The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02737

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Je54_Number29 TWO SECTIONS
Miami, FloridaFriday, July 17,1981
fnnsitochmi By Mail 80 Cents
Price 50 Cents
France Ready to Sell New Reactor to Iraq, Arms to Anybody
PARIS (JTA) France is ready
to replace the Iraqi nuclear reactor de-
stroyed by Israel last month, Foreign
Minister Claude Cheysson told the
Beirut daily AI Nahar. Cheysson said
that if Iraq makes the request, France
will replace the reactor "on the terms we
apply to other countries."
Earlier, he said that France will
multiply checks and controls to ensure
that civilian reactors are not used for
military purposes."
CHEYSSON ALSO said France will
sell arms to Middle East countries but
not to Israel. He added that arms will
not be sold to countries with totalitarian
regimes or which are at war. "As far as
Except Israel
the Middle East is concerned, only the
second restriction is applicable,*' he said.
"As a consequence (of the restriction) we
shall not deliver arms to Israel."
Cheysson named Saudi Arabia,
Iraq, the Persian Gulf States, Egypt and
North Africa as countries to which
France is prepared to sell weapons. Last
week, he told the weekly Le Nouvel Ob-
servateur that arms exports are "vital
for our industry" and that 300,000
people are directly employed by it. He
jaid that the export of weapons is essen-
tial to French industry and to the coun-
ty's defense.
CHEYSSON REITERATED
France's recognition of the Palestine
Liberation Organization as "one of the
representatives of the Palestinian
people," saying that the Palestinians do
not have, under current conditions, the
Continued on Page 9-A
'::-:*::%V*V:V&:&^^
O
I

ngton in recent meeting with Simone Veii president
i / .ropean Parliament.
n London
Rally Condemns
arrington Arabism
| MAURICE SAMUELSON
London A
p- rally of Jews from all
of Britain was held in
ral London to condemn
iro-Arab policy of
tun and the European
nic Community
'-' More than 25.000
from as far away as
in Scotland and
rmouth in southwest
land, packed Trafalgar
re to hear politicians.
ritual leaders and show
linesfl personalities re-
the EEC demand that
Palestine Liberation
Organization be involved in
a Middle East settlement.
It was one of the biggest meet-
ings held in Trafalgar Square in
recent years, and it was the
biggest ever rally organized by
Britain's 400.000-strong Jewish
community.
The theme of the rally.
organized by the Board of
Deputu "f British Jews and the
Ziooilt Federation, was "No to
the PLO." A massive portrait of
PLO chairman Yasir Arafat was
propped against the pedestal at
Nelson's column. Trafalgar
Square's monument which
dominates the London skyline. It
was captioned: 'Wanted for
Continued on Page 11-A
Begin Threatens To
Call New Elections
Sharon for Defence.....10-A
Absolute Confidence... 14-A
JERUSALEM I.ITA)
Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin gave notice
Monday that he would try
for only three weeks to set
up a new government. If he
failed, he would return his
mandate to the President,
and this would mean new
elections within five or six
months.
Begin told newsmen that
while he hoped and ex-
pected to be able to over-
come problems posed by
the coalition negotiations,
he certainly was ready for
new elections, if these
proved the only solution,
and he firmly expected the
Likud to increase its
strength in such elections.
In a lengthy press conference
on the steps of his office. Begin
lssu.iI the following warnings to
his potential coalition partners:
TAMI COULD only expect
one minister Its demand for two
ministers was "political bribery.
Begin said, considering that it
had only three Knesset ers
The National Religious Party
would pat two ministers, and no
more lit has six Knessetersl.
He hoped the wrangle be-
tween Tami and NRP over which
party will control the Religious
Ministry "can be resolved." If
Tami "is stubborn" and stays
out of the coalition over this
issue. Begin will cease trying to
Prime Minister Begin
lit
form a government and will move
to hold new elections. The Prime
Minister stressed that he would
not consider setting up a Likud-
NRP-Aguda minority govern-
ment (of 58 seats) even if Tami or
another faction pledged to sup-
port it in the Knesset. Unless
there was a majority of 61
Knesseters in his government.
Begin said, he would return his
mandate to the President.
He would not undertake to
"force" his Likud faction to vote
for the amendment to the "Who
is a Jew" law as proposed by the
Orthodox parties. If Agudat Yis-
rael "God forbid" insisted on
such an undertaking from him,
said Begin. "I will tell them
Continued on Page 10-A
American Jews Furious
Over Rabbis' Litmus Test
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The current proposal of
Orthodox groups in Israel
is a "religious affront to the
overwhelming majority of
the Jewish people," accord-
ing to Dr. Gerson Cohen.
Chancellor of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America.
Cohen released a cable he
has sent to Israeli leaders
urging them to reject the
demand of the religious
parties mandating a change
in the Law ot Return as
their price for joining a
viable Israeli government.
COHEN SAID. The Law of
Return is being made a political
tool, subject to the selfish inter-
pretation of a tiny Orthodox
group. They have constituted
themselves as the sole arbiters of
the question of who is a Jew, and
s.ek to use their momentary po-
litical clout to have their idiosyn-
cratic interpretation enacted into
the laws of the State of Israel.
"It is not difficult to imagine
that, under such a law. Jewish
Continued on Page 6-A
Amendment DangerousAbortion Is Not Murder
NEW YORK The American Jew-
ish Congress has criticized as "unwise'*
and "incompatible with Jewish tra-
dition" a Senate subcommittee vote ap-
proving legislation that could allow the
states to prosecute abortion as murder.
Phil Baum, associate executive di-
rector of the Congress, declared in a
statement: .
"We deplore the 3-2 vote in the
Senate Judiciary Subcommittee that
might lead to the outlawing of abortions
by defining human life as starting at the
moment of conception.
"AS WE indicated in our testi-
mony, we believe this position is not only
unconstitutional but unwise, not only
unrepresentative of American opinion
but incompatible with Jewish tradition
and with the broad reach of universal
religious principles which embody a deep
committment to the enhancement of life.
These traditions reflect the belief that, in
Continued on Page 9-A


Page 2-A
. Ai<#> fkridiari
Friday. July p. |

Sherry Lansing, president of 20th Century Fox, chats with Sidney E. Cohn, at the New York
State Theatre prior to the annual American Jewish Congress Festival Evening at which
Cohn, a Manhattan attorney, presented Lansing with the AJCongress' Artistic Achievement
Award Lansing hailed AJCongress for being in the vanguard of the fight against prejudice
and for freedom.
Headlines
Install New JWV Memorial at Pearl
Iris Goldwasser, special projects chairman of
the National Ladies Auxiliary. Jewish War Ve-
terans of the United States, is announcing the de-
dication of a memorial plaque immortalizing the
men who lost their lives at Pearl Harbor aboard
the USS Arizona on December 7,1941.
The dedication announcement was made in
conjunction with JWVA National President
Evelyn Mermonstein. Lt. Cmdr. Fred N atkin, of
the U.S. Navy Chaplain Corps, and a member of
the Jewish War Veterans in Hawaii, placed the
plaque in the shoreside memorial at Pearl Harbor.
The new memorial is under the supervision of
Gary Cummins, superintendent of the USS
Arizona Visitors Center, a project of the National
Park Service.
Some 500 participants in the World
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors in Je-
rusalem witnessed the unveiling of plaques in
memory of three young Jewish men who were
executed in 1944 in the notorious Buna Camp of
Auschwitz.
The brother of one of the three, Fred Dia-
ment of Los Angeles, established the memorial at
Hebrew University to promote the study of the
Holocaust
University President Avrsham Harman
greeted the gathering in the Wise Auditorium on
the Givat Ram campus.
The three, Nathan Weissmsn, Janek Gross-
feld and Yehuda Leo Diament, were arrested,
tortured and hanged for Iting a resistance
movement among the inmates of the extermina-
tion camp.
The ceremony was opened in Hebrew and
English by Fred Diament, who witnessed the ex
ecution. Another brother, Rabbi Shaul Diament,
recited a chapter of Psalms in memory of the de-
parted A dose friend of the young men, Arthur
Poznanaki, also delivered a tribute.
Sephardic Jewish texts once used by Georgi-
ans in Atlanta are now in the hands of other
Georgians Jews from the Soviet Union's Re-
public of Georgia thanks to the Sephardic
Community Activities Program at Yeshivs Uni-
lity in New York City.
One of the programs' projects is the develop
it of new Sephardic communities and
congregations in the United States, according to
Rabbi M. Mitchell Serais, associate director of the
program. Sephardic Jews are of Spanish, Portu-
guese or Oriental descent.
Congregation Or ve Shalom in Atlanta was
one of the groups that donated books. That con-
gregation is comprised mainly of Sephardic Jews
from the Island of Rhodes. Rabbi S. Robert Ichay
is spiritual leader.
Texts from Atlanta were given to the Associ-
ation of Jews from Russian Georgia, in Forest
Hills, N.Y.. Rabbi Serais said.
Prof. Allen Pollack, president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance, will lead delegates from across
the nation in an ideological conference to be held
<- Israel Aug. 25 to Sept. 4 in celebration of the
. 5th anniversary of the Labor Zionist Alliance in
America.
Joining with delegates from Labor Zionist
Alliance will be Pioneer Women, Habonim and
other organizations related to Labor Zionism.
In addition to sessions in Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv, a day is planned at Kibbutz Ginosar by the
Sea of Galilee to honor the memory of Yigal
Allon, late chairman of the World Labor Zionist
Movement, as well as visits to Labor Zionist In-
stitutions.
A vastly expanded force of pro-Arab lob-
byists and government officials has been singled
out as the main reason for Israel's increased diffi-
culty in obtaining political support in Washing-
ton.
Speaking before the convention of the
National Council of Young Israel at Spring Glen.
N.Y., Leonard Davis, director of Information and
Research of the American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee based in Washington, urged con-
cerned friends of Israel to counter the efforts of
"an army of Arab lobbyists, backed by millions of
dollars of oil money" to turn American support
away from Israel. He said that Israel's friends are
outnumbered 10-1.
Davis cautioned against speculation about
the internal workings of the Reagan Administra-
tion and against allowing the American Jewish
community to get caught up in the personality
politics and in-fighting within the executive
branch.
The number of Jews who arrived in Vienna
from the Soviet Union in the month of June was
866. bringing the total for the first six months of
1981 to 6,668. In reporting these figures, Char-
lotte Jacobson, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Re-
search Bureau of the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, emphasized the steady decline in
emigration by comparing the first six months of
1979,1980 and 1981.
In the January through June period of 1979,
a total of 24.794 Jews left the Soviet Union, while
15,087 left in the same months in 1980. These
figures represent a 40 percent decrease from the
first half of 1979 to that of 1980. and a 55 percent
decrease during the same periods from 1980 to
1961.
The Mel and Sheila Jaffee Chair in Interna
tional Trade has been inaugurated at Tel Aviv
University to promote research and teaching of
international trade, with particular emphasis on
prospects of economic cooperation and peace in.
the Middle East, and examination of conditions
which enhance integration into the world
economy.
The incumbent of the Chair,"" Prof. Se'ev
Hirsch, is an expert in the field, a former dean of
Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Management,
who has served as visiting lecturer at Oxford Uni-
versity, and at the Economic Development
Institute of the World Bank.
Donor of the Chair. Mel Jaffee. of Orange
County, Calif., is a member of the Council for
Economic Development and has been a longtime
supporter of Jewish and Israeli causes, particu-
larly in the fields of health and higher education
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Friday, July 17,1981
Jenist> tkrkJlan
News in Brief
Religious Parties to Ease Demands
ByJTA News Services
JERUSALEM Political ob-
servers here believe that the Na-
tional Religious Party and the
Aguda Israel will ultimately
agree to join a Likud-led coalition
government even if Prime Minis-
ter Menachem Begin declines to
meet their demands for an iron
clad guarantee that the contro-
versial "Who is a Jew" amend-
ment to the Law of Return will be
adopted by the next Knesset. The
two religious parties are expected
to cast their lot with Begin, as
they did in 1977 when the Likud
leader promised to "do his ut-
most" to get the amendment
through parliament.
The amendment has been ef-
fectively shelved during the past
four years for lack of political
support, even within Likud ranks
and the opposition to it is as
strong now as when Begin first
took office.
Simcha Ehrlich, a leader of
Likud's Liberal Party wing, gave
notice over the weekend that he
and his party were not prepared
to support trie proposed amend-
ment which went against their
conscience.
The amendment would define
as a Jew any person bom of a
Jewish mother or converted by
an Orthodox rabbi "according to
halacha."
JERUSALEM Meyer
I^'vin, who for more than 50
years recorded Jewish life in the
I nited States and Israel and who
for the last 25 years of his life
contended that he was the first to
conceive of a stage adaptation of
'The Diary of Anne Frank." died
of a stroke last Thursday night at
Hadassah Hospital. He was 75
years old. Funeral services were
held here Sunday.
I.r\ in. who began writing for
The Chicago Dotty Newt in 1922
while attending the University of
Chicago, was a prolific writer of
novels, plays, documentary films
and scenarios. He was a passion-
ate defender of Jewish settlement
in Palestine and the State of
Israel. During the last years of
his life, he was an outspoken
advocate for the immediate
settlement of all Ethiopian Jews
I Falashas) in Israel.
UNITED NATIONS Israel
did not participate Monday in a
dinner given by the Association
of South East Asian Nations in
honor of all the participants in
the International Conference on
Kampuchia which opened here.
The invitation to Israel, which
participated in the conference,
was withdrawn by the hosts of
the dinner without an explana-
tion and without a written notice,
Israeli diplomats said.
According to those diplomats,
the invitation to Israel to partici-
pate in the dinner waa withdrawn
by a telephone call last Thursday.
The next day, on Friday, Ambas-
sador Tommy Koh of Singapore,
who is chairman of ASEAN,
called Israel's UN Ambassador
Yehuda Blum and apologized for
the withdrawl of the invitation.
But Koh, Israeli diplomats said,
was not able to provide any satis-
factory explanation "for this ex-
traordinary breach of etiquette."
JERUSALEM Despite ru-
mors of a resolution of the
problem, Israel and the U.S.
clashed Monday over the future
use of U.S.-supplied weaponry by
the Israel Armed Forces. Premier
and Defense Minister Menachem
Begin conferred for more than
three hours with State Depart-
ment counselor Robert McFar-
lane and told newsmen later that
they had reached agreement.
But Begin said that details of
the accord "may or may not be
published" regarding use of
American weapons. Begin con-
ceded that the talks were "con-
nected, directly or indirectly"
with the continuing U.S.
suspension of delivery to Israel of
tour r-lb warplanes that should
have arrived here more than two
weeks ago.
American arms supplies are
legally conditional upon their
being used for "self-defense," and
the differences between Jerusa-
lem and Washington seem to be
over the definition of that key
term.
Begin said outright that Israel
would not agree to American
control of its military actions.
Sovereign states could never
agree to such a thing, he ex-
plained. Nor indeed was McFar-
lane seeking U.S. "veto" powers
over Israel's use of the weaponry
it supplies.
NEW YORK The Jews from
Iran who arrived in the United
States by the thousands, same of
them even before the Ayatollah
Kuhollah Khomeni took power in
1979. needed help fast and re-
ceived it from three agencies of
the Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, according
to Federation officials.
They said the first group of
about 1.200 were youths brought
here by the Agudath Israel and
the Lubavitcher organization.
The Federation, in cooperation
with the United Jewish Appeal of
Greater New York and the city's
Iranian Jewish leadership,
started the funding of vital serv-
ices for the Iranian Jews through
the Jewish Board of Family and
Children's Services (JBFCS). the
Jewish Community Services of
Long Island (JCSI.il and Feder-
ation Guidance and Employment
Service (FEGS).
WASHINGTON The Reag
an Administration is expected to
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decide this week on two issues af-
fecting Israel's security
delivery of F-16 jet fighters to
Israel and notification to Con-
gress of its proposed sale of
AWACS reconnaissance planes
and other equipment to Saudi
Arabia.
The Administration has prom-
ised a decision by Friday on
whether to lift the suspension on
delivery of four F-16s to Israel,
ordered last month after Israel's
June 7 attack on Iraq's nuclear
reactor. Friday is the day six
more F-16s, not affected by the
ban, are scheduled to go to Israel.
The Administration is also ex-
pected to give its unofficial notice
to Congress this week, of a
decision to sell Saudi Arabia five
AWACS and enhancement
equipment for 62 F-15s previ-
ously purchased by the Saudis.
NEW YORK Federal offi-
cials and local police are investi-
gating the explosion of a pipe
bomb in the Sanctuary of the
Jewish Center of New City, a
community in suburban Rock-
land County about 40 miles from
New York City. No one was
injured by the blast which caused
an estimated $20,000 damage.
According to Murray Cohen, a
spokesman for the Center, the.
bombing was motivated by anti-
Semitism. He said other in-
cidents included the theft of four
Torah scrolls from Temple Beth
Shalom in New City several
months ago. New City detectives
said their investigation has
turned up no suspects so far, but
they expressed doubt that anti-
Semites were involved.
NEW YORK Murray Gross,
a prominent labor leader, human
rights advocate and an activist
on behalf of Soviet Jewry, died
here Saturday at the age of 74.
He had been a vice president of
the International Ladies Gar-
ment Workers Union (ILGWU)
and, at the time of his death, a
member of the Executive Board
of the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
Gross was also a member of the
Board of the Jewish Labor Com-
mittee and of the American ORT
Federation and a member of the
New York City Human Rights
Commission from 1962-78.
JERUSALEM Premier
Menachem Begin said Monday
that he would meet with Egypt's
President Sadat in Alexandria at
the end of this month if he had
managed to set up a coalition by
then. Begin said that he had read
in an Egyptian newspaper that
Sadat's invitation to him to hold
the summit meeting was in effect
predicated upon his forming a
new government.
"If that is the case, then very
well. If I cannot form a govern-
ment, I won't go."
If, however, Begin continued,
the Egyptian leader wanted to
meet with him, as Israel's legal
Prime Minister, even though he
had not yet set up a new govern-
ment, then he would be "glad" to
go to Alexandria.
Begin said he had made this
position clear to the Egyptian
Ambassador Saad Mortaada who
called on him Monday morning
with a thank you cable from
Sadat for Begin's message to
Sadat on occasion of the holy
month of Ramadan.
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-Jewisjilhr****
Rabbinic Litmus Paper
Whether or not Prime Minister Begin succeeds
in putting together a workable government is beside
the point. What is to the point is the absolute black-
mail that the Orthodox religious parties have at-
tempted to impose on the Prime Minister as the price
for their participation in a Likud coalition.
This time, the price was amendment of the Law
of Return defining who a Jew is, not only on the basis
of Jewish motherhood, but also of conversion to
Judaism by the Orthodox rabbinate only.
We do not wish to enter into sectarian ar-
guments here, but merely to observe that at a time
when Jews are struggling to retain their identity not
only as a people, but also as a nation in the form of
the State of Israel, we must question those who
would seek to make distinctions among us, pro-
fessing Jews, as to our origins.
Adolf Hitler did that. The Angel of Death, Josef
Mengele, did that when he pointed left or right in the
concentration camps, delineating with his insouciant
gesture just who would live, and who would die. Do
now rabbis demand that right, too?
What, for example, would they do with respect
to Jewish arrivals from the Soviet Union, especially
today, when so many of them ultimately opt out of
Israel for a new life elsewhere? Isn't the presence of
every Soviet Jew in Israel precious? Must those who
commit themselves to this life also submit them-
selves to the Orthodox rabbinate for tests of "racial
purity?"
The implications are too hideous to contemplate
further. We do not praise Prime Minister Begin on
political grounds for his refusal to knuckle under to
the blackmail, even if it means new elections. We
praise him on strictly human grounds. And on
Jewish grounds.
The Moving Finger
We are happy that British Jewry was at least
able to hold its huge rally in London protesting the
Arabist policies of Lord Carrington before the spate
of violence erupted that has seized that island nation
these past few weeks.
Suffice it to say that, as Americans, we can be
no less than surprised to note that it was said this
week, on the floor of the House of Commons, that if
Britons could not find the kind of courage and
wisdom the United States showed during its own
riotous days of the 1960s to deal with the causes of
the unrest, not merely to demand law and order, then
they were in for a heap of trouble.
My, my. How times have changed. Not only are
we praised for having done something worthwhile,
but for having done it sufficiently well to be
emulated. And to think: once, in their eyes, we were
nothing but a nation of racist bigots.
A Period of Mourning
Shiva Asar BTamuz introduces a three-week
period of mourning that culminates in the observance
of Tisha B'av, the ninth day of the Hebrew month of
Av, the day that both Temples were destroyed.
On the 17th day of Tamuz, which this year will be
marked on Sunday, July 19, a number of calamities
befell the Jews. To begin with, the first Ten Com-
mandments were broken. Next, came the breaching
of the walls of Jerusalem.
Other tragic events included the placing of an idol
in the Temple. Also, Apostumus burned the To rah
publicaily.
Shiva Asar B 'Tamuz is observed from sun-up
until nightfall. And the entire three-week period in
memory of these bleak occurrences reminds us, if
reminder is necessary, that the Jewish struggle to
survive, so profoundly geared as it is to the Hitler
Holocaust, is in fact an ancient phenomenon.
Tragic though this three-week period is, let us
think of the splendor not of our survival, but that
endlessly we prevail.
Jewish Floridian
UtTICVintPLAKT- WNlMa.MlMU.ni
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What's Wrong With Lobby?
TIME WAS. maybe ten yean
ago and more, that to suggest
that Jew* had special political
interests and voted as s bloc was.
to put it in western movie
terms, "fightin' words"
There was, we insisted then, no
such thing as s "Jewish vote."
American Jews, so our argument
went, voted like anybody else
as individuals, reflecting their
own individual predilections. To
say otherwise was. in our opinion,
to be anti-Semitic.
I NEVER held with this non-
sense, and the passage of years
since then has borne me out. We
are no longer fearful of the clear
existence of a "Jewish vote."
Post-election results, along with
every other analysis of how labor
voted, or Blacks, or Catholics, or
Eastern seaboard intellectuals, or
fundamentalist Protestants, also
attempt a study of Jewish voting
patterns, with a special eye on
Jewish concerns for Israel.
No one seems to be fearful of

this anymore. When Jews felt
less safe in the general American
community, they resented being
targeted as part of a bloc interest
because bloc interests suggest
interests other than the Ameri-
can interest as a totality, and the
targeting process only served to
isolate them from the main-
stream even more.
But such appears not to be the
case today. Cultural, ethnic,
religious, nen linguistic
*The heaviest load I have to bear
islheloadonheUN."
pluralism is the current order of
the day. and individual inter**
groups have no problem
raising the banner high of ths*
interests. So open-minded hav.
we become about this that
diversky in our time even chal
lengM the status of English u
the language of the nation.
TELL A Miami Cuban that
he must learn to speak English if
he ever hopes to experience the
full flavor of his status as an
American citizen, and he will if
you are lucky, do no more than
laugh at you. Or else advise you
to learn to speak Spanish if you
expect to get along with him.
Why not? In this foolishness
he has the divinely-inspired
media behind him. and the public
school system, and the communi-
ty's leading politicians, too. If no
one else, they certainly know on
which side their bread is but-
tered.
But even if this Miami Cuban
is dead wrong, one thing is cer-
tain: no one will dare challenge
his credentials as an American
He is merely insisting on the
practice of his inalienable
American right to pluralism as he
All of this is supremely impor-
tant today because the American
Jewish community is now be-
deviled by a new monster. If once
k was the charge against Jews
that they vote aa a bloc, now the
charge w that they place the in-
terests of Israel above the inter-
ests of the United States
THE CHARGE is not new In
the days of the Jewish vote"
imbroglio, there were those who
accused Jews of "dual alle-
giance" also, and it was alleged
that in a confrontation of
allegiances. American Jews
would be most inclined to give
Israel the nod.
The charge reached its high
point in the 1956 Suez-Sinai War.
when the United States de-
manded unconditional Israeli
withdrawal from the Suez Canal
Zone. I myself recall young Jew-
ish hotheads who warned that in
the event of an open U.S.-Israeli
confrontation over unconditional
Continued on Page 13-A
Paris Report
French Jews Eye Mitterand More Cooly
Friday. July 17. 1981
Volume 54
15 TAMUZ 5741
Number 29
PARIS -
Francois Mitterrand's elec-
tion last month as France's
new President made many
French Jews feel at the
time as if the clock of histo-
ry had been turned back 23
years to the heydays of
Franco-Israeli friendship
and the Fourth Republic.
De Gaulle and his crippling
arms embargo, Pompidou
and his anti-Israeli initia-
tives and Giscard d'Es-
taing's pro-Arab policy
seemed a bad dream from
which France had finally
awakened.
Even Israeli politicians,
usually careful and even suspi-
cious of foreign statesmen.
seemed won over by the general-
ized satisfaction with the Social-
ist victory. Prime Minister
Menachem Begin and opposition
Labor leader Shimon Peres view
with each other on who had
better or older ties with the new
French President. A new era in
Franco-Israeli relations, and
many hoped, in Jerusalem's links
with Western Europe as s whole,
seemed to have started
SIX WEEKS LATER, many
of France's Jews are worried and
sometimes disillusioned with the
new Administration. Most ex-
press their misgivings privately.
^::::::^::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::::::::.:::::::::.:.:..
1 I
Edwin
g
Eytan
v
but other have come out into the
open. Even the most pro-
Mitterrand Jewish organization,
Jewish Revival." which had
actively campaigned against the
outgoing President and hia
administration has openly
protested against some of the
new government's statements
and decisions. The militant
Jewish organization took the new
administration to task for its
statements over Jerusalem and
the Palestinians, its speedy con-
demnation of Israel's bombing of
the Iraqi nuclear reactor and its
attitude during the Security
Council debate on this issue.
The disillusionment started
slowly. The first dear inkling
that the new government's policy
was not going to be exactly what
some of its Jewish supporters
had imagined, came on May 21,
the day Mitterrand was
inaugurated The man. slated to
become Frances next Foreign
Minister, Claude Chevsson. told
reporters that France will honor
all its foreign contracts and in
ternational commitments.
Two days later. Cheysson in an
interview with the French paper
L* Monde, stressed that these
commitments include arms
contracts but also such
diplomatic engagements, as the
European joint statement in
Venice in June 1980 and
reiterated last December in Lux
emburg.
BEHIND THE scenes, the
new Finance Minister Jacques
DeJors was busy reassuring Arab
businessmen that nothing will
change in Franco-Arab relations,
while the Minister for Foreign
Trade. Michel Jobert. was meet
ing Arab diplomats. Jobert s sp
pointments as one of the new
government's five Ministers of
State, sort of a super-Cabinet
title, had already surprised and
shocked many French Jews. Job-
ert, Pompidou's Foreign Minister
at the time of the Yom Kippur
war, is known for his strong anti-
Israeli and pro-Arab line
Other apparently insignificant
details contributed to further
diaturb Israel's friends: Mitter-
rand's friendly message to PLO
leader Yssir Arafat and Libya's
Muamar Quaddafi. his messages
delivered to the Arab leaders, one
by his own brother. Gen. Jacques
Mitterrand, and the general tone
of rapprochement with the Arab
world.
Continued on Page 11 A
-.


Friday. Jury 17,1981
+Jmistfk>rkMan
UPP^
Wise Synagogue Opposes
National Draft Renewal
NEW YORK resolution calling for the support
of an all-volunteer military farce
and opposing the "inauguration
or implementation by our
government of any national draft
at this time" was approved over-
whelmingly by the membership
of the Stephen Wise Free Syna-
gogue at the recent annual meet-
ing of the congregation. The
resolution was presented by the
Social Action Committee of the
congregation.
Rabbi Balfour Brickner, spir-
itual leader of the 800-member
congregation, said "We are, I
believe, the first and only Jewish
congregation in America publicly
to debate this issue and to take
such a stand. It is as courageous
an action as it is unprecedented.
Most congregations, if they even
consider issues as controversial
as this one, do so in the privacy of
some small committee. Their
conclusions are rarely, if ever,
discussed with the entire mem-
bership."
THE RESOLUTION stated,
in part: "We support the existing
all-volunteer military force. We
oppose the inauguration or im-
plementation by our government
of any national draft at this time.
Similarly, we oppose the idea of
registering our youth at this time
for some future draft. We believe
that should there arise some na-
tional emergency necessitating
the mobilization of our popu-
lation, sufficient techniques exist
by which to affect that mobiliza-
tion. Males and females should be
conscripted equally."
The congregation went on
record urging members of the
congregation to provide counsel-
ling services and "to widely ad-
vertise this service in. and to. the
community so that Jewish youth,
particularly, might know where
they might come for counselling
that is based in the Jewish reli-
gious tradition."
The rationale for the resolution
was stated in its preamble which
noted that: "Judaism recognizes
the right of both conscientious
objection and selective con-
scientious objection to war":
"Judaism teaches us to 'seek
peace and pursue it' {Psalm
34.151"; "registration at this
time is both unnecessary and un-
necessarily provocative, re-
flective of a national trend
toward increased militarism that
threatens world peace"; "the
costs of such an action draws
funds from needed social, edu-
cational and economic programs
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At the congregational meeting,
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HE SAID: "We believe that
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In anticipation of the con-
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distributed to every family in the
congregation a 14-page back-
ground paper outlining both the
Biblical and rabbinic material on
the subject of conscription and
conscientious objection.
Air Force Restrained
Rabbi Still Wearing Yarmulke
NEW YORK (JTA) A Wash-
ington federal district court judge has
issued a 10-day temporary restraining
order prohibiting the U.S. Air Force
from taking disciplinary or other adverse
action against an Orthodox Jewish Air
Force member for refusing to remove his
skull cap while wearing his service uni-
form.
AT ISSUE is whether the Air Force
can enforce its uniform dress standards
against Rabbi Simcha Goldman, who
serves as a clinical psychologist at
March Air Force base in Riverside, Cal.
Goldman is being represented in his
court action by two Washington at-
torneys, David Butler, a board member
of the National Jewish Commission on
Law and Public Affairs (COLPA), and
Nathan Lew in. a COLPA vice president.
At the end of the 10-day period, the
attorneys said. Judge Aubrey Robinson
III will decide whether to permanently
enjoin the Air Force action against Gold-
man or dismiss the case.
Howard Zuckerman, president of
COLPA, said this was the first instance
in which Air Force uniform dress stan-
dards have been challenged when the in-
dividual involved has not been a chap-
lain.
ZUCKERMAN SAID Goldman had
been wearing his skull cap for a number
of years as a psychologist at the Air
Force base. When a new base command-
er took charge, Goldman was ordered to
remove his skull cap while in uniform.
Zuckerman said COLPA attorneys had
been negotiating informally with Air
Force officials for about eight weeks.
When the Air Force made it clear
that it expected Goldman to observe the
Air Force dress code by not wearing his
skull cap, he asked COLPA to take the
issue to the courts.
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Friday. July 17,198!



I.
U.S. Orthodox Jews Urge Israelis
Hold Line on Coalition Demands
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi Moshe Feinstein,
president of the Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada, sent a cable to the religious parties in
Israel Aguda Israel, the National Religious Party and
Tami stating that a primary and essential condition to
their participation in a coalition government headed by
Prime Minister Menachem Begin must be a firm commit-
ment by Begin to amend the Law of Return immediately
without further delay.
FEINSTEIN EMPHASIZED: Do not rely on any
promises that 'we will try" to amend the law. You must
demand a clear and unequivocal commitment that the
law will be amended immediately to read Giyur
KeHalacha (according to Halacha)." He added that it is
now quite evident that the opportunity for such a demand
is rijK'. "Do not let this opportunity pass you by." Fein-
stein declared.
He also urged the religious parties to include in their
demands a law prohibiting the desecration of the Sabbath
and legislation barring the Conservative and Reform
movements from making any inroads in Israel.
Reform Jews Anticipate
'Serious Rupture of Unity'
NEW YORK- (JTA)-
Warning of "a serious rup-
ture of the unity of the
Jewish people," the leader
of Reform Judaism in
America has called on
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin to reject demands by
the Aguda Israel party for
amendments in the Law of
Return as a condition for
joining his government.
The office of Rabbi Alexander
Schmdler, president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congre-
gations, released the text of a
cable he had sent to Begin seek-
ing "reassurance" that the Israeli
leader would permit every mem-
ber of his coalition to "vote his
conscience" on the controversial
issue.
Schindler's message followed
news reports that the Aguda had
insisted on government support
for its long-standing demand that
the Law of Return be changed to
deny the right of immigration to
Israel for persons who had not
been converted to Judaism "ac-
cording to halacha."
THE MESSAGE to Begin
from Schindler, who is currently
in Geneva attending meetings of
the Memorial Foundation for
Jewish Culture, stated, in part:
"The preponderant majority of
America's Jews are non-
Orthodox. They are deeply com-
mitted Jews. They stand by
Israel materially, politically.
They feel bound to the Jewish
people body and soul. They are
determined to share our common
destiny.
"By what right does anyone
question their Jewish legitimacy?
How can we ask them to continue
to sacrifice for Israel when their
children's right to enter Eretz Is-
rael is put to question? How can
any Jewish leader after Ausch-
witz permit the setting up of a
selection process at Jerusalem's
gates? And how will Orthodoxy
be served by such a means? Does
halacha really require validation
by Knesset vote? Can such a vote
enhance its sanctity and compel-
ling power?"
"This is not the way. Jewish
unity must never be bargained
away. Please provide me with the
means to restore our com-
munity's sense of at-one-ness
with the Jewish people."
Conservatives Furious Over Litmus
Test Demanded by Israel's Rabbis
Continued from Page I A
refugees from some tuture anti-
Semitic excess could be denied
admission to Israel just as an
earlier generation of would-b^ im-
migrants was turned away by the
intransigent policies of the
British protectorate."
The Seminary. Cohen continu-
ed. "Recognizes that the deter-
mination of who is a Jew must be
made according to the dictates of
halachah However, it objects to
the move under consideration be-
cause the Orthodox minority is
using its improper, but calculated
interpretation aa a means of ex-
cluding the majority of estab-
lished rabbinic authorities from
the valid and responsible ap-
plication of the Jewish laws of
personal status."
THE INSISTENCE of the
leaders of Agudath Israel. Cohen
concluded, "to have their inter-
pretation of who is a Jew made
part of the laws of the State of
Israel shows indifference to the
universal nature of halachah, and
contempt for the millions of Jews
who live today outside the State.
Such legislation would constitute
the first tragic example of an
official action of the State of
Israel taken in violation of the
spirit of Torah."
French Historian in Jail
PARIS (JTA) Robert Faurisson, a French his-
torian who wrote a book last year in which he' claimed that
reports about the Holocaust are "grossly exaggerated"
and that genocide was not a policy fundamental of in-
citing hatred and racial discrimination, is in trouble.
The 52-year-old history professor, who has been sus-
pended from his post at Lyons University, was given a 90-
day suspended sentence and fined$900 by the Correctional
Court of Paris. He was also ordered to pay a total of
$3,500 to three French Jewish organizations that had filed
suit against him for spreading "racist theories."
Bipartisan Cooperation
Concerned by Aryentine Rights
WASHINGTON A bi-
partisan group of 67 Con-
gressmen has sent a letter
to Argentine President
Roberto Viola expressing
their "concern" over the
violation of human rights in
his country, partticularly
as it applies to the Jewish
community there. The sig-
natories included 54 Demo-
crats and 13 Republicans.
Rep. Charles Schumer (D..
N.Y.I in releasing the letter, said
he organized the move in the
wake of revelations by Jacobo
Timerman of human rights \ ro-
tations in Argentina. Schumer
said a member of his staff spoke
to Timerman recently.
THE FORMER editor and
publisher of the Argentine daily
La Opinion, who was imprisoned
for 30 months without charges or
trial, said he considers it "very,
very important" to remind the
Argentine junta that the U.S.
Congress is watching not only
how the government itself acts,
but also when it fails to prevent
abuses of human rights. Schumer
said.
Rep. Henry Wax man (D..
Calif.), one of the signatories of
the letter, issued a statement on
"Anti-Semitism in Argentina"
several days ago in which he
noted that Timerman "does not
hesitate to liken Argentina to the
Third Reich. His detractors take
him to task for exaggeration
Surely, Argentina is not Ausch-
witz, they indignantly state.
Jews are not being systematical-
ly killed on a mass basis, they
protest. That Argentina is not
yet Nazi Germany is a point on
which most observers agree."
Waxman's statement added:
"What is really central to the dis-'
pute is the validity of inferring
from the fact that Argentina is
not Nazi Germany, that it is,
therefore, not a virulently and
dangerously anti-Semitic society
I would hate to see us reach the
point where we became in-
different on manifestations of
anti-Semitism which fall short of
the standards' set by Hitler It
should not be necessary for
Jacobo Timerman to prove that
Argentina is in a pre-Holocaust
situation to convince us that
Argentine anti-Semitism is
dangerous."
SCHUMER. in releasing the
letter, noted that the Keagan Ad-
ministration's effort to lift the
ban on U.S. arms sales to Argen-
tina will face stiff opposition in
the House because of the human
rights situation in that country.
The Congressmen noted that
they "welcome the commitment"
the Viola government has made
to strengthen the democratic
process in Argentina but ex-
pressed their "particular concern
for the continued well-being and
safety of the one-half million-
member Jewish community in
Argentina They said they have
U-en deeply disturbed !>y attacks
on a number of Jewish ineti
tut ions, including the homlmin*
of the .Jerusak-m Synagogue in
Huenos Aires and t he desecration
of tombstones in the I.iniers Ji a
ish Cemetery in the summer and
fall of 1980."
The letter said. "We art
alarmed at the marked increase in
the public availability of anti-
Semitic and Nazi literature; the
journals 'I'apeles and 'f'ahUdu'
are two of the most blatant ex-
amples of this disturbing
development. We are also con-
cerned that no information has
been forthcoming about the fate
of several hundred or more Jew-
ish citizens who have been listed
as 'disappeared' since 1978."
THE LETTER also strongly
urged the Argentine government
"to exercise greater vigilence in
actually combatting anti-Semitic
acts and in repeatedly con-
demning anti-Semitic pro-
paganda in whatever form they
take The continued livelihood of
the Jewish community j
Argentina is of great importance
to us as elected representatives of
the people of the U.S. and to the
citizens of our entire nation We
trust that you will take all
necessary steps to foster an at
moaphere in which this com-
munity may live and flourish
without fear."
The Congressmen stressed
that "a deeply committed defense
of human rights and human
dignity by your government m
Argentina will greatly oontnbuu
to improving relations betwesj)
our two countries
/ I'A Rtport by Dai id I nan
Bonn Envoy:
Ties to Israel
Still Special
111. WIV UTAI Yo-
ihanan \lero/ Israel's outg og
Ambassador to w.-m i
U-lieves that that
'vary special relationship *uh
Israel persists among the popu-
lation, though it has eroded at
the official level and is Us- im
portant to the younger
generation than to thos, who
lived through the Nazi era
Mem/., who spent seven years
as Ambassador to Bonn, laid he
gained his impressions from
many thousands of Germans
with whom he spoke in groupi
and in private conversation-
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O^^g&L
Friday, July 17,
Habib s Back
Starts Shuttle for Third Time
By DAVID LANDAU
AND GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
U.S. special envoy Philip
Habib arrived here from
Beirut on the third round of
his mission, begun Last
May, to defuse the continu-
ing crisis between Israel
and Syria over the latter's
deployment of SAM-6 anti-
aircraft missiles in
Lebanon.
American sources here were
quoted aa saying that Habib
would ask the Israelis to refrain
from aggressive statements or
actions against Syria in order to
make his mission easier. His
arrival coincided with Israel's
second air raid in 48 hours on
Palestinian terrorist bases in
Lebanon which were seen here as
an expression of displeasure over
the slow progress Habib has
Reagan Eases Pressure
Pending Election Decision
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Reagan's
timetable for Middle East
peacemaking allows ample
time for Israeli coalition-
making, and Prime Min-
ister Menachem Begin will
not therefore be under for-
eign policy pressures in the
weeks ahead as he goes
about the task of setting up
a government.
The U.S. President invited
Eygpt's President Anwar Sadat
to meet him in Washington in
August, and Israel's Prime
Minister whomever he may be
to follow early in September.
Until September, therefore, no
significant diplomatic movement
is expected, according to a high
source close to Begin.
The pre-planned hiatus, the
source added, will effectively
freeze any notion that Britain's
Foreign Secretary Lord C airing-
ton might have of reviving the
European Middle East initiative
at this time.
CARRINGTON took over last
week as chairman of the Euro-
pean Economic Community's
(EKO Council of Ministers for
the next six months. He is one of
the most ardent and energetic
advocates of the European ini-
tiative in the Mideast. But he can
scarcely attempt to move ahead
with it before a new government
has been formally established in
Israel or before Reagan meets
with the two main Mideast pro-
tagonists.
Begin took the opportunity
last week following the elections
to lash out at the European ini-
tiative which he said Israel
"utterly rejects.'' He asserted
that Carrington would be
wasting his time" to try and
promote the initiative. The ini-
tiative is based on the EEC's
Venice declaration of June. 1960
which called for the Palestine
Liberation Organization to be
"associated with" the Mideast
peace process.
The summer hiatus will also
apply to the long-dormant
autonomy talks with Egypt and
the U.S. "Israel did not break off
the talks." the high source close
to Begin recalled, "and it's not
our duty to initiate their
resumption.'' But in practice, he
was certain, neither the U.S. nor
Egypt would propose the
resumption of the talks before the
Reagan-Sadat and Reagan-Begin
summit meetings.
IN HIS ADDRESS. Begin
made a point of stressing that the
government had full consti-
utional authority to act.to take
tec is k ri- and to formulate policy
Junr>" the transition period. He
-" ed as "ignorant and un-
tied Labor Party leader
i" assertion that the govern-
ment waa "morally limited to
taking only neceeaary and non-
roversial measures during
transition until a new
mment is sworn in.
In practice, however, as far as
can be foreseen, the immediate
foreign policy issues likely to
arise are non-controversial. Begin
would act forcefully if the U.S.
Administration goes ahead with
its intention to seek Con-
gressional approval for the sale of
AWACS intelligence-gathering
planes to Saudi Arabia. Israel is
pledged to fight this move in the
court of American public opinion
and this Israeli opposition to the
proposed sale is a matter of broad
national consensus.
Similarly, the prospect of Italy
or France reestablishing nuclear
knowhow supply channels to Iraq
would be fiercely opposed by Is-
rael under the transition govern-
ment if it seemed imminent. On
this, too, there is broad bi-
partisan agreement.
made to date.
THE INITIAL air raid,
Friday, the first in more than a
month, destroyed a number of
guns and rocket-carrying vehicles
near the Zahrani River, according
to a military spokesman. The
Syrians did not intervene and all
Israeli aircraft returned safely to
their bases, the spokesman said.
The targets were some distance
from the area where the Syrian
missiles are deployed. Sundays
raid was in the area of Damour,
about 12 miles south of the
Lebanese capital.
There was no confirmation here
of reports that the U.S. had. in
effect, worked out a compre-
hensive plan to solve the missile
crisis. Habib is understood to be
trying hard to win agreement on
a package proposal that would
ensure Israeli and Christian
withdrawals in areas of Lebanon
in exchange for removal of the
missiles. Habib held talks with
Lebanese President Elias Sarkis
in Beirut and with the Druze
leftist leader Walk! Jumblatt
before coming to Israel.
Israel is said to be sticking to
its demand that Habib speed up
his efforts to get the Syrian mis-
siles out of Lebanon. Syria re-
iterated its determination over
the weekend to keep the missiles
in place, come what may. Despite
Israel's evident impatience over
the lack of success by Habib to
date, sources here were quoted as
saying that no ultimatums would
be given the American envoy
during his current visit to Jeru-
salem.
Deny Begin Timetable for Syria
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin denied reports that appeared in some Ameri-
can print and television media that he informed President
Reagan's special Middle East envoy Philip Habib that Is-
rael would bomb Syrian missiles in Lebanon within two
weeks unless they were removed. According to one report
on CBS News. Begin reportedly told "a number of
visitors" recently that he informed Habib of his in-
tentions.
However. Begin told Rep. Jack Kemp (R, N.Y.) in a
meeting here that Israel will give Habib the necessary
time to mediate in the missile crisis as long as the U.S.
envoy can prove that he has a chance of succeeding in his
mission.
"So far. there are signs that there are certain results
to these (Habib si efforts.'' Begin said. However, he
added that the time given to solve the crisis was not un-
limited and that the time available should not be wasted.
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Nablus Court to Rule
On Claims of Suspects
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
A Nablus military court is
expected to rule on the
claims by four suspects in
the May, 1980 ambush
slaying of six yeshiva stu-
dents in Hebron that they
are prisoners of war and
therefore cannot be tried for
the crime. Similar claims of
POW status under the
Geneva Convention have
been rejected in the past
when raised by alleged
terrorists facing trial.
One of the four accuaed is
serving a li/e sentence for the
murder of a Jewish couple last
year. All of them. West Rank
Arabs in their 20s and 30s. are
charged with firing on their
victims from ambush near the old
Hadassah building in Hebron. In
addition to the six dead. 16 other
Jews were wounded All were
returning from Friday evening
services at the time.
THE PROSECUTION charges
that the leader of the group.
Adrian Jaber. 33. had been
trained in the Soviet Union in
sabotage and espionage tactics.
The others, Yaair Zayadat. 31,
Muhammed Shubaki, 36, and
Taisir Taha. 21, are members of
El Fatah who received military
training in Syria.
According to the charges, the)
were sent on their mission by
Abu Jihad, deputy to Palestine
Liberation Organization leader
Yaair Arafat. They were captured
last September while attempting
to escape into Jordan.
If convicted, the defendants
could face the death penalty
under a recent amendment the
penal code. Defense lawyetl da>
tributed pamphlets in the court-
room quoting the accused as
saying they did not fear death
"Any Pales* inian should be
proud of their brave action in the
war against Zionism. the
pamphlet said.
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7nday7juiyl7.1981
>JenUtifk)rkHar
Flatto-Sharon Wins Jail j
Postponement Pending 1
| High Court Study |
JERUSALEM (JTA) Samuel Flatto-Sharon,
defeated in his bid for reelection to the Knesset, has won a
st ponement of the nine-month jail sentence imposed by
Jerusalem magistrate following his conviction on
charges of bribery and other irregularities in his 1977
election campaign.
A Jerusalem district court has agreed to delay
Flatto's prison term until the Supreme Court rules on his
appeal against the lower court's verdict. The Supreme
Court is not expected to review the case for several
months because of its backlog of work.
The District Attorney did not oppose the delay. The
ourt denied a prosecution request for an injunction to
kjrevent Flatto from leaving the country. The former MK,
a multi-millionaire, was ordered to post bail of 500,000
Shekels.
French Ready to Sell Another Reactor
Continued from Page 1 A
possibility to democratically chose their
representatives. He said the PLO might
emerge as the sole Palestinian repre-
sentative "when conditions become
adapted to their free, democratic
choice."
French officials refused to comment
on Cheysson's declaration. Only State
Minister for Foreign Trade, Michel
Jobert, confirmed Paris' readiness to re-
place the Iraqi reactor "on certain condi-
tions and if Iraq makes the demand."
When asked whether the training of
a nuclear generation in Baghdad might
not by itself endanger ultimate peace,
Jobert said "there is no stopping pro-
gress. All over the world, an increasing
number of countries and scientists are
about to enter the nuclear age." Jobert
did not comment on Cheysson's declara-
tion barring Israel from the French arms
market.
Abortion Not Murder, AJCong. Declares
Continued from Page 1 A
the long run, life is diminished, de-
meaned and desecrated far more by
callousness and insensitivity to the born
than the unborn, however precious their
promise. That is why this legislation, if
well-intentioned, is ill advised and
damaging.
"The one bright spot is that the
subcommittee action will appartently
have the result of inducing further hear-
ings, which would delay the con-
sideration of the matter by the full Ju-
diciary Committee until next year. By
that time, we hope, reason, good sense,
and a decent regard for human dignity
will assert itself and yesterday's sub-
committee action will be undone."
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If He's Asked
Hatzeira Sags Legal Problems
Begin to Choose Sharon for Defense Not an Issue in Possible
Union With Begin's Lukud
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin hinted strongly
that he intends to name
Ariel Sharon Defense Min-
ister in a new Likud
government despite the
bitter controversy
surrounding the ultra-
hawkish Yom Kippur War
luTO.
He said, on a television
panel interview, that he be-
lieved the appointment
would not now encounter
the overwhelming op-
position raised within the
Cabinet a year ago when he
favored Sharon for the de-
fense post just vacated by
Ezar Weizman.
BEGIN DECLINED to say
flatly that he has decided to ap-
point Sharon, observing that he
would name his Cabinet members
onlv after he receives a formal
call*" from President Yitzhak
Navon to form a new govern-
ment. Navon began consultations
Monday with representatives of
various parties in an effort to
form a new coalition government.
The final official results of last
month's elections were issued.
They showed that Likud has 48
seats; Labor, 47: National
Religious Party. 6: Aguda Israel.
4; Hadash (Communists) 4;
Tami, 3; Tehiya, 3; Telem. 2;
Shinui. 2; Citizens Rights Move-
ment. 1.
Begin also made clear his per-
sonal sympathy for the primacy
of Orthodox Judaism in Israel.
He claimed that the "Jewish reli-
gion and Jewish nationhood are
one and the same thing" and that
he has always favored a halachic
definition of conversion "because
conversion is a purely halachic
concept."
Peres Forces Still Believe
They'll Form Government
TEL AVIV (JTA) Both the Likud and the
Labor Parties told President Yitzhak Navon they were
ready to try to form the new coalition government, and
suggested he call on their leaders to begin putting it
together.
As anticipated, the Likud delegation urged Navon to
call on Begin to establish the government, assuring him
that a Likud-led coalition could command a majority
even if of only 61 of the 120 members. Speaking to news-
men after the meeting, they rejected with scorn reports
that Labor would also offer to head the government.
But an hour later, when the Labor delegation
emerged from their talk with Navon. they said they had
told the President that Peres had a better chance of form-
ing a coalition government than Begin. They said they
had the assured report of five votes of Moshe Dayan's
Telem the two of Shinui, and Shulamit Aloni's sole voice.
They said they would also be supported within the
Knesset on major issues by the Communists and Geula
' ohi hiya Part) and could thus beat back no confi-
ence motions unlike Begin who. they said, was
assured of only the 48 votes of his own Likud alliance.
with the possibility of d< feet ions from even that bloc.
Begin Threatens He'll
Call New Election
If Mandate Unclear
THIS PLACED him squarely
on the side of the National
Religious Party and Aguda Israel
which are demanding that the
next Knesset amend the Law of
Return to define a Jew as a
person born of a Jewish mother
or converted by an Orthodox
rabbi "according to halacha.''
The NRP and Aguda have made
it their price for joining a new
Likud-led coalition government.
But the proposed amendment
has raised a storm of protest from
leaders of Conservative and Re-
form Judaism particularly in the
U.S. who see it as enshrining in
law. the narrow and restrictive
interpretation of halacha by an
Orthodox establishment and
represents a minority of Israel's
population. The NRP and Aguda
together won only 10 seats in the
120-member Knesset.
But Begin indicated that he
would support other Aguda and
NRP demands. He said he per-
sonally favored stricter Sabbath
observance, though he thought
this should be effected "by per-
suasion, not by coercion." He
conceded that it was "unrealistic
to demand that Israelis forego
their weekly football games on
Saturday since it is the only non-
working day in Israel. Similarly,
he didn't think the city of Haifa
should be deprived of public
transportation on Saturday be-
cause the running of busses there
was a "tradition of decades."
Continued from Page 1-A
straight out: No I cannot give
it."
POLITICAL observers saw
the Prime Minister's tough state-
ments as a form of political arm-
twisting applied with great skill
to the small coalition partners.
If this was indeed the purpose,
Begin s*f med to achieve almost
immediate impact:
Tami s Aharon Abu HaUeira
was quoted as saying in reaction
that Begin would find his party
'the moat flexible' in the
coalition talk*
Aguda's "Council of Sages."
meeting in Jerusalem Monday,
runted that they would not lay
down an "ultimatum" on the
"Who is a Jew" issue.
And NRP sources sa.,. the
party was not seeking more than
two cabinet places, although it
wanted Dr. Burg to hold both the
Interior and the Religious port-
folios while Zevulun Hammer
stays on at education
BEGIN said he expected the
formal summons from President
Navon Wednesday. He would not
avail himself on the statutory
three days to 'think it over." but
would immediately embark on his
efforts after praying to God at
the Western Wall for success.
Begin said if he failed in the
statutory period of 21 days to set
up a government he would not
avail himself of his right under
law to ask another 21 days. The
President could then ask Labor's
Shimon Peres to try his hand.
But even if Peres accepted the
challenge, said Begin, he would
surely fail. "In his position, I
wouldn't even bother to try."
If new elections were the only
solution, the Prime Minister
continued, he would be "very
pleased ... I will be in my
element again, fighting an
election campaign I'm not
seventy yet."
JERUSALEM -
Aharon Abu HaUeira. whose
three-member Tami faction is the
key to a Likud coalition majority
in the next Knesset, insisted that
his legal problems have not
entered into his discussions with
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
over the formation of a new
government.
They have "nothing whatever
to do" with it. he told reporters
after a meeting with Begin. He
was referring to press reports
that his price for joining a Likud-
led coalition was immunity from
trial on charges of fraud and em-
bezzlement from a charitable or-
ganization he administered while
serving as Mayor of Ramie five
vears ago.
HATZEIRA. Religious Affairs
Minister in the outgoing govern-
ment, was indicted several
months ago and stripped of his
Knesset immunity. His trial was
postponed until after the June 30
elections. According to press re-
ports, his attorneys will argue
that the action by the Ninth
Knesset does not carry over into
the Tenth and that the new
Knesset will have to vote all over
again to determine whether Hat-
zeira can be tried.
This has led to speculation that
he is demanding a guarantee
from Begin that all coalition
parties in the next Knesset will
vote against lifting his immunity.
The influential daily Haaretz
warned Begin this week not to be
a party to such machinations
But the matter will be decided by
the courts.
Attorney General Yitzhak
Zamir was quoted as saying this
week that he believed the Ninth
Knesset's decision to revoke
Hatzeira's immunity is binding
on the Tenth Knesset. The Tel
Aviv district court judge who will
hear the arguments said that
legal point will have to be settled
before Hatzeira's trial can begin.
BEGIN NEEDS Tami s three
Knesset mandates to achieve a
61-seat parliamentary majority.
His meeting with Hatzeira
yesterday was believed to have
been over possible Cabinet port-
folios.
HaUeira made it clear that he
wants to retain the Religious Af-
fairs Ministry which is >
demanded by the National Reli-
gious Party. But he has re-
portedly hinted that he would
accept the Labor and Social Wel-
fare Ministry as an alternative.
JTA Report by David Landau
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JewistiHerkHafi
; Scene
tews Giving Mitterand Closer Scrutiny
9m Page 4-A
hange in France's
with the Tarauz
hours aftefthe
Monday, June 8.
nch Premier Pierre
demned Israel with
[ circumstances. The
speaking in the
telimar. Mitterrand
condemnation '"in
iemlship for Israel."
an> country "which
Rational law' would
Id by Franc*'
REMAINED
her Prance would
ork on t hf bombed
i place tin de-
damaged nuclear
LS
equipment. Mauroy said: "This
will be decided when, and if, Iraq
submits such a request." The
Foreign Ministry issued commu-
nique after communique rapping
various Israeli declarations and
especially Begins claim that the
Israeli raid had destroyed an
underground secret chamber. The
Quai d'Orsay. usually protocol
conscious, used most undiplo-
matic language in qualifying
BegkVl -tatement as "pure
fantaay
On Saturday, June 13, King
Khali.I < t Saudi Arabia made a
rix*bour stopover in Paria to
confer ertth the new administrs
tion leaders Mitterrand
welcomed him at the airport and
British Jews Rally
Protest Carrington
fcurd from Page 1-A
I SPEAKERS aimed
rks at Foreign Sec-
rd Carrington. preei-
EEC Council of Min-
vho has said he would
meet Arafat before
he year.
Dre. who until recently
foreign affairs
said Carrington
be so foolish as to
bi anyone regarded
I the EEC as an im
liator in the Middle
Carrington to "tear
pee document." Shore
ould back the Camp
> program.
initiative the Euro-
d take was to "stop
the Middle East by
feting competition in
lies to the area." he
lANUELJakobovtta,
bbi, set the tone by
\n> recognition of
DSgOt uit ions with it
I of civilization He
in similar veto b)
paser, MP, chairman
eervative Friends
shadow (IhaaceUor
4uer. and 94-vear-old
lei I
lend ot the mooring
Bner M I*. president of
Df Deputies, led a ds>
! the main speakers to
Office with a reso-
emning the FEC's
aration of June. 1980
for associating the
the Mideast peace
red Judge
'fends
[ilitary
LLEM Retired Su-
Juatice Haim Cohen
defending the conduct
itary Government in
territories He ob-
it while the military
exaggerates security
other values, its
>rd of administration
emplary.
who earned the repu-
being one of the most
ista on Israel's highest
ide his remarks at a
iference to mark pub-
' the booklet "The Rule
in the Areas Ad
by Israel," a research
he Jerusalem branch of
itional Committee of
:ji.
Itport by GU Sedan
Lord Carrington
Sir Hugh, recounting the vio-
lence which had swept the Middle
Fast's Moslem countries in the
past year, called the Venice de-
claration "a gondola of disaster
that is sinking without trace."
Accusing the PLO of being bent
on the genocide of Israel, Sir
Hugh also castigated politicians
and journalists in the West who
had bean bribed by the PLO.
Their hands are covered with
th* filth of sacrilege. Sir Hugh
said.
SHIN WELL DELIGHTED
the mas- crowd by saying Jews
were sick and tired of per-
secution His advice to Israel
waa "don't yield an inch. You get
nothing by being weak."
Actor Chaim Topol. the only
Israeli speaker, said that
Lebanese democracy had been
destroyed by the PLO. "Do you
wish for us what happened to
Lebanon?" he asked.
The hour-long rally concluded
with a tape recording of Carring-
ton saying the PLO was not a
terrorist organization followed by
Arafat saying: "The destruction
of Israel is the goal of our
struggle." _____
rode with him into Paris.
After a banquet at the Elysee
Palace, the King's brother, Saudi
Defense Minister Sultan Abdel
A/./.iz. said, "The King is highly
pleased with his talks. The
French and Saudi positions on
practically all issues concerning
both Europe and the Middle East
are near-identical."
FRENCH FOREIGN Minister
("heysson stressed after the
meeting that the Palestinians
have ;i sacred right" to a home-
land and denounced unilateral
(Israeli! decisions on Jerusalem.
He said the status ol the holy
plat es should be decided el en In-
ternational conference attended
oj all the pai
i-Mi, because ol their religious or
cultural links
During the Security Council's
debate, the Trench delegation not
only asked for Israel's condem-
nation but also called for the paj
ment of damages for the de-
stroyed Iraqi site and equipment
Many of Frances Jews, in-
cluding peopk who had voted for
the outgoing center-right admin-
istration, were distressed not
only the concrete statement and
decisions but also by the tone
used by the country's new
leaders. The French Jewish
weekly Jewish Tribune wrote
that some of the words and the
tone "were sometimes offensive"
in spite of the new administra-
tion's obvious good intentions.
SOME FRENCH Jews, espe
cially those who had supported
the previous regime, condemned
the new approach. Others ex-
pressed surprise but said that
"We should wait to give Mitter-
rand a chance to apply his
policies and views." Others still
said they had "expected nothing
else" and that a country's policy
Ls determined by cold facts
which, whatever the administra-
tion in power, remain the same
Among those who expressed
no surprise is Jacques Soustelle,
a former Minister in the days of
the Fourth Republic, a former
Governor of Algeria during the
Premiership of Socialist Guy
Mollet and since then a warm and
unwavering friend of Israel.
Soustelle still is vice president of
the "France Israeli Alliance."
Soustelle told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, "Inever had
any illusion concerning the new
regime as far as Israel and the
Middle East are concerned. I was
unhappy with the outgoing ad-
ministration because of its Mid-
dle East policy, but I never
thought that a Socialist takeover
would change things. The tone,
maybe, might become pleasanter.
more amiable, but the policy
would remain the same."
Soustelle who practically
broke with < )i icard over the Mid-
11. East .nils If anything, the
new regime is even more depen-
lenl on \i.>'< good will. Its main
um is to Combat unemployment.
and \r^1) conl racta ill be ever
more important. It has
decided to stop work on the Plog-
ott reactor, which would have
supplied .i large part of France s
electricity and will increasingly
rely on Arab oil"
THE PRESIDENT of the
"Jewish Revival," Henri Haj-
denberg, admits that he is
shocked" by some of the new
government's words about Israel.
11 is movement was highly active
in changing France's political
climate during the long campaign
and helped swing part of the
Jewish vote against Giscard.
Now. he told the JTA. he is
"surprised at some of the things
which have happened," but he
wants to wait and "give Mitter-
rand a chance."
Hajdenberg. a 34-year-old at-
torney, said that "Begin and the
Tamuz bombing have not made
things easy for the new adminis-
tration. Even in Israel, not
everybody agrees with Begin s
decision or his ensuing state-
ments. In spite of this, some of
the things said by France's new
leaders are wrong. Should this
become the country's policy, we
will act against it. but for the
time being, we are still waiting to
see how things will turn out."
One of the outgoing deputies.
38-year-old Jean Pierre Bloch, is
far more critical. "The new Ad-
ministration will be far worse
than anything we have known in
the past. Formerly, we could
work from within, there were
means we. the Jewish Deputies,
as part of the former majority,
could influence the President's
decisions. Now. there are practi-
cal no Socialist Jewish
Deputies One or two at the
worst, and all anti-Israeli Dm
new Socialist majority will lose
it wants and what it wants with
cation whatsoever
PIERRE BLOCH,
part) '- bitter for oh\
political reasons, but h. els re-
presents man) attached lews
who feel the same, though they
use mure moderate terms in ex-
pressing themselves Pierre
Bfech, whose father is President
ol LICRA and the French M'nai
H nth. showed the JTA a tract
against him distributed by pro-
Mitterrand Jews. They would
rather see me. a Jew. lose And
win another Socialist seat.'
The new French Administra-
tion will have to clarify its posi-
tion within the next few weeks
unless it wants to risk disillu-
sioning most of its Jewish
electorate for good. Hajdenberg
and other French Jewish leaders,
said "something must be done
within the coming months or
weeks, to make it clear where
Mitterrand and his men really
stand."
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Reagan Sends Congress
N-Agreement With Egypt,
Friday, July |m
'Other Interests'
WASHINGTON President Reagan has sent to
Congress the nuclear agreement
with Egypt which, he said, will
"further the non-proliferation
and other foreign policy interests
of the United States."
The agreement, signed at the
State Department on June 29,
could provide Egypt with up to
two nuclear reactors for energy
production purposes. Congress
has 60 days in which to accept or
reject the accord.
"The proposed bilateral agree-
ment reflects the desire of the
governments of the U.S. and
Egypt to establish a framework
for peaceful nuclear cooperation
in a manner which will recognize
our shared non-proliferation ob-
jectives, the economic and energy
development needs of Egypt and
the friendly and harmonious rela-
tions between the U.S. and
Egypt." Reagan said in his mes-
sage accompanying the nuclear
cooperation agreement.
THE PRESIDENT noted that
Egypt ratified the Nuclear Non-
Proliferation Treaty last
February. "This is an important
step toward controlling the
dangers of the spread of nuclear
weapons," Reagan said, "and is a
reaffirmation of Egypt's long
standing commitment to the ob-
jectives of this (non-proliferation)
treaty and its commitment to
peace and stability in the Middle
East and Africa."
Meanwhile, White House
Deputy Press Secretary Larry
Speakes had no comment on a
report in the Los Angelas Times
that the U.S. has been main-
taining secret contacts with the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization since the Nixon Ad-
ministration and up to the
present. He also had no comment
on reports of joint Soviet-Syrian
naval maneuvers off Syrian
coast.
That issue was raised by a
minister at Israel's Cabinet
meeting but was promptly
quashed by Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. Cabinet Sec-
retary Arye Naor explained later
that "This is not a matter for the
government of Israel."
URI PORAT. Begins press
spokesman, was quoted by Israel
Radio as saying that Israel
expects the U.S. to "react" to
such Soviet moves wherever they
are made, but especially in the
Middle East
At the State Department,
spokesman Dean Fischer also re-
frained from commenting dird
on the Los Angele* Times mM
He merely repeated that thetll
will not hold talks with the m
until it recognizes Israel -J
to exist and accepts I'nita
tions Security Council i
hitiona242and338
31
*
I've just gone over last month's
financial statement, John.
Our move fo Jarvis
saved us 25% on
telephone expenses."
r
YDlfWE LOOKING AT THiBUSiateftD
OFAJAmnSPHONISrTflM.
Since 1963, over 4,000 businesses have converted to Jarvis phone systems.
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They could get the same(or better) telephone service tor 20% to 30% less with Jarvis
If you're interested in reducing your current phone system costs, call us
Our phone numbers in Rorido are Ft. Lauderdale 791 -8172,
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When it comes to the business end of phone systems
we haw some numbers with a very nice ring to them.
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CXKOM
UDSMasBM*


f. July 17. 1961
* legist fkrkiton
oMindlin
What's Wrong With Lobby?
[continued from Page 4-A
hdrawal, they would be off to
Aviv. Fortunately for all of
|two things occurred: Tel Aviv
the hotheads under any cir-
stances please to stay home
they would not be welcome;
a9 history records, there was
Snfrontation to test the issue
luse the United States
nately made its withdrawal
ind somewhat less than tra-
ditional.
be dual allegiance" bit is
ie the point today if only be-
a posteriori, there are
[y Americans who carry dual
Jenship and dual passports.
American Jews seem not to
jle to enjoy the same pro-
in pluralism as, say, Ameri
"ubans do. Miami's Alpha 66
fget on prime-time television
and announce that its
ops" are in Cuba to aasassi-
Kulel Castro in time for
is July 26 revolution cele-
on And that's okay apart
slap-on-the wrist State De-
cent warnings that such op-
j>ns staged from the territor-
Jiuted States are against the
lOtherwise no one tells Alpha
jt it is placing its Cuban in-
ts above those of the United
is
ND THEN there is Rep. Paul
rCloskey (R.. Calif.), who is
ling all over the place these
declaring that "There is a
Jewish lobby" in the
td States. Also that "we've
overcome the tendency of
Jewish community in
ica to control the actions
pngress and force the Presi-
[ and the Congress not to be
landed."
re are two issues here. One
American Jewish com-
y s reaction to the McCloe-
statement and other
ents like it. The second is
IcCloskey reaction to the
table American Jewish
unity's anger and resent
run his statement elicited
h respect to the first: I was
fed ten years ago and more
se Jews who criticized the
that Jews voted their
I interests as a bloc. Jews
ite that way; they still do.
es everybody else, and it is
fess to deny it the Jewish
is for their denial, good
h they were, notwithstand-
is therefore absurd and
counter-productive today to deny
that Jews constitute a lobby of
significant public political
opinion reflecting their concerns
for Israel.
WHY SHOULDNT they?
Fundamentalist Protestants are
a bloc of lobbying interest
against abortion, "pro-life" as
they call themselves, and they
are now threatening the with-
drawal of their support from the
Administration because of
President Reagan's nomination
of Judge Sandra O'Connor to the
U.S. Supreme Court on the
grounds that she allegedly voted
against anti-abortion legislation
as a onetime Arizona state sena-
tor.
Why shouldn't thev? The Fed-
eral Reserve Board is the U.S.
banking industry's private lob-
bying enterprise on Capitol Hill
in defense of that industry's
obscenely usurious interest rates
which have in fact become federal
usurious practice.
Why not the Jews? The Penta-
gon is the American weapons
industry's equivalent of the Fed
in the cause of the bankers.
Why not the Jews? The Ameri-
can Medical Association acts as a
lobby in Washington to assist the
nations physicians toward mil-
lionaire status despite the fact
that these physicians are con-
tributing toward the bankruptcy
of Medicare and Medicaid, and
making catastrophic illness a
cause for personal bankruptcy
also.
WHY NOT the Jews? The
lobby for the tobacco industry is
so powerful that despite all Sur-
geon General warnings, more cig-
arettes are being smoked in
America than ever before and
at higher levels of profit to that
industry than ever before.
Why not the Jews? The petro-
leum producers' lobby in Wash-
ington has managed to snake leg-
islation through Congress gua-
ranteeing its control over
alternate energy research, in
which it of course never intended
to enter in the first place. Not to
mention the continuation of the
travesty of the oil industry's
depletion allowance, the use of
obscene levels of profit to
diversify through the prolifera-
tion of conglomerate enterprise,
and other mind-boggling activ-
ities in which the petroleum in-
dustry and its lobby are engaged.
Why not the Jews? The pat-
terns of chaotic immigration into
3,500 Years Old
amid Dating from Time
Solomon to be Studied

kuSALEM (JTA) -
illogical digs in the City of
| excavations will focus in
ning season on a monu-
kyramid-like structure ap-
dating from King
i's time.
ew season of excavations
next Monday. The
e, of which 16 meters has
tposed so far, waa un-
at the end of last sea-
There is speculation
the structure waa
I with the citadel of the
|city, or served as royal
the House of David. In
t. there is an agreement
I very existence of a sub-
I structure dating back
ars ago is a unique
'ill be made at three
^s in the City of David,
[ one holding remains of
aanite city of Jebus,
which David conquered. This will
be the fourth of five scheduled
seasons of excavations in the
City of David. It will last eight
weeks. Some 400 volunteers from
Israel and abroad will participate
in the excavation.
the United States from Latin
America today are largely in-
spired by the Roman Catholic
Church, and the fear on Capitol
Hill to cope with these patterns
stems in large part from the fear
to put an end to this Catholic
Church dominion.
DARE ONE MENTION the
gun lobby? This lobby is respon-
sible for tabling every substantial
national effort aimed at gun con-
trol in the face of ever-rising inci-
dences of violence involving hand
guns. One can go on and on.
The point is that lobbies, good
or bad, have long been a fact of
American political life. The
Jewish community must not be
afraid openly to say that it is a
part of this system also. It ought
not to permit itself to become
victim to every two-bit McClos-
key attempt to intimidate it.
Which brings me to the second
issue that the McCloskey state-
ments have raised. It is en-
shrouded in a cloak of McClos-
key s arrogance and self-right-
eousness and can best be read in
this observation of his: "We have
to respect the views of our Jewish
citizens, but not be controlled by
them."
THAT IS one step away from
saying: why do we have to
respect the views of our Jewish
citizens? It is two steps away
from saying: we must not allow
them to have these views. Re-
peatedly, McCloskey hammers
away at Jewish "control" and
some inherent Jewish "force." In
failing to acknowledge that Jews
have the same lobbying rights as
any other interest group in
America, he evokes the typical
anti-Semitic position that,
somehow, Jews are an invisible
phalanx of power above and
beyond allegiance to country. In
this sense, McCloskey is as anti-
Semitic as the crassest anti-
Jewish ideologue.
But this must not be our
concern. Our concern must be to
demonstrate that what the Mc-
Closkeys among us are doing is
to deny to Jews the same plural-
istic rights that Chase Man-
hattan takes for itself. Or Exxon
specifically and the American
Petroleum Institute generally. Or
the American Medical Associa-
tion. Or the Moral Majority. Or
the tobacco industry. Or the Na-
tional Rifle Association's gun
lobby.
Why are all their attempts to
influence legislation perfectly
American? And why is the
Jewish attempt to do the same a
part of some invisible plot to
"control" and "force'7
THE anti-Semitic roots of this
reasoning should be clear to us,
and we must point them out to
McCloskey and to others.
But the main thrust of our
efforts must be to continue acting
according to our political sensi-
bilities undaunted by these
detractors and with pride in the
efforts themselves. Otherwise, we
fall victim to the intimidation
Rep. McCloskey in fact expected
his statements to be. We go right,
back to the dumb days when we
said there is no Jewish vote
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Th Daily News
Reagan Accuses Libya Of
Wrecking Lebanon Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad-
ministration has accused
the Libyan regime of
Muammar Qaddafi of being
the only Arab state that
wants to wreck chances of a
peaceful solution to the
conflict in Lebanon.
"In what can only be seen as
an effort to interfere with a rea-
sonable solution to the most re-
cent tragedy in Lebanon, Libya
has introduced sophisticated
weapons and trained personnel
into Lebanon during the highly
volatile period of the last few
weeks," Chester Crocker, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for Africa
declared.
"WHEREAS other Arab
states have counseled together
and with us to seek a peaceful so-
lution, Libyan efforts seem
clearly designed to create the
opposite outcome in Lebanon,"
he said. Crocker made his re-
marks in the course of testimony
before a subcommittee of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee on what he said was
the "serious concern" of the U.S.
over Libya's "growing interven-
tion" in Africa and elsewhere.
"Under Col. Qaddafi. Libya
has adopted a diplomacy of
subversion in Africa and the
Arab world," Crocker said. "It is
a diplomacy of unprecedented
obstruction to our interests and
objectives. Qaddafi has tried in
every way he could think of to
obstruct our efforts to achieve
peace in the Middle East. He has
sponsored subversion from
Africa to the Philippines. He has
actively supported international
terrorism, using assassination
abroad as an instrument of his
policy."
Crocker said that because the
Administration realized "the
U.S. could no longer carry on
'business as usual with Qaddafi's
Libya,' it closed the Libyan
Peoples Bureau (Embassy) in
Washington in May. He said be-
cause of Libya's invasion of
Chad, the U.S. has offered
military aid to African countries
that feel threatened by Libya,
particularly Tunisia and Sudan
LAST WEEK, the State De-
partment expressed hope that
Qaddafi would not become the
next head of the Organization for
African Unity (OAUl The
OAU's 1982 meeting will be held
in Libya and traditionally, the
head of the host government be-
comea head of the OAU.
Libya's presence in Lebanon
became publicly known in late
May when Israeli jets destroyed
four SAM-9 anti-aircraft missile
batteries guarding a Palestinian
terrorist base in Lebanon It was
revealed at the time that the bat-
teries were manned by Libyan
troops.
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Fridav
Begin Still Confident
Expects to Form New Government
Jewish Defense Agencies
Reject Moonie Charges
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Premier Menachem Begin
has expressed absolute
confidence that he will form
the next Israeli government
based on an "absolute ma-
jority" in the Knesset, pro-
bably in partnership with
three religious parties.
Interviewed on the ABC-TV
"Issues and Answers" program.
Begin said the vote count com-
pleted gave his Likud party over
750.000 votes to over 705.000 for
the Labor Alignment which, he
said, translates into 48 Knesset
seats for Likud to 47 for Labor.
"We are the largest group. By all
the rules of democracy we expect
to be invited by the President
next week to form a govern-
ment". Begin declared.
ALTHOUGH HE declined to
say he had firm commitments
from any potential coalition
partners, he indicated that he
was almost certain to reach
agreement with the National Re-
ligious Party, the ultra-Orthodox
Aguda Israel and the new Se-
phardic religious party, Tami.
which will have 13 Knesset man-
dates between them. Such a coa-
lition led by Likud would com-
mand a bare majority of 61 seats
in the 120-member parliament.
Begin, in vigorous, almost
combative tones rejected sugges-
tions that he may have difficulty
governing with so slim a margin.
In a democracy, he declared, one
vote is a majority, "an absolute
majority," and he might have one
or two additional seats.
He said he would meet with
former Foreign Minister Moo he
Day an again to discuss the possi-
bility of Dayan's Telem Party
adding its two seats to a Likud
coalition.
Begin also insisted that a small
majority makes the most stable
government. He said this was the
case because it was more difficult
to reach consensus in a broader-
based government where some
members sometimes "vote their
conscience" on certain issues. In
a small government, every
member feels his responsibility
for the government. Begin said.
HE INSISTED that his gov-
ernment will be "the strongest,
most stable, most efficient"
government Israel has ever had
and predicted that it will govern
"for the next four-and-a-half
years."
He dismissed a proposal by
Yosef Burg, leader of the NRP. to
form a national unity govern-
ment of Likud and the Labor
Alignment. "These are hectic
days and all sorts of suggestions
are heard," he said. But he lashed
out at Labor Alignment leader
Shimon Peres who, he said, flatly
rejected his own past invitations
to form a national unity coalition.
Begin, who frequently in-
terupted his questioners, seemed
to take umbrage when it was
pointed out that his new coalition
would not include moderates like
Dayan or former Defense Minis-
ter Ezer Weizman who were
members of the Cabinet he
formed in 1977, and therefore was
likely to take a harder line than
ever on many issues.
"MODERATE, extremist,
empty phraseology." he said. "I
quote Shakespeare 'words,
words, words.' I am a moderate
not an extremist. I conducted
affairs I signed a peace treaty
with Egypt of great sacrifice,
great risks" to Israel. "All words
. My government will be good,
efficient, compact Govern-
ment is composed of groups, they
discuss matters. The majority
decides. Usually it is by consen-
sus. There is no problem of
moderates or hard line. Problems
are solved on their merits."
He enumerated the problems
he expects to face. "The Syrian
question, the peace process, the
missiles (in Lebanon), a compre-
hensive peace, the terrorist so-
called PLO in Lebanon. We shall
deal with them in all seriousness,
without hard line or soft line."
Begin said Israel "knows
everything" about the joint naval
maneuvers being conducted by
the Soviet Union and Syria off
the Syrian coast. He said they
were no threat to Israel. They
may be a problem for the U.S.,
"for the commander of the Sixth
Fleet and the government that
gives him orders," not for Israel,
he said.
BEGIN ALSO reiterated that
he would give U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib more time to find a
diplomatic solution to the Syrian
missile problem.
"We are prepared to see the
diplomatic course through.' Be-
gin said. "Habib shuttled until
now ... He is a brilliant man.
Until now. he didn't solve the
problem with all his brains. He
may come I to Israel) this week. I
will ask him what results .
U.S. policy is to return to the
status quo ante The missiles
must be removed We can't wait
forever We could have de-
stroyed them in two hours .
President Reagan and Secretary
of State (Alexander! Haig asked
for time. I agreed. But we can't
wait forever. If they are not re-
moved we will have to use our
own means to remove them."
Begin claimed that the Reagan
Administration's suspension of
delivery of four F-16 jet fighters
to Israel after Israel's destruction
of Iraq's nuclear reactor on June
7 hurt the U.S., not Israel. "It
(the suspension) shouldn't have
taken place at all." he said He
said Israel expected to receive six
F 16s not affected by the em-
bargo on their delivery date, July
17, and also the four embargoed
planes, possibly later.
He reacted with anger when
asked if Israel would continue to
use American equipment to
attack Palestinian terrorist bases
Reform Rabbis'Dander Up
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Three-hundred American Reform
rabbis, attending the 92nd
convention of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis
(CCAR) here over the weekend,
adopted a resolution demanding
the "disestablishment" of the
Orthodox Chief Rabbinate in Is-
rael and the granting of equal
rights to Reform and Con-
servative rabbis in this country.
The Chief Rabbinate is the
only Jewish religious body of-
ficially recognized and supported
by the government and has ex-
clusive jurisdiction over all as-
pects of religious life in Israel.
CCAR loaders said at a press
conference that their rasoration
had nothing to do with Israel's
Knesset elections.
THEY SAID it was prompted
by the Chief Rabbinate law
passed by the Knesset with
strong government support last
year, which transferred the
authority to decide which rabbis
may perform weddings from local
religious councils to the Chief
Rabbinate. The latter is immune
from court suits.
Rabbi Joseph Glaser. ex-
ecutive vice president of the
CCAR, said his movement is
tired of making periodic protests
against degrading and sometimes
insulting behavior toward its
members living in Israel "and
decided to take more drastic
action."
in Lebanon. "We have a perfect
right. It is legitimate self-
defense. It is in sefl-defense. This
is exactly what is stated in our
agreement" with the U.S.. he
said.
BEGIN SAID he had abso-
lutely no information to substan-
tiate a report in the Los Angeles
Times that for the past seven
years, and up to the present, the
U.S. has had secret contacts with
the PLO.
"I heard it the first time." Be-
gin said. "Ask the Los Angeles
Times where it got its informa-
tion." He said he was certain no
such contacts took place during
the Carter Administration, and
are not taking place in the
Reagan Administration. He said
he could not be certain what
transpired during the Ford Ad-
ministration and said he would
ask Yitzhak Rabin who was
Israel's Prime Minister at the
time.
He conceded that Israel knew
of indirect U.S. contacts with the
PLO in efforts to release the
American hostages held in Iran
last year. He said Israel didn't
object, "for the sake of the
hostages who we wanted free."
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish Committee and
the American Jewish Congress
said that they "reject" charges
by the Unification Church of the
Rev. Sun Myung Moon that the
two organizations "used the
powerful means which they
control" to force cancelletion of a
"World Conference for Judeo-
Christian Dialogue" which the
Church planned to hold in Jeru-
salem next month.
Maynard Wishner. president of
the AJCommittee and Henry
Siegman. executive director ot
the AJCongress said, in a joint
statement:
"TO THE extent that this
cancellation is due to action
taken by our two organizations.
as the Unification Church
asserts, we can only be glad. We
reject the Church's charges .
that we used our power' or acted
in ways contrary to the tenets of
free speech or tolerance in ex-
pressing our opposition. The only
'power' exercised was that of
freedom of information, to make
public to Jewish scholars our
view of the Unification Church as
we urged them to turn down in-
vitations to any such con-
ference."
On June 23. Bertram Go)d
ecut.ve vice president ?J
AJCommittee and SleKIn "*
nounced that thev h?d
letters to Jewish vholar, ^
academicians charpng thlt ?
writings of Moon ~?J?m4i
anti-Semitic"
numerous Jewish homes hZ
been thrown into turmoil^
parents subjected to ^
suffering" as a result of theJ?
spread proselytizing actK,^
the Unification Church ml
Jewish and other youth
They warned the ochoUrs M
to accept the all expensM.,^
invitation to the Jerusalem c
ference. noting that it an(j oll_
conferences in various pan, j
the world were self-servm,
devices by the Irufic.uoj
Church to associate itself witf
the names of prominent
respected persons
THE UNIFICATION Chun,
claimed that "The charges th
the teachings of Rev Moon n
distinctly anti-Semitic' in? ,b.
solutely false" and we reject
these "slanderous charges."
It said the conference w to
have been an ecumenical
dialogue" to promote unitv be-
tween diverse religious tradi'tioni
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Friday. July 17.1981
* iw/ */? fhridi&r
Page 15-A
3,500 Athletes Compete
11th Maccabiah Opens at Ram at Gan
By HASKELL COHEN
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
,ih Maccabiah the Jewish
tvmpic games opened in the
,ant Ramat Gan Stadium last
fc as some 3.500 competing
hletes from 35 countries
rched onto the field before
prjiy cheering crowd of more
an 50.000 sports fans and Is-
li dignitaries, including Preai-
,U Y'itzhak Navon and Prime
mister Menachem Begin.
The Israeli contingent, by far
largest with 900 marchers,
followed in size by the
encan team numbering 372
the South Africans with
re than 200. The smallest
try was from Singapore which
two contestants. Others
ie from such far off lands as
Ae and New Zealand. The
tch squad carried a huge ban-
reading. "Love from Hoi-
id." The Brazilian group
danced onto the field in Mardi
Gras fashion.
THE MARCH-ON was pre
ceded by the descent of 16 Israeli
paratroopers to the green turf. It
was followed by Israel's top
seeded tennis champ. Shlomo
Glickstein, who raced into the
stadium bearing the traditional
Maccabiah torch which had been
kindled earlier in Modi'in, birth-
place of the Maccabees, and run
in relays to Ramat Gan.
Contributing to the carnival
atmosphere of the opening cere-
monials was a gymnastic display
by hundreds of Israeli younsters
who released thousands of silver
balloons as they completed their
exhibition.
Earlier in the evening, Navon
and Begin, who arrived in motor-
cades, were greeted officially by
Mayor Israel Peled of Ramat Gan
and Michael Kevehazi. chairman
of the Maccabiah Organizing
Committee. The American team
marched on the field led by flag-
bearer Danny Schayes. a seven-
foot tall basketball ace. The
marchers were joined by Rep.
Jack Kemp (R.. N.Y.). who was
currently visiting Israel.
HE WAS slated to present
medals to the winners of early
swimming events before return-
ing to the U.S. Kemp, a one-time
professional football player
with the Buffalo Bills was
instrumental in securing a
$25,000 donation for the U.S.
Committee Sports for Israel from
the National Football League
(NFL). The USCSFI is the
American organization that
funds and supplies the U.S.
Maccabiah teams.
With the festivities over, the
games began in earnest and were
continued through Thursday,
featuring competition in 31
sports at 58 locations around Is-
Oo you think they expect any trouble7
reel. They include basketlball.
trap shooting, lawn bowling,
fencing, golf, chess and bridge.
The swimming and track meets
are expected to be the most
dramatic.
This year, the competing ath-
letes will be housed together ac-
cording to their sports specialties
rather than nationality, ft will
The Star
give the men and women in the
same competitive areas a chance
to mingle and exchange ideas.
The first Maccabiah games
were held in March. 1932. They
lasted only two days and drew
about 25,000 fans from abroad.
This year's Maccabiah is
reported to have cost S3.5 million
to mount.
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/liddle East Report
^Jewish. lo:
3T
Miami, Florid*. Friday, July 17,1981
SECTION B

f Unforgettable Tour Through Israel, Egypt
My GERALD SCHWARTZ
pThere goes the 61601011."
a had just listened to a stir
idrees in Eogliah by
Minister Menachem Begin
concluding session of the
Gathering of Survivors at
packed entrance to the
Wall.
[veteran, though minor, offi-
the Alignment, as Israel's
Party and its close allies
known these days, was
impressed by the moving
I of Begin to the survivors,
families and the onlookers.
lsed that Begin had im-
the aura of a national
r not only on the thousands
ibled but on the electorate
at**
I few days later, as we
' Hrican Zionist Federation and
Beer Women leader Harriet
Hn. Miami Beach City Com
.. Boner Mildred Falk and our
ctive spouses watched
i debate Labor chief Shimon
those words seemed sub-
la ted.
WAS a virtually empty
jjoff Street in Tel Aviv, at a
ilk cafe frequented mostly
raelis on ordinary Thursday
that we watched Feres
a narrow triumph over Be-
a debate that was more of
ian Carter-Ford but less of
Ian the critical June 30 elec-
emed to warrant.
Hour group prepared to de-
for Fgypt, we met Simcha
i former Israeli ambassa-
o the United States and a
npal in the Alignment's
ugn. m the lobby of the
Blotel for the third or fourth
within a week. "The final
Bwhich will be out tomorrow.
Gerald Schwartz is past presi-
dent of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida
and former national chairman
of the Israel Bonds Committee
of B'nai B'rith. Together with
his wife, Felice, he heads his
own public relations agency
on Miami Beach. They have
just returned from a trip to
Israel and Egypt.
will give us a lead of three seats."
said Dinitz, who now will return
to his position as fund-raiser for
Hebrew University. Yet we could
see there was no confidence in his
voice.
Labor's charge had been too
little, too late. We sensed that as
we gathered, along with some
125.000 to 200.000 others in the
huge square adjacent to Tel Aviv
City Hall. The Alignment had
some 1,300 buses mobilized
throughout Israel, and residents
of the kibbutzim and moshavim
streamed in. But, alas, too many
were too young to vote.
BECAUSE of a scheduling
change due to an El Al sellout at
the start of the peak summer
season, we found ourselves in
Upper Egypt as the returns came
in. Within two hours of the
closing of the polls, the manager
of the Winter Palace Hotel in
Luxor had picked up an Arabic
live broadcast from Jerusalem.
"One report gives it to Peres by
one or two seats, another to Be-
gin by one seat," he told those of
us assembled around the short-
wave radio in the shadows of the
ancient Temples of Kamak.
I thought back to my last
meeting with Tel Aviv Mayor
Shlomo Lahat, the retired major
general who leads Israel's
bustling metropolis as a member
of the Liberal party, partner of
Begin's Herut in Likud. "It looks
like a tie vote," I told the mayor,
giving him a foreigner's assess-
ment of an election far more
heated than the one Felice and I
witnessed in 1969. which was the
only other time we were on hand
for the every-four-years trip to
the polls. "We'll settle." said the
efficient, affable and able Lahat.
For he knew that all Begin
needed was a tie or near-tie to
govern.
We also had a change to dis-
cuss the upcoming election in the
ivory 30-story tower of Haifa
University with its president,
former Israel Ambassador to
Canada, Gershon Avner, and its
rector former University of
Miami visiting Professor Gabriel
Warburg. They too sensed that
Labor had been too complacent in
the months since Camp David,
and that the continuing social
Continued on Page 2-B
ieagonomics
Federations to Struggle
Frantically for Dollars
By AMY STONE
IEVV YORK As the
kgan budget cuts make
lr way through the
ise and the Senate,
eduled for implementa-
Oct. 1. the start of the
leral Government's
year, it is already
that there will be less
ley for social services,
it will be allocated in
ways to the agencies
Jewish Federations
)ss the country help
lie anticipated loss of billions
federal dollars comes at a time
many Jewish Federations
ilready in trouble with fund
Iritf drives that are in no way
^ing up with inflation.
iese two factors combine to
a third factor that's going
hitting Jewish Federations
their constituents. As
med up by Or. Steven B.
tir. executive director of the
Jewish United Fund and Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan
Chicago, during the most recent
meeting of the board and com-
mittee members of the Council of
Jewish Federations:
"AS THE Federal Govern-
ment cuts out needed services
.... the people will then look to
the voluntary agencies, the
Jewish Federations and their
agencies, for service, so we're
going to have an increased flow of
demands for service at a time
when we don't have the resources
to meet those needs."
During the April meeting in
Washington. D.C., of the Council
of Jewish Federations, the
umbrella organization of the 200
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds throughout the United
Stales and Canada. Mark Talis-
man, director of CJF's Washing-
ton Action office, repeatedly
emphasized the importance of
local Federations having the
facts in hand to "give a human
face to the computerized budget
cuts." For example, the major
proposal for the Medicaid pro-
gram is the imposition of a five
percent ceiling on increases in
Federal spending during fiscal
1982. resulting is a $ 1 billion cut.
To compensate for the cut.
states will be allowed more flexi-
bility in determining eligibility
requirements, covered services
and reimbursement rates to serv-
ice providers, such as the Jewish
social service agencies. What has
yet to be documented is the
actual number of elderly who will
no longer be eligible for Medicaid
benefits if the states change eligi-
bility guidelines, and the number
of patients who will be affected if
more doctors, hospitals and
nursing homes stop accepting
Medicaid patients if reimburse-
ment reates do not keep up with
inflation.
CARE FOR the Jewish aged,
through support for nursing
homes, homemakers, home
nursing and medical care, reha-
bilitation workshops and
geriatric hospital care, is one of
the major areas of Jewish Feder-
ation allocations. For example.
Continued on Page 12-B
Honored for serving Mount Sinai Hospital for the most years
are: Use Simonhoff, 25 years; Elsie Malschick, 20 years; Helene
Owen, 30 years; Rhonda Kern, 20 years; and Rose Krause, 25
years.
Jewish Spokesman
In French Cabinet
PARIS Pierre Dreyfus,
newly-appointed Industry Minis-
ter in the cabinet of French Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand, and
president of French ORT since
1975. is a French Jew dedicated
to countering anti-Semitism and
bettering the lot of the North
African Jews who have settled in
France, according to his Amer-
ican counterpart. Sidney E. Lei-
want, president of the American
QRT Federation, who has sent
the new Minister a letter of con-
gratulations.
The appointment of Dreyfus,
who ran the Renault company for
many years, was formally an-
nounced on June 23. He replaces
Pierre Joxe. a left-wing Socialist.
The appointment has been
generally interpreted as a bolster
to the position of Finance Minis-
ter Jacques Delors within the
Mitterrand cabinet.
DREYFUS IS known to be
particularly sensitive to the situ-
ation of North African Jews who
have immigrated to France in
recent years, raising the popula-
tion of Jews in France from
250.000 to over 700.000. and
making the French Jewish com-
munity the fourth largest in the
world. Many of the nearly 10.000
students studying at ORT
schools throughout France come
from this new segment of
France's Jewish community.
Commenting in a recent inter-
view on the danger of assimila-
tion faced by this group. Dreyfus
noted, "North African Jews tend
to be very religious and loyal to
their Jewish traditions But
France is a highly effective
melting pot. Jewish schools, like
Continued on Pane 2-B
Dr. Joseph Harris is the
new President of the Medical
staff of Mount Sinai Medical
center. Harris, who came to
Miami in 1957 as a Resident,
is an Internist who has pre-
viously held offices on the
staff, he was also recently in-
stalled as Secretary of the
Dade County Medical Associ-
ation.
Genn To Join Miami Israel Programs Office
Rena Genn of Moshav Zarit in
Israel has been appointed the
new community Shlicha and di-
rector of the Israel Programs
Office of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Ms. Genn. born and educated
in New York City, has been living
in Israel for the past 13 years.
She has worked in educational
planning in Israel's northern
most region on the Lebanese
border, in addition to operating a
poultry farm on her family's
share of the moshav (cooperative
farm community with individual
land ownership).
She holds a Masters degree in
Public Health Education from
Hunter College of the City Uni-
versity of New York, as well as a
Rena Genn
Bachelor of Arts Degree in bio-
chemistry from the City College
of New York.
Noughts on Israel's Reunion of Holocaust Survivors
[ByCHAIMBERMANT
London Chronicle
Syndicate
reunion of Holocaust
vivors? Time lends a
to almost any experi-
but one would have
ght Auschwitz was an
eption, and when I first
rd of the idea, 1 thought
'as a cruel joke, or if not.
it showed a complete failure
of imagination on the part
of the organizers.
I asked F, a survivor of Ausch-
witz and Buchenwald. who is now
a successful professional man.
with two sons at public school
and a third at Oxford, whether he
planned to attend the reunion.
"What for?" he said. "I've
started a new life here. It's not as
if I've tried to hide anvthing. or
forget anything. My children
know everything I've been
through, but who needs to reopen
wounds?"
Several other survivors made
the same point. The whole idea
sounded like a Festival of Grief
or, as one of them put it, "a four-
day Yiekor I arrived in Jerusa-
lem with the deepest misgivings,
which were by no means eased by
my experience of the first day.
EVERYONE OVER 40 will re-
member the newsreels taken in
the death camps shortly after lib-
eration. One felt at the time that
the human eye would never be
exposed to anything more
horrific, but about 20 years later,
when I was working for televi-
sion. I came upon some films
taken by the SS of the death-
squads in action, and although I
thought of myself as a fairly
hardened individual, I could not
watch them for more than a
minute.
When I arrived at Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust center in
Jerusalem, I found them being
screened again in a large audito-
rium. Every seat was taken, and
there were people standing round
the walls. And there was almost a
repeat performance during a son
el lumtere display on the plfH
Continued on Page 7-B


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An Unforgettable Tour
Through Israel, Egypt
Continued from Page IB
imbalance between Ashkenazi
and Sephardi communities would
uh the scales to Begin.
HAIFA University's "Bridg-
ing the Gap" is one of the all-too-
few programs addressing this so-
ciological problem that has
turned the Jewish state into an
almost totally divided country.
On aech questions as a united Je-
rusalem, on the need to strike at
southern Lebanon, indeed at the
right to destroy the Iraqi nuclear
reactor. Israelis stand together.
But their divisions are real.
They are there. And it must be a
top item on the agenda of world
Jewry.
There were times in our 17-day
trip, on a Pioneer Women mission
put together by the tireless Har-
riet Green, when we could enjoy a
ceremony in Tel Aviv City Hall
at which Mayor Lahat awarded
the city's medal of honor to Mrs.
Green and to Mrs Falk. herself a
former president of a Miami
Beach chapter of Hadassah.
There was the thrill of watch-
ing Arab and Jewish students
learning together at Haifa Uni-
versity, of seeing the growing
campus of the nearby Technion,
of again taking the cable car
almost to the top of Masada a few
weeks after watching the televi-
sion drama.
There was the fun of taking an
express train from the new Haifa
station to Tel Aviv in exactly the
scheduled 60 minutes. And of
using the express buses between
Tel Aviv and Jerusalem (leas
than an hour) along the new
road" now taken for granted.
And the delight at seeing
copies of Israeli newspapers for
sale at the Mena House, that his-
toric hotel in Giza. at the foot of
the pyramids.
THERE WAS the wonder of
King Tuts tomb, both in the
Valley of Kings and in the Cairo
Museum, the antiquity of the
boat ride on the Nile, the un-
changing walks through Akko.
Sfad. old Jerusalem.
And yet. the realities came
face-to-face only when we went
up to the Lebanese border, slept
overnight a few kilometers away
in Kfar Blum. No PLO rockets
came whistling at Kiryat Shmona
that night. That came a few days
later, after we were home
But the train we rode was
occupied by scores of Israeli
soldiers, carrying more M-16's
than Uzis. The public buses we
used were filled with members of
Zahal on active duty or reserve
And the bewilderment over
an* American Jewry that appar-
ently encourages Russian
refugees to opt for America in-
stead of Israel was real, and deep
The call by Begin for the survi-
vors of the Holocaust and their
families to "come to Israel" was
sincere.
EVEN THE most strident of
the Israelis calling for retainment
of Judea and Sum ana realizes
that there are simply not enough
Jews in Israel to accomplish that
goal And the headlines telling of
the United States vote against
I srael on the Baghdad strike were
hard to take, even as one Israeli
assured another that Cairo and
the Saudis and Washington
really approved.
But there was good news on
this trip too. Tel Aviv opened its
new Dolphinarium, a match for
our own Seaquariuro, And the
country rushed to completion
preparations for the Maccabiah
Games. Israel's basketball team
again ruled as Champions of
Europe. The exports of flowers
and produce to the Common
Market are steady. Israel's three
major banks, all of which have
major branches in Miami Beach,
now exceed $50 billion in assets-
New hotels near completion in
Eilat. in Jerusalem, in Tel Aviv.
The flow of auto traffic moves
unhampered by gasoline
priced well beyond the three
dollar-a-gallon mark. More color
television sets abound
Then so do they in Cairo, a city
whose metropolitan population
approaches 10 million, a large
percentage living in housing that
makes our Liberty City a palace
The inhabitants of the mud huts
on the way to ancient Memphis
wash their clothes in the same
muddy river that their ancestors
did hundreds of years earlier
And they are concerned not
about Begin or Peres, Camp
David or the Iraqi nuclear reac-
tor.
ANWAR SADAT recognizes
that. And as we watched his
fully-documented travels for four
days on Cairo TV. we realized
that he knows it full well Even
the explosion in Teheran that
took the lives of 72 of his
strongest opponents was not the
top news. A visit by Sudan's
president, and Sadat's upcoming
trip to Washington were given
more prominence.
And then it was over The
Swiss Air flight to Zurich zoomed
us away from a Cairo airport that
defies description And it was
back to Miami Beach, and a Re-
development program just as real
and necessary as Tel Aviv's
Jewish Spokesman
Continued from Page IB
those in the ORT network, play a
major role in keeping the sons
and daughters of this new com-
munity Jewish."
Through the ORT program,
Drevfus observed. North Afri-
can Jews learn the job skills that
afford them an opportunity to
live a decent life and remain true
to the Jewish traditions of social
Justice "
DREYFUS WAS raised in a
relatively assimilated French
Jewish family At the age of 13,
he surprised his family with a
request for a Bar Mitzvah to
which they agreed Since that
time he has firmly identified
himself with the French Jewish
community He was instrumental
in negotiations with French
national school* su-.h as the
L'Ecole Normal and L'Ecole
National? d'Administration
which led to the schools agreeing
not to hold examinations on
Jewish holidays, thus enabling
Jewish students to observe their
religion while pursuing their edu-
cation on an equal footing with
their fellow Frenchmen.
Highly respected in all circles
of French society, Dreyfus holds
the honors of Grand Officer of the
Legion of Honor and Commander
of the National Order Of Merit
He began his career as a mem
ber of the Corps of Technical
Advisors in the French Ministry
of Commerce in Pans before the
Second World War During the
war. he served as an infantry
sergeant until the fall of France
and then joined the French resis-
tance
AFTER THF liberation, he
returned to Paris and was ap-
pointed Inspector General of In-
dustrial Production and v.as later
elected president of the Fnergv
Commission of the Planning
Office, where he develooped a
program for reequippmg the
energy production industry -
In 1949. Dreyfus was named
director of Mining for France and
later became director of Mines in
the Lorraine Basin Under his di
rection. the productivity of thi.s
area reached a record level for
Western Europe. In 1955. Drey
fus accepted the post of president
and managing director of Renault
Industries
I
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
% cap green beam. P pieces
fresi of (rosen
fc cap Acrt celert
% o ctoaatd onto*
ft cap caaaflover florets, (res* or frocen
i ttateipooai Gulden i Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple iiuce
Haaca alt *e seartaMes la bo** -Her lor 7
wastes, draw Cotabiae aara GuMet s MasUrd
andpawapafciftce Storem ref/ajerator Sen*
Mtk cold or hot meats sack as broke*, pas
snarl, carted beef, lalaau aad bologna
Makes approBaaateK 2 cups
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S
FrmMy MasUre Saace
?i cup chopped appte
>> cup chopped pear
V cup chopped canned
cknf peaches
V) cup raisins
t tablespoons Gulden s Mustard
I tablespoon caaf peach syrup
Miack apples and pears in boiknf water lor S
minutes drain Add peaches raisins Gulden s
Mustard aad peach swap, stir well Store in re
fiterator Serve with cold or hot meats sack as
brisket, pastrami, corned beef, salami and
bologna Makes 2 cups
The Mmttmrd good enough to cook with
Members of the National Board of Pioneer Women fromM^i
meet to plan the 27th National Convention to be held Q\
ember 1316, at the Concord Hotel at Kiamesha Lakt.sil
York, (left to right Ann Block, National Chairman. Btbttpui
man. National Board Member- Fort Louder dale. Harrin^^A
Nat tonal Board Member-Coral Gable*; Frieda Leemon, .Voons,
President; Mildred Weiss, National Board Member-DttrfiA
Beach; Phyllis Frank. National Convention Prvgnun OiaJ
man
Rachel Sommer To Join
National B'nai B'rith
Rachel Sommer. has been ap-
pointed to the national staff of
the B'nai B nth Fo Nation as
\s.ociate National -ector of
liegacv Development, announced
Malcolm H Fromberg. National
Chairman of the Legacy De-
velopment Committee
Mrs Sommer is a member of
the bar in Florida and New Jer-
sey and served as Deputy Attor-
ney General for the State of New
Jersey in 19T0. and also served as
attorney in the estate tax
division for the Internal Revenue
Service Her expertise in the
field of estate planning. said
Fromberg. and her familiarity
with the problems of South Flor-
ida residents will make it possible
for the B'nai B nth Foundaua.
office in Miami, to serve *
membership needs
ORT Sponsor*
Vocational Loans
The Jewish Vocational Sena
is accepting applications froa
vocational-technical studatt
who need assistance in finwcat,
their education Kligibilsi
requires the applicant must tit
Jewish, reside in N>uth Fbndj
and be attending lor acceptejal
a vocational technical school Ta
South Florida Region i
Women s Ameruan ORT i
funding this mtereal tree low.
New Orleans
Super
Summer
Saver
$115.00*
Includes deluxe accommodations
for two nights...
Two complimentary drinks in
Le Centime Lounge...
Free parking...
Lagniappe Booklet for special
discounts at selected New Orleans
restaurants and attractions
Additional night
$5500
room sales tax included
EPAVILLON
HOTEL
Baronne at Poydras
New Orleans. La 70112
(504) 581-3111 Of Toll Fr 1-8OO-535-9095
'single or double occupancy, children in
same room tree without additional bedding


iday, July 17,1981
+Jewist> fhrkMain
Standard Club Announces
Election Of New Officers
The Standard Club of Greater
liami held elections recently and
new officers are: President,
d Stone; Vice President,
_,ouel L. Barr; Vice President,
jorton L. Weinberger; Secre
y, Norman H. Lipoff; Treas-
er, Jeese Casselhoff; 1st Past
ident. Sylvan Meyer; 2nd
jH President, Thomas Tew;
puse Chairman, Peter L. Ber-
Dnt; House Vice Chairman,
King; House Vice
_, Lawrence Weiner;
cial Activities Chairman,
Jack Goldstein; Art Committee
Chairman, Lawrence E. Singer.
Elected to the Board of Gover-
nors are: Samuel Barr, Jr.; Peter
Bermont; Jesee Casselhoff; Kurt
Enfield; Gerald Engel; Ralph M.
Gilstrsp; Jack Goldstein; Stan-
lev Goldstein; Arthur Herts;
Shepard King; Norman Lipoff;
Bernard Litman; Sylvan Meyer;
John McDonnell; Alan Parerira;
Blanks Rosensteil; George Sal-
ley; Tom Spencer; Fred Stone,
Thomas Tew; Morton Weinber-
ger; Lawrence Weiner.
[Dade County Council of Arts and
Sciences Appoints New Members
| The Metro- Dade Board of
bunty Commissioners approved
appointment of three pro-
uent community members to
Dade County Council of Arts
Dd Sciences.
As past Chairperson of The
Arts of Beth David. Toby
Irs. Edmund) Ansin co-
linated the World Premiere
Andy Warhol's exhibit 'Ten
vs of the Twentieth Century'
I the Lowe Museum last fall. In
ebrusry of this year, she was
^pointed by Secretary of State
srge Firestone to serve on the
nee Grant Review Panel of the
srids Arts Council;
[Marshall S. Harris, partner in
i law firm of Harris and Sirkin,
I president of the Florida Phil-
ionic, spearheaded, along
Alvsh Chanman. the Phil-
fionic's successful fund-
rig efforts of last season.
)iane Heller, art collector and
ive member of the local arts
ununity, is current Vice
sident of the Lowe Art
use urn's Friends of Art, as well
I a Board Member of the Metro-
lit an Museum and Art Centers
I the Bass Museum.
Irs. Ansin. Mr. Harris and
Heller will serve five year
is. beginning their tenure
i the Council in October at the
Council's meeting of October 7,
simultaneously with the in-
duction of recently elected Coun-
cil officers for fiscal year 1961-82:
David A. Wollard (elected for a
second term aa Chairman),
Robert S. Hosmon (as Vice-
Chairman), and Erica Meyer
Rauzin (as Treasurer).
Jackson Board
Begin Duties
Dr. Martin H. Kaiser, chief of
the Division of Gastroenterology
was re-elected as president of the
Medical Staff at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Also re-
elected were vice president. Dr.
Mary Jane Jesse, vice chairman.
Child Health, pediatrics: and
secretary-treasurer. Dr. Gerard
A. Kaiser, chief. Division of
Thoracic and Cardiovascular
Surgery, and secretary-treasurer
of the coordinating committee for
Continuing Education in
Thoracic Surgery.
University of Miami Medical
School Professor Dr. Leon Schiff,
was the first lecturer in the
Annual Leon Schiff Lecture
series established in his honor at
the University of Cincinnati
Medical Center.
Business Notes
Arthur H. Courabon, chairman of the board of J*-_
National Bancorp, announced the election of Miami Beach
Attorney Marvin M. Green, to the Normandy Isles Advisory
"oard. Also elected was Key Biscayne advertising executive
-trice Gray. She will serve on the Key Biscayne Advisory
ard of Jefferson National Banks.
Financial Federal Savings and Loan Association baa an-
ointed six branch managers to the poet of assistant treasurer,
hey are: Betty Sue Bowen. Nicky Fondrieet. Becky Jilton,
lancy Karlan, Dana Williams, and Bill wirth.
IDB BaaahoMiag Corporation Limited announced that
I there was a substantial oversubscription to its recent public
offermg of Ordinary Shares and option warrants made in Israel
pursuant to a prospectus dated June 2. Also announced was that
larights offering to shareholders in Israel made at the same time
Iwaa also successfully completed. Through these offerings. IDB
iBankholding raised in excess of IS. 200 million (approximately
Bg20 million). ^^
PnW99W9WWWW9VnW99W99W99999W99W99W9WrWWnWWW
Y0UN6 ISRAEL OF
5SIS*
Sfey e^Pafae Synagogue
i85o Nt isird mm
NOTM MIAMI MACM FlOtlDA 33179
PMONt |305l 94J 871? o. B7IS
In North Miami Beach, Florida
invites you to Join our vibrant community
New synagogue building with dynamic, community
linded rabbi and growing, young membership
Eruv & Mikvah under development
Excellent Day Schools, Yeshivos & Synagogue youth
)rograms
All conveniences & kosher facilities
Modern, moderately priced housing available
High Holy day seats are now available
Register now for our Sunday Hebrew School
lei Qrablna. President
or more information contact:
labbi Dow Bidnlck-Y.I. of Sky Lake
[850 N.E. 183rd St.N. Miami Beach, Florida 33162
>ne: (305) 944-1334 or 945-8712
miiiiiAiui.i.m.ui.tuHiiiiiii
UUUULX
Miami Musicians Invited To Competition
Miami musicians are being in-
vited by the American Jewish
Congress to enter a Young Musi-
cians Competition for violinists
and pianists. The competition is
sponsored jointly by AJCongress
and the Pepei Cola Company.
Contestants must be between
the ages of 17 and 25. They must
be pl"""i"g a professional career
in rlairff^*1 music and have their
applications in by Sept. 1.
Requests for application and
competition rules are available
from Alia Hand at the Martin
Steinberg Center of American
Jewish Congress, 15 East 84th
St, New York. N.Y. 10028.
There will be two prizes in
violin and two in piano of $ 1.250.
Each winner will be given a
coveted solo recital at the 92nd
Street YM and WHA in New
York. They will also be invited to
perform in concert at synagogues
and Jewish Community Centers
throughout the New York i
Internationally-renowned pia-
nist Eugene Istomin has just
been appointed to the Board of
Advisers for the competition.
Others on the board include
many performers who have
frequently appeared in South
Florida. Former Miami Beachite
Leonard Rose, one of the world's
leading cellists, is a member of
the board. Joining him, among
others, are pianists Emanuel Ax
and Falcolm Frager, and violinist
Eric Friedman.
Police Chief To Speak
The Abe Horrowitx Auxiliary
682, Jewish War Veterans, will
hold a breakfast meeting on Sun-
day, July 26, at 9:30. North
Miami Beach Chief of Police.
Buford Whitaker will be the
guest speaker.
WhvisFPDs
fueladjustment
so high?
Michael C. Cook, Vice President, Fuel
Resources and Corporate Development at
Fort Everglades Oil Storage Facilities.
Why is there a fuel adjustment
in the first place? Customers are
understandably annoyed by high summer
bills, and particularly the size of the fuel
adjustment. But fuel represents about
45% of the total cost of generating elec-
tricity, so the cost of fuel does have a
big impact on the bill. Since fuel costs
change frequently, its important to have
a timely and fair way to cope w ith these
enormous, fluctuating costs. The fuel
adjustment allows us to pay our fuel bills
so that we can continue generating
electricity, and to pass on any savings
directly to our customers.
Why does it always seem to
keep going up? Because tht cost of
fuel has gone up, especially residual oil,
the kind we use most. About half of
our electricity is generated by oil; even
more in the summer. So oil prices have a
dramatic effect on the fuel adjustment.
$34.00
$29.00
Jan-Mar June
8?_____
'Awrag* Summer pries- Jut* August. September
Prices have risen so much in the past
few years that we now spend $4 million
a day on oil.
I've heard that oil prices
were dropping. Will the fuel
adjustment go down as a result?
Oil prices have dropped somewhat
recently, but this summer we'll be using
even more oil than usual because one
of our nuclear plants that generates
lower-cost electricity is being repaired.
During months of moderate tempera-
tures, overall use of electricity decreases,
and we bum less oil. This could mean a
lower fuel adjustment. A lot will depend
on the weather, the price of oil and now
much generation we can get from other
fuel sources.
What is FPL doing to fight high
oil prices? Everything we can. We
shop for bargains in the oil market, both
in contract fuel supplies and in open
market purchases, wfe're not building
any more oil-powered generating facil-
ities. And before we use the ones we
have, we use all our other less-costly gen-
erating sourcesnuclear, natural gas,
and coal-generated power from other
utilities brought into the state by trans-
mission lines, we've also been mixing
coal and oil at one plant, and we're
pursuing opportunities for converting
our oil plants to coal use.
Doesn't the fuel adjustment
destroy the incentive to buy
fuel economically? No. First of all,
our own performance standards are
extremely high. In addition, there are
efficiency incentives built into the
fuel adjustment regulatory proceedings,
and FPL must prove that all fuel was
bought and used wisely when its case
on the fuel adjustment is presented.
Does FPL make a profit on the
fuel adjustment? No, Not a cent of
the fuel adjustment goes to profit. All
of it goes directly to pay for the cost
of fuel.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


*^*^
Jefferson National to Serve
As Voter Registration Office
Oil* lag, noted that Vtril
thousand persona were Z2
from the Miami Beach $*
rolls recently because indiv*L?
failod to vote during the ^
years. In addition, the JeffJ?
National Bunks public -ft
department estimates that tlw
as many of 10.000 addmotuhT
sons eligible to vote who hav,
registered.
not
Pictured left to right are the newly elected Executive Committee officers of Miami Region of
Hadassah: Laura Altshuler, Irma Rashhind, Adrienne Chiron, Mary Ross, Blanch Fishe, Helen
Spitz, Mimi Dicherman, Daphne Weiner, Natalie Lyo.is, Shirley Kaplan and Jean Sternlieb.
Seated left to right: Edduse Kessler, Eve Nemirow, Diane Issenberg, Rosalie Schechter (Na-
tional Advisor}, Linda Minhes (President), Anne Soule, Bonnie Jacobson and Yetta Fried, who
were installed at the recent regional conference at the Konover Hotel
Nazi Asche Gets Seven Years
a,
Registration for the
election in which voters ^L
choose the mayor and six cZ
mission* 'or two-year ten
will continue until one tumv
S3dberghsaidOVe,nb'r b*"^
BONN Kiel has sentenced a former Nazi
to seven years in prison for hi*
complicity in the deportation of
25.000 Belgian Jews to Che
Auschwitz concentration camp
where they died in gas chambers
in 1941 and 1942. The court said
that Kurt Asche, 71, who was
chief of police in charge of Jewish
affairs in Nazi-occupied Belgium
during World War II. played an
important role in the deportation
of the 25,000 Jews, 5,100 of them
children.
Presiding Judge Rudolf Dann
said the jail term was insufficient
punishment for Asche's actions
but for the former Nazi it would
amount to a virtual life sentence
in view of his age. Defense
lawyers had asked the court to
Southern Bell Begins
New Billing System
Starting July 27 all of South
era Bell's monthly telephone bills
will be printed in s new format,
aimed at being easier to under-
stand and more descriptive of the
individual customer service
charges.
The new look is structured to
benefit both residences and busi-
ness telephone customers and
those with complex systems.
The changes are in response to
the consumer concerns which
have been expressed. Physically,
the new document has been
separated into four sections (bill
summary, current charges,
itemized calls, other charges) and
will be printed using easier-to-
read type.
May unnecessary details have
been eliminated, with words re-
placing symbols and codes.
CTUDK3
-&&"
-
sal
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
eicomei
you Dae k to
hii renowo'd
STUOIO
ESTAUBANT
o' a unique
dining ep*'i*nce
Vatcn you' table io vow
mood m one o 4 ind'widual
rooms The Tenl
yVme Cellar Studio Piare
Piqaii* Iwiil Chain
Fine Entertslnment
At the Piano
Also violin plsytng
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(privat* Luncrion arranged!
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
- 2340 SW 32 Avt.
445-5371
cloveo Mondays
i
acquit Asche, saying the prose-
cution failed to prove his com-
plicity in the deaths.
BUT DANN said Asche was
responsible for rendering Bel-
gium "Jew-free" as quickly as
possible and that he had carried
out his duties in an "obliging and
reliable" way.
Another former Nazi, Ernst
Elders, was charged with Asche
in the trial which began last De-
cember. Asche worked with
Ehlers who was the chief of the
gestapo in Belgium and who was
Asche's immediate superior.
Ehlers, who served as a magis-
trate in Schleswig-Holstein until
his retirement in 1974, committed
suicide six weeks before the trial
began when he learned that he
was to be tried-
Belgian Jewry had tried in vain
to bring Ehlers and Asche to
court since 1962. Only in May,
1975 did anti-Nazi activists Beate
and Serge Klarsfeld take drastic
action to bring them to justice.
They broke into Ehlers home,
with the help of seven Belgium
Jews, and managed to collect
documents on his wartime activi-
ties. Although detained by
German police, they succeeded in
preparing the evidence which led
to the trial of Asche
FIU Accepts Freshman
Florida International Uni-
versity is currently accepting
applications from students in-
terested in becoming a part of
FIU's first freshman class this
August 26, whan Fall Semester
begins.
Approval of funding for FIU's
lower division, described by an
administrator as "the most im-
portant development for the uni-
versity since its opening in
1972," was granted during s spe-
cial session of the Florida Leg-
islature. Since it opened. FIU has
been an upper-division university
offering junior, senior and grad-
uate level courses.
Miami Beach voters are now
able to register for the forth-
coming (November) munKipal
elections and for all Ffderai-
state, county and city balloting
every Tuesday, beginning July
14 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the
Jefferson Plaza office of Jefferson
Nstional Bank of Miami Beach.
300 41 St.
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson Nationsl Banks, said
the bank will extend a service
which Jefferson Nstional Bank at
Sunny Iales has provided to
voters in its service area for many
years.
Members of the advisory board
of Jefferson National Bank of
Miami Beach, under the chair-
manship of Selma (Mrs. Ben)
GrenakT. will serve as registrars
for new voters each Tuesday.
They have been deputized by the
Dade County elections supervisor
and his staff to serve in an official
capacity.
Samuel Flatto Sharon Appealing
Nine Month Prison Sentence
TEL AVIV (JTA) Senior members of the Likud
are reported to have assured Samuel Flatto-Sharon, who
is appealing to the Supreme Court against a lower court's
nine month prison sentence for bribery in the elections
four years ago. that Israel will not agree to a French
request for his extradition to France to stand charges
there for embezzlement. Flatto-Sharon was sentenced is
absentia by a Paris court to 10 years in prison
Flatto Sharon's entry into the Knesset four years ago
provided him with immunity against the French ex
tradition request. But his parliamentary immunity was
lifted by the Knesset earlier this year to allow him to be
tried for bribery in the 1977 election campaign He failed
to receive enough votes in last month's elections to pro-
vide him with a seat in the Knesset.
Both the Miami Beack
Chamber of Commerce and the
Civic League of Miami Beach m
arranging with bank officials to
take over the registrauon dize,
on several dates between no* and
the deadline.
$4.95
A Lot of dinner.
Not a lot of dollars.
Our special Inflation Fighter Menu wages war on the high
cost of dining out.
Come.io the King's Wharf at theMamott Hotel Where
you can en)oy a complete dinner from $4 95 to S7.75.
Choose one of 6 complete dinners Roasled Rib of
Beef Au Jus, Chicken Breast Marsala, Beef Ribs with /
Barbecue Sauce, Sliced London Broil, Grilled Liver
with Bacon & Onions, or Broiled Fresh Fish. And,
the dinners won't end 'til coffee and dessert.
All served at your table with a beautiful
roof-top view of the city.
Marriott's new Inflation Fighter
Dinners. Great new meals at pocket
pleasing prices.
Now Served 5-7 p.m., 7 Days
a Week!
Not Available Holidays.
Free Self Parking.
When Marriott does it. they do it right.
Miami/Harriott Hotel & Racquet Club
1201 N.W LeJeune Road. Miami. Florida 33126
Phone 649-5000


A Jewish-German Dialogue
By MORDECHAIBECK
[Apart from the tension in
rael-German relations
lowing Menachem Be-
's attack on Chancellor
^hmidt whatever else it
ings to Israel marks
20th anniversary of one
the country's most trau-
itic events, the trial of
iolf Eichmann in 1961.
le impression made by
trial on Israelis and
vs, especially on the
^unger generation, was
?p and powerful. What is
I known is the effect that
trial had on Germans
)ecially -Christian Ger-
ms and how it altered
relations of many of
m towards Israel and
Jewish people.
The Kichmann trial." recalls
man protestant pastor Dr.
lal Krupp. "coincided with
bi-annual Church Day in Ger-
many when the churches meet to
discuss topics of mutual interest
and contemporary issues. As a
result of the trial, there was a
serious interest expressed at the
gathering in Israel and the
Jewish people. Prior to this, there
had been formal relations be-
tween the two countries; but now
the churches, as religious institu-
tions, wished to open up a
dialogue with Israel and the sur-
vivors of the Holocaust. As a
direct result of the Church Day,
Jewish and Israeli speakers were
brought over to Germany to
speak to the churches about all
matters pertaining to this
possible dialogue."
BY ANOTHER coincidence.
Michael Krupp. then a 20-year-
old seminarian from Berlin, was
working on a kibbutt, studying
the Bible and gathering material
for his first book. The subject
was Zionist history, and the book
was to be published soon after, on
his return to Germany. "As a
result of the book." he adds
modestly, "I became known
within my church as something
of a Jewish expert'."
Wolfson Joins Miami Law Firm
jchard F. Wolfson. executive
president and general coun-
f Wometco Enterprises, will
>me a partner of the law firm
Stroock and Stroock and
in. located in its Miami
September 1. Wolfson is
tv in professional, civic and
mil affairs, and serves as a
tor of the Miami Metropoli-
luseum of Art. and on the
Executive Committee of the
Florida region of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews.
He is a former president of the
Child Guidance Center, the
Greater Miami Philharmonic
Society, and is a trustee of the
Florida International University
Foundation.
j
V
WINDOW SPECIALISTS
Maintenance, Inc.
REPAIRS AND AAAINTENANCE OF All TYPfS
WINDOWS AND JALOUSIES
SERVICE WERE PROUD OF
Comp/efe Stock of Replacement Paris
290 N.E. 79th STREET MIAMI, FLA. 33138
Phone 751-4584______ J
Michael Krupp's own interest
which was to make him a key
figure in the German-Israel
dialogue was not totally acci-
dental: "My own father, an East
Prussian priest, was an active
anti-Nazi. Even prior to the war.
between 1936 and 1938. he got
thrown into jail several times for
organizing illegal meetings and
for sheltering illegal' priests. As
a result of his experiences in jail,
he did not openly agitate again,
partly for the sake of his children
of whom there were then seven
and partly because he saw
many of his contemporaries being
carted off to concentration
camps."
Michael recalls his local church
kindergarten in Elbing being
taken over by the Nazis, who
swathed a large portrait of Jesus
in a huge Nazi flag. "I stayed at
the kindergarten for two hours
and then fled for good."
WHEN PEACE came, Michael
was six. His first contacts with
Jews after the war came when his
parents moved to Essen, where
his neighbors were Jewish con-
verts to Catholicism. "But there
was also a small Jewish commu-
nity in the city," he adds, "and
we would visit their synagogues
and their homes." Later, too, his
father invited many of the com-
munity to their home so that Mi-
chael's contacts became personal.
"I also had a Latin teacher at
my secondary school who de-
voted one lesson a week to the
Nazis. This was very interesting,
especially since no one else was
saying anything about the period
at the time."
All these experiences helped
increase Michael's interest in the
Jews and Judaism. His deepest
influence, he feels, was shaped by
his own religious upbringing,
particularly by his reading of the
Old Testament. "Nevertheless,"
he admits, "it was still all rather
Continued on Page 8-B
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Valerie Ketover (left). President of the South Dade chapter,
with the Louis D. Brandeis award during the 33rd conference at
the University in Waltham, Mass. Eighteen of the 125 national
chapters won this award which is given for imaginative, crea-
tive and outstanding community activities.
JWV Auxiliary Plan Orientation
On Sunday morning. July 19,
President Ceil Steinberg, of the
Department of Florida Ladies
Auxiliary Jewish War Veterans
will hold a brunch for newly
elected officers and chairmen at
her home. Guests will be coming
from throughout the State of
Florida. An orientation session
will follow, including the ex-
changing of portfolios between
the various chairmen: making
plans for the Department s ac-
tivities for 1981-82 and Florida's
representation at the coming Na-
tional Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans to be held
at the Diplomat Hotel the week
of August 16 through the 23.

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Phinehas
Cwtior Weiss to Officiate
At Temple Emanu-El
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Synagogue -7
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T ^4


i. July 17,1961
+Jewish narkilari
Closing Thoughts on Israel's Reunion of Holocaust Survivors
Continued from Page 1-B
Lide, later in the evening. I eat
Lugh it all with averted eyee.
[suspect that my own reac-
I owed something to the fact
I had had the extreme good
one to leave Eastern Europe a
before the frontiers closed,
I] could not face up to the fate
fch would have awaited me
my journey been delayed.
how could people who had
I through it all sit through it
An how could they go
,iigh the exchange of painful
nories which the reunion
lid entail without breakdowns
[distress?
|ie organizers must have
themselves the same ques-
for they had stand-by
fts of doctors, nurses and psy-
ktrists to deal with
igencies. I"06 great spaces of
Isalem's Binyanei Ha'ooma
inul convention center) had
i made available as a meeting
e, and I wandered from one
to another during the four
. of the reunion talking to
e- of survivors. But the only
of stress that I came
ss was a woman psychiatrist
i was rushing here, there and
krwhere, giving out leaflets
ping that another Holocaust
beat hand.
II KK WERE tears in
[v. but they were mainly
of joy, and it gradually
ned on me that I was in the
H of a celebration. I had come
Kaddish, and found myself
ig Hallel. The gathering was
eater success that anyone
have envisaged or its orga-
could have hoped for, and
made it so was not so much
[formal occasions, some of
were less than impressive
informal get-togethers.
pe reunion had several aims.
|t was clear that most of the
Icipants had been brought
by hope. "I know what
?ned to my family,*' said a
lie aged New Yorker with
bally Slavic features. "I saw
men with my own eyes, but
ler really believed it did hap-
I8t> I came here. You never
ere were stories in an eve-
[ paper (which I wasn't able
ifirm) of sister meeting sis-
IttT a gap of 40 years, and of
meeting daughter, but the
reunions I witnessed were
liscovery of lantsUti. There
i nine computer terminals in
linyanei Ha'ooma linked to
fad Vashem archives, with
lines at each, and they
some dramatic stories,
pie managed to find each
without the benefit of
Jters.
AS having a beer in the
rrm when I heard the sound
s breaking and a loud
m. A woman had recognized
itfhbor from the street in
Lodz and had 1st the lemonade
bottle she was holding fall from
her grasp. I don't know how they
recognized each other, for they
could only have been children
when the Germans invaded, but
they fell upon each other in tears
and were inseparable for the rest
of their stay.
The organization of the event,
which was largely in the hands of
volunteers, was impeccable, and
there was a shuttle of buses be-
tween hotels in Jerusalem, Tel
Aviv, and even Natanya. and the
Binyanei Ha'ooma. In one bus, a
man looked at the number of his
neighbor's arm, looked at his
own, found that they were only a
few digits apart. "Ah," he said."
a shoe hen We must have come
to Auschwitz on the same day."
And they had
The overwhelming majority of
the participants were from Amer-
ica and normally spoke English,
but during the course of the re-
union, they found themselves
reverting to Yiddish, Polish or
Russian, and I found myself
doing the same. In fact, I was so
caught up in the spirit of the
occasion that I, too, began to
search for Ian tsleit.
THERE WERE large boards
round the walls on which people
were invited to write their names,
histories and where-abouts. and I
wrote down my name and tele-
phone number and that I was
from Barovke. near Dvinsk.
When I got back to my hotel that
evening. I got black looks from
the receptionist. The switch-
board had been blinking with
calls all day. and there were 27
messages for me.
Had my name been Herman.'
. Hermans'.' Did I mean
1'msk or Dvinsk? Was my
father called Mendel der Sch-
u-artterf. Did I have a brother
in Schwintzyan? ... A sister in
Glubok? Would I like to come
and stay in Miami? Sadly. I did
not trace anyone from Barovke it-
self but had I been in need of it. I
could have had free board and
lodging for the rest of my days.
If hope was the main force
which had brought the people to-
gether, the second, I believe, was
thanksgiving, and there was
much to give thanks for. The fact
that they were alive at all was in
itself a miracle, and they were not
only alive, but thriving. Many
had brought their children, some
had brought their grandchildren,
others brought whole family
albums, and the dead were alive
again not only in the reccollec-
tions of the survivors, but in the
names of their progeny.
ONE RARELY came upon any
single person. The participants
were a self-selected group. Most
of the people one spoke to had
built up prosperous businesses or
had risen in the professions,
which does not mean that every-
one who has survived the Hok>
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caust is a university professor or
a millionaire, but moat of them
were clearly driven by an angry
determination to show the world
that, in spite of all they'd been
through, their dynamism and
spirit were intact.
So, indeed, was their sense of
humor. There was a thick-set
grey-haired man with gold teeth
and dark glasses, who wore a pla-
card on his back with a number
running into six figures. I asked,
though I could have guessed,
what the number represented. "It
ain't my Swiss bank account," he
said. The theme of the gathering
was "From Holocaust to Re-
birth," and they were its affirma-
tion.
The thought of a reunion was
born in the camps themselves,
but it began to take life about
four years ago with Ernest Mi-
chel, executive director of the
United Jewish Appeal of New
York, and himself a survivor of
Auschwitz, as the moving spirit.
His speech at the opening cere-
mony at Yad Vashem was the
most forceful and eloquent of all
the many speeches to be heard in
the course of the gathering. The
hundreds of correspondents who
attented the event from all parts
of the globe sat in dazed mystifi-
cation and wondered how so
many could listen to so much
TWO THINGS nearly marred
the reunion. One was the ex-
cessive rhetoric, and the other
was religion. The former was the
more serious, for it detracted
from the poignancy of what
should have been a solemn and
historic occasion.
Among the six-thousand par-
ticipants were about a thousand
young people in their twenties
and thirties, the "Second Gener-
ation" as they were called, chil-
dren of the survivors, and it was
planned that they would take a
solemn vow at the closing cere-
mony to transmit the testament
of their parents. The testament
was, after all, a symbolic one, and
properly drafted, it could have
been contained in a paragraph, or
at most a page. Instead, it bulged
with rhetoric and ran to several
pages. When Rabbi Hugo Gryn,
who was one of the 80 British
survivors, saw in advance copy,
he blanched at the language. I
blanched at the language and the
length, but it was too late to do
anything about it.
Worse was to follow. When the
ceremony began, it was made
clear that the testament would be
delivered by six different people
in six different languages
Hebrew. Yiddish, English.
Latino. French and Russian.
Even the 23rd Psalm would have
sounded banal if subjected to
such treatment. The whole thing
took an hour (though it felt much
more) and half the audience
would have vanished but for the
fact that they were waiting to
hear another survivor Mena
chem Begin.
The contretemps caused by re-
ligion were rather different.
On their hut day in Jerusalem,
participants were bused to the
"dedication of the Jerusalem
Great Synagogue at Hechal
Shlomo in memory of the Six
Million." It was news to me, as it
was to others, that the syna-
gogue, which is widely regarded
in Jerusalem as a white elephant,
was ever intended as a memorial
to the Six Million. Moreover,
though it has been under con-
struction for over 10 years, it is
still far from complete. There is
building material all over the
place, and the edifice is a shell,
but the Holocaust, as Elie Wiesel
observed at a press conference,
has become an industry, and here
was somebody trying to get in on
the ground floor.
THAT WAS in the morning.
In the evening, at the closing cer-
emony, one of the speakers was
to have been Chaike Grossman, a
Member of the Knesset who had
fought in the Warsaw Ghetto.
and the ceremony was held not
by the Western Wall, but at the
adjoining plaza, which, it was
assumed was not terra sancta. I
The assumption was wrong, for
while the rabbinate was prepared
to tolerate the sight of men and
women sitting together, it was
afraid that if the voice of a
woman was actually heard within
sound of the Wall, there might be
demonstration from the ultra-
Orthodox. Chaike was asked to
stand down and, rather unchar-
acteristically, she did. Pew people
knew about it at the time, other-
wise the whole mood of the
gathering would have been
soured.
As the evening approached its
climax, I could see an apprehen-
sive look in the eyes of some of
the organizers. Elie Wiesel, one of
the three honorary chairmen of
the gathering, was asked at his
press conference whether, given
the fact that the elections were
only 12 days away, the event
might not be exploited for
political ends. A BBC producer
put the same question to Hugo
Gryn, though in more specific
terms. Would Begin not use the
ceremony as a trump card? "I
don't think he will" said Rabbi
Gryn "God, I hope he won't."
AND HIS prayer was answer-
ed. Begin didn't. His speech was
low-keyed, pensive, sentimental,
and entirely in keeping with the
spirit of the occasion. An almost
audible sigh of relief went up
from some sections of the vast
audience.
In the bus back to the hotel, I
found myself next to a woman
who was convulsed with tears,
and I asked what had upset her.
"It's over, ian't it?" she said. "I
made all these friends. It was like
having my family back. I m from
Detroit. In New York, you can
sometimes meet up with people,
in Miami, too. But who comes to
Detroit?"
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TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB,.
The 4th Of July Missed You, Louis Shochet Jfc
The founder of the Jewish Floridian was an all
American Jew. To him every synagogue was important
and he listed every one of them in Greater Miami,
designating its denomination and its Rabbi, its
location and its Service sermon, just as if it were vital
news to all his readers. In years when he had 18
Synagogue to list, I know that he would have been
elated with 80 Synagogues to list. It was not only good
Judaism, it was good business ... "cast thy bread
upon the waters and it shall come back to thee" But-
tered! Now the 80 Synagogues are here, but Louis
Shochet is not. Fewer than 18 appear in the July 3rd
issue, and no mention is made of July 4, a Yom Tov so
important to the All American Jew that that the issue
might have appeared with the front page printed in
red white and blue, with the flag of Israel one one top
corner and the flag of America on the other.
Oh how he would have welcomed my article
suggesting this be a double celebration paying tribute
to one ideal, "freedom for all mankind" as directed in
the Torah and as observed by the only two great
democracies in the world-Israel and America, two great
allies celebrating as one, one day July the 4th, en-
compassing July the 4th 1776 upon which was "fired
the SHOT'heard round the world and July the 4th 1976
when a young American Jew led an Israeli rescue
mission to Entebbe and in just sixty minutes
straightened the posture of all free and responsible
men all over the world, enshrining "Operation
Jonathan" as one of history's finest hours.
May next year's 4th of July issue of the Floridian
satisfy all American Jews. ______^_____


A Jewish-German Dialogue
popular and practical level. It re- ,"|K*'1h <>%.
rnain.- to be seen how much this ?}*ji ^l"**? *> r*^
Continued from Page -B
abstract. I remember when my
mother announced the birth of
the State of Israel. It was very
exciting, but I couldn't quite
connect it with the Jews I was
reading about in the Bible"
HIS INTEREST in Jews and
Israel remained with him through
his seminarian years, and
brought him his first trip to
Israel and his reputation as a
Jewish expert." This expertise
earned hun a further stay in
Israel in the mid-1960's, when he
completed his doctorate in
Mishna at the Hebrew Universi-
ty. He also met and married his
Jewish Algerian-born wife during
this period. That upset some
church conservatives." he says
ruefully, "including my father
who thought that such a mar-
riage was taking the dialogue too
far. Still, the church was broad-
rrunded enough to send us back
here to Israel in 1970."
The year 1970 was another sig-
nificant turning point in German-
Israel relations, for its was in
that year that the Lutheran
Church set up the AktionSuh-
nerueichen program for German
volunteers to work in Israel. The
program was beaded by Dr. Mi-
chael Krupp who took up resi-
dency in Jerusalem's Ein Karem
district, where he has stayed ever
since, raising his Jewish farmh-
and "living a true ecumenical
existence."
The Aktion Suhnemeichen
program.'- he observes, which
brought over young German
people to work on kibbutz and in
social and voluntary work (for
example, with handicapped chil-
dren and old people), was a
typical expression of this new
concern about Jews and Israel."
In some ways, of course, this
program was looked upon as a
form of penance for the Holo-
caust. Not that it could hope to
repair the inestimable damage
perpetrated by that event. But it
was seen as a way of promoting
better German-Israel relations
through practical good deeds.
This does not mean that there
has not also been some very
radical rethinking done in the
sphere of German Christian
theology.
DR. KRUPP. in the role of
theologian, has been at the fore-
front of these developments,
although he is first to admit that
his activities are only one of
many similar developments
taking place within the German
church community.
"Since I visit Germany in the
course of my work, I see how the
dialogue is developing. On the
whole, there has been a steady
Miami born attorney
MR. DAVID STERN,
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growth of interest and involve
ment. Some 20 professors now
teach Judaica and Hebrew
studies in Germany Each year,
the Nov. 9 commemoration of
Knstallnacht brings more and
more people to the churches,
while some of the church synods
have begun publicly making
statements revising the church's
stand on Jews and Israel.
The most significant of these
statements was made at the be-
ginning of 1980 by the Synod of
the Protestant Church of the
Rhineland. one of the largest and
most influential groups in Ger-
many. It confessed the guilt and
responsibility of German Chris-
tendom for the Holocaust, af-
firmed that the Jewish people re-
main God's elect people, and
stated that missionary' activity
among Jews was and is inadmis-
sable.
DR. KRL'PP himself has con
tinued to host German visitors,
students and theologians all of
whom have been coming to Israel
in increasing numbers. But more
important, he set up. some three
years ago. a year-long course for
German trainee priests who come
to Israel to study Bible. Hebrew.
Talmud and Zionism, as well as
to get to know the land and its
people "When they return to
Germany, they can become an in-
fluence both inside and outside
the church. I've seen the first re-
sults and they are very encourag-
ing. We have 70 candidates for
the coming year and it is a shame
that we can only accept 20. Yet
the response shows the enthusi-
asm with which the program has
been met in Germany."
This is not to say that tensions
don't exist. Some claim that the
dialogue tends to polarize
opinions on both sides, especially
when the Arab-Israel conflict is
brought in to the discussion. One
'extreme philo-Jew and Zionist"
this is how Lutheran Pastor
Roland Neidhart defines himself
believes in speaking to Jews in
Hebrew, which he sees as the
"authentic language of
dialogue He speaks of the need
for a balanced" attitude be-
tween the Church's dialogue with
the Jews and its concerns for the
Christian Arab community in
Israel and on the West Bank
It would thus appear that
problems notwithstanding, the
Jewish and Zionist dialogue with
Christian Germany has devel-
oped over the past decade or so
on both a theoretical and
theological level as well as on a
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FUDGE FERNS FURNITURE TRASn TREASURES
BRIC A-BRAC KNlCK KNACKS
Single Booth (10'x10V75
Double Booth (10x20) 120
HURRY! RESERVE YOUR BOOTH TODAY!
DEADLINE FRIDAY AUGUST 28
THE MONEY YOU MAKE, YOU KEEP!
You've Got A Friend On
For More Inlormation.
Please Contact.
Gay Levmson
377-811 InDade
525-3193 In Broward
mams 10 De s?n now bm ___ -'
dialogue will be allowed to *v>rwher* in our diy
flourish and whether or not it will Jerusalem Press Se
Family Medicine
Pediatrics
Surgery
Vascular Surgery
Cardoiogy
nict
Pediatr.c Hematoiogy
Psychiatry
De'Tiatoioow
Internal Merjionj
STAT MEDICAL CLINIC
12302 N.E. 6th Avenue
North Miami, Florida
(305) 893-7698
KENNETH A. ROSEN, M.D., P.A.
WHOMATI IMIRK AN hi l\HIM>l IMRMATOHK \
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF AN OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
DERMATOLOGY
DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY
15175 EAGLE NEST LANE. MIAMI LAKES
FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 557-6719
CHIROPRACTOR
$
35
00
Neck Pain
Heodoches
Dock Poin
Arthritis. Etc.
Athletic Injuries
24 Hr Chiropractic Core Available
Se Hablo Espartol
9230DIRDRD. 551-0105
Includes
Consultation
Lxominonon
0 X-Ptoy
Harvey I. Cohen, D.M.D.
Takes Pleasure In Announcing That
Julio A. Llera, D.D.S.
Will Be Associated With Him
In The Practice Of Dentistry
Office Hours:
Mbn.-Sat. & Evenings
By Appointment
Sunset West Plaza
8752 Sunset Dr.
274-8374
MICHAEL H. SCHENKMAN. D.D.S.
Announces the opening of his office for the
Practice of General Dentistry
Sum land Shopping Center
11735 South Dixie Highway
Miami Florida 33156
omct hours
rr AP9ctNT\a*rr
TDJTMOHi
iivccr
HOMESTEAD MENTAL HEALTH CENTER
46 N. HOMESTEAD BLVD.
(Across from Ramada Inn or j
WILL BE OFFERING A SERIES Of
WORKSHOPS JULY 7 thru AUG
TUES. EVENINGS 7 P.M. to \0 P.M
*1- lKstt SaI Estecn M,2! lotu.frnf U ***h MlW
JJM featof witl Reject* JUfisH latwq Skis Issevaeii'
mn tatrictnreufet ufistll ta*,zf leutms*Heecs
AW II leotms* If remits
. ..... MODERATE FEES
FNTKI MfMMiTMfl m f, TtM MlTIOflT*
CALL 245-6195 _


Miblic Notice
m the circuit court of
The eleventh judicial
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Can Ne-SI-ISSSe FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
I BE: The Marriage of
IBORAH MILLER
AHOONE.
stitloner-Wlfe
*KKT TABOONE.
r spondent Husband
MARK T. TABOONE
Residence Unknown
IVUl MARK T. TABOONE
. hereby notified to file your
,-r to Uua PeUUon (or Dil-
ution of Marriage with the
r-. of the Court and mall a
, to Petitioner's Attorney
Kiel gallup, sses sai
do Street. Coral Gables,
oride. 33134. on or before
[fruit 7. 1981 else PeUUon will
_ -.iken as confessed.
rrhls 6 day of July, tail
KICHARD P. BRINKER
(let* Circuit Court
By C. P. Cope land
Deputy Clerk
101 July 10.17. 4.11,1661
I t m E Cl RCUIT COURT OF
4E ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
)ADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CaM Na.il-mt FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
I RE The Marriage of
>Rr UVAUX,
usband.
|YLE L LA VALUE.
1fe.
UAYLE L LAVAIXE
3 ho Trenton Avenue
AUanUc City, N.J. 0MO1
!< ARE NOTIFIED that
action for Dissolution of
rlage has been Bled
Unit you and you are re-
ed lo serve a copy of your
If- defenses. If any. to It on
[PHEN L. RASKIN. ESQ .
Snorter's attorney, whose
ra la Suite SOS. Dadeland
?era North. 8300 So. Dade-
iloulevard. Miami. Flor-
IS31M. on or before July U.
and file the original with
| Clerk of this court either
re lervlce on PeUUoner's
rney or Immediately there
r. otherwise a default will
kntered against you for the
If demanded In the com-
tit or petition
ITEDon June 34.1881-
tlCHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk of the Court
By AD Wade
As Deputy Oerk
July 1.10. IT. 24. 1M1
NOTICtUNfttR-------------
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
)TICE IS HEREBY
EN that the undersigned.
ng to engage In business
the fictitious name IN
(IOKS BY JEROME at ltTB
ILING ROAD. DANIA.
33004 Intends to register
| name with the Clerk of the
nil Court of Dade County.
Ids
KKOME LJEBERMAN
JuneSf;
Julys. 10. 17. 1081
|THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE IITH JUDICIAL
| CIRCUITIN ANOFOR
DE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASEN0.81-16S41FC
*E The Marriage of
INIELLE FLOOD
'IJCSPIE
CtitlonerWlfe
|arlss brette
LESPIE
spondent Husband
TICK OF PUBUCATION
CHARLES BRETTE
.ESPIE
I Kealdence Unknown
[YOf ARE HEREBY notl-
that a PeUUon for
nlutlon of Marriage has
i filed against you. You are
ured to serve a copy of your
er or pleading upon the
Btioner-Wlfe or upon
[ItlonerWlfe's attorney.
^ALD MATES. ESQ The
ey I'laia. Suite III SS
!" Avenue. Miami Beach.
Ida ssiso. and file Uta
lnal answer or ph-artlng In
[office of the Clark of the
full Court on or before the
y of August. 1881: other-
a Default Judgment will
ntered against you.
DATED this S day of July
I in Mlanti. Dado County!
11 da.
"CHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
ByC.P.CapaUnd
Deputy Clark
JulylT.I4.il.
August T. 1M1
NOTICE UNDER
i,'",T'U NAME LAW
PTICE 18 HEREBY
n-.N that the undersigned.
,ln"K to engage In business
>r the flcUUoua name JEW-
MKH SCHOOL. JEWISH
BH SCHOOL OF 80UTH
JRIDA at 18800 N.E. X
fnue. North Miami Beach.
"nda 33180 Intend to register
names with the Oerk of
1 ircult Court of Dade
|M) Florida.
''iah High School of
.south Florida. Inc.
> Rabbi Loula B. Herring
1'rtnclpal
June 26.
July ._10. 1L l8i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 11 MM
DiviionOJ
IN RE ESTATE OF
JACK NEWBERG
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
Within three months from the
Ume of the first publication of
Uua notice you are required to
file with the clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Flortda.
Probate Division, the address
of which l.i 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Flortda 331 SO, a
written statement of any claim
or demand you may have
against the estate of JACK
NEWBERG. deceased
Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor of
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
win become due shall be
stated. If the claim la con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security snail be
described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative
ALL CLAIMS AND DE-
MANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Dated July 7. 1881
RAE NEWBERG
As Personal RepresentaUve
of the Estate of
JACK NEWBERG
De ceased
MARVIN GREBER. ESQ
Attorney
6.U N E 167 Street Suite 1016
North Miami Beach. Flortda
33163
Telephone 661 3343
First published on July IT. 24.
tsn
MM
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name D. M.
R DISTRIBUTORS SOUTH, at
6748 Commerce Lane, South
Miami Flortda intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Flortda
D M R INTERNATIONAL,
INC..
by: A MELVIN MORRIS
President
Law Offices of Alnalee R.
Ferlde
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 216
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Coral
Gables. Fl 33134
10006. July 10. 17.24.31. 1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
TROYA CAFETERIA, at T410
S.W 8 St.. Miami. Fla. Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Carlos Rodriguez
Owner
08876 June 38:
_____________July 10. IT. 1881
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ns 61 16646
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIANA HERNANDEZ
daKANOEL
Petitioner Wife
and
KtKLIORANGEL
Respondent Husband
TO EV ELIO RANCEL
Centre raa 29A
Matanses. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NO-
TIFIED that an action for
DlasoluUon of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
II on HARVEY D. FRIED
MAN. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
420 Lincoln Road Suite 378,
Miami Beach. Florida 33138,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 14, 1881.
otherwise a default win be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or peUUon.
This not Ice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDLAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Flortda on this 14 day of July.
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flortda
By Paul F McCarthy
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal I
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road Suite's7
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Telephone 13061 631 0301
Attorney for Petitioner
10021 July 17.24 SI:
August 7. 1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Noil 4471 FC
IN RE:
JOHN JEFFREY
GATTHER. by
and through his next best
friend, natural mother
and guardian,
SUSAN SCHWARTZ,
I'etltloner.
TO JOHN M. GAITHER.
Residence Unknown
VERIFIED PETITION
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Verified PeUUon
for Change of Name has been
filed and commenced In this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defense. If any, to It on
RICHARD G. DUNBERG,
ESQUIRE. Attorney for Peti-
tioner, who address Is GOOD
MAN, DUNBERG A HOCH-
MAN, P.A.. 8686 Sunset Drive.
Suite 180. Miami. Florida SHU.
and fUe the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before the M day of July,
1881: othrwtse a default will be
entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the PeU-
Uon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
eecuUve weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida, an this 31 day of June.
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKE R
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
RICHARD O. DUNBERG.
ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
GOODMAN. DUNBERG A
HOCHMAN. P.A.
8688 Sunset Drive.
Suite ISO
Miami. Flortda S814S
Telephone: (806)278-8000
0N81 June 28;
July S. 10. IT. 1881
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNe.81-1S4t FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
1.11 J.IAN PAYNE
Petitioner. Wife
and
MILTON PAYNE
Respondent, Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO MILTON PAYNE
I residence Unknown)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RUSSELL ROSENTHAL.
ESQUIRE. Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address Is
L1BERMAN BENJAMIN
and ASSOCIATES. P.A. 0801
Sunset Drive. Miami. Flortda
331T3. on or before July 31.1881.
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either be-
fore service on Petitioner's
Attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered agalnat you for
the relief demanded In the Pe-
tition.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on June 28.1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
i rk of the Circuit Court
By M J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
OW003 July 3. 10. IT. 24. 1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. Si -10644 FC
IN RK
GENIA JACQUES LOUIS
Petitioner
and
THEODORE ADAMS
Respondent
TO THEODORE ADAMS
residence unknown
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MAKRLAGE
YOU ARE HEREBY NO
TIF1ED that an acUon foi
DlasoluUon of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on BENNETT D. ELTZ.
P.A attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 618 S.W. 13th
Avenue. Miami. Flortda, 13130.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 14. 1881:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
aecutlve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDI AN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of July.
1081
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
1002(1 July IT. 24. 31.
August T, 1081
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 81-10772 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JEAN VTLLE LAURENT,
I'etltloner Husband.
and
YVONNE LAURENT.
Respondent Wife.
TO: YVONNE LAURENT
Deimas 10, No. 11
Port-au-Prtnce.
Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
DAVID 8. BEROER. ESQ..
attorney for I'etltloner, whose
address Is 08O Washington Ave-
nue. Miami Beach. Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 14,
1881: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
BH FLORIDLAN
WTTNES8 my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Flortda on this 13 day of July,
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flortda
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID8.BERGER
Attorney for
Petitioner-Husband
888 Waahlngton Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida SUSS
Telephone (806)873-8100
10016 July 17. 34. 81:
NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCUI T COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil A ctton
No. 81-18341 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARAMET ETIENNE.
Petitioner-Husband
and
SYLVIE MERCIUS
ETIENNE.
Respondent Wife
TO: SYLVIE MERCIUS
ETIENNE
Seven Section
Marotlere.
Port de Palx
Haiti. West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a peUUon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ESQ
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 616. 1st State
Bank Bldg 7000 NE 2nd Ave-
nue. Miami. FL 33138. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 7.1081. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 2nd day of July.
1081
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Hy A I) Wade
Aa Deputy Clerk
10004 July 10. 17, 24.31.1881
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
CaaeNo.Si-HST
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DIANA ROLLS.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
OSWALD ROLLS.
Respondent Husband
TO: OSWALD ROLLS
22 West Street
Grant Town
Nassau. Bahamas
NOTICE OF
PUBUCATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dla-
soluUon Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's at-
torney, GEORGE T RAMANI.
ESQ, Suite TU, Btecayne
Building. 18 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida UlSO
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or
before 34 day of July, 1881. If
you fall to do so. Judgment by
defsult will be taken agalnat
you for the relief demanded In
said peUUon.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida.
this 18 day of June 1081
RICHARD!' BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Flortda
BY L C Bedasse
Deputy Clerk
08871 June 36:
July!. 10.17.1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action
No.Sl -fleSFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE. The marriage of:
SEBASTIAN MONTOYA
and
MARIA J PALACIO
MONTOYA
TO: MARLA J. PALACIO
MONTOYA
Carrera No. SOD,
No: 4017
MedeUln, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Philip L. Font, Esq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
880 S.W 8th Street Miami.
Flortda SSISO. and file the ortgl
nal with the clerk of the above
stylsd court en or before
August T. 1881: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered agalnat
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive wests In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDI AN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of July,
1881.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flortda
ByK Setfrted
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
PHILIP L FONT. ESQ..
LAW OFFICE OF
I. ROGER FELDMAN.
ESQ..
880 S.W. 8th Street
Miami, Florida SUSO
Attorney for Petitioner
10OO7 July IT. 34. 81;
August 7. 1881
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CsieNe.ll-10274FC
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
Michelle Woelffle.
Husband,
and
Donna Woelffle.
Wife.
TO: Mr Michelle Woelffle.
1S4 Rue Bourbon
ChatelleraulL
France
NOTICE OF
PUBUCATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a PeUUon For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's at-
torney, JOEL V LUMER.
ESQ. Suite 711. Btecayne
Building. 18 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Flortda 331S0
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or be-
fore 7 day of August. 1881 If
you fall to do so. judgment by
default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
said peUUon.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Flortda.
this 2 day of July, 1881.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Flortda
BY: M J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
00808 July 10.17, 24, 31.1881
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No.ll-S18*(FC)(2S)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRAIGE OF
ADR1ENNE BEAUCHARD.
Petitioner Wife
and
FLORIUS BEAUCHARD.
Respondent Husband
TO: FLORIUS BEAUCHARD,
Respondent-Husband
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a peUUon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ESQ
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 618. 1st State
Hank Bldg 7800 NE 2nd Ave..
Miami. FL 33138 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above aty led court on or before
July 34. 1881: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
aecutlve weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 18 day of June
1081.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByK Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
08876 June 26.
July S. 10. 17.1881


Public Notice
NOTICB UNOII
FICTITIOUS MAMS LAW
NOTICB IS HEREBT
GIVEN that the
Clark of Um dm Court of
D* County, riortda.
FORTY FIRST STREET
LIQUOR mc
_____ By: Qasaar
DANIEL M KEIU ESQ.
NOTICB OB ACTION
CONSTR UCTIVB SE RVICE
(NOMOfHTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOUBT OF
TMB (LEVINTN JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLOHI DA, IN
AMO FOB DADE COUNTY
ChrHAcftoa
MH1-NMFC
F AMI L Y DIVISION
NOTICB FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMAIRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
PEARL ANGUS.
PeUUooer Wife
and
CALVIN ANGUS.
Reecxavtem rfaasand
TO MR CALVIN ANGUS
3 Vectie Avenue
Kingston Jamaica
YOL' ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dtaao-
lutlon of your Marriage haa
been filed and commenced in
thia court and you are required '
to t~* a copy of your written
defense*. If any. to It on HAR
OLD CEASE. ESQ. attorney
for Petitioner whoa* adrtraaa to
2730 Wast Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33138 and file
the original with the dark of
the above ityled court on or
before Jury 24. 1M1 otherwise
a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
aeal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thia 24 day of June
1M1
RICHARD P BRISKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
Aa Deputv Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
HAROLD CEASE. Eaq
2720WeetFmgtorSt
Miami. Florida Ml J6
Attorney for Petitioner
July 3. 10 17. 24. 1M1
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAM. STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
a.
The undersigned, under oath.
eaya It la the Intention of the i
undersigned to engage to) a
buatneee enterprlae under the !
fictitloua name of CORAL
REEF PROPERTIES located
at 13MB South Dixie Highway in
the City of Miami. Dade
County. Florida.
Thoae interested la aald en-
terprlae. and the extant of the
intereet of each, to aa fouowa
Intaraet
MIAMI SOUTH
REALTY. INC
15006 So. Dixie Highway
Miami. Florida
Sworn to and aubacrlbad to
before ma, at Mtwt. Florida
thte 24th day of June. 1M1
Notary Public.
tale of Florida
At Large
My Comouaaaoa
expire* Apr. a IMS
Banded thru General Ina
Underwriters
Proof of publication of tbto
intention to reglater. to filed
herewith, pursuant to the pro
vision* of Chapter 2MM. Lawa
of 1M1. (MOOBFSAi
as July 1.10.17. 24. Hal
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE BLBVBNTMJUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FON
DAOI COUNTY. FLOR ID A
Case No II H7WFC
FAMILY Of VISION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
DIME OCANA
Petitioner. Wife
ANGELF OCANA
Respondent Husband
NOTSCK OF ACTION
TO: ANOELF OCANA
Cuarto Paaajs-Rlmac
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
all action for Dtoaehitiun of
Marriage haa been filed
you and you an
I a copy of soar
, H any, to It on
RUSSELL ROSENTHAI.
ESQUIRE Petitioner Attar-
aey whoa* addreaa la
UBERMAN and BENJAMIN
ASSOCIATES. P A fNMI
unset Drive. Miami, fit****.
August M. INI
orlglaal with the
Ble the
at thto Oourt either
before aanrlce on Petitioner-
Attorney or Immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you Bar
the relief demanded in the
i hand and aeal
WITNESS I
nrl
of thto Court on July 10. 1M1
RICHARD P BR INKER
dark. ClreuB Court
ByC.P Copsiand
fyCtork
Dsputyl
July IT. M. 11;
AuguatT. lBli
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OB
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIBCUIT OB FLOR IDA, IN
ANDBOB DADECOUNTY
(FAMILY DIVISION)
Case Ns.il lesaa
IN RE The Marriage of
KOROUSH MEHRPOUTAN.
PeUUoner
BEN HAZ MEHRPOUTAN.
TO BENHAZ MEHR
POUTAN
Residence Lknown
or
TO: BENHAZ MEHR
POUT AN
c-o Behnam EUaaaadah.
brother
14300 Ventura Blvd
NO 101A
Encino. Calif. BUM
YOU. BENHAZ MEHR
POUYAN. ARE HEREBT
NOTIFIED THAT A Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage haa
bean filed against you. and you
are required to aerve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Petition for DUaolutlon of
Marriage oa the Petitioner
Attorney, FRANK. STREL
KOW A OAY. ESQS 803
Capital Bank Building, lee*
Kennedy Causeway. North Bay
Village. Florida 33141. and file
the original Answer or Plead-
ing In the Office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before
the 31 day of July. 1M1 If you
fail to do so. Judgment or De-
fault will be taken agalnet you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition
Thto Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
consecutive week* In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
DATED thto 20 day of June.
taw*
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY N. A. Hewett
Deputy Clerk
FRANK. STRELKOW A GAY
Attorney* for Petitioner
MB Capital Bank BkJg
IBM Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village
Florida 331*1
Telephone i305>aM-4711
II July 3. 10. 17. 24. 1M1
IN THE CIBCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLOR IDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CeteNell 1M7J FC
NOTICE OB ACTION
IN RE The Marriage Of
MASUDA ZEHRI.
PeUUoner Husband
v*
CHERYL JEAN ZEHRI.
Respondent Wife
TO CHERYL JEAN ZEHRI
Residence I'nknown
YOU CHERYL JEAN
ZEHRI are hereby notified to
file your anewer to thia Petition
lor Dissolution of Marriage
with the Clerk of Hie Court and
mail a copy to Petitioner s
Attorney DANIEL GALLUP.
2365 Salaedo Street. Coral Gab-
les. Florida. 33114. on or before
July 31. INI els* Petition will
be taken aa confessed
Thto IBth day of June. 1BJ1.
RICHARD P BRISKER
Cle rk Circuit Court
By A. D Wade
Deputy Clerk
July 3. 10. 17.24. 1M1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPBOBBBTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIBCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FORDADECOUNTY
CivII ActtaB No 11 -1M7J BC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RK: THE MARRIAGE OF
JAIME SUAREZ
PeUUoner Husband
and
CARMEN MARIA SUAREZ
ION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: CARMEN MARIA
SUAREZ
TOU ARE HEREBT NO-
TIFIED that aa action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
m filed agalnat you and you
required k> eerv* a copy of
your written itaNnin, Many, to
It on HARVEY D FRIED-
MAN. ESQ.
atiaraay tor
to
Miami Beach. Florida HIM
and file the original with the
clerk of the above atylad oourt
on or before August 13. 1M1.
other-wto* a default will be
entered against you for the
relief rtotnended In the com
plaint or petition
Thto notice shall be pub
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBT
GIVEN that the undersigned.
skirl rig to aagage In business
under the fictitloua name Inter-
amerlcaa Industrial Plaaa at
TBW N.W. Mth Street MlamL
Florida IBM liaanda to
register aald name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
BT Harry Hahamovlteh
SCHONINGER. JANKOWTTZ
AND SIEGFRIED. PA
Attorney* for
H H H Conetruc lion Corp
Julv JO. 17.24.11. 1M3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO BOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA I
Case Ms 11 7N
FAMILY DIVISION
LN RE The Marriage Ol
RUBY SHAW.
Petitioner Wife.
and
CARLTOS SHAW.
Respondent Husband
NOTICE OF
PUBL1CATIOS
YOU CARLTON SHAW.
HUSBAND. RESIDESCE UN-
KNOWN, are hereby notified to
aerve a copy of your Answer to
the Petition For Dissolution of
Marriage filed against you.
upon Wlfe'a attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS
ESQUIRE (13 S W 13th Ave-
nue. Miami Florida 331M. and
file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before July 31.
1M1. otharwlae the Petition
will be confessed by you
DATED this 30 day of June.
1W1
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clerk
By K Seifned
Deputy Clerk
Julys. 10.17.24. ln
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OB'
TNI ELEVENTH JUDICIAL >
CIRCUIT IN AND BOB
DADS COUNTY. BLOBIDA
Case Nell WSfFC
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage Of
L HARRISSON ANICET
PeUUoner Husband
and _______
BERNANDETTE ANICET.
Respondent Wife _____
TO BERNADETTE ANICET
AUTO ROUTE CARR.
PORT AU PRINCE.
HAITI
YOU ARE HEREBT notified
thai a Petition tor Dissolution
of Marriage haa been filed
against you and you are hereby
required to eerv* a copy of your
answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the PeUUoner
Attorney. LESTER ROGERS.
whoa* addreaa to 14M N.W. 17
Avenue. Miami. Florida 13128
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above atyled Court
on or before thto 31 day of July.
1M, or a Default will be en-
tered against you
DATED thto 31 day of June.
1M1
RICHARD P BR INKER
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
ByM.J Hartnett
July 1. 10. 17, 34. lam
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT OF
THE II TH JUDICIAL
CIBCUIT IN ANO FOB
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
CaaaNs.SMMelBC
BAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The marriage of
ADOLFO L GOMEZ
PeUUoner husband
and
HURT GOMEZ
Respondent Wife
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
la; NURY GOMEZ
YOU. NURY GOMEZ.
Apartado Aeroo tOOM Itagul.
Anuoqula. Colombia S A are
required to file your anewer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and aerve a copy
thereof upon the petitioners
attorney. Herman Cohen. Esq..
22 8W i Street Miami. Fla
Sliio. on or before August IT.
1M1. or else petition will be
Dated July 10. 1*81
RICHARD P BRISKER
Clara. Circuit Court
ByA D Wade
Deputy Clerk
10011 Jury IT. M. II.
August 7. 1M1
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELE VE NTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OA DC COUNTY. FLOR IDA
Case Ns II leMS
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE EV
PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage Of
EUGRIE G PAR1SSE.
PeUUoner wife,
and
WILSERJEAN
PAR1SSE.
Respondent husband,
YOU. WILNER JEAN PAR
ISSE. re aide nee unknown, are
requested to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court aad aerve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner *
attorney. Herman Cohen. Esq..
22 S W 1st Street. Miami. Fla.
31130. on or before August 3.
lfBl or else petition will be
confessed.
Dated June 24. 1M1
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By: N. A. Hewett
Julys. 10.17. 34.1M1
consecutive weak* la THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand aad
the aeal of aald court at Mtoml.
on thto 10 day of July.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WUlle Bradehaw, Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road Suit* 17*
Miami Beach. Florida 131
llOBlMl-OeBl
Attorney tor Petitioner
IOO10 Jury IT. M. II;
AuguatT. 1M1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OB i
TNBMTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DAOI COUNTY. F LOR IDA
CaeNo.;*-3B334FC BAMILY DIVISION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERTA LEE TEW
Petitioner
JAMES LEONARD TCW
Pies on a I at
rfOTKX OF PUBLICATION
TOU JAMBS LEONARD
TEW, ARE HEREBT NOTI
FIED TO FILE your written
reaponee to thto action to
Imprese Lien for Delinquent
Child Support with the Clerk of
the above Court, aad aerve a
copy upon Petitioner
Attorneys. SAUL T. VAN
ZAMFT and SAMUEL E
SMITH. 1130 S. Dtxle Highway
Suite NO. Coral Oablea. Florida
31144. oa or baton the 14 day of
August. UMQ. elaa the Petition
to Impress Lean for Delinquent
Child Support will be taken aa
DATED: July 7 mi
RICHARD P BRINKER
BT N A He wen
Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal!
10001 Jury 17, 34. 31.
_________________AuguatT. U*B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTV)
IN TNE CIBCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTN JUDICIAL
CIBCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Ache*
No. II-W4IFC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OFMABRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
MIRIAM SOEMI
BRASSDORF
PeUUoner
and
JAMES A BRASSDORF.
Respondent
TO JAMES A BRASSDORF
181071SI Street
Miami Beach.
Florida 33141
YOU ARE HEREBY SOTI
F1ED that an action for DUao-
lutlon of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
wirtten defenses, if any. to It on
Bruce J Scheinberg. attorney
for PeUUoner. whose addreaa la
420 Lincoln Road Suite 312.
Miami Beach. Florida 13130
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
n or before JULY 34. 1M1.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW
1SH FLOR.DIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of June
1M1
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WUlle Bradehaw Jr
As Deputy tie rk
> Circuit Court Sea >
Bruce J Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road stall
Suite 312
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Attorney for PeUUoner
us*a JuneM.
July3. 10.17. 1M1
NOTICB UNDB R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICB IS HEREBY
GIVES that Use undersigned.
to engage to business
fictitious name Bun-
Janitorial Service at IBM
SW. S Street. Miami, Florida
NUB totanda to register aald
name with the Clerk of the Clr
curt Court of Dads County,
Vladimir Ouarra. Owner
Oecar Ouerra. Owner
July 17. 34.11.
August 7, 1 Ml
NOTICE UNDB R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
SOT1CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In buelneee under the
ficuuoua name HISPaem at
SL u^Sria 8,r, oo'-j
Gables Florida 31134 Intends to
register said name with the |
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dads County. Florida
HISPANIC AMERICAN
EDUCATIONAL
MATERIALS. INC
By: Joss- Naaer President
JuneM;
July I, 10.17. 1MU
NOTICE UNOBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Circuit Court of Dads County.
a"TOrtJrea
iioi Dec
By MIRTHA C BRE8LIN
Preeldent
wml Jury it, 34.31.
August 7. 1B31
AFFIDAVIT UNOBR
FICTITIOUS
NAMB STATUTE
STATE OB BLOBIDA
COUNTY OB OADB
The undersigned.
says II la the Intention of the
underelgned to engage to bual-
neaa under the fictitious name
of QUALITY OFFICE MACH-
INES located at Ml East First
Avenue in the City M Hlaleah.
Dade County. Florida
Thoae lntereeted to aald en
torprtos. aad the Meant of the
Interest of each, la aa follow*
Interest
QUALITY OFFICE
MACHINES OF
MLAMI. INC
MBB. 1st A vs.,
Hlaleah. Fla
Sworn to and aubecrlbed to
before ma. at Miami. Florida.
this 34th day of June. IBM
Notary PubUc.
State of Florida
At Large
My Commission
expires A ug IS. IBM
Bonded thru General Ina
Underwrltara
Proof of publication of thto
intention to register, to filed
herewith, pursuant to the pro-
vtelone of Chapter 3BMB. Laws
of 1041 i MO OOFS A I
July 3, IB. IT. 34. 10B1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND BOB
DADS COUNTY. FLORID*
NOTICE OB ACTION
CONSTR UCTI VE SERVICE
INOFBOBEBTY)
IN TNE CIBCUIT COUBT OF
TNI ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
CIBCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOB DAOI COUNTY
ChrllActtoa
Na. 11-IBaalFC
ACTION BOB DISSOLUTION
OF MAR BI ABB
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
OLGATEEN EDO ECO MB
Petitioner wife
and
NATHAN IEL E DG ECO MB
Respondent Husband
TO NATHANIEL
EDCECO MB
Crania Town
Nassau Bahama*
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
F1ED that an action tor Dtoao-
lutHai of Marriage haa bean
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses If any. to It on
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
ESQ.. ATTORNEY FOR Peti-
tioner, whose addreaa to 43B
Lincoln Road Suite STB. Mtoml
Beach. Florida 11! and file
the original with the clerk of
the above atyled court on or bo-
fore August 17. lMl. other-wise
a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief de-
manded m the complaint or
petition.
Thto not toe ehall be published
ones each wash far four con-
eecuuv. wsaka to THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my band and the
I of said court at Miami.
Florida on thto T day of July.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Cle rk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WUlle Bradehaw Jr
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 371
Miami Beach. Fla. 1HM
Telephone I Bll I III MSI
Attorney tor Petitioner
lBOB! July 10. 17. 34.11. 1M1
NOTICB UNOBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
2J1CK M HBRBDT
GIVEN that the underelgned.
daatrtng to engage to Nadnaaa
under the fictitious name
"aXBEU. TRUCKING at
M30 N W. 17 Avenue. Miami.
Florida. 33147 tolends to regie
tor aald name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dado
County. Florida.
Maxwell G Hinds
"*T JuneM.
July 3. 10. 17. 1M1
GIVEN that th. uol
SKaWafa
ages Jules Vem* t _i7'
Rd. Suite 430 Miami
5 1M intend '
aid name with th*Cw***-a
Curt Court of D*4^$|
TravaxTravtlu*
By MarkWmu,^.
J"'y 3. It. n Hi
Te>nMFC|lS)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICB BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERTA LEE TEW.
Petitioner
and
JAMES LEONARD TEW.
Respondent
YOU JAMES LEONARD
TEW. ARE HEREBY SOTI
FIED TO FILE your written
response to this action to Im
Cm Lien for Delinquent Child
.port with the Clerk of the
above Court, and serve a copy
upon PeUUoner* Attorneys
SAUL T VON ZAMFT and
SAMUEL E SMITH. 1120 S
Dixie Highway. Suite MO. Coral
Gabiea. Florida 3314B. on or be-
fore the 7 day of July. 1M1 elaa
the Petition to Impress Lien for
Delinquent Child Support will
be taken aa ronieased
This notice ehall be published
once each week for four con
ecutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH F LOR ID LAN
DATE July 7. 1981
RICHARD P BRISKER
BY N A Hewett
Deputy Clerk
10002 July 10. 17.34.31 1M1
WOTICE UNDBk
FICTITIOUS BANS u*
NOTICE is HrY"'
GIVEN that th. una, '
osalrlng to engage m
* the flcuoou,
PRIMERA GRAN
INTERNACIOSAL r~
CAMACOLM 1417 W |
.St. MlamL Fla Mm-_
S BMr aald nam* ,
Ctork of the Circuit Cast,
Dade County Florida i
CAMARA DE lYjlttRcio
LATTSA INT
By LUIS SABINES. Pra I
0BBBB July 3 lu 17 ui
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVial
(NOFROFEBTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COulTal
TNE ELEVENTH JUDlClal
CIBCUIT OF FL0BI0A.nr
ANO FOR DADE COUNTf I
Civil Ache*
N* II ilFC
ACTION FOR OllSOLI.
OF MAR 11 AGE
IN RE TheMarnanof
HI DOLFOFRIAS
Petitioner
and
JADW1GAFR1AS
Reepondenl
TO J ad wigs Frtas
343 Linden Bled.
Apt So A3
Brooklyn S Y ua
YOU ARE HEREBT Will
FIED that an action forDeJ
lutton of Marriage hsi xa|
filed against >ou and ran
required to sertr copy dp
written defense* if any .;:
A Norman Drucker stk
for PeUUoner whoatadarasl
430 Lincoln Kuad
Beach. Florida 3313B aal
Use original with th* -enI
the above stvled court a|
before JULY 23 INI
wtoe a default wUl b* a
agalnat you for the relMfl
manded In the compUikl
petition
This notice ahallb* |
once each week for fouri
aecuUve weeks in THE .T
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITSESS my hand tall
seal of aald court at
Florida on this 18th aa I
June. IMl
KICHARDI' HH1NKD.
Aa Clerk Circuit Cbufi
Dade County. FlonA
By WUlle Brwdshas Jr
Aa Deputy Ort
i Circuit Court Seal i
A SormanDn-i .-
43B Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. PM WB
Attorney tor Petitioner
JuneX. July J 10.1' 1
NOTICE OF ACTKW
CONSTRUCT! vl IIbYKI
(NOFBOBSBTY) I
IN THE CIRCUITCOvSTBI
TNB BLB VB NTH JOWCUll
CIBCUITOFFLOBIOAIII'
ANO BOB OADB COwBTY /
IN RE: THE MARRIACICf |
HERMANN BREA
PetittoaerBuabaad
and
AIMABLEBREA
Respondent vy;ft
TO: AlMABLE BREA
YOU ARE HEREBT W
FIED that a patitioa far oaai
lutton of your aUrrB-Jj"I
boon titod and comaiaaeai"!
BdB court and you art raaaw
to aerve a copy of your wtmt
dofeneaa. If any. JJl
LLOYD M. ROUTklA". W-l
attorney tor Pot^J-_l
adereas to Suiu ns. 'nn*"S|
But BasBaBaa TON Na *
TZmTBi. rt wufl
file the original *;"*"
of UM aatrr* atyled court *
before August 14. '-W J2
wtoe a default will to a-*"
you for OH -_
tor to the cornpu
ESL!
Thia notice hauMf***H
one. each week kfW'H
aaeutive week* m TrHC J* ]
BHFLORIDIAN___ ,
WITNESS my Mnd ^.
aeal of aald court *' "Tr
FtorMa oa UU* io oay !
wmmuatr brd"**
AaCfcrt.CTrtuitOo-rt
rJadsOain^FWi"
Aa Deputy CJ*r
(CVcunCxwrlSeaJi
LLOYD M rU)l"rsiAr"
Butts SIS.
1st Stats Bank BKN
TBMNESndAve
Miami. Florida ssi
Attor~y faction*
AU|U" "


.day. July 17,1981
+Je*ist ncrk/lan
Text of Israel's
Nuclear Study
G. Milton Rubin, Circuit Judge
By YITZHAK RABI
|UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
A United Nations spokesman
i the Jewish Telegraphic
ency that the text of a study
J Israel 'a nuclear weapons caps
|ity. under preparation by an
(emauonal panel selected by
tretary General Kurt Wald-
lm. "has not yet been finalized.
[that its precise contests have
t yet been established."
The spokesman said it would
|"inappropriate to comment on
part of the study until it has
n officially submitted to the
neral Assembly." The report
be published by the end of
' or early August, he said
The Xew York Times reported
kt a "draft report written May
' by the panel, which was
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number II M7]
Divisional
IM'.K ESTATE OK
I UtRY |M)|J.A(-K
i >< rJM'il
n ones or
\l'MINISTRATION
iin' administration oi the
tali >i HARRY I'ol.i.ACK.
i. i.il KiN- Number >1 5M73.
i- pending in the Ciriuil Court
I. ii I Mil.' County. Florida.
U Division the odilreas
ii which Ii ::< Weal Flaglei
Miami. FlorMa inso
I hi Mima and addresses the personal ra^raaitallv
and the ptTnun.il rep
rvsenlaUvv's. stUiriMj .ir -*'t
below
\.. ini'-i inI.'i! paraoni art*
required to file with this lourt.
WITHIN I'llUKK MONTHS OF
IDE rll!.-; II MUTATION
hi~ NOTICE i i .ill
ujuinsl the esu'.e and
ii. objei iii.n h> .in in
rvsled pi i -.on in m hum noUi '
> .- mailed ih.ii i tuUleiurei tha
th< in.- quail
tis ui thi rep-
..',..< \enuv, 01
. i Mil t
ind iiiijii iimi- not sn
i i" i......
, if Unit Notici
...
.iiil Itt-i..... -
VII llli II M lol.l.VK
>i I la) r UniK \|H
\l,i IV
I \ i \ I'KN
I | ...lull
dllVv
\ I'I'.IHI.N
I !
i :. ..
-- 1731
. IT.24, iin>i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civd Action
No II I034S FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage UI
M'El.MA I. VAKUAS,
| 1 I'Kl.MAI.UZyUIROS.
I'rlitioner.
and
VICTOR M varc;as.
Keapondanl
ITU VICTORM VARQAfl
Consuelo.No 108
MtKgril-A.I'em
VrOI AUK HEREBY NOT1
Mh.D that a Petition for Dtaao-
ul your Marriage haa
been hied and commenced In
Ulll Tourt and you are required
I opy of your written
M if any. to It. on CAR
| M MENDEZ. ESy at
tor IVtltloner. whose
Jfddreaa la ims 4th Avenue.
IiALEAH, Honda. S3012 and
in She original with the clerk
I"! tin styled court on or before
I August 7. 1WN1. otherwlae a de
I'.iult will be entered agalnat
tor the relief prayed for In
""plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
each week lor four con-
laerutlva weeks In THE JEW
I^HKIAJRIOIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
laaaj of said court al Miami.
Honda on this l day of July.
I 19K1
KK1IARDP BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I >ade County, Florida
ByM.J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
" ""cult Court Seal
"ARLOSM MENDEZ.
Esq
(j"*W 4th Ave..
1'IIAI.EAH. Ela.SSOU
Attorney for IVtltloner
*"* July 10.17. 24. 31.1981
named in response to a General
Assembly resolution adopted in
1979, has concluded that Israel
can make nuclear weapons
"within a very short time." But
the study added, according to the
Times, that Israel's policy of
"deliberate ambiguity" makes it
impossible to determine whether
Israel actually possesee bombs.
According to the Times, the
panel calculates that "Israel may
already have enough weapons-
grade material for making several
bombs comparable to the bomb
dropped on Nagasaki," in 1945.
The panel also estimates that
Israel's Dimona reactor could
have produced enough weapons-
grade plutonium for 10 to 15 nuc-
lear weapons.
Israeli diplomats said they
have not seen the panel's draft
report. Israel did not cooperate
with the panel. The U.N. spokes-
man said that Waldheim has not
seen "either the present text of
the study or the preliminary text
dated May 12."
Hawkins To Hold
CETA Hearings
In Orlando
U.S. Senator Paula Hawkins
(K Fla.l will conduct a meeting
of the Senate Subcommittee on
Kmployment and Productivity in
Orlando on July 17 to consider
alternatives to the Comprehen-
sive Kmpluvment and Training
Act ICETA).
Senator Hawkins, one of seven
members of the Subcommittee,
said the Orlando hearing will be
the first in a series of regional
hearings on CETA to allow
testimony from witnesses who
.in unable to travel to Washing-
ton to appear before the Senate
panel, the only one scheduled for
the South
The regional hearings are in-
tended to develop background in-
formation for the Subcommittee
before it begins deliberations on
thf proper role of the federal gov-
ernment in employment and
training programs." Hawkins
eid.CETA, which funds the
majority of federal employment
programs, is due to expire next
year."
Dade County Circuit Judge G.
Milton Rubin, who served as vice
mayor and city councilman in
North Miami Beach for six years
before being elected judge in
1976, died July 7 of a heart at-
tack. He was 67.
Judge Rubin spent most of his
years on the bench in the court's
family division.
He was a member of many
civic, fraternal, and charitable or-
ganizations, a World War II vet-
eran and a supporter and fund-
raiser for Israeli causes.
Born Dec. 16, 1913, in New
CAVA -n
Dr. Ada. S3, of Miami, passed away July
10. She Is survived by two sons. Dr.
Edward Cava, and Dr Edmund Cava.
sister Inez Zabban. five grandchildren;
She graduated from the University of
Turan in Italy She practiced oral
surgery In Vienna in the early JO s In
the L'.S she went Into psychiatry, retir-
ing in 1964
FASS
Emma. 79. of Hollywood. A resident
here for 17 years, formerly of New York
City Mrs. Faas waa a life member of
the Golds Meier Chapter of Hadassah
and Aquarius Cancer Unit. She Is sur-
vived by her husband. Emanuel.
daughters. Rhoda and Joan, five grand
hildren. three great-grandchildren;
brother. Harry Riverside Chapel
WEINSTEIN
Abraham. 68. of Sunrise, pajaed away
July 10. He had been a resident here for
the past 27 years, coming from Brook-
lyn. N Y He owned and operated the
Welnsteln Painting lnc for 25 years;
survived by his wife, Lillian, sons. Sey-
mour. Cerald and Leonard, daughter,
lieborah. five brothers, one sister, six
grandchildren Gordon
SCHWARTZ
Rose. 76. of Pembroke Pines, passed
away July 12 A resident of Florida 21
years formerly of Jersey City. New Jer-
sey Survived by her husband. Fred.
ton, I.eonard, daughter. Adele. six
grandchildren Riverside
BASS
Joseph, ol Miami Hearh. formerly of
M.ipl.-w.Kid N J passed away July 9
He waa a foufldei and Senior Past vlca
I Mli-iil ill tin' Herklev Keder.il Sav
Ins* .ind Loan ui Short Hills N .1 a
membei and trust......I B nai Abraham
ni Livingston, N 1 and raal aatata
appralaei Survived b) Ittawlfa Molly.
tisters Natalia and Gertrude; brother
Harold itepdaughten Rhod.i and
and in.' graiMtchUdnn
AI.ENIEK Samuel. Miami Beach
CLARK Silas. M, July 12. Miami
Beach Riverside
DINOV1TZ Morton. 57. Miami Beach.
Kul.in Chapel
I- INGOLD Rose. July 12. Miami Beach.
Ri\ en Ida chapel
KR1EDNBERO Henrietta. Hollywood.
Kuhin Chapel
HERMAN, Philip Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
SPIER, Jerome, Miami Beach
/. \Sl.tiFF. Kay. Miami Beach
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open fvery 0oy Cleserf SmmmeHt
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
g*Y>e*V
sSfe&
r>* c**
\e'
-0

York City, Judge Rubin was
reared in Boston and went to law
school at Northeastern Univer-
sity and the University of Miami.
Judge Rubin won a North
Miami Beach City Council seat in
1969, and served three terms, be-
coming the city's vice mayor be-
fore retiring undefeated in 1975.
He gave up his law practice a
year later to run for judge.
Surviving are his wife, the
former Gertrude Harrison; two
sons, Richard of North Miami
Beach and David of Orlando; his
mother, Esther; a sister Dorothy
Rotker. and three grandchildren.
Memorial services were con-
ducted at Levitt-Weinstein
Funeral Home.
Martin Genet, Miami Beach
Community Worker Passes
Martin Genet, 61, of Miami
Beach, passed away July 12. He
was a resident of Miami Beach
since 1936 and was a practicing
attorney for 30 years and a leader
and forrunner in the Orthodox
community since his arrival. He
was vice president of Beth Jacob
Congregation, the oldest syna-
gogue on Miami Beach, a founder
of the Hebrew Academy, active
in the Zionist Organization, the
Jewish National Fund, was presi-
ukrnstkin. Robert, 59. July S.
Hallandale 1 .. m Weinsiein
lll.ix >M Samuel. 72. July 7. Hollywood.
Riverside Chapel.
STARK. Herman. Miami Beach
in >< 11 HSll. Kdward. July 8. Hallandale
BROEDER. Herman. July North
Miami Riverside Chapel
COHEN. Herman. 76. Miami Beach.
Rubin Chapel
GREEN, Irene, 74. July 7. Miami
ROSENBAl'M. Molly. 67. July 8. Miami
Beach Riverside Chapel
VEXLER Hazel 7X July K. Miami Star
of David
APSEL. Pearl. 84. July 6. Miami Beach
Rubin Chapel
HARROCAS, Donna. .;;. July 9. Miami
Riverside Chapel
r El'iEl.MAN. Jack. 61. July 10. Miami
Gordon
KREEMAN. Rose. Miami Beach
FLAX, Shirley. 77. Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
KESSEL Mendel. Miami Beach
MEYROW1TZ. Irving. M. North Miami
Beach Gordon
NATTOVE, Frances. 58. North Miami
Beach Rubin Chapel
BERNSTEIN Ida U July 9. Miami
Beach Riverside
KI'STAN lrvln. 81. July 10. Miami
Beach Riverside
SEGAL. Herman. 81. July 10. Miami
Beach Riverside
c m.ish. Helen, 9U. July 5 <>rdon
QOOTENBERO, Henry July 5 I.ev1tt
Weinateln
LEVY ito.s.-. Kj. July 6.
HERMAN Philip. Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel
K \SK' '\\ IT'/. Solomon. Miami Beach
KATZ Loula Hollywood Rubin Chapel
SPELKY Minnie. Miami Beach
ZliKMvN [Hirolhv. July 13. Miami
Beach
dent of the Landau Yeshiva. and
a member of the Beth Israel and
Or Chaim Congregations. He
established a Free Loan Fund in
memory of his son, Lawrence
William. He is survived by his
wife, Evelyn; sons, Michael,
Sandy, Ben J., and David; four
grandchildren; mother. Rose;
brothers, Irving and Saul; sister,
Florence. Services were held July
12 at Riverside Chapel, with
interment in Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
BLOOMGARDEN, YetU. 76. No Miami
Beach. July 13 Riverside
GLASS. Celia. No. Miami Beach. July
13 Rubin Chapel.
MORRIS. Dorothy. 79. July 14 Gordon
APPELBAUM. Monroe C, 77. June 18
Star of David Memorial Chapel
COOPERSMITH. Irving. Miami Beach
FRIEDENN. Irving, N.. Miami Beach.
June 17. Riverside Chapel.
GOLDSTEIN. Lee, 81. N Miami. June
17 Riverside Chapel
KALLICK. Nathan C 83, N. Miami
Beach, June 17 Riverside Chapel
SILVER. Norman
GRAFF. Mrs Florence M 84. Miami.
June 18 Rubin Chapel
JANUS. Mrs Sarah, Miami Beach
Rubin Chapel
KLEINMAN, Samuel, 82. North Miami.
June 19. Riverside Chapel.
LEVY. Rosalind. Miami Beach Rubin
Chapel.
REDER. Dr Benjamin. Miami. June
19 Riverside Chapel
ROSENBLOL'M. Harry M Coral
Gables. June 18. Riverside Chapel
ROSEN Milton M 77. Hollywood. June
19 Riverside Chapel
VAN DAMM. Edgar E 73. Pompano
Beach. June 18 Riverside Chapel
BRl'SKIN. Dr Martin Edward. June
19 Menorah Chapel
GRANATE. Gusale
KORCHNOY. Michael. 92, Miami
Beach. June 19 Riverside Chapel
LEVrTZ, Evelyn, June 19
LEVY. Rosalind. Miami Rubin Chapel
MOSKOWrrZ Jacob J 73. Hollywood
June 19 Riverside Chapel
SEITl.r.ft. Joseph Miami Hearh Rubin
Chapel
SPECTOR. Dr Samuel. 75. Hollywood.
June 17 Levitt Welnsteln Memorial
Chapel
FOR SALE ONE SINGLE CEMETERY PLOT. FOR
INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 573 5577 9-4 P.M.
.Levitt \ Fe
EVITT WW EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
>-CXi "wood '?' '"?w oa W"00
-.. MMi 'JM5 W [)... M. 43'S
WES' PAlM BEACH 44" 0*WC"OBM Bia 6*9 S'X
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SI'IIH HIT/ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Reprrvented by S Irvitl, F O
New York: (212) 2b\-7bOO Queens Blvd & 7bih Rd Forest Hilis. NY
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd


W-JJI
Struggle Frantically for Dollars
IN A EBCEVT W
Pom-ABC
of aaOataaa oa
of aai <0 percent of
ponad sajd '-arj had eat
v.
17 they doc *. heue-k*
Jw wiS raanond taa way ov
*_-
:-*-.:;.
I'JA-
For example, '.a* New Yara
Ftonux afioQBcat for 1
ir-aa the UAFederatM
Joent Caaapaasx asaa : 4 aoaV
hoe. Fne Tears tear. the aOa*-
a was an to SI9.2 mJaoa. bat
wxa aa/Wirc u vafcat of the:
19-J saafaoa b 1974 dodan a
aajfe i:.'."4jOOO At the aa=*
* aoa bear* that. a> Dr
badget process a
a > bare to kmc
peopat Ixnaud oc s. The beet
that we caa do a 10 Been aa.iaag
ao ant cat the p^f*- :t-
aoout. to fore* farther debate
aariln 10 do as the
no
of
_*_^ o* toiatoa to --*
Federatjoc for aetp such
baser afford to pay the
barvme; a parent or
cared for b a aaraaag
Mejcajd coverage a cat.
Id adder aori to Medacaad and
Medxare. the badcet cota wfl] ay
Baaaa
Accords; L.edermaa.
We -e j .ist core ;rs;r.g ta do sb>
thane; w> don't have aa? faaa
plea or master piaav The Dastn-
batioa CoeBauttee wfcjca deodes
:.-.* specific Fecen
allocations < ace ao pooxt atiyx|
v. aaae hare decaaona haaad oa
hassled facia Even w*n cota a:
use Federa. jevei. a t praaatih for
state and local gcr. ernments to
pace opiheeseca
IN A PERIOD of budget cute
at every level of fov eraaaeac a
say be overly optinaaatr to
expect atate and local govern-
Asac ae rsjseCtbe .
me Fiaee* i eject a gooc
part of tae aoaa. aervvce btoca
pas: ajc "Jirouai ecs^aa; atau
oca. aerv-jc* pr-.jaa^ saa ta*
Feoera- f--aoa toward coweraae taec cwa aO-
aaaaatratjoa coata
II MORE .roans art -1
pectec to '-* 11 anihaaaj for ner
-.-.;-.-: _i -. _-
Jewat Federataoa prograase are
staruas;
- ..,
a;. Cathasat aac instate
;x or/a:.:
EUacc eedersaap aac Jewna
groups oatoade the Fedaracaoa
sjessara Many of those soggse
Una; bcadaaf coahtaoaa tease tae
cnahtanna c' a vdhan*
be very difkaem from the bra:
crri rights rnalaaew of tae 60 a
The need aacc for alaanraa
rxuk. arouac pec^c aeoaa for
srjort periods or ume
Ta..raaa aaaaaa :
i-nof Fedarataoa aaders that m
toobyina; at the Batoaai aac
ttate hnaji oaf aotaoc of coah-
uoa become* aapera::.* The
aouoe of Jews (oina; alone a aot
RUN...RUN
THE SKY IS FALLING!
Tanaaaan. alao voacad the 1
of maay that wxhia iocaJ Jewish
iiwiaiiuaaaa as oc- aa*
-j* avTjadec a: a^ eaatt be-
tween those aat to lower
the cotBaaauaant of pmaxeh'
raaed njumma either to Israel
aad other overseas Jew-ah aeads
or to cut bach on kxal niadi
Ha sototjoe for Federauoaa a
caz o cat alto-
be mat *fh "'I
not redrodma: am* :* "l
iiapuuiiaihui -rial
staff people art .
people who have f- -- -j*o\
-
WaihaifTnci ws
banes amnad whicr
walk
Jttask Stud*
NOW YOU CAN GIVE YOUR CHILDREN THE
EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY THEY DESERVE
SPECIAL INCENTIVE PROGRAM
FOR NEW STUDENTS
Who Meet Entrance Requirements
And enroll by August 14,1981
ARE YOUR CHILDREN MISSING OUT ON THE
BEST IN THEIR QUEST FOR KNOWLEDGE?
ALDO KLUCZKOWSKI
Welcome You
To
ALDO FORD
SEE WHAT
STUDENTS HAVE
STANDARDSThe Hebrew Academy is the only Hebrew day school
in the southeast region of the U.S. which is fully accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, the most demanding
and prestigious accrediting agency.
FACILITIESThe most modern and innovative facilities and
educational techniques.
FACULTYAll teachers are fully certified by the State of Florida
Department of Education and over 70% have Post-Baccalureate
degrees.
CURRICULUMFrom nursery through 12th grade, our educational
program provides excellence in Jewish and secular studies.
MUCH MORE.
CALL 532-6421 FOR MORE INFORMATION
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
aaSBBBVaaBBlBVBBBaaBVnMBBBBBBBaaVHBBBBaBaBaB

*
. e

EJHb


Full Text
Middle East Report
Miami, Florid*, Friday, July 17,1981
SECTION B
i
iforgettable Tour Through Israel, Eggpt
GERALD SCHWARTZ
'There goes tba lection."
\t had just listened to stir-
| address in English by
Minister Menacnem Begin
concluding session of the
Gathering of Survivors at
Ijam packed entrance to the
em Wall.
I veteran, though minor, off i-
the Alignment, as Israel's
Party and its close allies
nown these days, was
impressed by the moving
of Begin to the survivors,
families and the onlookers.
ised that Begin had im-
the aura of a national
not only on the thousands
lbled but on the electorate
pge
I few days later, as we
^ruan Zionist Federation and
er Women leader Harriet
Miami Beach City Com-
>ner Mildred Falk and our
dive spouses watched
debate Labor chief Shimon
those words seemed sub-
iated.
WAS a virtually empty
iff .Street in Tel Aviv, at a
Ik cafe frequented mostly
raelis on ordinary Thursday
that we watched Feres
u narrow triumph over Be-
a debate that was more of
lun Carter-Ford but less of
in the critical June 30 elec-
med to warrant.
our group prepared to de-
[for Kgypt. we met Simcha
former Israeli ambassa-
the United States and a
pal in the Alignments
ign. in the lobby of the
otel for the third or fourth
within a week. "The final
which will be out tomorrow.
Gerald Schwartz is past presi-
dent of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida
and former national chairman
of the Israel Bonds Committee
of B'nai B'rith. Together with
his wife, Felice, he heads his
own public relations agency
on Miami Beach. They have
just returned from a trip to
Israel and Egypt.
will give us a lead of three seats."
said Dinitz. who now will return
to his position as fundraiser for
Hebrew University Yet we could
see there was no confidence in his
voice.
Labor's charge had been too
little, too late. We sensed that as
we gathered, along with some
125.000 to 200.000 others in the
huge square adjacent to Tel Aviv
City Hall. The Alignment had
some 1.300 buses mobilized
throughout Israel, and residents
of the kibbutzim and moshavim
Reagonomics
streamed in. But, alas, too many
were too young to vote.
BECAUSE of a scheduling
change due to an El Al sellout at
the start of the peak summer
season, we found ourselves in
Upper Egypt aa the returns came
in. Within two houis of the
closing of the polls, the manager
of the Winter Palace Hotel in
Luxor had picked up an Arabic
live broadcast from Jerusalem.
"One report gives it to Peres by
one or two seats, another to Be-
gin by one seat," he told those of
us assembled around the short-
wave radio in the shadows of the
ancient Temples of Karnak.
I thought back to my last
meeting with Tel Aviv Mayor
Shlomo Lahat, the retired major
general who leads Israel's
bustling metropolis as a member
of the Liberal party, partner of
Begin's Herat in Likud. "It looks
like a tie vote," I told the mayor,
giving him a foreigner's assess-
ment of an election far more
heated than the one Felice and I
witnessed in 1969, which was the
only other time we were on hand
for the every-four-years trip to
the polls. "We'll settle." said the
efficient, affable and able Lahat.
For he knew that all Begin
needed was a tie or near-tie to
govern.
We also had a change to dis-
cuss the upcoming election in the
ivory 30-story tower of Haifa
University with its president,
former Israel Ambassador to
Canada, Gershon Avner, and its
rector former University of
Miami visiting Professor Gabriel
Warburg. They too sensed that
Labor had been too complacent in
the months since Camp David,
and that the continuing social
Continued on Page 2-B
By AMY STONE
BW YORK As the
fan budget cuts make
ir way through the
ise and the Senate.
jduled for implement u
Oct. 1. the start of the
?ral Government's
I year, it is already
that there will be less
ley for social services,
it will be allocated in
ways to the agencies
Jewish Federations
>ss the country help
!>e anticipated loss of billions
federal dollars comes at a time
many Jewish Federations
[already in trouble with fund
rig drives that are in no way-
ping up with inflation.
ban two factors combine to
ktf a third factor that's going
m? hitting Jewish Federations
I their constituents. As
|med up by Dr. Steven B.
itir. executive director of the
Federations to Struggle
Frantically for Dollars
Jewish United Fund and Jewish
Federation of Metropolitan
Chicago, during the most recent
meeting of the board and com-
mittee members of the Council of
Jewish Federations:
"AS THE Federal Govern-
ment cuts out needed services
.... the people will then look to
the voluntary agencies, the
Jewish Federations and their
agencies, for service, so we're
going to have an increased flow of
demands for service at a time
when we don't have the resources
to meet those needs."
During the April meeting in
Washington. DC. of the Council
of Jewish Federations, the
umbrella organization of the 200
Jewish Federations and Welfare
Funds throughout the United
States and Canada. Mark Talis-
man, director of CJF's Washing-
ton Action office, repeatedly
emphasized the importance of
local Federations having the
facts in hand to "give a human
face to the computerized budget
cuts." For example, the major
proposal for the Medicaid pro-
gram is the imposition of a five
percent ceiling on increases in
Federal spending during fiscal
1982. resulting is a $ 1 billion cut.
To compensate for the cut.
states will be allowed more flexi-
bility in determining eligibility
requirements, covered services
and reimbursement rates to serv-
ice providers, such as the Jewish
social service agencies. What has
yet to be documented is the
actual number of elderly who will
no longer be eligible for Medicaid
benefits if the states change eligi-
bility guidelines, and the number
of patients who will be affected if
more doctors, hospitals and
nursing homes stop accepting
Medicaid patients if reimburse-
ment rentes do not keep up with
inflation.
CARE FOR the Jewish aged,
through support for nursing
homes, homemakers. home
nursing and medical care, reha-
bilitation workshops and
geriatric hospital care, is one of
the major areas of Jewish Feder-
ation allocations. For example.
Continued on Page 12-B
Honored for serving Mount Sinai Hospital for the most years
are: Use Simonhoff, 25 years; Elsie Malschick, 20 years; Helene
Owen, 30 years; Rhonda Kern, 20 years; and Rose Krause. 25
years.
Jewish Spokesman
In French Cabinet
PARIS Pierre Dreyfus,
newly-appointed Industry Minis-
ter in the cabinet of French Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand, and
president of French ORT since
1975, is a French Jew dedicated
to countering anti-Semitism and
bettering the lot of the North
African Jews who have settled in
France, according to his Amer-
ican counterpart. Sidney E. Lei-
want, president of the American
ORT Federation, who has sent
the new Minister a letter of con-
gratulations.
The appointment of Dreyfus,
who ran the Renault company for
many years, was formally an-
nounced on June 23. He replaces
Pierre Joxe. a left-wing Socialist.
The appointment has been
generally interpreted as a bolster
to the position of Finance Minis-
ter Jacques Delors within the
Mitterrand cabinet.
DREYFUS IS known to be
particularly sensitive to the situ-
ation of North African Jews who
have immigrated to France in
recent years, raising the popula-
tion of Jews in France from
250.000 to over 700.000. and
making the French Jewish com-
munity the fourth largest in the
world. Many of the nearly 10.000
students studying at ORT
schools throughout France come
from this new segment of
France's Jewish community.
Commenting in a recent inter-
view on the danger of assimila
tion faced by this group, Dreyfus
noted. "North African Jews tend
to be very religious and loyal to
their Jewish traditions. But
France is a highly effective
melting pot. Jewish schools, like
Continued on Page 2-B
Dr. Joseph Harris is the
new President of the Medical
staff of Mount Sinai Medical
center. Harris, who came to
Miami in 1957 as a Resident,
is an Internist who has pre-
viously held offices on the
staff, he was also recently in-
stalled as Secretary of the
Dade County Medical Associ-
ation.
Genn To Join Miami Israel Programs Office
Rena Genn of Moshav Zarit in
Israel has been appointed the
new community Shlicha and di-
rector of the Israel Programs
Office of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Ms. Genn. born and educated
in New York City, has been living
in Israel for the past 13 years.
She has worked in educational
planning in Israel's northern
most region on the Lebanese
border, in addition to operating a
poultry farm on her family's
share of the moshav (cooperative
farm community with individual
land ownership).
She holds a Masters degree in
Public Health Education from
Hunter College of the City Uni-
versity of New York, as well as a
Rena Genn
Bachelor of Arts Degree in bio-
chemistry from the City College
of New York.
Noughts on Israel's Reunion of Holocaust Survivors
| By CHAIM BERMANT
London Chronicle
Syndicate
reunion of Holocaust
vivors? Time lends a
to almost any experi-
but one would have
ku^ht Auschwitz was an
Option, and when I first
krd of the idea, I thought
pas a cruel joke, or if not,
it showed a complete failure
of imagination on the part
of the organizers.
I asked F. a survivor of Ausch-
witz and Buchenwald. who is now
a successful professional man.
with two sons at public school
and a third at Oxford, whether he
planned to attend the reunion.
"What for?" he said. "I've
started a new life here It's not as
if I've tried to hide anything, or
forget anything. My children
know everything I've been
through, but who needs to reopen
wounds?"
Several other survivors made
the same point. The whole idea
sounded like a Festival of Grief
or, as one of them put it. "a four-
day YUkor." I arrived in Jerusa-
lem with the deepest misgivings,
which were by no means eased by
my experience of the first day.
EVERYONE OVER 40 will re-
member the newsreels taken in
the death camps shortly after lib-
eration. One felt at the time that
the human eye would never be
exposed to anything more
horrific, but about 20 years later,
when I was working for televi-
sion. I came upon some films
taken by the SS of the death
squads in action, and although I
thought of myself as a fairly
hardened individual. 1 could not
watch them for more than a
minute.
When I arrived at Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust center in
Jerusalem. I found them being
screened again in a large audito-
rium. Every seat was taken, and
there were people standing round
the walls. And there was almost a
repeat performance during a son
et lumiere display on the pi
Continued on Page 7-B


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Jefferson National to Serve
As Voter Registration Office
Miami Beach vottfi a*M*
.ble to regiater for the forth-
coming 'Novnber- mumopjl
elertjoru and for all Fedr*l.
^T^unty and cky balloon*
everv Tueaday. bafiniuna; Jufr
from 9 am to 2 p m in th
Goldberg noted that w
thousand persons -
from the Miami
ere
P*W
Beach cki-
roBa recently becaus* mdZrJ
failad to vote during tJ2*
yaars In addjuon. ta jXz
National Banks pubbc^S
iZffmon Plata office of Jeffereon daparUnant eatunat** that!!
pfSSiS4****** zzzl^."*E1
on* abjpble to vote \
- Pa
hohavt^,
Pictured left to right or* the neul\ elected Executive Committee officers of Miami Region of
Hadassah. Laura AUshmier, Irma Rathkind, Adrienne Chiron, Mary Rots, Blanch Fiske, Helen
Spitz, Mimi Dickerman, Daphne Werner, Natalie Lyo t*. Shirley Kaplan and Jean Stemheb
Seated left to right: Edduee Kestler. Eve Nemirow, Diane Iteenberg, Rotate Schechter (the
Hanoi Advisor), Linda Minket (PresidentJ, Anne Soule, Bonnie Jaoobton and Yetta Pned, who
were mttallad at the recent regional conference at the Konover Hotel
Nazi Asche Gets Seven Years
Hafistratioo for t^ ^
*** -hkfcvottna
one o>h
tha November '
Goldberg said
choose the
miaainneri for two-vsar
will conunue unui
ballot**
Both
Chamber
BONN (JTAI A court m
Kiai haa nil......I a former Nazi
complicity is the deportauoo of
25.000 Belgian Java to the
Aoache itx
where they died
in 1941 and 1942. The court amid
that Kurt Aacto. Tl, who was
cnief of police hi charge of Jewish
affairs in N exi-occupiad Belgium
during World War II. played an
important role in the deportation
of the 25.000 Java. 5.100 of them
children
PsssssssM Judge Rudolf Dann
aaid the jail term u insufficient
pumahment for Aaches saasssal
but for the former Nad it would
mount to a virtual life sentence
in view of his age. Defense
lawyers had asked the court to
Southern BeU Begins
New Billing System
Starung Jury 27 all of South-
ern Bell monthly telephone bills
will be printed in a new format,
aimed at bang easier to under-
stand and more deecriptive of the
individual customer service
charges
The new look is structured to
benefit both residences and bus
nans fehphnrw customers and
those with complex systems
The changes are in response to
the consumer concerns which
have been expressed Physically,
the new document has been
separated into four sections (bill
summary, current charges,
aemirerl calls, other charges) and
will be printed using easter-to-
readtype
May unnecessary details have
been eliminated, srith words re-
placing symbols and codes.
STUDIO
Continental
Cwsine
'EOJOSII
row 0: I
STUDIO
ESTAUaANT
?O' ..*
0.' -g 2penc<
Mater- row 'awe to row
r-^OOC 0"e O* i "fl "'flu*
'oomt Trie Ten'
M-ne Ceuar Jtwd-o ''ar*
p aa"# s* Cseari
Fhaal
All
Asso sssw> ptowaj
Ww vour Ow9#ttW
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
pwai ,^.wo" m I'wae
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"TMI Gtono"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
1 V 40 SW 32 Av.
445-5371
ctesea Maedavf
......a..a
acquit Aacto. saying the prose-
cuuoo failed to prove las com
pbcay in the deaths
BUT DANN aaid Aacto was
responsible for iawtosa Bel
gjum "Jew-free" as quickly *a
possible and that to had carried
out his duties in an "obliging and
reliable" way.
Another fanner Nan. Ernst
Ehlers. was charged with Asche
a the trial which began last De-
cember. Aacto worked with
Ehlers who was the chief of the
geatapo in Beigarm and who
Aaches immediate
Ehlers. who served as a magis-
trate in Schhwwig-Holstem until
his
; in 1974. committed
six weeks before the trial
began when he learned that he
was to be triad
Belgian Jewry had tried in vain
to bring Ehlers and Asche to
court since 1962. Only in Msy.
1975 did anti-Nazi actmsts Beat*
and Serge KTaraf eld take drastic
action to bring them to justice
They broke into Ehler' home
with the help of seven Belgium
Jews, and managed to collect
documents on his wartime activi-
ties Although detained by
German police, they succeeded in
preparing the evidence which led
to the trial of Asche
the Mumi Bd
of Commerce sad th
Civic League of Mian-.. Basch n
arranging with bank official, 2
take over the regiatrstioo data,
on several dates bet m* m mu
the deadline
FIU Accepts Freshman
Florida International Uni-
versity is currently accepting
applications from students in-
terested in bamming a part of
FIU i first freshmen class this
August 26. whan Fall S smear sr
begins.
Approval of funding for FIU's
lower division, deerrihod by an
administrator as "the most im-
portant development for the urn
versity since its opening in
1972." was granted during s spe-
cial session of the Florida Leg
islature Since it opened. FIU has
been an upper-division university
offering junior, senior and grsd
uate level courses
300 41 St.
Barton S Goldberg, preaadeot
of Jeffereon National Banka. aaid
lae bank will extend a semce
which Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Ialee has provided to
voters in its service area for many
years
Members of the advisory board
of Jefferson National Bank of
Miami Beach, under the chair-
msnshap of Sauna (Mrs Ban)
GrenaJd. will serve as registrars
for new voters each Tuesday.
They have been deputised by the
Dade County elections supervnwr
and his staff to serve in an official
capacity
Samuel Flatto Sharon Appealing
Nine Month Prison Sentence
TEL AVIV (JTA) Senior members of th* Likud
are reported to have assured Samuel Flatto-Sharon. who
is appealing to the Supreme Court against a lower court i
nine month prison sentence for bribery in the elecuoa
four years ago. that Israel will not agree to a French
request for his extradition to France to stand chargw
there for embezzlement. Flatto-Sharon was sentencedi
absentia by a Paris court to 10 years in prison
Flatto-Sharon's entry into the Knesset four years ago
provided him with immunity against the French ei
tradition request. But his parliamentary immunity was
lifted by the Knesset earlier this year to allow him to he
tned for bribery in the 1977 election campaign He failed
to receive enough votes in last month's elections to pro
% ide him with a seat in the Knesset.
$4.95
A Lot of dinner.
Not a lot of dollars.
Our special Inflation Fighter Menu wages war on the high
cost of dining out.
Come.to the King's Wharf at the Mamort Hotel Where
you can enjoy a complete dinner from $4 93 to S7.7S d / $*&
Choose one of 6 complete dinners Roamed Rib of ^-^Vv^- \-J-" Beef Au Jus. Chicken Breast Marsala, Be.-f Ribs with f[ taT^J V-
Barbecue Sauce, Sliced London Broil. Crdled Liver u
with Bacon it Onions, or Broiled Fresh Fish. And,
the dinners won't end 'til coffee and dessert.
All served at your table with a beautiful
roof-top view of the city.
Marriott's new Inflation Fighter
Dinners. Great new meals at pocke*
pleasing prices.
Now Served 5-7 p.m., 7 Days
a Week"
Not Available Holidays.
Free Self Parking.
When Marriott does it, they do it right.
Miami/Harriott Hotel & Racquet Club
1201 N.W LeJeune Road. Miami. Florida 33126
Phone 649-5000


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FILES


A Jewish-German Dialogue
)v MORDECHAI BECK
^part from the tension in
lei-German relations
i wing Menachem Be-
fs attack on Chancellor
ndt whatever else it
igs to Israel marks
J20th anniversary of one
[hv country's most trau-
tic events, the trial of
>lf Eichmann in 1961.
impression made by
trial on Israelis and
is, especially on the
linger generation, was
and powerful. What is
known is the effect that
trial had on Germans
?cially -Christian Ger-
js and how it altered
relations of many of
towards Israel and
l Jewish people.
"he Kichmann trial." recalls
nan protestant pastor Dr.
lal Krupp. "coincided with
biannual Church Day in Ger-
many when the churches meet to
discuss topics of mutual interest
and contemporary issues. As a
result of the trial, there was a
serious interest expressed at the
gathering in Israel and the
Jewish people. Prior to this, there
had been formal relations be-
tween the two countries; but now
the churches, as religious institu-
tions, wished to open up a
dialogue with Israel and the sur-
vivors of the Holocaust. As a
direct result of the Church Day,
Jewish and Israeli speakers were
brought over to Germany to
speak to the churches about all
matters pertaining to this
possible dialogue. "
BY ANOTHER coincidence.
Michael Krupp. then a 20-year-
old seminarian from Berlin, was
working on a kibbutz, studying
the Bible and gathering material
for his first book. The subject
was Zionist history, and the book
was to be published soon after, on
his return to Germany. "As a
result of the book." he adds
modestly. "I became known
within my church as something
of a Jewish expert'."
Wolfson Joins Miami Law Firm
lard F. Wolfson. executive
iresident and general coun-
Wometco Enterprises, will
ne a partner of the law firm
It mock and Stroock and
located in its Miami
September 1. Wolfson is
in professional, civic and
irul affairs, and serves as a
tor of the Miami Metropoli-
Museum of Art. and on the
Executive Committee of the
Florida region of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews.
He is a former president of the
Child Guidance Center, the
Greater Miami Philharmonic
Society, and is a trustee of the
Florida International University
Foundation.
WINDOW SPECIALISTS
Maintenance, Inc.
i
REPAIRS AND AAAINTENANCE OF All TYffS !
WINDOWS AND JALOUSIES \
SERVICE WE'RE PROUD OF '
Complete Stock of Replacement Parts
NE. 79th STREET MIAMI, HA. 33138 j
Phone 751-4M4_______________|
Michael Krupp s own interest
which was to make him a key
figure in the German-Israel
dialogue was not totally acci-
dental: "My own father, an East
Prussian priest, was an active
anti-Nazi. Even prior to the war.
between 1936 and 1938, he got
thrown into jail several times for
organizing illegal meetings and
for sheltering 'illegal' priests. As
a result of his experiences in jail,
he did not openly agitate again,
partly for the sake of his children
of whom there were then seven
and partly because he saw
many of his contemporaries being
carted off to concentration
camps."
Michael recalls his local church
kindergarten in Elbing being
taken over by the Nazis, who
swathed a large portrait of Jesus
in a huge Nazi flag. "I stayed at
the kindergarten for two hours
and then fled for good."
WHEN PEACE came, Michael
was six. His first contacts with
Jews after the war came when his
parents moved to Essen, where
his neighbors were Jewish con-
verts to Catholicism. "But there
was also a small Jewish commu-
nity in the city," he adds, "and
we would visit their synagogues
and their homes." Later, too, his
father invited many of the com-
munity to their home so that Mi-
chael's contacts became personal.
"I also had a Latin teacher at
my secondary school who de-
voted one lesson a week to the
Nazis. This was very interesting,
especially since no one else was
saying anything about the period
at the time."
All these experiences helped
increase Michael's interest in the
Jews and Judaism. His deepest
influence, he feels, was shaped by
his own religious upbringing,
particularly by his reading of the
Old Testament. "Nevertheless."
he admits, "it was still all rather
Continued on Page 8-B
rotect Your Car
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(leaning, Wash. Waxing Requirements In a
lost Comfortable and Serene Setting.
DuPont Wash & Wax Center
)75 N.W. 7 Ave. Off i-95 exit 62 St 757-4311
Ipen 7:30-5:00 Closed Sun. & Mon.
SUMMER SHOE
<
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Direct from Factories in Spain to You
"TREMENDOUS SAVINGS!
f triple "LLL" SHOE OUTLET
545 W. 17 St., Hialeah
888-1124
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OPEN:
Mon.-Fri. 10 to 4 00
Sat. 10 to 2:00
Libby Strauss, right, Brandeis Region Expansion Coordinator
and member of the Miami Herald Food Testing Panel, presents
Valerie Ketover (left). President of the South Dade chapter,
with the Louis D. Brandeis award during the 33rd conference at
the University in Waltham, Mass. Eighteen of the 125 national
chapters won this award which is given for imaginative, crea-
tive and outstanding community activities.
JWV Auxiliary Plan Orientation
On Sunday morning. July 19,
President Ceil Steinberg, of the
Department of Florida Ladies
Auxiliary Jewish War Veterans
will hold a brunch for newly
elected officers and chairmen at
her home. Guests will be coming
from throughout the State of
Florida. An orientation session
will follow, including the ex-
changing of portfolios between
the various chairmen: making
plans for the Departments ac-
tivities for 1981-82 and Florida's
representation at the coming Na-
tional Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans to be held
at the Diplomat Hotel the week
of August 16 through the 23.

FREE 30 DAY TRIAL OFFER
Magnetic Water Conditioner
Jvet oiv. Mf 30 day, to ,how yev haw to eat the kin* of
water you o Wwayi -i.hod you could hve.
Meanot now wton out. Sttt on the out.M*. ol yeer
tne pipo M, etter 30 It, M
car chock for $49.9J. nil INSTALLATION
AeaJkeel. South of Kotall D On*
No Kum or lima seal* buildup! Soltar water You be tha |udoa
A E STRUOWICK. OLR. CALL 248-5938
528 English Ave Homestead. FL 33030
LHertu AvaMMa

A Deluxe
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BAT YAM, ISRAEL
ly (0 Own
an .!,' I he hi I ol lf'e
.. v .,.. ,'lfRA
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a ce u
E

SEEING IS BELIEVING!
SPECIAL PRE SAlE VISITS TO
GAL RIVIERA CLUB
IN BAT-YAM ISRAEL
Tew Da\ Tour $
for ()nl\
1,230.
00
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from Miami
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l.iT I K --
v
rT4IK>l*
i-Mo-432 mm
I Scornn nTSa
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netymst


KC" vr-\
> hnisHkridiarL
V
RADIAti
WHITES
SIZE
185x14
?
205x14^
*215x14
*205x15
215x15
225x15
230x15
PRice
59.70
61.21
67.43
69.49
y.E.r
2.30
2.51
2.84
2.72
63.03
2.91
64.96
71.66
3.34
3.36
"Quantities Are Limited
P195/75-14
ER78-14
69.53
P205/75-14
FR78-14
P205/75-15
GR70-15
GR78-15
P215/75-15
HR78-15
71.17
74.11
81.51
78.12
255
291
295
78.12
84.41
m
4TRX
RADIALS
&4MAG
WHEELS
check our stores to see if
these will fit your model car
190 65R390 BLACK
220 55R390 WHITE
YOUR
:hoice
ONLY
$499
Plus F E
Ta 8 80
10 9 48
EXCHANGE
2.75
294
XCA LIGHT
TRUCK TIRES
SIZE
700- 15
6 pi lupfiess
750- 16
. :>e type
800- 16.5
8 ply tube'ess
875- 16 5
8 piy tuDeiess
950- 16 5
10-165
bei'ss
PRiCt
77.66
96.30
FE T
3 04
4 14
96.85
104.81
119.59
124.64

4 88
XZXTUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
PRICE
SIZE
155- 12
145<13
155- 13
40.67
37.59
F.E.T.
1 39
42.90
165 13 48.13
165- 14
175-14
165x15
175/70x13
185/70x13
50.16
1 32
1 48
1 61
54.85
53.24
57.85
64.02
68.31
1.73
206
1 81
1 73
1 90
DFGoodrich
BELTED
CLM
A STRONG,STABLE
TIRE AT A MOST
AFFORDABLE PRICE
P155/80B13
28"
WNHL
SIZE PRICE FE T
P165 80B13 30.06 1 56
P175 80B13 31.79 1 65
P185 75B14
-"
P195 75BU
P205 75B14
35.48
37.09
________38.13
39.40
41.35
37.90
40.43
42.50
44.46

201
P-METRIC
POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS
BELT
FACTORY
WHITEWALLS

P22b '5B14
P20-
2 13
P21-
P22b 75B15
P235 75B15
2 40
Fiberqia' I
tv I '
tai .
.....
Betted con*-*.,
ion
It .-.
up
SIZE
P195 70R13
P205 70R13
PRICE
51.38
52.75
P205 70R14 55.81
i Goodrich
LIFESAVER
XLM
P-METRIC_____
FACTORY P195 75R14 57 48
WHITEWALLS ^o^Ws&go
P175 75R14I47.91
P185 75R14 52.75
P215 75R14
P225 75R14
P205 75R15
61.05
65,31
62.31
P215.75R15 64.74
25 75R15 67.04

P235 75R'
.71.88
P15580R13 45.50
P17580R13 49.08
50.34
FET
1 88
2 04


WE
IMPORTED
RADIALS ____
FOR FOREIGN iessRi3___________
& MOST DOMESTIC 175SR13 33.53 207
SMALL AND 165SR14 36.30 190
INTERMEDIATE CARS "itssru 37.80 209
155SR12 27.33
155SR13 29.67
32.48
1 65
NORTON
206
MtAAEAM/PALM SPRINGS MILE
t275 49thSt 822-2500
MIAMI MPORT
RIANTATtON
3*N StataRa 7 5S7-2W6
S'sCe '92J-
Til
iwrr
n mcmcc
2604 Soutn 4lfi St 4*4-802-
VlHOifACM
75". Tm\ Strt 5S7.T174
185/70x14
CORAL OASt.ES
BrO Dougla* Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
O360 N W 7tn Ava 68V6541 N W 25 Si MHarr- Dairy Ra 593-tioi **, ,, r- X*MAHAC
n mumi beach vtutrmZOr *WCo7^*BM3 '-*"?
1700 N E 3rd St 945-7454 Bra & Ga***y Rda 5524656 N Unrya~m. n. .rn7r^ ORLAMOO
MIAMI BEACH KENOALL DR./HIOATE BOUARE ^^LV^L^IJ7^*700 M*0 C Cotona* Or B96 -
>454 Alton Road 672-5353 13872 S W 88fh St 387-0128 *. *, V^**NO BEACH wWTIIIMWt
BOOTH DAOC _____ HOME8T1AO *ZttZLZ'**>0 8W S OrWndo A*. 645-9306
90O1S OooaHwy 867-7575 3O0 S Fadaral Hwy 247--J22 mTScUt?^ SWACM OAVTOfJA BEACH
CUTLER RIOOE W HOLLYWOOO LAKE^al^*iVL *** >7 ** *" *** '"*'
Wt Honor MASTER CARD VISA 20390 S Owa Mwy 233-5241 497 S Stat.Ra 7 987-0450 M2nT! I ^5-"tACM MB*U
*mHC*anm.m*%UM ,740 ilSfSTlZ 75* ***" *~E *"~ "**"
--------------- *!> W Hb^o Btvq 427-86O0
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