The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02791

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
' .
/'
Volume 55Number 31 Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday July 30,1982
* fr*ist>och*i
ByMaiiaoonn Price 50 Cents
U.S. Ready To
Accept Arab
Plan for PLO?

* #* V* *
Yes or No?
Ptioto by Suzanne Szasi/Pnolo Researchers, Inc
A Young Person's Guide
To Sex Before Marriage
[ By HAROLD SCHULWEIS
We do not normally speak
>tiut sexuality in the synagogue
ecause we somehow feel it inap-
propriate. Matters of sex are
tired outside the sanctuary,
fiven over to psychologists and
L-ialogists, not to those who
leal with spiritual matters. But
sexual silence in the synagogue is
both un-Jewish and unwise.
We are not the children of Paul
or Augustine or Luther. We are
not the inheritors of a classical
Christian or Gnostic tradition
which regards sexuality as de-
grading lust. We are not Puri-
tans, and we ought not behave
like Puritans. Indeed, on the
Round
After AW ACS: The
to Arm Jordan

Jy MERRIE EISENSTADT
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Repnnta by Special Arrangement
"When I heard about the
rdan arms sale," one pro-
brael lobbyist in Washing-
bn said, "the first thing I
bought of was Sisyphus."
le was referring to the
Mythological king con-
emned to roll a heavey
one up a steep hill, only to
pve it roll down again as it
ars the top. "We had just
finished pushing the rock
up the hill and now we've
got to push up the hill
again."
The rock was AW ACS, the hill
is Capitol Hill and the "push" is
the political struggle over Ameri-
can arms sales to Israel's
enemies. No arms deal for Jordan
has been specifically proposed
yet, but experts believe it is in-
evitable. The question now is how
will pro-Israel lobbyists go about
opposing it, in light of what they
Continued on Page 10-A
most awesome of all days, we
read out loud about sodomy,
transvestism, and adultery. On
Yom Kippur afternoon, we read
the eighteenth chapter of
Leviticus. The rabbis were re-
markably astute in picking that
section for a holy day when Jews
behave like the angels, neither
eating nor drinking. Is it perhaps
to remind us that we have bodies
or, more important, that we are
bodies.
We are fortunately rooted in a
biblical and a rabbinic tradition
which deals explicitly and frankly
with the most intimate sexual re-
lations, for in Judaism there is no
shame in the body. It is unwise to
avoid speaking about the Jewish
view of sexuality because that
creates a vacuum which is filled
with notions more appropriate to
the Christian ethic. However
ecumenical my spirit, I sense here
the limits of speaking in terms of
the "Judea-Christian tradition."
Some problems of Christianity
are not Jewish problems.
IF THERE is anything that
clearly differentiates the percep-
tions of Christianity and
Judaism, it is their respective at-
titudes toward sexuality and the
status of the body.
The central passage in the New
Testament's treatment of the
Continued on Page 7-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad-
ministration indicates that
it could accept an Arab
plan to move the some
6,000 Palestine Liberation
Organization terrorists in
west Beirut to a temporary
location in northern Leba-
non before they are taken to
other Arab countries.
State Department spokesman
Dean Fischer refused to comment
on the proposal discussed at the
White House meeting between
President Reagan and Foreign
Minister Prince Saud of Saudi
Arabia and Syrian Foreign Min-
ister Abdel 1 lalim Khaddam.
BUT FISCHER noted that
"what we have tried to do is
make a distinction between the
immediate problem in west Bei-
rut and the longer term problem
of the future of Lebanon." He
said that the U.S. has made made
clear it wants "all foreign ele-
ments" to leave Lebanon and.
Top Priority
when pressed, said this included
Israel, Syria and the PLO.
However, he said it would
serve no purpose "to be more
precise" in view of the "sensitive
negotiations" now going on in
Beirut under the direction of
Reagan's special envoy Philip
Continued on Page 6-A
Special UJA Fund to Aid
Services Hit by War
NEW YORK (JTA) The
national officers of the United
Jewish Appeal have approved a
Special Fund Campaign for 1983
to help the Jewish Agency main-
tain social services, welfare and
educational programs endanger-
ed by the enormous human cost
of Israel's military action in
Lebanon. Current estimates pro-
ject a $220 million total cost for
the programs to be sustained by
the Special Fund.
At an emergency session called
by UJA national chairman
Robert Loup after return from
meetings of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors in Jerusalem,
the officers endorsed a resolution
calling on American Jewish com-
munities to move immediately to
implement a separate special
fundraising campaign in addition
to their 1983 regular and Project
Renewal campaigns.
THE UJA campaign leader-
ship was joined in the action by
Martin Citrin, president of the
Council of Jewish Federations;
Jerold Hoffberger, chairman of
the United Israel Appeal; and
Continued on Page 8-A
Official Explanation
Why Israel Can't Permit PLO to Stay in Lebanon
[Israel is fighting against
Te PLO, not the Pales-
lian Arabs. Israel has al-
ys aspired to reach a
aceful settlement with
Palestinian Arabs on
basis of mutual respect
and through direct negotia-
tion, the only way peace
has ever been made. The
root cause and substance of
the decades-long, Arab-Is-
rael conflict has been the
persistent refusal of the
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following analysis has been com-
piled as a policy backround report by the Israel Minis-
try of Foreign Affairs Information Division in Jeru-
salem and made available to The Jewish Floridian by
the Israel Consul General's Office in Miami
Arab states (with the re-
cent exception of Egypt) to
make peace, on this or any
other basis.
Since 1964, the PLO has been
the symbol and the spearhead of
this pan-Arab policy, in the wake
of which the Middle East has
seen so much warfare, suffering
and wasted human and material
resources over the years.
THE FIGHT against the PLO
Continued on Page 14-A
Personal Report: Weeds Grow from Beirut's Rubble. .Page 1-B


- '>- 11
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Filling in Background
Leaders Angered By
Watt Letter to Arens
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Jewish leaders
and major political figures
are reacting angrily to a
warning by Interior Secre-
tary James Watt that U.S.
support for Israel could end
if "liberals" in the Ameri-
can Jewish community
continue to oppose the Ad-
ministration's energy poli-
cies. Many have demanded
Watt's resignation.
The implicit threat was con-
tained in a fetter from Watt to Is-
rael's Ambassador to Washing-
ton, Moshe Arens. The letter,
dated June 17. stressed efforts to
end America s dependency upon
foreign crude energy" and ob-
served that "If the liberals of the
Jewish community join with the
other liberals of this nation to op-
pose these efforts, they will
weaken our ability to be a good
friend of Israel. Your supporters
in America need to know these
facts."
THE WHITE HOUSE disa-
vowed the tetter. Deputy Press
Secretary Larry Speakes said.
"The main quarrel we have with
it is it does not represent Admin-
istration policy ... It is not the
President's viewpoint." The
initial reaction from the White
House Friday had been that the
tetter was "unfortunate." But
Watt insisted, in various public
statements over the weekend
that he had intended no threat
and defended his position.
Sen. Daniel Moynihan lD..
N.Y.I, accused the Secretary of
"bare-knuckled bigotry" and
declared that if Watt does not
resign "President Reagan should
dismiss him immediately.'' Reps.
Toby Moffett (D.. Conn. I and
Tom Lantos ID.. Calif.) wrote to
Reagan over the weekend: "Mr.
Watt's remarks were highly in-
appropriate and inflammatory.
They suggest that America's for-
eign policy is in some way linked
to 'Jewish' and liberal support
of the Administration's energy
oolicy."
Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal ID..
N.Y.) said it was incredible for a
Cabinet officer to make a state-
ment bite that. It clearly disqua-
lifies him from continuing to
serve in his post."
BERTRAM GOLD, executive
director of the American Jewish
Committee, suggested that "Sec-
retary Watt should go back to
school for a refresher course on
the American political system,
for he seems to question the right
of Americans that hold opinions
different from his." Gold noted.
"We are saying this despite the
fact that the American Jewish
Committee since 1972 has had a
national task force on energy
problems that has developed a
comprehensive program in the
energy field, rooted in the goal of
ridding dependency on foreign
oil."
Hyman Bookbinder. the
AJCommittee's Washington rep-
resentative, said he was "con-
cerned that Mr. Watt did not
realize that if he had a message
for the American Jewish commu-
nity he could simply have picked
up the phone and talked to any of
us instead of doing what he did.'
But Bookbinder said he did "not
think too much should be made of
this" because "it doesn't go to
the core of the problems facing
the country and the Jewish com-
munity.
Rabbi Alexander Schindter.
president of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations,
declared. "I don't like to be ap-
pealed to as a Jew on an issue
that is essentially of concern to
all Americans." That view was
reflected in a Washington Post
editorial today which asked.
"Does Mr. Watt think of Ameri-
can Jews as foreign nationals?
Young Terms Israel's
Operation Unjustified
Says PLO Won't Quit
WASHINGTON-(JTA)- Mayor Andrew Young of
Atlanta. Georgia termed Israel's invasion of Lebanon
"uncalled" for and unjustified and warned that military
action in that country would not destroy the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
THE FORMER Ambassador to the United Nations,
who resigned in 1979 following criticism of his unauthor-
ized contacts with the PLO observer at the UN, told re-
porters, after addressing the annual meeting of the Home-
based Society for International Development, that the
PLO "is not just an organization, it is an idea like Zionism
and can't be destroyed by killing off a few people."
Young accused the Reagan Administration of having a
T.uddled Middle East policy. "Both Israel and this
Administration have created such a mess in the Middle
East that it is almost difficult to comment on it," he said.
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
YOUR COMPLETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 1933
BROWARO
463-9680
DOWNTOWN UPTOWN
134 NE 1st St. 228 NE 59th St.
Miami. Fla. Miami. Fla.
757-8513
MIA. BCH.
1606 Wash. Are
Miami Beach. Fta.
CORAL GABLES
272 Valencia A
Coral Gables. Fla.
Full Text of Letter to Israel's Ambassador Arens
The text of the tetter Interior Secre-
tary James Watt sent to Israel's Am-
bassador Moshe Arens, as provided to
the press by Thomas I DeRocco, the
Interior Department's j Deputy Direc-
tor of Public Affairs, stated:
It was a delight spending some time
with you Sunday evening at dinner.
Your remarks were extremely well de-
livered and interesting.
I appreciate the opportunity of dis-
cussing with you the need for a strong
energy self-reliant America.
If we do not reduce America's de-
pendency upon foreign crude energy,
there is a great risk that in future
years America will be prevented from
being the strong protector and friend
of Israel that we are and want to be.
If the friends of Israel here in th
United States really are concerned a*
bout the the future of Israel, I believe
they will aggressively support the
Reagan Administration's efforts to
develop the abundant energy wealth of
America in a phased, orderly and en-
vironmentally sound way. If the liber-
als of the Jewish community join with
the other liberals of this nation to op-
pose these efforts, they will weaken
our ability to be a good friend of Israel.
Your supporters in America need to
know these facts.
I look forward to opportunities to
speak to groups of your supporters in
this nation so that I might share with
them the truth of what this Adminis-
tration is trying to do for America.
Does he really believe there is
nothing wrong with the idea that
the way to reach them is through
a communication to the Embassy
of Israel?"
WATT SAID in a telephone
interview with The New York
Times that "The letter does not
threaten anyone." He said he
stands by it because "Its inten-
tions were right and it was pro-
perly worded."
The Washington Post quoted
him as saying. "There's no threat
intended. To have a threat, you
have to say we'd do something if
they i American Jews) didn't do
something." His message, he
claimed, was. "If you don't sup-
port this, the Reagan Adminis-
tration is going to go ahead doing
what's right whether you support
it or not."
The Secretary, appearing over
the weekend on Mutual Radio's
"The Larry King Show," a call-in
talk program, explained that his
letter to Arens was a follow-up to
a friendly discussion he had had
with the envoy at an Israel Bonds
dinner last month at which the
Ambassador was the principal
speaker.
THE LETTER came to light
when it appeared last week in the
Washington Times, a recently es-
tablished daily of strong conser-
vative views. There was no indi-
cations how the newspaper ob-
tained the month-old letter.
Watt, himself an ultra-conser-
vative, had been a controversial I
figure since his appointment by]
Reagan as Secretary of Interior [
He has been under attack by
many politicians and consent
tionist groups for alleged despol
liation of publicly owned land for I
private commercial exploitation.!
His critics represent the political!
spectrum from main line conserl
vatives through moderates and |
liberals.
The latest controversy sur-
rounding Watt stemmed from his I
recent decision to make one I
billion acres of outer continental!
shelf available to oil and gas de-
velopers and his plans to permit |
oil and gas exploration and
drilling in Federal wildemestl
areas.
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Not surprising,if s River-
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If you've ever worked with
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you'd understand. If you've
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At Riverside, we have
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The Largest Jewish Staff ADDRESSES:
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President of the Jewish MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
Funeral Directors of (Douglas Rd.)
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Charles Salomon. Vice N.E. 19th Ave.
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Isaac Nahmias Okeechobee Blvd.
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M-T-30-M
M-7-M43


i Jewish Floridian Paga 3-A
News Briefs

Reagan Aides Reject Arafat's Vow to 'Recognize'
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON The
agan Administration has re-
led a document reportedly
liirned by Palestine Liberation
ganization Chief Yasir Arafat
not being the "clear and un-
auivocal" statement the U.S. is
demanding before it will recog-
tze or talk with the PLO.
The rejection came in the form
kf a State Department statement
a claim by Rep. Paul
IcClskey (R., Calif.) that Arafat
ad signed a document giving his
[acceptance of all United Nations
olutions which include the
light of Israel to exist." But
AcCloskey, who was accom-
anied by four other Congress-
nen on a visit to Arafat's head-
quarters in west Beirut was im-
nediately corrected by Arafat
vho said he had agreed to accept
[all UN resolutions concerning
tie Palestinian question."
In rejecting this, State Depart-
sent spokesman Dean Fischer
eiterated the U.S. position. "The
Jnited States will not recognize
negotiate with the PLO until
He PLO accepts Un Security
ouncil Resolutions 242 and 338
nd Israel's right to exist,"
hscher said. "We have indicated
liat this must be done in a clear
nd unequivocal way. The state-
nent by Mr. Arafat does not
et these conditions."
leavy Fighting Reported
kround Beirut Area
TEL AVIV Heavy fighting
jmtinues around Beirut. Israel
Force planes bombed Pale-
^ine Liberation Organization
asitions in west Beirut and ar-
llery and tank gunners ex-
banged fire with terrorists south
the city. An army spokesman
nnounced that three Israeli
pldiers were slightly wounded,
krael said its aircraft destroyed
pwly deployed Syrian anti-air -
aft missile batteries in eastern
ebanon over the weekend, and
Emitted the loss of one Phantom
I Meanwhile, U.S. special envoy
":ulip Habib, who was due in
Jrael this Tuesday, changed his
ans at the last minute and flew
< London to see King Hussein of
Drdan who is there on a private
Bit. Habib was in Damascus
nd Riyadh over the weekend and
Egypt where he met with Pres-
ent Hosni Mubarak. He was
ipected to come to Israel direct-
' from London.
>aris Police Step
jp Murderer's Search
[PARIS French police have
epped up their search for the
Hers of a senior Palestine Liber-
on Organization official but
needed that they still have no
lies and have traced no sus-
cts.
The official, Fadel el-Dani, 38,
i deputy director of the PLO's
pee in Paris, was murdered Fri-
morning outside his home,
died when the car he was in
demolished by an explosive
rice.
'olice still do not know for cer-
whether an incendiary device
tossed into his car through
open window or whether a
h was electronically trigger-
off as el-Dani was about to
e to his office. The Gaza-born
official was the seventh
itinian official mysteriously
1 in Paris during the last 10
rs.
braham Suss, the PLO's Paris
or, said after the killing, "I
Uy accuse Israel." He said
technique used in killing el-
" was simihar" to that used
I the PLO deputy director in
Rome last month. In that attack,
Kamal hussein, 42, was killed by
a bomb planted under his car
seat.
Cabinet Okays Entry
Of Tehiya Faction
and "biased commentary" in its
coverage of events in Lebanon.
In a protest addressed to
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher, Blumenfeld complain-
ed specifically about the compar-
isons in some of the media be-
tween the acts of Israeli troops in
Lebanon and Nazi acts of geno-
cide during World War II. He
found "false and detestable" the
media's use of the term "final
solution" to define Israel's
alleged intentions toward the
Palestinians.
According to Blumenfeld, the
Bonn government should use its
diplomatic and political influence
to help achieve the evacuation of
west Beirut by the Palestine Li-
beration Organization, to per-
suade the Arab states to admit
the PLO and to reestablish full
Lebanese sovereignty in a
Lebanon free of all foreign ele-
ments.
JERUSALEM The Cabinet
approved the entry into the go-
vernment coalition of the ultra-
nationalist Tehiya and a portfolio
for its leader, Prof. Yuval Nee-
man.
Neeman, a professor of physics
at Tel Aviv University, will head
a newly created Ministry of
Science and Development. The
inclusion of Tehiya in this gov-
ernment will give Premier Men-
achem Begin a comfortable eight-
seat margin in the Knesset
which, according to observers,
will enable the Likud to serve out
its full term which expires in
1986.
Only a month ago doubts were
expressed that the Begin govern-
ment could survive after the de-
feet ion of two Likud MKs to the
Labor opposition reduced the
coalition to minority status in the
Knesset.
Ex-Envoy Barbour
Dead at Age 74___________
BOSTON Walworth Bar-
bour, who was the U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel from 1961 to
1973, died July 21 at a hospital in
Gloucester, Mass., at the age of
74. His tour in Israel was one of
the longest of any American dip-
lomat of his rank in a foreign
post.
Barbour was held in high
esteem by the Israelis. When he
left Israel he was described by
The Jerusalem Post as "a
sagacious political intelligence.
who could continuously and
precisely define for his own coun-
try and for his hosts the political
aims of boths. and more specific-
ally the limits and tolerance of
both."
The American International
School in Kfar Shmaryahu was
renamed in Harbour's honor in
1972 in recognition of his work on
behalf of the institution.________
Young Israeli Soldier
Believed of Command
TEL AVIV A young Israli
army colonel was relieved of his
command in Lebanon at his own
request because he said his con-
science and world opinion did not
permit him to continue to partici-
pate in the fighting, a military
spokesman disclosed.
Col. Eli (leva, 32, described as
one of Israel's most brilliant
young commanders, was seat on
leave by Chief of Staff Gen.
Rafael Eitan but no action was
taken on his request to be allowed
to resign from the army. Earlier,
Eitan, Premier Menachem Begin
and Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon met with the young
officer in an unsuccessful attempt
to persuade him to withdraw his
resignation. He is a career officer
in the regular army.
Similar urgings by his father,
Maj. Gen. (res.) Yosef Geva, a
former commander of the central
front, were also of of no avail.
Young Geva, who led the brigade
that captured the Palestine
Liberation Organization strong-
hold of Tyre and fought its way
to the outskirts of Beirut, said he
opposed plans for an assault on
the PLO remnant in West Beirut.
German Media Accused
Of Biased Reporting_______
BONN The president of the
German-Israeli Friendship
Association, Erik Blumenfeld,
has accused that West German
media of "onesided reporting"
Mideast Analysis
Guarantee Sought Israel Will Quit
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Arab coun-
tries are apparently asking
for a guarantee from the
United States that Israel
will withdraw from Leba-
non before they agree to
provide a haven for the es-
timated 6,000 Palestine
Liberation Organization
men in west Beirut.
' This appeared to be the impli-
cation of remarks by Saudi
Arabia's Foreign Minister,
Prince Saud Al-Faisal, as he and
the Syrian Foreign Minister, Ab-
del Halim Khaddam, emerged
from a more than hour-long
meeting with President Reagan
at the White House. The two
ministers, representing the Arab
League, met for two hours with
Secretary of State George Shultz.
Shultz also attended their meet-
ing with Reagan.
WHEN REPORTERS asked
Saud directly about the PLO
withdrawal, he said that the PLO
has agreed to leave Beirut, but
there is a need to know "in par-
ticular and in principle how to
guarantee the withdrawal of the
Israeli troops." A senior Admin-
istration official briefing report-
ers on the two days of talks,
stressed that while the withdraw-
al of all troops had been dis-
cussed, it had not been in the
context of a timetable.
The official noted that the U.S.
position has been "from the very
beginning" that Israel has to
withdraw from Lebanon. "This is
consistent also with the position
of the government of Israel which
both privately and publicly made
it clear that it has no intention to
stay in Lebanon," the official
said.
He said that "new ideas" had
been broached during the talks,
"basically" by the two Arab
spokesmen. "I think it adds a
new element of possible move-
ment in the near future in the
right direction," he said. The of-
ficial was deliberately vague
about specifics. However, he in-
dicated that those ideas will form
the basis of the negotiations
being conducted in Beirut by
President Reagan's special
envoy, Philip Habib.
THE OFFICIAL noted, that
the White House meeting, which
extended beyoud the 45 minutes
allocated to it, indicated the
President's "continued support"
for Habib s efforts.
Prince Saud stressed that be-
fore any decision can be made as
a result of the Washington talks,
he and Khaddam must report to
the Arab League. The two minis-
ters comprised one of five teams
the Arab League has dispatched
to the five countries which have
permanent members on the
United Nations Security Council
to get support for Security Coun-
cil Resolutions 508 and 509 which
call for, among other things, Is-
rael's withdrawal from Lebanon.
Saud's remarks to reporters
persistently stressed the need for
Israel's withdrawal. He said that
in the talks with Shultz and
Reagan, "We were able to convey
to the President the seriousness
and the willingness of the Arab
countries to bear their rwoonsi-
bilities in assisting the govern-
ment of Lebanon to maintain its
independence and territorial
integrity and also to safeguard
the legitimate rights of the Pales-
tinian people."
KHADDAM MADE virtually
the same statement, exphasizing
Lebanon's integrity and the "leg-
intimate rights of the Palestinian
people."
An Administration official said
the Palestinian issue was dis-
cussed since "You cannot discuss
the current problems in Lebanon
without getting to the core issue
which is the Palestinian problem
itself." He said President Reagan
reiterated his commitment, in
light of the situation in Lebanon,
to find a solution for the Pales-
tinian problem within the frame-
work of the Camp David process.
Brezhnev Gets Letter from Congress
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sixty-seven Congressmen have
sent a joint letter to Soviet Presi-
dent Leonid Brezhnev urging him
"to do everything in your power
to expedite the emigration of
Marina Tiemkin" of Moscow
who, at the age of 13 in 1973, was
kidnapped by Russian police
from her father, Prof. Alexander
Tiemkin, after both had received
exit visas to Israel.
The letter was inititated by
Rep. Patricia Schroeder (D.,
Colo.) following a Capitol Hill
visit to members of Congress by
Dr. Tiemkin organized by the
Student Struggle for Soviet Jew-
ry and Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews. Tiemkin now lives
in Israel and is associated with
Tel Aviv University.
The letter points out that
"father and daughter have been
denied any communication in the
past eight years." The SSSJ said
that since his arrival in Israel
Tiemkin has waged an unceasing
battle for Marina's release. He
periodically received information
from friends in the USSR that
Marina continued in her desire to
rejoin him, but that for the past
two years authorities have shut
down any news conduits.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, Jury 30, 1982

'Photo Opportunity'
When, having emerged from the White House on
Monday, President Reagan was asked by a bevy of
reporters whether he was worried about the latest re-
port that special Middle East envoy Philip Habib
makes yet another Bechtel employee in the Adminis-
tration, the President smiled broadly.
This was no time, he said, for 3uch a question. It
spoils what he called "a photo opportunity." Still, he
wanted the world to know that he felt just fine.
Didn't his smile show that he wasn't worried?
If it was not the proper time to ask Mr. Reagan a
question, it is time for something else: It is time for
the American people to wake up and let the Adminis-
tration know, especially to let the President know,
that he serves them, not the other way around. And
that if he doesn't like that arrangement, he ought to
pack up and go home.
It is time for Mr. Reagan to come to grips with the
fact that the latest Habib embarrassment, coming on
the heels of the James Watt letter to Israel's Am-
bassador Arens about American Jews, a second em-
barrassment in just one week, is no laughing matter.
Motor Mouth Speaks
When Andrew Young left his post in the Carter
Administration as U.S. Ambassador to the United
Nations, his firing because he had made unauthor-
ized contact with members of the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization did not quiet him down.
In no time, Young got himself elected as Mayor of
Atlanta and, the other week, Young averred that
"Both Israel and this (Reagan) Administration have
created such a mess in the Middle East that it is al-
nost difficult to comment on it." Almost, Andy,
almost. But not entirely. Before that, came the
Mayor's mouthful on the PLO, which he equated as a
movement with Zionism.
Frankly, we wonder what this grandiose foreign
policy palaver has to do with running the city of
Atlanta. All of which leaves us with that sneaky sus-
picion we felt when Young got himself elected as
Mayor in the first place.
He's got bigger things in mind, and old Motor
Mouth keeps talking his way there. And talking.
And talking.
Joining Anti-Nuke Drive
It is good to notice that American Jews are
finally joining the worldwide movement aimed at
curbing the super-power enthusiasm for nuclear war.
This is not to say that either the U.S. or the Soviet
Union really wants nuclear war.
But the fact is that both sides are mounting
eager campaigns to convince their peoples that a nu-
clear war can be "won."
The Soviet people can not speak for themselves.
But the rank and file of other nations throughout the
world are increasingly telling their leaders to forget
it. Until now, American Jews have been singularly
silent.
We suspect one of the reasons has to do with a
beleaguered Israel in the Middle East which, though
perennially secretive about its atomic capabilities,
must maintain as a deterrent the ultimate weapon in
the event that an Arab neighbor, or an alliance of
Arab neighbors, would be so foolish as to launch an
Armageddon against it.
But this should be no reason for American Jews
not to voice their horror of nuclear war and their
repudiation of it in principle. Even Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, speaking before the General
Assembly in June, voiced his country's eagerness to
join a regional anti-nuclear bana statement the
region did not hear because the Arabs and other
Third World leaders walked out on him.
We must not be disheartened by this. We must
join with the rest of the peoples of the world in
making our sentiments clear. Apparently, American
Jews are beginning to do just that.
eJewisli Florxdian
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Tll.Fa.pMr Aaaney. Sovan Art* Faatura tfaUHl. WorWMa Now. Santo*. National Editorial
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AMOCtotlon.
SUBSCRIPTION HATES. In Advanc* (Local Araa) On* Yaai-S18.00 Two Vaara$3400. Thr*a
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June-$3 50 Oul Of town, country, upon raquaat. (
Friday. July 30.1982 10 AB 5742
Volume 66 Number 31
PLO's 'Last Gasp': A Fantasy
WHEN several months ago I
had a brief visit with Israel's
Ambassador Moshe Arens, our
conversation quite naturally
dealt with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and the con-
tinuing Arab unrest on the West
Bank.
At the time, Arens skilfully
related the two issues and
declared both to be "the PLO's
last gasp" before coming to grips
with the Middle East's new Real-
politik.
I WONDERED then, and I
wonder even more now, just how
accurate Ambassador Arens' as-
sessment was. And it's not just
that, in the rubble of his ruin, Ya-
sir Arafat is these days resur-
rected and offering "recognition"
of Israel as his one-way ticket
back to stardom. The recent IRA
bombing of visiting Belfast
bandsmen at Hyde Park in Lon-
don is the real case in point.
There is not only a parallel in
intent and method of operation
between the IRA and the PLO;
there is, in fact, a well-
documented relationship between
the two as a consequence of far
more complex ties between them
and international terrorist orga-
nizations in Italy, Japan and
West Germany.
tr*
Everywhere in the West, the
terrorists are deplored. The
media report their doings with
proper revulsion. When the
papers the other day quoted Bel-
fast Mayor Thomas Patton's as-
sessment of the IRA as "sewer
rats," you could sense that the
indignation in his words had been
heightened by an equivalent
editorial indignation with dry-
gulchers who won't fight fair and
square.
BUT NOT the PLO. Here,
everyone makes an exception to
the terrorist rule, with the Pied
Piper press leading the whole
shebang in pious hosannahs to its
most exalted purposes. The PLO
aren't sewer rats. On the con-
trary, we now have Yasir Arafat
almost daily on the front page of
the Miami papers kissing babies,
and baby-kissers can't be all
bad even if they do wear a mS
oldbathtoweiforahat "^l
There are two basic reason, b
this distinction: oil and relicv,.,
am not at all sure which is ny
important in terms of
growing anti-Israel aversion.
Secretary of Interior
Watt's letter to Ambawafc
Arens that warns him about
America's ultimate friendshjn
with Israel if Arens doesn't 3
American Jews to shape up ani
support the Reagan Administra.
tion's energy policies is I
example of the role of oil in th,
widening impasse.
Watt's letter can, I suppose, be I
dismissed, especially since tb(
White House is attempting to do
just that, or so say the reports ol
this latest hideousness on Capitol
Hill. Watt is. after all, Mr.
Reagan's updated model of G.
Gordon Liddy, the man who ate a
rat to steel himself against the
Gotterdammerung.
BUT OIL and energy generally
can not be so easily dismissed as
Watt can in the growing anti-Is-
rael tide. And religion is even
more dangerous. The history of
anti-Semitism carefully cul-
tivated and encouragedby Chris-
tian belief speaks for itself.
Whatever equally strong anti
pathies Christianity feels for
Islam, at least in the hatred of
Jews, Christianity has found a
soulmate.
There are, of course, other
reasons behind the careful
Western separation of the PLO
from the mainstream of interna-
tional terrorism. But it is signifi-
cant on its own terms to see how
exquisitely tenderly the PLO is
treated compared with the treat-
ment of the IRA's bombing in
Hyde Park.
What the IRA did there, what
it did in snuffing out the life of
Lord Mount batten these are
merely trifling examples of what
the PLO has been doing in its
outrages perpetrated upon Israel
and Israelis for years now.
STILL, the treatment of Isra-
el, the victim, remains savage
Nor is the harlotry of the media
which shape this public savagery
entirely to blame. The stunning
report this week that Philip
Habib, the sainted Presidential
envoy to the Middle East
through two administrations
now, is yet another Bechtel mer-
cenary tells the story from an
even more potent viewpoint. If
the White House sells itself, how
can the press be far behind?
No one can walk away from all
Continued on Page 13-A

Carl Alpert
Uzi Has Become World Trademark
HAIFAThe sub-machine gun )
known as the Uzi, designed and
produced in Israel, has become
almost a trade mark of Israel's
armament industry. It is quite
common to find in pictures from
many countries that police of-
ficers, guards and military
personnel are shown holding the
familiar weapon. Not long ago it
was revealed that Israel has sold
1,360,00 of the guns to 42
countries.
Israel's exports of military
merchandise are not limited to
Uzis, however. The list ranges all
the way from howitzer artillery,
mortars and bombs, to a broad
range of sophisticated military
electronic apparatus, as well as
non-battle items and field kit-
chens. In 1981, the value of such
exports exceeded $800 million,
reflecting a growth rate of 20-30
percent per year, which is expect-
ed to continue into 1962 and
1983.
ISRAEL DID not go into the
munitions business by design. It
all came about in the gradual
development of circumstances.
As far back as the 1950s, this
country over-hauled and recon-
ditioned some of its old planes,
which had been withdrawn from
service, and discovered there was
a market for them in countries
like Burma, in the Far East, and
in Latin America. Indeed, the
Israel Aircraft Industries made
its first big money reconditioning
planes, and went so far as to buy
discarded "junk" from other
countries, which it turned into
first-class flying craft for which
there was a market.
In that same decade, David
Ben Gurion agreed to sell arms to
Germany. India, no lover of
Israel, purchased
for use in its
Pakistan.
The principal
domestic arms production was, of
course, our own military forces.
Indeed, the uncertainties of
ov^qnnas^ supply .made it
necessary for us .0 become
as self-sufficient as possible in
these matters. The'wars which
supplies here
war against
customer for
Israel has endured and the
threats of war. ensured a local
market for the wide range of pro-
ducts. In time of peace, the- de-
fense establishment was able to
stockpile its needs. But there is a
limit even to stockpiling, and the
several large industrial plants
together with their subsidiary
firms, faced a serious problem-
SOME COULD shift over to
production of civilian consumer
goods, and hold their military
production lines in readiness
case of need. To close down
completely was out of t"
question not only because ottne
thousands of jobs involved, wn
also because industrial activity
like these are not easily 8tfrttrj
at the push of a button, shouw
national need arise-
Thus, it was that markets were
sought, and found, overseas tor
the principal items *hlch.,'9X
was willing to share with W
worW: Needless to say. there *
Continued on Page 13-A


Two Viewpoints
Arafat Vow Brings Scorn, Welcome
'Exercise in Deceit,' Says Shamir of 'Evidence'
Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page S-A
AJComm. Hails Ruling
Against Violations
*
JERUSALEM (JTA)
J_ Israeli has officials
|heaped scorn on reports
from Beirut that PLO Chief
r'asir Arafat has signed a
locument affirming United
Nations resolutions which
irould constitute PLO rec-
jgnition of Israel's right to
sxist. Foreign Minister
rttzhak Shamir called the
iocument "an exercise in
ieceit."
The paper Arafat reportedly
kigned was presented as evidence
pf PLO recognition of Israel by
lep. Paul McCloskey (R., Calif.),
member of a five-member Con-
gressional delegation visiting
rirut. He met with Arafat in his
vest Beirut redoubt which has
en under siege by Israel for the
ast month.
FOREIGN MINISTRY
ikesman Avi Pazner called the
locument a "public relations
nmmick" and warned that the
*LO will have to leave Lebanon.
\All the deceit and declarations
iven for the benefit of public
union will not help them," he
jld reporters today.
Premier Menachem Begins
^ress spokesman, Uri Porat,
ompared the document to the
ne produced by British Prime
linister Neville Chamberlain on
|is return from Munich in 1938
er Britain and France had ac-
liesced to the dismemberment
Czechoslovakia by Hitler. He
aid the paper McCloskey dis-
Jayed "i the kind waved by

Jfe ^s#* /*

people who are naive, ignorant of
both."
Other Israeli officials insisted
that the PLO was stalling for
time in the hope that diplomatic
pressure on Israel would some-
how relieve the PLO of the neces-
sity to leave Beirut and Lebanon.
According to McCloskey, PLO
"Chairman Arafat accepts all
United Nations resolutions
relevant to the Palestine ques-
tion."
THE U.S. has persistently rei-
terated in recent weeks that it
will neither recognize nor have
any contact with the PLO unless
the latter recognizes Israel's
right to exist and accepts UN Se-
curity Council Resolutions 242
and 338. According to the reports
from Beirut, Arafat told the
visiting Congressmen that the
PLO cannot accept 242 alone be-
cause it refers to the Palestinian
.. .But Mubarak Calls It
A 'Good Step Forward'
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
'resident Hoseni Mubarak
f Egypt has welcomed
Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization Chief Yasir
irafat's declaration ac-
epting "all UN resolutions
elevant to the Palestinian
Question" and called upon
ie United States to "take
step forward" towards
ie PLO in view of this de-
felopment.
Mubarak, who was speaking in
airo at the end of the ceremonies
arking the 30th anniversary of
lie 1952 revolution which over-
rew King Farouk, called
rafat's declaration "a good step
^rward in the direction of peace"
ad urged Washington to start a
alogue with the PLO leader-
ip.
[Practically the entire French
bws media hailed Arafat's
itement as a great step forward
lich, most commentators said,
fight open the way to a Pales-
i-American dialogue.
[BUT ARAFAT'S statement
strongly denounced by Am-
sador Meir Rosenne of Israel
lo termed the statement "a
apaganda maneuver trying to
ike him pass off as a moder-
9. Rosenne declared: we shall
ver negotiate with this terror-
I organization but only with the
presentatives of the autono-
>us councils of Judea, Samaria
' Gaza under the Camp David
ements."
Nevertheless, the French For-
Ministry said that France
Egypt will submit in the
days a new resolution to
the United Nations Security
Council and probably also to the
General Assembly based on what
the Ministry said was a new situ-
ation. Foreign Ministry sources
said Arafat's statement served to
"concretize an already existing
situation."
Hani al-Hassan, an advisor to
Arafat, was quoted in the Beirut
weekly, Monday Morning, as
saying that the PLO was hoping,
with French support, to get a new
UN Security Council resolution
that recognized the Palestinian
people's right to self determina-
tion and statehood.
MUBARAK, who in his speech
charged Israel with responsibility
for the Lebanon crisis, invited,
however, four prominent Jews to
Cairo for top level consultations.
The four are former World Jewish
Congress presidents Nahum
Goldmann and Philip Klutznick,
and former French Premier Pierre
Mendes- France, the three signers
of the Paris Declaration which
called upon Israel and the Pales-
tinian to mutually recognize each
other and open peace negotia-
tions' and the current WJC presi-
dent, Edgar Bronfman.
Bronfman was apparently in-
vited for having said in a speech
at the WJC Executive meeting
here earlier this month that the
Palestinian rights should be rec-
ognized, although he and the Ex-
ecutive dissociated themselves
from the Paris Declaration.
Mubarak said he wanted to
pay tribute to the four men's
"spirit of humanity and courage
which contributed to the peace
process." The Egyptian Ambas-
sadors to Paris and Washington
will forward Mubarak's invita-
tions to the four, Egyptian
sources here said.
-
issue as a refuge problem and
says nothing of Palestinian self-
determination and aspirations for
a homeland.
But according to PLO spokes-
men in Beirut and McCloskey's
apparent interpretation of the
document Arafat signed, affirm-
ation of all UN resolutions per-
tinent to the Arab-Israeli conflict
includes acceptance of 242 and
the implicit recognition of Israel
contained in its text.
McCloskey said, after meeting
with Arafat, that the PLO leader
"signed for his acceptance of all
United Nations resolutions which
include the right of Israel to
exist." But Arafat corrected him,
saying, "All UN resolutions con-
cerning the Palestinian ques-
tion."
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Commit-
tee has hailed a ruling of a
Federal appeals court that
the Immigration and Natu-
ralization Service violated
the United States Consti-
tution when it raided fac-
tories in searches for illegal
aliens.
The Committee had joined with
the Mexican American Legal De-
fense and Education Fund in a
brief amicus in support of the In-
ternational Ladies Garment
Workers Union, which had
brought suit to halt the raids.
The brief, filed with the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Ninth
Circuit, argued that "it is intoler-
able to expose American citizens
to detention and questioning on
no more of a basis than their
racial and ethnic background,"
and that the factory sweeps
violated the Fourth and Fifth
Amendments.
LESTER HYMAN. chairman
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee's Immigration Committee,
welcomed the Federal court
decision, saying, "While we be-
lieve that the immigration laws
must be vigorously enforced, we
also believe that law enforcement
officials charged with enforcing
those laws may not do so by
themselves violating the law. All
persons in this country are en-
titled under the Constitution to
due process of law and protection
against unreasonable searches
and seizures."
The amicus brief was filed in
I accordance with AJC's State-
\ merit on Undocumented Persons,
which maintains that "enforce-
ment of our immigration law
must itself conform to the
standards established by our
constitution. Mass roundups or
sweeps of any persons without
due process of law must not be
countenanced in the United
States."
The ILGWU contended that
the raids constituted unreason-
able searches and seizures be-
cause they improperly
discriminated against persons of
Latin origin. The Immigration
Service, which had won a lower
court decision, had claimed that
the interrogation of suspected
aliens was necessary in order to
enforce the immigration laws.
Jewish-Owned Shop Burned Down
PARIS (JTA) Unofficial Jewish sources say a
Jewish-owned shop was burned down last week on the
Tunisian Island of Djerba. The sources said the show was
burned as retaliation for Israel's Lebanese campaign.
The sources claim that the Tunisian local authorities
arrested the owner and charged him with arson instead of
trying to find the culprits. The Tunisian national police
contacted by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency disclaimed
any knowledge about the affair, saying that no such in-
cident has been reported to their headquarters.
Now, twice weekly direct flights
from Miami to Israel.
One more reason to choose EL AL
The Chosen Airline.

.
.


**fl-,n.
* .-.- .. ^
Page6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. Jury 30,1982
.<
U.S. Ready to Accept Plan for PLO?
. ^
Continued from Page 1 -A
Habib. Saud also said that he did
not want to give any details
wluch might prejudice" the is-
sue before he and Khaddam could
report to the Arab League. The
two ministers came to Washing
ton as representatives of the
Arab League.
A senior Administration offici-
al also refused to give any detail;
in briefing reporters on the
meeting the two Arab officials
had with Reagan and with Secre
tary of state George Shultz. But
he said that "new ideas" have
been made by the Arab officials
which provide "a new element of
possible movement in the near
future in the right direction."
THE ARAB proposal, which
reportedly provides that whik-
the armed PLO is moved to
northern Lebanon to Tripoli,
their leaders will leave the
country, is believed by observers
here to be unacceptable to Israel.
Fischer repeated that the U.S.
hopes the Arab world will con-
tinue to help solve the problem.
Saud said that the PLO has
agreed in principle to leave Leba-
non and that Arab countries
would welcome them. But most
Arab countries do not look with
relish at the prospects of having
6,000 armed terrorists arrive in
their country. There are indica-
tions that the PLO group would
be split up among such countries
as Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Al-
geria and North Yemen.
Saud made it clear that while
he believes the U.S. is sincere in
trying to avoid an Israeli attack
on west Beirut and in demanding
that Israel leave Lebanon, there
has yet not been any clarification
in "practical terms" how the
effort to achieve this will be im-
plemented.
AT THE same time, Saud
denied that he made any threat at
the White House of Arab
economic retaliation against the
U.S. if the Israeli army attacks
west Beirut. Sen. Charles Percy
(R., 111.), chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
after meeting with Saud, said
that such a move was possible.
Meanwhile, Fischer rejected
reports from Beirut that the U.S.
is moving closer to negotiating
with the PLO because of the
statements by some PLO officials
that it is willing to recognize Is-
rael's right to exist. "Our posi-
tion on the PLO remains un-
changed," he said.
Fischer said that before the
U.S. negotiates or recognizes the
PLO it must meet the American
conditions "clearly and unequi-
vocally." And he added, "In our
view they have not been."
The conditions are recognition
of Israel's right to exist and ac-
ceptance of UN Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338. Fischer
would not say how the PLO
should indicate to the U.S. if it
was willing to meet these condi-
tions. "They understand our po-
sition very well." he said. At the
same time, Fischer said the U.S.
rejects any changes in 242. The
PLO has said it cannot accept the
resolution or 338 because it does
not mention the Palestinians.
IN ANOTHER development,
the State Department admitted
that a U.S. official had met "in-
advertantly" with a PLO official,
Hatam Husseini, director of the
Palestine information office in
Washington. Fischer stressed
that the meeting at the State De-
partment did not imply any
change in U.S. policy toward the
PLO. Husseini revealed that he
had met with an Administration
official during an appearance on
ABC-TV's "Nightline" program.
Fischer explained that Hus-
seini accompanied Fahd
Kawasma, former mayor of He-
bron, and Mohammed Milhem,
former mayor of Halhul. when
thev met with Elliott Abrams,
Yaacov Gabbai wounded in Lebanon when a missile hit his
v? ^Vcf"** in S* fhaare Zedek Medical Center by Mrs
Yitschak Shamir, wife of the Minister of Foreign Affairs
Assistant Secretary of State for
Human Rights. He said that the
Department official who ad-
mitted Husseini did not know
him and thought he was part of
the travelling party accompany-
ing the two former mayors.
But they learned of his identity
before the two former Arab offici-
als were to meet with Nicholas
Veliotes. Assistant Secretary of
State of Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs, and he was barred
from that meeting.
FISCHER SAID that the Pal
estine Information Office, which
opened in 1978, is registered with
the Justice Department as a for-
eign agent for the PLO. He said
as long as it complies with all
U.S. laws and is directed by a
U.S. citizen, or a legally resident
alien, it can operate. Husseini is
believed to be a naturalized U.S.
citizen.
On another matter, Fischer
said he did not know under what
conditions Khaled Hassan, a
close associate of PLO chief Yasir
Arafat, entered the country.
Hassan accompanied the Syrian
Foreign Minister here, although
he was not allowed to attend anv
of the meetings at the White
House or the State Department
and is reportedly staying on a few
days in Washington although the
two Foreign Ministers have re-
turned to the Middle East. There
have been reports that he entered
either as a PLO delegate to the
UN or carrying a diplomatic
passport from an Arab country.
Shamir Reported to Have Made
Secret 48-Hour Trip to Europe
Shi^USA^LEM-(JTA)- Forein Mini*ter Yitzhak
Shamir made a secret 48-hour trip to Europe this week
twoTu^ere- Sff1 Achronot said Shamir had been in
two European capitals, accompanied by an aide. The For-
trferepoTs'17 SPkeSman a "no comment" to male on
rh?S^1?iS? tha/ WaS mtMnlly triggered here included
KLErSEZ*! ? "fret Sham'>Hussein meeting in
a h!^ ^daman King is on a private vis*, or
LSS&SK tnP, t0 ?umania- The Rumanians have
sought to play a role in the Beirut crisis.
Wounded Soldier 'Proves
Even Israelis Hurt
By War in Lebanon
the blockbuster
Ebullient, endearing, Qspeth
Baker comes bursting out of
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of her own".1., "a book-length
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America in the '80s.
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L JERUSALEM If you
read the world press, or
especially watch American
television, you'd never
know it. You'd never know
why Israel's Defense
Forces are in Lebanon.
You'd never know what
they are doing there. Or
even that Israelis get hurt,
too.
Take Yaacov Gabbai. In civil-
ian life. Gabbai drives a tractor
on the fields near his home in
Moshav Beit Meir near Jeru-
salem. Called up on a Tuesday
night, he was sent to the Bekaa in
the eastern sector of Lebanon,
where units of the Syrian Army
were entrenched.
UNTIL Friday morning, there
was only sporadic fighting, but
as soon as the ceasefire became
imminent, heavy shooting broke
out and. at about 11:30 a.m.. just
one half-hour before the ceasefire
came into effect, a Sagher missile
penetrated the tank where
Yaacov was the gunner.
All members of the crew
managed to escape uninjured
with the exception of Yaacov.
who was the last one out. He was
badly burned in the hip. waist
and both hands, and had shrap-
nel wounds in his thigh and left
knee.
He was immediately h_
by helicopter to STiLSSi
Safad where he fi
aid. Gabbai waa then fZ5 S
by another helico^ft
Atarot Airport gjLiLJ
where a waiting ,!?S
rushed him to BLJSS
3:40 p.m.. he was alreadTrlJ
^treatment in the EmerS;
THREE WEEKS later *M t
mg a light dressing on the S3
on his body and the scarsont
hands hardly noticeable. YW
was able to spend ShabbafX
^family and friends jS
After a few more davs of treat
mentin the Burns Unit at Sha
Zedek. he will convalesce I1\
Army convalescent home
Yiddish Dictionary
PARIS (JTA) The first,
hranco-Yiddish dictionary to be
published was finalized in Paris
this week. The heavy tome 400
page containing 23."(X)u words
has been edited by the French
Committee for the Propagation
and Survival of the Yiddish Lan
guage and Culture in France, a
non-profit organization affiliated
with the Sorbonne University.
r
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Yes or No
Continued from Page 1 A
body and of marriage is found ii.
the sixth and the seventh chap]
ters of the first book of Coring
thians. There we find Paul's idee
I of celibacy and of virginity: "It is
good for a man not to touch t
woman ... I say, therefore. t<
I the unmarried and widows, it ii
good for them if they abide ever,
as I. But if they cannot contain]
let them marry, for it is better
| marry than to burn."
In classic Christian teaching
j the world is divided. There is 1
I split between the body and thj
I soul, the senses and the spirit
I the inner and the outer, thj
I human and the divine. The worlj
I is to be overcome and trans
Icended. The Christian ideal c,
[celibacy reflects man's decisio]
Ito withdraw from Eve and reprcj
Iductivity so as better to serv]
God. One must come to God i
burdened by the concerns and
Isponsibilities of the humal
I funuly.
A JEW, however, must be cor
riected to the world and involve]
in its history. If the classic Chrd
tian ideal is celibacy, the class!
Jewish ideal is marriage. Ma
riage is the way we enter th
world of care and responsibility
God and man are not adversariel
Man is the co-creator with God I
phe repair of the world.
To marry, to have a child, is
ehgious act reflecting one's corj
rutment to transform the worlJ
To have a child is to have a bloo]
ind flesh connection with the fj
lure. We have an investment ;
Ihe future through our husbanq
^nd wives, through our chile
Wsld
Miami Beach's FineJ
Open Agin For Tr
With Your hosts Sam and Moj
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SERVICES CONDU<
12 Days-11 Nights (5
(2 meals daily inclu<
8 Days-7 Nights (Sep|
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- SImp at adjoining Atlantj
EARLY RESERl
. Phone Sam Waldi
On The 0<


Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewiah Floridian Page 7-A
Yes or No
A Young Person's
Continued from Page 1-A
body and of marriage is found in
the sixth and the seventh chap-
ters of the first book of Corin-
thians. There we find Paul's idea
of celibacy and of virginity: "It is
good for a man not to touch a
! woman ... I say, therefore, to
the unmarried and widows, it is
good for them if they abide even
as I. But if they cannot contain,
let them marry, for it is better to
| marry than to burn."
In classic Christian teaching
I the world is divided. There is a
split between the body and the
soul, the senses and the spirit,
the inner and the outer, the
I human and the divine. The world
I is to be overcome and trans -
Ifunded. The Christian ideal of
[celibacy reflects man's decision
Ito withdraw from Eve and repro-
Iductivity so as better to serve
God. One must come to God un-
burdened by the concerns and re-
sponsibilities of the human
family.
A JEW, however, must be con-
nected to the world and involved
its history. If the classic Chris-
tian ideal is celibacy, the classic
Jewish ideal is marriage. Mar-
iage is the way we enter the
vorld of care and responsibility.
God and man are not adversaries.
Ian is the co-creator with God in
^he repair of the world.
To marry, to have a child, is a
:'ligious act reflecting one's com-
itment to transform the world.
To have a child is to have a blood
id flesh connection with the fai-
lure. We have an investment in
tie future through our husbands
id wives, through our children
Guide to Sex
j
Before Marriage
Dr. Harold M. Schul-
weis is the rabbi of Temple
Valley Beth Shalom of
Encino, Calif. This article
first appeared in'Davka'.
It is reproduced courtesy
of 'Keeping Posted' and
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations.
and children's
riage, then,
children. Mar-
is not understood
biologically but theologically and
morally.
What in Judaism is the major
motivation for marriage? It is a
primary mitzvah to see to it that
the world is continued. The clas-
sic text used by rabbinic com-
mentators to sustain this moral
stance comes from Isaiah 45:18,
"He created it not a waste. He
formed it to be inhabited.
Interestingly, the Hebrew term
for bachelor is ravak, which
means literally emptiness, for the
willful bachelor empties the
world. Folk tradition further
dramatized the point by denying
the bachelor the prayer shawl,
thereby making him something
of marked man.
BUT PROCREATION is not
the sole end of marriage. A re-
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hi iii-
markable statement from the
tractate Yevamoth (61b) reads,
"Though a man may have many
children (and has thus fulfilled
the mitzvah of procreation), he is
not to remain unmarried because
it is not good for man to be
alone." To be alone is the dreaded
curse among our people.
In a 13th Century treatise,
Menora Ha-Maor, written by Is-
rael Ibn Nakawa and popularly
attributed to Nachmanides, we
find a chapter dealing with the
sanctity of sexuality in the rela-
tions between husband and wife.
In the "Epistle of Holiness"
addressed to the husband, the
author writes: "Engage her first
in conversation that puts her
mind at ease and gladdens her.
Thus, your mind and intent will
be in harmony with hers. Speak
words which arouse her to pas-
sion, union, love, and desire.
Never may you force her, for in
such a union the Divine Presence
cannot abide. Quarrel not with
her win her over with words
of graciousness and seductive-
ness."
TO THOSE who feel under the
influence of Aristotle, such as
Maimonides, and who disap-
proved of the sense of touch, our
author admonished, "Let a man
not consider sexual union as
something ugly or repulsive, for
thus we blaspheme God. Hands
which write a sacred Torah are
exalted and praiseworthy; hands
which steal are ugly."
And so it is with the sexual or-
gans of the body. All energies are
morally neutral. There is nothing
that is intrinsically contaminat-
ing, nothing that is instrinsically,
holy except the use to which that
energy is put.
The non-Jewish contemporar-
ies of Al Nakawa and Mach-
manides, Peter Lombard and
Pope Innocent III, insisted that
the holy spirit leaves a room even
where a married couple has
sexual relations, for such action,
even if for procreation, shames
God.
THERE THUS grew up a
church tradition that on Friday
one is to abstain from sex in
memory of the death of the
Savior, on Saturday in honor of
the Virgin Mary and on Sunday
in memory of the Resurrection.
In this tradition, holiness and
sexuality are contradictory.
Contrast this view with that of
the tractate Sotah (17a) which
asserts, "When a husband and
wife unite in holiness, there the
devine presence abides." The
Shabbat is the celebration of the
creation of the world. What more
appropriate time to rejoice with
one's wife.
It is clear that today people are
not struggling with the inhibi-
tions of the Victorian era. The
pendulum has swung the other
way. The older morality proposed
the ideal of loving without sex.
The new sexual morality en-
courages sexuality without love.
Both positions are daulistic and
in conflict with Judaism.
IN ITS BLUNTEST form, the
new morality is articualted by the
publisher of Playboy, Hugh
Hefner. Hugh Hefner puts it on
the line. "Sex is a function of the
body, a drive which man shares
with the animals, like eating,
drinking and sleeping; it is a
physical demand that must be
satisfied. If you do not satisfy it,
you have all kinds of neuroses
and repression psychoses. Sex is
here to stay. Let us forget the
prudery that makes us hide from
it, throw away those inhibitions,
find a girl who is like-minded and
let yourself go."
One of the typical cartoons in
Playboy depicts a boy and girl
locked in amorous embrace dur-
ing which he cries out, "Why talk
of love at a time like this.''
Four basic arguments are
usually presented by those advo-
cating the right and propriety of
having sexual relations without
marriage. The first argument
maintains that being in love is its
own justification. The important
thing is "to feel." Feeling is more
important than a marriage
license.
The second argument insists
that sexual relations openly ar-
rived at by mutual consent are
fine as long as "nobody gets
hurt." No one advocates seduc-
tion or coercion.
The third argument asserts
that sexuality is important as a
means of determining marital
compatibility. How will you
know whether you are compatible
without knowing if you are
sexually compatible.
The fourth argument claims
that sexuality is morally neutral.
It is a biological phenomenon and
not really different today from
yesterday's holding hands.
I for one. cannot accept these
four arguments because I cannot
isolate the body from the total
self, nor can I isolate the private
self from the community. If sex-
uality is essentially a bodily
function, the purpose of which is
to relieve tension, then the body
is merely a machine. Clearly, be-
fore you invest in a machine, you
try it out. You see whether or not
it works. If it doesn't work, you
may discard it or trade it in or try
to fix it up. Such a mechanical
view of sex depersonalizes man
and woman.
THE BODY conceived of as a
machine leads to serious conse-
quences. Psychiatrists report a
rising concern with impotence
Continued on Page 12-A
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~ -i-fflmHU-HlLJKfJJ
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, Jury 30, 1982
Top Priority
UJA Fund to Aid Services Hit Hard by War
Page i-A
Henry Taub. president of the >
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee.
Loup said that the Special
Fund will be the American Jew-
ish community's share of the cost
of the programs and services
which traditionally have been the
humanitarian responsibility of
the Jewish Agency but which the
Agency could no longer fund
when UJA Community cam-
paigns failed to provide adequate
support. Because of the drain on
the Israeli economy resulting
from its entry into Lebanon, the
people of Israel can no longer
sustain these programs, and the
Agency must reassume the fi-
nancial burden of providing
them. Loup said.
"Because we did not
*m*g*i money in the past," he
said, "the people of Israel have
had to bear the cost of Life-en-
hancing programs that are right-
fully our responsibility. The re-
solution adopted by the officers
of UJA reaffirm our commitment
to meeting that responsibility
fuBy."
THE RESOLUTION urges
communities to establish guide-
lines for their campaigns that in-
clude provisions for accepting
gifts to the Special Fund only
from donors who first match or
increase their 1962 gifts during
the 1963 campaign. Loup said
this step was taken because the
officers recognized the need to in-
crease giving to the regular cam-
paign to protect the integrity of
established needs locally, nation-
ally and overseas.
Communities are uged to strive
for substantial increases in
pledges for Project Renewal, the
worldwide social and cultural re-
habilitation program for resi-
dents of Israel's distressed immi-
grant neighborhoods.
The action of UJA's leadership
is the latest step in the mobiliza-
tion of American Jewish com-
munities for an emergency fund-
raising effort that began last
month. American Jewish leaders
who toured settlements in the
Galilee and met with Jewish
Agency and government biffici-
als during the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors meetings
returned to the United States to
brief community leaders and pro-
fessional and to outline scops of
the human needs resulting from
the crisis. Loup explained.
THE COMMUNITIES im-
mediately moved to provide cash
during the first week of the crisis
and to accelerate 1982 campaign
efforts, he noted. The drive to
bring the 1982 campaign to a
strong close is continuing under
the leadership of UJA president
Herscfael Blumberg. while an in-
tensive round of meetings is tak-
ing place at the community, re-
gional and national levels to plan
and organize the Special Fund
campaign.
"The response from the
American Jewish community has
been enormously encouraging."
Loup said, "and demonstrates
the depth of our commitment to
Loup said that the Special
Fund will be the American
Jewish communitys share of
the cost of the programs and
services which traditionally
have been the humanitarian
responsibility of the Jewish
Agency byt which the Agen-
cy could longer fund when
UJACommunity campaigns
failed to provide adequate
support.
our people in Israel and to the
quality of Jewish life in the Jew-
ish homeland It is a message we
hope the whole world hears, and
understands."
Reports of similar responses
have been received from major
Jewish communities in England.
France, the Scandinavian coun-
tries, Canada and South Africa.
Keren Hayesod, UJA's sister or-
ganization responsible for fund-
raising worldwide, is committed
to raising $100 million to meet
emergency needs in Israel.
I
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...
Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridlan Page 9-A

v*

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THIS YEAR,YOUR VACATION CAN DO AS MUCH FOR ISRAEL
AS IT CAN DO FOR YOU.
A vacation can relax you. Invigorateyou.Tanyou. Even It can do more than any other vacation. And it can cost
educate your children. Make this one an Israel vacation legs than you think,
audit can do all that, and so much more. For all the information you need to
For Israel, it can show solidarity Support. And give Israel vacation. *ee M^a% M1=I nli
Israel the sengftjpt the Jewish people lye caafr iSKAcL. KHjI|,I NOW.
m
Israel Government Tourist Office and El Al Israel Airlines


"*^^w
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, July 30,1982
Ordeal for Sysiphus
Continued from Page 1-A
have learned from the AW ACS
defeat.
MANY OF the arguments will
be the same. But there will also
be some important differences.
Word of a possible arms sale
for Jordan came during Secretary
of State Caspar Weinberger's re-
cent visit to that country and
discussions with King Hussein.
After Israel vigorously protested
such a sale, the Administration
appeared to back off, labeling it
Weinberger's "suggestion."
President Reagan sent a letter to
Prime Minister Begin assuring
that the U.S. will help Israel
maintain her strategic superi-
ority. But most followers of Mid-
dle East affairs expect that Jor-
dan arms sale will be pro-
posedafter the November elec-
tion, when the divisive issue
won't damage those up for reelec-
tion.
There is a chance, believes
Howard Squadron, recent presi-
dent of the Council of Presidents
of Major Jewish Organizations,
that if the Democrats do well in
the election, the Administration
won't propose the sale. "If the
Democrats come back in equal or
greater numbers," Squadron
said, "this Jordan arms sale will
have tough sledding."
"THEY'LL DO it in a series,'
predicted military and political
affairs consultant Aaron Rosen-
baum of Washington, who ex-
plained that after the U.S.-Jor-
dan military commission meeting
in April, the Administration may
ask Congress to upgrade the im-
mobile Hawks already in Jordan
to make them mobile. Then, after
the election, the Administration
will probably submit a separate
proposal for more mobile Hawks
and F-16s, says Rosenbaum, a
former American Israel Public
Affairs Committee official whose
specialty is Mideast arms.
Now a private consultant,
Rosenbaum is credited with fo-
cusing AW ACS debate on the
threat to American technological
interests through a major article
he wrote for the Washington
Post, August 30, 1981.
Congressman Clarence Long,
who led the fight against the
AWACS in the House of Repre-
sentatives, believes he has come
up with a way to dissuade the
Administration from proposing
the Jordan sale in the first place.
Long said that as the chairman of
the House appropriations sub-
committee on foreign operations,
he is going to "stall" action on
some S20 million in economic
support funds and another $75
million in.foreign military sales
credits for Jordan in the fiscal '83
budget until the Administration
lets him know if it plans on pro-
posing the sale.
IF THE Administration does
pursue the sale, Long added tihat
he will move to wipe out all U.S.
aid for Jordan in the '83 budget
in hopes that the Administration
will withdraw the sale.
After AWACS: A Fight to Arm Jordan
ND TWO:
tne Jordan^

Now Jordan Wants Arms
"He can try it." was the reac-
tion of one Israel supporter in
Washington, who was decidedly
skeptical that Long's ploy would
work.
In approaching King Hussein
about U.S. arms sales, Secretary
Weinberger has maintained that
he was trying to convince the
Jordanians, who have signed an
agreement to purchase $200 mil-
lion worth of SAM-8 mobile mis-
sies from the Soviets, that Mos-
cow "was not a very desirable
source" of weaponry.
"The essential (Administra-
tion) argument will be, 'If we
don't do this, Jordan will go to
the Russians,' Squadron said.
THAT ARGUMENT has al-
ready been weakened, given Hus-
sein's statement this month that
his agreement with the Soviets
was completed before he visited
Washington last November and
that the Russian deal (paid for by
Iraq) will go through.
In pressing for the sale to Jor-
dan, proponents will also argue
that the U.S. must continue de-
veloping its friendships with
"moderate" Arab states and that
by so doing, these states will be
motivated to join the peace
process. In addition, the Ad-
ministration will emphasize the
threat that Jordan faces across
its northern border in Syria.
Jordan has cited both Syria
and Israel as threats. But the
Administration will emphasize
Syria and not Israelbecause,
as one JOrdanian official was
quoted recently as saying, "they
have to say Syria, because other-
wise they won't get them (the
Hawks) from Congress."
Proponents of the Jordan arms
sale will also try to disprove the
threat that a heavily-armed
Jordan poses to Israel.
"HOW COULD Jordan be a
in-
threat to Israel?" Jordan's
formation minister, Abnan Abu
Odeh argued in the op-ed pages of
the Washington Post Mar. 7.
"Jordan of the meager resources,
the financially dependent nation
that has placed its major capital
investment along its borders with
Israel and the ceasefire line, that
has consistently, for more than
one decade now, maintained
tranquility over its territory and
has consistently and s
caUed for and worked fort?
peace in this region? w"*
"How can Jordan risk a
vocation in Israel, with [J?
gressive attitudes and
pansionist policies? Stronger ,
richer Arab countries
a provocation,"
official continued.
In pushing for
weaopns sales for the Arabs
some supporters of Israel worrv
that the United States is noting
seeking to cultivate Arab friend
ships but to redirect U.S. policv
away from Israel to the Arabs I
friend of Israel in Washington
suggested that a redirected U $
policy may not be the objectiveof
the Administration's actions but
it may be the result of those"
actions.
OPPONENTS of the Jordan
arms sale will not quarrel with
the notion that the U.S. needs to
build alliances with other Mid-
east nations besides Israel, but
they will suggest that the U.S. is
going about it the wrong way.
They will stress that the U.S.
should link arms sales, and
friendships, with the Arabs to
participation in the peace
process. In that regard, they will
blast Jordan's assertion that it
has "consistently and sincerely
called for and worked for genuine
peace in this region'' and will
point up Jordan's rejection of
Camp David.
The major argument against
to'' sale, however, will be the
safe's critical threat to Israel's
security and the resultant likeli-
hood of a preemptive strike by
Israeland war.
"The I-Hawks have the poten-
tial of giving the Jordanians air
superiority over the battlefield
and over civilian flightsthat's
the main fear," commented a
supporter of Israel in Washing
toil. "If there was a crisis, and Is-
rael felt threatened she would
probably be prompted to go in
and wipe out the missile batter-
ies."
ISRAEL'S MILITARY
superiority has deterred the
Arabs from launching another
war, Anti-Defamation League
Continued on Page 4-B
to the
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toplj do us both a favor
call 0 the Thrift Shop
old new smalfc^ large
mess
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f
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Social P^chai,e8
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we'll come get it iSs and
there's no charge
Everything you give to the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is tax deductibte,
and is sold to pay for medical supplies and medication for the indigent elderly of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
SSSFj-g Gardens
1 Call 751-3988
In Miami 5713 NW 27 Avenue, Miami. Tel: 635-6753
In Miami 500 NE 79 Street, Miami. Tel: 751-3988
In Hallandale 3149 Hallandale. Beach Blvd., Hallandale.
Tel: (In Broward) 981-8245. (In Dade) 625-0620
In Carol City 2800 NW 183 Street, Carol City. Tel: 624-8252____________^^
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board. Harold Beck, President.
Aaron Kravitz, Chm. Thrift Shop Committee. Fred D. Hlrt, Executive Director.


New Stamp
Touro Synagogue to be Commemorated
WASHINGTON A
20-cent commemorative
jstage stamp featuring
the historic Touro Syna-
gogue will be issued in
Jewport, R.I., on Aug. 22,
[he U.S. Postal Service has
mnounced.
The oldest existing synagogue
building in the United States, it
was built principally by Sephar-
Bic Jews from Spain and Portu-
_. who had fled the Inquisition
End found in the Rhode Island
^lony the religious freedom they
lought. Noted colonial architect
Peter Harrison designed the syn-
agogue, which was dedicated in
763. It was designated a Na-
tional Historical Site in 1946.
THE FIRST day of issue cere-
nony will be held at 11 a.m. in
[Touro Synagogue, and Postmas-
er General William F. Bolger
kill serve as the dedication
ipeaker. Rabbi Theodore Lewis
^f Touro Synagogue and Aaron
\. Slom. president of the Society
^f Friends of Touro Synagogue,
Jso will participate.
Postmaster General Bolger un-
veiled the design of the stamp in
Vashington, on December 10,
1980. at the opening of an exhibi-
tion depicting "The Jewish Com-
nunity in Early America: 1654-
[830." In his unveiling address,
lolger noted that "While Touro
Synagogue was built by a specific
rroup of people, the visions, hope
fcnd confidence which made it a
eality are part of the heritage
equeathed to all Americans by
kll the stalwart colonists who
btruggled to establish and build
pis nation."
In 1970, President George
Vashington visited Newport and
; Touro
I Synagogue
I
I To bigotry,
no sanction.
I To persecution,
> no assistance.
(roi fp- WashingK >i i
received a letter of welcome from
the Touro Congregation. Part of
his reply read, "For happily the
Government of the United
States, which gives to bigotry no
sanction, to persecution no as-
sistance, requires only that they
who live under its protection
should demean themselves as
good citizens, in giving it on all
occasions their effectual sup-
port."
THE DESIGN of the stamp
honors Touro Synagogue as an
historic American building and a
symbol of America's tradition of
religious freedom. Printed on the
left side of the stamp, beside a
full-color drawing of the building,
are the words "Touro Synagogue,
Newport, R.I. 1763" in three lines
of red type. Below that, in five
lines of black type, appears "To
bigotry, no sanction. To persecu-
tion, no assistance. George
Washington." "USA 20c" is
printed in black type in the upper
right corner of the stamp.
The design of the stamp was a
joint effort by two artists. The
view of the Synagogue at the
right of the stamp is from a
painting by Donald Moss of
Kidgefield, Conn., and the typo-
graphy is the work of Bradbury
Thompson of Riverside, Conn.
Following the British occu-
pation of Newport during the
Revolutionary War, Touro Syna-
gogue ceased to be used for reli-
gious purpose for over 100 years.
In 1780, the General Assembly of
Rhode Island held its first meet-
ing in the building and the State
Supreme Court also held sessions
there.
BY THE end of the eighth
Century, the congrega-
tion had scattered, and the Syna-
gogue closed. It was preserved
and maintained by descendants
of the Reverend Isaac Touro, but
services were not resumed there
until 1883. Today, the building
and its furnishings reflect those
early years, having been carefully
maintained and restored.
The horizontally-oriented com-
memorative size stamp was
modeled by Peter Cocci, and the
engraver for the lettering and
numerals was John C. Masure.
Both are with the Bureau of En-
graving and Printing.
Reagan Aide Vows Talks of Visas
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
lichael Gale, President Rea-
an's liaison with the Jewish
immunity, reiterated the Ad-
iinistration's position that it
vill raise the issue of Soviet
Jewry emigration at all "top
level" meetings between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.
"The President shares your
hope that the leaders in the
Soviet Union will reconsider their
policies on emigration and human
rights and renew their commit-
ment to the Helsinki Final Act,
LABOR DAY WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days A 4 nights
Sept. 2 to Sapt. 6
$110
pet
person
double
xc
PLUS TAX &
GRATUITIES
INCLUDING
MEALS
4 days A 3 nights
Sept 3 to Sept. 6
$85
per
person
double
occ
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCC0TH
Services Will be Conducted by Cantor Herman Klein
BEAUTIFUL
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v. TV in All Rooms
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fir1
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A confirmed High Holiday reservation made at the Crown
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GLATT
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Your Hosts, Michael Lefkowitz & Alex Smilow
not just with empty words, but
with deeds," Gale told some 100
persons attending the daily noon
vigil across from the Soviet
Embassy here. It was the first
time in the 11-year history of the
vigil that a White House official
had participated.
THE VIGIL was dedicated to
Ida Nudel, who had been exiled
to Siberia and released last
March. Before the vigil, a five-
member delegation from the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry and the Jewish Communi-
ty Council of Greater Washing-
ton met with Elizabeth Dole, di-
rector of the White House office
of public liaison, to urge the
President's help on behalf of
Nudel.
They said Nudel was denied
permission to return to Moscow
after she was freed and was sent
to the Riga only to be told that
she would not receive a residency
permit there. She is believed to be
travelling to Strunino. Dole, who
said she was "chilled" by the
Soviet mistreatment of Nudel,
said she would urge Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz
to intervene on Nudel's behalf.
At the vigil, Joan Sacarob of
Hadassah attempted unsuccess-
fully to deliver petitions on behalf
of Nudel to the Soviet Embassy.
The Jewish group had stressed to
Dole that Nudel seemed to be a
"person without a state in a
country that will not permit her
to emigrate."
AT THE vigil, Gale declared
that Nudel "reminds us that
there are thousands of Soviet
Jews and others who desire to
emigrate. The President has been
deeply disturbed by recent
reports that the flow of emigrants
from the Soviet Union has been
sharply reduced."
Friday, July 30, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Tehiya Party's Entry
Into Coalition to Give
Begin Working Majority
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The ultra-nationalist
Tehiya Party is expected to
join Premier Menachem
Begin's coalition govern-
ment soon. But difficulties
have arisen over its demand
for a large new budget to
increase and expand Jewish
settlement on the West
Bank.
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor and Deputy Premier and
Housing Minister David Levy
say the money simply is not
there. Other minister from
Likud's Liberal Party wing op-
pose the inclusion of Tehiya in
the government on principle. The
faction's leaders opposed the
Camp David accords and the Is-
raeli-Egyptian peace treaty,
sponsored no confidence motions
against the government and en-
couraged die-hards to try to pre-
vent the return of Sinai to Egypt
last April
NEVERTHELESS, Tehiya is
ideologically close to Begin's
Herut Party. Its three Knesset
mandates would give the govern-
ment a comfortable 64-seat ma-
jority in the Knesset in place of a
present one-seat margin. When
negotiations with Tehiya began
last week, Begin made it a point
to be present.
Tehiya, which strongly sup-
ports the war in Lebanon, is
believed anxious to join the gov-
ernment in time to participate in
the "fateful decision" over the
current stalemate in west Beirut
and in negotiations involving the
future of Lebanon. But it de-
mands an accelerated settlement
policy on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip and, beyond that, the
prompt imposition of Israeli law
to those territories, an act that
would be tantamount to annexa-
tion.
It also demands a Cabinet
portfolio for party leader Yuval
Neeman, a Tel Aviv University
physics professor who is an out-
spoken advocate of a "Greater
Israel."
The faction apparently has
dropped its demands that Israel
unilaterally abrogate the Camp
David accords. Neeman, how-
ever, has called for the establish-
ment of "security boundaries"
for Israel deep inside Lebanon, at
least as far north of the Litani
River or possibly the Zaharani
River, even further north. Those
proposals are not supported by
the faction as a whole.
. IT IS NOT known how far Be-
gin is willing to go to embrace
Tehiya and thereby improve his
precarious position in the
Knesset. Opposition to Tehiya
within the Cabinet seems to be
mainly on financial grounds.
Aridor noted that there is no
money in the Treasury for addi-
tional settlements in the territor-
ies. He said that to meet Tehiya's
demands, each ministry would
have to allocate two percent of its
own budget, something none of
the ministers is likely to agree to.
Some Likud-Liberal MKs want
to make the admission of Tehiya
to the coalition conditional on the
appointment of one of their own
men, Minister-Without-Portfolio
Yitchak Modai, to the post of
Minister of Information. There is
no Information Ministry in the
government and Foreign Minis-
ter Yitzhak Shamir, like his pre-
decessors, has fought hard
against the creation of one. The
Foreign Ministry is presently
responsible for the dissemination
of information abroad.
But there is a growing feeling
in Israel that the country urgent-
ly needs more effective overseas
information machinery in the
wake of the Lebanese war which
has tarnished Israel's image
abroad.
A Costa Cruise
is easy to take.
J Take the
Bahamas
Party Ship.
Amerikanis from Miami,
3- and 4-night cruises.
It's half price sail time on the fun-loving,
spacious Amerikanis sailing from
Miami, August 2 through ^t^^M I
November 19,1982. ^ lam
I
I
That's when the sec-
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"for 50% less at a savings of $202.50 to
$332.50* Choose a 3-night cruise to Nassau
sailing every Friday or a 4-night cruise to Freeport
and Nassau sailing every Monday.
So have some fun at these easy-on-the-pocket
prices. Just call your travel agent. It's that easy.
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ft
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In Miami 358 7330


V"

w my
White House Confident'
Habib
WASHINGTON -
JTAi The White House
has expressed full confi-
dence in the ability of
Philip Habsb to i iliasji
he has been employed
by the Bechtel Group of
San Franciaco forthepasf
year as a i
taecaaot
net by Sec Larrr
Prwau E. SD< tiau Habab
nnji as D S specmi esrroy on
U* gTOBBds UM fiJS rr>r '+-*t-
wnM the giant miianii.ii.
rxLptLzy -,oc:pTus*c T.jt a^_j:>
to *KTV* a; i :-y^" --^vr
e tie Ler>a=>eK -. r..
-Tne Pre**
Wat .- Hi
'aajnxy He Hababi is an ho-
noraoie man. I cannot find words
oour to describe the Prea>
dent s feelings ior PhiJ Habib
Speaxee saicL
ANOTHER WHITE Howe
press aide. Anaon Frankhng. de-
dared that Any implication or
any ruifliri ia absurd- Wale
confinnina; that the Adnuzuatra-
uon was rhscssig Habib s
Beefate. association, be stressed
that "We re confident that Am-
bassador Habib tt wonting soiery
for the President and tne United
States Government id tne Middie
PhiUp Habib
The djadoaure that Habsb. a
reured career Cip*-xnat.
by Bechtel appeared m The
WasbanaToc Poet- It was con-
firmed by s Bechtel rposesEar:
Rick Laubscner. who said he >u
engaged last year by George
SbnJti. former president of Bech-
tel and now Secretary of State.
primarily as a consultant oc tne
Pacific beam region, the rr^-.r.
area of Habib s poor expertise.
According to Preasler and
several other members of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
raspucc-as wxi .-upset to
a MaidseEast
the
at dneaan of i
tat Arse wort rttrfrr Saaaf
aYnSMa
THIS WAS the
.-umC to Shaaths i
_=e saMsai vf sharp
Netertcawsa he was naifiansl
_=a^_=:-_.;. hi -_^e NBSbYb Re-
auoaa C-or-naxee and the faD
Senate rwc weeks ago
Prese^er said that Shakz s
to fwtsai Habsb em-
by Bechtai darmg the
;.*r=gi snowed a lack of candor.
r.i xntendec :na: Bechtel
" actrrety lobbata for pro-Arab
a-ses and Habsb therefore
car not be effective now that K
sas Deer, repealed that he is a
paid consultant to the company
According to Preasler. Habsb" s
connectaoc wan Bechtel was aa
ernnarrassment to Preaadent
Reagan It was Riasrsn who. m
Mi> Hbm called Habib oat of
retirement to defuse a rapidly es-
calaung crisis m 1-ebsnon.
The controversy over his em-
ployment by Bechtel erupted as
Habib was on a round of
drpiomacy- at Reagan's
to find a scant ion to the
Beirut crisis. He visaed Riyadh.
Damascus and Cairo over the
weeaend and fiew to London to
* King Hussein of Jordan who
is there on a private visit. He is
expected in Israel shortly.
A Guide to Sex Before Marriage
Coatiawed from Page 7 A
and frigidity. Patients no kmger
come to the psychiatrists with
the old comptaims of sexual in-
hibitions They now come with a
complaint of an incapacity to feel,
an inability to be moved, an
inability to laugh or cry. or love.
The complaint of these eman-
cipated men and women is of a
numbness, a frozeneas. an anes-
theized self. When the other
person is seen as an appendage of
your body, as an instrument of
physical gratification, as an
object, you are alone with your-
self You do not experience love ,
To love is to see the world
through the eyes of the other. It
is to be patient with the tempera-
ment of the other To love is to be
willing to defer the gratification
of the moment. When others
argue it is all right to relate sexu-
ally with another as long as
"nobody gets hurt.' they mean
something other than what I
mean by love. To love is to suffer
the hurt of another and open
one's self to the possibilkks of
being hurt by the other.
Who can hurt me more than
someone I love? The stranger
cannot hurt me. Many turn to
Barry University
u
A Clash*
M.A. in JEWISH STUDIES
Fall Semester &30 9:30 p.m.
Mon. Temple Israel. Kendall
"Modern Jewish Nationalism'
Dr. Yehuda Shamir
Tues. Barry University Campus
"World of the Talmud"
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Thurs. Barry University Campus
"Contemporary Judaism"
Rabbi Samuel Jaffa
Admissions Off It* 11300 N .E. 2nd Ave.
758-3392 Miami Shores, FL 33161
Name.
Address.
City.
.State/
ZipL
Phone:Home_
-Bus.
sexuality without love, not out of
hist, but out of fear Behind much
of the trivialization of sex. behind
Playboy coolness, is a fear of
authentic relationships, a fear to
suffer, a fear of responsibility and
of community.
THE ISSUE before us is not
sexuality, the issue is character.
How we express our sexuality
reveals much about our moral
character. A person who requires
instant joy. instant contact, here
and now. is devoid of frustration
tolerance, gets angry with any
demand to postpone immediate
gratification, and becomes im-
patient with the need to under-
stand the needs of the other.
Such a person is lktle more
than a spoiled child grown up.
Erotic detachment, "without any
strings attached." is not a re-
hearsal for marriage. It is a re-
hearsal for divorce. It is a rehear-
sal for the growth of moral
coarseness and insensitivky.
What is most important is not
the wedding, the chupah, the
breaking of glass, the presence of
the rabbi The religious rite of
passage takes on its proper signi-
ficance when it expresses the
virtues with which a community
has endowed marital love. For
Judaism marriage is not a private
arrangement; marriage cele-
brates the formation of a moral
community within a moral com-
munity. The vow which declares
"be thou consecrated unto me" is
not complete. It is completed by
the statement ". in accor-
dance wkh the law of Moses and
Israel." When two persons are
convenanted for the purpose of
marriage, there is a third pre-
sence. That presence is the Jew-
ish community and its ideals of
divinity.
The ultimate task of life is to
i overcome separation, to live with
another because without the
other one cannot become a whole
human being. That love embraces
body and soul.
i
B'nai B'rith Sends
Delegate to Provide
Info on Soviet Jewry
WASHINGTON JTA -
la aa effart to ie%sase the cam-
by the Soviet Union to
Era. Br.tr
dese-
t
about the status of Soviet Jewry
to the World Conference on
Cnkaral Pohaes in Mexico Ckv
July 26-Aa*. 6. The conference is
to be held under the annum of
the United Ni
Sormifif and Cukural
uon UNESCO*.
Phihp Lax. chairman of the
International Council of B'nai
B nth. said the group plans to
present data to heip UNESCO
fuifiH its guarantees that every-
one has the nxht to enjoy his own
ethnic culture, mrkuftrtg the lan-
sofi
The conference has been called
by UNESCO to review cultural
poucies and practices adopted
smce its last such meeting in
19T0. The world organization
seeks also "to encourage
thorough reflection on fresh
guidelines both for strengntning
the cultural rli 'frit in de-
velopemeni and for facilitating
auernational cultural co-
operation The meeting's agen-
da includes consideration of the
preservation of the non-material
heritage, such as language.
CITING THE Soviets Union's
drive to prohibit the taatanag1 of
Hebrew and Yiddish. Lax assert-
ed. "Central to ranni rights in
the field of a minority cukure is
the assurance that that culture's
language or languages will not be
subject to discrimination, let
alone to deprivation or ex-
clusion.' He added that "this is
specifically defined in inter-
national law
Lupoaeda,^
Kigr-.s ,
------- on Cn-i. t^- p
R****. hot*
unanimonsrv. ._^, .
ranml ActaE^^.J^
?a*one^. ~ ^ -rc.ide
Sonet Laaon v. ^J"
man rights anc ^uaeati
J^oaa- and to ?r^T
encourage the exerc je
Even tnongh th*
Union has accoroec offk
recognition of Hebrv* u i
and living language ji:
knaed to the cohere -.'. iheji
ish people, the enverrae* J
displayed a sysiemau; pat;*, J
discnmination aga^st the M|
and teaching of Ht;rTt [J
dedared-
THE B'nai B'nth .rader uJ
that the UNESCO =**:ag J
also expected to be -j* zsl^^A
propaganda aoacx :-. Icndbyl
supporters of the Pustwl
Liberation Orgaruza:,- If thail
e such an attack. Lai said, tail
B'nai B'rith deiega:.>- p-J
ared to counter :-.: :;-< abovl
the Lebanon akuatic- aj vellal
Israel's rule over all of Jerusalem f
In addition to Lax :he B'nai
B rith delegation consols of Dr..
Isaac Frenkel of San:.a^. Chile. I
co-chairman of the C: .nal indJ
head of its Latin America sal
tion. Samuel Hoffer.Derg iu
UNESCO represen:a::ve il
Pans. Rabbi Gunther Fnedl
lander of Miami a men-.Deroftkl
International Council and far-L
marly director of its Canbbeu
region: and Dr. Harr.i Schoen-|
berg. director of :he or-
ganiaiiaws Unkec Nations!
office.
DO YOU
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SUMMER & EARLY AUTUMN? WHY
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Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Readers Write: Ad Heartened Israelis
Leo Mindlin
)IT0R. The Jewish Floridian:
Last weekend, the newspapers
| Israel, both in Hebrew and in
Lglish, carried a large display
vertisement in the name of the
ater Miami Jewish Federa-
I speaking on behalf of the
irish Community of Greater
ni and informing Prime Min-
er Menachem Begin and the
ens of Israel that during this
ne of crisis and distress, Great
liami stands with us here.
think the readers of The Jew-
ish Floridian should know that
.his advertisement had a pro-
bund and encouraging effect on
-he people of Israel. At a time
when we are being subjected to
an oil-financed smear campaign
overseas, it is heartening to know
that this large community of
yours truly understands the situ-
ation and supports us.
All the distortions and falsific-
ations of press and TV notwith-
standing, you should know that
New Italian Law to Make
Religion an 'Optional' Subject
By LISA BILLIG
I ROME (JTA| The Italian
rliament has passed a law that
111 make "religion" an optional
Ibject in the high school curri-
ilum. It has been hailed as a
ctory for the democratic and
nralistic philosophy and a
ndamental change in the way
pgion is taught in this Catholic
tion.
hitherto, religion, meaning
|tholicism, was a required sub-
t, though students could re-
est exemption at the beginning
{the school year. Under the new
v, students may elect to in-
Ide or exclude religion from
eir studies.
In addition*, relationships be-
tween the Catholic and the
various non-Catholic religious
communities in Italy will be de-
fined when separate agreements
come up for revision. These a-
greements include the Church-
state Concordat and agreements
between the Church and the Pro-
testant Waldensian and Jewish
communities which date back to
the period 1929-30.
It is expected that Italian Jew-
ish communities in the future will
be able to organize separate
classes on Judaism on request.
The details remain to be defined
but the approach is expected to
be extended to the grade school
as well as the high school level.
Fabled Uzi Has Become
A World Trademark
Continued from Page 4-A
ne things which remain ex-
jsive here.
Israel has not always been
Ippy about its customers. When
|i Amin asked us to sell him
khter planes, and we refused, he
pke off all contact with us.
Ime idealists at home have
pun mended that Israel draw a
and refuse to sell to nations
at violate human rights. Who
' > be the judge?
["here is hardly a country in the
brld that is not accused by
ther bloc of countries of
plating human rights. Israel,
kich has been the target of
ernational lynching parties in
UN knows how much value
be attached to decisions of
at august body. Furthermore,
me two thirds of the world is
bsed to trade with Israel under
ly circumstances. The number
I potential customers is limited,
Id many of these today buy
am Israel only on condition that
the business relationship be kept
completely secret.
NOW IT can be revealed, of
course, that Iran under the Shah
was a major customer. In 1978,
for example, one Israel company
alone, Soli a m, sold more than $50
million worth of military mer-
chandise to the Shah. The closing
of that market caused a severe
jolt to the Israel economy.
More recently, the New York
Times has published reports
claiming that last year Israel sold
S70 million worth of munitions to
Ayatullah Khomeini's govern-
ment in Iran. There have been
reports that controversial
governments in Latin America
equip their armies with Israel's
products.
An opprobrium has always
been attached to the very concept
of "munitions makers." How
ironic that little Israel, which so
ardently yearns for peace, has by
circumstances been propelled
into that very occupation.
We run the party*
get the applause.
Bring your next banquet, reception, bar mitzvah,
lor ball to the Marriott Hotel.
We'll make statues of ice and create theme
|parties to delight. Keep the coffee cups
|full. Flaming dessert presentation.
We have rooms for
parties of ten or a grand
ballroom for five hundred.
iVe serve everything from
drinks to five-course
kit-down dinners.
All you have to
Po is relax. Show
rour charm. And
kt us throw the
barty.
wfea I 4.XL-.
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Miami /JtfcUTfolt Moid & Racquet Club
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there has never been an army
which has been more considerate
of civilian lives and welfare, and
which has been greeted with such
welcome and respect as Zahal,
Israel's Defense Army, in
Lebanon.
I do not presume to speak for
all the citizens of Israel, but I am
sure I do voice the opinion of
most, when I send you this ex-
pression of our warm gratitude
for your support, and for your
thoughtfulness in expressing it at
this time.
CARL ALPERT
Haifa
PLO's "Last Gasp-
A Hopeful Fantasy
EDITOR'S NOTE: Carl Al-
pert is the distinguished
newspaper columnist whose
' reports from Haifa, where
he lives, frequently appear
in The Jewish Floridian
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Our controversial Interior Sec-
retary James Watt has a lot of
chuzpah in calling upon Jews, in
a letter to Israel's Ambassador
Moshe Arens, to support his
highly questionable policy of
giving away all of our off-shore
oil lands to the U.S. oil compan-
ies at bargain prices.
The Secretary wrote that
American support for Israel
could be jeopardized if "liberals
of the Jewish community join
with other liberals of this nation"
in opposing his policy which has
been strongly condemned by all
of the conservationist organiza-
tions of this country.
The Secretary's letter was dis-
avowed by the White House
which issued a statement saying
that his letter "in no way reflects
the U.S. foreign or domestic
policy" and that it "regards the
Secretary's remarks as unfor-
tunate."
MILTON GORDON
Miami
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I disagree with the Jewish
leaders who speak against the
Watt letter. I believe they should
speak out very strongly in favor
of what it says. Mr. Watt wants
to develop the U.S. off-shore oil
reserves. If this is done, the U.S.
will no longer be a slave to Arab
oil.
If we have our own sufficient
oil supply, we no longer have to
bow down to the countries of
Araby. Today, we not only are
dependent on these Sheikhs, but
half of the present U.S. adminis-
tration was or is still in the
employ of the Bechtel Co., which
has extensive interests in Araby.
They cooperated with Arab
blacklisting of people during
business with Israel. Secretary of
State George Shultz was presi-
dent of Bechtel. Caspar Weinber-
ger, the proponent of AW ACS for
Saudi Arabia, was a Bechtel em-
ployee. W. Kenneth Davis is
President Reagan's Deputy Se-
cretary of Energy, also a former
Bechtel employee.
And now we learn that Philip
Habib, who is presumably ar-
ranging for withdrawal of the
PLO from Beirut, is on the
Bechtel payroll right now. No
wonder he is useless in the
Middle East negotiations. It is
almost two months now, and he
hasn't accomplished a thing
except a ceasefire that aids the
PLO. While the lightening has
stopped striking, the PLO is
being rearmed and reorganized,
and Israeli youngsters are still
being killed.
Whose side are Habib, Shultz,
Weinberger and Davis on any-
way? I think our Jewish leaders '
should learn what to say. Let's
hear an outcry from our Jewish
leaders against the Bechtel con-
nection by supporting our off
shore^.oiJ.deY^lopmeut, ilBii
.I,; 't
MARVIN ZALIS
Miami
Continued from Page 4-A
of this without a clear awareness
that the cards are stacked
against Israel almost beyond the
point of breaking even, let alone
winning.
I keep thinking of Ambassador
Arens' "last gasp" observation
to me, and it still doesn't make
any sense. I replied to him then,
and I continue to think, that Is-
rael's only ace-in-the-hole would
be a stunning technological
achievement of such dimension
as to make it the envy of the
world.
ARENS, himself an engineer,
would not assure me that any
such developments were in the
offing, say, an anti-gravitational
force field which could send the
energy crisis and the G. Gordon
Wattses of the Reagan Adminis-
tration packing.
From Zion shall come forth
Torah, or wisdom generally. That
is the ancient Jewish prayer.
Still, this hope for a stunning
technological achievement is
Ambassador Arens
sheer fantasy, I know. It is about
as fantastic as Arens' "last gasp"
analysis of the PLO-inspired
Arab unrest.
Ex-Nazi Pinched in Cleveland
CLEVELAND (JTA) -
Failure to appear at a deportation
hearing a week ago led to the
arrest here of John Demjanjuk,
61, a Ukranian-born auto worker
who was stripped of his American
citizenship for having lied about
his World War II Nazi activities
when he applied for naturaliza-
tion in 1958.
Demjanjuk's citizenship was
ordered revoked by Federal
Judge Frank Battisti on June 23,
1981 after a five-months trial, a
ruling which cleared the way for
U.S. authorities to initiate
deportation proceedings which
were to have started July 12.
Demjanjuk, who denied
charges he tortured thousands of
Jewish prisoners and herded
them into gas chambers in con-
centration camps in occupied Po-
land, was taken into custody at a
federal courthouse.
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Why Israel Can't
Permit PLO To
Remain in Lebanon
para*** ao tmmmmmmmt bee
the PLO vast* X that
PLO s central hi
beee aadreaaaaate that day. the
uotai l*adatauu of the Seal* of
Urnei a* tat iegaaaat* iaceraav
taaaaay recogaxaed cxpraaaoa of
atli TaaFLO

-. kakder*
to
the lac* of that i
OtfA of OOI
sMwagini One cannot come to
taraai vita those wheat terms av
caade one's nqpaidataon.
TW PLO threat, therefor*, a
no lea* than mibtary So
M the PLO. with ita leafier
its centxal organization*,
and even a a* atari
ataff. exist*, it vfl try. by diet of
ita very /-oiaow detn, to bras'
the darmantkng of ItraeL
ha* been and ragaaaM ita
pohtJcaJ aan
Recent |WsasH by
PLO leader* attempting to
project a more moderate
are obviously tactical in
tar the unreliable utterance of
desperation I f given the chance,
the PLO wiD try again in the fu-
ture u> achieve ita avowed aim by
any means that come to hand' by
terror, by direct attack, by incit-
ing or otherwise csnsmg Arab
government* to become involved
in military dashes and all-out
war* with Israel, by intimidating
Palestinian Arab leader* ao aa to
keep them from entering into
peace talks with Israel, or by so-
railed diplomatic means.
BEREFT NOW of meaningful
armed strength, aa a result of Is-
rael's Operation Peace for Gab-
lee, the PLO will, if permitted,
content itself for the time being,
with "mere" political status and
the leeway this will provide it for
continuing As maneuving against
Israel. Meanwhile it will rebuild
its numerical, logistical and
armed strength until it ia once
again in a position to resume the
battle "on all fronts." For such
an effort it needs a base, no mat-
ter how narrow. "Political
status" would give it precisely
that needed base.
The PLO debacle in Lebanon
presents all who have suffered
from the PL/J menace and form
international terror with an un-
paralleled opportunity to root out
this force for destruction. The op-
portunity, and the reaponsiblity,
are not Israels alone.
Lebanon has been subjected,
for years, to devastation, waste,
suffering and death. It has been
deprived of ita independent exis-
tence as a sovereign state. Many
countries have suffered at the
hands of PLO terror mostly
through the terrorist activities of
underground organizations
working hand in-glove with PLO
headquarters in Beirut. All these
Strike Ends
TEL AVIV (JTA) A five-
month strike by Druze on the
Golan Heights to protest Israel's
annexation of the area has been
ended by leaders of the Druze
community The strike, which
was triggered by Israel's insist'
ence th.'if the Golan Druze carry
Israeli identity cards, had
become relatively ineffective
since the war in Lebanon began
last month.
At a m.-.-img in the Golan town
of Maidel Shams, where the
decision was taken to end the
strike, the Druze leaders issued *
statement. requesting Israeli
assurances that their land would
not be appropriated. >
NOBODY DC th*
cea to take m
Syria, aar
the
PLO
To allow t
ia Bears*.
see on Leoaro*e sol.
pry keep the or.ac
fcrw x to fester stal
PLO seeks to
one actrrca* in the only piece in
whacfa a has been able to operate
b the past twain years Israel
wiD not allow thai to happen. The
*r..^r.usied assail ssjaj UksWmJ
osetf have every rnterest in keep-
Tw? the PLO from re-establishing
itself m Lebanon.
In tine with their usual prac-
tice thousands of PLO men have
entrenched I Its uses 111 a in the
heart of iiaaitutial West Beirut.
Once again, thai has created
acute danger to the safety of the
Lebanese as well as Palestinian
men, women and children from
behind whom these PLO forces
are sending out volleys of artil-
lery and small-arms fire against
the Lebanese and Israeli forces in
East Beirut and beyond. Con-
demnation of this blatant viola-
tion of the rules of wsifaie should
be strong and universal.
ISRAEL, keenly aware of the
implications of this situation, is
anxious to avoid harming inno-
cent civilians. With this in mind,
the Israel Defense Forces have so
far refrained from entering West
Beirut to root out the terror is ta,
giving diplomacy a chance to re-
move the terrorists through
negotiation. Israel has, moreover,
repeatedly warned the civilian
population of West Beirut to
leave the city, so as to be out of
the line of fire. Hundreds of
thousands have heeded Israel's
call, many moving south into the
area now controlled by the Israel
Defense Forces; in numerous
cases, indeed, these are people re-
turning home to towns and vil-
lages in southern Lebanon from
which they had previously been
driven by the PLO.
Every effort must be made to
prevent harm from coming to the
civilian population still remain-
ing in West Beirut. However, to
do so without thoroughly rectify-
ing the untenable situation
which, over seven years, has
brought Lebanon to the brink of
chaos and destruction, would be a
disservice and mockery. At-
tempts to buy a "peaceful"
denouncement of the crisis by
yielding to PLO demands for
some ot continued ponticaJ (and
perhaps military) status are mis-
guided and short-sighted: they
would only rehabilitate this
nihilist, chaos-breeding organiza-
tion with disastrous conse-
quences for Lebanon, Israel and
the world.
Determined action to prevent
the PLO from resuming its rob
will promote stability and peace
in the Middle East. It could well
remove a major obstacle to the
Mideast peace process by
eliminating the PLO's intimidat-
ing anti-Camp David influence.
With the PLO out of the way, the
road to negotiation and peace be-
tween Israel and its neighbours
to the north and east could finally
open.
pet,
trucks carries foam-rubber
cartons of cooking stoves,
eating utensils on the coast
road north from Israel toward the etcfaj of
Tyre and Sidon for delivery to Lebcxst s
cial welfare workers. fJDC Photo).
in Sends Stiff Warning to Syria
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTAi
Premier Menachem Be-
gin has conveyed a stiff
warning to Syria through
US. Ambassador Samuel
Lewis to desist from aiding
and abetting Palestine Lib-
eration Organization at-
tacks from Syrian lines in
east Lebanon against Israel
Defense Force positions.
Israeli and American sources
confirm that Begin spoke
strongly with Lewis on this issue
in the aftermath of the terrorist
ambush in which five Israeli sol-
diers were killed by a PLO group
emanating from Syrian lines.
IN BACKGROUND briefings
following the IDF's attack on
Syrian and Palestinian positions
in the Bekaa valley, sources in
Jerusalem stress that the PLO
was being actively aided and
even "briefed" by the Syrians in
their persistent harassment of
IDF forces in eastern Lebanon.
The sources term this IDF action
a "warning" to the Syrians and
referred to it as "limited.''
Almost immediately after his
meeting with Lewis, Begin vowed
to 150 members of a special
United Jewish Appeal Prime
Minister's Mission that not one
of the 6,000 PLO fighters would
be allowed to remain in Beirut.
"There is a problem, but we can
solve it soon," Begin said.
"For six weeks we have re-
frained from entering Beirut," he
added. "But we will have to take
care that all the terrorists leave
Beirut and Lebanon. None of
them will be left. That is the only
guatantee that we will have
^ Tiuoteami
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peace, not only in our time but for
generations to come. Begin
ciaimeri
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon,
addressing the same group, de-
clared: "The terrorists should be
driven out of Beirut. We can do it
militarily, we are prepared to do
it militarily. But we would like to
solve it by negotiations."
SHARON STRESSED that
there was a distinction between
west Beirut proper and the ter-
rorist camps to the south. He ac-
cused the Western media of Mar-
ina this distinction and reporting
that the IDF shelled Beirut
when in fact it had shelled, in the
pest, these Palestinian ssjasjaas, to
the south of Beirut itself, on the
way to the airport.
This pointed distinction made
by Sharon was linked by some
observers here to the known feel-
ing of the Cabinet that the stalled
diplomatic negotiations may
need to be expedited by the em-
ployment of other limited options
in Beirut. The purpose of this
would be to convince the PLO
that Israel was firmly resolved to
launch a comprehensive military
assault, as a last resort, if the
stalemate continued in the diplo-
matic effort.
The feeling in the Cabinet is
that the credibility of Israel's
military threat is not strong
enough in the eyes of the belea-
guered PLO and that may ac-
count for their apparent belief
that if they hold out long enough
they will somehow be "saved'"
and spared the need to vacate
Beirut.
INFORMED sources confirm
that the U.S. has been able to
point to no concrete progress as a
result of the talks in Washington
between U.S. leaders and the
Foreign Ministers of Syria and
Saudi Arabia. This became clear
to Israel last week when Lewis re-
ported on the talks to Begun
Jerusalem. Begin MbbbsJI onefedl
the Cabinet at a spec*, >sDn
No details were r**i> afiaj
the session, but the IDF spota
man's communique on the IDF I
action in east Lebanc- nocedk
had been taken "fallowing the
Cabinet's decision anc oc the |
Cabinet's orders.'* "
Despite the lack of a '.angibttl
breakthrough, however m the I
Washington talks, the U S. still
believes there is hope r. the on
going diplomatic process. Israel
was told.
THE US. is reportec:> point-
ing out that the two Foreign
Ministers must report oadt to
Riyadh and Damascus respec-
tively and that there nay there-
fore yet be progress m contact! I
following up on their Wasr^ngun
visit.
But Israeli sources said there is
apparently no movement from
Syria either on the question ol
taking in the PLO men from Bei-
rut or on the longer-term ques-
tion of withdrawing Syrian forces
from Lebanon altogether.
An-nell
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UMStMKMTHI


Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
War Fails to
By HASKELL COHEN
| TEL AVIV (JTA) -
iis country is so soccer
ht that even a war can-
t stop Israelis at home
soldiers at the war front
Lebanon from watching
ies which may come
jugh on television.
[Last week, during the world-
|de craze surrounding the
Forld Cup final in Madrid be-
leen Germany and Italy, it was
^possible to move about this
Soccer-
city by cab since all the cab
drivers were either in bars or at
home trying to view the finals
which were telecast by Israel Tel-
evision in very fine fashion.
I WAS invited to see the game
on TV at the home of Chaim
Glovinsky, honorary president of
the Israel Olympic Committee. I
waited a half hour for a cab and
finally managed to flag one down.
The dirver was on his way home
to watch the game, but fortun-
ately he was heading in the direc-
tion of Glovinsky's residence. I
arrived just in time to watch the
opening kick-off.
Glovinsky told me that the Is-
rael soldiers in Lebanon were
watching the game. I asked him
how this was possible. He ex-
plained that the IOC, Bank Hap
oalim and Tadiron, the giant
electronic conglomerate, had
pitched in a million Shekels, each,
so that arrangements could be
made to televise the game to the
soldiers in the Beirut area.
Glovinsky explained multi-
millionaire Shaul Eisenberg, who
lives in Israel but who is most of
the year in Tokyo where he is a fi-
nancial tycoon, had arranged
through his various industrial
setups to provide for big trucks
to haul generators right up to the
front lines surrounding Beirut.
The trucks were equipped with
mammonth screens so that the
soldiers could watch the World
Cup final in comaprative comfort.
WHILE THE fighting is going
on, the reserves who shuttle back
and forth between Lebanon and
home are concerned about how
the Israeli basketball teams are
going to fare in the National
League competition which gets
started, hopefully, the first of
September.
Practice sessions begin Aug.
14, and somehow the bulk of the
teams will be able to arrange
their practice sessions so that
most of their players can partici-
pate despite the fact that they are
required to relieve fellow soldiers
at the front. There is great con-
cern over how the various teams
will make out and several of the
clubs have arranged, apparently,
leave for their coaches to visit the
United States and other coun-
tries in order to sign up players
for their respective teams.
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foam-rubber mattresses and cartons containing kerosene cooking stoves, pots,
ins and eating utensils have been distributed to needy Lebanese in the cities
' Tyre and Sidon by social welfare officers of the Lebanese Ministry of Social
\ffairs in recent weeks. The distribution was made possible by a donation from
American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee in the name of the
Report from Lebanon
American Jewish community. Under this program a total of 3,000 mattresses
and 700 cartons were given out. Holding his identity card in his mouth and a
blanket donated by a Swiss agency under his arm {left), this resident of Tyre
reaches for his carton of cooking equipment. (Right), a JDC foam-rubber
mattress is carried in traditional Middle East style.
I
EAST BEIRUT, Leba
non Weeds are growing
over the rubble and ruins of
the burn-out buildings
here. Other buildings pres-
ently occupied show the
shell and bullet scars of the
last seven years of civilian
massacre between the
Christians and Moslems
the Palestine Liberation
Organization and the
Syrians of this war-torn
city.
I am with a group of English-
Jewish newspaper editors from
all over the United States ob-
serving first-hand the situation in
Lebanon. Our travels have taken
us to Tyre, Sidon, Nabatiya and
now here. East Beirut.
THE WEEDS are the telltale
give-away. Newspapers and tele-
vision in the United States, espe-
cially in the early days of the war,
were fed with pictures, and "re-
ports to fit the pictures, of the
civil war seven years ago.
Nowhere here, in the Eastern
sector of Beirut, is there any evi-
dence of the present Israeli-PLO
conflict. On the contrary, it is
business as usual. Stores, offices,
restaurants, hotels are all open
and doing a brisk trade. People
crowd the streets, stopping to
lunch in a sidewalk cafe. And no
one bothers to listen to the shell-
ing of the PLO tanks and the Is-
raeli missiles overhead.
The traffic is incredible. The
PLO destroyed all traffic lights
shot them out for rifle prac-
tice. A single mountain road be-
comes a two-lane highway; two
lane roads become four the soft
Weeds Growing from Rubble
Give Lie to the World's Media
shoulders serving as the other
two). And, all the time, you see
caravans of Israeli armored
equipment and troops being
brought in and out of their instal-
lations.
ALL DAY long, you see trucks
carrying complete households
leaving Beirut. Some leave the
Western Sector for safety; others
leave to return to their liberated
homes in Sidon, Tyre and other
coastal cities.
It is there, in those cities, that
the lie told in the American media
is most apparent. "10,000 killed,
600,000 homeless" this was
the lead story in the U.S. media
within days of the onset of the
fighting, the Peace for Galilee
Operation. Notoriously, people
love sensationalism. So it was no
wonder that when these astro-
nomical figures were released by
the PLO, there was anger
throughout the free world. The
PLO did their job well. And the
news media were receptive. Very
few questioned the source of
these figures. Most everyone
took the numbers released by the
Palestinian Red Crescent, run by
Yasir Arafat's brother, as eternal
truth.
Even before our trip to Israel
and then on up into Lebanon, it
had been admitted that these
By SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor, Jewish Floridian
figures were substantiated by the
Red Cross Mission here. Later,
the Mission denied the figures,
but the denial was not published.
I ASKED a number of high-
placed Israeli officials, "Why
didn't you counter with the
truth?"
These officials now admit that
they should have repudiated the
statistics supplied the Red Cross
by the PLO. "But we were still
counting and could not give an
accurate accounting right away.
We made a mistake. A very grave
mistake."
What was the truth in Sidon
and Tyre and Nabatiya? It is
agreed by the International Red
Cross and the Israeli government
today that in the ancient city of
Tyre, about 40 persons died. In
Sidon, there were less than 260
many of these victims of a butane
explosion in a shelter where the
PLO had been storing ammuni-
tion. In Nabatiya there were 10
deaths. The homeless are listed at
some 25,000.
NO ONE discounts the gravity
of these figures. But they tell the
truth a truth the American
media, and the world media as
SAW
well, don't especially care to
know, or to let other people know.
Yasir Arafat's brother has
spoken. And the networks and
the press are his disciples.
Sidon did not fare as well as
East Beirut. There, too. you can
see the scarred remains of the last
seven years of civil war. How-
ever, there is also large-scale de-
struction as a result of the
present conflict. Some buildings
are practically gutted by bombs
and shells.
Still, in Sidon, the Lebanese
have reopened their shops and
restaurants, and they have amaz-
ingly begun to pick up the pieces
left from the years of destruction
and torture caused by the PLO.
Many Lebanese speak English
and were very anxious to express
their views to us. To say that
they are happy with the Israeli
presence in Lebanon would be an
exaggeration. But they are
pleased that the Israelis did for
them what they were not able to
do for themselves to liberate
their country and homes from the
PLO.
THE ONLY people I spoke
Continued on Page 3-B

!
JTewislhi Floridian

.
| Miami, Florida Friday, July 30, 1982
Section B $$$;$:


vwr
Participants in a recent fact-finding mission
to Israel and Lebanon report to 250 Jewish
Community leaders about their observations
regarding Operation Peace for the Galilee.
Shown above from* left are Stanley
Rosenblatt, Federation Vice President Mari-
lyn Smith, Board Member Michael M. Adler,
Vice Presidents Aaron Podhurst and Samuel
Adler, Howard Scharan, Executive Vice
President Myron J. Brodie and President
Norman Lipoff.
Miami's Leaders Back from Tour
Report on Facts as They Are
A delegation of 11
leaders of the Greater
Miami Jewish community
returned from a fact-finding
mission to Israel and Leba-
non and reports that, des-
pite media reports to the
contrary, the Israel Defense
Forces are carrying out "as
humane a military effort as
possible."
The Miami delegation, led by
Norman H. Lipoff, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, was the largest group
that participated in the mission,
which was composed of 140 Jew-
ish leaders from 24 U.S. cities.
The mission was organized at the
invitation of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and traveled in
Lebanon as far north as the hills
overlooking Beirut.
EIGHT OF the mission par-
ticipants reported their findings
to a gathering of 250 Jewish
leaders at the Federation build
ing-
"We went to see and hear for
ourselves the facts surrounding
Operation Peace for the Galilee,"
Lipoff said. "Basically, the peo-
ple of Lebanon are terrified of the
PLO. They view the Israeli as
liberators. For the first time in
seven years, they feel free."
Lipoff said Lebanon had been
turned into a PLO base for ter-
rorism and an outpost for train-
ing of terrorists from countries
throughout the world. He des-
cribed stories told by Lebanese
civilians of atrocities and crimes
committed by PLO members
during their seven year occupa-
tion of Lebanon.
"The stories we heard about
rapes, slaughters, wives being
taken away from their husbands
and all sorts of atrocities were
just frightening," Lipoff said.
The PLO are the Icoal gang-
sters. They imposed their own
taxes through protection money
that would prevent them from
destroying businesses. They took
that money in addition to the
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funds they received from oil-rich
Arab countries."
THE FEDERATION presi-
dent also described a 170-meter
storage area that had been dug
into the side of a mountain, in
which the PLO stored a cache of
weapons and ammunition. The
Israel Defense Forces required 70
trucks to transport these cap-
tured weapons, Lipoff said, not-
ing that this was only one of 18
major arms storage areas cap-
tured.
Lipoff also cited detailed docu-
ments captured from PLO terror-
ists, which described plans to at-
tack and shell Israeli border
towns, including Kiryat She-
monah, Metulah and Nahariyah.
Southern Lebanon remains a
prospering, thriving region, in
which life is proceeding normally.
free from PLO interference,
Lipoff said. Statements about the
Lebanese people's relief at the
ouster of the PLO were echoed by
mission participant Aaron Pod-
hurst, Federation vice president
and 1983 general campaign chair-
man.
"I SPOKE with Lebanese
Christians and Moslems, and
they felt the Israelis art
liberators," Podhurst said
"They see the Israelis as the
French saw the Americans when
they liberated Paris in World
War II."
Lipoff added that the Israel
Defense Forces were under orders
to hold their fire until they were
assaulted by PLO gunfire. He ex-
plained that this policy led to
greater casualties within the
^anks of the IDF. but this tactic,
combined with careful "surgical"
bombing of the PLO military
outposts, reduced the number of
casualties within the civilian
populace.
"I don't think there is a more
humane army in the world thar
that of Israel," Lipoff said.
"Most Israeli casualties were the
result of their efforts to minimize
civilian casualties."
The mission participants des-
cribed the war's tremendous
drain on the Israeli economy and
the threat this could impose to
the continuation of vital social
services. Lipoff said the Jewish
Agency has assumed the respon-
sibility for the survival of these
programs at a cost of $345 mil-
lion.
LEADERS OF the Americar
Jewish community have accepted
the resopnsiblity to raise $220
million to help bridge the social
service funding gap, Lipoff said.
"(Defense Minister Ariel)
Sharon had. some reajly interest-
ing comments about the situation
and Federation Vice President
Marilyn K. Smith, who partici-
pated in the mission. "He said,
'Israel is not just an Israeli
project anymore. It is a Jewish
project. Israelis give because
they must, but the Jews in the
Diaspora give from the heart.
Now, the Christian world looks at
Israelis like normal Jews, not
separate or apart.' "
Myron J. Brodie. Federation's
executive vice president, stressed
the importance of communicating
the true facts of Operation Peace
for the Galilee, and countering
PLO propaganda that has ap-
peared in the American media.
"WE HAVE to communicate
to ourselves, to our friends,
neighbors, business associates
to everyone about what's hap-
pening in Lebanon," Brodie said.
"Begin, (Labor Party leader
Shimon) Peres and all the other
leaders we met said they hope
there can be a diplomatic solution
to the PLO problem. But they
agree that if such a solution can-
not be reached, then a military
solution may be needed to keep
Israel's northern border safe."
Other mission participants
were Samuel Adler, a Federation
vice president; Donald Lefton, a
Federation vice president;
Robert Russell, a former Federa-
tion president; Michael M. Adler,
a member of the Federation
Board of Directors; and
prominent Jewish community
leaders Rabbi Haskell Bernat,
Howard Scharlin and Stanley
Rosenblatt.
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Federation Offers
Israel Mission
The land of Israel and the his-
tory of the Jewish people will be
explored and analyzed during the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Mission to Is-
rael, which will be held from Oct.
24 through Nov. 3. This program
will provide trips, seminars and
special sessions geared to interest
the seasoned traveler to Israel, as
well as the first-time visitor.
The Community Mission can
be combined with an opportunity
to visit Czechoslovakia, one of
Europe's oldest Jewish commu-
nities, as part of a four-day sub-
mission to Prague, and link with
the Israel Mission.
"The Community Mission is an
exciting opportunity to explore
the roots of the Jewish people, its
historical background and the
concept of the Zionist idea," i
Federation Missions Chairpe
David Schaecter and Commm
Mission Co-Chairperson Ma
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heart, challenge your mind vA
inspire your soul, as you explortl
the beauty, character and ids>
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Mission partkipants will r|
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vided by ranking govemmml
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In addition to the low travel
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quired to give an Sl.SOol
minimum gift per family to toe I
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-[
Israel Emergency Fund.
Nominations Open for
Dade Citizen
South Dade Council of B'nai
B'rith Lodges will sponsor the
33rd annual presentation of the
Dade County Outstanding Citi-
zen's Award for outstanding
service to the community, ac-
cording to Ronald M. Friedman,
president of the organization.
Winners of the prestigious
award will be honored this fall at
a banquet which will be held in
the Crystal Ballroom of The Four
Ambassadors, which is joining
the South Dade Council as patron
of the award. Congressman
Dante Fascell will be guest spea-
ker.
The Council now is accepting
nominations for the award from
civic, educational and community
organizations. Nominations must
come from such recognized orga-
nizations, from previous winners
of the award, or from the Out-
standing Citizens Award nomin-
ating panel. Deadline for nomina-
tions is August 15.
Council officials said nomina-
tions should include a detailed
resume of the nominees activi-
ties to enhance the community.
Usually, an organization may
suggest a man and a woman.
with the letter of nomination to
be signed by an officer of the sub |
mitting organization.
Nominations and informatioe|
are available from Dr. Reuben
Sorkin at the B'nai B'rith Re|
gional Office.
AmeriFirst Often]
Free Readings
Free blood pressure readings
are being offered at the Atton
Road Office of AmeriFirst from
August 2 to August 31 during]
regular office hours Monday
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Customers and visitors coming I
into the office, located at 900
Alton Road in Miami Beach, may
check their blood pressure at the |
"Blood Pressure Teller as often
as they wish.
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Friday, July 30^ 1982 / The Jewish Ftoridian Page 3-B
Report from Lebanon
Weeds Growing from Beirut's Rubble
Continued from Page 1-B
jth in Sidon left the city during
fighting. Some heeded Isra-
[s warning and stayed on the
aches; others were forced to
Mve their homes by the PLO
|or to the Israeli invasion and
| now just returned.
|In retrospect, the strongest
Ipression I share with other
vs editors here in Beirut is that
most devastation in Lebanon
far was in the town of
^niour. just on the outskirts of
city. This was a thriving
ristian community of high-
es overlooking the Mediterra-
in 1976, the PLO attacked ,
massacred its citizens. In
Jiation, the Christians at-
bked a PLO refugee camp,
hen the Christians were killed,
PLO moved in and remained,
lil it was attacked by the Is-
rli Air Force.
)amour is now a virtual ghost-
ra. Ironically, many of the
Dtographs shown in the U.S.
lia purporting to be of the
ksent fighting in Beirut were
Jually of Damour during its
lish and devastation by the
ristian-Moslem (PLO-Syrian)
B war.
[IT HAS taken more than 400
licks constantly in action to re-
pve the arsenals of explosives
the PLO from churches,
hools, apartment buildings
liters and storage bunkers here
enough ammunition to supply
[army of 23,000 men. And all of
was to be used to carry out
PLO's avowed purpose of
THE QRfMLft* BEHIND THZ SET
destroying Israel.
As of this writing, the situa-
tion is far from resolved. Some of
our group, many Israelis and
many Israeli officials feel that it
was a mistake not to have
finished the job at the very out-
set, come what may. And yet,
there are many others who felt.
1BYO Appoints Roshfeld to Post
The B'nai B'rith Youth Orga-
ation announces the appoint -
lt of Debra Roshfeld as Assis-
t Florida Regional Director
the Gold Coast Council of
YiO: Ms. Roshfeld will be di-
ting the BBYO office at the
It Lauderdale Jewish Com-
lity Center.
ebra was graduated from

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8
John Thomas has been ap-
pointed Southern Bell Public
relations manager for Miami,
Miami Beach and North
Miami Beach. In his new posi-
tion, Thomas is responsible
for community and media re-
lations in these areas. A 30-
year resident of Miami,
Thomas joined Southern Bell
in 1954 as a mailboy.
Schmuel Hirschfeld, Deputy Director of the Department of Ed-
ucation for Ramat Gan, Israel, has a steel-hammered menorah
for Mayor Norman Ciment of the City of Miami Beach. Ramat
Gan is the Sister City of Miami Beach, and the occasion is the
visit of the 60 member Ramat Gan Youth Band scheduled to
play in Miami Beach's Theater of the Performing Arts and in
Disney World.
CJen. Sharon to the contrary, that
because of the humanitarian
aspect, the delay is justified.
This is a kind of feeling the
PLO, dug into the very heart of
this city for its own protection,
would not understand.
1*1 XL
Presenting Rabbi Dov Bidnick (center), spiritual leader of tne
Young Israel of Sky Lake, with the synagogue's permanent
charter from the National Council of Young Israel at their re-
cent 70th anniversary national convention held in New York are
Harold M. Jacobs (right), president, and David Schneck (left),
liaison vice president of the organization.
New FPL Appliance Efficiency Program
Helps Customers Select Energy-Saving Models
Choosing major electrical appliances that are energy efficient
and less costly to operate will be easier for consumers with a new
product-identification program initiated this week by Florida
Power & Light Company.
Participating retail appliance dealers soon will be displaying a
bright yellow "Select and Save" emblem on room air-
conditioners, refrigerators and freezers that meet FPL's rigid
energy efficiency standards. Additionally, the utility has
developed guide books on these appliances that rank models
according to size and efficiency rating.
"The 'Select and Save' program is a lot like mileage and
performance ratings for automobiles, except it compares
operating costs and efficiency for those appliances that are the
major energy consumers in the typical home," said Tom Petillo,
FPL's Director of Marketing and Energy Conservation. "Like
our other Watt-Wise programs, this new identification system
will help customers save money."
Participating dealers are receiving training to assist
customers in choosing models that best fit their needs at the
most economical price, and will have the FPL appliance guide
books available free. The guides also can be obtained by calling
FPL's Watt-Wise Line at 223-WATT in Dade, 463-WATT in
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I


Page4-B The Jewish Floridian / FrkUy. July 30,1962
After AW ACS: A
Fight to Arm Jordan
i Pac 10-A
national director Nathan Peri-
mutter pointed at an ADL lunch-
eon recently. "Is it conceivable
that Israel would stand passively
by in the face of provocation if
she foresaw, down the time pike,
that her sworn enemies would
soon have air parity? Possible air
superiority? Would the United
States?"
Israel's threat from Jordan is
cited in a recent column by
George F. Will: "Israel's longest
border is with Jordan (200 miles),
The four states on Israel's 'east-
ern front' (Jordan, Iraq, Syria,
Saudi Arabia) have a tank force
(9.000) larger than NATO's. Jor-
dan's publicly expressed excuse
for not joining the Yom Kippur
War in 1973 was that it had in-
adequate air defense. Mobile
Hawks (together with the SAM-
8s Jordan is buying from the So-
viet Union) would remove the
reason for restraint."
Will continues: "Mobile
Hawks in western Jordan would
be within range of four of Israels
six airfields, and Jerusalem. In a
period of high tension, any Israeli
government might reasonably
feel duty-bound to order preemp-
tive disarming strikes against
mobile Hawks, even tough such
strikes might guarantee Jor-
danian involvement in a war.
Otherwise, Israel might be with-
out its shieldits air force. This
is especially crucial, because
when Israel leaves the Sinai next
month, it will lose a crucial air-
field and will radically contract
its air space."
WILL AND other analyst*
note that Israel "can live with"
the immobile Hawks already in
Jordan. "Hawk missiles are on
fixed sights, and the assumption
by Israeli planners is that in
combat, they could be easily des-
troyed by Israeli fighter-bomb-
ers," asserts a recent New York
Times analysis. "Mebile missiles
of the kind that Secretary of De-
fense Caspar W. Weinberger is
said to have discussed with the
Jordanians are less vulnerable to
air strikes."
" In a one-on-one confrontation,
Jordan's forces are no match for
Israel's armed forces," says a
current American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
memo. "But few observers pre-
dict such an eventuality. Instead,
it is likely that Jordan would
once again participate in an east-
ern front war with Israel, a front
consisting of Syria, Iraq, Saudi
Arabia and Jordan. The com-
bination of forces is a particularly
threatening one, especially after
Saudi acquisition of AW ACS.
Close cooperation between the
Saudi and Jordanian airforces,
both frying U.S. made aircraft, is
likely."
The AIPAC memo also points
up Jordan's assistance of Iraq in
the Iraq-Iran war and suggests,
"Clearly, Hussein is quick and
willing to volunteer his army to
the service of the 'Arab nation.' "
IF JORDAN gets the Im-
proved-Hawks, says political and
military affairs consultant
Rosenbaum, there is little doubt
that Israel will knock them out.
But Israel might not stop with
the missiles, he added, citing one
yn ma
Beth Din Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel: 534-1004 or 672-0004
school of thought in Israel, re-
portedly endorsed by Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon, that says
Israel would be better off with
Hussein out of power. Why? Be-
cause his Hashemite rule pre-
vents a solution to the Pales-
tinian problema Palestinian
state in Jordan (where dose to 70
percent of the inhabitants are
Palestinian). Noting the irony of
Israel working to create a Pales-
tinian state in Jordan. Rosen-
baum says, "better there than in
the West Bank." some believe.
"The United States has got to
realize," Rosen baum continues,
"that if the Israelis confront the
Jordanianswhether they pre-
empt against the Jordanians 01
whether the Jordanians are fool
hardy enough to join a Syrian at-
tack on Israelthere is a schoo
of thought within Israeli intelli-
gence and policy planning which
says, "If we fight Jordan, let's
not just defeat it militarily, let's
overthrow it politically and es-
tablish a de facto Palestinian
state; establish a vacuum in
which a Palestinian state can be
created' So the United States is
destabilizing Hussein in twe
ways by this sale."
Not only could opponents ar-
gue that the arms sale might un-
dermine Hussein and lead to the
establishment of a radical Pales-
tinian state in Jordan, they could
also assert, says Rosen baum.
that the sale will encourage Arab
rejection of U.S. aims for peace in
the region. "By treating those
who oppose our policy as
'moderate,' it reinforces behavior
which is injurious to America's
own interests and puts control of
the peace process in the hands of
people who oppose it," he said.
"YOU CANT be against them
(the Administration) for trying to
reach out to the Arab states."
commented one friend of Israel in
Washington. "We have no
qualms with that. But you can-
not feed that friendship with
arms and you cannot threaten
another friend by providing the
means of its destruction to its
enemies."
"Believe me," Rosen baum
says, his voice rising. "Jordan
and Saudi Arabia would be much
more moderate if we cut them off
at the knees, if we cut them off
from arms sales and aid. The Jor-
danians and Saudi Arabians are
no more going to go into the So-
viet orbit than the Vatican is go-
ing to go into the Soviet orbit.
Period. So this is a red herring.
"Yes, we do need other friends
in the Mideast." he adds, "but
full
The Improved Hawk (l-Hawk) is the most
sophisticated reliable and maneuverable
missiles in the world. Hawk missiles, flying
at supersonic speed, are effective against the
we've been pursuing those | anything," Howard
friendships for 30 years and we
haven'
spectrum of tactical aircraft and a
capable of evading electronic counterm*,
sures.
t gotten a commensurate
response. Anti-communism is not
sufficient recompense for all that
the United States has done and is
doing. .
-AMBIVALENCE to the
Arabs is a sign of weakness," he
continues. "Ambivalence is an
invitation to exploitation. We
don't act like a superpower in toe
region," Rosenbaum said. "We
should be forcing the Arabs to
conform to us. That's the first
rule of power: if you're more
powerful, it's the other guy who
has to respond. We have failed to
do that. Why? Because we're
penitential'Oh, excuse me for
having helped Israel to be born.'
In the last round over
AW ACS. opponents based their
disapproval in terms of the sale's
threat to American interests,
first: the dangers to Israel
seemed to have come second. Op-
ponents warned of the possible
compromise of sophisticated
American technology in the
hands of the Russians. But in the
debate over the Jordan arms sale,
this argument will be less effec-
tive, several supporters of Israel
have noted-
"We're not selling them as
sophisticated equipment as the
A WAG'S,' Rosenbaum says.
"Loss of technology, that's a
different story" this time around,
agreed another Washington ob-
server. Still he noted the instabi-
lity of the Hashemite regime and
the possibility of a radical Pale-
stinian state gaining control of
those armaments.
OPPONENTS will also try to
remind the American public of
the Ford Administration's
promise to Congress in 1975. not
to provide Jordan with a mobile
anti-aircraft system. "I think the
issue will be clearly set forth as to
whether the commitments by
American Presidents are worth
Squadron
said-
In the test melee over
AW ACS, the intense lobbying by
corporate America and the per-
suasive power of Ronald Reagan
were said to have made the dif-
ference in the dose vote.
This time around, some sup-
porters of Israel say, the Presi-
dent will have a harder time
pleading, "Do this for me," and
the business lobby will be less in-
terested in the outcome of the
Jordan arms sale.
Essentially, "it will be dis-
similar in the sense that Jordan is
simply not Saudi Arabia." one
Mideast observer says. "America
doesn't have the same stake
economically in Jordan that it
has in Saudi Arabia."
AGREES ROSENBAUM.
"The intensity of commitment by
both the American military and
the military contractors and by
the business community is going
to be less, simply because Jordan
is not an oil producer, is not
wealthy and is not that signifi-
cant a market for the United
States.
"That means that the pro-
ponents of the sale will be able to
use economic fear, political fear
J*
and threat less efficiently-tl^
doesn't mean they won't
them.
The threat of Sandi di|
proval might be brought into tit
Jordan arms sale indirectly,
though, Rosenbaum continue! I
"It will be argued that if we don't
sell weapons to Jordan it will d I
courage the Saudis from support
ingtheU.S."
The Saudi disfavor argumeg
could be even more direct, I
pecially considering that Saudi
Arabia probably wul pay for Jor-
dan's acquisition of America I
arms.
" I WOULD think the pro-Anb I
lobbies would have their act a lit-
tle more together," commented
one Mideast analyst in Washing-
ton. "Remember, with the
AWAC8 thing they had to create
a pro-Arab business lobby from
scratch. Now, it's more or less in
place and that's very bad.
Mitigating that factor is the fact
that they don't have the same |
economic stake in Jordan
The involvement of the cor-'
porate business lobby probably
won't be as strong, noted
another Middle East observer,
"but to counter that, Hussein has
a much better image in this coun-
Continued on Page 8-B
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Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
^
Lefton to Report
on Israel Trip
a
'*!*.
lagen David Adorn, Israel's official Red
Cross Service ambulances close in on the
Israeli Air Force Hercules immediately upon
landing at Atarot Airport, Jerusalem, to re-
ceive Israel Defense Forces wounded soldiers
'
Sherry Muss, daughter of Stephen Muss of Miami Beach plays
\piano at the Gaslight Club in Miami Beach.
Konover
Features
New Musical
' "Stars," a 90-mihute music
and comedy production has been
signed for an initial four week
stay into the 400-seat Club 54 of
the Konover Hotel, Miami Beach.
The show, which has a cast of 13
is now showing. Created by
award winning showman Ted
Larson, "Stars," captures the ex-
citement of more than a dozen of
the entertainment world's most
popular performers, featuring the
multi-talents of the nation's lead-
ing female impressionists.
brought in directly from the battle field in
Lebanon. The AMDI maintains offices in
North Miami Beach and Tampa with Bob
Schwartz as Southeast District Director.
AmeriFirst Sells
Orlando Division
Thomas R. Bomar, President
of AmeriFirst and Kenneth E.
Kamberg, President of Coral
Gables Federal Savings and Loan
Association announced jointly
today that their Associations
have entered into an agreement
that transfers ownership of
twelve of AmeriFrist branch
offices to Coral Gables Federal
conditioned upon tinal approval
by the Federal Home Loan Bank
Board.
The twelve offices, holding ap-
proximately $400,000,000 in
deposits, are located in Orange,
Osceola and Seminole Counties
and have been operated as the
Orlando Division of AmeriFirst.
An overview and detailed
analysis of "Operation Peace for
the Galilee," Israel's military
campaign in Lebanon, will be
provided by Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation Vice President
Donald E. Lefton, who recently
returned from a factfinding
mission in Israel. Lefton will ad-
dress the topic, "Israel in Leba-
non" on Tuesday, Aug. 3 at 7:30
p.m. the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation-South Dade Jewish
Community Center Facility.
Lefton, who also serves as vice
president of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, returned from Israel on
June 22, after meeting with
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and other Israeli leaders, and
touring the battlefields of South-
ern Lebanon. His analysis will
include explanations about the
factors leading to the conflict, the
Donald E. Lefton
current situation in Lebanon and
the future of regional relations in
the Mideast.

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iwiomL____________ _____
fUflDI An Urgent Message To The Jews Of America
Leonard Luria, president and
chief executive officer at L.
Luria and Sons, will be pre-
sented with the Gold Medal-
lion for Communal Service by
VnaiB'rith International at a
'inner-ball in his honor on
[October 23. Malcolm H.
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{made the announcement.
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I
We Jews stand with Israel as she struggles and sacrifices to secure peace
at her northern borders. Once again the Jewish people's right to live in its
own land with reasonable and elemental security has been challenged.
We are being tested.
At this hour we must respond to Israels costly and courageous action
with nothing less than renewed dedication and determined effort. It is our
responsibility.
Israel has gone to war to defend and protect the strategic and ancient
Galilee, to put an end to the rockets, artillery barages and PLO outrages
against vulnerable northern settlements.
As Israel's soldiers fought to secure Galilee by pushing beyond the nor-
thern borders into the enemy's midst, JNF planners and builders em-
barked on an intensive program to consolidate the Jewish presence inside
Galilee by widening the network of outpost settlements in sparsely
populated areas. The settlers at these hilltop outposts are guardians of
Israels future, preventing illegal Arab land grabs and curtailing the ex-
pansion of Arab villages that breed and harbor terrorists.
Now, more than ever before, Israel's borders must be secure. The Jewish
National Fund must immediately prepare sites tor new lookout settlements
along the Lebanese border. We must also repair and restore settlement
sites destroyed by the PLO shelling of the Galilee.
We must respond to the urgent needs of Galilee and all of the land of
Israel by coming forth with an outpouring of support for the JNF's life-
giving land development projects.
We need your help. Your contributions now will go to strenghtening
Galilee It is our way of fighting, of standing side by side with the Jewish
soldiers at the front so the world will know that Israel and the Jewish
people are one, that we are meeting the test, that the sacred legacy of
Eretz Yisrael is honored through the reclaiming and rebuilding of the
land that the Galilee is both a cherished legacy and valued providence of
the Jewish nation. Help us prevent future loss of life by budding and
rebuilding now.
Please act immediately by sending your check now. Your personal com-
mitment today means a safe and secure future for a generation that has
spent too much time in bomb shelters. Your support at this crucial time
means you, too, are counted in our people's struggle. Commit yourself to
our effort by sending your check today. We must act today.
DR. SAMUEL I. COHEN
Executive Vice President
Jewish National Fund of America^

Send To:
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Phone 538-6464
Enclosed is my contribution:
Name-----------------------------
Address.
City____
.State.
.Zip
!


" -" iiiFimm > uiwrr^^^wi
rafeeo-n The Jewish Floridian / Friday, July 30,1982
.
PRICES AND COUPONS GOOD
THURS. JULY 29-AUQ. 4. WE
RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT
QUANTITIES. WE WILL GLADLY
REDEEM YOUR USDA GOVT.
FOOD STAMPS.
Shop at Partly Pride and
Y total B
iPRODUCEi
iDAIRYi
"DEUi
iMEATi
SALAD SIZE F*M PJPE
SAVE
. .6mpkg .SO 30
CAPE GROWN QRANNv SMITH
Applet.......lb .79 10
0 8 No 1 ALL PURPOSE
White Potto10^ 1.59 io
ADD ZEST TO SALADS FRESH FLORIDA
Avocados.....u .49.10
GARDEN FRESH GREEN U PICK
Zucchini Squash lb .29 .40
SWEET RED P*>E WHOLE
Watermelon* E. 1.79 so
U S No 1 ALL PURPOSE
White Potatoes 5& .89 o
fwm heads
.lb .19-04
assorted colors freshly cut
Pom Poms .bunch 1.79.20
WALOEN LOCAL ITAUAN OR
THOUSAND ISLAND
Salad Dressing ,u .99 20
BREAKSTONE
Sour Cream .,
Boz
CUPS
PANTRV PRIDE ASSORTED FLAVORS
SWISS STYLE
Yogurt .... 3
MRS FILBERTS
Spread 25 .iSi?
PANTRY PRIDE AEROSOL
Cream Topping
7-OZ
MWUTE MAID
Orange Juice
. GALLON
LIGHT N LIVELY
Milk .
HALF
GALLON
KRAFT LONOHORN 10-OZ PKG
Cheddar Cheese
GENERIC QRTRS
Margarine .1
GENERC
Oral
GENERC PROCESS CHEESE
Qrated Cheese com
American Loaf 2
PKO
SAVE
.59 .10
.89.20
.79
1.15
1.49 36
1.15 06
1.69.10
SIM 22
1.39 60
2.29.31
OSCAR MAYER MEAT OR
Beef Bologna .
QWALTNEY GREAT DOG
Turkey Franks
SAVE
U S CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
SAVE
PKG
I LB
PKG
1.69 30 Und'blade Steak lb 1.99
U S CHOICE BEEF LOIN TOP LOW BONE IN
.89 20 Strip Steaks ... lb 3.79 90
SPICED LUNCHMEAT. PICKLE 4 PIMENTO LOAF ... rHrurc
OR SLICED COOKED liJL ,72?
Lykes Salami ."p01.19 09 sifokt
HEBREW NATIONAL KNOCKWURST OR
Pranks......'^1.99 50
LB
3.69 10
LKilOVER,
Midget Salami .",3 2.29.41 wlngBesf ..lb 1.99 10
Sauerkraut.. 2 ^ .59 10 Ground Chuck .lb 1.99 10
GENERIC SUCED. COOKED u S CHOICE BEEF LOW
Salami.......LB 1.39 10 ggg'^ n
GENERC SLICED r*" ^* _
Dutch Loaf ... .lb 1.39 10 Steaks....... 4.39
GENERC SUCED SPCED
Luncheon Meat .lb
GENERC SLICED
Bologna ....
1.39.10 S^NOWCH STEAK
steak-
1.39.10 Ummmm
14-01
Pko
iPERSONALi
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2.69 30
iranjFNi
1BAKERY1
SWIFT PREMIUM 2-LB PKO
Turkey Ham Loaf. 3.29 20
GEL MMT OR REGULAR 6 4-OZ TUBE SAVE
Crest Toothpaste 1.47 32
JHMMACK EFA GELAVE. OlY OR NORMAL OZ BTL
1.87 62
JHMMACK EFA OR GELAVE SOZ BTL INSTANT
Conditioner-------1.87.62
JHMMACK REOOLAR OR UNSCENTE0
EXTRA MOLD 4-OZ PUMP
.....1.37 52
MRS SMITHS SAVE
Apple Pie_____."-ox 1.49 .50
ASSORTED SIZES 11 7-OZ-12 S-OZ BOX
Jeno's Pizzas 1.19.10
PANTRV PNOE 6-OZ BOX
Waffles..... 4/.89 43
REGULAR OR FRUIT PUNCH SNOW CROP
5 Alive......"c3 .89 20
PANTRY PPJOE 10OZ BOX PEAS OR
Mixed Vegetables 2/M ,e
SAVE
White Bread .*?& .59.10
PANTRY PPJOE SPLIT TOP
White
AUNT HANNAH
Angel Pood Bar -pko .89 0 Total It Up!
.79 20 Checl
.83 oe Join the
"WW, Check it out!
Meyer's Breads
AOLERS
Kaiser Rolls .sn
FRENCH VMHS OR STEAK
A AC Rolls .pkg .73 12


Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Ptoridtan Page 7-B
oull
BUI.
money on your
WHITE/ASSORTED
4 ROLL PKG 2-PLY
tyne/FyneSoft
zwmeoti iwt
Bath
89*
(SAVE 30c)
B* VALUABLE COUPON* MM SB1 WM M MM BW
(SAVE 60c) B3fi
12-OZ. CAN PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN
^ffjSBSP 19* :
UMIT ONE CAN WITH COUPON AND S10 ORDER
EXCLUDING TOBACCO PRODUCTS
COUPON GOOD JULY 29-AUGUST 4. 1082
VALUABLE COUPONB BBI BBI BB) SSI Baal BBj
I/*> 'jf/U PANTRY PRIDE (IN QTRS ) tBM
-^^WS. LIGHTLY SALTED Egg
ir^^^/ 1"LB PKG mWZW
II ^'ii-^^3r^WLIMIT ONE PKG WITH COUPON AND ,auc 7n^,
| Wt^^ JS-^ $10 ORDER EXCLUDING TOBACCO PRODUCTS (OAvfc /OC)
COUPON GOOD JULY 29-AUGUST 4, 1982
BONUS
BUY
T2-OZ. PKG.
BORDEN COLORED OR WHITE
American
Singles
smtencan
(SAVE 76c)
$139
BONUS
BUY
U.S. CHOICE BEEF LOIN
(WHOLE OR HALF IN CRY-O-VAC)
CUT AND WRAPPED FREE
Top Loin
Strips
(SAVE 60c)
$249
.*3sjo. J
l&l
LIGHT N' UVELY
-OWFAT 12-OZ CUP
Cottage
HO-KIS
BUY
6-PK 12-OZ CANS
12-OZ BAG
I Chips T-| JL
Tab. Sprite (reg.. sugar free)!^-
Fresca. Mr Pibb. Mellow Yellow
Coke
(SAVE 30c
$169
Keebler $
Chips Deluxe
(SAVE 16c)
iGROCERY"
lAPPETIZERSi
HOT FOODS"
SAVE REALEMON
.59 20 Lemon Juice
32 02
. BIi
,'T.ROLL
fi Towels .
mtbWxise
kaple Juice V& 1.49 .26 Potato Chips V& .79 .10
tf% CUT GREEN BEANS CREAM OR W K CORN SUNSWEET REGULAR OR WITH PULP
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mv PRioE
tneapple Juice
i.^RtShEO OR W PASTE
hp* Tomatoes
HTS DEUOHT CHUNKY PEARS OR
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CAN
.99 10 Paper Plates
PANTRY PRIOE GRAPE CHE
_ FRUIT PUNCH OR LEMONAC
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100
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218 OZ
CAN
_ ORANGE APPLE FRUIT LEMONADE
99 63 ,0P* CAPRI SUN
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tBmlum Wines S3 5.99 $3 HIC Fruit Drinks*l .99 20
inner Wines. irisLT" 4.79i 20 King Cole Beans 31*1 26
UTO ANCOiLAMB#WSCO g1*^ "**&&* I2BOZ KO ,
lunlte Wines r 2.99 40 Crystal Water .. UG .59 .10
BUS RHWESKELLER RHINe OR ROM
atony Wines .V3S.99 .50
LMO OR CABERNET
ria Wines
790
1
1.99 30
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32 OZ
JAR
BONUS PACK WHITE BLUE BROWN OR GOLD
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POWDERED DETERGENT
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2-LITER BOTTLE
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28-OZ
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40
1.79 20
PANTRY PRIDE
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fclosauos .
(^MOREO XH B1L
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1.39 20
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WISHBONE SOUR CREAM W1ACON. SOUR CREAM
W/ITAUAN HERBS
.... BTLS .59 .40
ONLY AT STORES WITH SERVICE DELI COUNTERS
SAVE
MRS RESSLtRS
Chicken
Roll___
HALF
. POUND
1.49
30
ONLY AT STORES W FRESH BAKERIES
MOUTHWATERING OAVb
Dinner Rolls doz .99 20
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ONE
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Swiss Cheese .T/ 1.89 20
OVEN FRESH
BBQ Chicken 1.69
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All Beef Bologna 1.49
1/4 POUND CORNED
Beef Round .... 1.24
.95 04
BREAKFAST TREAT
Cinnamon Rolls 4/1.09 10
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Cherry Pie .each 2.59.10
NEW NEW'
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GUARANTEED
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well pay you Double The
Difference In Cash1


Page8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, July 30,1982
After AWACS: A Fight to Arm Jordan
Continued from Page 4- B
try than rand (of Saudi
Arabia).'* Hussein appears "more
Western," the analyst noted.
"He's known as the 'Plucky Lit-
tle King' in Washington," he
8 aid.
Another difference, noted
several supporters of Israel, is
that Jordan will be able to argue
more convincingly .that it is
threatened from hostile nations.
"Jordan really does have a
threat to its north from Syria,"
one observer commented.
Said Rosenbaum, "The Jor-
danians probably do have a
legitimate need to (improve) de-
fense against the Syrians, but
there are restraints within the
Arab League which make full-
scale conflicts between Arab
countries unlikely."
PRESIDENT Reagan's per-
suasion may play less of a factor '
this time around, several sug-
gested. "The climate has
changed; the President is not as
popular as he was," commented
an aide to Rep. Clarence Long.
"He's a different President now."
"We can't do anything about
him (Reagan) sitting people on
his knee and saying, 'Please vote
for me.' But as a tactic, it mav
have worn a little thin after
AWACS," said a Washington
source.
Should the Jewish community
be doing anything differently this
time around? In an article in the
December, 1981, issue of Moment
magazine, Rosenbaum applauds
the Jewish community's lobby-
ing effort against the AWACS
sale and concludes that "there is
not much that one can fault."
The community lost, he says, but
not "... for any reason within
its ability to control."
He does suggest that the larger
Jewish communities teach the
smaller ones how to mobilize on
behalf of an issue.
"THE ONLY otherweaknesL
that seems apparent was the in-
sistence of some Jews on couch-
ing the AWACS issue solely in
terms of the threat this sale
posed to Israel. American sup-
porters of Israel have increasing-
ly learned to lobby on the basis oi
America's national interests.
This is not just a slick technique;
it is right, it is principled and it i;
a natural weapon against charges
of dual loyalty."
Some Jewish newspapers have
also reported that legislators who
voted against the AWACS sale
were not properly thanked by the
lay-Jewish community. As the
next round unfolds, the Jews i
might do well to continually show
appreciation through letters,
telegrams and phone calls to
those out in front.
In the fight over AWACS and
F-15 enhancements for Saudi
Arabia, two of the chief figures
for the opposition in Congress
were Rep. Clarence Long and
Sen. Robert Packwood.
Though Long did not initiate
the House letter of opposition to
the Jordan arms sale that will be
sent to the President, he was one
of the 55 signators and has prom-1
ised to actively fight the sale.
"There's no special reason"
why Long did not initiate the let-
ter as he did in the AWACS
round, says his legislative aide
Polly Dredge: "It's just a matter
of who gets the letter out first."
EVEN IF Long loses the Jew-
ish community in the Congres-
sional redistricting process, he
said, "I was a friend of Israel
long before I had the Jewish area
in my district and I'll be a friend
of Israel's forever." Long says it
is easier for him to be outspoken
on Israel-related issues if he has
Jewish constituents, but he
stressed, "I'm not going to back
away. I've reached the age where
if I can't do what I want to in
Congress, then I don't want to be
in the Congress."
The 55 House signatures on
the letter to the President fall far
short of the number Long
amassed on a similar letter dur-
ing the AWACS fray. While an
aide to Congressman James J.
Florio, who initiated the letter
with three other colleagues, con-
ceded that the number of sig-
nators was low, she said the issue
was not yet receiving much at-
tention on the Hill. Once a sale is
proposed, she said, interest in the
issue would pick up.
One supporter of Isarel in
Washington said he is not wor-
ried by the low number of sig-
natures: "There is very little at-
tention being focused on it .
there's no deal (proposed) yet."
CONGRESSWOMAN Bar
bara A. Mikulski, who may rep-1
resent the Baltimore Jewish com-
munity under redistricting, was
one of the four original signators
of the House letter of opposition
to the sale. (The other original
signators were Matthew J.
Rinaldo, Mike Synar and Florio.)
In the Senate, Gary Hart (D.,
Col.) initiated a similar letter to
the President that 33 of his col-
leagues have signed, including
Maryland Sen. Paul Sarbanes.
Maryland Sen. Charles Mac
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is One" (Deut
6.4)
V A ETHAN AN The portion begins with Moses' plea to
God for permission to enter the Promised Land, and God's re-
fusal. The law-giver warns the children of Israel against practis-
ing idolatry in Canaan, calling their attention to their special
history and mission. "Did ever a DeoDle hear the voice of God
speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and
live? Or hath God assayed to go and take Him a nation from the
midst of another nation, by trials, by signs, and by wonders, and
by war, and by a mighty hand, and by an outstretched arm, and
by great terrors, according to all that the Lord your God did for
you in Egypt before thine eyes?" (Deuteronomy 4.33-34). Moses
sets aside three cities of refuge on the east side of the Jordan. He
repeats the Ten Commandments, with slight variations for the
purpose of clarity. The first section of the Shema beginning
"Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart" and end-
ing "And thou shalt write them upon the door-posts of thy
house, and upon thy gates" is in this portion (Deuteronomy 6.4-
9). Moses urges the Israelites to show no mercy to the seven
Canaanite nations. "And when the Lord thy God shall deliver
them up before thee, and thou shalt smite them; then thou shalt
utterly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them,
nor show mercy unto them; neither shah thou make marrigaes
with them: thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor
his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son For thou art a
holy people unto the Lord thy God: the Lord thy God hath
chosen thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that are
upon the face of the earth" (Deuteronomy 7.2-6). Finally, Moses
stresses the need for strict observance of the various ritual com-
mandments.
ITU* recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
dST'VE Oracle MlSery of the Jewish Heritor*," edited by P. WNM
Tiamlr. US? published by SheaeoM. Tb volume it available at 75 Maiden
Lm?. t*dw VortVN.Y. letM. Joeee* Scfctong I* president of the society dis-
tributine, the volume.)
Mathias' press secretary said
that the Senator "will not com-
ment" on the arms sale "until he
sees (proposed) legislation on it."
In the AWACS round, we saw
a President of the United States
admonishing Israel not to inter-
fere in American foreign policy.
We saw a former President
(Ford) warning not to let the
Jews beat us on this one and
another former President (Nixon)
quipping that if it weren't for the
Jews the arms package would
have had smoother sailing. And
Senators complained about the
dangerous level of anti-Semitism
in the debate.
Will we see it again?
"As to whether they (the Ad-
ministration) will get into the
nastiness again, they will try to
avoid it," commented Howard
Squadron, "but they like to win;
they play hard ball in this Ad-
ministration."
DURING AWACS, the Ad-
ministration raised the anti-
Semitic backlash argumentif
you defeat the President it will
result in anti-Semitism suc-
cessfully enough to sway several
key Senate votes at the last
minute. "But believe me, these
corporate guys or Administration
officials who try to do that again
are going to encounter a very
harsh reaction from the American
Jewish community," says Aaron
Rosenbaum.
"And I can assure you that the
Jewish community will be trying
to find out specifically who it is"
who is behind the anti-Jewish re-
marks.
"Until now, the situation of
Jews in this country was radical-
ly different from the situation of
Jews in Europe," Henry Siegman
of the American Jewish Congress
recently observed. "They had to
confront their own governments,
their own political leadership,
who advocated policies that were
totally different We've had a'
dispensation from that; we've
had it easy here. That has come
to an end. In teh foreseeable fu-
ture, we are going to have a series
of heightened confrontations be-
tween the Jewish community and
American political leadership be-
cause we really see American for-
eign policy in very divergent
ways."
"I don't know how many Jews
in the last week or two of the
AWACS debate said to me, 'I
won't say this publicly but do
we really have to fight this one?'
recalled Nathan Perlmutter of
the ADL. "There is a kind of ero-
sion of one's own team esprit that
goes on, and it works effectively,
whether through plan or happen-
stance, when people project the
possibility of anti-Semitism as a
consequence of winning. We are
Robert a. Kwei has been
elected to the Board of Direct-
ors of American Savings and
Loan Association of Florida, it
was announced by Shepard
Broad, chairman.
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi Rami Shapiro of
Shoresh Hadash Congrega-
tion, Miami, will appear on
the Jewish Worship hour
Sunday at 8 am. on Channel
10.
so afraid of winning that we end
up losers either way."
Anti-Jewish overtones have al-
ready emerged in the gearing up
for the Jordan arms sale debate.
"If Israel succeeds in blocking
the armament of Jordan with ad-
vanced weapons," warned Jor-
dan's information minister,
Adnan Abu Odeh, "the Arabs
will come to the conclusion that
Israel, and not the United States,
draws up American policy in the
Mideast."
Supporters of Israel say that
the simple truth is that the Jor-
dan arms sale would place Israel
in grave danger and therefore 4t--
must be fought, even if charges or
dual loyalty and opposing the
President are used again. Retreat
does not advance the cause, but
only harms it.
"Will they use it (the threat of
anti-Semitism) again?" pondered
one friend of Israel in Washing-
ton. "It's something to be wor-
ried about. By the same token,
though, it's not something to
knuckle under to."
All Publication Right! Rlttrvtd
Synagogue
Listings
Candlellghtlng Time: 7:48
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Daily 7:30 a.m.
Evening 6:30 p.m.
Shabbos 8:30 a.m.
Shala Seudot 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Mlami-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Frl., Rabbi Morton Hoffmen will apeak on
"Challangaa for American Jews."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S W 3rd Avenue
South Dade 7500 S.W. 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Friday, 8 p.m. South Dade Chapel
Saturday, 9 a.m. Coral Way
Shabbat Servlcea Conducted by
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
* Cantor William W. Upeon
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101S.W.12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Daily Minyan Services-7:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler. Cantor
Sat. mom. Service-9 a.m.
Dr. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Fri. Eve. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL^CTGieatar Miami
Mkvnrs Pioneer Aetaen CongnatMon
137 N.E 19th Sf_ Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Masked M. Bemat
Asst Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Sa Ik in
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstein
Frl. eervicee 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl.. p.m.. Queal Rabbi Evelyn Bleckmen;
Queat Soioln Laurel Swerdln
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd TeL 534-9776
DR DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH, President
Services Fri. 7:30 p.m. Sat 9:30 am
31
TEMPLEMENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPI F BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 Conseivative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A Gortinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m
Frl. aervlcea 8 p.m
Set. aervlcea 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. MA, A 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Saul H.Breeh
Daily Service 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.
Friday 7:15 p.m.-Saturday 8:30 a.m
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Friday services at 8:15 p.m
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.

SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDAL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court #111
Miami. Fl. Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-0898
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41 st. St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Fri. Evening 8:15 p.m.
Sat. morn. 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Upschttz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec Director
Frl. Evening Service &00 p.m.
Sat Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
Daily Services: 7:30 a JTt-5:30 p.m.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATfON-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Flortda 33137
Phone 5764000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone.57S4000
Rabblr^Aaaocistfcw Office
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsiey, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara a Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday of month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
s
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Beniamin Dickson. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon a Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
Queal* Are Welcome
Register Now, For Religious Schools
Kindergarten Thru Confirmation
wnmmwsm
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St.. N. Miami Beach. Fl. 33183
047 8004. H.roid Wlahna. executive director.
Franklin 0. Kroutzor, regional president.
uN.0ri6FAMER.cAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami, Fl.
33166,592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional director
\
xlV
i
.


Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
[otice
tOURTOF
[JUDICIAL
ID FOR
FLORIDA
Jv.JJ
rioN
m
tv
rioN
IN and
nown
EBY NOT1-
. on tor tore-
lied andcom-
ouri and you
lie your an
ure action
the above
i copy thereof
J's attorney.
Esq., 622 a.W.
t, Fla. 831S0.
123. 1982. or
ctlon will be
action cori-
ng described
Block 4. of
%T OF JEF-
fccordlng to the
recorded in
88, of the
of Dade
,1982
|. Brlnker
ult Court
fried
i Clerk
July 23, SO;
lugust 6, IS, 1982
)F ACTION
IVE SERVICE
)PERTY)
IIT COURT OF
TH JUDICIAL
'FLORIDA. IN
lADE COUNTY
.ACTION
102-10420
: DISSOLUTION
IRRIAOE
MARRIAGE
lY HOWARD,
HER
CNRY
>ENT
I HENRY
irth Street
Jabama
i HEREBY NOTI-
i action for Dlsso-
krrlage has been
[you and you are
rve a copy of your
leu If any, to It on
ILL BENNETT,
'etltloner, whose
Weit Flakier
520 Blscayne
Florida ssiso-
I the original with
[the above styled
before August 20,
lae a default will
gainst you for the
sded In the com
Hon.
| shall be published
eek for four con-
ks In THE JEW
JAN.
|my hand and the
court at Miami,
: 20 day of July,
IP. BRINKER
Circuit Court
nty, Florida
I. Copeland
lity Clerk
[S.'Hl
.BENNETT
titloner
I Bldg.
rS'.re.-.
163130-4469
liuoner
&1885
July 23, 30;
^Uirust 6, 13.1982
uit court of
Nth judicial
PlN AND FOR
MT Y.FLORIDA
JIVISION
-10843 FC 13
CEBY
CATION
Carriage of
1ENAO
LAMIREZ
EZ
IO
1REZ
hknown
EBY notified
for Dissolution
been filed
you are hereby
copy of your
pleading to the
the 1'etltloner
D. ROG-
ias Is: 1401
inue, Miami,
nd file the orlg-
Krk of the above
1 or before this
Knber. 1982, or a
ntered against
Bm day of July,
tINKER.
IWi
fried
iClerk
July 80;
It6. 18. 20, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-10*24 FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DORA STELLA PATINO
Petitioner wife
and
JAIME PATINO
Respondent-husband
TO: JAIME PATINO
RESIDENCE ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE T. RAMANI, ESQ.,
Suite 711. Blscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 38130 and file the Origi-
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
August. 1962. If you fall to do
so. Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami, Dade County, Florida,
this 10 day of July, 1062.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
BY: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17998 July 28.80;
Augusts. 18,19OT
IN I HE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GERTHAALCENA
GERMAIN
Petitioner Wife
and
EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN,
Respondent-Husband
TO: EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN
Ruelle
Desmanjles No. 19
Port Au Prince Haiti
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE T. RAMANI, ESQ.,
Suite 711. Blscayne Building, 19
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130 and file the Origi-
nal Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
August. 1982.1 f you fall to do so,
Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
this 19 day of July. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
BY: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17999 July 23. 30;
August 8.13, 1982
--------NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-10530
ACTION FOR '
DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
FLORA C.
HERRERA-MOYA
PETITIONER
and
FRANK DE JESUS MOYA
RESPONDENT
TO:
FRANK DE JESUS MOYA
WHOSE RESIDENCE
IS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1960 South-
west 27th Avenue, Second
Floor. Miami, Florida 38146,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 20. 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.Moor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DELVALLE LAW
OFFICES, P.A.
1960 Southwest 27th Ave.
Miami, Florida S314B
Telephone: (806)446-0272
M. CRISTINA
DELVALLE, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
17984 July 28. 80;
August 6.13, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
C1RCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.02-204 PCM
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSIIIJNA
DAV1DSONHN a-k-a
JOSULINA
DAVID SONHN
KA1.HNKANTKI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YO ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Josullna Uavld-
sonhn a-k-a Josullna David
sonhn Kalhnakantkl, deceased,
late of Dade County, Florida.
File Number 82-284 PC 04 la
pending In the Circuit Court In
and for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 3rd Floor, Dade
County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tative of this estate Is Ber-
nardo Tetner Grossman, whose
address Is 2 DA Avenlda Las
Dellcas de Sabana Grande,
Residencies Las Dellclas, apto
43, Caracas, Venezuela. The
name and address of the attor-
ney tor the personal represen-
tative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufi
fie lent copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's win, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 12 day of July. 1082.
Bernardo Tetner
Grossman
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JOSULINA DA V1DSONHN
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on the 30 day
of July. 1982.
Norman Schwarz
Of Law Offices of
NORMAN K SCHWARZ. P.A.
407 Lincoln Road,
Suite 4A
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 6721222
18008 July SO;
___________________August 6.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 02-10*48
FAMILY DIVISION FC 11
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
WILLIAM S. INGRAHAM
and
MARLA J. INGRAHAM
TO: MARLA J.
INGRAHAM
99 Jamestown Road
R.D. No. 1
Randolph,
New York 14772
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to It on:
SAMUEL S. SOROTA, Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is: 16300 N.E. 19th Ave-
nue, suite No. 227. North Miami
Beach. Florida 33182 and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 31. 1982; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petlUon.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
by: K. Selfrted
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18000 July SO;
August*, 18. 20, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 700
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH SCHMIER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE: YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
Joseph Schmler, deceased,
File Number 82-700 (08), la
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
is Dade County Courthouse, 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida, 88180. The personal
representative of the estate Is
Rose Schmler, whose address
is 19700 N.E. 22nd Ave., North
Miami Beach, Florida, 33009
The name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
. required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: July SO, 1982.
Rose Schmler
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Joseph Schmler
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Gary F.Canner
Schmler, Canner A Glaaser
American Savings Bldg.,
Suite 811
2500 E. Hallandale
Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. FL 33009
Telephone: 946-1586
18011 July 80;
August 6,1982
T
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
REPORT
The annual report of the pri-
vate foundation. The Selma
Schechter Foundation. Inc., re-
quired to be filed under Section
6056, Internal Revenue Code, is
available for public Inspection
at Its principal office. 2000 So.
Dixie Hwy Suite 103. Miami.
Fla. 33133. for Inspection on
business days between 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m. by any citizen upon
request within 180 days after
the date of this publication.
J. Jerry Schechter
. Principal Manager
18014 July SO, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
L'Bakery at 8879 SW 107 Ave.,
Miami, Fl intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Aa-FBakerlM !
Owner
Bernard Forman,
25 percent Interest
Rubin Furman,
25 percent Interest
Harold Ackermann,
25 percent interest
Ernesto Fischer,
25 percent Interest
18010 July 80;
Augusts, 13,20. 1982
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
REPORT
The annual report of the pri-
vate foundation, Frank and
Anna Goldman. Foundation,
Inc., required to be filed under
Section 6056 Internal Revenue
Code, is available for public
Inspection at Its principal of-
fice, 1128 7lst Street, Miami
Beach, Florida 33141. for In-
spection on business days be-
tween 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. by any
citizen upon request within 180
days after the date of this pub
llcaUon.
Aaron Goldman,
Principal, Manager
18008 July SO, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
-desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
THELMA'S HATS at 027 Lin-
coln Road-Suite 217 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
THAT'S THAT. INC.
Sandra Jacob,
President
Attorney for
THAT'S THAT, INC.
WEISS A WEISS
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 349
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
llSOlS JulyS6;
___________ Augusts. IS. 20,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Na-
ture's Wonders at 8040 North
Kendall Dr.. Miami. Fl 33156
' Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
John T. Cole. Jr.,
Owner
18005 July 80;
Augusts, 13.20. 1982
1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 82-S074
DIVISION 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM SCHWEBEL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of ABRAHAM
SCHWEBEL. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida, has
commenced In the captloned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate,
if any, or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Juris-
diction of the Court, with the
Court. Dade County Court-
house, 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
. DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this No-
tice on the 80 day of July. 1982.
Philip Schwebel
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ABRAHAM SCHWEBEL
Deceased
82-29 Ablngdon Road
Kew Gardens. New York
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Herbert Jay
COHEN. P.A.
9400S. DadelandBlvd.
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: (306)666-0401
18018 July SO;
August 6, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-5923
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EPHRAIMF.
MANDELCORN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of EPHRAIM F. MAN-
DELCORN, deceased, File
Number 82-6923, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal rep
rescntatlve and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are re
Sulred to file with this court,
rtTHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July SO, 1082.
Personal Representative:
Samuel P. Mandeicorn
4660 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Moses J. Grundwerg. Esq.
Suite 900.
21 se First Ave.
Miami, Fla. S3131
Telephone: (808)871-4410
18017 July 80;
Augusts, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81-10402
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BALLANTTNE. PAUL O.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of PAUL O BAL-
LANTTNE, deceased. File
Number 81-10482. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 78
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate Is PAUL
M. BALLANTINE. whose ad-
dress Is c-o Law Offices of
Barry C Flelsher. 1400 Miami
Gardens Drive. Suite 108,
North Miami Beach, Florida
33179. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this NoUce of Admlnlstra
Uon: July SO. 1982.
Rudolph Ballantlne
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
PAULO. BALLANTINE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Barry C. Flelsher. Esq.
1400 N E Miami Gardens Dr.
Suite 103
North Miami Beach,
Florida 88170
Telephone. (806)947-6226
18018 July SO;
August 6, 1982
1 NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Laly's Fashions at 1681 SW
Flagler Ter., Miami 88188 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Maria Cabrera.
Owner
17976 July 9,16;
23.80.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name S I A
INVESTMENTS, a partnership
at 7406 N.W. 41 st Street. Miami,
Florida intends to register aald
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
MARIANITO S. CHUA
EDWIN S. CHUA
AMELITA S. CHUA
ARISTEDES S. CHUA
MABELS. CHUA
DEBBIE S. CHUA
JEANETTE S. CHUA
ELENITAS.CHUA
VINCENTS. CHUA
DENNIS S. CHUA
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney tor S I A INVEST-
MENTS, a Partnership.
18006 July SO;
August*. 13.20.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Smithy's Diamond Setter at
Seybold Bldg., Suite 738, 36
N.E. First Street, Miami, Flor-
ida, 88182 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Charlie Smith. Jr.
17985 July 28.30;
Augusts. 18,1082


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Community Corner
I Emily S. Rownthal of Miami will receive Master of Social
Fork degree from the Block Education Program of Yeshiva
diversity's Wurzweiler School of Social Work on Aug. 6 in
bw York.
Steve Armstrong, the news editor of the Miami Herald's
neighbors' will be guest speaker at the Abe Horrowitz Jewish
far Veteran breakfast meeting on Aug. 1 at 9 a.m. at the Post
jilding, North Miami Beach.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy-Beth El
Dngregation will present Cantor Ben-Zion Lanxner as guest at
turday morning services, according to Jerome Bienenfeld,
lairman of the board.
| Governor Bob Graham has appointed Stephen E. Cohen,
? A, a partner of Touche Ross & Co. of Florida, as a member of
i Governor's Advisory Council for the 1992 Florida Columbus
[position. The organization is attempting to have Miami
signated as the host city for the celebration of the 600th
liversary of Columbus' discovery of the New World.
flea market will be held at the Jewish Community Center of
ami Beach on Aug. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Steven Leigh Singer, son of Mr. and Mrs. David M. Singer,
1 attend the University of Pennsylvania this fall as a result of
ining the top Ryder Truck Scholarship $4,000 award.
gathering sponsored by the coordinating committee of the
id ish Clubs of Miami "Remembering the Martyred Soviet
ish Writers" will take place at the American Savings Asso-
tion Building, 840 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach, on
12 at 2 p.m.
)aniel K. Gill has been elected chairman of the Miami-Dade
imunity College Foundation. Other officers and directors
ted were Dr. Piedad Robertson, Barton D. Powell, Dr.
race J. Traylor, Benjamin Gould, Gerald Greenblatt, and
tchellWolfeon.Jr.
Ofelia Hirigoyen, chairperson for Congressman Dante
cell's Annual Labor Day Picnic announced that the '82
nic will be held Monday, Sept. 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
funds of the Youth Fair at Tamiami Park.
nentin Dart Parker. Architect, has been elected to the Board
)irectors of Alfred Browning Parker, Achitects, Chartered.
Parker is a son of the founder of the firm.
lurray Klein, candidate for Dade County Court Judge,
oup 9, received the Florida Crime Prevention Commission's
tard of Merit.
Jacob Levinson, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ampal-
ii'rican Israel Corporation announced the election of Stephen
dom of New York to the Board of Directors of Ampal.
is active in the UJA of Greater New York having just
apleted his term as president, and currently serves on the
ird of Governors.
Esther Plansky Passes
iblic Notice
NOTICE UNDER
:ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
kt the undersigned, desiring
engage In business under the
Mtlous name MR. DON UT at
Southwest 87th Avenue,
Mil, Florida 33166 Intends to
[later said name with the
prk of the Circuit Court of
ie County, Florida.
CHARLES L. HARRIS
d-b-aMR.DONUT
I BY: Charles L. Hariiss
LTON, WEST & BOLTON
(ley for
rles L. Harrlss
IN.E. 171 Street
i Miami Beach,
.33160
July SO;
August 6, 13, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
HOTICE IS HEREBY
ITEN that the undersigned,
hiring to engage In business
Tier the fictitious name DA-
J. WEINER, D.M.D. at
S. W. 8th Street, Miami,
brida Intends to register said
Tie with the Clerk of the Clr-
Court of Dade County,
Ma,
DAVID J. WEINER,
D.M.D..P.A.
BY: DAVID J. WEINER,
D.M.D.
PF.
HETT. P.A.
TF. BARNETT
orney
> BOX 640400
ml, FL 33164
July SO;
Augusts. 13,30. 1083

S 4. 2. Li
JS-0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 NorlhwPSl 3rd Street
Tel 261-7612
i
Esther Plansky, 92, a Miami
Beach resident since 1935, passed
away July 25. Mrs. Plansky was
a native of Poland. She and her
late husband, Louis, built the Lu-
Esta Apartment on Euclid
Avenue in 1936. The facility was
KLEIN
Harold L. 77. of Miami passed away
July 21. Mr. Klein had made his home
here for the past 34 years, coming from
Brooklyn. He was a member of Beth
Tov Synagogue. Mr. Klein Is survived
by his wife. Betty; sons, Bernard
(Reva) Klein of Israel, Michael
(Mayna) Klein of Miami; and three
grandchildren. Service were held July
22 at Star of David Memorial Park. Ar-
rangements by Gordon Funeral Horn*.
DENHOLTZ
Herman A. A 14 year resident, formerly
of New Jersey. He was acUve In B'nal
B'rlth, Galahad South Mena Club and
the Masons. He la survived by his wife,
Ann; son, Jack, of Livingston, New Jer-
sey; daughter. Rhoda of Short HUls.
New Jersey; and brother, Abe of Lake
Wales. Services were held July 23 at Ri-
verside .
ROSENTHAL
Jerome, 75. Mr. Rosen thai was elected
Vice President-Industrial Relations of
National Airlines In 1MB. He was bom In
New York City, attended the University
of Illinois and Chicago Law School,
where he was graduated with an LL.B.
degree in 1929. He Is survived by his
wife, Birdie Glnglss Rose nt ha I; slater,
Roslyn R. Zeltlln; and brother, Law-
rence V. Richards. Services were held
July 26 at Riverside.
MANDELCORN
Rabbi Ephralm F., 63, of Miami Beach
passed away July 22. He was a native of
Montreal, Canada, and had resided on
Miami Beach for seven years. He was a
member of the Greater Miami Rabbini-
cal Association, a former Rabbi of Tem-
ple Beth Raphael, Gold Coast Synago-
gue and Ocean Pavllllon Jewish Center.
He Is survived by brothers. Rabbi Harry
Mandelcom of Jerusalem and Rabbi
Samuel P. Mandelcom of Miami Beach,
Services and Interment will be In Israel
with arrangements by Riverside.
GAINES, Sidney. (Glnsburg) Miami
Beach, July 23.
GRODNIK, Sablna A.. Miami, July 22,
Riverside.
TABEROFF, Edna, 75, Miami Beach,
July 23, Levltt-Welnsteln.
APPEL, Bruce Arthur, 21, Miami, July
26. Riverside.
CHALEF, Benjamin. 69. North Miami,
July 23, Levltt-Welnsteln.
GABOWITZ, Diana, 71, North Miami.
Gordon.
POTASCH. Evelyn, July 21.
KAUFMAN, Emannuel, 71, North
Miami Beach, July 25, Riverside.
LAZARUS. Leo, 84. North Miami. July
26. Levltt-Welnsteln.
SCHWARTZ, Michael A., July 25, Riv-
erside.
I.EBOW, Leon, 71, Miami Beach, July
26, Riverside.
COTTIN, Jacob, July 27. Riverside.
GREEN, Dr. Emanuel, 66, Miami
Beach, July 28, Riverside. i
MARANS, Sylvia. North Miami Beach,
July 27. Levltt-Welnsteln.
SCHIER, Llllle, Miami Beach, July 27,
Rubln-ZUbert.
SOFFER, Dora, 83. Miami Beach. Riv-
erside.
WINSTON. Esther Molly. 85, North
Miami Beach, July 27. Levltt-
Welnsteln.
A RON SON, Charles, Miami Beach, July
26, Levltt-Welnsteln.
BUSH, Joseph, Miami Beach, Rubln-
Zllbert.
KAHN, Jane, 53, North Miami Beach,
July 26. LevtU-Welnsteln.
SALOFF, Gussle. Miami Beach. Rubln-
ZUbert.
SCHACHTER. Clara. 86, Miami Beach,
July 26. Riverside.
sold 16 years ago.
Survivors include a son, Mur-
ray; daughters, Faye Gilman and
Rose Mantel; eight grandchil-
dren and three great-grandchil-
dren. Arrangements by River-
side.
COHEN. Charles, 86, Bay Harbor, July
22, Levltt-Welnsteln.
COHEN, PhUllp, Blasberg.
M1SKIN, Cells, Blasberg.
SCHREIMAN (GELFMAN) Jennie K.,
86. North Miami Beach, July 22.
Riverside.
TUBIN, Bamett, Blasberg
WEIL, Morty. July 22, Blasberg.
WHITAKER, Harry. Blasberg.
BIRNHOLZ, Dorothy. 74. Coral Gables.
Riverside.
COEL, Morris. 93, North Miami Beach,
July 14, Levltt-Welnsteln.
GRANT. Glenn Spencer, 21, Coral
Gables. July is, Riverside.
GOLDFARB, Carrie, Blasberg
FREEDMAN, Jacob J. 83, North Miami
Beach. July 20, Riverside.
KIMMEL, Emanuel. 86. North Miami,
July 18, Riverside.
ROSENBERG. Sadie Lillian. Miami
Beach. Riverside.
SALZER. Frederic, 60. Blasberg.
FRIEDMAN, Belle, 79. Miami. July 19.
Gordon.
K ASS AN, There, July 20. Blasberg.
ROGERS. Sadie. 84 July 19, Riverside.
LYON. Winifred. Miami Beach, July21.
Rubln-ZUbert.
SEIDER, Pearl. North Bay Village, ,
July 20, Rubln-ZUbert.
SIEGEL. Ruth. 66. July 21. Riverside.
COHEN. Dorothy. Miami Beach, July 8,
Rubln-ZUbert. ,
HURWITZ. Bernard. 81. North Miami -
Beach.
SCHAFF. Herman. 79. North Miami
Beach, July 9, Levltt-Welnsteln.
MEDVIN. Louis. Blasberg.
BADER, Gloria. July 11. Blasberg.
MAISTER. Anna, Miami Beach.
BOXER, Charles I.. 80, Miami Beach,
July 12, Gordon.
CEADER, Tessle. 86. North Miami,
July 12, Mt. Nebo, Gordon Funeral
Home.
COHEN. Meyer, 79. North Miami
Beach. July 11. Mt. Nebo, Gordon
Funeral Home.
AMKAN
Louis, 84. passed away July 16. He was a
84 year resident coming from Washing-
ton D.C. He Is survived by his daughter.
Estelle. He was a licensed registered
masseur at the Harbor Island Spa..
Services were held July 18 at Mt. Nebo.
Arrangements by Riverside.
HAHN
Jennie of Miami passed away July is
Mrs. Harm had made her home here for
the past 36 years, coming from New
York City. She la survived by a son,
Gregg (Bebbe) Hahn of Miami; a
daughter Ruth (PhUlp) Mann of Miami;
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Services were held July 18 at Riverside
with Interment at Mt. Nebo.
ZEILINOER
Rose, 72. A resident of Miami Beach
since 19S9. coming from Pittsburgh. She
Is survived by her brother, Charles
Zelllnger, and sisters, Ida Fagen and
Lillian Cohen. She was a member of
Hadassah. a Life Master In the Bridge
and a member of ACBL. Services were
held at Riverside.
STEINBERG
Hyman, 93, North Miami Beach passed
away July 17. He had made his home
here for the past 20 years, coming from
New York. He Is survived by two
brothers: Jack, of Miami Beach, and
Morris, of Miami. Services were held
July 19 at Gordon Funeral Home with
Interment at Star of David.
DESSNER. Irving. 83, North Miami
Beach. June 29, Levltt-Welnsteln.
MOSKOWITZ. Harry, 82, Miami Beach.
June 29, Riverside.
DICK. William. Miami Beach. River-
side.
KKI.KMAN, Morris. Miami Beach, Riv-
erside.
'1 KNELL. Dr. Benjamin. 79, North
Miami Beach, June 26, Riverside.
'NSKER, Louis, 78. Miami. June 26.
Itiverslde.
MONUMENTS INC
Open Evaiy Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscayne Boulevard.
CtjapelS
945-3939
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and all South Florida cemeteries from chapels
in North Miami Beach, Sunrise, Deerfield Beach
and Margate.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors ot America
720 SEVENTY FIRST STREET
MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
865-2353 miami beach. Florida 331*1
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SnWttTK BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Dade County
949-1656
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Repreiented by S. Levitt, f.O.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76lh Rd., Forest H
i
Is, NY.


Marshalls is
our store.
"We may not enjoy the same
sports, but we sure agree on where
to buy our activewear. Marshalls.
No one gives you so much for so
little.
Take Jean's tennis outfit- It*s all
first quality from a famous pro
maker...right down to her shoes.
She bought it at Marshalls for a
lot less than regular prices at i
department stores.
Me? I play racquetbalL
And I enjoy wearing
designer styles. But I won't
pay more than I have to. so
youll find me at Marshalls
every time. From pro maker
joggers, shorts and designer
tee shirts to brand name
visors, accessory bags-
even sweat socks. At
Marshalls they all cost a
lot less."
So if high prices have
turned you away from
quality brands and
designer styling, get
back into the swing of
things at Marshalls.
Brand Names For Less.
<
\
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\Brarut Ncunes for Less J\
SO. MIAMI: So. Dixie Highway (U.S. 1) at intersection of 160th Street (adj. to Service Merchandise) HIALEAH: 103rd Street, just east of
Palmetto Expressway, across from Westland Mall (adj. to Service Merchandise) HOLLYWOOD: Rt 441 at intersection of Pembroke
Road. adj. to Service Merchandise TAMARAC: University Drive at intersection of NW57th Street (near Commercial Blvd.) WEST PALM
BEACH: Military Trail at intersection of Okeechobee Boulevard in the Pine Trail Shopping Center
opan Monday tru Saturday MO a.m. to :30 p.m. MarahaNa rafund policy
opart Sunday 12 noon lo 6 p.m aurthaai wHh your
WEST PALM BEACH opan Sunday 12 noon to 5 p.m.
Simply ratum your
uaa our conyaraant no aandca charga layaway


Full Text
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INGEST IEID E230D3MMP_0EHIZE INGEST_TIME 2013-06-18T02:30:53Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02791
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Two viewpoints
Arafat Vow Brings Scorn, Welcome
'Exercise in Deceit,' Says Shamir of 'Evidence'
Friday, July 30,1982 / The Jewiah Floridian Page 5-A
AJComm. Hails Ruling
Against Violations
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ Israeli has officials
heaped scorn on reports
from Beirut that PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat has signed a
document affirming United
Nations resolutions which
would constitute PLO rec-
ognition of Israel's right to
exist. Foreign Minister
I Yitzhak Shamir called the
[document "an exercise in
I deceit."
The paper Arafat reportedly
signed was presented as evidence
jf PLO recognition of Israel by
|ltep. Paul McCloskey (R., Calif.),
i member of a five-member Con-
gressional delegation visiting
eirut. He met with Arafat in his
vesl Beirut redoubt which has
en under siege by Israel for the
ast month.
FOREIGN MINISTRY
ikesman Avi Pazner called the
document a "public relations
gimmick" and warned that the
JLO will have to leave Lebanon.
I'AII the deceit and declarations
riven for the benefit of public
opinion will not help them," he
>ld reporters today.
Premier Menachem Begin's
^ress spokesman, Uri Porat,
impari'il the document to the
^ne produced by British Prime
linister Neville Chamberlain on
lis return from Munich in 1938
er Britain and France had ac-
quiesced to the dismemberment
bt Czechoslovakia by Hitler. He
laid the paper McCloskey dis-
played "is the kind waved by
people who are naive, ignorant of
both."
Other Israeli officials insisted
that the PLO was stalling for
time in the hope that diplomatic
pressure on Israel would some-
how relieve the PLO of the neces-
sity to leave Beirut and Lebanon.
According to McCloskey, PLO
"Chairman Arafat accepts all
United Nations resolutions
relevant to the Palestine ques-
tion."
THE U.S. has persistently rei-
terated in recent weeks that it
will neither recognize nor have
any contact with the PLO unless
the latter recognizes Israel's
right to exist and accepts UN Se-
curity Council Resolutions 242
and 338. According to the reports
from Beirut, Arafat told the
visiting Congressmen that the
PLO cannot accept 242 alone be-
cause it refers to the Palestinian
.. .But Mubarak Calls It
A 'Good Step Forward'
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
'resident Hoseni Mubarak
h Egypt has welcomed
Palestine Liberation Orga-
lization Chief Yasir
Arafat's declaration ac-
cepting "all UN resolutions
elevant to the Palestinian
question" and called upon
[he United States to "take
step forward" towards
[he PLO in view of this de-
velopment.
Mubarak, who was speaking in
fairo at the end of the ceremonies
narking the 30th anniversary of
pe 1952 revolution which over-
irew King Farouk, called
rafat's declaration "a good step
brward in the direction of peace"
bd urged Washington to start a
lalogue with the PLO leader-
>ip.
[Practically the entire French
ews media hailed Arafat's
atement as a great step forward
Ihich, most commentators said,
fight open the way to a Pales-
nian-American dialogue.
I BUT ARAFAT'S statement
s strongly denounced by Am-
bsador Meir Rosenne of Israel
ho termed the statement "a
opaganda maneuver trying to
ike him pass off as a moder-
b." Rosenne declared: we shall
ver negotiate with this terror-
. organization but only with the
presentatives of the autono-
ous councils of Judea, Samaria
" Gaza under the Camp David
Bements."
[Nevertheless, the French For-
Ministry said that France
.Egypt will submit in the
: days a uw resolution to
the United Nations Security
Council and probably also to the
General Assembly based on what
the Ministry said was a new situ-
ation. Foreign Ministry sources
said Arafat's statement served to
"concretize an already existing
situation."
Hani al-Hassan, an advisor to
Arafat, was quoted in the Beirut
weekly, Monday Morning, as
saying that the PLO was hoping,
with French support, to get a new
UN Security Council resolution
that recosnized the Palestinian
people's right to self determina-
tion and statehood.
MUBARAK, who in his speech
charged Israel with responsibility
for the Lebanon crisis, invited,
however, four prominent Jews to
Cairo for top level consultations.
The four are former World Jewish
Congress presidents Nahum
Goldmann and Philip Klutznick,
and former French Premier Pierre
Mendes-France, the three signers
of the Paris Declaration which
called upon Israel and the Pales-
tinian to mutually recognize each
other and open peace negotia-
tions' and the current W JC presi-
dent, Edgar Bronfman.
Bronfman was apparently in-
vited for having said in a speech
at the WJC Executive meeting
here earlier this month that the
Palestinian rights should be rec-
ognized, although he and the Ex-
ecutive dissociated themselves
from the Paris Declaration.
Mubarak said he wanted to
pay tribute to the four men's
"spirit of humanity and courage
which contributed to the peace
process." The Egyptian Ambas-
sadors to Paris and Washington
will forward Mubarak's invita-
tions to the four, Egyptian
sources her* said.
issue as a refuge problem and
says nothing of Palestinian self-
determination and aspirations for
a homeland.
But according to PLO spokes-
men in Beirut and McCloskey's
apparent interpretation of the
document Arafat signed, affirm-
ation of all UN resolutions per-
tinent to the Arab-Israeli conflict
includes acceptance of 242 and
the implicit recognition of Israel
contained in its text.
McCloskey said, after meeting
with Arafat, that the PLO leader
"signed for his acceptance of all
United Nations resolutions which
include the right of Israel to
exist." But Arafat corrected him,
saying, "All UN resolutions con-
cerning the Palestinian ques-
tion."
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Commit-
tee has hailed a ruling of a
Federal appeals court that
the Immigration and Natu-
ralization Service violated
the United States Consti-
tution when it raided fac-
tories in searches for illegal
aliens.
The Committee had joined with
the Mexican American Legal De-
fense and Education Fund in a
brief amicus in support of the In-
ternational Ladies Garment
Workers Union, which had
brought suit to halt the raids.
The brief, filed with the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the Ninth
Circuit, argued that "it is intoler-
able to expose American citizens
to detention and questioning on
no more of a basis than their
racial and ethnic background,"
and that the factory sweeps
violated the Fourth and Fifth
Amendments.
LESTER HYMAN, chairman
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee's Immigration Committee,
welcomed the Federal court
decision, saving, "While we be-
lieve that the immigration laws
must be vigorously enforced, we
also believe that law enforcement
officials charged with enforcing
those laws may not do so by
themselves violating the law. All
persons in this country are en-
titled under the Constitution to
due process of law and protection
against unreasonable searches
and seizures."
The amicus brief was filed in
I accordance with AJC's State-
| ment on Undocumented Persons,
which maintains that "enforce-
ment of our immigration law
must itself conform to the
standards established by our
constitution. Mass roundups or
sweeps of any persons without
due process of law must not be
countenanced in the United
States."
The ILGWU contended that
the raids constituted unreason-
able searches and seizures be-
cause they improperly
discriminated against persons of
Latin origin. The Immigration
Service, which had won a lower
court decision, had claimed that
the interrogation of suspected
aliens was necessary in order to
enforce the immigration laws.
Jewish-Owned Shop Burned Down
PARIS (JTA) Unofficial Jewish sources say a
Jewish-owned shop was burned down last week on the
Tunisian Island of Djerba. The sources said the show was
burned as retaliation for Israel's Lebanese campaign.
The sources claim that the Tunisian local authorities
arrested the owner and charged him with arson instead of
trying to find the culprits. The Tunisian national police
contacted by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency disclaimed
any knowledge about the affair, saying that no such in-
cident has been reported to their headquarters.
Now, twice weekly direct flights
from Miami to Israel.
One more reason to choose EL AL
EU7J/ML7/Y.
The Chosen Airline.

,


'nUttTlVLn "('iiirTSw'lK'i.inni.*7 Ifi/A.f i...'-. .
Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. July 30, 1982
'Photo Opportunity'
When, having emerged from the White House on
Monday, President Reagan was asked by a bevy of
reporters whether he was worried about the latest re-
port that special Middle East envoy Philip Habib
makes yet another Bechtel employee in the Adminis-
tration, the President smiled bioadly.
This was no time, he said, for such a question. It
spoils what he called "a photo opportunity." Still, he
wanted the world to know that he felt just fine.
Didn't his smile show that he wasn't worried?
If it was not the proper time to ask Mr. Reagan a
question, it is time for something else: It is time for
the American people to wake up and let the Adminis-
tration know, especially to let the President know,
that he serves them, not the other way around. And
that if he doesn't like that arrangement, he ought to
pack up and go home.
It is time for Mr. Reagan to come to grips with the
fact that the latest Habib embarrassment, coming on
the heels of the James Watt letter to Israel's Am-
bassador Arens about American Jews, a second em-
barrassment in just one week, is no laughing matter.
Motor Mouth Speaks
When Andrew Young left his post in the Carter
Administration as U.S. Ambassador to the United
Nations, his firing because he had made unauthor-
ized contact with members of the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization did not quiet him down.
In no time, Young got himself elected as Mayor of
Atlanta and, the other week, Young averred that
"Both Israel and this (Reagan) Administration have
created such a mess in the Middle East that it is al-
most difficult to comment on it." Almost, Andy,
almost. But not entirely. Before that, came the
Mayor's mouthful on the PLO, which he equated as a
movement with Zionism.
Frankly, we wonder what this grandiose foreign
policy palaver has to do with running the city of
Atlanta. All of which leaves us with that sneaky sus-
picion we felt when Young got himself elected as
Mayor in the first place.
He's got bigger things in mind, and old Motor
Mouth keeps talking his way there. And talking.
And talking.
Joining Anti-Nuke Drive
It is good to notice that American Jews are
finally joining the worldwide movement aimed at
curbing the super-power enthusiasm for nuclear war.
This is not to say that either the U.S. or the Soviet
Union really wants nuclear war.
But the fact is that both sides are mounting
eager campaigns to convince their peoples that a nu-
clear war can be "won."
The Soviet people can not speak for themselves.
But the rank and file of other nations throughout the
world are increasingly telling their leaders to forget
it. Until now, American Jews have been singularly
silent.
We suspect one of the reasons has to do with a
beleaguered Israel in the Middle East which, though
perennially secretive about its atomic capabilities.
must maintain as a deterrent the ultimate weapon in
the event that an Arab neighbor, or an alliance of
Arab neighbors, would be so foolish as to launch an
Armageddon against it.
But this should be no reason for American Jews
not to voice their horror of nuclear war and their
repudiation of it in principle. Even Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, speaking before the General
Assembly in June, voiced his country's eagerness to
join a regional anti-nuclear bana statement the
region did not hear because the Arabs and other
Third World leaders walked out on him.
We must not be disheartened by this. We must
join with the rest of the peoples of the world in
making our sentiments clear. Apparently, American
Jews are beginning to do just that.
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE aad PLANT-110 N.E.fthSl.. Miami. Fl*. 33132 Ptaoaa: 373-4W6
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET LEO M1NDLIN SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor aad Publiahar AaaoaaU Editor Eiacuuvt Editor
HiJwMi HI Pa XI a Tha aahnrth
Of Tha Marchandlaa MMM Nb Cakmmm
ruliaiaiit Waakfcr Bvary Friday tact 19*7 by Tht JnraJi Fkndian
Sacoad-Cbaa Poatafa Paid m Man. FU USPS 27S320
Mr Fata 3S79 nMam M JmjWI Floridian. P.O. Boa 01-2973. MUil. FU 31101
PLO's last Gasp': A Fantasy
WHEN several months ago I
had a brief visit with Israel's
Ambassador Moshe Arens, our
conversation quite naturally
dealt with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organisation and the con- .
tinning Arab unrest on the West
Bank.
At the time. Arens skilfully
related the two issues and
declared both to be "the PLO's
last gasp" before coming to grips
with the Middle East's new Reai-
politik.
I WONDERED then, and I
wonder even more now, just how
accurate Ambassador Arens' as-
sessment was. And it's not just
that, in the rubble of his ruin, Ya-
sir Arafat is these days resur-
rected and offering "recognition"
of Israel as his one-way ticket
back to stardom. The recent IRA
bombing of visiting Belfast
bandsmen at Hyde Park in Lon-
don is the real case in point.
There is not only a parallel in
intent and method of operation
between the IRA and the PLO;
there is, in fact, a well-
documented relationship between
the two as a consequence of far
more complex ties between them
and international terrorist orga-
nizations in Italy, Japan and
West Germany.
and baby kissers can't be
Utk
Everywhere in the West, the
terrorists are deplored. The
media report their doings with
proper revulsion. When the
papers the other day quoted Bel-
fast Mayor Thomas Patton's as-
sessment of the IRA as "sewer
rats," you could sense that the
indignation in his words had been
heightened by an equivalent
editorial indignation with dry-
gulchers who won't fight fair and
square.
BUT NOT the PLO. Here,
everyone makes an exception to
the terrorist rule, with the Pied
Piper press leading the whole
shebang in pious hosannahs to its
most exalted purposes. The PLO
aren't sewer rats. On the con-
trary, we now have Yasir Arafat
almost daily on the front page of
the Miami papers kissing babies.
bad even if they do wear a .,
oldbathtowelforahat *
There are two basic reason, k I
this distinction: oil and relig 1
am not at all sure which is tJ,'
important in terms of tb
growing anti-Israel aversion.
Secretary of Interior JamJ
Watt's letter to Ambassador
Arens that warns him arjout
America's ultimate friendshin
with Israel if Arens doesn't 3
American Jews to shape up and
support the Reagan Administra-i
tion's energy policies is u,
example of the role of oil in the
widening impasse.
Watt's letter can, I suppose, be I
dismissed, especially since the
White House is attempting to do
just that, or so say the reports of I
this latest hideousness on Capitol
Hill. Watt is, after all, Mr
Reagan's updated model of G.
Gordon Liddy, the man who at*a
rat to steel himself against the
Gotterdammerung.
BUT OIL and energy generally
can not be so easily dismissed at
Watt can in the growing anti-Is-
rael tide. And religion is evea
more dangerous. The history of |
anti-Semitism carefully cul-
tivated and encouraged"by Chris-
tian belief speaks for itself.
Whatever equally strong anti-
pathies Christianity feels for
Islam, at least in the hatred of
Jews. Christianity has found a
soulmate.
There are, of course, other
reasons behind the careful
Western separation of the PLO
from the mainstream of interna-
tional terrorism. But it is signifi-
cant on its own terms to see how
exquisitely tenderly the PLO is
treated compared with the treat-
ment of the IRA's bombing in
Hyde Park.
What the IRA did there, what
it did in snuffing out the life of
Lord Mountbatten these are
merely trifling examples of what
the PLO has been doing in its
outrages perpetrated upon Israel
and Israelis for years now.
STILL, the treatment of Isra-
el, the victim, remains savage
Nor is the harlotry of the media
which shape this public savagery
entirely to blame. The stunning
report this week that Philip
Habib. the sainted Presidential
envoy to the Middle East
through two administrations
now, is yet another Bechtel mer
cenary tells the story from an
even more potent viewpoint. If
the White House sells itself, how
can the press be far behind?
No one can walk away from all
Continued on Page 13-A
Carl Alpert
Uzi Has Become World Trademark
AaaociattorL
SUBSCRIPTION HATES In Advance (Local Araaj On* Yaar-18.00 Two Vaara(34.00. Ttiraa
yaars :>4900 Suppiamant laaua (Local Ataa) Laat Friday aacn monff) (10 luuasi Sap I
junaS3 SO Out of town, country, upon raqunl (
Friday. July 30.1982 10 AB 5742
Volume 55 Number 31
HAIFAThe sub-machine gun |
known as the Uzi, designed and
produced in Israel, has become
almost a trade mark of Israel's
armament industry. It is quite
common to find in pictures from
many countries that police of-
ficers, guards and military
personnel are shown holding the
familiar weapon. Not long ago it
was revealed that Israel has sold
1.350,00 of the guns to 42
countries.
Israel's exports of military
merchandise are not limited to
Uzis. however. The list ranges all
the way from howitzer artillery,
mortars and bombs, to a broad
range of sophisticated military
electronic apparatus, as well as
non-battle items and field kit-
chens. In 1981, the value of such
exports exceeded $800 million,
reflecting a growth rate of 20-30
percent per year, which is expect-
ed to continue into 1982 and
1983.
ISRAEL DID not go into the
munitions business by design. It
all came about in the gradual
development of circumstances.
As far back as the 1950's. this
country over-hauled and recon-
ditioned some of its old planes,
which had been withdrawn from
service, and discovered there was
a market for them in countries
like Burma, in the Far East, and
in Latin America. Indeed, the
Israel Aircraft Industries made
its first big money reconditioning
planes, and went so far as to buy
discarded "junk" from other
countries, which it turned into
first-class flying craft for which
there was a market.
In that same decade, David
Ben Gurion agreed to sell arms to
Germany. India, no lover of
Israel, purchased supplies here
for use in its war against
Pakistan.
The principal customer for
domestic arms production was, of
course, our own military forces.
Indeed, the uncertainties of
overaeas supply made it
necessary for us to bf^"nr
as self-sufficient as possible in
these matters. The'wars which
Israel has endured and the
threats of war. ensured a local
market for the wide range of pro-
ducts. In time of peace, the de-
fense establishment was able to
stockpile its needs. But there is a
limit even to stockpiling, and the
several large industrial plants.
together with their subsidiary
firms, faced a serious problem.
SOME COULD shift over to
production of civilian consumer
goods, and hold their military
production lines in readiness in
case of need. To close down
completely was out of m
question not only b^^*0,r!
thousands of jobs involved. t>
also because industrial activity
like these are not easily restfrMT|
at the push of a button, should
national need arise-
Thus, it was that markets were
sought, and found, overseas"*
the principal items which wn*
was willing to share with u*
woiW: Needless to say, there
Continued on Page 13 A