The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02773

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
II IOC1
THE
s
^Number13 Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, March, 26,1982
5 ffd Shochm:
ByM.iisocenis Price 50 Cents
[order Dispute Solved Temporarily
Facility to Open in Miami Monday
Jewish community
jtory will be made Mon-
ty when a new Israel Con -
l General's office opens in
nmtown Miami. Israel's
Ambassador to the
kited States, Moshe
/ens. will be at the
Luguration of the facility.
lArens will meet at breakfast
|th other Israeli officials and
bn join them in official opening
rummies. The first official act
Israel Consul General Joel Ar-
, who heads the consular of-
will be to introduce Am-
issador Arens at a press and
dia conference with journalists
I the consulate.
[ARENS' appearance Monday
Bl follow by one day a reception
I Sunday noon at Consul Gen-
il Amon's home to meet offi-
t and leaders of the Greater
liami Jewish Federation, as well
I Jewish and non-Jewish corn-
unity personalities identified
numerous civic, religious
dethnic organizations.
JAlsoon Mondav, Arens will be
t WTVJ. Channel 4 Television
an interview with longtime
wsman Ralph Renick. as well
I for a taping for the WTVJ pro-
ram. "Montage."
| Monday evening, the Ambas-
idorwill be keynote speaker at a
late of Israel Bonds function at
Joel Arnon
Oded Ben-Hur
the Konover Hotel on Miami
Beach.
The opening of the new con-
sular facility on Monday follows
years of State of Israel Govern-
ment activity toward that end.
"Our new consulate is a tribute
not only to Miami but also to the
Jewish community throughout
Florida," according to Consul
General Arnon.
ARNON NOTED that Miami
has become the gateway to
Central and South America. In
both these geographic areas, Is-
rael enjoys cordial relations with
many countries and, according to
Arnon. the consulate in Miami is
expected to become an important
link to them.
"Resides." he observed, "Isra-
el and the State of Florida share
mutual problems in their large
agricultural endeavor. Israel has
taken an international lead in the
application of solar energy and
desalinization of water to solving
these problems, and we hope to
be able to offer some help to Flor-
ida's agricultural needs in these
technological areas."
Arnon also envisions as part of
the new consulate's endeavor the
opportunity to promote trade
with Israel, tourism and, especi-
ally in this regard, to set up
liaison with church groups on a
statewide basis to encourage
Continued on Page 7-A
But Tension With Egypt
Grows As Talks Halted
ByJTA Wire Service
JERUSALEM The Cabinet Sunday endorsed a tem-
porary solution to one of Israel's border disputes with
Egypt. The compromise emerged during the discussions
here last week with Egyptian Foreign Minister Kama!
Hassan AH and involves about a kilometer of territory in
the Taba region near the Israeli port of Elat.
It is understood that an
interim arrangement was
agreed upon which would
allow Israelis to operate a
luxury resort complex
which is near completion
while negotiations continue
with Egypt on ultimate
sovereignty over the area.
With New York Co,
Syria Tried to Bar U.S.
Jews from Contract Work
I NEW YORK The
nerican Jewish Congress
s assailed a demand by
' Syrian Ministry of De-
n that "suspected per-
Wiu particularly Jews
Hi be barred from par-
fcipating in a proposed
lct with the Sybron
orporation of Rochester,
Citing similar discrimination
urged by the Syrian government
in proposed contracts with com-
panies in New Jersey and Illinois,
Henry Siegman, executive direc-
tor of the American Jewish Con-
gress, wrote to Syrian Ambas-
sador Rafic Jouejati in Washing-
ton:
"THE OUTRAGEOUS de
mand by your Defense Ministry
that American companies
discriminate against American
citizens on the grounds of religion
destroys the claim that Arab
boycott activities are directed
against Israel and Zionists and
not against Jews as such.
"It also destroys the absurd
contention that Arabs cannot be
anti-Semitic because they are
Semitic.
"And it explains the persecu-
Continued on Page 12-A
Rabbi Warns
ISRAEL MUST complete its
pullout from Sinai by Apr. 26,
and it is hoped that the other ter-
ritorial disputes along the 143-
mile international boundary will
be resohed by that date.
However. Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon, who will go to Cairo
shortly for further talks with
Hassan AH, reportedly told the
Cabinet Sunday that he would
consider no further concessions
to Egypt. "We have reached the
limit," he was quoted as saying.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin took an equally tough line
on the venue of future autonomy
negotiations with Egypt. An
autonomy session on the experts'
level due to have been held Sun-
day was postponed by Cairo
Saturday night because of Is-
rael's insistence that the talks be
held in Jerusalem.
. THE ISSUE of Jerusalem has
emerged as a source of tension
between Israel and Egypt due to
President Hosni Mubarak's re-
fusal to go there during his
projected visit to Israel and Is-
rael's position that he include
Jerusalem on his itinerary or not
come at all. Ongoing consulta-
tions between the two countries
have produced no compromise so
far, although officials on both
sides say that the visit will take
place.
Part of Sunday's Cabinet
meeting was in closed session as
a ministerial security committee.
Sharon briefed his colleagues on
the tense situation on the West
Rank. No details were released,
hut Prime Minister Begin sent a
message of congratulations to the
army for the restraint it exercised
during confrontations with
violent demonstrators. At the
same time, he expressed sorrow
over the fatal shooting of an Arab
youth by soldiers in El Bireh
Saturday.
U.S. Has
West Bank
State Plan
London Chronicle Report
WASHINGTON The
State Department is seek-
ing to distance itself from
an officially-distributed
document proposing the
Officials
Embarrassed
creation of an independent
Palestinian State on the
West Bank and in the Gaza
Strip.
U.S. officials have clearly been
embarrassed by publication of
the detailed plan in the Spring,
1982, issue of the State
Department's "Open Forum
Journal," an unclassified
quarterly widely circulated
throughout the State Depart-
ment and overseas missions.
OFFICIAL U.S. policy has
never supported the creation of
Continued on Page 12-A
Carolina 'Judaica' Seminar to be Shunned
RSl and '^ leadera
uXC,munity "over
wed States not to be taken
^..a so-called "Judaica
XcelSir fCh^uled *
Cp ff Columbia Bible
PS Why and Saturday,
e *l h located in
Columbia, S. C, and it is ex-
pected thousands of people will
attend. The warning was issued
by the National Jews for Jews
Organization which has found
that the "Judaica Conference" is
a deceptive front for evangelical
missionaries who seek to convert
unknowing and innocent Jews to
Christianity. Rabbi Rubin
Dobin. head of the Miami Beach-
based Jews for Jews, explained
that the Seminar is being spon-
sored by the Southeast Regional
Student Missions Fellowship
whose sole purpose is to conduct
programs and train missionaries
for Jewish evangelism."
RABBI DOBIN said that a
printed Seminar program 1
the following as speakers:
Moishe Rosen, founder of Jews
for Jesus; Dr. Louis Goldberg,
professor and specialist in Jewish
Studies at the Moody Bible In-
stitute; Dr. Ben David Lew,
general director of Israel
Evangelistic Missions and host of
the "Hope of Israel" television
Continued on Page 2-A
' c
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin


-"*" marrn jy^J"0"
Filling in Background
W. Bank Mayor, Council
Removed, Begin Signed Order
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The elected mayor and
municipal council of El
Bireh, north of Jerusalem,
were removed from office
on grounds that they re-
fused to cooperate with the
Israeli civilian regime set
up on the West Bank late
last year by Defense Minis-
ter Ariel Sharon.
The order ousting the local of-
ficials was signed by Menachem
Milson who heads the civilian
government. According to Israel
Radio it was the first time Israel
has disbanded a municipal coun-
cil on the West Bank since it oc-
cupied that territory in 1967.
THE OUSTER was followed
by a violent demonstration in El
Bireh. Rocks were hurled at a bus
carrying Israeli troops, shatter-
ing the windshield. Several dem-
onstrators were arrested. Al-
though the El Bireh council was
Agencies Set
Boycott
VIENNA (JTA) Several
travel agencies, mainly in Hol-
land, have announced that they
would boycott the Tyrolean ski
resort of Mayrhofen because its
Mayor. Franz Hausberger.
served in the infamous SS 1st In-
fantry Brigade in World War II
Legal proceedings against
Hausberger were recently
dropped by the Innsbruck
District Attorney for lack of evi-
dence.
replaced by one headed by an Is-
raeli officer from the civilian ad-
ministration, the deposed Mayor
Ibrahim Tawil declared that he
was still the legal mayor and that
the townspeople continue to
regard him and the council as
their duly elected leaders.
In Nablus. the largest city on
the West Bank. Mayor Bassam
Shaka announced a three-day
shut-down of all municipal offices
in protest against the Israeli
action in El Bireh. He vowed that
he and his town council would
never cooperate with the Israeli
civilian government.
The Defense Ministry issued a
statement saying that Tawil and
his colleagues were removed in
the interests of the citizens of El
Bireh who wre being adversely
affected by the municipality's
refusal to cooperate with the
civilian government.
THE ISRAELI move climaxed
10 days of sustained unrest on
the West Bank which spread to
the outer suburbs of Jerusalem.
Earlier this week, a bus was
stoned near the Jewish suburb of
Neve Yaacov and similar in-
cidents occurred on the roads
from Jerusalem to Bethlehem
and Hebron.
Israel's troubles on the West
Bank were compounded by
a series of defections by local
Arabs from the Village Leagues
after the Jordanian government
warned that they would be tried
in absentia for collaborating with
Israel and executed.
The Village Leagues were es-
tablished by Israel to counteract
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion influence on the West Bank.
Arabs prepared to cooperate with
Israel were given local functions
under the civilian regime and
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
YOUR COMPLETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 1933
BROWARO
463-9680
DOWNTOWN UPTOWN
134 NE 1st St. 228 NE 59th St
Miami, Fla. Miami, Fla.
MIA. BCH.
1608 Wash. Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla.
757-8513
CORAL GABLES
272 Valencia Ave.
Coral Gables. Fla.
I
I
The collection of
Dr. Albert Scaglione
and various other owners
will be offered without
fixed reserve bids at our
FINE ARTS
AUCTION
Tuesday & Wednesday
March 30 & 31, 1982
MIAMI MARRIOTT
1201 N.W. Le Jeune Road
Miami, Florida
Agon
AM-
Apoe'
Cilder
Chigitt
Coign 3rd
Dili
Da til)
Ourer
Dui
Cxher
'riedltendei
Con
Liuiiec
Wiro
Neiin in
Picasso
Pinntu
Rrmbundt
Renoir
Rockwell
totxjsse
Viuretr
Pre-Auction Exhibition: 7:00 p.m.
Auction Opens: 8:00 p.m.
Master-quality graphics, drawings and rare gouaches
CUSTOM FRAMED WITH 100% RAG
MATS & MOUNTS
INC
Entire sale catalogued and authenticity
guaranteed by the
Park CDc>t GallGriG:>
1 -521 MM
Albert Scaglione. PhD Auctioneer
A.E. VISA M C D C C B
CASH CHECKS
M-S-26-"*
their villages were supplied with
cash.
MUSTAFA DUDEIN, who
heads the Village Leagues in the
Hebron area, is trying to stem
the tide of defections. He met
with Eliahu Ben-Elissar, chair-
man of the Knesset Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee, to
urge more Israeli support for the
villages.
Reaction in Israel to the re-
moval of El Bireh's elected offici-
als was split along party lines.
Labor Party Secretary General
Haim Barlev accused the govern-
ment of heightening tension on
the West Bank instead of
defusing it.
But Likud MK Ronnie Milo
said the move was much less
harsh than what would have
occurred if there was no civilian
administration on the West Bank
and it was left to the Military
Government to remove an inept
local council.
MEANWHILE. Defense Min-
ister Ariel Sharon told a Herut
meeting in Tel Aviv that terror-
ists had carried out 15 acts of
sabotage in Israel and another
five in southern Lebanon during
the past two weeks.
He warned that Israel "might
be forced to take action" if such
attacks continued. He disclosed
that shellfire had been directed at
an Israeli naval vessel on patrol
off southern Lebanon, but it was
not hit.
Jews for Jews9 Chief Warns
Against N.C 'Judaica' Seminar
cial help to the State of I.
these missionaries gain J
fidence of uninitiated jjj
deviously try to make ffl
1^ that the only way >'
become complete JpU '
accept the divinity of iL8
other Christian dogma.^
The Jews
Continued from Page 1-A
program: Rev. John Fisher,
former vice president of Brit
Shalom: and Rev. Larry Jeffrey,
Southeast regional director of
American Board of Missions to
the Jews.
"These people have a long
record of engaging in devious
methods and coercive techniques
while trying to wean unwary
Jews away from their faith," said
Dobin.
"Under the guise of extending
a hand of fellowship to Jews and
seeming to give moral and finan-
for Jews 0i
a ha^ ,asked t0 ^ in
send a delegation to the'
and be permitted to #,
booth to distribute itsownv
re. To date no ^
been rece.ved from the Z
seminar organizers.
Munich Group Urges Banl
On Nazi Organizations
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A Munich
group called "Stop the Nazi
Terror" has demanded that the
Bavarian state government and
the federal authorities impose an
immediate ban on all neo-Nazi or-
ganizations, particularly those
engaged in paramilitary training.
A spokesman for the group,
which was formed after the 1980
Munich Oktoberfest bombing,
warned at a press conference that
neo-Nazi and paramilitary
organizations are still operating
in Bavaria and at least four are
registered in Lower Saxony. The
Bavarian neo-Nazis are based in
Rosenheim and Neustadt, he
said.
Police have confirmed that the
Rosenheim organization has been
active since 197N. It COtt
mainly of youths aged 141
who receive paramilitary tn
and have been involved ins
of Nazi propaganda activitie
vandalism of Jewish cemete
Meanwhile, Karl-Hein 1
mann. leader of the out
Wehrsportsgruppe lloffma
remains in custody pendingt
lor the murder ol a Jewish i
lisher in Nuremberg last y
I loll matin was arrested inft.
lurt when he returned fromav
to Lebanon where he was hot)
by Palestine Liberation On,
/at Kin chief Vasir Arafat. Pol
have confirmed I'l.O ties
Hoffmanns neo-Nazi
which is suspected ol havingp
petrated the Oktoberfest
ing
The most respected
in Jewish funeral servii
In the world
Not surprising.if s River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
i If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors,you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
M-5-26-82
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish.F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Soma Gale
Bernard Eilen
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
M-t-M-82
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920Alton
Road (19th St.) 531-1151|
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive; 531-115J
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17thSt.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 164
N.E. 19th Ave.'947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywo
Blvd./920-1010
FT.LAUDERDALE(Tamarac):j
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Ro.)
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New |
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
HimCKill ChJP*. '"*
Tradition. It's
what makes us Jews-I
msormg the Guardian W
^.Arranged Funeral.
u
l.iiurtliMn
Plan..


Friday, March 26, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Arafat Doesn't Want to be 'Traitor'
Two Graiver Family Members
Released from Argentine Jail
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON YaairAra-
CZa f the Palestine Libera-
tfr^tion. has indicated
w hf will never accept United
L'editions for recognition
f he PLO because he fears that
would mean he would meet the
E fate as the late Egyptian
Bident Anwar Sadat.
he U S. pol'cv since 1975 has
. that it will not talk or nego-
E'ISh the PLO until that
Cnn recognizes Israel s right to
1st and accepts United Nations
fcuritv Council Resolutions 242
Ej 338 The Reagan Adminis-
Lion has added the require-
Lt that the PLO renounce ter-
ism
Iwhen Ted Koppcl. in an inter-
lw with Arafat at his head-
Lters in Lebanon, shown on
EcTV's "Niphtline" program.
M Arafat why he does not go
lad and meet the U.S. condi-
|ns. the terrorist leader said he
L not want to be considered a
tailor" to his people as was
idat. He said that if he took this
re. "I will lose the confidence of
vpeople. I will be useless."
[Arafat said that Sadat paid for
I return of the Sinai with the
Jestinian people and Jeru-
fera. He predicted that after Is-
e1 returns the Sinai April 25,
t Egyptian army will force the
rptian government to reverse
Jit's policy of peace with Is-
tl He said the Egyptian people
hi the army support the Pales-
nians and indicated that it was
tirmy that killed Sadat.
eport Iran Buying
ns from Israel
[ PARIS The French paper
I Matin reported, quoting an
Israeli who has recently returned
mm Teheran, that Iranian leader
pyatollah Ruhollah Khomeini
lonally approved arms deals
pith Israel The paper said the
Israeli, who went under an as-
nmed identity to Teheran to
Bgotiate new arms contracts on
Jerusalem Gathering
'JERUSALEM-(JTA) A
JwW gathering of war-time
|wish partisans is to be held in
Imsalem next year to mark the
ph anniversary of the ghetto
Ipnsing against the Nazis.
toraunSholk
^njy to keep alive
S'kt "lebrate the
"* of Ufe itself
Ijg-Sholk.
ESJ Ration's
5^*^ Blvd. W
"^ Florida 33,37
Israel's behalf, said Khomeini re-
cently ruled that "Israel is Satan,
but in our country's situation we
have to deal with Satan himself."
Le Matin, which did not dis-
close the identity of the Israeli,
said that the decision to buy
arms and spare parts in Israel
was taken at the urging of the
"Islamic Guard," an estremist
group. No Iranian leader wanted
to assume responsibility for the
contracts with Israel and
Khomeini himself had to rule on
the issue.
The French weekly L'Express
reported ealier this week that
Iranian army generals telephoned
Israel via Rome to discuss arms
deliveries to Iran which is now in
the second year of war with Iraq.
New Soviet Edition
On Life of Mikhoels
TEL AVIV Natalia and
Nina Mikhoels. daughters of the
late Shlomo Mikhoels. the
famous Russian Yiddish actor
murdered on the direct orders of
Stalin nearly 30 years ago. have
received a copy of a new edition
of a Russian book on their father.
The first edition of "Mikhoels"
was published in 1965. No reason
has been given for the sudden
publication of a new edition, with
many photographs to accompany
the series of articles on Mikhoels'
life and artistic career as director
and leading actor of the Moscow
Yiddish Theater.
But Russian immigrants to Is-
rael believed it is an attempt on
the part of the Soviet authorities
to prove to Western critics that
the Soviet Union is not anti-Jew-
ish. Mikhoels' daughters said the
editor of the official Russian book
had hand-written a cordial dedi-
cation and greetings to them.
Fast Day Decreed To
Mark Sinai Exit_______^^
JERUSALEM The Chief
Rabbinate Council decreed
Wednesday that a fast day would
be held to underline the "serious-
ness and painfulness" of the
withdrawal from Sinai and to
pray that the government "con-
sider its steps and decisions" in
this respect. But the Council
stopped short of actually oppos-
ing the withdrawal.
Wednesday was the day before
Rosh Hodesh Nissan, also known
as Yom Kippur Katan (minor
Yom Kippur), on which ultra-Or-
thodox Jews always fast and re-
cite special prayers. The Council
decision linked the day specifical-
ly to the imminent withdrawal
from Sinai.
Chairing the meeting was
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef, who is regarded as more
moderate than his Ashkenazi
counterpart, Chief Rabbi Shlomo
Goren. The decision was unani-
mously approved by the ten man
Council.
Scientists Warn Against
Nuclear Fuel to Iraq
PARIS French scientists
warned President Francois Mit-
terrand that even low grade nu-
clear fuel sold to Iraq could result
in the production of a nuclear
weapon.
The scientists said, in a report
just issued, that the construction
of a new Iraqi reactor based ex-
clusively on "Caramel," the code
name for a non-military fuel,
could "still be highly dangerous"
and enable Iraq to eventually
build atomic weapons.
The report was released to the
press by Georges Amsel, a senior
research fellow of the National
Scientific Research Center in
Paris. It was signed by four other
prominent scientists, including
another expert on nuclear phy-
sics. The five conducted their re-
search reactor for Iraq in view of
recent French official declara-
tions indicating that Paris is
about to replace the Tamuz re-
actor destroyed by Israeli planes
in June. 1981.
Druze Town Placed
Under Army Curfew
TEL AVIV "The. IsTadi
army has imposed a curfew on
the Druze town of Majdal Shams
on the Golan Heights. It was
only the second time since Israel
captured the Golan in 1967 that a
Druze town was placed under
curfew. According to the army,
the measure was intended as
punishment for demonstrations
at Majdal Shams to protest the
sealing-off of that town and the
three other Druze villages on the
Heights since last month.
The Golan Druze are in the
fourth week of a general strike
aimed against Israel's annexa-
tion of the territory and the ar-
rests of the leaders of the largest
Druze clans who refused to ac-
cept Israeli identity cards. The
demonstration in Majdal Shams
reportedly touched off sympathy
demonstrations in Kuneitra on
the Syrian side of the line and in
parts of the West Bank.
Sages Threaten Boycott
On Sabbath Flight Ban
JERUSALEM Agudat Is-
rael's Council of Sages has or-
dered its four-man Knesset
faction to press the government
to enforce a Sabbath ban on El A1
and to act more vigorously to
ensure passage of the controver-
sial "Who is a Jew" amendment
to the Law of Return by the
Knesset.
The Sages have warned that
unless Israel's international air
carrier ceases flights on the Sab-
bath and Jewish holidays before
the start of the Passover season
next month, it will call on all
Jews in Israel and abroad to boy-
cott El Al which is government-
owned.
The boycott would coincide
with the peak of Jewish tourist
travel to Israel. Economic ob-
servers believe the finnancially
troubled airline could be seriously
hurt since a very large proportion
of its passengers are Orthodox
Jews.
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
members of the family of David
Graiver, the Argentine Jewish
banker who was reported to have
been killed in an airplane crash
several years ago, have been re-
leased from jail in Argentina
following that country's Supreme
Court ruling that the "Graiver
case" should be tried by a civilian
court because the military
tribunal which sentenced five
members of the family had no
jurisdiction, according to reports
from Buenos Aires.
David Graivers mother, Eva
(iitnach de Graiver, and his
sister-in-law, Lydia Brodsky de
Graiver. both of whom had been
sentenced to three-year jail
terms, were freed last month. Da-
vid's father. Juan (iraiver. and
his wife. Lidia Papeleo de Grai-
ver, both of whom were given 12-
year sentences, remain in jail.
David's brother, Isidore, is also
in jail awaiting sentencing,
according to the reports. Argen-
tine authorities accused David
Graiver of having contributed
money to anti-government left-
wing guerrillas.
Last month, the Buenos Aires
daily, Clarin. reported that
shortly before the Supreme Court
decision was announced, the Na-
tional Commission on Patrimon-
ial Responsibility (CONAREPA)
decided to transfer to the nation-
al treasury, without charges, a
large amount of assets of the
"Graiver group" for "not having
explained the legitimate origins
of their acquisition." The assets
of David Graiver and the five
members of his family then in inil
were included in the CONARE-
PA decision.
PASSOV
TRADITIONAL
KOSHER SEDERS
Conducted
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" ?


Working Together
While the Reagan Administration's economic
recovery program has yet to show significant indi-
cations of success, President Reagan says we should
keep the faith and bite the bullet, relief is on the way.
It's surely a hard view to digest for those on the
bottom of the totem pole looking up. But within the
Jewish community, this has prompted one leading
official to call for a show of pluralism to seek a more
moderate program that adapts to the social fiber of
the country.
Albert Chernin, executive vice chairman of the
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory
Council, in an "Overview" of "Basic Trends and
Priorities in Jewish Community Relations,"
presented at a four-day plenum recently in Houston,
admits that there is no quick fix to the problems of
the poor, but he expresses fear that high poverty
levels and increasing unemployment may foster
hostilities between certain groups in society.

I
Sj^tHtyJMVX^ AS- no
Welcome, Mr. Arens
Dramatic events in the Middle East sometimes
tend to obscure the quiet and immense achievement
of the Israel Bond Organization in helping to develop
Israel's economy.
An occasion to focus on the Bond role in Israel's
thrust towards greater economic independence will
be afforded at the Konover Hotel in Miami Beach on
Mar. 29. Israel's new Ambassador to Washington,
Moshe Arens, will be welcomed by South Florida's
Jewish communities and Bond leaders from across
the United States and Canada at an international
dinner of welcome this Sunday evening.
In choosing this area as the venue of one of his first
major appearances as Ambassador, Mr. Arens points
up the increasing recognition of the importance of i
South Florida's Jewish community recognition re
fleeted in the forthcoming dedication of a new Israel
Consulate General here.
The Bond dinner comes at a time when close rela-
tions between Israel and the U.S. in the pursuit of
Middle East peace have never been more important.
Clearly, this is a time to demonstrate our unity with
the State of Israel. South Florida's friends of Israel
will want to show a strong presence on Mar. 29 and
help make this dinner an outstanding success.
Israel's New Consulate
Speaking of Ambassador Moshe Arens' appear-
ance here in the cause of Israel Bonds and the dedica-
tion of a new Israel consular office in Miami, that
dedication takes place on Monday. New Consul
General is Joel Arnon, who for years held the same
post in Israel's consular facility in Atlanta.
Consul General Arnon comes from Atlanta with an
enviable record he established both diplomatically
and reckoned in terms of the ties he helped forge in
that community. His energetic support in cause of
establishing a consulate in Miami has now brought
forth fruit, and it is clear that he will establish an en-
viable record in Florida, as well.
Arnon's dedication to his country and his genuine
belief in the effectiveness of a strong bridge between
Israel and the American community, both Jewish
and non-Jewish, stand him in good stead.
The new Israel facility emphasizes the growing im-
portance of Florida, not only as a Jewish community,
but as the gateway to Central and Latin America. In
these geographic areas, the Government of Israel has
cordial relations with many countries, and Miami's
consular office is expected to serve as an important
tie to them.
In addition, Florida shares with Israel a similar
climate and similar agricultural interests, and the Is-
g raelis have much to offer us in terms of their ad-
I vanced technology bearing on solar energy and
: desalinization procedures, both of which, properly
^ applied to Florida's agriculture, can be of inestimable
ig help to the state's economy. It is to be hoped that the
:: office in Florida will help the state move in that
} direction.
a Ambassador Arens will be at the opening of the
& consular office in downtown Miami Monday, and it
? should serve as an auspicious beginning for a long-
Sen visioned and much-needed consular facility.
i We welcome the new office, its Consul General and
:^his second-in-command, Vice Consul Oded Ben-Hur.
jgTheir presence among us is a unique distinction for
Florida and a boost to the diplomatic needs of the
Government of Israel.
A Dubliner's Jewish Obsession
i

::
8
1
I
I
I AM indebted to William K.
Robertson, book editor of the
Miami Herald, for reminding us
all that this is the centenary of
the birth of James Joyce, the
Irish novelist. My own inclina-
tion is to be less sensitive to
Joyce's birthday than to June 16,
1904, the date on which the
mythic voyages in Dublin took
place of Stephen Dedalus. Leop-
old Bloom. Blazes Boylan, Buck
Mulligan and that whole cast of
smitten characters in the Joyce
masterpiece, "Ulysses."
It is not that I am unique to
this inclination. The whole world
celebrates June 16. 1904, better
known as Bloom's Day. I recall
emerging from the campus of the
University of Bonn several years
ago to arrive at a bookstore
across the street called Bouvier's,
whose windows in honor of
Bloom's Day were filled with
German-language translations of
Joyce's novels, as well as
scholarly dissertations on the
nature and meaning of Joyce's
work.
PERFORMING, right out
there on the sidewalk, with Bou-
vier's windows as backdrop, was
a crew of actors reading passages
from "Ulvsses." The same read-
ings were occurring simultane-
ously on the streets of cities
throughout the western world. It
is, by now. an old custom. The
obsession with "Bloom's Day" is,
as I say. universal. For Robert-
son, his Sunday column took the
torm of an interview with the dis-
tinguished Joyce scholar,
Richard Ellman. who lectured
several weeks ago at a Florida
Atlantic University Conference
on the Fantastic in the Art*
From Joyce to the fanUnJ
one easy hop because Joy(S,
single-handedly responsible
changing the characteristic,]
the traditional novel in the 2ft
Century. For the standard q
ties of plot, character, setting
theme, he substituted the int
monologue of the silently wM
dering human consciousness |
development he puckishly ,
tributed not so much to him*
as to the influence on him oft
otherwise unknown Fn*
novelist. Edouard Dujardin
instead of the traditioi
narrative style of the m,
Joyce gave us the multi lays
perception of the simultan.
experience by which all th
occur at once, indeed, precisebi
they do in real life.
What Joyce "simply" did i
to magnify the simultan
experience so that the inten
and external, each given
consideration, could be perceiv
by the reader at the same tig
and as from the point of view th
they are opposite sides of i
same coin.
AMONG OTHER thinj
it is this revolution in
rative style style that
made Joyce so forbidd
to most readers this
the fact that the simultan
experience, to be described
detail, requires on the part of tl
writer to write it, and thei
to read it. a good deal of tn
and so it no longer seems toll
simultaneous experience app
hended in an instant
Understood in these terms,I
internal and external appeartolj
two separate things, eventh
they are not \dd to this thei
credible scholarship deman
from the reader, and you ha\ea{
the reasons why Joyce is
casual or even a careful readei
delight so much as it is a cou
in a college classroom.
Ancillary to these consider^
tions is that internal experiem
suggests modern psychnanalyi
and more so lung than Freo
For example. Joyce character!
Anna I.ivia Plurabelle in "Fi^
negans Wake as Jung
Continued on Page I3-A
Werner Frydman
Peru Shuns Anti-Semitic Policies
Anti-Semitism in Peru
has never been official pol-
icy. Peruvian governments
have traditionally respect-
ed the Jewish minority and
have always been willing to
listen to community leaders
who denounced anti-Semi-
tic acts and attitudes.
Today, living in a democracy,
Peru's Jewish minority (5,000
people) enjoys full rights and the
government maintains friendly
relations with its community
leaders.
Anti-Semites in Peru, however,
have adopted an anti-Zionist
position. Thus, anti-Semitism is
now rooted in Peru's extreme
leftist groups which have em-
braced numerous anti-Zionist
positions, while pro-Nazi groups
have freely expressed their anti-
Jewish accusations that went as
far as casting aspersions on the
Jewish religion.
PERU HAS authorized the
setting up of a Palestine Libera-
tion Organization office. Its re-
presentative, Issam Besseiso,
works tenaciously with both left
and rightwing extremists in an
effort to disseminate anti-Israel
propaganda. They have an enor-
mous budget.
Not long ago, a group of mem-
bers of parliament traveled to
I-ebanon and had interviews with
PLO leader Yasir Arafat, who
moderated his views without
speaking about "extermination
of Israel" and without mention-
ing the Palestinian Charter.
Vigorous protests from the Jew-
ish community prevented other
"junkets" from taking place.
A TV program, "Testimony,"
conducted by a Peruvian journal-
ist who interviewed Arafat for
the first time, provoked a temp-
est which lasted for several
weeks. The Jewish community
put out an official statement
denying the accusations of "Jew-
ish intervention in freedom of the
press," and condemning the in-
creasing wave of anti-Semitism in
the country. A community lead-
er, Eduardo Bigio, appeared on
TV with a panel of journalists
and answered all of the accusa-
tions and published threats.
Besseiso, the PLO representa-
tive, has traveled throughout
Peru setting up committees in
support of the Palestinian cause.
He was received royally in *"
quipa. whose mayor is a Con
munist. while in the northerner
of Piura, his presence and act
ity caused the mayor to resign
HIS VISIT to Ayacucho.
of the centers of national tet
ism, was criticized by the ne
paper Opinion Libre, which sal
that the PLO in Peru "iscarryij
out 'unholy' activities before tn
eyes of our authorities'' It adde
that the PLO has expressed a
sire to support "liberation movl
ments" in Latin America.
Various PLO materials arec
tributed by Communist group**
the universities: some ot tnen
use bulletin boards to pun?
PLO propaganda and virulent
tacks on Zionism and Israel.
For more than a year now!
there has been a daily trans
sion on Radio Santa Rosa ot
Continued on Page *
Jewish Floridian
ttm
3"3-
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OFFICE and PLANT-110 NE. 6th St. Miami. Fla. Mill *^ *
P.O. Boa 012973. Miami. Florida 31101
FRED I SHOCHKT LEOMINDLIN
Editor and PuhHahar Aaaodata Editor
TH* Jmateh Ftortdtan Dm* Not Ouaranta. Th* KatKum
Ot Th* MirelmUln AdoarHaad In it. Column*
Pubhahad Evary Friday ainca 1M7 by TbaJawiah Flo-
Sacond-Claaa Poataa. Paid in Miami. Fla. USPS 216
Fn4 SH.C.ar ,. ., int
Tatagraphte AMcy. Art. Faatura lynwcate, Wortewtda Near. **"' floMt
Ajjoetatton. Am.rte.ii AaaaolrtUn el jgB J.wtih New*?*-*, and "<
SUBSCRIPTION HATES: (Local Ar.a) On. V^r-IIS.OO; Two v""-'3i^l
Vn-tW.OO-Flnt Friday aach month (12 luuM)-M.SO; out ot town, country, upo
Friday. March 26. 1982 2 W^5 ''
Volume 55 NumD


Friday, March 26, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page on.
Assisi Honors Friends of Jews
_ ..o> mi IIP. shelter in the villaare whirh haii ?..,.. ____ ,.. ,
kvs
ByUSABILLIG
ROME (JTA) Two
of ceremonies opened
the mountain viUage of
to honor the towns-
pie who saved the lives
Tows during World
when, following
iisi to honor the towns-
who saved the lives
300 Jews during World
yu ii when, following
jv's surrender, the occu-
fag German forces de-
brted about 20 percent of
alian Jewry to death
npS in Eastern Europe.
Ussisi is the birthplace of St.
Lncis. whose eighth centennial
IjIjo being celebrated this week.
Lresentatives of Italian Jewry
surviving members of the
ish familites who received
shelter in the village which had
no Jewish population of its own,
came there to pay tribute to the
courage of the villagers. They
were joined by many present-day
residents and by Catholic priests,
monks and nuns in renalling the
events on nearly 40 years ago.
THE RESCUE of Jews who
sought refuge in Assisi, begin-
ning in the spring of 1943, was
organized by Bishop Placido
Nicolini. his brother Ruffino
Niacci, and Father Aldo
Brunacci. Only Father Brunacci
is alive today and was on hand
for the ceremony of thanks. But
the entire population of the vil-
lage collaborated in the rescue,
including its Fascist mayor,
Arnaldo Fortini.
Frisco Plans Holocaust Memorial;
Site in Park Palace of Honor
Egypt Eases Way for Tourists
Interested in Visiting Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
I JERUSALEM (JTA) -
he Kgyptian authorities are re-
iving some of the obstacles in
. ay of Egyptian tourists in-
jested in visiting Israel. As a
.suit, according to Moshe Cas-
ulo. head of the Israel Govern-
ment Tourist Office in Cairo, be-
|wtsn 5.000 to 10.000 Egyptians
uy come to Israel this year, a
Bjor increase though still far
i than the number of Israelis
I have visited Kgypt.
I I'jssuto disclosed in weekend
interviews that the Egyp-
i authorities are now issuing
ond passports to Egyptian
ns. obtainable within 2 to 4
weeks. The purpose is to avoid
having Israeli entry stamps in
their original passport which
would prevent them from visiting
other Arab countries. The Egyp-
tians are also easing the maze of
red tape which many Israelis
suspected was a bureaucratic
device deliberately intended to
discourage Egyptians from
visiting Israel.
CASSUTO'S prediction of in-
creased Egyptian tourism to
Israel is expected to produce a
more favorable climate at high
level normalization talks between
Israeli and Egyptian teams
headed by Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali.
Jews were hidden in homes,
convents and monasteries. They
were provided with false papers
identifying them as Catholic
parishoners. Some were given
clerical disguises and were in-
structed in Catholic ritual to ap-
pear authentic. Jobs were found
for the refugees, enabling them to
blend into the community, un-
known to the German occupying
forces. The villagers protected
the Jews at risk of their own lives
until the town was liberated by
Allied forces in June, 1944.
Graziella Viterbi Carucci, one of
the Jews who owed her life to the
people of Assisi spoke at the
ceremonies.
So did Daniel Kropf of Trieste
whose parents were among those
rescued. Kropf is vice chairman
of the European Foundation of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. Another speaker
was Miriam Viterbi whose family
was the only one of the 300 Jews
that remained in Assisi after the
war.
A SILVER plaque was
presented to the Jews' benefac-
tors, inscribed with the words,
"The Jews of Italy, in gratitude,
1943-82." Today, an Italian
translation of "Assisi Under-
ground." a fictionalized account
of the period written by the Is-
raeli author Alexander Ramati,
was presented to the village. Bice
Miglao, director of the Rome
Jewish Cultural Center,
presented documents on Nazi
concentration camps to repre-
sentatives of Assisi's schools.
Assisi has also been honored
by the Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.
\n avenue of trees has been
planted in the Garden of the
Righteous.
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA)
San Francisco has been added
to the small number of cities with
Holocaust memorials on public
property. The planned memorial
will be financed by public contri-
butions. The San Francisco
Recreation and Parks commis-
sion has approved a site in front
of the Palace of Honor in Lincoln
Park, which overlooks the Golden
Gate Bridge.
Rhoda Goldman, chairman of
Mayor Dianne Feinstein's Com-
mittee for a Memorial to the Six
Million Victims of the Holocaust,
said the memorial monument will
be in the form of a massive sculp-
ture.
Although planning for the me-
morial began some time ago,
lund-raising was postponed until
the Lincoln Park site was con-
firmed. Mrs. Goldman said the
Mayor's committee estimated the
project would cost about
$750,000.
She said $150,000 would be
raised within the Holocaust
survivor community in the Bay
area. The rest will be raised
through 36 individual gifts of
$15,000 each, a plan based on the
Talmudic legend of the 36 "just
men" who always live on earth.
Goldman said the committee
has proposed that the monument
be not "just a statue, but an en-
vironment; not just a monument
to the horror of the past, but a re-
minder of the hope of the future."
Six noted artists and sculptors
have been invited to submit
monument designs. Goldman ex-
pressed hope the project would be
completed within the next two
years. She said the committee
also would seek to raise at least
$250,000 for an educational pro-
gram for Bay area public and
private schools.
In addition to being a memori-
al for the Holocaust victims and
focal point of the educational
project, the sculpture will be a
"legacy" to San Francisco.
Sandi Simon
gives generously of her time
and energy to keep alive
in the world those timeless
values that celebrate the
beauty of life itself.
To Sandi Simon
To Life.
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation'!
1982 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund C31
4200 Blscayne Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33137
Free Passover Cards
at AmeriFirsL

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P^^^ V.1T IV, A JOL "

Avraham Harman (left), president of the He-
brew University; Frieda S. Lewis, national
president of Hadassah and Bernice S. Tan-
nenbaum, Hadassah Medical Organization
chairman and chairman of the 70th anniver-
sary (center); and Harry Hurwitz, Israel
Prime Minister Begins Director of Informa-
tion in the United States, at Congregation
Emanu-El, New York, where over a thousand
guests celebrated Hadassah's Purim birth-
day party.
Headlines
HIAS Reelects Shapiro President
Edwin Shapiro has been reelected president of
HIAS the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society.
Shapiro joined the board of the Jewish
migration agency in 1971. He is a board member
of the Joint Distribution Committee. UJA-Feder-
ation of Greater New York, United Israel Appeal,
American ORT Federation. Council of Jewish
Federations. New York Association for new
Americans and CARE.
He is also a member of the American
Immigration and Citizenship Committee and the
Citizens' Committee for Immigration Reform.
The Iraqi atomic reactor was destroyed by Is-
raeli agents and not by Israeli aircraft bombard-
ment, according to a report in the London Sunday
Times, which quoted Italian technicians who were
working near the reactor-site at the time it was
blown up.
The report states that a small cadre of Israeli
agents infiltrated as technicians into the reactor
area itself and placed a large amount of explosives
which annihilated the facility. The agents, ac-
cording to the reported sources, were in radio con-
tact with the Israeli Air Force whose bombing
runs served merely as camouflage at the time the
explosives went off.
The Federal District Court for the District of
Columbia heard oral arguments on Mar. 19 in a
suit brought by the American Jewish Congress to
force the Treasury Department to disclose records
showing the dollar holdings of Saudi Arabia,
Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates in the
United States.
The Jewish group, acting under the Freedom of
Information Act, submitted a request to the
Treasury Department last year to obtain the
documents. It asked for release of data listing the
amounts of funds on deposit in U.S. banks and
the amounts of Treasury bills owned or held by
each of the three Arab oil-producing states.
AJCongress charged that the growing size of
Arab investment in the United States is of "par-
ticular concern" because of the "concomitant
increase in the influence by these three countries
over American foreign policy in the Middle East."
It added that information obtained on the size
and scope of such investments may form the basis
for recommending further legislation.
David H. Peirez of Great Neck, N.Y., will serve
as Chairman of the Planning Committee for the
76th annual meeting of the American Jewish
Committee May 12 to 16 at the Grand Hyatt Ho-
tel in New York, according to Maynard I. Wish-
ner. AJC national president.
Peirez, an attorney, Garden City, N.Y., is a
member of AJC's Board of Governors, Board of
Trustees, and National Executive Council. He
serves as a vice president of the Committee's
Long Island Chapter.
AJC leaders from all parts of the United States
will participate in the program planning process
for the organization's annual meeting, which will
be attended by more than 500 delegates to con-
sider such pressing issues as AJC's concern for
social justice and the New Federalism, anti-
Semitism and other threats to Jewish security,
Israel and the Middle East.
The values embodied in both the domestic and
foreign policies of the United States under the
Reagan Administration are consistent with tradi-
tional Jewish values, two leading representatives
of the Administration told an audience of 300
government, business and Jewish community
leaders at the seventh annual Conference on
Social Concerns sponsored by Agudath Israel of
America on Mar. 15.
Dr. Edwin I.. Harper, newly-appointed assis-
tant to the President for Policy Development, and
Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick. U.S. representa-
tive to the United Nations, i ddressed the theme
of "New Directions in America's Foreign and
Domestic Politics: Are They Working? "
The President of the Council of Europe, Leo
Tindemans, has told the World Jewish Congress
that his forthcoming round of visits to countries
of the Middle East is intended to reassess possi-
bilities of EEC involvement toward promoting a
peaceful settlement in light of recent changes. He
specifically cited changes since the Venice Decla-
ration of June. 1980 resulting from such events as
the elections in the U.S., Israel and France, the
death of Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, and
President Mitterrand's recent visit to Israel.
Tindemans, who is Foreign Minister of Bel-
gium and has been president of the EEC since the
beginning of the year, met privately last Friday
with leadership of the WJC European Branch in
Brussels. The subject of the discussions focused
on developments in the Middle East.
A call for the United States to reassess its
policy toward the United Nations within the
framework of American foreign policy goals was
made in New York last week by a group of inter-
national affairs experts who presented a report to
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, U.S. Ambassador to the
UN.
While stressing that "our interdependent world
needs the UN" and the principles enunciated in
its Charter, and that it continues to be in the
American interest to use the UN as a significant
foreign policy forum, the expert group urged that
the U.S. be prepared to "act alone" or with others
outside the UN, in light of deterioration in the
capacity of the world organization to deal impar-
tially and effectively with questions of world con-
cern.
"The U N system, with some good works in
the cause of peace, economic and social better-
ment and human rights, also reflects and occa-
sionally aggravates the dangerous internation-
al environment in which the U.S. finds itself,"
declared the report issued by the Ad Hoc Group
on United States Policy Toward the UN.
Chairman of the Ad Hoc Group is Morris B.
Abram, former U.S. representative to the UN
Commission on Human Rights.

Eleven scientists and two painters, represen-
ting five nations, received their 1981 Wolf Prizes
from Israel President Yitzhak Navon on Mar. 21
in ceremonies at the Knesset Building in Jerusa-
lem.
the Worlf Prizes represent $100,000 in chas
and a citation in each of five scientific disciplines
and in the category of art.'
Democratic Nations Urged To
Form Own Parallel 'UN'Body
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir proposed here that
the democratic nations of
the world establish a new
organization of their own,
parallel to the United Na-
tions which, he charged, no
longer serves the purpose of
world peace.
Shamir, invited to address an
Israel Honds dinner here, spoke
at a press conference for corres-
pondents assigned to the UN in
Geneva. He noted that the Arab
states had their organization, as
did the Eastern bloc countries,
and claimed it was time the
democratic nations had one. too.
ACCORDING TO Shamir, the
UN. founded to maintain peace in
the world, has erased that task
from its agenda thanks to the
automatic majority which, he
claimed, has made the world or-
ganization an instrument against
the democratic world in general
and Israel in particular.
Shamir denounced the General
Assembly resolution of Feb. ">.
which demanded punitive sanc-
tions agaiqsl Israel and branded
it j non-peace-loving state, as
untrue, onesided and scan-
dalous He said. "It is a scandal
to call Israel a nation that does
not love peace when we are i
to give back the Sinai in a
1 he resolution, adopted by a v
of 86-21, was backed'ok
entirely by the Arab. SoiveU
and Third World nations.
Shamir said that analvzin.,
situation at the UN it is'appL,
that the democratic countries,
a minority. constituting onlv
of the 155 member "L
Therefore, Israel believes ik,
time has come for the democrat
nations to organize themselves!
protect liberty and democracy i
the world, he said.
HE PROPOSED that the,
organization be based on i
same foundations as the Par)
ment of Europe. He also sir
Israel's determination to
tinue the peace process fa.
Middle East. Hut Shamir said 1
country was worried by the ne*
supply of weapons to the region
where there are already too mu
arms provided by the Sovm
Union and the U.S.
Referring to recent prop |
that the U.S. sell. Jordan a mobile
air defense system and r'-ltijaj
lighters. Shamir said, Jordan
tloes not need sophisticated
ground-to-air missile and
winced F16 fighters The leaders I
lot Jordan) haw repeatedly
claimed they could not Hghl I- I
rael as they had no air lot
why should the I S -upplythemf
now with these weapons?'
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Friday, March 26, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian
Facility to Open in Miami Monday
Continued from Page 1-A
^concern for the Holy Land.
I nNON. who comes to Miami
1 vttanta Ga.. where he
Ced "onsu. Genera, of the
K consulate there, has high
K for the new office m
Ehrida which he encouraged the
Jateof Israel to open.
We anticipate that the Miami
,,, wiU become one of the
C?Tn the southeast of the
fSd States, and it is expected
Kfc, states will ultimately
B under its junsdirtion ac-
Eding to Arnon. After all
Kami is now the third largest
Braising Jewish community
|n the nation
*rnon had high praise for his
eovernments vision in the es-
IfabH-hment of the new fac.hty.
I-Thi- b a" extremely important
Ld courageous event, he said.
|\V,th so many problems that
beset mv Government, it still
lound the time to make such a
[forward-moving step.
I Arnon expects that his office
Kill work in close cooperation
Ivith all Jewish organizations and
Ivith pro-Israel civic and religious
Igroups generally. Jewish and
E. Germany
Criticized
BONN-IJTAI The govern-
ment of East Germany was
sharply attacked over the week-
end by Israel's Ambassador to
West Germany, Yitzhak Ben Ari,
(or the reception it accorded last
week to Palestine Liberation
Organization. Chief Yasir Arafat
by East Germany's leader Erich
Honecker and Prime Minister
WilliStoph.
Arafat was received with the
pomp and circumstances befit-
ting a head of state. Ben Ari also
denounced the East German
government for its policy of co-
operating with the PLO.
^
-A

A m bassador A rcns
non-Jewish. "We expect to have
contact with broad strata of
Florida society and to mobilize
understanding, friendship and
support of Israel among them."
ARNON DOES not envision
the new facility as 'just another
consulate." Ultimately, he hopes
to establish a library of books,
periodicals and even art which
people can visit and where people
can read about Israel and see for
themselves its historic sites and
new developments.
The new consulate is equipped
with the latest and most up-to-
date design in furniture
manufactured in Israel. In ad-
dition, its facilities include
highly-sophisticated made-in-
Israel telephone and other com-
munications equipment. The
opening, which will also feature
the appearance of Florida Secre-
tary Of State George Firestone
comes at an auspicious time for
Israel.
Noted Arnon: "It coincides
with the coming 34th anniversary
celebration of the State of Israel.
It also comes on the eve of the
Apr. 2fi withdrawal from the
Sinai Peninsula, a difficult time
for us indeed."
ARNON IS a long time Israeli
diplomat. Born in Germany, his
parents perished in the Holo-
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A member of the Hagana. he was
sent at the end of World War II
to Greece to bring back survivors
of the Holocaust.
Arnon studied at the Univer-
sity of Michigan and has been a
member of the Israel Civil Serv-
ice since the establishment of the
State. For a period of time, he
served in various capacities with
the Ministry of Transportation,
the Treasury and as of 1966 the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
For four years after that, he
was with the Israeli Mission at
the United Nations. He acted as
deputy director general for ad-
ministration of the Foreign Serv-
ice and served as a minister in the
Israel Embassy in Bonn, West
Germany.
VICE CONSUL Ben-Hur. the
new consulates' second-in-com-
mand, was born in Israel in 1951.
From 1970 to 1974. he served in
the Israel Navy. He earned a
Bachelor's degree in .political
science and Middle East studies
at Tel Aviv University in 1976.
jkkeit easy. Take a Costa.
Thereafter. he joined the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Je-
rusalem in the Departments of
Press, Information. West Europe
I and North America.
In 1979. Ben-Hur was assigned
to the consulate of Israel in At-
lanta. HLs appointment to the
Miami consulate was announced
last January.
A later festive ceremonial
occasion, to be announced, will
celebrate the new Miami consul-
ate. It is anticipated that Gov.
Bob Graham will attend the
event.
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The Jewish Floridian Friday, March 26, 1982



.

UN Useless Mediator
Arabs Feel They Can Get
Object to Denigrate Israel-Kirkpatrick a& Arm8> 0ppo8e hr*
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jeane Kirkpatrick, the U.S.
Ambassador to the United
Nations, declared here that
the UN "has effectively
been eliminated as a useful
mediator in the Middle
East conflict" because its
"objective is to isolate and
denigrate Israel."
Addressing 300 government,
business and Jewish community
leaders at the seventh annual
Conference on Social Concerns
sponsored by the Agudath Israel
of America, Kirkpatrick said she
saw no UN role in Middle East
peace negotiations. "The time a
Ralph Bunche could work on be-
half of the United Nations for
peace between Israel and the
Arabs has long passed," she said.
ACCORDING TO the Ameri-
can envoy, the atmosphere in the
General Assembly indicates that
"The objective is to isolate and
denigrate Israel and ultimately to
undermine its political
legitimacy." She claimed that "a
secondary objective is to isolate
and undermine the United
States" and "a related objective
is to frighten away from associa-
tion with Israel any country
which might be disposed to be-
friend her."
Kirkpatrick drew an analogy
between the lynching in 1915, in
Georgia, of a Jew, Leo Frank, for
a murder he did not commit and
Buildings
Dismantled
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Laborers employed by the Jewish
Agency, mostly Arabs, continue
to dismantle buildings and
equipment in farm settlements in
the Yamit region of northern
Sinai without incident. Soldiers
sent to protect the workers from
possible assaults by militants op-
posed to Israel's withdrawal from
Sinai have little to do as green-
houses and farm implements at
Ugda village are disassembled for
relocation in Israel.
The Jewish Agency is concen-
trating its dismantling efforts on
Jewish settlements closest to the
Israeli border. They want every-
thing removed from that region
by Apr. 25, the Sinai pullout
deadline, so as not to facilitate
the settlement of Egyptian
civilians near the border.
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the "resurgence of anti-Semitism
in the world" today. She com-
pared the neutral nations to
Alonzo Mann, the 83-year-old
eyewitness who knew another
man had committed the crime for
which Frank was murdered, but
kept silent.
Kirkpatrick declared: "Like
Alonzo Mann, they are intimi-
dated. Perhaps they need oil, or
petrodollars, political and
economic support or are afraid
they'll be targeted by this and
that terrorist group."
THE ENVOY told the Agudat
Israel group: "We share com-
mon understandings and com-
mon values. We also share a con-
viction that what happens in the
UN matters to these common
values and understandings."
"The United Nations cannot
survive if it does not live by its
own rule, since membership is
supposed to be decided in the Se-
curity Council where the U.S. can
cast a veto," she said. She ex-
pressed doubt that the UN could
survive a "flagrant disregard of
its charter and constitution." She
also denounced the policies of the
Soviet Union toward Jews as "a
gross and persistent abuse of
human rights."
Another speaker, Dr. Seymour
Lachman, Dean and Professor of
History of Education at City
University, New York, said the
Reagan Administration's new
approaches to domestic, foreign
and defense policy were of deep
concern to the American Jewish
community and were making
them wonder whether the new
direction "was indeed working."
RABBI Menachem Lubinsky,
director of Government and
Public Affairs of the Agudath
Israel, urged the Administration
"to plan the national agenda as
part of a full partnership between
government and communities."
At a special awards ceremony,
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, president of
the Agudath Israel of America,
presented the organization's 1982
"New Horizons" award to
Anthony Gliedman, Commis-
sioner of the New York City De-
partment of Housing Preserva-
tion and Development.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Ambassador Moshe Arens
declared here that there is con-
cern in Israel about the growing
perception among the Arab
states that they can continue to
receive United States arms and
other aid while continuing a
"policy of belligerency to Israel."
Arens told the more than 1,500
persons from across the country
attending the third annual
United Jewish Appeal Young
Leadership Conference that it is
his job as Ambassador to reverse
this perception. He said the U.S.
Mideast policy has always been
based on a strong Israel and a
U.S.-Israeli "partnership."
In response to Arens, Steven
Greenberg of metropolitan New
Jersey, co-chairman of the
conference sponsored by the UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet and
Young Women's Cabinet, said
the participants would go back
knowing the necessity to con-
vince the American public that
support of Israel is not only good
for Israel and Jews, but also for
Americans.
Arens spoke at an Israel k
dinner at which Sens. EH
wood (R., Ore.) were honnmfc
leadmg:the fight SSP
the sale of AW ACS and ,
arms to Saudi Arabia Arl
the two Senators were T^
for their "unrelenting *?
ment and support for Israel"
Cranston and Packwood m
given statuettes of the late |S"
Premier Golda Meir with U?i
scnption declaring that thev wd
dedicated to the humanitaj
deals of Golda Meir and 3
Unued support of the peop^
,J.h^y,unK J^ish leaders,
tended the banquet after an
temoon in which they visit
Capitol Hill and met T
Senators and Representativ
Jne banquet, which indue
dancing to Israeli music wast
entertainment highlight of
three-day conference.
The conference has
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[uadron
No One in White House Cares
Friday, March 26, 1982
Of
of "foreign policy experience" in
the White House. According to
Squadron, the only top level Ad-
ministration people who do un-
derstand these matters are Secre-
Tpwish Organizations, tary of State Alexander Haig and
ieves there is no one in Jeane Kirkpatrick. the U.S. An
NEWYORK-(JTA) -
oward Squadron, chair
of the Conference
sidents of Major Ameri-
White House who
freally understands Is-
el." appreciates its fears
nd recognizes why it is
Uared to engage in pre-
optive military strikes.
While "there is great sym-
hv for Israel" in the Reagan
fdmnistration. "there is no
opprehension that Israel is in
nv real danger, and no willing-
i to accept Israel's own evalu-
lion of its danger." Squadron
I in an interview last Sunday
CS,t on a radio-magazine pro-
Um hosted by Rabbi Mark
r.ohibonWMCAhere.
| HE ATTRIBUTED the ab-
ce of understanding to a lack
Exchange
Program
Opposed
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
, MONTREAL (JTA) -
[More than 300 faculty members,
(administrators and students at
[Concordia University here de-
Imanded that Rector John
lo'Brian make it absolutely clear
|that the university is unequivoc-
/ opposed to any exchange
[agreement with Saudi Arabia
thich discriminates against
I Jewish members of the university
I community
"Everything we have been
I hearing until now is very vague.
I We want a clear statement
saying the university will have
nothing to do with this type of
discrimination." said Frederick
Krantz. principal of the liberal
arts college, commenting on a
1 proposed student and faculty ex-
change agreement with King Fai-
sal University in Riyadh.
THE AGREEMENT has
stirred a controversy between
faculty and the administrative
heads of Concordia University
because of Saudi Arabia's well
known policy of denying entry
sas to Jews.
^BobMarlin
517 8enously0f his time
^nergyto keep alive
ie,7ld t^se umeless
s;&scthc
S2?1" Miami
;fgencyFUnd4 >
gO BiscayneBlvd. M
Mumi. Florida 33137
bassador to the United Nations.
Squadron said there was an in-
creasing possibility that Israel
would launch a preemptive strike
into south Lebanon as the date
for its withdrawal from Sinai ap-
proaches because of the arms
buildup in Syria, possibly in
Jordan, and in southern Leba-
non.
"That could happen, not be-
cause the Syrians attack, but be-
cause the Israelis decide that the
buildup of forces is so frighten-
ing, and that the United States
and the French and the British
and the Germans and whoever
else, by providing weapons to the
immediate Arab world surround-
ing Israel, are presenting such a
threat to Israel that Israel has to
do something," Squadron said.
HE SAID that if the Israelis
perceive that the U.S. cannot
defuse the situation, as with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in south Lebanon, then the
U.S. will "have to expect the Is-
raelis to do something about it
and they have to hack them up,
not get worried about it."
On the other hand, "if the U.S.
was not accelarating the concerns
of the Israelis by supplying arms
and by threatening to supply
more arms, it would be possible
for the U.S. to say to Israel,
'Don't take this action. We are
going to see to it that nothing
comes of this'."
Squadron contended that there
are "many people" in the Penta-
gon who are "prepared to
disregard Israeli sensitivities .
who consider Israel not so much a
strategic asset, except in time of
war. but a strategic liability that
is a burden."
He accused Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger of nonveying
"that Pentagon view to the
White House, because he's got a
close longtime personal relation-
ship with the White House peo-
ple." According to Squadron,
"What you have is foreign policy
being formulated both at the
Pentagon and at the State De-
partment with each of the formu-
lations having an equal opportu-
nity to become foreign policy."
Squadron also expressed the
view that while President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt will seek to
reestablish relations with the rest
of the Arab world, "he says he
will not do so under any circum-
stances at the expense of Camp
David of peace with Israel," and
"I do believe him."
Israeli Soldiers Break
Down Barricades in Sinai;
Remove Militants
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
soldiers broke down barricaded
doors and forcibly removed kick-
ing, screaming militants from
buildings they had occupied in
Ha tzar Adar village in the Yamit
area of northern Sinai. The
operation, to evacuate illegal
squatters of the movement to
block Israel's withdrawal from
Sinai which must be returned to
Egypt on Apr. 25. began last
week and was suspended for
several days. Many if not most of
the militants removed earlier,
managed to evade roadblocks
and return.
About 50 young men and
women, accompanied by MK
Geula Cohen of the ultra-
nationalist Tehiya faction, began
repairing houses in Hatzar Adar
and planting trees. Soldiers en-
tered the village urging the
squatters to leave peacefully. But
the plea by a senior officer was
rejected.
Two soldiers were slightly in-
jured as they carried struggling
protestors, one by one, out of the
buildings and into waiting buses.
The troops were unarmed.
Women soldiers had the task of
carrying our women protestors.
The militants, mostly Orthodox
Jews, shouted at the soldiers to
disobey their orders because set-
tlement was a "holy task."
In another development, Lt.
Gen. Frederik Hull-Hansen of
Norw.ny who will command the
2,fi00-man international peace-
keeping force in Sinai after Is-
rael's withdrawal, arrived in Tel
Aviv. He joined an advance
guard of 300 members of the unit,
known officially as the multi-
national Force and Observers
(MFO), that arrived here earlier
to oversee the Israeli withdrawal
and the demilitarization provi-
sions of the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty.
Hull Hansen stressed to re-
porters that the MFO was not a
fighting force, thoh his men had
the right to use force to defend
themselves. He noted that a bat-
talion of American soldiers from
the 82nd Airborne Division, part
of the U.S. Rapid Deployment
Force, would not be diverted
from its duties in Sinai to rejoin
that force. The entire MFO was
due to be in place by Mar. 20.
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IT'S THE 34th ANNIVERSARY
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I
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?wshMondian Tnday."March 26, 1982





At Unations
500 Rally in Uprooted Settlers' Cause
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Some 500 people rallied
here across from the United
Nations at the Isaiah Wall
to express solidarity with
the settlers in northern
Sinai who are opposed to
the Israeli withdrawal from
the peninsula, scheduled to
be returned to Egypt Apr.
2b as part of the Camp
David peace agreement.
At the same time, rabbinical
lenders and Jewish community
representatives, who addressed
the gathering, sponsored by 16
organizations. including the
Americans for a Safe Israel,
draped a 12-foot long placard at
the steps of the Isaiah Wall
which they said would more
closely correspond with the anti-
Israel actions of the UN. The
sign, a passage from the Book of
Isaiah 154:17). said: "No weapon
that is formed against thee (Is-
rael) shall prosper, and every
tongue that shall rise against
thee in judgement shall be con-
demned"
THE PRESENT inscription on
the wall, which quotes from
Isaiah 2:4, declares: "They shall
heat their swords into plow-
shares, and their spears into
Gotham Criticized for Failing To
Erect Holocaust Memorial
NEW YORK (JTA) City
officials were reminded that
"New York City today numbers
among its citizens more survivors
of the Holocaust than any other
city in the world" but still lacks a
proper memorial to the victims 40
years after those events.
The need for a New York City
Holocaust Memorial Center that
would also serve archival and re-
search functions, was stressed by
Richard Berman, the New York
State Housing Commissioner,
and others who appeared at a
hearing of the Mayor's Holocaust
Memorial Task Force here. Ber-
man appeared in his capacity as
chairman of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations Council's New
York Holocaust Commission.
The Holocaust Memorial Task
Force was established by Mayor
Edward Koch last July to deter-
mine what kind of memorial
should be created, where it
should be located and what it
would cost. The Task Force will
create a special committee to see
the project through.
Herbert Rickman, a special as-
sistant to the Mayor, stressed
that the memorial would not be
paid for out of city funds. "The
funding will come from the Jew-
ish community, the community
as a whole," he said,
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pruning tools; nation shall not
lift up sword against-nation.
Neither shall they learn war no
more."
The present inscription on the
Isaiah Wall became the focus of
criticism following the Feb. 5 UN
resolution condemning Israel's
annexation of the Golan Heights
and calling for the total isolation
of Israel.
The speakers at the rally fo-
cused on several themes which
included charges that the Reagan
Administration has reneged on
its commitments to Israel by its
continued efforts to sell weapons
to moderate Arab countries;
Egypt has committed "multiple
violations" of its peace treaty
with Israel: Premier Menachem
Begin signed the Israeli-
Rgyptian peace accord under the
"duress" of the military buildup
by its other Arab neighbors.
Some of the rally participants
carried placards reading: "First
Yamit, next Jerusalem": "Yamit
is Israel"; and "Next year,
Yamit."
Rabbi Avraham Weiss, of the
Hebrew Institute of Riverdale,
N.Y., said that Begin operates by
"assuming certain strengths'* in
the American Jewish community
will support him. He said that if
Begin decides not to withdraw
from Sinai, the American Jewish
community will support his
actions.
WEISS ANNOUNCED that
on Apr. 25, the day Israel is
scheduled to withdraw from
Sinai, an organization called the
"Movement to Stop American
Abandonment of Israel" will
march on Washington.
Included among the groups,
supporting the rally at the Isaiah
Wall were the Rabbinical Alli-
ance of America, Poale Agudath
Yisrael (Religious Labor Party).
Hebrew Institute of Riverdale.
Herut of Washington, and the
Council of Orthodox Synagogues
of the Greater Washington area.
Arabs Attack French Minister
Attali for Critical Remarks
tive post is incompatib|ettil '
militant activities on |I3!
half.-AtUli.aS.isvVe?^
of the Foods Social jM
and ,s or, the boards of van
pro-Israel organizations ,
A FORMAL comply, hJ
so been lodged by SauS y
after he told a radio M
test month that Saudi Ara^.
the country where thevX,
the hands of thieves "Thj'Sfi
requested a formal apoio ^3
terrand officially expressed J
regret over the statement i
hus averted a diplomatic ^
but the Saudis are mainta'J
their campaign against
andhKsroleinih.tormulatiolj
wnchpoli^intheMiddJeS
MOLLIE GOODMAN
ACADEMIC HIGH SCHOOL
IN ISRAEL
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Arab Ambassadors in Paris
and representatives of the
Arab League have launched
an attack against one of
President Francois Mitter-
rand's Jewish advisers,
Jacques Attali, accusing
him of lacking objectivity
because of his "pro-Zionist
activities."
The attack was formally
launched last week by Arab Lea-
gue representative Mohammed
Yazid who told a press conference
hen' that Attali's "highly sensi-
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Unemployment Rate Seen Steady
J
&M&
TgJsTiu
IBB**
, Ppa, Prize winner Prof. Andrei Sakharovs stepson,
KjJJ "nnr with his wife, Lisa Alexeyeva,
K Xm f/i* t/SSR /b/toirmg her parentsin-Lxw s dramatic
lJSe visit the opening night of the exhibit. Religious
"ng, Tnviet Unofficial Art, at the Case Museum of Russian
UfS'" rail Art in Exile, in Jersey City, N.J. The exhibition
mtZPntedl< cooperation with the Cremona Foundation and
tfSSZnt Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
Effort Revealed to Streamline
Zionist Activities in U.S.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
According to the latest
figures released by the
Ministry of Social Better-
ment, there is no danger of
an increase in the un-
employment rate in the
foreseeable future.
The number of job 9eekers last
December reached 34,328. with
20.032 job offers. About 33.500
persons were looking for work
last month, with 18.800 openings.
Some 14.296 were registered in
December as unemployed for a
period of six days or more.
A similar number of unem-
ployed in the same status is ex-
pected to be recorded for Jan-
uary. At certain times last year,
the unemployment rate was more
than 15.000."
ACCORDING to the Employ-
ment Service, the employment
agencies are still unable to fill job
openings for lack of suitable
workers.
Last December, some 5.523 job
offers remained unfilled. Last
month the number of unfilled job
offers was 3.876. Some of these
offers were referred to the em-
ployment agencies in the admin-
istered territories. Arab workers
from the territories were in great-
est demand during December for
seasonal work such as citrus
picking.
This caused an increase in the
number of Arabs from the terri-
tories working in Israel. There
are presently some 50.000 Arab
workers from the territories em-
ployed in Israel through the em-
ployment service. Another
25.000-30.000 are believed to be
employed in Israel outside of the
official channels.
Despite the general positive
employment scene, in some areas.
B, YITZHAK RABI
NKWYOKK iJ IV. In an
l-ttori io improve and streamline
ionist activities in the United
Zionist Or-
Lmzalion hxeculive, which met
fclwodays in \rad. Israel, la*
^ ;8 setkin) a ^imctural
Cage in the ork ol \inerican
jonist organizations
jliln Joseph M.riisti'iii.
siaVnt ol the American Zionist
ration, who has iusi re-
Umt'dlrom the meeting in Arad.
Mold u pre-- conference that the
Luutiural change ill im olve the
location ol a unit led and coordi-
liwwlMruciuri- |hi|i. in place ol the current two-
pronged set-up which comprises
line X/.Y and the American Sec-
lliun ol the WZO." He stressed.
pm, in response to a-ques-
litMi. (hat no merger of the two
I bodies is intended.
Another objective of the struc-
llural revision, Sternstein said,
l"i to vast mater control and
liuthority in the American Zionist
I leadership.
Sternstein. claiming that "tens
lol millions of dollars" are being
Ispent each year for Zionist activi-
|Us in America mainly for
Mutation, aliya and public infor-
I nation said that for a long
Itime now there has been a gap
Ttwssa the elforts invested and
I results achieved.
Therefore, in an effort to
[remedy the situation, "the large
Inetworks ol existing Zionist
jwgamzaiions in the United
|ates should be harmonized and
Itwrdmated with a systematical-
ly programmed effort of World
uonist departmental activity,
pen of which is embodied in a
Iwbstaniial rorps of sMichim
|nissaries|,' Sternstein said.
J'^^lnat'tisimpopUntto
|W*Ke and in many cases insti-
E tlT\ne Zion,st Presence in
IaL Jew,sh communities in
l wnca. 'Serious discussions
I -.__


concerning the prevent state ol
Vmericun Jewry was the back-
ground against which these deci-
sions were made." Sternstein de-
clared, adding: "The need for
greater control bj our American
Zionist leadership was under-
scored by the changing ol Ameri-
can Jewish circumstances."
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Ska bbt.5
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WZPS Jerusalem
U.S. Has W. Bank Plan;
Officials 'Embarrassed'
Continued from Page 1-A
an independent Palestinian
State, which is why veteran
observers in Washington have
expressed surprise at the decision
to circulate the proposals, ad-
vocated by a group of State De-
partment career diplomats.
Knowledgeable insiders say
that there is widespread sym-
pathy among the department's
Middle East specialists for the
position outlined in "Open
Forum."
The publication was
established in 1967 to put "new
or alternative foreign policy
views to the Secretary of State
and other senior officials.
An editiorial note in the
current issue acknowledges that
the proposal for a Palestinian
State on the West Bank with
Jerusalem becoming the joint
capital of Israel and Palestine
"goes beyond current U.S.
policy."
THE NOTE continues: "But
that is the purpose of the 'Open
Forum' to provide a context in
which new or alternative policy
options can be freely and
creatively expressed."
The authors of the plan said
that Israel's security concerns
could be met "by a wide spec-
trum of practical arrangements
which would not violate
Hap Levy
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Palestinian sovereignty so long
as the essential attributes of a
State (territory, a flag, a govern-
ment, exchanging ambassadors,
etc.) were left intact."
Among these arrangements
would be an Israeli right to
station security forces on the
West Bank, "in return for the
intangible but precious con-
cession of 'sovereignty,' which
the Palestinians value above all
else."
With regard to Jerusalem, the
proposals say that the city "can-
not be redivided," suggesting
that "an undivided Jerusalem
should serve as a dual capital for
both Israel and the new
Palestinian State."
THE UNITED States should
"inform the parties of its desire
to recognize a common capital
and make clear that the transfer
of our Embassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem would be contingent
upon a treaty of peace negotiated
between the Israelis and the Pal-
estinians."
The proposals contain a de-
tailed formula for joint Israeli-
Palestinian administration of Je-
rusalem.
"It may be advisable to have a
city manager selected from the
International Association of the
City Managers," the proposals
state, adding: "Such a person,
especially if neither Israeli nor
Palestinian, could be more ef-
fective" than an elected mayor.
Syria Tried to Bar U.S. Jews from Contract Work
Continued from Page 1-A
tion by your government of the
pitiful handful of Syrian Jews
still barred from leaving your
country."
Siegman said he was "deeply
gratified" that the discrimina-
tory request has been "properly
rejected" by the Sybron Corpora-
tion, a manufacturer of medical
supplies and equipment. Similar
anti-Jewish discrimination de-
manded by the Syrian govern-
ment as a condition of proposed
contracts was rejected by the
Buck Engineering Co. of Far-
mingdale, N.J. and the Central
Scientific Co. of Chicago.
THE DEMAND by the Syrian
Ministry of Defense to Sybron,
dated March 5. 1981, was dis-
covered by the American Jewish
Congress during the course of its
program of monitoring reports to
the Department of Commerce of
boycott-related requests received
by American companies. Re-
quests to participate in a boycott
must be reported to the Com-
merce Department under the Ex-
port Administration Act. Access
to the report is made possible by
the Freedom of Information Act.
The proposed contract received
by Sybron includes the following
paragraph: Contract shall be
deemed canceled, regardless of
the state of affairs before the ap-
proval of the contract or after ad-
vising the contractor of the ap-
proval of the contract, if the ad-
ministration finds out that the
contractor, for the execution of
his contract, depends materially
on suspected persons, particular-
ly Jews. He shall be penally
prosecuted before the court mar-
tial, and legally for all expenses
and indemnities (financial penal-
ties) without his having tk, J
to any objection." mW
Concluding his letter t
Syrian Ambassador to th* iiJ
Siegman wrote: "I need LJ
point out that American bids discrimination by emn"
because of race or relieion .
that it would be illegal to"'1
with your infamous parag
"Is it too much to hope L
your government might mind
American experience of tok
and nondiscrimination an i
pie worth emulating?"
Mathematicians Urged to Snub
Poland Unless Martial Law Lifted!
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Center for Russian and East Eu-
ropean Jewry and the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry have
called upon the chairmen of the
International Mathematical
Union, located in Paris, and the
American Association for Com-
puter Machinery, based in New
York, not to hold their 1982 in-
ternational gatherings in Poland
unless martial law is lifted u
arrested are freed, and the i
Semitic campaign is halted.
The IMU and A ACM ii
planned gatherings in Poland
pecially the Internal
Congress of Mathematician,)
Warsaw and an intematio,
symposium on computer scieu
in Gdansk, formerly Danzig J
sign of support for Solidarity
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A Dubliner's Jewish Obsession
om.
Coatinned htm. Page 4-A
fUdened," both young and full
Ijoy- ,
ctll Jung comes first, and for
Sn that the Jungian racu.1
tS* 5?"the THLJ2
Uic experience, or history
E*d through the perceptions,
Tdous and unconscious of the
"3 generations. It is this
Sopment in the modern novel
hirh is Jovce's dominant con-
Jbution 'to contemporary
ture. a fact perceived as
1v as in 1923 by the poet. T.S.
,;[, in his essay. Ulysses.
derand Myth."
THE professors and
Jwlets. Ellman included, have
Kin focus upon is Joyce sob-
Un with Jews. The most
example of this is Leopold
himself, the hero of
ises"; it is no1 Stephen
(dalus who is the hero, the in-
flation of James Joyce, who is
reduced to us in "Portrait of
Artist as a Young Man, and
ho in "Ulysses" has briefly re-
irned to Dublin from Paris to be
his mother's deathbed.
IJoyce perceives Bloom as the
tonal, wandering Jew. the
Uim not just of what he calls a
driest-ridden" Ireland, but of all
Christendom, which Joyce
self rejected in the same way
Kafka rejected his Judaism,
i young man.
|0n one level. Bloom wanders
Lough Dublin on Juno 16, 1904
Jthe same way that the Ulysses
Homer wandered in the
tWyssey" from Troy back to
Lea Rut it is an improbable
^rallel. as all the Homeric paral-
in the novel are improbable.
*n ahsurd
IBL'T IN FACT Bloom is not
lung and handsome the way
- H. is not envied by
His wife. Molly, is not
nelope. though she is cast in
role, if for no other reason
tan that she is constantly un-
bthful to him Ka a Jew. Bloom
(not admired, but rather reviled
f his fellnw-Dubliners.
[He escapes a fateful encounter
|th diners in a restaurant when,
onding to an anti-Semitic
k. he proudly reminds
of all the important Jews
oughout history, including
Pus as Christos. the Messiah,
Christian god. Only by the
graces of Elijah the
bet. who rescues him in the
of time on a chariot
ended from heaven, and
: them both back to whence
came "like a shot off a
shovel," does he escape the wrath
of the mob.
Bloom wanders through his
Bloomusalem, an obvious pun on
Jerusalem, isolated and held in
contempt despite the fact that it
is he who is far more humane,
more sensitive, more intelligent
than any of his enemies. Joyce as
Stephen Dedalus, responding to
one vicious anti-Semite, the
schoolmaster, Mr. Deasy, thinks
of the Jews of history when Mr.
Deasy says of them that the Jews
"sinned against the light" and
that England is in the hands of
the jews (sic). In all the highest
places: her finance, her press.
And they are the signs of a
nation's decay ..."
SAYS DEDALUS in defense:
"On the steps of the Paris Stock
Exchange the gold-skinned men
quoting prices on their gemmed
fingers. Gabbles of geese. They
swarmed loud, uncouth about the
temple, their heads thickplotting
under maladroit silk hats. Not
-theirs: these clothes, this speech,
these gestures. Their full slow
eyes belied the words, the ges-
tures eager and unoffending, but
knew the rancours massed about
them and knew their zeal was
vain. Vain patience to heap and
hoard. Time surely would scatter
all. A hoard heaped by the road-
side: plundered and passing on.
Their eyes knew the years of
wandering and. patient, knew the
dishonors of their flesh."
The Jew, in Joyce's eyes, is a
victim of Christian bigotry
precisely as Bloom is a victim of
the "priest-ridden" Dubliners
Wandering through the city, he
observes the earliest Jewish Na-
tional Fund-type placards in
shopwindows appealing for dona-
tions to buy land in Palestine for
the establishment of "Gan
Netaim."
Essentially an assimilated
Jew. he understands little of the
Zionist dream, but it helps him in
the agony of his isolation.
Limned in these terms, he
becomes a symbol for all of 20th
Century secularized (assimilated)
mankind isolated from the re-
vealed word of God. overwhelmed
instead by the new word of his
scientific knowledge.
JOYCE'S OBSESSION with
Jews extends to Bella Cohen, the
brothel-keeper in "Circe." an
episode in "Ulysses." the Jewish
madame on Mecklenburg Street,
whose professional staff includes
the prostitute. Florry Talbot.
fashioned after the real Dubliner
he once knew. Fleury Crawford.
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All three evoke the Jewish pros-
titute in "Portrait of the Artist"
whom Stephen Dedalus visits for
his initiating sexual experience in
"Portrait." The implication is
clear: if one must visit a prosti-
tute, it is best to visit a Jewish
prostitute, who would be en-
dowed with all the sensitivities to
which young Stephen himself,
the emerging artist, is heir.
In the "Dubliners," a collec-
tion of short stories originally
intended by Joyce to end with a
story about the Dublin Jew, Leo-
pold Bloom, which got out of
hand and became "Ulysses,"
there is a vignette of Little Chan-
dler in the piece, "Little
Cloud." Little Chandler is a frus-
trated poet who thinks with
regret and even horror of his
marriage and infant child. He
secretly regards both as the
sources of his failure. Ruminating
upon a framed photograph of his
wife, he sees her as exotic and
reminiscent of some magnetic,
sensitive Jewess: it was these
qualities in her that seduced him
into marriage in the first place.
In a story he never intended for
publication, but which his wife,
Nora Barnacle, somehow rescued
in the same way that she rescued
Stephen Hero." the Urlext of
the "Portrait," from the fireplaCe
into which he threw it, Joyce
immortalb.es a student of his in
one of the numerous Berlitz lan-
guage schools in which he taught
in Europe in order to earn a
living. Amelia Popper was the
daughter of a Jewish business-
man whose first name was I,eo-
poldo. One need not be prodded
too persistently to recall Leopold
Bloom in memoriam to him
ELLMAN WRITES of
Amalia: "He (Joyce) envisions
her as a Jewess come out of the
dark East to hold his Eastern
blood in thrall." She is "rounded
and ripened: rounded by the
lathe of intermarriage and
ripened in the forcing-house of
the seclusion of her race." In
short. Amalia is the prototype of
Little Chandler's wife, of the
prostitutes in "Portrait" and
"Ulysses." They are isolated by
the contempt of a Christian
world, like Bloom himself, but
sensitive, sensuous and superior.
For the Jews, there is mainly in
Joyce's mind a correlation with
suicide a wonderment that a
racial Armaggedon. despite
Christianity's most virulent ef-
forts to exterminate them, never
did occur. Bloom's father. Vierag.
the Hungarian Jew. committed
suicide, which prompts him to
think obsessively throughout the
day of June 16. 1904 of his own
son. Rudi. who died at age 11
days. Bloom swims through the
simultaneous experience of his
internal consciousness noting
that'I last of my race."
In "Giacomo Joyce," intended
to remind the reader that he him-
self is Jacques Casanova, the
great lover, Joyce immortalizes
his wife by giving Amalia Popper
he name, Nora, a rather dubious
nedal to Nora Barnacle Joyce for
his own adultery.
The climax of Joyce's obses-
sion with Jews occurs in "Gia-
como Joyce" when he accompa-
nies Pimply Meissel to the
Jewish cemetery to visit the
grave of Meissel's wife who died
by suicide. Here, he is reminded
of Amalia, and he thinks: "The
tomb of her people and hers:
black stone, silence without
hope: and all is ready. Do not
die!"
IT IS AN outcry as agonized
as is Joyce's defense of the Jews
against the Christian anti-
Semitism of Mr. Deasy in the
"Nestor" episode of "Ulysses."
The professors and the critics
still have much left to say about
the Jewish obsession of James
Joyce, the greatest of the 20th
Century's novelists.
Peru Has Always Respected
Jewish Community Minority
Continued from Page 4-A
Palestinian Voice." a program
which spews out anti-Semitic
poison, splashed with songs and
words of support for the "move-
inenta of national liberation in
Latin America."
Besseiso attended the festivi-
ties in the town of lea connected
with the grape harvest. He was
welcomed by the mayor of the
city and asked to sign the "Book
of Illustrious ('.wests." The PLO
was also invited to participate in
the XVII Congress of the Fed-
eration of Peruvian Students.
which took place in June at the
University of San Marcos.
Also worth mentioning is the
in\ itation by the orthodox Com-
munist Party to the PLO repre-
sentative in Lima, who spoke to
union leaders and was introduced
by (iustavo Espinoza. secretary
of international relations of the
Communist Party.
THERE IS no doubt that the
presence of the PLO in Peru is a
decisive factor in strengthening
anti-Semitism. In addition, there
are Nazi publications which incite
racial hatred Temple (Temper)
and Trinchera HS (Trench 88), as
well as Communist newspapers
and ultra-leftist magazines which
promote terrorism and attacks
against Israel and Zionism. The
democratic parties, Action Popu-
lar, Apra and Partido Popular
Cristiano. maintain support for
Israel and the Zionist movement.
The Catholic Church also has a
fraternal relationship with the
Jewish community.
The attendance this year for
the first time in the history of the
100-year-old Jewish community
in Peru of the President of the
Republic at Rosh Hashanah ser-
vices is significant. President Be-
launde Terry's words were full of
affection and revealed that the
present democratic regime will
not permit attacks on any per-
sons on religious or racial
grounds.
The Jewish community of
Peru, though small in numbers, is
well organized and is very con
scious of its role in supporting Is-
rael and Zionism. It is on a con-
tinuous state of alert and united
against anti-Semitic attacks
whose inspiration, financing and
guidance come from outside the
country.
JTA Feature Syndicate
Correcting
The Record
In the Friday. Mar. 19 edition
of The Jewish Floridian, it was
erroneously reported that the
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center held its third
annual meeting at Florida Inter-
national University on Wednes-
day. Mar. 17, with FIU's Presi-
dentDr. Gregory B. Wolfe suc-
ceeding Sister M. Trinita Flood,
academic dean of the St. John
Vianney Seminary, as president
of the Center. The story should
have been in the future tense, re-
porting that the Center would
hold the meeting on Wednesday,
Mar. 24. The Jewish Floridian
regrets the error and the inconve-
nience it may have caused.
^V '^^* J^
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i^rtSKaian/T^nday, March 26, 1982



Com. Director Lauds Billy Graham as Friend of Jews
NEW YORK j
Rabbi Marc H. Tanen-
baum, national inter-reli-
gious affairs director of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee, has lauded Billy
Graham, the world-famed
evangelist, as "one of the
greatest friends of the Jew-
ish people and of Israel in
the entire Christian world
in the 20th Century."
Speaking at the Church Centre
at the United Nations, at which
Dr. Graham was named recipient
of the prestigious Templeton
Foundation Prize for Progress in
Religion. Rabbi Tanenbaum
hailed him as "the world's most
noted evangelist who has reached
more people in more places than
probably any other religious per-
sonality in our lifetime." He
added:
"IT IS not generally known
among either Jews or Christians
that Dr. Graham has been
present to the Jewish people in
virtually every moment of trial,
threat and testing, as well as in
celebration. The American Jew-
ish Committee can tell in moving
chapter and verse how Dr.
Graham came time and again to
the aid of the embattled people of
Israel, when his voice and influ-
ence in high places made a crucial
and. at times, a decisive dif-
ference."
Dr. Graham will receive the
$200,000 prize at a ceremony in
London's Queen Elizabeth Hall
on May 11. The Award was in-
augurated ten years ago by the
Presbyterian layman, John M.
Templeton. to highlight the
pioneering breakthroughs in reli
gion around the world.
Announcement of the award
was made by the Rt. Reverend
John Allin, Presiding Bishop of
the Episcopal Church in the
USA. Also taking part, in addi-
tion to Rabbi Tanenbaum, were
Archbishop Iakovos, Primate of
the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese
of North and South America, and
Archbishop John Gerety of the
Catholic Diocese of Newark, N. J.
RABBI Tanenbaum stated
that "on the basis of my personal
experience and friendship with
Dr. Graham since the mid-1960's,
I can testify that the growth in
mutual appreciation between
Evangelicals and Jews in many
parts of the United Stetes and
abroad, was in very large
measure due to the attitudes,
convictions and personal influ-
ence of Dr. Grahamm" He said
that his intervention led to the
freeing from Soviet labor camps
of Jews who might otherwise
have perished.
Referring to Dr. Graham's
public statements and his films
condemning anti-Semitism and
his repudiation of proselytizing of
the Jewish people through the
deceptive techniques of such
Genscher to Visit Israel Only
After Withdrawal From Sinai
BONN (JTA) Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher is expected to visit Israel in April or May, dip-
lomatic sources here said. They said his visit is no longer
opposed in principle by the government, although Chan-
cellor Helmut Schmidt has insisted it take place only after
Israel completes its withdrawal from Sinai next Apr. 26.
Schmidt himself shows no signs of accepting a seven-
year-old standing invitation to visit Israel. According tc
one of his aides, he sees no reason to change his mind. But
the Bonn government has obviously decided to maintain
high-level contacts with Israel, especially after its two
major partners in the European Economic Community
(EEC), Britain and France, have been conducting a
dialogue with Jerusalem on the foreign ministers level or
have declared their intention to do so.
1960 Pulitzer Prize-Winner
OPENS MARCH 5
Through March 28
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PRICES: $7.50-13.50
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groups as Jews for Jesus, Rabbi
Tanenbaum described them as
"expressions of his friendship
and respect for Judaism and for
the Jewish people, in addition to
his deep love and support for Is-
rael."
"While not overlooking for a
moment our authentic theological
and other differences as
Christians and Jews which we
have discussed frequently, freely
and openly," Rabbi Tanenbaum
said. "I do not believe that it is
an exaggeration for roe toiUi
-based on nearly 20 yetn*!?
association with Dr rT
that next to Pope jefffe]
and Prof. ReinhoW NelL,?
towering genious and l
Semite of American ft m
ism. Dr. Billy Graham fc
and continues to be one,
greatest friends of the I
people and of Israel in the!!"
Christian world in the SftT
tury."
Begin s Initiative
Inquiry Into Arlosoroff Case
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
At the initiative of
Premier Menachem Begin,
the Cabinet resolved to set
up an official commission of
inquiry headed by a judge
to investigate the murder,
49 years ago, of Mapai
(Labor) leader Haim
Arlosoroff who was found
dead on a Tel Aviv beach
in 1933.
The decision followed a revived
controversy over the murder,
triggered by the publication of a
book by a leading Israeli his-
torian. Shabtai Tevet. which ap-
peared to cast doubt on the ac-
quittal of two young Revision-
ists. Avraham Stavsky and Zvi
Rosenblatt, who were originally
arrested for the murder.
. IN AN extraordinary move.
Begin ordered the full transcript
of the Cabinet's two-hour discus-
sion of the matter made public.
Cabinet sources said it contained
a lengthy speech by Begin and
reminiscenses by many Herut
ministers of how they or their
families were harassed by Mapai
in the years following the murder.
The crime deepened the bitter-
ness between the then Labor
majority and the Revisionist
movement in Palestine and
among the Zionists in the
diaspora in the 1930's.
Some observers believe Begin
wants to fan the flames of the old
controversy at this time to focus
local media attention away from
the withdrawal from Sinai next
month. The Cabinet decision is
certain to touch off a wave of
press and public comments and
arguments.
UNDER THE 1958 Commis-
sions of Inquiry Law, the Presi-
dent of the Supreme Court,
justice Moshe Landau, must
choose a serving or retired senior
judge to head the commission
and two other persons, including
at least one respected layman, to
be members. The commission has
powers of subpoena with ar-
rest and imprisonment to back
them up like a regular court of
law.
Interior Minister Yosef Burg,
of the National Religious Party,
and Minister-Without-Portfolio
Yitzhak Modai. of Likud's
Liberal Party wing, dissociated
themselves from the Cabinet's
decision to revive the Arlosoroff
case. Burg warned that th,
mission would create divia?
the nation at a time
national unity
needed.
was ur
Anti-Semitic AWACS
Debate Can Return In
In Another Form
NEW YORK A noted
political analyst has as-
serted that the anti-Semitic
aspects of the recent
AWACS debate on
whether the U.S. should
sell AWACS aircraft and
other sophisticated military
equipment to Saudi Arabia
could fuel similar out-
bursts in the future if new
events revived the "harm-
ful perceptions that came to
the fore" during the debate.
However, continues Milton
Ellerin. director of Trends
Analyses for the American Jew-
ish Committee, research con-
ducted since the debate does not
indicate conclusively whether the
AWACS question has sub-
stantially damaged American
Jewry. Adds Ellerin, whose
statements are contained in a
just-published AJC report titled
The AWACS Debate: Is There
An Anti-Semitic Fallout?":
"Some three weeks after the
AWACS vote. President Reagan
indicated to Jewish leaders that
he was disturbed at the anti-
Semitic aspects the debate had
revealed, and he expressed his
desire to undo the harm. The im-
plementation of this desire is
permanent."
REVIEWING the events of
the AWACS debate, Ellerin
notes that "for the first time in
recent memory an American
Administration impugned the
loyalty of the American Jewish
community, saying that Jews
were 'casting undue influence' on
the legislative process .
"The Administration set the
tone for the debate. managingJ
convey the notion that i
American Jewishcommunityi
disloyal, that Jews who foui,
the sale were fighting again
America's best interests. Mi
non-Jewish legislators who
posed the sale on the merits i
accused of bowing to Jewsj
pressure.' of fearing thecessatioi
of Jewish financial support."
Ellerin also points to "th
that dire consequences would i
sue for Jews in America if I
sale did not go through," i
that one Washington obs
charged that 'the Administrate^
has begun to poke at anti-Seraiti
cesspools beneath the surface o
American society.""
However. Ellerin Stn
"these themes found virtuallyg
echo in the editorial pages of t
sponsible newspapers outside t
capital. The insinuation
emanated from Washington i
trickled downward: they did i
come from America's
roots."
ELLERIN SAYS that Jen|
leaders "draw some consolatio
from the debate because, besajl
they feel it "reinforced
American Jewish communitT|
determination to assert its i
to participate in public debateo
matters of vital Jewish concern |
Nevertheless, Ellerin
lieves these same leaders
"feel troubled, not quite cer
that the harm to Jewish interest!
and the insensitivity to JewisJ
concerns were indeed only I
ing phenomena."
"The AWACS Debate" wasi
sued by the Discrimination Din
sion of AJC"s Domestic HOT
Department.
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Eddie's Marriages Didn't Help His Career
raw
en
ByMARLAROYNE
\JtjFlon He's been out of the public eye
en better.
.Tm working harder than I
J have before." Fisher de-
' "I'm involved with more
ople. and I've never been hap-
fcjer" .
Part of the Miami Beach scene
,948 when played the Casa
janca. Fisher has returned to
second home" and is CUT-
ntlv reviving his lost singing
"" aTVhe Newport Hotel. He
moving his second life and
ks towards the future with
optimism.
[ His "first life, "highlighted by
L hit. "Oh My Poppa." was
icarred bv three unsuccessful
liarriages and a drug problem.
None of my marriages has
v positive effects on my
ireer." Fisher candidly admits.
Jut Debbie (Reynolds) and I
.txiuced two beautiful children
ogether Connie (Stevens) and I
0 had two wonderful children."
"Liz definitely played a nega-
tive role in my career. I was busy,
slaving nursemaid to her and
d'n't pay attention to my own
ireer." Fisher recalls without
bitterness. "You have to work at
what you're doing and keep up
ith the times. I didn't. But it
iidn't matter. I was in love for
pfirst time in my life."
| Living with the most beautiful
1 around is very tough, Fisher
ys. and adds jokingly.
specially when you have only
lie mirror in the house."
"But being married to Eddie
fisher is no easy task either," he
Bms "I like to think of myself
i a nice guy. but all performers
(neurotic, and I 'm certainly no
|xception."
His voice mellows as Fisher
isually mentions his addiction
drugs, it certainly caused
oblems in my life," he com-
mits, "but I'm fortunate to
live beat it. I was lucky."
I leans back in his seat and
ghs. "It took a lot of effort and
I to survive and reach a point
ml wanted to sing again."
With the successful battle of
Melanle Cohen
S'vesgenerously of her time
Mlenergy to keep alive
""theworld those timeless
lues that celebrate the
"awy of life itself.
}> Melame Cohen
To Life.
fter Miami
^Federation*
Agency Fund *
jj BtecayneBlvd *
MUnU. Florida 33137
Eddie Fisher
the pills behind him. Fisher be-
gan his "second life" about two
years ago. He came to Miami and
stunned his audience with a
"triumphal performance." He
shakes his head regretfully and
says. "I never pursued it from
there."
Shortly following his Miami
visit, his daughter, Carrie,
beckoned him to New York, and
Fisher wilfully moved across the
country. "That move changed
my life." Fisher claims. "I met
new. creative people and started
living again. It was one of the
healthiest things I ever did."
In the Big Apple, Fisher be-
came friendly with cast members
and producers of Saturday Night
Live. He speaks warmly of the
group and their times together,
remembering one night in par-
ticular, it was Passover, and we
all met in a deli. None of them
were Jewish but we held a Seder
and had a great time."
Another major influence on
Fisher's comeback to life is a
woman named, Lyn, he met
about a year and a half ago. "She
arrived just in time," says Fisher
of his girlfriend. "She's played a
major role in my life until now."
"As Liz would say," Fisher
continues with a smile, "She's
the greatest love I've ever
known."
Beside his daughter and his
newly-found love. Fisher attri-
butes his strong will and positive
outlook to his religion. "The Jew-
ish people are special," he says
proudly. "They are stronger
survivors."
Fisher speaks freely of his
"first life" in his book "Eddie.
My Life, My Loves," which he
bluntly states is dedicated to
"Lyn." After 20 years of wanting
to write about his experiences,
Fisher spent the last four ful-
filling his desire.
"While money was a major
factor in writing the book," says
Fisher, "I also wanted to set the
record straight on several things.
For example, the public never
liked the idea that I left a beauti-
ful wife (Reynolds) and family for
a femme fatale (Taylor). But the
two had nothing to do with each
other. There were problems in my
marriage already."
"I wanted to tell all," he con-
tinues, "but some things must be
left unsaid."
Describing himself as an open,
honest person, "maybe too
much." he adds. Fisher points
out that there are unfinished
stories in the book because "I
didn't want to hurt anybody."
What are Eddie Fisher's plans
for his "new life?"
To keep his loyal fans happy,
he has no intention of abandon-
ing such old favorites as "My
Yiddisha Mama." He's planning
on doing "a little old and a little
'Liz definitely played a
negative role in my
career. I was busy playing
nursemaid to her and
didi't pay attention to my
own career,' Fisher recalls
without bitterness. 'You
have to work at what
you 're doing and keep up
with the times. I didn't.
But it didn't matter. I
was in love for the first
time in my life.'
new." "I want to encompass the
music of the past and today. I
want to appeal to both the young
and the old," he says."
He's also looking forward to a
I^oren Michaels (Saturday Night
Live) film. "Nothing Lasts For-
ever." ("a perfect title." he
laughingly remarks) about a
singer in outer space.
Regardless of what he's doing,
Fisher appreciates the fact that
he was given a second chance.
"It's very exciting. The first time
around, there was no time to
think. I was too young. Now I
have time to think, digest and re-
flect. I'm very lucky," he em-
phasizes.
"I'm having a love affair with
my audience. That's what makes
it so much more special!"
\
Menorah Chapels,
Broward County's oldest, largest, most reliable
Jewish-owned chapels,
cordially invite you to a
FORMAL DEDICATION & RECEPTION
THURSDAY, APRIL 1ST 2 P.M.
at their chapel on North Miami Beach
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between Hallandale Beach Boulevard and
Ives Dairy Road, Menorah Chapels will serve our
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South Broward County with its
easily accessible location.
Please join us for refreshments, a tour of the chapel
and receive a free gift with our compliments.
Menorah Chapels. Eight years of serving individuals,
families and the community by maintaining the
traditions of our faith. Now serving both Dade and
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In Palm Beach County, call 833-0887
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
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NEW YORK: Kirschenbaum Bros., Inc.
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L *aA annual Statewide
JK ^""f the Association of
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Tu *** Hyatt-Orlando in
7 inference is designed to
*e,^ her Jewish communal
jL"{othroughout Flonda
hSe numerous issuesof
feu) Jewish Commune
felocal nattonal and over-
|Si-5 will include
KKr of plenary sessions as
KSaH^up workshops.
K r.ilhert of Palm Beach
Sty Jewi^ Federation m
CRaton and chairman of the
*, of Florida Federa-
Ions. _
ElLof Jewish Federations;
C Uine executive director.
tan Sel Public Affairs
t^mittee and Esther Leah
r'Sdent-elect Nationa^
Wh Welfare Board, will be
,tured as special participants in
pe conference.
JThe Association of Flonda
federations Huntianit.arn
Iward wUl be presented to Lon-
Wman Pepper.
Gene Greenzweig. executive
irector, Central Agency for
Swish Education will present a
Lorkshop on Challenges Facing
Jewish Education." L. Jules Ar-
tn, past president of Greater
faami Jewish Federation and
lhairman of the Government
Congressman Claude Pepper
Affairs Committee, will chair the
workshop "Government Affairs
in the State of Florida" with
Elaine Bloom, former member of
the Florida House of Representa-
tives as consultant to the com-
mittee.
Harry B. Smith, past president
of Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will serve as a panelist on
"Priorities in Spending the
Community Dollar." The session
on Agency-Federation Relations:
Coping with Community
Growth" will be presented by
chairman Goldie Goldstein, a vice
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and by
panelist Lazer Cohen, assistant
executive vice president. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
"A Statewide Approach to
Jewish Education," workshop
will be chaired by Alfred Golden.
a member of the Board of Direc-
tors, Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration. Fran Levey, chairperson
of the Federation's South Dade
Committee, will chair the work-
shop on "Jewish Singles in
Florida, Their Needs and New
Approaches to Services."
David B. Fleeman. and Morton
Silverman. both past presidents
of Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will present the workshop
"The Federation as a Political
Entity."
Other workshops scheduled for
the day include "Developing
Facilities for the Elderly,"
chaired by Irwin Blonder, Palm
Beach, and presented by Elliot
Palevskv. executive director,
itiver Garden, Jacksonville; and
Developing New Gifts in the
Annual Campaign" chaired by
Alan Shulman, regional chair-
man, I ,:.I A and presented by
Jerry Kapner, Sarasota with
Miriam Kanter, National UJA as
consultant.
Roger Mock of Tampa will act
as chairman and Esther Leah
Ritz as presenter for the work-
shop "The Changing Role of the
Community Center in the
1980s."* "Developing Services
for the Elderly*' will be presented
by Eleanor Bernstein, director,
South Broward Multi-Purpose
Senior Center. "The Jewish
Family in Trouble" will be
chaired by M. H. Levine, Jack-
sonville and presented by Mi-
chael Bernstein, director, Gulf
Coast Family Service and
Spencer Gellart, director. South
County Family Service. There
will also be a workshop on
"Leadership Development
Models that Work: A How-To
Session."
Residents of the Four Winds High-Rise
garnered for a brunch on behalf of the Great-
\* Miami Jewish Federation's 1982 combined
Ueuish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
\Pktured (left to ri^htl are Norman Braman,
oresident. Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation and guest speaker; Nathan miner.
Four Winds co-chairman; Charles Sommer,
honoree; William Feinberg, general chair-
man and Emmanuel Glatt, co-chairman.
n
V
\
r
I Seacoast Towers South residents were pre-
m at a meeting on behalf of the Greater
JWM Jewish Federation's 1982 Combined
msh Appel-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
** Pictured are (left to right) Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Dreier, Seacoast Towers Com-
mittee members; Albert M. Shulman, guest
Speaker; Mr. and Mrs. Harold Medow and
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Stephen Schweig, spon-
sors.
"Jewig
Miami, Florida Friday; March 26,1982
IsraelAnalysis Update
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Behind the drama of
Tuesday night's cabinet meeting, where Premier
Begin allowed himself to be persuaded not to resign
following the Knesset tied vote, lay a political reality
which, it seemed, Begin and his aides had failed to
predict.
_,In bold terms, this was the threatened rebellion of
the three small coalition parties, NRP, Aguda, and
TAMI.
While Begin and other Likud leaders seemed to
think that the Premier's resignation, and the auto-
matic fall of the government, would trigger new elec-
tions later this year, the coalition partners plainly did
not share this prognosis. Nor did they share Likud's
interest in early elections and they made this ex-
ceedingly plain to the Prime Minister during that
late night extraordinary cabinet session.
Dr. Yosef Burg, the veteran NRP leader, indicated
clearly that if Begin implemented his earlier threat to
resign because of the tied vote (when there was, after
all, no constitutional necessity for him to do so), the
NRP would be "open" to other ways of starting off
early elections. This meant, of course, forming an al-
ternate coalition with labor.
Begin to Stay
March 24 Jerusalem The cabinet voted 12 to
6 Tuesday to reject Premier Menachem Begin's
proposal that it will resign following a tie vote on a
no-confidence motion in the Knesset several hours
earlier. According to Cabinet Secretary Arye Naor,
the cabinet's majority regarded the 58-tie in the
Knesset to be only a "chance" vote that could not be
construed as a natural coalition and would not repeat
itself again.
Schoenbrun to Speak at
Holocaust Day Observance
David Schoenbrun, chief cor-
respondent for the Public Broad-
casting System at the 'world
Gathering of Holocaust Survi-
vors last June in Jerusalem will
be keynote speaker at the 1982
observance of Yom Hashoah
(Holocaust Day) in Greater
Miami. The observance, to take
place Tuesday. April 20 at Tem-
ple Emanu-El, in Miami Beach, is
being coordinated by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Com-
munity Relations Committee, the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, and the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami.
Schoenbrun will discuss "Les-
sons of the Holocaust "
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro,
president of the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami stated.
'Sihoenbrun won plaudits from
around the world for his sensitive
and moving reporting of the pro-
creeding of the World Gathering
of Holocaust Surivors for the
Public Broadcasting System.
Schoenbrun s complete and in-
depth coverage oi tin- proceed
ings and the people who partici-
pated in the World Gathering for
PBS was unmatched by any
other journalist or news
organization. We are very
honored to have David
Schoenbrun as keynot speaker at
our Holocaust Day gathering."
David Schoenbrun's career in
broadcast journalism began right
Da vid Schoen brun
after Pearl Harbor, when he be-
came one of the first commenta-
tors for the Voice of America.
After the war. Edward R.
Murrow appointed Schoenbrun
Paris correspondent for CBS
News, where he served through
I960, and then as chief Washing-
ton correspondent through the
Kennedy years.
Schoenbrun left (.'MS for free-
lance broadcasting and to have
more time for writing books. His
latest is "'Soldiers of the Night
the Story of the French Resis-
tance," published in June 1980.
Among his books was the best-
selling "The New Israelis," the
first book about the young people
born after the creation of Israel in
1948.
Moshe Arens to be Welcomed
A capacity crowd of Jewish communal leaders from the
United States and Canada is expected to welcome Israel's new
Ambassador to the United States Moshe Arens at the Interna-
tional Tribute Dinner to be held Monday evening at the Konover
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Ambassador Arens, who has recently appeared on numerous
television programs and in many press articles, is an outspoken
member of the Israeli Government. On Monday evening he will
again discuss Israel and her role in the Middle East.
Special guest at the Tribute Dinner will be Israeli pianist Op-
hra Yerushalmi. Yerushalmi is a graduate of the Academy of
Music in Jerusalem and has appeared as a soloist with the Jeru-
salem Symphony Orchestra.
Last minute reservations will be accepted by the Israel Bonds
Office.


1


"c?.
.'*linrrtir.-r- .*>.*
Strike
-r ^~: -
.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A,
general strike paralyzed most
West Bank towns Monday. The
strike, called to protest the ouster
of the elected mayor and town
council of El Bireh last Thursday
was to have ended Tuesday. But
West Bank mayors called for an
extension until Wednesday.
All shops, schools and places of
business were shut down in Ram
allah. Halhoul and El Bireh. The
latter town is under a dawn-to-
dusk blockade with residents
unable to leave or enter between 8
a.m. and 4 p.m.
IN HEBRON and Bethlehem.
Israeli soldiers forced shopkeep-
ers to open for business. In East
Jerusalem, where the strike
spread, hundreds of Israeli police
visited the homes of local mer-
chants with written orders from
the central command to open
their businesses immediately.
Dozens of shopkeepers were
transported in police vans to
their shops which they were
forced to open under the eyes of
the police. But at least half of
East Jerusalem remained strike-
bound during the day.
The police tactics drew an
angry protest from Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek who com-
plained that the security forces
neither consulted nor informed
him of their plans. He said he was
opposed to opening businesses by
force, especially in Jerusalem.
POLICE WERE stoned near
the Herod Gate and Lions Gate
entrances to the Old City. There
were further incidents of rock-
throwing on the West Bank. A
Mulolov cocktail was thrown at
an Israeli army officer in Jenin.
but he was not hurt.
Meanwhile, a Jewish settler
trom Shiloh on the West Bank
was taken into custody on sus-
picion of murder. The arrest fol-
lowed the discovery over the
weekend of the body of 17-year-
old Mohammed Abdullah Suh-
weil who lived in a nearby Arab
village. His family had reported
that he and several other tenn-
agers were kidnapped by Jewish
settlers from Shiloh last Friday
after a stone-throwing melee.
Israeli sources said that the
level of violence on the West
Bank seemed to be abating for
the time being. But new flare-ups
are expected next week when
Israeli Arabs mark Land Day on
Mar. 30. the anniversary of the
seizure of Arab lands in Galilee
by the Israeli government several
years ago. Land Day has usually
triggered violent demonstrations
on the West Bank.
PREMIER MENACHEM Be-
gin's government shows no signs
of relenting in its crackdown on
West Bank officials who refuse to
cooperate with the Israeli regime.
It faces a vote of no-confidence in
the Knesset tomorrow on
motions submitted by the op-
position Labor Alignment and
Shinut factions and the Commu-
nist Party. But despite the nar-
rowness of the Begin s Knesset
majority, the motions are ex-
pected to be defeated, as similar
motions have in the past. Sunday
the Cabinet voiced its approval of
the army's actions on the West
Bank and Begin congratulated
the soldiers for showing restraint,
although 18-year-old Ibrahim Ali
Darwish was killed by soldiers in
El Bireh Saturday and at least
five other Arab teen-agers were
wounded. Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon said the tough policy was
intended to eliminate Palestine
Liberation Organization in-
fluence from the territory.
According to Sharon, the
policy is succeeding. He claimed
that for the first time since 1967
there are leaders on the West
Bank who are not obedient to the
PLO. He was referring apparent-
ly to local Arabs who ave joined
the Israel-financed and protected
Village Leagues.
Sharon said this group was not
necessarily pro-Israel and in-
cluded partisans of Jordan and
advocates of a Palestinian state.
Hut all of them show on indepen-
dent approach to problems and it
is therefore in Israel's interest to
strengthen this group. Sharon
said.
f

At the 30th annual dinner ofAgudath Israel Hebrew Institute
Beach, Mr. and Mrs. Morris A. Marcus, Surfside, were Aonowrfl
their dedication to the congregation.
THIS PASSOVER
SWEE-TOUCH-NEE TEA
FOR YOU
AND YOUR FAMILY
ORT Features Exhibit at Youth Fair
Women's American ORT will
feature an audio visual presenta-
tion ORT A Bridge 100 Years
Long' in the Dade County House
of Career Education at the Youth
Fair through Apr. 4. at Tamiami
Park
The exhibit has been co-ordin-
ated by Lois Emanuel. District
VI, community chairman, in con-
junction with Dade South Region
education coordinator. Joan
Kobrin and Nancy Guerrera.
According to .Mama Light of
Hollywood. District VI presi-
dent. South Florida Women's
American ORT has 15.000 mem-
bers and is represented by Mary
Ellen Pevton. president. Dade
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
knaidlach with G. Washington's"
Seasoning and Broth.
G. WASHINGTON'S
KNAIDLACH tSSt
2tfl ItfttflMlM
2 minimi *t*tj t mi
1
For an extra speoa* seder
make knamtach mat are different
from all other knaidtach t"1
G Washington s Seasoning and
Broth G Washington s is more
than a flavor enhancer
it s a complete seasoning
The unique Mend of herds and
spices flavors your oatftach m
more *ays man one
Se-ve knaidlach made ntft
G Washington sand hear your
guests smg the? prases'
snail.....iii
Motors -> o*o*6 imwan%mitmt# ftwaati aa: -j^- -m
>.....; -- ;. ~f iifi :.' ~.'ts ::.: : ::_;--: :
Mis Aoc t-*--; MOCK G WttJIC' -
m a**s -: IMi s. X -.: fcttws -.icr
The
of
dm
nutritious Noah's Ar*
Morns and kids go tor Zoorora Twc Bv two1 KjdS tw* Zooroni
looks as groat as it tastes And s*k* Zooroni vcamrv
armcfied pasta itmrnnO ** tots of yurmy tomato i
tangy cnaace Moms tov to pair tap w*h *. too'
South Region; Jean Rose, presi-
dent. Southeastern Florida Re-
gion. Roz. Klein, president. South
Broward Region, and Barbara
Shapiro. president. North
Broward Region.
Masada Card Party
A luncheon and card party is
on the agenda for the meeting of
the Masada Chapter. Pioneer
Women Na'amat to be held on
Wednesday, at noon at the Four
Freedoms House. Miami Beach,
in the community meeting room
on the 15th floor.
Rose Becker. Malvina Lewis.
Beatrice Rifkin. Mary Salmirs.
and Gertrude Zelnick are chair-
men of the day. Bertha Lieb-
mann. president, will preside.
For nearly 100 Passover seasons
Jewish families have known the en-
joyment of the Swee-Touch-Nee fam-
ily of fine tea products. For fine tea
products for this Passover season
think Swee-Touch-Nee.
"^DISTRIBUTED BY
HI-GRADE FOOD CO. INC
305 758-0516
ENJOY YOUR COFFEE. ENJOY YOURSELF.
ENJOY YOUR SEDER.
This festive musical interiude is brought to you
with the best wishes of
i Brand Decaffeinated Coffee.
hoo^-tod
SanKP so^
SonKD --


r Builders to be Honored at Yeshiva U. Dinner UZR to HokTCm^Jay
.L l'I.tuIb mpn mail. *._.. ^ ... ... A vhId In hnnnr n( Icmal'a 'ink War Velprnn
r Lb South Florida men
r^n will be honored as
flifir" of Yeshiva
J*. a, the annual
ltyAward dinner spon-
Pf .hrFlorida Friends of
IKSs Sunday night at 6
I Fnlland Ballroom of
tEmanuELMiam. Beach.
tl. Vice President Walter
r le and Yeshiva Univer-
l0tdeS Dr. Norman
ifS address the audience
PUmunitv and religious
fe Si pay tribute to
Institution-
Luncement of the 26
FL Was made by h. Peter
fc general chairman of the
Kriends of Yeshiva Un,-
R and by Miami Beach
^(Commissioner Sy E.sen-
dinner committee chair-
Four men were designated as
honorary chairmen of the dinner
They are Beach Mayor Norman
Ciment, Metro Dade County
Mayor Stephen Clark, Miami
Mayor Maurice Ferre and Harry
A. (Hap) Levy, president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Those selected as dinner co-
chairmen include Philip Belz,
Norman Braman, David Flee-
man. Dr. Philip Frost, Leo Hack,
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Max A. Lipschitz, Sidney L.
Olson, Arthur Pearlman, Dade
County Judge Steven D. Robin-
son, Dade County Commissioner
Barry D. Schreiber, Edward
Shapiro, Sherwin Stauber, Philip
T. Warren, Dr. Charles Weiss
and Dr. Matthew Zuckerman.
Harry Levy to be Honored at
Lehrman Scholarship Ball
LrryA.lHap) Levy, president
the Greater Miami Jewish
deration, will receive the 1982
taonides Award of Temple
Jnu-El of Greater Miami and
Lehrman DAY School at the

J
i A. Levy
Lehrman Day School
Dlarship Hall. Apr. 3, in the
dland Ballroom of Temple
nu-EI
nnouncement of Levy's
|ction was made by Dr. Irving
nan. rabbi of Temple
nu-El, and by Mr. and Mrs.
ry Zuckerman and Mr. and
k Sidney Cooperman, chair-
ed! the. Scholar shin Hall
Wji vice president of Temple
nu-El, is the third person
to receive the Maimonides
Previous Recipients are
|iuel N. Friedland. chairman
b board and past president of
[temple, and Stephen Muss, a
Wesident.
ft) is past chairman of the
ation's annual Combined
^TWtsky
^generously of bis,une
"d energy to keep alive
"wth celebrate the
b*"T of We itself
^'Florida 33137
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign and past presi-
dent of the Greater Miami
chapter of the American Friends
of Hebrew University.
Master Builders who will be
honored at the dinner are
Samuel I. Adler, Joseph Appiebaum,
Mrs. Paul Benjamin, Louis Berkowiti,
Shepard Broad, Hyman I. Cohen, Mrs.
Jess M Colchamiro, Mrs. Joseph M.
Drexler. Dr. Leon Fill, Charles
Fruchtman, E. Peter Goldrincj, Max
Heimowitz, Mrs. Moses Hornsteln, A.B.
Joffe, H. Jerome Joseph, Mrs. Norma
Kreaden, Harry A. Levy, Sidney L.
Olson, Victor Posner, Mrs. Samuel
Remhard, Judge Steven D. Robinson,
George Rohr, Eugene Rosenfeld,
Samuel M. Rosner, William Silverstein
and Dr. Matthew Zuckerman.
Members of the dinner committee in-
clude Michael Adler, Samuel I. Adler,
Rabbi Amram J. Amsellem, Charles
Afromowiti, Joseph Appiebaum.
Sheldon H. Becher, Alberto Behar, Sue
D. Berkowiti, Jerome Bienenfeld, Dr.
Norman Bloom, Benjamin Botwinlck,
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan, Rabbi Ralph
Carmi, Hyman Chabner, Dr. Larry
Ciment, Hyman I. Cohen, Dov
Dunaevsky. Milton Ehrenreich, George
Feldenkreis, Solomon Garazi, Alfred
Golden, Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold Goodman,
Alex E. Grossman, Moses Grundwerg,
Max Heimowitz, Dr. Elias M. Hersch-
man. Henry Jeret, Rabbi Warren
Kasztl, Rabbi Barry Konovitz, Dr. Ben-
jamin Lechner, Mrs. Davida Levy,
Martin Margulies, Joseph Margulles,
Dr. Joshua Miller, Sidney Poland,
Rabbi Menachem Raab, Dr. and Mrs.
David Reinhard, Abraham Resnick,
Samuel M. Rosner, Robert Russell,
Julius Sand, Dr. Joseph A. Singer,
Joseph L. Sharpe, Dr. Joshua Stern
berg, Robert H. Traurig, Samuel Wald-
man. Dr. George S. Wise and Judd Zis
quit.
A gala in honor of Israel's 34th
anniversary and the Veterans of
the Israel and American Armed
Forces will be held Sunday at
2:30 p.m. in the theatre of the
Konover Hotel.
Major Menachem Meron
The celebration is being held
under the auspices of the United
Zionists-Revisionists of Florida,
in cooperation with the Jewish
War Veterans of America and
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida.
Special guest of honor will be
Major General Menachem
Meron, Israeli Army hero and
Military Attache of Israel to the
United States and Canada.
Those participating in the pro-
gram will be Commissioner Barry
D. Schreiber, president and
chairman of the sponsoring
Zionist group; Ainslee R. Ferdie,
president, Jewish War Veterans;
Rabbi David Raab of Temple
King Solomon and spiritual
leader of the UZR of Florida, and
Cantor Zvee Aroni of Beth Torah
Congregation.
Coordinators of the event are
Joseph Morley and Martin Ac-
kerman.
Art Auction
At Beth Am
Sisterhood of Temple Beth Am
it holding ita Spring Art Auction,
under the auspices of art
America, on Sunday at the
temple. At 7 p.m. reception will
precede the preview scheduled to
begin at 8 p.m.

NOW
LAND O LAKES
IS KOSHER
FOR PASSOVER.
Here's a $1 refund on
our Kosher for Passover Butter.
i.
Kosher foi
i*W' v. -//
UNSALTED(.w;BUTTER
(M /
We'll send you a dollar bach for enjoying your favorite butter,
Land O Lakes, now made specially Kosher for Passover. Enjoy the
special delicate flavor of LAND O LAKES" Unsalted Butter this
Passover. Look for the specially-tagged lib. cartons at your store.
And get $1 in return!
Copyright La"d O lakes. Inc.. 1902
NAILTOi Land O Lakes Passover Refund
fO. Box 1011
Mocwood, MM 55368
m* ,nr klrKi the -Kosher for Passover" sticker and the proof of purchase seal
from^^nd^Son of LAT1D O LAKES' Unsalted Butter. Send me *1
please.
I
I
I
City.
I
flame.
Address,
___State-
Zip.
M ^^<^^^"'lil,^.7?WllMli..Allo* 4 6 -ecks to.h.nd1lnu Oftae.pl.es
l
l
l
l
l
l
^?vSSKE; ^i^her^lc^^ J
Vs


'*mUr-
Jerome Kurtz, immediate
Past Commissioner of the
Internal Revenue Service, will
discuss "Politics of Taxation "
at an Israel Bonds seminar,
scheduled for Apr. 5, at noon,
at the Four Ambassadors
Hotel.
Norman A. Sugarman, former
Assistant Commissioner of
the Internal Revenue Service
and counsel to the Council of
Jewish Federation s Endow-
ment Program, was guest
speaker at a legal and tax
seminar, sponsored by the
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Vt Block To Ocean
WINTERHAVEN
APARTMENTS
Furnished & Unfurnished!
EFFICIENCIES
& 1 BEDROOM
ADULTS ONLY
FROM $250 MONTHLY
CALL 672-0085
or 931-6169

4%Mp|kfatMin.
^TVVT. 1602.1454 8)
In 1882, Sam Breakstone put every
dime into his sour cream and cottage cheese.
But you dont have to.
In his day, Sam Breakstone never compromised when it came to making the
highest quality cottage cheese and sour cream.
But if his standards weren't so high, his all natural cottage cheese and sour cream
wouldn't taste so delicious today.
Sam Breakstone never cut comers to make his dairy products. But you can. by
cutting out our coupons.
George Malta
gives generously of his time
and energy to keep alive
in the world those timeless
values that celebrate the
beauty of life Itself.
To George Malta.
To Life-
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's
1982 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund "^^
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Florida 3*3P W!
biSSIT QDEhT
Mr. Grocer Kraft. Inc will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
you redeemed it on your retail sales
of the named product(s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod
uct to cover all redemptions Coupon
SAVE 10C ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONES COTTAGE CHEESE
10C
is void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law. and may not be
assigned or transferred by you Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
applicable tax For redemption, mail
to Kraft. Inc. Dairy Group. PO Box
1799. Clinton. Iowa 52734
Expires 9/30/82.
1M300 IbSSTT
0TO11 QDEhT
Mr. Grocer Kraft. Inc will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
you redeemed it on your retail sales
of the named product! s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod-
uct to cover all redemptions Coupon
SAVE 1 BREAKSTONES SOUR CREAM
10C
is void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
applicable tax. For redemption, mail
to Kraft. Inc. Dairy Group. PO Box
1799. Clinton. Iowa 52734
Expire. 9/30/82.
1M3Q0 IbSbbO
Famous since 1882
1981 KRAFT, NC



iHealth and Beauty are Topics for Women's Division
i events focusing Community Center. A tennis
f* SPH beauty will be held tournament followed by two
lejlth^a Qivision of the beauty care workshops featuring
'Sft/is __......__
1 2 lewish Appeal-Israel ding Collegen," and Joyce Julien and Dr. Daniel Kane will be guest
bl Fund announced on the topic of "Nutrition & speakers. Muriel Russel is chair-
Llt
Dr. Joel Wilentz, speaking on
'Cosmetic Dermatology Inclu-
date for a breakfast meeting at
the Bal Harbour 101 Party
Room, with Lydia Goldring and
the 1982 Campaign message.
Joyce Julien, Linda Rosenthal
F&an. Evelyn Mitchel.
Li Futemick, Women s
sion vice president
leader-
will be guest
$EZi
helAnn
Russell Jewish
Today's Woman," will be
featured as part of the program.
North Dade Area committee co-
chairman are Helen Berne,
Renata Bloom and Phylis Meier.
Wednesday, Mar. 31 is the
ibarak's Visit to Israel
'Will be On'Says Ali
By DAVID LANDAU
IjERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel and Egypt appear
have found a way to
solve a boundary dispute
may be working for a
^promise arrangement
L President Hosni Mub-
_j's projected visit to Is-
iThe visit "will be on,"
.yptian Foreign Minister
amal Hassan Ali told re-
brters after a two-hour
eting with Premier
Fenachem Begin which he
cribed as "friendly and
brdial."
[Hassan Ali brought Begin a
essage from Mubarak which,
tording to Israeli sources, ex-
wsed a desire to go ahead with
visit. Begin was quoted as
illing the Egyptian President's
tier "very friendly.'" Mubarak
hs to have come to Israel this
onth but refused to include Je-
tsalem on his itinerary because
repercussions in the Arab
krld. The Israeli government
taken the position that he
bust visit Jerusalem or not come
tall.
HASSAN ALI said that Mub-
rak referred to the visit in his
ssage to Begin and that its
ning and itinerary would be
Jdiscussed and decided later."
He did not say how the Jerusa-
dispute might be resolved
m indicated that the visit
obably would not take place
efore Apr. 25 when Israel com-
es its withdrawal from Sinai.
:25th of April is "not a target
te for anything,"' Hassan Ali
in reply to a reporter's
stion.
The Egyptian Foreign Minis-
ter and Deputy Premier was here
for high-level talks with Israeli
officials on normalization of
relations between the two coun-
tries and to try to settle out-
standing problems related to the
withdrawal from Sinai.
One issue is the old interna-
tional boundary line between
Sinai and Israel which is in dis-
pute at several points along its
143-mile length. Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon said that the differ-
ences over the border in the Taba
region near Eilat "will be
solved." He spoke after Hassan
Ali and his party met with Begin
and top Israeli policy-makers.
Israel Radio reported later that
a "way" had been found to recon-
cile the differences and would be
disclosed in a joint statement to
be issued before Hassan Ali re-
turns to Egypt.
THE BORDER dispute at
Taba involves some 600 yards of
territory. It is important because
the way it is solved will deter-
mine whether a resort hotel com-
plex will be on the Israeli or
Egyptian side of the line.
Hassan Ali told reporter after
his meeting with Begin that
"technical differences of points of
view" still remained on several
matters and would be the subject
of further discussion. He and
Sharon chaired a meeting of the
Israel-Egypt, Joint High Com-
mission on normalization.
The Egyptian minister also
met separately with Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and In-
terior Minister Yosef Burg. Burg
heads Israel's autonomy
negotiating teem. Hassan Ali
told reporters that both sides
have "agreed to give new
momentum to the autonomy
talks in the near future."
man of the Miami Beach Area,
Bernyce Gittlin is special events
chairman, and Mikki Mill man
and Lydia Goldring are campaign
chairmen for Miami Beach.
Candy Colby of Channel 10s
Jazz Aerobics program will be
featured at a breakfast Apr. 1 at
9 a.m. at Country Walk Recrea-
tional Center. Nancy Lipoff,
president of the Women's Divi-
sion, will be guest speaker
South Dade Area chairman is
Gloria Scharlin, Annette Aeren-
son and Gail Jaffee are campaign
chairman and Laurel Shapiro is
special events chairman. For the
Southwest Dade Area, Debby
Grodnick is chairman, Fran stor-
ner is campaign chairman and
Marilyn Kohn is special event
chairman.
Jeffrey Mell, staff assistant, local aide-de-camp for Representative
William Lehman congratulates the Southeastern Florida Region of
Women's American ORT on its official ORT Day 1982 "Kick-Off
Function" at the Michael Ann RussellJewish High School in North
Miami Beach. Pictured (left to right) are Mildred KaU, chairperson of
the day; Lois Emanuel, ORT District VI publicity chairperson; Mell;
and Jean Rose, region president.
Gralnick Named to CRB Cabinet
recommended by
William A. Gralnick, South-
east regional director of the
American Jewish Committee has
been appointed to the Dade
County Community Relations
Board's Professional Cabinet.
Gralnick was
CRB Chairman Dr. Herbert
Baumgard, and the appointment
was made by CRB Director
Robert Simms.
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8Ws generously of her time
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Tube Babies?
Science Know-How Ahead of Ethics
Friday, March 26, 1982 / The Jewish Ftoridiar^l'agT^^'
By
DR. JONATHAN
SACKS
bbi Dr. Jonathan
I, is newlyappomted
t of the Chief Rabbi
tmanuel Jahoboyitz
Jews' College,
, science run faster
' ethics? It. seems an
ird suggestion What-
ff else changes the world.
[tandwrongdonot.Yet
his claim is being
forcibly and
usiblv. in the case of
.J,
<^
Mike Cooper
gives generously of his time
ad energy to keep alive
in the world those timeless
nlues that celebrate the
beauty of life itself.
To Mike Cooper.
To Life
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's
1982 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel a>
Emergency Fund O
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33137
genetic engineering. So fast
is progress being made in
the field of test-tube babies
that the British Medical
Association's central
ethical committee is asking
for time to think time to
construct a framework of
norms and values which
will govern work in the fu-
ture.
Medical know-how has run
ahead of ethics, the committee
chairman was reported to have
said. Perhaps "doctors needed
guidance in these uncharted
areas." Another expert com-
mented that it was not surprising
that controversy had arisen over
the new techniques of artificial
generation of life. What was sur-
prising was that it had taken so
long. In fact, it has taken some
three and a half years since the
work of Edwards and Step'oe hit
the headlines, for the suggestion
to be made that a moratorium
should be called for until the
ethical issues have been resolved.
Just this suggestion had been
made by the Chief Rabbi as long
as 1970.
. AMONG THE problems that
will have to be discussed are
these. A woman undergoing fer-
tility treatment may produce
several eggs in a single month.
They can be removed from her
body, and fertilized with her hus-
band's sperm in a test-tube.
Often, two are re implanted in the
hope that one at least will con-
tinue growing. But what of the
surplus embryos? Are they to be
destroyed? Does this constitute
the destruction of potential
human life? What of the suKjjes-
Continued on Page 9-B
PLANNING i
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
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and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
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anywhere in the U.S. or
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ATTENTION:
WttlHtd ads are not
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J* a classified send
JJ (20 word limit) to
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Of Florida
no ~ RABBI
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^BBINIC MATTERS
"UN Local, and foreian
KuCUn,rieS-
MSashin0,on Ay"u
W^Floritl 33139
'' 534-1004 or 672-0004
Gideon Samet, U.S. Corres-
pondent of the Ha 'A retz Daily
in Israel, will be guest speaker
at the Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
breakfast of the Brotherhood
of Temple Beth Sholom, to be
held at the temple.
JEWISH WORSHIP HOUR
Kabbi Irving Lehrman, Temple
Emanu-El, will appear on the
"Jewish Worship Hour" on
Sunday at 8 a.m. on Channel 10.
Donor Luncheon
Set For Sunday
^ The Tzivos Hashen Boy's
Choir under the direction of
Shmuel Fershko and assisted by
Cantor Zvi Adler of Temple
Fmanu-Fl, will highlight the
entertainment program of the
annual Donor Luncheon of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer
Woman Na'amat at the Konover
Hotel on Sunday at noon.
The 20 boys of the choir range
in age from eight to twelve and
will be singing mostly Hasidic
melodies.
Fershko, pianist, composer,
and musical director of Temple
Kmanu-Kl, is a graduate of the
Conservatory of Music in War-
saw and was the musical director
of Israel's Broadcasting System
during and after the establish-
ment of the State of Israel.
Harriet (Ireen. president of the
Pioneer Women Council of South
I Florida and chairman of the
annual luncheon has named the
following chairmen: Bina Ock-
man. Sylvia H. Cohen, Shirley
Partner, Margot Amstel.Gisela
Cutter, Lillian Hoffman, Dora
Hill, and Felice P. Schwartz.
Bebee Pullman, Southeast
region area coordinator will
deliver the invoccation, and
Phyliss sutker of Chicago,
national president of Pioneer
Women Na'amat, will be princi-
pal speaker.
Business-
Brooklyn Style
The Charm
of Park House
For those wishing to enjoy
the excitement of Manhattan
along with the charm of
Brooklyn, the Park House
Hotel (1206-48th Street, 871-
8100) offers excellent,
wholesome accommodations
for the visitor and tourist. '
Located in the heart of
Boro Park, this luxurious
four story, 114 room hotel of-
fers studios and suites that
feature fully equipped
kitchens.
Comfortable bedding ar-
rangements, private bath,
plush carpeting, a television
in every room as well as
decoration in tasteful interior
design, complete the warm
and inviting atmosphere at
the Park House Hotel which
is sure to greet any weary
traveler.
The courteous and eager to
please staff add the integral
finishing touches to this
unique hotel establishment.
The Park House Hotel
serves a large clientele of in-
ternational guests who are
expecially pleased with this
facility's affordable rates so
close to the hustle and bustle
of Manhattan. "Plenty of
times you can't get reserva-
tions in Manhattan and we
offer them at half the price,"
stated Ascher Scharf, co-
owner of the Park House
Hotel with hi? partner Jerry
Fried. By AARK PECHENIK
s Rissover.



Fage 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, March 26,1982 !
Jungreis Wants to Recapture Jewish Traditions
By MARLA ROYNE
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
She has been dubbed the
"Jewish Billy Graham" by Time
magazine. Those who have seen
her call her flashy and theatrical.
Others prefer dynamic.
But Rebbetzin Esther Jung-
reis, author of the new book.
"The Jewish Soul on Fire."
claim* that these descriptions arc
hardly accurate because "I'm not
a missionary. "I don't want U"
convert people. I want to remind
people of their own heritage and
the responsibility of all Jews."
Jungreis is the founder of
Hineni. an international move-
ment which "seeks to restore the
values of faith, the Bible and the
traditional views of family-cen-
tered life."
She is a firm believer in the
family unit and the traditions it
survives on.
"Unfortunately. increased
mobility, a lack of close vicinity,
and the independence syndrome
have contributed to the tragedy
of the 20th Century the break-
down of our famines." remarks
the writer, who hosts her own
show for National Jewish Tele-
vision.
missionary cults whom she wants
to recapture for "the raptures'" of
Jewish tradition.
Jungreis attributes the now
declining, but still prevalent
trend, towards "a lack of Jewish
knowledge, an unhappy family
life or a lack of morals due to ex-
perimentation with drugs or
sex."
The cult offers a sense of
security, an extended "family"
and a place to be reborn.
Since its conception in 1973,
Hineni has counteracted cults by
offering an education on "the liv-
ing Jewish experience." Jungreis
explains. "We hold Sabbath re-
treats, and we try to restore lost
faith in the family and in God."
Jungreis feels that while
Hineni is an organization based
on Jewish beliefs, and her book
"is supported by the Old Testa-
ment and the Talmud," non-Jews
can profit from her philosophy.
Speaking of her book, Jungreis
comments, "The roots are Jew-
ish, yet the problems are uni-
versal."
In "The Jewish Soul on Fire," J
partly written from personal
anecdotes and experiences, Jung-
reis deals with such topics as
marriage, the family, raising chil-
dren and happiness, among
others. "The book is a bridge
from Sinai to the 20th Century,"
the Rebbetzin observes. "It can
help every man reorient his life."
Her own faith in God has never
been altered, claims Jungreis. a
Holocaust survivor. "Persecution
and anti-Semitism have always
been the Jewish experience. The
Hitler Holocaust was not unique.
We have one in every genera-
tion."
"Yet if a man anchors his life
to the Torah and God. he is never
alone," she notes.
"God's commandments have
been given to us in the Torah.
Everything is written down.
With that, we can overcome
moments of darkness. We can
find peace and contentment in
ourselves and in our family. And
that's what life is all about."
Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis
HapoaUm Opens First Israeli Bank in
Memorial Held for Alexander Gross
"People are coming to regard
family life as burdensome and in-
terfering," she continues. "There
is an obsession with personal
satisfaction. It's capital ME."
As in the movie, "Kramer vs.
Kramer," where a young woman,
after renouncing her family in or-
der to discover herself, returns
for her son. people are discover-
ing that families are both fulfill-
ing and necessary, comments
Jungreis. "A family is contingent
upon interdependence." she
points out.
While Hineni offers families
the opportunity to "relearn how
to live as a Jewish family." tne
organization was originally
founded for youth, particularly
those who were turning towards
A special memorial assembly
for the Junior and Senior High
School students of the Rabbi Al-
exander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy was held recently in
memory of the founder, Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, who passed
away two years ago.
Special prayers were offered by
the students and faculty. Others
who participated in the program
were Rabbi Stanley Bronfeld.
principal of the Hebrew
Academy; Rabbi Karmi Gross,
teacher of Hebrew studies and
son of the late Rabbi Alexander
Gross; Rabbi Yossi Heber. direc-
tor of Torah studies, and Nussie
Zemel. engineer and former stu-
dent of the academy.
In conjunction with the memo-
rial assembly which will be held
annually each March. Dr. Elias
Herschman. president of the He-
brew Academy, has announced
that a special annual Rabbi Alex-
ander Gross Memorial Lecture
Series will also be held during the
month. The series will feature
Jewish authorities in their
respective fields.
The faculty of the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
completed a five year interim
evaluation for the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and Schools
and dedicated this brochure to
the memory of Rabbi Gross
which reads. "For Rabbi Alexan-
der S. Gross, who founded our
school, shaped its destiny, and
inspired us to strive forever to
seek ways of making it the finest
of its kind."
Bank Hapoalim is the first Is-
raeli Bank to have taken advan-
tage of changes in Canadian
banking laws, allowing foreign
banks to establish subsidiaries in
that country. The full service
subsidiary. Bank Hapoalim
(Canada), opened on Mar. 18. in
Toronto with a reception at-
tended by dignitaries and busi-
ness leaders.
Bank Hapoalim. headquar-
tered in Tel Aviv, has offices in
major financial centers around
the world, including New York,
Los Angeles. Chicago, Philadel-
Hadar Chapter Meeting
Hadar Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will meet Apr. 1
at First Nationwide Savings and
l,(i.in Auditorium. 1132 Kane
Concourse. Bay Harbor Island,
at noon.
phia, Boston. Miami, i
Montreal. Cayman U
London, Manchester,
Zurich, Luxembourg.
Aires, Sao Paulo. Caracas,
tevideo. Punta Del
(Uruguaryl, Mexico City
Panama City
TEMPLE EMANUELI
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Test-Tube Babies?
Medical Know-How is Ahead of Ethics
I'
tt for observation and expen-
hjhere is the line to be drawn
J hS-h it becomes unacceptable
Lbor
Itooo
I**"6 'Hnto the -natural
kept ^'^'^en? And what
I&57lWr53 that, bank of
^^embrTbesetupforre-
\%Ti* donation to
fSwomen'' There is the ques-
ISTrfffrtok of abnormalities
Sting'rom such a procedure.
.. rjr. Michael Thomas put it:
Lh babies would not exist but
Shedoctor'sinterventKm.aad
ES the benefit was to the
S, the risk was to the baby.
RC- also the ethical question.
Ecuu i"semKinat," U9s;|
Lwrm other than from the
>' husband has already
LjKd heated opposition, not
!t from the rabbinical
luthorities. What new dimen-
Si added by the fact that
L such embryo transplants, the
question of maternity as well as
j paternity is in doubt?
THESE ARE issues which re-
I quire the most sober reflection.
I The generation of life has long
1 been seen in the Jewish tradition
I to be an area where there are no
easy answers. There are many
Midrashic sources which suggest
I that while for every other being
in the universe, creation pro-
ceeded by a simple Divine "Let it
I be." when it came to the making
of man, God too paused to take
advice from the ministering
angels. There can be no weightier
commendation to caution that
this: that even for the Creator of
the world, the making of man was
I a grave responsibility.
In the other direction too: the
[Talmud records that King
I Hezekiah was granted the
prophetic foresight to see that
the son he might bear Menasseh
would bring evil and suffering in-
to the world. He decided, accord-
ingly, not to have children. The
Prophet Isaiah rebuked him
wagely "What have you to
do with the mysteries of the Al-
mighty?" any potential can be
quantified except a potential
human life.
The treatment of infertility
touches on perhaps the most
sensitive emotional motif of the
whole Torah. Sarah. Rebeccah,
Rachel and Hannah were all bar-
ten and longed for children.
Hannah was not placated by her
husband's consolation, "Am I
not better to you than ten sons?"
The Talmud attributes to her the
(n de cotur, "Lord of the
Universe, of all the hosts and
hosts that You have created in
Your world, is it so hard to give
me one son?"
RACHEL GAVE voice to the
definitive words of despair, "Give
ne children, If not, let me die!"
Her husband, Jacob, was angry
that she asked for a miracle:
Mali I take Cod's place?" But
rabbinic tradition did not ap-
prove his response. According to
sage God replied. "Is that
ftow you answer someone who
cnesout in distress?" The plight
lzUinfertile may never be
treated lightly.
Neither does Judaism see any-
thing threatening in the transla-
tion of miracle into scientific
technique. Isaiah in a famous
"iwm once said. "Sing, O barren
*oman who could not give birth
n( lor many shall be the children
S the desolate." And
^imomdes commented of such
Prophecies that we will not know
*nt they mean until they hap-
nliV.Lmedical science has sup-
Pied the reality to an expectation
'Jf'th' th" too is a fact of
E! LrellKious significance.
tinn! .u barest handfu f excep-
J the rabbis did not see the
l*ment of infertility as inter-
fering with the course of nature
or with the Divine decree.
But the ethical issues cannot
be avoided. The Torah itself des-
cribes one such dilemma. The
Hebrew midwives were ordered
by Pharaoh to "look upon the
birth stool" and "if it be a son,
then you shall kill him." Instead
they "feared God" and disobeyed
the instruction. R. Samuel Edels
suggests that the reference to the
"birth stool" implied that they
were told not to commit in-
fanticide but to perform abor-
tions just before birth.
THE MIDWIVES might in
fact have given themselves a
justification for going ahead.
What kind of life might such a
child expect if allowed to live?
Slavery, oppression, and perhaps
worse. Nonetheless they refused.
Again it is Dr. Thomas who has
supplied the contemporary
equivalent: "When Hitler started
the extermination campaign, he
didn't begin with the Jews. He
went for the mentally subnormal,
saying it would be much kinder
to give them a gentle, easy death.
Maybe with amniocentesis we are
trying to spare the health serv-
ices the high cost of dealing with
handicap, and cloaking it with an
air of respectability. Maybe we
are already drifting down this
road without any publk debate."
Of course, there is now a new
problem. Is the destruction of
surplus test-tube embryos on a
par with abortion? On the face of
it, it is not. And even if it were,
Jewish law does not confer the
status of person upon the fetus,
and it makes a marked distinc-
tion between the taking of actual
and of potential life.
The consequence has been to
allow a considerable diversity of
rabbinic opinion on what consti-
tutes valid grounds for abortion.
Nonetheless the literature shares
certain common ground rules, in
particular that there must be
proven major need in the specific
case, and that "need" is defined
by reference to the mother, not to
the unborn child. Quite different
questions are therefore raised in
the case of an embryo not as yet
implanted in the womb. For here
the argument tends to be con-
ducted in terms of the "rights of
the unborn." And for the most
part, Jewish law finds this an un-
helpful, even a nonexistent, con-
cept.
BUT THE problem is more ap-
parent than real. There are many
instances in Judaism of duties
towards things or beings that of
themselves have no rights. It
may be true that in the writings
relating to abortion some of the
authorities make a distinction
between before and after the first
forty days of pregnancy. Before
then, the Talmud calls the em-
bryo "mere liquid," not yet bear-
ing the recognizable signs of fetal
development. Others reject the
distinction: even before then, it is
still potential life. The test-tube
embryo may be still less. For
without the positive act of im-
plantation, it is not yet even
potential life.
Yet we could not conclude that
it is too not-yet-human to come
within the scope of morality. To
mention just two of many con-
siderations. First: Judaism
records the strongest possible
objection to hash-hatat zero, the
destruction of seed prior to fer-
tilization. This is further from be-
ing potential life even than the
test-tube embryo, yet the Talmud
says that he who does so is "as if
he shed blood." The Zohar des-
cribes him as one who 'kills his
own (potential! children.
Second: there are strict rules
against inflicting pain on
animals. And as Maimonides ex-
plained, this is not a recognition
that animals have rights, but
rather a refusal to countenance
behavior that might breed indif-
ference to pain or disregard for
life. Thus, the broad psy-
chological consequences for
society of the practice of destroy-
ing or experimenting on test-tube
life would itself count as a factor
in the halachic guidelines. There
is as yet no substantial expres-
sion of rabbinic opinion on this
very recent development. But we
can expect strong reservations *
be expressed on the fertiliza. i
of more ova than are strictly
necessary for the immediate
needs of the woman undergoing
treatment.
IT IS LIKELY, though, that
the technique of test-tube fer-
tilization in itself will not be op-
posed, in cases where there is no
outside donor and where the
couple have no other chance of
having children. To those who
permit artificial insemination
using sperm from the husband,
the new technique is similarly
permissible. Such, at any rate,
was the conclusion of one major
halachic authority in a recent un-
published responsum.
There is. correspondingly, a
clear consensus of opposition to
artificial insemination using
sperm from a donor other than
the husband. The new techniques
raise a further possibility: that of
an ovum taken from one woman
and after fertilization implanted
into another. Not least of the
questions to be determined in
Jewish law would be that of
maternity. Whose child is it? The
genetic mother, or the host
mother?
This kind of question had
arisen earlier this century in rela-
tion to ovarian transplants. In
general it is widely agreed that a
transplanted organ takes the
identity of the person to whom it
has been given. But is the same
true of an embryo? Strangely
enough it is just here, in relation
to a startling new development in
medical technique, that we find a
precise precedent in the ancient
rabbinic literature. A tradition is
recorded about Leah, the wife of
Jacob. She had had six sons
and Jacob's two handmaids had
two sons each when she be-
came pregnant for the seventh
time. She had known by
prophetic foresight that Jacob
would have twelve sons. Thus,
had she then given birth to a boy,
that would have left only one son
to be bom to Rachel. And her
sister would then have had the
humiliation to have given birth to
fewer sons than the handmaids.
The child in Leah's womb was in
fact a boy. She prayed for it to be
a girl. And so by a miracle the
fetus was transferred to Rachel
who eventually gave birth to it
and called him Joseph.
JOSEPH, in other words, had
I^eah as his genetic mother and
Rachel as his host mother. And
he was. of course, Rachel's son.
The proof is, at it happens, not
decisive, and there are several
legal passages in the Talmud that
have a bearing on whether a
child's relationship to its mother
is determined by the moment of
conception or of birth. Two very
recent responsa discuss the ques-
tion in relation to test-tube
babies, and neither comes to a
definite conclusion. Again, we
await clarification.
It is already clear that the
questions posed by presently
possible techniques are formida-
ble. The possibility of a fetus
brought to full development
without ever having been within
the womb, and still more the
technique of cloning, will call for
reconsideration of our most basic
definitions of personhood and
parentage. The rabbis of the past
did not shrink from such ques-
tions, though they occured in a
very different context.
. THUS IN a famous respon-
sum, R. Zvi Ashkenazi was
asked, almost three hundred
years ago. about the status of
artificially created life. Could a
golem, a being in human form
created from clay and animated
by mystical technique, count as
part ot a minyan ? His answer was
ready to hand, for the Talmud it-
self had in a way already con-
sidered it. "Rabbah created a
man." it is reported, "and sent
him to R. Zera. R. Zera spoke to
him. but received no answer. So
he said to him: You must be a
creation of the magicians. Return
to your dust."
. SINCE R. ZERA, without
compunction, turned the golem
back to dust, it must follow that
such artificially created life has
no status. R. Zvi's responsum is
interesting not only in its
characteristic willingness to find
a halachic answer to a seemingly
remote question, but also for its
obiter dictum that taking a life
applies only to "something
formed as a foetus in a mother's
womb." Would a foetus brought
to full maturity in a laboratory
thus be no more than a golem?
One recent writer in a medical
journal wrote, "In an increasing-
ly godless society, we find tech-
nology pushing us into areas
where there are no rules to break
and no principles to guide us."
Despite the fact that the re-
sources of the halacha will be
strained to the limit, the rabbinic
literature has an unbroken tradi-
tion stretching back over two
thousand years in which every
ethical issue, common or
recherche, was subjected to the
most minute analysis, against
the constant background of faith
that a single human life was as
precious as a universe and as holy
as the image of God. One thing is
certain. That the vigilance of the
halacha will not allow medical
science to march on without rules
to keep and principles by which
to be guided.
New BBW Chapter
H'nai B'rith Women is in the
process of forming a new chapter,
drawing from the North Dade,
North Miami, Miami and Miami
Beach communities. A get
together is scheduled for Apr. 4
at 1 p.m. at the Miami home of
Diane Robbins.
Free Tickets
are now available at
Chase Federal Savings & Loan Branches
for the
Annual ;
Spring
Concert
Wednesday, April 14, 1982
7:30 PM.
Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts
1700 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
Starring
The Opus l Singers
Mlaml-Dade Community College
Caravan Singers
and more
Sponsored by Chase Federal Savings & Loan Association
and The Miami Beach Cultural Society
/^CHASE FEDERAL^
JJM sayings and Loan Association *****
Ifvat Manna*.


111 loutuan /

friday, March 26, 1982
1982 CJA-IEF Events
The Cuban-Hebrew annual dinner-dance was held recently on behalf
of the 1982 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund at the
Konover Beach Hotel. Joel Arnon. Consul General of Israel I far left),
presents a 1982 Cuban-Hebrew Pacesetter award to Issac Sklar. while
Sklar's wife, Berta, and Philip T. Warren, general campaign chairman
for the Greater Miami Jeuish Federation's 1982 CJA-IEF Campaign,
look on.
B mjfi Ik | *>*-'
m Ltd ^B 1 a^^L^L^ mm
The Second Annual South Dade Cocktail Reception was held at the
Kings Bay Yacht and Country Club on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federations 1982 Combined Jewsih Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. Pictured (from left to right) are Harry Weitzer, South Dade
Cocktail Reception chairman; Senator Carl Levin, guest speaker; and
MorrisFuternick, South Dade Campaign chairman.
Costa Brava sponsors joined for a dinner on behalf of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federations 1982 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. From left to right are Al Isaacson, sponsor; Rabbi
Irving Lehrman, guest speaker; Louis Harris, sponsor and Stanley C
Myers, sponsor. J
A brunch on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federations 1982
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund wThtldat
Iir0cnaJhntVentUr% ?Uc "eft Hght' ^^ Satovsk^. BuUding
R ?Z f n ?te""r- general c**>n and S
Richard Essen, guest speaker and Renee Zales. general ccxhain
Maison Grande Residents met on behalf of the Greater Min~,; l
Federations 1982 Combined Jewish AfM,ZuSJS^ZS
Pwtujd Heft to right) are Meyer LevinTn, SK2H558S
Grande; Louis Fnedman. co-chairman; Sidney I Bernbaum
chairman; Alfred Golden, guest speaker andco^rnZ.% ,?'
Federation, High-Rise Division, co-chairman of the
Ceremonies to be
Held for
Judge Stember
Investiture of Dade County
Court Judge Joan A. St ember
will be held at 12:15 p.m. Apr. 2,
on the fourth floor of the Dade
Courthouse, with Chief Judge
Gerald T. Wetherington presi-
ding.
Both State Attorney Janet
Reno and former State Attorney
Richard E. Gerstein will speak at
the formal swearing-in cere-
monies for the new judge.
Others who will take part in
the investiture include Dr. Irving
Lehrman. Frank Angones. Neal
Sonnett. Ted Klein. Joel Hirsc-
horn. State Rep. Roberta Fox.
F.ddie Fields, and Burton Young.
The judge's 91 year-old grand-
mother. Pauline Stember. will
hold the family Bible for the
investiture.
Jewish Musk Sabbath'
At Temple Zion
Five J>outh Dade Jewish con-
gregations and the South Dade
Jewish Community Center will
co-host the second annual "Cele-
bration of Jewish Life Through
Music'' community concert on
Wednesday at Temple Judea, at
7:30 p.m.
In addition to the South Dade
IOC, congregations participating
in the concert include Bet Breira,
Beth David. Temple Judea. Tem-
ple Samu-Fl and Temple Beth
Am.
Auxiliary 174 Meeting
Norman Bruce Brown Ladies?
Auxiliary No. 174 will bold their
monthly business meeting at the
Israelite Center Temple on Sun-
day morning. President Mae
Schreiber will hold nominations
and elections of officers for the
1982-83 term.
The auxiliary will
monthly social at a!"9J
Miami Community r* **
tween 12:30 and 4 m >
^Hostess for 4thPemday0n&
dent Schre.ber is p,^ **
out-going' party
.J"'
/
*
f**^%
Passover
Seder
Wednesday, April Seventh
Cantor Irving Shulkcs
Traditional Dinner
HOTEL O.VTHE-OCEAN MUM BE.V 11
830.00 per person, tax and gratuity Included,
Reservations: Catering Office 532-3600
"Let All Who Are Hungry Come And Eat...
And Celebrate The Passover."
The traditions of Passover are not
only ancient but beautiful. Just as Im-
portant, they are as relevant today as
thy were centuries ago. And inviting all
those who are hungry to come and eat
has become a hallmark of the Jewish
way of life.
Preparing fine Jewish food has aJ
ways been the hallmark of MamschewrU.
For almost a century, we have been
helping families honor Passover with an
array of delicious products specialty pre
pared for this festive occasion. And we
lite to fed that, in some way. we add to
the Joyousness of the holiday
Happy Pass overt
63' Manischewilz
^nnsssv QUALITY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision B
For Kashruth Certificate write:
Board of Rabbit. P.O. Box 214. Jersey City. NJ 07303


Community Corner
nolDhin Coach Don Shula and Mrs. Shula will be pre-
Miam', Robert W. Laidlaw Humanitarian Award by the
,nted the ation of south Florida at a dinner Apr. 15 at The
Pmbassadors Hotel. ___ "
(ill man Gallery is presenting an exhibition of paint
1 BVaM,,rrav Pill-----from Philadelphia. The opening recep-
P^bWheld Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. at 270 N.E. 39th St.
gj5 exhibition Will continue through Apr. 29.
-j r.ladvs Silverbush will be the recipients of the
L ^Vr^ll Awara at Histadrufs third annual Seder, which
l^vpar commemorates the 62nd anniversary of Israel
At The Seder will be held at the Konover Hotel on
HiamiBeachonApr.il-
ikemia Society of America, Southern Florida Chapter, has
' need that Stella Taylor, marathon swimmer, will be
l?nn0lrv chairperson for their second annual "Super Swim
"SScVbe held Oct. 3, in Broward and Dade Counties.
Sid Gereh has been reappointed to the Miami Beach Conven-
Center Advisory Board by the Miami Beach City Commis-
KJ Gersh is past president of the Miami Beach Jaycees.
Dr Alex Berenthal, son of Mr. Mori Berenthalof Miami
I aZh was recently awarded the Doctor of Optometry degree
IZ, the New England CoUege of Optometry. Dr. Alex Beren-
Jd did undergraduate work at the University of Miami m Coral
| Gables.
The 8th annual Tennis Event for the benefit of the American
I Cancer Society will begin Friday at the Royal Palm Tennis Club.
i Agatha Christie's Black Coffee, Players State Theatre's final
production of the season, will open Apr. 2 at 8 p.m. at the
I theatre in Coconut Grove.
Aaron A. Foosaner and Sally Milledge are co-chairing the
Mental Health Association of Dade County's Capital Funds
Friday, March 26,1982 /'
^.
"FLORIDA RESIDENT* ESCAPE
NANTASKET BEACH CONDOS
SANDCASTLE CONDOMINIUMS
CALL COLLECT
ONLY SEVEN UNITS l-17-S26-2273
DIRECTLY ON BEACH
^h*
Not since the asking of The Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
*
> Teiiey s liny imie tea leaves. They ve been making it big in
Jewish homes for years Tetley knows that |usl as tiny lamb
u i and "ny ^^ are ,he mosl "avorful the same is true tor
' a leaves That's why tor rich, refreshing tea. Tetley bags
^e packed with tiny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier1
TONY RANDAL I
Kosher for Pai
TETLEY. TEA fta. m*m*
I
|
X;
::
vrnmvmmmm\mmmmmimuam
mt0fMfmis*fifs&iM*i.
Wedding
I
Attias-Cypen
ATTIAS CYPEN
Nicole Attias. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer
Attias of Lille, France, and Wayne Alan Cypen,
son of Judge and Mrs. Irving Cypen of
MiamiBeach. were married Mar. 20 at Temple
Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiated.
Maid of honor was the bride's sister, Sonia At-
tias. Jennifer Cypen and Leslie Cypen, the
groom s nieces, served as flower girls. Brides-
maids included Chantal Ginzberg, sister of the
bride; Bonnie Epstein, sister of the groom and
Helen Fajardo.
Steven Schiffres served as best man, and Ste-
phen Cypen, Tad Cypen, Myles Cypen, brothers
of the groom, and Leon Attias, brother of the
bride, all served as ushers. Ring bearers were
Adam Epstein and Brett Epstein, nephews of the
groom.
After a honeymoon in Hawaii, the couple will
live in Miami Beach.
fc-SSSSSS
ttWftWftWra^
Seder Services At
Shelbourne Hotel
Passover Seder services will be
held at the Shelborne Beach
Hotel on Miami Beach, according
to Managing Director Charles A.
Kramer.
"They are strictly kosher, with
Mashgiach Harry Stein on the
premises. Services will be by
Cantor Ed Todras," according to
Kramer.
Technion Women
Miami Beach Chapter, Wom-
en's Division, American Tech-
nion Society, will hold its ne:.t
luncheon meeting, honoring Na.n
Cohen, on Apr. 1 at the Shel-
bourne Hotel, at noon. New
Horizons Choral Group will pro-
vide the entertainment.
Jean Zaben and Dorothy Ar-
thur are in charge.
WE HAVE

' Live-in Companions
Home makers, to care for
home & patient. Sitters, for
Adults & Children. LPN's*
RN's, Aides, Male
Attendants. Cleaning
Service.
iRates starting at $5.00/hr.

Professional Medical *
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J 688-9899 or J
688-9896 Eves.
Bring back that ^
homemade taste
for
1 !*0RSCHT
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Gold'S BorschtJ
ibdli^wbJEllir^pidPiQun
riarltU'i Meat CtaiftU Iifliih-Iewisk Wttki*
Printed in Engliah .
MFC Mf Off to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? 1 Year $18.00 ? 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
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Address:.
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P.O. Box 01 '3. Miami. Ftorida JI101


ReoultionprvWeub*cr.ptiombtp^dlnd*net. |


Commissioner Ruth Shack is shown with some of the new OUT mem-
bers who attended the Dad* South Region ORTDay Membership Fair
to hear her discussion on the federal budget cuts and their effects on
Dade County. Seated (left to right) are Mary Ellen Peyton, president,
Dade South Region Woman's American ORT; Robyn Haber, vice
president, Dade South Region ORTDay chairman and Shack. Stand-
ing (left to right) are Susan Greenberg, Fran Sachs, Dorrie Solomon,
Ruth Kravitz and Pearl Teitler.
Celebrating the 90th birthday of David Goldstein at a recent luncheon
of the Aviva Chapter of Pioneer Women-Na'amat are (left to right)
Dorothy Goldman, president; Jean Stessel, Na'amat chairman; Jean
Goldstein, and David Goldstein. Goldstein was honored for his contri-
butions to Pioneer Women and the Spiritual Adoption program.
Douglas Gardens Auxiliary Events
Silvers, donor chairman, will give
the Invocation.
Anne Tanenbaum, Hennie
Jaffee, Dorothy Cymrot, and
Rose Astrov are in charge.
The Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary, the Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Douglas
Gardens, will hold its monthly
birthday party for the residents
on Sunday on the campus of the
home at 2 p.m.
This party will be sponsored by
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Silverman and
Dr. Edna Lavitt.
Frances Makovsky is program
chairman.
Auxiliary will hold its monthly
luncheon on Tuesday at noon at
Sambos Restaurant, 2701 Col-
lins Ave.
Zelda Thau, president of the
auxiliary, will preside and Ruth
Sisterhood Luncheon
Sisterhood of Temple Ner
Tam id will hold its annual Torah
Fund-Residence Halls Luncheon
on Tuesday Sklar Auditorium,
Miami Beach.
Guest speaker will be Mrs.
Norman Sholk, Torah Fund
chairman of the Florida Branch
of Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism. I
Helen P. Sussman of New
York City and Surfside,
former national president of
the Womens League for Con-
servative Judaism, was to be
honored by tke Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America
with the Ha'Yay Olam Award
at a luncheon on Thursday at
the Waldorf-Astoria
Post and Auxiliary
Installs Officers
Installation of the newly
elected officers of the Abe Hor
rowitz Jewish War Veterans Post
683. and its Ladies Auxiliary was
held at McDonald Senior Citizen
Center.
New post officers are Harvey
Malise, commander; Ben Borew,
senior vice commander; Morton
Todd, first junior vice command-
er; Edward Kass. second junior
vice commander; Norton Leff,
judge advocate; Dr. Jack Gerard,
post surgeon; Frank Ash, Fulton
Greenberg, William Schneider,
trustees: Harry Lopchinsky,
chaplain; William Schneider, of-
ficer of the day; Morris Greebel,
quartermaster and Al Friedman,
adjutant.
Officers who will serve the
auxiliary are Phyllis Shaw, presi-
dent; Elsie Greebel, senior vice
president; Janice Alter, junior
vice president; Shirley Motton,
treasurer and corresponding
secretary; Rae Koshar, conduc-
tress; Rose Greebel, chaplain;
Betty Reibman. patriot instruc-
tress; Mary Wexler, Gert Bar-
nathan, Ann Friedman, trustees;
Shirley Schultz, recording secre-
tary; Afore Brunner, financial
secretary; Yevett Gromet, his-
torian and Lillian Wannbrandt,
jruard.
RELGO, INC.-
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
OpwiSurmr
I Waahingtoa Avenue M.B.
532 5912
Condo For Sale
1 bedroom, large terrace,
absolutely best Buy.
Owner will finance, 9Vi%
mortgage, one block from
ocean. 531-4994
WOMAN DESIRING COMFOR-
TABLE HOME AND MODEST
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ELDERLY LADY. REFEREN-
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You can have a KOSHER PESACH made easier if you
do your shopping at
Everything's Kosher
Largest selection of Kosher Le'Pesach
V
American
Israeli
"Our 25th
Anniversary"
Religious Gifts
Articles
Spaciillzlna In Bar atltzvah Sets
1X7 Washington Are.
Miami Beach 5317722
The Story of Schapiro's
Entwined with Dedication to
Excellence in Winemaking
Over 80 years ago, a winery was established in Manhatt
Lower East Side by a Polish immigrant, Samuel Schapiro l! I
knew but one way to make Kosher wine <------
quality New York State grapes to produce the best
in a time honored way.
fermentation oil
tastingwin,
Samuel Schapiro opened his original winery on Attc
Street. After years of careful winemaking, the winery mov^T
Rivington Street where the winery still stands today as tw
torical and legendary symbol of excellence in Kosher win/nui
ing. Schapiro's original method called for the patient ferme tl
tion and maturation of the finest New York State grapes in k
and redwood casks, always under the supervision of Orthod
ordained Rabbis. Today, the firm maintains its respectful 5
cation to tradition under the auspices of its third general
owner, Norman Schapiro. He produces his traditional and h! I
wines to perfection, keeping in mind the founder's credo "Why.
that are fit for only observant Jews only the very beet ri!
do." m'
Rivington Street has changed over the past 80 years, butnotI
Schapiro's. It is still the onh/ winery in full production in Mm-
hattan. While the Manhattan skyline has changed considerably
shifts have occurred in ethnic population and lifestyle.
Schapiro's has remained constant its methods of quality
winemaking and strict adherence to the standards of Kashruth
are as consistent and reliable as the U-0 designation on the
wines" labels, symbolizing approval by the Union of Orthodox
Rabbis.
Schapiro's traditional extra heavy Concord and Malaga winej
won their quality and richness described in the familiar slogan
"You can almost cut them with a knife." For this reason, peoplt
who want the best in Kosher wines return to their local packan
stores throughout America.
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
THE FULL LINES OF
EMPIRE
Kosher
Poultry
& Foods
ARE PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED BY:
MENDELSON, INC.
Miami Beach (305)672-5800
TROPIC ICE COMPANY
Hialeah (305)624-5750
ISUN..TUES., WED.,
THUR..9PM
FRI.andSAT.I
8110PM
.
Tickets
Available
Bass Outlets
Jordan
Marsh
Stores
<*
'*t,ons 9*9
I WED., THUR., FRI. $10.00 SAT. S12.00J
WINES-Kadem.Carm.l
CHEESE Domestic. Imported
FROZEN FOODS
CHOLOV YISRAEL DAIRY PROD.
TOOTHPASTE COSMETICS
MOUTHWASH
DIET FOODS-No Salt, Sugar
SMOKED FISH-Lox
FRESH CAKES-COOKIES
SHMURAH MATZAH
LIQUID SWEETNER
ICEES.etc.
Take advantage of unadvertlsed specials
A HAPPY AND KOSHER PASSOVER
Tokayer-Katz Family
Open Evenings till 8.00
1344 Washington Ave
672-4154
Delivery service to some areas
Sun. till 5:00
Miami Beach.
WHAT'S HOT?SUMMER!...AND>
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy
day camp, THAT'S WHAT!
8 WEEKS......JUNE 21 THRU AUGUST 13
4 WEEKS......JUNE 21 THRU JULY 16
< WEEKS......JULY 19 THRU AUGUST 13
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EARLY AND LATE CHILD CARE AVAILABLE
CALL-
HEBREW ACADEMY DAY CAMP 1982
2400 Pine Tree Drive, Miami Beach, 33140 532-6421
..."f/ie Summar Experience with Jewish Values"...


Friday, March 26,1982 / The Jewish Floric


i



<%e iH-Tf i he Jewish Floridian Friday. March 26, 1982
Receiving certificates of appreciation from
Howard Klein, executive director, Israel
Bonds, (far left) at the Crvstal House's
annual Salute to Israel are (left to right)
Samuel Gale, Jr., Charles Reskin, Mr. and
Mrs. Erich Braun and Benjamin Botwinick.
Celebrity Auction at
South Bade JCC
The 9th annual Mammouth
Celebrity Auction will be held by
the Y Women of the South Dade
Jewish Community Center on
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the South
Dade JCC.
,
The auction will feature such
prizes as lucheon with public
officials, autographed scripts and
books, and original paintings.
All proceeds will go to the
Linda Shapiro Richard Camp
Scholarship Fund to aid un-
Residents of Majorca Towers in North Miami celebrated their annual derpnv lledged children who wish
Salute to Israel to benefit the Israel Bonds Organization. Samuel to attend Summer camp.
Jaffee was presented with the State of Israel Scroll of Honor Award
recognizing his participation in Jewish philanthropies and civic __
groups. From left are Irving Wiesenfeld, co-chairman; Rabbi Louis Haim YflSSky Meeting
Lederman, spiritual leader of Temple Beth Moshe in North Miami;
Jaffee and Benjamin Rosen, chairman of the event.
'Artists of Israel' on Display
Haim Yassky Chapter of
Hadassah will meet Wednesday
at Byron Hall at 1 p.m. The pro-
gram is subtitled "A Dialogue."
"Artists of Israel: 1920-1960"
will open at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art Center Tuesday
and run through May 16. The ex-
hibition will include 124 paint-
ings, drawings and sculptures by
36 Israeli artists.
According to Marcy Lefton,
chairperson of the exhibition, an
opening reception will be held
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the ;
museum. Consul General of Is-
rael for the State of Florida Joel
Arnon will officiate.
Susan Tumarkin Goodman,
chief curator of the Jewish
Museum in New York, will con-
duct a slide lecture on the exhibi-
tion on Sunday at 7 p.m. also at
the museum.
The exhibition was organized
by the Jewish Museum, New
York, under the auspices of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Proudly Presents
JACK
ANDERSON
Tuesday, March 30.8 P.M.
in the Temple Sanctuary
1701 Washington Ave
Miami Beach
Tickets Available
Phone 536-2503 NOW
Anita Krieger and Lidia Kriger are co-chairing Temple
Menorah's annual art auction, scheduled for Apr. 1 in the Ball-
room of the temple. Art America is conducting the auction,
scheduled to begin at 8:30 p.m. with a wine and cheese preview
beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Lois Emanuel to Represent Dade South ORT
ment Plan.
Mary Ellen Peyton, president,
has appointed Lois Emanuel to
represent ORTat the conference
which will provide career guid-
ance and career information from
the elementary to the junior and
senior high level.
. Women's American ORT,
Dade South Region, will partici-
pate in the Dade County Public
Schools Career Education Arti-
culated School Based Manage-
Dr. Landau to Speak
Dr. Sol Landau will address
the question of mid-life crisis at
the regular monthly "rap"
session of Temple Beth Am for
children with aging parents,
scheduled for Wednesday at 8
p.m. at the temple.
Chinese Tutor
Speak1, the same
language with one billion
people. Tutoring in
Chinese, all levels.
Call 759-5815
Ezra Katz
gives generously of his time
and energy to keep alive
In the world those timeless
values that celebrate the
beauty of life Itself.
To Ezra Katz
To Life
Greater Miami
Jewlah Federation!
1982 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel **
Emergency Fund +
4200 Btscayne Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33137
Dr. I ruin R. (alien received Israel's David Ben-Gurion Award at tlA
annual California Club Salute to Israel sponsored by the LakeCarmM
Lodge of B'nai B'rith. Dr. Callen was recognized for his support 0(th/
Israel bonds Organization and his participation in B'nai B'rith th
.Icu ish Federation, and synagogue groups. From left are Mrs. Calk
Dr. Callen. and Herman Sacks, chairman of the event
Anderson to Speak
Temple Emanu-Els 1982 resi Forum Series will feature Jack ^Cretarv f, s'ate Henry I
Anderson on Tuesday at 8 p.m. Kissinger had hidden the Uniud
at the temple. States tilt towards Pakistan dur-
. ... ,_ me the India-Pakistan war which
Anderson received the 1972 ^^ ^ the formaUon JJJ
Pulitzer Prize for investigative new nation of Bangladesh
reporting with his disclosure that
Add o little natural sweetness to the
beauty of your hoilday. Enjoy 'he
wholesome goodness of Sun-Moid
Raisins. Blue Ribbon* Figs and
Sunsweet" Prunes. They're the Passover
treat that no one will pass up!
-DIAMOND GROWERS
Of CALIFORNIA
K CERTIFIED KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
C SON-DIAMOND GROWERS Of CALIFORNIA 1982


Jjlfeof the Weekly Torah Portion
td he shall bring forfeit unto the Lord for his sin, which
ginned" VAYIKRA
Pod called to Moses from the tent of meeting and
IYIKBA ., The burnt-offering was to consist
mthe sa' wi hout blemish; if it be a fowl, it was to be a
lwte"Ta voung pigeon. The purpose of this offering.
P'. lloWy burned, was to make atonement for
fch was to "f."1!; Offering was to consist of fine flour, raw,
J *" Jed generally intended as a free-will offering. The
M'r ?!.*" cattle or sheep, either male or female, was
fc*fc2!Sm offering, or vow, offered in the name of a family.
ther ferine was intended to make amends for sins com-
Ik nmr Different categories of individuals and groups
W y sLp different animals for sin-offerings. The anointed
eW^ congregation offered a young bullock, the prince
"u'llf rSnSS person a she-goat. The person who
I \ j ..nrlean object, or failed to keep a vow. must bring a
I flamb "r a female goat for a sin-offering; and if he could
Ird either he must bring two young pigeons or turtle-
.he first as a burnt-offering, the second as a sin-offenng
mrved as a wilt-offering in the case of a violation of a
Tive r Thou shalt not"I commandment, or in cases of theft
[Nicies set aside as holy.
.-.counting of the Weakly Portion of Nit Law it extracted and bated
Tlit Graphic History of tilt Jewish Mtrittgt," edited by P. Wollman-
US published by ShengoM. The volume It available at 75 Maiden
? Ntw York, N.V. 100JI. Joseph Schlang it president ol the tacitly 4il-
(iinothevolumt.) _______________________________________
B'not Mitzvah
ttiture for Newman Set For Wednesday
pmel S. Smith of Miami
h president of the Florida
will be among the speakers
-e formal investiture of Dade
[it Court Judge Robert H.
man. Wednesday at 12:15
on the fourth floor of the
I County Court housi
f, cere.
monies will be Chief Judge Weth-
erington Neal Sonnett. Richard
K. Gerstein, Rabbi Michael Eis-
enstadt. Kddie Fields. Frank An-
gones. and Diane M. VanNess.
Robing will be done by Judge
Newman's two children, attorney
Mark Newman and Mrs. Lorie
Levins
Lane
AUDRA TEDDI LANE
Audra Teddi Lane, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Lane, will be
called to be Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah. Saturday at 10:30 a.m.
at Temple Emanu-El. Dr. Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
The celebrant is in the seventh
grade at Miami Country Day
School. She plays the violin and
is a gymnastics student.
Dr. and Mrs. Lane will host the
kiddush following the services in
honor of the occasion. Special
guests will include Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Shulman, Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Lane, grandparents, and
Gerald Shulman, uncle, of New
York.
RONNIE ISSENBERG
Ronnie Issenberg. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Issenberg will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning at Beth Torah
Congregation, with Dr. Max A.
Lipschitz conducting the serv-
ices.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Helen D. Cohen
Nursery School
ENROL! \G NOW FOR FALL SEASON g
OUTSTANDING PROGRAM j
|U>K \H MO\'< i
667-5657 _________________r
TrjTjTjrri s sTmrnri b b 8 s imn iistoit stto b s b b itrr-
It's time for '
happiness* good food
and Sorrento.
Sorrento wishes all
our friends a happy,
healthy passover holi-
day. It's a time for the
joy of family gather-
ings, a time for remem-
bering and sharing.
Sorrento Ricotta's be-
come a tradition at
family celebrations.
We're proud to be a
part of your life.
Haveajoyousfeast!
THE BEST
ITALIAN
CHEESE IN
AMERICA!"
Carmel Wines Offers
Free Information Booklet
"Historically speaking, it's not known for sure whether Adam
and Eve enjoyed the fruits of the vine in the Garden of Eden."
So begins an attractive and informative new booklet produced
by the Carmel Wine Co., Inc., New York, importers of world
famous Carmel wines, imported from Israel.
Carmel's booklet...Born in France...Raised in Israel...tells the
saga of Moses and the land of Cannan and brings the reader to
the modemjwine industry in Israel today. Wine is mentioned
155 times in the Old Testament and Carmel's booklet quotes
many that are still meaningful today. In addition, there are
educational descriptions of Carmel's many fine wines,
highlighting their two vintage dated selected varietals, Cabernet
Sauvignon and Saucignon Blanc.
Wine lovers are invited to obtain this colorful new brochure by
sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Carmel Wine
Co.. Inc., 271 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10016
Ronnie is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Highland Oaks Junior
High School, a member ol the
!lc\ classat BethTorah's Harold
\\ nlk Ri ligious School and ;m
active member ol Beth Torah's
I S\ group
\- part ol the Shabbat si n
Ri mnu a ill chant the Hal-
torah and conduct a portion ol
tin Sa"bbath S n i< es In his
Honor his parents ill sponsor the
Kiddush following the sen ices.

CELEBRATE PASSOVER A G^
AT TEMPLE BETH MOSHE fa
fa
A
Tha in SMtf
Wadnattfav Eng. *.l 7
CONOUCTtD BY
RABBI LOUIS M LEOERMAN
and
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEOLER
ArnnqiKlntl hava Mn ada "1th
couti. traditional Paaaovar Mil
IktaMI
Thuf4ay Evanmf. Aprt*
COSOOCTtO BY
RABBI JOSEPH A OORFINKEL
and
CANTOR MOSHE f RIEOLER
Koahar Catarar to provlda full
aarvad alaqantly on chlnavara.
RESERVATIONS CAM BE MADE AT
TEMPtX BETH MOSHE
222i N. E. 121 St. Worth Miami
891-SSOD"
B91-5SOB" ^y
&
KCertified Kosher
The Prune Juke
Its a natural Eat wtf balance*
foods, mmdm^m*'*"*!!^
the mt% pm lutural fruit juke, ft
contains iron and potassium and
vitamin B2. And it tastes good.
Remembei, any Jmi^ovement you
makcis{or SUNSWECT*
me better you.^^.


Tfjnrn;rn~
r;-%rsf&rTt>: war

Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name VIL-
LAGE WNANDE at 928 Palm
Avenue, Jrllaleah Dade County.
Florid*; SS010 Intends to
register said name wltn the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Santiago Senande
14643 March 12.19. 36;
April J. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLOR IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number M-1117
DivilnMI*]
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBA APPEL
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
ttto Of REBA APPEL. de-
ceased, File Number 82-1817. la
pending In the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 Weal Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 13130
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
within three months of the first
publication of this notice; (1)
all claims against the estate
and ( any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfi
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue or Jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begttntti March 36.1983.
Personal Representative:
DOROTHY LOWENSTEIN
330 South McLean
Boulevard
Memphis. Tennessee 38104
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
G ALBUT. G ALB UT *
MENIN. P.A..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139
Telephone: 673-3100
14678 March 26:
April 2. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. t2-42r* FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALBERTO PEREZ
Petitioner Husband
and
YOLANDA PEREZ
Respondent Wife
TO: YOLANDAPEREZ
Residence and
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FTED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
Tiled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Louis R. Beller attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
4S0 Lincoln Road. Suite 338.
Miami Beach. 33139. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore APRIL SO. 1983; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeka In THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 34 day of March.
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Self ried
As Deputy Clerk
lCircuit Court Seal)
14683 March 36;
April 3. 9. 16,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
CARLOS F DE LEON. CAR-
LOS E. DE LEON. MARIO T.
DE LEON AND LUIS M DE
LEON, d-b-a SERGIO'S
CAFETERIA at 9330 S W. 40
Street. Miami. Florida Intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
A KOSS, Attorney
for
CARLOS F DE LEON,
CARLOS E DE LEON.
MARIO T. DE LEON
and
LUIS M DE LEON
d-b-a
SERGIO'S CAFETERIA
14667 March 19.36;
April 3.9.1982
IN MEMORIAM
The Officers, Board of Directors, Faculty and
Students of the Rsbbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Acsdemy psy tribute to the memory of our beloved
Founder, Rabbi Alexander S. Gross z"1 (Reb Alexander
Sender Ben Menashe) on this, the second anniversary
of his death, 22 Adar.
"The very world rests on the breath of children
in the schoolhouse"
Talmud: Sabbath. 119b
Dr. Elias Herschmann Rabbi Stanley Bronfeld
President Principal
Isadore H. Abrama
Chairman of the Exe.: ve Committee
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LEO
MAN CUSTOM WORKS at 7T80
N W 71st Street. Miami. Fla.
33166 Intends to register aald
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida. __ .
PERFECTO M GARCIA
LEONEL S. HERNANDEZ
TED E. TSOUPRAKE
LAW OFFICE
Attorney for LEO MAN
CUSTOM WORKS
014M1 March 19, 36.
___________April 3.9.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
FAMILY CIVIL
DEPARTMENT
CASE NO. IJ 4725
NOTICE TO APPEAR
AND DEFEND SUIT
N RE The Marriage of:
VANCY N GREEN.
Petitioner.
ind
IOHN DAVID GREEN.
Respondent.
TO: JOHN DAVID
GREEN
Post Office
Box 42829
Houston. Texas 7T242
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-.
FIED that a Complaint has
been filed against you In the
above styled Court to dissolve
the marriage of the parties
hereto and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer or
other pleadings upoon the Peti-
tioner's attorneys, SHOREN-
STEIN LEWIS. 407 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach, Florida.
33139. and rile the original of
such Answer or other pleading
in! he Office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida, on or before the 33 day
of April. 1983 If you fail to do
so. a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
ORDERED at Miami, Dade
County. Florida, on the 19 day
of March. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERKOF
THE CIRCUIT COURT
COUNTY OF DADE.
STATE OF FLORIDA
By: Willie Bradshaw Jr.
Deputy Clerk l Seal)
14681 March 36:
April 2. 9. 16. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. I2-J45t
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JULIUS ISAAC
STEINBERG.
1'ctltumer.
and
ELEANOR ELIZABETH
STEINBERG.
Respondent.
YOU ELEANOR ELIZA-
BETH STEINBERG, residence
unknown, ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED TO FILE your
written response to this action
for dissolution of marriage,
with the Clerk of the above
Court, and serve a copy upon
Petitioner's Attorneys. SAUL
T. VON ZAMFT and SAMUEL
E. SMITH. 1330 S. Dixie High
way. Suite 800. Coral Gables.
Florida 33148, on or before the
9th day of April. 1982 else the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage will be taken as con-
fessed
DATE: March8.1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Courts
BY: LolaH. Currer
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
14650 March 12. 19. 26;
April 3. 1983
ifctJii^islWEJIiK
UerMi'i Mast Caaplata Iialisk-Jtwisa fttklt
Print*' tn Rngliah
i to receiv? THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? 1 Year $18.00 Q 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:
Address:.
City:____
.Apt. No.:.
State:.
(Please Make Ch-cs Payable to 'THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN")
aye 24 1 Miami Florid* moi
p be paid in advance
WU to Hold Donor Days
Chapter, f. th8 ^TJSJSS^T^
chairman. Vivian > *'
LaMer
Women's League for Israel,
headed by chairman, June
Wagner, will hold its Donor Day,
Monday at Turnberry Isle
Country Club. Bertha Goldberg
is chairman of the day and Bea
Berlin's chairman of the journal.
Cindy Claire will provide the
entertainment.
Lincoln Miami Beach Chapter
of WLI will hold its Donor Day,
Tuesday, at Temple Emanu-El,
according to Frances Resnick,
chapter chairman. Betty Got-
providetheenterUinmentd '
Yiddish Culture
Yiddish Culture WinkL,
present a program on WednL
at 10:30 at Temple NerWT^
Professor Arthur Lermer
Luski, Leon Yudoff
Shapiro, and Rabbj
Goldberger will partid
according to Mensha Feld
chairman.
Synagogue
Listings
Candlelighting time 6:15
TEMPLEADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami
Drive
947-1436
Carter Ian Alpam
Fn.-7:45 p.m. Daled Shabbos.
10 p.m.- Singles Service
Sat.- 8:30 a.m. Sabbath Services.
TEMPLE BETH AM Or Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr Baumgard
& Miarrs-66767 Sensor Rabbi
Marlon Hoffman. Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Fn.-8:15 p.m. Rabbi Goldstein will discuss
"The Art ol Humility Set 9 15 and it '5
am.- Texan Services
EfcfH DAVID CONGREGATION -
Corai Way 2825 SW 3rd Aenue
South Dade 7S00SW 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILUAM W. UPSON
Friday, 8 rxm. South Dad. Chal
Saturday. 9 am Coral Way
Fri.- Fsmiiy Service
I Sal Adult B not MiUvah ol Judith Berger.
Marianne Oedmon. Hanna Krumnoli.
and Susanna Tarian
Daty Service* at Coral Way Chapel
South Deda Mlrryan on Tueeday*
i^lnorrmik)nCasia6>3B11
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 SW. 12Ave
Rabbi Max Sriaptro 8584334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose BerK-n-Executive Secretary
Deity Minyan 7:45 a.m. and 5:30 pjn.
Saturday services 8:45 a.m. and
5:30 p.m..
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St N. Miami, FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M Lederman
Canter Moshe Fnedter
Rabb. Ffmeritus Joseph A. Gortinhal
Dairy services 8:15 am.. 5pjTL
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.-M.B Fla. 33139
Tel-538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Meiber
Cantor Saul H. Brash
Dairy Service 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Friday 5:30 p.m.-Safc irday 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase A ve. & 41 st St 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish. Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser FA Eve, 8:15 p.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec Director
Frt Everw.Tg Service &0U p.m.
Sat Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
Deify Services: 7:30 a.m. 530 p.m
FrL- Bat Mltrah of Eftka
Sat l*om Bar Mltnen aeerf.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. FkXKla 33137
Ftwr57&4000
Rabbi Sc4omon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association OIIkx
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Waerarigfon Avenue
Dr. Irving Lehrmen, Rabbi
Late Fn.-EmServ. 8 p.m.
Rabbi Berger will speak on
"To Reach and to Achieve"
. DNCMfcaelelMSar
Or. Lehrmen presch
at 1030 am
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetrae Drive Miami Be**
S3M421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schrfl
Fit eve. 7 p.m. SitSafll
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ol Greater Mu
MsamTs Pioneer Reform (nWpaasfsj
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9900 N. Kendall Dr.. 5955055
Senior Rabbi: HaskeH M. Bemit
AeeL Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Sefcin
Cantor Jacob G Bornstain
Frl.. Downtown-Hewn Saimn *,n discusi
Bui Seriously Folks Kendall -"Sermon
Suite" with RabC" Bemat ana
Rachelie Nelson
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fn.-&l5p.m- Men sCiuDSaooeih
Sorrel Resnick M D iii speak on
"Men's Club. Directions loi Chang*
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd Tel. 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH. President
Services Fri. 730o.m
Set-930am
TEMPLE MENORAH
82075th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 815 p.r>
Saturday services at 9 am
TBIPLENERTAMID
7902CartyteAve..
Miami Beach. 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Friday servicea at 8:15 p-m.
Saha^y services at &*5a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court 111
Mtemi.F1. McdemOrmodoi
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 3820896
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Frl 555 pm
SaL 930 a.m. and 555 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Aw
North Dade's Relorm Cono/egatK*
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi W2*101
Jukan I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:18 aJB.
(730 pm first Friday ol monthi
Sabbath morning services ik*
Sat B not Mitzvan -'. '' Mass"
and Greg Misncon
Conservatn*
271-2311
TEMPLE ZION'
8000 Miller Dr
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Dtokson. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon *T^ur*7"
Sabbath Eve Services 8:15 p.m-
Sabbath Services 9, am
Fn.*lS- Jewish MuS'C Mow" SaDMt" .
Mar. 29- 7 s.m Bar Mitzan ol
Kenneth Svmons
-, QuwtsAreWeJcpme
1982-83 I" III-.......r^nlirmt,. J
sCjtrrHEASTREGrON
UNrrED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA ^
sassnaKasusw.ieaWg^**^.
UNWNOF^AMbHICAN
HEBIWCOriGREGATIONS
119ERa^St..Mr..^2:
379456a Rabbi Lev* L Boc*9^
Davctor. Uraon ol American Hrw
Congragation


abBc Notice
nZ PROPERTY)
JTCIRCUIT COURT OF
l!i;HELEVENTH JUDICIAL
R!?l7lTOf FLORIDA, IN
I^DFORDADE COUNTY
'^"CIV.L ACTION
NO.il-4'21
FAMILY
r nVIL DIVISION
LnCEFORD.SSOLUT.ON
POtiC0Vmarriaoe
jteclNAMARGETSON.
[petitioner,
^IMABGETSON.
feMARGETSON
r *W 108th Street
L V N Y 10021
Lou ABE HEREBY NOTI-
1 Suit a petition for Disso-
EZ your Marriage ha.
IT (lied and commenced In
court and you are requlred
K.e a copy of your written
TZZm If any. to It on Gull-
Statehta Esq.. STONE.
Jgam* GONZALEZ.
R attorney for Petitioner
XirSSm I. "01 West
S2ir Street, Miami. FL
K TEL. (305. 649-4411. and
fcUi original with the clerk
ft* above styled court on or
Kt April 23. 1982; otherwise
^ default will be entered
nlnii you for the relief
jived for the complaint or
[Tali notice shall be published
kg each week for four con-
sume weeks In THE JEW-
BH FLORIDIAN.
[WITNESS my hand and the
Lai of said court at Miami,
ponda on this 18 day of March.
*RICHARDP BRINKER
AaClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByLC. Bedasse
As Deputy Clerk
circuit Court Seal i
BuillermoSostchln. Esq
IrONE.SOSTCHIN*
GONZALEZ. P.A.
WlViestFlaglerStreet
Miami. FI.33135
tttomev for Petitioner
ft,- March 28;
April 2. 9.16. 1982
INTHECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY CIVIL
DIVISION
NO. H-2902
N0TICEOF CHANGE
OF NAME OF A Ml NOR
BY PUBLICATION
I IN RE. CONCEPTION
CARTAYA.
Petitioner for
ANTHONY CASTE LLANO.
a minor.
| TO LENNIN I LEONARD I
CASTELLANO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
FED that a Petition for Name
Ounge of a Minor. ANTHON Y
CASTELLANO. was filed in the
Circuit Court of the 11th
Judicial Circuit. FAMILY DI-
VISION. CASE NO. 82-2902. on
the 25 day of February, 1982.
and you as the child's natural
lather, are required to serve a
copy of your objections or
written defenses to It, if any. on
the Petitioner's attorney,
hose name and address Is:
NATHANIEL L BARONE.
JR. 7801 Coral Way. Suite 131.
Hlmi, Florida 33155, and file
the onglnal with the Clerk of
the above-styled court on or be-
fore the 2nd day of April. 1982;
otherwise a judgment may be
entered for the relief de-
manded In the petition.
Dated: February 25.1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
11th Judicial Circuit
Dade County. Florida
L C Bedasse. DC.
'CIRCUITCOURT SEAL)
"" March 5.12;
19,26,1982
THEpB,rJ5U,T COURT OF
ClIcmT,NJHJUDICIAL
Dr!cJiITINANDFOR
"ttfflWy. FLORIDA
"SENOaj-JWFCU
NOTICE BY
ISRE CJSyCATION
|gSf MARRIAGE OF
PeRtmoAneSrMCHENRY
scottdwanf
MCHENRY
Respondent
TSUDMcH
0-Box 532
?n7, Virginia.
^aPe^^KBYnoUfled
eniWjSfL,*1" been
reoulnsd i d you are hereby
p'tlononmt PeadlntoU'
^ D R^'torney. HAR-
** la 1401 St?!' who ad-
Oait^n'^iTth Avenue,
,0" IhU Mrt. ?0urt on or be-
'Winityou W" entered
^Dm^ n **y of
The Circuit Court
itn ** K 8elfrl,d
March 19, ae
| AnT" 2.9. 1983
------
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12-3*14
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE;
ORLANDO SERMENO
Petitioner
and
BLANCA SERMENO
Respondent
TO: BLANCA SERMENO
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, U any. to It on
Albert L. Carrlcarte, P.A.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2491 N.W. 7th Street.
Miami. Florida 3312S, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore April 9, 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of safd court at Miami.
Florida on this 9 day of March.
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE, P.A.
2491 NW. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 3312B
Telephone: (806)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
14687 March 12.19, 26;
April 2, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-70*2
IN RE ESTATE OF
JOSEPHM
DREXLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Joseph M.
Drexler. deceased. File Num-
ber 82-2082. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130 The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is Dorothy
Drexler. whose address is 231
174th Street. No. Miami Beach.
Florida. The name and address
of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be slated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: March 16.1982.
Dorothy Drexler
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Joseph M. Drexler
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
CYPEN By; Michael A. Dribln
826 Arthur Godfrey Rd ,
POB 402099
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
Telephone (306)083-4731
14669 March 19. 36, 1963
-i__
VJIJFLEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 17 4015
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
INRE:FMARR,AGE
The marriage of
CREGORIOM MENDIZ
and
VIOLETA PORTAL-DE.
TO: VIOLETA PORTAL
DE-MENDIZ
Prolog Avenue
El Sol 927 No. l
Lima. Barranco
Lima. Peru
U,hARE HEREBY NOTI-
r ISO that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR HLIPSON, attorney^
;r' e1u"oner- whose address Is
1815 N.W. 167th Street. Ste 218
Miami. FL 33169, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 23, 1982. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of March,
1962.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Sea)
March 26;
----------------------AprU2.9.16.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 81-3282 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
AVENTURA COUNTRY CLUB
OF FI.ORIDA, a general part
nership.
d-b-a
TURNBERRY ISLE YACHT
AND RACQUET CLUB,
Plaintiff,
vs
ROBERT MOWDER.
Defendant
TO ROBERT MOWDER
l.ast Known
Addresses:
7932 Embassy
Boulevard
Mlramar. Florida
c-o International
School of Travel
2269 Yonge Street
Toronto.
Ontario. Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
damages has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses. If any."to It on Bruce
l.amchlck. LAMCHICK.
GI.UCKSMAN & JOHNSTON.
Plaintiff's Attorneys, whose
address Is: 10651 North Ken
dall Drive. Sutle 217. Miami.
Florida 33176. in or before
APRIL 16. 1982. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's Attorneys or imme-
diately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on March 10. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByK Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN
& JOHNSTON
Bruce Lamchlck
Attorneys for Plaintiff
10651 North Kendall
Drive
Suite 217
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (3061595-6333
14658 March 19. 26:
April 2.9.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
ARNO COMFORT SHOES at
486 N.E. 126 Street. Miami.
Florida. 33161 Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
ArnoShoe Stores. Inc..
Anthony J. La Falce,
President
Hector A Borrell.
Secretary
14870 March 19, 36;
April 2. 9. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
EVERGREEEN INSURANCE
AGENCY OF MIAMI at 2291
N.W. 38th Street. Miami. Fla.
33134 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
EVER-G INSURANCE
AGENCY. INC.
ROSA M. LOPEZ,
Secretary
TED E. TSOUPRAKE
LAW OFFICE
Attorney for EVER-G
INSURANCE AGENCY. INC.
014662 March 19. 36;
April 2. 9. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 13-4023
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE LOURDES
DESDUNES,
Petitioner,
and
HERVE DESDUNES.
Respondent
TO:HERVE DESDUNES
1012 East
New York Avenue
Brooklyn,
New York 11212
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
HOWARD HILL BENNETT,
attorney lor Petitioner, whose
address is 19 West Flagler
Street, Suite 520 Biscayne
Building, Miami, Florida 33130
4*69 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 23,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of March
1982.
RICHARDP. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
Ad Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HOWARD HILL
BENNETT. ESQUIRE
19 West Flagler St.
Suite S20,
Biscayne Building
Miami, Florida 33130 4496
Attorney for Petitioner
1*676 March 26,
April 2, 9. 16.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 92-379* FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LEONSIFRALIEN.
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIE MARTHE
ANDRE SIFRALIEN.
Respondent Wife
TO: MARIE MARTHE
ANDRE SIFRALIEN
c-oOdll Blanc
RueCeffardNo.87
Port-de-Palx.
Haiti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Disso
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is Suite 615. 7900 NE
2nd Avenue. Miami. FL 33138.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before Aprl 16. 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day of March.
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By MJ Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M
ROUTMAN. ESQ
Suite 615.
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
14668 March 19. 28;
April 2. 9. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 62 4 341
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
REINALDOI ZUNIGA.
Husband
and
ELDA ZUNIGA.
Wife
TO ELDA ZUNIGA
RESIDENCE
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed agalst you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defense. If any. to It on
Albert I. Carrlcarte. PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2491 N.W. 7th Street,
Miami. Fl 33125. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 23. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDAIN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of March,
1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By LoUH. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERTL
CARRICARTE. P.A
2491 N W 7th Street
Miami. Fl. 33125
Telephone: (3051649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
114682 March 26;
April 2, 9, 16, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
EM.EX. at 34 SE 2 Ave, Suite
310, Miami, Fl SS1S1 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Efralm Rosner, Owner
14637 March 8,13;
19,36,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engate In business
under the fictitious name Cen-
tral Veterinary Export. Inc. at
7230 W Flagler St.. Miami,
Fla 33136 Intends to register
.Sid name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Eugenlo Marques.
President
14040 March 12, 19.26;.
14 April 3.1983
Mir l
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
, desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Bob Skldell Enterprises and or
Bob Skldell Ent at 928 Arthur
Godfrey Road. Miami Beach.
FL 33140 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
BOBSKIDELL
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By: Robert A. Skldell.
President
14684 March 26;
I April 2. 9.16. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 3798 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ISMARD BIENVENUE
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIE ERMITE
BIENVENUE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIE ERMITE
BIENVENUE
610 Boulevard
Jean-Jacques
Des saline
Port-au-Prince,
Haiti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced In this
court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses. If any. to It on LLOYD
M ROUTMAN, ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
Suite 618. 7900 NE 2nd Avenue.
Miami, FL 33138, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 18. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of March.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
' LLOYD m.
ROUTMAN, ESQ
Suite 618,
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
14606 March 19. 36;
April 3. 9.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Leg's
Export at 1046 NE 80 St.. Miami
FL SS138 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Lux Elvira Smith,
Owner
14680 March 36;
April 3, 9,16,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 67-3*76 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
NRE: THEMARRIAGEOF
ADIELAU RAMIREZ.
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
ROBERTO RAMIREZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO:ROBERTO RAMIREZ
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road-
Suite 379. Miami Beach. Fla.
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before APRIL 16.
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for our consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FIXJRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 10th day of
March. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
i LAW OFFICES OF
< HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
BY: Harvey D Friedman
Attorney for Petitioner
420 Lincoln Road-
Suite 379
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305)531-0391
Attorney for Petitioner
14661 March 19. 26;
April 2, 9, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 62-1941 FC 10
NOTICE OF SUIT
RICHARD BEAUUEU
AND
OLIVE BEAUUEU.
his wife.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
TRAVELERS INDEMNITY
COMPANY. WILLIAM E.
FULLER and FLORENCE
QUIGLEY.
Defendants.
I TO: FLORENCE
1 QUIGLEY
1721 Challen Avenue
Jacksonville,
Florida 32208
YOU, FLORENCE QUIG-
LEY. are hereby notified that a
Complaint for Quiet Title has
been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Complaint For Quiet Title on
Plaintiffs' attorney. RONALD
L. DAVIS. ESQ., Suite 407, Sky-
lake State Bank Building, 1560
N.E. Miami Gardens Drive.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33179; Phone (305) 940-2352.
and file the original Answer or
I Pleading In the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Dade County. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130,
on or before the 9th day of
April, 1982 If you fall to do so,
Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In the Complaint
For Quiet Title.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks In the j'
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED, at
Miami, Florida this 3 day of
March, 1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade Culnty, Florida
By: V.Barkley
DEPUTYCLERK
(Circuit Court Seal I
013871 March 6.12;
I. 19. 26.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Riverside Food Distributors at
2100 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd., Hallandale, FL 33009 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
RIVERSIDE
INTERNATIONAL
FOOD CORPORATION
By: StanleyB. Levlnson,
President
14678 March 36;
_ _. Aprtl 2. 9.16. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Lacho Fashions, at 940 17th
Street. Miami Beach, FL 33139
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Lasaro Rlvero (owner)
14666 March 12. 19.36;
April 2 1982
l>
>


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number M-7M
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIE SELDON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of WILLIE SELDON. de-
ceased. File Number 80-7656
04. Is pending In the Circuit
Court for DADE County. Flor-
ida Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cation of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 19, 1882
Personal Representative:
Vincent P McGhee.
Esquire
799 Brlckell Plaza
Suite 700
Miami. Florida 33131
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LeonE.Sharpe. Esquire
799 Brlckell Plaza
Suite 700
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (3061374-4780
14673 March 19. 26. 19821
INTHECIRCUITCOUHT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-423
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER HOLOBER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ESTHER HOL-
OBER. deceased. File Number
82-423. is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The Co personal repre-
sentative of the estate Is
SAMUEL HOLOBER AND
FRANCES KALLET. whose
address is 73 Soundview Road,
Great Neck. Long Island. New
York 11020 and 140 Van Cort-
land Avenue West. Bronx. New
York 10463. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
" OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the cjerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS;
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO?
FILED WILL BE FOREVXH
BARRED. I
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: March It. 1M2.
SAMUEL HOLOBER
A* Personal Representative
FRANCES KALLET.
Co-Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ESTHER HOLOBER ,
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RE PRESENTATTVE:
MARVIN I MOSS. P.A
P. O. Box 546280
Surfslde, Florida 33154
Telephone: 866-6736
14671 March 19. 26,1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY ,
Civil Action I
No. 12-113 FC 27
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
ROSWITHA GABRIEL,
Petltloner-Wlfe.
MICHAEL A. STEIN,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: MICHAEL A.
STEIN
Respondent-Husband
161-06 Jewel Avenue
Flushing,
New York 11365
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-i
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
GARY P. COHEN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
407 Lincoln Road, Suite 7-L,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before APRIL 9th, 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 3rd day of '
MARCH, 1982. .
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court I
Dade County, Florida
By K. Self ried
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
GARY P. COHEN, PA. i
407 Lincoln Rd.,
Suite 7-L
Miami Beach. Florida 33139 '
Telephone: (3061672-8552
013872 March 5,12;'
19, 26, 1982
-L.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.82 34S4
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
XAVIER NELSON.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
ETELIT LARFLIER
NELSON.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: ETELITL.
NELSON.
Borge, Haiti
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU, ETELIT LARFLIER
NELSON, are hereby notified
to serve a copy of your Answer
to the Petition For Dissolution
of Marriage filed against you,
upon XAVIER'S attorney,
GEORGE NICHOLAS, ES-
QUIRE, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33136, and file
original with the Clerk of the
court on or before April 9th,
1982: otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 8 day of March.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: LolaH. Currier
Deputy Clerk
14647 Marrh 12. IB. 26.
AprUs.tffiajl
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW |
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Nen- i
Ita's Pharmacy and Discount
at 1906 West 60 Street, Stores 26 l
and 26. Hlaleah. Florida, 33010 \
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
OlgaGonzalez, R. Ph.
14630 March 8,13; I
19.26.1982
p4>
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF I
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA '
CASE NO. 82-3516
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
JULES G. AUGUSTUS,
Petitioner-Husband
and
EVELYN AUGUSTINE,
Respondent-Wife
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
To: EVELYN AUGUSTIN
Second (21 Impase
Lavard No. 18
Port-au-Prince.
Haiti
YOU, EVELYN AUGUST-
INE, are hereby notified to
serve a copy of your Answer to
the Petition For Dissolution of
Marriage filed against you.
upon HIS attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQUIRE, 612
N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami.
Florida 33136, and file original
with the Clerk of the Court on
or before April 9. 1982: other-
wise the Petition will be con-
fessed by you.
DATED this 9 day of March.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: C. P. Copeland
Deputy Clerk
14648 March 12, 19.26;
April 2.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 12-37*8
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
SOSIRE AMPARO
MARTINEZ.
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
RAUL MARTINEZ,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: RAUL MARTINEZ
I Residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lution of Marriage has beer
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It
on. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is DAVID M
SOSTCHIN. ESQ.. 2121 Ponce
de Leon Blvd.. Suite 480. Coral
Gables. FL, fend file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April
16. 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of March
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. C. Bedasse
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David M. Sostchln
2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard
Suite 480
Coral Gables, FL S3134
Telephone: 306.444.gSn.
Attorney for Petitioner
14662 March 19. 26;
April 2. 9, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 81-1133) FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CYNTHERIA ALBURY
BARRETT
and
ISAIAH FRANKLIN
DAVIS.
TO Isaiah
Franklin Davis
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
wrlllen defenses, if any. to It on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 3000 Blscayne
HI Ml Suite 315. Miami. Flor-
Ida. 33137, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
APRIL 23rd. 1982: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 15 day of
MARCH, 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Self ried
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
LAWRENCE M.
SHOOT. ESQ.
3000 Blscayne Blvd.
No. 315
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (3061573-5010
Attorney for Petitioner
14669 March 19. 26;
April 2, 9. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CICUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.82-4077 CA 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
WEYERHAEUSER MORT-
GAGE COMPANY,
a California corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
REUBEN DOZIER, et ux., et
I.,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FAIRFAX FAMILY
FUND. INC.
3!0Whlttington
Parkway
Louisville.
Kentucky 40222
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property:
Lots 5 and 6. in Block l. of
COCOPLUM TERRACE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded In Plat Book 28. at
Page 4. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
If any. to It. on PABER. LE-
VINE A TRYSON. P.A.. Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address
Is 328 Minorca. Coral Gables,
Florida. 331S4. on or before
APRIL 18, 1982 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on MARCH
10, 1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
ByK Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
14660 March 19.28;
April 2.9.1982
\
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 12-1443 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DAN1ELAEDIT
MAIER de MERCHAN.
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
MIGUEL MARINO
MERCHAN LUCO.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: MR. MIGUEL MARINO
MERCHAN LUCO
Diario El Mercurio
P.O. Box 60
Cuenca. Ecuador
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
PAUL KWITNEY, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 612
Miami Beach, Florida 33139,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before MARCH 8, 1982;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day of Jan-
uary. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
KWITNEY. KROOP*
SCHEINBERG.P.A.
Paul Kwltney
420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-7575
Attorney for Petitioner
13882 February 8,12; '
19.26. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW -
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
CHILDREN'S HAPPY CLUB
at 1875 W. 56 STREET Bl, 202
HIALEAH FLA 33012 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Cour* of
Dade County, Florida.
JOSEPH FERNANDEZ
VALENCIA
and
PEDRO CORTES.
owners
14639 March 5.12;
19.26. 1982
---------NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 81 19*46 FC 24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIO OSVALDO
PIMIENTA LOPEZ,
and
GLADYS ESTELA
OSORIO CADAVID.
TO: GLADYS ESTELA
OSORIO CADAVID
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN attorney'
for Petitioner, whose address Is
2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard.
Suite 480. Coral Gables. FL-
33134, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before APRIL 9,'
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for tour con
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 3rd day of
MARCH. 1982.
.. RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Self ried
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID M.
SOSTCHIN, ESQ.
2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard, Suite 460
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: S08.444.8S83
Attorney for Petitioner
013870 March 5. 12;
19, 26, V
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFl
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA '
CIVIL FAMILY
DIVISION
CASE NO 12 3*3*
NOTICE OF ACTION i
JEFFREY M. BIAL.
Petitioner-Husband,
and >
BLANCA M. ROA de BIAL.
Respondent Wife.
TO: BLANCA M. ROA
da HAL
P. O. Box A. A.
No. 92461
Bogata. D.E.
Columbia, S.A.
Last Known Addreaa:
10975 SW 36 Street
Miami, FL 33161
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you '
and the Petition seeks an
award that certain property.
owned by you and PeUUoner,
JEFFREY M. BIAL, located at
10975 SW 36 Street. Miami,
Florida 33161. and more partic-
ularly described aa:
East 180' of the SW \ of the
SE V4 of the N W V. of the SE 54 of
Section 18. Township 64 South,
Range 40 East, lying and
being In Dade County,
Florida, bet forwarded 11" Pe-
titioner, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to the
Petition on the Petitioner's
Attorney. Bruce Lamchlck.
Esq.. Lamchlck, Gluckaman A
Johnston, whose address Is
10661 North Kendall Drive.
Suite 217. Miami, Florida 33176
on or before April 16th, 1982 and
file and original with the Clerk
of this Court either befor
service on Petitioner's
Attorney or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a Default
will be entered against you for '
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on March 10,
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: V. Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
LAMCHICK, GLUCKSMAN
& JOHNSTON
Bruce Lamchlck, Esq.
Attorneys for Petitioner
10681 No Kendall Drive
Suite 217
Miami. FL33176
14656 March 12. II .26: 4
_____________________Apri' U, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-3422 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
IN THE MARRIAGE OF:
LAJOS LENGVARI.
Petitioner- Husband.
and i
ANNA LENGVARI.
Respondent-Wife.
TO:ANNA LENGVARI
44 Charles Street
West
Apartment No. 2009
Toronto. Ontario
Canada M4Y1R7
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
DAVID S. BERGER. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
990 Washington Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore April 9, I9h2.otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of March.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33189 .
Telephone: 308-672-3100 \
Attorney for PeUUoner \
14644 March 12. 19.26;'
April 2.1982!
1 '
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss.
. The undersigned, under oath,
says: It la the Intention of the
undersigned to encage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of WORLD
MANAGEMENT COMPANY
located at tie* S. W. 87th Ave-
nue in the City of Miami. Dade
County. Florida. Thoae In-
terested In said enterprise, and
the extent of the Interest of
each, la as follows:
Interest
Stephen A. Wayner
9146 SW. 87 th Ave..
Miami. FL
14674 March 26;
April 2, 9, 16.1982
rNi.lHcH,RCU'iTMuS.
THE ELEVENTH JUDlru
C'"CUIT IN ANDY'S
DADECOUNYY.FlbSf,..!
CASE NO. 82 lie l
FAMILY DlVlsirL
INRETheMarrS"
BAN1TAPAUL '
PeUUoner Wife
and
VICTOR PIERRE p.,.,
Respondent Husband
PAuTRH,E^E
RESIDENCE UNKRo
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU, VICTOR10"
PAUL, Respondent,^
are hereby notified to !!
eppy of your Answer LJ
rtage filed against you 3
her attorney. GEORGE N?
OLAS. ESQUIRE. ,5hjH
S* Avenue. Miami, f^
33136. and file origin*! !
Clerk of the Court on X2
April 9. 1982. OtbsrtntotSaV
UUonwlllbeconfesstTb.il.
DATED this | dsTofiJS!
1982. "*"<
RICHARD P BRINKER i
CLERK
By. C P Copeland
Deputy Clerk
14646 March 1J, nj
AprUli
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERE
GIVEN that the underuf
desiring to engage In bu
under the fictitious i
Screen Gallery at 161 NW:
St., Miami. Fla 33127 Int,
to register said name wllhi
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida.
Rockaltzer. Inc. a
Florida Corporation
By: BradSchlffer,
President
l72 Marchlt
April 2,9.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBI
GIVEN that the underslr,.
desiring to engage In buslnesl
under the fictitious name 13-1
LAND PAINTING at 8937 Bail
Dr Miami Beach 33141 (menu
to register said name with tntl
Clerk of the Circuit Court of|
Dade County. Florida
Lloyd Llewelyn
Beck ford, owner
14663 March U.Jtl
Apnl 2 9 ll
NOTICE UNDER "
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engate In businea
under the fictitious name I'
Name It Intends to register
said name with the Clerk ol (he
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Gall Kasztl
and
Lois Za ret.
Owners
14638 Marcn5.ll.
________\___iy.a. !S
NOTICE UN&fR
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBTl
GIVEN that the undersigned I
desiring to engage In buslnesl
under the fictitious nnu|
ARALE LOCKSMITH iCERf
RAJEROl at 4607 N.W "H
MIAMI Fla 33126 Intends tol
register said name with ti|
Clerk of the Circuit Court of|
Dade County. Florida
ARALE I-ocksmllll r
.,, March 19 *;l
14*M April, lid
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL]
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE N0.8I-34W
FAMILY OIVISI0N
JUDGE:
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
ESKETH HAMILTON.
Petitioner Wife
HORACE R. HAMILTON
Respondent Husband
TO:HORACER
HAMILTON
P.O. BOX 290
ST. ANN. JAMAICA
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TOU, HORACE R. HAMUjI
TON, Respondent-Husbanil
are hereby notified to, tene
copy of your Answer to therei
UtJon For Dissolution of MjJ
rlage filed against you. "Pl
S?attomey. GEORGE NKSl
OLAS. ESQUIRE, "^i
t2th Avenue. Miami. ForWJI
33136. and file originalwttbJJ
cSrkoftheCourtonorb.^1
April 9. 1982; otherwise Uw^l
tlEon will be confessed by J j
DATED this 8 day of ltu^[
1WBRICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: C. P.Copeland
^March'*.^
April J."
14646
UrutedPamt*3lgnsupv
5373 W. 8 Ave.. *Jf.^r said I
oi2 intend. *&$&]
name with the, Clerk 0.
cult Court of D*0*
Florida. _
QuldoDeLerWS*'
14636 19. i*1!


Elaine Miller, Civic Activist Harry Paskow, 79 AX. Nadler, 60 Year Resident
Miller civic activist and
t^Seac resident since 1939
K2o'March 18 at South
P^HosP'tal. She was 57.
t Miller a graduate of Ida
ItttarW sc"001 and th,e
ES of Miami, was a vol-
fe 2 Mt. Sinai Medical
* a member of the Jewum
5 Karens Service and a
director of the Sisterhood of
Temple Emanu-El.
Survivors include her husband.
Fredric B.; sons, Michael and
Roger; mother, Minna
Planick;two sisters, and two
grandchildren.
Services were held Mar. 19 at
Rubin-Zilbert.
Etta Schuham, Active in ORT
brrMa^l^
& 2 for the Aged. She
C. Schuham **",
l.M in 1925. After her
fce she and her husband
* Jm Verona. N.J-. where she
I vears ago.
I Mrs. Schuham was active
Lens American ORT to
resettle orphans in Israel. She
was a member of Temple Beth
Am and Fairchild Tropical
Garden.
Mrs. Schuham is survived by
her husband, David; daughters,
Iris Cutler and Michelle Etsho-
kin; two sisters; seven grand-
children and two great-grand-
children.
Services were held Mar. 19 at
Star of David Memorial park.
Arrangements by Riverside.
Louis Landy, 20 Year Resident
I Louis J. Landy of Miami
ach passed away March 17. He
: a resident here for 20 years
fcming from Chicago and was
\& employed in the grocery
dustry-
|He is survived by his wife,
OLDFARD
n of North Miami Beach pasted
kiv He was a resident here for 27
E com.ng from Pittsburgh. He to
Ervivtd bv Ms wife. Beth; onJMf**
fputsbureh; and two grandchildren.
fcrvices were held Mar 23. Arrange-
tnisby Riverside.
Ievy
oiis B widow of Arnold Levy, passed
Cm March 20 in Memphis She waa a
yer resident of Dade County, mov-
kf to Memphis in 1980 She Is survived
Vher nephew. William Heine and wife.
Imam, great-nephew. Max Heine;
niece. Marilyn Heine; and a
1 great nephew. Services were held
r 22 in New Orleans.
iVINE
.._. M. of North Miami Beach.
j!d awav March 21. He was a real-
Mi lor 20 years coming from New
tort He is survived by his wife.
ionic, son. Arnold of Tampa,
lughlers. Arlene Gordon of Tampa
I Ronnie Wolfson of North Miami;
-jUier. Louis of NY.; sisters, Cella
FelnDerg ol Miami. Rosalind Casper of
U, Lome Axelrod of NY., Irene San-
krs ol Miami and Reggie Schangle of
IN Y and len grandchildren Arrange-
ment by Riverside
TER.Sadie, Rubln-Zllbert
XJVrrZ.Lawrence. Riverside.
WSSIE, Max. Miami Beach. Kubln-Zll-
t
KICK.Charles. Rubln-Zllbert.
3RD. Alexander. Miami Beach.
taZUbert.
iUBAIM Irving, Bay Harbour,
"wch20. Blasberg Funeral Chapel.
TOTEM AN. Ann. North Bay Village,
urn* ^ B
EaMN. Am. North Bay Village.
Jwntt,
|HRL\RE1CH. Johanna. Miami
Mi Rubin-Zilbert
ER. Leo Sam. 67. Miami Beach.
* IS. Riverside.
LER Samuel North Miami
iVkJ'M,AN' Irene' M,am Beach.
IjttM. Henry John. Blasberg
Kwral Chapel.
flV Charles. Blasberg Funeral
Public Notice
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA IN
ANDFOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.U-JS01
NOTICE OF ACTION
AR1AGRACTELA
DIAZ, Wife
Petitioner
and
GILBERT PEREZ
Husband
Tnr?,ON
TO GILBERT PEREZ
wSfSB" unknown
JRfl" HEREBY NOTI-
^^'""UonforDUao-
rZISS*'you *nd yu"
"VUiWI to serve a copy of your
^L NlchoU, peUUoner's
SW?ho,eaddr"to7488
ST?**> Anat, n.
nfaff! court elthe'- before
ySffTS thereafter;
gftjLi*'* will b.
Itcf lul^r"*' you ,or the re-
^^"thecomptatat
&DP BRINKER
S?* Circuit Court
1! UDeP"ty Clerk
Mrch 12.18.28;
April 2,1982
Clara: sons, Dr. Jerome J. Landy
and Burton Landy. both of
Miami: brother, Herman Landy
of Calif.: sister, Fanny Kormick
of Chicago: a brother-in-law, and
five grandchildren. Arrange-
ments by Riverside.
Bernard Hercher,
Retired Realtor
Bernard K. Herscher, a retired
realtor and philanthropist,
passed away March 23.
Mr. Herscher was a resident of
Miami for 26 years coming from
New York.
He was past president of the
Bay Harbor Islands Club and a
past vice president of the Bal
Harbour. Bay Harbor and Surf-
side chambers of commerce.
A founder of Mt. Sinai Medical
Center, Mr. Herscher also contri-
buted to several charitable
organizations, including the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
He is survived by his wife.
Ruth and two brothers. Services
were held Mar. 25, with arrange-
ments by Riverside.
KAHN. Gilbert (Goodie i.
AMINOFF. Ralph. 83, Bal Harbour.
March 20, Riverside
FEIBL'S. Fannie. 85, North Miami
Beach, March IB. Riverside.
PLATT. Minnie, Miami Beach. Rubin
Zllbert.
RICE. Irving H Miami Beach. March
20. Rubln-Zllbert.
SHORE. Teresa. Miami Beach, Mt.
NeboCemetery. Riverside.
LEV1NE. Sarah. 93. Miami. Gordon
Funeral Home.
SCHOENES, Jack L. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert
SNYDER. Lillian. North Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
TANNEN. Louis. March 20.
SAIFMAN. Rebecca. 88. March 13.
Levitt-Welnsteln
FISCHER. Morris. March 13. River-
side.
SHAPIRO. Rose. 73, March 15. Gordon
Funeral Home
LEWIN, Marguerite, 85, March 15,
Riverside.
COHEN, Harry E.. 79, North Miami
Beach. Gordon Funeral Home.
STEARNS. Henry John. Blasberg
Funeral Chapel.
BLANK. Rebecca. 88, Miami Beach.
March 18. Riverside.
GOLD. Lorraine, North Miami Beach,
March 18. Riverside.
K1RSCHENBAUM. Joaeph. 78, Miami,
March 18. Levitt-Welnsteln.
FRIEDMAN. Al. North Miami Beach.
March 17, Riverside.
GOLDSTEIN, Albert A.. North Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
GOODWIN. Irving. Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert. ..
LEFKOWITZ, Abraham, 88. North
Miami Beach, March 18. Riverside.
BLOOM, Philip E.. North Miami Beach.
March 22. -__
GARDNER. Alvin.Surf**>-
HUDISH. Meyer. Miami Bes.cn.
Blasberg Funeral Home.
LA8T, Lynn. 72. Miami. March 22.
Levitt ^welnsteln.
WEINSTEIN. Sadie. 80, Miami. Rlver-
DANTO. Nathan. Surfside. March 9.
cau&W"E*^North Miami
G^a5cShT^,arch 9, ^".Weln-tem
GONICK, Pearl. North Miami Beach.
PA^TeV: RVkrEXh, Miami B-ch,
March 5 Riverside
-?akny P8JSkOW 19' of Mia
Beach passed away March 17. He
was a resident here for 38 years
coming from New Jersey.
Mr. Paskow was a retired
salesman and was active in the
knights of Pythias.
Jfi is_,survived by his wife,
Ksther: daughter. Nancy Asher,
Ienn.: sister, Doris Paskow,
n.j. and four grandchildren.
Services were held Mar. 19 at
Kiverside.
Arthur Berke
of Miami
Arthur Berke, a Miami resi-
dent for 62 years, passed away
March 21. He was 71.
Mr. Berke was a member of the
Biscayne Masonic Lodge and the
Mahi Shrine.
He is survived by his wife,
Yvette, and a sister, Evelyn B.
Davis.
Services were held Mar. 23.
Arrangements by Gordon
Funeral Home.
William Groner,
President of
Flamingo Assoa
William Groner. president of
Flamingo Associates, passed
away March 22 in South Miami
Hospital. He was 84.
Mr. Groner was a Miami Resi-
dent for 47 years coming from
Paterson. N.J. He was a member
of Hibiscus Masonic Lodge 275,
the Mahi Shrine, and Temple Bet
Breira.
Survivors include his wife.
Lillian: daughter, Phyllis Imber,
and two grandchildren.
Services were held Mar. 23 at
Gordon Funeral Home.
MONUMENTS INC
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
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Margate 427-4700
2305 West Hillsboro Blvd.
Deerfield Beach 427-4700
Biscayne Blvd. at 209th Street
North Miami Beach
In Broward, 742-6000
In Dade, 945-3939
In Palm Beach. 833-0887
A.L. Nadler, a Miami resident
for over 60 years passed away.
Mr. Nadler was a trustee and
active member of Temple Israel,
a Shriner and a member of West-
view Country Club.
He is survived by his wife,
Lucille: children and grandchild-
ren, Ronald and Nancy Nadler,
Leslie, Lori and Wendy Nadler
and family, Mickey, Barbara and
Paula and Robb Stone of Chi-
cago.
Services were held Mar. 21 at
Riverside.
Morris Ifshin of Miami Beach
Morris Ifshin, 86, of Miami
Beach passed away March 18. He
was a resident here for 33 years
coming from New York.
M r. I fshin was a member of the
Workman's Circle.
He is survived by his wife.
Yetta: sons, Isidore of Miami
Beach and Edward of Washing-
ton, D.C.; and four grandchild-
ren.
Services were held Mar 19 at
Riverside with interment at Star
of David Cemetery.
Frances Rudich Passes
Franees R. Rudich of South
Miami passed away March 21.
She was 83.
Mrs. Rudich was a resident
here for 60 years coming from
New York. She is survived by her
son. Bert; sister, Pauline Borsuk;
three grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.
Services were held Mar. 23 at
Riverside with interment at Star
of David Cemetery.
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n


The festival of
"In eveiy generation each
individual is bound to
regard himself as if he had
gone personally forth
from Egypt, as it is said,
'And thou shalt relate to
thy children on that day
saying, this is on account
of what the Eternal did for
me, when I went forth
from Egypt.' "
MATZOS
15th
NISAN
5742
8th
APRIL
1982
Manischewitz
LB. BOX
$
118
FRESH
Horseradish
Root
$
24-OZ. JAR
MOTHERS
Gefilte
Fish
LB.
159
$
SILVER SPRINGS
RED OR WHITE ^ .
Horseradish d*l
5-OZ.
JARS
FOR THE HOLIDAYS
Fresh Fruit Baskets
MADE TO ORDER
24-OZ. JAR
MOTHERS
OLD WORLD
White &
Pike Fish
32-OZ. JAR
Rokeach
Borscht
81
$
10-OZ. CAN
Messing
Macaroons
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURS., MAR. 25 thru WED., MAR. 31 AT STORES LISTED.
* Skylake Mall
Miami Gardens Dr. r NE 19 Ave.
* Alton Road at 18th St.
* Collins Avenue at 5th Street
* Collins Avenue at 74th Street
* 79th Street Causeway
North Bay Village
* Alton Road at 10th Street
* Arthur Godfrey Rd & Prairie Av
* Normandy Dr. & Rue Versailles
* Harding Avenue at 94th Street
Surfside)
* Diplomat Mall
Hallandale Beach Boulevard
* 1510 South Federal Highway
Hollywood
* 2700 Hollywood Boulevard
* Briar Bay Shopping Center
SW 136 St. w. of So. Dixie Hwy
* Plaza West
N. Kendall Dr. & SW. 127th Ave.
* Causeway Plaza
NE 123rd St. & Biscayne Blvd.
* 163rd Street Shopping Center
* Crandon Blvd.ErWestwood Dr.
* Biscayne Shopping Plaza
Biscayne Blvd. & NE 79th St.
* Coral Way
3rd Avenue & SW 15th Road
* 3100 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
* South Miami Shopping Center
6200 South Dixie Highway
* Miami Gardens Drive
& NW 7th Avenue
* Coral Park Shopping Center
Tamiami Trail & SW 97th Avenue
cPiide


Israel's
34th
Anniversary
in Greater Miami
^ rV & C ft & *
^ o
O

1982
A Walkathon on behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund and a joyous festival,
to be held May 2 in South Dade wdl b^**^
Greater Miami Jewish commumty s celebration
$& ^e Greater Miami Jewish
Federation South Dade Office wdldisplay
the community's support for Israel and
celebrate the 34th anniversary of the Jewish State s
birth. See Page 3
CJA-IEF Omplg* Building at **
Supplement to the JewUh Floridiw. Section C. March 26,
1962.



Contents
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
March 26, 1982
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations committee
Eli Tlmoner
PACESETTERS BALL 3
The most spectacular event of the 1982 CJAIEF Campaign is still to
come.
YOM HA'ATZMAUT WALKATHON
AND CELEBRATION 3
A major day of events for all of Dade County will celebrate Israel's In-
dependence Day.
MERCANTILE
DIVISION DINNER 3
One of the most successful divisions of Federation will hold its annual
dinner at the Four Ambassadors.
SENATOR
LAWTON CHILES 4
Senator Chiles discusses his views on issues concerning Israel and the
Jewish community.
JCC NEWS 4
First graders "adopt" elderly at JCC Center for Frail Adults.
ISRAEL 5
The Arava Desert in Israel is becoming lush and prosperous with the new
breakthroughs in technology and agriculture.
THRIFT SHOPS 5
A bargain-hunter's paradise can be found at the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged's four thrift shops.
CJF 6
For 50 years, the Council of Jewish Federations has been providing ser-
vices and programs for Jews everywhere.
ISRAEL MISSIONS 7
Two memorable and exciting Missions are planned for April and July.
CAMPAIGN'82 8
The 1982 CJA-IEF Campaign is in full swing, with some major events
yet to come.
PASSOVER SPECIAL
10
Edward Asner, star of CBS" "Lou Grant." will host a special PBS
television show about the history, practice and significance of Passover.
JEWS OF KISHINEV
10
Beth David Congregation adopts the refuseniks of Kishinev in a unique
twinning program with that Soviet community.
TZEDAKAH FUND 11
Gifts to the Fund provide assistance to individuals in need.
WOMEN'S DIVISION 11
Highlights of the success of past events, and information about up-
coming events.
PROJECT RENEWAL
12
The Campaign for Or Akiva is at the $750,000 mark with a goal of SI
million.
JDC 12
The Joint Distribution Committee aids retarded children through your
contributions to the CJA-IEF Campaign.
CUBAN-HEBREW COMMITTEE 13
A highly successful Dinner-Dance celebrates Israel's 34th Anniversary.
FOUNDATION 14
The Automated Response Monitoring System, a project of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, provides Miami Beach senior citizens with a secure
feeling.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
15

lA*MB**
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS


Campaign/Event
Page 3
aU> erace and elegance will mark the
n olitPr Ball, the Greater Miami Jewish
I nSebleau-Hilton Hotel. The evening's
BSKtwffl be the presentation of Pacesetter
SS Sculptures, created expressly for GMJF
{Jtchitect-artist Kenneth Treister.
This event honors the Pacesetters, those who
JS contributed $10,000 or more to GMJFs
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Prominent designer David Harrison will provide
the decor for this noteworthy event and en-
tertainment will be provided by Jerry Marshall
and his Orchestra.
The sculpture presentation ceremony was
ntiated last year, with contributors in four
ateeories receiving the first sculpture or
medallion in four series. This year s ceremony will
mark the award of the second sculpture or
medallion in each series to second-year members
of each category. First-year members will receive
the first of each series.
The great personages commemorated in the
Pacesetter Judaica Sculptures are those whose
contributions have been instrumental in the
development and growth of Jewish theology and
thought, and the creation of the State of Israel.
Moses. "Prophet and Lawgiver," the second of
five in the series of the Great Minds of the Biblical
Tradition collection of bronze medallions, will be
presented to those men who have given second-
year CJA-IEF gifts ranging from $10,000 to
$24,999- First-year members of this category will
receive a medallion of Abraham, "Patriarch of a
People."
Women in the $10,000-$24,999 category for the
second year will receive a medallion of Deborah,
"Judge and Prophetess." Those entering this
category for the first year will receive the Sarah,
Matriarch of the Ages," medallion.
Pacesetter who have made a gift of $25,000 to
$99,999 for the second year will receive Rabbi
Akiva, "Sage and Martyr," the second in a series
of five originally designed bronze statues known
as the Great Minds of Jewish Thought. Each
Pacesetter's Gala Set for May 8
i
r* 'A* *
The four series of Pacesetter Judaica Sculptures above are awarded to exem-
plary contrbutors to the 1982 CJA-IEF.
statue is 6 inches high and is mounted on a base of
Italian marble. First-year members of this
category will receive the first of this series, Rabbi
Hillel. "Gentle Scholar."
Outstanding Pacesetters who have contributed
$100,000 or more will be honored with 9 inch
bronze statues of Great Minds in the Creation of
Modern Israel. Second-year members of this select
category will receive busts of Chaim Weizman,
"Scientist and Idealist;" first-year members will
receive a statue of Theodore Herzl, "Visionary and
Realist."
The Pacesetters Ball marks the culmination of
the year's CJA-IEF campaign and the hard work
Greater Miami Celebrates
Israel's Independence
The Greater Miami Jewish community will share
the joy of Israel's 34th Anniversary at a special
celebration to be held on May 2 in South Dade.
The Yom Ha'Atzmaut (Independence Day) event,
coordinated by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation South Dade Office, will be preceded
by a Walkathon in support of the 1982 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The festival will capture a bit of the all-out joy
that will be felt in Israel on this important day.
The site will be South Dade.but the atmosphere
will be uniquely Israeli. The festival will offer
contests, crafts, entertainment, games, food and
films.
The Walkathon, in support of CJA-IEF, will
kick off the day's events, beginning at 2 p.m. at
the Killian Senior High School-Ron Ehman Park
complex, 10665 ~S.W. 97th Avenue, and
proceeding for 10 kilometers (5.7 miles) to the
South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401
S W. 102nd Avenue. The walkers will be led by a
torch from Israel and a delegation of prominent
dignitaries.
The festival will begin at the Jewish Community
t-enter at 4 p.m. The opening ceremony will in-
clude an address by Israel's Consul General in
Miami, the Hon. Joel Amon, and a memorial
wrvice for soldiers who died in defense of the
Mate of Israel, in commemoration of Yom
"azikoron (Memorial Day) which precedes Yom
Ma Atzmaut.
Entertainment will be provided by the Temple
jwael Dance Group, the Temple Samu-el Dance
uroup the Beth David Concert Choir, the Temple
* a Choir' the Beth Americans of Temple
2*& Am, the Hillel Dance Group of University of
J'ami. the Choral Speaking Group of the Home-
wad Jewish Community Center, the Det Breira
y. the South Dade Hebrew Academy Players
Md others.
A mouth-watering assortment of Israeli and
American foods will be sold during the event.
Displays of Judaic arts and crafts, and other gift
items will be available for public viewing and sale.
Winning entries in localYom Ha'Atzmaut poster
and essay contests wiU be shown, as will films
about the Land of Israel, its people and culture.
As darkness begins to fall and the day comes to
an end, the celebrants will be invited to join a
Kumzitz, which means just what it says Come
and sit." A bonfire, song, dance and laughter are
the key ingredients for the Kumzitz, an enjoyable
final event to a memorable occasion.
The Yom Ha'Atzmaut events are being coor-
dinated by an active committee, with Bert Brown
seeing as Walkathon Chairman, Dror Zadok
serv ng as Celebration Chairman and Judy Ad er
and Phyllis Goldman serving as Walkathon Vice
Chairpersons.
For further information about this important
even please contact the Greater^ Mmi Jewish
Federation South Dade Office at 251-9334.
of dedicated Pacesetter volunteers. Samuel Adler
serves as chairman of the $250,000 Club, Howard
R. Scharlin chairs the $100,000-$249,999 category,
Norman H. Lipoff spearheads the $25,000-$99,999
category and Mikki Futernick and Joel Levy chair
the $10,000-$24^999 category. Paula Friedland and
Nancy Frehling serve as the Women's Division
Pacesetter-Trustee Chairpersons.
The Pacesetter Campaign is expected to raise
$11 million for the 1982 CJA-IEF drive. The
Pacesetters Ball gives credit to the dedicated men
and women who set examples of generosity and
dedication to the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity.
Mercantile Division
Dinner April 21
J. William Baros, Jr., former Chairman of the
Home Furnishings Group of the Mercantile
Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
will be the recipient of the coveted Harold B. Bos-
worth Memorial Award at the Division's Annual
Dinner. The Dinner will be held at the Four Am-
bassadors Hotel, April 21 at 6:30 p.m. on behalf of
the 1982 CJA-IEF.
The Harold B. Bosworth Memorial Award,
initiated in 1964 by the Mercantile Division of the
Combined Jewish Appeal, is to be presented to an
Continued on page 14
J. William Baros


Washington/JCC
pae 4
Chiles Advocates Strong Israel
United States Senator Lawton Chiles met with
leaders of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
February 26 in the Federation Board Room to
participate in a question and answer session to
discuss overall issues of concern to the Jewish
Community.
Since his election,' Senator Chiles has taken a
strong interest in the State of Israel and has
worked in the Senate for a strong and secure
Israel. As a member of the Senate Appropriations
Committee, the Senator has been a firm advocate
for U.S. military and economic aid to Israel. In
1979, Senator Chiles led a Senate Appropriations
Committee delegation to the Middle East to
survey and report on economic and security
assistance programs needed to implement the
Camp David Accords. For his efforts in behalf of
Israel, the Senator has been honored with the
Histadrut Humanitarian Award and the
American Mizrachi Women Bronze Medallion
Award.
"I fully recognize the extraordinary costs that
Israel faces in attempting to defend itself in very
hostile environment, and at the same time build a
healthy economy," Senator Chiles stated. "I feel
the United States has a special relationship with
Israel and thus a responsibility to assist Israel in
meeting its defense and economic requirements."
In the Appropriations Committee and on the
Senate floor, the Senator has been in the forefront
supporting assistance to Israel. He has firmly
resisted amendments that seek to place arbitrary
conditions on that aid or that would reduce sup-
port in response to Israeli policy. Among these
have been efforts in the Senate to cut off military
aid because of Israeli air raids in Southern
Lebanon; the Hat field amendment to reduce
foreign military credits to Israel; the placement of
a condition on economic aid that Israel cease
expanding settlements in the West Bank; and a
move to limit military aid unless Israel was a
signatory to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.
MAINTAINING MILITARY BALANCE
Security remains the dominant fact of economic
and political life in Israel. "Israel has to be ever
vigilant to any shift in the military balance in the
Middle East," Chiles said. "Israel must maintain
its position of strategic superiority. This means
providing Israel with the aid it needs to assure a
well-equipped fighting force. It also means other
nations in the region with hostile
intentiom
United States Senator Law ton Chiles
On two critical and heavily debated votes.
Senator Chiles stood firm in his support for
upholding the security of Israel. In 1978, he
supported the Senate Resolution stating the
objections of Congress to the Carter
Administration's proposed arms package that in-
cluded the sale of 60 F-15 aircraft to Saudi Arabia.
In 1981, the Senator opposed the AWACS F-15
enhancement package sale which he viewed as the
breaking of a solemn promise to the Government
and people of Israel.
CAMP DAVID ACCORDS
"I believe the initiative achieved at Camp David
represents a major breakthrough and that the
Camp David Accords must remain the foundation
for the Middle Easi. peace process," Chiles stated.
Legislation to authorize U.S. participation in an
toward Israel should not be provided arms th
place Israel at a military disadvantages Chill
said. *s
early warning system to insure compliance with
an Israeli-Egyptian agreement was supported hv
Chiles. He was an original sponsor of the Senau
Resolution expressing the hopes of the US
Senate for a successful outcome to the Camn
David negotiations. Chiles conducted the on site
survey for the Senate Appropriations Commits
in response to the President's request for fundine
in support of the Israeli-Egyptian Peace Treaty
and worked for passage of the Middle East Special
Assistance package. The Senator has spoken
against the so-called Saudi peace plan and has
urged the present Administration to recommit
itself to a continuation of the Camp David peace
process.
UNITED NATIONS
The United Nations has become a favored
staging ground for Arab, Communist and Third
World nations to mount their attack on Israel.
"The General Assembly resolution urging
isolation of Israel and threatening expulsion is an
example of the prevelent U.N. hypocrisy in which
Israel is castigated while the activities of Cuba,
Libya, Iraq and other such nations are ignored.'
Chiles said. "I have encouraged successive ad-
ministrations to take a strong and aggressive
position in the United Nations to thwart these
attacks, and have supported measures in the
Senate to express the concern of the Senate with
U.N. actions and to sound the warning that they
will not be tolerated by the United States." he
added.
The Senator also worked for a strong U.S.
posture to combat the Arab boycott of Israel and
of American firms doing business with Israel. He
sponsored legislation which mandated tough
sanctions and effective prohibitions against
boycott compliance by American firms.
SOVIET JEWRY
"The treatment of Soviet Jews who wish to
emigrate to Israel is a continuing scandal. "Chiles
said. He has worked in the Senate to pressure the
Soviet Union to comply with the Helsinki Accords
and has worked privately to assist individuals in
the Soviet Union who are attempting to emigrate.
Senior Citizens "Adopt" Grandchildren
Fifteen little rays of sunshine visit the elderly
participants of the Day Care Center for Frail
Adults once each week, brightening their days and
their attitudes.
The first grade class of the Leroy Feinberg
Elementary School sings, dances and laughs with
the elderly day care clients, adopting them for half
an hour each week as their "grandparents."
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center
sponsors the Day Care Program and is an affiliate
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation which is
supported by gifts to the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
"The object is for the people here to be with the
children and share with them," said Day Care
coordinator Elaine Kramer. "Being with young
people is healthy for them. They need constant
interaction."
The Day Care Program serves local senior
citizens, some of whom require walkers,
wheelchairs or canes to move about. However, a
recent session with their "grandchildren" proved
that they can be stirred from their seats and
encouraged to sing and sway along with the
youngsters.
"When you're smiling, the whole world smiles
with you," the children sang in unison.
Suddenly, 85-year-old Sophie Klugman and her
friend Elizabeth Eichenbaum rose from their
chairs to stand with the children in a circle and
sing the next verse.
Then, other seniors joined the circle to "dance"
with the children, moving arms, legs and hips in
rhythm to disco music. Those who could not stand
on their own moved their arms and swayed to the
beat.
"I love children," Mrs. Klugman said.
"Sometimes I am very lonely, but I look forward
to these visits. My husband died and I have my
own grandchildren and great-grandchildren. So. "l
must love children."
Mrs. Eichenbaum explained that the rest of her
family lives "far away," but the first graders
visits give her a brighter outlook.
"When I see the children come in, it does
something special to me," she said. "I try to be a
friend to them all."
Mrs. Kramer explained that in addition to the
youngsters regular Thursday visits, they also
share parties and holidays with the senior citizens
occasions which all involved have learned to
forward to this."
'b too-noisy.* !Ww we all look
The children also enjoy the interaction with their
elderly friends, as was displayed by the --riles on
thoir fact's, which materialized as BOOB afl they
entered the room and remained until tnej
prepared to return to school.
As Omyra and Mileibv '
walked toward the dooi I
they tall
had with ill radop
"We sing with .... an;
Omyra said. "We did ripping paj
them together in patterns. We did i*t-
them."
Their teacher, Sylvia Kanner. Vhat do
you tell them? How do you feel about them
"We tell them we love them," hot 'l,c
beaming with ear-to-ear smile-.


Israel/Jewish Home and Hospital
Page 5
Arava Desert Blooms With Israeli Technology
ARAVA CORRIDOR, ISRAEL The Arava
A^ .trptrhes 120 miles from the salt lake of the
EfftTlS the way south to the Red Sea at
K u is a barren landscape with Israel's Negev
jjy 0n one side and the Jordanian Desert on
*L nesert of Arava can be cruel. Temperatures
intothe hundreds through the long summers,
"^thVwinter rains, though sporadic can cause
Jl floods taking roads and homes with them,
uraelis call it the Arava, The Wilderness There
A 000 people who live here in 15 rural com-
!luties established by the Jewish Agency,
inlv with funds raised in annual campaigns
lm the American Jewish community like the
Ster Miami Jewish Federations Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Although this dry. rocky wUderness seems
uninhabitable, it doesn't have to be. The dollars
SSI through the CJA-IEF campaign have
Sen the people of Arava the technology and
agricultural breakthroughs to make it lush and
prosperous.
Last year 470 tons of dates were grown in Arava.
A quarter of the crop was exported to Europe and
South America, earning much needed foreign
currency. Thousands of bushels of onions, green
peppers, tomatoes and grapes help to feed Israel's
own people. Over 5 million quarts of milk were
produced by 750 dairy cows last year.
Surprisingly, there is an ample supply of water
beneath this'so-called arid wasteland. Specialists
in desert research estimate that there is a suffi-
cient supply of underground "fossil" water to
produce 25 to 30 cubic meters for 30 years to come.
Fossil water has a high salt content. The first
settlers here used it to water their crops with
disasterous results salt deposits formed on the
leaves, killing the plants.
Drip irrigation, an Israeli innovation of the 60s,
trickles controlled amounts of water directly onto
plant roots which are more salt-resistant than the
leaves. Each season, a procedure to wash the soil
has been introduced to rinse out accumulated salt
deposits at root level. Drip irrigation permits
farmers to feed fertilizers and fungicides to crops
along with water so that plants receive extra
nutrients and protection. These techniques,
combined with year-round sunshine, favorable
temperatures and the high degrees of radiation
characteristic of this region, make two planting
seasons possible, thereby doubling production and
earnings.
I8RASL \^
Eilt
While breakthroughs in modern agriculture are
helping the Arava's 4,000 settlers succeed, recent
political changes will significantly change that
number. As a consequence of the Peace
Agreement between Egypt and Israel, Israel's
border will recede in April of this year. Once the
Sinai Peninsula is returned to Egypt, Eilat will
again become Israel's southernmost city, at the
tip of the Arava corridor. Off the center of that
corridor is Beersheba. And a short distance from
the top are Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
What is needed in Arava, for both security and
growth, is a great deal of people and money, to
expand settlement already in existence and create
new ones. Just when the need to accelerate is
critical, development is slowing down. The
primary cause is a lack of funds from UJA
community campaigns to the Jewish Agency. The
only site scheduled for building in 1981, Shizafon,
remains in the planning stage because the cash
simply isn't available to proceed. For lack of
$600,000, nothing at all was built in the Arava last
year.
However, hopes are high for the future. Near
Yotvata, the regional center of the southern
Arava, mangoes, pomegranates and papayas are
being raised on an |experimental, station. At
Kibbutz Fraan, use of irrigation water from
underground hot springs has resulted in a crop of
melons ripe for harvesting three weeks ahead of
time, giving Israel a jump on the international
market. Probes are being made along the Red Sea
coast to determine possibilities for marine
agriculture, such as drilling holes in rock and
planting crops in warm water pools.
Fortunately, farming is not the only business
flourishing here. Tourism is growing with visitors
from both Israel and abroad. A network is
developing of camping areas, picnic grounds,
roadside stands selling souvenirs, local produce,
eating places, and tours to the desert and Red Sea
sites are expanding.
Light industry is also being woven into the
primarily agricultural life of the kibbutzim and
moshavim. Yotvata operates a date storage and
packing plant which services the entire Arava as
well as a regional dairy which processes and
markets milk and other dairy products. Electrical
transformers are even being manufactured in Elot,
the southernmost kibbutz.
The desert, empty and dead for so long, is
springing to life. What is most needed now is for
the long arm of American Jewry to reach out and
help.
Thrift shops raise funds for Jewish Home and Hospital
Four Stores Offer Bargains Galore
Bargain hunters can unearth a treasure trove at
the four thrift shops, sponsored by the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. The
wealth of used goods regularly on sale includes
everything from fabrics to furs, from bicycles to
bric-a-brac.
The shops three in Miami and one in
Hollywood raised nearly $250,000 in 1981,
which provided drugs and medical supplies for
indigent patients at the Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, according to Glenn
Solomon, director of the operation.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged is an agency of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
"With the cost of quality health care constantly
increasing and the availability of outside funding
decreasing, the funds the thrift shops raise are
needed and put to good use," said Aaron Kravitz,
chairman of the Thrift Shop Committee for the
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. "We
toke almost anything that is resalable. Today,
almost anvthina in rQfllnhl as long as it's in
Solomon said the most unusual item sold by the
thrift shops was a race horse, which was donated
by one of the Jewish Home and Hospital s of-
ficers.
"It was not one of the regular items we deal
with, but we sold it," Solomon said with a smile.
Solomon walked through the 53,000-foot thrift
shop at 5713 N.W. 27th Avenue, Miami, and
talked to the store manager, Jim Dinkins, and
various salespersons.
The size of the shop, diversity of merchandise
and influx of customers gave the faculty the air of
a busy retail outlet.
Dinkins spoke proudly of the 30-year history of
the thrift shop operation and its growth from one
small store into four thriving shops. Solomon
echoed that pride, noting that the shops currently
employ 44 persons.
Dade County residents who wish to donate
merchandise or seek more information about the
thrift shops may call 751-3988. Broward County
residents may call 981-8245.
almost anything is resalable,
decent shape."
JJ>e thrift shops' staff provides door-to-door
PKkup of all merchandise and sorts out all items
^placement in the shops' various departments.
2" Roods are sold department-store style, with
^Parate sections reserved for men's clothing,
"omen's clothing, books, fabrics, household
*. furniture and other merchandise.
? the furniture on sale at the Miami Jewish Home and


Federation
Council of Jewish Federations Turns 50
.
The Council of Jewish Federations is a half
century old this year. At 50, today's CJF is very
different from the organization which was born in
1932. Established originally as a central coor-
dinating body for the various local Federations
spread throughout the U.S. and Canada, the
Council forces had been initially put in motion as
far back as 1895-%, with the creation of
federations in Boston and Cincinnati. The roots
were in the common needs shared by federations,
to counsel with each other, to pool experience, to
short cut to the successes of others, and to avoid
their failures. A new need was perceived among
the Jewish populations of this continent to finally
take collective action on joint needs and purposes
so that those aims which they could not achieve
alone could be achieved in concert.
A basic task of the Council was to help non-
organized communities establish federations to
meet the welfare and health needs in their own
cities more effectively, and to share in carrying
national and overseas responsibilities. Such action
was an immediate and urgent necessity, as the
federations pressed the government for funds to
save the Jewish agencies from being overwhelmed
by the massive relief needs of the Great
Depression.
One year after the establishment of the Council,
Hitler came to power in Germany and intensified
his drive against the Jews of the world. Every Jew
felt a threat to his own security and wanted to
make sure that all possible measures were taken to
combat that menace. Federations, and through
them the CJF, were under a strong mandate to act
in unison on the destiny of all Jews.
As the American Jewish community grew, so did
the mandate of the Council. As the instrument of
the various Federations throughout the country,
CJF strengthened their productivity beyond
social service and health programs; over the years
the Council has effectively helped Federations to
increase achievements in their own communities
as well as internationally.
Community services to member Federations are
provided by a group of professionals trained and
skilled in the process of community organization.
Each member Federation is assigned a Com-
munity Consultant who works along with the Ex-
ecutive Director and lay leadership of Federation
in helping to carry out their objectives. The
Council also takes a major role in providing
services to federations to assist them in areas such
as campaign and endowment funds, as well as
helping to plan budgetary services for the com-
munity. CJF coordinates programs whose goals
aim at improving planning structure and
procedures; at the same time, these types of
programs help federations to identify new and
crucial needs in their various communities, needs
which might not have been perceived previously.
Since our community opted to join the family of
federations, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
has benefitted from the assistance of CJF in many
areas. As the elderly population among us con-
tinues to increase, the Council has supplied
guidance on housing for the elderly and related
support services, develops models for federation
planning and organization of services.
In addition to the important needs of the elderly,
CJF provides assistance in the areas such as
Jewish education and culture, federation-
synagogue relations, public policy which, focuses
on improved legislation and funding for human
needs. The U.S. Government block grant to help
federations around the country to resettle Soviet
Jews was obtained through the work of this office.
CJF also works in the area of human resources
development. Our federation, through its
Leadership Education and Development (LEAD)
program, its Women's Division and its highly
qualified professional staff, focuses on the creation
of human resources, highly trained and motivated
individuals who are equipped to deal with the
complex issue confronting our communities. Each
year, more than 350 young lay leaders take part in
the CJF General Assembly, which includes an
intensive leadership development component that
addresses itself to the whole gamut of leadership
concerns. Council services also involve the
creation of innovative model programs dealing
with major Jewish issues; compiling and
publishing information on creative approaches;
inter-city retreats; and, in-service training
seminars for volunteer leaders and professional
staffs of Federations.
Probably the greatest metamorphosis which the
CJF has experienced in its 50 years has been in the
area of international affairs. In 1936, the
European leaders came to the General Assembly
The central purpose of CJF is to strenk
federations; The Greater Miami &
Federation is an integral part of that street
Paralleling the national and international tr
sformation of the Council, GMJF has become th
core of all those agencies which work together t
strengthen the entire Jewish community Unri
the aegis of UJA Federation, the responsibilZ
of agencies extend beyond health and welfare to
Jewish culture and education, recreational ar
tivities, leadership development and more.
The goal of GMJF as jt is with its sister
federations across the country, focuses on
enriching the quality of Jewish life, building
greater commitment among our people for their
community, for Israel and for Jews around the
world.
Building the
Jewish Community
1932-1982
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
to tell the Federations that emigration of the Jews
of Germany was imperative the efforts to help
through the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC),
and others were increasingly frustrated and
blocked. Although the federations' leaders
committed themselves to do everything possible
to help their embattled co-religionists, the lack of
a strong Jewish presence here and the lack of a
cohesive body to direct resettlement and ab-
sorption abroad, made such efforts difficult.
The CJF was instrumental in facilitating the
merger of the JDC and the United Palestine
Appeal, both conducting campaigns for worldwide
relief, rescue and rehabilitation. The new
organization, created in 1939, became the United
Jewish Appeal mandated with carrying on the
help U> world Jewry. With the end of the war, the
need for such an organization became quite ap-
parent, and the apparatus constructed by CJF for
the massive fundraising necessary to relieve
millions of desperate refugees was put into
motion.
lSS!T!!2T f the State Qf Iarael ""I the
flood of 685,000 immigrants who poured in to the
fledgling country in its first four years began a
chapter m the history of the Council whh con-
tinues into the present.
CJF also conducts interchange with Jewish
commrnumt.es abroad, to bring to them American
experience in community organizations, planninir
financing and services, and to share the benefits of
their experience. Of special immediate concern to
I lf?dersmP the condition of Soviet Jewrv
and the need to strengthen the advocacy
movement; maintaining an alert over the
situation in Iran and Syria; and, insuring that the
largest possible number of Falashas immigrate to
The CJF begins its second half vastly more comprehensive scope of respon-
sibilities and services than ever before; it is
moving into the 1980's as the association of
community Federations with the involvement of
both people and funds that are many multiples of
what they were 50 years ago. More important is
the commitment to develop exceptional human
resources men and women of high abilities and
firm dedication to the historic Jewish precepts of
social justice, who themselves exemplify and press
for uncompromising excellence in all that they do.
As a Federation which reflects that com
mitment, the GMJF is spearheading this com
munity effort to meet the crucial and pressing
needs so vital to the survival of Jews and of
Jewish life.
GMJF is represented on the Council Board of
Directors by a number of Greater Miami's Jewish
leaders, including Harry A. (Hap) Levy, GMJF
President and Vice President of CJF; Fran Levey,
GMJF South Dade Chairman; Norman Lipoff.
GMJF Vice President and Chairman of the CJF
Endowment Fund Committee; Stanley C. Myers,
Founding President of GMJF, past president of
CJF and life member of the CJF Board; Morton
Silberman, Past President of GMJF; and Harry
B. Smith, Past President of GMJF and chairman
of the CJF Nominating Committee.


***** MRsssaBr*I
Israel Missions
Page 7
Young Couples to Celebrate Israeli
Independence Day in Jerusalem
Israel Independence Day will have special
significance for 20 young Miami couples who will
nend the holiday in Jerusalem. Greater Miami
Federations first Young Couples Mission to
Israel on i>eHalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Kmergency Fund, will leave Miami on
Wednesday. April 21 and return on Monday,
May 3.
Mission leaders Jeff and Elaine Berkowitz
expect an exciting 12 days of intensive travel and
study' in Israel, as the participants enjoy the
country at its springtime best.
There arc a limited number of openings
remaining tor mission participants, and interested
couples arc advised to contact the Federation as
quickly as possible for reservations and in-
formation.
"I'm looking forward to introducing a group of
highly qualified people to the land of Israel and to
sharing with them a very special experience," said
Jeff Berkowitz. "There is a very special itinerary
planned, which I'm very excited about."
Independence Day, April 28, will begin with
dawn atop Masada, the ancient mountain fortress
and symbol of Jewish courage. The balance of the
day will be spent celebrating Israel's 34th an-
niversary in Jerusalem.
Another highlight of the trip will be a tour of the
Sinai Desert, just days prior to its historic return
to Egypt. Sabbaths will be spent in Jerusalem and
Saffad.
Day trips will include tours of the Golan
Heights, the West Bank, Yad Vashem, ar-
chaeological digs, military bases, the Lebanese
border and other places of interest. Participants
will stay in five-star hotels in Jerusalem, the
Galilee and Tel Aviv, as well as share home
Elaine and Jeff Berkowitz, Couple Mission Leaders
hospitalilty with young Israeli couples.
The mission will be supplemented by an over-
night stay in London for rest and relaxation, prior
to the direct return flight to Miami. Some par-
ticipants also have chosen to use the mission as a
starting point for more extended travel to Egypt,
Europe or other regions.
Contact Federation's Young Adult Division at
576-400, ext. 284, for further information.
National Young Adults Mission Planned
The most exciting yearly event of the Young
Adult Division of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, in cooperation with the 1982 UJA
National Singles Mission, will begin taking
"c* Levine, National Chairman of the UJA
>>ln8les Mission
reservations for the Third Annual Summer
Mission to Israel, on behalf of the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. The
Mission will take place July 18 to 28, 1982.
All YAD members and any individuals 25 to 40
years of age are invited to participate in the 10 day
Mission. Jack Levine, National Chairman of the
UJA Singles Mission said, "The Mission is an
excellent opportunity for young people to go to
Israel to become involved in a total Jewish ex-
perience."
Last year, 435 adults from all over the country
took part in 'he Mission, which totally immerses
singles into Israeli life. This year at least 500
participants are expected from across the nation.
A five-part orientation program will be set up
two months prior the Mission to expose singles to
the issues which will be concerning them as Jews,
and to prepare them for the Mission.
"This Mission is important to Miami par-
ticipants in that it will give them the opportunity
to meet with people from all over," Levine stated.
"They can see that there are committed Jews not
only in Miami, but from everywhere in the
country."
-The-Mission is seen by Levine as "a positive
Jewish experience, to promote a positive Jewish
identity." It will give participants a lifetime
connection with Israel, to support Israel and
Jewish causes. "Mission leaders hope the Mission
wiU Drovide sustained action and participation in
Jewish communal affairs by young Jews, Levine
QfllQ
Monique O'Hayon is the UJA Florida Regional
Chairperson for the Mission. Michael Katz is a
Mission Leader for Miami.
An attractive payment plan is being offered by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation for those
Crested. For more information, call Federation
at 576-4000, extension 284.
Stephen Arky
Linowitz to Speak to
Attorney's Division
Sol Linowitz, the Carter Administration's
special Middle East ambassador, will address a
cocktail party-reception of the Attorneys Division
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, to be
held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 29 at the Four
Ambassadors Hotel, 801 S. Bayshore Drive,
Miami.
The event will be held on behalf of the 1982
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
Linowitz, a former chairman of the Xerox Corp.,
was an active participant in the shuttle diplomacy
process between Israel and Egypt, which resulted
in the signing of the Camp David Peace Agree-
1 Continued on page 13_____________



Campaign '82
Page 8
riLTt\nrhrZL?ZSentin? '?% Cuban-Hebrew Committee Pacesetter award at the Dinner Dance is (left to
riant) Greater Miami Jewish Federation Executive Vice Proton t A*,...,., / u__iL r- ill t,ii nceA' "ei'tu
nnhnr~.~*JLA- P rvT y" "tu.ru K.ummuire raceseuer awara at the Dinner Dai
C^mJlttZnt, Qmi i 'Indention Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie; Cuban Hebrew Pacesetter
WarmerVSSSTEZ. Jck H-?** Cuban-Hebrew Committee General Chairman, IskacSklarindPhilVnT
^s^E^r^Flf^fha"nan fr tke 1982 Grea(er Miami Jeui*h Federation I S2S3KS%
1982 CJA-]
Exceeds ll
The 1982 Combined Jewish Add
been building at record-setting pak
the Greater Miami Jewish commuij
Chairman, said the response thus i
IEF within reach of its expectation*)
"A lot of hard work and countlft
paign this far,"' Warren said.' We!,
and set a standard for tuturecampau
Warren explained that many of to,
CJA-IEF also receive federal funds,L
past year. Thus, the Greater Miami
providing a larger percentage of the]
maintain them at their current levelsj
"Any decrease in overall funcL
programs and agencies serving ours
Chairman said, noting that such pn
federal budget ax.
Warren emphasized that newproje
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
community. He listed among these]
School of South Florida in North Mb
of South Dade, which is scheduled]
Federation Towers II high-rise comp|
and will be GMJF's second subsidnf
senior citizens.
Israel, which faces political isolatioi
and massive problems resulting fit
desperately needs the help of the Aij
He noted that the CJA-IEF provida
the State of Israel.
The Campaign also provides financij
half of Soviet Jewry and other seg
oppressed conditions, he said.
"We have a responsibility to prd
countries throughout the world,
represents your tangible linkage to Isij
A continued response to the CJA-IE
crucial to meeting expectations forth
payment or pledges during the up
important, so that GMJF can mainU
responsibilities to the lireater Mir-
Jewry.
"Our chosen slogan this year. To I
gifts to our campaign.' Warren saul
Jews around the corner and around tlf
m&&^&tttt&>&&iimi

The Second Annual South Dade Cocktail Reception on behalf of the GMJF 19H2 CIA ive
Bay Yacht and Country Club March 4, 1982 Pictured from Lfttn nWh, li)tiJ^JA'FF was held at Kings
Cocktail Reception Chairman; Senator Carl Uvin(D-lJi7hl zuest shaker Fd'kVh W,%*-er' &uth Da'



mpaign '82
Page 9
,w>*^^^

1
I
I
n
lampaign
IMillion
Lncy Fund campaign has
E raised $15.2 million from
Warren. General Campaign
Ling and has put the CJA-
Lone into bringing the cam-
i now. We will meet our goal
Kl agencies supported by the
teen cut drastically during the
Catty will be responsible for
"i to support these services to
. a very negative effect on
[and children." the Campaign
jdy have felt the blade of the
k initiated in cooperation with
ethe support of the Jewish
uewlv opened Jewish High
(Jewish Junior High School
ies in September; and the
..with is under construction
nd congregate-aid center for
[eighbors. triple-digit inflation
ption of new immigrants,
_j community. Warren said.
mpport for human services in
I continuing program on be-
|jewish people that live under
pport the Jewish people in
. "Your gift to the CJA-IEF
8 in all nations."
iduring the coming months is
Ten stressed that support and
over season are particularly
1 of meeting its growing
ommunity, Israel and World
i exactly the purpose of your
pporting the quality of life of
WftttW:*^^^
(far right) assists in the presentations.
I
I


Committee member; lVtu i-/t


Television/Soviet Jewry/Tzedakah
p%
Channel 2 presents
Passover Special
A special half-hour documentary hosted by Ed
Asner on Passover can be seen at 11 p.m. on
Channel 2, Sunday, April 11th, and also at 10:30
p.m. on Tuesday, April 13.
" Passover"" produced by the Mississippi Center
for Educational Television, details the history,
practice and significance of Passover, celebrated
each spring by Jews in remembrance of the
Exodus, led by Moses, from Egypt into Israel
more than 3,000 years ago.
An American seder is the program's focal point.
However, other sequences shot on location in
Israel show art from several rare, historical
Haggadahs (Passover prayer books): an Israeli
dance troupe: several geographical locations that
pertain to the Passover story; the Sinai Desert,
Jericho and the Western Wall. The filmed
segments in Israel are intended to illustrate the
universality of the practice of Passover among
Jews everywhere.
Co-producer and writer Edward Cohen echoed
the emotions behind the production, "Throughout
history, the Jewish people have faced political
subjugation, forced conversions, the Inquisition,
mob violence and the ultimate challenge to their
existence: Hitlers attempt at genocide. But
always deliverance has come, and the Jewish
people and the spirit of Judaism have survived.
This is what Passover celebrates."
Also on Channel 2 a repeat telecast of
"Holocaust: The Survivors Gather A Look
Back" will be broadcast on Monday. April 12th at
8 p.m. Relive these emotional days in Israel with
the Holocaust survivors and their families. David
Schaecter member Board of Directors, GMJF, led
a sizeable contingent of Miamians to the world
gathering of Holocaust survivors, which attracted
Jews from all over the world.

K
*&
.*
Edward Asner, host PBS Passoier Special
Beth David adopts Refuseniks of Kishinev
The Jews of Kishinev, USSR, have found new
hope and a new liason to the outside world as a ;
result of an innovative program initiated by the
Beth David Congregation of Miami.
Beth David has adopted the refuseniks of
Kishinev, choosing to zero in on a specific Soviet
community in which residents have been refused
visas to Israel.
"We decided to focus our attention on the Jews
of Kishinev, rather than on all refuseniks or some
scattered refuseniks," explained Rabbi David H.
Auerbach, Beth David's spiritual leader. "This is
a new type of program and one which we started."
The Beth David program received its impetus
and inspiration for this program from the South
\A Seder Prayer (
for Soviet Jews I
LET MY PEOPLE GO The cry of the ancient
; Israelites still is heard echoing through the
\ Soviet Union. It is the cry of modern-day heroes j
; those Soviet Jews who struggle with their own:
I Pharoah," the Soviet government.
Remember our brothers and sisters, the brave!
: refuseniks and prisoners of conscience, who cry
(out!
" DO NOT FORGET US."
Include them at your seder service by reading ti-
the following prayer in their honor: c?
1
May the blessing of Heaven
r Grace, loving kindness and mercy,
; Long life, ample sustenance,
P. And the joy of seeing their children
: Continuing to be devoted to the study ofTorah
\ Be granted to our brothers
\ Who live in the land or Russia.
I May the Almighty bless them and sustain them.
i May He grant them the courage to continue.
I May He strengthen the bonds between them and
: US.
: A nd may He enable them soon to live in pride and
I dignity
Freedom and honor.
\ And until these goals are achieved
May we be their voice,
j And may our prayers on their behalf be heard,
: In the councils of the nations here on earth.
i And in Thy Presence above.
' Master in Heaven,
Be with them in their plight,
[And let us say: Amen.
%ct*vmw&*^^
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, an arm of the
Community Relations Committee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Federation is sup-
ported by gifts to the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergancy Fund.
One of the aspects of the Beth David program is
plans for the "twinning" of Bar and Bat Mitz-
vahs. As each Beth David youngster reaches Bar
or Bat mitzvah age, a Kishinev youth who is ap-
proximately the same age is chosen to be honored
at synagogue services.
The first such twinning ceremony at Beth David,
will be held on May 29, when Dov Cazary of
Miami and Dorian Averbukh of Kishinev will be
honored upon reaching the age of religious respon-
sibility. A chair will remain empty in the syna-
gogue, signifying Dorian's absence, and the
Kishinev youth will be remembered when Dov is
called before the Torah. Rabbi Auerbach noted
that one similarity, other than age, which links the
two boys is the fact that each has grandparents
living in Herziliya, Israel.
The congregation also is involved in an active
letter-writing campaign to Kishinev refuseniks
and to U.S. and Soviet officials. Dr. Gary Frank, a
Research Associate at the University of Miami
and a member of the South Florida Conference
emphasizes that the letters have particular impor-
tance, since they remind the refuseniks of the sup-
port of Jewish communities outside the Soviet
Union.
"If they think we've forgotten them, it only
compounds their state of pessimism," "In light of
what is going on in the Soviet Union today, they
can't be too optimistic."
Dr. Frank noted, by way of providing some his-
torical background, that one third of the city's
150,000 people were Jewish at the turn of the cen-
tury and many Jews still remain. There is docu-
mentation of at least 19 refuseniks within that
community and it is distinctly possible that others
have been refused visas; their plight, however re-
mains little known outside the Soviet Union.
"We hope to be a catalyst for all congregatk
in the U.S. to attempt something along th
lines," Frank said. "We plant trees in theirhon
in Israel, we have adopted the twinning prog
something other synagogues have done as \
highlight a refusenik family every other weekj
the Beth David bulletin. Moreover, each of I
congregation's many Havuroth have adopted]
specific refusenik family. We simply cannot
them feel we have forgotten them."
Rabbi Auerbach explained that he was instri
mental in choosing Kishinev as the target coq
munity when the program began in Decemb
"Both of my parents originate from Kishinev,"!
said. "Even though they were both from thesa
town, they met in Montreal."
The rabbi also explained that one of the pn
gram's objectives is to spotlight some
prominent refuseniks. "Much of the focus
other programs) has been on urban centers, sufl
as Moscow," he went on to say, "We're concen
trating on a town that has a large Jewish popuM
tion of its own. This is a type of program we hop"
will be picked up by other communities.
Tzedakah Fund Answer To Special Need
Aids Individuals In Times Of Distress
When the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
set up its special Tzedakah Fund over 13 years
ago, the Fund was designated to deal with the
many special needs of persons in the community
not now taken care of by the annual Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Tzedakah, translated as charity, justice or
righteousness, and often a blend of the three, is an
important tradition of Judaism.
The Tzedakah Fund is used to help people
with emergencies, with emphasis on a person to
person type of aid. Each case is handled on an
individual basis. Oftentimes, a grant from the
Fund is used to provide a Jewish burial to an
individual whose family cannot afford the cost, or
for someone who has no family. On occasion it is
used for emergency overnight lodging or
even a bus ticket back home.
Gifts to the Tzedakah Fund are accept*
from those who wish to honor a joyous occas. m
such as a Bar or Bat Mitzvah, or to recogniKj
who has an outstanding contribution to nis o i
community or country. The Fund may ai*>
used to honor the memory of loved ones.
When a gift is made, a card with thenaroeo
the donor is sent to the person or family on-
so honored. When making a contnbutwn^
donor is requested to specify that it is a gi
Tzedakah Fund; the name of the person in w
honor it is donated; the person to receive w
card, and the donor's name.


omen's Division
Page 11
*
i .
.w Pmfp 6fttSW33x Federation Women's
KSSS consultant and commentator)
JSSdSS, Campaign Chairman, Business
I Professional Women.
n. Women's Division 1982 Campaign, led by
[airman Ellen Mandler. is now in its most active
important stage. With more than $2.5 million
iSy committed to the Women's Division.
Lh is working toward a goal of $3.45 million
7year, the following will highlight recent pro-
_ss and upcoming Campaign efforts:
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
rision Business and Professional Women parlor
Kins and cocktail reception on behalf of the
> Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
ii took place February 22, 1982. The group
t at the home of Bunny Horowitz, with special
at speaker Aaron D. Rosenbaum, a noted
itical consultant and commentator from Wash-
M, DC. This was a highly successful meeting,
i excellent gift increases by the 35 women
Ml Nancy Bloom is Chairman of Business
1 Professional Women, Amy Dean is Campaign
nan, Robin Davidson, Campaign Vice-
nan and Sonia Miller served as Meeting
I Aaron Rosenbaum was guest speaker at
bother Greater Miami Jewish Federation s
fomen's Division event, the first Miami Beach
anis Tournament and Luncheon on behalf of the
I CJA-IEF, February 24th. This event was
J at the Grove Isle Club featuring a doubles
_nis tournament and a private tour of Martin Z.
larguiles" Grove Isle sculpture garden. Over 50
nen attended, and a gift increase of 20 per-
r-t resulted. Muriel Russell is Chairman of the
jliami Beach Area, with Miki Millman and Lydia
oldring serving as Campaign Chairmen. Patron
'airmen are Gail Harris and Bonni Lang, Spon-
Chairman is Debby Schwartz and Donor
airmen are Amy Dean and Adria Rasken.
I March 5 brought the GMJF Women's Division
jTurnberry Isle at Aventura for the Fifth An-
1 North Dade Luncheon and Doubles Tour
nt on behalf of the 1982 CJA-IEF. Vicki
on, Chairwoman, National United Jewish Ap-
1 Young Women's Leadership Cabinet was the
t speaker at this event, which gathered nearly
J women. Sue Graubert is North Dade Chair-
pi, Terry Drucker and Dolores Wolf are Cam-
n Chairmen. Patron Chairmen are Helene
a and Lorraine Rubin; Sponsor Chairman is
die Gellman, Donor Chairmen are Wendy
jjh, Lynn Mendelssohn and Ileen Taylor.
"""i Tournament and Luncheon Committee
nen are Melanie Cohen, Lenore Elias and
ta Segal. All together, their efforts help
*te outstanding giving increases of 59 per-
Bi GMJF Wonen's Division South Dade
{"* on behalf of the 1982 CJA-IEF was
rwnesday, March 10 with guest speaker Profes-
AUen Pollack a founder of the American
Qemic Association for Peace in the Middle
' A spring fashion show sponsored by the
nty-Four Collection was a special attraction
! ^lunch. The event was held at the Sheraton
House and sponsored by the Hotel's
ement. Gloria Scharlin is South Dade area
"an, Annette Aerenson and Gail Jaffe are
J?lgn, Chairmen: Patron Chairmen are
1 Faggen and Joan Morrison; Sponsor
Campaign Highlights
Chairmen are Barbara Kasper and Carolyn Sharf;
Donor Chairmen are Arleen Rosenthal and Elaine
^ Ross. For the Southwest Dade Area, which
assisted in this major function, Debby Grodnick is
Chairman; Fran Storper is Campaign Chairman
and Donor Chairmen are Joan Fisher and Barbara
Wasserman. Nearly 250 women took part in this
highly successful event.
Leaders of the High-Rise Division of the GMJF
Joined forces in a series of Hi-Rise Telephone Task
l'orce sessions March 22-25, a segment of the
Women's Division Phonothon. The Hi-Rise Tele-
phone Task Force is a special group of men and
women working to complete the 1982 CJA-IEF, in
an effort to reach Hi-Rise residents whose com-
mitments have not yet been made. Charlotte Held
is the Women's Division Phonothon Chairman,
Sidney Olson is High Rise Chairman and Alfred
Golden is High Rise Co-Chairman. Women's
Division Phonothon Miami Beach Chairmen are
Lorraine Cooperman and Mickey Granoff; Karen
Katz is North Dade Chairman; Elaine Rackoff and
Estelle Seget are South Dade Chairmen and Sandi
Miot is South West Dade Chairman.
Special Events March 26 April 1; Evelyn
Mitchel, Chairman
There are three Women's Division Special
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women s
Division met at the Grove Isle Club for the Miami
Beach Tennis Tournament and Luncheon on be-
half of the 1982 CJA-IEF February 24, 1982.
Pictured from left to right are: Miki MUlman,
Miami Beach Campaign Co^hairman; EUen
Mandler, Campaign Chairman Women's Division;
Nancy Lipoff, President Women s Division;
Selma Newman and Pom Turetsky, Patron,
Sponsor, Donor and Tennis Luncheon Committee
Members.
Events coming up on behalf of the 1982 CJA-IEF
for the G M JF. The programs of these are focusing
on health, beauty, physical fitness and nutrition.
NORTH DADE
Mikki Futernick, Women's Division Vice-Presi-
dent, Leadership Development, will be the fea-
tured guest speaker March 26 at 9 a.m. at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center.
Following that will be a Tennis Tournament and
Beauty Care Workshops featuring Dr. Joel
Wilentz, speaking on "Cosmetic Dermatology In-
cluding CoUegen" and Joyce Juken speaking on
"Nutrition and Today's Woman.
North Dade Area Committee Co-Chairmen are
Helen Berne. Renata Bloom and Phybs Meier
Members of the Tennis Tournament and Coffee
Committee include: Adrienne Anchell, Arlene
GXn "tula Horton. Evelyn Mitchel, Evelyn
Spreiser. Susan Fried, Carole Lubowsky, Elaine
Orvieto, Joyce Fine and Ann Fingerman.
MIAMI BEACH
Wednesday. March 31 at the Bal Harbour Ml
Prtv Room, a breakfast meetmg at 9.30 a.m. ww
make-up 1"uStiacn Campaign Chairman. Th^^fCasXff,
Gittlin.
The Women's Division of the GMJF held the
North Dade Tennis Luncheon at Turnberry
Isle March 5, on behalf of the 1982 CJA-IEF.
Pictured from left to right are: Dolores Wolf,
North Dade Campaign Co-Chairman; Lenore
Elias, Event Co-Chairman; Melanie Cohen,
Event Co-Chairman; Vicki Agron, guest
speaker; Terry Drucker, North Dade Cam-
paign Chairman; and Ellen Mandler, Women's
Division Campaign Chairman.
SOUTH DADE AND SOUTH WEST DADE
You will have the choice of getting in shape with
Candy Colby of Channel 10's Jazz Aerobics pro-
gram or play bridge, scrabble, backgammon and
other games on April 1 at 9 a.m. at Country Walk
Recreational Center for breakfast. Speaker for this
special event is Nancy Lipoff, President of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women s
Division. South Dade Area Chairman is Gloria
Scharlin, Annette Aerenson and Gail Jaffe are
Campaign Chairmen, and Laurel Shapiro is
Special Events Chairman. For the Southwest
Dade Area, Debby Grodnick is Chairman. Fran
Storper is Campaign Chairman and Marilyn
Kohn is Special Events Chairman.
WASHINGTON MISSION
The Women's Division is offering a unique ex-
perience to get a first-hand closeup look at our
seat of power in Washington, D.C. with the excit-
ing Mission to Washington, March 29-31. Cam-
paign Chairman EUen Mandler and Missions
Chairman Marcy Lefton will act as Mission
Leaders. Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack
will accompany the group as a special consultant.
The exciting three-day itinerary will include visits
with Senators and Congressmen, special briefings
by officials of the Israel Embassy, cultural events
in Washington, visits with Reagan Administra-
tion officials and more. Participants wdl stay at
the beautiful Loews Lenfant Plaza Hotel and
even eet to see Katharine Hepburn in West Side
Waltz'' at the Kennedy Center. Capacity is
limited, and for more information caU Debbie Pol-
lans at the Women's Division at 576-4000. ext.
209.
The Women's Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation held the South Dade
Luncheon at the Sheraton River House March
10 on behalf of the 1982 CJA-IEF. Pictured
from left to right are: Gail Jaffee, South Dade
Campaign Chairman; Ellen Mandler, Women's
Division Campaign Chairman; Barbara
Kasper, Sponsor Chairman; Marsha Faggen,
Patron Co-Chairman; Sandi Miot, Southwest
Dade Category Chairman; Joan Morrison,
Patron Co-Chairman; Elaine Ross, Donor Co-
Chairman; and Arleen Rosenthal, Donor Co-
Chairman.



Campaign '82
Page
Project Renewal Raises $750,000 for Or Ah
JProject Renewal, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's direct investment in a designated Is-
rfeli development community, has raised more
t*an $750,000 thus far in 1982, approaching its
goal of $1 million for the year.
Willa Abramson, the Project Renewal Campaign
Chairman, announced this latest fundraising
achievement at a March 10 preview exhibition of
the works of prominent Israeli artist Menashe
Kadishman. Ms. Abramson expressed pride in the
degree of success Project Renewal has attained
but emphasized her determination to meet the $1
million goal.
"This represents an important undertaking by
the Greater Miami Jewish community,"Ms.
Abramson said. "Or Akiva, our designated
Project Renewal community, will benefit from our
direct support. Our gifts will show very tangible
results."
Project Renewal is a bold new plan to revitalize
160 seriously distressed neighborhoods in Israel.
These areas are a threat to Israel's strength,
morale and vitality. Project Renewal is designed
to help neighborhood residents plan and imple-
ment the revjtalization of their own communities.
Greater Miami's Jewish community has been
twinned with Or Akiva, located one kilometer
East of Caesarea, midway between Haifa and Tel
Aviv. Those funds raised by Greater Miami's
Project Renewal Campaign will aid construction,
human services and rehabilitation of this
developing community.
Philip T. Warren, General Campaign Chairman
of the 1982 CJA-IEF, expressed his personal
commitment to Project Renewal and echoed the
sentiments of other GMJF leaders about the im-
portance of this new undertaking.
"The results of our Project Renewal effort have
been most gratifying," Warren said. "Our in-
volvement will undoubtedly benefit not only Or
Akiva itself, but the entire State of Israel. We are
helping a struggling community establish itself
and build a better future."
The March 10 Kadishman exhibit drew nearly
100 members of the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity who have made a commitment to Project
Renewal. They met the renowned Israeli artist, as
he displayed his latest works. Those contributors
who gave gifts of $500, $750 or $1,000 received one
of three specially designed Kadishman litho-
graphs, which the accomplished painter-sculptor
signed personally at the event.
"I'm very proud to be playing a part in this
project," Kadishman said. "I know Or Akiva and
I know the town really needs your help and sup-
port."
Kadishman, whose art accents the tones of
man's environment in flourishes of color and
themes, noted that the Greater Miami Jewish
community's investment in Or Akiva will have a
strong positive effect on the town for generations
to come.
"It's hard to believe that Or Akiva, a poor,
struggling community is right outside Caesarea.
one^of Israel's richest towns," he said. "There is a
lot "of work to do there and the people of Or Akiva
need your support."
For further information about Project Renewal,
contact Federation at 576-4000.
National Institute in Jerusalem for the
training of Teachers of the Retarded helps a
young man barn to distinguish shapes. The
teacher is one of 1200 who have graduated the
school since its establishment in 1969 The
American Jewish Joint Distribution Commit-
tee (JDC), the overseas relief arm of the
American Jewish community, helped set ud
the school and has been supporting its ttuiior,
ts with scholarships. The JDCrefeivesitsin.
come largely through the campaigns of the
United Jewish Appeal '
l\
Renowned Israeli artist Menashe Kadishman talks with Project Renewal
Campaign Chairwoman Willa Abramson at the March 10preview exhibition of
his most recent works, which was held on behalf of Project Renewal
Br^7,i
Painter Sculptor Menashe Kadishman displays one of his latest works, which
was previewed at the March 10 exhibition on behalf of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Project Renewal Campaign.
JDC Aids Retarded Children
In Israel, as is the case elsewhere in the West
three out of every one hundred children born
suffer some form of mental retardation. Of this
three percent, most are mildly retarded, but some
are profoundly retarded.
The interest of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC) in helping the
retarded, stems from its overall program of aid for
the handicapped which embraces the physically
and neurologically impaired, the blind, the deaf
and the mentally 01. JDC, the overseas arm of the
American Jewish community, is active in over 30
nations around the world engaging in rescue, relief
and rehabilitation of Jews and Jewish com-
munities. Its annual budget of $39.5 million is
SPTJ^SS thl?.Ugh "^unity campaigns
SLk- ^Greater Miami Jewish Federation s
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign, which helps support JDC to provide
training for teachers of retarded chOdren, work
with the deaf, courses for work with families in
social welfare centers, and other services.
fcPSitf the Ntioi*l Institute in Jerusalem
969 wh^T?8^ TeaCJhere 0f the Rtarded1
19691 when it first opened, was to graduate 1 000
teachers within ten years. It was bSXdthenm
now, that retarded children deservetKuSied
to the fullest of their capabOities and
were needed who would devote themselves to I
important and challenging task.
In the 12 years since then, more than 1,2
teachers of the Retarded have been graduated.]
on JDC scholarships. They have spread
around the country, bringing a new light into I
lives of the children they serve.
The institute, or Midrasha, as it is known]
Israel, is supported by the Ministry of Labor f"
Social Affairs and has grown together with
number of graduates. Today it has brancnesi
four cities: Tel Aviv, Netanya, Beersheba
Tiberias.
JDC has also begun granting aid to an Institu
course for teachers in local day centers tor
retarded. The first class of nineteen has airei
graduated, with the second class opening soon
Thanks to another JDC initiative, all of
handicapped are now included under the umbr
of the Association for Handicapped Children i
the Retarded in Israel. JDC founded
Association in partnership with the Governn
of Israel to provide more efficient and c
prehensive services on the local level, thani"
your contributions to the CJA-IEF each year.


r **' -'-
ipaign
'82
Page 13
I
ban-Hebrew Committee Celebrates
jrael's Independence
l rnnsul General of Israel, Joel Arnon was
Jhe5luest speaker at the Greater Miami
Krlfrations Cuban-Hebrew Committee
ft KfiS San'e held on behalf of the 1982
f iuew sh Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
,bined Jewisn"F function at the Kon-
l5ByHo\rwhich also honored the 34th
iS of Israel's statehood.
i, in his address, stressed the lmport-
,Ar? uniU between Israel and the United
f.O needs the support of the United
teuriike ever before. The Soviets are con-
Bv supplying our most dangerous adversaries
laments H Israel is to remain a free state.
:T7niu^ support from the United
Its is essential.
then echoed his feelings on the unstable
Idle East situation, 'Israel is caught between
Iral very aggressive nations, which seek to
Col Israel. Now. we must agree that Israel
I never fall prey to these irresponsible
fcnes She must remain free, strong, and
Lrained by opposing governments.
fin light of Arnon's poignant words, the Din-
I Dance resulted in an overall increase of 30 per
lover last year's campaign effort.
[Cuban-Hebrew Committee General Chairman
L Sklar said, 'Our hard work has produced
Hits. We have raised more money this year than
ars past, and this illustrates the increase in-
ternet of the Cuban-Hebrew Committee,
Eg with the increased support of the Cuban-
[irew community. Dinner Chairman Guillermo
hin also did a wonderful job in coordinating
levent."
I However, in his speech to the audience
jsaid. The military, economic and political
Rations facing Israel today are in the most deli-
i balance ever. We have to continue our
of Israel, if she is to maintain this very
tile balance."
He continued, "In everyone's heart
all dream of aliyah. This is why Israel
k remain as a major concern in everyone's
hd.Tonight, we celebrate her 34th Anniversary.
Honoring the 34th Anniversary of Israeli statehood at the Cuban-Hebrew
Committee Annual Dinner Dance held at the Konouer Beach Hotel are (left to
right) Henry Percal, Campaign Director and his wife Susana; Issac Sklar,
General Campaign Chairman of the Cuban-Hebrew Committee and his wife
Berta; and Guillermo Sostchin, Dinner Dance Chairman and his wife Keta.
Let s make sure our children will be able to cele-
brate her 64th."
Also participating in the sponsorship of the
Dinner Dance were the Cuban-Hebrew Congre-
gation, the Cuban Sephardic Congregation of
Florida Temple Moses, B'nai B'rith Miami Latin
2796, Inter-American Chapter of Hadassah.
Cuban "David Bliss" branch of Farband and the
Latin-American Jewish Community of Miami.
Serving on the Cuban-Hebrew Committee which
planned the Dinner Dance were, Dr. Issac Cohen,
Secretary; Moises Derechinsky, Vice-Secretary;
Issac Silberberg, Treasurer; Leon Yarmus, Vice-
Treasurer; Henry Percal, Campaign Director;
Max Garazi, Vice-Campaign Director. Dr.
George Feldenkreis, Rafael Kravec and Saul Sreb-
nick were the Honorary Chairmen and Jack Ches-
ter was the Chairman of the Pacesetter Commit-
tee.
Arnon summed up the feeling in the room by
saying, "It's good to see people like yourselves
coming together for a common purpose. Some-
times we officials can get lost in our ivory towers;
however, when we realize that people do care
about what happens to Israel, as well as to fellow
Jews all over the world, then we know that no
matter where we are or what ever happens, we are
together. Unified by strength, and bonded in
spirit. This is what makes the State of Israel
survive."
Jewish Demographic Study Begins
Demographic Study of the Jewish popu-
lon of Dade County is scheduled to begin the
eof data-collection on Wednesday, March 17,
[. Jesse Casselhoff, Chairman of the study,
ich is sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish
iteration, reported that the results will provide a
kith of information to the community about
pulation characteristics, attitudes, and needs.
ie study's consultants, Dr. Ira Sheshin and
aham Lavender, of the University of Miami,
J that they are planning to contact a random
Me of Jewish households through a telephone
)witz
Continued from page 7
* He also played a significant role in the for-
tion of the Carter Administration's Middle
* policies.
i reception will mark the culmination of an
K by the Attorneys Division to attract active
jwipation of more Jewish legal professionals.
lie 1982 Campaign signals the beginning of
m grassroots response from a Dade County
.attorneys, tne most populous of Jewish
ons in the area," said Stephen Arky, the
eys Division Chairman. "Attempts to
rneys have been made in
todown-
i
paigi
Attorneys Division
contribution by
interview followed by a written questionnaire. Be-
ginning on March 17 and over a period of several
weeks, interviewers at the University of Miami
will make telephone calls during the evenings from
Monday through Thursday and on Sunday after-
noon and evening.
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, President, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, joined Mr Casselhoff in
stating, "We urge all individuals who are con-
tacted to respond openly and fu ly so that the
Study's findings will accurately reflect the
characteristics of our community.
Handbook Offered
The National Federation Endowment pro-
gram, chaired by Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation Vice President Norman Lipoff, has compiled
a two-volume handbook entitled, "Handbook on
Charitable Split-Interest Trusts and Supporting
Foundations." These handbooks incorporate un-
portant changes resulting from the Economic Re-
covery Tax Act of 1981. Norman A. Sugarman,
former Assistant Commissioner of the Internal
Revenue Service and counsel to the Council of
Jewish Federation's Endowment program, ana
nationally known expert in the field of tax law and
its impact on charitable giving, prepared the
handbooks. The books are available through the
... Jewish Philanthropies of the
:; Federal. Biscaync
B76.4000.exl 228.
n to produce $1
d ited l ire i
neys in Dade Coi'
h s; attractri:. to the
ltnt, \ in empha^s is hn:ng
the "wolvemeni. oi Jewish law firm mem-
itioh, roma<-t Federation at
14000
wtenaioi 15.
Notice To Readers:
If you have been called or writ n u> regar-
,w th Den, rraphic Study ol the Jew^h
"fuiauonoi ..mnty.pkM, opewtoand
rush the aPi> >priate information to the in-
Urviewe; Thar, <>u
Joseph Handleman, Miami Beach business and
civic leader was recently honored by the
Magen David Adorn for Israel's International
Committee when it named it's newest planned
blood facility the Joseph Handleman MDA
Central Blood Bank. This new technologically
advanced facility will be built along with the
MDA National'Blood Center Just outside of
Tel Aviv in Kirat Ono. Mr. Handleman has
been extremely active with 'he Jewish Welfare
Federation of Detroit and currently is serving
on the Administrativi Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish F ni He is also a
membet tnvestm mmittt* of the
Foundation of Jewish ".rotnes, as wll
as a member of the Pacesetter Committee of
the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fu- : lis dedic>t: -id commitment to
Judaism the vital o i'tis of Israelhave lo
been re: by Jewish leaders
from ol the wort rrently, Mr. Han-
dleman is serving as National Vice Chairman
of the American lied Magen David-for Israel,
and teas instrumental in the o'mutation of the
MDA International Co nmittee. Pictured here,
Mr. Handleman (left) congratulates George M.
Elxey, President of the American Red Cross on
the occasion of the AmenCtSU' tied C^ross Cen-
tennial.


Foundation
Page
Foundation-Funded Program Provides
Security for Elderly
Senior citizens in the South Beach area have a
new link to emergency aid in times of danger, as a
result of an innovative mechanical system offered
by Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami.
The Automated Response Monitoring System
(ARMS) offers elderly subscribers security at the
touch of a button.
Creation of the system was aided by a $35,000
grant from the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
The ARMS operation also received a $120,000 :
grant from the State Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services. The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services is monitoring the
program as a federal demonstration project, for
possible implementation in other parts of the
nation.
Tabletop units are installed in the homes of
subscribers, so they are accessible. When a
subscriber feels sick or endangered, he or she
presses a beeper, which triggers a signal in Mount
Sinai's Emergency or Outpatient Department. A
trained professional responds by calling the
subscriber immediately. If the subscriber fails to
answer the telephone, the professional alerts a
neighbor, a relative, the Fire Rescue Squad, the
police or another municipal agency of the
situation.
The entire series of steps usually takes no more
than five minutes, and the system is credited with
having saved lives and preserving senior citizens'
ability to live independently, without nursing
home or extended care involvement.
Although similar emergency systems are avail-
able in several other places across the nation, the
ARMS program operated by Mount Sinai will
be the largest program of its kind in the United
States. The system has the capability of
monitoring 1,000 clients and 221 home units
currently are available for use.
At this time, clients must be affiliated with the
United Community Care Program for the elderly
to be eligible for ARMS. Those enrolled will then
be evaluated to determine whether their physical
handicap, functional disability or illness merits
participation in the program.
File cards are written for each client and stored
adjacent to the ARMS monitoring consoles at
Mount Sinai Medical Center. This assures that the
staff professional has access to each client's case
history, so the proper emergency response can be
initiated for each instance.
One special feature of the ARMS program is
the ability to install extra beepers in bathrooms
and other locations in client's homes where the
clients might fall or become immobile due to
emergency or illness. The system has been
designed to provide maximum protection for the
elderly in their homes.
Mercantile Continued from page:!
individual in the Greater Miami Community who
exemplifies the principles, beliefs and
humanitarian concepts of Harold Bosworth, which
have contributed to the betterment of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and for the community
in general. The Award signifies the high
humanitarian ideals to which Mr. Bosworth was
dedicated in his service to his profession, to his
community and to philanthropy.
Mr. Baros is receiving the award for his in-
volvement with the community and dedicated
service to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign throughout the
years.
Past recipients of the award include John N.
Sertin, Jacob Rabinowitz, Jay I. Kislak, Robert
Macht, Max Orovitz, Milton Weiss, William S.
Ruben, Thomas C. Wasmith, Robert Russell,
Mendell M. Selig, Goldie R. Goldstein, Ted Bodin,
Ralph Levitz, Melvin Jacobs, Leonard Luria and
David Kenny.
"The groups are gearing up to change the format
of the Mercantile Division this year," said
Leonard Luria, Chairman of the Mercantile
Division. "We want to reach a broader segment of
the Mercantile community and have all of the
groups represented at the Dinner and within
Federation."
The benefits of the one-button emergency alert provided by the ARMS syste*
is demonstrated by Mount Sinai Medical Center administrative assistant
Sheldon Sussman and Auxiliary Volunteer Vice President Ceil Block in
recent enactment of a medical emergency situation.
Nurse Fran Bloom and patient-care assistant Catherine Mackey monitor |
ARMS console at Mount Sinai Medical Center, during a recent demonstration
of the system.
*1*
I
Leonard Luria
William S. Ruben
Last year, the groups within the Mercantile
Division raised $960,000. The goal for this year is
$1,150,000 for the groups, which include:
Apparel, Department and Retail Stores, Home
Furnishings, Jewelry, Cleaners and Laundries,
Shoes and Beauty and Barber Supplies.
"We want a new focus on the many retail stores
and decorating and design aspects of the
Division," stated Willian S. Ruben, coordinator of
the Mercantile Division.
"The numerous groups within the Division make
it one of the strongest Divisions witl
Federation," he added.
Reservations can be made for the Mercantil
Division Dinner by calling Federation at 5H|
and speaking to either Martin Barasch or fca.
Geiger.
Larry Mizrach is Chairman of the AOTJJ
Group, Tim Cohen is Chairman of the n
Furnishings Group and Howard Socol is w-
man of the Department Store Group.



PMBB
Page 15
URSDAY, APRIL1
nivision of the Greater Miami
Litton Living breakfast with a
SffL P TSll S W 144th St. The breakfast wUl
W'ES* Colby of Channel 10 who specializes
fc Aerobic? Be a part of the action, call 576-
0,ext-232.
NDAY.APRIL4
- i Rrh Sholom Great Performances
Tafures The Israeli Piano Quartet. Moshe
"ifV Abraham Bornstein, and Elhanan Breg-
.* members of the Israeli Philharmonic and
1 been performing as a trio for many years.
JZ wK outstanding pianist]Pmna Salzman
pfl the Israeli Quartet. The concert will
Ts om.to the Temple Sanctuary, 4144
Ave. Call 532-3491 for more information.
Uday,april4
Li Mien in the Spring" is a lecture series
KSd at Temple Israel Downtown. The
series is open to the public so brush up on
Cof major concern. Call 573-5900 for more
jormation.
l0NDAY,APRIL5
nle Israel of Greater Miami presents the
urL "Gateway to Judaism" which will be
Ut at the Kendall Branch of Temple Israel,
)N Kendall Dr. Call 573-5900 for information
srning registration times and dates.
URSDAY, APRIL 8
Lin the Young Adults Division of the Greater
Kami Jewish Federation for the Second Seder,
ke Seder will begin at 7 p.m. in the Hillel Jewish
Lmunity Center on the University of Miami
mpus 1100 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables. Make
ur reservations now through the Young Adults
on by calling 576-4000, ext. 287.
ONDAY, APRIL 12
^ht come hear Noble Prize winning author
lac Bashevis Singer lecture on topics of com-
aity concern as the Temple Emanu-El
.w Series concludes its 1982 season. The 1978
ble Laureate for literature, Singer's work has
widely translated into various languages.
Ru will not want to miss "An Evening with Issac
ishevis Singer." Call Temple Emanu-El for more
brmation at 538-2503.
In April
SATURDAY, APRIL 17
Winner many times of Israel's "Grammy" the
King David award for top female vocalist, Israel's
best known folk-singer Chava Alberstein will
perform in concert. Ms. Alberstein has a wide-
ranging repertoire in many styles do don't miss
this fantastic evening of music and fun. The
concert is taking place at Temple Beth Sholom,
4144 Chase Ave., Miami Beach at 8 p.m.
Presented as part of the Temple Beth Sholom
Israeli Showcase Series, the evening promises to
be quite entertaining. Call 532-3491 for more
information.
SUNDAY, APRIL 18
A Cocktail reception will be held on behalf of the
GMJF 1982 CJA-IEF at the Doral Beach Hotel
for Young Business Persons and Professionals.
All interested Young Business Persons and Pro-
fessionals are encouraged to attend. For more
information, call Federation at 576-4000 extension
287.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21
The Mercantile Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation presents its Annual Dinner at
the Four Ambassadors Hotel. The Dinner will
begin at 7:30 p.m. with cocktails to be served at
6:30. The address is 801 South Bayshore Dr. Call
576-4000 for more information.
SUNDAY, APRIL 25
The Fine Arts of Beth David is presenting "The
Pavarim, Israeli Folk Duo Family Concert" at
2625 S.W. 3rd Ave. Make sure your plans include
this stimulating concert. Call 854-3911 for in-
formation concerning ticket prices. The concert is
scheduled to begin at 3 p.m. so get your reser-
vations in now.
SUNDAY, APRIL 25
Sharpen up on your bidding skills and plan to
attend the Chai Chapter of American Mizrachi
Women's Annual Auction. Temple Or Olom is the
place, and is located at 8755 S.W. 16th St. Miami.
Call Sadie Kane for more information at 271-
5814. The auction is scheduled to begin at 5 p.m.
so come early.
TUESDAY, APRIL 27
The Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation begins its "Annual Spring
Learn-in" in the Federation building, 4200 Bis-
cay ne Blvd. The topic will center on "Our Jewish
Roots: Our Ashkenazi and Sephardic Heritage."
Reserve your place by calling 576-4000, ext. 287.
THURSDAY, APRIL 29
Sol Linowitz, the Carter Administration's Special
Ambassador to the Middle East, will address a 6
p.m. reception-cocktail party for the Attorneys
Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
at the Four Ambassadors Hotel, 801 Bayshore
Drive, Miami. Linowitz, a former chairman of the
Xerox Corp., was a key figure in the shuttle
diplomacy process which led to the Camp David
Peace Accords.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
I Please Print or Type)
The deadline for May events is April 9. 1982.
Organization
Event______
Place _____
Date ___
Your Name
Title_____
.Time
JIA.M.OP.M
Phone No.
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Federations Support Aid for Human Services
|As federal aid for human service programs
mes increasingly scarce, the Greater Miami
ish Federation has become involved in ad-
vocacy of public and private sector support for
ssary social services. As a member of the
orida Association of Jewish Federations, the
pfJF has taken the forefront of championing aid
the needy through the efforts of the
ciation's Government Affairs Committee.
H Jules Arkin, GMJF's Immediate Past
ident who serves as the Gdverment Affair
nmittee Chairman, has caucused with other
ewide Jewish Federation leaders and their
ators in Tallahassee to discuss ways of filling
funding gap created by cutbacks in federal
nan service programs.
tony of the meetings with legislators were
"ff*1.anc* a'ded by the services of former State
'Elaine Bloom, who currently is serving as the
Association of Jewish Federations'
vernment affairs director Mrs. Bloom, who held
seat in the Legislature from 1974-78, has
I if"1 various volunteer capacities within the
PM and other local and national Jewish orga-
"ons. During her legislative tenure, she
the House Committee on Federal State
"Pnations and the Joint Committee on
omic Policy.
Hfc emphasized that the Florida Jewish
ations, in cooperation with statewide United
SatpPr0gram8' nave been activelv pur8uin
_ and public sector support for numerous
* of Programs, which would otherwise face ex-
*n due to federal budget cuts and the pres-
Mt the inflation.
11, .Je been seeking private sector support
Kunni Pro&ran8," Arkin said, citing one
1 e of the Association's efforts. "Private
sector subsidies could save programs that provide
much needed services."
Delegates representing Jewish Federations and
United Way branches in the northern, central and
southern portions of the state met in the State
Capital on February 24, March 3 and March 20
respectively to discuss the proposed 1 percent
sales tax and one-half percent local sales tax
option.
Arkin said the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
took an interest in this proposed legislation as a
means of supplying funds to substitute tot-re-
duced federal funds. He also said GMJF, as a
sponsoring member of the Miami Citizens Against
Crime, supports the tax as a means of supporting
increased local crime prevention.
"We focused on the sales tax increase to provide
adequate funding for the Community Care for the
Elderly Program, nursing home reimbursements
and replacement of other lost federal funds
Arkin said. "We also are seeking to utihze funds
from other available federal programs for these
purposes." .
On March 10, the Florida IMM^gjg
with 27 other agencies representing business
tabor, taw enforcement, interfaith, civic and
^cation groups for a press conference ad-
vocating the 1 percent sales tax. The
Sanctions, representing theconce?s of more
thin 2 million Floridians, stressed ^ecr.t.calneed
for additional state revenues and immediate
action by the Florida Legislature to aid human
service programs.
Arkin noted that a waiver was recently granted
to use Federal Title XIX Medicaid funds, which
SdinarUrare reserved for senior citizens below
SfpWrty line, for Title XX programs, which
L. Jules Arkin
provide services for persons primarily seniors
in a wider economic spectrum.
"We have met with a positive response on many
of these issues," Arkin said. "Our effectiveness as
a statewide coalition has touched a large number
of the legislators who represent us."


It's not just the thought that counts-
It's the action.
A will is a
reaffirmation of your
commitment to strengthen
the community
in times to come.
All bequests to the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies are exempt
from estate tax. Your attorney, bank
or trust officer can advise you further.
&*
&
e.0

Arrange for a bequest to benefit the
Jewish People.
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
OF THE GREATER MIAMIJEWISH FEDERATION
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Fl. 33137
305-576-4000


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