The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02734

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
ejewlslhi Floridiao
Volume
~ Number 26 TWO SECTIONS
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Miami, Florida Friday. June 26, 1981
frta S"ocni
By Mail 80 Cants Price 50 Cents
As Election Day Nears
Labor Faces Gloom at Polls Tuesday
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
1 Faced with steadily slip-
ping support in the opinion
polls, the Labor Alignment,
Israels main opposition
party, is making a deter-
mined effort to pull itself
[together and paper over in-
ternal differences with
I election due on June 30.
Last month, the Labor Party
I drew up its list of Knesset candi
date* nt- smaller Mapam partner
Religious Party
In Disarray...........
IB
haunt: done so earlier.) Labor
Part> Chairman Shimon Peres
and a small committee of key
leaders worked around the clock
for M'\.-rul days to try to accom-
modate all the various disparate
pressure groups, regions, ethnic
communities, settlement move-
ments in the list of "realistic'
spots
PRESENTING the list of
Labor's mammoth Central Com
mitt.t Peres went out of his way
to praise his arch-rival. Yitzhak
Rabin, for his "constructive
h*lp m hammering out the list.
Eknen members of the "Rabin
Camp appear in the first 50-odd
places and Rabinites professed
themselves "satisfied."
In a low-key, conciliatory
speech Peres noted that there
*ere unevitably disappointments
for some people in a selection
process of this kind. He called on
everyone especially those who
Wt they deserved a higher
Pl*cng to accept the party's
verdict and maintain the image of
un'ty which is so vital if Labor is
to recoup iu current losses in the
Polls before June 30.
Among those disappointed
*ith their relatively low (and
unrealistic') placing wars
'ortner top diplomats Sirocha
Uinitz and Yosef Tekoah.
Another former dinlomat. Chaim
Shimon Peres
llerzog. secured a high place on
the list, as did another of Labor's
bnght new stars, former Chief of
Staff Mordechai Our. With the
list drawn up. Labor began cam-
in earnest and plainly
of the
panning
toughest ever fought in this
country.
ONLY A FEW months ago,
things looked very different. The
polls then were giving Labor
close to 50 percent of the vote,
and party keymen were day-
dreaming of the prospect of an
absolute majority" enough
Knesset seats to be able to form a
government without the need for
coalition partners.
This has never happened in
Israel before, and. barring un-
foreseen upsets, it is now abun-
dantly clear that it is not going to
happen this time either. Indeed.
Labor's rating has slipped so fast
that now there is very real doubt
among pollsters and pundits as
to whether Labor will be able to
form a government at all-
in the latest opinion poll,
released June 2. Likud, for the
first time, forged ahead of Labor.
Were elections to be held now. it
would capture 45 Knesset seats
to 42 for Labor, the poll in-
dicated
PART OF the cause of Labor's
slippage has doubtless been the
artful campaign of price and tax
reductions instituted by Likud's
recently appointed Finance
Minister. Yoram Aridor. Aridor
has quite deliberately triggered a
consumer bonanza, by slashing
sales taxes on televisions,
refrigerators, and other consumer
durables, while keeping food
Continued on Page 11-A
Nuke Expert
Says IAEA
Was Fooled
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) A 33-year-old nuclear
engineer who is the only American inspector in the Middle
East section of the International Atomic Energy Agency
(IAEA) said Friday the IAEA could not have detected a
diversion by Iraq of plutonium from its nuclear reactor to
build an atomic weapon.
Roger Richter, who resigned from the agency last
week, said Iraq could have "thwarted the IAEA in-
spection." He said he disagreed with Sigmund Eklund of
Sweden, head of the IAEA, who reported to the agency's
Board of Governor's in Vienna last week that the IAEA
could have detected a diversion.
RICHTER TESTIFIED before the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee, which is investigating whether Israel
acted in self-defense when it destroyed the Iraqi reactor on June
7. Sen. Alan Cranston (D.. Cal.) said Richter was a man of
conscience." who called him on June 12 from Vienna because
he was concerned about the Iraqi nuclear program.
In Iraq, Richter said the IAEA inspectors were lirtuted to
checking only the equipment and material declared by France
and Iraq to the IAEA. He said the inspectors would not be per-
Continued on Page 6-A
^:^x^:^x^;^x^:^;^:^:^:^:^:^:^:^x^^:^::^x^^:^:^^:^x^lv>x>^^:^>>>>^>>>^>>>>>>>>>>>>>^^l^^^^x^:^^:^x
Testimony Shows
Iraq Working Towards
Producing Three A-Bombs
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Sen. Alan Cran-
ston (D.. Calif.) revealed
that he has received in-
ternal documents from
American sources at the
International Atomic En-
ergy Agency (IAEA) that
estimate that the Iraqi nu-
clear reactor destroyed by
Israel June 7 could have
produced enough plu-
tonium each year to build
up to three nuclear bombs.
"Furthermore, these IAEA
documents indicate that there is
a significant possibility, indeed
probability, that this plutonium
production could not have been
detected by IAEA inspectors,"
Cranston told of hearings by the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee on the Israeli raid.
The Senator, a member of the
committee, revealed that Roger
Richter, a 33-year-old American
who has been working aa an
IAEA inspector in the Middle
East and South Asia sections,
would testify before the com-
mittee on the unreliability of the
IAEA inspection system.
Richter. who recently accepted a
five-year extension of his con-
tract, resigned from the IAEA so
he could testify before the com-
mittee. Cranston's office said.
RICHTER, who reportedly
was closeted in a hotel room
working on his testimoney, was
Continued on Page 6-A
*" c^^^.."--""e,-,!'-..w^......:.:.:.::.:::-:::::::::-:::-w
One of Them in Florida
U.S. Acts Against Alleged Former Nazi Aides
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The government
is instituting proceedings
against two alleged Nazi
collaborators for concealing
their participation in crimes
against Jews and others
when they applied for ad-
mission to the United
States, one of them living
in Florida.
Facing possible revocation of
citizenship and deportation are
Kazys Palciauskas. former mayor
of Kaunas. Lithuania, who
allegedly falsified his war-time
activities when he was granted
U.S. citizenship in 1964; and
Edgars Laipenieks, who was a
member of the Nazi-affiliated
Latvian political police between
1941-1943.
THE JUSTICE Department
has already filed deportation pro-
ceedings againa Laipenieks, 67,
who lives in Valley Center, Calif.,
and is seeking to deprive
Palciauskaa. a resident of St.
Petersburg, Fla.. of his citizen
ship.
Laipenieks has bean served
with an order to show cause why
he should not be deported for
concealing his war-time activities
Continued on Page 7-A
Mitterand Still Mourns Old Mentor Dayan. 7-A


!V2A
- MmiU fkskm&n




On Capitol Hill
Violation Probe Continuing
By DAVID FKIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
' JTA> State Department
officials str*sec that
tratioR s
of laiad nor its
ai tht &ek\tr\ oi
FI6
the
tb rasd He bjsd
bat tbe l > 2* aot share
bv
:-:
UJS. CondemnedAct,
Not Triend and Ally'
'-:
I
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
JTAj The United States
has made it clear that it re
gards the Security CouDd
resolution condemning Is
raei's June 1 air attack or
Iraq's nuclear reactor to b*
a condemnation of the act
itself but not of I
which, according to the sussmuoaa.
'ambassador to the A*BBC> : hi
UN Jeane Kirkpatnck. JJ? "i.
*W in the Reagan Ad- iea m as
unistralsorj are proud to saajouauoe -** her to reserve
call a friend and ally
Mrs Ksapatncs and Iraqi
'*= Minister Seadan
loot the draft
of the asattsr wowJd
He
be
whan the
of thai
Ii
acted that the U S had
ad Israel after the Iraq
aad that TVaabaiiiua
bat be dismayed by the
r.jcr. tie.* Seer. 3ooe Ii las I
for peace is the Middie East
the Iaraeli action
HE PABTICX LARLY noted
that the raid had
lerrnsssd
Sadat of Ecypt aad cast a
shadow o%er the efforts of
-p&cml envoy Pkttp Habab to
Srcng a peaceful aoBatson to the
the Middie East
the US aaderstood Israel
Iraq, whsrfa has
Ureei aad is
at war wsih a He
Iraq has not played a con
rose as the Maids* East
Hei
Iraq as considered a
that aids terronesa
Bat he rejected a tamtrutum by
Rap Wuhan Bi nsanf.il rl
hSra -.Rat Iraq has osed biach
asai' to get France aad Italy to
hasp a baud as aarJaar pan
StoeaaeJ icfaatd to go into
detaas. be argued that the I -
has veered concern abut the
Iraqi auciaar piani mr.t Frenr*
aad Itafy. aad sasd that the
Israeii acuon bac prev listed the
Families expect
in
Riverside.
More service.
Kakpatnck seal that, frossthe
iiCamaia, the U S opposed say
Israel Yea Isrsai
Energy
Fnday. aw
at tbe offices
of Sacreury Genera. K jrt Wu
bean Thar obyectnes was to
errrve at a teas '|H alia? to Iraq
US veto naai larlalih Kirk
petnek streasad sa her speech to
the Cooadi that -bile bar
mnrtrswiarl Israel s de-
af the reactor that does
J^" '" seat of as iasrleas cooduci aad
so srafl other resartssasst Arab
BUT ISRAEL'S ,airisaesa\i states deteroaned to block the
Yahaaa Blaaa. anenh peace process so tbe Msdctte
after as adonuoe. Is- caa oaf> harthar reduce the al-
REP STEPHEN Sosar?
N > sasd be was aaaassd aad
appaBsd a: Scoesaai refusa
say that Iraq ara* plan wane to
d the U S thou** Iraq was ir
ldam to replace o*i as a i
of aairrj" Bat RoeeJc Sti
of the State Departsasat
of Iatetisaeocr and
did not
Iraq was capable of buna1
*. no* -as s*~- crapi
jea^sr-- com : of D3e 3'o*ar-3 v :
cou -e corrseraenc* !
-v people compare funeral service
<*-*: ?arr^iesareser^
j* s*- staff of any fia^erai director
oeoc* *-t"age^a' .-'0e*Karv3nf, o fa-
i *w*r t of t>.a"oa circumstances
to Je* s* i economcai haR
serv*ceber**
r sexcec? raan
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f 9/ ccKcriwr nj Da
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movs.s
HO*'-
cnapsH aev^ re *-
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RIVERSIDE
Sc>-i:- ,reGuan>ar Ptar- P* arrange

bosabad the saaae Iraqi macaw
^ nr u aoofiuDB. is- caa oar iMTaai i
asaaan iilj reyacta the rwsch low nnrtai
: of tbe Uaaad
irnaiilssthe
of cood srfl Usroaa>ct the
The reaorauoa fats aato the orid Israel resects the aueasat
pattern of so assay rsaohauaaa of to coadessa aa actaaa carraad out
the sbbbs ksad srhsch have caa- the esercxae of kcaassate aetf
the root caase of the Arab-Israel waohasaa wah the reaped a so
and af of c* aian> ncs>o-r-. HsSaaJi
Ghetto Fighter Dies
TEL AVI\ UTA) Yiuhak Zuckerman. one of
the leaders of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising 36 years ago
and a founder-member of Kibbutz Lohame: Hagetaoc
died of a heart attack here. He was 66. Better known by
bat underground fighter name of Antes: he took ov*t
command of the ghetto fighters and managed to escape
with a tsRsstthil of aursisws to continue their fight against
ie Nazis in the forests
* s>
Nsrbolaa Yebntes V
Secretary of State for
Eastern and Sotah Asssn Affair*
said that the attack came duruar
u war between Iran and Iraq
and the I S aad others had ex
pressed concern over the war and
aot just oae partaruiar incident
Rap David Brown (D Miss >
saad that a recently completed
Craajiiasamsl research study
rejected Israel s coateatK>n that
a had to bomb the nuclear plant
because d a waited until tbe
psant aas onerafmnal. or hot a
would have caused large numbers
of deaths m Baghdad He said
fauad that s bomb
oa an operational plant
ot have endangered u>
Psopie
BROWN UATER told report-
era that ha aad asset members of
the commsnee were fnendh
toward Israel but thought d
should have waned until :? had
i rtsplnciistii efforts an_
m a way wturh eodan
> the peace process
Rp Paul Fmdley iR IB i said
the US was "a silent partner m
tbe attack He said if the '.
had apoken to Israei abcut -he
use of Amencan-mada wiapraa)
m Lebanoc. as he bad urgei tbi
attack on Iraq would ne\er I
BSBBBBaa
3 I/ml aC V-/I
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
\m RI SffQAUSTSIN
tSatASI SH L RlTlfs
m
TR^SsAC IsONSCMKI VIA THr \
rOISRAEI MOCKfU HANCI
l.euitii

Msw '
Securities
Corporation f ee e ^
- that th.
Laaad States was not consuhea
an any way on any phase of this
action. Nor were w informed m
advance he said
aea
OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
0VISK>N Of SCHREJBER INCl
-KiS8 ^WSlOtMajecC-
YOlIP rnMPlETE OFFICE SUPPLIER S^
463-9680 757-8513
DOWNTOWN UPTOWN MIA. BCH CORAL CABJJ
iSkSsSHtSt 22tMCS9thSt l*08WnAvr J72 Valencia*
aam."U MtamLAa sstasniaaart) FU CoraicaW
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IprxUyJ""826- 1961
+ hwistfh*k*nr)
Page 3-A
Goldmann Wants Palestinian State
ByJTA Wire Services
VIENNA Dr Nahum Gold-
Linn. lon ** a*k *-
Lrtel Government policies
award the Arabs, has coma out
ongly in favor of the establish
eBl of a Palestinian aUte.
^4ing to an interview
ubluhed in the daily Kurier.
Goldmann maintained that no
ution could be found to the
aa in Lebanon until Israeli
b relations are improved, and
important prerequisite for
jt development waa the
it ion of a Palestinian state.
Goldmann, a past president of
World Jewish Congress and
ETche World Zionist Organize
was quoted as saying, "I
,__emn the permanent Israeli
ids on Lebanon. These attacks
r.. morally and politically not
justified I hope that another
Dvemment than (Prims Min-
m Menacheml Begin s and in-
ter chief of staff than (Gen.
jfadl Eytan will change this
ohcy He added, according to
Kuntr interview. "I see no
before the Palestinians
ir had the right to found a
ate of their own. just as they
ke ______________
SPRING GLEN. NY. *
ir*iinK Orthodox rabbi criticize*
rrv what he called attempts bv
trva and Reform groups
ndertaks a program to utilize
Ilk" United lewian Appeal, the
tppajsj and Fsjfsjf
\ 'hmughout th
U prasa IsrasJ t<
\ he rtghl to "t
i
, s to
. n

. rn trial has
d in Jewish lile in the
I
i>t
JEM'SALEM Mexico has
p\en its tormal agreement to the
pppnmmerit of Y Israel Gur-Arye
Israel i \mhu-ssador
dur \r>e. currently head of
y* Latin American Section at
M Foreign Ministry, will take
p the post shortly, relieving
m) Erell. who has been hold
the fort in Mexico City on s
temporary basis pending the
ppointment of a permanent
dvo) Erell himself recently
tompleted his tour of duty as
1 issador to Brazil.
The Mexico post became
P>Bt quite suddenly when
J*ul Rosolio. a non-career diplo-
mat, quit after two years to take
p> commercial position at home
|u> Israel Rosolio was previously
|Wtor General of the Israel
I Police
NEW YORK A 25-year-old
tyttntine Jew for whom the
Ann I), tarnation League of B'nai
I" nth repeatedly interceded with
p'gentinian authorities, has been
pleased from an Argentine
If^son after being detained more
|tnan five years without charge.
Alberto Schprejer is now in
'"el. one of five countries which
pnered u> accept him. Rabbi
I'jtorton M Rosenthal. director of
I.,, Hague's Latin American
flairs Department, said Rabbi
jnosenthai said that Schprejers
Jwin. Marina Kaplan of New
^*ns. phoned ADL on June 16
InL*** "* "^pressed his sp
[Pfciation u> the League for
never giving up."
Schprejer is one of 1.200 Ar-
gentine citizens, both Christian
and Jewish, who are prisoners or
who have disappeared there, for
whom the League has interceded
as part of its Argentine prisoner
project.
GENEVA The Arab bloc at
the International Labor
Organization (ILO) conference
here failed last week to have that
United Nations agency condemn
Israel for its June 7 raid on Iraq
and to have it barred from the
conference.
Alioune Liagni. the Labor
Minister of Senegal who is presi-
dent of the conference, strongly
opposed the Arab demands. He
said he was against politicizing
the conference and that, in any
event, the Arab proposal was
contrary to the ILO's constitu-
tion.
The Arabs nevertheless
mounted a bitter attack on Israel
in the course of debate on
apartheid They accused Israel of
selling nuclear weapons to South
Africa and of collaborating with
that country in the field of
nuclear research. The Palestine
Liberation Organization observer
said the raid on Iraq was in fact
worse than apartheid.
Ovadia Soffer. head of the
Israeli delegation, said in reply.
"We are witnessing outrageous
attempts by Arab extremists and
racists who lost no time in using
the question of the struggle
against racism for the purposes
of their political and military bel-
ligerency toward Israel."
WASHINGTON A bi-
partisan group of 142 members of
Congress has sent a letter to
President Reagan urging him to
work for the release of some 5,000
Jews in Syria.
The letter, initiated by Rep.
Stephen Solarz ID.. N.Y.). noted
that the Jews still in Syria are
Joseph Handleman of Miami Beach (left), national chairman of
American Red Magen David for Israel 1ARMDI), extends best
wishes to George M. Elsey, president, American Red Cross, at
the recent centennial convention in Washington, D.C. Handle-
man congratulated the American Red Cross on its 100 years of
humanitarian service and reaffirmed the friendship between the
ARC and its sister society, Magen David Adorn in Israel
"the remnant of a once-
flourishing community" and now
"face a number of deprivations
and handicaps, the most serious
of which is denial of the right to
emigrate."
REWARD
OFFERED
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN
is offering a valuable reward to persons for the apprehension of
rising prices and crushing inflation.
This reward, in the form of GIFT CERTIFICATES, is the equivalent of
hard cash in PUBLIX. PANTRY PRIDE. WINN-DIXIE. BURDINES and
FEDC0 STORES.
Rewards may be claimed at all Flagler Federal offices by persons
opening new savings accounts of 51000 or more!
Interest rates on these accounts are the highest permitted by law!
AN AGENCY OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PROVIDES
INSURANCE UP TO $100,000 FOR CUSTOMER
PROTECTION
Flagler Federal is described as having tall Interest rates, friendly
personality, sound financial Knowledge and frequently seen in at
least 25 locations throughout Dade. Broward and Palm Beach
Counties.
For further information, contact your nearest Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Office, or call 377-1711. ext. 204 in Dade.
525-1557. ext. 204 in Broward. FLACLEB
Ml* OuV*
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,SM4 PWamunc rtt) ""., a*am ....*, snooomaCt. 4T*7 W Atlantic Aw 498 71


Page* A
Friday. Jun. 28. m,

I
I Word's Not Yet Out
From time to time, our Newsroom is treated to
ifif the charade of a Novosti Press Agency report from
ifif Moscow sent to us via the Soviet Union's Embassy
fffi in Washington.
The most recent report sports a June 18 dateline
iff! and purportedly documents the "crime" of Viktor
ifif Brailovsky and his "systematic fabrication and
ffff distribution of deliberately false materials casting
fifi aspersions on the Soviet state and social system."
The ruling circles of the imperialist colonialist
if Muscovites, sitting like depressive fat cats on their
ifif West European Empire, crushing the democratic
;!;! aspirations of the oppressed working classes there.
;!;! know nothing about acceptable journalism.
For example. Novosti says of Brailovsky. after fffi
:> documenting his trumped-up crime: "He is short. -i
:: stumpy and slightly fattish." In our view, this is a |
!>erfect description of Leonid Brezhnev, but what has
il to do with Brailovsky and the fascist actions of the
Kremlin's masters against him?
Or. Novosti describes Brailovsky s work as *'an 1
| illegal (sic) typewritten collection' called 'Jews in ifif
fifi the USSIi." which it judges to be "derogatory .
;i; and distorting Soviet realities."
Regarding Brailovsky s defense. Novosti j
concludes: "All petitions by the defendant were iff;
| satisfied, and he fully exercised his rights as the j
:f: accused and as counsel for the defense."
Bully. Also. bull.
We are in accord with a statement this week on
| the arrest and sentencing of Brailovsky to five years ifif
;!ff in internal exile by the South Florida Conference on ;
fifi Soviet Jewry, which characterizes Brailovsky as "a fifi
man who is guilty of no crime."
We echo the sentiments of the Conferences ifif
:f;f conclusion that if the Soviet Governments purpose ifif
ffff is to rid Moscow of this "pariah." would it not be ffff
fff: better "to free him and issue the necessary visas to if!
iff; him and to his family so they may join his father and |
8 brother in Israel under the reunification-of-familv
I provisions of the Helsinki Accords?"
The trouble is. Novosti knows nothing of the j
ifff Helsinki Accords. The Kremlin's ruling circles have fifi
ifif not yet given them the word.
A Law of Physics
s
::
A basic law of physics declares that for every
action there is a reaction. The law works perfectly in
international affairs, too.
Take for example the hypocritical condemnation
of Israel by the United Nations for its Osirak opera
tion. Duplicity and pragmatism prevailed there to
such a degree that the United States delegation
worked with the delegation of Iraq to word the state-
ment of condemnation in the face of the fact that
there are no relations between Washington and
Baghdad to speak of.
The net result?
The previously low-profile Muscovite stance in I
its tilt with Poland has suddenly taken on menacing
proportions. The ear her brave declarations
emanating from Washington and North Atlantic !
Treaty Organization headquarters in Europe that the i
Russians had better watch their step in the matter of
an outright military invasion of Poland were =
promptly assessed by the Kremlin to be what they I
are words, and nothing more.
If the American and the European reaction to
the Osirak operation is a guideline of Western com- ':'
mitment to truth, then reasoned the Communists, %
why should the West be any different if once and for i?
all they crushed the Poles in their quest for genuine I
home rule?
The laws of physics are somewhat older than the &
f:f laws of men. Certainly, they are far more consistent I
| The Russian reaction to the United Nations action &
f portends even bleaker days ahead. I ifif
K
I
::
Jewish Floridian
OWICB an* PLANT-IK M.E.OB) St
p.o. Bmaum.
KHKOK SHOCHET
K4lilvi and
IXOMWDUN
SUXANNB MCOCHKT
Iraq: A World Terrorist Center
CHAPTER TWO of Philip
Habib's peace mission to the
Middle East is redundancy.
Israel is already actively engaged
in getting the Syrians to remove
those missiles from Lebanon, and
nobody seems to recognize it,
least of all the Syrians them-
selves.
Israel has just acknowledged
that the Syrians shot down
another one of its pilotless air-
craft on a reconnaissance mission
over Lebanon. This makes at
least the fourth drone downed by
the Syrians since the crisis over
their surface-to-air missiles in
Lebanon first broke early in May.
Evaa if the number is correct,
and there i- sufficient evidence
ind these days u> suggest
thai there are more such downet'
BOS plane* than Israel
its t' the meaning is cleat
Of .m obvioui Machiavellian
scheme plotted h\ the Israel
high i-ommand that has managed
thus tar to elude the Syrians. Il
the) knew its details, the Syrian*
might !* more cautious about
Leo
IHiiiriliii
spilling their missiles so promis-
cuously on the air
THE SCHEME is simple: one
Israeli drone tor one Syrian mis-
afle although Heaven knows that
the Syrians are most Ukeh to
aaoot more than one missile at
one drone balnea their gunners
cm knock it out of the sk\ In
tact, one Israeli drone may well
mean eight Syrian missiles or.
less optimistically. |,Ve. six or.
one can be sure they hope, at the
VSrj least se\en missiles.
The question, ot course, is just
&tf>W IVAN &U)W
how long the Soviets, given thai
shrewd capitalistic instincu T,
going to want to supply' J
Syr, wah such dE-J
Uonately large number of su,
sophisticated. high-technoloev
missiles to shoot down such.
disproportionately small number
of frve-and-dime store model air
planes. Relatively speaking
But if the Machiavellian
purpose of the Israelis is not soon
laid bare, the countrv i .vnerals
are counting on the fact that the
Syrians will elect to conta*,,
shooting at the drones until thev
have no more nissUea left in Leb-
anon (Than il an unlimited
supph of .iron.
children bein)
cornea I
then rectai noun in
number
The affscl ol
the same as it t(. Sy, ,., ^
volunuinK run. .
suppli.il missii,- fron
in the tirvt pi,,,, i .
success of tbl 1st
command scheme dep
just how t.f-l i! t,,K,.v
teas i" cab 1 ntil :.-
erj is I'hilip Habifa k<
truck in'
IN APRIL. 1979 the Iraqia
baaaaaVN t,, (Chart was
\pelied for taking part in an
attempt to overthrow
President Numein
Hut tine would never Km.*
this, judging by the mi,,
presentation ot the Sudl
igation before th. SecurU)
Council last mea, in
Sudan played the role
bast friend, showing outrage at
those nasty Israeli- for their
Immlung of the Oaarak
outside nt liaghdad
In fact, all of the Third World
was in euphoria during thi
of that debate, having failed
eijui\ak-ntl\ exorcized sin,, the
last time the I'nited Nal
moved to condemn Isra.
reason or another Why :he>
shoulil conn e\en to the h.-
onic defense of Iraq is hard [nun
derstand (ieneraUy ipiraltitl|
Iraq is a principal sponsor of
training camps, weapon- su|
and financial backing to radical
Continued on Page ft-A
Why Hess Should Remain in Spandau
Rudolf Hess suited the world
and threw Adolf Hitler into one
of his worst tantrums 40 years
ago when he snitched a Nazi ME-
110 two-man plane and flew from
Augsburg to Scotland to try tc
negotiate peace with England.
This madcap escapade is back
in the news because Hess, now
87, has been returned from s
British Military Hospital in West
Berlin to Spandau Prison. A
routine medical check had reveal-
ed pneumonia. And new cries for
his release, inspired by his illness,
have touched off interest once in
Spandau s lone jailbird.
Britain. France, and the
United States are willing to lot
Hess depart the prison which was
built 105 years ago to hold 600
convicts. After all. the World
War II allies reason, what harm
can a doddering old man do if
freed? His son. Wolf, has been
fighting for his release; his aged
wife, Use, wants him home also.
She is allowed only two half-hour
visits with him each month.
Friday. June 26, 1961
24 SI VAN 6741
Niimhnr2fl
WHY SPEND $500,000 a year,
then, to keep the old codger in
jail? At the Nuremberg war tri-
als, he was cleared of any in-
volvement in war mines against
humanity. The American judge
decided 10 years in prison wss
sentence enough for a man who
had helped Germany prepare for
and wage war. But the Soviet
judge, mindful of the USSR's
loss of 20 million Russians in
Moscow's bloody conflict with
Hitler's hordes, wanted to
Hess. The compromise court
solution finds Hess still s prison-
er, while old Nazis like Albert
Speer and Nazi Youth Leader
lialdur von Schirach had to serve
only 20 years.
Some 200 members of the Brit-
ish Paiiiment are filing for
Hess' release. So are small lob-
bies in other nations, much af-
fected by the old Nazi's dilema.
Some who plead his cause recall
that many Germans considered
him s bit balmy, a strange man
with a lion for bis pet and an ear-
nest belief in astrology as one of
the inspirations for that weird
and daring fught-for-peace in
May. 1941
Simon Wiesenthal, this plan-
et's most determined Nazi-hunt-
er, has assembled s huge array of
reasons for keeping Hess behind
bars. He realizes that not every-
body remembers that Hess was
one of Hitler's earliest partners-
in-crime against Jews. Hess was
in prison in 1923 with Hitler sfter
the Munich Beer Hall putsch. It
was to Hess that Hitler dictated
Mem Kampj, that most mfi
of all anti-Semitic publications
From Hitler to Deputy Fuehrer
Hess was only one step in the
early 1930s: and even when Her
mann (ioering was placed second
in command by the Nazi mad
man. Hess was immediately next
in succession to Goering
WIESENTHAL'S case a
gainst the release of Hess goes
much further. Did not Hess know
about, give approval to. and
participate in many of Hitlenan
sadistic acts and barbaric Nazi
events the building and use of
death camps, the 1935 ant i Jew-
ish (Nuremberg) Lews, Knstati-
nacht. massacres, deportations.
torture? Hess, says Wienenthal.
is "a symbol of the murerous re-
gime he helped to power:" he was
present st the birth of Holocaust
Hitler wss more than sick over
Hess' fruitless flight to Scotland
He uttered the hope Hess would
fall into the sea. Probably sware
of the fact that Hess had met the
Duke of Hamilton in 1936 at the
Berlin Olympics. Hitter fesred
that even if his brother-Nazi did
reach the Duke's estate in Scot
land, he might blow the cover on
Operation Barbarossa. the Fueh-
rers bold plan to try to crush the
USSR.
Hitler really had no need to
worry on that score. In his fash
ion. Hess continued loyal to his
Nazi idol. Nor did he get far in
England no farther than the
Tower of London. In fact, when
CoaUawed oa Page 5-A


fry, June 26. 1981
+ Jewish thrkJian
PjhwR-A
Brailovsky Gets Three-Year Sentence
.. u YORK UTA) Dr.
, Brailovsky. a 45year^ld
lit'
Uiinaiion
,imiICiM and k-ading .forfeit
; ,, mi sentenced by a
url t<> thr* >rs and
months in Siberia internal
|0I alleged anti Slate
u,aiK>n accrding to the
truggh tor Soviet Jew
nj |nt. UlUOO of Councils for
Xht t>'"" '' r,,*'uti'<1 ,r"m
,um Brailovsky
y bten imprisoned skua last
(feyi .liter tin- open
Madrid ol the review con-
: -he Helsinki IgM
,,,,:,:,,,,,,,::::::::::::::::::::::
mot, which the Soviet Union
ugaad, huh tronglj lupports
li.isi, human rights
BRAILOVSKY was the or-
ganizer ol unoffk id scientific and
Jewish seminars, which met m
his apartment in Moscow, and
l he editor of the Sami/dat
(underground). Jews in the
USSR
The SSS.I and the I < S.I (fe.
i tared Th trial i( Dr \ iktor
Brailovsky proves yet again that
m the USSR today, innocence
meana guilt, sdvocacj ol Jewish
idem u> is criminal and the desire
to Join i-nes people in their .in
:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.-
Protest Staged Outside
Soviet Airline in N.Y.
Bj KEVIN FKKKMAN
\, M YORK UTAl -
p .pi. gathered m front
Dtficea "I Aeroflot. the
airlines, here to protaat
i trial ol Soviet Jewish activfel
Ki<>r Brailovsky Brailovsky, a
List, is charged with
Igainsl the State and fcning the Soviet Unfesi and its
system
1'rnt William QlahsrSOB,
|ph>MiiM Irom Rutgers I'm-
nit) and a member of the
lnmniitlee of Concerned
IVN-ntists read s statement out-
J-.iIi ihi Vrofkit office saving
|:rul the charges for which Mrail
rsk) is >n trial are the cul-
. ears ot ottu ml
I menl brought on by his
I lKin to emigrate to Is-
I llkivsky first applied for
I tin 1972
BRAILOVSKY HAD bean the
Moai ow Sundaj
Semii nssi-
inu rn.iiion.i. con
nlist* (ilabers*m
participalad in
m! the)
Mill- adding thai
iiu i \\satara par
tttaat to the [act
Dlhing can he cimstru- imation of the So* fet
Others participating in the
|*-rrn>nstrati.in included rep-
Beatativei of the National
aferencc on Soviet Jewry, the
Vitional Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council, the
MBcD of Jewish Organizations
WhyHess
ShouldStay
InSpandau
Coetinued from Page 4 A
Ithe Duke of Hamilton, once con-
tacted by Hess, hurried to inform
|ChurrhhiU that the German
fgle. Hess, had landed. Church
H Mid Well. Hesa or no Hess.
n going to see the Mara
| Brothers "
SO HESS is very old now. very
"fly. very bitter He has told
^1 Lugene Bird, an American
formerly assigned to help keep
*tch over him at Spandau. that
sorry what happened to the
*** But with a band of neo^
*us threatening to kill two
** in Bonn if Hess is not soon
Mssasd, with the Federal
Administrative Court in Berlin a
**"> rejecting Hess' plea for free-
*fn. and with Simon Wieeenthal
'Wl adamant against the move to
Pi prison gates, the Nazi who
"ugh! have inspired an opera re-
*">iscent of Wagner Ekes out his
"* Spandau.
Sevtn Art$ Ftaturt
In Civil Service, Pioneer Women,
the United Synagogue of
Vmerica, Hashomer Hatzaii and
the Greatest New York Con
ference on Sot n-t Jew ry.
iint homeland is treasonous
Dr Seymour I.achman. chair-
man oi the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
called Brailovsky's conviction
an attempt of the bsSOSt sort to
i rush the Jews of the USSR
under a lid ol repression
New York Stale Attorney
General Robert Abrama sent a
cable to Soviet President Leonid
Hn/hnev urging him "to lake
whatever sups are necessary to
ensure that Brailovsk) and his
familj are permitted t<> join their
relatives in Israel
lie also cabled the Procurator
General ol the I SSR calling the
arrest and trial of Brailovsky "a
flagrant violation of his basic
rights under both Soviet and in-
ii rnatkmal law
BRAILOVSKYn wife, Irina.
who attended the two day trial,
said the internal exile sentence
is belter than a labor camp.''
Under Soviet penal practice,
one month in jail is equivalent to
three months in exile, the SSSJ
n ported Maximum sentence for
slandering the state is three years
ill a labor camp.
! Former Supreme Court 1
I
I Justice Goldberg Says
I I
8 S
Reactor Raid Justified
By DAVID LANDAU
JERI SALEM (JTAI -
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg believes
Israel had a legal right'' under
international law to bomb Iraq's
nuclear plant and (hat its June 7
air raid therefore was a "justified
Ct ol self defense."
Goldberg, who also served as
I S Ambassador to the United
Nations in the late 60s. offered
his opinion in a letter to Prime
Minister Menachem Begin that
was released here. "I have no
doubl about Israel s right to
bomb Iraq's nuclear installations
in light of the given cir-
cumstances under traditional
principles of international law
and generally accepted concepts
of what actions constitute self-
defense between belligerents."
(ioldberg wrote.
HE NOTED in that connection
that Iraq and Israel were certain-
ly belligerents in international
law since "Iraq has consistently
proclaimed that it is in a state of
war with Israel He pointed out
further that "Iraq, contrary to
relevant resolutions of the United
Nations, has refused to renounce
belligerency against Israel and to
conclude a peace treaty" to
accept Security Council
resolutions 242 and 338.
Israel has expressed willing-
ness to make peace in accordance
with those resolutions, he said.
According to Goldberg, "In
light of the fact that Iraq deems
itself to l.i at war with Israel, the
State of Israel under established
rules of international law has the
right to take military action, in
eluding bombing, against in
stallations in Iraq which
potentially may assist Iraq in its
proclaimed warlike designs
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KIBITZ WITH A KIBBUTZ IN HAIFA
DIAL DIRECT
Does your oreo hove Inrernononol Dialing? Then you con coll around rhe world
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PS Everyone con dial direcr ro Canada, rhe Caribbean, Alaska, Hawaii,
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53
54
A
Southern Bel


Page6-A
-Jewisti Ik i id inn
Friday, June 26, 1981
Testimony Shows
Iraq Aimed for Three Atom Bombs
Nuclear Expert Says IAEA
Was Fooled at Osirak
Continued from Page 1-A
said by Cranston's office to be a
strong supporter of the peaceful
use of nuclear energy for making
electricity.
Sen. Cranston, however, read
portions of an analysis Richter
provided the U.S. Mission to the
IAEA in 1980. "The available in-
formation points to an ag-
gressive, coordinate program by
Iraq to develop a nuclear weap-
ons capability during the next
five years," Cranston said.
"As a nuclear safeguards
inspector at the IAEA, my con-
cern and complaint is that Iraq
will be able to conduct this pro-
gram under the auspices of the
Non-proliferation Treaty and
while violating the provision of
NPT," Richter wrote.
"The IAEA safeguards are
totally incapable of detecting the
production of plutonium in large-
size material test reactors under
the presently constituted safe-
guards arrangements. Perhaps
the most disturbing implication
of the Iraqi nuclear program is
that the NPT agreement has had
the effect of assisting Iraq in ac-
quiring the nuclear technology
and nuclear material for its pro-
gram by absolving the co-
operating nations of their moral
responsibility by shifting it to the
IAEA.
"THESE cooperating nations
have thwarted concerted in-
ternational criticism of their ac-
tions by pointing to Iraq's sign-
ing of NPT while turning away
from the numerous, obvious and
compelling evidence which leads
to the conclusion that Iraq is em-
barked on a nuclear weapons pro-
gram," Richter charged.
Cranston, the Senate Assistant
Minority Leader, made available
Holocaust Survivors Hear Plea
To Help U.S. Prosecute Nazis
By BARBIE ZELITZER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Allan Ryan Jr., director of the
U.S. Department of Justice's Of-
fice for Special Investigations
(OSI), issued a plea here to Holo-
caust survivors around the world
to help in locating Nazi war
criminals now residing in the
U.S.
"My office has one purpose,"
Ryan told a press conference at
the World Gathering of Holo-
caust Survivors in Jerusalem, "to
seek out, investigate and pros-
ecute those persons who took
part in Nazi persecutions and
who received an American
citizenship which was never
rightfully theirs. Our ultimate
goal is to remove them from the
United States."
Set up three years ago, Ryan's
office is presently investigating
20 cases of such a nature. But
Ryan believes there may be
hundreds more. In that light, he
needs to make contact with as
many survivors as possible. "The
cooperation of survivors can
make the difference between win-
ning and losing a case. The story
must be told to American judges
if we are to prevail," he said.
Ryan attended the World
Gathering to talk with heads of
survivor organizations. He circu-
lated a questionnaire to all
Gathering participants in hopes
that this might broaden his
contacts with Holocaust sur-
vivors from around the world.
The
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to the reporters the IAEA docu-
ments which he said were not
classified.
He said the documents point
out that the IAEA "safeguards
simply are not comprehensive to
do the job." Cranston added that
"The glaring weakness of the
inspection system could have
contributed to Israel's decision
that a preemptive strike was
necessary." He called fo
strengthening the IAEA and it
safeguards.
Walter Stoessel, Jr., Undersec-
retary of State for Political Af-
fairs, conceded that the IAEA
safeguards are not "foolproof
and the United States would like
them strengthened. But, he add-
ed, the U.S. attaches great
importance to the system as it
now exists.
SEN. JOHN GLENN, (D.,
Ohio) said that "Israel took the
law in its own hands" in what he
said was probably the first "vote
of no-confidence" in the in-
ternational inspections system.
He said that the Israeli raid may
finally have awakened public
opinion to the necessity for nu-
clear non-proliferation.
Glenn said he sent a letter to
President Reagan, asking him to
call a meeting of nuclear sup
pliers to begin putting real safe-
guards into effect.
Top Administration officials
attempted to have Richter's
testimoney before the Senate
committee declared as classified.
Continued from Page I-A
mitted to look at the "hot cells" provided by Italy or other
material which he said Iraq could use to make nuclear weapons.
He said Iraq would have been able to make a weapon in about
three years.
RICHTER NOTED that clandestine material can easily be
moved before an inspector arrives from the IAEA heaquarters.
He noted that before an inspector can go to a country, he must
obtain a visa so that none of his trips can be unannounced. In
addition, Richter said that since 1976 only Hungarian and Sov-
iet nationals have been allowed in Iraq as inspectors. He added
that a French national was approved in January, but he has not
made any inspections as yet.
Dr. Herbert Kounts, chairman of the Nuclear Energy
Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New
York, said that even if the inspector could not check other
materials, there were always "tell-tale" signs of nuclear weap-
ons were being built. Kounts also said that if Iraq wanted to
produce nuclear weapons, there were more sophisticated re-
actors than the one France was building for them. Richter said
that Iraq wanted the more advanced reactors but France would
not sell it to them.
Kounts and Dr. Robert Selden of the Los Alamos Labora-
tory in New Mexico, said if the reactor had been operational
when Israel bombed it, the radiation effect would only have
been for about 1,000 yards around the area and Baghdad would
not have been endangered.
PRIME MINISTER MENACHEM Begin had said that
Israel acted when it did because if it waited until the reactor be-
came operational, it would have cost thousands of lives in
Baghdad.
Richter said that while he was with the IAEA, he knew
nothing about the French-Iraqi secret agreement which was re-
vealed this week and which was claimed to be a safeguard
against the development of nuclear weapons in Iraq. Sen. Paul
Sarbanes (D., Md.) asked why France and Iraq had kept it
secret since he noted no one knew about it and thus the agree-
ment could not reassure anyone.
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* *


Friday, June 26, 1981
* Jewish rtcrkJiar
Page 7-A
Mourns Old Mentor
Jewish Friend's Death Left France's Mitterand Bereft
By MICHEL GURFINKIEL
London Chronicle Syndicate
PARIS Less than 24
hours after being elected
President of France,
Mitterrand visited the
grave of Georges Dayan in
the Jewish section of Mont-
pa masse cemetery.
Dayan, who died two
years ago, was the French
Socialist leader's closest
friend and mentor, and
played a discreet but de-
cisive role in shaping his
political career. Mitterrand
was said to have been so
upset after his death that
.3 considered giving up his
political activities.
Born in 1916 in the Western
province of Charente, Mitter-
rand's family was Catholic and
patriotic. He himself is said to
have sympathized with the
Koyalist Action Francaise or-
ganization before the Second
World War, but he steadfastly
denies this.
HE WAS taken prisoner of war
in 1940, but escaped and returned
to France in 1942. Here he imme-
diately joined the Resistance
movement under the name of
"Morland."
Nazi Camp
Commandant
OnTrial
NEW YORK (JTA) Karl
Linnas. a 61-year old Long Island
resident, went on trial in Federal
Court in Westbury for concealing
his activities as commandant of a
Nazi concentration camp when he
^ntered the United Sates in 1951
"and became a citizen in 1960.
The charges, brought by the
U.S. Justice Department which
seeks to revoke Linnas' citizen
ship, accuse him of participating
in the persecution of thousands of
"innocent persons," primarily
Jews, at the Tartu camp in
Estonia in 1941-1943.
There was no gas chamber at
the camp, but many inmates were
executed by firing squad, and
others were tortured, the Justice
Department said. According to a
Department official it was Linnas
who prepared the "death lists"
and selected people who he or-
dered shot.
When he applied for entry into
"the U.S., Linnas misrepresented
his background by claiming to
have been a university student in
Estonia during the war, the
Justice Department charged.
1

V
In 1943, he met a young under-
ground fighter, Danielle Gouze,
whose family were active in
sheltering Jews from persecution.
He married her after the Libera-
tion.
Mitterrand was a junior official
in General de Gaulle's provisory
government, and in 1944 he be-
came leader of a small left-of-
center group, the Socialist Demo-
cratic Union of the Resistance.
He then held several ministerial
offices, including the Ministry of
the Interior.
At that time, he was staunchly
anti-Communist, and he played a
decisive part in the repression of
Algerian nationalists in French
North Africa.
HOWEVER, in 1958, Mitter-
rand switched to the left by op-
posing the establishment of the
Fifth Republic under General de
Gaulle, a regime which he de-
scribed as "authoritarian."
Advocating a strategy of union
for Socialists and Communists,
he became the unchallenged lead-
er of the Opposition after captur-
ing a massive 45 percent of the
votes in the 1965 Presidential
Elections.
In 1971, Mitterrand called for a
new Socialist Party to replace the
SFIO, the Section Francaise de
1, Internationale Ouvriere, which
was in chaos.
By merging with SFIO and
other left-wing groups, the new
Socialist Party quickly emerged
as a strong partner of the Com-
munist Party.
SINCE THEN however, the
so-called Union of the Left has
been anything but unified, being
heavily defeated by Mr. Valery
Giscard d'Estaing, in the 1974
Elections following internal
squabbles.
In 1978, Mitterrand resolved to
stage a new more "national"
strategy and engaged in various
contacts with non-Giscardian
Conservatives, including the
Rassemblement pour la Re-
publique (RPR>, the party led by
Jacques Chirac, the Mayor of
Paris.
At the same time, he strongly
opposed Soviet expansionism in
Afghanistan, and made clear his
support for the Camp David
accords.
A charming, fatherly per-
sonality, Mitterrand entertains
excellent contacts with the press
and also with many writers and
academics.
He has written several books
I on politics, and his latest, lei et
Maintenant, (Here and Now), re-
veals a surprising degree of
understanding for the "religious
commitment" of Mr. Menachem
Begin, the Israeli Prime Minister,
to the land of I srael.
He claims that he himself read
the Bible and believes in God.
U.S.Acts
Against More
Nazi Aides
Continued from Page 1-A
when he applied for a U.S. visa in
Chile in 1960. He is alleged to
have committed acts of per-
secution against civilians because
of race, religion, national origin
or political opinion. His member-
ship in the Latvian political
police constituted assistance to
Nazi Germany, the Justice
Department contends.
ACCORDING to U.S. District
^Attorney Gary Betz in Tampa,
?'la Palciauskas ordered Jews
confined to the Kaunas ghetto
and confiscated their valuables.
'But there is no evidence that he
was directly involved in the ex-
ecutions of 12,000 Jews in the
Latvian capital in October, 1941,
Betz said.
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Page 8-A
* Jewish fkridiain
Friday, June 26, 1981
jiffflli^y&wawara^
U.S. Jewish Leaders
Angered by Our Vote
Leo Minriliii
l ':;;>['
i
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American Jewish leaders
reacted with great anger
over the weekend to the UN
Security Council's resolu-
tion condemning Israel for
its destruction of Iraq's nu-
clear reactor and blasted
the Reagan Administration
for supporting it.
Howard Squadron, chairman
of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, declared: "We are
dismayed that our country
decided to vote in the UN Secur-
ity Council to condem Israel for
taking action to avert the threat
of nuclear holocaust. Although
the U.S. delegation to the United
Nations deserves credit for acting
to insure that the Security Coun-
cil resolution imposes no sanc-
tions on the Jewish state, it is
distressing to find this country
appearing to uphold a claim of
injury by Iraq, a nation that has
persistently proclaimed itself to
be at war with Israel and that has
continuously committed itslef to
the destruction of Israel."
Squadron observed that "We
had been led to expect stronger
resistance to the Arab-Soviet-
Third World majority that has
regulary perverted the peace-
keeping purposes of the Security
Council by using it as a one-sided
forum for attacks on Israel."
RABBI Joseph Sternstein,
president of the American Zionist
Federation, stated: "We are pro-
foundly disappointed and
shocked at the role played by the
United States in the formulation
and ultimate adoption of the
latest Security Council resolution
condemning Israel. It is indeed
disheartening that this Ad-
ministration, which has con-
sistently articulated a positive
attitude toward Israel, could be
party to the writing and passage
of such a one-sided resolution
which maligns one of America's
most loyal and steadfast allies."
Nathan Perlmutter, director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai Brith, called the vote "a
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charade" and "well-intentioned
hypocrisy." He said that while
the United States succeeded in
rendering the resolution '"tooth-
less" this country nevertheless
should not have lent itself to a
moral condemnation of an act of
self-defense." Because Iraq was
clearly moving toward a nuclear
capability aimed at Israel. Perl-
mutter said, the U.S. should have
opposed "even a defanged reso-
lution condemning Israel."
Maynard Wishner. president of
the American Jewish Committee
declared: We deeply regret that
the United States has voted for
the UN resolution condemning
Israels bombing of Iraq's nu-
clear reactor. We believe such a
vote is particularly inappropciate
when our own government has
only just begun its hearings on
whether or not this was a legi-
timate defensive act by Israel.
Nor is it consistent with Presi-
dent Reagan's recognition that
Israel had reason for concern in
view of the past history of Iraq."
JACK SPITZER, president of
B'nai Brith International, called
the UN resolution "incompre-
hensible." Spitzer expressed con-
cern at the failure of the Security
Council to address the problem of
nuclear proliferation in the
Mideast. "The UN has once
again failed to consider the
very real potential for the spread
of nuclear weapons into the
hands of unstable and aggressive
leaders like Saddam Hussein of
Iraq. There is an alarming need
for more effective international
safeguards agains nuclear pro-
liferation which should include an
evaluation of whether a nation's
program is for peaceful energy
purposes," he said.
Alexander Schindler, president
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC) asserted
that the Council's resolution is
unjust and uncalled for." Con-
tending that "Israel's 'crime' was
to eliminate the threat of nuclear
war in the Middle East,
Schindler declared that "The
United Nations is infamous for
its hypocrisy in damning Israel
no matter what it does, while
ignoring the continuing acts of
aggression and violations of hu-
man rights perpetrated by mem-
bers of the Arab-Soviet bloc.
What is new and deeply
distressing, is the spectacle of
America joining Israel's sworn
enemies in condemining our
country's friend and ally,"
Schindler said.
Rabbi William Berkowitz,
president of the Jewish National
Fund, called the American vote
in the UN "deeply disappointing.
Our country will rue the day,
when it embraced the murderous
pro-Soviet regime in Baghdad
and turned its back on the one
free and democratic state in the
Middle East."
RABBI WALTER Wurz-
burger, president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America,
charged that "the present ad-
ministration in Washington,
which promised no double
standards at the United Nations,
has joined the blatant hypocrisy
of UN voices in calling for Israel
to pay reparations for its defense
raid on Iraq." He added that
"there should be payment. The
nations of the world should
refund Israel the cost of the raid
on Iraq which was an heroic
service to the world's quest for
peace."
Ivan Novick, president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
noting that Mrs. Kirkpatrick, in
a television interview, had called
the acceptable resolution, "the
lesser of two evils," asserted that
both options, "sanctions or con-
demnations of Israel, were evil
decisions and both of them
deserved to be rejected outright
by the United States."
Iraq: A World Terrorist Center
Continued from Page 4-A
Palestinian groups and global
Marxist opposition movements.
AFRICAN STATES have
more than once trembled at the
threat of Iraqi-Libyan "libera-
tion" campaigns on their con-
tinent. Look at Chad. Ditto for
the Middle East. Look at Iran.
The fact is that Iraq has long
carried on a policy of terror and
assassination against political
rivals and enemies abroad as a
matter of its self-assumed belli-
gerent right to do so. In this, not
even the Europeans have been
spared. For example, in 1979 and
1980. a number of Iraqi diplo-
mats were arrested and expelled
from Western European capitals
after they were discovered to be
carrying bombs and assassina-
tion orders for Iraqi dissidents.
The plot against the Sudan's
President Numeiri dates from
that time.
Iraq's President Saddam Hus-
sein al-Takriti, in the forefront of
Iraqi strongarm politics since the
Ba'ath Party takeover there in
1968, is affectionately known by
his countrymen as the "Butcher
of Baghdad."
WHEN THE children's home
at Kibbutz Misgav Am was
attacked by the so-called Arab
Liberation Front in 1980, a
terrorist gang operated by the
Ba'ath Party, Al-Thaura. the
party's official publication,
praised the action and said it had
been launched on instructions
from President Hussein himself.
It is Hussein who never gives
up calling for the destruction of
the "Zionist entity" as a
"usurper of the territory of
Palestine" and as a threat to "the
Arab nation's future, sovereignty
and prospects" (Radio Baghdad,
August 20. 1980).
When Iran attempted to bomb
the Osirak reactor in the fall of
1980. Hussein explained that
Iran really had nothing to worry
about on that score in its war
with Iraq; the reactor, he said,
was "not intended to be used
against Iran, but against the
Zionist enemy" (Al-Thaura,
October 4, 1980).
YET THIS is that poor victim
of Zionist aggression that the
Security Council, including a hy-
pocritical Reagan Admin-
istration, raced to condemn
in its anti-Israel resolution
last week. The Third World and
its Western puppets, euphoric in
the joy of their punitive en-
deavor, struck with a demand for
reparations from Israel a
blatant confession that even in
the presumably principled halls
of the United Nations, property
. has greater value than humanity.
For example: It is okay to kill
children at Misgav Am; it is
verboten to kill a nuclear reactor
outside of Baghdad or
anywhere.
Given that Arab, African and
Western states all have their
moments of anguish about Iraq,
what was their rush to defend
Iraq against Israel? The question
becomes all the more complex
reckoned in terms of these ancil-
lary considerations raised by Lois
Gottesman and George E. Gruen,
of the Foreign Affairs Depart-
ment of the American Jewish
Committee:
"Iraq is one of the four coun-
tries indentified by the U.S. State
Department as a supporter of in-
ternational terrorism" the
others being Libya, Syria and
South Yemen .
"Iraq is a Soviet ally and
client, bound by a 20-year treaty
of friendship and cooperation
signed in 1972, and supported by
massive Soviet arms sales and
economic aid .
"Iraq's ambitions to1
dominate the Persian Gulf and:
the Arab world threaten thei
national security of its neigh-
bors."
THERE IS nothing in the his-
tory of the Arab people to show
that they can act with a sense of
geopolitical proportion, and one
should not be surprised by the
paradoxes on which they crucify
their civilizational identity.
But after such hypocrisy at the
United Nations as shown among
the Western nations, after such
teachery against their own best
interests brought on by their pe-
troblindness, is there any
wonder, for example, that the
Russians now threaten with pre-
dictable impunity to move or.
Poland?
::
Begin Voices 'Deep
Regret' U.S. Supported
UN Condemnation
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin announced af-
ter Sunday's Cabinet meet-
ing that the government of
Israel "condemns the
condemnation" by the UN
Security Council of the Une
7 air attack on Iraq's nu-
clear reactor and expressed
"deep regret" that the
United States supported
the resolution unanimously
adopted by the 15-member
Security Council.
"This resolution gives express-
ion to the double morality that
rules the roost in this inter-
national organization," the
Cabinet statement read by Begin
said. The "Iraqi tyranny" built
the reactor in order secretly to
manufacture atomic bombs
which have been dropped "when
the time came" on Israel's popu-
lation centers. Begin stated. "In-
stead of condemning this, the
Security Council has condemned
the state (Israel) that had taken
unavoidable action to protect the
lives of its citizens "
Continuing, the Cabinet
statement said. "With deep re-
gret, we note that the U.S., our
friend and our ally in the
words of the U.S. Ambassador to
the UN lent its hand to this
grievous injustice perpetrated a-
gainst Israel. America even con-
ducted negotiations with Iraq to
formulate an agreed draft."
The statement said that
"Israel ... will continue to defend
its people and will prevent its
enemies from obtaining weapons
of mass destruction aimed a-
gainst it by all the means at its
disposal. This is the supreme
duty of the State of Israel."
Abba Eban, foreign affairs
spokesman of the opposition
Labor Party observed that the
U.S. has supported "the most
injurious" resolution ever adop-
ted by the Security Council a-
gainst Israel. The injury was
tangible and "operative", Eban
said because it required compen-
sation to Iraq and inspection of
Israel's (nuclear) facilities. "It
was not. therefore, a run-of-the-
mill condemnation."
According to Eban, "There is
no justification for this U.S. posi-
tion." He observed that the U.S.
itself had invoked the principle of
deterrent action during the
Cuban missile crisis and had
asserted the right of intervention
across its sovereign borders in
the name of its national defense
"A major effort will be needed to
restore U.S. Israel relations.
Eban said. He added howevei
that the Likud government was
hardly helping by its "exagger-
ated pronouncements about
ostensible unanimity between
Jerusalem and Washington."
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*Jewist Pae 9-A
MM
JNF Newsletter
Published by the Jewish National Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 Phone 538-6464
JNF Means:
Land Redemption
Land Reclamation
Afforestation
Water Projects
JOOBOOBOOOOGI
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
Moe Levin
Chrmn. Exec. Board
So. Region
Abraham Qrunhut
Pros. JNF Gr. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abrnmowit?
Chrmn. JNF
Exec. Board
Ernest Samuel*
/V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
ZevW. Kogan
Pres. JNF So. Region
THE JNF BIKURIM CELEBRATION HONORS ITS OUTSTANDING LEADERS, DONORS.
HONOREES, AND CHAIRMEN OF VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS, CONGREGATIONS
At the Annual Tribute Bikurim Celebration held recently at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel the
Jewish National Fund paid tribute to its outstanding leaders, donors, honorees, and chairmen of
various organizations. Congregations, and Apartment Complexes. In a very imaginative and un-
paralleled ceremony, and as a token of esteem and appreciation all honorees were presented with
art work Statuettes made by the famous and beloved Sculptor, Maurice Bobbin, leader of the
Jewish People: Chaim Weizmann. Golda Meir, David Ben Gurion, Rabbi Akiva.
trom left to right: Augusta Mentz, Chairperson Women for
JNF, and for Morton Towers, former JNF Queen Esther,
David Moskowitz, and Mollie Moskowitz, ardent supporters
of JNF and Mrs. Moskowitz is the reigning Queen Esther,
1981-82, seen here wearing her crown, Julius & Theresa
Levine, Chairman JNF West Ave., Community, veteran
Zionists, and proud parents of Robert Levine, a National
Vice-President JNF of America, and Clara Mazer devoted
JNF worker.
From left to right: Jean & Hy Akop, Jean Akop served as
Queen Esther for 1980-81 season. Victoria Adouth,
reigning JNF Princess, shown wearing her crown, she is the
President of the Sisterhood, Temple Moses, Pearl & Leon
Huda. who have distinguished themselves for years with
unparalleled service to JNF.
I Marcus & Alice Fuchs, Outstanding JNF leaders. Bertha
[Fox, JNF Princess for 1980-81, Florence Flederman, JNF
[Princess for 198081, Lou & Etta Aronson, devoted JNF
leaders and JNF Chairmen Morton Towers.
"4
Morris & Fannie Grauer, devoted JNF leaders, Eric Glaser,
supporter of JNF and former honoree of Morton Towers,
Hilda Grau, ardent JNF supporter, Toby Glassman, devoted
JNF supporter and former Morton Towers honoree.
Keve & Fannie Kessler, Co-Chairmen JNF 100 Lincoln Rd.,
Harry & Belle KrolL former honoreespfMorton Towers, and
Jennie Kleeman devoted and generous JNF leader.
MB 3 BEt JOB
i |
Elsie Nusbaum, honoree of Temple Beth Raphael 1981,
philanthropist and oustanding JNF supporter, Sam & Rose
Pascoe, Co-Chairman JNF 100 Lincoln Rd., Leon Pepler ardent supporters of JNF from early childhood.
\Miriam Press, Distinguished leader JNF of Gr. Miami for
lover 25 years, and its treasurer, Helen Pollock, devoted JNt
header and worker, Birdie Pomper, Champion Tag Day
\Volunteer, Moe & Sadie Reiffen, Chairperson, JNF 100 Lin-
coln Rd., and Sadie Reiffen is the current Secretary JNF.
Sidney & Gussie Tabach, dedicated JNF worker, Doris Skol,
dynamic and generous JNF supporter, George & Lena
Wind, former honoree Temple Beth Raphael, and ardent
JNF supporters, Freida Tobey, former honoree Morton
Towers, and devoted JNF leader, Anne Zuckerman, former
honoree Morton Towers, and devoted JNF leader, Mary
Silip Cohen, devoted JNF leader.
\Frieda Sack, devoted JNF supporter, Leo & Gusti Schimel
\Co-Chairmen JNF West Avenue Community, Igor and Clara
ISc/iuite, outstanding JNF leaders and former honorees of
Kf1^ Beth Raphael, Leon Shuster, JNF Ambassador to
T Cuban Jewish Community who has earned the love and
Tfspect of all
r fJtPtf*^<


Page 10-A
* Jew is* tk rid ton
Friday, June 26, 1981
Assad Gives the Word
He Won't Budge on Lebanon Posture
SJKWft&W^ftSfcWSyswsSW:
W^AWAWiV^^WAWASAVAft^WAW:
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
U.S. special envoy Philip
Habib returned to Israel
late last week after a
several weeks' absence. He
flew in from Damascus, but
neither he nor other Ameri-
can officials would com-
ment on the status of his
mission to defuse the
Israeli-Syrian missile crisis
over Lebanon.
Habib met with Premier
Menachem Begin Friday mor-
ning. But reports in the Syrian
press and speculation among
Israeli observers during the past
few days have been uniformly
negative with respect to Habib's
chances of success. During his
latest visit to the Syrian capital,
all indications were that Presi-
dent Hafez Assad will not
consent to remove the SAM 6
anti-aircraft missiles from Leba-
non that Israel has threatened to
destroy.
VARIOUS comments reported
by the State-controlled Kol Israel
Radio reflected pessimism in
Israeli official quarters. The con-
sensus seemed to be that Habib's
mission is going on endlessly
with no progress in sight. Vir-
tually the same view was expres-
sed in Syria's government-
controlled press this week.
Israeli sources stressed that
Begin would give the American
diplomat all the time he needs to
come up with a peaceful solution
if Habib himself would indicate
that he had reasonable prospects
:;S::*:::::::::::*:::W^
1 Kollek Cites German Envoy 1
8 $
JERUSALEM (JTA) Mayor Teddy Kollek !
awarded the Jerusalem Medal to the outgoing German
Ambassador to Israel, Klaus Schuetz, for his contri-
butions to the development of friendship between West
Germany and Israel. Schuetz spared no effort to deepen
the friendship between the two countries and had de-
veloped special ties with Jerusalem ever since he served as
Mayor of West Berlin, Kollek said.
At the same time, Kollek noted that there was a na-
tional consensus in Israel against the views of West
German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt toward the Palestine
Liberation Organization and his recent remark that
l iermany had a moral obligation to the Palestinian peo-
liut Kollek criticized Vrime Minister Menachem
r recent personal attacks on Schmidt.
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to do so. He has been on his mis-
sion for seven weeks, including a
week in Washington for con-
sultations, and has visited Saudi
Arabia, Lebanon, Syria and
Israel a number of times.
Premier Begin did not intend
to lay down any "ultimatum"
when he said that if Habib's mis-
sion did not make progress,
Israel would resort to other
means to remove the Syrian anti-
aircraft missiles from Lebanon.
This was clarified by Begins
spokesman, Uri Porat, in the
wake of an angry public response
to Begin's remarks by a U.S.
State Department spokesman.
AT AN election rally in
Netanya, Begin had told a large
crowd that he would tell Habib
that if President Assad did not
remove the missiles, Israel would
do so itself. The State Depart-
ment spokesman stressed in an
obvious reaction to this state-
ment that the U.S. would not be
dictated to as to the timetable of
Habib's effort.
Begin's spokesman made it
clear that if Habib felt he was
making progress, the Israeli
Premier would certainly agree to
give him all the time he thought
he needed to bring about a diplo-
matic settlement of the missile
crisis. The spokesman said the
State Department was in error if
it interpreted Begin's words as an
"ultimatum."
Meanwhile. Gen. Yehoshua
Saguy. director of Israel's
military intelligence, said that
the chances were "practically
zero" that Syria would remove its
SAM-6 anti-aircraft missiles from
Lebanon voluntarily or through
macy. Saguy 'old local
at the
rians tun i .ming was
irations.
mii-
arv maneu\ i r- ind :ivil del
xerr.-i :n t think
;a-OUl
war v.-ith Israel I it would be
a low profile
limited confrontation.
SAGUY SAID one ot the main
problems in the region is the in-
stability of the Arab regimes and
their internal quarrels. On the
one hand, this prevented a
common effort on their part. But
it also increased the danger that
they would use the threat of the
"Israeli enemy" to paper over
their differences, he said.
Referring to Israel's air attack
on Iraq's nuclear reactor June 7,
Saguy said the operation had re-
quired "exact and detailed intel-
ligence." But he insisted that
Israel had received no intelli-
gence assistance from the U.S.
Missiles No Threat to UsBegin
JERUSALEM Israel's Prime Minister Menachem
Begin may have yet another solution to the Syrian missile
crisis in Lebanon. Early this week, in his latest volatile
statement, Begin allowed as how Syria's missiles don't
pose a security threat to Israel after all, and that he may
just choose to back off from the confrontation that has
kept the two countries teetering on the brink of war since
mid-May. So far, no word as to whether he's helping spe-
cial U.S. envoy, Philip Habib, pack bis bags for Habib's
second (and final?) flight home.
Meets Khalid
Mitterand Assures Saudis France
Wants to Continue All Assistance
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) President
Francois Mitterrand has assured
Saudi Arabia'8 King Khalid that
his country wants to continue its
cooperation with Riyadh in all
fields, condemned the Israeli
bombing of the Iraqi nuclear re-
actor and pledged to continue
honoring all of France's previous
international commitments.
After a one-hour talk and a
State lunch given in the King's
honor at the Elysee Palace, For-
eign Minister Claude Cheysson
told newsmen, "We consider that
the Palestinians have a sacred
right to live in peace, to express
themselves like all other people
and to have a homeland of then-
own. There is no peace without
the total respect of this right."
HE ADDED. "As regards the
Jerusalem holy places, we con-
sider it is a fundamental issue
which cannot be changed by any
unilateral decision but must be
the subject of an international
agreement reached directly by
those concerned."
After Khalid s meeting with
Mitterrand, the King's brother.
Defense Minister Sultan Abdel
Azziz, said the King "is leaving
highly satisfied with all of Presi-
dent Mitterrand's explanations.
On all issues, whether connected
to European or Arab affairs, our
points of view are similar."
Abdel Azziz said that Mitter-
rand had shown himself in the
course of his meeting with the
Saudis to be "a strong friend of
Israel" but added "he nonethe-
less supported the Palestinians'
right to a homeland" and seemed
to understand that "the question
of Jerusalem is an integral part of
the Saudi Arabian Kingdom's
l*)licy."
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4i


Friday. June 26, 1981
* Jewish rkrMiln
Page 11-A
As Election Day Nears
Labor Faces Gloom at Polls Tuesday
Poll Show Likud Way Ahead
Continued from Page 1-A
trices relatively stable.
the short term, Aridor
lopes, this policy will not only
nake people feel better off, it will
jso have the effect of slowing
nflation.
Labor economists say this is a
fcnical mirage, and that the
Ciblic will have to "pay dearly"
V these relatively few months of
Ipparent well-being.
Hut many voters are skeptical
M the economists, with their
boom anti-doom prognoses. The
Ivailbility of money at the
Eminent, coupled with substan-
price reductions for a large
lumber of consumer commodi-
|it'-, seem much more tangible
el realistic than Labor's
imingly kill joy predictions.
This is particularly the case
knee a number of the taxes
lashed by Aridor have always
emed excessive and even cruel
the eyes of most Israelis, over-
worked and underpaid as they are
comparison with other
lestern consumer societies.
| THE FACT that cars here cost
twice to three times their
ice abroad, and washing
lachines, televisions, ovens and
Bier durables are similarly
ibject to 100 percent purchase
seems indefensible to many
nple here. A finance Minister
> is prepared to ease these
shing burdens is automat-
liy hailed as a man of aim
psion,
I Hut Aridor has not been the
lily reason for Labor's loss of
^pport. Political commentators
agree in assigning a good deal
the blame to the Labor Party
ell because Peres has been
nable to assert sufficient leader-
pip .ind authority to quell in-
Ttial unrest and present a solid
determined face to the
Ktorate,
[Whine Premier Menachem Be-
llas successfully halted the
fckcring and back-biting within
Is Cabinet and his Likud fac-
|on. Peres has failed to turn his
rn 70-30 victory over challenger
alnn into a long-term consolida-
Dii of his leadership. Indeed,
nee the party convention last
Bomber, Peres has had to
(id with an insistent cam-
[ugn on the part of the defeated
abin camp" representation on
the party's policy-making
una.
| SIMILARLY, Peres flopped
Uy in his selection of an
conomic leadership team." His
^st choice for Finance Minister,
nk Hapoalim boss Yaacov
vinson, clashed with the party
lairman over the propective
pwers of the Finance Minister
and eventually refused to
fcept the nomination. Levinson
been depicted by the Labor
opaganda machine as the
onomic wizard who would save
country from bankruptcy:
> his refusal to take up the role
merely embarrassed Peres.
ventually, Peres put together
conomic "leadership team"
ising Tel Aviv University
[lent Prof. Haim Ben-Shahar
listadrut industries czar
Ji Blumenthal. neither of
^well known to the general
policies that Ben-Shahar
Presented seem to many
to foreshadow harsh
Is: A swift and sudden
Aridor's consumer
Most people, granted,
pf Labor's determination
i the countr's economic
ifter years of effective
But "growth" is a
conomic term ihui has
Beet meaning to the
wage earner. Cut-rate
Revisions, on the other
Jhave a very real and direct
>R'S EFFORTS under
Likud Party Accused Of
Frightening Demonstrations
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Likud has substantially
increased its lead over the Labor Alignment according to
the latest public opinion poll published in the Jerusalem
Post Sunday, ten days before the Knesset elections.
THE POLL.conducted.byltheModiin Izrahi company
following Israel's air attack on Iraq's nuclear reactor June
7, found that if the elections were held now, Likud would
win 49 Knesset seats to 37 for Labor. The pollsters con-
cluded that the results seemed to reflect widespread pup-
lic support for the attack for which Likud was credited.
The pollsters noted however that the survey did not cover
the Kibbutz population which is traditionally pro-Labor
or the Arab community which usually divides its vote be-
tween Labor and the Communist Party.
Another significant finding was that some 23 percent
of the voting public was undecided, a larger proportion
than a poll taken several weeks ago. According to the
pollsters, many former Labor supporters have reverted to
the undecided category.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Labor Party leaders have accused
Likud of deliberately inciting
violence at Labor election rallies
to frighten people away
from them. In Petach Tikva, a
mob of youths shouting "Begin
Begin," disrupted a rally for
Labor Party chairman Shimon
Peres, set fire to garbage cans
and hurled rocks through the
windows of the local branch of
Map.nil. Labor's Alignment
partner.
In Ashkelon, a rally for Labor-
ite Abba Eban was the target of
similar rowdyism and the speaker
had to call for police protection.
AT A PRESS conference,
Peres declared that he "no longer
regards the Cabinet as Israel's
government but as the election
campaign headquarters of
Likud." He was referring to a
statement released after a Cabi-
net meeting alleging that Labor
criticism of Israel's air attack on
an Iraqi nuclear reactor June 7.
had encouraged other countries
to condemn Israel.
Peres also accused Begin of in-
spiring the violent outbursts that
have occured with increasing fre-
quency at Labor Party rallies.
"Begin is mistaken if he thinks
he can frighten us, Peres said.
He referred to Likud's tactics as
"Khomeinism" and "personality
cult" and charged that Likud was
'trying to create an atmosphere
wherein if you don t chant
Begin, Begin' you are almost a
subversive element," He charged
.hat anti- Labor rabble rousers
were bussed in by Likud and were
uikI to disrupt Labor meetings.
AT A PRESS conference of his
own later, Begin flately rejected
the charges. Justice Minister
Moshe Nissim who heads Likud's
campaign information head-
quarters said his party "utterly
condemns" violence of any kind.
Nevertheless, Begin issued a
call to all Likud members and
supporters to refrain from violent
disturbance at the election rallies
of all parties.
Peres to achieve a facade of unity
have not been crowned with un-
qualified success. Even the ham-
mering out of the Knesset list
was an occasion for bitter and
embarrassing infighting. Labor's
political apponents must have
been amused to hear on Israel
radio that Abba Eban, slated for
the Foreign Ministry in a Labor
government had threatened to
withdraw altogether if his name
appeared below that of Rabin on
the Labor list.
In the event, Peres elevated a
hitherto little-known Knesset
member, Sh.oshana Arbeli
Almoslmo. to the number two
spot on the list. She displayed
three advantages: she is a
woman, a Sephardi, and a hawk.
Pollsters have found that the
pervading trend among the
majority of the public is towards
hawkishness on foreign policy.
Such Labor doves as Yossi
Sarid and Micha Harish often
find themselves the objects of
bitter attacks on the hustings.
With Eban and Haim Barlev
(another dovel slated as foreign
and defense ministers, respec-
tively, Peres plainly wanted a
hawkish figure like Mrs. Arbeli
among the "top five" to ward off
distrust of Labor from the
growing hawkish wing of public
opinion.
But this very gambit, in the
opinion of some political ob-
servers here, seemed to under-
score the flimsiness of the policy
"consensus" within Labor, a
"consensus" that in effect
stretches from "Greater Israel"
sentiments to the ultra-doves of
Labor and Mapam who favor
near-total withdrawal and
Palestinian political rights.
THIS IS A DILEMMA which
Labor has faced in every election
campaign since the Six-Day War.
Under Golda Meir the party was
always able to strike a delicate
balance between hawks and
doves. Now, especially in the
wake of Likud's success as the
peacemaker in Egypt, that task
has become tougher.
In the remaining days until
election day the Labor Alignment
is expected to pour millions of
Shekels Into its campaign. The
part}- seems particularly well
endowed for this campaign. A
group called "Alef" (Hebrew
a ronyra for "Citizens for Peres")
publicaly returning, duly con-
trite, to the Labor fold.
Labor has been especially
unfortunate in the refusal of its
prospective Arab peacemaking
partner, King Hussein of Jordan,
to so much as hint that he would
indeed be prepared to negotiate
with a Labor government over
the future of the West Bank.
WHILE LABOR Party leaders
claim repeatedly that they know
from private contacts with Jor-
danian and other Arab leaders
for example, Morocco's King
Hassan that there is real hope
for "the Jordanian option,"
Hussein himself, and his brother,
Crown Prince Hassan, miss no
public opportunity to mock at
and ridicule that "option."
Labor Confab Elects Israeli
Despite Campaign by Arabs
GENEVA (JTA) Gideon
Ben Israel, the Histadrut dele-
gate to the International Labor
Conference here, has been re-
elected to the governning body of
the organization for another four-
year term.
The election is considered an
important victory for Israel as
the Arabs made all possible ef-
forts to have the Lebanese dele-
gate elected in place of Ben Is-
rael. In the event, Ben Israel won
68 of 129 voted demonstrating
Histadrut's popularity in the or-
ganization and Ben Israel's good
contacts.
This year, the Arabs did not
present an anti-Israel resolution
at the conference, as they have
done previously. This year, their
main preoccupation and lobbying
Iwas aimed at having Ben Israel
ousted from the governing body.
It was noted that even the Israeli
attack against the Iraqi nuclear
reactor did not hamper the
election of the Histadrut
delegate.
Officially, the African Unity
Movement gave instructions to
vote for the Lebanese candidate
but, as the ballot was secret, the
Africans voted for Ben Israel as
.lid some Moslem countries.
.ias lpoarently succeeded in
abroad, v.
g (1 under Israel's pob.
finarteir .jluus.
Labor has already inserted
millions of Shekels worth of full
page ads in the daily newspapers,
many of them featuring men and
women who strayed off to the
Democratic Movement for
re in 1977 and are now
My Son,
The Knight!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
parts of the world can a Jewish parent proudly proclaim. "Meet my son, THE
KNIGHT!"
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), ana the only Jewish
pipe-band In the entire world! :
(v c v Scotland's mosi famous product is scotch whisky.
Vmeric I ivoritesc "ch is 'OkB. \Xfe .\ select thefin-
cches I blend then smoothness and subi ["he
is why w i ay that J&B v. hispers.
Incidentally, you don't have to wait untilv our son becomes
a Knight or vour daughtei Da leinordertoe |&B Any
'simcha' will -'
86 Proot Blended Scotch Whisky. 01980 The Paddington Corp., NY
J&B. It whispers.
on Corn. NY *-


Page 12-A
*Jenisti Hcridiaii
Friday, June 26,I9gi
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Israel's Religious Party in Disarray:
Abu Defection Leaves Forces in Tatters
\ 1 J I 1 1 !4n I I. ..i .-----*-*--------_____- ...
By DAVID LANDAU
JKRUSALEM (JTA)
fcver in the history of Israel has
National Religious Party
['I gone into the final stages
i an election campaign looking
(lite so ragged and sorry for it-
lf.
Through nine campaigns and
_ne Knessets. the NRP has been
(bedrock of stability on the Is-
|e!i political scene. It always
lulled in the region of 9 10 per-
Igni of the votes. It almost
|ilw;iys participated in the
joverning coalition of the day
*fore 1977 under the leadership
[ Labor, and during the last four
tears under that of Menachem
|legin's Likud.
Indeed, only a few weeks ago it
Itemed that the picture would re-
itself once more on June 30.
pundits predicted that if there
Ins any change in NRP*s pros-
Ijeci s it would be a change for the
letter. NRP key men waxed
bper-optimistic during the early
lnonths of this year, predicting
I they could add two or even
three Knesset seats to their 1977
|*'0I v of 12.
NOW EVERYTHING has
Ichanged. The party is in tatters
Ibllowing the dramatic defection
|:i Religious Affairs Minister
lUiaron Abu Hatzeira who
llounded a separate religious
Iptrty, "Tami'* (Tenua Lemas-
Inret Ysrael Movement for the
|Tradition of Israel).
Tami is openly and unabashed-
ly "ethnic." Abu Hatzeira cites
is his reason for creating the new
party the refusal of the "ethnic
Ashkenazi" leadership of the
,VRP to allocate more than two of
the first dozen spots on the NRP
list to Sephardim. This, Abu
Hatzeira noted, was "a retro-
gression" compared to 1977, and
lir below the level of rep-
resentation to which the party's
Sephardi membership felt them-
selves entitled.
Very probably the motives and
circumstances behind the estab-
lishment of Tami are far deeper
than that. According to rumors
circulating in political circles, an
ethnic" list of this nature had
been mulled over by Sephardi
politicians from a number of
parties for many months and
even years.
THE ROLE of millionarie
Geneva financier and president of
the World Sephardi Federation,
Nissim Gaon, in backing or
perhaps pushing for the
creation of an "ethnic" party is
not yet fully known either. Abu
Hatzeira, naturally, sought in his
public interviews to play down
Gaon's involvement.
But the question that NRP
leaders must now contend with is
not why Tami was founded but
how much damage it will do the
parent party. The answers im-
plied in experts' predictions can-
not offer much consolation to
veteran NRP leader Yosef Burg
and his heir-apparent, Zevulun
Hammer.
Abu Hatzeira himself main-
tains that 75 percent of the card-
carrying members of NRP are
Sephardim and thus potential
voters for Tami. Possibly that is
>n overstatement. But any ob-
jective analysis would conclude
fnat the majority of NRP voUjr*
> recent elections have been
Sephardim.
AT THIS TIME, no opinion
Polls have been conducted on
rami's vote-pulling potential.
But politicians and pundits pre-
dict a handsome four-to-seven
seats for the new party.
Most of those votes would
come from the NRP, with fewer
rom Likud and even less from
. Ubor. For those two major blocs
he blow would be bearable; for
th* NRP it might well spell the
"id of its enviable balance of
Pwer between the tv- main
parties.
Put in other terms, Tami's suc-
cess at the polls might rob the
NRP of its hitherto unthreatened
ability to form a government
with either of the two big blocs or
to thwart the formation of a
government if it chose to do so.
This ability would have been par-
ticularly potent in the next Knes-
set if the pollsters are right and
the gap between Likud and Labor
is only a few seats.
Taking his analysis a step
further, it can be understood why
Labor Party leaders privately
Continued on Page 2-B
Jewish Christians
Fulfilled Jews?
By RABBI MARK KRAM
Executive Director
Hillel Foundation
University of Miami
In recent years, we have heard
a new phrase, "fulfilled Jew,"
which according to Christian
missionaries is a Jew who has
accepted Jesus as the Messiah-
Lord. That is to say, a Jew who
accepts Jesus as a Messiah-Lord
is no different from a believing
Christian. Those engaged in the
practice of trying to bring Jews
across this bridge into Christian-
ity seem to think that if they use
the phrase, "fulfilled Jew," Jews
might be the more willing to take
this step. But the overwhelming
majority of Jews have under-
stood this approach to be no more
than another variety of conver-
sion approach.
Recently, a lovely Catholic girl,
about to marry a Jew, wondered
why I could not share in the mar-
riage ceremony with a priest.
"After all," she said, "my priest
says that we Catholics have in-
corporated Judaism into Cath-
olicism, and we have merely ex-
tended upon it." The young lady
continued, "Why can't I say,
K'dat moshe v'yisrael, according
to the religion of Moses and
Israel," in good faith under a
Jewish marriage canopy, and
why can't you accept the fact
that I am perfectly capable of
accepting Judaism, even though
I am a believing Catholic?"
RABBIS ARE hearing more
and more of this kind of talk from
young people in love. Christians
are merely Jews who believe in
Jesus as Messiah-Lord; why
aren't they then considered
Jews? Even more disconcerting is
the fact that many young Jews
see no clear-cut difference be-
tween themselves as Jews and
others who believe in different
faiths. "After all," the reasoning
goes, "we all believe in the same
God."
It is interesting to live at a
time when differences among
religious faiths suddenly pale
into insignificance. At one time,
the Church, as in Fifteenth
Century Spain, killed Jews who
could not surrender their
distinctive religion. Now we are
being told by some, like our own
children, there really is only a
meaningless difference among
religions.
I am one of those who believe
that God loves all humans, even
atheists, and that we will all go to
heaven (or none of us will), but as
a student or religion, I could
never bring myself to agree that
all religions are the same. To be
sure, Christianity incorporates
some of Judaism, but not all of it,
for if Christianity incorporated
what was most significant in
Judaism, it would teach (which it
cannot) that no man could
become God, that we are born
pure (not in original sin), that the
sacrifice of one person (like
Jesus) could not "save" us.
JEWS SPEAK of this-worldly
salvation; Christians speak of
other-worldly salvation. Indeed,
as a Reform Jew, I cannot believe
in the existence of Hell, nor could
I believe in a God who would
punish us after death. Judaism
and Christianity may speak to
the same God, but that God says
different things to the teachers
and faithful of each of these
religions.
The official position of the
Catholic Church today (based on
Vatican Two) is much nearer the
reality of things. Judaism and
Christianity do not constitute the
same brit or covenant with God.
There is no way of merging the
two. Yet, each of them has its
own validity. The most informed
scholars in these separate and
distinct faiths are those who
insist most firmly on the impor-
tant differences between the
faiths. We can respect one
another and work with one
another in solving the many
human problems in our modern
society, but let us not say,
"There really is no difference, and
whatever difference there is, it is
not significant." For those who
really believe what their religion
teaches, the difference is worth
committing their life to it.
Ruth Shack Elected
JCC Centers President
Commissioner Ruth Shack has
been elected the new president of
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida at the Annual
Meeting of the Central Board of
the agency held on June 17. The
North Miami resident and Metro
Commissioner succeeds Muriel
Russell who completed her fourth
term as president of the JCC's.
The vice-presidents selected at
the meeting were Stanley R. Gil-
bert, Steven J. Kravitz, Joel I.
Levy, Gerald K. Schwartz, and
Morton Silberman. Marc Hauser
. was elected secretary, and Neal J.
Menachem, treasurer.
Board members chosen include
Michael Adler, Emanuel Berlat-
sky, Roslyn Berrin, Norman
Broad, Timothy Cohen, Abe
Feinbloom, Hope Fuller, Jerome
Gevirman, Allan Gluckstern, and
Lydia Goldring.
Stanley Greenstein, Barry
Gurland, Charlotte Held. Robert
Lefcort, Frances Levey. Edward
Lustig, Allan Margolis. and
David Nevel were elected to the
board along with Aaron Pod
hurst, Donald Reiff David
Rosenbaum. Muriel Russell,
Steven Schwarberg. Lawrence
Schantz, Harry Smith, and Eric
I'uretsky.
Highlights of the annual meet-
ing included a special tribute to
Muriel Russell for her dedication
to the development of the Jewish
Community Center system in the
Miami area, and the signing of a
lease agreement between JCC's
and the new Jewish High School
of South Florida which will begin
classes this coming fall at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC in No.
Miami Beach.
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida has three branches
in Dade County serving North
Dade. Miami Beach, and South
Dade. Each branch selects its lay
leadership, and the Central
Board, which is responsible for
the overall agency, is chosen by
the entire membership. Together,
the branch centers provice rec-
reational, cultural, educational,
and social services to more than
22.000 individuals in South Flor-
ida.
South Dade: Michael Adler.
Roslyn Berrin. Marc Hauser,
Robert Lefcort, Frances Levey.
Joel Levy. Neal Menachem,
David Rosenbaum.
North Miami Beach: Emanuel
Continued on Page 10-B
1
Norma Ederer, director of Human Resources at Mount Sinai,
presents plaque to Rabbi Stahl at a party in his honor.
Rabbi Alex Stahl Retires
As Mount Sinai's Rabbi
"We're going home,"
said Frida Stahl when
asked what she and her
husband, Alex, plan to do
following his retirement as
Mashgiach of Mount Sinai
Medical Center of Miami
Beach. This meaning of
"going home" may very,
well be different from that
of the average retiring
Miami Beach couple who
look forward to shuffle-
board tournaments and
Mah-Jong, "early-bird"
dinners, and visits with
grandchildren.
Instead, Rabbi and Mrs. Stahl,
who have no children, will soon
be leaving their 4182 Chase Ave.
address, and moving to Natanya,
Israel, just north of Tel Aviv.
"We have visited the Holy
Land eight times," Mrs. Stahl
explains in broken English as a
smile appears on her face, "and
we have always intended to move
there when Alex retired." Now,
after three years of planning, the
couple will finally be putting
their plans into action.
RABBI STAHL studied at the
Yeshiva in Czechoslovakia for 22
years. During World War II, he
spent four years in a concentra-
tion camp where he lost his first
wife and their seven children. He
and his wife Frida, met in line
while applying for their visas in
Prague.
The Stahls moved to Miami in
1948, where Alex began working
with his brother as a kosher but-
cher. After owning and operating
a poultry market, Rabbi Stahl
heard about Rabbi Max Shapiro,
the ailing Mashgiach at Mount
Sinai, and began to help the sick
Rabbi in his work. In 1965, soon
after he began his part-time work
at Mount Sinai in one of South
Florida's only hospital kosher
kitchens, he was asked to join the
staff as a full time employee in
the position of head Mashgiach,
rabbi of the Dietary Laws.
During his 12 years at the hospi-
tal, he reported to work every day
(except Saturdays) at 7:30 a.m.,
after praying in the temple for a
half-hour, and left the hospital at
1 p.m., to study the Talmud for
the remainder of the afternoon.
BESIDES performing the
duties of seeing to it that the food
served through the kosher kit-
chen at Mount Sinai meets Jew-
ish Dietary Laws, and also cut-
ting the meat, Rabbi Stahl some-
times was called in to recite a
prayer for a sick patient, or one
who had passed away.
At a retirement party for
Rabbi Stahl given by the Dietary
department of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, the Rabbi, with
Yarmulke neatly placed on his
silvery grey hair, thanked every-
one "for being so kind" during
the years employed here. Tears
filled the corners of his eyes, and
it became more and more difficult
for him to speak to the crowd of
30 co-workers there in his honor.
He recalled several experiences
which brought chuckles to all
who shared in the memory. Mrs.
Stahl sat quietly across from her
husband, listening seriously, and
catching the tears which seemed
to race down her face. But this
was not an occasion for sadness.
The elderly couple were finally
getting their chance to fulfill a
dream that was born three years
ago and nurtured to this date.
THE STAHLS began life at
their new address in Israel by
celebrating Alex's 75th birthday
on June 21. And, as soon as they
are settled, Mrs. Stahl will begin
a routine of working for charities,
a job she enjoyed in Miami as
well. Rabbi Stahl, on the other
hand, will travel to the syna-
gogue every day to study the
Talmud, all day.
In acceptance of a plaque to
him by Mount Sinai in appreci-
ation for his services, Rabbi Stahl
thanked "each and everyone for
their encouragement," and
wished them "good health and
many blessings throughout the
rest of life." Both Rabbi and Mrs.
Stahl would like someday to re-
turn to Miami for vacation.
Lipoff Chairs Tel Aviv Region
Jack L. Cummings, President
of the American Friends of Tel
Aviv University announced the
election of Norman H. Lipoff,
Miami attorney, as chairman of
the Southeast Regional Board of
Directors.
Upon making the announce-
ment, Mr. Cummings noted Mr.
Lipoff's many years of service to
the Miami Jewish community,
particularly pointing to his
activities with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation where
he now serves as Vice President
and a member of the Board of
Directors. He also has served
F'ederation as Campaign Chair-
man. Chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Committee and
Chairman of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
In the Council of Jewish Fed-
Norman H. Lipoff
erations. Mr. Lipoff is presently
National Chairman of the
Endowment Fund Development
Committee.
^Jewish Floridian
SECTION B
Miami. Florida Friday, June 26, 1981


Page 2-B
* Jewish HuridUan
Friday, June 26,


Dr. Abdel Meguid (right), Deputy Prime Minister for Economics and Finance of the Arab 8
5: Republic of Egypt, is being congratulated by Prof. Michael Sela (left), president of Israel's %.
S Weizmann Institute of Science, and Morris L. Levinson, board chairman of the American'-*
g Committee for the Weismann Institute, following his address to its International Leadership^
Conference in Los Angeles. |
Headlines
Homage To Weizmann Institute
:: Paying homage to Israel's Weizmann Institute B
g: of Science and "the great land that produced it," ::
:: Dr. Abdel Meguid, the Arab Republic of Egypt's B
:: Deputy Prime Minister for Economics and ::
:: Finance, has forecast a fruitful era of scientific ::
:j:| and economic cooperation between his country S
': and the Jewish State. ::
:|:j Dr. Meguid, popularly described as the S
"economic czar" of Egypt, told 400 guests at- :
& tending the three-day International Weizmann Eg
:: Leadership Conference in Los Angeles: "We look Cv
x at the Weizmann Institute of Science with great |*r
% pride, we cherish it, we love it, we consider it a *:
g center of excellence for the entire M iddle East.'' %
:: No changes of administration in Israel or new ::
:: tensions in other Arab countries could change the :
:|:j relationship between the Jewish State and Egypt, :*
g: Dr. Meguid, noted Middle East economist and -S
:: regional planner, emphasized. ::
:: The American Jewish Congress has urged the !
:: U.S. Senate to reject a sweeping anti-abortion :
:: bill, arguing that "the proper role of government j
5 in a free society is to allow the different religious :
:: traditions to inculcate their own beliefs about the :
:: appropriateness of abortion and to leave the final '
6 decision to the woman, answering to God and *:
:: conscience."
:: In testimony before the Senate Judiciary Sub- :!
:: committee on the Separation of Powers, Henry %
g Siegman, executive director of the American S
:: Jewish Congress, stated that "this legislation ::
j:j: takes sides not between a moral and a permissive $
:: approach, but between two conflicting ap
:: proaches that are equally grounded in profound ::
: religious conviction and in a desire to enhance the ::
:: sacredness and dignity of life." ::
Siegman told the panel that AJ Congress also *":'
opposes the bill because "it usurps the role of the ::
Supreme Court as the final arbiter of the Consti- ::
tution" and because it is "a direct assault on the ::
constitutional liberties of all Americans." ::::
concepts and stereotypes acquired from the
family, the church and the street," Prof, j
Frederick Schweitzer, chairman of the Manhattan j
College History Department, told a conference of i
the nation's leading textbook publishers.
The conference, jointly sponsored by the Anti- j
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith and the Asso-:
ciation of American Publishers, was held in New ;
York on the theme of the image of the Jews in
textbooks.
In his paper. Schweitzer urged representatives
of publishing firms to strive to rectify this situa- j
tion because "it inures students to inhumanity, :
fortifies their stereotypes and supports their
indifference. :
Vff&^^f^ifiSf^fSSftti((S((&&i^^^SffiSS&
::
::
Rabbi Henry I. Sobel, of Brazil, speaking to x
members of the Zionist Organization of America :*
in New York, expressed a personal point of view jH
that Jacobo Timerman "deserves all the publicity ::
because he suffered, but the obsession of South :*
American military juntas is not with Jews, but ::
with Communists. They don't want Communists x:
to rule their countries." ::
"His ordeal was not caused by his being a Jew; ::
paradoxically, his survival was," said Rabbi
Sobel who was on a lecture toor to ZOA District
throughout the country. "The army in Argentina
did not want the label of anti-Semitism on its
shameful record of human rights."
Timerman, editor and publisher of the liberal
newspaper La Opinion, was kidnapped by
Argentine security forces in 1977 and held B
without charges until his expulsion from Argen- jx
tina in 1979. g
The neglect of Jewish history in American high
school and college textbooks helps foster anti-
Semitism, according to a noted Catholic scholar.
"Students fill in the gaps with anti-Semitic
The chairman of the Democratic National Com- g
; mittee has termed the apparent decision of the ::
! Reagan Administration not to fill the post of As- B
: sistant Secretary of State for Human Rights
"petulant" and "unseemly," and said such adeci- ::
j sion would send out the "worst possible signal to ::
: friends and allies about how U.S. foreign policy is ::
made." ::
Charles T. Manatt, speaking before a meeting ::
of Los Angeles political writers and correspon- $
dents, responded to suggestions by top White ::
, House officials and recent newspaper columns S
i indicating the White House would consider j:|:
:| abolishing the post and not nominating a ::
replacement for rejected nominee Ernest W. ?
Lefever. ::
"While it is understandable that the President 8
is disappointed at the rejection of his nominee by ::
the Senate, it would demean the Office of the S
President to refuse to fill the position of Assistant x
Secretary of State for Human Rights out of presi- ::
dential pique," Manatt said.
Irving Mitchell Felt, national chairman of the ::
Executive Board of the National Conference of ::
Christians and Jews, was elected honorary presi- in-
dent of the International Council of Christians inl-
and Jews at an annual meeting in Heppenheim, ::
West Germany. B
Felt, who is chairman of the board of Madison :?
Square Garden Corporation, was elected by over 5
100 delegates from the 16 countries which ::
comprise the ICCJ.
S
Prof. Yehoshua Beh-Arieh has been elected
dean of the Faculty of Humanities at the Hebrew ..
University of Jerusalem for a three-year term. He |f
succeeds Prof. Nehemia Levtzion.
The new dean is a professor of geography, spe- {:
cializing in the cultural and historical geography R
of Israel. He was born in Petach Tikvah in 1928&:
and is a graduate of the Hebrew University.
Prof. Ben-Arieh was chairman of the Depart
ment of Geography for many years and also.:-;
served as head of the Institute of History, :
Geography and Regional Studies in the Faculty
of Humanities. |
He won the Ben Zvi Prize in 1971 for his book ::
on the rediscovery of the Holy Land.
K
Israel's Religious Part1
Continued from Page 1 II
welcomed the creation of Tami.
The NRP, which has become in-
creasingly rightist in religious
and foreign policy over recent
years, had virtually declared its
preference for Likud over Labor.
Its leaders especially Hammer
and Gush Emunim leader Rabbi
Ilaim Druckman have made it
clear that their party, given the
choice, would prefer to cooperate
in a Begin coalition rather than
with Labor's Shimon Peres.
THE RISE OF Tami could
mean that the NRP will not be
given that choice. While Abu
Hatzeira himself has said Tami
would team up with either of the
two main parties, his number two
man on the Tami list, Aharon
Uzan, a former Laborite, has
made clear his own preference for
Labor.
"I remain a Mapainik at
heart," says Uzan, a Moshav
leader who served as Minister of
Agriculture in Labor's last
government. There is a distinct
ieeling too that Abu Hatzeira's
resentment over his treatment by
his Cabinet colleague iring the
drawn-out legal prot against
him (he was acquitted on bribary
charges after a marathon trial!
extends not only to Burg of his
own party, but to other members
of the present Likud-led coalition.
The defection of Abu Hatzeira,
and with him Moroccan-born
Benzion Rubin of Burg's
' Lamifne" faction in the NPP.
was the latest but by far the
worst of a series of blows that
have rocked the party over recent
years. The crisis began, it is fair
to say, with the toppling of the
man who many telt was Nttr-s
ablest leader, Dr. Yitzhak Rafael
(Minister of Religions 1974-77|.
This was engineered by a plot led |
by Hammer and Yehuda Ben-
Meir, the chiefs of the "young I
guard" faction in the party, and
Abu Hatzeira, who was Rafael's
deputy in the Likud "Utemura' |
faction.
THE PLOTTERS made ,
clear that they felt themselves to
be the rising force within NRP
and that, sooner or later, they
would move to displace Burg
himself.
But the creation of the anti-
Begin. anti-peace Tehiya faction
by Herut breakaways Geulal
Cohen and Mose Shamir stirred
cold winds of dissent from the far)
right. The young Bnei Akiva in-
doctrinated, skullcap wearing]
settlers on the West Bank andl
their supporters swung toward I
the new group whose ultra]
nationalism complimented theirj
dreams of restoring Biblical!
Israel. The NRP's "youngj
guard" leaders in contrast,)
appeared tainted by their support f
of the Camp David autonomy [
plan and the peace treaty with)
Egypt.
Accordingly, Hammer andl
Ben-Meir were forced to appease!
the NRP's right-wing, led by[
Druckman, by placing anotherI
Gush F.munim activist. Meir I
Har-Noi. in the 11th spot on the I
party's 1981 election list. This
conflicted with Abu Hatzeira's I
demand for "safe" spots for his
own faction within the party. It
also reduced the NRP's chances |
of attracting support from non-
Orthodox voters, by which ii
hoped to broaden its base.
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Friday, June 26, 1981
*Jewishncrk/itr
Page 3-B
Campaigners Recognition Dag
Over 300 participants in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1981 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund were feted at
Campaigners Recognition Day held on June 10
at the Carillon Hotel.
Every GMJF campaigner who covered at
least 5, 10 or 20 pledge cards on behalf of the
1981 CJA-IEF received an award and was the
guest of the Federation at the coctail reception,
dinner and awards presentation.
Among the GMJF leadership present were (left to right):
Edmund Abramson, member of GMJF Board of Di-
rectors; Marilyn K. Smith, GMJF officer and chairman of
Big Gifts Division; and Harry B. Smith, a past president
and member of the GMJF Board of Directors.
On hand were (left to right): Kenneth Schwartz, Worker
Recruitment and Recognition Committee chairman; Irma
Braman, chairman. Women's Division Benefactor
catergory; Larry Schantz, vice chairman, Attorney's
Division; and Elaine Bloom, member of GMJF Board of
Directors.
Pictured are (left to right): Aaron Podhurst, chiarman,
Pacesetter Division and member of GMJF Board of Di-
rectors; Paula Friedland, co-chairman. Women's Division
Pacesetter Trustee category; and Joel Friedland.
Golden Rose Deli &
Sub Shops
7397SW40thCt. g
Miami _,
Catering For All Occasions
catering rw office Parties
Luncheons ^
Weddings Birthdays
Parties ..
Kosher Foods Available
"Weekly Specials"
Samuel S. Smith will take
office on Saturday as presi-
dent of the Florida Bar,
during the Bar's 31st Annual
Convention at Innisbrook.
Smith is a partner in the
Miami Beach law firm of
Smith and Mandler, P.A.
A plaque was presented to
Murray Rosenthal (right),
vice president and branch
manager of the Washington
Savings Bay Harbor office,
located at 1132 Kane Con-
course, by Herbert Schneider,
president of Surf-Bal-Bay
Lions Club, for its continuing
community service efforts.
Jewish Worship Hour
Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr of
Temple Kol Ami, Plantation, will
appear on "The Jewish Worship
Hour" on Channel 10 on Sunday,
June 28, at 8 a.m.
Full Scholarships For
College Study In Israel
American Jewish students can receive full scholarships
enabling them to study for academic degrees in most of Israel's
universities, yeshivas, teachers colleges and art, music and tech-
nical institutes, it was announced by the Israel Aliyah Center.
According to Joshua Shomer, Aliyah Center Shaliach in
Miami, the plan, which has been renewed this year, has assumed
increased importance because of the steep rise in the cost of
higher education in the United States and the dangerous trend
towards assimilation and intermarriage of Jewish students on
American campuses.
"Thousands of American students have gone to Israel for
"Junior Year Programs," said Shomer, "But only a few hundred
are studying for a degree and receiving the scholarships for the
full three or four years. Most students and their parents just
haven't heard about the program."
Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology in Haifa, Tel-Aviv University, Bar-Ilan University,
Weizman Institute of Science, Haifa University, Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev, the Rubin Academy of Music, Betzalel
\rt Academy are among the many fully accredited universities
.ind colleges where qualified American Jewish students can
benefit from the scholarship plan.
Free tuition, free dormitory housing or aparment rental subsi-
dies; stipends for food, transportation, books, and entertain-
ment; and loan assistance for the plane flight to Israel are the
key elements of aid offered.
"In America parents often pay $10,000 a year to send each son
or daughter to college, or instead accept federal loans which
must be repaid for years afterwards," Joshua noted, "But Israel
is offering an education of equal or higher quality for almost no
cost to the student."
The Israel Student Authority, a joint body of the Jewish
Agency and the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption, operates
the scholarship program with funds contributed by world Jewry
through the United Jewish Appeal.
"The program is offered to Jewish students with the studies
expectation that many of them after three or four years of
study in Israel will choose to remain and settle permanently
in the Jewish homeland," Joshua stressed.
"Israel and world Jewry are prepared to subsidize free college
education for Jewish students because it's important that our
youth have the chance to spend several years studying in Israel
and even more important that they adapt to Israeli life and
decide to make Aliyah," said Joshua.
The scholarship is available for bachelor's, master's or doc-
toral studies. Since Israel university studies are conducted in
Hebrew, most prospective undergraduate students from the
U.S. and Canada enroll in a one year, fully subsidized pre-
academic course in Hebrew to bring their language ability up to
the required level. This too, is fully subsidized.
Further information on these scholarship programs are avail-
able at Israel Aliyah Center in Miami.
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Page 4 B
+Jewish /fcricJUr
Friday.J
une 26. is
Cedars Luncheon Honors Volunteers
At the recent Bikunm celebration of the Jewish National Fund,
Rabbi Dr. Yehuda Melber, spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Raphael, is shown presenting Maurice Bobbin, sculptor, with a
Bible as a token of the "love and esteem oftheJNF. "
Thirteen men and women were
specially honored during Cedars
of Lebanon Health Care Center's
Annual Volunteer Awards
Luncheon. A total number of
160,000 hours of services has
been accumulated by the Volun-
teers.
The Volunteer of the Year
Award went to Lee Rubin who
serves as a buyer in the Cedar
Chest, (the Cedars' gift shop).
She has also been a dedicated
Auxilian for 21 years.
Auxiliary At
Breakfast Meeting
The next regular meeting of
the Abe HomwiU Auxiliary 682.
Jewish War Veterans, will be
held Sunday morning. June 28 at
9:30 a.m.. at NE 160 St.. and 19
Place. North Miami Beach
Breakfast will be served
Edith Rose. Milton Lieberman
and Joaquin Riesgo were re-
cipients of the New Volunteer
Achiever Award. This Award
gives recognition to those in-
dividuals who demonstrated
exemplary rerformance and
effort as new Volunteers.
Seven individuals were
honored for contributions for the
management of Cedars' Volun-
teer Program They were: Cecile
Parker. Patient Library; Cherie
Fox. Geriatric Services; Gwenn
Myerson. Information Services;
Libbv Werner. Information Serv-
ices; Loy Ahem. Cedar Chest
Dorothy Sagman. Cedar
and Eve Zinner. Departmental
Services
Ida Lichlman received the Vol-
unteer Recruiter of the Year
Award. Lichlman has been a Vol-
unteer at Cedars for three veers
and serves in Geriatric Services
She began her volunteer work at
Cedars with her late hushand.
and as a team recruited <
volunteers to the Health Care
Center This past year she con-
tinued to bring new rohintaan [0
Cedars
President Man. Wexler will
report on the Department of
Florida Auxiliary Convention
The regular Auxiliary 682 execu
Employment Aid For Senior Citzens iuJ^tT^^^ifvS
home.
Senior Citizens 55 years and ui
are interested m employment cat
call The Senior Aides Program oi
Dade County for application anc
job counselling.
The three offices located at
1407 N.W 7th St.. 642-9630; 163
St- Pan American Bank Bldg.
944-4667; and 833-6th St.. Miami
Beach. 672-8300 are now ac-
cepting applications for a number
of jobs openings in clerical,
typing, companion, security, and
factory work.
Anyone wishing to apply for
High School
Students Return
Among students returning
from High School in Israel are
Cynthia Arndt. Sheryl Safer
stein. Hrenda Saul and Sharon
Klutz, students of Sunset High
School; Robert Herbstman. Mi-
chael Indgin and David Schoc
kett, students of Palmetto High
School. Julie Zwelling. Adam
Barrett. Jerold Horenstein. Elisa
Baum. Lynn Gordon. Barbara
1-andsman. David Brenner. Mi-
chael Cohen. Mitchell Foreman
and Steven Hacker, students ol
Killian High School
Students from North Miami
Beech High School were Cind
Martin. Gene Sherman. Samue.
Curtis, Handy Kritchman. Scott
KrviLzer. Michael Kurzman.
Handy Lynne. Norman Rich
nxind. Michael Weinberg. Karen
Lmn Krutchik
and Man Rosenberg.
Valerie Donati. a student at
North Miami High School: Scott
Jaffee. a student at American
High School: Greg Toledo, a stu-
dent at Miami Lakes High
School; Kline Price, a student at
Deerborne High School: anc
Irom Miami Beach High School
were Beth Barron. Karen Burn
styn. Mayro Molina. Raquel
Zaids. Jill Godur. Betty Borsky.
Susan Gardner. Ihana Heisler.
Belinda Sussi. Allen Stasevich.
Johan Zelcer. Loren Alexander,
and Iiene Kolin
Beth David Cong
HonorsMargulies
The Administrative Offices o
the Beth David Congregation t
Main Sanctuary were wsnmd in
honor of Mrs. Guasie Margulies
at the annual meeting of the Con-
gregation. "Guaaie". as she has
been affectionately'' called over
more than three generations of
Beth Devidkes. has served Um
congregation as a member of its
staff for some 40 years. Tht
Guasie Margulies Administrativi
Offkes are located at 2625 S.tt
Third Avenue.
Rabbi David Auerbach wil
begin his rabbinical leadership o
the congregation oa August 1.
these positions should call the
above in their area for an inter-
view between 8:30 a.m 4:3C
p.m.
Retirees considering reenterin
the job market can also receive
job counselling to help then
identify their marketable skills
The Senior Aides Program is
funded through Title V of the
Older American's Act and the
National Council of Senior Citi-
zens, and is locally administered
by Senior Centers of Dade
County. Inc.
Subscription
Rates Increase
Jewish Floridisn sub-
scription rates were raised
Msy 1. to offset increase cost
of postage and newsprint
One year subscriptions are
now $18.00. and two year
subscriptions S34.00. These
rates are for local area onlv.
9/l Strengthen Israel
nEcK. Through JNF Foundation
REMEMBER THE JNF IN YOUR WILL
LET YOUR WILL REFLECT
YOUR LIFE AND IDEALS
ESTABLISH AN ANNUITY WITH JNF
Have A Share in the
JNF Upbuilding of Israel
Help Redeem and Reclaim
The Land of Israel
Through the JNF Foundation
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353
Miami Beach Florida 33139 538-6464
OQOOBOI


Lay. June 26. 1981
legist Fhrkiinr
Page 5-B
Family Service Honors Longevity
Tte Jewish Family and Chil- and cited their commitment as a
1" Service of Miami at its key to the longevity of the agen
ual meeting presented cy and its high quality of service.
In addition to Mrs. Heldner's
faction to the presidency, of-
ficers of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service elected for the
new year include Walter Kovner.
Vice President. Joe Unger. \ ice
Idrens *""*
Lut ann
Cial awards to five membere of
ird
The
were
,''** Hoard of Directors.
wards. Judaic *.
..M-nied in recognition of Board
ambers who have served 25
,H. more on that body.
vearsor
UBliii! Beldner. who was
I lLso elected to her second year as
[rvs.deni of the agency was pre
*nied with an award for 31 con
^-utnc vears of Board member
T Dr Melvin Becker, the
i jZiry'i Assistant Treasurer and
Chair "of 'ts Budget Committee.
was presented an award for 29
vear< of Board service. Goldie
Rand and Harold Tannen. former
presidents of the agency, received
awards for JO years of service.
\ former Vice-President of the
Ikanj of Directors. Ethelda
Kirsh. received an award for 27
vear of Board service to the
agency
The awards were presented by
Jot I'nger. currently a Vice Pres-
,l,.m of the Board of Directors of
he Ifincy and recently elected
President f the Dade County
,lar \ss,wiation Mr Unger
noted Ihe combined total of 147
ears of ser\ice to the Jewish
Family
President. Muriel Katz.
Treasurer. Melvin Becker.
Assistant Treasurer and Sue
Samuels. Secretary.
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren i Service is a beneficiary
agency of the (i renter Miami
Jewish Federation and the
I'nited Way of Dade County.
South Florida Conference On
Soviet Jewry Issues Statement
and Children's Service"
Minda Cantor, chairman of the
South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry. has issued
statement following the Soviet
Union's sentencing of Viktor
Braikivsky.
"We are shocked by the results
of the legal action against Viktor
Brailovsky by a Soviet court, a
brief trial was closed to the
foreign press and US diplomats.
We find it unthinkable that a
man who is guilty of no crime has
l>een sentenced to five years in
internal exile which means at
lea-st :t'J months in dreaded
Siberia for Brailovsky
The sentence indicates in-
credible hardships. Having
wammWaWmaWaWaWaWaWaWaW**KaW
RABBIS-EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS
Traditional Midwestern Jewish Congregation seeks spiritual and
educational leadership M you feel you could be a driving force m the
spiritual rennaisance that our entaDiished Dut vital Jewish com-
munity must have, please contact.
Ahavath Achim Hebrew Congregation
ISM North Wood I awn
Wichita. Kansas 67208
Salary and banaiits commensurate with qualifications.
suffered physical setbacks during
months of incarceration awaiting
his trial. Brailovsky is in a weak-
ened state and suffers growing
medical problems including a
serious kidney condition. Those
close to him say that he appears
to have aged more than 10 years
in only a few months.
"WE FEAR that the arduous
weeks-king journey to Siberia in a
slow-moving and ill-equipped
prison train over some of the
world's most desolute land,
together with his forced stay in
Siberia, may do irreparable
damage to Brailovsky's already
delicate health.
We. along with the leadership
of our parent organization, the
(irenter Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, call upon Soviet officials to
set aside the verdict and the sen-
tence and to free Brailovsky. If
their purpose is to rid Moscow of
this pariah.' would it not be a
\ iable approach to free him. and
issue the necessary visas to him
and to his family so they may
join his father and brother in Is-
rael, under the reunification-of-
family provisions of the Helsinki
\ccords'.'"
Recipients of the 1981 Stanley C. Myers Presidents'Leadership
Award presented at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
43rd Annual Meeting. Harry A. (Hap) Levy (right), GMJF
president, presented the awards to Michael Adler (left) and
Sandi Simon (center) for their exceptional service and dedi-
cation to the ideals of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Bank Hapoalim Increases Rating
multipled 67B times in Israeli
currency terms, and 31 times in
US Dollar terms. This growth
has been accompanied by an im-
pressive rise in profitability.
The Bank Hapoalim Group,
with over 330 branches through-
out Israel, maintains branches,
offices and subsidiaries in the
world's major financial centers,
including: New York. Boston.
Chicago. Philadelphia. Miami,
Los Angeles. Toronto. Montreal.
|indon. Manchester. Zurich,
Luxembourg. Paris, Mexico City,
Buenos Aires. Sao Paulo.
Caracas, Montevideo, and Punta
del Este. Uruguay.
TEL AVIV. ISRAEL Bank
Hapoalim. a leading Bank in
Israel, with consolidated assets
of over USDOLL 17 billion, has
risen three places to number 102
of the world's top 300 banks
listed by The Banker Magazine in
London, it was reported.
Recently Bank Hapoalim suc-
cessfully completed a shares and
options warrants offering
totalling USDOLL 45 million, the
largest amount ever raised in ode
issue on the Israel caffital
market.
During thex^ast 12 years, the
Bank's balance sheet volume has
&Mend&/up and
Manischewitz team up
WhatataanMGriapy
laror
Thay'ra a parfact comttMfen tor Ight
tham up no* and aawi <*
Dsjeow. cnsrjy i
Ingaon
to help you take oft
bEaDOT TShTi
matztKracter | WHEAT
mitzo-rracVer
n^m m won P
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mmi**wmmtcmtmtaiini*mnim
tQVrtMn MftffeMMDVl pMWRl pfVMSM anw
aHmOinmw icmid O^iwwim.
mw tor ont pmaum o tmcn-B frandwp Srana ay
product in, otw un tMokn mus tm, warn m mat
t pad o conaaiwJrwon*
cant aoc* lo cow coiaoni mua ha shown on nouaR
Compnt m na m mignn o. tm>n*i o, fa. Cam
Mka 1 70 ol ont cm h> pwnH MK^Mi*
Dary PTMyca *0 13SS OMm. Mm S27M MM
71481 100231


Page&B
Fntby. June 26. ig,,
Alvtn J Ferro. President
The Padding ton Corpora-
tion, importer? of JAJ3. u
shown here uith Ana Loud
Jones. Vice President for
d*i*U,pmtnt and public rela-
tions. The Seu York Public
Library, and Alfred Kazm.
hterary en tic. educator and
Mithor of \eu- York Jeu
Ferro was among the major
contributors honored by the
pni ately funded library at
it* Annual Con senator's
Dinner gnen recently Mr
Karm addressed the 250peo-
ple uho attended the black-
tie affair held m the Stain
Reading Room of the 42nd
Street hnanch JAB's in-
i-oloemen: uith the Library
.n keeping uith
iterest :n \eu
- rulturu,
Area Students Achieve Honors In Competition
-at#


d coordinate*
illy b> th- Cerural Aj
^alton
.est in the entin
h Honda area were. Seth Sil
\erman. An Sklax. Sally Segel. o
ihf Lehrman Day School. Jeffrex
>al. of Temple Beth Torah o
Fort Lauderdale. and Ted Gayer
of the Hebrew Day School of Fort
1-auderdale
(iene Greenzweig. CAJE exec
utive director, noted. We are ex
traordinanly proud of th*
achievements of the student* ot
the schools of our community, o
those who achieved the aware
pins, and of the more than 600
students who participated in tht
examination
Dr Martin Cooper, national
coordinator, announced that over
10.000 students in the Jewish
weekend, afternoon and day
schools of the country partici
pated in the annual examination.
He said. 'F.ach year the ex-
amination highlights current or
past events in the history ot
modern Israel. The quiz this year
focused on the 100th anniversary
of the first settlements in Israel
by the BILL! pionnecra. the 100th
anniversary of the birth of
Vaidunir Zev Jabotinsky. and 36
Years of the Liberation of the
Holocaust Survivors. In ad-
Studio :
Continental
Cuisine
ED JOSSI
rOu back to
STUDIO
fSTAUHANT
for a unique
Match your table'o row
mood >n one or J individual
'00"">1 The Tent
Wine Ce * g i ie S it Chie>
Fsnm EntmfHmuH
AlthaPtano
AtoevMbiptoywifl
tor your pliaiwra
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(prnrata Luncnaon* arranged!
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THI Gtono"
MOST MAJOA
CHCOIT CANOS
HONOBEO
2340 SW 32 Av*.
445-5371
ciai.c Mandavi
>N1****aa-
-
5ok>
jtei
Lehrman 1
h Dade Hebrew Academy
-.iia-Louis Merwu/er Senior
.--. School, and Hebrew classes
.'. .ami Beach and North Miami
Beach High Schools Also part*
ipating were Beth Shalom Day
School of Holly wood. Temple
Beth Orr. Temple Beth Torah.
Temple Kol Ami. and the Hebrew
I)a\ School, all of Fort Lauder
dak-
In addition to the WZO and
CAJE. the Jewish National Fund
serves to co-sponsor the quiz and
- -
are
and B.
ad'
Community Federal
Branch Opens
Tr- be Com-
mumty Keck-rai Savings and
ism .ation's new branch
al 20400 Btsvayne Boulevard is
celebrating its opening (or
several weeks with free gift-
coffee and bagels each day. cul
minating with a grand prize
drawing on July 15 for a variety
of gifts The public is invited to
participate No deposit is neces
sary to qualify for the drawing
Community Federal s new office
is open from y am to 3 p m
dailv
Official cutter of the Grand Opening Ribbon at '
Federal Sat ings and Loan Association'* newest brar.
Biacmynt Bh d. >- V S Congn ttman '.'. Uiam
Holding the ribbon made up of "Chi
Int* Frank Wail'' rg, Pn lid* nl
the Board of Community Fcderjl Saving
.'wn ileff I hde JV<
' I n. and John ''
rphen ( .
O R C
EMBASSY
KOSHER STEAK HOUSE
1417 Washington Awe
Miami Beach

D
E
L
C
A
T
E
S
S
E
N
> !S
HA"PY ANNIVERSARY!
Ve re CeieOraimg 0f
Annrve'sa'v and we d u*e you
to be Dart of it If you r>ne w
Thursday. June 29-July 2. we H toast
you with a complimentary glass of
CARMEL wme and well treat
every 4th member of your party to a
FREE 0INNER for Good Luck
You ve made these past 3 years pleasant and
memorable for us we d like to make this An-
niversary something special for you
The GOODMAN Family
Phorw 538-7550
T
A
K
E
O
u
T
F
O
o
D
1
$4.95
A Lot of dinner.
Not a lot of dollars.
Our special Inflation Fighter Menu wages war on the high yf-*~y~'
cost of dining out.
Come.to the King's Wharf at the Marriott Hotel. Where
you can enjoy a complete dinner from $4 95 to S7.75.
Choose one of 6 complete dinners: Roasted Rib of //r^&^^,
Beef Au Jus, Chicken Breast Marsala, B*-<-f Ribs with
Barbecue Sauce, Sliced London Broil, Grilled Liver
with Bacon it Onions, or Broiled Fresh Fish. And,
the dinners won't end 'til coffee and dessert.
All served at your table with a beautiful
roof-top view of the city
Marriott's new Inflation Fighter
Dinners. Great new meals at pocket
pleasing prices.
Now Served 5-7 p.m., 7 Days
a Weeki
Not Available Holidays.
Free Self Parking.
When Marriott does it. they do it right.
Miami/Marriott Hotel & Racquet Club
1201 N.W. LeJeune Road. Miami. Florida 33126
Phone 649-3000


+ k*ishrhskU-ui

i South t lorida Conference on Soviet Jewry was honored at the Policy Conference of the Na-
',-nce on Soviet Jewry, held recently in Washington. DC The South Florida Con-
[nee is u committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Community Relations Com-
... Donald F. Lefton. Federation associate secretary, was reelected as national vice presi-
j of the organisation. Shown (left to right) at the award presentation are Donald E. Lefton,
tstanct Smukhrr, chairperson of the Conference Program Committee; Burton Levinson,
urman of the S'ationaJ Conference on Soviet Jewry; Shepard King, immediate past chair-
Myriam Wolf, editor of the Refusenih Journals published by the area group and Hinda
Ifljr, 'incoming chairman of the South Florida Conference on Soviet Jeu r\
Pioneer Chapters Announce Officers
tan <>f four North Dade
Pimm Women, the
:.n- Labor Zionist Organ i-
ol \menca. have DMB
'-I 83 Their election
laUMWncadb) Harriet Green.
Li.ni ol the Pioneer Women
lr.nl <>t South Florida, em
jug 26 chapiara and clubs in
ami Hroward counties
in head the \mi
i North Miami Beach is
rxluh Groaswald Other
Wl alactad ar- I-u> Abel.
fecal m ratfj and treasun r.
Tandhch, n ording and
ipood aai ratar) Robin
Ban, program ihairperson.
Higgina miharahip
nxn n Beth Miller. Sun
!!Mi tas chairparion;
istorian
ss; .t^t; H.Kh bseEq
ation in Traditional tr (on
nativr S\naKKur Florida
Prrlrrabl> Miami or Ft.
bd>rdlr i'rrvonahlr
Miamir orator" llm
SH Jawiafe Klondian. P<>
uiiil.-i? I Miami. H UI01
c*l stowing Wast Kendall
ISynagogua saaks Synagogue
I School Admimatratof Sand
tumetoM Slotn.ch 10340 SW
(Terrace. Miami, Ft. 33176.
SECRETARY
JEWISH AGENCY
pm. good phone manner.
1 ork 36 hour., all benefite.
573-2556
::::::
FOR RENT
KIRYATWOLFSON,
JERUSALEM
[uxury furnished new 2
Jroom Apt. Sept. 1981
or1 or 2 years Call (after
pune 29) (716) 271-0842.
Cboaan a- praaidanl ol the
Aviva Chapter of North Miami
Baach is Dorotb) Goldman
Otbar officari aaiectad includa
Jean Slessel. % ice president. Etta
Seiden. vice president. Kster
Wcmstein. % lie president. Sylvia
Spaatblar, treasurer. Idae Kuth
Wolf, financial secretary Sylvia
Chase, recording secretary, and
Sylvia Speuhler. corresponding
aacraiar)
\mong the new offioan "f the
Sabra Chapter ol North Miami
are Amelia Davidoff, president
Dai lat ii Bradlaigh vita preai
(it-nt. Jaan Riaannioom financial
aacraiar) and treasurer. Frieda
Pataraon, corraaponding aecre-
iar\ and Sylvia Bergman, re
< ording eecretar)
Tht praaidaal <>f the liana
Israel Exhibits
AtAgritech'81
I'he latest innovations and de-
valopaasoU bl the field of agricul-
tural machinery and equipment.
Mill U- on via* at Agntech 81
which will take place in Tal Avhr,
Israel. September 14-11 More
than 500 exhibits m the fields of
agricultural machinery and
equipment, including irrigation
systems. agro-chemicals,
livestock and energy conserva-
tion products will be featured at
the world-wide showcase
Agntech 81 the Eighth In
ternational Agricultural
Mechanization and Technology
Exhibition is an official event,
organized by the Israel Ministry
of Agriculture. Ministry of
Industry. Trade and Tourism.
Israel Export Institute. Field
Crop Growers Association and
Israel Trade Fairs Ltd In the
past, more than 1.000 visitors -
buyers, producers, scientists,
policy-makers and others from
all over the world have attended
Agritech.
Additional information may be
had by contacting any Gover-
nment of Israel Trade Center or
the America Israel Chamber of
Commerce -Florida Region.
Miami office.
Chapter of North Miami Beach is
ban Cohen Other officers
elactad are Francaa Johnaon, vice
president; Rose Oiahanaky, vice
president Sylvia Kates, financial
Secretarj and treasurer, and
Rosa Boolutein, corresponding
wcretan
Page 7-B
The Supermarket:
Your Summer Health Spa
Need to lose a few inches quickly before you hit the beach?
W ant to lose a few pounds quickly so you can stuff yourself on
vacation?
YOU don't have to check into a fancy health resort for a
quickie shape-up just check out your local supermarket
Von ma) l<>se up to five pounds in two days with the effective.
attractive, tilling, high protein Blitz Diet from Helen Schwartz.
1 rundship Foods' home economist.
THE BLITZ DIET
Although every meal is the same, you probably won't get
Imred with this diet because each meal is satistaying: and great
results m two days are worth it!
Three times a day eat:
Eight ounces Friendship Cottage Cheese
1 'wo or three peach halves (fresh or canned in natural
mice with no sugar, or dietetic pack)
and. if you desire:
Ten Manischewiu Matzo-Crackers (plain or wheatl spread
lightly with butter and sprinkled lightly with cinnamon and
sugar v
Or for a change, mix the Friendship Cottage Cheese with one
tablespoon chopped chives, one eight teaspoon garlic powder,
and a dash of pepper or one teaspoon caraway seeds, one quarter
teaspoon dill weed and a dash of pepper and spread on the 10
ManiachewiU Mat/.o Crackers. Enjoy with peaches for dessert!
You may di\ ide each meal in half for a total of six mini-meals.
1 r\ to eat your first meal as early in the day as possible the
diet works best that way.
(inly use the diet for two days once in a while. It's a good
idea to check with your doctor if you plan to use it often or have
special medical problems.
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxim*the coffee any busy baibusta
would be croud to serve Especially wth the
strudei Or the Honey cake Or the lox n
bageis Or whenever friends and mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim? the i000'o freeze
G-ied coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to nake fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!
FOR RENT
JELRAY BCH: HI PT.
** Lux condo on canal. 2
|R'2B. 1-sty. screened
**> w w rugs, mirrored.
[*" binds. refrig..
Phumid Beaut clbhse..
|d. pool, tn. cts.. Unf. Yr-
* just 495. mo.
499-4266/215 563-1450.
H-1484.
French Lady Seeking Companion
Poaitioa Part-time or full time
Will rook Call eve. 55*7067
Local Conservative Tem-
ple Needs Cantor for High
Holiday Service*
861-4006




Pae8-B
* Jewish HerMkw
Fr"u W
&

Dr. Sim mo*
Elmer Hurwitz
The Papanicolaou Cancer Research Institute announced
thai Elmer Hurwitx has joined the Board of Directors. Mr.
Hurwitz. Chairman of the Board of Teltec Communications has
Basal active in community projects in Dade County for the past
20 years
Dr. Warren Simmonds, a Miami Beach Podiatrist, was
chosen Podiatrist of the Year by the Dade County Podiatry As-
OCiotion l)r Simmonds is currently president of the Florida
Podiatry Association.
Barry Stuart Schonwetter. son of Joyce and Morris Schon
wetter nt North Miami Beach, recently graduated from the Uni-
\ i rait) "1 Florida Medical School.
.Barry attended schools in North'Miami Beach and holds a
Bachelor of Science degree from Duke University where he was
graduated Magna cum laude
Jack M. Firestone has been named general manager of The
Florida Philharmonic, where he starts officially September 1.
Firestone H a past president of the Regional Orchestra
Managers Association on the Board of Directors of the Ameri-
can Symphony Orchestra League The 35-year-old graduate of
Qoorgo Washington I niversity. Washington. DC. who at-
taadad the Institute in Arts Administration at Harvard, is
married to nationally recognized potter Marsha Silverman.
An organizational meeting of the Greater Miami Chapter.
\meruan Diabetes Association will be held in the Greenspan
(Hit patient Waiting Area at 7 p.m.. June 30 to plan for ex
[winded pan KM of the organization. Dr. David kudzma. presi-
dent of the Chapter, said The Chapter's need to provide patient
education services and research support is increasing as the
incidence of diabetes grows in Dade County
Sandy (Mrs. Harry) Fdelman. vice president of the Bis-
coyns Point Homeowners Association and an active realtor on
Miami Beach, has been named campaign treasurer by Dr. Leon-
ard Haber. The former Miami Beach mayor designated his sister
to the campaign position in his bid for the Miami Beach City
Cofmmission
The South Dade Jewish Community Center is sponsoring a
summer bridge class designed for advanced beginners. The
group will meet on four consecutive Wednesday mornings from
9:30 to 11 30 a.m.. starting July 1.
Charles Peter Schulu of 1964 NE 172 St.. North Miami
Beach. was awarded the Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical
Engineering, by the Rensaelaer Polytechnic Institute.
The 1981 Pops Concert will start July 4, presenting six
consecutive Saturday programs, featuring Ray Charles, Nsacy
Wlaon. Jerry Vale. Andy Williams. Marvin Haaalisch. the Big
Band Sounds from the Summer of '42 and members of the Flor-
ida Philharmonic, at Miami's Marine StadiUm
Miami Beach Mayor Murray Meyerson bestowed a certificate
of Honorary Citizenship and a key to the city upon Gertruda
Babilinsha of Israel this week. Mrs. Babihnska was responsible
for saving a young Jewish boy from the Nazis in Germany dur-
ing World War II. She raised this boy, Michael Stolowitzky, as
he- own son and took him to Israel where she Mill lives. Stolo-
witzky now lives on Miami Beach where Bqfiilinska visited him
' en tly.
Anita Alter
Weds Elliot
Walton King
\nita Alter and Elliot Walton
King exchanged marriage vows
on Sunday. June 21. in Philadel-
phia. Pa., followed by a reception
at Sugar Loaf Estate.
The bride is the daughter of
Suzanne and Bertram Schild of
Miami
The bridegroom is the son o
Mr. Leon and Dr. Diane King o
Philadelphia. Pa.
The bride's sister. Ronnie
Slernberg. served as matron of
honor The bridegroom's brother.
I.e is King, was best man
Anita wore an antique victo
nan wedding dress and veil. She
holds a BA degree in social work
from New York University, is
emplo\ed in her field in New
York, and spent three years at
Kibbutz Gezer in Israel
I he bridegroom attended
Mrandeis. graduated with a BA
from Southern California, and re-
>ei\ed his masters degree- from
Columbia Graduate School of
Journalism.
Among the guests attending
the wedding wire Marcel Drey
fus. grandfather of the bride. Mr
and Mrs Fred Shochel. and Mr
and Mrs Manny Bmokmire The
wedding chupa was held by Mark
Schild. brother of the bride.
Maureen Schild. sister of the
bride Rubin Salz. brother-in-law
of the groom, and Ron Wischkin
The newivweds are horn>
mooning in Cape Cod and will
make their home in New York
Cit\
AJ Committee Meets
With Israeli Judge
Judge Moshe Nacht. Adminis-
trative Judge of the Israeli Court
System, visited South Florida as
the guest of Robert Lock wood.
Clerk of Courts. Broward
County. Mr. Lockwood toured
Israel's Courts two years ago on
a trip arranged by Senator Rich-
ard Stone.
The Greater Miami Chapter of
the American Jewish Commit-
tees officers, president. Barton
S I dell. \ ice-president. Shepard
King, foreign affairs cofmmission
chairman. Neil Alter: and execu-
tive committee member. Judge
Rohart Newman, hosted Judge
Nacht I % isit to Dade County.
Congressman William Ieh
man's office arranged the
meeting to enable the Judge to
hear from concerned meml>ers of
the local chapter of the^r
Jewish Commuu, wjts
sions centering n ,-orUriM
the Israel, court system J
American court SV8Uffl
Israel. Judges an. appoa^J
life term b) a mm- mernbw "*'
mittee. South Florida judas?
learning about the Israeli c
system, were surprised to k.
that there are no )im tnjT
Israel AJoodiacuaNdooaJ
of the rtItlemum of Son
J >Md Israeli emigmfr.
Accompanying .Jud^e \*
on his \.-it through the ft
Count] Courthouse was M*
Tamara Nachl ludfj y^
Friedman. Dadi Count)
and Jules Brest ,if Bro,
Count) The.
ard and Palm Ret
Courts
Zohara Hadassah Installs Officers
ZohaVl H.uia.ssah. -\\eniura
I a tern shores Chapter, held its
installation of new officers at a
gala .it;.moon at the White
House in 1 astern Shores
\s part of a tribute to Helen
Spitz, outgoing president Molly
BUM presented Mrs Spit/ with S
certificate for years of out
standing leadership awarded by
National Hadassah
Yotta Fried. Area Vice-
Presidont of Miami Region, con
ducted the installation ceremony
I r* following officers were in-
stalled
President Marian Hoefler
tdministralivi
Elc) Levin. Fun
Presidents < .
Blioo; Educal
nca Migd \|,.mh
\ I. e IV. Rid It. S G L ,
Program Via Pi I'esrTy
l.ew Trass Arm,.
conlmg Secret n .. V/m
Mssnborship Duei s, reun.l
Sow Lei | I i Bin ler Kiiuixsil
Socrotory, H Nenunl
( onunponding S laml
Lovj
\ delight ful prognal
possssstod Rosenpf.J
MB and Irving \ nd^.]
?"*! he after n--
The newly elected officers of the Miami Beach Region of Hadassah, taken at the installation^
officers at the Region Conference are (Front row left to right) Frances Glazer. Correspondmi
Secretary; Jean Feinberg, immediate Past President; Elaine Ellish, Installing Officer. Satiom
Hadassah Vice-President; Betty Kestenbaum, newly elected President of the Miami Beock
Region; Esther Boyarin, Treasurer; Lillian Martel, Area Vice President. (Back row left to rightl
Marion Glazer, Corresponding Secretary; Jean Temkin, Area Vice-President; Tillu- Yates. Ant
Vice-President; Florence Scheiner, Recording Secretary; Bertha Kohansov, Area Vice-Pntt
dent; Faye Yarrow, Area Vice-President and Helen Adams, Area Vice-President
"Easy
Summer
Meals"
Take the blahs and drudgery out of
hot weather meals and learn nutritional
cooking tips prepared by Susan Artz.
Dade County Cooperative Extension Agent
MONDAY, JULY 6th, 2:00 PM
In the Auditorium of our Normandy Isle Office
1133 Normandy Drive
For reservations call 674-6700
Admission is FREE!
A SERVICE Of
^ WASHINGTON
SAVINGS
AHO lOA* AUOOAIC*. a HOSCM
Atom IXCU0U MUJOOJ OOUAM
***"" "WOW Ue TO A MAXIMUM OS 1*00 000 IV >UJC
-orving ma community to, 2t yon Mow with to convarMant offIcoa


m
June 26. 1981
+Jeistfk>rkMari
Page9-B
Elegant and Easy.
&- 1^
Just in time for summer, AmeriFirst Federal offers you a selection
of 25 handy gift items.\bu will find elegant gifts to enhance any home.
Or easy-living gifts for the casual summer outdoor life.
Just make a qualifying deposit when you open a new AmeriFirst
checking account, open or add to a savings account, or renew a maturing
certificate. Depending on the amount of your deposit, you can receive
your selection as a gift, or you can buy it at a special low price.
Or if you prefer, receive a valuable super market gift certificate
with a qualifying deposit. One gift per account. .....
At AmeriFirst Federal, you'll find a full range of high-interest rate
savings plans, from Regular savings to Money Market Certificates, plus
interest-earning checking accounts. And your funds are backed by over
$3 billion in assets here at Americas oldest and the Souths largest Federal.
So come in soon, make your deposit and get the most out of
summer with an elegant or easy-living Summer Spectacular gift
from AmeriFirst Federal.
/ImeriFirst
Money Market Certificates
I8MUMO.
14.189
Special Moaey Market Certificate.
2S to 10 year*. Hmmb <*r* M swo.
12.000%
1**'
12.748
%
*'________________-
Federal
America** Number 1.
FSEIC
f NTRAl mlP*=W.K..Wrv.n

fn** ****.m
Israel Bonds Urges Reinvestment
Congress Pamphlet In Braille
j-j -
Ruth Shack Elected
LncZzrmukj
Cmj mi Mmm
ben. Moral Banal
----?
a
Bbbbs
Claude Pepper Talks
To Senior Showcase
abQKe s^
a Flnrtu to tti*

.--: Map Baad, ,
-- Matd ..-.
'-" -'" -'
hb^bukki ii i nmy o* nnaaa pv Hmni Mar
tapes ad Ii in by tiU( FAm-
Ffcnda niXi Library for tbe M*rrr
.*. ^T*^ aeonaauoo can be
Ceuur* of So**Ji Honda M
Jmak How ud Heap**!
Utt Aed. oa beaaaf of tfc* L
* *> \rca Afcac? oa \
TW ins \*ar> 01
mvd-t4u441 m L
far MM. TW
Or Jom* Tkeedt km M-
**>a*ci *r mdbhj for
Stayer of Miami m the
Soi ember flections Dr
TMeede u a Lcensed teter-
^nam aad u pmedemt of AU
Vi< Ni***r Auasei Oduc /v
Pior to entry m Alburn Lnt-
leruty. the wax aetue at
*g industry +d
marketing
\%m
BBBC Vt
ajaj | fr*
Jack Oordoa -ifl
at ikertcat
pin Friday Jaaa
of tae Parlor
by tea
Chabad-Lubacitch
Awareness
Program
SiK
BEST PRICES
For Your State of
ISRAEL BONDS
Li twin Securities. Inc.
538-1333 m.c.
*J
iii e*& -ammci for
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And our ur*Qua aennca. pnea and
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FREE LENSES
with Eveav mo a purchased*
Mr. rs Optical
me J a mate ye* ate" _

EaTaRaSS Advisor Maadad
For Temple Beth David tc
work arith 6th & 7tr
graders Experience
preferred if interested
call Wendy 279-1156
;.::' ...: .-.-> _..-._ >>x.:.:.>x-:-::::: ': .-.
fFREE X-MYISMUL EXAilUTMl)

PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
MOW WONDERFUL
Call me Earner. 635-6564
and let me quote you
rates. Also Kjdfti mo ig&
long distance mowing
anysaVre m the US or
overseas
A B VAN UNES INC
(Of Miami)________
I Neck Pain. Tight Muscles
3 Shoulder Pain. Pain Down
i m Hands
4
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Dr. Steve
""aa's****!
j
BUY OR RENT A RESORT APT AT
GAL RIVIERA CLUB
BAT-YAM ISRAEL
unique opportunrty to purchose on oportment for 3
nK>o# ol the year or longer in a deluxe resort club in
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hearth octrvrhes m on exclusive resort on the beach
Whether yoo seek on exerting ochve retirement or a
deluxe vocation in hroet. tfas n your opportunity of o
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For your colorful .brochure & oddrhonoJ information
contoct:
ISRAEL RESORT CLUBS, INC.
W7 Lincoln Ed. Suite 12C
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In Dodo County: 674-0019
Coat Toll Free
In State of Florida* l-tOO-432-3130
/'-o-AnywHeae an USA: 1^00-317-3199,


+Je*i*tFkrklian
Pagell-B
i
*
*
And the earth, opened her mouth, and swallowed them up J
irfall the men that appertained unto Korah" ?
(Num. 16.321. *
Synopte of the Weekly Torah Portion
,i"
KORAH
Korah. son of Izhar. and Dathan and Abiram. sons
( Fliab. led a rebellion of 250 men who refused to accept the
dtfthip ot Moses and Aaron. Moses tried in vain to persuade
, j* that all was being done according to Gods will Finally.
t ufmself acted. "And it came to pass that the ground
, Lugve asunder that was under them And the earth opened
mouth, and swallowed them up. and their households, and
h,. men that appertained unto Korah. and all their good* 9o
went down alive into the pit. and the earth closed upon
,: they perished from among the assembly And fire
me'forth from the Lord, and devoured the two hundred and
vroei N "''" r "*"" Prmt t"at AafOB had indeed
0 chosen by God fct his mriastl} function, M eted
rod near the Ark of the I venant;
\ iron arod -prout.il Thus ended the controv
priesthood The portion proceed! to de


u tl il the priests and !. ived
l,nf ef MM wo. m, Portion or h Law I
iphic MiMo'v ot trie Jewish Heritae;
iid Th* volumr
. n iomi Jo\apH Schlang I!
*

*



*


*

*
*

?

,,?.?
,.,*.***-> *###?*#
ITESHI
| leach 94714A5
00' Sinvna Free*:
rtor la'' Alpem Conservative
Fnda* night service 8 15 p m
iturday morning, services 8:30
FlEBETH AM Of Herbert
?50 N Kendall Dr Baumgard
M-am. SoTftftftT Senior RebW
tuin G Welnblatt. Associate
Morton Hoffmen.
isociate Rabbi
| Family worship ser Frt, 130 p.m
bbi Wemblalt will speak on
(standing Israel Today."
serv. 9:15 am and 11:15
KTM DAVID Miami's Historic
nservatlve Congregation
Sol Landau. Rabbi
HiHin Wm M Llpson
CORAL WAY 2825 SW 3rd Ave.
na 854 3911 Dally Services
Morning 8 evening Coral Way:
n Sanctuary Set morning 9
in. South Dade Crvapel 7500 SW
PD St Late Snabbet serv Fn. 8
IKODESH
i Tradlllooal
>W 12 Ave
aooi Mai Shapiro 858 8334
""lor Leon Sagal
i Bafim Executive Secretary
Mly Minyon for Yahraatten
Saturday
8:45a.m.
SraiRTOal----------
I Ave. ft 41st St 53ft- 7231
Laon Kronash, Rabbi Liberal
'"lor Da.td Convtear
Fn ava.115p.m.
Sat mom.. 10:45 a m.
fT5RXR-----
MEOATION
* Llpacnru.
Cantor
Saturday morning, Juno 27
"' Mltzveh of Oavtd Qamlfy
'^JIJWLLAH OF KBtOALL
SWiS4CbTjieCoMrtli
"t FIs. Mot
*< Warrar, Kaaaft
Sabbath
9:30 a jn
^^Educabon Wad 1p.m.
^NICAL ASSOCIATION
OfsWEATCT MIAMI
^B^cayne Bootevard
Mlml,FlorlOaj 33137
Phone 576-4000
.f E^y.^VTceProaldeni
o^^emlng Qroater Miami
HoueeeofWorsNp
. Phonsc |7ft-4000
**"**/ Aaeooefw Otltoa
Synagogue
Listings
CandMighiinK '
M\ \\
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Av MB
Or Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Zvl Adter. Cantor
Fn.. eve. serv 6.-00 pjn.
Sat mom. serv.. 9O0 a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preach
at 10 30 a m
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Retonn Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami. 573-5900
9980 N Kendall Dr 595-5055
Rattx Brett S Goldstein
Cantor Jacob G Bomsteln
Administrator Raymond Chait
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Brvd Reform
Coral Gabies 667 5657
Michael B EisensUt. Rabbi
Frl., June 26. Sabbath services. 8
p.m An Oneg Shabbat wW follow
ei the Social Mall
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th SL. Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowttz
Cantor Moahe Boryn
Frtdayaanrtcaeat&lSpm
Saturday eervtcee at 9 am
TEMPLE SINAJ 18801 HE 22 Ave
North Oode's Reform Congreoatton
Ra4ph P. Klngsliy. Rabbi
L Cook, Aeeocaete Rabbi
wtkes. Cantor
S Ramaay. Admlnastrafor
Sabbath eve eervtcee 8:15 pjn.
(7:30 p-m first Fnday of month,
Sabbath morning service* 10:30
aoN
r Or.
N.
Otcfceon, Caraor
Mxyan SwwoMMor. JIVl '"<
Samei twj Samoa at a
SeMeai SarMcaa *C0 am
271-2311
Quest A/e\
June JSaal MiUvari or Moewi WHcr>
fm way earn Wpini I Schooa>
ll|nmiUi'l1>''"'J*<"""
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 M IS* Uiai S4740< UBH Oad B Seiuman
cwi'vad''*1
UWoKIofam^iVan
hebrew conoreoatrons
lift E Ragler SL. Miami Fie. 33131
379-4663. Rabbi Lewteh L Bngage,
Otaactor, Union ot American Hebrew
Corajragai
Gordon Vital
Information
Bill Passes
Vital information for senior
citizens will become available in a
fan months as the result of a
pioneering bill sponsored by Son-
Btoi Jack D Gordon ID., Miami
Beach) and passed bj tin- Florida
Senate.
The new law roquifOft all medi
'.il doctors, osteopaths and
chiropractors to inform the state
h year whether or not the) will
Medicare \ssignmenl a-
lull payment Thia information
wil .. ih| upoi
.....: s in

'' bt Lhi :.: i ". ii
country

il
Strengthening oi his original
that patients be
issued itemized lull- tor medical
and hospital services, the
development ol a pilot program
tor geriatric outpatient clinks,
Slid a lull tor the immunization of
school children, which he spon-
sored with Hep Virginia Rosen of
North Miami, were among the
Gordon hilK dealing with the
pulilu health which were sent to
the Governor at the close of the
regular session
V
CARICATURIST
BARMITZVAHS
AND AFFAIRS
MMcne// Gordon
| W3-0024. Miami
Three Miami members of the B'nai B'rith International Hillel
Commission get together in Washington for the annual meeting
of the commission. From left. Paul Rosen. Alma Hofstader. and
F^d Snyder. Mrs Hofstader is the representative from B'nai
B'rith Wo run. HilM, with units at colleges and universities
throughout Florida, offers religious, cultural and cine pro-
gram ml faculty on -.ome 350 campuses in .\ 'th
America and abroad.
At the Breakfast Meeting of the Men's Club of Temple Ner
Tamid. David S. Meyer (left I. chairman of the board of trustees
of the Synagogue, was cited by Paul Novak President, for his
outstanding contributions. Harry Kaplowitz was cited by
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz (far right) for five years of service in
maintaining the proper decorum at the services.
Bar
Mitzvahs
BILLY SIGNER
Bill) Danny, son of Mr and
Mr- Howard Signer, will be
called to the Torah as Bar
MitZVah OH Saturday evening.
.lime 27. at Temple Kmanu-El.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Kmanu-Kl Religious
School and is in the seventh
grade at Nautilus Junior High
School. He has received many a-
wards in physical education, he
plavs the drums and is interested
in many different sports.
Special guests will include
great-grandmother. Mrs. Bessie
Savitsky: grandparents. Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Steinwald; Mrs.
Alice Kotler. Brian and Donna
Roller, all from Montreal and sis-
ters. Cathy and Julie.
DAVID GAMILY
David, son of Mr. and Mrs
Ben Zion Gamily. will observe his
Bar Mitivah at Beth Torah Con-
gregation on Saturday morning,
June 27.
The celebrant is in the seventh
grade, and a student at the Beth
Torah Harold Wolk Religious
School.
Mr and Mrs. Gamily will
sponsor the Riddush following
the services. Among the guests
attending will be his grandpar-
ents. Mr Ezra Gamily of Tel
Aviv. Israel and Mrs. Fanny
Sobel.
Pointing out the benefits of the new Video Visit system are out-
going Young Presidents Club Chairman Ted Finkel and in-
coming Chairman Martin Gelb.
Mount Sinai Adds That
'Important Touch'
Have you ever been a patient
in the hospital for an extended
period of time, or even for a few
days, when you started to miss
your young children or grand-
children? Perhaps you've been
one of those people who sneaks
the youngster up to the floor only
to have them quickly routed out
by the diligent staff who are con-
cerned about the little one
coming in and either catching
something or giving some illness
to the patients. Or are you the
patient who walks over to the
window to wave at children
standing eight stories down in
the parking lot waving upstairs
to give you a glimpse of then-
smile and well wishes?
Weal, now, at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, thanks to the
donation of the Young Presidents
Club, little children need not be
kept away from parents and
grandparents during a hospital
stay a Instead, through modern
closftxi circuit television tech-
no l/gy. youngsters can come into
t f Abess Lounge, call their
aWed ones by phone, and the
patient will see them on the tele-
vision screen. It's a one-way
video system; that is. the patient
sees the visitor, but the visitor
does not see the patient. It was
designed that way to keep the in-
stallation at a reasonable coat.
The phone is used so that the
patient and visitor can cany on a
conversation.
Viewing hours are limited to
evenings during the week and 11
am to 6 p.m. on weekends.
A Video Visit guide who staffs
the service speaks to people wait-
ing in the Main Lobby area toex-
plain how they can use the sys-
tem. Already, more than 100 peo-
ple have taken advantage of
Video Visiting. Besides young
children, other visitors who have
been interested in using the sys-
tem are visitors of patients in iso-
lation, visitors who don't feel
well, and visitors and patients
who just get a kick out of seeing
the closed circuit television sys-
tem in action.
Video Visit is a free service,
and just one of many patient care
programs funded by the Young
Presidents Club.


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4




-Jeiitnvrktinr>
iblic Notice
,= circuit cout of
[Eleventh judicial
,titi<,n,r'
till .K =<"' -VN,,K
I *"' oSEL
I luUMi
R**k*rflC Add re as
I nri"n ^_
NOT1CEOI
Lai ARK HEREBY NOTI
,,,.,. rwU
[;' n ,), Marriage has been
fcUS.in!.t you and you -re
,,r r Pleading to Mid
..-.n in i-tili.iner's at
iTcKniWTET HAMANI.
HI Biscay nr
I Mm* II **' rlaglrr
"*%ml Florida vis.)
Birth. ...uHuiAnweror
K Court Oar*, on or
,( July. 18*1 U
luil I" oo o judgment by
tull iH e taken K*!"*1
, M the relief demanded In
ip.i.eked at
Lml> p.,,1. fount)! Florida.
UHDP BRINKER
I ,rt clerk
i Florida
HY M I Hartnett
Deput) c'lrrk
Inn.-12. IB 26.
Icily J_ll
|tmE CIRCUIT COURT OF
it ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
LoE COUNTY.FLORIDA
CJWNoll WIFC
FAMILY DIVISION
l.c mi m *RRI \gkof
UPEZ
'
[ ":/.
i iiand
tenon
Mr Frli lanu Lope*
known
,l MCI NOTIFIEO that
Dhaolutlon "'
B04M filed
i .ire re
pj ..( your
Rl HRNTH XL
Idraai i*
M\ lll-MVMIN
I V
Florida
dj
naj III
. .'her
I 'el lift
I .lei v
I t.-f.tull
, l| )
II I. .1 liv 111.-
|' ind .mil -ai
HUNKER
UK
lltrtl
NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUSNAME LAW
HEREBX.
iunii'
DtXrS
Ulan I'.-
in in i lab
p li .mi
lune 12. IB. V.
lul) 1 I IN. I
NOTICE UNDER
F|CTiTlOUSNAME LAW
HERKBV
undersigned
I "inn* ; gaga in business
IN 'n UlMaM name IN
NKNTAI. MKT
' "RATION at 2150
i Miami. Florida
pit: inle. ,|, i,, register aald
J-"" ith the Clerk of thellr
' .! Dade County
1ndi
Rebr., a I. earner.
I'reidrnt.
^TEltrovriNENTAL
METAL. Inc
^Florida Corporation i
Junes. 12. 18.36. 1B61
AFFIDAVIT
UNDER FICTITIOUS
T*AMESTATUTE
/"EOF FLORIDA)
JNTVOFOAD*)
v uno''r>imed. under oath.
u." the Intention of the
^signed to engage In a
ineai enterprtsc under the
H.,^" mi of IMAGES
n th, ry o( Mlam, rj^o),
jnly Florida
"** intereaud In aald eiv
?" nd the extent of trie
.!!*'>' '<-h. U aa follow.
'"AGES OF KENDALL. INC
v Intereat
Gorman L Yop President
"'ml. Florida BIT*
-lunea.ll.iS.Si, 1M1
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKREBY
GIVEN Lhat the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names l .
BtoGraFxl MuXiramx at P.O
Itox MMOt. MIAMI BEACH
HI. 33138 intends to register
said names llh the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Seal I > Atkins. Owner
08842 June IB. 26.
JkU> Liu. ..>.
'-------efoTTcTTJFTrnoTJ-------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
no II MA4PC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RK The Marriage (if
MANUELA RODRIGUEZ
XNI"
JACKil.INK RODIROUEZ
TO 1ACKILINK
ROORIGUEZ
i Residence t'nknowni
yol ARE HEREBY NOTI
FTED that an action for liisan
Ivitliui "f Marriage has been
fll. raoulrad to Bavvi ^ I "l'v 01 your
u rltten defenses. If any. to It on
It ic HARD I MF.N1N. attorney
fur Petitioner, whose address is
WW Washington Avenue Miami
He... h Florida RllMi and file
the ..riKinal with the clerk of
the afcova ~t\led ctMirt nn nr
before I til > in l>l otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de
manded In the complaint or
pa-UUon
This notice shall be published
OHM eai h rvk for fixir con
Bvcutlva ooka In "nil-' iv:w
rnHFLORIDl \n
WITNRSfl mv hand and the
-e.il of amid ixirt at Miami
Klon.U Oil thi> I day of June
I RBI
Itic-H \ri> P BRINKER
Aa Clark dri ult Court
Dad> Count) Florida
BjrC i' C*wpaland
tork
Clt. ult l
RICHARD l MENIN RSQ
.: m.iii r i; M.m Ta MENIN
SBIt V..Imti. t.Mi \venue
Miami Brarh Florida SSI SB
one JOoial
Ml. I
I one |] m M
lul) 3.1IK1
NOYlCE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
.NOTICE is HEREBY
OIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
i ourtasy Transfer and Star

Miami Reach Kla intends
.ester said name with the
lerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County Florida
Bat Moving* Storage Inc
By John Melviso
President
"IS JuneS, 12. IS 2K 1H1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CaiaNoH tMOFC
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN 1:1
DANII
I.ii ii.'
II \Nlhi.l.r : .....
.II.I.KS1U..
I'etlllol..
ill \i:; BKl ITK
cill.l.KSriK
luundent > I
In i HAKI..:.- BRBTTK
Gil I
i. t nknown
\ oi cltK HKREB
, Patltton BM \nnulmenl

>olil I
'
attomav
DONALD M
M
tie

11 \i>.i i una
^mt>
RICHARD I' BKIN
I '.xirt
IU M : llartnett
l.Kl'i \\ CLERK
iWIS.i lun.
juiia.Hi !
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No II VSMFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INKK THK Marriage of
J T GIU.l M.
I'etitionrr Husband
and
UULLIKGILLL'M.
Reapundent Wtfa
TO Doilie Gillum
IMtc SeatUe
Memphis Tenneeaee
VOI ARE H>:REBY NOTI
F1ED that an action for Dlsao
luuon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHl R H UP80N. attorney
for Petitioner, whose addreae Is
IBIS N W IB7 St.. Suite 21B.
Miami Klorlda. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above atyled court on or before
July IT. IBM. olherwtae a
default will be entered against
you lor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 16 day of June.
1BB1 ____
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Cout
I>ade County Florida
By M J Hartnatt
As Deputy Clerk
II June IB. M.
____________July S. 10. !>*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE is HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name JEW
isn Hiciii SCHOOL lEWIarl
HIGH SCHOOL OF SOITH
Fl-ORIDA at 1NBOU N E 26
A\enue. North Miami Beach
Florida S31 an intend to register
said names with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Jewish High School of
South Florida. Inc
By Rabbi l.ixiis B Herring
Principal
UWM June2
JulyS. 10. 17. 1BH1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name 14*0
Apartment Building at BM
Wrst Flagler St Miami. Fli.r
Ida 33174 intends to register
said name with the clerk of the
On nil Court of Ilade County.
Florida
Carlos A Rodriguez Esq
for
Magdalena Alvarez.
orestes Alvarez.
Orestes Alvarez. Jr
and America Alvarez
ORTA. RODRIGUEZ *
\SSi
CARLOS a RODRIGUEZ
ESQ
2HB1 Coral Way
Munii Florida331*5
Attomev lor Applicant
UOTdl Junef. 12. IB. 3*. 1&1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No II 4*4?
Division 0}
IN lit-' ESTATEOF
(OSEPHF (i CONNOR
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
To MI PERSONS H > IN !
CLAIMS OR DEM '
(GAINST rill ABOVE
ITE \N|. M.I OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
VOI M'.r HEREBY NOTI
FIEP thai the adminlatratlon
of tt. ISEPH v
O'CONNi R de. ....-.-it
lendlnf In .
the i irl I1
! iivi
''
\N
M PREI
13131 The
the

TION
wrltli
laim the n
; '
. and Uh
limed H li-
the .late when It
.. I ''"'
"i" B eonUn
K,.,n ,.r unUquldatad. the
nitur..... I'"' uncertainty shall
It the I lain Is ae-
Irtt) shall brde
,. nt.c.l The laimant shall
dellvei ilfi.ieni copies of the
, (aim to the clerk to enable the
, i,.,k to mall on* cow to each
personal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are "-quired
WITHIN niKKK. MONTHS
FROM THK pATEOr THK
FIRST ITBl.ICATION OF
TH1S NOTICE, to file any ob^
>e,ti.is the> ">ay have that
fhallenges the validity of the
decedent, will, the quail-
fuations of the personal re^
pre.enUtive. or the venue or
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
Mli-.D Wlli. BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this NoUce of Admtnlstra
tlon June 12 IBB1
Stanley M I'red
As Personal RepresenUUve
oftheEsUteof
JOSEPH rOtTWNOR^
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RKIRKSKNTAT1VE
STANLEY M PRED
HlOBrlrkellAve No *08
Miami. Florida SS1S1
^lephone ^--...-I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
Lhat the undersigned.
ring to en| the :n litmus name of
HARRi M GORDON 4> CO at
nutnliei 1777 S Andrews Ara-
rat* In the i It} oi Hurt iudar-
Flonda. intends to
r the said name with the
I it the "ircuit Court of
Mint) K irlda
HARRYM GORDON
i IV. lie-
RICHARD \ BOLTON
Attorney for Applicant
.i ',^,.t
Suit. |
North Miami He.irh Kla
'WBB2 June 19.26.
July 3. in IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. II WIFC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage Of
ELDAKEaCP,
Petitioner W'fe.
and
Rl H \nii KEMP
Respondent Husband
TO ROtJtNDKEMP
Respondent
Middle Street No 3
Nassau Bahamas
"i ot ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED thai an action for Dlsao
hit ion of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
nlten defenses. If any, to It on
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 179 Miami Reach. Flor-
ida MISS, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
t) led i OUrl on or before July B,
lie-1 otherwise a default will
l- entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
Thi?. nolh -hall he published
aach area* for four con-
In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN
WTTNESS my hiind and the
. .ml court Bl Miami.
Florida on this Ith day of June.
ISM
RICHARD P BRINKER
\. Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
R\ Willie Bradahaa Jr
As Deput) Clerk
c in ull Couii Sea
M m:\ kv i> FRIEDM \n
|m : in. oln R WJ
Mi.if H. ai FL8S18I
i nev for Petitioner
lune 12 IB. 2*.
JulvS, 1BR1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No II I'M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
GILB MONTOl \
and
CARMELA MONTOY I
TO CARMELA MONTOYA
Realdanca i nknowi
vul vkk HEREBY NI
that an action for Hiaao-
oeen
xl aim you are
ipy of your
i it on
Philip i. Font Bap, attornaj
. titiotier whose addreaa Is
\s Mh Slreel M
ind file the ort1
July
ilharwlaa a default
iii be entarad afmlnal >.xi for
ti- raliel damandad m the
lalnl or petition
Thli notice shall be published
,-a, h week for lixir I DO
.. ,. kl in THK JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
of said court at Miami.
Honda on this 17 day of June.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
I >adeCounty. Florida
ByK Self lied
As Deputy Clerk
i'ii. ult Court Seal i
l-hilipl. Font. Esq .
I.AW OFFICE OF
1 ro.;k.RFELDMAN.ESm-.
vwSW nth street
Miami. Florida SSIS0
Attorney for Petitioner
iWBt-3 June IB. 2*.
JulyS. 10, IB81
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNo Bl-MOl FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage of
LNDRE CIKRMAIN.
I 'etitioner Husband,
and
RAYMONDE GERMAIN.
Kespondenl Wife,
TO RAYMOND GERMAIN
VOI RAYMONDE OCR-
MAIN, residence unknown, are
r.-quired to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petlUoner s
attorney. Herman Cohen. Esq .
m s W 1st Street. Miami.
Klorlda. 33130. on or before
July 27. 1881, or else petition
will be confessed
Dated June 17. 1B81
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By L C Bedaaae
iieputy Clerk
cBK4 June IB. 26.
July 3. 10. 1881
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Caie No II 1425 FC
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
INKK The MriiageOf
MARIO ENRIQUE
ZALDIVAR.
Petitioner-Husband
and
I.AI'RAM ZALDIVAR.
Respondent Wife
TO LAURA M ZALDIVAR
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that a Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are hereby
required to serve a copy of your
answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Petitioner's
Attorney. LESTER ROGERS,
whose address Is 1464 N W 17
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the
(lerk of the above styled Court
on or before this 6 day of July.
1B81. or a Default will be en
tered against you.
DATED this l day of June.
IBS]
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
IByL-C Bedasse
'(.. Jun 5.12. is. 26. 1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name IN-
TERIORS BY JEROME at 1878
STIRLING ROAD. DANIA.
FLA 33004 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
JEROME I.IERERMAN
08873 June 26.
Ullll ka.ii.llil
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICB
(NO PROPERTY)
in the CIRCUITCOURTOF
VhEMeIIvVnTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO.B0-1SM4FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE ADOPTION By
MARION KELLOGG,
TO JOYCE A KELLOGG
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that Petition for Adop
lion has been filed concerning
your child you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on MAKK
B SLAVIN. W9Q attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa la
1560 NE Miami Gardens
Drive. Skylake State Bank
Building. Suite S02 N Miami
Beach. Fla and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
July 10. 1881; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be publtaned
once each week for 'out con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW
ISHFI>ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
a-al of aald court at Miami.
lorlda on this 8 day of June,
881
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk .Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK Selfrled
A a Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal)
STRIAR A SLAVIN. P A
MARK B SLAVIN. ESQ
1BB0N E Miami
Gardens Drive
Suite S02.
Skylake State Bank Bidg
N Miami Beach, Fla 33178
Telephone: (3051 844 1SS3
Attorney for Petitioner
Ml June 12. 18.26.
JulyS. 1881
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In bualness
under the fictitious name Sea
ramouche Fashion at 280 N E
2nd St Miami. Fla S31S2 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
M iramar Fashions Inc
By M cases Be Jar
Vice President
08837 June 12, 18. 26.
July 3. 1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buatneas
under the fictitious name RJ-.Y
KKCORDS at 51TA W 48th
Street Htaleah. Florida 33012
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
MF.SAN INCORPORATED
By SU1JMER SANCHEZ
President
CARLOS M MENDEZ. ESQ
Attorney for Applicant
2BA8 W 4th Ave
Hlaleah Florida SS012
WM0 June 12. 18.26.
^ JulyS. 1881
HBTlCE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
HVEN that the undersigned.
Ic.-inng to engage In business
.inder the fictitious name Five
laaaona Hoiel at 820 Ocean
I'rive Miami Beach. Florida
intends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
1 'iHirt of Dade County. Florida
-L'ii 1 iceazi I irive Realty Corp
a Florida corporation
ll\ Robert Ma'
President
JuneS. 12. IB. 2*. IBM.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT ORDER OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 11-6742 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THK MARRIAGE OF
IMESDDCON
petitioner Husband.
MAKGAKETDIXON
Respondent Wife.
TO MRS MARGARET
IHXON
5308 Austin Street
Detroit. Mich 48211
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that Uie action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
CEASE A CEASE attorney for
PetlUoner, whose addreaa is
2720 W Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida, and file Uie original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
10. 1881. otherwtae a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In Uie
-omplalnt or peUUon
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
lecuUve weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORID LAN
WITNESS my hand and Uie
teal of aald court at Miami,
lorlda on this B day of June.
881
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal I
HAROLD CEASE, ESQ
tT.ASEACEASE
2720 W Flagler St.
Miami. Fla. Ml IB
Attorney for PetlUoner
0aB4S June 12. IB. 36:
July S. 1861
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
irVBN that Uie undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Mlra
mar Faahlons 11 at 1741 N W 20
Street. Miami. Fla 3S142 In
tends to reglater said name
with the Clerk of Uie Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Mlramar Fashions. Inc.
By MolaesBeJar
V Ice Prealdent
ajW June 12. 18.26.
July 3. 1881
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No.11-6307 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RF The Marriage Of
LILLIAN ROIJ.E
I'eUtloner
and
JOSEPH ROLLE
K.-spondent
NOTICE OK ACTION
Iii JOSEPH ROLLE
Residence I n*. *
rOC ARE NOT1KIEK that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy oi raur
written defenaes. if any. on B.
I LEVY ESQ Attomev for
Petitioner. 633 N K 167 St..
N MB, Fl S3162 on or before
July 6. 1881. and file Uie
original with Uie clerk of this
court, otherwise a default will
be entered against you
Dated May 28. 1881
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk
by M J Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
08822 June 8. 12. IB. 26. 1881.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Uie undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name C'eat
SI Ron at 2280 N E 163rd St. N.
Miami Beach. Fla 33160 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Norms Lopez
Sylvia Modesto
Ltvtar Bonopaladlno
08831 June 12, IB. 26;
JulyS. 1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Uie undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under Uie fictitious name Mor
eno Habtf, Trustee d-b-a Char-
don Apartments at 14600 N.E.
6th Avenue. North Miami. FL
Intends to register aald name
with Uie Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florlda
Moreno Hablf. Trustee
GuillermoSostrhln. Eaq.
Attorney for
Moreno Hablf. Trustee
<*840 JuneS. 12. 18.26. lBa-1


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JofjJ .t. 17 1*11


idv.Jui26. 19H1
JtathtJhricMw
Page 15-B
The Anti-Defamation League honored Eastern Airlines at a recent meeting.Pictured Heft to
riant) "re Arthur N. Teitelbaum, Southern Area Director. Leonard L Abess, Honorary Na-
tional Chairman; Russell L. Ray., Jr.. honoree; Robert Adler. Chairman "Florida Thousand";
Mrs Samuel Levine. National Chairman of Development; and Allan 8. Marolis. Chairman
florida Regional Hoard.
I)r Irving Lehrman, rabbi of Temple Kmanu-El. is shown with 11 graduates of his bat mitzvah
itudy group. The women were bat mitzvah recently during a Sahhath service dedicated to them
, Miami Reach congregation. From left are Elaine Barrist, Ruth Passik. Vicki Land.
Bonnie Lang. Trudy Ixteb. Sheila Kurte. president of the Temple Sisterhood, Rabbi Lehrman.
i rta Kaye. chairman of the bat mitzvah study group. Erma Podvin. Judi Meyers, (iail
Harris, and Leslie Harris.
v M HOBIW <" *** '*
Id MemonaK'napel
K SMITH Irving. Miami Hearh
. w Irving n Miami Dm oh
.. irasdeCbapal
:us l.ee tl N Miami June
riapel
KALUCX Nathan C 3. N Miami
, h lunel? Riverside Chapel
-man
Mn FIlMCI M M Miami
Junel KubinChapel
I Ivu Mlairl Retch
Chapel
.Man Samuel M North Miami.
rersktoChapal
ReaaUnd Miami Bum Kubin
.,-el
Dr Benjamin Miami lune
II Ku>ride Chapel
RDSENBLOUM Harr> M Coral
luntll Riverside I'hapel
l M n Mialyaisxl. June
le Chapel
\MM Bssjlf I H Pnmpano
- Riverside Chapel
KI.N It Martin Kdaard June
Mm.irsh Chapel
IRAN VTK (iussle
KORCHNOY Michael K Miami
Bsrh lune in Riverside Chapel
;>:\ ITZ Evalya June IB
LEVY Rosalind Miami Rubin Chapel
MOSKOWtTZ, Jacob J 71. Hollywood
Juni Riverside Chapel
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OAOf COUNTY. RLORIO*
PROBATE DIVISION
FIN Nat I MI*
oivumm a
IN RE ESTATE OF
AK 1.14A HENLEY
l*.esed
NOTICE OK
ADMINISTRATION
The administration ol ths
late of ZKLMA HENLEY
feceased PUa Number l pending in the Circuit Court
tor DADE County. Florida.
Probsie Division, the address
o which Is T Waal Flakier
Street Miami. Florida U1W
Tb namaa and addresses of
Ul personal representative
w the personal represents
-*' sttorney aft) set forth
below
AU InlaroaUd parsons are re
^Ired to nia wh this court.
"THIN THREE MONTHS OF
THF. FIRST PUBLICATION
<* THIS NOTICE (11 ail
claims sgainat the esuie and
;>' any objacUon by an in
"rested person to whom notice
* mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
"lions of the personal repre
entstive. venue or Jurtadlc
"on of the court
*U- CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
NOT SO EIIJED WILL
"K KOREVER BARRED
*ubllcaUon of In Is Notice has
begun on June M. 1141
I'eraonal RepreaenUtH -
Mildred L MUler
XNMN W 26 Ct
pa Lock*. Fla llift*
Attorney for Personal
''presentatrve
M.mrr.oAijjuT*
M'MN.PA..
* hlnfton Ave
Miami Beach. Fla SUM
>bone OMitnilOO
June
d
Kenneth M hay. i we pre--:
dent of Ru erside Memorial
Chapels, has been appointed
manager of the North Miami
Beach Riverside branch. He
has been associated with the
firm for l.'i years and is chair-
man of the board of the
(ireater Miami Chapter of
Men's ORT Bnai Brith.
Congregation Beth Torah.
Knights of Pythias, and
Miami Beach Jaycees are
among other organizations in
which he is active.
MARGER
..r.1 :n l.auderhll! andformerlyof
Miami Beach passed aw.v June 22
Surviving are his ife Jean, sons.
Jeflrt-v and Hr IVinald. brother
r Thelm.i Stein and six
/r.indchlldren Services were held June

ZARROW
DUUna Porvln, Bay Harbor Islands.
. June IT A resident for the
past 35 years, formerly of Detroit Sur
viwng are her buaband Hemard.
parents David and Adei I'orvin and
Bett) Braun Services were held
June mat Riverside Chapei
SEtTLea Joseph. Miami Bea.-h RuMn
Chai
SPECTOR Dr Samuel 71. Hollywimd.
June 17 Levitt Wein.steln Memorial
l"ha(
iLPERI Murray 77 N Miami June
.'1 I,ev lit VAeinsteli.
URABER Uiuis H LasM Worth.
June IV Riverside Chapel
KOCM Oaftnida. tl Hollywood. June
II Rivaratda Chapel
Ml < Miami June 22
STROMFELD Murray H 67. Miami
Beach June 21 Riverside Chapel
FOR SALE
SINGLE CEMETERY
PLOT. FOR INFOR-
MATION PLEASE CALL
573 5577 9: a.m. to 4: p.m.
July S. 1M1

GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Optn Iwtrr Dej C'eiea Joebslh
J40 SW 57fh Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Obituaries
MESSE
.(1st-. 97. passed away Thursday.
JlUMJ 1H. in Chicago. Illinois.
Loving mother of Inez Krensky
of Miami Heach. darling grand
mother of Marry and Marylin
Smith, Herbert and Arlent
Krensky and Thomas Gerard.
and the late Judith Krensky
Gerard, proud great-grand-
mother ol Lou Ann. Joe and
David Smith. Leslie and Andrea
Krensky. Jamie and John
Gerard Interment in Chicago.
Mnnrlav.liiiw>22. 1981
HARRIS
Sadabelle Ruth. Kl Miami Beach,
passed away June 16 A resident of 20
years, formerly of Minneapolis. Minn
She had been a member of B'nal B'rith.
Hadassah Sisterhood of Temple
Menorah founding member of Temple
B'nal Zlon founding member of Beth El
Synagogue In Miami, member of the
Order of Kastern Star, and MUrathl.
surviving are her husband Samuel,
daughter Madeline Maltaway. sons.
Wallace I. Harris and Stanley I
Harris. 10 grandchildren and nine
great grandchildren Services were
held June 17. with local arrangements
by Riverside Chapel
SOBEL
Mona H writer, artist, business
woman passed away June 16 She had
been a resident of Coral Gables since
the early 50s. formerly of New York
For the past 29 years she had been a
Miami real estate broker and owner of
the Trail Rug Mart She was a member
of the Coral Cables Art Club and the
South Miami Over 60 Club Survivors In
elude a son. I'eter B Sobel. and three
grandchildren Services were held June
tl at Riverside Chapel.
VINKBKRi; Ix>uls J June22
VAASSKKMAN Charles
WHITE Mrs Anna H 90 Miami
Beach. June 21 Newman Funeral
Home Mt Nebo Cemetery
ABT. Sylvia M Hallandale. June 22
Usn/Kt Weinsteln
HARRIS
Alex E 70, Miami Pf^*!^,^
15 A resident for 31 years. MMftJ of
Philadelphia. Surviving are hla artta.
Rose. sons. Harvey iJllll of Pj"J'g"
Pines, and Mickey -Carol" of WBuiow
Township, N.J brother Sol of King,
ton, NY. and nine grandchUdreri Ser
vice, were held June 17 at Riverside
Chapel
KOCH
Gertrude. 62. Hollywood, paased away
June 18 A resident for 21 years, for-
merly of Mlllvule. N J Surviving are
her husband. Tobias, son, Dr Howard
Koch of Miami Beach; daughter. Ruth
Koch of Hollywood brother Pr Leo
Taft of Great Neck, LI.. NY and
sister, Sylvia Lleberoff of Delray
Heach Services were held June IB at
Riverside Chapel.
POVLIN
Dr Sheppard S. 80. Boca Raton, paaaed
away June 21 A realdent for 16 years,
formerly of New York Surviving are his
wife. Marceila of Boca Raton, son. Ira
Povlln. duaghter Paula (Jlmi
Spadacclnl of Charlotte. Vt and five
grandchUdren. Services were held June
23 at Rubin Chapel.
BARON
Irving A N Miami Beach, passed
away June 21 A resident since 1964,
formerly of New York Surviving are his
wife. Evelyn: daughters, Gllda Zeld-
man of N Miami Beach. Carol Sllver-
steln of Palm Harbour and Susan Bell of
Clearwater. alter. Jean Lelner and
Pearl Gold, both of Miami 11 grand-
children and five great grandchildren
Services were held at Riverside Chapel
LIBERMAN
Alan. 78. Miami, paaaed away June 17 A
resident for the past 28 years, formerly
of New York City Surviving are his
wife, Helen, a daughter. Sherry Lleber-
man Fallkaft of Miami one grandchild,
and one greatgrandchild Services
were held June 18 at Gordon Funeral
Home with entombment
Mausoleum
in Mt Nebo
Levitt \ Fe
EVITT WW EINSTEIN
memorial chapels

When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Reprevemed by S Levitt, f O
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 7bth Rd Forest Hills. NY.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
RUBIN
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL
Leonard Zilbert
FOUNOCR
Three Generations of our
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Family Serving You in
Dade
Miami Beach
1701 Alton Road
538-6371
AND
INQUIRE
About
Pro-Arrangement*
Broward
Hallandale
100 S. Dixie Hwy.
456-4011


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Full Text
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FILES


JnMiMBm
Campaigners Recognition Day
Over 300 participants in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1981 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund were feted at
Campaigners Recognition Day held on June 10
at the Carillon Hotel.
Every GMJF campaigner who covered at
least 5. 10 or 20 pledge cards on behalf of the
!9gl CJA-IEF received an award and was the
guest of the Federation at the coctail reception,
dinner and awards presentation.
Among the GMJF leadership present were (left to right):
Edmund Abramson, member of GMJF Board of Di-
rectors: Marilyn K. Smith, GMJF officer and chairman of
Big Gifts Division; and Harry B. Smith, a past president
and member of the GMJF Board of Directors.
On hand were (left to right): Kenneth Schwartz, Worker
H>. '.utrnvnt and Recognition Committee chairman: Irma
Hraman. chairman. Women's Division Benefactor
catergory, Larry Schantz. vice chairman. Attorney's
Dii ision, and Elaine Bloom, member of GMJF Board of
Dl
Pictured are (left to right): Aaron Podhurst. chiarman,
vr Duision and member of GMJF Board of Di-
Paula Friedland co-chairman. Women's Division
tttr Trustee category: and Joel Friedland
Golden Rose Deli &
Sub Shops
7397SW40thCt.
Miami .__ _
Catering For AU Occasions ^^
Luncheon* and
Wedding Birthday*
"Weekly Specials
Samuel S. Smith will take
office on Saturday as presi-
dent of the Florida Bar,
during the Bar's 31st Annual
Convention at Innisbrook.
Smith is a partner in the
Miami Beach law firm of
Smith and Mandler. P.A.
1 ww A\ I: {iT m a
A plaque was presented to
Murray Rosenthal (right),
vice president and branch
manager of the Washington
Savings Bay Harbor office,
located at 1132 Kane Con-
course, by Herbert Schneider,
president of Surf-Bal-Bay
Lions Club, for its continuing
community service efforts.
Jewish Worship Hour
Rdbbi Sheldon J Harr of
Temple Kol Ami. Plantation, will
appear on The Jewish Worship
Hour" on Channel 10 on Sunday.
June 28, at a.m.
Page 3-B
Full Scholarships For
College Study In Israel
American Jewish students can receive full scholarships
enabling them to study for academic degrees in most of
universities, yeshivas, teachers colleges and art. music and tecn-
nical institutes, it was announced by the Israel Aliyah Center.
According to Joshua Shomer. Aliyah Center Shaliach in
Miami, the plan, which has been renewed this year, has assumed
increased importance because of the steep rise in the cost of
higher education in the United States and the dangerous trend
towards assimilation and intermarriage of Jewish students on
American campuses.
Thousands of American students have gone to Israel for
Junior Year Programs." said Shomer. "But only a few hundred
are studying for a degree and receiving the scholarships for the
full three or four years. Most students and their parents just
haven't heard about the program."
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology in Haifa. Tel-Aviv University. Bar-Ilan University.
Weizman Institute of Science. Haifa University. Ben-Gunon
Jniversity of the Negev. the Rubin Academy of Music. Betzalel
\rt Academy are among the many fully accredited universities
.ind colleges where qualified American Jewish students can
benefit from the scholarship plan.
Free tuition, free dormitory housing or aparment rental subsi-
dies; stipends for food, transportation, books, and entertaui-
ment; and loan assistance for the plane flight to Israel are the
key elements of aid offered.
"In America parents often pay $10,000 a year to send each son
or daughter to college, or instead accept federal loans which
must be repaid for years afterwards," Joshua noted, "But Israel
is offering an education of equal or higher quality for almost no
cost to the student."
The Israel Student Authority, a joint body of the Jewish
Agency and the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption, operates
the scholarship program with funds contributed by world Jewry
through the United Jewish Appeal.
"The program is offered to Jewish students with the studies
expectation that many of them after three or four years of
study in Israel will choose to remain and settle permanently
in the Jewish homeland," Joshua stressed.
"Israel and world Jewry are prepared to subsidize free college
education for Jewish students because it's important that our
youth have the chance to spend several years studying in Israel
and even more important that they adapt to Israeli life and
decide to make Aliyah," said Joshua.
The scholarship is available for bachelors, master's or doc-
toral studies. Since Israel university studies are conducted in
Hebrew, most prospective undergraduate students from the
U.S. and Canada enroll in a one year, fully subsidized pre-
academic course in Hebrew to bring their language ability up to
the required level. This too. is fully subsidized.
Further information on these scholarship programs are avail-
able at Israel Aliyah Center in Miami.
PAINT
THE TOWN
RED, WHITE
AND BLUE
WITH WASHINGTON SAVINGS...
FREE DRAWING.
Win a Super Patriotic Prize by simply filling out an entry blank
between June 24th and July 1st.
2 winners will be selected at each office. Thursday. July 2nd
Make a deposit on July 2nd and receive a FREE coupon for
Baskm Robbins Ice Cream while supplv lasts* /
Beginning July 1st. the Washington Savings medallion will be
offered to customers making deposits of $100 or more and
opening accounts
So"y Not available at (our) 1234 Washington Avenue or 810 Lincoln Road (offices)
WASHINGTON
SAVINGS
AND IOAN ASSOCIATION OTHOIHOA
A service of
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Israel's Religious Pj
Coathssed fresa Pw IB
l)r Abdei Meguid Inghtt. Deputy Prime Minister for Economics and Finance of the Arab >:
Repubbc of Egypt, is being congratulated by Prof Michael Seta lie ft I, president of Israel
Weizmann Institute of Science, and Morris L Levmson. board chairman of the American 1
( ummittee for the Weismann Institute, follouing his address to its International Leadership j
Conference in Los A ngeies
r
I
Headlines

Homage To Weizmann Institute

ss
I
:-:
1
7.
raying homage to Israel "s Weizmann I nstitute
of .Science and the great land that produced it
VK^I.Meguid.th*ArabRepUbJKofF^pt,S;^rpt\^ ;t^lv^ ~1"red from the ^
Deputy Pnme Minister forKcooom^ and 1 5S ^ F* lh* strwt Pf
Finance, has forecast a fruitful era of scientific &, n ., v'h"'ll,r chairman of the ManhatUn
and economy cooperation between his country %)** M"l<*> Department <*i conference of
and the Jewish State x tbt" n*1*0" leading textbook publishers
I* Meguid. popularly deacribed as the i J?" l"ni*r*nc* J'r>tly sponsored b> the Ann
economic czar of Egypt told 400 guests at I*',am*t,on Dfague of B nai B nth and the Asso :
tendmg the three-day InternationaJ Weizmann & V"^" Xmeflc*n Publishers, was held in New
leadership Conference in Los Angeles We look ^ i lhe tn*rn*' of th* "n*e of the Jews in :':
at the Weizmann Institute of Science with great | ,"xlbook*
pride, we cherish it. we love it. we consider it a :: ,n *"* P*P*' SchweiUer urged representatives |
center of excellence for the entire Middle East "' putm-run* firms u, strive to rectify this situa
No changes of administration in Israel or new 4 ]*"* b*-c*u'*' ,l """ students to inhurrn.Miv
tensions mother Arab countries could change the ;: '"7''* lhw stereotypes and supports their i
relationship between the Jewish State and Egypt. ? ,nd,"e^,l
Dr Meguid. noted Middle East economist and ::: :-::::***. m
regional planner, emphasized Th. ch,lrm,n of the I)(nocritir N,lK)n., (,>m |
w-xxxw:-::: ::: w:>*>-.::::yXtiWOW-M-ys. mittee has termed the apparent decision of the :::
The American Jewish Congress has urged the X **"**" Administration not to fill the post of As- :
Senate to reject a sweeping anti abortion :: swtam *r*ur> of Slate for Human Rights |
bill, arguing that the proper role of government 1 P**uiant *nd unseemly, and said such a deb- :::
in a free society is to allow the different religious ::: ?n TrouMJ*?d oul lhe wors possible signal to |
traditiofu to inculcate their own beliefs about the ^ Md ,,*"s bout bom L s foreign policy is g
appropnateneae of abortion and to leave the final :::: "*"
decision to the woman, answering to God and | Charles T Manatt. speaking before a meeting |
oon* In testanony before the Senate Judiciary Sub- i ^ntS ^P00*1*0" "> suggestions by top White
.mmittee on the Separation of Powers. Henrv I HU9e "k^* **d recent newspaper columns
committee on the Separation of Powers. Henry 1 jU8e
Siegman. executive director of the American .:^?:*Mn* "!* Whit* Hou* W"W consider
Jewish Congress, stated that "thia legislation ?: ^"run "* poet and not nominating a
j takes sides not between a moral and a permiaaive :? 7^f*cm
approach, but between two conflicting ap- :? L*,ever
| Proaches that are equally grounded in profound 1 While it is understandable that the President
religious conviction and in a deaire to enhance the g disappomted at the rejection of his nominee by
aacredneaa and dignity of Ufa." g the Senate, it would demean the Office of the
Siegmaa told the panel that AJCongreas also ?!!!^ent **} refu*e 5? fUJ th* P*lttoa of Assistant
opposes the bill because "it usurps the role of the I j"*1^ SUte for Hum"n RihU out of preai
Supreme Court as the final arbiter of the Coneti I dent,*J P"!"* Manatt said
Rabbi Henry I SobaL of Brazil, speaking to f < hnstians and Jews, was elected honorary presi
embers of the Zionan Organization of America S dent of tne International Council of Christians
an New York, expressed a personal point of view I "^ Jew at "n annual meeting in Heppenheim
that Jacobo Tunerman "deaervea all the publicity 3 West Cermany.
"Hia ordeal was not caused by his being a Jaw; S :-:-:::-:-:::X::;:::::::x:::::::>:::^^::w:::::::::::::::::: ::::::-::
paradoxically, his survival was." said RabbiV- iw v-u-x-u m. .. .
Sobel who was on a lecture toor to ZOA Diatrictk aL"', ,L^ IT %Ane ^ been **
v de*n of lhe *" culty of Humanities at the Hebrew
1
I
I
throughout the country. "The army in Argentina
did not want the label of anti-Semitiam on its
shameful record of human rights. "
Timcrman. editor and publisher of the liberal
newspaper La Opinion, waa kidnapped by
.--------* ---..^.., ,i lIlr nporew
University of Jerusalem for a three-year term He
succeeds Prof. Nehemia Levtzion.
The new dean is a professor of geography, spe- i
riaUzing in the cultural and historical geography!
of Israel. He was born in Petach Tikvah in 1 w*

Una in 1979. fe rr0' Ben-Aneh was chairman of the Depart
._ ,. B **rved as head of the Institute of His tor v
The neglect of Jewish hiatorym American high g (.eography and Regional Studies in the Facultv
school and collage textbooks helps foster anti \-v. of Humanities racuity
.Semitiam. ^cording to a noted Catholic acholar won ^ ^ Zvi ^^ ^ W1 ^ ^ ^
iv. **= iwi tvi rrize in iJfYl |
"Students fill in the gapa with anti-Semitic & on the rediscovery of the Holy I.and
welcomed the creation of Tami
The NRP. which has become in-
creasingly rightist in religious
and foreign policy over recent
years, had virtually declared Oa
preference for Likud over Labor
Its leader* especially Hammer
and Gush Emunun leader Rabbi
Haim Druckman have made it
clear that their party, given the
choice, would prefer to cooperate
in a Begin coalition rather than
ith labor's Shimon Peres
THE RISE OF Tami could
mean that the NRP will not be
iP\-n that choice While Abu
Hatzeira himself has said Tarn,
would team up with either of the
to main partiev hi* number two
man on the Tami lit. Aharon
I'zan. a former LaborAe. has
made clear his own preference lor
Labor
I remain a Stapatnih at
heart. a> I'zan. a Moshav
leader w ho served as M mister of
I uhurv in Labor s last
mmeni There is a distinct
i* too that Abu Halzeira s
raarntmrnt ->\pr his tn-atment by
hi* Cabinet rolleagi> inng the
drawn out laasaaj m againt
him 'he wi< acquitted on briharv
charge* after a marathon trial"
xtend* n"t onl\ to Burg of h
"wn party out to Hher members
of th. pssjaaaaj Likud-led coalition
Thr def-<:i.m of \:>u Halzeira.
and with him Moroccan born
Benzion Rubin of Burgs
Ijimifm- faction in the NrP
j> the lateM but b> far lhe
MM of a series of blow* that
haw r-k*J the party over recent
nsi> In-^jan it is fair
jy. with the tippling of the
man wno many Ielt
'Minister of Rel,g10n8 ,j
Tta.wmsengmeendby.p,,
by Hammer Md Yehud,
Meir. the chief* f lht,
guard faction L-.
Abu Halzeira who w .
<**Py m th.- Utai ft
faction
THE PLOTTERS ^1
clear that they f.-lt thenU
be the rising force w,thia 3
and that, sooner or late
would mo\- :,, dispUce
himself
But the creation of tat!
Beg v,
Herut hiaaJnajin
Cohen and Mow Shamir
cold wind* of (tinmi frootb]
right The yoang Bnei .\km
doctrinal.*! -Kullcap i
settler* on t
their *upporter- ury
the new group whose ,
nationalism o.rr.piunentd
dream- of rwtorah] Bi
l*rael Th, N
guard leaders &
appeared Uinn-c) I j theirs
of the Camp I >av id autu
plan and tht- peace treatv
r-tcypt
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June 26. 1981
JmMnutMm
Page7-A
Mourns Old Mentor
[Jewish Friend's Death Left France's Mitterand Bereft
| MICHEL GURTINKIEL
,n Chronicle Syndicate
kRlS L*88 than 2*
after being elected
,ident of France,
orrand visited the
e of Georges Dayan in
[Jewish section of Mont-
I cemetery.
who died two
ago, was the French
list leader's closest
and mentor, and
red a discreet but de-
role in shaping his
itical career. Mitterrand
said to have been so
after his death that
[considered giving up his
itical activities.
in 1916 in the Western
of Charente, Mittr-
family was Catholic and
otic. He himself is said to
sympathized with the
st Action Francaise or-
ation before the Second
War. but he steadfastly
i this
; WAS taken prisoner of war
40. but escaped and returned
France in 1942. Here he imme-
>!> joined the Resistance
at under the name of
Nazi Camp
{Commandant
OnTrial
[IEW YORK (JTA) Karl
, a 61 -year old Long Island
at. went on trial in Federal
in Westbury for concealing
(activities as commandant of a
iconcentration camp when he
the United Sates in 1961
i became a citizen in 1960.
charges, brought by the
Justice Department which
to revoke Linnas' citizen
accuse him of participating
fhe persecution of thousands of
cent persons," primarily
rs. at the Tartu camp in
Ionium 1941 1943.
[There was no gas chamber at
icamp. but many inmates were
uled by firing squad, and
rrs were tortured, the Justice
tment said. According to a
tment official it was Linnas
prepared the "death lists"
selected people who he or-
Ishot
[*hen he applied for entry into
1 U.8.. Linnas misrepresented
background by claiming to
ft been a university student in
onia during the war, the
* Department charged.
1
U.S.Acte
ainst More
Ag
Nazi Aides
^tissed freaa Psgs 1-A
*n he appbed for a U.S. visa in
'"* 'n 1960. He is alleged to
committed acts o7 per-
ut*on against aviliana because
"*. reljgion, national origin
'Political opinion. His member
^ "> the Latvian political
ee constituted assistance to
Germany, the Justice
tment contends.
I^CCORDING to U.S. District
^*y Gary Beta in Tampa.
^alaauakas ordered Jews
*?d..to the Kaunas ghetto
confiscated their valuables
b no evidence that he
"""dry involved in the ex
*J of 12.000 Jews in the
zs2dCaP,Ud ctakm- l9il-
In 1943. be met a young under-
ground fighter, Danielle Gouze.
whose family were active in
sheltering Jews from persecution.
He married her after the Libera-
tion.
Mitterrand was a junior official
in General de Gaulle's provisory
government, and in 1944 he be-
came leader of a small left of
center group, the Socialist Demo-
cratic Union of the Resistance.
He then held several ministerial
offices, including the Ministry of
the Interior.
At that time, he was staunchly
anti-Communist, and he played a
decisive part in the repression of
Algerian nationalists in French
North Africa.
HOWEVER, in 1968. Mitter-
rand switched to the left by op-
posing the establishment of the
Fifth Republic under General de
Gaulle, a regime which he de-
scribed as "authoritarian."
Advocating a strategy of union
for Socialists and Communists,
he became the unchallenged lead-
er of the Opposition after captur-
ing a massive 45 percent of the
votes in the 1965 Presidential
Elections.
In 1971. Mitterrand called for a
new Socialist Party to replace the
SFIO. the Section Francaise de
LInternationale Ouvriere, which
was in chaos.
By merging with SFIO and
other left-wing groups, the new
Socialist Party quickly emerged
as a strong partner of the Com-
munist Party.
SINCE THEN however, the
so-called Union of the Left has
been anything but unified, being
heavily defeated by Mr. Valery
discard d'Estaing, in the 1974
Elections following internal
squabbles.
In 1978. Mitterrand resolved to
stage a new more "national"
strategy and engaged in various
contacts with non-Giscardian
Conservatives, including the
Rassemblement pour la Re-
publique (RPR), the party led by
Jacques Chirac, the Mayor of
Paris.
At the same time, he strongly
opposed Soviet expsnsionism in
Afghanistan, and made clear his
support for the Camp David
accords.
A charming. fatherly per-
sonality, Mitterrand entertains
excellent contacts with the press
and also with many writers and
academics.
He has written several books
on politics, and his latest, Ici et
Maintenant, (Here and Now), re-
veals a surprising degree of
understanding for the "religious
commitment" of Mr. Menachem
Begin, the Israeli Prime Minister,
to the land of Israel.
He claims that he himself read
the Bible and believes in God.
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Page6-A
+Jewist> rtcrkMan
Friday, June 26
1981
Testimony Shows
Iraq Aimed for Three Atom Bombs
Continued from Page 1 A
said by Cranston's office to be
strong supporter of the peaceful
use of nuclear energy for making
electricity
Sen. Cranston, however, read
portions of an analysis Richter
provided the U.S. Mission to the
IAEA in 1960. "The available in-
formation points to an ag-
gressive, coordinate program by
Iraq to develop a nuclear weap-
ons capability during the next
five years," Cranston said.
"As a nuclear safeguards
inspector at the IAEA, my con-
cern and complaint is that Iraq
will be able to conduct this pro-
gram under the auspices of the
Non-proliferation Treaty and
while violating the provision of
N IT." Richter wrote.
"The IAEA safeguards are
totally incapable of detecting the
production of plutonium in large-
siae material test reactors under
the presently constituted safe-
guards arrangements. Perhaps
the most disturbing implication
of the Iraqi nuclear program is
that the NPT agreement has had
the effect of assisting Iraq in ac-
quiring the nuclear technology
and nuclear material for its pro-
gram by absolving the co-
operating nations of their moral
responsibility by shifting it to the
IAEA.
"THESE cooperating nations
have thwarted concerted in-
ternational criticism of their ac-
tions by pointing to Iraq's sign-
ing of NPT while turning away
from the numerous, obvious and
compelling evidence which leads
to the conclusion that Iraq is em-
barked on a nuclear weapons pro-
gram," Richter charged.
Cranston, the Senate Assistant
Minority Leader, made available
Holocaust Survivors Hear Plea
To Help U.S. Prosecute Nazis
By BARBIE ZELITZER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Allan Ryan Jr., director of the
U.S. Department of Justice's Of-
fice for Special Investigations
(OSII. issued a plea here to Holo-
caust survivors around the world
to help in locating Nazi war
criminals now residing in the
US
"My office has one purpose."
Ryan told a press conference at
the World Gathering of Holo-
caust Survivors in Jerusalem, "to
seek out. investigate and pros-
ecute those persons who took
part in Nazi persecutions and
who received an American
citizenship which was never
rightfully theirs. Our ultimate
goal is to remove them from the
United States."
Set up three years ago, Ryan's
office is presently investigating
20 cases of such s nature But
Ryan believes there may be
hundreds more. In that light, he
needs to make contact with as
many survivors as possible. "The
cooperation of survivors can
make the difference between win-
ning and losing s case. The story
must be told to American judges
if we are to prevail." he said.
Ryan attended the World
Gathering to talk with heads of
survivor organirations. He circu-
lated a questionnaire to all
Gathering participants in hopes
that this might broaden his
contacts with Holocaust sur-
vivors from around the world.
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to the reporters the IAEA docu-
ments which he said were not
classified.
He said the documents point
out that the IAEA "safeguards
simply are not comprehensive to
do the job." Cranston added that
"The glaring weakness of the
inspection system could have
contributed to Israel's decision
that a preemptive strike was
necessary." He called fo
strengthening the IAEA and it
safeguards.
Walter Stoessel. Jr., Undersec-
retary of State for Political Af
fairs, conceded that the IAEA
safeguards are not "foolproof
and the United States would like
them strengthened. But. he add-
ed. the U.S. attaches great
importance to the system as it
now exists.
SEN. JOHN GLENN. 11) .
Ohio) said that "Israel took the
law in its own hands" in what he
said was probably the first "vote
of no-confidence" in the in-
ternational inspections system.
He said that the Israeli raid may
finally have awakened public
opinion to the necessity for nu-
clear non-proliferation.
Glenn said he sent s letter to
President Reagan, asking him to
call a meeting of nuclear sup-
pliers to begin putting real safe-
guards into effect.
Top Administration officials
attempted to have Richter's
testimoney before the Senate
committee declared as classified.
Nuclear Expert Says IAEA
Was Fooled at Osirak
Continued from Page 1-A
mitted to look at the "hot cells" provided by Italy or other
material which he said Iraq could use to make nuclear weapons.
He said Iraq would have been able to make a weapon in about
three years.
RICHTER NOTED that clandestine material can easily be
moved before an inspector arrives from the IAEA heaquarters.
He noted that before an inspector can go to a country, he must
obtain a visa so that none of his trips can be unannounced In
addition, Richter said that since 1976 only Hungarian and Sov-
iet nationals have been allowed in Iraq as inspectors. He added
that a French national was approved in January, but he has not
made any inspections as yet.
Dr. Herbert Kounts, chairman of the Nuclear Energy
Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New
York, said that even if the inspector could not check other
materials, there were always "tell-tale" signs of nuclear weap-
ons were being built. Kounts also said that if Iraq wanted to
produce nuclear weapons, there were more sophisticated re-
actors than the one France was building for them. Richter said
that Iraq wanted the more advanced reactors but France would
not sell it to them.
Kounts and Dr. Robert Selden of the Los Alamos Labora-
tory in New Mexico, said if the reactor had been operational
when Israel bombed it, the radiation effect would only have
been for about 1.000 yards around the area and Baghdad would
not have been endangered.
PRIME MINISTER MENACHEM Begin had said that
Israel acted when it did because if it waited until the reactor be-
came operational, it would have cost thousands of lives in
Baghdad.
Richter said that while he was with the IAEA, he knew
nothing about the French-Iraqi secret agreement which was re-
vealed this weak and which was claimed to be a safeguard
against the development of nuclear weapons in Iraq. Sen. Paul
Sarbanes (D., Md.) asked why France and Iraq had kept it
secret since he noted no one knew about it and thus the agree-
ment could not reassure anyone.
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