The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02697

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
rdTewislfo FloridllamL
folume
53 Number 41 TWO SECTIONS
Combining THt JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Miami, Florida Friday. October 10, 1980
I tnastiochtt By Mail *o Cents Price 35 Cents
In Wake of Bombing
March to Protest French Terrorism
Filling in Background 12-A
By EDWARD EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Tens of thousands of
I Jews marched for the third consecutive day to
protest the bomb attack on a Paris synagogue
last Friday night in which three people were
killed and 33 were injured. It was the worst
[anti-Semitic attack since the end of the war
and the first to have caused fatalities. It
capped a series of anti-Semitic attacks last
weekend for which a neo-Nazi group, the
European National Fascists, claimed
responsibility.
Tens of thousands of non-Jews, trade
unionists, students and politicians
representing the entire spectrum of France's
political and social life, joined the Jewish
demonstrators. The outpouring of solidarity
and the universal rage over the attack
prompted many observers to note that the
French Jewish community has never been as
strong as it is now and the anti-Semitic and
neo-Nazi groups as small and as isolated.
President Valery Giscard d'Estaing has
personally taken over the police investigation
and Prime Minister Raymond Barre and
Interior Minister Christian Bonnet have
ordered special units of France's riot police to
guard all Jewish schools, synagogues and
institutions. Police guards armed with
machineguns are conducting an around-the-
clock patrol near all Jewish institutions and in
business areas, such as the textile center,
where there are large Jewish concentrations.
Jewish defense groups, some belonging to
the Jewish Defense Organization and some
self-improvised, are also standing guard over
Jewish schools, synagogues and other in-
stitutions throughout the country.
Everywhere in Paris and in major French
provincial cities young Jews, some carrying
walkie-talkies and steel bars, are guarding
institutions and entire city areas. They stop
suspicious-looking cars and frisk passersby
and motorists. Others say they plan to "seek
revenge" for the synagogue bombing.
----------------------..11.11^-------------------
Bonnet Forced to Eat His Words
:
I
PARIS Despite Interior Minister
Christian Bonnet's vow that "This thing
will not repeat itself. I swear it to you,"
words he spoke within minutes following
the bombing of a Paris synagogue last
Friday night, another bomb explosion
rocked Paris Sunday as French police
continued their search among right-wing
militants for those responsible.
According to police here, a Dutch
woman tourist was injured seriously
when a bomb exploded in a car parked on
the Boulevard St. Germaine in the Latin
Quarter. The dutch woman, Carmelia
Van Pusselen, 33, was expected to lose
both her legs. She is not Jewish.
AN ANONYMOUS telephone caller
claimed responsibility for the blast in a
message to the French news agency,
Agence France Presse, declaring the
explosion to be the work of the
Revolutionary Nationalist Movement,
the extreme-rightist group whose leader
was one of 13 persons arrested following
the Friday night explosion.
Also reported here Sunday was an
attack upon a Moroccan Jew cut by a
knife by three men. They insulted him
for wearing a skull cap. Meanwhile, 50
miles from the West German border, a
French synagogue was defaced with
graffiti and swastikas painted on its
walls during the night.
.;.;.;v:.:::;:::::::::::v>:v:;:;:;:;:::;:::;:::v:-x-^
Vanessa Still at Issue
CBS Snubs Proposed Dialogue;
Miller too Busy to Get Involved
Sim one Veil
Ham's Poll
Israel Viewed
tore Favorably
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
privately commissioned
auis Harris poll, just re-
ased, shows that Amer-
ans favor U.S. military,
conomic and political sup-
ort for Israel by a greater
lajority than four years
.go; that they reject the
proposition that support of
Israel should be reduced to
latisfy the demands of the
rab oil-producing states;
Continued on Page 8-A
By ROCHELLE WOLK
NEW YORK (JTA) -
CBS-TV network officials
and playwright Arthur
Miller said that they would
turn down a request from
two Auschwitz-Birkenau
survivors for time to air a
dialogue between them and
Miller, author of the tele-
vision drama, Playing for
Time, which was broadcast
on the CBS network last
week.
The survivors are Marc
Berkowitz of New York City,
NY., and Alex Dekel of New
York City, both in their late
forties. As children, they were
subjects of the notorious Dr.
Josef Mengele's medical ex-
periments at the extermination
camp in southern Poland. They
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that they wanted the
dialogue with Miller to clear up
"deceptions" and "dangerous
fictionalizing" in Miller's version
of the story of Fania Fenelon, a
i
Continued on Page 6-A
JEWISH ANGER is so in-
tense that Jewish demonstrators
tried to storm the Presidential
residence, the Elysee Palace, and
the Ministry of Interior, and
came close to clashing with
French riot police. Tourists or
passersby who seemed to con-
form to the image of neo-Nazis
those with short-cropped hair and
wearing conservative dark suits
were harassed or beaten up.
Some were seen fleeing, with
blood over their faces.
Simone Veil, president of the
European Parliament, who was a
former government minister,
marched in one of the demon-
strations. She was surrounded by
an angry crowd which reproached
her for "supporting the gover-
nment." It took riot police close
to 20 minutes to extricate her and
her two companions, philosopher
Bernard Henri-Levy and artist
Marek Halter, and escort them to
safety.
All along the Champs Elysee.
in the Place d'Opera and in the
vicinity of the Presidential
Palace, hundreds of demon-
strators waved Israeli flags
throughout the day and late into
the night, with people shouting
"Israel shall live," and "Death to
the Nazis." The demonstrators
and almost the entire French
Jewish leadership blamed the
government, Giscard d'Estaing,
Barre and Bonnet for Friday
night's tragedy.
THE GOVERNMENT has
promised Chief Rabbi Jacob
Kaplan and Baron Alain de
Rothschild, president of the
Representative Council of Jewish
Organizations In France (CRIF),
that 200 police cars and three full
companies of riot police a total
of some 600 police will hen-
ceforth be assigned to special
Continued on Page 14-A
Ball Calls Israel:
'Enormous Inhibition' for U.S.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Former
Undersecretary of State
George Ball, long regarded
as an advocate of appeasing
the Arab states with regard
to Israel, said here that
Israel is "an enormous
inhibition" and is not "a
strategic asset" for the
United States.
Appearing on ABC-TVs
Issues and Answers, Ball made
his statements about Israel after
disclosing that he is now sup-
porting President Carter for re
election and has severed his
suport for Independent candidate
John Anderson, who is strongly
pro-Israel.
BALL, WHO was a leader
adviser on foreign affairs for
Anderson, clashed on the ABC
program with Richard Allen,
Continued on Pag* 11-A
m isioci, oo*u .v..~ ~----- ,--------o------------------------- -- ueorge Hall


Pae2-A
+ le*i*t fkrkJiairi
Friday. October io
Pictured at the John Wood Recording Studio in London, Rabbi Martin Hier. dean of the
Wiesenthal Center, reviews the narrative portion of the Center's "Genocide" multi-media
project with Elizabeth Taylor Warner and multi-media director. Arnold Schwartzman. Mrs.
Warner, who, along with Orson Welles donated her time and talent to participate in the first
multi-media presentation ever done on the Holocaust, will be the recipient of the first Simon
Wiesenthal Humanitarian Award at a dinner in Los Angeles Nov. 9.
Headlines
Israel Fifth Most Powerful Militarily
The London-based correspondent of the
Hebrew morning daily, Davar, cites a survey
made by English experts which includes some
remarkable data about the State of Israel. The
study has Israel listed as the fifth most powerful
military force in the world, immediately behind
the giants USSR, USA, China, and West
Germany. Among the lesser powers compared
with Israel are mentioned, France, India, Viet-
nam, South Korea and Taiwan. Following all of
these comes Great Britain.
The study further says that with respect to the
relative size of the population, Israel actually is
the first in the world in terms of professors, there
being 14,000 in Israel compared with 2,300,000 for
the entire world. Israel is also listed as third in the
world in terms of university graduates propor-
tional to population. Israel is eighth in engineers
and scientists and tenth in terms of the national
budget for education.
The new Ramot portable artificial kidney, the
smallest and lightest of its kind, has been
awarded the international IR 100 prize as one of
the 100 most significant technological in-
novations of the year1980
Developed by A.T. Ramot Plastics Ltd., a
subsidiary of Tel Aviv University's applied
research authority, Ramot, the artificial kidney
offers a new independence from the hospital
system and the constraints of hospital schedules
and manpower, which are so confining in con-
ventional kidney dialysis today.
The brief-case sized Ramot artificial kidney,
weighing only 17 kilograms (1 kilo, equals 2.2
lbs.), features a microprocessor control system
which monitors and controls kidney functions and
operates the machine almost automatically. For
the patient, the use is so simple that he can use it
in his sleep and lead a next-to-normal life in his
waking hours.
Shirley Hufstedler, Secretary of the newly
formed U.S. Department of Education, will
address the luncheon session of the Women's
American ORT 13th National Board Conference
in Houston on Oct. 23.
The address will be delivered to some 800
delegates of Women's American ORT,
representing 140,000 members of the organization
in over 1,200 chapters from coast-to-coast, as well
as distinguished conference participants from this
(country and abroad.
Claire Pyser is conference chairman, and Gerri
Prince is conference co-chairman at the National
Headquarters of Women's American ORT in New
2 York City.
The 13th National Board Conference of
/ Women's American ORT, Oct. 20 to 23, will usher
& in the second century of ORT's vocational and
technical education program, during which time
the ORT network has provided over two million
people with modern skills ranging from carpentry
and plumbing to telecommunications, avionics
and computer technology.
Richard H. Adler, former vice president of the
Greater Cleveland Growth Association, will
receive the American Jewish Committee's
Distinguished Leadership Award at the annual
dinner of the AJC's National Executive Council
Oct. 25 at the Bond Court Hotel in Cleveland.
The dinner will be the featured event at the
four-day sessions of the Executive Council, which
are being held Oct. 23 to 26. Among others who
are scheduled to address the group are Sol M.
Linowitz, President Carter's special envoy for
Middle East negotiations; Arthur F. Burns,
former chairman of the Federal Reserve Board;
Teddy Kollek, Mayor of Jerusalem; and the Rev.
Dr. Jimmy R. Allen, former president of the
Southern Baptist Convention, and now president
of its radio and television commission.
Adler was executive head of the Cleveland
Growth Association from 1972 to 1977.
Previously, he had been president of the Joseph
and Feiss Co., a leader in the men's clothing
industry', and had also served as president of the
Clothing Manufacturers Association of the
United States.
Mrs. Ariella Kisch has been appointed director
of the Fund-Raising Department in the Division
of Public Affairs at the Technion-Israel Institute
of Technology in Haifa.
Mrs. Kisch is a graduate of Tel Aviv
University, where she studied Jewish history and
English literature. She was a member of the
World Wizo Executive and Head of its Fund-
Raising Department between 19"?0 and 1977. In
1977, Mrs. Kisch served as head of the Office of
the Minister of Agriculture, Aril Sharon.
In 1978. Mrs. Kisch returned to Wizo and was
appointed Head of Organization Department
until 1980. She was a Wizo delegate to the World
Zionist Congress in 1974 and in 1978.
Republican presidential candidate Ronald
Reagan and his chief foreign policy advisers are
angry at Israeli Opposition leader Shimon Peres
for "belittling" Regan's expertise on foreign
affairs while in Washington three months ago.
Peres s remarks, made during background
briefings for American reporters, have been
published in The Wall Street Journal and The
Washington Post, which wrote, "A visiting
Israeli political leader was even more outspoken
(in discussing Regan). After a meeting with
Reagan, he told amost everyone he encountered in
Washington. Reagan knows as much about the
Middle East as I do about making films in
! [< "\ wood."
Families expect more
from
Riverside.
More service.
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
Jewish communities of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935. Riverside has been the standard by .vhich
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director irr Florida. The> are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs.
regardless of financial circumstances
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere e^se
in the world. _
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up to that trust.
Four locations serving Dade County:
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RIVERSIDE
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' ____________________


Friday. October 10.1980
+Jewistrk>rkftor)
Page 3-A
News in Brief
Former Nazi Wagner Kills Self
RIO DE JANEIRO A
former Nazi officer, accused of
complicity in the murder of
250.000 Jews and Poles at the
Sobibor extermination camp in
occupied Poland in 1942-43. com-
mitted suicide last Friday night
at his home in the town of
I Atibaia. about 50 miles from Sao
I Paulo.
Gustav Franz Wagner had
I emigrated to Brazil in 1950 and
[lived quietly under his own name
Iuntil Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesen-
Ithal identified him from a news-
I paper photograph taken at a
Ibirthday party for Hitler near Rio
Ide Janeiro in 1978.
Israel, West Germany. Poland
_nd Austria sought to extradite
Jthe 69-year-old former officer in
IsS elite guard. Wagner turned
himself in in 1979 after federal
Ipolice announced that they
wanted him in connection with
lextradition requests but the
|Supreme Court rejected the
extradition requests on the
grounds that the statute of
limitations on war crimes had
(expired.
Wagner, who denied taking
in the extermination of the
__np inmates, told Brazilian
Officials. "I only obeyed orders."
Officials said he tried to commit
uicide four times since he was
piscovered living in Atibaia.
WASHINGTON Dis-
fcussions will be resumed "for-
ally" on West Bank-Gaza
Autonomy starting on an un-
ecified date next week in
Washington, the State Depart-
nent said. The announcement
kppeared to contradict official
fgyptian reports that the talks
ill be resumed here Oct. 14.
TEL AVIV Police investi-
gating the booby-trap explosion
nat killed three people and
njured six in the Givatayim post
Jffice here believe it may have
en the result of a criminal ven-
etta even though the Palestine
liberation Organization claimed
hat "Palestinian warriors" were
esponsible.
Funeral services were held
ilonday for two postal clerks,
Aharon Amiga, 53, and Avraham
Joseph. 54, who were killed when
parcel containing a wired hand
Tenade exploded, wrecking part
' the post office. Amiga was the
ather of nine children and
fcseph the father of eight. The
nird fatality was a woman whose
ame has not been released.
JERUSALEM Prime
linister Menachem Begin has
liven his approval to the return
p>m exile of two West Bank
ayors to allow them to appeal
gainst their expulsion, a
ilitary spokesman announced
ere.
The two mayors, Mouhamad
Iilhem of Halhoul and Fahed
awasme of Hebron, were
eported last May after Pales-
Inian terrorists killed six Jewish
eshiva students in Hebron. The
fcraeli authorities charged the
*o banished mayors with incite-
ent against the Jewish State.
[According to the announce-
ment, Begin's decision opens the
y for the two mayors to appear
efore a special military appeals
oard. The Supreme Court
"cently criticized the govern-
ed for refusing to let the two
payors appeal to the military
*ard prior to their expulsion.
BONN The chairman of
jest Berlin's Jewish com-
Fyfe the largest in Germany,
TO West European leaders to
ke coordinated, decisive action
ffyt the spread of neo-Nazi
ojence. The community leader,
le>nz Galinski, made his state-
West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt (right) won an over-
whelming victory Sunday over Prime Minister of Bavaria
Franz-Josef Strauss' bid to unseat Schmidt, who has held the
chancellorship since 1974.
ment in the aftermath of Friday's
fatal bombing of a synagogue in
Paris and the rash of rightwing
terror in France, West Germany
and Italy.
Galinski charged that the
French authorities were too soft
in dealing with anti-Semitism. He
has been warning for some time
against right-wing and left-wing
terrorism in Europe. West Ger-
man police have uncovered
terrorist plots against him and
other Jewish leaders.
NEW YORK Independent
Presidential candidate John
Anderson has blamed the series
of attacks on the French Jewish
community, which culminated in
the bomb blast outside a Paris
synagogue Friday night, on "in-
difference" to bigotry and hatred.
Anderson, in a statement
issued by his Washington cam-
paign headquarters to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, said that he
and his Vice Presidential running
mate, Patrick Lucey, "are sad-
dened and angered by the recent
spate of terrorist activities
directed at the Jewish com-
munity of France."
While extending his con-
dolences to the victims and their
friends, Anderson stressed that
"beyond the sadness lies a sense
of anger at the intolerance,
viciousness and evil that pro-
duces such events and at the
indifference with which such
events are all too often greeted."
WASHINGTON Repub-
lican Presidential candidate
Ronald Reagan rejected the
statement by one of his leading
supporters, fundamentalist
Baptist minister Jerry Falwell,
that only the prayers of
Christians are answered by God.
But the GOP standard-bearer
first denied that Falwell had
made the statement.
The incident took place in
Lynchburg, Va., last weekend
where Reagan delivered a
political speech at FalweU's
Liberty Baptist Church. He told
reporters later that he did not
agree with FalweU's view "since
both the Christian and Judaic
religions are based on the same
God the God of Moses.
He added, "I'm quite sure
those (Jewish) prayers are heard.
But then I guess everyone can
make his own interpretation of
the Bible and many individuals
have been making differing inter-
pretations for a long time."
PHILADELPHIA The de-
naturalization trial of Wolodymir
Osidach has been adjourned until
Oct. 15 due to his hospitalization
with chest pains. The 76-year-old
Osidach, who is accused of con-
cealing his collaboration with
Nazi forces occupying the
Ukraine in order to enter this
country and obtain citizenship,
has had a history of heart
problems.
Before the trial adjourned last
week in Federal District Court
here, the prosecution had com-
pleted its case which included
eye-witness testimony on
Osidach's role as police chief in
the Ukrainian village of Rawa
Ruska.
The defense, which opened its
case Sept. 25, maintains that
Ukrainian police were only
responsible for keeping order in
the non-Jewish part of Rawa
Ruska.
"Iask the questionAVho is the architect of
the peace treaty between Egypt and
Israel? And the answer is, the President
of the United States, Mr. Jimmy Carter."
-Prime Minister Menachem Begin
Some people have forgotten.
They've forgotten about Jimmv Carter s
d initiative-the Camp David Accc
They've forgotten about the im-
portance of human rights. And the
300% increase in emigration by Soviet
Jews under this Administration.
They've forgotten about the
President's Holocaust Commission.
And his courageous fight against the
Arab boycott of firms that trade
with Israel.
And they've forgotten what Ke-
publican Ronald Reagan and his right
wing friends have in mind. Rolling
back 40 years of Democratic progress
for social justice, civil liberties, and
racial and religious tolerance. Cutting
aid to the needy and help for the
elderly. "Unleashing" the oil com-
panies to solve our energy problems.
Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale
stand proudly in the Democratic tradi-
tion of Roosevelt Truman, Kennedy
and Johnson.
They are committed to Israel's
survival. To human rights around the
world and to fairness and tolerance
here at home.
That's the record and the commit-
ment the Reagan and Anderson
Republicans want us to reject.
Don't let the right wingers win this
one. Let's re-elect President Carter
and Vice President Mondale.
andVicePmidenlNoiidale.
The Democrats.
Paid for by the Carter/ Mondale Ke-Election Committee. Inc..
Robert S. Strauss. Chairman


Page 4-A
" M* istfk rktian
Fridi

France as Poseur
For the first time in a long time, the very fabric
of French civilization is under scrutiny because it is
being torn apart by the forces of neo-Nazi terrorism
against the Jewish community.
At issue is not so much that the terrorism is
occurring as that the French establishment is so
passive in response to it. Indeed, there are charges
that neo-Nazi elements exist within the official in-
stitutions of the state, and that these elements are
the very source of what seems to be the indifferent
manner in which the establishment is moving to meet
the challenge to France as a democratic society.
For a country that purports to judge the rest of
the world by its sometimes astigmatic view of its
own civilizational achievements, and that never
wearies of waving the flag of liberte, egalite,
fratemite, the history of bigotry in France in general,
and anti-Semitism in particular, is frightening.
The current wave of anti-Semitic outrages
recalls the Dreyfuss affair and the fight of Emile Zola
to force the French to examine themselves
realistically.
Then there was the more than enthusiastic level
of collaboration between French police and the Nazis
against the Jewish community during World War II.
At one point, in 1942, French police happily rounded
up thousands of Jewish children in Paris to be
shipped off to concentration camps an act neither
requested by nor supported by official Nazi orders.
There is no doubt that the current wave of out-
rages is the result of the French government's
similarly enthusiastic anti-Israel policy formulated
since the days of le grand Charles.
If France indeed expects the world to continue
accepting the abstract notion of the grandiose
quality of French kultur on its face, then it must
institute an immediate about-face in its official at-
titudes.
Evangelicals and Jews
Many Jews are perplexed over how to consider
Evangelical Christians, particularly those who are
now so vocal on right-wing issues. Their call for a
"Christian America" threatens the Constitutional
guarantee of separation of church and state a
necessity for a pluralistic democratic society which
has permitted the American Jewish community to
flourish. Yet their position on 'moral" issues such as
abortion, homosexuality and the Equal Rights
Amendment, while opposed by the majority of the
Jewish community, are not so different from that
espoused by Orthodox Jews.
At the same time, the Evangelicals are the very
Christians who support the drive to convert Jews to
Christianity. Orthodox Jews and Jews living in small
towns are the ones most upset by these activities.
But we have still another anomaly. Evangelical
Christians are among the most ardent supporters of
Israel, partly for religious reasons, since it is an
element of their doctrine that Jews must be in control
of Israel before there can be the Second Coming. The
Rev. Jerry Falwell, head of the Moral Majority,
supports Israel, including its settlement policies on
the West Bank.
This support was dramatically shown recently
when Evangelical Christians from 20 countries
dedicated a "Christian Embassy" in Jerusalem. It
was established as a reply to the withdrawal of the 13
embassies from Jerusalem in the wake of the
Jerusalem law.
Perhaps the response to Evangelicals by Jews
should be to act towards them as they act toward us:
join with them when there are grounds for agreement
and oppose them vigorously on the issues where we
differ.
"Jewish Floridian
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Old Teachings Plague Us Again
I HAD been talking about
World War II as one of those rare
wars in history in which human
values were at stake. I began
with Marathon, the successful
Greek battle against a Persian
invasion in 490 BCE. a campaign
that chroniclers love to define as
the first known struggle in the
cause of democracy.
One student said that he had
registered recently because he
was 19. but that if called upon in
a draft, he would not serve. What
did World War II achieve, he
asked, to justify my claim that
human values depended upon its
outcome?
HIS ARGUMENT went some
thing like this: In that war, our
enemies almost immediately
became our allies; while our
allies, notably Russia, just as
quickly became the enemy.
Look, he urged me. at Europe
today. He pointed to the bom-
bing of a synagogue in Paris last
Friday night as symbolic of the
recrudescence of European anti-
1 Leo
idealism that sparked the *.
today all but ,i,ad Nor VS,*
deny that the eominKNXa
nronnrarutn f- *$ In
preparation for a
war
that
1
Maudlin
fr:*:*:*:*:*:*^^
Semitism. He emphasized the
EEC's new "peace initiative" in
the Middle East predicated on
selfish oil needs and the willing-
ness to see Israel destroyed as
the price of satisfying its greed.
In return. I said that World
War II had not been fought
either to destroy anti-Semitism
or to establish a Jewish nation in
Palestine. These. I said, were
merely ancillary and un-
fortunately only temporary by-
products of the war.
BUT I could not deny his
charge that the John Wayne
purely commercial i
saidofthePeloponnesmnW^
a stand that brought his .tL~
and execution in 399 HC'K
In any case. 1(warned him. if k.
didnt want to be punished ^
lessly like Socrates, he'd C
se^e if drafted. Whet hero';;
tnH ,IerepliedhadnotC
to do with my rose-colored vi-f
of World War Us .dea^S
the clear commercialism of th.
last Friday night s bombing
Paris a second time
He wore a giant cross of gold
around his neck on a thick gold
chain, which he fingered end.
lessly as if it were an amulet to
protect him from some invisible
enemy. Somehow. I began to
have the feeling that I was it 1
asked him why the Paris bom-
bing obsessed him. Surely. 1 said
he was not Jewish
I HOPED for an outburst
along the lines that being Jewish
had nothing to do with his angn
reaction that so contemptible
thing as the bombing of a syna
gogue had occurred, indeed, with
the fact that anti-Semitism is a
revolting thing
Instead, he snickered. His tone
was clear: how could I be so
stupid as to think that he was
Jewish? In effect, he had success-
fully baited me with his concerr.
about the bombing and ami
Semitism. feeling assured that as
a consequence I would be sym-
pathetic to his argument about
World War 11 and his decision
not to serve if dratted
What is worse, others around
him joined in th<- snickering,
which he had encouraged by his
own behavior and which ti
an even more vicious quality now
that he had enlisted terrorists
bis own private bombing outrage
right there in the classroom. The
snickering w.i- ni
at my "stupid rhel
question about hi~ being Jewisl
but at the cinr.il al tl
anyoiu could be so ..ntnrtunatr
as to be Jew ish
THE SNICKERING
Continued on Page 1 l-A
Two Chief Rabbis Under Heavy Fire
Friday, October 10,1980
Volume 53
30TISHRI5741
Number 41
TWO chief rabbis have
come under heavy fire from
various non-religious and legal
sources for their alleged in
terference with the judicial
process in the broadening in-
vestigation of Religious Affairs
Minister Aharon Abu Hatzeira
and senior officials of his
ministry who have been accused
of financial misconduct. They
were also rebuked, indirectly, by
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim.
himself an Orthodox Jew.
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi
Shlomo Goren and Sephardic
Chief Rabbi Ovadia Yosef raised
the storm of protest when each
asserted, in separate press in-
terviews last week, that the
institution of state's evidence
was contrary to halacha, Jewish
religious law. Their statements
were seen as an attempt to
prevent a key prosecution wit-
ness. Deputy Mayor Yisrael
Gottlieb of Bnei Brak, from
testifying against Moshe Gabbai,
a top aide to Abu Hatzeira who
was arrested last week and
remanded in custody by a Tel
Aviv district court.
GOTTLIEB had agreed to
testify for the State in order to
avoid possible criminal
proceedings against himself. He
was quoted by one newspaper as
saying that "If the rabbis say I
mustn't talk then I won't talk."
But other newspapers reported
that he has refused to commit
himself unequivocally.
David
Landau
Goren andYosef have rejected
the charge of deliberate meddling
in the case. They insisted that
they were duty-bound to
pronounce the halachic position
when reporters asked them about
it. They are stropgly backed by
the national Religious Party of
which Abu Hatzeira is a member
and which, allegedly, received
misappropriated funds.
The most significant, albeit
oblique attack on the chief
rabbis, was delivered by Nissim.
An official statement released
before Yom Kippur by the
Justice Minister's office noted,
"The Minister takes a serious
view of any public statement that
could have the effect of in-
fluencing the course of a police
investigation or the consideration
of the prosecutor The
decision whether to make use of a
state's witness must be taken
solely on the merits and
without interference by ex-
traneous officials or other par-
ties," especially when "such
interference comes in the midst of
an investigation."
THE STATEMENT noted
that the device of the state's
evidence is used all over the
wor]u: jind^ has been used -
sparingly in Israel sim
inception of the State
In New 'lurk las) week, Kabbi
Roland Gittelson. president of
ARZA-Association of Reform
Zionists of America, released a
statement demanding a thorough
investigation of the Abu Hatzeira
affair and accused the two chief
rabbis of a 'shameful at-
tempt ... to block the judiciaJ
process through the cynical
application of halachic
minutiae." Gittelsohn observed
"When Jewish law is misused to
shield people in high places and
to protect the vested interests of
Israel's political-religious
establishment, the Jewish
tradition is perverted by those
who claim to be its champions.
The latest development in the
Abu Hatzeira case has intensified
the always present friction
between the secular and religious
elements in Israeli society. TO
secular parties Labor, Mapam
the Citizens Rights Movement
and others have decried tne
chief rabbis' intervention witn
varying degrees of intensity j
NRP has lined up behindI tne
chief rabbis. Its Knesset faction
chairman, Yehuda Ben-Me*
declared last week that the WJ
and all Orthodox Jewry baw
the right of the chief rabbis a
speak out on halachic issues
any time.
Another potentially j*J2
element was added to the conn*
Continued on Page HA


(Friday. October 1
0, I1WI
* MnitfFk ridHnr
Page 5- A
W. German Jews
Worried by Apathy
Toward Violence

::::
A
'Die Welt'Links Neo-Nazis to PLO
Bj DAVID KANTOK
By DAVID KAN TOR
BONN (JTA) The
I Jewish community and
other victims of Nazism are
deeply disturbed by the ap-
parent apathy of the au-
thorities in face of in-
creasingly violent activities
I by neo-Nazi para-military
groups in West Germany.
Ia case in point is the out-
lawed 'Wehrsportsgruppe
iHoffmann" which the
Iprosecutor General origin-
lally held responsible for the
)ktoberfest bombing in
iMunich that killed 12
Ipeople and injured 213
according to the latest
count.
The group's self-styled fuehrer,
Karl-Heinz Hoffman. 42, was
krrested along with five of his
associates. All were released for
ack of evidence linking them to
Ihe outrage. According to the
msecutor's office, there was no
[urgent suspicion'' of this in-
lolvement. Instead, police
ilieve the bombing was the
fork ol one man. 21-year-old
jundoll Kholer, a student who
Jelongcd to the Hoffmann group.
died in the blast
THE HISTORY of "Wehr-
(port-gruppe Hoffmann'' which
pasqueraded as a sports club.
perns to bear out charges that
be \\ i st (ierman authorities and
lolitkal leaders have un-
derestimated the neo-Nazi
( \- early as 1974, the
pup's activities were widely
kported in the German news
ledia, Police in Nuremberg
there the organization was based
Bid the Hoffmann and his group
fere well known, and on several
Cessions members were
nested, though promptly
pleased.
Interior Minister Hans-
Jietrich Genscher said more
scent ly that Hoffmann's ac-
Ivities were very suspicious. But
pe state government in Bavaria
Hiich studied the charges
)ncluded that no un-
U.S. Official
In Pow-Wow
HI. AVIV ,JTA) -
I "> I ndersecretary of
flense Robert Komi-r arrived
1 ni Cairo to hold regional
talks against the
1 '"' "i the Iranian-Iraqi
1 ordingto Israeli officials.
who arrived here with
e l military experts.
I '' Deputy Defense
" Mordechai Zipori.
s Chief of Staff Gen.
jpnael Kuan and other Defense
fnistry officials.
RELGO, INC. -
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Cratts
Hebrew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Optn Sunday
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"532-5912'
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^Peciahz.ng in Bar Mitzvah sets
M,.J,3!7whlngtonAva.
[Miami Beach 531*722
constitutional aims could be
attributed to his organization.
Hoffmann and his supporters
engaged in military training in an
old castle near Nuremberg.
Hoffmann was brought to trial
for illegal wearing of uniforms.
But the prosecution was un-
successful. At a second trial he
was found guilty and fined 8,000
Marks. The sum was easily
raided by the right-wing National
Zeitung. the most widely cir-
culated neo-Nazi publication in
West Germany. Eventually.
Hoffman was tried for violating
the law against possession and
use of firearms and was found
guilty.
IN 1978. the then Bavarian
Interior Minister Alfred Seidl,
said in reply to a question in the
Bavarian Parliament that his
ministry did not consider
Wehrsportsgruppe Hoffmann to
be a danger to constitutional
order and to the state. Hoffmann
and his group continued their
military exercise openly and
BONN (JTAI Links between the
Palestine Liberation Organization and Wehr-
sportsgruppe Hoffmann, the largest neo-Nazi
paramilitary organization in West (iermanv. were
reported here in Die Welt. The daily said that
West (Ierman security agencies are informed on
these contacts
Wehrsportsgruppe Hoffmann was held respon-
sible for the bomb explosion at the Munich
Oktoberfest Sept. 26 in which 12 persons were
killed, although its leader. Karl-Heinz Hoffmann,
and five associates were released from custody for
lack of evidence. One of the 213 people injured in
the Munich outrage, a 17-year-old boy, died in the
hospital. Four others are reported to be on the
critical list.
ACCORDING to Die Welt, the paramilitary
group has a record of association with the PLO
going back several years. The paper also reported
began publication of a periodical.
Kommando.
The Bavarian police dismissed
their action as a "Punch and
Judy Show." The Social
Democratic opposition in Bavaria
criticized the government's
failure to take action.
Last January. Federal Interior
Minister Gerhard Baum banned
the organization. A police raid on
its headquarters yielded a
quantity of military materiel
including an old tank. But the
that members of the Hoffmann group drove
German trucks to Palestinian terrorists in
Lebanon A convo) ol similar trucks driven by
neo-Nazis was seen on a highway in Bavaria
shortly after the Munich outrage
According to Die Welt, PLO terrorists and neo-
Nazis have organized public meetings in recent
years. The National Zeitung, the largest neo-Nazi
newspaper in West (iermanv. published in
Munich, has consistently supported the PLO. A
neo-Nazi activist. Udo Albrecht, 40. was arrested
four years ago with PLO papers.
When apprehended, Albrecht had 80.000 Swiss
Francs in his possession and a bank withdrawal
receipt for 14.000 Francs. The German authorities
established that the money was given to him by
PLO officials for arms purchases. Albrecht was
also accused of recruiting neo-Nazi Germans for
PLO raids on Israel. He is presently in a prison
near Bonn.
8
group's activities continued. A
police raid in the wake of the
Munich bombing, turned up more
miilitary equipment and ex-
plosives in member's homes. But.
according to the Prosecutor's
office, they were not related to
the explosion in Munich.
THE Wehrsportsgruppe
Hoffmann has a membership of
about 400. making it the largest
neo-Nazi para-military
organization in the country.
During the past few months, its
gangs frequently clashed with
police while trying to disrupt
demonstrations and meetings of
left-wing organizations.
Hoffmann has been accused of
seeking to destroy the democratic
system by violence. He has
summed up his ideology as
follows: "We do not want the
power in the state but a powerful
state ... A democracy is im-
potent. Only a dictatorship led by
the right man can do anything for
the people.''
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
6 mo, "xv". 0.6 mj tutvmt iv, per agiwte by FTC method.


Page 6-A
> kvist fkjjd&n
Fridy. October]
i
I
- I
1
I
r
P

B
B
*
a
u

M
fli
N
| OB
'ff*
Vanessa Still at Issue
CBS Snubs Proposed Dialogue
_ 9SSJJ
Evangelical Christians Join
Israelis in United Jerusalem
Continued from Page 1-A
French. half-Jewish member of
the women's orchestra at Ausch-
witz.
IN ADDITION to other cruel
insensitivities." they described
the characterization of Mengele
in the television play as "a farce
and an outrage."
"After 33 years of pain and
sorrow, we want to come out and
express what happened to us
Seeing this opened wounds that
never will be healed, they said.
Along with the denial of air
time. CBS officials reiterated
that the network had never in-
tended to offend the Jewish
community in either the casting
of the controversial Palestine
Liberation Organization sym-
pathizer. Vanessa Redgrave, in
the role of Fenelon or in the
presentation of Playing for Time
On the contrary, it is our
belief that this production will
make a lasting contribution that
the terrible events of the Nazi era
will not be forgotten, the CBS
official said.
A SPOKESPERSON for
Miller told the JTA that the
playwright "prefers not to get
involved or discuss the idea' of a
dialogue. He is starting a new-
project and important as the idea
is. he cannot get involved. He
doesn't have the time." the
spokesperson stated Miller, in
the midst of rehearsals of his new
Broadway play, said he had "no
comment" on the allegations that
Mengele's character was
distorted in Playing for Time.
Berkowitz said he watched the
television film from a hospital
bed where he is under treatment
for a neurological condition
inflicted upon him by Mengele's
medical experiments. Claiming a
lack of authenticity in the film, he
told the JTA in a telephone
interview. "Maybe this can be
done when it pertains to ancient
times. But when something is
still before your eyes like pictures
in a camera, you don't need
second best "
Berkowitz. whose arm bears
the Auschwitz tattoo number
A7738. carries a copy of a cer-
tificate signed by Mengele,
stating that he was experimented
on by the infamous death camp
doctor.
He said he obtained the
document from the Polish
government. He said that he and
his twin sister were among some
400 children, mostly twins, who
were selected for inhuman
'medical" experiments.
BERKOWITZ and his sister
were liberated from Auschwitz by-
Soviet forces in December. 1944
along with five other pairs of
twins who survived. Berkowitz
described Mengele's medical
experiments section of the camp,
not referred to in the television
film, as a "human zoo."
Dekel described himself to the
JTA as "a human guinea pig for
Mengele" when he was a child in
Auschwitz. He was liberated
while on a death march from the
camp The tattoo number B14844
is still on his arm.
According to Dekel. "Miller's
message was we're all human
beings, even Nazis, and he made
heroes out of butchers to prove
it." Dekel said. "The film gives
the impression Auschwitz was a
jail with inmates who were
sentenced. The SS were depicted
as wardens, human beings who
did their jobs. Giving people like
Maria Mandel I the SS com-
mander of the women's camp at
Birkenaul a human element is a
very tragic situation." Dekel
said.
HE DESCRIBED Mandel.
portrayed in the film by a slim,
attractive blonde actress. Shirley-
Knight, as weighing over 200
pounds and regularly beating the
women. "Here lin the film) only-
he r tragic human element is
depicted," he said "She is
glamorized and her constant
beatings and cruelty are left out.
showing her as compassionate. 1
saw her beat the women with my
own eyes."
Dekel. who has detailed "what
the experimental children went
through." in his forthcoming
book. Tin Valley of Dry Bones.
called the television film "an
injustice to the few survivors of
Mengele. Miller misled the public
on what actually happened at
Auschwitz-Birkenau." he
charged. He observed that
"There was just enough realism
to make people believe that this
is how it was."
The greatest danger of all,
according to Dekel, is that
Playing for Time will help the
neo-Nazi movement's denial of
the Holocaust because it portrays
the Nazis as "just human
beings."
While neither of the survivors
questioned Redgrave's acting
ability nor her right to perform.
Dekel said he feared that she will
use her role to promote her pro-
PLO sentiments in an attempt to
separate anti-Zionism from anti-
Semitism. "She will be able to
say. you see. I did something
beautiful for you." he said.
MEANWHILE. CBS
headquarters in New York City
reported that Playing for Time
swept the ratings in Los Angeles.
ww*
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Teleonone
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Evangelical Christians
from 20 countries joined
tens of thousands of
Israelis in affirming their
support of undivided Jeru-
salem as Israel's capital. At
ceremonies led by Dutch
Pastor William van der
Hoeven, the evangelists
dedicated a Christian Em-
bassy" in Jerusalem as a
I
Chicago and New York City. The
film captured 41 percent of the gestUre of solidarity with
viewing audience in New \ ork, 36 cmo,
in Chicago and 35 in Los Angeles.
In related developments, the
front door of the CBS network
affiliate in Phoenix was
firebombed. and the front door of
the CBS network affiliate in Los
Angeles was shattered by bullets.
No one was hurt in either in-
cident.
Some American Jewish
weeklies said they would publish
a list of advertisers who spon-
sored the program. In at least
two cities. Los Angeles and
Philadelphia. Redgrave was hung
in effigy prior to the telecast.
Fenelon. who has threatened to
sue CBS over the casting of
Redgrave, was reported to have
said in Paris. "These kind of
fanatics frighten me. They are
almost as bad as she (Redgrave)
is
IN LOS ANGELES, an
Israeli Cabaret Night" at-
tracted more than 2.000 people at
the Stephen Wise Temple during
the three hours Playing for Timt
was being shown. The Cabaret
night had been designated as an
alternative to watching the
program.
CBS in New York reported
that it had received some 900
unfavorable calls.
I srael.
Meanwhile, an estimated
20.000 Israelis, soldiers and
civilians, participated in the
annual Jerusalem March," a
parade that has become a
tradition of the Sukkot season.
THE CHRISTIAN Embassy,
located in the Rahavia section of
Jerusalem, was established as a
reply to the 13 nations which
moved their embassies out of
Jerusalem after the Knesset
proclaimed undivided Jerusalem
Israel's capital. Mayor Teddy
Kollek. who shared the platform
with van der Hoeven, told an
audience of about 1.000
Christians that the gesture
"outweights" the embassy
closures. Those were acts of
governments, he said, whereas
the Christian Emb
represents authentic rxm'r
sentiment. **"
The Christian grouns
1 V^ithrhome c"S
andwPl^5fd that lhenC
would become a center for UrS
information work abroad.
The Jerusalem march dr
Israelis from all parts of Z
country who assembled at th
outskirts of the city in th
morning and paraded through fa
main streets in the afternoon
Prime Minister Begin greets
them from a reviewing stand in
downtown Jerusalem where he
was joined by Kollek and Chief of
Staff Geh. Raphael Kvtan. The
parade was the first to'beheldm
several years. It had been
suspended for a time tor financial
reasons.
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RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who named the "Turkey"?
A: Luis de Torres who called it TUKKI
The Hebrew word for peacock!
The first of Columbus" crew to set foot in the
"New World" was Luis de Torres, a Jewish
crewman, a master of languages and one of
Columbus* trusted friends Thinking that any
natives they might meet may be descendants of
the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Columbus sent
de Torres ashore first, to find out if the natives
were friendly and whether they spoke Hebrew
or some other known language of the day.
The beauty and richness of the land captivated
de Torres' imagination and he prevailed upon
Columbus to let him settle there In writing
to his friends "back home de Torres used the
Hebrew word for peacock-TUKKI-to describe
a new bird he encountered And through
usage, the American bird came to be called a
Turkey (probably because there is no known
Hebrew word for Gobble Gobble).
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to open the house' when mishpocha.
guests or friends drop in. Out comes the
fine food and. invariably. J&B Rare
Scotch. And why not?J&B is a clean,
light scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving the
best. And because of its great taste.
J&B commands a high level of elegance...
at home or at your most important
simchas.
And that's a fact!"
J'B
RARE
SCOTCH


Lay. October 10,1980
vJewist th>rklkir
Page 7-A
Iraq-Iran War
Threatens Mideast
Knesset Studies Conflagration 10 A
Israel Would Assist Militarily 15-A
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
sraeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir warned
fhat the Iraqi-Iranian war
threatens the entire Middle
feast and the supply of oil
[o most of the world. He
Lggested that the United
States take measures to
knd the conflict and hinted
that it may already be
doing so. He also said that
[he danger of Arab moves
to expel Israel from the
United Nations still exists,
fhough they may not be
Timinent.
Shamir, who spoke in reply to
Questions at a press conference at
the Regency Hotel here, also
welcomed the call by Foreign
Minister Gabriel Matthews of
Liberia in the UN General
\ssembly, for African countries
_o re-examine their relations with
jsrael. Most African countries
Severed diplomatic ties with
Ilsrael after the Yom Kippur War.
SHAMIR called the Liberian
Foreign Minister's remark in his
General Assembly address
Fencouraging." He said it was
indicative of a new tendency on
the part of the African countries
Ito revise their relations with
Israel.
"We have to look at it
! k and 1 hope there will be
la follow up to it." he said. He
Imiciid [hat contacts between
I ind African countries are
I nuing all the time" at
| li vels.
\skiii to comment on the war
I n Iraq and Iran. Shamir
K posed a danger to Israel.
He said the Iraqis have am-
bitions to control the Middle
East area, "and anybody who
wants to control the Middle East
wants to achieve it by harming
Israel. This is a real cause for
concern."
SHAMIR added that the war
threatened not only the entire
Middle East but much of the
world's oil supply Therefore, he
said, it is expected that a country
as important as the United
States would make efforts to stop
this danger and it seems that
developments are moving in that
direction. He did not elaborate.
He said that in his view the
danger still exists of an Arab
attempt to expel Israel from the
154-member world organization,
although he does not expect such
a move in the next few days, "but
the attempt might be renewed in
the future as long as there is an
automatic majority at the UN."
He noted that during his talks
with various foreign ministers
here in the last two weeks, he
received assurances from them
that they would exert all their
power to thwart such a move.
WITH RESPECT to Israel's
relations with the Soviet Union.
Shamir said, in reply to a
question by the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he does
not see any sign of change toward
Israel on the part of the USSR.
He said he had met with Foreign
Minister Stefhan Andrie of
Rumania who asked him why
Israel objects to a Soviet role in
the Middle East peace
negotiations.
Shamir said, "I told him that
I he Soviets removed themselves
from the process bj severing
diplomatic relations with Israel."
Reagan Says U.S. Should
Suspend Funds to UN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
| Republican Presidential can-
didate Konald Reagan said the
I nited States should suspend its
j financial contributions to the
L'nited Nations if the UN
I (ieneralAssembly voted to expel
Israel.
Reagan, on a campaign swing
[ol New York and Pennsylvania,
; made that remark to reporters
two days after President Carter
declared in New York that the
expulsion of Israel would raise
questions about the U.S.
remaining in the world
organization and one day after
Syrian Foreign Minister Abdul
Halim Khaddam urged the
General Assembly to suspend
jg
Israel from membership.
Reagan noted that under the
UN Charter a member can be
expelled or suspended only at the
recommendation of the Security
Council and, in that event, the
US. should exercise its veto
power.
If this failed. "We should
suspend our contributions to the
United Nations and urge our
friends to do the same until the
rights of Israel are fully
respected." Reagan said. "If we
are determined and made clear
that we will protect our interests
and our friends, I am confident
the attempt to deprive Israel of
its rights in the United Nations
can be deterred."
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JNF Newsletter
Published by the Jewish National Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fia. 33139 Phone 538-646*
Or. Irving Lahrman
Chrmn. Foundation
Abraham Qrunhut Rabbi Mayar Abramowltz
President Chrmn. Exec Board
MM Levin
VTce-Prea.
Ernest Samuels
VIce-President
The First Eighty Years of
The Jewish National Fund
1901 5th Zionist Congress
creates Jewish National
Fund.
1903 Land purchased at Kfar
Hittim, Hulda, Ben Shemen.
1908 Land purchased for Degania
and Kinneret farms, Herzl
Forest begun.
1909 JNF buys site of Tel Aviv
for 250,000 francs.
1910 First land purchase in
Jezreel Valley.
1929 Emek Hefer purchased.
1936 Beginning of tower-and-
stockade settlements, with
prefabricated settlements
erected in a single day.
1939 British White Paper restricts
land purchases by Jews.
1940 JNF land holdings reach
125,000 acres.
1943 Observation posts estab-
lished at Gvulot, Bet Eshel
and Revivim in the Negev.
1946 JNF spearheads new Negev
settlements. 11 in a single
night.
1948 JNF holds 234,000 acres,
sites for some 221 agri-
cultural settlements.
1950 Draining of Huleh swamps
begins.
1951 Martyrs Forest begun.
1953 Number of trees planted in
JNF forests passes 20
million.
1954 Last fever swamps outside
Huleh valley disappear due
to JNF drainage programs.
1955 Lachish area on southern
coastal plain is developed
by JNF.
1957 JNF undertakes reclama-
tion, and afforestation in
Adullam border area.
The JNF work is not yet finished... the JNF is engaged In
developing the Galilee and the Negev... the JNF is busy n
bringing life to the desolate deserts of Israel ... the JNF is busy in
building roads, outposts, preparing land for settlements, planting
millions of trees to secure Israel's future, and to help In the im-
mediate present.
The JNF of Greater Miami adopts a 1.2 million dollar budget to
meet the JNF challenges of 1980-81.
Won't vou be a partner and have a share in the historic work and
grandeur of the JNF accomplishments.
JNF has reclaimed more than 250,000 acres| in Israel
Help JNF reclaim more land. Contribute now.
Help the JNF convert Sand to Land
with a cash contribution, or by a JNF! Annuity.
Designate the JNF as a beneficiary in your will.
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone 538-6464
1958 Huleh project completed;
15,000 new acres available
for intensive cultivation,
15,000 more improved.
1960 Lands Administration Au-
thority, Land Development
Authority established by
the State together with
JNF.
1962 Highway from Arad to Dead
Sea. JNF outpost on Mt.
Gilboa.
1963 Plan to develop the Galilee
launched.
1965 Afforestation begun in Yatir.
1966 John F. Kennedy Memorial
and Peace Forest estab-
lished.
1967 Six Day War. JNF work
begun in Golan Heights.
1968 JNF starts reclaiming the
Jordan Valley and the
Arava.
1971 JNF inaugurates string of
settlements from Dead Sea
to Red Sea.
1973 Yom Kippur War. Burnt
forests in north replanted
by JNF.
1975 New JNF DEVELOPMENT
AREAS IN Tefen and Segev.
begun in Galilee.
1976 American Bicentennial Park
established.
1977 JNF begins Five-Year Plan
for 185 new settlements.
1978 Jewish Children's Forest in-
augurated.
1979 Hubert H. Humphrey Park-
way dedicated.
1980 JNF prepares sites for new
settlements in Negev
Peace Salient.


jt^sf-fe -
Pag* 8-A
+Jewish fhrkHa*!
Harris Poll
Public Opinion Views Israel More Favorably Today
withholding of economic and
CRITICISM of
policies centered arour
announcement that he
l
- i
I
1
i
I
%
n
n
a.
c*
u
ai
The poll, which probed at-
titudes on virtually every aspect
of the Middle East situation, was
conducted last July among a
1,506 cross-section of the
American adult public and a
separate 1,030 cross-section of
Jewish adults nationwide. All the
respondents were interviewed in
person.
THE SURVEY was un-
dertaken for Edgar Bronfman,
chairman of the Seagram Co.
Ltd., who is acting chairman of
the World Jewish Congress. The
results were made available to
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
The 105-page survey, with 46
tables, revealed many am-
biguities, with majorities sup-
porting certain propositions but
also supporting others that ran
counter to them.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin remained a controversial
figure. Certain of his policies are
criticized, but he is given high
marks for his contributions to the
peace process and, to some extent
benefits in public opinion from
the heavily negative attitudes
toward such other Middle East
figures as the Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini of Iran and Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat.
President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt is the best known and
most highly regarded of Arab
leaders among all Americans.
President Carter is in deep
trouble with Americans for his
overall performance but is given
a slightly better though still
negative rating on the job he had
done in handling the Middle East
crisis. Among Jews, Carter is
given an 88-10 percent overall
negative job rating and a 59-39
percent negative mark for his
work for peace in the region.
ACCORDING to the survey,
the shift in public attitudes
toward Israel in a positive
direction is due in part to such
relatively recent events as the
seizure of American hostages by
Iran and the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan. In 1976, a 74-12
percent majority viewed Israel in
a positive light. In 1980, an 81-12
percent majority shared that
view.
Among non-Jews, a 56-33
percent majority said they would
be "very upset" if Israel were
overrun by Arabs in another war
compared to a 50-36 percent
majority in 1976 and a 44-37
percent majority who felt that
way in 1975.
"Underlying the results of this
9u.rvey:" tne IIarris organization
said, "is a deep sense of urgency
that peace can be found between
the Israelis and Arabs in the
region. There is a strong sense
that outisde the gates of the
traditional and long-standing
Arab-Israeli conflict are larger
nemies in the region who would
x the direct beneficiaries of
mother Arab-Israeli war."
THE POLL showed a 75-15
Jercent majority in favor of the
J.S. sending planes, tanks,
irtillery and other weapons to
srael, up from a 65-23 percent
najority in 1976. A substantial
6 percent of the public believes
srael is "very much dependent
a the U.S. for military aid
oday." But "when put in ex-
reme terms, 'if the government
f Israel should become so un-
ending that the chance for peace
i the Middle East grows much
/one,' a 44-37 percent plurality
wls 'the U.S. should threaten to
il.hhold economic and military
id to the Israelis.' "
According to the survey,
owever, "When asked if such
would oppose such a withholding
of aid."
, Polled on another aspect of the
support issue, a 63-19 percent
majority opposed the proposition
that the withdrawal of military
support for Israel should be a
trade-off for Arab oil at lower
prices. "It is evident throughout
the survey that the Arab cause
has been done much damage in
this country by the believed link
between oil price increases and
continued U.S. support for
Israel," the Harris report said.
THE POLL showed "areas of
reservation and dissatisfaction
with Israel and its current
leaders." By 48-38 percent, the
public thinks that "Israel seems
to feel the U.S. will back them, no
matter what they do." By 44-43
percent, it feels that "Israel is
friendly to the U.S. mainly
because it wants our military
supplies." But a much higher, 61-
26 percent majority, felt that way
four years ago.
A 44-28 percent majority
agrees with the charge that
"Israel is wrong to think that the
Jewish lobby in the U.S. is so
powerful that it can keep them
from making the compromises
necessary to achieve peace."
Harris reported that "It is
significant that the cross-section
of American Jews rejected this
charge only by a very narrow 41-
39 percent. Jews with incomes of
$35,000-$50,000 agree with the
charge by 48-36 percent, and
those with incomes of $50,000
and over agree with it by 52-30
percent."
L
The poll reported that a 67-17
percent majority of the public
rejects the claim that "Israel
thinks it can control the U.S.
Congress" and a 72-13 percent
majority dismisses the
proposition that Israel does not
belong in the Middle East. A 55-
23 percent majority rejected the
view that "Israel should give
back all the territory it gained
from the war of 1967," up from a
49-25 percent majority who felt
that way in 1976.
"VASTLY outweighing these
annoyances with Israel is a whole
set of positive views about
Israel," Harris reported. An 86-8
Percent majority thinks that
"Israel is a small, courageous,
democratic nation which is trying
to preserve its independence."
A 68-20 percent majority
agrees that "the Arabs are
determined to destroy Israel, so
Israel is justified in building
itself up militarily to defend
itself." By 66-13 percent,
Americans also agree .hat "Israel
is trying to keep from having to
give up territory and make
concessions until it is reasonably
sure that the Arabs want to
negotiate a peace settlement."
The poll found that a 62-23
percent majority of the public
feels that "Israel is right not to
agree to sit down with the PLO
because the PLO is a terrorist
organization and wants to
destroy Israel." Nonetheless, a
66-13 percent majority of the
public and a 53-34 percent
majority of Jews feel that "if the
PLO would recognize the right of
Israel to exist instead of pledging
to destroy Israel, then they
should be able to join the peace
talks about the future of the
We8tBank."
WITH RESPECT to the
Palestinian problem, the poll
reported that a 39-29 percent
majority of the public feels that
"Israel has mistreated the
Palestinian refugees and that is
wrong." up from a 35-29 percent
plurality in 1976. By 50-26
percent, most Americans feel
that "by refusing to come up
with a plan to give back parts of '
On the other hand, a 40-26
percent majority believes that "If
the West Bank becomes an in-
dependent Palestinian state,
other extremist Arab states such
as Syria, Libya and Iraq would
use it as a launching pad to
destroy Israel."
But Americans, by a 71-12
percent majority, agree that
"The Palestinian people are now
homeless and deserve their own
independent state, just as much
as the Jews deserved their own
homeland after World War II."
By 72-11 percent, Americans
agree "there must be a way to
guarantee Israel's security and
also give the Palestinians an
independent state on the West
Bank."
Of the respondents, 56-16
percent felt that Israel ought to
agree to a Palestinian state on
the West Bank if it can be
assured of security from attack.
"Jews reject this proposition by
only a very close 41-39 percent,"
Harris reported.
ON THE issue of Jerusalem, a
52-26 percent majority of the
public and a 72-14 percent
majority of Jews oppose "placing
Jerusalem under international
control." A 52-22 percent
majority of the public and an 82-7
percent majority of Jews oppose
"giving East Jerusalem back to
Arab control."
But a 63-17 percent majority of
the public and a 66-21 percent
majority of Jews favor
"establishing a new system of
government for Jerusalem, under
Jewish section and an Arab
borough which would elect
representatives of the Arab
section, with citizens of each
section and Christians, Arabs
and Jews having access to all
parts of Jerusalem."
The survey showed that Israeli
leadership enjoys a majority
support of Americans but
Begins policies "lag a full 20
points behind when compared
with backing for the State of
Israel." By 69-16 percent, the
public feels the current Israeli
leadership is reasonable about
working for peace. Among Jews,
87 percent feel that way.
NO MORE than 38 percent of
the public express a great deal of
confidence in Begin compared
with 54 percent who feel that way
about Sadat. Among Jews, 61
percent express high confidence
in Begin "although this drops to
only 42 percent among those
Jews in the highest income
brackets," Harris reported.
However, a 77-7 percent
majority of the public credits
Begin with showing at Camp
David that "he is capable of
making concessions that can lead
to a peace settlement when he
agreed to give back the Sinai to
Egypt." A 90-4 percent majority
of Jews concur in that view.
A 42-38 percent majority of the
public agreed that Begin "is right
to claim that Israel has prior
historical right to control the
West Bank since Jews lived there
in Biblical times." Baptists
agreed by a larger 51-25 percent
i way.
A 54-19 percent majority of th.
Ejft.jff* with th.cE
U^at by advocating and alloZ
more Jewish settlements on 2
WestBank.helBegmiismak^
it almost impossible to bwI
peace settlement. The Jewiah
community disagreed with that
proposition by a 44-41 percent
majority. ti
President Carter received
negative 64-34 percent rating bv
the general public for handling
the Middle East crisis, though
this was better than his overall
performance rating of 72-27
percent negative. But 46 percent
of the public gave him high
marks for his efforts to work for
peace in the Middle East and 44
percent perceived Carter as being
"very sympathetic" to Israel
AN OVERWHELMING 906
percent felt that he "has tried to
keep good U.S. relations with
both Arabs and Israel so that he
can persuade both sides to make
peace." A 68-14 percent majority
felt that "he has kept his word
that the U.S. will stand by
Israel." But a 63-24 percent
majority criticized Carter for
"allowing Arab oil pressure to
influence U.S. Middle East policy
too much."
Only 18 percent of the Jewish
community saw Carter as "very
sympathetic" to Israel and 59
percent thought he had been
highly sympathetic to Egypt. By
55-22 percent Jews gave Carter
negative marks for the way he
dealt with the PLO. Jews" did
give Carter credit on two counts.
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Great Historical Personalities
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Reading Hebrew for Beginners
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Gods Ten"
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October 10, I960
+Jewish thx-kUan
Page9-A
5. Chiefs of Staff Chairman in Israel to
y YITZHAK SHARGIL
Discuss Military Relations
military
ITEL AVIV (JTA) -
David Jones,
Sinan of the U S Joint
S of Staff left Israel
onday after a one-day
it in which he conferred
|tt Prime Minister
fenachem Begin in his
Ipacity as Defense
U.S.-Israeli
relations.
According to informed sources,
their dialogue was limited to an
exchange of assessments on the
military situation in the region,
but there were no concrete ex-
pressions on strategic co-
operation such as has been
developed between the U.S. and
Egypt.
U.S. and Israel that was post-
poned by the U.S. a month ago.
Israeli sources believe the visits
by Komer and Jones were in-
tended to mollify critics in Israel
and the U.S. who have charged
that American military co-
operation with Egypt is growing
at the expense of Israel.
The discussions were held be-
tween Jones and his aides and
Israeli General Headquarters
staff officers. Jones received
V^"J i-rapl', ton JONES' VISIT, which fol- **" onicers. joihjo "^wveu
inister ana H lowed by four daiy3 the ^ of short briefings from Chief of
litary brass. A total news ^ R Undersecretarv of Def^ Army Intelligence Gen.
ckout was imposed on Robert Komer, represented a Yehoshua Saguy, Navy Com-
that ap- resumption of the regular joint
ntly
centered around mflttafy dklofua between'~the Air Force Commander Gen.
David Ivri. A detailed assess-
ment of the Iraqi-Iranian war is
said to have been among the
topics discussed. Jones met with
Begin later in Jerusalem.
The joint talks are expected to
be continued in Washington next
month. Jones said he would visit
Israel again in December and
spend the Christmas holidays
here but he declined to elaborate
on the nature of that visit.
NEITHER the Americans nor
the Israelis who participated in
the talks would confirm or deny
whether the questions of a U.S.-
Israeli mutual defense pact or
joint maneuvers between the two
countries were among the
subjects discussed.
Jones, who was greeted with
full military honors on his arrival
by Chief of Staff Gen. Raphael
Eytan, declined an invitation to
visit the Golan Heights. How-
ever, after his briefings he was
taken by helicopter to an Israel
Air Force base and was then
flown to watch large-scale exer-
cises by the combined services in
the southernmost region region
of the Negev and in Sinai. An
army spokesman said later that
the American military chief was
visibly impressed.
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_ Page 10-A
> knist flcridian
Friday, Qctob
er lo.
Knesset Deliberates
Impact of War on Security
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security
Committee deliberated on
the impact of the Iraqi-
Iranian war on Israel's
security. Prime Minister
Men ache m Begin, who
attended the session,
repeated that Israel must
watch developments closely
and carefully.
Some members
suggested that Israel take
some initiatives to prevent
an Iraqi victory, while
others maintained that
Israel keep a low profile
while exploiting the
propaganda value of the
conflict between two
declared enemies of the
Jewish State.
THE CONSENSUS in the
committee was that it is too early
to predict the outcome of the war.
Military experts who briefed the
committee said Iraq's heavily-
armored land forces enjoy an
advantage in ground fighting.
I
In Miami
Rabbis, Federation Eye
Anti-Semitic Violence
!
i
The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has sent cables to
the Jewish community of France expressing outrage at the recent anti-
Semitic acts of violence perpetrated against them and expressing
solidarity with French Jewry in this trying period.
The cables were sent to Baron Alain de Rothschild, chairman of
the CRJF, Conseil Representatif des Juifs de France (Jewish
Representative Council of France) in Paris and to Rabbi Michael
Williams, spiritual leader of the Union Liberale Israelite (the
synagogue in front of which a bomb was placed to go off following
Sabbath services, at which time the deaths and injuries took place).
THE CABLES were sent by Rabbi Simcha Freedman. president
and Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive vice president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami. The cables read:
"We express our outrage at violent anti-Semitic acts perptrated
against Jewish community of France in recent days. We join with you
in calling for universal condemnation and for immediate steps by
French authorities to pursue and prosecute the perpetrators and to
insure an end to those despicable acts. Am Yiaroel Choi."
A telegram was also sent by Rabbi Freedman and Rabbi Schiff on
behalf of the Rabbinical Association to Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum.
executive director of the Synagogue Council of America, informing
him of the Association's action and sugesting that the SCA urge other
American Jewish communities to send similar communications to our
brethren in France.
MEANWHILE, in response to the recent attacks against the
Jewish community of Paris. Joseph Ranter, chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
issued the following statement:
"We are shocked and outrated by the horrifying events that took
place this weekend in Paris. They should cause people everywhere to
ponder the broad and dangerous potential inherent in these acts for all
peoples regardless of ethnic or racial background.
"History has shown that tyranny invariably goes beyond the
original scapegoat. Once begun it is never known where it will end. We
are reminded of the anguished statement of Pastor Martin Niemoller,
well-known German theologian, who said. First the Nazis went after
the Jews, but I was not a Jew. so I did not object. Then they went
after the Catholics, but I was not a Catholic, so I did not object. Then
they came after the trade unionists, but I was not a trade unionist, so I
did not object. Then they came after me, and there was no one left to
object.
"Let the world be aware of the grave danger facing people every-
where if the Paris events are allowed to go unheeded,'' Kanter said.
EEC Envoy Thorn's Visit
Much More Cordial This Time
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Gas ton Thorn
of Luxembourg met here with
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and, separately, with a panel of
top Foreign Ministry officials on
his second fact-finding mission
since August as a special envoy
of the European Economic
Community (EEC). He met later
with several Palestinian leaders
from the West Bank and Gaza
Strip.
Thorn's sessions with Begin
and other Israeli officials were
described as "friendly though
frank talks." The atmosphere of
the meetings, especially the one
with Begin, was markedly mort
cordial than on his earlier visit.
THE EUROPEAN diplomat
apparently listened and said
little. He did not respond when
David Kimche, director general
of the Foreign Ministry,
criticized him for making "one-
sided" public statements and for
exchanging correspondence with
Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir Arafat
over the situation in Lebanon.
He did not comment when
Begin told him "There will be no
Palestinian state we will see to
that." But after each of the
meetings, Thorn told reporters
that there had been on progress
since each side Israel and the
Arab rejectionist states which he
also visited recently have not
budged from their well-known
positions.
The main purpose of Thorn's
visit was to meet with
Palestinian representatives. The
meeting took place at the home of
the British Consul in East
Jerusalem. One of those he spoke
to was Mayor Elias Freij of
Bethlehem who said the
Palestinians were ready to live at
p;ce alongside Israel, but only
in state of their own.
The Iranians have naval
supremacy, and both sides are
about even in the air with
possibly a slight advantage for
the Iranians, they said.
According to the experts, Iraq
had been preparing for the war
for many months, militarily and
politically. Baghdad moved to
improve its relations not only
with the Soviet Union which had
deteriorated since the Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan, but also
with the Western-oriented Arab
states, Saudi Arabia and Jordan.
They said Iraq has three goals
in its war on Iran: to acquire
supremacy in the Persian Gulf
area; to depose the Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini; and to take
over the Arab-populated, oil-rich
area of Khuzistan southern Iran.
That would give Iraq full
control over the Shatt el Arab,
the waterway formed by the
confluence of the Tigris and
Euphrates rivers, easy access to
the Persian Gulf and a sub-
stantial increase in its oil
producing capacity. The
Khuzistan fields have a potential
of five million barrels a day.
MEIR AM IT, of the Labor
Alignment said Israel's dilemma
was how to cause the fall of the
Khomeini regime and yet
promote an Iranian victory that
would prevent the strengthening
of Iraq. Amit said Israel should
consider possible moves in that
direction.
Yehuda Ben Meir, of the
National Religious Party, also
spoke of possible Israeli
initiatives toward the resumption
of relations with Iran. He said
Israel was a natural source of
assistance to Iran since it could
supply that country with spare
parts and other equipment of
American manufacture which are
still in use by the Iranian army.
Yosef Rom of Likud said
"Israel's first interest was its
own security and therefore any
action in that direction is
positive." However, Rom was not
sure that arms sales to Iran were
feasible under present cir-
cumstances or whether the
Khomeini regime was interested.
Former Foreign Minister Abba
Eban of the Labor Alignment
said the Iraqi-Iranian war gave
Israel the opportunity to point
out to the world that the Arab-
Israeli conflict is not responsible
for turmoil in the Middle East.
"IF ISRAEL ceased to exist,
the Soviet troops would not with-
draw from Afghanistan,
Khomeini would not release the
American hostages, Iraq would
not stop the war, and the price of
oil would not drop one penny,"
Eban said.
Labor Party leader Shimon
Peres stressed that Israel must
not become involved in the
Persian Gulf war. He said the war
could change the map of the
Middle East and touch off a new
arms race in the area.
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The Shekel, which is equal to IL
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Although Israelis were
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THE INTRODUCTION of the
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October 10,1980
Ball Says of Israel
+JSBisL ncriciinn
Page 11- A
::*:::*:::?:!:*:*:-x-:*:^
Enormous Inhibition' for U.S.
Continued from Page 1-A
Lblican candidate Ronald
leans chief foreign policy
Iser, who said. "Gov. Reagan
fceeds to an appreciation of
le| because he believes it is a
(tegic asset for the United
es."
|he differences between Allen
I Ball, who was the chairman
| study of American policy on
and the Persian Gulf for
Hident Carter last year, came
I,,, c]o8e of their discussion on
I S role in the Iraq-1 ran
Jlict and the Middle East in
feral.
he Israeli matter arose when
*ie Dunsmore. ABC diplo-
lc correspondent, asked Allen
Tther the U.S. "is properly
- one of its key allies in the
||e East right now, Israel, in
situation? Do you think
is a role for Israel to play
hreare not using'.'"
Ll.KN REPLIED: 1 don't
think so. In this particular
situation. I don't know what that
role might be. Of course, we are
well aware of the academic
conflict, of the latest conflict be-
tween Arabs and Jews. Gov.
Reagan proceeds to an ap-
preciation of Israel because he
believes it is a strategic asset for
the United States. It represents
an off-setting power. It's a stable
democracy. It's one to which we
are committed over the long
term.
"We're committed not only on
the basis of our strategic in-
terests in maintaining the ter-
ritorial integrity of Israel and its
right to exist, but also based on a
deep moral commitment that we
have to the State of Israel. Israel
is an important ally. It must con
tinue to grow. It must continue
to exist. It must continue to be
able to defend itself against any
possible threat to its existence."
Bob Clark, chief correspondent
for the ABC program, then
lief Rabbis Under Fire
continued from Page 4-A
the Sephardic community
fed behind Abu Hatzeira.
lug that he was being
d by the Ashkenazic
plishnii'tu which dominates
th politics. Sephardic .lews
I \ -hr.cna/1m in
pthnic mix but feel they
|pder-represented in political
Hatzeira is ol Moroccan
and In- lather. Rabbi
spiritual leader of Moroccan
Jewry. About 1000 supporters ol
the Religious Affairs Minister
paraded in Jerusalem today
carrying the Minister on their
shoulders, waving garlands ,,|
flowers and singing traditional
songs. They angrily charged that
Abu Hatzeira was being tried by
the pies- and that the entire
matter reflected the anti-
Moroccan attitude ol the
authorities
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said to Ball, "I know you dis-
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feel much more strongly about
resolution of the Palestinian
problem."
BALL REPLIED: "Well. I
think unless we resolve it Israel
simply remains for us an enor-
mous inhibition to our achieving
any kind of decent political
relations in the area. The
countries that count most in the
area, which are the oil-producing
areas I don't see Israel as a
strategic asset. I am certainly-
committed to the security of the
State of Israel But I think we
delude ourselves when we talk in
those terms."
Earlier in the broadcast, Hall
said he sees "a better oppor-
tunity of improving key U.S.
relationships in the Middle East
under Carter than under Reagan.
He said Carter has "in the course
of the Camp David negotiations
shown some appreciation of the
necessity to come to grips, say,
with the Palestinian issue, which
I think is a key festering issue.
"I think he has shown a certain
sensitivity to the main political
interests that we have in the area.
And i hope that more and more
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Middle East in terms of an over-
all United States policy and not
be deflected by a lot of pressures
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U.S. Vows to Oppose
Israel's Ouster from UN

%.
8
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
Department said that the
United States would
"firmly oppose any at-
tempt" to oust Israel from
the United Nations General
Assembly, but stopped
short of saying that the
U.S. itself would withdraw
from that body in the event
of Israel's expulsion.
A State Department
spokesman. David Noll, was
asked for comment following
President Carter's statement in
New York that such an expulsion
"would raise the gravest
questions' about future U.S.
participation in the General
Assembly.
NOLL READ the following
prepared statement: "While we
have no indication that serious
challenge to Israel's credentials
at the General Assembly will be
made, obviously this is poten-
tially an extremely serious
matter. The United States will
firmly oppose any attempt to
deprive Israel of its legitimate
rights as a respected member of
the international community.
"I would note that any such
action would be a clear violation
of the United Nations Charter
which states that all UN
members shall be represented in
the General Assembly and that
only the Security Council can
suspend or expel a member state.
It is obvious that the principle of
universal representation in the
General Assembly by all status is
essential to the continued fun-
ctioning of that Assembly as an
institution. Any attempt to deny
a country its right to participate
on political grounds damages the
General Assembly and the
United Nations itself in a fun-
damental way whether or not it is
successful."
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PwrelO-A
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1 _.
Filling in Background
Five Assaults in 48 Hours
By AARON MELER
PARIS (JTAl A
neo-Nazi group claimed
credit for the machinegun
attack on a synagogue here,
the fifth armed assault on
Jewish institutions in Paris
in 48 hours. In earlier
predawn attacks,
unidentified gunmen
sprayed bullets into the
entrance of the Great
Synagogue, a Jewish-run
children^ home. a
memorial monument to
Jews deported by the Nazis
and the entrance to the
Lucien Hirsh School.
No casualties were reported in
any of the incidents. But the
French Jewish community is
enraged and President Valery
Giscard dEstaing has expressed
his indignation." Last Friday
night, police swooped down on
the offices of the recently-
outlawed Federation of European
Nationalist Action (FANEl and
arrested six persons. Two were
still in custody at the time, in-
cluding FANE leader Marc
Fredriksen who was tried and
convicted last month for inciting
race hatred.
ANONYMOUS telephone calls
to French news media said the
attacks were the work of the
European Nationalist Faces
(FNFi. a neo-Nazi organization
set up by Fredriksen after FANE
was banned on orders of the
Interior Ministry.
The armed attacks capped a
series of incidents in Paris and
other parts of France, including
the proliferation of anti-Semitic
leaflets and daubings on the walls
of Jewish-owned buildings and
street clashes between Jewish
actvists and neo-Nazis.
The most violent of these
occurred outside the courthouse
during Fredriksen's trial. Two
days later, a shop owned by
Salomon Milgrom. a Jewish
activist, was the target of an
attack. Anti-Semitic slogans
were smeared on the walls of the
Hirsh School three days before
the machinegun attack.
JEWISH shopkeepers, con-
cerned by the wave of anti-
Semitic attacks, organized a
demonstration attended by
several political leaders, and they
took the opportunity to announce
that they would set up defense
groups to prevent such crimes.
The Representatives Council of
Jewish Organizations in France
iCRIFi published a communique
denouncing the attacks and said
through its president. Alain de
Rothschild, that anti-Semitic
elements are trying to aim at the
vital sectors of our community
We demand that the authorities
deal firmly with those who are
responsible for the attacks. We
believe that they constitute
minority groups which are
seeking to destabilize democratic
life. Above all. it is essential not
to fall into the trap of
provocation
Fredriksen and his associates
are believed to be waging a
deliberate campaign of terror
against French Jews to force
them to react. According to this
view, counter-violence by Jews is
expected to stir anti-Semitic
feelings in the population since
the right wing extremists would
utilize the counter-attacks to
convice the population that Jews
are responsible for France's
present economic difficulties.
FOR THE first time, mean-
while. President dEstaing in-
tervened by saying that the
attacks were particularly
despicable as they had been
aimed at schools. The Mayor of
Paris, former Premier Jacques
Chirac, said everything should be
done to track down those
n-ponsible for the attacks and
punished. He added that he
asked the police to protect all
Jewish schools and institutions
in Paris.
Several Jewish personalities,
however, expressed regret that
French police have not gone after
the neo-Nazis. Andre Wormser.
head of CRIF's Commission on
anti-Semitism, stressed that it is
necessary to dismatle" the neo-
Nazi groups but that the Jewish
community should refrain from
using violence.
French police, he said, "have
not always done their job as they
should. For three years, three
neo-Nazi groups have been active
in France: the Joachim Peiper
group, the French Front Against
Jewish Dictatorship, and the
Charles Martel group. All the
members of these groups are
similar to the pro-Nazi
collaborators during the war."
HE ADDED that Dolice must
French Police Release
Self-Styled 'Fuehrer'
B\ \ A RON MELER
^ PARIS (JTA) -
French police have released
neo-Nazi leader Marc
Fredriksen from custody on
grounds that they had no
evidence to link him to a
series of machinegun at-
tacks on Jewish in-
stitutions in Paris.
Fredriksen and five other
suspects were arrested
when police raided the
offices of the outlawed
Federation of European
Nationalist Action
(FANE), but all have been
freed for lack of evidence.
Unidentified gunmen sprayed!
bullets into the Great,
Synagogue, a memorial
monument to Jews deported by
the Nazis, a Jewish-run children's
home and the Lucien Hirsh
School. The pre-dawn attacks
caused no casualties. Later.
another synagogue was riddled
with bullets.
ANONYMOUS telephone
callers told the French news
media that the attacks were the
work of the European Nationalist
Fasces (FNE), a neo-Nazi group
set up by Fredriksen after FANE
was banned.
The attacks were generally
believed to have been in
retaliation for beatings ad-
ministered to Fredriksen's
supporters by Jewish activists in
a series of clashes outside a Paris
courthouse Sept. 18. The neo-
Nazi leader was convicted on that
date for inciting race hatred. He
will be sentenced soon.
But police sources said that
Fredriksen and the other five
suspects had managed to prove
that they had no connection with
the attacks on Jewish premises.
According to the police, the
attacks could have been carried
out by another neo-Nazi group.
carry out their investigations in
earnest. It is hard to believe that
it is impossible for them to
dismantle these groups "
Jewish leaders said it was
urgent to dissolve all neo-Nazi
groups and prevent their leaders
from reconstituting their
organizations under another
name, which a loophole in French
laws enables them to do.
French police said they faced
difficulties in dismantling neo-
Nazi organizations because they
were set up as clandestine cells.
They added that they could only
act against known pro-Nazis but
that it was hard to track down
the anonymous sympathizers.
CRITICS of the French police
have nevertheless noted that
many police are rightwing
sympathizers. They recalled that
during the war it was French
police, not the Germans, who
rounded up Jews who were
eventually sent to Nazi death
camps. After the liberation of
France in 1944. the police
department was not purged
entirely of its former
collaborationists, and for years
neo-Nazi elements live in peace
It was recalled that during the
war some 50.000 Frenchmen
enrolled in the militia corps which
carried out even more brutal
actions against the population
than the Germans. When the war
ended, less than 2.000 of these
men faced French tribunals, and
only 500 were executed for their
crimes.

:
>


- M
.
tl

-
>
/&
/
<
-^
Could be trouble in Poland, the workers are beginning to unite'
| Israel Expresses Shock n
At Paris Bomb Blasts
a
>>
JERUSALEM The Cabinet
has issued a sharp statement in
the wake of the weekend's fatal
bomb blast outside a Paris syna-
gogue, declaring "the right and
duty of Jews to defend them-
selves, their lives and their
honor." Cabinet Secretary Arye
Naor would not say precisely
what this call meant, or whether
it was directed at French Jewry
as a distinct group within the
broad body of French citizenship.
The Cabinet statement was
proposed by Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, Naur said, and
was accepted unanimously after
some changes had been worked in
during the discussion
The statement read: The
Government oi Israel expresses
its horror at the bloody attack on
. nagogue in Paris, the murder
wounding of manv others %
participate in the' grief of t>j
bereaved families and send ml
well wishes to the injured It'I
should be noted that theterrorutl
organizations that operate
France and other Europe,!
countries collaborate with u*l
Arab murderers organizatiotl
calling itself "PLO
"There is no distinction btj
tween anti-Israelisra or antJ
Zionism and anti-SemitismwhidJ
brought down disaster anjl
shame on all -Kind ThJ
years of the 1930s and the I940j
must never return. It isiherigkl
and duty of the Jews to defej
tbemselvi -
honor \\ e an sun I
men of goodwill in France
support then
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October 10, 1W0
* k*i<*t fhridiiar
Page K5-A
/(/ Teachings Plague Us Again
Continued from Page4-A
|. kh. as it started and for all
I wrong reasons. You do not
f h very long at the Prof. He
,.. you. and so he has the
gay, unless you don't care
art. willing to sacrifice your-
j on the altar of your opinions
L, vou believe conflict with his.
If this is not precisely what he
U thinking, it was nevertheless
Lrallv what he had in mind.
Ldent's think that way even
Lgh it i-s a dead giveaway of
fcrown addled view of power -
at thev would do if they had
chance, not what in fact
{urs in similar circumstances.
yiell. I asked him. So you
V8 the bombing was a
picable act? His agreement
once again so enthusiastic
.. his heavy gold cross swung
Jits heavy gold chain like a
Idulum gone out of whack.
i'HY'.'. 1 persisted, especially
[being Jewish was such an
Tusing thing. I did not give him
fhance to deny he found it
using, but instead pressed for-
d: What does your church
fch you about the Jews?
(Je sat silently, his face mildly
hson. Others joined him in his
nee. Soon it became oppres-
No one would speak. I had
hing to say either, although I
i tempted to explain that the
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reasoning behind his vow not to
serve if drafted was as hypo-
critical as he believed the ideals
behind our own fighting in World
War 11 to be.
He suddenly blurted out, the
venom in his soul finally coming
to the fore: 'You can not expect
the church to deny the universal
truths.''
I remembered the Pope's pro-
nunciamento on Jerusalem the
other day. his hoopla about the
children of Abraham and the
fears he expressed about a Jewish
Jerusalem.
THE WHOLE twisted history
of Jews and early Christianity as
delineated in the most anti-
Semitic passages of the New
Testament seized me as a prin-
ciple of religious faith that, in the
name of God. it is righteous to
condemn and hate and engage in
ceaseless war upon the entire
Jewish people forever.
Suddenly there, in that class-
room, it seemed to me how vain
and absurd were all the Brother-
hood-type enterprises in which
some Jewish organizations
engage as they participate in
dialogue after dialogue with the
enemy that will never give up the
hatred and the war.
No. I said to the student. I can
not expect the church to do any-
thing about the truth.
THE FRENCH role in the
Iraq-Iran war is nauseous.
French Foreign Minister Jean
Francois-Poncet, in an address
the other week before the General
Assembly of the United Nations,
attacked Israel's policies in Jeru-
salem and on the West Bank as
"impediments to the search for a
peaceful settlement in the Middle
Fast.''
He charged that Israels
"attacks on Lebanon's
sovereignty and territorial in-
tegrity and on the mission and
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authority of the United Nations
force in that country" are a
further danger to peace
Said Poncet: "The friendship
that links France to Lebanon and
my country's role in LJNIFIL
make this action all the more ab-
horrent to Franee."
THUS FRANCE, that excres
cense of arrogance on the back-
side of the Furopean continent,
continues to lecture the world on
international integrity and
morality and to sway public-
opinion through the filter of the
anti-Semitism that has forever
been integral to its national life.
It is an anti-Semitism in-
distinguishable from its national
religious identity. As such,
historically. France is to be
equated with Germany under the
Nazis, which adopted a religious
identity as defined by the
prophet. Adolf Hitler. Just as
there was no governmental
authority in Germany under the
Nazis to cry out against the
excesses visited upon the Jews
there, so do we hear a deafening
silence today in the official ranks
of the Quai d'Orsay as French
Jews are daily rocked by one
Fascist outrage against them
after another. And why should
there not be a deafening silence,
when the Fascists are in the very
ranks of the Quai d'Orsay itself?
Understood in these terms, we
can begin to understand the
enormity of the horror that it was
the French who first moved the
Furopean Fconomic Community
into its new anti-Israel orbit,
although it is only fair to say that
the rest of Furope needed little
prodding to join in.
Now the EEC, with a French
hand on the wheel of its rearward
shot into past history, demands
Israeli territorial concession after
concession as the price for its
continued support of Israel as a
nation plus, of course, recog-
nition of the "legitimate rights"
Carter Says U.S. Would
Quit UN If Israel is Ousted
NEW YORK (JTA> President Carter warned
here that should Israel be expelled from the United
Nations General Assembly, it would raise questions about
whether the United States and other countries would
remain at that UN forum.
The United States will strongly oppose any effort to
exclude Israel from the General Assembly or any UN
specializ.ed agency, Carter told the convention of the
International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWUL
THE "ILLEGAL EXPULSION" of any member
"would raise the gravest questions about the future of the
UN General Assembly and the further participation of the
United States and other nations in that deliberative
body," the President declared.
Islamic countries at a recent three-day meeting in
Morocco decided to seek support from other Third World
countries to expel Israel from the current session of the
Assembly. The Assembly's credentials committee last
week approved Israel's membership, but a challenge
could come when the committee's report is presented to
the full Assembly.
of the Palestinian people.
WHAT THIS means in the end
is the ilelegitimization of Israel
about which the French could
care less at the same time that
they preach about the inadmis-
sibility of expanding hegemony
through conquest, thus rational-
izing their repudiation of Israel
de jure.
Hut it remains to be seen if the
French will offer similar lectures
to the world in the case of Iraq,
its principal client for whose soul
it appears to be vying with the
Kremlin, and whose forces at the
!>eginning of the week were some
75 miles into Iran.
Meanwhile, with such scurvy
official attitudes encouraging
them as a statement of national
French policy, the terrorist at-
tacks upon Jewish institutions in
France can be expected to
continue.
Why not at home, when France
abroad tells the world just how
wicked and immoral the Jewish
state is? And when the French
read their Hibles in the candle-
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_ PmbIO-A
Page 14-A
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Friday. October]
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In Wake of Bombing
10,000 March to Protest French Terrorism
These
include
machiiiegunning last l J
eluding two school, TS
synagogues, and
bomb attack
last
*Dd
;*J
Continued from Page 1-A
security measures for the Jewish
community. But the Jewish
community and many govern-
ment opposition leaders feel,
however, that these measures are
too little and too late.
The country seems to be in a
state of shock and there is a
nationwide demand for speedy
and energetic action. The feeling
if solidarity with the Jewish
community is such that France's
two major trade unions, the CGT
and CFDT, called for a
nationwide strike Tuesday as a
gesture of solidarity with
France's Jews. Work in factories,
offices and public transportation
will come to a standstill for two
hours.
Representatives of all social
classes and political parties
voiced support of former Prime
Minister Michel Debre s
statement: "No one can or will
forget what took place in Paris
Friday night.'' Newspapers
carried front page headlines.
"Abominable.'' declared France-
Soir "The Assassins are Among
Us," thundered Quotidien de
Paris.
TWO DAYS after the bomb
explosion. Rue Copemic, where
the Reform Rue Copemic Temple
is located, looks as if it had been
the target of an air raid attack.
Burned out cars litter the streets;
buildings in a 100-meter area are
wrecked, their windows shattered
and their walls blackened by
smoke. Local residents say that a
day after the bombing they could
still smell the stench of smoke
and burned bodies.
The Reform synagogue,
located in one of Paris' most
fashionable residential areas, was
filled with worshippers who came
to attend both the Sabbath
services and Simhat Torah
services. At 6:20 p.m., the
worshippers suddenly heard a
blast. The synagogue's front gate
was blown off, the ceilings caved
in, and the windows were
shattered. Only a handful of
people inside were injured. Most
suffered slight wounds from glass
shards and wood splinters.
The synagogue's rabbis. Dr.
Michael Williams, an English-
man, asked them to remain calm
and to remain indoors. Later he
said that he feared a possible
ambush outside the synagogue
and wanted to send someone out
to reconnoiter the area. On the
street, eyewitnesses said they
first saw a 20-meter high flame
leap into the air. Immediately
afterwards they heard the blast
and saw cars lifted into the air by
the force of the blast, windows
shatter and flames spreading all
over the street.
THE JANITOR of an adjacent
building said, "Within seconds I
could see dead bodies lying
around and other people burning
in their cars." One of the dead
was identified as Aliza Shagrir,
42, an Israeli film editor who was
in Paris for a two-week holiday
with her 17-year-old son. She was
walking to the home of a friend to
meet her husband when the bomb
exploded. She died on the way to
the hospital.
A 14-year-old girl driving a
moped had the skin of her face
peeled off. An elderly woman had
her legs severed. Moat of the
other dead and injured were
either passing by the synagogue
or milling outside.
Within minutes of the attack, a
crowd gathered at the scene.
Jews from all over Paris who had
heard the news on the radio
arrived at the synagogue to join
the worshippers. Bonnet, who
arrived on the scene shortly after
the blast, drew the wrath of the
crowd. People shouted, "Shame,"
"Resign." A press photographer
shouted at Bonnet, "My mother
died in a concentration camp, and
now the same thing happens
here." Rabbi Williams shook his
'
fist and cried out, "Shame on
France and on all Frenchmen.
Shame on you. Shame for what
happened."
SEVERAL PEOPLE wept
openly as Bonnet pledged. "This
thing will not repeat itself. I
swear it to you." He also ap-
pealed to the Jewish community
to keep calm: "I feel tonight like
a young Jew, and I can imagine
what you are going through. This
is why I beseech you not to give
in to violence and not to reply in
kind. Trust the government and
the legal authorities.'' he begged.
The principal Jewish leaders
were also at the scene. Rothschild
was on the verge of tears. He
appealed directly to Giscard
d'Estaing to take "the ex-
traordinary measures needed."
He warned that Jewish youth will
have to guarantee the com-
munity's security themselves.
But directly after the blast
tempers were so high that both
Rothschild and Jewish elder
statesman Jean Pierre-Bloch
appealed for calm.
Bloch, a former minister and
prominent resistance fighter is
known as an "activist." His son,
Gaullist Deputy Jean-Pierre, is
reputed to be the head of the
Jewish Defense Organization. On
Friday night, they and Chief
Rabbi Kaplan, pleaded for calm.
"Let us not start a cycle of blind
violence," they said.
IN SPITE of those pleas,
demonstrations began late
Friday night at the Etoile. The
crowds marched down the
Champs Ely see. Israeli flags
appeared by the hundreds. In the
Jewish Quarter, other Jewish
youths gathered. They could be
heard complaining about police
laxity and incompetence. Small
defense squads were formed. The
first cars that tried to enter the
area early Saturday morning
were stopped by the new Jewish
defenders, their passengers were
scrutinized and their trunks were
inspected.
A group of Jewish youths
drove to a disco, "Bus
Palladium," reputedly a meeting
place for rightwing activists, but
found the police waiting for them.
Saturday morning began with
a huge meeting at the synagogue
itself. Over 10,000 people were
massed there. Ms. Veil, herself an
Auschwitz survivor, appeared
shaken. Francois Mitterrand, the
Socialist Party leader and
probable contender for the
presidency next spring, showed
up accompanied by most of his
senior advisers. The Israeli
Ambassador sat in the front row.
FROM THE synagogue the
crowd marched again to the
Etoile and from there to the
Champs Elysee toward the
Presidential Palace and the
Interior Ministry. The crowd
grew rapidly and as many more
continued to join the demon-
strators, police had a difficult
time preventing the marchers
from approaching the govern-
ment building.
Three young people were
allowed through the police cordon
and met with one of Giscard
d'Estaing's aides who told them
that "the President is deeply
moved. He has given orders that
everything should be done to
apprehend the criminals."
Outside the government
building people screamed and
pushed. Ms. Veil, who marched
with the crowd from the
synagogue, was harangued and
insulted. Fights broke out
continuously. Passersby
suspected of being rightwingers
were punched and pummeled. A
man, mistaken for neo-Nazi
leader Marc Fredriksen, was
beaten up. It turned out that he
was a Norwegian tourist who
spoke no French.
MEANWHILE, French police
have begun to implement
government orders to protect
Jewish institutions. Riot police
equipped with machineguns are
stationed in front of every
synagogue in Paris. In
Strasbourg, the street on which
the synagogue is located has been
cleared of all vehicular traffic and
all parked cars have been towed
away. At the same time, hun-
dreds of detectives are going
through the files of rightwing
organizations.
Hundreds of people have been
arrested since Friday night and
have had their homes searched.
However, according to police, no
clues have been found as to the
identity of those responsible for
the synagogue bombing.
The police department's trade
union secretary held an im-
promptu press conference
yesterday and disclosed that one-
fifth of the members of the
outlawed neo-Nazi organization,
the Federation of European
Nationalist Action, are
policemen. He charged that "it is
they who inform their neo-Nazi
colleagues of all we do. They use
police intelligence operations
against the government and the
police."
ACCORDING to Interior
Ministry officials, this could be
the likeliest explanation of police
failure to apprehend the neo-
Nazis who have carried out a
dozen attacks on Jewish in-
stitutions over the last two years.
"" "IW1CK on '--I
students hostel, Centre M
which seriously iniurrf ot^
lr>jured26
pa*!
Meanwhile, late Mrm*.
ternoon. one of tho*&:
Friday mghts blast died?'
hospital. ra.s.n* the de;
Jackson Urges Renewed Help
For Soviet Jews Seeking Exit
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Henry Jackson (D., Wash.)
has called for a resurgence by the
West to help Soviet Jews and
others emigrate and reverse the
development by Soviet
authorities of obstacles against
their emigration.
Pointing to the drop in Soviet
emigration in recent months,
Jackson told the Senate, "There
are many reasons why the
Soviets are pursuing these
policies, and one reason may be
that they think the United States
and the West do not really care
anymore."
"AT ONE time." the principal
author of the Jackson-Vanik
Amendment dealing with Soviet
emigration and U.S. trade said,
"the fate of Soviet Jewry and the
cause of freer emigration were a
primary subject of public at-
tention. Of late, public attention
has focused on Iran,
Afghanistan, Camp David
negotiations. Poland ami
Iran-Iraq war It is high |J
Jackson added, "to Zu
abundantly clear that we doa,
about those denied their k
damental rights to emigrate"
Jackson observed that
this respect, the Helsinki
ference is an especially weL
opportunity. Let the'public
this country now call uponri
government and the 4,
Western governments u
champion at Helsinki tjJ
emigration of Jews. Christ^
and others who can no local
tolerate or be tolerated by J
repressive government."
Jackson has personally urgui
the Helsinki conference which
to review the Helsinki
beginning Nov. 11 in Madrid
"give special attention to the fail
of the Soviet and East Europe
members of the groups formed
monitor compliance with tU
Helsinki accords He said no
than 40 of those members t
imprisoned or exiled.
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_______.


Way
.October 10,1980

*Jenisfi Fkridliain
Page 15-A
Conditions Stated
Israel Would Assist Iran If ...
Autonomy Talks I
j By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Lrael would assist Iran
tlitarily in its war with
aq on condition that Iran
pandoned its extreme anti-
[rael policy and stopped
jpporting Palestinian
Irrorists. Deputy Defense
linister Mordechai Zipori
ud according to an in-
Irview published in
taariv
I" Israel can provide con-
erable assisUnce to Iran and
^ble her, from a logistical point
vie*', to continue its war with
Iq," Zipori was quoted as
Ving "However, it is self-evi-
Jit that such a possibility could
t materialize unless there is a
nificant change in the present
ireme regime of Iran. The
Inian authorities will first have
[change their bitterly hostile
icy toward us. Today they
bport Palestinian terrorists
j wage political and economic
ragainst us."
fclPORl noted, according to
nrh. that Israeli military
istance in the form of equip-
|nt could be of major im-
portance to Iran because its army
already uses some shells of Israeli
manufacture, and its navy
employs the Israel-made Gabriel
surface-to-surface missile,
weapons apparently sold to Iran
during the regime of the late
Shah. But as of now, Zipori
pointed out, the Iranian attitude
toward Israel is the same as that
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, and "it is unthink-
able that we shall assist the
PLO."
Zipori's remarks reflected
growing concern in Israeli circles
that Iraqi hegemony over the
Persian Gulf in the event of a
successful outcome of its war
against Iran could have long-
term detrimental effects for
Israel.
Gen. Yehoshua Saguy, chief of
Army Intelligence, made that
point in a television interview
here. He warned that the
ascendancy of Iraq would streng-
then Soviet influence in the Gulf
region. He did not rule out the
possibility of direct Soviet inter-
vention if the Iraqi-Iranian war is
prolonged or if a power struggle
develops in Iran.
SAGUY ALSO noted that Iraq *
has a nuclear weapons potential.
Envoys Urged to Show
Israel Not Root Problem
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli Ambassadors
Wind the world have been urged by the Foreign
listry this week to cite the Iran-Iraq war as dramatic
roboration of Israel's long-held view that it is not the
kb-Israeli conflict that is the sole or main cause of
jonal instability.
The envoys have been cabled background material
[wing the deep economic and political origins of the
VIraq conflict, and its potentially devastation con-
lences for the west.
fHE ISRAELI "line" is that
war shows the really pro-
ud undercurrents of political,
nomic, religious and ethnic
pion in this region which are
Irely unrelated to the Israeli
pe and would continue to
He unrest even were the
st inian question to be
ved
This does not mean, says
er Foreign Minister Abba
>. that there is no need to
e the Arab-Israel dispute.
what it does mean is that
dispute should be seen in a
and much reduced dimen-
ban. Shimon Peres, and other
Uborites have given their
d endorsement to this new
m line. They, like the
rnment. feel the war should
harnessed" by Israel on the
teal and propaganda level to
sympathetic Western
n that the oil and strategic
ems of the region cannot be
ved simply by satisfying
Unian demands.
IS BROAD spectrum of
Prt for this contention came
ne 'ore at a meeting of the
sset rordgn Affairs and De-
tommittee which heard
; on the Iran-Iraq war and
.mentanes from senior Army
P'lgence officers.
The same argument was voiced
by Peres on the one hand, and by
Likud-Herut hardliner Moshe
Arens MK on the other, at
separate meetings with a toplevel
delegation of British Liberal
Party MP's under Party Chair-
man David Steel.
"In view of the war there,"
said Arens, "there is little I need
add
ANOTHER LIBERAL, Gas
ton Thorn, the EC's Mideast
envoy and head of Luxembourg's
Liberal Party, was expected to
hear the same argument made by
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
when the two men met Tuesday.
Begin has made it clear that
beyond stressing the lesson of the
war to the fullest extent possible.
Israel should maintain a "low
profile" in regard to the war.
There was therefore scarcely
veiled annoyance in Begins circle
at statements by his deputy at
the ministry, Mordechai Zippori,
speculating on the possibilities of
Israeli aid and support for Iran
were Teheran to change its at-
titude towards Israel.
"The less said the better" is
understood to be Begin's watch-
word in connection with the Iran-
Iraq war.
If I were an Iranian. I would
think twice about the effect of
this war in another four or five
years, especially about the fact
that Iraq will be a nuclear power
by the end of the 1980s." Saguy
said.
The Iraqi nuclear reactor under
construction near Baghdad has
not yet been hit by Iranian
bombers, he observed.
Of more direct consequence to
Israel, Saguy referred to the
growing economic ties between
Iraq and Jordan, leading possibly
to military ties, which would pose
a serious threat to Israel on its
eastern borders.
Shimon Peres, leader of the
opposition Labor Party, also
referred to Jordan in the context
of the Iraqi-Iranian conflict. In
an interview published in Yediot
Achmnol. Peres suggested that
the time is now ripe for Israel to
seek contacts with Jordan.
According to Peres, King Hus-
sein fears being squeezed be-
tween a powerful Iraq and a
threatening PLO. and despite his
public declarations to the con-
trary. Jordan would be ready to
talk peace with Israel.
Slated To Resume |
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Autonomy
negotiations will resume Oct. 14 with a ministerial level
meeting, Prime Minister Menachem Begin has informed
the Knesset. Begin's aides said it was not clear yet where
the meeting will be held or whether it will involve the full
negotiating teams of Israel, Egypt and the U.S. or only
the heads of delegations.
The meeting will be the first since President Anwar
Sadat broke off the autonomy negotiations last May. The
Oct. 14 date was reportedly suggested by the U.S. after
Israel and Egypt failed to agree on a date or locale for the
meeting.
ACCORDING TO sources here, this represents a
softening of Israel's insistance that the autonomy talks be
resumed at an earlier date. Israel had called for sub-
committee level meetings to begin in September, and
Begin is on record as saying that the First week of
October was the latest possible time for the talks to
resume.
But Begin said last week that the Egyptians con-
vinced Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir in New York
that they had 'serious reasons" for delaying the resumed
talks.
He'd rive him one of his kidneys, if he could. Both
of Joey's have failed. Unfortunately, willing relatives
don't always have kidneys that will match.
So joev waits. D .
A kidn'ev machine can buy precious time But the
longer kids'like Joey have to wait for real kidneys, the
more their growth and development are stunted
And living with a kidney machine h >urs and hours,
several davs a week-is living only half a life. It s emo-
tionallv and socially crippling. It's very expensive.
There are thousands of children and adults whose
only chance for a full, normal life is a donated kidney.
Their odds for a suitable match improve every time
someone signs and carries a donor card.
To be an organ donor is a decision you should
make for yourself. What would you do if Joey were
your child?
r> more information, ask your local kidney
foundation. And for a free booklet about all kinds of
anatomical gifts of life (including a nationally rec-
ognized uniform donor card), write Liberty National.
Dept. K.

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
po Roy.x. ?:R:rvt*...... ILABAMA"


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i.


Gunter Ousts Stone In Runoff Lehman Calls for Hearing
On U.S. Funding to UN
Florida State Insurance Com-
njssioner Bill Gunter defeated
en. Richard Stone in Tuesday's
emocratic runoff.
Though Stone refused to
oncede defeat early Wednesday
lorning. with all of the state's
brecincts reporting, Gunter led
fetone by 38,567 votes.
The final, unofficial tally, with
bout 30,000 Democratic ab-
Lntee ballots still to be counted,
tgve Gunter 574,238 votes (52
ercent) to Stone's 535,671 votes.
SOUTH FLORIDA voted
,verwhelmingly for Stone, giving
lim a roughly 2-1 landslide with
kigher margins in the pre-
lominantly Jewish con-
lominiums along the Gold Coast.
But it wasn't enough to over-
ome Gunter's lead elsewhere in
state, especially in the Pan-
andle. where Stone's turn-
ound support of the Panama
fcanal treaties cost him.
Stone became the nation's
fourth senator defeated in his bid
for renomination this year.
Gunter will face Winter Park
Republican Paula Hawkins in the
Nov. 4 general election. Hawkins,
a former Public Service Commis-
sion chairman, defeated five-term
congressman Lou Frey Jr. for the
GOP nomination. She captured
287,162 votes (62 percent) to
Frey's 176,169 votes in statewide
balloting.
IN BIDS for the State House,
Michael Friedman (D.), a former
Beach city commissioner, beat
his runoff opponent Dorothy
Cohen, former North Bay Village
mayor and city council member.
William (Ray) Hodges (D., a
longtime Hialeah city council-
man, edged Vashti Armbrister in
District 104. Insuranceman Pat
Smith trounced lawyer Steven
Siegfried in District 115. And
Dexter Lehtinen beat State Rep.
Gene Flinn in District 116.
Winning posts on the School
Board were Michael Krop (D.) in
District 5; Paul Cejas (D.) in
Group 1; and Janet McAliley
(D.) in Group 2. J
Incumbent Metro Com-
missioner Beverly Phillips won
over Luis Morse.
FLORIDA voters said yes to
the five constitutional amend-
ments on energy tax credit,
housing bonds, development
incentive, homestead exemption
and inventory exemption.
North Bay Village lawyer
Richard Daar easily won a seat
on the town council.
City of Miami voters approved
bond issues for a sanitary sewer
system and highway improve-
ment. Hialeah voters narrowly
approved a recreation referen-
dum; and Bay Harbor Islands
voters approved a charter
amendment.
Congressman William Lehman
(D., Fla.) has requested that over
sight hearings on the use of U.S.
contributions to the UN be
scheduled early in the next
session of Congress.
In a letter to Appropriations
Foreign Oeprations Sub-
committee Chairman Clarence
Long of Maryland. Congressman
Lehman, a members of the
Appropriations Subcommittee,
warned that the PLO's influence
is on the increase at the UN and
surfaces not only in the work of
the UN General Assembly and
Security Council, but is highly
visible in other UN programs
such as the recently-held UN
Mid-Decade Conference for
Women in Copenhagen.
IN THE final resolution
adopted at that conference, the
PLO carved for itself a role as
consultant to future programs,
which would be a violation of
U.S. legislation passed by
Congress prohibiting the use of
U.S. funds to the UN for PLO-
related activities. The UN, Leh-
man wrote, may also be violating
our anti-boycott laws.
The United Nations
Environmental Program (UNEP)
has rejected a bid offered by an
Israeli construction company to
construct a headquarters in
Kenya, even though the company
presented the lowest bid.
In light of the increasing use of
the UN for propaganda purposes.
Lehman emphasised that the
time is ripe to hold oversight
hearings to focus on our role at
the UN and to examine the use of
our voluntary and assessed
contributions to that body."
Chairman Long has responded
favorably to Lehman's request.
|NI
*no
(ACAU W.NDOWS
MMMV Of MOTH"
HANNAH CLARK
; Al!CI f ADAMS
' am, HACN. "*OA
,*M(MOYOf
plAHl FRANKLIN
YlllUAN MAKKUN
CHICAGO IUINOIS
IN MfMOKY OF HU5IANO
JACOB GOLDENBERG
M lintt* COIDENBIRG
CNKAOO. IUIMOI5
ANNA y ISAAC H. GRAN CELL
IOI ANtm CAUfORNIA
HAZEL
Wise Jewish Studies Chair Created
At Haifa University in Israel
in
Establishment of the George
and Florence Wise Chair of
Jewish Studies at Haifa Univer-
sity was announced this week by
Gershon Avner, president of
Haifa University in Israel. The
chair has been named in honor of
Dr. and Mrs. George S. Wise of
Miami Beach, who are major
benefactors of institutions of
higher learning in both Israel and
the United States.
Dr. Wise, director of the Uni-
versity of Miami Center for Ad-
vanced International Studies,
was the first president of Tel
Aviv University and now serves
as its life chancellor. He was
formerly chairman of the inter-
national board of governors of
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
leaders of the American Friends
of Haifa University.
He will be guest of honor at an
Oct. 19 reception at the Holly-
wood home of Mr. and Mrs. Allen
Gordon, both founders of Haifa
University and leaders of the
South Broward Jewish
Federation. On Oct. 20, at noon,
he will be the guest at a luncheon
in the Bankers Club, Miami,
hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Morton
Silberman and Jay I. Kislak. all
members of the board of directors
of the Florida Chapter of the
American Friends of Haifa U.
A*TOH. MAS5ACH0SITTS
W the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center
Jerusalem^ Mrs. Alice E. Adams of Miami Beach and Park
Avenue, New York, visits the stained glass windows of Marc
.hagall in the synagogue of the hospital and stands beside the
olaque commemorating her donation of one of the 12 windows curriculum and recruiting new
faculty. Being primarily a liberal
arts institution, the University of
Haifa has concentrated its efforts
Auschwitz Album
Among Beachite 's Treasures
Pictorial Story of Tragedy
The University of Haifa always
has stressed the importance of
Jewish studies in developing its
[o Hadassah, in memory of her mother, Hannah Clark.
HADASSAH NAMES NEW EDITOR
Ifter 33 yean as editor of'Hadassah Magazine,' Jessie Lurie
I'Mht) u Hi become publisher of the magazine. Alan Tigay (left),
\earEast Report,' took over as editor as of last Monday.
in the social sciences and the
humanities so as to serve the
Israeli society, particularly in the
northern half of the Jewish State.
It is with this in mind that the
university has established a wide
variety of programs in Jewish
studies. The George and Florence
Wise Chair in Jewish Studies will
fill a crucial role within this
sphere. It also will enable Haifa
University to play a significant
role in "Project Renewal."
Among its functions, the new
chair will help train qualified
teachers from Ma'alot, Kiryat
Shmona and Nazareth. In these
communities, such instructors
are in a critical shortage.
Ambassador Avner, Israel's
former envoy to both Canada and
Norway, will be in South Florida
Oct. 18-20 to meet with local
United Way Names Campaign Cabinet
Way of Dade County
f recently
Mlowi
United
appointed the
, ,v'" community leaders to
; 1980 United Way Campaign
Joseph Robbie Jr., managing
eneral partner of the Miami
o'Phms. has been named
Resident of Pioneers Club. Larry
t, Adams, vice president
[southern division of Florida
[*er and Light Company, has
r*n named co-chairman of Unit
Mgwotd B. Miot, senior vice
Resident of Arvida Corporation,
LV F appointed co-chairman
ir!lso' Konald H. Dunbar. vice
psident personnel, Ryder
ptem, Inc.has been appointed
phairman of Unit and Albert
[ Abraira. traffic reporter for
WGBS Radio, has been ap-
pointed co-chairman of Unit P.
Thomas Chamberlain, partner-
in-charge of Price, Waterhouse
and Company, has been ap-
pointed co-chairman of Unit R.
Political Debate Scheduled
The Sabra Chapter of
Hadassah, in cooperation with
Miami-Dade Community College,
South Campus, Social Science
Division, scheduled a debate on
the political platform of the
Presidential candidates with
special emphasis on the Middle
East. The debate was to be held
on Oct. 9, 12:30 p.m. at
McCarthy Hall, Miami Dade.
South Campus.
Representing the Republican
Party was Bill Brock, chairman
of the Republican Party.
Representing the Democratic
Party was Philip Klutznick,
secretary of commerce in the
present administration. Mrs.
Arnold Thorner was chairman of
the day.
JWV Auxiliary
The Department of Florida,
Ladies Auxiliary, Jewish War
Veterans will hold its Second
Council of Administration
meeting during the weekend of
Oct. 10, 12 at the Palm Beach
Hilton Hotel. Palm Beach.
By YORAM KESSEL
The "Auschwitz Album"
containing over 200 unique
photographs of life in the
concentration and death
camps there and described
as "one of the most impor-
tant original documents"
about the Holocaust has
been deposited at Yad
Vashem in Jerusalem.
An energetic search in
several countries conducted
by Sergee and Beate Klars-
feld led to the discovery of
the original album in the
possession of Auschwitz
survivor Lily Meier of Mi-
ami Beach.
Having held it for 36 years, she
agreed that the remarkable photo
album be held as a permanent
testament in the Memorial Insti-
tute in Jerusalem.
MANY OF the harrowing
photographs which provide the
sole visual testament of events in
the camps during the early
forties, especially the shocking
selection process on the station
platforms outside the camp after
the arrival of transports, are well-
known, but this is the first time
that the originals are known to
have come from a single
collection.
Lily, then Jacobi, had acci-
dentally come across the album
while recovering from an illness
just after the liberating of the
Dora Nordhausen camp several
hundred kilometers from Ausch-
witz to which she had been trans-
ferred.
In a former SS villa, she found
the album in an old drawer while
rummaging for warm clothes. It
was under a pair of pajamas, and
to her amazement she found that
she could identify members of her
own family and a rabbi from the
small town of Bilki in Slovakia on
the Czech-Russian border. She
was the only survivor of her
whole family.
After the war, she allowed
copies of the photographs to be
made by the Prague Jewish com-
munity before she emigrated to
settle in the United States. It is
only now that the Klarsfelds have
managed to trace the original
collection. Serge said at the
ceremony at Yad Vashem that
the collection is most significant
as an authentication of the Holo-
caust documentation. It is not
only vital in retaining memories
of the Holocaust but in com-
bating neo-Nazi efforts to deni-
grate the Holocaust as if it never
happened.
"I AM greatly relieved that
this weight has been lifted from
my heart and that the album will
be permanently exhibited at Yad
Vashem," Lily said at the
moving ceremony.
The motive for assembling the
photos is uncertain. Since all
cameras were normally
rigorously barred by the Nazis, it
is clear that the photographer
must have had official sanction.
But some of the photos are so
stirringly evocative and almost
sympathize with the victims that
Klarsfeld believes that the un-
known photographer may have
collated the album for his own
reasons, perhaps even to atone by
leaving this testimony to history.
Dr. Itshak Arad Direc, director
of Yad Vashem, who presented
Lily and her husband Eric with a
Yad Vashem medal as a tribute
to their contribution, takes the
view that this was "clearly an of-
ficially-sanctioned job. It is, how-
ever, ironic that what the Nazis
had intended as a photographic
representation of their "glorious
achievements" should have now
become their own most damning
document by eternalizing in
photos, the death factory at
Auschwitz," he says.
ejewislh Floridian
Miami, Florida. Friday. October 10. 1980
SECTION B


Patrp 10-A
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Friday, October lQ, ugd
Ileitis, Colitis Group to Meet in Surfside
Education and entertainment
will be on hand for those at-
tending an open meeting of the
Ann Gorlitz-South Florida
Chapter of the National Foun-
dation for Ileitis and Colitis Oct.
16, at 1:30 p.m. in the Surfside
Community Center auditorium.
The meeting is free and open to
the public, according to Mr. and
Mrs. William Sigman of Surfside
and Mrs. Gussie Shine of Miami
Beach, co-chairman of the event
scheduled to last until 4 p.m.
Dr. William Ludwig, chairman
of the scientific advisory com-
mitee of the National Foundation
and attending gastroenterologist
at Mount Sinai and Saint Francis
Hospitals, will da latest
developments concerning ileitis
and colitis.
Bay Heights opera star Irene
Patti Swartz will present musical
selections, accompanied by Dr.
Carmelite Espiritu, a pianist who
is a gastroenterologist at Mount
Sinai Medical Center and a
member of the scientific advisory
commitee for the National
Foundation. Dr. Espiritu is a
founder of Miami Beach's Art in
Public Places, Inc.
Beth Raphael
Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Raphael will meet on Oct. 16 at 1
p.m. at the temple, with
President Rose Ginsberg
presiding.
Guest speaker will be Rabbi
Jehuda Melber, newly installed
rabbi of Temple Beth Raphael.
Refreshments will be served, and
the public is invited.
Ohev Shalom Women
Sisterhood of Ohev Shalom wfll
meet Oct. 15 at the synagogue at
noon.
Shulameth Cohen will give a
travelogue of the recent trip to
Israel, arranged by h*r and Dr.
Archibold Cohen.
Women's League for Israel
Abrams and Henrietta Boiotin.
Seen at a recent planning session to arrange details for the
opening fall season of the Ann Gorlitz-South Florida Chapter of
the National Foundation for Ileitis and Colitis are from the left,
Mr. and Mrs. William Sigman, founders of the group, Barbara
Greenberg, co-president of the organization and Jules Gorlitz,
southern regional vice president of the National Foundation for j
Ileitis and Colitis, Inc.
Tobian to Address AJC
Barbara Weiner, chairperson
of the membership committee of
the Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee,
announces an open meeting with
Milton Tobian. Leonard
Selkowitz, Annette Fayne and
Weiner organized this event.
Tobian, the southwestern
regional director of AJC, will
speak on "The New Right: A
New Twist to an Old Story.'' The
meeting will be held on
Wednesday, Oct. 16, at the
Terrace Room of the Dupont
Plaza Hotel at 7:45 p.m.
Tobian has served on the
national board of AJC and of
various other organizations. He
has been the state director for
Texas Common Cause, the first
self-contained state organization
for Common Cause.
Tobian has been invited to
The Lincoln-Miami Beach
Chapter of Women's League for
Israel, meeting the first Tuesday
of each month, will hold its in-
stallation luncheon of officers and
board members on Oct. 28 at
noon, at the Montmartre Hotel.
Mrs. Yaffa Dermer, sabra. life
member of the group, and wife of
the ex-mayor Jay Dermer, will be
the installing officers.
To be installed are Frances G.
Res nick, chapter chairman; Viola
Minkoff Levine, treasurer;
Dorothy Summer, recording
secretary; Faye Saifer, Ida
Weasel and Mae Fried, vice
presidents; Betty Got tea man,
corresponding secretary and
board memberers as follows:
Ruth Block, Aida Yaslos, Rose
Pascoe, Lillian Kronheim, Rae
Tenen, Lena Kimmel, Lily E.
Fischer, Gertrude Insler, Tyl
Weisman, Lillian Winter, Delia
Eth, Lillina Matlins, Ann
Halpern, Shirley Halpem, Adele
The Florida Chapter ,
Women s League for Israel hold.
to mstallation 0f **
board members at its mid
October 16,12:30. """"I*
To be installed are Ch.w
Chairman, Delia SStmfi
Vice President, Rose Glkk
Second Vice President, Minna v'
Phine, Treasurer, RaeShevinskv
Donor and Sunshine 580^*^'
and Pubhcity Secretary. SlyvJ
Atkinson, Sunshine Secreurv
Pauline Hirschhorn, Fundraiains
Chairman, Florence Spiere?
Telephone Captain Ann Miller
Hostess, Lilian Shapiro'
Chairman of the Board, Rose
Ann Zubow, board members
Minna Aaron, Tillie Barsky
Gertrude Brill, Regina Cuttler
Tillie Chemow, Rose Freeman
Pauline Grayson, Gus Horn*
Irma Jeret, Rose Reyer, Rose A
Schwartz and Frances Sheingold.
'Remembrances of Yiddish Theatre1
On Oct. 16, Avrum Arnold and
Arthur Solvay will bring their re-
creation of the spirit of Yiddish
theatre to North Miami Beach in
an appearance at the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center. It will begin at 8 p.m. in
the Katz Auditorium of the
Center.
Another program offered bv
the JCC is the Bewildered
Parents" program, designed tc
help parents cope with
aggravating and antisocial
behavior in teenagers and
younger children. It will meet on
Thursdays from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
for six weeks at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center. Sessions begin on Oct
16.
'Jewish Worship Hour'
Rabbi Tibor H. Stem of Jacob
C. Cohen Community Synagogue
will be appearing on "The Jewish
Worship Hour" on Oct. 12,8 a.m.
on Channel 10.
Why RAND^ The Big 3fc~ Tzimmes
B* Over
^^J. Tetley's Hp Tiny M| Little Tea
1 ^0 Leaves?
riER. THAT'S WHY!
Gourmets have always known that! That's why
they buy tiny peas. Tiny baby lamb chops. And
the same goes for tea leaves. The most flavorful
are the tiny young leaves. The kind of leaves
Tetley packs into every tea bag. That's why hot
or iqed, Tetley Tea gives you rich, refreshing
flavor. Tetleythe favorite tea in Jewish homes
sine* 1875.
Milton Tobian
speak in Florida, as the American
Jewish Committee is exploring
the revival of religious influence
in American politics.
Asthma Center
Chapter to Meet
A meeting of the North Dade-
Broward Chapter of the National
Asthma Center at Denver will be
held on Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. at
Washington Federal Savings
Bank, 633 NE 167 St., North
Miami Beach.
The program will consist of a
film entitled, "Cruise around the
World," and Hattie Vee of
Ambassador Travel will narrate
the film and answer questions.
Everyone Welcome.
TONIGHT...
LET THE CHEF COOK!
KREPLACH ITALIAN)
Chef Boy-ar-dee* Cheese Ravioli in sauce
Italian dehciousness to go
Tender Ravioli (kreplach) stuffed
with cheese and smothered in The
Chef's own tempting tomato sauce
it's like "ordering up" direct
from Italy Just heat it. serve it-
then sit back and take credit for it
You can serve Kreplach italiano
as a quick, nourishing lunch or as a
hearty dinner
So relax tonight Get Cheese Ravioli
trom The Chef Chef Boy a'-dee'
of course Bravo'
Jarlsberg: Nosher's Delight
K Certified Kosher
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION
Norway's Jarlsberg Brand
Cheese is a natural cheese. It
has a unique, mellow yet dis-
tinctive nutty flavor. It's
wonderful with fruit, bagels
or challah. Firm enough for
bite size chunks yet versatile
enough for use in recipes.
Your family will enjoy
Jarlsberg anytime. Ask for it
where you buy cheese.
Enjoy Gjetost,
Nokkelost, Norvegia,
Ridder and many
other fine cheeses
from Norway.
. \
^4UK? N?,*yniiaM"mfof(j. ct oeeoi
J


r^v.OctobtrlO.MW
+JewistFk>ridlan
Page 3-B
Torah Comes to Beach Congregation Histadrut Names Director
A Torah scroll from Havana s
Patronato Synagogue was
ESS w Miami Beachs
, Zn-Hebrew Congregation on
inm Kippur by Continental
SSonaJBank officer Dr. Ber-
do Benes. who alao brought a
Sfand" rmulke. Many of^he
local worshippers used the same
Torah many years ago m Cuba.
i-he 100-year-old Torah was
brought in due to Benes
negotiations.
It was all above board." he
explained. "They are keenly
aware that in a few years the
Patronato Synagogue might
close down. The
once the most
renowned temple in the Carib-
bean, is now only partially used. I
was told that the few young Jews
remaining in Cuba have in-
termarried and lost interest in
religion.
"There is no persecution or
anti-Semitism, but the elders can
plainly see that the days of
Judaism in Cuba are num-
bered," Benes said. "That is why
we agreed that it was important
to continue our traditions here."
Of the 11,000 Cuban Jews who
left Cuban when Castro came to
power in 1959, about 8,000 live in
the Miami area. The Cuban-
Hebrew Congregation, at 17th
and Michigan, was founded in
1961.
Pallot Award Dinner Held
I have to
synagogue
Focusing on South Florida as a
hub of international education,
the International Center of
Florida has named Florida
International University and its
President. Dr. Gregory Baker
The (ireater Miami Jewish
"ederation has captured top
honors for its public relations
programs in the large city
ategory "f lhe 1980 p.ubl'\c
Relations Competition, which is
conducted annually by the
Council of Jewish Federations.
Miami, which won first place
awards in four categories, was
cited for its newspaper ad-
vertising, radio and television
spot announcements, opening
campaign dinner and a series of
invitations utilizing the theme.
The Dream Is Within Reach."
Over the past 10 years, the
(ireater Miami Jewish
Federation." stated Eli Timoner,
chairman of the Public Relations
Committee, has led the country
and has l>een the recipient of 53
first-place awards in the CJF's
annual competition."
h'li Timoner
Fine Arts of Beth David Coffee
Mvrna Shevin and Roberta
i Shewn will host a coffee at the
[home of Robert and Myrna
She\ in. on Oct. 23. at 10:30 a.m..
for Angels. Benefactors and
I Patrons of the Hrothers
I Peskanov (Jala.
Greeting the guests will be Mr.
land Mrs. Robert Shevin; Mr. and
i Mrs Jerome Shevin; Toby
Ansjn. chairperson of The Fine
\\n- ni Beth David; Dr. and Mrs.
Sol l.andau. honorary chair-
Ipersons of the gala; Arlene
Zakarin. >;ala chairperson; Lotte
Glover, Fine Arts vice chair-
person and Richard Bailey,
president of Beth David
Congregation.
A "Morning Musicale" has
been planned featuring pianist
Beverly Norton. A pupil of Ivan
Davis. Ms. Norton holds a
bachelor of fine arts degree from
Florida Atlantic University and a
master of musical arts from the
University of Miami. Her
musicale is part of The 1980 Fine
Arts of Beth David Award in
honor of Parker D. Thomson.
FORTHE
DAYTIME MAYVIN
SWISS KNIGHT
7
x1
AND THE
NIGHTTIME NOSHER.
One of the proudest products to come from Switz-
erland, Swiss Knight cheese has long been a favor-
ite in Jewish households. Not only because of its
taste and qualitybut also because of its versatil-
ity. Balabustas continually discover new and differ-
ent ways to serve these delicious wedges. Perfect
'or decorative hors d'oeuvres, garnished with
smoked salmon and olives, or speared on a tooth-
pick with a chunk of fruit. And It also provides a
high protein snack for children. On the other hand,
with the nighttime noshers, the use remains the
same. Grab one or two wedges and run!
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY
CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdftlt Road.White Plain*. NY. 10605
Wolfe,
annual
Award.
recipients of the sixth
Bill Pallot Achievement
Federation Wins PR Award
The Pallot Award, presented
for special achievement by a
Floridian or a Florida-based
institution in international af-
fairs, was presented at a banquet
held Oct. 4 at the Omni Hotel.
Mike Mansfield. U.S. am-
bassador to Japan, was the
keynote speaker. A delegation of
Japanese officials accompanied
the ambassador.
It" Executive Director Stephen
Sternfield said. "FIU has found
new energy and imagination,
charted new courses and made
commitments to bold new
programs." Sternfield cited the
University's International
Banking and Finance Center as
one sue h program.
Dr. Sol Stein, national
president of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation. announced the
appointment of Lewis Alpert as
executive director of the Florida
regional office.
Alpert has served the Israel
Histadrut Foundation as
associate director of the Florida
office, located on Miami Beach,
for the past year. His appoint-
ment was effective Oct. 1.
Prior to joining the Israel
Histadrut Foundation staff, he
was the executive director of
B'nai B'rith in Michigan, a
director for special fund-raising
events for B*nai B'rith Inter-
national in Washington, D.C..
and a field director for State of
Israel Bonds in New York.
Alpert received his bachelors
degree from the George
Washington University and has
completed post-graduate studies
at the University of Utah and
Lends Alpert
Wayne State University
(Detroit).
He resides with his wife.
Phyllis, a librarian for the Miami
Dado Public Library System, and
two children in Kendall.
Chapman Heads Campaign Cabinet
Alvah H. Chapman Jr..
president of The Miami Herald,
has been appointed chairman of
the Council of Campaign
Chairmen for the 1980 United
Way Campaign
Comprised of former United
Way campaign chairmen, the
I ouncil is responsible toi
overseeing the general campaign
in Dade County. Chapman will
coordinate trie fund-raising
activities in key <"oinpanies and
will lend his considerable ex-
perience and knowledge to any
areas of the campaign when it is
needed.
Maxwell House'Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of America's favorite pas-
times. It's always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House* Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't 'shop'
for Maxwell House? They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House? you pour
relaxation. At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
Hrf1
V2F
K Certified Koahcr
C.Wf4
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


Paire 10-A
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Courshon to Receive
B'nai B'rith Award
Arthur H. Courshon of Miami
Beach will receive B'nai B'rith's
highest award, the Gold Medal
for H u ma ruta nanism, at a
dinner-ball to be held at the
Sheraton, Bal Harbour, Nov. 15,
it was announced by Norman M.
Oilier, general chairman.
Courshon, better known for his
business activities as a banker, is
an honorary life trustee of the
Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce. He is a corporate
founder of the Mount Sinai
Medical Center in Miami Beach;
a member of the Pillars Club of
the United Way of Dade County
and a grand patron of the Heart
Association of Greater Miami.
He has been an active member of
Temple Beth Sholom and a
scholarship patron of the
Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-El. Courshon has been a
leader in a host of local activities.
On the international level, he
has been a consultant on housing
to many governments in Latin
America. He was a member of the
United States Task Force of the
Federal Home Loan Bank and a
member of the board of directors
of the South Florida Housing
Foundation.
The Humanitarian Award,
which will be presented to
Courshon on Nov. 15, is a citation
which has been bestowed on
Presidents Truman, Eisenhower
and Kennedy; King Christian of
Denmark; Queen Wilhelmina of
the Netherlands and Israeli
Prime Ministers David Ben-
Gurion and Golda Meir. Most
recently in Florida, dedicated
public servants and community
leaders such as Congressman
Claude Pepper, Robert Russell,
Mayor Steve Clark and William
S. Ruben have been its recipients.
The proceeds from the sale of
admission to this function will be
used for the National Program of
Youth Services of B'nai B'rith.
These consist bf the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations on some 350
college campuses, 1600 BBYO
chapters in 1,100 communities for
teenagers and career and
counseling programs serving
thousands. These Youth Services
of B'nai B'rith have been widely
acclaimed for their ability to
provide cultural, civic and
recreational programs for young
people, to build better citizens for
a better America.
The dinner is being sponsored
by the B'nai B'rith Foundation of
the U.S., as represented by the
Florida Fund Campaign Cabinet,
chaired by Samuel S. Sherwood.
The other members of the B'nai
B'rith liaison committee include:
Malcolm H. Fromberg of Miami,
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith; Bert S. Brown, past
president of District Five and
Paul L. Backman of Hollywood,
president of the Florida State
Association.
Reservations may be made by
contacting. Norman M. Giller,
general chairman or the B'nai
B'rith Foundation office in North
Bay Village.
The dinner committee is now
being formed, and many ad-
ditional names will be added to
the following members:
Thomas R. Bomar, Richard C.
Baakw. David Buchwald, Marwln g.
Caaael. Jack Chalken, Charlea J.
Courshon, Congressman Dante FasceU,
David Fenton. Richard K. Pink, Phillip
AICC to Meet
The America-Israel Chamber
of Commerce /Florida October
luncheon meeting, at 12:30 p.m.,
will be held at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Gui Govaert,
president, International Center of
Florida, will be the guest speaker.
Menorah Sisterhood
At the Temple Menorah
Sisterhood meeting, Wednesday
Oct. 16, at 12:30 p.m. at the hall,
Mrs. Annie Ackerman will review
the book, Horowitz and Mrs.
Washington, by Henry Danker.
Arthur Courshon
Frost, Bernard C. Fuller, Milton M.
Gaynor. Albert R. QenzUnger. Richard
E. Oersteln, Ben Giller, Charles Giller.
Samuel J. GUlott. Barton S Goldberg,
Jerrold F. Goodman, Sen. Jack D.
Gordon.
Also, A Gosselln, M.D., Abraham A.
Grunhut, Mrs Judith F Hemstadt, Dr.
Antonio Jorge. Joseph H. Kanter. Jack
Kassewltz. Sy Keith. Leslie A. Klein.
Harvey E. Kramer. Mathew A. Larkln.
Ronald Lavan, Sidney Lefcourt. Con-
gressman William Lehman, Dr. Irving
Lehrman. Marx Leva, Neal J. Mena-
chem. Sylvan Meyer, Stu Newman.
k M. Papper, M.D.. Congressman
Claude D. Pepper. Rocky Pomerance.
And, Sam Portnay, Alan H.
Potamkln, Dr Ptedad Robertson,
Lawrence N. Rosen, Commissioner
Harvey Ruvln, Fred Sheldon, Steven M.
Siegfried. Stuart L. Simon. Walter G.
Simon. Arthur H. Simons, Simeon D.
Spear. Morton Stein, Richard K. Stein-
bach, Sen. Paul B. Steinberg, Mori
Stern. Stanley Tate. Robert V. Walker.
Joseph Welnlraub. Dr. Eugene Weiss,
Kenneth W. Whlttaker, Sen Sherman S.
Wlnn. Richard S. WoUson and Slgmund
Zilber.
Judea Sisterhood
Sets Program
A trinary program is the
entertainment planned for the
paid-up membership luncheon of
Temple Judea Sisterhood, Oct. 15
at the temple social hall.
Starting at 10 a.m.,
simultaneously in three areas of
the room will be exhibitions of
aerobic dancing, food preparation
and all about plants, conducted
by experts in those fields.
President Laurel Shapiro will
call the groups together at 11:30
a.m. to partake of pot luck dishes
prepared by the Sisterhood
members. Chairperson for the
day is Sandy Levin, working with
Ernestine Richman, program vice
president.
Upbeat Singles will hold a
dance at Temple Judea social
Hall, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12. On Oct.
16, meeting will be held in the
temple youth lounge to plan for
future events.
Ten delegates from the Southeastern Florida Region
Women's American ORT will leave Oct. 19 for the /Ml
National Board Conference to be held in Houston, Tex., Oct &
23. They will join 800 collegues representing 140,000 mem ben\
of Women's American ORT in 1,200 chapters, as well as]
distinguished guests.National board members include (left to
right) Bea Shultz, Adrienne Sussman, Mildred Feld, Syd\
Sablosky, Jea Rose (president) Ruth Leff (executive committtt
chairman). Dale Flam, Hilda Katz, Ann Speroni limmediati]
past president) and Mimi Weiner (not shown).
Temple Zion Sets LwhP ** on 'Tracing Our Roots'
Adult Forum
On Friday evening, Oct. 17,
following late 8:15 p.m. services,
Temple Zion's Adult Forum will
present guest speaker, Jay
Ducassi.
Ducassi, news reporter, comes
to Temple Zion from Radio
WINA's newsroom with
"Today's Topics Now Local -
National." A question and an-
swer period will follow. The
public is invited.
Beth David Solomon Schechter
Day School and Beth Am Day
School, in cooperation with The
Central Agency for Jewish
Education are sponsoring a
"Family Night Lecture" by
Arthur Kurzweil, author and
Jewish genealogist.
On Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Beth Am, Kurzweil will
explore the step by step ways in
which most Jews can make
discoveries about their personal
Jewish history.
On Oct. 17, at Beth David
South, Kurzweil will conduct a
seminar for the teachers so that
the mi irial can be integrated
into the school curriculum.
For more information, oil
Beth Am Day School or Beth
David Solomon Schechter Da?
School.
Chai Hadassah
On Oct. 18, Chai Chapter I
Hadassah will have a nightclub
evening at the Beau Rivage
Motel. For reservations a
information, call Hazel Siegel.
PHILADELPHIA
BRAND WHIPPED
CREAM CHEESE
SPREADS
HAPPINESS

Philadelphia Brand Whipped I
anything that's crisp and crunchy: i
you name H, and Philadelphia Brand Whipped Cream I
goes splendidly on it.
But make no mistake about it. This is genuine Kraft
Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese. If s been whipped to make
spreading its deliciousness a little easier. For instance, the
children can put it easily on fresh bread without tearing holes
in the bread. Or, if company suddenly drops in spread it on
some crackers, garnish with an olive and in seconds you have
a superb, elegant nosh to serve. Philadelphia Brand Whipped
Cream Cheese. Kraft makes it delicious whipped makes it
delic iously easy.
K Certified Kosher
Conies In The Following Kosher Flavors:
With Chives With Pimentos With Onions With Smoked Salmon
TTieCn^OfChet^-PI^^


^.Octo^lMBSO
+Jewistnr>riHli*r>
Page5-B
llleft to right) Mrs. Harold Kurte, president of Temple Emanu-
\El Sisterhood, discusses plans for the Sisterhood and PTA of
\Temple Emanu-El membership petite luncheon, to be held at
{the temple on Oct. 15, with Mrs. Mitchell J. Rubinow, and Mrs.
{Frank Di Franco, membership vice president. A special tribute
liritt be given to Mrs. Rubinow for her outstanding con-
I tributions to Sisterhood.
Sisterhood Fashion Show
The Sisterhood and PTA of
[Temple Kmanu-fcl will hold a
membership petite luncheon and
fashion show, honoring new
Imembers, at noon.Oct. 15. in the
[temple.- Friedland Ballroom.
According to Mrs. Murray
I Kern, chairman of tne luncheon.
We are not only honoring new
| members, but we are paying a
vpecial tribute to Mrs. Mitchell J.
| Rubinow. for her many years of
outstanding dedication to the
I Sisterhood. "
An unusual feature of the
luncheon will !> a "Fashion
Production" presented by Sheila
Natasha, said Mrs. Harold
Kurte. Sisterhood president.
Fashion will be modeled by
Sisterhood and PTA cowgirls.
Mrs. Ted Hollow. Mrs Carol
Greenberg, Mrs Marc Epstein,
Mrs. Frank Di Franco, Mrs
Allan Land. Martha Mishcon,
Mrs. Jon Charming, Mrs. Charles
Rosenblatt, Mrs. Sherman
Kaplan and Mrs. Al Podvin.
Celeste Johnson from the
Boutique of Sheila Natasha will
also model.
Scheck Is
Re-elected
Michael Scheck has been re-
elected to ,his eighth term as
president of the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School.
He and his wife Raquel are
founders of the school and have
been active members of Hillel's
executive board and board of
governors since the school's
inception in 1970.
Scheck is an active and sup-
portive member of the local
Jewish community and of the
general community as well. He
holds membership in the Junior
Chamber of Commerce and
Optimists Club. He is a member
of B'nai B'rith and the Michael
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center and is on the Advisory
Council of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
S< heck is also a member of
Beth Torah Congregation, where
he has served on the board of
directors.
The eleventh annual
Scholarship Ball of the Samuel
Scheck Hillel Community Day
School will be held on Nov. 15 at
Bet h Torah Congregation.
Dr. and Mrs. Max I.ipschitz.
!)r. and Mrs. Robert F.nnis and
Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Spatz have
been appointed co-chairmen of
the Scholarship Ball Committee.
Marshall Baltuch. executive
director of Hillel. and his wife
Rochelle, will be honored at the
TJte Tin Drum'
American Savings Provides
$20 Million Loan to Israel
Shepard Broad, chairman of
the board of American Savings
and Loan Association of Florida,
has announced that American
Savings provided the State of
Israel with a $20 million loan for
the construction and renovation
of housing. The full amount of
the loan is $25 million, with the
remaining $5 million to be
divided among three other
American investors.
In accordance with the terms
of the loan, American Savings is
providing long-term mortgage
financing for the renovation and
expansion of publicly owned
housing projects of Israeli
national, municipal and public
corporations. The loan will
benefit over 40.000 Israeli people
by enabling the government to
renovate 9,000 rental units of
public housing and offer mort-
gage financing for approximately
800 families to purchase newly
constructed apartments and
houses. The units will all be con-
structed within the 1967
boundaries.
The loan will be protected by a
full, faith and credit guarantee of
the United States government,
through the Agency for Inter-
national Developments Housing
Guaranty Program.
Boca Raton BOCA LAGO
RESALES AND RENTALS CO.
The only office on site.
largest and most complete
inventory of villas,
townhouses and apartments.
Call Dorothy P'Hara broker
482 5500 (Miami) 947-4037
'Opportunity for active,
companionable, mature
Jewish lady to join family
with mildly handicapped
daughter in S.W. Must be
'able to drive, have good
home skills, may be em-
ployed. References. Box
OFP, The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami
Rabbi Dobin Speaks at Beth Torah to be Reviewed
Beth Torah opens its series of
late Friday evening services on
I' k i 10 and will continue through
I the end of May.
Guest speaker for the
linaugural service will be Rabbi
JKubin Dobin, national chairman
|<)f "Operation Recognition," in
lits drive to have the Inter-
Inational Red Cross recognize the
] Magen David Adorn."
Rabbi Dobin is also the
national chairman of the
"Concerned Citizens aganist
Cults."
Rabbi Dobin is the grandfather
of Dianne Billig. daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Billig, who will
be celebrating her Bat Mitzvah
that evening. He will be speaking
on "A Jewish Agenda for the
year 5741."
The community is invited to
attend.
The "Ideas Through Books"
group of Temple Beth Am will
sponsor the review of The Tin
Drum by Gunter Grass. Rabbi
Jerome Gurland will be the
reviewer of this novel about
wartime Germany.
The morning review will take
place at 9:30 a.m. on Oct. 23, at
the home of Helaine Lipinsky.
The evening review will be at 8
p.m.. also on Oct. 23, at the home
of Sofia Markovich.
The Rabbi Alexander 5. Oross
HEBREW ACADEMY
of GREATER MIAMI
2400 Pine Tree Dr.. Miami Beach. PL 33140 Tel: 532-6421
The Only Fully Accredited Day School
In the Southeastern United States
Following are just ten of the prestigious institutions of
higher learning where Hebrew Academy graduates
now attend.
Barnard John Hopkins
Brandeis McGill
Columbia New York Univ.
Georgetown Univ. of Florida
Univ. of Miami Yeshiva Univ.
For application forms and further information, please
call or write:
Rabbi Stanley Bronfeld
Principal
inkP DECAFFEINATED COFFEE WANTS YOU TO W
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HMD' Brand is a registered
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1980 General Foods Corporation
(?HI
cikioi toon*
OFFICIAL RULES: ISRAEL SWEEPSTAKES FROM
' BRAND DECAFFEINATED COFFEE
'. J** ,n"> M accompanied by mnerseal tram a r
?T>or Fretie Dried SANKA- BRAND Decaffeinated
ulV./ JSfSf cul l'om "r*W H el a can ot Ground
H BRWID DKaftematid Collet SANK** BRAND
rS5rS?* Co"** "mvelepe or !h word SANKA* printed
wen letters on a 3 x 5 card and man to
IsMEl IWUnTMES
'0. leant*
nae-CeaM StMtea
' *> Purchase required
.J,'"*5 ""J51 M postmarked no later lhan Novemoer 24
4 w,i l8tM December 1 1980
. "'""*' "j1 M selected by random drawing under We
iim ',slcn an'no*Dno'nlo,9*'"Mtlon."nrjseOecxi
m, -tL"1 lhe nm *"> *""*' oecwes me prue or iMor
' 6n" '"w1 tne pn/e cannot be awarded ater the m
oal draw.no. a wpc*tmenul fSSiSSKSS^
neidioawardtMpr.il 9mmg!WS*iSXSSi
II 1980 Winner will M notified by man t winner s
name can r obtained by sending a separate stamped sen
addressed envelope to
Israel MMMMM **" ,
Jette* Jacefts Orajraiitlea. let.
M Catt 41 Strut
n.t.Hi _
J. Pnie wil oe awarded as soon as fSXSSZSStm
entry wiin tMse rules is vertied I" *'""''"?'
prue winning parfcipant must be available ^1**"
"hewn on M em.y Wank or mus. tu.msn a pope- tonea-d-
M address to sweepstakes ot'ic.ais prior lo lhe date ol
'" consist! 0< round trip airfare to. Iwo a Pan Am B
London or Pome and connecting ill 10 W A... Israel plus
now accommodations lor 14 days and 13 mgtiK m jem-
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not redeemable lo- casn TM Irip must be taken in 1981 on
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I Tne Sweepstakes is open lo all US .isrdents. ecipt
residents* Idaho Missouri Utah. Wisconsin, and employ
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Svtmsmt agencies subs-diaws or alt-ales or Joseph
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I All laes are lhe sole responsibilty ol me winner
W You. chances ol winning are dependen. onand vary
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STATE
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BROUGHT TO YOU BY
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Pr>dy. October]
Temple Sholom Announces Omnibm Series
Max I.
Human rights activist Jacobo his 57 years denouncing anti-
Timerman, novelist Amonz Or. Semitiam, fightuig for social
academician and autheor Yosef justice and calling for political
Yerushalmi, writers Francine change within the raost-prone
Klagsbrun and Susan Dworkin, South American government.
historian Max Dimont and Nazi
hunter of Europe, Beate Klar-
sfeld are experts in their in-
dividual areas, who have been
assembled for this year's fourth
annual Temple Beth Sholom
Omnibus'Series by cultural arts
director Judy Drucker.
The Sunday morning lectures
are scheduled at 10:30 a.m. in the
temple sanctuary. Miami Beach.
Timerman. who will launch
the series on Oct. 19 has been
hailed by Rabbi Leon Kronish as
"a 20th century Jewish hero."
Two and one half years as a
political prisioner in his adopted
country. Argentina, ended his
longtime career as one of the
country s foremost journalists,
newspaper editor and defender of
human rights. A lifetime Zionist.
Timerman spent the majority of
Now living in Israel and a
columnist for the leading evening
newspaper, Maariv, Timerman's
lecture will be "Human Rights
Under Threat An Experience
in Argentina.1' The experience yerushalmi
was his.
Nov. 16 will be the first ap-
pearance in Miami for the Israeli
novelist. Amos Oz. "One Writer's
View of Modem Israel" is his
lecture topic drawn from his first-
and knowledge as a native of
Jerusalem and resident of
Kibbutz Hulda. Author of the
award winning novels, My
Michael, Elsewhere Perhaps,
Touch the Water Touch the
Wind. Unto Death and The Hill
of Evil Counsel. Oz is a veteran of
The Six Day War and the 1973
Golan Heights campaign
Scholar, author, historian,
the
Omnibus offering on Jan. 18.
"Changing Role of Jewish
Women ... A Dialogue" will
bring together Francine
Klasbrun and Susan Dworkin,
whose writings have appeared in
such national publications such
as Ms., Moment Magazine,
Family Circle, Seventeen and the
New York Times.
In 1977, Ms. Klagsbrun was
appointed to the Commission for
the Study of Women in the
Rabbinate and to the board of
governors of the Melton Research
Center of Jewish Theological
Seminary.
Her published works include
the best seller Free to Be You
and Me. co-edited with Mario
Thomas, an anthology of articles
Dimont will tab tk.
podmm at the sanctuary m^
15 when he speaksTn -fi
Future of American jj >
drawing from k; _. uu drawing from his nUEFK
The Jew in AmerKa. JJ>k
Jewish life from 165J ft"*
Dimont s first book. rZ^
sold
over
01*
and History,
million copies.
"A Woman of Valor" i. ,l.
Golda Meir said of the *jl
final Omnibus contributo*X
Klarsfeld, who on April 2^
address herself to'Ne vL1"
on the Rise-Lest We Forge? m
A 12-year crusade hv ill
German-Bom Christian L^
dedicated to bringing \azi T
criminals to justice, has led heZ
be called a modern dav j0an 0,
Arc. Nominated in 1977 for t|,l
Nobel Peace Pn/r by a com
mittee of 100 Israelis which
included Abba loan and
Dimont
Home Furnishings Bond Dinner Set
Leaders of the home furnishing
industry will gather tomorrow
evening at the Konover Hotel to
support Israel's economic growth
through the Israel Bonds
Program.
The Lion of Judah Award, one
of Israel's highest honors, will be
presented to Glora and Alan
Blake and Ingrid and Max
Friedman. The Blakes and
Friedmans will be recognized for
their many years of involvement
in Jewish communal affairs and
S. Dade JWV
Auxiliary Meets
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans, South
Dade Post 778 was to meet on
Oct. 9, 8 p.m. at Temple Samu-
El.
Evelyn Cohen, president was
to be in charge of the meeting.
Molly Brown, vice-president in
charge of a membership pot luck
dinner to be held at the home of
Sandy Simon on Oct. 25 at 7 p.m.
This will open to all members of
the Auxiliary and Post.
Post 778 also was to meet on
Oct. 9mand Dave Portock,
commander, announced that
following a short meeting, a
movie on the PLO was to be
shown in the temple chapel.
'Still Small Voice'
Changes Format
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz,
chairman, of the Sunday Mor-
ning, Channel 7 Program, en-
titled "The Still Small Voice,"
announces the formation of a new
committee and a change in the
format of the program.
The thrust of the program will
be to teach and will cover areas in
Jewish history, traditions, Israel,
Zionism, youth, Jewish family
life, Jewish law, and con-
temporary Jewish communal
problems.
The committees under the
directon of Rabbi Lipschitz and
Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
president of the Rabbinical
Association.
For the month of October,
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard of
Temple Beth Am will discuss
"Jewish History."
Four Freedoms JWV
Four Freedoms Ladies
Auxiliary No. 402 of the Jewish
War Veterans will hold its
monthly meeting Oct. 16 at noon
at the Four Freedoms Building.
Trophies won at the depart-
ment convention wUl be on
display at the meeting.
for their active participation in
the Israel Bonds Program and
numerous Jewish philanthropic
groups.
Special guest will be Rev. John
Stanley Grauel, a religious leader
and fromer crew member of the
"Exodus." Rev. Grauel is a
frequent traveler to Israel and
has been raising funds for the
Jewish State since its inception.
Co-chairman of the Tribute
Dinner are Bob Rubinstein and
Sara Seidler.
Klagsbrun
professor, teacher and lecturer,
all apply to the series' third
speaker. Yosef Yerushalmi, who
will speak Dec. 14. Addressing
his audience on "Modem Spain
and the Jews," he is first Salo
Baron Professor of Jewish
History, culture and society and
director of the Certer for Israel
and Jewish studies at Columbia
University.
This will mark the second
Miami engagement for the native
New Yorker whose published
works include From Spanish
Court to Italian Ghetto.
Haggadah and History, The
Lisbon Massacre of 1506 and
Alexander Herculano: History of
the Origin and Establishment of
Inquisition in Portugal.
A discussion between two
%
%*
^
Dworkin
T'mermun
/
th
from Ms. Magazine. The First
Ms. Header and her most recent
book, Voices of Wisdom Jewish
Ideals and Ethics for Everday
Living. Ms. Dworking has
written several plavs. including
"The Farm Bill" and "Galilee."
The playwright is also a
producing director at Bergen-
stage in Teaneck, N. J.
Menachem Begin, Klarsldd was
cited for "the actions which has taken for 10 years
throughout the world and at the
risk of her liberty and her life
against anti-Semitism, against
the impunity of the Nazi
criminals, and in favor of peace
between the Arab States and
Israel.
Kasha Recipe sand Nutrition Guide.
Please send us a Wolff's Kasha boxtop or a card with the
words "Wolff's Kasha" printed on it, along with your
name and address, and we'll send you a FREE recipe
folder and nutrition guide.
Kasha has long been recognized as an economical,
nutritious substitute for rice, potatoes or pasta. And
when you send for our free recipe folder and nutrition
guide we'll show you how you can expand your menus
deliciously without expanding your food budget... and
how to nourish your family better.
Wolffs Kasha is dehulled, roasted buckwheat kernels,
and buckwheat is the best source of high biological value
proteins in the plant kingdom.
Buy a package of Wolffs Kasha and send for your
FREE Kasha recipe folder and nutrition guide today!
Mail to: The Birkett Mills, Penn Yan, N.Y. 14527
Offer expires: July 31,1981


Friday. October 10,1980
+Je*istfk>rMinn
Page7-B
Midrasha to Offer Largest Schedule Yet Seniors Plan Happening Oct. 15
The North Dade Midrasha, the
Adult Institute for Jewish
Studies in the North Dade area,
will open the largest schedule yet
of classes beginning the week of
Oct. 13.
The schedule calls for classes
to be held at Aventura Jewish
Center, Congregation Beth
Torah, The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
Temple Adath Yeahurun, and
Temple Sinai of North Dade.
The North Dade Midrasha is a
coordinated effort on behalf of
the above mentioned synagogues
and the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, which
sponsors and coordinates the
classes and activities, through its
coordinator Miles P. Bunder.
The Agency recently an-
nounced the opening of Four
Teachers Training Courses, all to
be held at the Jewish Federation
Building. The courses will be
conducted under the auspices of
the Institute for Jewish Studies,
directed by Bunder.
All four courses began on Oct.
Sisterhood 25th
Anniversary
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth I
Am will celebrate its 25th an-
niversary on Oct. 15 at 10 a.m.
with a "Preppy Look" fashion
show by Barbara Katz, The Male
Image and Corset Closet. A
gourmet luncheon will be
prepared by Mariana.
Sisterhood president is Selma
Rappaport. Doreen Mark, Sydell
Efronson and Gail Calodney are
co-chairing this event. Com-
mittee Members are Executive
Vice President Claudia Dessler,
Florence Birchansky, Barbara
Hertz. Millie Infled, Kathy
Revitz. Sandy Cook, Allison
Rosenberg, Re nee Rubenstein,
Bonnie Webman, Jeanne
Winston and Trudy Selevan.
For further information, call
the temple office.
Ein Karem
Hadassah Events
A paid-up membership tea will
be held by Ein Karem Chapter of
Hadassah in Star Lakes
Auditorium, on Oct. 14, at noon,
featuring Patricia Gayle, who
plays the accordian and violin,
sponsored by Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan.
Belle Sail is membership
chairman, Martha Hudes is
membership secretary and Slyvia
Alpem is program chairman.
Frences Weinstein is president.
Ein Karem Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
study group session in the Star
Lakes Hobby Room on Oct. 21,
at 10:30 a.m., with guest speaker
Brenda Shapiro, director of
Honda American Jewish
Commitee. Topic: "American
Jewry and Judaism in the 20th
Century."
All members, unit owners and
guests invited. Ann Field,
educational chairman, will chair
the study session.
Asthma Center
Group Sets
Lunch
The Lorber Chapter of
National Jewish Hospital-
National Asthma Center, at
Denver, will have a luncheon and
fashion show on Oct. 23 at 11
am. in the Reflection Room of
the Cricket Club.
The theme for the day is "one
Plus One for 81." Fashions by
The Rear End Boutique will be
shown. Shirley Chubin is
chairwoman for the day: for
reservations contact her.
5, and then continue on one
evening a week through
j December. The courses include:
An Ulpan Teachers Seminar
designed for teachers wishing
certification in the Ulpan
technique of conversational
Hebrew, as well as teachers of
afternoon and day schools who
wish to improve their techniques
in teaching Hebrew Methods of
Teaching Torah, a course
designed to review the major
strategies and methodologies of
teaching the Bible; the
Development of Jewish Law and
Hebrew Poetry from the
Medieval Period to Modern Day.
The participants of the
Douglas Gardens City of Miami
Senior Adult Day Center are
planning a "happening" for Oct.
15, from noon to 3 p.m. at the
Center.
The 118 men and women who
take part in this day care
.program for the elderly have been
preparing craft items all year
that will be for sale at this special
(event. Also featured at the
"'happening" will be ethnic foods
and the music of Frank Hubbel)
and "The Stompers." Music is
provided in Cooperation with
PACE.
nnn
X

Play Around In your very own "WANNA PLA Y AROUND" T-SHIRT.
JUST $2.50 when you send us Your Subscription to the
PLAYERS STATE THEATRE
1980-81 SEASON*****
October 17-November 9,1980
MIAMI PREMIERE
Broadways longest-running
Comedy!
GEMINI
by Albert Innaurato
"Inspired lunacy! Outrageous!
New York Times
Febraury 6-March 1,1981
FLORIDA PREMIERE
THE 1959 PINK
THUNDERBIRD
by James McClure
Two hilarious plays,
LONESTAR and
LAUNDRY AND BOURBONI
"James McChire la a real Hndl"
Jack Kroll, Newewk
November 14-December 7,1980
Shakespeare's Greatest
Masterpiece!
HAMLET,
PRINCE OF DENMARK
March 6-March 29,1981
WINNER
OF THE 1980 FESTIVAL
OF NEW AMERICAN PLA YS
AGNES OF
GOD
by John PWme+er
"The Festivals outstanding play"
Mai Gussow. N.Y. Tlmea
January 9-February 1,1981
MIAMI PREMIERE
Winner Outer Critic's
Circle Award 1979
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"A BLOCKBUSTER"
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April 3-Aprll 26,1981
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Questions?
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ORDER FORM
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Happy Holidays!
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Tn RPCOME AN ANGEL; Players State Theatre is a non-profit
SSK& t3*K contribution o. $20 or more
injures continued great theatre tor the South Flor.da
community. ^r
PRICE AND PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
1980-1981 Season
MEET THE CAST Lowest Prices
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Tues. it 8.15 P.M. Wed /Sal /Sun.
at 2 00 P M
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at 8 15 P.M.
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at8 15 PM
SECTION auMcrtw ***
A S 11.00
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uMcflMi Angri
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CIRCLE ONE: SECTION A SECTION B
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Po.ro
Page8-B
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a
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Di
of
tPtide.
, PRICES EFFECTIVE
lllllllllllll THURS.. OCT. 9 THRU
|i(0llii'C00| WED.. OCT. 15 IN DADE
rsTMrtj AND MONROE COUNTIES.
- GENERICS -
Compare these products to national
brands. They're as dependable and
nutritious but without fancy labels.
Bath Tissue
VEGETABLE OIL 95'
IIOI iU MSOIIIO inilS SMtMTTi
SAUCES 79'
Mil > SII'HII"'
PRESERVES
ho; iil uhiim'
JUICE COCKTAIL
nun torni
ASSORTED SODAS
1POUH0IAC
RICE
iic: cms i ..io
EVAPORATED MILK
JOO C JOCAUOR
TRASH BAGS
1"
4"
79'
79'
3/4
4*
a oid
l"
1"
1"
r
'i"
3 1"
'2"
Apple Juice
hoi iomi
CRANAPPLE DRINK
1? W IC"
DISH DETERGENT
.HP IC
SANDWICH BAGS
HOI KH.i TtO'Cl
FRUIT PUNCH
*0: UM S'fMS | '((CIS
MUSHROOMS
Hi 01 Km!
GRAPE JUICE
moc mi
FACIAL TISSUE
it ct m iui
KITCHEN BAGS
4"
49*
59'
99'
2/89'
4"
2/89'
79'
li
971
1"
2 1 '
ip
2/1"
mi
Tea Bags
TACIESS
pkg. or
100
?. DINNERS
2 II i" OHHOI
MARMALADE
211 "C
PANCAKE MIX
NATl
HAND
M.99
sWeeTpeas
it o< cms
WHOLE BEETS
IS 01 CMS CUT
GREEN BEANS
III Pit
SPAGHEni
799'
99'
69
3/89'
3/89'
3/89'
2/89'
4/1"
1"
3/1"
3/1"
3/1"
2/1"
*-Jewist Flcridton
OM' A' ITORRS HAVING UtvKI Mil COUNMRl
All lUfKM MAI AMO CHIIM UKIO IO OtOt*
RfAOY TO SfRVE
Barbecued Chicken
?149
1
LI.
OORMAN'S wikoaimn wmiti or coiCMia c
American Loaf-^ *lw
MMrStMH hau $109
Munchee Loaf- -3 I
IIIWHT MAM POTATO SAIAO OR iL^|
Cole Slaw OV
ION APPU VAU.IT IONO
Liver worst.........._...........
DORMANS
Austrian
Swiss
HALF
LB.
$109
...........u
$159
1
J0h
Thoeo beautiful handbags or* 0 Mb 11
stain roeietant. Coma and sec h,. "
want to own ona or giv. on. 0I 0 gjf,"
^
Complete
details
al participating
Stores
Out"1
We pick the best... so you can, too!
GOOD EATING FANCY GOLDEN Q
DeliciousAppleSn B/5I
U.S. No. 1 ALL PURPOSE f fl oV ^ Mf%
White Potatoes*!49
PANTRY PRIDE
U.S. 1 All RURROSI 'PICK 'Out OWN)
Yellow Onions i
NUIRIHOUS AND HIICIOUS IFICH YOUR OWN
Yams................................ 3's
21*
1
G4IDIN FRISH
MS" ANO CUUNCnr
(PICK rout OWN
Cucumbers 3 oi 49*
GOOD EATING
Top Quality
Honeydews
Yellow Squash .. 39*
UNSWII1INID PUII HAlf -
GAUON >| IV
Orange Juice I
assoriio coiois msHCui ,_
Floral Bouquets iuncm
Fresh
Mushrooms
Mayonnais
PLANTATION PRIDE
Kosher
LAYS
Potato Chi
NABISCO DOUBLE STUF
Oreo Cookii
PICK YOUR OWN FROM A IOOSE DISPLAY
GREEN mqs
PEPPERS hHZ3
GARDEN
FRESH
EGG PLANTS
IB
35
HEINZ
KegO'
Ketchup
89
32-OZ.
BOTTLE
HIRES ROOT IEER
SUNK 1ST ORANGE.
OR REG. OR DIET
Dr. Pepper
or 7-Up
MAKES AS MUCH AS A FULL POUND GROUND COFFEE
Pantry Pride
flatted Coffee
PANTRY PRIDE
UNSWEETENED
Grapefruit
Juice
REG.
PINK
69
46o:
CAN
SS
$119
1
2 LITER
NO RET
OTTLE
NOT AVAILABLE IN
MONROE COUNTY
SILVER SPRINGS
DRINKING OR
Distilled
Water
MOUNTAIN DEW OR REG. OR DIET PACK Jk ^ M Al
Pepsi-Cola 8=*141 59
(NOT AVAIIAMI IN MONtOl COUNT <
^GALLON
JUC
*p*e4A "SoAtd $cmU
PANTRY PRIDE
Split Top
Bread
PAUl MASSON rilMIUM
UIGUNOT IMINI OH ROSI
UIGUNOY IMINI OR ROM ( s l|T J M 99
California Wines ... *
JOOZ.
PKCS.
99
iriiSHtNC
,5 1.1 *4J
Tl ~
AUNI IANNY
Vegetable Oil *4i
Apple Strudel Sff 99*
COUNTY IAW MONIY A ICO
MAMCUaOil Ol
Hot Dog Rolls 2 ' A 4 C II Alian Ol
French Bread 59*
vuvit CRIMI
Glazed Donuts 2ft 69*
AMIR'S ROllt
Egg Twists 8ft 69*
Mf YirS FIBER RAISIN
OR SOUR DOUGH 0 A ^ aa
Muffins ,,o>2o,?109
Real Sangria
GOOD Hull SAITID OR UNJAIHO
0...O.ST.0 14.0, $lt
Peanuts........................... '' *
'TNI IASTI IIUOW Cl INC, QI f Q(
Sliced Peaches m T
CHICKIN Of TM MA IN Oil Ol w'l
crnmn ,.oi ||0'
Light Tuna "" T
MUSM1MAN $ A1SORTID VARHIH* ^gt mQ(
Apple Sauce **
|t. MKHAIl WHM 7J0-K. 93
Liebfraumilch
NORlHINtAIMCAl.rORNUUGUN0
pink CHAIUS VM ROM OR |01 OI fAI
ChablisWine "' *
PANItT PIIM SMOOTH OR CHUANIT ^ g{ QQ(
Peanut Butter T


October 10.1960
+Jewish nurMinn
Page 9-B
I1ZER
_otr.tr, yt *coH and
r,or yourself. Yoo II
lilOW THIS CHART:
l MM
t.150
? SO
600
725
800
800
97S
.,.. ,.1 v P
..ih-wi tp
I 599
8 69
10 99
12 39
13 99
13 99
16 79
OHf Endi Dcmbr II IMP
1419
y
1419
You'll And only the top
PjntryPr.de along
with quality poultry and
lamb products.
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VAILEY
BEEF ROUND BOTTOM
Boneless Round
Steak
*039
;:. '.
X

U S CHOICE FRESH VAILEY BEEF ROijND
Boneless Bottom
Round Roast
2
>-
IB.
WHOLE IN CRY-OVA*.
U.S. CHOICE
BEEF BRISKET
IjLHlljf
FRESHLY GROUND PATTIE MIX A ^m
'Great Ground' Beef I
WITH SOV PROTEIN ADDED
U.S.D.A.
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY BEEF LOIN
Sirloin Steak *2
$099
GRADE A FROZEN _,-. ^_ _
Cornish Hens 99*
HORIOA 0 SHIPPiD PREMIUM FRESH IIC OP ME AST j, j-, L
Fryer Quarters 89c
U.S. CHOICE FRISH VALLEY BEEF CHUCK A .*_-* ft
Cubed Steak .*269
BONNIE MAID BREADED _l r
Veal Steaks ss*!49
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH a _- *. A
Fryer Parts .$119
CONTAINS: THIGHS-BREAST-DRUMSTICKS
$am
HALF
GALLON
2*1
16-OZ.
BOTTLES
Ito Juice ?!
k-VOISSHASTA
Sodas 6"OI$
Isnaiuiai
29
79*
l
Juice Iff $1
(Oil
KG
SSOI'ID VARIITIIS
Tissue 4
Be.
Mustard SS1
89*
69<
10 ..v $279
ton 01
Kola
3-UTfl
.!3T 79*
. vs 89*
IPS-CI.
o
59*
OI.$l
INt I
69*
'apkins .of",.,
_jw otnD vMmn
food 5c.St$l
Nil
Tissues
|oiih oiniciNi
so-oi. Si 79
.......................jo* I
hum situ
h Sauce 6 M
e JuiceJ5St 99*
' MJO11I0 POWOItIB
Mixes JSS* 99*
I'iiuii
'n Low ,.t^'
89*
PePper S& 79*
-Creamer V.r$T^
'akes Jg* 89*
,eergent '.',?' 49*
Npkins ^' *1
TROPICANA 100% PURE
FROM CONCENTRATE
Orange
NEW I
OtANGf
JUKE
MOM
FLORIDA
KRAFT COIOKED
AMERICAN
SINGLES
HALF
GALLON
12 Ol
PKG
$159
1
PHILADELPHIA
Cream Cheese
i
79
8-OZ.
PKG.
CIACHII AIll 1IA W'l -
Cheddar Cheese....1?.'
89
Cheddar CheeseJS8*!79
LIGHT N'LIVELY
Cottage
Cheese
BOKDEN LITE LINE ASSORTED
FLAVORED
YOGURT
3i.oi QQ<
cups 9v
MODI Wlf CHAM
Topping 5? $1*
owaunit
Great Dogs....................Pb 99*
ClAUSSIN WHOll 0 SPIAI __
Pickles ssr $ 1 n
SUNNTIANO COOKID SALAMI Ol SPICID 1UNCHIOM
MIAI. SIICIO MIAT CM mm-a"**
Beef Bologna o 79*
99*
PANTIT SPICIB LUNCMION MIAI Ol
I......"C,
I AND O IIOST ASSOIHD
Cooked Salami
OHDIN MAl> MOON CHUNK CHIDOAI
Longhorn............................p>*
PANTIT MIDI MOMISTTll Ol
lum.MiiK ..OI-7Q*
Biscuits..........................** n ?
Pantry Pride Midget
Sliced Meats 2
IIAKSIONI'S IIINCH
Onion Dip...........................cV
GWAUNIT
,. J-0 2 $ | 09
PMC
59*
GWAUNIT At**!**
Chicken Bologna UV9V'
Salami
w..'
IHOMAS IIOIIN _
English Muffins SSI 69*
MM in fioiin iosoi SI 29
Pound Cake.................. I
PANTIT PIIM IIOIIN u Al Ol
CHOPPIO sunacm _
Peas or Corn 3 Mm I
CHIIM^r IIOIIN ] AfkAMAA
Jeno's Pizzas...........'Vo* 9V
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PANIIT PIIOI IIOIIN PIA'N.
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Eclairs.......................................< 3p*~
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Thin Mints 3% $16'
TUSCAN IIOIIN ,
Yogurt Bars St $1**
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN
Orange Juice
PHOTO SPECIAL
Get 2 Sets of Prints
plus One Roll of
Fresh Film...
Evory tlm you dovclop on*
roll of 110. 126 or 135 film
with Pantry PridVf foit
Film Developing Service
DETAILS AT THE COURTESY DESK
HEALTH & BEAUTY AID VALUES
COIGA1I ._
Toothpaste ,u.. $109
NORMAL OR OUT
Pert Shampoo i,? $16*
MOU1HWASH .
Listerine 3 $1"
SOU MIOIUM Ol MAIO
PIPSOMNI ^_ .
Toothbrushes 2.. 88
THESE
STORES
OPEN
24 Hours3
Monday thru Saturday (Midnight)
Sun. 7 a.m. 'til midnight: optn Mon 7a.
cPtide
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10-B
+JewistfhrkMan
Fridy-Octet*,
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Miamarama
by Isabel Grove
Photography Exhibit Now at Federat
Our holidays, with their tig-
nrfiranr* and beauty, are rapidly
passing, aad the ra Wtviar if not
the weather md irate* that
Ijaajaj ia upon us The past
weeks have brought happy news
of marriages, births and birth-
days and many honors bestowed
on our own residents or their
progeny who have found a niche
elsewhere.
A copy of Portraits in Char-
coal. Dr Irving Lehman's
sketches of famous people, has
been added to the Jewish
National and University Library
in Israel and will be included in
its bibliographical quarterly. A
copy has also been added to the
library of Congregation Heve
Tuvia The Ted Garner Syna-
gogue Center in Jerusalem. You
too can find a copy of the book at
Temple Emanu-El, where Dr.
Lehrman is the longtime rab-
bi .. .
Alex Harris, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Harris, has been
appointed to the Jewish
Vegetarian Society of London to
represent the Southern U.S.A.,
and congratulations are being
showered on Benjamin and
Bertha Cohen whose daughter,
Beverly Davis of Jamaica, N.Y.,
was reelected vice president of
the B'nai B'rith Women Inter-
national at its convention in
Washington. D.C., earlier this
year. As national membership
coordinator, Mrs. Davis' efforts
have increased membership in
her organization from 5,000 to
150,000. Quite a feat ask any
membership chairman
anywhere .
Mrs. Gwen (Morton) Wein-
berg, a past president of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, has been appointed
by At Golden, CAJE president,
to the post of acting chairperson
of the Greater Miami Board of
License for the State of Florida.
And from California comes news
that Frances Yellin'a son,
Richard, has had honors galore
heaped on him by the B'nai
B'rith Lodge there. There is an
additional reason for the glow on
Frances' face her forthcoming
marriage .
Although we cannot claim him
as a Floridian, we can still enjoy
the news that famed pianist and
comedian Victor Borge has been
appointed by President Carter to
serve on the United States Holo-
caust Memorial Council .
News on a more personal level
a dual celebration for Irving
and Lenore Wolaer whose 46th
wedding anniversary and the Bat
Mitzvah of granddaughter, Jill,
brought much happiness to the
family .
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Gilbert
marked their Golden Wedding
anniversary on Sept. 15. Others
reaching that lovely plateau are
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Lieberman,
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Adler and
Mr. and Mrs. Moe Blitz. Not too
far behind, Miriam and Leon
Srago are up to the 45 year
level .
Arriving just in time to make
the holidays even more joyous,
Sept. 3 will be the birthday from
now on for Jamie Beth, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Terry Rosen-
blum and delighted grand-
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Harry
Rimer.
And now as we slip towards
winter, perhaps we can reprise a
few events of the past summer
which for many of our neighbors
may have made the Summer of
1980 a memorable one or even a
high water mark in their lives:
David Gindy, 14, who has been
performing magic shows since he
was 10. was thrilled to be ac-
cepted ae a professional when he
attended the Florida Magicians
Convention in Fort Lauderdale
during the summer. There is lota
of good-natured competition in
the Gindy home these days.
Judith Gindy, David's lovery and
talented mother, is a vocalist of
note in the community and is in
great demand on the condo and
hotel circuit. where David
frequently shows his magic
skills .
The new Hy and Dora Wiener
Social Hall at Temple Sinai was
completed in August and every-
one agrees that it is a beauty. A
wonderful gift to be enjoyed for
many years from the Wieners and
son. Alan .
Israel figured prominently in
the plans of many of our citizens:
Florence Berth spent five weeks
in Jerusalem on an Ulpan study
group sponsored by Hadassah.
Classes were held five days a
week concentrating on the study
of Hebrew. There were lectures at
Hebrew University and trips to
witness the development of new
settlements, as well as to explore
historic spots. Florence says she
"wouldn't have missed it for any-
thing" .
Rabbi and Mrs. Ralph Y.
Carmi journeyed to Israel in July
to attend the brith of their grand-
son: Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Kravitz
celebrated the Bar Mitzvah of
their grandson at the Western
Wall in Jerusalem, and a card
from Dr. Marvin and Ileene
Isaacson, who spent the holidays
in Israel, managed to convey in a
few words the "intense thrill of
being in Jerusalem at this
particular time" .
Meanwhile, Ann Hauaman was
one of the many passengers on
that SS Norway trip to "No-
where," but reports that all the
passengers had a good time any-
how, so she and many others are
looking forward to using their
half-price offer for another cruise
this time to "somewhere!" .
A rather unhappy ending to
Ann Green berg's summer. She
spent August visiting family in
California and sightseeing in the
glorious Canadian Rockies, but a
fall in her apartment on her
return resulted in a broken elbow.
The cast will be on for a while
longer.
Dr. and Mrs. Eli Levy
welcomed a son, Lee-Or-Harris on
Aug. 29, and a son, Matthew
Herman, brought joy to parents
Pamela and Eric Turetsky and
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Murray Turetsky, this summer.
And Mr. and Mrs. Ben Siegel
were blessed with a new gran-
dson.
Rabbi Sol Landau of Beth
David and spouse, Gabriela,
spent most of August in Europe.
The trip was centered around a
sojourn in West Berlin as guests
of the City Government. To
quote Dr. Landau: "If you want
to have a fast picture of the two
societies which are generally
called the democratic and the
communistic, you need only walk
across a few hundred yards from,
West to East Berlin to appreciate i
that unique blessedness which we
as a democratic peoples enjoy
and which is now so sorely,
threatened."
Recent honors accorded Dr.
Landau: appointment as a
delegate to the Governor's Con-
ference on the 1981 White House
on Aging; and a request from
Chancellor Gerson D. Cohen to
serve as a member of the Rabbi's
Advisory Committee to provide
guidance and support to
seminary development at the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America.
A special exhibit of landscape
and human interest photography
by Miami Beach resident Alan
Morgenstern is currently on
display at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The an-
nouncement was made by
Stanley Arkin, chairman of the
Federation Art Committee.
The exhibit, comprised of 24
color photographs by 28-year-old
Morgenstern, a self-taught
ajajsjtsjf photographer from New
York, is showing through
October in the Federation Gallery
located on the second floor of the
Federation building.
Morgenstern'a work depicts
people and places from around
the world including Israel, Italy
and the western United States.
Dramatic and humorous human
interest subjects balance out the
exhibit which is dominated by
scenic subjects.
Morgenstern has been an
amateur photographer for eight
years and has exhibited his works
K
!<*H
in New York syni
graduate of Queen, c$
York^orgensternhaj,
Hebrew University in jL
A resident of the Gret J
area for the past mne^'
hopes toi someday return^
to continue photormni.
P^andhhKK"*
The exhibit U 0
public during reguM
hours Monday through 3
andthereisnoadrmssSch
jwvAuxiliary Pioneer Women to Meel
Quarterly Meeting
Mrs. Claire Greenwald,
president of the Norman Bruce
Brown Ladies Auxiliary No. 174
of the Jewish War Veterans of
Miami, will head a large con-
tingent of members of the first
quarterly meeting of the Ladies
Auxiliary of the Department of
Florida the weekend of Oct. 10-12
at the Palm Beach Hilton.
Oct. 16 the Auxiliary will hold
a business meeting at the
Israelite Center Temple at 8 p.m.
Mrs. Leah Esienman. president
of the Ladies Auxiliary of the
Department of Florida, and her
staff will appear on their official
visit.
JCC Sets Creative
Art Tours
Where can one go to see and
enjoy art like never before?
Here in Greater Miami
during a series of creative art
tours, that will be presented by
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida (JCC) from
October through February.
The tours will encompass fine
arts, architectural and antique
excursions to a variety of site in
the community.
Harriet Green, president of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer
Women, will speak at a Club 2
Chapter luncheon honoring
Harry Dolan. of Miami Beach.
Oct. 12, at noon, at the Mont-
martre Hotel. Dolan is a long-
time Zionist leader and
philanthropist.
Mrs. Green is national vice
president of the Aemrican Zionist
Federation and is president of the
Jewish Historical Society.
Rose Gershon and her ac-
companist, Helen Skolnik. will
present a musical program to
highlight the occasion.
The luncheon is open to the
public. For reservations, contact
Pioneer Women's offices.
Dora Cohen is president of the
Club 2 Chapter of Pioneer
Women.
The Kinneret Chapter of
Pioneer Women will celebrate its
10th anniversary' at an Oct. 12
meeting at noon, in the civic
auditorium of the Washington
Savings and Loan Association.
1133 Normandy Dr., Miami
Beach.
Council of P^neer Woo*,
be the featured speaker
Ueon Yudoff. intern*..
Yiddish and Hebrew foP1
will present a musical pn
with accomparust. OscarSh
Rita Adoff la president o(i
chapter
An afternoon of card nli
will highlight the first m
the 1980-81 season of the La
Bet Chapter of Pioneer Wa,
Oct. 15. at 12:30 p.m.. at Ta
Adath Yeshurun.
The meeting is free and o
the public
Sylvia Roster is president
Yossi Shohat. I;n
representative to the Ca
Agency for Jewish Edu
Inc.. will discus? theaterinli
and perform improvisatio|
the Aviva Chapter of
Women on Oct. 15. at
the civic auditorium ofi
Washington Savings and I
Association. 633 NE 1671
North Miami Beach.
Harriet Green, National Dorothy Goldman is pn
Building Fund chairman and of the Chapter, and
president of the South Florida Cohen is program vice pres
fa
HONORING
Mr. and Mrs. Isidore Denburg
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Denburg
Mr. Sidney L. Olson, Dinner Chairman
Friedland Ballroom
Temple Emanu-El
Miami Beach, Florida
Wednesday, November 19th, 1980
For further information call 531-8329
__



iy, October 10,1980^
+Jewistfk>rkHar

Page 1 IB
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Noah
NOAH Adam and Eve had children and grandchildren, and
oeople multiplied upon the face of the earth. But they became
wicked, until God was sorry that He had created man.
Only one man was worthy in the eyes of God, and that was
Noah. So God said to Noah:
i have decided to send a flood of water upon the earth to
destrov ever) living thing. But I will save you and your family."
God instructed Noah in the making of an Ark, to be 450 feet
long. 78 feet wide, and 45 feet high. Noah boarded the Ark with
his wife and children and took along pairs of every sort of living
thing with him. male and female of each kind, and food to keep
them alive.
Then it rained for 40 days and nights. Every living creature
wa. drowni d in the flood. And God remembered Noah The
wilier- went down and Noah stepped out on dry land.
od -aid in His heart: "I will never again destroy living
things as I have done." God then spoke to Noah: I set My
rainbow in th clouds to be a symbol of My promise to you.
,, | vill look upon it. I will remember the everlasting
,., emenl between Me and every living creature. Gi
: 32)
Tin recounting of the 'Ve^kly Portion ol 'h.; Law it "xtrdciud ,nd based
udui The Gripnic HiMur, of the Jewish Heritage," i.-ditodby P Wollmdn
Tsamir it 5. published S> Shengold The volume is available at 's Maiden
Lane. Now fork N.v '0038 Joseph Schlany is president ot the society
distributing the volume, i
lagogue
[Listings
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Conservative
538-2503
EMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
|025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
onservative
abbi Simcha Freedman
antor Ian Alpern
Friday Night Services 8:15 p.m.
Late services (or the entire tamily
Saturday morning service at 8:30
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E 19th Street. Miami. 573-5900
9990 North Kendall Drive, 595-5055
EMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
t&0 N Kendall Dr. Baumgard
, Miami 667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Stuart G. Weinblatt, Associate Rabbi
I Morion Hof Iman. Associate Rabbi
Jriday, Oct. 10, Religious service,
po p.m. Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
speak on 'What does the Iran
aq War Mean lor Israel." Torah
rvice Saturday, Oct. 11, 9:15
Im. and 11:15 a.m.
TH DAVID
nservative
Miami's Historic
Congregation
Sol Landau. Rabbi
2an Wm. M. Lipson
ORAL WAY 2625 SW 3rd Ave
ne: 854-3911 Daily Services
Morning and Evening
Coral Way Main Sanctuary
Saturday morning 9 a.m.
Oade Campus 7500 SW 120th St.
ale Shabbat Services Friday 8 p.m
TH KODESH
i Traditional
|I01 SW 12 Ave. 858*334
bbi Max Shapiro
Jntor Leon Segal
1 Berlin Executive Secretary
Dally Mlnyon lor Yahrzelten
Dally 7:45 tun. & 7 p.m.
Saturday Service 8:45 a.m.
Membership Available
PLTTCTTrSHoTCH------------------
ase Avenue at 41st St
? Leon Kronlsh 538-7231
ntor David Convlssr Liberal
"bath Services, Friday Oct. to,
|15 p.m. Dr. Leon Kronlsh wilt
mm on "Stop Violence Agslnst
QM Now." Saturday. Oct. 11,
P*5 a.m., StvIcos.
LZ25&! 947-7828
'REQATWN Conservative
61 N. Miami Beaoh Blvd.
Dr. Max A. LI pschltz. Rabbi
__.?antor2vaaAronl
Friday Evening, Oct. 10,
Bat Mltzvah of:
DlanneBllllg
Saturday Morning, Oct. 11,
Bar Mltzvah of:
Scott Moehbaj
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
ReUglous Information
concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 5784000
Rabbinical Association Office
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Zvi Adler. Cantor
Sat. Morn. Serv. 9 a.m.
Rabbi Maxwell Berger will preach
Cantor Hyman Fein will chant
Rabbi: Brett S. Goldstein
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Administrator Raymond Chait
Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd
Coral Gables
Reform
667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstai. Rabbi
Serving Coral Gables and
the Southwest atea
Sabbath Services, Friday. Oct. 10,
at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Michael B
Eisenstat will speak on "The
Christian Alliance A Threat to
the Constitution?" On Sunday, Oct
12, at 7:30 p.m.. the Singles Group
will hold a dance in the Social Hall.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowtte
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE SINAi 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath Eve Services 8:15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. on the ikst
Friday of the month)
Sabbath Morning Services
1030 am
TEMPLE 2X>N
8000 MiHer Drive
Conservative
271-2311
Oct. 10, 8:15 p.m., Sabbath Serv-
ices, membership Sabbath. Dr.
Norman N. Shapiro will speak "An
Affirmative Way of Life." Cantor
Ban Dickson Chants the liturgy.
Oct. 11, 9 mjn.. Sabbath Services
Teltler Chapel. Oct. 12, 11:30 s.m..
Membership Picnic, Tropical Park,
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Club.
Oct. 13, 7:30 a.m., Minyan Teltler
Chapel. 7:30 p.m., USY Kadlma.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St., N. Miami Beach
Fla. 33162 947-6094. Rabbi David B
Saltzman, executive director.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St.. Miami. Fla. 33131
379-4553. Rabbi Lewis L. Bogsge,
Director, Union of American
Hebrew Congregation.
"An Evening with Itzhak
Per/man," a special event
presented by the Hope Center,
Inc. in cooperation with
Temple Beth Shalom of
i "-eater Miami, is announced
by Cultural Arts Director,
Judy Drucker, another
highlight Of the classical
music season when the violin
virtuosi' appear:; in concert,
Dec 22, at H p.m.. at the
Miami Beach Theater of the
Performing Arts.
Delta Players
Rehearse Show
Delta Players are in rehearsal
for a new show. As usual, all
presentations are in Yiddish. The
first performance, beginning in
early January, will be a musical,
"De Dubbe"s Yerishe" ("The
Grandmother's Legacy."!
There are still some openings
for singers and dancers.
Auditions are being held.
Beth David
Sisterhood
Beth David Sisterhood's first
open membership meeting of the
season will be held on Oct. 15, 10
a.m.. at Heth David South.
Highlighting the day will be an
induction service for new
Sisterhood members followed by
a lashion show by Dolingers of
Dadeland, featuring Beth David
models. There will be a catered
luncheon to finish the day.
Candlelight! ng
Time
6:41
30Tishri574V
Planning a Trip to Israel-Europe?
contact
For Effld.nl Sarvic* Hmw* >
651-2894 (4-10 p. m.)
Learn Modern
Hebrew
Learn modern Hebrew and
about Israel Your home,
$12.00/hour. Call evenings
893-5998
TnRAH READER WANTED FOR
L0NSERVAT,VE CONGHEGA770N
ON BROWARD/DADE CO. LINE
CALL 1-961-1700
MAILING LISTS
| AAA DIRECT MAIL & TYPING SVC.
N. Dade: 1574 Ives Dairy Rd.. 945XJ347
Gables: 1550 S. Dixie Hwy.. 861-1523
fmWop>WoVess/ng Hepuf/r-vw Linn
Community Corner
Secretary of State George Firestone has announced the
appointment of four residents of Brevard, Dade and Sarasota
counties to Florida's State Theater Board. Gerald Pulver,
Miami, ex-officio member and chairman emeritus of the board of
directors of the Founders of the Players State Theater, was
chosen as one of the board members.
The second annual Casino Nigh to benefit the Association
for Retarded Citizens, Dade County will be held Oct. 18, 7:30
p.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall.
The Greater Miami Community Concert Band will open its
1980-81 season with a free concert dedicated to all citizens of
Miami. On Oct. 26, the Band will perform at Florida Inter-
national University's Athenaeum Hall.
South Seas Plantation Tennis Club at Captiva Island will
host this year's third annual Florida Federal Opportunity Open,
a chance for women amateurs and professionals to compete for a
"wild card" entry in the $125,000, 1980 Florida Federal Tennis
Open, a Colgate Series Event, the open is scheduled for Oct. 17-
19 and is being sponsored by Florida Federal Savings and Loan
Association.
The Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida is sponsoring its
first annual Columbus Day Fundraising Barbecue on Oct. 12
from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m at Bird Drive Park.
Tickets may be purchased at the door, or by calling the
Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida.
The Players State Theatre Conservatory is offering a full
schedule of acting classes and special theatre workshops for fall.
Taught by a complement of professional theatre artists, the
courses begin the week of Oct 13 for an eight-week session.
Each class and workshop will meet two hours per week.
The Democratic Club of Miami Beach will hold its 30th
annual Banquet Dinner-Dance and Show at the Deauville Hotel,
Oct. I- The "Man of the Year" Award will be given to U.S.
Congressman, Claude Pepper, as a tribute to his ac-
complishments. The "Peoples Award" will be given to Hon.
Harold T. Toal, city manager of Miami Beach for 15 years.
Women's Caucus for Art invites the public to its Oct. 11 at
10 a.m. meeting at the Wesley Foundation. University of Miami.
Francis Klerner will lecturer on "Health Hazards in the Studio."
Private Jaime A. Pardo. son of Mr. and Mrs. Romon R.
Pardo of Miami, has arrived for duty at Fort Clayton Panama.
Private Pardo, an infantryman, was previously assigned at Fort
Bennings, Ga.
Surfsitle Taxpayers Association will meet Oct 16 at 7:45
p.m. at Surfside Town Hall. The guest speaker will be
Congressman Claude Pepper. The public is invited.
Stephen E. Goodman, son of Susie M. Goodman, Miami,
has been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of airman
first class. Airman Goodman is an administrative clerk at
Holloman Air Force Base, N.M.
The Concerned Parents of Cult Children will hold a general
meeting on Oct. 20 at 8 p.m.. Call the South Florida Branch for
further informal ion.
Reyna and Alex Youngerman of Bay Harbor had a reunion
this week, entertaining their cousin Harvey Ginsburg of
Washington, senior executive United States Intelligence officer,
who recently was United States consul in Zurich. Prior to that,
while serving many years as United States consul to The Hague,
the Youngermans were guests for a week of the Ginsburgs.
The work of Reyna Youngerman, Miami artist, was the
subject of a recentl column in the Yale Alumni Magazine.
Airman Thomas P. E. Miller, son of June R. Nierenberg of
Hollywood, has been assigned to Chanute Air Force Base, 111.,
after completing Air Force basic traning.
Airman Miller's father, Don M. Miller, resides in North
Miami Beach.
Voters Incorporated will have a "Town Hall Meeting" on
Oct. 14 in the auditorium of the Washington Savings and Loan
Association 1234 Washington Ave., Miami Beach at 8 p.m.
Harry Levy, presidnet of Voters Incorporated will moderate this
meeting. This will be the last "all candidates" night for 1980.
For further information, contact Harry Levy.
On Nov. 2, Voters Incorporated will have its annual in-
stallation, dinner, dance and show at the Embers Restaurant,
honoring Stephen P. Clark, Mayor of Dade County, as roan of
the year.
Spotlight Players announce a cast call for parts in the play,
"Bell, Book, and Candle" to be given in December. The call will
be held in the stage/-auditorium of the Atlantic Christian
School. Casting begins at 7 p.m., Oct. 16. The script calls for two
women and three men, ages 18 to 50. Spotlight also needs
production technicians for this show.
Get out your paints, brushes, crayons! The Association for
Retarded Citizens, Dade County, is encouraging all mentally
retarded person to enter the National ARC Art Design Contest.
United States Savings Bonds will be presented to the top three
winners.
Retirement MONEY
You may be entitled to a 2nd Social Security pension Irom West Germany If you eter worked in
Germany or were expelled from Communist Eastern Europe as Volksdeotscher 'or belonging
to the German Kulturkrels Disability and old age pensions even before reaching 85.
NAZI PERSECUTEES must file by Nov 30. 1960
contact GLOBAL COUNSELOR
P.O. Box 63. New Milford. NJ 07646
for our $3 information booklet


Pag*12-B
+Jeist> fkricHan
Fri**y. October
c
f
t
e
a

E
0.
a
B'nai Mitzvah
B
F. GARRETT GRABARNICK
F. Garrett Grabarnick. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Gene Grabarnick.
was to be called to the Torah as
Bar Mitzv-ah Thursday. Oct. 9. at
8 a.m. at Temple Emanu-El. Dr.
Irving Lehrman was to officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Emanu-El Afternoon
Religious School.] He atu?nds
Nautilus Junior High School
where he is in the eighth grade.
Garrett likes to play tennis, and
he enjoys hite water canoeing
Mr. and Mrs. Grabarnick will
host a reception Oct. 10 at their
home
Special guests will include: Mr
and Mrs. Joseph Grabarnick,
grandparents: Mrs. Kay Miller,
grandmother and Marty Miller,
uncle from Chicago. 111.
STEVEN MAIMAN
Steven Maiman. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Maiman. will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Temple
Menorah Saturday morning, Oct.
11. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
will officiate
Steven is an eighth grade
student at the Hebrew Academy.
Mr. and Mrs Maiman will host
a lunch follow ing services. Steven
will be honored with a reception
and dinner Saturday evening at
the Fontainebleau Hotel
Guetta attending will be
arriving from Israel. Argentina
and Caracas

V
V
Seth Tilou
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISIONS?
File No to nil
IN RE ESTATE OF
JOHN CE SKA
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE
YOC ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED thai the administration
of the estate of JOHN CESKA.
deceased, late ot Dade County.
Florida File Number H0-*111 is
pending in the Circuit Court In
and for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 3rd Floor. Dade
County Courthouse. 73 West
Flakier Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The personal represen-
ts tn<- of tius estate is SAN-
FORD S FAINCE. whose
address is :i000 Biscayne Blvd..
No 511. Miami. Florida .13137
The name ano address of the
attorney for the personal rep-
resentative are set forth below
All parsons having claims or
demandb against this estate
are iequire'1. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they
may have Each claim must be
In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attor-
ney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the
date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk of the above
styled court to enable the clerk
to mail one copy to each
personal representative.
AU persona Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST- PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
chailange the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal '
representative, or the venue or
JurUdlcUon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 7 day of October. 19S0
Sanfoi-dS Faunet
As Personal RepressntaUve
of the Estate of
JOHN CESKA
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on the 10 day
of October, 1M0.
David I. Schlosberg. Esq
SOOOBlscayneBlvd
No. Ml
Miami. FL 33137
Telephone: (SOB) 573-0713
Attorney for
Personal Representative
OWWO Oct. 10.17. IBM
SUSAN LYNN BRAMAN
Susan Lynn Rraman, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Norman
Braman. will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah on Satur-
day. Oct. 11. at Temple Beth
Sholom.
Susan is a student of the
confirmation class of 5742 and a
member of Junior BESHTY. She
is in the eighth grade at Nautilus
Junior High School.
Her grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Miller of North
Miami Beach and Mrs. Harry
Braman of Philadelphia will
attend.
DIANNE BILLIG
Dianne Billig, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Billig of North
Miami Beach, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah on Friday evening.
Oct. 10 at Beth Torah
Congregation in North Miami
Beach. This will be the first Bat
Mitzvah for the new Jewish year
5741.
Dianne is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Lucy Billig and Rabbi and
Mrs. Rubin R. Dobin. all of North
Miami Beach. She is an eighth
grade student of Highland Oaks
Junior High School and Beth
Torah's Judaica High School.
She is active in the United
Synagogue Youth and is a former
executive officer of the Kadimah
Jewish Youth Organization.
Andrew and Michelle BUlig,
Dianne's younger brother and
sister, will participate in the
service. Andrew will chant the
Kiddush prayer, and Michelle
will render the concluding Yigdal
prayer.
The Billig family will host an
Oneg Shabbat social after the
services. Several additional
receptions will be held in honor of
Dianne for the many friends and '
family members coming to Miami I
from out-of-town.
Hadassah Names
Region Director
Charlotte Wolpe. Youth
Commission chairperson of the
Florida Hadassah Youth
Commission. announces the
appointment of Seth Tilow as
regional director of "Hashachar,"
Young Judaea, and announces
that Yehuda Einan. shaliach
from Israel, will be on the staff
for another year.
Tilow comes to Miami from
New Jersey, where he served as
director of the Zionist Youth
Commission Born and reared in
the northeast United States.
Tilow was an active member in
Habonim. an International Labor
Zionist Youth Movement.
After completing the Habonim
Workshop Program 'an ac-
credited year course program in
Israel), he made aliyah in 1972
He served in the Israeli Defense
Forces from 1974 through 1976.
At present he is a member of
Kibbutz Gesher Haziv on
temporary leave. He has also
studied at Yad Natan. an Israeli
Government School, where h
successfully completed courses ii
irrigation. He has organized am
conducted many leadershi(
training seminars for Jewish
youth both in Israel and the
United States. Upon mmpletion
of his work in Florida. Tilow
plans to return to Israel.
B'nai Zion Singles
Plan Dance
South Florida Chapter No 147.
B'nai Zion Sing'"s, invites
members and friends to its first
dance of the season. Saturday.
Oct. 11 at 8 p.m. in the
Hallandale Jewish Center.
Proceeds go to the B'nai Zion
Home for the Retarded Children
in Israel. There will be a catered
coffee hour and music.
Business Notes
Barry H. Spinrad has been promoted to assistant vi~
president of Jefferson National Bank of Miami Beach H^
appointment was announced by Barton S. Goldberg, presiri
of the bank, a subsidiary of Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.
Goldberg also announced
Menendez as assistant cashier.
the appointment of
Lourdeg
The Institute of Condominium and Cluster Housing will h u
a seminar. Oct. 17-18 at the Bahia Mar Hotel and Y.rl.
a
Center in Fort Lauderdale. For more
registration, contact the University of Miami Law Center'
information"'^
l_:
TRACY SCHREIBER
On Saturday morning, Oct. 11,
Tracy Schreiber, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Schreiber, will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah. The Torah portion for
the week will be studied. ,
South Seas ORT
The South Seas Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
having a luncheon and card
party. Oct. 27 at noon at the
Washington Savings Bank, N.E.
167th St. and 6th Ave., North
Miami Beach. Contact Renee
Korn or Evelyn Rice, function
chairmen, for more information.
Mu ............ ...
John C. Taylor has been promoted to senior vice president of
Jefferson National Banks of Miami Beach. Kendall and Sunnv
Isles according to Arthur H. Courahon, chairman of the board 2
the banks which are subsidiaries of Jefferson Bancorp. Inc.
Taylor will head the recently created real estate division of
Jefferson Banks. The new division will coordinate all real estate
and construction loans.
Banker and insurance executive William M Kurau has been
elected a vice president of Pan American Bank. N.A., thj
company announced.
Kurau. who specialized in the sale and service ot pension
profit sharing and executive compensation plans during the past
year, was affiliated with Flagship Banks from 1972 to 1979,
most recently as senior lending officer.
Abraham A. Grunhut. vice president and branch manager of
the Washington A\onue office of Washington Snvings and Loan
Association, and Tamara F Nixon, vie* president and
economist fur the association, have been ren director* of the Central Agency for Jewish Education, an agency
of the Jewish Federation.
Grunhut has also just been renominated to the board ol
directors of Temple Menorah on Normandy !!< while Mrs
Nixon serves on the board of director* at Tempi*- Beth Shnlom
on Miami Beach.
Shepard Broad, chairman of the board of American Savings
and Loan Association of Florida (NYSEl. announced that the
board of directors has declared a regular quarterly dividend of
>.20 per share. This regular quarterly dividend will be paid on
Nov. 11 to shareholders of record Oct. 15.
Pfeffer Joins Sinai Staff
Arnold Pfeffer has joined the
staff of Mount Sinai Medical
Center's Foundation at its
associate director
Pteffer has 20 year; experience
in the field of fundraising. in-
cluding 12 years with Brandeis
University. For the past five
years, he has been Southeast
Regional Director of Develop
ment from Brandeis in Miami.
A native of New York, he ha a
bachelor's degree from Brooklyn
College. A resident of Broward
County. Pfeffer resides in Coral
Springs with his wife. Barbara,
and son Laurence. He is a
member of the Men's Club of
Temple Beth Am of Margate
In his new position at Mount
Sinai, Pfeffer will be working
with major fund-raising groups,
including the Founders and the successful fund-raising efforts of
Young Presidents, to increase the Foundations campaign,
membership and to continue the
Arnold Pfeffer
TjJe^i^UEItojpidliiapn
f.rllt'i Milt Ce-.nl.tt Iifliii.Jfv.ih Wtfklt
Print*! in Engliah
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
i
"! to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the wono
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:.'
? l Year $15.00 D 2 Years $28.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:.
Address:
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( Plus. Ms he All ChKss Payable to "TM1 JEWISH FLOS. IDI AN")
P.O. Baa 01-2*73. Miami, Florida 33101
Beoulaf 10m provide ubcr iptions be Mid In advance


Ortober 10.1960_
*Je*istinor*M*n
Pael3-B
public Notices
DISSOLUTION OF
r marriaoe
lm rp The marriage of
I petitioner-Wife
IffllTHA.DAVIS
I Respondent Husband
|W Keith A. Davis
284-48-0678 ow
HHC26Slg.BN.
iPO NY.08176
voil KEITH A DAVIS, are
sJreb%oufled that a Petition
IMssolution of Marriage
IJu been "led aga"U,t ^ '"?
B ire required to serve a
ESf of your written defence.
in the Petition for Dissolution
Krr'age on the Petitioner's
Attorney? Harold A Turtle
ICb Eq. Soutn DUle
Ittinaay Suite 307. Miami.
iForida 33156 and file the
Tri*inal written defenses In the
G,T of the Clerk. Circuit
Kirtonor before the 21st day
Li October. I960. If you fall to
DM, Judgment by default will
i taken against you for the
vli,.f demanded In the
This notice shall be published
nee each week for four con-
Jcutlve weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at
Mumi Hade County. Florida.
Jliu 18 day of September AD.
hi
RICHARD I' BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
Deputy Clerk
harold A. Turtletaub. Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
MM South Dixie
Highway. Suite 307
Miami, Florida 33156
im Sept 26;
Oct 3. 10. 17,1980
NOTICE UMDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
felVEN that the undersigned.
Miring to engage In business
nder the fictitious name ITL-
tlA HORA at 2025 SW lat St..
lisml. Fla.. Intend to register
Ud name with the Clerk at the
tjrcult Court of Dade County.
RAULR OLIVA
Owners 50 percent
NESTOR J.BARBOSA
Owners 50 percent
m_____Oct lp, 17. 24. 31.1880
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
JIVEN that the undersigned.
eilrlng to engage In business
nder the fictitious names of
RABBI ALEXANDER S.
(ROSS HEBREW ACADEMY,
EBREW ACADEMY OF
SREATER MIAMI AND HE-
BREW ACADEMY at 2400
Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach.
florlda Intends to register said
ames with the Clerk of the
cult Court of Dade County,
Florida
GREATER MIAMI
HEBREW ACADEMY,
a Florlda corporation
not-for-profit
By: DR. ELI HERSCHMANN
EON M FIRTEL, PA.
Ittomey
|111 Lincoln Road Mall
ulte 802
(laml Beach, Florida 33138
8176 Sept. 18.26:
""' L mac
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
1 (NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
RHE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FORDADECOUNTY
I Civil Action No. M-I3S4SFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I RE: The marriage of
RTHURG WEITZEL
[Petitioner-Husband
NICEH WEITZEL
Respondent-Wife
Janice H. Weitxel
4C Great Meadown Lane
East Hanover. NJ
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
JED that an action for
'"solution of Marriage haul
MB filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
ir written defenses. If any. to
on STANLEY E. GOODMAN,
iwrney for Petitioner, whose
dress Is 80S E. 8th Avenue,
Mean, FL 33010, and file the
nnal with the clerk of the
've styled court on or before
* 17, 1880; otherwise a
iautt win be entered against
>" for the relief demanded In
lecomplalnt or petition.
mis notice shall be published
.ieach week ,or ,our con-
cuuve weeks In THE JEW
'H.M.ORIDIAN.
"'TNESS my hand and the
si of said court at Miami,
onaa on this 10 day of Sep-
h>her. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
1 Dade County. Florida
ByS. A. Barner
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
Jjn'ey E. Goodman
ML 8th Avenue
^ah.FL 38010
WD888-7T33
g"iey for Petitioner
L oct i, io. r
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 10-911* (12)
FAMILY CIVIL DIVISION
I NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
llN RE: The marriage of
'LOURDES MA YTIN
I VASSALLO
Petitioner
and
ORESTES L.
VASSAlJ.o
Respondent
TO: Orestes L. Vasssilo
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
GIsela Cardonne; Stone. Sost-
chln A Gonzalez. P.A., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1401 W. Flakier St.. Miami.
Florida 33130 (648-4411). and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 21, 1880; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In The Jewish
Floridlan.
WITNESS my hand the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida
on this 12 day of September,
1880
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florlda
By V Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GIsela Cardonne;
Stone. Sostchln A
Gonzalex, P.A.
1401 W. FlaglerSt.
Miami, Fla 33135 (648-4411)
Attorney for Petitioner
09178 Sept. 18.26;
Oct. 3.10. I860
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
SI MAR IMPORTS at 36 NE
First Street. Room 638, Miami,
Fla., Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florlda.
Edward Baruksen
Owner
Joseph B. Shacter
Attorney for
Edward Baruksen
09207 Oct 3.10. 17. 24, 1880
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Ohio Bar. at 6051 SW 8th Street,
Miami. Florida intend to
register said name with tne
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florlda
Ronald Foster, Co-owner
Rosa Foster, Co-owner
09194 Sept. 26;
Oct. 3.10,17, 1880
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 10-14171" FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marrtage of
HELLMAN SARMIENTO.
Petitioner
and
TERESA RUTH
SARMIENTO.
Respondent
TO:TERESA RUTH
SARMIENTO
Calle 64 No. 5063
BARRANQUILLA,
Colombia ..__-
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for DU-
solutlon of your Marrtage has
been filed and commenced in
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on CAR
LOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.. Attor
ney for Petitioner, whose
address la 2985 W 4th Avenue,
HIALEAH, Florida. 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
October 24. 1880; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive weeks In TOT
JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN.
MIAMI
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami
Florida, on this 23 day of
September, 1880 .....
RICHARD I'. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. Erice
As Deputy Clerk
Carlos M. Mendel, Esq
2986 W. 4th Avenue
Hlaleah. Florlda 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
08186 sept, as,
OcLl.i0.1T. IMP
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
I JUDICIALCIRCUITINANO
I FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 10-11991 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
in re the marrtage of
HELEN KINNEY
Petltloner-Wlfe
vs.
ROBERT KINNEY
Respondent-Husband
TO; ROBERTKINNEY
Residence Unknown
YOU ROBERT KINNEY are
hereby notified to file your
answer to this Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with
the Clerk of the Court and mall
a copy to Petitioner's Attorney
DANIEL GALLUP. 2358
Salzedo Street. Coral Gables.
. Florida, 33134, on or before
October 24, 1880. else Petition
will be taken as confessed.
1 This 18 day of September,
1880
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
ByC. P Cope land
Deputy Clerk
08186 Sept. 26;
Oct. 3,10.17,1880
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 10-11977 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
BRIGITTE STOLZ
Petitioner-Wife
and
WERNERSTOLZ
Respondent-Husband
TO: WERNER STOLZ
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
It on HARVEY RICHMAN.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 407 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach, Florida, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before October 24. 1880; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florlda. on this 18 day of
September. 1880.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florlda
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY RICHMAN
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
08187 SeP' *
Oct. 3.10,17,1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. B0-U4S1 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ENE ALEXIS
Petitioner
and
JUDY ALEXIS
Respondent
TO: JUDY ALEXIS
residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
'Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
ft on BENNETT D. FULTZ,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 618 SW 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florlda. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 31. 1980; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of Sep-
tember. 1880. __________
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
OBIM SeP' M-
Oct 3. 10. 17.1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring l<> engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Dirt) Dl<* S Tub at 1666 TSUI
Street Causeway. N Bay
Village. Florida 33141. Suite
706, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Seville Caterers, Inc
Charles Gertler. Esq.
Attorney for
Seville Caterers. Inc.
00206 Oct. 1.10, IT. 24,1M0
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 60-14201 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
MICHAEL D. MacLENNAN
Petitioner-Husband
and
CYNTHIA MAE
MacLENNAN
TO: CYNTHIA MAE
Mac LENNAN
c o William Miller
3202 Timber Line Court
Marrletta.
Georgia 30066
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on LOUIS R BELLER. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 LINCOLN
ROAD, SUITE 238, MIAMI
BEACH, FLORIDA 33138, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 24, 1880: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of Sep-
tember, 1880.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Louis R Heller
Esquire
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 238
Miami Beach. Florida 33138
(a C 3061531 0860
Attorney for Petitioner
08196 Sept. 26;
______________Qrt 3.10.17.1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY COURT
Division No. 60-15644
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
CHARLES F. MALFA
Petitioner
and
CONCEIT A M. MALFA
Respondent
TO: CONCETTA M. MALFA
89 Worcester Road
Natlck. Massachusetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
JOSEPH W. MALEK. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 601,
Miami Beach. Florida. 33138.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before Nov. 7,1980; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said court at Miami. Florlda
on this 6 day of October. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Joseph W. Malek
350 Lincoln Road-Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 538-4431
Attorney for Petitioner
08222 Oct. 10, IT, 24.31.1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CaieNo. 60-14294
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In re the marriage of
CHRISTIANNA
PIERRE-LOUIS
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
ST. AMAND
PIERRE-LOUIS.
Respondent Husband
TO: ST. AMAND
PIERRE-LOUIS
DelmaNo. 208
Port A Prince. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that a PetlUon for Dissolution
of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are hereby
required to serve a copy of your
answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Petitioners
Attorney, LESTER ROGERS.
whose address is 1451 NW 17
Avenue Miami. Florida 33125
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before this 31 st day of
October, 1980, or a Default will
be entered against you.
DATED this 24 day of Sep-
tember. 1980.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Betty J.Carson
Deputy Clerk
001W Oct. 3,10, 17, 24.1660
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 60-14464
Family Civil Oivlsion
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
'IN RE: The marriage of
CARLOS VILLAVICENCIO
Petitioner
VS.
LEOMIRA MONTENEGRO
VILLAVICENCIO
Respondent
TO: LEOMIRA MON-
TENEGRO
VILLAVICENCIO
62 West 106th Street
New York. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Rogelio A. Del Pino, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1401 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33136. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before October 31, 1880; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In The Jewish
Floridlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of Sep
tember, 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Betty J. Carson
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Stone. Sostchln *
Gonazalez, P.A.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Rogelio A. Del Pino
Attorney for Petitioner
08202 Oct. 3. 10, 17. 24. 1880
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cafe NO. 60-14270
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
CAROLS. BISHOP
Petitioner
and
WAYNE C. BISHOP
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: WAYNE C. BISHOP
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
M. GREBER. ESQ.. Attorney
for Petitioner, 633 NE 167 St..
N M B.. Fl 33162 on or before
October. 31. 1980, and file the
original with the clerk of this
court, otherwise a default will
be entered against you
Dated: Sept. 24.1980
Richard P. Brlnker. Clerk
by N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
08203 Oct. 3. 10. 17.24, 1980
' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE II TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
I AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 66-14120 FC
NOTICE TO APPEAR
BY PUBLICATION
In re the marriage of
MARIE JACQUES RENAUD
Wife
and
PABLO B. J. RENAUD
Husband
TO: PABLO
B. J. RENAUD
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
required to serve a copy of your
answer to the Petition for Dis-
solution of Marrtage herein on
the Petitioner's Attorney:
MURRAY Z. KLEIN. Suite 610
Alnsley Building. 14 NE First
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33132.
and file the original In the of
flee of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 31 day of
October. 1880 or said cause will
be taken as confessed by you.
Dated this 24 day of Sep-
tember. 1880.
Richard P Brlnker, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
S. A. Barner
Deputy Clerk
09200 Oct 3. 10. 17,24, 1980_
.N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case NO. 60-1799 (02)
NOTICE OF ACTION
SABAL CHASE
CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION
(I), INC., a
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ARMANDO DELGADO.
Defendant
TO: ARMANDO DELGADO
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property
In Dade County. Florida, to
wit:
Unit sex, in GREEN
GLADES CONDOMINIUM
NINE, according to the
Declaration of Condo-
minium filed for record on
June 28,1876. and recorded
In Official Records Book
9367 at Page 963 of the Pub-
lic Records of Dade
County. Florida; together
with the undivided In-
terests In COMMON ELE-
MENTS declared In said
Declaration of Condo-
minium to be an appur-
tenance to the above-de-
scribed Unit,
has been filed against you; and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
If any. to It. on Steven M. Sieg-
fried. Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address Is 9300 South
Dadeland Boulevard, Suite 702.
Miami. Florida :i3156 on or be-
fore October 28 1980, and file
the original wltn the Clerk of
this Court either before ser\ I
on Plaintiffs attorney or im
mediately thereafter other
wise a delault will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded "in tne Complaint or
Petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on 24 day of
September. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
aa Clerk of said Court
By L. C. Bedasse
aa Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
0O2O6 Oct. 10,17. 24, i860
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 60-14347 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
In re the marrtage of
VERALEW
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
KENNETH LEW
Respondent-Husband
TO: Kenneth Lew
c o Vincent Lew
45 Neptune Avenue
Kingston 17,
Jamaica. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marrtage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on STANLEY E. GOODMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 908 E. 8th Avenue.
Hlaleah, Florlda 33010. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before October 31. 1980; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on Oils 28 day of Sep-
tember. 1980
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. Erlce
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
909 E. 8th Avenue
Hlaleah, Florida 33010
883-7733
Attorney for Petitioner
09201 Oct. 3. 10. 17. 24.1880
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-4712
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
GERVAIS VERNERET
Petitioner
and
JOYCE MATHIS VERNERET
Respondent
TO: OERVAIS VERNERET
residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
BENNETT D. FULTZ, attor-
ney for Petitioner whose
address Is 616 SW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florlda, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 21.1980; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6th day of
October 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
09223 Oct. 10. 17.24.31.1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE US HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
oil SHORE MADNESS, at
5470 NW 161 St., North Miami,
Fla.. Intends to register sard
name with the Clerk of the
'Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dale Simmons, Inc.
Ivea Legal Center
Attorneys tor Applicant
06904 Oct. 8.10. IT. 24. IBM


Pagel4-B
*Jeis*rkrkMan
Friday, October 1Q"^
Public Notices^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cast NO. 10-U01 2
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
OLGA GIBB
Petitioner
and
GORDON GIBB
Respondent
NOTICE Or ACTION
TO: GORDON GIBB
ORANGE DIST
SIGN P.O.
ST JAMES. JA. W.I.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action (or dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
M GREBER. ESQ. Attorney
for Petitioner. 633 NE 167 St..
N If B Fl 33162 on or before
Oct 31. 1980. and file the
original with the clerk of thla
court. otherwlae a default will
be entered against you
Dated September 18.1980
I'.!i hard P BrinKer. Clerk
by Loia II. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
Win Sept. 26.
Ort 1. in IT, 1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 90 13620 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN lit. The marriage of
GLADYS I.YDF.S
Petitioner
and
PALL TERRY L YDEN
Respondent
TO PALL TERRYLYDEN
Residence 1 nknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to It. on CAR-
LOS M MENDEZ. Esq. Attor-
nt> for Petitioner, whose
address is 2985 W. 4th Avenue,
HIALEAH. Florida, 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
October 24, 1980; otherwlae a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weelr. for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN. MIAMI.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida, on this 11 day of
September. 1960.
RICHARD P.BRLNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
Carlos M. Mendel, Esq.
2985 W. 4th Avenue
Hlaleah. Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
09175 Sept. 19.26;
Oct. 3.10.1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
The Downtown Athletic Club at
200 South Miami Avenue.
Miami, Florida, intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Paul E. Rosen. Owner
Smith. Mandler, Smith,
Werner. Jacobowltz
A Fried. PA.
Attorneys for Applicant
09171 Sept. 19,26;
Oct. 3.10. 1980
----------NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN thai the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
GIT-N-GO PIZZA and ICE
CREAM at number 10682 SW
24th Street, In the City of
Miami, Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Cleric of the Circuit Court of'
Dade County, Florida
Dated at Miami, Florida, this,
30 day of September, 1980.
CARLOS MELENDEZ
MANUEL F.FENTE. Esquire j
Attorney for Applicant
1401 W Flagler Street
Miami. FL 38136
08215 Oct. 10. 17,34,31, 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
David A. Namoff, D.D.S., at
number 9633 Fountalnebleau
Blvd.. in the City of Miami,
Florida, Intends to register the
said name with the Clark of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, thla
mil day of Sepu m be r. 1980
David A. Namoff. D.D.8., P.A.
By: David A. Namoff .
Herbert Jay Cohen. P.A.
Attorney for AppUcant
400 S. Dads land Boulevard
Miami. Florida U1M
Teie: (aM)0s-Oai
Oct. 10.17. M.U.I0M.
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL ,
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 90-7425
IN RE ESTATE OF
ALFRED HUNGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ALFRED
KLINGER. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida. File
Number 80-7M6, U pending In
the Circuit Court In and tor
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
la 3rd Floor. Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
The personal representative of
this estate la Eric Kllnger.
* hose addreaa Is 307 E 5th
Street. Morris, Minnesota
56267 The name and address of
the attorney for the personal
representative are set forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against this estate
are required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
lile with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they
may have Ea< h < laim must be
in writing and mu-st indicate
the basis (or the claim, the
name and address of the
( reditor or his agent or attor-
ney, and the amount claimed
If the claim Is not yet due. the
date when It will become due
shall be stated If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty snail
be slated. If the claim la
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk of the above
Btyled court lo enable the clerk
to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persona Interested in the]
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required. I
WITHIN THREE MONTHS.
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any'
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Hallandale,
Florida on this 2nd day of
October, 1980.
Jeffrey A Kent
Attorney for
Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALFRED KLINGER.
Deceased
First publication of this
notice of administration on the
10 day of October. 1080.
Jeffrey A. Kern. Esquire
Of Law Offices of
Fromberg. Fromberg A Roth.
PA.
Suite 800. 2500 E.
Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. Florida 33009
Telephone 940-0709
Attorney for
Personal Representative
J8221 Oct 10, 17, 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
"Miami Beach Cleaning Ser
vice" at 2624 NW 24 St.. Miami.
Fla. 33142 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Lucy A. Rodriguez
(Owner)
09213 Oct. 10. 17. 24.31 iann
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
AMERICAN LEISURE
TOURS at 683 NE 167th Street,
North Miami Beach. Florida
33162 Intends to register aald
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Worldwide Leisure
Travel Tours. Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Marvin Greber,
Attorney for Corporation
Worldwide Leisure
Travel Tours, Inc..
a Florida Corporation
63S NE 167th St.
Suite 1015
N. Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
00230 Oct. 10,17. M, 31,1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buauiesa
under the fictitious name
Frank's Repairs A Welding, at
219 NW JOth Street, Miami.
Florida, tun intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Frank Grice. Jr. and
Margaret Grice, Partnership
0tM Oct. It, IT. M. 1. IMP!
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 00-1474* FC
(FAMILY DIVISION)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
MIREYAAMARAL
Wife,
land
HORAClO L. AMARAL
Husband
frO HORACIO L. AMARAL
RESIDENCE ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE. P.A attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 NW 7lh Street. Miami.
Florida 33125. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above atyled court on or before
November 14. 1980; otherwlae a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this l day of
October. 1980.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal i
Albert L. Carrlcarte, PA
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33125
i 3051 649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
09216 Oct. 10. 17. 24, 31.1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.80-544? FC (08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
DAVID WAYNE CHURCH
Petitioner Husband
and
KATHY JANE CHURCH
Respondent
Residence; UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HERBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on CEASE A CEASE, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2720 W Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33138.
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 14.
1980; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDLAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 1st day of
October 1980
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal)
HAROLD CEASE. ESQ
CEASE A CEASE
2720 W Flagler Street
Miami. Fl. 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
09218 Oct. 10,17.24. 31. 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. ao-l 1100 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The marriage of
CYNTHIA 3. KEATING
Petitioner- Wife'
and
WILLIAM JOSEPH
KEATING. JR.
Respondent-Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: William Joseph
Keating. Jr.
c / o Camllle Dentry
3460 Townaend Blvd.
No. 164
Jacksonville. Florida
mu
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written d* ferises, If any, to it on
Lleberman. Benjamin and
Aaaoclatea. P.A., Petitioner's
Attorney, whose addreaa la 0801
Sunset Drive. Miami. Florida
33173, on or before October 24
1080, and file the original with
the Clerk of thla Court either
before service on Petitioner's
Attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwlae a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
witness my hand and seal
of thla Court on September 16.
Richard P. Brlnker. Clerk
By Deborah G Haas
Deputy Clark
" optiA.ia;
. Oct i, io. loto
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
M.11I12FC
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
PROCEEDING
Y PUBLICATION IN
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
IN RE:
THE ADOPTION OF
a minor
By
Petitioner:
JAMES L WEST
TO: ROBERT BOWDEN
Residence Unknown
You are hereby notified that
a petition for adoption of your
minor child was filed In the Cir-
cuit Court of the llth Judicial
Circuit Court. Family Division.
Case No 80-130. on the 2 day of
Sept. 1980. by JAMES L.
WEST and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any to it. on the
petitioner's attorney, whose
name and address la:
RICHARD L. LARIN, 17971
Bi>cavne Boulevard. Suite 119,
North" Miami Beach. Florida
33160. and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled ,
court on or before the 10 day of
October, 1980. otherwise a
judgment may be entered
st you lor the relief de-
manded in the peitlon
DATED Sept 2,
19><0 RICHARD P
BKINKER. Clerk
By Clannda Brown
Deputy Clark
RICHARD L. LARIN
Attome) for Petitioner
17V71 Bleceyne Boulevard J
Suite Ut
North Miami Beach.
I noa 33160
931 3366
09162 Sept 12. 19 26:
Ort 3, 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names of
OINA JECK1E. Inc .
d b a ICI PARIS at 18759
Blsiayne Blvd N. Miami. Fla
Intends to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Reglne Melamed. President
09170 Sept 19. 26.
Oct. 3.10. 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT o.
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 80-13*43 FC
IN RE The Marriage of
FERNANDO MATOS
Petitioner-Husband
and
ERLA GALVAN MATOS
TO:ERLAGALVAN
MATOS
Residence Address
Unknown
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition Fo
Dissolution Of Marriage ha;
been filed against you and yoi
are required to serve a copy oi
your Answer or Pleading tc
said petition on petitioner's
attorney, GEORGE T RA
MANI ESQ Suite 711. Bi>
cayne Building. 19 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In tne
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before IT dav of
October, 1980 If you fail to do
so. judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida
this nth day of September.
1980
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By A D Wade
Deputy Clerk
09174 Sept 19,26;
Oct. 3. 10. 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 10-140S3 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
In re the marriage of
ANGELAi TOSCANOI
Petitioner-Wife
va.
GUGUELMO TOSCANO
Respondent-Husband
TO: GUGUELMO TOSCANO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE haa been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses. If
any. to It on DANIEL
GALLUP. ESQ.. plaintiff a
attorney, whose address Is 2355
Salzedo Street. Coral Gables
Florida 33184, on or before Oct.
24, 1080: and file the original
with the clerk of thla court
either before service on plain-
tiff's attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on SepL It.
1080.
Clerk of the Court
by8 A Barntr
A Deputy Clerk
" Sept. JO;
Oct 8. 10, 17. 1000
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 00-1J774 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
CHRISTIAN JEAN-
BAPTISTE,
Petitioner Husband
and
SHELLEY JEAN-BAPTI3TE
Respondent-Wife
TO:SHELLEY
JEAN-BAPTISTS
410 Prospect Street
East-Orange.
New Jersey 07017
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to aerve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on ARTHUR H. LIPSON,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
addreaa la 1516 NW 167 St..
Suite 216, Miami. Fla.. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before October 24. 1980; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 15 day of Sept..
1980.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Count). Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
i Cin uit Court Seal i
09177 Sept 19. 26.
Oct 3. 10 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
CLTMAWEST at 161 Almerica
Ave.. Suite 200-E. Coral
Gables. Fla 33134. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
GESA INC
161 Almerta Ave .
Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Fla 33134
KURT W'ELLISCH. ES
WeUlach, Metzger*
Leone. P.A.
Attorneys for
GESA. INC.
161 Almeria Ave Suite 200-E
Coral Gables, Fla 331.14
09180 Sept 19. 26;
Oct. 3.10. 1080
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-13831 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
HORETHAL SAKARIYAWO
Petitioner Wife
and
WAZ1RIA SAKARIYAWO
Res pondent Husband
TO WAZIRJ A
SAKARIYAWO
Kesioonce Unknown
YOI ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
he* n filed against you and you
an i squired to serve a i opy of
vour written defenses. If anv. to
it on ARTHUR H LIPSON.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
addreaa la isi5 NW i7 Bl .
Suite 21B. Miami. Fla.. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before Oct 21. 1080; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition,
WITNESS my hand and the
.seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this II day of Sept..
1980
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
09182 Sept 19.26;
Oct. 3. 10. 1980
FAMILY CvlsioJ10*
Case No. M-nuJc?
IN RE Them "rl.of
ALFREDO SI SI '
Petitioner
and
DEBORAH E SCSI
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTtnw
todeboraheS"
""College Siren
Vllle St Laurant
Montreal Quebec
Canada
FIED'' thlf HEREBY NOT,.
riKD that a Petltim, i_
Dissolution of tSSSZ ,*
been filed agamstvou^t
you are required to 25?!
copy of your Hnom^
Pleading to '.he i>7.??e '
the Petitioner's ZT
NORMAN K SCHWAteTrJ'
at Miami Beacn. Florida Z.
file the original RmZL
Pleading lr uw off, Clerk of U-.e.Vcuitc^
before the 17th 1*>.AD II ... tai| ^
Default Ju".- .,<*,,:;"
a*"11"", > r ,., *"
demanded:- --Petition
Dated .: ,.. D
County. Flon -his in dayi
September '
RICHAP.l BRINKER
C
tourl
B> ihawjr
Dt
09173 |, j.
____________Oct 3.10. mi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ii i H JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No.00 13*42 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
FRANCISCO ROA
Husband-Petitioner
va.
GOD IN IC1A ROA
Wife-Respondent
TO: GODINICIA ROA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed, and you are hereby
required to aerve copy of your
Answer to the Husband/ Pe-
titioner. Attorney. DONALD F.
FROST, ESQ.. 36 SW 6th St..
Miami. Florida 83180 and file
an original with the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 31 day of October,
1080 or the allegations win
taken aa confessed against you.
and a Default will be entered
DATED at Miami, Dade
County. Florida, thla 10 day of
September, 1080
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
By Deborah O Hess
Aa Deputy Clerk
001*8 Sept It. M.
Oct 1,10.1MB
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 80-'ll
Division 03
IN RE r- OF
iDOLPH S'BRUN
Docei
V EOI
ADMINISTRATION
The a itlofl oi Da|
"enbna.
deceased '- i Number*)-
ll prim.: ; .. Circuit Oh
Florida. Pit
bate I the address ^
which is Dadi Count) Coun
house. 73 Weil f ..:.rr Strta
Miami. Fl :r,e .-ami
and addi> -- : IhC perscrjlj
representative and the
sonai i -1 itlye'aatl
are set forth below
All interested persons a)
required to : *.th this
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
'IMi: FIRST I'lBUCA'
OF THIS NOTICE: il.aE
claims against '.He estate
i j i an> dbji etion by an a!
' i i -: 11 I i 11 w horn noun
waa mailed thai r.allengM'k
validity >;i Uw will
quallfli atii the pe
represi nue,
. ourl.
ALL CI.-MMs AM'OBJEG
tions KDinui
HE FORE\ ER BARRED
Publication of this Notice
begun on Ocl .
Personal RepresenUtril
Charl. > MerwttUI
Bal Mar'- ll : Apt 15B
LOlSf \.enue
BalHarl u FLS15I
Attornev .'< 1 i :.-onal
R) pre... ntai
Sparoer SI
Snap fcH nner.PA
OneSoutl I "-enue I
SOth Floor
Miami .L ,
Telephone i *
00317 Ocl I0.17.ttl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTC*
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,!"
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 80-HS10K
ACTION FOR OISSOLUTIC*
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE ANNA WILSON
Petitioner Wife
ALBERT J WILSON
Respondent Husband
TO: ALBERT J WILSON
Respondent-Husband
residing at
4 West 31 st Street
(Room 3231
New York. NY
YOU ARE HEREBY Mn
FIED that an action
Dlaaolutlon of Marrlaft
been filed against yw*"*'.
are required to serve a 0WJ
your written defenses, W
if on BEN LAWSON. jgj
for Petitioner, whose ad 800 North Venetian BB
Miami. Florida 33139. and
the original with *?,
the above styled court o*
before October 31. '*'JS
wise a default will koo*g
against you .aJLe
demanded In the compi*"1
petition ih.nublW*
This notice shall g
once each wook **?&
aecutive weeks In THE
ISH FLORIDIAN t d
WITNESS my hand ana
seal of aald court at -^
Florida on this day "
tomber. 1080 BsmflaaV
RICHARD P. 52X5
Aa Clerk. Circuit^
Dade County. FWrw
ByM I.WffS
A* Deputy fl
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ben Law son
sWN.VeneUanDrW
W**- rlort?5Ser
aUa


.October 10,1980
[arry Kamins, 52-Year Resident
+Jewish fhrktowi
Pagel5-B
KaB^a, 68, of North
passed away Oct. 6
./were held Oct. 8 at
, Funeral Home.
^ved from Toronto,
Zd has lived in Miami
. years. He had been
ted for many years with
Parisian Dry Cleaners.
He is survived by wife, Sally;
daughter, Candice Rengstl of
Miami Shores; brother, Norman
of Miami; sisters, Mary Ann
Shapiro of Miami and Rose
Logan of Miami; two grand-
children, William and Patrick.
Services for Sophie Altshuler
daughter, Judith and son-in-law,
Bhie Altshuler, 83. of Miami
, passed away Sept. 28. Ser-
l were held at Riverside.
I Altshuler was a resident of
Beach for 20 years after
I from Philadelphia.
is survived by son,
rd, and daughter-in-law,
of Coconut Grove;
utt of North Miami Beach. Sept
fii'iurvlved by wife. Rebecca;
Jen Jane B. Robertson of
Mm S.C, and Ettle Sue Bemle
Orleani, La.; granddaughter.
*nn Robertson and son-in-law.
ibertson Services held at River-
nth Interment at Mt. Slnal
Inkel
\. of Miami Beach, Oct. 3. She
lrtnally from New Jersey before
r to Miami Beach 20 years ago.
_s a member of Hadassah and the
Cerebral Palsy Aasn. She is sur-
ly two sons. Fred Gold of Clark,
fed Donald Grant of Springfield.
to daughters, Mrs. Sylvia Braun
-ml and Mrs. Rae Goldberg of
IBeach. two brothers, Abe Gold
-ill and Philip Gold of Miami
| one sister, Mrs. Tillie Lewis of
JJeach; seven grandchildren and
[great-grandchildren. Gordon
1 Home Star of David Memorial
netery.
iblic Notices
I the circuit court of
IE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DECOUNTY,FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CSMNo.lO-lttlt
NOTICE OF ACTION
c the marrrlage of
ERIE H GARCIA
etltloner Wife
VARD B GARCIA
eapondent Husband
[EDWARD B.GARCIA
Residence Unknown
|Of EDWARD B. GARCIA
1 hereby notified to file your
*er to this Petition for DIs-
btlon of Marriage with the
rk of the Court and mall a
(y to Petitioner's Attorney
|NIEI. GALLUP, 2S55
edo Street, Coral Gablea,
Ida. 33134. on or before
ober 31. 1H0. else Petition
I be taken as confessed.
his 30 day of September.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
ByM. Erlce
Deputy Clerk
Oct. 3.10, 17.24.1980
THECIRCUITCOURTOF
| THE IITH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. INANDFOR
DECOUNTY,FLORIDA
fNERALJURISDICTION
DIVISION
CaseNo.S0-129S3
NOTICE OF ACTION
INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TIONALBANKOF
tENWOOD. a NaUonal
*mg AssoclaUon
jjnlzed under the lawa
e
led Slates of America,
aintiff.
IDA.NIBLACK,
sendant.
DAVID A. NIBLACK
1908 Fox Cliff
Estatea North
Martinsvllle,
Indiana 46151
H- ARE HEREBY NOTI-
f.."?1 a cmplttlnt has
filed against you, and that
are required to serve a
0( your Answer or
mg to the Complaint upon
Plaintiffs attorneys.
' ER 4 SILVER, Attorneys.
t 2B28 One Blscayne
*. Miami, Florida 33131.
"lie the original Answer or
wing; In the office of the
k o the Circuit Court, on or
re this 29 day of October,
[ If you fall to do so, a De
J Judgment wUl be taken
i you for the relief de-
'dedh, the Complaint.
VTED at Miami. Dade
"y. Florida, this 24 day of
ember, 1980.
'chard P. Brlnker, Clerk
_ Clerk of
The Circuit Court
By Paul F. McCarthy
f* Silver
ffneys for Plaintiff
[Blscayne Tower
^Florida UU1
Oct. 1.10, IT, 84.1980
Jack Waxier of Houston, Tex.;
grandchildren, David and Julia
Altshuler, David and Robert
Waxier and Mary Sue Kahn;
great-grandchild, Jeff; brothers,
Morris Waxier of Washington,
D.C., George Waxier and sister
Betty Lamer, both of
Philadelphia.
GOLDSTEIN
Grace I.. 7T. of North Miami Beach. Oct.
4. A 33-year resident. Mrs. Goldstein
originally moved from Massachusetts.
She Is survived by husband, Max;
daughters, Carol Levtnbook and Lee
Kantor, five grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. She was a
member of the Point East Chapter of
Hadassah. ORT and the JWV Auxiliary.
The Riverside had charge of
arrangements.
PASCUL
Saul, 61. of Miami. Oct. 4. A resident
since 194S, Mr. Paacul was originally
from Plttsburg, Pa. He Is survived by
wife. Rosette; sons, Irwln and Stuart
and brother, Norman. He was a mem-
ber of the Miami Symphonic Orchestra
and a member of the IAPES He was
employed by the Florida State Employ-
ment Services for 18 years and
graduated from the University of Miami
in 1847. The Riverside had charge of
arrangements. Interment was In Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
ROSENBLUTH
Sadye. of Miami Beach, Oct. S. She
came to Miami 14 years ago from
Rochelle, N.Y. She Is survived by
husband, Harry; sons, Kal Ross of
Beverly HUis. Calif., and Myron Buddy
Rosenbluth of Tucson. Arts.; brothers
Joe Ferber and Harry Ferber of Los
Angeles; sisters, Ethel Ferber of Los
Angeles and Rose Rappaport of SUver
Springs, Md. and six grandchildren.
Trie Riverside had charge of arrange-
ments.
SHAPIRO
Belle, 83. of Miami Beach passed away
Sept. 28. She Is survived by son. Marvin
S. Shapiro; sister, Sadie Ooodsteln and
three grandchildren. Mitchell E.. Ken-
neth W.. and Ronald F. Shapiro. Ser-
vices and Interment held In New York.
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name B F
Management Services at
Miami Beach, Florida intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
By Victor Poaner
Chairman of the Board
Security Management Corp.
09208 Oct. 3, 10, 17. 24, 1980^
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13W9 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
VIRGILIO TORRES
Petitioner
and
BLANCA L. TORRES
Respondent
TO: BLANCA L. TORRES
4684 N. Winchester Ave.
Apt. 2
Chicago, Illinois 60640
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it, on CAR-
LOS M. MENDEZ, Esq., Attor-
ney for PeUUoner, whose
address Is 2985 W. 4th Avenue.
HIALEAH, Florida, 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
October 31, 1980; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN, MIAMI.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 29 day of
September, 1980
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. C. Bedasse*
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CarlosM. Mender, Esq.
MS w. 4th Avenue
Htaleah. Florida33012
Attorney for Petitioner
08310 Oct. 8,10. IT, 34,1980
[ Ethel Placet,
45-Year Resident
Ethel Placet, 73, of Miami
passed away Sept. 27.
Mrs. Placet was originally
from New York City before
moving to Miami, where she
made her home for 45 years. She
was a member of the Gen. John J.
Pershing Auxiliary No. 6 of the
Spanish American War Veterans.
She was also a member of the
VFW Auxiliary and an active
member of the Smathers Senior
Citizens Center.
She is survived by daughter,
Beatrice Wagman of Westport,
Conn.; sister, Gertrude Bochner
of Brooklyn, N.Y., and grandson,
Michael Wagman.
Rebecca White
Services Held
Rebecca White, a resident of
Miami Beach and Miami since
1944, passed away Sept. 29.
Services were held at Newman
Funeral Home with interment at
Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
Mrs. White is survived by
daughter, Rose Swee of Miami
Beach; son, Abraham of Attle-
boro, Maine; brother Abraham
Podell of Laguna Hills, Calif.,
and sisters, Tilly Spies man of
Montreal, Esther Komblum and
Jenny Blum of Miami Beach.
Mrs. White was a member of
the Rose Lukoff Club No. 3,
National Council of Senior
Citizens and a volunteer at the
Stanley Myer Community
Center-National Council of
Jewish Women.
GOTLIES
Lenard 71, of Miami Beach. Oct. 2. A 10-
year resident, coming from West Vlr
glnla. he Is survived by wife, Sara; son,
Larry; daughter, Phyllis Classman.
three grandchildren; brothers. Herbert
Gotlleb and Bernard Gotlleb He was
chairman of the board of Medco Drug-
stores In Florida, former national
director of Phi Sigma Delta fraternity;
C president of the Tree of Life
igogue, Clarksburg. W.VA.. past
chairman of TTl-State UJA and member
of the Rotary Club. Riverside. Star of
David Cemetery.
PALLEY
Nell. 87, of Miami Beach. A long-time
member of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, Mrs. Palley came to Miami
Beach 15 years ago from Pennsylvania.
She is survived by husband, J. Lewis of
Miami Beach; son. Marshall of Nevada
City. Calif.; eight grandchildren and
nine great-grandchildren. Rubin
Chapel.
SASLOE
Michael, 75. of Kendale Lakes, Oct. 3.
He was a resident for 20 yeara after
moving from New York. He la survived
by wife, Estelle of Kendale Lakes,
daughter, Rhonl and son-in-law, Ned
Tannebaum of Kendale Lakes and
grandchildren Brian and Darcy. He was
a member of the Shriners and past
president of the South Florida Auto-
motive Wholesale Association.
Riverside.
ACKERMAN. Dorothy S.. 70, of
Hallandale. Sept. 29. Riverside.
CHAIKIN, Paulln. 87, of Hallandale,
Sept. 30. Riverside.
GELLER, Abraham. 73, of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Lakeside.
ROTH. David, of Miami Beach, Sept. 29.
SCHERMER. Anna, of Miami Beach.
-.fEINBERG. Isls M.. 84, of Miami,
VIATRIck, Sidney, 77. of North Miami
Beach, Sept. 80.
GOFF. Albert A.. 69, of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
SHERMAN, Betty, originally from
Miami Lakeside Memorial Park.
MECHANIC. Dora, 86, of Deerfleld
Beach. Gordon Funeral Home.
ROTH, David, of Miami Beach.
SHAPIRO, Charles, 62, of Bay Harbor
Island, Sept. 29. Levltt-Weinsteln.
WAXMAN. Edward 71, of Delray
Beach. Riverside.
GOLOMB, Samuel, 82, of Miami.
Gordon Funeral Home.
GROSS. Eugene. 70, of Sunrise. Gordon
Funeral Home.
KOHN, Jenny, 64, of Miami Beach.
Rubin Chapel.
MARKS. Ida. 78, of Miami Beach.
Gordon Funeral Home.
MELTZER. Ell. 66. of Massachusetts.
Rubin Chapel. Mt Nebo Cemetery.
NUSSBAUM, Else. 93. of Miami Beach.
Rubin Chapel. Lakeside Memorial
Park
ROMM, Molly, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Chapel. Lakeside Memorial Park.
SCHWARTZ, Ell, 83, of Miami Beach.
Oct. 4. Riverside. Mt. Nebo Cemetery
SIRE. Sldell, 84, of Miami Beach. Oct. 4.
Riverside. Mt Nebo Cemetery.
GOLDMAN. Louis. 79, of Hollywood.
Oct. 1.
MARCUS. Bebe, 68, of Hallandale. Oct.
l. Riverside. __!__.
PLOTKIN, Betty, 88. of Miami Beach.
Oct. 1. Star of David Gardens.
FORSTATE. Sylvia, of North Miami
Beach. 8ept. 80. Riverside.
Morris Fenster, Temple Founder
Fenster was also a life member of
the Zionist Organization of
America and was one of the
founders of three temples. He
I Morris Henry Fenster of North
Miami Beach passed away Oct. 3.
Services were held at The
Riverside with interment at
Lakeside Memorial Park.
Mr. Fenster was a resident of
North Miami Beach for 39 years
after moving from Patterson,
N.J. He was a life member of
Patterson-Orange Masonic
Lodge, a 32nd Degree Mason of
the Valley of Patterson, N.J., a
Shriner of Salaam Temple of
Newark, N.J., one of the founders
of Temple Ner Tamid and a
member of the Men's Club. Mr.
devoted much of his life's work to
charities.
Mr. Fenster is survived by
wife, Rose of North Miami
Beach; son, Alexander of
Fairlawn, N.J.; daughter, Rita
Gomberg of North Miami Beach;
three grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren; brother,
Benny of Hollywood, George of
Tucson, Ariz, and Irving of
Elizabeth. N.J.
Lillian Goldblatt Services Held
Lillian Goldblatt, 81, of North
Miami Beach passed away Oct. 2.
Services were held Oct. 5 at
Lakeside Memorial Park, with
arrangements by Levitte-
Weinstein.
Mrs. Goldblatt is survived by
ROTHMEN
Dorothy D., 80, of North Miami Beach,
passed away Oct. 6. Formerly of
Atlantic City. N.J.. Mrs. Rothmen was
the beloved wife of the late Moses;
beloved mother of Katherlne R. Resnlck
of Miami and the grandmother of Susan
Judith Resnlck and Joyce Ellen Res-
nlck. She Is also survived by sister.
Sadie K. Doranz and brother Harold K.
Doranz, both of Trenton. N.J. Mrs.
Rothmen and her late husband owned
and operated the Davenport Hotel In
Atlantic City. N.J. She was the founder
of the Quota Club of Trenton, and was
one of the first women to be on the
Democratic Board of Electors. A
prominent attorney In New Jersey, she
was active In real estate on Miami
Beach. Funeral services were held at
The Riverside with interment following
at Mt. Nebo Cemetery. Contributions
may be made in her memory to Adaph
Israel.
WALSH. Samuel. 74. of North Miami.
Sept. SO. Riverside. Lakeside
Memorial Park.
WEINSTOCK. Sydney, of Miami Beach.
Oct. 2.
LEVY. Lawrence S.. 61. of Miami.
PROPPER. Dorothy M 88. Sept. 19.
Riverside. Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
YAGER. Eleanor. 73. Sept. 88. Mt Nebo
Cemetery.
SCHERMER. Anna. 74. Sept. 80. Mt.
Nebo Cemetery
VALHUERDI. Leigh Ann. of Miami.
Riverside. Lakeside Memorial Park.
CHAPIN. Samuel J.. 88. Oct. 4. River-
side. Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
COHEN. Fanny. 98. Oct. 4. Gordon
Funderal Home.
DELMAN. Sophie, of Miami Beach.
Rubin Chapel.
FINKELSTEIN. Simon. Oct. 3.
GOLDBERG. Aaron, 60, of Hollywood.
Oct. 3. Levltt-Weinstein. Sharon
Gardens Memorial Park.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open fiery Day Cosed Sobbotfi
140 SW 57th Avenue
son, Stanley of North Miami
Beach; daughter, Jacqueline
Wein stein of North Miami
Beach; brother, Abe Grainick of
St. Louis; sisters. Rose Paris and
Florence Yaffe, both of Illinois
and six grandchildren.
Howard Grove
Dies at 76
Graveside services were
scheduled Thursday at 2 p.m. at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery for Howard
Grove, 76, of Miami, who died
Oct. 8 at Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Survivors include his wife
Isabel, a columnist for The
Jewish Floridian.
GOLDSMITH
Jerome H 86. of Coral Gables. Oct. 6.
He Is survived by wife, Eileen; sons,
Richard of Portland, Ore.. Mark of
Atlanta, Ga.. and David of Washington,
D.C.; brother, Guy Goldsmith of Miami
and sister, Peggy Mai da ver of Sarasota.
He was the former owner of Jerry's
Plant Shop of the Seybold Arcade. The
Riverside.
GREENFIELD
Alex. 84. of North Miami Beach. Oct. 1.
A Miami resident for 40 years. Mr.
Greenfield was formerly of New York
City. He was the past commander of
Jewish War Veterans. He Is survived by
wife. Helen; son. Steven; daughter.
Renee and two grandchildren.
Phone 266-2888
An effective way to record
to the Jewish community
expressions of sympathies
and regrets is through the
obituary page of the
weekly Jewish Floridian.
W
EVITT-WW EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
HOLLYWOOD 1921 PsmbroHS Hold 921-7200
NORTH MIAMI 1338S W Oixis Hwy 949-6315
WEST PALM BEACH 5411 OKteclobe* BlvO 689-8700
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented, by S-ji^viU, fD. ',.
Broward County
925-3396
, 1921 Pembroke Rd.
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New Yorl: f212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.


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Prominent personalities from the fields of international politics, world history and economics
will be joining the 1981 Around The World Cruise of the s.s. Rotterdam as guest lecturers in
Holland America Cruises' cultural program. This group of speakers will include Moshe Dayan
and Muhammed Hassan El Zayyat (former foreign minister of Egypt). The s.s. Rotterdam will
"follow the sun westward" to 22 ports for 90 days through the Panama Canal via Mexico and
California to Hawaii, the Orient (the first worldcruise ship to call in Shanghai), India and select
ports in the Mediterreanean such as Haifa and Suez. A four-color cruise brochure is now
available from your travel agent.
Temple Sinai Lehrhaus to Open Oct. 14
The Temple Sinai Lehrhaus,
the North Dade Reform
congregation's Institute of
Jewish Learning, will begin
holding classes in its Rosenbloom
Synagogue School Building on
Oct. 14.
The proeram offers a wide
'ariety of courses in Jewish
listory. Among the courses to be
aught by a faculty which in-
cudes Rabbis Ralph Kingsley,
Julian Cook and David Salzman
and Cantor Irving Shulkes, are
Mitzvot for a Lifetime,
Responses to the Holocaust,
Modern Jewish Writers, Torah
Begin Admits Israel
Provided Arms to Kurds
JERUSALEM (JTA, -
Israel has admitted officially for
the first time that it provided
arms and military instructors to
the Kurds in their secessionist
fight against Iraq from 1965 to
1975. Foreign news media had
frequently reported that suc-
cessive Labor Party governments
were aiding the Kurds, but a
statement yesterday by Prime
Minister Menachem Begin was
the first official confirmation.
Talking to reporters at Givat
Olga, near Tel Aviv, Begin said,
"Israel actively supported the
Kurds in their struggle for in-
dependence for 10 years." He
said Israel "provided arms and
instructors to train the Kurdish
fighters, who performed
courageously despite the fact
that they were outnumbered and
outgunned by the Iraqis."
Begin said the late Shah of
Iran was the leading advocate or
aid for the Kurds and had
supplied them with some arms.
Trie program continued until Iran
and Iraq signed a treaty in 1975
settling their bilateral dispute.
Iraq denounced the treaty when
hostilities broke out with Iran
two weeks ago.
Aliyah Hadassah Wise A*c Grup
Aviva Chapter of Hadassah
announces that it will hold its
annual Member-Bring-A-Member
Luncheon on Monday, Oct. 13, at
9:45 a.m. at Temple Judea.
Reservations are necessary.
The feature of the event will be
apmusical comedy, written and
directed by Judie Berger and
starring the Aviva Players.
South Seas ORT
The South Seas Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
planning a guided bus trip to
Fan-child Gardens, followed by a
luncheon at the Ginger Man on
Oct. 21.
The Justine Louise Wise
Chapter of American Jewish
Congress was to meet Oct. 9 at
the American Saving Bank on
Lincoln and Alton Roads.
Refreshments were to be served
noon and a meeting at 1 p.m. A
representative of the League of
Women's Voters was to discuss
"Vital Issues Facing Voters in
1980."
Renanah Hadassah
Renanah Chapter of Hadassah
will have a paid-up membership
luncheon Oct. 13 at noon at Top
Draw Club. Speaker will be
Connie Morrow, sex therapist
and counselor. Her subject is
"Family Relations." Call Doris
Meland for details.
Lary Bloom, editor of the
Miami Herald's Tropic
Magazine, will be the guest
speaker on The Fine Arts of
Beth David series, "Creative
Communication," on Oct. 22,
7:45-9 p.m., at Beth David's
South Campus.
Trope. Rabinnic Wisdom and an
advanced seminar centering on
the philosophy of Moses Men-
delsohn.
In addition to the Tuesday
night courses which run from
7:45 to 10 p.m., there will be
several special events including a
weekend Scholar-in- Residence
program in November featuring
Dr. Michael J. Cook, professor at
the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion in
Cincinnati.
'Heart to Heart
Happening9 Set
A "Heart to Heart Hap-
pening" will be held at the next
regular meeting of the Naomi
Chapter of Hadassah on Oct. 13
at 8 p.m. at the Tamarind
Apartments Complex Clubhouse.
Participants include vice
presidents Pearl Noble, Tina
Rothstein, Bobbye Arman,
Rhoda Haber, Marlene Magness
and Eileen Seitlin. Also involved
are Shirley Grossman, Mimi
Becker, Barbara Bulbin and
Cheryl Artman.
Bay Harbor Hadassah
Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
monthly meeting on Oct. 13, at
12:30 p.m. at the Washington
Savings and Loan auditorium,
1132 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands. Reports on the
national convention and on Camp
Hashachar will be given.
Fromberg Elected to
B'nai B'rith Post
Malcolm H. Fromberg, a local
attorney and a senior partner
with his twin brother, Lynn, in
the law firm of Fromberg, From-
berg & Roth, P.A., was elected a
B'nai B'rith International vice-
president at the recently-held
International Bi-annual Con-
vention in Washington, D.C.
Prior International vice
presidents from the south are E.
Albert Palk>t, president and
chairman of the board of
directors of Biscayne Federal
Savings and Loan Association
and Dade County Circuit Court
Judge Milton A. Friedman.
Delegates from 42 countries
were addressed by the three can-
didates for President of the
United States, as well as
Malcolm Fraser, prime minister
of Australia, Ephraim Evron,
Israel's ambassador to the
United States, Sen. Henry
Jackson and many other national
and international personalities.
FROMBERG is one of the
youngest men in the history of
B'nai B'rith to become an Inter-
national vice president. Prior to
his election to this position,
Fromberg served as a member of
the B'nai B'rith International
board of governors, president of
District 5 B'nai B'rith (the
southeastern United States),
president-elect of the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges and president of the
South Florida Council of B'nai
B'rith Lodges.
Along with his new duties as a
B'nai B'rith International vice
president, Fromberg is also
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
International Legacy Develop-
ment and Deferred Giving Pro-
gram a member of the .
B'nth International .J^l
tranvecorrrniitteeandaZS!
of the executive commi
Bnai B'rith National fi
Raising Cabinet. """I
Having at one time served-r
International chairman f ,ul
B'nai B'rith Fund n H
Cabinet and a member^
financial management cornmu,*'
of Bnai Bnth. Fromberg^
called upon to serve on m* 7
national committees involvril
B nth Youth Services programT
HE IS presently serving on.
special national committee con>
posed of six representatives ol
B nai B nth and six rwLT
tatives of the Council of Jewish
Federations, which is under
taking a study of the B'nai Bra.
Hillel program with a vin
toward mutual cooperation am
participation between B u
B'rith and local Federations d
Welfare Funds in the funding2
enhancement of the HIM
program throughout thecountn.
This committee meets regular^
and its conclusions could wti
determine the future direction d
the B'nai B'p*'.. .iillel programs.
Fromberg is a member of:
executive committee of the Ami.
Defamation League of B'nii
B'rith and will be honored on
Dec. 2 by the AUL for his J
standing efforts in support of
their causes.
In addition to his B'nai Brital
activities, Fromberg is serving|
secretary of Temple Emanu-Elofl
Miami Beach and is a memberofl
Who's Who in World Jewry. A
biographical dictionary of ttl
world's outstanding Jewiskl
leaders.
Beth Am Brotherhood Breakfast
Oct. 19 at 9:30 a.m. is the time
of Temple Beth Am
Brotherhood's Congregational
Breakfast Program. The topic for
discussion will be "The Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and its
Activities."
The featured speakers will be
Morton Silberman, a past
president of the Greater Mianil
Jewish Federation; Gwnl
Weinberger, president of Centnll
Agency for Jewish EducaUwl
and Irene Baros. member d\
Federation's planning juj
formulating concepts for Sodj
Dade. This event is open to tk|
community.
Philharmonic Opens Season Oct. 21
The Florida Philharmonic,
conducted by music director
Rainer Miedel. opens its 1980-81
season Oct. 21 at 8:30 p.m. in a
presentation at Miami's Dade
County Auditorium.
The program, which featinl
soprano Victoria de Los Angaal
and the music of Ravd.1
Messiaen. Franck and De Falkl
will be repeated Oct. 25 at 3 pa I
in the downtown Miami Gusw|
Cultural Center.
Money Back
Guarantee Offered
The Florida Philharmonic, in
order to re-establish its ties with
lovers of classical music in
Greater Miami, is offering a
radical departure in concert
salesmanship a money back
guarantee.
A number of orchestra seats
have been set aside for the
opening concert, Oct. 21 at
Miami's Dade County
Auditorium, featuring soprano
soloist Victoria de Los Angles
and music director Rainer
Miedel.
Patrons who don't find the
concert satisfying and up to the
standards of a professional or-
chestra will be able to retrieve
their admission free.
JUMBO RATES
for Jumbo Certificates
Minimum Investment $100,000
For current rate and term information call:
Mr. Bernstein at 674-6651 or 674-6652
WASHINGTON
SAVINGS
ANO IOAN ASSOCIATION Of FICWO*
ASSFTS EXCHD ONE BILLION DOUAW
^^w MAIN OFFICE: 1701 Meridian Avenue. Miami Beach
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5-| NORTH MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD DAVIE PLANTATION BOCA RATON WEST PAlM BEAW
*wmwTT -four savings insured up to $100 000 by an agency or the Federal Government
Federal regulations require a substantial
interest penalty for early withdrawal
All rates are simple interest.
Rates subject to change without notice.
ESLE


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