The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02752

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE
1 L H\W
54-Number 44 Thraa Sactiona
l)
SI
Miami, FloridaFriday October 30,1981
* fndSKochm:
By Mm so cent* Price 50 Ce n t s
Threat of Terrorism Spreads to U.S.
ftfcWx \
yx&xSi
Tmn^m

I
"'
ft*
::::::::::<::::::::: :::-:-::-:>:::v<>:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Take Your Choice
Byrd Decision
May Kill AW ACS
The Jewish Floridian went to press just prior to the
Senate vote Wednesday evening. By Tuesday, Senate
Majority Leader Howard Baker predicted a Reagan Ad-
ministration victory for its A WACS sale to Saudi Arabia.
But before that. Democratic Minority Leader Robert
Byrd stunned the Administration with his decision to
vote'no.' Following is one possible scenario. (For a second
scenario, see Page 10-A.l
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
Al On the eve of the
Mte vote, Sen. Minority
ader Robert Byrd (D.,
accusing the
V
pjuan Ad ministration of
TjjPg to develop "a clearly
pined or workable policy"
f the Middle East, an-
bunced he would vote
puttta sale of AWACS
Vonnaissance planes and
her military equipment to
Ni Arabia.
Jin a speech nn the Senate floor.
"rejected the Administra-
tion s argument that the weapons
s.ile was needed as part of the
Administration's strategic con-
eamia policy opposing the threat
to the region from the Soviet
Union or its surrogates. While
,n know lodging that there is a
direct and indirect threat to the
region from the USSR. Byrd de-
clared. The central issue for
American policy in the Middle
East is the Arab-Israel dispute,
and not the Soviet threat."
BYRD REJECTED the view
that the U.S. would be damaged
in the Arab world if Congress ve-
toes the arms sale. "The United
States is damaged in the Arab
Continued on Page 8-A
PLO Vows Assassination of Jews Here;
Declares 'The Enemy are Known to Us'
AMMAN, Jordan American Jews are being threatened with assassination by
the Palestine Liberation Organization. A PLO official declared here Sunday that his
organization will retaliate against American Jews if the United States continued with
its plans to extradite Zaid Abu Eain to Israel.
By declining to review an
appeals court ruling, the
U.S. Supreme Court has
opened the way for the ex-
tradition of the 21-year-old
Palestinian to stand trial
for planting a bomb that
killed two persons and
injured 36 in Tiberias in
May. 1979.
:-:xW:*::ftW:W:W^
l
After Assassination
Without Sadat, Will
Egypt Want Israeli Tie?
*$.
E am has been held in a
Chicago jail since August. 1979.
when federal appeals courts
affirmed a lower court's decision
thai there was sufficient evidence
for extradition.
EAIN MAY still appeal
against the extradition to Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig.
The accoaod youth contends that
there wt insufficient evidence to
link him to the bombing and that
the olfeiist- was a political one.
exempting him from the existing
extradition treaty between the
IS and Israel.
In Amman, Hamed Abu Sitta.
a senior member of the PLO s ex-
ecutive committee, declared that
Haig "can overrule this deci-
sion." At the same time, he
warned that if Washington does
not intervene, then the PLO
revolutionary courts "would try
all those American citizens that
joined the Israeli army, or con
tributed towards the enemy's war
efforts, accomplices in all the
ugly crimes against the Palestin-
ian people."
Sitta added: "Those
I Americans! who have helped the
enemy (Israel) are known to us,
and we can reach them."
SITTA'S WARNING came at
an extraordinary time. In Rome,
U.S. Ambassador to Italy
Maxwell M. Rabb was recalled
to Washington largely because of
a threat by terrorists to kidnap
and assassinate him. Rabb
appeared in Washington Monday
surrounded by an extraorinarily
heavy armed guard of security
personnel and wearing a bullet-
Continued on Page 10-A
By WOLEBLITZER
London Chr miclt Syndicate
WASHINGTON
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat's assassination has
dramatically forced senior
Reagan Administration
policymakers into rethink-
ing some of their earlier as-
sumptions about the Mid-
dle East.
With some serious ques-
tion marks now hovering
over the Arab-Israeli peace
process, U.S. officials have
come to really appreciate
the singular importance of
the Camp David accords,
especially the normaliza-
tion of relations between
Egypt and Israel.
In the months before Sadat's
death, many U.S. experts on the
Middle East, both in and out of
government, had become disen-
chanted with the Camp David
approach, largely because of the
slow progress on the search for
Palestinian autonomy on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip. It
had become almost fashionable to
say that Camp David was dead.
WHAT SADAT'S death has
not demonstrated, however, is
the critical nature of the entire
Camp David process. The Middle
Bast, people here now recognize
more than ever, is a basically un-
stable region of the world
Sources of tension abound. The
peace between Egypt and Israel,
while still imperfect and strained
by the dragging autonomy talks,
Continued on Page 7-A
President Sadat
Nixon IVip
Was Unofficial,
State Dep't. Says
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment denies that for-
mer President Nixon had
been asked by Secretary of
State Alexander Haig to
seek means to open con-
tacts with the Palestine
Liberation Organization
during his visit to four
Arab countries in the Mid-
dle East and North Africa.
Calling Nixon's visits to Saudi
Arabia. Jordan, Tunisia and
Morocco "private," State De-
partment deputy spokesman
Continued on Page 6-A
Dayan Waited for a Peace Call from King Hussein
By GIL SEDAN
teALEM Fro
r^he Dayan did not com-
*b8 \ ,hlsLdlalogue with the
*hopeaI Hat D,ayan him9elf
terarTY ^mplete it. On the
L^' at various stages of his
military and political career he
spoke about the conflict with the
Arabs as a matter for genera-
tions.
At the height of the War of At-
trition in 1968-9. Dayan. as De-
fense Minister, had no words of
consolation as pictures of young
fallen soldiers appeared daily in
the press. He repeatedly told the
people to be patient, to learn to
live with the conflict. Perhaps for
that reason he was described as a
pessimist by nature.
The peace treaty with Egypt,
in which he was involved from
the early contacts which led to
President Anwar Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem in 1977, was, un-
doubtedly, Dayan s greatest con-
tribution in this dialogue. How-
ever, even then, he never hid his
skepticism and was a tough bar-
gainer.
THE PEELING that Dayan
did not complete the dialogue is
accentuated by what the Arabs
themselves expected from him.
Gaza Mayor Rashad A Shawa
said that Dayan was the one
Israeli statesman who best
understood the Arabs. Such ex-
Continued on Page 14-A


11 t' I I
no iaoi
Pne-p 22- A Th Towiak Fi ,;,<;-./'
Page 2*A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 30,1981
ADL Study Shows
Terrorists Target West European Jews
SAN FRANCISCO -
(JTA) West European
Jews are the targets of in-
ternational terrorism even
though they are relatively
secure in their respective
countries, according to a
survey by the Anti-
Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. The survey
was released on the eve of
the ADL's National Ex-
ecutive Committee meeting
here at the Fairmont Hotel
which concluded Sunday.
Abraham Foxman. ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Affairs
Division, said the survey re-
vealed that Jews and Jewish
institutions 'face very real
threats-incuncluding threats to
their physical safety because
of bombings, assassinations,
attempted assassinations, as-
saults and vandalism." The
countries examined by ADL were
Austria. Belgium. England.
France. Italy and West Ger-
many.
TERRORIST ACTS are not
only aimed against Jews, Fox-
man declared, but, increasingly,
against American military per-
sonnel and installations in
Western Europe and against oth-
er European groups and in-
dividuals in an attempt to de-
stabilize society and bring down
democratic governments.
The perpetrators of these acts,
he said, are well-organized net-
works of terrorists and ex-
tremists including the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization.
other Arab terrorists, neo-Nazis
and far left extremists that
cross national boundaries.
The ADL study further noted
that many terrorist factions on
the right and left cooperate with
each other in attacks on Jews, Is-
raelis and Zionist groups. PLO
terrorists, the report went on,
train West European right wing
paramilitary groups, and Libya
funds ultra-leftists, who provide
support for PLO and other Arab
terrorists in Europe.
Many or all of the groups
operating in Western Europe, the
report said, have been responsi-
ble for terrorist incidents in the
past two years, the most promi-
nent of which were the fatal
bombings of synagogues in Paris
in October. 1980 and Vienna last
August, the murders of a West
German businessman and a non-
Jew who headed the Austria-Is-
raeli Friendship Society earlier
this year, and the slaying of a 15-
year-old Jewish boy in Antwerp
in July. 1980 when a hand gren-
ade was tossed at a bus carrying
youths to a Jewish summer
camp.
NOT ONLY are Jewish lives
threatened, the ADL report said,
but Jews are victims of many
other types of anti-Semitic acts
carried out by neo-Nazi and other
right wing extremists and para-
military groups.
These include harassment and
intimidation through militant
rallies and marches designed to
provoke violence and attract
headlines; acts of vandalism such
as cemetery desecrations; inti-
midating letters and threatening
phone calls, and the widespread
distribution of "vicious"' anti-
Semitic and anti-Zionist propa-
E. German Official Denies Policy
Change as Jewish Family Emigrates
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A high-
ranking East German official
maintained that East Germany
has in no way modified its
position toward Israel or changed
its emigration policy. The official,
who declined to be identified,
spoke in response to reports pub-
lished in Israel of an East
German Jewish family which was
allowed to leave for Israel.
The official refused to com-
ment as to whether the authori-
ties in East Berlin have received
applications from Jewish families
to emigrate. There are about 800
registered Jews in East Germany
RELGO, INC.
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books-Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Open Sunday
1570 Washington Avenue. M.B.
""^"532 5912 ^^^~
of whom about 500 live in East
Berlin. They inaugurated a syna-
gogue there two years ago in a
building restored with funds pro-
vided by a government agency.
SOURCES IN West Berlin,
commenting on the report from
Israel, noted that applications to
emigrate were rejected by the
East Germans in the past. "If
there is no change of policy, as
the East Germans claim, there
must have been good reason to
have allowed this rare ex-
ception," a well informed Jewish
source said.
Dr. Peter Kirchner. chairman
of the Jewish community in East
Berlin, is a regular visitor to the
West Berlin Jewish community.
He has represented East German
Jews at several events organized
by the World Jewish Congress in
Western Europe and the United
States. Kirchner told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he sees
no reason why he should now
represent East German Jews at
similar gatherings in Israel.
kJ\ational vJlcirfw
ISRAELI GIFT CENTER, INC.
Synagogue OH1 Shop SuppHM
Olfta tar aM Occasion*
La/y* Safrcttow of Chmnukmh Gifts
MS Washington Ava
Mami Beach, R. 331 SB
1532-2210
UAH QOUU !
on 1 000 Stt'ti
(TRADERS INVE
SAVE 1/8
:
NASD tSiPC
ganda materials through news-
papers and handbills.
The terrorists, according to the
ADL findings, operate effectively
despite the fact that they are few
in numbers and do not have mass
followings and despite the fact
that West European Jews are
prominent in public and pro-
fessional life and reside in nations
which have a "healthy" state of
democracy.
The threat may grow even
greater in the future, the report
went on, with unemployment and
economic uncertainty the his-
toric situation for 9capegoating
Jews contributing to the im-
pact of anti-Semitic acts and
propaganda.
TURNING TO the menace
posed by the PLO, the report de-
clared that the "PLO and its
assorted factions continue to de-
monstrate the ability to bomb
and shoot selected targets,
virtually at will. Their ability to
do so rests in large measure on
the fact that they enjoy the sup-
port of the Soviet Union, other
Communist and Arab states and
ultra-leftist and rightist groups
which make common cause
against Jews. Israel, the United
States and democratic forms of
government."
In detailing the activities of
neo-Nazi and other extreme
rightist movements, the ADL re-
port stated that "they are few in
numbers and without significant
political influence. But they
constitute a serious threat to the
security of European Jewry' be-
cause of their ability to bomb and
terrorize Jewish targets."
Jewish National Fund President Rabbi William Berkowiu
(left) confers with the late Gen. Moshe Day an during Rabi
Berkowitz' visit to Israel on the occasion of the JNF's SOtiJ
anniversary. The two leaders discussed the strategic anA
geopolitical situation in the Mideast. Rabbi Berkowiu also
reported on the JNF's extensive future plans
repor. _
preparation in the Negev and the Galilee.
is for settlement-site]
Terrorist Found Guilty in Israel;
Tried Hang-GUder Infiltration
TEL AVIV (JTA) A 17-
year-old terrorist who tried to
infiltrate Israel on a motorized
hang glider last March was sen-
tenced to seven years in prison.
The terrorist, whose identity was
not released because he is a
minor, was found guilty of mem-
bership in the Palestine
Liberation Front. His mission
was to blow up the Haifa oil
refineries.
The terrorist said nothing in
court but told the ITIM Israel
News Agency later that he ex-
pected a suffer sentence and was
sorry that television cameras
were not allowed in the coun-I
room because he wanted hul
friends to see him as a "hero "I
The youth, who attempted tol
infiltrate Israel on Mar. 7. wasl
forced down while still in south!
Lebanon. He was captured byl
Maj. SaaH Haddad's Chnstiul
militia who turned him over u|
Israeli authorities
Another terrorist succeeded inl
reaching Israel on a glider I
powered by a small engine Hel
held an Israeli hostage for seven! I
hours but the Israeli escaped un-[
harmed and the terrorist naj
captured. He is due to go on trial j
soon.
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service
In the world.
$$$ pvSKin
LITWIN SECURITIES, INC I
531-2223/

8
^American
y Israeli
LARGE SELECTION OF
TALAISIM WOOL or RAYON
SEOURIM SKULL CAPS
Everything, for all year round
,clalizing in Bar Mltzvah sets
1357 Waahlngton Aw.
Miami Beach 631-7722
'ATTENTION:
Classified ads are not
taken over the phone. To
order a classified send
$10.00 (20 word limit) to
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, 33101.
Not surprismg,it's River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in tbe world.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier. Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack. V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish.F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Soma Gale
Bernard Eilen
Aaron Rosenthal
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg. Manager
Steve Fischman
Alfred Stern
Syd Kronish
Dick Sorkin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.) 531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive 531-Ua]
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 16480
NE.19thAve. 947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood|
Blvd./920-1010
FT.LAUDERDALE(Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University m.h
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
OkeechobeeBlvd.,
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Mimonai Chap* ">c .'>""' JewS.
Tradition. It's what makes us J^-
rSponeor.n.tr* Guard*"''
'Pre Arranged Fun*"'-
uimnluui
Plan-
M103011
M10 X II
....... ...


Jewish
Neo-Nazis Fight Police in Bonn
anHH A neo-Nazi gang in-
Zu in a gun-battle with police
01 MMich Tuesday night was
ed to the bomb blast outside
Antwerp synagogue which
two lives and to the
Palwtme Liberation <***
La The connection, reported by
West German State Televi-
_ was not directly confirmed
I police or the domestic security
ice.
But both sources said the neo-
Ui organization, called "Peo-
Socialist Movement." has
d established links with simi-
-r .rroups abroad, including the
mo One of the three neo-Nazis
,ho survived the shoot-out with
Ipnlia in which two of the gang
here killed, was identified as
fmer llamberger. 18. who was
[mined at an F.l Fatah camp in
[Lebanon According to West
IGerman television, one of the
ISazis shot dead in the encounter
[probably played a
I Antwerp bombing.
role in the
TF.L AVIV -Negotiations on
llocal autonomy for the
IPalestinian* of the West Bank
lind (jaza Strip resumed at the
lllvatt Hotel here. They were
I scheduled to continue daily
| through Friday
The Israeli. Egyptian and
lAmencan delegations, all sub-
[nunistenal rank officials and
Itechnicians, have been discussing
[the 15 major issues" itemized
lliy Premier Menachem Begin and
Irus ministerial colleagues in talks
liih the late President Anwar
L\ni.u and hia colleagues in Cairo
la month ago The present round
I talks were the first official ne-
K-u(iutions since the assassination
|ofSadatonOct.6.
Although they are supposed to
[be purely technical,
"preparatory' for ministerial
level talks next month, they may
be raised to the ministerial level if
[any snags develop.
Observers noted that Egyptian
Foreign Minister Kamal Hassan
and Minister of State for
IForeign Affairs Butros Ghalli
ere due in 1 srael for talks on the
Sinai withdrawal plans. Thsy
ould be available to join Israeli
ministers if a high-level meeting
ls necessary to add impetus to
[the lower-level talks.
WASHINGTON Richard
' President Reagan's Na-
Security Advisor, an-
that he has dismissed
Gen Robert Schweitzer aa
I of the National Security
"cil's Defense Policy Cluster
miking an unapproved
n
bweiuer was transferred
,w j the Pentgon from where
(fcd joined the NSC. AUen said
while he had high regard for
cnweitzer he broke NSC rules
** charing beforehand his
1 before the annual meeting
BORED!
Top management
"usinessman seeks newl
worlds to conquer. I
wong ethnic background]
Well schooled in
feting, merchandising,
advertising, and people
contact
Vit*
000,Jewish Floridian
,P-Box 012973
'mi 33101
of the Association of the U.S.
Army.
The speech created a furor be-
cause Schweitzer said, "The
Soviets are on the move, they're
going to strike." He also spoke of
"a drift toward war" wjth the
Soviet Union. Allen told re-
porters that the speech had not
been cleared by him or anyone
else in the NSC nor did he know
of its content, even in general,
before it was delivered.
BONN West German in-
telligence services may have in-
filtrated the Palestine Liberation
Organization office here, ob-
taining information on PLO ac-
tivities in the planning stage or
already carried out. According to
the West German daily. Die
Welt, the Bonn authorities may
have been informed in advance of
recent PLO activities in Austria,
although that remains unclear.
A well placed source indicated
that the disclosure of secret serv-
ice operations in the PLO office
ni.iy huve been the outcome of a
recent expose in official publica-
tions of military cooperation be-
tween the PLO and neo-Nazi
groups in West Germany. .The
disclosures, by Interior Minister
tier hart Baum. were a major
blow to Bonn's policy of wooing
the Pl.t) and trying to associate
it with the Middle East peace
process.
Meanwhile, according to Die
Welt, the PLO office is in disar-
ray over reported leaks. Arab
diplomatic circles here have been
unusually outspoken in describ-
ing what they allegedly termed a
"confidence crisis' in the. PLO
jffice.
ATLANTA Prof. Georges
Vajda. dean of European scholars
of Judaic a. died of a heart attack
at his home in Paris on the eve of
Yom Kippur, it was reported here
by friends. He was 73 years old.
Educated in Budapest and Paris,
Vajda is credited with having
single-handedly restored after
World War II whatever now
exists of European Jewish
scholarship.
Vajda published the Revue des
Etudes Juives, the most presti-
gious journal of scholarly Jewish
content outside of Israel. He
worked towards, and eventually
occupied, the first and only Chair
of Hebrew Studies at the Sor-
bonne. He trained two ger
IT"
Mtttttttt
q
12-7/8%
18 months 20% down*
13-7/8%
18 months 10% down*
14-7/8%
18 months 5% down*
2 bedroom, 2 bath and
3 bedroom, 2 bath
new homes from $69,900
with
NO DEVELOPER'S PROFIT
'for details of this limited
special offer visit the
sales office at
CEDARWOODS OF
PEMBROKE LAKE
Acorn Lane at Taft
1 block west of Palm Ave.
Pembroke Pines
THEKEYESCO.,
REALTORS
Exclusive Agents
432-3207
11 to 5:30 Daily
1
Broker Cooperation Invited
s
tions of scholars in medieval
Jewish philosophy and mysti-
cism. He served as a member of
the faculty of the Ecole Rabbini-
que. Vajda was the author of
numerous works dealing with
Jewish and Islamic history and
philosophy.
WASHINGTON The State
Department said that it cannot
prevent the Libyan government
from constructing a building for
its Mission to the United Nations
in New York as long as the build-
ing is used for diplomatic pur-
poses.
"Under the Headquarters
Agreement between the United
States and the United Nations,
member nations of the UN are
entitled to establish offices," the
Department said in a statement
read by deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg. "Libya is a member
nation of the UN and, therefore,
has a right to establish offices
that are determined to be appro-
priate for the purpose of con-
ducting official activities with the
UN."
TEL AVIV A fierce contro-
versy continued in Israel this
week over the Israel Philharmon-
ic Orchestra's attempt to add the
music of Richard Wagner to its
repertoire. The music of Wagner
has been boycotted in this coun-
try since 1948 because of the
composer's anti-Semitism, be-
cause his music was often played
as concentration camp inmates
were marched to the gas
chambers, and because of the
close associations members of his
family had with Hitler. Wagner's
music was chosen by the Nazis as
a symbol of the "Nordic
superman."
The controversy erupted last
week when Zubin Mehta, conduc-
tor and musical director of the
IPO, who also serves as musical
director of the New York Philhar-
monic, announced that the over-
ture to Tristan and Isolde would
be played as an encore at the con-
cert being performed at Mann
Auditorium.
Mehta, well aware of the
hostility toward Wagner among
many Israelis, particularly Holo-
caust survivors, announced that
he would pause before the encore
to allow people in the audience
and members of the orchestra to
leave if they so wished. Some of
the audience and orchestra mem-
bers left, and fist fights broke out
in the auditorium between those
who wanted the music halted and
those who wanted to hear it.
TEL AVIV A large-scale
airlift between Libya and Syria
continued without interruption
since last Sunday, but the cargo
being ferried in the giant Ameri-
can planes chartered to the Lib-
yan airline is not known.
ItOing Gypen lower
A new concept in independent living for
older adults.
Located on the campus of the Miami
Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged,
this modem eight story building offers a
complete program of health and social
services and recreational programs, while
creating an atmosphere of independence
and security for adults over age 65.
Call or unite Manager. Injing Cypen Tower.
5100 ti.E. 2nd Ave. Miami. Ra.
33137; (305) 756S5B3.
WEIL
PAMPER YOU
RIGHT DOWN
TO YOUR TOES.
TIE WTO Of YOU WILL LOOK MEAT, Fill MEAT, AND NAVE
MEAT FUN AT SAFETY NAKtOK SPA.
A luxurious massage. A set of tennis. A candlelight dinner, impeccable
in every way. This is the vacation that's more than a vacation.
This is Safety Harbor Spa.
Slide into the warm waters of a natural mineral spring. Enjoy a
steaming sauna. Or a cool swim. Safety Harbor Spa will do wonders
for the way you look and feel. Safety Harbor is your own private hide-
away on Florida's easy-going West Coast. Its a place with tennis, golf,
art classes, entertainment. A place where you can have great fun,
great food, and even lose a few pounds. Where you'll find an
atmosphere of head-to-toe conditioning supervised by skilled experts.
(You'll even get a complete physical from our medical staff.)
In fact, Safety Harbor Spa is totally committed to one purpose -
making you feel great.
And after all. isn't that what a vacation is for?
30% OFF: OCT. 11 DEC. WJ
For reservations or more information in Florida or Canada call collect
(813) 726-1161. Or write Mr. Salu Devnani, Safety Harbor Spa, Safety
Harbor. Florida 33572 Just minutes from Tampa International Airport.
#:#
Resort Hotel & Tennis Club
ENJOY IT IN GOOD HEALTH.
A subsidiary q/Harduiickf Companies Incorporated


. 14-..UJ....,
W-ij n^.L.ofl mm
Pagen-A STfrbiwvmWkiatitnr fTklrfy.uCUtofcr J0ri9r
Terrorism in the U.S.?
It was clear that ultimately it would come to
this. A Palestine Liberation Organization official
Sunday warned American Jews that they will be tar-
gets of PLO assassins if the United States extradites
Ziad Abi Eain to Israel for trial on charges that,
alledgedly, he planted a bomb in Tiberias in May,
1979, killing two and injuring 36.
Were the issue not the extradition of Eain, it
would be something else at some time in the near
future. The way in which Libya's CoL.Khadafy has
been threatening his enemies in the U.S. for quite
some time now should, if nothing else, have been the
tipoff.
Thus, the legacy of unchecked international
terrorism becomes ours, no longer being confined to
Europe and the Middle East.
We must agree with official Israeli statements
this week that the bombing of a synagogue in Ant-
werp on Oct. 20 resulted directly from a growing in-
ternational tolerance of the PLO's dastardly crimes
as colorful freedom-fighting.
The threat this week by Hamed Abu Sitta, a
senior member of the PLO's executive committee in
Amman, that "Those (Americans) who have helped
the enemy (Israel) are known to us, and we can reach
them," should be intolerable, not just to American
Jews, but to Americans of all political and religious
persuasions.
All Americans Targeted
A case in point, if Sitta's threat fails to be con-
vincing, is the sudden recalling on Sunday of our
Ambassador to Italy Maxwell Rabb. It so happens
that Rabb, a Reagan appointee to the post, is Jew-
ish. But Rabb's recall from Rome was as a con-
sequence of a reported Khadafy threat to have him
assassinated in retaliation for our shooting down of
two Libyan jets late in the summer.
This sort of terrorism goes beyond the narrow
parochialism of Rabb's religion. It strikes at the
heart of American integrity in the arena of in-
ternational diplomacy. It should anger ail
Americans, not just American Jews. Ditto, the
threat by the PLO's Sitta that Palestinian "revo-
lutionary courts" will try American Jews who have
"contributed toward the enemy's (Israel's) war ef-
forts ..."
AW ACS Votes Anyway
All of this puts an even more dismal light on the
vote Wednesday evening in the U.S. Senate on the
AW ACS sale to Saudi Arabia. We go to press before
the vote takes place. In retrospect, it would be
impossible to call the vote it was reported Monday
to be that close.
But Saudi Arabia is being presented to
American public opinion as a "moderate" nation.
Even more terrifying is the inexorable drift of Egypt
into the Saudi camp following the assassination of
President Sadat at the same time that Saudi-PLO
ties grow stronger every day.
Given these circumstances, and the implications
that the drift holds for peace in the Middle East, par-
ticularly so far as the Camp David accord is con-
cerned a "yes" victory in the AW ACS case would be
a disaster. .
Still, up until Wednesday at 5 p.m., President
Reagan was pressuring members of the Senate to do
just that to vote "yes." What will it take for
Americans to recognize that Israel is not the villain
in the Middle East?
Will blazing PLO bullets and bombs on the
streets of the nation be the catalyst that brings our
national awareness back into reasonable consonance
with the realities of today's spiralling terrorist ex-
perience?
A Non-Romantic IRA Analysis
Jewish Flor idian
Phonr .1- < nh*
UKKICK and PLANT 130 N E SthSt Miami. Fla. 12
P.O. Box ousts Miami. r tart da U101
MIKliK SHOCHET LCOHINDUN SUZANNE 8HOCHET
Kihlui .inil PuMUher Aaeoclate Editor Executive Editor
T*s Jew.m PtarMtoa Dm Net OwaraertM f|M KeaftrwJti
Of TIm MfefcaadHi As write* la l* Calewmi
Published Every Friday since 1*37 by The Jewish riorldlaji
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla USPS TTSsJO
{ ff*Shoctt
The Jewish FlerrSiaB he* iSesrSU MM Jewtefc Merit* and the Jewish Weekly
**r ef "The Jewish TeHhreahlc Mht|. levee Arts MUl Sywskatt.
ww/Mwtde Mewt Service. MSMiasI swailal anetUN. America- Attecletree el
Hah Jewish Nmimiii, sad the Flen*. Prei Aseeciatlea
I MATES. (Lecel Area) One Year tit 0O. Two Veers (MSO. Three Veers
eyoachiwjiWiriliwiMOal- O-tft owlot www, CDWW'.,ysori squiel.
Friday, October 30,1961
Volume 64
THE GERMAN newspaper,
Frankfurter AUgemeine Zeitung,
came closest the other day to a
realistic assessment of the agony
in Northern Ireland.
The newspaper opined that
"The IRA's success if it can
talk of such in light of ten hunger
deaths is limited to a stream, of
weapons and money from Ameri-
ca, where old Irish Republican
romanticism has gained new
impetus."
It is an exaggeration of .the
truth to suggest that Irish Amer-
ican "romantics" are "the
dominant source of weapons "now
in the hands of the Irish Repub-
lican Army. But the Frankfurter
AUgemeine is correct in its asser-
tion that colorful, which is to say
inaccurate, American public
opinion is the stuff on which the
IRA feeds in its struggle to throw
the British out of Northern Ire-
land.
INDEED COLORFUL Aineri-
can public opinion, which is.'to
say totally erroneous opinion; is
the stuff on which many political
mythologies abroad feed in their
ideological struggles. A case in
point is the expanding, sloppy
sentiment among Americans' to
see Saudi Arabia as. 'a
"moderate" Arab nation. Or PLO
Chief Yasir Arafat as a man for
all reasons that the imperatives
of American Realpolitik should
Hi mil iti 1
muster to stage a dialogue with
him.
Arafat's irrowth as a romantic
figure is' -. of the same order
as the Irish Republican Army's,
and if wife'hesitate about accept-
ing this equivalency, there is al-
ways the manipulative "free
press" to' help the equivalency
along.
For example, an official Arafat
visit to Austria was cancelled in
August when Austrian police un-
covered 9 terrorist plot to assas-
sinate him. The story was
reported widely at the time. But
it became grist for the manipula-
tive "non-news" mill of the press
last week again which, in its cam-
paign to make Arafat respectable
and cram him down our throats,
featured a sensational repeat of
the same .story in front page
headlines quite as if it had never
been reported in August at all.
indeed as" if the uncovering of the
'^.V2b^
, plot had just occurred.
EGYPT'S PRESIDENT
Sadat had just been asMMl.
nated, and look what that did for
Sadat s romantic quotient, which
is to say what that did for a tin-
gularly twisted view of Sadat s
life, work and times. The decision
to repeat the Austrian Arthn
scenario was the best possible
way for the propagandists who
masquerade as editors in the
ivory towers of America's sweaty
Fourth Estate to reach into the
hearts of Ivory Soap-minded
Americans and have them em-
brace this scruffy, unshaven
"hero" as another one of those
"freedom-fighters" we are in-
stantly supposed to adore, his
pungent bath towel he wears for a
hat and all.
Besides, hadn't Arafat been
given a bad shake? Wasn't the
Austrian story in August
blanketed into obscurity by
Sadat's visit with President
Reagan in Washington, which
stole his headline thunder? If
nothing else, romantics always
require just retribution in order
to maintain the symmetry of
their lives.
In the case of the Irish U.-pub-
lican Army, there is hardly a need
for the same rort of hard sell The
AUgemeine Zeitung hit it
squarely on the head when it
made its wry observation about
Irish Americans and their star-
struck but politically dim-witted
sympathizers.
ISN'T IT after all true that
every Irishman looks and sounds
like that old film star curmudge-
on whose career began in
Dublin's Abbey Theatre, Harry
Fitzgerald? Ditto Victor Mc-
Lauglin? Your heart just has to
go out to people who speak
English so that it sounds like an
11| n-r;i Or who agonize that it is a
long, long way to Tipperary and
the sweetest girl I know Think
ol I'.U O'Hrienas the priest of the
"righting Sixty-Ninth, or as
hnuu- Hoc km*. In either case, the
war is the same, and you must
love the cause equally with its
heroes
This kind of sentiment rates
Continued on Page 13-A
Why. Mr Begin you're early'
The A'qus
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
Time to Remember Lithuania Slaughter
v 2KESHVAN 5742
Number^
By ARTHUR HESS A YON
London Chronicle Syndicate
Each year, memorial
services are held through-
out the world on the anni-
versary of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising. Alao re-'
membered is Kristcdnachi,-
when the destruction of 191.
synagogues took place' in
Germany in 1938.
However, little seems to
be known about the mas-'*
sacre of 10.00Q Jews in the.
Kovno Ghetto in Lithu-
ania, on October 29, 1941.
This infamous day was
called, by the inmates of
the Ghetto, Der Groyser
Actzyeh "The Great
Act."
At the outbreak of the Second
World War, the Jewish popula-
tion of Kovno numbered 30,000,
which was 25 per cent of the total
population. Together with the
other Jews of Lithuania, they had'
always supported Lithuanian
hopes for independence during
the Czar's reign, despite living
among a people who were largely
anti-Semitic.
WHEN LITHUANIA
achieved independence after the
First World War, hatred of the
Jews increased, especially under
the dictatorship of Augustinas
Voldermaras who took office in
1926; Under his despotic rule, the
seeds of Fascism grew.
On the day the Nazis entered
Lithuania, greetings were broad-
cast, on Kovno radio by promin-
ent citizens, hailing the arrival of
. their' liberators. Bishop Brizgis
announced that this was a great
-day tor Lithuania and offered up
prayers for the brave German
; soldiers. -.The streets of Kovno
.'.were decorated with Lithuanian
national flags to greet the "gal-
lant "Wehrmacht.
.Following the occupation,
Jewish blood soon began to flow.
.There were killings by the Nazis
and 'their willing helpers, the
. Lithuanian auxiliaries.
'By: October 15, 1941. the kil-
. hfcgs in Rovno were accelerated.
In nearby' Slobodka, famous for
its great yeshivas, hundreds of
Talmudical students and their
teachers were rounded up and
shot, along with the patients and
nurses of a Jewish hospital.
'THE GESTAPO chief for the
area, General Suloker, sum-
rrfpned five leading members of
the Kovno Jewish community
arid informed them of a decree
issued by the Gaulieter for the
Kqvno district, Hauptsturmfue-
hrer Yordan, restricting all Jews
to a Ghetto in the district of
Slobodka. The reason given was
that the Lithuanian population
no longer wished Jews to live
among them. Furthermore, all
Jews would have to wear the dis-
tinctive Yellow Star of David on
their clothing.
The leader of the Lithuanian
Fascist Auxiliaries, Babialis,
organized the herding of Kovno
Jews into the Ghetto and warned
them that anyone attempting to
escape would be shot.
All this was a prelude to the
slaughter that was to come. The
intellectuals were at the top of
the list. Professors, writers,
artists and famous figures in the
world of Yiddish culture 541 in
all were taken to the 9th Port
and shot, a small fortified town
six kilometers of Kovno, used be-
fore the war for political
prisoners.
On October 28, 1941. there
came another dreaded announce-
ment from Hauptsturmfuehrer
Yordan that all Jews must as-
semble in the square for
"selection."
Those who were strong enough
to work for the Wehrmacht were
separated from those *ho J*e.re
too old, too young or too sick, in
other words, those who would
live and those who would die.AU
the while, the square was sur-
rounded by SS soldiers and Lith-
uanian Fascists armed with
machine guns.
A SURVIVOR recalled seeing
Continued on Page 10-A


Our Readers Write
Friday, October 30,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Ex-Presidents Fly High on 'Chutzpah'
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
How interesting to read of our
three ex- Presidents harmoniously
(presumably) collecting attention
while flying to pay respects to
Anwar Sadat. Leo Mindlin, in his
fpcent column, has described
(heir individual and combined
chuupah perfectly. Their mo-
tives are suspect. However, their
inflammatory and meddlesome
statements regarding Prime Mi-
nister Begin and Israel show evi-
dence of their longing for power
Md the spotlight it provides.
Nixon. Ford and Carter were
three wise men from out of the
West heading to regain stardom
in the East. Three who deserve
credit for much of the economic.
political and social plight in
which we find ourselves, surely
deserved each other. How fitting,
whole circling half the globe, they
still cut political pie in the sky.
Credit President Reagan
*uh sparing Vice President Bush
attendance at this historic super
- summit meeting, complete
with high altitude wisdom and
polemics They even managed to
continue to undermine taunts
meant to pass for statesmanlike
discourse. This symbolized per-
fectly how up-inthe-air much of
our foreign policy continues to
I)R FREDJ.WITKOFF
Coral Cablet*
EDITOR. Ih, Jvuish Floridian:
My husband and I have lived
on Miami Beach for 35 years. I
am 81 years old. and he is 83.
Last year, we became concerned
about the high price of keeping
our condominium and our safety
on the street What seemed even
more threatening was what
would happen to us if we had a
health emergency. How long
would it take for the rescue squad
to come? We wondered how we
would care for one another should
one of us get sick.
Last spring, we sold our con-
dominium and rented an apart-
ment in an adult congregate liv-
ing facility, the Irving Cypen
Tower of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged. This
move placed us in a protected en-
vironment, but it seemed to be an
appropriate answer for maintain
rog our independence in a society
that so often denies that precious;
right to older people. Here, we
on maintain our privacy and
family life, while eliminating the
toirden of shopping, cooking, and
transportation. We feel safer here
Knowing that we have health care
% the premises.
For the first time in years, my
husband and I feel as if we have a
Mure. 1 offer this message to our
neighbors on Miami
cn and to the policy-makers
"> local, state, and federal gov-
ernment who struggle every day
to provide services to the elderly
that they can bve indepen-
dently and with dignity.
MOLLIE SILVKRM AN
Miami Beach
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian
It is certainly proper for the
SS? Pridian to report former
^resident Nixon's views as to the
* of the AWACS to Saudi
,v? However, your heading
2 rePp Return of Hatchet
J. Nuon up to Old Tricks,
V*8 Jews, Israel," certainly
?*"not do credit to The Jewish
l~*ban a professional news-
paper.
It does not belong on the news
. P*w. but should have been con-
SJf to an editorial, if you hate
J* do d-ply. New. pag^
3u. C n*w>: iitorial pages
! bow you fad .bout atAD
AWA^T cS?rn-d bout *
but rl Arabs have them,
J w. can't behave that Nixon
w we Reagan Administration
want to
jeopardy.
Israel's future
in
MAY I remind you that if it
were not for Nixon, the Yom
Kippur War would have been the
death knell for Israel.. It was
Nixon who saved Israel, and you
could never get a better authority
on the subject than Prime Min-
ister Golda Meir. It is too bad
that Nixon and his people did
some stupid things at Watergate,
and we American Jews forget the
debt we owe to Nixon.
It was he who shipped plane
loads of desperately needed
armaments to Israel, practically
stripping the U.S. arsenals, and
that turned the tide of defeat fpr
Israel into a great victory for Is-
rael's army and air force. Had the
UN not stopped Israel, the Israel
army would have marched into
Cairo.
And had not Nixon come to Is-
rael's aid, the Egyptians would
have marched into Tel Aviv. It's
Nixon, your so-called ''Hatchet
Man." who saved Israel from
Egypt s tanks and planes.
SOL C. SH AYE
Miami Beach
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian.
In the last presidential elec
tion, we had three candidates to
choose from. If Bo Derek was a
"10," then politically how would
we number the three candidates?
John Anderson, because of his
faulty congressional record,
couldn't go above "2," even
though he made several impres-
sive speeches. President Carter,
who was a political "3" in 1976,
defeated President Ford, who
was only a political "2'/."
Ronald Reagan, with his acting
experience and his acceptable re-
cord as Governor of California for
two terms, pulled a political "5"
and swept the election. He even
won my vote, as well as those of
millions of other Democrats and
closet Republicans who came out
to vote again, after Nixon's dis-
honor drove them into hiding.
However, we must realize that
as an actor. President Reagan is
only as good as his supporting
cast and his (screen) writers.
Ronald Reagan as President is
still acting and is definitely not
heading for an Oscar. As a matter
of fact. I believe he will be tne
sixth consecutive president who
will not be in office for two full
terms. He most likely will be
defeated in 1984, if the
Democratic Party can united be-
hind a worthy candidate.
I am certain many members of
President Reagan's supporting
cast are equally unfit for the roles
he is having them act in the cur-
rent movie, "The Reagan Presi-
dency." With proper reviews,
presented to the voting public,
this movie will not be held over
for a second showing.
Why President Reagan is now
hinting to play the role of a "dic-
tator" by selling the AWACS to
Saudi Arabia even if the Senate
votes against the sale is very
alarming. The President insists
upon trusting our most impor-
tant advanced military equip-
ment to a country that is nc
stronger than the sand it live*
upon country ruled by some
5,000 royal families who are
secretly hiding over $200 billion
of their nation's wealth in foreign
QuikQuip
Husband: "My wife and I
resolved no t to go to sleep
mad as of now we've
been awake three weeks."
countries in the event of the anti-
cipated Islamic revolution.
Saudi Arabia pays nearly $100
million a year to the PLO in
blackmail to prevent them from
formenting an internal revolu-
tion. The Saudis give political re-
fuge and vast monthly payments
to one of the most vicious but-
chers of human life, the deposed
dictator of Uganda, Idi Amin.
Right now. President Reagan
is heading for a political zero.
HARRY Sl'SSM AN.
N. Miami Beach
TO SELL
Israel Bonds
And Securities
LITWIN SECURITIES INC.
531-2223
MEMBER
NASD. 4SIPC
NOW YOU CAN KIBITZ
WITH A KIBBUTZ IN HAIFA
FOR ONLY $3.75.
A 3-minute coll ro Haifaor any city in Israelnow costs only $3.75, dialed direct, without
operator assistance on the weekend.
DIAL DIRECT
Dialing dtrea is rhe easiesr. fbsresr, mosr money- saving way ro call long disronce. any rrnne For example, a
3- minute call, dialed direct wirhour operoror assistance on weekdays now costs just $4 95 Thar saves you
$4.50 -47% less rhan rhe cost of on operoror assisted coll So dial direa' Here's hew ro dial Hoifa
miwiw. aia com"ccci
011 + 972 + 4 + LOCAL NUV0DX
DIRECT
This is rhe next best way ro save time if your area doesn'r rx>^ Inrerrx^iorol Dralir^ yef L>d 0, crd be
ready to grve rhe Operator rhe counrry dry and local reteptore number you wot Specify Stot^
son. The fewer questions rhe Operoror must cbK tr^ faster you'll corinea On Stereo colls na
speaal operator assistance, you con get rhe same low rores as Internahonal Dialing.
PS Everycreccrick^direoroCciTooa, rhe Caribbean, AloskQ Hawaii, ardpomofA^exjco-justosyou
c*ol dtrea to aries inside rhe conrinenral US
Ordering oranges or finding o friend, keep a recede* rhe courvry and dry codes yo^
rhem ro coH'ihe world -fast!
ca tax preen* arc n enaa wa
MJo
A*.
Asr#*pr,
Dofarr.
DMrywwo

aa Dmono 57 Noiorwn 65
4 Hodno 6.1 Nnono 53
51 Mo*) 4 r%tao> 54
3 Hoton 3 MAv 3
57 Mruotom 2 Tbano* 67
Southern Be>


. rM._M.\... ,_.,
- J /- .1-----no
*
j
MMflfl
Paire22-A Th*.Tpwuih liTrtriHUw./Kw-* --*.--- "------
__^w>.. ____mm >!i ml------ ........ '"
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. October 30,1961
AJComm. Reports
U.S. Hispanic-Jewish Ties Strengthen
HOUSTON, Tex. -
Hispanic Jewish ties are
growing steadily among the
15 million Hispanic Ameri-
cans and the six million
American Jews despite
some points of disagree-
ment. Increased efforts will
be made by both groups to
reconcile differences and
form future coalitions.
was the concensus of
opinioi "is of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee's Annual
i lecutive Council Masting at
Galkria Plate Hotel here. How-
e\ ft i' was made clear that there
wen Still differences on some is-
|\ 1 HI words of Manuel A.
i.iirman of the Forum
National Hispanic Or-
ganizations and executive direc-
: the National Puerto Rican
! hen ifl a big difference
.ma communication.
u- Ion m must
ti in;, it. V\. must sit
I
to find our
our common in
goals, and the way in
which we can work together so all
i rain- anil pn I
A similar view was voiced by
Alfredo Gutierrez. Arizona State
Senator. Both he and Bustelo
said that Jews had frequently
gotten behind a number of
programs vital to Hispanic
Americans Cited were
A generous U.S. immigration
policy, including family uni-
fication, and amnestv for workers
without papers;
The use of native languages in
schools primarily as a vehicle for
teaching hnglish:
Encouragement ol pluralism
in public schools
Extension of the Voting
Right- Act
SPEAKERS AT the meeting
pointed out that many Amer.
Jew! live ir. the areas in which
iii< Hispanic population is in-
creasing, and that the two groups
would 0OOM into closer contact a.-
theii residential patterns con-
verg
Hispanic representatives em-
phasised thai their communir.
feels il is subject to a great deal
ol discrimination in emplovment
and in he gem ra society and
-i/eabii segment ot it
atrongh favors affirmative
tmn. including quotas. They also
si ressed 11
Hispanics and Jews will not
j i juuutnnnjuinnniuiniiiiii n n.......................--,,^,~,,~~~~^^*^
State Dep't. Denies Nixoni
Trip to Saudis Official

i
V.
Continued from Page 1 A
Alan Romberg said Nixon was
not asked to engage in any dis-
cussion during the trip. He
denied a report that while in
Cairo for President Anwar
Sadat's funeral, Nixon and Haig
had discussed the need to bring
the PLO into the Mideast peace
talks.
ROMBERG STRESSED that
the U.S. position on the PLO was
"clear,'' and it is that the U.S.
would "neither recognize nor
negotiate with the PLO" until it
recognizes Israel's right to exist
and recognizes UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338.
Romberg also called newspaper
reports that Haig had kept the
White House in the dark about
Nixon's trip a "tempest in a tea-
pot."
He said that on Oct. 8. the day
the American delegation pre-
pared to leave for Cairo for the
funeral, Nixon told Deputy Sec-
i etary of State William Clark of
his plans to make a private trip
after the funeral, and Clark
agreed to his request for briefing
papers on the countries he plan-
ned to visit. RomberR said Haig
learned of the planned trip later
in the day, as did President
Reagan.
Nixon was expected to report
on his trip to the Administration
on his return to the U.S. It is not
known whether he would report
to Reagan or Haig or to both.
Nixon, in a stopover in Paris,
issued a statement calling for an
economic boycott of Libya and a
suspension of oil shipments from
the government of Libyan leader
Muammar Kaddafi. He said the
leaders of the four Mideast coun-
tries he visited expressed concern
about Kaddafi and "an interna-
tional threat requires an interna-
tional response."'
NEWSWEEK Magazine re-
ported in its Oct. 26 issue that
"the Reagan Administration is
working quietly to bring the PLO
into the peace process." It said
that "after discussion in Cairo
with Secretary of State Haig.
former President Nixon last week
urged Saudi leaders to induce the
PLO into accepting (Saudi)
Prince Fahd's eight-point peace
plan, if only in principle, as a
springboard for expanded nego-
tiations later."
TWIN CITY CLASS CO
AffTKMK mm mum
Hat. & Window Glee. WfAmtmmmnH
1220 lew St, MB Visit our Showroom 67-2*7
(Comer 1Mb ft Alton) 24 Hour Emergency Service
always see eye-to-eye. Affir-
mative action quotas are one area
where thev disagree. There are
also differences regarding some
aspects of U.S. immigration
policy.
Hispanic-Jewish ties are
steadilv increasing, and that
more exploration was needed to
reveal common concerns and
points of disagreement
If both sides approach the re
fetwnsbJp with realism and
reenei I for each other s needs and
feelings, it should be poeaibk U
forge an effect i\ e coalition mo\
men! beneficial to both groups.
IT WAS explained during the
lions that about 60 percent of
Hispanics in tht I'nited States
are ol Mexican origin; 18 percent
Rio sew :
. uban ancestr
most of them refugees trom
tro. and 18 percent stem trom
,>tner Latin nations A key chai
rtensticot all the community
was saui is their doasnaaa to the
moret:
n?rc Ixirn flut-
ters
Most li
hut there
centratioo! in the ind
nurthen am in Flori
primarily ir metropolitan an
but witl a growing suburl
preeencc
It was also stated that attach
ment to the Spanish language us
the one bond that unites all
members of the Hispanic com
munity. Surveys indicate that
Hispanics see their language as
one of the most important as-
pects of their tradition and are
deeply committed to preserving
it. In addition, many newcomers
cannot yet function in English.
These factors explain the com-
munity's strong support of bi-
lingual education, and their de-
mand that those who provide so-
cial services to the Spanish-
speaking be competent in that
language
JWV Sale to Missionary
Outfit Being Resolved
By BEN GALLOB
\rw YORK IJ1 Al The
length) conti bout plans
tome members ol the KeJke)
lewisl War veterans Peal ii
i, tall the i"
buildi : nstiar.
arj group to
. *... indicau
Rubin, |ud|
vocati K key p tha
msament
terminating th< sale to the attor
ni \ representing twe ui-.-Mer.t
groups ot i>st members who had
tiled lawsuits to stop the trans
act ton
Rubin said, in a telephone
interview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, that he had sent
the copy to Barbara Pressman,
the attorney who had filed the
lawsuits and that he "assumed"
his action, which Pressman had
requested before she would drop
the lawsuits, ended the long-run-
ning controvers\
Earlier. Rubin, who had rep-
resented the post's building com-
mittee, of which Albert Katz is
chairman, said each party has
released the other from the agree-
ment The report!
.lilt' A I- 12 I
would-be buyi was tl
Mi siona Asi
i tie sale, w i eh wa
last Ma) reported
b) ; ::>liil\
to maintain the bui
strong opposition aV
Jewish
learned th<
w ere Chn
mes
Rabbi Gil Marks u I
BssocJete directoi ol
gioui activities
delphia Jewish Communit
Lions Council, called th<
11\ i purchase a "H<
Christian group involved n,
unethical" methods
-ionizing Ran Mark Mterman.
who deacribed hhnseM as -pirn
ual leader of the missionary
tfroup. denied the charge it the
lime Katz had previously told a
meeting ol some 150 post mem-
bers that the sale haii been
dropped and he insisted lhat the
building committee had not been
aware that the buyers rep-
resented a missionary group
when the sale was consummated.
TAKING A CRUISE?
G.T.I, takes the "lid" oft cruising with this dynamite publication.
Complied by a former maitre'd of one of tha world's foremost cruise
lines, the booklet is filled with information (not ada) that nobody ever
dared to release to tha public.
FIND OUT How to receive better than average service. Who dines at
the Captain's table. How to gat more out of excursions and tours plus
a host of other facts. Coma home from your cruise knowing that you
got the VIP treatment while others simply enjoyed themselves.
; Send Check or M.O. for
S $5.00 to:
I........................................................
j Name..................................................;
Street..................................................j
city....................................................i
: zip....................................................!
i
Veineen i i i I i------ ________ __ i '
X
Gti
GOOD TIMES INTL.
P.O. BOX 340667
Coral Gables
Fl 33114-0667


After Assassination
Will Egypt Want to Pursue Peace Now?
Friday, October 30,1961 / The Jewish Floridian Page7-A
Continued from Page 1-A
did represent an element of
'stability.
As long as Israel and Egypt
remained at peace, an all-out
Arab attack against Israel was
unlikely, given Israels strong
deterrent strength. It has always
j,,vn in Israel's longrange
strategic interest to make peace
with its largest, most important
neighbour.
As Sadat, himself, pointed out
on many occasions. Egypt could
make peace with Israel without
worrying about the rest of the
Arab world. But the rest of the
Arabs could not make war
against Israel without Egypt.
INDEED, this fundamental
strategic axiom helps to explain
*h> Prime Minister Menachem
Begin and the Israeli Govern-
ment .igreed to withdraw from
Sinai and to accept Egypt's other
demands in the peace negotia-
tions
During his last visit to Wash-
ington in August. Sadat was, as
usual, impressive in reaffirming
hi.- bask conviction that Egypt
and 1-rael had fought their last
war At a small gathering with
reporters. Sadat called the
Israeli -Kgyptian peace treaty
"vary solid." insisting it was
the only prevailing fact in a
troubled and dangerous area."
The Reagan Administration
had come into office with that
(act in place. They began to
take it for granted; some less-
experienced officials even
assumed that Israel and Egypt
had been friends virtually forever
and that U.S.-Egyptian relations
had always been smooth and
friendly New administrations
have very short historical
memories. They tend to think
that the world was created when
they take office.
The Middle East, after Camp
David, may indeed be a danger -
ous region, where more than a
dozen sources of tension could
break open into actual hostilities
at any moment. But how much
more dangerous would it be if
Israel and Egypt were once again
in a state of war. as they were be-
fore Sadat's trip to Jerusalem in
1977.
"THE PEACE process has not
proved to be a failure." Sadat
said here in August, following his
first direct encounter with Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan. Defending
his peace mission, he sounded
very much like Begin and other
Israeli leaders who have pointed
to other conflicts in the region.
"In this troubled part of the
world, full of all these rapid
changes, no one can predict what
will happen at any moment,"
Sadat said. "The only prevailing
fact in the area is the Camp Da-
vid agreement and peace between
Egypt and Israel. It is very solid,
and it will continue to be very
solid in the future also.
Sadat's assassination and the
accompanying uncertainty in the
future course of the peace process
hit the Reagan Administration
like a thunderbolt. The first thing
Washington decided it had to do
was double its efforts to promote
the Camp David process, because
without it. no matter how imper-
fect, the situation in the region
would be much worse.
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig told a nationally-televised
news conference on Oct. 7 that
the U.S. was determined to pur-
sue the Camp David process.
Washington welcomed President
Mosny Mubarak's declaration
that the new Egyptian leadership
would honor all its international
Jj
We are proud to be
a sponsor of the special
^S
ONE-HOUR
TELEVISION
DOCUMENTARY
V~" ,*D5UJ UUDT3
rnririnb nrauro
WORLD GATHERING
OF JEWISH
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
u la.wai-irnwn tro rua

Hosted by MARTIN BALSAM
MONDAY EVENING
NOVEMBER 2nd
ON YOUR PBS STATION
(check local listing for exact time)
We encourage your family to
be a part of this moving
historical presentation.
treaties and obligations, includ-
ing the pact with Israel. Israeli
officials, obviously, were de-
lighted by that pledge.
The United States, in recent
years, had been very generous in
rewarding Sadat and Egypt for
cooperating in the search for
peace. Egypt was the number one
recipient of U.S. economic assis-
tance in the world, and only
slightly behind Israel in terms of
military credits.
BUT SADAT, according to
reliable sources, had come to be
disappointed on many occasions
lOQOBOflOOe
by the Americans. He accepted
the fact that the US. and Israel
maintained a special relationship.
While he tried to convince U.S.
officials to treat Egypt and Israel
equally, he was said to have rec-
ognized the unique fabric that
ties Washington and Jerusalem.
What he was not prepared to
accept, however, was any
secondary status in the Arab
world or any lowering of Egypt's
importance to the United States
because of pressures from other
Arab states. He wanted to be
America's most trusted Arab
friend and, indeed, he was. But
Sadat, a very proud leader, was
often irritated by statements and
steps coming from Washington
which appeared to take other
Arab interests more seriously.
Thus, Sadat was concerned
about the U.S. attention paid to
Saudi Arabia, which had split
with Egypt because of the peace
treaty with Israel. Within the
Arab world, Sadat resented the
impression, often given, that the
United States was closer to the
Saudis than to Egypt. To shore
up his own standing, Sadat was
always anxious to point to his
U.S. connection.
But Sadat may receive his wish
more in his death than in his life.
Determined to see the successor
Egyptian leadership continue
Sadat's approach, the Reagan
Administration has agreed to
step up fighter aircraft shipments
to Egypt a request turned
down when Sadat was here in
August.
You Are Cordially Invited to Attend
Jewish Notional Fund
Morton Towers Annual Banquet
In Honor Of

Outstanding Entartalnmsnt
Kosher Culslns
Cou vert $14.00
For Reservations
Etta A Lou Aronson 672-5928
Chairpersons
. Albert & Anne Anker
Sundoy, November 8th, 1981 12:00 Noon
.. Fontoinebleou Hilton Hotel
Have o Shore in the JNF JNF Strengthens Israel Strengthen the JNF
hOO
OQOOOO
?oooo
Myon,
The Knight!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how manv
parts of the world can a Jewish parent proudly proclaim: "Meet my son, THE
KNIGHT!"
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the only Jewish
pipe-band in the entire world!
Of course Scotland's most famous product is scotch whisky.
And America's favorite scotch is J&.B. We carefully select the fin-
est scotches and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The
result is why we say that J&B whispers.
Incidentally, you don't have to wait until your son becomes
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in order to enjoy J&B. Any
'simcha' will do! ,
86 Prool Blended Scotch Whisky. C1960 The Paddington Corp NY
]&B. It whispers.
inn r^m MV *"


-r*-
'
Paee22-A

nn inni
Trw .IpwiaK V\nriAi-~./ P J-- f\-*..t----m mum
Paire2iA_ .-The kI*riK FWiHIan / Pri^.., rw~w~ <
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 30,1981
Take Your Choice
Byrd Vote Staggers AWACS Drive
Continued from Page 1-A
world only because of continuec
irresolution of the Palestiniai
problem and the perceived lack 01
commitment on our part to
address this issue." he said.
Byrd's announcement could
seriously wreck President
Reagan's efforts to win support
tor the sale in the Senate where a
slim majority now opposes it.
The House has voted by a three-
to-one margin to reject the sale
and the Senate was due to vote
this week on Wednesday. The
President had been hopeful Byrd
would support the arms package
and the Minority Leader acknow-
ledged that he had swung back
and forth before making the deci-
sion.
After Byrd spoke. Senate De-
puty Minority Leader Alan
Cranston (D.. Calif.) a leader of
the anti-sale forces, called Byrd's
announcement a "turning point."
He said many undecided
Senators may now announce
their opposition to the sale.
BUT SEN. JOHN Glenn (D.,
Ohio) said that while he agreed
with Byrd's position, the Ad-
ministration could still get the
sale approved if it obtained an
agreement on joint U.S.-Saudi
crewing of the planes. Glenn
urged Reagan, of the NorthSouth
Economic Summit in Cancun.
Mexico, to speak to Crown Prince
Fahd of Saudi Arabia and con-
vince him to agree to the joint
crewing.
Meanwhile, the President
failed to win any converts in talks
at the White House with six
Senators. Three of the Senators
- Alan Dixon (D., 111). Daniel
Inouye (D., Hawaii) and Roger
Jepsen (R., Iowa) said they
still intend to vote against the
AWACS sale after seeing the
President. Sen. John Melcher
|D.. Mo.) said he was still unde-
cided. The other two Senators
Malcolm Wallop (R.. Wyo.) and
Jennings Randolph (D., W.V.) -
had announced previously they
would support the sale.
In speech and the failure of
the Administration to get a joint
crewing agreement from the
Saudis, it is doubtful that the let-
ter the President planned to send
the Senate giving assurances on
the sale would have much effect.
A DRAFT of the letter, cir-
culated in the Senate, had the
President promising that the
Saudis have agreed to "stringent
security measures" to safeguard
the equipment being sold them,
that all information gathered by
the AWACS will be shared with
the U.S., that no information will
>e shared with a third country
without the approval of both the
U.S. and Saudi Arabia, and that
the Saudis will not operate the
AWACS outside Saudi Arabian
borders without the consent of
the U.S.
The letter did not appear to go
beyond the safeguards outlined
earlier by Administration
spokesmen to Congress.
In his speech, Byrd stressed
that he did not believe the S8.5
billion arms sale would endanger
Israel's military superiority. He
said there were three reasons for
his opposition. The first was his
fear that "the highly sophisti-
cated technology" being given
the Saudis would fall into Soviet
Isaiah Peace WaU
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Mayor Edward Koch has signed
into law a bill naming the spiral
s taxi way at the Isaiah Peace Wall
opposite the United Nations in
honor of Prisoner of Conscience
Anatoly Sharansky. The legisla-
tion was initiated by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and
was adopted unanimously by the
City Council last month.
hands. He was not only con
cerned about the AWACS but
also about the AIM 9-L Side-
winder missiles that are being
sold to the Saudis.
Secondly. Byrd said he was
concerned about fueling the "ever
escalating" arms race in the area.
"As long as the Arab-Israeli dis-
pute is pushed into the back-
ground, this sale does not make
sense," he said. "Rather than
contributing to stability in the
region. I fear it will only raise the
threshold of tension. I am con-
cerned that we are fast approach-
ing the point where we are hand-
ing over grenades to potential
adversaries in the region with the
pins already pulled."
BUT BYRD stressed that his
main reason for opposing the
arms sale was his belief that the
Administration has "all but
abandoned the Camp David pro-
cess, leaving the future of the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty un-
certain at best." He said the as-
sassination of Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat "sends a
strong signal; it is time for cau-
tion and reflection" and not that
there is a need for a new arms
sale.
Byrd said that "the key to the
peace process (in the Mideast)
now rests on the shoulders" of
Israeli Premier Menachem Begin,
since he is the only one of the
three signers of the Camp David
agreement still in office. He said
he was "heartened" by the "mu-
tual commitment" of Begin and
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak "to carry forward with
the peace process. Despite
domestic concerns. Prime Minis-
ter Begin has also committed his
government to complete the total
withdrawal of Israeli forces from
the Sinai scheduled for next
April. For this he is to be com-
mended."
Cornell Prof. Wins Nobel;
Snares Prize in Chemistry'
With Japanese Researcher
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.Ronald Hoffmann, a
nrofessor of physical sciences at Cornell University, will
share the 1981 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Kenichi
Fukui of Japan for theories developed independently on
the course of chemical reactions, the Royal Swedish
Academy of Sciences announced in Stockholm.
Hoffmann, a naturalized citizen who is Jewish was
born in Zloczow, Poland in 1937 and emigrated'to the
United States in 1949. His research aimed at theoretically
anticipating the feasibility of chemical reactions have
been applied in many fields, including the development of
special plastics and other materials. He is best known for
his work in the 1960s at Harvard University with the late
Prof. Robert Burns Woodward, winner of the Nobel Prize
in Chemistry in 1961.
The $200,000 prize will be shared by both Hoffmann
and Fukui, who also developed similar theories on
chemical reactions in separate research work, the
Academy said.
FLAGLER FEDERALS FACTS ON
INTEREST
compounded monthly
11.51% 12.14%
ANNUAL YIELD
TAX FREE CD
WHAT:
The All Savers Tax Free Certificate Is an Insured one-
year fixed rate savings certificate. For most savers. It Is
an exceptional and wise Investment opportunity. It
enables the saver to earn up to 5 2,000. In Interest tax
free on a Joint return, and up to $1,000 tax free on an
Individual return. Minimum deposit: S500.
WHO:
If you pay as much as 51,400. In taxes to the IRS, the All
Savers Tax Free Certificate Is probably for you, since
the tax free yield of the All Savers Certificate will be
greater than the net yield on other comparable but
taxable Investments.
Even If you are not concerned with the tax aspects,
where else can you find a yield of 12.14% on an Insured
one year account requiring only a S500 deposit 7
WHERE:
Any FLAGLER FEDERAL office.
WHEN:
Right Now.
FLAGLER FEDERAL will pay 12.14%* for one-year All
Savers Tax Free Certificates purchased between now
and Oct. 31, 1981.
HOW:
very simply. The minimum deposit Is only $500. If you
have funds available, or any certificate that will ma-
ture, bring It to FLAGLER FEDERAL. We will give you
a gift and pay you 12.14% on a new Tax-Free CD. (the
highest rate allowed by law on your Investment. /
WHY:
The Insured All Savers Certificate combines guaran-
teed safety, high yield and convenience. It Is the best
Tax Free Investment you will find today. Take advan-
tage of It now I
'Interest rate H bated upon 70% of the Investment yield from one-year treasury Biih Federal lav* reoulres a substantial penalty lor premature redemption
esuc
FLAELEK
FEDERAL
SAViribS & LGAI1 AssociATicr
f=J
|QUI "* v"*
LtNOf
mmmmm-immatmam COmUMUbm-rmmmm*mr*mmtmmmmmm *so\nm:>s$siu.>*,...u .BArvuiAat:$*sni immmm W00"
HHNisM awiMotN4if ,,.,.,, MUMmtmm mm mmmmam aitohuach.hi mo .*.**.+* coumuACHin hoc < ""'
HSCH31 m4~~,*~ AMmmtOOIMrKO.tSiUill.ntHH.c^,* WmftKimuWUIomMGCttlTn:SSl U00. ,im\e ** m%TCHfSTt' :n.-H' *<.. UMBfUHSHiMO
mtmmmmmimrtukmmiwmmmuaum >><.* MouraDMwuInM.itMW nourwooo'Atm>*arnn-.m *** >
Stmumv~mc*


Friday, October 30,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
the Jewish Floridian's
great super subscription
savings bonus.
Our costs for postage, printing, and
paper have all gone up.
But, because you are important to
us. we've come up with a way to keep
the cost of a subscription to the weekly
Jewish Floridian down.
And. save you money on valuable
goods and services. A real bargain.
Virtually every major newspaper
in the U.S. covers the news events that
happen in or relate to Israel and the
Mideast.
But those events are covered
primarily according to their outcome
for the United States and its foreign
policy. Not how they will affect Israel,
its people, and us.
The Jewish Floridian takes a
different perspective. We take you
inside Israel every Friday. Inside the
minds and hearts and dreams of its
leaders. And its people.
And, in every issue, in addition to
"ring worldwide news events that
concern all Jews, we report extensively
on local Jewish news. Community
events. Social events. News of organiza-
tions. Your friends. Your neighbors. In
short, we cover every facet of Greater
Miami's Jewish community.
This edition of The Jewish
Floridian is one of ten issues a year
you receive through the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation along with
the Federations newsmagazine
supplement
Because we'd like you to increase
that to 52 times a year, we're prepared
to make this very special introductory
offer: For the next 60 days you
can become a new subscriber
to the weekly Jewish Floridian
and save money too!
Here's how:
With the price of a one year sub-
scription less the dollar value of the
special super savings bonus coupon
we'll send you
The Jewish Floridian for just
25 an issue, if you act now. This special
offer is for 52 issues a year, including
our special holiday issues.
A special offer to our current
subscribers:
For a limited time only,
we're offering you an opportunity
iiimmiiiiinnimiinmnnimiummummi......niiiii.....m
! $15Jm^gp,(;irT(ERTIFirATE 24146
\

r.
UJJIMIII 11 11 uuuli 11
FEDCO GIFT CERTIFICATE
to extend your Floridian subscription
based on its present expiration date for
one. two or three years, and, we'll
Here's what to do:
Just fill out, clip and mail The Jewish
Floridian subscription coupon.
Enclose your check or money order,
payable to The Jewish Floridian, and
we'll send your redeemable super
saving bonus coupon from one of the
send you a valuable super saving bonus
coupon from Fedco, Jordan Marsh,
Pantry Pride or Publix.
leading south Florida retailers you've
selected.
Get money back with The Jewish
Floridian's great super subscription
savings bonus.
Yes!
I want to start renew/extend
my subscription toThe Jewish Floridian and save! Enclosed is my check or money order, payable
to the Jewish Floridian. for my weekly subscription. If I'm a current subscriber. I understand that
my subscription will be renewed from its present expiration date for the term I've indicated
below:
Name _--------------------------------------------------------------~---------------
I
i
IB
I
i
Address
City
State
Zip
!
These special rates apply to Dado County only
Please check one:
? 1 year subscription/$18 Send me a $5 coupon
? 2 year subscription/$34 Send me a $10 coupon
? 3 year subscript ion/$49 Send me a $15 coupon
I'd like my super saving bonus coupon from
(please check one):
? Jordan Marsh D Pantry Pride
? Publix O fedco
Offer K spires Dec. 16.1981
Mail to:
PO. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 331011
Allow three weeks for delivery.
j


~l _!J__ /
** i.-no inoi
*
Paee22-A Thp.TpwiaK FlnrUim./cw mL ^1 w*
Page H?A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, October 30.1981
>1 Second Scenario
Baker Sure of Administration Victory
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA -
The iate of the Reagan
Administration's proposed $8.5
billion sale of AWACS re-
connaissance aircraft and other
advanced weaponry to Saudi
Arabia appeared this week to
depend on whether President
Reagan returned from Cancun,
Mexico with an agreement by the
Saudis for joint U.S. Saudi
crewing of the AWACS. Reagan
lunched with Prince Fahd of
Saudi Arabia in Cancun where
both were attending the North-
South economic summit con-
ference.
But Sen. Alan Cranston (D..
Calif.). the Senate Deputy
Minority Leader and a leader of
the opposition to the AWACS
sale, said on the Senate floor that
even if Reagan returned with
such an agreement, the opposi-
tion was now so solid against the
sale that he believes it will be
rejected.
HE ATTRIBUTED the
strengthened opposition to the
announcement by Sen. Robert
Byrd (D..W. Va.), the Minority
Leader, that he would vote
against the AWACS sale.
However. Senate Majority
Leader Howard Baker (R.Tenn.)
said that he still believed Reagan
would win when the Senate votes
v/IA
Wednesday. He said he had 40
votes in favor of the arms
package deal and rejected claims
by its opponents that they have
the 51 -plus votes to defeat it.
Meanwhile, two Senators an-
nounced ooDoeite ooaitions on
the sale. Sen. Ernest Holhngs
(D.S.C) said he would oppose it,
principally out of fear for the
security of the high technology
weapons being offered Saudi
Arabia.
But support for the sale was
expressed by Sen. Warren
Rudman (R.. N.H.I, the only one
of the six Jews in the Senate to
support it. The other five, three
Democrats and two Republicans,
were opposed to the sale. One of
them. Sen. Rudy Boschwitz (R..
Minn.) was a leader of the op-
position.
IN A SPEECH on the Senate
floor. Rudman denied that the
sale would endanger Israel. "I for
one am willing to trust in Israel's
strength and understanding in
order to take a step which may
have more far reaching conse-
quences than the simple physical
placement of five radar planes
within a single country's
tx>undaries." he said.
As for the Reagan-Fahd
meeting in Cancun. President
Reagan \\'ashington let it be known that
a major part of the agenda
between them involved dis-
cussion of Libya s Col Khadafy_
Administration spokesmen in-
sisted that the subject of
AWACS did not come up at all.
Remembering a Massacare in Lithuanian Ghetto
Continued from Page 4-A
a brutal auxiliary with a cigar
clamped in his teeth calling out.
"You, to the left; and you, old
men, to the right." The "old
man'" was a prominent cellist
who had played for the Dresden
Opera Orchestra. The selection
continued for over ten hours,
with the remorseless cry, "You to
the left; you to the right."
The next day. October 29.
1941, Der Groyaer Actzyeh
took place. This was the name
survivors gave to this terrible
massacre when nearly 10,000
men, women and children were
marched to the 9th Fort and shot,
and their bodies burned. And the
killings still continued when Jews
from over 150 villages in the
Kovno district were liquidated.
By November, 1941, there were
about 17,000 Jews remaining in
the Kovno Ghetto. Many were
forced to work to build an air-
field, nearby, for the Wehrmacht.
During the winter months, hun-
dreds died from hunger and
disease. Despite these privations,
their spirits were raised when
they heard of the heroism of the
young Jewish partisans who were
fighting the Germans in the
PLO Vows to KM UJS. Jews
In Retaliation for Extradition
Continued from Page 1-A
proof vest.
The 71 year-old Rabb. ap-
pointed to his post by President
Reagan, is Jewish. Reports
linked the threats to a report that
Libya's Col. Khadafy had sent
out word to assassinate Rabb in
retaliation for the American
shooting down of two Libyan jets
at the end of the summer.
But Administration sources
have denied at least in part tht
story reported in Sunday's New
York Times, adding that the
threat could easily have been
handled in Rome. These sources
noted that Raab was in fact
called back to help lobby U.S.
Senators in behalf of President
Reagan's push to sell AWACS
planes to Saudi Arabia.
MEANWHILE, in New York,
the Egyptian Government
Tourist Office was bombed early
Sunday. An anonvmoue tele-
phone caller telephone news
offices there that the bombing
had been staged by the Jewish
Defense League to emphasize
that the Camp David accord
should be "buried with Sadat."
JDL officials have denied all
responsibility for the bombing,
but they agreed with the prin-
ciple that the Camp David ac-
cords are dead.
forests close by. Yiddish songs
and poetry were still being writ-
ten as an act of defiance. In books
of Ghetto songs one often sees at
the bottom of the page, shrviber
umbakant "writer unknown. "
A NEW DECREE was an-
nounced in 1943 that those re-
maining in the Ghetto were to be
transported to concentration
camps or used for slave labor in
Germany.
A sadistic SS officer, Hans
Gekke. who earned the nickname
"The Cat with the White
Gloves," because of his mode of
attire and death-mask grin, per-
sonally took charge of 3,500
Kovno Jews, aided by Ukrainian
SS men known as "Vlasovskies."
They were the followers of the
renegade Russian General Vlasov
who was fighting with the Nazis.
Hundreds more died of hunger
and exhaustion on the long
march to the concentration
camps.
With typical Teutonic
thoroughness, the Gestapo chief.
General Staloker, reported to
Heydrich that 136,641 Lithuan-
ian Jews, precisely, had been
liquidated by Einzatsgruppen
Nazi execution squads and
Lithuanian auxiliaries. He also
estimated that 80.000 of these
executions had taken place at the
9th Fort
The tragic irony was that
among those who were killed at
the 9th Fort, there were Polish.
German, Austrian and Czecho-
slovakian Jews who had fled their
own countries, just before the
war, to escape Nazi persecution,
and had sought refuge in Lithu-
ania.
W. Germany's
GenscherWiU '
Visit Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA)
West Germany's For-
eign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher will visit
Israel in February, 1982.
His acceptance of a long-
standing invitation from
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir was conveyed by
Bonn's Minister of State
for Foreign Affairs, Hilde-
garde Hamm Bruescher,
who was the Federal Re-
public's official representa-
tive at the funeral of Moshe
Day an.
Observers saw Genscher s im-
pending visit as a confirmation of
West Germany's desire to im-
prove relations with Israel.
THOSE RELATIONS have
been frosty since Premier Mena-
chem Begin s personal attacks on
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt
during the Knesset election cam-
paign last spring.
Begin and Schmidt met and
shook hands at the funeral of
Kgyptian President Anwar Sadat
in Cairo on Oct. 10 and Begin
mentioned their meeting in his
briefing to the Cabinet af-
terwards. It was perceived here
as the final sign of a thaw be-
tween Bonn and Jerusalem.
Genscher's visit will follow on
the heels of the visit to Israel by
President Francois Mitterrand of
France who is due in January.
Officials here view the two visits
as an encouraging sign that
Israel's position with many West
European countries is improving.
A notable exception is Great
Britain. It was alone among the
major Western nations which
failed to send an official represen-
tative to Dayan's funeral.
FIELD'S (212)391-22W
FRIENDSHIP. LOVE
MARRIAGE
FrM BooaMM- Find Mop.ns Open 7
day*an > 1B20 nationwide seb
VICE AHRaiigions 41 Eaal 42nd SI Rm
1600 NVC '0011 Wa maaa afrangamanla lot
you' ona t daugMara arithoul Ihan
knowlwdga
O.R.C.
ASHEVILLE. N.C.
J.C.C. Administrator Is moving.
Must sell remodeled 3 bedroom
ranch-style home In prestigious
No. Ashovllle. Spacious rooms,
saumable mortgsgs. $64,5000.
Call 704 255-8111 and ssk for
Bonnie Lewis.
V", iva
BETH DIN OFFICE
OF FLORIDA
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Othodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenu
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel: 534-1004 or 672-0004
EMBASSY
KOSHER STEAK HOUSE
1417 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach
GREAT NEWS FOR
FOOD LOVERS
Reopening November 1st
at 4 PM
For Information Call 538-7550
SKYLAKE LAKEFRONT
EXECUTIVE HOME
100 ft. beach, Pool, Patio
4 bedroom, 3 bath, study & den
Walking dlstancs to Synagogus,
J.C.C, Shopping Canter
PRICED TO SELL
evenings & weekends 932-8599
weekdays 931-0400
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
['Call me, Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(ot Miami)
"Companion Needed"
Good Salary for cultured,
intelligent, educated lady
to be paid companion to
Intelligent, cultured,
elderly lady. Can share
lovely apartment. Must be
good driver. References
required. Reply Box C.N.,
Jewish Floridian p o
Box 012973 Miami 33101. l
Ufodi ChauJdlc fativd
1981
THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS
1700 WASHINGTON AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14,8:30 P.M.
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
Prices: $8.50 $10.50 $12.50
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ARIE K.A0IEHI AGENCY INC 16125 NE IS Ava. NMB
JORDAN MARSH: DADELAND, 163rd ST., OMNI
BROWARD MALL, HOLLYWOOD FASHION CENTER
For Information, Reservations ft Group Rates
CALL: 949-3055 Sponsored by: Temple King Solomon I


Friday, October 30.1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Da van Memorialized
Begin, Navon Pay Respects to War Hero
RUSALEM (JTA) -
ner Menachem Begin and
Bident Yitzhak Navon both
their respect to Moshe
fan in poignant statements
Begin first met Dayan in
and Navon knew him since
l,i\ when both served under
lier David Ben Gurn. In
ipprociation of Dayan, Begin
I no we first met. in the
prgn-und in summer 1944, I
ens. of respect and
lot \lc--h(' Diivaa -
r for Israel, indeed one
>ur greateel warrior- of all
|\l,,. both a
H,,.- nd statesman, and in
. n ii tai he Nrvod he-
th devotioa and
I :> I Israel
,, ,r and soul .
r even valley, every
1 IS NOT true that he was a
hard man. I can say from my own
experience of him that there is no
truth in that legend; he had a
sensitive soul, the heart of a poet.
He was a man without fear, and
therefore he w nhlp to serve as
an example toothers "
"When we think upon his life."
Begin said, as a pioneer and a
soldier, the long centuries of ex-
ile persecution and humiliation
Men to disappear, and we re-
turn in our minds to the days of
Joshua and Caleb. Gideon'and
.lephtah. Jonathan and David.
\mi.t and Voav, .ludah Mecca
bee. \ annai and Mar Kochba For
he wa- their brother, their son or
grandson their blood flowed
through his \,
Bui the centuries oi Jewish
suffering cannot be erased, the
Premier continui in part
ol our histor\ and the) mi
the modern-da) renaissano
Jewish martial valour and na-
tional self reaped ;tll the more
U.S. Medals Mark
on fab of Liberators
t_y

\ gold on silver
minted to m
historic iirst International
\ Libi raton n baa
lunced b) Elk Wiesel.
th) ', S Hokxausl
L Council The medal-
\ -.uteri al the climax of
conference to high ranking
bresentativea ol 16 Mlied na-
\n- A World War II which
irated Nazi concentration
up- and to the Jewish Bri-
lls, which fought long side
hied forces
|The unprecedented (inference
as luld hen- Tuesday and
ssdnssday at the U.S. State De-
triment, with opening remarks
Secretary of State Alexander
|aig Besides the official na-
pnal delegations, and rep-
Mtative lilK-rators from across
l'ruled Stales and other
iintrie-. survivors of Nazi era
ended The conference was
fir--, encounter on an in-
stional scale !>etween thOQS
tree men who were the
>t to see ihe world of Nazi
Or and those who had been its
habitants.' said Wiesel. who is
hdrew W. Mellon professor of
inanities at Boston University
pre-eminent authority on the
liocsust.
STUDIO
SatA"
ii"iimi"
"mm
Continental
Cuisine
'eco jojji
0o 0j ? I
feno*nrd
THE MEDAL for the liberator
nat ion was ere.it' : b) the
I ranklin Mint near Philadelphia,
ilie world largest private mint
It i- ft millimeters in diameter,
ol gold electroplate on sterling
silver. The design, created b)
Washington artist Lou Stovall, i-
finely etched in Ixild relief,
frosisd and set against a polished
mirror-like background. The de-
sign features a symbolic wreath,
with a quotation by Prof. Wiesel.
"For the dead and the living we
must l>ear witness, on one side.
A statement on the other side
reads. In appreciation, to libera-
tors of Nazi concentration
camps."
The medal was struck in a
ceremony at the Franklin Mint
on Friday. Oct. 23. followed by a
press conference by Prof. Wiesel.
Kach medal, was struck twice
under 200.000 pounds of pressure
to produce a "proof coin." The
acme of the coiner's art. the die
will be destroyed after the medals
are made
In addition to the medals
presented to the liberating na-
tions, one will become a per-
manent exhibit at the national
Holocaust memorial museum
which the council has been di-
rected by Congress to create in
Washington. A full record of the
conference proceedings also will
be housed in the museum.
Nations expected to take part
in the confernce liesides the
United States, were Australia.
Belgium. Canada.
Czechoslovakia. Denmark.
France. Great Britain, the
Netherlands. New Zealand.
Norway. Poland, the USSR, and
yugoslavia
ITUOI0
RESTAURANT
o' a unique
dming riperlence
Watch your table to your
fnood m one o' S md-vidua1
'OOmi The Ten!
W'n* Cellar Studio Place
Pigaiie S*nt C*S*H
Fins Entertskwnenl
At tha Piano
AlsovtoMnptsytng
lor your pleasure
OPENS ATS P.M.
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THI GWTT0"
MOST MAJOR
cesoiT CANOS
HONOSItO
2340 SW M Avt.
445-5371
elated MsttSav*
*<*

.KOSHER MOTEL
rGLATT
ymmmmMmrmmmmr
No nrt auSanat rfa* our
us* Mali east saSlsssS
MltMU
__e*niTsilBTt
CAU r1K M SSMMaS MACH
(rltlra OC-J-Ja**W^e,H IjWbsC*
37*a.3aj^St.liaAaiB*ACM
,.: 13061 S31-OOS1
marvellous." Dayan was "one of
the greatest (of Jewish fighters),
and thus he will live on, from
generation to generation."
NAVON, in his assessment
which was broadcast to the na-
tion, said. "Moshe Payan will be
remembered for his great contri-
bution in imbuing the spirit of
fighting bravery into Zahal, and
for his fruitful and original think-
ing in the field of foreign policy
For many long years he sym-
bolized, to this nation and to thi
world, the young generation of
Israel lighting lor it- survival. In
recent years he was the untiring
pursuer alter psSCI
"Moahe Dayan was always
controversial figure. You could
never l>e indiflerent towards him.
'i mi couldn't ignore his per-
sonalit) his deeds and his
thoughts Ever) step that he
took or statement that he made
immediately reverberated and
lecasioned either enthusiastk
approval or energetic opposition.
"But both his supporters ami
hi> opponent- were united in re-
garding him as ,i very special
Deraon an original and multi-
faceted figure He was a man
of the earth a product of thi
land, i moslun member, always
an earl) rise: He fought for
ever) inch ol land and knew tin
value ol ever) agricultural imple-
ment At one and the same time
he was a roughedged sabra and a
sensitive poet and a brave and
cunning warrior May his
memory be blessed."
STATEMENTS OF apprecia
lion were also issued by promi-
nent people in Israel and abroad.
Nearly all referred to Dayan's
pragmatism, originality of
thought and his charisma.
Messages of grief and con-
dolences arrived from many
world leaders, including Presi-
dent Reagan of the United
States, President Francois Mit-
terrand of France, and President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. All
described Dayan as a visionary in
search of peace.
Former Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance, who worked with
him on the Camp David accords,
and former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, who worked
with him on the separation of
forces and interim agreements
with Egypt after the Yom Kippur
War. spoke of his "brilliant intel-
ligence" and "originality of
thought." Kissinger referred to
him as a good friend' and as "a
man in advance Ol his time
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir described Da van as "one
of Israel's greatest sons ... a
man who will be remembered as a
great soldier who followed an
original path, in advance of his
own time."
LABOR PARTY Chairman
Shimon Peres spoke of his long-
standing friendship with Dayan,
since both had been chosen by
the Labor Party and Ben Gurion
to represent the party at the
World Zionist Congress in 1946.
Peres described Dayan. who had
served in various Labor Party
posts until he broke with r
1977. as a "man of great wis
. and original mind
Tributes to Dayan also >
from West Hank
spoke of their admit it ioi
efforts to ensure no
tween Jews and itx
though they said th1 could
agree with his apprnai i
political ideolog\
OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
ytTOi^y
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN Of THE BOARL
YOl IP rriMPlETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 19^
HI-..WAI-
463-9680 757-8513
DOWNTOWN UPTOWN MIA.BCH. CORALGABL
iSANElstSt 228NE59thSt 1608 Wash Ave 272 Valencia A
Miami Ma Miami,Fl.T. Miami Beach Fla CoralGaoiev
4 DAYS-3 NIGHTS
iNov 26-29)
ONLY
%QA PER PERSON
0*+ DBL OCC.
PLUS TAX
THANKSGIVING AT
MIAMI BEACH'S FINEST
GLATT KOSHER HOTEL
^u
5DAYS-4NIGHTS
(Nov 25-29)
$99
INCLUDES 2 DELICIOUS
KOSHER MEALS DAILY
EVERY LUXURY
OCEANFRONI
FACILITY
POOL 'PRIVATE
BEACH
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
DAILY
ENTERTAINMENT
WftLDMAN HOTEL ON THE OCEAN AT 43 ST
PHONE 538-5731 FOR RESERVATIONS
The Jefferson National
"Good Neighbor Policy"
1. Help the Community we serve.
A. Provide meeting rooms.
B. Be active in Civic and Charitable organizations.
C. Provide leadership tor neighborhood and
community improvements and projects.
2. Provide convenient Full Service Banking in our "We
Care" tradition
***
JEFFERSON
NATIONAL BANKS
Serving all of Dade County

r
aflAia BEACH with Tru* Dopartmortf. 301 Arthur Go Godfrey Road and 978 Arthur Godfley Road 532-6451 NOftMANDTBLE
948 Normandy Drrvo 532-0451 .BTBOKTATKI600 Crandon Boukward
561-6451 SOOT* DAM 9600 North Kendall Drive and 10690 North Kendall
Drive 294-8382 ? MOM* DAOI290 Sunny Ufcw Boulevard and 18170 CoBtts
Avenue 949-2121
Subtk!Kuiaol>0>r^nari V
ZL


- nil inoi
<
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 30, 1981
False Sense of Security

Israel Sports Institute
Reagan Urged to Give Leadership Remembers Moe Berg
HOUSTON, Tex. -
Warning that the U.S. may
be "lulling itself into a false
sense of security as a result
of the present international
oil glut,'' the American
Jewish Committee has
called upon the Reagan Ad-
ministration to "provide
leadership and a sense of
urgency" to the public if
the country is to be-safe
from cutoffs of oil supplies
and "ruinous cartel prices."
At a news conference at the
Galleria Plaza Hotel, here, where
the AJC held its 75th anniver-
sary National Executive Council
meeting, Harris L. Kempner, Jr.,
chairman of its energy commit-
tee, expressed the agency's con-
cern that the government's
"commitment to reducing U.S.
energy dependence has slipped
dangerously, posing threats to
our nation's security and
economic well-being."
Kempner, who is president of
United States National Banc-
shares, Inc., Galveston, was
joined at the news conference
by Arnold Safer, a Washington,
D.C. energy consultant, presi
dent of the Energy Futures
Group, Inc.
KEMPNER CHARGED that
the Reagan Administration had
broken with the policies of four
previous administration's in that
it no longer views reduction of
oil imports as the primary goal of
U.S. energy policy, and pointed
to the proposed dissolution of the
Department of Energy aa a signal
to the American public of this.
"Its reliance on market forces
alone will not be sufficient to
resolve the complex energy
problem," Kempner added, al-
though he acknowledged that
market forces could increase
energy production and con-
servation.
Turning to the National
Energy Plan offered by the Reag-
an Administration in July 1981,
Kempner stated the AJC belief
that certain elements in the plan
should be modified, and other ini-
tiatives should be added. Speci-
fically, he urged these points:
CONSERVATION: He called
for an active government role in
conservation programs, sugges-
ting requirements of individual
metering in new construction and
limiting pass-on energy charges
to tenants, encouragement of
utilities to become a major force
for conservation, and tax credits
and tax incentives for conserva-
tion retrofitting.
aLIQUID SYNFUELS: A
larger appropriation for the U.S.
Synthetic Fuels Corporation than
the S13 billion outlined by recent
testimony of Edward Noble, its
chairman, along with support of
the shale and methanol pro-
grams. "While some synthetic
fuels and other alternatives may
be more costly to produce now,
over time and with improved
technology many alternatives are
likely to be less expensive than
imported oil," Mr. Kempner
added.
NATURAL GAS DEREGU-
LATION: He urged immediate
removal of restrictions on end
uses of gas, but no more rapid de-
regulation of gas prices at the
wellhead on the grounds that it
would be inflationary. Pointing
out that the price differential be-
tween oil and gas helps to en-
courage switches from oil to has,
Kempner added that if gas sup-
plies appeared to be adequate,
future deregulation of wellhead
gas found at depths lesser than
15,000 feet could be considered.
NUCLEAR: Higher priority
to the completion and licensing of
new nuclear plants, "subject to a
regulatory process that provides
for safe nuclear power and control
of nuclear waste."
INTERNATIONAL ENER-
GY POLICIES: The AJC recom-
mended policies that would en-
courage energy development and
production in other parts of the
world serving "the strategic and
social purposes of the U.S.";
removal of curbs that have pre-
vented the U.S. Overseas Private
Investment Co. from pushing
energy production of Argentina.
Venezuela, and the Andean coun-
tries; support of lending policies
to encourage energy production
in the lesser developed countries,
and renewed efforts to negotiate
an agreement on energy with
Canada.
STRATEGIC PETROLE-
UM RESERVE: The AJC urged
that there be no interruption be-
cause of funding of the filling of
the Strategic Petroleum Reserve,
maintaining that this should be
"a top item in the defense budget
where it belongs."
B v HASKELL COHEN
TEL AVIV (JTA) Of-
ficials of the Wingate Institute
for Physical Education and Sport
in Netanya announced that it
dedicated a reference room in its
library to be named the Moe Berg
Reference Room.
Moe Berg was the baseball
catcher who made quite a repu-
tation for himself in the Ameri-
can major leagues both as a
player and a gentleman. In ad-
dition, he undoubtedly had to be
the best linguist to ever par-
ticipate in professional sports in
the United States. The room is
being presented to Wingate by
Dr. Bem Dibner of Norwalk,
Conn, an admirer of Berg.
BERG, born in New York City
in 1902, graduated from Prin-
ceton University, the Sorbonne in
Paris and the Columbia Law
School. He was considered a
linguistic genius, having
mastered no less than 11 lan-
guages.
During World War II. he was
recruited by the O.S.S. and spent
much of his time spying behind
the German lines. It was revealed
after the end of the war that he.
at one time during the course of
the fighting, attended a meeting
of some of the world's leading
physicists in Germany and
brought back valuable informa-
tion on the progress that country
was making in rocketry.
An enigma to his various team
mates. Berg once elicited an ex-
clamation from the great hitter.
Ted Williams, his teammate on
the Boston Red Sox: "If I didn't
see and hear this guy, I just
wouldn't believe that such an in-
dividual existed in our world.''
As a baseball catcher, Berg
was not rated among the stars,
but he was a competent com-
petitor and batted fairly well. He
gained the respect of players in
both major leagues in the United
States and probably will be
remembered as the most cerebral
athlete whoever competed in the
U.S. Berg died in 1972.
Israelis Whip
West Pointers
WEST POINT. NY. (JTA)
The Rogosin High School
Men's Volleyball Team of Kiryat
Ata, Israel stunned its counter-
part from the United States
Military Academy at West Point
when it took three out of four
games in a contest played here.
The scores were 15-9, 13-15, 15-
5 and 15-9, with Rogosin losing
only the second game.
The Kiryat Ata. volley bailers
are undefeated on their short tour
to the United States. The team
recently defeated a squad of
rabbis in Syosset, Long Island.
Prior to the match at West
Point, the Israeli athletes were
welcomed to the Academy by the
protcol office, headed by Captain
Michael Rochelle. Issac Oren. of
the Israeli Embassy, responded
on behalf of the visitors, and Uri
Afek, director of the Israel SporU
Authority, spoke briefly to the
gathering.
Israel Categorically Rejects Fahd Plan
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has once again categorical-
ly rejected the eight-point peace
plan for the Middle East pro-
posed by Crown Prince Fahd of
Saudi Arabia last August.
Premier Menachem Begin's press
spokesman, Uri Porat, said that
the peace plan is, in fact, a for-
mula for continuing the state of
war and that the only acceptable
framework for Mideast peace ne-
gotiations was the Camp David
accords.
Porat's statement was in res-
ponse to expressions of support
tor the Saudi plan by British
Foreign Secretary Lord Carring-
ton, current chairman of th
Council of Ministers of the Euro-
pean Economic Community
(EEC), and Habib Chatti, Secre-
tary General of the 42-nation Is
lamic Conference.
BOTH SEE the plan as a feaai
ble basis for negotiations and, ac-
cording to Chatti, Palestine Li-
beration Organization Chief
Yasir Arafat is prepared to nego-
tiate on the basis of the Fahd
plan. Arafat himself reportedly
endorsed it in Tokyo.
Carrington said that the EEC
sees the plan as a basis for peace,
in line with the European foreign
ministers' Venice declaration of
June, 1960. Porat noted that Pre-
sident Francois Mitterrand of
'France no longer accepts the
' Venice declaration, and therefore
it is not certain how broad
European support for the Fahd
plan is.
, Arafat's reported support for
'the plan has raised the questions
in diplomatic circles as to
whether this gMtt shift in
the PLO position inasmuch as
the Saudi proposals imply recog-
nition of Israel. But sources here
said that this is just a tactical
move intended to make the PLO
position more palatable to the
West. They contend that the
PLO has not abandoned its aim
to destroy Israel.
ISRAEL, meanwhile, ex-
pressed official regret over
Arafat's visit to Japan, his first
to a major non-Communist ally of
the United States The Japanese
charge d'affaires, Yoshikazu
Kaneko, was summoned to the
Foreign Ministry and told that
Israel regarded Arafat's recep-
tion in Japan as especially, seri-
ous coming shortly after the
assassination of President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt and PLO jubila-
tion over the murder.
The Japanese diplomat said his
country has no intention of
recognizing the PLO as the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people or extending it diplomatic
recognition. He said he would
relay Israel's position to his
government.
HOW'S THIS
F0K OPEHUS?
Because Good Health-and Good Cheer-knew no such
thing as a peak season, there's no better time or oppor
tunity to take advantage of all the magnificent facilities
of this elegant Resort-Estate Renowned Hearth Club to
add years to your life Free golf at nearby 18 hole course
with free transportation Epicurean, weight shedding
cuisine Everything you could hope for in a memorable
vacation. at incredibly low, all- inclusive rates.
Hervs now CaN (305) S33-S411 or write Larry Boraf n.
Piidant and General Manager
PALM BEACH SPA
Overieeetae levaty
GALA OPENING
NOVEMBER 4
SPECIAL EARLY
WINTER RATES
Nov. 4Dec. 15
AS LOW AS $42*
50o150 Rooms
Haas* Ctub. futy-equippad and -
prolatxonaK lUNad
FrMMwfccal Summation
Epcutwn Miala
Supaf viaad condrtKKMng routines
tndmdual wgni control maraa
Aatro-mrt Puring arMn
Comply Social Program
F. GoH (mc Son )
Fr da* maaaagt (c. Sun )
h Sauna T
i Dry-Heel __
BoutoV Swam and Wtrtpool
rwO SWferTWnenQ F^OOMJ
irmiiiLi-riai amuicm
rlM-UMMii
$45~47
IMIXIIIUMM
mmmmmt
Miami Beach s GLATT KOSHER
ON THE OCEAN AT tOttl ST.. MIAMI BEACH s******v '* *
2 Block* From Lincoln Road Mail >*^"
THANKSGIVING WEEK-END SPECIAL
4 Days-3 Nights 5 Days-4 Ntghts
$70 srr A $90 a
i
.aav.a
Strict** Koi
taH Al The
OPEN ALL YEAR
Managed 4 Supervtaed by Rabbi Olmpel Or imland
*~ 538-7811
BRAND NEW 1981
CITATION HATCHBACK 4 DR
13.8V FINANCING
AVAILABLE
'(ionrl thru No* 1 -
1 .. rev.
l .V
!>- .
Slk '0C
7195
FIGUEREDO
. HLVROLETINC
m .--
... .



Leo Mindlin
IRA is More Than
Misty Irish Landscape
William F. Farley (second from right) is recipient of the 1981 Human Relations Aunrd from
| the American Jewish Committee. Farley, chairman of Chicago-based Farley Industries, was
Ikonored at a special testimonial dinner in Chicago where Maine Republican Sen, William
[Cohen (second from left ) was guest speaker. Also shown are Allan Muchin (left), dinner
chairman, and Marshall Zissman (right ), chairman ofAJC's Chicago chapter.
Headlines
Bar Dan Chair Honors Slomovitz
Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan. Israel, has >^WS^^ic^^jSftSS
announced the mauur.t n of .Chair mConv | Women 8 e fof l8rael wiU receive the Torch
munitions named for Philip Slomovitz. ed.tor of I of i^^g Award of the American Friends of the
the Detroit Jewuih New.. g ||ebrew Univen|itv at a ,uncheon m her honor on
The Slomovitz Chair will play a central role in a Nov. 18 at the Hotel Pierre in New York.
new two-year, graduate program to train expert* | A$ president of the Womens l^^ for Israel.
in the print and electronic'media and in public re;g Mrs Wiles ided major expansion of the
ktiom, said Dr Emanuel R*ckman. presiden.of | organizations activities on behalf of Israels
Bwllan Its purpose he swdwUl be to combat > y ,e ^ particularlv 8tudenta at the
the miMnformation of which Israel is so often the | Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
t irti"t ''
., _. During her administration, from 1975 to 1981,
l)r Kackman spoke at a dinner of the Detroit g the 1 Knends of Bar-1 Ian at which he conferred an
honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters on Slom-
>wt/ 86, in tribute to his "nearly 70 years in
Itvnii journalism and his championing of Jewish
nd humanitarian cau.es."
Endowment Fund which enables disabled Israeli
veterans to attend the University. Mrs. Wiles
also played an important role in the creation of a
Book Endowment Fund at the Paul Baerwald
School of Social Work at the Hebrew University.
The American. Association for Jewish Educa-
tion has announced its reorganization into a
successor agency called the Jewish Education
Service of North America.'
The reorganization, based on a two and a half-
year study of the agency, will provide it with a
new structure, mode of governance and program-
ming focus designed to enable it to better address
:: the educational needs of Jewish communities in
& U.. t l-.t.-l Ulil rfnrl PanaHa Alhort R RfltrMV
:::::vX-x->>w>m-fr>m%%-:-:-:-:<-:-:-::-:-:-x-:-:-:-:
Rabin Norman Kahan. general chairman of the
New York Board of Rabbis' Centennial
Anniversary, announces the first Centennial
lecture to U- delivered by Dr. Abram L. Sachar on
Nov 8. at Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun in
V* York City. Dr. Sachar will speak on the rabb
in American Jewish life.
Dr Sachar is Chancellor of Brandeis University
in Waltham. Mass. A noted historian and:;
educator, his career includes the leadership that :g ^he fjmted States.and Canada. Albert B. Ratner
W to the development of Hillel as a part of S i a co-chairman of the study committee.
Jewish college campus in the United States. *WWWW*8W*W|W^^
Dadie I'erlov, executive director of the National^ Senator Howard M. Metzenbaum (I), Ohio)
Council of Jewish Women, has announced the ap- !:: presented the major address at the opening night
pointment of Diana Aviv a. director of program *: banquet of the 26th national biennial convention
"rvices. -| of Women's American ORT in New York. The ad-
Most recently director of the Alternatives to:? dress was delivered to 1.200 delegatesMonday. at
Domestic Violence project of the Bergen County. 1 the New York HiUon Hotel. Claire Pyser uicon-
N J. Community Action Program, she has served I vention chairman Gem Pnnce and Barbara
in various administrative posts in social service I Silver are convention co-chairmen.
Kwioes in this country and her native South : Sen. Metzenbaum is one of a handful of
Africa In addition to studying social work in I Senators who serves on four major committees in
Israel and South Africa. Aviv ha. a Master's | the 97th Congress. He Is a member of the Energy,
'"Pee m Social Work from Columbia University g: Judiciary. Budget, .and Labor and Human Re-
National Council of Jewish Women supports ; sources Committees.
1.600 service projects across the country. NC :| ftftftftft^AQftft^ftftfflftWSSftWft AiJUUlWuTAJlnJUin/innn
W's 100.000 volunteers are part of 200 Sections Q The American Jewish Congress has called on
commuted to a broad program of education, Sjj the New York State Banking Superintendent to
cml action, and service in the United State. ?? determine the "real owners" of an Arab consorti-
"nd Israel. urn that is seeking to gain control of an American
W^finiiiintionnnniifiriiiiiiiiiiintioDgiflQoaiiDfliiiiaQQflnaflM Damt holding company that owns the Bank of
' "_ 'iiiiiiiiiiiinJlUJlUJUlluilUUULUUia)iasa^Bjji ^_ CommeTCe m New York and the Community
* fa headed Inah-American who is an expert g Stau, Bank of Albany.
Jnh > S intelligence for Saudi Arabia was reportedly
-onn uuify. an Emmy-winning composer with ac.ting for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
l*E*n f 8M *i">rt"1 f^"' I A prompt and thorough investigation should
j"s oeen commissioned by executive producer;^ A P rompi *n u wu T annroved "
!** Siegel to serve a. music director for the s|be undertakenbefore the purchase i. approved,
J*-*. for which Israeli sUtesman Abba Eban is Maslow declared.
:
Continued from Page 4-A
high in the world order of, say,
someone like New York Times-
man Pete Ha mill, whose view of
Britain's Prime Minister Mar-
garet Thatcher is almost unprint-
able. Hamill won't forgive
Thatcher for having failed to give
into the IRA hunger-strikers who
succumbed in Northern Ireland
prisons in their campaign to
wrest political status from her.
She sees the IRA as a band of
terrorists in the same way that,
say. Mr. Reagan sees the PLO, or
at least says he sees the PLO.
I hold no brief for Thatcher. I
agree with Hamill that, in what
he calls "this bitter winter of
British collapse," Thatcher is in-
competent to handle it and that
she "is never more thorougly in
character than when she is driven
by hatred." although I'd be more
inclined to substitute for
"hatred" what Martin Luther
King, Jr. once described as the
white moderate's nemesis: the
need to confuse justice with "law
and order.
BUT IT is rank sophistry to
suggest, as the romantics are
doing, that all the IRA wants is
for Britain to get out of Northern
Ireland so that it can get on with
the business of unifying Ulster
with the rest of the country. The
equivalent would be that all Yasir
Arafat wants is a separate Pales-
tinian state, however tiny.
The most corrosive force in the
Ulster struggle is the Catholic-
Protestant issue, which spokes-
men for both sides assure us, as
they have since Elizabeth Tudor,
would come to dialogue, peace
und love given the chance.
Hut anyone acquainted with
Ireland's modern home rule
movement that began in earnest
in the middle of the 19th Century
knows this is nonsense. The
Catholic Church betrayal of
Charles Stewart Parnell for
reasons of his adultery pales be-
side Ireland's earlier betrayal of
the Protestant Englishman.
Wolfe Tone, who came to Dublin
at the end of the 18th Century to
help organize Irish resistance
against the occupation by his
own countrymen. The med-
dlesomeness of Catholic Church
activism in the political arena
knew bounds then no more
clearly than it doe. now this
from a Church today that
deplores the growing seculariza-
tion of its faithful.
THE IRISHMAN, as many
important Irish artists and
writers have observed of their po-
litical agony since before Sinn
Fein, is self-destructive. The
Irish immortal, James Joyce,
said of his country that "Ireland
is an old sow that eats its far-
row."
I said at the beginning that the
Frankfurter AUgemeine exagger-
ates in its opinion about the
romantic Irish Americans who
are the IRA's principal arms sup-
pliers. The exaggeration is not
intended; it is merely a romanti-
cizing of fact. In this sense, the
AUgemeine falls victim of the
very thing that it correctly
identifies as corrupting Irish
American opinion.
The truth is that the IRA is
about as closely linked to the
PLO these days as anything or
anyone can possibly be. If Irish
Americans send money to sup-
port the IRA cause, and in this
the AUgemeine is correct, the fact
is that the money goes to buy
guns and bombs which come in-
directly from Moscow through its
Middle East client states and
agents, including the PLO itself.
THIS MEANS that if the
Catholic-Protestant impasse is
Ireland's most corrosive issue,
the IRA's ties to international
terrorism, clearly documented for
all to see but the sentimental, is
the country's most life-
threatening issue.
Union between north and
south under IRA direction is not
the ultimate aim of this group, no
matter what its spokesmen say
here or in Ireland to the contrary
after all, Arafat says the same
thing when he calls for "nothing
more" than a new Palestinian
state in Gaza and on the West
Bank. Not to mention what the
Republic of Ireland (the south),
with its duly-constituted govern-
ment seated in Dublin and in
which the IRA can play no polit-
ical role whatever,would have to
say about it.
The ultimate aim of the IRA is
in fact the establishment of a
Marxist state in Ireland with ir-
revocable ties to Moscow, in the
same way that Arafat's new Pal-
estine would be tied to Moscow.
That is what people like Berna-
dette Devlin are all about. Fur-
thermore, the IRA is part of an
international network having
more in mind than a Dublin-
Belfast takeover. Its members
include, in addition to the PLO,
the Red Army Faction in West
Germany, the Red Brigade in
Italy, the progeny of Japan's
Zengakuren, and more and more.
IT WAS sentiment that had us
embrace Fidel Castro in 1959,
when his "freedom-fighter"
forces took over from Batista in
Havana. Now, we are on the
brink of the very same disaster
with Yasir Arafat; American
foreign policy translates the
Sadat assassination to mean that
Arafat is the logical successor to
Sadat as spokesman for Araby.
And while Ulster is still pre-
dominantly Great Britain's hot
potato, there are the sentimental-
ists among us who perceive that
the IRA is nothing but a clear-
toned Irish tenor, a poet speaking
symphonies, the bicycle-rider in
the Irish Spring soap commercial
longing only for peace, clean skin
and a sweet-smelling colleen.
But, as with Arafat and the PLO,
the IRA's devastating record of
terrorism says otherwise.
host
narrator and chief consultant
Siegel s working relationship with Duffy goes a New York City Comptroller Harrison
? 10 year., when they collaborated on an ABC :g Goldin will support the Emunah Worn*
**"mentary on American Jewish htotory, I America s new fund-raising drive to build a Day
endeZvoua ^^ FneAonL" In 198ot they fe Care Center in Jerusalem. The facility is to be
JOttd together on "A Talent for Life." an NBC I Mmed the Elizabeth Taylor Warner Day Care
P^Pam which focused on the Jews of the Italian % Center "in honor of Miss Taylor s humanitarian
renaissance. It was for this score that Duffy won fe efforts on behalf of Israel.
nErjuny.
Viol
Wiles,
jjaat president of the
Goldin was among honored guests at a recent
Emunah reception recognizing lfl\ss Taylor as
Outstanding Woman of Achievement for 1981


J!.._ ^^Ts ^ L.-iw moi
Peure22-A TTw.Tpwih FWv..,./!?-;- o-.u-o- /~.
rage i4-/\ 1 ne jewiso i* lonclian / Knday. October 30, 1981
Day an M
tone C5o#
Continued from Page 1-A
pressions were common also
during his life.
Arab leaders and common
people often said that Davan
was just the person to conclude
peace. Despite bitter criticism of
Dayan's role as an enemy, es-
pecially as Defense Minister, he
was considered as the most
favored partner for negotiations.
Unlike most Israeli statesmen,
Dayan did not bwcome
acquainted with the Arabs only
at the negotiating table or only in
the battle field. He learned to
know them from his early child-
hood in the fields of Nahalal.
As a child, he often went on ex-
cursions in the vicinity of
Nahalal. meeting Arab children
in fights, as well as in fun. He
learned the language, although
he never quite mastered it. In ne
gotiations with Arabs later in his
lift- he always preferred English.
HE WAS the first in his class
to join older boys and their
fathers in skirmishes with the
neighboring Arab and Bedouin
population. As a youth, he estab-
lished a close friendship with a
young Arab, until a major clash
between the settlers and the
Arabs caused them to break off
ties.
From then on, Dayan's rela-
tions with the Arabs focused
mainly on the battle fields. How-
ever, after the War of Indepen-
dence, Premier David Ben Gurion
chose him as his principal advisor
on Arab affairs. As commander
of the Sixth Brigade in Jeru-
salem, he was involved in pro-
longed negotiations with Jordan
over the ceasefire. Later, he took
an active part in the Rhodes
Armistice negotiations with Jor-
dan, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt.
In December, 1953, Dayan be-
came Chief of Staff. It was a
period of changing rule in Egypt.
A year-and-a-half after the over-
throw of the monarchy by the
"free officers" led by Gamal
Abdel Nasser, Gen. Mohammad
Naguib ruled the country, but
four months later, Nasser re-
moved him.
Some Arab affairs experts argue
until today that Nasser would
have been ripe for some political
settlement with Israel. The same
experts argue that Dayan was
influential in preventing that set-
tlement. Leftwing historian Meir
Payil said that Dayan probably
felt that the War of Independence
would not be over until the
Egyptians suffered a major blow.
DAYAN, of course argued that
the Egyptians were the ones who
lad to the deterioration. The fre-
quent terrorist attacks from the
Gaza Strip, than under Egyptian
control, led to the major Israeli
raid on Gaza in 1966 which, ac-
cording to some historians, put
an end to any possible compro-
mise with the new Egyptian re-
gime. The swift Israeli victory in
the Sinai campaign in 1966 did
not bring the Egyptians any
closer to peace.
But Dayan retained his repu-
tation as one who understood the
"Arab mentality." As Defense
Minister during the Six-Day
War, he wanted the army to stop
short of the banks of the Suez
Canal, apparentry to leave the
door open for negotiations with
the Egyptians. However, the fast
pace of the war did not allow for
such Israeli restraint.
Dayan succeeded in developing
the "open bridges" policy with
Jordan, as well as opening the
"Green Line" between Israel pro-
per and the administered terri-
tories for a two-way traffic of
people and commerce.
THE IDEA which guided this
policy was to maintain life in the
territories as normal as possible
and to create the framework for
de facto peaceful relations with
neighboring Jordan. But some
critics of Dayan, such as Zvi
Elpeleg of Tel Aviv University,
argued that by opening the
bridges across the Jordan River,
Dayan actually opened the door
to the gradual takeover of the
West Bank by the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Dayan's name was associated
with the liberal military occupa-
tion of the administered territor-
ies. His philosophy was to let the
Arabs in the territories do what-
ever they pleased as long as they
did not act against the security of
Israel "If they wish to close their
schools or shut their shops, let
them do so," he used to say.
He developed a close relation-
ship with Mohammad Ali Al-
Jaabari, the Mayor of Hebron,
whose role in the 1929 massacre
of Hebron Jews is still controver-
sial. Dayan removed Gaza Mayor
Rashao A-Shawa from his post
after he sheltered a wanted ter-
rorist in his home. But later,
Dayan reappointed him as
Mayor.
ARABS ON the West Bank do
not remember Dayan for his col-
lective punishment for terrorist
acts; the demolition of houses
whose owners or relatives of
owners were involved in terror-
ism.
"As the Minister responsible
for the territories," said Anwar
Nusseibeh, the former Jordanian
Defense Minister who had fre-
quent contact with Dayan, "he
was responsible for negative acts,
such as the demolition of houses
and the deportation of (West
Bank leaders). But he tried to
moderate these acts w:th a
human approach."
Continuing, Nusseibeh said:
"We were, of course, on opposite
sides of the fence, but one could
not help liking and respecting
him. I wish we had him on our
side."
During the first Likud govern-
ment, Dsyan, as Foreign Minis-
ter, quietly engaged in what was
described as "private talks" with
local Palestinian leaders in a fu-
tile effort to find alternative part-
ners for negotiations to the PLO.
He met with PLO supporters
such as Dr. Ahmad Natshe
(whom he had deported in the
early 1970s) and Khaidah Abdual
Shafi of the Gaza region.
DAYAN RAN on the Telem
ticket in the tenth Knesset elec-
tions last June with essentially
one message: Impose a unilateral
autonomy on the West Bank. It
was a logical consequence of his
old belief that the Arabs in the
territories should run their own
affairs, with Israel limiting her
control to security.
But the Jewish voter, just as
his Arab partners for the nego-
tiations, did not show enthu-
siasm for the idea. Dayan won
only two Knesset seats, much to
his disappointment. Admitting
the defeat, he said he would con-
tinue to work toward this end.
Undoubtedly, Dayan's great-
est achievement in the Arab-
Israeli arena was his contribution
to the conclusion of the peace
talks with Egypt.
In the spring of 1971. Dayan
proposed an Israeli pullback from
the western bank of the Suez
Canal as part of an interim agree-
ment with Egypt. The plan,
which had Sadat's support, was
defeated by Premier Gold* Meir
with the backing of other senior
Ministers.
ASKED YEARS later why he
did not fight for his proposal.
Dayan replied: "What would you
want me to do, resign over it?"
He argued that even his resigna-
tion would not have changed the
decision against the pullback.
Eventually, the Dayan plan was
implementedbut only after the
Yom Kippur War.
It is easier to recognize
Dayan's contribution to Israel's
security than his contribution to
the development of relations be-
tween Israel and its Arab neigh-
bors. The nature of these rela-
tions is still under a veil of sec-
recy. Time will probably shed
more light on Dayan's role in this
respect.
Immediately after the Six-Day
War, had one been asked which
Israeli could lead Israel to peace
with its Arab neighbors, the
answer undoubtedly would have
been Dayan. Dayan himself be-
lieved this. For a brief period, he
said after the Six-Day War that
be was waiting for a telephone
call from Hussein a telephone
caH which had never come,
despite a number of secret meet-
ings between the two leaders.
JTA report
DR. SOL LANDAU WORKSHOP AT BARRY
Sol Landau. Ph.D.. executive director of Mid/Life Services Foundation, Inc. of
Miami, the first organization in South Florida dedicated to relief of Mid Life
Crisis", has scheduled a workshop at Barry University Nov. 19th from 10 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. Register NOW. Send $20 to Barry University Continuing Educa-
tion. Registration ends Wednesday. Nov. 18.
.
Barry University
A CATHOLIC INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY
11300 NE. 2nd AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES 33161
PHONE: 758-3392
A&'JDAT
liRML
"VIHMOuR NATION MEEDS iS ,
MORE RELiGiON iN GOVERNMENT.
i inn axxivi;ksakv si:aso\
A STATE THEATKF OF FMMUOA
You Don't Have to be Irish
to Love .
s-
Tony Award-Winning Comedy
By Hugh Leonard
OCTOBER 9-NOVEMBER 1
Co-Pr^BCMl it Metropolitan Noitfac Commit
8:15 pm Tuesday (Meet the Cast Night).
Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday:
*11.50/10.00/8.50
2:00 pm Wednesday, Saturday. Sunday:
MO.50/9.00/7.50
8:15 pm Friday, Saturday:
M3.50/12.00/10.50
Special Priced Preview:
Thursday, October 8,8:15 pm
CELEBRATE IRISH WEEK AT PLAYERS
OCT. 13-11
W* Prizes. iKMMf tw Mart-Trip "mnm*
Tickets ta Skaoo. If elaO
(lifister it Theatre No ftrctase Necessary)
frisk Eittf takwMt art tifristonts*
lot Ik Special M Dtsceots at Ctcoxt Srm*
Sops od totawaits
Di Sol Landau if noted
as a national opart on
hotping adults through
enpioring and solving
problems arising in
rmdoTe years ol life
M0NCT SAVING SEASON SUISCRIPTIONS STILL N SALE
Cte.a Diic-j.su Eayt Motiow, 442 2*42
IIAMI.I n KITS HV IIMtXI
AM. 44S-4000
Matter Card Visa American E> press
Tickets Mto available at Jordan Marsh DedeiarxJ Omni
163rd St B'owaro Mall Hollywood Shopping Center
I tlic- (itconul Grove HlayhowiM;
3500 Mom Highway Coconut Grove Florida 33133


fitch, Belgtan police Cooperate
Liithorities See Tie in Two Synagogue Bombings
SDWIN EYTAN
- (JTA) -
Cnd Belgian police
iperating in the
Vtion of the syna-
bmbing in Antwerp
tiled two persons
ed more than 100
tecause of strange
les between that
ind the Rue Coper-
rogue bombings in
st October which
lives.
cases, the bombs
of containers of
powerful charges of TNT
and on both occasions,
vehicles bought by men
claiming Cypriot na-
tionality were used.
Belgian police said that the car
in which the Antwerp bomb was
hidden was bought a few days
ago by a man who said his name
was Nicolas Brazzi. a Cypriot na-
tional. French and Belgian police
officers are trying to determine
whether the same men were in-
volved in both attacks.
ONE YEAR after the Rue
Copernic explosion French police
still have no clues to the real
identities of the terrorists or
where they originally came from.
A man claiming to represent
"Black September" telephoned
news agencies in Brussels claim-
ing responsibility on behalf of
that extremist Palestinian Or-
ganization. The caller said
that two more cars packed with
explosives we-2 about to deto-
nate in Antwerp and concluded
his call with i h< Palestine Libera-
tion Organization slogan "Pales-
tine shall win."
Belgian investigators say.
however, that the call came some
24 hours after the explosion and
that the caller supplied no in-
formation which had not been
Friday. October 30,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 16-A
ecent Belgian history. A black
cloud hung over the area and
auildings were damaged in a
radius of several hundred yards.
Firefighters had to battle their
way through fire and shattered
glass to evacuate the wounded.
Fire brigades from several cities
near Antwerp were called to help
fight the flames and dozens of
ambulances evacuated the
wounded.
Most of the 15.000 Jews in
Antwerp feel personally and
deeply concerned by the attack.
All those contacted by the JTA
and other news agencies blamed
the police for neglecting to take
all necessary precautions and
governments which have failed to
strongly condemn Palestinian*'
organizations and their terrorist
acts. On July 27. 1980 two Arabs
threw a hand grenade at a group
of Jewish youngsters waiting to
board a bus for a day's outing.
One 15-year-old boy was killed
made public before. "It could be
anyone." a police investigator
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency.
POLICE SAY that the blast
might have caused twice as many
victims had it gone off half an
hour later when the synagogue
across the street would have been
filled. At 9:30 a.m. local time, po-
lice sources say, the street was
half deserted and the synagogue
empty. The large number of vic-
tims was due to the force of the
blast which killed or wounded
passersby several hundred yards
away.
Police said the explosion was
one of the most powerful ever in
OurWatt-\Wse
pac
eiss
$30 to $40 a mom
on our electric bill."
"We've compared our electric bills with neighbors
who live in the same si:e home and theirs are $30 to $40
more than ours." That's what Thomas and Lois Pomerov
of Miami estimate their Watt-Wise Living"' package
saves them every month.
What's a Watt-Wise package.' It's a combination oi
features that meet FPL's eneigy-saving standards and can
he easily included in the construction of a new home.
Over a period of yean they can save you substantially more
than they cost.
W.itt-Wise homes have cost-saving features like extra
ceiling and wall insulation, solar or heat-recovery units
lor water heating, a higher-efficiency air conditioner or
heat pump. Power silvers like fluorescent lighting and a
microwave men. and thermally efficient windows and
doors, with glass areas planned to minimize heat build-up.
Today, there are many ways to save on electricity
without giving up comfort. You'll find them in FPL's
Watt-Wise Living Program. Today, it's one of the wisest
investments you could make. Stop by your local FPL
office and pick up a free brochure.
FLORIDA POWER 4 LIGHT COMPANY
DSK5ND
PORWATP
WATTWIS
*ecnm
SMCMMK
Pi
Witt'Wise Living. It saves you more than it costs.
Ask your builder.


Paw 29.-A Tk.J-----:-- -
I Pagel6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday,
30.1961
5
P
f
P
i
a
t
I
e
f
i
*
I
t
f.
D
I
A
t
t
n
e
d
c
o
o
8
1(
o
a
/
d
c
P
A
t
A
IN
f<
n
5
i
1
(
c
i
t
I
f

i
t
1
c
(
c
r
c

B
f
t
D
C
t

HUlOM
X
III lit ""*! ."
^Il
-I .'S- ** v
u
\!
norton t*i co-. uiirreo wawwawtt
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
np .' Il iM"""* '*,r- '"'"
, m *> x- < "*"3?"!l0",!.i,!!
v V
?//#
/ I 4
l I I l
I'll

I**'
BFGoodrich
W!N
BELTED
CLM
A STRONG,STABLE
TIRE AT A MOST
AFFORDABLE PRICE
P155'80B13
P-METRIC
POLYSTERCORD
FIBERGLASS
BELT
FACTORY
WHITE WALLS
Fiberglass cord
belts for strength
and stability
Polyester cord body
tor a smooth quiet
ride
Belted construction
tor good mileage
and traction
Wide Whitehall tor
up-to-date styling
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
price
F-E-t
31.48
1 56
33.24
1 65
37.10
38.85
t 77
2 01
P15580R13 49.05
P195/75-14 69.53
FR78-14
P205/75-14
P205/75B14 | 39.90
2 14
P215/75B14 41.20 j 2 2*
P225/75B14 I 43.31 I 2*s
P205/75B15 39.67 2 13
P215/75B15 j 42.37 2*0
P225/75B15 I 44.48 256
|P235/75B15 46.58 2 n
MICHELIN
'X' RADIAL WHITE WALLS
PRICE
FET
1 46
2 22
ER78-14 69.53
260
71.17
2 54
71.17
2 51
62.19
2 51
P205/75-15 74.11 *5S
GR78-15 | 78.12
GR70-15 ; 81.51
295
2 91
P215/75-15 78.12
64.03
2 75
2 91
84.41
2 95
66.00
DFGoodrich
LIFESAVER
XLM
P-METRIC
FACTORY
IWHITEWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
FET
P195/70R13 52.88
2 24
P205/70R13 54.36
13
P205/70R14 59.21
2 35
P175/75R14 49.41 '86
P185/75R14! 54.36
04
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
59.21
226
61.74
2 37
P215/75R14 62.89
P225/75R14! 67.28
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
64.16
66.69
69.11
P235V75R15
P155/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
74.06
46.89
50.56
51.84
252
2 74
250
264
2 85
306
1 52
l 79
1 91
72.81
334
336
xvs
MICHELIN TUBELESS
195 70-14 205 ?0 -14
10F
XCA LIGHT
TRUCK TIRES
*"
70015
6 p>y t.X*iess
750-16
8 pty tutw typo
800-165
8 ply luOeiess
875-16 5
8 ply lul
950-16 5
8 im 10 p"v i ss
10- 16 5
8 ply tut*MMS
WCt
77.66
96.30
96.85
104.81
125.58
124.64
Jt_!_
3 04
4 141
3 881
4 27
i :<\
5 061
4 881
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SEE
155*12
145 13
155^ 13
TRX RADIAL
& MAG WHEEL
check our tore* to see it
these will ft! your model car
190 65R390 BLACK
220 55R390 WHITE
SPECIAL
PRICE
165*13
165x14
175x14
165x15
175/70x13
185/70x13
185/70-14
PRICE FET.
40.67
37.59
42.90
48.13
50.16
54.85
53.24
57.85
64.02
68.31
1 39
1 32
1 48
1 61
1 73
206
1 81
1 73
1 90
206
H**n*.'IUS!iftCAftO VIM
AMfRICANEIrfUSS
omen s ciut
COOUU IWH MAlAl/tAJU.M IMIWU MM.I 0XA0TTAT1O0I
ftro t DougN. OM 4 W 07S4M*SI S22-2S0O <'N SMI. Bo > S6I 2
NONTH MUM! UIAUI AiOin TAUARAC
I33CON \V 7W. Av. OMMIN*?1Sl IIMmOar,*,! ->93 ' N. ftHAMI MACH > (VIST WIAAM iAMAWAC
l70ONi *OSI toJ-'OM BVO Ga*., RO. W-MM N uw^o uhowHO '21A7QO
. MIAMI 6*ACM UNOAU M mOATI IOUAM MMAfAANO OWACM
14Ml^ol HJS353 MUSIVHO.SI 36' 0126 3'S'M .d.i iy 43M1
BOOTH DAM HOMltTIAO mlT ^^j,, mac,,
9ocs r>.Hv 667-747s sowos >m..h^ 22 ; ., ., ,..
cunt* moat w NOmrwooo LAKt mAmuH ^M mtACH
;a)WS M.ry 23 3 524'
A67 S Sim. no 7 967-OA40
FT LAUDf.DALI
'7.0 r Sunn.. 6tvo 46J '560
- N LA*. Rrv] .48 M44
DfllWll.O MACH
_2265 m-m*,., ntvo 42 7 0600
"rr F10XCI
2604 SouO- 4II> Sl 464-6O20
vino NACH
'SSTOISlrMI 467-1174
* CM.IAAIOO
3620 f CotanMM Or 666 "A-
' WINTm UAH
e F nnrgo a* 64s vios
OAVTO04A 60ACM
"'* A.. 254 748'
0AAOH.lt)
2065 rfcrrMAtfTN 1> 7 74 444 3


Moc Levin, Israel Devotee Passes;
Philanthropist-Worker
Moe Levin, internationally respected fi-
gure in activities on behalf of Jewish causes,
particularly Israel, passed away after a
lengthy illness on Monday. He was 76.
A Miami resident for 27 years, he was
president of the Chaim Weizman Farband
Branch, a member of the board of the Na-
tional Histadrut Council, national vice presi-
dent of the Israel Histadrut Foundation, vice
president of the Jewish National Fund, and
president of the Baby Orphans Home in
Israel
Mr. l^evin recently established a chair in
the Department of Religious Philosophy at
Hebrew University in Israel.
locally. Mr. Levin recently announced a
$300,000 gift to the Hebrew Home for the
Aged on Miami Beach, according to Mr.
Leonard Zilbert, president. He was a major
contributor to At. Sinai Medical Center and
served on the campaign committee of the
Miami Jewish Federation Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund for many
years.
The owner of S & M Realty and a partner
in L & L Investors in Dade County, he had
major real estate holdings and had built
apartment houses in the United States and
Europe. He also owned Kaline Products, a
billiard ball manufacturing company in
Miami. He is survived by his wife. Lea L.,
and one grandson
Services were held Wednesday at the
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
Moe Levin
Aired Over WLRN Radio
Jewish People's University Series
Begins with Course on Holocaust
A new Jewish People's Uni-
nty of the Air Series is being
punched by Riscayne College on
he Public Radio Station,
rLRN-PM, beginning Monday
om";30 to 8 p m. Riscayne Col-
is the largest Catholic co-
ducat tonal college in Florida.
nth some 3,000 students.
The series will begin with a
enes of 13 lectures on the Holo-
with Kabbi Rubin R.
ohm. of Miami Reach, who is an
id Professor at the col-
Pastoral Institute, as co-
linaior.
Title of the series is "The
olocaust: The Destruction of
Juropean Jewry. 1933-1945." It
be heard throughout Dade
rid Broward Counties.
"This is a great milestone for
fisciyne College and the Jewish
pmmunity." according to Fr.
tt O'Neill, college president. "A
' ile new dimension is being
ded to the lifelong learning
ss of people here."
I According to Rabbi Dobin,
ludents enrolled in the course
ill listen to 13 lectures prepared
i the Holocaust by Prof. Nora
win. of C.ratz College in Phila
lia There is no charge for
course or for the teaching
hatenals, which will be provided.
^formation on how to receive a
yllabus is available from Cecilia
lennett, (enter for Continuing
Wucauon at Riscayne College,
P*MNW32ndAve,
Inconjunctionwiththe 13-week
fcnes. Rabbi Dobin will conduct
Rabbi Dobin
a two-hour seminar every four
weeks at Riscayne College. The
first of these roundtable dis-
cussions is scheduled for
Monday, Nov. 30, beginning at
3:30 p.m.
Rabbi Dobin explained that Fr.
O'Neill was anxious for the series
to begin with the Holocaust "be-
cause of the growing anti-Semitic
propaganda that the Holocaust
sever occurred." Abo, because of
the heavily Latin constituency in
South Florida, the second in the
series of 13-week courses to be
offered by the college over
WLRN will be on "Sephardic
Jewry."
Other of the courses available
include "American Jewry."
"Jerusalem," "Yiddish Litera-
ture," "Hebrew Literature,"
"American Literature," "The
Jewish Woman" and "Jewish
Values."
Arrangements may be made
with Biscayne College to take the
course for undergraduate
graduate level credit-
or
*T:-

hoMi ^ LifeAward presented to Jack Chester (right) in
Ifefc KcuV*' nia act*ve participation in numerous Jewish and
N in ,?ntroPic an tatr rt te f IaraeL Th* award presentation was at a
onds n r mL ganuatin. The award is given to survivors of the
Z Wno have demonstrated unique community leader-
frnfoK 8 n ileft to H8ht> an Rabbi Leon Kronish, Israel
iamijtlonai Campaign chairman; Gary R. Gerson, Greater
Jrop/Sra*' **ontt* chairman; and Joel Arnon, consul general
Kreisky Angered by Palestinian Jubilation
Over Assassination of Egypt's Sadat
By MONIKA BRENNER
And REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky,
shocked and angered at the
unabashed jubilation ex-
pressed by the Palestine
Liberation Organization
over the assassination of
President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt, has indicated that
Austria's hitherto warmly
sympathetic attitude to-
ward the PLO may be over.
Declaring that "It is unbeliev-
able that somebody is praising a
murder," Kreisky said that PLO
Chief Yasir Arafat's remarks
after Sadat's death might result
in "personal consequences," but
be declined to eleborate He did
indicate, however, that Austria,
the first Western country to
extend quasi-diplomatic recogni-
tion to the PLO, was in no hurry
to receive a new PLO representa-
tive in Vienna.
KREISKY MADE his remarks
the day of Sadat's funeral. The
Chancellor's spokesman, Wolf-
gang Petntsch, said that "We ar
in written diplomatiic contact
with the PLO. This could mean
reconsidering how the contacts
would be continued."
Kreisky said that he and Araf-
at had "unbridgeable dif-
ferences" in their assessments of
the assassination. According to
Kreisky, Sadat was a victim of
his own political miscalculations.
"Sadat's tragedy was that he be-
lieved he could take on the Pales-
tine question with his peace
treaty with Israel. He underes-
timated the problem."
Asked about a new PLO repre-
sentative in Vienna, the Chancel-
lor said, "At the moment we are
not interested. We are not in a
hurry, which should be under-
standable." The PLO representa-
tive in Vienna, Ghazi Hussein,
was expelled from Austria last
summer for involvement in an
arms smuggling operation
shortly before a planned visit by
Sadat to Salzburg. The visit was
subsequently cancelled.
KREISKY REPEATED that
he was shocked by the assassina-
tion and warned that "deeds like
this one have never contributed
to a peaceful development." He
continued to maintain, however,
that there would be no political
solution to the Middle East con-
flict without the participation of
the PLO.
Kreisky was angered by Araf-
at's remark that "The assassina-
tion of Sadat was carried out by
the Egyptian armv in the name of
Yasir Arafat
the brave Palestinian people that
bears the burden of the Zioni t
occupation."
He claimed the deed demon-
strated that "The Palestinian
struggle is alive in the conscience
of the great Egyptian people,
which has not forgiven its Presi-
dent for having deceived it on Je-
rusalem, bartered away the Pal-
estinian goal and signed the
treacherous machinations of
Camp David."
FAROUK KADDOUMI. head
of the PLO's political department
and its spokesman on foreign
policy matters, said in an inter-
view with Agence France Presse
during an official visit to Havana
Oct. 6 that the assassination of
Sadat's "is the best news for
many years The Egyptian
people removed the shame
and dishonor which Sadat had
imposed on the glorious history
of Egypt." He added that Sad-
at's death marks "the beginning
of the disintegration of the plot
represented by the troika (triol
Regin-Sadat-U.S.
Abu Ayad. head-of El Fatah,
the PLO's terrorist arm, said in a
Beirut radio broadcast, "We
shake the hand that fired the bul-
lets and declare to the whole
world that the dubious house of
cards has been blown away .
The shot fired at Sadat was fired
at the worst of all stages in Arab
history and is proof of the
people's vigilance and the evolu-
tion of the opposition from the
passive steps to the active."
Joel Sandberg, MD of North
Miami Beach, was reelected
vice president of the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews at its
annual meeting in Washing-
ton. Dr. Sandberg has been a
national vice president of the
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews for the past three years.
He is a past chairman of the
South Florida Conference of
Soviet Jewry and is presently
chairman of the South Florida
Medical Mobilization for
Soviet Jewry.
Go to the Polls on Tuesday
Residents of Miami and Miami Beach will go
to the polls on Tuesday to vote for candidates
in city-wide elections. County-wide, voters face
choices in same districts for state office.
Registered voters are urged to be sure to exer-
cise their voting right.
"eJewiglx Floridiai-
Miami. Florida Friday. October 30,1981 Section B


-i -j; / t^
____
rune i-m
nan m/^i
JL .Ta- i- -."- -
News Briefs
di
P*
D
P
w
fa
D
ac
at
tb
kr
ho
cu
Ni
in
1m
he
Ro
Uft
to
fat
ne
PO
lis
yo
be)
Ar
tie
1
tio
ma
ev
dei
chi
on
of
sal
Ion
ov
an
An
dai
I
can
per
A :
thr>
"fn
Ab.
Na,
foui
nnr
Sot
3
led
C
S
"At
Nixon: PLO
ByJTA Win Services
NEW YORK Former Pret
dent Richard Nixon says in an in
lerview in the latest issue of Time
Magazine that it is vital that the
United States should push ahead
with the Camp David peace plan,
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization must recognize
Israel's right to exist, and that
the U.S. not allow a vacuum to be
left on the Palestinian issue.
Nixon has just returned from a
visit to Saudi Arabia, Jordan,
Tunisia and Morocco and visits
with a half dozen Arab leaders, a
trip begun when he flew to Cairo
to attend the funeral of President
Anwar Sadat. Both Nixon and
the White House deny that the
former President was acting as
an emissary for President
Reagan. According to Time
Magazine, Nixon will not make
any formal report of his observa-
tions to the Administration, but
he expects to discuss the trip by
telephone with Reagan and with
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig.
The U.S. is the only nation
with influence on Israel." Nixon
said. "That must be exerted in
Israel's best interest. This hard
line, that they've won four wars
and they will win the next one. is
long-term disaster, eventually
suicide." At the same time, con-
tact should be established with
the PLO. perhaps by proxy, but
not the Andy Young route," he
added, referring to the former UN
Ambassador who was forced to
resign after meeting informally
with PLO representatives.
WASHINGTON The State
Department expressed
satisfaction Tuesday with the an-
nouncement in Jerusalem that
Egypt and Israel have agreed to
speed up the autonomy negotia-
tions at the ministerial level. But
it rejected a call by Premier
Menachem Begin and Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali of
Egypt for the U.S. to upgrade its
representation at the autonomy
talks.
"We are very pleased" by the
announcement. State Depart-
ment spokesman Dean Fischer
said. He observed that it was an
indication of their (Israel and
Egypt) determination to move
the process forward."
But Fischer said that when the
talks are held in Cairo on Nov. 3
and 4. the senior U.S. representa-
tives will continue to be the
American Ambassadors to Israel
and Egypt, Samuel Lewis and
Alfred Atherton.
The Reagan Administration
has refused so far to name a
special envoy for the autonomy
negotiations as the Carter Ad-
ministration did in the persons
first of Robert Strauss and later
Sol Linowitz, both with the
status of special ambassador.
JERUSALEM President
Reagan has reaffirmed his com-
mitment to go ahead with the
strategic cooperation agreed be-
tween him and Premier Begin at
their summit talks in Washing-
ton last month.
In a letter to Begin at the
weekend, the President wrote
that the U.S. would fulfill its un-
dertakings. Word of the letter
was leaked here Sunday ap-
parently to counter a report from
Washington to the effect that the
Pentagon is linking the strategic
cooperation with Israel to the
passage of the Saudi AW ACS
sale through the Senate.
Some observers here believe
President Reagan wrote the letter
to help reassure pro-Israel Sena-
tors that the U.S. Israel relation-
ship would remain strong despite
the AW ACS sale.
TEL AVIV Labor Party
Recognize
Chairman Shimon Peres, return-
ing from a one-day visit to Cairo,
said here that President Hoeni
Mubarak of Egypt assured him
he intended to carry on the peace
process with Israel initiated by
the late President Anwar Sadat.
He also said that Mubarak made
it clear that he does not want to
see Jerusalem divided.
Peres, who headed a Labor
Party delegation to the Egyptian
capital, said. "Mubarak assured
us. in the clearest possible man-
ner, that he continues Sadat's
policy of working for an un-
divided Jerusalem, though the
various ethnic groups in Jerusa-
lem should be allowed to give ex-
pression to their own interests."
He said the delegation was also
given assurances that the peace
process would be broadened after
Israel completes its withdrawal
from Sinai next April.
Peres has come under attack
from Geula Cohen, a leader of the
ultra-nationalist Tehiya Party
which opposes the peace treaty
with Egypt and is demanding
that Israel abandon its commit-
ment to withdraw from Sinai.
Cohen accused the labor party
leader of" misleading the public.
She claimed that "as everybody
knows, both Anwar Sadat and
Hosni Mubarak really wanted
and still want to divide sover-
eignty in Jerusalem."
JERUSALEM Premier
Menachem Begin and Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan Ah of
Egypt appeared optimistic this
week that a breakthrough will be
achieved in the autonomy nego
tiations now once more under
way between Israel and Egypt
Ali said after meeting with Begin
that the talks will shift to the
ministerial level in Cairo next
week. They opened in Tel Aviv at
the sub-ministerial, technical
level last week.
Ali said the purpose of the
higher level negotiations will be
to reach agreement within a short
time, although no target date has
been set Begin told reporters
that Israel and Egypt would
make a joint effort to bring the
talks to a successful conclusion.
According to Begin, the key
element is agreement on the elec-
tion procedures, the functions
and the number of members of
the Administrative Council
which will be the self-governing
body on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip under the autonomy plan.
He said the talks opening in
Cairo next week will concentrate
on that issue.
Residents Return From Israel
Adults recently returning from
the Adult Quinmester of High
School in Israel were Harvey and
Gloria Friedman. Sid and Sybil
(ireenstein. Norman and Arlene
Bush. Bill and Jackie Leone.
Barbara Abraham, Saul and
Mildred Riesberg. Dr. William
and Francine Ross, Lois Sargent
and Leonard and Barbara Kalish.
all of South Dade. and from
11 hi lea h Gardens. Ida Landau.
Students recently returning
from eight weeks of intensive
study were Kenneth and Richard
Schurr, Cynthia Indianer.
Michael Grusby and Mindi Lang
of Killian High School; Jodi
Bertman. of Southwest High
School; Alyse Garber. Linda
Rolen. Jill Salty. Robin Sirkin.
Hope Tieman. Robert Marsa.
Robert Ruwitch and Benjamin
Steinberg, all of Palmetto High
School; Jacque Perwin. a student
at Coral Park High School; Shari
Kisenberg. Stephanie Shore and
Mitchell Katz, all students of
Sunset High School; Sheryl
Burdick, Jodi Kopelman. Sharon
Miller. Cheryl Osheroff. Robin
Serotta. Michell Wilensky.
Jordan Cohen and Jay Goldman
of North Miami Beach High
School; Shari Meredith, a stu-
dent at American High School;
and Debbie Biggs and MicheJe
Cioldin, both students at North
Miami High School.
Mt. Sinai Clubs Feature Speakers
"Help Your Medicines Help
You" is the topic of the Mount
Sinai Medical Center's Lung
People Club's meeting on
Monday at 1:30 p.m. in the hos-
pital's Wolfson Auditorium. Dr.
Jeff Spears, a pharmacist, will
discuss essentials in drug treat-
ment.
On Thursday, at 3 p.m., the
Center's Stroke Club will meet on
the second floor of the Warner
Pavilion. Lyndell Jenkins, a
physical therapist will speak on
"Let's Get Physical. Stroke and
Physical Therapy."
The STroke Club meets the
first Thursday of every month,
and the Lung People Club meets
the first Monday.
We mourn the death of our President and Founder
MOE LEVIN
Chaim Weizman Branch L.Z.A.
A great leader and benefactor to the cause of
Israel and the Humanities.
The Chaim Weizman Branch. Farband
We mourn the passing of our
beloved Chairman of our Board of Directors
MOE LEVIN
His devotion and dedication to the
Israel cause will be greatly missed.
Israel Histradut Campaign
Irving Gordon Lwla Alpert
Executive Director, Executive Director
Campaign Foundation
Morris Newmartt
President
it*
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anker
Ankers to be Honored at Banquet
Dr. Irving Lehrman, chairman
JNF Foundation, and Abraham
Grunhut, president JNF Greater
Miami, have announced that
Albert and Anne Anker, will be
honored at the Annual JNF
Morton Towers Tribute Banquet,
on Sunday, Nov. 8 at noon at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. Anker have
earned this honor by their
dedication to the community and
to the State of Israel. They are
Zionists who have worked for the
upbuilding of the State of Israel
before the State was established.
Lou Aronson and Gus Menu
are chairpersons of this Annul
Banquet. Mrs. Lou (Etui Aroo-
son is chairman of the Ticket and
Arrangement Committee
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi Mayer Abromowiu
of Temple Menorah. Miami
Beach, will appear on "The
Jewish Worship Hour" on
Channel 10 on Sunday
November l.at Ha.m
The officers and board of directors of the
Israel Histadrut Foundation mourn the
passing of our Vice President and Chaver.
MOE LEVIN
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Chairman
Lewis Alpert
Director
Dr. Sol Stein
President
The Jewish National Fund
mourns the passing of
MOE LEVIN
Great and beloved leader, outstanding
lumanitarian, philanthropist and unmatched
lover of Zion and Israel,
the State and its people
May his memory be an inspiration
Rabbi William Berkowitz
National President
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chairman, Found. So. Region
Abraham Grunhut
Pres Greater Miami
Dr. Samuel L Cohan
National Exec V.P
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltt
Chairman Exec Board
Zev W. Kogan
President. So Region
Andre Bialolenkl
Leo Mindlln
Ernest Samuels
Vice Presidents
Greater Miami



^'
Miami Beach Campaign Reports
iiiiiMw. inuiuti ou. izni uie jewiau i iuiiuioji
Friday, October 30. 1981 / The Jewish FloridUa
1 Oft,
B iO"^
Pge3-B
Congressman Lehman, Dick Stone, Police Endorse
alcolm Fromberg Campaign to Replace Mendelson
.....^,m;in Rill I^hmnn v L'n.mL.*., Alt i__ Ban*
Congressman Bill Lehman's Fromberg's whirlwind campaign
ringing endorsement of Malcolm to retire Mendelson
Fromberg has propelled the
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith into what appears to
be an insurmountable lead in his
determined campaign to unseat
Mel Mendelson on the Miami
Beach city commission.
With former U.S. Senator
Richard (Dick) Stone. State
Senator Paul Steinberg and
County Commissioner Barry
Schreiber adding their total
support to Fromberg. the chall-
enger s lead widened as the
countdown to Tuesday's citywide
munucipal election neared.
Fromberg also swept organi-
zational indorsements, picking
up formal recommendations from
the I'nited Teacher* of Dade
County. TIGERC.O.P.E.. the
Miami Beach Lodge of the
Fraternal Order of Police and the
Dade County Council of Senior
Citizens.
David H. Nevel, Fromberg's
campaign manager, emphasized
that every registered voter in
Miami Beach Democrat. Re-
publican and Independent can
cast ballots for Fromberg. presi-
dent of the Temple Emanu-EI
Family League.
New Hope coalition chairman
Jim McDonnell, former Beach
Police ('hut Rocky Pomerance
I and former Chamber of Com-
merce presidents L. Jules Arkin.
Barton S Goldberg and Leon
Manne are among those who
ha\e signed endorsements for
Fromberg's experience as an
officer of the B'nai B'rith Senior
Citizens Housing Corporation
played a decisive role in the en-
dorsement by the Dade County
Council of Senior Citizens,
headed by civic leader Max Ser-
chuk.
Tenants officials announcing
their support of Fromberg in-
cluded Mrs. Shep (Lena! Davis,
widow of the founder of the
Tenants Association of Florida;
Benita Argos. first vice president
of the Tenants Association; and
Frank T. Reiner, who succeeded
Davis as president of the organi-
zation.
A member of the American
Zionist Federation. Fromberg
has lobbied key leaders in Con-
gress on behalf of the State of Is-
rael and Soviet Jewry. He also is
a member of the national joint
committee of B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation and the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds.
A 46-year-old attorney and ac-
countant. Fromberg is a member
' the executive committee and
board of directors of Temple
Emanu-EI and is secretary of the
Miami Beach congregation
headed by Dr. Irving Lehrman.
Carol Greenberg and Samuel N
Friedland.
Fromberg was honored last
year by the Anti-Defamation
I-eague of B'nai B'rith for his
leadership on behalf of ADL. He
lias served as president of the
Miami Beach lodge of B'nai
B rith. president of the South
Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
I-odges. vice president of the
Florida State Federation and as
president of District 5 of B'nai
B'rith. including the entire
Southeast and Washington, D.C.
Joining the Fromberg team,
which has Stanley H. Arkin as
campaign finance chairman, were
Dade County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber; attorney Gerald
K. Schwartz, president of the
Jewish Community Center of
Miami Beach; public relations
executive Gerald Schwartz, past
president of the South Florida
Zionist Federation; and Joseph
A. Nevel, president of the He-
brew Free Loan Association and
of the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce.
Fromberg picked up formal
support from Dr. Sherman R.
Kaplan, Joseph A below, presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Home-
owners Association; Ira (idler.
president of the Miami Beach
Kiwanis Club; and Toby Fried-
land, former campaign chairman
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation women's division.
Former Dade County Circuit
Court Judge Robert L. Floyd.
Judge Roy Morgan, Al Golden,
president of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, and
Samuel Pascoe. past president of
the South Florida Council of
B'nai B'rith I-odges, all endorsed
Fromberg.
Former Circuit Court Judge
Irving Cypen. past president of
the Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
Murray Candib. leader of the
Lehrman Day School, and Law-
rence Schantz, vice president of
Temple Emanu-EI. all joined the
Fromberg team.
Fromberg, who served as
chairman of a Federation
allocations committee, spoke for
State of Israel Bonds during the
High Holy Days appeals and has
served as chairman of a grievance
committee of the Florida Bar.
His wife, Arlene, is a Miami
Beach school teacher and the
Frombergs' two daughters are
fourth generation Beach natives.
Veteran political observers cal-
led Fromberg's campaign kickoff
one of the most impressive in
Beach political history. Members
of his kickoff committee included
Larry Aberman, vice president of
the Beach Chamber of Com-
merce: E. Albert Pallot, chair-
man of the Florida division of the
U.S. Committee for Sports in Is-
rael; and Democratic leader Mar-
win Cassell.
Other Fromberg kickoff com-
mittee members include Sidney
Cooperman, national campaign
rot-hairman of Israel Bonds; Ir-
ving FirteJ. past president of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross He-
brew Academy; Ramon B. Fisch,
Robert Frehling. Perry M. Fab-
ian, Wendy Gibbs and Mitchell
M. Goldman.
htlcolm H. Frombvrif
Jerrold and Jane Goodman, Gol-
die Goldstein. Sidney Goodman,
Pioneer Women president Har-
riet Green. Carol Greenberg, Dr.
and Mrs. Jerry Hagen and Nei-
sen O. Kasdin, vice president of
the Beach Jaycees.
Marcy and Donald l-efton,
Gladys Rerman Palestine, Sey-
mour Rubin. William E. Schoc-
kett. Felice P. Schwartz. Linda
and Jon Serbin, Marilyn and
Harry B. Smith. Milton Sirkin.
Mrs. Harold (Sylvia) Shapiro.
Mrs. Harry (Carole) Bernard,
Lily and Al Stone, Dr. Paul
Swaye. Nelan Sweet, George Tal-
ianoff. I.arry Taylor and past
Florida liar president Burton
Young all served on the From-
berg kickoff committee.
Fromberg gained support from
paid political !varliwmrnl by r rtunDrrg Campaign Kund. Kh hard S H*rntnn. Tri-a-un r
Commissioner Falk Gains Overwhelming Support
From Teachers, Tenants, Civic Leaders, Seniors
With endorsement from area
[newspapers, organizations and
Tcivic leaders flowing in daily,
Commissioner Mildred Falk this
Iweek headed towards an easy
victory over two challengers ir
I Tuesday Miami Beach munici
|pal election.
The United Teachers of Dade
[County's powerful
[TIGER-CO.P.E. political
iKtion committee sent in its for-
Imat endorsement of Mrs. Falk. a
I retired New York City school-
[teacher who has headed
I numerous major Miami Beach re-
ligious, educational and civic or-
I imitations during the past three
Idecades.
Tenant, senior citizen and
community leaders joined with
jk Miami Beach Board of
wltors in officially endorsing
Mildred S. Falk, who is recog-
nized as the "watchdog of the
city treasury."
Past president of the Temple
Emanu-EI Sisterhood, a former
president of a Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah and four
times president of the Miami
Beach Homeowners Association,
Mrs. Falk took a strong lead in
final pre-election polls.
Mildred Falk was president of
the Miami Beach Doctors Wives
Club which then became the
Mount Sinai Hospital Auxiliary,
and has held offices in a dozen
other major Beach organizations.
This week. Harriet Green,
national president of the Ameri-
can Zionist Federation an-
nounced her endorsement of Mrs.
Falk. Mrs. Green, who also is
president of the Pioneer Women
Council of South Florida, and
Mrs. Falk visited Israel and
Egypt this summer on a survey
mission.
Both Mrs. Green and Mrs.
Falk received the Tel Aviv City
Medal of Honor at impressive
ceremonies held at city hall in
Israel. Maj. Gen. Shlomo Lahat,
mayor of Tel Aviv-Yaffo.
presented the commissioner and
the Zionist leader with their high
honors.
Her platform stresses full fiscal
responsibility and the right of the
people to know what they are
paying for, according to cam-
paign manager Gerald Schwartz,
past president of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith and
vice president for public affairs of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce.
New Hope coalition chairman
Jim McDonnell is chairman of
the Falk Finance Committee,
which includes many of the city's
best known civic leaders. Mrs.
Falk led the successful petition
drive to place the Falk Amend-
ment on the ballot, and all Beach
voters now have a voice in ap-
proving every bond issue of more
than $250,000.
A four-term president of the
Miami Beach Homeowners
Association, Mrs. Falk is a
trustee of the Bass Museum, a
former member of the City of
Miami Beach Beautification
Committee, Senior Citizens
Advisory Board and Committee
on the Status of Women.
Mrs. Falk, a resident of Miami
Beach for 40 years, is a graduate
of Hunter College and Columbia
paid poliUca) advarUaamant by Falk Campaign
University, where she earned her
bachelor's and master's degrees.
She favors tax abatement for
all residential and condominium
owners whose property taxes ex-
ceed 25 percent of their income,
and a limit of five percent tax in-
crease per year on all residential
properties.
Her platform pledges housing
assistance through the Housing
Authority for the neediest, most
elderly, long-time residents of
Miami Beach and moderate in-
come housing with stabilized
rents.
Commissioner Falk advocates
full support for police and
adequate equipment to properly
fight crime.
Fund. Jack falk. uaaauw.
Alex Daoud Backed By Fraternal Order of Police,
Senior Citizens, Congressman Fascell, Democrats
Sweeping aside a weak chal-
ne from hotel clerk Norman
wwanian, former Miami Beach
;"* Mayor Alex Daoud this
Wt headed for victory in bis
"Chitting campaign for re-
wn to the Miami Beach city
"omission.
A strong endorsement from
gUd States Rep. Dante B.
***. who led the successful
JK m the House to defeat the
BKSa1 ,8ale of American
2"ACS planes to Saudi Arabia,
griginened Daoud s landslide
Elected two years ago with the
W>t vote in Beach election
^story. Daoud also won endorse-
ment from the Dade County
SV."1 of Senior Citizens, the
United Teachers of Dade County
T.I.G.E.R.-COPE and the Miami
Beach Lodge of the Fraternal
Order of Police.
Campaign coordinator Felice
Schwartz and finance committee
chairman Joseph A. Nevel called
the sweep of endorsements by
Daoud "a tremendous boost for
his prospects for another over-
whelming victory on Nov. 3."
Former United States Senator
Richard (Dick) Stone. State Sen.
Gwen Margolis and County
Commissioners Barry Schreiber
and Harvey Ravin signed en-
dorsement cards for Daoud, past
president of the Miami Beach
Striders and a frequent speaker
for Hadassah and Pioneer
Women Na'amat.
Vice president of the American
Federation of Senior Citizens
Miami Beach chapter, Daoud
serves as legal counsel for the or-
ganizaton and in the same
capacity for the Dade County
Council of Senior Citizens.
Long-time legal counsel to the
Tenants Association of Florida,
Daoud founded the Shep Davis
Memorial Scholarship Fund at
Haifa University, chaired the
committee which secured the re-
naming by Related Housing of
Florida of Shep Davis Plaza, and
was chairman of the successful
fund-raising drive for the Peter
torso Memorial Fund.
A member and legal counsel of
the Miami Beach chapter of the
Guardian Angels. Daoud.was the
sponsor of the nationally
renowned Miami Beach Equal
Rights Amendment. Nevel said.
Governor Bob Graham to repre-
sent the City of Miami Beach at
hearings on nursing home care in
the city.
An active member of the Ma-
sons, Elks, Knights of Pythias,
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce and the American Zionist
Federation, Daoud served as vol-
unteer attorney for Legal Serv-
ices of Dade County, Miami
Beach branch.
Daoud supporters include
State' Representatives Mike
Friedman, Barry Kutun, Ron Sil-
ver and Hal Spaet; New Hope
chairman Jim McDonnell, former
Chamber of Commerce president
Leon Manne and Gerald Sch-
wartz, former national Israel
Bonds chairman for B'nai B'rith
pud political advartiaacnax by Daoud Campaign Fund. Evalyn Daoud RoaaothaL Traaaurar
Daoud was selected last year
by the Miami Beach Jaycees to
receive its highly coveted General
Chappie James Americanism
Award, and this year wan
nominated for the state Jaycee
Good Government Award by the
Beach chapter.
An assistant professor of
medical jurisprudence at St.
George's University College of
Medicine, Daoud worked in the
City of Miami Beach legal de-
partment before opening his own
law practice in Miami Beach.
He recently was named an ad-
visory committee member of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospi-
tal for the Aged's Channeling
Project. He also was selected by


pro 99. A
TV- *------:--
oo ion

v^wxuuu w. HJ



/tepi/i Speaks For
Israel Bonds Event
Benjamin Begin, son of the
Israeli Prime Minister, will be
hosted at a parlor meeting to be
held by the New Leadership
Division. State of Israel Bonds
Organization, on Wednesday.
Begin will be coming to Miami
with his wife Ruth to discuss the
latest situation in the Middle
East and his views regarding
some of the ongoing projects fi-
nanced by the Israel Bonds pro-
gram.
A geologist. Begin is engaged
in research with the Geological
Survey of Israel. He holds a
doctorate in Geomorphology
from Colorado State University
and received his undergraduate
degrees from the Hebrew Univer-
sity.
His present research relates to
feasibility studies for nuclear
power plant sites and computer
terrain descriptions for slope-
stability analysis.
Mrs. Begin is associated with
the rehabilitation Department of
Israel's Ministery of Defense.
Benjamin Begin
working with families bereaved
by military actions.
She studied at the Hebrew
University and is a social worker.
federation Tuesday'
Features Dr. Schulweis
Dr. Harold M Schulweis, Los
Angeles' Judaic sociologist and
community leader, will be a spe-
cial guest speaker at "Federation
Tuesday. November 17 at the
Konover Hotel, announced Susan
Pant f, event chairman.
"Federation Tuesday" is the an-
nual community education day of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division.
"Dr. Schulweis is among three
guest speakers who will highlight
the program which takes place
from 9.15 a.m. to2:15p.m.." ex-
plained Mrs. Panoff. This year's
theme will be "Womanpower:
The Jewish Woman Chooses Her
Destiny."
In addition to his involvement
in teaching contemporary Jewish
life issues. Dr. Schulweis is a past
recipient of the Israeli Prime
Minister's Medal and a founder
of the Institute for Righteous
Acts, a study center for the res-
cue of survivors of the Holocaust.
He is a contributing editor to
Dr. Harold M. Schulweis
several leading publications and
a professor of Jewish Contem-
porary Civilization at several
West Coast educational institu-
tions.
Adult Education at Beth Sholom
The Adult Education Program of
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami will begin on Monday at
9:30 am Rabbi Leon Kronish.
spiritual leader of Beth Sholom.
will open h weekly Bible Series
on the theme "Know the Bible
Using the portion of the week as
a springboard. Rabbi Kronish
will present the Bible as a con
stant source and resource for
contemporary living.
At 11 a.m.. Rabbi Harry Jolt,
Auxiliary Rabbi of the Congrega
tion will open a new series of lac-
Israeli Stage Show For Miami
ADL Award To Joseph! Kanter
Arthur Pearlman. Chairman of
the Anti-Defamation League's
Society of Fellows, announces
that Joseph H. Kanter will be the
recipient of the ADL American
ism Award at a dinner-dance on
Saturday. December 12. at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton. Maurice
A. Ferre is serving as Honorary
Dinner Chairman.
"The measure of a man may be
determined solely by his achieve
ments in his chosen field. Using
this yardstick alone. Joseph H.
Kanter is a giant among men
His has been one of the most
amazing careers in American
business life. He was elected by
Esquire magazine hUMMf*
of the 54 outstanding bright
young men in science, politics,
arts, and business." Pearlman
said.
Active in civic and philanthro-
pic organizations, he is iht b-
volved in club and fraternal life
Mr. Kanter is former Nationa
Chairman. United Jewish Appeal
and member of its executive com-
mittee; former National Chair-
man. Israel Education Fund of
the UJA; former National Chair-
man. International Young
1 Leadership Cabinet of UJA;
former President. American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
and presently its honorary presi-
dent: former chairman, Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
UJA Campaign, and chairman of
the Century Chib of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. His
awards have included; State of
Israel Award for Leadership in
UJA. the Governor Herbert Leh-
man Award and the B'nai H nth
Humanitarian Award.
Rapport Heads Cuban Israel Bonds
Morris Rapport, local ac-
countant, has been named
president of the 1981-62 Cuban
Israel Bonds Campaign. The an-
nouncement was made by Gary
R. Gerson. General Campaign
Chairman of the Greater Miami
Men's Club Breakfast
The Men's Club of Temple Ner
Tamid will hold its monthly
Breakfast Meeting on Sunday, at
7:30 a.m.. in the Sktar Audi
torium of the Temple
Mr. and Mrs Bamett Lerner
will present a film on The Balkan
Toar, which includes Yugoslavia.
Bulgaria and Roumania. Presi-
dent of the Men's Club is Mr.
Paul Novak.
Fall Class Begins
The Israelite Center will begin
its Adult Education class of the
fall season on Wednesday at 1
p.m. in the Temple social hall.
Rabbi Solomon Waldenberg will
lead the class which deals with
the theme. "Judaism Confronts
Contemporary Issues."
Moms Rapport
State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization
Gerson said that Rapport's
long involvement with the Bonds
Organization and his business
background make him an ez-
cellent choice to lead "one of the
most important divisions in the
local Israel Bonds campaign "
Rapport is a founder and
former secretary of the Cuban
Hebrew Congregation of Miami
He is also a founder, former sec-
retary and director of the B'nai
H nth Miami Latin Lodge For
several years he served as
treasurer and director of the
Cuban Hebrew Israel Bonds
campaign.
An accountant. Rapport is a
graduate of the University of
Havana and the University of
Miami. He is president of the
Latin Realty Corporation and
Rapport Accounting Co.
He has been honored by
numerous Jewish philanthropic
and service organizations in-
cluding the Cuban Hebrew Con-
gregation. B'nai B'rith and the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion.
Singles Hold Service
"A New Beginning.'' a singles
group for ages 35-54'i. meeting
under the auspices of Temple
Beth Am. will present a creative
Sabbath evening service on Oct
30 at 8:30 p.m. in the Beth Am
Sanctuary-
tures on "Know the Jew."
The course will deal with many
of the questions people have been
asking about the Jew.
At 9:30 a.m., on November
6, book reviewers, Arlene
Lhtchek and Lena Goldberg, will
present a series of book talks on
Jewish literature, entitled "Ad-
ventures in Jewish Bookland."
On Thursday, at 11 a.m.. Rabbi
Jolt will offer a course on "Know
the Talmud." Test "Pirke
Avot" the Ethics of the
Fathers.
Voters. Incorporated. Harry Levy President
Tenants Association of Florida. Moe Schiftman. President
Dade County Council of Senior Citizens. Max Serchuk. President
International Ladies Garment Ufarkers Union Retirees (ILGWU)
The Democratic Club a* Miami Beach. Walry Gluck, President
Voters and Taxpayers League at Miami-Dade County
Homestead Tax Exemption League at Dade County
Erny Fannotto. President
BEST QUALIFIED
The 1961 Israeli Chaasirtir
Festival is coming to the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Performing
Arts for one performance.
Saturday. November 14 at 8:30
p.m This is the 13th Annual
Celebration of Musk, Dance and
Coffee, Culture and
Conversation'
The opening session for the
"Ceffoe. Cakare sad Cas>
versatioa" program of Temple
Beth Sholom will be bald on
Sunday, at 10:30 am., at the
Temple.
Arlene Ditchik and Lena Gold-
berg, two book leviewera, team
up to bring a review of 'The
Terrible Secret" by Walter
Song by Israel* popular artists,
sponsored by Temple King
Solomon.
"The Israeli Chassidk Festival
is a challenge met each year in
the greatest annual event in the
musical world of Israel, under the
auspices of the President of the
Stats of Israel The first Israeli
Chassidk Festival, which origi-
nated in 1969, was intended to be
a one-time song contest, however
the overwhelming response
changed the course of history for
this musical event," Aria Kaduri.
theatrical producer pointed out.
"The Israeli Chassidic" Festival
1961 adds op to two hours of
thoroughly enjoyable entertain-
ment for the entire family. It's
the best way to experience Israel
without leaving town," Kadun
Miami Beach Resident 28 years
Crime Watch Captain. Miami Beach
Senior Advisor for Corporate Finance for
Rooney Pace. Inc.. Members N.Y.S.E.
Board of Directors Hebrew Academy
Active. Miami Jewish Federation
Former Finance Chairman. Florida State
Democratic Party
Veteran United States Army. Korean War.
Member Veteran of Foreign Wars and
Jewish War Veterans.
Former Vice President Center for
International Security Washington. D.C.
National Board Member. Association
for Welfare of Soldiers in Israel
sS Years Real Estate Broker
Travel Agency Executive
Speaks English. Spanish.
Yiddish. Hebrew
ELECT Sy
Kf
MIAMI BEACH CITY COMMISSION
FREE RIDE TO POLLS 534-3000 PUNCH 43


:l
On Davenin:
Talking With God
By RABBI
MITCHELL CHEFITZ
Director.
Havurah of South Florida
As a little boy growing up in
Boston, I would walk with my
father to tha schul not far from
our home. There, my father
would wrap himself in his talli.%.
and I would play with the Tzitrit
and watch the men pray.
I learned soon that there were
two groups those who knew
what the page number was. and
those who did not. And of those
who knew what the page number
was. there were two groups
those you would ask for the page
number, and those you would not
disturb These last were very few
indwd. and all old. Their clothes
nn black and their beards
white They are no longer with
us, alayvhem hashalom. And I
wonder if anyone still talks with
(iod in that schul. Or has the
search for God been totally re-
placed by the search for the page
number?
MY LIFE since has wound its
way about the world, the memory
of those who talked to God sur-
facing now and then. 1 have
learned enough of the holy
tongue to know the page number.
and that is not enough. I have
learned enough to know the
words and their meaning, and
that is not enough.
To daven, I have learned to lift
the words off the page and let
them flow together in my heart,
and once off the page the words
and the page number cease to
exist. There is only the flow of
prayer from the heart to the Holy
One, blessed is He. And if at such
a moment one asked me the page,
I could not respond with a num-
ber, for I would be davenin from a
page beyond numbers.
But I could respond. To turn to
that page, first you clear all false
notions from your thoughts, and
then you incline your heart and
open it. Hebrew is useful, for it is
made for this purpose. But it is
the mind and the heart, the de-
termination and the inclination
that will bring you there.
MY CLOTHES are not black,
and my beard not yet white. I do
not share that with them. But I
have learned something of them,
those few one would not disturb
for a page number, that they were
waiting for someone to ask them
how to find the page.
More than waiting. Hoping,
praying that there would still be
a concern within the community
to find the page beyond the num-
ber.
Tannenbaum Receives Award
Bernice S. Tannenbaum. im-
mediate past president of Hadas-
iah. will receive the prestigious
Myrtle Wreath Award at the
Miami Beach Regions Member-
ship Ciala on Monday, at 1 p.m.
at the Theatre of Performing
Arts
Mrs. Tannenbaum is currently
the chairman of the Hadassah
Medical Organization, vice-presi-
dent of the World Confederation
of United Zionists and co-chair-
man of the National Council of
American-Israel Public Affairs
( ommittee Additionally, she is a
member of the Zionist General
Council (Actions Committee), the
World Zionist Organization and
the Assembly of the Jewish
Agency. She is also a member of
the Executive Bodies of the
National Conference for Soviet
Jewry, the Board of Directors of
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
and the Board of Governors of
the Hebrew University. Other
organizations she is active in in-
clude the World Jewish Congress
and the United Jewish Appeal.
The Membership Family, com-
prised of Helen Adams. Region
Membership Chairman: Betty
Miller. Coordinator: Florence
S.iifer. Life Membership: Rose
Naidorf. Transfer and Trackdown
and the Membership personnel of
the 36 chapters which constitute
the Region, will present Member-
ship Rewards at the Gala. Enter-
tainment will be provided.
Lipsons Will Be Honored
Mr and Mrs. Arthur Lipson of
North Miami Beach, will be
honored at the Hillel Community
Day Schools 12th annual
Scholarship Ball on Saturday.
November 7 at 8 p.m. in the Beth
Torah Ballroom.
Honored for their con-
tributions to Hillel. both Mr. and
Mrs. Lipson serve on the school's
\ Board of Governors and Excutive
Committee.
Mr Lipson has been treasurer
of I Idle I since 1972 and is also
building chairman. "It waa his
presence on HUlels Steering
Committee that waa instru-
mental in relocating the kchool to
its present location in 1976,"
according to school spokesmen.
A graduate from the Uni-
versity of Miami, Lipson opened
his own CPA firm in 1975, which
concentrates on real estate,
utility and tax accounting.
Mrs. Lipson, a graduate of
Barry College School of Nursing.
it- on the staff at Hollywood
Medical Center. As FT A mem-
bership vice president of Hillel.
she helped push the enrollment of
the school from 60 to almost 600
students. The Lipson family are
members of the Beth Torah Con-
gregation where he has served on
the Board.
Marvin Friedman to Speak at Beth David
Marvin Rosa Friedman, attor-
ney and art dealer, will be the
Ck T*? Bt"" F^ Arta of
Hh David aeries. "The Visual
rts Scene on Wednesday, at
Z.45 P m Beth Davids South
vampus.
In his presentation, "Contem-
porary Art: Name. Rank, and the
UK* PPtive on the
rniui?lman euirtad several
western Europe andthe United
aurS" u* "** to
-"Jon houee., Ucturer in
JJdern art, and a private dealer
IS*, collectors, and cor-
Uorothy Raphaely is chairper
^oJthelec^reT^.TSSrd
"* Fine Arts of Beth David.
Friday. October 30.1981 / The Jewish Floridian Pager 5-B
HADASSAH ISRAEL COUNCIL HAS NEW CHAIRMAN
In Jerusalem (left to right) are Marian LewinEpstein, formerly of Washington, Pa., outgoing
chairman of the Hadassah Council in Israel, with Hadassah national president, Frieda S. Lewis,
and Sylvia Shapiro, formerly of Cleveland, newly-appointed chairman. Induction of new officers
of the volunteer body, which represents the National Board in Israel, was planned so that Mrs.
Lewis and other National Board members could attend after the national convention. Next
year's convention will be held in Jerusalem, Mrs. Lewis announced.
LIMITED TIME Of FER
Empire's
Got Legs!
STRICTLY
KOSHER
NO BACKBONE
PORTIONS IN EMPIRE'S
CHICKEN LEGS
YOU'LL TASTE THE DIFFERENCE
OF THIS REAL QUALITY KOSHER CHICKEN!
-----------------ITS MARVELOUS!----------------
CENTS'
TEN CENTS OFF ANY BOX OF FAMOUS EMPIRE
FRYING CHICKEN LEGS WITH COUPON.
OFFER EXPIRES NOVEMBER 13, 1981
Empire's got the best legs in town!
ID*
I
CUP THIS! USE THIS! SAVE 10$!
TEN CENTS OFF ANY BOX OF EMPIRE
FRYING CHICKEN LEGS.
TO Ttal MALI* For MOi Coupon you acts) aa aw uXoruad aganl aa>
pay you taca vatoa p*ua 2{ tor rvjnrang ajhan row and you/ cuaaomar rtava com-
Had man too Mm*) at tat oft* Hill until oMy on EMP1KC KOSHER
PCXATRY brand Frying Qackan Lag paokaaaa at 10 par paekag* ona packaga
par Coupon. Any otar n'lfHnr I m ifUtm 1 Conaumi to pay rjppftaaftto
mm tm mmm puitof pwratoi at tufttotora aaor. to oovar coupom pnaaraad
to. radar nuto>n mual Ot alwarn upon annul CoupanMrtanarauaaaprontoaad
Oood only to USA Caan raJua i He aval to Eam**K KOSHER POIA.THY
MC PO BOX its. kamMTOam HA. 1709ft Traieono>a)
andiuaayi
LIMITED TIME OFFER
Coupon sprrea Noxembei 13.1M1
Marvin Ross Friedman



f\n tnm
Pnoro 99. A TV. T-----:_!. --
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 30,1981
Community Corner
The Citizens' Crime Commission of Greater Miami has
selected new officers and directors to implement the organiza-
tion's program aimed at fighting crime and educating the public
about how to channel its concern into action, according to
Warren S. Wepman, the commission's new chairman.
Dr. Sol Landau, president and executive director of the Mid
Life Services Foundation will attend and participate in the First
National Burn-Out Conference on November 2-4 in Philadelphia.
Dr. Landau will present a workshop entitled, "Factory Workers
Burning-Out: Early SymptomsEarly Solutions."
Violinist Boris Belkin is the stellar soloist with The Florida
Philharmonic, with Interim Music Director Rainer Miedel on the
podium, for the second pair of subscription concerts of the 1981
1982 season, Monday at 8 p.m. at the Theatre of Performing
Arts and Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Dade County Auditorium.
Senator Jack D. Gordon (D., Miami Beach) was honored by
the Florida State Heading Council with the presentation of its
Legislative Award for his work in developing and passing
legislation to improve the writing skills of high school students
in Florida. The Council recognized Senator Gordon at their an-
nual conference at the Carillon Beach Hotel on Miami Beach.
Leonard Bernstein's one-act opera "Trouble in Tahiti." will be
presented by the Greater Miami Opera on Friday at the Arturo
di Filipi Educational Center. Performances are at 10 a.m. and
11:15a.m.
The University of Miami School of Music will present 12 con-
certs and recitals from November 1-15. All programs will be held
in the UM's Gusman Concert Hall on the Coral Gables Campus.
Miami-Dade Community College's Lunchtime Lively Arts
Series presents "Matinee Rendezvous." in a duo piano concert
by William Dawson and Judith Burganger at noon on Wednes-
day, at Gusman Cultural Center.
Second Lt. Jerry I. Siegel. son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Siegel of Miami, has graduated from U.S. Air Force pilot train-
ing, and has received silver wings at Vance Air Force Base.
Okla. Siegel will now serve at Vance.
He is a 1980 graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Meena E. Snyder. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bruce J.
Snyder of 14236 Kendale Lakes Blvd.. Miami, has entered the
freshman year at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo.
The cadet is one of more than 1.400 freshmen who were offi-
cially accepted into the cadet wing after completing six weeks of
intensive field training, physical conditioning and survival
instruction.
Cadet Snyder begins four years of academic study and mili-
tary training that will lead to a bachelor of science degree and a
commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force.
She is a 1981 graduate of Miami Sunset Senior High School.
^iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
MMM
Lomar Rental Apartments
3501 Tyler Street, Hollywood, Fl.
aiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Broward 966-7600
Dade 624-4777
MHMMMMMMUIIIIIIIIIIUUIIIIIIIIIMIII
No Children, No Pels
A niUJCIAl 4 IAI
ruuwc innu
presented by
The Rabbi Alexander S. Grot*
Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami
SPEAKERS:
ALAN BESHANY*SHEPARD KING*NEIL SCHWART^
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE
NEW 1981 ^SR?AN~^A^'TAW^T.T^rT!rjRETr
Thurs., Nov. 19th at 7:45 to 9:45 p. m
2425 Pine Tree Dr.: H. S. Dining Hall
Admission is free and reservations
are suggested at 532-6421
MOVING?
Lao------e
mi
Floridian roaoxmn*.rw^aiai
Irving Cypen
Tower Accepting
Applications
Applications are being ac-
cepted for available apartments
in Irving Tower (ICT), a modern
102-unit adult congregate living
facility for senior adults. This
progressive living concept offers
a lifestyle that maximizes inde-
pendence while minimizing con-
cern for home maintenance and
health care.
Located on the campus of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospi-
tal for the Aged at Douglas Gar-
dens. Irving Cypen Tower opened
in February of this year. The idea
of an apartment building de-
signed for independent living
while providing for a wide range
of safety and support services,
was conceived by the Board of
Directors of the Home.
Irving Cypen. chairman of the
Board and honorary president of
the Home, for whom the building
was named, said. "With the
elderly population rapidly in-
creasing in this country, more fa-
cilities similar to Irving Cypen
Tower will be needed It is a step
toward the future in helping peo-
ple live in the community without
needing to be placed in a nursing
home."
Residents of ICT benefit from
the one meal a day served in a
central dining room, weekly
housekeeping service, a courtesy
van for shopping and out-trips,
organized social and recreatioanl
activities, and a 24-hour security
patrol.
The studio suites and one bed-
room apartments have wide
doorways and walk-space, wall-
to-wall carpeting, and two emer-
gency call buttons in each apart-
ment.
All tenants of ICT are eligible
to register as outpatients in the
Douglas Gardens Ambulatory
Health Center, also located on
the campus, offering a full range
of medical care. Regularly
scheduled doctor's appointments
are available and convenient to
ICT residents.
Interested applicants must be
6ft years of age, a resident of
Dade County or South Broward
for the past three years, and must
have a medical evaluation at the
Douglas Gardens Ambulatory
Health Center. Further informa-
tion is available at the Cypen
Tower office.
Gross Academy
In New Program
Helen Ciment. president of the
Parents Association of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Aca-
demy, has announced a new pro-
gram of after school classes to be
held at the Academy in co-
operation with Miami Dade Com-
munity College.
The classes which will include
beginning magic, singing Hebrew
songs, karate, guitar, aerobic
dancing, beginning and inter-
mediate ballet, folk dancing, and
modern dancing emphasizing
creative, recreation and physica
fitness.
Classes are open to both boys
and girls of all ages and will be
taught by collage instructors,
meeting once per weak from 4 to
5:90 p.m.. beginning the week of
October 26. Elias Herschmann is
president of the Academy.
Beth Am Lectures
Temple Beth Am, in aaao-
ciation with its Brotherhood, is
sponsoring a aeries of lectures on
recent events in the Middle East,
by Dr. Bernard Schechterman.
beginning October 22 and for the
next three Thursday evenings at
7:45 p.m. in the Youth Lounge. A
question and answer portion will
follow each lecture.
'Rock Cornish Broiler Chicken'
is Empire's Name to Remember
M1FFLINTOWN, Pa. When you hear the name "Cornish
Game Hen." chances are good that you quickly get an image of a
fifty dollar meal at a fancy restaurant.
F.mpire Kosher Foods reminds you that the name to rem-nv
b if you want to enjoy that kind of elegant feast inexpensively
at home is the Empire Hock (arrush HnnUr (hnki n
"This is our special strain of young, tender chicken that will
let you surprise and delight the entire family and all your guests
with a first class restaurant dinner at home for under two dollars
ahead." said Empire's President. Murray L. Katz
"This specially bred strain of tender, juicy young bird make- u
so easy to fix an elegant dinner that will impress everyone.
Katz noted. "It makes it so easy for you to look good in the kit
chen."
"Just cut up a couple of onions, carrots and celery and place
inside and around the bird in a roasting pan. After pouring in a
glass of white wine, pop in the oven, turn over once or twice an.l
VOII.A! You're a French chef, looking like you've got your
own television cooking show. And th. Km k ( ornish Broiler
Chickens are strictly kosher." Katz observed.
"There's really nothing to cooking the Cornish Chicken
However, there is an important but easy secret behind the sue
cess of the cooking. That secret is simplv to be sure and insist on
the Bmpin Rock (ormaA Broiler Katz stated
"That's our special strain of chicken thai makei it better that
makes it fun to cook your own; that makes it easy to look In
gourmet cook while you re doing it."
"Remember, the colder weather months bring the p
times for our Rock Cornish Broiler Chicken Those first ni|
winter air and the brisk outdoors will bring ryonc to the
dinner tabk with hearty appetites that the lelicious R
Cornish Broilen will satisfy completely. Katz concluded.
The Rock Cornish Broiler Chickens COOM tro/.en. v.
wrapped in Cryovac protective plastic to seal in freshness and
flavor.
Hil
ALTON ROAD
Opportunity (or individual who en joy working with people to tram
to be vault custodian at our Alton Road office. Thie ia a full
time position requiring light typing and excellent cuetomer
relation akilla. Good aalary and benefita
Apply:
1060 Alton Road
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Equal Opportunity Employer
Jewish Radio in South Florida
I Sunday afternoons hear the best in Jewish and Israeli
music on the
The Jewish Sound on WLRN 91.3
2-3P.M.
RebbiDevidEliesrie-Hoet
In Sooth Dade and Miami Peach-
The Sunday Morning Simcha
10 AM .-Noon on W VUM FM 90.6
IntarriewaaadNewa
of Miami
!.,
Information 661 7642
Aaron Howard & Rabbi David EUexrie-Hoeti.



wrT~ ">>''
Friday, October 30, 1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B

I
BvCARLALPERT
HAIFA There's something
fith) going on in Israel. Perhaps
it began when Jonah found a
highly original solution for his
housing problem, but in our
times it seems to have started in
1938 when the first pairs of carp,
male and female, were brought
litre from Furope and became the
progenitors of the country's fish
population. Today Israel is
dotted with fish ponds, populated
by countless hundreds of
thousands of the fleshy fish
which has become almost a
dietary staple of many Israelis.
Another, more recent immi-
^ grant- the dolphin. This easily
trained marine mammal has al-
ready become something of a star
in show business. Several trained
American dolphins were brought
to Israel with their bagful of
tricks and introduced to local
dolphins taken out of the water
ofl Israels coast. The idea was
thiil the (Jim would teach the
>ul>ras how to Derform. It worked
well for a while, but then Israeli
^ intelligence began to assert itself.
Whatever the visitors would do,
the Israelis felt they could do
better. If Israelis could design
new planes and release hostages
at Kntebbe and win wars in six
days, why should an Israeli dol-
phin not be equally resourceful?
Tel Aviv's Dolphinarium has be-
come an overnight success. It ia
reliably reported that the dol-
phin- make uncomplimentary re-
marks to each other about the
spectators all in Hebrew, of
course.
v-
Now there is another tourist
attraction at the hot springs of
Munwt l.ader. on the further side
Leah Benson to
Speak
1-eah Benson, past national
vice president of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat and membership vice
president of the South Florida
* ouncil of the organization, will
speak at Monday's meeting of
the Filat Chapter of Pioneer
"omen at 1 p.m. The session will
be held in the civic auditorium of
Washington Savings and Loan
Assn.. 1234 Washington Ave..
Miami Beach.
Mrs. Benson will speak on the
current Middle East situation.
V eda Uruber is president of the
chapter.
Pat Kolski to
Speak
The Lorber chapter of the
Rational Jewish Hospital-
National Asthma Center will hold
wneral meeting on Tuesday, at
U305 SW 69th Place. The guest
speaker is Pat Kolski. who will
'lls'uss. Why the Supreme
""rt was right in it* draft
aecision concerning women. "
of Lake Tiberias. About 100 alli-
gators were flown in from Florida
and if all goes well they and their
offsprings will be slithering
through the swampy nature pre-
serve being flooded for them. Nile
crocodiles were common in Pales-
tine for hundreds of years and up
to recent times there was a whole
colony of them near what is now
Hedera until settlers began
draining the swamps. The project
opens up many possibilities, in
addition to entertaining tourists.
This could provide a new. effec-
tive threat for Israeli mothers
who seek to control their uncon-
trollable little sabras: If you
don't behave. I'll throw you to
the alligators!
From a more constructive
point of view, one can look for-
ward to a new export industry of
wallets, belts, shoes and other
products of the flourishing alliga-
tor farms. To be sure, we're going
to need a lot more swamps to
support that industry, but the
Israelis who were ingenious
enough to dry up the swamps,
can be counted on to show equal
ingenuity in restoring them. New
zoning laws may forbid agricul-
ture, industry or housing
developments in areas reserved
for swamps!
That's not the end. Marine life,
of a sort, made other headlines in
Israel not long ago when a
Sephardi member of the Knesset.
Ra'anan Na'im expressed his an-
ger at what he felt was Ashkenazi
repression by saying, in effect:
'Gefilte fish makes me vomit!"
The colorful expression captured
the essence of certain forms of
Ashkenazi culture, and a national
debate broke out over the relative
merits of Lithuanian gefilte fish,
highly spiced, and Polish gefilte
fish, much sweeter. All the com
plexities of the Ashkenazi-Se-
phardi confrontation were neatly
reduced to a marine metaphor.
For weeks gefilte fish was a na-
tional slogan, a trademark, a cap-
sule expression of a major na-
tional problem.
When a group of Israelis living
near Nairn objected to his re-
mark on the grounds that it
fanned inter-communal divisive-
ness: one paper headlined the
story: "Neighbors Carp About
MK's Quip." The country was
swept by a wave of dinner parties
at which gefilte fish was ostenta-
tiously served alongside the
Sephardi delicacy, couscous, as
indication of national unity.
Between the carp and the alli-
gators, the dolphins and the
gefilte fish, it would appear that
Israelis have really gone off the
deep end. The question is: Can
we keep our heads above water?
People are having a whale of a
good time, but there's no need to
fish in troubled waters. Anyone
who crabs about the new spirit
must feel like a fish out of water,
and nobody will pay attention to
his crocodile tears. And anyone
who thinks this is just a plot of
the public relations people,
angling fat business, is jost try-
ing to draw a red barring across
the path
Sephardic Jew Wins Nobel Prize
Celebrating a gathering in honor of the Young Presidents Club-
Mt. Sinai Hospital, are (from left to right) Leonard A. Wien,
Jr. (Young President); Honey Giller; Ira Oilier (Young Presi-
dent); and James Resnick (Young President).
A Fishy Story
NEW YORK (JTAI Elias
Canetti. a Bulgarian-born
Sephardic Jew, has been awarded
the 1981 Nobel Prize for Litera-
ture, it was announced in Stock-
holm The 76-year-old author who
has lived at various times in
Switzerland. Austria, Germany
and France before settling in
England in 1939 has produced
seven books, only one a novel.
But despite the sparsity of his
literary output and the obscurity
of his work among the general
public, he has garnered the
highest acclaim from critics and
other writers.
The recipient of the $200,000
Nobel award has been likened to
James -Joyce, Henry James,
Bertold Brecht and Franz Kafka.
As an essayist and philosopher,
the area of most of his writings,
he has been compared to Karl
Marx, Sigmund Freud and Os-
wald Spengler.
Canetti's first and only novel.
Die Blendung" (The Blinding!,
was published in Germany in
1935 and appeared in English
translation much later as Auto-
Da-Fe." English translations of
his other books have been avail-
able in the United States only
since 1978. published by Conti-
nuum Books, a small firm
specializing in intellectual
writings. Only a few thousand
copies have been sold.
Canetti has been described by
prominent British and American
novelists and essayists as "a
solitary man of genius" whose
work reflects a life "rich in dis-
placements."
Pioneer Women Hold Walk-a-Thon
The Atid Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat. will sponsor a
10 mile walk-a-thon on Sunday,
at 9 a.m. The event will begin in
the parking lot of the Michael
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center.
According to Nancy Higgins.
chairman of the walk-a-thon. 10
members of the organization will
participate. Contributions are 50
cents to $1.50 per mile, and the
funds collected will aid the child
care program in the State of
Israel.
Rose-Edith Grosswald is
president of the group.
Weekly Forums
The Miami Beach Lodge 1591
B'nai B'rith will hold weekly
forums every Friday at 12:30
p.m. in the social hall.
a*
**
Do You Need a Tax Writeoff.
Chabad Needs Cars, Office Equipment and Land
You can earn a significant tax credit and at the same time do a mitzvah
by helping strengthen Jewish life in your community. Chabad needs cars, office
equipment, micro computer and land, your gift can be of great help.
hor more information call or write
CHABAD HOUSE
1540AlbengaAv.
Coral Gables, 33146
Telephone 661-7642
a*
fendi... italian leathers becoming an american tradition
Our fabulous Fendi collection is a timeless blend of elegance and
straightforward style An unmistakable presence of Italian character
and superb craftsmanship, for the discriminating few who recognize
the very best Shown from our complete collection of Fenai luggage.
hanObags. totes, handbags and accessories: portfolio. $100 Satchel.
$129 French purse. S69 Fendi Shop. omni. the galleria
CHARGE ITI Your own JM credit account. American Express. Diners Club We welcome them all1
SHOP JM DAILY. 10 AM TO 9 PM SUNDAY. 12 NOON TO 5:30 PM
(aaHy aoaeiano *63ra M o 30 p


"i :-i:____, r\ i
-- -J
rtrt mm
Page 8 B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. October 30, 1981
B'not Mitzvah
"1,
Jason Rosenberg Adam Shawn Unger
Da rid Platt
ADAM SHAWN UNGER
Adam Shawn, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Martin L. Unger of North
Miami Beach, grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Steinberger of
Surfside and Mrs. Millier Unger
of North Miami Beach, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday. October 31. at Temple
Ner Tamid.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
fvabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpam Concwttv
Friday night aarvtoa 8:15 pjn.
Saturday morning services 8:30
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Or. Baumgard
S Miamh667-e867 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Famlry worship eerFrt, 8:30 pjn.
on
Rabbi Beumgerd wet
"A New Beginning"
Torah serv. Sat., 11:15 a.m.
Synagogue
Listings
Candelighting Time
522
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Aw.. M.B.
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Frl ewe., serw. 6 pjn.
Sat mom. serv. 9 am
Dr. Irving Lehrman wMI preecn
at 10:30 am
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Friday Htf* Sarxcaa 6 p m
SouthOadeOiap*. 7500SW IZXfStiwI
Saturttay Monwig SarMoea.
Coral Way S1uy 2625 S W M Avenue
AatXa David M Auerbac* onVaam and
praacnM In* nimona. Cantor WMarn W
Upaon chants trie Mturgy
DatfyServicaeai Coral VVayChapei
South Dade Minyan on Tueaday Mommga
Join Miami Hansnc Congragation
For urtormation can aSMBl 1 (Coral Wayl or
MM South Dade)
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schtfl
Fri.ewa.7pjn. SatSajn.
BETHKOOESH
1101S.W.12A*e.
Rabbi Max Shaprto
Cantor Leon Segel
Rose Benin-Executive Secretary
Defy Minyan
7:46 am 7 pjn.
6566334
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ot Grealer Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E19th SL. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr, 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskeil M. Bemat
Asst Rabbi: Jerry K. SaUn
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Friday evening, Oct 30. 8 p.m.
Downtown: Rabbi Bemat wW
caacuss -The Future oi Technology
Kendall: Rabbi Safcin wW discuss
-Why Not NoerTr
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St N. Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 ConaarvatNa
Onry Tempie In North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Ledermen
Cantor Moshe Friedaw
Rahbi Emeritus Joseph A Gorfinkel
Daly aarvloaa 8r15 ajrv, 5 pjn.
Fri. eve, 8 pjn. a special Sebbeth
Dinner at 6 pjn preceding services
Sat meaning, 9 am
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
ChaaaAva.ai41.iSL 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish Rabbi Ubaral
Cantor David CorNtaar M Eva, fclS pjnj
r*. Kronash w speek on "When
Bad Thtnga Happen to Good
Paopta-.SaL.OcL 31,
of
947-7528
BETHTORAH
CONGREGATION
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd.
Dr. Max A Upechrtz, Rabbi
Cantor ZveeAroni
Frt,Oct3aBatMrtzwehc4Bonnl
She*. Set, OcL 31. Bar MMzveh of
SHAARE TERLLAH OF KENDALL
6460 SW 154 Circle Court #111
Miami. R. Modem Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kaszti 3824898
Sabbath services 930 am
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
RettoScaomonSchlft
Executive Vice President
neepjtoua- Information
concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. Reform
CoraiQabtee 867-5867
Michael B. Bsenetat Rabbi
FiL, OcL 30, Sri S pm Rabbi
Beenetat wHI soeek on "The
Importance of Scapegoat
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th St, Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowto
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 8:15 pjn.
Saturday services at 9 am
TEMPLE SINAI--------iWJTNTSAve-
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P Klngsiey. Rabbi 923-9010
Juaan I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shutkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, AdministrBtor
Sabbath ewe services 615 pm
(7:30 pm first Friday ot month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
ff not Mitzvah of Wendy Goldberg
*Amy-
TBJHiaorf-
aOOOMMarDr.
Conservative
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Dtoxaon, Cantor
Minyan Services Mon. & Thurs 7 AM
Sabbath Eve. Services 8:15 P.M.
Sabbath Services 9:00 A.M.
Guests Are Welcome
Frt, Oct 30. Dr. Norman N.
Shapiro's topic: "A Soul That Lives
on"
Sat, Oct 31, Bar Mitzvah of
Daniel Sheldon
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NC KM aV N. Maml Baactv a 331S2
M'0S4 HaraM
a
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E Reater St, Miami, R 33131
379-4553. Rabbi Lewis L Booage.
DafKtcv, Union of AfntvtCatn Hebrew
Congregation.
The celebrant is an eighth
grade student at HUM Com-
munity Day School, where he
enjoys his classes in religion as
well as secular studies.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Hubschman. Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Hubschman. Mr.
and Mrs. Len Gershberg. Mrs.
Hilda Wulach. Miss Norms
Hibschman and Mrs. Harvey
Hibschman.
A reception will be held on
Sunday in honor of the occasion.
DAVID PLATT
David, son of Mr. and Mrs. S.
Jack Platt will become a Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Menorah on
Saturday morning. October 31.
The celebrant attends High-
land Oaks Junior High School as
a seventh grade student His ex-
tra-curricular activities include
all outdoor sports and playing
chess.
Mr. and Mrs. Platt will host a
Kiddush following services and a
reception and brunch Sunday
morning at the California Coun-
try Club.
JASON ROSENBERG
Jason, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Rosenberg will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
October 31 at Temple Beth
Sholom.
The celebrant is a student of
the Confirmation Class of 5743.
BONN I SHEIR
AND
DAVID SHEIR
Bonni and David, daughter
and son of Dr. and Mrs. Arnold
Sheir. will celebrate their Bat and
Bar Mitzvah on Friday evening.
October 30. and Saturday
morning. October 31. at Beth
Torah Congregation.
Bonni is a ninth grade student
at the Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School, and David is
an eighth grade student at High-
land Oaks Junior High School, in
addition to his being a student at
Beth Torah s Harold Wolk Reli-
gious High School program.
Among the guests celebrating
this double simcha will be their
paternal grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Sheir and maternal
grandmother, Mrs. Sylvia B.
Chisen of Atlanta, Georgia. In
addition, many guests will be at-
tending from Boston and At-
lanta.
Dr. and Mrs. Sheir will sponsor
the Oneg Shabbat on Friday eve-
ning and the Kiddush on Satur-
day morning.
Bo lot ins Host
Havurah
Irving and Joan Bolotin will
host the Havurah of South Flor-
ida on Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. at their
home. 7391 SW 130 St. Rabbi
Mitchell Chefitz will officiate.
The Havurah Minyan is in the
process of developing its own
style of davening every Saturday
morning at 9:30 in the Havurah
office.
Parenting Course
Temple Beth Sholom Founda-
tion School is offering a Parent-
ing Skills Education Training
(STEP) course for mothers on
eight (8) successive Tuesdays
from Oct. 27 Dec. 15 at 9:30
a.m. 8-11:30 a.m.
By working together in a small
group, STEP participants
become involved in "sharing ex-
periences of common concern";
learning and practicing specific
child training principles and
techniques.
The Parent Resource Center of
Dade County, Inc. a non-profit
organization, will present the
course through the skills of Social
Worker, Meryle S. Weiss. Volun
teer. Susan Percal, will assist
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy wife'' (Gen. 8.16)
Noah
NOAH Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter
from the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark he
placed his wife and three sons. Shem. Ham. and Japheth. to
Ik*her with their wives; also two of each species of creature on
earth one male and one female to perpetuate the species (seven
Iran allowed for the species that were rituaUy clean). The Flood
that covered the earth drowned all living things except those in
the Ark wilii Noah. After a year, the waters receded and the
earth dried Noah let all the creatures out of the Ark. that the>
might be fruitful and multiply on earth He sacrificed in thanks
giving to God. God. for Hal part, promised Noah that He would
MVr again send a flood flint would destroy the earth. The sign
for this agreement, or covenant, is the rainbow.
Men increased and spread over the world; in the land of
Shinar they sought to build a tower whose peak should reach to
heaven Here, thev thought to concentrate all the earth's popu
lation. Hut God. "irked at mans presumption, confused their
pooch Previously all men had spoken one language. Now the)
poke various languages, not being able to understand each oth
er. they could not work together, and the building of the Tower
ot Mabel ceased.
Terah. the father of Abram. came to Haran.
(The recounting ol ttie Weekly Portion ot tho Law is e traded and eased
upon "The Grapnic Mutory oi tho Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsam.r SIS. published by Shengoid The volume It available at 7$ Maiden
Lane, New York. NY. 10011. Joseph Schlang it president ol Itio society dis
tnbutine the volume )
Rosenthal Asks For
Immediate Action
With housing starts in the
nation at their third lowest level
in history, the chairman of the
Florida Savings and Loan
League wants Congress to "act
immediately" to abolish the De-
pository Institutions Deregu-
lation Committee "the ramp-
aging child of the Financial Insti-
tutions Reform Act of 1980.'
Herschei Rosenthal. who is
president of Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan of Miami, said
"Congress did not intend the re-
sults we have seen." and that the
"regulation or de-regulation" of
the thrift industry should be re-
turned to the Federal Home Loan
Bank Board."
Rosenthal said the housing
situation is even worse in other
parts of the country than in
Florida "but it's going to
catch up with us in Florida More
long ."
He pointed out that de-
regulation of the thrift industry
was decreed by Congress to take
place by 198fi. but that the 1)11 ><
purposely brought it alxiut
within six months "
An indication of the disarr.n
and confusion in the group
Rosenthal said, was its recenl
action in recklessly raising pass
book interest rates to six percent
then panicking into reversing :t
back to five and a hall perceni
just prior to its November 1st
effective date.
"The result is not di
regulation, but de-stabilization
and confusion of an entire vital
industry," Rosenthal said. It s
up to Congress to right this
wrong at once."
Rose Matzkin Speaker
At Bonds Luncheon
Kose Matzkin, former presi-
dent of the National Hadassah
Organization, will be the featured
speaker at the annual Hadassah
liond-wit h Israel Luncheon to be
held 11:30 a.m.. Thursday, on be-
half of the Greater Miami State
of Israel Bonds Organization.
The annual luncheon spon-
sored by Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah is being chaired by
Jean Feinberg. former Region
president.
Louella W. Shapiro, a veteran
Hadassah leader, is slated to re-
ceive the coveted Woman of
Valor Award, bestowed by the
State of Israel.
Mrs. Matzkin is immediate
past chairman of the National
Hadassah Medical Organization
and currently serves as Constitu-
tion chairman. She has been ac-
tive in all facets of Hadassah and
served on President Ford's Task
Force on Women. She has been a
delegate to the World Zionist
Congress and served on the
Executive Committee of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
Jewish Organizations.
Family Children's Luncheon
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service Women's Com-
mittee will hold an Artsy"
Buffet Luncheon and Gallery
South Seas Meeting
The South Seas Chapter of
Women's ORT will hold their
meeting on Tuesday at noon at
Temple Adath Yeshurun. Esther
Silver will be in charge of the
meeting.
Hadar Women
Hadar Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will meet
Thursday at noon at Washington
Savings and Loan Bank Audi
torium. 1132 Kane Concourse
Shelameth Cohen will review
current events.
Tour on Thursday, at 11:30 am
at the Metropolitan Museum of
Art in Coral Gables. Fran Giller
is in charge.
Spa Holiday
Temple Menorah Sisterhood is
sponsoring an all inclusive
holiday at the Lida Spa. Miami
Beach, four days and three
nights, from Nov. 22 to Nov. 25
Or Olom Activities
Temple Or Olom will hold a
Menc Club breakfast meeting on
Sunday morning at the Tempi'
Wednesday, the Temple will
present a Community Action
Program featuring a speak.'
from Dade County Metro
I'epurtinent of Police
_i


Friday. October 30,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
W Arises Wafted Over Their Evening of Romance
B* MARCY LEFTON
/, hnsas wafted across the
bav. the stars twinkled for the
grit time in weeks, and that ol'
romantic moon came in from the
rain iV'hl on cue. It was the
perfect Miami evening to cele-
brate .1 rtoiy book romance.
Onoc upon a time, when Ellen
A|cer m IS years old. and
rseb;ick riding with her par-
ents. Lolita and Isaac Zelcer. she
wt ,, hoy named Oscar Felden-
jjreis who was also at the same
ranch nh a few of his friends.
Like most love stories, it was
nstanl dislike. But. as time
: Oscar, at least, changed
nd Me wrote to Ellen in
Se York, where she lived with
Jer family, and he asked her to be
Ms girlfriend. Of course, she said
BO
Over the next few years. Ellen
and her family, while on visits to
Miami, would, by chance, run
;nto Oscar at parties, weddings
and Bar Mitzvahs. Af'er all.
their parents did come from the
same Jewish community in
Havana
EVENTUALLY, Zelcer moved
his family and his business to
Miami He manufactured Charles
Jordan ties Ellen, meanwhile.
Ellen Zelcer and (hear Feldenkreis
enrolled at the University of
Miami where Oscar was also a
student. The couple started going
out three years ago. The rest is
history.
The black-and-white invitation
About Feature Writer Marcy Lefton
v
Marcy Left on is a leader in
South Honda's Jewish and gi-n-
ml communities and a pace-
after m women's activities. She
k bean in the forefront of many
Greater Miami Jewish Fad-
rration campaigns. She is iden-
tified in an official capacity with
the programs of Women's Am ri-
can OUT Her other activities in-
clude leadership roles with
Mount Sinai Hospital, Jewish
Kamih and Children's Service.
Temple Heth Sholom. Jewish
Community Centers of South
Honda and the Miami Jewish
Macy Lefton
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
In 1977. she wrote, produced
and directed the play, 'We Are
One.' for Federation. Mrs. Lefton
is also identified with the Dade
County Coalition for Human
Rights. She grew up and attend-
ed schools in Shaker Heights
(Cleveland). Ohio, and is an
honors graduate of Finch College
in New York. Married to Donald
E. Lefton. she and her husband
have led a number of missions
with the (ireater Miami Jewish
Federation to Rumania. Austria,
Russia and Israel. The couple
have two children, Robyn and
Lisa.
requested the pleasure of the
company of 150 people to meet
the "newest" member of the Fel-
denkreis family. The now-
engaged, Ellen, would soon be re-
lated to one of the most out-
standing Jewish Cuban families
in Dade County.
Arriving in Miami in 1961,
George Feldenkreis. a practicing
attorney from Havana, brought
his young wife, Dorita, and their
baby son.'Oscar, on the airlift.
Their daughter, Fanny, was born
a few months later in Miami.
INASMUCH as he couldn't
practice law in the State of
Florida, and he had a growing
family to feed, George started
Cartel, which ultimately became
a successful importing company.
Although his early years as a
businessman were years of
struggle, he never forgot his new-
ly-adopted community. Partly
out of gratitude, and because he
was blessed with an innate sense
of leadership and commitment to
the State of Israel, George be-
came involved in communal af-
fairs first as a member of the
board of Temple Menorah; and
then as a board member of the
Hebrew Academy. He served for
many years as the first president
of the Latin Division of the
(ireater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, and on its board of di-
rectors.
Vivacious Dorita also never
said no to a good cause. She has
been more than a wife and
mother, reaching beyond her
home as an active member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, the Heart Association,
the Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, and only recently
serving as chairman of a gala e-
vent for Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital.
Together, the couple have sup-
ported untold charities, have
traveled on Federation missions,
and have been named honorees
by numerous causes such as the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion.
THEIR DAUGHTER, Fanny,
former student lx>dy president of
the Hebrew Academy, attends
Hrandeis University and is
presently taking a leave of ab-
sence to work in Washington for
U.S. Congressman William Leh-
man.
Oscar will be graduating this
year from the University of
Miami School of Business. He
owns, operates and manufactures
his own line of menswear under
the Feldini label. He recently
convinced the famous Cuban-
bom designer, Adolfo. to do a line
of Guayabera shirts for his
company.
In America, everything is
possible. Both the Feldenkreis
and /.'lei! families, newly-
arrived immigrants only 20 years
ago. today embody the spirit of
the American way.
BOTH FAMILIES fled their
homeland in fear of Communism
and went through the same
period of struggle, settling in a
new land with a new language
and different customs. Although
forced to give up the security of
familiar surroundings of their
childhood, both families have
forged a new life for themselves
and their loved ones, all the while
inbuing their children with a
sense of responsibility towards
community, lending financial
support to Israel almost to the
point of self-sacrifice, and some-
how maintaining the salsa that
sets the Latin apart.
The poolside party was at-
tended by some of the most ex-
citing leaders in Dade County,
the fun-loving Latin and gringo
amigos of both families. The ex-
otic Oriental decor created by
David Harrison was com-
plemented by a sumptuous buffet
catered by Gene Singletary .
and the guests danced the night
away to the Latin perfect beat of
Joe Hernandez' "2 x 1."
Engagement
Beverly Albert to Wed Grant Fern
He\erl\ lna Albert, daughter
of Jack \ll>ert of Miami and
Florence H. Albert of Coral
liable-*, has announced her en-
gagement to Grant Iawrence
rm, son of Ronald N. Fern of
North Miami.
The hnde-to-be is a graduate of
Coral Gables Sr High School and
Lniversity of Central
The
Honda, w here she studied to be a
Pn-legal
The future groom a Naval Offi-
cer, (traduaied from North Miami
"" Hi^h School and Duke
University, where he received his
degree in Mechanical Engineer-
ing.
The future Mr. and Mrs. Fern
will be married December 27, in
Fall River, Massachasetts.
Cong. Meeting
Congregation Shaare Tefillah
of Kendall will hold a general
meeting on Monday at 8 p.m. at
8460 SW 154th Circle Court. No.
111.
Business Notes
tabert I. Spak. of Bay Harbor Isle, has qualified as a mem-
L **r "' the 1981 Top Club of New York Life Insurance Company,
according to George M. Fitzgerald, CLU, general manager of the
Miami office.
\Im-1 Holtz, chairman and president of Capitol Bank, has
contracted to purchase a controlling interest in Hemisphere Na-
tional Bnk in Washington, DC. Holtz said that he has signed
an agreement to purchase 54.000 of 150,000 outstanding shares
of the Washington bank. The transaction is subject to the ap-
proval of the U.S. Controller. Holtz founded Miami's Capital
nk in 1974. Capital has eight branches throughout Dade
tounty
I >ary S. Burman has been elected vice president of Jefferson
National Bank of Miami Beach and of Jefferson National Bank
t Sunny Isles. His election was announced by Arthur H. Cour-
i 2?' cha'rmiin of the boards of both banks, subsidiaries of
Mffcraoa Bancorp. Inc.
' Hurman, who is assistant comptroller of the holding
company which also owns and operates Jefferson National Bank
Kendall, will work in the commercial loan departments of
"th the Miami Beach and Sunny Isles banks, Courshon said.
ann i horn Infant.-, President of Intercontinental Bank
|)ri'"Un"'s the appointment of A. Anthony Noboa as Senior Vice
'" ami Hninch Manager of the Washington and Alton
K...,.
'ninche
Religious Leaders Endorse Singer
These religious leaders and many others
endorse Bruce Singer
Carol Greenberg
President, Temple Emanu-EI
Joel Gray
President, Temple Menorah
Aaron Kelton
President, Cuban Hebrew Congregation
Harry Smith
Past President, Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Gerald K. Schwartz
President, Jewish Community Center of Miami Beach
Goldie Goldstein
Executive Director, Holocaust Memorial Center
Joseph Nevel
President, Hebrew Free Loan Association
Dr. Elias Herschmann
President, Hebrew Academy of Miami Beach
Singer is member of the Board of Directors of
Temple Emanu-EI and Executive Vice President of
i Gfat B'nai B'rith, Koach Chapter
38
BRUCE
SINGER
Miami Beach City Commissioner
FREE RIDE TO POLLS CALL 673-53281 532-7823


*-i :j;~ t-.
e\r% troi

J
Page 10-B The Jewish Ftoridian-/ Friday, October 30, 1981
bank leui ** h Moshe offcl
AZF Sponsors 'Great Books'
HERZLIYA, Israel Mr. Ernest Japhet, chairman of the
Board of Bank Leumi le-Israel, is seen reporting the successful
completion of the largest financial issue ever offered on the Tel
Aviv Stock Exchange, adding approximately $66 million to the
Bank's financial base. The announcement was made recently at
a meeting here of officials of the Bank Leumi Group.
Chaim H. Friend Named Director
Chaim H. Friend has been
named director of the Southeast
Region Development Office of
Yeshiva University and its
Albert Einstein College of Medi-
cine, according to Dr. Norman
Lamm, president.
Mr. Friend has headed devel-
opment efforts for the B'nai
B'rith International Center
Building Fund, the American
Association of Jewish Education,
and the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion
(HUC-JIR). He also served as
executive vice chairman of the
Reform Jewish Appeal of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations and HUC-JIR, and for
more than 10 years, he was a na-
tional director of the United
Jewish Appeal.
Mr. Friend's affiliations in-
clude the American Academy of
Fund-Raising Sciences. National
Temple Beth Moshe is offering
an Adult Education "Minimester
Series" during the month of No-
vember.
Courses will be given to "B
ginners Hebrew.' "Basic Jewish
Concepts." "Critical and On-
going Dialogues for the Jew.
and courses in learning the can-
tellations for chanting Haftorans.
Classes will meet from 7 to 8
p.m. and 8 to 9 p.m. on four con
secutive Wednesdays beginning
this week.
The American Zionist Federa-
tion of South Florida will launch
its 1981-82 "Great Books" dis-
cussion group on Thursday, at
1:30 p.m. in the Miami Beach
Public Library auditorium, 2100
Collins Ave. The series is co-
sponsored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
Seymour B. Liebman, author
and university professor, will re-
view Michael Pollak's "Mandar-
ins. Jews and Missionaries
during the opening program.
The series will continue on th*
first and third Thursdays of each
month through March 18. with a
concluding lecture on March 25.
according to Mrs. Harriet Green,
chairman of the board of the AZF
of South Florida.
Hadassah
Luncheon
The Hanna Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its luncheon
meeting on Tuesday, at noon, at
the Seville Hotel.
Chaim H. Friend
Society of Fundraisers. American
Veterans for Israel, Jewish War
Veterans, and B'nai B'rith.
Local Residents Attend Convention
The Miami-Coral Gables Chap-,
ter of the Women's Division,
American Society for Technion
will represent its Chapter at the
National Convention in Boston,
starting Sunday.
Delegates include Mr. and
Mrs. David Issenberg (Mrs.
Issenberg is president of the local
chapter). Others attending are
Mrs. Florence Baskin. Mrs. Ethel
Sernaker. Mrs. Dorothy Spector.
Mrs. Vera Fiedler, Mrs. Selma
Nayhouse and Mrs. Eleanor
Richman.
The celebration of the Wom-
en's Division's 25th anniversary
will be highlighted by the special
guest speaker, Maj -Gen Amos
Horev, President of the Tech-
nion, and Jacob W. Ullman,
Chairman of the Board of the
American Technion Society.
JWV Holds Meeting
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223,
Jewish War Veterans, meet on
Thursday, 8:15 p.m. at the home
of Thelma Potlock. 7875 SW 17
Terr.
The meeting will feature guest
speakers from the American Red
Cross in celebration of the 100th
anniversary of the organization.
A film will be shown by Mr.
William Shaughnessy and vet-
erans benefits will be discussed
by Bernie Moscovitz. The agenda
also includes the awarding of
scholarships to children and
grandchildren of Auxiliary mem-
bers. Thelma Potlock, scholar-
ship chairman, states that all
monies for the scholarships are
raised by donations from friends
and members of the Auxiliary.
Association Elects Officers
The Association for Jewish
Special Education elected the of-
ficers for the current year at their
first membership meeting. They
are Leo Plotkin. president; Jean
Genut. first vice president; Benee
Landau, second vice president;
Elfe Nelson, Secretary; Vera
Plotkin, treasurer and Charlotte
Kleiman. coordinator.
Weekly classes have started
for Jewish Special Education for
the retarded men and women,
and more classes are being plan-
ned.
Wise Chapter Meets Jeffrey Joing Father
The Stephen S. Wise Chapter
of Hadassah will hold their meet-
ing on Monday at the Seville
Hotel. Luncheon will be served at
11:30 a.m. Presidim president,
Betty Schaffer. will speak about
the Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion, the featured project of the
month.
Jeffrey, son of Rose and Irving
Newman of North Miami Beach.
has joined his father's insurance
agenc-v. ,,,
A recent graduate of 1 IU,
Jeffrey just completed his stu lies
in property and casulty at
USF&G School of Insurano in
Baltimore.
mi u*
Mtl
rou iuk
MOVING
MOVING?
Max-------
HvJpu* avoid
olwvtngt
Port OMc*
charge 25 c*ote
torMkngui
you moved.
# rhp l*i .row**." **^
Jewish Florid ijin
REPRINTED FROM THE SUN REPORTER
OCTOBER 22,1981
New Hope, Chamber join
in opposition to Miami
Beach buying FP&L system
(This is the first of o series of articles
dealing with Question No. 3, which
will appear on the Nov. 3 ballot for
the City of Miami Beach municipal
election. All voters Democrats,
Republicans andindependents-
may vote in the elec4ion from 7
a.m. until 7 p.m. at the regular
voting precincts.)
Miami Beach voters will
vote Nov. 3 on whether or not
they favor the City of Miami
Beach purchasing the
distribution system of
Florida Power and Light Co.
within the city and forming a
public power system
The proposition will
appear on the ballot for or
against the city buying the
FP&L system under terms
of Miami Beach's existing
franchise, which expires
Jan. 23. 1982.
The ballot question does
not mention a price for the
purchase of the system, nor
does it reflect the results of a
feas ibility study on the
city's operating its own
power system. Such a study,
voted upon by the Beach city
commission, is in progress,
but its results are not due
until after the election.
The question was placed
on the ballot by initiative
referendum, and a motion to
have the city commission
approve the question for
inclusion on the ballot failed
for lack of a second.
Proponents of the attemp-
ted buy-out claim that the
purchase will result in lower
electric bills for the more
than 50.000 residential and
business customers in the
city.
Opponents deny the claim,
and say that the economics
of such a purchase cannot be
established clearly without
results of the feasi bihty
study
The New Hope Coalition of
some 28 major Miami Beach
fraternal, civic, educational
and religious organizations
has gone on record against
the passage of Question No.
3.
The board of governors of
the Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce voted to
oppose the proposition
because of lack of evidence
that there would be any
savings, and their concern
as to the possibility of an
increase in electric bills.
In addition, the city would
not collect the more than $3
million in franchise changes
which are paid by the
customers and channelled
through the company to the
city's general operating
fund.
Using the measure of
value which has been
approved under Florida law.
the total cost of purchasing
the distribution system
could amount to $200 million
or more and. with municipal
bond rates at an all time
high, it is unlikely that any
utility entering the business
today could provide the
same quality of service at
lower rates.
If the city does not renew
its franchise prior tothe Jan.
23. 1982 deadline, Florida
Power and Light has advised
Miami Beach that under the
Dade County franchise, the
franchise charges paid by
both residential and busi-
ness consumers would go to
the county and not tot he City
of Miami Beach, resulting in
the loss of millions ol dollars
to the city annually.
Him umc*


In Capitol Hill
Hearing On Anti-Semitism
Friday. October 30,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Pagell-B
By HELEN SILVER
f, ASHINGTON arings to increase public
reness of officially-condoned
li-Semitism in the Soviet
ton were held on Capitol Hill
; week. The hearings were de-
fied to commemorate the 40th
-niversary of the massacre of
Ire than 33,000 Jews by the
NOTICE OF ACTION
I CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
ITHE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO II lSIFC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
|\ RE THK. MARRIAGE OF
: iKKVKT ARTHUR,
loner Husband
(I ARAMAXINE ARTHUR.
Kespondenl Wife
IT. ARAMAXINE
\RTHI K
J82HHollywood Place
Hontlngton
west Virginia
VOL' ARK HERKBY NOT!
flED that petition for Dlsso
jUon of your Marriage haa
filed and commenced In
His court and you are required
i-rve a copy of your written
h ... If any, to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. KSg.
v for Petitioner, whose
kridress U Suite 616. lat Slate
< Hide T00 NE 2nd Ave .
Iianil. Ft. 33138. and file the
onumal with the clerk of the
tyled court on or before
ember 30. 1M1. otherwise a
plault will be entered against
mi lor the relief prayed for tn
umplalnt or petition
Tins notice shall be published
nh week for four con
.. weeks in THE JEW
JSH FLORIDIAN
wITNKSS my hand and the
| I said court at Miami.
u on this 2T day of Octo
r -'
I'.ICHARD P. BRINKER
uiClark, circuit Court
I >,ide County. Florida
Hy Clartnda Brown
As I>eputy Clerk
kCin ml Court Seal i
LLOYDM ROl'TMAN
Kuitf So 615.
I"' NK 2nd Ave
iMi.imi KI. 33138
attorney for Petitioner
I October SO.
V'%ember, 13 Jo IBM
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number II 743'
Division 01
I.NRE ESTATE OF
" M'.Y K BROWN
i .tx-d
NOTICE or
Mi MINISTRATION
ulministratlon ol the
I M IRT K BROMN
I Kile Number M 7*37.
nosng in the Circuit Court
I i.i.I.- County. Florida.
..te Division, the address
huh is 73 Waal Flagler
Miami. Florida 33130
Tlir names and addresses of
personal representative
the personal rep-
Ullve's attorney arc act
forth below
Ml interested persona are
>>'d to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THK FIRST PUBLICATION
W THIS NOTICE: la) all
urns against the as late and
- any objection by an In
lervstrd person to whom notice
"as mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quail
(>'Atlons of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or Juris
diction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JKCTION8 NOT SO FILED
MILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
^ nun on October 10.1M1
Personal RepresentsUve:
SYDSABLOSKY
100 Bayvtew Drive
North Miami Beach. FlSSlfO
Attorney for
Personal RepreeentaUve
CEOROE J. TALIANOIT.
W'UBSBtnhoNDr..
JJJAmLFlaaUl
Telsphone; wnW
October 30;
.rhwmiTi,mi
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME CAW
NOTICE HEREBY
GIVEN dial the iifsSainit
dl.irtng to eoxage la >ijiiai
e"t of Dado County. Florida
AttaSS RHOD,*BAUOH
^WHENCE F KAXNE
MIAMI 33118
,a* M OctoosrSO;
Novembers. 13.10. ltd!
Naria at Babi Yar near Kiev in
the Ukraine.
The special hearings were co-
chaired by Sens. John Heinz (R,
Pa.) and Claiborne Pell (D., R.I.),
both commissioners of the Com-
mittee on Security and Coopera-
tion in Europe (Helsinki Com-
mission). Co-sponsoring organi-
zations were the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJl
and the Jewish Community
Council of Greater Washington.
In his opening statement.
Heinz said, "As we gather here
on this double sad day (referring
to the assassination of President
Anwar Sadat of Kgypt and the
massacre at Babi Yar on Oct. 6,
1941) there is no question that
the repressions of Soviet Jews is
the harshest of any time in the
last decade."
HE TOLD the heavily attend-
ed hearings: "One thing that
emerges as more disturbing than
anything else. It is not the op-
pression of Jews who apply for
visas for Israel. It is not the re-
iection of most of the applica-
tions, not even the waiting in fear
and anguish for years, which is
the fate of most Jews who want
to leave the country which simply
does not accept them as Jews.
The ugliest part of the cruel anti-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CiwNollli;iFC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re Ihe in.iri1.iKe of
CORN ELI I 8 K EDWARD!
Petitioner
anil
RHONDA R EDWARM
Reaponted
NOTICE or action
vol ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, to it on MAR
VIN OREBER, ESQ. hisattor
ney, 633 N E lB7th Slreel. Suite
HII5. N Miami Beach. Fla
.13162. on or before November
in IM1, ami file the original
rttll the clerk of this court;
Otherwise a default will be
entered .igalni*! you
Dated October31, ivmi
RICHARD!' BRINKER
\> Clerk ol Ihe Court
ll> M I ll.irlnetl
Aa Deputy Clerk
ISSIa October ;
November! II, 10, ii,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name Mora
Conversion Body Shop at 7836
NW 3* Ave Miami. Fla 33147
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Mora Conversion
Body Shop. Inc.
Victor Ramos. Vice President
13310 October 28, 30,
November 6. 13. 1961
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
HUOO INTERNATIONAL
TRADING at 7800 SW 97 Ct .
MIAMI. FLA Intends to regls
tar said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Irmgrard Epstein
Pita Romero. Owner
13300 October 23. 30.
November*, 11.1M1
IN THK CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No fl Ut7JFC
FAMILY DIVISION
in re the marriage of
MAUD LOFTON
PeUUoner
and
ALBERT USE LOFTON
Reapondent
rJorieE or action
TO ALBERT LEE
LOFTON
(Reetdaoc* Unknown)
TOO ARE NOTIFIED that
an action lor iBatnhtlnn of
marriage haa bean filed and
you are required to eervs a
copy of your written defenses,
If any. on MARVIN OREBER.
Attorney tor rNjOOooer. H
NJE. 167 at.. N.M.B.. Fl H1U
on or before November Ml. Ml.
and rue toe original wiui the
clerk of thle court, othsrwlee a
default wUl be entered against
you. Dated: October l, 1M1
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
by 8 A Byrd
Aa Deputy Clark
October IS.;
November 6. 18, 1M1
Semiusm which today is part of
Soviet policy is its unrelenting ef-
fort to eradicate every last ves-
tige of Jewish culture and Jewish
contribution to the history of the
Soviet Union."
Heinz added: "All of us
Jews and non-Jews, Americans
and others throughout the free
world should recognize and
know that this is the moat evil
and dangerous epidemic, and it is
getting worse, not better. Just as
the people of the free world did
not permit the lesson of Babi Yar
to be lost in history, so we will
not permit Soviet anti-Semitism
to excape our thorough and criti-
cal examination."
Pell, who is a ranking member
of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, said that while the
Soviet Union is a signatory of the
Helsinki accords, it "has con-
-isi.ntly and flagrantly violated
i heM obligations in its treatment
of Soviet Jews."
HE STATED. "Through its
policies and practices, the Soviet
government institutes and
fosters the growth of anti-Semi-
tism. There are many indications
that in recent years discrimina-
tion against Jews, particularly in
the areas of education and em-
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name BAL-
LOONS "N THINGS at i76S8
NE 8th Court. N Miami
Beach. Fla 33162 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court ol
Dade County. Florida
JOYCE Kl'TTLER
SUSAN V Ol JCENFELD
13328 October 30.
November 6. 13. 20. 1WK1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Ori-
ental Handicrafts Center at
8255 S W 10 Terrace. Miami.
Fla .13144 Intends to register
said nume with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Oriental Handicrafts
Center. Inc
By Cay Sim. President
13327 October 30.
November h. 13. 20. 1081
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
deelrliuj to aaaajn in business
iltidei the fictitious name
ItAC'E I. At LINO SERVICE at
4361 N W 173 Drive. Carol City.
i SOU Intend! to regls
' i *.inl name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
( ount) Florida
ItuhenA Ramos
13318 October 30.
November*. 13. 20. llWl
IN THECIRCUIT COUKI
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number |l 6*27
Oi vision 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
GERTRUDE SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es
tate of GERTRUDE 3CH
WARTY., deceased. File Num
bar 81-8637. I* pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 78 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentaUve and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persona are re
Sulred to file with this court,
iITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: 11) all
claims against the estate and
(I) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom noUcs
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, toe quallfl
caUons of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT 80 FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 80. 1861
Personal Rapresentatlve
MOSES J ORUNDWERO
Suite800. USE First Ave..
Miami. Florida 33131
Attorney for Personal
RepreeentaUve
Richard J Hays
HAY8 A GRUNDWERG
Suite 800.
USE. FlratAve.
Miami. Florida 88131
Telephone: (808)871-4418
1883* October 80:
Novembers. 1881
ployment, haa increased." In ad-
dition. Pell said, "the Soviet
government has placed further
obstacles in the pathway of Jews
who desire to emigrate to the
West and has increased harass
ment of those who have been re-
fused exit permits."
Dr. Michael Novak. US
Representative to the United Na-
tions Human Rights Commis
sion. was among the scholars
clergymen, and a former refuse
nik to testify. He emphasized
The situation for Jews in the
Soviet Union is especially bleak
at this time."
Dr. William Korey. director of
International Policy Research for
B'nai B'rith International,
echoed warnings by Soviet Jews
that this is "a moment of grave
urgency." He quoted from a re-
cent analysis of the Soviet Jewish
condition signed by nearly 130
prominent Jewish activLsts in
Moscow and l^ningrad which
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 61 1*447 FC
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGEOF
ADA J CHACON
SEGOVIA.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
1.1 IS RAMON SEGOVIA.
Respondent-Husband
TO LI IS RAMON
SEGOVIA
Residence Unknown
YOf ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on MOR-
TIMER S COHEN, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
180 S.E 2nd Avenue. Suite 1000.
Miami. Florida 33131, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled Court on or be
fore November 30. 19HI. other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks tn The Jewish
Floridian
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of Octo-
ber. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY I A Byrd
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
13336 October 30.
November* 13.20. 1W1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name of
AMERICAWIDE FINANCIAL
SERVICES at 612 NW 12 AM-:
MIAMI FLA 33136 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
AMERICAWIDE
INSURANCE INC.
13333 October 30;
November6. 13. 20.1981
stated: "The Jews of the USSR
are facing the threat of a national
catastrophe."
OBSERVING THAT anti-
Semitism has become "a form of
state policy" in the Soviet Union,
Korey declared that as a result.
Soviet Jews "find themselves
particularly vulnerable" because
not only haa their institutional
life and structure "all but been
pulverized" by a drive that began
in 1948 and that has continued
ever since, but a 90 percent slash
in emigration finds them trapped
in the Soviet Union. Emigration,
he said, "is their only salvation,"
but with doors all but closed,
"agony becomes desperation."
Two Washington clergymen
who visited the Soviet Union last
year. Rev. John Steinbruck.
pastor of the Luther Place
Memorial Church, and Father
Kugene Brake. Oblate. St.
Francis DeSalles. Chaplain of the
Ixtrton. Va.. Reformatory, des-
cribed their meetings with Soviet
Jews and witnessing signs of
their harassment
Dr. Israel Rubier, national pre-
sident of Workmen's Circle, told
how thousands of Jews thronged
to the tiny exhibit booth he
manned at the Moscow Book Fair
last month, in awe over the Yid-
dish and Hebrew books dis-
played. Marcia Weinberg. chair-
woman of the Committee on
Soviet Jewry of the Greater
Washington Jewish Community
Council, and Jerry Goodman,
executive director of the NCSJ,
assisted in questioning the wit-
nesses. The entire proceedings
were recorded bv the Voice of
America for future broadcast
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 11-1*24* FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE. The Marriage of
D1AN A CASABLANCA
de DEL CORRAL
PeUtloner-Wlfe
and
FERN AN DO DEL CORRAL
Respondent Husband
TO: Fernando Del Corral
Can-era 21 No. M -SB
AptoNo .401
Bogota.
Colombia, S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
fUed against you and you are
required to serve a copy Of your
wrltlen defenses. If any. to It on
LOUIS R. SELLER, attorney
for PeUUoner, whose address U
4X0 Lincoln Road. Suite 2,
Miami Beach. Florida, and rile
the original with the dark Of
the above styled court on or be-
fore November SO. Ian j other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
Petition.
This notice shall be published
one* each week for tour con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of Octo-
ber. 1M1.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
13330 October SO;
November*. IS. SO. 1S81
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number fl (002
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
IRVING MKYROWITZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
ACJAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED XH
THK. ESTATE
Vlll' ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
Of the estate of IRVING MEY
ROWITZ. deceased. File Num-
ber 81-8002. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 3rd
floor Dade County Court
House, 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate Is STEPHEN R MOR-
ROW, whose address Is 100
Bates Road. Great Neck. New
York 11020 The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below-
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis Tor the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
peraonal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OP THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
MeOons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
floattooa of the personal re-
presentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FTJJED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
'.Data of the Orat publication
of this JNoOce of Administra-
tion: October SO, lMl.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
IRVING MEYROWITZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Siegfried A. Ramer
1*300 N.I. 19th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Fla. S3182
Telephone: tSOS) B44-8741
1SSS4 October SO;
November*, lffll


-t
- II III

i nn mm
____P?5~-'
OO A
12-B
The Jewish Floridum/ Pridey. October 30,1981
iPubUcT^otice
IN THC CIRCUIT COURT
DADS COUNTY, FLOU IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NvmNr tl 7J17
OlvlNluM
INRE: ESTATE OF
LEOSCHREYER
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The >dm frustration of the e*
tote of LEO SCHUSTER, de
ceased, File Numbtr 81 -7887. It
ending In the Circuit Court tot
ADS County, Florida.
Probate Division, the addreaa
of which la 7* Waat Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida SUM.
Tha namaa and addraaaaa of
tha personal representative
and tha paraonal represents
Uvc'a attorney ara aat forth be-
tow.
All interested paraona ara
required to file with thla court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Or
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
clalma against the aatate and
(3) any objection by an Inter
sated parson to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 3S. 1981.
Paraonal RepreeentaUve:
HYMAN P. QALBUT, ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 381 SB
Attorney for Personal
Repraaentatlve:
Richard J Mentn
GALBUT, GALBUT
4MENIN.P A .
we Washington A ve
Miami Beach. Florida 83189
Telephone 672-8100
13397 October 28. 80, 1M1
NOTICI UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that tha undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name olTie
Bride's Oallery at number 21
Ponce Da Leon Boulevard. In
the City of Coral Gables. Flor-
ida. Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Clr-
cupt Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thla
22 day of September, 1981
THE BRIDES GALLERY.
INC.
By: ClemenclaLaatre.
Secretary
ANTONIO TORRENT. JR..
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
STONE. SOSTCHIN ft
GONZALEZ. P.A.
1401 Wast Flagler Streat
Miami. Florida 881 SO
132B4 October 16. 28.80;
November 6.1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 81 -14313 FC
NOTICI OP SUIT
IN RE: Tha Marriage of
EMMELINEROLLE,
Petmooar-Wlfe. and
WILLIE ROLLE,
Reapondant-Husband
TO: WILLIE ROLLE
MUX ROCK
FREEPORT. BAHAMAS
TOU. WILLIE ROLLE. are,
hereby notified that a Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage has
bean filed against you, and you
ara required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Petition tor Dissolution of Mar
rlage on Petitioner Wife
attorney. RONALD L. DAVIS.
ESQ.. Suite 407. Skylake State
Bank Bids I860 N.E. Miami
Gardens Drive. North Miami
Beach. Florida 88179-4896;
Phone Number (SOB) 940-2882,
and file the original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Curt.
Family Dlvlalon. 8800 NW.
27th Avenue. Miami. Florida
38142. on or before the 20th day
of November, 1981 I f you fall to
do so. Judgment by default will
be taken against you for the
relief demanded In the Petition
for Dissolution ofhMarrlage.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks In the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED, at
Miami. Florida, this 8th Day of
October. 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clark; Circuit Court -
Famllv Dlvlalon
Dade County. Flort.
lorida
By: K. Selfried
Deputy Clerk
13376 October 16. 28. SO;
Novembers. 1981
IN TNE CIRUCIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND DOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CateNe.t1-lS777FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
In re tha marriage of
SUSAN M BLUMBERO.
Petitioner Wife
va.
ALANS. BLUMBERG,
R espondent- Husband
TO ALAN S.
BLUMBERG
13511 Dripping Spring
Houston. Texas 77OS3
YOU ALAN S. BLUMBERG
are hereby notified to file your
answer to this Petition tar Dis
solution of Marriage with tha
Clerk of the Court and mall a
copy to Petitioner's Attorney
DANIEL GALLUP. 235S Sal
ledo Street. Coral Gables.
Florida. 33134. on or before
Novarntoar 30,1981 else Petition
will be taken as confessed.
This 14 day of October, 1*81
RICHAROP. BRINKER
Clark Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clark
12391 Octohwr 23,30.
November a. 13. l *t 1
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OP
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Actton
No.SI-lJSarFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OPMARRIAOE
INRE:
JUAN RAMON VEREA
and
MARIA ELENA VEREA
TO: MARIA ELENA VEREA
8 Dal Norte Entre
ly2Estc
Placate. Laa VUlaa -
Cuba ____
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HUGO DE AT ALA, ESQ at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 11S4 SW 8th Street.
Miami Florida 33130. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore November 6. 1981; other-
wlae a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day of Sep-
tember. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
HUGO DE AY ALA. ESQ.,
Attorney for Petitioner
1134 SW 8th Street
Miami. Florida 38180
Telephone 858 8626
12248 October 9.16;
28, 30. 1981
NOTICI UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN ttat tha undersigned.
daalrtng to engage hi bustneaa
under tha flcttUoua name Bur-
K Cuban King at 2239 NW 27
I.. Miami. FL SS142 Inlands
to register said name with the
Clerk of tha Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
LAURENTTNO GONZALEZ
8M3W81 Ave
Miami, FLA SS1S6
October 38. 80,
Novembers. 1S,1 Stl
1
NOTICI UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
daalrtng to engage In business
under the Bctltloua name of B*
TEOfVAL TOUCATION UNI-
VERSITY at number 1889 NW.
Tth St. ht tha CJtjr <>:
Florida, intenda to register the
aKl name with tha Clark of the
Circuit Court of Browai*
County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thla
let day of October, 1991
INTEGRAL PSTCHOLOOT
CENTER, INC.
By LutoaS Dtax-Padron.
Secretary
October IS, 3S. SO;
Novembers, 1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 11-15140 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OPMARRIAOE
IN RE.
DIANA CEBALLO
PETITIONER WIFE
and
ARMANDO C. CEBALLO
RESPONDENT HUSBAND
TO: ARMANDOC.
CEBALLO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
HUGO DE AY ALA. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1184 S.W 8th Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the Clark of the
above styled court on or before
November 6. 1981; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor tha relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
Thla notice shall be published
once each weak for four con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this SO day of Sap
tember. 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HUGO DE AT ALA. ESQ..
Attorney for Petitioner
1184 S.W. 8th Street
Miami. Florida 88180
Telephone SINN
13347 Octobers. 16.
.__________23.30.1661
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Action
No.61 IS3SSFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: Tha marriage of
HILDEGARDA.
VARDILOS,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
LOUIS E. VARDILOS.
Respondent Husband
TO: LOUISE.
VARDILOS
Residence Address
Unknown
TOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FTED that an action tor Dtoao-
tutton of Marriage has bean
filed against you and you ara
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner, whose sddress U
1S1S NW. 167 St. Suite 336,
Miami. Florida, and file tha
original with tha clerk of tha
above sty led court on or before
November 18th. 198J; other
wise a default will be entered
sgsinst you tor tha relief de-
manded In tha complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla tth day of Octo-
ber 19*1
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
KSeUrled
Ctofh
Octobers, 16
~ 36.80.
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 11-14497
NOTICE OF ACTION
ROBERT INFELD and
MELVIN MITCHELL
d-b-a
INFELD ft MTTHCELL.
Plaintiffs.
vs. _____
RICHARD KlTTENDORF,
Defendants
TO: RICHARD
KlTTENDORF
Last known address:
8800 SW 136 Avenue
C B No 16
Miramar Florida 38086
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
PIED that an action for
damages has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses. If any. to It on Bruce
Lamchlck. LAMCHICK
GLUCKSMAN JOHBNTON.
Plaintiff's Attorneys, whose
address Is. 10661 North Kendall
Drive. Suite 217, Miami. Flor-
ida SS176. on or before Novem-
ber 13th. 1981. and file the origi-
nal with the Clark of this Court
either before service on Plain-
tiff's Attorneys or Immediately
thereafter, otherwlae a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Complaint
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on October
tth. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By K Self rled
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN ft
JOHSNTON
Bruce Lamchlck
Attorneys for Plaintiffs
106S1 North Kendall Drive
Suite 217
Miami. FL SSI7t
12263 Octobers. 16,
28,30, 1981
- NOTICI UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBT
GIVEN that tha undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under tha fictitious name JUN
ARD CO. ERA A ERA -
JUN ARD OO. at 9140 SW. 87th
Avenue. Miami. Florida In-
tenda to register said name
with tha Clerk of tha Circuit
Court of Dada Counts'. Florida.
MARK L FRIED. President
WATNER 4 LEAVT. P.A.
Attorney for
JUN ARD OO.
9146 8 W 87th Ave
Miami. Florida 88176
13272 Oetobar9.lt;
28. SO. 1M1
By K Self
As Deputy*
NOTICI UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBT
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under tha fictitious name BET-
MAR OF SOUTH FLORIDA.
IMC. (a Fla. Corporation) at
4T) SW 73 Ave.. Miami. FL
SS1B6 Intends to register said
name with Use Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
SAUL FRANK SCHONINGER
18. DADELAND BLVD.
MIA. SS166
Octobers, it,
28, SO. 19S1
NOTICI UNOIR
FICTITIOUS NMMU
NOTICE IS HEREBT
OIVEN that tha undeyifsnsed.
uSir^ltotlttoS iiajn^OO-
ARDI CONCRETE PtJMPmp
at 10480 S W 30rth TO"*"*-
kUAMI. FLORIDA SSltB
tonda to register said name
with the Clark of the Orcult
Court of Dada Otainty,FMl
ROOELIO ARTIOAS
18904
October 28. SO
Novambert.lS.1981
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAD! COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATB DIVISION
File Number 81-M39
Divistoatl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE CAPPELLETTI
Deceaeed
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVDia
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AOAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FTED that the administration
of the eetate of Rose CappeUet
U. decaaaed. File Number 81-
8419. Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Flor
Ida, Probate Dlvlalon. tha ad-
dress of which Is 78 W Flagler
St.. Miami. Fl S81S0 The
personal representative of the
estate la Dennis Cappelletti.
whose address U 2801 8 W 2Srd
St., Miami. Fl. 88148. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having clalma or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with Use clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate tha
basts for the claim, the name
and addreaa of tha creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall bo
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim la ee-
cured tha security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal repreeenlatjve
All persona interceted In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob
Jecuone they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
flcaUona of the personal re
preaentetlve. or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Data of tha first publication
of thla Notice of Administra-
tion October 23. 1861
DENNIS CAPPELLETTI
Aa Paraonal Represents".ve
of the Estate of
Rose Cappelletti
Deceased
ATTORNET FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Eugene Lemllch. Eaq.
2730 W Flagler St
Miami. Fl 881 SB
Telephone 642-6261
12294 October 38. SO. 1981
NOTICI OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SIRVICI
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OP
THIILIVINTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND POR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Actton
NO. 81-13979 (16) TISTA
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF
A MINOR CHILD BT:
PROPHET _
CHARLES PINKNET
TO WILLIAM SESSION
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBT NOTI
FIED that Petition tor Adop
tlon has been filed concerning
your child you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenees. b* any. to it on MI-
CHAEL P STRIAR. ES-
QUIRE, attorney for PetJtlon-
ei. whose addreaa la 1860 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive. No 802.
North Miami Beach. Florida.
88179. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
lSth. 1981; otherwlae a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for 'cur con
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and tht
seal of aald court of Miami
Florida on thla 6th day of Octo
ber. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Selfried
Aa Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal l
MICHAEL P 8TRIAR.
ESQUIRE
1880 N E Miami Gardens
Drive. Suite No 803
North Miami Beach. Fla 38179
Telephone (SOB I 944-1888
133T1 Octobers. 18.
28. 80. 1981
Mlcr
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR OADICOUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 81-8191
Division 94
INRE ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM GEVIRTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate Of ABRAHAM GEVIRTZ.
deceased, File Number 81-8193.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
tor Dade County Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which la 78 Waat Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
The names and addressee of
tha personal representative
and the personal represents
five's attorney are sat forth
below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to fll with this court.
WTTHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (1) all
clalma against the aatate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cation of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of thla Notice has
begun on October 16.1981.
Paraonal RepreeentaUve:
RUTH GEVIRTZ
10188 Collins Avenue
Bal Harbour, Florida SUM
CTPENSCTPEN
Attogney tor Paraonal
Repraaentatlve:
NOTICI OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) <
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OP
THR BLE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND POR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Actton
Na. 81-4174 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICI POR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF
MARCO ANTONIO
MONSALVE
BT
EFRAIN SOLTVAN
Petitioner
TO MARCO A MONSALVE
BARRERA
Calls 78 A No 64 A 84.
Barrio Cart be
MedeDin.
Colombia
TOU ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that a petition for the
ADOPTION of MARCO AN-
TONIO MONSALVE. has been
filed and commenced In this
court and you are required to
serve a copy of you written de-
fenaea. if any. to It on HUGO
DE AYALA. attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa la
1184 SW 8th Street. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above style
court on or before November
6th. 1981. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS may hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of Octo-
ber. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BYK Selfried
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ .
1134 S W 8th Street
Miami, Florida 83130
Telephone 888-8636
Attorney for Petitioner
13282 October 9. 16.
33. SO. 1981
ehael A. Diibtn
838 Arthur Godfrey Rd .
Miami Beach. Florida SSI40
Telephone (SOB) 882-4721
1228S October 14. 3S. 1981
NOTICI 6P ACT KM
CONSTR UCTI VE SE RVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
ANO POR DADE COUNTY
Civil Acne*
Ne.81 1S389FC
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
INRE:
Joeeph L. Rivera
and
Nasretta M. Rivera
TO: Nasretta M Rivera
244 N Main Street
Apt lt-A
Hlilcreat. New York
TOU ARE HEREBT NOTI
Fl ED that an actton tor Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses M any. to It on
Stanley E. Goodman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address la
MS East 8th Avenue. Hlatoah.
FLA. 88010 and file tha original
with tha clerk of tha above
styled court on or bate re No-
vember isth. lssi. etharwtoa a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded to
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
ones each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and tha
seal of aatd court at "inf.
Florida on thla tth day of Octo-
ber. 1840.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Flortda
By K Selfried
As Deputy Clerk
12364 Octobers, It:
9,69,
NOTICI OP ACTION
CONSTR UCTI VE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OP
TNI ELE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND POR OADI COUNTY
Civil Actton
No.SllSMIFC
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
INRE:
William White
and
Glenda Jean White
TO: Glenda Jean White
Route 3. Box J
Lowell. Arkansas
TOU ARE HEREBT NOTI
FTED that an actton for Dtoao-
tutton of Marriage has been
Btod against you and you are
repaired to esrvs a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN,
attorney tor Petitioner, whoaa
address is 909 East Sth Avenue,
Hlatoah. FL ISO it and file tha
original with tha clerk of tha
above styled court on or before
November lath. 1981. ethar-
wtoa a default will be enured
against you tor tha relief de-
manded to the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor lour con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS m* hand and tha
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 9th day of Octo-
ber. 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dada County. Florida
ByK. Sctfrtod
As Deputy Clerk
13SW Octobert. It;
-------- 39,90,
INTHICIRCUITCOURT
POR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11)903
Division 91
INRE ESTATE OF
SARAH LE VINE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the eetate of SARAH LE
VINE, deceased. File Number
81 1083, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
addreaa of which la Dade
County Courthouse. 78 W Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida. The
paraonal representative of the
state to SAMUEL LEVINE.
whose addreaa to 838 Washing
ton Avenue. Miami Beach.
Florida. The name and addreaa
of tha personal represents
five's attorney are aat forth be-
low
All persons having claims or
demands against tha estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with Us* clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have, Each chin must be to
writing and must toeaanaS the
seats tor the claim, tha name
and addreaa of the creditor or
hie agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed if the c lalm la
not yet due. tha data when It
will become due shall be
staled If tha claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated. tha
nature of tha uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim to se-
cured, the security shall ha de-
scribed Tha claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to tha clerk to askable the
clsrk to mall one copy to each
ueiaeaal laaaaaenlaflii.
All assssns Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration baa
been mailed are
WTTHIN THREE
FROM THE DATS OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
they may have that
a the vandtty of the
required,
MONTHS
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT BO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
. Data Of tha first publication
Of thai Notice of Admtntetra
tkm October 38. 1981
SAMUEL LEVINE
' A. Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SARAH LEVINE.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
EUGENE J. WEISS. Eaq.
SWItooa
NJE

a* 88,1981
_**_


>deT
i lira
rial
XO-D
iblic Notice
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
4E ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
IAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVPL DIVISION
CsseNo. I1-U341CA
NOTICE OF SUIT
t-DAVl ENTERPRISES.
A Flortda corporation.
^VIAE BOREL.
plaintiffs
vs.
|ELE. CEPEDA
defendant
ABELE CEPEDA
2SS0 3W 104th Place
Miami. Florida
OR
2330 S W 104th Place
Miami. Florida
'nt ABEL E. CEPEDA.
i hereby notified that a Com
nt For Damages haa been
nKint you. and you are
ilred to serve a copy of your
|wer or Pleading to the
nplalnt For Damans on
ntiff attorney. RONALD
I DAVIS. ESQ.. Suite 407.
Make State Bank Building.
N E Miami Hardens
North Miami Beach.
Ida SS17S. Phone: (3001
392. and file the original
ter or Pleading In the
of the Clerk of the
nty Court. Civil Division. 78
Flagler Street. Miami.
Ida 33142. on or before the
j day of November. 1M1. If
[fall to do so. Judgment by
lull will be taken against
(for the relief demanded In
Complaint For Damages.
kli Notice shall be pub
fc'i once each week for four
[consecutive weeks In the
ilSH FIX) RID IAN
>SK AND ORDERED, at
nl. Florida, this 8th day of
ST. 1M1.
(ICHARDP BRINKER
Clerk
cult Court. Civil Division
I idr County. Flortda
By K Seitrted
DEPUTY CLERK
October 11.23. 30.
November*. 101
i Road Bldg
I Beach. Flortda 1313s
530 4313
October It. 33.30,
November 6,1663
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
|E ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN ANOFOR
IDE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case N*. 61-1340* FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
(PETITION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MAR R IAOE
IE THE MARRIAGE Or
IAKI.ES J V ESSIO.
Petitioner. Husband.
[AN REMSEN VESSIO.
^t-apondent. Wife
I JEAN REMSEN VESSIO
I Residence Unknown
the above) as mart Res
nt. are hereby notified
[ a Petition for Dissolution
ilarrlage haa bean filed
you. You are required
Irve a copy of your reply to
Iprtlllonon the Petitioner's
ney. KENNETH N. RE
Suite m, One Lincoln
Building. Miami Beach.
33131. and file the ortg-
[reply In the oCOve of the
of the Circuit Court. Tt
Flagler Street Miami.
33130. on or before the
I of November. 1601
you fall to do so, Judgment
Mault win be taken sgakssl
or the relief demanded hi
Lid petition
notice shall bo pub-
i once each weak for lour
Icutlve weeks In the JEW
t ID IAN
*NE AND ORDERED at
nl. Flortda. this T day of
t>r 1M1.
Richard P. Brlnker.
| as Clerk of said Court
WUlle Braoahaw Jr
DEPUTY CLERK
pNETHHN. REKANT
neyforP
. NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
>TICE IS HEREBY
CN that the
to engage ks |
Ihe fictitious
the
Kasuga Sales of
at 141110 U0. M 8.E.
Avenue. Miami. Fla. 33131
to register said name
I the Clerk of the Circuit
1 of Dade County. Florida.
">asuga America, lac.
i Florida corporation
Efrmln Rosner. Preeldsnt
October 33. 30
November 1.13. 10ti
. NOTICE UNDER
KTITIOUS NAME LAW
DTICB U HEREBY
EN that the undersigned.
! to engage in business
he fictitious name Lm-
I Leasing at toi Flagship
Bldg iin Lincoln Rd..
-1 Beach. Fla 88186 In-
to register said name
we Clerk of the Circuit
1 of Dads Count/. Florida
ncoIn Leasing Company
' Alan Roth. President
William O'Nell
Alan Roth
n O'Nell in
ey for
, "P Bank Bldg
Hoi ^
ncobiRoad
1 Beach. FL361SO
October it. SI, to;
November t. lttl
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILENO.II-tttv
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALAN I. SILVERBERG
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ALAN I. SIL-
VERBERG. deceased, late of
Dade County. Flortda, File
Number 81-83B8 la pending In
the Circuit Court In and for
Dade Cunty. Florida Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 3rd Floor. Dade County
Courthouse. 78 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Flortda SS1S0
The personal representative of
this estate Is Sylvia SUverberg.
whose address Is 8701 Collins
Avenue. No 808. Miami Beach.
Fla 88140. The name and ad-
drees of the attorney for the
personal representative are aet
forth below
Ail persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
Or THE FIRST PUBLICA
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the, above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim la as-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
state to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
yacttons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
flcaUons of the personal re
pressntatlvs. or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAD48. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Flortda on
this lath day of October. 1M1.
8YLVIA SILVERBERG
Aa Personal Representative
of EM Estate of
ALAN I. SILVERBERG.
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on the 3) day
of October, 1081
LYNN W. FROMBERG. Esq.
Of Law Offices of
FROMBIRG. FROMBERG.
ROTH. GROSS, cohen,
SHORE A BERKS. PA
No. 000,
BOO E. Hsllsndale Beach B l vd
Hallandale Florida 33006
Telephone 040-0708
la*M October 33. 30. itsl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne.tl-I MI7 PC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELIZABETH
WTLHELMINE
MENUAU.
Petitioner. Wife
and
CHARLES ALEXIS
HENRI MENUAU.
Respondent Husband
TO: CHARLES ALEXIS
HENRI MENUAU
Rue 2 H Number 300,
rear apartment
Cap Haitian.
Haiti. W I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage haa
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite tit. first State
Bank Bldg 7000 NX Second
Ave.. Miami. FL 33131. and Hie
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be
fore November SO. lttl. other
wise adefault will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of Octo-
ber. 1M1
RICHARD P. BRINKE R
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Cunty. Flortda
ByL C Bedaase
As Deputy Clerk
12300 October 23, 30.
Novsmbert.18. lttl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. II-istt
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
CLARENCE T LEWIS
Petitioner Husband
and
BOBBY GENE LEWIS
Respondent-Wife
TO BOBBY GENE LEWIS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1180 N E. 108 Street.
Miami. Fla.. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before No-
vember SO. 1881: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week lor four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Flortda on this 18 day of Octo-
ber. 1M1.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N a Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
l Circuit Court Seal
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ
Room SIS
1180 N E. 188 Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone: 040-8036
Attorney for Petitioner
13801 October 28. 80;
llnvamlurll IX 1SS1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cssc No. 11-14866
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
BERNARD ROSENBLOOM.
Plaintiff.
vs.
ALEXANDER MTTOW and
KIMBERLY MTTOW.
his wife
TO: ALEXANDER MITOW
and
KIMBERLY MTTOW,
his wife
Residences Unknown
YOU ARE NOTm ED that
an action on a Promissory Note
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any. to it on ABRAHAM A.
OALBUT. ESQ.. Plaintiff's
Attorney, whom address Is 800
Washington Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida 33138 on or be-
fore November 30th. 1081, and
Me the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's Attorney or
Immediately thereafter, other-
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Complaint or
Petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on October
llth. 1881
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
BY: K Setfrted
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal
ABRAHAM A. OALBUT.
ESQ.
OALBUT. OALBUT
AMENTN
880 Washington Avenue
Mlam I Beach. Flortda 83136
Telephone: (306lira-3ioo
BY: ABRAHAM A. OALBUT.
ESQ
Attorney for Plaintiff
lUOt October 23. 80;
Novembers. 13.1661
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CeseN*. 11 l>747
FAA4ILY DIVISION
D4RI THE MARRAIOE Or
JOAN G DANIELS
Petitioner. Wile
and
DENNIS AARON
DANIELS
Respondent. Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO DENNIS AARON
DANIELS
Restdence-UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOnrotD that
an action for Dissolution of
Marring* has been tiled
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defensee. if any to It on
FRANK W ZARXMBA. ES-
QUIRE, PsUUonsr s Attorney.
whom address Is LJXBER-
MAN, BENJAMIN AND ASSO-
CIATES. PA.. 8001 Bunsst
Drive. Miami. FL 83173. on or
before November SO. 1861. and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before eerv-
lce on PsttUonsr-s Attorney or
immediately thereafter other-
wise s default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on October 11,
1661
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Deputy Clerk
October 33. 80.
6.13,1663
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No It I J?M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
LOTTIE B BURNS
Petitioner Wife
and
LAWRENCE C BURNS
Respondent-Husband
TO: LAWRENCE C BURNS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1160 NE. 188 Street. Miami.
Florida (Room 3180, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore November 80. 1081: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this IB day of Octo-
ber. 1881.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN, ESQ
1180 NE 163 Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone 048-8035
i Room 818)
Attorney for Petitioner
13302 October 23, 30.
November 6,13, IOC
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* No. 81-1341*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EDOUARD PIERRE
CHARLES.
Petitioner-Husband
and
OLA PIERRE CHARLES
Respondent-Win.
TO: Mrs Ola Pierre Charles
1407 N W 100th St.
Miami. FL
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that s Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's at
tomay, GEORGE T RAMANI,
ESQ.. Suite 711. Blscayne
Building. 18 Wast Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 88130
and Ills the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or be-
fore 30th day of NOVEMBER.
1681. If you fall to do so. Judg-
ment by default will be taken
against you for the relief de-
manded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dad* County. Florida,
this 16th day of October. 1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dad* County. Florida
BY K Selfrted
Deputy Clerk
13308 October 33. 30.
____________rtovemherO. 13.1681 |
NOTICE or ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELE VENTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Or FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.61-14147
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE Or
MARIA DEL ROSARIO
MOTA
Petitioner Wife
and
JUAN ESTXBAN MOTA
TO JUAN ESTEBAN MOTA
San Jaclnto No 3618
Houaton,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIE D that an action for Disso-
lution of Msrrlag* has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to Ken
MARIA DEL ROSARIO
MOTA. whoa* address Is P.O.
Box 668. Homestead. Flortda
88060. and Sle the original with
the dark of the above styled
court on or before November
SOth. 1881: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive WSSks m THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 18th day of
October. 1081.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Flortda
By K Selfrted
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIA DEL ROSARIO MOTA
PO Box 663
Homestead. Tla 33000
133*3 October 33. 30,
November 6. 13 1681
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. II -l Jill FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Merrlaosof
CARYL LYNN DeFEO
Petitioner Wile
and
ANGELO ERNEST DeFEO
Respondent Husband
TO: Mr. Angelo Ernest DeFeo
213 Wett Gloucester Pike
Barn not on,
.New Jersey 08007
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT I
FIED that v\ action for Ditto
lutlon of Marnaoe has been
filed against you and you art
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses if an v. to it on
Alan H Miller, Esq Attorney
tor Petitioner, whose address is
Suit* 302. 10671 Caribbean Sou
letard, Miami, Florida 33189,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 20th,
1*81, otherwise default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13th day of Oc
tober. 1*81.
RICHARDP. BRINKER
At Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Seifned
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Sesi)
Alan H. Miller. Esq.
Suite 302.
10871 Caribbean Boulevard
Miami. Florida 331W
Telephone: (305)238 1060
Attorney for Petitioner
122V2 October 23,30,
November 6. 13, 1961
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTME CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR OAOE COUNTY
Civil Action
Ns. 11-1*034
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
VICTOR AVILBS
Petitioner Husband
and
ILKA AVII.KS
Respondent Wife
TO ll.KAAVII.ES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defensee. If any. to It on
HUGO DB AY ALA. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1134 SW 8th Street.
Miami. Florida 83130. and file
the original with the dork of
the above styled court on or
before November 30. 1681;
otherwise s default will be en-
tered against you tor the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
saal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 33 day of Octo-
ber. 1661
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Saal)
HUGO DE AY ALA. ESQ
1134 SW 8th Street
MIAMI. FLORIDA 88130
Telephone 666-8636
Attorney tor Petitioner
13830 October 30.
November t. 13. 30.1661
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Transllngo at 7808 N Kendall
Drive, Apt F 304. Miami. Flor
Ids 33158 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Margaret Bordon,
Sole Proprietor
Robert G Covtngton. Esq
Attorney for Applicant
12285 October 16. 23.80;
Novembers. 1681
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In business under the
fictitious name Lucille TutUe
and Phyllis Arrow d-B-A Ac-
cessories Plus at 8 N E. 40 St
Miami. Florida 33137 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Flortda.
Lucille Tuttle
Phyllis Arrow
13311
October 23, 80;
Novembers. 13, 1081
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
COURT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, XLORIDA
CaseNe.Sl 1J494FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
URIAH BLAIR
Petitioner
and
IVY MAY BLAIR
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PVY MAY BLAIR
Residence Address
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOT IT I ED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. on
MARVIN OREBER. attorney
for Petitioner. 683 NE 167 SL.
N.M B PI 83162 on or before
November 30. 1081. and file the
original with the clerk of this
court; otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
Dated: October7.1681
RICHARDP BRINKER.
Clerk
by A D Wade
As Deputy Clerk
13273 October 16. 38.80;
Novembers. 1681
IN YNE CIRCUIY COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Ne. 11-14166 FC
NOTICE OY
PUBLICATION
to Re The Msrrlag* Of
AVON GUY,
Petitioner Wife
and
JOHN GUY.
Respondent Husband
TO: JOHN GUY
3836 Bronx Boulevard
Bronx. New York
YOU ARE KBRBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other plead-
ing to the Petition on the
PETITIONERS Attor-
ney. JOHN J GALLAGHER
whose address is 1483 NW IT
Avenue. Miami. Florida 38138.
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before this 30 day of
November. 1081. or a Default
will be entered against you
DATED this 21 day of Octo-
ber, 1081
RICHARDP BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
By LC. Berts see
13814 October 30.
November t. IS. 301081
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil A ction
Ne.11-1133* FC
FAMILY-CIVIL
DEPARTMENT
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN KK The Marriage of
MARIA LUCINDA
MARQUEZ.
Petitioner.
and
ALFREDO MARQUEZ.
Respondent
TO: ALFREDO MARQUEZ
CalleGemliJa
6th Antara JU
Santa Paula
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa boon
filed against you and you arc
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whnst
address la USD S W 8th Street.
Miami. Florida 33138. and tile
the original with the dark of
the above styled court on or be-
fore November 6. 1681; other-
wise s default will be entered
sgalnst you tor the relief de
manded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Octo-
ber. 1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
13306 October 8.18;
21, 30 1061 .1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 61-14012 rc
NOYICE OF ACTION
In re the marriage of
GERALD CLARKE.
Petitioner Husband
OB
ANNIE RUTH CLARKE.
Respondent Wife
TO: ANNIE RUTH
CLARKE
YOU ANNIE RUTH
CLARKE are hereby notified to
file your answer to this Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage
with the Clerk of the Court and
mall a copy to Petitioner'e
Attorney DANIEL GALLUP.
3886 Salsedo Street. Coral
Gables. Flortda, SUM. or. or
before October 80. 1081 else Pe-
tition will be taken aa con-
fessed
. This 36 day of September.
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
Octobers.*.
16. SS. 1661



"*" **-\o*

I2-B The JewirfFloridin/Friday, October 30.1981
Page W>B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. October 30.1981
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cast No. l -47*1
NOTICE OF SUIT
RICHARD B. JUDGE mnd
INGABRITT
SEHLSTEDT JUDGE
Plaintiff*
SHAMROCK INDUSTRIES
INC.. and
FINANC1AL ACCEPTANCE
CORP..
Defendants
TO: SHAMROCK
INDUSTRIES. INC.
3046 Madison Street
Hollywood, Florida
Mark Solomon Proa
30*6 Madlaon Street
Hollywood. Florida
Mona Sugar man
Secretary Trea.
2046 Madlaon Street
Hollywood. Florida
Ronald Roaen
Resident Agent
1438 Washington Street
Hollywood, Florida
TO: FINANCIAL
ACCE PT A NCE CORP
436 Lathrop Building
Kansas City. Missouri
Deane H. Shapiro, Proa.
11030 A Vila Drive
Kansas City. Missouri
Nancy Shapiro
11020 A vlla Drive
Kansas City, Missouri
Charlotte Shapiro
11030 A vlla Drive
Kansas City, Missouri
If living. Including any un-
known director*, officer*, and-
or resident agent* of said cor-
porations and If any of aald cor-
poration* are dUsolved. and-or
defunkt their respective last
known director*, officer* and
resident agent*. devUee*.
grantees, lelnor*. creditor*,
trustees or any other person*
claiming an Interest by. or thru
or against the above named de-
fendant* who are not known to
be dead of alive. _____
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a complaint to quiet
title ha* been Instituted by
Richard B Judge and Ingabrltt
Sehlstedt Judge. Plaintiffs
gainst the Shamrock Indus
tries. Inc an alleged dlasolved
Florida Corporation, and Fln-
nanctal Acceptance Corp-, an
alleged dissolved Mlsaourl Cor-
poration due to an alleged
mortgage deed which proporU
that on the 18th day of April
107S. Florence E. Campbell, fee
simple owner of the herein-
above described property
entered Into a mortgage with
Shamrock Industrie*. Inc.. of
Broward County. State of Flor-
ida; and that thereafter on-or
about the 15th day of April 1078.
Shamrock Industrie*. Inc.. by
assignment of said mortgage
did transfer their Interact unto
Financial Acceptance Corp.. of
Kansas City Missouri; all mat-
ter* and alleged mortgage*
relating to the following
described property to wtt:
Lot 8 Block 8 less the North 10
foot thereof of Amended Plat of
Miami Suburban Acre*, Ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded m Plat Book 4. Page
78 Of the Public Record* of
Dade County. Florida i
and a* a result of the Institution
of aald complaint to quiet title
which has boon filed against
you; you are required to aerve
a copy of your written do-
fane**. If any on Arthur w.
Karlick. Esq.. attorney for the
Plalnuffa. 1464 N.W. if Avenue
Miami, Florida S813B on-or
about this lth day of Novem-
ber. 1M1. and file the original
of aame the Clerk of thl* Court,
or else a default will be entered
against you the relief da-
inandodbythePlatottfts.
- WITNESS my hand and official
seal at Miami. Dade County.
Florida thU 8th day of October.
""rICHARD P. BRJNKER
Clera Circuit Oout
BY: K Selfrted
deputy clerk
October 0.18;
3B.aa.uai
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No 11-14*22 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
TH W. M ARRIAOE OF:
HECTOR ALFREDO
RODRIGUEZ.
and
DORIS D McKEALL.
TO DORIS D. McKEALL
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage ha* been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defense*. If any, to It on
MARIO QUINTERO JR .
ESQ.. KOSS AND QUINTERO.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. at-
torney for Petitioner. who*e
addres* Is 101 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue. Miami, Florida S8128, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before NOVEMBER 30th. 1081;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each wekk for four con-
secutive week* In THE JEW
1SH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on thl* 22 day of Octo-
ber. 1081
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Selfrted
A* Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIO QUINTERO JR.,
ESQ .
KOSS AND QUINTERO.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida S3128
Telephone: (SOB i 328-8*44
Attorney for Petitioner
13338 October*),
November*. IS. 20.1081
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-14303 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
CARLOS ALBERTO
GORASSINI
Petitioner-Husband
and
GRACIELA GORASSINI
Respondent-Wife
TO GRACIELA
GORASSINI
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HUGO DE AY ALA. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address I* 1134 S.W 8th Street,
Miami. Florida 33180. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above sty led court on or be-
fore November 30. 1081; other
wise a default will bo entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall bo published
once each week for four con-
secutive week* In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my band and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of Octo-
ber. 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Se al)
HUGO DE A Y ALA, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
1134 S.W 8th Street
Miami. Florida S81S0
Telephone: 858-8838
Attorney for Petitioner
13822 October*).
Novembers. 13.30.1881

NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA
IN FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO. 81-14304 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
RAUL SANTIAGO
LAZAOA
Petitioner Husband
and
CLARIVEL LAZAGA
Respondent Wife
TO: CLARIVEL LAZAGA
12807 Calle 2.
Keparto Paralao.
Cotorro, Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage ha* been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 1134 S W. 8th Street.
Miami, Florida 33130, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above tyled court on or be
fore November 30, 1981; other
wise a default a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
Thl* notice shall be pubushed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of Octo-
ber, 1081.
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clartnda Brown
A* Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
1184 S.W 8th Street
. Miami. Florida 33130
\ Telephone 888 8828
Attorney for Petitioner
13323 October 30;
Novembers. 13. 30,1981
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAMiI LAW
NOTICE 18 H**SBJ
GIVEN that the undoralfnea
desiring to engage "> bufne"
under the flcOklBlBWo.Cur
rent Service at 8240 S .W 32
Terrace, Miami. FL. BMW
mtend. to register saidl name
with the Clerk of uieQrcult
Court of Dade County. Florida
OSVALDO MIRANDA
8240 SW 32 terr
MIAMI. FL38186
12981 Octobers, IS;
Ua81 28.80,1081
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-1*310 FC
IN RE:
FERMINA VEGA
Petitioner Wife
and
PEDRO VEGA
Respondent Husband
TO:PEDRO VEGA
2703 W S3 St No. IE
Brooklyn. NY 11221
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed agalnat you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defense*. If any, to It on
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address, whose address Is 1184
S.W. 8th Street. Miami. Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
30, 1981: otherwise a default
will be entered agalnt you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
Thl* notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive week* In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of Octo-
ber. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
h 1184 S.W. Sth Street
I Miami. Florida 88180
Telephone: 886 8628
Attorney for Petitioner
18810 October SO;
Novembers. IS. 30.1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
(knifing to engage In business
under the fictitious name Cafe
Coco at 9700 Collins Ave.. Bal
Harbour. Fla 8*164 Intends to
register said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
David Mlglcov*ky. President
11831 October 80;
November*. IS. 30, 1081
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In buetnes*
under the fictitious name Coco
Cafe at 9700 CoUln* Av*.. Bal
Hsrbour. Fla. 8(164 Intends to
register amid name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
David Mlgicovsky. President
October 80;
November*, IS. 30.1881
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE E LEV ENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
Case No. 81-14171
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
EMANUEL RHYMES
Petitioner
and
DOROTHY RHYMES
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DOROTHY RHYMES
re el dene* unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dUaoluOon of
marriage has boon filed
against you and you aio I
quired to serve a copy of your
written l1*fllSO* on MARVIN
GREBER. ESQ.. Attorney for
PeUtlonor. 888 N.E. lot St.
N.M.B.. Fl. 881*3 on or before
November SO. 1863. and file the
original with the clerk of thl*
court: otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
October 22. 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By James D. Don*gen
Aa Deputy Clerk
October 80.
Novembers. 18.30.1881
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
CsieNo.Sl-1*127
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
AGNES BRIGrTTE
DEHAAV
Petitioner. Wife
and
LEOPOLD DEHAAV
Respondent. Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LEOPOLD DEHAAV
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has boon filed
gainst you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defense*. If any, to It on
S-REDORUCHOV.ESQ.. Peti-
tioner* Attorney, whoso ad-
dress la 9801 S.W. 72nd Street.
Miami. Florida 88178. on or be-
fore November SO. 1981. and file
the original with the Clerk of
thl* Court either before service
on Petitioner'* Attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter, other
wise a default will bo entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and aeal
of this Court on October 23,
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: C. P. Copeland
Deputy Clerk
18321 October SO;
November*. IS. 20.1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
N0.S1-1S12SFC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: DEIFILIA MAR
TINEZ.
Petitioner Wife,
and
OREGORIE MARTINEZ.
Respondent Husband
TO GREOORIE MARTINEZ
13340 Santord Avenue.
Apt 4H
Flushing. New York 11386
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written defense*. If any. to It on
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN,
attorney for PeUtlonor. whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road
Suite 37*. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before No-
vember 9. 1981. otherwise s de-
fault will be entered agalnat
Sou for the relief demanded In
le complaint or petition
ThU notice hall be published
once each week for four con-
ecutive week* In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this SO day of Sep-
tember, 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A* Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WUlle Bradshaw Jr
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Petitioner
420 Lincoln Road -
Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida SS1S9
Telephone (SOB) 631-0891
12244 October 9. 16;
38,30.1981
IN THf CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE BLBVBNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Ca**No. SMSflSFC
NOTICE OF ACTION
In re the marriage of
CRISTTNAS.
FERRETTI.
Petitioner-Wife
RODOLFO FERRETTI
GOMEZ.
Respondent Husband
TO RODOLFO FERRETTI
GOMEZ
Caaa Ferrottl
Granada. Nicaragua
YOU RODOLFO FERRETTI
GOMEZ are hereby notified to
file your answer to thl* Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage
with the Clerk of the Court and
mall a copy to Petitioners
Attorney DANIEL GALLUP,
2368 Saliedo Street. Coral
Gablee, Florida. S81S4. on or
before November 80, 1981 elee
Petition will bo taken aa con
teased.
Thl* IS day of October. 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
13307 October 38. 80;
November*. IS, 1*81
;
NOTICE UNOBR
FICTITIOUS NAMI LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of IN-
TEGRAL EDUCATTN CEN-
TER at number IBM N.W. 7th
at in the City of Miami. Flor
Ida. Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Broward County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
1st day of October. 1981
INTEGRAL PSYCHOLOGY
CENTER. INC.
By Luis* S. Dlas-Padron.
Secretary
13306 October 2S, SO;
November*. IS, 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW *
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN thst the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
SIMCO WASTE PAPER COM-
PANY at 286 Seville Avenue.
Coral Gable*. Florida SS1S4 In
tends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SIMCO RECYCLING
CORP INC.
By: William J. Ooldwom
Assistant Secretary
William J Ooldwom, Esq.,
Attorney for Slmco
Recycling Corp.. Inc.
286 Seville Avenue
Coral Gablee, Florida SUM
12282 October*. 18.
38.80.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action
NO. 81-7*3 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
AMENDED
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MTRTA PEREZ.
Petitioner Wife
and
HECTOR PEREZ
Respondent Husband
TO: HECTOR PERES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has boon
filed agalnat you and you are
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whoso
address Is 430 Lincoln Road
Suite ST*. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 88188. and Bio the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before No-
vember 18, 1881; otherwise a
default will bo entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
ThU notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Octo-
ber, 1*81.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A* Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
430 Lincoln Road-
Suit* S7
Miami Beach. Florida 88188
Telephone: (808)681-08*1'
Attorney for Petitioner
13368 October*, 1*;
SB-SfLlSai
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL-
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No II 15113 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
JUANACUEVAS
PETITIONER WIFE
and
CARLOS CUEVAS
RESPONDENT HUSBAND
TO CARLOSCVEVAS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written d-fenses. If any, to It on
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ .
attorney for Petitioner, whoee
address 1* 1134 S W Bth Street.
Miami, Florida S3130, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore November 6. 1881: other
wise a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con
oeeuttvo weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
sal of said court at Miami.
Florida on SO day of Beptom-
NOTICS UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In busln***
under the fictitious name LE
COIFFURE UNISEX
BEAUTY SALON at 14380 S.W
107 Terr. Miami. Florida 3318*
Intends to regUter aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dado County, Florida
MANUEL F. FENTE. ESQ
Attorney for
Lilian Cartagena
1481 N.W. North River Drive
Miami. Florida $3128
Telephone: (806)834-090*
133M October 23, SO.
November 6. IS. 1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engag* "l bulne under the
fictitious name EL TORREON
at 1560 N E 164th Street, No.
Miami Beach. Florida Intend to
register aald name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dsde County. Florida
Culpepper Plantation
PltBarbequeof
North Miami Beach. Inc
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
Attorney for El Torreon
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida S31SS
13313 October 80.
Novembers. IS. 30.1881
NOTICB OF MOTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF-
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITCOURTOF
FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 7* 70J7FCII3)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR MOTION
TO AMEND
FINAL JUDGMENT
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GISELAVILLAR.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
NELSON VILLAR
Respondent Husband
TO: GISELAVILLAR
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Motion to Amend
Final Judgment of your Mar
rlage has been filed and com-
menced In this court and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It. on CARLOS M. MENDEZ.
ESQ attorney for respondent,
whose addres* 1* 2986 West 4th
Avenue. Hlaleah. Florida
33012. and tile the original with
the clerk of the styled court on
or before November 16. 1981, at
9 00 a.m on motion calendar.
otherwise said motion will be
heard without your presence
for the relief prayed for In said
motion according with the law
Alao the court may designate a
guardian ad lltem to represent
you.
ThU notice sha" be publUhed
once each week for four con
ecutlve weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal
on thU 38 day of September,
1081 at Hlaleah Florida
CARLOS M MENDEZ
LAW OFFICE
Attorney for Respondent
3*86 West 4th Avenue
Hlaleah, Florida 38012
Tel. (806)886-6876
CARLOS M MENDEZ. ESQ.
13361 October 9.1*.
23. SO, 1981
her,1*81 ____
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A* Clark, Circuit Court
Dado Cunty. Florida
By MJ Hartnett
AaDeputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ..
Attom*y for Petitioner
1184 S.W 8th Street
Miami. Florida 83130
TeUphone 868-8*3*
Attorney for Petitioner
I f|*8 October*. 18;
28, SO. 1981
\
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 9*-l7*11 FC-84
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
SHERRY MARIE
THOMPSON
Petitioner
and
MARK THOMPSON
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MARK THOMPSON
1848 Fountain Vlow-
APT. F
Columbus, Ohio48313
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage ha* boon filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defense*. If any. on
MARVIN GREBER. Attorney
for Petitioner, 888 N E 1*7 8L.
N MB, Fl SS162 on or before
November 6th. 1881. and file
the original with the clerk of
thU court: othorwto* a default
will bo entered agalnat you.
Dated: September 80th. 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
by K Selfrted
As Deputy Clerk
13346 Octobers, 16;
28. 80.1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) i
IN THE CIRCUIY COURY OF
THS BLBVBNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OB FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADB COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-1*341 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOCUYION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
BIANCA McGUIRE,
Petitioner Wife
and
PAUL McGUIRE.
Respondent Husband
TO: PAULMeOUtRE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIE D that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has boon
filed against you and you aro
required to serve a copy of your
written defeneeaUsjiy. to It on
HARVEY D rWEDMAN.
attorney tor PeUtlonor. whose
address si 430 Lincoln Road -
Suite eT8\ Miami Beach. Fla.
lUSa and fue the original with
the dork of the above a*****
court on or before November
IS. 1881; oOsarwto* a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded to the
complaint or pstition. ,
ThU notice shall be pubUehed'
once each weak tor tour con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of Octo-
ber 1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dado County. Florida
By WUlle B radon* w Jr.
A* Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
430 Lincoln Road -
MumYBeach, Florida SS1S9
Telephone: (SOB)801-0881
Attorney tor r^ttonar
13374 October 18. S*. JO.
Novembers, 1881


Ruth Rosenberg Passes
Itosenberg. 66, of Miami
assed away October 21.
nt here for 33 years
om Brooklyn. NY She
| by her husband, Bar-
liter. Iris Tannenbaum
fMiami; son, Jerry Ros-
enberg of Alabama; four grand-
children; and sister, Ann Harris
of Mt. Vemon, N.Y. Services
were held October 23 at Riverside
Chapel with interment at Mt.
Sinai Cemetery.
Dvoskin, Active In Charities
dvoskin. 76. of Coral
fssed away October 25.
skin had been a resident
k> past 40 years, coming
r York City. She waa a
[the late David Dvoskin.
en active in volunteer
work with the NCCH, United
Way, and programs to help the
blind. She is survived by her
brother, Leo Bernstein Wood-
mere. N.Y. Services were held
October 27 at Gordon Funeral
Home with interment in Mt.
Sinai Cemetery.
rt Whitman, 41-Year Resident
Whitman. 73, of Hol-
issed away October 25.
nan had been a resident
Florida for the past 41
[ling here from Long Is-
Ha was a member of
fith He is survived by
puted away October M in
Survived by her husband.
crly HUH. Calif; daughter.
er one grandchild, and
i Pellen of North Miami
Goldiarb waa a resident
eari Service* were held in
inith local arrangement* by
pel
| Bai Harbour passed away
I He was a resident or 32
i from Oak Park. Ill Mr
cai vason Heissurvived
Rose daughters Phyllis
^stinger and EdvnelAlani
grandchildren, brother,
kno Sister Norma Asher
le held October 71 at River
ic Notices
5TICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
K IS HEREBY
[ that the undersigned.
; t" rngage in business
he fictitious name of
ntematlonal at 3834
Istreet. Miami. Florida
|to register aald luime
Clerk ot the Circuit
Jade County. Florida
[Carol A Kaye
I for Carol A Kaye
October SO;
riovemberC. IS. 30. 1881
JTICE UNDER
|TI0USNAME LAW
J> IS HKKKHV
lint Uif undersigned.
"to i-nKage in business
fu titious name
MALI, at 1201
I Ave Miami
33139 intend to
said name with Uie
lthi- C|f, u court ol
Bt) Y .nrlda
Molkoand
t R Shear. Owners
ID Heloff. K*q of
Tlandler I' A
|for Applicant
Oet so.
Noi 13.20 I9M1
: CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
COUNTY.FLORIDA
BATE DIVISION
I Number II .go31
Division03
|STATE OF
t: TOPPEL
ed
[NOTICE OF
iflMSTRATION
niniitratlon of the es-
ILSSIE TOPPEL. de
[lie Number 81-8088. is
l the Circuit Court for
nty Florida. Probate
Ithe address of which
lest Flagler Street.
fL 33ISO The name*
Tesses of the personal
tlve and Uie par
entail ves attorney
1 below
ested persons are re-
[flle with UUi court.
"HKEE MONTHS OF
1ST Pl-BUCATION
NOTICE (1) all
|Jnt the aatate and
flection by an Inter
Fn to whom notice
W that chailengaa the
the will, the qualm-
the personal repre-
venue, or lurladlc
| court
riMfAND OBJEC-
DT SO FILED WILL
|VER BARRED
[Uon of this NoUcc has
MoberSO. 1BC1.
' "epresentaUve
eorge Toppai
itimoeastraat,
nla Maria
UoHiedraa
krtoRico00B37
|CYPEN
">r Personal
stive:
[Godfrey Road
ch. FLSS140
1308)613^711
October*:
Novembers. 1IM1
his wife. Ruth: a daughter, San-
dra Buchman, Tampa; and two
grandchildren. Funeral arrange-
ments by Gordon Funeral Home.
Helen Pont,
34-Year Resident
Helen Pont. 58. of Miami,
passed away October 22. She had
made her home here for the past
34 years coming from Charleston.
S.C. Mrs. Pont was a member of
the Order of the Kastern Star and
Beth Kodesh Congregation. Sur-
vived by husband. Harold: son.
Dr. Edwin Pont of Toledo. Ohio:
daughter. Lvn Pont of Miami:
brothers. Irvin Zalkin of Green-
ville. B.C., Kobert Zalkin of
Greensboro. N.C.. and sister.
Lilly Bebergal of Charleston. S.C.
Services were held October 23 in
Charleston. S.C with local ar-
rangements by Gordon Funeral
Home.
PEACEMAN
Rebecca, 78. of Homestead, passed
away October 28 A resident of Florida
for 30 years, formerly of Brooklyn. NY.
Survived by her daughters. Lillian Har-
latt. Homestead, and Gertrude Golub.
Northrtdge Calif sister. Rose Kali of
Naw York, and two grandchildren
Services were held October 27 at River
side with interment In Mt Slnal
ROSEN. Nathan. 76. Hollywood. Octo-
ber 23. Riverside
SADOWSKY. Shelley C Louise. North
Miami. October 22. Riverside
hkonstv.lv Ida. Miami Beach
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Uie undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name ABC
Auto Parts at 1106 NW 22ND
AVE MIAMI VI.A S3128 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
RosendoO Suarez
13341 October SO:
Novembers. 13. 30.1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO II IWFCIU1
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROSE MARIE
BOISROND.
Petitioner Wife
and
CHARLES BOISROND.
Respondent-Husband
TO: CHARLES BOISROND
716 Cleveland Avenue
Linden.
New Jersey 07086
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a peUUon for Dlsso
luUon of your Marriage has
been Hied and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ESQ..
attorney for PeUtloner, whose
address Is Suite 816. 1st State
Bank Building. 7900 NE 2nd
Avenue, Miami. FL SS1S8. and
Hie the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November SO. 1981:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief prayed for in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published
onoe each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 37 day of Octo-
ber. 1981
RICHARD P BKINKKK
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dad* County. Florida
By K. Self rled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ESQ.
Suite 816.
1st State Bank Bldg
7900 NE 3nd Avenue
Miami. FL SSI SB
Attorney for PeUUoner
issss October SO:
November 8. IS. SO. 1M1,
SolMaiseU
Miami Attorney
Sol Maisel. 64, of South Miami
passed away October 24. Mr.
Maisel had been a practicing
attorney for 40 years and a resi-
dent here since 1946. He was a
member of the Florida and New
York Bar Association. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Lillian; son.
Allan S. Maisel of Miami, daugh-
ter. Deborah (Ivan) Safra.
Miami; father. Max Maisel.
Miami Beach: sister. Rose Miller
of New York City; and one
grandson. Services were held Oc-
tober 25 at Riverside with inter-
ment in Mt. Nebo.
Leonard Usina, 91, Peoples
Bank Founder, Passes
Leonard Ambrose Usina, a
Florida banking pioneer and re-
tired chairman of the executive
committee of the Peoples Group
of National Banks, died October
22 at his Miami home at age 92.
In 1950, after 19 years as presi-
Albert Naness Of
Beth Shalom
Albert Alex Naness. 78. ol
Miami Beach passed away Octo
her 24. Mr. Naness had been a
resident here for 43 years. He was
Dorothy Freedland* rmbfrM of SS? 5*?
Shalom of Miami Beach and the
Miami Beach Elks Lodge. He is
survived by his wife, Esther: son.
Dr. Sidney Naness, Los Angeles.
Calif.; daughters, Sylvia (Ben)
Kanner. Miami Beach; Dorothy
Kidge. Miami, and Dr. Joyce
(Warrent Fox, Los Angeles.
Calif.; nine grandchildren; a
brother. Joseph, and sisters,
Rose Mussal and Laura Rosner.
Services were held at Rubin
Zilbert with interment at Mt.
Sinai.
ADLER. Leona. 87. Miami Shores. Oc-
tober 21 Riverside.
MUNACH. Mary. 86. Miami. October 33
Riverside
SCHWARTZBERG, Samuel 8. 73. Lau-
derhlll, October33. Riverside
RABINOWITZ. Sally. Miami Beach.
October 24 Rubin-Zllbert
MESSINOER
George M resident for 16 years.
coming from Chicago. Member of the
Skylak Mens Club and FA AM Masonic
Lodge 3347 Golden Glades He is sur-
vived by his wife Hannah, daughter
Lorraine i Edward > Brenner, Holly-
wood; son. Lester Messlnger. Chicago;
six grandchildren; two brothers, Frank
Messlnger of Chicago and Herman Mes
singer of Tuscon. Ariz. Services were
held October 27 at Riverside
Passes Away
Dorothy Freedland. 76. Miami,
passed away October 22. Mrs.
Freedland had made her home in
Miami for the past 34 years,
coming from Lockport, N.Y. Sur-
vived by son. Shelby (Sharonl
Freedland. Hollywood, and
daughter. Carole (Sidney)
Kotkin, Miami: sister. Rae
Friedman, Los Angeles; and four
grandchildren. Services were held
October 25 at Gordon Funeral
Home, with interment in Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
CHAUSER
Clara Dorothy. 94. of Miami Beach
passed away October 18 Mrs. Chauser
had been a resident of Miami for the
past 17 years, coming from New York
City She Is survived by Dr Herbert
Chauser of Miami, a daughter. Gloria
Bernstein. Woodbury. NY; two slaters.
Gertrude Wilson of St Petersburg and
Teresa Glasser of Forest Hills. N Y :
five grandchildren, and a great-
grandchild Services and Interment In
New York
LAZARUS
Philip. SO. a resident of North Miami
Beach since 1963, formerly of London
and North Carolina, passed away Octo-
ber 16 He Is survived by his wife. Use
lotte of North Miami Beach; daughter.
Sylvia i Frank i Heller. Tampa, brother.
Leonard Lazarus, North Miami, sisters.
Bella Hammond. New York. CUa Feld-
man. New York, and Anna Metzger.
North Miami Services were held Octo-
ber 19 at Riverside
LEIDER
Kate. 83. of Coral Gables, passed away
October 30 Mrs. Lelder had made her
home here for the past 46 years, coming
here from Philadelphia She Is survived
by a son. Dr Irwln Lelder. Daytona
Beach, a daughter. Ruth Nas. Coral
Gables, four brothers, Louis Herman.
William and Nathan Needleman. Phila-
delphia, three sisters. Betty Levtgne
and Minnie Rubin. Philadelphia, and
Anne Slmkln Miami six grandchildren
and four great-grandchildren Services
were held October 33 at Gordon
TEMCHIN
Max William. 70. of Miami, paased
away Oct. 3S. A resident of Fla for SO
years formerly of Detroit. Mich He was
a member of the Israelite Center Tem-
ple A Vice President for many years. He
was Chairman of the Religious Com
mlllee A served as the Reader of the
Scroll A performed services for Holy
Days ft Sabbaths He was very devoted
to the dally Mlnyan ft used to pick up
many people for the Mlnyan. He was
very well versed In Rabblnlcs ft In add!
Uon to the morning service, he read ft
studied Jewish Law In the Temple. He
was a Rabbinical student at Yeshlva
Unlv formerly I Isaac Elchonan Ye-
shlva I He waa active in the Mizrarhl
Organization. Young Israel of Detroit ft
Bar Ilan Unlv Organization In Israel
He was a member of the Miracle Mason
Lodge ft a Mason for over 40 years He
was President of the Florida Metal
Supply Co. Survived by his wife. Edith,
son, Jerome of Alexandria, Va. daugh-
ter. Joan Rothenbergof Brodbeck. Pa.:
grandchildren. Merrlck ft Jason, sis-
ters. Bertha Spllman ft Esther Stems,
both of Southfield. Mich ft Lillian Bar-
man of Grand Rapids. Mich Family
suggests contributions to the Israelite
Center Temple 3176 S.W. 25 St Miami
S3133. Funeral services Tues 11:30 AM
at the Chapel. Interment to follow at Mt.
Slnal Cemetery
THE RIVERSIDE'
Guardian Plan Chapel
1717 SW 87 A ve Miami
443-2221
dent of Florida National Bank &
Trust Co. he resigned to start his
own bank, called Peoples Na-
tional Bank of Miami Shores. The
name soon was changed to
People's First National, the first
of what is now the Peoples group
of national banks in Dade Coun-
ty-
Mr. Usina, son of Domingo and
Dora Usina, was born November
29, 1891 in St. Augustine. He was
a descendant of the Minorcans.
natives from the Mediterranean
Island of Minorca who settled
around St. Augustine and New
Smyrna in the 1700s.
At 16. he began his banking
career with Peoples Bank for
Saving, St. Augustine. Even-
tually, he joined the duPont-Ball
interests as first vice president of
Florida National Bank at St.
Petersburg.
He was transferred to Miami in
1931 as president of duPont-
i iv. ned Florida National Bank
and Trust Co.
HABER
Louis, of Miami Beach passed away
October 26 He was a resident for 28
years coming from New Jersey He is
survived by his wife. Betty, son.
Lawrence, daughter, Brenda Softer
two grandchildren and two brothers.
Joey and David Haber Services were
held October 28 at Riverside with infer
menf in Mf Nebo
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Oaten (eery 0 140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
LEVITT-WEINSTEIN
Pot**!)** oad
21 'ISO
tff jf wish fun(i Dint cross
Local an* Owl ol Stala SSSSS^aaaSSSI
E e*io ruMCsais ailiu thsooom
Oil" OUAMAMTECO "SfCUaiTY PUNT
*nl Paso tSSS> Mottl Miam. BSSS*
OHOKKow B~o isw [.
ss-aiis
S4II
8* C*v%hOm
a
"Nobody likes to think about bad things which might
happen to us but, someday, in the distant future, it might
. why not make your own plans with the assistance of
of an experienced counselor, at no cost to you?
Call 949-8354
National Cremation Society."
!
!% aasaisaiaaia
F
SHV*3 IM BOSTON ABE* SINCE ISM
(EltapriB
BROOKHNE MA (6ir|2770O
FOB COORDINATING SERVICES
AND ARRANGEMENTS
FROM FLORIDA CALL
otd sfwawo imsi*cm
COUNt> LIT> COUNTY
374-6626 463-0501 655-2603
Momswrvama* Psm R isveis
Davw M Bfomu* Kannaei j Laaamsn
Enanl Lewi*
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 Wesl Dixie Highway
Represented by S leviit. f O
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queens Blvd & ."hth Rci forest Hills N Y
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd


Page 12 B The Jewish Fioridian v Friday, October 30, 1981
r1* ,
rage n>p ine jewian r tonaian r naay, October 30,1981
i
T
RI
IN
SE
I
va
SH
IN
PI
CC
I
TC
TO
]
kn
or
PO:
po
a*
kn
r
n
tn.
cU
or
fet
M
FI
tit
RI
Se
g
trl
PI
na
all
po
mi
thi
IB-
sir
ab
en
Sh
Br
Idi
ab
Sh
aa
dli
Ft
K
toi
re
da
fa-
in
eo
ra
78
Di
a
of
art
P

la
Ki
PI
M
at
be
of
or
I
m
W
aa
PI
i
u
o
d* *.
ui
O
H
ra
a
Di
i
it

i
r
or
Ca
Ha
it's no trick to treat yourself to

Savings
?
cPride
Pantry Pride will save you more on your total food bill
than any other supermarket, or we'll pay you
Double the Difference in Cash!*
W% =<* te*o* cfcng peaches
BarUett Pears
B'eastone
C** to* *t smooth n creaf >
Fkxida o' sropped prem.um fresh ^f ^^ fat smooth n crear">
Lots of Chicken Cottage Cheese
Open 24 Hours
check your locat store foe apeofK ^ovrt
p^poaawh,,.
Potatoes
usew^ce price 69c
elsewhere doc* 1 53-
e*sev*here price $1 79

...,?


trryA lHaplLevy
esident
Philip T. Warren
Campaign Chairman
'hilip T. Warren Named to Head
ederation's 1982 CJA-IEF
22,500,000 Campaign
As Jewish Community Sets
Largest Goal in History
Philip T Warren has been appoin-
ted general chairman of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's 1982
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund (CJA-IEF) Cam-
paign. The 1982 Campaign will be
the largest such effort over under-
taken by the Greater Miami Jewish
ocmmunity, with a goal of $22^00,000,
according to Harry A. Levy,
Federation president The CJA-IEF
Campaign, the Jewish community's
largest fundraising effort helps sup-
port over 50 local, national and over-
seas social service agencies and
programs.
In announcing the appointment, Mr.
Levy said, "Phil Warren has proven
his strong commitment to the needs of
Jews around the world through his
energetic involvement in the
Federations both here and in his
native Detroit, where he served as
chairman of the 1978 Campaign, the
most successful in Detroit's history up
to the time. I am confident that Phil
Warren will give us the innovative and
energetic leadership we need to raise
the funds necessary to overcome the
difficult problems of the elderly and
youth in Miami, and of the hundreds
of thousands of underprivileged people
in Israel today."
CoatiMd Supplement t<> the Jewiah Fteridian. Section C October 30.1981.


>4.n
The Jewish FToridian / Pridy, October 30,1981
1H....U
: ... ..iiii
Rl'
Contents
Warren to Head '82 CJA-IEF Campaign Page 1
Israel Programs Activities Expand Page 6
Federation Tuesday
Multiple Appeals Strengthens
News From South Dade
Community Calendar

Jewish High School of South Florida opens its doors. See story page.?
This material prepared for
The Jewish Florldlan supplement.
October 50.1981 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33157
president
Harry A. (Hap) Lew
Executive vice president
Myron J.Brodle
Chairman, Public Relations committee
EllTlmoner


New Jewish High School Wins
Raves from Students, Teachers
innm
David Wolf, a fifteen year old from North
Miami Beach with wire rim glasses and a disar-
ming smile, wasn't sure just what to expect when
he began his studies at Jewish High School of
South Florida this September. After all, the school
was brand new, the daily schedule long (8-5 Mon.-
Fri. with 11 periods each day) and the course of
studv appeared to be rigorous, with a full load of
Ixith Jewish and general studies required. But
after vears of sleeping his way through the public
schools, David decided, "I need to get a good
education if I am going to have a chance for
having a good career. If I have to give up a little
freedom in the meantime, its worth it."
Now, slightly more than a month later, David
is certain he made the right decision. "This place
is great in so many ways" he says, "There are only
100 kids in the school and we are all getting to be
good friends, probably because we work so closely
together. The student teacher ratio is about five
to one, so you can arrange to meet privately with a
teacher almost any day. What amazes me is how
much I'm learning. 1 cant believe how much
Hebrew I've picked up in only a month."
The Jewish High School of South Florida, more
than four years in the preparation stage, is off and
running, and so far the response of students,
teachers, and everyone else connected with the
school, has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic.
Part of the good feeling may be engendered by
the surroundings; the school is housed in a one
story building on the grounds of the Michael
Ann Russell Jewish Community Center, and is
surrounded by green lawns and playing fields.
Yet the first time visitor to the school is struck
by something more; an air of evident excitement
that pervades both students and faculty, the
feeling that they are all building something
beautiful together. Says Stuart Grant, head of the
Jewish Studies program, and an experienced
Jewish educator, "so far, this school has one of the
most successful educational experiments I have
ever seen. The entire faculty is impelled by a
common dream; to impart a strong sense of
Jewish identity to our students. We believe this
education will help our students to confront
college and career goals anchored in a strong
Jewish heritage, sure of who they are and what
they stand for."
The Jewish High School of South Florida is
an independent entity with its own Board of
Directors. Its President is Richard D. Levy. The
School received a large initial allocation from the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation as well as from
the South Broward and Fort Lauderdale
Federations. It also enjoys a close relationship
with American ORT, which provides funding for a
program of computer education. Four years in the
foundation stage, the school was created through
the close collaboration of The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Planning and Budget
Committee and the Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE).
The Jewish High Schools principal is Rabbi
Louis Herring, former director of Jewish
education in Cape Town, South Africa, who
personally selected all 17 faculty members and
100 students. Says Herring, We are committed
first and foremost to academic excellence, com-
Student/teacher interaction in a Judaic Studies class. High school curriculum includes both Jewish
and secular courses.
bining a strong Jewish education with a quality
secular education. We also exphasize athletics,
art, and computer studies. We are working to
create a self-sustaining community, a place where
our students can form rewarding friendships and
make a commitment to positive self-
development."
Indeed the atmosphere at Jewish High School
of South Florida is radically different from that
prevailing at most American high schools. Each
student has signed a pledge not to smoke, take
narcotics, or participate in the abusive use of
alcohol and "to the best of my ability to dem-
onstrate courage, integrity, strength of char-
acter and high ideals." and "to assure that
my actions will bring honor to my own name, to
my school, and to the Jewish people." The school
day is long, and students must work hard to keep
up with extensive study load. Yet despite this (or
perhaps, partly because of it) there have been
virtually no discipline problems and the students
display a motivation and eagerness to learn in
startling contrast to the apathy and rebellion so
typical among adolescents. "We feel that Rabbi
Herring and our teachers respect us and care
about us. and that makes a difference" says
student Sabrina Krief. Sixteen year old Gary
Goldman, whose major interest is science, says
that "we have much better scientific equipment
here'than I had in public school, and I get to work
more closely with my teacher." Adds student
David Brodie. "I feel like I can learn more in one
year here than I could leam in three years in
public school."
According to Rabbi Herring, the Jewish High
School seeks to give a basic Jewwh education that
will "strengthen appreciation of Jewish|vahiea.
He adds. "We have no formal ideological af-
filiation but are ideologically committed to Jews
Judaism, and Israel. We have students eommg
from all streams of Judaism, as well as some that
haU had very little formal Jewum education. Our
high school will try to nurture the love for an
appreciation of our young people for their
jjwishness. and intensify their kfoM and
commitment to Jewish life in all its aspects.
Students can choose between three different
Jewish education tracks with differing focuses on
Jewish history. Bible studies, and TaJmudic
. All students do at least some work in .U
three areas in order to get a sense of the overall
EEeVof Jewish life. In addition there are classes
on?Lismand Israel, andon J^^hoWays^and
observance. There are frequent prayer services
and prayer symposiums. All students study
Hebrew, using the ulpan method proven suc-
cessful with new immigrants in Israel.
Stuart Grant, who teaches the Talmud class
notes that, "what is so exciting is to see some
students who came here without knowing the
Hebrew alphabet, now taking part in discussions
of Talmucuc philosophy, excited to learn more.
Their evident interest is an inspiration for all of
the teachers."
Rabbi Herring too is pleased with the way the
Jewish High School of South Florida has begun
and is full of plans for the future. Considering
that our students came to us from 28 separate
schools public, private, and other Jewish day
schools they have come together as a unit very
nicely. Thanks to our location at the Michael
Ann Russell Jewish Community Center and the
superb support and cooperation we have received
from the center, we are able to give our students
an invigorating program of sport and physical
education to balance their studies. I am par-
ticularly excited about our computer education
program, which will prepare our students for a
future and a job market in which computer
technology is becoming more and more important.
We believe that our school can help set the pace in
creating a modern relevant and innovative Jewish
education, an education that will prepare our
students 'o be among the next generation of
Jewish leadership."


"' ll
12-B The Jewish Floridian' Friday, October 30, 1981
pmM ""'
Warren to Head
'82 CJA-IEF Campaign
Continued from Pg. 1
Warren, a top steel executive, serves as a vice
president of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. General Chairman of the 1978 Detroit
CJA-IEF Campaign, le has served as a Board
Member since 1978 of the Detroit Jewish Welfare
Federation, and a Board Member of the Jewish
Home for the Aged and the Jewish Vocational
Service. During 1980-81, he served as Treasurer of
the Metropolitan Museum and Art Centers in
Coral Gables.
Warren has announced that the vice chairman
of the Campaign will be Aaron Podhurst, and that
the associate chairmen will be Ed Abramaon,
Sheldon Guren, Cal Kovens. Sidney Olson, and
Marilyn Smith.
Aaron Podhurst
Vice Chmn. Campaign
In announcing this years campaign goal.
Warren pointed out that in the 1981 Campaign
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation raised
$19,000,000, placing it in first place among major
American Jewish communities in terms of per-
centage increase over the previous year. In ad-
dition to the campaign goal of $22,500,000.
Warren stated that the community is seeking an
additional $1,000,000 in 1982 for Project Renewal,
an undertaking on the part of the American
Jewish communities to help disadvanted com-
munities in Israel. Miami has been twinned with
the town of Or Akiva on the Mediterranean coast,
halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa. Located
alongside the resort village of Caesarea, or Akiva
is a struggling, predominantly Oriental Jewish
community, whose people confront problems of
poverty and youth alienation.
"We recognize that we are asking a great deal
of the Greater Miami Jewish Community, but the
times demand no less" said Warren, "Due to
budget cuts in Washington, there will be
significant cutbacks in government support for
human service programs. It is absolutely vital
that the Jewish community maintain its support
for these programs that directly affect the lives
and well-being of so many in our community."
Warren added, "In light of the tragic
assassination of Egyptian President Sadat, the
tenuous situation in the Middle East has become
even more volatile. We hope and pray that the
Camp David peace process will be continued, but
we must be prepared for all eventualities."
"When Israel was attacked in 1973" Warren
wm
Edmund Abramson
Camp Assoc. Chmn.
continued, "thousands of Greater Miami Jews
contacted Federation to ask, 'What can 1 do to
help? It is vital that Israel be sure in this un
certain time, as she was in 1973, that the Greater
Miami Jewish community, and Jews throughout
the United States support her, helping to finance
the many social programs that give Israel her
special strength and unique character. Making
your pledge to the 1982 Campaign today is the
best way to give Israel the reassurance she
needs."
The Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign supports a network
of social welfare, educational, recreation, health
and life sustaining services provided by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's family of local
agencies. These include the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the Jewish Family and
Children's Services. Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, the Jewish Vocational Service, and
Mount Sinai Medical Center among others.
In addition, the CJA-IEF Campaign helps to
support similar social service programs to enrich
the quality of Jewish life in Israel, through the
United Jewish Appeal, as well as in 30 other
countries around the world.
Federation President Levy said that Warren's
appointment and the higher Campaign goal comes
at a time when government economic austerity
programs in Jerusalem as well as Washington.
combined with high inflation rates, and the ever
rising costs of basic human services, has placed an
extra burden on the Greater Miami Jewish
Sheldon B. Guren
Camp. Assoc. Chmn.
Cal Kovens
Camp. Assoc. Chmn.
Sidney Olson
Camp. Assoc. Chmn.
Marilyn K. Smith
Camp Assoc. Chmn.
Michael Adler
Builders A Allied Trades
Co-Chmn.
Leonard Miller
Builders & Allied Trades
Co-Chmn.
Elliot Brown
YAD Chmn.
Isaac Sklar
Cuban-Hebrew Chmn.
L. Jules Arkin
Cash Comm. Chmn.
Lydia Ooldring
Super Sunday Co-Chmn.
i
David Rosenbaum
Super Sunday Co-Chairman
Eric Turetsky
Super Sunday Co-Chmn.


community, said Levy, "Without our increased
support those who depend on us in Miami will
have to wait for services they badly need today.'
Unless we increase our commitments, Jews
around the world will pay a heavy price for our
lack of responsiveness."
Warren said that this year"s campaign theme,
"To Life" was meant to symbolize to every Jew in
the community, the life giving power of the
Campaign for young, elderly, and troubled Jews
at home, for the trapped Jews of lands like Russia
and Syria, and ultimately, for the people of
Jerusalem. "I believe that by keeping Israel
strong and viable, we are also safeguarding the
future of our children and our children's children,"
he said.
Warren sated that he took the top position in the
campaign, as he had in Detroit, "out of a sense of
total commitment to the welfare of the Jewish
people," and a knowledge that, "as chairman I can
make the greatest contribution to that cause."
Warren pointed to the crushing costs of peace that
Israel has had to absorb since the signing of the
treaty with Egypt, which combined with triple
digit inflation, has made it more difficult than ever
for the Israeli government to provide the basic
services needed by citizens of many of its poorer
communities. Warren pointed to the lack of funds
to build adequate housing for new immigrants,
young couples, and the thousands of Israeli
families living in substandard conditions. New
schools, parks, and community centers are needed
in many communities, he said, as well as a variety
of counseling and human service programs to give
a new sense of hope and personal growth to the
youth of the development towns.
Warren cited a number of pressing needs in
Miami. He called for the creation of more after-
school recreation programs for the Jewish youth
of Dade County, a group particularly susceptible
to the threat of assimilation and cult groups.
Warren also stressed the importance of the Jewish
Junior High School now being built in Southwest
Dade, and scheduled for completion in September.
1982.
Of crucial importance, Warren said, is the need
to maintain and expand services for the elderly, a
group that is especially vulnerable to the effects of
budget cutting. The hot meals program, for
example, which currently supplies 1,220 hot
kosher meals each week delivered at 8 sites and
430 weekly meals delivered to home bound elderly,
must be expanded to meet the needs of the
growing number of elderly, those who cannot
afford a proper diet on their extremely limited
incomes during this inflationary period.
Warren said that Federation must further
expand its network of social and educational
services for the emotionally and mentally han-
dicapped, who require continual care to success-
fully overcome their handicaps. "Throughout
history" Warren said, "the Jewish people have
been concerned with the quality and meaning of
life. We have been concerned not only for the life
of our own people, but for enriching the lives of all
mankind. Leonard Bernstein has given us music
for all the world to love. Jonas Salk helped to
make the world a safer place for all our children.
And Albert Einstein changed the world."
When you make a pledge to the CJA-IEF
Campaign, you too are doing the work of
generations; from creating youth programs to
give the disadvantaged youth of Israel a second
chance, to assuring that a hot meals program will
be continued for poor elderly Jews right here in
Miami Beach. You are reaching out to free
prisoners of conscience from Siberian prisons and
above all. helping the people of Israel overcome
the challenges facing them on the road to security
and peace.
"When you give to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation" Warren concluded, "You give to life.
Warren concluded by announcing a number of
key leadership positions in the campaign. Howard
R. Scharlin will be chairman of the Pacesetter
$100,000 Division, and Joel Levy and Mikki
Futernick will serve as co-chairmen of the
Pacesetter $10,000-$24,999 Division. Co-chairmen
of the Special Gifts $1.000-$9,999 Division are
Steven J. Kravitz and Jeffrey Lefcourt. Michael
Adler and Leonard Miller are Builders and Alied
Trades Co-Chairmen. whUe Elliot Brown will serve
as Chairman of the Young Adults Division and
Isaac Sklar will head the Cuban Hebrew Division.
Jules Arkin will be Cash Committee Chairman
and Helene Berger and Kenneth Schwartz will
serve as co-chairmen of the Worker Recruitment,
Howard Scharlin
Pacesetter S100,000 +
Chmn.
Helen Berger
Worker Recruitment A
Recognition Co-Chmn.
Joe Levy
Pacesetter $10,000424,999
Co-Chmn.
Mikki Futernick
Pacesetter $10,000-24,999
Co-Chmn.
Steven J. Kravitz
Spec. Gifts Co-Chmn.
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Spec. Gifts Co-Chmn.
.:
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Worker Recruitment A
Recognition Co-Chmn.
David Schaecter
Missions Chmn.
Alan Kluger
Chazak Chmn.
urn
Maxine Schwartz
Synagogue Camp.-Chmn.
Super Sunday Co-Chmn,
Morris Futernick
So. Dade Camp. Chmn.
Jeffrey Berkowitz WA
Young Leadership Cab.-Cnmn
Ellen Mandler
W.D. Camp-Chmn.
Retention Training and Recognition Division.
David Schaecter will be Missions Committee
Chairman, Alan Kluger Chazak Chairman, and
Maxine Schwartz, Synagogue Campaign
Chairman and Super Sunday Co-Chairman. Other
Super Sunday co-chairmen will be Lydia Goldring,
David Rosenbaum, and Eric Turetsky, Jeffrey
Berkowitz will be UJA Young Leadership Cabinet
Chairman, Morris Futernick, South Dade
Campaign Chairman, and Ellen Mandler,
Women's Division Campaign Chairman. Other
Campaign leadership apointments will be un-
nounced in the coming weeks.


v r
12-B The Jewish Floridian'Friday, October 30. 1981

1
New Shlichah Plans Extended
Israel Programs Activities
*'I see myself and the Israel Programs Office as
a resource center on Israel, from which we can
bring the message and spirit of Israel to the
Greater Miami Jewish community" says Rena
Genn, the new community Shlichah. and director
of the Israel Programs office of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. She adds, "We want to help as
many people as possible to visit Israel: because
someone who visits Israel, even if he does not
make ah yah. will return to Miami as a more
committed and active Jew, and will better serve
the community."
Rena Genn has a much better sense of the
American Jewish community than most new
shlichim. for she is a former New Yorker who
made a successful aliyah. Rena and her
husband Reuben, alsoirom New York, live in Zarit.
a moshave along the Lebanese border, where Rena
does community work. "I took on the challenge of
coming to Miami" she says." because I feel that
Americans who have made a successful aliyah
have a responsibility to come back as shlichim. I
feel it is easier to develop a rapport with the
community you serve when you know the country
and the language, as well as the problems con-
fronting people contemplating an extended visit
to Israel or aliyah."
Ms. Genn sees her job as having three major
components. "First, I want to make myself and
the work we are doing here as visible as I can, and
try to do as much speaking as possible in '.he
community: second, I want to continue the fine
work of my predessessor of reaching out to the
Jewish students on Florida's campuses, and third,
I want this office to become the resource center for
Israel in South Florida, to provide information
and programs for organizations, to combat
misinformation about Israel, and to strengthen
the link between Israel and the Greater Miami
Jewish Community."
One effort to which Ms. Genn gives high
priority is to coordinate Israel-related
programming with Jewish Community Centers of
Dade County. "We believe this is expecially
important in the area of teen programming" she
explains. She intends to work closely with
Federation's High School in Israel program,
especially in maintaining close liason with the
students after they return to Miami. "We want to
reinforce the positive experience these kids had in
Israel, to help those who want u> go back for
future work or study. I think many of these kids
will be in the Young Leadership of Federation in
10 years."
Ms. Genn is particularly pleased with the
office's outreach to Jewish college and University
students. According to Genn. the Israel Programs
office has developed a network of campus workers
on almost every campus in the state. There are
now frequent Israel-related events, especially at
the large schools like the University of Miami and
the University of Florida, and many more
students are going to Israel than in past years.
"We know that students returning from Israel are
the best salespeople" Rena says. She adds that
she will spend about 25 per cent of her own time
traveling to campuses around the state and
helping to spur programs.
A new organization that works closely with
Ms. Genn is the Aliyah Council, which is chaired
by Morris Futernick. The council will organize
support for aliyah in the community, encourage
potential olim in Miami, and maintain contact
with the olim after they have gone to Israel. Says
Ms. Genn, "The council will help to give olim from
this area the sense that they are not alone, and
that the community supports them in what they
are doing."
Ms. Genn expressed satisfaction at the close
working relationship she has achieved with the
Israel Programs Committee chaired by Emmanuel
Berlatsky. She is also confident that the five
shlichim in Greater Miami will continue to work
Rena Genn
closely together, pooling their resources u
strengthen Israel and aliyah and Israel
programming in South Florida. In addition to Ma
Genn. the other shlichim in Greater Miami are
Gadi Kahana of Bnai Akiva, Yossi Shochat of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education. Yehoshua
Shomer. the Aliyah shaliach. and Yonatan Weil.
the shaliach of Young Judea and Hadassah
Ms. Genn says that she is optimistic that she
can "do a lot for Israel" during her two years as
shlaliach in Miami. She adds. "I find thifl an
exciting opportunity because Miami has a large
and vibrant Jewish community, and the work
itself is stimulating and rewarding Working
closely with Federation, I believe that I can
further strengthen the close ties between Israel
and the Greater Miami Jewish community
WHEN THE FELDMANS
OF MIAMI TRAVEL
TO THE SOVIET UNION
THIS YEAR, A
VISIT TO THE
FELDMANS OF
MOSCOW COULD BE
VERY MEANINGFUL
FOR ALL OF US
LET A SOVIET JEW
KNOW HIS FELLOW
JEWS HAVENT
FORGOTTEN HIM. LET
GMJF'S COMMUNITY
RELATIONS
COMMITTEE'S SOUTH
FLORIDA CONFERENCE
ON SOVIET JEWRY
SHOW YOU HOW.
PHONE 576-4000
jr


omen's Division
"Federation Tuesday"
Set For Nov. 17
"Womanpower" will be the program theme for
eration Tuesday, the annual community
ucation day of the Greater Miami Jewish
federation Women's Division, which will take
lace on Tuesday, November 17 from 9:15 a.m. to
15 p.m. at the Konover Hotel.
The program will explore the Jewish woman's
hoice of her destiny, according to Federation
^Tuesday chairman Susan Panoff. "This event is
geared toward presenting the opportunities which
have evolved during our history and which are
Open to Jewish women.'' Mrs. Panoff explained.
These are important times in terms of the
choices for women in religious life, in Jewish
volunteer and professional life and in Jewish
political and social activism." The choices each
woman makes determines her destiny," she said.
"Federation Tuesday presents an opportunity for
women throughout Greater Miami to participate
ogether in an event and experience a meaningful
Lj*i effective day of education," she continued.
"The program is designed to make women
rognizant of their Jewish identities, as well as to
rive them the opportunity to rekindle their
iedication and response to the Jewish ex-
wrience," Mrs. Panoff explained. The Federation
Tuesday agenda will feature three nationally
distinguished Jewish spokespersons presenting
.>pu-s of current concern. "The speakers' topics
trill explore the experiences of the past, present
ind future Jewish women, along with the in-
action between their everyday lives and their
ewish lives," Mrs. Panoff added.
Guest speakers include Ellen Goodman,
pular nationally syndicated columnist of the
ston Globe; Dr. Harold M. Schulweis, Los
ngeles' innovative Judaic sociologist and
ommunity leader; and Marilynn Tallman,
'hicago-based originator of a unique approach to
ewish education for adults. A luncheon will
poliow the speakers' presentations.
Working closely with Mrs. Panoff and
Women's Division Community Education Vice
President Dorothy Podhurst on the arrangements
Assisting chairman Susan Panoff (seated, left) with the planning of Federation
Tuesday are Ellyn Elkins (seated, right) South Dade representative; (standing
from left to right) Elaine Richman, North Dade representative; Laurie Turner,
South West Dade representative; and Bonni Lang, Miami Beach Represen-
tative.
for Federation Tuesday are Bonni Lang, Miami
Beach representative; Elaine Richman, North
Dade representative; Helene Lanster, South Dade
representative; and Laurie Turner, Southwest
Dade representative. In addition. Federation
Tuesday committee members include Ellyn
Elkins, Gifts and Favors; Nancy Lipoff, Women's
Division president; Merri Mastoropoulos,
Business and Professional Women representative;
Estelle Haber. Miami Beach Community
Education vice chairman; Judi Billig. North Dade
Community Education vice chairman; Robbie
Herskowitz, South Dade Community Education
vice chairman; and Barbara Sussman, Southwest
Dade Community Education vice chairman.
Approximately 1,000 women are expected to
attend this forum, the most important educational
event of the year sponsored by the Women's
Division. For information and reservations, please
phone the Federation Women's Division office at
576-4000.
f
Business and Professional
Women Host EREV
Federation Tuesday
The Business and Professional Women of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division will host Erev Federation Tuesday, an evening
edition of the Women's Division Federation Tuesday program designed
especially for working women. The event will take place on Monday, November
16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Konover Hotel.
The program is entitled Womanpower. the Jewish Woman Chooses Her
Destiny." and will feature guest speaker Marilynn Tallman, Chicago-based
originator of a unique approach to Jewish education for adults.
Business and Professional Women Chairman Nancy Bloom urges all
Jewish working women to attend this informative, educational event. The
program is being planned by Merri Mastoropoulos. Business and Professional
Women Representative; Dottie Ridge. Business and Professional Women
STmuni^Sucation chairman; and Susan Panoff Federation Tuesday
cSdnnan. For reservations and further information, please call the Women s
Division office. 576-4000.


12-B The Jewish FToTtdiari / Friday, October 30,1981
GMJF Multiple Appeals Committee
Strengthens Efforts

-*,

The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Multiple Appeals Committee spearheaded by
Chairman Cal Kovens, has embarked on a major
effort to achieve increased participation of Greater
Miami Jewry as part of a determined approach to
reinforce the strength of the 11 year old Multiple
Appeals Resolution, which guides the scheduling
of various fund-raising efforts in the Jewish
community.
The problem of duplication in the Jewish
community's fund-raising efforts, particularly as
it concerns schedules, purposes and methods,
prompted the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in
1970 to establish unprecedented guidelines for
multiple appeals.
The guidelines, which seek to coordinate all
Jewish community fund-raising drives so that
each does not tread upon the time, energy and
potential of the other, are contained in a "Multiple
Appeals Resolution" and overseen by the Multiple
Appeals Committee. Currently, there are more
than 120 signatories to the Resolution, each one
thereby agreeing not to participate by working in
or contributing to any campaign directed to the
Jewish community unless clearance has been
obtained through the Multiple Appeals Com-
mittee.
"In its original state," said Kovens, "the
Resolution was successful in developing a year
long calendar which coordinated all Jewish
community fund-raising drives." "However," he
pointed out, "the past ten years have witnessed a
tremendous growth in the Jewish population as
well as the number of fund-raising efforts in the
community."
In early 1970, a group of prominent leaders,
recognizing the troublesome condition of
overlapping appeals, formed a committee to
review the problem and report back to the
Federation Board of Directors. On May 27, 1970,
the Committee's "Multiple Appeals Resolution"
(officially the "Resolution and Guidelines of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Multiple
Appeals Committee pertaining to Independent
and Supplemental Fund-Raising Campaigns for
Maintenance and Capital Funds on behalf of
Local, National and Overseas Agencies,
Institutions and Organizations in the Greater
Miami Jewish Community") was unanimously
adopted by the Board of Directors.
"Many of the most active and generous
citizens of our community were besieged for
contributions during a very limited time period,"
Kovens said. "This then unique resolution which
has served as a model for other Jewish com-
munities throughout the United States, has
helped reduce excessive burdens upon this
community and upon the time of its leadership."
He added that the existence of this resolution
and committee helps not only the citizenry of the
Greater Miami Jewish community, but every
Jewish education, health, and welfare organiza-
tion seeking to achieve its maximum fund-raising
potential in Miami.
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, GMJF president, ex-
plains "the Jewish community recognizes the
validity of all legitimate campaigns organized for
meeting human needs and that the Federation
itself is dedicated to upholding the voluntary
nature of philanthropy as we have known it
throughout our history.
"The voluntary citizen and his health and
welfare organizations require some sort of self-
discipline and informed leadership if all philan
thropic endeavors are to achieve the maximum
potential," Mr. Levy stated.
In the put eleven years, cooperation among or-
ganizations sponsoring fund-raising efforts has
become widespread. Recognition of the period of
January 1 through March 15 as "prime time" for
Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign has become
universally recognized in the community.
In January 1975. Stanley C. Myers, then
chairman of the Multiple Appeals Committee and
founding president of Federation, informed all
signatories that the Multiple Appeals Resolution,
its guidelines, policies and procedures were cir-
culated by the Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds throughout Canada and to more
than 230 communities in North America. The
success of the Resolution was being used as a
model of implementation elsewhere.
The effort toward achieving "more effective,
more orderly and better coordinated fund-raising"
has produced successful results in Miami. Yet the
national impact of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's adoption of the Multiple Appeals
Resolution in 1970 is also being felt, with a similar
degree of success. This historic development
brought about by Miami's Jewish leaders has
clearly been recognized as a major milestone for
Jewish communities all over America.
Gathered at a recent Multipi
(seated, left to right) Joseph Ha
past president; standing (left to
General Campaign chairman.
Committee chairman.
n lien
ieh
> *
Recent Actions
The Multiple Appeals Committee meets f<
dinate the timing, objectives and methods of fun<
interpret to various organizations the policy of|m
At a recent meeting, the Committee acted upon
for clearance of fund-raising efforts from
organizations. Those campaigns which were aj
supplementary campaigns for annual members!
Jewish Student Centers, capital improvementsj
the Jewish community Centers of South &
development of a scholarship fund by the Jewisl
South Florida. Also approved were the annual
Brandeis University on October 14, American^
Aviv University on November 21, and the
League on December 20.


-*,
Multiple Appeals Resolution
RESOLUTION AND GUIDELINES OF THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH
FEDERATIONS MULTIPLE APPEALS COMMITTEE PERTAINING TO
INDEPENDENT AND SUPPLEMENTAL FUND-RAISING CAMPAIGNS
FOR MAINTENANCE AND CAPITAL FUNDS ON BEHALF OF LOCAL,
NATIONAL AND OVERSEAS AGENCIES, INSTITUTIONS AND
ORGANIZATIONS IN THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH COMMUNITY.
Appiat.s Committee meeting were
nbieman and Harry B. Smith, a GMJF
ight) Philip T. Warren, GMJF 1982
nd Cal Kovens, Multiple Appeals
The following resolution was unanimously
adopted by the Board of Directors of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation on May 27, 1970:
"We, the undersigned, believe the needs of a
rapidly growing Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity, the increasing needs of national causes
and the critical needs overseas and in Israel
require the maximum mobilization of manpower
and resources.
We recognize the validity of all campaigns
organized for the purpose of meeting these
growing needs and uphold the voluntary nature of
philanthropy. We believe, however, that volun-
tarism requires self-discipline and informed
leadership if all legitimate philanthropic en-
deavors are to operate effectively and serve the
greatest good.
We further believe the increasing number of
fund-raising campaigns of any nature, mostly
within the same limited period of time during the
year, creates an excessive burden upon the
community and conflict upon the time of its
leadership and serves to further divide the
community and drain its manpower and resources.
A community climate of divisiveness and com-
petition is not in the best interests of the com-
munity or the individual agencies and
organizations seeking financial support.
The variety of Jewish interests in our com-
munity is to be encouraged, but only an orderly
and coordinated process for their financial support
can insure the enhancement of the constructive
nature of their work.
It is the task of our central community
organization, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, through its Multiple Appeals Com-
mittee, to undertake a program which will im-
plement the foregoing principles and philosophy
which will result in more effective, more orderly,
and better coordinated fund-raising efforts in our
community.
In support of these objectives, we resolve not
to lend our names, exert our efforts or give of our
means to any fund-raising appeal of any nature
directed primarily to the Jewish community which
has not been cleared with the Multiple Appeals
Committee of the the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as to validity, objectives, timing, goal
and method of their fund-raising program. We
urge our community leaders to join us in this
resolution."
Alwly to coor-
so-raising, and to
f he Resolution.
i Jveral requests
' arious Jewish
if >roved include
* P of the Hillel
s ind repairs by
Sfcnjda and the
' HiRh School of
tinners for the
rViends of Tel
A Ki-Defamation
Signed by:
Edmund N. Ansin
L. Jules Arkin
Herbert N. Baumgard
Ted Baumritter
Charles Berg
Mrs. Sam Berzon
Claudette Candib
Jesse Caaselhoff
David P. Cataman
Herbert Clofine
Jack Cooper
Marvin Cooper
Sidney Cooperman
IrvingCypen
Diane Eisenberg
Marcia Epstein
Myra Fair
Martin Fine
Jerome Fleeman
Mar vis Ross Friedman
Seymour Friedman
Morris Futernick
Gary Gerson
Stanley Gilbert
Saul (Hottman
Alfred Golden
Marvin Goldman
Goldie Goldstein
Jack D. Gordon
Abraham S. Gould
Emil J.Gould
Joel Gray
Robert Greene
Robert Grossberger
Robert Cruder
Nathan S. Gumenick
Sheldon Guren
Louis Handler
Marshall S. Harris
LilaHeatter
Daniel Neat Heller
Larry Hellring
Arthur HorowiU
Richard Horwich
E.E. Hubshman
Donald Jacobson
Donald Kahn
Ronald Kalish
Howard Kane
Joseph H. Kanter
Don Kaplan
Melvin Kartzmer
Hal Kaye
Seymour D. Keith
Morris Kipper
Alan Jay Khiger
Cal Kovens
Roz Kovens
Raymond Kramer
Sidney Lefcourt
Donald Lefton
William Levenson-by
Evelyn C. Barutio
Frances B. Levey
Harry A. Levy
Joel Levy
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Herman Lipsitz
Sidney Ludwig
Peter Luria
George Malin
Bernard S. Mandler
Morris Marder
Hank Meyer
Julius Miller
Leonard Miller
Saul Morgan
Meyer Myers
Stanley C. Myers
Norton S. Pallot
Norman S. Rachlin
Forrest Raffel
Irwin Raskin
Nat Ratner
Harold Reinhard
Sylvia Reinhard
Lou Rones
Nathan Rood
Sam Rosen
Herschel Rosenthal
Sherwin Ross
Muriel Russell
Robert Russell
BertSager
David Schaecter
Lawrence M. Schantz
Neil Schiff
Kenneth SchwarU
Samuel Schwartz
Samuel Segal Jr.
Mendell Selig
Israel D. Shapiro
Fred Shochet
Harold Silberman
Morton Silberman
Val Silberman
George M. Simon
Isaac Sklar
Harry B. Smith
Lee Spiegelman
John Sumberg
Carl Susskind
Jerry Sussman
Harold Thurman
Eli Timoner
Robert Traurig
Philip T Warren
Carl Weinkle
Harry Weitzer
Nate Willis
George Wise
PhilZacharia
as of October 12.1981


Pmge 12-B The Jewish Florithan / Friday, October 30,1981
Miamians Attend Young Leadership
Cabinet Retreats in
Chicago, Dallas
i
i
"Stimulating and inspiring ... a marvelous
opportunity to meet with people from all over
America with the same level of commitment to
Israel and the Jewish people the chance to rap
directly with Senators, Congressmen, and in-
fluential Jewish leaders was really exciting."
These were a few of the comments of the 13
members of Miami's UJA Young Leadership
Cabinet after their return from the national Men's
Young Leadership Cabinet Retreat held near
Chicago from September 16-20, 1981. From
September 11-13, five Miami women attended the
UJA Young Women's Cabinet Meeting in Dallas.
The retreats brought together hundreds of the
Jewish community's top young leaders from
across the United States for five days of
solicitation and allocation training, caucuses,
discussions with Congressmen, top American
Jewish leaders, and members of the Israel,
Knesset. Attending the Cabinet retreats
from Miami were Michael Adler, Jeffrey
Berkowitz, Amy Dean, Phyllis Goldman, Linda
Hoffman, Steven Housman, Ezra Katz, Alan
Kluger, Jack Levine, Sonia Miller, David
Rosenbaum, Edward S ho hat, Sandi Simon, John
Sumberg, Eric Turetsky, Barry Yarchin, Allan
Yarkin and Richard Zinn.
For the thirteen men from Miami, the
Chicago retreat was an invaluable experience at
which they honed their solicitation and leadership
skills, and learned to work closely with their
counterparts across the country. "The week in
Chicago completely supercharged me" said Barry
Yarchin, a new member of the Cabinet, who was
attending his first retreat. It was fantastic to get
plugged into a national network of people who feel
like I do. After this experience, I feel primed to go
into the 1982 Campaign, and raise as much money
as I possibly can."
According to Jeffrey Berkowitz, the Chair-
man of Miami Young Leadership, "the most
inspiring facet of the trip for me was the super
performance of the young men I brought with me
from Miami. I felt that Miami as a community set
a trend at the retreat for outspoken leadership and
commitment, a commitment that manifested itself
in the way our people really stretched themselves
in their personal giving to the Campaign." Indeed,
Berkowitz had reason to be proud. The thirteen
young men from Miami pledged a total of
$141,000 to the 1982 Campaign, placing nine of
the 13 on the Pacesetter level. Overall, the figure
represents an 83 per cent increase over the 1981
Campaign. Everyone attending the retreat took
part in a 'full disclosure caucus' in which he was
expected to openly and fully disclose his personal
financial situation to the others in the group,
which is chosen at random. Working together, the
group would then come up with a meaningful level
of giving for every member of the caucus. "The
full disclosure solicitation helps you to judge the
level of your own commitment by using other gifts
as standards," explains Jeff Berkowitz. "The
caucus members really open up to each other, and
attempt to guide one another in judging the
quality of a gift. What is wonderful about this
process is how close you become in a few hours to
people who several hours earlier may have been
strangers to you."
The Miami contingent also expressed
satisfaction at the opportunity they had to hold
in-depth discussions with two of Israeli Knesset
members, Ronnie M ilo of Likud and Uzi Baram of
Labor. They also met with Rep. Tom Lantos (D.,
Calif.) one of the leaders in the House of Represen-
tatives in the fight against the sale of AW ACS
planes to Saudi Arabia, and Sen. Robert Kasten
(R., Wis.) who has also expressed his intention to
vote against AWACS. "We were pleased to have
the opportunity to explain to the Senator why we
think the AWACS sale would be so disastrous,"
said Jack Levine. "Having the chance to talk
personally to a U.S. Senator on an issue of this
significance for Israel, for the United States and
the Jewish people was a tremendous respon-
sibility. It gave me a great deal of satisfaction to
be able to speak on behalf of our Jewish com-
munity."
In Dallas, the Women's Young Leadership
Cabinet met with Tom Dine, the Director of the
American-Israel Affairs Committee. David
Saperstein of Union of American Hebrew
Congregation's Religious Action Center. Marshall
Weinberg. Vice President of the Joint
Distribution Committee, and K. James Weinberg.
Chairman of the Allocations Committee of the
United Jewish Appeal. The speakers helped focus
the women on political issues confronting the
Jewish community. There was also an educational
component of the program concentrating on
Project Renewal and planning for Super Sunday,
1982. According to Sandi Simon, much of the
energy went into forming networks and strategies
to bring more professional women into the
Campaign structure. Says Simon, "A large part of
our work in the coming months will be reaching
women with independent incomes. Business and
career women remain a source of maximum giving
which we are only beginning to Up."
Both the Men's and Women's Young
Leadership groups are now planning for the
national UJA Mens and Womens Young
Leadership Cabinet in Washington D.C. set for
March 13-16. 1982. Michael Adler. the Miami
cabinet membei. who is National Portfolio
Chairman for Special Projects and is responsible
for recruiting nationally for the event, expects
that 2.000-3.000 young Jews from around the
country, including 220-300 Miamians. will gather
in Washington for the event, where they will be
briefed by key officials on issues of vital interests
to all Jews. During the last such gathering
delegates were addressed by President Carter, key
Senators and Congressmen, as well as the top
Jewish leadership. Adler explains that at the
upcoming conference, delegates from Florida will
meet personally with Florida Senators and
Representatives, "to make them aware of our
needs and concerns." He added. "In this time of
grave uncertainity in the Middle East, I feel it is
crucial that we show up in Washington in strength
to show that we stand foresquare behind Israel in
defense of her legitimate security interests."
Adler urges that those interested in attending
the Washington meeting register early, as interest
is running extremely high. Those wishing to
register or requesting further information should
contact Federation's Leadership Development
Department at 576-4000.
(Back row, left to right) Alan Kluger, Steven Housman, Jack Levine, Michael Adler, Alan Yarkin, (Front
row, left to right) David Rosenbaum, Barry Yarchin, Ezra Katz, Richard Zinn, Jeff Berkowitz.


JP Announces
982 Grants Program
11
*
I
A
Sidney I^efcourt
1
L.I
:.^i?Sl
j 1 'be people who make endowments and
lui-sts to the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
ppies are working to ensure that the Greater
tmi Jewish community remains strong and
rant'" says Sidney Lefcourt.chairman of the
rater Miami Jewish Federation's Foundation of
iish Philadthropies. "Each year" Lefcourt
klains. "the Foundation invests a portion of its
ring assets in programs that strengthen the
Jununity as a whole, and give special support to
|se in the community such as the elderly,
Vh, and the troubled who are most in need of
f help."
Over the past year, the Foundation has con-
Ued to grow rapidly. Most significantly, the
Jindation's legacies and bequests program has
pted from some $3 million in 1975 to nearly
.500,000 today. This dramatic increase in
ets is after distribution of over $6.8 million in
allocations and S815,000 in 28 special grants.
.Juring the fiscal year which ended May 31,
II. the Foundation allocated over $1,500,000,
mi the money being distributed to the GMJF,
[building funds, UJA and other Federations,
leficiary agencies, synagogues, Israeli in-
lutions and a plethora of other agencies and
rams.
j-efcourt announced recently that new grants
[the 1982 fiscal year have been awarded to the
ptral Agency for Jewish Education (CAJE),
pth Dade Community Day Junior High School.
Community Relations Council (CRC)
Yernment Affairs Office, the Jewish Family
Children's Services (JFCS1 Prevention
vices, a Geriatric Nurse Home Visits Program
rtiami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
'HHA), the ARMS emergency reiponM
tem at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC).
I the South Florida Holocaust Conference.
The CAJE South Dade Community Day
^r High School will receive a $57,060 grant
a the Foundation to help it prepare for its
mg in September, 1982 with both 7th and 8th
to classes. A ninth grade class will be added
following year. The school, which will reach
out to all ideologies within Judaism, in accordance
with the concept of "Rial Yisrael," (the unity of
the Jewish people will complete the community
day school network in Miami, starting with the
elementary schools and leading into the Jewish
High School of South Florida which opened this
September in North Miami Beach. The High
School received a major grant from Foundation
during the last fiscal year.
The Foundation is providing a major grant this
year for the new Government Relations Office,
representing all the Federations of Florida, which
opened recently in Tallahassee. Heading the office
is Flame Bloom, who serves as full time Gover-
nment Affair Officer, and receives backing from a
statewide lay committee called the Florida Jewish
Governmental Affairs Committee (FJGAC). Says
I^efcourt, "Given the enhanced role that state
government will be playing in the allocation of
resources, it is timely that a Federation presence
now exists in Tallahassee to ensure the Jewish
community is heard on these vital issues."
The Foundation is also making a major grant
to the Jewish Family and Children's Services
for the creation of a Prevention Services Program.
The concept of prevention services is to reach out
to the community to reduce the incidence of
emotional, behavioral, and social problems by
reaching people before they become entrapped in
depression and other negative patterns. The
Preventive Services Program will work closely
with the day schools and Jewish community
centers, to create Jewish Family Life Education
programs, to develop specialized prevention
oriented support groups for persons undergoing
significant life changes or who feel in need of
group support, and to begin the development of a
prevention oriented outreach program for Jewish
teenagers using the agency's mobile van. A
successful Prevention Service, according to Mr.
Lefcourt. can lead to greater opportunity for
family stability, decreased need for treatment
services, and an overall improvement in individual
self concept and Jewish identity."
A Foundation grant will allow the Douglas
Gardens Ambulatory Health Center to employ an
additional geriatric nurse practitioner who would
be available to make home visits to the over 1.000
applicants on the waiting list to enter Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
In addition to giving physical examinations
and post-hospital evaluations to the elderly people
in their homes, the nurse will also be available to
them for mental health, counseling, assistance in
applications for social services like SSI. housing.
Medicare, chore and-or homemaker services, and,
if needed, referrals to appropriate agencies. It is
believed that by providing these services the
nurse can help to forestall premature in-
stitutionalization of many of these elderly people.
Another key program to help maintain elderly
people in their homes is ARMS; the personal
emergency response system jointly sponsored by
Mount Sinai Medical Center and the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida. The
program which services 220 indigent, frail
homebound elderly people living primaray in
Miami Beach, uses electronic communication
equipment in the home to provide twenty-four
hour access to emergency care based at Mt. Sinai.
The Foundation will contribute a grant this year
to assist in the funding of a portion of the salary
expenses for two nurse practitioners who are
working with this innovative program for the
elderly.
The Foundation will make a grant to the work
of the Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial
Center, which during the first year of its existence
has undertaken extensive audio and video taping
of oral histories of Holocaust Survivors. These are
made available for use in public and private
schools. According to Goldie Goldstein, the
Board of Directors of the Holocaust Center, which
includes top educators. Catholic, Protestant, and
Jewish clergy, and civic and business leaders, as
well as its volunteer interviewers, "are anxious to
cooperate in any way possible to prevent mankind
Jay Kislak
Stanley C. Myers
Shepard King
Harry B. Smith
from repeating the greatest crime ever committed
by a sovereign nation."
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies has
achieved its landmark growth since its establish-
ment in 1972 in part through a network of com-
mittees and involved lay leadership who have
served the Foundation by advising the
organization of the most advantageous means to
capitalize on those bequests and unrestricted
funds endowed over the years.
The Investment committee, which is chaired
by Jay Kislak. is comprised of professionals in
the fields of business and finance. The committee
decides on how best to invest Foundation's assets.
Foundation's other three subcommittees are
the Operating subcommittee chaired by Harry B.
Smith, which determines the distribution of all
general and philanthropic funds, the Development
subcommittee, chaired by Stanley C. Myers,
which promotes financial resources within the
community, and the Legal and Tax subcommittee,
chaired by Shepard King, which consists of
lawyers, accountants, and trust officers who give
professional counseling to the Foundation director
in addition to sponsoring a Speaker's Bureau and
an annual tax seminar.
"The marvelous thing about an endowment
fund like Foundation's" Lefcourt explained," is
that our resources are recycled over and over to
produce new dollars that allow us to fund in-
novative and pilot programs, which do not receive
an ongoing allocation from the annual CJA-IEF
campaign." "In this way," he added, "the
Foundation fosters new and creative enterprises
at Federation, and keeps the Greater Miami
Jewish Community forward looking and open to
original thinking."
"I encourage interest members of our com-
munity to contact me or the Foundation director
Steven Rose for further information about
bequests or charitable trusts."
sw vi;


./puj. rw~K~an loai
u
Skokie"-A Dramatization
12
I
On Tuesday, November 17th the CBS
television network, locally WTVJ-TV Channel 4,
will broadcast, "Skokie" the story of a proposed
Neo-Nazi rally during 1978 in the heavily Jewish
suburb of Skokie, Illinois. The program stars
Danny Kaye, as a survivor of a Nazi concentration
camp, and Marin Kanter, as his teenage daughter.
The show will air from 8:00-10:30 p.m.
Ms. Kanter, who began her acting career at
Miami Beach Senior High School, is the daughter
of Nancy and Joseph Kanter of Miami Beach. Her
father, a prominent Miami banker and in-
dustrialist, is a member of the Board of Directors
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and is
Honorary National Chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal Young Leadership Cabinet. He
also serves as Chairman of Federation's-Century
Club.
Marin Kanter s mother is the former Nancy
Reed, a song writer, singer and pianist before her
marriage. She toured with the Benny Goodman
Sextet in Europe and appeared on numerous
television shows, including those hosted by Morty
Amsterdam, Garry Moore, Paul Winchell and
Steve Allen. In addition, Mrs. Kanter performed
on Frank Sinatra's radio show. A member of
ASCAP, she wrote the musk for the United
Cerebral Palsey's theme song, along with lyricist
Betsy Gettinger. Mrs. Kanter is a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Public
Relations Committee.
A student at the Sarah Lawrence School of
Drama In New York, Ms. Kanter has appeared in
leading roles in four major motion picture
productions. In addition to her role in "Skokie,"
Ms. Kanter has also starred in "All Washed Up,"
which will soon be released by Paramount Pic-
tures. Her other movie credits include a sup-
porting lead in the film "Breakdown," as well as
her most current role in "Endangered Species,"
now being filmed on location in Wyoming.
"Skokie"-The Story
When Mayor Smith (Ed Flanders) and Bert
Silver man (Eli Wallach), the town lawyer, learn
that Frank Collin (George Dzundza) is planning to
hold a Neo-Nazi demonstration is Skokie, they
organize a series of community meetings. They
hope to calm the public but soon discover that
their constituents will not tolerate Nazis in
Skokie. The town leaders set in motion a series of
legal roadblocks to keep Collin and his followers
out.
Max Feldman (Danny Kaye), a survivor of a
Nazi concentration camp, speaks for many of
Skokie's Jews when he declares that he will resist
any Neo-Nazis who come to demostrate in their
village Just the thought of brown-shirted
troopers wearing swastikas terrorizes Max's wife
Bertha (Kim Hunter). The crisis forces the
Feldmans to discuss with their teenage daughter
Janet (Marin Kanter) something they have always
avoided their experiences in the Holocaust.
She, in turn, struggles to come to terms with her
own identity as separate from their legacy of
suffering.
Herb Lewisohn (John Rubinstein), the lawyer
from the American Civil Liberties Union who
represents Frank Collin, sees the case as a clear-
cut challenge to the First Amendment. Both he
and Aryeh Neier (Stephen Newman), The
National Executive Director of the ACLU, bear an
additional burden they are Jews criticized for
defending anti-Semites. David Hamlin (James
Sutorius), the Executive Director of the Illinois
Division of the ACLU, stands with Lewisohn,
even though the organization loses many mem-
bers and large contributions because of their
defense of Collin's rights.
Abbot Roam (Carl Reiner) of the Anti-De-
famation League of the B'nai B'rith at first rec-
ommends that Jaws in Skokie ignore the Neo I
Nazi demonstration, thus-denying them the media
attention they want. As the controversy deepens,
however, the ADL joins with other Jewish groups
to bring a "survivor suit" against Collin. Rabbi
Steinberg (Charles Levin), a local rabbi, counsels
nonviolence while Wendy Raskin (Robin Bartlett)
of the Jewish Defense League advocates con-
frontation with the Neo-Nazis. Other clergy in
Skokie show their solidarity with the Jews by
supporting them against the proposed demon-
stration.
THE EVENTS
(This chronology of the key events in the con-
troversy has been compiled from The Nazi-Skok ie
Conflict by David Hamlin. who was the Executive
Director of the Illinois Division nf the American
Civil Liberties Union in 1977-1978.
February 1977, Frank Collin. head of the
National Socialist Party of America, writes
the Trustees of the Park District of the
Village of Skokie requesting a permit to hold
a Neo-Nazi rally there.
The Board of Trustees of the Skokie Park
District informs Collin that he will have to
provide a bond or insurance in the amount of
$360,000 before he will be issued a permit to
demonstrate in-one of Skokie's parks.
Collin informs the Skokie Village Council
that he and his followers will protest the
insurance bond requirement on May 1 in
front of the Skokie Village Hall.
On April 27, the Village of Skokie asks for a
court order to bar Collin from demon-
strating.
Collin calls the Illinois Division of the
American Civil Liberties Union and asks
them to defend him against this violation of
his right to free speech and assembly. They
agree to take his case.
Cook County Chancery Judge Joseph Woslk
issues an injunction barring Collin and the
National Socialist Party of America from
parading in uniform in Skokie on May 1.
The ACLU files and appeal with the Illinois
Appellate Court. The court denies the ap-
peal.
Collin announces he will demonstrate in
Skokie on April 30.
Judge Harold Sullivan expands Judge
Woslk's order banning the Nazis from
parading in Skokie "until further notice of
the court."
On May 2, the Skokie Village Council passes
three ordinances aimed at Collin: (1)
requiring a permit for any parade of 50 or
more in Skokie, to be acquired only after
giving the village 30 days advance notice and
proving possession of $350,000 worth of
liability insurance, (2) forbidding the public
display of "symbols offensive to the com-
munity" and parades by military
organizations in "military style" uniforms,
and (3) banning the distribution of literature
containing "group libel."
On May 4, the Illinois Board of the ACLU
deeides to hear an appeal about the expanded
injunction until the Appellate Court rules.
On June 14, the Supreme Court of the United
States rules that any citizen subject to prior
restraint of speech is entitled to have that
, restraint either reviewed or removed im-
mediately. The Illinois courts are ordered to
hear arguments on Skokie's injunction.
On Jury 6, the Appellate Court leaves the
Injunction in force by changing the ban from
wearing uniforms to carrying swastikas. The,
ACLU appeals to the Illinois Supreme Court.
Several Jewish groups file a "survivor suit"
against Collin claiming that a demonstration
by Neb-Nazis in Skokie would constitute
"menticide" ("the willful infliction of
emotional harm") on Holocaust survivors
1- -u
'
'*. fc
--------------
Marin Kanter and Danny Kaye in "Skokie".
residing in the Village.
OH January 27, 1978, the Illinois Supreme
Court finds that the injunction preventing
Collin from demonstrating in Skokie is H1
constitutional. The court dismisses the
survivor suit.
On February 23, U.S. District Court Judge
Bernard Decker finds Skokie's three or-
dinances to be in violation of the United
States Supreme Court's dictate.
The United States Court of Appeals for the
Seventh Circuit affirms Judge Decker's
finding and orders the Village of Skokie to
issue a demonstration permit to Frank
Collin.
Jewish and other groups plan a huge
counterdemonstration against Collin should
he come to Skokie.
Collin does not use his court-mandated First
Amendment right ot demonstrate on the
steps of the Village Hall in Skokie on June
25, 1978.
Freedom of speech is one of the liberties
guaranteed by the First Amendment to the
Constitution of the United States. Because of this
protection, all Americans have the right to
communicate their opinions and beliefs. Still.
throughout history, some concerned citizens have
argued that it is necessary to limit the rights of
those who advocate racism, fascism, sexism, and
other obnoxious views. The government, these
individuals assert, can and should make ex-
ceptions to the rule of free speech.
"Skokie" depicts the events which took place
in Skokie, Illinois during 1977 and 1978. Some of
the characters' names have been changed, and
some fictional characters have been created. But
the events protrayed are essentially as they
happened. The screenplay conveys both the
unswerving commitment of those who defended
the First Amendment rights of the Nazis and the
strong passion of those who were convinced thst
guarantees of freedom of expression do not apply,
to groups who would end this right for others.
-


News From
outli Dade
13
ter Highly Successful First Year of Activity,
South Dade Office Foresees Further Growth
ie success of our first year of full activity in
Dade is due, first and foremost, to the
Ipation of so many committed individuals
cognized the importance of a meaningful
ktion presence in South Dade and were
to devote the time and energy required to
ft happen."
is the assessment of Fran Levy, Chair-
of the South Dade Committee. Thanks to
ffforts, Ms. Levy believes, "We have been
i establish Federation and its agencies as an
int part of the lives of South Dade Jews.
)ntinued progress will be based on main-
and expanding involvement from all
; of the South Dade Jewish community. We
I continue to involve synagogue, temple,
r, and organizational representatives and
e our efforts to reach out to presently
bated Jews."
Hoard of Directors of the Greater Miami
Federation first approved plans to
k-h a South Dade Office in May. 1979 after a
it ion study confirmed the movement of a
leant proportion of Miami Jewry into the
Today.it is believed that approximately one
)f Miami Jews reside in South Dade. After a
of organization and planning beginning in
II of 1979, the South Dade Office developed a
rogram of activities in September 1980. with
(Levy serving as chairperson of the South
[Committee and Michael Mever as director of
}uth Dade Office. The four vice-chairpersons
181-Mii program year are Morris Futernick,
Herkowitz, Dorothy Oppenheim and
|ce Donsky.
roughout the year, the South Dade Area
littee concentrated its efforts on several key
of community building, including in-
lT\fi awareness and consciousness on issues of
kh concern, increasing the reservoir of Jewish
Vship in South Dade. and perhaps most
tant. bringing the services of Federation and
?ncies to the area.
iuth Dade's Demographic Needs Assessment
littee chaired last year by David Rosenbaum.
a year identifying thousands of South Dade
Bh residents previously unknown to
^ration. The Assessment Committee
am ended to Federation that a Demographic
s Assessment Study be undertaken of the
Dade Jewish Community, a recom-
lation that led to Federation Board of
Ctors approving funding for a county-wide
ssment Study. The study will be undertaken
l months ahead.
South Dade Shalom Committee chaired by
lanie Hauser. held several welcoming
tions for newcomers to the South Dade
ih community during the past year, and has
for more during the upcoming season. A
Hion was held September 17 in conjunction
| the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
cognition of Synagogue Mobilization Month.
[committee developed a detailed information
flet of South Dade Jewish resources, which is
ble on request from the South Dade Office.
South Dade Committee has made im-
nt strides in the area of community
Btion. This year, in cooperation with the
lership Development Department of
potion, it is offering a lecture series the first
*"sday of each month entitled, "The Jewish
*ftion-An Adventure in Jewish Identity and
r-nitment. Federation agencies, such as the
H Vocational Service, promoted their ser-
* through special programs in South Dade,
there are plans for an expansion of such
programs during the coming year. One especially
significant outreach program. Open Doors' was
begun this summer. Open Doors, which is chaired
by Elaine Berkowitz, attempts to reach hundreds
of individuals and couples in small "non-
fundraising" meetings to stimulate interest in
Jewishness and the Jewish community. Hosts
invite friends for an evening program.
A Public Affairs Committee, to be chaired by
Robert Kanziger, and designed to address issues
of concern to the Jewish community, is present-
ly in formation. The Committee plans to reach out
to congregations to involve their social action
committees in developing an agenda of mutual
concern. The Public Affairs Committee will also
work closely with Federation's Community
Relations Committee. A Special Events Com-
mittee to be chaired by Dror Zadok, will also be
formed to plan major community-wide events in
cooperation with agencies, organizations, and
congregations in the area.
Symptomatic of South Dade's increased weight
in the Greater Miami Jewish Community was the
organization of a Campaign Committee chaired by
Morris Futernick, which organized the area's first
major fundraising event at Kings Bay Yacht and
Country Club, active involement in Super Sunday,
and the South Dade Ma Bell Blitz to help conclude
the 1981 Campaign. This year, the committee m
planning several additional campaign events to
involve even greater numbers of South Dade Jews
in the CJA-IEF Campaign.
In 1980-81, several programs were held on such
subjects as; The Jews of Ethiopia; and USSR
Policies in the Middle East. More programs are
planned this year to alert, sensitize and involve
the community in expressing concern for fellow
Jews wherever there is need. One such program.
Troubled Jews in Troubled Lands, is scheduled for
January 1982.
The South Dade Community Services and
Continued on Pg. 14
Dr. Helen Fagin
Dr. Fagin to Speak
on Holocaust
As part of the continuing series "The Jewish
Connection: An Adventure In Jewish Identity
and Commitment," Dr. Helen Fagin, director of
the Judaic Studies Program at the University of
Miami will speak on the Holocaust November 5, at
8:15 p.m. The event will take place at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation South Dade Office,
12401 S.W. 102 Street. Future lectures in the
series include "Troubled Jews in Troubled Lands"
by Ted Comet, director of the Overseas Program
of the Council of Jewish Federations in New York,
and "The Future of the American Jewish Com-
munity" by Dr. Jonathan Woocher, Assistant
Professor of Jewish Communal Service, Brandeis
University.
JVS Opens New South Dade Branch Office
The Jewish Vocational Service has expanded
it's capacity to serve the expanding Jewish
community of South Dade through the recent
opening of a Community Services Branch Office at
8353 S.W. 124th Street, JVS will offer Career
Development and Job Placement Services at this
new location. The counseling services are designed
to help individuals develop educational and
vocational plans in relation to their abilities,
aptitudes, interests and personal characteristics.
The program provides both individual and
group counseling services and includes the use of
vocational aptitude tests and extensive oc-
cupational information and school catalogues. The
program serves in and out of school youth and
adults who wish to explore alternatives or second
career possibilities as well as an increasing
number of women seeking re-entry into the labor
market. The new office will also offer job coun-
seling and job placement services to individuals
seeking employment. JVS also plans to expand
group career counseling services in conjunction
with synagogues and other agencies within the
South Dade area.
The new office is the result of several years of
planning by both the Jewish Vocational Service
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. This
South Dade office is funded under a special grant
by Federation's Planning and Budget Committee.
For more information concerning the JVS
Community Services Program, please call the
South Dade Office at 235-8491 or the Central
Office at 576-3220.


WPBT-TV To Rebroadcast
"World Gathering"
The World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors, held last June in Jerusalem, was a once
in a lifetime event; a gathering which enabled
Jews from all around the world to come toaether
for the first time since their liberation from Nazi
concentration camps 36 years ago. On Monday
November 2nd, at 10:00 p.m. WPBT-Channel 2
will present a special rebroadcast of World
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors. Join
host Eli Wallach for the one hour documentary
which relives those emotional days in Jerusalem,
when Holocaust survivors from all over the world
came together to affirm life, and to celebrate the
survival of the Jewish people.
David Schaecter, Chairman of the South
Florida Committee of the World Gathering of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors, led a sizeable
contingent of Miamians to the event, which was
organized to emphasize the significance of the
Holocaust and to insure that the atrocities of 36
years past never occur again. Aa David Schaecter
put it, "The World Gathering was a deeply
moving experience for my family and mvself. and
I am very pleased that the Greater Miami Jewish
community will be able to share this extraordinary
event with us."
*^1
JDC Seeks First-
Hand Reports
The American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee has announced it is looking for in-
teresting stories from Jews helped by the agency
since its establishment in 1914. for possible usfc
during the JDC 70th anniversary, to be observed
in 1984.
The JDC has been active in more than 60
countries around the world, providing for the
relief, rescue and reconstruction or Jewish
communities. The stories from its beneficiaries,
which are being gathered by the JDC public in-
formation department, will provide the basis for
material to be distributed during JDC's 70th
anniversary.
One such incident was related by Leon
Wolfstahl of New York. At 15, he was on a train to
a concentration camp when he was liberated by
the U.S. Army. He said he remembered a JDC
staff member.Laura Margolis, who came to a DP
camp identifying Jews, later getting Leon settled
in a halfway house in Brussels operated by the
JDC.
He reported she had faith in him and suggested
he renew his schooling. He learned to be a gold-
smith "and it enabled me to begin life again."
Eventually he settled in the United States. He
said a child without hope at 15 remembers when
given hope. He added when one is older, "you add
the balance sheet and ask: who do I owe? I owe
the JDC and the American Jewish community."
Individuals with personal accounts which
related to JDC are asked to send their material to
the JDC public relations department. Room 1914,
60 East 42nd Street. New York. N.Y. 10165.
After Highly Successful First Year of Activity,
South Dade Office Foresees Further Growth


Continued from Pg. 13
Planning Committee chaired by Dorothy
Oppenheim had a very meaningful and productive
year. The committee's report regarding the need
for new or expanded Federation services was
submitted to Federation's Planning and Budget
Committee and the Federation Board of Directors.
Virtually all requests for new or expanded services
in the report were approved for funding. Among
the items funded were: a new Jewish Vocational
Service Office in South Dade and several part time
professionals to provide services to the area; an
additional staff person for the South Dade Office
of the Jewish Family and Children's Service, and a
county-wide Prevention Services Program
(Family Life Education); funding for a part-time
position for the Central Agency for Jewish
Education to staff a Midrasha (joint community
wide adult education program) in South Dade and
to coordinate all of the agency's services in the
area; an additional day of chaplaincy services per
week to serve unaffiliated Jews in South Dade
hospitals and nursing homes, and a part-time
professional to staff a singles program at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center. The
Committee wffl expand its function this year in
order to meet with agencies not presently serving
in South Dade, but which might wish to or might
appropriately begin to do so as a matter of
community priority.
During 1980-81, the South Dade Steering
Committee was expanded from twelve to over
thirty individuals. This committee and the others
previously mentioned gave scores of South Dade
Jews the chance to play leadership roles in the
community. In 1981-82, there are plans to develop
a South Dade Area Committee of up to one
hundred persons, to work in conjunction with the
Steering Committee, hopefully involving in-
dividuals and representatives of all community
organizations, agencies, congregations, as well as
others who want to be a part of these rapidly
growing activities in South Dade.
Given the tremendous growth during South
Dade's first year, Fran Levy is decidedly op-
timistic about the future. Says she, "We hope all
interested Jews will join us to continue what we
have accomplished to date, and to enable us
working together, to make South Dade a great
place for us all to live as a united, committed,
Jewish community."


ovember Community Calendar
15
IDAY. NOVEMBER 1
lh Dade Jewish Community Center
door Concert with the American
jika Company, offered in
cnition with PACE
(p.m.
251-9334 for more information
.DAY. NOVEMBER 3
kter Miami Jewish Federation
ag Adults Division
ek Fall Learn-in
|p.m.-10 p.m.
576-4000 for more information
>NESDAY. NOVEMBER 4
rersity of Miami's
iren in Distress
loon Luncheon
U Doral Hotel
365-0403 for more information
Pine Arts of Beth David
ire Series
vin Koss Friedman, internationally known
paler; will lecture on
itemporary Art: Name. Rank, and the Big
bbers."
i S W 120th Street. Miami
|p.m.
S54-3911 for more information
th Dade Community Center
New Male Female Relationship''
lure with Dr. Steven Mack. Psychotherapist
|251-9334 for more information
'IRSDAY. NOVEMBER 5
Ittr Miami Jewish Federation
hi Dade Community Education Program
|b social hall of the South Dade
12401 S.W. 102nd Ave.. Miami
lb 1-9334 for more information
fURDAY. NOVEMBER 7
)le Judea
lal Dinner Dance
emple Judea
Ip.m.
|Temple Office at 667-5657
nore information
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 11
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Brunch and Book review by Rabbi David H.
Auerbach
10 a.m.
Beth David Congregation
Call 854-3911 for more information
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Lecture Series
Ira Licht, Director, Tne Lowe Art Museum;
" Is there Jewish Art?"
7500 S.W. 120th Street, Miami
7:45 p.m.
Call 854-3911 for more information
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12
Temple Beth Sholom
Great Performance Series
Cho Liang Lin, Violinist In Recital
8 p.m.
Temple Sanctuary
Call 532-3491 for more information
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 14
South Dade Jewish Community Center
"1981 Art Auction" beginning with a wine and
cheese preview, and featuring
works by Agam, Dali, Simbari, Nieman, Mero and
Neman
7:30 p.m.
Call 251-9334 for more information
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 15
Temple Emanu-El
Semi-Annual Dinner Dance Meeting
Trip UTIK Drawing
6 p.m.
At Temple Emanu-El
Call 538-2503 for more information
Michael-Ann Russell Community Center
"The Holocaust Assessing the Future"
Lecture with Dr. Helen Fagin, Director of Judaic
Studies. University of Miami
7:30 p.m.
Call Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more
information
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 16
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
"EREV" Federation Tuesday Business and
Professional women
Konover Hotel
7:30 p.m.
Call 576-4000 for more information
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Womens Division
"Federation Tuesday"
9:15a.m. -2:15p.m.
Konove. Hotel
Call 576-4000 for more information
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center North
4221 Pine Tree Drive, Miami Beach
"College Night"
in cooperation with Jewish Vocational Service
7:30 p.m.
Call Miami Beach Jewish Community Center -
North for more information
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 18
South Dade Jewish Community Center
"Communication Skills in Interpersonal
Relationships
7:30 p.m.
Call 251-9334 for more information
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Grace Hokin.
"Yesterday. Today and Tomorrow, Modern Art
Trends."
7500 S.W. 120th Street. Miami
7:45 p.m.
Call 854-3911 for more information
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 22
Hope Center
Open House
12:30-4p.m.
At the Hope Center 666 SW 4th St.
Call 545-7572 for more information
Toras Emes Academy
"Book Fair"
1 p.m. 4 p.m.
In the Temple Ner Tamid social hall
Call 653-5227
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 29
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
18900 N.E. 25th Ave., North Miami Beach
Concert Pianist Phyllis Ssoia Satz
7:30 p.m.
Call Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more in-
formation
IDAY. NOVEMBER 8
lael-Anne Russell Jewish Community Center
Evening of Yiddish Theatre"
Avrum Arnold and Arthur Solvay
p.m.
Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more
lation
SSDAY. NOVEMBER 10
r*ple Israel
Review
temple Israel (Downtown)
|0a.m.
Temple Israel for more information
*DAY, NOVEMBER and
ESDAY, NOVEMBER 10
ple Beth Sholom
at Artist Series
)A Concert Version
Jpolitan Opera Cast, Florida Philharmonic
bestra
ter of Performing Arta
1532-3491 for more information
I
I
i
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
The deadline for December events is November^
(Please Print or Type)
Organization
Event______
Place _____
Date ___
Your Name
Title______
Time
.OA.M.OP.M.
.Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


2-B The Jewish Froridian / Friday. October 30.1981
16
They left
the world
a little
better than
they
founa it.
Th msn and womtn hcnrs
rtachd bsyond thsir own lirss
to hlp th hlpl*:
Abend, Sadie
Alblnder. Harry
Albert. Maurice
Alexander, Arthur
Arnsteln, Martha
Atlas, Fannie
Baron, Henry
Berger, Leopoldlne
BlocK, Sophie |
Blum, Frida
Bond, Irving
Bornstem. Leo
Bring, Noel
Brodsky, Sophie
Brown, Benjamin
Buckner, Fay
Chersky, William B.
Cohen, Louis G.
Conn, Anna
Cortez. Ann
Davis, Sophia Doris
De La Vlez. Lee R
Dworetz, Joseph
Erllnger. Hazel G.
Estreicher, Jacob E.
Fenn, Mannie
Fields, Charles
Finck, Sara G.
Finder, Rosalie Rose
Frankel, Anna
Frankel. Jennie Jean
Freeman, Morris
Frleber, Elvira Lampel
Friedberg, Mayshie
Frledlander, Florence
Friedman, Abraham
and Marcella
Friedman, Jacob j.
Goldberg, Abraham
Goldberg, Joseph
Goldsmith, Alfred
Goldsmith, Lucillie H.
Goldsmith, Sylvester
Goldstein, Mary
Goodman, Esther
Gotkln, Harry
Green, George
Greenberg, Harry B
Greenglass, Hyman
Greenstein, Esther
Grossfeld, Mary
Haber, Kathe
Hartensteln, Harry
Himelson. Max
Hlrth. Josephine
Hoffman, Sally
Honigbaum, Morris
Iser. GustaveW.
Joffe, Max
Kamlot, Adele
Kaplan, Amelia
Kaufman, Max
Kershaw. Benjamin
Klelman.Jean
Klein. Max
Korenvaes. Aaron
Kornblum. Bernard A.
Kraus. Philip
Krede. Leah E.
Kurland. Abraham
Kurzman, Harry
Kushner, Hyman
Lamnin. Irving
Land, Pola
Lande, Julius Martin
Landes, Philip
Landsman, Sol
Lawrence. Daniel N
Lesk. Benjamin
Levenson. William
Levine, Louis
Levy, Louis
Licht. Elizabeth
Lincenberg. Samuel
Lipman, Sol
Lippow. Charles
Loewy. Rose
Mandelbaum. Ethel
Mantell. Frieda
Marks. Louis
Merrill. Charles E.
Michelson, May
Mlnkoff. Martin
Oppenheimer, Elsa
Platoff. Evelyn
Pollak, Irvin
Popiel, Annie
Putter, Anna
Rapaport, Ruben
Rapoport. Mildred
Rich, Rose
Rlfkin, Julius
Rose, CarlynG.
Rosenberg, Benjamin
Roeenthal, Ann Ruth
Rubin, Harry
Rudolph, Jack
Sachs,Jacob
Sacks. William
Sapln.Genla
Sarnoff. Emanuel
Schechter, Harry
Schleslnger, Isidore
Schlussel, Edward
Schmukler, Israel
Schneider, Isabel
Schuchman, Edward
Schuster, Stanley
Schwartz. David
Schwartz, Irving J.
Schwartz. Samuel
Schwartz. Theodore
Seifert, Murray C.
Sernaker. David
Siegel. Betty
Siegel. Mildred
Siegel, Philip
Sley. Harry
Sloan. Samuel
Sporn, William
Stein. Arthur
Stern, Arthur
Strominger, William
Sussberg, Victor
Sussman. William
Tarlow, Emma
Teitelbaum. Charles
Unger. William
Urdang. Eve
Wemstein, Betty
Weiss. Lena
Wexler. Samuel
Wilson. Ben|amin
Wilson. Hortense
Wind. Hilda
Wlnstein, Louis
Wolf. Lena
Wolfson, Abraham
Woloshin, David
Yampolsky. Elizabeth
Zornetzer. Zelman
(As of September 30,1981)
These 150 men and women reached beyond their own lives to help the helpless.
Each one of them left a legacy to the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies.
A 79-year-old women who outlived her family and her ability to care for herself will have
a home and companionship.
A student yearning to study in Israel will see his dream come true.
The Jewish Vocational Service's much needed Nutrition Program for the elderly will be
given a helping hand to expand.
Greater Miami's long awaited Community Day High School has become a reality.
And a thousand other needs will be met.
Foundation off Jewish Philanthropies
off the greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscay no Blvd. Miami, Fla. 33137
(303) 570-4000


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ETCP8DT9P_V3FPH2 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-14T04:01:31Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02752
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


ovember Community Calendar
15
)dAY. NOVEMBER 1
|h Dade Jewish Community Center
loor Concert with the American
|laika Company, offered in
crat ion with PACE
[p.m.
E51 -9334 for more information
KDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Iter Miami Jewish Federation
jg Adults Division
fk Fall Leam-in
ip.m.-lOp.m.
S76-4000 for more information
)NESDAY. NOVEMBER 4
krsity of Miami"s
iren in Distress
loon Luncheon
|e Doral Hotel
B65-0403 for more information
Fine Arts of Beth David
ire Series
/in Ross Friedman, internationally known
ealer; will lecture on
Hemporary Art: Name, Rank, and the Big
^bers."
JS.W. 120th Street. Miami
jp.m.
164*3911 for more information
In Dade Community Center
New Male Female Relationship"
ire with Dr. Steven Mack, Psychotherapist
1251-9334 for more information
LRSDAY. NOVEMBER 5
kter Miami Jewish Federation
p Dade Community Education Program
|e social hall of the South Dade
12401 8.W. 102nd Ave.. Miami
251-9334 for more information
Jl'RDAY. NOVEMBER 7
)le Judea
jal Dinner Dance
femple Judea
Ip.m.
Temple Office at 667-5657
lore information
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 11
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Brunch and Book review by Rabbi David H.
Auerbach
10 a.m.
Beth David Congregation
Call 854-3911 for more information
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Lecture Series
Ira Licht, Director, The Lowe Art Museum;
" Is there Jewish Art?"
7500 S.W. 120th Street. Miami
7:45 p.m.
Call 854-3911 for more information
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12
Temple Beth Sholom
Great Performance Series
Cho Liang Lin, Violinist In Recital
8 p.m.
Temple Sanctuary
Call 532-3491 for more information
SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 14
South Dade Jewish Community Center
"1981 Art Auction" beginning with a wine and
cheese preview, and featuring
works by Agam, Dali, Simbari. Nieman. Mero and
Neman
7:30 p.m.
Call 251-9334 for more information
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 15
Temple Emanu-El
Semi-Annual Dinner Dance Meeting
Trip UTIK Drawing
6 p.m.
At Temple Emanu-El
Call 538-2503 for more information
Michael-Ann Russell Community Center
"The Holocaust Assessing the Future"
Lecture with Dr. Helen Fagin, Director of Judaic
Studies. University of Miami
7:30 p.m.
Call Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more
information
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 16
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
"EREV" Federation Tuesday Business and
Professional women
Konover Hotel
7:30p.m.
Call 576-4000 for more information
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 17
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Womens Division
"Federation Tuesday"
9:15 a.iti.-2:15 p.m.
Konove. Hotel
Call 576-4000 for more information
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center North
4221 Pine Tree Drive, Miami Beach
'College Night"
in cooperation with Jewish Vocational Service
7:30 p.m.
Call Miami Beach Jewish Community Center -
North for more information
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 18
South Dade Jewish Community Center
Communication Skills in Interpersonal
Relationships
7:30 p.m.
Call 251-9334 for more information
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Grace Hokin.
"Yesterday. Today and Tomorrow. Modern Art
Trends."
7500 S.W. 120th Street. Miami
7:45 p.m.
Call 854-3911 for more information
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 22
Hope Center
Open House
12:30-4 p.m.
At the Hope Center 666 SW 4th St.
Call 545-7572 for more information
Toras Emes Academy
"Book Fair"
1 p.m. 4 p.m.
In the Temple Ner Tamid social hall
Call 653-5227
SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 29
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
18900 N.E. 25th Ave.. North Miami Beach
Concert Pianist Phyllis Ssoia Satz
7:30 p.m.
Call Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more in-
formation
IDAY. NOVEMBER 8
iael-Anne Russell Jewish Community Center
Evening of Yiddish Theatre"
Avrum Arnold and Arthur Solvay
Ip.m.
Michael-Ann Russell JCC for more
) at ion
CSDAY. NOVEMBER 10
b>le Israel
Review
emple Israel (Downtown)
[0 a.m.
Temple Israel for more information
kDAY, NOVEMBER and
CSDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Iple Beth Sholom
Vt Artist Series
)A Concert Version
> poll tan Opera Cast, Florida Philharmonic
|estra
Her of Performing Arts
532-3491 for more information
I
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
The deadline for December event $ it November &
(Please Print or Type)
Organization
Event______
Place _____
Date ___
Your Name
Title______
.Time
.0A.M.0P.M.
.Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


WPBT-TV To Rebroadcast
"World Gathering"

I1JJ WJDD
nroprd nmuin
WORLD CATHERINC
OF JEWISH
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS
ISHAEL.JUNE 14-18.1981-N OuiP 1VO 10-'

The World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors, held last June in Jerusalem, was a once
in a lifetime event; a gathering which enabled
Jews from all around the world to come toirethnr
for the first time since their liberation from Nazi
concentration camps 36 years ago. On Monday
November 2nd. at 10:00 p.m. WPBT-Channel 2
will present a special rebroadcast of World
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors. Join
host Eli Wallach for the one hour documentary
which relives those emotional days in Jerusalem,
when Holocaust survivors from all over the world
came together to affirm life, and to celebrate the
survival of the Jewish people.
David Schaecter, Chairman of the South
Florida Committee of the World Gathering of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors, led a sizeable
contingent of Miamians to the event, which was
organized to emphasize the significance of the
Holocaust and to insure that the atrocities of 36
years past never occur again. As David Schaecter
put it, "The World Gathering was a deeply
moving experience for my family and mvself, and
I am very pleased that the Greater Miami Jewish
community will be able to share this extraordinary
event with us."
JDC Seeks First-
Hand Reports
The American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee has announced it is looking for in-
teresting stories from Jews helped by the agency
since its establishment in 1914. for possible usfc
during the JDC 70th anniversary, to be observed
in 1984.
The JDC has been active in more than 60
countries around the world, providing for the
relief, rescue and reconstruction of Jewish
communities. The stories from its beneficiaries,
which are being gathered by the JDC public in-
formation department, will provide the basis for
material to be distributed during JDC's 70th
anniversary.
One such incident was related by Leon
Wolfstahl of New York. At 15, he was on a train to
a concentration camp when he was liberated by
the U.S. Army. He said he remembered a JDC
staff member,Laura Margolis, who came to a DP
camp identifying Jews, later getting Leon settled
in a halfway house in Brussels operated by the
JDC.
He reported she had faith in him and suggested
he renew his schooling. He learned to be a gold-
smith "and it enabled me to begin life again."
Eventually he settled in the United States. He
said a child without hope at 15 remembers when
given hope. He added when one is older, "you add
the balance sheet and ask: who do I owe? I owe
the JDC and the American Jewish community."
Individuals with personal accounts which
related to JDC are asked to send their material to
the JDC public relations department. Room 1914,
60 East 42nd Street. New York. N.Y. 10165.
After Highly Successful First Year of Activity,
South Dade Office Foresees Further Growth

Continued from Pg. 13
Planning Committee chaired by Dorothy
Oppenheim had a very meaningful and productive
year. The committee's report regarding the need
for new or expanded Federation services was
submitted to Federation's Planning and Budget
Committee and the Federation Board of Directors.
Virtually all requests for new or expanded services
in the report were approved for funding. Among
the items funded were: a new Jewish Vocational
Service Office in South Dade and several part time
professionals to provide services to the area; an
additional staff person for the South Dade Office
of the Jewish Family and Children's Service, and a
county-wide Prevention Services Program
(Family Life Education); funding for a part-time
position for the Central Agency for Jewish
Education to staff a Midrasha (joint community
wide adult education program) in South Dade and
to coordinate all of the agency's services in the
area; an additional day of chaplaincy services per
week to serve unaffiliated Jews in South Dade
hospitals and nursing homes, and a part-time
professional to staff a singles program at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center. The
Committee wffl expand its function this year in
order to meet with agencies not presently serving
in South Dade, but which might wish to or might
appropriately begin to do so as a matter of
community priority.
During 1980-81, the South Dade Steering
Committee was expanded from twelve to over
thirty individuals. This committee and the others
previously mentioned gave scores of South Dade
Jews the chance to play leadership roles in the
community. In 1981-82, there are plans to develop
a South Dade Area Committee of up to one
hundred persons, to work in conjunction with the
Steering Committee, hopefully involving in-
dividuals and representatives of all community
organizations, agencies, congregations, as well as
others who want to be a part of these rapidly
growing activities in South Dade.
Given the tremendous growth during South
Dade's first year, Fran Levy is decidedly op-
timistic about the future. Says she, "We hope all
interested Jews will join us to continue what we
have accomplished to date, and to enable us
working together, to make South Dade a great
place for us all to live as a united, committed,
Jewish community."
J J-