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The Jewish Floridian ( August 28, 1981 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 28, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02743

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
August 28, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02743

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
11
folum
e54_Number35 Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday. August 28,1981
rraSKocht' By Mail 80 Cent-
Price 50 Cents
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5
I
|
For Some Sephardis
::
Two-Wife Family Serve*
Important Social ATeed
::
Reborn
Capucci
Leading PLO
Advocate
SEW 1DHK The anti-ls-
I'l.t) activities of Greek
\rchbiahop Hilarion
arc detailed b> fellow
athulic clprgyman in a report
the \nti -Defamation
ij B n.ii H'rith.
clergyman, Abbot 1-eo A.
i\ b it is with "reluc
that he exposes "certain
reditable characteristics" of
Xrihbishnp Capucci. who was
imprisoned in Israel in 1974 for
gling terrorist arms into the
rj .mil released three years
later, after Vatican intercession.
condition that he refrain from
.inn Israel activity.
N ANNOUNCING the report,
rheodom H Freedman. director
< "iitinued on Page 5-A
By GLORIA DEUTSCH
London Chronicle Syndicate
The idea of meeting two
wives married to one hus-
band seemed irresistable.
Could it possibly work?
How do they get on togeth-
er? How do the children
relate to them? What divi-
sion of labor applies in run-
ning the home?
I found the answer to all these
questions on a visit to the
Temam family Shalom, a
wizened old immigrant from Ye-
men, the two i\es. Yona and
Bracha. and the 11 surviving
children out of 12.
The Bible seems to disapprove
of polygamy while allowing it.
The very word describing the re-
lationship between two wives is
tsarah which also means "sor-
row" and neither Abraham nor
Jacob, the two patriarchs, who
had more than one wife each,
enjoyed shalom bayit
domestic peace.
POLYGAMY was prohibited
by Rabbi Gershon for Ashkenazi
Jews in the year 1,000 but con-
tinued to be practiced in Oriental
countries. Hence the existence in
Israel today of several dozen two-
wife families, many of whom
went there over 30 years ago.
I visited the household in the
early evening in the mornings
both wives are at their cleaning
jobs, and in the afternoon slum-
bers. A knock on the door of a
small two-story house opened up
a glimpse into another world,
where blaring transistors, the TV
in the corner, the mixer on the
kitchen counter cannot disguise
the essentially medieval element
in which this older generation
exists.
Bracha. the younger wife, sits
on a couch in the small entrance
hall which also contains a table
and many chairs. One child is
getting ready for bed, another
does his homework, another
reads. A daughter. Rachel, 26.
explains my mission, and one of
the younger children is
dispatched upstairs "to fetch
mother." This is the first sur-
prise. Not one of the children dif-
ferentiated between Bracha, the
Continued on Page 8-A
Talks Out If
PLO Present,
Begin Warns
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier Menachem Begin
told a 30th anniversary Israel Bond Organization confer-
ence that Israel would not attend talks on the West Bank
autonomy if the Palestine Liberation Organization was
included in the negotiations.
Addressing the final festive dinner of the conference,
he told the 600 delegates from the United States, Canada
and Western Europe, "If that murderous, neo-Nazi or-
ganization" is included in the autonomy talks, "the chair
reserved for Israel will be empty."
BEGIN SAID he rejected Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat's proposal that the United States recognize the
PLO, despite his feelings for "my dear friend Anwar." He
added in Yiddish: "Let them talk among themselves."
Referring to the downing of two Libyan aircraft by
American Navy jets about 60 miles from the Libyan coast
after being fired on by one of the Libyan aircraft, Begin
said it had been an act of self-defense, as had been Israel's
raids on the nuclear reactor near Baghdad last June and
the terrorist installation in Beirut last month.
Pending Modifications
F16*8 Grounded Indefinitely
Following Crashes in U.S.
Saudis Lobby for AWACS.....
Evron Denies Deal with U.S. ..
Israeli Reaction Chilly........
___Page 8-A
... Page 10-A
...Page 11-A
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) The F16 warplanes for
Israel, which were released from the embargo the U.S.
had imposed, will continue to be grounded for an indefi-
nite period, Pentagon officials said.
The officials told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the planes are under flight restrictions because of "modi-
fications" that must be made. "We are not even in a posi-
tion to guess on when we will have them ready." the JTA
was told.
THE PENTAGON began repairs on the F16s last
week after one of the planes crashed in Utah, and its pilot
Continued on Page 10-A
How is Haig Doing?
Like Anyone Else, He Waits on Line to See President
WASHINGTON One
f the most unusual devel-
opments in the first six
months of the Reagan Ad-
ministration has been the
Perception that Secretary
of State Alexander Haig is
the strongest supporter of
frael within the Adminis-
tration, except for Presi-
dent Reagan himself.
The belief has always been in
Washington that the State De-
partment is pro-Arab or at least
wants an "even-handed" ap-
proach. This has been true not
only since the creation of the
Jewish State but goes back to
Britain's enunciation of the Bal-
four Declaration when State De-
partment officials sought to keep
President Wilsolt from giving his
support to a Jewish homeland.
SECRETARIES of State up to
now have echoed the views of
their Department. The
professional foreign service
officers at the State Department
still share these views. But Haig
and some of the people he has ap-
pointed around him do not.
What makes supporters of
Israel look toward Haig as an ally
is the view that the anti-Israeli
policy in this Administration is
being pressed by the Pentagon,
particularly Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger, Haig's chief
Continued on Page 9-A
Secretary Haig


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i4mnon Go&zn ffe#A director general of Tel Aviv University, and John Brademas (right).
president of New York University, meet at NYU. With 20,000 students, Tel Aviv University
is the largest in Israel and the world's largest Jewish institution of higher education. NYU.
the largest private university in the U.S., will celebrate its 150th anniversary this year,
beginning with the official inauguration of Dr. Brademas as president on Oct. 14.
Headlines
Voting Rights Act Extension Urged
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
has urged "early action" by Congress in ex-
tending provisions of the Voting Rights Act for
ten years beyond its expiration next August.
The call for passage was contained in written
ADL testimony submitted this week to Rep. Don
Edwards (D Call, whose Subcommittee on Civil
and Constitutional Rights has held hearings on
the voting rights extension bill.
The statement, signed by David A. Brody,
ADL s Washington representative, noted that
the human relations agency is already on recorc
in favor of the extension as part of the Leadershi|
Conference on Civil Rights, an umbrella grou}
which testified during the public hearings.
Jerusalem's Shaare Zedek Medical Center ha;
inaugurated its new Hall of Remembrance.
One wall of the Hall displays the plaques, some
dating back to 1873, removed from the hospital
building on Jaffa Road and reset into a prominent
passageway in the new location. One visitor. Mrs.
Els Bendheim of New York, found the plaque
honoring the memory of her parents from the
Netherlands who sent the generator and all of the
equipment needed to make the old Shaare Zedek
the first building in Jerusalem powered by
electricity.
On the opposite wall is a tablet commissioned
and brought from New York by Mrs. Erics
Jesselson, chairman of the National Women's
Division in the U.S., and herself a second gen
eration "survivor."
Edwin Shapiro, president of Hias, the world-
wide Jewish refugee and migration agency, has
been named to the Citizen's Committee for Im-
migration Reform, a non-partisan, broadly based
group in the field of migration affairs. The Com
mittee is dedicated to the promotion of a humane
and coherent immigration policy for the Uniteo
States.
The Citizen's Committee, which also includes
such prominent citizens as Benjamin Civiletti.
Cyrus Vance, George Romney, Philip Klutznick,
and Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, was founded
through the efforts of Fr. Theodore Hesburgh.
president of Notre Dame University, and chair-
man of the government appointed Select Com
mission on Immigration and Refugee Policy.
JC The Commission has conducted an exhaustivt
1 review of U.S. immigration policies and pro
g cedurea. and presented its final recommendations
90 to President Reagan earlier this year. Nina K
2 Solarz, who served on the staff of the Select Com
mission, serves as executive director of the Cit
izen's Committee.
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University
of the Negev, will hold their national dinner dance
on Sept. 15 at New York's Pierre Hotel, with
Delia (Mrs. Lawrence) Leeds of Manhattan as
chairman and Irena (Mrs. Lane) Kirkland of
Washington, D.C., co-chairman of the black-tie
event.
Former Secretary of State Henry Kissenger
will receive the degree of Honorary Fellow "for
his distinguished service to peace in the Middle
East". University President Maj. Gen. (Res.)
Shlomo Gazit. Israel's former director of military
Intelligence, will also participate in the program.
Arnold Forsler, general counsel of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. will receive
the Ben-Gurion Negev Award. The League's chief
attorney for over 40 years. Forster is a nationally
known authority on human and constitutional
rights.
Calling on the White House to fill the vacant
post of Assistant Secretary of State for Human
Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. B'nai H nth
International has urged President Reagan and
all U.S. policymakers" to maintain human rights
as a "significant factor" in making foreign policy
decisions.
In a resolution approved by the organization's
Board of Governors at its annual summer meet-
ing in Grossinger. N.Y.. B'nai B'rith stated that
leadership by the United States "can assist the
effort to contain worldwide violations of human
rights."
Failure to fill the vacant State Department
post, B'nai B'rith said, could be interpreted as "a
weekened U.S. commitment" to human rights
This, in turn, could lead to an "open season" on
domestic political enemies in many countries.
Groups of teachers and students from many
parts of the vorld are taking part in summer
seminars specially arranged for them at Bar-Ilan
University. According to Avraham Pomerantz.
academic secretary in charge of the programs,
there has been a considerable increase in par
ticipation this year. Pomerantz is being assisted
by Micha Landau, of the Rabbi Joseph H. Look-
stein Center for Jewish Education in the Dias-
pora.
The first of the groups were 150 teachers from
Judea and Sumaria who attended a four-day
seminar organized for them by the Institute for
In-Service Studies of the Israel Ministry of Edu-
cation. They were followed by college students
from throughout the United States who have
come for a summer semester of intensive studies.
A major administrative restructuring of the
National Conference of Synagogue Youth, the
youth movement of the Orthodox Union, is an
nounced this week by Harvey Blitz, chairman of
the Unions jouth Commission, and Ronald
Greenwald. chairman of NCSY
Rabbi Yitzchok Rosenberg, who served NCSY
as director of nat.onal projects tor the past three
years and Rabbi Raphael B. Butler. mSSZ
and administrator with an extensive background
in community work, have been named cc-dinx
tors of the organization, which annually reaches
a^SiSS/""* ~* -k B
M-8-28-81 \
One reason why
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select Riverside.
More Jewish personnel.
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Today, if Riverside s>
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North Miami Beach
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Rabbi Julian I Cook l>*<"
OFFICE SUPPUES & EQUIPMENT
M-8-28-81
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
^frRE'8ER P*ID6NT AND CHAIRMAN Of THE BOARO
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Miami. wa


Covert Assist
Effort Said to be Underway
Reduces Sentences for Nazi Criminals To Save Golda's Denver House
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Im-
prisoned Nazi war criminals
in West Germany benefit
from the efficient help of a
powerful and discreet lobby
which has succeeded re-
markably in reducing their
jail terms and in providing
them legal help, according
to a broadcast of the
Cologne-based state radio
station. Westdeutscher
Rundfunk.
According to the broadcast.
the lobby masquerades as a
voluntary organization, called
Stille Hilfe" (Quiet Help) which
purportedly seeks to help all
prison inmates.
THE BROADCAST cited a
recent study on two categories of
prisoners serving life terms: Nazi
criminals and "normal" crimi-
nals. For Nazi inmates, life im-
prisonment usually ended after
12 years in jail, but for the other
category, a jail term of less than
18 years was an exception. The
broadcast attributed the sharp
difference to the continued efforts
of Stille Hilfe to obtain early re-
lease for Nazi war criminals.
Heiner Lichtenstein, the mod-
erator, said judges often get
letters asking them to release
Nazi inmates because of family
problems or for reasons of age.
He said many of those letters had
a similar text and were most
probably prepared by Stille Hilfe
members with legal backgrounds.
The organization is recognized by
West German income tax offi-
cials so that contributions to it
are tax-deductible.
The broadcast named some
leaders of Stille Hilfe and quoted
from a document which made it
clear that, at a recent Stille Hilfe
meeting in a Bremen hotel, addi-
tional help for jailed Nazis was
being planned.
MEANWHILE, the opposi-
tion Christian Democratic Union
ICDU) has charged that four
German neo-Nazis, trained by the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in Lebanon, had the help of
the West German Embassy in
Beirut despite the fact that they
had criminal records and were
wanted by the authorities.
Carl-Dieter Spranger. the CDU
expert on interior policies.
charged that the Social Demo-
cratic government of Chancellor
Helmut Schmidt was guilty of
Reagan Gets Jump on Congress;
Opens Drive for AWACS to Saudis
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
sent Congress on Monday
the informal notification of
his Administration's
proposal to sell Saudi
Arabia five AWACS recon-
naissance planes and other
sophisticated military
equipment.
But State Department
spokesman Dean Fischer
said last Friday that the 50-
day period in which Con-
gress may reject the pro-
posed sale will not actually
start until after Congress
returns from its summer re-
cess in September.
The Aug. 24 date was an-
nounced by Max Friedersdorf.
The President Assistant for Leg-
islative Affairs, at a breakfast
J meeting of the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce.
FISCHER SAID he could not
say whether the U.S. had com-
pleted its negotiations with the
Saudis on the AWACS. The ne-
gotiations reportedly concern
continued U.S. control of the
highly sophisticated planes in
order to calm the fears of Con-
gressmen opposed to the sale.
The President has delayed
submission of the proposal since
last May on the advice of Senate
Majority leader Howard Baker
iR Term.) and other Republican
leaders who feared that the
proposal would be rejected by
Congress.
I n a letter to Senate and House
leaders. Keagan urged Congress-
men, as they left for vacation
earlier this month, not to "pre-
judge" the sale until they saw the
completed proposal. The sale
goes through automatically
unless rejected by both houses of
Congress. Congress has a 20-day-
informal notification period fol-
lowed by a 30-day-formal period
during which it can adopt
resolutions voiding the sale.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISKAtl SK URITIES.

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"dangerous neglect" in dealing
with recent revelations of mili-
tary cooperation between West
German neo-Nazis and the PLO.
Spranger said that the annual
report of the Federal Service for
Domestic Security disproved the
reply by Interior Minister Ger-
hard Baum to the charge in a key
detail. That detail, Spranger de-
clared, was Baum s assertion
that the four neo-Nazis had es-
tablished that they had no crimi-
nal records and received help
fmm the Embassy in Beirut on
that assurance.
THE CDU called the answers
given by Baum to a series of
parliamentary questions on the
issue unsatisfactory." The CDU
urged the federal government to
"tell the whole truth" about the
issue, and to answer specifically
why the West German Embassy
in Beirut helped neo-Nazis work-
ing with the PLO and whether
that Embassy had made avail-
able information about the four
neo-Nazis to other West German
government services.
In his answers, Baum con-
firmed that an unspecified
number of German neo-Nazis re-
ceived PLO military training in
an Al Fatah camp near Beirut
and that this information had
been available to West German
authorities since the start of
1980. But Baum insisted that the
information was not enough to
justify legal steps against the
leader of the neo-Nazi group
training in PLO installations.
DENVER (JTA) An ef-
fort is underway by an ad hoc
committee to save an abandoned
structure in Denver which by
sheer chance has been discovered
to be a residence in which Golda
Meir lived as a teen-ager and
where she met Morris Myerson,
later to become her husband.
The Intermountain Jewish
News reported that on Aug. 4,
the Denver City Council una-
nimously passed a resolution
calling for the preservation of the
abandoned duplex on Julian
Street on Denver"s West Side.
The Jewish weekly reported that
while the vote does not guarantee
preservation of the structure, it
will help greatly, adding that ac-
tual permission to allow the
building to be placed on city
property" should be debated
soon."
MEANWHILE, a resolution
urging that the home be desig-
nated a historical landmark was
adopted by the Denver Land-
mark Preservation Commission.
The commission said that the
home was likely to qualify as a
landmark.
When Golda Mabovitz was 15.
she lived in the Denver duplex,
then the home of her sister and
brother-in-law, Shana and Sam
Korngold. During the year she
lived there, she attended North
High School and made pocket
money by working in her brother-
in-law's dry cleaning business.
According to the weekly, the
duplex has been empty for more
than a year and its owners, the
Boys Club. Inc. of Denver, who
had no idea that Israel's Premier-
to-be had lived in it, planned to
raze the structure for a new
athletic field.
The Intermountain Jews News
reported the structure was saved
at the last moment by two for-
tuious events. One was the
photographic activities of a vol-
unteer, Jean May, seeking pic-
tures of historic buildings in
Denver for a fund-raising cook-
book for a local citizens group.
Though non-Jewish. Ms. May
has long been an admirer of
Golda.
SHE TOLD the weekly that
she knew Golda had lived in the
area but she did not know where.
She checked material at the
Denver public library, and
Colorado tax records and North
High School files to confirm the
location. Mrs. May photographed
the duplex and called the Boys
Club and learned of the plans to
destroy the building.
The other fortuitous event was
that the demolition contractor
had been delayed. After Ms. May
notified newspapers and historic
preservation committees, pro-
testing telephone calls poured
into the office of the Boys Club
which agreed to postpone any
demolition action while the ad
hoc group develops a plan and
raises money to save the house.
We're serving you
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r
Page 4-A The Jewish Floricfian / Friday, August 28, 1981
| Confused Objectives
| We can understand the Jewish Agency's Leonf
i Dulzin as he expresses his frustration with "drop-
| outs," those Soviet citizens who leave for freedom[i
1 on an Israeli passport, arrive in Vienna and then optiijij
for a new life in the West, predominantly with aji
I covetous eye on the United States.
There is something, we suppose, deceitful in
J someone's declaring that his or her one desire is to go :j:j
to Israel and then to flee to the United States as fast 1
as possible once the iron gates of the Kremlin open 1
|v up and present a free choice as to destination.
But we object to the way in which Mr. Dulzin j?
:g expresses his anger. Theother week, for example, he :?
i said of "drop-outs" that they are traitors.
Our major concern must be to save the lives of 1
$: Jews under any circumstances, and we should be 3
& grateful that these days we have alternative means of
* doing just that. It is irresponsible to accuse Jews so %
| harshly who are looking for a way out of the Soviet
:g Union. It only complicates the present means avail- I
g able to us to help these Jews when, as Mr. Dulzin has
I been doing, he shows the rest of the world a break in |
g the ranks of the world Jewish community with |
J respect to what should be our primary objective: not I
g to impose a destination on where Jewish refugees go,
g but to celebrate the fact that they are going at alL
j$ Nor can we in American afford to join Mr.
: Dulzin in the broad expression of his frustration and
even anguish at those Soviets who say "no" to a new
I life in Israel. If we are so upset with these Soviets,
gthen why don't we demonstrate our belief in the
g prospect of a new life in Israel by going there our-
5 selves?
Unlike the Soviets, we don't have to beg for exit
1 papers as a matter of life and death: they are ours for
i f f 8T!25: u !?ard fee,inSs either for fronds and
g family left behind.
1 Storm Warning Posted
President Reagan has rejected the Saudi Arab-
ian "peace plan" for the Middle East. For now. any-
way.
The President's rejection was based on the con-
:j: tinuing U.S. policy not to do business with the Pal-
I estine Liberation Organization until the PLO first
recognizes Israel's right to exist within safe borders.
*: That's as fine as it goes. We don't think it will go
| very far for very long.
I There can be little doubt that President Anwar
g Sadat s recommendation to Mr. Reagan that the
g: U.S. start talking to the PLO and the announcement
g of the Saudi "peace plan" were orchestrated
I beforehand as a simultaneous experience to occur
I during Sadat's visit the other week in the United
States. Even if that effort has thus far failed, what is
in the works is making the Administration ac-
I customed to demanding more and more Israeli con-
gcessions until the Saudi objective and yes. even
? kgypt s. is achieved: Israel returned to its pre-1967
borders.
Until now. the President has been remarkably
;:; consistent in his stout defense of Israel even against
| his own State Department. But Mr. Reagan, for all
::": of his well-propagandized leadership abilities in the
:: face of unpopular causes, has also been remarkably
consistent in withdrawing from many of these
J strategically advanced causes once withdrawal
;: seemed the better part of discretion.
His brave words about Soviet world domination
j:in January gave way to his lifting of the wheat
: embargo in April-May. His firing of 12,000 profes-
i sional air transport personnel in early August is by
i now,a, b,unal ground upon which his Administration
i will likely be conceding to PATCO in September.
j Friends of Israel, while they may be happy
| about Mr. Reagan's Israel policy, would be well-
I advised to exercise caution. In the winds of Wash-
ington change, storm damage is often unalterably
widespread and lethal.
Jewish Flor idian
Argentine Jews Move Funds
:-::::::::::::::::::::;:::::;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::::::::::::::
1
I Leo
I AM informed by an official in
the highest echelons of the inter-
national banking community
that trouble is brewing in Argen-
tina. The official refuses to be
named. Ditto for the bank affilia
tion from which the information
comes.
Essentially, there is a vast and
so far underground flow of funds
from Argentina to the United
States. To the question. "Are
there any Jews involved in this
huge diversion of capital?", the
answer is: "Almost all of them
are Jews."
The process begins casually
enough. A visiting Buenos Aires
businessman shows up at the
bank in New York and says he'd
like to open an account in order to
facilitate the conducting of his
affairs in the city, or elsewhere in
the country. Or else/a relative or
Himllin
8
:-'::
friend opens an account in trust
for "someone in Argentina
IN EITHER CASE, what is
really occurring becomes clear
during the course of the following
months There are almost no
withdrawals posted On the other
hand, the deposits are frequent
and large, and since from an
interest-bearing point of view
such sums could be invested far
u+>ICK and PLANT -UONt Mil. Miami. FU BUS Phone *7l **,
I'O BoxOljro Miami Florida U101
KIIKH K SHOCHET LEO MINDUN SUZANNE 8HOCHET
Kililoi .mil PuMUher Associate Editor Executive Editor
p. M JJ1* **"* **** i. ih C.........
r^bltohed Every Friday .Inc. lt*7 by The jiwUk Flortdlan
Second-Claaa Poata|c Paid at Miami, ria USPS 77UXI
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UCHTIO a*Tf8 (Local Ana) One Yea- IH oo Tao Veen U4eorh.ee y,, -
u.nn->M1,^Him..l^i-M....,----- -tirTr erti|aai>a>[
Friday. August 28. 1981 ^- ^8AB5741
\olume54 Number 35
8jG oAUb FR.M
LITTLE ACokNSGrioV/...
more profitably in other economic
enterprises. the reason for
banking them to maintain both
their secrecy and liquidity under
scores what can only be viewed as
a flight plan from Argentina
Depositors who viait the bank
themselves masquerading as
persons with business interests in
the U.S. wind up being painfully
frank about their intentions The
sharing of their intentions with
the bank's officials boils down to
this:
After the account has been es
tablished, cash begins to be sent
in small "unnoticeable" sums,
either to American friends or
relatives acting in their behalf, or
else to the New York bank
directly. Uniformly, the con
veyance is by ordinary mail from
various cities in Argentina In
most instances, phony return ad
dresses are used to avoid
detection if the mail should for
one reason or another be inter
cepted by military or state police
Mail that is naturally lost, re
turned due to misaddress or error
in delivery, or simply fails to
arrive at its New York destine
tion for undocumented reasons, is
discounted by the sender as a
hazard of this highly dangerous
flow of capital out of the country
THE BANK official tells me
Mostly, the 'depositors' rely on
our absolute integrity. Our usual
procedure in banking by mail is
to acknowledge deposits b)
return mail Hut we are instruct
ed. Send us nothing no ac-
knowledgements, no ac
countings "
The bank official says that th>
\rgent inians warn them thai
they are constantly being
watched Their mail is scrutin
i/ed Their phones are tapped
Their object is to rescue as much
ot their aa as secreth .>-
they can. and then to flee the
count ry
We tell them the bank offi
cial declares, "that it all seems s>
James Bond, so exaggerated
that Argentina would have to
employ a hefty secret policeorga
nization for such a broadband
type of surveillance He reports
their answer "Believe us VV i
assure you thai the government
has it and uses it
WHY ARE the Jews fl.
Continued on Page 9-A
Robert Segal
More Battering for Public School System
America 'a public school iva
tern, still nostalgically regarded
by many as the mortar in the Cru-
cible Of democracy, is battered
now by the newest Coleman
Report and by the concomitant
intensified demand for legislation
to provide tax loopholes for par
ents preferring private schools.
Commissioned by one arm of
the U.S. Department of Educa-
tion, the current study by Dr.
James Coleman of the University
of Chicago gives high marks to
Catholic high schools and bul-
warks Coleman's campaign to
have government school
vouchers paid to parents, rich
and not so rich. Money flying out
of that Pandora's box may well
wreck the public education sys-
tem.
THIS DEVELOPMENT de-
lights a host of Americans. It
pleases an army of foes of school
integration. It gives muscle to
the Moynihan-Packwood-Roth
legislative proposal calling for a
tax assist of $250 the first year
and $500 thereafter for parents of
private school students. It helps
drive another nail into the coffin
of plans for busing to achieve in
tegration. It dispatches joy into
the hearts of New Rightists who
are pressing President Reagan to
get on with some of their pet
projects including public school
praying. It emboldens and en
heartens maiiagtn ol privati
schools plagued by inflation
On the other side of the ladgaf
it dismays many citizens who m
tuition lax credit grants and
various school voucher plans as
instruments of destruction for
the constitutional tradition and
reality of church-state
separation. (It is estimated that
85 percent of children in Amen
can private schools are parochial
school students.)
It alarms thousands who see in
the trend to establish more
private schools a dodge to extend
school segregation. It makes
some economy minded law-
makers wonder where the esti-
mated additional schooling cost
of $4 to $6i billion will be coming
from. It disturbs public school
administrators and school board
members who see in the plan the
dumping into public schools of
problem.children along with more
responsibility to mainline handi-
capped boys and girls.
"THE DANGER.' 8.V9 .
Newsweek round-up. "ytha?
public schools could eventual
become the last resort an edu
national scrapheap f" the
dS^nl,hBd 'eaSt mtivated ch"
Dr Coleman. some of whose
Previous .uud.es have ,.!$
storms of debate and prote't'nal
Dou eaid 'f his esj
It* w h.it OH ap|ieared '
is now know n to t
tion Hut this time around. th>
current rough political climau
together with mounting attack-
on public education, seems likely
to leave scant rOOB for a debate
BS to what is fact, what fiction
For public school troubles
mount daily Imposition of tax
caps, such as Boston's crippling
Proposition 2'. are eroding
curricula, driving teachers Into
the ranks of the unemployed, and
severely damaging the structure
of the public school system
Battles over the demand for
multilingual instruction induce
community quarreling.
School vandalism demoralizes
school management and weakens
school cost-effectiveness. Drug
users, alcoholism, teen-age preg
nancies, the problems of children
from broken homes, mounting
drop-outs, the scarring of teach-
ers by blackboard jungle types all
rise to the top of public school
agendas.
DR. COLEMANS 1966 study
on the effects of racial segre
gation in the schools: his later
study attacking court-ordered
busing, and some of his public
utterances have fueled fierce ae
bates Now he has startled, if not
Continued on Page 9-A


Arcbishop Reborn
Capucci Said to be Prime PLO Advocate
Friday, August 28,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Continued from Page 1 -A
of ADL's Program Division,
noted that the Italian Jewish
community has lodged protests
with the Vatican over Arch-
bishop Capucri's pro-PLO prop-
aganda activities. He said that
according to a Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency report from
Rome dated July 29. Archbishop
Capucci "has emerged as the
foremost propagandist for the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization in Italy, if not in all
Western Europe."
Italian Jews, the JTA report
continued, are concerned over the
Italian media's unquestioning
acceptance of Archbishop
Capucci'* propaganda "while ig-
noring his involvement with
terrorists."
In addition to the Arch-
bishop's anti-Israel. pro-PLO
record. Abbot Kudloff's 21 -page
report also points out that the
prelate supported Ayatollah
Khomeini against the United
States during the hostage crisis.
Abbot Rudloff. now living in
Weston Priory in Vermont, was
abbot of the Dormition Abbey in
Jerusalem for 20 years and was
personally acquainted with Arch-
bishop Capucci He quotes
reliable sources as saying that
Pope John Paul II reprimanded
the prelate following his release
from an Israeli prison in 1977.
THE PAPAL criticism, ac-
cording to the sources quoted by
Abbot Rudloff. came during an
audience that the Pontiff granted
Archbishop Capucci in 1979.
After the meeting, the Arch-
bishop made a declaration to the
effect that the Pope "under-
stood" his struggle because of his
own experience in fighting the
Nazis in World War II. Abbot
Rudloff declares, however, that:
"According to reliable sources,
when Capucci told the Pope *I
defenced my people just as you
did in Poland.' the Pope raised
his finger at him and said. In
Poland we defended morality
without engaging in politics,
whereas you engaged in politics
without taking morality into
account.'
Abbot Rudloff recounts the
steps leading up to the agreement
between Israel and the Vatican
under which the Archbishop was
released after serving only three
years of his 12-year sentence.
Under the accord. Archbishop
Capucci was to be posted "far
from the Middle East" and
"would not be allowed to make
anti-Israel propaganda."
ACCORDING TO Abbot Rud
loff. the prelate first violated the
agreement by leaving his new
post in Caracas. Venezuela, and
traveling to Damascus in
January. 1979. where he attended
meetings of the Palestine
National Council
This prompted a Vatican
statement that Archbishop
Capucci made the trip "on his
own initiative, without the
authorization of the Holy See and
without having previously in-
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Archbishop Capucci
formed the Holy See."
Subsequently. Archbishop
Capucci was assigned by the
Vatican to new duties as a
"visitor or inspector" in connec-
tion with Greek-Melchite com-
munities in Europe, with head-
quarters in Rome. While in
Kurope. Archbishop Capucci ap-
peared with PLO leader Yasir
Arafat when the latter visited
Spain in September. 1979.
Abbot Rudloff said that up to
the summer of 1980 Capucci
could be said to have acted
"without the authorization of the
Vatican which appeared em-
barrassed by his activities" and
criticized him for visiting Iran. In
July, 1980, Israel's Foreign Min-
ister Yitzhak Shamir said the
Vatican had informed Israel that
it was taking steps to honor the
agreement under which Arch-
bishop Capucci was released.
Abbot Rudloff said.
BUT IN August, 1980, Abbot
Rudloff went on, Pope John Paul
II "entrusted Capucci with a
delicate job in Iran to in-
tercede for the beleaguered
Catholic community there.
Archbishop Capucci, an Arab
who was spiritual leader of 4,500
Melchite Catholics who live in the
Jerusalem area. "repeatedly
smuggled arms into Israel, some
of which were used to kill inno-
cent civilians." Abbot Rudloff
said.
When Archbishop Capucci was
arrested. Abbot Rudloff's ac-
count continued, "the authorities
found huge quantities of rifles,
pistols, explosives, grenades and
detonators" in his automobile.
"These are not the usual trap-
pings of a Christian priest, let
alone a bishop." he added.
*
Jewish Book Exhibit Due
For Viewing in Moscow
I
NEW YORK (JTA) The
JWB Jewish Book Council, in co-
operation with the Association of
Jewish Book Publishers, has co-
ordinated an exhibit of Jewish
books that will be on display at
the Moscow Book Fair, to be held
Sept. 2 to 8, Dr. Robert Gordis.
president of the JWB Book
Council, has announced.
"While the Association will
display the books of Jewish pub-
lishers, the JWB Book Council
will exhibit books of Jewish in-
terest issued by general pub-
lishers," Gordis said. Books of
fiction, non-fiction, adult and
children's books of the following
publishers will be exhibited:
Bantam Books. Basic Books.
Charles Scribners, Crown Pub-
lishers. Dell Publishing. Double-
day & Co., Farrar Straus and
Giroux, Fawcett Books. Holiday
House. Knopf. New American
Library. Pocket Books, Putnam,
Random House. Simon and
Schuster and University of
Chicago Press.
Together with the books of the
Abstainer
Rand Daily Mail
Jewish publishers, there will be
over 1.000 title exhibited. A bi-
lingual catalogues in English and
Russian will list all the titles with
their publishers and prices. At
the Second International Book
Fair in Moscow in 1979, Soviet
citizens stood for hours reading
the volumes that we displayed."
Gordis said. "Russian-Jewish
authors asked whether the Coun-
cil could advise them on the
publication and translation of
their works."
HOW TO
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I---------------------------
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, August 2ft, 1981
f
Get more than your money's worth
with The Jewish Floridian's great
super subscription savings bonus.
Our costs for postage, printing, and
paper have all gone up.
But, because you are important to
us, we've come up with a way to keep
the cost of a subscription to the weekly
Jewish Floridian down.
And, save you money on valuable
goods and services. A real bargain.
Virtually every major newspaper
in the U.S. covers the news events that
happen in or relate to Israel and the
Mideast.
But those events are covered
primarily according to their outcome
for the United States and its foreign
policy. Not how they will affect Israel,
its people, and us.
The Jewish Floridian takes a
different perspective. We take you
inside Israel every Friday. Inside the
minds and hearts and dreams of its
leaders. And its people.
And. in every issue, in addition to
covering worldwide news events that
concern all Jews, we report extensively
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tions. Your friends. Your neighbors. In
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This edition of The Jewish
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Because wed like you to increase
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offer: For the next 60 days you |j=
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and save money too!
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Wwi'SW'' '
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Friday, Auguat 28,1981 / The Jewiah Floridian Page7-A
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] t e price of a one year sub-
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nd you by return mail, you can
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I---------------
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 28, 1981
For Some Sephardis
I1I1-41 I
JDC Reports Renewed
Two- Wife Family Serves Social Needs Jcontact With Polish Jewry
Continued from Page 1 -A
mother who bore them, and
Yona, the mother who lives up-
stairs.
BRACHA, grey-haired, soft-
eyed and thoughtful, moves up to
make room for Yona, tall angular
throaty. "Who is younger?" Sh<
repeats my question. "She is,"
pointing a bony finger. "She got
to look old when our best, our
oldest son fell in the Yom Kippur
War." Then I remember how it
was the talk of Kfar Saba eight
years ago. when Zachariah was
killed and both mothers wept and
beat their breasts, distraught
with grief.
My next question produces a
cackle of laughter from Yona.
"Where did you both marry
him?"
"There, of course," she de-
clared, pointing into the distance.
"Would they let me here? Let my
husband have another wife?" She
contrives to make Israel sound
like the last bastion of intoler-
ance.
"Why? Because come Purim
I'll have been married 43 years,
and after ten, I'd had no children.
I agreed, for him," acknowledg-
ing the twinkling-eyed Shalom
with a nod. "It was at my ex-
pense But I felt good each time
she had a baby. We lived in a tent
when our first child was born. I
delivered him myself and
wrapped him in my skirt."
Shalom looks up from his glass
of vodka to chip in his contribu-
tion. "After 10 years, she agreed
to another wife as long as she was
Lobbyist's Pamphlet Pushes
For Saudi Weapons Sale
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A 16-page publi-
cation, which urges support
for Saudi Arabia's request
for U.S. AW ACS recon-
naissance planes on
grounds that Israel might
bomb Saudi Arabian oil
fields to demonstrate its in-
dependence of United
States aid, has been dis-
tributed to capital opinon
makers by a Washington
lawyer who is counsel to the
Saudi Embassy here.
The pamphlet, printed on
glossy paper and containing color
photographs and maps, was dis-
tributed to members of Congress!
and the press by Frederick Dut-
ton, who served President John
Kennedy as a White House aide.
His office said 7,500 copies of
"Why Saudi Arabia Needs
AW ACS'" have been distributed.
Dutton is registered as a Saudi
agent in the United States.
THE SALE of the AWACS
and other military equipment to
the Saudis has been proposed by
the Reagan Administration
which has been served notice of
opposition by a majority of Sena-
tors and Representatives. A
majority vote of both Houses is
required to block such weapons
sales.
The pamphlet cited Israel's
June 7 bombing of Iraq's nuclear
reactor in Baghdad, and noted
that an Israeli strike at Saudi oil-
fields would not involve a much
longer flight.
The pamphlet disputed state-
ments by Israeli officials that the
AWACS could be used to scan
and photograph Israel's defenses
on behalf of such Arab enemies as
Iraq. The pamphlet contended
that the AWACS radar equip-
ment could not take photos, see
tanks or other ground targets,
detect low-flying planes beyond
200 miles or collect electronic
data. The pamphlet said the
AWACS' only function would be
to detect air or naval attacks on
Saudi Arabian oil installations in
time for Saudi planes to provide
an effective defense.
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a^ a
a virgin, not a divorcee. She
picked her out for me. They "re
exactly the same for me.
THE DOOR is flung open, and
in bursts another Yona, a 24-
year-old police-woman who eyes
me suspiciously. But then she
agrees to answer questions. "No
I haven't mentioned it to my col-
leagues, it simply hasn't arisen,
but of course I'm not ashamed If
my mother hadn't let him marry
my other mother, we- wouldn't be
alive." Rachel agrees. "They're
both the same to us. It's natural
for us. If we do want to distin-
guish we call them big mother
and little mother." They all laugh
because little mother really is
smaller in stature as well as being
younger.
Do they get on together? The
concur that they do. like sisters,
and sometimes there are argu-
ments. "But they don't come to
blows." laughs Shalom.
Yona says she doesn't like
Bracha to go out to work. She
should stay home and look after
the house." she says. Bracha
does all the cooking upstairs
Yona has only a small gas ring
for morning coffee. What is the
food like? "Could be better, but
what she makes I eat. 1 have a
choice?" They all fall about
laughing.
I ASKED if they could read
and write. Rachel, who is an
income tax clerk, answers, "my
mother's learning." It wasn't
clear which mother she meant.
Sharon, the "baby" of eight, is
asked which mother he loves best
and he sagely answers that he
loves both the same. "The same,
the same." growls Shalom.
"She's an eye and she's an eye.
I've got two women to get mad at
me. But on Friday night when I
make kiddush I give wine first to
her (Yonal to show respect.'*
Last year Yona achieved a
brief moment of glory when she
appeared on the TV news in a
demonstration against abortion.
Large numbers of religious
women had been bussed to Jeru-
salem to bolster the crowds.
"I told them that the Al-
mighty helps everyone to
manage. I brought 12 children
into this world," she said. ( "She
was speaking for my mother."
whispered Rachel). "Only our
enemies bring one or two."
Bracha nodded but her mind
seemed far away. She was think-
ing of their lost, their best son
who would have been 30 this
year. The children range in age
from eight to 28. Those that havef
left school have left religion. The
younger girls still wear modest
clothes, and the boys long peyot
and kipot. The chances are they
will follow the way of their older
brothers and sisters but that is
another story.
Four German
Women Given
Top Honors
BONN (JTA)- An organiza-
tion which aids victims of vio-
lence, the White Ring, has
honored four women who during
the five-and-a-half year trial of
former SS officers and officials of
the Maidanek concentration
camp cared for Jewish witnesses
from Israel and other countries.
The four are Elieabeth Adler,
Use Huett. Hilde Fedler and Use
Neuburger. all members of the
Association for Christians Jew
ah Cooperation. A representative
of the White Ring, Gerhard
Boeden, said the four assisted the
witnesses who were traumatized
by having to relive the horrors of
NEW YORK (JTA) A
visit to Poland last month by the
leaders of the Joint Distribution
Committee brought yet another
Eastern European country to the
list of those in which the JDC has
been invited to reestablish direct
contact with the Jewish com-
munity in recent years.
Participating in the visit to
Poland, which included stops in
Warsaw. Auschwitz and Lodz
were JDC president Henry Taub
and his wife Marilyn. Ralph
Goldman, executive vice presi-
dent of the JDC. and Akiva
Kohane. JDC representative for
Eastern Europe. The JDC visit
was made in response to an in-
vitation from the Union of Reli-
gious Jews of Poland. It is esti-
mated that only 6.000 Jews re-
main in Poland out of a pre- Holo-
caust population that exceeded
three million.
In January, 1980, direct
contact between Hungarian
Jewry and JDC was established
Contact with the Jewish com-
munity of Czechoslovakia
followed in February 1981. The.
JDC has had relations with the
Jewish communities of Rumania
and Yugoslavia for a number of
years.
JDC's association with Poland
extends back to World War I.
when it brought aid to the Jews
trapped between the warring
forces. It was forced to cease
operations in 1941 but returned K
after the surrender of Germany.
Contact was broken again in 1949
and reestablished in 1956 It was
broken again from 1967 to 1981
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Friday, August 28,1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
o Mindlin
Argentine Jews Move Funds
itinued from Page 4-A
na.' The bank official,
not Jewish, is a
tly-educated person in in-
>nal economic affairs. He
simply: "We're coming to
our underground
prs about their reports of
te anti-Semitism. About
ing Argentine police
He mentions Jacobo Tim
"Prisoners Without a
I Without a Number."
lan is the former pub-
lf the Buenos Aires La
rho for 29 months
arrest and torture before
Ina's military cadre let
to freedom in Israel. His
book and his appear
efore a U.S. Senate
Committee hearing
limately led to the
of President Reagan's
tion of Ernest Lefever as
Rights Secretary are a
documentation of
Han's experience at the
^f Argentina's police state.
>ank official feels that his
to Timerman should ex-
plain entirely this new pheno-
menon of Jewish capital transfer
from Argentina. Perhaps it does.
But to some elements of
American Jewish opinion it does
not. For a long time, Timerman
has been on the receiving end of a
loud chorus of raspberries from a
number of highly-placed Ameri-
can Jewish intellectuals and their
non-Jewish colleagues bent on
discrediting his charges of anti-
Semitism in Argentina.
FROM Irving Kristol. an edi-
torial writer on the Wall Street
Journal: to Norman Podhoretz,
editor of the American Jewish
Committee's Commentary
Magazine: to such distinguished
conservatives as William F.
Buckley, who publishes the
National Review and conducts
the syndicated Public Broadcast-
ing Television program, "Firing
Line." the word is out: get Tim-
erman.
Conservative opinion in the
non-Jewish community com-
mitted to the assault on Timer-
man is perhaps understandable,
particularly if it is seen in lifrht of
Canadian Civil Rights Bill
Ipected to Outlaw Ku K lux Klan
ly BEN KAYFETZ
ONTO UTAI
- A
Irk civil rights Uill which
Effectively' ofltlaw the Ku
Ian has been introduced
tish Columbia's Attorney
Allan Williams. The
lights Protection Act. the
ivincial law of its kind in
tering For
\hool System
Continued from Page 4-A
tad, many with this pro-
u-nt "The evidence is
that the Catholic schools
In much closer to the
tan ideal of the common
educating children from
i backgrounds alike, than
)ublic schools "
in then opt to send .Jew
hen into Catholic schools
sake of l'r Coleman's
pattern? \re religious
itites to t>. toBd into a
rational mixing \>i>*!'.'
are not da) ol sunshine
Vmerica i proudeH
s the public school
Canada, prohibits the promotion
of hate propaganda or doctrines
of superiority based on race, reli-
gion or ethnic origin. Williams
explained. The opposition New
Democratic Party hailed the
measure and promised to push
for swift passage in the legis-
lature.
Williams has been under pres-
sure from opposition members to
take action against the KKK in
British Columbia. The racist out-
fit recently conducted crossburn-
ings and has spread hate
propaganda against East Indians
in the province.
THE NEW ACT will permit
civil action in the provincial Su-
preme Court against any person
or group that interferes with an
individual's civil rights by pro-
moting racial hatred. The court
could issue an injunction to pro-
hibit racist activities.
The act would also allow pro-
secution under summary con-
\ id ion and provide tor maximum
fines "l 12.600 or s,\ months in
prison for individuals, or 110,000
tor .1 rorporration or a society
There .in- alreadj anti-racial pro-
visions in the Canadian criminal
codi
the Reagan Administration's
decision to downgrade the Jimmy
Carter legacy of linking Ameri-
can friendship abroad to a ther-
mometer measuring the commit-
ment of foreign governments we
regard as allies to human rights.
Ergo: If Argentina cuts some
human rights corners, this can no
longer mean that friendly U.S.
ties to Argentina should be cut in
similar proportion. Our buddies
abroad do not, necessarily, have
to share our democratic prin-
ciples.
IT IS, however, surprising to
see similar sentiments in the
Jewish community, conservative
or otherwise. (It is not a sine qua
non of political conservatism that
it holds human rights in low
repute. On the contrary, his "the
people is an ass" notwithstand-
ing, read Alexander Hamilton on
this very issue.)
To be seen in the Jewish as-
sault on Timerman s authenticity
is a replay of world opinion with
respect to Hitler's genocidal
policies. At their height in the
late 1930s, world leaders, includ-
ing many intellectuals who
should have known better, con-
tinued to debate whether the
policies were mere Zionist fabri-
cations or at the very least gross
exaggerations.
The debate has not ended. It
exists today in the anti-Semitic
rewrite of history that says that
the Hitler Holocaust never in fact
took place that it. too. is a
mere Zionist fabrication. Under-
stood in these terms, the Timer-
man debate shows that we have
U-arned nothing since the heyday
of the German Jewish communi-
ty's tragedy on the eve of the
Nazi takeover.
WE HAVE become infected, if
not by the anti-Semites them-
selves, then by the complascent
in our midst whose arrival at an
easy exercise of power in Amer-
ica, whether intellectual or
political, has made them disin-
clined to rock askew the crade of
their comfort Since Timerman's
charges do the rocking for them,
there appears nothing left but to
deny the charges as exaggera-
tions.
Meanwhile, the secret transfer
of Jewish funds from Argentina
to hanks in the U.S continues
For the depositor- it I matter
ot life or death They can hardly
be concerned by the vagaries and
ennui of Jewishsuhurbia
Like Anyone Else,
Haig Waits on Line To
See the President
^%
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not even consider
settSinqfor anything (ess
than the very oest. The
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Mr. Mercurio at
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______________^-
^ Sheraton River House
\l2J 3900 N.W. 21 Street. Miami. Florida 33142

Continued from Page 1 A
rival in the Administration for
controlling the shaping of foreign
policy.
Writing in the New Republic
recently, Morton Kondrake, the
weekly's White House reporter,
said that some see Weinberger as
part of the "Bechtel oil group"
which they consider "further to
the Arabist side than the tradi-
tional State Department
Arabists." Weinberger was vice
president of Bechtel, the
California-based firm which is
building billions of dollars worth
of projects in Saudi Arabia
During the Presidential cam-
paign last year, some supporters
of Israel expressed concern about
the presence in Reagan's inner
circle of such people as Wein-
berger and George Shultz, Bech-
tel's vice chairman.
WHEN THIS question was
raised before a Jewish audience in
New York. Edwin Meese, now the
President's Counselor, said that
Reagan had supported Israel
when still an actor and before he
entered politics, and the people
he appointed would have to sup-
port his policies. Shultz was not
named Secretary of State, as ex-
pected. But Weinberger, a close
California friend of the new
President, did get a Cabinet post.
A third Administration official
who should be mentioned is
Richard Allen, the President's
National Security Adviser. Allen,
who entered office as a strong
supporter of Israel, reportedly
has little influence. He no longer
briefs the President daily but
provides a written briefing and
waits at the door of the Oval
Office for five minutes in case
Reagan has any questions.
Consider how far this is from
his predecessors. Henry Kissin-
ger and Zbigniew Brzezinski, who
spent time alone with the Presi-
dent each morning.
AS FOR THE President him-
self, one doesn't have to be a sup-
porter of Reagan to admit that he
is pro-Israel. At his press confer-
ence after Israel's raid or the
Iraqi nuclear reactor, Reagan all
but endorsed the Israeli action,
even though he admitted his Ad-
ministration had condemned it.
When Weinberger and Deputy
Secretary of State William Clark
criticized Israeli Premier Begin in
harsh terms for the raid on the
Palestinian terrorist headquar-
ters in Beirut, the White House
repudiated them the next day.
But Reagan does not have the
grasp of foreign policy that he
has demonstrated on domestic
issues. And Haig does not have
the ability to see the President at
will but must make an appoint-
ment aa do other Cabinet
members.
The only ones who can see the
President unannounced are
Meese, Chief of Staff James
Baker, Deputy Chief of Staff Mi-
chael Deaver. None of them is
familiar with foreign policy and
yet these three are the people who
will have the final talk with the
President before he makes a
decision.
SO FAR in all arguments be-
tween Haig and Weinberger.
Weinberger has won. including
the decision last April to go
ahead with the sale of AWACS
reconnaissance planes to Saudi
Arabia.
Despite newspaper speculation
that Meese, for example, favors
Reagan's old California friend,
Weinberger, over Haig, the out-
side although experienced foreign
policy hand, no one really knows
how the White House triumvirate
stands as a Middle East policy is
being developed.
Reagan stressed that his recent
meeting with Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat was basically a
learning experience for him. The
same will hold true when he hosts
Israeli Premier Menachem Begin
at the White House after Labor
Day.
His three chief advisers are
also learning. Both Israel and
Egypt want the U.S. to begin
pressing forward with the
autonomy negotiations.
THE REAGAN Administra-
tion has not yet shown that it has
a policy on this beyond a general
support of the Camp David
agreements. So far it has just
come up with hasty solutions to
crises.
But the Administration must
develop a policy before the end of
the year. It may make a differ-
ence whether the President and
his three chief White House aides
decide that in developing such a
policy they will lean more closely
on Haig or on Weinberger
./ TA Report bx David Friedman
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Absolutely Not
Evron Joins Begin in Denying Deal
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Ambassador Ephraim
Evron denied that a deal had
been made between Israel and the
United States which led to the
lifting of the U.S. embargo on
warp lanes to Israel. Asked on
NBC-TVs "Today" progran-
whether the decision announce*
by Secretary of State Alexandei
Haig was related to Israel's
agreement to the ceasefire last
month, Evron replied: "Certainly
not. One thing has got nothing to
do with the other." He also
asserted that "no deal whatso-
ever" had been made.
The envoy reiterated the view
expressed by Premier Menachero
Begin that the suspension of the
deliveries of the planes "was un-
just and damaging in many
ways." He added that "we are1
glad it has been lifted.
A STATEMENT issued by tht
Israel Embassy said that Evron
"welcomed" Haig s announce-
ment. It added: "The Ambassa-
dor said that the suspension was
unhelpful and unjust but ex-
pressed his conviction that with
its abolition, the traditional close
bonds of friendship between Is-
rael and the U.S. will deepen and
get even stronger.
Haig, in talking to reporters
after announcing the suspension,
also said he hoped the embargo
had not damaged U.S. relation?
with Israel. "We don't see any
change in our long-standing rela-
tionship," he said. "Clearly they
were not happy with the sus
pension."
Haig. in making the announce-
ment, said the Administration
completed its "intensive" review
of Israel's use of American-
supplied F16 warplanes in its
attacks on Iraq's nuclear reactor
and the headquarters of terrorist
orgnizations in Beirut but had
not reached a conclusion on
whether the raids violated the
U.S. Israeli agreement to use
the planes onlv for defensive pur-
Air Base Construction Delays Won't
Cause Israel to Drag Feet in Sinai
TEL AVIV (JTA) Military, Defense Ministry
and American construction officials denied a report in the
Los Angeles Times that delays in construction of new
Israeli air bases in the Negev to replace those to be evacu-
ated in the Sinai would endanger Israel's air security and
might cause delays in the evacuation from Sinai due to be
completed by next April.
American base construction company officials said
there were no delays in essential works, though there was
some delay in construction of housing for airmen and their
families. But they could move into housing put up at the
start of work, to house the construction workers.
F16's Grounded Indefinitely
Following Crashes in UJS.
Continued from Page 1 A
was killed. The U.S. grounded ail the F16s in this coun-
try, and other countries with U.S.-made F16s did so
"voluntarily," a Pentagon official said. The problem re-
portedly is with the planes' flight control computers.
Meanwhile. Pentagon officials said that the Fl5s due
for delivery to Israel, now at the McDonnell-Douglas
plant in St. Louis, 'will depart for Israel after the U.S.
Air Corps and tanker support have been arranged and
when all required preflight tests have been made. We do
not have an exact time yet."
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poses. Israel claimed that both
raids were entirely defensive.
"THE ADMINISTRATION
in its review has also taken ac-
count of events and trends in the
Middle East, particularly events
in Lebanon leading to a ceasefire
there." Haig said.
"Following our discussion with
the government of Israel, con-
sultations with the Congress and
completion of the Administra-
tion's review, the President has
lifted the suspension of military
aircraft deliveries to Israel."
The suspension. which
followed Israel's bombing of the
Iraqi nuclear reactor last June
and terrorist installation in
Beirut last month, involved a
total of 14 F16s and 2 F15s. Is-
rael maintained that its two
actions were defensive in
character and did not therefore
violate any arms agreement with
the U.S. not to use American-
supplied aircraft for offensive
purposes.
Haig said the U.S. had neither
sought nor received any assur-
ance from Israel that she would
abide by the terms of the arms
agreement in the future. Nor, he
added, was there any promise by
Israel to consult the U.S. before
taking military actions in the
future.
"THE UNDERSTANDING of
the arrangements under which we
provide military assistance to Is-
rael are clearly recognized on
both sides." Haig said.
Meanwhile. Jewish leaders
hailed the President's decision to
end the two-month old embargo
and resume delivery of the
planes.
Nathan Perlmutter. director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. said that the release
of the planes was "an implicit
recognition that a pre-emptive
strike is indeed defensive."
adding the decision was "a
welcome development without
which the Palestine Liberation
Organization could continue its
raids secure in the knowledge
that Israel's responses would be
frustrated by America's with-
holding the planes."
Rabbi William Berkowitz,
president of the Jewish National
Fund, called the announcement
the "righting of a wrong and the
proper reversal of an ill-advised
decision." He said the release of
the planes "can only bode well for
the strengthening of relations be-
tween the United States and its
strategic, democratic ally in the
Mideast. Israel."
RABBI Sol Roth, president of
the Rabbinical Council of
America, said that, by the de-
cision, the United States "again
manifests its commitment to the
Jewish State, assures that Israel
wiD remain strong and continue
to have the wherewithal to defend
itself against military threats to
its existence." and "ensures the
kind of stability in the region
that serves the interests of Israel
the United States and the entire
world."
Tht 9tm
Housing Starts Rise Nine Percent;
Called Largest Jump Since 79
NEW YORK IJTAI -
Housing starts in Israel in 1981
rose almost nine percent over the
previous year, the largest jump
since 1976. according to a report
issued last month by the Builders
and Contractors Association in
Israel Association president
David Stern reported that 70.370
apartments were built at the end
of March 1961. compared with
around 64.000 during the same
period last year.
The increase in housing
construction followed four years
of sluggish building activity.
Stern said In 1976. 76.230 apart-
ments were built; that figure
dropped to 60.130 in 1977.
slumped further to 56,480 in
1978: rose slightly to 64.410 in
1979 and remained at that level
thoughout1980.
In the third quarter of 1981.
Stem put area construction for
apartments and commercial
buildings at more than 53 million
square feet.
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tension Lifted. .
Reaction in Israel Said to be Chilly
\\ SEDAN
.EM (JTA)
circles reacted
announcement
of State Alex-
hat "the Presi-
ted the suspen-
^ary aircraft de-
Israel." There
:t reference to
but political
erred reporters
kement Premier
Jegin mu.lt-.
\t\ that the embargo
p!\ unjust and un-
J wrong was done to
[ i having been
m| lor quit* a long
Ir added, however.
f Reagan "will
It that wrong, and
wrong is doing
Iso stated that the
the U.S. withheld
"are not American planes. They
are Israeli planes made in Amer-
ica."
CONSEQUENTLY. the
sources pointed out, Jerusalem
was not about to thank the
United States for lifting the
embrago. Furthermore, the
sources stressed that Israel had
not undertaken any new com-
mitments following the lifting of
the embargo Israel, they said,
had never broken any arms
agreement with the U.S. to use
the planes for defensive purposes
only according to Israel's
definition of defensive. This
included the bombing* of the
Irat(i nuclear reactor and the
terrorist installations in Beirut.
I h> lifting of the embargo was
interpreted here as an obvious
step on the eve of Begins
meeting with Reagan next
month. This development has
cleared the air for a thorough dis-
cussion of the relationship be-
tween the two countries, it was
explained here.
According to reports in Jeru-
salem. Begin intends to be on the
offensive when he meets with
Reagan, stressing Israel's contri-
bution to the Western nations
which has made it an important
ally in the Middle East.
THIS VIEW was reflected in
the reaction by Moshe Arens.
chairman of the Knesset Foreign
Affairs and Defense Committee.
He welcomed the lifting of the
embargo and expressed hope that
the U.S. would refrain in the
future from using the embargo
because this would be counter-
productive to American interests.
Former Premier Yitzhak Rab-
in, a leader of the Labor Align-
ment, said Israel should utilize
the new situation to explain to
the American public the serious-
ness of withholding the shipment
of military equipment that had
been contracted for, with signed
agreements, as was the case with
the embargoed planes.
Anti-Semitic Woman Had
Been Given Top Award
BONN (JTA) A
retired woman from Dues-
seldorf, Josephine Juer-
gens, has been in the center
of public attention since the
end of the Maidanek trial a
few weeks ago. where for-
mer SS officials of the con-
centration camp were
charged with the murder of
thousands of inmates.
IN AN IRONIC twist. Juer
gens turned out to be a dedicated
neo-Nazi who has never hidden
her hostile view towards Jews,
although at the time she received
her award no one in the federal
state government seemed to
know about her views. For the
last five years, she was involved
in helping the former SS officials
who were tried in Duesseldorf.
In a radio interview, Juergens
declared that Duesseldorf is
governed by Jews, hence, she ex-
plained, the lack of public
sympathy for the SS officials
during the trial. In a letter to the
judge who presided at the trial,
she said that it is imperative for
him, as it is for every German, to
resist Jewish influence in similar
court trials in the future and in
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government realized that the
award to Juergens had become a
public scandal. In a recent letter
to Carstens, Johannes Rau, the
head of the Duesseldorf
government, acknowledged that
his administration was not aware
that Juergens was a dedicated
neo-Nazi. He recommended that
the decorations she received be
taken back.
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lalks Open Warily
Begin, Sadat Tread on Eggs
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTAI Talks on autonomy for the
\\ eft Bank and Gaza Strip Palestinians got underway at
a summit conference between Premier Menachem Begin
and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in Alexandria on
Tuesday. But the positions of the two countries were still
far apart, and there were reported differences, mainly of
approach, within the Israeli delegation.
While Begin still held to
i uncompromising stand,
Interior Minister Yosef
Burg, leader of the minis-
terial negotiating team,
favored a more flexible and
compromising approach.
The position of Defense Minis
\riel Sharon, attending the
talks for the first time in his new
capacity, was still unclear.
though observers believe his
:it Iy announced more liberal
h to the West Rank
indicated his desire to reach
autonomy with some degree of
understanding with local West
Hank leaders, thus hopefully
undercutting the influence of the
H.irut based Palestine
Liberation Organization.
ACCORDING to reports.
Sharon has already begun talks
with West Bank Arab notables,
but Defense Ministry officials
decline to confirm this. The Arab
leaders involved are reported to
have promised not to disclose the
subject of the talks, or even the
fact that they have taken place.
His recently announced
"velvet glove" policy included
instructions to the army to press
ahead with its campaign to
combat PLO terrorism and PLO
supporters but not to mistreat
the West Bank civilian popula-
tion.
Burg said in a weekend radio
interview he thought every at-
tempt should be made to resume
the autonomy talks without any
reference or linkage to next
April's deadline for Israel's final
withdrawal from the Sinai.
The taiks were halted some 18
months ago. Analysts say they
were stopped by Egypt because
Sadat hoped that Begins Pre-
miership was only a passing
phase, and he would be replaced
by a Labor leader in the Knesset
elections last June. He is also
thought to have felt that then-
U.S. President .lummy Carter
could not bring sufficient
pressure to bear on Israel during
an election year both in the U.S.
and in Israel.
BEGIN WAS due to hold two
private meetings with Sadat
during his two days in Alexan-
dria, while the negotiating teams
started their talks in a larger
ministerial forum. Israel was rep-
resented by Sharon, Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, and
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim,
with Burg as head of the team.
Begin was due to return to Je-
rusalem on Wednesday, while
Sharon was expected to stay on
in Egypt for a few days more for
further talks on specific military
aspects of relations between the
two countries, specifically the
details of the Israeli Sinai with-
drawal.
The Cabinet Sunday discussed
the Begin Sadat summit
meeting, and Cabinet Secretary
Arie Naor told reporters after-
wards that Israel would submit
proposals for renewing the taiks.
"I can't tell you if we have any
new proposals, but very frankly.
Israel does have proposals of her
own leading to the resumption of
negotiations." he said. Naor
avoided saying Israel had new
proposals to present to the Egyp-
tians.
Normalization at Issue
Israel Critical of Egypt's Slow Pace
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Premier Menachem Be-
gin headed the large dele-
gation in Alexandria for the
first Egyptian-Israeli sum-
mit meeting since Begin's
reelection for a discussion
of a variety of topics, in-
cluding one which is sore
point for the Israelis
w hat they consider the slow
pa> dt normalization of re-
lations between Egypt and
Israel for which they hold
Egypt responsible.
Another key topic was the
completion of Israel's withdrawal
from the Sinai peninsula,
scheduled for next April under
the Egyptian-Israeli peace
t- at v. Observers said the Israeli
delegation will seek to create a
linkage between the way Israel
will evacuate the Sinai and the
nature of relations between the
two countries.
OBSERVERS said that nor
malization of relations and Sinai
evacuation arrangements have
been given precedence, as far as
the Israelis are concerned, over
resumption of the talks on
autonomy for the Arabs of the
West Bank and the Gaza Strip,
also required by the Egyptian-
Israeli treaty, which have been in
a state of supension for the past
14 months
Israeli officials reportedly feel
that they will have more leverage
to expand normalization before
completion of the Sinai with-
drawal than after.
As the Israelis see it. an evacu-
ated Sinai peninsula will serve as
a bridge between Israel and
Egypt, and the peninsula will be
open to a free flow of tourist
traffic, both by auto and train.
Airfields in the Sinai will be used
for civilian purposes, and postal
services will operate on the
ground as well as by air.
Israel also wants a step-up of
the normalization process in such
areas as larger operations of
Israeli corporations in Egypt,
youth delegations exchanges and
more cultural ties.
UNDER THE peace pact. Is-
rael must turn over to the Egyp-
tians the civilian and military in-
frastructures they created during
their occupation of Sinai, but at a
regular Sunday Cabinet meeting
there were expressions of differ-
ing views as to just what parts of
those infrastructures should be
handed over to Egypt.
Workmen's Circle Plan
Southren Conference
The Southern Region Work-
pen s Circle will be holding its
rnd Southern Region Confer-
[nct at the Seville Hotel, on the
cean at 29th Street and Collins
rv*nue. Miami Beach. Florida.
abor Day Weekend. Sept. 4 to
Featured events during the
inference include keynote
eakers. Michael Friedman.
Representative, House of
datives. Donald Slai
'wish Labor Committee.
Tay Meyereon. Mayor of
Miami Beach. Claude Pepper,
U.S. Congressman and Saul
Charro. representing the
National Executive Board of
Workmen's Circle.
There will be a concert by
Lydia King, accompanied by
Harry Lefcourt. pianist. On Sun-
day. Sept. 6, the annual banquet
for Jewish Labor Committee will
beheld.
Further information may be
obtained by calling the Dade and
Broward offices of the Work-
men's Circle.
Most Cabinet Ministers urged
that everything movable should
be dismantled and brought back
to Israel, with only the immov-
able components left behind. But
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon, a
member of the delegation going
to Alexandria, and three Liberal
Minister suggested that Israel
leave behind a considerable
quantity of buildings and equip-
ment, but on a purchase-by-
Egypt basis.
Begin was expected to raise in
Alexandria the resumption of the
autonomy talks, but he was not
expected to try for a formal un-
derstanding on which talks could
be resumed, primarily because
the two countries are so diamet-
rically opposed on many prin-
ciples affecting the autonomy
goals. Egypt's Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali, said over the
weekend that the autonomy talks
are not likely to resume until
after the completion of President
Reagan's meetings with Mideast
leaders at the end of the year. Be-
gin determined that Israel had
no more to offer than it had al-
ready offered, was seen likely to
agree with this approach.
THE SADAT-Begin summit
lasted two days. It included three
work sessions between the two
leaders, with parallel talks be-
tween ministers of both coun-
tries. Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon stayed in Egypt until the
end of the week.
According to reports from
Cairo, the Egyptians showed
special interest in Sharon's recent
intensive contacts with leaders of
the West Bank. Egyptians have
expressed their hope that this ac-
tivity would pave the way for a
resumption of the autonomy
talks and the establishment of
Palestinian trust in these talks.
Sharon met last weekend with
the first among the Arab West
Bank leaders. Elias Freij, Mayor
of Bethlehem, and Anwar Al
Hatib, former Governor of Jeru-
salem. Both are considered pro-
Jordanian moderates. He will
also reportedly meet with Mayor
Bassam Shaka of Nablus, usually
referred to by Israeli military
government officials as "PLO
commander in the territories."
Dr. George S. Wise (left), chancellor of Tel Aviv University, re-
ceives a scroll designating him as Honorary Citizen of Tel Aviv-
Jaffa, from Mayor Shlomo Lahat in ceremonies in Tel Aviv.
Miamian Honored
Tel Aviv Univ. Gives
New Citation to Dr. Wise
A distinguished Miami
educator and industrialist,
Dr. George S. Wise, in his
capacity as chancellor of
Tel Aviv University, was
awarded honorary citizen-
ship of Tel Aviv-Jaffa by
Mayor Shlomo Lahat in
ceremonies there at the end
of July.
The citation is "in recognition
of his distinguished service to the
nation, to the State and to
science as a man of action, as a
man'of science, and as a man of
vision."
DR. WISE who recently retired
in his capacity as director of the
University of Miami's Center for
Advanced International Studies,
cited for his contributions "in the
advancement and flourishing of
Tel Aviv University, which under
his aegis broke out of the bounds
of a small and fledgling universi-
ty and earned a prominent place
among institutions of higher
learning in Israel and the entire
world."
Dr. Wise was the first presi-
dent of Tel Aviv University. On
the occasion of his 75th birthday,
celebrated by institutions
throughout Israel, he declared
that "I still have a great deal of
energy for work and have not
reached a point where I can rest.
There are still a lot of things I
want to do."
Said Prof. Haim Ben-Shahar,
president of Tel Aviv University,
"The city of Tel Aviv is unimag-
inable today without its Univer-
sity. Throughout the city it
leaves its mark: in the schools, in
legal offices, in welfare bureaus,
banks, hospitals, industry, the
theatre, in poverty neighbor-
hoods, public service, commerce.
In all these areas, there are stu-
dents and graduates of the Uni-
versity. And like the city of Tel
Aviv, the University is a magnet
drawing students and scientists
from all over the country and the
world, and patrons of culture and
knowledge from every walk of
society."
The Professor explained that
"It is 'a great cultural and spirit-
ual center,' which was the vision
of Dr. Wise from his first day as
president of Tel Aviv University
a vision that became a reality
by a visionary who is also a
builder."
Greetings were received from
Prime Minister Begin, and the
ceremony naming him Honorary
Citizen was attended by a large
audience which included minis-
ters, members of Knesset, heads
of academic institutions through-
out Israel, and other of his ad-
mirers.
DR. WISE is the recipient of
an honorary doctorate from
Columbia University and a dis-
tinguished award from the Gov-
ernment of Mexico and has been
honored throughout Israel for his
support of all its institutions of
higher learning.
Dr. Wise is a former president
of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University. He is former
president of Clal Investment
Corporation and a member of the
board of American-Israel Paper
Mills.
Rabbi Labovitz
Speaks To
Beach Zionists
Dr. Eugene Labovitz. Rabbi of
Temple Ner Tamid of Miami
Beach, will be the guest speaker
at the opening Fall meeting of the
Miami Beach Zionist District at
the American Savings and Loan
Auditorium, Alton and Lincoln
Roads. Miami Beach, on Mon-
day, Sept. 21. at 1 p.m.
Rabbi Labovitz will discuss
"Israel-Yesterday, Today and
Tomorrow." The Rabbi is a
frequent visitor to Israel and
recently returned from a stay at
Moshav Mod'iin.
Rabbi Labovitz has been the
spiritual leader of Temple Ner
Tamid since it was established 23
years ago. An interesting musical
program featuring Al Wolf at the
piano will follow.
Report For
Mizrachi Women
A report of the American Miz-
rachi Women's Convention in
Iorael will be given by Mrs.
Regina Wang, and the Miami
Beach Chapter of American Miz-
rachi Women will welcome back
Mrs. Ida Wessel from her trip to
Israel, on Sept. 8, at 1 p.m., at
the Washington Savings Bank,
at 12th and Washington St.
jjgWMh Floridian.
Miami. Florida Friday. August 28. 1981 Section B


TrtTi
- L

Page2-B Toe Jewish Flondian Friday. August 28. 1961

B'nai B'rith Ends Confab
Issues String of Prime Resolutions
GROSSINGER. NY
UTA) B'nai B'rith In-
ternational has called on govern-
ments around the world to act
both directly and through the
United Nations to end the per-
secution of Jews in Syria. Iraq
and Iran
In a resolution approved un-
animously by the Jewish service
organization's Board of
Governors at its annual summer
meeting. B'nai B'rith cited syste-
matic and official mistreatment
of the Jewish communities in
those three Islamic countries
Living under impoverished
conditions. Jews there are vie
tims of scapegoating for eco-
nomic and diplomatic disasters
and. although the objects of hate
and scorn, they are neither
permitted to improve their
quality of life nor leave the
country
CITING ITS distress over the
situation. B'nai B'rith pledged to
increase its efforts, "both in pub
lie forums and through private
channels." to seek the right of
Jews in Syria. Iraq and Iran to
emigrate and to persuade these
countries "to allay conditions for
those who remain."
Stating that it will continue
"to emphasize that the status of
Jews in these countries is strictly
a humanitarian issue and should
not be caught up in the Arab-Is-
raeli conflict.'' B'nai B'rith called
on "concerned governments" to
intercede on behalf of these com-
munities and to bring their
plights before the UN. especially
its Commission on Human
Rights.
Among other resolutions
adopted by the Board of Gover-
nors. B'nai B'rith urged its large
American membership to con-
tinue efforts to defeat the Reagan
Administration's proposal to
supply Saudi Arabia with
AW ACS and offensive add-ons to
F-15 warp lanes.
TERMING the sales an action
"against the interests of the
United States," and a threat to
the security of Israel a vio-
lation of a commitment made in
1978 B'nai B'rith called on
members of the U.S. Senate and
House of Representatives to vote
their formal disapproval. Both
houses must pass a resolution of
opposition in order to kill the
sale.
The Board of Governors also
proposed that individual mem-
bers of the United Nations with-
hold funds to UN agencies
which violate the values and
principles of the binding inter-
national agreements under which
they were created." The proposal
is in reference to several agencies
that have given recognition and
support to the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization despite the
PLO's advocacy of terrorism and
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military action in place of diplo-
ma cy
In addition, the resolution is an
objection to the unbridled at-
tacks on Jews. Israel, the United
States and the West have have
come to predominate many UN
activities
Contending that the agree-
ments that were made in estab-
lishing these agencies are being
broken to the detriment of the
UN B'nai B rith declared that
adherence to the principles and
rules of the world body would be
ensured by a system of rewards
and penalties, especially those
agencies supported by voluntary
contribution'-
OTHER RESOLUTIONS ap
proved by the Board of Gover-
nors covered a wide range of con-
cerns They included
Anti-Semitism The board,
citing a resurgence international-
ly, called on all governments and
intergovernmental institutions
"to initiate or intensify" a drive
against all forms of terrorism,
urged human rights and defense
agencies to expose and repudiate
"falsifiers of the Holocaust." and
asked Western nations to sup-
port the effort of Michael Novak,
the U.S. representative to the UN
Commission on Human Rights,
"to excoriate anti-Semitism.,
reject double standards at the
UN and repudiate the Zionism
declared that women should have
the right to choose freely whether
or not to terminate a pregnancy
in the earlv months' and railed
on B'nai B'rith members to op-
pose efforts to outlaw abortion.
Equal Rights Amendment
B'nai B'rith reaffirmed its belief
that the amendment would give
American women the same
standing before the law that men
now enjoy and that the approval
of ERA can only enhance Ameri-
ca s reputation as the leading
champion of human rights in the
world." Consequently, it urged
members to "redouble their ef
forts to obtain ratification of the
amendment.
The Board of Governors
B'nai B'rith International s top
policy making body. Members
attending this summer's meeting
came from Argentina. England
Canada. Mexico. Panama
Sweden and the United States
Moe Levin, Wife Leah Establish
Chair At Hebrew University
E Lef
riends
Moe I-evin. civic and religious leader and philanthropist
and wife. Leah, are e^tabh-hing a Chair in the Depart men;
Religious Philosophv at the Hebrew I niversity Donald t
on. President of the Greater Miami Chapter American V
>f the Hebrew University announced thi* week
The Chair in memorv of their daughter. Gilah iGaOl l-e\ in
[> Nur ill be dedicated before the next academic year It is
Mot Levins hope that the students m generations to come who
stud\ at the Hebrew University, particularly in the Department
. ligioufl Philosophy, will make contributions not only to
benefit the State of Israel but all mankind. l-eftnn said
Mm Levin, has been a resident in Miami tor better than 27
He has ban actively involved as President of the Chaun
lan Karband Branch, member of the Board of the National
Histadrut Council, as well as National Vice ProsidSfl1 ths
Israel Histadrut Foundation: Vice President of M Is* N I
tional Fund member of the American Friends of ths
Cm\ ersity. Temple Fmanuel. Temple Beth Sholom. and SJOl
benefactor of Mount Sinai Hospital
The Hebrew (Jniversit) i> the main generator of the future
leaders of the State of Israel It trains and develops pi of OSS ion-
als. research scientists, teachers, behavioral scientists and
others to generate into Israels growing society the managers
and key people who are significant in the development of a
democratic viable society." Mr Levin stated in announcing
their gift ______^^
North Bay Village
Jewish
equals racism thesis and similar gpleCtS NeW CailtOr Worship Hdir
perspectives as anthema to cm- ___
lized society
Israel under attack The
Board of Governors called on
governments and those who in
fluence public opinion" to view
Israel "not exclusively in terms
of specific policies." but as a na-
tion "facing awesome deilemmas
in the quest for peace.' Stating
that the West's impatience with
the pace of autonomy talks "is
unjustified and misplaced." it
asked Western governments to
appreciate that nothing less
than Israel's survival as a free
nation is at stake "
Soviet Jewry Pointing out
that Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union nad dropped
drastically in the first six months
of 1981. B'nai B'rith called on the
Soviet government to adhere to
the solemn obligations" it had
accepted in signing the Helsinki
Final Act and urged others com-
mitted to human rights to de-
mand that the denial of the rights
of Soviet Jews cease.
Raoul Wallenberg: Noting
that the U.S. Senate had passed a
resolution granting honorary
citizenship to Raoul Wallenberg,
the Swedish diplomat who had
saved thousands of Hungarian
Jews from Nazi extermination
and who had disappeared aft r
his arrest by the Soviet Union,
B'nai B'rith asked the U.S.
House of Representatives also to
approve the resolution.
Freedom of choice: The Board
Rabbi David Raab of
Temple King Solomon.
Miami Beach will appear on
The Jewish Worship Hour
on Channel 10, on Sunday
\uk M). at Ha m
Net Tomid
Sisterhood Meets
Sisterhood of Temple Ner
Tamid will hold their meeting on
Tuesday. Sept 1 at Ham at the
Temple Luncheon will be served
at 12 noon Mrs Mildred Blake is
president Fannie Rest and Essie
(ilickman are in charge For in-
formation contact the Temple
office
Rabbi Marvin Rose, spiritual
leader and Mr Irving I^eighton,
president of the congregation of
North Bay Village Jewish Center,
announces the selection of Jacob
E. Tambor as their permanent
Cantor.
Cantor Tambor has served the
Beth Zion Congregation in
Brookline. Mass. for 15 years and
with the Concourse Center of Is-
rael in Bronx. N.Y. for nine.
Sabra Women
The Sabra Chapter of Pioneer
Women, will hold its opening
meeting on Thursday. Aug. 27 at
7:30 p.m. at Washington Savings
& Loan Building, North Miami
Beach.
lie* Lei in
Yassky Chapter
Haim Yassky Chapter of Had
assah will hold the first meeting
of the season on Wednesday.
September 2 at 1 p m at Hvron
Hall. Miami Beach Florence
Gordon, president, will boat the
meeting Refreshments will be
served
Golden Addresses
Sholem Lodge BB
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Season Opener
TheGalil Chapi. \raer
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their first meet in.: '-< SSSSSJ
on Mondav Vug SI, at the
Washington Savings Bank
Building Guest speaker will be
Dr J 1. Fine
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iose E. Matzkin, past president of Hadassah and chairman of the Henrietta Szold Committee,
presents Hadassah's highest honor, the Henrietta Szold Award, to Elena Fridman of Israel on
behalf of her sister, Ida Nudel, who is serving a four-year term of exile in Siberia. Ida is known
is the Guardian Angel' of Soviet Jewish Prisoners of Conscience and their families. Some
11,000 signatures on petitions were handed in at the 67th national convention of Hadassah in
\eu York City. The petitions, from all over the U.S., asked Soviet President Brezhnev to allow
Ida Xudel and other Soviet Jews to go to Israel.
News in Brief
Hussein Meets With Mitterrand
[PARIS King Hussein of
brdan met French President
nncoia Mitterrand Wednesday
what French officials say was
vide-ranging discussion of the
iddle Fast situation. Mitter-
nil is due to leave next month
his first official visit to the
M, to Saudi Arabia, and For-
%n Minister Claude Cheysson is
biting this week a trip to
K'r.il Arab capitals, including
kmaacua and Beirut, where he
due to meet Palestine
twration Organization chief
sir Arafat.
The recent Arab slant within
French administration is
Jvoking a definite uneasiness
ong many French Jews. The
ually pro-Socialist weekly,
mbune Juive, in an editorial due
[appear this week, says "the
^ has come to judge the new
ench) administration on its
s and not on its sentiments of
Messed sympathies."
WASHINGTON The State
partment says that it has "no
dence" to support a report
t Israel secretly sold Iran
>" parts and tires for
Wan-built F-4 fighter
nbers last October to help Iran
1 war against Iraq and at a
when American hostages
s being held by Iran,
^cording to a report last
prsday night on ABC News,
*> Iranian President Abol-
Ban Bani-Sadr said in an in-
fle*,in Paris with ABC that
nad been opposed to any deal
"rael but had been over-
i py religious leaders close to
[Wlah Ruhollah.Khomeini. "I
! "PPosed. I said: If we have
,uy anr> from the Israelis,
not make peace with the
J it would be much better."
f'Sadr said.
former Carter Administration
I181* and diplomatic sources
over the weekend that the
suL y'ekled to American
[. no* to conUnue their
lul ,ri'Iatlnship with Iran
tr* hostages were freed.
lneTsndin| to 'n"s State Department
r'scher stated last Friday.
"We have no evidence that any
U.S.-origin equipment or spare
parts subject to our control, has
been supplied to Iran by the gov-
ernment of Israel."
Bar Mitzvah
JACOB KIRIATI
Jacob, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Menahem Kiriaty will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Moshe on Saturday
morning, August 29.
The celebrant is an eighth
grade honor student at Lear
School
Special guests will include
grandmothers, Carolina Croitoru
from Israel, and Luisa Lud-
vinovsky from Peru; Mr. and
Mrs Yehezkel Croitoru from
Venezuela; Mr. Rafael Lud-
vinovsky from Peru; Mr. and
Mrs. Yaacov Croitoru, of Israel
and Mr. and Mrs. Moshe
Croitoru from Miami.
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
learned that Viktor Brailovsky
has started his journey by pris-
oner train into internal exile, the
place of his banishment as yet
unknown. On Aug. 14, Brail-
ovsky's appeal was heard by the
Supreme Court of the RSFSR,
which upheld the conviction and
sentence of five years' internal
exile imposed by a lower court on
June 18. The prominent refusenik
scientist was convicted on alleged
charges of "fabrications which
defame the Soviet state and
social system."
JERUSALEM The two
Chief Rabbis ruled that the entire
City of David archaeological site
is a cemetery, and no excavations
are to take place. Nevertheless,
the archaeological team led by
Prof. Yigal Shilo continued its
work under heavy police pro-
tection. The scientists argued
that the rabbinical ban is not
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binding and that the permit
allowing them to dig, which was
issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation and Culture, is still in
effect.
The question now is whether
the government will abide by the
permit and consider it valid or
capitulate to religious pressure.
One indication that the issue will
become more intense were state-
ments by Religious Affairs Min-
ister Yosef Burg and the National
Religious Party's Knesset Whip
Dr. Yehuda Ben Meir. Both said
that the ruling of Ashkenazic
Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goren and
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef was binding.
TEL AVIV A private home
in Cianei Tikva near Tel Aviv was
badly damaged Thursday when
part of the refuelling mechanism
of an Air Force plane broke off in
mid-air and fell into the living
room. The family was outside the
house at the time and was un-
harmed.
BONN Former SS official.
Heinz-Guenther Wisner, 64, goes
on trial Sept. 17 in Duesseldorf.
He is charged with the murder of
31 Jewish inmates of the Riga-
Kaiserwald concentration camp.
For the last year Wisner has been
in custody. According to a
spokesman for the Duesseldorf
Prosecutor's Office, the Nazi offi-
cial was the right hand of the
doctor stationed in the con-
centration camp. His trial is like-
ly to take six months.
PARIS President Francois
Mitterrand told Iraq that France
was willing to replace the nuclear
reactor destroyed by Israel in an
air attack last June.
Officials indicated that Mit-
terrand told Iraqi special envoy
Tareq Aziz that if replaced,
France would impose tighter re-
strictions to prevent the use of
the reactor for military purposes.
Mitterrand believes that Iraq
should not be denied materials
and technology which are pro-
vided to other countries, one
official said.
"But we want to make sure
that under no circumstance
would such supplies lead to a
proliferation of nuclear weap-
ons," the official said. "France is
opposed to nuclear proliferation."
Scholarship
Matching
Service Offered
Scholarship matching
service of Oak Park. III. is
pleased to announce the ap-
pointment of Ivan T. Siscoe
as a representative. Scholar-
ship matching service is a
computerized service to help
the scholar find the scholar-
ship. Last year alone over
one third billion dollars went
unused because of lack of
applicants.
"Without the aid of a com-
puter it is impossible for any
individual to explore all of
the possibilities for
scholarships, grants, loans
nd other aid sources which
e available. Our computer
ta base is continually
b> ng updated to provide as
much information as possible
to the applicants." Accor-
ding to Richard Mackoy.
president of the company.
The service guarantees to
find from five to 25 sources
for which the applicant is
.nominally qualified. If at
; least five sources are not
found for the student, the
l $40 processing fee is
refunded along with the
sources that were located.
For further information
contact Ivan T. Siscoe at
P.O. Box 2985 Ft. Myers
Beach. FL. 33931-0685 or
phone him at 813-463-0147.
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT WANTED
The Jewish Floridlan Editorial Department
has an opening for an editorial assistant.
This is a full-time position suitable for a
bright entry-level journalist or someone with
previous journalism experience wishing to
return to the work force.
You will handle social and organizational
news items, obituaries and other essential
; news copy. Your duties will also include
some filing, statistical listing and similar
responsiblities. Good typing, neat work
habits and the ability to get along well with
others while meeting deadlines are essen-
tial.
This is a challenging position promising a
serious future in journalism. Send resume to
MM-Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973
'Miami, Florida,33101.
1
tf\M*N
EXPERT SOFER.n usa
: a man you can trust
wHTHK, COMfCmK IN CHECH* \SR| tmun. mu,
11 AM SELLING TORAHS USED AND NEW.
Rabbi Yakw Gurin
______ 673-0951


-
______^---
. ...^
------ Page4-B The Jwish Floridian Friday. August 28.1981
I
I
I
1
t
I
I
1
Rabbi Tibor' Stern Reports On Central American Trip
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, spiritual
leader of tfae Jacob C. Cohen
Community Synagogue, and
Chairman of the Beth Din of
Florida, recently returned from
an extensive lecture tour of
Central American Countries, in-
Beth Torah
Services At
Four Locations
Mr Marshall Baltuch. Presi-
dent of Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, announced that this year.
Beth Torah will conduct High
Holy Day Services simultaneous-
ly at four different locations.
Services in the Main Sanctuary-
will be conducted by Rabbi Max
A. Lipschitz and Cantor Zve*
Aroni and the Beth Torah Choir.
Mr. Baltuch also announced
that the following additional
High Holy Day staff has been
engaged to officiate at the
various service. At Deakter Hall.
Rabbi Harold Richter and Cantor
Isaiah Wertheimer will return for
another year.
At the Wometco 163rd Street
Twin Theatres. Rabbi Norman
Muss man and Cantor Earl Rack
off will officiate in Theatre I. and
Mr. Daniel Siege! and Cantor
Leibd Rozner will officiate in
Theatre II.
eluding Mexico. Colombia.
Panama. Costa Rica and
Guatemala-
Rabbi Stern in his report,
stated lhat "these communities
are in dire need of spiritual
leadership. Rabbis, teachers and
other rehgious functionaries."
The Rabbi, in the Spanish
language, addressed many youth
groups whose main concern is the
percentage of intermarriage and
the lack of Jewish education.
The leaders of these com-
munities requested Rabbi Stem
to alert the Jewish families who
have settled in Miami, originally
from these countries, to register
with the Beth Din Office in order
to maintain a religious contact
with their former communities
Rabbi Stern has made official
arrangements with the Jewish
Communities of Central America
that copies of the records ser-
Auxiliary
Hears Report
Abe Horrowitz Ladies
Auxiliary 682. Jewish War Vet-
erans, will hold a breakfast meet-
ing on Sunday. Aug. 30 at 9:30
a.m. at the Poet Home. N'E 160
St and 19 PI.. North Miami
Beach
President Mary Wexler will
give a report to the membership
on the 54th annual JWVA
National Convention held
recently at the Diplomat Hotel.
West Miami Auxiliary Plans Social
West Miami Post 223 and
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans,
will hold a BACK YARD
SOCIAL on Saturday evening.
August 29. at 7:30 p.m. at the
home of Stan and Caol Gold. 8410
SW 36 St Miami. Members and
friends are invited to attend. Co-
chairmen are Stan Gold and
Tanya Levine. Reservations are
necessary
The Auxiliary will hold its first
meeting of the fall season on
Thursday, Sept. 3 at 8 p.m. at the
home of its president. Ruth
Herman. Mrs. Herman will re-
port on the recent National
Ladies Auxiliary Convention
held at the Diplomat Hotel,
which she attended, along with
delegates. Carol Gold. Tanya
Levine. Carol Marks. Julia
Farkas. Lee Rubin. Shirley
Achtman. and Gladys Isgar.
Program for the evening will
focus on the upcoming Jewish
High Holidays, and will be
presented by Carol Marks, pro-
gram chairman and Lucie Viola,
cultural chairman.
NEED A TAX WRITE-OFF
Chabad needs Cars, Vans and
Office Equipment.
By Donating you can earn a
Significant Tax Credit.
Information 661-7642
CHAD AD HOUSE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
presents on tour from Israeli
THEMEGAMA '
SINGING
'MYZAIDF
ond o0wi Nb
H
ENGLISH
HEBREW
YDOtSH
SUNDAY
SEPT. 13,1961
> 640 P.M.
GUSMAM CONCERT HALL
IWvenky of Mkvnl
ALL SEATS RESERVED
LitUn to the Jewish Sound,
SundavnlMn.nL-Sn.n. WLRM-FM91.3 j
vicing their former members will
be dispatched to their respective
communities and aD those who
need Rabbinic services will be
cleared with them. "One of the
reasons for this arrangement is
that many unauthorized persons
in Miami execute Rabbinic
functions that are neither valid
nor recognized by the proper
Rabbinic authorities in these
countries."
Lakes Council
Members of Lakes. National
Council of Jewish Women, will
hold their first meeting of the
season on Wednesday. Sept. 2. at
11:30 am in the Washington
Savings Bldg 633 NE 167 St..
North Miami Beach. Nuca Gins-
berg and Fay Schweitzer, in-
ternational folk singers, will
entertain._____________________^
Laurie FUnk
Vacations
Laurie Funk recently
attended a performance of
the smash hit Tony award
winning musical ex-
travaganza "42nd Street" at
the Majestic Theatre, while
vacationing in New York
City.
Temple Menorah Selects
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Joel Gray, president of Temple
Menorah. Miami Beach, an-
nounced the selection of Cantor
Murray Yavneh as cantor of the
Temple Mr Gray said that
Cantor Yavneh will assume his
duties immediately and is
arranging special services for the
high holy days.
Cantor Murray Yavneh. son of
the Cantor Zalman Yavneh. is the
President of the Cantor's Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, which
is the umbrella organization of
Orthodox. Conservative and Re-
formed Cantor's of the State of
Florida.
Cantor Yavneh arrived in
Miami in 1970 and served as ex-
ecutive director of the Women's
American ORT of the region.
Two years later, he returned to
his cantorial profession by ac-
cepting the pulpit in North Bay
Village where he served as full
time Cantor for the area.
As the Cantor of Temple
Menorah. he will officiate at all
holiday Sabbath Services and
will take charge of the entire
musical program of the congre-
gation including Bar and Bat
Cantor Murray Yavntk
Mitzvah instruction, children's
and adult choirs and presentation
of concerts.
Cantor Murray Yavneh will
begin his services at Temple
Menorah by officiating at the
Sabbath morning services on
Saturday morning August 29 in
the main Sanctuary of Temple
Menorah. A Kiddish honoring
the new Cantor, will be tendered
by the Sisterhood of the congre-
gation following services
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Friday, August 28, 1981 7 The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Hadassah Honors
New' Founders
One of the gala events at the 67th na-
tional convention of Hadassah, to
which 3,000 delegates and guests par-
ticipated, was a special dinner honoring
new Founders of the Hadassah Medical
Organization, which maintains the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical
Center in Jerusalem. (Top left} Local
participation included (left) Linda Min-
kes of Miami, with Dr. Kalman J.
Mann, retiring director-general of the
Hadassah Medical Organization. Mrs.
Minkes is a member of the National
Board of Hadassah. (Center) (Right to
lef) Charlotte Wolpe and her daughter,
Suzanne, of Coral Gables proudlv
flank Hadassah president, Frieda S.
Lewis. (Lower) Seymour Smoller of
Chicago and North Miami, and his
family grouped around Hadassah
national president, Frieda S. Lewis
(center). (Left to right) Edward Lewis,
Betty Hirsch, Dr. Simon Godfrey,
Seymour Smoller, Mrs. Smoller, and
grandson, Irwin Hirsch. Mr. Smoller
has just been given a clinical chair in
Pediatrics to the department at the
Mount Scopus campus of the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical
Center in Jerusalem.
t^r~
;
Judge Snyder
Installs Interama
Chapter ABA
|Th> Honorable Arthur I.
g.vder. Wiu install newly elected
Been of Interama Chapter of
werican Business Women's As-
nation IABWAI. at an Instal-
fjon Dinner Meeting. Tuesday,
p I. at the Holiday Inn. 11190
pcayne Blvd.
(Officers to be installed include
tan u I'azarus- president
poda Kurzman. vice president.
Psemaiy Botti. recording secre-
p Marion Kellogg, correspon-
||K secretary; and Helen
'any. treasurer.
[Friends and relatives are in-
tj. said Millie Lanes, program
irman of the chapter.
|0RT Women Meet
rf* South Seas Chapter of
pmen i American ORT will
on Tuesday, Sept. 1. at 12
on. at the Washington Savings
, North Miami Beach.
SECRETARY WANTED
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Must know typing and spelling. Located close to Baptist
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COMTREX Liquid 6 oz. 2.29
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'f
-:.>
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 28,1981
A
Sunday. May 24,1981
Our first visit was to Yad Vashem. the memorial
to the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust
This holy place serves as a constant reminder to
the world of the horrors of Nazism and the
genocide committed against the European Jews.
This must never happen again. We walked
through the museum which pictorially shows the
rise of Nazism and the cruelties that were inflicted
on a people only because they were Jews. We
viewed the impressive monuments to the heroes
of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and then partici-
pated in a ceremony commemorating the death of
the Six Million.
Next we went to Bethlehem, where we visited the
Church of the Nativity the holy place where
Jesus was born. While here, we witnessed a
confirmation ceremony and then chatted with the
parents, whose family had lived near Bethlehem
for hundreds of years. Our next atop was to visit
the Mormon garden on the Mount of Olives. Here
we saw the site where the Mormon missionary
Orson Hyde dedicated the land to the Jews; pro-
claimed, in 1841. the rebirth of the State of Israel;
and beckoned Jews to return from all over the
world to restore this historic land and form a
modern state. This was particularly meaningful
since Gene and I are Mormons.
After lunch we met with Jerusalem's legendary
mayor Teddy Kollek. I asked Mayor Kollek why.
in Jerusalem, where there are so many potentially
hostile groups vir* "deby se. *< "
visible street crime. He responded that_the in-
timity of the neighborhood and the importance of
STfarnUy unit 5 two values held **&%*
groups. It is these values that prevent cnme
What a great lesson for us in the Unitec1 States
who are plagued with an increasing cnme rate.
At 4:00 we met with David Ephrati in the( Mirus-
of Foreign Affairs; he handles **"
ad the churches. He a*t*il.tfae CgPg
dialogue with representative* of the Wfm*
Catholic. Greek Orthodox, and Moslemrehgion.
regarding the importance of *.*
unique sl-tus of the religious shnnes throughout
the State of Israel. I was most impressed ith
safegllrds that allow each religion toJunction
freely without any government interference.
while allowing each to respect the rights of others
We met with Yitzhak Shamir, the Minister of
Foreign Affairs, who gave u. Imuch greater
comprehension of the fragility of the existing
peace" in the Middle East.
Mr. Shamir warned against atowteg Wgfcg;
cated arms to fall into the hands of pc4*ntudl>
hostile or unstable neighbors. This would endan-
ger not only the security of Israel, but would also
compromise America's military technology and
jeopardize the safety of American pilots and sol-
diers. He showed us the geographic proximity of
Saudi Arabia and Israel and emphasized that
those lethal weapons would have no other even
tual use but against Israel. Mr Shamir's words
were sobering. He reminded us not only of the
most recent declaration of the Saudi leaders, de-
claring a Holy War against Israel, but also of the
Saudi's participation in at least three previous
wars against Israel
That evening, we met with the current leader of
the Labor Party, Shimon Peres. He stated that.
even though there are great differences between
Mr Begin and himself, they share a common
ground concerning defense and adherence to the
belief that Israel and the United States share a
common position.
2f**fr,i
Monday. May 25.1981
We began the day by meeting with Prime Minis
ter Menachem Begin. 1 was impressed by his keen
insight into Israels relations w*h her Arab
neighbors, his sincere desire for peace and his rec
ognition of the Soviets as the most senous threat
tipeace and stability in the Middle East and Per
sian Gulf regions. He emphasized the disaster
that would result if sophisticated American
weapons were sold to unstable Arab states who
neither participate in the peace proceaa nor sup
port American foreign policy
Later in the morning, we met with Mrs Tamar
Eahel. a member of the Knesset (the Israeli Par
liament). She noted that Israel is the only demo
cratic state in the Middle East. She. a duly
elected member of the Kneaset. serves with other
duly elected members including other women.
Arabs Bedouins and Druze members. We dis-
cussed the sociological problems caused by the
large number of Jewish refugees absorbed from
Arab countries refugees who. when they enter
Israel, for the first time enter the twentieth
century refugees with large families and many
young children who have to be educated and
integrated into a modern western society.
Gene and I spent the rest of the morning at the
new" Hadassah Hospital, a modern, world
renowned medical center Some of the major ad-
vances in medicine have been developed by
members of the staff of this hospital which treat
Jew and Arab alike. One of the doctors explained
to me that, before 1947. Arabs from all over the
Middle East came to Hadassah for advanced

*
medical treatment: and, even now. non-Jerusalem
Moslem and Arabs come there for treatment oi
their moat serious medical problems. With peace
in the Middle East, this most certainly would be
the regional medical center improving health care
for all
Norman Bremen, a friend from Miami who M-
companied us during our entire visit to Israel
took us to the original Hada *ah Ho. ial built
in the 1940s on Mount Scopo- Thi* P'tal was
surroundr 1 by the Jordanians in nd
not be used as j medical fai ilitv
hospital duplW.fmif the one i Mottj Vopu*
was built irs Je .ulcm in th< 960


Friday, August 28. 1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Gene and I felt that this was a terrible waste of
physical property.
Norman Braman than told us the story of a
dearly marked unarmed medical convoy contain-
ing 105 professors, doctors, nurses and patients
Which left for Mt. Scopus under British and Jor-
danian protection and guarantees for safety. En
route, it was attacked by Arab soldiers 76 were
slaughtered while the "protectors" did nothing.
Although this event happened in 1948, I can un-
derstand Israel's attitude that it must protect
itself guarantees cannot be relied on.
After lunch at the hospital and meeting with the
medical staff, we visited Jerusalem's religious
shrines, now accessible to all in a unified city. Je-
rusalem is a holy city of the western world's three
major religions Judaism, Christianity and
Islam I was inspired to stand at the Western
Wall, to walk the Stations of the Cross, and to
view the Al-Aqsa i Mosque holy sites dear to so
many people and now accessible to all religions.
Tuesday. May 28,1981
We left for the north via the Jordan Valley where
we stopped at Kibbutz Gilgal. located three miles
from the Jordanian border, composed of approxi-
mately eighty members, both Christian and Jew,
from all parts of the world. This kibbutz has a
very large number of children. The older children
expressed their concerns about security and their
fear of this territory's being returned to the Arabs
-which would mean that they would have to
leave their home. They reminded Gene and me
that lews were not allowed to live in occupied Je-
rusalem or the West Bank while it was illegally oc-
cupied by Jordan from 1948 to 1967. The younger
children showed me the bomb shelters in which
tht) >leep every night of their lives. We inspected
the vineyards and were amazed to see barren rock
turned into fertile soil and grapes growing on
this soil. This ability of these pioneers to make
productive use of the land is a major reason for
the success of the State of Israel.
We continued our journey to Lake Tiberias, the
Sea of Galilee, where Christ's ministry began and
where he performed many of his miracles. The
historical significance of this area is as important
as its present day significance. Now a heavily
fished sea surrounded by flourishing agricultural
communities, it supplies 80 percent of Israel's
fresh water. Prior to 1967, the Syrians and their
h< ,i\ \ artillery constantly bombarded the sea and
the ..immunities surrounding it. making
everyday farming and fishing a life or death
experience The serenity that now exists must be
-u. h .i sharp contrast to those times of peril.
We then ascended the Golan Heights to visit Kib
butz Kfar Haruv. Of the 110 member population,
one-third are American and most of these are
American military veterans. Lenny Spector, who
conducted our tour, is from Bayonne, New Jersey.
He impressed upon us the importance of the Is-
I resence in the Golan Heights to protect the
heartlands of Israel. He reminded us that, during
the 1973 Yom Kippur War.lthe Syrians would
have overrun and destroyed Israel had it not been
tor the Israeli chain of settlements in the Golan
Heights. As he was talking. I gazed from the
barren rock-strewn countryside to the kibbutz's
I "Mi acres of land under cultivation and shared
thi pride these people feel. From these heights, I
could see how easily the Syrians could shell the
region from which we had just come the vul-
nerable farms around the Sea of Galilee. 1 fully
understood the peril to Israel and her need to re-
itain these lands and settlements which serve as
her first line of defense against a repeat of Syrian
| attack.
Wednesday. May 27. 1981
We arose early in the morning and again drove
north towards the Lebanese border stopping at
Metulla to visit a gateway in the "Good Fence"
a unique international boundary between
Israel and Lebanon where the beleaguered
Ubanese-Christians are able to enter Israel for
social and medical aid. It is a site where one can
view what is left of the once beautiful country of
Lebanon now war-torn, occupied by Syria and
terrorized by the PLO. I was shocked to learn of
the genocide being practiced by Moslems against
Christians and to learn that, with the excep-
tion of Israel, the world silently watches, doing
nothing. Israel is the only country actively op-
posing the genocide of this once vibrant
1 .etutnese-Christian community. The Arab claim
that Jew and Moslem can live together in peace in
a secular state of Palestine is put to the test in
Lebanon. It fails that test! Israel's aiding the
Lebanese-Christiana to survive is proof of Israel's
[intentions.
[On this up-beat note, we left the "Good Fence"
land drove to the holy Jewish city of Sfad. a
[quaint town where scholars intermingle with
artists and tourists visiting Jewish holy places. It
I was in Sfad that I met Sara Zefira the head of the
(Israel Red Magen David, an organization with
Jmuch meaning for ine since I serve as its United
[States National Co-Chairman. Sara show.-d me a
" w ambulance that had just been delivered there
I told me >1 the i ins work being done by our or
i cation. 1 esolved at that time to continue
I'ven ra :e stronirly .riv fight to force the Interna-
lonal Red CrOM to recognize the Hi-d Star of
David as an official symbol just as it does the Red
Cross, the Iranian Red Lion and Sun, and the
Moslem Red Crescent to include the Red
Magen David Adorn as a member of the interna-
tional organization of mercy and to allow
official affiliation of the American and Israeli
sister organizations.
We returned to Tel Aviv and had a most enjoy-
able dinner with Mordecai Zippori, the Deputy
Minister of Defense and his lovely wife Tova. I
had looked forward to meeting this couple who
are cousins of good friends of mine in South Flor-
ida, Stan and Karen Margulies. We had a
fascinating interchange of ideas regarding Amer-
ica's and Israel's strategic and military needs.
Zippori expressed to me in the strongest military

.,U' iw*tt
-W*anwa
gM
i

terms how threatening the sale of sophisticated
weaponry such as the enhanced F-15 s and
AWACS would be to the security of Israel. Me
then added a much more startling thought how
could we Americans allow our most IWW
military technology to be given a regime already
unstable? There was very little question ui his
mind thst the secrets of our AWACS and F-15 s
would soon faU into Russian hands if given to the
Saudis, just as our F-14 airplane technology and
our Harpoon and Lance missile secrets had fallen
into Russian hands soon after being given to
Iran; and that President Carter planned to deliver
AWACS to Iran just before the fall of the Shah
! AWACS that would now be in the hands of Aya-
tollah Khomeni and the Russians. He reminded
me that many of the same people who testified
before the Senate that this could never happen m
Iran were now coming forth with similar
testimony about Saudi Arabia. I restated my
active opposition to such a sale. We must learn
from our mistakes, not repeat them.
Thursday. May 28, 1981
Early the next morning, we arrived in Beersheva,
the capital of the Negev. In the early 60's. Beer-
sheva was nothing more than a Bedouin trading
post; it is now the fourth largest city in Israel. I
was able to see again how barren and arid desert
had been transformed into productive, agricultur-
al soil. If what has been done here could be done
in other parts of the world, what benefits would
derive to underdeveloped nations, especially in
alleviating world hunger.
While in Beersheva, we visited the Ben Gurion
University, the youngest and among the most in-
novative of Israel's universities. Ben Gurion U.
concentrates its efforts in several areas. Most
interesting to me were agriculture, irrigation and
health care. The medical school provides com-
plete modem medical care to the large Bedouin
community of the Negev, a community which
prior to 1970 received almost none. In discussion
with students and faculty, I learned another im-
portant facet of Israeli life everyone who serves
on the faculty teaches and everyone who teaches
serves. The social and economic implications of
this to me were staggering This means that each
Israeli citizen, male and female, after completing
mandatory military service, spends an average
one month a year on active military duty.
Gene and I examined other divisions of the Uni-
versity where applied research for specific prob-
lems is being performed. As a member of the
Senate Committee on Agriculture and as senator
from Florida, where agriculture is a major in-
dustry, the projects that centered on special uses
and conservation of water, new agricultural ap-
proaches and the unorthodox use of presently
grown crops were of special interest to me. We
visited four desert settlements where brackish
water, never before used in agriculture, is now
being used to grow cotton, corn and wheat. I dis-
cussed the possible applications of this method of
agriculture for use in Florida. It seems to me that,
if brackish warm water could be used in our state,
we might be able to avoid the problems of un-
timely freezes and resulting crop loss I have
asked Dr. Pasternak to provide additional in-
formation and to testify before the Senate Com-
mittee on Agriculture on these innovative
techniques.
I was excited to meet with Dr. Mizrachi. who ex-
plained how his genetic research on tomatoes has
produced a commercially acceptable product with
a six week shelf life. I asked if this could be
feasibly done in Florida where tomato farming is
an important part of our agriculture industry. He
thought that his research could be useful in Flor-
ida and agreed to testify before the Senate on this
subject. I feel that, with the possible benefits to
residents and farmers in Florida, this is well
worth looking into. Because ot Florida's water
problems, especially shortages, I was extremely
interested in the Israeli system of drip irrigation
presently being used in the Negev to grow fruits
and vegetables. Their moisturized hot houses
allow for the inexpensive growth of large varieties
with very little usage of water and with extremely
high yield per acre. This is another area having
important implications for Florida and will be
carefully followed.
Of interest for Florida also were projects of.de-
salinization, the use of salt water for commercial
growth of ornamental plants, and techniques for
energy production from solar resources. 1 was
amazed to leam that there were joint projects be-
tween Ben Gurion University and Egyptian
academic centers that are already benefitting the
populations of North Africa One of these in-
volves research on animal health care at the Isan
Center for Comparative Medicine, the veterinary
center at the university, dedicated by Floridians.
Barbara and Jerry Isan. Before leaving the Uni-
versity, I had lunch with President Shlomo Gazit,
the former head of Israeli intelligence and Vice
President Israel Ben Amitai, former chief of Is-
raeli artillery We discussed the strategic impor-
tance ot the Negev and the Sinai. They explained
to me the strategic and economic sacrifice Israel
had made by returning to Egypt the Sinai with its
important military bases and its large oil supply
- at a cost to Israel of over eight billion ar*
> felt that Prime Minister Begin wh-
svarything possible for the sake o' peat
gested that the military bases in i


i%, *^1* i in; jt-wisn r loncuan / rnday, August 28. 1981
41 if U i< 11 Perspective
Or Ilhe Israeli Attack
' It seems to me that there is a terrible sense of
unreality about the outcry over Israel's
attack on the Iraqi nuclear facility at Tuwa-
itha. Rarely does a commentator mention the
explicit threat made by Saddam Hussein, the
President of Iraq, to use weapons supplied
by this reactor against Israel. Rarely does
anyone mention the destabilizing effect a
nuclear weapon would have in the hands of
Hussein, or any of a number of other Mideast
potentates.
Looked at realistically, the Israeli attack has
to be seen as stabilizing not upsetting. It is
ironic that those who call for having all
nuclear weapons destroyed should object tc
the destruction of this nuclear device,
potentially in the possession of someone
engaged in a holy war of elimination against
the people of Israel.
But, of course, Mr. President, the Israeli
attack is not viewed realistically. It is viewed
through the prism of the United Nations, an
organization which sometimes appears de-
dicated to clouding the real world in a fog of
rhetorical confusion. The United Nations is.
to put it mildly, irresponsible. It has no real
constituency, no economic base, no founding
in the real world. It is largely a paper organi-
zation, and so it can engage in a paper battle.
Nations such as Israel can pay some at-
tention to the UN. so long as it does not
threaten Israel's real interests. The United
States is the same way. The only difference
seems to me to be that Israel has a clearer
sense of its own interests than the United
States has demonstrated in recent years."
Paula Hawkins. United States Senator
Congressional Record, June 16. 1981
Statement Item Unite] State*
Senator Paula I ivl h % Or Ire Cecaslen
Of Israel's 11 Iil>-(l li I Anniversary
"Every free person, in the world whether
Jew or Christiancherishes the contribu-
tions Israel has brought forth since her
inception thirty-three years ago. The words
democracy, stability, friendship, strength,
dedication can be applied to only a hand-
ful of nations throughout the world. No state
in the world has been a more faithful ally of
the United States. No other nation in the
world has had to prove over and over again
that she deserves even the basic right to
exist.
I again restate my commitment to preserve
Israel's security by providing her with the
means to shape her own future. I again
restate my opposition to the sale of sophisti-
cated offensive weapons not only to Saudi
Arabia, but to any nation in the Middle East
that treatens the security of the State of
Israel. Israel is a strategic ally of the United
States; therefore, any effort to harm her
hurts the interests of the United States in
the most critical part of the world. Unless
Saudi Arabia lowers its heated anti-Israel
rhetoric unless Saudi Arabia stops its fi-
nancial support for international terrorism
through its one-million-dollar-per-day con-
tribtuin to the PLO unless Saudi Arabia
joins the Camp David peace process
unless Saudi Arabia grants the presence of
American bases on Saudi soil I will not
support the sale of sophisticated weaponry
to the Saudis. This firm United State policy
should not only apply to Saudi Arabia, but
to Jordan as well. King Hussein must not be
a recipient of potentially destructive military
equipment until a valid quid pro quo for the
United States is obtained."
Paula Hawkins, United States Senator
May 7. 1981
most modern in the world, would be ideal base*
for an American military presence in the
strategic part of the world, the Persian Gulf area.
On our return to Tel Aviv, we visited one of th
many ORTcenters in Israel, heavily supported bv
many friend, in Florida. These center, help pj
pie to help themselves by education and training
which make them productive and self-respecting
members of society. ORT has a well-respected
system of education including technical andvoca-
tional high schools, technical colleges appreri
ticeship centers and factory schools where revolu
tionary techniques have created one of the most
successful programs in Israel.
Our final evening in Israel, we enjoyed a magnifi-
cent concert conducted by Leonard Bernstein at
the Mann Auditorium. As we listened to **
beautiful music of the Israeli Philharmonic
were struck with the stark realization am "f
concert was dedicated to a young. mt*rn*t"TU)
renowned flutist whose career was interruptsi
fight in the Yom Kippur War. His death was m
result. I was moved by the spirit of the I"""
represented by this young hero, who even t
of greatest peril, have never failed to ""3
the importance of the quality of life and cuk
enrichment.
tiene and I were thrdled by all that the journe?-
agenda had meant to us and through us. w
citizens of Florida. We had the *P"ne~fo v
lifetime on this trip to Israel and wer*.'TL,
return home filled with information and *
to share with our friends. W. would uifjwS
feOow Florkhans to -------'-------*sndi
to Israel.


Friday, August 28, 1981 7 The Jewish Floridian Page ll-B
w
l*"^***:
l;<
^d 6> the residents of the Miami Jewish Home and
1 for the Aged, Sarah Weinstein (second from right) wat
Ms. Douglas Gardens. Judges for the contest Mr*
Mt) Sol Bloom, Board Member of the Hollywood
v. Sophie Desky, President of the North Miami Auxil-
bllie Silverman, Honorary Life President of the OreaU r
Auxiliary. Bather Schneiderman. President of the Junior
id Ben Buten, President of the Men's Club.
\glas Gardens Chooses A Queen
ant ltul pT*on can be any
?nrah Weinstein was
Ms. Douglas Gardens
field of five ladies whose
n erased 87 years. The
Annual Ms. Douglas
(is Contest is sponsored by
lami Jewish Home and
lal for the Aged.
ta nominated by her fellow
it- of the Home gave Ms.
tein a sense of pride. She
(he people in her Douglas
rns "family" are the most
i ant people in her life.
Weinstein was judged on
I'rsonality. attitude, spry-
and activity Mr. Bloom
Ms. Weinstein received the
^st number of points from
judge. Ms. Schneiderman
lined. "A person's beauty
tade with age. but their
beauty always shows
ugh." and that's what the
looked for. Mr Buten
added, he looked for. someone
with vitality, who hasn't stopped
living because of their agl
In her four years at the Home.
Ms Weinstein has kept active as
a member of the Residents
Council, chairwoman of the
Welcoming Committee. and
hostess on the Synagogue
Committee Ms. Weinstein says
she wakes up every day and
thinks. "What can I do to help
someone today?" She makes a
point to visit other residents
frequently. In the arts and crafts
department Ms. Weinstein
shares her professional talent as a
milliner by making silk flower
corsages for the residents'
monthly birthday parties.
Ms. Weinstein was born in
New York and retired to Florida
in 1961. She is honorary vice-
president of the Sisterhood of
Ohed Shalom and a member of
ORT
Rabbis Proclaim 'Synagogue
Mobilization Month'
In a community-wide effort to increase memberships in area
^nagogues, the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has
"claimed the month of EIul (the last month of the Jewish
lendar year! as "Synagogue Mobilization Month" to begin
lut: :il and end with the ushering in of Rosh Hashanah on
londay evening. Sept. 28. The announcement was made by the
ksociation'a President. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro of Temple
fen and its Executive Vice President. Rabbi Solomon Schiff.
pector of Chaplaincy. Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Synagogues have always been the traditional center of
Intinuity in Jewish life in every community." Rabbi Shapiro
kid in the announcement. "It is the house of assembly and
Trning as well as the house of prayer.
During Synagogue Mobilization Month, we urge all people
in are not presently affiliated with a synagogue to participate
' i> ely in the richness and beauty that synagogues offer."
The Rabbinical Association is offering information on
thodox, conservative and reform synagogues throughout the
Timunity to help guide residents. For information, please
itact Rabbi Solomon Schiff at the Rabbinical Association
i 1200 Biscayna Blvd.. Miami, 33187, phone 576-4000.
-HAP'A'NOSH AT t.i sm9io4
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DELI-NOSH
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GREAT NEW LOW PRICES PLUS 10% OFF WITH AD
Rabbi Brett S Goldstein has
been appointed as guest
lecturer for the fall term of the
University of Miami's Judaic
Literature Program. ac-
cording to l)r Ronald New-
man, Chairman of the pro-
gram. Rabbi Goldstein is
currently the spiritual leader
of Temple Shir.
Bat
Mitzvah
Patti Cohen
PATTI COHEN
Patti Faye Cohen, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Rose, will
be called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah on Friday evening, Aug.
28 at Temple Solel. Hollywood.
The celebrant is an eighth
grade student at At tucks Middle
School.
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Rose
will host a reception in honor of
the occasion. Special guests will
include grandmother. Edith Sch-
wartz Jampolis. and Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Schwartz from New
York.
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Thou shall set the blessing upon mount Gerizim, and the
curse upon mount Ebal"
IDeut. 11.29).
Re'eh
RE'EH "Behold. I set before you this day a blessing and a
curse: the blessing, if ye shall hearken unto the commandments
of the Lord your God. which I command you this day: and the
curse, if ye shall not hearken" iDeuteronomy 11.26). When the
Israelites enter Canaan, six tribes are to stand upon Mount (> i
iziin and bless all those who will keep God's commandments,
and six tribes are to stand on Mount Ebal and curse all those
who will disobej God's commandments.
. S;" >W to be offered onlj in the place that God shall
choose He who wishes to offer a meat sacrifice which he n
em and lives too far from the proper place of offering, n
slaughter the offering in his own house, but it will not be cons
ered a sacrifice. He must be careful not to consume anv of the
blood.
Those v, ho incite others to idolatrous acts are to be extermin-
ated. The portion goes on to state the rules defining puritv and
impurity in regard to animals, fish and fowl the basic "ritual
dietary laws. The portion also contains the rules regarding
tithes, money moratoria. a prohibition on interest, and
regulations regarding the Hebrew slave, the first-born of
animals, and the three pilgrim festivals.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
'upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir. 15. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Sirncha Freedmen
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Friday night service 8'15 p.m.
Saturday morning services 8:30
Bar Mitzvah of Joel Siakind
Uff rufn of Clifford Stem
Bar Mitzvah of Mark Shulman
Bat Mitzvah of Heidi Shulman
Synagogue
Listings
Candlelighting Time
7:27 :
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5050 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami-6674667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman. Associate Rabbi.
Famrty worship sw Fri.. 8.30 p.m.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
will speak on
"New Beginnings"
Torah serv., 11:15 a.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Miami's Historic Congnagaiiorr
Coral Way
2625 SW. 3rd Avenue
South Dade
7500 SW. 120th Street
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Hazzan William W. Uoson
Fri., 8 p.m., South Dad*
Sat.. 9 a.m. Coral Way
Deify Services at Coral Way
For Information Call 854-3911
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Wash. Ava. MB
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Sat. Morn. Serv. 9 A.M.
Registration Now In Progress
ll Departments Religious School
and Lehrman Day School
Membership Inquiries Invited
MUrnfa Pioneer Reform Congregatkaw
137 NJL 19th SL, Miami, 573-5900
~ N Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 SW. 12 Ave
Raooi Max Shapiro 6564334
Cantor Leon Segal
Roee Berlin Executive Secretary
Daily Mkiyan
7:45 a.m. 6 7 pjn.
Saturday Services 8:45 a.m. 6 7
p.m. Sunday Services, 8 a.m.
Reservations lor High Holy Days
accepted to assure seats.
Senior Rabbi: HaakaU M Bemat
Aaat RabbUaffrey K. Satkin
Cantor-Jacob a Bometeen
TEMPLE BETH SMdLdM-------------
Chase Ave. A 41at St. 536-7231
Or. Leon Kronlsh, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Convteer
Fri. Eva., 8:15 p.m.
Dr. Leon Kroniah will speak
on "Report from Israel"
Sat. Mom. 10:45 a.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Qatolee 667-5657
Michael B. BeeosUt. Rabbi
Friday. August 28
Summer Service 8 p.m.
Late Singles Sabbath Services
9:45 p.m. An Oneg Shabbat
wWfoHow.
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abrarnowhz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday services at 8:15 p.m
Saturday services at 9 a.m.
BETH TORAH 947 7528
CONQREQATION Conservative
1061 N. Miami Beech Bred.
Dr. Max A. Upechrtz, Rabbi
Cantor Zvee Aronl
Sat. Afternoon
Aug. 27
Bar Mitzvah of
QaryStgal
FRIEI FILET OF SOU
INCLUDES: CUP OF SOUP OU JOUR OR CHICKEN NOODLE. FAMOUS HEALTH SALAD.
DINNER ROLLS with CREAMERY BUTTrn. CHOICE OF ENTREE with POTATO OR VEG
"ABLE, COFFEE. TEA. or FOUNTAIN *ODA. RICE PUDDING, FRUIT JELLO or ICE CREAMI
(SHARE CHANGE $1.75 flmlMdoi cup of soup)

.* + + ***** *
SHAARE TEF1LLAH OF KENDALL
_6eytW1S4C^CoujM111
Miami, rla Modem Orthodox
Rabbi Warren KaazB
Sabbath sarvtoM 9:30 am
High Holy day tickets
aveeabli Seats are smiled.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice PreekJent
TEMPLE SlNAI 18601 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngsley, Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
kving Shorkes. Cantor
Barbara & Ramsey, Administrator
Sabbath eve service* 8:15 p.m
(7:30 p.m. Hrst Friday of monthf
Sabbath morning services 10:30
Bar Mitzvah of Brian Adler
TEMPLE 2JON Con.wv.ttve
8000 Mater Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
niamtn Dtefcaon. Cantor
Miny.n Service* Mon. a Thur*. 1 *.m.
Sabbath Eve Service* 8 15 p.m.
S*bb*lh Service* 9.00 a.m.
Quests Are Welcome
Sureme; Ssrvtoee-TeNMr Chapel"
Sun a/30 960 A M.-Hoon Memb*rh4p
upennoue,
I ooncemlng Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNrrEDSYNAOOQUE
OF AMERICA
illlO NC 1SM St. M. MUnH Beach, a SS1SZ.
istreos*. hooh www......jh aw am.
FfnMln 0. Kieutaw. l
UWonofamTrican-------
hebrew congregations
119 E. Flagter St, Miami, Fla. 33131
379-4553 Rabbi Lewis L Bogag..
Director. Unftti of Amwican Hebrow
Congregation_______


Public Notice
IN TMi CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Ne-.ii-sin
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE Or
ISIDORE PURITZ
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
Hie administration of the
ealM.tr of ISIDORE PURITZ.
deceased. File Number 81-6811.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for DADE County. Florida,
Probate Dlvlaton. the addreat
of which la 73 Weal Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida. 38130
The names and addreaaea of
the personal representative
and the peraonal repreeenta
Uves attorney are aet forth
below.
All Interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE riRST PUBLICATION
Or THI8 NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the eaUta am
(2) any ob)ecUon by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the peraonal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication ot this Notice has
begun on August 21, 1081
Personal Representative:
BARBARA M SCHNEIDER
80-42 208th St .
Queens Village
Long Island. New York. 11427
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HYMAN P GALBUT ESQ.
GALBUT GALBUT
A MK.NIN PA..
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 38139
Telephone (3061872 3100
11113 August 21. 28. 1881
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CaieNo.il-i JtVs
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ELIANE BELL
Petitioner
and
ROOSEVELT BELL.
Respondent-Husband
TO MR ROOSEVELT
BELL
Residence I'nknown)
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT! '
FIED that a 1'etlUon For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney.
GEORGE T RAMANI. ESQ. .
Suite 711. Blscayne Building, if
West Flagler Street. Miami
Florida S31S0 and file the Orlgl
nal Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 26 dav of
Sept 11181 If you fall to do so.
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
:><>NK AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida
this 21 day of Auguat. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
nt Court ClerK
N <'(>unty. Florida
I
Dei
August >
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
'NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. il-1 1972 FC
[N RE THE MARRIAGK OF
JOSE A ROJAS
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIA E ROJAS
Respondent Wife
TO: MARIA E ROJAS
860 West 178 Street
Bronx. New York
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTIO.
OF MARRIAGE
YOL" ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on MARIO QUINTERO JR..
ESQ attorney for Petitioner
whose address Is 101 N W. 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 18
1981; otherwise a default wii.
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be publlahec
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDLAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami. '
Florida on this 12th Day of
August. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K Self rled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIO QUINTERO JR.. ESQ.
101 N W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 31128
Tel: 13061326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
11109 August 14, 21. 28.
September 4.1881
' NOTICE OT ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No.il-12*50
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROSA DIAZ,
Petitioner-Wife
and
ROLANDO L DIAZ.
Respondent Husband
TO: ROLANDO L DIAZ
Lugareno 1214 entre
Bouxa y Aqullera
ApL No 7, Lauton
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
MARIO QUINTERO JR ,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 101 N W 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before, September 18,
1981; otherwise e default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pubiisneo
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this IS day of Au
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By James D Donegan
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal)
KOSS AND QUINTERO.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
101 N W 12th Ave
Miami. Florida33128
Telephone (306) 326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
Ullv August 21. 28:
September 4. 11.1881
^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Sun-
ny Roofing Company at 929 W
87th St.. Hlaleah. FLA 33012
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
SECUNDINO GONZALEZ
Owner
11124 August 21. 28.
September* 11. 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LOL-
LIPOP DESIGNS at 3636 W
Flagler St Miami. FL 33136
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Martha Dlai
11131 August28.
September*. 11. 18.1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
Noil 33>0 Section"
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER45
LB,
Plaintiff
vs-
isjtle man
iERALD D I \\K and
REEN YANKS, as sur
wMng Directors of Al MAN
sGEMENT INC a dissolved
Florida corporation d-b-a A l
BAIL BONDS
Defendant*
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order or
Final Judgment dated August
14. 1981. and entered In Civil
Action Caae No 81-8310 of the
Circuit Court of the Eleventh
Judicial Circuit in and for Dade
County. Florida, wherein
GLEN COLE. Plaintiff and
PAUL PEREZ, a single man
GERALD D YANKS and
MAUREEN YANKS, as sur
vlvlng Directors of A 1 MAN
AGEMENT. INC.. a dissolved
Florida corporation Defen
dmnte I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash In the
lobby at the South front door of
the Dade County Courthouse In
Miami. Dade County. Florida
at 11:?? O'CLOCK A.M on the
10th day of September. 1981.
the following described
property as set forth In said
Order or Final Judgment, to
wit
Lot 1 of BARBELLA SUBDI
VISION FIRST ADDITION,
according to the Plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 91. Page
34. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
DATED this 20th day of Au
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of said Circuit Court
by V.Clark
CT. CT. SEAL '
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
EMANUEL SPONDER
ESQ
6006 Mlramar Parkway
Mlramar. Florida 38023
'DM August 28.
September 4 1881
in the circuit court of
the eleventh judicial
circuit in and for
oafamWJ.yv.sIon",DA
CiSSNo.at UtteFC
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GEMINIANO ORTEGA,
Petitioner-Husband.
and
EUGENIA ORTEGA.
Respondent-Wife
TO Mrs. EUGENIA
ORTEGA
370 Lakandula St.
TONDO. MANILA.
PHILIPPINES 2807
notice or
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a PeUUon For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's at-
torney. GEORGE T RAMANI.
ESQ. Suite 711. Blscayne
Building 19 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or be-
fore 26th day of September.
1981 If you fall to do so. Judg
ment by default will be taken
against you for the relief de
manded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami Dade County. Florida.
this 20th day of August. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY A D Wade
Deputy Clerk
11136 August 28.
September 4. 11. 18. 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
JOE-ANN APARTMENTS, at
number 12401 N E 1st Avenue.
In the City of North Miami
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
DATED at Miami Florida,
this 14 day of August. 1981
LEONARD OSHEROFF
PORA OSHEROFF
MARVIN OSHEROFF
DOROTHY OSHEROFF
(Owners Names i
Moses J Grundwerg
Attorney for Applicant
HAYS A GRUNDWERG
21 Southeist First Ave
Suite 900
Miami Florida 33131
Hit* August 14. 21.28.
September 4.1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN thai the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under trie fictitious name I; Y
GY FASHIONS at 11420 SW 47
Terr MIAMI FL 33168 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Greant Corporation
11132 August 28
September 4 11. 18 1981
INTHECIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
OADI COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Noll Utel FC
''

and

SA8SA1 BAHAMAS
ir
ITION
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTI
MhP thai ,i Petition For DIs
solution i)l Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe
tltlon on petitioner s attorney
GEORGE T RAMANI. ESQ.
Suite 711. Blscayne Building 19
West Flagler Street. Miami
rlorldi 38130 and file the Orlgl
nal An wer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 26th day of
Sept.. 1881. If you fall to do so
judgment by default will be
taken igalnst you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida
this 20th day of August. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY A D Wade
Deputy Clerk
11186 August 28.
________September 4 U. 18,1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No 1 12714
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
CARLOS A BRlGUERAS
Petitioner-Husband
and
SANDRA MONDEJAR
Respondent Wife
TO: SANDRA MONDEJAR
Calls 17 1408
entre 28 y 28
Veda do,
Havana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1134 S W 8th Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Sept 18. 1981. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FIX) RIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of Au-
gust. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By James D Donegan
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal'
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
1134 S W 8th Street
Miami Florida 33130
Miami Florida 33130
Telephone i 306' 868-8826
U121 August 21 >
____________September 4 11 I8i
IN THi CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NO 79 4059
1NRK ESTATE OF
JAMES PERRY
BARCLAY
Deceased
notice
to creditors
TOL ALL PERSONS HAYING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE
Within three months from the
time of the first publication of
this notice you are required to
file with the clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Probate Division the sddress
of which Is 73 West Flsgier
Street Miami. Florida a
written statement of any claim
or demand you may have
against the estate of James
Perry Barclay, deceased
Each claim must be in srrH
lng and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim is
not yet due the date hen It
lll become due shall be
stated If the claim is conTji
rent ir ininiuKlated the
nature of the ur -hall
be stated If the claim Is
secured the
ilescnhed The i laimanl
.iairr
'ierk ,-ach
persona, r. ( reeentat!
ALL CLAIM.- INDDEMAN
NOT HF
fORK'. KI-. BAR!
I'sled August r I8M
Junne Ba Mngham
As Personal Represented* e
of the Estate of
JAN' u
BARCLAY
Deceased
ALANS KESSLER
Attorney
The Honey Plaxa
Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach Florida 33139
Telephone i306i 638 4421
August 21 26.1981
TTO1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that tne undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
ADAM A EVE CLOTHING
FOR MEN A WOMEN .V5697
?e^i,,?7.A!T "'*> Florta.
331,5 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Clr
Ftor,daUrt *-' Count>
Jaime Cueva
MANUELF FENTE ESO
Attorney for Jelme Cueva
1481 N W No RIverDrtve
Miami. Florida33128
Telephone (806)324-0908
10080 Aug. 7.14, 21. 28. 1981
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
SLm*. ,.h*' 'he una"'K"ed.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name MN A
Company at 3660 Blscayne
Florida 33137 Intends to regl-
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Judy s Trust I
Judy's Trust II
Judys Trust in
Judys Trust IV
Judy s Trust V
Judy sTrust VI
Rodolpho's Trust I
Rodolpho s Trust II
Rodolpho's Trust III
Rodolpho's Trust IV
Rodolpho s Trust V
Rodolpho's Trust VI
Juan s Trust I
Juan's Trust II
Juan's Trust III
Juan s Trust IV
Juan s Trust V
Juan's Trust VI
Karen's Trust
Cash's Trust
Packman. Neuwahl A
Rosenberg
Attorneys for
MN A Company
,U" ., Auu21.2. I
September4.11. it*,
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
OENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cats No il llisi
NOTICE OF ACTION
MAGALUT TOWERS
CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION. INC..
A riorida non-profit
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
HELENA ABUAWAD
DE ABRAHAM
Defendant.
TO: HELENA ABUAWAD
DEABRAHAM
Unknown Residence
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action to fore
close a CONDOMINIUM AS-
SESSMENT LIEN on the fol-
lowing described property:
UNIT NO H4 OF MAG A
LUr TOWERS CONDOMINI
I'M a Condominium, ac-
cording to and as more parti-
cularly described In the Decla-
ration of Condominium thereof,
filed for record under Official
Records Book 10668. Page 1887.
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida together with
an undivided share In the com-
mon property appurtenant
thereto, which condominium
parcel Is located on Lot 72 and
74. HARBOR ISLAND accord-
ing to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 44. at Page
72 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
Has been filed against you You
are required to serve a ropy of
vour written Defenses. If any
to It on KENNETH N
REKANT. Plaintiff attorney,
whose sddress Is Suite 229. One
Lincoln Road Building. Miami
Hearh. Florida, on or Before
Sept 18 1981 and file the origi
nal with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plsln
tiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on the 12 day
of August. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of
the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
HI* August 21 28
September 4 11 1881
m THE CTRCUTTCOORT _
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANOFOR
OAOECOUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CeteNo.il 1211 5 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE The Marriage of
LINDA KAY
STEADMAN.
Petitioner Wife
WINSTON HARRY
STEADMAN
Respondent Husband
TO WINSTON HARRY
STEADMAN
Residence Unknown
YOl WINSTON harry
STEADMAN ..r. hereby noti
your answer to this
' Dissolution "( Mar
era of the
' and mail
INI EL
I8SI
ssed
-
N'KER
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NOPROPERTY)
IN 7 HE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No H 1(17 FC
FAMILY CIVIL
DEPARTMENT
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
KRROl UEAVERHROOK
CAMPBELL
Petitioner,
and
ALMAERETTA
CAMPBELL.
Respondent
TO ALMAERETTA
CAMPBELL
1008 Gerard Avenue
Apt No 9E
Bronx. NY 10463
FU, ARE HEREBY NOTI
< ied that an action for Disso
'u"n Marrtege ha. been
'lied against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
MELVIN J ASHER ESQ.. at
lorney for Petitioner whose
addreae Is i860 S W 8th Street.
Miami Florida 31185. and file
tne original with the clerk of
he above styled court on or be
Jore Sept 18. 1881. otherwise s
default wm be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition
*'ESS my hand and the
Sr..? *' Florida this 17th day of Au-
RICHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A D Wade
.,,.. A Deputy Clerk
IIIM August a. zs:
___________September 4, n, i98i
NOTICf OF _
CONSTRUCTIVE t,
.NO^ROPE.^
THE ELEVF.
CIRCUIT OF PiamSH
andfordad'e0^
CIVIlACo,0*"
INREThe^i^
OSCAR E8TOLAS
Petitioner Husbana
via
RUBY A E8TOI.A8
Respondent w if.
NOTIFIED that an sSl^H
Dissolution of Mvre?*-1
been filed agamn"^*
are required to serv,.^-
your written defenses *2
It on DAVID s
?$
attorney for Ivtiuon,,"***
.ddree. ,. W T^
Avenue. Miami HearnrS*
33.39 and file .he o^J
the clerk of ,, aijctTtS
court on or before Se-2r
1981. otherwise .IJJN
be entered against yoT^
relief demanded in iL *
plaintor petition *
This notice shall be hjl.. i
once each wee. for fcTT"'
secutlve week, ,.
JEWISH EM iK1I>UN
WITNESS m, haiinaja,
seal of sain i .rt ai Mu-J
Florida on thi, layofAuji
KICHARDI HHINKER
As Clem On iitCowt
Dadet .,: Florkh
Bj N \ Stwttt
AsDeput) Hers
i Circuit Court seali
DAVIDS Hi- i. iCR
,A1""rn'y ,or I'etmontr
Husband
HI*) MfaaMngti Uenue
Miami He.. hondsDm
305 eTMlOO
ISECT August: 14.21 it in
INTHECIRCUITCOUiT
FOR
OAOE COUNTY FLOIIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No *' 4 91 s
Division 03
IN HE ESTA1
BHEPARJ W : AVIS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The sdministration of tli
estate of SHE PAKD* DAVIS
deceased File V;-nber*14Sl5
is pending In the ''.rcuit Court
for Dade >,..r.:-, Fiona*
Probate Division the tddrtM
of which is 71 vies! Flai.fr
Street. Miami Florida 33130
The names and addresses of
the personal -epresentsuve
and the peraonal represent*
tlve'e attorney are set forth
below
All interested persons r re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THRFr Ml NTHS0F
THE FIRST PI BJ :
or this n
claims against Ins esiste and
111 any or.-. I
ested persi P. HI notice
was mailed that
valldilv of the a
cations of repre
sen'atu
\: : i
be r,,.

-

'
\l
Miami I-
I r.one JOS W -
11181
Saptenib.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANOFOR
DAOECOUNTV FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CaseNo.il UtieFC
IN RE THE MARRIAOEOF
I'NA KIRHV
Petitioner
and
RAYMOND KIRHV
Respondent
TO MR RAYMOND
KIRBY
I Residence I nknowni
NOTICE or
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a PeUUon For DIs
solution Of Marriage has been
fUed against you and you are
required to serve s copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe
Utlon on petitioner s attorney
GEORGE T RAMANI, ESQ
Suite 711. Blscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street, Miami
Florida 88130 and file the Orlgl
nal Answer or Plesdlng In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 28 day of
Sept 1981 If you fail to do so.
Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
this 20 day of August. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, riorida
BY: M J Hartnett
Deputy Clark
HIM August 28;
September 4. 11. 18. 1881 :
I*


iblic Notice
|e circuit court of
eleventh judicial
jcuit.inandfor
county,florida
THE ADOPTION Or
r child
JAMH ALLEE
Jtloner
JTICE OF ACTION
(ESA McOIRT
sldence Unknown
ARE NOTIFIED that
bon for the adoption of
[has bcn filed and you
Quired to aerve a copy of
rltten objection, to It on
IN GREBER. ESQ.. at
for Petitioner, whoae
li Suite 1018. 683 N.E
|N M B .FL 33182. on or
September 18th, 1881,
the original with the
I thli court, otherwlae a
[will be entered against
1ARD P BRINKER
Clerk
H> K Selfrled
li Deputy Clerk
13th 1881
August 21, 38.
September*. 11. 1M1
JTICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
|CE IS HEREBY
that the undersigned.
to engage In buaineas
he flcUUoua name of
IEALTY at 388 21st
llaml Beach. Florida
regliter aald name
Clerk of the Circuit
[Dade County. Florida
IAYC BERKOWITZ.
CE
.RETTER. ESQUIRE
r for EAST REALTY
nt-rlFlrit Bldg.
, Third Avenue
Honda 33131
tugust7. 14, 31.28. 1881
>TICE OF ACTION
TRUCTIVE SERVICE
tOPROPERTY)
i circuitcourtof
Eleventh judicial
c it of florida, in
|fordaoe county
Civil Action
No II lltJOFC
IN FOR DISSOLUTION
)F MARRIAGE
IE MARRIAGE OF
IN \ U HA BKHKKNS
Wile
ISTO ALFREDO
li.VS
pi'lent Husband
STOAUrRSDO
KENS
I North Van Street
inilna. VA
\MS HEREBY NOTI
t on action lor Disao-
M.image has been
lin.-t you anil you are
r i iei veai opj ol your
lenses II am to it on
I' FRIEDMAN.
di Petitioner, whose
120 Uncoil) Road.
Miami Beach, Fior-
l.iinl flic the original
|< lerfc ol the above
on or before aep-
l*>l otherwlae a
I be entered against
i r.iiei demanded In
liiit or petition
MmII be published
[eek lor lour con-
feks in THK JEW
DlAN
'> hand and the
our! at Miami.
this 3d day of July
Idp hhinker
1'iri oil Court
kniiity. Florida
I Hradshaw Jr.
eputy Clerk
H 1.14). 21.28.1881
IRCUIT COURT OF
'ENTH JUDICIAL
T. IN AND FOR
JRTY, FLORIOA
')-8)-rfJFC
- DIVISION
! MARRIAGE OF:
bT.E8E
>
K Husband
:k.
t. wife
' ACTION
IK.
Unknown
[NonrrnD that
Dissolution of
*>en fllsd
you are re
copy of your
""any. to tt on
, -J"e Attorney,
,' U LJHERMAN,
|AND AJWOGI-
l Sun.* Drive,
on or before
MM, and file
1 UM Clerk of
AttoiiMy or tm-
L*UI ho SaRarad
the relief de
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THI ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action N. 81- Ufa? FC
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
LRMA F REGA MITRE
Petitioner wife
, and
JULIO ALFREDO REG A
MITRE
Respondent Hue band
TO JULIO ALFREDO REGA
MITRE
Ecuador Ocadli 630
Barrio MaJpu
Cordoba. Rap. da
Argentina
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE J
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT
TTFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage ha*
been Bled against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on EMIIJO C PASTOR,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 101 N.W 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before September 18th. 1981,
otherwlae a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12th day of
August. 1881
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIOC PASTOR. E8Q
101 N W 12th Avenue
Miami Florida 3312*
"si i 306 I 126-M44
Attorney for Petitioner
11110 August 14.21. 28.
September 4. 1881
(IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Noll-4415
Division 0 J
IN RE: E8TATE OF
JOHN W MATTHEWS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
eetate of JOHN W. MATT-
HEWS, DECEASED. File
Number 81-8418. la pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE
County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida. 33iso The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
reaentatlve and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
12) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVERBARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21. 1881.
Personal Representative:
MARJORIE HANET
1821 North Rochester
Indiana polls. Indiana 48222
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. G ALHl.'T. ESQ
GALBUT. GALBUTA
MEN IN. P.A..
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 13139
Telephone: 1308)872-8100
Hill August 21,28.1881
IN THI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Ca*e No.81 11547
NOTICE OF ACTION
MAGALUF TOWERS
CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION, INC..
A Florida non-profit
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
VINCENTE DOMINGO
BRL'ZZISI.
Defendant
TO: VINCENTE DOMINOO
BRCZZI8I
PanAmericana 3829
Lomaa De San Isldro
Buenos Aires.
Argentina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a CONDOMINIUM AS-
SESSMENT MEN on the fol-
lowing described property
UNIT NO. 718 OF: MAOA
LUF TOWERS CONDOMINI-
UM, a Condominium, accord-
ing to and aa more particularly
described In the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, filed for
- record under Official Records
Book 10668. Page 1887. of the
Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, together with
an undivided share in the com-
mon property appurtenant
thereto, which condominium
parcel Is located on Lot 72 and
74. HARBOR ISLAND, accord
lng to the Plat thereof, aa re-
corded In Plat Book 44. at Page
72 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
Has been Bled against you. You
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on KENNETH N. REKANT.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress Is Suite 228. One Lincoln
Road Building, Miami Beach. -
Florida, on or before Septem-
ber is, 1881, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this court
either before service.on Plain
tiff's attorney or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on the 12 day
of August, 1881
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk of
the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY CP Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
11118 August 11. 28;
September 4,11, 1881
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PRORATE DIVISION
File No.81-4541
Division 81
IN RE ESTATE OF
SIDNEY MOLDOFF,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of SIDNEY MOLDOFF.
deceased, File Number 81-8643,
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 W Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33180. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: ID all
claims against the estate and
12) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
. validity of the will, the qualifl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 21. 1981
Personal Representatives:
JOYCE N WEISS
and
BARRY MOLDOFF
c-o H M. Waltxkln. Atty
740-71 st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740 71 st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: (309)886-0383
11112 August 21. 28,1881
August lTth.
NICER
t Court
Hl.28);
fa, U. r
NOTI CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buaineas
under the fictitious name RTT
' CHIK FASHIONS at 17081 W.
i Dixie Highway. North Miami
' Beach. Florida 88180 Inlands to
register said name with the
I Clerk at the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Ftortda
DOUBLEJOF
BHOWARD. INC.
CHARLES GERTLER
Attorney for DOUBLE J
OF BROWARD. INC
, 420 Lincoln Rd,
| Miami Beach. Ftortda HIM
I 10072 Aug. 7. 14.11. 28.18*1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaieNo.ai llsltFC
FAA4ILY CIVIL
DEPARTMENT
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CORONA MELLERSON
STRINGER.
Petitioner.
and
LUCIUS STRINGER.
e-ka
CHARLES JAMES.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUCIUS STRINGER,
a-k-a
CHARLES JAMES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you 8
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
KENNETH OFGANG,
ESQUIRE. Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address Is 44
West Flagler Street Sts.2414,
Miami. Florida 88180. on or be
tore August 38. 188U, and f
the original with the Clark of
this Court either before asrvlcs
on Pettttoaer-s Attorney or
Immediately thereafter;
sRsailfcsl a Sitansl will be
entered against you tor the
relief demanded la the
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on July 14, 1881
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: ClartndaBrown
Deputy Clerk
July 81;
August 7. 14. 21.1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
tNO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No II 12325 FC
(FAMILY DIVISION)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JORGE C. ALVAREZ.
Husband,
and
MARIBEL ALVAREZ.
Wife
TO: MARIBEL ALVAREZ
Marti 208 Norto.
Entre Benbeta y
Eduardo Marmot.
Camaguey.
Clego De Avlia. Cuba.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlaeo-
lutlon of Marriage has been
I Bled against you and you are
| required to serve a copy of your
I written defenses. If any, to it on
I Albert L. Carrlcarte, PA, at
I tomey for Petitioner, whoae
address Is 2491 NW. 7th Street.
Miami, Florida S312B, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 11, 1981. other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 6 day of August,
1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P. Cope Land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. PA.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (305)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
10093 August 14, 21, 28;
September 4,1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-12192 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN HE The Marriage Of:
LEOPHAT APPOLON
Petitioner
and
CLA1MENCINE
iAPPOLON
Respondent
TO CLAIMENCINE
APPOLON
i residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
' FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
1 filed against you and you are
required to serves copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
BENNETT D. FULTZ. ESQ.
; attorney for Petitioner, whoae
address Is 619 S.W. L2th Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore Sept. 4. 1981; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of August.
1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
10089 August 14.21. SB;
September 4.198],
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in buaineas
under the fictitious name HAP- "
PY DAYS INVESTMENT
COMPANY at 2780 West Third
Court. Hlaleah. Florida Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Bible Trust I
Hlble Trust II
Bible Truat IU
Hlble Trust IV
Faith Truat I
Faith Trust n
Faith Trust III
Faith Trust IV
Charity Trust I
Charity Trust II
Charity Trust ID
Charity Trust IV
Love Trust I
Love Trust II
Love Trust IU
Love Truat rv
HopeTrustl
Hope Trust II
Hope Trust III
Hope Trust IV
Happiness Trust I
Happiness Trust II
Happiness Trust III
Happiness Truat IV
[Packman. Neuwahl A
(Rosenberg
Attorneys for Happy Days
j In vestment Company
110081 Aug 7, 14,21,28. 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CsieNo.811354*
NOTICE OF ACTION
MAGALUF TOWERS
CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION. INC..
A Florida non-profit
corporation,
Plaintiff
PIERRE YVES THOMAS,
Defendant.
TO: PIERRE-YVES THOMAS
Resldencla Chiricea,
Apt. B-2
Avenlda Principal
Caurimare
Caracas, Veneiuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
r"IED that an action to fore-
close a CONDOMINIUM AS-
SESSMENT LIEN on the fol-
lowing described property:
IN IT NO. 1131 OF: MAGA-
LUF TOWERS CONDOMINI-
UM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to and aa more particu-
larly described in the Declara-
tion of Condominium thereof,
Bled for record under Official
Records Book 10666. Page 1887,
of the Public Records of Dade
\\ County, Florida, together with,
an undivided share In the com-
mon porperty appurtenant
thereto, which condominium
parcel Is located on Lot 72 and
74. HARBOR ISLAND, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, aa re-
corded in Plat Book 44, at Page
72 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
Has been filed against you. You
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
it on KENNETH N. REKANT,
Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is Suite 226. One Lincoln
Road Building. Miami Beach.
Florida, on or before Septem-
ber 18. 1881, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default -
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on the 12 day
of August, 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of
the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BYC.P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
11116 August 21, 28;
September!. 11. 1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO.81 12717
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROLANDO FERNANDEZ
Petitioner- Husband
and
MARTA FERNANDEZ
I Respondent-Wife
TO MARTAFERNANDEZ
Residence unknown
| YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlaeo-
lutlon of Marriage has been
I Bled against you and 'you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HUGO DE AY ALA. ESQUIRE,
i attorney for Petitioner, whose
addreas is 1134 S.W. 8th Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
' fore Sept. 18. 1881: otherwise a
l default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded If
I the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
I once each week for four con
I secutlve weeks In THE JEW
i ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
1 seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of Au-
gust. 1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By James D. Donegan
As Deputy Oerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Hugo da Ayala. Esquire
1114 S.W 8th Street
Miami. Florida 31IK)
Telephone: (108) 868-8*38
Attorney for Petitioner
11122 August 21. 28.
September 4, 11, 1981
f"!
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-12339
FAMILY DIVISION
1CTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ELVA LOZANO
LOMBARDO.
Wife,
.and
ANTHONY LOMBARDO.
Husband.
TO: ANTHONY LOMBARDO
401 Frederick
Douglas St.
Rochester, N.Y.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
Bled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
lAlbert I Carrtcarte, PA., at-
torney for Petitioner. Wife
whoae address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Fl 33126. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Sept. 11. 1981; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
1 ISH FLORID LAN.
i WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of August.
1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Oerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. PA.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Fl 33126
Telephone (306)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner Wile
10091 August 14, 21,28;
September 4.1981
NOTICE UNDID
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the
to engage to I
the flctluous
LATIN TOURS OF MIAMI
BEACH at 18*1 Dreael A**..
Suite 313. Miami Beach. FL
SUM Intends to register said
name with the Oerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
OSCAR H OCHOA
11118 August 21. 38;
Wsptetnher 4. 11. 1SU
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. II 12417
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ISIS LARA
Petitioner-Wife
and
EDGARDO LARA
Respondent-Husband
TO: EDGARDO LARA
4404 Palisade Ave
Union City.
New Jersey 07087
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
Bled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQUIRE.
ATTORNEY FOR Petitioner,
whose addreas la 1134 S.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida, and file
the original with the clerk of
: the above stvled court on or be-
fore Sept.. 1 lr 1981. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 10 day of Au-
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Oerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Ftortda
By James D. Donegan
As Deputy Clerk
, Circuit Court Seal)
HUGO DE AYALA. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
1134 SW 8th Street
Miami. Florida 33110
10099 August 14. 21.28.
September 4.1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buaineas
under the fictitious name JOE
IMPORT at 1711 WEST 88th
PLACE). HLALEAH Intends to
register aald name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Ftortda.
QIUBEPPE CA LAB RISE
10074 Aug. 7. 14, H. 38.19*1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cs*Ne:S1-Ss71 FCIM)
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE THE ADOPTION OF:
MINOR CHILDREN
BY: ARTHUR BHARPE
Stepfather.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Thomas Francis Oullo
residence unknown
You are notified that Petition
tor Adoption has been Bled and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any. to It on THOMAS FRAN
CSS OULLO Petitioner, whose
address U.
c-o I Isoirnias, Benjamin
and Assoc PA. 9801 Sunset
Drive. Miami. (Florida 113171
on or kstore. Bsptomkar nth,
1981, and file the Mlgsssl with
the Clerk of this Court either
betore service on Pwtlttonar or
Immediately thereafter;
otherwlae a default will be en
tared against you lor the relief
demanded In the cornplalnt or
Pstlttaa.
WTTNESSMT
of this court on August 7. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By K8e In-led
AS DEPUTY CLERK
August 14, 21,38,
September 4, 1981



~^^9JJl
Public Notice,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No.il U54
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
FRANCISCO JAVIER MAS.
Petitioner-Husband
and
ARACELIA MAS.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ARACELIA
RODRIGUEZ DE MAS
Flnca More Jon.
Bolondron. Matanxas
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTl-
nsi I that an arUon for Dlsso
lutlon ol Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MARK) Ql 1NTERO JR .
ESQ attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 101 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33128.
and : lie the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 18.
1981. otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-'
ISHKLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13 day of Au-
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By James D. Donegan
A* Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
KOSS AND QUINTERO.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
101 N.W. 12th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (3061 326 88*4
Attorney for Petitioner
11120 August 21. 28.
September 4. 11. 1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-12434 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
RENEMURGULA
Petitioner; Husband.
and
ELS A MARIA LOPEZ
Respondent Wife.
TO: ELS A MARIA LOPEZ
Campanarlo 416
San Jose
San Rafael.
Habana. Cuba.
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
IRIS L BENSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
736? West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 83144. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 11. 1981; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive wesaa In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 10 day of Au-
gust, 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
IRIS L BENSON
7367 West Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 33144
Attorney for
Petitioner Husband
11103 August 14,31. 2s:
September 4.1981
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN A NO FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CeMMeJjI-IJIUPC
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE The Marriage Of
CARRIE LEE WATSON.
Petitioner Wife
vs.
ELCIE B. WATSON.
Respondent Husband
TO: ELCIE B. WATSON
P.O. BOX234
Moorhead, Miss NTIl
YOU ELCIE B. WATSON are
hereby notified to file your
answer to this Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage with the
Clerk of the Court and mall a
copy to Petitioner's Attorney
DANIEL GALLUP. 3SS6
Selsedo Street. Coral Gables
Florida 88184. on or before
Sept 26. 1981 else Petition will
be taken as confessed
This 26 day of August 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
11141 August 38
September 4, 11, IB. 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFl
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* NO I1-S475 FC (4S.S0)
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The adoption of
A minor by
COLYN ANTHONY
THOMPSON.
Petitioner
TO: EVERTON EVELYN
1872 Andrews Avenue
Bronx. New York 104S3
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for Adop
tlon by Step Parent has been .
filed and commenced In this |
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de
fenses. If any. to It on LLOYD
M ROl'TMAN. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
Suite 615. First State Bant \
Building. 7900 NE 2nd Avemn
Miami. FL 33038 and file Ul
original with the Clerk of tl
above styled Court on or befo:
September 11. 1981, otherwi
a Default will be enter-
against you for the reli<
pruved for In the Complaint i
Petition
This notice shall be publish.
once each week for four coi.
secutlve weeks In the JEWISH
FLORID IAN-
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of August.
1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC L.Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
LLOYD M ROl'TMAN, ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 618,
1st State Bank Bldg
7900 NE 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone 13061 757-5800
10097 August 14.21. 28:
September 4.1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No il 12305 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage Of:
DELIA I .WATKINS.
and
LOUIS J WATKINS. JR
TO LOUIS J
WATKINS. JR
219 Barrow Street
Plaquemlne,
Louisiana 70764
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are'
required to serve a copy of your'
written defenses. If any. to It on
IRIS L BENSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
7357 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before,
Sept ll. 1981. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this tth day of Au-
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal l
IRIS L BENSON
Attorney at Law
7367 West Flagler St
Miami. Florida 83144
Telephone (306)381-4643
Attorney for Petitioner
10093 August 14.31. 38;
September 4. 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNI ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNo.il lli FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
ELIZABETH E. RODRIQUEZ
Petitioner
and
STEVE RODRIQUEZ
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: STEVE RODRIQUEZ.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has bsen filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. on
MARVIN OREBER, ESQ .
Attorney for Petitioner, 888
NE. 187 St. N.M.B Fl. 88162
on or before September 4. 1981
and file the original with the
clerk of this court, otherwise a
default will be entered against
Dated,: July 81.1981
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk
by C. P. Cope land
as Deputy Clerk
10083 August 7.14.81,86,1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name AL-
FREDO'S BOUTIQUE AND
BEAUTY SALON at 1834-38
EUCLIDE AVE MIAMI
BEACH. FL 33139 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
ALFREDO AVELLO
10094 August 14. 21.28:
September 4.19S1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
SHERMAN a BROWN ASSO^
C3ATE8 at Suite 430, 1110
Brtckell Avenue Miami, Flor-
ida 33131 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida
Sherman Brown
Associates. Inc
Packman. Neuwahlir
Rosenberg
Attorneys for Sherman *
Brown Associates Inc
10096 August 14.21. 28.
September 4. 1981
NOTICB UNblR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In business under the
fictitious name ALAM COR-
PORATION at 8384 N.W 4th
Street. Miami. Florida 33128
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
ANA D MARTINEZ
10088 Aug. 7.14.21,38. 1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 61 10171 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
SUZETTE NOEL
ROBERSON.
Petitioner,
and
STEVEN WILLIAM
ROBERSON.
Respondent
TO STEVEN WILLIAM
ROBERSON
I Residence Unknown i
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MILTON E GRUSMARK,
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 3838 N E Sec
and Avenue. Miami. Florida
33137. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on >r before September
11th. 1981 otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 10th day of Au
gust. 1981.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Self ned
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MILTON E.
GRUSMARK. P.A.
3628 N E Second Ave
Miami. Florida 33187
Telephone: (3061 37 6690
Attorney for Petitioner
11100 August 14. 21.38;
September 4.1981
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No il 11415 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
04 RE: The Marriage of
CLARA MAYRA
MORENO.
Petitioner-Wife
and
FRANCISCO PABLO
MORENO.
Respondent Husband
TO: FRANCISCO PABLO
MORENO
1716 Kennedy Blvd.
N. Bergen.
Ne< Jersey 07047
YOU .RE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
IRIS L. BENSON, ATTORNEY
FOR Petitioner, whose address
Is 7887 West Flagler 8treet.
Miami. Florida 33144. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September n. 1981. other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 10 day of Au
gust, 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By. C P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
IRI8L BENSON
7367 West Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 88144
Telephone 13051 261 -4642
Attorney for Petitioner
11101 August 14,21. 28;
September 4, 1981
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF ,
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Noi' VO' U)
IN RE ESTATE OF
CLARA F BLIDEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of CLARA F BLI
DEN, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, File Number
i 47(17 c31 Upending In the fir
cult Court In and for Dade
County. Florida Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 3rd
Floor, Dade County Court-
house, ra West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The per
sonal representatives of this
Is Mrs Arlene Bdtwari
and Mr Gerald Guthrie. whose
address is 1745 W 24th Street.
Miami Beach Florida and 249
Lynnwuod Drive. I.ongmea
do\. Mass 01108 The name
and address of the attorney for
the personal representatives
are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim
must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim.
the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet
due. the date when It will
become due shall be stated If
the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mall one copy to each personal
representative
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 18 day of August. 1981
Arlene Schwarx
Gerald N Guthrie
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
CLARA F BLIDEN
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration of the 28 day
of August, 1981
Michael Schlffrln. Esq
Of Law Offices of
SCHWARZ A 9CHIFFRIN,
PA
407 Lincoln Rd Suite 4A
Miami Beach. Florida 3318*
Telephone: (8061673 1333
Attorney For Personal
Representatives
11130 August 38.
September 4. 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Coral
Way Chevron at 1901 Coral
Way. Miami. Fla 88146 Intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of.
Dade County. Florida
Emillano H Saumeil. Owner
11108 August 14. 31. 38.
September 4. 1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW '
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fIctltloui name CAL-
IFORNIA QUILTING UPHOL
STERY at 17 East 8 Street.
Hlaleah. Florida. 33010 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Haydee ds la Nuex
AdaNunes
10090 August 14. 31.38;
September* IBSl
_' TIC#UN0ER-----------T
NOTICE IS HEREBY
d^u^to-,,h'Un^-^
oesiring to engage In business
FLA1" ffsS*" "~*
LA DEB at 2100 r
Hyundai. IJescn^ BouZ.ro, I
HaUanoaj,,! 88009 Intends to '
register said name with the
Oerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida ,
___ Florida DEB. Inc
CYPENACYPEN
Attorney for
Florida DEB. Inc
836 A rthur Godfrey Rd
Miami Beach. Florida 38140
'** August 28
September 4 n. ig. iMl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
*40 PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
Noll IJP99FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CLARA ANGULO,
Wife.
and
JAIME ANGULO,
Husband.
TO: JAIME ANGULO
CarreraS9No. 4287
Bogota. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ALBERT I- CARRICARTE.
P A attorney for Petitioner-
\Sife whose address Is 2491
N W 7th Street. Miami. Flor
Ida 33125 and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sept
25. 1981 otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 21st day of Au
gust. 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A I) Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
ALBERT L
CARRICARTE.P A ,
2491 N W 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Telephone (8061649 7917
Attorney for Petitioner Wife
11139 August 28.
September 4. 11. 18. 1981
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADECOUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No **"
Division 93
IN RE ESTATE OF
IDA RUBIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED thai the administration
of the estate of IDA RUBIN,
deceased. File Number 81-6437,
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division the address
of which is 73 West Flagler St .
Miami. Fla 33128 The Per
sonal representative of the
estate Is HARRY RUBIN.
whose address Is 9121 Sunrise
Lake Blvd Sunrise. Fla. SMI)
Apt 1112 The name and ad-
dress of the personal rspron
tative's attorney are sat forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
baasa for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim to
not yet due. the date when It
will become due snail be
stated If the claim is contin-
gent, or unliquidated. the
nature of the uncertainty hall
b stated. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall Jm ire-
scribed The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
AU persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedents win. the quail
ncaUons of the personal re
preeentatlve. or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
raD WILL BE FOREVER
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: August 3S. 1981
HARRY RUBIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
IDA RUBIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HAROLD J COHEN. Esa
2761 Coral Way.
Miami. Florida 83146
Telephone I 3081 444-4781
"1*2 Augusta.
September 4.1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the under,,^
desiring to engage In businei
under the fictitious nam.
WORLD TREASURE its*1.!
(Suite 8061 8101 Hucavr!!
Boulevard. Miami. Fi $2
J*"** Uj'register said nanS
with the Clerk of the (W.!
CbU1rt'P*dCoun'v Floral
TERESA GOUIJiKN
Sole Owner
11106 August 14. 21.28;
__. ____ September* iui
NOTICE Of ACTION '-
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE H
(NOPROPERTYl '
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No at 1248a
IN RE THEMARRIAGECW
GLORIA HAKI'.W ,
Petitioner Wife
and
RAFAEL BARRIENTna
ROJAfl
Respondent I! .
ACTHiM'.: lTtnv
(>v M
TO
RAFAEL i
ROJ
c-o Marts llir-. .
93-17 Elde I
Woodhaven N
YOU ARE 1(1
FIED that an action
solution of Marriage has been
filed against >. Q you an,
required to ser\. ,,p^' 0( yoUr
written defti... ,- ,
A KOSS, Bsq
Petluoner h.v address li
101 N.W 12th Aven it Miami
Florida HUM and fl! the
original with the t lerk of the
above styled i ourl it, or before
September ll 1981 therwtse
a default ui t.r cnUred
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH F1.DK11'IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on th Is nth day of
August. 1981
RICHARD I' BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade Count> Florida
By James l> Iiuweran
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal'
KOSS ANDQUINTERU
ATTORNEYS ATI AW
101 N W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida3.112>
Tel iS06iS2H>M4
Attorney for Petitioner
11101 AuituM 14
Seoteriberl 1931
---------NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO.61 11643 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I \ UK llu Mai rtageOI
AHMANDO MONIES
It lllioiirl
.mil
IMH EM .'IACARIDAD
\|oN |>.S. a k a
IMH'KNCIACAHIDAD
I AUKS.
lit -JH.IMS III
IO IMJCKNCIACAKIl>Al>
MONTE*, a k a
INUCKNCIACAKIDAI'
I'AGKS.
AbahiNu 4.
iutrr Nallaie It y
Kuaebiu Alvares
CHUCKS.
Villa Clara. CUBA
VOL" ARK HEREBY NOTI
I I ED that a petition lor Dlsso
lulrun ol your Marriage has
>si filed and commenced in
Una court and you are required
to serve a copy ul your written
uVKiiare, 11 any. to It. on CAR
LOS M MKNDKZ. ES. at
tut iu7 lor Petitioner whose
aiAlivaa Is 2986 West 4th Ave
9W Hlaleah. Florida 88012
ami lile Ihe original with If
11, ik of the styled court on >r
l.t loiv Sept 4. I9SI. OUrarwUU
a delault will be enter. '
against you lor the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
Million
This notice shall be publishe I
t.me each week for (pur con
m-tulive weeks In THE JK
ISHFIAJRIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
-...I of said court at Miami
rlund* on this 89 day of July
""rICHARDP BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M MENDEZ.ES4J
2W6W 4th Avenue
11IALKAH. Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
HPT* *-g 7,14, 31, J8, IWJ
NOTICE UNDER
PICTITIOUl NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undarslgn'a
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
ANNAPOLIS EQUITY AND
REALTY CO at number 17070
Collins Avenue. In the City of
Miami Beach. Florida. Intends
to register the said name with
the CJsrk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Dated at Miami Beach. Flor
Ida this 11 day of August. i9ii
Gabriel Shantsls
(OWNER'S NAME)
11144 August 38.
September4. 11.18.19*1;
S'


Dressier, 34 Year Resident Passes
Dressier, 73,
passed away Aug. 19
jf W'auchula, Mr. Drea
Friday, August 28, 1981 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
gar
l. Dressier. 73, of
19. A
.. Dressier
|e his home in Miami for
34 years. He was a
of Beth David Syna-
Mason member of Wau-
odge No. 17 F.& A.M..
charter member of the Elks Club
No. 1700 of Wauchula. He is sur-
vived by his wife, Bessie; a
daughter. Linda (Maurice)
Mason, Sarasota; two brothers,
Shepley and Oscar, Providence,
RI. and two grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Aug.
20 at Gordon Funeral Home with
ihrine the Touro Fraternal 20 at Gordon Funeral 1
ition'of Cranston. R.I.. interment in Mt. Nebo.
Lie Wolfeon, Congragation Beth Kodash
me Wolfson. 86. of Miami
awav Aug 23. Originally
rranton. Pa. she had made
M in Miami for the past 40
Ianci as a long time mem-
If Beth Kodash Congre-
She is survived by two
I ild (Mael Wolfson of
Miami. Leonard I Doris I Wolfson
of Hartsdale. NY., a daughter.
Rose (Phil) Felson of Miami: four
grandchildren and one great-
grandchild. Funeral services were
held Aug. 26 Cordon Funeral
Home
Harry Cohen, 50 Year Resident
Cohan, 70. North Miami
lasaed away Born in
\ I HE HAD BEEN
SI DENT OF South Florida
r ifl j ,ir- and had also
n the dry cleaning business.
len was a veteran >f the
\\ orld War 11. a member of
Roosevelt I^odge K of P
ide Lodge Mason and
-
B'nai B'rith He Ls survived by
his wife. Celia of North Miami
Heach. son. Robert (Sheilal and
two grandchildren, all of East
Brunswick. N J.; brothers. Irvin.
of Calif and Seymour, of Miami:
sisters, Jean Brown of Calif, and
Minnie Hyatt of Springfield. N.J.
Services were held August 20. at
Riverside Chapel, with entomb-
ment at Mt. Nebo
Ethel Otin, Resident Since 1929
ithel Orlin. 81. of Miami
had l>een a resident here
formerly of Michigan.
survived by her son. Sid-
irei Orlin of Miami Beach
ghter, Ruth Ann (Theo-
'ruble of Miami Beach,
randchildren and five
Great grandchildren: brothers,
Joseph Streller of California,
Harry Streller of Chicago: and
sister. Millie Orlinsky of Miami
Beach. Services were held Aug.
20 at Rubin Memorial Chapel
with interment at Mt. Nebo.
imi V Sponsors Religious Week
S'
iui Kmphasis Week will
Sept. B-ll, sponsored by
ersity Chaplains Associ-
eme for the week is "A
are.'*
iah Features
:er Dora Hill
I ill. who has recently re-
:>m South Africa, will be
peaker at the Kadimah
kf Pionasr Women to be
MS) Sept 1. at 11:30
nu She will discuss the
late of the Jewish com-
ISouth Africa.
kich will be served
my an afternoon of
pptar President Tillie
I conduct the meeting.
Notice
CIHCUIT COURT OF
1.EVENTM JUDICIAL
:UIT IN AND FOR
lOUNTY FLORIDA
" No* II PC
riCE OF SUIT
HK MAKKIACIEOK
[SCHIBRO
uru-r Husband
I DI R SCHIERO.
nd*nt Wife
PKl I>K K
ERO
204 Terrace
II KU>R1DA
CKTRl DC K 9CHI
|Mreb) notified that a
Million of Mar-
been filed against
Ki arc required to
f>y of your Answer or
the Petition for
of Marriage on
uiband attorney.
DAVIS. Esquire.
kyiake State Bank
l N.E Miami liar
North Miami
Jortda 18179 4890;
40-2802. and Hie
Answer or Plead
Ice of the Clerk of
Durt, Family Dlvt-
I.W. 27Ui Avenue.
Ida 88142. on or be
I day of September.
fall to do so. Judf
fault wUI be taken
for the relief de-
I'eUUon for Dla
Irrlage
hall be pub
>ach week for four
ive weeks In the
)R1DIAN
Miami, Florida.
f August. 1981
"II' BRLNKEK
ircult Court
' Division
anty. Florida
Selfrted
utyCUrk
I fasti
August 28.
nbar4.ll. IS. 1M1
Rabbi David Saperstein of the
Religious Action Center. Wash-
ington. DC. will speak on the
topic of caring at the Hillel
Jewish Center, on Tuesday. Sept.
8, at breakfast and lunch.
Rabbi Mark Kram. president
of the University Chaplains As-
sociation and director of the Hil-
lel Jewish Student Center, said
"The week is for the entire UM
community whose common link
is their concern about caring,
whether it be for the environ-
ment, ones peers or one's self."
MEYERS. Harry Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
IHII.LIPSON. Irving S 71 August 28.
Boca Raton Riverside Mt Nebo
ROSENBERG. Leah S Miami Beach
Rubin Funeral CTiapel
THEL.ISKY. Rose. August 23. Miami
Beech Rubin Chapel
BK1.L. Or William. August 23.
lUllandale I,evitt Welnstein
SKUIMAN. Sarah, 88 August 23. Miami
Heach Star of David
FRANK, Pearl. 79 August 24. Miami
Beach Riverside
FINKEL. Fannie Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
STAFF. Samuel Tommy. 4. August 24
Miami Beach Riverside
BRAFMAN. Anna. Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
I x IHFMANfella. 77. Miami Beach
KINKKI.STEIN. David. 84. August 24.
Hollywood l-evltt Weinstein
GREENBERQ. Irving
Ul'MOW'ITi Herman. August 28. North
Bay Village Riverside
HANDIN. Emilia. 79. August 25. Miami
i iordon Funeral Home Mt Nebo
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No 11-11905 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RK The marriage ol
UKAN1CTTK m UOIKRO
BRAUN wile
anil
EKIl I) BRAUN. husband
TO F.RICIi IIRAL.N
KH49 ASHCROFT AVI K
LOS ANOKIJCS. CALIF
YOI ARK HEREBY NOTI
FIED Hi.!I an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
Hied against you and you are
n-qulred to serve a copy of your
vi illlen defenses, if any. lo It on
ARTHUR H UPSON. KM)
attorney for PeUUoner. whose
address Is I SI 5 N W 167 Sreet.
SI 1TE 216 MIAMI FLORIDA
S3169, and Me the original with
the clerk ol the above styled
court on oi before Sept 4 1981.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for Ihe re
lief demanded in Ihi- lomplalnt
or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on (lus 30th day of July.
1981
RICHARD P BR1NKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A D. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
10O78 Aug T. 14.21.28. lMt
Frank Brickman Beach Kosher Inspector
Frank Brickman, passed away
August 25, ending a 27-year
career as Miami Beach's Kosher
Food Inspector. At 81, Mr.
Brickman, a former New York
grocer, was the only official
inspector holding the position.
He died of congestive heart
failure Tuesday at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, where he had
been admitted August 20 after a
mild heart attack.
Mr. Brickman took the job in
1953, three years after he retired
to Miami Beach from New York.
His position was to determine
whether products which were
advertised as kosher, actually
Sylvia Weinstein, Charity Worker
survived by her husband.
Jack: sons, Leslie N Miami,
Sylvia Weinstein, 66, of
North Miami Beach died
Aug. 22. Mrs. Weinstein had
been an active charity
worker on behalf of children
suffering from asthma. She
was born in Chicago and
came to Miami 28 years ago.
Her son. Philip, is a funeral
director with Levitt Wein-
stein Funeral Homes. She is
Stanley Brock of
Miami Passes
Stanley Brock of Miami passed
away Aug. 17. Formerly of New
York City, he had been a resident
of Miami for the past 23 years.
He is survived by his wife.
Rhoda: daughter. Tara Brock;
son Michael (Maria) Brock. Serv-
ices were held Aug. 19 at River-
side.
Paul Wilovsky,
Workmen's Circle
Member, Passes
Pauline Witovsky. 90, of
Miami passed away August 25. A
resident of Miami for the past 34
years, she was originally from
Iselin. N.J. She was a member of
Workman's Circle, Branch No.
699. She is survived by a son,
Louis, Miami; a daughter. Lillian
(Albert) Ruska, Miami: a
brother. Harry Surowitz. Bronx.
NY.; sister, Sarah Goldstein.
Allentown. Pa. and one grand-
child. Funeral services were held
August 26 at Gordon Funeral
Home.
Fannie Schaffel,
Hadassah Member
Fannie Schaffel. 83. Miami
Beach Resident for the past 33
years, formerly of Pittsburgh,
passed away Aug. 24. She is sur-
vived by her sons. Joseph of
Miami. Gerson of Belmont.
Mass.. Leonard of Cherry Hill,
N.J.; twelve grandchildren, three
great-grandchildren; sisters.
Belle Sakolsky of Los Angeles,
Calif., and Ethel Hoffman of
Arcadia, Calif. She was a member
of Hadassah Services were held
August 26. Arrangements by
Levitt-Weinstein.
ADELMAN. Harry. August 21
boldovitrh Joseph. August 21. North
Miami Beach Riverside
DOMB. Mark. 88. Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel.
KRAMER. Max
ML'CHNICK Betty
BOCOBL, Pearl
SABATH. Edwin J August 18 Bay
Harbor Menorah Chapels
WEBER. Rose. Bay Harbor Island
Ki\ erslde
BLOCK. Anne L 72. August 28. Holly
wood Star of David
Phillip (Gail) Coral Springs:
daughter, Barbara (David)
Webb. Gainesville; brother
Richard Lapidus, Chicago,
and five grandchildren.
Services were held Aug. 23
with arrangements by Philip
Weinstein. Jewish Funeral
Director.
BAUMBLATT
Mortimer of North Miami Beach passed
away August 22 He was a resident for 18
years, coming originally from New
York He la survived by rds wife Betty,
sons Charles and Bruce, five grandchil-
dren, and sister. Hortense Sandground.
all of New York Services were held at
Riverside
BAUMBLATT
Mortimer of North Miami Beach passed
away August 22. He was a resident for 16
years, coming originally from New
York He ls survived by his wife Betty,
sons Charles and Bruce, five grandchU-
dren. and sister. Hortense Sandground.
all of New York Services were held at
Riverside
EDELMAN. Saul. August 28
FELDMAN. Joseph. 80. August 24.
Miami Gordon Funeral Home
HOWARD. Nathaniel. 70. North Bay
Village Riverside
KAPPETT. Abe. August 23. Sunrise
Rubin.
i were.
Survivors include his wife,
Lillian; son, Lester; daughter,
Gloria Supran. and four grand-
children.
Funeral services were held
August 27 at Rubin Chapel,
Miami Beach, followed by burial
at Mount Nebo Cemetery.
OAKEN
Lillian Sandier. 72. a resident of Miami
for 48 years, formerly of Far Hoc kaway.
N Y passed away August 22 She was
the former owner of Paramont Bakery
of Miami Beach and Arnold's Bakery of
Miami Survivors include sons. Marvin
i Marilyn i of Miami. Arnold I Mary I
Ray of Cadiz. Ky.. three sisters. Sophie
Rosenberg of Miami Beach. Evelyn
Edelman of Naranja. Fla Blanche
Corby of Long Island. New York and
four grandchildren Funeral services
were held August 24.vArrangements by
Riverside
OAKEN
Ulllan Sandier. 72, a resident of Miami
for 46 years, formerly of Far Rorkaway.
N Y passed away August 22 She was
the former owner of Paramont Bakery
of Miami Beach and Arnold's Bakery of
Miami Survivors Include sons. Marvin
i Marilyn i of Miami. Arnold Mary i
Ray of Cadiz, Ky.. three sisters. Sophie
Rosenberg of Miami Beach, Evelyn
Edelman of Naranja. Fla.. Blanche
Corby of Long Island. New York and
four grandchildren. Funeral services
were held August 24 vArrangements by
Riverside
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Osen twtry Day Closes' Smkmrth
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
liEVITT \ IE
EVITT WlEINSTEIN
memorial chapels
VAM IWS A Dia Htt| 949-63'*>
. .\ v -*t " '"* "irj# 8'vO 6*9 8'OC
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13J85 Wrst Dime Highway
Hapran-WMd in S Let ii I 0
New York: :u 263-7600 Queens Blvd S ?6lh Rd. Forest Hills, N.V
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
RUBIN
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL s
Leonard Zilbert
FOUNDER
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
. Dade and Broward
Miami Beach Hallandale
1701 Alton Road "*** 100 S. Dixie Hwy.
538-6371 P^Arr^ngeswit. 456-4011


v^mr
fewtsl
iy. August 28. if
a. a anal
Count on Us
K Guaranteed
Savings
or we'll Double the Difference in Cash!
*AftY
AST?
i^kwSsBfci^*
E^dopecfiffofs^
^agnails,
-clopedla
[Encyc
New
only
T
Pu'
IV
Light n L-vely low fat I 'OP quai.-v eacr'ieht flavor ,umbo 4 we
9h ice Milk s | Turkey Dmn^cks | Cottage Cheese | Honeydews
49 "a
[W"L">
elsewhere price $2.09
elsewhere price 69c
Dr. Pepper.
Hires Root Beer. Sunkist Orange or
Seven-U]
179ta
Idep btts elsewhere w^,"*w"
ajSBJgj price $2 19
Not available in Key West.
Marathon or Ft. Piarce
Florida or shipped premium fresh
Lots of Chicken
3 breast qtrs BB IV ^gS BJBjw ^*
w backs 3 leg ------ l^
qtrs w backs
3 giblet pkgs
^"
elsewhere price 69c
j&m
^^Iwe're fighting inflation f Bonus| Check e savings
Ptnn> I- frw t&ar-rv CounU-r In the Meat DepL
VJ1F*S~-2U
Pinchers
1st the Grocery Counter
geh
pre*
US 1.792.19
r, at a> antry Mot Chunk LWM
Tuna........,H~
o> ataSai
2S-OI
ill' or tgnl M>
ScfUMftM
Fyna N-tWW or OTTO
Gear)
Tr
Sunanx*
Vier
go-fl biua amrta or brow
SoftSoa
VVhrtertouae natural
.77 .96
...^ .97125
,.S 1.57199
U S Choapa giean va"*e> baa*
Round Roast
u S Cnoca rnnfi vawr uf Ou
RoundStsak *
u S cftoca 'ajh vasw ko
.bow
: 1.88 2 19
SS, SI .67
20 C1
0*0
Vienna Rogers
go-fl Wue amrta or b*<
Soft Soap
Z19 3 19
K JBl.49
.99 1.49
1.17 159
10 H o*
cm
2.59
3.59
Everyday Penny Pinchers
ftnrm Or. GraM hour yt* online
Turkey Breast 1.28189
Chicken Livers .68 99
3 t> crtub 100% pors
Ground Beef 1.38 1 59
Free/a* Quaan tea e.cepi ** paremgaan
2 1.58 2.09
Mi
Ml
Apple Juice
red white go*d or rn- Last Country
Taylor Wines S.1 4.69 5.29
aaaVfjpM
Cold Power .. 1Z 1.79 2.03
Black Beans.. "5. .67 .77
Pantry Pnda
AlumariurnFoi^S 3J9 3.59
.79
Florida or anapped pramrum m*an fryar
Leg Qtrs. .... *
Tyson haat b serve
Fried Chicken 2.58 2 69
14 o
Tolmo 1 >2 1 Q MJUBI "kM
12 ot uappaiani trofOT
Party Pizzas .. ~ 1.29 169
Pantry p-aae combo crama k* rra
Novelties------"i 1.49 1 69
Mrs Smrth i aaaortad -Varan
Cream Pies ..' J9 1 09
Same* xautsr or ur. troian
Apple Juice ... JO 99
Pantry Pnda ataasaj
Coffee Ufner 3'" 1.00 119
vatox Owns pax .uwv
Donuts......R JB .79
Pajnajy PisSe MaBeaanjaa
White Breed. 3^. 1.00 1 47
Z68 2 99
Ground Chuck 1JJ8 1 99
acid iSn ooi D*apar Grade '-oran ''yog
Chicken Legs. .68129
2 tja and ova* *raan*y ground baa* aov proaaan addad
Great Ground. .881.29
Florida o* anopad pramaum fraah
Fryer Combo 1.18 1.29
conta-ns braaats fugns drv#rnancaai
Armour Star ervekan mad rjri
Haif fta
U66T I BLIMI
Armout Star beaded
Veal Patties
1.68 1.89
1.98 2 39
New Zealand-Spring Lamb shoulder blade
Lamb 178
Chops .. ib JL
elsewhere price $1.99
elsewhere price 85c
Lykes Power Pack
Chicken Franks
68c
elsewhere price 79c
Bonu, | Check the savings
LaT^aJ '
SB
- pr B Yogurts.....3 Cottage Chaasa cue .Be .85
Everyday Penny Pinchers
Orange Juice. ? 1.38 1 69
Pant-y Pnda natural ahead ceeea
nrlUaMlStBW pag BBsaai 1.15
Mrs **ba-n
rVlatgarineQtrs. .. Jj8 61
Bo* da" ha"* murx* cnaooa*
Umghom____'" 1.48 1.75
Ba*av*x.' ha** KV vnoM-
Pickles.......I 1.28149
B avtvis maat s*tad
Chicken..... 1.48 1 59
Matvai* Srnna Maoa* Saiam. o*
Bologna.....' 2.18 2 69
Arm*** .jana* *'an*i or
Knocks......l: 1.98 2 43
Uama *or-iaStva
Herring.......V 2.78309
G-atna> ahead tursav bosogna or
P ft P Loaf ... E .66 98
'try oo* oma* ahead G Oacar Mays* ahead maat or bl
Bologna.....It 1 J 1 85
>onaa cnub
Lrvenrvurst ... JM 99
gn Service Deli
tma Department
Your rnaats and chum *n bt skcad to ordar in
tfioM sicxas having a arvics (Ma counlar
nan auaHy Jan and M
Bologna...... 1.68 2 76
traanty emohed raoular or
Nova Lox....." 2.883.19
mn, ma*>
Cole Slaw___ .78 89
elsewhere price $2 39
the perfect snack Thompson
Seedless Grapes
.C
lb
-=-
eraewttera price 79c
Bonus 1 Pick your own fresh
kaBBr-aaBBBBBaJ Produce
WGBM
ac raj- arai 2 aa aaas ajarg warn i
....2*. .79 98
YelowCom. TV 1.001 35
garcjan "aeri svaaaarn
.79 99
Everyday Penny Pinchers
u $ Ne as p^-ooa. *
I... 10^ 1.79 2 49
t*
. .- w.
.69 75
.17 23
.69 1.18
fast *onde
teas aV'o*
pch "w" aaoaa aaaaw arga 200 aoa top *- -***ea)
Ha. Limes.. 10- 49 59
ac i-a" xsoa. isauiii Cae. aroa^ C-a^-. i '
Apples....... 59 79
Amancar Sur* pu*a
Orange Juice. S 69 79
P^j^l save more with
WSSSM Genetics
dspandabki nutritious products itujt
(ft pnead far balov NatonW Brandt ^^^
Tom.
MaccrChaaaa3^ .79119
...^ 1.49 2 29
42. J7104
____i.1 J61.6B
TeeBags ....T 1.19 199
Ba^Ta>sue.4X 77139
CatUttar .. .25^ 1.69209
Prices effective Thurs., Aug. 27 thru
Wed., Sept. 2 from Ft Pierce to Key West
glo^s Open
24 Hours
Check your local store for specific hours
cPrfde
*n atsiavr t>* aiGMi to nMtt ouiiitiis "oil soio to Or ah as mot afsaowsieti ro hkici taaoas
*GUARANTEED
Double the Difference
In Cash
. II you can (tnd lower prtcas this w*.h at -ny "
service supermarket. Pantry Pride UI pay you DouW* u |
T| Ditfe.ence Just buy 25 different Items worth 20 o. n
>3 st Psntry Pride. Compare prices on the same Items '
$ other lull service supermarket. If thek total is k>- <** |
tt^ ,our itemUcd Pantry Pride reflisutr tape and lh' j
' aaailiari prices on the esacl same Items to Psnt" '
and we'll pay you Double the Difference in Cash:
f 1




"*#

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RoddS our youth, and our families-all with their special
needs, all with their special interests. The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as the central address of organized Jewish life in
Greater Miami, has been reaching out for over 40 years to meet
the health, educational, professional counseling and recreational
needs of our community, which now numbers nearly ,0,000 and
ranks among the leading centers of Jewish life in the United
States
This' special issue of FEDERATION has been prepared to
provide an overview of the programs and services available to
you as a member of the Greater Miami Jewish community.
We hope it will help explain the scope of the Federations ac-
tivities, interests and concerns in maintaining the quality com-
munity we enjoy today.
Harry A. Levy, President
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Myron J. Brodie, Executive Vice President
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
August 28,1981 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
-
President
Harry A. (Hap) Lew
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
'""-Irman, Public Relations committee
. iTimoner


. r
Mount Sinai Medical Center:
"Destination Greatness"
Page 3-C
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a 699 bed teaching
I hospital, the largest private, not for profit voluntary
hospital in South Florida. Situated on 55 acres of land,
Mount Sinai is also the largest employer on Miami Beach
with 1,800 technical, support, and administrative per-
sonnel, 750 nurses and 135 residents and fellows who
|make up the House Staff. The medical staff is comprised
:>f 600 physicians and dentists.
Whether a patient requires a simple visit to a clinic to
see a doctor, immediate attention for an emergency, or
lospitalization for an acute medical or surgical problem,
Vlount Sinai can provide the service needed, according to
[Arthur Pearlman, Center President. Many patients are
?ferred to the hospital's special centers including the
Jain Center, Kidney Dialysis, the Neonatal High Risk
Nursery, and sophisticated Intensive Care Units.
Emergency and Outpatient
Working closely with the ambulance and fire rescue
?rvices, the Max Orovitz Emergency Department is
ktaffed around-the-clock by specially trained staff and
Emergency Room Physicians. The heliport expands the
hospital's emergency transport capabilities.
Through the S. Harvey Greenspan Outpatient
)i partment, residents of Miami Beach who cannot afford
jrivate medical services can qualify for health care ser-
pces in one of 50 clinics, paying according to their ability,
arlman said. Mount Sinai is able to provide this free
re m part because the hospital is a member of the
r Miami Jewish Federation's family of local
g( nciea and is a beneficiary of Combined Jewish Appeal-
ii 1 Emergency Fund. Last year, the hospital provided
million in free care. The Mount Sinai Foundation, the
lainstay of financial support for the medical center, made
is contribution to the community possible through its
ndraising efforts, said Gary Gerson, Foundation
ssident.
As a teaching hospital. Mount Sinai is not only
wived in the training of physicians and the education of
(k'dical students, but also maintains its own schools in
^edical. nuclear medical, ultrasound, and radiologic
chnology. Mount Sinai works cooperatively with many
Ihools of higher education in the area, providing clinical
tperience for students in nursing, social work, dietetics,
ivsical theraphy, biophotography, and many other
?lds. Continuing education is a priority for the medical
^aff. the nursing staff and all hospital employees.
New Programs
Mount Sinai is a dynamic hospital, with new and
tciting programs being undertaken regularly to provide
ttter health care services to the community. The
Blowing are some of the hospital's recent undertakings
yd accomplishments.
In keeping pace with medical technology and
^mmunity needs for health care. Mount Sinai, in
operation with the University of Miami School of
ledicine, has been granted $2.5 million by the National
istitutes of Health to undertake the Positron Emission
fmography (PET). One of ten in the United States, PET
I able to study actual functioning of the brain and is
ling used in research to study such neurological
orders as epilepsy and Parkinson's Disease.

*

U*2
MOUNT SINAI
MEDICAL CENTER
4100 Alton Road. Miami Beach,
FL 33140
674-2121
Arthur Peartnian, President
Ah/in Goldberg. Exec. Vie Pre*.
A new service to patients and families is Video
Visit, whereby a TV monitor transmits pictures of visitors
to patients over the hospital's closed circuit television,
called TV3. This is especially useful for those patients
who have children and grandchildren who ordinarily could
not visit in person. This project was funded by the
Medical Center's Young President's Club.
The majority of Mount Sinai Medical Center's
patient population is comprised of senior citizens, many of
whom have difficulty moving about their homes or in the
community. Project Sinai provides ambulatory care for
these patients as well as transportation to Mount Sinai's
Clinic. The Project Sinai van was purchased by the
Sustaining Board of Fellows. An Automatic Response
Monitoring System (ARMS), designed to provide
emotional security and emergency medical aid for elderly
persons living alone, was implemented this year. Thanks
to the efforts of the Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida. United Community Care and Mount Sinai,
patients now have a 24 hour "hotline" to the hospital.
Mount Sinai, in its concern for the elderly, was a
major sponsor of the Spectrum of Aging conference, held
at the end of March. This international conference on
gerontology featured many well known and respected
professionals in this field. Through the 700 health care
professionals and community participants, the first step
was taken in establishing a network to resolve common
problems relative to the care of the elderly.
Also for the community, as well as staff members,
a Goodbody Program of Wellness has been instituted in
the hospital. In trying to improve a person's health before
they have been hospitalized, the Goodbody Program
holds such seminars as Stop Smoking and various up-
dates on health related topics such as stress management,
/ continued on page 11
A 0fc


Page 12-
J.F.C.S. Shows Way to
Brighter Tomorrows
Page 4-C
JEWISH FAMILY AND
CHILDREN'S SERVICE
1790 S.W. 27th Avenue. Miami
Fl 33145
4454)655
Milbrait Betdner. Pmadent
David Saltman.
Executive Director

,
Six months ago Marjorie Katz despaired at the
thought of raising her two young children alone She knew
of no one in a similar situation to whom she could turn tor
advice. Faced with financial, interpersonal, and emotional
problems about her new lifestyle as a single parent, she
turned for guidance to the Jewish Family and Children s
Service (JFCS). a member of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies.
She was encouraged to attend multiple family group
therapy sessions, designed exclusively to aid single
parent families. The group, a new concept in counseling
for single parents, consisted of two other mothers, a
father and nine children ranging in age from 6-12. It was
developed to tackle problems mutually faced by all
members and to help them work out possible solutions
At the end of the 10 weeks. Marjorie Katz felt that
the sessions had been very effective in answering some
serious questions for her family.
'The Multiple Family program is just one of many
avenues of counseling made available to members of the
Jewish community through the Jewish Family and
Children's Service.'' according to Millicent Beldner.
president of JFCS. Mrs. Beldner explains that there is a
complete network of counseling services designed to help
individuals and families with problems requiring
professional aid."
Jewish Family and Children's Service is a counseling
agency for the Jewish community, supported through the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and the United Way of
Dade County. JFCS is a member agency of Child Welfare
League of America and is accredited by the Family
Service Association of America.
Marital Counseling
JFCS offers marital counseling for those who are
unhappy in their marriage, those about to marry and
those considering marrying again. Marital therapy
establishes contacts with those whose relationships have
dissolved and the children who have experienced stress
related to that situation. It focuses both on the about-to-
be-single parents who will be responsible for their children
and on those who will live alone.
According to Beldner, "plans are underway to for-
mulate groups for children whose parents are in the
process of divorcing. Children who have been through
similar experiences will be used as resources to provide a
problem solving environment."
Many individuals who are having difficulty main-
taining good social relations, cannot hold a job, or feel
overwhelmed by personal crises may be helped through
JFCS's psychiatric consultant. The consultant begins
with a comprehensive diagnostic program for the in-
dividual.
Through JFCS's parent-child counseling, parents
can begin to better understand their children and learn
more effective ways of living with them. Children can free
themselves from the anxieties they feel through talking or
play therapy with a counselor. This program has proven
effective in aiding parents who are confused by what seem
to be everyday problems such as a child's eating habits,
toilet training or school difficulties.
Young people often need a place where they can deal
with their personal problems and learn more about
themselves and other people. JFCS's teenage counseling
service is designed to meet and remedy conditions of
isolation, alienation and communication breakdown. The
JFCS Mobile Van. originally designed to extend coun-
seling service to those who are immobile, will now be used
to attract youngsters in need of counseling. Plans are
underway to send the van to areas where young people
gather and equip it with a variety of recreational facilities
as an attraction to those who need help.
Family Life Education
JFCS's Family Life Education programs are
available to civic organizations, fraternal organizations,
neighborhood associations, parent-teacher associations,
schools and colleges, sisterhoods, women's and men's
groups, youth, and other interested groups. Its intent is
to enhance family life and personal relationships. Group
discussions led by trained counselors provide op-
portunities for people to acquire new knowledge and
enrich their lives
JFCS provides a professional trained counselor to
lead groups in discussion. The Family Life Education
program can be conducted in various ways according to
the size and interest of group membership.
The programs available for groups include
Discussion Series, for groups of 10-20 people who can
attend regularly over a period of 4-6 weeks; Single
Meeting Speech, for a group of 25 or more interested in a
speaker and follow-up discussion; Institute or Workshop.
usually involves groups in general sessions and a number
of smaller discussion meetings during a one or two day
period; Films, a library of timely and thought provoking
films related to family life and child care followed by i
group discussion.
Some typical subjects for discussion in Family Life
Education include the maniage relationship, parents and
children, teenage years, later years, divorce, self-
awareness, and family living.
Refugee Resettlement
JFCS's branch office located at the Ida Fisher School
in Miami Beach works in cooperation with other
Federation agencies in refugee resettlement. Through a
special one year grant from the Council of Jewish
Federations, JFCS is the largest component in providing
monies and resettlement counseling for Soviet Jewish
immigrants. Aside from aiding refugees financially. JFCS
emphasizes counseling for the youth who experience
problems in adjusting to their new environment. "Now
Tovarish." a program designed especially for teenagers.
utilizes a team approach to their problems of integration
and emotional well-being.
aids in the resettlement of
Ethiopia, Indo-China and
maintenance and counseling
programs for the newcomers.
In the area of services to the elderly. JFCS leads
most other family services in the United States in t-
tending to the issues concerning the aged. Coping with
retirement, loss of a loved one, illness and lessening
financial resources can create a crisis for the senior citizen-
The sense of loneliness and isolation can be reduced
In addition, JFCS
refugees from Cuba,
Afghanistan, providing


I V
through involvement with the various services provided
to the elderly within a caring, casework relationship.
According to Mrs. Beldner, "senior citizens have not
outlived their problems. The nature of their problems
change with age, and it is important that they are aided as
much as possible." JFCS has counseling services for the
homebound which helps the elderly in planning out how to
handle their problems. The ultimate goal of JFCS*s
services to the elderly is to help them live as in-
dependently as possible.
Many of our senior citizens have adult children
living in other parts of the country," states Beldner. "Our
aim is to involve these relatives and have them assume as
much responsibility as is possible in care for their
parents."
Guardianship Program
An agency guardianship program for the in-
competent elderly which may become an advocacy model
for other such programs in the United States has been
developed and implemented by JFCS. By definition, a
guardian is a person who watches over, protects, cares
for. and defends another person. JFCS receives federal
assistance for its Guardian Program through funds from
| the Area Agency on Aging.
The Guardianship Program is sponsored by JFCS
land provides specialized services on a non-sectarian, no-
Ifee basis for persons 60 years and older, who are judged
Iby a court to be incompetent. A complete evaluation of a
I per son's ability to function effectively and safely on an
[independent basis is carried out by experienced staff.
That evaluation determines if a court hearing is indicated.
A person's competency is determined by the Probate
Tourt. The appointment of a guardian is a serious legal
>rocedure and every measure is taken to insure the
irsonal and legal rights of all persons referred to the
)rogram. If there is no other responsible person to assume
lardianship and a person is determined to be in-
impetent, the Guardianship Program takes legal steps
have JFCS appointed guardian.
Currently, the agency has legal guardianship over 80
idividuals. Four professionally trained JFCS staff
members have total responsibility for these individuals,
eeing that they are in a situation where they can be most
idependent, yet properly cared for.
As legal guardian, the Guardianship Program
[rovides for the health and welfare of the incompetent
?rson by using community resources to assure that his
isic needs are met and that he will not be neglected.
In instances where relatives or friends will become
ie guardian of the incompetent elderly person, the
[uardianship Program will assist them with information
id appropriate referrals. In addition, the program will
them in being legally appointed as guardian.
Beyond acting as legal guardian for the incompetent
lerly, the Guardianship Program offers information and
|ferral about protective services to the elderly of Dade
Junty. Due to the very special nature of the program,
' CS sees itself as an advocate for the rights and needs of
fcose elderly who because of their age are at risk in the
immunity.
JFCS has recently received a one year grant from
ieration's Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies to fund
>revention program. This is a major formalized attempt
deal with the causes of emotional and interpersonal
jblems through early intervention and prevention.
uis are underway to implement this program through
imunity education and consultation with other
Jncies, such as the Jewish Community Centers of South
arid a. One such plan would train JCC camp counselors
out normal and accepted child behavior and discipline.
us would enable counselors to recognize problems and
flp children deal with them before the problems become
>ntro liable.
The coat for counseling services at JFCS is based on
individual's ability to pay. The sliding scale fee
?^tributes to the cost of the service. The inability to pay
pver disqualifies a person who needs help nor does it alter
quality of service rendered. Beldner emphasizes that
lose who can afford to pay go to JFCS because they
know of the agency's reputation for quality and the broad
base of service provided."
JFCS's services to the Jewish community are
available through any of their offices or in their mobile
van which serves the outlying areas of Dade County. The
offices are located at: 1790 S.W. 27th Avenue, Miami; 850
Washington Avenue, Miami Beach: 2040 N.E. 163 Street,
North Miami Beach: 8905 S.W. 87th Avenue. Miami: 420
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach; and 1424 Drexel Avenue,
Miami Beach.


F*gel2-H
JCCSF Welcomes You!
Page 6-C
Q. What is Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida?
A. Jewish Community Centers of South Florida is
one organization composed of three branch centers ser-
ving Dade County. One center the Michael-Ann
Russell JCC, serves North Miami Beach, while two other
centers serve South Dade and Miami Beach.
Each center is a focal point that helps meet needs and
interests of the Jewish community it serves. They cover a
broad range of recreational, educational, creative, and
social service needs and interests, for all age groups.
Q. How does a JCC differ from a temple or
synagogue?
A. JCCs reach across congregational lines. Each is a
resource for the entire Jewish community. People of each
Jewish religious style are comfortable at a JCC. where
people of other religions are also welcome.
JCCs work with area temples and synagogues in co-
sponsoring educational opportunities, in being the
catalyst for cultural events, and in hosting events that
involve more than one congregation. The recreational
facilities offered by JCCs take the expense and burden of
creating health and physical education structures away
from individual congregations.
JCCs do not offer religious services or formal
religious instruction. However, each JCC is truly a Jewish
institution, providing a Jewish atmosphere and following
the Jewish religious calendar.
Q. Why does the Jewish community need its own
health and physical education facilities?
A. Some people feel most comfortable being with
other Jews when using a health and recreation facility.
Physical fitness and recreation have been concerns of the
American-Jewish community for over 100 years. In South
Florida, many people have swimming pools easily
available to them. Tennis and racquet ball courts exist
throughout the community. But they are not always
public facilities that everyone can afford, and often the
atmosphere lacks a familiar touch characteristic of many
Jewish institutions.
The health and physical education facilities at JCCs
are also important for group services such as summer
camps, teen programs, after school and preschool
programs, and for the promotion of health among senior
adults.
At JCCs there is indeed jogging, tennis, racquet ball.
basketball, and softball. But each JCC is considerably
more. Health and physical education is just one aspect of
JCC programming.
Q. How do the JCCs serve children?
A. Each JCC has programs for children as young as
18 months. The Michael-Ann Russell and South Dade
JCCs offer well established pre-school programs that are
highly regarded in the community. As children become
older, after-school classes for recreation and special in-
terests are available for them.
Q. Do teenagers use the JCC?
A. Yes. Teenage programming is of great concern to
the community, and therefore the JCCs. The South Dade
JCC, for example, has an extensive arrangement of high
school girls clubs, and an expanding program of groups
for junior high students. At the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC. youth utilize the center for sport league-, team
swimming, for meetings of clubs, and for special
educational opportunities. The new Jewish High School of
South Florida will add still another dimension of JCC
service for teens at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC Our
Centers are also involved in programming to utilize the
energy and talent that conns hack to Greater Miami in
students returning from the High School in Israel.
Q. What do the Centers offer adults?
A. Education, in the form of special interest classes
about everything from investment to calligraphy, from
bridge to current events. Recreation, from exercise classes
to family outings. Creative arts, from community theatre
to Israeli folk dancing. JCCs are designed to meet special
interests expressed by the community. However, many
adult programs focus on effective living in changing
times, and reflect the changing complexion of modern
American Jewish society. JCC programs are designed to
help Jewish single parents cope with their special needs as
well as provide suitable social outlets for young singles
and once again singles.
Q. Are there special services for young people and
adults?
A. A number of special services are tailored to meet
needs of Jewish families living in Miami. Many two-
parent families are faced with finding suitable care for
young children when both adults work. That situation can
be even more complicated and difficult for a working
single parent. The JCC provides after school care for both
pre-school and elementary school age youngsters. Here,
each child receives close, warm supervision, in a caring
and nurturing atmosphere.
The JCCs also sponsor programs for retarded
children and young adults, along with supportive en-
vironment for the families in these circumstances, as well
as a special acculturation program for Soviet Jewish
emigres.
Q. How are JCC program decisions made?
A. The programs JCC creates come from the needs
and interests defined by the Jewish community in
general, and JCC members in particular. Members are
encouraged to participate in program committee* which
may plan a specific event directly or recommend to a
Center s board of directors that a new program be created.
Each Center attempts to be as many things possible to as
many people as it can.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF S. FLORIDA
18900 NJ5.25th Avenue. N.MB.
Ft 33180 -932-4200
(VmunwMuner Ruth Shark ft
Stephen Lacker. Executi\e
Vice Pre*
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER
18900 NX 25th Avenue. NALB.
932-4200
Robert Larton. ML\ Pm***
MskDbadM. Center Director
MIAMI BEACH JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
25 Washington Avenue, MR
MM
GsrsM IL Sdmsrta, Branch
P^Podokky. Center Oirrrur
SOUTH DADE JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
12401 S.W. 102nd Ave, Mi**
251-1394
Morris Futerakk. Pmadent
Buddy Sspolsky. Center Dk


Q. One hears a great deal about Senior Adults and
the JCCs. What is available for them?
A. Seniors are an important client group at the JCCs
with many programs designed to help older adults remain
independent and active in the community. At Michael-
Ann Russell and South Dade JCCs, active Senior
Adult programs stress recreation, education, along with a
full range of supportive activity. The Miami Beach JCC
presently serves a predominately older population at its
Activities Center, as well as through the Day Care Center
for the Frail Adult. Each JCC also offers Senior Ride,
which assists those who need transportation for food
shopping, to central meal sites, and for medical visits.
The Senior Adult Roommate Referral Service helps to
match compatible seniors throughout Dade County who
wish to share apartments and houses for economic or
social reasons.
Q. Does each JCC have complete facilities?
A. Although none of our JCC sites is complete, each
offers a wide range of activity.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC in North Miami Beach
has the most extensive physical plant, with complete
gymnasium and locker rooms, tennis and racquetball
courts, jogging tracks, pools, and classrooms.
The South Dade JCC is more limited in its facilities,
but has a swimming pool, social hall, classroom-meeting
room space, and playing fields. With enough membership
support, the South Dade JCC hopes to build a fully
equipped center in the Kendall area of South Dade within
the next few years.
The Miami Beach JCC is in a period of transition. In
the fall its senior activities will move into the Ida Fisher
Community School which also presently houses the Day
Care Center for the Frail Adult. Negotiations are now
underway for a permanent year to year lease in the area of
40th Street and Indian Creek, which will allow the Miami
Beach JCC to significantly expand its services to children
and young adults.
Q. How does one join a JCC?
A. Contact the nearest JCC. There is a map of Center
locations, addresses, and phone numbers on this page.
Membership is by category for families, single-parent
families, teens, individuals, and seniors. Because facilities
vary. membership fees also vary among Centers.
Q. Suppose someone can't afford membership, but
needs the service?
A. Each year. JCCs of South Florida provide more
than SI50.000 in scholarships. Some of the funds provided
to the JCCs by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund and
United Way of Dade County go to meet this need. Each
application for membership dues or fee assistance is
reviewed by the Center Director.
Q. Do the Centers have family and community
events?
A. The Centers sponsor many events that bring
families from the entire community to a Center. This year
both the South Dade and Michael-Ann Russell JCCs
sponsored Purim Carnivals in cooperation with local
congregations. The Fifth Annual Yiddish Folk Fair
brought more than 5,000 people to the grounds of the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC for a celebration of Jewish-
American heritage.
Special events for member families brought
thousands of Greater Miami Jews together for Chanukah
celebrations, for Passover, picnics and baseball games.
The South Dade Jewish Music Festival joined singers and
performers from six congregations, while the Eighth
Annual Chanukah Run at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC
attracted more than 2,000 runners, volunteer workers,
and spectators.
MICHAEL ANN RUSSELL
JCC
MIAMI BEACH
JCC
Q. Why would a non-participant in JCC programs
support the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida?
A. Hopefully, Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida are supported by everyone concerned with the
quality of Jewish life in Greater Miami. Membership in
the JCC is an investment in the future, by assuring
Jewish solutions for circumstances facing children and
families caught in the turmoil of contemporary life. It is
an investment in the present for older people who wish to
live with dignity and independence. Membership helps
create a vital community resource for anyone who may
wish to turn to JCCs for a special need or interest.
Jewish Community Centers serve a critical role for
those who wish to avoid total assimilation in their secular
lives. Each JCC member knows that the quality of his life
is enhanced, and his Jewish identity is protected, by the
continuing existence and growth of Jewish Community
Centers <>l South Florida.


Page 12-3
lewwr
Providing the Key to Jewish
Page 8-C
CENTRAL AGENCY FOR
JEWISH EDUCATION
4200 Biscavne Blvd. Miami
Fl 33137
57&4030
Al Golden. President
Gene Greenzweig,
Executive Director
From its beginnings as the Greater Miami Bureau of
Jewish Education, established in 1945 and servicing only
25.000 Greater Miami Jews, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education has grown to serve the varied
educational needs of one of the leading Jewish com-
munities in the United States. Now numbering nearly a
quarter million, the Greater Miami Jewish community is
considered a leader in modem and innovative approaches
to that most precious key to Jewish survival education.
According to Al Golden, president. CAJE is com-
mitted to be responsible to the changing demands of the
1980s and to provide challenging approaches to the
presentation of traditional Jewish values.
Judaica High School
The Judaica High School program, now entering its
ninth year, offers programming for Jewish youth in the
formal classroom setting and the informal setting of
homes and youth groups where Jewish teens congregate.
Among its activities are an: Intensive Hebrew
Department, Junior and Senior High School Educational
programs in cooperation with the local synagogues, a
college credit program in cooperation with Miami Dade
Community College, joint programs with youth directors
and youth groups of the community, and an outreach
program for students in public high school offering
Judaica activities in the community.
In addition, the Judaica High School staff offers a
series of in-service training courses for teachers, special
programs for the Judaica High School classes, and inte-
grated curricula prepared by staff members and circulated
for use in the school.
Akiva Leadership Program
The Akiva Leadership Program was designed to help
develop a knowledgeable and committed group of future
leaders for the American Jewish community. This year
over 30 youth, who were recommended by principals,
youth directors and teachers with high marks for
motivation and Jewish commitment, participated in the
program. Staffed by the executive staff of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, the program draws upon
the most highly qualified educators in Greater Miami.
Akiva meets for two and one half hours every Sunday
afternoon for a curriculum of current events discussion,
regular college credit programs, as well as other projects
designed to spur motivation and interest among youth.
Teachers Training
With the tremendous growth of the Day School
movement in Greater Miami, the Jewish community has
committed itself to produce as well as maintain high
standards in the teaching profession. Included in this
commitment are all levels of the Jewish educational
process from Early Childhood, weekend and afternoon
Hebrew. Day School. Judaica High School, and adult
programs.
Through the "Teachers Institute" over 40 courses
and seminars are offered during the year both for the
V \

adult wishing to become a licensed Judaics teacher, as
well as for presently licensed teachers who wish to
augment their professional growth studies.
Some of the major areas covered under this program
are: Early Childhood Education courses and programs, a
series of two and three day workshops, a teachers tour of
Israel, inter-school projects, and professional growth
incentive programs.
Adult Education Programs
t Tuh^!!du,t educatin arm of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education serves to enhance adult Jewish studies
m the community by coordinating, stimulating and
cooperatively operating programs throughout Dade and
Hroward Counties. Other aspects of this program are
projects for the lay and professional leadership of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and ttfl family of
agencies, as well as the provision of council d guidance
tor Jewish studies on an adult level th. ghout the
community.
These programs have taken root in Greater Miami
through the North Dade Midrasha and the South Dade


lidrasha to open in October 1981, Bible study seminars,
[r Moadon Ivri (Hebrew Club), the Great Jewish Books
ub. and the Community Hebrew Ulpan. as well as
kcattonal programs for the Greater Miami Jewish
deration (including Women's Division, Young Adult
on, Leadership Development Division, Federation
gdership Learn-Ins. and professional enrichment
grams).
Institute for Jewish Studies
Under the aegis of this office, a wide range of com-
imitywide activities are conducted including the
Kional Bibls Contest, the AMI (My People) Knowledge
Israel Quiz, held annually by the World Zionist
fganization; the Jewish National Fund Israel Educator
vard. the Louis Schwarlzman Scholarship Fund, which
[ivides scholarship funds for professional enrichment;
Chug Tanach. a Bible study group. In addition, the
Lstitute works with a number of national Jewish groups
community organizations including the Jewish
^tional Fund, the Jewish Community Centers of South
onda. the Judaica Studies Program at the University of
^ami. the Southeast Region of the United Synagogue of
uerica. and the Department of Education and Culture
jthe World Zionist Organization to organize a full range
(community programs.
The Greater Miami Board
of License for
the State of Florida
The Greater Miami Board of License for the State of
Drida is an affiliate of the National Board of License of
American Association for Jewish Education, and is
thorized to grant Temporary and Continuing Hebrew
acher Licenses, Teacher of Talmud Licenses, Special
^cation Licenses, Early Childhood Educator Licenses,
iday School-Weekend Teacher Certificates, and
taica Certificates for secular school teachers.
The Board of License, through its process, not only
pnses teachers, but has also been instrumental in
s'n the minimum qualifications for professional
piers in the South Florida Jewish community.
A comprehensive placement service for the schools of
community is conducted for administrators,
ttroom teachers, and specialty personnel through the
ard of License. Applicants are evaluated, files
iblished. referrals solicited, and guidance and coun-
|ng are provided toward the attainment of the ap-
priate license as well as placement in the schools of
ith Florida.
In the past year over 147 applicants have been
|pttMd through this service of the Board of License.
Teachers Fringe
Benefits Program
The teachers fringe benefits program has now
eluded 10 successful years working with the Greater
Mm Jewish Federation. Through this program, partial
fment of health insurance and retirement premiums
been provided for teachers in Jewish schools. "This
rn has helped to attract and retain qualified,
ised teachers for the growing Jewish community of
*h Florida," Golden said. "Additionally, and equally
Jificant," he added, "it has become the major incentive
teachers to continue their professional growth and
|elopment."
Day School Department
With day school student registration in Dade and
|Jh Hroward Counties now nearly 3,000 strong, the
JJs Day School department was established three
fs ago to work with these schools. The program has
nded to deal with funding, internal audits, tuition
*ances, in-service institutes, the Principals and
unistrators Council, holiday celebrations, spelling
Ipts. the Hebrew Essay contest, sports activities.
"jog and administrative personnel placement, and
ter licensing.
. addition, under the initiative of CAJE
Jewish High School of South Florida, to opt a its
f 'n September of 1981 at the Michael-Ann Russell
f munitv Center, has been planned and organized. The
imunity Day Junior High School is scheduled
to open in South Dade in the Fall of 1982. Start up funds
for both schools were provided by a grant from the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies.
Educational Resource
Center and Library
The Educational Resource Center and Library of the
Agency is a multi-faceted resource facility for the Jewish
community located at 4200 Biscayne Blvd. Among its
facilities are a circulating library, containing English,
Hebrew, Yiddish and Russian books, a pedagogic
reference center, a resource center for Jewish education,
an extensive Hebrew and English reference center, an
audio-visual bank of filmstrips, cassettes, tapes and
records, a verticle file reference section, and a small card
and gift shop.
Jewish Film Library
The Jewish Film Library of CAJE, originally started
by a grant from Mrs. Isadore Abrams, and then sup-
plemented by the Public Relations Department of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, now has over 150 films
covering a broad area of subjects, including: the
Holocaust, the Development of the Modern State of
Israel, current Israeli problems, biographical films,
American Judaism, the Bible, as well as many holiday
films geared for the younger student in the Day School.
Additionally, the Library owns the monthly series of
films Israel Reports.
Publications
The Publications Department of CAJE not only
produces educational material for the Judaica High
School supplement, supplementary schools and Early
Childhood teachers, but also for the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, camps, and public and
private schools in Dade County. At present, over 40
publications have been issued with sales in Greater Miami
as well as throughout the United States.
Community Service* Department
The Community Services Department sends regular
mailings to every private, public, elementary, schools
with gifted programs, junior high, senior high and
Catholic school in Dade and Broward Counties.
Notification is sent regarding the availability of material
and curriculum assistance encompassing the entire
Jewish educational sphere from approaches to the
Holocaust, Israel, Soviet Jewiy, prejudice and other
social studies materials in the related fields.
In this department, an emissary (shaliach) from
Israel, offers his expertise in the teaching of these sub-
jects through the use of drama, as well as material and
subject relating to Israel.
Jewish Special Education
The Central Agency for Jewish Education intially
began its Jewish Special Education Program through a
two-year grant from the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and the
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Now in its fourth
year, the program serves as a special learning disabilities
resource for supplementary synagogue and community
schools as well as Day Schools. The program is now an in-
tegral part of the CAJE program.


iwtim ii.Ui.UUUpJ.v .,,..,,,,,
JVS Means to Live
With Pride
Page 10-C
Since its founding 23 years ago. the Jewish
Vocational Service has touched the lives of thousands of
Greater Miami's Jewish community through an ever
expanding range of services designed to help maintain self
sufficiency in modern society.
Through its membership in the National Association
of Jewish Vocational Services and the International
Association of Counseling Services as well as its ac-
creditation by the Commission on Accreditation of
Rehabilitation Facilities, Greater Miami's Jewish
Vocational Service has come to be recognized as a leader
in the field of vocational counseling and service, according
to Robert K. Levenson, JVS president.
Its multifaceted program allows JVS to provide
comprehensive service to those seeking to enter the job
market for the first time as well as to those returning to
the labor force or in need of special services to ac-
commodate disability.
Job Placement and
Employment Counseling
A job placement counselor is available to assist
applicants in making vocational choices and obtaining job
placement. Resume writing, job interview techniques, job
seeking skills, and career information are integral parts of
the services available, according to Levenson. The
placement program obtains job orders on a continuing
basis and provides information about the Florida job
market. The placement counselor also works in con-
junction with the career development counselor to present
special interest programs.
Job opportunities, as well as applicants, range from
the unskilled to the professional. Employers can depend
upon receiving carefully screened and qualified ap-
plicants. JVS does not charge a fee to either the applican
or the employer.
Career Development
Counseling
The Career Development Counseling program is
designed specifically for anyone needing assistance in
choosing a career.
Vocational interest and aptitude tests, along with
individual counseling are used to help those wishing to
make a career choice. Counseling for adults considering a
mid-life career change or those entering the job market is
also available.
For those considering a college education, this
program also offers college selection counseling. A limited
financial aid program is administered by the JVS and is
available to both college and vocational students.
Various group programs are presented throughout
the year including Career Workshops for Women. College
Selection Seminars for High School Students, and Job
Finding Skills for College Seniors. Counseling is offered
at various locations in Dade County with evening hour.'
available.
Fees are based on a sliding scale.
Services to the Elderly
The JVS Nutrition Project provides over 1,700 hot
kosher meals daily, five days a week at eight meal sites for
the elderly of Miami Beach and North Miami Beach. More
than 400 of those meals are delivered daily to the
homebound elderly. The project provides a variety of
supporting social services including escort services,
transportation, outreach, information and referral, health
and welfare counseling, nutrition education, and shopping
assistance.
The Project receives additional support for sup-
plemental programs from JVS Homebound Services, an
auxilia-y which funds additional home delivered meals,
some livery costs and Project Market Basket, which
farms a package of groceries to the homebound for the
weekend.
1 JVS Home Services Department, located on
Mian- each, coordinates and administ. ton-
munit rviceprograi
these programs provides personal ear-
to t i;ent elderly homebound on Mia
Home Health Aides, trained by the American Red Cross
and community health professionals, assist the elderly in
the community who require care and service to maintain
an independent life style and avoid or postpone in-
stitutionalization. Levenson said.
The Home Services Department also operates a
Referral Service for people who wish to work as com-
panions and homemakers.
Immigrant Services
This program offers vocational services to refugees
who have been arriving in Miami in recent years from all
corners of the earth. Faced with major problems in their
adjustment, acculturation and adaptation to American
life, they often turn to the JVS for guidance and
assistance.
The JVS's immigrant services include training in
English as a Second Language, both in the classroom and
language laboratory; vocational counseling, skills
training, job placement, and on-the-job training which
features partial reimbursement to employers for hiring
disadvantaged persons.
Sheltered Employment
The Jewish Vocational Service operates a special
older worker program which provides work paid on a piece
rate basis to a selected group of people 60 years of age or
older. These workers perform the same subcontract ac-
tivities as do other clients in the Sheltered Workshop.
who include both physically and emotionally handicapped
as well as clients in the Vocational Rehabilitation;-
Program.
This facility operates as a subcontractor to a number
of important business concerns. In each instance, con-
tracts are negotiated competitively and work is completed
in accordance to specifications. The Jewish Vocational
Service Workshop performs a wide variety of routine
assembly, packaging and bench operations as well as

IF*

.


ATIONAL
St. Miami.
Ram, fmadent
-i V.U1. Kxw. I Hr.

more intricate work.
"Income derived from subcontracts is paid to
trainees who are able to learn the meaning of work and its
rewards,'" said Levenson.
Deaf Rehabilitation
Program
The JVS Deaf Rehabilitation Program has been
serving the needs of the deaf community in Miami for the
past two years through a grant from the Florida Office of
Vocational Rehabilitation. Included in the program is a
curriculum of vocational evaluation and work adjustment
training tor deaf adults
Remedial education programs are developed on the
basis of clients" communication ability, personal and
social skills, education, work history, observed behavior
and the desire to succeed.
"Our program is considered complete only when our
clients" goals of self-understanding and improvement
have been met and employment commensurate with
potential is obtained,'" Levenson said.
Vocational
Rehabilitation Program
This program offers several comprehensive formats
including work evaluation, work adjustment training,
individual and group counseling, referral and job
placement.
Work evaluation is designed to find the client's
vocational strengths and assets by means of intelligence,
personality, and aptitude tests as well as a variety of work
samples geared to determine suitability for job
placements.
Work adjustment seeks to alter behavior which may
interfere with the client's ability to work and or maintain
employment. This would include work attitudes, habits,
social and personal adjustment and personal hygiene.
Techniques include individual and group counseling,
behavior modification, video taping, observation and
feedback, field trips and guest speakers.
Job placement, in a competitive or sheltered setting,
referral to training programs, and-or to other community
agencies is considered an integral part of the
rehabilitation process, Levenson said. "In all cases, the
individual needs of the client are given first priority."
Mount Sinai
Center
continued from page 3
fitness, weight loss and arthritis. Free self-help groups for
the chronically ill, diabetics, pacemaker patients,
ileostomy patients, sleep disorder and stroke victims, all
meet on a regular monthly basis at the hospital to hear
guest speakers. CPR and childbirth classes are also given
monthly.
In a further effort to foster a "We Care" attitude,
the hospital is refurbishing its rooms with new more
comfortable and sturdy beds and furnishings, and up-
dating its decor in many areas.
Groups called Quality Circles were formed to
produce a better working environment and increased
productivity. Quality Circles are small groups of people
who voluntarily meet to analyze work problems and
recommend solutions to management. Mount Sinai is the
first hospital in the United States to institute this
program which gives employees the opportunity to share
in decision making processes which affect their everyday
work activities.
When a physician prescribes any tests or treat-
ments on an outpatient basis. Mount Sinai's Private Out
Patient office ensures that patients are in and out of the
hospital as quickly and conveniently as possible. Not only
does this special office register and give all the necessary
financial information, it also provides a personal escort for
patients to the proper department for their procedure.
To provide a central location for the re-
habilitation of orthopaedic and stroke patients, among
others, the hospital has opened a 20-bed Rehabilitation
Unit, complete with a central dining area and therapy
facilities.
In an attempt to decrease the cost of medical care
to the patients, the medical center is putting the finishing
touches on the Sophie and Nathan Gumenick Ambulatory
Care Center. The first floor of the building will be devoted
to ambulatory care surgery and the second floor will house
the Gastroenterology, and the Pain and Dialysis Centers.
The never ending quest for knowledge is one of the
philosophies of Mount Sinai Medical Center. Reinforcing
that philosophy is the current construction of the Hany
Pearlman Biomedical Research Institute, scheduled for
completion by year's end.
Mount Sinai currently has the only 100 percent
voluntary Blood Bank in Dade County and the only
hospital based Blood Bank. The need for additional space
and modernization has called for the construction of even
a larger facility, the Olivia and Louis Hand Blood Bank,
expected to open at the end of this year.
For 32 years, Mount Sinai has grown and progressed
with new programs and renovation of facilities. The
hospital is currently developing a master plan for the
future. When accepted by the Board of Trustees, it will be
announced to the community, whose support and com-
mitment will be essential to its development. The
hospital's theme has been "Destination: Greatness."
Through the accomplishments of the past three decades,
great strides have already been made toward that goal.


i ne Jewish
Douglas Gardens:
A Community In Itself"
MIAMI JEWISH HOME &
HOSPITAL FOR THE AGED
151 NE. 52nd St. Miami.
Fl 33137
751-8626
Harold Beck Praadcat
Fred D. Hirt. Exec Director
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The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens is a recognized leader in the field of
geriatric health care. From the acute care unit of the long-
term facility to the community outreach programs, the
Home is setting the pace in progressive and rehabilitative
services and programs.
"Ours is one of the few institutions in the country
accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of
Hospitals as both a nursing home and a specialty geriatric
hospital," according to Harold Beck, president. The 376
residents in the long-term care facility live in one of 11
areas, based on individual need.
"Douglas Gardens is a community in itself,
providing a wide range of services and facilities to meet
the physical, social, and emotional needs of its residents,"
Beck said. Fully-equipped Physical and Occupational
Therapy Departments are geared toward the individual's
rehabilitative needs. Social services, arts and activities,
educational and recreational activities are part of the
variety of programs designed to maximize residents'
active and self-sufficient lifestyles.
Admission
Admission to Douglas Gardens is open to any elderly
person who has lived in Dade County or South Broward
County for 18 of the past 24 months. Applicant decisions
are based on need, and not one's ability to pay, said Beck.
"The Admissions and Patient Care Committee of the
Board of Directors reviews all applications for admission.
The Board is comprised of some 100 business and com-
munity leaders who provide direction and establish policy
governing all areas of operation.
Looking beyond tomorrow to meet the needs of a
changing and growing elderly population is a priority
consideration for both the Board and Administration of
the Home. The Stein Gerontological Institute (SGI) at
Douglas Gardens provides research, planning, and
training for and about the elderly.
Results from these studies and programs may have
far-reaching effects on senior adult environments. A
Human Factors Study is now underway in SGI to analyze
the activity involved in meal preparation, a necessary but
difficult task for someone with even slight impairments
Cabinet heights, appliance and utensil design are beinjr
scrutinized with the intent of recommending better ac-
commodations for the elderly. The Institute includes the
Nurse Training Special Project, an educational program
to improve the care of the elderly through continuing
education of nurses and aides serving the elderly in in-
stitutions throughout Dade County. SGI also conducts
program evaluation and training projects for Douglas
Gardens, the State of Florida and, on a contractual SET
communities around the United States.
Independent Life Style
"Setting these far-reaching standards is a trademark
of the Home, Beck said. "Douglas Gardens is among the
first institutions to offer an independent apartment uvin*
environment in conjunction with support services from-
long-term care facility."
Irving Cypen Tower, a 102-unit adult congregate
living facility, is designed to maximize independence in a
secure environment. Residents benefit from social.
recreational, and medical services provided by the Home
Great strides have been taken by the Home to
transgress the boundaries of institutional care by
bringing services to the community. The medical and
mental health divisions of the Home operate outpatiertj
services based on one's ability to pay. The Douglas
Gardens Outpatient Mental Health Center was among the
first gerontological mental health programs in the U.S.
Supportive counseling and psychiatric treatment are
intended to provide the means for sustained life in the
community.
Another mental health center is operated by Douglas
Gardens on Miami Beach. The Douglas Gardens Com-
munity Mental Health Center of Miami Beach serves
people of all ages in areas including drug abuse, ac-
culturation programs for refugees, special counseling for
the elderly, children, and families, emergency services.
transitional, court screening, and vocational counseling.
The highly-trained staff of professionals is interested is
strengthening the individual's ability to live in-
dependently.
SWAT
A direct approach to home-delivery of social and
health services is being explored through the 3-yeaf
demonstration program, Service Workers Action Team
(SWAT). The SWAT team, comprised of a registered
nurse, nursing assistant, recreation coordinator, social
worker, home health aide, and field coordinator, travels to
retirement residences on Miami Beach providing services
to building residents. By bringing services into the older
person's home, SWAT seeks to extend the period of time
a person can remain independently in his or her cod-j
munity.
Members of the community with greater needs i
attend one of two day care centers operated by the Homi
The Douglas Gardens-City of Miami Senior Adult Dp
Center at Legion Park serves more than 100 clients with
transportation, a daily meal, and two snacks. Tta
comprehensive program includes arts and crafu,
psychotherapy, nutrition education, as well as heal"
screening by a registered nurse.
The Community Care Adult Day Center at Dougtol
Gardens serves some thirty-five men and women win
have limited functional capacity and can benefit mo*!
from this unique application of the day care concept toi
nursing home environment. Clients are offered therapyI
and medical services through the outpatient medw
center at the Home.
Senior adults who live in the community may i
difficulty obtaining jobs because of their age. Doug*!
Gardens currently has 22 part-time workers employ*
under the Senior Community Service Emptoyoj*
Program (SCSEP) Title V of the Older American Act -Twl
program was developed by the American Association
Retired Persons, the Florida State Program OfBa*
Aging, and the Home. Training senior adults with sped*!
skills which they can apply to today's work force *
goal of SCSEP. These employees work in all areas i *
from mailroom, purchasing, and personnel clerks to<
care aides and transporters.
In addition to the staff in each of the Home s munity outreach divisions, network of 200 men *
women volunteer as friendly visitors, letter writ**
entertainers, clerks, barbers, party hosts, and s^P^I
among other important functions. Many of f1*
volunteers come from one of the Home's five AuxiW
and the Men's Club.
The Home operates two Thrift Shops in the Sojl
Florida area. All proceeds from the Thrift Shops areu*!
to offset the cost of medical supplies for indigent reside*
of the Home.


CJW & Refugee
Resettlement Greets
New Americans
Page13-C
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Refugee
Resettlement Program at the Ida Fisher School on Miami
Beach is designed to provide a coordinated service facility
lor incoming Soviet Jewish emigres as well as refugees
being assisted at the request of the United States
Government.
The program at the school, leased from the Dade
ounty School Board at $1 annually plus a prorated share
building maintenance costs, is but one institution using
e building for a variety of social services reflecting the
eeds of the surrounding community, which has seen a
owing influx of Soviet Jews and other immigrants in
lecent years.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation is planning to
settle 200 Soviet Jewish emigres between this Sep-
mber and the end of September 1982. The emigre
|ommunity. still centered in South Beach after gaining its
itial strength in the mid 1970s, now numbers over 1,500
id was augmented in 1981 with absorption of over 120
w arrivals.
The $512,115 cost of resettling 200 Soviet Jewish
Jnigres between September 1981 and the end of Sep-
ber 1982 will be broken down as follows: $343,118
ovided by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation ex
^iding the value of volunteer services; $168,997 provided
the Federal Government as part of larger grant made
the Council of Jewish Federations, the central
anization of Jewish federations in the United States
ch oversees emigre absorption nationwide; and
.000 provided by Mount Sinai Medical Center in free
ical care. In addition, other members of Federation's
ily of agencies will spend a total of $662,000 for emigre
ices in the course of the year, both for newcomers and
se already in the community.
Three Federation agencies most active in the
ttlement of Soviet Jewish emigres include the Jewish
ily and Children's Service which provides family
.seling and other case work related to resettlement,
directs the financial maintenance program for
comers.
The Jewish Vocational Service uses its space at the
Fisher School to provide a full range of job counseling
I placement services along with English language
pruction and language lab facilities
The Rescue and Migration Service of the National
Incil of Jewish Women is the local cooperating agency
Ithe worldwide, international Hebrew Immigrant Aid
*ety (HIAS). It has worked locally since 1923 to assist
comers to the united States.
REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT
PROGRAM
1424 Drexel A ve. Miami Beach
Fl 33139
672-2773
Madeline Arenson, Director
REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT
COMMITTEE
G. Alan Brooks. Chairman
NATIONAL COUNCU. OF
JEWISH WOMEN RESCUE
AND MIGRATION SERVICE
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. Fl. 33137
573-6971
Florence Albert Executive Dir.
Charlotte Oliver,
Ahboc Exec Dir.
In the pre-migration phase, clients are referred to
Rescue and Migration by other Federation agencies, the
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, HIAS,
synagogues, attorneys and other organizations. Many
other cases are brought to Rescue and Migration's at-
tention by family members already living in Greater
Miami.
When and if the immigrant arrives, post migration
activities begin, largely coordinated by Rescue and
Migration. Language barriers may further complicate
proceedings because all official documents must be
submitted in the original, together with certified tran-
slations. In addition, a translator must be present during
all following interviews with the Immigration and
Naturalization Service.
The process continues with additional procedural
matters including alien registration, lost documents and
missing relative searches and finally with the request for
assistance in completing the naturalization process with
citizenship five years after arrival.
Soutjl
ide"|
Z
forking directly with the United States
?ration and Naturalization Service as well as U.S.
Hates throughout the world, the Rescue and
Service has been involved in every facet of
rant service, beginning with the earliest waves of
~ation at the start of the 20th century and con-
_ with Holocaust survivors,' Hungarians in 1956,
patter 1960, Czechoslovaks after 1968, Moroccans,
s and Soviet Jews. In 1980 individuals from 47
[s were locally assisted by the Rescue and
t service.



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B.B.Y.O. Comes Alive
Page 14-C
Are you a Jewish high school student? Do you enjoy
the company of other Jewish teens?
In Dade County, over 600 members in 18 groups of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization are exploring op-
portunities to build friendships with other Jewish youth
while participating in a variety of recreational and
educational activities. Additionally, a chapter for the
educable mentally retarded is staffed by two special
education professionals.
New members ioin a chapter iAZA for boys. BBG for
girls) which meets weekly under the leadership of their
own elected officers. BBYO youth plan and conduct their
own programs with the help of an adult advisor.
Together, the Dade chapters comprise the Greatei
Miami Council of BBYO which plans inter-chapter
events and large scale community service or social
programs. The council also provides local representation
on the State (Regional) and International executive
boards of BBYO.
According to Bert Brown, president of the Greater
Miami BBYO Adult Board, the'group programs in four
major areas including cultural and Jewish Heritage,
community service, athletics and social activities.
This year BBYO youth organized a nine session
Jewish Heritage and Cultural discussion group on current
topics of concern to the Jewish world. They have involved
several community agencies and resources (Rabbi Warren
Kasztl of Congregation Shaare Tefillah. Dr. Helen Fagin,
Chairman. University of Miami Judaic Studies Program.
B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League. Central Agency for
Jewish Education. Israel Aliyah Center. Hillel. individual
Holocaust Survivors, and recent immigrants).
Additionally. several chapters held creative Kabbalat
Shabbat services and Havdalah programs. Several
BBYO'ers manned an information table at the South
Dade Jewish Renaissance Fair, held this year on February
22.
Community Service
Over 200 BBYO youth, lay board, volunteer advisors
and staff volunteered in many capacities for Super
Sunday on January 18, 1981. The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation recognized this participation in this com-
munity wide phon-o-thon with a Certificate of Recognition
presented at the Greater Miami Council Annual Con-
vention held in Homestead April 10-12.
Several chapters have worked in many other com-
munity agencies. B'nai B'rith BBG volunteered time at
the Sunrise School for the mentally retarded in
November. Several chapters have spent their weekends at
the Jewish Home for the Aged on Miami Beach.
Babi Yar AZA sponsored the second annual Tree-A-
Thon to raise funds for the Papanicolaou Cancer Research
Center. Seventy-five youth and guests spent their
weekend in a tree in Coconut Grove holding Friday and
Saturday services and providing entertainment while
collecting funds for this worthy cause.
Additionally, all BBYO youth contribute to the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization International Service Fund
which is used to support the many Tzedakah projects
B'nai B'rith is involved in worldwide.
Dade County BBYO members are supporting the
Gold Coast Council Youth 6 Million Penny Drive. All four
North Miami Beach chapters and many of the South Dade
groups are actively seeking pennies to help Gold Coast
reach its goal to amass 6 million pennies to create a
visualization of the meaning of that number which
represents the number of Jews lost in the Holocaust. They
will allocate the funds to programs related to Holocaust
memorials and local Jewish causes.
Athletics
Dade County BBYO'ers participate in a year round
athletic league. 300 members play every Sunday, sharing
in a comprehensive physical education program with
other Jewish youth. All members have the chance to
participate.
Annually, the B'nai B'rith Men's South Dade
Council sponsors the Junior Maocabiad for Dade and
Broward County B'nai B'rith youth. Last year over 500
individuals represented their chapters while participating
B'NAI B'RITH
YOUTH ORGANIZATION
14411S. Dude Hwy., Miami.
Fl 33176
253-7400
Bert Brown. Preadent
Steven M. Klein, Rcg.Dfa-.
KM BRITH mil
-
N~v-Jn.4Utato*
#*
. *
in the games. This year a repeat of 500 youth attended
and participated in the Junior Maccabiad held February
15 at Miami Dade Community College South Campus.
Generally. BBYO helps Jewish youth of all religious
backgrounds become involved in the Jewish community
with their Jewish peers through informal and formal
educational experiences. A major goal of BBYO is to
allow youth to feel comfortable with themselves as Jewi
and individuals. A second goal is to encourage personal
growth and development of leadership skill- |
chapter, council and upper level program
designed to challenge and nurture the young rious
mind.
Youth participate in local and international
leadership training institutes which are conducted by
professional staff throughout the year. Hade \ advisors met in October to develop leadership ski 11s and
programming expertise. Greater Miami Council youth
played crucial roles in planning the Regional LeaderabJj
Training Conference in November and wore wei
represented at the BBYO Regional Convention held it
December. This summer many local youth will participate
in international summer Judaism and leadership
programs held at B'nai B'rith camps in Wisconsin and
Pennsylvania and on tour in Israel. The three we'
International Leadership Training Conference held ati
B'nai B'rith Perlman Camp has been described by a senior
vice-president of American Telephone and ielegrapij
Company as "the finest practical leadership program af
the country."
BBYO is open to all high school Jewish youth Tbjl
opportunity for healthy, challenging, educational ami
social experiences is the draw power of its program.


^mmmm


llel: "For The Most
ucial Time In Our Lives"
Page 15-C
lege is the most crucial time in any of our lives,
[ion is at its highest during these years; we are
questioning our identity, our upbringing and
As a minority anywhere ... we need to
lose, to form a community within a community
? able to grow as young Jewish adults."
It were not for Hillel. my identity as a Jew would
ffered greatly. Who knows if I'd still be lighting
bat candles and walking to services on Friday
[lei not only introduced me to other Jews ... to
irofessors, to Jewish activities, and to Jewish
f but it also helped me to express myself as a Jew
1,000 others in a school of 40.000 students."
tse statements were made by a young woman, now
at the University of Miami, majoring in Jewish
)se who founded the Hillel Jewish Student Centers
University of Miami, Florida International
lity. and Miami Dade Community College cam
[now that Jewish students and faculty members
fa place to call their own on campus. These in-
lls involved in campus life needed a place to gather
|r as Jews for religious observance, and simply
[lace to hang out" with other Jewish students and
unmet need existed on these campuses to speak to
idemic community with one voice when concerns
?d about absences for religious observance or re-
lrses or exams on Shabbat.
lay. these needs and concerns are met through the
lewish Student Centers throughout Greater Miami.
by B'nai B'rith and are also supported today
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
lewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
wording to Sydney Traum, president of the Hillel
itions of Greater Miami Community Board. Hillel
each out to students who feel little need to identify
lewishness in a community which has a strong
communal life. In addition, he said, Hillel may
on community college campuses as a weekly club
| students can meet with a faculty advisor or a Hillel
)r for a meal, to hear a speaker, for a discussion or
i a social event.
any campus on which it is involved, Hillel
les Jewish educational and cultural resources for the
it who wishes to expand his Jewish knowledge while
ig his major study time to professional and
lie interests.
There appropriate, Traum said, Hillel has supported
lcouraged the development of programs of Judaic
in colleges and universities.
allow the further expansion and development of
[programs on local campuses, "the Greater Miami
Federation set a standard for the American Jewish
inity when it made a commitment to help meet the
)f Jewish college and university students," Traum
iroughout Greater Miami, Hillel maintains an
Program to meet its goals of involving Jewish
HILLEL JEWISH
STUDENT CENTERS
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
1100 Stanford Way. C.G.
Ft 33146
FLORIDA INTL
UNIVERSITY
Tamiami Trail. Miami.
FL 33199
562-2215
MIAMI DADE COMMUNITY
COLLEGE NORTH
10815 N.W. 27th Ave, Miami,
Fl 33167
681-5540
MIAMI DADE COMMUNITY
COLLEGE SOUTH
11011 S.W. 104th SL, Miami.
Fl 33176
598-1200
Sydney Traum. President
Richard K GcJdstein. Reg. Dir.
students with Jewish life. At Florida International
University, a Shabbat Chavurah and a movie series are
regular highlights of the year's program. In addition, a
regularly scheduled faculty-staff breakfast series and a
communitywide rally for Soviet Jewry marked a calendar
of highly visible Hillel events.
At the University of Miami, regular Shabbat services
and dinners were but one aspect of a comprehensive
program which included Israeli dancing, a Tu B'Shevat
observance, and participation in the Scholar in Residence
Program of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Israel
Programs Office.
The Hillel program at Miami Dade Community
College-South included an active club with weekly
meetings, speakers and discussions, and a Purim
hamentashen sale on the campus to raise funds for the
Hillel club.
Hillel programs, Traum said, attempt to cover
some of the broad religious, cultural and Jewish
educational needs of the contemporary Jewish college
student. Its success has been based on diversity and
responsiveness to changing needs as well as providing a
sense of continuity for traditional Jewish life on area
campuses.
n
- I


THE GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION
AND ITS fAMILY Of LOCAL AGENCIES
PROVIDING SERVICES TO THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY Of DADE COUNTY
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
1 4iOOBisca>nr Boulevard Miami 33137
Baal B'rith Youth Organization
2 1441 I South Dick-MK)h.i> Miami 33l7f>
Central Agency tor Jewish Education
3 4200 Bncaynr Boulevard Miami 33137
Community Chaplaincy Service
4 4200Bistavne Boulevard Miami 33137
Community Relations Committee
5 4200 rlrjcayne Boulevard Miami 33137
federation Information 4
Referral Service
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami 33137
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
7 2400 Hne Tree Drive Miami Beach 33140
High School In Israel
3950 rlrjcayne Boulevard Miami 33137
Itlllel Community Day School
19000 n.C 2Sth Avenue
north Miami Beacn 33180 ,
Nillel Jewish Student Centers
10 I niirrvlt of Miami I Kll Nt.iill.Mi' tt.u
iMIHrr Dnvei Coral Gabm 33146
11 norida International Univervt)
Tamiami Trail Miami 33199
12 Miami Dsde Commuml> College i*Wtti Campusi
10813 n* 27th Avrnur Miami 33167
Israel Programs Office
IS 3930Baca>nr Boulevard Miami 53137
Jewish Community Centers of
South riortda
I* l89O0nt 23th Avervue north Miami Brach 35180
15 12401 S* 102nd Avenue Miami 33176
IS 23 Washington Avenue Miami (Vac h 33139
JCCST Community Care Program
17 I SO Alton Road Miami Beach 33139
JCCST Day Care for the Trail Man-
ia 920 ANon Road Miami Beach 33139
JCCST Senior Ride
19 920 Alton Road Miami Beach 33139
JCCST Very Important People (VIP) Project
20 23 WastMngton Avenue Miami Brach 33139
Jewish tamllv and Children % Service
21 I790SW 27lh Avrnur Miami 33143
22 2040 n.C 163rd Street north Miami Brai h 33162
23 420 lincoln Road Miami Beach 33139
24 850 Oashingtan Avenue Miami Braih 33139
25 8903MH 87th Avrnur Miami 33176
Jewish High School of South TVorida
2w 18900 fit 23th Avenur north Miami Brach 33IH0
Jewish Vocational Service
27 318 1* 25(h Street Miami 33127
2*
29
SO
SI
32
S3
34
SS
S7
38
59
40
41
47
4*
91
s
Jewish Vocational Serv Ice
nutrition Program
tSWaMnoJon teenur. Miami Btacil S3138
1424 Dread v.. Warm Brach 33139
920 Altim K.v.1.! Miami Brach 33L3B
Mm 77th'4n-rl Miami Brach 33141
lOVl Street sYOtcan DrhC Miami Beat li S3tV
I70II-I I'Xh Avenue north Miami Beat h 3ir
2391 Pratnr Avrnur Miami Brach 33139
ISO AHun Road Miami Brach 33139
Judak Studies Program
IMnBaa) it Miami Miami BHd
Lehrman Day School
7."7 77lhVirrl Miami Brach 33141
Mesivta UMiis Mrn.it/ri High School
I9b3 Alton Rnad Miami Brae I> S3 ISO
Miami Jewish Nome and Hospital
for the Aged
131 nr 32nd street Miami 33137
M.iriM Outpatient Mental Health Care
Centers for the Elderly
151 fit S2nd Street Miami 33L37
1007 Lincoln Road Miami Brach 33139
M1MM A Senior Adult Day Care Center at
Legion Park
Brwaynr Biwlevard fV ( With "-tree! Miami 33137
MJMrl A Community Care Adult Day Center
131 ne 32nd Strerl Miami 33137
MJMH A Irving Cypen Tower
3100nr. 2nd Avenur Miami 35137
Mount Sinai Medical Center
43U0 Alton Road Miami Brach 33140
afgnBinttlimiafmysta
1424 Drearl Avrnur Miami Beach 33139
Rescue and Migration Service.
national Council of Jewish women
42O0 Bncaynr Boulevard Miami 33137
South Dadc Hebrew Academy
11801 Sit 74th Avenue Miami 33156
Toras Eases Academy of Miami
990nf I7lst Street north Miami Beach 33162
Tederatlon Towers
770 West Avenue Miami Beach 33139
roundation of Jewish Philanthropies
4200 Bncaynr Boutevard Mujrm 33137
Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Pund
Campaign Headquarters
42(11 Bncaynr Boulrvard Miami 33137
12401 S. ICOnd Avenur, Mhrm 33176

1JJU1VSS4