The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02789

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
For Facts and Statistics that tell the truth about the war in Lebanon, See:
| Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .Special Insert
T cJewisla IFJtaridliaim
Volume 55Number 29 Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, July 16,1982
j rmttmiM
ByM.,ieoont Price 50 Cents
\
w > .
At Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem, a Lebanese ister Menachem Begin (in photo at right) visits a wounded soldier visited bv his
tcoman (left) is one of two flown by helicopter for special treatment. Prime Min- child.
fen Years Ago
Dragged from her Father,
Top Senators
Kicking and Screaming, SwaHiped By
Hate Writing
PHOENIX Ariz. -
)ragged, kicking and
screaming from a Moscow
lpartment, a 13-year-old
Fewish girl was snatched
from the arms of her father,
le attempted to pull her
>m the grip of her abduc-
>rs but was restrained by a
^GB agent. This was one
many legal child snatch-
gs perpetrated by the
[GB.
Mori' lhan W) years ago. the
ivicis adopted a new code abo-
jishing parental rights. Thus it is
i ii h ihis law that the Communist
I'urly threatens to legally take
fhildren from parents who fail to
aise them as communists.
CHILDREN legally taken
[licim their parents in the USSR
[arc held captive in orphanages
Iand youth camps lor communis-
llic indoctrination. These artificial
by KGB
Marina Temkin
"orphans" have loving parents
who want their children returned
to them.
The 13-year-old girl taken from
her father was Marina Temkin,
daughter of renowned scientist
Alexander Temkin. Today,
nearly 10 years later, Marina, a
.:.; \raiold woman, is still under
the watchful eye of the KGB. She
Ls not free to choose her future.
The lives of Marina and her
lather were disrupted in 1972
when they received permission to
emigrate from the USSR, and the
Israel government granted them
citizenship. Strongly Zionist
Irom early childhood, Marina has
never renounced her Israeli citi-
zenship.
AFTER SEVERAL thwarted
attempts to regain custody of
Marina, Dr. Temkin was offered
two alternatives by the KGB:
either leave the USSR without
Marina or face a trumped up
Continued on Page 14-A
BY IRWIN SUALL
WASHINGTON- The
young Senate aide picks up
a nondescript package
which had just been de-
livered by mail. The plain
brown wrapper bears no re-
turn address; the postage
stamps are from Pakistan.
He removes the wrapper,
revealing two books, one
titled Anti-Zion, by
William Grimstad, the
other an anonymous vol-
ume, The Six Million Re-
considered. There is no
covering letter.
This scene was repeated all
over the United States last
January when district offices of
members of the U.S. Senate mys-
teriously received the two
volumes, all in packages
dispatched from Pakistan.
THE SENATORS' aides easily
identified the unsolicited materi-
als as anti-Semitic hate mail.
Anti-Zion is a compendium of
anti-Jewish writings put together
by Grimstad, an American neo-
Nazi and Ku Klux Klan propa-
gandist. The Six Million Recon-
sidered is dedicated to the propo-
sition that the Nazi Holocaust
against European Jewry never
happened.
The A nti-Defamation League's
Continued on Page 11-A
What Are Prospects for Friends of Israel in Congress?
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
WASHINGTON With less
Ithan four months to go before the
November federal elections, it is
limportant to remember that
fsupport for Israel in the U.S.
ongress will remain a crucial
actor in American foreign policy
lin the Middle East and in sus-
taining diplomatic and economic
support for Israel.
That is why it is vital to know
where the candidates stand on
the issues, what their prospects
are and to act accordingly. We
will cover all of the 33 Senate
races and some of the key House
races starting with the Senate al-
As November Elections Loom
phabelically by state.
Future columns will be devoted
to the rest of the Senate, and se-
lected House of Representatives
elections. Active involvement in
the political process of our
country should be a vital function
of the American Jewish commu-
nity.
ARIZONA
First term Sen. Dennis DeCon-
cini il) i. who faces a potentially
difficult reelection effort, holds
an important position on the
Foreign Operations Subcommit-
tee which has oversight on the
foreign aid appropriations bill.
Continued on Page 5-A
I
I


AT "*'- *"T
iii.uiiiuiuiuji WuLv .\m
Page 2-A The Jew^ rior^^i^. July 16.1962
------------------------------------. _c .' ..'----------------------------
Israel Feefe'Optimistic'
Now Th#'$m Will
? ;/
Contribute
'-! AS REPORTED earlier in the
' 're&k.'tite 'two"obstacles that still
JERUSALEM (JTA> ?m Vfcjtoj>k a settlement are
By DAVID LANDAU
The optimism generated
here by President Reagan's
agreement in principle to
"contribute a small contin-
gent" of American troops
to assist in the withdrawal^
of Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization forces from west
Beirut was not dissipated
by the resurfacing of obsta-
cles still holding up a final
agreement.
the.PL;'* demand that it keep a
pobricahotfice in Beirut, and the
HliO-$ decland that two small
Palestinian -Army units stay in
Lebanon", m the areas under
$yriao leotrol. and withdraw
ortfv.atla later stage, together
-itftirtireSyrian and IDF forces.
Thf Prime Minister s spokes-
man; L>i* Porat. reiterated the
Cabinet'sV%incFay decision reject-
mg. boti of these demands
S'evettheJpss observ ers here con-
tinue to :be&eye that if these are
ih&.sore remaining problems to be
Israels Cabinet held a long ,"] 6oH*i.. solutions will somehow
session in the morning, and-. bt found
ministers emerged saying the-v .\'>\.x- ^ ... ,
were hopeful of a peaceable mkr^S^SST. S?5 ""^
tion to The problenTof the be,' *LB* M^f *" &"*
leaguered PLO forces trapped by
the Israel Defense Force in west
Beirut. There was no substantive
official statement issued and a
top Israeli aide. Foreign Ministry
Director General David Kimche,
was reported to have gone to
Beirut to report to U.S. envoy
Philip Habib on the Israeli Cabi .
net stance.
Foreign Aff airs and Defense
Cofrianttee that their party
would-not support IDF military
action against west Beirut if
tbe&e ywcrpLO demands were the
only, remaining obstacles and the
malp. body- of-the PLO agreed to
leave "th'e city without a fight.
ONE. IDEA that has been
aired daring the week was for the
i .
U.S. Shrugs Off Brezhnev's
Threatening Letter
2
I ;
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A letter from So-
viet President Leonid
Brezhnev to President
Reagan warning him
against sending American
troops to Lebanon will not
affect Reagan's offer of a
contingent of U.S. Marines
to help Palestine Liberation
Organization forces evacu-
ate west Beirut, State De-
partment spokesman Dean
Fischer said.
Fischer confirmed that Reagan
received Brezhnev's letter which
he said Soviet Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin gave acting
Secretary of State Walter
Sioes.se 1 at the State Depart-
ment. Fischer refused to provide
any details of the letter or to say
what the U.S. response would be,.
except that it would not affect
the offer of American troops.
BREZHNEV'S letter re-
portedly warned against sending
troops into Lebanon and said if
the U.S. did so, the USSR would
have to build its policy on that
fact. Some observers believe
Brezhnev's letter was not aimed
at the U.S. but at the PLO and
was a message from its chief sup-
plier of arms not to leave west
Beirut, even though surrounded
by Israeli forces.
"All of our actions and policies
. are aimed at a peaceful reso-
lution of the situation," Fischer
; stressed. He noted that U.S. spe-
I cial envov Philip Habib is con-
tinuing his consultations in
Beirut and we are hopeful a
solution will be achieved.'' The
negotiations include the creation
of a multinational force to which
the U:S-i would contribute a con-
tingent qf"up to 1.000 men to
escort the'PLO out of Lebanon.
Fischerexphuned.
The Spokesman again stressed
that there was no Israeli deadline
for reaching an agreement and
noted that Premier Menachem
Begin was quoted as saying so
himself. At-.the same time.
Fischer said, "We feel it is a mat-
ter of great urgency to achieve a
solution ip tfje problem of west
Beirut.''
FISCHER ALSO revealed
that the Foreign Ministers of
Syria and. Saddi Arabia are com-
ing to Washington but no date
has been "set said they are-being sent by the
Arab League.'and that the Ad-
ministration and the ministers
are trying to find a "mutually
convenient ear^y date" for them
to come Gere: In other matters,
Fischer said the U.S. is in daily
contact with' Israel on the
humanitarian- aspects of the
situation id Lebanon. He said the
U.S. was" "pleased" to note that
central services such as elec-
tricity and"-Staler have been re-
stored to-west Beirut.
Fischer had no comment on the
closing down of Bir Zeit Univer-
sity on the West Bank by the Is-
raeli military authorities today.
But he said .the ouster of the
Mayor of the West Bank town of
Jen in by the Israelis this week
"was regrettable." He observed.
"The (municipal) elections in
1976 represented the only recent
expression of the popular will on
the West Bank."
r
I
Minister of Education Zevulun Hammer
visits soldiers wounded in the fighting in
Lebanon, who
Zedek.
PLO to set up its desired political
office in the north Lebanon town
of Tripoli, thus remaining on
Lebanese soil but not in the much
more sensitive spot. Beirut.
The situation of another prob-
lematic issue the PLO's de-
mand for a partial IDF pullback
from Beirut in the First stage
was not known. Israel has said it
will not pull back until the PLO
withdrawal from Beirut has been
accomplished.
Conceivably the entry' of U.S.
forces into west Beirut and also
of French troops with the
commitant implied U.S.
French guarantee of the PLO's
exit would enable Israel to
soften its stand on this point and
agree to a partial withdrawal
earlier than it otherwise intended.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS do not
conceal their reluctance to ap-
prove a direct French role in the
proposed Beirut withdrawal
Jerusalem has been deeply disap-
pointed by Paris' stand during
the war in Lebanon, and its ef-
forts to save the PLO.
But the Israeli officials recog-
nize that the US is extremely re-
luctant to send its troops into
Beirut without a broader "mul-
tinational' framework. Since
France, with its own strong and
traditional interests in Lebanon
is apparently eager to play a role.
Washington plans on a French
bat a Ikon alongside the U.S.
were hospitalized at Shaare
forces, giving the venture its
"multinational" character.
Israel Radio reported after a
Cabinet meeting that the French
are seeking a UN aegis for their
proposed role in Beirut. This no
doubt would make Israel even
more, dubious about the French
participation.
Meanwhile, it has become clear
that the exiting PLO men would
head firstly to Syria to the
port of Latakia if they are taken
off by ship and from there
would presumably spread out
among the Arab states. Israeli
officials note wryly that most
Arab states have expressed out-
right reluctance to receive the
ousted PLO men.
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News in Brief
Bonn Wants Three Munich Terrorists
By JTA Services
BONN A West German
lawyer has asked the Justice
Minister to seek the extradition
of three Palestinian terrorists
reportedly captured by Israeli
forces in Lebanon recently. The
three, believed to have partici-
pated in the 1972 massacre of Is-
raeli Olympics athletes in
Munich, would not be given a fan-
trial in Israel, according to attor-
ney Wilhelm Schoettler.
Schoettler represented the Pal-
estinians when they were briefly
imprisoned in Germany several
years ago and claims to have
power of attorney to action then-
behalf. He said extradition was
also justified by the fact that
their alleged crimes were com-
mitted on German soil.
Schoettler is known here for his
rightwing political views. But he
insisted he is not a member of the
neo-Nazi National Democratic
Party or of any neo-Nazi group.
He said that if extradition fails,
he would go to Jerusalem to
defend the Palestinians if they
are tried before an Israeli court.
Knesset Confirms Naming
Of BenPorat to Cabinet
JERUSALEM The Knesset
voted 52-45 to confirm the ap-
pointment of Mordechai Ben-
1'orat as a Minister-Without-
1'orlfolio in Premier Menachem
[Begin'a coalition Cabinet. The
rote followed a stormy debate
[during which Labor Alignment
I dove Shulamit Aloni denounced
the war in Lebanon and Likud
MK Roni Milo lashed out at the
I foreign news media and Israel
H vision for allegedly distorting
Ithe war news to put Israel in a
| bad light.
Ben-Porat and former finance
[Minister Yigal Hurwitz had com-
prised the Telem faction, founded
I by the late Moshe Oayan. They
I dissolved it voluntarily and
I joined the coalition. This restored
] Begins one-seat Knesset major-
lily which he lost several months
Iago by the defections of Likud
JMKs Amnon Lin and Yitzhak
iPeretz. The government is
[reportedly now negotiating with
11he ultra-nationalist Tehiya fac-
Ition to bring it into the coalition
well.________________________
Rightwing Groups Rise
In Strength, Bonn Says
BONN Internal security
services have reported a sharp
rise last year in the number of
extreme rightwing organizations
operating in West Germany and
in their membership which was
placed at 10,300. According to
security sources, 1981 was the
first year since 1969 that the far
right has managed to increase its
I membership.
Officially, only 19 groups with
a membership of about 1,150 are
classified as "neo-Nazi." But that
number does not include about
600 members of the outlawed
Wehrsportsgruppe. Hoffmann
and the Peoples Socialist Move-
Iment. The security services do
I not classify the rightwing Na-
jtional Democratic Party (NDP)
las neo-Nazi but most West Ger-
man political leaders do and the
I NDP is referred to as neo-Nazi by
I most newspapers.
The security services are most
I concerned by the growing pro-
|Pfn8'ty for violence among neo-
INazis and rightwing extremists.
French Mideast Visitors
Praise IDF Behavior
PARIS Four opposition
embers of the French Parlia-
nt who just returned from a
study mission to Israel and Leb-
paid tribute to the Israeli
army for its "correct and even
generous" attitude towards the
Lebanese civilian population.
They said the press had "grossly
distorted" the truth when pre-
senting a near-apocalyptic pic-
ture of alleged destruction and
killings in major Lebanese cities
and refugee camps.
The group, led by former Cen-
trist Deputy Jean-Pierre Bloch,
visited the area at the invitation
of the Israeli Foreign Ministry,
said they were free to meet with
whomever they wanted to see and
mingle at will with the civilian
population. Didier Barlani, head
of the tiny Radical-Valoisian
Party, said the recent appeal for
Israeli-Palestinian negotiations
launched by three prominent
Jewish personalities is "highly
respectable but far from reality."
JDC Delivers Aid
To Lebanese Victims
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, acting on behalf of the
American Jewish community,
announced that it had delivered
3,000 foam rubber mattresses,
500 cartons of cooking stoves,
pots and pans and eating utensils
and 1,000 gallons of kerosene to
the Lebanese social welfare au-
thorities in Tyre and Sidon.
The JDC announcement, made
in a report to Ralph Goldman,
JDC executive vice president,
from the coordinator of its Leba-
non program. Dr. Samuel Hal-
perin, noted that the distribution
was being made with the full co-
operation of the Israeli and Leba-
nese authorities. The report
noted that the JDC was also de-
livering baby food, powdered
milk and blankets donated by
others.
Goldmann, Klutznick Come
Under Fire of WJCongress
JERUSALEM The World
Zionist Organization Executive
has sharply attacked Nahum
Goldmann and Philip Klutznick,
two past presidents of the World
Jewish Congress, for their state-
ment in Paris calling upon Israel
to lift its siege of Beirut and for
mutual Israeli-Palestinian recog-
nition. The same statement was
also made by former French Pre-
mier Pierre Mendes-France.
In a communique issued here,
the WZO "rejected the harmful
and unnecessary interference in
Israel's internal affairs by Gold-
mann and Klutznick. They repre-
sent neither the Jewish people
nor the organizations they once
headed. They speak only for
themselves."
Rafael Kotlowitz, the acting
chairman of the WZO Execu-
tive, issued an even stronger
statement, in his own name,
blasting Goldmann and Klutz-
nick for "sticking a knife.into the
nation's back ..." >, ;
Kreisky Opens His Arms
To New PLO Envoy -
VIENNA Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky confirmed that Abdullah
Frangi, the Palestine Liberation
Organization's diplomatic repre-
sentative in Bonn, will become
the PLO's diplomatic envoy in
Austria as well. "He shall get his
accreditation," Kreisky said.
The announcement was un-
expected inasmuch as the
Austrian government appeared
in no hurry to receive a replace-
ment for the former PLO repre-
sentative, Ghazi Hussein, who
was declared persona non grata
and outsted from the country last
summer for his alleged involve-
ment in an arms smuggling at-
tempt at the Vienna airport.
Frangi had been considered as
a possible successor for several
months but Kreisky himself said
there was no rush to fill the post.
BirZeit University
Closed for Three Months
JERUSALEM Israeli mili-
tary authorities closed down Bir
Zeit University on the West
Bank following demonstrations
on the campus earlier in the week
at which more than 100 students
were arrested. Bir Zeit, 10 miles
north of Ramallah. is considered
an intellectual stronghold of sup-
port for the Palestine Liberation
Organization. It has been closed
down several times in the past
after anti-Israel demonstrations
by the student body.
The university was ordered
closed for a period of three
months because of student
protests against the Israeli occu-
pation despite repeated warnings
by the West Bank civil adminis-
tration and the army, the author-
ities said. It had been reopened
only a few months ago after the
faculty heads promised that the
students would stay in their
classrooms and refrain from dem-
onstrations. Israel's invasion of
Lebanon is believed to have trig-
gered the latest protests.
Eliav May Head Lebanon
Rehabilitation Program
Barry University
A Catholic International University
M.A. in JEWISH STUDIES
Fall Semester 6:30 9:30 p.m.
Mon. Temple Israel, Kendall
"Modern Jewish Nationalism"
Dr. Yuhuda Shamir
Tues. Barry University Campus
"World of the Talmud" ?
Rabbi Haskell Bernat .
Thurs. Barry University Campus
"Contemporary Judaism" _
Rabbi Samuel Jaffee
Admissions Office: 11300 N.E. 2nd Ave
758-3392 Miami Shores, FL 33161
Name.
Address.
City____
.State.
_;Zip_
Phone:Home_
4Bus.
JERUSALEM The govern-
ment is considering the appoint-
ment of Arye Eliav, former leader
of the leftist Sheli faction, to take
charge of rehabilitation efforts
for the Palestinian refugees in
Lebanon, it was learned here.
Eliav/a leading dove; tenta-
tively accepted the assignment
pending a final decision by the
government. He has already
toured the refugee camps and
submitted his report to the Israe-
li authorities. He declined to dis-
close its contents but said it was
a basic proposal on how to tackle
the problem. The first stage
would not require a large expen-
diture, he said.
An estimated 500,000 Pales-
tinian live in Lebanese refugee
camps some of which served as
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion strongholds before the Israe-
li invasion of Lebanon. Israeli
forces destroyed the PLO in all of
the camps except the Shatila and
Sabra camps in Beirut.
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Page 4-A
.. ; j. ,.;> .
The Jewish Floridian Friday. July 16, 1982
Oari^s the Man
To Watch Now
An editorial in the Suddeutsche Zeitung pub-
lished in Munich makes some excellent points about
the 'resignation" of Secretary of State Alexander
Haig.
The editorial reasons that "Haig s resignation is
not capricious; it is a resignation in the face of a
difficult balancing act.'' presumably President
Reagan's top-sider Edwin Meese and Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger.
But the Suddeutsche Zeitung is less concerned
about these well-known speculations than what the
arrival of Shultz on the Administration scene will
mean. It is. for example, a fact that Shultz is not a
foreign policy expert His field, if he has any at all. is
economics. Our own view is that Shultz would surely
not be president of the multi-billion dollar annual
gross business Bechtel Corp. were this not so.
And so. the Suddeutsche Zeitung concludes:
"He (Shultz) is facing a security adviser who has the
President's absolute trust and who was able to put a
damper on Weinberger first and then push Haig out
of office."
The upshot of all of this is that "Washington's
new strongman is William P. Clark who, until
recently, did not know the name of South Africa's
Prime Minister, but who is able to articulate the
demand of America's conservatives for the
reconquest of supremacy."
Ergo: More than Shultz, the man to watch is
Clark, the Weinberger-Haig stopper. Ominous
though that sounds, we agree with the seers of
Munich.
A Trip to Israel Now
One hopes that the war in Lebanon may be
winding down. Even now, the end appears in sight.
But at no time during the fighting, was there any
reason for tourists to Israel to change their vacation
plans and not come.
It is true that longshoremen at the Piraeus in
Athens have declared a boycott of Israeli ships. The
Athenian port city, with its close proximity to Israel,
therefore poses tourist problems for vacationers
bound for the Holy Land.
There have been other minor problems as well,
including Israeli charter ship operators of tours and
cruises emanating from Greece.
Apart from this, the fact is that within Israel, all
is calm and tranquil and vibrant. Visitors from all
over the world arriving in Israel for the summer are
finding a country that is peaceful and hospitable.
Only last week, rabbis throughout the United
States devoted their Sabbath sermons to the theme
of "Israel, Right Now," with worshippers being
asked to visit Israel this summer, not only as a
vacation, but also to demonstrate their unity with
and support for the people of Israel.
Whether you heard one of these sermons or not,
the message is clear. A trip to Israel now is no dif-
ferent from before. With one exception, it is always
informative, fun and a means of identifying yourself
with your ancient Jewish heritage.
The exception is that, this summer, you are
telling the enemies of Israel that you are a part of
Israel and that nothing can intimidate you away
from showing this solidarity.
Will
il^llil
Fall a Second Time?
NO ARAB nation wants the
PLO forces when they finally
leave Beirut not even the Mos-
cow-aligned Syrians, presumably
the PLO s closest allies who. bet-
ter than anybody, know how-
dangerous these terrorists can be.
After all. what are friends for. if
not to betray you?
Only the ugly Europeans make
a case for Yasir Arafat. But the
European advocacy is different
It comes from another part of the
world, the western part, which
pretends to be civilized when
tnere is no cost to itself
AND THEN there are the
Jena of the nut, myself in-
cluded, who love Israel long dis-
tance Mousy, yes. Political and
ideological support, yes. Philo-
sophical interpretation of Israels
nistoncai roots to argue the case
for the modern State of Israel's
iacticity today, yes. Participation
in an occasional LJA or Israel
Bond mission to Jerusalem, yes.
Even the purchase of a con-
oominium in a fashionable
Mediterranean beach develop-
ment around Herzliyah to pre-
Leo
Mi.Mill.
tend that they are part of it all.
yes. Why not"
But when the chips are down,
no. Abandon ship. When to pro-
tect its very capacitv to survive,
Israei must do what every other
people, even.' other nation has
done before in similar circum-
stances, then turn your back on
That is exactly what some
American Jew? have been doing
since Israel began its operation in
Lebanon The) have been hiding
in the dark comers of their super-
civility while the bombs fall,
while blood is being shed. Jewish
blood, too
I X??E?Y ^E that
fabled Jewish capacitv for nlT
sophizing, argumentation Th.
gathering of facts in support of,
principle. The super-civUitv i!
turning inward in a unique sit 3
critical Jewish self-destn,
unparalleled since tnffe
conquest of Judea in the vearTo
of the Common Era. when the
Jews of Jerusalem finally emu
supplying the garrison force,
atop Masada because their grow
ing ties with the Romans were
being compromised by the suddIv
lines. KP-
For that is exactly how some
American Jews feel about Israel'
in Lebanon. They perce:\e their
trrowing political, social and
economic ties with the power
structures of the communities in
which they them?-
ndant as becoming comprt,.
mised.
How utterly craven! It g ,
swallowing whole of the propa-
ganda disseminated by the
world's media that portrav Israel
as a brutal invader, a killer of
women and children with no
other purpose than just that.
Forget the endless provocations,
the PLO vows to sweep Israel
into the sea. the Russian-made
rockets raining down upon settle-
ments in the Galilee since the
fabled Habib 'ceasefire' just one
year ago.
EVEN IN the ashes of defeat.
forget the PLO manipulations in
Beirut, refusing to withdraw
unilaterally, demanding a simul-
taneous withdrawal with the Is-
rael Defense Forces under the
eye. say. of those friendly French
to indicate an equivalence-of-
power stalemate. And then, yet
another Arab rewrite of history
to come: Arafat claiming, and the
world applauding, a PLO moral
victory, the PLO to live again
elsewhere, to plot, to scheme, to
terrorize, to enter upon yet
another round toward the
achievement of his glorious
revolution"' in the New Pales-
tine.
I have raged here against the
media that feed the force of this
romantic assessment of the
Palestinians for weeks now. with
little support and mainly a mas-
sive silence by hordes of Jews
who would, themselves, cut your
Continued on Page 13-A
Robert Segal
U.S. Jews Entering Anti-Nuclear Arena
I
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Friday, July 16,1982
Volume 55
25 TAMUZ 5742
Number 29
Baptist Billy Graham, the
evangelist, has mounted a strong
drive against the nuclear arms
race. Cardinal John Joseph Kroll
of Philadelphia and other
Catholic prelates are urging
parishioners to join in the pro-
tests. And at last the people
whose prophetsIsaiah, Joel,
and Micah spoke long ago to
the end of beating swords into
plowshares and demanded that
nations not lift up swords against
nations nor learn war any more,
are calling passionately for anti-
nuclear action in Jewish houses
of prayer.
Ten Reform congregations in
the New York area have sent rep-
resentatives to the Stephen Wise
Free Synagogue to join in Rabbi
Balfour Brickner's conference on
disarmament. Now it is clear that
the organized religious Jewish
community will refuse "to remain
silent in the shadow of the nu-
clear menace." In the Leo Baeck
Temple, Los Angeles, Rabbi
Leonard Beerman has voiced a
sound appeal: "The destruction
of European Jewry by Nazis pro-
vides a model for destroying the
human race. Hence, we have the
unique duty to warn of the
danger of possible universal des-
truction."'
IN CALLING for United
States and Soviet agreement on
the control, limitation, and des-
truction of nuclear weapons, the
American Jewish Congress has
pointed out that negotiations for
a ban on these engines capable of
universal destruction is "not a
favor one side grants to the other
but an urgent necessity for all
humanity."
Each day adds to the grounds-
well so strong it appears capable
of overcoming the timidity and
intransigence of some of our top
arms limitation negotiators. Our
chief strategic arms bargainer,
Gen. Edward Rowney, who
helped kill Salt II, has hard ques-
tions to answer. So do true-be-
lievers in the outworn theory that
a nuclear war is winnable, includ-
ing Eugene V. Rostow.
Here are former President
Gerald Ford and such outstand-
ing hawks as John B. Connally
and Arizona's Congressman John
J. Rhodes calling for cuts in the
economy-wrecking arms build up.
Earlier in the days of protests
against the nuclear evil. Presi-
dent Reagan was inclined to scold
the peace-marchers. In his
opinion, they were helping Mos-
cow, hurting Washington. Not
long ago, when asked for advice
on protection against the possi-
bility of Armageddon, he sug-
gested smoke alarms as a
priority. Now, however, facing up
to the cool truth that approxi-
mately 74 percent of us want a
halt to the high explosive death
march, the President is taking
the outcries seriously.
IN HIS commencement speech
at Eureka College, he refused to
buy either the Kennedy-Hat field
or Jackson-Warner bipartisan
freeze proposals. His own
proposal is START (Strategic
Arms Limitation Talks). Should
the Soviets agree, we will slash
our nuclear arsenal. The Reagan
arithmetic calls for a ceiling of
850 international nuclear missiles
for the USSR and the U.S. and a
limit of 5.000 for the war heads on
those missiles. America would
cut 500 missiles, Russia 1.500.
We would eliminate more war-
heads.
Former State Secretary Alex-
ander Haig handed Mr. Reagan
this plan as prelude to Reagan-
Brezhnev talks. When you press
for revival and eventual ratifica-
tion of Salt II, Mr. Haig said.
you're causing confusion. Henry
Kissinger and Cyrus Vance dis-
agree.
So runs the American debate
on the world's most pressing and
most dangerous challenge. How-
ever, in pulpits and classrooms,
in town halls and council cham
bers, on New England Commons
Continued on Page 7-A


As Elections Loom
How Will Israel's Friends on Hill Fare?
Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Continued from Page 1 -A
DeConcini has opposed sophis-
ticated arms sales to Israel's foes
and is in favor of strong U.S.-Is-
rael relations. Little is known of
DeConcini's possible Republican
challengers in terms of their posi-
tions vis-a-vis the Middle East.
CALIFORNIA
Neither Republican Mayor of
San Diego Pete Wilson nor De-
mocratic Gov. Jerry Brown, who
are vying to succeed retiring Sen.
S. I. Hayakawa, has a Congres-
sional voting record on Middle
iast issues. Public statements,
however, give an indication as to
future positions. Throughout his
career, Jerry Brown has ex-
pressed strong support for close
U.S.-Israel ties. Most recently, he
reaffirmed his opposition to sales
of advanced arms to Jordan and
Saudi Arabia. While Wilson has
also voice support for Israel in his
campaign, he gave public support
to the sale of the AWACS and F-
15 enhancement equipment to-
Saudi Arabia. The early lead is
clearly held by Wilson, but politi-
cal pros expect a strong effort by
Hrown, and this race will probab-
ly be very close.
I CONNECTICUT
The Connecticut Senate race is
I.shaping up as one of the most
crucial races nationwide. Incum-
bent Republican Sen. Lowell
Weicker is running for a third
term and is drawing challenges
from within his own party and
the Democratic party. Weicker,
I who has had a consistent and
[outspoken record of strong sup-
Iport for Israel, is being chal-
lenged by Prescott Bush, brother
jof Vice President George Bush,
for the GOP nomination, and by
Rep. Toby Moffett (D.) in the
I general election. Despite recent
good public statements, Moffett
is remembered for his 1980 meet-
ing with Yasir Arafat, his muted
I record on foreign aid, and par-
ticularly his vote (one of only 32)
in favor of a $200 million cut in
aid to Israel in 1976. In a late
June poll by a Hartford TV sta-
llion, Weicker and Bush came out
leven in a GOP primary, and
IWeicker led Moffett narrowly in a
(general election matchup. Mof-
Ifett easily beat Bush in a two way
Irace. These results buoyed the
IWeicker camp as they pushed
[toward the July 23 GOP conven-
tion, where Bush will have to re-
ceive 20 percent to gain a place on
the September primary ballot.
DELAWARE
Incumbent Republican Sen.
William Roth is running for a
'third term and is favored to re-
tain his seat over Jewish Demo-
Morn's J. Amitay served
as executive director of
the American-Israel
Public Affairs Commit-
tee (AIPAC) from De-
cember, 1974 to Octo-
ber, 1980 following con-
siderable experience
with the Department of
State and the U.S. Con-
gress. During his five
years as a senior legis-
lative aide in the
Senate, Mr. Amitay
took the lead in organ-
izing Senate initiatives
affecting Israel and So-
viet Jewry. Previously
he had worked as a leg-
islative assistant in the
House of Representa-
tives. He is curently
practicing law and
lobbying in Washington
with offices on Capitol
Hill and was recently
described by Washing-
tonian magazine as an
insider and heavy hit-
ter.
Sen. Chiles: considered
a likely winner
cratic challenger David Levin-
son, a local real estate developer
and ADL activist. Roth has both
voted against the F-15s to Saudi
Arabia in 1978 and was one of
only five incumbent Republicans
running who voted against the
AWACS. The state of the
economy could significantly
affect this race, although Levin-
son must campaign non-stop
until November to overcome his
low name recognition. Roth is
favored.
FLORIDA
Democratic Sen. Lawton
Chiles is a good bet to retain his
Senate seat for a third term, as
the GOP has failed to muster a
strong candidate to challenge
him. A strong supporter of Israel
over the years and a member of
the Appropriations Committee,
Chiles should be able to beat any
of the three Republican candi-
dates who will be facing each
other in the September 7th
primary.
HAWAII
First term Democratic Sen.
Spark Matsunaga has fended off
any primary challenge in this
fairly Democratic state and is not
expected to face a strong conten-
der in the November general
election. Matsunaga has been a
strong and consistent supporter
of Israel and has the backing of
Hawaii's small but active Jewish
community.
INDIANA
Incumbent Republican Sen.
Richard Lugar, a member of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, is facing his first reelec-
tion fight against a strong Demo-
cratic opponent, Rep. Floyd
Fithian. Fithian decided to
challenge Lugar on the basis of
the Reagan economic program's
impact on Indiana. While gener-
ally supportive of foreign aid leg-
islation, on the two major contro-
versial issues of sales of sophis-
ticated weapons to Saudi Arabia,
Lugar supported the sales both in
the Foreign Relations Committee
and on the Senate floor. Fithian,
who has a mixed record on for-
eign aid, voted against the sale of
AWACS and F-15 enhancement
equipment last year in the House,
and was active in his opposition.
At this time Lugar is the clear
favorite.
MAINE
In Maine Democrat George
Mitchell, who was appointed to
fill out Muskie's unexpired term,
is being challenged by Republic-
an Rep. David Emery, a four
term Congressman. Mitchell,
who is of Lebanese-American ex-
traction, has been very support-
ive of strong U.S.-Israel relations
in his two years in the Senate. He
actively opposed the sale of
AWACS and F-15 enhancement
equipment to Saudi Arabia and
voted in favor of foreign aid leg-
islation. Emery also opposed the
AWACS package but has not
been supportive on foreign aid
legislation or on any other initia-
tive favorable to Israel. Early in
the race, Emery was the heavy
favorite to easily defeat Mitchell.
Recently, however, Mitchell has
come on much stronger and the
race is now considered dead even.
Poles Plan
To Mark
Ghetto Uprising
Anniversary
WARSAW - Polish government plans to com-
memorate the 40th anniversary
of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising
next year with impressive cere-
monies on the site of the former
ghetto.
Polish officials said the com-
memoration will be one of the
most important ceremonies held
in Poland in recent years and
Jewish survivors from all over
the world will be invited to at-
tend.
The Association of Polish Jew-
ish War Veterans as well as the
various associations of ghetto
survivors will be asked to partici-
pate in drawing up the plans for
the ceremonies which will last
several days.
Most of the ceremonies will
center around the impressive
monument erected on the ghetto
site. Several of the former ghetto
buildings still stand and Polish
officials are taking necessary
measures to prepare them for his-
torical purposes.
Do You Care
About Israel?
Then, do something...
For lsrael...and yourself
Come home.
For further information contact:
Israel Programs
Office
576-4000
Israel Aliyah
Center
573-2556
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taetfvi


"*""*'IIL J wi i1 HJPWBl^fBBWHWW
MaMBHk-aMBM
."
*-A The Jewish Ftoridian / Friday. July 16,1962
In Washington, Too
- -
m

Give-Aways Enthrall D.C.
By david Friedman In MumUi fa Sheikh has hod mixed reviews. In
Washington has been en- D.C, where he doesn 't live, things go somewhat bet-
thraDed in recent weeks by terforhim.
the largesse of the Saudi----------------------------------------
Arabians. The Saudis, who
have admitted that they
get more money from their
oil revenues than they
know what to do with, ap-
pear to have targeted this
nation's capital as one of
their favorite charities.
First there was the announce-
ment that Sheikh Mohammed
S.A. al-Fassi had donated
$50,000 for the city's summer job
program. Mayor Marion Barry
was so overwhelmed that he pro-
claimed last May 6 as a day in
honor of the young Saudi and
praised Fassi for his "substantial
contributions toward increasing
understanding and goodwill
among all nations."
THIS LED Washington Post
writer Walter Shapiro, in a sati-
rical article, to complain about
"unctious festivities down at the
District Building," Washington's
City Hall. Shapiro noted that "30
cents "M*t aa much Co me as
$50,000 does to the sheikh, who
reportedly is worth some $6 b0-
lion.
Fassi was previously known to
the American public for some-of
his outrageous behavior at his
home in Beverly Hills and for the
$3 billion divorce suit his wife has
filed against him.
Then there is Wolf Trap. The
Washington area was *> earlier this year when the Pilene
Center where the federal park in
Vienna, Va held its summer con-
Do You Know Us?
The Miami Herald does...
April 22,1982, page ID
The only private school student to win a National Merit
Scholarship this year in all of Dade County (out of nine)
is Daniel Brief of the HEBREW ACADEMY.
The Jewish Floridian does...
April 23, 1982, page 2B .
Three HEBREW ACAOEMY students are winners in the
regionals of the National Bible Contest and go on to
the national finals in New York.
Yeshiva University does...
In a national Hebrew story essay contest sponsored by
Yeshiva University in which every Hebrew high school
in the United States participated Yonit Greenboim of
the HEBREW ACADEMY won first prize.
The Dade County Youth Fair does...
HEBREW ACADEMY students won four purple rosettes
and hundreds of first place blue ribbions at the Dade
County Youth Fair.
The Multiple Sclerosis Readathon does...
HEBREW ACADEMY
Sclerosis Readathon
according to %).
won first place in the Multiple
(for limited enrollment schools
The Miami Herald does...
April 28,1982, page 6G
Between 65 & 75% of private schools in Dade County
are not accredited. The HEBREW ACADEMY HAS
DUAL ACCREDITATION---------ACCREDITED AT ALL
LEVELS BY
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Association of Independent Schools of Florida
Is there really a choice about your child's education??
For more information call 532-6421 or write
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach 33140.
An Excellent Private Day School Under
Orthodox Jewish Auspices
certs burned down just as the
summer' season was being
planned. People, businesses and
organizations throughout the
area have been donating funds so
that the center can be rebuilt and
the summer program held as
planned
THE WOLF Trap Foundation
did obtain a modular structure
composed of fabric panels
stretched between aluminum
arches which was being used as a
storage facility in Dubai and will
be used temporarily until a
permanent building is con-
structed.. It was the Saudis who
brought the structure to the at-
tention of Wolf Trap, according
to Robert Keith Gray, chairman
of the foundation's board of di-
rectors."
. The problem then was that the
cost for' bringing the structure
here was prohibitive, $100,000.
Bnt then, it was announced that
Saudi Arabian Airlines will pay
for :the freight which is being
shipped on an Air France 747
carga-jet-_ -
The 'Saudi grant came as a
result from Nancy Thurmond,
. wife ef "Sen. Strom Thurmond
(It,'S.C.I and a WoH Trap Foun-
dation board member, to Nouha
A1 he gel an. wife of the Saudi Am-
bassador -Faisal Alhegelan, who
is a good friend" of Mrs. Thur-
mond's. .
"I THINK the Saudi Arabians
are well aware of events in the
U.S.." Mrs. Thurmond told the
Washington Post. "They saw
this as an avenue for getting in-
volved- I don't think there was an
ulterior motive behind it. It
creates a better understanding
between the two countries. It was
a gesture of good will."
But Dr. Michael Berenbaum.
executive, director of the Jewish
Community Council of Greater
Washington, said that these gifts
were "an example of the vast
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOWWONDERFUL
Calr-me. Esther, 635-6554
and lei me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long, distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A:8:VAN LINES INC.
-(of Miami) _
re-
economic power Saudi Arabia en-
joys. Lest we be overly moved by
this largesse, we should be
minded that over the past
years the Saudis increased the
price of oil. What they are giving
us is petty change on the billions
of dollars the American people
have paid to Saudi Arabia for
their oil."
There is no doubt that the Sau-
dis have gotten good public rela-
tions values for their donations.
It is easier for them to donate
$150,000 than to really prove
friendship for the United States
by providing the moderate acts
for which the U.S. government
likes to credit them.
These donations are "petty
change" when one considers the
billions given to the Palestine
Liberation Organization for their
terrorist acts, for example. What
is needed is not charity, but proof
that the Saudis want to work for
peace in the Middle East, by sup-
porting, instead of seeking to
wreck, the Camp David peace
process, for starters.
JTA Feature Syndicate
New Dutch
Cabinet j
HasOne
Jewish Member
AMSTERDAM (JTA| -
The new Dutch Cabinet, sworn in
last Saturday, has one Jewish
member, as was the case in o*
outgoing Cabinet. He is Mu
Rood, a professor of law at Ley.
den University, who will serve u
Minister of Interior.
Rood is Jewish on his mother, I
side and is linked thereby to i
prominent Orthodox family of
Amsterdam. But he has not been
active in Jewish affairs. A mem-
ber of the Democrats 66 Party,
which is left of center, he served
for several years as chairman of
the Humanist League in Holland.
The Jewish member of the last
Cabinet was Eduard Van Thijn, a
Laborite.
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Israel violates' Camp David
Egypt May Impose Sanctions
Friday, July 16, jJ92/TVJteWkfrloridian Page7-A
He said "Our (Bgyptito^j^V/^o.' s-2j;
liament has discussed* at Hepgth'-'. G^air :said he hoped that the
tmtjtury. defeat of the PLO could
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Egypt's Minister of State
for Foreign Affairs, Butros
Ghali, has accused Israel of
"violating the Camp David
agreements and the spirit
of the (Egyptian-Israeli
peace) treaty" by its ac-
tions in Lebanon. In an in-
terview published in Le
Monde Sunday. Ghali
hinted that Egypt might
take measures against Is-
rael in the future but did
not specify what they
might be or when they
would be applied. He said
the Egyptian Parliament
has discussed "the possi-
bility of sanctions" against
Israel.
Meeting With
Arafat Throws
MKInto
Hot Water
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV-(JTA)-In-
terior Minister Yosef Burg
has asked the Attorney
General for a legal opinion
as to whether official action
should be brought against
former MK Uri Avneri who
visited Palestine Liberation
Organization Chief Yasir
Arafat for two hours last
Friday, and allegedly em-
braced the terrorist leader
when they met.
Avneri. editor and publisher of
the weekly magazine, Haolam
Haze, and a leader of the leftwing
Sheli faction, said his meeting
with Arafat was solely in his
capacity as a journalist, therefore
he had broken no law, Burg ob-
served that reporters do not
normally embrace in friendship
people-they interview.
TO DO SO was a sign of
identification with Arafat and
encouragement for his policies,
Burg, said. Government sup-
porters are accusing Avneri of
treason and demand he be
brought to trial.
Meir Payil, another leader of
Sheli,- said Avneri had talked to
Arafat as a journalist, not as a
representative of the -political
faction. But Fayil admitted that
had he been in Avneri's place he
would have consulted with the
government before seeing Arafat.
Avneri said Arafat told him
that on several occasions he had
been ready to recognize Israel.
Victor Shemtov, leader of
Mapam which strongly opposes
the Likud government's policies,
remarked that if such had ever
been Arafat's intentions "it has
evidently been kept a close secret
from us or anybody else."
AVNERI, who spent a total of
four hours in west Beirut, which
is under siege by Israeli forces,
said he found the PLO leader
calm "but somewhat fatalistic."
He said Arafat told him he ex-
pected an Israeli attack on west
Beirut and that his men were
ready for it.
Avneri said he spent some time
with the only Israeli captured by
the PLO during the three weeks
of fighting in Lebanon Air
Force pilot Aharon Ahiaz. He
said he found Ahiaz in "relatively
good spirits."
The Egyptian diplomat, in
Paris for talks with President
Francois Mitterrand, said an ap-
peal over the weekend by three
prominent Jewish leaders for
Israel to lift the seige of west
Beirut and open direct negotia-
tions with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization was "estremely
encouraging." It was made by
former French Premier Peirre
Mendes-France, Dr. Nahum
Goldmann, former president of
the world Jewish Congress, and
Philip Klutznick, another former
WJC president who served as
U.S. Secretary of Commerce in
the Carter Administration.
PLO CHIEF Yasir Arafat,
who is in west Beirut, was also
quoted by Le Monde as saying
that the Jewish leaders call for
mutural recognition between
Israel and the PLO "constituted
a positive initiative toward a just
and lasting peace in the Middle
East."
Ghali's reported remarks were
the sharpest yet directed to Israel
by a ranking Egyptian diplomat.
According to the Le Monde in-
terview, he said that Israel's ag-
gression against the Plestinian
and Lebanese peoples" shows
that "it totally ignored the will of
the near unanimous family of na-
tions."
the possibility of saMctitfrie..
Serveral deputies have demanded '
that the government break US
diplomatic relations wlib> Tea -
Aviv. Others have asked that: our ,
Ambassador be at least recaltedr V .
IN RESPONSE to the.se de-
mands, Ghali saidt "The'tE.gypf
tianl government' said that \\
lead-to a political victory and
addj/d that the institutions of the
PLtP^must be preserved. He said
'Mitterrand would be visiting
'Kgypbin.November and observed
tb.at.both France and Egypt are
de'pty preoccupied with Israel's
.move into Lebanon. They were
does not plan such, measijifes,.{dri *#so. disturbed, he said, because
the time being, and I want,,to; ofN'lbe.power vacuum created in
stress for the time being. tfo-one-: .Washington by the resignation of
can say that such.ineasarepiVVuVs^tetty.'- of State Alexander
be applied" at some, time jn/hti>.' HWrV ;'!'.
. .'/ ,. -
%<*, f. ,..'
Jews Coming into Anti-Nuclear Arena
- ^ *- "* *
Continued frOm Pagjt4xA'*",'"Nagasaki, came quickly to realize
and in Colorado parks, the-people-' OP, hiding place exists, the alarm
of America want no- more t0p.*.'*.i\ls.-ounded. It has taken what
porizing. Urgency' is i key.*. Tfrne''. % seehts. ah eternity for most folks
dwindles. Nearly four dtecaa.fes*;*.t&' ago when vanguard.thinkerV.bV*'' "cofrfroritaall Washington,
holding atomic destruction ;at*. .V*-. ". ''''X^wmAntFmun
CMM
too
JEWISH
rwnonAL
FUI1D
An Urgent Message To The Jews 0 Aiftdraca


We Jews stand with Israel as she struggles and sacrifices 16 secure peace
at her northern borders. Once again the Jewish people's* right;tb-Uvein its
own land with reasonable and elemental security has been challenged.
We are being tested. **"
At this hour we must respond to Israel's costly and courageous action
with nothing less than renewed dedication and determined effort. It is our
responsibility.
Israel has gone to war to defend and protect the strategic and ancient,
Galilee, to put an end to the rockets, artillery barages and PLO outrages
against vulnerable northern settlements.
As Israel's soldiers fought to secure Galilee by pushing beyond the nor-
thern borders into the enemy's midst, JNF planners and builders em-
barked on an intensive program to consolidate the Jewish presence inside
Galilee by widening the network of outpost settlements in sparsely
populated areas. The settlers at these hilltop outposts are guardians of
Israels future, preventing illegal Arab land grabs and curtailing the ex^
pansion of Arab villages that breed and harbor terrorists.
Now, more than ever before, Israel's borders must be secure. The Jewish
National Fund must immediately prepare sites for new lookout settlements
along the Lebanese border. We must also repair and restore settlement
sites destroyed by the PLO shelling of the Galilee.
We must respond to the urgent needs of Galilee and aH'of the land of
Israel by coming forth with an outpouring of support for tfre-JNF's life-
giving land development projects.
We need your help. Your contributions now will go to strenghtening
Galilee. It is our way of fighting, of standing side by side with the Jewish
soldiers at the front so the world will know that Israel and the Jewish
people are one, that we are meeting the test, that the sacred legacy of
Eretz Yisrael is honored through the reclaiming and ^rebuilding of the
land, that the Galilee is both a cherished legacy and valued providence of|
the Jewish nation. Help us prevent future loss of life by building and
rebuilding now.
Please act immediately by sending your check now. Your personal comn
mitment today means a safe and secure future for a generation that has
spent too much time in bomb shelters. Your support at this crucial time
means you, too, are counted in our people's struggle. Commit yourself to
our effort by sending your check today. I We must act today.
DR. SAMUEL I. COHEN
Executive Vice President
Jewish National Fund of America
0)
Enclosed is my contribution:
Name
Send To:
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla 33139
Phone 538-6464
..,,.. ...... -........


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. Jury 16,1982
Filling in Background
Reform Jews Tulty Accept'
Reagan to Heed War Powers Act of 73 Women in Pulpit Today
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The White House
said that President Reagan
would comply with the War
Powers Resolution if U.S.
troops are sent to Lebanon
to assist in the withdrawal
of Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization forces from west
Beirut.
The resolution, passed by Con-
gress in November, 1973 over
President Nixon's veto, requires
the President to consult with
Congress before sending Ameri-
can military forces abroad to any
area where hostilities are under-
way or likely to develop. It would
be the legal basis for the deploy-
ment of American troops in
Lebanon and the duration of their
stay there.
REAGAN SAID in Los An
geles that he had "agreed in prin
ciple to contribute a small con
tingent" of U.S. troops as part of
a multinational force for "tem-
porary peacekeeping" in Beirut
provided agreement was reached
by all parties concerned in the
crisis there. The parties are
Lebanon, Israel, Syria and the
PLO. Reagan noted that he was
responding to a request relayed
to him by his special envoy for
the Lebanese crisis, Philip Habib.
Habib has been in Beirut for
nearly a month attempting to
negotiate a settlement that would
ensure the departure of the PLO
from Lebanon, the withdrawal of
Israeli forces and the estab-
lishment of a strong, independent
Lebanese government.
Reagan, saying that "The sit-
uation is too sensitive for detailed
discussion," disclosed that "This
weekend in discussions with Mr.
Habib, the government of
Lebanon told us that a multi-
national force might be essential
for a temporary peacekeeping in
Beirut and informally proposed
that the United States consider
making a contribution to that
force."
REAGAN STRESSED that
the Lebanese government "has
not made a formal proposal, but I
have agreed in principle to
contribute a small contingent of
U.S. personnel subject to certain
conditions." He did not say what
those conditions are.
White House deputy press sec-
retary Larry Speakes spelled out
the War Powers Resolution
which was adopted originally in
reaction to the war in Vietnam
The law states that the Presi-
dent. "In every possible instance
shall consult with Congress
before introducing United States
armed forces into hostilities or
into situations where imminent
involvement in hostilities is
clearly indicated by the cir-
cumstances."
When there is no declaration of
war, the President also must
send a written report to Congress
within 48 hours of the dispatch of
troops or after the number of
troops already in a country is
substantially enlarged.
The law requires the President
to end the use of American forces
after 60 days unless Congress has
extended the period. Congress
has the right, by vote of the
Senate and House, to order the
President to withdraw the troops
if they are engaged in hostilities
not related to a declaration of war
or not otherwise specifically
authorized by Congress.
France to Take Active
Part in Escorting PLO Out

By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
French troops will probably
take an active part in as-
sisting the Palestinian
evacuation of Beirut,
French sources said here. A
French task force might
join American marines who
will supervise the Palestin-
ian withdrawal from west
Illness Ends
Crimes Trial
BONN The longest war
crimes proceeding ever held in
West Germany ended abruptly
last week when a Frankfurt court
ruled that the accused was too ill
to continue. The defendant, Wal-
ter Fasold, a 77 year-old former
SS officer, was charged with
complicity in the mass shootings
of at least 180 Jewish concentra-
tion camp inmates during World
War II.
Fasold was sentenced to life
imprisonment in 1949. After
serving 22 years, he obtained a
review of his case. The second
trial, begun in 1971, ended incon-
clusively in 1974. A third trial,
opened in 1976, continued until
last month, during which time
more than 200 witnesses
testified.
But after Fasold suffered his
third heart attack in two years,
Judge Theodor Haller ruled that
the accused was in serious danger
of his life and could no longer ap-
pear in court.
Beirut and ensure their safe
departure from Lebanon.
Foreign Minister Claude Chey-
sson said that no agreement has
been reached yet and termed
these reports "premature." Other
officials, who did not want to be
named, said, however, that the
talks on French participation in
the Palestinian evacuation are
"advanced."
CHEYSSON himself broadly
hinted, when he addressed the
French National Assembly, that
the Palestinians have agreed to
evacuate the city. He said, "I can
confirm that the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization has accepted
to switch its activities from an
armed struggle to a political
campaign."
He gave no additional details,
but observers recalling the close
ties developed in recent days bet-
ween Paris and the PLO said his
words clearly indicate that agree-
ment has been reached.
Cheysson also said that Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand's
envoy to the Middle East,
Foreign Ministry Secretary Gen-
eral Francis Gutmann, returned
to Paris after talks with PLO
Chief Yasir Arafat in Beirut and
meetings with Israeli, Syrian,
Jordanian and Saudi Arabian
leaders.
A PALESTINIAN spokesman
in Beirut denied this evening that
the PLO has agreed to the evacu-
ation and to the stationing of
American troops in Beirut.
Egyptian Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali said in Cairo,
however, that the Palestinians
have agreed to the stationing of
American troops. Ah did not
mention the possibility of French
participation.
ADMINISTRATION officials
said with respect to the situation
in Lebanon that there would have
to be a commitment from all par-
ties to the conflict to a settlement
before the President would agree
to send U.S. troops to Beirut.
Vice President George Bush said
in San Francisco that he did not
believe American troops would be
sent to Lebanon unless all parties
involved agreed such a step was
essential to establishing and
guaranteeing peace in the area.
Speakes told reporters that if
U.S. troops were sent to Lebanon
they would be equipped for com-
bat. The last time American
troops were involved in Lebanon
was in 1958 when President
Eisenhower ordered U.S. marines
to land on the beaches near
Beirut in a show of support for
the government of the then
President of Lebanon, Camille
Chamoun. Chamoun had
requested American aid against
what he feared was an imminent
coup masterminded by President
Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt
who was believed to be acting
under the influence of the Soviet
Union.
REAGAN'S announcement
that he had agreed in principle to
send an American military con-
tingent to Lebanon drew a mixed,
largely cautionary reaction from
Congress. Senate Majority
Leader Howard Baker (R., Tenn.)
said he wanted more details
before deciding on the matter. "I
have previously expressed my
opposition to the use of American
troops in Lebanon, and I've ex-
pressed that directly to the Presi-
dent," Baker said.
Sen. Charles Percy (R., I1L),
chairman of the Foreigrr"Jle-..
lations Committee, said "The
action should not be taken unless
requested by the Lebanese
government with the consent of
Israel and the Palestinians .
and it should be for a limited time
such as 30 days." Percy, added
that the plan "would be con-
sidered if this is the only way" to
get the PLO out of Beirut and..
i avoid further bloodshed. *.
Rep. Clement Zablocki (D*.
Wise.), chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee, was
"less than satisfied by reports
that while the U.S., troops are
supposed to be part of a multi-
national force, the other par-
ticipants are not yet known." He
observed: "Should this de-
ployment take place, it is impera-
tive that American troops not be-
come involved in hostilities, not
one American life must be lost,
not one American soldier must be
wounded."
Senate Minority Whip Alan
Cranston (D., Calif.) ackowl-
edged that the dispatch of U.S.
forces to Lebanon would be a
delicate and possibly dangerous
mission but he hoped it might
result in peace and stability in
the region. Cranston, a strong
backer of Israel, said: "Just as
we have been urging the Israelis
and Arabs to take risks for peace,
we too must shoulder our share of
the risk."
Sen. Larry Pressler (R., S.C.)
said he would support the par-
ticipation of U.S. forces in Leba-
non if they were part of an inter-
national force and restricted to
the Beirut area. "This force
should not be viewed as a substi-
tute for United Nations forces in
Lebanon," he said.
Sen. Charles Mathias (R, Md)
urged that Congress and the Ad-
ministration carefully weigh the
many potential dangers before
making a commitment. He also
said the U.S. should use the
opportunity to reach a new
understanding with Israel on the
future use of American-supplied
weapons and for greater Israeli
flexibility in the autonomy nego-
tiations.
NEW YORK Women
rabbis today are "fully ac-
cepted" in Reform congre-
gations in the United
States and Canada and
judged on an equal basis
with men, in terms of on
their rabbinic and academic
qualifications, when apply-
ing for pulpit or profession-
al positions.
"We've come to the point, ten
years after the first woman was
ordained in 1972 by Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, where congregational
members, when engaging a rabbi,
are prepared to consider a woman
on the same level as a man."
RABBI A. Stanley Dreyfus.
New York City, director of place-
ment for the Rabbinical Place-
ment Commission, a joint agency
of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis, Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion, and the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, told his
colleagues at the group's 93rd
annual convention here that
nowadays search committees
often say "We would welcome
women as candidates."
Rabbi Dreyfus reported that
today there are 49 women Reform
rabbis, and Hebrew Union Col-
lege-Jewish Institute of Religion
will ordain 59 women now en-
rolled in its rabbinic program
during the next four years. "This
would mean," he stated, "that by
1986 we shall have well over 100
women rabbis as members of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis."
He attributed this receptive
climate to the growing number of
women serving as presidents of
congregations, members of con-
gregational boards and chairper-
sons of synagogue committees,
including rabbinic selection com-
mittees, and the growing accept-
ance of women in the business
world.
He attributed this recep-
tive climate to the growing
number of women serving
as presidents of
congregations, members of
congregational boards and
chairpersons of synagogue
committees, including rab-
binic selection committees,
and the growing acceptan-
ce of women in the
business world
HE FURTHER credited the
work of the Task Force on
Women in the Rabbinate, con-
sisting of laymen and rabbis from
the three major institutions ol
Reform Judaism, the Central
Conference of American Rabbis,
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion and the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations. The Task Force was
organized six years ago to create
a positive climate among the 1.2
million members of Reform syna-
gogues.
Rabbi Dreyfus conceded that
several minor problems still
exist. "Some congregational
members are reluctant to have a
woman officiate at a funeral. A
few still find it uncomfortable to
have a woman provide rabbinic
counseling or lead a religious
service. However in every in-
stance when such anxieties were
expressed," he added, "congre-
gants were then both pleased and
impressed with the woman
rabbi."
In his report on the current
employment of women rabbis,
Rabbi Dreyfus showed that 28
are engaged as congregational
rabbis, associates, or assistants,
and one as an educator: 11 are
employed as Jewish organiza-
tional professionals or as Hillei
directors, and the remaining nine
are either graduate students, not
seeking placement, or temporari-
ly out of the rabbinate.
*****
k_ "THRU. I
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Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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hi jihujii |i IllHinRfn
PagelO-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, July 16,1982
Filling in Background
..

U.S. Awaits Word from Beirut to Come In
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
will be sending up to 1,000
troops to Lebanon to help
in the evacuation of the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization and to ensure
the establishment of a
strong central government
in that country.
The offer, first revealed by
Israel Radio, was confirmed by
deputy White House press secre-
tary Larry Speakes in Los
Angeles where President Reagan
had been vacationing. But
Speakes added that a request
must be made from the Lebanese
government for U.S. troops
before they would be sent.
PRESIDENT Reagan has
already deployed a battalion of
some 800 U.S. troops joined with
participation by ships of the U.S.
Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean
to help in the evacuation of the
estimated 6,000 Palestine terror-
ists who remain entrenched in
West Beirut.
While there has been discus-
sion that the proposed agreement
would involve the Marines.
White House officials in Califor-
nia said personnel from other
military branches could not be
ruled out. But White House offic-
ials said any presence of
American military personnel
"would be limited in size and
duration."
Speaking to a meeting of city
mayors and state legislators.
Keagan confirmed U.S. willing-
ness to help in the evacuation of
Palestinians from Beirut. While
Keagan said there has yet to be a
formal request from the Lebanese
government, he added that he
has "agreed in principle to con-
tribute a small number of U.S.
personnel, subject to certain
conditions." He did not say what
those conditions were.
AT THE State Department,
spokesman Dean Fischer refused
to comment on the troops offer.
Trio Arrested For
Hitting Home
AMSTERDAM Three men
were arrested in Het Gooi, 25 ki-
lometers from here, for attacking
the house of Dutch Jewish jour-
nalist Hans Knoop last month
with Molotov cocktails. Knoop
was instrumental in the arrest
and trial several years ago of
Dutch Nazi collaborator Pieter
Menten who was subsequently
convicted of complicity in the
murder of Jews while serving
with the SS in Poland during
World War II.
The men arrested are also
suspected in similar attacks on
the house of a Protestant member
of Parliament and on the anti-left
Dutch broadcasting company,
"Tros." They were identified as
members of a group calling itself
"Red Action Front Nether-
lands."
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referring all questioners to the
Speakes briefing.
Meanwhile. Fischer revealed
that Secretary of State Alexand-
er Haig. who had been involved
in the Mideast negotiations dur-
ing his weekend vacation in West
Virginia has ended that involve
ment. Fischer said that Haig,
Reagan and Secretary of State-
designate George Shultz have
agreed that until Shultz is con-
firmed by the Senate and sworn
in. Deputy-Secretary Walter
Stoessel will serve as acting
Secretary of State.
However. Haig will have a
transitional office in the State
Department for 45-60 days,
Fischer said, although he did not
know if the Secretary would use
the office personally. He said it
would be staffed by Haig's aides,
including Sherwood Goldberg,
his executive assistant, and
Muriel Hartley, an assistant to
the Secretary. Reporters noted
that when Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance resigned in the
Carter Administration, he left the
Department the next day and
had no such office.
MEANWHILE, Fischer
stressed that the U.S. is doing
everything possible to help en-
sure the safety of the civilian
population in Lebanon, including
urging Israel to lift its blockade
of west Beirut. "We have a deep
concern about the. human dimen-
sions of the conflict'," he said. He
said, adding that the Department
has been restored to west Beirut
although not electric power.
Fischer stressed that though
seeking to maintain the ceasefire
and trying to bring about a
peaceful solution to-the conflict,
"we are trying to prevent actions
that endanger the lives or welfare
of innocent civilians.!' He noted
that Peter McPhersdn, Adminis-
trator of the Agency for Interna-
tional Development, is coordinat-
ing the U.S. relief assistance to
Lebanon in cooperation with in-
ternational efforts.'
Fischer also noted that the
U.S. voted for .the ,UN Security
Council resolution which was
aimed at the protection of the
civilian population in Lebanon
and the restoration of all services.
In concluding, Fisher stressed
that the U.S. urges "all parties in
the conflict to respect the rights
of all civilians.
::;. ; .
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:;:$^^ by Hate Literature
Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Pagell-A
Continued from Page 1-A
Fact Finding : Department in-
vestigated the source of the mail-
ings and *ra Pakistan-based. .mternational
Muslim organization, the World
Muslim Congress, which receives
funding from and "is closely iden-
tified with Saudi-Arabia's ruling
I establishment. Yfte same orgaru-
I zation was identified in 1981 as
l the source of a.jsimilar mailing
Llast summer to members of the
British Parliament.-. .
Ma'aruf-al-Dawalibi, the World .
I Muslim Congress president,
I lives in the Saudi capital
land was an advisor to the late
King Khalid: Financial support is
provided through',. the Saudi-
founded World Muslim League.
Based in the holy city of Mecca,
the World Muslim-League was '
created in 1962 through a Saudi
I Government grant1 m a principal
I instrument of its policy to-put all
Islamic institqt ions- including
those outswie the country
under its own auspices. In addi-
tion to the World-Muslim Con-
gress, the World Muslim League
supports a:long list of Islamic
centers, mosques,"' universities,
associations,and similar institu-
I tions outside Saudi Arabia.
THE ANTI-SEMITIC mailing
I by the World Muslim Congress
[did more than raise the question
lof a Saudi responsibility, ^hoW-
lever indirect, for,the dissemina-
Ition of hate material: It also cast
oubt on the propriety of such".
_ctivity by an advisory group to
the United Nation?. The World
Muslim Congress is accredited to
the United Nations,, where it en-
i status as a Category I Non-
Jovernmerital Organization
(NGO) the highest available.
That Saudi Arabia promotes
anti-Semitic probaganda is a fact.
Vnti-Jewish sentiments are
.requently given circulation for
."internal" consumption in Saudi
IArabia, coming .'from leading
[opinion molders within the Saudi
[oligarchy.
A Saudi Arabian newspaper
M'Nadwa, for example, quoted
he following statement about
Jews made by an official of Muh-
nmad Ibn Saud University last
July: "Their vices and corrupt
vays were noted as far back as
I Koran." The official, Mat-wan
The.Grand Mufti of Jerusalem
' of Nazi Germany. He is show
Himmler
(center) was an ardent supporter
n seated with SS Chief Heinrich
trioih Suall is director of
the Fact -Finding Oe-
, Apartment of the ADL's
"-National Civil Rights
..\-Divisibrt.- This article
'."., first appeared in thi
'ADL Bulletin. ,\\.\_
m+mm~mmmmmmmmmm
Muhammad Ali, went'.on- to*
castigate 'Jews for ten "alleged
negative characteristics; -among
th^m: "arrogance," "hard
hearted cruelty," "discrimination
and exploitation,' "warmonger-
uig;'#j,''miserlines8 and envy."
vLASTrSEPTEMBER, another
..Saudi j: newspaper, -. _At-3qziT9,
alleged that!'The Jewish religion
is nothing but -a collection;of
"criminal'jarist principles.'sowing
cruelty, blood-lust and killing in
those who bplieveinit." ,
Consistent with these; kinds of
anti-Jewish sentiments'is.a state-
' ment made by the president of
the World Muslim Congress
some years ago. According to
Dawalibi: "The Arabs would
prefer athousandfold to become a
Soviet republic than a prey to
world Jewry."
The World Muslim Congress is
based in Karachi, Pakistan,
where it was founded in 1949- For
the first two decades of its
existence, it was led by the late
Hajj Muhammad Amin al-Hus-
seini, Mufti of Jerusalem and the
leader of Arab terrorists who
raided Jewish settlements in Pal-
estine in the 1930s. During
World War II, in broadcasts
beamed to the Middle East from
Berlin, where he then lived, he
urged Arabs to join the Axis
powers. He was also instrumental
in organizing a Yugoslav Muslim
SS division which fought along-
side the Germans.
FOLLOWING al-Husseini's
death in 1974, the World Muslim
Congress presidency was taken
over by his associate, al-Dawa-
libi, a former prime minister of
Syria who, upon his political ,
demise in that country in the
mid-Sixties, moved to Saudi
Arabia and became an official ad-
viser to the Saudi royal family.
Dawalibi had also been "loaned"
by King Khalid to Pakistan's
Prime Minister, Muhammad Zia
ul-Haq, for the drafting of
Islamic legislation, part of
Pakistan's current Islamicization
process.
Under Dawalibi, the World
Muslim Congress, in addtion to
its United Nations status, has
engaged in dialogues with Chris-
tian bodies. Inamullah Khan,
secretary-general of the Con-
gress, conducted such discus-
sions with the staff of the World
Council of Churches in February
1981, in Geneva. The following
Mar. 20, Dawalibi had an
audience with Pope John Paul II,
during which they reportedly
spoke about advancing Christian-
Muslim dialogue.
In October, 1981. Dawalibi
stated in Paris that such
dialogues were necessary because
"international Jewry is undoubt-
edly behind the persistence of
misunderstanding (between
Muslim and Christian) and has
disseminated deviation among
Christian clergymen ... It is an
indisputable fact that the Jews
have succeeded in penetrating
the highest offices in the church."
ADL HAS taken steps to shed
on the previously-unexposed
anti-Semitic side of the World
Muslim Congress. U.S. Secre-
tary-General Javier Perez de
Cuellar was urged to initiate an
investigation to see whether the
World Muslim Congress is still
eligible for NGO status. In its
letter, ADL noted that by
resolution of the UN's Economic
and Social Council, the "aims and
purposes" of NGO's must con-
form to the UN Charter, and that
as a matter of UN policy, the
Secretary-General was asked to
"exclude all those organizations
whose aims or practices tend to
contribute to the propagation of
Nazi ideology and racial andor
religious discrimination."
With regard to the World
Council of Churches and the
Vatican, ADL's sharing back-
ground information about the
World Muslim Congress so that
they become aware that they
have been meeting with an orga-
nization which promotes anti-
Jewish bigotry.
Another issue emerging from
ADL's investigation into the
i World Muslim Congress is the
behind-the-scenes role played by
Saudi Arabia and others in the
Arab world in the funding and
promotion of Holocaust re-
I visionist propaganda. While
the full picture has not yet un-
' folded, certain facts are known.
THIS WAS not the first time
William Grimstad, the author of
the books sent to the senators,
has been connected with the
Saudis. In 1978, ADL revealed
that he had filed a Foreign Agent
registration form with the U.S.
Justice Department reporting a
$20,000 payment from the Saudis
"in appreciation for my 1976
book Anti-Zion and intended for
use in similar humanitarian
educational projects." Grimstad
subsequently changed his mind,
declaring that it was all a misun-
derstanding; it wasn't the Saudis
who had paid him the $20,000. he
claimed, but some anonymous
donor whose identity he did not
know.
An article in the June, 1978,
ADL Bulletin, spelled out Grim-
stad's connections. He was
a former managing editor of
White Power, the official publica-
tion of the neo-Nazi National
Socialist White Peoples Party.
An earlier edition of Anti-Zion
was published in 1973 in Wash-
Continued on Page 12-A
conllnnil chpcolim
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Made from Foreskins
A New and Cheaper Interferon Unveiled to Fight Viruses and Cancel
By GAI.INA VROMEN
REHOVOT. Israel A new
pharmaceutical firm here is seek-
ing ways to harness the body's
natural defenses in the fight
against certain viruses, auto-im-
mune diseases such as multiple
sclerosis and ultimately
cancer.
Interpharm Laboratories is
among a dozen companies in the
world working on fibroblast in-
terferon, a human protein that
helps fight viruses and has been
touted by some scientists as a
potential anti-cancer drug.
The three-year-old firm is also
involved in the production and
marketing of human growth hor-
mones and in researching the use
of an embryonic protein for po-
tential treatment of diseases en-
gendered by the body's immune
reactions to itself.
WORKING TOGETHER with
the prestigious Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science, the firm is in the
clinical trial stages of developing
fibroblast interferon, a human
protein which they are producing
from the foreskins of circumcised
infants.
Interferon received its name
more than 20 years ago when a
British virologist discovered that
a substance secreted by cells as
part of the body's natural defense
system 'interfered' with the mul-
tiplication of viruses.
Interferon is synthesized in
miniscule quantities by most
body cells when alerted to a viral
infection in a nearby tissue.
Secreted into the tissue, it allows
for biochemical changes that in-
crease the tissue's resistance to
the virus.
"The use of foreskins came
about because they are readily a-
vailable in Israel," said Israel
Makov. director of Interpharm.
Makov added that the young and
healthy condition of the fibro-
blast cells found in foreskins
facilitates the extraction of the
material.
IN ISRAEL and abroad, it is
being clinically tested as a possi-
Top Senators Swamped
By Hate Literature
Continued from Page 11-A
ington, DC, by the Aryan Press,'
under the title. The Jews on
Trial. A later edition of the book
was published by Noontide
Press, the publishing house in
Los Angeles controlled by Willis
Carto, head of the Washington-
based far-right anti-Semitic orga-
nization, Liberty Lobby.
Although the edition of the
second book received by the sen-
ators, The Six Million Reconsid-
ered, was anonymous, adver-
tisements in various U.S. and
British hate publications identify
Grimstad as its author. The book
was originally published by His-
torical Review Press in England.
The firm is headed by a British
right-wing extremist, Anthony
Hancock, who has been linked
with various British neo-fascists,
including the National Front and
the League of St. George. His
printing company specializes in
the publication of anti-Semitic
and neo-Nazi literature. A subse-
quent edition of The Six Million
Reconsidered was published in
the United States by Noontide
Press.
TIME IS demonstrating that
the mailing to U.S. senators was
no isolated affair. The earlier
mailing to members of the British
Parliament was one indicator;
the other is the fact that mem-
bers of the U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives have also recently
begun receiving the hate
packages.
What seems to be unfurling is
an anti-Jewish propaganda ef-
fort. It is being conducted from
Pakistan, but the Riyadh connec-
tion cannot be ignored. Despite
the attempt by some to portray
the Saudis as "moderate," their
anti-Zionist proclamations have
been shown to exhibit the rawest
anti-Semitic tendencies, and this
fits in with the current
machinations of the World Mus-
lim Congress.
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ble cure for eye infections caused
by adenovirus, herpes, some
forms of hepatitis and conjunc-
tivitis.
The discovery that interferon
also slows down the division of
cancer cells led to wild specula-
tion in the mid-1970s that a mira-
cle cure for cancer had been
found. "Public expectation,
based on inconclusive scientific
results, created an unrealistic at-
mosphere," says Makov. But he
believes that careful research
over a long period of time may
yet demonstrate interferon's use-
fulness in controlling cancer.
Interpharm has been produc-
ing interferon from the fibroblast
cells with the aid of culture tissue
techniques developed at the
Weizmann Institute by Drs. D.
Gurari-Rotman and T. Landau.
Once extricated from the fore-
skins, the cells are grown in a
nutrient medium, extracted, pur-
ified and freeze-dried.
IN RECENT years, new
genetic engineering techniques
for the eventual production of
synthetic interferon have been
advanced, and Interpharm hopes
to incorporate the new methods.
Interferon is not available for sale
to the public, but last year Inter-
pharm began selling small quant-
ities to research institutes.
Most of Interpharm's $1.5
million in sales last year came
from the marketing of human
growth hormones to prevent
dwarfing in children who suffer
from pituitary malfunction. A
series of injections of the expen-
sive hormone, which is extracted
in Israel from imported post-
mortem pituitary glands, allows
the children to achieve their
genetic height.
In yet another project, Inter-
pharm is working together with
the Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center on the use of a
protein produced by the human
fetus that may be useful in fight-
ing auto-immune diseases that
often lead to loss of muscle cont-
rol. These diseases occur because
the immune system mistakes a
part of the body to be foreign and
mobilizes its forces to attack it.
In short, the body begins to self-
destruct.
HAD ASS A H researchers
noted a remission in these di-
seases during pregnancy and
began asking why this occurred.
They now believe that alpha-feto
protein, produced by the fetus,
suppresses certain immunities.
Interpharm joined the Hadassah
research team to investigate the
potential commercial application
of the protein.
When Interpharm ,
launched m April, 1979 as a suk I
sidiary of the Dutch-own*I
Geneva-based pharmaceuuS
firm Area Applied Research Sys-
tems, it consisted of only two
people: director Israel Makov
and an assistant workijJ
together out of Makov s hom*
Today, situated at the KiryJ
Weizmann industrial park not far
from Tel Aviv, Interpharm hasj
staff of 70, plus 30 scientists o
the company payroll who work a?,
leading Israeli research institu-1
tions. Last year it became one of
a dozen Israeli firms to havj
traded on the New York Stock
Exchange, with stock sales o||
$6 million.
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Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
k
I U.S. Jews seems perceptibly to
be lessening.
ADD TO this a growing
awareness that what Israel has
been saying all along is
truethat reports of destruction,
loss of life and allegedly con-
temptible Israel Defense Forces
behavior in Lebanon are gross
PLO propagandistic exaggera-
tions accepted without question
by the pressand a lot of people
seem to be breathing more easily
at least for the moment.
Then what is the lesson to be
I learned? It has not very much to
(do with Israel at all. but with
Jews outside of Israel who love to
'bask in what was once the un-
tarnished morality of a renascent
Jewish nationhood. Their perch is
precarious, and they can recon-
stitute themselves into a hateful
ludenrat iust as quickly as the
going gets the least bit rough.
That's what happened at
Masada.
At the foot of Masada. there is
a sign: Shayneet Matzada lo
lipol. 'Masada will not fall a
second time" I wonder.
[Henry Taub. president of JDC, chats with a
[wounded soldier and his mother in the
Rambam Hospital in Haifa. Right is Zippy
Mor-Bai, director of the JDC-assisted Social
Service Department of the hospital, which
serves as the liaison between the wounded
men and their families.
Leo Mindlin
Will Masada Fall a Second Time?
Continued from Page 4-A
throat in exchange for a single,
personal, flattering reference in
[he morning paperthat very
aper whose fictional accounts of
he war in Lebanon are typical of
Jie anti-Israel "news" coverage
piese days throughout the world.
What do such Jews fear? In the
eginning. it was not so. The bat-
tle began on June 6, and even the
pair evoked Israel's greatest
nilitary triumph in the 1967 Six-
Day War. But six days later, the
tar did not end in another such
humph.
While many of the media were
puitably sympathetic to Israel's
jause in that first week, Jews
vere buoyed up by the hope that
i'LO terrorism against Israel
jvould finally be contained, that
Ihe purposes of the struggle were
justifiable and even fashionable.
BUT NOW it is coming on to
bix weeks later. Israel has never
fought so long an engagement.
tor have American Jews (and
lews elsewhere in the west) ever
sn asked to support an Israeli
var of such dimension before. In
lie meantime, the media sob-sis-
ers, perennially uncomfortable
vith their pretense of friendly
feelings for Israel, began with
Butright lies to wreak their
propagandistic vengeance
against Israel's best purposes in
equally mounting proportion as
the PLO could not do likewise in
battle.
During the period of escalation
>f the media war on the western
mt-. I have documented these
ties with careful presentation of
[the facts as they more nearly are
rather than as they were being
[created in the nation's editorial
I board rooms. So have others and,
II suspect, with equally little suc-
Icess.
The nation'8 editorial board
rooms, of course, won. In Miami,
for example, was their even asin-
Lj/e mass rally of Jewish support
[for Israel's campaign? In perfect
I subservience to the intimidations
lof the press, neither was there
Imuch, if any of that, elsewhere.
[On the other hand, Jews began
[organizing humanitarian fund-
raisers for Lebanon in a swift
essage to the media to let them
mow that the muck they were
[printing was perfectly all right
[with them and to let Israel
[know that they were dissatisfied
Iwith the conduct of the war.
REMEMBER THOSE Ameri-
[ci.iis who raised funds for the
|\iet Cong during our urn-
I pleasantness in Vietnam? More
1 recently, what happened to Ed
Asner in his campaign tor
medical supplies to the so-called
freedom-fighters of Central
America?
Yet that is what some Ameri-
can Jews are doing at this very
moment. With Israel in mortal
need of every penny of support
we can give, they are raising
funds for Lebanon where even
Bashir Gemayel, an emerging
power behind the Christian falan-
gists and, presumably, an ally of
Israel, says of the Israelis: "To
save Lebanon, I would cooperate
with the devil."
And why doesn't the PLO
leave Beirut now that it is tor the
moment thoroughly dessimated
militarily and politically? Be-
cause better than half of Lebanon
supports the Palestinian cause.
Yet some American Jews, piloted
by the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee among others, are sending
relief there. What is behind this?
An article in the Sunday paper
by one Howard B. Rock, an asso-
ciate professor of history at
Florida International University,
who teaches a course in modern
Jewish history there, typifies this
kind of emotional suicide. Rock is
an academic, and in this sense,
his article is isolated from the
realities of the American Jewish
experience.
BECAUSE HE is an academic,
Rock is an excellent advocate,
but it is an advocacy devoid of
the marketplace of Realpolitik.
Rock shows a thoroughgoing
textbook experience of Israel and
its modern historical roots, but it
also shows a fear of what the
Koyim will think and say.
In this fear. Rock may be right,
but his reasons are all wrong.
Rock says that Jews are "torn by
(Israeli) governmental policies
that they can not abide, and that
they fear will ultimately change
the very character of the Jewish
State."
It is his Ivory Tower isolation
that betrays Rock. What Jews
fear is not Israel's moral fall so
much as their own decline from
the Parnassan heights of Ameri-
can civilization. What these Jews
are saying is that for Israel the
end can not justify the means.
But that it is all right for them to
abandon Israel to guarantee their
own pragmatic purposes.
Israel deserves better from
them. By now, the American
Jewish betrav?l may be moot. As
Israel's objectives in Lebanon
become clearer despite the soap
opera cries to the contrary in the
media, and as these objectives
emerge in meaning so that they
show a remarkable congruence
with America's own objectives in
the Middle East, the pressure on
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Blum Reaffirms Israel Has No
Desire to be Lebanon's Occupiers
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Yehuda Blum. Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, said that Israel had
no intention of becoming an
occupying force in south
Lebanon once it completed
its military operation.
"Israel stands for the ter-
ritorial integrity and sovereignty
of Lebanon," Blum told reporters
following a meeting with Jewish
community leaders attending the
national commission conference
of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith here.
BLUM STRESSED that Is-
rael had "no territorial ambitions
whatsoever in Lebanon." How-
ever, Blum would not speculate
on the future status of southern
Lebanon once the operation,
dubed, "Peace for Galilee," has
been completed.
Questioned whether Israel has
overreacted in its response to the
terrorist shelling of Israel's
northern settlements and the re-
cent shooting of Israel's Am-
bassador to Britain, Blum asked
rhetorically what the level of re-
action should be in retaliation to
terrorist attacks.
Blum touched on a similar
theme in an address last month
to the United Nationals Security
Council prior to its adoption of a
resolution calling for the with-
draw! of Israeli forces from
Lebanon "forthwith and uncon-
ditionally." The (Council) also
called on all parties involved to
observe the resolution unani-
mously adopted thereafter calling
for the cessation immediately
and simultnaeously of all mill
tarv activities with Lebanon and
across the Israeli-Lebanese bor-
dei
IN HIS address to the Council
the envoy chastised the Council
for "evincing not the slightest in-
terest" in terrorist actions per-
pertrated by the Palestine
Liberation Organization. "How
many Israelis have to be killed by
terrorists for this Council to be
persuaded that the limits of our
endurance have been reached?"
he asked.
"Israel cannot expect this
body even to deplore PLO bar-
barism against Israel's civilian
population, let alone take any
steps with a view towards curb-
ing that barbarism."
Blum offered "highlights" of
PLO terrorism from April, 1979
up to the shooting of the Israeli
Ambassador, Shlomi Argov. He
pointed out that since the cease-
fire was agreed to across the Is-
raeli-Lebanese border last July,
17 people have been killed and
241 wounded in a total of 141 ter-
rorist acts, "all of them
originating from Terrorist bases
inside Lebanon.
"All our reports have gone
unheeded." He accused the
Council of having remained "un-
moved" and failing to attempt to
curb the "criminal activities of
the PLO."
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It Was Ten Years Ago

Id

KGB Tore Her Out of Her Father's Arms
Continued from Page 1-A
charge < t "parasitism" followed
by a ten; i in a labor camp.
Temkin chose to campaign
from a .sit ion of freedom out-
side of the USSR. He has contin-
ued his ; ruggle from his home in
Israel U gain worldwide support
for the i ause of Soviet Jewry in
General ind Marina in particular.
During the nearly 10 years
since net abduction, Marina has
not been free to rejoin her father
or even to communicate with him
or his friends. The USSR Minis-
try of Foreign Affairs has not re-
sponded to two inquiries made by
the Dutch Embassy which repre-
sents Israeli interests in the
USSR. The inquiries concerned
Marina's health, residence and
employment.
DR. TEMKIN explained the
necessity for obtaining informa-
tion about Marina. "I have not
enough information to write a
Soviet-recognizable invitation for
Marina to emigrate to Israel,"
Temkin stated. "Through the
fault of ihe Soviet authorities, I
know nothing about Marina for
the last two and one half years.
She is now old enough to be
married and to have children. If
she has a family of her own, their
names, addresses, birthdates,
need to be made known to
me. The refusal of the Soviets
e Was
ignored
laywright
eter Weiss
Dead In
Stockholm
BON (DaD) The news
that pi. right Peter Weiss had
died su nly in Stockholm has
prompt n the Federal Republic
of Genr. my a response he would
have pr rred to elicit in his life-
time an* ith his work.
Weiss, i German writer and
Swedish i tizen, the author of a
1965 Ai chwitz play, "The
Investigii on," and the 1968
"Vietnan. Discourse," a com-
mitted socialist and uncom-
promising person in both his
politics and his aesthetics, will
now be posthumously awarded
the Buchner Prize of the German
Academy of Language and
Literature in Darmstadt.
HE WAS born in 1916 in Ber-
lin. His lather was a Czech Jew
and a textiles manufacturer. He
grew up in Bremen, emigrated in
1934, the early years of the Nazi
era, to Prague, where he studied
art, and went on to Sweden in
1939, becoming a Swedish citizen
in 1948.
He first wrote in Swedish but
from 1952 returned to his native
language with an experimental
micro-novel, "The Shadow of the
Coachman's Body." He made a
name for himself in both German
states in 1964 with his Marat
Sade play. "My relationship with
Germany is a split relationship,"
he said, "with a divided coun-
try."
In both East and West Ger-
many he was successful and con-
troversial. His trilogy of novels,
"The Aesthetics of Resistance,
1975-81," a tribute to the anti-
fascist front, will be published
this year. The "New Trial,"
play based on Kafka's novel, was
his last work for the stage. He
directed it himself in Stockholm
last March.
to communicate this kind of in-
formation or the absence of any
answer (their usual tactic) is a
violation of the Helsinki Final
Act. 1 shall protest this to appro-
priate bodies in the USA and
Europe."
According to Temkin, a Soviet
diplomat told a Dutch diplomat
that Temkin's demand to estab-
lish communication with his
daughter constitutes interven-
tion in Soviet internal affairs.
Still unanswered since early in
1979 is an official request by the
Dutch Minister of Foreign
Affairs to Andrei Gromyko, the
USSR Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs, to let Marina visit Holland
and meet with her father there.
"This fact," said Temkin,
"proves the Soviets know that
Marina wants to emigrate. If she
really wants to live in the USSR,
I cannot prevent her return to the
USSR after her visit to Holland."
THE KGB frustrates at-
tempts by Temkin and hit
friends in the USSR to obtain
even the most elementary infor-
mation about Marina since De-
cember, 1979. But prior to that
date, she managed to smuggle
messages to her father's friends.
The Soviets have registered
Marina as an outpatient of a
Moscow psychiatric clinic. This
can be taken as a lightly veiled
threat of future imprisonment in
a dreaded mental instititution, an
action not unheard of in the
Soviet Union.
The KGB has warned Marina
that for any attempt to commun-
icate with her father, she will be
exiled to a "God-forsaken hole."
Small wonder then the USSR
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
stated to the Dutch Embassy
that Marina does not want com-
munication with her father.
DR. TEMKIN'S attempts to
reach Marina by phone are fruit-
less. None of his letters to her is
delivered. Instead, they are re-
turned to him bearing the Soviet
postal stamp in French: Re tour
Refuse.
Prof. Temkin engages in
Scientific research in Isreal. He is
' '*.'... '
in the United States to attawi
professional seminar. During'
visit, he also attended meetm
with the Arizona Council
Soviet Jewry and with sevJH
other member councils 0f uH*
Union of Councils for $q- |
Jews. On behalf of Soveit Jel* l
he conferred with Sen. iwl
DeConcini (Ariz.) and other u?|
legislators.
Dr. Temkin hopes that
Americans will add their supnS
to his efforts by writing t0 O
U.S. Senators, Representative,'
President Reagan and other hi
official*.
Temkin believes that eontinJ
ous pressure on Soviet authorij
ties by great numbers 0(|
Americans will tfpen the iron curl
tain for all Soviet Jews who wish
to emigrate, and that he and 3
daughter, Marina, will be reunitl
ed in Israel at last.
Alexander Temkin resides ail
Remez Street 3-1, Rishon \A
Zion, Israel.
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St 7:30 p.m. Theatre Performing Arts. For more information


Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A

50
Since Jews Were Given Civil Rights
3y MICHAEL:kttiAyti$\
ONTREAL ^; (Jt;^^.^.
Ah anniversary joif -th6 land-
Lie legislation which gaye Jews
ial political and civil rights in
er Canada, was o ff irially ob-
ired in Quebec city qip-Mdfl-.
L A plaque was Unveiled at the
tional Assembly '. by''. its
ker, Claude VaillanCoUrt,
; A series of ceremonies, exhibits
arid academic discussions are
scheduled to draw attention to
the historic significance of the
.Lower Canada Act of 1832 and
the long struggle for Jewish civil
rights that preceded its adoption.
The Act was a model for legis-
lation adopted the following year
n upper Canada, removing
mandatory Christian oaths for
officeholders.
According to David Rome, an
historian of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, the "various human
rights laws, fair employment and
housing regulations which we are
today enjoying are direct
descendants of the Lower Canada
Act of 1832."
The events leading up to the
Act can be traced to 1808 when
i Ezekiel Hart, a Jew, was elected
to represent the Trois Rivieres
Riding, or district, of Quebec
province, in the legislature of
lower Canada. His opponents
argued that a Jew could not
legitimately take the oath of
office which concluded with the
words, "On the true faith of a
Christian." Hart was ejected
from the legislature, and his seat
was declared vacant.
I According to David Rome,
an historian of the
Canadian Jewish
Congress, the 'arious
human rights laws, fair
employment and housing
regulations which we are
today enjoying are the
descendants of the Lower
Canada Act of 1832.'
New elections were held. Hart
won again and was ejected for a
second time. But his challenge to
the status quo stimulated a
quarter century of intellectual
and legal dissent which cul-
minated in the 1832 act.
-JO
'
-.-.

* V

' \ ,

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By BARBARA PASH
Copyriftit Btltimon Jewish TlmM
Rtprint jv Spsnal AiTn*mnt
He was Lebanese
.loslem, a teenager, but
jvith the sophistication that
tomes from shuttling bet-
ween two worlds. Most of
fche year he lived with his
parents in Beirut; summers
he spent in the States with
American relatives.
He had lived through the
Israeli invasion of Lebanon and
the bombing of Beirut, so he was
sought-after media commodity.
i chanced to meet let's call him
I'M ike" on a flight from New
Tork's Kennedy Airport. I was
knroute home from a press tour of
Israeli that coincided with the
butbreak of the war in Lebanon
A GANGLY KID, with a mop
If dark hair and dark brown eyes,
be looked typically American in
[11s jeans and t shirt, until he and
seatmates, began chatting
Ibout his recent adventures.
Since Beirut airport had shut
iu n. he had to leave Lebonon on
foreign ship. To reach the ship,
\i had to pass through the Israeli
heckpoints surrounding the city.
\ hut pleased him most was the
act that, he reported happily,
cause of the bombing of Beirut,
|is high school's final exams were
ancelled.
Ordinarily, his family lives in
lie Moslem section of Beirut.
kuring the bombing, they moved
the Christian section, an infin-
ity safer haven which received,
said, only minor damage
inks to the Israelis' accuracy.
But "safe" is a relative term in
keirut at the moment, where near
laos prevails. The city is clogg-
with refugees from the south
kho find shelter whereever they
an. The citizenry has armed
Iself with pistols, rifles and
Bachine guns; whenever, they
enture on the street, they rou-
aely carry their weapons.
THE DANGER, according to
like, come not so much from the
Hireling Israelis as from the
karious Lebanese Moslem and
thristian factions and from the
Palestinians. The Lebanese are
nbivalent about the Israelis;
Key dislike the Palestinians for
aving destroyed a once beauti-
pl, once prosperous country
ce their arrival in Lebanon
l*ter having been expelled from
jrdan by King Hussein in 1970.
Before bombing the southern
ebanese city of Sidon, the
kraelis dropped leaflets telling
he populace to gather on the
Baches to escape the bombing.
\e Lebanese appreciated that
^sture. They believe Israeli
rime Minister Menachem Begin
Ihen he says Israel does not
pvet Lebanese territory. Israel
ants a stable government in
ebanon; so do the Lebanese.
The Lebanese do not like the
tlestinians in their midst for se-
eral reasons. The "Fatahmen."
Mike calls them, go into the
t>wns and villages in southern
"aanon and requisition whatev-
they want. Why don't the
ebanese authorities stop them?
is asked, and he shrugs his
tioulders. "What authority?"
lie answers. "There is none."
THE PALESTINIANS acted
if they were a law unto them
elves, he continues. "They walk
round with their weapons like
us," he demonstrates, sitting
ramrod-straight in his seat
nd moving his shoulders
aughtily from side to side,
phere are their women and chil-
en? "Oh, they are with them,
list as bad."
In fact, Mike is friendly with
bme Palestinian teens who at-
nd his school. Every Saturday,
key must report to a paramilita-
| camp outside Beirut for riflery
aining. Once Mike accompanied
em for the day. Their instruc-
ts are Russians or Russian-
Mned, and their weapons are
kviet-made.
*x**fl
How Thousands of PLO
Fighters Have Suddenly
'Disappeared'
"The Palestinians hate the
Jews," Mike says "The worst in-
sult you can say to a Palestinian
is that he is like a Jew, an Israeli.
One of our teachers, an
American, told a class of boys,
because they were being noisy,
that they were acting like a
bunch of Israelis. The next day,
he got a warning from the Pales-
tinians that he'd better leave the
country quickly.
"The Palestinians are very
cruel to the Israeli soldiers they
capture," Mike continues. They
torture the soldiers, which
bothers Mike. "On Beirut televi-
sion, they showed an Israeli pilot
and his face was all bloody. They
showed an Israeli soldier, his
body half in and half out of a car
trunk, with a Palestiniar, sitting
on the trunk. The announcer said
the soldier was alive when they
did this."
BUT THE Palestinians are
"very weak now," Mike adds.
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion leader Yasir Arafat is
thought to be in hiding some-
where in Beirut, after having
escaped from the PLO headquar-
ters via a series of underground
tunnels. The Lebanese hope the
Palestinians will all pick up and
move to Syria. "Only Syria, with
its strong army, may be able to
control them," he muses.
Where are all the Palestinian
guerrillas captured by the Israeli
troops? Ask Israeli soldiers you
happen to meet. Ask Israeli offic-
ials you comer. The answer is the
same: they shrug, they don't
know. Presumably, thousands of
PLO fighters have disappeared
into thin air.
Stand in line waiting to get
into a Jerusalem hotel dining
room and ask a spry grandmo-
ther from America, the "classic"
little old lady with white hair,
and she knows. She's seen them.
So has her husband, an equally
spry grandfather. In fact, their
entire tour bus saw them, on a
jaunt up to Metulla, the north-
ernmost settlement in Israel,
near the Lebanese border.
"OH," SHE informs you casu-
ally, "The Israelis are bringing
them into Israel. We saw truck-
loads of them well, five, six
trucks in a row. They were all
standing up, because it was so
crowded there was no room to sit.
"Some of them," she estim-
ates, "couldn't have been more
than 14 years old."
Above the beaches of
Nahariya, the helicopters fly
north. Occasionally, one returns
south, following the beachline in
this pleasant resort town on the
languidly blue shores of the Med-
iterranean, variously labeled in
its brochure "The Riviera of the
North" and "The Pearl 0. Jie
Western Galilee."
These are not metro traffic hel-
icopters. Not state police helicop-
ters either. They are gigantic
brown war machines. The sides
appear to be heavily armored;
rockets are attached to the
runners. They make so much
noise you can hear their approach
a good two minutes before sight-
ing them in the clear, cloudless
sky. Plenty of time to focus your
camera.
ON THE road running past the
beach of Nahariya, the convoy of
armored personnel carriers
passes, their heavy treads raising
a dusty haze. They look like
tanks but they're not; they have
no gun turrets, someone know-
ledgeable about such things
points out. They have back doors
and inside, there are two facing
rows of turquoise-colored seats,
for the soldiers to ride to battle.
Despite rumors that Nahariya
is a mass of rubble, the city is
intact. "We had two days' bomb-
ing by Katyushas here," the rest-
aurant owner says. He is home
for one day, having been called
back into the arm v the past week
to serve as an aircraft mechanic.
He has a private bomb shelter
for his wife and two children. "I
built it four' years ago. There was
a law you had to have a shelter in
your home." When the Katyusha
rockets come, he says, "everyone
is scared. It's not like a real war
with a beginning and end. With
Katyushas, they can come one
hour and the next hour."
WHEN THE rockets come, his
one-year-old, a boy, "is a little bit
afraid. He hears an airplane and
starts to cry. The girl, 6, under-
stands more. She says it's a
shame so many are hurt and kill-
ed."
Sasson Levy, director of
tourism for Nahariya, outlines
the government policy on private
property damage: "All houses
are insured by the government.
When houses are damaged by
shelling, by terrorism, the go-
vernment has to repair them."
Yes, he says, he too spent a
few days in a bomb shelter but,
he shrugs, "I had to come back to
work," along with other city of-
ficials.
What is it like in a bomb shel-
ter? "It's not like a nuclear war
bomb shelter, but it's not
pleasant either. Sleeping at home
i nreferable. You have a radio, a
TV in the shelter, whatever you
need toys for the kids. The
funny thing is, whenever the kids
hear something interesting, they
run outside. Then we are shout-
ing at the kids to come back into
the shelters."
Inside the main hotel in
Nahariya, which might have been
beamed intact (including the
luncheon menu) from the Cats-
kills, the mayor announces, "At
the opening of the new wing of
this hotel, we are also opening a
new era in Nahariya. We hope
many holidaygoers will enjoy
Continued on Page 6
eJe wish FloridiamL
Miami. Florida Friday, July 16, 1982
Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, July 16, 1982

Mount Sinai Returns
$25,000 Gift to Sheikh
Sheikh Mohammed AJ-
Fassi of Saudi Arabia has
made a gift of $25,000 to1
Mount Sinai Medical Cen-
ter of Greater Miami. Al-
Fassi is the brother-in-law
of Prince Turki bin Abdul-
azis, who is the fourth in
line to the throne of Saudi
Arabia. Al-Fassi is a Miami
resident.
Now the gift is being re-
turned.
Ann Koven, vice president of
the Women's Cancer League,
said that after the birth of Al-
Fassi's nephew at Mount Sinai
Hospital in Miami, she ap-
proached the Sheikh for a contri-
bution.
WHEN THE Sheikh finally
accepted what Koven called her
"brainstorm," he requested that
the presentation of his gift be at a
reception to be arranged at the
hospital.
"We had a beautiful reception
at the hospital," she said. "They
(the Sheikh and his entourage)
were very impressed with our
equipment.
At that point. Al-Fassi turned
over two checks one for
$10,000 to the Women's Cancer
League and the other for $5,000
RELGO. INC.
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books-Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
1507 Washington Avenue. MB.
for Mount Sinai. A second
$10,000 gift to the League was
delivered shortly after that.
Arthur Pearlman, chairman of
the Mount Sinai Board of Trus-
tees, and Alvin Goldberg, execu-
tive director, have since revealed
that the check to Mount Sinai
has already been returned.
PEARLMAN said that the
gift-giving ceremony had turned
out to be a "media event," in-
cluding the appearance on the
scene of the CBS-TBV film crew
for "60 Minutes."
Norman Braman, a vice presi-
dent of Mount Sinai's Board of
Trustees, in defending the
decision to return the funds,
noted that "These are the people
(the Saudis) who give over a mil-
lion dollars a day to international
terrorism ... A Jewish-
sponsored hospital has no right
lending dignity to a situation like
that."
Women Start
Political Learn-In
The Jewish Women's Political
Caucus presents the first summer
learn-in on Tuesday. July 20th at
11 a.m., in the large pavilion,
Wainwright Park.
The first topic of the summer
series is "You and the Political
Scene." The discussion will be led
by Anna Mae Koss.
Chair person of the series is
Natalie B. Lyons. Committee
members include. Laurel Shapiro.
Anne Padower. Lois Emanuel,
Dora Hill, Dorie Lurie. Anne
Freedman Fischer. Hermione
Spahn is president of the Caucus.
WANTED
The Jewish Floridian is seeking a well-
qualified person with experience in literary
criticism to serve as a regular book-reviewer.
Background should include a wide range of
skilled reading with special emphasis on
Jewish subject matter and professional com-
petence in writing. Academic credentials are
desirable but not necessary. There will be a
minimun fee for each review, plus reviewer's
copy.
Write c/to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012941
Miami, Fla. 33101
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Dade and Broward Israel Bond
Groups to Receive Report
Gary Gereon, the Southeast
Regional Chairman for State of
Israel Bonds, will report his find-
ings on European reaction to the
current Lebanese crisis at an Is-
rael Bond breakfast on July 21 at
the Four Ambassador's Hotel in
Miami. The breakfast will also
feature Rabbi LeOn Kronish,
National Chairman of Israel
Bonds, in a live telephone hookup
from Jerusalem.
Gerson has recently returned
from a tour of various European
capitals where he met with vari-
ous government leaders to dis-
cuss the current Middle F
crisis. c*wt
The breakfast is one in a s-w I
of breakfasts and parlor meet^
sponsored by Israel Bond?
keep the Dade and Browa M
ish communities up to date on Z\
events ,n Lebanon and its ,mDZ
on the people of 1 srael.
The Israel Bond Organizati*
has recently undertaken a sDeri,i
effort at the request of the 3
government to provide an exti,
$100 million to relieve the ?
creased strain on Israel',
economy as a result of the event!
in Lebanon.
Stare Rep. Barry Kutun,
seeking reelection in House
104, is being feted as the guest
of honor at a reception on
Thursday, July 15 from 5:30
p.m. at the Top of the Colum-
bus Hotel, Miami.
Emanu-El Plans for Holy Days
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin of
Hollywood will appear on the
Jewish Worship Hour Sun-
day at 8 a.m. on Channel 10.
Cantor Stanley S. Rich will
help officiate the upcoming High
Holy Days Auxiliary Services at
Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami. Announcement was made
by Carol Greenberg, president,
and Samuel N. Friedland, chair-
man of the board of the Miami
Heath congregation.
Cantor Rich, who was gradu-
ated from Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion with
a degree in music in 1967. has
performed in cantorial concerts
through Florida and Pennsyl-
vania.
Rabbi Maxwell Berger will of-l
ficiate at this year's services, jJ
the main sanctuary.
Dr. Irving Lehrman and!
Cantor Zvi Adler will officiate at |
the principal services, which will
be held concurrently throughout!
the High Holy Days, in the I
Miami Beach Theater of the Per
fanning Arts, located across th
street at 1700 Washington Ave.
The Temple Emanu-Ll Choir.
under the direction of Israeli!
composer and conductor Shmuel
Fershko. will take part in the I
principal services.
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'-.-....
Friday, July 16.1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B

't*
Samuel Steen (left), a member of Temple Beth Am, has been
ilected to a four-year term as a trustee of the Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations. The Union is the congregational
irm of Reform Judaism. Welcoming Mr. Steen, a resident of
.oral Gables, to the governing body is UAHC President Rabbi
Mexander M. Schindler.
Jefferson Bank
Offers Services
For Registration
Persons wishing to register for
the upcoming Federal, state,
county and local promaries and
elections may do so every Tues-
day, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the
Jefferson Plaza and Sunny Isles
offices of Jefferson National
Banks.
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson National Bank and
Norman M. Ciller, president of
Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Isles, said official regis-
trars of the Dade County election
office will be at the offices every
week until the close of regis-
tration for the 1982 elections.
Persons who have changed
their places of residence also are
required to re-register, Goldberg
said. Locations for the regis-
tration are at Jefferson Plaza, 300
41st Street. Miami Beach, and at
290 Sunny Isles Boulevard.
Four volunteers have been de-
putized to handle registration at
Sunny Isles. They are Hiram
Goldstein, chairman of the advi-
sory board of Jefferson National
Bank at Sunny Isles; Harold
Kaufman; Isadora Toder and Bill
Farber, North Dade civic leaders.
Roberta Greenspan has been
deputized to handle registrations
at the Miami Beach office.
I A
and Mrs. Ted Finkel
Mr. and Mrs. George Bergmann
Chairmen Named for Annual Gala
I Named to co-chair the "CircusI
cus!*' event, presented by the
bung Presidents Club annual
Ua in December, in support of
junt Sinai Medical Center of
pami Beach, are Mr. and Mrs.
jrge (Barbara) Bergmann and
. and Mrs. Ted (Dorriel
akel.
= HDther key committee positions
JWV Barbecue
The West Miami Post and
ixiliary No. 223, JWV, will
ive their second annual back-
rd Kosher bar-b-que on Satur-
f, July 24 at 7:30 p.m. at Carol
Stanley Gold's home, 8410
36 St.. Miami. Advance re-
lations must be made.
|>rence and Eugene Dondes are
lirpersons for Auxiliary and
St.
include Dr. and Mrs." Charles
(Teena) Weiss, Host and Hos-
tesses; Ms. Flora Aranson,
music; Mrs. Ronald (Amy) Rose,
invitations Mr. and Mrs. Keith
(Claudia) Kovens, publicity and
photos; Dorrie Finkel, Barbara
Bergmann and Mrs. Martin
(Gladys) Gelb, menu; Mrs. Fred
(Mickie) Kosenbloom, hot line;
Young Presidents Club Chair-
man, Martin Gelb. tickets: Mur-
ray Candib. Founders liaison:
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry (Jane) Good-
man, entertainment; Barbara
Bergmann. Gladys Gelb and
Mrs. Richard (Isabel) Zimmer-
man, decorations.
Harry Zubkoff
Dr. William Zubkoff
Major Expansion for South Shore
Congressman Claude Pepper
cut the inaugural strings at the
South Shore Hospital celebration
launching its major expansion
and development program, last
Sunday morning.
Highlighting the event which
celebrated the growth of South
Miami Beach's medical center.
Mayor Steve Clark proclaimed
the day "Celebration Day for
South Shore Project Emerge."
Miami Beach Mayor Norman
Ciment read the city's proclama-
tion.
Congressman Pepper, a long-
time friend of the hospital and an
advocate of programs for the
elderly, was the featured speaker
on the program which included
remarks by Dr. Bernard J. Fogel,
Jean of the University of Miami
Medical School, who announced
the first clinical fellowship for the
training of physicians in geriatric
, medicine in the State of Florida.
The occasion announced the
naming of the new ten story, $12
million expansion now under con-
struction in honor of Harry H.
Brodie, founder of the hospital.
Book Review
Menorah Chapter of Hadassah
will present a book review en-
titled "Vignetts of Contemporary
Books," discussed by Zolalee
Blakeslee, librarian, on Tuesday,
July 20 at 2 p.m. at the Sunrise
Club.
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
Garden Vegetable Mustard Sauce
W cup green beans, 1" pieces.
fresh or frozen
Vi cup diced celery
!' cup chopped onions
V] cup cauliflower florets, fresh or frozen
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple juice
Blanch all the vegetables in boiling water for 7
minutes; drain. Combine with Gulden's Mustard
and pineapple juice. Store in refrigerator. Serve
with cold or hot meats such as brisket, pas-
trami, corned beef, salami and bologna.
Makes approximately 2 cups.
Cook
it with
GULDEN'
Fruity Mustard Sauce
Vi cup chopped apple
S# ty cup chopped pear
Vi cup chopped canned
cling peaches
Vi cup raisins
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
1 tablespoon cling peach syrup
Blanch apples and pears in boiling water for 5
minutes; drain. Add peaches, raisins, Gulden's
Mustard and peach syrup; stir well. Store in re
frigerator. Serve with cold or hot meals such as
brisket, pastrami, corned beef, salami and
bologna. Makes 2 cups.
The Mustard good enough to cook with
IbikrPim
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Of Florida
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Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel: 534-1004 or 672-0004
_-


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Fn*p.Jfel&H

Celebrate your Independence from
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jU


ly, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridiu Page 6-H
. l ii l n Hi l, i n i'i ill i i'ii'i i i i'i'i II
...with Everyday
Low Prices, Everyday!
VALUABLEl
KRAFT 7-1/4 OZ. BOX
Macaroni
& Cheese
Dinner
(SAVE 33$)
HMBCOUPONHBB
LIMIT ONE BOX
WITH $10 ORDER
GOOD THRU JULY 21.1 982
cPnde
9<
BLUE BONNET limit one pkg with $1 o order
QUARTERS GOOD THRU JULY 21. 1982
QPikk
I
I
I
I
I
Margarine
Margarine LB. PKa
(SAVE 39<)
COUPONS!
19i
iGROCERY"
lAPPETIZERSi
'HOT FOODS'
^YNE GIANT BOLL WHITE OR ASSORTED
Paper Towels ... .59
MUSSELMANS 64 OZ JUG
Apple Juice..... 1.49
ALMAOEN CHABLIS BURGUNDY
NECTAR ROSE RHINE CHENIN BLANC
FRENCH COLOMBARD 1 5 LTR BTL
Dinner
SAVE HEINZ I60Z JAR SAVE
20 Sweet Gherkins .99 so
KRAFT PLAIN OR SMOKED
4.79
PANTRYPRIDE 100CT BOX
Tea Bags........ 1.39
CASERA 8 OZ CAN
Tomato Sauce .. 4/.S9
OCEAN SPRAY 48 OZ BTL
HEARTSOELIGHT CHUNKY PEARS OR
Peaches.
Bathti.su.
20 BBQ Sauce..... 1.39 20
PANTRY PRIDE TWIN PACK.
REGULAR DIPN^HIP 7-1 2OZ BAG
Potato Chips.....79 .10
PANTRY PRIDE YELLOW CLING
PEACHESHALVESOR SLICES OR 16 OZ CAN
BaruettPears... 2/1.00
UNCLE BENS CONVERTED
Rice.......& LB BAG
SUNSWEET REGULAR OR w PULP
40 OZ BTL
Prune Juice.....
20
SOZ CAN
27.99
1.09
ROSATO. BIANCO. LAMBHUSCO
Reunite Wines
CHABCja RHINESKELLER. RHINE
jBBSjjj.
ERNET 750 ML
.180 CT
TL
JAR
BSNTRY PRIDE Vtt.4
Msyotmalso
5JNTBY (IDC REGULAR OR
FJNK4.0Z CAN
Grapefruit
2.99
3.99
1.99
.79
1.(
1.20
60
.21
IC JERGENS LIQUID WHITE BROWN
10 OR BLUE 10 5OZ
Lotion Soap.....
63 QUANT ANAMERA 8 PK 7 OZ BTLS
Malta...........
20 SCHAEFER REGULAR OR LIGHT
Beer.....>*^oz cams 1.79 40
PANTRY PRIDE REGULAR OR MINI
40 Marshmallows .. .49 10
GULDENS SPICY BROWN 8 OZ JAR
Mustard........ 2/.B9 .11
ONLY AT STORES WITH SERVICE OEU COUNTERS ONLY AT STORES W FRESH BAKERIES 0 ., (r-
SAVF large SAVE
WHITE OR YELLOW 1/2 LB omvc
American Kaiser Roils .... 07.79 30
Mllivilfai* JEWISH STYLE __
Cheese.......... 1.39 20 Pumpernickel Bread .95 04
BIL-MAR WHITE MEAT 1 2 LB DELICIOUS MINI CAKE DOZEN
Turkey Roll.........1.29 Donuts.............99 20
ZtON KOSHER SALAMI OR Vt-iM. FILLED W FRUIT EACH
1.89 30 Apple Pie..........1.99 20
BARBECUE^ 8P1ECE BOX__
Chickens.....lb 1.69 Fried Chicken......3.69
2.99 56
1.19 .10
.99 .20
1.19 20
AHUM AHA
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so hiaah onii Mti
6700 SoutA On. Halmi
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tmiri. I. I SW I?** Aw
3100 r-xt to i IW
1770 S 0... inn C (UUn
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ii ;ii sm
.50
.30
REALEMON 32 OZ
2 OZ BOTTLE
KRAFT 1000 ISLAND FRENCH.
I^IANORCAjALINA 1OZ BTL
14 Salad Dressings
PANTRY PRIDE SMOOTH OR
CRUNCHY 2S(5 JAR
30 Peanut Butter..
SUNSHINE VIENI
*>ESUB
PANTRY PRIDE Jl
CHUNK CRUSH 20i
06 Pineapple
SUNSHINE VIENNA FINGERS. HYDROX.
" PEANUT BUTTER
1202 PKG
PANTRY PRIDE JUICE PACK SLICED.
INK CRUSH 20 OZ CAN
.06
1.09 20
1.79 so
.79 20
.34
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1510 S IK rhn rlMrwraor)
7700 rwvn.) |r.M
11 HISI
< "in !
US I I SSi* snm
tPtide
GCJARATfTEED
If you can find tower price*
this week at any other
supermarket. Pantry Pride
will pay you Double the
Difference Just buy 25
different items worth $20
or more at Pantry Pride
Compare prices on the
same items at any other
supermarket If their total
is tower, bring your item-
ized Pantry Pnde register
tape and the other markets
prices on the exact same
items to Pantry Pnde. and
well pay you Double The
Difference In Cash!


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. July 16.1962
Report f rcm lefcarcr |
How Thousands of PLO Fighters Suddenly 'Disappeared'
mother-nenning from total mm. I
eers. "**>l
Continued from Pge 1
their holidays between Nahariya
and Beirut.
ROS MINSTER, Nahariyas
city councilwoman in charge of
tourism, follows with a speech of
her own. "One day after the
ceasefire," she says, "we are
ooen. The beaches are open. We
welcome tourists. And we hope to
offer cruises from here to Beirut,
under an independent sovereign
government in Lebanon."
Despite the brave words, it ie
obvious that tourism has nose
dived in Nahariya and through
out Israel. The constant refrain
from Israeli tourist officials is:
"Go home and tell Americans
that Israel is safe. They should
come and enjoy the country."
Dan Shemama works for
Israeli television. During the war,
he serves in the Israeli army
"making films of Lebanon to be
shown on Israel TV." Now the
batteries of his camera are ex-
hausted. He has used up all his
film. He is resting at a roadside
cafe, sipping a cool drink in the
shade.
"This is a hard war, a cruel
war," he says. "You are fighting
people hiding in houses, behind
trees. Many times, they hid in the
cities among the people and to
find them, you have to shoot at
the town. Many people are gett-
ing hurt."
ISRAELI SOLDIERS have
orders not to shoot at Lebanese
civilians but, he continues, "the
Palestinians are dressed in civil-
ian clothes. There were six Israeli
soldiers standing near a car. They
saw coming a car with women in
it and they let the car pass. In the
back was a Palestinian who shot
at the Israeli car and the ex-
ploded. The Israeli soldiers were
killed."
Dan has been to Beaufort Cas-
tle, the former PLO stronghold.
Along the way, he found "de-
struction on all the main high-
ways and roads. It's a pity, the
Palestinians in Lebanon, because
Lebanon is beautiful. Not in the
south but in the north. It looks
like Switzerland, all the moun-
tains. The beaches are kept
beautifully. The houses are very
well kept. In the north, 60 kilo-
meters north of Beirut, we saw
hiking clubs."
In northern Lebanon, Dan
adds, "there is a resort area. I can
see us going there as a tourist
place, like we can now go to
Egypt."
ONE NIGHT is spent at Kib-
butz Ayeleth Hashahar in the
northern Galilee, a few kilometers
from the Lebanese border. To
supplement its income, the kib-
butz, like others in the area, oper-
ates what it calls "guest houses:"
in this case, three long rows of
two-story buildings in the
American motel mode.
The gounds are tush, a riot of
carefully tended shrubbery and
rose gardens. Kibbutzniks'
homes, semi-detached bunga-
lows, lone the path to the
swimming pool where parents
relax on lounge chairs, kids
splash in the pool and babies run
around naked.
Midway through our dinner, a
two star general and his entour-
age walk in and quietly seat
themselves at a nearby table.
Naturally, they carry their wea-
pons, rifles and submachine
guns. No one (but us) bats an
eye..
The "waitress," a teenager,
Avi, badly burned in the arm, hands and leg. Medical Center by Knesset Speaker Mena-
during the recent fighting in Lebanon, is chem Savidor, accompanied by ShaareZeaek
visited in the Jerusalem's Shaare Zedek Director General, Prof. DavidM. Maeir.
Israeli Forces Are Ordered
Not to Fire on CiviliansBut
PLO Dresses in Civilian Clothes
EVEN THE occasional Arib,J
meet seems to have absorbed SI
solicitous attitude. GrabbmT.I
taxi outside your Jerus*L!l
hotel, you direct the drivWul
take you to the Mea Shearimdkl
trict for a walk around thai
stronghold of ultra-Orthodoxy
It takes a few seconds fc
something out of the ordinary i
register; namely, that there
Arabic writing on the
dashboard and that, in fact7
driver is an Arab.
He takes you to your desti
tion and as you take out
shekels to pay him, he asks,''.
you frum?' No, you answer,]
a curious American tourist. |
you are going to walk around
take pictures, he cautions ki
you*d better be careful.
people here are very strict
they don't like having to
photos taken. If they catch
doing it, and you are alone, i
might make big trouble for you,',
SHABBAT COMES early
Israel. By two or three in the!
Aviv afternoon, most of
shops are already shut. Ba
and post offices are closed.
small neighborhood shul. locau
off Dizengoff Street, is pretty i
side, with reflections of
stained glass in the windo
bouncing off the dark wood
nelling.
The rabbi's sermon,
translated for me, lasts 45 mini!
tes. The recent fighting, hesinJ
reveals a two-fold miracle, FinJ
it was a miracle the country I
the men and material for the s
ation. Second, it was a
that "we had the brains" i
out the battle plan. Each
Israel has experienced and
vived is a miracle, he points <
"God's hand can be seen in i
these wars. Other countries donil
accept this and they will have ul
come to terms with God wanting
Israel to exist."
All Publication Riffcu Kmrvta
hurries over their appetizers,
stuffed cabbage. One of the men
at the table looks familiar. It's
Robert St. John, the distin-
guished columnist. In Israel,
where I know nobody, I am
bumping into people I know.
THE FARTHER north you
go, the more troops and military
equipment you encounter. By the
time you hit the northern Galilee,
the narrow two-lane road, which
probably sees no more traffic or-
dinarily than an occasional kib-
butz tractor or school bus, is
jammed. Soldiers trying to hitch-
hike line both sides. Heavy
trucks rumble up and down it,
day and night.
At Kiryat Shemona slightly
north of Kibbutz Ayeleth Hasha-
har, 80 per cent of the residents
have headed south. They have
not been evacuated; they just de-
cided to take a short "vacation."
A teacher in the elmentary
school indicates the bomb shelter
for one of the apartment com-
plexes. The underground shelter
consists of a couple of rooms, has
its own electricity generator, and
is decorated with school chil-
dren's pictures. When it's not
being used as a shelter, it doubles
as a social club.
THE TEACHER, a young
man is his early 20's is worried,
not about the bombs but about
his students. The children, he
tells you, have developed psy-
chological problems because of
the shelling over the past few
years. They can't concentrate on
their work. School is also closed
during rocket attacks, so they've
lost a lot of school time.
But the teacher has remained
voluntarily at Kiryat Shemona,
which sustained only slight dam-
age in the recent attack. Asked
why he stays if it's so dangerous,
he replies. "Running away is not
our way. If the Israelis would run
away from the problem, they
would run away from Israel and
go to New York."
Going to Israel is like going to
a family reunion, a family you
never knew you had. The food is
the kind your mother makes, il
she's a good cook. The faces are
vaguely familiar. Almost every-
one you meet speaks English.
Most importantly, the attitude
you encounter is a kind of
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- ,. .I,'**-*"
Friday, July 16, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Judge Faske
Alvin Goldberg, Executive Vice President of Mount Sinai Med-
ical Center, was honored recently at the annual Installation
Banquet of the South Florida Hosptial Association (SFHA)
held at Turnberry Isle Country Club. Recognized for his many o 1 t
years of service to the Board of Directors of the Hospital As so- ijGCKS ReeleCtiOIl
ciation, Mr. Goldberg received a plaque from John P. Lauri,.
Chairman of the SFHA Board and Administrator of Miami] Dade Circu't Judge Adele
Heart Institute. Segall Faske has qualified to run
for reelection in the 11th Judicial
District Juvenile Court Division.
A native Miamian who won
national acclaim when she headed
the Non-Support Division of the
Dade State Attorney's Office,
Judge Faske was the first woman
in Florida to be appointed a state
prosecutor.
She was named to the position
in 1953 by then Governor Dan
McCarty, and later reappointed
by Governor Leroy Collins, serv-
ing as an assistant state attorney
until her election to the circuit
bench in 1976.
Horrowitz JWV
Plan Events
The Abe Horrowitz Ladies Au-
xiliary and Post 682, Jewish War
Veterans will host a games party
for hospitalized veterans in the
VA. Hospital on Saturday, July
24 at 7 p.m. Hosts will be Phyllis
Shaw, Elsie Cireebel, Herbert
Bergen and Harry Lopchinsky.
The Auxiliary will hold their
regular breakfast meeting on
Sunday, July 25 at 9:30 a.m. at
their building, NE 160 St. and 19
Place, North Miami Beach. After
the meeting, Claire Natter,
Chairlady of Senior Citizens Pro-
jects, and her committee, will
proceed to Greynolds Park
Manor Rehabilitation Center,
where a party will be held to cele-
brate the birthdays of those resi-
dents having birthdays in July.
Pictured are (left to right) the three generation "Imma" family,
Mrs. David Reinhard (Arline), Mrs. Jennie Blank, aunt to Ar-
line and Hermia and sister of Mrs. Beckie Reinhard, Mrs. Bec-
kie Reinhard and Mrs. Seymour Reinhard (Hermia) of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy Women.
>oooooooooeoooc
tOYAL HUNGARIAN IfflRESTAUl
Serving most delicious food
at reasonable prices
Our 36th Anniversary Year
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
Free Self Parking Now Available
Cloaes Monday t Saturday
tot
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The City of Miami Beach
& Lincoln Savings & Loan
Present the
Ramat Gan Musicians in an
evening of music
at The
Theatre of the
Performing Arts
July 21st-7:3QPM
Free Seating For 3,000 People
You Do Not Need A Ticket To Attend
Ybu are Invited to
this free concert co-
sponsored by Lincoln
Savings. The evening
of music features
Israel. The young
musicians are some of
Israel's most talented.
They will perform
symphonies, light
bands from Israel. The classics to musicals
60 student musicians and a selection of
are from Ramat Israeli Folk songs. No
Gan.. .which Is Miami tickets are required so
Beach's Sister city In come early for the
best seats.
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Association
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For More Information: 534-3600
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PageqO-B The Jewish-Fkmdian / Friday; fttty it, Iflfe
Weddings
Af rs. ,/?i*a Schoenberg
Schoenberg-Goldsmith
Susan Harliss Schoenberg, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Marvin Schoenberg of Miami, and Gary
Michael Goldsmith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Goldsmith of Athens. Georgia, were married June
27 at Temple Sinai in Atlanta.
Leslie Schoenberg was her sister's maid of
honor. Also attending the bride were Calianne
Lantz and Pam Garringer of Miami, Jean Gold-
smith of New York City and Marianne Montgom-
ery of St. Petersburg, Florida.
Marc Wank of Madison, Wisconsin was best
man. Also attending the bridegroom were Ken
Gross and Jerry Benda of Atlanta, John Budkie-
wicz of Portland. Maine and Alan Bush of Aspen,
Colorado.
Susan received her master's degree from
Florida State University and is a flight attendant
with Delta Airlines. She is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Celia Ross and the late Samuel Ross of
Miami; and the late Mr. and Mrs. Harry Schoen-
berg of Atlanta.
Scott is a graduate of Tufts University and the
Universary of Georgia, and is an attorney with an
Atlanta firm. He is the grandson of Mrs. Blanka
Goldsmith and the late Herman Goldsmith; and
the late Mr. and Mrs. Herman Hirsch, all of New
York City and Frankfurt, Germany.
The couple will make their home in Atlanta.
Sager-Dickler
Mindy Sager. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy
Sager of North Miami Beach, and Marc Dickler,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Dickler of Yardley,
Pa., were married July 4 at Beth Torah Congre-
gation. Rabbi Chaim Richter and Rabbi David
Saltzman officiated.
The bride's attendants included Mrs. Sam
I>eham-Wilzig of Israel, matron of honor, Mrs.
Alan Rothstein of.Atlanta, Arlene Dickler of
Plainsboro, N.J., Pam Dickler of Yardley, Pa. and
Ariella Soffer of New York City.
Dr. Alan Rothstein of Atlanta was best man.
The bride wore a Chantilly lace gown with a
lace mantilla headpiece.
Mindy is a graduate of the University of
Florida with a BA in special education and
Florida International Universary with an MS in
learning disability.
Marc received his BS from Rider College in
Lawrenceville, N.J. and is employed at Caplan,
Morrison. Brown and Co. The couple will reside in
Kendall Lakes.
Mrs. Marc Dickler
Kendale Lakes Condo.
Reduced for quick sale.
2/2 wallpapered, mirrored,;
fans, pool, sauna. Terms
available. 944-7114.
Cantor Wanted
For High Holidays
Conservative
Call 887-9595 9 a.m. noon
or 822-4896
ANEW
PROGRAM
for
Learning Disabled Students
built upon the richness
of a Jewish tradition
provided by
THE SOUTH DADE
HEBREW ACADEMY
and
THE
LEARNING
WORKSHOP______________
Individualized instruction by certified teachers
of the learning disabled in general academic
subjects and Judaic studies.
School opens August 30,1982 at 11801 SW 74th
Avenue.
For more information call 595-8232.
Sherwin-Stiss
Betsy Ann Sherwin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Sherwin of Evanston, and Carey Anthony
Stiss, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Stiss of Miami,
were married in a May 30 ceremony.
The bride's attendants included her sisters.
Wendy Sherwin, as maid of honor; Sally Sherwin
Rotenberg and Jane Sherwin Shapiro, and her
bridegroom's sisters, Rebecca and Sarah Stiss.
Best man was Joseph Pinsker, and Joseph
Shapiro, the bride's nephew, was ringbearer.
The couple is living in Miami, where the bride-
groom is employed at Mershon, Sawyer, John-
ston, Dunwody and Cole. He was graduated
magna cum laude from Tulane University, New
Orleans, and with honors from the University of
Florida Law School.
His bride has assumed a position in the legal
department of Burger King Corp. She was grad-
uated from Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y.
and Emory University Law School, Atlanta.
Beach Offers Hurricane Book
The 1982 revised edition of the
City of Miami Beach's Hurricane
Preparedness Booklet are availa-
ble without charge at the city's
public information office, fourth
floor. City Hall.
Gerald Schwartz, Beach public
relations executive, has been re-
elected chairman of the City of
Miami Beach Hurricane Defense
Committee, which prepared the
booklet in cooperation with the
public information department
headed by Zeke George.
Dr. Richard Schwartz, was
elected vice chairman of the Hur-
ricane Committee.
Other members of the new
committee include Mac Weill,
Lawrence Preiss, Nathan
Babroff, Julius Sand, Dr. Donald
Applebaum, Fred Wang together
with the city manager, city at-
torney, police chief and fire chief.
Schwartz said the city's master
plan for hurricane preparedness
and possible evacuation have
been completely updated for this
year,' with the fire and police de-
partments having major respon-
sibilities for implementation.
Individuals who require assis-
tance in evacuating their homes
are requested to register now
with the fire department, Dr.
Schwarz said.
DAVID M. TOBOLOWSKY, M.D.
Is Pleased To Announce The Opening
Of His Practice Of Psychiatry
Series Presents
Godunov Ballet
The International Series will
present the "Greatest Evening of
Ballet Ever" with the world re-
nowned young Russian Ballet
Defector, Alexander Godunov
(American Ballet Theatre star
and leading dancer from the
Bolshoi Ballet) and his Company
of Ballet Stars, on Saturday, July
24 at 8 p.m. in the Miami Beach
Theatre of the Performing Arts.
Included in the company will
be Rebecca Wright and Eleanor
d'Antuono (Joffrey Ballet-
American Ballet Theatre) and
Vanessa Harwood (National
Ballet of Canada).
The program includes four
Florida premiere ballets;
"Paganini," "The Dream," "Yes,
Virginia," and "Three Easy
Tangos."
Latin Americans
Hold Bond Dinner
The Latin American Jewish
community of Miami and The
State of Israel Bond Organiza-
tion have announced a "Solidari-
ty Dinner with Israel" on Satur-
day, July 24, at the Konover
Hotel in Miami Beach.
The dinner is the first ever bet-
ween the Latin community and
State of Israel Bonds. The group
consists of Jews from Peru, Colu-
mbia, Argentina, Nicaragua,
Venezuela, and other South
American countries now residing
in Miami. .__
On July 1, 1982
DADELAND MEDICAL BUILDING SUITE *OB 7400 NORTH KENDALL DRIVE MIAMI. FLORIDA 33156 i ------------------------------- offici hour* By appointment (305) 271-6667 1
FOREIGN CAR
|VANAND4WD
SPECIALIST
NO. 11N THE AREA FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE
AATCO TRANSMISSION
MAINTENANCE SPECIAL
FREE NATIONWIDE
WARRANTY INCt CANADA
TRANSMISSION LEAKING'
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TRANSMISSION SI IMPING'
Fill U POINT CHECK UP
FIEE Towmc
We honor extended new car
warranties
MIC, CIM end more
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SIMM CITIfl" MSCMNT
ON H1MW KPtm SAW
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i s r*
North Dade
19401 NW2ndAvt)(441)
652-2844
Plantation/
Sunrise
426 North
State Rd. 7(44t)
(4 Blks N oi Brwd Bird)
587-7040
^^ornpano-"
2301 Federal Hwy.
Wesiol Federal
on Copani Rd.
(Neat to
Goodyear Tire)
7622787____
North Miami Beach
Corner of 152nd St At
W. Dixie) Hwy
947-7722
Marge te
670 N. St. Rd. *7(441)
In front of K Marl
Shopping Center Neil
to Denny's Restaurant!
974-9200
Ft. lauderdaler
Oakland Pk
1139E. Comm Bird.
(1 Block Eatl ol
Dme Hwy I
491 '290
A BAGEL
A bagel is defined as a hard doughnut-shaped roll simmered in
hot water for two minutes before baking, then glazed with egg
whites. This definition only begins to explain this Jewish won-
der. You can buy plain bagels, egg bagels, onion, wholewheat or
salted bagels. They can be sandwiched *with cream cheese,
butter, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomatoes, onion's or simply spread
with jam. Bagels make great pizzas, too.
Bagels are useful. They harden, can be painted and preserved.
They are seen on tables as center pieces and used as key rings.
Children use them as toys, ring toss, shuffle board, race them
with a long stick and roll them, and paint them for counters. Ba-
gels are a perfect example of a circle, are good window pulls and
excellent elephant earrings.
Bagels are breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks. People are
found eating them in the middle of the night. They are dunkable
in coffee or soup. We freeze them, heat them in the oven, serve
them hot or cold. People who cannot live without bagels are cal-
led bagelholics.


Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And Moses gave unto God Reuben and unto the
half-tribe of Manasseh the kingdom ofSihon" (Num. 32.331.
MATTOT
MATTOT Moses informed the tribal heads regarding the
laws concerning vows. He sent 12,000 armed men (1,000 from
each tribe) to war with the Midianites. The expedition was
successful. Among those killed was Balaam. The tribes of
Reuben and Gad, who had large herds of cattle, asked to be
allowed to settle on grazing land in Transjordan. Moses agreed,
on condition that these tribes lead the other tribes across the
Jordan, and not return to Transjordan until all their brother
tribes had been provided for. Part of the tribe of Manasseh con-
quered half of Gilead, and were granted it for their territory.
. "Three cities beyond the Jordan, and three cities.
Canaan; they shall be cities of refuge." (Num. 35.14).
MASE
M ASE The portion begins with a detailed account of the var-
ious way stations on the Israelites' route to the Promised Land,
from the time they left Egypt until they reached the plains of
Moab, by the Jordan at Jericho. Instructions concerning the ap-
portionment of the land followed. "And ye shall inherit the land
by lot according to your families to the more ye shall give the
more inheritance, and to the fewer thou shalt give the less in-
heritance: wheresoever the lot falleth to any man that shall be
his" {Numbers 33.54). It was necessary that all the Canaanites
be expelled "But if ye will not drive out the inhabitants of the
land from before you, then shall those that ye let remain of them
be as thorns in your eyes, and as pricks in your sides, and they
shall harass you in the land wherein ye dwell" {Numbers 33.55).
The portion gives specific instructions concerning the
boundary lines' and lists the names of the persons who should di-
vide the land. The Israelites are commanded to set aside 48 cities
and surrounding lands for the Levites, who have not been given
territory as the other tribes were. Reference is made to the cities
of refuge where the accidental murderer might flee for safety.
The portion, and book of Numbers, ends with an injunction pro-
hibiting the transfer of inherited land from one tribe to another
through inter-tribal marriage.
(The recounting of Hit Weekly Portion of the Low is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. wollman
Tsamlr, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at IS Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. loon. Joseph Schiang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
Robert Sechen has been
chosen chairman-elect of the
Executive Council of the Eco-
nomics and Management of
Law Practice Section of the
Florida Bar. Sechen is a mem-
ber of the law firm of Smith &
Mandler.
Israeli Musicians
in Beach Concert
Lincoln Savings and the City
of Miami Beach will sponsor a
free concert on July 21 starting at
7:30 p.m. There will be 3,000
seats available.
Sixty young musicians from
Israel will perform at The
Theatre of the Performing Arts.
The Evening of Music will be
filled with the sounds of sym-
phonies, classical, popular favor-
ites, as well as Israeli folk songs.
These Israeli musicians are on
tour of the USA. They are stu-
dents under conductor Dov
Ronen, from the city of Ramat
(an which is Miami Beach's
Sister City in Israel.
Lincoln's Ramat Gan Evening
of Music is co-sponsoring this
event with the City of Miami
Beach as a public service.
wooooooooo
ooeoooooooooooocooooooooooooooooo
NEW ORTHODOX SYNAGOGUE
A. of Sunny Isles
Will Conduct:
High Holyday Services
at the
Desert Inn, Collins Ave. & 173rd St. (across from Rascal House)
V*
Yom Kippur
Sun. Eve. Sept. 26th
Mon. All day. Sept. 27th
Rosh Hashanah
Friday Eve. Sept. 17th
Sat. 1st day, Sept. 18th
Sun. 2nd day,Sept. 19th
Please Note: Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, our neighbor, has volunteered to officiate and
preach on Yom Kippur:
Kol Nidre. Sun. Eve. Sept. 26th
Yizkor. Mon. 1 P.M.. Sept. 27th
Neilah, Mon. Eve. Sept. 27th
Limited Space-Seat Reservations, $25.-Call 261-6877
* *Everyone Welcome For Yizkor*
Rabbi Dobin will officiate at SelichosSat. Nite, Sept. 11. Midnight
ALL ARE WELCOME
Thf Jewish BcridfaiR
fl.rl.i'i Mttt Ctapltt* Iaflith-ltiih Wtakli
Printmd la KovliMh
^W 9 WMmmW to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? 1 Year $18.00 Q 2 Years $34.00
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a m-nn. mmh.i
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P.O.
I nv
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*tad
Friday, July 16.1982 / The Jewish Meridian Page 11-B
Symphony for Beth Sholom
The London Symphony
Orchestra, conducted by Neville
Marriner with cellist Lynn Har-
rell as soloist, will appear in its
South Florida premiere per-
formance under the auspices of
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami at the Miami Beach
Theatre of the Performing Arts
on Thursday, July 22 at 8 p.m.
The London Symphony was
founded in 1904.
Marriner began his early career
as a violinist, playing with
several ensembles and orchestras
including the London Symphony
which he will be conducting in its
local appearance.
Cellist Lynn Harrell appear
frequently with Vladimir
Ashkenazy and Itzhak Perl man.
The event is presented by Cul-
tural Arts Director Judy
Drucker.
T
Synagogue
Listings
Candlelightlng Time: 7:56
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Mlnmi-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Frl.. Rabbi OoMeteln will (peak on
"ReMacUoiM on Miami."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: M2S S.W. 3rd Avenue
South Dede 7M0 S.W. 120th Straat
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. UPSON
Friday, 8 p.m. South Dade Chapel
Saturday, 9 a.m. Coral Way
Shebbat Samoa* Conducted by
RabM Da*M M. Auerbaoh
Cantor William W. Llpaon
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Daily Minyan Services 7:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington A
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Sat. mom. Service 9 a.m.
Dr. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Frl Eve. 7 pm Sal. 9 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
Mamrs Homer Astaen QMMfjaflM
137 NE. 19th St. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: HaskeN M. Bemat
Aaat Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Safcin
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstein
Frt-s p.m.-Rabbl Saftln will preach.
Kandill-An evening ot Song and Worship
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
CoralGabies 667-5657
MKheel B. EJeenetat. Rabbi
Frl p.m.-Ouoet NabM fUchanl Horwlch.
Ouoet Soletot Marshall WaMman.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 UncolnRd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH, President
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m. Sat 930 am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinket
Daily services 8.15 a.m. 5 p.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowite
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. MB, Fl. 33139
Tet 5384112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Metber
Cantor Saul H. Breeh
Dally Service 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.
Friday 7:15 p.m.Saturday 8:30 am
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave,
Miami Beach, 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovta
CantorEdward KWn
Frida y services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW154 Circle Court #111
Miami. Fl. Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 3624)698
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41 si St
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi
Cantor David Convtser
Frl Evening 8:15 p.m
Sat. morn. 10:45 a.m.
538-7231
Liberal
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Upschttz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Fri. Evening Service MO pm
Sat. Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
DaHy Services: 7:30 a.m.-S:30 p.m
BINICAL ASSOCIATION-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone 5764000
Rabbi Solomon ScMff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Ojocerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 57*4000
RaobtnicaiAssctMrtion Office
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsiey. Rabbi 932-9010
Jutien I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shutkes, Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath eve services 6:15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday of month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
Frl. 7:30 p.m. Family Worship
Services.
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benismln Dickson. Cantor
Minysn Services Mon 6 Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
Quaata Are Welcome
--------SOUTHEAST AEgI6N-------
UNITEO SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 ME 1 Mrd St.. N Miami Seech. Ft. S31S2
Mr-eOM. Harold Wlahna. SSSSSttM director.
FrenkHn Q. Kroetaw. regional praaldani.
UU.6rJOrAME-R.CAN----------
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Dora I Executive Office Park, STBS
NW 82 Ave, Suite 210, Miami. Fl.
33166. 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional director


rage iz-ti The Jewish Floridian / Friday, Jury 16,1&2
World Jewish Congress President Edgar M.
Bronfman calls for prevention of nuclear
holocaust in remarks to a Special Session on
Disarmament on June 25 at the United
Nations. In his speech, marking the first
time an international Jewish organization
addressed the General Assembly, Bronfman
told the assembled delegates that the charge
that Zionism is racism is an abomination.
Headlines
Jacobson Reports Emigration's Decline
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman of the Soviet
Jewry Research Bureau of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, says that only 182 Jews
arrived in Vienna, with Israeli visas, from the So-
viet Union during June. This figure, Jacobson re-
ports, is a 96 percent fall from the nearly 4,500
Jews who received exit visas in June, 1979, a peak
year for Jewish emigration, and represents the
sharpest decline since effective emigration began
in 1971.
"The situation for Soviet Jewry is desperate," j
Jacobson says. "Every refusenik is under seige as
the Soviet authorities wage a calculated cam-
paign to smother Jewish emigration an activ-
ism."
Following careful evaluation of the emigration
statistics for the first half of this year, Jacobson
implored U.S. officials to "place the Soviet Jew-
ish issue high atop its agenda in future negotia-
tions with the Soviet Union."
It is 47 years since Menachem Begin's gradua-
tion from the University of Warsaw. During his
recent visit to New York, he got a souvenir of it.
Last year in Jerusalem, he asked a favor of Jerzy
Kuberski, then-Poland's Minister of Religious
Affairs: Could he get a copy of Begin's academic
transcript? Kuberski promised to try. Kuberski
several weeks ago entrusted the transcript to
Rabbi Philip Hiat of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, who was visiting Poland in
connection with the UAHC's cultural exchange
program with Polish institutions.
When Rabbi Hiat returned to New York, he de-
livered the transcript to his boss, Rabbi Alex-
ander M. Schindler, a close friend of Begins. In a
private meeting, Rabbi Schindler surprised the
Prime Minister by handing over the transcript.
Reform Rabbis have deferred for further study
a statement that would have accepted the chil-
dren of a mixed marriage as Jewish if either the
father or mother is a Jew.
At their 93rd annual meeting in New York,
members of the Central Conference of American
Rabbis debated this statement for three hours,
which resulted from a two-year study by their
Committee on Patrilineal Descent, chaired by the
Central Conference of American Rabbis Presi-
dent, Rabbi Herman E. Schaalman of Chicago.
The Patrilineal statement that was presented
for action said, "Where only one of the parents is
Jewish, the Jewishness of a child is derivable
from the Jewish parent, and is expressed by par-
ticipation in Jewish life."
Banking executives from 23 countries have
completed a five-day International Banking Con-
ference in Tel-Aviv conducted by Bank Leumi le-
Israel.
Despite the war in Lebanon, 135 bank officials
| completed a series of meetings with top Israeli
political and economic leaders, visits to key in-
dustrial and development sites, and special
events to familiarize themselves with Israel, its
economy and potential for international com-
merce.
Participants represented 123 correspondent
banks of Banks Leumi from Australia, Austria,
Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France,
Germany, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, Nor-
way, Panama, Portugal, Rumania, South Africa,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.
United States, Venezuela and Zimbabwe. Israel's
largest financial body, Bank Leumi, hosted the
conference on the occasion of its 80th anniversa-
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
has declined a National Council of Churches o'f
Christ invitation to meet on the situation in
Lebanon because, according to the NCCC's news
release, participants will include a group that
actively supports the aims and policies of the ter-
rorist Palestine Liberation Organization.
Bishop James Armstrong, president of the
NCCC, invited ADL, other Jewish agencies, and
the Palestine Congress of North America the
group which caused ADL to decline to meet
with NCCC communions.
In a letter to Bishop Armstrong, ADL's
national director, Nathan Perlmutter, said in
part: "You oropose that we meet with repre-
sentatives oi '.ie Palestine Congress of North
America. We decline. It is difficult to understand
the insensitivity reflected by such a suggestion,
given the fact that that organization is actively
engaged in support of the PLO and its policies."
The National Council of Jewish Women, long
active in the campaign for women's rights, in-
cluding the ratification of the Equal Rights
Amendment, participated in "A New Day: Be-
yond ERA" rallies across the country earlier this
month.
Representing NCJW, National Board Member
Joan Bronk told a gathering at New York's City
Hall that, "Despite setbacks, the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women is pledged to work for an
Equal Rights Amendment and to support
legislative efforts at all levels of government that
will ensure equality of opportunity for women in
all areas."_________________________________
The writings of an early Jewish psychologist of
the unconscious, whose group-sensitivity sessions
were the precursors of methods now used by such
diverse groups as Alcoholics Anonymous and
marriage-encounter therapies, have been analyzed
for the first time in a new book by Dr. Hillel Gold-
berg, lecturer in modern Jewish ethics and intel-
lectual history in the Rothberg School for Over-
seas Studies at the Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem.
Israel Salanter (1810-1883) was an East Euro-
pean rabbi who wrote only in Hebrew, read no
French, spoke only one language fluently (Yid-
dish), was steeped in ancient Aramaic literature
(Talmud), never traveled outside Lithuania before
he was 48..
Broadaway Elected AMA Trustee
1 Rufus K. Broadaway M.D. has
recently been elected to the
American Medical Association
Board of Trustees at the annual
meeting of the American Medical
Association.
Dr. Broadaway has taken an
active role in several local and
state medical organizations in-
cluding serving as President of
both the Florida Medical Political
Action Committee, and the Dade
County Medical Association. He
also was Chairman of the Dade
County Health Resources Task
Force, the American Medical As-
sociation Council, President of
the Medical Staff and Chief of
Surgery at Cedars of Lebanon
Health Care Center.
Dr. Broadaway is a Clinical
Professor of surgery at the Uni-
versity of Miami, a Diplomat* of
the American Board of Surgery
and a Fellow of the American
College of Surgeons.
Dr. Rufus Broadaway M.D.
Dr. Seekinger Heads Medical Group]
Daniel Seckinger, M.D., Di-
rector of Laboratories and Chief
of Pathology since 1961 at Cedars
of Lebanon Health Care Center,
has recently been elected
President-Elect of the Dade
County Medical Association.
Dr. Seckinger's professional
involvement includes member-
ship in the Florida Medical Asso-
ciation and the American Medical
Association. He is a Fellow of the
American Society of Clinical
Pathologists, the College of
American Pathologists and Past-
President of the Florida Society
of Pathologists. He has recently
been elected Chairman of Cedars'
Cancer Committee. Dr. Seckinger
serves on the Boards of Directors
of the South Florida Blood Serv-
ice and the American Cancer
Society and is Clinical Associate
Professor of Pathology at the
University of Miami Medical
School.
Dr. Daniel Seckinger
Community Corner
Florida State Representative Hal Spaet (Democrat-Miami
Beach) has been appointed Chairman of the Jails and Prisons
Committee of the Florida Crime Prevention Commission. Spaet
also serves on the Governor's Task Force on Crime and the El-
derly.
"Nine Narrow Miles," a timely motion picture describing the
activities of the Palestine Liberation Organization, will be fea-
tured at the "Israel in Miami" program sponsored by the South
Dade Jewish Community Center on July 27 at 8 p.m.
State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner Bill Gunter I
[qualified for reelection. Gunter, who will celebrate his 48th
birthday, became Florida's 20th State Treasurer on November |*
10, 1976 and was elected to a full four-year term in 1978.
Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Doyle Conner announc-
ed that he will seek reelection to the Cabinet post he has held
since 1961. He has since been re-elected five times, four without
opposition.
College students and recent grads will have a party at Temple
Beth Am, South Miami, Saturday, July 17, starting at 8 p.m.
Offices Move
The law firm of Silver & Silver,
Max R. Silver and Ira S. Silver,
have relocated their offices to 150
S.E. 2 Ave., Suite 1326, Miami,
Fla. 33131
CANTOR
Israeli, High Tenor, Bar-Mltzvah
Teacher, Good Cantorial Ren-
ditions, Seeking Hlgh-Holydays,
Part Time, Or Yearly Posi^
Call Benny Evenings: 673W
ilcddlFiajn
ruritCi <:>!.!. iifiiikit.uk ttiki.
Prtnttd In EngliBh /
f lorecc.t- 1H( jt WISH FLORIDIAN every weekindi *e
I my keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community end throughout the worm
I Enclosed pleese find check Enter my NEW subscription lor
QlYear $18.00 Q 2 Year* $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLV
Name:
Address:
riiw
'* MMAHCWcht P.****** TNI MM FLOIOI*. I P.O %m%\ ?tn M.am, ri*i))Hi

'-



'
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
' CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANP FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. IJ-3J3
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MAKIA ELENA DUQUE.
Petitioner,
and
EMILIOLEONEL TORRES,
Respondent.
TO: EMILIOLEONEL
TORRES
c-o Sonla Almeida
633 Montgomery St.
Elizabeth,
N.J. 07202
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1880 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 206, Miami, Florida 33136.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 23, 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
' plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of June,
nix:1.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
17926 June 25;
________________July 2, 9. 16. \W2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 9591 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AURA MORALES
Petitioner-Wife
and
MODESTO MORALES
Respondent-Husband
TO: MODESTO MORALES
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
LOUIS R. BELLER, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 238,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 30. 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of June,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C.Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
17952 July 2, 9;
___________________ 16, 23. 1982
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82 9176 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
BANK AKIN BANJO
Petitioner-Husband
and
BARBARA ANNE BANJO
Respondent-Wife
TO: Barbara Anne Banjo
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N.E. 193 Street. Miami,
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
23, 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
SffLS* mU court ttt Miami,
f lorida on this June 16,1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN, ESQ.
2750 N.E. 193 Street
Miami, Florida 33180
Telephone: 949-8825
Attorney for Petitioner
June 25;
July 2, 9,16.JJJB2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOC COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 2*11
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Dorothy Halperln
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Dorothy Halperln, de-
ceased, File Number 82-2611, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, FL. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 9, 1982.
Personal Representative:
Arthur Halperln
16 Sarah Drive
Old Bethpage,
New York 11804
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Shirley Z. Kaufman
ZEMELAND
KAUFMAN, PA.
3550 Biscayne Boulevard,
Suite 603
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (3051573-1811
17977 July 9, 16. 1982
Friday, July 16, 1982 / The Jewish Ftoridian Page 13-B
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLOR IDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 82 8186
NOTICE OF
NAME CHANGE
IN RE: DANIELLE ELISE
BORRASAS PEDROSA,
a minor by and
through her mother
and legal guardian,
JOYCE GINSBERG.
TO: JORGE BORRASAS
PEDROSA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the PETI-
TION FOR CHANGE OF
NAME with the Court's Clerk,
and mall a copy of same to Pe-
titioner's Attorney, ALBERT
WILENSKY. ESQ., 819 Dupont
Plaza Center, 300 Biscayne
Blvd. Way, Miami. Florida
33131 on or before the 6 of Au-
gust, 1982. else Petition will be
taken as confessed.
DATED this 29th day of June,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
By C. L. Alexander DC
ALBERT WILENSKY.
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Petitioner
819 Dupont Plaza Center
300 Biscayne Blvd. Way
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (3051368-3570
17964 July 2, 9;
16, 23,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Re-
sort Time-Sharing Internation-
al at 17070 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach, Florida 33180 Dade
County Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Gabriel Shantzls
Realty Corp.
17070Collins Ave.,
Suite No. 218
Miami Beach. Fl. 33160
17974 July 9,16;
______________28, 30,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Al-
welss Enterprises at 1451 East
10th Avenue. Hialeah. Florida
33010, Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Ira's Trust No. 1
Alan's Trust No. 1
Jack's Trust No. 1
Melvln's Trust No. 1
Louis Alweiss
Cella Alweiss
17970 July 9,16;
23, 30, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW.
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Decor Lamps at 3383 NW 7 St.,
Suite 308, Miami, FI. 33125 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
E.V. Inc., owner
Enrique Vails,
president
17928 June 25;
July 2, 9, 16. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
I FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
' NOTICE IS HEREBY
3IVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
JAFFLES at number 7501
Dadeland Mall. FC-16. In the
City of Miami. Florida. Intends
to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
23 day of June, 1962.
JAFFLESOF
AMERICA, INC.
BY: PETERBUEHRLE
President
LAMCHICK, GLUCKSMAN
& JOHNSTON
By: BRUCE LAMCHICK
Attorney for Applicant
10651 North Kendall Dr.
Suite 217
Miami. Florida 33176
17940 July2,9;
16, 23, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engate In business
under the fictitious name of
JAFFLES & JUICES at num-
ber 7501 Dadeland Mall. FC-16.
in the City of Miami, Florida,
Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County*
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
23 day of June, 1982.
JAFFLESOF
AMERICA, INC.
By: PETERBUEHRLE
President
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN
& JOHNSTON
H\ URUCK LAMCHICK
Attorney for Applicant
10651 North Kendall Dr
Suite 217
Miami. Fl, 33176
17941 July 2, 9;
16, 23.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name MET
SHOE REPAIR at 917 East 8th
Avenue, Hialeah. Florida In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
PEDRO and ANTONIA
BELLO
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
Attorney for BELLO
17942 July 2,9;
16, 23, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name The
Modern Florida Democrat at
12555 Biscayne Boulevard,
Suite 963, North Miami. Florida
33181 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
JohnT. Vincent
17943 July 2. 9;
16.23.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Number: 82-9448
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
FOR SUIT FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of:
FRANCISCO A. VELES
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARINA CASTILLO VELES,
Respondent-Husband
TO: MARINA CASTILLO
VELES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED to file your answer to
other pleading with the Court's
Clerk, and mall a copy of said
answer to DANIEL M. KEIL,
Attorney for the Petitioner,
whose office is located at 3165
West 4th Avenue, Hialeah,
Florida on or before the 23 day
of July, 1982, else Default shall
be taken against you.
DATED this 21 day of June,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: L. C. Bedasse
DANIEL M. KEIL,
ESQUIRE
ATTORNEY FOR
THE PETITIONER
3166 West 4th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Telephone: (305)883-8600-01
17935 June 26;
____________July 2, 9,16,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
ASOCIACION MEDICA DE
GRADUADOS DE UNIVER-
SIDADES ESPANOLAS
"PREMIO PERIODISTICO
DR. GUILLERMO MAR-
TINEZ MARQUEZ" at 1797
Coral Way. Miami. Florida
33145 Intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Manuel Azugaray
17930
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 534*
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLARA B. DENNER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of CLARA B. DENNER,
deceased, File Number 82-5346,
is pending in the Circuit Court
(or Dade County. Florida,
I'robate Division, the address
>>l which Is Dade County Court-
house 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
i- i any objection by an lnter-
(sted person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 9.1982.
Personal Representative:
ELLIOTT YALE
DENNER
11650 N.E. 21 Drive
North Miami. FL 33181
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPEN&CYPEN
825 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305)532-4721
By: IrvlngCypen
17979 July 9.16. 1982
I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name My
Place at 107 NE 79 St., Miami,
FL Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
SaraDenhard,
Owner
17980 July 16, 23, 30;
___________________August 6, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name VIL-
I.AMOR REPAIR at 10358 S W
25th Street. Miami, Florida
33165 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Jose Vlllamor
17929 June 25;
________________July 2, 9,16, 1982
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-7137 (13)
NOTICE OF SUIT
AURELIOMACIPE-
REYES and MARIA TERESA
CAPE DE MACIPE, his
wife.
Plaintiffs.
V8.
NOR MA P. CASTILLO.,
MANUEL A.
CASTILLO. JR..
MARIA CASTILLO, his wife, et
al.,
Defendants.
TO: THE JEFFERSON
INDUSTRIES
COMPANY,
an Iowa Corporation
c-o Resident Agent -
CLOYCED.
PALMER
601 S. 23rd Street
Fairfleld,
Iowa 52656
YOU. THE JEFFERSON IN-
DUSTRIES COMPANY, an
Iowa Corporation, are hereby
notified that a Complaint For
Mortgage Foreclosure has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Amended Complaint For Mort-
gage Foreclosure on Plaintiffs'
attorney, RONALD L. DAVIS.
ESQ., Suite 407, 1660 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive, North
Miami Beach, Florida 33179,
Phone No. (306) 940-2852 and
file the original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Dade County. 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130.
on or before the 20 day of Au-
gust, 1982. If you fall to do so.
judgment by default will be
taken against you fr the relief
demanded in the Complaint
For Mortgage Foreclosure.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED, at
Miami, Florida, this 12 day of
July. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: K. Selfrled
DEPUTY CLERK
(CIRCUITCOURTSEAL)
" z 0(, ivinvuii \z^ui\i ocAi<;
' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number (1-4035
Division tl
(NRE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL H. O'NEIL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of SAMUEL H. O'NEIL,
deceased, File Number 81-4035,
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida, 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested.persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FORE VER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 9,1982.
ABRAHAM A GALBUT,
Personal Representative.
ABRAHAM A.
GALBL'T. ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HOWARD N. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT& MENIN,
PA..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
Publish: Jewish Florldlan
17976
July 9, 16.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FIC TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Pasteur Medical Center at
number 3233 Palm Avenue, In
the City of Hialeah, Florida,
intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
1st day of July, 1982.
Ismael Hernandez.
President
CL1N1CAS
PASTEUR, INC.
Mitchell Mandler
Attorney for Applicant
Smith & Mandler. P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall,
8th Floor
Miami Beach, FL33139
17972 July 9. 16;
23. 30, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name C A L
Associates at P.O. Box 61-2004.
North Miami, Florida 33161 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Clarice Hausman
Leona Hausman
17927 June 25:
July 2. 9,16. 19J32
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
, CASE NO. 82 10152
IN RE: THE MATTER OF
BRIAN RICHARD
McPHERSON.
a Minor
and
MELISSA PAM McPHER-
SON
A Minor.
TO: THOMAS McPHERSON
Residence Unknown
NOTICE OF
ACTION
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for a Change of Name
for BRIAN RICHARD
McPHERSON. a minor child
and MELISSA PAM McPHER-
SON, a minor child has been
filed in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written objection, If any to It on
Petitioner's Attorney, Bruce
Lamchlck, Esq., whose add-
ress is: LAMCHICK. GLUCK-
SMAN, AND JOHNSON 10651
North Kendall Drive Suite 217
Miami, FL 33178 and Ale We
original with the Clerk of tils
Court on or before the 6th day
of August, 1982 otherwise the
action for a Change of Name
for BRIAN RICHARD
McPHERSON, a minor and
MELISSA PAM McPHERSON,
a minor will be granted.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on July 2,1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk of the Court.
BY: I.. C. Bedasse
Deputy Clerk
Lamchlck, Glucksman
Johnston
Bruce Lamchlck, Esq.
10651 North Kendall Drive
Suite 217
MlamtFL 33176 July 9
jvtvi.law
' 17978
and
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Fash-
ion Totes Company at 8150
N.W. M.i St. Miami. FL 33166
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County .Florida
Sheila Childress.
Sole Proprietorship
17926 June 26;
i________________July 2. 9.16. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82 9490 FC
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE
THE MARRIAGE OF:
ENRIQUE HEITZER,
and
HELEN CHAVEZ
HEITZER.
TO: HELEN CHAVEZ
HEITZER.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been,
filed and commenced In this
-ourt and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any. to It on David A.
Karp. JAVITS A KARP. 3550
Biscayne Boulevard. Suite 504,
Miami. Florida (33137-3879),
telephone 13051 576-6525. attor-
ney tor Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is above and file the orlg-.
iii.il with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
23. 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of June,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
l Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
JAVITS A KARP:
David A. Karp
3550 Biscayne Blvd.,
Ste504
Miami, Florida 33137-3879
Telephone (306 > 576-6525
17936 June 25;
July 2. 9.16. 1982
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 82-10509
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of
ANNE MARIE JACKSON.
Petitioner-Wife
and
GREGORY JACKSON,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: GREGORY JACKSON,
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU, GREGORY JACK-
SON, Respondent-Husband,
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you, upon
ANNE MARIE JACKSON'S at-
torney. GEORGE NICHOLAS.
ESQUIRE, 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida 33136. and
file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before August
20, 1982; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed to you.
DATED this 13 day of July.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
CLERK
By: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17983 July 16, 28,80;
Augusts. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
I FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-9384
NOTICE OF ACTION
In re the marriage of
CATHERINE R. WALLACE
Petitioner-Wife
vs.
ABRAHAM WALLACE.
Respondent-Husband
TO: ABRAHAM WALLACE
c-o Pauline Hambrlck
607 W. 117th St.
Los Angeles,
Ca 90044
YOU ABRAHAM WALLACE
are hereby notified to file your
answer to this Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage with the
Clerk of the Court end mall a
copy to Petitioner's Attorney
DANIEL GALLUP, 2860 Sal-
zedo Street, Coral Gables,
Florida, 83134. on or before
July 23, 1982 else Petition will
be taken as confessed.
This 21 day of June, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By C. p. Copeland
Deputy Clerk
7934 June 26;
July 2,8,16, 1982


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. July 16,1982
Public Notice i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE UTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
ClHNfl.lJ-11101
NOTICE OF ACTION
LARRY MARKS and COM
PANY.INC.:
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff
vs.
ESTATE OF ROBERT
E. NORRIS,
ROBERT E. NORRIS. JR..
MICHAEL S. NORRIS, M.D.i
and i
PAMELA JEAN ALBRIGHT '
Defendants.
TO: MICHAEL S. NORRIS.
M.D.
w hose address Is:
4606 Lookout Road.
Virginia Beach, VA 23455.
his unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees.
creditors or other
parties claiming, by I
through or under him.
YOU ARE HEREBY NO-
TIFIED that certain pro-
ceeding* adverse to your In-
terest have been commenced
against you In the Circuit Court!
of the Eleventh Judicial Circuit.
In and for Dade County,'
Florida. General Jurisdiction
Division. Case No. 83-11801, the;
nature of the proceedings are
Complaint for Foreclosure ofl
Mortgage on the following des-
cribed property In Dade
County Florida, to-wit
Lot 1, Block 8. CAROL CITY,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded In Plat Book 57 at
page 20. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida.
You are hereby required to
file your written defenses In the
above specified proceedings
with the Clerk of this Court and
to serve a copy thereof upon
Plaintiff's attorney whose
name appears below within 28
days alter the first publication
of this notice which return Is
the 23 day of July 1982
DATKI) this 22 day of June.
1862.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Said Court
By: M.J.Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
PHILIP MEDVIN
1032 dulont Building
Miami Florida 33131
Tel: (3iir. i 378-7615
17831 June 25:
July 2. 9. IB. 1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring U> engage In business,
under the fictitious name'
Laly's Fashions at 1531 3W
Flagler Ter.. Miami 33136 In-'
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Maria Cabrera. .
Owner
1787B Julys. 16: \
23.30. 1882 |
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF|
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL;
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY I
IVIL ACTION
NO. 82-8747 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
1NKE:
THE MAKKAIGE OF:
GEKMAN O. MENDOZA,
Petitioner-Husband
and
BLAM A SANCHEZ
DEMKNDOZA,
Respondent-Wife
TO: BLANCASANCHEZ
III. MENDOZA
N>.>. iarland Ave
No. 11
Silver Springs.
Ma i-y land 20801
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution <>i Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
EMILIO C. PASTOR. ESQ., at-,
tomey for Petitioner, whose
address Is 28 West Flagler
Street. Suite 202, Miami. Flor-
ida 33130. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
30. 1882; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal ol said court at Miami,
Florida on this 24 day of June,
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D. C. Bryant
A.-. Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C.
PASTOR, ESQ.
28 West Flagler St.
Roberts Building.
Suite 202
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305)872-0068
Attorney for Petitioner ,
(Publish) '
EMILIO C. i
PA8TOK.ESQ.
17847 July 2, ;
18. 23.1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-9480 -
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE |
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBE RT ARISTIDE,
Petitioner Husband
and
ELIZABETH McCALL
ARISTIDE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ELIZABETH McCALL
ARISTIDE
Address *
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required'
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 615, 7800 NE
2nd Avenue. Miami. FL 33138.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 30, 1882:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of June.
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN.
ESQ.
Suite 615.
7800 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
17937 June26;
_________July 2. 8,16, 18821
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Bound Sound Records at 16182
N.W. 27 Avenue. Miami. Fla.
33055 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
FUN COAST
ARTISTS. INC.
6026 N.W. 37 Street
Miami, Fla. 33166
Maria Llord, agent for
FUN COAST ARTISTS. INC.
6025 N.W. 37 Street
Miami. Fla. 33166
17973 July 8,16;
-. 16. 23,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Fash-
ion Totes Company at 8150
N.W. 9a St. Miami. FL 33166
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County .Florida.
-Sheila Chlldress,
Sole Proprietorship
17925 June 25;
.__________July 2. 9, 16. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-9490 FC
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF:
ENRIQUE HEITZER.
and
HELEN CHAVEZ
HEITZER.
TO: HELEN CHAVEZ
HEITZER.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced In this
court and you are required tc
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, If any. to It on David A.
Karp. JAVITS A KARP, 3550
Blscayne Boulevard. Suite 504.,
Miami, Florida (3313738791,
telephone (305) 576-6625, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is above and file the orlg- j
lnal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
23, 1882; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for.
the relief prayed for In the'
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 22 day of June,
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
JAVITS A KARP:
David A. Karp
8060 Blscayne Blvd.,
Ste504
Miami. Florida 33137 3878 j
Telephone (305) 576-6026
17888 June 26;
July 2, 8.16,1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY! j
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-401 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CESAR MANUEL CODINEZ
and
SUZETTE ANN GODINEZ
TO: SUZETTE ANN
GODINEZ
820 Meridian Avenue
Apt. liu
Miami Beach,
Florida 33138
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
BRUCE J. SCHEINBERG, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 512. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before July 30,1882;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of June,
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal l
KWITNEY, KROOP A
SCHEINBERG. P.A.
420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
17858 July 2.9;
16,23 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82 9638
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF:
ISMAELCORNEJO.
Petitioner-Husband
and
IDAE.CORNEJO,
Respondent-Wife
TO: IDA E. CORNEJO
Garcia Ilastres,
No. 231
Lima, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI- .
F1ED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on ,
Emillo C. Pastor, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
202. Roberts Building, 28 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130, and file the original with ,
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before July 30, 1982;
otherwise a default will be <
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shallbe published
once each week for four con- .
secutlve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the J
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 24 day of June.
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIOC. PASTOR
202. Roberts Building
28 West Flagler St.
Miami.Florida 33130
Telephone: (305)372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish)
EMILIO C.
PASTOR, ESQ.
17948 July 2,9;
16. 23. 1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name COM-
ARE INTERNATIONAL COR-
PORATION at 386 NE. 181
Street, North Miami. Florida,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
COMAIR
INTERNATIONAL
CORPORATION
17846 July 2.8;
_______________________16.23.1882
NOTICE UNDER '
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
COMARE CORPORATION at
386 N.E. 181 Street. North
Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
THE COMAIR
CORPORATION
17845 July 2, ; .
16. 23,1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-9778
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MIRIAM LOPEZ
FERNANDEZ-LEY
PETITIONER
and -
JOSE LEY |
RESPONDENT
TO: JOSE LEY
Whose residence
Is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES.
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1850 South-
west 27th Avenue, Miami, Flor-
ida 33145, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
30, 1962; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW- <
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and in.
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 25 day of June,
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. C. Bedasse
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE
LAW OFFICES. P.A.
1860 Southwest 27th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33145
Telephone: (305)445-0272
M.CRISTINA
DEL-VALLE, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
17950 July 2. 8;
16,23. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-9924
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
CECILIA GONDAR
Petitioner
and
ORLANDO GONDAR
Respondent
TO:
ORLANDO GONDAR
Residence is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NO-
TIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are require your written defenses, if any, to
it on DEL-VALLE l.AW OF-
FICES, P.A., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1950 Southwest 27th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33145. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before August 6. 1982: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of June.
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
(Circuit Court Seal i
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES,
P.A.
I860 SOUTHWEST 27th
AVENUE
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33145
TELEPHONE: (305)445-0272
M. CRISTINA DEL-VALLE.
ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
17966 July 2. 8. 16. 23. 1982.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name AN-
CHOR FISH AND MEAT at
5918 N.E. Second Avenue,
Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
county, Florida.
Manuel Roche
Armando Rodriguez
17966 July 2,8;
16,23,1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name COM-
ARE PROPERTTJCS, INC. at
386 N.E. 181 Street. North
Miami. Florida. Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
COMAIR
PROPERTIES. INC.
17844 July 2,8;
16. 23,18S2
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-9786
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AN AST A SI
DOMINGUEZ-DIAZ
PETITIONER
and
JESUS DIAZ
RESPONDENT
TO: JESUS DIAZ
Whose residence
Is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES.
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1850 South-
west 27th Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida 33145. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
30, 1882; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 25 day of June,
1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. C. Bedasse
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
DEL-VALLE
LAW OFFICES, P.A.
1950 Southwest 27 th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33145
Telephone: (3061445-0272
M.CRISTINA
DEL-VALLE. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
17951 July 2.9;
16, 23, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 9589
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CECILIA 1BACACHE
Petitioner,
and
LUIS 1BACACHE
Respondent
TO: LUIS IBACACHE
Santiago
Fernandez 526
Poblaclon
ELTRANQUE
PLENTEALTO.
CHILE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to it, on
CARLOS M MKNDEZ. Esq.,
attorney for Petltoner. whose
address is 2985 W. 4th Avenue,
H1ALEAH. Florida. 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
July 30. 1982; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 23 day of June.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
2985 W. 4th Avenue
HIALEAH. Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
17949 July 2,8;
16,23, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
BRA USE A HIRSH at 8325
N.W. 53rd Street, Suite 201.
Miami. Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
BRAUSEAHIRSH.P.A.
17957 July 2.8;
16.23, 1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Jode
Star, Inc. d-b-a Jode Star Semi-
nars at 8145 SW87 Ave.. Miami.
FL 33176 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Steven A. Wayner.
Owner
17881 Julys,*;
ie. as. 1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVlrr
(NO PROPERTY) C|
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT0.
THE ELEVENTH JUDlCliT
CUICUIT OF FLORIDA |y
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-9178
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE *
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OP
EDMONDJULIEN
Petitioner Husband
and
GHISLA1NE ST jpA
JULIEN. tAN
Respondent Wife
TO: GHI8LAINE ST jf
JULIEN tAN
c-o Joanel Lucas
Place du Marche
Jean Rabel. Haiti, w I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Du.a>
lution of your Marriage tm
been filed and commenced in
this court and your are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
L aw Office of LLOYD M
ROUTMAN attorney for P#}-
tloner, whose address is Suite
616, 7800 NE 2nd Ave Miami
Florida 33138 and file the
orglnal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 6. 1882; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered agalnit
you for the relief prayed for in
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day n( June
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida '
ByM.J. Hartnel
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLoyd M. Rout man ESQ
Suite 615,7800 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESQ
17963 July 2,9.
16. 23. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
82-9923
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THEMARRIAGEOF
ZOE RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner
and
H1LARIO MEDINA
Respondent
TO: HILARIO MEDINA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action lor Dis-
solution of Marriage baa been
filed against you and you are
requried to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If anv. to Iton
\I CHRISTINA DEL-VALLE,
attorney for Petloner. whose
address Is 1950 Southwest 2TUl
Avenue. Miami. Florida 13115.
and file the original with the
Clark f the above styled court
on or before July 80, 1D82;
otherwise a default will he en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS by hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day of June.
1882.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N.A. Hewct
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal l
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES, ,
P.A.
1950 Southwest 27th Avenue
Second Floor
Miami. Florida 33145
Telephone; (306I44M272
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish)
17965 July2..
16. 23,1S2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name oi
LINCOLN MALL ASSOCI-
ATES at 701 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach. Florida. 331M
Intends to register saidI"""
with the Clerk of the Circuit.
Court of Dade County, Florlos.
RAE-UN REALTY
By:
Meyer Kotler
Co-Partner
I. Lee Flnkelsteln
Co-Partner
Linda F.Katzner
Co-Partner
Nelson Feldman. P.A.
Attorney for
Lincoln Mall Associates
1186 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands,
Florida 88154
mm g
h*l


Joseph M. Lipton Passes
Friday, July 16,1982 / The Jewish Floridian
Page 15-B
Joseph M. Lipton, a pioneer ot
Miami, passed away Wednesday
morning after a lengthy illness.
Since his arrival in Miami in
1925, Joseph M. Lipton was an
outstanding leader in community
business, civic and fraternal
activity. For a brief time, he was
identified with real estate ac-
tivity of the period; however, he
soon turned to life insurance and
later to general insurance, found-
ing the J. M. Lipton Insurance
Agency, Inc. Mr. Lipton held a
Chartered Life Underwriter
(CLU) Degree.
Mr. Lipton was one of the
loriginal founders of Dade Sav-
ings and Loan Association, and
I served as its President, Chairman
I of the Board and Chairman
Emeritus. He helped guide that
institution in continuous and
successful growth until its re-
sources are now over $2 Billion
Dollars. Today, the Association
[ has 32 offices serving Dade,
Broward, Orange, Seminole,
Brevard and Collier Counties. He
was a Past President of the
Florida Savings and Loan
League, and served as Florida
Director of the United States
| League of Savings Associations.
Mr. Lipton was a life member
Iof the YMHA, a member ol
I James Carnell Lodge, Scottish
JRite Temple and Mahi Temple;
IAncient Order of the Nobles of
[the Mystic Shrine; American Le-
[gion, Kiwanis Club, Pi Pambda
|Phi Fraternity, and the Univer-
Isitv of Pennsylvania Alumni
fclub.
He was Past President of
I Temple Kmanu-El, a patron of
'the Dade County Outstanding
[Citizens Awards for Sholem
I Lodge of B'nai B'rith and on
April 17. 1962, was himself
[named an Honorary Outstanding
[Citizen of Dade County. He was
[trustee of Ml. Sinai Hospital, and
served on the Citizen's Commit-
Itee of the University of Miami. In
11962, Dr. Henry King Stamford,
I President of the University of
Miami, announced that JOSEPH
[M. LIPTON was among the list
Joseph M. Lipton
of distinguished civic and
cultural leaders named to the
Board of Selections for Men of
Letters, Arts and Science of Flor-
ida who have made distinct con-
tributions to the cultural life of
Israel.
He was appointed Chairman of
the 1961 Greater Miami Com-
bined Jewish Appeal campaign
and worked as Vice Chairman
and in other capacities in sub-
sequent years. He was a member
of the 7th United Jewish Appeal
Study Mission to Rome and
Israel, which took place in Octo-
ber, 1960. He was also appointed
to the National United Jewish
Appeal's Committee for com-
munity Activities, in observance
of the UJA's 25th Anniversary.
He was member of the Board of
Governors and the Executive
Committee of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and served as
its President in 1965-66.
Prominent as a financial leader
and insurance executive, Mr.
Lipton received many awards for
his community services, includ-
ing the Man of Achievement
Outstanding Community Service
Awards of the local B'nai B'rith;
the Outstanding Service Award
of the Red Cross; the Outstand-
ing Service Award of Mount
Sinai Hospital; the National
Community Service Award of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, among others.
In 1965, he received the
coveted Silver Medallion Bro-
therhood Award of the National
Mitchell S. Gordon 71, North Miami
Mitchell S. Gordon, 71, of
Jorth Miami, passed away July
He was born in Lefichev,
luasia, son of the late Samuel
nd Susan Goldstein. His father
vas killed in Russia during the
evolution. The family immi-
rraled to Turkey, then to the
Jnited States. He received his
actorate from the Illinois
College of Optometry in 1934. He
ECKER
|.Vii.iin- Grace, 70. of Bay Harbor
Islands, passed away July 10. She came
k Klorida 13 years ago from Michigan.
purvivors are a son. Karoi of Potomac,
Mil and four grandchildren. Services
Here held July 11 at Riverside Chapel.
CAHN,
Mancy. 48. of North Miami, passed away
July In an alrolane crash In New Or-
leans. She Is survived by her husband,
Lit lin. daughters, Lee-Anne Marum-
^trud and Kelly Barfteld, and her
urents, Iola and Haul Sibre.
:haiken,
Clara. 81. Miami Beach, passed away
|uly 7. She Is survived by her daughters,
Slhel Zi-hiiz and Elsie Glvner; aon-ln-
aw, Jack Zebltz and daughter-in-law,
Mm Chalken, six grandchildren and 10
treat-grandchildren. Services were
eld July 8 at Riverside Chapel.
was a Veteran of World War II in
the medical department. He
practiced optometry until 1954
and was instrumental in the de-
velopment of plastic artificial
eyes. He was the head of the
Ophthalmic Division of Com-
bined Jewish Appeal in 1949. He
moved to Florida in 1954. Serv-
ices were held July 11 at River-
side Chapel with interment at
Mt. Nebo.
DONNER, Harry, 74, Miami Beach.
July 11. Mt. Nebo, Gordon Funeral
Home.
STONE, Louis, Miami, July 11, Stcr of
Oavld. Rubin ZUbert.
HECHT. Samuel. 68. July 5. Riverside.
SAI'ERO. Lawrence L 87, Blasberg.
KLEIN, Joseph, 74, June 30, Riverside.
LANGER, Samuel, 78. July 7. Gordon.
SEIDNER, William, 70. Miami Beach.
June 28, Riverside.
v\ II.I.I ; Bernard, Miami Beach. June
28.
CHOMET, Helen.
HERMAN. Harry S., Blasberg.
RIVKIN. Max H., Levitt-Welnstein.
SCHWARTZ. LesterL.. Miami, June30.
Riverside.
TAMRES, Morris, Miami Beach, June
28. Rubin-Zilbert.
TRUBITZ. Benjamin, Blasberg.
Sunny Isles Forms
Orthodox Congregation
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, a resi-
|ent of Sunny Isles in Miami
each will serve as volunteer
abbi during the Yom Kippur
ligh Holyday services of the
ewly-formed Orthodox Syna-
ogue of Sunny Isles. The serv-
pes will be held at the Desert
nn, 17201 Collins Avenue in
punny Isles.
Rabbi Dobin, who has been
btive as a leader in many local,
tional and international activi-
es has retired from the active
pipit Rabbinate, but has con-
sented to serve as volunteer
Rabbi for the new Synagogue in
order to help it establish itself as
an important adjunct of the reli-
gious life in the local area.
The new Sunny Isles Congre-
gation was first formed with the
help of Chabad House of North
Miami-Dade and its Spiritual
Leader Rabbi Casriel
Brusowankin. The Congregation
plans to institute a complete pro-
gram of religious, educational
and social activities for all the
Jewish families residing in the
Sunny Isles, Miami Beach area.
Conference of Christians and
Jews for his outstanding contri-
butions to good human relations.
JOSEPH M. LIPTON was
born September 9, 1900, and was
graduated in Latrobe, Pennsyl-
vania, where he attended public
and high school. He graduated
from the University of Pennsyl-
vania in 1922 with the degree of
Bachelor of Science in
Economics.
Mr. Lipton is survived by his
wife Anne Abrash Lipton; a son,
Ronald A. Lipton, who is Presi-
dent and Chairman of the Board
of Dade Savings: daughter-in-
law, Marilyn Lipton; daughter,
Harriet Harris; son-in-law, Mar-
shall Harris; grandchildren,
Debbie Sue Lipton, Douglass
Lipton, Cheryl Kay Lipton,
Jennifer Harris, Andrew Harris
and Jessica Harris; brother, Dr.
Simon Lipton of Rockville,
Maryland. Private services were
held.
Robert W. Becker
Photographer
Funeral services for Robert W.
Becker, a nationally acclaimed
portrait photographer who died
July 9 in the crash of Pan Am
Flight 759, were conducted Mon-
day.
Mr. Becker, 39, was on his way
to Las Vegas for the Professional
Photographers of America con-
vention, where he was to receive
another in a long series of honors.
A life-long resident of Miami,
he was the owner of Becker's
Photography Studio at Dade- \
land Mall.
After graduating from the
University of Miami, Mr. Becker
followed his father into the
photography business.
His work was featured in the
latest issue of the trade magazine,
The Professional Photographer.
Last year, he won the title of
Fellow of the American Society of
Photographers, an honor given
just 32 photographers since
1937.
Survivors include his wife,
Susan, two sons, Tony and
Randy; mother, Jeanne; father,
E. Allen Becker and wife, Rosa-
lind; brother, Dalton Becker; a
sister, Sondra Becker; sister and
brother-in-law, Brenda and Harry
(iordon, father and mother-in-
law. King and Estelle Dansky;
brothers-in-law and sisters-in-
law, Byron and Barbara Petersen
and Howard and Linda Bechtold.
MONUMENTS INC
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
(r.nr minify Mince /.'//*
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JAMES B.GORDON,F.D.
HARVEY GORDON,F.D.
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710SW12Ave
858-5566
Mel Schoenfeld Passes
Mel Schoenfeld, former cam-
paign director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, passed
away July 13. Known as a tire-
less, energetic and committed
worker for Jewish causes, Mr.
Schoenfeld also served in the
position of campaign director for
the Jewish Community of Mon-
treal and St. Louis. Prior to join-
ing the staff of St. Louis Jewish
Federation, he was a vice presi-
dent of Milton Hood Ward Com-
pany in New York.
He was a member of the
National Society of Fund
Raisers, a former president of
Temple Emanuel in East
Meadow, New York, attended
New York University and re-
ceived his college degree from
Indiana University.
Survivors are his wife, Terry;
sen, Leonard; daughters, Sherri
Mel Schoenfeld
and Abbey; and seven grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services will be held
Friday. July 16 at 12 noon at the
Levitt-Weinstein Funeral Home,
1921 Pembroke Road. Holly-
wood, Florida.
Harriet Jackman Services Held
Harriet S. Jackman, 38, of
Miami, passed away July 11.
Mrs. Jackman was a native
Miamian. She attended Miami
Senior High, the University of
Florida, and the University of
Miami. She was a speech
pathologist, taught English as a
second language at FIU, and
taught at Fairglade Pre-School
She is survived by her husband
Stephen; son, Jeffrey; daughter
Wendi; father, Sam Seitlin, and
sister, Barbara (Marvin) Gill
man. (Jraveside services and in
terment were held July 12 at Mt
Nebo Cemetery. Arrangements
by (iordon Funeral Home.
Rose Brameister Hadassah Member
Rose Brameister. 90 of Miami,
passed away July 11. She had
made her home here for the past
40 years, coming from Palmetto,
Florida. Mrs. Brameister was a
long lime member of Beth David
and the Menorah Chapter of
Hadassah. She is survived by a
son. Herbert of Miami, a daugh-
ter. Marilyn Meltzer of Miami,
two grandchildren and one great-
I grandchild. Services were held
July 13 at (iordon Funeral Home
with interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscayne Boulevard.
cMeno&h
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945-3939
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and all South Florida cemeteries from chapels
in North Miami Beach, Sunrise, Deerfield Beach
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Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
SS/oU^m *jfMne* FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG
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Special Edition
peration Peace
or the Galilee:
he True Story
fter years of bloodshed at the hands of terror-
Israel has launched a campaign to halt PLO
ession, which had become particularly fierce
ng the past year. "Operation Peace for the
ee," the current effort to eradicate the PLO
ence on Israel's northern border, has allowed
ians of the Galilee to live normal lives, with-
I the fear of constant terrorist attacks.
ince launching its campaign in Lebanon on
|e 6, the Government of Israel has repeatedly
tared that it will withdraw from Lebanon once
joals are obtained.
srael seeks a 25-mile buffer zone along the
tanese border that will be free of any PLO
snce. This would place the Galilee beyond the
of the PLO's Soviet-made rockets and artil-
which had struck at Israeli towns and vil-
i for many years.
tie Israeli campaign also is expected to allow
J Lebanese government to regain its sovereign
[free from the dominance of Syria and the PLO,
|ch have subjugated Lebanon since 1976. Israel
i's to eliminate the PLO's military apparatus
arms supplies, which have been the major fac-
I in worldwide terrorism, and to initiate a com-
be withdrawal from Lebanon of Syrian armed
pes.
The Israeli government is seeking the presence
a multinational peacekeeping force to ensure
permanence of the 25-mile buffer zone along
I Lebanese border with Israel.
[errorist outposts in Lebanon, which were
iblished with the support and aid of Syria,
fe plagued Israeli towns and villages for many
rs. Entering Lebanon under the guise of an
rab Deterrent Force" assigned to quell the
|5-76 fighting between Moslem and Christian
as, the Syrians occupied 45 percent of Leba-
i's territory. The PLO was given an additional
ercent of Lebanon's territory, on which the
rorists established training camps for inter-
zonal terrorism and ammunition dumps for
je collections of Soviet-supplied weapons.
The Syrian military occupation had continued
ring the past sue years, leading many observers
conclude that Syria hoped to incorporate Leba-
into "Greater Syria," a territory on which the
rians have had designs for four decades.
lore than 100 terrorist assaults were directed
iinst Israel during a two-year period ending in

Focus Beirut
The PLO is a terrorist organization whose central aim is the liquidation of Israel. In pursuit
of this aim, the organization has been operating, from its bases in Lebanon, both against Israel
and against Jews abroad.
Israel is convinced that the only way to ensure that its citizens will henceforth be able to live
secure and in peace is to remove the PLO from Lebanon. This has been accomplished in South-
ern Lebanon, where the PLO bases no longer exist, but parts of its forces and headquarters re-
main in West Beirut.
The headquarters of the PLO's various component groups have been set up in the western
part of the Lebanese capital in total disregard of the authority and sovereignty of the Leba-
nese government. For the past twelve years, the city has served as the main center for PLO or-
ganizational activities' of all kinds, including the planning of terrorist strikes and the training
and activation of terrorists against Israel and other countries. In Beirut today, there are be-
tween 5,000 and 6,000 terrorists, together with their leaders.
Beirut has also been the hub of the organization's intelligence, publication and propaganda
apparatus. Its newspapers have been published there, and the broadcasts of its radio station,
'The Voice of Palestine,' have been beamed to the surrounding region from Beirut. The PLO
news agency, 'WAFA,' has its offices in Beirut.
Beirut was the center of international terror, with active links to virtually every known ter-
rorist underground in the world. The city also houses the administrative, logistical and tech-
nical facilities connected with terrorist activity abroad: a travel agency, printing presses, facili-
ties for forging passports, and workshops and storage places for arms, ammunition and ex-
plosive devices.
Like the rest of Southern Lebanon, the city of Beirut was turned into an enclave of piracy and
lawlessness under PLO domination. So long as the Lebanese capital is not rid of these terrorist
groups and their facilities, Lebanon will not be able to restore the lawful and effective rule of its
government or exercise sovereignty there, nor will the welfare of its citizens or the citizens of
Israel be assured. Israel is certain that all the nations of the enlightened world support the
restoration of Lebanese sovereignty, the disarming of the PLO and the elimination of one of the
main centers of world terrorism/
In the last few weeks, the government of Israel proposed several times that PLO personnel
and their leaders lay down their arms and leave Lebanon by any route they choose taking their
personal weapons with them.
Continued on Page 2
July 1981. At the end of that period, the United
Nations placed peacekeeping forces along the Is-
rael-Lebanon border to guarantee a ceasefire in the
region. None-the-less, there were 150 violations of
the ceasefire by the PLO during the past year.
After the failure of the UN forces to maintain
tranquility in the border area became increasingly
evident, the Israeli government determined that
action was mandated to protect citizens of the
Galilee from constant rocket and artillery assaults
by terrorists from across the border.
The overall objective of Israel's campaign in
Lebanon is self-defense of its people, a right that is
both a recognized and mandated factor of inter-
national law.
Make the truth known
>ne of the greatest tools of Nazi propaganda during World War II was
'he Big Lie," a theory which was based on the premise that if a lie is re-
nted often enough it is accepted as fact. The PLO and other enemies of
ael have resurrected The Big Lie and are using that theory to spread
i in form at ion about "Operation Peace for the Galilee."
n recent weeks the media have been deluged with misinformation
mulgated by the PLO terrorists and their allies about casualty and
ith statistics, about the Israeli objectives during the current military
ipaign, and about the real purpose, history and political stance of the
") terrorists. This misinformation is spread to the general public each
through the broadcast media, newspapers and magazines. If the truth
lot told, the lies may be believed!
'his supplement provides detailed facts and statistics that graphically
ict the truth about the current conflict in Lebanon. Armed with this
irmation, each of us can counter the fallacies before they are accepted
the general public as a factual basis for condemnation of Israel.
We ask that you take the following steps to let the truth be known:
Read this information, so that you can understand and spread the
truth about Israel's intentions in "Operation Peace for the Galilee."
Pass this supplement on to other persons who should know the facts.
Contact President Reagan, Senators Lawton Chiles and Paula
Hawkins, and Representatives Claude Pepper, William Lehman and
Dante Fascell to let them know of your support for Israel in this time of
crisis. All necessary addresses are listed on Page 3.
The Jewish community of Greater Miami stands with the people of Is-
rael in their quest to assure tranquility and freedom from PLO terror. We
are unified by our common heritage and values, which bind us together as
Jews. We are one.
NORMAN H.LIPOFF
President, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian, Section C. Juh/ 16.1988


hj i.'n.
Page2-
Friday. July 16.1982
Terror is its password
The major factor contributing to the PLO's
growth and political success in the Arab world has
been its unbridled use of conspicuous terrorist
acts and the resultant media spotlight this
heinous violence receives.
Since 1969, there have been over 40 attacks on
Jewish targets worldwide carried out by Arab ter-
rorist groups or with their encouragement, and
nearly 50 attacks were perpetrated against Israeli
diplomatic missions. A total of more than 200 ter-
rorist acts were launched against Israeli and other
targets located outside of Israel. Since September
1980. more than 40 attacks have been made
against foreign embassies and their personnel in
West Beirut. And within Israel itself, the PLO
has brashly claimed responsibility for countless
attacks directed exclusively at innocent civilians.
Major PLO Terrorist Acts:
MUNICH: The murder of 11 Israeli Olympic
athletes.
ATHENS: FourI murdered and 54 wounded
by terrorists assigned to murder travellers leaving
Israel.
LOD: 24 Christian pilgrim* murdertd
MAALOT: The slaughter of 24 ciriUaj,, i
an Israeli soldier.
GREECE: TWA flight from Tel Aviv to Nn|
York, via Athens, explodes in mid-air, killing J
88 passengers. I
VIENNA: Terrorists occupy OPEC offij
and murder four civilians.
ROME: Five terrorists attack a Pan And-
ean plane, murdering 31 persons and wounding si
PARIS: A bomb explodes near a synagogJ
killing three persons and wounding 20.
KHARTOUM: Assassination of the Ai
can ambassador.
LONDON: Attempted assassination of
Israeli ambassador.
The high incidence of terrorist activity
throughout the western world stems directly fi
a reluctance to speak out and fight against
PLO and international terror.
Were you there?9
(One of the Israel Defense Forces' of-
ficers relates to a question that many
are asking these days.)
Question: The war sowed death and
destruction and claimed the lives of
innocent civilians in Lebanon. Was
this necessary?
Answer: I want to ask those who are
so free in their criticism on this score:
were you here? Did you see what went
on here? You know, there isn't an
army anywhere in the world that acts
with such care, with such considera-
tion for human life there just isn't!
In every briefing, every talk, every
exercise and, later, at every stage
of the actual operation, even in the
midst of battle, even when your finest
men are falling in battle all our of-
ficers keep telling the men, and re-
peating over and over: Don't touch
civilians! They are not our enemies,
and we don't want to kill them!
How cautiously we acted! In that
killers' camp down there, at Ain
Hilweh, there were terrorist-killers
who felt no compunction about hold-
ing their own people hostage and
murdering their children in cold
blood. Five times we sent delegations
of local dignitaries from Sidon to ask
them to come out and hold talks with
us, to let the civilians in that camp
come out, or to give up their arms and
none of them would be hurt. But they
refused even to listen. Instead, they
shot at the dignitaries and drove them
back, shouting after them, "Victory
or death!"
And still, we acted with caution.
Still, we refrained from any act that
was liable to harm civilians or their
property.
But when you are storming an ob-
jective and you see your comrades
falling around you some of the fin-
est of our fighting men what com-
mander would not, in such a situation,
call for artillery or air support to
soften up the enemy positions?
The terrorists planned their defense
at the expense of the civilian popula-
tion deliberately, cold-bloodedly,
with no thought at all to human life:
their bunkers were situated under-
neath apartment-houses, so that
women and children would "defend"
them. Who. then, has the right to tell
a commanding officer whose men are
dying to hold his fire and simply let
the carnage continue?! That would be
a rank betrayal of the trust placed in
us by the mothers of these boys!
I want to tell you in total candor
and sincerity: we suffered losses in
this war. We sacrificed wonderful
young boys. We talk about them day
and night: they are never out of our
minds. We talk about their families
and make plans to help them. As soon
as I can make myself free. I will go
and visit every family that had a son
from my unit was has fallen. I shall be
at the bedside of every one of our
wounded.
I can assure all our critics: We have
not only gone to great lengths to
maintain a high moral standard in a
harsh and difficult war; but, on many
occasions, we did a great deal more
than what could have been expected
of us in the circumstances. I know
that my conscience on this score as
an Israeli, as a Jew and as a soldier
is clear.
What do Lebanese
Americans say?
At the conclusion of its recent annual convention in Washington,]
D.C., the American Lebanese League adopted the following resolution.
The organization represents an important and politically sophisticated]
element of the American Lebanese population of some two million.
Whereas: The American Lebanese League expresses deep sorrow at the I
tragic losses of life, limb and property, and laments the added thousands |
of Lebanese citizens made refugees in their homeland and;
Whereas: The Lebanese problem must be considered in a larger con-
text, having suffered the degradation and dehumanization of over seven |
years of brutal Syrian and PLO military occupation;
Whereas: It is in the vital and strategic interests of the United States
and Lebanon to have all foreign forces withdrawn. A tragic error would
be made if Israeli forces were to withdraw leaving Syrian and PLO forces
in place. This would condemn Lebanon to its continued agony and suf-
fering .
Whereas: The present situation offers an opportunity for the United
States to solve the Lebanese problem and to neutralize its territory as a |
flashpoint for conflict by alien forces with impunity.
Whereas; It would be in the United States* national and strategic in-
terests and those of Lebanon, that the present policy of containment and |
passivism by reversed.
Therefore, Be it Resolved that the United States use all legitimate^
means to:
Assist in the creation of a strong central authority and army in I
Lebanon that assures a free, independent, pluralistic, sovereign state |
with territorial integrity.
Focus Beirut.
Continued from Page 1
Israel, in its wish to svoid further bloodshed and suffering on both
sides, and in response to appeals directed to it to refrain from acts or de-
mands that would humiliate the PLO terrorists, is patiently giving the
process of diplomacy and negotiation every chance to succeed. The Israel
Defense Forces hsve only fired when fired open. The PLO has responded
with its accustomed cynicism and ruthlessness, and has repeatedly
violated the ceasefire. It has resorted to delaying tactics and has con-
stantly tried to mislead the negotiators. The present position of the Leba-
nese government is that the PLO armed presence in Beirut is illegitimate
and that the Lebanese army be restored to its rightful role in its own
capital. The responsibility for the fact that the crisis remains unresolved
rests squarely on the PLO.
Most of the Lebanese people Christians, Moslems and Druzes an-
xious to see an end to the fighting, support Israel's proposals for s peace-
ful resolution of the confrontation with the PLO. Nevertheless, the PLO
hss rejected these offers, preferring instead to consolidate its military en-
trenchment in Beirut. It has placed its artillery and other heavy weaponry
next to the foreign embassies in West Beirut, as well as alongside
mosques, churches, hospitals and schools as part of its customary and
well known i practice of locating its military equipment and facilities in the
heart of civilian areas. Moreover, large numbers of civilians in West Beirut
are known to hsve been seized by the PLO and turned into hostages.
In its effort to free Beirut and to remove the terrorist menace of the
PLO from Israel and from Lebanon, the Israel Defense Forces are doing
all within their power to keep to a minimum the number of casualties ar.i
the damage that will be caused by any war. In the course of the past few
weeks, the IDF hss repeatedly dropped leaflets into the city and beamed
radio broadcasts to the residents of West Beirut, urging them to leave the
city in order to save their fives. A large number of residents heeded Is-
rael's appeal and left West Beirut.
Israel's fight is not against Lebanon but only against the PLO. The best-
evidence of this hss been the enthusiastic reception that has been accordeo t
to Israel Defense Forces by the inhabitants of Lebanon, who have given
open and varied expression to their appreciation to Israel for having
liberated them from PLO terror.
Israel hss no territorial aspirations whatsoever regarding Lebanon. A*
its leaders have repeatedly stated, Israel's forces will leave Lebanon as
soon as that country will have recovered its sovereignty, estsblisbed an
effective central government and made suitable arrangements to prevent
any future PLO activity from its territory.


ly. July 16,1982
'age 3
Israel reaches out to
aid Lebanese civilians
THI JIRtllALKM
June 22. 1982
The Government of Israel, which
has repeatedly stated that its enemies
are PLO terrorists and not innocent
civilians, has begun a campaign of
humanitarian aid for the Lebanese
people. Hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars worth of medical care, food and
other supplies have been provided to
the people of Lebanon.
The actions initiated by Israel to
aid the Lebanese people include:
The economic ministers of Israel
and Lebanon have established con-
tacts to coordinate humanitarian as-
sistance efforts; '
The Israel Defense Forces are
supplying returnees to Lebanese vil-
lages with water, food and supplies;
Hundreds of people have been
transported from Lebanon to Israeli
hospitals. These people include Leba-
nese civilians and military personnel,
and Syrian and PLO prisoners;
A convoy of 80 Israeli am-
bulances with fully equipped teams
has been sent to Lebanon to provide
aid to the Lebanese civilian popula-
tion.
More than 1,000 Israeli homes
have opened to accept Lebanese chil-
dren during this period;
The Israeli Ministry of Com-
merce and Industry has dispatched
teams of experts to review the in-
dustrial infrastructure in Southern
Lebanon, in preparation for recon-
struction and marketing assistance;
A special Israel Defense Force
unit has launched a comprehensive
survey of the civilian economy in
Lebanon, which could serve as a basis
for speedy and full reconstruction of
local commerce;
DPT and polio vaccines have
been sent to Lebanon by the Israeli
Minister of Health to be administered
to children who have not received
regular medical care;
More than 1,000 Arab and Jew-
ish families in Israel have agreed to
look after Lebanese mothers with
babies, as part of the campaign,
"Shelter for the Children of Leba-
non;"
The Israeli Ministry of Com-
merce and Industry has arranged the
shipment of food supplies to Lebanon.
Dry Bones
ITS -
CO \*XD
IKj B&PUT...
flWaSCFTtiS
iGoess
rSMi&rfiee
TrlrVO"TH6
2
Provided by th* Israel Ministry of foreign Affair*
Let our government know you stand with Israel
Utilizing the material in this supplement, please contact President Reagan and our legislators in Washington to let
them know that you support Israel and its quest to win Peace for the Galilee. The following are the names, addresses
and telephone numbers of key federal decisionmakers:
The White House .
President Ronald Reagan, The White House, Washington, D.C. 20500
(202) 456-7639
Senators
Sen. Lawton Chiles, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-
5274; 931 Federal Bldg., Miami, Fla. 33130 (305) 350-4891
Sen. Paula Hawkins, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. 20510 (202) 224-
3041; Box 2000, Winter Park, Fla. 32790 (305) 339-1980
Congressmen
Rep. William Lehman, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
20510 (202) 225-3026; 2020 N.E. 163rd St., N. Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
(305) 945-7518
Rep Claude Pepper, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 225-3931; 827 Federal Bldg., Miami, Fla. 33130 (305) 350-5565
Rep. Dante Fascell, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 225-4506; 904 Federal Bldg., Miami, Fla. 33130 (305) 350-5301
PLO Schools of
international terrorism
Documents captured by Israel Defense Forces in Lebanon specify lists
of PLO terrorist candidates for training courses in East European, Arab
countries, and other nations hostile to Israel. In the documents are details
of the countries and the courses they conduct for personnel of Palestinian
terrorist organizations.
PLO Documents Captured in Lebanon
Among the document* was a list ol 41 officers and n
course* they took to quality rhem for combat
i commissioned officers
nes tanks and setial numbers, and the mi Mary
Country
Soviet Union
East Germany
Vietnam
Algeria
Hungary
Bulgaria
South Yemen
North Yemen
Pakistan
India
People's Republic of China
Type of Training
Command Training
Military Academy
Air Defense
Military Academy
Armor Courses
Brigade Chief of Staff
Military Academy
Military Academy
Engineering Company Comanders'
Course, Navy, Air Defense Officers
Basic Armor Platoon Commanders,
Basic Engineering
Military Engineering for Officers and
NCOs
The PLO had acquired a formidable cache of arms, rivaling the weapon-
ry stockpile possessed by many of the world's major nations. The PLO had
100 Soviet-produced tanks, compared to Norway's 186 tanks, Canada's
114 comparable armored vehicles and Portugal's 68 tanks. The Israel De-
fense Forces have also seized from captured terrorists: 4,000 tons of am-
munition, 144 military vehicles, 12,506 light weapons, 516 heavy weapons
(including cannons), 359 pieces of communication equipment and 795
pieces of military optical equipment.
Serial
No Name Rank number Course, date and place
1 I'm sal Mahmud Allheikh Yusssl Major 31487 1 Military Academy China 2 Regimental Commander course. Moscow 3 Stall Ctlicers. Pakistan
2 famal Yakub (adan Captain 44552 1 Fedayeen Commanders Moscow 1972 2 Armor. Hungary I960
3 Faisal Mahmud Atman Second Lieutenant 41054 1 Platoon Commanders. Moscow 75- 76 2 Company Commanders. Vietnam 77 78
4. Mahmud Abdallah Salameh ditto 44119 1 Company commanders. China 1977 2 Armor Company Commanders. Moscow
5 luad Ahmad Hamid Alan; ditto 32242 1 Military Academy. Algeria*. 1969 2 Political studies. China 1976-79 3 Political studies Bulgaria 78-79
6 Rateb Mussah Mahmud First Lieutenant 31492 1 Inlanlry Company Commanders. Moscow 1977 2. Armor. Hungary 1979

7. Yann Hachar Mahmud ditto 31281 1 Armor Hungary 1980 2 Armor Commanders. Moscow
1. Ahmed Muitalah Hamdan ditto 13644 1 Commando Course. Algeria 1972 2 Military Academy. Algeria 75-76 3 Armor Commanders. Pakistan 1976
9 Ibiahim Shahda Amai ditto SI0D9 1 Military Academy. Algeria 75-76 2 Armor Commanders. Pakistan 1978 3 Armor radio. Pakistan 1979 4 Armor. Hungary
10. Said Ibiahim Alazi ditto 74709 1 Military Academy. Algeria 75-76 2 Armor Commanders. Pakistan 1978 3 Armor. Hungary 1979 ,
11 Hal*d lea Abd Hauan ditto 46897 1 Military Academy Algeria 75-76 2 Armor (preparatory!. Pakistan 1979 3. Armor. Hungary 1910. 4 Armoi Commanders. Pakistan
12. Haaln Mahmud Ahmed Said ditto 52524 Armor. Hungary 1979
12 Zaki Mahmud Ibiahim Alsbeikh ditto 13463 Armor. Hungary 1979
14. Muelatah Hasan Mustalah Kandil ditto 15361 1 Social studies. Bulgaria 1979 2 Armor. Hungary I960
15 Ahned Hasin Abmsd labor ditto 31701 Armor. Hungary
It. Ibrahim Raia Salah Alhazat ditto 15372 Armor. Hungary
17. Ahmed Mahmud Ahmed Mar'i Alsharkawi ditto 73937 A iti-aiicialt Unit Commanders. Moscow
11. Ahmad Fachal Mahmud Abu Halil ditto 22029 Armor. Hungary
19 Shaai Mustalah Ibrahim Mustatah First Sergeant 21006 1 Armor. Pakistan 1971 2 Armor. Hungary 1980
20. Abd Aliahaman Ahmed Hasin Alsharll ditto 53477 1. Armor. Hungary I960 2 Military Academy. Cuba 1979
21. Sab. Abid Had id ditto 24767 Armor. Hungary 1179
22. Abdallah Wall Oaud Yussel ditto 13149 Armor. Hungary
22. Hasin Mahmsd Mahmud Private First Class 22298 Radio. Hungary 1979
24. Mustalah Abd Alrahamim Mahmsd ditto 22585 Armor. Hungary 1980
24 Shllul Ibrahim Shllui ditto 24469 ditto
a. Ahmad Musoh Ahmad Forah ditto 24551 Armor. Hungary 1171.
v. Hasin Daud Saad ditto 11753 ditto
a. Mahmsd Kasm Kablaul ditto 32429 Armor. Hungary 19*0
a. Abdallah All Abdallah Alsaad Sergeant 31498 Armor. Hungary 1179.
30. Mahmud Hasin Pachl All ditto 43021 ditto
31. Maid Marshd Mahmsd Alralub dltte 48103 ditto
13. Mahmsd Rasak abu Tart) ditto 52012 Armor. Hungary I960
13. lallm Mnhmri Falah Private 25136 ditto
M. Mahmsd Dlab Ah msd ditto 25313 ditto
a. sell Aldln Sadek Alall ditto 27177 Armor. Hungary 1171.
a. Abfl Hamd Marsal ditto 27898 Armor. Hungary 198C
v. labor lallman Ibrahim label ditto 32032 ditto
a. Kamal said Mahmsd Alabad ditto 32771 ditto
a. Amad Ibrahim tollman ditto 74D48 ditto
40. Ham ladek Abdallah ditto Security and Intelligence USSR Administration. USSR
41. abr Tab. Ahmed Private First Class 43*45 Armor Hungary IMl
_


Page 4
Friday. July 16.1982
What does the PLO say?
"Palestine. is an indivisible part of the Arab homeland."
PLO Covenant. Artide I
"Palestine, with the boundaries it had during the British Mandate, is an in-
divisible territorial unit."
PLO Covenant. Article 2
"The Palestinian people possess the legal right to their homeland and have the
right to determine their destiny after achieving the liberation of their country in
accordance with their wishes and entirely of their own accord and will"
PLO Covenant. Article 3
"Armed struggle is the only way to liberate Palestine. 7?.us H 's the overall
strategy, not merely a tactical phase."
PLO Covenant. Article 9
"The liberation of Palestine, from an Arab viewpoint, is a national duty and it
attempts to repel the Zionist and imperialist aggression against the Arab home-
land, and aims at the elimination of Zionism in Palestine."
PLO Covenant, Artide 15
"The partition of Palestine in 1947 and the establishment of the State of Israel
are entirely illegal..."
PLO Covenant. Artide 19
"The Arab Palestinian people, expressing themselves by the armed Palestinian
revolution, reject all solutions which are substitutes for the total liberation of
Palestine and reject all proposals aiming at the liquidation of the Palestinian
problem, or its internationalization."
PLO Covenant, Artide 21
"There is no new policy by the PLO to recognize Israel. The declared pro-
gram of the PLO is to bring about the destruction of the Zionist entity of Israel."
PLO Information Office, Oslo
May 5,1977
Soviet-made artillery, captured from PLO terrorist outposts
during "Operation Peace for the Galilee, are displayed by
the Israel Defense Forces.
U.N. school housed classes in terror
By YOSEF GOELL.
Jerusalem Post Reporter
SIDON What was apparently the central
training school for Fatah terrorists in Lebanon
was discovered several days ago by Israeli soldiers
in a vocational training school run by the United
Nations Relief and Works Agency.
The school, the Siblin Vocational Training
Center, sits on a mountain top with a breathtaking
view of the Mediterranean, several kilometers
north of Sidon. It was founded as part of the
UNRWA network of schools in June 1961, accord-
ing to the plaque above the door of the adminis-
tration building.
The impressive complex consists of a number of
large three- and four-story buildings on various
levels of the mountain. The upper buildings seem
to have served legitimate vocational-training
functions. The lower buildings were devoted ex-
clusively to the Fatah terrorist training school.
When reporters visited the school, Israel De-
fense Forces engineer corpsmen were busy defus-
ing bombs, removing booby traps, and sorting out
and loading the enormous quantity of weapons
and ammunition found in the complex. It was
their third day at the job.
There were crates of RPG (rocket-propelled
grenade) launchers and missiles, Kalashnikov as-
sault rifles, anti-tank and anti-aircraft missile
launchers, hand grenades and and an assortment
of other weapons and explosives.
The officer in charge of de-activating the
weapons and explosives said the large cache was
mostly of Soviet and Eastern Bloc origin. But
Chinese, Swedish, Belgian and NATO equipment,
and American recoilless rifles, were also found.
The terrorist training center had a modern
audio-visual language laboratory, in every way
the equal of the Hebrew University's language
laboratory.
Most of the students' rooms contained eight
double-decker beds and a double locker for each
student. Clothing and personal possessions had
been left behind in disarray, in what was ap-
parently a hasty flight just ahead of the Israeli
forces. The lockers contained books on business
English, illustrated weapons manuals in Arabic,
PLO propaganda material and, in one of them, a
book of English poetry.
In a notebook labelled "Ahmed Salaimi Sayyed.
2nd year, 1980-84," was a handwritten letter that
began:
"The English Broad Casting (sic) Co. 6 Mor-
timer St. London, WI. Dear Sirs, Please allow me
to apply for the position of program director with
you."
It was not clear whether the letter was a copy of
one actually sent or an exercise in business
English that had been filed away for possible fu-
ture use.
The Israel Defense Forces officer in charge said
that one of the rooms in the building had been
fitted out for Yasser Arafat's personal use as one
of his scattered headquarters. Personal effects
said to belong to the PLO chairman were on dis-
play, including his well-known Russian fur hat.
Provided by I** ItrmtlMinistry ofPonign A!!-

^CrtiteO >lcxle* S>erxaU
WaHlMTO*l. O.C lOV'O
June 29, 1982
Harry A. Lavy
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33137
Dear Harry:
Thank you for your letter expressing concern over the Israeli
incursion into southern Lebanon.
As you know, on June 5, 1982, the Israeli Amy attacked Palestin-
ian outposts in southern Lebanon. Previously, Palestinian forces
shelled Israeli settlements from Lebanon and made assassination
attempts on Israeli diplomatic personnel in violation of the
cease fire agreement negotiated by Ambassador Habib last year.
President Reagan net with Ambassador Habib and instructed him to
try to restore the cease fire agreement he achieved last year.
I understand the concern tha
military action against PLC
1. I believe that the acti
Lebanon delivered a blow to
provided critical assistance
around the world, with the
ist organizations are likely
that soon all non-Lebanonese
that Israel may live in peac
its own destiny.
Thank you for your expression of interest and concern.
Sincerely,
t led the Is
sponsored te
on taken by
internationa
to numerous
PLO in disar
to suffer a
forces will
e, and Leban
raeli government to take
rrorism in northern Isra-
the Israeli military in
1 terrorism. The PLO has
terrorist organizations
ray, these other terror-
s well. It is my hope
withdraw from Lebanon so
on can regain control of
LAWTON CMILB)
UlCmfeb >laU* >enals
June 28, 1982
Paula Hawkins
United States Senator
PH/bsh
Harry A. Levy
and David Fleeraan
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Dear Hap and David:
Thank you for getting in touch with me about the situation In
Lebanon.
As you are well aware, Lebanon has ceased to exist as a sovereign
nation over the past six years. Instead, It has been torn apart
by the PLO, Syrian troops and Christian and Moslem Lebanese
factions. Southern Lebanon has become a launching pad for PLO
terrorist and military activities against Israel. Finally, after
numerous PLO violations of the cease-fire on the Lebanese border
and the murder of the Israeli ambassador to England, Israel's
troops moved 1n.
On June 14, together with some of my colleagues 1n the Senate,
I wrote to President Reagan about the situation 1n Lebanon. In
the letter, we outlined our Ideas on what the United States can
do to help bring a lasting peace to the area. We advised the
President to direct American diplomatic initiatives toward neutral-
izing the PLO 1n Lebanon and getting Syrian forces out of the country,
thus allowing the Israeli troops to go home. I would hope that we
will aim toward establishment of a strong central government 1n
Beirut that can restore order and prevent the use of Lebanon as a
launching point for terrorist attacks against Israel.
I'm glad to see the President's envoy, Philip Habib. working In this
direction. Hopefully, his efforts will succeed 1n bringing about a
negotiated settlement that will end the current conflict without
further bloodshed and with Israel at peace with Its northern neighbor.
I appreciate your contacting
With best regards. I am
about this Important Issue.
Sincerely ,^/
LAWTON CHILES


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