The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02694

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dTewislb FloridiamL
Volume 53 Number 38 TWO SECTIONS
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Miami, Florida Friday, September 19, 1980
FfdShochit By Mail m> Cents Price 35 Cents
.;:::*:*:*^^
Arabs Press
To Unseat
Israel at UN
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir of Israel arrived in New York Monday to
represent Israel at the 35th session of the General
assembly which opened Tuesday. Before leaving Israel, he
said he would be surprised if the Arab states did not try to
expel Israel from the UN during this session.
"But we hope that such an initiative will be defeated,
even with the present structure of the UN." This was a
reference to I he automatic majority of Arab, Third World
and Commi"'ht, bloc states which support anti-Israeli
resolutions.
Kol IMidre Friday Eve
Tom Kippur Historically
s
By DR. SIDNEY GREENBERG
Yom HaKippurim is liberation day. In
the jubilee year, the sounding of the
shofar at day's end "proclaimed liberty
throughout the land for all its inhabi-
tants" {Lev: 25:10). Slaves went free,
and land was restored to its original
owners, the families of Israel. Similarly,
every year the Day of Atonement brings
freedom from the crushing isolation of
guilt. "For on this day, He atones for
you, to purify you; you will be purified
from all your sins, before God" {Lev.
16:30).
Yom Kippur does more than lift the
burden of evil. Forgiveness alone would
leave the individual still alienated. This
is a day of atonement. Atonement means
restoration to the wholeness of com-
munity and roots. It means a new recon-
ciliation and a new unification of
impulse and values, of individual and
community, of the human and God.
Yom Kippur is a day of dazzling
paradoxes. Israel stands before God,
united as a community of sinners
publicly admitting the universal evil in
all yet expecting and experiencing
forgiveness and the purging of guilt
through confession and mutual ac-
ceptance. Giving themselves over to the
Continued on Page 12-A
8
8

:.:*:;:;:;:::.3::;:^^
ow Lome.-
400,000 Israelis Sow in U.S.
By BORIS SMOLAR
About 400,000 Israelis
are presently residing in the
United States. Most of
them are lured to this
country by the American
dollar, eager to become
rich Americans" like the
American tourists they see
in Israel in the best hotels
who spend money freely.
There are other motives as
well.
At least two studies are
now being conducted in the
U.S. to determine what has
prompted Israelis to move
to this country. Their
number has increased
particularly since 1973. The
Israelis living in the U.S.
comprise people in all walks
of life from European to
North African immigrants
who could not adjust to
conditions in Israel as well
as "sabras," native-born
Israelis.
AMONG THEM are alao some
who were economically well off in
Israel. The studies attempt not
only to establish the reasons for
them leaving Israel but also to
analyze how they have adjusted
to life in America, the op-
portunities they have found here,
their reactions to the American
Jewish community and the gap
existing between them and the
American Jewish community.
They know that they are not
popular with Jews in this
country, and they keep aloof from
Jewish communal life.
Their growing number in New
York, Los Angeles and other
cities is developing into a major
issue. Many American Jews ask
how it is that the Israeli
government permits them to
emigrate at a time when the
Jewish State needs all the
manpower it can muster for its
security and economic
development.
Israeli diplomats explain that
Israel is not a Communist
country from where citizens are
not permitted to emigrate. Free
Continued on Page 5-A
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
UN, Yehuda Blum, underlined
this concern al a press conference
here. He said lliis year's General
Assembly is likely to be "one of
the most unpleasant" General
Assemblys as far as Israel is
concerned. He warned of the
likelihood of a move by the Arabs
and their supporters to suspend
Israel from the General
Assembly by revoking its
credentials to participate in the
session.
Shamir, who will address the
Assembly Sept. 29, devoted the
major part of this week to
meetings with Administration
officials in Washington and was
scheduled to meet with UN
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim later this week at UN
headquarters.
Next week, Shamir is
scheduled to meet with at least 20
other foreign ministers attending
the General Assembly, including
representatives of European,
Asian and Latin American
countries which have diplomatic
relations with Israel.
AT HIS press conference here,
Blum said that Israel will come
under fire not only in the general
debate but in the seven com-
mittees of the General Assembly.
He recalled that since the
beginning of this year, nine
meetings of the Security Council
were devoted to Israel and said
that this year would be a year "of
concentrated offensive against
Israel orchestrated by the
Palestine Liberation
Organization."
Blum said the purpose of the
PLO and its supporters is to
gradually "delegitimize" Israel in
the international community.
The Israeli envoy also warned of
the likelihood of a move by the
Arabs and their supporters to
suspend Israel from the General
Assembly by revoking its
credentials to participate in this
year's session.
Blum said the climax of the
Arab offensive against Israel is
targeted for Nov. 15 and
thereafter. Many of the anti-
Israel resolutions adopted
against Israel since the beginning
Continued on Page 14-A
Ambassador Blum
Due Process
Demand
Boot In
Trifa Case
DETROIT (JTA) -
Federal District Judge
Horace Gilmore has of-
ficially revoked the U.S.
citizenship of Rumanian
Orthodox Archbishop
Valerian Trifa of Grass
Lake, Mich. The action
followed Trifa's voluntary
surrender of his citizenship
papers two weeks ago and
ends the denaturalization
phase of the U.S. gover-
nment's five-year-old case
against Trifa.
Trifa is accused of concealing
his ties to the Fascist Rumanian
Iron Guard when he entered the
U.S. in 1950 and when he was
granted U.S. citizenship in 1957.
He is accused of inciting a
Continued on Page 14-A


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Headlines
Suppressing Motherhood 'Unnatural'
Dttarj^ f.".a; :.aere ts sooeth^sf --.--
zz aoc sive| a= ~pf- -;;~.'gr ::' T-.'r-eg: ft.'.
xs r-^ppress'iag the aar^ra^ ^yr.Tiru of
zaxherxoc lie Rabdr^ra A".ar- of Anrrxa
:.*-:' week iauaeiiee a rar-.pt:?-: thrx^kcm uie
cwu.. sc-nx-v :^oo^Bf JcaM par:Kips:jos
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Rabbinic group, sue :ha: _-.; :':r=.
Jewisb people
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ne idia and tetev ision are coooentec
The offtcal Iraniar. news agesr> Pa.-- _-
report motutorec in Kuwait, sate hence::.-..-
Jewish state wiii be caiiec occupied Paiest^e
The ruling was contained m a directive issued
on the heeis of tee A.vatoLah RuhoCah
Khomeini's recent crsmsn: of the Iranian news
media.
Rabbi Joseph B. Messing, first U.S. Army
Jewish chaplain to be on active duty for 30 years.
has been named to the dual position of director of
JWB Armed Forces and Veterans Services
Committee, and director of JWB s Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy.
Prior to his new appointment. Rabbi Messing
served as the Western Area field director of
JWB s Commission on Jewish Chaplaincy. He
retired from the military chaplaincy as Regular
Army Colonel
Rabbi Missing also has the distinction of
been Deputy Staff Chaplain of
U.S. Army is Europe, and
Seventh US. Army, the
A re*: L--ec..r.g :zx L'n-tec r~:-:^ :-
Sec---:-.;. 7:_-:_ ?j& 4"- hz^z reaff-tt.--.g Isr
right :- ehnai .: -wz. a::L beta
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For the put I tias r>eer
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*':r =--;> --.-: World oatwns with
fe*.. r: r. me r.: prograrr. ?
. ktf American Jewisn Congress ha amslad ar.
a--r^r.a.~r.--. -... the 1981 I>epar.mentor Education
-zz'Z'.ir.. -. InL -..- passec the rlouse o:
Representatives ^s: wMk oamng the Depar-
tment of Education from spending any funds for
tee purpose of preventing tne implementatjon of
programs of voluntary prayer or meditation m
the public schools
Abraham S Goldstein, chairman of the
American Jewish Congress Commission on Law
and Social Action called the bill the latest in a
series of unsuccessful Congressional attempts to
overturn the decisions of the Supreme Court
prohibiting religious exercises in the public
schools."
He added. Although we know of no program
of the Department of Education which would be
sub)ect to the language of this amendment it is
cumbeartening that Members of Congress, who
have taken oaths to support the Constitution
have voted to subvert that very Constitution."
-
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One reason why
Jewish families
select Riverside.
More Jewish personnel.
At Pwersiete. we have the .arger ttafl ;'
.ev. sK panowntl In Fkx-da. If s been mat *a, s -:e 1935
and :'s one of tne t^^ reasons why more Jew s- famiiiei
>e ad R .e'S oetnan a^y other funeral director.
At R .re-s-de. families find tota; dec oa-:- -.
.e* 1- -iZ ''.'.- :-' j 'ee rg cf -'oe'sta-r -g
Economical assistance in aTangingfunera! aarvices
between Fiorioa and New York or anywhere e'se --
work) -'rrea ooncem for each famir/s neeos a-:
a ines, 'egaro ess o'fi-aoc.a' circumstance.
Today, if Riverside service is becor- ngtne
i'zz-z\:. a" ch c-eco.e are comparing an lhaothers.
there sa-eas-;- =iversiOe peocwe. They know Je^. s-
fa: : :- f-'z i-.e, 'i~z-
ro.' >i3t c**s se-^ing Daoe ">-nty
v -M = -li: : 92C i :- = i*: M : ^~ Street
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RIVERSIDE
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KannetnM -=. 1 :e-es oe-: Car 3:ss:r';
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOI I
Invest in
Israel Securities
AI Rl SPE( MISTS IN
SRM SECURITIES

INS DAILY VIA TELE>
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OFFICE SUPPUES & EQUIPMENT
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463-9680 757-8513
CORAL CAfJI*
PU. coral<***
DOWNTOWN UPTOWN
1**W- 2MMiS9th$t 1


ttfav. September19.1980
+Jewisti fhrHi^r
Page 3-A
News in Brief
Peres Hospitalized for Chest Pains
TEL AVIV Shimon Peres,
Lader of the opposition Labor
bgrtv was admitted to Tel
iashomer Hospital early
Monday after complaining of
Ihest and abdominal pains, but
bctors found no evidence of a
tart attack and suggested that
might be suffering from in-
digestion.
] Peres was reported relaxing. A
Ledical bulletin announced that
U would remain in the hospital
tr a few days to rest and be
nder medical supervision.
PARIS Communist security
kiards this week forcibly "con-
,.ated" leaflets on Soviet Jewry
hich Jewish activists tried to
and out at the French Com-
unist daily, Humanite, annual
cnic.
[The Jewish activists were ex-
iled from the fair by the party's
curity guards. Some of the
tivists later said that the leaf-
i were taken out of their hand-
gs and even out of their
ckets.
|The picnic s a yearly fair or-
nized by the Communist daily
attended by over a million
Ipporters.
Il'NITED NATIONS Vice
esident Walter Mondale Mon-
called on the United Nations
reject any calls that would
dermine the progress made by
i Egyptian-Israeli peace agree-
knt and said the UN should
Ip build peace in the Mideast
the foundation of that
ement.
\ddressing a meeting at the
neral Assembly Hall to
picate a monument in memory
[UN Undersecretary General
Iph Runche, who won the 1950
Ibel Peace Prize for helping
Bel and its Arab neighbors in
thing an armistice agreement,
kndale declared:
['Today. Israel and Egypt live
at truce but at peace. They
[ exchanging not ammunition,
ambassadors. A process for
Hding a just and lasting peace
Jthe Mideast has been created.
[must not be jeopardized. It
st not be compromised. It
erves to be supported."
fEL AVIV Some 10,000 of-
rs and men of the U.S. Sixth
fet will spend a week to ten
N in Israel next month when
1 giant aircraft carrier John F.
nnedy and a flotilla of escorts
p at Haifa on a good will visit.
e visit is being described as the
gest to date by the U.S. Navy
[Israel and is seen here as
Wng political and military
plications.
While the American Embassy
lined to comment, it was
Shimon Peres
learned that the visit may be con-
nected with Carter adminis-
tration plans to bring Israel more
closely into the strategic picture
in the Eastern Mediterranean.
Critics of Carter have suggested
that the U.S. was putting too
much stress on its new military
relations with Egypt and leaving
Israel on the sidelines.
The 80,000-ton JFK will be
accompanied by three other
combat vessels and a Navy
supply ship.
RIO DE JANEIRO Energy
Minister Cesar Cals has strongly
repudiated allegations by mem-
bers of his ministry's Internal
Security Department that
Brazil's Jewish community
opposed the nuclear agreement
signed between Brazil and West
Germany.
Cals revealed that he has fired
the four officials responsible for a
secret report to that effect which
became public.
The report accused the CIA,
the KGB and the Jewish com-
munity of creating obstacles to
the implementation of the nuclear
pact. In an interview on Voz
Israelita radio program, Cals said
the government totally rejected
the report and that it is un-
equivocally opposed to anti-
Jewish manifestations in any
form.
JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir left for
the U.S. Monday apparently
satisfied with the state of
Seek Love, Not War
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A suspicious looking small
t making its way to Israeli waters from the direction of
banon was found by the Israeli navy patrol boat that
accepted it to be carrying not terrorists but a young
banese couple seeking sanctuary in Israel in order to
n-y. The eloping couple was taken to Haifa port where
y told their story to reporters.
THE YOUNG man and woman said they met a year
P and fell in love. But her father, a fisherman, refused to
iction their marriage after months of pleading, nor
"Id her stepmother relent. The man, who worked as a
""'st guide in Beirut, decided that flight was the only
^ution. On Sunday morning, he and his fiancee put to
in his boat and were picked up 10 hours later by the
aeli sailors.
Their names were not published. They told reporters
y decided to flee* LeUftrieri because* "it is not quiet
' We seek love, not war," they said.
rai
American-Israeli relations.
"There always are ups and downs
in the relations between the U.S.
and Israel," he told reporters at
Ben Gurion Airport. "I don't
think we are now at a period of
crisis."
Shamir offered his comments
when reporters noted that his
predecessor, former Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan, observed
recently that relations with the
U.S. are "at a very low ebb."
Shamir said that recent ex-
pressions by President Carter
indicated otherwise. He said he
did not expect the U.S. to
support Israel's position on
Jerusalem but he hoped the
Americans at least would under-
stand it.
PARIS A seminar devoted
to Jewish Mediterranean and
Oriental culture organized by the
Pompidou Center examined for
four days the roots and links be-
tween Jewish and Arab culture
and their mutual influence.
The seminar, which concluded
here Sunday night, was attended
by French-speaking writers and
scholars mainly from Algeria,
Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia and
Turkey.
Pope Paul Opposed To
'Unilateral Measures'
For Jerusalem Changes
^ ROME (JTA) An
Egyptian official said here
that Pope John Paul II is
seriously concerned over
the issue of Jerusalem and
has affirmed the Vatican's
opposition to any unilateral
measures in that city.
According to Osama Al
Baz, Egypt's Under-
secretary for Foreign
Affairs, the Pope expressed
his views to Vice President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
during a private meeting at
Castel Gondolfo, the Papal
summer residence.
AL BAZ said Mubarak con-
veyed a message to the Pope
from President Anwar Sadat on
the subject of Jerusalem.
Mubarak, who is on a six-nation
tour of Europe, apparently to
mount diplomatic pressure on
Israel, left for Paris after meeting
with the Pope.
Al Baz told a press conference
here that the Middle East peace
process was threatened by Israeli
actions such as the adoption of a
law declaring Jerusalem its
capital, settlements on the West
Bank and pre-emptive attacks on
south Lebanon.
He said Egypt would welcome
European participation in the
Middle East peace process and
favored an international con-
ference aimed at solving the
Palestinian question but only if
the Palestinians themselves
attended. Al Baz said an identity
of views between Egypt and Italy
on the Middle East was
demonstrated during Mubarak's
talks here with Prime Minister
Francesco Cossiga and Foreign
Minister Emilio Colombo.
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Pag-4-A
rJenist fkrkJk*r)
Fnda
y- September 19
'980
A Vote for Sen. Stone
What with his record during his first six years in
that high office, one would have thought that U.S.
Sen. Richard Stone hardly needed a boost up via our
editorial support in the primaries last week despite a
field of 11 candidates who sought to unseat him.
It seemed to us that both our readers and the
State of Florida in general would recognize the extent
of his legislative accomplishments despite the dif-
ficulties of a first term that a freshman Senator must
endure. In short order. Sen. Stone rose to the
chairmanship 0: the Senate F:re:gn Relations Com-
mit:^ s .Subcommittee on Mid die Eastern Affairs.
Whether ar not they did 15 a matter of pure
.-. r/.a that *e must rare the Eacl that, in
. ;-.- .:' :'r.~ ?tr:r.ge5t >:urcB of his
..-al -z~ ; '.' perceat ::' the county's
-_---: :: z\ :: the pc
- -:---mc-re Se~ Stone edgec out his nearest
::-;--. r~.tr.ia Inrurance C: im:;;:oner Bill
Gunter -.; a nere 12 XX :: . statewide among six Democrats.
It ia these gnm statistics that now urge us to
endorse the candidacy of Sen StOM and to recom-
mend him to our readers, as well as to voters
throughout the State of Florida.
We can no longer afford to take for granted what
seemed to us at the outset the obvious. The Senator's
voting record is not only satisfactory but laudable.
We urge Floridians to go to the polls and
support Sen. Stone in the Oct. 7 runoff.
Honors to Sen. Myers
Retired Sen. Kenneth Myers will be honored for
his 16 years as a member of the Dade delegation in
Tallahassee, along with four other members who
retired voluntarily, at an Oct. 3 testimonial party in
Miami.
It is a mark of the special esteem in which the
Senator is held that yet a second testimonial will
honor him exclusively later in the fall. A special com-
mittee representing distinguished members of our
community is now in the process of finalizing plans
for this latter event.
At a time when politics and public service, the
most noble of commitments a person can make to the
workings of a free society, are battered by the less
enviable activities of some politicians, it is a mark of
his special distinction that we should gather together
on these occasions to honor Sen. Myers in recog-
nition of his service to the people of Florida.
The many innovative positions that Sen. Myers
has taken during his 16-year tenure in Tallahassee,
innovations that led to unique and distinguished
legislation in the cause of our community and the
entire state, are the hallmark of his intellectual
breadth and legal acumen brought to the service of
the people he has represented so ably.
His insight into the legislative processes, his
understanding of what Florida needs if it is to move
forward as a progressive state, his patient resolve to
achieve these things all marked his stay in the
State Legislature and the unselfish dedication to
public service Sen. Myers has demonstrated.
The Kol Nidre Prayer
i over
thou
I ofls
We are reminded, this Yom Kippur eve that,
almost as familiar as the Shema. the Kol Nidre
prayer is the most serious in the entire Machzor. In
it, we prepare ourselves for the most challenging of
the Days of Awe, Yom Kippur, the hour when the
High Priest entered the Holy of Holies and there
revealed the Divine Name.
It is in Leviticus, chapter 16, from which we read
in the Torah on Yom Kippur morning, that we are
told of the role of the High Priest: to atone for him-
self, for his household and for the whole Assembly of
Israel.
But each individual Jew meets his Maker on his
own terms, as well, and entreats Him to be written
into the Book of Life before judgments are made and
its pages sealed for the year ahead.
If this is the most profound moment of all the
moments of Awe, its tension is lessened by the belief
that we imagine on Yom Kippur that the scales of
justice are exactly in balance, and that the world is
judged according to its majority.
It is the goodness of mankind that can help us
overcome our individual weaker natures. Atonement
though we must make on our own, it is the Assembly
' Israel that is paved to bring us a Happy New Year.
Special-Interest: Fact of Life
REMEMBER way back0 Re-
member when the scandalous rise
m automobile insurance rates
was making front page news
practically every day0 Remember
when we talked about this npoff
m much the same way that we
talk about oil industry profits
today1
Insurance has since taken a
back seat to oil. The reason is
dear oil goes beyond the crank-
rase As energy, oil and the oil
: affect our lives, our fortune
UMJ politically, even our sacred
- .'-surance does not
Still insurance r.as been back
..-. the news of iate at least in an
lar) a> *r.at with the run-
off between Sen Richard Stone
Fkinda State Insurance
Commissioner Bill Gunter
JUST BEFORE Rosh Hasha-
r.ar. *::.-. '.he primaries still
before us. I wrote in this column
that the American Jewish com-
munity has been, for generations,
going contrary to a growing
American tide
I said that we were so fixed on
the melting pot. that we regarded
as dangerous any reference to a
Jewish vote or a Jewish
bloc. Those who used such
terms, we attacked as bigots
I
Leo
Miiiaiiii
I
8
as persons who refuse to come to
terms with Jewish integration
into the American mainstream.
Indeed, we saw such persons as
purveyors of the poisonous
political principle that Jews have
a double loyalty, a dual allegiance
which gives priority to their
Judaism first and their Amer-
icanism second
NOW COMES a time in the
affairs of the nation when multi-
ethnic and bilingual sociology
pervades the brew in the Amer-
ican melting pot. when it is
fashionable to divide out the
elements of the brew to cater
to them, to offer hosannas to
their special interests.
Note the manner in which
Miami is being sliced asunder on
the butcher block of this new-
sociology a community
otoVErWMEr^
=jf ^a
JIIH HOHIDIA-.
divided among black u.
and Cuban gimea^H^
Anglos, that rtvoltm. J?
reserved for ,a: JJF*\
would under different^!0
stances call -others rJT I
standing aghast a: the cirnim
ferenceofthesl,e;r., dazeTg,
attempting to discover and -h,
digest what is happenmg to the!
and to their future
What I said :r -.. ;
few weeks ago was that Jew, *
"Anglos" loh. what a-nort^;
history. 1. must forget thai
melung pot pas: and adaa
themselves to frank rjolitiej
special-interest p- litics. Thev
must come to Me their Judaism
in the same way that the o
industry sees its petr.-cashflow
Or that Little Havar.a raw the so-
called freedom flotilla when fa
residents harassed the con-
munity night after night intoth]
wee hours with their gUnv
headlights and blaring horns. th>
annunciation of their net
national immigration policy
AND IF the object of someh
the runoff will be to vote againi
Bill Gunter because Gunter ha
done nothing for the auiomobik
owner to temper the greed of the
insurance compare I adv
that the object of others mustbt
to vote for Sen Stone precisely
because he is Jewish and
precisely becaus* he is chairman
of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee's Subcommittee on
Middle Eastern Affairs
Is this parochialism hard tl
swallow? Perhap- it is. for
special-interest groups and
-pt-cial-interest voting are in their
way as narrow-minded and
greedy as the oil and insurance
moguls and the intematioaj
financiers who havt- had a hand.
together with the igg< si >petal
interest group ol ill. the
United State- C ngress g
making usun
me new AmertV
Hut only hypocrisv would
Continued on Pane- 13-A
I
/
r
(
P
e
I
t
J
t
e
c
t
/
I
i
r
"t
Can We Believe Political Platforms?
In these torri I
paigning for the presidency the
blacks of America are one up on
the Jewish community in that
Benjamin L. Hook*, executive
director of the NAACP, has been
privileged to address both the
Republican and Democratic
National Conventions.
But representatives of J-
_-anizations have had abundant
opportunity to make known their
consensus on Middle East issues.
Neither President Jimmy Carter
nor Gov. Ronald Reagan has
spoken in a vacuum in their
references to the unending
conflict between Israel and the
Arab states And the prominence
given to proposals for solving the
Middle East conflict, especially
in the platforms of both parties,
reflect rather wholesome
digestion of the Jewish input.
OBVIOUSLY, what matters
most in the end is how much of
the platform promise is carried
into action, once the last hurrah
has been heard and the electoral
votes counted. Thus, had Mr.
Carter adhered completely to the
Democratic promises of 1976,
Israel today would be less
pestered by its Arab assailants,
and the Palestine Liberation
Organization would probably not
be so near the center of the
burning issues.
Holding the two platform
documents up to the light and
reading between the lines, one
finds this profile:
The Democrats now continued
support for Israel along with a
pledge not to help arm Israels
potential enemies. The
Republicans pledge full support
also and. while making a bow to
Robert
and the deterrant role of its
armed forces, go on to say the
GOP will seek to pursue ties
with moderate Arab states."
THE DEMOCRATS boast of
Camp David gains, project hopes
for full autonomy for inhabitants
of the West Bank and Gaza, then
tie to this a promise to help
preserve Israel's security while
permitting the Palestinians
living on the West Bank and in
Gaza "to participate in deter-
mining their future."
Along the way. the
Republicans warn of radical
Palestinian goals and their
relationship to Soviet ambitions.
The Ht-pul dirwi
ptiations
involved by waj ol I
md the Israi
negi \-
gains, the K pu
the Carter Xdn
involvement with th<- PL"
pledging to reject any call for
involvement ol that circle ol
troublemakers.
On Jerusalem. th
declare the L'.S. Embassv should
be moved from Tel \viv to
Jerusalem lone wonders when.i
and supports the established
status of the ancient Jewish city
as the capital of Israel with free
access to all its holy places
provided to all faiths. The
Republican platform is not
committed to a view of Jerusalem
as Israel's capital but does ap-
prove of the understanding that
Jerusalem is to remain an un-
divided city with free an"
unimpeded access to all hoi)
places by people of all faiths.
THE DEMOCRATIC plat-
form states flatly. "We oppo*
Continued on Page 11-A
JTewislh Floridiain
oFk'lCE and
Phone
373-4**
PLANT 120 N E 6th St.. Miami. Fla 33132
P O Box 012973. Miami. Florida 33101
KUEI K SHOCHET LEO MINDUN SUZANNE SHOCHET
Kiliiui and Publisher Associate Editor Executive taiw
The Jewish Flondian Does Net Guarantee The Kashruth
i. ki ? JIl' M*"h*nd'S Advertised In Its Columns
i ubiished Every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Florldlan
second-Class Postage Paid at Miami, Fla USPS 275320
MtftMOOM
Member*'n^ SlTlS PlS*"** ** """* *"* ,he Jew,i.h 2SoS
WorV^-M cJ EMuXSliuTLiSS: Na,,onal Ei'"al Association. Amtncm Asioe""*"
fuieVL Ne"*PPrs. nd the Flohda Press Assoc.at.on
Three Ye,frVON1AJES*,Loc" ArM' Y"r *"< Tw0 v#*r* .""-f'Ja^.
coh;nerrvVeo*p^7e,u5es0, ""* *" MCh m0n,h M iMUM' ~
Friday. September 19. 1980 9 TISHBJ 5^


triday. September 19,1980
+ teistfhridkr
Page 5-A
400,000 Israelis
Living, Working
In U.S. Today
King Wanted In
Sadat Opposed Hussein Role in Talks
Continued from Page 1-A
emigration, they say, is a major
principle in democratic countries,
Ld Israel is a democratic
tountrv. This explanation,
owever. is hardly convincing
speciallv since almost all of the
Israeli emigrants yordim -
of military age or in the
eserves that can be called to the
front in any emergency. No
emocratic country permits the
Emigration of citizens in these
ategories when war is involved.
ANOTHER reason why the
kxplanation is not accepted by
nany Jews in this country is the
act that even without increased
Emigration Israel's Jewish
opulation is diminishing in
oportion because of a low
kirthrate as compared with the
ligh birthrate among Israeli
\rabs. Already there are Jewish
jions in Israel like the
Salilee where the Arab
opulation is on the verge of
iitnumbering the Jews, and
Braeli statisticians predict that
his trend of low birthrate among
ews, high birthrate among
rabs, increased Jewish
nigration from the country and
lecreased immigration from the
oviet Union continues, the
krabs will within 20 years
ecome a majority in Israel
stead of a minority. Keeping
lewish emigration restricted
iould under such cir-
jmstances seem more logical
han permitting free emigration.
Unlike the Jewish immigrants
om the Soviet Union, the
ordim from Israel are not
ssisted by the American Jewish
immunity. They are not
efugees. They come as in-
ependent people seeking to
Btablish themselves on their own
Deans.
One can find among them taxi
rivers who start by working for
xi companies and eventually
cquire their own taxis. There are
nong them also mechanics
ngaged mostly in maintaining
tpair shops for radio and
fclevision with the hope of
Kentually opening radio and
Revision stores. Some maintain
lit-rate drug stores combined
[ith selling cigarettes at cut-rate
Vices.
RELGO.INC.-----
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Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes <
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.American
M Israeli
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SOME OPEN small
restaurants. Many are teachers of
Hebrew in Jewish schools and
children's camps. There are also
some with capital who go into big
business. And then there are
diamond dealers who were in the
diamond cutting industry
Israel.
in
Among themselves they still
speak Hebrew. They also buy the
Hebrew daily newspapers that
reach New York by plane within
24 hours after their appearance in
Israel and are sold on newstands
in sections of New York
populated by immigrants from
Israel. Their hearts are still in
Israel, but they concentrate on
becoming American citizens.
They don't give up their Israeli
passports which are renewed by
the Israeli consulates in the U.S.
during the five years which an
immigrant has to wait before
becoming a naturalized American
citizen.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Anwar Sadat
is firmly opposed to Jor-
danian participation in the
autonomy talks "at this
stage" because it might
jeopardize the entire peace
process. He said that King
Hussein had offered to join
the Camp David meetings
in September, 1978 but that
he, Sadat, had discouraged
him becuase of the Jor-
danian ruler*s low esteem in
the Arab world.
Sadat expressed his views in
the course of a two-hour con-
versation with former Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, a leader
of the opposition Labor Party,
who visited Cairo. An account of
their meeting was published in
Yediot Achronot.
SADAT SAID he objected to a
Jordanian role because Hussein
would try to prove that he is a
greater Arab patriot than the
Egyptian leader in order to
receive an additional $200-$300
million subsidy
producing states.
from the oil
Rabin reportedly was surprised
by Sadat's attitude, since he and
the Labor Party in general
believe that Israel eventually
must negotiate with Jordan on
the Palestinian issue.
Sadat described the last ten
years as "years of success" and
repeated his conviction that
despite difficulties, the peace
process with Israel has reached
the point of no return.
HE RECALLED that during
the Camp David talks with
President Carter and Prime
Minister Menachem Begin, he
received a telephone call from
Hussein who was in London
saying he was ready to join the
talks. "It did not take me much
time to realize that I should not
let Hussein join the talks," Sadat
told Rabin, according to Yediot
Achronot.
"If I had consented, we never
would have reached the Camp
David accords. The Man
(Hussein) is known throughout
the Arab world as a black sheep.
The man in the street does not
respect him," Sadat said.
Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, Exec. V.P.
Leo Hack, v.p.
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Arthur crossberg, v.P.
Carl crossberg, v.P.
Riverside Memorial Chapels
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PimS-A
+Jeitffkrid&r
Frid>y-Septnbtrlo
Major Stories Of
Outgoing Year 5740
B% > HA RYN PE RLMA.N
Aad ROBERT POL.VER
SEW YORK JTA -
g the year 574(
!-rir. : _.-.i iraeJI more
MJ ifl the international
eon. .-.:> than ever be-
I lejertec :; ;. --:=..
.-. allies ~xcep: the United
S tatea I srael eras under
>e-. : --re;::-.* Sit
in the : Nations by
the Arab- Third World-
mtnnnwt bloc for :".-
West B -.-.lement
"r-.salem law.
and thr Palestinian ques-
tioo Even the US ab-
Baadizg car-ica;*D3s frotn
Israei MgatdiBg Jerusalem and
:ae settlements.
;.- tad the autonomy
-1 ta* t ergs of re-
; i tripartite
~v-r-._r.je as M the
; liter the Presc-
'
Middle East
stair.ec
re- oa cor.-
iemnmg larad rather than
\ddmg -
*-- rn to the
rganiza
ULI .-Z.7.Z
-q -
It* bf 3.-1
'rr awaking The ---: bob-
I
runs l :..--
-
-.
THROUGHOUT us. boa
r
" rj ". *:.-.
--
-
toner -
SEPTEMBER. 1979
Egypt _.-.: '. -rn.
-- pacekeep hag I -
... trewal
nliur,
Isrs .year b*n on pur-
..;.c ^rr.:orie-- Arawiag
OCTOBER-
Israr. rhargaa thai the V-.-.ec
Satin.- baa .-;rr-:-:r-: the
?amber A I ilr-:..--.-. un -.--.-
act.-.- Efl the UN-co .v.- led ires
u -
NOVEMBER-
T -- '-...- : ;- c trie Guii
of :._ S.r.a.
- ;- ire I r
DECEMBER-
The irter -.:.--..-
massive anna
-
I ad Pake
-
Yasir Arab It
2
-
JANT'ARY 1980
[ srae
.----- Z
.
Rosh
Hashana & Yom Kippur.
The High Holy Days.
Celebrations of hope.
'-'' :--:-:-?
'=- the end of the growing seasor begur
as a j .-'-- jnks for the ear**
- chnesa ind _.'
POT jht ..;- ;; met j -,--
" "-'- The f irsi lay the begir
renewed -:-
"~ :-' -e tenth -;, the i
Jew ;- dayj [>f prayer mc | to make
-,. itonement for a thai
- these honest c- a els offer
s s-aso--oorandgooG .-. the trad I or of -._- fa -
oA^nomhMi
^ep'ese': g
Ktrjctienbaum Bros. Inc in New York
And serving chapels throucf.out the U.S. and Canad*
^ COLLECT Da S S*lS OP JEMSH RELlClC
SUITABLE PO* FtAUIHG ARE \Q* -
COWLIHE,
6800 rV. Oakland Park Boulevard. Fort Lauderdale
2305 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. Deerfield Beach
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441. Margate
i greatest bl faring Outgoing Year 5740 came in Venice in Jumt, when tl
European Econ ~.. r mmunity all but recognized the Palestine Liberation Org^- '','
for kegei iy Fr m eft in Pierrt T'^ikxu. Helmut Schmidt. Yale'-. Git Estain
Frances* I isiga PresidentC irter Margaret Thatcher. Roy.Jenkins.

Anwar Sadat eode n a note of
aeraooal friendship md Israeii-
in -.-..:; break-
'..-.-: ._-- -
FEBRUARY
I tpeeda
fighter ;._.-. to Israel. -
Israel*. -- --. > October
1981 _-. ;
. .... ratati as Tkb u Aral
-e:_"
MARCH -
The
-
. -
met*. m 48 bou
S
-1
I
- _s
.-
iFRIL -
-
r rig

' '-.~ in the upper
-_--: in :
rs
-----
-
in fight
MAY -
Mai Saad Haddad. com-
inder of the Christian militia in
.-.h Lebanon accuse* UN
peace-keeping forces there of
aiding Palestinian terrorists.
PI.O ten rist attack in Hebron
i Israeli. all yeshiva
idents and wounds 16
other- Tensi :- :ncrease on
' ink reed Israeli
'ntend with
isingh stile Arab
lewisli
suspends lutonomj
fpr gn
JUNE -

Bassam Shaka : S'abha, wk
lost both legs an I -; -.- Khallaf |
of Ramallah. *.- .- r.is left
f't A Dnrze : e -aPper
Suleiman Her ^i
*nen a bomb he i> .->mptin|
todismantl>- ;ace '
IN Securit) I approve.I
. 1-0. with the : i -'.j;r,ing.i
resolution declaring I
ions taker -.... alter
the ch jj" j) I
Jerusakrn
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netting
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Friday. September 19. 1980
*JeniHh>rSdHan
Page 7-A
Big Stories of Outgoing Year
Continued from preceding page-
all occupied territories, including
Jerusalem and that it begin to do
so no later than Nov. 18.1980.
AUGUST -
Sadat postpones resuming
autonomy talks in response to
the Jerusalem law adopted by the
Knesset in July which proclaimed
united Jerusalem Israel's capital.
UN Security Council votes 14-0
with the U.S. abstaining to
censure Israel for its Jerusalem
law and urges all countries with
embassies in Jerusalem to move
them. U.S. under fire by Israel
and US Jewish leaders for
abstaining and thus making
possible the adoption of the
resolution.
SEPTEMBER
President Carter announces
that autonomy talks will resume
in a few weeks and that there
"will be a summit later this
year."
Around World
Anti-Semitic activity was
widespread in many countries
around the world. The most
dangerous situation was in Iran
where Ayatollah Kuholla Kho-
meini's government imprisoned
some 100 Jews, executed a
number of Jewish communal
leaders and businessmen and
confiscated Jewish property
worth millions of dollars.
There was also an upsurge of
neo-Nazi activity in a host of
countries, including France,
West (iermany, Switzerland,
Brazil and the United States, and
a number of terrorist atrocities
against Jews in Europe and
South America.
The nine member states of the
European Economic Community
meeting in Venice adopted a
declaration acknowledging the
right of Palestinian self-deter-
mination and calling for the
participation of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in the
Mideast peace talks.
Following the adoption of a
resolution by the UN Security
Council demanding that Israel
withdraw from all the occupied
territories, including Jerusalem,
and calling on all countries that
have embassies in Jerusalem to
remove them. 11 Latin American
countries. Holland and Haiti
began moving their embassies to
Tel Aviv.
The Soviet Union continued its
harassment of Jewish ^ctivitist
and prospective Jewish emi-
grants. During the Olympic
Games, Soviet authorities cleared
the cities of Jewish dissidents.
By year's end, Soviet authorities
had reduced to a trickle the
number of Jews allowed to emi-
grate. Prisoners of Conscience
continued to languish in jails and
labor camps.
SEPTEMBER, 1979
Banco Israelite, a Jewish-
owned bank in Argentina, is
damaged by a terrorist bomb.
Argentine Jewish journalist.
Jacobo Timerman. imprisoned
without charges, is released and
allowed to go to Israel.
OCTOBER -
Two Jewish physicists.
Sheldon Glashow and Steven
Weinberg, and a Jewish chemist.
Prof. Herbert Brown, win Nobel
Prizes for work in their fields.
Fania Fenelon, author of
"Playing for Time," raps CBS-
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TV for casting Vanessa Red-
grave, a PLO supporter, to
portray her.
Anti-Semitic books are sold in
Brazil despite a 1950 law which
prohibits their sale.
NOVEMBER
Canadian Prime Minister Joe
Clark scraps his campaign pledge
to move Canada's embassy in
Israel from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem.
President Carter selects dip-
lomatic trouble-shooter Sol Lino-
witz. who was instrumental in
negotiating the Panama Canal
treaty, to replace Robert Strauss
as his special envoy to the
Mideast.
Israel's Ambassador to Por-
tugal, Ephraim Eldar, wounded
in terrorist attack in Lisbon. One
of his bodyguards is killed.
DECEMBER
"Israel Week" in Rio de
Janeiro draws nearly 40,000 Jews
and non-Jews.
Philip Klutznick, prominent
Jewish leader, is named by Carter
as Secretary of Commerce.
Book by strongman Ayatollah
Kuholla Khomeini of Iran, "Is-
lamic Government." attacks
Jews.
JANUARY. 1980
Abraham Elazar. manager of
El Al fn Istanbul, is shot to death
by undentified assassins.
The French Liberation Front,
an anti-Jewish group, claims
responsibility for bombing the
Pompidou Modern Art Center in
Paris, to protest what it calls
Jewish dictatorship.
Dr. Rita Levi-Montalcini, an
Italian Jewish scientist, receives
the Saint Vincent Prize for Medi-
cine, generally considered second
in worldwide prestige after the
Nobel Prize.
The government of Iran con-
fiscates property of wealthy
Iranian Jews worth some S54
million.
MARCH
France officially recognizes the
right of the Palestinian people to
self-determination, thus im-
plicitly accepting the creation of
a Palestinian state.
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Con-
VI
HWTSH
rwnocw
punD

science Ida Nudel charges local
newspapers in Siberia where she
is exiled with purposely inciting
hatred against her.
APRIL
Iranian Jews hit by travel
restrictions, forcing them to
either become homeless if they
remain abroad or to return home.
President Carter appoints
Alfred Moses, a Washington
lawyer, as new liaison with the
Jewish community.
Israel celebrates its 32nd
anniversary.
MAY
West German Parliament
agrees to financial reparations to
Nazi victims.
An international tribunal urges
the Soviet Union to release
Anatoly Sharansky.
Israel Olympic Committee
votes to boycott 1980 Olympics
in Moscow.
JUNE
The European Economic Com-
munity at its summit meeting in
Venice acknowledges the right of
self-determination for Pales-
tinians and calls for the PLO to
participate in the Mideast peace
talks.
Albert Danielpour, a
prominent Iranian Jew, executed
by the government.
JULY-
Convicted Nazi war criminal
Pieter Menten. living in Holland,
gets 10-year prison sentence and
fined $50,000.
Pope John Paul 11 meets with
members of Brazil's Jewish com-
munity in Sao Paulo at the Pon-
tiff's request.
The World Conference of the
UN Decade for Women in Copen-
hagen politicized by Arab, Third
Continued on Page 10-A
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Page8-A
* Jewish Daridiar
Friday, Septernber iq ,
Maw Release Prisoners
But Begin Vows It's No Gesture to Egypt
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin has confirmed
reports that Israel is con-
sidering the release of
Palestinian security pris-
oners. But he insisted that
this would be purely a "hu-
manitarian" move, not a
"gesture" to Egypt con-
nected with the planned re-
sumption of the autonomy
talks.
Begin told Israeli diplomatic
correspondents he had been
approached regarding the release
of prisoners some weeks ago by
U.S. Ambassador Samuel Lewis.
The approach had been uncon-
nected to special envoy Sol Lino-
witz's mission to the area to seek
a resumption of the long-stalled
negotiations.
BEGIN SAID he had told
Linowitz and Lewis that he
Begin to Talk
To CJFWF
NEW YORK (JTA| Premier
VIenachem Begin of Israel will
iddress over 2,500 leaders of
Vorth American Jewish
federations on Nov. 13 at the
^ouncil of Jewish Federations'
ieneral Assembly in Detroit.
>peaking at a major plenary
ession, Begin will provide
lelegates with his view on
Israel-Diaspora Relations."
THE GENERAL Assembly.
Jov. 12 to 16. will bring together
jadership from CJF's 200
onstituent Federations in the
Jnited States and Canada. The
Assembly is the largest single
thering held each year of North
American Jewish leadership
THIS YIZKOR. REMEM8I YOUR DEAR ONES
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3 ARalCi Cra* tasmoar iia
I wish to give 'GIFT OF LIFE"
would personally favor prisoner
releases provided they did not
endanger or impair national
security. He has not yet brought
the issue before the Cabinet
defense committee, but indicated
that he intends to do so. Sources
close to the Prime Minister said a
limited number of prisoners were
involved "individuals, rather
than dozens or scores."
Though the Prime Minister
insisted that the prospective
release of prisoners is not a
"gesture to Egypt" ("politics is
not gesticulation," he said),
observers here immediately read
it as part of a goodwill package.
Both sides pledged, in the agreed
statement issued by Linowitz at
the end of his trip, to "strengthen
the foundations of mutual trust
and friendship," and this was
widely interpreted as including
such gestures by Israel as
prisoner release and postponing
moving the Prime Ministers
office to East Jerusalem.
On this latter point, Begin
firmly denied that he had
changed his intention to move
the office. He was not respon-
sible, he said, if Linowitz or
others had come away from
meetings with him having formed
that impression.
"I DEFINITELY intend to
bring (the office move) before the
Cabinet," Begin declared. Sig-
nificantly, though, he declined to
say when he would bring the
matter to the Cabinet, saying
vaguely that there were "con-
siderations" to be borne in mind.
He noted that no minister had
raised objections when he had
first broached the issue at the
Cabinet but added im-
mediately that that had been "a
long time ago" and many de-
velopments had occurred since.
Several senior ministers have
made no secret, in private con-
versations, of their hope that
Begin will quietly let the pro-
posed office move lapse
especially in view of the inter-
national drubbing Israel has
taken in the wake of the Jeru-
salem law.
Begin revealed that President
how to translate this reiterated
Egyptian commitment into
action. Sadat, Begin said, had
given "specific orders" to his
Minister of State for Foreign
Affairs, Butros Ghali, to see to it
that normalization ties "develop
positively.^'
BEGIN CITED commerce,
tourism and culture as areas in
which an immediate improve-
ment was possible. In general,
the Prime Minister said,
Egyptian businessmen were
"very interested" in concluding
deals with Israeli firms, and. once
government-imposed restrictions
are lifted, many such deals would
develop. Sadat had now promised
that the restrictions would indeed
?n ^ ~^>
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disappear.
There would soon be a
delegation from Sadat's political
party visiting Israel, and later a
parliamentary delegrtion, Begin
noted, and in the other direction,
Israels President Yitzhak Navon
would visit Egypt, and this
would "be part of the normal-
ization and bring honor to
Israel" Begin said that Navon
would not be addressing the
Egyptian People's Assembly.
This was Navon's own decision,
and he (Begin) had welcomed it.
Questioned on the aftermath of
the Jerusalem law, the Prime
Minister refused to concede that
the law had done Israel more
political harm than good. The
exit of 13 embassies from the city
had not at all affected its status
as Israel's capital, he declared.
The definition of a capital was a
city which a nation, through its
parliaments, determines as its
capital and places its head of
State, Legislature. Executive and
Supreme Court therein. "Even if
30 embassies had left and not 13
it would have made no dif-
ference," Begin said.
BEGIN NOTED with gratifi-
cation President Carter's
references to Jerusalem and its
meaning to Jewry at his address
to the B'nai B'rith International
convention in Washington. This
was the first time an American
President had spoken in these
terms, Begin said.
Carter had linked the city to
the "Jewish people" and had re-
called how King David had pro-
claimed it Israel's capital. "In the
last three years, you have been
hearing someone else speaking in
those terms." Begin joked.
The fact that it had been an
election speech to a Jewish
audience did not detract from its
importance, the Prime Minister
noted. The Jewish political in-
fluence in the U.S. the fact of
especial Jewish weight in key
states was nothing to be
ashamed of, he said. On the
contrary, Israel was fortunate
indeed to have the support of
"this great Jewish community."
THE JEWISH people was
united behind Israel and behind
Jerusalem as Israels cam, !
Begin declared. He cited tW'
that Prof. Leonard Fein f"
gotten the support of 38 of ftS
signatories of his "Peace He,
letter for a new declaration I
dorsing Israels stand
Jerusalem. on
But there were two matters
which. Begin said, diaspora J
had no right to interfere. One n.
Israel's defense needs, and th
other the scheduling 0f th
Knesset election which .!
purely a matter for the \sn2
voters to determine.
WASHINGTON
SAVINGS
is pleased to bring you the broadcast of the
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
from Temple Israel
on WTMI-FM-STEREO
931 in Dade and Broward Counties
102 3 m Palm Beach County
YOM KIPPUR-THE DAY OF ATONEMENT
Friday, September 19 8 00 PM -10 00 PM
Saturday. September 20 10 00 AM -12 Noon
3:00 PM-6 00 PM
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Why should the Zeppelin
really be called a "Schwartz*?
A: Because "The Zeppelin" was
invented by David Schwartz.
David Schwartz was an Austrian-born
engineer who, in 1890. came up with the
idea of an airship with a gas-filled metal
container to make it rise. Because of finan-
cial reasons, the Austrian minister of war
turned down the idea. However, in 1892
after Schwartz built a prototype in Russia,
the German government urged him to
go ahead with production for them
Unfortunately. Schwartz died before the
project could get off the ground. Shortly
thereafter, Count von Zeppelin bought the
patents from Schwartz's widow.
ANOTHER RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affec-
tion is to quickly become completely
open and informal with people and
things they particularly like. Samuel is
called "Sammy;' a snack is a "nosh"
and the famed Chicken Soup has
become known as "Jewish Penicillin"
And riant in keeping with this inherent
warmth J&B Rare Scotch has come to
be regarded as a favorite part of the
mishpocha'. Because along with its
e egance at formal affairs-J&B is
also the kind of 'relative' one can
take his shoes off with, loosen the tie
and relax with friends at home
M-hporho-- TV JmM ttndtd lomil w,ud
I- neu, moie and numerous
J'B
RARE
SCOTCH
M


,ntcmberl9,19e0
+Jewist fhridian
Page 9-A
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OULD IjOVETO HAVE
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PagelO-A
+ kmistfkrkJ&T
Fnda>
^P^ber,
Major Stories of Outgoing Year 5740
Zmttmmk from Page 7-A
World detegauons
AUGUST -
Terrorist grenade attack is
Antwerp on Jewish children.
which kills one 25-year-old boy
and injures 20 other people.
Mfe teenagers. is discovered
to be pan zi a plot by a terrorist
"hit team" whose mission .- tc
attack Jewish individuals and
ustitutions
Prominent Iranian Jew. Avra-
ham Boruchim. executed for
- spy;ag for Israel
Women's conference in Copen-
hagen, by vote of 4-4. adopts
resolution which hsts Zionism as
one of world worst evils.
Esagfc Farahmar.dpour. the
only Jewish deputy in Iran's
Praiiament. is expelled and
accused of spreading Zionist
propaganda
FKe years after being indicted
on charges of concealing his ties
to the fascist Rumanian Iron
Guard when he applied to enter
the U.S in 1*50 and again when
he gained U S citizenship in
I95T. Rumanian Orthodox Arch-
bishop Valerian Tnfa of Grass
Laxe Mich., surrenders his
citizenship papers to US. of-
ficials
SEPTEMBER -
France outlaws a neo-Nazi
organization, the Federation for
European and National Action.
Trifa stripped of US at-
zenship by Federal District
Judge Horace Gilmore in Detroit
The Intergovernmental
Committee for European
Migration reports that only 770
Jews left the Soviet Union in
August, the lowest number since
1971. and expresses pessimism
that there will be no significant
increase in the near future.
f'YRl'S VANCE: Excused Jeus and resigned
American Seen
The United States was in the
throes of the Presidential election
campaign during most of the
year Democrats and Republicans
sought to woo Jewish voters with
pledges to continue support for
Israel and not to recognize the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion until k renounces terrorism
against Israel and accepts United
Nations Security Council Reso-
lutions 242 and* 338. President
Carter came under increasing fire
from Jewish leaders for U.S.
abstentions in the United
Nations on anti-Israel
resolutions.
The Jewish communky and its
leadership was preoccupied, in
addition to its traditional concern
for the security and well-being ol
Israel, with such issues as Soviet
Jewry. Jews in Arab lands.
aiding Soviet Jews who
emigrated to this country, and
pressuring the Justice Depart-
ment to ferret out and prosecute
former Nazis living in this
country The climax of this
pressure was the revocation of
U S citizenship of Rumanian
Archbishop Valerian Trifa.
American Jewry was also con-
cerned over the electoral victories
in the primaries of Gerald
Carlson of Dearborn, a former
member of the local Nazi Party
who won the Republican nomina-
tion in Michigan's loth District.
Ku Klux Klan leader Tom Metz-
ger who won the Democratic
nomination for Congress in
California's 43rd District: and
American Nazi leader Harold
Covington who received 43 per-
cent of the vote in North Carolina
for Attorney General
The Jewish community was
also engaged in trying to heal the
rift in Black-Jewish relations fol-
lowing the resignation of Andrew
Young as U.S. Ambassador to
the UN. Black leaders charged
that Young had resigned as a
result of Jewish pressure on the
Administration following his un-
authorized meeting with the PLO
representatives at the UN Both
Young and Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance denied that Jewish
pressure forced the envoy to
resign.
SEPTEMBER. 1979
Secretary of State Cvrus Vance
Kenmore
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Dancing
absolves the American Jewish
community of any connection
with the resignation of Andrew-
Young as Ambassador to the
United Nations.
Black organizations call on the
Carter Administration to "re-
examine the pledge given to
Israel barring the IS from
negotiating with the PLO until
the PLO recognized Israel' r.ght
to exist.
OCTOBER -
John Connaliy. the Republican
Presidential aspirant, came under
heavy fire from Jewish leaders
and GOP leaders for his nine-
point plan that included a pro-
posal for Israel to withdraw to its
pre-1967 borders and for linking a
Mideast peace settlement to
Arab oil supplies
NOVEMBER -
The issue of expanding the
reservoir of Jewish leadership in
the U.S.. meeting the needs of
Jewish communities in this
country and abroad, including
the needs of Israeli. Soviet and
Ethiopian Jews are discussed by
2.600 communal leaders from the
U.S. and Canada at the 4bth
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations in Mon-
treal
DECEMBER
Assaults against Jewish in-
stitutions, cemeteries, houses of
worship and private property
have more than doubled in 1979
compared to 1978. reports show
President Carter meets with
Hasidic rabbinical leaders in the
White House, the first such
meeting of its kind.
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JANUARY. 1980
The Justice Department sets a
one-year deadline for the disposal
of cases pending against 250
alleged Nazi war criminals living
in this country.
MAY-
The Rabbinical Assembly en-
dorses for the first time the or-
dination of women as rabbis.
For the third consecutive year
the American Red Cross rejects a
resolution urging the Inter-
national Committee of the Red
Cross to immediately admit
Israel's Red Magen David to the
League of Red Cross Societies.
JUNE
Some 100 American Jews,
including prominent rabbis, aca-
demicians, editors and writers,
sign a newspaper advertisement
in support of the Peace Now
movement in Israel.
JULY
The Republican Party conven-
tion adopts platform which in-
cludes a pledge to "honor our
nation's commitment (to Israel)
through political, diplomatic and
military aid'' and affirms that
"Jerusalem should remain un-
divided with continued free, open
and unimpeded access to all."
AUGUST -
The Democratic national
convention adopts platform
pledging to continue to achieve a
comprehensive Mideast peace
through the Camp David frame-
work and reiterates its 1976 plat-
form plank recognizing and sup-
porting the established status of
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
with free access to all its holy-
places presided to all faiths. Asa
symbol of this stand, ft.
Embassy should be m* ,
TelAvK-toJemsaJ^l
flvcts over such ""*<
West Bank^tleS'*1
the Jerusalem la-*. s^vn
inflation, calls for earrv e
and the resignation of
Minister Moshe Da van
fens* M mister Ezer VV.
both of whom accused"
government of missing ch
for peace. In addition faZ
subjected to continuing Z
atrocities
Nevertheless. Israel,,
with Egypt, aespiu 1
caused by President
Sadat's suspension t
autonomy talks, continues
solidify. A 600-square-mik
of Sinai was returned to Epi
the Camp David accords\m
implemented and the norm*
tion process continued, abet
evenly, with regular commo
and cargo service between I
and Egypt.
SEPTEMBER 1979-
The Palestine LiberiJ
Organization claims resj
sibility for a bomb explo
which kills one ar.c injuresii
downtown Jerusalem.
OCTOBER -
Mnshe Dayar.
Foreign Minister
The Supreme Court rules :fl
the Elon Merer. ~tr::.ementj
resigns
Continued on following

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Page 11-A
Big Stories of Outgoing Year
d from preceding page
Continue
(dismantled
Hurwitz
becomes
ZS Mtotofr and Simcha
Kh becomes second Deputy
* Minister, a newly created
Isf alongside Deputy Prime
Lister YigaelYad.n.
(Mount Sinai and the Santa
IJarina Monastery are included
ftJe 600-square-mile section of
^returned to Egypt.
j;CEMBF.R -
liwin averts government crisis
fSvincing Knesset members
vote lor an amendment to the
Uoversial abortion bill which
ninated a clause permitting
lortions lor mothers of poverty
[el families with large numbers
T children and convinces Elon
Uh settlers to relocate
Wefully.
INUARY.1980
J Inflation is at 111.4 percent for
>e 1979 calendar year, according
the Central Bureau of
btistics.
IBegin praises Soviet dissident
Li Nobel Prize winner Andrei
kkharov in a special statement
jthe Knessel and urges world-
|de support tor him.
EBRl AKY -
I Ami Christian vandalism in
tusalem denounced by Begin.
lull American-financed air-
[kls are under construction in
_ Negev to replace those given
Kgypt with the return of Sinai.
Shi kel replaces Pound as new
pal currency.
L\K( II
I1) || Minn dies at the age of
and is hifried at Kibbutz
|nii".ii his home in the Galilee

Commercial flights between
i and Egypt are
lu rated
m it/.hak Shamir sworn in as
b ijjn Minister.
Pit 11.
terrorists invade Kibbutz
r-gav Am neai Lebanon, killing
1
Leader ol Ethiopian Orthodox
lurch visits Israel, first
liopian leader to visit Israel
|ce illations were severed by
liopia in 1973.
vV
tnessel votes to boycott
|rnpics in Moscow.
Can We Trust
Platforms?
-oniinued from Page 4-A
lation ot an independent.
lestinian state" (no doubt
are of the fact that Jordan
Btitutes one today if only the
lbs would acknowledge that
lily). The Republican platform
bna more willing to stop short
saving the establishment of a
lestinian state on the West
Ink is a no-no. Frequent
pence in the GOP plank to the
linous thought of Soviet
net rat ion of the area seems to
ice that factor far ahead of any
|rrv about the emergence of a
Vlestinian state anywhere.
The Democrats are strong for
I nd of terrorism and violence
he Middle East. No doubt the
publicans are, too; but the
Ivier platform underlining is
P' on the danger of Soviet
pies. The Republican hope
Pns high also for more
pelican trade in the area with
Nats on Arab boycotts and
lj"e particularly on an Arab oil
Ibargo.
[n trying to decide where to
that vital "X" on the
pidential ballot. American
kens now have before them the
s'ory of Carter promises,
Pons, and mishaps in con-
pon with the Middle East but
left to rely on Reagan
Bges, with no way to tell for
Jain how he might perform if
' when he gets into office.
Defense Minister Ezer Weiz-
man resigns accusing Begins
government of missing chance for
peace.
JUNE-
Begin takes over as Defense
Minister after Weizman's resig-
nation until a new minister is
named.
Israel contributes $250,000 to
Cambodian relief fund.
JULY-
Security forces foil attempt by
four PLO members to assassinate
Agriculture Minister Ariel
Sharon.
The Jerusalem bill, proclaim-
ing united Jerusalem as Israels
capital, passes the Knesset by a
vote of 69-15.
Hi-weekly cargo service be-
tween Israel and Kgypt begins.
AUGUST -
A gang of terrorists trying to
infiltrate Israel by a balloon from
south Lebanon is foiled when the
balloon crashes in Lebanon.
Israeli forces attack terrorist
bases in south Lebanon in what is
described as the largest Israeli
operation into the area since
Operation Litani in March 1978
when Israel took over all of south
Lebanon.
SEPTEMBER -
Begin says the resumption of
the autonomy talks with Kgypt is
a precondition for a new summit
meeting between himself. Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat of Kgypt and
President Carter. He says such a
summit will probably take place
in September.
Jtem$#> Fkridfian
Upheaval in Poland
Jewish State Theater Visit Delayed
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
turbulent situation in Poland,
recently hit by strikes of
shipyard workers and miners, has
delayed the Israel tour of the
Jewish State Theater of Poland
which had been scheduled for
next month.
Szymon Szurmeij, manager
and artistic director, and Jerzy
Romanski. head of the theater
and folklore department of the
Polish Artists Agency (Pagart).
stressed at a press conference
here that the postponement was
only temporary.
THE TWO officials, who
arrived in Israel to make final
arrangements for the tour, said
the Polish Jewish Theater would
visit Israel next April in the
course of a worldwide tour that
will take it to the U.S., Canada.
Mexico. France. Belgium and
Britain.
At another press conference.
Stefan Orayek, chairman of the
Polish Jewish Association,
announced that the internal
situation in Poland has also
forced the postponement of the
visit to Israel by the Polish
Minister of Religious Affairs,
Jerzy Kovarski.
He was due here early in
October to chair a session of the
Janosz Korczak International
Memorial Committee but
requested that this be delayed
until the beginning of January.
His arrival then is assured.
Grayek said.
THE POLISH Jewish Theater,
based in Warsaw, consists of 36
artists, seven of them non-Jews.
All speak fluent Yiddish. The
theater performs three evenings a
week and has a junior studio
where young actors study their
art and learn Yiddish. When the
troupe visits Israel next spring it
will perform The Dybbuk. by
Anski. The Comedian, by
(ioldfaden, and Sunset, by the
Russian-Jewish writer. Isaac
Babel.
Szurmeij announced that the
troupe is also rehearsing a new
version of Tevya, the Milkman
by Sholem Aleichem. in which
the story of Tevya's mishaps
mirror the hardships of the
Jewish nation.
The company has recently
[x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x^XrWrWrW'-'W-S'
I hf tiro officials, who
urrired in Israel to make
final arrangements lor the
lour, said the Polish Jewish
Theater would visit Israel
next April in the course of a
worldwide lour tliui will take
ii io ike U.S., Canada,
Mexico, France, Belgium
ami Hritain.
perlormed a play in Warsaw
based on K. Kentnik s story. The
Clock liy the Head, to mark the
35th anniversary of the lilieration
of Warsaw,
(irayek heads the public
committee for the visit of the
Polish Jewish Theater to Israel.
It includes Deputy Premier
Simcha Khrlich. Jewish Agency
chairman Leon Dulzin and other
officials,
T4t wJbm o(f
Gold'S Wo^Aixdu^
NEW YEAR


Page 12-A
> bmUt fkrrttoti
Frida
> September 19,191
Kol Nidre Frida y Eve
Yom Kippur's Meaning Seen Historically
Yom Kippur lightly T"^*
1848. during a cholera SJJ
Rabbi Israe
lanter Person
instructed the ettre 0 ^
Continued from Page 1-A
realm of dee:.-. bM &-
-..:- :: -i- -'-i
:- zrs*-
:;. ,'r- ----.-
u.-_-*_-
ALL DAY
anc bs~ l- -. :r>: : = _-
the Jewish c stench* -t:
-_--.- :-.,-, .-.-. Sod
wants =c prayer :r fas:,-g ;:.f*s
X leads "-: .-Ur :: :'-ee.r-* '.-.-.
; ; -- -*c ; r. c fec^x
-ngry I r: he em -a-
e f.r.a..y irof *- our defenses
and ratx>r.a'. ravens and throw
: ..-ve.ves on the mercy of the
court Yet we never lose the coo-
vietaoa that we will be pardoned
Despite the relentless. :*r.
-..--r.es repeated confession of a
staggering iist of sins "which
blessedly runs out when the
alphabet runs out we experience
forgiveness out of personal
repentance and the atoning
power of the comunity of Israel
and of the day.
This atonement, by divine
grace, is above and beyond our
own effort, or merit.
Wan the setting of the sun. the
catharsis from sin of the people
Israel is completed It stands for-
given, beloved and at one in life
before its Maker and covenant
partner
"ON THE tenth day of the
seventh month, you shall afflict
your souls iLei. 16:29 and
23:27; Sumbers 29:"i. Denying
the soul its due, in Jewish
tradition, means giving up the
fundamentals of dignified life
eating and drinking, washing,
anointing or cosmetic lotions,
sexuality. lAlso given up is
wearing of leather shoes, which
involves giving up the pleasure of
proper support and comfort for
the foot I.
In addition, we stop work and
transfers (carrying) and by
implication, wealth amassment
as is done on all Sabbath days.
[Yom Kippur is called the Sab-
bath's Sabbath and is considered
a kind of Shabbat). In contrast to
Tisha B'Av, however, these
deprivations are not undertaken
as mourning rituals.
Despite the anxiety of the trial.
Yom Kippur symbolizes a
rejection of the accepted
dependence of our sense of well-
being and dignity on these
normal acts. It makes clear that
in an ultimate sense (only),
human well-being and dignity
transcend the presence of every-
day material pleasures. "Playing
dead" gives a perspective on the
vanity of conventional life. From
this encounter we go back to
deepest enjoyment of life func-
tions (on Sukkot the time of
our rejoicing) without giving
these pleasures ultimacy any
more.
THE PRIMARY self-denial is
that of eating and drinking, even
in minor amounts. However,
some people are exempted by
Jewish law from these restric-
tions. The exempted are: the
dangerously sick (when there is
definite or potential threat to life)
and a pregnant woman, if she
feels an irresistable urge to eat. A
doctor need not certify that the
patent needs the food although
this is the usual way. In fact, if
the dangerously sick patient says
he needs the food and even if
the doctors deny this we are
commanded to feed the patient.
In such cases of eating, regular
blessings over food are said and
the yaaleh v'yavo prayer for Yom
Kippur is inserted in the grace
after meals.
I recommend following the
Brisker tradition that
dangerously sick patients should
be fed normally and fully. Many
orthodox Rabbis urge that the
feeding be done in smaller than
legal size portions, if possible.
But as Rabbi Chayim Brisker
used to say: "I am not treating
j......... .............................i^mB^mmmimmmmmmmmmmmmm
,,.
::
I
;

of \ ilna to eat. He personally
pubucry ate first to sho* ^
way. for fear the plague *
spread to people in
ouijl
condition from' fast.V.g e^tenec
one of his greatest
moments.

AS FAR AS washing -
concerned it is cosmetic w-asnin
for pleasur. :h"^J
given up. All anointing iiig*J
up
The Yom A':pp..- _v.rgv 5Um,
ith Kol Nidr. wh ,,."
with
its d.
This extract is from Guide to High Holy
Days, by Dr Sidney Greenberg. published
by the Sationai Jeuish Conference Center,
a forum uhere Orthodox. Conservative. :
X
1
I
Reform, and Reconstructionist rabbis, pro-
fessionals and lay leaders meet to work on
shared problems.
solution of vows, in advance^
prevent casual vows and Z
dramatize the utter senousne,,
of words). The liturgy u
vehicle through which the yjj,
Kippur miracle of transmutatim
takes place. Far from ^
dominated by death, a conscious
ness of love and affection wells uo
from the liturgy. There is aJ
and a feeling of I oncw
tration and devotion| but whit
comes through above all is th,
sense of devotion and closeness
and warmth which unites thi
congregation of Israel
ON THIS DAY. there is also,
camaraderie of the congregm
that reassures and breaks -J
tension. As at Selicho:. it is cus-
tomary to wear the Tallitu mgk
because of the solemnity of }'M
Kippur.
Paradise Lost?
Find it again on
Marco Island on
Honda's West Coast
Three and one half miles
of unspoiled beach on
the Gulf of Mexico.
Golf, tennis, boating,
fishing and shelling.
Shopping in bountiful
stores and boutiques.
Dining in restaurants with
varied atmospheres
and surroundings.
An unhurried
lifestyle on an island
paradise.
Temple Sholom (Formerly
Jewish Community
Center), within
thirty minutes. Membership of
over 200 families
Hebrew School. Activities
include Men's Club,
Sisterhood. NCJW and
Choir.
Land reserved to be
given to possible
future builders of Temple
on Marco Island
We'd like to tell you
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Homes or homesites on
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Come see us.
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Ly September 19, 1980
fJewist Fhridtirtn
Page 13-A
go Mindlim
Special-Interest Groups: A Fact of Life
Koming
[creasingly
Continued from Page 4-A
im that this parochialism is
^practical, or even immoral. Or
l|v the craven view of some
Lsh civil libertarian organize-
rs still dedicated to their
Lgmatic notion of America as a
0t of pabulum, when it is in fact
increasingly Latin,
Roman Catholic,
Icreasingly black: in short,
Lcreasinglv sliced into the seg-
ments of special-interest groups
|,ai demand their ethnic iden-
tic* as a principle of their being,
that no longer submit to
cepting the status of anony-
mous ingredients in a mythic
l/nerican stew.
| IF PRESIDENT Carter and
ir. Reagan could run from one
bpearance before a B'nai B'rith
hnvention to a second ap-
fcarance before an Italian Amer-
n convention to a third ap-
farance before a Polish Amer-
an convention, all in the space
two short weeks, why not
ankly give up the ghost and
cept the new sociology?
I If they can fractionate their
indidacies into multi-ethnic
eds, to needs beyond and at
at odds with a united
nerican need, then why resist
if fashion?
I American Jews who refuse,
hii continue to Live in the past,
ercly contribute to a weakened
nerican Jewish political
atus .
A LETTER last week from the
Irm-rican Jewish Committee"
lates thai the organization
Opposes the anti-bilingualism
Herendum (in Dacle County.
jht i and calls for an even greater
Ber-ethnic understanding and
Dmmunication among the
verse groups that comprise
liami "
My hue friend, Judge Harold
paet. would have obser\'ed,
Imm nam bully.' In line
ih what I have just said about
lecial-interest groups, it does
seem that I should agree with the
American Jewish Committee on
its face. My own position on
special-interest is after all in the
good old American tradition of
Jamesian pragmatism what-
ever works is right.
There can be no doubt that bi-
lingualism is a special-interest
which, like all the others, imposes
the will of the minority on the
majority. If it passes the prag-
matic test, how can I gainsay it?
BUT THE problem is not so
much the American Jewish Com-
mittee's pronouncement on bi-
lingualism as it is with the Com-
mittee's rationale for the pro-
nouncement. And especially the
hauteur of its tone, which "gam
bully'' punctures in a delicious
Groucho Marx way:
"Bound together by a trau-
matic uprooting from their native
land, Miami's Cuban-Americans
have settled in common neigh-
borhoods and found solace in use
of their native tongue. And this is
not unusual.
"First generation Jewish set-
tlers to America frequently spoke
only Yiddish until the day they
died, and what Miamian has not
some experience with a relative
from a foreign land who never
quite adjusted to the English
language?"
TO WHICH the American
Jewish Committee concludes,
answering its own question:
"Whether legally sanctioned or
not. in fact (emphasis theirs),
Miami is bilingual.''
The trouble is that the pre-
sumably acceptable pragmatic-
conclusion, which suggests that
if we don't like it we can stuff it.
Ls linked to a faulty analogy as
premise.
Yes. first generation American
Jews ofi'd speak Yiddish many
of them to their dying day. Yes.
many of them never quite ad-
justed either to English as a
language or to native custom.
But here, the analogy dies. For
Yiddish never was legally sanc-
tioned as a bilingual phenomenon
anywhere in the nation that Jews
concentrated heavily. And Jews
never demanded or received
financial and or any other kind
of support in their immigrant
status. In fact, no group of Euro-
pean arrivals did.
IF JEWS retained their lin-
guistic and ethnic characteristics
as a community, it was at their
own expense, through their own
religious and burial and
benevolent societies, through
their social and educational insti-
tutions, not at the coffers of the
public trough.
And the Leo Rosten epic based
on his Hyman Kaplan saga is a
paean of praise to Jews and other
immigrant peoples along with
them who made every possible
sacrifice to learn the American
language after sweatshop hours
in night schools proliferating
throughout the new Jewish
ghetto. If their presence in the
land cost the public anything at
all, it was hence to help integrate
them, not to help keep them
separate.
It is, of course, the charac-
teristic of the new special-interest
sociology so far as Latin America
is concerned that just the op-
posite must occur that
Americans must learn Spanish,
that Americans must become
comfortable in the ways of the
Latin, or risk being left behind. Is
this not how we are being
threatened?
I HAVE no desire to debate
this point. Merely, I am repelled
by the analogy which humiliates
and degrades the noble sacrifices
of my forebears to become
Americans. It is bad enough in
these pragmatic days that the
greatest symbols of Jewish
suffering are being stolen from
Jews or else being used as
weapons against them.
Blacks have appropriated the
ghetto as their own at the same
time that black anti-Semitism
runs rampant in it. And anti-
Semites of another color
currently charge Jews with being
"racist" or "Nazi" in their Zion-
ist affiliations, when there were
no people in the Hitler heyday,
nor are there any today who have
suffered more at the hands of
each.
But I do not need a ,/ ish
organization to join these ranks.
I do not need a Jewish
organization to explain to me the
Yiddish experience. For in
assessing that experience, they
are dead wrong.
Begin Warns Against Iraqi Arsenal
By DAVID LANDAU
JE'rtUSALEM (JTA)
F'rime Minister Mena-
chera Begin has warned of
recent arms acquisitions by
Iraq which, he said, were of
major strategic purchase of
1,200 tank transporters,
mainly from West Ger-
many. This would enable
Baghdad to deliver a
powerful armored force,
intact, to Israel's north-
eastern front in the event of
a new war, the Prime
Minister noted.
There' was every reason to
expect Iraq to participate in such
a war, he said. It had participated
in all past encounters and
indeed had suffered because its
tanks had bad to make their way
to the front on their treads.
REGARDING Iraq's nuclear
program. Begin said Israel was
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doing "all we can" to thwart it,
and would continue to do so.
Israel was receiving "help from
important friends" in this
respect. Begin stated. He gave no
further details.
Begin spoke of accretions to
Syria's armed strength, too. He
revealed that the number of
Soviet advisors in Syria had
recently doubled to more than
5,000. Syria could now field more
than 3,000 tanks, he said, and its
pilots had begun to fly the
Russian-supplied MIG 25 jets
hitherto flown only by the
Soviets themselves.
Periodically. Israel received
"information" that the Syrians
were planning to take hostile
action but denials always fol-
lowed. Israel for its part re-
mained on its guard.
BEGIN SPOKE with satis
faction of Israel's success "with
the help of the Senate" in per-
suading the U.S. not to supply
Saudi Arabia with auxiliary fuel
tanks for its soon-to-be supplied
E-15 jets. These tanks, Begin
said, would have given the
Saudis the capacity to bomb
Israels cities and return to bases
deep inside the country.
But even without the auxiliary
tanks, the Saudi planes could be
moved up to the Tabuk base,
close to Israel's southern tip. for
sorties against Israel from there.
Begin warned. He said he always
pointed this out in conversations
with U.S. officials who stress
that the American-supplied F-15s
are not to be stationed at Tabuk
but at bases much farther off.
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P$el4-A
+A*fMfksk#*n
Want Trifa Kicked Out Now
Continued from Pge 1-A
Bucharest pogrom in 1941 which
killed 236 Jews and Christians
Daring the court proceedings last
week. Tnfa was also forced to
relinquish his passport
IS. ATTORNEYS in the case
said deportation proceedings
against Tnfa would be started as
soon as the proper papers could
be drawn up Dr. Charles Kremer.
-.re ->year-old dentist whose 25-
year effort led to the govern-
ment's indictment against Trifa.
told reporters outside the Detroit
courtroom that he was unhappy
that the government did not file
the papers immediately.
Kremer said he would not feel
vindicated until Trifa was
deported
Detroit attorney Peter Alter, a
Mayors Hit
UN Actions
NEW YORK The mayors of
two major American cities, who
recently visited Jerusalem, have
deplored the "one-sided" actions
of the United Nations in con-
demning Israel last month.
Major George Voinovich of
Cleveland, in a letter to President
Carter, and Mayor Ernest Morail
of New Orleans, in a statement
released this week, condemned
the "unwarranted attacks" on
Israel and noted that the United
Nations has in effect questioned
Israel's right to exist by
denouncing its presence in
Jerusalem, which has been part
of Israel since it became a nation
in 1948.
BOTH MAYORS took part in
a three-day International
Conference of Mayors in
Jerusalem last April, co-
sponsored by the U.S. Conference
of Mayors, the Institute of
Jerusalem Studies and the
American Jewish Congress. The
mayors' statements were made
public by the American Jewish
Congress.
In his letter to President
Carter, Mayor Voinovich wrote:
"Nothing more clearly illustrates
the direction that the United
Nations is taking in the one-sided
action of this supposed
representative body in con-
demning Israel. While I take no
position in the statement by the
Israeli government that
Jerusalem is now the capital of
the nation, I do take issue on the
unwarranted attack on Israel
because of the action taken in
this regard.
"Vitriolic statements such as
were thrown about in the United
Nations, especially by enslaved
territories and other countries
that practice no freedom
whatsoever, and in many cases
violate fundamental human
rights, do not serve the purpose
of a genuine peace. I therefore,
request that you seriously
evaluate whether the United
States should remain a member
of the United Nations under
these seemingly hypocritical
conditions."
MAYOR MORIAL said in his
statement: "The United Nations
has asked all nations which have
embassies in Jerusalem to move
these embassies to Tel Aviv. And
yet these embassies are not in
East Jerusalem, but in Jerusalem
controlled by Israel since it
became a state in 1948.
"In deploring Israel's actions
to make Jerusalem the capital the
United Nations has denounced
the Jewish presence in Jerusalem
and has once again questioned
the very presence of the Itfrueli
nation in the Middle East."
member of the National Law
Commission of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B rith. commented after the
proceedings that deportation
should be started immediately
No justice can be done. .Alter
said, if due process is not
followed swiftly. He speculated
that Trifa surrendered his
citizenship papers because he did
not want to be subjected to the
embarrassment of a full trial.
The government's case has
become very substantial Alter
said.
IN STATEMENTS delivered
to The Jeuish Sews, Trifa and
his attorney. George Woods,
charged that the case against the
archbishop was an international
conspiracy. Woods' statment was
an excerpt from his book about
the case. The Undoing
According to Trifa s Rumanian
Orthodox Episcopate of America.
"From a simple suit for
denaturalization. the Bishop's
case had grown into a vast
historical debate over Fascism in
Rumania, the relationship of the
Iron Guard' to Nazi Germany,
and the proper labeling of the
Legionary Movement on the
political spectrum.
With teams of government
lawvers winging their way to
Europe and the Near East to
depose witnesses and search out
public and private documents, it
has been made out to be a case
with international political
ramifications involving
Congressional politics, secret
connections between Richard
Nixon and nefarious Rumanian
industrialists (the machinations
of Nixon being always a topic
designed to arouse public in-
dignationi. and anonymous
American protectors' of ex-Nazis
scattered across the country."
TRIFA S SUPPORTERS
claim that Trifa's speech to the
Iron Guard in 1941 ended
peacefully. Others claim that his
speech was directly responsible
for the beginning of the
Bucharest pogrom that led to the
deaths of hundreds of Jews
According to Woods. "One
could hardly deny that Bishop
Trifa was verbal and critical of
what he and so many others felt
was the undue influence of
Rumanian Jews in the polticial
and economic fabric.
;::::.:;:::::::.:.:.:.:.::%^^
Arabs Press to Unseat Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
of this year established Nov. 15
as the date for reviewing Israel's
compliance with them. Blum
explained. He said the Nov. 15
date was chosen also because it is
after the U.S. Presidential
elections.
BLUM SAID that he and
Israel's Ambassador to the U.S.,
Ephraim Evron, were to meet
with U.S. State Department
The Israeli diplomat aJjol
announced that an additional ll|
diplomats will join the i_
members of the permanent hr|
Mission and that two Knessal
members will join Israel's UJl
delegation as advisors during tal
three-month session They ml
Haim Corfu of Likud and Mct|
Amit of the Labor Alignment.
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price increase, no fuel surcharge.
The s.s Rotterdam departs Port
Everglades. January 12. 1981. and San
Francisco. January 25. For immediate
reservations, see your travel agent.
Holland America Cruises
2 Penn Plaza, New York. NY 10121
Please rush me your 44-page brochure on
the 1981 Holland America World Cruise.
Name-
Tl
in
oil
I
ye
I
Si

u Welkom aan Boordr
Wk
I
rVil
ni
Wi
u


. September 19.1980
fJewisti ihridHari
Page 15-A
Long Shadow Over Florida, N.Y.
vote Democratic have given
favorable ratings to Javits,
according to assessments of
voters leaving the polls in New
York last Tuesday, a question
raised is whether votes for Javits
and not for Holtzman in
November would bring victory
for D'Amato, as happened 10
years ago in the Buckley victory.
|By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
uA| Last weeks
[atonal primary elec-
r in New York and
Jrida cast a long shadow
\x the probable com-
on of the Senate
agn Relations Com-
Itee when the new
ss organizes next
jiuary.
New York, the
[publicans denied
nination to Jacob
irits, their ranking
on that all-
ortant committee which
strong influence on
\. foreign policy and on
ever is President.
liSTEAD OF the liberal
Si with a record of 24 years
[Senate and a specialist in
.. affairs, the Republicans,
[stunning upset, gave their
Ination to a conservative,
|tse D'Amato. the 43-year-old
ding Supervisor of the Town
Pemp9tead in Long Island,
nato also has the nomination
> Conservative and Right to
[parties, thus being assured
lines on the ballot.
|e Democrats in New York
nated 38-year-old, three-
Congresswoman Elizabeth
Bman. She upset three
bncnts. including Bess
the first Jewish Miss
Hca, who was favored by
York's major Democratic
Irs. and former New York
[Mayor John Lindsay.
veral surveys showed that
Holtzman. who is giving up
Tiouse seat to run for the
lie. ran ahead of Ms.
son among Jewish voters
ped the field among Catholic
FLORIDA. Sen. Richard
E. chairman of the Foreign
ons Subcommittee on the
st, was forced into a
ninnft lor the Democratic
a second term.
ponent is Florida
Comissioner Bill
f >ul Gunter in the
ries bj 12,000 votes in
ont million votes cast
Democratic can-
is 31 percent of
1 i>ne more per-
than Gunter. The
aci Oct. 7, six
| defeated Gunter
''. the political
| *mg this Presidential
F in Florida may
're difficult for Stone
Gunter a second
the Democrats
h Dan Berman. a
lawyer of Salt Lake City.
R his first statewide race.
| Senatorial, candidate.
will oppose Republican
Jake Garn. who is
l> favored to win a second
L'tah is known for ticket
FK m general elections. In
P gave 72 percent of its vote
fnard Nixon whUe electing a
cratic Governor by the
cal margin.
'AN, who specializes in
ust law. is a graduate of
ns College and Columbia
imty Law School. He was
f" Washington. D.C. and is
Eh i? retired ,aw Professor
no University in Moscow,
Berman has four
Pws.by his first marriage.
named two years ago. .
teu javits w
by the UbersJ Party
Si*JS that "" ^e
l** ballot in November,
i ft1*"*1 micte ccu".
\*9 not be back in the
Even if he is elected.
Washington sources consider it
unlikely that the Senate
Republican Policy Committee,
which decides membership, will
name Javits as its leader on
foreign relations in the Senate,
since New York Republicans
have rejected him.
If Javits does not return to the
Senate for a fifth term, Sen.
Charles Percy of Illinois would
hold seniority as the committee's
ranking Republican. However,
Percy is now the ranking
Republican on the Governmental
Affairs Committee and the
Republican rules preclude a
Senator from having two such
Senate leadership posts. If Percy
declines, Tennessee Senator
Howard Baker would have
priority for the Javits position.
SOME REPUBLICAN friends
of Javits were encouraging him
here to make the stiff race for the
Senate seat. They noted that only
about 20 percent of the state's
Republicans voted in the primary
in which D'Amato won both
statewide and in New'York City.
"People now recognize they were
sleeping for the primaries and did
not get worked up for Javits,"
according to one prominent
Jewish Republican in New York
City.
"They took it for granted he
would win in the primary. In the
general election people will
recognize his services and look to
him to continue," that
Republican leader said.
Others, however, had a dif-
ferent perspective. Although
undefeated in 32 years in politics,
Javits, now 76, was targeted by
D'Amato for age, health and
liberalism. Minority party
members have won in New York
in the past in some instances. A
classic case was in 1970 when
James Buckley, wearing the
Conservative Party label, was
elected Senator. He won when the
encumbent Liberal-Republican,
Sen. Charles Goodell, and the
Democratic candidate, Richard
Ottinger. divided the liberal and
moderate vote.
WHILE MANY who normally
3 i SHALOM
Our Warmest Wishes for a
Peaceful, Healthy and
Happy New Year
To All Our Travel Agents,
Friends and Passengers
,13115 iVVh
SLA. ISRAEL AIRLINES T>rW7 TIN '1'TU *WW
1602 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
For Reservations and Information
Phone Toil-Free 1-800-223-6700
"All we have of freedomall we use or know
This our fathers bought for us, long and long ago.
Rudyard Kipling
This collage by New York artist F'ed Otnes was especially commissioned by B'own & Williamson tot its, permanent collection of tine ait works
The freedom to choose our livelihood was
provided to us long ago And it was typified
by the struggle of immigrants to Amenca in
the early 1800 s People like Adam Gimbel.
a humble Jewish peddler from Germany,
who later founded the country's first
department store. And individuals who
became industrial giants, like Andrew
Carnegie from Scotland, who built one o
the largest steel producing businesses in
the United States. America had given both
of them the freedom. The freedom to choose
A free individual does not live without
choice A free society does not prosper
without it. Consider, if you will, the personal
choices we make every day without intervention
from others. Now consider how many we
take for granted.
The right to choose is the basts of all freedom-
political, social, artistic, economic, religiousfor
all people But this right must be protected from
those who would chip away at it...either delib-
erately for personal gain, or innocently tor the
"betterment" of humanity. It must be protected
from those who would make their choice,
your choice These personal freedoms are our
legacy as welt as our responsibility, .to protect
and to pass on to those who follow
Freedom, it's a matter of choice
f
i
'
.-


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BR78x14 44.88 2.28
iER78x14 47.00 2.33
IfR78x14 49.47 2.50
fGR78x14 51.58 2.65
HR78x14 54.51 2.86
GR78x15 54.40 2.70
HR78x15 55.92 2.90
LR78x15 62.04 3.24
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I P195/75R14 1 Replaces DR & ER 78-14 56.00 2.33
1P205/75R14 1 Replaces FR78-14 57.65 2.48
|P215/75R14 I Replaces GR78-14 58.93 2.58
P205/75R15 Replaces FR78-15 55.00 2.57
P215/75R15 Replaces GR78-15 62.77 2.75
P225/75R15 Replaces HR & JR78-15 67.90 2.93
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3151 N Federal Hwy 943-4200
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515 South Dixie 832-3044
* LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544


Holy Bay Bond Appeals
'ocus on United Jerusalem
u.nv synagogues throughout Shomrei Yerushalayim, Guar-
x L'Hroward counties will dians of Jerusalem, who would
u ,ditional Kol Nidre and heP support Jerusalem through
vc innur 1 srael Bond appeals the purchase of $ 1,000 or more in
*2Kd o"1" *K **}}<{*. "A all-out sales effort
Begin's Rosh Hashanah Message
weekend in
Upport the economy of the
fjewish State, according to Gary
K Gerson. South Florida general
Campaign chairman.
I Gerson announced that at the
IRosh Hashonah appeals, held
llast weekend, sales of Israel
Bonds far surpassed previous
Ivears and the Kol Nidre and
|Yom Kippur efforts were also
[expected to be greater than ever
Ibefore.
Because Israel must continue
Ijts economic growth and, at the
I same time, meet the costs of
developing the Negev to ac-
[commodate thousands of people
Iwho must move there from the
ISinai as a result of the peace
treaty, the Israel Bonds
lOrganization has set its 1980
[South Florida goal at $21 million
|_ the highest in history,"
I Gerson said.
Rabbi Leon Kronish, national
ICampaign chairman for the State
of Israel Honds, has called for the
(enrollment of a record number of
will take place this evening and
tomorrow in synagogues
throughout South Florida, as
well as across the nation and in
Jewish communities around the
world," he noted.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, co-
chairman of the Israel Bonds
National Rabbinic Cabinet, said
more than one-third of all bonds
sold in the United States are sold
directly through synagogue
functions. The rabbi noted that
Israel needs bond dollars now,
more than ever before, to help
build its economy and in-
frastructure. "Anyone who goes
to Israel can see bond dollars at
work, and it is the duty of Jews
in the diaspora to see that this
bond power continues," he
stressed.
Members of the community
who will not be attending Yom
Kippur services and who wish to
purchase an Israel Bond may do
so by calling the Israel Bond
Office at the Roney Plaza on
Miami Beach.
\At the Iladassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in
\ Jerusalem, Phyllis Miller of Miami Beach, chairman of the
I Dade County School Board, visits the Children's Department of
the hospital. "It is thrilling to see the modern facilities of the
I hospital open to all peoples, including the residents of the West
\Bank, providing excellent health care for Jewish and Arab
[children alike," she said.
JERUSALEM The
following is Israeli Prime
Minister Menachem Begin's
High Holy Day message:
"We stand on the threshold of
the New Year 5741 with hope and
belief that our people's ancient
great human values will endure
and triumph over the transient
material considerations provided
by oil these days. We are a small
nation and we know our place in
the world. We know what we can
offer mankind. We also know the
role we can and do play in the
Middle East.
"The region in which we live
and its periphery is now in
turmoil. In Iran we have seen
civilization itself endangered by
the emergennce of dark forces
that have trampled underfoot the
time-honored customs and
traditions of international
cooperation. We have seen the
power of petrodollars reduce
even some democratic states to
subservience and capitulation.
"THIS IS a disturbing
development for the shrinking
free democratic world. We must
stand together in the face of the
Soviet thrust into the four
corners of the globe for control of
strategic and material assets.
After Angola and Mozambique,
Ethiopia and South Yemen,
Vietnam and Cambodia it would
be foolhardy to ignore the im-
plications of their operations in
Afghanistan, as a result of which
the Soviet army could reach the
Indian Ocean through
Baluchistan. The whole free
world is in danger; liberty itself is
in peril.
"For our part we have done all
in our power to advance the cause
of peace in our region. We faith-
fully carried into effect every
commitment that we undertook
in the peace treaty with Egypt.
We have made great sacrifices for
peace an ideal which is not
easily obtainable and, therefore,
we must pursue it with deter-
mination and patience.
"We have the profound
satisfaction that it was we who
originally proposed autonomy for
the Arab inhabitants of Judaea,
Samaria and the Gaza district.
We have stated and reiterated
our readiness to fulfill the letter
and spirit of the second part of
the Camp David agreement,
dealing with this autonomy, and
not to deviate from it by one iota.
We are in no way responsible for
the periodic interruptions and
suspensions of the negotiations
all of them caused by the
Egyptian government and
earnestly call on our friends and
partners likewise to abide by the
original agreements.
"AS USUAL, the world has
overreacted to our reaffirmation
of an existing truth that
Jerusalem is united, the capital of
our State, an indivisible city with
complete freedom of access to the
holy shrines of all religions
guaranteed by law for all time.
Any proposal which may either
directly or indirectly bring about
the redivision or repartition of
Jerusalem will be rejected by all
our people, for we stand by the
unity of Jerusalem for ever and
ever.
"From this city, eternal
Yerushalayim, I send you, my
dear brethren and sisters,
greetings for a happy New Year
5741. With God's help may it be a
year of continuing advance
towards peace, a year of im-
provement in the economic
situation of our country and its
individual citizens, a year of
growing aliya from the East and
the West to the Land of our
Forefathers. May this Rosh
Hashanah season usher in a year
of happiness and freedom,
strength, security and dignity for
all the House of Israel."
Close Ties Still Bind
Israel, Latin America
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The withdrawal of 11
Latin American embassies
from Jerusalem to Tel Aviv
in recent weeks, in reaction
to the Jerusalem law, has
been a grievous blow to
Israel. But, in the view of
Avraham Argov, a leading
expert on Israel-South
American relations, it does
not necessarily presage a
general worsening or even
weakening in the close ties
that bind Israel with many
of the Latin American
countries.
Argov, who is director of the
Latin American section in the
World Zionist Organization, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
in an interview that he hoped and
expected that the damage would
be restricted to the embassy
moves and would not spread to
other areas of the relationships.
BASICALLY, he stressed,
pro-1 srael sentiments were still
very young in South and Central
America, both among the
governments of the continent and
among the peoples. "The man in
the street in most Latin
American countries supports
Israel," Argov said.
Himself an immigrant from
Latin America, Argov has
several times revisited the
continent. His next trip will be
this fall, to Sao Paulo, Brazil,
where he is to help organize a
conference of Jewish and Zionist
leaders from all over the con-
tinent.
The conference, from Nov. 9 to
13, will be a major watershed in
Latin American Jewish affairs.
Organized jointly by the WZO
and the World Jewish Congress,
it will be addressed by Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the WZO and
Jewish Agency Executives, and
by Edgar Bronfman, acting
president of the W JC.
AGROV ASCRIBES the
embassy moves to political
pressure, rather than merely
direct oil threats. He points out
that two of the countries in-
volved, Venezuela and Ecuador,
produce their own oil and are
therefore not susceptible to oil
blackmail. Rather, the Arabs
successfully mounted a campaign
of political pressure using the
Jerusalem law as its pretext.
Citing the bases of
traditionally good relations
between Israel and Latin
American states, Argov noted
particularly the international
cooperation programs with many
of the smaller countries.
Guatemala, Colombia and Costa
Rica are among those that benefit
Continued on Page 10-B
Jewish Leaders on UJA Prime Minister's Mission
The largest increases in United
Jewish Appeal campaign con-
tributions by a major leadership
mission to Israel were recorded
on Thursday, Aug. 28, at a state
dinner in the Knesset for the 100
members of the UJA 1981 Prime
Minister's Mission.
Miami leaders who par-
ticipated in the Mission were
greater Miami Jewish
federation president Harry A.
(Hap) Levy, vice president
Norman Lipoff, and GMJF past
president Robert Russell.
Figures released showed that
regular 1981 campaign pledges
announced in the presence of
Prime Minister and Mrs.
Menachem Begin totaled $15.6
million, from contributors whose
gifts for the previous campaign
were $114 million. The 37 per-
cent increase is the highest in the
history of the annual Prime
Minister's Missions, which began
shortly after the Six Day War of
1967.
ACCORDING to UJA
National Chairman Herschel W.
Blumberg of Washington, D.C.,
who led the mission, the
uprecedented gains were an
intense and spontaneous reaction
to face-to-face meetings between
groups of mission members and
the local leaders and residents of
four Jerusalem neighborhoods
included in the renewal program.
The meeting freely aired the
hopes and concerns of the
residents, as well as the advances
made and problems encountered
in carrying it out.
The mission, for which Lee W.
Home Re-Opens Thrift Shop
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
gardens will re-open its main
i nnft Shop in the northwest area
ot Dade County four months
wter it was totally destroyed
during the May riots in that area.
it will be open for business at
5713-5734 NW 27th Ave., Miami.
" Sunday, Sept. 21, with a
nbbon-cutting ceremony at 11
"Reopening in this area is a
Profound statement about out
commitment to serving the
Population that has been
shoppuig at our Thrift Shop for
more than 16 year.," said Aaron
*vitz, chairman of the Thrift
Shop committee of the Home.
"Our board of directors is quite
positive about investing our
efforts and resources in this
area."
Although the exact dollar loss
cannot be computed, the loss of
the main Thrift Shop last May is
estimated to be in excess of
$900,000 in property and mer-
chandise. Last year the shop
grossed $545,000 in sales of
donated merchandise, the
proceeds of which provided
medicine and medical supplies to
indigent residents of the Home.
The two other Thrift Shops of
the Home, located at 500 NE
79th St., Miami* and at 3146
Hallandale Beach Boulevard,
Hallandale, were not damaged
and remained open.
The destroyed Thrift Shop was
opened in 1964 to help support
residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
It became a well-known
establishment in the community
as an outlet for quality furniture
and unique items.
Our new Thrift Shop is bigger
and better than before,'' says
Kravitz. "The community has
really come to our support by
donating some fine and unusual
merchandise all of which is for
sale. It's going to be beautiful!
Scheinbart of Boston served as
program and recruitment
chairman, was the first of the
annual Prime Minister's in-
vitational events with a $100,000
minimum pledge qualification.
The 100 participants represented
the largest group of givers in that
category ever brought to Israel
on a UJA mission. The event was
a key element in a new program
for $100,000 minimum con-
tributors being initiated in the
1981 campaign by the UJA
"Hineni Committee," under the
chairmanship of Samuel H.
Miller of Cleveland.
Prime Minister and Mrs. Begin
were presented by Miller with
specially designed pins, making
them honorary members of the
Hineni Committee.
Another first recorded by the
mission was an all-morning
seminar at Hebrew University
conducted by the Jerusalem
Institute of Management,
bringing mission participants
.ogether with some 50 leading
Israeli businessmen, bankers and
industrialists. Seminar
discussions covered a wide range
of subjects related to Israel's
economy and financial structure,
examining the status of the
country'8 technology-based
industries, the investment
potential for diaspora Jewry and
other means of closing Israel's
trade gap.
IN ADDITION, the mission's
opening night dinner in Beit
Machase Square was the first
UJA mission plenary session
ever held in the reconstructed
Jewish Quarter of the Old City in
Jerusalem. Support of the in-
divisibility of Jerusalem was an
underlying theme of the mission,
which voiced the age-old pledge,
"For Jerusalem's sake I will not
be silent," on the first night at
the Western Wall and again on
;he final evening in a Yizkor
service at Yad Vashem's Hall of
Remembrance. A visit to
Ammunition Hill, site of a critical
1973 battle in the drive for the
reunification of Jerusalem,
preceded the Yad Vashem
ceremony.
Prime Minister Begin's ad-
, Continued on Page 3-B
(Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida, Friday, September 19,1980
SECTION B


Page 2 B
> Bewisti fkrxMar
Friday. September 19
Yom Kippur Observed This
Weekend; Succoth Next Week
Reform. Conservative and
Orthodox Jews throughout the
world will observe Yom Kippur.
the Day of Antonneat, the most
sacred and solemn of the ancient
Hebrew holidays, from sundown
Friday until sundown Saturday.
The observance of Yom Kippur
is one which has remained un-
broken for more than 2.000 years
Yom Kippur u universally ob-
served by all branches of
Judaism by fasting from sun-
down to sundown, by prayer and
by a searching reappraisal of the
individual's behavior in all of his
relationships. It is the
culmination of 10 days of intense
self-examination during which
the individual Jew examines the
year just past, atones for his
short-comings in relations to God
and man and expresses his hope
for strength and regeneration for
the year to come.
Succoth. the holiday of har-
vest, follows shortly after Yom
Kippur. At sundown. Sept. 24,
Jews throughout the world begin
celebrating the Feast of
Tabernacles or 'Booths.' a
holiday of thanksgiving and the
most joyous of ail Jewish ob-
servances.
Succoth is observed by Reform
Jews for eight days and for nine
by Orthodox and Conservative
Jews. The holiday was called the
Harvest Festival because, ac-
cording to the Bible, it was
celebrated at the autumnal
harvest.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Dr. Irving Lehrman will of-
ficiate at Kol Nidre and Yom
Kippur services for Temple
Emanu-El Friday night, Sept. 19,
and Saturday in the Miami Beach
Theater of Performing Arts.
He will be assisted by Cantor
Zvi Adler and the Temple
Emanu-El Choir, under the
direction of Shmuel Fershko
Friday's services begin at 7:15
p.m.. with Saturday morning's
starting at 9:30 and continuing
until sundown, the end of the
High Holy Days and of the Day
of Atonement.
Simultaneous service will be
held across the street in the main
santuary of Temple Emanu-El.
with Rabbi Maxwell Berger and
Cantor Richard S. Browdy
leading the parallel services.
On Saturday, Yizkor memorial
service will begin at 12:30 p.m.
A special presentation by the
Temple Emanu-El Youth will be
made during a 3:30 p.m.
Saturday service.
Rabbi Lehrman will chant the
Neilah (concluding) service at
6:15 p.m. Saturday.
Junior congregation services
for Temple Emanu-El and
community youngsters, ages 7
through 12. will be held at 2:30
p.m. in the Pearlman Mural
Room adjacent to the main
sanctuary
A section of the Theater of the
Performing Arts has been
reserved for teenagers for both
Kol Nidre and Yom Kippur
services.
TEMPLE BETH TON
Temple Beth Tov is having Kol
Nidre services Friday. Sept. 19.
at 6:30pm. Yom Kippur services
wul be Saturday Sept 20. at 9
a-m. Yizkor at 1 p.m. Sermon:
You Are Children of the Lord. '
TEMPLE BETH AM
Temple Beth Am will conduct
its Yom Kippur evening servares
at 6:30 p.m and 9 p.m. on
Friday. Sept. 19.
Rabbi Herbert M Baumgard.
senior rabbi, wul speak on the
theme. "To Whom Does the
Earth Belong?
On Yom Kippur morning. Sept
20. Beth Am will have two con-
temporary services at 9:30 a.m
Rabbi Baumgard will speak in
the sanctuary on the theme.
"Why Judaism?" Rabbi Stuart
Weinblatt. associate rabbi, will
speak in the gym on the theme.
Building Bridges."
Rabbi Weinblatt will speak at
the Children's Service at 1:30
p.m.. and Rabbi Baumgard will
speak at the 3:30 p.m. afternoon
service. Rabbi Morton Hoffman
will serve as cantonal soloist at
all services in the sanctuary, at
which the Adult Choir will be
conducted by Selma Baumgard.
Harriet Pollock will conduct the
Children's Choir in the gym, and
Jackie Berney will serve as can-
tonal soloist there.
Rabbi Baumgard will begin the
first adult education course of the
season on Tuesday. Sept. 23. at 8
p.m. The four-week course will be
on the subject "Modern Jewish
Mystics."
AVENTURA JEWISH CEN-
TER
Yom Kippur services will start
with Kol Nidre on Friday, Sept.
19. at 6:30 p.m. with Rabbi
David Saltman officiating and
Cantor Lawrence Tuchinsky
chanting the liturgy. Opening
service on Saturday. Sept. 20.
will begin at 9 a.m
Memorial service (Yizkor) will
be at 11:45 a.m. for members.
There will be a community Yizkor
service at 3 p.m. All are welcome
There will be a special Yizkor
memorial service at 5:45 p.m.
Services will conclude with the
blowing of the Shofar at 8 p.m.
Flowers gracing the pulpit will
be donated by Mr and Mrs. Leo
Driben in honor of their recent
marriage and in memory of
Driben s father. Succoth holiday
services start Wednesday. Sept.
24, at 7 p.m. and will be Thur-
sday. Sept. 25. at 8:45 a.m.
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TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami announcee that Dr. Alfred
Gottschalk. president of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, will preach
at both the Kol Nidre service on
Friday. Sept. 19. at 8 p.m. and
Yom Kippur morning service on
Saturday morning at 10.
Dr. Gottschalk will discuss
The Jew in the World of
Tomorrow" during the evening
service and "Is This the Fast
That I Have Chosen?" in the
morning.
There will be a Laymen's
Service at noon, led by Ken
Rosen
The Afternoon Service, which
will include Yizkor Prayers, will
begin at 3 p.m. Rabbi Brett
Goldstein will discuss "The
Healing and the Hurt."
TEMPLE OR OLOM
Yom Kippur Nol Nidre service
will begin at 7:15 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Rudy's sermon will be
Commitment to God." Yom
Kippur service Saturday morning
will be at 8 a.m.; Torah reading
at 11 a.m. and memorial service
at noon. The rabbi's sermon will
be "The Power of Memory."
M incha service is set for 4 p.m.
Neilah dosing service will be at
6:15 p.m., and the rabbi's sermon
will be "Jonah's Message."
THE ISRAELITE
CENTER TEMPLE
The following is the Succoth
service schedule: Wednesday.
Sept. 24, Succoth Eve service.
6:30 p.m. Thursday. Sept. 25.
first Day Succoth. morning
service, 8:45 a.m. Sermon: The
Meaning of the Succah. Lulav
and Esrog. Evening Service, 6:30
p.m
Friday, Sept 26. second Day
Succoth. morning service, 8:45
am. Sermon: Harvest and
Thanksgiving Evening Service.
6:30 p.m.
Saturday. Sept. 27. Choi
Hamoed Sabbath Services, 8:45
a.m. and 7 p.m.
All sermons will be delivered
by Rabbi Solomon Waldenbersr.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Temple Beth Sholom will hold
Yom Kippur services Sept. 19 at
6:45 p.m. and at 8:45 p.m. Yom
Kippur services will be held Sept.
20 at 9:15 a.m Additional ser-
vices will be held at the following
times: youth service. 12:15 p.m.:
children's service, 1:15 p.m.;
afternoon service, 3:30 p.m.;
Yizkor service. 4 p.m.: Neilah
service. 5 p.m.
6:15
a-m. During Yom
there will be a Yizkor
BETH DAVID
CONGREGATION
Services at Beth David will l.
as follows: in the main %J1 **'
Kol Nidre at 6:15 p m^L^
and on Sept. 20^^'!
Kippur D*
. at about noon.?
session at 3 p.m.. and Il2*
Neueh. and the conclus^
day beginning at 5.45 pm.
There will also be a Fama
Service in the social hall at CnS
Way. Sept. 19 at 6.15 p"^
Sept. 20 at 9 a.m. Hm'"*
BETH KODESH
CONGREGATION
Succoth" or the Festival of
Tabernacles will be ushered in al
Beth Kodesh Synagogue Wed-
nesday. Sept. 24 at 6:30 p.m A
Kiddush will take place in the
large booth adjacent to tk,
synagogue.
Services for the two davj
Thursday and Friday. Sept 25
and 26. will be at 8 45 a.m. Rabbi
Max Shapiro and Cantor Lean
Segal will officiate. The theme for
discussion will be The Clouds of
Protection."
Menorah Sisterhood
Sarah Heller, humorist. 1
talk on Sholom AUichtm, at the
first meeting of Temple Menorah
Sisterhood. Sept. 24 at noon in
the Temple social hall Refresh-
ments will be served, and the
public is invited.
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Along with the fun of recalling a
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Friday. September lg.-.l0
+ Jewish fkridimr
Page 3-8
Mizrachi Women Announce Meetings
American Mizrachi Women
announce the following events:
Skvlake Chapter will hold a
Succoth party at the home of
Rabbi and Mrs. Jonah Caplan on
Sept 29 at 12:30 p.m. This party
is to honor the groundbreaking of
AMW Beth Hayfled Child
Haven in Gilo Jerusalem. Mrs.
Renina Wang, of Florida Council
of AMW will be the speaker.
Hostess: Mrs. Elsie Dratler. Mrs.
Nettye Goldberg, president.
Aviva Kinneret Chapter an-
nounces a meeting and card party
on Oct. 13 at 1 p.m. at Beth
Kodesh Synagogue. Mrs. Ssimon
April, president.
Shalom Chapter will meet on
Oct. 14 at 100 Lincoln Road Club
Room. There will be a program
with a speaker from American
Savings and Loan Association on
the topic of money. Luncheon
and entertainment. Mrs. Jeanette
Golberg, president.
Galil Chapter will meet on Oct.
6 at noon at the Washington
Savings Bank. Mrs. Ruth
Zellner, president of the Florida
Council of American Mizrachi
Women, will speak about Beth
Hayfled Child Haven in Gilo-
Jerusalem. Refreshments.
Jewish Leaders on
UJA Mission
Continued from Page IB
dress at the state dinner climaxed
a full program of appearances by
leading Israeli officials. Others
greeting mission members and
exchanging views with them
included President Yitzhak
Navon. Deputy Prime Minister
Yigael Yadin, Jewish Agency
Chairman Leon Dulzin and
Mayor Teddy Kollek of
Jerusalem.
Another highlight of the
mission was an afternoon of home
hospitality with young couples
establishing pioneering new
miUpim (pre-settlements) on
hilltops in the Galilee. Before and
after these visits, mission groups
paid their respects to the people
of Kibbutz Misgav Am, recent
target of terrorist violence and
murder. A briefing on the Galilee
repopulation program by Dr.
Raanan Weitz, director-general of
the Jewish Agency Rural
Resettlement Department,
provided the background for the
afternoon*s program.
The mission itinerary also
included visits to a number of
human support programs
funded through annual
UJA / Federation campaigns,
including a Jewish Agency
absorption center and Youth
Aliya village, and JDC-aided
projects for the elderly and for
handicapped children.
The mission launched the 1981
United Jewish Appeal fund-
raising campaign, which seeks a
peacetime record national total of
S635 million to meet Jewish
needs in Israel, elsewhere
overseas and in communities at
home.
Furnishings Industry
Meets for Bonds
Members of the home fur-
nishing industry will meet at a
special reception to be held
Sunday morning on behalf of the
State of Israel Bonds
Organization.
Each year the industry honors
a chosen member to be the
recipient of the Israel City of
Peace Award, and this year Mr.
and Mrs. Alan Blake and Mr. and
Mrs Max Friedman have been
chosen to receive this honor.
according to Bob Rubinstein and
Sara Seidler, co-chairman of the
industry's annual Israel Dinner
"I Suite to be held in October.
Mr. and Mrs. Blake are
publishers of Florida Designers
Quarterly, active members of the
home furnishing industry and
participants in numerous Jewish
philanthropic organizations. Mr.
and Mrs. Friedman are the
founders of General Mica Cor-
poration, have numerous
business interests in South
Florida and have been staunch
supporters of the Israel Bonds
Organization.
The industry members will
gather to make plans for their
October banquet and to pledge
support for Israel through the
Bonds Program.
Are You Afraid That Your Child
Might Join a Cult?
The Danger is Greater Than You Think.
Missionary cults are on the increase; Jewish children are bowing down to
gurus and building their lives areound non-Jewish ideologies and prac-
tices. In order to bring our people out of these cults and prevent others
from joining, we have to give them an alternative, advises Dr. Mordechai
Nuri. director of JEM (Jewish Experience in Meditation). JEM teaches an
ancient method of meditation which was learned in Israel.
As the former director of Maimonides Clinic and a therapist, Dr. Nuri has
researched various cults for the past 2 years and he is an expert in de-
programming the victims. His goal is to build up a large centre which
could accommodate youth or adults for a period of time while they are
learning to meditate in accordance with the Jewish tradition. In this way,
Jewish people would no longer need to forsake their heritage to find
relaxation and a satisfying way of meditating.
Dr. Nuri is appealing to all Jews to imagine that it is, God forbid, their very
own child deceived into these cults so please help to support this cause.
There are a number of ways that you can help:
1. Send contributions to JEM P.O. Box 3901921. Miami Beach. Fla. 33139.
All donations are tax-deductible.
2. Support JEM by buying Lulav and Etrog for the holiday of Sukkot.
3 Fill up a JEM charity box which you can obtain by calling (305) 534-5550.
4. Call up and register as a volunteer for this cause.
Classes in Jewish meditation are applicable for any Jewish person age 16
and up. For times of current classes or for information, call 534-5550 or
write the above mentioned address.
\
On Oct. 19. Galil Chapter will
hold its Annual Fresh Air
Luncheon (Dime Bank) at the
Tarlton Hotel at noon. Mrs.
Hannah Tarr, chairperson.
Galil Chapter is also holding
its annual Thanksgiving
weekend. Call Elizabeth
Fttelman for information.
Hatikvah Chapter will hold its
first meeting for the New Year on
Oct. 9 at noon at the Kneseth
Israel Synagogue Social Hall.
Guest speaker will be Lily Stone,
a member of the national board of
American Mizrachi Women, and
mother of Richard Stone.
Luncheon will be served. The
meeting will be dedicated to all
new "Mothers-in-Israel." Pearl
Schwartz, president; Sylvia
Dweir and Yocheved Cohen,
program chairpersons.
Shoshana Chapter will meet
Sept. 23 at noon at the Seacoast
Towers South. Program will be
the celebration of ground-
breaking of Beth Hayeled Child
Haven in Gilo Jerusalem. Rose
Shapiro and Nora Aranoff.
presidium.
Migdal Chapter will meet on
Sept. 24 at the Forte Tower
Meeting Room at noon. Guest
speaker will be Lily Stone.
Entertainment and an Israeli
movie. Mrs. Elsa Zigler.
president.
a

The Auxiliary at Mount Sinai Medical Center was all smiles as
they opened their newly remodeled Gift Shop off the lobby of
the Main Building. Gift Shop Manager Honey Grossman,
Executive Vice President Alvin Goldberg and Auxiliary
President Alice Ruby graced the doorway after cutting the
ribbon opening the shop to the public.
Assistant Regional Director
Administration, planning, supervision of B'nai B'rith
Youth Program in N. Miami Beach and Broward Area.
Recruit, train, and supervise volunteer advisors. MSW
or related discipline with experience in group, youth
work. Adequate knowledge of Jewish history, culture
and customs. Includes evening and weekend work.
Send resume to: BBYO, 14411 S. Dixie Highway, No.
208, Miami, Florida 33176.
.
.
WfWPWWWW
The problem with stress is not how to get rid of it. It's a part of
life. And it's not even all bad. The real problem with stress is how to
recognize it and control it. So it doesn't control you.
Your body reacts to stressful situations with its nerves, glands and
hormones. And because these systems function throughout the body,
what affects them can affect other parts of your body that may be
vulnerable at the time.
That's why stress is a factor in many people's heart attacks,
hypertension, ulcers, asthma, possibly even cancers, and probably
many other ailments. That's also why, in these times of many stresses,
it's a major factor in increasingly costly health care.
You can recognize stress by heeding the warnings of your body
and.emotions. Frustration. Anger. Hostilities that build up. Heavy
pressures of responsibility time demands and conflict. Headaches,
insomnia, muscle tension.
The key to handling stress is learning. Learning to air your
feelings in constructive ways, to train your body to relax, to repair a
lifestyle before you're faced with expensive medical repairs. You have
to learn what your stresses are and the best ways for,you to deal
with them.
But they must be dealt with.
Because the longer you remain in the
qrip of stress, the more crushing and life insurance company
*Ti I*______t BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA
costly its effects.
I For a tree booklet about stress and preventive health rare write JF' .
Liberty National. Communication Department. PO Box 2612. Birmingham Alabama 35202 I
1
NAME-
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Pa*7e4-B
>Lmir
Friday. September 19
Evron to Speak on Beach
Tbe Ar-baaaador of Israei H *'**
the United Scatea. Ep*Jraa= Aa
Evron. will be the r^** ?*** L ~~-~"
for the irTj' ,+r-trr or* the *
American-Lsraei Chasber a4 rf C01
fierce F ^ .-.: : --sec
-_ :* mc 1. --- _, -.
Hocei V ~^,:r :~ Sar-x-aa;- l ---:: -:
*r r \ : -1. *.-.': "j-r :.~.e
g :r.C 1-- ? RvM
7T-
--.-
-OJcenoencs
:=
.--r-r-erce :e<=r I ?rfc ;
'. .cC S-a:
a "-~e ;-:j_ l_ i-c ajajteajl rr.v?ec :~e : _*:~es5

'.?r*r. a~C :: ~*.~ s*r*"~e:
pavaapend r ;i~-i *Tta
Jar-isa-ec: j:
Academv Renamed for Rabbi Gross
. r_- H*cr- Acaoec;
Z- aut Miaavji *i= wd the
?-:t. A_xa~.-er 5 Gross He-
'-- A:*:--; .Sept hccor-
x* ?~i". It-s -; p-aisec
a*s> _- N'i.-:.- ?-::. I-r:ss wi*
^r: e **rr.-.2 M^rr.: Beacr.
The cerer-er.:** ere rriairec
bj Lr E^as Heracr.rr.a~r
preajdent of the Academy
Speeches were given by Cocna-ua-
sioner 5 a:-;- Scbreiber
Nat ha rat Smm a iB< Beacfa
resident and former Academy
atudect aad I H Abra~-a.
chairman of the executive com-
mittee of the school. Rabb.
amgl -- MB ::' :he
?. = --. Stoat -ad Zr liorria
Gross, brother poke or. beta.
I H Abrams iecucatcc :-*
Wall of Joy Rabb: Gross
Mrj T.-.r ''.;.. xmmmU of
--:.-:? pwchand -; individuals
or families to commemorate a
;:;. m aaaji Each fcarfcfc trfl be
--::_:.. .--bed accorti^g
-..: :.-.* j:--:r ; washes Tbe cost
per bnar. 1a 8>X and 81.000. and
:-~ t.-z- _. :e .sec hi taJaBaW'
ihipa to continue Jewish
rOicatnn.
The ceremonies were closed by
Rabb: Stanley Bronieid. newly
appoisied prmcipai of the school-
Ileitis, Colitis Seminar Slated
The National Foundation for
Ilexus and Colitis. Inc.. will
present an educational seminar
or. Medical. Surgical, and
Nutritional Aspects of
Inflammatory Bowel Disease.'
Sept 25. at 7:30 p.m.. in the
Educational Center at South
Miami Hospital.
Four leading South Florida
physicians. surgeons and
nutritionists will participate in a
par.el discussion on the latest
developments in diagnosing ar.d
treating ueitis. colitis and reiateo
diseases which currently affect
more than two million
.Americans
The panel is free and open to
the general public Individuals
affected by ileitis or colitis, and
their families and friends, are
urged to attend the session which
also will outline the programs
and facilities of the .Ann Goriitz
South Florida Chapter of the
National Foundation
ORT Starts Its Second Century
Local and district meetings
have been held throughout the
summer to continue ORT s
Centennial Year 1880-1980
celebrations and to plan for
ORT s second century of service
to the Jewish people
Goals have been set and will be
FALL COURSES
IN ISRAEL.
CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
Retraining ana orientation
co-'Srs --i~. -5 to career$ -
israe a-e s" accepting
a:: cams Courses are free'c
ne* iTmigrants
^ TEACHERS
& COMPUTER
t> HOTEL
MANAGEMENT
V SOCIAL WORKER
MSW, BSW
V REHABILITATION
WORKER
Contact us immediately for
complete details
(305) 573-2556
presented at the 13th Nauona;
Board Conference in Houston.
Oct. 2-23. Nine delegates, headed
by Jean Rose. Southeastern
Florida Region president, and
Ruth Leff. executive committee
chairman, will join 800 delegates
representing 140.000 members of
Women's .American ORT in over
1.200 chapters throughout the
United States
Plans are in the making for
1980-81 agenda activities that
will include the entire Jewish
community. membership
recruitment and fund-raising
activities, along with plans to
take an even greater concern in
Jewish community problems-
Hebrew Academy
Expands Classes
The Rabbi .Alexander H Qstm
Hebrew Academy of Great*'
Vi--_ k expanding its prograr
of service to the Miami Jewisr.
::: ..-..:> In aid::.or. to the
ear.y childhood. elementary.
or high and senior high
programs, the Academy will offer
dents enrolled in secular
coueges the opportunity to
- their Jewish studies in
MfcM
Tbe Academy will provide
_-?e-5 :r. GemorraM Tilmudi.
Jew;;- history'- Jewish
philoaop h y ar. d Halac ha
t ''.-- practical applications
faviafc 'a* to contemporary
exper.er.
Rabb: Avraham Chaim Feuer
and other members of
Acaoem> staff have set up this
program to complement
secular program of Miami's
Jewish college studer.:-
Mount Sinai
Holiday Services
Patients at Mount Sinai
Medical Center in Miami Beach
who must be hospitalized during
the Jewish High Holidays can
observe their faith through
special programs offered by the
hospital
Ambulatory patients can
attend an abbreviated holiday
service in the hospital's
Employee Cafeteria Friday. Sept.
19. at 3 p.m. Conducted by Rabbi
Solomon Schiff. director of
chaplaincy for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and chaplain
for Mount Sinai, the services will
combine Rosh Hashanah 'New
Year 1 and Yom Kippur 'Day of
Atonement' prayers in one
service
Patients unable to leave their
beds can view services for each
holiday on Mount Sinai's TV-3. a
closed circuit television system.
Rabbi Schiff also conducts the
video-taped services, both
morning and evening on Sept. 19
and 20 for Yom Kippur.
Holiday Partu
Lebediker Branch of Farband
plans a holiday cocktail party on
Sunday. Sept. 28. at 2 p.m at
1234 Washington Ave.. Miami
Beach, according to Joseph P
Zuckerman. president
'Jewish Worship Hour'
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will be
appearing on the Jewish Worship
Hour. Sept. 21. at 8 a.m.
Opti-Mrs. Club Installation
_ ._______;-.._n-4.. Secretary. Anita Cfc. *~
Sydelle Blatt was installed as
president of Opti-Mrs. Club of
Miami Beach at a dinner-dance in
Jimmv DeNicola s Grist Mill at
the Hemispheres in Hallandale.
by her husband William.
Past presidents Mickey
Sonnett and Bernice Troop
wrote, arranged, narrated and
sang the original program
Sevmour Silverman. president-
elect of Optimist International,
gave the invocation Past
President Lillian Olkin was
chairperson for the evening.
Husbands were installing
officers for the Opti-Mrs.. which
included Vice Presidents, Esther
Steiner and Beverly Homreich;
Treasurer. Fay Miller: Recording
Corresponding Secret,
Charlotte Chester-
Secretaries Dorothy m,ij
Edith Leibowitz
- ,ry'
Social
'-f and
Henry Kram. incomi
president of North Sk *
Optimist Club. L-stalled T
board of directors which bf
eluded: Claire Brotrnan. Dorothv
Carrnel. Norma Henig Benr
Hirsch. Iris
Beatnce
Molaen.
Hurwi'tz. %Helene" JaTbon.^JiJ
Katz. Norma
Levenson. Li
Kui
", Carol
l.c. *;..;>... Lilian Levin
Barbara Miller. Je-fOlkin.LiC
Olkin. Gen Peters. Irene Pdy,
Anne Pines. Helen Segal. Mickev
Sonnett. Elaine Ste.*; Bemic.
Troop. Miuie Webster Muriel
Weston. Peppy Fields Flaxman
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mdav. September 19,1980
+Jenist> fhridinr
Page 5-B
City of Hope to Honor Plasky
Mrs. Cy (Bess) Plasky.
national vice president of the
Htv of Hope, will be presented
with the Spirit of Life Award at
the annual Leadership and
Fundraising Seminar, sponsored
by the Southeast Region Council
of Auxiliaries.
Bess will be honored on Sept.
28 at the Doral Hotel on the
Ocean for her many years of
devoted service to the City of
Hope. She has had her portrait
hung in the gallery of
achievement at the nonsectarian,
free. National Medical Center.
Mrs. Mollie Bloom, past
president of council, is mistress
of cerimonies and will make the
presentation.
Through Bess efforts, the
City of Hope in this area has
grown from one small chapter
(Miami Beach No. 203) to 24
chapters. She is president of the
Council, consisting of more than
I 30,000 members.
She was instrumental in
initiating Project HEAL (Help
Eradicate All Leukemia) and has
[raised over one half million
dollars expressly for the treat-
Iment of leukemia through the
I bone marrow transplant, a
[process of replacing the patient's
I own abnormal bone marrow with
I healthy marrow which can be
[obtained only from a closely
[matched donor, such as a brother
lor sister.
Also, among her noteworthy
I accomplishments has been the
|establisment of the first pilot
[original intensive care unit in the
[United Spates and the world.
I This was originated by her in
| memory of her seven-year-old
\Mrs. Henry Solomon,
assistant principal at Hillel
Community Day School,
spent this past summer at
{Harvard University's annual
\ Reading Seminar. The course
\ surveyed the latest materials
land methods in reading, from
{kindergarten to college
boards.
New Test
Detects Mono
A highly accurate, fast and
inexpensive test for detecting
infectious mononucleosis,
popularly called the "kissing
disease," has been developed by
immunologists at the University
| of Miami School of Medicine.
The test is more effective than
others in use for many years, said
Mary Ann Fletcher, Ph.D.,
principal investigator who
developed the procedure after
nine years of work funded by the
I National Institutes of Health.
Although the person with
I mononucleosis often experiences
I extreme fatigue, the victim may
I be unaware he has the disease.
symptoms generally include
malaise, fever, sore throat,
swollen glands and rash.
I Mononucleosis is normally a self-
I limiting disease. The only remedy
|rest.
"There is no other test of this
JVype that is available," said Dr.
IHetcher. She called the one step
Itest less tedious and more ac-
curate than a popular commercial
I test which uses horse antigen and
another which uses an antigen
derived from sheep........
Bess Plaskv
child Kobyn after her early death
at City of Hope more than 20
years ago. Bess and many kind
hearted people responded with
contributions which made this all
possible.
Bess helps all chapters when
called upon and gives of herself
generously, according to City of
Hope members.
She is a life member of
Parkinsons, Variety Children's
Hospital, Temple Ner Tamid,
Fight for Sight, Cardiac
Children's Hospital, Douglas
Gardens, ORT, Hadassah, B'nai
Birth, and Pythians. She is pre-
sently living in Treasure Isle.
Samuel Farber, far right, executive treasurer at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, celebrated his 65th birthday with a surprise
party. Morry Kovens, a trustee and founder (left) and Chair-
man of the Board Edward Shapiro (center) were among the
friends and family who gathered to honor him on this special
occasion.
Thorn to Return to Israel to Meet Begin
By EDWARD EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Gaston
Thorn of Luxembourg, who
is also the president of the
European Economic
Community's (EEC)
Council of Ministers, will
return to Israel later this
month to meet with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin
and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir. Thorn,
who is conducting a study
on the Middle East conflict
on behalf of the EEC's nine
member states, also plans
to meet with Palestinian
leaders from the West Bank
and the Gaza district.
Thorn's decision to return to
Israel Sept. 29 for a two-day visit
followed an open rift between
himself and Israeli leaders. The
EEC Council president, who has
already conferred with President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt in Cairo,
had warned earlier that he would
cancel altogether his return visit
to Israel.
CIRCLES CLOSE to him said
he was "exasperated" by what
they termed Israeli-made dif-
ficulties. These, the sources said,
hinged mainly on the people
Thorn wanted to meet, including
Palestinians under ad-
ministrative detention, and the
actual date for his arrival.
Israeli sources said, however,
that Thorn wanted to arrive in
Meyer to Address
B'nai B'rith
B'nai B'rith Harmony Lodge
No. 2463 will hold its Sept. 22
meeting at the Washington
Savings Auditorium at 8 p.m.
633 NE 167 St., North Miami
Beach.
The guest speaker for this
event will be Hank Meyer, who is
president-elect of the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodge. The theme of his address
will be membership.
Meyer has been active in B'nai
B'rith and community affairs for
. many years. He is charter past
president of Zion Lodge, a
member of the state Hillel ad-
visory board, and has earned the
District Five Hillel Award and
the National Gold Key Com-
munity Award, as well as the
B'nai B'rith Benny Award for
bringing in over 50 new members
in one year.
Bergida to Speak
at Beth Am
Who will be our new poetical
leaders after election day? is the
Uric which Hal Bergida wffl
-discuss at the Temple Beth Am
Youth Lounge, on Sunday, Set*.
28 at 9:30 a.m. Bergida is a radio
commentator with a daily
program on WKAT.
Israel while Israel's leaders were
busy with President Carter's
special representative to the
autonomy talks, Sol Linowitz.
An Israeli official source told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
"both sides have to agree on a
visit date."
The matter was straightened
out when Israel's Ambassador to
Belgium and Luxembourg,
Yitzhak Minerbi, met with Thom
in Luxembourg. European
sources in Brussels said that the
rift between Israel and the EEC
"was only papered over and
continues to exist."
THE EEC is due to meet this
week in Brussels when their
foreign ministers consider
Thorn's report and decide
whether to take immediate
diplomatic action in the Middle
East or wait for the American
presidential election.
Several of the nine ministers
reportedly want immediate
initiatives as they fear that
"Israel might well use the
American pre-electoral period to
carry out additional unilateral
actions, such as transferring the
Prime Minister's office to East
Jerusalem or annexing the Golan
Heights."
Israel obviously resents any
West European interference in
the current tripartite peace
process and says that Israel and
Egypt should be allowed to work
out matters between themselves,
with America's assistance, in line
with the Camp David accords.
THE NINE, on the other hand,
say their policy is based on their
joint declaration issued last June
in Venice which called for the
recognition of Palestinian self-
determination and the par-
ticipation of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in the
peace talks.
The Europeans do not believe
that the Camp David accords can
succeed in achieveing peace and
are pressing for a West European
initiative. ____
Full Time Secretary
National Jewish Womens Organization. Excellent
working conditions benefits. Send resume to 420 Lin-
coln Road, Suite 430. Miami Beach, Fla. 33139.
m
m
NEW IN TOWN?
LET MIAMI SHALOM
GREET YOU AT A
SPECIAL RECEPTION!
SUNDAY. SEPT. 28 7:30 P.M.
PHONE: 576-4000, Ext. 251
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
THE NEW ORLEANS HILTON INVITES YOU TO...
FOLLOW THE RAINBOW
TO NEW ORLEANS
AND PARADE WITH STYLE
Come to the New Orleans Hilton, the
fabulous resort hotel right on the banks
of the mighty Mississippi and just steps away
from the world famous French Quarter.
Take advantage of Hilton's "Rainbow
Weekend'5"'" package. For only 56900 per
person (based on double occupancy)* you
can stay in one of New Orleans' finest guest
rooms for 2 nights/ 3 days, a welcome bas-
ket of fruit, cheese and wine awaits your
arrival, a complete breakfast Saturday morn-
ing and Sunday you'll tap a toe to Hilton's
world famous Champagne Jazz Brunch fea-
turing hot jazz, Creole cuisine and the Mardi
Gras Spirit. Tickets to popular Pontchar-
train Beach, New Orleans' lakefront amuse-
ment park are included through Labor
Day. But you don't have to step out of the
Hotel m enjoy the fun
and excitement that is
unique to New Or-
leans. Lounge by the
pool, or in the Tropi-
cal paradise of
Rainforest.
our rooftop
hideout with
the city wide
vista. Jazz it up in the lush atrium
where the music is live every eve*
rung and the International Buffets 4it5
offer a bounty of seafoods and delicacies
from the tables of the world Pete Fountain
plays it to the Hilton every night except
Sunday and Monday.
Take advantage of
the resort atmosphere
of the Rivercenter Ten-
nis Club where eight
indoor and three out-
door tennis courts, eight
racquetball courts, a
complete health spa and pro instructions
are yours for a nominal charge.
Come on down to the New Orleans
Hilton. Well give you an incredible vaca-
tion at an unbelievably low price. Rooms
are limited so call today for reservations.
Call your local Hilton Reservation Service
or your travel agent.
The New Orleans Hilton
Poydras and the River
New Orleans. La. 70140
'Single occupancy, $117.00. Children free
in room plus menu prices for meals.
All prices include tax and tips
except bellman's gratuities.
TOWERS


Pae6-B
>Jeis*rk*i Friday, 6ept Super Travel Service
777NW72Ae.
2966020
Hc*day Greetings
Miami
lot
-*>Gr.
E H. Inc.
Edd Helms, Inc.
Electrical Contracting
179850 State Road 9 653-2520
MwlMCf Comttwti
"Vs
Miami
The Diving Locker
- Wa/ Oti'V Re*/ Tnps 4 Day Certification Course
Cen.i-eciir NASDS PADi 7Days a Wee* 9a m to 10pm
295 5.--. sesBrvd 9*7-6025 Miami
Hoeday Greetings
Ackerman & Roth we 11
PerS;a.- &OocSoeoa s: Steam Oearnog Shampoo
Carpet Laying
1500 NW 93 St 8366305 Miam,
Outrigger Ship Store &
4*** Boatique
Ljj**1 Manoe Hardware Water Soot Equipment
D*n-g Equipment Gift Ware & Jeweiry
Nautical Furniture
13301 Btscayne Blvd. 944-0704
Hobday Greetings
Telesound Systems Corp.
Erq -ee' -vgs Sa>es Seduce ^arge or Smai:
N^'se Cai. Sound Systems Paging & Background Music
7295 NW 12 St 592-3943 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Maria
Spiritual Reader & Adviser
oas7 POSS" C_".E BESEF *s GCK/P PEAOif^GS
4218 SW 8 St. 446-9339 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Johnson Brothers
Commercial Apartments Restaurants
Construction & Industnai Debns Hauling
Free Surveys & Estimates Locally Owned
Consolidated Waste. Inc.
3840NW37C1. 6241800 Miami
Hoiday Greetings
Investacorp. Inc.
Discount Broker Stocks Bonds Mutual Funds
Special Situation Investment
4500 Biscayne Blvd. Miami
(Penthouse South) 573-2212
Holiday Greetings
Bel Music
Near Miami Airport Discount Prices Musical Instruments
Rent Band Instruments Piano Guitar
Bass Drums Violin
136 NW 57 Ave. 2642572 Miami
Carol Greene
Holiday Greetings
Barbara Abelson
Something Special
Personalized Service for Creative Invitations
Napkins-MatchesAlbums-Thank you notes-Gifts-Favors
Designed Especially tor You
12811 N.Kendall Dr. 5966133 Plaza West
Holiday Greetings |
Sunshine Boys Van Shop
"We Do It AIM!"
Accessories you have heard about at prices you dreamed about
2460SW28Lane 858-3333 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Owens & Associates, Inc.
NEW POOL IN 30 DAYS GUNITE POOLS MARBLE -
COATING-POOL PATIOS-REPAIRS 2040 NW 97 St.
638-2833
Hoiday Greetings
A/bright Jewelers
Since 1965 The Place for Gold Chains
Custom Designs Fine Jewelry
2346 Ponced* Leon Blvd. 446-2866 Coral GaWet
Holiday Greetings
Delta Gas
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
/SALES & SERVICE EXPORT DEPARTMENT
12850 SW 71 Ave 266-2811 Miami
Medical Center Laboratory
Services &
Medicare Assignment
1688 Meridian Ave 538-1424 MB. Holiday Greetings
Greenstreets
3110 Comrnodore Plaza 44&6T93 Coconut Grove
Holiday Greetings
Something Different
Display
Trade Show Exhibits Layouts Scale Models Art Worx
Mura's Signs Silk Screening Parade Floats Designs
[Animation Dealers for Vaughs & LC Williams
5384 NW 56 St. 592-8970_______________M-ami
Holiday Greet.ngs
Arrow Messenger Service
We do it faster Let us prove it
_ov. Rates 24 Hours 7 Days a Week
4011 W. FlagterSt 649-7000
Miami
Holiday Greetings
Condo Resales, Inc.
Specialists in Condominium Sales & Rentals
Serving N. Miami Beach. Hallandale. Hollywood. Ft. Lauderdale
'8C* S Ocea- t> 9456579 a .anaaie
Holiday Greetings
international Cinema
Equipment company, inc.
1635-70 MM Export Specialist Sa>es Ser.ice
Rentals & Repairs New Used & 'eouiit
6750NE4Ct 7560699 Miami
HOLIDAY GREETINGS
Big K Tire
Discount Prices Complete Auto Service Center
Alignment High Speed Wheel Balance
Brake Service Shocks
4751 W. Fiagier St. 445-1355 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Morris Wolf, Photographer
Besf Wishes to My Customers & Friends and Happy Aye* Year
1615 NE 163 St. 944-2424 N. Miami Beach
Holiday Greetings
Use Faster "Imparca Express"
Weekly Sailings from Miami to Lagua.'a
Caff S.E.L Meduro Agents 1 World Trade Center N. Y.
371-4591
Holiday Greetings
Bob Hilson & Company, Inc.
Pest Control
Pressure Cleaning. Roof Coating, Tent Fumigation
Weed Control FHA & VA Termite Inspections
2811 SW70Ave.______________2667677______________Miami
Holiday Greetings
Miami Welding Supply, Inc.
We Rent We Repair We Export
"Where One Call Cets It Air
3026 N. Miami Ave. 573-5423
Miami
Chromachron Gallery
In Color Time, you tell time with 12 beautiful colors instead of
numbers. One of the world's first time pieces to be designed for
people and not for machines or people who function like
machines. 3490 Main Hwy., Coconut Grove
Holiday Greetings 442-4820
Holiday Greetings
Revision Clinic
Wane Clark, re.
EJectrologist Weight Control
'"WBI*. North MtarnlBeach
9360064
Suite 108
OUR REDEMPTION
NEW YEAR 5741
Aquarius Age Begins
Esoteric Judaism
Rev' Maggidah Edah Binah
Lectures-Counsel
864-1219
Gottex of Israel
777 NW 72 Am
2814700
Hotday Greetings
Miami
Hollywood Chiropractic Clinic
Total Chiropractic Care
15X32' Heated Whirlpool Sauna
Dr Stephen Tuzzolino.D.C. Dr. Frank Stock. DC
2710 Van Buren St.
Dr. Emanuel M.Cane. DC
Coionic Irrigation
9456272
'/wooa
Hoeday Greetings
Hausman Bus Sales
New & Used School Buses Charter 4 Trans,: Coaches
Full Line of Parts & Complete Service
1100 NW23AVB.__________940-4BS5__________gt. Lauded*
Holiday Greetings
Florida School of Drivinq
"We Take the Time To Care
36 Classrooms Nervous & Elderly Our See: a \
Dual Controls. Air Cond Cars. Lie by the S"a--
h917NE168St. 9446989 N. Miami Beach
Holiday Greetings
Computer Village
Associated Data Systems Inc.
Personal. Educational. Professional & 8-5 -ess
Computer Systems
33iSW87AVe. 266-5965 v a-
HoikJay Greetings
Dorothy B. Flynn, Realtor
We Specialize m Prestigious Waterfront ProDe- es
Pnme Residential
5759 Sunset Drive 567-2568
S Miami 2i serv ce
Florida Guard Dog Rentals
^iday & Sales, Inc. *""
24 hour service Area Security Body Gja-: Service
35 Years Same Location
240 W 25 St. 887-5218 3 ea"
Handcrafted Jewelry by
Holiday Greetings
Lou-Bert
Wholesale Retail Complete Job Done Premises
15 Years Serving Miami
707 NW 119 St. 6054644 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Humperdinck's Catering
Delicatessen Restaurant Eat In/Take 0-!
We Serve Party Trays.
1601 Biscayne Blvd. 356*395 Miami
(Omnf5th Floor)
Holiday Greetings
Music Music in Omni International Band
Instruments Guitar Amplifiers
Mikes PA Systems Sheet Music
1601 Biscayne Blvd.
358-9638
Viarrn
Holiday Greetings"
Mr. Trophy
SIGNS FOR BUSINESS. APARTMENTS. CONDOMINIUMS
PENS & SETS SHEAFFER PARKER CROSS
LAMINATIONS AWARDS TROPHYS PLAQJES
Gifts Onyx Bo/ova Clocks Desk Sets
807 NE 125 St. 8934441 N M.ami
Vydec
__.._ Td Editing Systems Video Display and
BSC MEDIA SALES AND SERVICE
^ Business Machines of Miami
302 Bird Road 444-6146 Coral Gabies
Dade 638 3800
Broward 463-1066
m
RALPH VEL0CCI
INDUSTRIAL WAtTt IRVICIB
3840 NW. 37th Court Miami. Florida 33*142
e
Shalom Welding Supplies
18763 SW 104 Ave. 233-0649
Ltoyd McGiboon
Holiday Greetings


vnd.v.Septpberl9,1980
*JewistifhrkJian
Pge7-B
Pioneer Women Set Annual Conference Classes for Jewish Retarded
_. ._.i__ #__ In arlHitmn nther new <
Sarah Alspector of Israel will
discuss new goals and projects of
Sneer Women at the second
annual conference of Pioneer
Women in the Southeast Area
JJrt 7 and 8 at the Deauvdle
Hotel in Miami Beach.
The two-day conclave will
bring together officers and
committee chairmen of more than
40 Pioneer Women clubs and
chapters in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
Ms. Alspector, a member of the
Naamat executive in charge of
information and culture has been
designated the new schhcha
(emissary) from Naamat to its
sister organization of Pioneer
Women, the largest Jewish
Women's group in the world.
Mildred Weiss of Deerfield
Beach, coordinator of the
Southeast area, will serve as
conference chairman. Harriet
Green, president of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Florida
and national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation, will
serve as conference coordinator.
Conference headquarters have
been established in the offices of
the Pioneer Women Council.
Mrs. Green said the conference
will feature participation by
chairperson of all areas com-
mittee, with particular stress on
Naamat, fund raising, mem-
bership and Women in America
and Israel activities.
Named to various conference
committees as chairmen were
Margot Bergthal, council
treasurer, reservations; Lillian
Davis, council social secretary.
Nominees Sought
for Grant ReWew
TALLAHASSEE -
Nominations for individuals to
serve on Florida's 10 cultural
grant review panels in 1981 are
now being accepted by the State
Division of Cultural Affairs and
the Fine Arts Council of Florida,
Secretary of State George
Firestone announced today.
The panels are responsible for
reviewing and evaluating grant
applications from Florida artists
and arts organizations. The
Council reviews and amends the
panel's findings and makes
recommendations for funding to
Firestone.
Tropical Cancer
| League Luncheon
The first luncheon meeting of
the new season will be held by
Tropical Cancer League
American Medical Center and
Research Center of Denver, on
Sept. 26 at the Montmartre
Hotel, at noon.
Entertainment will be fur-
nished by Joseph Baker and
Jerry Carretta. Plans for the
forthcoming year will be
discussed.
Single man age 40, 5'10', not bad
looking, worth about $250,000
cash, seeks pleasant female who is
unselfish, without arrogance, not a
nagging type. Matrimony possible.
Reply Box LMS, The Jewish
Floridian. P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami,
Fla. 33101.
\\
SHOREVIEW
TOWERS
1,2&3BedroomUnits
Now Accepting
Applications
CONVENIENT LOCATION
SPACIOUS ROOMS
SWIMMING POOL
PRIVATE TERRACES
Open Mon.-Fri. 9 am-5 pm
invitations; and Felice Schwartz,
council vice president, publicity.
The conference banquet is
slated Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 6:30
p.m., and the closing luncheon
Oct. 8 is slated for 12:30 p.m.
Theme of the conclave is "Caring
and Doing: Pioneer Women 55
Years and Still Growing."
The Association for Jewish
Education sponsors classes for
Jewish retarded at Haven School,
Miami Adult Center and Miami
Beach Activity Center.
In addition, other new classes
are being proposed. Classes start
Oct. 6. Call Vera Plotkin or
Charlotte Klieman for further
information.
Y
?&4
MM
Play Around in your very own "WANNA PLA Y AROUND" T-SHIRT.
JUST $2.50 when you send us Your Subscription to the
PLAYERS STATE THEATRE
1980-81 SEAS0N*O
October 17-November 9,1980
MIAMI PREMIERE
Broadways longest-running
Comedy!
GEMINI
by Albert Innaurato
"Inspired lunacy! Outrageous!
New York Times
Febraury 6-March 1,1981
FLORIDA PREMIERE
THE 1959 PINK
THUNDERBIRD
by James McClure
Two hilarious plays,
LONESTAR and
LAUNDRY AND BOURBONI
"James McClure Is a real find!"
Jack Kroll, Newsweek
November 14-December 7,1980
Shakespeare's Greatest
Masterpiece!
HAMLET,
PRINCE OF DENMARK
March 6-March 29,1981
WINNER
OF THE 1980 FESTIVAL
OF NEW AMERICAN PLA YS
AGNES OF
GOD
by John Pleimeier
"The Festival's outstanding play"
Mel Gussow. N.Y. Times
January 9-Fabruary 1,1981
MIAMI PREMIERE
Winner Outer Critic's
Circle Award 1979
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"A BLOCKBUSTER"
Cllve Barnes. N.Y. Post
April 3-April 28,1981
UNITED STATES PREMIERE
AGATHA CHRISTIE'S THRILLER
GO BACK
FOR
MURDER
SEE SIX PLAYS FOR THE PRICE 0* FIVE!
(except Fri. /Sat. evenings) )
You'll receive an incredible array of benefits, delud-
ing easy ticket exchange fuaranteed same seat-
ing and Over $50 m specla* discounts!
PLUS THESE VERY SPECIAL SURPRISES!
Questions?
Call the Box Office at 442-4000.
MIAMI ARTS SAMPLER
Introduce yourself to the arts
with 2 tor 1 discounts to
MIAMI OPERA GUILD, FU-
SION DANCE COMPANY.
FLORIDA PHILHARMONIC
and BEAUMONT CINEMA!
BAH1 HUMBUG!
Guaranteed Seating Availability
fa our special production of
A CHRISTMAS CAROL
December 12 through 28.1980
Happy Holidays!
------ ORDER FORM --'
(0"Of WITH T B BONUS MOST Bl *ff v-J Y SCPIIWK* 30
PLAYERS STATE THEATRE
3500 Main Highway
Coconut Grove, Florida 33133
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FOR THE PRICE OF FOUR
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AnrM mceive aK Subscriber benefits PLUS* Guaranteed first
335 STSSs aTTSco^X to A CHRISTMAS CAROL' a
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TO RFCOME AN ANGEL; Players State Theatre is a non-profit
abaSS VowtaTcteducttoie contribution ot $20 or more
insures continued great theatre tor the South Florida
CITY/STATE/ZIP.
PHONE (Day)____
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CIRCLE ONE: SECTION A SECTION B
PRICE AND PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
1980-1981 Season ______
MEET THE CAST Lowest Prices
Lowest Price* Matinees
Toe*, el 8:15 PM. Wed/Set/Sun.
at ^00 PM
Evenings
Wed /Thuis./Sun.
tB 15 P.M.
Piemwm
Evenings
Fn./Sal.
at 8 15 PM
SuMcnMr MO*
400 U-M
SS90 4SM
CIRCLE ONE:
First Week
Evenings Sat. Sun
Matinees: oat Sun
TtwdWeek
Evenings:
Maflnser
Tues. Wed Thus
Fa Sat Sun
Wed Sal
Second We*
Evenings: Tuts. Wed. Thurs. Fri.
Sat Sun
Matmeei. Wed- Set Sun.
Fourth Wei
Evenings:
MaHness.
Tub Wed Thurs.
Fri Sat
Wed. Sat. Sun,
Pnces cJ0 $100 h*j*g charge
SPECIAL STUDENT SUBSCRIPTIONS JUST $20.
lacHonBieaM^iS N available tor Frt./Sat. evening performance..
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1251 NE108SI.
893-6820


Page8-B
+Jeist>ncrkMi*n
Friday. September 10

Summer is over and while our
climate still does not feel like fall
Rnhhi lAindau Writes
'The Needs of the Middle Years
a is upon us.
Just a few notes on the fall
fashion scene in case you hadn't
noticed the purples are "the"
colors. Some of the various
shades include magenta, rasp-
berry, wine, lavender, eggplant,
violet, mauve, burgundy and
lilac.
Skirt lengths are on the rise,
and more attention is being paid
to the leg. Opaque hose and shoes
in a matching color are giving an
all-in-a-tone look, especially when
they match the color of the skirt.
The other effect is a monotone
one. with tiny designs of dots,
geometries, butterflies on the
sheer color. They are most often
done in black or brown shades.
Bits of this-and-that ... to
catch up on this summer news:
Harriet and Fred Segal have
recently completed building a
"long weekend" home in the
Georgia mountains at Lake
Arrowhead, about an hour's drive
from Atlanta. Now Fred can get
away for a change of pace and
climate without being away from
business for too long.
Earlier in the summer, the
Segals met Peggy and Max
Brown at La Costa, near San
Diego, where the four of them
had a "super" time. .
Irene and Bill Baros have
become grandparents for the very
first time. A son was born to their
son Grant and his wife. Martien.
She is from Holland, and they
met on a kibbutz in Israel. They
are now living in Jacksonville,
and that's where Irene and Bill
went for the bris of Grant Arnold
Baros. Jr.. .
and Norman Kate
new to San Francisco for
the wedding of their daughter,
Sneaa to Alan Snyder. at Temple
F.manu-El. The groom's cousin,
Rabbi Jesepa Asaer, officiated.
Alan's parents, Naomi and Jack
Snyder, flew in from Baltimore.
Susan is a graduate of the
University of Florida and is a
professional photographer. Alan
is a graduate of Yale University,
and received a Mater's degree
from the University of California.
He is a Financial Analyst, and
they live in Beverly Hub. They
are currently honeymooning in
Europe and plan to maintain
their homes in both San Fran-
cisco and Beverly Hills .
Theima and Sidney Schreer
first time grandparents and
really enjoying their grand-
daughter, Shana Yvette. Their
daughter, Ilene, and her
husband, Howard Bujacky, have
given Howard's mother, Sylvia
Horn*, her third grandchild.
Trudy and Ralph Nernberg
made a last minute decision to fly
to Brussels, which they did not
regret. They rented a car and
drove to many places off "the
beaten track." Came back tired,
but really enjoyed the trip .
Barbara and John White sailed
the Carribbean on the Fairwind,
and in addition to all the fun and
good times of the cruise, they
garnered First Place in the bridge
tournament, which earned them
additional mater's point.
Paula Winter and Betty Rifkm
flew to Milan, then went on to
Venice where they boarded the
Navarino for two weeks of
delightful cruising. They were at
sea on July 4 and while on a side
trip to Athens, they met other
Miamians who echoed the
sentiment that it really is a small
world.
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Gail and Seymour Weiss
among the first time grand-
parents clan. Their daughter, Sae
Ellen, and her husband, Michael
Miller, presented them with
Rachel Adrienne. The Weisse's
traveled to Corpus Christi. Tex.
to see their new granddaughter
Peggy and Mac MermeU were
enjoying Lake Tahoe when they
received a phone call that their
daughter, Debby, had just given
birth to a son, Jesse. They flew
to Denver for the bris, and to
visit with Debby, her husband,
Ken, and their granddaughter,
Sara.
Bon Voyage
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Anne and Marvin Sheldon's
daughter, Barbara, recently
returned from six weeks in Israel
where she was an AZYF tour.
Barbara graduated from the
University of Florida last June,
and the trip was her graduation
gift. Anne flew over to Milan to
meet Barbara when the Israel
tour was over. Together they
traveled throughout Italy and
Switzerland. They celebrated
Barbara's 21st birthday by
having breakfast in Milan, lunch
in Chamonix, France, and dinner
in Geneva.
Their son, Stephen, is home for
the summer from the University
of Florida. He is studying
microbiology and hopes to enter a
veterinary school after
graduation.
Technion Women
Set Luncheon
The Miami Beach chapter
Women's Division, American
society for Technion, will hold its
opening luncheon meeting on
Oct. 9. at the Montmartre Hotel
at noon.
The entertainment for the
afternoon will be a fashion show
by the -Touch of Class
Boutique.
For reservations, call Jean
Zaben or Rose Shocket.
An article by Rabbi Sol
Landau, spiritual leader of
Beth David Congregation,
Miami, in Analysis studies
the possibilities of the
middle years for productive
living or even for the
beginning of a "fresh start"
in what Rabbi Landau
refers to as "man's second
adolescence."
Entitled "The Needs of the
Middle Yean-A New Era of
Exploration," the article appears
in the publication of the Institute
for Jewish Policy Planning and
Research fo the Synagogu
Council of America.
RABBI LANDAU asserts that
midlife, between the ages of 40
and 60. is a time of "great tur-
bulence and intense inner tur-
moil." In his view, "The search
for identity is stirred up again,
and the search for meaning' is
renewed in profound ways ..."
Adding to the turbulence of the
period are characteristic physical
and emotional changes in both
men and women in midlife. "Men
become more passive and gentle,
while women become more
assertive and aggressive.'' he
observes.
Declining physical powers
apart, there are the stresses of
what he described as the realities
of "an empty nest" and the
rebelliousness in teen-agers at the
same time that "the crises of
aging parents press for at-
tention."
DECLARES Landau:
"Boredom and feelings of en-
trapment bring about
frustrations in the work en-
vironment. The desire for new
avenues of work surfaces, and
ambivalence about career change
results."
Against these monumental
changes, "Marriages are
reassessed, and as the divorce
rates would seem to validate,
many are dissolved." Statistics,
he reports. indicate that
presently one in every two
marriage of couples, age 45 and
over, terminates in divorce. "Men
develop fears of impotence and
inadequacy. Women become
obsessed with looking for ways to
escape appearing older."
As Rabbi Landau notes, there
is a paradox in this seeming
decline in midlife. "The paradox
of all this is that, in midlife, the
individual is actually at the
height of physical, intellectual,
economic and social power. In
fact, as a group, middle-aged
citizens are the decision-makers
of the society."
* Erikson ^
Rabbi Sol Landau
THE RABBI notes that "The
myth that you can't teach an old
horse new tricks has been ex-
ploded." To work one's way out
of the midlife crisis is "af-
firmation of the principle in
Judaism that anyone, at any age,
can change his or her ways."
The Analysis article traces the
studies of the great psychologists
of the twentieth century from
Freud and Jung to Erik Erikson
about the stages of life in human
development. Rabbi Landau
concludes
midlife as
vs. generativity
The stages of life view, whifll
does not at all 8quare JJ
popular notions of midlife J.
tune for decline, is emphasis;!
both The Bible and the TaCd
OBSERVES Rabb, Landau
Judaism views the lodttSJm
always needing addition"
knowledge and deeper answers so
that appropriate responses can be
made to 'the inner search Xhi.
is signifkant he says, because in
Judaism there is a phmarv
value that learning spansThe
entire lifetime of the in
dividuali- setting aside a fixed
time for the study of Torah beinr
a basic requirement for all."
In this sense. "Judaism not
only provides a means for coping
but it guides in the renewal
process." As one grows older.
"Deeper, richer, more profound
personal relationships with the
environment and each other are
discovered."
And so, midlife need not be the
beginning of the end at all.
Quoting again from Erikson,
Rabbi Landau concludes:
"Religion serves as a crucial
function in that it restores ... a
new sense of wholeness, of things
rebound."
Sunshine Biscuits Offers
Kosher Products
The Sunshine Biscuit Com-
pany has a rich heritage of over
75 years, one that has always
been based on the ideal of
product integrity. Sunshine
started out in 1902. when the two
Loose brothers had an idea and
an ideal to found a baking
company that would be
distinguished for top quality
cookies and crackers which would
be baked in a glistening clean
bakery filled with sunshine.
Today. Sunshine approaches
the future with the same en-
thusiasm and vision as its
forebearers. Sunshine Biscuits is
forging ahead in their com-
mitment to baking with only pure
vegetable shortening in all
Sunshine Branded products,
uther national manufacturers use
lard and other animal fats in their
baking. All Sunshine products
contain the finest ingredients and
natural flavors wherever possible
m order to provide great taste.
K^Xampie' Wheat wfers are
baked with real whole wheat
flour. There is real honey in
Honey Grahams, real cinnamon
in Cinnamon Grahams and sun
ripened raisins in Golden Fruit.
Of its most popular brands, 15
Sunshine products have kosher
certification: Wheat Wafers.
Krispy Crackers, (salted &
unsalted Tops). Cinnamon
Grahams, Hyde Park Assort-
ment, Sugar Wafers. Peanut
Butter Wafers, Chocolate
Nuggets, Hi Ho, Oyster & Soup
Crackers, Honey Grahams,
Shredded Wheat. Sugar Wafers-
Assorted, Golden Fruit. Fig
Bars.
Sunshine Biscuits enjoys a
long, close association with
certifying rabbis such as Rabbi
Lazar Karalitzky. the head
Mashgiach at the Sayreville. N.J.
bakery and Rabbi Dr. J H.
Ralbag in Cohimbus, Ga. These
bakeries, as well as those in
Kansas City, Oakland, and Santa
Fe Springs, continue to provide
good things to eat, as thev have
since 1902.
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center
and the
Women's Caucus For Art
present
A FINE ARTS EXHIBITION
Opening Reception
Sunday, September 21
3 to 5 p.m.
MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY
10AMTOMOONAND7to9PM
-Ann
18900NE. 25thAvenue
Nrtn Miami Beach, Rorida
932-4200


v, member 19, I960
Community Corner
l ivina With Stroke: A guide to Community Resources in I
4e and Monroe Counties," is a new publication of the =
lirican Heart Association of Greater Miami. The guide, =
"Zntlv being distributed to local health care agencies, will be I
I by health professionals who work with stroke patients and |
eir families.
I-onard Solonion, father of tennis pro Harold Solomon and =
^jdent of Budget Rent-A-Car, recently participated in 720-1
lie bike ride from Atlanta, Ga. to Miami Beach to raise money =
hr the Hunger Project, an organization which helps to combat I
Lgths that occur due to hunger and starvation.
Dade County Judge Harvey Baxter has been designated to =
Lrve as chairman of the County Canvassing Board for the I
ountywide elections to be held Oct. 7 and Nov. 4.
Dr. David B. Levenaon, instructor in religion at Florida State I
University. Tallahassee, was among the 12 educators from =
olleges and universities who took part in the first-of its-kind I
Bational Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for =
ollege Teachers in Jewish Studies, held at Yeshiva University. =
he purpose of the program was to provide opportunities for I
pculty members at undergraduate and two-year colleges to =
tork with distinguished scholars in their fields at institutions =
fith libraries suitable for advanced research.
A caucus of the Dade House of Representatives selected Rep. =
Maine Gordon (D> to chair the delegation for 1981.
1 Gordon will assume this post at the organizational session of =
lie Dade Delegation which will be held within the week |
Lllowing the Nov. 4 General Election. 5
| Chairmen of the 1980 Mercy Ball are Dr. and Mrs. Joseph R. =
jnach. This year's event will be held on Nov. 22 in the Grand I
allroom of the Omni International Hotel. Proceeds from the |
nnual Ball go to the Mercy Hospital Foundation.
I The Association for Retarded Citizens, Dade County, will hold |
Candidates Night" Meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 24, at 7:30 |
Im. The meeting will be at the Norin Building, located at 1590 |
|E 123 St., North Miami. Talk Show host, Hal Bergida of =
^KAT Radio, will moderate the discussion. Candidates for |
ommission. Legislature and School Board will be in at- |
fcndance. =
I The University of Miami was to dedicate its Tactual Speech |
oject in honor of Jerome J. and Rita Cohen of Miami, at 3 p.m. =
hursday, Sept. 18, at the Mailman Center for Child |
evelopment.
| University of Miami President Henry King Stanford was to |
sent a plaque to the donors who have dedicated themselves to =
kpport development of an "artificial ear" for deaf persons. =
heir gift, said Dr. D. K. Oiler, director of the Tactual Speech |
^oject, has allowed employment of a biomedical engineer.
Two veteran Dade members of the Florida
egislature and an entrepreneur in the nation's
^usic recording industry will be honored by
North Miami Chamber of Commerce at its
Bth annual installation of officers and awards
nner-dance on Saturday, Sept. 27, at the
forth Miami Holiday Inn, Biscay ne
oulevardat 111th Street.
Three-term Rep. Gwen Margolis, a North
liami resident active in public affairs for
Barly 20 years, has been chosen to receive the
lumber's "Person of the Year" award.
+JewistFk)rldHaHn
Page 9-B
Kraig-Friedland
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Friedland
announce the marriage of their
son Mark, to Heidi Kraig,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Luis
Kraig of Cleveland, Ohio.
The newlyweds are graduates
of Northwestern University.
Mark is attending the University
of Miami Law School, and Heidi
will be receiving a master's
degree in art history.
Mr. and Mrs. Friedland were
married Aug. 17 with Rabbi Leon
Kronish officiating.
Margolis
Former North Miami Mayor (1965-69) Sherman S. Winn, now 1
lie senior senator from Dade County in the Legislature, will =
ceive the Chamber's 1980 "Favorite Son" award, and Mack I
jmerman, founder and president of Criteria Recording Studios =
North Miami, will be honored as "Businessperson of the
lear," according to Chamber President Nancy Appleton.
[The Sunrise Club, a retirement community, is sponsoring an ^
' show featuring over 220 exhibits of clay, copper, paintings, [
gravings and hand works. The exhibits can be seen daily be- j
hen 2 and 4 p.m. until Sept. 21.
[Deadline to submit an application to exhibit art work in the j
fenth annual Miami Beach Festival of the Arts is Monday, |
pc 1. The 1981 Festival will be held Feb. 7 and 8, adjacent to =
Miami Beach Convention Center. Over 150,000 people at- I
tided the two-day event in 1980, and Festival officials estimate ;
frowd of 200,000 plus for 1981.
[University of Miami philosophy professor Eddy M. Zemach j
ill lecture on "Momentary Selves" at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, =
I Room 194 of the Whitten Learning Center on the UM's Coral j
Poles campus. The talk, sponsored by the UM philosophy j
Apartment, is free and open to the public.
[Victoria Hospital will host volunteer training classes for j
"*pice, a health care service which provides support for ter- ;
iaUy ill patients and their families. Victoria is the first hos- j
si in the Miami area to sponsor this training program.
IMIMMIMIMMUUMyillllllHIUUIIIIIIMi
Happy New Year and Best Wishes from
A v rah am and Debbie Froelich
Kartzmer-Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin L. Kartzmer of North Miami Beach
announce the marriage of their daughter Sheri to Alan Gold-
berg, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Goldberg of Lake Worth.
The wedding took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Kartzmer on Sept. 7 with Rabbi Leon Kronish officiating. A
champagne brunch reception was held following the ceremony at
Reflections on the Bay.
Sheri received her bachelor of music degree from Boston
University and is currently an administrative assistant in the
Melvin L. Kartzmer Inc. Pension Consulting firm. Alan, a
graduate of the University of Hawaii, is currently president of
the John Liner Corporation, a national insurance marketing
firm.
After a honeymoon trip through New England, the couple
will reside in North Miami Beach.
'Blended Family' Course Set at JCC
Blending two families into one
will be the topic of a six week
workshop offered by the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Dade County.
"The Blended Family" course
will be on Monday evenings from
7:30 to 9 p.m. starting Oct. 6.
The course will be taught by
Sonia Cohen, a psychiatric social
worker in private practice and
associated with the Children's
Home Society of Florida's school
outreach project.
The course on family blending
is one of manv focusing on ef-
fective living sponsored by the
JCC. There are five other courses
on family life dealing with
subjects such as couple com-
Southern Bell
Rate Reduction
Southern Bell agreed to set of
proposals that were approved by
the Florida PSC, Sept. 2 in
Tallahassee.
The result of this agreement
will be a long distance rate
reduction and refunds that will
total $51.8 million for Florida's
consumers.
munication, positive parent-child
relationships, meeting the
unusual need of special children,
coping with anti-social children,
and the changing nature of the
family.
A series of workshops will look
at a variety of topics designed to
widen awareness of the in-
creasing influence and concerns
of women. A continuing program
is also being offered for those
working through grief over the
Torah Hadassah
On Monday, Sept. 22, at noon
at Temple Zamora, Coral Gables,
the first fall meeting of the Torah
Chapter of Hadassah will take
place. Lunch is to be served.
Renee Brodsky is to be installing
officer of the Torah slate, headed
by president, Rose Lauretz. Olga
Issenberg, program vice presi-
dent, is in charge of the program.
loss of a family member or close
friend.
A mixed media art exhibit,
sponsored by the South Florida
Women's Caucus for Art, will be
held from Sept. 21 through Oct. 2
at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC.
The opening reception will be
held from 3 to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
Sept. 21, and the general public is
welcome to attend. The
exhibition will then continue
showing on Monday through
Thursday until Oct. 2. Hours will
be from 10 a.m. to noon and 7 to 9
p.m.
The South Dade JCC is of-
fering the course "Creative
Decorating on a Budget," a class
designed to teach people how to
decorate a house, build furniture
and stay within a budget. Classes
start the week of Oct. 6.
U"U#-
Ben Chicken Little
1315 NW 89 Court
Miami, Fla. 33152
592-8660
THE
THRIFT
SHOP
IS BACK!
Our beautiful new store is open
for business featuring quality items
and the unusual.
Come see what we've done at our
new address: 5713-5737 N.W 27th
Avenue, Miami. Telephone: (305)
635-6753. Proceeds from the sale
of all merchandise help support
indigent residents of the Miami
Jewish Home & Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens. p/inK]
Monday-Saturday _M_I rm
8a.m.-6p.m. VUfM
Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. ^*>--l
GRAND OPENING SUNDAY,
Oft.Mocations: SEPTEMBER 21, 1 1 AM
500 N.E. 79th Street, Miami. Telephone 751-3988
3145 Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale. Telephone 981-8245


PagelO-B
+ ***** DtrklkMi
Friday, September 19.1960
Mizrachi Women to Construct Childhaven
The Florida Council of Amer-
ican Mizrachi Women will mark
the groundbreaking and start of
construction of AMW's newest
project. Beth Hayeled Child-
haven, in Jerusalem, Sept. 28.
Each chapter is dedicating a
meeting to celebrate this event.
Slides and guest speakers will
inspire the membership to re-
double their efforts in behalf of
this project.
The Beth Hayeled Childhaven
Sleep-in Nursery will provide a
home and education, in a
traditional Jewish environment,
to hundreds of underprivileged
Israeli children .and also serve as
a day care center for working
Jerusalem mothers. The project
is slated to be completed within
two years. It will be a major
addition to the AMW network of
educational and social service
projects throughout Israel.
A unique feature of Beth
Hayeled Childhaven is the
"family system" of child raising
that will prevail, with a group of
12 children of varying ages from
3 to 12 living together in each
wing of the facility under the
direction of a trained, live-in
counselor. The system u> de-
signed to provide a family frame-
work in which the older children
will help care for the younger
ones, providing many of the
children with their first ex-
perience of being part of a family.
Similar Childhaven Day cele-
brations will take place across the
United States on Sept. 28, as the
350 AMW chapters throughout
America herald the latest
achievement in AMW's history
of 56 years of service to Israel.
Kaplan Elected to
Close Ties Bind
Israel, Latin America
--~?
Continued from Page ID
the most from Israeli projects.
The aid is conducted through
three main channels inside Israel:
the Mt. Carmel Institute, the
Histadrut's Institute for
Development Aid, and the
Hebrew University's agriculture
faculty at Rehovot which
specializes' in overseas aid
courses.
In addition, there are Israeli
experts in such fields as
irrigation, cooperative economy,
agriculture, youth movements
fT, {\tt\nt\ npii* *_.m~~w~ -- agriculture, youtn movements
Topf Named to Technion Office Beach Commj9Si0ni^rE~Tir
Sam B. Topf, president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Technion Society-
Israel Institute of Technology,
was appointed national mem-
bership chairman at the national
conference in Chicago of the
American Technion Society. This
announcement was made by Ted
Krengel, national president,
board of directors.
Topf serves as the executive
vice president of the Florida
Israel Chamber of Commerce and
is the founder of Consultants for
Israel Industries. He is also on
the international board of
governosrs for the Technion-
Israel Institute of Technoloev.
Sam B. Topf
Bank Hapoalim Offering Raised
Bank Hapoalim B.M. has just
completed a shares and warrants
offering totaling IL 2.5 billion
(U.S. $47.8 million), the largest
amount ever raised in one issue
on the Israel Capital market.
Bank Hapoalim is a leading bank
in Israel with consolidated assets
totaling U.S. $14 billion.
Close to half of the offering was
in the form of a rights issue to
existing shareholders, with the
balance of the issue offered to the
public. The issue to the public
was oversubscribed 15.3 times,
with the volume of orders
reaching IL 11.5 billion (U.S.
$222.9 million).
Walter Kaplan, owner and
manager of the Embers
Restaurant on Miami Beach, was
recently elected to serve on the
Miami Beach City Commission.
Kaplan, a 30-year resident of
Miami Beach, is a member of
Elks, Kiwanis, Chamber of
Commerce, Florida Restaurant
Association and the past
president of Miami Beach
Restaurant Association.
Prior to owning the Embers
Restaurant, Kaplan owned and
operated the Park Avenue
Restaurant and the Ambassador
Cafe, both on Miami Beach.
Kaplan and his wife Freddie
have two daughters, Gayle
Polakow and Donna Kaplan, two
granddaughters. Kelly e and
Shea.
Cohen JWV to Honor Spiegels
The Harry H. Cohen No. 723
Post and Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans will
sponsor a celebration in honor of
the 60th wedding anniversary for
the Past Commander Lou Spiegel
and Past President Ruth Spiegel,
at the Washington Federal Bank
Auditorium, 1133 Normandy Dr.,
on Sunday Sept. 28, at 8 p.m.
The Spiegels were the first
husband and wife team 17 years
ago to preside jointly over the
offices of Post and Ladies
Auxiliary.
Walter Kaplan
countries.
AGROV ALSO underscores a
common experience of, and
reaction to, terrorism as a factor
tending to strengthen political
understanding between Israel
and some of the Latin American
governments. Some of the Latin
American terrorist organizations
actually have proven links with
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
This factor is true mainly of
the right-wing military regimes
in the southern part of the
continent. It is a fact, perhaps
sad but true, that in the more
northerly states that have a more
democratic political system,
Israel finds itself sometimes
under attack from left-wing
parties that tend to sympathize
more with PLO and general
Palestinian aspirations.
The actions of Jewish com-
munities in several of the Latin
American countries to the
Jerusalem episode has been
noteworthy, says Argov,
especially in view of the difficult
political situations and con-
straints in some of those
countries.
IN URUGUAY, for instance,
the community invited former
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on
a visit to Argentina, to address a
public gathering, and 4.000
persons (the community numbers
45,000) turned out to hear him.
The gathering was an impressive
public disolav 0f solidarity with
Israel and with Israel's stand on
Jerusalem.
In Chile, the presidents of the
Jewish community and of the
local Zionist Federation met with
President Augusto Pinochet in
an effort to dissuade him from
moving the embassy or at
least to persuade him to minimize
the damage to Israeli-Chile
relations. (Chile's 28,000 Jewjn
and the country's sizeable Arab
community traditionally try to
avoid the Israel-Arab conflict in
the Middle East from marring
intercommunal relations within
the country).
In Central America, the
"Fedeco," an umbrella group
embracing the Jewish com-
munities of all six states, held its
biennial session in Costa Rica at
the height of the crisis over the
Jerusalem law.
THE TWO guests of honor
were Costa Rica's President
Rodrigo Carazo and Gen. (res.)
Uzi Narkiss, the "liberator of
Jerusalem." (Fedeco has formally
applied for membership in the
World Zionist Organization. It
represents an estimated 8,000
Jews in these six countries).
In other countries, Jewish
reactions have been less visible,
but in several of them local
Zionist Federations have been
active in lobbying politically for
Israel and seeking to contain the
effects of the embassy moves.
Women's Caucus
for Art Show
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center Cultural
Arts Department invites the
community to attend the opening
reception of an Art Show and
Sale by the Women's Caucus for
Art on Sept. 21 from 3 to 5 p.m.
in the Katz Auditorium.
This Multi-Media Fine Arts
Exhibition will be on view and for
sale at the Center. The hourse
are: Monday through Thursday.
10 a.m. to noon and 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. ,|-
mil
\>rt
'
fun
peop
nun
men
shot
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Merchandise Storage for
Importers and Exporters
856-1524
Holiday Greetings
Hart Tire Co.
Racing, Auto, Truck. Farm, Recreation
Pirelli, Goodyear, Michelin, Uniroyal & Others Discount prices
10752 SW 188 St. 232-0990 Miam,
Gresham Electric Co.
Holiday Greetings
T & R Store Fixtures, Inc.
Custom Designers & Manufacturers of Business' Interiors
In Stock for Immediate Delivery
918 N. Miami Ave. 371-0412 Miami
HoMday Greetings
Calson Enterprises Inc.
Pirelli & Dunlap Tires
Passenger & Racing Tires
10754 SW 188 St.
Steel Belted Radials
40,000 Mile Tread Life Warranty
232-0990 Miami
HoMday Greetings
Midway Mall CB Center
Retail Wholesale Import Export '
Cobra Export Distributor Wholesale pricing to publkj
7815W.F1aglarSt 261-6839 Miami
Holiday Greetings
Security Aluminum Windows
Awning Windows Tub & Shower Enclosures
Sliding Glass Door Custom Picture Windows
Q60W20St 8t74841 Hlateah
Florida Silica Sand Co., Inc.
5801 Bryan Road 949-3521 Danla
Holiday Greetings
^
s>
Do You Have Electrical Problems?
Cat 266-3889
Nights Sundays a) Holidays CaH266168
Service Repair Installations
4846 SW 75th Avenue
Holiday Greetings
Electrolysis Center
The Professional.Way
Fo. Brows. Hnrtme, tan. Arm. Ltga. Bo&f, Oonsultiliom Rtcommtntod
Flonnot Lotwmnumn. Omcior
9445 SW 40 St. Suite 107 221-6555 Miami
Holiday Greetings
WSTANT
25 SE 2 Ave
Girl Friday
Temporary Personnel
THELP! SpecMUng in Al Office F
Suite 100 No Fees
Personnel
3793461
252 Miracle Mile
Minna Lee
4434264
Holiday Greetings
Coral Gables
Jackie Hague
940-7425
Holiday Greetings
The Kelly Health Care
1250 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
458-5777 Hallandale
HoMday Greetings
Continental Engraving
Engraved plastic signs for business, banks, hotels, industry and
professionals. Name plates, ID Badges, Directories,
Elevator Signs. 9300 S. Dixie Highway
Wall &
6666703
Holiday Greetings
All Window Repair
7813 Bird Road
Miami, Florida 33155
666-3339
Er*


19,1980
+Jewish ncrkfar.
Page 11-B
' v y i
r v v

wu/est device, the Telecommunications Device
fp), enables hearing or speech impaired people
licate over the telephone. According to Larry
Bell's spokesman, "The TDD will provide
physical impairments with a way to com-
mends, family, emergency services and govern-
The new unit can be moved from phone to
irk on batteries when electrical outlets are
B!9**
Happy New Year Greetings
and Peace For All
IDGE and MRS. DAVID L. TRASK
P*R. and MRS. DAVID PHILLIPS
IR. AND MRS. PAUL LEFKOW
SETH'D LEFKOW
and FAMILY
[MR. and MRS. NORMAN SMITH
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. BARRY ROBBIN
and FAMILY
IR. and MRS. ARTHUR TURKISH
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. JEFFREY BRODY
and FAMILY
Persian Gulf Is Area of Concern
\Jra Licht, director of the Lowe Art Museum;
Warhol; Toby Ansin, chairperson of The Fine
rid; and Barbara Oilman at the world premiere
"s newest work, "Ten Portraits of Jews of the
[Over 800 art lovers and Warhol fans attended
ie Lowe Art Museum.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The security of the Persian
Gulf region, which holds
more than 50 percent of the
world's known oil reserves,
will be a major pre-
occupation of policymakers
in Washington, Western
Europe, and Tokyo all
during the 1980s, Time
Magazine reports this
week.
Says Time: "That security is
|in jeopardy at virtually every
point of the compass. To the
north, Iran sinks deeper and
deeper into chaos. To the west,
what is widely seen as Israel's
intransigence emboldens
radicals, undercuts moderates
and enrages almost everyone in
the Arab world. To the south, the
memory of last year's attack by
zealous dissidents on the sacred
Mosque in Mecca still sends
shudders through Saudi Arabia's
House of Saud and the monar-
chies that rule the Gulf's mini-
states ... The USSR now main-
tains 85,000 troops in Afghanis-
tan and has miltary advisers in
South Yemen and Ethiopia, while
a fleet of ten Soviet warships and
16 support vessels cruises the
Indian Ocean."
HENRY KISSINGER told a
Congressional committee in July:
"Our future is now at the mercy
of a precarious political status
quo in what is probably the most
volatile, unstable and crisis-prone
region of the world."
National Security adviser
Zbigniew Brzezinski says, "It is
very likely that in the 1980s we
will be involved in an un-
precedented effort to assure
stability, and therefore exercise
deterrence in the Persian Gulf
area."
Seeking to redress the Soviet-
American military balance in the
region, the U.S. has negotiated
agreements with Somalia, Kenya
and Oman for access to their
ports and airfields in a crisis. The
U.S. Navy has strengthened its
forces in the Indian Ocean and in
the Gulf, and last March, the
Pentagon announced the creation
of the Rapid Deployment Joint
Task Force, a reservoir of 200,000
troops from which the President
could draw an expeditionary
force.
ITS COMMANDER, Marine
Lieut. Gen. Paul X. Kelley, says:
"We have a global mission, but
our focus is on the Persian Gulf."
Century Village
| Boca Raton. $450 new unfurn 2 BF
|lVi Bath 0% Crime. Fabulousl
iRecreation. (305) 8566413 7-9 p.m.|
\Enjoy
lUrlirt Mtit Ctapltt* Iiflitk-Itwiih Wtfklf
Printed in Engliah
-------'Wlf to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
breast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world,
pease find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? 1 Year $15.00 ? 2 Years $28.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
.Apt. No.:.
State:.
Zip:
(PIMM Make All Checks Payable to "THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN")
P.O. Box oi -W73, Miami, Florida 33101
Regulations providt subscriptions be paid In advance.
Its strategy is to create highly-
trained mobile units which could
quickly be airlifted to a scene of
an emergency, and there pick up
supplies and equipment already
aboard ships in the region.
But acquiring permanent bases
in the Persian Gulf region
presents enormous political dif-
ficulties, particularly to the
resident regimes, which feel the
creation of U.S. bases creates a
temptation for the Soviets to
strengthen their own forces.
There is also a deep-rooted sus-
picion among the Arab regimes
that the U.S. would simply seize
threatened oilfields.
Says Time: "The trouble is
that American credibility in the
Arab world depends not so much
on how much military muscle the
U.S. can flex as on how much
political clout it can bring to bear
in the Arab-Israeli standoff. The
U.S.'s inability to budge the
Israelis from the West Rank and
to mediate a settlement of the
Palestinian issue has direct and
damaging consequences for
American efforts to shore up Gulf
security."
CONCLUDES Time: "With
their immense wealth and their
fixation on a different enemy
from the one Washington worries
about, the Gulf states are simply
not very amenable to U.S.
leverage.
"The stagnation of the Camp
David process has been a great
boon to Soviet interests in the
area. By making the most of its
longstanding support for the
Palestinian cause against the
U.S., Israel and Egypt, the
USSR has been able to weather
quickly and painlessly the initial
storm of protest within the Arab
world over the invasion of
Afghanistan."
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd SI. N Miami Beach Fla 3)162
947*094 Rabbi Oavirt 6 Sailzman eecutiv
director _____
i rtireu
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E Flaglei SI. Miami Fla 331J1 37*4553
Habbi Lewes L Bogage. Oirecloi. Union o'
(American Hebrew Congregation
Synagogue
Listings
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Conservative
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem
Friday Night Services 8:15 p.m.
Late services for the entire family
Saturday morning service at 8:30
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Stuart G. Weinblatt. Associate Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Friday, Sept. 19, 6:30 p.m., Family-
Adult Service; 9 p.m. Adults Only.
Saturday, Sept. 20, 9:30 a.m.
Adults Only in Sanctuary; Family-
Adult Service in Teen Bldg. 1:30
p.m. Children's Service. 3:30 p.m.
Family-Adult Service.
iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij
Candlelighting 1
Time
7:03 I
9Tishri 5741
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Conservative
538-2503
Koi Nidre
Tonight at 7:15
Yom Kippur
Saturday morning 9:30
Dr. Irving Lehrman will preach
Services at the Theatre of
The Performing Arts
BETH DAVID Miami's Historic
Conservative Congregation
Dr. Sol Landau, Rabbi
Hazzan Wm. M. Lipson
CORAL WAY 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Phone: 854-3911 Daily Services
Morning and Evening
Coral Way Main Sanctuary
Saturday morning 9 a.m.
S Dade Campus 7500 SW 120th St.
Late Shabbat Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd.
Coral Gables
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 SW 12 Ave. 858-6334
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose'Berlin Executive Secretary
Daily Minyon for Yahrzelten
Daily 7:45 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Saturday Service 8:45 a.m.
Membership Available
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 NE. 19th Street, Miami, 573-5900
9990 North Kendall Drive, 595-5055
Rabbi: Brett S. Goldstein
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstein
Administrator Raymond Chait
Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m.
Reform
667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Serving Coral Gables and
the Southwest area
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Avenue at 41st St.
Or. Leon Kronish 538-7231
Cantor David Conviser Liberal
Friday, 6:15 and 8:45 p.m.
Dr. Leon Kronish will speak on
"Is H Hard to be a Jew"
BETH TORAH 947-7528
CONGREGATION Conservative
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Llpschitz, Rabbi
Cantor ZveeAroni
TEMPLE ZION
8000 Miller Drive
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
-H.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath Eve Services 8:15 p.m.
' (7:30 p.m. on the first
Friday of the month)
Sabbath Morning Services -
1000 am
Conservative
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Ben Dickson, Cantor
Guests Welcome
Festival of Sukkot
Monday, Sept 22, 7 a.m., Minyan -
ertler Chapel. Thursday, Sept. 25.
9 am., Morning Services First Day
Sukkot. Dr. Norman N. Shapiro will
speak on "The Sukkah A Symbol
for All Times." Cantor Ben Dickson
chants the liturgy- Friday, Sept. 26,
9 a.m., Second Day Sukkot Dr.
Norman N. Shapiro will speak on
'The Uninvited Guests!" Cantor
Ben Dickson chants the liturgy. No
Friday evening services.


Page 12-B
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMMHIIHIMHIIIMmiW
Business Notes
Jei<,tfk)idia_
Friday, September 19,1980
Amnesty Report Rejected
Intercontinental Bank announces the appointment of Juan
j Jose Martinez as vice president of its Operations Center. The|
j announcement was made by E. Anthony Infante, president of|
| the bank. .
Hanging out' in ghetto streets was not this summer's
I pastime for 30 of South Miami's underprivileged children.
Instead, it was off to camp, thanks to the Bank of Florida in
i South Florida, corporate sponsor for a two-week supervised
i YWCA day camp at Tamiami Park.
Miami's civil disturbances earlier this year caused the bank's
I community advisory board to brainstorm a way that the bank
i could help its local disadvantaged neighborhood, and at the
| same time reward that area which did not resort to violence to
I vent racial frustrations. A two-week summer camp program
provided just the positive, productive experience the board
sought for neighborhood children.
William Ruben, chairman of the board
= Jordan Marsh / Florida, has announced t hi
I appointment of Carol Ann Stone to broadcas'
I director and the promotion of Sandra Garbe
3 to media director.
Ms. Stone, an honors graduate of tht
I University of Florida and former broadcast
= producer for Burdines, has been television
= creative writer and producer for JM for the
= past six months. Prior to joining Jordan
Marsh, she was creative writer and producer
= for numerous South Florida clients.
Ms. Garber, a graduate of the University of
= Bridgeport, Bridgeport, Conn., began hei
I career with Dade County Public Schools at
= Distributive Education teacher coordinator
= She joined Caravetta Allen Kimbrough ir
11976, served as media director / accounl
= executive for Krieff Advertising and MCA Ad-
= vertising before joining Jordan Marsh as
= media buyer.
Garber
Sidney Caplan has been named senior vice president ofg
| Capital Bank, it was announced by Abel Holtz. chairman and!=
| president. In his new position, Caplan will be the bank's chief I
| lending officer, responsible for management of Capital's overall i=
commercial lending activities.
A native of Boston, Caplan is a veteran banker with moreE
| than 30 years experience in the banking and mercantile credit I
| industry in New York City. Prior to joining Capital, he was
= president of Community National Bank of New York.
[ Previously, he served as senior vice president of the National |
1 Bank of North America.
| Caplan holds an undergraduate degree from Harvard p
I University and an MBA degree from the Columbia Graduate =
School of Business. =
| Capital Bank currently has seven branches throughout Dade =
= County. At mid-year, its total assets were $190 million and total =
deposits were $ 170 million. i=
i The international public accounting firm of Peat, Marwick.'E
Mitchell & Co. will be sponsoring an all day International =
: Business Conference in Miami at the Omni International Hotel
= on Sept. 17.
The conference is expected to attract individuals from many
= countries who presently are, or have an interest in conducting I
= business in Florida or Latin America.
= Natalie Greenfield and Norma Frasher, co-directors of Weight
E Watchers, announce the appointment of a new executive vice
= president, Hermann Vogel.
1 Julius Littman, a member of the advisory board of Jefferson
National Bank at Sunny Isles, has been elected treasurer of the
= North Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce.
I Littman is executive vice president of Concerned Citizens of
Northeast Dade County, Inc., a major civic organization with
headquarters at Jefferson National Bank at Sunny Isles. He also
3 serves as president of Eastern Shores Civic Association.
= Mann & Safchik, certified public accountants, announce the re-
location of their off ices to 6701 Sunset Dr., South Miami.
illlllllllllllllllillllllU
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WMMt
YOU AM
movhm
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MOVING?
MoX--------
Help us avoid
lw expense
of having the
PostOfltee
charge 25 cents
tor teHngus
you
TIU us
WHIM
YOU AM
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TO.
WWWCMH ____ *?. ----
Otr arooc*

ouaaai
an STATI arenas
IISMIII
IWKMUT
tFFICTIVtOATI
PUm- chp 'All ...upon mmdmmUlo Jemh FlOridlaUl PO BOX 2973 Miami Fiona. 33101
London Chronicle Syndicate
LONDON The report stated
in the preface that the
discussions between the
Amnesty delegation and the
Israeli authorities did not
alleviate Amnesty Inter-
national's concern" on these
matters.
Israel replied that the report
"blatantly fails to offer an im-
partial, evenhanded portrayal of
Israel's treatment of security
detainees."
In its recommendations,
Amnesty called for the establish-
ment of a public and impartial
committee to investigate the
allegations "in their totality" and
"the administrative and legal
procedures and practices relevant
to the arrest, confinement, in-
terrogation and trial of security
suspects."
THE REPORT said that the
committee should be appointed
to protect "suspects and security
officials alike" and that its
findings and recommendations
should be made public.
The report also includes the
Israeli government's response to
Amnesty's memorandum on the
visit of the mission and
Amnesty's comments on this
response.
In his reply to Martin Ennals,
Amnesty International's security
general, dated December 31,
1979, Prof. Itzhak Zamir, the
Israeli Attorney General, said
that "the memorandum blatantly
fails to offer an impartial, even-
handed portrayal of Israel's
treatment of security detainees in
the administered areas. .
"International law has always
recognized that in governing
areas under military rule after a
period of armed conflict, in
addition to ensuring the welfare
of the local population against
the danger of disorder and
terrorism, the administration
also has a clear duty to protect its
own population against the
dangers of disorder and
terrorism.
"IN THESE circumstances,
the question of human rights
takes on a very different com-
plexion. .
"Amnesty International,
knows full well of the existence,
purpose and activities of the
'Palestine Liberation
Organization' a terrorist
organization financed by Arab
capital and armed and en-
couraged by a number of world
powers."
PROFESSOR Zamir said that
Amnesty knew that the PLO's
declared aim, according to its
published covenant, was "to
terminate by means of 'armed
struggle' the existence of the
State of Israel," and it also knew
of the terrorist activities of the
PLO associated groups both in
Israel and the administered areas
"for which such groups readily
and openly claim responsibility."
The reply quoted "the
massacre of 26 children at Maalot
in 1974, the murder of 15 in-
nocent civilians in Jerusalem's
central Zion Square in 1975, the
wanton killing of 34 men, women
and children in the civilian bus-
hijacking on Israel's coastal road
in 1978, and the systematic
elimination of prominent local
Aran political and religious
notables in the administered
territories."
THESE, Prof. Zamir said, "are
but a few of the grim realities of
the situation of which Amnesty
International is well aware. Yet
nowhere are these realities
mentioned in the memorandum."
In its comment on this reply
Amnesty said that the fact that
this was not mentioned in the
memorandum sent to the Israeli
government in October, 1979, did
not signify that Amnesty "is
different to such acts by op-
Israel has rejected Amnesty International's report,
just issued, of its mission to the Israeli Government
in June, 1979, to inquire into allegations of the ill-
treatment of prisoners in Israel and the territories
occupied by Israel since the 1967 Six-Day War.
position groups, and it did not
condone violence in any form."
The memorandum was sub-
mitted to the Israeli government
as a confidential document, and
Amnesty had every intention of
including a statement of its view
of human rights violations by
opposition groups in any later
statement it might make.
This it now did with a
statement in the preface "to
eliminate misunderstanding of
Amnesty International's in-
tentions."
IT SAID that it "does not
condone crimes of violence, nor
does it work for the release of
people who are imprisoned for
having committed acts of
violence. On the contrary, it
condemns assassinations and the
taking of hostages by anti-
governmental forces and regards
these as grave violations of
human rights..."
In its comment on the
Attorney General's statement
that when there is not a state of
normal peace, "the question of
human rights takes on a very
different complexion," Amnesty
said that it "recognizes the
obligation of a government to
protect its citizens from the
dangers of violence.
"However," it said, "in
fulfilling this obligation every
government must do si in a
manner compatible with respect
for and protection of the fun-
damental human rights of all
people under its administration."
The report, together with Prof.
Zamir's response, also dealt at
length with Amnesty's use of
sources of information over the
years, including the London
Sunday Times report in 1977.
PROF. ZAMIR said that "the
sources upon which Amnesty
relies and the unbalanced
manner in which these sources
are presented, raise questions
about the credibility and im-
partiality of the findings."
Amnesty commented that "the
Attorney General mistakes the
use to which the sources are
put they are used as an in-
dication of the nature of alleged
ill-treatment and of the
inadequacy of official rebuttals r
not as sources of verified, proven^
instances of ill-treatment. ,
"The common conclusion of
these reports made by other
organizations or allegations of ill-
treatment in Israel occupied
territories is that instances of
ill-treatment occur too
frequently. (Their) conclusions
show a sufficient level of con-
sistency to warrant serioc
concern."
In his concluding remarks, the
Attorney General said that "in
the light of Israel's exceptional
security dilemma, we believe that f
the rights afforded to security
detainees in the administered
areas are reasonable.
"AMNESTY ... is fully aware
of two unique features of Israel's
system in this regard. First, there
is the agreement with the
International Committee of the
Red Cross assuring early access
by ICRC delegates to detainees.
"Furthermore, the system
includes the right of any detainee
to petition directly the Supreme
Court of Israel.
The Government of Israel will
continue to ensure that the civil
rights of security detainees in the
administered areas are duly
respected."
Amnesty said that "the ~"
Attorney General rejected the
whole of Amnesty's "critique and
recommendations for im-
provement (and) he
repeatedly appealed to concepts
such as the 'survival of the State'
to justify restrictions imposed on
the rights of individuals.
"Missing from the Attorney
General's reply is any clearly
reasoned statement explaining f^
how the prospects for the sur-
vival of the State would be
changed by instituting a set
of administrative procedures
which would provide greater
protection for detainees from ill-
treatment."
Conference on Hebrew University
NEW YORK Mexican,
American and Canadian Jews are
gathering in Toronto this
October for a major conference on
Hebrew University's role in
Israel, the Middle East and in
helping Jewish people worldwide.
For three days, Oct. 9 to 12,
participants will have the op-
portunity to meet with leading
University administrators and
professors in a program com-
bining lectures and workshops
with home hospitality and
sightseeing.
UNIVERSITY President
Avraham Herman's opening talk
and slide presentation on "The
Hebrew University in the '80's"
will set the tone for the weekend.
"The Middle East Where Are
We Headed," a panel moderated
by former Israeli Ambassador to
the United States and University
Vice President Simcha Dinitz is
one of the discussions on the
agenda. The panel will include
such experts as political science
Prof. Shlomo Avineri, whose past
experience includes a stint as
Israel's Ministry of Foreign
\ffairs director general.
I

I
I
I
%>
Also participating will be Prof.
3alia Cohen, international
authority on the Soviet Union,
and Prof. Menachem Milson, an
expert on Islam and former
political advisor to the Governor
of Jordan's West Bank.
Lebediker Branch
extends best wishes for a
Happy New Year
Joseph P. Zuckerman, President
Fanny Gibson, Vice President
Oscar Shapiro, Vice President
Sunday, Sept.-28 at 2 p.m.
a holiday cocktail party
is being held at 1234 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach

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1980
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^Tl960
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
, File Number 80 6816
Division 03
NRE: ESTATE OF
11CHARD C. LANG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
| AGAINST THE ABOVE
I 1.ST ATE AND ALL OTHER
[PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of RICHARD C.
LANG, deceased. File Number
80-6816 103). is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
FlaEler Street. Room 307.
Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is BARBARA M. LANG,
whose address is 7870 NW 185
Street, Hlaleah, FL 33015. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
' demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
J MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement uf
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
' will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob
Jectlons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Sept. 12, 1980.
Barbara M. Lang*
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
RICHARD C.LANG
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JAMES A. MOLANS, ESQ.
5901 SW 74 St.
Suite 404
South Miami. FL 33143
Telephone: 1305) 661-3633
09169 Sept 12, 19, 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADECOUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 80-13643 FC
IN RE: The Marriage of
FERNANDO MATOS
Petitioner-Husband
and
ERLAGALVAN MATOS
TO: ERLAGALVAN
MATOS
Residence Address
Unknown
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI,
FIED that a Petition For
Dissolution Of Marriage ha.'
been filed against you and yoi
are required to serve a copy ol
your Answer or Pleading to
said petition on petitioner's
attorney, GEORGE T. RA-
MANI, ESQ., Suite 711, Bls-
cayne Building, 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In the
"1 Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 17 day of
October, 1980. If you fall to do
so, Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida,
this 11th day of September.
1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
Deputy Clerk
09174 Sept. 19.28;
Oct. 3.10.1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME
LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
'3IVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
ABCOR at 1175 NE 12S Street,
Suite 417, Miami. Florida 33161
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
(Associated Business
. Co-Ordlnators, Inc.
Smith, Mandler. Smith
Werner, Jacobowlts
A Fried. P.A.
Attorney for
Applicant
09140 Aug. 29;
Sept. 5, 13. 19.1980
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 80-5380(1)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
, MICHAELLEFF
1 Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Michael Leff,
deceased, File Number 80-5380
(1), Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade
County Courthouse. 73 W.
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of
the estate is Susan Leff. whose
address is 1801 NE 140th Street,
Apt. 204. North Miami. Fla.
The name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate
are required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be
In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet
due. the date when It will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mall one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Adminis-
tration: Sept. 12. 1980.
Susan Leff
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Michael Leff
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE;
NORMAN K SCHWARZ
SCHWARZ&
SCHIFFRIN, P.A.
407 Lincoln Rd.-Suite 4A
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Telephone. 672-1222
09168 Sept. 12. 19, 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No 80-11437 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The marriage of:
BETST MAY NEMBHARD
Petitioner-Wife
and
WILFRED CHURCHILL
NEMBHARD
Respondent-Husband
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU. WILFRED CHUR
CHILL NEMBHARD. L / K / R
354 Washington Avenue. Miami
Beach. Fla.. are hereby notl-
fled to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition For Dis-
solution of Marriage filed
against you. upon Wife's attor-
ney. GEORGE NICHOLAS,
ESQUIRE, 612 NW 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33138,
and file original with the Clerk
of the Court on or before
October 10, 1980; otherwise the
Petition will be confessed by
you.
DATED this 28 day of
August, 1980.
Richard P. Brinker, Clerk
By V. Barkley
Deputy Clerk
09154 Sept. 5,12.19,26.1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80 13029 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
iN RE: The marriage of
jNADIA TAMARA COLS
Petitioner
land
RAFAEL RAMON COLS
Respondent
TO: RAFAEL RAMON COLS
Calle 2
EdlflcloBETA.
I'lsol3, Apto. nil
LA URBINA
CA RACAS (Venezuela I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to it. on CAR-
LOS M MENDEZ, Esq.. Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose
, address is 2985 W. 4th Avenue.
HIAI.EAH. Florida. 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
Oct. 10, 1980: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN. MIAMI.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 29 day of
August. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByS. A Bamer
As Deputy Clerk
Carlos M. Mendez. Esq.
2985 W. 4th Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
09158 Sent 5. 12, 19, 26, 1980
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 80-6815 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
OSORIA GARCIA
Petitioner Wife
and
JUAN MANUEL GARCIA
Respondent Husband
TO: JUAN MANUEL
GARCIA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Petition on the
Petitioner Wife's attorney,
Donald Mates, of 2301 Collins
Avenue, Suite M-8. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139. You are
to file the original Answer or
Pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 3 day of October.
1980. otherwise a Default
Judgment will be entered
against you.
DATED AT Miami, Dade
County, Florida this 22 day of
August. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the
Circuit Court
By Deborah G. Hess
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
ROBERT H. BURNS
2301 Collins Ave
Suite M-8
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Tel 638-4421 (Dade)
920-205 iBroward)
By Terrl Buchalter
For the Firm
09142 Aug. 29:
Seot.5, 12. 19. 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Ledy Imagination at 210 SW
22nd Avenue, Miami. Florida.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LEDY IMAGINATION. INC.,
a Florida Corporation
By Ley da Gonzalez,
President. ,
Sanford H. Kramer, P.A.
Attorney for
Ledy Imagination. Inc.
2699 South Bayshore Drive
9O0F
Miami. Florida 33133
09116 Aug. 22, 29;
Sept. 5. 12, 1980
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 80-11800 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The marriage of
"tCYNTHIA S. KEATING
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
WILLIAM JOSEPH
KEATING. JR.
Respondent-Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: William Joseph
Keating, Jr.
c o Camllle Dentrjr
3450 Townsend Blvd.
No. 184
Jacksonville, Florida
32211
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. II any. to It on
Lie ber man. Benjamin and
Associates, P.A., Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address Is 9801
Sunset Drive. Miami, Florida
33173. on or before October 24,
1980, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
Attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal
bf this Court on September 15,
1980.
Richard P. Brinker, Clerk
By Deborah G Hess
Deputy Clerk
|09178 Sept. 19. 28;
Oct. 3, 10.1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR
DADECOUNTY, FL
Civil Action No. 8012909
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage
between:
IVONNE ALICIA
OBREGON
Petitioner Wife
and
JOSE OBREGON
Respondent-Husband
TO: JOSE OBREGON
Address Unknown
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
PIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on Robert H Burns, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
2301 Collins Ave.. Suite M-8,
Miami Beach. Florida 3.1139.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before Ocl 10. 1980;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of
August. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM.Erlce
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
ROBERTH.BURNS
2301 Collins Ave.
Suite M-8
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel: 538-4421 (dade
920-2005 ibroward)
ROBERTH BURNS
09156 Sept. 5.12, 19, 26, 1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-9119 (12)
FAMILY CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
LOURDES MAYTIN
| VASSALLO
Petitioner
and
ORESTES L.
VASSAIJ.O
Respondent
TO: Orestes L. Vassallo
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
.written defenses, If any, to It on
Glsela Cardonne; Stone, Sost-
i-lnri It Gonzalez, PA. attorney
'for Petitioner, whose address Is
1401 W. Flagler St., Miami.
Florida 33135 (649-44111, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 21, 1980; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
Iprayed for In the complaint or
[petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
fecutlve weeks In The Jewish
"lorldlan.
WITNESS my hand the seal
bf said court at Miami, Florida
Kin this 12 day of September,
11980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By V. Barkley
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
G lse la Cardonne;
Stone, Sostchln A
Gonzalez, P.A.
1401 W. Flagler St.
Miami. Fla. 33135 (649-4411)
Attorney for Petitioner
09179 Sept. 19. 26;
Oct. 3.10. 1980
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE
Public notice Is hereby given
that on Tuesday. September
29th. 1980 at 10:00 A.M. we will
sell at public auction to the
highest bidder for cash only at
Barbon Towing Service Inc.,
1111 NW 20th Street, Miami,
Florida a 1971 Dodge Dart ID.
No. LH23C1R235088 yellow In
color as Is condition. A 1985
V.W. Bug ID. No. 115714086
white In color as Is condition. A
1973 Oldsmoblle S, W ID. No.
SJ46K3R130688, as Is condition,
brown In color.
09181 Sept. 19,1980
" INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
! THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-13774 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I IN RE: The marriage of
I CHRISTIAN JEAN-
BAPTISTE,
Petitioner-Husband
and
SHELLEY JEAN BAPTISTE
Respondent-Wife
TO:SHELLEY
JEAN BAPTISTE
410 Prospect Street
East-Orange.
New Jersey 07017
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
it on ARTHUR H. LIPSON,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1515 NW 167 St..
Suite 216. Miami. Fla., and file
the original with the clerk of
, the above stvled court on or
before October 24, 1980; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 15 day of Sept.,
1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
09177 Sept. IB, 26;
Oct. 3,10. 1980
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
CLIMAWEST at 161 Almertca
Ave.. Suite 200-E, Coral
| Gables, Fla. 33134, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
GESA. INC.
| 181 Almeria Ave..
Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Fla 33134
KURT WELLISCH. ESQ.
Welllsch, MetzgerA
Leone, P.A.
Attorneys for
GESA. INC.
|l61 Almeria Ave Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Fla 33134
09180 Sept. 19. 26;
Oct. 3, 10. 1980
| INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-13831 FC
< ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
i IN RE: The marriage of
DORETHA L SAKARIYAWO
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
WAZIRI A. SAKARIYAWO
Respondent Husband
' TO: WAZIRI A.
SAKARIYAWO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
| Dissolution of Marriage has
' been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
i It on ARTHUR H LIPSON,
I attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1515 NW 167 St.,
Suite 218. Miami. Fla., and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before Oct. 24, 1980; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of Sept.,
1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
09182 Sept. 19,26:
Oct. 3. 10.1980
1 NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names of
Fine Knits, Inc., d, b.'a Tri-
cot D'anjou France, at 7665
West 2nd Court, Hlaleah. Fla.,
Intend to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Larry Felnatnger, Owner
Martin Felnslnger. Owner
147 Aug. 29;
Sept. 5. 12. 19. 1980
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No 80 13842 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
FRANCISCO ROA
Husband-Petitioner
vs.
GODINICIA ROA
Wife-Respondent
TO: GODINICIA ROA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed, and you are hereby _|
required to serve copy of your
Answer to the Husband/Pe-
titioner, Attorney. DONALD F.
FROST, ESQ.. 26 SW 6th St..
Miami. Florida 33130 and file
an original with the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 31 day of October,
1980 or the allegations will
taken as confessed against you.
and a Default will be entered. ,
DATED at Miami. Dade'
County. Florida, this 16 day of '
September. 1980.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
09183 Sept. 19. 26;
Oct 3. 10,1980


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.September 19.1980
Jfemsft Fhrktetr
Pagel5-B
&
mUei Rodan, 43-Year Resident Abraham Mailman, Banker, Developer
__ hlH sons. Lawrence. North Miam : 9 -^w^fw^r-w
held
uneral Services were
r 14 at Levitt-Weinstom for
uel Rodan 79. of North
'" a resident of Dade
Bty for 43 years, who died
.12.
urvivinjt are his wife Frances:
sons, Lawrence, North Miami;
daughter, Evelyn Brookstone,
Opa-Locka; five grandchildren;
and three great-grandchildren.
Interment
Cemetery.
was in Mt. Sinai
ch of Dimes Chairwoman Rose Gordon presents Dr.
rles Bauer with a grant check for $60,000 funds needed to
itain Jackson Memorial Hospital's neo-natal intensive care
The growing number of sick newborn infants, due to the
Lr of Cuban and Haitian refugees, has created an enormous
ent load and severe limitations with regard to physical
e, equipment and staffing, according to hospital officials.
Israel Professor
Battles for IMDA
|y JOSEPH POLAKOFF
ASHINGTON (JTA) -
iissian-horn scientist with a
cal degree from the
ersity of Berlin which he
fed during the bitter years
Hitler's onslaught was
kting against Jews, has
up the long struggle to
|the International Red Cross
recognize Israel's Magen
. Adorn.
Arieh Harell, now 68 and a
sor of endocrinology at Tel
University, is president of
is counterpart of Red Cross
I Red Crescent societies in
countries. In the United
is tor a series of seminars
(conferences in his medical
he seeks with indefatigable
J as did his predecessors, to
[support for Israel's mem-
}ip in t he international body.
IK IRC holds its
rennial meeting in Manila in
ber, !V)M when Israel's
Dership will be proposed. In
when it made its first
tat ion. it lost by one vote.
fcai time, the East European
Jwa split, and some mem-
[ lined Every four years
then. Israel has un-
fcssfuliy sought membership
face of opposition from the
and their allies.
|is year marks the 50th
reraary of -Magen David
which was established
M the British Mandate in
Itine Harell noted in an
riew here that in the past 50
Israel's society has sup-
aid to more than 30
ies. including Moslem and
n countries which now
srael.
lically, among them is
ladesh which in mid-August
Juced the resolution in the
Nations Security Council
at depriving Israel of
ilem as its capital.
month, Harell said,
en David Adorn sent 200
I of medicines and first aid
the Red Cross in Nepal to
[earthquake victims. Five
teams, helped by the
jUMQt of Israel and Israel's
sion network, went to aid
es from Cambodia in
nd. Israel's television
50 million Israeli Pounds
1 purpose."
tELL NOTED that "most
I Cross societies recognize
' -international
cooperation. There are strong
personal ties between our society
and Red Cross societies abroad
the West Europeans.
Rumania's and especially with
the American Red Cross." While
in Washington, he was the guest
of George Elsy. American Red
Cross president.
Harell, who was in Washington
with Rabbi Reuben Dobin of
Miami Beach, a leader in the
American effort in "Operation
Recognition" for Magen David
Adorn, was Israel's minister to
Rumania in 1957-58 and am-
bassador to the Soviet Union in
1958-62.
Born in Kiev, he emigrated to
Palestine in 1934, and then
entered Berlin University where
he received his medical degree in
1937.
While on his current U.S. visit,
he is participating in conferences
and seminars, including the
Gordon Foundation Conference
in Meriden. N.H.. North Con-
necticut University. the
University of Kansas Medical
Center in Kansas City. George
Washington Univesity in St.
Louis, and at Estes Park in
Denver. He will return to Israel
in October.
GORDON. Stuart Jr., 36. Hollywood.
Sept 12 Riverside.
HOCHBERG. Matthew Charles. North
Miami Beach. Sept. 12. Riverside
Lakeside
KEATS. Richard Larry, 53. North
Miami. Sept. 12. Riverside.
PERCHIK, Max. 85. Sept 10. Gordon
SCHAFFER. Steven Jv\ 20. North
Miami. Seot 12 Rlverslut Lakeside
Sl'SSMAN. Murry.Miami btach. Sept.
13 Kiverslde LaKealde.
BERNSTEIN. Guenter. 68. North
Miami. Sept 13. Levltt-Weinsteln
Sharon Gardens
DAVIS. Philip. Miami Beach Rubin
Lakeside
HERTZ. Sophie, 67. Hollywood. Sept IS.
Riverside Star of David
KEATS, David Bogln, Sept 12.
Riverside. I
KEATS. Richard Larry. 53, NorUii
Miami. Sept. 12 Riverside.
SILVER, Harvey. 68. Coconut Creek.,
Menorah.
SIMON, Bert. 67. Hollywood, Sept. 13;
Riverside. Star of David.
GREENWALD. Mrs. Martha, Miami
Beach. Rubin. Lakeside
Funeral services for Abraham
Mailman, whose philanthropy led
to the building of the Mailman
Center for Child Development at
the University of Miami, were
held Sept. 11 at Temple Beth El
in Hollywood.
Mr. Mailman died Sept. 9 at
his Hollywood home at the age of
82.
A financier, banker and de-
veloper, Mr. Mailman moved to
Hollywood from Montreal in
1951. He developed Miramar and
was one of the largest owners of
land in the unincorporated area
around Hollywood.
Mr. Mailman and his brother
Joseph donated $1.5 million for
the child development center.
Known for large gifts to
educational and medical insti-
tutions, Mr. Mailman also
donated $100,000 for a Boy Scout
Camp in Wild wood, was one of
the co-founders of the Mount
Sinai Medical Center, and
R. Michnoff, Crash Victim
Funeral services for Robert
Louis Michnoff. regional director
of development for the Wendy's
restaurant chain, were held Sept
14 at Riverside Normandy Isle
Funeral Chapel.
Mr. Michnoff, 26. was one of
six persons killed Friday in the
crash of a twin-engine airplane in
Clearwater.
A native of Miami Beach, he
was a star athlete at Miami
Beach High School, where he
made the all-city football team,
played on the school's tennis
team and won the state high
HIRSCH
Sella. *(3, Sept 12 A resident of Miami
23 years, coming from Cleveland. Ohio.
Mrs. Hirsch was a member of the
Israelite Center of Miami. Surviving are
a son Robert P. of Miami; brother
Roland Sandier of Chicago; three
sisters. Onnle Felnberg of Santa
Monica. Calif.. Fay Rothenberg of Flint.
Mich #.iihI Bess Lemer of Miami, four
grandchildren, Barbara. Eric. Jordan
and Barry Schreler. Graveside services
were held Sept. 14 at Mt. Sinai Cemetery
under the direction of Gordon Funeral
Home.
BLACKER
Gertrude II., Miami Beach. Sept. 16.
She had been a resident of this com-
munity since IMS She was a founder
and past president of the Tropical
Cancer League and for the past 13 years
she was the vice president of the board
of directors and chairman of the Re-
search Department Auxiliaries at the
Miami Heart Institute. She was also a
member of Bnal Brith. Fight for Sight.
Bayvlew Social Club and the National
Council of Jewish Women Surviving
are her husband lvar J Blacker of
Miami Beach; son Michael (Shaun)
Blacker of Miami, daughters Marsha
{James i Horland of Miami Beach and
Sherry iGary) Freedman of Miami;
brother Morton Kaplan of New York
City; and five grandchildren. Mlshaand
Mandy Blacker, Debra and Pamela
Horland and Maggie Freedman
Funeral services were held Sept. 17 at
Riverside chapel with interment at
lakeside Memorial Park.
FRIEDMAN
Sydney S.. 81, Miami Beach. Sept. 15. He
was a resident here for 16 years, for-
merly of Detroit. Muh He was a mem-
ber of the Miami Beach Retirees. He
was the husband of Henrietta Friedman
of Miami Beach; father of Irwln M.
Friedman of Westfleld, N.J and
grandfather <>l four Services were held
Sept. 17 at Rubin Memorial Chapel with
Interment at Mt Nebo Cemeterj
SOHNEN
Tillie. formerly of Brooklyn, NY., a
resident of Miami Beach for the past 10
years. She was the wife of 4H years of
Samuel; mother of Geraldine Turner,
Irene Nathan and Elaine Seltzer,
grandmother of nine; great-grand-
mother of one. sister of Rancis Slegel
Bite was a member of Hadassah, B'nai
B'rith. ORT and a member of Temple
Emanu-EI. Funeral services were held
Sept 16 at the Riverside with interment
In New York.
ARROLL. Morris. Miami Beach Rubin
Star of David
BRAUN. Fany. 95, Miami Beach. Sept.
15
FISHMAN. Harry Solomon. 77. North
Miami. Sept. 16 Riverside. Star of
David
SCHAFFER. Steven Jay. 20, North
Miami. Sept. 12
SCHWARTZ. David. North Miami
Beach, Sept. 16. Riverside. Lakeside
STEINBERG, Jacob (Jack), Miami.
Sept. 14 Levltt-Weinsteln
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open lirry Day Closed Sobbjfh
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2688
I school tennis championship.
In 1976, he graduated from the
University of Florida Gainesville.
He was a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, the Westview
Country Club and Tau Epsilon
Phi fraternity.
Survivors include his father,
Dr. Donald Michnoff: mother,
Shirley: and two sisters, Sally
Jacobs and Jane Blumenthal.
Interment was at Lakeside
Memorial Park.
ZILBER
Mrs Bessie. 80. Coral Gables. Sept. 12.
She was a member of Hark Synagogue
of Cleveland Heights. Ohio Survivors
Include her sons. Sidney of Shaker
Heights. Ohio. Norman of San Fran-
cisco. Calif., Maurice of Boston;
daughter Mrs. Bluma Marcus of
Miami; sister. Jeanne Stier of Detroit.
Mich., and 13 grandchildren Funeral
services were held Sept. 15 at Vista
Memorial Cemetery. Hlaleah. with the
Riverside in charge of arrangements.
Contributions may be made to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation or
Temple Judea
AGREE. Solomon. Miami Beach.
Rubin.
BL'CHWALD. Albert. Miami Beach.
Sept. 15. Rubin. Mt. Nebo.
FRIEDMAN. Sidney. Miami Beach.
Rubin
donated the land for Temple Beth
El.
He was chairman emeritus of
the Harriett Bank of Hollywood
and comptroller and former
chairman of the Mercantile Bank
of Miami.
Survivors include his wife,
Alice: daughter. Marilyn Segal;
brother. Joseph L. Mailman;
sister, Mary Greene: eight
grandchildren and 10 great-
grandchildren.
ORUCKER
Robert Steven. 47. of Miami. Sept. 15. A
34 year resident, formerly from the
Bronx Surviving are his wife Sheila,
sons. Jonathan Scott and Jed Lowel :
daughter Jodi Rcnee: brother Michael;
parents. Fred and Sally Drucker
Funeral services were held Sept 16 ai
the Riverside with Interment in Lake
side Memorial I'ark
PAUL
Joseph W 85. passed away Sept 11 In
Holly Hill Nursing Hume m Hollywood.
Bom in Russia, he came to the U.S. In
1806 and settled in Newark. N.J. as a
salesman for wholesale grocers. He
originally worked for R. C. Williams
Co.. in New York City before working
for Seaman Brothers, where he retired
10 years ago and moved to Florida A
World War 1 veteran, Paul was also a
member of the Masons and the Amer-
ican Legion. He Introduced ChanUclalr
Market In 1937 In Caldwell. N.J. and
lectured on retail marketing at City
College of New York aft-r World War II
Survived by his wife Freda; son Robert
D. Haul of New York City: daughter
Norma Benlsch of South Orange. N.J ,
and sisters Mrs. Rose Cuban of Miami,
May Paulof New York, Tillie Freedman
of Long Island, Sonia Mosh of Old
Bridge, N.J.; and four grandchildren
Services were held Sunday. Sept. 14, at
Temple Israel of the Oranges and
Maplewood In South Orange, N.J. Ser-
vices were conducted by Suburban
Chapel. Philip Apter and Son. Maple-
wood. N.J.
HOROV1TZ. Charles. 88. Sept. 4.
Riverside. Mt. Nebo.
COHEN. Morris. 79. Sept. 4 Gordon
Mt Nebo
MARKS. Bella. 79. Sept 5. Riverside
Ml Nebo.
FOSTER. Minnie, 88. Sept. 6 Riverside
Ml. Nebo.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
! J385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by s tevitt, l O
New York: Ol.'i 263-7600 Queens Blvd a. 76th Rd., Forest Hills. N.Y
RUBIN
CHAPEL
serving drTOdox, conservative
Famines d1pi#4evrtsh Faith.

Every tf|rvk (Personally ar
by
N.RUBIM
Road, Miami
W; 538-6371


Pagel6-B
+Jewi*f> fkrkMar
f^y-SeptanberW
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.Ofler ends December 31. 1980-
y
IIMIIIIlHJi
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NEW ZEALAND
SPRING LAMB
Whole
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paniit >ii Astoano i.voi5
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Bath Tissue 6 Kg $1"
DIITINA P ANUM tlVll
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REG ADC OR ELEC PERK
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US CHOICE FRESH VALLEY BEEF ROUND BONELESS
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PRICES AND OFFERS GOOD
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