The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02784

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
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THE
Volume 55Number 24 Three Sections
m
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^fifjorlda-. Friday, June 11,1982
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ByMaiisoc^n Price 50 Cents
Plastic Surgery
In Search Of
The Perfect Body
ByMERRIE BISENSTADT
Capvnfki HaltimorrJmull 1'inui
Rfpnii s Special Arramgrmmt
"You don't /fee/ any
Ner, do you?" Gladys
her husband, her tone
nost urgent. "Doyou feel
? You don't feel old, do
ou?"
F don't feel old," he
T*ers, "but I know I am
*mg older."
1^ Gladys her age, and she
"ages you: how old do I
["Forty," I answer.
"Fifty-four!" she shoots back.
Wm a son 33. and a daughter
Pjjdys is smiling; she is tri-
Tnt, as if winning her gues-
lgme had demonstrated that
Mfc surgery which she had
wgone was well worth $5,000
M three-day hospital stay.
TWO YEARS ago. she and her
husband. Harry (not their real
names), both had cosmetic sur-
gery. They shared a room at the
hospital. Gladys had a full face-
lift, including the tightening of
the skin beneath her chin and
around her neck; Harry had the
puffiness under his eyes and the
heaviness of his eyelids relieved.
The couple tries to downplay
their preoccupation with aging,
but their actions indicate that
they are engaged in a struggle to
hold back an enemy. They have
enlisted the surgeon's scalpel in
their battle to halt the wrinkles,
lines and puffiness which seem
perhaps to signal a kind of death
knell in a society that idolizes
youth and good looks. Gladys
even went so far as to have her
surgery performed even though
she was assured by her docter
that she didn't need it: "I didn't
want to wait to the point when I
needed it, because when do you
Continued on Page 8-A
Israeli Retaliation:
Troops in Lebanon
JERUSALEMIsrael officials had no comment Tues-
day on the announcement from Syria that its forces were
in direct confrontation" with Israeli troops as columns of
thousands of soldiers thrust deep into Lebanon over the
weekend.
The invasion Saturday came
on the 15th anniversary of the
1967 war that Israel won in sue
days. By late Monday, Israel
troops were battling Palestinians
in the streets of Tyre, 13 miles
north of the Israeli border on the
Mediterranean coast. Para-
troopers landed by helicopter and
boat in the towns of Ansar and
Zahrani further to the north.
IN DAMASCUS, officials said
that a 25,000-man force occupy-
ing Lebanon was already engag-
ing the Israelis near the south-
eastern villages of Hasbaya,
Jarmag and Barghout. And
Lebanese officials noted that the
Syrians were moving toward
Nabatiye, a southern PLO center,
Continued on Page 2-A
But these officials did
say that its troops were
moving to engage in search-
and-destroy operations
against the Palestinian
guerrillas dug in beyond ar-
tillery range of the northern
Israeli border.
COLUMNS OF tanks and ar
tillery crossed into southern
Lebanon Saturday. Jets, gun-
boats and artillery shot away at
Palestinian positions along the
Lebanese coast. It was reported
in Beirut that more than 150 peo-
ple were killed and 250 wounded.
The invasion was called the
heaviest in four years by United
Nations Forces observers. By
Tuesday, casualties had mounted
to 210 killed and 520 wounded.
Timur Goksel. a spokesman for
the UN Forces in Lebanon,
stressed that the Israeli invasion
aimed at establishing a presence
in an enclave long known as Had-
dadland under the control of the
Israel-backed Lebanese militia
headed by Maj. Saad lladdad.
Goksel said that the movement
into the six-mile strip along Is-
rael's northern border had
stopped.
AT THE United Nations, the
security Council met in
emergency session and passed a
15-0 resolution calling on Israel
and the PLO to obey a ceasefire
as of Sunday midnight EDT.
But by late Monday night and
early Tuesday, Israeli troops
were smashing toward Beirut.
"We are in a war situation," said
one Israeli Air Force commander.
"We're succeeding in catching
the terrorists no matter where
they are, and we are keeping
them under fire."
Object of Israel's massive
bombardment and lightening of-
fensive was the town of Damour,
13 miles south of Beirut. PLO
sources charged that Israel gun-
boats were attacking the coastal
road outside Damour, with Is-
raeli war planes flying overhead.
Philip Ha bib
Luncheon of Issues
Begin Set for Full
White House Menu
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Reagan's
invitation to Israeli Premier Menachem Begin to have
lunch at the White House June 21 may now turn out to be
a threesome with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak
joining in an informal summit. But whether or not
Mubarak accepts the invitation, the June 21 meeting and
talks possibly in New York the weekend before will mark
the start of the Reagan Administration's renewed effort to
get the autonomy negotiations moving.
This "more active role" on au-
tonomy, the Iraq-1 ran war and
the situation in Lebanon was the
main stress of Secretary of State
Alexander Haig's speech on the
Middle East in Chicago. The ad-
dress, the first major speech on
the Mideast by a top Reagan
Administration official, did not
contain anything that Haig has
not been saying for the past
months. But it did show some
sources of differences between Is-
rael and the United States.
ON AUTONOMY, Haig re-
iterated that "The Camp David
process, which is based firmly on
United Nations (Security Coun-
cil) Resolutions 242 and 338, re-
mains the only practical route to-
ward a more comprehensive
Middle East peace between Israel
and all of its neighbors including
iJordan and Syria."
Continued on Page 14-A
Tiat Can Israel Do for Zaire Now that Ties Resume?
By EDWIN EYTAN
ifrHASA, Zaire -
W r Less than a few
|22 yards from the Is-
r embassy, over which
LWue ^d white flag has
'Proudly flown for a
fc e Kinshasa "jun-
LZ*108- a huge con-
centration of miserable
hovels, often without elec-
tricity or running water, in
which three million people
live or, more precisely
struggle to survive.
The real jungle, with its dan-
gers and hardships, is no longer
in the bush where fruit grows on
trees and the bush people manage
to harvest a small but life-sus-
taining crop of manioc. The jun-
gle, where starvation, sickness
and insecurity reign is right in
the capital where life, often short,
is a permanent and merciless
struggle for survival.
KINSHASA, however, will be
carefully watched by all other
African countries to find out if
Israeli assistance can really help
them: whether Israel can really
"deliver" what they expect and
whether renewing diplomatic ties
with Israel is worth braving the
wrath of the Arab states and giv-
ing up Arab, and especially
Saudi, financial aid.
In Senegal, Saudi Arabia pro-
vides, through grants and loans,
a third of the national budget. In
Zaire, President Sese Seko Mo-
butu, by renewing ties with Is-
rael, gave up a straight Saudi
grant of $500 million spread over
10 years, plus a variety of other
forms of Arab assistance. This is
high in Israeli terms.
It is astronomical in Zaire or in
the Central African Republic,
where salaries often remain un-
paid for months for lack of
Continued on Page 12-A






Page 2-\ The Jewish Floridian. .Friday .June 11.1982
Israel Retaliates
Troops in Mass Move;
Beirut Seen as Target
Continued from Page 1 A
to reinforce the garrison there.
President Reagan, at an
economic conference of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization
members in Paris, urged restraint
from Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, and he sent special envoy
Philip Ha bib to Israel to try to
reinstate the ceasefire he ar-
ranged last July. U.S. officials
meanwhile ordered American de-
pendents and a good part of the
U.S. Embassy staff in Beirut to
leave Lebanon.
Habib stopped off at Ver-
sailles, outside of Paris, to meet
with President Reagan and
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig on his way to Israel. Haig
was asked whether it was "ap-
propriate" for Israel to use
American-supplied tanks and
planes in the fighting.
"THESE ARE questions of
extreme importance, questions
on which assessment will be
made in the hours ahead." he
said.
Begin did not immediately re-
spond to President Reagan's plea
for restraint. But following a
Cabinet meeting Sunday, he
noted that "Our answer is in the
field." Adding that residents of
the upper West Bank were being
evacuated for their safety. Begin
noted that the last military
operation had been dubbed
"Operation Peace for Galilee."
He added: "We must place all
the civilian population of the
Galilee beyond the range of the
terrorist fire from Lebanon."
At the Security Council meet-
ing calling for Israeli withdrawal,
Israeli Ambassador Yehuda
Blum accused the FLO of waging
a campaign of terror, and he
specifically emphasized 150 acts
of terrorism agains Israelis and
Jews since July, 1981, "which
made a mockery of the ceasefire."
THE ATTACK last weekend
followed 19 hours after Israeli
jets bombed PLO offices in
SS Officers
Found Guilty
BONN IJTA) Two for
mer SS officers found guilty of
complicity in the murders of
1,000 Jews in the Ukraine during
World War II, received prison
sentences from a Traunstein
court last week. Franz Bauer, 64,
from Altoetting was given 5'/
years and his co-defendant, Hans
HerteJ, 65, of Hamburg was sen-
tenced to 3Vi years.
Their trial, which lasted nearly
six months, heard eye-witnesses
testify about details of mass
shootings, allegedly ordered by
Bauer and Hertel. But there was
no conclusive evidence that either
man had personally participated.
The accused claimed they were
acting on orders of their superiors
The State Prosecutor charged
that Bauer and Hartd were re-
sponsible for the murders of at
least 11,000 Jews but the court
concluded there was insufficent
evidence to support the charge.
downtown Beirut, where police
said 60 persons were killed and
270 wounded. The attack was in
apparent retaliation for the
attempt on the life of Israels
Ambassador to Britain Shmuel
Argov last Thrusday night.
"We regret any civilian casual-
ties," said Blum. "The respon-
sibility must lie with the PLO
cowards who have established
their bases within such civilian
neighborhoods.
Three Palestinians Charged
Envoy Argov Shot on Streets of London
LONDON Three Arabs were charged last weekend
with the attempted slaying of Israel's Ambassador to
Great Britain Shlomo Argov. The Ambassador was shot
Thursday
Hotel.
night outside of the fashionable Dorchester
Members of Scotland
Yard's Diplomatic Protec-
tion Group returned their
fire. One was wounded and
taken to a hospital for neck
injuries. Several hours
later, they arrested two
suspect accomplices.
Those arrested include two
Jordanian students in their early
20s and an Iraqi merchant. One
of the Jordanians. Ghassan
Hasan Ahmed Said. 23. was also
charged with the attempted
murder of a policeman. Colin
Simpson.
SCOTLAND YARD said that
the Jordanian first fired at Ar-
gov's police bodyguard, who re-
turned the fire and hit the attack-
er in the neck. After a brief hospi-
talization. he was taken into
custody.
The others charged with at-
tempted murder were Marwan Al
Banna. 21. of Jordan, and Nowaf
Nagib Miflih Rosan, 36 of Iraq.
Also briefly detained were a
Syrian, later released without
being charged, and an Iranian,
who was handed over to immi-
gration authorities.
Deputy Assistant Commis-
sioner David Powis of Scotland
Yard was quoted as declaring
that "We believe we have frus-
trated a series of terrorist out-
rages."
In response to Israel's charge
that the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization was behind the assas-
sination attempt. Nabil Ramlawi,
the PLO representative in Lon-
don, issued a statement that,
condemned "the silence from Eu-
rope" following the Israeli
bombing of Palestinian targets in
Lebanon last weekend.
"THE PALESTINIAN people
can not fail to notice the silence
from Europe when hundreds of
our people are killed or injured by
Israel, and compare this to the
concern expressed by European
leaders and press when a single
Zionist is injured." Ramlawi
denied Israel's charge that the
PLO had masterminded the
attempt on Argov s life.
Scotland Yard said it was
probing possible connections be-
tween the shooting of the Israeli
Ambassador and of the assassi-
nation of other Israeli diplomats
in Europe, most recently the fatal
April shooting of Yaacov Barsi-
mantov, an Israeli Embassy
official in Paris.
Meanwhile, police also an-
nounced coming upon a cache of
guns and ammunition in raids
after the attack on Argov, as well
as a "death list" suggesting a
terrorist campaign against other
Israeli diplomats in the future
elsewhere in Europe, to which
Scotland Yard's Powis had ap-
parent reference.
DOCTORS AT the National
Hospital for Nervous Diseases,
where Argov underwent a 2'/t-
hour operation to remove a blood
clot and bone fragments from his
brain following the assassination
attempt, have announced that
Argov may remain paralyzed for
life on his left side if he survives.
"From the areas of the brainl
damage, one might expect parucl
ularly some degree of paralysisoff
the left limbs, also interfen
with the sensation of that st
and possibly a defect in the field
of vision on the left side," si
Dr. Norman Grant
Grant also warned that Arj_
would probably suffer speech and]
intellectual disability, but itwa
an "informed guess that
would not be a serious impair|
ment. Still, the prognosis forth
critical Argov was such tb
Grant added: "I can not suu
categorically (if he will recoverlj
1 have no way of predicting th
at this stage."
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News in Brief
Friday, June 11,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Did Weinberger Have Meeting With Jewish Leaders?
ByJTA Services
p\V YORK A source close
s Conference of Presidents of
American Jewish Or-
ations confirmed to the
Telegraphic Agency a
."report that Defense Secre-
Caspar Weinberger held a
t meeting with American
jrish leaders in New York last
nth in an attempt to reconcile
I sharp policy differences
i the Reagan Administration
lie Middle East.
.ording to the report, the
ng focussed on Administra-
ans, strongly advocated by
nberger, to sell advanced
weaponry to Arab countries
Jly to the U.S., notably
But the problem was not
i, the report said. The
ling, at the Princeton Club,
arranged by Jacob Stein,
(dent Reagan's former
i to Jewish groups.
i report of the closed meet-
; quoted Administration offi-
i and Jewish leaders as say-
I there was basic agreement
I U.S. interests come first and
tit was in the U.S. interest to
Israel's security. The
nces stem from the Ad
atration's view that it can in-
i Arab countries.
ptian Claims Agreement
>NoTalks in Capitals
, AVIV A top Egyptian
expressed his country's
and concerns in the con-
j peace process with Israel
Butros Ghali, Minister of
Foreign Affairs, said at
ng with the editorial staff
nv that he was confident
autonomy talks would
and claimed that the
f venue was determined by
ntlemen's agreement" not
I the talks in either Jeru-
r Cairo.
con-
arouse
' terrorist state" and raising the
charge of deicide against Jews.
Its editor. Georges Montaron,
was fined 1,600 Francs ($300) on
grounds that the editorial over-
stepped the bounds of normal
political commentary and
tained material likely to
anti-Jewish feelings.
The nature of the editorial
surprised many because
Temoignage Chretien, though
pro-Palestinian in its views,
reputedly represents "progres-
sive liberal" elements in the
French Catholic Church. French
circles were also puzzled by an
editorial in the Moroccan govern-
ment controlled newspaper
L'Opinion on May 30 which
called the Holocaust a Zionist
hoax and claimed that Israeli
Premier Menachem Begin was
more vicious than Hitler.
Morocco traditionally has been
moderate in the Middle East con-
flict.
Soviet Embassy Site Of
Vigil for Valadimir Slepak
Some
major obstacle to re-
on of the talks appears to
ypt's refusal to meet in
ilem and Israel's insistence
I the talks cannot proceed
i Jerusalem is at least one of
Wing places. According to
" egentlemen's agreement
w in effect all along, since
I earlier autonomy sessions
n held either in Alex-
wHerzliya, near Tel Aviv.
conceded there was nothing
""'ng, but suggested that
Ask Dr. (Yosef) Burg,"
I the Israeli autonomy ne-
"!team, "who would con-
t over 50 talks have been
i numerous venues outside
: Weekly Guilty
^Jewish Attacks
~ The prestigious
Catholic weekly,
Chretien, was found
'criminal court here of
I *ial hatred in an edi-
Mtacking Israel as a
WASHINGTON
thirty persons gathered across
from the Soviet Embassv here to
highlight the fourth anniversary
of the imprisonment of Soviet
Jewish activist Vladimir Slepak.
Sponsored by the Washington
Committee for Soviet Jewry, the
group presented a petition with
hundreds of signatures to a
Soviet official at the gates of the
embassy appealing to Soviet
authorities to release Slepak. But
the official who spoke briefly with
some members of the group said
that he could not accept the peti-
tion and that the matter should
be handled through the State
Department.
Slepak is serving a five year
sentence in internal exile in
Siberia, and according to the or-
ganizers of the rally, his crime
was hanging a banner from his
window which read. "Let us Out
to Our Son in Israel.''
Prospect for Three-Day
Summit Appears to be Dim
JERUSALEM Egyptian
Foreign Minister Kamal Hassan
Ali delivered a personal message
from President Hosnit Mubarak
to Premier Menachem Begin,
reportedly proposing that the
two of them meet in the near
future. The message also dealt
with resumption of the autonomy
talks.
Begin told Ali he appreciated
Mubarak's message which re-
portedly asserted that peace
between their countries was
"eternal." Begin and the
Egyptian visitor both said they
hoped the autonomy talks would
be resumed quickly but neither
indicated progress in resolving
the venue issue. Begin insists
that some of the sessions be held
in Jerusalem. Mubarak refuses to
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send the Egyptian negotiating
team to the Israeli capital.
Prospects of a three-way sum-
mit meeting between Begin,
Mubarak and President Reagan
m Washington later this month
appeared to have dimmed.
Hassan Ah told reporters after
his meeting with Begin that the
leaders of Israel and Egypt
should hold a meeting of their
own before attending a summit in
Washington.
Bill Would Delete
Reparations from Taxes
NEW YORK A bill is cir-
culating in the U.S. House of
Representatives that would ex-
clude Holocaust reparations pay-
ments from countable income in
determining eligibility for
Supplemental Security Income
(SSI).
Reparations to Holocaust sur-
vivors for personal injuries
suffered during World War II are
provided under the Federal Law
on the Compensation of Victims
of the National Socialist Per-
secution, enacted by West Ger-
many in 1956.
The bill was introduced last
month by Rep. Henry Waxman
ID Calif.) after the case of a
constituent, Felicia Grunfeder,
was brought to his attention.
Grunfeder's SSI payments, pro-
vided to Social Security recip-
ients on the basis of need, were
terminated by the government
after it declared her monthly
reparations payments as un-
earned income, placing her total
income over the eligibility limit
for SSI.______________________
JWV Commander Protests
U.S. Meeting With Arabs
WASHINGTON The na-
tional commander of the Jewish
War Veterans, Robert Zweiman,
has sent a telegram to Secretary
of State Alexander Haig protest-
ing and seeking clarification of a
meeting between two State De-
partment officials and two West
Bank Palestinian mayors who
Zweiman said had "ties" to the
Palestinian Liberation Organiza-
tion.
The two mayors Fahd
Kawasma of Hebron and
Mohammed Milhem of Halhul
met with two Assistant Secre-
taries of State: Nicholas Veliotes,
who is in charge of the Near East
and South Asian Department;
and Elliott Abrams, who heads
the Human Rights Division,
according to a State Department
spokesman.
Department spokesman Alan
Rom berg revealed that the two
mayors called at the State De-
partment for talks on the West
Bank situation, U.S. policy and
the prospect for Palestinian auto-
nomy. The talks, Romberg
pointed out, were initiated by the
mayors and "took place in the
context of our willingness to meet
with a broad range of Pales-
tinians other than members of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization."
Watch Out: Here Comes
'Jimmah' Once More
NEW YORK Former Presi
dent Carter, providing a preview
into his soon to be published
memoirs during an address to a
convention of American book-
sellers, described this week how
he had ordered increased security
.precautions one evening during
the Camp David peace talks for
former Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat because he feared
the Egyptian leader might be "in
danger from the Egyptian dele-
gation."
Elaborating on his remarks to
the American Booksellers Asso-
ciation convention meeting in
Anaheim, California, the former
President said at a later news
conference: "I thought Sadat
was in physical danger. I called
Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski (Carter's
former National Security Ad-
viser) to come to my cabin about
3 o'clock in the morning, and I
called the head of the Secret
Service detail to come to my
cabin and I told them I wanted to
tighten the guard around Sadat's
cabin without letting him know
and not let anybody go into it."
The Carter memoirs, "Keeping
Faith," are scheduled for release
in November. The former Presi-
dent also mentioned his "frus-
trations" in trying to deal with
Israel's Premier Menachem
Begin.
Soldier Identified
LONDON (JTA) There
are about 300 Jewish members of
Britain's regular armed forces
but only one of them, a Royal
Navy officer, is known to be serv-
ing in the Falkland Islands task
force. Rev. Malcolm Weisman,
chief Jewish chaplain to Britain's
armed forces, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
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'
Friday. Jane 11.1 82
Israel's Move Must be Seen As Act of Self-Defense
Secretary of State Alexander Haig has
tipped the US. position on Israel's retalia-
tory strike into Lebanon. The United
States, he said in Versailles, must deter-
mine 'within hours'" whether Israel had the
right to defend itself against unrelenting
Palestinian provocation by using made-in -
America planes and other weapons.
It is clear Once more. Israel will be
labeled as aggressor, and Prime Minister
Begin will be called "intransigent"
As for the United Nations, its instant re-
sponse was for the Security Council to call
on Israel "to withdraw all its military
forces forthwith and unconditionally" from
Lebanon. That. of course, leaves Syria with
its forces still there, and the PLO to con-
tinue to mastermind its international ter-
rorist activities from Beirut
PLO Aim: Extermination
Meanwhile. Israel Ambassador to Bri-
tain Shlomo Argov was as o: the beginrv.r.g
of the week still fighting for his life in a
London hospital following the assassina-
tion attempt on him by a corps of three
Palestinians. Of course, the United Nations
said nothing about that
The fact is that Israel's action in
Lebanon is in the cause of self-defense. Ob-
ject is to bring under control PLO terrorist
concentrations in Lebanon and to end the
constant and growing threat to the welfare
and safety of Israel's population in Galilee.
Against this objective, let not Secretary
of State Haig forget that the central and
declared aim of the PLO. including all its
associated terrorist groups, is the elimina-
tion of the State of Israel through violent
means, and it is clear that the buildup of
the PLO's vast arsenal of weapons in
Lebanon was to utilize them in that avowed
purpose. Would any sovereign nation, in-
cluding the United States, permit that de-
velopment? Would any member of the
United Nations, especially the Soviet
Union, which so high-handedlv at the
emergency Security Council meeting in-
sisted that the word "unconditionally"
be added to the UN withdrawal demand
addressed to Israel?
Terrorist Activity on Rise
It is well-known that the threat of terror-
ist activity against Israel and its popula-
tion has recently increased, with repeated
and serious breaches of the ceasefire ar-
ranged last July by U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib now in the Middle East. There
have been repeated and serious breaches
including the shelling of towns and villages
in Northern Galilee, infiltration into Israel
via Jordan, the planting of explosives in
towns and villages within Israel, and at-
tacks on Jewish and Israeli targets
abroad all aimed at causing maximum in-
jury and bloodshed to the civilian popula-
tion.
In effect, the terrorists of the PLO have
utilized the period of the ceasefire since
July, 1981 to reestablish and expand their
bases and fortifications in Lebanon, a coun-
try they have virtually destroyed with the
help of the Syrians. acquiring and station-
ing there large quantitites of tanks, missiles,
A
UTO
NOMY
FOR THE
VEST BANK
AJfT
"Jf'torncarrtsee
you're in troublefj
Florxdian
omcsi
IPLANT-IMNE WScH>MLFhnu:
PO BnOlim. Uma
rBSO K-tHOCHET LEO HINDUS
13101
17J-440S
SUZANNE SHOCHET
bmmEAuf
I W*!y E<*ry Tntaj
1W7 fc? TW Jam* Fkntea
pwusraxTuao
HATES in Admnca (Local Afw: On* VmS18 Two Imn U4 00. Thr
ln 111 aMM''"1""' (Local A>al -a' fnom eacf month (10 .....n Sapt
jurmSXJO Owl <* low country, upon r*Qu*v
artillery and ammunition. And they have
constructed an extensive offensive infras-
tructure in Lebanon directed toward the
destruction of Israeli sovereigntv
In the end. Lebanon, whose territory the
PLO terrorists have usurped, is totally
unable to prevent a terrorist presence on its
territory, or to prevent PLO activities
against Israel. One will never know it from
reading the general press or listening to
general television news reports, but a sig-
nificant part of of Lebanon's population
shares Israel's view of the murder of its
sovereignty at the hands of the PLO and
Syria.
What must be understood in this self-de-
fensive Israeli action is that Israel respects
the territorial integrity and the sovereignty
of Lebanon. It has never aspired, nor does
it now intend, to bring about change in the
international border between itself and
Lebanon. But it is not prepared to suffer a
war of attrition waged by the PLO against
it from Lebanese territory. A war that
bombs and maims men. women and chil-
dren. And that shoots Israeli envoys in the
performance of their official duty in Vienna.
In Paris. And. last week, in London.
A New Look at the Rosenbergs*
n
i
Friday. June 11. 1962
Volume 55
-MS1VAN5T42
Number 24
THIS IS a tune to consider the
defense of John W. Hinckley. Jr..
who attempted to gun down
President Reagan. Hmckley put
the President into the hospital.
Hmckley snuffed out the world, if
not the life, of one James Brady.
still the President s nominal
press secretary today, but he
might just as well be dead, his
brain all battered and convulsive
and confused. And Hinckley
made a .painful ro^diaai case out
of a Washington poUceman. who
must suffer the agonies of his
wounds until the end of his days
Still. Hmckley s defense at-
torneys are seeking special dis-
pensation for him on the legal
ground that this former Nazi.
this vile anti-Semite didn't know
what he was domg when he made
his assassination attempt and so
ought to be excused Especially,
because he really knew better
coming as he does from a wealthy
oil fa mil y
THIS IS a time to consider the
case of Sirhan Sirhan. the Jew
hating Palestinian who murdered
Robert Kennedy and who still
plays out every lawyer's
maneuver available to him to win
a parole from life imprisonment
in a California institution on the
ground that not even Kennedy.
were he still alive, would condone
his continuing punishment.
This is a time to consider the
appeal of the National Committee
to Reopen the Rosenberg Case,
an appeal offered in a letter to
Rep. Peter Rodino. chairman of
the House Judiciary Committee,
that endorses a request for
Judiciary Committee appoint-
ment of a Commission of Inquiry
to rethink the Rosenberg-Sobell
trial in June. 1953 as a result of
The Hmckley defense and the
Sirhan plea are the products of a
humanistic criminal justice
system bent on destroying the
fabric of American civiliza-
tionand on lining the pockets
of legal experts committed to
perverting the original purpose of
the insanity argument. Far
ticularly Sirhan Sirhan s relent-
less pursuit of his freedom is a
variety of chutzpah yet to be seen
and to which even the usually in-
trepid core of "defense" lawyers
always eager for new business are
apparently cool.
BUT WHAT of the Rosen-
bergs? There are Americans
apiancy. Jews among than, who
are irritated as they observe the
national judicial process at work
THEROSENQERGS
in the Hmckley case. And who
are incensed by that process as
Sirhan Sirhan attempts to make
it work for him. too. But there is
no such platoon of opinion in the
case of the Rosenbergs. In the
case of the Rosenbergs there is
only silence
I am, in fact, reasonably cer-
tain that to suggest that the
Rosenberg Sobell case ought to
be reconsidered raises the hark km
of those who are asked to con-
template it. The Rosenbergs were
after all Communists. The
Rosenbergs were after all spies.
After ail, the Rosenbergs gave
our atom bomb secrets to the
Russians And beyond eve.,
thing else, the Rosenbergs wa
at least nominal Jews wi|
proved'' the spurious dicta
that all Jews are Communists
I tend to suspect that it is t
last popular sentiment behij
which bes the thunderous silaJ
of most American* to the causej
reopening the Rosenberg C
Committee appeal, including l'
silence of man> Jews out u>(
prove the tpw .-ibel
them
ESPECIALLY so far
American Jew- ire concer
this rnentary. Afu]
almost M year- since the ex
tion of the F. rgs, whati
ought to be si jdydis
sionateiy ;- the enormous
parity bietwei I J of justs
:hat. on the -and. suco
'oh" Hit nd "is verv
spectabke very wealthy oil fa
and encourage- the '.utzpoh
the assassin S ">:rhan. .V
that, on the otner. sent I
Rosenberg- '<*th H
out even a Supreme Court rev*
of a federal court statement
outrage at the >entence and r
atmosphere in which the
berg trial was held
American Jews should not
fearful to come to grips wiinto
What is not involved here ]
attempt to reverse the Roseno
case decision and execution
that decision That is imp""
Ethel and Julius Rosenberg!
dead. They can not be returns!
life. The rest is commentary-
it is important commentarv
serving examination
For example, there are
claims that the Rosenbergs r
to due process was National Commit tee pom" w
cases of Jencks. Shepp
Gruenwald and Withers^
which the United Stag**J"
Court reversed a Florida*
sentence "because the tnal^
had removed one J^*^
because of his oppoa'^
capital Punishment^
Rosenberg case. f*j**
removed eight suchjuro*
regulars and two alternates.
THE ROSENBERGc*
considered during J, rf
War and at the heg^ j
McCarthy heyday ^
relatively easy for tj"jn
**-po*f /ucro that I.* ,
imposaAle. Or to** ^
failed to express <*"** \
CoatiaaedoaPaffl**


Thumbs Down
Friday, June 11, JMfc The Jewtoh Floridim Pge*A
Support for Reagan Seen Plummet
[WASHINGTON -
sklent Reagan's support
continued to plunge,
_, sharp decreases in
Import from women, which
cts the severity of his
joman problem." The in-
easing gap between men's
women's attitudes
vard the President and
ppublican candidates who
affle on women's rights
! surfaced again in state-
I elections.
[Illinois Gov. James Thompson
latest state politician to
:er from the decline among
in his reelection bid
nst former U.S. Sen. Adlai
venson. the Democratic con-
iate for governor. The Equal
its Amendment drive in Illi-
has played a key role in
ompson's decline in support.
RECENT Chicago Tribune
shows Thompson trailing
Ivenson. a reversal from the
trnor's 9-point lead in Janu-
The political gap between
i and women in Illinois is a
Jmatic 23 percent, with 14 per-
more women supporting
venson and 9 percent more
| opting for Thompson.
Rationally. Ronald Reagan's
i are showing similar results
i a 25 percent gender gap: 15
: more women saying "no"
question. "Would you like
Ronald Reagan run for re-
as President in 1984?"
i answer "yes" by a 10 point
n. according to an AP-NBC
), 1982 poll. Overall, there is a
er proportion of Americans
i do not want Reagan to run
n, 46 percent 42 percent,
i is due primarily to his re-
onby women.
[President Reagan's opposi-
i to the Equal Rights Amend-
his insensitivity to
n's rights issues and, his
omic policies which have
women disproportionately,
cially his increases in mih-
f spending in contrast to cuts
omestic programs, have an-
women." states Eleanor
1. president of the National
nization for Women. "Not
s this show in the polls, it
we believe will continue
at the ballot box."
REPUBLICAN candi-
pay lip service to women's
they too will find they
woman problem," Smeal
F Illinois is a good example.
-Thompson's opposition to
[Majority Rule for ERA. plus
|*Pport of an anti-ERA run-
lmate- has hurt him. He is
: m the polls largely be-
,.* a 'ss in women's sup-
DPn's problem among
| can be attributed to the
Primary campaign for
J governor which pitted
^rnor's candidate, House
,e!peore Ryan, against
'iwnsor, State Rep. Susan
in her bid for the Re-
nomination for lieu-
governor, exposed
i k? SLW,eak 9uPPort for the
J* challenged him to do
o!pR^honiP80n Pub"
^RA, he supported
*nch to Press
Nili on Jews
^2?T Claud. CIv*
""^^ninatlon to con
iSS Soykt **
'tfSoviatJ,
House Speaker Ryan, who is sin-
glehandedly blocking the ERA in
Illinois by not allowing the
House to vote on a proposed
Majority Rule for passage of the
Amendment.
STEVENSON', running mate
a strong ERA leader, Grace
Mary Stern, Thompson trails
Stevenson 35 percent to 37 per-
cent, which is a turnabout from a
January poll showing Thompson
m the lead by 39 percent to
Stevenson's 30 percent.
Shortly after the March
primary in Illinois, Gov. Thomp-
son came out against adopting
the Majority Rule for ERA.
Thompson has modified his posi-
tion because of increasing pres-
sure from the Illinois Majority
Rule Campaign. The Governor
now says that he is not against
the Majority Rule in principle;
however, he is not for it at the
present time in the Illinois
House.
It is the Illinois House which is
controlled by the Republicans
and where Ryan is keeping the
Majority Rule from passing.
Thompson has said in public
ing
statements that he could be for
the adoption of Majority ttule in
the Democratic Senate.
A WOMEN'S voting pattern,
similar to the trend of women's
support now seen in Illinois, was
present in th Virginia guberna-
torial election of November, 1981
where the ERA was also a key is-
sue. The women's voting gap
measured 17 percent in a Wash-
ington Post pre-election survey.
The Democratic candidate,
Chuck Robb, led a solidly pro-
ERA ticket to victory with the
women's vote helping to make
the difference. Marshall Coleman.
the Republican candidate, sup-
ported ERA passively and had
anti-ERA Republicans on his
ticket.
For the first time since winning
the right to vote 62 years ago,
women are expressing candidate
preferences that are markedly
different from those held by men.
The November, 1980 presidential
election provided the first solid
evidence of this phenomenon,
dubbed "Reagan's woman prob-
lem" in the March, 1981 Opinion
Outlook.


Lauren Teives (right) wears a 'Jerusalem' tee-shirt as she
dances the Hora at a recent reception in Jerusalem. Tewes is
one of the stars of ABC-TV's 'Love-Boat' series, and the cast
spent a day touring Jerusalem on a break from their recent Me-
diterranean filming cruise.

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Page6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. June 11. 1982
Before the Weekend war
Sharon Found Talks in D.C. Cordial
By GILL SEDAN
Aad HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTAI
The Cabinet met in spe-
cial session to hear Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon's re-
port on his meetings with
Reagan Administration of-
ficials in Washington.
Cabinet Secretary Dan
Meridor told reporters that
Premier Menachem Begin
expressed appreciation for
the way Sharon carried oat
his mission. Begin also in-
formed the Cabinet of re-
cent messages he received
from President Reagan and
Secretary of State Alexan-
der Haig and his replies to
them. No details were re-
leased.
Sharon reportedly told the
Cabinet that contrary to press re-
ports here and abroad, his meet-
ings in Washington were held m a
"good" atmosphere Neverthe-
less, it behaved here that
Sharon's trip was aggravated by
differences bet Israel and
the (L& over Israel's support of
Iran in its war with Iraq, the pro-
posed sale of advanced American
weaponry to Arab countries, par
uculariy Jordan, and the situa-
tion in Lebanon. Sharon re-
portedly had an angry confronta-
tion with US Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger.
VOICE OF Israel Radio
riaimil that Weinberger had
acted contrary to specific in-
structions from President
Reagan by- adopting a tough line
toward Sharon "becuase of
Sharon's style." Sharon, on his
return to Israel, described his
visit to the U.S. as an oppor-
tunity to "clarify and define both
?-vnf^
countries positions on the vari-
ous issues."
He said there was nothing new
m Israel's posapns. namely that
it would not agree to the con-
Palesuman
and that it
beheved that .American sanctions
Israel such aa its
of the memorandum
of underatandmg on strategic co-
operation last December
should not be an element in the
between fnendry na-
to reports here,
refused :c rule out
if Israel
vxal American c-
Sharon s meet
Haag any more ec
soarces here said The
of State reportedly
Israel against farther
compbeataons m the Lebanon
arsis
HAIG WAS said to have
presented Sharon with a new
formula by which the L'.S would
judge Israeli actions against the
Lebanon-based Palestinian ter-
rorists in proportion to the
severity of the terrorist act that
elicited the response. This was
mterpreted here as a clear warn-
ing that the U.S. would no longer
tolerate massive air strikes by Is-
rael in retaliation for individual
acts of terrorism, such as have
occurred in recent weeks. That
position is in direct conflict with
Israel's insistence on the right to
act as it sees fit
In fact. Sharon told a group of
disabled war veterans in Tel
Aviv that "Israel will exer-
cise its right to self defense
whenever a finds it necessary"
and "under no circumstances will
Israel put up with any attempt to
restrict its freedom of action at
this point Sharon spoke shortly
after a truck owned by Kubbuu
Kfar Guadi in Galilee was blown
"THE HISTADRUT WAY"
to keep ahead
of INFLATION!
Introducing
The Histadmt
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ia The High Yield Aaaarieaa M
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Gives Lifetime Iaceeae Quarterly to
Swrvivora. 40 Years of Age and Older
The "Histadmt Way"
Builds and Maintains for 85t of Israel s People
17 Hospitals. 1300 Clinics
60 Amal Vocational Schools (18.000 Students!
25 Homes for the Aged and Chronically ID
S Children's Villages for Orphans
Synagogues provided with Torah Scrolls and
Religious Articles
Over 500 Youth. Sport, sad Cultural Centers
FOB FUKTHEI INFORMATION CALL JOS Ul-tTSZ. Oft WRITE
Israel Histadmt Foundation
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Attention: Lewis Alpert. Executive Director

iathe
Si
Histadmt Is The Heart Of Israel
'*wow rwgetr
up by a land mine in the salient of
southern l the IsareJ-backed militia of Maj
Saad Haddad There were no in
juries.
On a more positive note,
sources here said Sharon found
more understanding of Israels
problems in the Senate and more
Senators supporting Israels
views. Furthermore, it was re-
ported here, the U.S. for the first
tune, wfll offer specific proposals
to KihT the Lebanon situation
when President Reagan's special
envoy. Philip Habib. returns to
the region shortly.
VOICE OF Israel Radio said
that Habib s next mission, his
sixth to the Middle East in the
past 12 months, will go beyond
preserving the ceasefire along the
Lebanese border. According to
the radio, the U.S. will propose
that all parties in Lebanon, in-
cluding the Syrians, the Pales-
tinians and Haddad s mflitia.
would wkhdraw from southern
Lebanon, and the region would be
turned over to the Lebanese
army
Nevertheless, there appear to
be undeniable strains between
Jerusalem and Washington. In
an apparent effort to ease the
tension. U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis visited Begm to
stress that the Reagan Adminis-
tration is well aware of Israel's
security and eranomir needs and
that Begm would see this for
himself when he visits Washing
ton at Reagan s invitation.
Pilot's Remains
Laid to Rest
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The remains of Maj. Jonathan
Ophir. an Israel Air Force pilot
mnong in action 8-^ years after
the Yom Kippur War. have been
laid to rest in the military ceme-
tery on Mt. Herzl. The remains
were recently handed over to Is
rack authorities by the Egyp-
tians.
The pilot's mother, wife and
his daughter, along with hun-
dreds of other mourners, were at
the graveside as the chief army
chaplain. Rabbi Gad Savon
eulogised Ophir as "one of the
true heroes of Israel" who made
k possible for "the Jewish people
to live in this country '
Ophir was born at Kibbuu tin
Herod but lived in Beersbeba
since the age of rune He served
as an officer in the paratroop unit
that captured Gaza in the 1967
Six-Day War and subsequently
joined the .Air Force where be ex-
celled in the pilot training course.
He disappeared during a mis-
sion over the Nile delta on Octo-
ber 11. 1973 It was hoped that he
and his navigator. Eiran Cohen,
bailed out safely. But they were
not among the prisoners of war
returned by Egypt. When Ophir
died, his danghtar was three
old
Halt of Soviet Jewish Emigration
Aired at Meeting in Brusseb
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM JTA -
The virtual hah of Jewish emi-
gration from the Soviet Union
was the subject of urgent dis-
cussion st a meeting in the Prime
Ministers' Office in preparation
for the Brussels Conference on
Soviet Jewry, scheduled to con-
vene in Paris next October.
According to the latest figure,
only 206 Jews left the USSR in
Msy. the smallest number in 10
years, and of them, only 60 came
toIsraeL
A dispute has arisen mean-
while between Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
chairman Leon Dulxin and the
Bank of Israel over figures the
bank released on emigration from
Israel. According to the bank's
annual report, the number of
Jews leaving Israel in 1961
exceeded, for the first time, the
number of immigrants arriving
There were 26.000 emigrants
against 15.000 immigrants, the
numtxr
k'*rthiDi
bank report said The
immigrants was the hjjL
1953. '0We8,
The report attributad tacl
off in immigration to the i
number of Soviet J,3
who chose to settle in
other than Israel and 1
tarroptaon of Jewish i
from Iran after the ov
the Shah. The high en
figure was blamed on the lv
job opportunities in Israel
Dulxin charged that the i
was "irresponsible and
any foundation He told it
mittee of the Zionist Council |
it was impossible to
accurate estimate of
because there were different S
nitions of the term But
MK Uri Baram. chairman of j
Knesset's Immigration ind
sorption Committee, said
reality was even worse Una (
Bank of Israel report ind
He said 1981 was in fact thei
ond year with a
gration balance
make i
negative
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' i

Israehs were temporarily distracted from Walter Matthau. The two arrived in the
their problems during the first week m May country as part of a 25-member UJA Los
by the comic antics of Jack Lemmon and Angeles Entertainment Study Mission
Headlines
Hassan Invites Bronfman to Visit
King Hassan II has invited Edgar M. Bronf-
| man. World Jewish Congress president, to pay an
I official visit to Morocco later this month at the
I first meeting between the two since the affiliation
I of the Moroccan Jewish community with the
Iwjc.
A one-hour meeting between the two was held
1 in the King's private suite at the Waldorf Astoria
i in New York following Bronfman's return from
Europe where he had held similar high-level dis-
cussions with Austrian Chancellor Bruno Kreis-
ky, Rumania's President Nicolai Ceausescu, and
West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt.
It was at the meeting that the invitation to
Bronfman was extended. It was also announced
that the secretary general of the Moroccan Jewish
community, David Amar, had invited Bronfman
to attend the congress of the Moroccan Jewish
Council scheduled for June 13 and 14. The event,
which will commemorate the 120th anniversary of
the founding in Morocco of the first school of the
Alliance Israelite Universelle, is to be held in
Casablanca.
The growing polarization of the American
Orthodoxy and its effects upon the future of the
American Jewish community will be the central
theme in the major presentation of Dr. Norman
Lamm at the convention of the National Council
of Young Israel June 17 to 20 at the Homowack in
the Catakill Mountains resort area of New York.
Dr. Lamm, president of Yeshiva University,
will discuss aspects of the "painful problem of ex-
tremism and divisiveness within the Orthodox
community, as well as relations between Ortho-
doxy and the rest of the Jewish community."
The convention theme is "Facing the Chal-
lenges in a Changing World."
Sen. Bob Packwood (R., Ore.); Simone Veil of
I ranee, delegate and past president of the Euro-
pean Parliament; and Dr. Christian B. Anfinsen,
1972 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, were to be a-
>ng eight honorary degree recipients at Yeshiva
University's 51st annual commencement on
Inursday, it was announced by Dr. Norman
J*nm, president. Sen. Packwood will deliver the
Commencement address.
The Mordecai Ben David Award "for service to
world Jewry" wUl a]*, be presented at the
ercises to journalist David Horowitz of New
>0|,k. past president of the United Nations
correspondents Association.
r. Lamm will preside at his sixth commence-
mentsince taking office as the University's third
President in 1976. Altogether, some 1,400 Bache-
rs Master's, and Doctoral degrees and dip-
as will be awarded. Recipients include grad-
es of the University's six undergraduate and
its gr*7.uate "nd professional schools, including
ach I 1Ca1' law' P8ycnolgy. and social work
Israel to celebrate the fourth anniversary of Is-
rael's independence.
Previous recipients of the AJCongress Artistic
Achievement Award include Joanne Woodward,
Elizabeth Taylor and Betty Ford.
A Russian-Jewish emigre, who had only a
nominal Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, was
invested as a cantor at ordination and investiture
ceremonies of Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion in New York's Temple
Emanu-El last week.
Mikhail Manevich, a native of Leningrad and
an honors graduate of the Leningrad Con-
servatory of Music, who came to the United
States only six years ago, was one of eight grad-
uates of the College's School of Sacred Music to
be invested in the cantorate by Dr. Alfred Gotts-
chalk, president of the College.
Dr. Gottschalk, presiding at the ceremonies
marking the close of the 107th academic year of
the College, also ordained 17 graduating students
as rabbis. More than 2,000 guests attended the
ceremonies at Temple Emanu-El.
Thirty-six Jewish cadets, including seven
women, are among this spring's graduates from
four U.S. service academies. The 36 are being
commissioned as officers, according to Rabbi
Herschel Schacter of New York, chairman of the
JWB Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. Among
them is the U.S. Military Academy's Gary M.
Sax tan, of Boca Raton, Fla.
"The number of Jewish cadets to graduate is
the largest in more than a decade," Schacter said.
"Previously, the number has varied from as few
as 12 to as many as 35."
JWB representatives will present com-
plimentary copies of the Hertz Pentateuch and
Haftorahs to the Jewish officers at the bacca-
laureate services.
The 36 newly-commissioned Jewish officers in-
clude 12 at the U.S. Naval Academy at Anna-
polis; 10 at the U.S. Military Academy, West
Point; nine at the U.S. Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs; and five at the U.S. Merchant
Marine Academy. Kings Point, N.Y.
Lena Home, now appearing at the Nederlander
tre in a one-woman show, has been named to
?*ive the 1982 artistic achievement award of the
^erican Jewish Congress. The award will be
CJW at a dinner June 21 at the New York
w Theater in Manhattan's Lincoln Center.
Home has been active in the National Asso-
2"B for the Advancement of Colored People
In lqv>VOtfr regMt**tk>n campaigns in the South
w, she gave a series of 30 charity concerts in
The director of the Weizmann Institute's
Center for Neurosciences and Behavioral Re-
search in Israel, Dr. David Samuel, visited the
Menninger Foundation in Topeka, Kans., last
week.
The Menninger Foundation is internationally
recognized for its work in the treatment and pre-
vention of mental illness, mental health research,
and the education of mental health professionals.
The Weizmann Institute is known for its work in
the physical and biological sciences and for its
new department of behavioral studies.
Samuel's visit was his second under the aus-
pices of the Sadie Danciger International Scholar
Exchange Program at The Menninger Founda-
tion.
During his visit, Samuel met with Menninger
staff members to review plans for the colla-
borative work and training of Weizmann and
Menninger staff members and to bear about re-
search and treatment currently underway at the
Foundation.
Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page i-n.
Address to Students
Israel Can't Stop
Terror by WarRabin

TEL AVIV (JTA) For-
mer Premier Yitzhak Rabin has
warned that Israel cannot solve
the problem of Palestinian
terrorists in southern Lebanon by
military means and to attempt to
do so would be a grave mistake
likely to entangle Israel in inter-
national difficulties without
achieving its objectives.
Rabin's address to students at
the Hebrew University's agricul-
ture school in Rehovot was an in-
direct reply to Chief of Staff Gen.
Rafael Eitan who told high school
students in Tiberias that only a
military strike by Israel could
put an end to terrorist harass-
ment from Lebanon. Eitan has
already been criticized by Knes-
set members for implicitly ruling
out a political solution.
Rabin, himself a former Chief
of Staff, said the terrorist threat
from Lebanon could not be elimi-
nated by military means because
no nation in the world would
agree to an Israeli occupation of
Lebanon for any length of time.
He did not refer to Eitan's re-
marks.
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The Jewish Floridian. Friday, June 11, 1982
Plastic Surgery
In Search of the Perfect Body
Continued from Page 1-A
really need it anyway? This way,
I'm two years ahead of myself,
because this is two years later,
and maybe I would have needed
it now, but I already did it."
ABOUT a million middie- and
upper-income Americans annual
ly are having their faces lifted,
noses reshaped, tummies tucked,
breasts resculpted and thighs
tightened. Their sagging but-
tocks are lifted, flabby arms
slimmed, and protruding ears
pinned back. Bald heads are en-
dowed with hair, virginity is
technically restored, and impo-
tent penises are rendered per-
manently erect.
Also, a few men are trans-
formed into women.
"Just about every part of the
body can be remodeled if people
don't like Mother Nature's de-
sign," one plastic surgeon said
recently. As they invest over $2
billion per year to redo their in-
herited looks, a significant num-
ber of Americans have obviously
rejected the traditional grand-
motherly advice that "if God
wanted you to have a smaller
nose, he would have given you
one."
Cosmetic surgery is the fast-
est-growing medical specialty, no
longer a hush-hush matter solely
for worn politicians and aging
celebrities. It is popular.
ESPECIALLY among Jews,
says one local surgeon, who cites
as reasons Jews awareness of the
procedures and their ability to
pay for them. In Baltimore, the
cost for reshaping faces ranges
from $750 to $1,500 for pinned-
back ears, to $5-to $6000 for a ful'
face-lift, including eve surgery.
C'onmetic or aesthetic proce-
dures, as opposed to therapeutic
ones, are generally not covered
by most insurance plans.
Whether vanity or severe dis-
figurement motivates a person to
have plastic surgery, the indivi-
dual's reasons are usually impor-
tant to him or her and the re-
sultseven if they are not as
dramatic as the case usually
is often have a strong, positive
emotional impact on the patient.
"Maybe (the patient) has what
others consider only a slight de-
formity, something not worth a
surgeon's skill. The point is. its
not others who have to live with
it." explained Dr. Laurence R.
I^eWinn, a plastic surgeon at
New York-Cornell University
Medical College, in a report in
Prime Time, a magazine for older
Americans.
Dr. Lawrence Pinkner, chief of
plastic surgery at Baltimore's
Sinai Hospital, says that when he
asks patients why they want
plastic surgery, the answer he
likes to hear is that they want to
look better.
"MANY OF my patients come
in and apologize, and say, 'I'm
sorry, I know you think it's silly
that I'm being so vain, but I'd
like to have my face lifted.' This
is my field! They don't have to
apologize to me. There's nothing
wrong with wanting to look bet-
ter," Dr. Pinkner says.
He recognizes that some people
do overreact to every fine line:
"But to most people there's a
realistic complaint that they
don't look good and they want to
look better. And, yes, in their
own minds it seems more serious
than in my mind, but there is a
problem. There is something that
can be fixed. In other words:
they 're not crazy.''
From "The Gimlet Eye, Plastic
Surgery," by D. Keith Mano, in
National Review (November 1,
1981):
"Rhinoplasts (nose hobs)
aren't my favorite," the
anaesthetist has told me.
for the injections. Then they're
awake after the nose is all
numbed. But they're groggy.
They usually have no recall, but
they're. responsive if you talk
to them. Where (the surgeon)
breaks the bone a bit they
tease me about it I look the
other way."
LIVE CARTILAGE comes
out: a thick, red toenail paring of
it. I see blood froth. (The sur-
geon) is cutting within the nose
tip: he carves a sort of human
rind away. The woman has been
moaning: her nostrils are flared
almost inside out: she will hawk
phlegm up. The surgical hard-
ware seems to me almost bur-
lesque: mallet, chisel, rasp: tools
for sullen carpentry .... A bump
on her nose bridge won't shear
off. (The surgeon) points the
chisel and his assistantit is
grisly, grisly, this proce-
durewill start to hit with a
mallet: rap, rap, rap, rap, rap.
My anaesthetist friend has
looked some other way. The
woman guzzling spit: a hopeless
knee has risen in half-conscious
protest .... (The surgeon) asks
again for the largest metal rasp.
... He sticks it far up the nostril
and, with full body weight down,
begins to saw. I have never heard
such a monstrous sound. (He)
asks for my (opinion). Yes. dif-
ferent. Yes, if you will, better .
Jewish law forbids wounding
one's body except for therapeutic
reasons. This would seem to rule
out plastic surgery, but some
traditional rabbis have inter-
preted Maimonides' injunction so
as to allow for it in some in-
stances.
Talmudic commentary, they
argue, maintains that a state of
mind which prevents a person
from mingling with people con-
stitutes pain within the halachic
definition of that term. Therefore,
the rabbis argue, if a person
"shuns normal social intercourse
as a result of deformity or other
disfigurement, the condition
causing distress may be corrected
by means of plastic surgery."
(Since definitions of "deformity,"
"distress" and "disfigurement"
may vary, observant Jews con-
templating plastic surgeryre-
constructive or cosmeticare
advised to consult appropriate
rabbinic authorities.)
THE TERM "plastic surgery"
comes from the Greek word
plasty, meaning "to mold or
shape." The field first became a
medical specialty after World
War II when battlescarred
soldiers needed new faces and
limbs. Refined techniques
evolved as World War II
weaponry wrought even worse
mutilation. Medical ad-
vancesespecially those which
have prolonged life and
health have also contributed to
the boom in plastic surgery.
More than half of plastic sur-
gery is therapeutic, and involves
treatment of such individuals as
burn victims, people bitten by
dogs, women seeking breast re-
construction following mastec-
tomies for cancer, and people dis-
figured in car accidents. The re-
maining work is cosmetic. Of
that, about 90 percent is done
above the neck.
For many plastic surgeons like
Dr. Pinkner, the largest volume
of work involves such com-
paratively simple procedures as
removing moles, slight scars,
cysts or warts. But in terms of
hours spent in the operating
room, major surgery accounts for
the bulk of a surgeon's practice.
A successful plastic surgeon in
Baltimore may perform a few
hundred major plastic surgery
operations and several hundred
minor procedures each year. Dr.
Pinkner says.
OVER THE last several years,
Dr. Pinkner has observed several
changes in the nature of his
patients and their needs and
preferences. Nose jobs, once
largely performed on teen-agers,
are now requested by more and
more people of age 20 or older.
And while he used to do five
times more nose jobs than any
other major cosmetic surgery, he
now does as many eyelid opera-
tions as nose jobs.
The removal of redundant skin
and fat pads around the evelirf
to make the eyes look JJ
again is a procedure that "sud
denly blossomed" about five
years ago. Dr. Pinkner describes
the operation and recovery
process as relatively painless He
notes that patients don't have "a
new look," as they do with a nose
job Instead, they look as they
used to, he remarks, "but thev
took rested. '
He says many of his u
patients had gotten tired of be-
ing told they look tired when thev
were not tired. The whole world is
out exercising and trying u> d0
things to stay young. This eyelid
surgery is a very simple way to
look younger," he remarked.
Although men comprise a
small proportion of the plastic
surgery patient load, their num-
bers are increasing. Some of Dr
Pinkner's male clients include
businessmen who appear on tele-
vision advertisements, salespeo-
ple, retirees heading for a new life
in the sunbelt, and middle-aged
men competing with younger job
seekers.
WHEN HARRY had eyelid
surgery two years ago at his
ophthalmologist's recommenda-
tion, he was most concerned
about removing the annoying,
drooping tissue that sometimes
made his eyes tear and interfered
with his peripheral vision, rather
than with looking younger. While
he was at it, though, he had bags
under his eyes eliminated at his
wife's suggestion.
Al Blank, a businessman, also
had his eyes done. "They were
puffy, and I wanted to get rid of
the excess fat and the excess
Some faces are recognized
all over the world.
From New\brk to New Delhi, and throughout
the world, American Express Travelers Cheques
are known and accepted.Which isn't surprising
when you consider that American Express has
been the leading travelers cheque for years.
Or that we have 105,000 refund locations.
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And nearly 1000 worldwide Travel Service
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So carry American Express Travelers
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American Express Travelers Cheques
"They're
We.


BEFORE
skin," he says. But the cosmetic
surgery that had the most
" dramatic effect on his appearance
was his hair transplant, done five
years ago. That procedure, which
results in permanent hair that
actually grows, took four visits,
spaced about 60 to 90 days apart.
"Plugs" of hair are taken from
the back of the head and placed in
bald areas. At S16 a plug, Mr.
Blank estimates that his proce-
dure would cost 85,250 today. He
says the procedure and the re-
cover)' were not painful.
" "I DIDN'T like being bald,"
Blank says frankly. "I used to
wear a hairpiece, but I got tired
of it. It always needed tape and
you had in net rid of the itching
and peeling from perspiration;
it created a lot of discomfort.
Also, 1 wanted something I could
wash my hair with, because I
coun't wash my scalp unless I re-
moved the hairpiece.
"Not .\er> man is unhappy
being bald." he observes. "Telly
*avalas' iTV'a Kojack) scalp
could carry a bald look, but my
scalp was not conducive to that.
It made me fed older. And it took
away from my self-image. So I
(eel a little bit better about my-
self You never totally eliminate
everything. '
Suzanne Mann was once very
obese She took off 150 pounds
and ended up with loose, sagging
skin, through a two-year series
^involved operations scheduled
flvjund breaks of several months
ch, she had her breasts reduced
and finned, her stomach tighten-
1. her thighs slimmed and her
my lifted.
We started at the top and
"orked our way down," she
IM'Ps. The skin had lost all its
elasticity .- all of its ability to
snap back so there was noth-
ing for it except surgery, or to let
just hang. And I chose not let
"hang,"
*-TW0 YEARS have passed
"ace the last of Ms. Mann's o-
f*rations. which were begun four
jJJW ago. Now an attractive,
^"proportioned woman, an ob-
wver would have no reason to
""< that she has ever looked
"y other way.
.1 think its wonderful. I think
^tever God hasn't corrected,
wtic surgery can," 8he says.
" there has also been a price
119 lZS Pald "P"1 from th
WM cost of her surgery.
weft her insurance covered.
She has expected visible scarr-
nm the reality of it has af-
S2jferc.?u the 9ame-She un-
"iied She worries about how a
^n would react to seeing the
" when she initially presents
C"! m a relationship. "You
ionship.
think it'1 scars everywhere. 1
tnu.u -vre noticeable, but I'm
S*ave scars everywhere. I
tnW7u re nouceable, bi
"'hey re not," she says.
JJf"n refuses to classify
SX sur8ery as a fad
"^.v still surgery," she
,*. don t think any doctor
E f.1Sithlng at the whim f
a addist. But yes. I'm sure
11 Popular."
AFTER
"It's a fad, it's a fad." insists
Gladys. Her husband agrees:
"It's in vogue."
IN THE southwest sunbelt
and Miami, cosmetic surgery
may indeed be a fad a chic
topic for luncheon chitchat, poss-
ibly even a status symbol. Dr.
Pinkner believes that Baltimore
"is not as bad as other cities. It's
Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
getting there, and probably
someday people will feel they
must continue to have another
procedure and another and
another done."
One hears stories probably
some of them true about plas-
tic surgery junkies, people who
have to have things "done" to
keep up with their younger-look-
ing friends, or just to have some-
thing to do.
There seems to be a certain re-
ticence about discussing body
surgery. Suzanne Mann, for in-
stance, is touchy about the sub-
ject: "I don't tell people. It's
none of their business. They
don't tell me they've had a hemia
operation, I don't tell them I've
had plastic surgery. It's a private
domain." Gladys and Harry, who
discuss their surgery in a warm,
approving, open manner, still
didn't want their names publish-
ed. But face-lifts, eyelid surgery
and nose jobs have become popu-
lar topics of conversation in some
circles.
"It's big with women who are
starting to age," says Celia
Ostrow, who recently had a face-
lift and feels that she looks 15
years younger. She believes that
most people are so happy with
their results that they don't care
what other people think.
PHYLLIS (not her name)
says that she felt awkward at
first talking about her plastic
surgery. "But once you say it, it
feels better."
Discussing her eye surgery and
nose job after school in the tea-
chers' lounge, her tone is hushed
and she glances around the room
to see if anyone listening. At 31,
it might have seemed premature
to have had "bags" removed
from beneath her eyes, but Phillis
had a marked fleshiness there.
Her satisfaction with the eye
surgery convinced her to have her
nose done, too.
"No one in my life ever teased
me about my nose until the day
before I was admitted to Sinai,"
she says. "I was driving down
the street with my roommate and
a car pulled up next to me with
three guys in it. One of them
looked at me and said, 'Hey, big
nose!' I was so happy. I felt it
was really okay to have the sur-
gery. It was the nicest knock I've
gotten in my life."
NO ONE will even knock
Phyllis about her nose again. Her
"before" picture shows a long,
very prominent nose with a bul-
bous tip. Five weeks after her
surgery, her nose looks delicate,
natural and in complete harmony
with her face. She is so beautiful
that it is surprising that she has
requested that her name not be
published.
"When you have plastic sur-
gery, the less you say about it,
the better. People are going to
give you an argument wherever
you go, whoever they are.
They say, 'You don't need itl
Why would you do that?' Evan
when you finish, there are some
who say, I really can't under-
stand why you did it,' she be-
lieves.
Gladys suspects that some
people try to keep their face-lifts
Continued on Page 10-A
If you believe that a vacation
should be spent in an exotic land
where ancient sights stir your senses
and people wairm your heart-
a p erfe ct blend of fas cination and
relaxation with long, lazy days and
magical nights of music, laughter
and fine cuisine- all at a cost that's
easily affordable-you believe
in miracles
-I'KllW.l ~* .,
<"% This summer, come to Israel.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, June 11, 1982
-
In Search of a Perfect Body
Continued from Page 9-A
secret "because they don't want
others to know they feel they're
getting older, or because they
really are getting older. They
don't want to admit that they
need it. If they don't tell anyone,
they think friends will just think
they look young."
THERE IS A certain impulse
to be cynical about cosmetic sur-
gery and people who may be un-
dergoing the procedures in pur-
suit of eternal youth or beauty.
But when one encounters people
as delighted with the results as
Phyllis. Al Blank or Celia
Ostrow, it becomes apparent that
cosmetic surgeons are providing
a service that is very important
to their patients.
Celia Ostrow recalls how her
card-playing friends reacted
when they saw her face-lift:
"They just cried out of happi-
ness! They couldn't believe the
difference. I went to a sorority re-
union last Saturday and every-
body recognized me, but I didn't
recognize them. I felt so good!
Everyone who sees me says, 'I
have to do it!"
The most common problem in
plastic surgery is the patient's
unrealistic expectations, followed
by disappointment. "Some peo-
ple may have excellent improve-
ment in their appearance but if
they don't look like Sophia Loren
or Robert Redford afterwards,
they think the operation is a fail-
ure," one surgeon says.
Adds Baltimore plastic sur-
geon Dr. Larry Pinkner, "No
matter how much time we spend
with them, many people still
don't hear what you say and just
do not understand. They have in
their own mind what they want.
And no matter how you explain
that this is living tissue it's
not plaster that we can mold any
way we want they hear it and
they don't understand it. .
"It's your job as the physi-
cian," he continues, "to rule out
from plastic surgery those people
who refuse to understand. Those
who have unreal expectations.
Those who think that making
their breasts larger will keep their
husband at home. Or who think
that a nose job is going to get
them a job. It's not going to keep
the husband home and it's not
going to make new friends for
them."
Following are brief descrip-
tions of what can often be ex-
pected with some of the most fre-
quently-performed cosmetic
operations:
FACE-LIFT
As part of a face-lift operation
(rhytidectomy), the surgeon re-
moves excess wrinkles and skin
from the face and slims the jaw-
line and neck by removing excess
fat. The placement of the inci-
sions differs among surgeons, but
generally they are made above, in
front of and behind the ears, ex-
tending into the hairline.
Although some surgeons are
doing face-lifts on an outpatient
basis, many doctors prefer a
ihree-or four-day hospital stay.
Most often the pain is minimal,
and swelling and discoloration is
gone within a few weeks.
A good face-lift gives the pa-
tient a subtle improvement. Dr.
Pinkner describes the patient as
looking "rested or refreshed."
Generally, a patient can expect to
look seven to ten years younger.
How long will it last? That de-
pends on the patient's own aging
process. The surgery turns back
the clock, but it doesn't stop it
from ticking.
FACIAL LINES
A face-lift will not remedy the
tiny lines above the mouth,
crows-feet at the corners of the
eyes or the vertical lines that
form between the eyebrows or on
both sides of the nose and mouth.
For that, some surgeons recom-
mend dermabrasion a fine sand-
ing process to remove the top
layers of the skin. With this pro-
cedure, the patient develops a
scab as the skin heals. Patients
must usually stay at home for
two weeks, as no makeup may be
worn during this time. This pro-
cedure is sometimes used to
smooth scars caused by acne.
Some physicians are also in-
jecting collagen directly into the
pitted areas of the skin to lift up a
sunken area to match the level of
the surrounding skin surface.
NOSE JOB
Nose jobs or rhinoplasties are
still the most popular cosmetic
procedure. Depending on the pa-
tient's nose, sometimes reshap-
ing it involves breaking the bone
and resetting it, shaving off a
bump, changing the cartilage at
the tip and reducing the nostrils.
The operation is done on the in-
side of the patient's nose, and
there is no visible scarring.
A nose job can take 45 minutes
to two hours. While most pa-
tients are anesthetized locally,
more and more physicians are
choosing to put the patient under
a strong intravenous sedative as
well.
Nose operations are often per-
formed on an out-patient basis
while some surgeons prefer that
the patient remain in the hospital
for a few days. After nose jobs,
most patients have black-and-
blue marks underneath the eyes
and swollennees. Most of those
after-effects are gone in two to
three weeks.
EYELID SURGERY
Eyelid surgery or (blepharo-
plasty) involves cutting away the
excess skin and fatty tissue
above and below the eyes. Most
often it is performed as out-pa-
tient surgery. The stitches are
hidden in the upper fold of the lid
and just below the bottom lashes.
They become invisible within a
few months. Both upper and
lower eyelids can be done at once
if desired. Swelling under the
eyes and bruising usually lasts
for a few days.
"When we do the eyelids,"
says Dr. Pinkner, "nobody's go-
ing to come running up to you
if we're successful and say.
Oh. you had your eyelids done!'
The classical comment every
woman gets is. 'Gee you look
good! What did you do, change
your hairstyle?'
"And that is success."
BREAST REDUCTION
This is a more involved proce-
dure, requiring general anesthetic
and a few days' stay in the hos-
pital. A reduction mammoplasty
involves extensive scarring
around the nipples and down the
center of each breast. As part of
this procedure, excess skin and
tissue are removed, and some-
times the nipples are replaced in a
higher position on the chest. The
recovery is similar to the breast
augmentation.
BREAST ENLARGEMENT
An implant or prosthesis is
placed between the breast and
the chest muscle in an augmenta-
tion mammoplasty. A common
implant is the silicone-gel-filled
pillow or bag which is also used
for breast reconstruction after
mastectomy.
Scars are usually located
around the nipple or in the fold
under the breast.
Breast enlargement can be
done on an out-patient or hos-
pital-stay basis. Patients can
usually return to normal activity
in one to two weeks, although
they have to limit their move-
ment for two weeks and wait sev-
eral weeks before exercising
strenuously.
BODY SCULPTING
Body sculpting or shaping is
not a substitute for dieting or ex-
ercising. Generally, this proce-
dure involves more discomfort
and lengthier recovery than the
facial procedures. As with breast
reduction surgery, the procedures
to tighten the thighs, hips, but-
tocks and reduce excess tummy
tissue result in extensive scar-
ring. With the thigh and fanny
lift, scars usually go the whole
way around the upper thigh-leg.
The tummy tuck may involve an
incision from one hip across to
the other, often a new belly but-
ton is created. Usually, these
procedures are performed on pa-
tients after pregnancy or extreme
weight loss. The surgery requires
general anesthetic and several
days stay in the hospital. The
recuperation takes several days
of bed rest and limited activity
for a few weeks.
All Publication Rights Reserved
Memphis to Honor Israel in '83
ATLANTA (JTA) Israel will be the honored
country at the 1983 "Memphis In May," a month long
festival and fair in Memphis, Tennessee. Yehoshua
Trigor, the Consul General of Israel for the southeastern
United States, accepted the invitation on behalf of his go-
vernment from Tom Hutton, president of "Memphis In
May," a cultural and trade event.
During the "Memphis In May" festival next year,
Israeli paintings will be on display at art galleries in
Memphis, local shops will carry Israeli goods, museums
will display exhibits from Israel.
Carlos Dominguez
STATE SENATOR
DISTRICT 34

MEMBER OFTEMPLE BETH AM
COMMITTEE OF 100
Join Our Friends Supporting, Carlos
Al Leibert, President of his
Congregation
Dr. Barry N. Burak
David M. Krause, Atty.
Helen Kutner
Dr. Samuel Mozes
Alan S. Olinick
Claire Shulman
CARLOS DOMINGUEZ
Working Together. Building Together

Paid Pol. Adv.


->aranoid Anti-Semitism
Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
. 1
i

Former Candidate Masterminds Hate Cult
SW YORK Lyndon
iRouche, who conceal-
anti-Semitic and ex
list ideology in cam-
Jf*"** ad his followers
jSm it""118 amn m8in
stream Democrats through the
acuvities of his National Demo
Other LaRouche front opera
tions listed in the ADL report in-
clude the National Anti-Drug
Coalition, a group claiming to
n >w ~-" ~ ~ "uonai uemo- coalition, a group claiming to Th
ling for the Democrat- J**_*a*t*m (NDPC) oppose drug abuse The Coahtion that
esidential nomination ADI |!~"coct according to Promotes a magazine called "War conti
80. continues to mas- ffJUKBiMtt" on. "*"kV *kh has falsely
Shamir
80, continues to mas-
knd a "paranoid style
Semitic political cult,"
ding to the Anti-De-
tion League of B'nai
iDL report titled "The La-
1 Network: A Political
|ias been made public here.
ort said that LaRouche, a
I Marxist who turned to-
pnservatism and ran in 15
atic Party primaries, o-
. through front groups
age seemingly legitimate
pis for such causes as op-
to drug abuse and sup-
the development of nu-
trgv
I REPORT was released as
1 Kissinger, wife of the
Secretary of State, was to
in Newark Municipal
eking dismissal of a
kf assault filed against her
few York City LaRouche
| arising out of an incident
irk Airport in March.
pmplainant, a member of
j-nuclear energy Fusion
[Foundation, was distri-
literature for the
me front group when she
|ly harassed and pro-
l Kissingers. The Fusion
Foundation is one of the
bited in the ADL report
distribute the political
opaganda at airports,
pinals and other public
che literature, according
J is characterized by ex
[ideology and includes
Itism, villification of
|t Jews and Jewish or-
ns, attacks on Zionism
ft.it of Israel. LaRouch-
deny nature and extent
izi Holocaust and allege
Kernel of truth" in the
anti-Semitic forgery,
Itocols of the Elders of
IE political front, La-
I reportedly planning to
I for the Democratic no-
|or President in 1984. In
ceived 185,000 votes
t and qualified for over
llion dollars in federal
Bunds In 1976. he ran
knt on the ticket of the
pt U.S. Labor Party.
tion with the Democratic Party.
Mr\Vthe -.Wake of ex^nsive
NDPC mailings to Democrats
and distribution of LaRouche
propaganda materials at Democ
ratic Party functions, the Demo-
cratic Party advised its state af-
Mn!f inupl has no connection with it.
ACCORDING to the ADL
report, LaRouchites are attempt
ing to use the political process at
the state and local levels to
further their goals. The organiza-
tion has fielded municipal, state
and congressional candidates in
several states, including New
York, where Mel Klenetsky, a
LaRouche activist, ran against
Mayor Edward I. Koch in the
1981 Democratic mayoral
primary and is currently plann-
ing to challenge U.S. Sen. Daniel
P. Moynihan for the Democratic
Party nomination.
Separate political and propa-
ganda operations in the La-
Rouche network, the League
said, are specifically aimed at in-
fluencing:
and industry
Business
leaders;
Labor leaders;
Government and law en-
forcement officials;
Americans concerned about
such issues as the economy, drug
abuse, and nuclear power.
LaRouche directs the National
Caucus of Labor Committees
(NCLC), as the umbrella organi
zation for his far flung opera-
tions, which are well funded and
staffed by "cadres of zealous fol-
lowers."
THE ADL report said that one
of the key elements of the La-
Rouche apparatus is its weekly
magazine, Executive Intelligence
Review, ostensibly directed to-
ward the security concerns of
business and law enforcement.
The publication claims 7,000 sub-
scribers who pay $400 a year per
subscription. Among the
magazine's so-called "intelli-
gence" reports. ADL noted, was
the charge that the U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice had a secret a-
greement with ADL to promote
the interests of Bill Wilkinson,
leader of a violence-prone Ku
Klux Klan faction.
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. falsely
linked prominent Jewish individ-
uals and organizations to the
worldwide drug trade.
The LaRouche organization's
twice-weekly newspaper, "New
Solidarity," claims a paid circul-
ation of between 20,000 and
25,000 and reflects the gamut of
the political cult's extremist
ideology. In addition, the organi-
zation operates a New Solidarity
International Press Service,
which maintains a global teletype
and telex communications net-
work.
THE LEAGUE said the
paranoid nature of the LaRouche
operations is reflected in frequent
allegations that LaRouche
enemies are plotting to assassin-
ate him. During the New Hamp-
shire primary in 1980 and the or-
ganization's New York conven-
tion earlier this year, such assas-
sination "plots" were alleged
with the result that LaRouche
armed his followers and beefed up
his security.
The ADL report pointed out
iat LaRouche's activities
continue despite such recent set-
backs as defections of followers,
government investigations of his
actions, internal squabbling and
the bankruptcy of Computron, a
computer firm that had been do-
minated by LaRouche activists.
The League report concluded
that in view of LaRouche's extre-
mist ideology and the deceptive
nature of his front groups, "in-
creased public awareness and iir-
formed response by public
figures" is needed to counter the
network's activities."
Jordan Poses Growing Threat
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir told the Knesset
that Israel could not sit by
idly while Jordan increased
its capacity to harm Isra-
el's populated centers. He
was speaking in a Knesset
debate on American plans
to supply Jordan with so-
phisticated military equip-
ment.
Both Labor Alignment opposi-
tion and government spokesmen
joined in opposing the arms
supply plans hinted at the De-
fense Secretary Caspar Wein-
berger in statements this week.
SHAMIR SAID the supply of
sophisticated equipment to Jor-
dan represented an even greater
threat to Israel than the supply
of AWACS planes to Saudi
Arabia, because of the proximity
of the Jordanian bases to Israel's
populated centers and military
bases in the Negev.
Such arms to Jordan would
only be an incentive to Jordan to
join in any new Arab war against
Israel, Shamir said. He said that
the United States was wrong in
describing Jordan as a peace-
loving state, as it had already
fought several wars against Isra-
el. There has been no basic
change in Jordanian policy and
Jordan has still not accepted the
Camp David accords.
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Mumw-s"-?

Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday. June 11, 1982
Mobutu's Expectations Too High?
What Can Israel Do for Zaire Now?
Continued from Page 1-A
money; where roads are prac-
tically non-existent, the tele-
phone does not work and hos-
pitals are rare and poorly e-
quipped. The poverty, the lack of
technical know how, and the
magnitude of the problems so-
cial, economic, financial and re-
gionalstagger the imagination.
ISRAEL'S PRESTIGE in
African eyes is great. African
leaders, and even the middle
classes, credit Israel with work-
ing economic, social and diplo-
matic miracles. Israeli soldiers
are believed to be "bullet proof."
Many Africans say its doctors
can cure with the wave of a magic
wand. Israel is the talisman of
Africa, the good sorcerer on
whose side it might pay to be.
Israeli negotiators, who began
secret contacts with Mobutu
several years ago. have never
made promises which they felt
they could not keep. Foreign
Ministry Director General David
Kimche. who first visited Kin-
shasa in May. 1981. a year before
the Israeli flag was raised over
the Embassy building here, never
made promises or gave commit-
ments on which he felt Israel
could not deliver. According to
Zaire officials, he stressed re-
peatedly that Israel is a poor
country itself with no money to
spare. It can barely cover its own
needs.
But he made it just as clear
that Israel can and will only do
"its very best" to help Zaire.
There could easily be, however, a
major divergence between what
Israel considers its "best" and
what the Zaire may expect of Is-
rael.
PRESIDENT Mobutu is a
brave man with vision who loves
and admires Israel. He took his
higher military training in Israel
where he won his paratroop
wings. Today at 51. his power is
absolute and secure. The well-
known Indian writer and journal-
ist, V. S. Naipul. who can not be
suspected of racism or excessive
admiration, wrote "The Congo
(Zaire! used to be a Belgian
colony." Now it is an African
kingdom, and Mobutu is its
King.'" He is an absolute
monarch, as few kings in the past
ever dreamed of being, who
makes his own decisions, often on
intuition.
Now that Mobutu has com-
pleted his first task, erasing some
of the regional and tribal dif-
ferences and animosities and uni-
fying the huge country which
covers an area larger than all of
Western Europe, his main ambi-
tion is to bring it out of condi-
tions of dire poverty and human
misery.
Israel and Zaire have signed a
number of official agreements
providing for Israeli aid. Zairi of-
ficials in close contact with
Mobutu say that his real expec-
tations are higher He faaia Israel
can help even indirectly by using
its influence with the United
States.
Zaire needs American aid and
support. Its southern border is
with Marxist Angola. In the
northeast is troublesome Chad.
Mobutu also realizes that only
the U.S. can suddIv the financial
and economic assistance which
can make an impact, even slight,
on his run-down economy.
ZAIRE ECONOMISTS men
tion the figure of $1 billion per
year as a minimum which could
be usefully employed. Smaller
sums would probably be wasted
as they would be used to cover
immediate, urgent needs
Last month Congress, after
much haggling and pleading,
finally approved a paltry S4 mil-
lion per year in total aid to Zaire.
In his May 14 speech in which he
announced the renewal of diplo-
matic ties with Israel, Mobutu
launched a vitriolic attack on the
U.S. and practically broke off all
talks. Relations between Kin-
shasa and Washington are at
their lowest ebb.
Mobutu believes that Israel
can rapidly and dramatically
change this situation and that
the Israeli lobby and the Ameri-
can Jewish community can ob-
tain from Congress and the
White House what his own men,
and he himself, have failed to get.
American Jews are obviously
grateful for what Mobutu has
done and will probably try to
help. His needs and expectations
are, however, on such a scale that
he risks being disappointed.
American diplomats in Kinshasa
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency last week that according
to State Department evaluations.
Congress in the best of cases will
only approve a minimal part of
what Zaire wants.
ISRAEL IS seen as a source of
agricultural help to enable Zaire's
population of 30 million produce
most of its food needs. The 15
million who live in the bush man-
age to survive with a small plot of
land, wild fruit and an occasional
fish or an unlucky monkey whose
meat is considered a delicacy.
The problems are in Kinshasa
and Lubumbashi (formerly Eliza-
beth ville) with their teeming
hungry masses and millions of
unemployed or under-employed
people.
A serious food crisis in the
cities could bring about a mass
uprising. Major food riots could
threaten Mobutu's undisputed
rule. For the last four years. Is-
raeli experts have run a state
farm at N'Sele, 30 kilometers
from Kinshasa.
The Israelis and a handful of
Belgian Jews who run the ad-
ministrative side have managed
to produce 60,000 eggs and 6,000
chickens per day. milk, vegeta-
bles and 600 tons of meat per
month. The former rundown and
money-losing domain has become
a prosperous and even profitable
enterprise which today supplies
part, though a small part, of Kin-
shasa's needs.
Two similar agricultural sta-
tions, one in the extreme south
the other near Lubumbashi. have
been started with the help of Is-
raeli technicians. Mobutu feels
that Israel could supply him with
the key to his agricultural prob-
lems.
BUT THE issue here is of such
staggering proportions that
many including some Israeli ex-
perts, doubt that what they can
do would be more than a drop in
the ocean.
Local agriculture, with the
exception of a few foreign, mainly
Belgian-run domains, is so
primitive that Israeli methods
may yield no results. Zaire has no
real agricultural policy and no
system of transportation to bring
products to town. Here again its
problems are immense and linked
to social and tribal changes and
the construction of a network of
roads and railways.
Israel is looked upon to help
train and equip Zaire's military
forces. Mobutu, like most African
Presidents, lives in constant fear
of being overthrown or possibly
assassinated. The main threat is
always the army. Mobutu himself
was Chief of Staff when he took
over the country's rule.
The 60.000-strong Zaire army
has in the past shown itself to be
weak and inefficient when faced
with an emergency. As recently
as the Sheba invasion. French
paratroopers, had to step in to
put down the revolt and save the
Europeans living in the city of

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891-6872
Kolweai after more than loo aaJ
murdered. ^* I
A NUMBER of foreup,
visers, French Belgians. Chn
and even North Koreans. i*Z?!
rently training Mobutu's fonT
The President wants ew
from as many different cou^Z
as possible ao as not to give J I
one foreign nation the upper hard
over the army and thus overT
country and himself.
He wants Israel to help tnin,,
2H 52. pmtroP brig*
which could serve as the rejru*
main trouble shooting forced
also as an unofficial Pres.deruJ
guard.
The Zairi soldiers, all volun.
tears, are badly paid A private
earns $20 dollars per month
Their equipment is generallv run
down. Their morale is low Israel j
has. however, sufficient expert-
ence and prestige to give Mobutu
and Zaire a small but highly effi-
cient force, fa this respect there
is no doubt that Israel can supply
Mobutu with everything he
wants.
THE ZAIRE President, who in I
his long talks with Kimche never
went into details or made specific I
concrete requests, also harbors a
semi-secret hope that Israels
presence will change every-1
thing." During the toughest daysI
last week, when Arab sute*|
Continued on Following Page
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1
i on dMwel >riT -' '' 7'';'/.
^Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Leo Mindlin
New Look at the Rosenbergs?
Mobutu's Expectations too High?
Continued From Preceding Page
oke off diplomatic relations or
it off their aid. Mobutu did not
On the contrary, the
der the Arab pressure, the
iffer his determination. As the
fcys went by. his resentment
l against Arab interference in
s country's affairs.
public declaration last
ek he reminded Africa all of
not just his country
lit the Arabs had traditionally
en the slave traders who des-
and hunted Africans. For
the Arabs were "men with
turbans and whips" who had run
Africa for generations. But
Mobutu's anti-Arab passions will
eventually die down. Zaire's
problems remain. Many of them
the tribal structure, the en-
demic corruption, the size of the
country, the lack of basic in-
frastructure, the poverty, will
take years if not generations to
cure.
The rest of the African states,
or at least most of them, will be
watching meanwhile to see if
Israel is indeed the magic
talisman that can cure age-old ills
in a few months or years.
Continued from Page 4-A
U.S. Supreme Court refused to
review the Rosenberg decision
because the McCarthy climate
intimidated us. How could our
silence at that time be our fault
now.'
Hut the Supreme Court is not
intimidated today. In fact, its
relentlessly conservative opin-
ions increasingly constitute an
attack on our judicial system to
weaken it further. The intent,
perhaps, is to fill the gaps in
which the Hinckleys and the Sir-
han Sirhans live so that they can
not live there anymore, but the
end result may well be just the
opposite.
Because of this uncertain time
for the future of the courts, the
Rosenberg Case Committee ar-
gues that "there is a need to rein-
force the courts with rules and
regulations which will permit
them to act for justice and bar
the improper and unethical illegal
practice of ex parts discussions."
THE FACT is that the Second
Court of A i men Is sharply criti-
cized the death sentences of the
Rosenbergs. It affirmed the
court's doubt about the cre-
dibility of the David Green-
glasses' testimony, the ultimate
basis for the conviction. And it
labeled as "wholly reprehensible"
the conduct of the Rosenberg
case prosecutor, Irving Saypool,
who repeatedly badgered the de-
fendants and played to a noisy
crowded courtroom, with little or
no attempt to control the atmos-
phere of the trial exercised by the
presiding judge.
And so a reexamination of the
Rosenberg case would not be
with an eye toward redressing a
grievance so much as it would
lead to support of a drive today
to affirm the integrity of the
American judicial processto af-
firm it in the cause of questioning
the Hinckley high-jinks and the
Sirhan Sirhan chutzpah. And to
strengthening the court against
railroading potential victims in
the future.
Is that not devoutly to be de-
sired? If American Jews flinch
from this, then they are submit-
ting to the jackals. They are con-
ceding that there is a hierarchy of
criminality which makes political
assassination respectable and
atomic spying reprehensible in
the face of the fact that neither is
acceptable and that both should
be punished with equal intensity.
IN THE end, we were no more
responsible for the genius of Al-
bert Einstein than for the
criminality of Jake "Greasy
Thumb" Guzik or Bugsy Siegal.
Or for the actions of Ethel and
Julius Rosenberg. And so, if
Hinckley and Sirhan Sirhan have
their due process protections un-
der the law. so should the Rosen-
bergs have had them. And if they
did not, we must not be afraid to
exhume the record and to hunt
out the violations.
E. German Accuses Bonn
Of Failure to Prosecute Nazis
Half of Senate
Opposes Sale of Arms to Jordan
By HELEN SILVK
: WASHINGTON -
TAI Half the U.S.
lenate now supports a
solution opposed to the
Ueof advanced U.S. wea-
pnry to Jordan on grounds
at it would threaten Is-
I's security and peace in
fMiddle East.
&* resolution, which has 50
onsors. was introduced by
Edward Kennedy (D..
IKij John Heinz (R., Pa.);
Hart ID.. Colo.; and Rudv
tote (R.. Minn.).
wpands and updates Senat*
Pwtum 332. co-sponsored by
J*' and Heinz last March.
|J tune, 33 Senators signed
*r to President Reagan
ItiLT wilh reported plans
I8 Administration to sell
F'6 jet fighter bombers
-In* mobile ffawfc antiaircraft
missile systems.
THE STRONG opposition re-
portedly caused the Ad-
ministration to scale down its
offer of arms to Jordan. The new
resolution would apply to F-5G
fighter aircraft. "Stinger"
shoulder-launched missiles and
laser-guided missiles, items the
Administration is now con-
templating for sale to the Jor-
danian kingdom. No date has
been set for a Senate vote on the
measure.
At a press conference before
introducing the resolution.
Kennedy said, "Our message to
the Administration in this reso-
lution is clear beyond any doubt
the U.S. must not sell arms in
the Middle East that jeopardize
the security of Israel. The Ad-
ministration's scheme to sell ad-
vanced weapons to Jordan vio-
lates that cardinal rule of respon-
sible U.S. policy in the Middle
East.
I reject the incredible notion
that Jordanian warplanes, mis-
siles and bombs supplied by
the U.S. and stationed just
minutes away from the Western
Wall in Jerusalem, the factories
of Tel Aviv and the kibbutzim in
Galilee will not constitute a
real danger to the people of Is-
rael." Kennedy added. "Our
resolution is designed to en-
courage the Administration to
hall its escalation of the arms
race in the Middle East and to
pursue a policy of peace."
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) An East
German Communist official has
accused the Bonn authorities of
failure to prosecute the judges
who served in the notorious
Peoples Courts during the Nazi
era, pronouncing death sentences
on thousands of political prison-
ers opposed to the Third Reich.
According to Josef Streit, the
Chief Prosecutor of East Berlin,
his country handed over thou-
sands of documents to the West
German authorities identifying
former Nazi judges living in West
Germany. "But the Bonn author-
ities erected legal barriers to keep
the former Nazi judges from be-
ing tried, on grounds that it
would not be in line with the
principles of international law,"
Streit said in an interview with
the official East German news
agency, ADN.
Streit is a member of the East
Berlin Politburo and as such is
active in an ongoing propaganda
campaign aimed at discrediting
the Federal Republic. But his
charges touched on a sensitive
and much discussed issue in
West Germany. Despite persis-
tent efforts by anti-Nazi activ-
ists, the Bonn government has
made no serious attempt to pro-
secute the dozens of former Nazi
judges estimated to be living in
the country.
Gerhard Meyer, when he was
Justice Minister in West Berlin
three years ago, prepared a list of
former and sitting judges who
had served in the Peoples Courts.
The list contained the names of
34 judges who imposed death
sentences on anti-Nazis and are
currently living in West Ger-
many. The records of another 34
judges and 117 prosecutors are
still under review.
Egypt Raises Oil Cost to Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) Egypt is raising the price
of oil it sells to Israel by 50-60 cents a barrel, it was re-
ported here Tuesday. Light top grade oil will cost $32.60.
The increase follows a series of price reductions on the in-
ternational petroleum market due to what has been de-
scribed as a "glut" of crude oil supplied during the past
six months.
Weddings Bar Mitzvahs Quinces.
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The Eden Roc
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A catering executive will help you plan your meeting from start to
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So if you want to be catered to with the ultimate in service, atten-
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Page 14-A
Friday.
11.1
Luncheon of Issues
White
Land Se-
242 mad 330
land's nght to
BVT ISRAEL beneves to do
bock the 9yraan army aad
the PLO. wfaach laaatarr control
oi.. CO percent of Lebaa. have
to be iiiii ill awes ?*'
battled eowaary Tha* whet Is-
rael would has to see ae-
aaaapaiafcad from the antes* trap to
!* M :: ?^P ?ji*
5 special savor for the
who at about to
iole
sixth trap to the area aa
a year. rlaag sasd
Habsb will cbs-
LS. "skes" for the reato-
of 1 atiaaina "with tbe o>
of<
So
over
there w be paaaty to
at tbe White House haaeh-
we wfll bare to wait to see
US. to Sell hrael 75 F-16 Jets
WASHINGTON UTA) Defense Department of.
firials confirmed that the Reagan Administrate.aj *-fl] ^
Israel 75 advanced P-16 fighter-bombers to cost S2.5
billion, the largest arms sale to Israel m four .ears In
1978. the VS. sold Israel 75 P-16e. al of which have been
delivered.
According to the officials. Congress has beets aotifcd
privately of the Administration's decision. It has 30 days
following pub be notification, expected later this month, to
veto the safe. The veto most be by both booses The Fife
are manufactured by General Dynamics. The Pentagon
officials said the first should be on the assembly line in
three years.
Baa Haig aaade a dear that.the
U-S was opposed to Israel s pok-
ey of
'exacerbated
Pah niri arts
oaty a
the? fear will lead to further rad>
cabzauoc of the entire region.
OP COLTtSK. Israel's Wet*
pokey aad tbe
Egypt
_ Israel are act the oafy
to be settied aa the White House
kmcfc Before the a
aegouaUGne can begin the die-
pale over thaw sat* has to be
settled. Israel aashaing that
wbik tbe talks can be held m any
_ of peaces, they also most
be bead m Jerusalem- Egypt has
refused to meet m JerosaJetn-
'State Department officials have
been saving that the problem will
be served when Begm and Rea-
gan get together.
Meanwfuie. the Iran-Iraq war
has emerged as another major
of dispute between Israel
aad the L S. as demonstrated by
Defense M mister Ariel Sharon '
visa to W
Sharon made it dear on
numerous occasions that Israel
feared a new coalition that was
emerging around Iraq. Sharon
stressed that Iraq a nnpfcacabry
hostile to Israel and its vsnory in
the war would endanger the Jew-
ish State
At the same time. Sharon be-
bevee Iran is strategically .
more important" to the West and
there is need to gain mfluene*
wah whatever forces come to
power after the Ayatollab Ro-
boUah Khomeini.
THE OJkV, on the other hand.
is worried that an Iranian vic-
tory, which now seems harry,
would endanger the security of
the Persian Gulf states, par-
ticahvty Saudi Arabia In his
Chicago address. Haig stressed
L'-S. neutrality" hi the war
Neutralit;.. however, does not
mean that we are indifferent to
the outcome." he added. We
have friends and interests that
are endangered by the continua-
tion of hostilities. We are com-
mitted to cefendmg our vital in-
terests it. the area. These in-
terests, and the interests of the
world are served by the territorial
jtegnty and independence of all
countries m tbe Persian Golf."
Tbe Secretary also made it
dear that it rejects Israel's at-
tempts to block the sale of arms
to Saudi Arabia and Jordan.
"Though we shall take full ac-
count of local sensitivities, no
can be given a veto over
ait of oar best interests
or necessary cooperation with
others.
Haig also devoted a major part
of has speech to Lebanon. Cer-
tainly Israel agrees wah Haig s
hopes for concerted action in
support of both Lebanon "a
territorial integrity within its
sterna* tonally recognised
borders and a etioag central
government capable of pro-
moting a free, open.
traditionally
BOOK A SAGAFJORD
CRUISETO ALASKA
and spend 2 weeks with author
CHAIM
POTOK
Join Norwegian American s magnificent Sagafjord
for a two week Alaskan cruise. August 8th from San
Francisco, and meet Chaim Potok. Mr. Potok will
present literary and film programs and be
available to answer questions as you cruise
north to spectacular Columbia Glacier. The
Norwegian registered Sagafjord holds
Fielding s only Five Phis Star Rating, the
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in New York (212) 422-3905.
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PI


Frid^-Juhe & 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
-
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
'tat Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health

ULTRA LIGHTS 100s 5 mg. "tar".0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette, FTC Report DEC.'81: 100's: 9 mg."tar".0.7 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, June 11. 1982
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Latest in Lebanon

Israel Shoots Down Syrian MIGs Over Galilee, Captures Beaufort Castle
See Related Stories 1-A, 2-A
TEL AVIV-The war in Lebanon against the Pales-
nian Liberation Organization escalated early Wednes-
when Israeli forces experienced increasing contact
b Syria's 25,000-man occupation army. Until then Is
| had rigoursly avoided shooting confrontations with
Syrians.
On Tuesday, Israeli jets
hot down tWO Syrian 0f 1973. The Syrian MIGs were
fllGs over the Galilee re- the first since then. Military
ion as we^ as two ruore
an jets in dogfights
the Lebanese town of
amour.
3n the ground. Israeli com-
ndos were engaged in battle
th along the Mediterranean
istal highway toward Damour,
miles south of Beirut, and Is-
i warships shelled the city.
,'HE LAST time that Arab
hwrs flew over Israeli territory
s during the Yom Kippur War
authorities here said that the
MIGs were apparently trying to
attack an Israeli army convoy in
southern Lebanon.
In Damascus, Syria would only
confirm that two of its jets were
downed in dogfights over
Damour. Damascus also claimed
an Israeli Skyhawk, but Israel
has denied that any of its planes
were hit.
As further evidence mounted
of the growing Israel-Syria war-
fare, Damascus reported that Is-
rael, jets and artillery bombed
the Synan-controlled Lebanese
town of Jessin, adding that "bat-
tles are still going on at this
minute.
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion meanwhUe acknowledged
that most of the coastal highway
south of Beirut is in Israeli hands
following a night of landing by
helicopters of paratroopers and
amphibious commandos who are
said to have overrun the town of
Saadiyat just 13 miles south of
Beirut.
"SIDON IS within an Israeli
noose," Associated Press corres-
pondent Edmond Shedid was
quoted as declaring. "AH hills
around the city have been taken
by paratroopers, and the beach is
crowded with tanks and com-
mandos north and south of
Sidon."
Inland, Israelis Monday cap-
tured Beaufort Castle, the
medieval Crusader-built fortress
on a clifftop from which guerrillas
of the PLO have been shelling the
northern Galilee for years, in-
cluding the time since July, 1981,
when U.S. special envoy Philip
Habib, now in the Middle East,
arranged a ceasefire.
The army acknowledged that
the Beaufort Castle was captured
only after being bitter hand-to-
hand fighting. No mention has
been made yet of casualties sus-
tained bv either the Israeli or
Palestinian foroas. Earlier
Monday, an army spokesman
denied reports from abroad that
there had been fighting or any
kind of contact between Israeli
and Syrian forces in Lebanon, or
air battles between Israeli and
Syrian planes.
But Chief of Staff Rafael Eitan
said later there had been clashes
with Syrian forces. He said the
army took pains to avoid areas
"Jewish Floridiam.
Miami
i, Florida Friday, June 11,1982
Section B
Begin Says Old
Ceasefire is Dead;
Spurns Habib Meeting
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S. special envoy Philip
bib met with Premier Menachem Begin Monday
ning over the conflict in Lebanon. No details were re-
1. Begin reportedly told the American diplomat that
could be no return to the conditions of the ceasefire
helped work out along the Lebanese border last
nmer.
Habib arrived here Sunday night after consulting
President Reagan at the Western economic summit
:ing in Versailles. He reportedly hoped to see Begin
nediately but was refused and declined to meet with
[other Israeli officials.
ISRAEL IS SAID to be seeking a new agreement in
un that would keep the Palestinian terrorist out of
ery and rocket range of northern Israel, a distance of
kmeters (25 miles) according to Begin.The pursuit of
j an agreement is expected to be one of the main topics
I will discuss with Reagan and other U.S. officials
>ne visits Washington later this month.
Although Israel has stated that it has no territorial
wtions in Lebanon, this by no means indicates that Is-
i forces will withdraw from that country in the near
fc. Prior to withdrawal, there could be tough bargain-
I>especially with the U.S. for conditions to ensure that
Palestinians would no longer be in a position to strike
I from Lebanese bases.
PRESIDENT REAGAN
demands immediate
withdrawal
PRIME MINISTER BEGIN
Beaufort Castle
'is yours'
where Syrian troops were known
to be deployed, even if the Pales-
tinian troops were in the same re-
gion. He said he believed shells
fired from Syrian-held areas were
not fired by Syrian gunners.
PREMIER Menachem Begin
spent much of the day at a for-
ward command post "somewhere
in the north" together with De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon,
Eitan and local area commanders
and intelligence officers. Accord-
ing to one report, he went to the
Beaufort Castle to personally
congratulate victorious Israeli
troops at the very time the PLO
radio was denying that the
stronghold had fallen.
The ancient Crusader fortress
stands on a 700-foot bluf)' over-
looking the Litani River. It had
been subjected to repeated Israeli
air and artillery bombardment
but the thick stone walls held
fast. Israeli military planners de-
cided it could be taken only by
direct ground assault. Begin
demonstatively handed over the
ruins to Maj. Saad Haddad, com-
mander of the Israel-backed
Christian militia in south
Lebanon.
"THE BEAUFORT Castle is
yours," Begin told Haddad, un-
derlining Israel's official stated
objective not to hold any
Lebanese territory but simply to
clear it of terrorists. Begin in-
formed President Reagan Mon-
day that Israel does not "covet
an inch" of Lebanese territory
and that the army was instructed
to push the terrorists out of artil-
lery and rocket range of northern
Israel, to a distance of 40 kilo-
meters (25 miles) from the
border.
The only military casualties
acknowledged by Israel so far
have been an Air Force plane
shot down by anti-aircraft fire
and a helicopter's two-man crew
was reported missing. The Air
____Continued on Page 12
State Dep't.
Attempts 'Balanced' View of Operation
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment is indicating a
balanced approach to the
fighting in Lebanon. "Is-
rael will have to withdraw
its forces from Lebanon and
the Palestinians will have
to stop using Lebanon as a
launching pad for attacks
on Israel," the De-
partment's deputy spokes-
man Alan Romberg told
reporters.
He added, "A divided Lebanon
must not be the outcome of this
present violence." Romberg
stressed that "The United States
has been doing its very best
not only in recent days but also
as far back as last year to fore-
stall the terrible tragedy now un-
folding.'' He noted that the U.S.
joined in the United Nations
Security Council's call for a
ceasefire in Lebanon two days
Miami
Arnon Says World Mist Understand Israel's Dilemma
ago "which, if observed by all
sides, might have prevented the
present developments."
ASKED WHETHER U.S.
arms shipments to Israel have
been delayed, the State De-
partment official said they have
not been interrupted, but added,
"We will be looking into the
question of possible use of
American equipment" by Israel.
"The United States has been in
touch with the Israeli govern-
ment and quarters which have in-
fluence on the situation," he said.
"Our counsels of restraint and
caution have been intense and
constant."
Romberg refused to reply when
asked if the U.S. has discussed
the situation with the Soviet
Union, He observed, however,
that "There have been a number
______Continued on Page 12
I Joel s Consul General in Miami Joel Arnon believes
is only right to explain our position" in Lebanon.
Cft0 Arnon, "Israelis deem it only right" that the
'understand.
Arnon, "The
Position is one in
'^banon has become
'JWseatrromwnicna
P of organizations only
d to the de-
0n of Israel by war
E2: that i8- the
jttntinually threatens
'Prepares to attack it
1 'act does attack Is-
J"ens and objectives
"wael and abroad."
H-onsui Uenera, empha
1 is not for Israel to
threaten a neighboring country
(Israel), thus leaving the
threatened party no alternative
but to do what Lebanon can not
do, that is, to put an end to this
situation."
Says Arnoq: "The fact remains
that Lebanon has become the
principal base for hostile ac-
tivities against Israel and for
terrorist attacks the world over
directed primarily against Israel.
This being so, Israel is both
entitled under international law
responsibility for what is occur- and morally duty bound to de-
rinTandLlE not complain if Is- stroy those hostile bases. If the
raef defends itself. Arnon be- Lebanese authorities are power-
raei aeienas iue ^ ^ ^^ ^ j^^fl, actlvities
oS a h.M -nvoreien- fro"1 their territory, they -re not
Besides. Lebanese ovemgn ,rf complain if Israel
ty has already been violated and
its territory abused in order t
judge whether the Government of
Lebanon regards itself as at war
with Israel and accordingly com-
pounds these warlike activities,
or whether it merely tolerates
them passively, lacking the
power to enforce its rule over its
own territory."
LEBANON SHARES the
finds it necessary to stop these
activities by its own power."
Arnon emphasizes that "Israel
deeply regrets'any loss of life and
damage that may be caused, by
its self-defense measures, to
peaceful Lebanese citizens and to
other innocent bystanders. Un-
fortunately, this is an inevitable
consequence of all hostile ac-
tivities, aggravated in the
present case by the positioning of
unt i- Israel bases in the midst of a
civilian population. Israel has
done and will continue to do all in
its power to reduce civilian
casualties and damage as much
as possible, but it must be clearly
understood that the prime
responsibility for such losses and
damage as will occur lies with
those who established those
Continued on Page 12
CONSUL GENERAL ARNON


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, June 11, 1982
mark, Hoffman Recipients of GMJF
Presidents Leadership Award
Drori to Speak at Bonds Events
Sydney Newmark and Kenneth
Hoffman have been selected as
the 1982 recipients of the Stanley
C. Meyers Presidents Leadership
Award, presented each year by
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation in recognition of service
and dedication to the ideals of the
'Federation and its Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. The presentation
ceremony will take place at Fed-
eration's 44th annual meeting
and dinner June 17 at the
Carillon Hotel on Miami Beach.
The award was named after
Federation's founding president,
Stanley C. Myers, whose ongoing
involvement and dedication to
the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity continues to set an
example to young leaders.
"Both Sydney and Ken have
truly exemplified the commit-
ment and leadership qualities
implicit through this award,"
said Harry A. (Hap) Levy, presi-
dent of the Federation. "This
award cites the special efforts of
our young leadership and calls
attention to those individuals
who will lead our Jewish com-
munity in future years."
Newmark was recently selected
to serve as vice chairman of com-
munity education for Federa-
tion's South Dade branch. A
member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida's
Young Cantor
Baritone. 10 years experience (5
locally) Seeks position for
Jewish holidays. Inquire to:
Box #Y.C.
co The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
Youth Advisors Wanted
for Kadima and or USY
groups in West Kendall.
Salary negotiable.
Call 382-3668-daytime;
595-6794-evenings.
Conservative Synagogue
in West Kendall seeks
Religious and Sunday
School teachers. Some
positions available for
weekdays only. Bible and
history teachers without
hebrew skills also invited
to apply. Call 382 3668.
QTUDI0
^>IWIUI
^IH
I
.
Continental
Cuisine
FREO JOSSI
welcome*
you back to
h, renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lor a unique
[dining experience
Watch your *abie to your
mood m one o 5 .nfliyidual
'oomj The Tent.
Wine Ce'lar. Studio Place
Piqaiie Swiii Chalet
Fin* Entertainment
Al the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheon* arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Avt.
445-5371
cloved Mondavi
i........a*i
Kenneth Hoffman
Central Board, Mrs. Newmark is
active in community affairs, in-
cluding serving as chairman of
the recent Eisenstadt photograph
exhibition, which was co-spon-
sored by the JCC of South Dade
and the Lowe Art Gallery. She is
a board member of Project New-
born, a support program for neo-
natal and peri-natal care at the
University of Miami Medical
School. Within Federation, Mrs.
Newmark has been an active
member of the Leadership Devel-
opment Committee and led the
November 1981 Mission to Israel
with her husband, Stanley.
Hoffman, a Miami attorney
and senior vice president and sec-
retary of Biscayne Federal
Savings and Loan, has been
chosen to serve as vice chairman
of the South Dade Association
Executive Committee. An active
member of the Federation Plann-
ing and Budget Committee and
the Leadership Development
Committee, he is Florida regional
chairman of the UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet, vice presi-
dent of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education and the Jewish
Junior High School of South
WANTED
Receptionist/Typist
Jewish High School So.
Florida. Experienced. Full
Time. Mrs. Left 935-5620.
Senior experienced
students of Ba'al Koreh
class are available to
conduct services for Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kip-
pur, including Torahj
reading and blowing the
Shofar. For information
call 538-0931.
Private Tutor, in South
Dade available to enhan-
ce your child's education
this summer. Expert in-
struction in all secular
AND Judaic studies by
qualified learning
disabilities specialist.
Call 931-8409

An-nell tx
HOTEL ^
Strictly Kosher #
3 Full Course Meals Daily .
Mashgiach and .
Synagogue on Premises #
TV Live Show-Movies #
Special Diets Served .
Open AN Year #
Services
Near all good shopping
Call for rates "
700 EUCLID AVE. *

Sydney Newmark
Florida, board member of the
Jewish High School of South
Florida and Beth David Congre-
gation, past president of the
Sholem Lodge of B'nai B'rith, co-
chairman of the Outstanding Cit-
izens Award Luncheon of B'nai
B'rith and Federation's Chazak
chairman.
Past recipients of the Stanley
C. Myers Presidents Leadership
Award have been Sandi Simon
and Michael Adler, 1981; Fern
Canter and Steven Kravitz, 1980;
Jeffrey L. Lefcourt and Sandra
Goldstein, 1979; Joel Levy and
Mikki Futemick, 1978; Barry
Ross and Pat Feldman, 1977;
Barry T. Gurland and Mrs.
Kenneth Schwartz, 1976; Nancy
Lipoff and Leonard A. Wein, Jr.,
1975; Morris Futernick, Estabell
Gettis and Howard F. Scott,
1974; Marcy Lefton and Melvin
C. Morgenstem, 1973; Gerald R.
Falick, Norman H. Lipoff and
Mrs. Philip Bloom, 1972; David
S. Kenin, 1971; '
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, 1970;
Frances B. Levey, Mrs. Robert I.
Shapiro and Richard Horwich,
1969; Robert H. Traurig, Mrs.
Richard Brickman and Marilyn
Smith, 1968; Mrs. Milton S.
Green and L. Jules Arkin, 1967;
Mrs. Howard Trinz and Harry B.
Smith, 1966; Sam Luby, Jr.,
1965; Norton S. Pallet. 1964;
Daniel Neal Heller, 1963;
Marshall S. Harris, 1962; Sue
Stevens, 1958; and Martin Fine,
1957.
For Sale
On the Intercoast. 159 St and
Collins Ave. Luxury Bldg.-12th
Floor. Panoramic View. 1
Bedroom Furnished. $67,500.00
Telephone: 651-3731 or
651-0810
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.8. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami}______

Beth Din Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 or 672-000*
Shlomo Drori, head of Israel's
Dead Sea Works and a spokes-
man for Israel Chemical Ltd., will
be guest speaker at a gathering of
the Prime Minister's Club and
Ambassador's Society of Trus-
tees of the State of Israel Bond
Organization June 21 at the
Jockey Club.
The Prime Minister's Club is
comprised of Israel Bond pur-
chasers of more than $25,000 and
the Ambassador's Society of
Trustees is made up of purchas-
ers of more than $10,000.
Drori is also scheduled to
speak at a reception for the North
Dade New Leadership Committee
at a private home in Bay Harbor
Islands, on June 19.
Drori is one of the key figures
involved in the planning and con-
struction of the new Mediterra-
nean to Dead Sea Canal now un-
derway and funded with Israel
Bond dollars. According to Drori,

Shlomo Drori
"the project is one of the,^
engineering feats underUbal
man."
N AT'L JEWISH SERVICE ORGANIZATION
Has staff opening for someone to^ork with lodges on l
Miami Beach in all aspects of lodge administration.
Must be able to relate to volunteers; stimulate menv
bership; aid in programmatic activities and train
leaders. Full time postion with salary commensurate
with background and experience. Apply in confident*
Arnold Ellison, Exec VP., 3379 Peachtree Rd., NE Suite!
252, Atlanta, Ga. 30326.
AUCTION
Beautiful lakefront & lakeview
lots on Lake Easy
Sale date 6-12 11:00 AM
Croft Real Estate
122 W. Central Ave.
Lake Wales, Fl. 33853
813-676-4177
S Miami U*d. s WATT KOSHE I Jf
HOTEL MAC* ClIM ^^^
OPEN ALL YEAR -
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS
&SUCCOTH
SUCCAMprwniNS
Services Will UI
val
ii Noams FfM PaftMfl
E n%e>rtA*N*. m#fit
LET THE SHORE CLUB HOTB
BE YOUR HOME
ON YEARLY BASIS
INCLUDING
(Miaous Metis at) **
racates of The Lo**Y Hoa*
on
BB CLATTKOSME* -
Phone: 538-7811
f> TNC OCCAM AT tm *' "
The High School In Israel
Is Not Just For Kids Anymore*
THE ADULT COURSE
offers .
22 days of excitement and learning, using ,he!an. j
Israel as your class room and the Tel Aviv Dan Hotei
your home........Your choice:
November 1-24,1982
April 24- May 16,1983
June 12-July 3,1983
Write or call for Adult Application-Brochure
HIQH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL
3950 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33137
(305) 576-3286 call collect in the state


Friday, June 11,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
AmeriFirst
salutes
America with
Star Spangled Gifts
We're saluting America's savers with a special offer. Choose from
gifts like the Grand Old Flag, an "I love America" teddy bear,
or other quality items including a Tbastmaster toaster oven,
Rogers stainless or steak knife set, or Timex wall clock.
Just make a qualifying deposit when you open a new
checking account, open or add to a savings account,
or renew a maturing savings certificate. Depending on your
deposit, get your choice as a gift or at a special low price.
At AmeriFirst, you'll find a variety of services,
from a wide range of high-interest rate savings
plans to interest-earning checking accounts.
*jj And two unique new credit cards: the Visa
C CreditLine Card with up to $5,000 credit
available, and the Visa EquityLine Card for
homeowners, with up to $50,000 credit available.
d your funds are secure, backed by over $3Vfc billion
in assets here at America's oldest and one of the
nation's largest Federals.
So come in and get your gift now!
Frtieeea.il ti HMHeadi MUM* OTJL utomr
Star Spangled Gifts met k* eae eih ar eae punkas, m Mann
an J1Mte u.m SSUMM M.*N Stt.MI
1 Rtari and Diamonett. Ring an Grft Gilt an S 495
2 Diamonette Mean Pendant Gilt an Gilt an 495
3 HeavyDuty6-voitlaniern/Batty on Gill Gill an 495
4 I Low. America Bear S 295 Gill an an 795
5 Magnavo- Ratable AM Radio 295 G.M Grft Gill 795
6 28-ql Folding Ice Chest 2 95 G.M Girt an 795
7 Time. Decorative Mail Clock 295 an Grit an 795
8 Nylile2 pc Tole Set 295 an Gilt an 795
9 Ingtid Mmi Snack Sel 295 Gilt Gilt an 795
10 iSCash Gilt -
ii USA Du'tlelJag 595 S 395 an an 9 45
12 USA Flag Set 595 395 an Gin 9 45
13 Helton Mans WfclcMGoldl 795 595 Gill Gill 1195
14 Kelton Mans lAkHcn (Silver) 795 595 an an 1195
15 K.ltonVvomansr 16 KellonVvomansVvalch (Silver) 7 95 595 an an 11 95
17 GE ftxlac*Mn.er 795 595 an G.ll 11 95
18 Rogers 6-pc Steak Knife Set 795 595 Gill an 1 95
19 Rogers 24-pc Stainless Sel 7 95 595 Gill an 1195
20 JiOCash an -
21 Windsor AM, FMSiereo Headphone Set 1495 12 95 S9 95 an 22 95
22 Spartus Digital Time Vaion Clock 14 95 1295 995 an 22 95
23 Windsor AM/ FM Clock Radio 14 95 12 95 995 an 22 95
24 Laughhn 20 pc Dmnerware Sel 14 95 12 95 995 an 22 95
25 Toastmaster Toaster Oven 14 95 12 95 995 Gill 22 95
26 12" 3-Speed Oscillating Fan 1495 1295 995 an 22 95
27 $20 Cash an -
Ouantilevs united Some items may become unavarfabie "*> r archer** phone or mad requests No orfts tor internal tianslers Sevmoa deposits tor gilts must rema*i 60 davs or more One OlM per accounl
Special
Money Market
Certificates
^^: 24 yeare-35 month*.
'""'mdepoall fSOO.
14.000
15.024
%
Ptr
%
Annual
*?! r'fecttvt throJ^giTjunTzY 1982
n*i!!?uU!'oni require a substantial interest
i*L*n>iiiI from ,, certificate
ZlMERlFlRSr
Federal
Number 1.
rsssK
Amtrir'trst Federal Savmflsand Loan Association. America
^rieririrM r*^ral.^avmi&4nOLoa/i/\sjociaijii.'*iii";~"--,'-. c*ji)
I**** 3rd Av,. (Mam ? 10C N.E. IX Aw. IWTTWAST: 8MWL****?
M07 N.W 67th Aw.. Msam, Late. CVtTMAL MOO
.. ._j__, rh..tV/,RillionSlronil W. H Wafer, Jr.. Chairman Member federal MM and Loan Insurance Corporation
i^^iF^d Avr MM' *?2nd Av 10785 Biscay Blvd. 900 NX 12*h St 18301 Bucavne Blvd. NORTH: ITS N.W. 199th Si.
ItaS^^TSOCoraJV*
^"tarl*li
^*AK-lf3ta
25 UJwne Hd lladrlaiid Mall
WTr: J" if A,. 'ZSZii MalT MIAMI BEACH: 17395 N Bav Kd a. Wtnston Tb-ers KISS Kane Concourse KB5 71* St. 306 4LM St 900
v 2B0O LfJtunr HO iMnara nm -u -T'", 7iL_^j Btm SnoooaM Clt 32"! N. rWrrai NWV. uananu m. jawi is. uccan dm.. rs. law.- umsm
^BmhBr*.E.Dii-B^BlWr^^
her tmmu\l CU HUM tatACe. COUNT* 7 Office srnnnjt rasm nucn v. Mrvinjl the Orlando j







Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. June 11, 1982
ft
JEWISH
rwnoiw
mnD
JNF Newsletter
Published by the Jewish National Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 Phone 538-6464
KM
Jewish National Fund Bikurim Celebration Pays Tribul
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn
Abraham Grunhut Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz Ernest Samuels
Pres.JNFGr. Miami Chrmn.JNF Exec. Board V.P. JNFGr. Miami
"At the recent Bikurim Celebration held at the Fontainebleau Hilton, and attended by
an overflow crowd, the JNF paid tribute to its outstanding and deserving leaders, con-
tributors, chairmen of various functions, and especially honorees of the various fun-
ctions", said Rabbi Irving Lehrman, JNF Foundation Chairman. In paying tribute to
the Honorees, and to the meaning of Bikurim, Rabbi Lehrman explained the pressing
immediate tasks of the JNF facing Israel in view of the recent peace development, and
revitalizing the Negev and the Western Galilee."It is a privilege to be of the generation
which saw the rebirth of Israel, and to participate in its upbuilding" stated Rabbi Lehr-
man, "and the JNF is at the forefront and should be foremost in our minds and hearts."
A most unusual musical program was arranged by Maestro Shmuel Fershko, the
guest artists included Doreen Stuart, Accordionist, and Cantor Edward Klein. Ernest
Samuels delivered the Prayer for Peace, Augusta Mentz made the Invocation, and Lou
Aronson made the Hamotzei. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, Chairman of the Festival, and
Chairman of the JNF Exec. Board opened the celebration and stated the need for total
involvement for every Jew in the work of the JNF, and the role that the JNF plays in
our daily lives. Certificates of Merit were presented to the deserving leaders, honorees,
donors, and function chairmen by Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region.


Mrs. Theresa Levine is shown holding the Cd
tificate for a Grove of 1000 Trees which u^
established in the American Independen
Park by Theresa and the Late Julius Levine.

I Certificates of Merit. Miriam Press, Treas. Ernest Samuels, V. P., Rose Leiter, Sam & Rose Pascoe, Elsie Nusbaum, Purim Princess 1982-83, M | Clara A Igor Schultz Neumann, Helen Pollock
I
Maurice Robbin, Leon Schuster, JNF Mordecai 1982-83, Sadie & e' 1 I"


noooooooo
Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
JiVF Newsletter
420 mSSSSwZS'i Nat'0nal Fund ,n neater Miami
20 Lincoln Road, Suite 353. Miami Beach. Pit. 33139 Phone 538-6464
>oooex
HjaooocaoBi
JEWISH
rwxxw
rhid
'o Its Honorees, Chairmen, And Outstanding Leaders
hn*
JNF Means:
Land
Redemption
Land
Reclamation
Afforestation
Water Projects
1
V'


* V\
J
Ida WesseL Comptroller, Zelda Thau, Purim Queen 1982-83, Birdie Pomper,
Mr. < Mrs. David Pomerantz
Frank Brickman was presented with a
ificate for a Grove of 1000 Trees
ttablisked in Israel by the Brickman Family
i memory of her late husband, Frank Brick-
nan
From left to right: Lou and Etta Aronson, Albert & Ann Anker, Marion
Altshuler
\\
1 <
J*
i
ton Bureau, Bertha Fox, Hilda Grau
Mary Silep Cohen, Maxwell Corn, Cantor Saul H. Breeh, Chrmn. Spec. Ac-1
tivities, Leo and Pearl Buda, Maestro Shmuel Fershkoi .Musical Director
kfc,,.^~~r~^I r. __ David A Mollie Moskowitz, Augusta Menu, Chairperson, Women for JNF.t
| w. Shirley Kotin, Mr. A Mrs. Isidore Hammer, Jennie Kleeman ;-ft phmp /yc/Uoiu4 Theresa Leuine


Page 6-B The Jewish FToridian Friday. June 11. 1982
Visions of Peace
By RABBI
SIMCHA FREEDMAN
Temple Adath Yeahurun
It is especially significant that June 5. the 15th civil anniversary of
the Six Day War, fell on the Sabbath during which the Torah portion
of Naso is read. It is in this portion that we find the 15-word priestly
blessing with its emphasis on peace. The benediction reads. "The Lord
bless thee and keep thee. The Lord make His face to shine upon thee
and be gracious unto thee. The Lord lift up His countenance upon thee
and give thee peace."
We live in a world filled with conflict and violence and death. All
around the globe, war. murder and killing are taking place. Iran and
Iraq. Russia and Afghanistan. Great Britain and Argentina, Israel
and the PLO are just a few of the antagonists in the process of self-
destruction. Man has yet to learn the significance of peace. If as much
time and energy and resources were spent on creating a language of
peace as are put into the creation of armies, weapons systems and the
instrumentalities of annihilation, then perhaps peace could be
achieved.
Who will teach the world the meaning of peace? I believe the mes-
sage will come from Israel, from Jerusalem, even as the prophet Isaiah
said. "How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger
of good tidings that announced peace ..."
The great sacrifice which Israel has made for peace in returning the
Sinai is one of the most noble efforts by any country in the annals of
world history to create an atmosphere for peace. I need not recount
here what Israel gave up in a material and strategic sense in the hope
that Egypt would abide by the Camp David initiative. You have read
of this in the Jewish press and in those newspaper editorials which
have an unjaundiced view of the Mid-East. You are also aware of the
trauma Israel endured as Israelis forced Israelis to abandon their
homes in Yamit and throughout the Sinai. I pray that these efforts
will bear fruit.
On March 26, 1979. three men faced the world on the very steps of
the White House. One was President of the United States, the second
was President of Egypt, and the third. Prime Minister of Israel. They
spoke about the Camp David agreement. Following are excerpted the
words spoken by Jimmy Carter, Anwar Sadat and Menachem Begin
on the theme of peace:
"Peace has one thing in common with its enemy
With the fiend it battles with war:
Peace is active not passive:
Peace is doing not waiting;
Peace is aggressive, attacking;
Peace plans its strategy and encircles the enemy;
Peace marshals its forces and storms the gates;
Peace gathers its weapons and pierces the defense.
Peace, like war is waged
Let there be no more war or bloodshed. .,
Let there be no more despair or loss of faith.
Let no mother lament the loss of a child.
Let no young man waste his life on conflict from which no-one benefits.
Peace is the beauty of life.
It is sunshine.
It is the smile of a child.
The love of a mother.
The joy of a father.
The togetherness of a family.
It is the advancement of man.
The victory of a just cause,
The triumphs of truth.
Peace is all these things
And more.
And More.
And they shall beat their swords into plowshares
And their spears into pruning hooks.
Nation shall not lift up sword against nation
Neither shall they learn war anymore.
No more war
No more bloodshed
No more bereavement
Peace unto you
Shalom
Salaam
Forever."
May their vision come to pass.
South Bade Teacher Receives Honors
Gale Lang has been named
"Science Energy Educator of the
Year" by the Florida Federated
Women's Club. The sixth grade
teacher at South Dade Hebrew
Academy was cited in the state-
wide contest sponsored by
Southern Bell, for her "energy-
awareness" lesson plan.
"We encourage our students
and teachers to become aware of
the issues of tomorrow," com-
mented Marlene Mitchell, prin-
cipal of the Academy.
The South Dade Hebrew
Academy, a beneficiary agency of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, is a private, non-profit
school which offers an integrated
and comprehensive curriculum of
general and Judaic studies to
boys and girls nursery through
6th grade.
Imperial At Kendall
9100 SW 77th Avenue
{Dadeland's largest and most luxurious 1 andl
12 Bedroom Rental Apartments, with separate
dining room. Lush Landscaping, 3 swimmingj
pools with saunas, adults only, no pets.
Please call the Manager, Bill or Jean White at:|
(Around the Corner from the Palmetto Expressway) 271 -34331
The Jewish National Fund of Greater Miami
recently held a breakfast meeting at Temple
Emanu-El to discuss future plans of the or-
ganization. Attending the meeting were (left
to right) Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat, Temple
Israel; Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Temple
Beth Shalom, Hollywood, and chairman,
JNF Broward County; Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive vice president. Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami; Zev w. *]
gun, president, JNF Southern Region; RM
Irving Lehrman, Temple Emanu-El- flaJ
Samuel Z. Jaffe, Temple Beth e( HM
wood; Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard, Temo
Beth Am; and Rabbi Mayer AbramouL
Temple Menorah, and chairman. JNF Ex,
cutive Board.
Auerbach Elected Assembly Council Member, Region President
Rabbi David H Auerbach of
Beth David Congregation has
been elected to a one-year term as
a new member of the Executive
Council of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the international body
of 1.2(H) Conservative rabbis
serving 1.5 million congregants.
Rabbi Auerbach was also
elected president of the Assem-
bly's Southeast Region. Other
Miami rabbis who will serve with
Rabbi Auerbach on the regional
level include Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man, Temple Emanu-El, honor
rary president; Rabbi David B.
Saltzman, Aventura Jewish
Center, executive vice president;
Rabbi Louis Lederman, Temple
JCCtoSee 'Annie'
An opening day benefit perfor-
mance cf the film version of the
musical, "Annie," will be held
June 20. 4:25 p.m.. by the South
Dade Jewish Community Center
at the Riviera Theater, South
Miami.
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Auxiliary Celebration
The Junior Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospit-
al for the Aged will hold a
Father's Day celebration June 20
at 1:30 p.m. Gladys Israel is
chairing the event, according to
Esther Schneiderman, president.
Beth Moshe. treasurer;
Rabbi Edwin Farber, Ten
Samu-El, conversion coc
chairman
The Southeast Region con
of 55 rabbis serving syna
throughout the States of Fie
Alabama. Georgia. Ten
Louisiana. South Carolina.^
Carolina and Puerto Rico.
Brandeis U. Womt
Install Officers
South Dade Chapter of!
deis University Nati
Women's Committee in
Bobbie Cohen as president i
installation luncheon held at I
Grove Isle Club.
Also installed for the 19
year were Donna Singer,!
Rothberg, Roni Lefo
Marjorie Weiss, and BobbiWj
.;-..-.: !ra^**&,-
for Wici*uh/ cool """""Li
**rofrhmnl.po'n|
Sonkp Brond DeoMo'"
towooorcHH"^^-
aeon S**>"",w",*Lj
C^tetaiflw.Srtao"*<0,d'3t 0r
k od Mcve JSkammm a*d wgor..f yo** I
c*Ma-!rM.Aii4lte*er,H>o Sf*P*
for MMMT it MM* O *!*-* *">
or ymtr wommt sfcoeM aaly
KOnXwIMwt
ei'
*2C*l'~*C




Friday, June 11,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
-^ ^j # ruy, june ii, iwoz. i ne jewisn r lonaian rage <-r>
ing aii Optimist Brings 'Awards and Rewards'-^ Maybe Optimism
. XI__J._ Ktnft Writer nTOdatintf A IW\ fc- r nnn .....
ByMARLAROYNE
Jtuiish Floridian Staff Writer
Seymour Silverman won't ad-
ut to being an optimist. He is
owever, "more optimistic today
11 was 25 years ago."
's also not an organization
A member of the Young
icrats for about 30 days, he
J with the Jaycees for nearly
3 months.
Yet Seymour Silverman is cur-
:lv president of Optimist ta-
xational, a men's service
gnization comprised of ap-
ximately 134,000 members,
jjch provides a variety of
pities for males and females
Ura OilU ICUU1N90 ..
for the obvious **3"">"- Silver
is named
asons."
"By nature. I'm not a joiner,"
kiherman claims. "But the Op-
mist Club is different. We initi-
I more service projects than
i of our contemporaries. Other
anizations may have better
, but we offer more service. As
as I'm concerned, the Op-
ist Club is "the service or-
ization in North America.' "
| The 3,500 clubs throughout the
otinent offer a number of serv-
sponsorship of athletic
ues. a Help-Them-Hear pro-
and an oratorical contest
Bname a few.
Individual clubs participate in
proved international activities,
I continually develop innova-
te projects of their own.
chapters may do things
ntly, but the bottom line of
ping the community is the
t," Silverman asserts.
i first Jewish president of a
ominantly non- Jewish
nization, Silverman recalls
Beocounters with anti-Semitism
! he assumed office last fall.
y've accepted me good, bad,
(indifferent," he says.
[Continuing on the subject he
.....usry adds, "I won't say it's
nitism) not there. In the
11 've been a member, I 've
) it. But at dinners and
gs where district leader-
is present, it's at a low
Sherman found that his serv-
president has provided an
*>n for many non-Jews af-
' with the Optimists. In his
he has come across a
I of Gentiles who never
face-to-face contact with a
mofthe Jewish faith.
the Midwest, for example,
there are few Jews, people
rictly by what they've
A Jewish president gave
the exposure they never
man
|Coofirming this discovery, he
' one member's comment of
you first became presi-
I though you were just
P* one of those stuffy Jew-
Pwyers."
'hope I haven't disappointed
"m Silverman's clever re-
hve," the member re-
". adding "I had the
IweaofwhataJewwas."
Iv*mbenng a dinner earlier
w where pork was served,
STrwSH Smiles as he elates
one Optimist s attempt at com-
wrvW,tS ''ytu. dont hav to
m-^k / Were you
roast beef instead."
A soft-spoken and admittedly
soft-hearted man, Silverman con-
siders his presidency an honor,
and being singled out as the first
Jewish president is a "double
honor. But the honor isn't iso-
lated, as certain responsibilities
come along with the position.
The officer assumes the presi-
dency of the international board
of directors and the Optimists
International Foundation. He is a
public relations man, a traveling
consultant to the 42 districts and
a speaker at the main dinner.
Deeper than these initial duties
are the president's individual
goals. Silverman refers to his as
"three-fold."
"My emphasis was more serv-
ice," he explains. "I wanted to
double our offerings, expand on
all levels, and institute new
projects."
He continues: "Through the
growth of these services, I looked
to increase on manpower.
"And I wanted the Interna-
tional Foundation to reach $1
million."
As of today, the president is
"more than happy with my ac-
complishments. But I won't be
satisfied until everything's
final."
"Everything" includes a
projected 256 new clubs, accom-
Fahringer Elected
FIU Foundation Prexy
Catherine H. (Kay) Fahringer.
executive vice president and
board member of Dade Savings
and Loan Association, has been
elected president of the Florida
International University Found-
ation.
Prior to her election, Fahringer
served the Foundation as a
trustee for five years, four of
those as vice president.
Her public service roles include
immediate past chairman of the
board of trustees of the Public
Health Trust and current chair-
man of its Joint Conference Com-
mittee.
world, he says regretfully. "We
have to do the best we can to
make the world a better place."
As president, he's working to
do just that. Following his term
of office, of which he has "enjoy-
"ur 'years, a Juvenm i mES &***,iJ* plans on
hopes to reach it by the time he ru,,m that ol by remaining
leavMni~c~ oy an international board member
for two years and by "being
available" to whoever needs him.
Silverman hopes that other
men will become available to the
organization in which he believes
so strongly. "The are so many
men out there just waiting to be
asked to join." He points out,
modating some 4,000 to 5,000
new members, and the realization
ot his si million goal for the
Foundation which provides
scholarships, grants, research
and activities. The Optimists
have been working towards the
goal for 11 years, and Silverman
popes to reach it bj
leaves office Sep. 30.
m -*? Pres'dent of his home
North Shore Club, Silverman is
not the only member of the chap-
ter serving the organization in a
capacity above the local level.
Current Florida district
governor is Amanuel Alster,
while zone lieutenant governor is
Jay Jacobi. Coincidentally
they're both Jewish.
"North Shore has always had a
history of good leadership on the
district level," Silverman says.
The fact that they are both Jew-
ish is unusual, but I really don't
think their religion had anything
to do with their election."
He emphasizes: "I do think the
perfect man for a volunteer or-
ganization is Jewish. The Jews
are giving people who want to
help others. A service organiza-
tion, particularly the Optimists,
is the perfect outlet."
He is adamant that the Optim-
ists remain restricted to men. He
has seen "too many inner dis-
putes," when existing coed orga-.
nizations tried to convert into
Optimists Clubs. "Wives get too
involved in the election proce-
dures. They form cliques."
"In the 25 years that I have
been a member, I have seen what
men can do working together to
make this world a better place to
live," he adds.
And according to Silverman,
making the world a better com-
munity for the youth of today is
the Optimists' ultimate goal. "I
think the greatest asset that the
country has is youth. And we're
not turning over such a good
"we need to bring them in _
give them an opportunity to get
i involved."
In his opinion, men who be-
come Optimists earn both awards
and rewards. And while Silver-
man is pleased with his awards he
has earned as a member, nothing
can replace the rewards that have
come to him as an Optimist.
He has seen a young thief
become involved in basketball,
grow up and start a family, and
join the Optimists.
And that kind of reward can
even tum a non-believer into an
optimist.



The Israel Histadrut Foundation recently held a luncheon
featuring its 60 Plus Club Program for Retirement to Israel
rictured at the event, held at the Konover Hotel, are (left to
right) Lewis Alpert, Florida director, IHF; Nissim Bachar,
chairman. Control Committee of Histadrut in Israel; Dr. Sol
Stem president, IHF, Commissioner Harold Salkind, board
member; and Zev Weiner, director of Mishan in Israel, guest
speaker. m



Seeking Loving Jewish Family
To adopt alert, "healthy"
Down Syndrome Infant boy
with high learning potential.
Sincere Inquiries Only.
Box #SL J c/o The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
___________Miami, Fl. 33101

FIRST WE MEET
KOSHER STANDARDS.
THEN WE MEET
TOUGHER STANDARDS.
OURS.
Kosher standards are tougher than the U.S. Government's.
But they're not tough enough for us.
Because while kosher law forbids many non-meat fillers
and additives in meat, it does allow by-products and artificial coloring.
We don't.
We not only make sure our hot dogs, bologna, salami,
and knockwurst are 100% pure beef, but we also make sure they're
100% natural. Qualities everyone has a taste for.
At Hebrew National, we make our kosher meat by the
only law we can live with. Our own.
_______NO 11N THE AREA FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE
11AATC0 TRANSMISSION
MAINTENANCE SPECIAL
!! CANADA
ft am*'
$1088
V*ndmor.
S( MM CITIflU MCMT
m mm it run saw
Miurocf
MUM CHUT UMS ICCirill
MRS UN <> !til* UT
MM Ml
North Dade
19>1NW2ndAre<41)
652 2844
la**"*
me
M01 FMnl Hwy.
Wmi o< Fadaral
on Copana M.
(Nail la
QoodyaacTlfal
B
North Miami Beach
Comer of 152nd St At
W. Dlxla Hwy
M7-7722
Margaia
I 970M.St ad. #7(441)
In Iron! ol K-Mart
Mpptaj Canlar Mail
lo Danny'* Ptoataurant)
9744300
Fl. Laydantala/
OaalandP*.
<1ME. Comm. Blvd.
(IMactEaatof
DUIa Hwy )
491-7M0
on any package of
Hebrew National franks,
knocks, salami or bologna
Mi trfocr M#t*r* N*Uon*l Kmhr I *4I tidwm li. rowp>m h" IOC pki 7 ton
dkng yxi m*w "! ton.0, ncv "*
I SAVE 30*
__________i..~.~<
I
I
I
I
I
rrqiani vw uomil voVnt inert** aft io"\-
oHvbi**! N**o*al Fonda In. Suchtvadm*
*Mfl inclwoV iovoc#* lot frar qu*nM> ol product
I oufjor- M* rroWmdd Coupon* m*\
nt* br ataajwd < MWifd W-d ** pre-
h.NMd laatxl .!* S la* C*od o*t)j, p
USA CaahvatW 1/31K for*dfnpt>onal
Prl**K'9^v^*nrfr^*dad>*pom mad
to rW-. Naaooal Inc PO Boa \1M
Camof lo** S2734 (JMrr J*> Jl l**HJ latMUdio
taw coupon
130*
STORE COUPON
*"r'.;


Pge8-B The Jewish FToridian Friday. June 11. 1962
cprfde
Dlidous
and
ready to
eat!
DELI
[DAIRY
PANTRY PRIOCTkSSORTED SLICED
Luncheon $-
Meats
12 OZ PKG
, HtfONfc HUMS 0"
OWKUnCOHD
SEAUEST 24 OZ- CUP
LARGE OR SMALL CURD
.ja 1.
51
10
(SAVE2SC
vJlCCSe leal ^bV SA^E
c^&zsr .........9e 13
SwtoS.............tea o
mm. wantctx^eec dm "^
MOZ "6
Err M U3W HMCOtO L*C" c
Qr.t*dC
1.18 21
148 31
..... 148 06
......78 11
..... 48 09
ich-g 148 10
oio* 8/148 27
..... 8/48 22
..... 148 ac
..... 1.18 36
3i
GENERICS'
(SAVE 1 00)
GENERIC 100 CT BOX
99*
SAVE
G*N6|C ASSORTED F&M3RS 2LTB __
.77 22
.77 48
1.29
3/.79 02
24
30

Whole Wheat Bread 2 ,$- BUY 7T51
1 J L
^aiKiau'iHia:' .'.:?< -
cmwkm < or *g SAVE 48 20 .78 20 48 20 48 12
yMIMIIKMliyUM K0H
MCWCW IMUW k
What's
Eveiyday Low Prices Every<
weekly specials do at some stores!
US CHOICE BEEF ROUND BOTTOM BONELESS
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRES-
Round Roast Fryer L*gQuarters
$188 ? 58<
SAVE 11C LB ) ^^bV LB
BONUS BUYS
=Z=ZEVERYDW LOW PRH
SAVE GOLD KIST U S NSPECTED SAVl
WBBfSIBSSrrrr.......... 2.3a 31 Frying ? 198
LB
3C>
1
89
48
m
ti^lffipVa^."*.......^2.78 si Chicken Livers
ftWOxtatts 1.38 vf&!&um*Ukm or Wings
S!s rk:h SUced 2"iBS 0VER
Turkey Breast ^78 Beef Liver...... lb
OllvCB.......... LB HiBB as's oyancy .
TYSON CHCK N QUICK PATTIES frf9* COOTDO.................J 1,1
Hoaoies & ^53 i^bub.
V2koZ Si .31
:j ^s t ovtp-
2.88|
j 1.961
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH (SAVE 11< LB
IBREASTQTRS
WBACKS
^CHOtCE BEEF RqyND BCTnOM BONELESS
22
use
Chickenfa 58?
___________________(SAVE 21C LB '
US CHOICE (WHOLE OR SIRLOIN HALF" SAVE 5--B'
PRODUCE
PICK YOUR OWN
TENDER SWEET
(U-P1CK LOOSE DISPLAY-
GARDEN FRESH TENDER
f>

7/$-|00
wM BB (SAVE 30C]
Com Round
BONUS
Hl>
QAROEN FRESH
.LB
BUN IIS
IUI>
SAVE
20
US 1 ALL PURPOSE
.YsMov
TOPS IN VTTAABN A" GARDEN FRESH
LB
I LB AM3
. US 1 GENUME IDAHO
.... 8 LB BAG 1
| TOP OUAUTY FLOROA PER3AN LARGE 200 SIZE
.06
.45 34
.40
10/.59 20
CJWSPV FRESH
8......BUNCH
luscious sweet eating (large 2-inches and up)
......2lbs .79 .21
LOW IN
CALORIES
3 (SA&/E 30t)
ISAVEM
GARDEN FRESHGREEN(ZUCC
Squash
39
Eggpli
39


Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
great
prices?
iey dont go up in price like
save more on your total food bill!
cPnde
PRICE EFFECTIVE
THRU JUNE 15,
Jggjffi RESERVE
THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES
WE WILL GLADLY
REDEEM YOUR
US GOVERNMENT
FOOD STAMPS
ETuJi
(SAVE30C
ASSORTED COLORS
Gala
Jumbo
Towels
69*
^B^d^F Bjaj^F SAVE
BONUS BOYS =
SAVE TREE TOP REGULAR OR NATURAL
EVERYLW LOW PRICES
OBllGH' 6 '!Ol CANS
IMMW 8 -tc,! net bus.
2.29 4a
1.60 16
1.79 40
1.10 10
lllf OR PtPOtH Ofl 21. BTl
1.09 60
I RNK 4S QZ CAN
.60 oe
,JUc.
Apple
Juice
$149
^^B (SAVE 20C)
64 OZ JUG
SAVE
PANTRY HRIOE CHUNK LIGHT IN Oil OR WATER
una........6 1/jozcan .79 oe
0NJO^iM407C*N
.......89 30
PANTRY PRIDE I GALLON
White Vinegar...... 1.99 os
pan-at PRigE^PQwotREOASST FUUORS
ARM 1 HAMMER
Laundry
. .' CAN
65 02 BOM
1.19 20
1.29 12
1.59 ie
(SAVE 20C)
| SLICES
i PEACHES OR
CASERA soz cw.
Tomato Sauce...... 47.89 11
jYNii Bathroom Tissue .79 10
pantry PBioeSirtf PEAS 1*02 CAM
" CUT 0" FRENCH >S'?OZCAN
1000 ISLAND. FRENCH. 16 OZ BTL
ITALIAN OR CATALINA
Kraft Salad
Dressinq
WiHatv*
3/1.00 33
JES HEAVY OUT LIQUID MOZ BTL
Laundry Detergent. 3.35 so
SOMAEFFER REGULAR LIGHT e PK I? OZ CANS
Bear............... 1.79 20
PANTRY PRIOt 33 OZ JAR
Mayonnaise .
WHITE 100 CT INCH
lOUMGI 101 BTl
PCA9EBKT PtOM BTl
*>KE0
,.W 1.39.20
tttR I'M CAN
1.1
Ob
30
.99 20
.99
PWMCKIVtL>OUI0.?0t C*F LABEL! MOZBU
DM Detergent..... 1.19 a
PANTRV PRIOt BflQ SOUR CREAM i ONION
Potato CMpa e ? a? bag .55 20
VAX 4< OFF LABEL I 14 02 CAN
mmmmr........... 2/.79 i b
UNCLE BENS CONVERTED
Rice 5lbbag
$109
I (SAVE 20Ci
SMUCKERS JIB JAR
Strawberry Jam .
Charcoal Briquet,
Dill Pickle,........

Com Oil.....
NNS'LVANLA OUTCH PlTRNRBTL

IANLAOUTC
iBeer
33 oz BTL
6 1/2 OZ. CAN
BCMBLEBEE
CHUT#X UGHT IN
OIL OR WATER
I
I
I
58 WITH COUPON
LIMIT 1 WITH 110 ORDER
GOOD THRU JUNE 15. 1082
Tuna
59 I in/in
I'inli
IVALUABLE COUPONB
I VALUABLE
MRS. FILBERTS
(SAVE 40C)J
11/2 LB.
BOWL
54JC WITH COUPON
AND 10.00 ORDER
GOOD THRU JUNE 15, 1082
MRS. FILBERTS
Spread 25 !
59<
(SAVE29C)
I
I
IBCOUPONII
$
52~QRR]
TOWARDS THE PURCHASE OF
8" "
I *u/in
I "inli
$2^9
ffBjBf, (SAVE b6>
&$-|09
Softener JLsave6c
i Mi
.49 ce
4/1.00 oe
Hl"*>SHER 2*0
Dill Spears
SRAM 1?Ctf CAN
Lunch#on
MfAHISDfLKiH
?"C*1#S
Cook*.,
1.39 12
0E0OTB.ERNO
.....79 20
CHABLIS RHINESKELLER
RHINE. ROSE 1 5 LTR
, >ny m
ines
ARTS QEKGHT CHUNKY PEARS OR
..ISO/ CAN
SA J I.2QZ G
.99 42
1.49 ie
2/99 63
Tf BAKERY
T TREATS
399
OjMB*7 (SAVE SOt)
ownnoKswnMKSKaiHian
49 06 CBISPY LARGE ^gm ,._.
Kaiser 6/TQc
RoUSSAvE20t' ^
SAVE
Pumparracka. Braad .89
Fudge Brown!.,.....27.55
Apple PC........... %M .0
iacaron. a Ch~.e 1.79 20
mawussL^ 3.09
WITH COUPON
GOOD THRU
TUESDAY. JUNE IS. 1962"
WITHOUT COUPON $10.9
TOWARDS THE I _
Capri Bake N Serve
Divided
Vegetable Bowl
I
-HeaKh^BeautyAids-
Iers,a9>r^a9af
2
(SAVE S2C]
SAVE
11 OZ BTL
PRELL SHAMPOO OR
Head & Shoulders
Shampoo
GILLETTE ALL STAR 9CT PKO
Tree II Bladoe.......2.99 40
GIILET1E ALL STAR 5 CT RKG
Atra Blades.......... 1.79 .20
QllETTE EACH
Atra Raxor...........3.09 30
(60s OFF LABEli 10 OZ BRONZE CAN
Right Ouard.......2.47 so
JOHNSONS 14 OZ CONT
Baby Powder......... 1.99 so
=FROZEN=
s^"$-|09
CUTORFRtNCH OZ BO
TED UOZ BOX
pSS.? Double the difference in
| 'fellS cash if we dont save
I jSSSL you more.
k*m GUARANTEED
> 1.
Mai
AUAHOIli
It, ^nVa95jga|
''*
If you on find lower prices Itw a ny oth* supermarket
PntTv Pnde win pay you Double the Difference Just Duy ^
difWrent wms worm 20 or monj at Pentry Pnde Compere
preee on the serrwiWrm it snyottwr supermarket HlrW*jMe
lower bringyourrwmuedPenftyPnderegaWrUpeendine
other MM s once, on Itw eujet seme rwms to Pntry Pnde
end we pey you DouDW The DrIWrenee In Cesh'
sSERVICEDm!
OVEN FRESH
Barbecue $ ^
Chicken lb. am
Jack & JUI 4 78
Bologna .lb JL .24
OWFariilonLo^ I.OS oe
SaWaVch^reV \ *...... 1^8 22
SAVE
2/39 29
79 9n
pNTmmUM0NAOOR eoz can
Llrrnadi 4/1.00 24
Whippy Topping ^g10
E^^liomn,.....9 18
Ogf. If MOMESTyiE WEDGES OR SICES
i*otatoee.....moz ag 139 26
27.79 10
.MOZ BAG
RANTFTY RRtOE ASSORTED SOZeOH
Pot Plea...........
SAVE
Swanson
F^-Fried
Chicken
f'3KM
K%%yuk::".......i.
H^SaUni 138
20
11



.
.



Pfrg^O-B Tl* Jewish Florkfian Friday. JUne 11,1962


Community Corner
Alfred Goldf of Miami Beach led a program on "Personnel
in Jewish Education" for members of the Executive Committee
and board of directors of the Jewish Education Service of North
America, when they convened for an institute and meeting in
Washington.
Dr. Sol Landau, president and executive director of the
Mid-Life Services Foundation, and a lecturer on the middle
years and the "burnout" phenomenon, will present a workshop,
' How To Cope With Burnout," at the International Association
of Business Communicators, Tuesday, in Chicago.
Harry B. Smith, a founder and member of the South Florida
law firm of Smith & Mandler, PA. has been named to the board
of overseers of the Florence Heller Graduate School of Brandeis
University. Smith will serve a three-year term.
Voters Inc. will hold a "Giant Political Rally" Tuesday,
7:30 p.m., in the auditorium of the American Savings Bank,
1200 Lincoln Rd., according to Harry Levy, president.
Airman David A. Shapiro, son of Judy A. Shapiro, Miami,
has been assigned to Chanute Air Force Base in Illinois after
completing basic training.
Jack Lubin was elected vice president of Southeastern
Public Service Company at a board of directors meeting. Lubin
is a founder and former vice president of education of the South
Dade Hebrew Academy, and served three terms as president of
Temple Or Olom
An overwhelming response to the Florida Philharmonic Or-
chestra subscription renewal campaign has prompted officials to
extend the renewal deadline thru June, according to Marshall S.
Harris, board chairman.
Miami Beach City Commissioner Alex Daond will address
members of the Miami Beach lodge of B'nai B'rith Friday, 1
p.m. in the civic auditorium of the 100 Lincoln Road Building.
Music, ranging from a Miccosukee Indian band to a pianist
playing Rachmaninoff, will be featured during the Miami Beach
Symphony's six Summer "Pops" Concerts Jury 11 thru Aug. 22
at the Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts.
Concerned Parents of Cult Children will hold a general
meeting June 21 at 8 p.m.
Writing _
Arithmetic
Reading, Writing & Arithmetic are
basic skills, tour cNkjs ability to
think creatively is also basic to life.
It is the resource upon which he or
she will draw again and again to
help understand and build our
world.
The South Do** Hebrew
Acodamy is dedicated to help-
ing each child reach full potential
in a loving and supportive
atmosphere. Programs for nursery
school through grade 6 are
comprehensive, and combine
modem teaching methods with
the richness of Jewish tradition.
Visit the South Doda Hebrew
Acoovmy and learn why reading,
writing & arithmetic are only the
beginning of a quality education.
AN famllls* vlsrring the South
Doda Hebrew Acodomy before
June 30 will be offered a "Torrance
Test of Creative Thinking" at
no charge and with no obligation
This 30-minute test evaluates
the creative thinking ability of
individuals from kindergarten
to graduate school Recognizing
and developing creativity is an
important part of educating our
students. Call 253-2300 for an
appointment.
Registration b now open
for Foil 1962. Call or write:
Martene Mitchell, Principal
South Doda Hebrew Academy
11801 S.W 74th Ave.
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 253-2300
SHIDOACHI our son 32, should
be married already! Intelligent,
good natured, nice looking,
works family business
Vegetarian, loves books, music,
astrology. Pleas* send photo,
letter with Mrtnoate. Interests.
Writs: Box N.N.N., C/o The
Jewish Fkxidlsn, P.O. Box
012973 Miami, Fl. 33101.
theY?f*
best!"
^BSRAOiOand
l'S*.lL.rUWur Hfilt Kk AM v
MAAXIMIUAN SCHEil ROD STEIGLR
JiODBY BENSON THE CHOSEN. .&*.!
' PG

4th WEEK AT POPULAR PRICES
SOUTH (MM-
immmtco
KKHDALI
MNMUUMS
SMOPMMCT*
3*V33
wor-H oad-; -
lores
- MIAMI BCACH-----
.VTJON.
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eoecTco
HALLANDALB
HAllANOAlf SCM. SUV
MTWIEN US 1 I A1A
SKYLAKI
raw
MUM) CONS CM
iiassn
sMMM
----------------------PEMBftORE PINCS-----------------.
PMNBSTWIN
cmum
17UWVtSSITTPK
4J2-M77
* WMUD MOW CITY 10 ft LAUOiAOAll
OCA KATOM TWW LOf t CXMAl SMHNCS
PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED
BY
MENDELSONJNC.
833 First Street
MIAMI BEACH
672-5800
DON'T BE FOOLED
BY SUBSTITUTES!
When spending your hard earned money for value, be sure that's
what you get! Be certain it's EMPIRE KOSHER fresh chickens and
turkeys. Ask your butcher to show you Empire's famous Red White
and Blue tag while it's attached to the wing. Otherwise, you risk
getting something less than the best. Make sure that you are not
another victim of deception.
Thursday, July 1
is Health Care
Day.
On that day, all surgery (other than emergency surgery) will cease in several south Florida
counties.
Why?
Because outrageous jury awards in medical malpractice cases have caused a fiscal crisis
in Florida's Patients Compensation Fund (PCF).
The Result?
Anestheseoiogists and surgeons face PCF premiums which are over 400 percent higher
than last year's. These premiums are due July 1, 1982. That's why July 1 is Health Care
Crisis Day doctors without malpractice insurance cannot participate in surgery.
What are we physicians doing about it?
1. We are notifying the general public and elected officials of this health care crisis.
2. We are asking Governor Graham, Insurance Commissioner Gunter, the Florida Senate
and House to deal with this crisis in the Special Legislative Session starting June 21.
3. We are asking that emergency surgery be performed by assigned surgeons for whom
liability insurance coverage must be provided.
What can you do about this crisis?
Call or write Gov. Bob Graham, The Capitol, Tallahassee 32301
(904) 488*4441; Insurance Commissioner Bill Gunter, Larsen Building,
Tallahassee 32301. (904) 488-3440
Call Broward County Delegation Chairman Jim Scott (305) 566-8600
and Dade County Delegation Chairman Bob McKnight
(305) 358-3764.
Tell them all of your concern; It's your battle, too.
Florida Physicians United for Health Cost Reform
Hugh Unger, M.D., Dad* County Paul Baxt, M.D., Broward Count
Stratton N. Sterghos, M.O., Broward ,.*
Walter Gassner, M.D., Dade County Arnold Tanis, M.D., Broward coum
J.S.A. Wester, M.O., F.A.C.S., Broward County
Chairman of the South Broward Hospital District
Physician's Professional Liability Insurance Trust.


Fridy, June 11,1982. The. Jewish Floridian Page i-l-B
Six service organizations paid
tribute to Dade Circuit Judge
Adele Sega II Faske for 31 years of
public service at a reception and
award presentation ceremony at
the DuPont Plaza Hotel. Chair-
man of the reception committee
wasJoePardo.
The six organizations, whose
memberships total more than 500
persons, were the Boys Club of
Miami, the Committee on Total
Employment, Lions Inter-
national. Optimist International.
the Hope Center and the North
Shore Optimist Club.
A native Miamian who won
national acclaim when she headed
the Non-Support Division of the
Dade State Attorney's Office,
Judge Faske was the first woman
in Florida to be appointed a state
prosecutor. She was named to the
position in 1953 by then
Governor Dan McCarty and later
reappointed by Governor Leroy
Collins, serving as an assistant
state attorney until her election
to the circuit court bench in 1976.
As chief of the Non-Support
Division. Faske became known to
families, civic leaders, govern-
ment officials and those in judi-
cial-legal circles for her efforts in
obtaining assistance for aban-
doned mothers, children and
other needy persons whose plight
she became aware of through the
operation of her office.
She received national attention
for her leadership in helping per-
suade the Florida Legislature to
enact the reciprocal support law
which requires fathers to pay for
the support of their children.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"When thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall give
light in front of the candlestick." (Num. 8.2)
BEHAALOTEKHA
BEHAALOTEKHA "And the Lord spoke unto Moses.
saying: Speak unto Aaron, and say unto him: When thou
lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall give light in front of
the candlestick."
And this was the work of the candlestick, beaten work of gold,
unto th.. hum thereof and unto the flowers thereof, it was beaten
work; according unto the pattern which the Lord had shown
Moses, so he made the candlestick" [Numbers 8.14). After the
Levites has been purified, they who were between their twenty-
fitth (Numbm 8.24) and their fiftieth years,came to the tent of
meeting to take the place of the firstborn in the holv service. In
:h< second year after the Israelites had departed from Egypt,
they observed the Passover festival on the 14th day of the first
month, Nissan Those who having touched a corpse were deemed
impure, were required to wait a month to observe the festival.
On the 20th day of the second month, the cloud rose from the ta-
bernacle and the children of Israel journeyed from mount Sinai,
each i ribe grouped around its standard, three days distance be-
hind the Ark. At this time, the Israelites began burdening
Most's Wltn their complaints. To ease the burden, 70 elders, on
whom Moses spirit rested, were delegated to serve under him.
a^h'.rVounUn9 0<** We:,V Portion of the Law is extracted and based
Tull ., Gr*Ph,c History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
amr, si5, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
m e!J.Vork' NV- l00M- JoPn Schlang is president of the society dis
""ling the volume.)
Mokoks
Dear Friends,
SS
Ice Cream Shoppe Telephone (305194^8080
R B International
17240 Collins Avenue
Sunny isles. Florid* 33160
B'nai MitZVah ** David to JmiBn Tescher ** President
Presenting a plaque to Circuit Court Judge Adele Scgall Faske
ore Harry Holtzman (left), president of North Shore Optimists
and Seymour Silverman of Optimists International.
Judge Faske Recognized bg
Six Service Organizations
March 9,1982
Avery dear friend of ours, Joel Benes, a young Cuban-
Jewish boy, has opened a Haagen-Dazs Ice Cream
Shoppe next to the Rascal House on Collins Avenue
and 172nd Street.
We. together with some friends, go there very often to
"ave a cone. In addition to a delicious ice cream (the
tost), we have a very enjoyable time in a beautiful en-
vironment. Joel can also arrange and prepare ice
cream cakes for any social event and will cater your
Pities. Since Haagen-Dazs is kosher, we recommend
al1 our friends in the catering business to call Joel at
W5-808O to inquire about this service.
Visit Joel, you'll like it!
Thank you tor supporting Joel's first business venture.
Shalom,
to'itaFeldenkreis
Marcy Lefton
^Q&Ja^ FnUr
LV
Stanley Phillips
STANLEY PHILLIPS
Stanley Phillips, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Stephen Phillips will
become a Bar Mitzvah at TemDle
Menorah. Saturday morning.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
officiate.
Stanley is a seventh grade
honor student at Nautilus Junior
High School.
Mr and Mrs. Phillips will host
a kiddush following services.
JOELSCOTTJACOBI
Joel Scott Jacobi, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Benjamin Jacobi, wili
become a Bar Mitzvah Saturday
morning at Temple Beth Moshe.
Kaboi Louis M. Lederman will
officiate.
Joel is in the seventh grade at
North Miami Junior High where
he participates in sports and is on
the honor roll.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacobi will spon-
sor the kiddush following serv-
ices in honor of the occasion. Spe-
cial guests will include Mr. and
Mrs. Jay Jacobi, grandparents;
and Tillie Schwartz, great grand-
mother.
DAVID MARK COLLINS
David Mark Collins, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Collins, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, 10:30 a.m., at
Temple Sinai of North Dade.
The celebrant is a student in
the Dalet class at Temple Sinai
and in the seventh grade at
Highland Oaks Junior High. An
honor student, David loves
sports and was voted most athle-
tic in the seventh grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Collins
will host the kiddush following
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception at the temple.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Murray Zoland and Mr.
and Mrs. Barney Collins, grand-
parents; Lauren, sister; and
Scott. brother.
KEVIN LOUGACHI
Kevin Lougachi. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Lougachi, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, 10:45 a.m.,
at Temple Beth Sholom of
Greater Miami. Dr. Leon Kronish
will officiate.
Kevin is a student of the Con-
irmation Class of 5744.
JON DAVID HARRIS
Jon David Harris, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Harris, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday, 10:30 a.m., at
Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
The celebrant is a student of
the Temple Emanu-El Religious
School and Nautilus Junior High
where he is in the seventh grade.
A member of the Latin Club, he
placed second in the district
forum and fourth in the state
forum of MOTOS. Jon plays the
piano and was chosen last year to
play the bells in Dade County's
Superintendents Festival.
Mr. and Mrs. Harris will host
the kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion and a re-
ception Saturday at Westview
Country Club. Special guests will
include Mrs. Dorothy Harris and
Mrs. Helen Kay, grandmothers;
and Brett and Geoffrey, brothers.
Wanted
Licensed Sunday school
teachers and certified afternoon
Hebrew school teacher. Part-
time bus drivers, chauffeur's
license. Beth Torah
Congregation, 1051 North Miami
Batch Boulevard. 947-7528.
Beth David Congregation has
slated its installation of officers
for Saturday, 9 a.m. at the Coral
Way Sanctuary, during Shabbat
services.
Officers to be inducted into
their new responsibilities include
Donald R. Tescher, president;
Philip Bergman, executive vice
president; Jerome Shevin, Dr.
Jules Minkes, Irene Sholk,
Martin Hellman, Jose Portnoy,
Elayne Tendrich. Morris Cohen,
Dr. Stanley Zakarin, Dr.
Abraham Benyunes and Jeff
Kosinek, vice presidents; Robert
W. Spiegelman, treasurer;
Myron Stayman, assistant trea-
surer; Madelyn Saul, financial
secretary; and Richard Milstein,
recording secretary.
Sisterhood Brunch
Sisterhood of Temple Or Olom
will hold its annual Father's Day
brunch June 20, 10:30 a.m., in
the temple social hall.
''
Synagogue
Listings
Candlellghllng time: 7:52
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Fri 15 p m Ron Mania will dlacuaa
"The Soviet Union and Relueenlka
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Baach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adlar, Cantor
Sat. morn. Service 9 a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preach a! 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schtff
Fit Eve. 7 p.m. Sat 9 am
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N.Kendall Or. Baumgard
S. Mlami-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morion Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Frl 1Sp m D School Graduation
Sat 9 1 & B'nai Mli/vah of Andrew Chakott
and Oa.id Smith 11 IS B nal Mlti.ah ol
Bonnia Brooke and Eric Poien
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: MM S.W 3rd Avwmm
South Dado rtOO S.W. iMttt Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. UPSON
Friday, 8 p.m. South Dade Chapel
Saturday, 9 a.m. Coral Way
Frl a pm Shabbat Servlcea Sat 9am
Inatallation during eervlcee
Bar Mltivah of William Schlld.
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
Mtarrrt Ptanear feateerr) Congmgmtan
137NE 19thSt. Miami. 57*5900
9990 M Kendaf Or, 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haake* M Bemat
Aast Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Sakin
Cantor Jacob G. Bomsteln
Frl a p.m Cantor Bornatein will dlacuaa
Weak neat and Strength Kendall Rabbi
Fernet will dlacuaa "Chrlatlana Weakening
Chrlallenlty
667-5657
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd.
Coral Gabies
Mfcnael B. BaensUL Rabbi
Frl 1S p m Servlcea Ja Kerruer. MOWN
dlacuaa Nuclear War The Conaequencea
Wa Dare Not Think About...
But Mart No Choice
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. TeL 5349778
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH. President
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m. Sat 9:30 am
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 8586334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Daily Mlnyan Services 7:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami, Fl. 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Frtedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A Gorflnkei
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
r ri ave Inatallation Sat a.m..
Bar Mitzvah of Joel Jacobi
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavnoh
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. M.B..FI. 33139
Tel. 5364112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Meiber
Cantor Saul H. Breed
Daily Service 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.
Friday 7:15p.m.Saturday 6:30 a.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach, 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward Klein
Friday services at 6:15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court #111
Miami, Fl. Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Wamsn Kaaztl 3820696
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Frl. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. a 41 sL St
Dr. Loon Kronish, Rabbi
Cantor David Conviaer
Fit Evening 8:15 pm
536-7231
Liberal
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7526
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd.
Dr. Max A Upschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Fit Evening Service 6tt> pm
Sat Morning Service 8:30 am.
Deity Setvteea. 7:30 a.m.-5:30p.m.
Sat. mom Bar Mltneh of Dan Wood.
NtCAL ASSOCIATION-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Btecavns Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 5764000
KICrW oOHXTlOn oCfwTT
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
HOUMS Of wOfWlIp
Phone 576-4000
P Jihlraij-! laann'-"----tTaaHI
nmootnem mmmoemwon UTDOI
TEMPLESNAI 18601 NE22Ave.
North Dede's Reform aggregation
RafpbP.KaigtJay.Rabbi 9324010
Julan L Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shutkes, Cantor
Bsibara & Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:15 p.m
(7:30 p.m. first Friday of month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
Frl 'L hltreot Don t Foroot Ua
Sal ntom.-S'nal MlUvah of Davtd CoNena
and Gregg Joaapheon.
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
6000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Dlckaon, Cantor
Mlnyan Services Mon 6 Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 6:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
Queeta Are Welcome
Frl Corn1 kmaMan Sabbath
Sat liritaaa Totttor Ceaaaaa
- soUlrJtAsTAHrOrJ-------
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE IBM St. N. Miami Soecti. Ft. 131 (2
MreBM. Harold Vnabna, eaoouOea deractor
Frank Mo 0. Krewtaer. rajteaol anjHaa.il.
UHIONAP AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fl. 33131
379-4553. Rabbi Lewis L. Bogege
Director, Union of American Hebrew
Congregation,


Pace 12-B Tne Jewish Flondiac
.- ndai
,-ae
..-.
Consul General Anton Says World
Must Understand Israel's Action
Shack to Spearhead JCCs for Second Year
We regret to stale that these
efforts have proved mefieruve
aad that imp mi thee aad de-
the presence of I NTFIL
m pans of Lebanon the
of the bi bases aad
to Israel have actuat-
such a* in downtown
d effort to destroy the
WHILE HE acknowledges the
of the Luted Nations to
the hare caused by the
agaimt Israei
directed froe Lebaaoc. he notes
Say? A moo No
government would tolerate
passively the continuation of
such a state of affairs We there-
fore reject w*h indignation any
attempt to impose oc Israel a re-
straint which would not be ex-
ercised by or expected of any
ether country
Wedacadav. 8
.. to be held at the new Miami
Beach JCC buudmg on the
grounds of the Ida Fisher School
Beach.
Kau. Steven J Kra\jfc
G Layton. MD. Frames B"1
vey. Joel I. Levy Eom
\*- Nr I ^<\
Nancy Newman a z-
I faajMl sseu.^gH
rJriaaaMl
Steven J
Ruth Shack
M D Harrv
Syrian MIGs Downed Over Galilee
i
Cowtiawtd froea Pi
Force pdoc who baled out over
Lebanon was taken prisoner At a
press conference at a Beirut hoe-
be said he had had
with the vu-
who first captured has bat
bv
:-
i_-echaJ BfjaaVal
the Sj naaa. and Israei has no in-
tention of harming or chsruptaag
".at uves of caucus of I rhaanti
who had no hand in terrorist
activities Streaeaag that Israel
had no temtonal claims oa
lehanoa. Eitan declared n an
.-;*- -.: ..-.* ^a> 'At aaal
piete the mKskm and
strengthened, to our homeland
and peace and security wul rec-
to oar northern towns and vil-
hajai
1982-83 officers will be
Dade County Commissioner
Ruth Shack, serving her second
year as president. Marc Hauser.
Steven J Kravrtz Joel I Lew.
Neal J Menacbem. Gerald I
Schwartz vice presidents. Syd-
ney Newark, secretary and Mor-
ns Futernick. treasurer
Board members for the coming
vear will be J W Baros
Emanuel Beriatsky. Rosiyr. K
Bernn. Norman Broad. Barry N
Burma. D C Fern Canter. Tie R
Singles Party
The Singles Club of Temple
Emanu-El will bold a wine and
cheese party. Sunday. ? p.m. in
the Pearimar. Mural Room.
\
R.-^Shmdi
Coher. Hope K Fuller. Harvey
Friedman Moms Futermck.
Norman Gotdenberg:
Stanley K Greenstein. Edward
F Hams. Marc Hauser. Ezra
Schwaru^g. R
Ronalo w Shane.
bmith and Ha^.
beaahoaorao-bwremwht,
1-^1 t^"* *.Jau
eanwyofHerbR.^.io^l
program director of the jrr.
South Beach Aetivkiaj cYmJI
for senior adult* of Fr^f1
June .- a-. I p.tt dedriuiil
ceremonies; ,. ltstf
will be held
The Miaeai Beach Center wl|
be headquarter* for all South
Beach JCC progi ^ml
adults The** include tat South
Beach AcuvTtie> -efrii]
eiderfy day ca.--
outreach progra
Ride a spec:*,
system tor annor a;..:-
smice
i-ic Senior
Department Selects Gold as 1982-83 Leader
State Dep'L Takes Balanced' Mew
Caatiaaed frwea Page 1
ex of the
" -
< th-
ai *-^:cTT-;^
Soviet L
not oeen terribly
respect to
vorvement in the
fighting, he said "We have ex-
pressed our concern that there be
no w i*tnng of this conflict
Romberg said that some US
Navy ships have been ordered to
Port Rboda in Spain where they
will be in a position, if required.
- :r~
of
He dechhed to sa> how
A mencans there are at the
m Bea-ut or how
be evacuated if
aecessarv
The Luted States strongly
supports the independence, tern-
tonal integrity and sovereagnty
of Lebanon within its inter
nationally recognized borders.
Romberg said
The Department of Florida
Ladies Auxiliaries of the Jewish
'A ar Veterans culminated its
tree-cay convention at the Sher-
aton Bxj Harbour with final elec-
tions and installation of officers
Elected to the presidency was
Carol Gold Her slate of officers
Deludes Befle Horowitz, setuor
vice president: Ida Kadm. junior
vice president. Edith Novins.
chaplain: Lillian Wetntraub. pat-
riotic instructor. Rita Sasiaw.
conductress: and Eleanor Pales,
treasurer
Appointed to their offices were
past Department president. Leah
EisenmaE. recording secular-
Tanya Lev me. corresponding se-
cretary Florence Grossman his-
tonan. and Mary Wexler. guard
Beth Torah to Pay Tribute to Dade County Judges
Four Dade County judges who
are members of Beth Torah
Congregation will be honored by
the North Miami Beach syna-
gogue Saturday morning during
the Sabbath service which begins
at 9am
Those to be recognized include
County Court Judges Harvey
Baxter. former financial secre-
tary of the congregation. Milton
Starkman. an active member for
-xm than 20 years and Arthur
Winton. former president and
Circuit Coun Judge .\nhur S
Snyder. also past president.
"The four jurists are bemg
honored for their rhatrnguisbec
and dedicated service :o the nidi-
nen* communay and to
*.heir congregation, said Rabbi
Max V L.pschiti. sptntuai
*ader of the synagogue
Rabbi Lipachaz and Cantor
Zvee Aroni wui participate > the
ceremonies, and Federal Magis-
trate Herben S. Shapiro past
president and currently laaririaii
chairman of the board of Temple
Emanu-El will speak
Goes in N.Y. for
Leadership Training
Carol Goss of Maitland. Fla.
newiv-elected president of the
Florida Branch of the Women s
League for Conservative Juda-
hd. is one of 28 Women's League
presidents who met in Long
Beach. NY. for intensive
training as Wader\ of Cooserva
tive Sisterhoods m the United
States and Canada.
Women s League is the parent
body for the Conservative Move-
ment Sisterhoods.
'"^
mm '
v
Box:*-
', -
s ;- as
Liftman UAHC Regional Director
Rabr Lewis C L ttaaai Tas
beer, appotnted regional airector
:ae Southeast Council of the
Union of Amercan Heorew
Congregations. according to
Rabrji Alexander at Schindler
UAHC president
In his new post, which he will
laiimf Jury 2. Rabbi Lktman
will serve as the professional re-
source and liaison to the 61 Re-
form congregations in the South-
east Council.
Ordained at Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion in New York. Rabbi Litt-
for the past three years, has
red as senior rabbi of the Cen-
tral Synagogue of Nassau
County in New York. He prev-
iously served at Temple Anshe
Hesea in Fne Pa where he was
.-.amed human.tar-.an of the
year by the Ene Human Rela-
tions Commission, and Tempie
Emanuel in Denver
A former cantonal soloist.
Rabbi Lit t man has pursued his
interest in theatre and Jewish
music His lecture concert. "Jew-
ish Life in Music." has been per-
formed throughout the eastern
Unked States.
Young Singles Social
The 21 ? Beth Torah young
singles will hold a social evening
June IT. 8 p.m.. in the Rosemarv
Nacron School Chapel.

JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi Max A. Ijparhitx of
Beth Torah Congregauoa.
North Miami Beach, will ap-
on the Jaanah Worship
naday at t av aal
!. -_____
BEST C0N0O BUYS IN NORTH MIAMI BEACH
OLYMPIC TOWER
920 N E. 169th. St.
One bedroom. 1 i bath apartment in beautiful well main-
tained building. Walk to everything. Only $44,500
SKYLAKE GARDENS
1723 Miami Gardens Drive FURNISHED 2 bedroom. 1
bath apartment in excellent condition Great facilities,
convenient to everything. Owner left town and said price
it below market at oniv $49,900

m
THE MOGEL COMPANY
acALToas
Phono 940*1220
The presaient's Advisory
Board is chaired by Mae
Schreiber Charman of the
Finance Committee is Evelyn
Ferdie. and Budget Committee
cnairman is Ceil Steinberg
A member of the West Miami
Auxiliary 22-3 since 1955. Mrs
Gold was chosen "Woman of the
Year at the department s con-
vention in 1976 while represent
hag them She also served as
auxiliary president.
M the installation
members of President Gold's
family were present including her
parents. Till* and Fred Sandier:
sisters. Charlotte Mittler and
ntj ma Fistel: one daughter. Lots
of Miami, and husband. Stanley
Gold
Past department presidents
Mae Schreiber. Evelyn Lev me.
Lee Rubin. Eveivn Ferdie and
1

Ceil SteinDerg served as install-1
Bg officers
The new pres.ot-r.: uiUhoWanl
onentation roncheon meetingl
June 13 at her noise for ail in-f
coming ana outgoing officers.
Lau Firm Announces Merger
The law firm of Myers. Kaplan
Levinson. Kemn and Richards
announces that Charles L Ruff-
:he r.rrr. ar.c the firm name will
hereafter be Myen Kenm.
Leriaaoa Raffuei Frank and
Ricnards
Debra E Cohen WUbam E
Sundstrom Bruce J. Berman.
Daie S Recinella. and Jeffrey
Wen horn ha\e become members
of :he firm, and E:elie C Pat-
'' rodnick and!
Donna Seadeo have|
become j--
faawi on Israel
tap at
--. *._! on I
- lay r.oonl
--- Chapter of I
1 t to bel
held "- '' ''"I
leakk Wa ....ding.l
North Miami Beacr. jccordinutol
n adeM |
Eve Gat '':Tla^
**A*
ROSENBAUM, ROSE V.
We deeply .-no- "
of an extraordinan woman in
our time The patient* of the
Shaare Zedek Hospita: in Jeru-
salem in particular the pre-
mature babies of the De-
partment of N'eonatoiogy and
the elderlv infirm of the Chronic
Care Department wul forever
bless the name of Rose v
Rosenbaum. President of the
South Florida Women 5 Com-
mittee of Shaare Zedek Medical
Center This House at Healmi
in Jerusalem stands as
everlasting memorial to
concern for the afflicted. To her
beloved son. Dr Lawrence
LeShan. and daugnte'-m-'aw
Eda and to her manj P*
children and great grandchil-
dren, we otter our deepest condolences. May the great Comforter
bring to them and to the House of Israel, consolation
AMERICAN COMMITTEE FOB ZEDEK HOSPITAL
Charlea BeadheiBi President
Lud wig Jeasetaoa. Chairman of the Board .
Sidaer L. Otaaa. Nataoaal Vice President and >outw
an
her
SaalM.
.Sr.Vlee
RegioB


Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
BADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: *< CA 4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
DOLORES JAMES
INVESTMENTS. INC..
I Florida corporation,
pialr.UK.
Jose avendano. and
OSAGAS PROPERTIES, N.V.,
a Netherlands AnUllea corpo-
ration.
Defendant!
TO JOSE AVENDANO
Residence Unknown
YOC ARE NOTIFIED that
an Interpleader action In-
volving an escrow deposit to
vhlch you may have claim con-
cerning a lease for L'nlta 1SG
and 13H of Yacht Harbor Con-
dominium. OR Book 9021,
Page 67 of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, has
been (lied against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any.
towlt on Keith W Saka, Plain
UK's Attorney, whoee address
H 2701 Southwest LeJeune
Road. Suite 401. Coral Gables.
Florida 33134 on or before July
1, iW2 and file the original with
Uie clerk of this Court either
before service upon Plaintiff's
attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a Default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court of this 26 day
of May. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
as Clerk of the Court
BY K Selfrled
Deputy Clerk
1W73 May 28;
June 4, 11, 18. 1882
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 440*
Division 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARY SPECTOR,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of MARY SPEC
TOR. DECEASED. File Num-
ber 82-4407. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
toress of which Is 73 West
Flijler Street. Miami. Florida
The personal representative of
t* estate Is AARON SPEC-
TOR whose address la P.O
Box 611156. North Miami. Flor-
" 33161 The name and ad
*wi of the personal represen
ttuves attorney are set forth
I Mm
-All persons having claims or
I *mands against the estate are
lEKd' W'TH1N THREE
IS-0NS t-ROM THE DATE
l?L FIRST fl'BLICA-
|22\0lF THIS NOTICE, to file
I Win the clerk of the above
l~" a *riiten statement of
"X claim or demand they may
mi ch, clalm must m
niuig and must indicate the
IS"''r <"* claim, the name
IWI address of the creditor or
lv.*,mnl, .r aUo"ey. and the
lin claimed If the claim la
Ml L ue' lne date when
LuT due be
ImJ ^' cla,m '" contUi-
Kaa. ,S" clalm aecured.
b!SS !"a" leacrlbed
"cuimant shall deliver suf-
i2ta-plw".of me cMm ""
I4*n!nabl'me cl*rk to mall
teuveeaChp*r~n'lre-
aS.'yW" Interested In the
fc i?" a C"W of this
t d are required.
BM -mlHSEE MONTHS
B ^,EDATE OF THE
BIS NOTiV5LICATION OF
*~il may taw "
*'* "> validity of the
iQiulLSf1- vuacmr
|'^SuVrt,!nUe0rJUrt'dJc-
LD o^'MS. DEMANDS,
^b BE FOREVER
! S Nott".'1?1 P*UcaUor
|aip, *aron Spec tor
MAVSPECTOR
.."RNFvl-.m,.. ceaaed
faalfV'J-^R
V^R-SLVER
ifeneBlvd.
IT* '* 374-4888
June li. ia. 1909
Friday. June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 12 7152 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
SERGIO VELAZQUEZ,
and
BELSISA.LAHERA
TO: BELSIS A. LAHERA
Pasaje Central No. 1
Altos Arroyo A polo
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
IRIS L. BENSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
7357 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33144, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be
fore June 25. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
The notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 21 day of May
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By MJ Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
IRIS L.BENSON
7367 West Flagler St
Miami. Florida 33144
Attorney for
Petitioner Husband
18885 May 28;
June 4. 11,18, 1982
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-7747 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The marriage of
KYSENTH LEWIS.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
JOYSE C LEWIS,
Respondent-Wife
TO: JOYSE C.LEWIS
Residence address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1515 N.W 187 St., Suite 216.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 25. 1982; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
WITNESS ray hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 20 day of May
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
16861 May 28,
June4, 11,18. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT HELD IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
Case No. I2.I50*
In Re: The Marriage of
MICHEL S1RIL,
Petitioner Husband
Vs.
ACEPHIE OMELUS SIRIL.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ACEPHIE OMELUS
SIRIL
Port de Palx,
La Plate
Nabou. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY re-
quired to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for DIs
solution herein on the Petition-
er's Attorney. Murray Z. Klein.
Esq Israel Discount Bank
Bldg Suite 610. 14 N.E. 1st
Avenue, Miami, Fl. 33132 and
file the original In the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before July 9,1982 or said
cause will be taken as con-
fessed by you.
DATED this 3 day of June,
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
C. P. Copeland
Deputy Clerk
16893 June 11.18,26;
July 2.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name PAL-
METTO GARDENS at 9600-
9650 N.W. 79th Avenue. Hialeah
Gardens. Florida intends to
register sold name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ALINV. IN\ KSTMENT3
V
16878 M*y ^8.
June 4. II, 18.182
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
c'rcu and for dade county
civilaction
____NO. 12-4752 FC II
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
.-, OFMARRIAGE
in RE The marriage of
RAQUEL MESSINA
Petitioner-Wife
and
ALBIS N.MESSINA.
Kespondent-Huaband.
TO; Mr. Alois N. Messina
LagunaGardens, No 2
Apt 4-J
Isla Verde.
Puerto Rico
FIFnHARE "E^BY NOTI-
f U.D that an acUon for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose addresa Is
1515 N.W 167 Street. Suite 216
Miami. Fla.. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
July 2. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
Uie complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 26 day of Mav
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
'72 May 28;
June4. 11, 18, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 7 156 F-C 01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ADA MAVIS BLANDIN.
Wife,
and
RAFAEL MANUAL
BLANDIN.
Husband
TO: RAFAEL MANUAL
BLANDIN
Calle San Gabriel
Qulnta.Lavegutla
La Florida
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 9400 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300, Miami,
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
26. 1982. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of May.
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
stanley m. newmark.
esquire
940U South Dadeland
Boulevard
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
16858 May 21. 28.
June4.11. 1982
"0TICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
t7.I1!! CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
C'RCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-7|2
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROBERT E HOLLY. JR.
Petitioner Husband
and
VIOLET DARLENE HOLLY
Respondent Wife
TO: VIOLET DARLENE
HOLLY
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to Ron
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N. E. 193rd Street, Miami,
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
25. 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 21 May, 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal l
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ.
2750 N.E 193rd Street
Miami. Florida 33180
Telephone: 949-8926
Attorney for Petitioner
16868 May 28;
_______ June 4,11,18,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
ALAMO HOTEL at 4121 Indian
Creek Drive, Miami Beach.
Florida 33140 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GEORGE K.
CORPORATION,
A Florida corporation
by: Georglos Karamallos.
President
15743 May 28;
June* II 1H 1M2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name P A
Service at 7850 NW 71 St.. Med-
ley Fl 33010 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Jose R Morejon
A
Alberto De Castro.
Owners
16846 May 21. 28;
June4.11.1982
NOTILE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
Intra American Corp d-b-a
American Wholesale Hard-
ware A d-b-a a-I Fourty Foot
Long Discount Storage Trailer
Rental Leasing A Sales Spe-
cialty Company of South Flor-
ida Division of Intra American
Trading Co. A d-b-a Storage
Trailer Discount Rental
Leasing and Sales Specialty
Company of South Florida in-
tends to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of 1 iade County. Florida
.liter American
Trading Company
mm Junen. 18.25;
Julv2. 1982
JTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name East
Fern Professional Building at
9848 East Fem Street, in the
city of Perrlne. Florida intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RONALD ASKOWITZ
LINDA ASKOWITZ
SANFORDF. DERNIS
Utorney for Applicants
111700Caribbean Blvd.
Suite 212
Miami, Florida 33189
Telephone: 1306)233-3735
lfiM!i7 May 21. 28.
June 4.11,1982
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-1701
IN RE: The Marriage of
CECIL BRYAN.
I 'etltioner-Husband
MARGARET BRYAN.
Respondent-Wife.
TO; Mrs. MARGARET
BRYAN
220 Walklns Avenue
Brooklyn. NY.
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Amended Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to said petition on
petitioner's attorney.
GEORGE T. RAMANI. ESQ..
Suite 711. Biscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 and file the Orlgl
.ml Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 18 day of
June, 1982. If you fall to do so,
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami, Dade County, Florida,
this 13 day of May, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY :K. Selfrled
Deputy Clerk
16849 May 21. 28:
June 4.11.19&a
NOTICC UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name All
Seasons Shoes and Accessories ,
at 3735 S. W. 8 Street. Coral
Gables, Fla. 88134 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Alda Rodriguez. Owner
Mfja May 28;
June 4, 11.18. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-If 14
NOTICE OF SUIT
GISELA MILIAN.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY GREEN and
ROBERTA GREEN,
his wife.
Defendants.
TO: LARRY GREEN and
ROBERTA GREEN
5850 Suncrest Drive
Miami,
Florida 33166
YOU. LARRY GREEN and
ROBERTA GREEN. are
hereby notified that a Com-
plaint For Mortgage Foreclo-
sure has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or Plead-
ing to the Complaint For Mort-
gage Foreclosure on Plaintiff's
attorney. RONALD L. DAVIS,
ESQ. Suite 407. 1560 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive. North
Miami Beach. Florida: Phone
No. (306) 940-2362 and file the
original Answer or Pleading in
the Office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, Dade County, 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130, on or before the
25th day of June. 1982. If you
fall to do so. Judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you
for the relief demanded In the
Complaint For Mortgage Fore-
closure.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED, at
Miami, Florida, this 21 day of
May. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: K. Selfrled
DEPUTY CLERK
16887 May 28;
______________June 4.11. 18.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 12-1085 FC
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE.
Petition of WAYNE MARK
TO. ARTHUR MILTON
SAPP
P.O. Box 1175
Islamorada.
FL 33036
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Adop-
tion has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to It on Sol Alexander,
Attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 3121 Ponce De Leon
Blvd Coral Gables, Florida
331.14. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styleo
court on or before July 9. 1982:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of the said court at Miami,
Florida on this 1 day of JuneJ
1982. 7
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court i
Dade County. Florida
By K. Selfrled I
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
Sol Alexander
3121 Ponce De Leon Blvd
Coral Gables, FL
Telephone: 446-9887
Attorney for Petitioner
16886 June 4,11;
18.26, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 3120
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEANNE RUTH
BERNSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of JEANNE
RUTH BERNSTEIN, de-
ceased. File Number 82-3120
(03), is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Flor- i
Ida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flag-
ler Street. 3rd Floor. Miami,
Florida. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate is
CLAUDE D. DAVIS, whose ad-
dress is 1319 Center Street.
Leesburg. Florida 32748 The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim la
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WTLL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this NoUce of Administra-
tion: June 11,1982.
CLAUDE D. DAVIS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JEANNE RUTH
BERNSTEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
KEPRESENTATrVE:
JOSEPH W.
MAI.EK.ESQ.
!350 Lincoln, Road
! Suite 501
, Miami Beach. Florida 33139
. iVUphona: (805|6&&-81
116888 June 11.18,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 12 134* FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CRISTINA PINEDA
DE GARCILAZO.
Petitioner Wife
and
ROBERTO GARCILAZO.
Respondent-Husband
TO: ROBERTO GARCILAZO
6a. Avenlda
North No. 706
Granada. Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW, PA. attorney for
PetlUoner. whose address is
101 N W 12th avenue, Miami.
Florida, and file the original
wllh the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July 9,
1982. otherwise a default will
' be entered against you you for
i the relief demanded in the
| romplalnt or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2 day of June,
1962.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
A KOSS, ATTORNEY
AT LAW. P. A.
101 N W. 12th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (306)325-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish)
LEOPOLDO A.
OCHOA. ESQ.
18887 June 4.11;
18. 26. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name GAL-
ERIA FIDELIO PONCE at 800
Palm Avenue, Hlaleah. Flor-
ida. 88010 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Nancy T. Perei-Crespo
16884 May 28;
June 4. 11.18. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME lAW
NOTICE IS HI .EBY
GIVEN that the underatgnad,
leslrtng to engage In bail;>ess
under the fictitious r.H.-r.e of
J.M.F. 8KY HAWK." .: num-
ber 811 Lincoln K in the City of Mian. Beach,
Florida, Intends to rei- star the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dan.- Collator,
Florida.
Dated at Miami Baa i Flor-
ida. thisOBday of .lun-
MICHAEL E HA
FERNANDOBAI ,
16899 June 11 ..'a:
JuH V. 1982


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, June 11,1982
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 62-7527
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Mirrtut Ol
ARTHUR ROGER.
Husband.
Mi
AMADA ROGER.
Wife
TO: AMADA ROGER
MOW. 180 Street.
Apt. 1
New York. N.Y. 100SS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If anv. to It on
Albert L. Carrlcarte. P.A.. at-
torney for Petitioner whose
address Is 34*1 NW 7 8t..
Miami. Florida S312B. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore June 18. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
sscutlve weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 17 May. 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. C. Bsrtssss
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
2481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88125 |
Telephone: (M0)MB-7917
Attorney for Petltloner
18BM May 21, 38.
June*. 11. 1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 43 7831
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROBERT MONROE
Petitioner Husband
and
EVA MONROE
Respondent-Wife
TO: EVA MONROE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
3700 N. E. 18Srd Street, Miami,
Florida 33180, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
3D. 1883: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
L e relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFIXJRIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 31 day of May.
1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ.
2780 N.E IH.trdSt
Miami. Florida 88180
Telephone 848-8820
Attorney for Petitioner
168M May 38:
June 4.11.18.1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTKr IS HEREBY
GIVEN .'the undersigned,
desiring i > ngate in business
under t) 'Itloua name of TV
I at 84V NW 84th Street.
Miami. i .da Intends to reg-
ister said me with the Clerk
of the Cln-uit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
TORRE SCO VIDEO. INC.
A Florida corporation
By: FRANKTORRESI.
as President
LAW OFFICES OF
AINSLEE R. FERDIE
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 215.
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables. FL. 88184
18877 May 38:
tsTsti "" *"
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUeus name MIL
LYGEAN CORP. d-b-a Sam
Beauty Concept at 411 W. 38 St.
Illslsah Fl 88819: 1X187 So.
DbdsHwy Miami. Fl SS108 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk cat the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
MUlygeanCka-B. owner
By Jeans
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name D A J
DEVELOPMENT, a Florida
General Partnership at 8800
S.W. 87th A vs.. Suite 8. Miami.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
JOHN P. McKIE
1040 N.W. SSL.
Miami. FL
HOMER F.DANIEL
13320 S.W. 83 Ct..
Miami, FL
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
Attorney for partners,
JOHN P. McKIE and
HOMER F. DANIEL
16884 June 4.11:
18.25. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 62-4284
Division 81
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE SOHMER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Trie administration of the es-
tate of CHARLOTTE SOH-
MER. deceased. File Number
82-4388. is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITH IN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publicstlon of this Notice has
begun on June 4.1983.
Personal Representative:
Jack Sohmer
8470 S.W. 94thStreet.
No. 100E
Miami. Florida 33108
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEO PLOTKIN, P.A.
8008 South Dixie
Highway. Suite 308.
Miami, FL 33143
Telephone: 881-8080
18880 June*, 11, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO 93 4831 FC 07
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The Marriage Of
BONY JEUNE
Petitioner Husband
and
MARIE MAUDE
JOURDAJN JEUNE.
Respondent Wife
To: MARIE MAUDE
JOURDAIN JEUNE,
residence unknown
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. MARIE MAUDE
JOURDAIN JEUNE. Respon-
dent-Wife, residence unknown,
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you, upon
BONY JEUNE. Petitioner
Husband attorney. GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQUIRE, 813
N.W. 13th Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33138, and file original
with the Clerk of the Court on
or before June 18. 1982: other-
wise the Petition will be con-
fessed by you.
DATED this 17 day of May,
1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
By: K.Selfrled
Deputy Clerk
10855 May 31.38:
June 4.11.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name The
Total Car at 18100 Blscayne
Blvd.. North Miami Beach. Fl
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Amoco at Maule Lake, Inc..
owner
May138:
__________June 4.11.18.1883
NOTICE UNDER
F l CT ITIO US NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OIVEN that the undersigned.
0sslllllg to engage In business
uader the flctmoue name LIB-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 13 4*57 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
RYSLER CLARKE,
Petitioner Husband,
and
MADELEINE CLARK.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: MADELEINE CLARK
Respondent-Wife
Rue Notre Dame
PortdePalx. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
Harvey D. Friedman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 379,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above sty lea court
on or before June 18. 1982:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of May.
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D. C Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
By: Harvey D. Friedman
Attorney for Petitioner
420Lincoln Road.
Suite 379
Miami Beach, Florida33139
Telephone: 1300)031-0391
Attorney for Petitioner
16842 May 14. 31.38:
June4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 83 4517
DI v I lion 01
IN RE: ESTATE Or
ISAAC DANNENBERG
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ISAAC DAN-
NENBERG. dscsased. File
Number 83-4087. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 73
W Flagler Street. Miami. Fla.
33130. The personal represen-
ts live of the estate is NINA
FRISCH. whose address Is 17
Cauilna Drive, SomervUle.
N.J. 08876. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be
described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
PILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admlnletra
Uon: June 11. 1882.
NINA FRISCH
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ISAAC DANNENBERG
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ARTHUR D FRIRHMAN
11.18.1083
NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-7343
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MARIA ARACII.
DE GONZALEZ.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
ANDRES GONZALEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO:ANDRES GONZALEZ
Calle4SENo. 1183
Ca pa rra Terra
San Juan.
Puerto Rico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
MARIO QUINTERO JR..
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2800 Douglas
Road. Douglas Centre. Suite
700. Coral Gables, Florida
33134. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before June 18.
1982: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13 day of May.
1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By H. Penn
As Deputy Clerk
l Circuit Court Seal I
LAW OFFICES
MARIO QUINTERO JR
2600 Douglas Road
Douglas Centre.
Suite 700
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: 1308)444-5404
MARIOQUINTERO JR.. ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
( Publish i Mario Qulntero
16800 May 21. 28:
June 4, 11.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 82-7323
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF:
PHILIP FELDMAN.
Petitioner
and
LEAH FELDMAN.
Respondent.
TO: LEAH FELDMAN
ROUTE 5
BOX 894
HOLLY DRIVE
FRANKLIN.
N.C. 28734
NOTICE. A dissolution of
marriage action has been filed
naming you as respondent. You
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
the petition on petitioner's
attorney on or before June 18.
1982 The original is to be filed
with the Clerk of this court
either before service on peti-
tioner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter Failure to file
timely written defenses may
result in the entry of a default
by the Clerk. and the court may
render a Judgment against you
for the relief requested in the
petition
DATED In ,r!wmi, State of
Florida on May 12. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk
By: L. C. Bedasse
DEPUTY CLERK
STANLEY M. PRED. Esq.
1110 Brlckell Avenue
Suite 806
Miami. Fl 33131
16844 May 21,28;
June 4. 11. 1*82
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Downtown Miami at 3023 S. W.
1st Street. Miami. Fla. 33120 in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Chin Martinez. Owner
16870 May 28:
June 4. 11. 18. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
JAQUE8 PEQUAR at number
1080 East 24th Street, in the
City of Hlaleah (88013). Flor-
ida. Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dads County,
Florida
Dated at Hlaleah, Florida,
this 38th day of May. 1083.
J. PACKER
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By Jack Packer,
President
George J. Tallanoff.
P.A.
Attorney for Applicant
3888 South Bavshore Drive
SuKe No. 48>C
NOTICE OF ACT ION .
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-7449
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LINNETTE LEANDER
WILLIAMS. Petitioner,
and
GODFREY WILLIAMS.
Respondent.
TO: Mr. Godfrey Williams
c-o Miss Lilly Bowe
P.O. Box6043.
Nassau. Bahamas.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against vou and vou are
required to ssrvo a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 3000 Blscayne
Blvd., Suite 318. Miami, Flori-
da. 33137. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
18. 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of May 17.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By H. Penn
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAWRENCE M SHOOT. ESQ.
3000 Blscayne Blvd.
No. 310
Miami. Fla 33137
Telephone: (300)073-0010
Attorney for Petitioner
16801 May 21. 38;
Juris 4.11.1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Rich-
man Realty at 18800 N.E. 18th
Avenue. Suite 310. North Miami
Beach. Fla. 88183 intends to
register said name with Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Peter J. Rlchman, Owner
Jonathan Beioff. Esq.
Smith and Mandler
Attorney for Applicant
10SS8 June 4.11:
------------------------------1I.JE, 1MB I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name PAL
METTO GARDENS EAST at
9800 and 9890 N.W. 78th Ave-
nue. Hlaleah Gardens. Florida
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
JOGE
INVESTMENTS N.V.
16879 Junc4.11;
18.29.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engsge In business
under the fictitious name Lin-
ens A Gifts Place at 432 Ar-
thur Godfrey Rd. (41st
Street) Miami Beach FL33141
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Claudette's
FASHIONS, Ine
16847 May 21. 38.
________________June 4. 11, 1982,

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 82-8S4S FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE EV
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
I.IR1A DE J. PEREZ,
Petitioner wife.
and
EULOGIO PEREZ.
Respondent husband.
YOU. EULOGIO PEREZ.
Bucarell 80. Mexico. D.F.. are
required to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof, upon the petitioner's
attorney. Herman Cohen, Esq .
622 S. W. 1st Street, Miami.
Fla. 33180. on or before July 9.
1982. or else petition will be
confessed.
Richard P. Brtnksr
Clerk, Circuit Court
ByM J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
16894 June 11,18.30;
Julys. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under 1m fictitious name Jar-
din Habana at 1784 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida. 88188
Intends to register SAM name
with the Clerk of DM Circuit
Court of Dads County,
MlrtaBass
4.11.18,1
NOTICE UNDER
NOTICE IS HrBrl-
GIVEN that the unitSS
rtorida^^^a
name with the CHrtTOS
cult Court of Dsds ff*
Florida. Coui"7.
V.R.K.. INC
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
Attorney for ^^
V.R.K.. INC.,
A Florida Corporation
16882 JJW1U;
NOTICE UNDER31^
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HErerv
GIVEN that the undeS
desiring to engage buXa
VALLE NURSERY 9
W-W- Miami. FlonS
5K"4f. to re*"" .aid Si
with the Clerk of the 33
Court of Dade County. Florida
SILVIA RAMON
MARIOQUrNTEROJR
ESQ
Attorney for
SILVIA RAMON
14892 Jun 11.18,38.
luitl liff?-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in buiineti
under the fictitious name Union
Comerclal Market at 837 S.W
13th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
33130 Intends to register aid
name with the Clerk of the Or
cult Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Israel Hemandet
16891 June 11.18.25.
________________JufrUgE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Sam
Bray Ball Bonds, at 1481 N W
7 Street. Miami. Fla 33128 In-
tends to register said namt
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Sam Abravaya. Owner
16874 May 38,
_____________June4,11,18.1982
INTHECIRCUITC0U8T
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-7810 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
SILVAN CLARKE,
Petitioner Husband.
and
BETTY CLARKE,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Betty Clarke
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlue-
lutlon of Marrlag* h" bMn
filed against you and you sf*
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner whose addnusIf
1010 N.W. 167 Street. Sum 316.
Miami, Florida, and filed the
. original with the clerk of thi
above styled cour on or before
July 3nd. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
Ce complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and thi
al of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 37 day of May.
1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
16880 June 4.11.
________________18.2B.18U
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JU0ICIAI
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FL0RI0*
NO. 12-7404
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The MarriageoT
I.LZELENA MAKCHENA.
Petitioner-wife.
and
ARTUROMARCHKNA.
Respondent husband.
YOU. ARTLRO MAR
CHENA. 43 Kolemrt Blvd.
White Plains. N Y 10*7.
required to file your answer to
the petition tor dissolution ol
marriage with the Clerk ol UK
above Court and "*R
thereof upon the P*""0"'9
attorney. Herman Cohens.
622 S. W. 1st. Street. Mum
Fla. 33130, on or before June 38.
1982. or else petition will <*
confessed.
DATED: May 14.J*
Richard P Brlnker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By L C Bedass*
Deputy Clerk
168M 1*6*2
Juns4.lL!
JS5TS- ySs
T V at J- ugssR
MtaJnl. Florida. *^^a*
" re|Ut.r said name** ^
Mfhl


Harold Vinik to Head Temple Beth Sholom
Friday, June 11,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Harold B. Vinik was reelected
sident of Temple Beth Sholom
Greater Miami at its recent
eeting-
Vinik, who 9erved as president
the past two years and pre-
lUSly served as vice president,
also president of the temple
therhood from 1973-1977.
graduate of the University of
iami, and founder and presi-
M of Blackstone Realty, Inc.,
ink served in the U.S. Navy
i the South Pacific Fleet dur-
World War II. He has been
with the Knights of
las, National Association of
|Wrs, Miami Board of
ltors. Jewish War Veterans
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
Serving with Vinik will be vice-
.jidents. Neal Amdur, Gary R.
fcson, Dr. Solomon S. Lichter,
Miller; treasurer, Rose
trve
Harold B. Vinik
Lnna
cjereky; nnancial mmt^DmM Meyer, Father of Miami Publisher
James S. Knopke; and, genera
secretary. Jerrold Goodman. David N Meyer, father of Syl-
Elected to the board were Jack
A- Abbott, Stanley Arkin, Ruth
Benoliel. Harry Blumin, Marvin
Cooper. Aaron Fair, Ted Finkel,
Milton M. Gaynor, Martin Gelb,
M.chae Goldstein. Harold
Granoff, Jack Hartley. Irving B.
Kaplan Donald E. Lefton,
toward Levinson, Vivian Levin-
son, Ira Liberson, Leonard Lie-
bowitz;
Morris Marder, David Miller.
ouW1ard..M.i,,er- PnyH's Miller,
Shirley Miller. Sue MUler. Morry
B. Morris. Joseph A. Nevel.
Tamara Nixon, Dr. Robert
Rosen, Murray Rubin, Dr. David
Russia. Dr. Walter G. Sail, Jon
^erbin, Jack B. Shapiro, Stuart
Simon, Harry B. Smith, and
Leon Srago.
61 Celebrate Kindergarten Graduation
celebrate their graduation
the Samuel Scheck Hillel
nunity Day School Kinder-
en, 61 young graduates will
"Journey in Time," at
duation exercises Wednesday,
in HiUel's Friedman-Uh-
r Auditorium.
Orchestrating the event are
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUl T OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12-8741
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE.
The Marriage of
KATHY ALBERT.
Petitioner Wire,
uid
DAVID ALBERT,
Respondent-Husband.
TO Mr David Albert
co Mattle Albert
Route 2. Box J2R
New Roads. LA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON, attorney
tar Petitioner, whose address U
1515 N.w. 187 Street, Suite 218.
Miami. Fla and fUe the origi-
nal with the cleric of the above
lyled court on or before July 8.
1W2. otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
PWntorpeUtlon. '
WITNESS my hand and the
m of said court at Miami,
nonda on this 8 day of June.
1pS2
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N A. Hewett
A Deputy Clerk
June 11, 18.28;
July 2.1982
e,^101106 UNDER
oK HEREBY
iS^1 ""undersigned.
w^X to *"** "i busLieas
iJK;^" Service at 18110
SETVP ,North M1*""
"". n S3180 Intends to
" County. Florida.
Ctoverleaf Auto Service.
"1C-, owner
arro
May 28;
June*. 11. 18, 1082
B./-tTICE undo
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
IgnR,.,!8 hereby
rui ncUUou "SS of
" 8V Miami. Fl 88186 In-
I CSS?* Circuit Court of
T"Wy. Florlda.FIux Inc.
|Mml0'W*rg.Pr,id-frt
June li. 18.28;
July 2.1989
*FF'P*VIT UNDER
kATr^\H$T*TUTE
I "*tiou, TEF'P H*"* *
jBajy^ t,t of the
-lach.UaafoUow:
ER^STODURAN.
PRESIDENT
Ef- WTA DURAN
Kindergarten teachers and aides
Ruth Jacoby, Fanny Lefkowitz
Miriam Levy, Adele Schneider,
Rosalind Singer and Lola Stol-
berg. headed by Dorothy K.
Gruen, director of early child-
hood. Joyce Botton, a parent vol-
unteer, heads the committee for
i props and decorations.
Rabbi Dr. Joshua Tarsis, Mi-
chael Scheck, president of Hillel,
and Stanley Spatz, vice president
of the Hillel Day School, Edu-
cation Committee, will partici-
pate in the ceremonies.
The 1982 graduates are David Almog
Alien Anldjar, Hedva Assarai. Chad
Benenfeld. Sandra Besso, Leslie Binder
gq* B.u<;k' Evan Bloom, Bridget
Botton. Joshua Boyce, Philip Chusld,
Uat Cohen, Daniel Courtney. Deborah
Robert Voskovitch has been
named director of human re-
sources of American Savings
and Loan Association of
Florida, according to a joint
announcement by Morris N.
Broad, president, and Dr.
Benjamin A. Lewis, senior
vice president of branch
administration._____________
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OrVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name Mai's
Shoe Box at 8819 S. W. 107th
Avenue. Miami, Fla. SS1T6 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Gold Coast Shoe Corp. and
Benjamin S. Felnswog
A Associates. Inc.
Benjamins. Felnswog.
President
17901 June 11,18.28;
July 2.1982
"" Dfor, Diey Dweck, Sarlt Fink, Da
vld Follc, Steven Frank!. Anna Genet,
Becky GUadl, Marc Goldberg, Keith
Goidmann, Isaac Oorln, Lome Gost-
frand. Natalie Greenrock, Dawn Harris,
Rebecca Harris, Alan Haspel, Debra
Hllsenroth;
David Itskowltx, Lisa Jacobs, Scott
Jacoby, Rachel Klein, Brenda Kllnger.
Jordanna Konovltch. Ilan Konover, An-
drea Koplowltc, Michelle Lederman,
Michael Levlne, Jennifer Mack, Leon
Maratchl, Jessica Michael. Tammy
Mlldenberg, Claudia Mltxner, Debbie
MUne, Miriam Mlzrachl, Moses Neren-
burg, Orl Onn, Tal Plotkln, Brian Rorfe,
Jay Schantx, Daniel Schwarti, Vanlna
Serber, Matthew Slca, Karen Sllber-
man, Michael Slnnrelch, Kathy Suiyn.
and Alex Wander.
CAJE Teacher
Training
Rabbi Norman Lipson, adult
education director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
has released the summer schedule
of courses for the first semester of
its Teacher Training Institute.
Beginning June 21 and running
thru July 2, CAJE will be offer-
ing courses in education, Hebrew
poetry, development of liturgy, ,
and modem Jewish history.
"Though the courses are pri
marily geared toward those ob
taining teaching licenses in reli
gious and day schools," Rabbi
Lipson stated, "the classes are
open to individuals in the com-
munity wishing to increase their
Jewish knowledge for its own
AmeriFirst Offers
Pressure Readings
Free blood pressure readings
are being offered at Winston
Towers Annex of AmeriFirst
Federal through June 30. Cus-
tomers and visitors coming into
the annex at 17395 North Bay
Road on Miami Beach may check
their pressure at the "Blood
Pressure Teller" any Monday,
noon to 6 p.m., or Tuesday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC
Opan Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
/an H. Meyer, publisher and edi-
tor of Miami Magazine, passed
away June 2 in Atlanta. He was
82.
Mr. Meyer was a resident of
Bay Harbor Islands for the past
two years. He was former presi-
dent of the Wine and Spirits
Wholesalers of America and the
Georgia Wine and Spirits Whole-
salers, and founding president of
Ida Kowsky, 97
Ida Kowsky, a resident of
Miami Beach for the past 45
years, passed away June 1. She
was 97.
Services were held June 3 at
Riverside.
CARLIN, Ethel J.. 76. North Miami
Beach. Levltt-Welnsteln.
ENGELSBERO. Mary. 103. North
Miami Beach, June 7, Star of David.
Riverside.
PHILLIPS. Irwln, 78. North Miami
Beach. June6. Riverside.
SCHNEIDER. Anne, 89. North Miami
Beach, June 7. Levitt Welnsteln.
SILVERMAN
Bessie, 89. of Miami passed away on
June 2. She had been a resident here tor
the past 20 years coming from N.Y. She
was a mother of Sidney SUverman, sla-
ter of Gertrude Elkln, and grandmother
of two. Services were held June S at
Gordon Funeral Home.
BRAVERMAN, Jack. 81. May 20. Ri-
verside.
GREENBERO, Rachel 87. Surfslde
May 26, Mt. Nebo, Riverside.
ROBBINS, Sylvia, Blasberg.
ROSE NTH AU Mortis. 81. Miami
Beach, Rubln-ZUbert.
SILVER, Samuel. 84. North Miami
Beach, Gordon.
' State Wholesalers Inc. of Atlanta
and Augusta, Ga.
He was born in Atlanta and
graduated from Atlanta Law
School.
Survivors in addition to his
son. Sylvan, include his wife,
Rae; a son, Leonard A.; six
grandchildren; and two great
grandchildren.
Services were held June 3 in
Atlanta.
TAINES. Bella. 88, May 22, Mt. Nebo.
Riverside.
SCHLEICHER. Bella. 87, May 24. Mt.
Nebo, Rubln-ZUbert.
FAREN. Betty. 82. May 24, Mt. Nebo.
Gordon.
GREENBERO. Rachel. 87, May 26, Mt.
Nebo. Riverside
DASHKIN, Sol. 76, Miami Beach.
Gordon.
OKLIN. Milton. 70. North Miami Beach.
Gordon.
PrTCHERSKY, David, 94. Miami
Beach. Gordon.
WASSBRMAN. Beaa. 89. June 8. River-
side.
WERNER. Robert, 68. June 2. River-
side.
COHEN. Bernard Benjamin. 70. Miami
Beach, June 6. Rubln-ZUbert.
ENDT. David B June 6.
HOPSTADTER. Eleanor. Bay Harbor
Isle. Riverside.
HONIG, Edward E.. Miami Beach Star
of David. Rubln-ZUbert.
JANKELOVIC. Alois. Rubln-ZUbert.
VAN TESLAAR, Sophie, M, Miami,
June I. Rubln-ZUbert.
ROSENBAUM
Rose V. passed away June S. She was a
Miami Beach resident for nearly 26
years coming from New York City. She
waa president of the South Florida
Women's Committee of Shaare Zedek
Medical Center. She Is survived by her
sister, Sadye Adelaon; son. Dr.
Lawrence LeShan and daughter-in-law,
Eda; eight grandchildren, and five
great grandchildren. Services were held
June 8 at Rubln-ZUbert.
~



Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscay ne Boulevard.
CljapelS
945-3939
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and all South Florida cemeteries from chapels
in North Miami Beach, Sunrise, Deerfield Beach
and Margate.



When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by S. Levin, F.D.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills, N.Y.


i

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Mr.
DeU-Tlxer. Inc. d-b-a Mr. Dell-
Tlzer at 18S71 SW 88 St., Miami,
Fl 33186 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Fred Cohen, owner
18000 June 11.18,38;
July 2.1083
ALE
AH, FLORIDA
June li, is. 28
July 2, 1083
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In business under the
flcUUous name of S S
Lawnmower A Small Engine
Repair at 3200 Palm Avenue,
Hlaleah, Fla. S8010 Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ismael Soto. Jr.
Ismael Soto, Sr., Owners
UUB7 June U, 18,38;
July 3,1082
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL x
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
I

Dade
Miami Beach
1701 Alton Road
538-6371
The only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arran gem en ts
No Money In Advance
Broward
Hallandate
100 S. Dixie Hwy.
456-4011


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, June 11,1982
-
441
Like it
I got it at Marshalls."
When 1 shop Marshalls. I don't
have to hunt for quality. Or for
sales. I know everything in every
department from mine to my
little girl's will be a brand name
or a designer label. And I also
know it's all priced a lot less than
regular prices at other
fine stores.
Believe me.
IVe checked.
The selection is fantastic and
always changing, because they get
new shipments every week. And talk
about service IA private dressing
room, convenient la^ways. cash re-
funds, mastercard and visa accept-
ance, and personal checks. In tact,
Marshalls has everything my
family needs to keep us
coming back. Because
no one does it quite
like Marshalls."

Brand Names for Less/
VISA-
SO. MIAMI: So. Dixie Highway (U.S. 1) at intersection of 160th Street (adj. to Service Merchandise) HIALEAH: 103rd Street, just east of
Palmetto Expressway, across from Westland Mall (adj. to Service Merchandise) HOLLYWOOD: Rt 441 at intersection of Pembroke
Road, adj. to Service Merchandise TAMARAC: University Drive at intersection of NW 57th Street (near Commercial Blvd.) WEST PALM
BEACH: Military Trail at intersection of Okeechobee Boulevard in the Pine Trail Shopping Center
Monday thm Saturday *30 a.m. to *30 p m
Sunday 12 noon to pjn.
PALM BEACH opan Sunday 12 noon to 5 p.m.
purchoaa wHh your
r*'uod P*tey: SJmplyratum your
ur mm aHp wftftto fourtoon daya
uaa our convanton< no-aarvtco-chanja toyaway
r


&rA

"ssisse
OT
;^%

>^>
*
*"'to the Jewish Floridian. Section C. June 11. 1982
See Page 3











Contents
Page:
Annual Meeting
3
The selection of Officers, Trustees and Board of Directors Members
will be made at 44th Annual Meeting June 17.
Planning & Budgeting/Campaign 4
The distribution of funds to agencies is guided by P & B.
Campaign
5
Campaigners Recognition Day honors achievements of Campaigners,
June 29 at the Doral Country Club.
Mt. Sinai Medical Center 6
An enriched obstetrical program allows comfortable maternity care.
Washington
7
Morton Silberman is named President of the American-Israel Public
Affairs Committee in Washington D.C.
Sen. Paula Hawkins telephones refusenik Aleksandr Lerner.
South Dade
8
The walkathon and celebration of Yom'Atzmaut in South Dade is a big
success.
Federation Housing
9
Federation Towers II is expected to be completed by the end of the
year.
Foundation
Saving taxes with charitable lead trusts.
The Investment Committee invests Foundation's assets.
Jay Kislak is named as Chairman of FJP.
10
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
June 11,1982-
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations Committee
Eli Tlmoner
Foundation/Community Programs 11
Tax benefits from charitable giving.
The Dade Partners Program involves the community in the public
education process.
Singles participate in late Friday night services.
Women's Division 12
The Lion of Judah pin is soon to be a trademark for use by other Jewish
Federations.
Recent phonothon raises $50,000.
Officers of constituent boards named.
Community News
The Cuban Hebrew Congregation breaks ground on a new
purpose facility.
Calendar
14
multi-
15
GMJF appoints new Assistant Executive Vice President, Morris
Sherman.
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff is elected as the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami 1982-83 President.
1^*_
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS


"
lual Meeting
Page 3
GMJF leadership to be elected June 17
--
Sormiin H. Lipoff
President
*
1
amuel I. Adler
Vice President

Norman Braman
I Vice President
1
i
I
W E. Lef ton
P* President
.A
I?*'Levy
Tetary
The leadership and direction of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation in 1982-83 will be deter
mined by representatives of the Jewish com-
munitv at the Greater Miami Jewish Federations
44th Annual Meeting to be held Thursday.Tune
17 at the Carillon Beach Hotel, 6801 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach. mourns
-J.n 2*iitjon.to electing new Officers, Trustees
m1,W H P""*?8 Members' the Annual
rSgpde'f,e8uWli W tribute to outgoing
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
General Campaign Chairman Philip T. Warren.
The slate of Officers prepared by the GMJF
Nominating Committee, which will be presented
to the Annual Meeting delegates, includes
Norman Lipoff, President; Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Immediate Past President; Samuel I. Adler
Norman Braman, Goldie Goldstein, Donald e'
Lefton, Aaron Podhurst and Marilyn Smith, Vice
Presidents; Joel Levy, Secretary; Cal Kovens,
Treasurer; Forrest Raffel, Associate Secretary;
and Steven Kravitz, Associate Treasurer.
Additional nominees and appointees to be
chosen at the Annual Meeting are listed below.
Hap Levy will be recognized and honored by the
delegates for his service to the Greater Miami
Jewish community, particularly for those achieve-
ments accomplished during his two-year term as
GMJF President. A recipient of the Hebrew
University Scopus Award and the 1970 GMJF
Young Leadership Award. Levy has provided
guidance for the Federation and its family of
agencies, proving his dedication to the Jewish
people.
Prior to assuming the presidency, Levy served
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation as Vice
President, CJA-IEF General Campaign Chair-
man, Planning and Budget Chairman, Public Re-
lations Committee Member, National Executive
Committee Member of the United Jewish Appeal,
and United Israel Trustee. He also has served the
Jewish community as Vice President of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations, Chairman of the South
Honda Chapter of American Friends of Hebrew
University, Vice President of Temple Emanu-El,
Mount Sinai Medical Center Trustee and Vice
President of the Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged. A graduate of the University of Miami
Law School, Levy also is a member of the Florida
Bar Association and the Fraternal Order of Police
Association.
Philip T. Warren will be honored for spearhead-
ing the most successful CJA-IEF drive in the
Federation's history. An activist in Jewish com-
munity affairs and 1978 General Chairman of the
Detroit United Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, Warren has spent countless
hours coordinating and leading the 1982 CJA-IEF
Campaign.
Warren previously has served the Greater
Miami Jewish community as GMJF Vice Presi-
dent. Prior to moving to Miami, he served the De-
troit Jewish community on the Board of the Jew-
ish Welfare Federation, and as Vice President of
the Adat Shalom Synagogue of Famington Hills,
Michigan and Board Member of the Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged and the Jewish Voca-
tional Service.
The Annual Meeting and Dinner is being coor-
dinated by Norman and Irma Braman, Meeting
Chairman and Dinner Arrangements Chairman,
respectively.
The event will begin with a 6:30 p.m. reception
and 7:30 p.m. dinner, to be followed by the meet-
ing agenda. All Greater Miami Jewish Federation
members are invited to this important gathering,
which will shape the future of the Jewish com-
munity.
For further information and reservations, call
576-4000.
Edmund Abramson
Stephen Arky
llelene Berger
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Jesse Casselhoff
Myra Farr
Martin Fine
Harvey Freedman
ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS
Gary Gerson Alan Kluger
Stanley Gilbert Jack Levine
Alfred Golden Ellen Mandler
Peter Goldring Sidney Olson
Arthur Horowitz Val Silberman
Joseph Kanter Isaac Sklar
Mel Kartzmer Philip Warren
Jonathan Kislak George S. Wise
APPOINTED BY THE PRESIDENT
Michael Adler
Remardo Batievsky
Theodore Baumritter
Ben Botwinick
Tim Cohen
Shepard King
Leonard Luria
Arnold Rosen
PAST PRESIDENTS
L Jules Arkin Morton Silberman
David Schaecter
Hon. Barry D. Schreiber
Fred Shochet
Robert Traurig
PAST PRESIDENTS APPOINTED TO BOARD BY PRESIDENT
David B. Fleeman Sidney Lefcourt Stanley Myers Robert Russell Harry B. Smith
AS REQUIRED IN BY-LAWS
President B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
President Central Agency for Jewish Education
College Student Representative
Chairman Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Chairperson GMJF South Dade Steering Committee
President Hillel Jewish Student Center
President Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
F'resident Jewish Family and Children's Service
President Jewish Vocational Service
President M iami Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged
President Mount Sinai Medical Center
President of Rabbinical Association
President of Women's Division
Chairman of Young Adults Division
.-_ T**
Bert Brown
Helene Berger
Barry Weinberger
Jay Kislak
Mikki Futernick
Sydney Traum
Ruth Shack
Millicent Beldner
Robert D. Levenson
Harold Beck
Cal Kovens
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Maxine Schwartz
Robert J. Merlin
Steven J. Kravitz
Associate Treasurer
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Forrest Raffel
Associate Secretary
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Immediate Past President
Goldie Goldstein
Vice President
Aaron Podhurst
Vice President
Marilyn Smith
Vice President
Cal Kovens
Treasurer
>



:




I


.v. -a wwwRrtw.v
^..*^.'
Planning & Budgeting/Campaign
Page
Panel reviews agency allocations
In aiding the Jewish community through its
family of agencies, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation weighs and balances the allocation of
funds to its agencies to ensure the most efficient,
cost-effective route. The distribution of funds col-
lected through the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign is reviewed and
guided by GMJF's Planning and Budget Com-
mittee.
44It's a process of defining
the needs of the Jewish
community and devising
a strategy to answer
them.
The Committee, chaired by GMJF Vice Presi-
dent Goldie Goldstein and assisted by Committee
Vice Chairman Melvin Kartzmer, receives alloca-
tion requests from GMJF's family of local and na-
tional agencies, and numerous agencies serving
Jewish communities throughout the world, in
addition to considering the total allotment to the
national United Jewish Appeal.
'The members of the committee are very dedic-
ated, hard-working people who have taken on a
great responsibility." Ms. Goldstein said. "It's
often a frustrating process, deciding who gets
what and when. It's a process of defining the
needs of the Jewish community and devising a
strategy to answer them."
Prior to their review by the committee and
submission to the GMJF Board of Directors, the
allocation requests are discussed by three sub-
committees, each dealing with a specific category
of agencies.
The Sub-Committee on Group Services reviews
the budget requests of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, the Hillel Center, the Hillel Founda-
tion, the Israel Programs Office and the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida. The mem-
bers of this sub-committee are Chairman Gwen
Weinberger. Vice Chairman Jack Levine. Rachel
Abramowitz. Emanuel Berlatsky. Debbie Grod-
nick. David Heller, Ken Hoffman. Norman Sholk.
Sandra Simon and Robert Weiner.
The Sub-Committee on Individual and Health
Services reviews the allocation requests of the
Community Chaplaincy Service, the GMJF Infor-
mation and Referral Service, the Jewish Family
and Children Service, the Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice, the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged, the National Council of Jewish Women's
Rescue and Migration Service and Mount Sinai
Medical Center. This sub-committee is composed
of Chairman Jonathan Kislak. Les Beilinson,
Maurice Donsky. William Grodnick. Jeffrey Lef-
court. Frances Levey. Anita Rob bins. David Ro-
senbaum, Susan Sirotta and Terry Schwartz.
The Sub-Committee on Education, Culture and
Religion is assigned to study the budget requests
of the Central Agency for Jewish Education, the
Jewish High School of South Florida, the Jewish
Junior High School of South Florida and Greater
Miami's numerous Jewish day schools. The mem-
bers of this sub-committee are Chairman Jerome
Catz. Vice Chairman Barry Bogin. Helene Berger.
Elliot Fassy. Sheldon Guren, Marc Hauser. Kal-
man Mintz, Robert Loring, Shirley Raffel, Sandi
Samole and Jerry Suss man.
The full Planning and Budeet Committee is
composed of the aforementioned sub-committee
members, as well as Irene Baros. A.J.
Rabbi Haskell Bernat, Jesse Casselhoff"\fo
Farr. Linda Minkes, Jeffrey Newman. Aaron Pn
hurst. Forrest Raffel and Philip Warren.
The recommendations of the three sub-coiLu,
tees are submitted to the entire commute* far!
view and final ratification by the Board of 1
The input of the agency
officers and directors len-
ds extra perspective to I
the committee's deliber-
ation.
tors. Ms. Goldstein emphasized that the comn
tence of the Planning and Budget Departn
staff eases the burdens the committee must:
"The staff people do an incredible job, .
our task that much easier.'' she said. I cann
compliment their efforts enough.
Ms. Goldstein also noted that agency offic
and directors have been invited to meet with I,
committee and discuss allocation recommend
tions before a final decision is made. She said i
input of the agency officers and directors lee
extra perspective to the committee's delibe
tions.
"The inclusion of the directors was a major sti
because it makes them a part of our total [
cess." she said. "It also gives the directors]
better understanding of how the process worl
and what our considerations are.
Pacesetter gala A night to remember
%&&&&z^^
I
S
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Pacesetter Ball, traditionally
a highlight of the CJA-IEF campaign year was held on May 8th at
the Fontainebleau-Hilton.
The overflow crowd of 300 pius. who danced to the music of the Jerry
Marshall Orchestra, were honored at the gala for their commitment to
the 1982 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Carole Taran, glamorous songtress. performed for GMJF Paceset-
ters, those who contribute $10,000 or more to the annual campaign, as
the finishing touch to a magnificent evening.
V
*:-x-:-:*>x-:v*:->:-:-:-:-x-x-x^
S
x*
l
I
(Left to right) Jay Ellenby and his wife, Karen, are joined ov Barbara andl
tin Goodman at The Pacesetter Ball.
(Left to right) Davida Levy, wife of Federation president, Harry A. (Hap) Levy,
greets Ruth (Mrs. Bernard) Fuller on the receiving line at The Pacesetter Ball
Sid Poland is shown in center.
(Left to right) Helyne and Ken Treister at The Pacesetter Ball. Mr. Treiste\
the creator of the Pacesetter Judaica Sculptures which were design*
pressly for GMJF Pacesetters, and were presented at the Ball



Campaign
Page 5
Campaigners to have their day in the

sun
The dedication and loyalty of the 1982 Combined
Lish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund cam-
ligners, who drew new commitments of support
om members of the Greater Miami Jewish com-
L^jty, will be honored on Campaigners Recog-
nition Day. June 29, at the Doral Country Club.
This event will mark the end of the 1982 cam-
ijign and will recognize the campaigners'
^hievements. which have helped raise the CJA-
FF w a record-breaking level. The Greater Miami
Itwish community has raised $18 million thus far.
tjth a goal of $20 million projected to be reached
(ffore the campaign's end.
The campaigners' efforts bring us ever nearer
rgoal to provide the type of high-quality human
bices we provide to Jews in need in Greater
tiami. Israel and communities throughout the
orld.' said Philip T. Warren, 1982 General Cam-
ugn Chairman. "Campaigners Recognition Day
i our way of showing our thanks to the camp-
ners for their commitment to the Jewish peo-
| Awards will be given to campaigners who have
hieved three different levels of accomplishment,
categories are divided into those who have
Icovered" five to nine new commitments, those
jhave obtained 10 to 19 pledges and those who
tit received 20 or more commitments.
| The day's events will include golf, tennis and a
nner. at which the awards will be presented.
larren explained that Campaigners Recognition
will honor individuals who have made a
que commitment to the CJA-IEF.
"Time is the most precious item in anyone's
said Campaigners Recognition Day Chair-
i Ken Schwartz. "Once time is spent, it is gone
MM*. It is with this knowledge that we appre-
ii* the many hours invested by our campaigners
i have placed such a high priority on commit-
nt to fellow Jews."
| The names of those campaigners who have
died the "Five. Ten and Twenty" levels are
eminently posted on specially designed placards

Campaigners Miki Granoff (from left) Gail Jaffe. Bill Baros, Irene Baros and Mikki Futernick enjoy a tour-
nament on the Doral Country Club tennis courts, during a previous Campaigners Recognition Day.
in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Building
lobby. Warren said the posting of these names,
which are also listed below, cites the campaigners
for the exemplary service to the CJA-IEF.
For more information about Campaigners
Recognition Day, contact Federation at 576-4000.
Five, Tens and Twenties
AiofMayttlh
FIVES
Prat Abel
ter Abrahamer
. mund M. Abramson
^Louis Achbar
kne Adler
HielAdler
Advocate
l^illiamHams. Jr.
doBatievskv
JBeck
Kr
eBehar
yBaumhol
Behrman
ice Bellock
Bl> Berenhaut
uel Berlatsky
Benin
"Biniakonsky
Bierrnan
Billig
^rBimbaum
ilBlau
[%ene Bloom
T* Blumenthal
*Borisoff
"Bressler
P%cer
JfCuUer
PCwhn
, Casselhoff
fuialek
JChamock
JChernin
& Chicoine
tJJ Cohen
Cohen
pCohen
"th Cohen
'Mike Cooper
"-popersmith
""Cutler
ftPen
1 wtman
tforos
PDorph
6 Dutch
EPutch
AP*orkin .
J'-'senherg
"^isenberg
Murray Eisenberg
Herman Farer
Joseph Feld
Arnold Ferber
Joan Fisher
Morris Fradkin
Frank Friedman
Hannah Friedman
Sam Fromkin
Molly Fromkin
Marc Fuchs
Rey Caller
Rabbi Nessim (iambach
Gladys Gelb
Gary Gerson
Joe Getzoff
Sara Ginsburg
Buddy E. Glass
Dr. Marshall A. Glasser
Max Gleiberman
Max Golden
Israel Goldberg
Ben Goldfield
Morris Golub
Jeff Granoff
Max Greenberg
Emanuel Grossman
Ann Gruber
Matthew Hartson
Israel Hellerman
David N. Herman
Milton Hoelfer
Paula Horton
Robbie Housman
Gladys Israel
Ron Kalish
Nathan Kalka
Jack Kasdan
Fred Katz
Morris Kirsch
Bertha Kirsch
Jonathan K is Ink
Jerry Klaff
Marilyn Kohn
Natalie R. Kopper
Cal Kovens
Ziola Kozolchik
David Kramer
Wendy Kravitz
Julius Krupp
Ruth Krupp
Helen Kurtz
Nathan Login
William Land
Helene Lanster
Murray Lawner
Anne Leeb
Jack Leeb
William Lehman. Jr.
Jerry Lelchuk
Paula Levins
Joel Levy
Sidney G. Lew-
Ben Lieberman
Belle Lipsky
Yacob Lubin
Howard Lucas
Leonard Luria
Harold Malin
Adele Mann
Dr. Robert E. Marlin
Betty Mason
Fred Mayer
Neal Menachem
Lawrence Metsch
Dr. Alan A. Metzger
Herta Meyer
Louis Miller
Aida Mitrani
Larry Mizrach
Saul'Morgan
Julian Nacron
Connie Nahmed
Leon Nass
Syd Newmark
Nancy Orovitz
Kaye Ossip
Sam Ostrowsky
George Pearson
Raquel Percal
Irving Pinhas
Esther Pinsky
Edith Pisk
Rev. Abraham Potash
Sam J. Rabin
Elaine Rackoff
Sylvia Reinhard
Florence Remer
Jack Rever
David V. Rosen
Pearl Rosen
Herschel Rosenthal
Anita Robbins
Dr. Michael N. Rosenberg
Gerald Ross
Lois Ross
Naum Rozen
William S. Ruben
Muriel Russell
Roy Sager
Eric Salm
Milton Samuels
Jack Samuels
Anne Samuels
Fred Sanders
Abraham Satofskv
Allen Satz
Jeanne Satz
Marvis Schaecter
Marcy Schaeffer
Howard R. Scharlin
Max Schleifer
Robert Schultz
Rona Schultz
Al Schwartz
Debby Schwartz
Gerald K. Schwartz
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Sandra Shapiro
Carolyn Sharf
Fred Shochet
Nat Siegfried
Sylvia Siegfried
Jack Sills
Sarah Sills
David Silver
Dr. William E. Silver
Stanley Silverman
Gloria Silverman
Harold Simons
Dr. Arthur W. Sitrin
Rebecca Sklar
Howard Socol
Ellen F. Sokoloff
Julius Stein
Irving Straus
Noah Smyler
Sandra Smyler
Reuben Stan-
Roe Starr
Faye Stein
Edward Stern
Betty Suchman
Sigmund Topfer
Eileen Trautman
Alice Vinik
Salomon Wainberg
Esther Walker
Nat Waiter
Barbara Wasserman
Dr. Joseph Weinreb
Harold Weinstein
Yale Weinstein
Manny Weiss
I lann Wiener
Hermine Wiener
Richard Wolf
Tommy Wolf
Dr. Lloyd Wruble
Rae Ellen Yarkin
Pola Yarmus
Renee Zales
TENS
Mildred Abramowitz
Samuel Abramson
Annette Aerenson
Arnold Altman
Judah Angard
Louis Aronson
Etta Aronson
Samuel A. Bale, Jr.
Mickey Balsam
Max Bauer
Helene Berger
Sheva Berland
Elaine Berkowitz
Louis Berkowitz
Richard A. Berkowitz
Harry Bernstein
Max Bernstein
Samuel Bernstein
Benjamin Botwinick
Joseph Bowman
Lillian Brenner
Alvin L. Brown
Elliot Brown
Dr. Lawrence Brant
Hazel Canarick
Ruth Charin
Jack Chester
Sam Cohen
Tim Cohen
Bruce Colan
Betty Cooper
Dr. Max Cooper
Maxwell Coulter
Morris Davidson
Amy Dean
Sylvia Drosnes
Alice Dworkin
Mildred Eigen
Milton Fn gel man
Sol B. Farber
Harry Fein
William Feinberg
Stecia Feldman
Milton E. Feldman
Sylvia Farber Freedman
Sally Frank
Nancy Frehling
Paula Friedland
Louis Friedman
Susan Fuller
Morris Futernick
Charles Ginsburg
Dr. Marvin B. Goldberg
Harry Goldberg
Seymour Goldstein
Sidney J. Goodman
Dr. Elliot Gordon
Bernard Graber
Julius Gracer
Ceil P. Greenspon
Lester Grossman
Herb Gruber
Estelle Haber
Isadore Hammer
Harry Hanover
Joe Harmelin
Gail Harris
Paul Heller
Lawrence Hellring
Ruth Herscher
Robbie Herski
Marge Hill
Linda Hofti;
Howard Hollan !er
AlIsaacson
Milton Jacobson
Continued on Page 14






Mt. Sinai Medical Center
Page
Program provides quality obstetrical care
Although the pill and women's liberation move-
ment have made having babies an option instead
of a foregone conclusion, family centered
maternity care is more important than ever at
Mount Sinai Medical Center, a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
Mount Sinai, located on Miami Beach, and the
largest not-for-profit teaching hospital in South
Florida, has enriched its obstetrical program and
redesigned its labor and delivery areas to make
childbirth as comfortable, medically up-to-date,
and comprehensive as possible.
Family centered maternity care delivers quality
health care that is safe, while providing an experi
ence that focuses on the psychological needs of the
family. For example, beginning in the seventh
month of pregnancy, couples are offered a 7-week
series of evening prenatal instruction classes
sponsored by the Professional Association for
Childbirth Education (PACE) at Mount Sinai.
The last class consists of a tour of the labor and
delivery areas conducted by hospital staff. (Tours
are available to all prospective obstetrical patients
by appointment.)
At Mount Sinai, birth is a family affair, with the
father or other support person participating in the
labor process and attending the delivery. As a
teaching hospital. Mount Sinai has residents spe-
cializing in obstetrics working around-the-clock
alongside the skilled nursing team to assist the
private doctor in care for the expectant mother. A
consulting perinatologist from the University of
Miami School of Medicine is a member of the Ob-
stetrics staff.
Caesarean Sections
"We believe that high risk and Caesarian sec-
tion births should be family oriented too.'' says
Dr. Arthur Shapiro. Chairman. Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology. and a specialist of in-
fertility, "provided, of course, that the health of
the mother and baby are not compromised.''
In three newly refurbished delivery rooms, de-
signed as self contained suites similar to operating
rooms, caesarian sections can now be performed
directly on the obstetrical floor. Each delivery
room has a hotline to the waiting family in the
main lobby. Phones are also available in all labor
rooms, so the patient or her spouse can call friends
and family at home.
1 pidural Anesthesia
In a normal birth, the mother is offered natural
labor, using the techniques of natural childbirth
and no anesthesia, traditional labor with general
anesthesia, or assisted birth with regional
anesthesia.
Epidural anesthesia, according to obstetricians
and anesthesiologists, can allow the mother to re-
main awake, be virtually pain free and actively
participate in the delivery. Administered while the
patient is still in labor, unlike most other
anesthesia which is not given until the delivery
stage, the analgesic is inserted into the sac sur-
rounding the spinal cord. Although the patient
doesn't feel pain, she does have control of motor
function and thus can bear down during the de-
livery and be awake to "bond" immediately with
her newborn. With an epidural, there is no re-
^1
Family centered childbirth
Mount Sinai Medical Center.
is available at
quirement for a sedative or narcotic drug, and the
method of injection avoids sedation in the baby.
"Many women planning natural childbirth do
request an epidural during labor,'" says Dr.
Shapiro.
Mount Sinai is one of the few hospitals in the
community offering epidurals as a choice of
anesthesia. Anesthetists trained in the techniques
of administering epidurals must be available
around-the-clock because of the unpredictability
of childbirth.
"Epidurals are also preferred for caesarian sec-
tions." says Dr. Shapiro. "It gives the ob-
stetrician the option not to hurry the delivery (as
opposed to general anesthesia) and is therefore
suitable for having only a bikini cut or Pfanen-
steil scar ."
Birthing Room
With natural or assisted labor, families are
given the option of using a Birthing Room, now in
the process of being renovated and modernized.
Thus attractively furnished "bedroom-like' labor
and delivery room, which provides a homelike en-
vironment, will have a television and a telephone
for outgoing calls. A birthing chair, which has
some advantages in spontaneous delivery, has
also been ordered. The room is equipped with
emergency supplies, concealed, but close at hand.
Newborn Special Care
In any delivery in which the mother remains
awake, she is encouraged to hold and caress her
infant in the recovery room and breast feed if she
desires.
The baby's stay in the nursery continues the
high level of care offered by Mount Sinai. A
neonatologist a physician specialist in the care
of newborns is on the hospital staff and availa-
ble on-call 24 hours a day. A pediatrician is always
available in the hospital, around-the-clock.
Mount Sinai also provides Level II care in the
nursery for sick or premature babies. Specially
*2X
Skilled nurses provide intensive care to si
neuborns in Mount Sinai's Level II nursery.
trained nurses provide intensive, highly skilk
care for the sick newborn. Newborns with mil
respiratory disease, moderate pneumonia, or
calized infections, among other problems, r
the most sophisticated monitoring and medii
care available. Mothers who have a sick or
mature newborn, can feel comfort in knowing I
if their baby is ill. there's a good chance that he she can be cared for right at Mount Sinai.
Parents of infants in this special nursery are*
couraged to participate in the care of their ho
pitalized newborn. Nursing stall teach til
mothers and fathers how to feed and bathe llj
tiny child and explain characteristics and behavil
of the newborn.
Rooming In
The new arrival can also spend time I
family by "rooming in wit
private room. If not. rooming u. -
muted with the consent ofthedocl
well as the roommate. If the m \
baby may go back to the nurse r.
nurses will attend the new born cai
.4* a teaching
lock to assist
Visiting Hours
While normal visiting hours are from 2:30 tol
p.m. and 7 to 8 p.m.. fathers or significant otntr
are welcome to visit for an extended period i
time. Individual arrangements can be made j
special sibling visitations for those under 14 yea
of age.
Classes for Parents
While one parent enjoys his new son or dau
ter, the other can attend baby care classes on H
maternity floor. A patient educator assigned
the area teaches new parents about baby cai
breastfeeding, and self care among other subjeco
In addition, there is a mothers support group.?
fering sessions both for mothers in the nospiij
and continuing for follow-up after they leave.
Carriage Room
New mothers and fathers even get a chancel
party a bit in the hospital's Carriage Room wm
gourmet supper and champagne before WW
take up the obligations of first-time parentnoouj
of bringing home a new brother or sister tor
siblings.
Early Discharge Option
No matter which way you look at it. hav
baby costs money, but Mount Sinai otters
rate for a normal 3 day stay, if the pat** p
registers and pays the full amount by tne se
month of pregnancy. Should there be no comp
tions for mother or child, the P^J*wl
ment of the obstetrician, may elect to su.
than the normal 3 day stay and ^'53
$100-per day. There is also a discount for]gg
ment if the delivery is to be by caesarian seci
In the world full of changing values tt*
______ stm many couples opting to give parentnwu
A r ~~ J j u, best efforts, and Mount Sinai gives them
hospital Mount Sinai provides a full time neonatologist and a pediatrician available qround-the- footjng for their first step in the journey
in care of the newborn. a child.
aPl


Washington
Sen- Hawkins telephones refusenik
In a disolav Of SUDDOrt for thp nlicrk* ~4 Oi^ *^*-'-*S.**M.M.m.
Page 7


In a display of support for the plight of Soviet
jews. U.S. Senator Paula Hawkins of Florida tele-
phoned prominent refusenik Aleksandr Lerner in
Moscow to discuss his plight and that of other
Soviet Dissidents.
Lerner. who has been actively seeking an exit
visa to emigrate to Israel since 1971. has been
constantly refused that right by the Soviet go-
vernment on the grounds that he has knowledge of
state secrets, a charge which Lerner denies. He
is a prominent scientist who has authored 168
scientific works, including 12 books, but who has
been dismissed from all his academic duties since
applying for visas for himself and his family.
Senator Hawkins placed the call to Moscow
from her Washington office and compared the re-
fuseniks fate to that of Holocaust victims.
I truly believe that the Jewish community in
the Sr\ tot Union is th victim of a political holo-
caust, she said "Ut Lerner's case exemplifies
the persecution these people have been forced to
enduri' at the hands of the Communists. I wanted
Dr. Lerner to know that we in the United States
care about him and about all the Jewish people in
the Soviet Union, and that we will continue our ef-
forts to win their release."
In his conversation with Ms. Hawkins. Lerner _________ ____ ______
described the tightening of the Soviet emigration // c e D ,.**" -^^ MM
policy and urged the American Jewish community %'*"yAik.5 IJau'klns'accomPained by her Washington Office legislative staff, speaks with Soviet
to speak out against this program of repression m* ieksandr Lerner who has been seeking emigration from Moscow since 1971.
and discrimination.
"The emigration situation is the worst it has
ever been." Lerner said. "The Soviet government
is issuing only about 200 visas each month, down
from about 4,000 per month as recently as 1979. It
is a terrible situation."
Lerner said he currently is working on an
analysis of Einstein's theories, which he hopes will
be "my best contribution to current literature
about Einstein." He said his son, Vladimir, cur-
rently is working, but still wishes to immigrate to
Israel and join his sister, Sonya. who was permitt-
ed to emigrate in 1973.
"1 need an exit visa to leave the Soviet Union
for Israel." Lerner said. "I have applied for a visa
many times since 1971, and have been refused
each time. You must demand that the Soviets
allow us to leave. You never will get anywhere by
being nice."
Lerner expressed fear that prominent refusenik
Anatoly Schransky may have died in Soviet pri-
son. Schransky, who has become an international
symbol of the refuseniks' plight, reportedly has
aeen held in solitary confinement, often being de-
prived of food for days at a time.
"I don't know if he is even alive," Lerner said.
"I don't know what is the state of his health. I am
very fearful about what has happened to him. I
have not heard anything about him in over three
months."
Although Ida Nudel has been released from
Silberman
elected
AlPAC
President
labor camp, she does not yet know whether au-
thorities will allow her to remain in Moscow,
Lerner reported. He also said refusenik Vladimir
Slepak remains in exile, although his wife has re-
mained in Moscow.
Lerner emphasized the importance of continued
activism by Americans on behalf of Soviet Jews.
He noted that Soviet authorities are conscious of
the mail sent to Jewish dissidents.
"The more attention you can focus on the pro-
blems we are having, the better," he said. "So
many don't know that the Soviets have virtually
cut off all immigration to Israel."
Hawkins' discussion with Lerner was reported
to the Community Relations Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation its sub-commit-
tee, the South Florida Conference on Soviet Jew-
ry-
Morton Silberman
Morton Silberman, a past President of the Greater Miami Jew-
's^Federation, has been named as President of the America-Israel
nibuc Affairs Committee, the American Jewish community's
g lobbyist in Washington dealing with Middle Eastern Af-
lGM!P^rman has nelt* numerous leadership positions in the
H l0^8' a8enc-ies and national organizations. His leadership
M contributions to the American Jewish community have been
l*gnized through various awards given to him during the past
lew j if8' incmdin8 the Human Relations Award of the Ameri-
In
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
A Very Demanding High School Experience
IF you want the teenagers in your family to receive the highest quality
education from excellent faculty,
Jewish Committee.
a Message delivered to Silberman at the May 9 AIPAC An-
** Dinner, at which he was inaugurated, GMJF President
JJJ A. (Hap) Levy and Executive Vice President Myron J.
RW described Silberman as "a devoted Jewish community
"der.
iis no douDt in our minds that your drive and influence
Lj continue to guide the American Jewish community for dec-
ItotU Acome-" Levy and Brodiesaid. "We consider your selection
l*d .A^ presidency as both a tribute to your achievements
8 credit to the Greater Miami Jewish community."
BiM^tion to his current position as a member of the GMJF
J" of Directors, Silberman also serves on the Board of Direc-
ts h u ^"ncil of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. He
J7 the positions of GMJF President, Vice President, Com-
P'Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund General Chairman,
""ng and Budgeting Chairman, and Founding Chairman of
f Vmmunity Relations Committee. He was Founding
to aTM tne Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and a
^AIPAC Vice President.
IF you want your children to grow
up proud of our people, fascinated
by our long history, and enthralled,'.
by our unique faith,
THEN
SELECT
THEIR
HIGH SCHOOL
WITH CARE
/^
'' /

uiijr
A
A
Because the high school years are the most important of their schooling you
are invited to consider the JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH
FLORIDA located at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach, a school committed to academic excellence.
Motivated and ambitious students, entering 9th or 10th grades are eligible
to enroll for the Fall of 1982.
THIS COULD BE THE MOST IMPORTANT
DECISION IN YOUR CHILD'S LIFE
For information call Rabbi Louis Herring, Principal: 305/935-5620
The Jewish High School is a Beneficiary of the Jewish Federations
Greater Miami, South Broward and Fort Lauderdale, and is affiliated
with the Central Agency for Jewish Education and ORT.
A



South Bade
Page 8
6,500 celebrate Israel's independence
^*J ^~ v w ^ -A joyous celebration of

H
A joyous celebration of Israels 34th annh-er.
sary drew more than 6,500 persons to a May 2
celebration, based at the Greater Miami Jewish i
Federation-Jewish Community Center of South
Dade facility. In proceedings coordinated by the
GMJF and led by prominent dignitaries and'
celebrities from the Greater Miami community i
participants raised $30,000 in a walkathon on b* i
half of the 1982 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign, and enjoyed
festival on the JCC grounds.
The success of the walkathon was aided by
Senator Lawton Chiles, who raised $5,900 in
pledges and walked the entire 10 kilometer route
and Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack, who
raised $800 and completed the entire course. Other I
participants in the day's events included Israeli!
Consul General Joel Arnon; Former Governor!
Reubin Askew; Congressman Dante Fascell;
State Senator Richard Renick; State Representa-
tives John Cosgrove, Scott McPherson and
Roberta Fox; Metro-Dade Commissioner Barry
Schreiber; Homestead Mayor Irving Peskoe; 1
Howard Schnellenberger and Joe Brodsky of the I
University of Miami Athletic Program; and Edl
Newman of the Miami Dolphins.
"The Jewish community proved its commit-l
ment to supporting Jews in need throughout thel
world by providing the time and energy to makel
our walkathon a success," said Walkathon Chair-"
man Bert Brown. "We are extremely grateful l
all support provided by our dignitaries wh
presence not only drew participants from
tapped segments of the community, but
added special emphasis for our cause."
Brown also announced that walkathon partii
pants who submitted fulfilled pledges before M
17 will be eligible for a drawing for numero
prizes. These will include a bicycle, jogg
watches, a radio headset, hairdryers and
valuable items.
The festival began with a memorial service I
those who gave their lives in defense of the Stau
of Israel and continued with strong statements r
support for the Jewish State, issued by dignitark
and religious leaders.
"The State of Israel has taught the world th
lessons of strength in times of war and strength
pursuit of peace," Former Governor Askew sa
"Israel is a bastion of democracy, embattledr
surrounded by enemies. The United States m
maintain its unwaivering support for this bravd
young nation."
Consul General Arnon noted the large numb
of participants at the Yom Ha Aumaut llsraj
Independence Dayl celebration, citing this as f
strongest possible evidence of the great ma
friends of Israel" who share in Israels joy.
The festival featured exhibitions, games. ent<
tainment. 'Israeli and American food, and por
and essay contests. Winners of the poster con
which included contestants from schools t
out Greater Miami, were Howard Jeffreys, i
place, Marc Futernick. second place, and Jennn
Tescher, third place.
The poster contest brought in contestants^
numerous schools, who competed on tour
levels. Uri Chefitz won first place tor in*
second grade entries, as Paula Szuchinan ana
bey Glaser took second and third place honors.
spectively. On the third and fourth graae
Eagen Rifas won the first place award.
Emerson, second place; and Shaina OotJ
third place. Guy Lipof, Jennifer SchaHel
Adam Perets won first, second and twru y
honors, respectively, at the fifth and suth g
level; Junior high school students Joj
Shatkin. Betty Matz and Crtug Kolman won ;
second and third place awards, respective
that grade category. _
A bonfire fit the Jewish Community
grounds, as participants joined in a K
Israeli-style evening of entertainment, mm
folk dance. tic
"The entire celebration dw* "2T''
pouring of devoted members of the urc
Jewish community, said Dror ZadoK, ^
the celebration. a n Movers J
Sponsors of the celebration were AB g
& M Buses; Bank Leumi ^JSvSS *
pital. Barnetfs Office SuPP1*"*^!
ners. Inc.; Biscayne Federal ^vingSror8]
Burger King; Consolidated Ba;' j n*
Hospital; Hardees Restaurants. r ^ '
Bank; Luria Stores; Surplus Elect"'
Palette; and Wendy's Corporation.
HA



MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMmmm
Federation Housing
Page 9
Towers II construction ahead of schedule
Construction is ahead of schedule on Jewish
Federation Housing's new 110 unit South Dade
apartment house providing subsidized housing for
the elderly, Samuel I. Adler, President of Jewish
Federation Housing announced. The new com-
plex, which is located on a seven acre section of
the 28 acre College Park Trust property owned by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, is situated
on the corner of 112 Avenue and 112 Street S.W.,
and is expected to be ready for occupancy by the
end of 1982.
According to Adler, the South Dade apartment
unit, tentatively called "Federation Towers II," is
an important step in Federation's long term com-
mitment to provide affordable, secure housing for
low income elderly Jewish people.
'This new building will follow in the footsteps
of our very successful Federation Towers on
Miami Beach," Adler explained. "Not only will
this new apartment unit help provide low cost
housing for Dade County's large population of low
income Jewish elderly, but it will also reduce the
number who might otherwise have to go into in-
stitutional settings if Federation's housing pro-
gram were not in operation."
aH VhVing UnitS 5 the apart'""" complex are
esDSalWm^nd WiI1 indude ten apartments
SK? i JW*1 *> accommodate handicapped
3,UtJ,t,fesuwiU be Eluded in the renf All
P m* be current residents of Dade
nSS- addltlon- residents must be capable of
maintaining themselves in their apartment^
thpMrr?/' 5TOdie' ExecutJve Vice President of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation said, "the
new housing unit will resemble Federation Towers
a Sen.fe that !t wU1 Prov>de a low cost, secure
and a well-cared-for environment with opportuni-
ties for a rich social and cultural life.''
Facilities at the apartment complex will include
a library, lounge.crafts room, game room, meeting
room, dining and social halls. Although each a-
partment will be equipped with a kitchen, there
will also be a central kitchen for the preparation of
communal and holiday meals.
Mi7? A- iftft Uvy' President of the Greater
^^ri9^Federation Said' "We extremely
pleased that this new apartment complex is going
to be completed ahead of schedule. It is projected
that the entire project will have taken only 13
months to build. The result will be that people will
be able to move in sooner than expected."
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's com-
mitment to its housing program for the elderly
was first articulated several years ago by the
GMJF's Commission on the Elderly, which
created a task force designed to study the pro-
blems confronting Miami's elderly Jewish popula-
tion. One of the results of the study was Jewish
Federation housing Inc., a non-profit corporation
formed to build and operate Federation Towers,
an 11-story apartment building for the elderly on
Miami Beach which opened in November 1979.
"The overwhelming response of the elderly to
Federation Towers and its highly successful oper-
ation, provided us with solid evidence of the cor-
rectness of our vision, and gave us a model on
which to base our new building, Federation Tower
II,"explained Adler.
Persons interested in applying for an apartment
in Federation Tower II may write to Martha
Cohen c/o Greater Miami Federation, 4200
Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137. No
telephone applications can be accepted.
^^ An artist's rendition of the Federation Towers II project, which is expected to be completed by 1983.
Congregate services aid elderly
* inn F**816 Housing Services Program is
^anovative project designed to provide suppor-
^frvices for 30 residents of Jewish Federation
8 Federation Towers on Miami Beach,
supportive services include two hot kosher
e TK <*ay' nomenudter services and personal
srslk Con8re8ate Housing Service Program
Jer nese services in order to enable Federation
, s residents who need help to remain in the
unity and not be placed into an institutional
Bs'ca Locke, Director of the program said,
i eilPhartlclPants who utilize the CHSP services
Pie % smg'e people living alone or married
s everyone wants to be able to take care of
him or herself, but sometimes illness and old age
requires that assistance be made available. There-
fore, the CHSP provides lunch and dinner and, for
those who cannot provide for their personal needs,
a homemaker who can help them with personal
hygiene and housecleaning."
Program participant Pauline Avrutis said,
"This program has helped me tremendously, and
should help everyone else who is old and needs as-
sistance. It is a beautiful program, and I wish
everyone else would appreciate and understand
that older people need this type of carefully guided
assistance."
CHSP oarticipants Dav for the services on a
sliding fee scale which takes into account their
rent, medical expenses, monthly income and per-
sonal expense allowance. Each participant is re-
quired to pay for all or part of any services render-
ed, depending on the amount of their income.
Jewish Federation Housing President Samuel I.
Adler said, "This innovative program has been
the difference between dependence and indepen-
dence in caring for Miami's Jewish elderly popula-
tion. Currently, this program is only offered at
Federation Towers. However, in the future we
hope to initiate other programs of this type in our
planned facilities."
Federation Towers was created and is support-
ed by Jewish Federation Housing, an instrument-
ality of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.











Foundation
Page 10
Charitable lead trusts: A way to save taxes
By ERIC B. TURETSKY
The Internal Revenue Service is seldom seen in
a benevolent light. However, certain policy de-
cisions have been made over the years, which in
some cases, create a tremendous tax benefit far an
individual who is desirous of making charitable
contributions either during his lifetime or after his
death. Obviously, that individual wishes to also
benefit the recipients of his estate, i.e.; his family.
One device which accomplishes the foregoing is a
charitable lead trust. This seemingly complicated,
but actually simple vehicle can be created under
the terms of a will (testamentary lead trust) or
during ones lifetime.
TESTAMENTARY LEAD TRUST
A donor takes an income producing asset (eg
securities, real estate, oil wells, etc) and places tht
asset in a trust which has a minimum length of ten
years and one day and which would provide for a
present income interest to go to a charity (e.g. The
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies. The
Foundation") while also providing that the prin-
cipal of the trust be distributed to individuals of
the donors choice (lor example, the children or
grandchildren) after the specified term of years
has expired.
Assume Mr. Schwartz has a large estate and is
in the top estate tax bracket (which will be 50 per-
cent when the present tax cuts are fully phased in
1985 and later years). Assume further that Mr.
Schwartz's children are in the same tax bracket. If
Mr. Schwartz desires to make a gift of one million
dollars to his children off the top of his estate,
they will receive five hundred thousand dollars
and the IRS will receive the other five hundred
thousand dollars. Taking this example one step
further, when the five hundred thousand dollars
passes from the children to the grand-children the
IRS will receive an additional two-hundred fifty
thousand dollars in estate taxes. Therefore, Mr.
Schwartz's intention of giving his family onejnil-
lion dollars now ends up as two hundred and fifty
thousand dollars by the time it reaches the grand-
children.
Now assume that Mr. Schwartz's will creates a
one million dollar trust which pays The Founda-
tion $100,800 per year for fifteen years. At the end
of that time period, the trust principal will be pay-
able to his grandchildren. This trust would qualify
Mr. Schwartz's estate for a one million dollar
Kislak
named
Chairman
Jay I. Kislak
Jay I. Kislak has been named Chairman of the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies for the 1983
campaign year, announced Greater Miami Jewish
Federation President, Harry A. (Hap) Levy.
Kislak, a former Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund campaign chairman, and,
GMJF Board of Directors Member and past Trea-
surer, is also the 1967 recipient of the Harold B.
Bosworth Memorial Award. The award is given
to an individual in the Greater Miami communi-
ty who exemplifies the principles, beliefs and
human concepts of Harold Bosworth which have
contributed to the betterment of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the community in
general.
"I am thrilled to take on the position which Sid-
ney Lefcourt has so ably filled for three and a half
years," said Kislak. "The Foundation potential
for growth and service to the community is un-
limited. With a new effort to renew the Founda-
tion's resources, it is my hope that we can involve
an increasing number of donors in the work of the
Foundation," he added.
As chairman of the Foundation, Kislak will be
responsible for overall management of Foundation
affairs, including the supervision of the four sub-
committees; Legal and Tax, Investment, Oparat
ing and Development.
Eric B. Turetsky
charitable deduction which is the value of The
Foundation's right to receive the payments for the
trust term. The entire one million dollars is availa-
ble to fund the trust. At the end of fifteen years
the one million dollars (or whatever the value was
at that point in time) will go to Mr. Schwartz s
grandchUdren.
A charitable lead trust should be used primarily
by those people with high federal gift and estate
tax brackets who wish to benefit not only charita-
ble institutions of their choice and family mem-
bers, but also to save valuable tax dollars. There-
fore, in addition to enabling one to make a major
Arnold Ganz
Created in 1972, the Investment Committee of
the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation manages and
invests all the assets of the Foundation.
The Committee members meet quarterly and
each is experienced in financial management. AH
have expertise in fields such as finance, banking
and real estate development. Foundation invest-
ment objectives are first for safety and security,
and second for income. According to incoming
Committee Chairman Arnold Ganz, this is the
most sensible current investment policy for a
charitable organization in light of a volatile in-
vestment market.
Typically, the Committee invests in govern-
ment guaranteed obligations, such as U.S. Treas-
ury Bills, as well as Certificates of Deposit of large
commercial and local financial institutions. The
Foundation holds all of its own assets, and does
not invest for growth.
On occasion, an individual will give assets to
the Foundation such as real estate or mortgages,
each of which the Committee will carefully review
and dispose of, with the proceeds reinvested in the
Foundation's portfolio. It is the policy of the
Foundation not to hold donated stocks, but rather
to liquidate them immediately.
Ganz notes that "by investing in government
obligations, the return has been better or as good
as investing in the stock market but without the
risks." Ganz succeeds Jay Kislak who is becoming
Chairman of the Foundation.
The Investment Committee is composed of
Arnold Ganz, Jay Kislak, Adolph Berger, Shepard
Broad, Judge Irving Cypen, Solomon Garazi,
William Gordon, Joseph Handleman, Kenneth
Hoffman, Sidney Lefcourt, Stanley Marks,
George Simon, Simeon Spear, Paul Sussman,
Morton Weiner and Stanley Wolff.
charitable contribution to the Foundation, thus
enhancing Jewish life locally, one can also obtain
maximum tax and financial benefits for oneself
and one's family.
CHARITABLE LEAD TRUST
CREATED DURING LIFETIME
There are also advantages to a donor in creating
a charitable lead trust during his or her lifetime
whereby assets can be passed to family members
down the line (for example, children, grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren) at reduced or no
transfer tax costs. For tax purpose-., the gift to
family members is the value of their remainder in-
terest rather than the full value of the assets used
to fund the trust. Generally, any gift lax wruchis
incurred on the value of the family memberin-
terest in the trust will be lower than i lie estate tax
on transferring the family meml>e'-'s .Merest at
death.
It is also possible to structure a charitable lead
trust to avoid gift tax on the assei? which will
eventually go to the family members by setting
the trust term in yearly payments to The Founda-
tion in a manner where no gift is deemed made to
the family members, even though they are likely
to receive a substantial amount at the termination
of the trust. Treasury tables are used to determine
the combination of the yearly payment and the
trust term that will produce a one hundred percent I
charitable deduction, thereby making the gift to|
the family members tax-free.
Another beneficial use of a lead trust is by ml
individual who wishes to give up the income fromj
some assets for a number of years but would like
to have the assets returned to him or her sometimel
in the future. For example, if a donor creates a|
trust that provides payments to The Foundation
for at least ten years and one day. with the prr
cipal then returning to the donor, the income i
ceived by The Foundation would obviously not!
taxable to the donor nor would it be taxable to th
Foundation. In this instance, the donor would r
making before-tax rather than after-tax doll
available to The Foundation.
Finally, there is an additional benefit in utiluj
in* this type of trust. As the grantor one would t*
able to determine how and when the income
spent. If ones primary interest concerns help*
the elderly or education, or the general Federal
campaign, the trust income earned can be direct-
to that use.
A Charitable Lead Trust may be^the.perfecti
vice to benefit both major charitable msututio
such as The Foundation of Jewish Philanthrope
while at the same time providing greatlaxlT,
tages to one's familv members Because du
complex estate, gift and income tax COBJjg
of a charitable lead trust, anyone who to fflWJj
in such a planning device should consult hisorn
tax advisor.
.:.:::::::::::^
Foundation
bequests
I The growth of the Foundation of JewishiPMjjj
gthropies is due in large part to bequests recei
gfrom individuals upon their d*WSfi3
i assist in the long term work of the Found.ujj
I which is designed to improve thequality ofw l
Sof Jews in need in Greater Miam. a
I munities throughout the world.
I During the first quarter of the y'*"^
| new funds and additions to funds were rece
1 from the following individuals:
| Sol Landsman, Alexander Schneider
| Abraham Wolfson, Abraham and
| Friedman, Eva D Smith Gertrud6^
f Noel Bring, Aaron Israel, Irving Epstan,
I Honigbaum, Cecilia Stutz, and Rose UW
: In addition, gifts to existing Pjjjjf" J
funds and new contributions were maae j
: following: -^
Robert and Nilza Karl; Greenberg, I
Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff, QuentelJVolff, rg^
Jules Arkin; Ganz Family; ^ff1^^
Carl and Lillian Schustak; Eva a
Herbert Katz; Leroy Raffel; and Sidney u
I Gifts from all of these sources amo
: $707,901 during the four month peg0";



./ -
Foundation/Community Programs
Page 11
CHARITABLE i
GIVING OCTAXIS
V "ur fathers pl.nt,d lor us. s,l W1. p|,, ,, ur, .,,,,. ,,. ,.,lM1u(t
PROBLKM: Mr. and Mrs. Cohen are retirees
living in Miami Beach. The Cohens, who are in a
) percent tax bracket, would like to shelter some
jof their current income from taxes. Additionally,
the Cohens would like to maintain their current
10.000 level of giving to the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation during their retirement and
Eventually leave a memorial fund in their parents'
lemory
The Cohens have an asset (which could be real
state, securities, or any other type of property)
at they purchased as an investment 10 years
jo for 120,000, but today has a value of $100,000.
fhe Cohens would like to sell their investment,
fcut are concerned about the capital gains taxes
at they will incur.
Can the Cohens obtain current tax benefits by
|ontributing this property, and still be able to
Utinue to support the Greater Miami Jewish
federation and create the memorial fund in their
Brents memory?
ANSWER: Yes. The Cohens can best accom-
plish their intentions and obtain a large reduction
MFederal Income Tax by creating a Philanthropic
fund with their asset. There are two tax benefits
that explain why a large reduction in personal
federal Income Tax can result from the creation
I a Personal Philanthropic Fund using long-term
lapital gain property. The tax benefits and tax
pving are:
)Up to 20 percent (the effective maximum tax
ilong term capital gains) of the contribution
r eliminating liability for capital gains tax on the
pntribution.
I Up to 50 percent (the maximum tax rate offset
1 the charitable contribution) of the contribution
othe" income1"1 f "* ^"^ dedUCt,0n *"-
The creation of a Philanthropic Fund will enable
the Cohens to benefit from the tax deduction in
the year the gift is made, and the making of the
gilt eliminates the tax liability which would result
irom the capital gain on the contributed property.
The following chart explains the tax conse-
quences of such a transaction assuming that the
asset will be sold:
With Personal
Outright Sale Philanthropic Fund
Sale of Asset S 100,000
Original Cost 20,000
Capital Gain 80^000
Capital Gains Tax 16,000
Charitable Deduction
After Tax Cash Value of
Charitable Deduction
Balance in
Philanthropic Funds
Proceeds to Cohens 84,000
20,000
-0-
-0-
100,000
50,000
100.000
50,000
The result of this transaction is that $100,000
fund has been created at a one-time cost of only
$34,000. The Cohens will be able to recommend
charitable distributions from the earnings of the
fund which assuming a return of 10 percent
will support their current level of annual giving to
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation for the rest
of their lives. Upon their deaths, the principal
balance in the fund will create a $100,000 me-
morial to their parents, in accordance with their
wishes.
Upon the death of Mr. and Mrs. Cohen, the pro-
ceeds of the remaining balance in the fund are
automatically transferred to the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and, in this case, as a memorial
fund to the Cohens' parents. The contribution will
then be permanently titled the Mr. and Mrs.
Cohen Philanthropic Fund and invested as a sepa-
rate fund on the books of the GMJF, enabling the
donor to make recommendations to GMJF over a
period of years as to how the income and principal
of that separate fund may be distributed to var-
ious charities, including the GMJF which is main-
taining the fund.
It should be noted that the donor is entitled
only to make recommendations and not to direct
the charity as to how the Fund or its income is to
be distributed. In this manner, and through com-
pliance with I.R.S. directives relating to pro-
cedures and management of such funds, the Fund
may avoid the status of a private foundation, in-
cluding added costs, expenses and problems asso-
ciated with such foundations.
Any donor who is considering such a gift should
consult with his tax advisors to ensure that the
making of the gift will accomplish the desired re-
sult..
The Personal Philanthropic Fund is just one of
the many ways in which the current tax laws re-
garding charitable deductions can work to your
advantage. We urge you to send your questions to
"Charitable Giving and Taxes,'" Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, PI., 33137 ... or phone Joseph Imberman
at 576-4000. All questions will receive individual
replies.


le County students need your help
Dade County educators are
kin^ mce from the
munit;. rivate sector to
itional guidance.
itivi- rol ideli ;ind enhanced
futures count] 'a student
fpulatuui. Tht Dadfl Partners
pan:, in which the Greater
mi Jewish Federation is an
Ive participant, involves adults.
local companies and agencies in
public education process.
As all segments of the com-
mit}- work more closely together,
students have a greater chance
succeeding." said Dr. Leonard
ton. Superintendent of Schools,
dour students' success is vital
ir future and the future of our
unity."
Dade Partners program
to involve adult community
wrs in vocational training,
I services, speakers
s and Board of Education
ry panels.
1 its involvements in the Dade
project, GMJF provides
lors. speakers, tutors, films.
Placements and field trips upon
fct GMJF President Harry A.
" Levy described Federation's
'vement as "a commitment to
"tare viability and strength of
Miami.
f young people are Dade
PfJ future," Levy said. "We
'help them mature and realize
topes and dreams, not only to
nt them as individuals, but
' ensure that our community
J from the leadership and
^y they can offer us in years
*n Enterprises, Inc., under
Warship of the Combined
Appeal-Israel Emergency
8 immediate Past Chairman
Braman, has become
>n the Dade Partners
::
V.
:
Vocational Inclusive Program,
offering job opportunities to public
school students.
"It is beneficial to us, as well as
the schools," said Linda Brickman,
Personnel Director of Braman
Enterprises. "Our participation as
a Dade Partner provides entry level
jobs and training for those kids who
require skills. Many of the people
we hire as permanent employees
had worked with us before through
the Dade Partners Program and
already know our procedures from
the training they had received. It
makes good business sense to be a
partner because we get back as
much as we give."
Braman Enterprises also
provides free circus tickets each
year for all kindergarten pupils of
the Phyllis Wheatley Elementary
School, as part of Braman s in-
volvement in Dade Partners.
"The Dade Partners Program
offers us a unique opportunity to
make our community a better
place," said David Fleeman,
Chairman of GMJF's Community
Relations Committee. "The
program affects the Jewish Com-
munity because a majority of our
youth attend the public schools.
However, this program offers us
the chance to be of service to the
entire Dade County community.
The CRC enthusiastically supports
this program and urges the Jewish
community's involvement."
Dade Partners participants
include educators, attorneys, ac-
countants, business and
professional concerns, com-
munications firms, social service
agencies and other segments of the
community committed to the
success of the public education
system, Fleeman said.
For further information about
the Dade Partners Program, call
350-W20.
Singles services
formed
>:j A program of late Friday night services
and Oneg Shabbat for Jewish singles has
:;: been developed by the Greater Miami Jewish ::
>: Federation, the Rabbinical Association of 5
:: Greater Miami and Jewish Community
:j: Centers of South Florida. Fifteen 1
synagogues throughout Dade County are
:: participating in the singles programs.
The idea for the series of 18 services was
;: developed locally by Rabbi Louis Lederman
:j: of Temple Beth Moshe in North Miami.
:: Rabbi Lederman indicated that many singles
:: in the community felt alienated and were
:: unsure of what is offered to serve Jewish
singles through the synagogue. The program
: attempts to reach out to these singles, to
:: give them a way to become involved in the
: synagogue and meet other singles in a
: Jewish environment.
Sj Over 400 individuals have subscribed to the
B late Friday evening services, with attendan-
: ce ranging from 150 to 300 persons at each
:: service. Single adults of all ages have at-
!;: tended.
:: Chairman of the program Fran Levey said,-
3 "There has been a great deal of success with
>:j this program, which ends for this year on
:: June 18. I am quite confident that the
:: services will continue again in the fall."
:: The late Friday night services is one
g project undertaken by the Jewish
S: Association of Singles Services (JASS) in
3 Miami. This local group is sponsored and
supplemented by the Community Con-
sortium for Jewish singles. The Miami JASS
group is patterned after similar
organizations successfully formed in Los
Angeles and Washington, D.C.
"The Oneg Shabbat following the 10 p.m.
services is an ideal opportunity for
socializing," said Ms. Levey. Refreshments
are served and at times entertainment and
Israeli dancing are offered."
For more information on the singles
services, contact Marsha Tejeda at the South
Dade Jewish Community Center, 251-1394.


Women's Division
Page 12

Paula Friedland
Lion of Judah pin
The Lion of Judah
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division has a special award for women
who become Trustees by contributing $5,000 or
more to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign. The award is the
beautiful 1 1-karat gold Lion of Judah pin, which is
now being incorporated as a trademark for use in
other Jewish Federations, announced Gloria
Scharlin and Paula Friedland, Trustee-Pacesetter
Chairmen for 1982.
The Lion of Judah pin was originated in 1972 by
Norma Kipnis and Toby Friedland, two of the
Women's Division campaign leaders. For each
subsequent gift of $5,000 or more after initial re-
ceipt of the pin, a diamond is presented to be
mounted on the pin to enhance its beauty.
"The success of the pin in Miami has been over-
whelming," said Bunny Adler, National UJA
Women's Division Board member. The Jewish
Federations in South Broward. Fort Lauderdale.
Boca Raton, Pinellas County, Chicago and Metro-
politan New Jersey have already adapted the pin
and we are now in the process of creating a trade-
mark for it," she added. Mrs. Adler is responsible
for helping those communities interested in
adapting the pin for use in their campaigns.
Each year in December, the Lion of Judah
Luncheon is held on behalf of the CJA-IEF. This
year, the luncheon was hosted by Maureen Muss,
with over 130 women attending this very suc-
cessful event. Plans are already underway for the
1983 luncheon which will be held December 9.
1982.
Gloria Scharlin
Constituent Board officers elected
The five constituent Boards of the Women's Di-
vision of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
have recently elected officers for 1982-83. These
women will serve as the leaders ol these Boards in
carrying out the programs of the Women's Divi-
sion, announced incoming Women's Division
President Maxine Schwartz.
Among the five constituent Boards is the newly
formed Business and Professional Women. Amy
Dean will be chairing the Board, and serving with
her will be Adele Laurence, Vice Chairman, Cam-
paign; Sonia Miller, Vice Chairman, Leadership
Development; Carol Rose, Vice Chairman, Com-
munity Education; Susan Kleinberg, Secretary
and Nancy Bloom, Nominating Committee Chair-
man.
This year the Miami Beach Board will be
headed by Muriel Russell who is serving her
second term as Chairman. Other Officers of that
Board are Miki Millman. Vice Chairman, Cam-
paign; Bonni Lang, Co-Chairman. Campaign; Roz
Ness, Vice Chairman, Leadership Development;
Mickey Teicher, Co-Chairman. Leadership Devel-
opment; Debby Schwartz, Vice Chairman, Com-
munity Education; Pam Turetsky. Secretary and
Gail Harris. Nominating Committee Chairman.
In North Dade, Sue Graubert will chair the
Board for a second year. Working with her will be
Terry Drucker, Vice Chairman, Campaign;
Renata Bloom, Co-Chairman, Campaign; Evelyn
Mitchel, Vice Chairman, Leadership Develop-
ment; Judi Billig, Vice Chairman, Community
Education; Wendy Kravitz, Secretary and June
Slavin, Nominating Committee Chairman.
The South Dade Board of Women's Division
has a new chairman this year. Robbie Herskowitz
will assume the position for 1982-83. Other officers
Maxine Schwartz
in South Dade's Board include Annette Aeren
and Gail Jaffee. Vice Chairmen. Campaign; I
Hoffman. Vice Chairman. Leadership Develop)
ment; Micki Hocnberg. Vice Chairman, Commun
ity Education; Elaine Ross. Secretary andGlori
Scharlin, Nominating Committee Chairman.
The Southwest Dade Board has been in ex
tence for one year and has been serving
rapidly expanding Jewish community. This ve
the chairman of that Board will be MarleneKo
who will be working with other officers whicnj
elude Sandi Miot, Vice Chairman. Campai"
Judy Adler, Vice Chairman, Leadership Deve
ment; Joan Fisher, Vice Chairman, tt>mmgj
Education; Fran Storper, Secretary and I*MT
Grodnick, Nominating Committee Chairman.
The incoming chairmen of all five constituen
Boards were installed during the Women s
sion 7th Annual Retreat at the Annual Inst
tion and Dinner held May 26th.
Campaign Phonothon raises $50,000
Nearly $50,000 was raised by 70 volunteers
from May 3-6 in a campaign phonothon for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's
Division 1982 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign, announced Phono-
thon Chairman Charlotte Held.
"The May phonothon was the second phono-
thon of the year," said Ms. Held, "Over 3,000
pledge cards were covered. The first phonothon
was the very successful Hi-Rise Telephone Task
Force which took place in March and raised over
$120,000."
The purpose of the phonothons was to reach out
into the Jewish community to those who> had no
yet made their commitment to the CJA-lEFUm-
paign. Volunteers met at the Federation buiicuns
for either 2 or 3 hour shifts in the mornings or eve-
nings to place telephone calls to Jewish wome
throughout the community.
Working with Ms. Held on the PhonotlLonw3
Lorraine Cooperman and Mickey Granoff. mw
Beach Chairmen; Karen Katz, North Dade GOfJ
man; Elaine Rackoff and Estelle Segal. w
Dade Chairmen; Stella Haas, Southwest ijj-
Chairman and Carol Glassman, Business ana
fessional Women Chairman.


>. r. f >
"-*----' I '-.....,.,,
WJ-/tWI

Community News
Page 13
Oifczft Hebrew dream coming true


Over 20 years ago a handful of people had a
ggn a dream to erect on Miami Beach, a
ilding that would include a synagogue, social
I, and every other conceivable facility which
,uld be of use to a new, thriving Jewish com-
munity. These people began the Cuban Hebrew
mgregation, and now, 20 years later their dream
become a reality.
They began by holding religious services in pri-
|ate homes with makeshift settings. Then, they
iere able to purchase a home and convert it into a
knagogue and social hall. Now, the Cuban
Hebrew Congregation has broken ground on a
Land new facility to be constructed at 1700
Michigan Avenue on Miami Beach. This new
icility will include a synagogue, social hall,
dieting rooms, gym and a kitchen for all events
lonsored by the Congregation.
Mr. Aron Kelton, President of the Cuban He-
Irew Congregation said, "With this ceremony, we
]re not only breaking ground for our new building,
Lit we are also paying tribute to all of our past
esidents. We are honoring that small group of
^dividual* who in 1961 saw the need for a facility
uch as ours, and thus created the Cuban Hebrew
ongregation of Miami."
The ground breaking ceremony was attended by
Jeveral prominent Miami Beach political leaders
Icluding. Mayor Norman Ciment, Commissioners
llfx Daoud, Malcom Fromberg, Leonard Haber
pd Bruce Singer. Also in attendance were Joel
on, Consul General of Israel in Miami, and
(abbi Solomon Schiff, Executive Vice President of
[Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami.
I "This new structure is a monument our
peration will leave behind as a legacy for future
Derations." Kelton said. "It is testimony of
at a hard working, dedicated community can
omplish in only 20 years. The amount of work
I dedication demonstrated by our Rabbi Dow
oencwaig, and our primary benefactor. Jack
ster. has served as an inspiration to all of us."
iHarry A. (Hap) Levy, President of the Greater
pmi Jewish Federation said, "The Cuban
brew Congregation has always been admired
1 respected by the Federation and its family of
cies. Their dedication and commitment to
ow Jews and Israel has been awe inspiring.
*y began as a small group of people living in
Other land, and now through their intense
Termination, they have progressed into one of
"nost influential Jewish organizations in the
"ter Miami area."
flie construction for the new facility is slated to
"a in the very near future now that the proper
nits have been signed. The Congregation
K that the new building will be completed
W High Holy day services in 1983.
1 in want to nld 8ervices in the new building
,1983, however, this may be difficult to
rW," Kelton said. "Ideally, we would like to
P the building completed in 18 months, but
now we'll have to wait and see how the
Auction progresses."
p new building will incorporate all religious,
nthropic, and social functions under one roof,
.has been the dream of the Congregation
its inception 20 years ago. However, a
mt facing the Cuban Hebrew Congregation
oe faced by all Jewish communities keeping
youth involved and active in their Jewish
nunity.
JJj have buUt this facility to initiate feelings
mm and togetherness in our youth. We want
to pray in our new facility with pride and
ly We also want them to have the op-
P% to socialize in the same setting. We
10 pass along our patriotism because today's
'must carry that torch into future
oon," Kelton explained. "The future of
' jd Israel both lie in the hands of our
Jnerefore, we want them to have the
Brv environment to carry out our legacy.
r*2* generations must never forget the
who began this congregation 20 years ago.
"earns must always continue to grow and
^te new ideals."





Rabbi Dow Ro/encwaig
Aron Kelton



Greater Miami Jewish Federation leader Jeffrey Berkowitz presents a special Certificate of
Merit to Congressman William Lehmen during a recent Young Leadership Conference of the
United Jewish Appeal, held in Washington, D.C.
;'


-*. .
Campaign
Five, Tens and Twenties
Continued from Page 5
Arthur Jurkowitz
RaeKann
Gert Kartzmer
Barbara Kasper
Martin Kasper
David Kestenbaum
Alan Kluger
Abraham Kokiel
Selma Kramer
Steve Kravitz
Ted Kreuter
Sol K re vans
Rebecca Leon
Dr. Arthur H. Levine
Meyer Levinson
BeaLevy
Davida Levy .
Louis Liebowitz
Bob Loring
Moll ye Lovinger
Peter Luria
Irving Magenheim
George Malin
Berta Marcus
V.Herbert Marks
Abraham Mannes
Estelle Matzon
Harold Medow
Jack Merchant
Arnold R. Meyer
Miriam Meyerhoff
Arthur Miller
Dr. Bernice Miller
Miki Mill man
Benjamin Millstein
Sandi Miot
Evelyn Mitchel
Joan Morrison
Peter Mosheim
Meyer Myers
Stanley C. Myers
Oscar Nadel
Ruth Natelson
Manuel Pearl
Joseph Peiken
Rose Postal
Henry Rakowski
Adria Rasken
Lillian Ratner
Elaine Richman
Dr. Paul Richman
Ted Richmond
Maurice Robin
Alan Rosenthal
Elaine Ross
Mary Ross
Seymour Roth
Ernest Samuels
William Sanes
Dr. Maxwell Schram
Leon Schuster
Edwin Stephen Schweig
HySelig
Abraham Shakun
Sally Shakun
Edward R. Shohat
David Siegal
Esther Silverman
James F. Silvers
Ben Singer
Harry B. Smith
Hermine Spahn
Sidney Spiegel
Michelle Stone
Fran Storper
Jerry Sussman
Irene Sussman
Helyne Treister
Jay Trilling
Jack Try
Samuel Tuch
Belle Tuch
Eric Turetsky
Murray Turetsky
Sol Vogel
Nathaniel Wechsler
Esther Weinkle
Bernie Weiser
Jeanne Winston
Essie Wolfe
Barry Yarchin
Jack Ziegelheim
TWENTYS
Anne Ackerman
Michael Adler
Bunny Adler
L. Jules Arkin
Rabbi Shimon Azulay
Yoshua Sal Behar
Jack Bellock
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Max Bernstein
Irma Braman
Jerome Brill
Florence Brill
Dr. Isaac Cohen
Lorraine Cooperman
Irving Cypers
Morris Davidson
George Dean
Terry Drucker
Alice Durst
Lenore Elias
Myra Farr
Menashe Feldstein
Anne Fingerman
Howard Frank
Abe Franklin
Carolynn Friedman
Harvey A. Friedman
Nat Friedman
Mikki Futernick
Max Garazi
Raquel Gerson
Al Golden
Marvin I. Goldman
Lydia Goldring
Dr. Elliot Gordon
Mickey Granoff
Debby Grodnick
Kathie Grossman
I.<>iiis Harris
Charlotte Held
Sue Helfman
A. Fred Hirsch
Kenneth Hoffman
Gail Jaffe
Mickey Karzen
Ezra Katz
Karen Katz
Nate Katzen
Louis Katzman
Morris M. Kling
Eva Kokiel
Sol K rev an s
Gerson Kriger
BonniLang
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Marcy Lefton
Moises Levin
Jack Levine
Harry A. Levy
Nancy Lipoff
Michell Lopato
Jose Luria
Ellen Mandler
Max Mansfield
Benjamin Marcus
Irving Meshover
Arnold Meyer
Benjamin Millstein
Milton Moskowitz
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias
Irving Nass
Bernard Penner
Adam Penny
Enrique Percal
Aaron Podhurst
Al Postal
Irving Pressman
Norman Rachlin
Mike Rechler
pageH
Sy Reisman
Dr. Elton Resnick
Phyllis Rosen
Morris Rothman
Ronnie A. Rounel
Abe Satran
Gloria Scharlin
MaxSchoen
Maxine Schwartz
Estelle Segal
Leon Z. Segal
Sandi Simon
Isaac Sklar
Marilyn K. Smith
Guillermo Sostchin
Irving Stessel
John Sumberg
Jackie Traurig
Carl Turchin
Arnold Unger
Philip T. Warren
Rabbi Phineas Webermu|
Harold A. Weiss
Harry Weitzer
Charles Wilder
Nate Willis
Dolores Wolf
Alan Yarkin
Leon Yarmus
Charles Y avera
Reuben Zaretsky
Richard /.inn
Howard Frank, Chairman of the Accountants Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, addresses 300 Dade
County accountants gathered for a division reception on behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.
I
The first Young Business and Professional Division cocktail party, held on behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign drew several hundred interested participants. Pictured above are Kenneth S. Hof-
fman, the event's chairman; Linda Hoffman; Norman Lipoff, GMJF President-Elect; Nancy Lipoff; Susan Sirotta;
Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack; and Anne Monique O 'Hayon.



Calendar
Page 15

JNE17
The Officers, Board of Directors, and
ktaff of tne Greater Miami Jewish
Federation are honoring President Harry
I (Hap) Levy and 1982 CJA-IEF Cam-
jlign Chairman Philip T. Warren at the
[4th Annual GM JF Meeting and Dinner
[t the Carillon Beach Hotel, 6801 Collins
^ve., Miami Beach.
Call 576-4000 for more information
oncerning this evening to be remem-
ered.
JUNE 24
June is busting out all over. A fashion
show for today's mother-in-waiting will
IS ,? fa Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Wolfson Auditorium at 1 p.m. Reser-
vations are necessary for this event
which will feature fashions for both the
expectant mother and her newborn, as
well as information on the latest delivery
methods. For reservations please phone
the nursing department at Mount Sinai
(674-2015) for more information.
JUNE 29
Cover your cards and we'll cover your
day! Yes, today is Campaigners
Recognition Day at the Doral Country
Club. For Greater Miami Jewish
Federation volunteers who have covered
either 5,10, or 20 campaign pledge cards,
today will feature a complete day of golf,
tennis and dinner, all for helping
Federation during its 1982 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. Call 576-4000 for more infor-
mation.


GMJF names new Assistant Executive Vice President
The growth of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Is-
tel Emergency Fund Campaign has created a
for greater depth in professional expertise,
suiting in the appointment of Morris Sherman,
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's new
Ussistant Executive Vice President, Myron J.
brodie. GMJF Executive Vice President, has an-
nounced.
"Morris is uniquely qualified to join our profes-
sional ranks and compliment the ongoing success
pf our campaign,*' Brodie said. "We are extremely
pleased that he has taken the helm of our profes-
onal campaign staff and we are confident that
pus leadership will have a dramatic effect on up-
oming CJA-IEF drives."
Sherman, who received a Master's Degree in
cial Work from the University of Maryland,
ved during the past three years as Assistant
Executive Director of the Jewish Community
federation of Metropolitan New Jersey. His pri-
ary responsibility in this position was planning
nd implementing of campaigns on behalf of the
ssex County, N.J., Jewish community.
Sherman's previous positions included those of
Campaign Director of the Jewish United Fund of
Metropolitan Chicago, Assistant Campaign Di-
ctor of the St. Louis Jewish Federation, and
antsman for the State of Maryland and the
bmmonwealth of Pennsylvania.
In listing his goals and objectives for the CJA-
EF Campaign, Sherman said he hopes to initiate
1 strong new gifts effort by "searching out and
ating potential supporters who have yet to
ke major contributions.
"It's a matter of studying the campaign struc-
as it relates to the 1980s and the Greater
imi Jewish community," he said. "I hope to
ovide the guidance for necessary reorganization
Morris Sherman
and retuning of our efforts."
Sherman noted that the demographics of the
Jewish community are changing rapidly, as more
families move from Miami's urban neighborhoods
to the suburbs. This must result in a fundamental
shift in fundraising emphasis, he said.
"It is imperative that we establish our presence
in growing new Jewish communities, helping them
to grow while encouraging their participation in
our campaign," Sherman said.
Sherman also emphasized the need to support
and bolster the young leadership ranks as a means
of "adding new depth to our existing leadership."
He cited this approach as the best means of assur-
ing the influence and vibrancy of the Greater
Miami Jewish community in future generations.
Tabachnikoff to head
Rabbinical Association
|kbbi Barry Tabachnikoff, founding Rabbi of
""Pegation Bet Breira, has been elected to the
sidency of the Rabbinical Association of
* Miami. He succeeds Rabbi Norman N.
*Po as Rabbinical Association President.
L* 1982-83 Rabbinical Association officers
nabbi Max Lipschitz of the Beth Torah Con-
nation, Vice President; Rabbi Brett Goldstein
tSJ*P* of Temple Shir Ami, Secretary; and
D1 arber of Temple SamuEl Treasurer.
L graduate of the University of Pennsylvania
fchT l tion fr0"1 the Hebrew Union College,
j labachnikoff has served as Chairman of the
Ium^m tation Seroce and has been active
2 atK)nal Conference of Christians and Jews
Sue and the American Jewish Committee,
special interest in interfaith affairs. He also
ved on the regional board of the Hillel
Rations and the Dade County Youth
**y Board.
kdJ Tabachnikoff 8 teaching experience has
ded
courses at Florida International Univers-
it? hp University of Miami Medical School
Nation Program.
After ordination in 1968, Rabbi Tabachnikoff
served as assistant rabbi at Shaar Emeth in St.
Louis and later was associated with Temple Israel
of Greater Miami. In 1975, he helped form Con-
gregation Bet Breira in the Kendall area.
"We'll be looking for more of an application of
current issues and more involvement in current
issues concerning our community," Rabbi Ta-
bachnikoff said, defining his aspirations for the
Rabbinical Association's upcoming programatic
year. "We should be concentrating more on issues
like crime and violence, and other topics that talk
to the nature and quality of life in our community,
which can be approached by the clergy. I'm hop-
ing the Rabbinical Association will lead the way."
Rabbi Tabachnikoff described his predecessor
in the presidency, Rabbi Shapiro of Temple Zion,
as an outstanding person and a dear colleague.
"Norm has set the tenor and the tone for the fu-
ture of the Rabbinical Association, "Rabbi Ta-
bachnikoff said. "What he has done has helped us
heighten the awareness of the community in a way
upon which we hope to build during the coming
year."
Community fund aids needy
Established in 1976, the Community Passover
Fund provides aid to needy Jews in the form of
kosher products used to conduct a traditional
Passover Seder. The fund is operated under the
joint supervision of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida, the Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice, the Jewish Family and Children's Service and
the Community Chaplaincy Service.
Older adults and children form the heart of this
volunteer group, which collects money for the
fund's utilization. The money is used to purchase
products needed for the enjoyment of a Passover
Seder. Project coordinators, Sharon Grizel and
Pearl Bernstein have worked diligently to aid as
many Greater Miami Jewish community members
as possible, and have met a great measure of .suc-
cess.
Philip Tyson, Fund Chairman, said, "Every
year it astounds me to see the level of cooperation
we get from the community. Each year the aware-
ness grows stronger. Our volunteers have dedic-
ated a tremendous amount of time and ener in
sustaining the program, and have served as in-
spirations to all of us associated with the pro-
gram."
The coordinators of the fund, an ongoing pro-
gram, attempt to expand efforts each year.
"However," Tyson said, "community involve-
ment is essential if the fund is to operate success-
fully in the future. Thus far, the support of the
Greater Miami Jewish community has been quite
substantial as each year the fund grows larger.












Our Defense Budget
page 16
The best possible defense we can provide to ensure a
strong Jewish future in Greater Miami is quality
Jewish education. Jewish day schools, after-schools
programs, special events for youngsters and other
projects supported by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation strengthen our defenses against
assimilation, intermarriage, cultural and religious
ignorance and other factors that threaten Jewish
existence.
The most effective defense we can provide for the
Jewish community's elderly population is congregate
housing, quality health care, nutritious meals and
other innovative programs sponsored by members of
Federation's family of agencies. As the economy
drives down the buying power of fixed incomes, the
elderly become more dependent on the services we can
provide.
Jews of all ages in Greater Miami, Israel and com-
munities throughout the world count on us and the
social services we offer. They count on us as their first
line of defense. We can not let them down.
Your continued support is needed to help Jews in
need, no matter where they might live or what type ot
social service they require. Your legacy could make
the difference in our quest to ensure Jewish survival.
Have vou remembered us in your will?
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Fla. 33137


Full Text
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. June 11. 1982
oo
VI
HW1SH
rwnorw
FUI1D
J]%F Newsletter
published by the Jewish National Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353. Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 Phone 538-6464
Jewish National Fund Bikurim Celebration Pays Tribul
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNFFdtn
Abraham Grunhut Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz Ernest Samuels
Pres. JNF Gr. Miami Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board V.P. JNFGr. Miami
"At the recent Bikurim Celebration held at the Fontainebleau Hilton, and attended by
an overflow crowd, the JNF paid tribute to its outstanding and deserving leaders, con-
tributors, chairmen of various functions, and especially honorees of the various fun-
ctions", said Rabbi Irving Lehrman, JNF Foundation Chairman. In paying tribute to
the Honorees. and to the meaning of Bikurim, Rabbi Lehrman explained the pressing
immediate tasks of the JNF facing Israel in view of the recent peace development, and
revitalizing the Negev and the Western Galilee."It is a privilege to be of the generation
which saw the rebirth of Israel, and to participate in its upbuilding" stated Rabbi Lehr-
man. "and the JNF is at the forefront and should be foremost in our minds and hearts."
A most unusual musical program was arranged by Maestro Shmuel Fershko, the
guest artists included Doreen Stuart, Accordionist, and Cantor Edward Klein. Ernest
Samuels delivered the Prayer for Peace, Augusta Mentz made the Invocation, and Lou
Aronson made the Hamotzei. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, Chairman of the Festival, and
Chairman of the JNF Exec. Board opened the celebration and stated the need for total
involvement for every Jew in the work of the JNF, and the role that the JNF plays in
our daily lives. Certificates of Merit were presented to the deserving leaders, honorees,
donors, and function chairmen by Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region.
C

A.
Mrs. Theresa Lei me is shown holding the i
tificate for a Grove of 1000 Trees which wt
established in the American Independent
Park by Theresa and the Late Julius Levine.
Certificates of Merit Miriam Press, Treas. Ernest Sarr.uels. V.P.. Rose Leiter. Sam it Rose Pascoe, Elsie Nusbaum, Purim Princess 1982-83, Ma
Clara & Igor Schultz Neumann, Helen Pollock
Maurice Robbin, Leon Schuster JNF Mcrdecai 1982-83. SadU '" *>*,


JNF Newsletter
Lincoln Roao. suite 355. Miami Beach. Fia. 55139 Phone 538-6464
Friday, June 11, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
IOOBOOOI
?OOOOOOO
IBOOOULI
o Its Honorees, Chairmen, And Outstanding Leaders
ii1
t#*i
JNF Means:
Land
Redemption
Land
Reclamation
Ida WesseL Comptroller, Zelda Thau, Purim Queen 1982-83, Birdie Pomper,
mm Mr. & Mrs. David Pomerantz
Afforestation
i
Water Projects
777>^'" Frank lirickman was presented with a
ch u'^BVrfi/iVur*' for a drove of 1000 Trees
'ndenc^gstablished in Israel by the Rrickman Family
ine IB" memory of her late husband, Frank Brick-
R
From left to right: Lou and Etta Aronson, Albert & Ann Anker, Marion
Altshuler
K
\\
9 \
1 >
J^%
A
L* ^i:
. %>
i
am & Mary Goldman, Abraham Bodow, Rabbi Jehuda Melber. Chrmn.
>"n Bureau, Bertha Fox, Hilda Grau
Mary Silep Cohen, Maxwell Corn, Cantor Saul H. Breeh, Chrmn. Spec. Ac-
tivities, Leo and Pearl Buda, Maestro Shmuel FershkOi Musical Director
**> Shirley Kotin, Mr. A Mrs. Isidore Hammer, Jennie Kleeman
David & Mollie Moskowitz, Augusta Menu, Chairperson, Women for JNF,\
f Philip Richland, Theresa Levine


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