The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02792

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"eJewislfo Floridian
55Number 32 Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 6,1982
* fl9* tfCfl
yMauncants Price 50 Cents
Are Israeli Weapons Superior to the Soviet Brand?
some of the most up-to-date
armour, including T-72
tanks, modern MiGs and
sophisticated ground-to-air
missiles.
One man who is reluctant to
join the chorus which hailed the
Israeli operations in Lebanon as a
triumph of American technology
over Soveit weaponry is Col.
Jonathon Alford, deputy-director
of the International Institute for
Strategic Studies in London. Af-
ter a recent visit to both Israel
and Lebanon. Col. Alford is in a
good position to form an expert
judgement.
ONE CAN mention, in par-
ticular, as evidence of Israeli
superiority, reports of how the
Israelis were able to destroy the
SAM batteries in the Bekaa val-
ley, utilizing drones (pilotless air-
craft) to discover the radio fre-
quencies of the Soviet-installed
air defenses and by using the
Hawkeye planes (a smaller ver-
sion of the airborne radar control
AWACs) to confuse the Russian
missile tracking systems.
In reply. Col. Alford pointed
out that his general impression
was that because the Syrains
were not willing to risk their lives
in defense of their positions in
Lebanon or on behalf of the
Palestinians, they had not put up
a really determined resistance.
Apart from the Bekaa Valley,
Continued on Page 14-A
Israel Crosses Green Line
loscow Connection
PLO-Soviet Tie
las Long History
' TERENCE PR1TTIE
tdon Chrvmcle Syndicate
|NDON The devel-
it over the past ten
of relations between
jviet Union and the
las been a spasmodic
than organic pro-
[The Russians burned
fingers badly over the
war and were later
W from Egypt.
Thereafter, the Soviet leaden*
have been supremely cautious in
the main Middle East area of
conflict, while strengthening ties,
influence and actual presence on
the periphery in Libya,
Ethiopia, South Yemen and Af-
ghanistan. The fratricidal conflict
between the Syrian and Iraqi
Ba'athist Parties has made it im-
possible to find a viable alterna-
tive ally to Egypt. This is why
the Soviet leaders have turned to
Continued on Page 14-A
By HUGH ORGEL
From Lebanon
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
army spokesman insisted that
the heavy fighting going on in
Beirut was not the long antici-
pated all-out assault on West
Beirut, or even an attempt to
split the- Lebanese capital into
two or three sectors with guerrilla
groups in each.
An army communique said
that the attack has been
"launched" in view of the re-
peated ceasefire violations in re-
cent days. Among other things,
in the form of attempted infiltra-
tions of a terrorist squad into the
airport area (captured) after
sniping, bazooka, rockets and
artillery fire. It said that the IDF
had "accordingly tightened its
seige on the city of Beirut, im-
proving its position in the airport
and Beirut racetrack areas."
The spokesman's communique
emphasized that "this is not the
all-out attack to conquer the city.
The dominating positions taken
by our forces in the area north of
the airport and in the Hippo-
drome area will obstruct terrorist
fire at our forces."
According to reports from Bei-
rut the guerrillas blew up a large
ammunition dump in the race-
track area to prevent it falling
into the hands of the Israeli sol-
diers advancing from the Leba-
nese National museum area.
Cabinet to Hold
Special Meeting
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet is scheduled to hold
a special session to determine
Israels position regarding a
resolution adopted by the United
Nations Security Council author-
izing the Secretary General "to
deploy immediately on the re-
Continued on Page 2-A
which had been one of the three
crossing points, the "green line"
separating the Christians from
the Moslem area of the capital.
While a second Israeli column
was reportedly moving north
from the airport area, a third
thrust was said to be in progress
southwards from the port area in
the north
The large Bourg El Barajna
refugee camp area, now aban
doned by its civilian residents,
was reported largely cut off by
the advancing Israeli forces.
Israeli Soldiers Prevent
UN From Entering Beirut
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel officials said that they
did not anticipate the United Nations would make the
"mistake" of trying again to deploy observers in Beirut after
the Israeli Defense Force prevented a convoy of 28 UN ob-
servers from gaining access to the city.
Both Israel and the UN Were plainly anxious to play down
the incident. The Israeli's refer to it as "a technical error in that
the convoy sought to deploy without coordinating in advance
with the IDF." The observers, led by an Australian colonel, was
stopped on the road from Damour to Beirut by Israel Golani
troops and eventually they received orders to return to their
base camp in Nahoura.
A UN spokeman said later that the UN would not seek to
deploy observers "to monitor the situation in and around
Beirut." as the UN secretary general was authorized to do in a
resolution the security council adopted last Sunday, without
coordinating with all parties. The spokesman called for an early
decision on the matter by Israel.
Shamir Warns Against Giving
PLO a 'Political Reward'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir of Israel warns against trying to give the Palestine
Liberation Organization a political "reward" in order to get it
to leave Beirut. "Let no one confuse these terrorists with the
Palestinian Arabs," he said this week at a luncheon of the
overseas writers, an organization of diplomatic reporters. "Let
no one attempt out of a mistake or twisted sense of obligation
to reward the PLO with some political achievement."
While the foreign minister did not specify what he meant by a
reward, his remarks were apparently aimded at the efforts to
get the United States to drop its promise to Israel not to
negotiate or recognize the PLO.
eport from Israel
luestions are Complex, There are No Easy Answers
SUSAN NE SHOCHET
r. The Jewish Floridion
IUSALEM Com-
my fact-finding
>n as part of a group
iglish Jewish news-
paper editors from all over
the United States included
sessions with key govern-
ment and military officials
and was highlighted by our
listening to Prime Minister
Begin's comments at a
joint session of Jewish
community leaders from
various communities in the
United States.
On an optimistic note. Prune
Minister Begin told us that
"Soon, travel agents will be able
to sell a tourist package trip to
Lebanon, Israel and Egypt."
Alivyai.
PRESENT DAY Israel em-
phasizes "business as usual."
The only sign of the present
struggle is the obvious absence of
its young people from the streets,
from business and cities. It seems
that every Israeli we speak to haa
a son, husband or brother in
Continued on Page 6-A


- s-i-W-
HY-tar*-*.'**
Israel, U.S. 'Goal' to End
Domination of Lebanon
Cabinet to Hold Meeting 0|
Security Council Resolution
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir emerged from a meeting
with President Reagan maintain-
mg that Israel and the United
States, as well as the government
of Lebanon, share a common
goal" to end the domination of
Lebanon by the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and the Syrian
"We have to reach this goal as
soon as possible." Shamir told
reporters after the nearly half-
hour meeting. But he would not
aay whether Reagan had been
firm with him about maintain
ing the ceasefire as the President
said he would be
But a White House statement
issued shortly after the meeting
said the "President stressed the
need for a complete end by all
parties to the hostilities in and
around Beirut as a prerequisite
to enable Reagan's special envoy.
Phuio Habib. to complete his
"urgent work." The statement
declared "The world can no
longer accept a situation of con-
stantly escalating violence.
Reagan told reporters at the
White House following Israel's
14-hour bombardment of Beirut
and the ceasefire which ensured.
"I think it's absolutely impera-
tive that this ceasefire at this
stage of the negotiations must
not be violated by anyone." Al-
though he did not criticize Israel
for its bombardment, the Presi-
dent appeared upset at the latest
breakdown of the ceaaafare. "I
lost patience a long yjaeago.' he
laid.
However. Shamir stressed to
reporters that Israel has always
wanted to maintain the ceasefire
but it must be an "absolute and
mutual ceasefire, not a one sided
ceasefire He said the PLO has
Aleksandr Paritsky Visa Refused
NEW YORK (JTA) Soviet Jewish Prisoner of
Conscience Aleksandr Paritsky has been informed that
his application to emigrate to Israel will be refused until
1990. according to the Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry. The Conference has also learned that
pressure is being brought on Paritsky to appear on Soviet
radio and television to recant his crimes.'"
Returning to her home in Kharkov following a visit
with Aleksandr. Polina Paritsky reported that her hus-
band is in extremely poor physical condition. Soviet labor
camp authorities refused to allow her to give him clothing
or food to supplement his meager diet. Polina was re-
luctant to leave him in his weakened condition, but indi-
cated that Aleksandr urged her to return to Kharkov so
that her residency permit for that city would not be re-
voked, it was reported.
taken advantage of the ceasefire
by "killing and wounding our
soldiers."
The Israeli official said that his
country wants a diplomatic
solution. But the PLO presently
will not leave west Beirut until it
has decided that it has only one
choice, either negotiating "or by
other means." Shamir said there
is no deadline but that the situa-
tion cannot last forever.
Both Shamir s and Reagan s
statement stressed that an early
diplomatic settlement is neces-
sary in order to go on with the
task of helping Lebanon as well
as achieving a broader peace in
the Middle East. "Progress will
be made when we will see the
PLO leave Lebanon." Shamir
said
He also said that an early PLO
departure is needed to end the
"suffering" of the Lebanese
people. The White House state-
ment noted the President high-
lighted the humanitarian needs of
the large civilian population of
west Beirut with emphasis on the
need to maintain essential serv-
ices and to assure adequate
supplies of food and medicine
Presumably, this was aimed at
the Israeli blockade of west
Beirut
Meanwhile Sen Charles Percy
(R. Ill i chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
said he was "deeply disturbed"
by the seizure by the PLO of the
warehouse housing food con-
trolled by the United Nations Re-
lief and' Works Agency (UNR-
WAI and he called upon the PLO
to release the warehouse imme
diatdy."
"A very special kind of help... "
For Israel's wounded-and their families-give to
BEIT HALOCHEM
the rehabilitation center
of Israel's Disabled Veterans Organization
Today our specialized rehabilitation center in Tel Aviv is providing a
comprehensive program to meet the physical and social needs of Israel's
wounded war veterans. Our newest center in Haifa opens later this year.
Plans for our first center in the Jerusalem area are now on the drawing
board.
Help Those Who Have Given Off Themselves
So That Israel And The Jewish People May Live
American Friends of Beit Halochem
136 E. 39th St., New York, N.Y. 10016
Here is my tax-deductible contribution to Israels Disabled Veterans Fund.
N
Address
City.
.State.
Zip
? $25 ? $50 D $100 Z other
(Please make check payable to American Friends of Beit Halochem./
(The American Friend* of Belt Halochsm la a apedal Israeli project of the B'nal 2on Foundation.)
Costiaocd from Page 1-A
quest of the government of Leba-
non. United Nations observers to
monitor the situation in and
around Beirut"
Until now Israel has been
reluctant to accept such a plan,
fearing that such a team of ob-
servers would serve as a buffer
zone for the Palestine Liberation
Organization by separating the
Israel Defense Force from the
terrorists. The PLO has already
welcomed the Security Council
resolution.
However, since Israel has
agreed to give U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib time to work out a
solution for evacuating the PLO
forces from west Beirut, it was
decided here to postpone a
definite response to the Security
Council resolution until Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir returns
from Washington after meetings
with President Reagan. Secretary
of State George Shulu. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
and legislators.
Full Cabinet Debate Sought
Before the Cabinet takes any
official action. Premier Mena-
on a full Cabinet debates*?.,
P*ce of all the pawJH
the meeting. He isTp^l
sensitive about hav.n* r?l
resolution adopted w,uT5|
some of the ministers presm, jl
k)wing criticism voiced |
Cabinet session of rw
M mister Anel Sharon for h,
ordered the takeover of the I
rut airport without corau
with the ministers.
Sharon explained that fc,
cision to take over the
was a "local, tactical ,
which did not require a r_
decision. He said the purpoiT
the action was to take over *W|
had been, in effect, a non-m.
land, and that there was no *|
tention to storm Beirut
A senior political source saxl
that the purpose of the poundnJ
of Palestine targets in west Be*|
rut by the combined Israeli laajl
air and sea forces was to serve A
a warning to the terrorists tbst|
time was running out. that Is
would not countenance t,
violations of ceasefires and .
the beginning of the battle"
capture Beirut
Egyptian, Israeli Talks On]
Taba Has Been Deferred
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM- (JTAl-Talks between Israel and Egypt on re*>|
\ intf th- still disputed issue of the border of Tsba have been deferral
apparently Ix-cause of the Lebanon situation
Israeli sources said the Cairo press, and especially the vmi-offkal
Al Ahram. has stepped up its intense preoccupation with the Tiaj
iaaos, insisting on olderly arbitration and claiming that r gypt hasi-l
. appointed its own arbiter, an elderly jurist nameC I>r Waha|
Raafat
Raafat himself has published articles supporting the : *>p!*i
claim and even contending against the legality of Israel ;rvseiia|
F.ilat. which is alongside the disputed pact at Taba
SUPPLIES 6. EQUIPMENT
sgSBsas
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
YOUR COMPLETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 1933
BROWARO
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DOWNTOWN UPTOWN
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MIA. BCH. CORAL GABLES
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Miami Fu Miami. Fla Miami Beach. Fla Coral Gatnas c i
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel.Inc Fune'ai Di'e-
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523 5801
West Palm Beach: 683 8676
Carl Grossberg. President
Alfred Golden. Executive V.ce President
Leo Hack. V.P.. Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Sponsor ing the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged Funeral
Tradition* j
to what makes wjevfc j
... ..(
M-s-aas


Debate Rages
Jews Join World Anti-Nuclear Drive
London Chronicle Syndicate
|The debate raging today
the West on the issue of
nuclear arms race and
growing concern over
threat of nuclear war
become in recent weeks
(Jewish issue, as several
iigious and secular Amer-
In-Jewish groups and fig-
have been adopting
fashionable political
lse as part of their
?nda.
everal American Jewish fig-
mainly physicians and nu-
ir scientists, were already in-
itially active in some of the
kjor groups, calling for nuclear
Em freeze and expressing oppo-
|n to the Keagan Administra-
views on the subject, since
have emerged in the U.S. in
last months.
lowever. in contrast to the
Iv involvement of many Chris-
clergymen or American
ick leaders in the anti nuclear
Inpaign. the voices of Jewish
^mus or political leaders on
issue have just begun to be
krd.
THE FIRST Jewish religious
bference on nuclear disarma-
nt and the threat of nuclear
sponsored by 10 Reform
H i-h congregations, took place
ew York last month and was
ended by some 600 people.
3bi Balfour Brickner, senior
)i of the Stephen Wise Free
lagogue, in which the confer-
took place, and a leading
eral Jewish figure who was
.e in the past in the anti-
tnam war movement and in
New Left campaigns,
>ed a leading role in conven
the meeting.
The participation of 10 Reform
igregations in the meeting
early demonstrates that or-
lized religious Jewry cannot
will not remain silent in the
dow of nuclear menace." de-
ed Hrickner. a critic of both
Keagan and the Begin Gov-
kments. "This historic religious
phering reflects the anger and
fear of the people of New
rk as they see our so-called na-
nal leaders rearming us to
mageddon."
)ne of the major speakers in
conference was Rabbi Leon-
Beerman. of the Los Angeles
Baeck Temple, who blasted
"monologue of madness" in-
ent in the superpowers' arms
Speaking on the "Nuclear
eat: A Judaic View," Beer-
said that worshipping this
>per- Moloch in whose temple
are prepared to sacrifice our
and those of our children"
llies that ultimate denial of
and his commandment to
oose life."
IEERMAN, co-chairman of
interfaith center to reverse
arms race, argued that the
rish people "out of its own
>ric experience knows that
inthinkable can happen. The
truction of European Jewry
[the Nazis provides a model for
troying the human race. That
vhy we Jews have a unique
Ty to warn that this planet can
[transformed into a crematori-
and why we must be among
"' engaged in the quest of
ntil today, Jews have been
zingly "numb" about the
era of nuclear war, said
Mn. because the subject
I too "complex and univer-
|nd too horrible to be contem-
Aa much as other poo-
's generally lacked the
not to be enslaved to their
BMrtia on this major issue.
"winded flaw nun.
war is the
"greatest Jewish problem in the
world today," as well as the
"greatest moral, religious,
ethical, theological, political and
economic problem."
Aa Beerman noted in his ad-
dress, one of the Jewish figures
who has been trying for years to
mobilize world Jewish opinion on
the issue is international lawyer
and author, Samuel Pisar.
FISAR. WHO addressed the
Knesset during the world gather-
ing of Jewish Holocaust surviv-
ors in June. 1981, related the
legacy of the Holocaust and the
need to warn of a possible nuclear
annihilation. Auschwitz served
as a possible "model" for the des-
truction of human species, he
said. Pisar argued that the "com-
mandment" of many survivors,
"never again," must apply not
only to the threats to Jewish sur-
vival but to the danger of mass
technological death as well.
Judith Hertz, a board member
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, who also partici-
pated in the April conference in
the Stephen Wise Synagogue,
told a workshop dealing with
Organizing the American-Jew-
ish Community" that "if we
don't achive a commitment for a
nuclear freeze, all our other
achievements, goals, purposes
and projects for sustaining life
will be for naught."
Since the New York confer-
ence, an increasing number of
Jewish representatives have
joined in the call for the half to
the nuclear arms race through a
freeze on nuclear weapons by
the U.S. and the Soviet Union.
THUS, the Jewish Community
Relations Council of Greater Phi-
ladelphia, at a recent meeting of
its board of directors, adopted a
resolution which stated: "No
issue threatens our existence as
Jews. Americans and world citi-
zens more than the specter of nu-
clear warfare. For the Jewish
community, discussion of a nu-
clear holocaust' is more than a
metaphor. Our history teaches us
that man is capable of perpetrat-
ing unspeakable acts, and fur-
ther, that silence in the face of in-
humanity is equivalent to com-
plicity in that injustice."
In a more impressive action,
more than 100 religious and
secular American Jewish leaders,
including tens of rabbis, three
members of the Congress, four
Nobel Prize-winners and leaders
of Jewish organizations, have
signed a Shalom A lew hem state-
ment urging American-Jews to
address the issue of nuclear war
and the need for controlling and
reversing the arms race.
The statement said, "At a time
when tensions between the great
world powers are growing and
language of controlled nuclear
war' is reviving, we believe Jew-
ish tradition and experience have
much to teach We suggest
that synagogues and other Jew-
ish institutions hold teach-ins.
develop special liturgies, invite
artists to develop world of
awakening ... we can help to re-
awaken hope and change, in an
area of public policy now mired in
hopelessness and helplessness
AMONG THE signatories
were Rabbi Walter Wurzburger,
president of the Synagogue
Council of America; Rabbi Alex-
ander Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations: Rabbi Robert Gordis.
editor of "Judaism:'' Ira Silver-
man, president of the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College:
Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld, a former
president of the American Jewish
Congress: and Philip Klutznick.
honorary president of B'nai
H nth international and a former
president of the World Jewish
Congress.
Among the scientists and
scholars who signed the state-
ment were Jerome Wiesner of
MIT and former science adviser
to President John Kennedy.
Nobel laureates, George Wald of
Harvard: Howard Temon, of the
University of Wisconsin; Mar-
shall Nirenberg, of the National
Institute of Health: and Sheldon
Glashow, of Harvard University,
Uso signed the statement.
The statement was initiated by
the editorial board of "Menorah"
published in Washington by Ar-
thur Waskow, another former
New Left activist. In a column
entitled The H Bomb A Jew-
ish issue" published in several
American Jewish magazines.
Continued on Page 13-A
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;:VYa
Sri.-jw--

Media TestedWanting
rhe immense power of the advertising medium,
with its ability to sway and mold public opinion, is
hardly a point to dispute. The fact that a political
candidate's prospects, for example, may depend
upon a successful media campaign is indicative of
this power.
So it was disturbing to discover that a full page
advertisement used by an organization calling itself
"Concerned Americans for Peace has duped several
leading newspapers in the U .S. by placing an ad with
the names of six relief organizations which had never
consented or authorized to have their names listed as
supporters of the ad's message.
The ad ran in the July 11 editions of the Washing-
ton Post. New York Times. Boston Globe, Atlanta
Journal-Constitution, and several other newspapers
of equal stature. It condemned Israel's actions in
Lebanon and said in bold letters. 'The People of
Lebanon Innocent Victims of a Senseless War." Be-
sides listing outrageous figures for those killed,
wounded and left homeless in Lebanon, the ad said,
"No cause could be so righteous as to dictate the des
truction and devastation of an innocent people and
their country."
Just days later, representatives of the six or-
ganizations whose names appeared on the advertise-
ment, addressed a letter to the New York Times. The
officials of CARE, the American Friends Service
Committee, the American Red Cross, the Church
World Service, the U.S. Committee for UNICEF,
and Save the Children Federation said they were
"dismayed" that their names had been associated
with an anti-Israel advertisement and they had not
consented to have their names used in the ad. They
explained that such association of their organization
with anti-Israel ads as non-governmental relief
agencies could obstruct their ability to provide aid
and remain neutral to the fighting.
As it turned out, the address listed at the bottom
of the ad, a Los Angeles post office box number, had
never been rented to any organization by the name of
Concerned Americans for Peace. The advertising
company which placed the advertisement seemed
ambiguous in explaining iust who paid them for it.
The Los Angeles Times, for its part, escaped this
charade by double checking with the organizations to
confirm if they had authorized the use of their names
on the ad.
1 The paper dropped the names of the agencies after
failing to verify their authorizations. The other news-
papers, with their huge responsibility to the Ameri-
can public, would do wisely to double check with or-
ganizations in similar ads in the future. It harms the
newspaper's credibility, the relief agencies' ability to
provide aid and moreover, stymies the ability of the
American public to arrive at a clear and unbiased
opinion of the circumstances surrounding the events
in Lebanon.
'Shalom/ Zvi Redlich
Almost singlehandedly, Zvi Redlich was responsi-
ble for establishing the El Al Israel Airline's direct
flight to Israel from Miami. It was his guiding spirit
that also brought twice-weekly flights to Israel from
our community.
Now we must say Shalom to Redlich as he com-
pletes five years heading up El Al's operations in
South Florida. Redlich is returning to Israel for a
new and once-again challenging assignment in the El
Al Airline's head offices there.
No one who saw the Star of David on the wings of
El Al's 747 s as they flew to and from Miami's Inter-
national Airport during the past few years could help
responding to the enthusiasm Redlich helped gener-
ate for travel to his country.
The community wishes him well in his new assign-
ment.
Jewish Floridian
optics:salplant-issne us m>n. uiu
PO BaaOIWTl. Mim
PREO K SHOTHET LEOMINOLIN
MIOI
ftin BMW
SUZANNE SHOCHET
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iI_HS0O-Suppm>t Ismw ILoe* Ul *""* <*> **
June S3 SO Ovtoltown country, upon raqucM (
Friday. August 6.1982 Ja tSUi
Volume 55 Number 32
Is Shultz to be Feared?

By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Enter George P. Shultz as
Alexander Haig's successor at
State.
Alarms are sounded by Middle
East watchers long supportive of
Israel. Hurrahs arise from Saudi
Arabian diplomats and other
Arab sources. How will Mr.
Shultz approach his new duties?
For those champions of Israel
depressed by the prospect of hav-
ing the president of the Bechtei
group, with its strong Saudi
Arabian connections. as
Secretary of State, there are
anxious moments.
Yet. the new man on the block
at State offered a carefully ba-
lanced appraisal of both Israeli
and Arab concerns. Granted the
Fighting between Israeli forces
and Yasser Arafat's trapped ter-
rorists was uppermost in many
minds. Mr. Shultz treaded the
line of senatorial questioning in a
way reflecting wide experience
and careful planning.
HE REFERRED to "the legi-
j timate needs and problems of the
Paleainian people" as "a central
reality of the Middle !>..
the same time, he aaaj K. Lfl
8 the d5|
'I
"ngthaino,
fnend of the United Sutes7?
M.ddle East. add.n* th.7 **
should dispute America's u2
tional commitment to &,\
security of Israel and U.S. J*
fwawawB tft aosiiPA I *>_.! .1
ness to assure Israel the neo
ry means to defend itseJf^vl
lightness of Israel's preoccaHI
tion with matters of secuntyi
not be disputed, he said |
So far. who can complain?
Nonetheless, doubts an
tain to persist Ever sinct
Haig's dramatic departure
State, leading abruptly to rWj
dent Reagan's call on Mr Shuajl
to become the new "vicar th-,1
a strong consensus has deseiowl
that the U.S. is now beyond tgl
plateau of vigorous regard forUil
destiny of Israel Man> hogm|
upset by the heightened puch farl
even handedness in our Middkl
East policy in the Carter era noil
are convinced there is morethu|
a strong tilt Arab ward Tin|
must prove this thesis right a I
wrong.
MEANWHILE, when we *.
member that Mr Shultz himstfj
offers strength to the truth ihatl
hostility in the region is J
demic." we must hope and pro I
that he will prove to have a sdj
lar's grasp of every fact uc|
every nuance attending IsraeliI
difficulties in gaining modercl
statehood and in trying to disant |
revisionists depicting the Arabt |
as innocents and Israelis as pa
ennial villains.
For a starter, we should |
wonder if Saudi Arabia s and
friend at State will permit trail
tional Arabists in the Suu D* |
part men t to continue disregard]
ing basic facts written into a lont j
line of Commission studies runa- i
ing from the King-Crane report of
1919 through the resumes of the I
Anglo-American Commission of '
1946 and the UN Special Coo>
mittee On Palestine report of
1947.
Is Mr. Shultz. so long preoc.
cupied with the world of coa-j
merce. truly understanding ofl
pioneer Jewish life in Palatine. |
replete with Arab hostility? Don ]
he share the bleak disappoint
ment world Jewry suffered ove
Arab rejection of the UN Piru
tion decision in the late 1940s
when a truncated Israel is
Continued on Page 13- A
Carl Alpert
Miracles Recalled Long After Struggle
HAIFA Long after
the guns have fallen silent,
and Lebanon sets about re-
building its independence,
free at last from occupation
by terrorist gangs, Israeli
soldiers and civilians alike
will tell and retell some of
the stories behind the war,
stories that did not make
headlines but were part of
the crazy quilt pattern of
the conflict. Stories like:
Dehan, 37, of Kiryat
in the hospital
Denis*
Malachi.
giving birth to her daughter, but
she insisted on leaving immedi-
ately thereafter to attend the
funeral of her oldest son. Mottie.
who had been killed in action.
Lebanese farroera. who for
years had to tolerate the oppres-
siveness of the terrorist gangs in
their neighborhood, lined up to
donate blood for wounded Israeli
soldiers, and money for the Israel
r effort.
ISRAELIS were urged to send
gift packages for their soldiers at
the front. They did, and included
were large stacks of books nan/
of them volumee of poetry.
One of the major gniu^nes of
the soldiers during the first week
was: they had to miss an install-
ment of the television serial.
Dallas-
Beaufort Castle, towering on a
high crag, had for years rained
deadly fire down on towns and
cities in northern Israel. It was a
prime target, and the Israel Air
Force subjected it to a bombing
which appeared to have flattened
everything on the mountain But
when Israel soldiers picked their
way through the ruins and oc-
cupied the rubble, whose PLO oc-
cupants had all been killed and
wounded, they discovered that
the UN observation post nearby
had been totally unharmed,
despite destruction on all sides,
and the small garrison emerged
unscathed. That was precision
bombing.
Soldiers were given strict
warnings: anyone caught looting
would get ten years imprison-
ment or more.
THE STRANGEST looking
vehicle in the military lineup was
the "tank" of the "Chabadmckt.
Manned by I.uhavitch chase im,
it got as close to th- front it
could, its loudspeakers b
chassidic music .>pe>
Mi's, the chassidi- af<
vafJP_M in sight i. it/
donning tefillin.
MPs.
including the
-y
ed
of
It will take many weeks to uu*
proper count of the tanks, gum
and ammunition stockpiled in
Lebanon and captured by the
Israel troops. The quantity wai
so enormous, military observer!
say, that long range plans *w*
obviously being made for a major
military offensive into the haul I
of Israel
When Tova Nelah. of Tel Afc
married an Acre Arab in \9V
aha went off with her husband
and her family never heard from
her again until the Israel troop!
came across a 65-year-old woman
m a Palestinian refugee camp m
southern Lebanon, who spkeJ
perfoct Hebrew. It was Tova. and
contact with her family
tablished
One of the great post war pro-
blems has been what to do about
the flood of Israeli voluntein-
those not called upon to tight
who aeek opportunities to serve
It was recalled that not long
ago, after a particularly vicious
imbardr nf i -vat Shrnon.
hi %J
unchy l
ifd n th
>rty
viv
lie I
;-A


IMew Hardships
For Israel's Universities
Friday, August 6,1982 /The Jewish Hdrirfuii Pige^X
Ben-Avraham Zakaka Dead at 87
NEW YORK ebanese conflict has produced
hardships for Israel's uni-
lities. such as the mobiliza-
l0n 0f faculty members and stu-
[s. a curtailment of scientific
search and new financial
rdens resulting from cuts in
nation's civilian budget, ac-
jing to (en. Shlomo Gazit.
esident of Ben Gurion Univers-
[v of the Negev in Beersheva.
(iazit. the former head of
Israeli intelligence, who is in the
jnititi States on behalf of the
srael Bond Organization, told a
of the American Associ-
Of the university that the
s the war began "we felt the
ipacl in Beersheva. On the first
iv. most of our male students
ou faculty under 40 were
nobilized. leaving behind mostly
roman and Arab students."
(;AZIT SAID that Israeli in
Ititutions of higher learning face
in extremely difficult period in
lie coming months. "As one
(ample, he cited new military
emulations, extending by three
>nths those serving in the mili-
iry, and 60 to 70 days the new
oup
service requirement for the Re-
serves. This will seriously affect
the study program of many of our
students," he said.
He further mentioned reduc-
tions in the government's civilian
budget by three to five percent,
which Gazit said for Ben Gurion
University means a minimum
los.-: of one million dollars for
1982-H3. In addition, he noted,
the mobilization of some faculty
members and graduate students
will be a "set back" for the uni-
versity advanced peacetime re-
search projects in such fields as
agriculture, engineering, energy
and industrial technology.
University's Efforts Help Build
Peace
Robert Arnow. president of the
American Associate of Ben
(urion University, stressed that
these scientific projects are help-
ing to turn "the barren wilder-
ness of the Negev into a produc-
tive and comfortable environ-
ment. Since the Negev represents
Israel s largest remaining uncon-
quered frontier, our efforts con-
stitute a vital part in the building
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of peace
world.'"
in this part of the
ARNOW REPORTED that
the university's educational,
cultural and research programs
had already pioneered new solar
energy advances, irrigation and
agricultural technologies, that
produce lush fruits and vegeta-
bles with salty water, drought re-
sistant plants and food and
fodder crops which flourish in
arid soil.
In his presentation, (iazit said:
"We have felt this war much
more directly. Ben Gurion Uni-
versity has already had six
casualties six boys killed in
action, three students and the
rest the sons of our faculty and
staff. We have many other young
boys who are wounded in the
hospital, most of them lightly,
but some more difficult cases.
This has very much affected
everyone at the university."
(iazit indicated that the uni-
versity was setting up special
machinery to personally work
with and assist those now serving
in the Israel Defense Force so
that they could be prepared for
makeup exams and classes that
they have missed during their
military service. He further
stated that the university has de-
veloped a joint commission in
Cooperation with the military to
find "flexibility"' for those young
people who have to serve addi-
tional time in the army, so that
they can begin their academic
year without too great a loss of
time.
TEL AVIV. .-(JTA1-
Yefet Ben Avrahani Zakaka.
leader of the Samaritan com-
munity in Israel, died last Friday
in his home in Holon. He was 87
years old. He was hurried in the
Samaritan cemetery in Kiryat
Shau. His father. Avraham
Zadaka. was the first Samari to
leave Nablus in 1905 to settle in
Jaffa, hrmu the Samaritan com-
munity into close contact with
the Jewish community for the
first time and laying the founda-
tion for the Israeli Samaritan
community in Jaffa as an off-
shoot of the main community in
Nablus. Yafet Zakaka broke with
Samaritan tradition when he
married a Jewish woman in 1924.
This has become a practice fol-
lowed by many other Samaritans.
Don't Put Off Your Israel Visit!
As members of a tour group from Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, just returned from two
weeks there, we want to share with you our
feelings about being in Israel at this specific
time.
First, it is safe. Traveling through Israel during
the "Peace in the Galilee" camoaitm. we wit-
nessed Israel at a time of crisis. Yet life went on
as normal. We enjoyed all of Israel's wonderful
tourism sites and services right up to the
Lebanon border and also gained a better un-
der staning of how Israel lives, and the
sacrifices they make.
Like Florida, Israel is now hurting from a sharp
dropoff in tourists. As committed Jews, what
better way to show your solidarity with Israel
than to visit it at this time? Not only will it be a
moving and enjoyable experience for you, but a
welcome expression of your support. We
strongly urge you to visit Israel NOW.
Cantor Jacob G. and Joan Bornstein
David and Mildred Brown Harold and Faye Kaiser
Maurice and Marilyn Cromer Clara Kellner
Lester and Elaine Edelman Roberta and Elizabeth Lurie
Robert and Lillian Gorelick Rita Ratner
DOIT
FOR ISRAEL
BY DOING IT
IN ISRAEL.
Have a swim in ihe cod Mediterranean
Take a hike up breathtaking Masada
Or enjoy a delicious dinner
overlooking ancient Jerusalem
The year, do it in Israel
Because now more than ever.
when you do It in Israel, you'll be doing it tor Israel, too
You'll be having more than the best vacation ever
You'll be showing Israel you love her
when she needs it most
So this year.
take that special vacation in Israel
For Israel. And for you
BL7J/AC7//.
ISRAfL RIGHT NOW.


l^rTr-JtSf
Pagc6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. August 6. 1962
Report from Israel
There Are No Easy Answers
Time Running Short
Israeli Official Declares
Continued from Page 1-A
Lebanon.
Tourism has been hurt by the
war in Lebanon. More s the pity
becaus Israel is such fantastic
vacationland and safer to visit
than most countries frequented
by American tourists. For exam-
ple, we visited the settlement of
Metulla in the north, which was
founded in 1896 and is sur-
rounded by Lebanon on three
sides. It is this beautiful little
"city" that had been virtually
living in underground shelters for
the months prior to "Operation
Peace in Galilee." having been
under constant bombardment
from the PLO hold up in Beau-
ford Castle in Lebanon.
Other kibbutzim, cities and
settlements we visited included
Hagoshenm. Kiryat Shmona. in
the Golan Heights: Massua in
the Jordan Valley, and Tkoa. a
short distance from Ml.
Herod lan.
TKOA. a small border com
munity consisting of 40 families,
suffered two great losses this
past month One of their mem-
bers died in Lebanon, and on July
2, terrorists murdered a second
member, a former American.
David Rosenfeld. on Mt
Herodian. where he was in charge
of the castle rums a historic
tourist attraction Rosenfeld had
been stabbed 114 times 80
times after he was already dead
He leaves a wife and two infants
In retaliation the Israelis cap-
tured 21 terrorists, jailed them,
and then bulldozed their homes a
short distance from Tkoa. The
village of Tkoa immediately be-
gan a new settlement on a site
100 feet from the bulldozed area.
setting up tents until buildings
can^ be built and taking turns
manning this settlement until
new settlers can be found It was
here that we saw Shabbat dinner
being prepared from tents shortly
before sundown.
We had a meeting with Prof.
Menachem Milson. chief of the
civil administration in Judea and
Samaria Milson told us about
Rep.'s Target
Refuseniks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The 43 freshman members of the
House of Representatives are
making daily speeches on the
House floor on behalf of Soviet
Jewish refuseniks in a campaign
that began last week and will
cuntinue through September. The
campaign was announced by
Reps. Christopher Smith (R.
N.J.) and William Coyne (D .
IVI, co-chairman of the 97th
Congressional Class for Soviet
Jewry.
"Working in conjunction with
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, we have targeted
those refuseniks who have been
awaiting visas for more than six
years." Coyne explained. He said
each member has adopted one or
two refuseniks and will be writing
to the proper authorities in the
U.S. and the Soviet Union on
their behalf.
SMITH, who spent nine days
in Moscow and Leningrad last
January, said: "One can never
actually imagine the extreme
hardship the refusenik families
face on a daily basis in their at-
tempt to secure religious free-
dom He said he returned from
his trip "with a deeper commit-
ment to human rights in general
and a deeper commitment for the
human right to emigrate from tht
Soviet Union
Suzanne Shochet. executive editor of The Jewish Floridian, lis-
tens as former American Moshe Brill (right) discusses the
Lebanese war outside of his tent at a new settlement near Tkoa
With Shochet are Al Bloom and Gary Rosenblatt, who were also
members of the team of American newspaper editors visiting
Israel and Lebanon
some of the problems confronting
the administration regarding the
Palestinians in this region, but he
was cautiously optimistic that
Arab and Jews can live together
in harmony.
AMBASSADOR Zvi Brosh.
special adviser to Mayor of Jeru-
salem Teddy Kollek. talked to us
about the problems of Jerusalem,
especially about the development
of East Jerusalem and keeping a
balance between the "mosaic of
people" who live there, and mak-
ing certain that Jerusalem will
never again be divided.
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Shamir discussed three goals of
Peace for Galilee: peaceful re-
moval of the PLO and a way to
remove them: forming an inde-
pendent and strong Lebanese
government, and the departure
of all foreign forces from Leba-
non. He added that "The only
obstacle to ending this situation
is that we do not want to cause
innocent Lebanese civilian
casualties."
Our tour also included a visit
to the Israel Aircraft Industries,
which permitted us special access
to view the actual making of an
aircraft step-by-step. IAI is
Israel's largest and most suc-
cessful industry. It exports
private jets to many countries
and is responsible for most of Is-
rael s defense aircraft, as well as
tanks and equipment IAI
showed us the "Scout." the most
sophisticated unmaned surveil-
lance craft in the world today
A FINAL observation: Rein-
forcement of Israel's urgent need
to improve its public relations
approach to world media,
governments and the Jewish
rank and file, particularly in the
United States, is an absolute
must.' Jewish leaders basically
understand and are informed It
is the public at large that has to
be reached.
About ahyah from the United
States. This is a low-key theme
which I believe was repeatedly
touched upon throughout our
trip: Americans settling in Israel
with a dedication of becoming Is
raelis and taking part in building
the country.
There are 60.000 former
Americans now living in Israel.
Moral support from Jews
throughout the world and. par-
ticularly its major ally the United
Stales, must continue through
government with its military and
financial support, as well as the
United Jewish Appeal. Israel
Bonds, and all of the major or-
ganized Jewish groups, thus set
ting a tone for a better non-Jew-
ish comprehension of Israel's
overall position and problems.
There are no easy answers
no easy solutions.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A senior Israeli official
warned somberly after a
Cabinet meeting that "time
is pressing, time is running
short." He noted that the
Cabinet ministers, who de-
voted their discussion to
the conflict in Lebanon,
'are keely aware that the
present situaion cannot go
on indefinitely" and that
Israel, moreover "will not
tolerate a war of attrition"
developing in and around
Beirut
According to the official, the
general Cabinet feeling was that
the negotiations dealing with the
evacuation of Palestine Libera-
tion Organization forces from
west Beirut are not progressing
as the> should, they are not mov
ing ahead as had been hoped."
HIS TONE seemed more
somber than at any time since the
present negotiations in Beirut
began three weeks ago. under the
pressure of Israel s siege around
the western part of the city
The senior official noted
pointedly that U.S. mediator
Philip Habib had predicted a
breakthrough and had now to ex-
plain why it hadn't happened
This was not the first time
Habib s optimism had proved
unfoudned. the official said.
Also unfounded, as far as Is-
rael could tell, was the public as-
sertion over the weekend made
by l^ebanese negotiator (and
former Premier) Saeb Salaam
that the PLO had withdrawn its
earlier demands for a residual
political and military presence in
Beirut. Salaam had announced
the supposed PLO concession on
TV. but. said the Israeli official,
there was no subsequent tangible
evidence to support his state-
ment
SPEAKING AGAINST a
backdrop of escalating artillery
duels in Beirut between the Israel
Defense Force and the FIX), the
senior official warned that Israel
would not countenance a war of
attrition He stressed that for
the past several days it was in
vanablv the PLO that initiated
the artillery exchange, \st^I
added. ------
was reacting wth
it was no
force or firepower a
SMsm sac* s aun kbsmc \ -~rm
NSTIl 4 MACS USA ^LT~^
OPEN ALL YEAR
Rtsfvt How For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
4SUCCOTH
SUCCAMsrtfMtts
tentcwMWlltl
Hal
rvi* AMI
LET THE SHORE CLUE HOTEL
KY0URH0ME
0*1 YEARLY BASIS
MCLU0IN6
Dahcnai Mataj and Aa
radttm of Thai lover, Hom
straint it was not utilUin.
its dispoaj
An army spokesman
nounced that 28 Israeli
had been wounded in neaw |
lery exchanges Casualty
reported to be heaw on
sides as PLO forces msio*!
Beirut pounded most of
Christian areas m ea-t Beirut
If the Cabinet concluded |
diplomacy was leading not
it would consider other
ttVM to get the PLO out.
senior official continued
certainly need not mean bk_
bombing "as the Ww (
dunng World War II o
or Hamburg We ha% a diffc,.
morality Othf -liiurvj
lions were available he noted
HE SAID than majhteajj
another Cabinet meeting |a]aj
the week \|. i:
seemed to ba hii impli
the Cabinet had onreagusj
cided to p\ e tin
while not letting up
tary pressure ,]
teaguered west !!
The official said than *,J
direct diplomat u ."Marts
tween Jerusalem a no Mo
following the dam.li:> don* i
*> to the Soviet trade ma
in Ik-irut. apparent,) !romls
shelling. He did not elahorit*
Among the Bainistari theni
understood to be varwngi
men is as to the N.iuaiioej
Beirut. Some believe the PL
duping Israel and merely plan
for lime. Others still navel
the diplomatic afl
they themselves art- less
Umislic now than mj a u
10 days ago. in vie* of tbei
and complicated course of
negotiations
THE CABINE1 neardi
from Premier Menachem
Foreign Minist.r H
Shamir. Defense Minister
Sharon and the Foreign Ml
tr> s Director General Di
Kimche Kimche a< in
for talks and Habib and Leo
officials His efforts app
reflected continued Amencani
timism that the dipk
process, given tune, can
success The I S unde
to be maintaining ita pr
upon Israel not U .r:\ade
Beirut
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Friday, August 6, 1962 / Tha Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Ophria Navon Urges Aid for
Children of Lebanese Refugees
By GIL SEDAN
JKRUSALEM (JTA> -
)phria Navon. the wife of Presi-
|ent Navon. urged cooperation
ntwean Israeli and overseas wel-
jre agencies to rehabilitate the
Hhildren of I/ebanese refugees. A
urvey team she sponsored found
Uentlv that orphanages oper-
fted l)v the Lebanese govern-
nent did not accept children of
he thousands of Palestinian re-
fugees in Lebanon. Mrs. Navon
spoke at a press conference here.
The survey team found that
one Christian welfare agency had
taken in 30 orphans in recent
weeks, she reported. A central or-
phanage in Sidon. sheltering 600
children, accepted only 14 new
orphans during the current fight-
ing. A children's village with 24
residents and a capacity of 100.
took only one homeless child, the
team reported.
Mrs. Navon proposed that
Israel approach the international
agencies to organize assistance
for the badly-housed refugee chil-
dren. She also proposed that
Israel, working through the in-
ternational agencies, bring preg-
ant women and mothers with
young children away from such
embattled areas as west Beirut to
more secure section of Lebanon.
rowing Differences Between U.S., Israel
Ions
>n
JKKUSALEM (JTA) -
MiroM here noted that there
ire growing differences between
e U.S. and Israel over the ap-
>ach to the diplomatic negotia-
over the situation in Leba-
Whereas Israel wants to
,.d up the negotiations by con-
uing the military pressure, the
J.S. feels that the unstable
as. fire serves as a major obsta-
e to Habib's mission.
Israel's view is that the basic
roblem is getting the FLO out of
lanon. and not the ceasefire is-
which is considered of
condary importance. Israel has
d it clear in the past, and it
M reiterater by Begin at the
..hunt meeting, that the cease-
n has to be total and mutual.
at Israel would accept a cease-
only on that condition.
Begin responded to a cable
mgan sent him on the occasion
the Premier's 69th birthday
aturday Begin wrote "I feel
a Premier who was author-
*d to command a brave army
huh (aces Berlin in which Hitler
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and his associates hide in a deep
subterranean bunker, among in-
nocent people ... My generation
has vowed that anybody who de-
clares his intention to annihilate
the Jewish people, his fate will be
doomed. The experience of Berlin
shall not repeat itself."
Soviets Continue to Clamp
Down on Jewish Emigration
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau of the National Confe-
rence on Soviet Jewry, reported
that 186 Jews arrived from the
Soviet Union in Vienna with
Israeli visas, during July. She
noted that "Soviet authorities
have decided to allow the Jewish
emigration movement to become
a trickle, merely allowing a few to
come through gates that are virt-
ually closed. In the meantime,
hundreds of thousands of others
are damn damned behind those
gates."
The Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau will continue to closely
monitor Jewish emigration from
the USSR. Jacobson said. She
along with NCSJ's chairman.
Theodore Mann, will discuss the
situation at a special meeting of
the NCSJ Executive Committee
which will evaluate U.S. partici-
pation in'the Third International
Conference on Soviet Jewry in
Paris, in October.
Some faces are recognized
all over the world.

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P*geft'^, *">eJ^nhnorkiin Friday, Anuat 6,1983
Test of Patience
U.S. May Give Up on PLO, Too
that be believes that
negotiation! mm suctaeaful. a
kmited US operatioa could be
I oat.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
tJTAi Israeli Ambas-
sador Moshe Arens indi-
cated that while Israel be-
lieves that the negotiations
over the removal of the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganixation terrorists from
west Beirut cannot go on
"indefinitely.'' the decision
on whether Israeli troops
will move into the Lebanese
capital may depend more
on whether the United
States loses patience with
PLO stalling than on Is-
rael.
Even though we may be con-
vinced that the PLO is not nego-
tiating seriously, there are three
partners to the negotiations -
I.ehanoo. the U S and Israel.
Arens sejd in an interview on
ABC TVs Taw Wee* with
David Brinkley" program. We
have to get to the point where the
United State* also to the
conclusion that the negotiations
are going no place the Israeli
envoy said
BIT DEFENSE Secretary
Caopar Weinberger, m an ap-
pearance on NBC-TV s Meet the
Press, said the US would not
approve an armed evasion of
west Beirut or anywhere ease
We are trying to avoid that.' he
said That s why we are apend-
aag so much tune in the aanjnwB>
Both Arens and Wemberger
refused to say whether an August
1 dale, reportedly mentioned by
President Reagan special envo>
Philip Haoib who is conducting
the negouauons m Beirut, was a
for the talcs .Arens aaic
if there was a >triling. it
would serve no purpose in stating
a publadv Weinberger said the
date was probably the minxnum
tune required for the PLO to
leave Beirut and for the Israeli
and Syrian troops to begin their
evacuation of '^*ti
On the ABC program, the
Lebanese \m6assador to W ash
mgtoc hnahl Itini. said that be
been given reliable informe-
that a final agreement
should emerge in the next few
da >s. if not the next two days "
BIT SENS Christopher Dodd
Conn and Carl Levin (D
Mscfa i. who were interviewed
from Tel Avrv on the same ABC
program, said tne PLO was stall
ing Dodd saai mat Vasir Arafat
bead of the PLO. was playing for
the time in order to gam p"*""--1
advantage
The two Senatori. who were
scheduled to meet Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, said
they would urge him to grve
Habib more time Levin said that
Israel should not go atto west
Beirut but that if force is needed
to remove the terrorists the
I Dodd noted that in their talks
m Lebanon they found that
everyone wanted the PLO out-
He ntoed that there was a hatred
for the PLO and pointed oat that
the destructa>n of I aha Dan dad
; atari with the Iaraefc action m
but had baaa gosng for
rvoivement m Lebanon
AS POst the use of U S troops
m Besnrt. W
that the
on
the country at a
to the
from the Sixth Fleet He
thee* oauy purpose wall be to
I that the PLO leaves the
try and that should oary take
few days Ho desued that by do-
sag that, the VS. would be bnk>
Ambassador Arens
nag to salvage' the PLO
Our special objecuve in all of
this has been to try to restore
Lebanon to as sovereignty so
that its borders are secure and so
that it can't be used either as a
platform for attacks on other
countries or be invaded on a con-
stant state such as has been the
case for the past few years.
Weinberger eiplaineri He said
that the IS troops would not
remain until Lebanon regams full
sovereignty, something he con-
ceded would take a long time.
But Dodd. a member of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com
mittee who supported the possi-
bility of IS troops before he
went to the Middle East last
week, said be opposed it now He
said be found in I^banon sc
many different factions among
the PLO and the Chrvtians
more factions than cotnbna
uons to the Rubic Cube, be now
feels the U S force will now be
the target of some groups He
also expressed the fear that the
IS would have a prolonged sta>
in Lebanon and end up as yet
another force m the complicated
situation
LEA'IN. a member of the
Senate Armed Services Comma
But Sen Charles Percy (R .
Ill i. chairman of the Senate For
eagn Relations Committee, said in
an interview on the CBS-TV
"Face the Nation'' program that
opposition was rising both in
Congress and the American hin-
terland to Israel's actions in
Lebanon He predicted that Is
raeJ s incurs ion into Lebanon
could turn out to be its Viet-
nam
Percy sari that the Begin
government had once agam in
Lebanon broken a pledge to the
IS that it would not undertake
- American mterest, ,
PWe bro^ T 9
De*ween partners **a rw
ti-t UaaTSSd X **
pneea between Isrie7
Unaed States ^
00 %|
^'reach^t^^J
part^uUr poinTC^
-for maybe. dottn^H
row we have baao utteT,!1!
M Mil"H noted SKI
first ume m isrtei huu*M
was cuasention in i^S
about the conduct of .^
could turn out to be Ib-wjTv- '
nam. he said sr,a,
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i the PLO leaves the coaav ._ W m ' T! I, t
LlMOCM
-.uir L-. i [ \\ UjIliuiii


Friday. August 6.1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Focus on issues
Arab Reluctance to Take in PLO
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
fTA) "I think there
es seem to be a hesitation
many countries to accept
their country a group of
>ple who have a pattern
arming themselves and in
feet forming a govern-
>nt within a government.
's not anything that a
kuntry that can help it will
klerate."
i This was the reply by Secre-
krv of Stale George Shultz at his
priate confirmation hearing
rhen he was asked about the dif-
culty in finding an Arab
puntry that would take in the
bme 6.000 Palestine Liberation
hjanization terrorists now in
M Beirut. But Arab reluctance
iv have been based on an even
later fear of the PLO may have
n based on an even greater
sr of the PLO than just an im-
bed threat.
AN EXAMPLE is described
former Secretary of State
lenry Kissinger in his well
ntten and interesting second
lume of memoirs. "Years of
Upheaval." Kissinger reports on
PLO s willingness to accept
jnian as a Palestinian state in
return for the overthrow of King
Hussein.
In mid-1973. Richard Helms,
then U.S. Ambassador to Iran,
wrote Kissinger that one of his
aides had been approached by an
associate of PLO chief Yasir
Arafat seeking a dialogue with
the U.S. on the propositions that
"Israel is here to stay" and Jor-
dan should be the place for a Pal-
estinian state.
"I considered King Hussein a
valued friend of the United
States and a principal hope for
diplomatic progress in the re-
gion." Kissinger wrote in his
memoirs. "Our aim should be to
strengthen his position, not to
encourage a group that avowed
its determination to overthrow
him in its first communication
with us."
KISSINGER REPLIED to
Helms that the PLO should be
told that while the U.S. was in-
terested in hearing ideas from the
Palestinians on how to promote a
Middle East peace through nego-
tiations, "the overthrow of
existing governments in the Arab
world was not acceptable; we are
committed to the survival of the
Kingdom of Jordan."
Kissinger said that 10 days
later the U.S. received a similar
approach from the PLO through
King Hassan of Morocco. Then
on Oct. 10, four days after the
Yom Kippur War had started,
Arafat in a message to the U.S.
predicted that Israel would rout
Syria and Egypt and said the
PLO wanted to participate in the
subsequent negotiations. "The
score' it had to settle was with
Jordan, not Israel." according to
Kissinger.
Gen. Vernon Walters had a
meeting with a PLO representa-
tive in Morocco on Nov. 3, the
first and only by the U.S., ac-
cording to Kissinger. He was in-
structed by Kissinger to tell the
PLO that the Palestinian prob-
lem was not an international con-
cern but an inter-Arab one.
"IT WAS up to the PLO to
straighten out its relationships
with other Arab states with
one proviso: We would partici-
pate in no maneuver aimed at
Jordan; the PLO's real option
was reconciliation with the Has-
hemite Kingdom not its over-
throw," Kissinger wrote.
"What applied to Jordan was
even more true of Israel. Walters
was to make clear that the United
States would oppose any threat
to the survival of Israel and any
challenge to its legitimacy." The
only result of the Walters meet-
ing with the representatives, ac-
cording to Kissinger, was to
achieve its original purpose of
preventing radical assaults on
the early stages of the post-Yom
Kippur War peacemaking.
This account demonstrates not
only the PLO effort to use recog-
nition of Israel as a tactical bar-
gaining point as was seen during
the Israeli siege of west Beirut,
but as Israelis have often
stressed, a Palestinian state on
the West Bank would be more of
a threat to Jordan than even to
Israel.
KISSINGER'S declaration
that the Palestinian question is
, basically an inter-Arab issue still
holds true although it does not
negate the efforts to achieve an
autonomy agreement under the
Camp David process. There
would be no Palestinian problem
today, if. after the establishment
of the State of Israel, the Arab
countries had integrated the Pal-
estinian refugees into their coun-
tries as refugees throughout the
world had been taken into new
homes and. as indeed. Israel ab-
sorbed the survivors of the Hol-
ocaust and the Jews from Arab
countries.
And he noted in another pas-
sage: "The issue of contacts with
Palestinians was therefore not in
1973 a major policy problem for
the United States The issue
of a Palestinian state run by the
PLO was not a subject of serious
discourse."
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J*#b.10-A The Jewish Florid lan Friday. August 6. 1982
Report from Argentina
Assimilation is the Real Enemy
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
BUENOS AIRES tJTAi -
Assimilation, not anti-Semitism.
poses the long-term threat to the
integrity of the Jewish com
munity of Argentina, according
to communal leaders here. No one
interviewed by this correa
pondent underestimated the
seriousness of anti-Semitism in
this country, torn by political and
economic crisis But practically
everyone agreed that assimila-
tion is the real danger
"It is our main worry." said
Mario Gorenstein. the president
of DAIA iDelegacion de Asocia
ciones Israelitas de la Argentina),
which represents the community .
in its political dealings with the
military junta. "Anti-Semites
won't make the community dis-
appear. But assimilation, to-
gether with anti-Semitism, will
weaken it "
VICE DIRECTOR of the Latin
American Kabbinical Seminary.
Kabbi Mordecai Edery. believes
that the intermarriage rate is
about TO percent a figure
which seems high. Edery. a na-
tive of Morocco, insists that it is
accurate, and he points out that
the University of Tel Aviv re-
cently estimated that a mere
50.000 Jews will be left in Argen
tina within several decades if cur-
rent patterns of assimilation
and emigration persist.
"Assimilation, by far. is the big-
gest problem we face, he said.
There are some 350.000 Jews in
Argentina today, but this is only
an educated estimate But. once,
there were probably more. If
Ciregorio Fainguersch. the
general manager of the weekly
Mundo Israelita. is right, ap-
proximately 100.000 Jews have
left the country in the past 30
Sheldon Kirshner. a reporter
with the Canadian Jewish Seus
of Toronto, visited Argentina
just before the Argentines in-
laded the Falkland Islands.
years, mainly for economic
reasons
Up to 50.000 of the emigrants
have gone to Israel, and the re-
mainder have immigrated to
other Latin American nations.
North America and Europe. In
the last decade, as a result of the
political and economic turmoil
that grips this essentially Euro-
pean outpost in South America
about 2.5 million Argentines
have left their homeland in
despair.
JEWS IN Argentina, this re-
porter learned, must cope with
two seemingly contradictory im-
pulses.
This is a highly nationalistic
country which has been sus-
picious of foreigners but which
expects them to integrate once
they decide to settle here. Lip
service is paid to the notion of
cultural pluralism, yet minorities.
Protestants and Moslems in-
cluded, are tolerated and are ex-
pected to renounce glaring group
traits.
In this monolithic. Hispanic
inspired. Catholic-oriented so-
ciety, assimilation as total as
possible is the desired goal of
most inlegrationists. It -is no
coincidence that the^regune re-
cently tried, but failed, to intro-
duce a curriculum on Catholic re-
ligious values to state secondary
schools. The Jewish community
opposed the plan.
Because of their traditions.
Florida Secretary of State George Firestone (left) discusses the
current Mideast conflict with Israeli Consul General Joel Arnon
during a recent meeting in Tallahassee. The Israeli diplomat
visited the Florida capital to brief Firestone and other govern-
ment leaders on Israel's presence in Lebanon. Arnon heads the
Israeli consulate general office in Miami, which opened earlier
this year. In March, Israel joined the Florida Consular Corps, a
49-nation group of foreign countries with diplomatic offices in
Florida.
religion, distinct communal life
and solidarity with Israel (which
has good relations with Argen-
tina i. a great many Jews have
tried to reset the allure of a
homogemous society But. in in
creasing cases, they succumb,
given the high mixed marriage
raie.
We have tried to integrate
ourselves in the general cultural
life of the country without losing
our religious. cultural and
spiritual particularities a rather
difficult task where cultural
pluralism is not rooted, ex-
plained Nehernias Resnuky. the
former president of DAIA.
IN THIS VERY traditional
society, which has historically
swung between democracy and
authoritarianism. anti-Semitism
has seldom been absent. Recent
ly. for example, a Jewish ceme-
tery in the seaside resort of Mar
del Plata was desecrated.
Nevertheless the community
has withstood the assaults "We
have flourished here for over 100
years, often under crisis." said
Klias Zviklich. the president of
B nai B'rith. referring to the anti
Senutism and the economic and
political troubles which ail thi*-
country
Jewish life is normal, added
(iregono Faigon. the head of the
Latin American Jewish Con-
gress Our institutions function
without interference Herman
Schiller, the editor of Nueva
Pres-encia. a Jewish newspaper
published in Spanish, told this
reporter that Jews care more
about the state of the economy
than the repessive nature of the
junta "They prefer the order of a
military government
WHAT SEEMS clear to this
writer is that reports of anti
Senutism have been misleading
and exaggerated. "There is a dis
tort ion of our situation and it
doesn't help us." remarked
Nehemias Kesruzky "It s ridicu-
lous to compare us to Russian
Jews."
James Neilson. the editor of
the liberal Buenos Aires Herald
(who was forced to leave Argen
t ina several weeks ago because of
threats to his life.I agrees Anti
Semitism here is not clear cut.
he noted. "It vanes in tone and
shade There are a lot of gray
areas."
It seems clear that the govern
ment. which has often been ac
cused of violating the human
rights of its citizens and of taking
part in the kidnapping of
thousands of Argentines, is pub-
licly against anti-Semitism In-
deed, its spokesmen have de-
nounced it.
"Why do people talk of anti
Semitism when there is no racial
discrimination in Argentina?"
asked Rodolfo Battierrez. the
secretary for public information.
"The Jewish community has con-
tributed to Argentina's develop-
ment in every way." the former
ambassador to Israel added "It
is respected, has been respected
and will be respected."
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?
Internationally-renowned violinist Yiuhak Perlman Heft) .
ceives an honorary Doctorate from Hebrew University f^.
dent Avraham Harmon at recent ceremonies held in theampht
theater of the University's Mount Scopus campus in Jerusalem
The world-ranked virtuoso was himself born in Israel
Col. Bernardo Menendez. the
deputy minister of interior, said
Jews are "totally integrated"
into Argentine society.
BIT NOT everyone here is so
sanguine. Reliable sources who
prefer anonymity said that the
junta tolerates low levels of anti-
Semitism because its officer
corps has a general dislike of
Jews There s a Roman Catholic
tradition in the armed forces and
when the military comes to
power, it's logical that relations
between them and Jews won't be
ideal. even if some officers say
the> have Jewish friends."
Accordingly, he explained, the
junta makes no special efforts to
find, and arrest, those who have
desecrated Jewish property in the
last few years And the regime,
although it has banned the sale of
anti-Semitic magazines such as
fHinldo and Ideano. still re-
ported^ permits other neo-Nazi
publications to be sold on news-
stands
Yet the generals, led b> Presi-
dent l-eopoldo daltien. before the
war with (ireat Britain over the
Falkland Islands, realize that
major and -Semitic disturbances
could ba counter productive
First thev might bring disorder
to a junta which, above all else,
values stability Second, thev
might further tarnish \rgen
Una s already battered reputa
lion at a time when :t seeks a
improve relations with the L'5
The Reagan Administration r*
displayed a favorable ciupositna
toward the junta
DESPITE THE government,!
insistence that Jews are as is-'
tegrated into Argentine "warn
as any other group, the reveri I
appears to be true Jt s. moreot
less, are excluded from the kn |
centers of power the anrw
forces, judiciary. | < \ ernment |
ministries and diplomatic corps
In some cases wt n secooo.
. iass citizens. concede
Resnuky. speaking personally
Some parts of Argentine hfetni
cut off (to Jews). Jews haven]
fight, with the help of democrats:
forces, for full equal it v But hi |
made it clear that .lews are at-
corded full civil right-- and m I
free to manage the alfu.rs of thar I
communal organizations and in-
stitutions
Gorenstein does not trunk flat
the absence of Jews from influen-
tial government positions sun
the 1976 coup is a function d,
anti-Semitism. There nave bat
governments before that haven:
had Jewish officials he said
This isn't necessarily anti-Semi-
tism."
Neilson said he isn t urpnsw
that the officer Corp* ludeo-
rein, since the military cast* a
\rgentina is inievlei! bj MU'
Semitic sentiments
i
j
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The War Up Front
Beirut Enveloped in Gray Mist of Common Fire
Friday. August 6, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By HARRY WALL
JERUSALEM The
view from Docha, a
wealthy, residential com-
munity perched on a hilltop
overlooking Beirut, is de-
ceptively serene, one that
belies the wake of destruc-
tion behind us and the bat-
tle that lies ahead. Across
the bay lies the Beirut Air-
port and the city itself, en-
veloped in a grey mist left
by smoking cannon fire.
"It's hard to believe that a war
ii going on here." say8 a young
IsraaU helicopter pilot, clad in a
green jumpsuit. He had just fer-
ried cargo for the Israeli lookout
im the hill and paused to take in
the mi* before returning to his
THE PLUSH villas of Docha
had emerged unscathed from the
fighting and untouched by the
Israeli wldtan moving around
'.he area.
The soldiers did no damage to
my house or property." said Dr.
.V'lim Bl-Hou, whose only com-
plaint was being left without
elect ricity.
I vm> young and attractive
l-thanese woman walked up the
hill, carrying a white flag. Al-
i hough they appeared nervous.
they felt secure enough to leave
I their house. Their presence and
| the doctor 'a remarks indicated
that the Israel Defense Forces
were strictly adhering to the ban
agaawt pilferage and harassment
gainst noncombatants.
WE WERE in Lebanon as the
first authorized group of foreign
?ran and observers on an Israel
Detense Forces-escorted tour of
the battle-scarred cities along the
toast and villages in the nearby
hills What we had witnessed was
an awesome display of Israeli
military power, the ravages of
ar and the first signs of order
and hope in a country that has
not known peace for the past
decade.
Our tour began at the Israel
border town of Kosh Manikra. a
crossing point for hundreds of Is-
raeli vehicles, including armored
UOop earners and long convoys
ol flatbed trucks carrying fuel.
tood. water and other supplies to
the forest in lx>banon. No one
seemed to pay any attention to
the UMFIL checkpoint at the
border where the United Nations
observers stood idly by. watching
the heavy traffic on its way
north.
A lew kilometers into Lebanon.
road signs were posted in Hebrew
marking the way to the cities and
villages in the region. The ex-
planation: "Here, a wrong turn
can be hazardous to your health."
said Col. Dan Bawly. our army
escort officer. Bawly, who in
private life heads an Israeli ac-
counlinK firm and is also a noted
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Menachem Amsterdam is shown at his wife's
bedside holding their infant son who was
born in the Shaare Zedek Medical Center in
9\
Jerusalem while Amsterdam was hospital-
ized there, recovering from wounds sustained
during the fighting in Lebanon.
Harry Wall is director of
the Israel Office of the
Anti-Defamation
League ofB'nai B 'rith
author, was called up for reserve
duty the previous day.
THE JOURNEY north was
slow and arduous, the result of
numerous army checkpoints,
heavy military traffic and the
road itself, which was cratered
with potholes from the heavy
shelling. Along the way. we saw
the first signs of war: blackened
cars lying in ditches, houses re-
duced to rubble, while others,
while flags hung on their roofs,
appeared unscarred. Off the road,
farmers had gone back to work in
their fields and banana groves,
which had been left largely un-
trampled by the Isareli forces.
Despite the unfamiliar terrain.
our military escort, equipped
with large-scale topographical
maps, seemed certain of himself
Asked how long the IDF would
remain in Lebanon. Hawly said
the occupation would be short:
"We don't want to be here. We
are here because we had no other
choice."
Some 45 kilometers up the
coast we entered Sidon. a city of
some 70.000 people which 2.000
terrorists had turned into a FLO
military center and staging area,
according to IDF spokesmen.
The outskirts of Sidon had re-
mained virtually undamaged, but
as we reached the central district
we saw how much havoc the war
had wrought. Many buildings
were reduced to rubble.
OTHERS WERE pockmarked
from shelling. Not all neighbor-
hoods were hit and some build-
ings in the main plaza, including
a few high-rises, were only lightly
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damaged, an indication that the
bombing and shelling had not
Ix-en indiscriminate. We moved
cautiously in the city which, des-
pite the large presence of IDF"
troops, was not yet secure.
Only that morning. PLO ter-
rorists had taken over a mosque,
threatening to kill their civilian
hostages. Firing and shelling
could be heard in the distance.
Next to a large, now destroyed,
building that had housed an edu-
cational center. IDF clean-up
crews, using a crane and winches,
were busy removing crates of
weapons found in the basement.
The cache held over 50 tons of
Soviet-made arms. including
Strella and Saggar-type missiles.
Kalashnikov rifles, mortar
rounds, and ammunition. The
boxes were marked with Russian
or Chinese lettering, and many
showed Tripoli (Libya! as the
port of embarkation, thirty such
caches were found in Sidon alone.
"THE PLO would drive
around the city in their Russian
jeeps sounding their sirens and
waving rifles." said Halil Andris.
a Lebanese Moslem who owned
the office building next door to
the FLO arsenal. Asked how he
felt about Israel's action. Andris
answered. "We don't hate the Is-
raelis. We are glad the PLO are
out of Sidon." Andris added that
he hoped in the near future Leba-
non could run its own affairs, un-
der the leadership of President
Sarkis.
"This was not a spasmodic
act," said Col. Bawly as we drove
through Sidon. "What we did
here was the result of a lack of
action after a year of repeated
warnings that Israel could not al-
low an intolerable situation to
continue," he stated.
We could not let 60.000 set-
tlers in our northern settlements
be sent to the shelters or evacu-
ated every time the PLO decided
to fire on them." Bawly shook his
head. "This was inevitable. It
was unavoidable."
ON THE STREET, despite the
physical damage in Sidon and the
grisly reports emanating from
Beirut of wanton civilian killings,
we saw no evidence of such
casualties. Most of the civilians
had found refuge in their base-
ment shelters or the nearby hills,
having been warned in advance
by leaflets dropped from Israeli
planes to leave the town. Prior to
the ground assault by the IDF,
advance fighting units called out
to the remaining residents to
gather on the beach to avoid be-
ing injured.
A talk with one of the evacu-
ees, an elderly Danish woman
married to a Palestinian from the
nearby Ainhilwe refugee camp,
supported this account. We saw
her in a grove outside Sidon
where several hundred refugees
had gathered waiting to be relo-
cated in permanent quarters.
"About three hours before the
Israelis attacked Ainhilwe. they
warned us by megaphone to get
out. Most of us did," she said.
THE WOMAN did not hide
her dislike for what the Israeli
forces did to her camp, which was
a stronghold for the terrorists,
according to an IDF spokesman.
"But they have treated us well
since then," she said, referring to
the daily delivery of essential
human needs.
"It is true that there were some
civilian victims among the
casualties." acknowledged
Bawly. whose sensitivities to the
plight of the Lebanese were evi-
dent throughout our visit. "But
not nearly approaching the
figures issued from Beirut."
Bawly's estimate, based on in-
formed sources, was in the hun-
dreds, not thousands.
Israeli soldiers go to great
lengths, often at their own risk,
to avoid hurting noncom-
balants." he said. "But if some-
one can show us how to prevent
such suffering when terrorists
use civilians as hostages and
ishields, we are more than willing
to learn."
BACK IN SIDON. civilian life
was already being returned to a
semblance of normality. Shops
land banks that had been looted
by the PLO before they fled were
being reopened, now under the
protection of Lebanese police-
men. Military authorities were
'arranging lor housing and work
for the displaced inhabitant -
Food, fuel and water were l>eing
brought into Sidon by IDF con-
voys and Israeli medical tear:
had arrived to reinlorce the loo.
doctor^
We slopped to talk to a local
merchant, whose hardware store
was partically damaged from the
fighting. He smiled and wel-
comed us warmly "Lebanon's
troubles were brought by the
strangers.' a euphemism tor the
Palestinians." he said. He shook
hands with Col. Bawly. who told
him. ""We mean you no harm,
only peace." The Lebanese
seemed reassured by the Israeli's
gentle manner "Inshallah." he
replied, which in Arabic means
"Cod willing."
Returning to our car the Is-
raeli officer said. "We came to
Lebanon not to conquer the land,
but to drive out the PLO. We
may return with a tangible
peace." Bawly continued. "There
is a price for this peace, unfor-
tunately. We had to bear it, and
so did the Lebanese. But if we
can attain that goal, it makes the
cost worthwhile."
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Pfcg12-A TheJ*iah FIorkHan / Friday, August 6.1982
Jane Fonda and Tom Hayden were among tain Israeli soldiers at hospitals and bases in
the first celebrities to arrive in Israel for op- northern Israel Other visitors include
eration 'Shalom to Israel '82.' in which cele- George Segal, Danny Kaye, Sammy Davis,
brities have been invited to visit and enter- Jr. and Peter Strauss.
Headlines
Bernardin's Appointment Hailed
The American Jewish Committee is hailing the
designation of Archbishop Joseph Bernardin as
Archbishop of Chicago, and praising the Arch-
b is hop's "history of friendship and constructive
cooperation with the Jewish community" and
"commitment to Catholic-Jewish understand-
ing "
In a letter to Archbishop Bernardin from Rabbi
Marc H. Tanenbaum. AJC's national director of
inKrreligious affairs, the human relations agency-
notes "with especial warmth and appreciation"
an address the Archbishop gave at a 1975 AJC
meeting, "during which you made such important
affirmations about the Nazi holocaust, the State
of Israel and Palestinian rights, the cause of
Soviet Jews and other oppressed people, and the
imperative need for our collaboration in social
justice and humanitarian causes."
"We are confident." the letter continues, "that
you will bring that same spirit of commitment to
Catholic-Jewish understanding and solidarity to
your ministry in Chicago."
Edwin Shapiro, president of the Hebrew Immi-
grant Aid Society, has been elected a vice presi-
dent of CARE.
Since 1979. Shapiro has represented HI AS as a
board member of the non-profit relief agency,
whose world headquarters are in New York.
In 1961. CARE provided aid valued at more
than a quarter of a billion dollars to needy people
in Africa. Asia. Europe. Latin America and the
Middle East. In Israel. CARE furnishes a variety
of aid services, among them vocational training
for the handicapped and the young, and food pro-
grams for the needy, including ill and retarded
persons.
When American Christian broadcasters at the
"Voice of Hope" radio and TV' facilities in
southern Lebanon found they had an increasing
number of shells to duck in the latest conflict in
the Middle East, station manager Chuck Pollak
responded by expanding radio broadcasts from 19
to 24 hours a day and initiating overseas short-
wave services.
Manager Pollak was unperturbed, even
challenged, by the PLO's intensified attempts to
knock out the popular station, which under the
call letters WORD entertains, inspires and in-
forms the local population with country and rock
music. Bible readings and news reports. He sums
it up: "Fundamentally, we have God on our
side."
His conviction is one of the driving forces
behind the operation, founded by High Adven-1
ture Ministries, an evangelical organization in the
United States, to send a a message of solidarity
and faith to Lebanese Christians. The radio
broadcasts, which began two and a half years ago.
and TV broadcasts, launched shortly after, are
finding appreciative audiences.
"Large-Type Books of Jewish Interest" has
just been published by the JWB Jewish Book
Council to help visually impaired persons
become better acquainted with their Jewish
heritage
Dr. Robert Gordis. president of the JWB Book
Council, announced the publication of the new 19
page annotated bibliography of works of both
fiction and non-fiction.
Approximately 14 percent of the Jewish pop
ulation is over the age of 65." Dr. Gordis said
Many of these people are visually impaired
These and others whose eyesight is diminished
require reading material in large type."
Compiled by Helene L. Tuchman. the publics
tion describes 22 books of fiction. 11 religious
works, and 12 works of non-fiction.
Rabbi Schulem Rubin, newly-elected chairman
of the Council of Young Israel Rabbis, has an-
nounced plans by the group to provide "organized
support and direction for the expanded efforts of
the lay leaders of the Young Israel movement."
Rabbi Rubin, who is the spiritual leader of the
Young Israel of Pel ham Parkway. New York, and
was elected to the chairmanship at the convention
of the National Council of Young Israel in June,
pledged to support the new initiatives of the
Young Israel movement in the fields of adult
Jewish education and Kashruth. and in Young Is-
rael's expanded programs to reach youth on the
college campus.
Rabbi Benjamin Blech. of the Young Israel of
Oceanside. was elected vice chairman of the rab-
binical group.
The centennials of two famous Israeli commu-
nities are celebrated in the latest stamps from the
Holy Land. Slightly younger, at 70. is Hadassah
for which another stamp has just been issued.
Finally, a new set of four dramatically depicts
some of the miracles associated with the great
leader of ancient days, Joshua. These are the New
Jewish New Year stamps.
One of the communities marking its 100th year
is Rosh Pinna, for which an IS 2.50 stamp has
been issued. Often called "the mother of the
Upper Galilee settlements." the community can
trace its roots back to 1878. during Turkish rule.
In that year, a number of families from Safed
settled on the site of the Arab village of Jauni.
In 1882. Rosh Pinna was firmly established
when a group of Rumanian immigrants joined
these pioneers.
Kenneth J. Bialkin. national chairman of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. has told
Costa Rican President Luis Alberto Monge that
the American Jewish community "applauds and
supports his country's dedication to democracy."
President Monge met late last month with rep-
resentatives of ADL and the American Jewish
Committee at the League's headquarters in New
York.
Bialkin praised Costa Rica's willingness to
embrace a strong relationship with Israel and de-
scribed the recent return to Jerusalem of the
Costa Rican embassy as "a courageous political
action, a signal and wave of the future."
Shamir Denies Coolness
Toward Him By Reagan
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA1 -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
of Israel denied that he found a
coolness toward him by President
Reagan when he met with him at
the White House.
"It was a friendly atmosphere
in the mornings as it was (at the
State Department) in the after-
noon." Shamir told reporters
after a nearly three-hour meeting
with Secretary of State George
Shultz. including a working
lunch.
"Of course there are some diffi-
culties" between the United
State*, and Israel. Shamir added.
But he stressed as he had this
morning that the two countries
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had "identical goals in Lebanon.
Pool reporters who ^J
the picture-taking session aiT \
opening of the meeting at Z\
White House said there was ^
of the usual friendly small uu
that normally marks those oca
sns. The reporters noud tb
when Israeli Ambassador MZ
Arens tried to break the ice 2
a remark, the Americans did nal
respond.
But when Shamir was asked!
directly this afternoon if the l\$
was trying to put some disun*, I
between itself and Israel. beca
of Israel's bombardment of w|
Beirut. Shamir replied.
wouldn't say so."
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Is Shultz Really
To Be Feared?
Continued from Page 4-A
barly demolished by Arab on
aught?
HAVE HIS associations with
audi Arabian kingpins convinc-
I him that all the Arab states
ubscribing to the Khartoum Re-
blution of 1967 ("no peace with
preal, no negotiation with Israel,
recognition of Israel") really
in i mean to stick by such de-
pnce and rejection?
' Will Mr. Shultz now gloss over
r>e PLO record of brutal assault
i nationals in many parts of the
world and cut Mr. Arafat or his
most likely successor, George
Habash. a real master at murder
plotting, into negotiations for
peace?
Once the fighting stops in
Lebanon and Washington tries to
knit what's left of the unraveled
Camp David understandings,
Mr. Shultz faces a challenge few,
if any, people in his post have as-
sumed before. If he proves, as we
hope, to turn out to be the ar-
chitect of a just peace in the
Middle East, his name will be in
for an eternal blessing.
Miracles to be Recalled Long
After the War is Ended
3rs
Continued from Page 4-A
wn, anxious to help. They were
it to work at once, assisting the
habitants to fill out the compu-
ted forms required in their re-
est for government compensa-
n for war damages.
FORMER KNESSET member
lato Sharon put ads in all the
pers advising soldiers at the
>nt that if their families had no
ones at home, the boys could
1 him. and a battery of opera-
would accept the calls and
en dispatch special messengers
deliver the personal greetings
d reassurances.
The badly-wounded Syrian
ldier was picked up on the bat-
neld, and after first aid treat-
nt was flown to the Rambam
spital in Haifa, together with
unded Israeli soldiers. The
ck helicopter flight direct from
front often saved lives.
When the doctors examined
Syrian, they were at first
led to find a handwritten
eorew note among his papers.
The mystery was quickly solved.
The note was addressed to Or.
Ami Barzilai. a professor of med-
icine at the Technion and a staff
member at Rambam. It carried
reassuring greetings from his
son, somewhere in Lebanon, who
had chosen this unorthodox
means to get his message to his
father in the quickest way be
knew.
Debate Rages
Jews Join Anti-Nuke Campaign
Continued from Page 3-A
Waskow argued that a nuclear
war between the two superpowers
would lead to the destruction of
the Jewish people. The Jewish
people is far more concentrated in
the large metropolises of a few
large countries and therefore are
far more vulnerable to direct nu-
clear vaporization and the swiftly
following fall-out. famine, plague,
than are most of the world peo-
ples, writes Waskow.
"COUNT THE Jews in Mos-
cow, Leningrad, Kharkok, Kiev,
in London and Paris and in the 20
largest North American cities,"
writes Waskow who asks, "What
is left without them? The State of
Israel and Buenos Aires? Ooes
anyone imagine that Israel can
long survive the destruction of
America, Europe and the Soviet
Union?"
Waskow compares a possible
nuclear destruction of the world
to the biblical story of the flood.
"It is our tradition that offers a
way to integrate into our lives as
Jews the constant effort to pre-
vent the nuclear annihilation of
all life in earth, a 'flood of fire,' "
writes Waskow.
It would be of course a mistake
to argue that all or even most of
the American Jewish community
are supportive of the nuclear
freeze movement. "Neo-conser-
vative" Jewish intellectuals such
as Norman Podhoretz, the editor
of "Commentary," the publica-
tion of the American Jewish
Committee, have attacked the
movement and have been sup-
portive of the grand scale nuclear
arms build-up initiated by the
Administration, arguing that a
strong American nuclear and
conventional American military
force would contain Soviet ex-
pansionism and thus prevent a
possible nuclear confrontation.
OTHER American Jewish
critics of the nuclear freeze move-
ment, such as Charlotte Jacob-
son, the veteran American-Zion-
ist leader, have argued that the
movement has not focused its at-
tention on the nuclear-arms build-
up in the Moslem and Arab
world, as for example Libya,
Pakistan and Iraq, as a possible
threat to world peace. That is
perhaps where American-Jewish
ind Israeli concerns can meet:
Israel can take advantage of the
fact that so many American-Jews
and Liberal supporters of Israel
are active int he movement and
try to turn their attention to the
issue of the nuclear-arms prolifer-
ation in Arab countries.
Moreover, the Israeli proposal
for denuclearization of the Middle
East, which was submitted to the
UN General Assembly two years
ago. car. serve as an appropriate
Israeli contribution to the inter-
national debate on the nuclear
arms race.
Israel's Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin presented the Israeli
proposal when he addressed the
UN General Assembly during its
recent speical session on disarm-
ament when thousands of mem-
bers of the nuclear-freeze move-
ment demonstrated in New York
in front of the UN building.
Israeli Editor Says
Israel's first lady Ofira Navon (right) is shown how to put on a
Circassian shawl, which signifies a married woman. Saud
\iabasi, wife of Kafr Kama's council head, entertained the Pres-
ent's wife during a recent visit to his village. The Circassians
re one of Israel's smallest national minorities, with a popula-
tion of under 3,000 living in two villages in Galilee. They are
iuni Moslems, whose origins are in the Caucasian mountains,
their young people serve in the Israel army.
Media IgnorantNot Malicious
By JUDITH KOHN
NEW YORK (JTAI Call
ing the U.S. media "more ig-
norant than malicious," the edi-
tor of Maariv to a group of
American Jewish organization
officials that news media
coverage has failed to present an
accurate picture of the war in
Lebanon.
"The press, to my great sor-
row, did not understand what
was going on," the editor, Moshe
Zak. said at a luncheon confer-
ence sponsored by the Jewish
Community Relations Council of
New York. "They reported what
they did not see. They were given
lots of bits and pieces, but they
did not see the picture as a
whole." Zak suggested that
doubts and criticism voiced by
some American Jews over Is-
rael's operation in Lebanon were
an outgrowth of a sentiment that
had been stimulated by the media
here before the operation began.
"BEFORE THE war we were
not in the best shape in public
opinion in the United States,"
Zak said. He observed that
"there may be some misunder-
standing between us and Ameri-
can Jews, who were nourished for
some months before'' by a glut of
media reports on events in the
West Bank.
But Zak predicted that once
Israel succeeds in eliminating
PLO intimidation of potential
peace partners, and thus presents
new opportunities for peace be-
tween Israel and its Arab neigh-
bors, the doubts and questioning
among American Jews "will all
be forgotten."
Ernest Michel, executivie vice
president of the United Jewish
Appeal-Federation Joint Cam-
paign of Greater New York, who
also addressed the conference,
demonstrated the extent of
AMerican Jewish support for Is-
rael's operation with figures of
contributions received by his or-
ganization since the operation
began.
HE SAID that $7 million more
was donated in the past four to
five weeks than would have been
received over the same period
under normal circumstances.
Michel, who just returned from a
visit to Lebanon, maintained that
Israel has enabled southern
Lebanon to resume a state of
normalcy, as families come back
to areas that had been reduced to
rubble by the PLO.
Reciting PLO atrocities in
Lebanon, a Christian Lebanese
couple told conference par-
ticipants that they were speaking
on behalf of Lebanese Christians
and Moslems alike in thanking
the Begin government for under-
taking its operation.
May El-Murr, a poet and lec-
turer at the Lebanese Military
Academy, and her husband
Alfred-EI-Murr, presented ac-
counts of rape and murder com-
mitted by Palestinian terrorists
against Lebanese civilians of
both faiths, to an audience that,
in discussions which followed,
expressed outrage over what
some viewed as a deliberate lack
of interest by the news media in
this side of the Lebanese scenar-
Kosher Products
Safeguard Signed
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTAI A
number of measures to streng-
then legal safeguards in New
York State for purchasers of
kosher products including
what was described as a land-
mark requirement for registra-
tion of kosher delicatessens for
the first time have been signed
into laws by Governor Hugh
(Carey.
They are the first such kosher
consumer protection laws in the
United States. Rabbi Schulem
Rubin, chief supervisor of the
kosher law enforcement division
of New York State's Department
of Argriculture and Markets,
said. The division, which has a
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' ur iicaisu r wimuui .
\y rvugusi o. 1
Moscow Connection
PLO-Soviet Tie Has Long History
Costinoed frees Page 1 A
the FLO as a substitute for a
Middle East state.
TEN YEARS ago. the Rus-
sians began regular arms deliver
iss to the PLO to enhance its nui-
sance value. They began to give
consistent backing to PLO de-
mands to secure a sovereign Pal-
estinian State. All sorts of signs
or recognition of the PLO fol-
lowed In 1974 its leader. Yasir
Arafat, was first invited to Mos-
cow and then, with Soviet back-
ing, to New York to speak in the
UN General Assembly
In 1975. the PLO set up an of-
fice in Moscow, and in 1977 train-
ing bases in Southern Russia.
Since then. Soviet-PLO relations
have been steadily strengthened,
culminating in October. 1981. in
the logical granting of full diplo-
matic PLO status in Moscow, in
return for full PLO backing for
Soviet participation in a recon-
vened Geneva Peace Conference
Arafat s right-hand man. Abu
lyad. declared that the "decision
of the Soviet Union to recognize
our office in Moscow as an em-
bassy signifies recognition of the
State of Palestine before its
birth." and the same spokesman
declared on August 17. 1981: "If
we had the capability to sign a
treaty with the Soviet Union, we
would have signed a thousand
treaties: and if we controlled land
we would have allowed the Sovi-
ets a thousand bases, because we
are dealing with a foe stronger
than Israel, the United States
IN AN interview broadcast by
"Voice of Palestine on October
21, 1981. he enumerated four
joint aims for the Soviet-PLO en-
tente to establish a sovereign
Palestinian State, under PLO
control: to strengthen the Soviet-
Coalition Has
'Teach-In'
NEW YORK (JTAI -
Amtd tight security imposed by
volunteers, the "November 29
Coalition" held a "teach-in" on
the war in Lebanon that drew
some 1.500 people to Town Hall
in midtown Manhattan.
The all-day rally was originally
to have taken place at the Diplo-
mat Hotel across the street, but
was canceled, according to the
hotel's management, when it be-
came clear that the sponsoring
organization was a front for the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion.
Comparing Israel's operation
in Lebanon to the Nazi Holo-
caust, the panelists, who included
pro-PLO Americans. Lebanese,
and Palestinian academicians, as
well as an Israeli anti-Zionist at-
torney. Lea Tsemel. condemned
the invasion and derided the U.S.
attempts to evacuate the PLO
from Beirut.
Also attending the rally was
Zehdi Labib Terzi. the PLO'a
permanent observer at the
United Nations, who was greeted
by the audience with boisterous
cheers hailing the PLO.
Jewish Home
Blown Up
PARIS (JTA) A house
belonging to a prominent Jewish
family wax blown up by a bomb
Saturday morning near Toulon in
the south of France. The house
which is owned by a Marseilles
manufacturer, Daniel Cohen, waa
empty at the time. The bombing
caused heavy damage. Police in-
vestigators said they found leaf
lets inscribed "Death to the
Jews."
PLO Alliance: to induce all Arab
nations to lift their embargo" on
diplomatic relations with
Moscow; and to work for revolu-
tion in the Middle East, based on
PLO Marxism and its "pan-Arab
position."
Finally, on January 6. 1982.
Abu lyad added a fifth joint aim
This was for the Soviet Union
and the PLO to induce Jordan
and Syria to open battlefronts
against Israel "so that all Arab
revolutionaries can fight the
Israeli enemy For. "The only
way open to the Arab revolution
ara*s in fighting and then all
friends, the first of whom is the
Soviet Union, will side with us
. without fighting, not one
single inch of land will be re-
turned from the Golan or Pales-
tine through diplomacy,
memoranda or protests."
Not one of Abu Iyad's state-
ments was modified by Arafat
Three of them were singled out
by Israel for particular attention
that joint objectives include
the realization of PLO aims by
force, the spreading of the PLO
neo-Marxist gospel of revolution
in the Arab world, and the estab-
lishment of Soviet military bases
in whatever preliminary Pales-
tinian State may be established.
IT SHOULD be recalled, too.
that the PLO has laid claim to
the whole of the Kingdom of Jor-
dan. The reasons are demograph-
ic, because 60 per cent of the pop-
ulation of Jordan are Palestin-
ians, and ideological, because the
Palestinian "revolutionary idea"
presupposes the demise of the
Hashemite monarchy. So far. at
least, there has been no explicit
Soviet admission of direct in-
volvement in destroying the
Kingdom of Jordan, but the So-
viet Union must regard the sur-
vival of the Hashemite monarchy
as inimical to its own concepts.
The roost recent explicit PLO
resolution calling for the King's
overthrow was made in the Pal-
estine National Council on Apr.
15. 1981; it was publicly ap
proved by Yasir Arafat as being
"our brand of democracy, and we
are proud of it. "
So much for joint Soviet PLO
objectives. What the outside
world has failed to grasp is the
astonishingly close collaboration
which has sprung for them.
Since March. 1978. Arafat has
paid at least four, and possibly as
many as six visits to Moscow. In
addition, he has had at least two
meetings with Soviet Foreign
Minister Gromyko in Damascus,
in March. 1979 and January.
1980.
HIS MEETINGS with Am-
bassador Soldatov in Beirut have
become matters of regular
routine. generally monthly.
When Soldatov is not available.
Arafat travels to meet the Soviet
Ambassador in Damascus. Close
liaison with the Soviet Union is
further maintained through Ar-
afat's subordinates.
The Russians, are very, very
interested in the PLO. and their
use of it is. finally, a link in the
field of subversion. The PLO
reaps the benefits of unstinted
Soviet aid. in military training,
procurement of arms, political
schooling, administrative co-or-
dination and expertise in subver-
sive action and techniques.
Estimates of the number of
PLO members trained in the So-
viet Union and other east Euro-
pean countries vary between
1.000 and 3.000. But Soviet arms
and instructors have been avail-
able for PLO camps in Lebanon.
Libya and South Yemen as well.
and PLO members have in turn
been used to train terrorists from
Africa. South and Central Ameri-
ca and Europe.
NO COMPREHENSIVE con
elusions can at the moment be
drawn from the intimate inter-
linking of the PLO with the Sovi-
et Bloc The PLO ia of course
useful while it remains a terrorist
organization, as an agent of dis-
ruption. A PI.O controlled mini-
Palestine consisting of the West
Bank and Gaza would be much
more valuable. For a State so
small and scattered, so economic
ally unviable and politically
immature, would be a "natural"
Soviet client even more so
since PLO leaders believe,
mystically and mistiliy in Arab
"revolution.'
What has been happening in
Central America could be re-
peated in the Middle East: an in-
dependent "Palestine" would
play the part of Nicaragua. The
ways in which a poor and basical-
ly helpless State could be mani-
pulated would be legion. Here,
then, may rest the explanation of
the inordinate interest of Moscow
in Arafat and his henchmen. Of
only one thing can one be sure,
that interest will continue.
Are Israeli Weapons
Really Superior To
The Soviet Brand?
Coatisoed from Page 1 A
everything else in Lebanon
seemed to have been negotiable
for them from the start.
Had the Israelis intended to
attack Syria herself, the story
would probably have been dif-
ferent. It was also because the air
battles had taken place near their
own borders that the Syrians had
made a much more determined
effort to keep the Israelis out.
even at the cost of over 80 lost
MiGs
"IT WOULD therefore be un-
wise to draw too far-reaching
conclusions about the compara-
tive effectiveness of American
and Soviet weaponry. The only
safe conclusion one can draw is
that American military tech-
nology in Israeli hands is more
than a match for Soviet tech-
nology handled by the Syrians."
Col. A1 ford said
"The resounding victory of the
Israeli pilots over both the
ground based defenses and
enemy aircraft also reinforces an
old lesson: that any future com-
bat will be crucially dependent on
winning the war in the air The
techniques and methods of elec-
tronic warfare used by the Is
raelis were not new. But it is
dear, nevertheless, that the u
raeii Air Force paid more !.
tion to them than anybody else
especially in countering the aW
tronk and radar devices of thw
adversary."
TURNING TO some poling
aspects of the campaign. i<>i \\.
ford said that one of the surprise
during his visit to parts of south-
ern Lebanon was the. -\ghi of
Lebanese genuinely welcoming
the Israelis as their liberators
from the yoke of the Palest mians
"The Israelis have already
achieved their original Umitad
objective of ensuring that south-
ern Lebanon no longer serves as i
base for PLO attacks on settle-
ments and towns in Galilee It
was an objective they failed to
achieve in their earlier mvasen.
up to the Litani River, in 1971
But Col. Alford was doubtful
whether the wider objective
would be within the realm of
political possibility.
"I cannot see Israel able to so
transform the internal political
balance in Lebanon as to bring
forth a stable government with i
strong centrally-controlled army
and with sovereign aulhonty
over the whole count r\
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Jewish Members of Terrorist Group Claim
Responsiblity for Attacking Israeli Diplomat's Car
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTAI Jewish
members of an extremist left wing
terrorist organization, "Direct
Action," last night claimed re-
sponsibility for the attack on an
Israel diplomat's car. Direct
Action, a group which has carried
out numerous attacks on western
diplomats in Paris, said that
some of its "Jewish members
carried out the attack to protect
the Israeli invasion of Lebanon
and to prevent the genocide of
the Palestinian people.''
Three shots were fired at the
parked car belonging to a low
ranking official serving with the
Israel Embassy here. The car was
empty and Embassy spokesmen
said the owner has been on sum-
mer vacation for more than a
week.
The Direct Action statement
said that some of its Jewish
members carried out the attack
under the name of "Special
Action Group Marcel Rayman,"
the statement also referred to
Thomas Elek and Mendel longer.
All three were prominent leaders
of the anti-Nazi Jewish Com-
munist resistance movement
during World War II. They were
captured by the Nazis and exe-
cuted in 1944. The statement
said. "We shall remain faithful to
the example given to us by_ the
three" former Jewish resistance
fighters.
Police believe Direct Action is
responsible for the murder of an
American deputy military at-
tache in Paris and the machine
gunning of the Israeli Defense
Ministry's purchasing mission
here last spring. According to
local intelligence reports, many of
the terrorist organization's mem-
bers come from middle class Jew-
ish families.
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BB Launches Effort
Campaign to Counter
A JC Study
Between American Jewish
Lies About Lebanon War Community and the State of Israel
..ii PUlMP.TnV at lartro W
WASHINGTON -
^TA) The world's larg-
|t Jewish service organi-
Ition is mobilizing its
pmbership in 45 countries
counter the propaganda
ir being waged against
rael's attempt to remove
|e Palestine Liberation
rganization from Leba-
)n.
I As part of the effort. B'nai
frith International is sending
L. rs to each of more than
fl.000 members in the United
ites. The last time such letters
re Mnt was in March 1977 fol-
ding the Hanafi Muslim take-
h >>f B'nai B'rith International
idquarters here. Included in
packet is a four-page folder
Lch provides answers to the
^si frequently asked questions
out the Lebanese situation.
AMONG THE issues dis-
used, the folder takes up the
lie issue of why Israel has
\wd all the way to Beirut in-
ad of stopping at the 40-
pmeter line as it originally had
|uated it would. Other ques-
18 include the issues of civilian
Jualties. the alleged violations
agreements on the use of
mean arms, and the so-called
|ision among Jews over the
TIm folder also instructs
^ai B'rith members on how to
kr their views known to gov-
lent officials and the public
at large
In a covering letter, B'nai
B'rith president Jack Spitzer and
executive vice president Dr.
Daniel Thursz inform members
that the organization's leadership
"vigorously" supports Israel's
role in the current crisis and en-
dorses the Israeli-American peace
plan that calls for the reestab-
lishment of a central Lebanese
government, guaranteed security
of Israel's northern border and
the removal of all foreign forces
from Lebanon.
Spitzer and Thursz add that
through B'nai B'rith s grass
roots action network. B'nai
B'rith has been expressing its
support for Israel to President
Reagan, the Congress and the
media.
AT THE same time, "we have
urged our membership in other
countries to take similar action
with their own governments,"
they say.
The two top leaders add that
"we support efforts to move
quickly to assure Palestinian
autonomy within the framework
of the Camp David accords."
Spitzer and Thursz note that
B'nai B'rith has donated $5,000
to help Lebanese victims of the
current fighting. They called on
members to send additional
donations to the B'nai B'rith
Foundation. These funds will be
channeled to the Magen David
Adorn (Israel's version of the Red
Cross) for use in Lebanon.
Val Silberman Passes
ctive Communal Leader
ervices were held Wednesday
fmoon for Val (Venal Silber-
kn. popular community figure.
y i passed away in California on
[gust 2.
With her husband. Morton, she
been a leader in many Jewish
jam/ations both on the local
national scene.
Mrs Silberman and her family
)M-d to Miami in 1967 from
1m Beach where she held many
Dial service offices. She was the
st President of the Palm Beach
deration of Jewish Women, a
lirman of the Women's
vision of that Federation, a
kmber of their Board and
^airman of the Allocations
imittee She also served on
Board of the Mental Health
sociation and the Brandeis
diversity Women's Committee.
In Miami, she became active in
Women's Division of the
eater Miami Jewish Federa-
She served as a member of
Speakers Bureau and was
kairman of the Women's Initial
s for the Federation's
mined Jewish Appeal-Israel
aergency Fund.
Mrs. Silberman was a member
of the Board of Directors of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and served on the Executive
Committee. Women's Division.
She was a Board member and
past Vice Chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal National
Women's Division and past Vice
Chairman for the National Cam-
paign Cabinet for the Florida Re-
gion: Board of Trustees and
member of the Operating Com-
mittee of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies; Board
member and past Vice President
of the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service; past Chairman of
the High School in Israel: former
Board member of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
She was a past president of the
Florida Region of Hadassah. past
Chairman of the Southern Zionist
Youth Commission and was a
member of the National Board of
Hadassah.
She and her husband. Morton,
now National Chairman of
AIPAC. were awarded the Amer-
Continued on Page 11
Israel's Defense Minister To
Appear On Israeli Diary
On Thursday. Aug. 12. 10:30 p.m.. WPBTChannel 2 presents
la special edition of Israeli Diary, with host Miami attorney
[Stanley M. Rosenblatt.
During a recent visit to Israel. Rosenblatt interviewed Israel's
I present Defense Minister Ariel Sharon who discusses the recent
Idevelopments in the Middle East between Israel and the Pale-
jstinian Liberation Organization (PLO). The half-hour program
also focuses on the continuing issues of Palestinian rights and
I statehood.
Last year, Rosenblatt conducted interviews in Israel with
! Yitzhak Rabin, Shimon Peres, Teddy Kollek. Geula Cohen,
Maim Herzog, Mordechai Gur, Shmuel Tamir, Amnon Ruben-
[ stein and Moshe Arena.
The Public Broadcasting Service is soing to show a special
I half hour version of Israel Diary, nationally This will include
excerpts from interviews with the nine Israelis mentioned, and
[the entire focus will be on the Palestinian-PLO. issues.'
Israeli Diary is a WPBT-Channel 2 production, produced by
[Stanley M. Rosenblatt and directed by Kevan Cramer.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish Com-
mittee has announced the
formation of a project de-
signed to study the rela-
tionship between the
American Jewish commu-
nity and the State of Israel.
By KEVIN FREEMAN
The new project, to be known
as the Institute on American
Jewish-Israeli Relations will be
directed by Bertram Gold, execu-
tive vice president of the
AJCommittee, upon his retire-
ment from his position Aug. 1,
following 15 years of service as an
AJC executive, it was announced
by Maynard Wishner, national
president of the AJCommittee.
SPEAKING at a press confer-
ence here. Gold described the In-
stitute as "an American-centered
enterprise that will seek to study
the changing nature of the rela-
tionship between American Jews
and Israel. It will identify areas
of tension and delineate opportu-
nities to achieve a more effective
interaction between them. It will
also undertake specific programs
both in the United States and in
Israel aimed at improving under-
standing between the two com-
munities."
The Institute is basec on sev-
eral basic premises, which include
that the future of Israel and the
American Jewish community are
interwoven with both Jews in Is-
rael and in the United States
sharing a status of mutual con-
cern. Gold said. But he added
that there has developed in recent
years new realities concerning
American Jewry.
This, Gold pointed out, in-
cludes the realization of the per-
manence of American Jewry in
the United States, feeling that
their future is rooted here and not
in Israel.
Furthermore, part of the new
realities of relations between
Jews in the U.S. and in Israel
also stem from the changing
character of the Jewish State
with the increasing political ac-
tivity of the Sephardic commu-
nity, and finally the changing re-
lationship between Israel and the
United States.
Jacqueline Grennan Wexler,
former President of Hunter
College in New York City, has
been elected by the Executive
Board of the National Confe-
rence of Christians and Jews
as its President, it was an-
noticed by Irving Mitchell
Felt, National Chairman of
the NCCJ Executive Board
ADDRESSING THE issue of
a change in the nature of Israeli
society, Gold said it has been
"from a Western type of society
into a Middle Eastern one, due to
the reduction in Jewish immigra-
tion to Israel, Israeli's increased
emigration from Israel, and the
high birthrate of Oriental Jews
compared to Ashkenazic Jews."
These factors, along with the
international isolation of Israel,
and the almost total dependence
on the U.S. by Israel for iCs secu-
rity and economic viability, place
a large responsibility on Ameri-
can Jewry, Gold said.
According to the AJCommit-
tee, the Institute will serve as an
arm of the Committee and be
housed at their headquarters in
New York. Gold said the Insti-
tute will consult with knowledge-
able Israelis from various discip-
lines, representing diverse points
of view, and also will appoint
small ad hoc panels of Israelis
and Americans, as necessary, to
oversee the pilot programs to be
undertaken.
HE ADDED that the Institute
will be administered by an ad-
visory board of some 30-35
American Jewish leaders from
the religious, civic and communal
fields who will.select and approve
its programs.
Some areas under cons iden-
tic*! for study. Gold said, is the
question of religious pluralism in
Israel and its significance for
Israel and American Jewry;
common elements of identity be-
tween American Jewry and Is-
raelis; the American Jewish rela-
tionship to Israelis living in the
U.S.; and the question of dissent
within Israel and within Ameri-
can Jewry.
-These issues are under consid-
eration for study and no decision
has yet been finalized on their
status. (iold also noted that the
Institute would act as a clearing
house for other research on these
topics.
AT THE same time. Gold and
Wishner reported on their four-
day trip last week to Lebanon
Premier Menachem Begin and
other leading officials, both Is-
raeli and Lebanese. Wishner said
he was dismayed that American
media coverage of the situation in
Lebanon has not presented a
totally clear picture of the status
of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization terrorist forces.
He noted the huge arms caches
fdund by Israel Defense Force,
the absolute control of Sidon by
the PLO command forces and,
what he said, was a positive
reaction by Lebanese officials to
the Israeli action that would rid
the PLO from the country's
southern region.
Israel Defense
Forces Release
Return to Normal Life
Approximately 600,000 people live in the areas of Lebanon
now under control of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). These in-
clude some 115.000 in the region under the command of Major
Sa ad Haddad. i
From the start of Operation Peace for Galilee, some 1(J0,00C
civilians, who had fled southern Lebanon since 1975. have re
turned to the area.
As soon as the fighting subsided, commercial traffic opened
between Israel and Lebanon. At first, it was facilitated through
I.rkinese businessmen living in the area, and, later, with the
help of the Israeli Ministry of Trade and Industry. Officers from
the IDF civilian aid unit helped restore local government and
the banking and customs systems to working order: all these
services had been suspended since 1975 when the PLO took over
the area.
Israel immediately provided $320,000 worth ot ruei to tne
area.
The International Red Cross received full cooperation from
the Israeli authorities in all their activities.
Civilian Losses and Damages Resulting from Operation Peace
for Galilee
In Tyre, there were 56 dead and 95 wounded (20 of-them still
hospitalized as of 27 July 19821.
In Sidon. there were 265 dead (not 400. as previously
estimated) and some 1.000 wounded (300 of whom did not re-
quire hospitalization; some 100 are still in hospital). ; ;
In Nabatiye. there were 10 dead and 15 wounded. ','
In the Palestinian camps and towns (Ein nl-HUwe.
Rusheidiva. etc.). about 1,000-1.200 people were killed in heavy
fighting. The majority were PLO men. but it is highly probable
that civilians were among the casualties; there is no way of de-
termining their precise numbers.
Some 270 Lebanese are now hospitalized in Israel (at a cost to
Israel of $40,000 per day).
Some 20-25,000 people are homeless, and temporarily living in.
public buildings, under the care of the IDF civilian aid unit*
Their exact numbers are difficult to determine at this time, since
many civilians who left Beirut, and are now waiting for the
fighting there to cease before returning home, are now in
southern Lebanon.
A few hundred buildings n Tyre and Sidon, which served as
PLO positions, command posts and warehouses, were damaged.'
The Ein el-Hilwe and Rasheidiya camps, which had been
major PLO bases, were heavily damaged.
.Vote: estimates for civilian casualties were made py IDF
officers in cooperation with local Lebanese officials, including'
mayors and doctors.

I
"dTewislfo Floridiajm
Miami. Florida Friday. August 6,1982
Section B



A Rabbi's View
Politics From the Pulpit
By RABBI
BRETT S. GOLDSTEIN
Taaapt* SUr Aami
With increasing regularity, we
read in the newspapers about
clergymen who are urging cam-
paigns for or against issues that
we usually consider to be of a
"political nature." Whether these
topics be the nuclear arms race,
state aid for the poor, freedom for
the Haitians, or the Kenning of
abortion religious leaders are
fomenting a great deal of con-
troversy by voicing protest about
political stands. And quite frank-
ly. I am not at aO surprised by
that controversy. In a society
where there has long been clear
division between "church and
state," the controversy is un-
avoidable. One of the most im-
portant tenets of our govern-
mental system has been a clear-
cut separation of political and re-
ligious considerations.
Likewise. I am never taken
aback by members of the Jewish
community who express their
abject chagrin when I or other
Letter to the Editor
rabbis touch upon politically
sensitive subjects from the
pulpit "Rabbis should be talking
about RELIGIOUS matters."
they protest. "Politics has no
place in the sanctuary." And to a
certain extent they are cor-
rect! When religious leaders of
any persuasion insist that "God
is on their side" and hence they
must be correct on their stand,
they are doing a disservice to
people of all faiths and creeds. Or
when Moral Majoritariana
mobilize their followers to defeat
politicians on single-issue reli-
gious tests (busing, abortion, in-
tegration, or women's rights)
they are defeating the intent of
democracy in America.
And yet. quite clearly, there
are occasions on which a rabbi
must speak out on current issues
if religion is to be meaningful in
our daily lives. If religion is not
to be some isolated, ivory-tower
philosophy that pertains only to
the remote past, we must relate it
to the moral climate of our times.
Separating church and state is
UJS. Should Take in Arafat?
EDITOR. The Jewish Fhridian
Perhaps the USA. should
take in Arafat and the PLO!
After all. this terrorist organiza-
tion is no worse than Hitler and
his henchmen. Consider, if you
will, a beleaguered Hitler, sur-
rounded by the Allies, pounded,
justifiably. in his bunker,
trapped, and close to capture or
death and then a world appeal
to release him and his compan-
ions who had certainly arrived at
their precarious oosition through
their own misdeeds! Release him
to start all over again! Release
Arafat! Who will have him? Have
the Arabs opened their arms? No.
indeed Well then, why not us
Americans? We take in other po-
litical refugees. He will fit into
the South Florida atmosphere
perfectly. We can arm him with
all the guns he needs and he can
go around shooting the elderly
Jews on South Beach.
However, a better solution
Jay M. Tischenkel, past presi-
dent of Temple Beth Moshe,
North Miami, has been elected
the Temple s Chairman of the
Board. Mr. Tischenkel, a
graduate of Columbia Uni-
versity, is a Director of the
American Heart Association
of Greater Miami and Presi-
dent of a Miami based, na-
tional drug store chain.
Room a Board in lovely ocean
front condominium In exchange
for companionship (no
housekeeping) for my elderly
mother call M6-0M3.
would be to take them into Cali-
fornia and place them just where
they deserve to be in a reactiv-
ated Alcatraz. and let's throw
away the keys while were at it
Sincerely.
BERNARD B. BREITBART
Book Review
Menorah Chapter of Hadassah
will present a book review on
"The Lion's Way," by Louis
Orde. discussed by Thelma Han-
kin, on Tuesday. Aug. 7. at 2
p.m. at the Sunrise Club
not tantamount to separating
church and SOCIETY. There are
numerous instances when a
Rabbi must put himself out on a
limb if he is worthwhile as a reli-
gious leader.
When political leaders
further their own careers at
the expense of a trusting
public. .
... A RABBI SHOULD
SPEAK OUT.
When Nestles encourages
the use of contaminated
water with their products in
third world countries. .
... A RABBI SHOULD
SPEAK OUT.
When Hooker Chemical
Company dumps their foul
waste in the areas of school
playgrounds and poses
severe threats to public
safety .
A RABBI SHOULD
SPEAK OUT
When any nation Israel
notwithstanding insti-
gates strafings with cluster
bombs and other unusually
cruel weapons .
... A RABBI who be-
lieves in the tradition of his
heritage MUST SPEAK
OUT
That has long been the tradi
tinn of our prophets like Isaiah
Amos, and Jeremiah. They con
demned Jews who. on the one
hand, participated in sacrifices,
festivals, offerings, and prayers
and who then turned right
around and encouraged
inhumane and self-serving treat-
ment. Those prophetic leader?
found Jewish ritual to be
anathema when divorced from
justice and humanity Let it be so
with today's Jewry. May this
coming year lead all of us to
speak our minds and hearts. Let
us make the world in which we
live responsive to the ideals of
our people and our faith
Albert Rakoff presents an ambulance to American Red u
David for Israel Pictured are (left to right) Bob &4_7
ARMDI District Director, Howard Kaufman, ARMniT1
President, Rabbi David Lekrfield of Kneseth Israel of uA
Beach and Mr. Rakoff. "Wl of M**\
Horrowitz JWV
The Abe Horrowitz Ladies
Auxiliary No. 682 JWV. will par-
ticipate in the fund raising pledge
drive sponsored by WPBT.
Channel 2. on Monday. Aug. 16.
according to Phyllis Shaw. Aux-
iliary President.
The Auxiliary will hold thear 1
regular brkfast meeting oil
Sunday. Aug. 22 at 9.30 im .1
their building. NE 160 Street uj |
19 Place. North Miami Bach
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Friday, August 6, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Dade County Votes for Judicial Candidates Sept. 7
Judge Robert Kaye Gains Support of Richard E. Gerstein
)ade County Court Judge
ert P. Kaye's campaign to re-
his seat in Group 12 this
ek gained a tremendous boost
en Richard E. Gerstein, former
. State Attorney, assumed
general chairmanship of
lye's drive.
Judge Kaye. a graduate of the
jversity of Miami School of
Law with a Juris Doctor degre*,
was graduated from Meuru
Beach Senior High School and
from the University of Florida,
where he earned a B. A. degree:
A member of the Jewish War
Veterans of the United State* of
America and of the American
Zionist Federation, Judge Kaye
waa for 13 years news director of
Miami Beach's then top raied
radio station WQAM. and *as
news director for WINZ when' he
resigned to become an sasistant
to Gerstein.
Judge Kaye rose rapidly in. the
State Attorney's office, becoming
first chief of the career criminal
division and later chief of the
major crimes division of the Ger-
stein office, continuing his distin-
guished service under Janet
Reno.
Governor Bob Graham last
year appointed Judge Kaye to
the circuit court after Judge
Kaye was nominated by the
Judicial Nominating Commis-
sion. He and his wife, Amy, have
one child, Laura, 19, who is'a
tadent at Miami Dade Com
mn'>ty College. South Campus.
Joining Gerstein in supporting
Judge Kaye are former Judge
Irving Cypen, Robert H. Traurig.
former Florida Bar president
Burton Young, Howard B.
Lenard, Gerald Schwartz, former
Judges Herbert Stettin and
Robert Floyd, Edward Carhart,
David Goodhart, Neat R. Son-
nett, former Federation president
Harry B. Smith
Former Judge Stettin Chairs Judge Adderiy Campaign
former Dade County Circuit
iirt Judge Herbert Stettin has
kn named campaign chairmen
Dade County Judge A. Leo
derly, seeking to retain his
It in Group 13. Voting Sept. 7
1 be non-partisan and county-
He. Judge Stettin said.
\n attorney and judge for 17
Judge Adderiy waa ap-
pointed to the bench by Governor
Bob Graham a year ago after
nomination by the Judicial
Nominating Commission.
Judge Adderiy is past presi-
dent of Legal Services of Greater
Miami, Inc., former member, of
the executive board of the South
Florida Council of Boy Scouts.
serves on the board of United
Family and Children's Service
and is a former Dade County
school teacher.
Joining Judge Stettin in sup-
port of Judge Adderiy, former
vice chairman of the Florida Bar
Grievance Committee "D" for.
the 11th Judicial District, ire
John L. Brit ton, former Done
State Attorney Richard Gerstein,
former State Rep. Marshall
Harris, former Florida Bar presi-
dent Burton Young, campaign
coordinator Gerald Schwartz.
Rep. Hal Spaet. David Nevel.
Howard B. Lenard, Ron Book,
Diane Van Nsss, Alan Rossnthal.
Shachat
former Judge Martin
and Richard Pettigrew.
Schwartz emphasized that
Judge Adderiy"s only opponent is
not a judge, and is not related to
County Judge Bernard Jaffe.
Judge Jaffe's wife is an active
member of Judge Adderly's cam-
paign committee.
nl Public Backs Sidney Shapiro Drive to Unseat Joe Durant
orth Miami Beach Ciy At-
y Sidney Shapiro has
ed to a strong lead in his
inivwide campaign to unseat
jit Judge Joe Durant in
>up5.
Shapiro, who is vice president
Hadasssh Associates and vice
sident of the Miami Beach
iphony. swept early or-
uzational endorsements from
fie, fraternal and business or-
ganizations according to Harry
Cohen, North Miami Beaeh Vice
Mayor and Shapiro's campaign
manager.
Former Assistant City At-
torney for the City of Miami.
Shapiro la a resident of South
Dade, where his wife, Lynn, is
president of the Aliyah Chapter
of Hadaaaah. They have two chil-
dren Scott. 8. and Allison, 6.
Shapiro, 38. is a graduate of
the Merchant Marine Academy
and the University of Florida
School of Law. He has served
since 1979 as adjunct professor of
paralegal studies at Universfcy of
Miami, and since 1978 as city at-
torney for North Miami Beach.
Formerly an associate il the
Miami Beach law firm of Broad
and Cassel. he was a partner in
the firm of Turner, Shapiro and
Levy.
Shapiro is vice preside, t of the
North Dade Bar Association and
waa a member for three years of
the Florida Bar's Grievance
Committee He la a member of
Koach Lodge of B'nai B'rith,
past master of his Masonic Lodge
and is s member of the Abe Hor-
rowitz post of the Jewish War
Veterans.
Joining in endorsing Shapiro
are former State Senator Ken-
neth Myers, Mayors Howard
Neu, Marjorie McDonald and
Irving Peskoe, Miami Beach City
Commissioner Bruce Singer.
David Nevel, Gerald Schwartz.
County Commissioner Ruth
Shack, Federation president
Norman Lipoff, former Mayor
Walter Pesetaky and Arthur V.
Miller.
fudge Milton Stark/nan Wins Backing of Dade Leadership
Popular Dade County Judge
Iton I Starkman. running for
new circuit court seat, Group
created by the 1982 session of
I Florida state legislature, this
pk took an insurmountable
in the two-man race by
I'ping every endorsement an-
weed to date.
Judge Starkman, who was
cted judge four years ago by a
70 percent vote, is former North
Miami Beach municipal judge
and currently is assigned to the
criminal division of county court.
He is endorsed by such out
standing attorneys ss Richard E.
Gerstein. Public Defender
Bennett H. Brummer. former
Circuit Court Judge Herbert
Stettin. Richard E. Pettigrew,
former Mayor Harold Rosen.
Gerald K. Schwartz, J. David
Liebman. Melvyn Frumkes.
Murray H. Dubbin and Bill Col-
son.
Judge Starkman is past presi-
dent of the B'nai B'rith Trophy
Lodge, an active member of Beth
Torah Congregation, a member of
the adjunct faculty of Florida In-
ternational University, where he
teaches constitutional law. and is
a 32 nd degree Mason and
Shriner.
He is a member of the board of
the B'nai B'rith Harmony Lodge.
Co-Chainnan of the American
Bar Association's law-related
committee, and in 1978 establish-
ed the People's Justice Canter in
North Miami Beach, which has
received statewide attention an a
minor dispute resolution center.
Judge Starkman received the
Master of Laws degree from
NYU Graduate School of Law in
1954, following graduation from
Brooklyn Law School. He is an
Air Force Veteran of the Pacific
Theater in World War II, and
lives in North Miami Beach with
his wife Judith and children Jay
and Debra. He is 59 and practiced
law for 23 years before assuming
the bench seven years ago.
Rothenberg Sweeps Endorsements in County Court Bid
Former Florida Assistant At-
ey General Arthur Rothen-
this week opened up an im-
essive lead over two opponents,
ner Judge Al Sepe and Leon
el, in Rothenberg's intensive
ipaign to be elected Dade
Jnty Judge in Group 11. Thia
in open seat created by Judge
ilton Starkman s advancement
the circuit court.
Irwin Block, former chief as-
sistant Dede State Attorney, is
serving as campaign chairman
for Rothenberg, who himself was
an assistant state attorney under
both Block and Richard E. Ger-
stein. Gerstein also has endorsed
Arthur Rothenberg's candidacy.
Rothenberg gained the over-
whelming majority of both indi-
vidual and organizational en-
dorsements as his impressive
service for more than nine years
as former assistant United States
Public Defender and former
Executive Assistant Public De-
fender for Dade County, in addi-
tion to work as Assistant At-
torney General and Assistant
State Attorney clearly outdis-
tanced his opponents.
Rothenberg won the full back-
ing of such leaders ss Dade
School Board Member Janet
McAliley, former Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce president
BiU Colson. Marcia K. Cypen,
Robert C. Josefsberg, Florida
Bar Governor Theodore Klein
and Dade Bar Association presi-
dent-elect Nesl Sonnett.
Others endorsing RothenberK.
an honor graduate of the Univer-
sity of Miami and its School of
Law who is a member of both
Iron Arrow and ODK. include
Gerald Schwartz, past president
of the Miami Beach B'nai B'rith
Lodge; David Nevel,
Charles Kimbrell, Ira J. Kurzb^n,
Diane M. Van Ness. Alfredo
Duran and Mayor Marge Mc-
Donald.
Judge Gisela Cardonne-Dienstag Best Qualified By Far
ludge Gisela Cardonne Dien-
r, seeking to retain her seat in
jnty Court Group 9, has en-
" the support of hundreds of
le's most prominent civic,
liness and religious leaders as
ill as scores of Greater Miami's
emost attorneys and former
Iges.
lA member of Temple Beth
he in North Miami, aa la her
band, attorney Mark Dion-
stag. Judge Cardonne Dtenstag
lives in Miami Beach. She waa
appointed to the bench by Gover-
nor Bob Graham after selection
by the Judicial Nominating Com-
mission.
Burton Young, past president
of the Florida Bar, is her cam-
paign chairman and her support-
ers include Dade Public Defender
Bennett Brummer, School Board
Chairman Paul Cejaa, former
State Rep. Murray Dubbin, for-
mer State Attorney Richard E.
Gerstein and deputy North
Miami Beach city attorney
Howard Lenard.
Gerald Schwartz, ca
coordinator for Judge Cardonne
Diensteg, pointed out that her
opponent, Murray Klein, ia not
related to any of the three Judges
Klein now serving the Dade cir-
cuit and county courts. Schwartz
noted that Murray Klein has run
unsuccessfully for office nine
times.
Joining in support of Judge
Cardonne-Dienstag, at whose in-
vestiture Governor Graham per-
sonally participated, a judicial
first here, are former Judge Irv-
ing Cypen, Robert Traurig, for-
mer Florida Bar president
Samuel S. Smith, Miami Beach
Commissioners Bruce Singer and
Alex Daoud. Dovid Nevel. attor-
ney Norman K. Schwarz, Theo-
dore Klein, former Judge Robert
L. Floyd. Talbot D'Alemberte,
Hugo L. Black. Jr. and Manuel
A. Crespo.
Judge CardonneDienstag is a
graduate of the University of
Miami School of Law and earned
both bachelor's and master's de-
grees at Barry University.
Stanley Goldstein Rated Strong Favorite in Group 19
[Stanley Goldstein. 53, former
kief prosecutor in the circuit
~t division under State At-
ey Richard E. Gerstein, ia a
ndidate for Dade County Court
ige in the September 7
iary election. Voting ia coun-
wide and non-partisan to
up 19, a vacant seat. Gerstein
Is an impressive list of cara-
i supporters for Goldstein, \
Goldstein has 14 years of law
enforcement service in addition
to 14 years of practice as a
Florida attorney.
After graduating from the
University of Miami with a B. A.
degree in 1951, Goldstein served
three years in the United States
Army as a sergeant major in the
military police, European Com-
mand. He then joined the Public
Safety Department as a police
sergeant for nine years.
While serving as s police offi-
cer, Goldstein attended law
school at the University of
Miami, graduating in 1968 in the
top 10 percent of his dees with
the degree of Juris Doctor.
Others supporting Goldstein in-
clude distinguished attorneys
Irwin Block. Neal Sonnett. Barry
Garber. Max Kogen. Joel Hiroch-
horn. Rep. Barry Katun and
David Goodhart.
After a year of civil law prac-
tice, he joined Gerstern's staff in
the State Attorney's office where
he served for two years before re-
suming private practice in 1971.
Goldstein is a member of the
American Bar Association and
certified to practice before the.
United States Supreme Court:
Twice president of the Lions Club
of North Bay Village, he wad
deputy district governor of Lions
International He now ia active hi
the Knights of Pythias, the'
North Shore Optimist Club and
Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity.
Paid Political Advertisements


P>ge *"B The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 6.
1982
Community Corner
Free blood pressure readings are being offered at the
Winston Towers Annex of AmeriFirst Federal through Aug. 31
Customers and visitors coming into the annex st 17396 North
Bay Road. Miami Beach, may check their pressure at the "Blood
Pressure Teller" any Monday, noon to 6 p.m or Tuesday
through Friday. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Bermie Goodsasa. a Kendall resident, has joined J. I. Kislsk
Realty Corp. of Miami as an investment property sales con
sultan t.
B. Shape of Coral Gables, has been named to the
Dean's List st Bowdoin College. Brunswick, Me
The American College of Physicians announced that Martin
A. Coka. MD. of Miami Beach. Ha., has bean elected to Fallow-
ship m the national medical specialty society. Dr. Conn will be
honored during the Convocation ceremony at the College's
Annual Session in San Francisco. Calif., next year.
The City of Miami Beach Recreation Department will co-
sponsor s series of jazz concerts st Flamingo Park hnainiiing
Sunday. Aug. 15 at 3 p.m Concerts will be held at the Park on
the third Sunday of each month through the end of Fall All
concerts are free.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Imperial Apartments
9100 S.W. 77th Avenue
Dadeiand s most luxurious 1 and 2 Bedroom Rental
Apartments, with separate dining room. Lush lan-
dscaping, pools and saunas. Adults only, no pets.
271-3433
?
i
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i
Paula Hawkins |
Pleased With Act1
U.S. Senator Pauls Hawkins of
Florida said a Senate vote on the i
Missing Children Act. which she
introduced, could come within
the next few weeks, following
approval of the bill by the Senate
Judiciary Committee. The
Missing Children Act would es-
tablish a nationwide clearing
house of information, using the
FBI's computer system to help
law enforcement officials trace
missing children.
AmeriFirst Free
Birthday Gift
The Hallandale Office of
AmeriFirst. 1740 East Hallan-
dale Beach Boulevard, is giving a
free birthday gift to customers
and visitors beginning Aug. 1.
Everyone celebrating a birthday
in August is invited to stop by
the Hallandale Office and pick up
a free birthday gift. To receive a
gift, the recipient must be at least
18 years of age and a Florida resi-
dent
Pictured are Ed Abramson (right) presenting a plaque to Israel
Consul General Joel Arnon (left) for his dedication to the Jew-
ish community at a-recent Israel Bond meeting. A quarter
million dollars in new bond pledges was raised.
TEACHERS
Temple Sinai of North Dade has a few
choice teaching positions for Sunday School
and Hebrew School beginning this Septem-
ber. Contact Rabbi Cook at 932-9010 for fur-
ther information.
Director
Adult & Youth Programming,
Major Conservative Synagogue Miami,
Experience Preferred Salary Competitive
Send Resume to:
Box #MGS c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami. Fla. 33101
THANKS!
rf/y fmusiu mnm-Jr'mmM our si merest
mpfee-mcimiion te> milofour frienel* ******
tmrrr-fc-f for tnoir invaluable assistance
mnet cemneofin relurnino urn* to the Circuit
t^ourt for lAw next si* years.
Z/kmmJr* a/so to the many organizations
ufhicn Urnum made itpossible for me to
continue serving m)a*/e County un'th Justice
JUDGE HOWARD GROSS
Pd.Pol.Adv.
Maxwell Home Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping lor a good buv" has be-
come one of Americas favorite pas-
times. It's always run to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House' Coffee The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
pi ng day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K ( rrtifird koh-r
I close friend The good talk The
good feelings The warmth are sonic
of the things that go along
Maxwell House' Perhaps thar > win
many Jewish housewives don t 'shop
for Maxwell House* They simph
buy it Its the smart buy" as am
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer
ence instant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House." you pour
relaxation At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup
( '?
Sf

A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century. ,


Friday. August 6. 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
Political Notes
Circuit Court Judge Robert P.
Cave seeks to retain his seat in
proup 12. He served as chief of
[he major crimes division during
t years as Assistant Dade State
Attorney under both Richard E.
Bvateifl and Janet Reno. He is a
nember of the JWV and AZF.
icrstein is his campaign chair-
nan.
;*:ft>>-:-:-:WftWfffi-
Dade County Judge A. Leo
[Adderly is a candidate to retain
his seat in Group 13. Former Cir-
cuit Court Judge Herbert Stettin
Judge Adderly s campaign
chairman. Adderly is past preai-
ent of Legal Services of Greater
Miami, Inc.. and was an associate
of the law firm which included
iStettin and Larry Schantz
North Miami Beach City At
Brney Sidney Shapiro is a candi-
ate for the Circuit Court in
Croup 5, where Joseph Durant is
[he incumbent. Shapiro, former
Assistant city attorney of Miami.
j \ ice president of Hadassah As-
Kxiates and of the Miami Beach
pvmphony. NMB Vice Mayor
larry Cohen is Shapiro's cam-
x\gn manager.
Judge Milton St ark man is a
andidate for Circuit Court.
iroup l He is a past president
rt his B'nai B'rith lodge, a former
Temple B'nai Zion
Temple B'nai Zion will hold
|h>sh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
BrvkM in the main sanctuary,
fntulucted by Rabbi Jacob S.
[ire.ii and Cantor Yehouda
Imyamin. High holy day serv-
ices will also be held in the newly
erected auditorium.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
NMB municipal judge and has
served for the past four years as
Dade County Judge. He is a
member of the adjunct faculty of
FIU. where he teaches constitu-
tional law.
MNMMHHMHt
Former Florida Assistant At-
torney General Arthur Rothen-
berg is a candidate for Dade
County Judge. Group 11. the seat
vacated by Judge Starkman in
his bid for the circuit court.
Rothenberg is a former assistant
Dade State Attorney, was execu-
tive assistant Dade Public De-
fender and an assistant U.S. pub-
lic defender. Irwin J. Block is his
campaign manager and Gerald
Schwartz is his coordinator.
::::::::::::::::::::
Dade County Court Judge
(iisela Cardonne-Dienstag is a
candidate to retain her seat in
Group 9. A member of Temple
Beth Moshe. she and her hus-
band, attorney Mark Dienstag.
live on Miami Beach. She is a
graduate of the I'M Law School
and earned a master's degree at
Barry University. She was ap-
pointed by Governor Graham af-
ter selection by the Judicial
Nominating Committee.
.>y.-:-x-x<-:-:<
Stanley Goldstein is a candi-
date for the vacant seat in Group
19. Dade County Court. Gold-
stein brings to his judicial cam-
paign 14 years experience as a
law enforcement officer, in addi-
tion to 14 years as a lawyer. He
was a circuit court prosecutor un-
der Kkrhard E. Gerstein during
Goldstein's service as Assistant
Dade State Attorney. Goldstein
has been president twice of the
North Bay Village Lions Club.
Kayv
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi David Shapiro of
Hollywood, will appear on
the Jewish Worship Hour,
Sunday at 8 a.m. on Channel
10.
Adderlv
Shapiro
Starkman
Rothenberg
Bernard Jaffe, has announced
his candidacy for County
Court Judge, Group 13. He is
a practicing attorney with 18
years experience as both an
attorney and CPA. He pre-
viously worked for the U.S.
Government on tax related in-
vestigations in conjunction
with the Organized Crime
Drive. Elliot Kaplan, CPA,
has been named campaign
treasurer and attorney
Richard Burton is his cam-
paign manager.
Cardonne-Dienstag Goldstein
Michael Assumes
Legal Post
Michael N. Weiss, a Miami at-
torney, has been elected Second
Vice-President of the American
Immigration Lawyers Associa-
tion. Prior to assuming his new
office. Weiss was secretary of the
Association for the past three
years, and is a past president of
the South Florida Chapter.
Weiss is a past treasurer of the
Dade County Mental Health As-
sociation, past president of the
Florida Philharmonic Men's
Club, and is currently treasurer
of the Anti-Defamation League.
The Officers and Staff
of the
National United Jewish Appeal
Express their profound sympathy
at the untimely death of
VALSILBERMAN
A deeply compassionate individual, she always gave
generously of her time and talent to help others, and these traits
of humanitarian service spanned many decades, setting an
example that will serve as a model of excellence for generations
to come. Her dedication was reinforced and invigorated by her
husband, Morton, who formerly served as UJ A Florida Regional
Chairman and as President of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
An ardent supporter of the State of Israel, she devoted her
entire life to helping the Jewish people around the corner and
around the world and her service as a member of the Executive
Committee and Vice Chairman of the UJA National Women's
Division demonstrated the beliefs and commitment of which she
was so proud. Although she was well known and appreciated on
the national and international scene, her energy and enthusiasm
made her a bulwark of her local community which she served in
every conceivable way. She was a member of the Board of
Directors of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, a member of
the Executive Committee of the Federation's Women's Division,
a member of the Board of Trustees of the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies and the first President of the Palm Beach
Federation of Jewish Women, to list but a few.
Her name and achievement will be forever remembered by
all of us as we carry on her tradition of helping our brethren no
matter where they may live. We have lost a dose and valued
friend whose wise counsel, devotion, and commitment were a
constant source of pride and inspiration to all of us.
Our heartfelt sympathies are extended to the bereaved
family.
ROBERT E. LOU P. National Chairman
HERSCHEL W. BLUMBERG. President
IRVING BERNSTEIN, Executive Vice Chairman
CTUDI0
| Continental
Cuisine
EREDJOSSI
^ICC-^%
you 5JC* '0
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lc unique
iU.ning noertnct
Va'cn your -aei*'o your
-nooa 'n on* o S d'v dual
r00"n$ Th* T^nf
>Vin Ce'iar S'uo o Pi*ce
P'jaiie SMtt Cn*i*'
Fins Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(p>>yt* la-k" "angaOl
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
'THE GROTTO" 1
MOST MAJOS
CREOIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 3? A ve.
445-5371
ctoted Mondavt
;,
I0YAL HUNGARIAN KB RESTAURANT
Serving most delicious food
at reasonable prices
Our 36th Anniversary Year
731 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach 538-5401
Free Silt Parking Now Available
C/oses Monday Saturday
Put
AT THE CENTER OF YOUR UNIVERSE
as we celebrate our 25th Anniversary
Call 947-1435
Or Drop in for a visit at
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach.




6-8 The Jewish Floridian Friday, Augurt 6, 1982

K7
t>*
o
'""
Our pi
the

^
>
LARGE OR SMALL CURO ?4 OZ
$129
HOIUS
(SAVE244)
SAVE
BWCYERS ASSORTED FLAVORED
.....< 3/1.19 40
12 0Z
nb> raasbu"* all readv-
NOI
gM^
;
MEATS
US CHOICE BEEF ROUNO BONELESS BOTTOM
Round Roast
COOL t F0 I
Rjonm mn ww smt
ED FLAVORS
l^dftbrWk
OZ
OR GRAPE
. .OAL
3/.89 so
1.99 ao
na
20
SAVE
OBCAAUA.f*
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH FRYER
LegQus
U.S. CHOICE KNE.IP CORNED
Brisket
ROUN
Round
SOUTHERN BELLE BONEL_.
Turkey Ham
U.S. CHOCE BEEF ROUNO BONELESS BOTTOM
$1 7Q
(SAVESOc) JL% M %J
49*
(SAVE 20c) t^P
$1 7Q
(SAVE 40c) M>% M %J
$1.99
\H
(SAVE 50c)
LB
LB
LB
lE
1
LB
tysonhjatm serve save uichdcikefioh
Frisd CNcfcan A 2.69 20 SHofci Steaks
us CMOjct 0, Ma^crcomYNO
Veal BtmmI .99 40 CNcfcan Uvars
u orsm.omhalf us cmoce beef lom
-1.99 30
ORAOE -FRON TYSON COWI
i, .59 10 OamMn.....u
SAVE
VA WSWtO
FRUMUM FRESH (VHOLE
U S CMOCf BEE' ROUNO
OneLESS EVE
U S CHOICE Kl> MOUND
BONELESS
FLA OK Sf^Ftl
PREABUM FRESH
. 2.99 30 Lots of
2.49 20
EASTS JlEGOTRS BAC>!>
3 0MLEI mas
FAMILY PACK MEATS
BUY BIG 6 SAVE BIG!
3 CSS i OVtnu S CHOCE SCf' SA CubaStoiki 2.69 30
E CHUO" BONELESS MOCK TENDER
SSSjfcS 3 LBS 4 OVER Lt 259
3 LBS IOVER
.99 20 QraundRound 1.09 so
... .99 20
AAHTA. ARM J LBS I OVER
.59
10
J LBS t OVER-FlA OA
AREMuMFACS"
... .t 1.19 20
Wsalwfcys get- high merfcs on our
PRODUCE
TOP QUALITY (SAVE 8c) ^_^ ^-^
Del Monte *M *!* <
Bananas lb 4ms^P
FLAVORFUL RED CARDINAL SAVE 30c
BOPKM
SAVE
SAVE
SALAO StfE-FMtf AE SAVE u -, ____
Tn,-.n, It- (A _^'..*"**'*C>aLT"L --k SAMTREORP-EIANOLE t.
omMosi o^ .ov 20 Potatoes 10*. 1.59 40 w^amiBiini 1 no
XtommZrmmmm0^49 1^' "^
Plum Tomatoes .59 risil nsiaahw T '
_ ADO ST TO SALADS -FRESH
_-**2o Ft*. Avocados ~1.CO
5-^ .89 10 j^*nm ^
2
10 MAIDENS I.OCAL ASSORT EO
VANETS HOi
APPETIZERS
IN STORE BAKERY
ONL> AI STORES ROTM I
. < I

/
cPrlde
Dinner Rolls 1.19
Cinnamon Rolls 4/1.19
Onion or Corn Rye .99
Cherry Pie 2.69
Chicken on Stick
USOA CHOICE RARE 1 ? LB > ft*^fcv M f\
Roast Beef $2^3
>AESML> MADE SA.AD- I 7 LB
Salami'
! BOLOGNA OR
. IIU OR YELLOW 17 LB
SAVE
50
30
N FMSH LB
,AC* I JLL FINE
... 1.69
1ST OUALITV ^^
.. i/jiB .99
1'39 2 T."bH^T
'MpRN APPLE VALLEY OLD FASHION 1 iBVWay
Uvsrwurst ,a 1.59 so Rofl
HALF
V
\


o n
Friday, August 6, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7 B
Pantry passes
Eveiyday Low Prices
PRICES GOOO AUG 5 AUG 11
1962
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
QUANTITIES WE WILL GLADLY
REDEEM YOUR U S GOVERNMENT
FOOD STAMPS
save you more!
BUY ONE
GET ONE
COUPONS
LIMIT ONE OF EACH FREE ITEM
PER CUSTOMER
GROCERY
25 OZ JAR
ASSORTED FLAVORS I 2 GAL
Sealtest s*vt **>
Ice Cream4
. ltr bti E79 WHITE H0USE- REGULAR OR NATURAL
Diet Pepsi, Mountain AnnlpJl ^^
, Pepsi Lightor^-i-IQ "-" 694
LncL Kepsi, /mountain "^ MiJrilf*
ISA VI MM
PANTRY PRIDE 13 OZ BAG
Flaked
Coffee
(SAVE 90C)
ma &
HMbV 20 OZ BT H
^^ ^m^ TATERLAND FROZEN (SAVE 20C)
99< %BZP4&t
^WSS?
OP. ASSORTED 4RL/PX
SAVE
.89 ao
PEALEMON 33 (
UJ*8Y SWEET PEAS. CUT 0MCEN BEANS CPEAM
^ WHOLE KERNEL l OZ CANS
.... 2/89
OMNI ROIL
Delta Towels........... .50
JAM
21
20
20
rjsst............
DELTA 12 OZ CAN
Corned B#f............1.19
PANTRY PP.106 TVWN PUCR-BEGUIAB CUP N CM*
Potato Chips.....M/3 0ZBAG .79
gCKER_LABEL 100 CT INCH
SAVE
06
10
10
20
Juice
e
mi
SAVt
ChipARoosM! Rjce
99 I $139 {
(SAVE 10c)
CHEESE PEPPERONI
G&W
PACKAGED
BAKERY
nglish Muffins 3/1.00
Oy Roll .79
: aisin Bread .89
: rench Bread .59
: Jmpemickel .69
Double the Difference
^ GUARANTEED
Wel save you more on your total food bfl
or well Double The Difference In Cash!
II you can firm lower prices this t at any other supermarket Pantry
Ptide will pay you Double The Difference Jusl buy 26 different items worth
20 or more at Piniry Pride Compare prices on the tame items at any
other supermarket II their loiai is lower bring your itemized Pantry Pride
eg.aier tape and tie omer markets prices on the e>act same items to
Pantry Pride and we M pay you Double The Difference In Cash'
BOY ONE'GET ONE FREE'COUPON
Lawry's sct box
i Super Taco Kits
IE2I,
1.49
M N( (PJE KIT WITH COUPON
GOOO AUG i AUG i 196.?
I
I
I
'BOY ONE'GET ONE FREE'COUPOr
?oodStoragen.37 j
i
Bags
Glao 50-CT BOX
LIMI' ONE FREE BO WlTM COUPON
GOOO AuG i AUG i 112
BOY ONE-GET ONE FREE -COUPON
LA ROSA REG
Spaghetti
1 LB BO*
79

UMIT OK free BOX With COUPON
GOOO AUG 5 AUG 11 i ge;
I
I
UJflpBCIY ONE-GET ONE FREE'COUPON'
Bffri H-OZBTL SHOWER OF CAPRI
| Liquid Soap *1.49 }
UMIt ONE FREE BOTTLE WlTM COUPON
GOOO AUG AUG l I lg2
gSapBCIY ONE'GETONE FREE'CCKJPON Tjg|
ALES
Soda
6PK 12 OZ CANS
$
ilMIT ONE FREE 6 PACK WITH COUPON
GOOO AUG 5 AUG < I 1 982
1.99
I
J
BUY ONE'GET ONE FREE COUPON*
GOOO HUMOR LITE BOX I 2 BARS
Fudge Sticks *2.19 !
s ....r. I
., weal
LIN.lT ONE FREE BO WITH COUPON
GOOO AUG i AuG i i i tai
I
I
L.
'BUY ONE* GET ONE FREE'CCKJPON
GOOD HUMOR LITE BOX 12 BARS
earn WSSa
Sticks
> ft*lt BO* WTm COUPON
Not *.
'BOY ONE'GET ONE FREE'COUPON
A4C TWIN PKG OF 2 (SAVE 42ci
42c
Sub Rolls
JA' ONE FREE PACKAGE WI'm COUPON
GOOC AuG i AUG i 96!
BUY ONE'GET ONE FREE CCKJPON'LaW
TOZ PLASTIC SQUEEZE CONTAINER IfSZ
'ure Lemon uq$
Juice
LIMIT ONE FREE BOTTLE WITH COUPON
GOOO AUG i AUG 11 19S2
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE'COUPON
MRS FILBERTS 1VLB BOWL *
89c
Spread 25
..MiT C**6 fHEf BOWL with COUPON
GOOO *UG > *UG 96.
*UY ONE'GET ONE FREE'COUPON
RATH 8 OZ CHUB
Braunschwejger 89c
l*T ONC FRtt CHUB WITH COUPON
GOOO AUG 5 AUG I I '*e.'
I
I
I
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SPECIAL OFFERSi
GET FREE BOTTLE OF JOJOBA CONDITIONER
WITH THE PURCHASE OF AN 18 OZ. BOTTLE OF-
Jojoba
Shampoo
$
2
GET A FREE 2.5 OZ. BOTTLE OF
5 DAY ROLL-ON WITH THE PURCHASE OF
A 2.5 OZ. BOTTLE OF
5 Day Roll-On
Deodorant.....
$
GET A FREE 8 OZ. BOTTLE OF VO-5 NON-AEROSOL
REG. UNSCENTED. EXTRA HOLD WPURCH. OF-
VO-5
Hair Spray
$
209
i
_.


Pge 8-B The Jewish FlorWlan / Friday. August 6, 1982

m
Shown (left to right) are Ruth Shack, presi-
dent, Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida; Gerald K. Schwartz, president.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO IMM2] FC 23
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION'
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE MARRIAGE OF
JOHNNY DAVIS
Petitioner
and .
BRKJITTE BAL'MANN
DAVIS.
Respondent
TO: BRIUITTE BAL'MANN
DAVIS
BorgmannStr 4
"752 Klelnosthetm
*l Germany
YOl ARK HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
riled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It off
MARSHALL B FISHER, at-
torney for Petitioner whose
address is Suite 300. MBS S
Dixie Highway. Miami. Florida
.131M. and file the original with,
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September,
10. 19B2 otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
Um relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 38 day of July
1M2
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK Selfned
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
MARSHALL B
FISHER ESfj
Suite 300.
H6S6S Dixie Hwy
Miami KlondaS31Se
Telephone i306>6M-27
Attorney for Petitioner
18022 August 6. 13;
30. 37. 1M2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number SSMJ
Di vision )
IN RE ESTATE OF
SOLOMON FRENKEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Solomon FRENKEL.
deceased File Number 82 583*.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 31130 The
names and addrasses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (II all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
' validity of the will, Um quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FORE VER BARRED
Publication of this Notice kas
begun on August 6. 1M3
Personal Represents lives
Chalm M Halberstem
701 Empire Boulevard
No SA
Brooklyn.
New York 11211
Mendel Prater
1M0 Marseilles Drive
No 406
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative
JOSHUA D.
MANASTER. ESQUIRE
708 Flagship Center
777 Brlrkell Avenue
Miami. Florida 14111
Telephone i 3061 374 C72
l mi August 6. ii. iwa
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center:
and Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive
director. Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, at the unveiling of the bronze plaque
for the new building at 610 Espanola Way,
Miami Beach.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"For the Lord thy God bringeth thee unto a good land... a
land of wheat and barley ... a land of olive-trees and honey"
(Deut. 8.7-8)
EKEV
EKEV Moses declares: "And it shall come to pass, because
ye hearken to these ordinances, and keep, and do them, that the
Lord thy God shall keep with thee the covenant and the mercy
which He swore unto thy fathers, and He will love thee, and
bless thee, and multiply thee" Deuteronomy 7.12-13). The
Israelites are not to fear the Canaanite nations witness the
providence and supervision of God over His people in the desert,
though they sinned In passing. Moses makes a general reference
to the incident of the Golden Calf. The Israelites were not to
inherit the land of Canaan because of their own virtues.: "Not for
thy righteousness, or for the uprightness of thy heart, dost thou
go in to possess their land, but for the wickedness of these
nations the Lord thy God doth drive them out from before thee,
and that He may establish the word which the Lord swore unto
thy fathers'' I Deuteronomy 9.5). After mentioning God's
powerful miracles in Egypt and the desert (particularly in
reference to Dathan and Abiram). Moses dwells on the im-
portance of the Promised Land. The portion continues with the
second part of the Shema. beginning And it shall come to pass,
if ye shall harken diligently unto My commandments" and
ending "that your days may be multiplied, and the days of your
children, upon the land which the Lord swore unto your fathers
to give them as the days of the heavens above the earth"
(Deuteronomy 11.13-21). And the portion concludes with the
promise: "There shall no man be able to stand against you: the
Lord your God shall lay the fear of your and the dread of you
upon all the land that ye shall tread upon, as He hath spoken
unto you" /Deuteronomy 11.25).
(The recount ins of the Weekly Portion of fit* Law it extracted and bated
upon "The Graphic Mitfory of the Jewish Merits?* edited by P. Wollmsn
Tsamir. sis. pubiuhed by Shsagsld. The volume is available af 7J M Lane. New York, H.Y. ioojo Jesepn S*laie > president ol me society dis
mooting the volume >
Real Estate For Sale
(Reduced 40,000)
"90% MORTGAGE AT 10r/*%"
New two bedroom, two bath waterfront apar-
tment, pool, double parking, security on quiet
North Bay Road. Best price, best financing.
85,000 limited offer, call today,
(935-2917) ________
(Waterfront 85,000)
[REDUCED 40,000]
New two bedroom, two bath on water, pool,
parking, security on quiet North Bay Road.
90% financing at 107/*% mortgage.
Limited Offer, call today,
(935-2917)
(NORTH BAY ROAD)
New two bedroom, two bath, directly on
water, many amenities starting at $550 /
Call today.
(935-2917)
Pictured are Sidney and Lillian Bolotin who recently presented
an ambulance to A merican Red Magen David for Israel.
Synagogue
Listings
Candlellghting lima: 7:44
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Aipern Conservative
Dally 7:30 a.m.
Evening 6:30 p.m.
Shabboa 8:30 a.m.
Shala Saodot 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM Of Hafbart
5950 N. Kendall Of. Baumgard
ft, Mim, 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morion Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate Rabbi
Fit. Am* s, MO set F sassy Services
*i rtertmsn arwt toes* on
SsbO. Aalva.rn* Hero
BETH DAVID CONOREOATION
Corel way X33 UM Ammms
South Dsss MM t w ijow.Si.eei
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W UPSON
Friday. 8 p.m South Dada Chap*
Saturday. 9 m.nv Coral Way
SneSOai Semces Conducts* By
Wskki David M Sssrbsrh
Csnlor William W IN
BETH KOOESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S W 12 Ave
Rabbi Ma Shapiro 8SB-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berttn Executive Secretary
Dally Minyan Services 7 45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8 45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Zvi Adler Cantor
Sat. morn Service 9 a.m.
Of. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
3400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
5324421
Cantor. Rabbi Sotomon Schiff
Fit Eva. 7 p.m Sat 9 am
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
MaafTrt r-tarB*ar Aatoan QYe^rVprton
137 N.E.1991 Si. Mtarra. 573-5900
9990 N. KandaB Or, 596-5056
Sensor Rabbi Hass.es M Bemat
Aeat Rabbt Jermvy k Seeun
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornataln
ajsjsM aemst sucim
Sepon tram lebenon Pen I
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada BNd.
Coral Gabies 667 5657
Mfchaal B Exsens tat Raobt
Frt ( p m
TEMPLE KING SC4.0MON
910 Lincoln Rd Tat 534-9776
OR DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
SOL ROTH. President
SarvlceaFri 7:30pm Sat 930 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Vavneh
Friday Services al 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPI F BFTH MOSHE
2225 NE. 121 SI. N.Miami. Fl 33181
8915503 Conaatvativa
Qn/v Tempi* in North Miami
Rabbi Loots M. Laderman
Cantor Moahe Frtedler
Rabbi Emarttus Joeaph A Gorf inhal
Dairy sarvtcas 815 a.m. 5 p.m
Fn psrvtceatpm
Sal ssrMcs* am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave M B. Fl 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbt Or. Jahuda Mifcor
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Daily Service 8 a.m. 7:15 p.m.
Friday 7:15 p.m Saturday 8:30 a rr
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chasa Ave 4 41st St
Or. Laon Kronajh. Rabbi
Cantor David Convtear
Fn Evening 8:15 pm
Sal. mom. 10:46 a.m.
536-7231
Liberal
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1061 N Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Upachitz. fVabbi
Zvee Arom. Cantor
Harvay L Btovm. Exac. Director
FrL Evening Service 8:00 p.m
Sat Mornang Service 8:30 a m
Dairy Services 7:30 am 5:30 pjn.
^-^ABBINICAL ASSOCIATION-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biecayne Boulevard
Miami. Fkxtda 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabtx Solomon Schiff
Executive VTca Praaldanl
Religious Information
Cortcaming Greater Miami
Houaaa of Worship
Phone 57&4000
_ n^bfiantcalAjwiciabonOfftpj
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyle Ave..
Mkami Beach. 33141
Rabbi tugene Labovttz
Cantor Gdwart Mean
Friday services at 8 15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court 1 11
Miami. Fl Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Warren (Laert
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.
Sal. 9.30 a.m. and 730 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 Ave
North Dada a Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kmgessy. Rabbi 932 9010
-Aaxen I Cook. Associate Rabtx
l*M Cantor
S Ramaay Adrrsnsisraior
Sabbath eve services 8 15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday ol month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Millar Dr. 2712311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Baniamin Dtckaon. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon a Thur 7 am
Sabbath vte Sarvicaa 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9 00 am
(assets Ars enlists
Rtguur Now. For HfLgioui School*
Kindergartrn Thru Confirmation
ivrrmarmmm
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
mo hi ivs at. n tJisfM assm. fi iiiw
4 7 tOU Hsrsai Witnne sascvHve dtrecler
Fisnkim 0 KrevtSM. rssjransl pre*io*ni
UrJiO^oPAUEH.CAr,
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Dor al Executive Off lea Park. 3785
NW 82 Ave Sulla 210. Miami. Fl
33168. 592-47*7, Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional dlfaclor
f
a!
J


Friday. August 6, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
>tice
JUST OF
Judicial
ID FOR
FLORIDA
a
I and
BBY NOTI-
i tor ton-
I and com
; and you
your en
ure action
the above
py thereof
attorney.
. 623 8.W.
Fla M1M.
121. iMl.or
CUon will be
action con-
deecrtbed
Block 4. of
aT OF JEF-
dlng to the
recorded In
M. of the
of Dad*
11882
[Brinker
Ut Court
1*d
t Clerk
July n. SO:
Mtt, u.ian
ACTION
IVE SERVICE
ERTY)
JIT COURT OF
ITM JUDICIAL
I FLORIDA IN
IDE COUNTY
(ACTION
INK
DISSOLUTION
IRIACE
MAKKJAGE
IY HOWARD.
fER
CNRY
JENT
IHENRY
hrth Street
Jabama
HEREBY NOTI
i action for Dlaeo-
trnage has been
you and you are
rve a copy of your
ea. If any. to It on
LL BENNETT.
Petitioner, whoae
119 West Flakier
530 Blacayne
il. Florida S3 isa
the original with
the above atyled
| before August 20.
Via* a default will
lalnat you for the
nded In the com
It Ion
I (hall be pubUahed
reek for four con
ka In THE JEW
MAN
my hand and the
court at Miami.
Ha 20 day of July.
DP HR1NKER
t. Circuit Court
Bunly Klorida
[P Copeland
sputv Clerk
[Seal >
ILL BENNETT
{Petitioner
tayne Bldg
(er Street
SaS3] XI 44'.H
(Petitioner
7 i .-'
July 23.30
Augusts, is. i9S2
ICUIT COURT OF
ENTH JUDICIAL
IN AND FOR
iNTY.FLORIDA
Ly division
}: 12 10841 FC U
JTICE BY
ILICATION
IMARR1AUEOF
r seats HEN AO
^7. RAMIREZ
ARIO
M1REZ
nt
DARlO
RAMIREZ
tit Unknown
HEREBY notified
itlon for Dlaeolutlon
haa been filed
and you are hereby
aerve a copy of your
other pleading to the
ion the Petitioner
HARVEY D ROG-
addreaa la 1401
Avenue, Miami.
28. and file the orlg
Clerk of the above
on or before this
tember. 1982. or a
entered against
THIS 28 day of July.
DP. BR1NKER.
Clerk
K Seifried
puly Clerk
July SO;
Augusts IS. SO. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
OENBRAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASENO 82 19424 FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DORA STELLA PATINO
Petitioner-wife
and
JAIME PATINO
R capon dent-husband
TO: JAIME PATINO
RESIDENCE ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dta-
aolutlon Of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to aald pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney.
GEORGE T. RAMAN I, ESQ..
Suite Til. Biscayne Building. 19
West Klagler Street. Miami.
Florida 13130 and file the Origl
nal Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before SO day of
August. 1982 If you fall to do
so. Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
thla 19 day of July. IStt.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
1794J8 July 23. SO.
August*. IS. 19M
IHIHEIIEIUII CUURIUF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
OENBRAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GERTHAALCENA
GERMAIN
Petitioner Wife
and
EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN.
Respondent Husband
TO EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN
Ruelle
llesmenllee No. 19
Port Au Prince HalU
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition For Dls
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney.
GEORGE T RAMANI. ESy
Suite 711. Blscayne Building. 19
West Klagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 and file the Orlgl
rial Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 30 day of
August. 1983.11 you tall to do so.
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida,
this 19 day of July. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
179W July 33. 30.
___________Augusta. 13. 1982
--------NOTICE 6f action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
no. n-iosso
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
FLORA C.
HERRERA MOYA
PETITIONER
and
FRANK DE JESUS MOYA
RESPONDENT
TO
FRANKDEJESUSMOYA
WHOSE RESIDENCE
IS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lullon of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
DELVALLE LAW OFFICES.
P.A., attorney for PeUUoner.
whose address is i960 South
west 27th Avenue. Second
Floor. Miami. Florida 33146.
and Hie the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 30. 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this IS day of July.
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.Moor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DELVALLE LAW
OFFICES. PA.
i960 Southwest 27th A ve
Miami. Florida 33146
Telephone: I 3061 446-0272
M.CRISTINA
DELVALLE. ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
17984 July 23. SO;
Augusta. 13. 19K2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELBVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADB COUNTY. FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO SJ 2*4 PC 94
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOaillJNA
DAVIDSONHNa k a
JOSULINA
DAVIDSONHN
KALHNKANTKI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YO ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Joaullna Davld-
sonhn a-k-a Joaullna David-
sonhn Kathnakantkl. deceased,
late of Dade County. Florida..
Kile Number 83-284 PC 04 la
pending In the Circuit Court In
and for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which la 3rd Floor, Dade
County Courthouse. TS Weat
Klagler Street. Miami. Florida
31130 The personal repreaen-
tatlve of this eata.te la Ber-
nardo Tetner Oreman, whoae
address la 2 DA Avanlda Las
Deilcas de Sabana Grande.
Realdendaa Laa Dellrlas. apto
43. Caracas. Venesuela The
name and address of the attor-
ney for the personal represen-
tative are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
slated If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to fUe any ob
jecllons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifies
lions of the personal repreeen
tatlve. or the venue or Jurtadlc-
tlon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 12 dav of Julv. 1982.
Bernardo Tetner
Grossman
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JOSULINA DAVIDSONHN
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on the SO day
of July. 1982
Norman Schwarz
Of Law Offices of
NORMAN K SCHWARZ. PA
407 Lincoln Road
Suite 4A
Miami Beach. Klorida 33139
Telephone ( 3051 8721222
18008 July SO:
___________________AugustB, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flle> Number 62-79*
Divide*) 91
IN RE ESTATE OF
JOSEPH SCHMIER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
Joseph Schmler. deceased.
FUe Number 82-700 (OS). Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is Dade County Courthouse. TS
Weat Klagler Street. Miami.
Florida. SS1S0 The personal
representative of the estate la
Rose Schmler. whose address
is 19700 NE 23nd Ave North
Miami Beach. Florida. SS009.
The name and address of the
personal representative s
attorney are set forth below.
All persona having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will became due shall be
stated If the claim Is contln
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publlcstlon
of this NoUce of Administra-
tion: July SO. 1982
Rose Schmler
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Joseph Schmler
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
GaryF Canner
Schmler. Canner* Gleaser
American Savings Bldg .
Suite 611
2600 E Hallandale
Beach Blvd
Hallandale. KI. 33009
Telephone 946-1686
18011 July SO;
August 6. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
THELMA'S HATS at 927 Lin-
coln Road-Suite 217 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
THAT8THAT. INC.
Sandra Jacob.
President
Attorney for
THAT'S THAT. INC
WEISS A WEISS
4 20 Lincoln Road
Suite ste
I Miami Beach, Florida SS1S9
18013 July SO.
Augusts, IS, 20. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Na-
ture's Wonders at 8040 North
Kendall Dr.. Miami. FT S3166
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
John T Cole. Jr..
Owner
18008 July SO;
Augusts. IS. 20. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO *2 104a*
FAMILY DIVISION FC 11
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGEOF:
WILLIAM S. INURAHAM
and
MARLA J INGRAHAM
TO MARLAJ
INGRAHAM
99 Jamestown Road
R.D. No 1
Randolph,
New York 14772
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dlaeo-
lutlon of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenaes. If any, to It on:
SAMUEL S. 80ROTA. Attor-
ney for PeUUoner. whoae ad-
dress is 18300 N E 19th Ave-
nue, suite No. 227. North Miami
Beach. Florida SSI82 and file
the original with the clerk of
the above atyled court on or be-
fore August SI, 1982; otherwise
s default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of July.
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
by: K. Selfned
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
1800V JulySO.
Augusts. 13.20. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In busineaa
under the fictitious name
I. Bakery at 8879 SW 107 Ave .
Miami Fl Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
AAFBakerle* f
Owner
Bernard Korman.
26 percent Interest
Rubin Furman.
25 percent interest
Harold Ackermann.
26 percent Interest
Ernesto Fischer,
26 percent Interest
JulySO:
August*. 13.20. 1982
ICE UNDER ~
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN thst the undersigned,
desiring to engsge in business
under the fictitious name
EASTERN HOSIERY. INC. at
1386 Burlington St.. OpaLocka.
Fla 33064 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Pres Isaac MUrahl
18061 Augusts. 13;
30.27. 1982
J IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE OlVISION
PROBATE NO. 93-S074
DIVISION 94
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM SCHWEBEL.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of ABRAHAM
SCHWEBEL. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida, has
commenced In the capUoned
proceeding
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate,
if any. or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative venue or Jurts-
diction of the Court, with the
Court. Dade County Court
house. 73 West Klagler Street.
Miami. Klorida 33130. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OK THE FIRST PUBLI
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
First Publication of this No-
Uce on the SO day of July. 1982
Philip Schwebel
As Personal Repreaentatlve
of the Estate of
ABRAHAM SCHWEBEL
Deceased
82-29 Ablngdon Road
Kew Gardena. New York
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Herbert Jay
COHEN. P.A.
9400 S Dade land HI vd
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 33166
Telephone I S0619e8-O401
18018 JulySO;
Augusts. 1982
1SUI0
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thst the undersigned, desiring
to engsge in business under the
fictitious name MR DONUTat
2300 Southwest 87th Avenue.
Miami, Florida SS186 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
CHARLES L HARRIS
d-baMR DONUT
BY Charles L Harries
BOLTON. WEST A BOLTON
Attorney lor
Charles L Harries
2320 N E 171 Street
North Miami Beach.
Fla S31S0
18009 JulySO;
August6. IS. 20.19S2
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S3 -SMI
Division 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
EPHRAIMF.
MANDELCORN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The admlnlatraUon of the es-
tate of EPHRAIM F MAN
DKLCORN. deceased. FUe
Number R2-8B3S. is pending In
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate DIM
alon. the address of which la 78
West Klagler Street. Miami
Florida 331 SO The names and
addresses of the personal rep
resentaUve and the personal
representative attorney are
set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (11 all
claims against the estate and
(2i any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl-
cations of the personal repre
sentaUve. venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on July SO. 1982
Personal Representative
Samuel P Mandelcorn
4680 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Repre sentaUve
Moses J Grundwerg. Esq
Suite 900.
21 se First Ave
Miami. Fla 33131
Telephone I SOS I 871-4419
18017 JulySO;
Augusts. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number SI-10487
Division 91
IN RE ESTATE OF
BALLANTTNE. PAUL O.
I>e ceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE E ST ATE :
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the admlnlstraUon
of the estate of PAUL O BAL-
LANTTNE. deceased. File
Number 81-10482. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Dlvl
alon, the address of which Is 73
West Klagler Street. Miami.
Florida The personal repre-
sentaUve of the estate la PAUL
M. BALLANTINE. whoee ad
dress Is c-o Law Offices of
Barry C Flelsher. 1400 Miami
Gardena Drive. Suite 10S.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33179 The name and address of
the personal representative
attorney are set forth below.
AU persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA
TlON OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re
pre sentaUve.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob
jecUons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifies
Uons of the personal repreeen-
taUve. or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Dale of the first publication
of this NoUce of Admlnlstra-
Uon JulySO. 1982
Rudolph Ballantlne
As Personal RepresentaUve
of the Estate of
PAULO BALLANTINE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Barry C Flelsher. Esq
1400 N E Miami Gardens Dr
Suite 103
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33179
Telephone 13061947 6226
18016 JulySO.
Augusts. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LIMA
BODY SHOP at 4166 N.W.
132nd Street Lot 19-20. Opa-
Locka. Florida 33064 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Klorida.
OSVALDO AMADOR
LIMA
18029 Augusts. IS:
20, 27. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OrVKN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name S I A
INVESTMENTS, a partnership
St 7406 N V. 41st Street. Miami.
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
MAR1ANITO 8. CHUA
EDWIN S. CHUA
AMELITA S. CHUA
ARISTEDES S CHUA
MABELS CHUA
DEBBIE S CHUA
JEANETTES CHUA
ELENITAS. CHUA
VINCENTS CHUA
DENNIS S CHUA
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
Attorney for S I A INVEST-
MENTS, a Partnership
1H00B JulySO.
Augusts. 13.30. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engsge in business
under the flcUUous name
Smithy's Diamond Setter at
Seybo'ld Bldg.. Suite 738. St)
NE First Street. Miami. Flor-
ida. SS1S2 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
ChartleSmlUi. Jr
17985 July 33. SO;
Augusts. 13.1982 I




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dark
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RICHARD P BRJNKER
Aa Clark Circuit Court
DaatoCoukaty. FtorlAk
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DAVID M.
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RICHARD P BRJNKER
Ai Clerk. Circuit Court
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DEL-VALXXLAW
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M CfUSTINA
DEL-VALUCESQ
Attorney for PeUttonar
July B. a.
4


Val Silberman Passes
Active Communal Leader
fean
Continued from Page 1
Jewish Committee'1 Hu-
nitarian Award in 1976 for
eir outstanding service in Dade
unty
She was the Miami Chairper-
n of Operation Israel 1974, and
rticipated in UJA Leadership
issions to Israel in 1962 and
In October. 1971, she par-
ipated in a special Sub-Miasion
Vienna, Rumania, and Israel.
is was followed by Missions to
countries in September,
73 and in November, 1973 after
Yom Kippur War. She led a
ission in October, 1974 to Iran
d Israel, and a national
omen's Mission in March,
76 And. in July 1976. 1977,
,d 1978. she was a delegate to
Jewish Agency for Israel
ing in Israel. She was Chair -
n of UJA's national mission
his Year in Jerusalem" for the
rida region.
Survivors include her husband,
orton. daughters. Adria Ras-
Val Silberman
ken and Marjorie Stone; two
grandchildren; and sister,
Beatrice Fernebok.
Riverside Chapel in charge of
arrangements with interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Fred Sandier, Pioneer Man,
38-Year Resident Passes
Fred A. Sandier, a 38-year reai-
fnt of Miami, passed away on
ly 31. He had been associated
fith Metropolitan Life Insurance
and was a member of Beth
avid Synagogue. Temple Or
lorn. Coral Gables B'nai B'rith.
Duthwest Lodge F&AM No.
|6. Roosevelt Lodge K of P No.
t~ and the Jewish Home for the
ged
I Survivors include his wife.
Hie; daughters. Charlotte
lurray) Mitler; Myrna (Ralph)
stel and Carol (Stanley) Gold,
of Miami, two brothers. K.
trob Sandier of Bayonne, N.J
id George J. Sandier of Forest
nils. NY. eight grandchildren
id three great-grandchildren.
IService were held Aug. 2 at
)HAUSER
it..-. Miami, pund away July 28 She
d made her home In Miami for the
t c years, coming from New Haven.
nnectlcut She waa a member of
r-mple Israel of Greater Miami and the
terhood She waa acUve In Torah
kaoter of Hrnlxaaah National Council
Jewish Women. Cadara of Lebanon
klunteer. and Technlon. She la air
k< and her stater. Ann Goldstein
iimi Services were held July SO at
brdun Kuneral Home with Interment
iMl Nebo
flTMANS
|rc "4. of Miami, passed away August
Bhf hnd made her home In Miami for
past 37 years, coming from Phlla
|lpiu.i She is survived by her husband.
m. children. Howard (Madeline*
ktnans. Canoaa Park, Calif Eileen
trbartl Hlrsch. Miami, and five
mdchlldren Services were held Au-
t 4 at i ;..nlon Funeral Home with In
frment In Ml Nebo
MM
rk Morrison. AS. Miami Beach,
sed away July 30 He was a naUve of
York and had been a resident here
the pasl 13 years coming from Chl-
He was the I'ast President of Con<
gallon Heth Israel of Miami Beach
survived by his wife.. Jeanette, of
ami Heach. sons. Norman i Leslie i of
umbull. Conn Roger i Judithi of Da-
and Joshua < Jennifer i of Hulls
and two grandchildren. Service*
fa held August 1 at Riverside.
-OSTEIN
Jde. 87. of Miami, passed away
30 She had been a resident of
<\i for the past SO years, coming
i New York City She was a member
nple Beth El of Miami She Is sur
by a son-in-law. Jack Young, of
ll and two grandchildren. Services
held August 1 at Gordon Funeral
ne w Ith Inte rment In Star of Davld
(INI
Ida She Is survived by her daugh
Ruth Reglna Glaaser and Florence
rstock, brother, Nathan Leavltt.
grandchildren, and 18 grandchU-
Servlces were held August 1 at
iln Zllbert.
Fred A. Sandier
Temple Or Olom, with interment
in Star of David Memorial Park.
Arrangements by Gordon
Funeral Home.
SKOLNICK
Samuel. 82 A resident of Surfslde for
the paat 17 years, passed away July 28
He Is survived by a son. Harris Stewart
of San Francisco and three sisters
Services were held July SO at Star of Da
vld Cemetery with arrangements by
Riverside
SPIELMAN
Louis. 85, of North Miami passed away
July 28 He is survived by his wife,
NetUe. He was a concert pianist and
teacher, formerly with the New York
Philharmonic, NBC. Hollywood Movie
Studios, and official pianist with the
Inlverslty of Miami Symphony for 18
years He was a member of George Ger-
shwin I.odge 186 K of P Services were
held July 30 at Levtlt-Welnstein
ZUCKER
Dr Morris. 88, Miami Beach He was
President of the Miami Heach Philoso-
phical Association and an author and
lecturer He is survived by his wife.
Sara Sue Zucker, daughter, Harriet
Borkow Goodman, two grandchildren
and brother. Charles Zucker Services
were held July 30 at Rubln-ZUbert
KISIJ/.K. Kate C North Miami Beech.
July 30. Rubln-ZUbert
UCVY, l>orothy. July 28. Riverside
SINGER. Jeanne, Miami Heach. Rubin
Zllbert
WEBER. Rose R 80, Miami. July 28.
Riverside
SOONER, Bertha. 78. Miami.
COHEN. Sam, Miami Beach, Rubln-Zll
bert
GREENBERG. Dorothy, Miami Beach.
JulvW Kuhln-Zllbert
TIKOFSKY. Melissa Jo, 18, July SO
FRANKEL. Pearl, 70. Miami Beach.
August 1. Riverside
GlNSBL'RG. William. North Miami
Beach, August 1. Menorah Chapels
SCOLNIK. Betty. 88. North Miami
Beach. August 1. LevIU-Welnsteln
EDELMAN. Irving. 88. North Miami
Beach. Gordon.
LOPATIN, Jennie. 81. Miami Beach.
Gordon
FISHMAN, Dr Moses, Miami Beach.
Rubln-ZUbert
JOSEFSON, Baal. Rubin Zllbert,
AlexanderKushner, 72,
Orthopedic Surgeon
Alexander Kushner. who do-
nated much of his time in ortho-
pedic practice to helping crippled
children, died August 3 in Miami.
Dr. Kushner had practiced
medicine here since 1939 and was
a staff member of Mount Sinai
Medical Center and St. Francis
and Cedars of Lebanon hospitals.
He was in charge of the Elks
South Florida Crippled Chil-
dren's Clinic.
Born in New York, Dr.
Kushner was educated at the
University of St. Andrews in
Dundee, Scotland. He was a
member of the International Col-
lege of Surgeons and the Ameri-
can Fracture Association.
He is survived by his wife,
Gloria; son, Phillip; daughter,
Laurel Schiller; two grandchil-
dren; brothers, Sol of California
and Bernard of New York; sis-
ters, Lee Rosenblum of New
York, Polly Rabiner of Bay Har-
bour Island, and Ethel Bursen of
Mew York. Services August 5 at
Riverside.
I'aulR. Blau Chairman
of Furniture-Store Chain
Paul R. Blau. 52. board chair
man of the Georgetown Ethan
Allen furniture store chain in
South Florida, passed away on
August 3.
Born in Washington. D.C.. Mr.
Blau was a graduate of the
University of Maryland. Mr.
Blau was President of the Ethan
Allen Southeast Dealers Associa-
tion. He was active in the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the
B"nai B'rith Anti- Defamation
league, and was a board member
of Temple Judea.
Survivors include his wife.
Sylvia; children. Jonathan and
Lisa Blau and Beth and Lowell
Kuvin. parents. Jack and Addie
Blau; and a brother, Anthony.
Services were held at Temple
Judea with arrangements by
Riverside.
EvaWeinstein.Wifeof
Funeral Home President
Eva Weinstein, wife of the
president of the Levitt-Weinstein
funeral homes in Florida and
Illinois, passed away July 28. She
is survived by her husband.
Myron; sons. Harvey Y. and Joel
W. (Sue); a brother; three sisters
and three grandchildren. Services
were held July 30 in Wilmette.
Illinois.
KKITMAN, Martha, 80, Bal Harbor.
August 3. Gordon
/YSS. Gerald. Miami Beach. August 2.
Rubln-ZUbert
COLDSTEIN. Sadie. 81. Miami Beach.
Augusts. Levltt-Welnsteln
Jewish Floridian Pagell-B
Natalie Novick Passes
Mrs. Natalie E. Novick, 53,
active in the Jewish community
of Pittsburgh, and a leader of the
United Jewish Federation of
Pittsburgh, died suddenly at her
home in Pittsburgh. Pa. on July
29.
Survivors are her husband,
Ivan J. Novick. president of the
Zionist Organization of America;
sons. Dr. Howard Novick of
Pittsburgh; William E. Novick of
Boca Raton: daughter. Phyllis S.
Novick of Pittsburgh; sisters,
Mrs. Linda Shapiro of Holly-
wood; Fla.; Mrs. Joan Joshowitz
of Southfield. Mich.; and the late
Phyllis Eger. Mrs. Novick was
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Herman B. Mogerman of Pitta-
burgh and the late William Eger.
Funeral services were held in
Pittsburgh.
Natalie Novick
SANDIER
Fred A.. 78. Miami, died July 81 He had
made his home In Miami for the paat 38
years, coming from Jersey City, N.J.
He had been associated with Metropoli-
tan Life Insurance Co. for M years He
waa a member of Beth David Syna
ggue for 38 years. Temple Or Olom,
rat Gables B'nai B'rith. Southwest
Lodge Fft AM No 288, Roosevelt Lodge
K of P No. 177. and the Jewish Home for
the Aged. He Is survived by his wife, Til-
lie, three daughters, Charlotte (Mur-
ray) MJttler. My ma (Ralph I Flstel and
Carol (Stanley) Gold, all of Miami; two
brothers, K. Jacob Sandier. Bayonne.
N.J. and George J Sandier. Forest
Hills. N.Y.: eight grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren Funeral
services were held August 2 at Temple
Or Olom with Interment In Star of David
Memorial Park All arrangements by
Gordon Funeral Home
RUSENSTEIN
Irvine. 73, of Miami, passed sway on
July SO. He had made his home in Miami
tar the paat 38 years coming here from
North Bergen, N.J. He was a member of
the Miami Beach Lodge of K of P No. 170
and the Tropical Cancer League. He la
survived by his wife. BeUe, sons. Allen
Royce. Miami, and Herbert Rubensteln.
Upper Marlboro, Md a daughter,
Merlly Stalman. Stuart, Fla.. a brother.
Harry. Miami Beach and eight grand
children. Services were held August 1 at
Gordon Funeral Home with Interment
In Mt. Slnal Cemetery
MONUMENTS INC
Open fc**wr Day Closed Sabbath
i 140 SW 57th Avenue
I Phone 266-2888
Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscayne Boulevard.
cMeno&h
^OjapeJS
Ujljjl
94^3939
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and all South Florida cemeteries from chapels
m North Miami Beach. Sunrise. Deerf idd Beach
and Margate.
City Memorial
Monument, inc.
7610 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
Officei759-1669
Res.: 1-432-8815
When a loss occurs
away from home.
S1HUAUTZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Kd
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by s levin. I L).
New York: <212> 263-7600 Qu.-.n'.Bkfi & 76th Rd.. Forest H
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IKE GORDON, F.D.-JAMES B. GORDON. F.D.
HARVEY GORDON, F.D. _..
FAMILY OWNED OPERATED 858-5566
710SW 12Ae
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade
Miami Beach
1701 Alton Road
538-6371
The only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arranoamenta
No Money In Advance
Broward
Hallandala
100 S. Dixie Hwy
456-4011
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