The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02647

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
'Jewish Floridiaii
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
|\"SeS2^Number 43 THREE SECTIONS
Miami, Florida Friday, October 26, 1979
By Mail 60 Cents t'edShocher I'rifl' .'{") ( 'etlts
-
lame
n and children at Shelter for Battered Wives in Herzliya
Battered Wives
Now They're IScJ 1114
Taken
By KOBERT NOBEL
JERl SALEM The tragic
Imunlcr in the Herzliya Shelter
Battered Wives of C'armela
Nekesh li.i- brought a great
(mount (it publicity to the
problem (it wife-beating in Israel.
"ome observers hope it may have
Bn influence (in lessening its
ncidencein the future.
On the warm summer evening
hen the killing took place,
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
however, all thoughts were on the
tragedy. Carmel's husband
slipped into the Herzliya Shelter
for Mattered Wives on the heels
of a woman returning through
the entrance gate alter shopping
in town. He hugged C'armela and
then repeatedly stabbed her with
a pocketknifc in front of more
than a dozen other horrified
women and children at the
shelter.
Continued on Page 6-A
Bustling Pulpits
74 Women Hitting
Rabbinate Books
Bj HENGALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The number of women
fctudying for the rabbinate
lunder Reform and Recon-
struct ion is t auspices dur-
ing the 1979-80 academic
year is 74, one less than the
|record total of 75 enrolled
ring the prior academic
^ear, according to a Jewish
Telegraphic Agency sur-
vey.
However, unlike the 1978-79
KWr, when, out of a total of 13
gvornen candidates ut the Recon-
RKtonitt Rabbinical College in
Fouadelphia, two were in the
"BOf class and received the title
"r Wbbi last June 10, there are no
women m the senior class this
. according to Rabbi Ludwig
Nadelmann, executive vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Keconstruc-
tionist Foundation. He said there
27 men and 12 women
arc
studying at the Reconslruc-
('out inued on Page 6-A
7 Do Not Deal'
Timing of Day an's
Exit Is Regretted
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan has resigned from
the government declaring
that he could not continue
to serve because of his dis-
agreement with the Cabinet
majority over the conduct
of the autonomy nego-
tiations with Egypt and
other basic policy matters
and because he and his
office have been relegated
to a secondary role in
foreign affairs.
Dayan announced his resig-
nation after briefing the Cabinet
on the current political situation.
The announcement took his
fellow ministers by surprise,
except for Prime Minister
Menachem Begin who knew of
Dayan's intentions two weeks
ago and had the Foreign
Minister's letter of resignation in
band.
BEGIN expressed deep regret
over Dayan's decision and
praised his contributions to the
peace process over the past two
years. He said Dayan's
resignation was an important
"national and international
event" but stressed that the
government will continue to
fulfill all of its obligations.
According to law. Dayan's
resignation takes effect -ix hours
after its submission to the Prime
Minister. There was no indication
ut who will replace him. Begin
said that lor the time being he
would handle the Foreign
Ministry post himself.
Reaction to Dayan's bombshell
announcement was Bwift. Labor
Partj spokesmen declared it
spelled the beginning of the end
of Begin's Likud coalition
government and its "bankrupt''
policies Hut opponents of
Dayan's moderate policies in
I lerut and the National Religious
Party welcomed his departure.
IN CAIRO, Egypt's Minister
Continued on Page 8-A
'Israel will not even have a right of pursuit
(from the territories from which they will
have withdrawn), and will have to stop at
the border between its frontiers and the
newly-liberated territories.'Butros Ghali.
Stalled Autonomy Talks
Show Deep Differences
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA! Egypt's
Premier Mustapha Khalil.
Israel's Interior Minister Ynset
Burg and America's special
Middle Fast envoy Robert
Strauss will meet this week in
London to try to break the dead-
lock in the negotiations on the
Palestinian autonomy plan pro-
vided by the (amp David agree-
ments and give a new boost to
the Israeli-Egyptian peace
process.
The optimism, and even
euphoria, which marked the
signing of the Israeli-Egyptian
peace treaty last March have
l>een seriously eroded by six
months of hard bargaining on the
autonomy issue with no visible
progress in sight. Many dip-
lomats involved in the nego-
tiations believe that the
autonomy plan is the main
stumbling block to a bettei
Israeli-Egyptian understanding
and that a solution on this Issui
would mark the beginning of a
new era.
THE FIRST public Israeli
Egyptian debate ever to be helc
at ministerial level a joint
appearance by Israel's Poreigi
Minister Moshe Dayan (now
resigned) and Egypt's Ministei
of State for Foreign Affairs But
Continued on Page 10-A
On Miami Beach
Moynihan, Haig Will Speak to Zionists
U.S. Sen. Daniel Patrick
Moynihan (D., N.Y.) will
address a special session of
the International Leader-
ship Conference organized
by the Zionist Organization
of America on Saturday
noon at the Doral Beach
Hotel.
The session is part of the
deliberations of the conference,
which opened on Miami Beach
Wednesday.
ALSO AMONG the celebrated
personalities at the conference,
which is hemispheric in scope,
including in addition to theZOA,
the Zionist Organization of
Canada and the Latin American
Confederation of General Zion-
ists, will be Gen. Alexander Haig.
former chief of staff of the White
House during the Nixon adminis-
tration and former supreme com-
mander of NATO.
Haig is due to address th<
Brandeis Award dinner of thi
ZOA honoring H. Irwin Lev
Florida real estate developer an<
philanthropist. on Saturda
evening. Joining Gen. Haig a
speaker will be Ambassado
Continued on Page 3-A
ost-Kissinger Interview and Lebanon...Page 4-A


Page 2-A
JenistifkjrkMCHl
Friday, October 26,1 After two Israeli visits by Egyptian President Anwar Sadat, he was accompanied on his
most recent visit to Haifa by his wife and daughter. Here, Jehan Sadat (left) is shown with
Aliza Begin, wife of Israel's Prime Minister Menachem Begin, on a tour of Haifa University.
Headlines
Will Israel Hand Jerusalem Back?
Egyptian Vice President Hosni Mubarak said
he believed Israel would eventually agree to hand
Jerusalem back to the Arabs. In an interview
published by the weekly AkhbarEl Yom, he said:
"Experience has taught us that during talks
Israeli leaders begin by refusing to make any con-
cessions, then end up giving way."
Noting that Egyptian negotiators recognized
this and had achieved Israels total withdrawal
from Sinai, he said: "The same thing will be
repeated over Jerusalem, the Golan Heights and
the other territories." Mubarak added: "Today
the entire world backs the Arab cause, rejects ter-
ritorial occupation by force and refuses to see
Jerusalem under Israeli occupation Stressing
the need to continue efforts towards an overall
settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict, he also
said that "several Arab heads of state support
Egypt's point of view." He added: "The
American administration is no less interested
than Egypt in seeing Palestinian autonomy
established on the West Bank and in Gaza."
Igor Guberman. being held incommunicado on
a preliminary charge of trading in stolen icons,
has been transferred from the Dmitrov Prison,
about 40 miles north of Moscow, to the nearby
city of Zagorsk. Guberman's wife, Tatiana, was
told by the authorities that she will know the
actual charge against her husband when the trial
takes place.
There is growing speculation that Guberman
will actually be charged under Article 70 of the
Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic's
Criminal Code, which deals with "Anti-Soviet
Agitation and Propaganda." This article has been
used against many Soviet Jewish emigration
activists as well as non-Jewish dissidents.
Dr. Israel Miller has been appointed senior vice
president of Yeshiva University by Dr. Norman
Lamm, president of the University. Dr. Miller,
who earned the Bachelor's degree, magna cum
laude at Yeshiva University, and who was or-
dained at the University's Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary, where he is currently on
the faculty as professor of applied rabbinics,
joined the University in 1968 as assistant to the
president for student affairs.
He was appointed vice president in 1970, and in
1975 was named chairman of the Executive Com-
mittee for University Affairs, made up of the
institution's four vice presidents, which served as
an interim governing body pending the election of
a new president.
Black and Jewish organizations in the
Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR)
have endorsed a joint statement expressing their
undiminished shared commitment to human
rights which has bound them together in the
LCCR for 30 years, thus dispelling the idea that
differences which may exist will lessen their
ability to work together.
The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights is a
coalition of 149 major national organizations rep-
resenting Blacks, Hispanic and Asian Americans,
| labor, the major religious groups, women, the
handicapped, minority businesses and pro-
fessions, all seeking to advance civil rights
through enactment and enforcement of federal
legislation.
The joint statement issued by LCCR
Chairman Clarence M. Mitchell and Secretary
Arnold Aronson states that there are differences
between the two groups, "but to suggest that
such differences constitute an irreparable rift is to
misunderstand t he nature of a coalition and of our
relationship.' ___________
Vice Presi lent Walter F. Mondale and Lewis
Rudin. builder anil chairman of the Association
for a Better New York, will be honored by the
American Jewish Congress at its annual Stephen
Wise Award dinner Wednesday evening. Nov. 28,
at the Sheraton Centre in New York.
Howard Samuels, dinner chairman, made the
announcement. The Stephen Wise Awards were
inaugurated in 1949 on the 75th birthday of the
founder and longtime president of the American
Jewish Congress. Past recipients include Abba
Eban. Leonard Bernstein. Arthur J. Goldberg,
Golda Meir. Harry S Truman. Chief Justice Earl
Warren and Roy Wilkins.
Vice President Mondale will be honored for
"illustrious public service and dedication to the
social concerns of our time."
A century of negative Jewish stereotypes in
popular prints and serious literature conditioned
Americans to reject Jewish refugees as im-
migrants in the years before World War II, ac-
cording to a noted historian of American anti-
Semitica.
In the first of a series of monthly book and
author luncheons sponsored by the Program
Division of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, Michael N. Dobkowski, assistant pro-
fessor of Religious Studies at Hobart and William
Smith Colleges, New York, said that but for this
conditioning, 80,000 refugees could have been
rescued from the Nazi Holocaust.
Of this number, he observed, "60,000 died."
Prof. Dobkowski, author of The Tarnished
Dream: The Basis of American Anti-Semitism,
said that while American anti-Semitism of that
period was different from traditional European
anti-Jewish hatred in that it was much less
violent, "it was not different enough."
Sen. Carl Levin, Democrat from Michigan, will
be the featured speaker at the annual Jewish
Keconstructionist Foundation's Mordecai M
Kaplan Awards Dinner on Nov. 17 at the Pierre
Hotel in New York City.
At age 45, Sen. Levin is among the youngest
rnembers of the United States Senate. Elected in
n-i-iai?1-18 n men?ber of the Sen** Govern-
mental Affairs Committee, chairman of its Over-
sight of Government Management Subcom-
mittee, and is a member of the Senate Armed
Services Committee. He is a Harvard Law School
graduate and former Detroit city councilman.
Levin, who identifies himself with the Jewish
Keconstructionist movement, is one of the
founders of Congregation T-Chiyah in Detroit
where he, his wife, Barbara, and three daughters
hve when not in Washington. niers

Fisher Denies He's
Supporting GOP Candidate]
DETROIT (JTA) -
Max Fisher, Detroit in-
dustrialist and Jewish
leader, stated here that
despite allusions in the
press to the contrary, he
has not endorsed any
Republican aspirant for the
presidency.
Fisher stated: "The various
Republican candidates, declared
and undeclared, and the chair-
man of the Republican National
Committee, have been in touch
with me over these last several
months for advice and con-
sultation. While I have not
endorsed the position of any
candidate, I want to reiterate my
stand in opposition to any
linkage of the prices and
availability of oil to the issue of
peace in the Middle East."
FISHER emphasized that "I
consider this stand to be basic to
our country's national interest
and our long-range vital position
in this volatile area. He con-
eluded: "I shall continue to be
available for consultation to the
various Republican candidates
and shall announce my en
dorsement at the proper time."
Earlier, Rita Hauser who
resigned from former Texas Gov
John Connelly's presidential
campaign committee, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
Fisher had called her to ask about
Connally's speech before the
National Press Club j
Washington last week in which
he proposed a linkage between oil
supply and a solution of the
Middle East conflict.
In his speech, Connally, a
declared candidate for the 1980
Republican presidential
nomination, called on the Arab
states to foresake their oil
weapon in return for Israel's
complete withdrawal from the
occupied Arab territories.
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SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
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Our staff of Riverside people consists of
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They are people who understand Jewish
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Since 1935, these policies have been
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It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
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M-4MMV


Friday. October 26,1979
Jewisl)fhridirtr
Page 3-A
Leadership Conference
Moynihan, Haig Will Speak to Zionists
Continued from Page 1-A
I Yehuda Z. Blum, permanent rep-
Lsentative of Israel to the
| United Nations.
The Saturday night dinner will
I honor Levy with the endowment
0f a Chair in Social Studies at
I Kfar Silver in Israel.
IVAN NOVICK, president of
I the ZOA, noted that other speak-
5 here are Prof Fred Gottheil,
chairman of the American Pro-
fessors for Peace in the Middle
East; Prof Gil Carl AlRoy,
author and expert on Arab af-
fairs; Prof. Uri Ra'anan, expert
on Middle East affairs; Morris J.
Araitay. executive director of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee; Dr. Arnold Safer,
.expert on energy resources;
Zygmunt Nagorski, foreign
[policy expert; Max Lerner,
author and columnist; Elaine
Dubow, specialist on Soviet
Jewry; Michael Ledeen,
executive editor of the
"Washington Quarterly"; and
Prof. Edward Luttwak, expert in
I international affairs.
Gordon B. Zacks, Jewish com-
Imunity leader from Columbus,
Ohio, current national vicechair-
jman of the United Jewish
Appeal, and past national chair-
Iman of the young leadership
(cabinet of the United Jewish
|Appeal, is chairman of the Inter-
Sen. Moynihan
Gen. Haig
national Leadership Conference.
OTHER SPEAKERS will
include Jacques Torczyner,
president oi the World Union of
General Zionists, and Rabbi
Joseph P. Sternstein, president
of the American Zionist
Federation.
Participants from Canada will
be Max Goody, deputy president
of the Zionist Organization of
Canada; and Mrs. Helen Smo-
lack, president of the Toronto
Zionist Council.
Participants from Latin
America will be Bernard Ohesker
of Uruguay; Dr. Marcos Roit-
man, Peru; David Hecht,
Venezuela; Manuel Levinsky,
Mexico; Dr. Raphael Markman,
Brazil; and Carlos Kalusin,
Colombia.
In a statement on the eve of
the opening of the conference,
ZOA President Novick declared:
"We are meeting at a time when
Israel, the Jewish people,
democracy and western civil-
ization are being challenged. This
conference will attempt to give
answer to these challenges.
Israel, which again demonstrated
its strength as a democratic
nation in just these recent days,
is confidently going about its
affairs and continuing the peace
process with Egypt including the
autonomy plan which was agreed
upon at Camp David.
Referring to the resignation
this week of Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan, he said that it was
based "not on a political dif-
ference of opinion, but rather on
tactical considerations. It is the
opinion of the ZOA leadership
that the decision of the Israel
Supreme Court regarding the
settlement of Alon Moreh does
not affect the right of Jewish
settlement on the West Bank and
in Gaza except that these will
have to be entirely on govern-
ment land."
And in regard to the energy
crisis facing the country: "It is a
disservice to the American people
to claim that appeasement of the
Arab nations will ease the energy
problem, avert the threat to our
economy and the dollar by
making the import of oil less
costly."
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Stanfield Gets Free Rein
To Meet PLO Spokesmen
MONTREAL (JTA) -
I Robert Stanfield, Prime Minister
Joe Clark's :imhn.s.sador-at-large
to the Middle East, is free to
|make con!ml with the Palestine
Liberation Organization if he so
[chooses. Fxternal Affairs
I Minister Flora MacDonald said
In Ottawa.
She said the Cabinet gave
I Stanfield no instructions on
[consulting the PI.O while he is in
(he Middle Hast, and it is up to
I him to do so or not. MacDonald
[added, however, that "There is
[no question of official recognition
of the PLO at this time" by
[lanada. Before Stanfield left he
(said he would not talk to PLO
I officials.
CLARK SAID in a radio in-
jerview earlier this week that he
ould consider recognizing the
PLO as the official representative
of the Palestinian people if it
renounced terrorism and
recognized Israel's right to exist.
Stanfield. a former leader of
Chirks Progressive Conservative
Party, was sent on a fact-finding
mission to the Middle East last
month.
His assignment is to elicit the
views of Israel and the Arab
states on Clark's election
campaign promise to move
Canada's Embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and to
assess the Middle East situation
in general. He will submit his
recommendations some time next
year. Clark said on the radio
interview that he still believed
Jerusalem should be recognized
as the capital of Israel but would
have to consider Stanfield's
recommendations before acting.
=\
Jewish National Fund Morton Towers
Annual Tribute Banquet
K.-

** 1
%
11
..
HONORING
Eric Glaser
Sunday, November 18,1979 6:30p.m.
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
Dancing Entertainment
Kosher Cuisine
Couvert: $15.00 Dress Optional
You Are Cordially Invited to Attend
For Tickets Phone:
Co-Chairpersons: (Lou Aronson 672-5928
(Augusta M entz 672-5528
Ticket Chairman Morris Grauer 672-1588
V
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P*ge4-A
*JewistHorkhan
Friday, October 26
1979
Dayan's Departure
The Politics of Art Expression
' Our first reaction to Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan's resignation is that we wish it weren't so. To
begin with, it isl ill-timed: | it gives his country's
enemies, and they include Egypt with which Israel
has signed a peace agreement, the kind of support
they hardly need in their own ultimate dismember-
ment plans for the Jewish State.
More important, there seems to be a conflict in
Dayan's own explanations for his decision to resign.
On the one hand, he accuses the Likud *>f having
tied his hands so that he could not speak out.
"In brief, in what I wanted to deal," he said, "I
do not deal. With what I deal, I do not want to deal
cocktails and ceremonials."
But on the other hand, Dayan's duel with
Egypt's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Butros
Ghali before the Council of Europe in Strasbourg
does not suggest that Dayan's hands were tied.
There, Dayan said frankly to the Egyptians that
"an agreement is an agreement. If you did not like it,
you should not have signed it." And: "Nowhere in
the (Camp David) agreements are the words self-
determination written. Had Egypt wanted
something else than what we signed, it should have
held out for more and refused to sign the final
treaty."
This is hardly the stuff of which cocktail party
chatter is made. Nor, in our view, does it square with
Dayan's sharp differences (by his own account) with
Likud over the autonomy question.
These are issues that must be resolved before
the real reasoning behind his resignation can become
clear.
THOSE WHO justify their
worshipping at the soily feet of
the State Department's cultural
exchange program with the
Soviet Union by arguing that art
has nothing to do with politics
simply don't know a blessed
thing about history.
When the great Caesar deckled
to prove to the world that Roman
civilization was as accomplished
as the Greek, he commissioned
Publius Virgilius Maro to write a
work of literature that would
rival the best that the Greeks had
ever achieved.
Virgil, as he is known to us
today, tried; decades later, he
came up with the Aeneid, essen-
r.
artistic judgment, and in hk
political and cultural judgment
too.
Mindlin
51IM
I
J
tially an extension of Homer's
grand epics Iliad and Odyssey.
I say "tried" because Virgil
didn't think he had succeeded
and was probably right in his
IN FACT, so depressed was he
over the vast enterprise imposed
upon him by Caesar, so certain
was he that he could not change a
nation's public relations image on
order, even Caesar's order, let
alone its intellectual fabric, that
Virgil in succession att*>mnt~i..
Important Words for Us
The message Saturday noon of Sen. Daniel P.
Moynihan (D., N.Y.) to the International Leadership
Conference conducted by the Zionist Organization of
America will be one that all of us should want to
hear. So important is it deemed, that sponsors of the
conference are opening this session at the Doral
Hotel free to the public.
At a time when Israel is increasingly being
pressed to make concessions in the Middle East
peace-making process generally, and in the
autonomy talks specifically, and when world opinion
is being geared to the counterfeit notion that these
concessions will better our relations with the in-
transigent Arab faction and ease our energy prob-
lems, Sen. Moynihan's message should serve to
clarify these and other related issues so th.^t the
truth about them is more widely known.
Of no less significance will be the atidress
Saturday night by Gen. Alexander Haig. lormer
supreme commander of NATO forces, who with his
experience can shed some light on Israel's strategic
importance to the western friends who seem in-
creasingly indifferent to her fate, and their own
ultimate best interests, in the new petrodiplomacy
free-for-all.
The International Leadership Conference
promises exciting sessions and equally exciting
world personalities to appear at them as its
deliberations move forward this weekend on Miami
Beach.
Recalling Sister Teresa
In a letter here to Archbishop Edward
McCarthy of the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami the I
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has ex-1
pressed its profound pleasure at the awarding of the |
Nobel Peace Prize to Mother Teresa.
The Jewish community joins in affirming the I
Rabbinical Association's sentiments. Some of our I
community leaders here recall their meeting with
Sister Teresa and hearing her at Gesu Church as a
guest of the late Archbishop Coleman Carroll back in
1974.
It is more than that, as the Association has told
Archbishop McCarthy. "It was an extremely moving
experience to be in the presence of a genuinely saintly
person."
In retrospect, we come to realize that the pro-
foundly devoted work of persons such as Sister
Teresa with the needs of the poor, the hungry and the
deprived is ennobling to humanity in its highest
sense and elevates the Nobel Peace Prize beyond
its highest purposes.
Zirgil in succession attempted to
destroy the manuscript of the
Aeneid and even to commit
suicide.
This is one of the genuinely
historic examples of the principle
that art indeed does have a
primary role to play in politics if
only such a role is invoked
Virgil's agony occurred some
2,000 years ago he died in 19
BCE unconvinced either of the
worth of his efjic or of his success
as an author, let alone as an equal
of Homer.
The recent death of the
political philosopher. Herbert
Marcuse. proves the principle
again, and in our own time.
Marcuse argued that art that
does not illustrate the struggle of
the proletarian masses is not art
at all. In Marcuses terms,
political graffiti is the only
worthwhile contemporary art. It
alone can inspire the working
class revolution against multi-
national corporate oppression.
THIS MAY be a far cry from,
say, the Hallmark greeting card
notion of just what art is, which
popularly construes art as a New
England snow scene. Or a fat
Venus-type by VVatteau.
But Marcuse, though his
malevolent Marxism may offend
us, is not far removed from the
Irish poet W. B. Yeats principle
that art which is not symbolic is
mere story-telling, a notion that
removes him from the splendor of
Hallmark legerdemain no less
than it does the Marcusian. Both
Continued on Page 13-A
Victor Bi en stock
Mr. Frost, Dr. Kissinger and Lebanon
mmmm
Former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger has shot out the
moral underpinnings of any claim
the Carter Administration may
have to tell Israel how to handle
security problems involving
Palestine Liberation
Organization bases in Lebanon.
He did this in his angry NBC-
TV interview with British
journalist David Frost by his
justification of the Nixon-
Kissinger policy of bombing
Communist sanctuaries in
neutral Cambodia during the
Vietnam war. The Cambodia-
Lebanon comparison was not
explicitly stated in the debate but
the deadly parallel was there for
all to see.
VIETCONG and North
Vietnamese forces had invaded
Cambodia and occupied strategic
areas there which they used for
the massing of forces, stockpiling
of supplies and staging grounds
for attacks against American and
South Vietnamese forces in the
belief that the Americans would
not violate the frontier to strike
back at them in their sanctuaries.
Frost repeatedly charged that
the United States had violated
Cambodian neutrality by
bombing Cambodian territory
and invading the country to
eradicate the sanctuaries. An
angry Kissinger snapped back
that Cambodian neutrality "had
already been violated by the
presence of foreign troops."
By the same exercise of logic,
the Israeli incursions into
Lebanon are not a violation of
Lebanese neutrality because
enemy forces the PLO had
already breached the Country's
neutrality and were using the
Lebanese "sanctuary" to mount
attacks on Israel.
INNOCENT Cambodians had
been killed in the American
bombings. Kissinger agreed, but
only because the U.S. command
had been assured that civilians
had evacuated the target areas.
They were not the target.
Lebanese have been killed in the
Israeli bombings and shellings.
not because the Israelis con-
sidered them targets, but because
the PLO deliberately uses
Lebanese villages by placing its
bases in their midst or in refugee
camps so that they cannot be
attacked without the helpless
village or camp suffering.
Cambodia itself did not have
the strength to oust the Viet-
namese invaders, nor can the
Lebanese expel the PLO. It was
the PLO, in concert with leftist
Moslems, which overthrew the
legitimate ruler of Cambodia,
in 1975. Prince Sihanouk, the
legitimate ruler of Cambodia,
according to Kissinger, secretly
welcomed the American attacks
on the Vietnamese sanctuaries in
his country.
But there is only a puppet
government in Beirut, it-strings
pulled by President Assad of
Syria, and no one to speak for the
Lebanese. The puppet govern-
ment protests the Israeli in-
cursions and bombing, but. like
Sihanouk, it is helpless to
establish order in its own
territory and curb the PLO.
IT IS ironic that the British
government which, in Security
Council debates, has adopted
such a superior, moral tone in
criticizing the Israeli policy on
Lebanon, wants to use the same
tactics to crush the Provisional
Irish Republican Army and its
terrorism in Northern Ireland
and has been pressing the
government of the Irish Republic
to give the British Army and the
Royal Ulster Constabulary' the
right of hot pursuit of terrorists
fleeing to safety in the republic.
The British Government and
the press have subjected Premier
Jack Lynch and his government
to unsparing criticism
denunciation, because
and
the
Continued on Page 12-A
Jewish Floridian
Phone
373-4*09
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Friday. October 26, 1979' 5 HESHVAN157
Volume 52 Number


ftiday. October 26,1979
Je*ist)ncrMian
Page 5-A
Judge Rules
Britons' Book is Anti-Semitic
ByYORAMKESSEL
tendon Chronicle Syndicate
teH in .TwoPart Series
JERUSALEM Judge
Yucov Bazak, in his ruling
list Christopher Mayhew and
Schael Adams, the two British
authors of a book called Publish
USot The Middle East Cover-
In has agreed in a ruling here
^th the Israeli evening news-
paper htaarii''s assessment of the
book as anti-Semitic.
judge Bazak dismissed the
authors' libel action against
"So long as vociferous in-
vectives against the State of
Israel can be openly identified
With anti-Semitic and Nazi liter-
ature, there is no fear that many
people will be tempted to believe
such propaganda, particularly
based as it is on this type of
spurious and sick imagination,"
Judge Bazak declared in his
opinion.
| "NAZI ACTIONS were so
'cruel, so demonic, so evil, that
such propaganda is rejected out
ol hand by all civilized people.
The danger lies in the possibility
of the content of Nazi
propaganda remaining in the
human memory without the Nazi
source of that propaganda being
remembered."
The judge continued: "This, I
believe, is what happened to the
plaintiffs. Mr. Mayhew and Mr.
Adams. I am sure they did not go
Ito the pages Hi The Protocols of
\tln Elders <>/ Zion or to the
I writings ol Hitler, in order to cull
I their baseless accusations about
Israel and Zionism. But anti-
ISemitic propaganda in general,
land that of the Nazis in par-
ticular, succeeded in instilling
>uch ideas in their consciousness
I without their being aware of it."
Judge Bazak referred several
Itimes to the defense's evidence of
the use of parallel motifs in
notorious anti-Semitic literature
|andinthelHK)k.
UK ALSO engaged in further
[research of his own on the basis
[of additional documentation
presented to demonstrate the
[link, quoting at length from Mein
lKamp[. the Protocols, and
JGoebbels writings on the one
[hand, and passages from Publish
111 Not, on the other, to
[demonstrate similarities in
|theme. style and terminology.
One of the most obvious of
[such similarities was the "para-
Inoid argument" about alleged
Jewish control of the mass media,
[Judge Bazak pointed out.
He declared: "The authors
[attribute to Israel and Zionism
[just such unrealistic, super-great
[powers as anti-Semitics and
[Nazis, m their sick imagination,
[attributed to Jews .
"In their description of the
[iionist superman.' the authors
[use the same turn of phrase as
[traditional anti-Semitic treaties."
THE JUDGE then quoted
Itrom Page 20 of Publish It Not -
[ Ihese Zionist deputations were
[almost always well-informed,
articulate, demanding, pas-
sionate, ruthless."
Hecontinued: "If the power of
[Zionism were so great, its
[Position as inviolable as they
"contend, then, surely, the State
i Israel would have come into
[existence before the World War
|~ that is to say, before Hitler's
Iff Power and millions of
I Jws, men and women, old people
PM children, would have been
pved from the furnaces and gas
|vens."
He pointed with irony to the
l!7l.trat,iction8 in the two
[authors approach to references
|w Israel's historical past.
"When the Bible is employed
a source of the Jewish people's
Adams
historical rights in the Land of
Israel, the authors contend that
there is no link between the
Children of Israel of biblical
times and the Jews of today.
"But they consider that just
such a link does exist, when they
refer to acts of mass suicide
(Masada) and the conquest of the
land," Judge Bazak said.
HE TOOK the plaintiffs,
specifically Adams, to task for
parallels drawn by him between
Nazi behavior and that of Israel,
whether in South Lebanon or in
her administration of the oc-
cupied territories.
"The comparison (between the
Nazi conquest of Europe and the
Israeli occupation of the Gaza
Strip) is so baseless, so evil, so
brainless, that one can hardly
believe that Adams himself
believes in it. Unless, that is, for
some reason known only to
himself he willingly pulled the
wool over his own eyes .
"How can any reasonable man,
for any purpose whatsoever,
draw such a comparison?
"This (book) is indeed a piece
of libel; that is to say, a
propaganda document, one-sided,
deliberately distorting and exag-
gerated, presenting one side as
incarnately bad."
The judgement ends: "My
conclusion is that the review of
the book published in Maariv is
both justified and accurate.
"IT WAS important for the
article to have been published. If
this kind of propaganda goes
unrefuted, it may seep into the
public mind, just as anti-Semitic
and Nazi propaganda crept into
the consciousness of the plain-
tiffs.
"Thus, although they appear
reasonable and civilized men,
they are capable of repeating
absurd, paranoid accusations
leveled against a small nation
fighting for its existence against
powerful enemies."
Cash Chairman Will
Gather at UJA Seminar;
Silberman at Miami Helm
More than 100 local and regional cash chairmen
nationwide will gather at the first United Jewish Appeal
National Cash Seminar on Nov. 4 at the Regency Hyatt
Hotel, Chicago, 111., according to Edgar L. Cadden, UJA
National Cash Chairman.
"The flow of cash to the Jewish Agency has reached a
critical point and our human support programs in Israel
are in danger. This problem has both immediate and long-
range implications.
"THEREFORE, at this intensive six-hour seminar
we will work to develop a year-end campaign for cash
collection to avert the current existing condition. In
addition, this innovative event will activate a decision-
making process for structuring a UJA National Task
Force for Cash with an ongoing long-range program
nationally, regionally and in our communities," said
Cadden.
Calling cash flow the lifeline of Jewish aid, Cadden
indicated that the participating cash chairmen will work
to standardize cash collections nationally and to develop a
unified and ongoing program.
Morton Silberman, immediate past president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, will serve as Cash
Mobilization Committee Chairman for the GMJF's 1980
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
1979 R. J. Reynold* Tobieeo Co.
13 mj."m".0.9 mq.imcmm M 9* ogntflt. HC-fiepon MAY'


Page 6-A
vJenisti Ikridian
Friday. October 26,1979
Battered Wives
Finally, They Are Being Taken Seriously
Continued from Page 1 A
ACQUAINTANCES described
Carmela as a beautiful young
woman with an exceptionally
pleasant personality. She had a
knack for cheering up depressed
residents of the shelter a rare
and important trait among the
women in a place where most are
inevitably so involved with their
own problems that they cannot
reach out to help anyone else.
The incident drew a great deal
of attention to v. ife-battering, a
social problem that had long
demanded recognition in Israel.
It was partly achieved in May,
1978 when Ruth Reznic, head of
the feminist group called
Fighting Violence Against
Women, founded the shelter in
Herzliya.
It serves as a sort of first-aid
station for women who must
escape fro ohysical violence at
home ar e no other place to
turn to.
ESSIE LEV, an immigrant to
Israel from California and
volunteer at the shelter, ex-
pressed the surprise felt by many
to learn of battered wives in
Israel.
"I grew up in a home, and a
neighborhood where both Jews
and Christians had the idea that
Jewish men make the best
husbands. I was originally
shocked to leam that Jewish men
beat their wives. I shouldn't have
been. And I'm sure it goes on
74 Women Hitting
Books for Rabbinate
Continued from Page 1-A
tionist Rabbinical College this
year.
THERE ARE 208 rabbinical
candidates studying under
Reform auspices this year, in-
cluding 146 men and 62 women,
according to Stanley Saplin,
associate information director for
the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion
(HUC-JIR).
The total of Reform rabbinical
students during the prior
academic year was 209, with 63
women, Saplin said. The number
of anticipated Reform ordainees
those expected to be named
rabbis next June is 32, he
reported, 23 men and nine
women.
Noting that all Reform can-
didates must spend their first
year in Jerusalem, at the School
of Jewish Studies and the Nelson
Glueck School of Biblical
Archaeology, Saplin provided a
breakdown of the sites of Reform
rabbinical studies as follows:
The HUC in Cincinnati has 16
women among its 83 rabbinical
students; the JIR in New York
City has 26 women among its 61
candidates; the Los Angeles
school has seven women students
among its 23 candidates, and the
candidates studying in Jerusalem
total 41, of whom 13 are women.
BECAUSE no Reoonstruc-
tionist women candidates are in
the senior class this year, all of
the new women rabbis ordained
next June will be Reform nine,
the same number as those named
rabbi last June.
Assuming the nine women
Reform candidates complete their
studies and become rabbis next
June, the total number of women
ordained as rabbis under Reform
and Reconstructionist auspices
will be 31 25 Reform and six
Reconstructionist. The process of
ordaining women as rabbis began
in 1972, when Sally Preisand
became the first woman rabbi in
America.
Currently, 10 of the 22 women
rabbis hold pulpit posts, in-
cluding Preisand whose first
pulpit position was that of
assistant rabbi at the Stephen
Wise Free Synagogue in New
York City from which she was
promoted to associate rabbi
before she suddenly resigned last
July, declining to publicly state
her reasons for doing so.
SUBSEQUENTLY, she took a
position as part-time rabbi at
Temple Beth-El in Elizabeth.
N.J.
The women rabbis not in
pulpits are in education, adminis-
tration and Hillel posts. Of the 10
women rabbis in pulpits, eight
are Reform and two are Recon-
structionist.
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among Jewish couples in
California, just like it does here in
Israel."
The institution, whose
operations are funded by
municipal and national funds, is
housed in a small, residential
bungalow with two bedrooms, a
living room, a kitchen-dining
area, and bathroom. Despite its
small size, it has served as a
temporary refuge for up to 32
women and children at one time.
"WOMEN DON'T come here
because it is nice," Reznic notes.
"They come because they are in
serious trouble and have nowhere
else to go."
Most of the women who reach
the shelter are from impoverished
backgrounds, and of Eastern
origin. Similar problems also
exist among other socio-economic
levels, Reznic points out, but
more established women can
afford other ways of leaving the
house such as a trip inside
Israel or even abroad, putting up
in a hotel, or staying with friends.
Those who come to the shelter
generally married young and lack
professional training. They often
face strong pressure from their
families to remain with their
husbands, regardless of the
domestic situation. With no
experience of managing on their
own, and unable to return to their
parents, they seek refuge at the
institution.
FOR SOME of the women, just
the fact that they have a place to
seek help solves their problems.
"Often men receive the shock ol
their lives when their wives come
here." Reznic says.
"They suddenly realize that
their wife may leave them, and
they are willing to change their
ways so that she will stay. And
simplv the knowledge that the
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shelter is here and that there is
somewhere to come, gives many
women the confidence to go
home.
"Before the women return
home, we try to have their
husbands sign an agreement that
they will no longer use physical
violence. There are some types,
though, with whom we have little
chance. Men who are drug-users,
drunkards or card-players will
not easily change."
THE INSTITUTION supplies
marriage counseling for those
who want it. legal aid for those
women who seek a divorce, or
who want to bring charges
against their husbands, and
psychological counseling for the
women and or their men.
The women also discuss their
situation among themselves and
provide each other with a great
deal of moral support. "We have
a lot of group sessions where
women talk about their
problems," Reznic says. "They
see that they are not alone. And
for some of them, it puts their
situation into a new perspective
they realize that they are not
In addition to Ruth Hemi,
whose many functions include
director, public relations office
and someone for the women J
confide m and cry to, the center'.
staff ,s made up 0f a ^
worker paid by the!Ministry 0
Social Services, a house mother
and an accountant, all of whom'
serve on a part-time basis The
paid staff is supplemented bv 20
volunteers, two of whom are rnen
REZNIC CONCEDES that
much remains to be done for
example, new shelters must be
built in Jerusalem and Beer-
aheba, new laws must be enacted
but she is optimistic about the
shelters progress to date.
"To cure a problem, a social
one just like a medicinal one, you
must first be aware of it I see our
primai-y job as exposing the
problem. And I think we are
doing that.
"There is still a lon>: way to
go." Reznic says, "but as a
Zionist. I know Israel was started
with a handful of Jew-, whose
only real asset was a just idea
We will also go from a few people
with a cause to a change in the
Israeli society of the 1980s of
mores, concepts and behavior.
Ultimately, we hope to be able to
expose, tackle and overcome the
problem."
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Friday. October 26,1979
+Jewi$ti IhiidHcir
Page 7-A
News in Brief
Knesset Session Subdued
By Dayan's Resignation
ByJTA Wire Services
TEL AVIV Defense Min-
uter Ezer Weizman interrupted
his five-day visit to Cairo Tues-
day to fly back to Jerusalem to
participate in a Knesset vote of
confidence in the government of
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin He returned to Cairo
afterwards to continue his talks
with Egyptian officials on the
military aspects of Israel's with-
drawal from Sinai.
The Knesset opened its winter
session Monday under the
shadow of Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan's resignation and
[he Supreme Court's decision
[declaring the Gush Emunim
f settlement of Elon Moreh illegal.
Both surprise developments
(occurred after Weizman had
arrived in the Knyptian capital.
After a long telephone con-
versation with Begin, he decided
to return to .Jerusalem after a
scheduled meeting with
President Anwar Sadat Tuesday
morning Ile was expected to
raise the issue of Sinai oil for
brad.
PARIS Hundreds of French
Jem attended the trial of three
farmer Nazis, including Kurt
l.ishka. the former Paris area
I Gestapo chief, when it opened
Tuesday in Cologne.
l.ishka and his two accom-
plice. Herbert llagen and Krnst
Heinrichson, are charged with
I ihe forced deportation of more
I than 50,000 .lews from France.
| most of whom never returned.
l.ishka. who has been living
I quietly in Cologne since the end
I of the war. has become a symbol
Ifor many French Jews of un-
punished and unrepentant former
I Nazis, l.ishka had been sentenced
Ito life imprisonment by a French
I court m abesentia but had
escaped trial in Germany till now
|due to a technicality.
NEW YOHK Yasir Arafat,
I chairman of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization, has
I returned to Jerusalem three
I times since Israelis captured the
I city, and on one occasion, he
I himself narrowly escaped cap-
ture.
The close call is revealed in a
Iportrait of Arafat in the Novem-
Jber issue of Life Magazine,
Iwritten by David Tinnin. In an
[interview with Tinnin, Arafat
[explained that he returned to
[Jerusalem, his birthplace, by
[wearing a disguise and using
I fake papers.
Asked what he would do if he
could return, he said he would
"continue my prayers" because
on his last visit they were inter-
rupted. "The Israelis caught a
colleague of mine who was
carrying my picture. After they
started searching, I had to run,"
Arafat said.
WASHINGTON Sen.
George McGovern (D., S.D.) and
Rep. Christopher Dodd have
introduced bills in Congress to
honor Nazi-hunter Simon
Wiesenthal for his untiring ef-
forts to bring Nazi war criminals
to justice.
The bills, designated in the
Senate as S.1792 and in the
House as H.R. 5542, would allow
Congress to authorize a gold
medal to be struck and to be pre-
sented to Wiesenthal by the
President.
McGovern noted that once
passed by Senate and House, and
signed into law by the President,
"it would give international
recognition to Mr. Wiesenthal for
his unparalleled achievements
and immeasurable contributions
to upholding justice and his
success in single- handed ly
avenging the deaths of 11 million
innocent men. women and
children who perished in the
Holocaust.''
TEL AVIV The two persons
killed in the flash flood that
inundated Sharm el-Sheikh and
Ophira in southern Sinai Sunday
were identified Monday. One
victim. 19-year-old Ruth F'ishbein
of Ramal Hasharon, a soldier,
was drowned when a wall of
water sweeping down from the
hills destroyed the telephone
exchange room at the army camp
where she was on duty.
The other victim, Tzvi Ben-
Nathan, 36, was electrocuted by a
downed power line on the beach
at Ophira. Two other persons, a
young Bedouin. Ahmed Jouma,
and a West German tourist are
missing and were the objects of a
helicopter search Monday.
PARIS A French govern-
ment special representative has
reportedly invited Palestine Lib-
eration Organization chief Yasir
Arafat to France without fixing a
date for the visit, however. The
representative, Gabriel Robin,
head of the French Foreign
Ministry's Political Department,
met last Friday with Arafat in
Beirut.
Robin is one of the key men in
the Quai d'Orsay and his rank is
equivalent to that of Deputy Sec-
retary of State.
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J1XF Newsletter
Published by the Jewish National Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 Phone 538-6464
Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrman Dedicate
Their Forest in the American Bicentennial Park
In Jerusalem on Their Recent Visit to Israel
Shown on the left are Dr. Irving and Belle Lehrman holding saplings which were planted in their Forest. On
the right they are shown being congratulated and awarded a certificate by the World Chairman of the Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael, the Honorable Moshe Rivlin ol Jerusalem.
It all started at the Tem-
ple Emanu-EI-Jewish
National Fund Annual
Luncheon honoring Dr.
and Mrs. Irving Lehrman
on their Wedding An-
niversary last year, when
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen,
National Executive Vice-
President Jewish
National Fund of
America presented to Dr.
Irving Lehrman and his
wife Belle Lehrman the
highest JNF award
commemorating this
solemn and joyous oc-
casion.
Seen trom left to right: Mrs. Augusta (Gus) Mentz, Chairperson, Women
for JNF; Belle Lehrman and Or. Irving Lehrman, Honorees; Dr. Samuel I.
Cohen, National Executive Vice President. JNF of America, and Mrs.
Richard (Kathy) Schwarz, Chairperson, JNF Sisterhood.
Shown at the head table,
from left to right: Mr.
Carol Greenberg, Pres.
Temple Emanu-EI, Mrs.
Carol Greenberg, Mrs.
Lawrence Schantz, Mr.
Lawrence Schantz,
Chairman of the Tribute
Luncheon, Belle Lehr-
man, and Or. Irving Lehr-
man, Honorees.
At the first meeting of the 1979-80 season, the Jewish National Fund leadership
congratulates Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrman, while pledging to redouble their efforts on
behalf of Jewish National Fund for the coming year.
mJL +Mr r i
i
*
On this occasion they formulated the
plans for the forthcoming Annual
Banquet to be held on Sunday, Decem-
ber 9th at 6:30 p.m. at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel. Dr. Irving Lehrman, Chairman JNF Foundation, and Mr. Abraham Grun-
hut, President, JNF Greater Miami, have announced that a most outstanding program
is being arranged to have the Banquet surpass all previous ones.
The Jewish National Fund Aims and Ideals
RECLAIMRESTOREREBUILD THE LAND
Strengthen the JNF
Remember the JNF In Your Will


Page8-A
+Jewish ncridton
Friday. October 26,
1979
Timing Regretted
Dayan Resignation Stirs New Crisis
Continued from Page 1-A
of State for Foreign Affairs,
Butros Ghali. a participant in the
autonomy negotiations, said
Dayan's resignation was proof
that the Israeli government's
settlement policies on the West
Bank were an obstacle to peace
and that this was recognized even
within Israel.
Associates of the Foreign
Minister said that his resignation
had nothing to do with his health.
Dayan underwent surgery last
June for the removal of a malig-
nant tumor from his intestines
but was reported to have
recovered fully.
Dayan, speaking to reporters
at his home in the Zahala section
of Tel Aviv after the Cabinet
session, spelled out in some detail
his reasons for quitting the
government that he joined two
years and four months ago.
HE SAID he found himself in a
situation where neither he nor his
ministry were participating in
key policy formulations. In fact,
he said, he was dealing only with
minor matters and this was not
coincidental but stemmed from
his disagreements with the
Cabinet majority.
He made it clear that he was
dissatisfied with the progress of
the autonomy talks under
Interior Minister Yosef Burg of
the National Religious Party
whom Begin selected to head the
Israeli negotiating team. "As
long as we had the peace nego-
tiations with Egypt, I was en-
gaged in political work, and there
was an understanding between
the Prime Minister and myself,"
Dayan said.
"However, when the second
chapter began, the negotiations
over autonomy, I refused to head
the Israeli negotiating team
because I do not express the
basic position of the present
coalition on this issue. In brief, in
what I wanted to deal, I do not
deal. With what I deal. I do not
want to deal cocktails and
ceremonials. Under this situation
there was no point in my being
Foreign Minister. We need a
Foreign Minister whose views are
accepted by the Cabinet and who,
on the most important subjects
of relations with the Arabs, can
express the views of the govern-
ment and I am not that person."
IN RECENT months, Dayan
has proposed that in the absence
jf progress in the autonomy
talks, Israel should take such
unilateral steps as removing its
army from the occupied ter-
ritories and replacing it with local
civilian bodies. He also stressed
the need to negotiate with local
Palestinians, excluding members
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
But he himself came under fire
recently for meeting privately
with well-known PLO supporters
on the West Bank and Gaza Strip
and informing Begin only after
the fact.
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Dayan resigned without
rancor. In his letter of resignation
he said he had "favorable ideas
about the government and the
Prime Minister." It was learned
Monday that he first informed
Begin of his intentions in a letter
dated Oct. 2. He planned at that
time to remain in office until
December after completing
several assignments, including
visits to the United States and
Mexico. Cancellation of his
Mexican visit decided Dayan to
advance the date of his depar-
ture.
IT APPEARED clear that he
had already made up his mind to
quit the government when the
Cabinet debated the contro-
versial issue of seizing Arab
lands on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip to make room for
large scale Jewish settlements
last Sunday. The Cabinet's
decision to expand existing
settlements without resorting to
the expropriation of privately
owned land was seen as a victory
for the Foreign Minister.
Several prominent political
figures in and outside the'
government commented on
Dayan's resignation. Deputy
Prime Minister Yigael Yadin,
leader of the Democratic Move-
ment who is recovering from a
mild heart attack, expressed
surprise and regret. MK Yossi
Sarid of the Labor Alignment
said Dayan's departure should
not be regarded as a personal
step but as a "letter of resig-
nation to the government's bank-
rupt policy."
Dayan was always among the
first to sense "when a ship was
sinking" and to promptly leave
it, Sarid said, a reference to his
resignation from the Labor Party
shortly before it went down to
defeat in the 1977 elections.
FORMER Prime Minister
I Yitzhak Rabin, interviewed in
' New York, said he was surprised
by the timing of Dayan's resig-
nation but had nonetheless
expected it considering the deter-
iorating state of the Begin
government. Former Foreign
Minister Abba Eban said,
"Dayan was in the impossible
position of handling secondary
issues while he differed with the
government on the most vital
one, the question of autonomy."
Defense Minister Ezer
[Weizman who was in Cairo for
(meetings with Egypt's Defense
JMinister Kamal Hassan Ali, told
reporters that Dayan's
resignation would not help the
moderates in the Israeli Cabinet.
Asked if it would have a
detrimental effect on the peace
process, his reply was "yes, and
no." He indicated that while he
shared many of Dayan's views,
he had no plans to quit the
government.
Political observers said
Dayan's resignation would have
no effect on Begin's
parliamentary majority. The
outgoing Foreign Minister never
joined Likud. He retained his
Knesset seat as an independent
one-man faction and has no
particular constituency.
His traditional supporters,
former colleagues of the Rafi
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wing of the Labor Party, are no
members of the die-hard Laam,
component of Likud and follow
policies closer to those of Herat
and the NRP, the observers
noted. On the other hand, they
said, Begin's government has
lost one of its more brilliant
members and this will contribute
to the deterioration of its public
image.
ACCORDING TO the ob
servers, a reshuffling of the
Cabinet, demanded by the NRp
and some Likud ministers but
resisted by Begin, is now
unavoidable. Whatever form the
reshuffle takes, Davan's
resignation has weakened the
more moderate wing of the
coalition which was headed by
himself and Weizman.
The NRP, supported by hard-
liners such as Transport Minister
Haim Landau and Agriculture
Minister Ariel Sharon, may now
be in a position to push more
Continued on Page 9-A
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The time: 1850. The problem: a whale-oil crisis. Whale-oil
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The U.S. Department flB
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becoming dangerously f ^^ ^j jS
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soul?es: j. ... -^"O'-c^xT/CV^T/t.
bound familiar r
Then, as now, politicians called for tax incentives
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FLORIDIANS COULD FACE ENERGY
ECONOMIC STING
If Florida's electric utility industry must reduce its oil con-
sumption 50% by 1990-as proposed by the Adminis-
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by Floridians out of proportion to that of the rest of the
nation.
Presently, Florida utilities produce 65% of your electric
needs with oil and natural gas. Gas must be replaced by
1990, according to existing law.
Replacing oil usage 50% by converting to coal or
converting to nuclear would require an expenditure
approaching $20 billion! Other options, such as liquefied
or gasified coal, solar power, etc., simply aren't available
to fuel our electrical needs in the time frame to 1990
And if the utilities can't convert? It's "Gatch-22" time
again. There is a penalty payment on oil usage starring
at $12.50 per barrel (1979 dollars) which could be $25 00
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October 26,1979
*Jei<,tFkridk>r
Page 9-A
an Resignation
Continued from Page 8-A
activist policies with regard to
settlements and autonomy, the
observers said On the other
i, this would probably force
[ e Democratic Movement to
Lave the coalition, diminishing
Likud's Knesset majority by
I seven seats.
Dayan's political career has
been stormy. As Defense
[Minister and acknowledged
uthor of Israel's strategy in the
[Day War, he emerged as
,ael's No. 1 hero. He served as
Defense Minister in the Cabinets
l0f Premiers Golda Meir and
|YiUhak Rabin.
But his reputation plummeted
,fter the Yom Kippur War and,
ilthough cleared of any
wponsibility for Israel's lack of
eparedness in October, 1973, he
Subsequently resigned from the
(abinet and from the Labor
on whose ticket had had
elected to the Ninth
|Knesset.
SHORTLY AFTER Likud's
urprise victory in the May, 1977
elections. Dayan accepted
legin's invitation to join the new
overnment as Foreign Minister,
move for which he was
lenounced by his former Labor
olleagues. lit- dismissed charges
(opportunism, saying he joined
(the new regime only out of
I' national considerations."
He said it would have been
Irresponsible to have rejected
egin's offer at a time when
egotiations with the Arabs
eemed at hand. "If 1 had
efused, and then things would
ave turned out contrary to my
[liews. 1 would have felt very
Woman Rabbi
New Chaplain
NEW YORK (JTA)
lewish students at Hofstra
'niversity in Hempstead. L.I.,
lave a new chaplain. She is Rabbi
'innie Steinberg, a 27-year-old
imna of Rrandeis University
id the Hebrew Union College-
lewish Institute of Religion
IHUC-JIR).
Steinberg is the second woman
jbbi to become director of a
"nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at
university campus. The first
oman to hold such a position
*ves at the University of
authern California. Only 22
'omen in the nation have been
Warned as rabbis.
A NATIVE of Belmont, Mass,
jtejnberg attended Lake Forest
*Uege (III.) and the Longy
*nool of Music (Cambridge,
'ass I before studying for her
acnWnr ol Arts degree in Near
astern and Judaic Studies at
randeis University.
At HUC-JIR she received the
IVize in 1976. She
*jied lor one year in the
"'"ge s Jerusalem rabbinic
pogrom.
Steinberg taught Hebrew at
mple Beth-EI in Chappaqua,
P* >"rk and at Temple Rodeph
holom in Manhattan, and was a
ethemiMbbi ,at Congregation
n Hiuel in Jackson Heights.
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bad," he said at the time.
Within hours after Dayan's
announcement speculation was
rife over who would replace him.
Herut sources were quick to
declare that the Foreign Ministry
portfolio belonged to them as the
majority component of the Likud
coalition.
SOME HERUT circles
suggested Knesset Speaker
Yitzhak Shamir as Dayan's
successor. Others called for the
appointment of Moshe Arens,
chairman of the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee. But it was
acknowledged that Arens, a hard-
liner who voted against the Camp
David agreements, would find it
difficult to pursue a policy based
on those accords.
In some quarters, where the
Democratic Movement was seen
as holding the balance of power in
the coalition, either Deputy
Premier Yadin or Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir were
suggested to replace Dayan.
Such an appointment by Begin
would tie the Democratic
Movement more closely to the
government and preclude its
defection, it was argued. These
same sources claimed that
Yadin's candidacy would win the
support of the NRP.
UNDER SUCH a reshuffling,
Finance Minister Simcha Ehrlich
would become Deputy Premier
and Minister of Commerce Yigal
Hurwitz of the Laam faction
would become Finance Minister.
Ehrlich has been under pressure
to resign because of Israel's
worsening economic situation.
Other possible candidates
mentioned here for Dayan's job
included Burg and Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish Agency
Executives. Whoever is
ultimately selected and whatever
course the Cabinet's
reorganization takes, political
pundits agreed today that the
long-range effects of Dayan's
resignation could spell trouble for
the Begin government.
Poll Shows U.S. Feels Israel
Should Get Nod Over Oil
NEW YORK Even at the
risk of an Arab oil boycott, most
Americans feel that the United
States should give its strongest
support to Israel, or at the very
least believe that both Arabs and
Jews should be treated equally.
That is a major conclusion of a
study conducted by the Gallup
Organization for the American
Jewish Committee, made public
by the Committee.
THIRTY-EIGHT percent of
those polled favored heaviest
backing for Israel, as indicated
by these statistics: The United
States should pay more attention
to Arabs, 25 percent; give
strongest support to Israel, 38
percent; both equally, 18 per-
cent; don't know, 19 percent.
According to the Gallup study,
women were more likely to
support Israel, while men were
more apt to feel the United States
should pay more attention to the
Arabs. Individuals earning over
$7,000 a year were found to give
their support to Israel more
frequently than those earning
less than that amount.
The Gallup Organization
conducted 1,555 personal at-
home interviews with a
nationally representative sample
of adults. All interviews were
conducted between August 15
and 25, 1979.
IN MAKING public the
results of the poll, Bertram H.
Gold, executive vice president of
the American Jewish Committee,
expressed satisfaction that "even
in the most controversial areas
the fundamental good sense of
the American people comes
through clearly."
"As in so many other national
problems," Gold added,
"education is the indispensable
ingredient toward logical
solutions.
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PagelO-A
fJewist flcridUar)
Friday, October 26
1979
Optimism Dampened
Stalled Autonomy Talks Show Deep Israel-Egypt Differences
Continued from Page 1-A
ros Ghali before the Council of
Europe, which comprises the rep-
resentatives of 21 West European
countries, in Strasbourg, France,
last week showed that the split
between Cario and Jerusalem is
deeper and wider than it had
appeared to be.
The two Foreign Ministers
revealed that Israel's and
Egypt's views on the peace
process, the aims to be pursued,
the tactics to be used, and even
their interpretations of the Camp
David agreements are diamet-
rically opposed. They agreed on
only two points: their deter-
mination to implement the Camp
David agreements and to rule out
any recourse to war. On every-
thing else, they were in total dis-
agreement.
Ghali told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the dif-
ferences between the two
countries "are as serious and
fundamental as those which
existed at the beginning of the
(Israeli-Egyptian) negotiations.''
OTHER Egyptian diplomats
said privately that in their view
current differences "are far more
serious than what they were a
year ago." in September, 1978
when the Camp David nego-
tiations started. "Then," the
Egyptians said, "we still had
illusions. Now we have none."
The Ghali-Dayan "duel" in
Strasbourg revealed some of
these differences. The fun-
damental problem is the view
which each of the countries,
Israel and Egypt, takes of the
agreements themselves. For
Egypt, what matters is "the
spirit of the treaty which should
take precedence over the letter."
For Israel, as Dayan repeated
several times, "an agreement is
an agreement. If you (Egypt) did
not like it. you should not have
signed it."
This difference in basic ap-
proach is most evident on the
Palestinian autonomy issue.
Egypt, as Ghali made it crystal
clear, sees the agreements as pro-
viding for "Palestinian self-
determination" with all that this
implies. Israel. Dayan made just
as clear, intends to stick to the
agreements paragraph which
only provides that the Pales-
tinians will have a voice in
deciding their own future.
"NOWHERE in the agree-
ments are the words self-deter-
mination written." Dayan said.
"Had Egypt wanted something
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else than what we signed, it
should have held out for more
and refused to sign the final
treaty."
But besides the differences on
this basic approach, the two
countries also differ on tactics,
rhythm and speed of the nego-
tiations.
Egypt wants to obtain the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion's agreement to a Palestinian
participation in the talks even if
the PLO itself remains absent in
a first, and what Cairo considers,
a preliminary phase. The Egyp-
tians believe that no Palestinian
leader will accept to join the
negotiations without at least
tacit PLO approval, and the
Egyptians want the talks to
succeed rapidly.
The Egyptian desire for "fast
action" was stressed time and
time again by Ghali. He went as
far as to warn that in case of
failure "we shall have to seek a
solution elsewhere: either
through an international con-
ference specially convened for
this purpose or by having to
return to the UN Security
Council."
FOR ISRAEL, there is no
rush. "President (Anwar) Sadat
himself said that the Palestinians
can join the talks at a later date.
even in three years from now."
Dayan retorted. Egyptian dip-
lomats explained later that Cairo
increasingly feels its isolation
within the Arab world. The
Egyptians accused Israel of
"wanting to Isolate us so as to
deal with a weak and docile
partner."
On the actual interpretations
of the Camp David agreement,
the two countries are also in com-
plete disagreement. Israel.
Dayan stressed, feels authorized
by the agreements to re-enter the
territories from which it will
withdraw as a result of the
autonomy talks "should it feel
threatened or should the PLO
manage to establish a foothold
there." Egypt's interpretation is
that any Israeli withdrawal is
final.
"In no circumstances would
Israeli troops be allowed to re-
enter the territories from which
they will have been withdrawn."
Ghali said. "Israel will not even
have a right of pursuit and will
have to stop at the border be-
tween its frontiers and the newly
liberated territories."
ACCORDING to the Egyp-
tians, the Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty "shows that our (Arab)
interpretation of Security Council
Resolution 242 is the right one:
withdrawal from (all) the oc-
cupied territories."
Egypt also believes that the
treaty "spirit" demands certain
Israeli unilateral concessions,
such as halting new settlements,
no acquisition of Arab-owned
land and a general amnesty for all
Arab political prisoners detained
in Israel.
Israel. Dayan replied, will im-
plement the Camp David agree-
ments to the letter, but added:
"Nowhere in the documents are
these demands mentioned. It is
up to us to decide what gesture
we want to make and which we
want to turn down. Gestures are
free willing and not a question of
obligations."
THE BASIC difference be-
tween the two countries, the root
of most of the problems with
which they have to cope, is the
ultimate aim they pursue. Israel
believes that a bilateral treaty
has been signed with Egypt and
favors a comprehensive peace for
the area based on similar terms,
namely, negotiations with each of
its neighbors followed bv
separate peace agreements
Egypt, on the other hand, sees
the peace treaty with Israel as
the first step of a vast and com-
prehensive peace plan in which
Israel will ultimately have to
negotiate with all its Arab neigh-
bors on the basis of the Camp
David agreements.
Ghali barely hinted in his
statements before the Council of
Europe that what Egypt really
wants is peace with Israel, return
of its lost territories and reaccep-
tance by the other Arab states.
Even now, six months after the
signing of the peace treaty,
Egypt does not consider it as a
bilateral agreement but continues
to view it as part of a larger
Middle East peace plan. Kvery-
thing else ensues from this
starting point.
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Lay.October26,
1979
vJewist ncridicir
Page 11-A
General Assembly Slated for Montreal Nov. 14
NEWYORK-(JTA)-
Historic events and cir-
cumstances converging on
,h Jewish communities of
North America during the
coming decade will be a
major focus of the 48th
annual General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish
Federations on Nov. 14 to
18 in Montreal, Quebec.
Priority items on this year's
agenda, according to Lawrence
IVilliams of Cleveland, chairman
of the GA Program Committee,
include the Middle East peace
process; expanding and
allocating Federation financial
resources in a time of inflation;
demographic changes in the
Jewish community, and world
Jewry in the 1980s.
SET IN the continental at-
mosphere of Quebec, the 1979 GA
will bring together leadership
from 190 Federations in the
United States and Canada. The
GA, which includes over 150
sessions covering every major
aspect of contemporary Jewish
life, has become the central con-
vocation of the organized Jewish
community in North America.
CJF President Morton
Mandel, of Cleveland, will be
keynote speaker at the opening
plenary session on Nov. 14. Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the Jewish
Agency and World Zionist Or-
ganization Executive, will ad-
dress the Assembly Nov. 15 on
"A New Era in Israel-Diaspora
Relations."
The plenary on Nov. 17 will be
devoted to the challenge of
meeting human needs in a period
of inflation and recession.
FOUR FORUMS are sched-
uled to provide in-depth exam-
inations of selected issues. They
include "Planning Challenges for
the 1980s The Impact of
Population Shifts"; "The Con-
tinuing Quest for Peace in the
Middle East"; "The Impact of
Increased Soviet-Jewish Immi-
gration on the Advocacy Move-
ment," and "Inside the Arab
World."
Other sessions will be devoted
to Soviet-Jewish resettlement,
Jewish singles, Federation -
synagogue relations, government
funding, Canadian and U.S.
models for Jewish community
service, Jewish culture, and a
symposium on world Jewry led
by Dr. Irwin Cotler of McGill
University Law School who is the
Scholar-in-Residence for the G A.
Several receptions flavored bj
the spirit of Quebec will be hosted
by the Montreal Allied Jewish
Community Services.
I A WOMEN'S Division Soiree
'Canadienne," "Boit A Chanson"
for college youth, and a general
reception for all GA participants
are among the social activities
being planned by the Montreal
Jewish community.
During a reception and tour of
the Montreal Jewish community
complex, an exhibit on the
Holocaust and Yiddish theater
performance will be available.
S'S l*To THB MWWS L* STOrT/)
f S*'* 'M0 Low* tiNfi AT HorflE, <
tSL W, To S*t tiTHER *
VpU* 1SU- ff WHAT Jo DO/
raft?* ?** SL^f.
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7

< ktcland ir-.Nh v
y--:--:^>.-,:-:::-
THE
ROSE
GOR
STORY
1
N
A PUBLIC OFFICIAL WHO CARES In 15
years of public life, Rose Gordon has led the fight for
the elderly, the working parent, youth programs,
crime prevention, health care, housing, mini-bus and
water, transportation, and meal programs -just a few
of the programs vital to senior citizens for which she
has worked Day care and after school care just two
of the programs for working parents she has backed.
Boy Scouts, Youth in Government, a boxing program
lust three of the programs for young people that
Rose Gordon has supported.
HARD WORKING CIVIC LEADER Rose
Gordon is president of the Health Systems Agency
and vice president of the South Florida Regional
Planning Council. She led the fight for downtown
re-development, won national recognition for Brickell
zoning, pushed neighborhood re-vitalization, fought
to preserve the unique character of Coconut Grove.
SUCCESSFUL IN BUSIHESS Owner of
Rose Gordon Realty since 1954; currently president
'rf the 3,000-member Miami Board of Realtors; past
president of South Florida Chapter, Florida Planning
and Zoning Association.
WIFE, MOTHER AHD GRANDMOTHER -
Married to Alexander Gordon, retired general con-
tractor, since 1939. Parents of two sons, Melvin and
Stephen, and a daughter, Gail, who is the wife of
Stephen R. Chepenik, CPA. They have four grand-
children.
AMONG HER HONORS Outstanding Woman
of the Year, by Dade Business and Professional Wo-
men; Community Headliner Award, from Women in
Communications; Community Service Award, from
American Institute of Architects; Recognition and
Gratitude Award from Brigado de Asalto 2506; Cer-
tificate of Appreciation from Areawide Agency on
Aging; listed in Who's Who in American Women
*i You Can Believe In...
A FIGHTING
LADY FOR
MIAMI S
FUTURE!
London's famous
Reject
Orinit Shop
is coming to *
MIAMI BEACH
\AI here their London staff will
VV be exhibiting a beautiful
Collection of Fine English Bone
China, Pottery and Crystal from
Britain's finest manufacturers at
amazingly low prices.
Everybody is welcome No
invitation card is necessary.
See you in the
Parisienne Room,
BEAU RIVAGE
HOTEL
On the Ocean at 99th Street
Bal Harbour N-------.---------
November 3rd, 4th, Sth 10a.m.-10p.m.
ROSE GORDON*
DYNAMIC PROGRAM
FOR MIAMI
Reject
liina Shop
Elect Rose
GORDON
Mayor of Miami
"When I'm mayor of Miami, you'll see no more
Watson Island rip-offs, cronyism in government,
and the cynical belief that politics comes before
people..." City Commissioner Rose Gordon
PUNCH NOr5
Step Up War on Crime!!
Miami needs more police officers and firemen Rose
Gordon wants storefront precincts in high crime
areas. Maurice Ferre wants to slap a special tax on
parts of Miami for added police protection they're
already paying for! Rose Gordon would use the
$1 800,000 in Florida Power and Light franchise
money earmarked to support Ferre's Watson Island
boondoggle She already succeeded in deferring
$600,000 in new furniture for the new administration
building she believes city departments can take
their old furniture with them. And she'll beef up the
city's firefighter and emergency rescue departments.
She'll Stop the Boondoggle!!
Maurice Ferre wants to lease out Watson Island to a
syndicate that includes political cronies for construc-
tion of an amusement park It would require $55
million in city revenue bonds, plus a $10 million fed-
eral grant with $20 million of that backed up by your
city treasury. Even if the city treasury has to forfeit the
$20 million, the promoters are guaranteed $15 million
"In management and development fees. Ferres dis-
:|nal record of waterfront exploitation goes back to
M970. As a city commissioner, he tried to build a
convention hall in Bayfront Park, across the street
from hotels he then owned. But the voters defeated
the project.
She'll Be the City's Ombudsman,
and End Machine Politics!!
j Rose Gordon believes the mayor should fight for our
Icitizens before state and federal boards affecting
their welfare. Shell be up there at hearings affecting
'utility rates, airline routes and other vital services
She'll put a stop to machine politics and pyramiding
of city employes. The number of high-salaried
'employes must be cut back.
She Fights for the People
Who Need Help!!
The Ferre Administration tried recently to increase
the fees at child day care centers by 100%, which
would have made it impossible for many working
mothers to work and stay off welfare rolls. Rose
Gordon led the fight to block that move.
She'll Fight to Keep
the Dolphins in Miami!!
You saw the headlines Rose Gordon took the lead
in breaking the Dolphin Deadlock. She knows the
importance of the Dolphins to Miami, and shell keep
trying to keep them here!!


Page 12-A
* Jewish thrkMan
Friday, October 26
Victor Bien stock
Mr. Frost, Dr. Kissinger and Lebanon
Continued from Page 4 A
terrorists do have a certain
degree of sanctuary in the
republic. Hundreds of suspected
terrorists are in Dublin's prisons
and British police and army
helicopters have actually received
permission to overfly the border
between Ireland and Ulster on
the lookout for infiltrators.
The British have someone to
talk with and negotiate with in
Dublin; the Israelis have no one
in Beirut.
THE DUBLIN authorities
have promised strong measures
to control the activities of the
Provos, but there is no one in
Lebanon to enforce order:neither
the puppet government in Beirut,
the Syrian Army which occupies
most of Lebanon on the pretext
of maintaining order, nor the
United Nations peace-keeping
force in southern Lebanon which
concedes that it cannot prevent
hundreds of terrorists from
operating in the zone it purports
to control.
In 1958. when Syria instigated
a coup to overthrow the
legitimate Lebanese Govern-
ment. President Eisenhower,
without ado, dispatched a force of
U.S. Marines to maintain order
They didn't have to fight: their
presence was enough to abort the
coup, and they were home in
short order.
In 1975. after the Lebanese
Government had been forced to
give the PLO its own legal and
military status on Lebanese
territory, a PLO-leftist Moslem
combination, with Syrian sup-
port and Soviet arms, easily
ousted the government and
launched a merciless war on the
Lebanese Christians.
IN THE state of anarchy that
followed, two American
diplomats were kidnapped and,
slain by the terrorists. President
Ford sent no marines to help the
stricken nation. Secretary of
State Kissinger, always ready to
work out compromises, stayed
away from the mess and breathed
a deep sigh of relief when
Syrian Army marched in in the
guise of an Arab peace-keeping
force.
No Lebanese voice dared be
raised in international forums
against the rape of the tiny
nation except that of former
Foreign Minister Charles Malik
who warned a Senate committee
that there could be no peace in
the Middle East "while there are
non-Lebanese armed forces on
Lebanese soil."
There has been no change from
that situation although the State
Sanders Quits Post
As President's Aide

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By JOSEPHPOLAKOFF
WASHINGTON
(JTA) Edward Sanders,
a prominent Los Angeles
lawyer who was senior ad-
viser to President Carter
and Secretary of State Cy-
rus Vance on Jewish affairs
and other matters for the
past 15 months, is leaving
that post to return to his
previous status as con-
sultant to the President in
the same area.
Sanders disclosed this to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency fol-
lowing a 45-minute meeting with
the President. It has not yet been
determined whether a successor
will be named. Sanders resigned
as president of the American-
Israel Public Affairs Committee
JAIPAC) in 1976 to assist Carter
in his election campaign.
THE IMPORTANCE that the
President placed in him was
indicated when offices were set
up for Sanders at both the White
House and State Department. He
accompanied the President at
some of his most important
meetings on Middle Eastern
affairs, including Carter's trip to
Cairo and Jerusalem last March
which resulted in the signing of
the Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty. He also attended the
negotiating sessions at Camp
David in September, 1978.
Sanders told the JTA that he
believed he will be "more ef-
fective in the coming months" by
returning to his previous position
as a consultant because it will
allow him "a lot more flexibility"
than as a full-time government
employe.
"I have nothing but af-
firmative feelings for President
Carter and I continue to believe
in him for his leadership for the
U.S. and for the good of Israel,"
Sanders said.
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HE SAID. I will do all I can
to help him but being in govern-
ment inhibits me more than any-
thing else. I am not leaving the
President. This is not any kind of
goodbye This is only a change in
status. I still am going to be close
to the Administration and to the
President. I have only affirm-
ative feelings for them and they.
I believe, for me." he said.
Sanders told the JTA that he
will remain in Washington "for a
couple more months" and in-
dicated that he would be
speaking on behalf of the Presi-
dent. But. he said, his future is
"all in formative stages." He
indicated that his change in
status would take effect some
time next month.
During his 15 months as
Presidential adviser. Sanders
attended numerous Jewish com-
munity events and was fre-
quently visited by Jewish
leaders. His de^jarture from the
White House staff follows by less
than a month the resignation of
Robert Lipshutz as the Presi-
dent's Counsel.
Department, even without
Kissinger, still professes to see
the Syrians as a stabilizing force
and the only threat to peace, the
Israelis. Secretary of State Vance
has not been able to distinguish
between defensive and offensive
actions and would be satisfied if
the Israelis would just remain
south of the border.
HOWEVER. the Carter
Administration, which has come
up with some really fantastic
schemes, including revision of
Resolution 242. is apparently
working on another project to
bring together all the "interested
parties in the Lebanon situation
and Vance announced he was
discussing this with other
governments. Meanwhile, the
Slate Department moves closer
towards accusing Israel of
illegally using American
equipment in offensive actions in
Lebanon a charge which, il
substantiated, could bar Israel as
recipient of further military aid I
from this country
Since Vance unveiled his new
peace-making effort, nothing has
been heard of it publicly, lithe
Carter Administration is lucky.
this scheme was l>orn with and
will have died with Vance's
announcement in the (ieneral
Assemblv.
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fcffitf*'ttM
+Jewish tkrktiain
Page 13-A
[|^ ffiwdlin
2%e Politics of Art Expression
Continued on Page 4-A
lSo vastly different in
EUk sensibility and cultural
leTterprise, shared the same con-
Ittmporary conclusion.
This view of art is, indeed, only
IJ step, although admittedly a
lit step, removed from the aes-
thetic principles that characterize
I he atrocious Soviet sculpture
Ld painting typicd of the
Isialinist era; it is clearly allied to
lfhe fascist style of the Hitler-
Mussolini axis, whose object was
| to make simple statements about
I the ultimate triumph of the
[masses through the triumphs of
I their state.
MUSIC ENTERS into all of
I this with its own role to play. It
I may be a bit harder to conceive
Low music can serve up a
Ipolitical message in the same way
[that the literary and plastic arts
Ido.
. But even in a generalized way,
lone has only to recall the agonies
visited upon composers like pro-
kofiev and Shostakovich by the
Soviet strategists in the Kremlin
to see how this art form, too, can
be an effective political propa-
ganda weapon when it is deemed
necessary to manipulate music
toward that end.
One would think that the per-
former of music is immune to all
of this. Unlike the composer, he
is, in the end, no more than an
interpreter of a known com-
position, and what he brings to
his interpretations can hardly be
political if the compositions
themselves are not.
IT IS, I suppose, on this basis
especially that starry-eyed slaves
of the latest Muscovite keyboard
genius or gymnast or ballet
dancer base their argument that
art is apolitical as they race off to
see them wherever they may
appear in public performance.
But even here they are wrong, for
the inference one is meant to
Council Women Rap
Connally's Mideast Policy
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Middle East issues were
[prominent at the 10th Biennial
Joint Program Institute of the
National Council of Jewish
[Women attended by 500
[Delegates from 36 states at the
IShoreham Americana Hotel here.
The opening dinner was ad-
dressed by Israel's Ambassador
the United Nations, Yehuda
Blum, who castigated the anti-
Dsrael speech of Cuban President
Fidel Castro to the UN General
Assembly.
THE NCJW also issued a
Itatement deploring former
Texas Governor John Connally's
Middle East plan that would
Irade Israels withdrawal from all
Vcupied Arab territories for an
Issured supply of Arab oil at
|table prices.
Blum condemned Castro's
lompanson of Israel's actions
Vward lhe Palestinians with the
Ireatment nf Jews by the Nazis
The
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during World War II. He called
the juxtaposition "an outrageous
desecration against the victims of
the Holocaust" and observed
that the absence of a public
outcry against it showed to what
degree attitudes toward Israel
have eroded under the impact of
Arab propaganda.
Blum also explained why Israel
will never deal with the Palestine
Liberation Organization. He
called it an invention by which
the Arabs hope to achieve the
destruction of Israel.
IN A REACTION to Con-
nally's speech at the Washington
Press Club, the NCJW said: "He
called for Israeli territorial with-
drawal before calling for an end
to terrorism. And, most
significantly, he mistakenly
linked U.S. oil shortages with
American support of Israel, a
view not shared by this gover-
nment or by responsible
authorities in the field. If there
were no Israel, the OPEC
(Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries) nations
would still control the flow of oil
to the West on their own terms."
draw from these artists is clear:
they are exceptional because the
Soviet Union, Soviet society,
Soviet culture are exceptional.
There is no doubt that the
message is subliminal, but its
intent is obvious, in fact far more
so than were it explicitly stated.
It is for this reason that
organizations like the Jewish De-
fense League take such
vociferous objection to ap-
pearances of Soviet artists in the
United States.
As the JDL sees it, these
artists are neon signs advertising
the greater glory of the Soviet
system, when one really ought to
see them for what they are:
blinders to isolate our vision
against the grim realities of the
oppressive Soviet political
system from which they come to
beguile us.
ARE SOVIET performers in
music, gymnastics and the ballet
outstanding? By definition they
are; it is necessary that those
who visit here be outstanding.
But this is so to the exclusion of
too many personal freedoms and
ought to be seen in the same light
as the Soviets' excellence, say, in
missiles: it, too, is an achieve-
ment paid for at a price that is
devastating to the human spirit.
In the end, those in America
who indulge their artistic sen-
sibilities by jamming the
auditoriums wherever Soviet
performers may appear are
making the most revolting of
bourgeois statements: they are
saying that they are willing for
others to pay this devastating
price in order that their own
'higher" order of aesthetic
appreciation may be indulged
and pleased.
Is the Jewish Defense League
therefore right in engaging in the
sort of exotic tactics unique to
their brand of "persuasion" as a
preventive against Soviet per-
formances here? In a sense, it
seems to me that these tactics are
as self-indulgent as are the well-
fed aesthetes who clamber to
attend them. For more on that,
another time .
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Johannesburg or Jerusalem?
The Natal Mercwy
mmmmmmsmmm^mmmmmmmmfsmmmmmmmmf^mmm.
Red Cross Rapped
New View Puts Dutch
Of Nazi Era Down
By HENRIETTE BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
The failure of both the Dutch
govemment-in-exile and the
Dutch Red Cross to offer any
support or succor to the more
than 100,000 Dutch Jews
deportee by the Nazis during the
German occupation of Holland in
World War II was documented in
the ninth volume of a 12-volume
history of the war years by Prof.
Louis de Jong, former director of
The Netherlands State Institute
for World War II Documen-
tation.
Volume Nine, just published
here, devotes most of its nearly
1,600 pages to the activities of
the Netherlands Govemment-in-
Exile in London and the Dutch
Red Cross and its activities in
unoccupied parts of Europe and
other free countries. About 100
pages are concerned with the
Jews in occupied Holland and
those who managed to escape.
ACCORDING TO de Jong, the
Dutch authorities in London
seemed hardly aware of the mass
deportation of Jews and did
virtually nothing in its broad-
casts from London to urge the
non-Jewish population to help
them.
The Netherlands Red Cross, in
contrast to the Red Cross
societies of other occupied
countries, provided very little
assistance to Jews. Dutch
representatives in France,
Belgium, Switzerland, Spain and
Portugal were likewise unhelpful,
de Jong stated.
De Jong, who retired upon
reaching the age of 65 last May,
is of Jewish origin. His report of
the indifference of Dutch
authorities to the suffering of
Jews in Holland during the war
differs sharply with the
widespread belief to the contrary
held in many countries, especially
the United States.
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Page 14-A
Jewish flcrkUan
Friday, October
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADECOUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79-71C9
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOLOMON ZENDEL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS,
AGAINST THE ABOVE)
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of SOLOMON
ZENDEL. deceased, File
Number 79-7188, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130 The
personal representative of the
estate Is JOSEPH W. MALEK
whose address Is 360 Lincoln
Road. Suite 501. Miami Beach,
Florida. The name and address
of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be suated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-1
tative. or the venue or juris-,
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Dale of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: October 19.
1979.
JOSEPH W MALEK
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SOLOMON ZENDEL.
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH W MALEK
i50 Lincoln Road-Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 1305)538-4431
18149 Oct 19, 26.1979
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: October It,
1979.
ArtisB Parks
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Leola Parks
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Kwitney, Kioop
AScheinberg, PA.
420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida33138
Telephone: 538-7575 ,
08148 Oct IB. 28.1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Can No. 7t-12*44 FC
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAFAEL RE YNOSO,
Petitioner
and
ELENA REYNOSO,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: ELENA REYNOSO
410 State Street
Apt. 33
Brooklyn.
New York 11217
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution oi
Marriage has been filed
against you by RAFAEL REY-
NOSO and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to the Petition,
on the Petitioner's Attorney,
NORMAN K. SCHWARZ.
whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 335. Miami Beach.
Florida 33138, on or beforethe
Bth day of November. 1878.
and fUe the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
attorney, or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
Petition, to-wit: a dissolution ol
the marriage.
DATED the 26th day ol
September. 1979
LAW OFFICES OF
NORMAN K. SCHWARZ. PA.
Attorneys for Petitioner
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 335
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
672-1222
By Norman K. Schwarz. J.D
Richard P. Brinker
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
08086 Oct. 5, 12, 19. 26. 1979
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79 5977
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEOLA PARKS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
E8TATE AND ALL OTHER
Persons INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YO VRE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Leola Parks,
de< aai -rf File Number 7!'
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
Streel. Miami. Florida 33130.
The personal representative of
the estate is Artis Parks, whose
address is 13370 NW 13th Court,
Miami, Florida The name and
address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must
indicijfe the basis for the claim,
the fame and address of the
creditor or his agent or at
torney. and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet
due. the-date when it will
become due shall be stated. Ifl
the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of thel
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
snail one copy to each personal
representative.
Aii jHirsuns interested In the
1 state to whom, a copy of thisl
otne.ut.Administration has I
I m" >>.V n: -
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
STYLEMARTBU1LDING at 35
NE 17th St.. Miami, FL, In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Isaac Olemberg
GutllermoSostchln. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. FL 33135
08092 Oct. 5. 12. 19, 26, 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13027 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDU ARDO FONSECA.
Petitioner Husband,
and
NICIA FONSECA,
Respondent Wife.
TO NICIA FONSECA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for I
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on HARVEY D. FRIED-
MAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 392. Miami Beach.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Nov.
9, 1979: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 27 day of Sep-
tember. 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
. I lade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN.
ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 392
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
08081 Oct. 5, 12. 18. 26,1878
el "'------> <
\ .'i' 1< 10.V. : It'.M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY'
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Lai's'
Chinese Restaurant and Pastry !
Shop at 17071 W. Dixie Hwy..'
N.M.B.. Fla intend to register '
said name with the Clerk of the.
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Man Fong Lai
Chor Wing Lai
08150 Oct. 18. 26; Nov. 2. 8.1879.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned. '
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
ENVIRONMENTAL CON-
SULTANTS at 1000 North
Miami Avenue, Miami,
Florida, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Eugene Ettllnger
08146- Oct. IB, 26-, Nov 2,9. 1878
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 79 13799
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
PHILOGENE ETIENNE,
AKAFLORIGENE
ETIENNE,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
ROSE ETIENNE.
Respondent-Wife.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU. ROSE ETIENNE.
NE. 3480, Limbe. HaiU, are
hereby notified to serve a copy
of your Answer to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you, upon Hus-
band's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQUIRE. 612
NW 12th Avenue. Miami,
Florida 33136, and file original
with the Clerk of the Court on
or before November 28, 1878;
otherwise the Petition will be
confessed by you.
DATED this 15 day of
October, 1878.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
CLERK
By Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
08147 Oct. 19.26: Nov > a ia7Q I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civl Action No. 79 13*01 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE. The Marriage of
MORRIS WORTSMAN,
Petitioner Husband
and
LUCY WORTSMAN,
Respondent Wife
TO: LUCY WORTSMAN
Rhelnstr6-7
1000 Berlin 41
West Germany
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
MARTIN W WASSERMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is GALBUT. GALBUT
It MENIN, 888 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach. Fl.
33138. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Nov. 16,
1878; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami, i
Florida on this 10 day of
October. 1878.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By R. M Kisser
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
GALBUT, GALBUT
& MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
Martin W. Wasserman
08136 Oct. 19.26, Nov. 2,9,1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13677
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
GRACIE W. BOYETTE.
Petitioner Wife,
and
ROBERT GRAY BOYETTE,
Respondent Husband.
TO; Mr Robert Gray
Boyette
1133 Northwest
112 Terrace
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1515 Northwest 167 Street. Suite
110-B, Miami, FL 33169, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before Nov. 26. 1979; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of
October. 1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By G Rotoli
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal!
1X140 Oct. 19.26; Nov. 2.9.1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Modem Furniture Manufac-
turing at 1417 NE 129th Street.
Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
American Furniture
Manufacturing. Inc.
Harvey D. Friedman, Esq.
Attorney for American
Furniture Manufacturing. Inr
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 302
Miami Beach. Florida33139
08133 Oct. 19.26; Nov 2. 9. 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names of
I'.n km.in. Neuwahl & Rosen-
berg al 1401 Brickell Avenue.
Suite 608. Miami, Florida. 33131
intend to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Packman. Neuwahl
tv Rosenberg. P.A.
1401 Brickell Avenue
Suite 606
Miami. Florida 33131
Andrew Schreer, Esquire
Attorney for Applicant
08134 Oct. 19.26; Nov. 2.8.1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
OFTHE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civl Action No. 79-13424 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marrtageof
LUISJAIROMARIN.
Petitioner,
and
OLGAMARIN.
Respondent.
TO: OLGAMARIN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
KELVIN J ASHER. attorney
fur Petitioner, whose address is
1850 SW 8th Street. Suite 407 '
Miami. Florida 33135, and file'
the original with the clerk of.
Ihe above styled court on or
before November 26. 1979;!
otherwise a default will be'
entered against you for the'
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
eal of said court al Miami.
Florida on this ii day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
I 11 Wade
puty Clerk
nt Court Seal)
04136 Oct. 19V08I Nor. 2. :!979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring lo engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Triton Foods al number 2715
Collins Avenue, in the City of
Miami Beach. Florida. Intends
to register the said name with
Ihe Clerk of the Circuit Court of
I lade County. Florida.
I lated al Miami. Florida, this
Sth day of October, 1979
Jaime Esquenasl
GulllermoSostchin, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
inn West Flagler Street
Miami FL:33130
08148 Oct. 19.26. Nov. 2.9. 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADECOUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79-57*4
IN RE ESTATE OF
SYLVIA REYNOLDS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of SYLVIA REY-
NOLDS, deceased, File
Number 79-5764. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate Is IRWIN WEISS, whose
address Is 185-40D Peck
Avenue. Flushing. New York
11365. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested In the ;
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date Of the first publication
Ol this Notice of
Administration October 19.
1078
IRWIN WEISS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SYLVIA REYNOLDS
Deceased
VI"I'i H< NT-: V F( IR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Joseph.I (ilazer
2500 East Hallandale
Beach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
relephone: 945-7557
08127 Oct. 19. 26. 1979
26,1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring lo engage in business
under the fictitious name 87th
ask INDUSTRIAL PARK. A
Florida Partnership, intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Manuel Quintero
Nllo Ventura
Joseph M. Lopez
JoseR.Gil
Rolando Gil
GuillermoSostchln. Esq.
Attorney for
partnership
18145 Oct. 19.26; Nov. 2.9.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11 TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 79-13741 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
JEFFERY LEE CALVIN
Husband Petitioner
in
I.IA MARIE CALVIN
Wile Respondent
TO 1.1A MARIE CALVIN
Residence:
1.ia Marie Calvin
C o John Foglla
1: idn.. Way Hill
Franklin NC
Your are hereby notified that
.1 Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
1st you, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
01 sour Answer lo the Petition
on the Petitioner's Attorney.
DONALD I-' FROST. ESQ.. 26
SW Itl -':' Miami, Florida.
38130, and file the original In
the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, ol Dade County,
Florida, on or before the 26 day
ol No* 1979. Ul default Of
which the Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage will be
taken as confessed by you.
DATED THIS October 12.
1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByG.S.Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of
Donald F Frost, Esq
26 SW 6th Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone: 13051 379-6476
08139 Oct. 19. 26; Nov 2. 9. 1979
CIRCUIT OFVLoRmlC'AL
AND FOR DADE count"
Civil Action No jSsSV
ACTION FOR D SsolutS
ofmarriageUTion
INRE:Themarna)!e0I
NESTOR FDE CASTRO
Petitioner Husband
and
EMYF.DE CASTRO
Respondent Wife
TO: EMYF.
DE CASTRO
5622 East 13 Street
Tuscon. Arizona 857i 1
YOU ARE HEREBY not,
FIED that an action ,'
Dissolution of Marria h0r
beenfUedag.,ns,yo:aar,dvh0"
are required to serve aTopy .
your written defenses |f an* k
It on ARTHUR H L,PS0N
attorney for Petitioner, 222
address 1. 1515 NorthwestTr
Street. Suite 110-B. Miami si
33168 and file the onginal^
the clerk of the above .hJS
court on or before Novenhar
26 1878, otherwise a *2S
will be entered against you fo
the relief demanded "
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 17 day of
October. 1879 y a
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal 1
08154 Oct. 19,26; Nov 2,9. It7t
NOTICE UNDER "
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
kenza Floral Exchange at 810
NE 72 St.. Miami, Fla intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Lou Benskey. President
855 Corporation
08104 Oct. 5,12, 19, 26.1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
Squire Shops International.
Inc.. d b a Pierre Cardln
Diffusion by Squire Shops, at
1601 Biscay ne Blvd Space
E66. Miami, Fla intends to
register said names with the
Clerk of Ihe Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Daniel Kaufman President
Squire Sr
International Inc
Slc\ en Deulsch. Esq
Attorney for
Squire Shops
International. Inc
08103 Oct 19,26; V>-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring; to engage in business
under the flcutiOUfl names
Squire Shops International,
Inc. d b a Pierre I'ardir
Diffusion, at 1601
Blvd., Space E66 Miami Fla.
intends to registei said names
with the Clerk ol the Circuit
Court of Dade County Flonda.
Daniel Kaufmai
Squire Shops
International. Inc
Steven Deutai h Esq
Attorney for
Squire Shops
International. I in
08153 Oct 19. 2K. Nov J. M. 1979
"*"" >" vtor.zttf i79 | ufinoct'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desirlni
ius name of
CHICO 9 SHOES al 10814 W
Miami. FL
33174. intend lo register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida
Mario and
AdelaChlco
12.19.26: Nov.-. i79
' Vl.i____U_______HU
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
QIVEN that ihe undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
HEMISPHERE MARKETING
al 678 NW ntnii street. Miami,
Florida, intends '.o register
ne with the Clerk 01
I ideCounty, Florida
HEMISPHERE
CORPORATION
By Julius Kantor.
president
A KEIL, ESQ.
Attorney for
. lemlsphereCorp.
M2 Ocl U^^'ov. ill, 1878;
i ""! **,* 11 t ii.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
INTHECIRCUITCOURT0F
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
ANDFOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 79-13WFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marn
HERNAN CAI I IN
Husband
ami
ROSA CASTANO
Wife.
TO. ROSACASTAN'i
Trasversal
SurSSll
Anlioquia 1
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an ... '
solution of Man
filed against you and
required to serve a o'your
written dele; t''n
ALBERT L CARRICARTfc.
PA., attomej foi I ''i'0""'
whose address Is 2491 SW2TB
Avenue. Miami. Florida 3S1
and flic the original with UK
clerk of the abov
on or before N
1979. otherwise ......fault
be entered againsl U forme
reliel demanded In the >om-
plaint or petition ,
This notice shall b.i
ODCe each week for
ecutlva weeks In '"
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand >"a'_'
seal of said BOUl
rida on ihU
1 er. 1979.
i
1
By M
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Sea,
Albert 1. Carricarte,
Street
'
Allomevfor Huspaii'i ..
Oct. Hl.a,;.Ne-'
-- ?' ct, '<----------
Ol
7g 0*151 Oct.
j i.l.^


L.y.ctober26,w79
*Jewisti IhridHor
Page 15-A
public Notices
HOTICE UNDER
. ,Kn that the undersigned,
I Star the fictitious name 101
huwre* Building, at 101
aorca Avenue. Coral Gables
Clends to register said
ume 'th the Clerk of the
I Circuit Court ol Dade County.
I Florida
DulceM Arguelles
Donatot; Arguelles
ImiillermoSosUhin. Esq.
Atlorney lor Arguelles
11401 West Klagler Street
I Miami FL 33133
*lu*t. .!.*: Nov. a. lW
-"NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(N0 PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FORDADECOUNTY
Civil Action No. 791J340FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
] IN RE The Marriage of
Ijakejr tomlin.
Husband Petitioner,
land
[UXAR MAY TOMLIN,
I Wile Respondent.
|TO. ILLAR MAY TOMLIN
Respondent
Residence Unknown
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTI-
IFIED that an action for
(Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
III on HARVEY S. SWICKLE,
I attorney for Petitioner, whose
laodren Is 130 Lincoln Road,
ISuite 382, Miami Beach,
I Florida 33130. and file the
I original with the clerk of the
I above styled court on or before
I Nov. 16. 1U79; otherwise a
I default will b,' entered against
[you for the relief demanded In
I UiecompUinl or petition.
I This notice shall be published
i ich week for four con-
IteCUtlve weeks in THE
I JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
l-1.1l in said court at Miami.
I Florida on this 4 day of
liMobcr. 1979
RICHARDP BRINKER
\ 1CI1 rk Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
t Court Seal 1
I HARVEY S SWICKLE, ESQ.
...id
J
[ la 33139
I utioner
Nov 2, 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA.
IN ANDFOR
DADECOUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-1 3395 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
1:1 \ 1 BARBIERI,
Petitioner,
and
HECTORCARLOS
BARBIERI,
Respondent
TO HECTOR CARLOS
BARBIERI
AvenldaCorrlentee
i243SegundoPlso,
"epartamentoD
Buenoa Aires,
Argentina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
CED thai an action for Dlsso-
u.,lon "' Marriage has been
"led against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
T?i.lr.,.','u'f>'nses' any, to R on
:N,IJ.IMNEIR6,JR.of
AOUDO PINEIRO & KATES.
' attorney for PetlUoner,
*nose address is 1847 SW 27
Avenue. Miami, FL 33145, and
.,J"' .orlK'nal with the clerk
f of the above styled court on or
.before November 16. 1979;
l.ni Ist a de'ault will be
entered against you for the
n?i de,nan,ecl in the com-
I Plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
"W each week (or four con
JFwu,.."eek8 '" THE
Ti SS my hand and the
Ifhh shkI court at Miami.
Honda on this 5 day of
I 'Mober. 1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Uade County, Florida
y Deborah G. Hess
. As Deputy Clerk
't-rcuil Court Seal I
feNIOJ PINEIRO. JR.
101 l,o. PINEIRO &
'KATES. Pa.
,'M'SW 27 Avenue
1-Mi.imi. KI.33145
I'none. K54 2643
I ,,'""';> for Petitioner
llJ0Ort.u, 19,26; Nov. 2.1979
-.NOTICE UNDER
N HJIVfL f IS HEREBY
heilri. V1*1 lhe undersigned,
K !h en** m >u2ne
hSJLUlst,rtbutor intends to
IS"" MM name with the
b<2 fe areu" Court of
P* County. Florida.
MiryBloutti
ot 5.12, 18, 24.1t7(
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
CADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 79 13032 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GENARINA FASSINGER,
Wife Petitioner,
vs.
DAVID M. FASSINGER,
Husband. Respondent.
TO: DAVID M. FASSINGER
Husband Respondent
418 Church Road.
Bethel Park,
I'cnn 15102
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
ol your Answer to the Wife's
Attorney, LAW OFFICES OF
DONALD F. FROST, BY:
ROBERT J. TIRELLI, ESQ..
26 SW 6th Street. Miami,
Florida, 33130, and file the
original with the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the day of November,
1979. or the allegations will be
taken as confessed against you.
. and a Default will be entered.
DATED at Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this 27 day of
September, 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Circuit Court Clerk
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
DONALD F. FROST. ESQ.
By Robert J.TIrelll. Esq.
26 SW 6th Street
Miami, Florida33130
Phone: (305)379-6476
08089 Oct. 5,12, 19. 26.1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 79-179 57
1 ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
'IN RE: The Marriage of
(DAISY MONTOYA.
I Wife Petitioner
land
[JUAN OHEI) MONTOYA,
Husband Respondent
|TO: JUAN OBED MONTOYA
Carr6SCS3Bl9
Mcdillin. Colombia
South America
VI >C ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
Ihtii filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
it on ADOLFO KOSS, BSQ
attorney foi PetlUoner, whose
address is 101 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33128, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
befon November 9, i7a.
otherwise a default will be
entered agalnsl you for the
rellel demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notu e shall be published
once ea< h week for four con-
Bet ullve weeks 111 THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal ol said court at Miami.
Florida on this H day of Bep
lember, i79.
RICHARD 1' BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
ADOLFO KOSS. ESQ.
A. KOSS,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, PA.
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida .13128
(305)325-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
1 W0.sk Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26. 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 7*129J9
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SONIA LEDESMA BRYAN,
Wife,
and
JAMES L.BRYAN, JR..
Husband
TO: JAMES L. BRYAN. JR.
Husband
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on Albert L. Carricarte PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2491 NW 7th Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 9, 1979; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLOR1DIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 26 day of Sep-
tember, 1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal!
Albert L. Carricarte. P.A.
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone 649 7917
1 Attorney for PetlUoner
Oct s. 11.19, JS. lira
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 1ITH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 79 15451
NOTICE OF SUIT
IN REPLEVIN
DELAIR CREW SERVICE,
INC., a Florida
corporation, Plaintiff,
vs.
AEROAMERICA, INC..
a foreign corporation.
Defendant.
TO JOEL EISENBERG
President AeroAmerica Inc.,
7777 Perimeter Road, Seattle,
Washington, 98108
YOU ARE HEREBY OR
DERED and required to serve
a copy of your Answer to the
Complaint filed against you In
the above court, a copy of
which Is enclosed herewith, on
the Plaintiff's attorney, and file
the original In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, In
and for Dade County, Florida,
on November 9, 1979. Other-
wise the allegations of said
Complaint will be taken as con-
fessed by you. The case Is a suit
in replevin and is styled
DELAIR CREW SERVICE.
INC., a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff, vs. AEROAMERICA.
INC., a foreign corporaUon.
Defendant, in which the
Plaintiff seeks to recover the
following property to which
they claim title:
Boeing 720022 aircraft
bearing Registration Num-
ber N-7207-U, including en-
gines installed thereon, on
board kits, spares and
equipment and logs, main-
tenance records and other
operational documents.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FI.OK1DIAN.
DATED: at Miami. Dade
County, Florida, this 2 day of
October, 1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
I lade County. Florida
By (' L. Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
STEINBERG & SOROTA, P.A.
Attorney for Plaintiff
505 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
By Samuel S. Sorota
08100 Oct. 5,12. 19, 26, 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13231 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
MAM ELMOYA,
Husband
MARIA ISABEL MO YA,
Wife
n 1 Maria Isabel Moya
Cludadela Leon kill
No -. 1
Oollma ile Tinas,
San .lose
Costa Rica
Vi 11 ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED thai an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on Albert L. Carricarte, PA.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2491 NW 7th Street,
Miami, Florida 33125. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 9. 1979,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
rellel demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2nd day of
October, 1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carricarte, P.A.
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida33125
Tel: (306)649-7917
Attornev (or Petitioner
08101 Oct. 5, 12. 19, 36, 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
MARK'S ATHLETIC SOLES at
3041 Grand Avenue, Coconut
Grove. Florida intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
MARK'S ATHLETIC
SOLES. INC.
By Mark Brickman,
1 president
DANIEL M.KEIL, ESQ.
| Attorney for Mark's
Athletic Soles. Inc.
.08141 Oct. 19.26. Nov. 2. 9.1979 I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the flcUUous name J.C..
at 12747 Blscayne Blvd.. North
Miami. Fla. MU, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
nade Oountv. F lorlda
Jack Carmel. Pres.
J AD Financial
CorporaUon
08106 Oct. 5.12.1*. 2*. 1979
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79-7112
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRVING FAINBLATT,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
F1ED that the administration
of the estate of IRVING FAIN-
BLATT, deceased. File
Number 79-7182. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
IS 73 W. Klagler Street, Miuni.
Florida 33130. The personal
representaUve of the estate Is
DOROTHY FAINBLATT,
whose address Is 10350 W. Bay
Harbor Drive. Bay Harbor
Florida 33154. The name and
address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yel
due. the date when it wll
become due shall be stated. It
the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainly shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested in the
.state to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
dei edent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction ol the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
VND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARKED
Dale ol the first publication
ol this Notice of
Vdmlnlstratlon: October i.
1979.
DOROTHY FAINBLATT,
V- Personal Representative
01 the Estate of
li:\ ING I- MNBLATT
1 teceai d
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
FROMBER6, FROMBERQ
,v ROTH, P A
si ITE BOO, 2800E
llallauilale Ile,11 li Hlvil
Hallandale, Florida :009
Telephone iun-0709
08138 Oct. 19, 26. 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13213 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MURIEL JEAN
Petitioner
and
JOELJEAN.
Respondent
TO: JOELJEAN
residence unknwon
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
DissoluUon of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
it on BENNETT D. FULTZ.
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 619 SW 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 9, 1979;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2 day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
tCircuit Court Seal)
08110 Oct. 5. 12, 19, 26. 1979
------------NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
.GIVEN that the undersigned,
Idestring to engage in business
under the flcUUous name of
American Salads at 8401st St..
.Miami Beach, Fla.. intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Allan Myerson. President
American Food
SpeclalUas, Inc.
fOBlOS) Oct. 5.12. 19, 2*. 1979
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO.: 79 13343 FC
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE:
MARMONVIL NELSON,
Husband. Petitioner,
vs.
OCERNE JOSEPH
NELSON,
Wife. Respondent.
TO: OCERNE JOSEPH
NELSON
Anse-a-Faleur,
Cote-de-Fer. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
F1ED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed, and you are hereby
required to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Hus-
band Petitioner's Attorney,
DONALD F. FROST, 28 SW 6th
Street, Miami, Florida. 33130.
and file the original with the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 9 day of
November. 1979. or the
allegations will be taken as
confessed against you, and a
Default will be entered.
DATED at Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this 2 day of
October, 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
08103 Oct. 5. 12, 19,26, 1979
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
OFTHE11TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No 79 13510 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
. IN RE: The Marriage of
ELVIE MARTIAL DAMES.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
CAROL RICHARD DAMES,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU, CAROL RICHARD
DAMES. 4929 St. Francis
Church, Nassau, Bahamas, are
hereby notified to serve a copy
of your Answer to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you, upon Wife's
attorney. GEORGE NICHO-
LAS, ESQUIRE, 612 NW 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33136,
and file original with the Clerk
of the Court on or before
November lfi. 1979. otherwise
the Petition will be confessed
oy you.
DATED this 9 day of
October, 1979
RICHARD P DRINKER.
CLERK
By Clarinda Brown
1 leputy Clerk
08127 Oct 12, 19.26; Nov 2, 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
IIVEN thai the undersigned.
i. nine to engage In business
under the flcUUous name ol
\t TO TINT al 1849 SW 32nd
Avenue, Miami. FL S3146,
intends to register said name
with the clerk of the Circuit
Court ol Dade County, Florida.
Stahl Automotive
Accessories
1631 SW 32nd Avenue
Miami, FL33148
07001 Oct. S. 12.19. 26. 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
[desiring to engage in business
iiii.icr the fictitious name of
Salads by American at 840-lst
Street, Miami Beach, Fla.,
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Allan Myerson, President
American Food Specialties,
Inc.
,08106 Oct. 5, 12. 19, 26. 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
idesiring to engage in business
miller the fictitious name of
FICI at 6595 NE 36th Street,
Miami. Fla. 33166, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
FIBERGLASS INDUSTRIAL
CONSULTANTS. INC.
A Florida Corporation,
Sole Owners
;08084 Oct. 5.12. 19. 26.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 79-13043
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
JAMES J. DiMODICA
Petitioner Husband
vs.
JLOR1A R DiMODICA
Respondent Wife
TO:
GLORIA R. DiMODICA
464 Birr Street
Rochester. New York 14613
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses. If
any. to It on DANIEL GAL-
LUP, ESQ., plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address Is 2356 Sal
sedo Street. Suite 309, Coral
Gables, Florida on or before
9th November. 1979; and fUe
the original with the clerk of
Ulls court either before service
on plaintiff's attorney or tm
mediately therealler; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on September
27. 1979.
Richard P. Brlnker,
Clerk of the Court
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
08118Oct. 12,19. 26; Nov. 2, 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 79-13042
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
DAVID L. BARGER
PetlUoner. Husband
MARALYN M BARGER
Respondent Wile
TO:
MARALYN M. BARGER
7332 Lakeridge Drive
,Ft. Wayne.
Indiana 46819
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
JF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses. If
any. to It on DANIEL
GALLUP, ESQ., plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 2355
Saliedo Street. Suite 309. Coral
Gables. Florida 33134. on or
before 9lh of November, 1979;
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal ol this court on September
27, 1979.
Richard P. Bnnker.
Clerk of the Court
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
IIHM9 Oct 12. 19,26; Nov 2. 1979
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA,
IN ANDFOR
DADECOUNTY
Civil Action No. 7913392 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE marriage of
RICHARD FISHER,
Petitioner Husband
and
CYNTHIA FISHER,
Respondent Wife
TO CynthlH Fisher
Posl 011 ice Box 24
1 'rattsburg,
N.-w York 14873
vol ARE HEREBY NOTI
Kill 1 thai an at lion foi Dls
solution hi Marriage has been
tiled agalnsl you and you are
required to sen e .1 copy ol your
written defenses, it any, to it on
VRTHI R H LIPSON. attorney
(01 I 'etltloner, whose address 1
1515 Northwest hit Street, 110-
B Miami, FL 33169, and file the
original wllh the clerk of the
u.bo> 1 styled court on or before
Novembei 16, 1979; otherwises
default will be entered agalnsl
you for the relief demanded In
the 1 omplaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 5 day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD P. DRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I lade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
AS 1 leputy Clerk
1 Circuit Court Seal)
08124Oct. 12,19.26; Nov 2. 1979
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
OF THE 11TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
ANDFOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 79 13517
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ANDREW JOHN
LAN AHA N, Petitioner,
Husband and
MARY LANAHAN .
Respondent. Wife.
TO: MARYLANAHAN
460 Old Town Road
Apartment 2 F
Long Island, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a PetlUon for Disso
hit ion of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other
pleading to the PetlUon on the
Petitioner's Attorney, JOHN J.
GALLAGHER, whose address
is 1454 NW 17 Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33125, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
this 16 day of November, 1979.
or a Default will be entered
against you.
DATED this 9 day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the
Circuit Court
By Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
08126 Oct. 12, 19.26; JXov. 2,1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name of
Barons Bars at 3030 NW 27
Ave.. Miami, Fla., Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Kenneth Emerick, Owner
125 Oct. 12,19. 29; Nov. 1. MM


Ptgel6-A
>Je**iUfkrKitu-
Frkky.Octo-.,
IW

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1979
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yvvc
rs.--
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 NW 27th A,e 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360NW 7th Ave 681-8541
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700NE 163 S: 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S Dixie Mw/ 667-7575
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822-2500
CUTLER RIOGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-524'
WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Ros 552-6656
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal H, 247-1622
W HOLLYWOOD
497 S State Rd 7 987-0450
OAKLAND PARK
1000 W Oakland Par* EHvd 561-5880
FT. LAUDERDALE
1740E Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N State Rd 7 587-2186
TAMARAC
441 4 W Commercial Blvd 735-2772
TAMARAC
N University Or at McNabD Rd 721-4700
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N Peaera' .
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dxe --- *-""_,.
LAKE PARK N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lakt Blvd 64r
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4m St 4c-:
VERO BEACH
755 21st Street 56?"'"-
ORLANDO
3620 E Colonial Dr 896' -'
WINTER PARK
881 S Orlando Ave 6*
OAYTONA BEACH
907 Voiusia Ave 255-748
NAPLES
2085 E Tamtami Tr -----


[reutzer Appointed Convention Chairman
Franklin D. KreuUer has been
Jointed Southeast Region
gSSn Chairman for the
Vational Biennial Convention of
theUnited Synagogue of
America.
The United Synagogue of
America, representing con-
Lrvative synagogues in the
I United States. Mexico and
Canada is having its Biennial
Convention at the Concord Hotel,
Sew York, on Nov. 11-15.
The Southeast Region consists
| 0f six southern states and Puerto
- Rico, with over 60 congregations.
I Each svnagogue will be rep-
resented at the convention by at
least two official delegates and
Liters affecting conservative
Jewry as a whole will be the
subject matter of the convention.
mbject maiu i in nic i.uiivciii.iuii. iiJJJBK I
Kreutzer, a native Miamian. Franklin KreuUer
Interim Appointments
At Hebrew Academy
Three interim appointments
Ihave been announced at the
Hebrpw Academy of Greater
Miami, according to Dr. Elias
iHershman. academy president.
Rabbi Vossie Haber has been
I named interim director of
[Hebrew students for junior and
[senior high school. He is a CPA
land also holds a degree in ad-
ministration.
Rabbi Shrager Gross, the
I schools directdr of student
activities, is now also interim
assistant principal for the junior
and senior high school, Hersh-
man said. Harry Schwartz will
undertake additional respon-
sibilities as interim educational
director of the academy.
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami provides formal religious
training and a full educational
program for more than 600
students from nursery through
twelfth grades.
attended the University of Miami
undergraduate, graduate and
Law School, and has been an
attorney in private practice in
Miami for the last 15 years. He
has served as a special assistant
attorney general and special
counsel to the comptroller of the
state of Florida.
In addition, Kreutzer serves as
chairman of the City of Miami
Charter Review Board and is the
immediate past president of
Temple Zion and the Greater
Miami Hebrew Free Loan
Association.
Kreutzer has just returned
from the final planning session
for the convention, held in New
York, and reports that speakers
will include the Honorable Abba
Eban and Dr. Gerson Cohen,
chancellor of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary. Results of
various surveys conducted by
both the Seminary and the
United Synagogue will be
released and discussed.
Special seminars and programs
have been scheduled for presi-
dents, youth committees, adult
education committees, school
boards, Israel and social action
committees, as well as Sisterhood
and Men's Club leaders.
Over 1,500 lay leaders of the
Conservative Movement are
expected to participate in this
convention which will have a
I worldwide impact on the future of
conservative Judaism.
ft
Mrs. Belle Lehrman is shown planting a
sapling, while Dr. Lehrman is shown with
the Honorable Moshe Rivlin at the
dedication.
: .

George Washington University students from South Florida
met recently with their congressman, Bill Lehman 113th
District). From left are Jeff Naftal, son of Hy and Ruth Naftal
of North Miami Beach; Rep. Lehman; and Lisa Lerner.
daughter of Dr. Lawrence and Elaine Lerner ofHallandale.
National Leader at
'Federation Tuesday'
Dr. Irving Greenberg, who has
served as director of the
President's Commission on the
Holocaust for the past year, will
be one of the featured guest
speakers at Federation Tuesday,
Nov. 13 at the Deauville Hotel.
Federation Tuesday is the
annual community education day
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's
Division. The theme of the
program is "Your Chil-
dren. Who Will Be Jewish
in the Year 2000?," and will
present three Jewish leaders
discussing the political, personal
and cultural issues which bear on
the survival of Jewish life.
Other participants are Aaron
David Rosenbaum, research
director of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
Dr. Leonard Fein, editor of
Moment Magazine.
The day begins at 9:30 a.m.,
includes lunch and continues
until 2 p.m. Chairman of the
event is Elaine Bloom, assisted
by Women's Division president
Helene Berger and vice president
for community education,
Maxine Schwartz.
An ordained Orthodox rabbi.
Dr. Greenberg is director of the
National Conference Center and
Dr. Irving Greenberg
protessor of Jewish Studies at
New York's City College. He has
directed the Brandeis University
Hillel Foundation, served as
associate professor of history at
Yeshiva University and as
Fulbright Visiting Professor in
History at Tel Aviv University.
For reservations and ad-
ditional information on
Federation Tuesday, phone the
Federation Women's Division
office.
Honored by JNF
Bar-Ilan Women Slate Meeting
Lehrmans Dedicate Forest
On their recent visit to Israel,
Or and Mrs. Irving Lehrman
pedicatcd the Dr. and Mrs.
Ring Lehman Forest in the
^mencan Bicentennial Park in
jlerusalem.
I The world chairman of Keren
pyemeth Leisrael, the Honor-
pole Moshe Rivlin, praised Dr.
jTP "for his magnificent
dedicated leadership which
Oe has given to the JNF in
*neral, and the JNF Foundation
n Particular, for so many years.
IK"Y?k, are the Northern Star of
EuSH success >n America,"
p Rivlin to Dr. Lehrman, "and
f"e JNF in Jerusalem is proud to
Tve your illustrious names,
mn and your wife's added to
P roster of dignitaries in the
*mencan Bicentennial Park."
Dr. and Mrs. Lehrman planted
fw own saplings, and in
r*Ponse. Dr. Lehrman stated,
l'ne Jewish National Fund is
EL*" to my heart. I under-
LfSW realize the importance
fetnw, m,lhe totlity of Israel's
rruKgle for security and eco-
mic independence, and the
L s}s that lie ahead are
and many."
hnrikU*nnan added that he
P his wife Belle would continue
r serve the JNF in every
PPHcity and would double their
^'rts upon their return to the
On reporting to the JNF
leadership in Greater Miami, Dr.
Lehrman said. "Nothing equals
the feeling of having a project
dedicated in your name by the
JNF in Israel. As much as one
thinks he is blase, one cannot
help having a lump in his throat,
a shiver in his body, and a prayer
in his heart when this occurs."
Women for Bar-Ilan
University South Florida
Chapter will hold its first
membership meeting Tuesday,
Oct. 30, at 1 p.m. in the mez-
zanine card room, Roney Plaza.
Featured speaker will be the
executive vice chairman of the
international board of overseers
of Bar-Ilan University. Rabbi
Karpol Bender. A film of the
university will be shown. The
meeting will commemorate the
25th anniversary of the founding
of Bar-Ilan in Ramat-Gan, Israel.
Men are invited.
Dinitz to Address Cypen Tribute Dinner
Simcha Dinitz, former Israeli
Ambassador to the United
States, will be the featured
speaker at the Temple Emanu-El-
State of Israel Bonds Dinner
honoring Judge Irving and Hazel
Cypen on Thursday, Nov. 15 at
the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
According to dinner chairman
Tibor Hollo, Judge and Mrs.
Cypen will be honored for their
. long involvement in Jewish com-
munal affairs in the South
Florida area. "Irving and Hazel
Cypen have been dynamic leaders
in all phases of Jewish philan-
thropic and service work for
decades and have brought a very
special quality of devotion and
understanding to the needs of
Israel and the Jewish people,"
Hollo explained.
Judge Cypen is vice chairman
of the Temple Emanu-El board
and an honorary vice president.
He is a trustee and past vice
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and has been
active in B'nai B'rith, ZOA and
the United Synat
America. Currently he is
honorary president and chairman
of the board of the Greater Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged. He has been honored
by the State of Israel Bonds
Organization, Temple Emanu-El,
the Combined Jewish Appeal and
Dade County.
Mrs. Cypen was president of
Temple Emanu-El's Sisterhood
and is currently secretary of the
Women's Committee of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Services. She is a member of
Hadassah and on the Beach area
board of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's
Division. She has been president
of B'nai B'rith and the Central
Beach Elementary School PTA.
Mrs. Cypen is parliamentarian of
the Women's Auxiliary of the
Greater Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. She is
active in the United Way.
Hollo said that a gala evening,
is being iplanned to honor the
Cypens and to welcome Simcha
Dinitz to Miami again.
Judge Cypen
Hazel Cypen
"eJe wish Flor idiar
Miami, Florida Friday, October 26,1979
SECTION H


"or ;'
Page2-B
vJenist fkridiar
Friday, October 26,19731
Biblical Scholar Addresses Groups
Col. Izhak Izhaki. noted Bib-
lical scholar, archeologist
military leader and educator, will
address a wide variety of groups
throughout South Florida, high-
lighting the contemporary
relevance of Biblical values for
present day.
Col. Izhaki. who is a sixth
generation Israeli served as the
head of the educational branch in
the general headquarters of the
Israel Defense Forces in charge of
its famed Yediat Ha-Aretz
program and upon his retirement
from the IDF in 1969. became
director of the Pedagogic Center
of the Israel Ministry' of Edu-
cation where he supervised the
development of curricula in the
public schools and devised
training aids for its teachers.
On Oct. 28 he will address
Uiu-hm of North Dade. South
and North Broward on the sub-
ject. "Teaching Bible: Fresh Ap-
proaches and New Methods," at
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. 2719 Hollywood Boule-
vard. Hollywood, at 8 p.m.
On Monday. Oct. 29, Izhaki
will speak for the Greater Miami
Chapter of the World Bible
Seminar Study Group at the
Col. Izhaki
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, on "Samson: Is He An
Authentic National Hero?" at
9:30 a.m.
At noon on Monday. Oct. 29,
he will address the West Broward
Religious Fellowship on "Biblical
Values and Contemporary
+ '
Seated Heft to right! are Shula Ben David, teacher; Cantor
David Conviser; James S. Knopke, chairman of the Temple
board, and Rabbi Leon Kronish. Standing Heft to right),
director of education, Stanley B. Liedeker; Nancy Xewman.
teacher; Aaron Farr, Brotherhood president; Xanci Goldstein,
co-chairman of School for Living Judaism; and Milton M.
Gaynor, temple president.
Youngsters Consecrated
At Beth Sholom
Morality" at the Plantation
Jewis Congregation-Temple Kol
Ami in Plantation. That evening,
he will address a public meeting
in the Greater Fort Lauderdale
area on "The Message of the
Bible: Social Values and Com-
munity Morality" under the
sponsorship of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale at 8 p.m. Kol Ami's address
is 8200 Peters Road. Plantation.
On Tuesday. Oct. 30, Izhaki's
topic will be "The Conflict of Cul-
tures from Joshua to the End of
Kings" for the Moadon Ivri. the
Hebrew speaking cultural group
headed by Dr. Joseph Diamond
at 1:30 p.m.
Col. Izhaki will speak to the
classes of the Judaica High
School of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale at the Jewish Community
Center on Tuesday at 7 p.m.. en
the theme of "The Struggle for
the Land in Biblical and Con-
temporary Times." He then will
address a public meeting for the
Hollywood community under the
sponsorship of the South
Broward Jewish Federation at
Temple Beth Shalom at 8:30 p.m.
on the theme of "Biblical Per-
sonalities and Their Con-
temporary Relevance." Temple
Beth Shalom is located at 1400 N.
46th Ave.. Hollywood.
Col. Izhaki also will speak to
the leadership development
groups of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Miami and for the
University of Miami, coordinated
by Dr. Helen Fagin. director of
Judaic Studies.
Temple Or Olom
Picnic Slated
The Temple Or Olom picnic
sill be held Nov. 4 at 10 a.m. at
Bird Road Park, located at Bird
Road and SW 72nd Ave.
The temple c intinues to hold
daily Minyan services at 7:15
a.m. and 7:15 p.m.. except
Sunday morning when it is held
' 0 a.m. and on Friday when
services are at 8:15 p.m.
Twenty-eight youngsters were
consecrated at Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami at the
annual Shemini-Atzeret Service
conducted in the sanctuary of the
temple, Miami Beach, by Rabbi
Leon Kronish and Cantor David
Conviser.
The consecrants and their
parents, grandparents and great-
grandparents were guests at a
special luncheon given by the
Sisterhood of Beth Sholom after
the service. The luncheon
featured gifts to the children
miniature candlesticks for the
girls and miniature Torahs for
the boys. Dancing and singing
New Adult
Facility
A new Multipurpose Senior
Center to house the Community
Care Adult Day Center program
was dedicated last week at the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. The new
facility was made possible
through a grant from the
Areawide Agency on Aging. Carl
Dahl, executive director of the
agency,, and Fred D. Hirt,
executive director of the Home,
were present to dedicate the
building.
The idea for the Multipurpose
Senior .Center, which is located
adjacent to the Home on N.E.
52nd Street at 1st Court, is based
on the concept of utilizing in-
stitutional resources on an in-
tegrated basis with outpatient
programs. Participants of the
Community Care Adult Dayi
marked the program.
The consecrants are Amy
Albert. Rebecca Merritt. Kevin
Percal, Abby Rotbart, Joy
Frasca, Adam Amdur. Rasheena
Levine, Seth Hollander. Daniel
Muhtar, Miriam Cherry, Jamie
Cantor, Joshua Levine, Natalie
Bramson, William Kallus, Mark
Cohn, Simon Skandrani, Julisa
Banbanaste, Demian Rosenblatt,
Tammy Frasca, Jarrod Mason,
Marissa Scheinberg, Charles
Schneider, Lauren Cantor, Robyn
Cohn, Lisa Zusmer, Jodie Esses,
Beth Finkelstein and Mark
Schneider.
Day Center
Dedicated
Center program are able to take
full advantage of services at the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, including
meals, medical services, mental
health services, transportation,
and recreational and educational
activities.
The program is open to eligible
residents of Dade County, aged
60 and older. It is funded through
a grant from the State of Florida
under the Community Care for
the Elderly Act, through the
Areawide Agency on Aging and
the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a
beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, United Way
of Dade County, and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.


Happy with the results of the all-day Southeast Regional con
ference of Pioneer Women are from the left, Mildred Wei* J
Deerfield Beach, chairman of the day and Southeast Regm 1\
ordinator who also serves on the national board of Pi0e j
Women; Lillian Hampton, national board member Bebl
Pullman of Fort Lauderdale, morning workshop chairman and
national chairman of Friends of Pioneer Women; and Harriett
Green of Miami, conference program chairman and coordinator]
and president of the Pioneer Women Council. The conclave um\
held recently at the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood.
Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli
in Sauce:
Kreplach
Italiano
Today, serve Chef Boy-ar-dee"' Cheese Ravioli for a
great-tasting meal. Your family will really love this ver-
sion of kreplach made with cheese and tomato sauce
seasoned the Chef's special way.
Cheese Ravioli in Sauce from Chef Boy-ar-dee: Fca
delicious hot meal with cheese.
Your tzimmis just wouldn't be the same without
Sun-Maids Raisins. And your compote wouldn't be
complete without Blue Ribbon or Old Orchard Figs. For
over half a century our wholesome kosher fruits have
been a Jewish cooking tradition.
We dry them the traditional way, too. Naturally,
in the sun. So the natural sweetness you enjoyed as a child
still tastes the same today. And isn't that what
tradition is all about?
Certified by Rabbi Dr. J. H. Ralbag
OSun-Mud OrowmcrffJAfomi*. 1979


^,0^26,1979
vJewistfhrkttar)
Page3-B
Yeshiva Official Speaks to Local Groups
n, Israel Miller, senior vice
,ident and a key ad-
K.rator of Yeshiva
SSy for more than .
gE%fll bring Yeahiva's
mMsuie to several groupe of
jSlwminunal leaders on Nov.
Il
Dr Miller has been active in
Jewish communal life aa past
SmB of the Conference of
Presidents of Major Jewish
Organizations and has served as
the coordinating body a
spokesman in matters relating to
(jrael and international affairs in
^ U.S. and abroad.
Hosts for the meetinga will be
Babbi Max Lipschitr in North
Dade, and Mr. and Mrs. Morton
Weinberger in the southwest. Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Drexler and Mr.
and Mrs. Peter Goldring will host
Dr. Israel Miller
NCJWMeetings Slated
National Council of Jewish
[Women meetings are held
throughout Dade County.
Programs are interesting and
I varied.
Bay Harbor Division: Wed-
nesday, Nov. 7, 11:30 a.m. at
Washington Federal Building,
1132 Kane Concourse, Bay
Harbor Islands. Program: Billie
Hvman will present "A Living
Biography on Katharine Hep-
| bum." Luncheon.
Coral Division: Wednesday.
Nov. 7. noon at Temple Zamora,
jCoral Gables. Program: "NCJW
ShipA-Box to Israel" and
musical selections by Ann
Abrams. Luncheon.
Indian Islands Division:
IWednesday, Nov. 7, noon, at
Tower Forty-One Restaurant,
Miami Beach, Program: Nancy
llusted li(H)k review of Lauren
|Hacair*/U Myself. Luncheon.
Key Biscavne Division:
[Wednesday, Nov. 28. 12:30 p.m.
I at Towers Auditorium, Key
I Biscavne. Program: Fashion
[Show by Melange. Luncheon for
|paid-up members.
Lakes Division: Wednesday,
Nov. 7, 1:30 p.m. at Washington
Federal Bank Building, 633 NE
167 St., North Miami Beach.
Program: Sada Merel Glick,
narrator, presenting scenes from
"California Suite" and "The Last
of the Red Hot Lovers." Lun-
cheon for paid-up members.
Lincoln Division: Thursday,
Nov. 8, noon at Delano Hotel,
1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
Program: Important Issues of
the Day. Luncheon.
Ocean View Division: Wed-
nesday, Nov. 7, noon at Delano
Hotel, 4775 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach. Program: Book Review of
Sophie's Choice by Arlene
Ditchek and Lana Goldberg.
Luncheon.
South Dade Division: Wed-
nesday, Nov. 7, 8-10 p.m. at
South Dade Jewish Community
(enter. 12401 SW 102 Ave.
South Dade JCC and NCJW
present the film "Housewives: A
Career Choice" and a discussion
with Barbara Stoler, marriage
and family counselor as
facilitator, and community
leaders including State Rep.
Roberta Fox. Ruth Shapiro will
preside. Public invited.
a cocktail hour in honor of Dr.
Miller. Drexler is the president of
the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University.
Dr. .Miller served as the
founding president (and is now
honorary president) of the
American Zionist Federation ; for
a period of four years he was
chairman of the American Zionist
Council. He was a member of the
board of governors of the Jewish
Agency and the executive of the
World Zionist Organization; and
chairman of the Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy of the
National Jewish Welfare Board,
the liaison agency for the Jewish
community with the American
government and the armed
forces.
Dr. Miller's special interest in
Soviet Jewry found expression in
the three years of his national
chairmanship of the American
Jewish Conference on Soviet
Jewry. He was a member of the
presidium and guiding force in
Brussels, both in 1971 and in
1976, in the International
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Prime Minister Rabin, at a
testimonial luncheon in his home
in Jerusalem in December 1975,
conferred upon Dr. Miller a
special personal award for
distinguished leadership and
service to Israel and Jewish
people.
Anyone wishing to hear Dr.
Miller can contact the univer-
sity's local office.
Carson to Speak
At Temple Zion
On Oct. 26, following sabbath
evening services at 8:15 p.m.
nationally recognized lecturer,
consultant, fashion coordinator
and commentator, Gayle Carson,
will speak on "To Motivate or to
Intimidate What's in the Best
Interest of the Jewish Child" at
Temple Zion's Adult Education
Institute Forum. She is president
of the Gayle Carson Career
Schools and director of the
Florida Casting Agency.
Members of Hebrew Academy Women attended the unveiling
and dedication of the new "Imma" plaque recently at the
Hebrew Academy. New "Immas" shown, left to right. Mrs.
Helen Schiffman, Mrs. Minnie Posner, Mrs. Henry Stern
(president, Hebrew Academy Women); Mrs. Jennie Levinson
and Mrs. Albert Slater. Rabbi Shraga Gross addressed the
group, and refreshments were served in the Sukkah.
Sheldon D. Munach, M.D., anesthesiologist at Cedars of
Lebanon Health Care Center, was recently installed as
president of the Florida Society of Anesthesiologists. Dr.
Munach is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiol-
ogists, American Physicians Fellowship, Inc., and the Amer-
ican College of Anesthesiologists. Past president Dr. A. Graves
of Gainesville passes the gavel to Dr. Munach.
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Page 4-K
*J(nit> fkriJinr
Friday, October 26,1979
Dr. Gruber to Speak at Bonds Luncheon
Dr. Ruth Gruber. author,
foreign correspondent and a
leading authority on Israel, will
be the featured speaker at the
annual Hadassah Bond-with-
Israel Luncheon to be held
Thursday. Nov. 1 at 11:30 a.m..
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
Hotel, in cooperation with the
State of Israel Bonds Or-
ganization.
The Woman of Valor Award,
the highest honor the Inter-
national Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion can bestow upon a woman,
will be presented to Faye and
Anne Yarrow, longtime Miami
Beach residents and ardent sup-
porters of numerous Jewish
philanthropic and service groups.
Bible Scholar at Beth Sholom
Lt Col. ltzhak Itzhaki.
teacher-interpreter of the Bible as
living history, will be the first
speaker on the Sunday Omnibus
Lecture Series of Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami on
Sunday. Oct. 28. at 10:30 a.m.. at
the temple.
This is a "return engagement"
by popular demand" for Col.
Itzhaki. who lectured at Beth
Sholom last year.
Col. Itzhaki is serving as
educational consultant to many
institutions in Israel and South
Africa, but his principal work in
Israel is the training of teachers
Temple Menorah
Sisterhood Cruise
Temple Menorah Sisterhood is
sponsoring a 5-day cruise Dec.
10-14 on the .S" .S" Emerald Seas.
For further information, call
Pauline Kaplan, chairperson, or
the temple office.
The cruise is open to the
public.
APAI to Meet
; The Association of Parents if
Aibencan Israelis I APAI I. Dade
County Chapter, will meet on
Sunday. Oct. 28. at 1 p.m. at the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration Building. Guest speaker
will be Joshua Shomer. shaliach
of Israel Aliyah Center. Parents
of Americans living in Israel are
invited to attend.
JWV Groups
A joint executive board
meeting was to be held or
Thursday. Oct. 25, at the home of
the president and commander
Claire and Alex Greenwald to
make plans for November ac-
tivities of the Norman Bruce
Brown Jewish War Veterans and
Auxiliary.
Scheduled are a Nov. 1
business meeting. Veterans Day
observation on Friday evening,
Nov. 9, and Nov. 15 social games
night.
Wholesale Distributors of
i-V i
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
Turkeys, Ducks,
Cornish Hens, Pullets
and Roasters
Processors and Exporter*
of th finest U.S. Govt. Inspected
KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Fla.
Phone: 324-1855
Dr. Gruber covered the historic
meeting between Prime Minister
Begin and President Sadat and is
a versatile writer. She is the
author of 13 books, including
best-sellers Israel on the Seventh
Day and Raquela. A Woman of
Israel. Dr. Gruber has been on
assignment in the Soviet Union
where she met with Jewish ac-
tivists, scientists and artists.
Jean Feinberg. president of
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah. and Henrietta
London, luncheon chairman,
issued a joint statement in which
they praised Faye and Anne
Yarrow for their longtime
dedication to the continuity of
Jewish life at home and abroad.
They are prime examples of
women who know the importance
of supporting the economic
for B:ble and conducting many development of Israel through
adult seminars and courses on the Israel Bond Organization."
Bible ind Jewish history.
Or Ruth Gruber
Majority leader of Israel's Knesset, Avraham Sharir Heftl
chats with Gary R. Gerson, General Campaign Chairman of the
South Florida Israel Bonds Organization, at a recent area-uide
Israel Bonds leadership meeting. Sharir and Gerson noted that
with continued support and growth of the Israel Bonds
Organization, the Jewish State will proceed on its course of re-
developing the Segev and building housing projects and in-
dustry throughout the country. Mrs. Sharir is in the center.
TO THE PEOPLE OF MIAMI BEACH, AS YOUR MAYOR,
I WILL .
jtf\ MSSff*
Clean Out Corruption
Clean Up and Clean Out Incompetent
City Management
Have Your Tax Dollars Work For You
Get Rid of Boss Muss' Mayor and
Give the City Back To the People
Punch
Meyerson I MtYoT
PD FOR BY MURRAY MEYERSON CAMPAIGN FUND, Murray Meyerson. Treas.
Jewish National Fund of Greater Miami
Annual Tribute Banquet
Come and Join With Us
V*' .
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chairman, JNF Foundation
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chairman,
JNF Executive Board
Moe Levin
Vice President,
JNF Greater Miami
Strengthen the JNF
Abraham Grunhut
President,
JNF Greater Miami
-.. i^^ Natiftal Fund in Greater Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139, Phone 538-6464
The Jewish National Fund Aims and Ideals
RECLAIM-RESTORE-REBUILD THE LAND
.. Remember the JNF In Your Will


Hv. October 26,1979
vjewist Fk>ridlian
Page 5-B
:?:
\rihur Pearlman, left, president of the founders of the]
Ununt Sinai Medical Center and also president of the new \
iZature Club of Mount Sinai, chats with Polly DeHirsch
\Ler and Bin* Kossoff past Founders president, at the
first annual Founders dinner meeting of the season.
Mt. Sinai Founders
A ttendDinner Event
8
A record number of members of the Founders of the Mount I
Sinai Medical Center turned out Oct. 17 for the organization's |
. first dinner meeting of the season.
I
Founders president Arthur Pearlman introduced 38 new I
Founders, including three who announced from the floor. They I
will be formally inducted into the prestigious club at the Annual I
Founders Ball April 12. He also recognized members of the new
Signature Club, who wore name badges inscribed with a quill
. insignia.
The Signature Club is made up of Founders who pledge to
I sign at least one new Founder before the spring ball.
I
One of the highlights of the evening was the announcement
by Pearlman that the Mount Sinai Medical Center has been
selected as one of only five medical institutions in the country to
receive a $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of
| Health for a Positron Emission Transaxial Tomography system.
| As part of a joint project with the University of Miami,
| researchers will, for the first time, be able to record photos of the
I brain in action, through the Pett system. Areas of study will
I include possible diagnosis of impending strokes, Parkinson's
| disease, epilepsy and other metabolic brain disorders.
Lila Heatter, president of Mount Sinai, reminded members
of the upcoming Presidents Ball, which will be held Dec. 8 at the
' Konover Hotel on Miami Beach.
Mount Sinai Medical Center will celebrate its 30th an-
| niversary in grand style when more than 800 Founders, trustees,
medical staff and community leaders attend the Presidents Ball.
According to Mrs. Heatter, the event symbolizes the
I revival of a Mount Sinai tradition whereby the hospital
I celebrated its landmark anniversaries and honored past
I presidents and medical staff-
Honorary chairpersons for the Presidents Ball this year are
1 Mr. and Mrs. Nathan S. (Sophie) Gumenick; with president of
I Mount Sinai medical staff, Dr. and Mrs. Harold (Ronda) Ghck
I and Mr. and Mrs. Murray (Claudette) Candib as chairpersons.
Gifts were presented at the dinner meeting by Founders
I advisory board member Lou Harris to 29 Founders celebrating
I their birthday plateaus. They included Elise A. Adams, Norman
I Arkin, Mrs. Harry Barnett, Michael Brumer, Dr. Ralph Cobb,
I Max V. Cogen, S. James Cohen, Jack Esformes, Paul Faske, Dr.
Arieh Fester, Mr. and Mrs. Mac Gache, Mrs. Albert J. Gilson,
B.B. Goldstein, Dr. Morris Goodman, Dr. Frank Hildner, Dr.
Federico Justiniani, Hank Keller, Jr., Arthur Kline, John S.
1 Knight, Ann Koven, Mrs. A. J. Molasky, Nicholas H. Morley,
Alfred P. Orleans, Mrs. Blanka Rosenstiel, Mrs. Harold Sarko,
Edward Shapiro, Milton Sirkin and Mrs. Carl Weinkle.
-.-:.
Lila Heatter, right, president of the Mount Sinai Medical
Center, is pictured with Dr. and Mrs. Sherman Kaplan at
^ first Founders dinner meeting of the season. Mrs.
Heatter and Dr. Sherman are both members of the new
Signature Club of Mount Sinai, made up of Founders who
secure at least one new Founder before the annual
Founders Ball next spring.
Aventura Jewish Center Services
Friday evening services begin
at 8:15 p.m. at Aventura Jewish
Center. Officiating at the past
few Fridays and morning services
was congregation member,
Marvin Segal, who filled in until
Rabbi David Saltzman officially
joins the Center Nov. 2.
Segal was assisted by Cantor
Lawrence Tuchinsky who
chanted the liturgy.
On Friday, Oct. 26, following
services, an Oneg Shabbat will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. S.
Bressler in honor of Bressler's
75th hirt.hHny.
On Saturday Oct. 27, services
at 8:45 a.m. will be followed by a
Kiddush given by Mr. and Mrs.
Bressler. Dr. Harry Prystowsky,
son-in-law, will read the Mafteer
portion from the Torah. ..
Minyan services meet daily
at 8:30 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
VOTE
E. L MARINA
City of Miami
Commissioner
No. 16
E. L. Marina, a man of integrity, impeccable character, and exemplary
habits, has earned the respect of our community with certificates from the
Israeli Air Force and U.S. Air Force in his efforts to make free nations safe
from their oppressors. He would like to see a crime-free city with an envi-
ronment inviting to the tourist industry, and a progressive economy to em-
ploy our masses. He would also like to see his "Drug Prevention Plan," ap-
proved by the Governor in 1970, implemented in our schools. Last but not
least, he would like to see a unification of our multicultural city.
TOGETHER WE CAN DO MORE!!'.
VOTE FOR E. L. MARINA

IN GROUP 2 NO. 16
November 6
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COUPON EXPIRES DEC. 31.1960.
O Sun Maid Growers of California. 1979 R 6 9 D


Page6-B
+Jewist>ncridian
Frday. October
26.1979
Pioneer Women Meetings
A review of EHe HWl book.
A Jew Today, waa to highlight
the Thursday. Oct 25. meeting of
the Eilat Chapter of Pioneer
Women The session was to be
held at 1 p.m. in the civic
auditorium of Washington
Oga ar.d Loan Association.
"Washington Ave.. Miami
Beach
According to program
nan. Fneda Levitan. the
book was to be reviewed by Gittel
Jackson Kahn. teacher and
president :';vo Institute.
-noon was to conclude
.-.,-ical program of
Yiddish and Hebrew songs.
Veda Gruber. president of the
Eilat Chapter, said the meeting
was to be to the public
A memorial tribute to Rose
Marcus. Clara Kaplansky and
Pauline Levin will be sponsored
by the Club 2 chapter of Pioneer
Women on Thursday. Nov. 1. at 1
p.m. in the auditorium of
Financial Federal Savings and
Loan Association. 755
Washington Ave Miami Beach.
The three women, who died
during the past eight months,
were life members and served on
the board.
Life members and close
friends. Esther Shedroff. Nettie
Melman. Frieda Basso w and
Minnie Friedman, will conduct a
candleiighting ceremony in
memory of the three members
Ida Chinsky. president of Club
2, will speak on How To Be A
Living Part of Israel."
The event is open to the public,
with a donation required for non-
members. The funds will be
turned over to the Child Rescue
Fund in Israel.
For further information
contact the Pioneer Women
office. Miami Beach.
Special Events at Emanu-El
Installation of new officers of
both the senior and junior
divisions of United Synagogue
Youth of Temple Emanu-El of
Greater Miami will be conducted
by Dr. Irving Lehrman during
the Saturday morning. Oct. 27,
service at the congregation.
Rabbi Lehrman will induct
Dinna Greifer as president of the
senior group, which includes
students in grades nine through
12. and Gila Hadani as president
of the Kadima junior USY group,
which includes students in grades
six through eight.
A covered dish luncheon and
fashion show will highlight the
Wednesday. Oct. 31, opening
meeting of the PTA of Temple
Emanu-El of Greater Miami and
of the Lehrman Day School. The
11 a.m. affair will be held at the
home of Gail Lane.
The fashion show will be
presented by Young
Sophisticates. Members of the
Parent-Teacher Association
who will model the latest fashions
are Kitty DiFranco, Nancy
Green. Sheila Kurte, Barbara
Sonson and Beverly Walker.
Nancy Green is president of
the organizations.
'Melava Malka' at Adath Yeshurun
The Mr. and Mrs. Social Club
of Temple Adath Yeshurun.
North Miami Beach, will sponsor
a "Melava Malka" on Saturday,
Oct. 27. at 8 p.m. in the social
hall.
The Hebrew words melava
malka mean escorting the queen.
The Sabbath is referred to as a
queen which visits every Jewish
home from Friday evening until
Saturday night.
Temple Adath Yeshurun
"Melava Malka will feature
singing, entertainment, words of
Torah and refreshments.
Tickets may be purchased at
the temple office There will be
none sold at the door. For further
information, call Bill Katz.
Miriam Rubenstein, or the
temple office.
?
/ r
Give Your Office or Store a New Eye-Catching Look
From A New Sign to a Beautiful Wall Mirror
Interior or Exterior
? Call for free Estimate
940-3227 ?
call us for........................call us for
NEW YEAR'S CRUISES
4 DAYS and 7 DAYS
Reserve Now limited space
DADE
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SLUGGISH?
THE THYROID CENTER
995INTERAMA BLVD., SUITE 137
The place for complete evaluation of
your Thyroid and metabolism. All
tests including scanning done on the
premises.
FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 945-2594
MEDICARE and INSURANCE ACCEPTED
Sabra Hadassah Auction
dinners, pft certificates. c
MarUyn Weiner is chairing ^|
we.n^M?'nbersofthecomrnjtt
include Judy Barlin and G Si
Reichner fo[ Publicity UQ
Freund as bookkeeper Ma
Henkin as team coordir.a-.or and
Pam Adler as com-.p.,n(]ln
secretary. Refreshment- will h.
available.
Israel Folk Dance at Beth Am
Israel folk da: M I
instruction foi
intermediate da ?
by the Midrasha
Sabra Hadassah announces an
Auction to be held at Winston
Park Clubhouse. 8100 SW 132
Ave.. on Saturday. Nov. 3, at
7:30 p.m.
Jim Gall, professional auc-
tioneer with The Auction
Company of America. Inc.. will
auction off new merchandise.
A new class in Israel folk dance
and folklore with special em-
phasis on beginner and in-
termediate dancers is held even.
Monday evening at Temple Beth
Am social hall at 9:30 p.m.
> usi Vanich will teach the
For registration and
further details, call Yanich.
offered for eight weeks at BhM
Torah Congregation.
Instructor for the course ul
%usi Vanich.
Three top tourism pro-
fessionals have been named to
key posts in the newly formed
Metro-Dade Tourism Depart-
ment. The News Promotion
Division will be managed by
Phil Halpern. long-time pub-
licity director and chief aide to
the executive director of the
Miami Beach Tourist De-
velopment Authority; and
Manny Centeno, head of the
Miami Metro Publicity Bur-
eau's International Division
for seven years, who will
supervise North American
and international operations,
respectively. Arthur Ellick,
former assistant director of
the Dade County Economic
Development Department,
will be in charge of Tourism
Research Development.
Abramson Named
'Builder of Year'
ORLANDO West Palm
Beach builder Stephen Abramson
was awarded the Florida Home
Builders Association's top honor.
Builder of the Year. Oct. 9 in
Orlando during FHBA's 31st
Annual Convention Exposition.
Serving as the general session
chairman of the first-ever
Tnor I ference on
Housing and Community
Development held earlier this
year was one of Abramson"s
many accoinplishmi

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Friday. October 26.1979
+JSttlst fkriafi tr
Page 7-B
BRAMAN
BRAM AN'S FAMILY OF HAPPY CAR OWNERS
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1974 Fleetwood Brougham
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1975 Cadillac Sedan DeVille
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Page8-B
"Jen is* tkrktian
Friday, October 26,
1979

Community Corner
Writiag Braille Temple Sinai of North Dade is
sponsoring a free course of instruction in writing Braille for the
blind. There will be an orientation meeting on Monday, Oct. 29
at 10 a.m. at the temple. North Miami Beach. There are no pre-
requisites and no charge for the course. If you are interested, call
Harriet Nash.
Busy Caterer: An Urban Pobcy reception dinner on Oct.
26 is the first event of the season to be catered by Bill Goldring.
vice president of catering at the Konover Hotel. No job is too
small or too large for Goldring. who has arranged parties for up
to 3.000 people. Goldring also will cater the Pacesetters dinner of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation on Nov. 20.
Named Director: Sen. Sherman S. Winn. District 34. State
of Florida, has been named executive director of the Sunny Isles
Resort Association. When Winn assumes his new position on
Nov. 1. he will relinquish his post as executive director of The
Balmoral of Bal Harbour, a position he has held for 21 years.
Charles Rosen, president of the Sunny Isles Resort Association,
said Because of Winn's long-time tourism experience, we
believe that the Sunny Isles area will become even more im-
portant in domestic as well as international tourism."
Promoted to Sergeant: Edward A. Zehler. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Edward F. Zeitler of North Miami, has been promoted to
the rank of master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. Sgt. Zeitler is
an air traffic control technician with a unit of the Air Force
Communications Service at Yokota Air Base, Fussa, Japan.
Public Health Trust: Catherine H. Fahringer is the chair-
man of the board of trustees. Public Health Trust of Dade
County, for 1979-80. Other officers, elected to the board which
governs Jackson Memorial Hospital, include vice chairman, R.
Bunn Gautier, Jr.; secretary. Sue Rose Samuels; and treasurer.
Enrique Viciana. Michael Shores was elected member-at-large of
the Executive Committee.
Blood Drive: From 9 a.m. through noon Sunday, Oct. 28,
Mt. Sinai's Blood Mobile Unit will be at Temple Zion. Harvey
Rashkind, president of Temple Zion's Men's Club, announced
that a special committee will be on hand to assist and serve
breakfast. The need (for blood) is great the deed (for donors)
is greater.'' continued Rashkind. extending an open invitation to
the public to take part.
Spirit of Life: Bfll Klein,
vice president for industrial
development at Florida
Power & Light Co., will be
honored by the Teddy Grant
chapter of the City of Hope
Jan. 12 at the Carillon Hotel.
He is this year's winner of
the Spirit of Life Award.
Klein
Scholar's Grants: Almost 500 student- from Dade County
public and private schools accepted Scholar's Grants from
Miami-Dade Community College for the f;Ul 1979 term. The
Scholar's Grant is awarded to students who graduate among the
top 10 percent of their class in Dade County schools. A part of
the college's Emphasis on Excellence Program, the scholar's
Grant amounts to the waiving of matriculation fees for students
enrolling at any of Miami-Dade's four campuses. Based on
performance requirements at Miami-Dade, Scholar's Grant
recipients may retain their grant until completion of an associate
degree.
Rosen Honored: Homecoming, the annual college festival
where the past is revered, the present celebrated and the future
extolled, takes place at the University of Miami through Oct. 20.
Honored guests include Bernie Rosen, sports director, WTVJ-
TV.ChanneU.
Wolfson Forum: Nature's Answer to Hair Loss" will be the
topic at the Dr. Abraham Wolfson Forum on Thursday, Nov 1
at 10 a.m. at the Washington Federal Bank, 1234 Washington
Ave., Miami Beach. On Nov. 8, Larry Starr will speak on "Stash
Your Cash."
Open Offices: Dr. and Mrs. Louis (Rose) Coverman of Coral
Gables announce with pride that their sons have opened offices
in dermatology Dr. Michael Coverman in Austin, Tex., and
Dr. Randy Coverman in Altamonte Springs.
Breaking In: Florida International University's Inter-
national Institute for Creative Communications and a New York
non-profit literary agency, Writers Unlimited, will sponsor a
conference entitled "Breaking In: How to Sell Your Writing "
including major editors, agencies and authors. The conference
will be at the Gait Ocean Mile Hotel, Fort Lauderdale, Nov. 10
and 11.
Lodge Observes 25th Anniversary
The Mel Feigeles-North Dade
Lodge of B'nai Brith will
celebrate its silver anniversary
with a dinner-dance on Saturday,
Oct. 27, at the Hillcrest Country
Club, Hollywood. For further
information and tickets, call
president Newt Hofstadter.
Mizrachi Young Adults to Meet
American Mizrachi Young
Adults will meet on Monday,
Oct. 29, at 8 p.m. in the Tavern
Room, Jefferson National Bank,
301 41st St., Miami Beach. A
certified sex therapist and
Square Dance Set
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El of Hollywood is sponsoring a
barbecue and square dance with a
professional caller Saturday,
Nov. 3, on the Temple Beth El
grounds.
psychologist will be the guest
speaker on "Accepting Your
Sexuality."
Young adults between 18-35
are welcome. Rebecca Babouri
and Carol Flatto are chairmen.
Sky Lake Synagogue Sister-
hood plans a card party on
Monday, Oct. 29, at noon at the
synagogue.
Committee Named for Chamber Dinner
Norman B ram an. chairman of
the Florida-Israel Chamber of
Commerce Dinner, has an-
nounced the committee on dinner
arrangements for the annual
dinner to be held on Nov. 8 at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
As associate chairperson, he
has appointed Mrs. Albert
Rosenberg. Sol Schreiber and
Sam B. Topf. The committee
consists of the following:
Rabbi Maver Abramowitx. L Jules
Arkin Menachem BenBaaaat. Marshal.
Berkson J Frednc Blitziiein. Mrs
Philip Bloom. David Braun. Alua
Brenner Jesse Casselhoff. Gerald
Engei Mrs Aaron Fair. Dr George
Feidenkreis Martin Fine David B
Fleeman. Dr Edward Fox. Robert
Frehling. Max Friedman Morris
Fulernick. Stanley Gilbert Barton
Goldberg J ArUiur Goldberg. Marvin
Goldman Mrs Sol Goldstein Sen. Jack
Gordon. Herbert Gruber. Milton
Hecker. Barry Hersh and Ttbor Hollo
Gua Jacobson Irvine Kaplan.
Melvin L. Kartaner. Jonathan I KUlak
Steven Kravltz. Bert Kurland. Sidney
Leicourt. Harry A iHapi Levy. Joel
Levy. Richard Levy Norman H Llpoff.
Joseph Sevel. Samuel J. Rabin. Harry
Rich. Mrs Norman Robblns. Herschel
Rosenthai. Arthur S Roslchan. Barry
Ross. Robert Russell. Mrs Robert
Russell. Commissioner Barry D
Schreiber. Kenneth J Schwartz. Morton
Silberman. Harry B Smith. Mrs Harry
B Smith. Arthur Stein. Arnold J Stem.
Hyman Wiener and Morton B Zemel.
The program will consist of an
address by Ephraim Evron. the
newly appointed Ambassador of
Israel to the United States, who
is making his first official visit to
the chamber on this occasion.
Leonard Luria will be
presented with the Chamber Man
of the Year Award in recognition
of his dedicated efforts on behalf
of the State of Israel.
Judaic Studies
Program Offered
Tochnit Yud Gimel. a second
semester program of Judaic and
Eretz Yisrael studies in Israel,
geared to the outstanding
American Yeshiva High school
senior, will offer collegiate
courses at 15 higher institutes of
learning in Israel, according to
Moshe Ishon, director of the
Torah Education and Culture
Department of the World Zionist
Organization American
Section.
The Israel Torah Study
Program will admit students of
over 20 American Yeshiva High
Schools who have completed
their general high school course
of study by January and will
meet the other eligibility
requirements of the program
which is coordinated by Torah
Department co-director Rabbi
Mallen Galinsky.
Over 200 students participated
in the Yud Gimel programs
during 1979, and preparations are
now being made to accommodate
350 during 1980. The participants
will depart for Israel on Jan. 30
and return in June, July or
August.
Applications for the Yud Gimel
program can be obtained from
Yeshiva High School principals
or from the Torah Education
Department of the WZO at 515
Park Ave, New York, N.Y.
10022. A descriptive brochure
outlining the details of the
various programs is also
available.
Preparing {or the annual dinner on Xov. 8 are standing ifrom
left to right) Arthur S. Rosichan, president; Ruth Rosenberg
co-chairperson; Marvin Goldman, vice president; First Row-
Judith A/. Zemel, executive director; Sam B. Topi, ike
president and co-chairperson and Sol Schreiber, co-chairperson
Samuel Matters
Announce Birth
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C.
Matter announce the birth of
their son. Jason Eric, on Oct.
2. Maternal grandparents are
Arthur Selevan and the late
Beatrice Selevan. Paternal
grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. David Matter.
Runs for Office
Patricia M. Kolski is a can-
didate for the Miami City
Commission, Group 2. A native
and life-long resident of northeast
Miami, she has served on the
Zoning Board.
jy b'ationalJewish Organization
EJ Seeking
^ District Executive Director
Please send resume to:
P.O. Box 6253
K[ Hollywood. Fla. 33021
E-XEELLENTEANTBR
Beautiful voice,
Seeking
Year-Round
Position
Call 754 8189
Help Wanted
Baby care, light domes-
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WE GIVE COMPLETE AND DETAILED CERTIFICATES OF APPRAISAL
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For Further Information


October 26,1979
JtrtstJhrkMatri
Page 9-B
ss
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Page 10-B
* Jen is tkjridiaiii
Friday, October 26
Douglas Gardens Auxiliaru
Special Events Set
The Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary, Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. Douglas
Garden-, will hold its first birth-
day party of the new season on
Sunda Oct. 28. at 2 p.m.. in the
Rub> Auditorium, for the
residents of the Home.
Anna Singer, board member,
will sponsor this party Zelda
Thau, president of the Auxiliary,
will meet and greet the guests.
A musical program has been
arranged by Frances Makovsky.
program chairman. Tony Simone.
who has just returned from a tour
of Europe, will entertain.
The public is invited. Refresh-
ments will be served.
The Auxiliary will hold its
luncheon meeting on Tuesday.
Oct. 30. at noon at the Delano
Hotel.
Sophie Weiss, the New Year's
project chairman, will give the
invocation. Gifts will be awarded
to the people holding the lucky
numbers from the New Year's
project Reservations should be
made early by calling Anne
Tanenbauni. Ellen Franklin.
Henney Jaffee or Rose Metzger.
Horatio Alger Awards to Floridians
National leaders of business
Dr. Norman Vincent Peale will
present Horatio Alger Bronze
Award' to Shepard Broad, chair-
man of the board. American
Savings and I-oan Association:
Nick A. Caporella. presi-
dent chief executive officer.
Burnup & Sims. Inc.; and Joseph
Robbie, president owner. Miami
Dolphins, at the Omni Inter-
national Hotel on Wednesday
evening. Oct. 31. Carlos J. Arbo-
leya. president and chief
operating officer of Barnett
Bank- : Miami, will preside.
and industry will pay tribute to
modern-day Horatio Algers who
have made a success of their lives
through America's free enterprise
system. Others to be honored
are: E. Y Harburg. lyricist.
writer, lecturer. TV personality:
Carl N. Karcher. presi-
dent chairman of the board.
Carl Karcher Enterprises. Inc.:
Jack LaLanne. president owner.
the Jack LaLanne Company:
Abraham Lincoln Marovitz.
senior U.S. District Court Judge.
Northern District of Illinois.
Mae Schreiber Visits JWV Groups
Mae Schreiber. president of the
Department of Florida Ladies
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans
of the United States, together
Orseck Memorial
Tennis Event
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida announce
that the first Robert Orseck
Memorial Junior Singles Cham-
pionship will be held Nov. 3
through 5 at the Michael-Ann
Russell JCC Branch. North
Miami Beach.
This annual event is expected
to attract Florida state top rank
players and is sanctioned by the
U. S. Tennis Association and the
Florida Tennis Association.
Ranking class children. 16
years old and under, will be par-
ticipating.
Registration is limited, and
entry deadline is Monday, Oct.
29, 6 p.m. Chuck Gately,
Michael-Ann Russell JCC tennis
pro, can be telephoned for further
information.
with her official staff, will make
her official visit to the Hialeah-
Miami Springs Auxiliary 681 on
Sunday morning Nov. 4.
She will make an official visit
with her staff on Wednesday
Nov. 7, at noon to the West Palm
Beach Auxiliary No. 408. In the
evening she will attend the first
Joint Department Convention
meeting.
On Oct. 24 she visited West
Miami Auxiliary No. 223.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN

B. L. Dady, director of
management control and ser-
vices for Florida Power &
J/tfht- Company, was elected
^mAce president by the utility's
* board of directors. Dady
joined FPL in 1972 as
manager of management con-
trol, and was named director
of management control the
following year. He is assistant
corporate secretary and serves
as chairman of FPUs Budget
Committee.
21 yea is
catiiinc to
TNI IA
MIIIVAH MT
NATIONAl BRANDS
Pierre Cordin
Palm Beach
(Others
Regulars
Kopel Tours Offers
Israel-Egypt Cruise
Bruce Steinberg, technical
director designer of the Ten-
nessee Williams Repertory
Company in Key West, will
speak on The Fine Arts of
Beth David series "Ap-
preciation of Theater from
Shakespeare to Simon" on
Wednesday. Oct. 31. 7:45 to 9
p.m.. at Beth David's South
Campus. 7500 SW 120th St..
Miami. Steinberg will discuss
"Key West Theatrical
Treasure Reborn." Tickets arc
available at the door. For
nnitration and further infor-
mation, call Beth David Con-
gregation.
Israelite Center
Temple Events
The tir--i late service of the
season at the Israelite (enter
Temple is planned Fridav. Oct.
26,at 8:15p.m.
Rabbi Solomon Waldenberg
will conduct the services with
Cantor Hyman Lifshin rendering
the liturgy, assisted by Sol
Koenigs berg.
Rabbi Waldenberg. Cantor
Lifshin and Konigsberg will be
honored at the first Si-terhood
luncheon of the season on
Tuesday. Oct. 30. at noon.
Adult education classes will
begin on Wednesday. Oct. 31.
from 1 to 3 p.m. in the social hall.
Call the office to register.
'Kopel Tours." wholesale tour
operator with 17 offices in Israel,
plus offices in Frankfurt. Lon-
don. New York and now Miami,
introduces a cruise program from
Israel to Egvpt on the deluxe
ship.TS. -Melody.''
The announcement was made
by Michael Stolowitzky,
executive vice president of Kopel
Tours. Inc.. Miami.
He said that since the Egypt-
Israel peace treaty was signed, a
visit to the Nile country has
become increasingly popular.
The T.S. Melody" will be a
floating hotel and shore ex-
cursions will be made from the
ship. The ship will leave the port
of Ashdod on a Wednesday at 6
p.m. and will go to Alexandria
where shore excursions will be
available to Alexandria and
Alamein. then on to the port of
Suez to visit Cairo and the
Pyramids. Then to the port of
Safaga to visit Luxor and
Hurgada. arriving port of Eilat
the following Wednesday at 10
a.m.

Michael Stolowittk\
The entire ship was fully air-
conditioned and refurbished this
year. Travelers will he able to
tour Israel before or after theI
cruise and combine u nine-night
tour of Israel. The -hip sailing
time and the nine-night Israel
tour both coincide with El Al'il
Tuesday departure from Miami
tur Urael.
Seminary Leader to
Speak at Emanu-El
Dr. Bernard Mandelhaum.
president emeritus of the Jewish
Theological Seminar, of America
and executive vice president of
the Synagogue Council ot Amer-
ica will be the guest speaker
Wednesday, Ocl 31, at an 8 p.m.
reception in the Friedland Ball-
room of Temple Emanu-Fl ot
(ireater Miami.
The session will honor Dr.
Irving I^-hrman. rabbi of Temple
Kmanu-EI and former national
president of the Synagogue
Council, on the occasion of the
publication of his book. In The
Name <; God, by Bloch Pub-
lishing Co.
Carol Greenberg, president of
the congregation, said the
meeting is open to the public.
Dr. Mandelhaum. who directs
operations of the S) nagogue
Council, coordinating body for
Orthodox. Conservative and
Reform Judaism in the United
States, is past president of the
Jewish Theological Seminary
where he was seminar, professor
in homiletics and reader in Mid-
rash. He was previously provost
ol the seminary and from 1951 to
1961 was dean of students at the
seminarv's rabbinical >chool.
Demetrio Perez, Jr.
Candidate for
Miami City Commission
Croup 2
Proudly announces
the appointment
of his campaign
co-chairmen
Tod Aronovitz
Outstanding Attorney, Civic Leader
Mrs. Athalie Range
Former Member of cov. Askews Cabinet
Former Miami City Commissioner
DEMETRIO PEREZ, JR
WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR VOTE NOV. 6 PUNCH 17
FOR MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, CROUP 2
iPaia Pol AOv 0v the oemetrio Perez Jr. campaign Fund, Bruno Barreiro Treasurer)


'm^y, October 26,1979
+Jewist florid/an
Page 1 IB
"Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Noah
NOAH Adam and Eve had children and grandchildren, and
nfople multiplied upon the face of the earth. But they became
^rked. until God was sorry that He had created man.
Onlv one man was worthy in the eyes of God, and that was
Noah. SoG'Hi said to Noah:
"I have decided to send a flood of water upon the earth to
,iMr, ,.' living thing. But I will save you and your family."
God instructed Noah in the making of an Ark, to be 450 feet
, ; |e, and 45 feet high. Noah boarded the Ark with
hjj wife and ( hildren and took along pairs of every sort of living
thing with him, male and female of each kind, and food to keep
them alive.
Then it rained for 40 days and nights. Every living creature
was drowned in the flood. And God remembered Noah. The
waters went down and Noah stepped out on dry land.
God said in His heart: "I will never again destroy living
things as 1 have done." God then spoke to Noah: "I set My
rainbow in the clouds to be a symbol of My promise to you.
Whenever 1 will look upon it, I will remember the everlasting
agreement between Me and every living creature." (Genesis
6:9-11:32)
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ol the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman-
Tumir, Si5. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Line. New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
B'nai Mitzvah
BENJAMIN FISTEL
On Saturday. Oct. 20, 3en-
Ijamin Fistel. son of Mr. and Mrs.
(Ralph Fistel of Miami, was called
Ito the Torah as Bar Mitzvah at
|Temple0r01om.
Benjamin represented the fifth
[member of his family to be Bar or
|Bat Mitzvahed at Temple Or
Jlom. His three brothers and
|sister had preceded him over the
past several years. They all
oined Benjamin at the podium in
Ringing the final hymn.
The celebrant is a student at
Mfesl Miami Junior High School.
Where he is .i member of United
Synagogue Youth, Westchester
pptimists football team and
plays piano in the band.
A Kiddush luncheon was
kerved following services and a
paturda;. night pizza and pinball
pan;, was held at his home.
Among ihi- guests were grand-
parents, Mrs Hee Lemelman and
Wr. and Mrs. Fred Sandier; and
r-ousins. Fanny. Norman and
HillieUrad lr.nr. Toronto; Naomi
Bnd Alan Teperow, sister and
pother-in-law from Atlanta;
pousin Lois Gold of Gainesville
nd cousin Harriet Gold from
Tampa.
BARRY MOSKOWITZ
Barry Moskowitz, son of
oandra and David Moskowitz,
Fffl be called to the Torah in
ponor of his Bar Mitzvah, at
Remple Beth Tov Saturday, Oct.
*'.at9a.m.
i..B"!y is l the eighth grade at
McMillan Junior High. He is
Wive m all sports and is a mem-.
of a football league. Barry
P'ays the guitar.
Barry will conduct the service
F Beth Tov Friday, Oct. 26, at
* 'a p.m. At the conclusion of the
?" Mitzvah ceremony Saturday,
*' 2i. a Kiddush will be hosted
Michn parents and his sister
hAreception wi" be held m the
fwbranfs honor, Saturday
fining at the Winston Park
} ountry Club.
Among the honored guests
lading the Bar Mitzvah will
narry s grandparents, Mr. and
nd wlchael Cassorla and Mr.
j Mrs- Morris Moskowitz.
un,7, saunts and uncles are: Mr.
Kd M Robert Caplan, Mr. and
ll 'iarr>' B^^n. Mr. and Mrs.
qIv r!dberg' Mr and Mrs-
Mav' Cassorla, and Samuel
Powitz. Barry s father,
via Moskowitz, is president of
pemple Beth Tov.
. STEPHAN FRANK
J?leP"n Jon Frank, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Gary Frank, will be
called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 27, at 9
a.m. at Beth David Con-
gregation.
The celebrant is a student in
the prt-confirmation class and is
active in Beth David USY. He
attends Palmetto Junior High
School where he is in the eighth
grade.
Dr. and Mrs. Frank will host
the Kiddush following the ser-
vices in honor of the occasion and
a luncheon following at Kings
Bay Country Club.
Special guests will include
grandparents: Mr. and Mrs.
Kdward Cohen of North Miami
Beach; Mr. and Mrs. Barney
Frank of F'reehold. N.J.: and
relatives: Mr. and Mrs. Dave
Pollock and Mrs. Clem Perlman.
all of Philadelphia. Pa., and Mr.
and Mrs. Leon Wolf and sons, of
Tamarac.
STEPHANIK SHERMAN
Sabbath morning services will
be held on Oct. 27 at Temple
Sinai at which time Stephanie
Sherman, the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Meyer Sherman, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah.
Chug Aliyah
The next general meeting of
the South Florida Chug Aliyah
will feature a special presentation
by Avraham Frank, Israel Aliyah
Center"s employment specialist
in North America. The session
will be Sunday, Oct. 28, at 7:30
p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
6:24
5HESHVAN-5740
J
RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY
f
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGATION
995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION, 253.'
SW 19thAve. Conservative.
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
'0755 SW ll?th St Liberal Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoft (3 A)
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Drive Dr. Herbert
South Miami 447 5587 Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
I Mitchell Chetitz, Associate Rabbi
Friday service-8 30 p.m.
Rabbi Chefiti
will preach on
"The Story of Noah:
When God Goes Away"
B'NAI SEPHARDIM. 44 NW 150th St.,
Miami Beach. "Traditional services
betore sundown.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL, 1545 Jet
terson Ave., Miami Beach, Conser
vative Rabbi Dr Ephraim F.
Mandelcorn. Cantor Saul H Breeh.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA
TION 843 Meridian Ave, Orthodox
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig (22 A)
BETH DAVID
Miami s Historic
Conservative Congregation
Dr Sol Landau, Stanley R. Gerstein
Rabbi Assistant Rabbi
HaiianWm. W. Lipson
CORAL WAY 2425 SW 3rd Ave.
'hone: 854-3911 Daily Services
Morning and Evening
Coral Way Main Sanctuary
Saturday moming-9a.m.
Beth David
South Dade Campus 7500 SV- >th St.
Late Shabbat Evenings :es
Friday Night 8 15 p.
"3ETH TFILAH CONGREGATION. 935
Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Israel
M Tropper Cantor Henry Fuchs.
CHABAD HOUSE 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox Rabbi Joseph Biston. (441
BETHKODESH
Modern Traditional 858 4334
1101 SW 12th Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro I Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Daily Minyon tor Yahneiten
Daily 7:45 a.m. A 6:30 p.m.
Saturday service-8:45a.m.
BETH TOV TEMPLE,4438 SW8th St
Rabbi Charles M. Rubel Cantor|
William Golembe. (8)
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE, 7600
SW 123rd Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. (8 A)
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN
TER, Florida International Univer
sity, Tamiami Trail, Building PC 245,
Rabbi Denny Wald, director.
FEMPLE ISRAEL of Greater Miami,
South Florida's Pioneer Reform
Synagogue, 137 NE 19th St., Miami
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. Cantor Jacob
G.Bornstein.
SRAEL TEMPLE KENDALL. 9990 N.
Kendall Drive Rabbis Joseph Narot,
Brett Goldstein.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Avenue at 41 st St.
Dr. LeonKromsh 538 7231 Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frietav. 8.15 P.m.
:UBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1700 Michigan Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Dow Rozencwaig. (23)
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREATION. 715 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Melamed. (23 A)
TALMUDIC COLLEG !
1910 Alton Road. .
YochananZweig.
F FLORIDA,
nodox Rabbi
TEMPLE EMANU-EL Conservative
of Greater Miami 5M-2S03
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
Dr. I rving Lehrman, Rabbi
ZvlAdler, Cantor
Friday service-4 p.m.
Saturday service 9 a.m.
Dr. Irving Lehrman
will preach at 10:30a.m.
Installation of officers,
United Synagogue Youth ____
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Chaim Moshe K ovacs.
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE. 5445
Collins Avenue. Conservative. Rabbi
Maurice Klein. Cantor Eugene Roth.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. (25)
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3715 SW 25th
St. Conservative Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberq. Cantor Hyman Lifshin
(11). ------------
OR OLOM TEMPLE 8755 Sw 16th SI
Conservative Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Cantor P. Hillel Brummer. (13)
SAMU EL TEMPLE, 8900 SW 107th
Av ->nd Floor. Conservative.
...win P. Farber (9")
SYNAGOGUE OF KENDALE LAKES
CHABAD. 14456 Kendale Lakes Blvd.,
Miami 33183. Orthodox. Rabbi Shmuel
Mendelsohn.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
14200 Blacayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla. 33137 57
Rabbi Solomon Schltl.
Executive Vice President
UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW |
CONGREGATION
119 E. Flagler St.. Miami. Fla. 33131 379-45531
Rabbi Lewis E. Bogaoe Director Union ofl
American Hebrew Conaregetior-
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St, North Miami Beech FlaJ
33182 947-094. Rabbi Seymour FrledminJ
Eecuttve Director
TEMPLE ZION
Conservative
000 Miller DrivePhone 271-2311
Dr. Norman N.Shapiro, Rabbi
Cantor Ben Dickson
AvronSmolensky Musical Director
Janet Stone-Early Childhood Director
Dorothy H. Grant-Executive Director
Thursday, Oct. 25, 7 a.m., Minyan
services. Friday, Oct. 26, 1:15 p.m..
Sabbath evening services, Dr. Norman
N. Shapiro officiating. Cantor Ben Dick-
son chants liturgy. Choir directed by
Avron Smolensky, music director. Adult
Institute Forum guest speaker, Gayle
Carson. Saturday, Oct. 27, 9 a.m.. Sab-
bath morning services. Bar Mitzvah:
Keith Pasternak, son of Mr. and Mrs. A.
Pasternak; Bat Mitzvah: Susan Paster-
nak, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Pas-
ternak. Sunday, Oct. 28, 9 a.m.. Men's
Club, blood bank, breakfast. Monday,
Oct. 29,7 30 p.m., U S Y Kadima
MIAMI LAKE},
IKINNERETH CONGREGATION. 1550
West 84 St. Rabbi Bernard A. Silver.
Conservative.
HIALEAH
ITIFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Nathan H. Zwitman(15)
NORTH MIAMI
|BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rabbi
Louis Lederman. Rabbi Emeritus
Joseph Gortinkle. Cantor Moshe
1 Friedler. (35)_______
MIAMI BEACH
fcGUDATH ISRAEL 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N Ever.
(17)
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. (5)
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. (18)
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swrisky Cantor Maurice Mamches.
(19) __
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washinqton Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibor H. Stern
Cantor Meyer Engel. (26)
-KING SOLOMON TEMPLE. 910
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab Cantor Norman
Brody
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi David Lehrfield.
CantorAbrahamSeif (27)
LUBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Korf. (67)
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz. Cantor NicoFeldman.
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. (29)
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 7800 Hispanola Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Marvin Rose.
Cantor Murray Yavneh. (32 A)
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A.
Weberman. Cantor Sydney W.
Feinsmith. (80)
OHR HACHAIM CONGREGATION. 317
47 St. Rabbi Rashi Y. Shapiro,
spiritual leader. Rabbi Tsvi G. Schur,
rabbi emeritus. Orthodox.
PAVILION HEBREW STUDY GROUP.
5601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
Conservative. Rabbi Nathan Zoion
dek.
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER OF
GREATER MIAMI, INC., 645 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach. English speaking
Sephardic Temple. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmias. (31)
/VEST AVENUE JEWISH CENTER.
1140 Alton Road. Orthodox. Rabbi
Shoiom D. Lipskar, Rabbi Yitzchok
Marcus, assistant rabbi.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
'ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conservative
'Cantor Ian Alpern. (33)
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. (33 A)
BETH TORAH 947-752*
CONGREGATION Conservative
1051 N.Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Cantor Zvee Aroni
Daily Chapel Services 7:30 a.m., 5 30 p.m
Sabbath morning services 8:30 a.m.
Friday evening
Bat Mitzvah-Sherri Zuckerman
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER. 2972
Aventura Blvd., North Miami Beach
Conservative Rabbi David B. Saltz
man. Cantor Lawrence Tuchinsky
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE 200178th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Jacob S. Green
Cantor Yehouda'Binyamin (22 B)
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTF R, 571
NE 171st St. Rabbi NesimGan .ac*.
ISHAARAYTEFILA, 17000NE" Ave.,
North Miami Beach.
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH ADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave Reform Ralph P. Kinqsley Rabbi j an I
Cook. Cantor I rving Shulkes
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE M NE
183rd St. Orthodox. RaL Dov
Bidnick. (38)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GR rER
MIAMI 990 NE 171 St St 0 idox
RabbiZevLett (39)
CHABAD HOUSE JEWISH STi SNT
CENTER University of Mia' 1540
Albenga Ave, Coral Gable -ibbi
David Eleizrie. director
CORALGABLES
HILLLL JEWISH STUDEN CEN
TER, COLLEGE STI ENT
SYNAGOGUE. University ot iami
1100 Miller Drive. Director orton
A roll.
CHABAD OF NORTH DADE, 2 0 NE
202nd St., North Miami Beach Rabbi
C. Bruswankin, director.
TEMPLE JUDEA
SSOO Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 647-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Serving Coral Gables
and the Southwest area
I mmediate Membership
Available
Friday Services-8:15 p.m
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Dr. Akiva
Brillant. Cantor Louis Hershman.
(41)
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. (50)
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER. 183
NE 8 St. Conservative. Rabbi Sher
man Kirshner. (51)
HOLLYWOOD
|BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47 B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
1 Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45) I
|BETH SHALOM TEMPLE 4601
Arthur St. Conservative Rabbi
Morton Malavsky Cantor Irving
Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE 1201 Johnson St. Con
servatJVe. Rnbbi Sevmour Friedman
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Naftaly Lmkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL 5100 Sheridan St.,
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S Nob Hill Rd Liberal
Retorm. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGO
GUE 7473NW4thSt. (69)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
I Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. President Joseph Lovy.
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREGATION. 7640
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph E. Berglas.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER, 6101
NW 9 St. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Solomon Geld. Cantor Max Gallub.
(44B).
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 1 lth Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. (49)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE, 3291 Sterling
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe E.
Bomzer.
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform. Rabbi Leonard Zoll.
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Dr.
CarlKlein, Ph.D., D.D., Rabbi. (12)
PEMBROKE PINES
BETH EMET TEMPLE. Pines Mid
die School. Liberal Reform. Rabbi
Bennett Greenspon, ed. dir.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Stir
ling Rd. Conservative. Rabbi Ber
nard P. Shoter. Cantor Bernard
I Engel
FORTLAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. (42)
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Jeffrey Ballon. Cantor Jerome
Klement. (43i
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL TEMPLE.
4351 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Orthodox.
Rabbi Saul D. Herman
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. (44-A)


Page 12-B
+Jenisi> fhrkBar
Friday, October
26.

*-..
ORT Conclave in Boston
Several members of the
District VI Executive Committee
from the Miami area are among
some 1.500 delegates attending
the 25th Biennial National
Convention of Women's
American ORT meeting this
week in Boston.
District VI Executive Com-
mittee members of the delegation
are: Ruth Rothfarb. president;
Marcia Light, chairman of
Executive Committee: Ruth
Wilkes. Promotions Sub-
Committee chairman: Jeanne
Wormser. bulletin chairman and
district delegation convention
chairman: Bert Zalles. financial
secretary. Jean Zugman.
treasurer: Beverly Aaron.
American affairs and centennial
chainr.--. Selrr.a Biller. ex-
pansion chairman: Esther B:
program: Evan Delle:
public::;, chair-
-..- Pepi 1 inaj l '-- initj
Sub-' mm it I chairman:
Marcia Kerstein. L'JA and Is
Bonds chairman: Zelda Magid.
Administrative Sub-Committee
chairperson: Marcia Marx.
Bramson and retail enterprise
chairman; Lil Rosenblatt. Jewish
community relations chairman:
Diana Saunders. Education Sub-
Committee chairman: Rita
Weinstem. Speaker's Bureau.
There are a total of 160
delegates from District VI which
includes Florida. Georgia.
Tennessee. Alabama. Kentucky.
South Carolina. North Carolina.
Ruth Rothfarb. who heads
District VI delegation, said
"WAO's crucial 25th Biennial
National Convention will usher in
100 years of ORT s global
vocational and technical
education for the Jewish people.
For the past century, we have
served the needs of Jews
a here in the world and built
a magnificent program in Israel
has become a major force
m the country's socio-economic
life.
Business Notes
Morris N. Broad, president of American Savings and Loan
Association of Florida, has announced that American Savings
net earnings for the fiscal year ended, Sept. 30 were $14,229,177
or $6.34 per share.
Included in the year's earnings were $2,684,480 or $1.20 per
share derived from net non-operating income. Earnings from
continuing operations for the fiscal year were $11,544,697 or
$5.14 per share, up 24.4 percent from $9,278,463 or $4.22 per
share earned during the fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1978. Earn-
ings for fiscal year 1979 are now under the year end audit. Per
share figures do not reflect the 10 percent stock dividend
previously announced but not yet paid.
American Savings is the fourth largest savings and loan
association in the state of Florida and the 28th largest in the
United States. American Savings' common stock is listed and
traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol
AAA.
Americar. Savings currently operates 27 offices in South
Florida, including 11 offices in Dade County, 13 offices in
Broward County and three offices in Palm Beach County.
American Savings will shortly open two new branch offices on
Florida's Gulf Coast located in Port Charlotte and Venice.
American Savings anticipates opening 10 new offices in the
coming year. American Savings' subsidiaries, American
Savings Mortgage Corporation and American Southern Mort-
gage Corporation, operate 10 mortgage origination offices in
Florida, Georgia and Texas.
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., a registered bank holding company
headquartered in Miami Beach, announced increases in
operating income, assets, loans and deposits for the nine months
ended Sept. 30, compared to the same period last year.
Total consolidated assets for Jefferson Bancorp, Inc. and
subsidiaries increased 3 percent from $166,783,444 in 1978 to
$172,424,602 as of Sept. 30. Deposits rose from $127,828,646 as
of Sept. 30, 1978, to $142,500,933 for this year, an increase of 11
percent. Gross loans outstanding increased from $111,620,354 in
1978 to $112,405,531 in 1979, an increase of 1 percent. Stock-
holders' equity increased by 9 percent, moving from $9,972,861
($8.90 per share) at Sept. 30, 1978 to $10,895,168 ($9.73 per
share) this year.
Jefferson Bancorp has three Jefferson National Bank
subsidiaries which operate seven banking offices: two in Miami
Beach, two in Kendall, two in Sunny Isles, and one on Key
Biscayne. A previously operated branch of the Miami Beach
bank, located in Hialeah, was closed during the third quarter
and the real estate it occupied and other fixed assets were sold at
a profit of $216,700 before income taxes. A new branch of the
Miami Beach bank will be opened on Normandy Isle, Miami
Beach, later this year.
Collectibles on Display
What started out as idle conversation about a
recent newspaper story on collectibles grew into a
major exhibition at Temple Judea Sisterhood's
first meeting, their paid-up membership lun-
cheon. Oct. 17.
When president Laurel Shapiro and program
vice president Ernestine Richman started asking
around, they found that members had collections
ranging from bric-a-brac to 14th Century ar-
tifacts, from political buttons to button hooks,
from comic books to gourmet cookbooks.
Other collections include pewter, owls, shoes
I from antiquity to the present, of many odd
materials), salt dishes, rocks, semi-precious
stones, spoons, keys, tie clasps, watches and
clocks. Some of them will need vans to be trans-
ported to the temple at 5500 Granada Blvd .Coral ; from around the world display their coats of arms.
Gables, for the affair.
THE RABBI'S wife Nancy Eisenstat. uses her
collections to decorate her home. In the den. she
has knick-knack animals, artistically displayed in
type trays, on two walls. Her watches are
displayed in lucite frames, including pocket
watches and two original Mickey Mouse wrist
watches. From the ceiling in the kitchen hang
assorted odd wicker baskets. Miniature spoons
adorn her dining room wall.
many others in collecting them. A Hahn
project is their complete collection of "
baby and miniature shells, of which thev are o
proud.
Friends of Ruth Sheldon know what to brim I
her when they travel. She's been senoush
collecting spoons for the past nine vears. but it
really began with three souvenirs purchased bv
her father-in-law when he was stationed in Turkey
during World War I. These, the prize of her
collection, have enameled illustrations of Turkish
life in their bowls, one has the handle formed from
a star and crescent, another handle is of Arabic
writing. An Ecuadorian coin, hammered out to I
form the bowl, distinguishes a spoon from that
nation. Spoons from other countries and cities
Margy Hahn is an avid collector. She haunts
garage sales and thrift shops in her search for salt
dishes. Two glass dishes from Austria, given to
her by her great-grandmother, started it all when
she was still a teenager. Now she has pieces from
many countries, in wood, porcelain, glass, metal,
with prizes such as a 150-year-old dish from
Hungary, two early Limoges dating back to the
mid-1800s and a rare Early American green
hobnail glass salt dish. Margy will often give salt
dishes on gift giving occasions and has started
Mrs. Shapiro displayed some of the 50o|
foreign and American dolls from the collection of I
her daughters Lisa and Linda. T already!
won prizes at the Citv of Miami International!
Folk Festival and local doll shows The collection!
started with Japanese dolls and now rar.ge across!
Asia. A rare ceremonial doll of the Andes Indians!
is among those from South America
HARDWARE dealers' convent, ns whichherl
husband attended contributed a collection of tie I
clasps to Gladys Erdheim.
"I've been picking up cookbooks for vears,
said Barbara Goodman, and never thought of I
myself as a collector." Hers is a practical
collection for both she and her husband enjov
gourmet cooking and belong to a group that
meets periodically to dine on their creations..
Chairpersons of the day were Evelvn Slntlm
and Carol Goldenblank. tkm
Greenfield Series to Open on Oct. 28
Sunday morning. Oct. 28. at 10
a.m. will mark the opening of the
15th annual Eugene and Shirley
Greenfield Institute for Adult
Studies at Temple Israel, as Dr.
Michael Cook, professor of
Hellenistic anil Early Christian
Literature. Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, discusses The Citation
of Jewish Scriptures in Christian
South Dade JWV
Auxiliary Meets
Evelyn Cohen, senior vice
president of the Ladies Auxiliary
of the Jewish War Veterans.
South Dade Post 778. was to
chair a board meeting to be held
on Thursday, Oct. 25 at 8 p.m. at
Temple Samu-El.
Anyone interested in joining
the Auxiliary is invited to attend
the board meeting or the regular
meetings which are held at
Temple Samu-El the second
Thursday of each month.
'Jewish Worship Hour'
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat of
Temple Judea will appear on the
"Jewish Worship Hour" on
Sunday, Oct. 28, at 8 a.m. on
WPLG, Channel 10.
MissionizJig and the Jewish
Response.
A wide range of topics of
Jewish interest will follow,
starting Nov. 4 with Rabbi David
Altshuler. chairman of Judaic
Studies and professor of history.
George Washington University:
"Holy Moses! Or How Books
Became Scripture."
On Nov. 11. Prof Robert G.I
Jones, chairman. Department of I
Religion. George Washington I
University, will speak onl
"Christianity Among the I
Religious Movements of tht|
Judaism of Late Antiquity.'"
Season tickets for bothl
members and non-members may I
be obtained through the temple |
office.
Ocean Point Yiddish Cultural Club
Serving the largest Yiddish
speaking community in Florida,
the Ocean Point Yiddish Cultural
Club will hold its first open
meeting of the season, its sixth
consecutive year. Friday, Nov. 2,
at 1 p.m. on Miami Beach at the
Financial Federal Building on
Washington at 8th St.
In addition to artists to
provide entertainment by
recalling favorite Yiddish songs.
Samuel Davidon will discuss in
depth the subject: "Yom Kippur
War and Its Consequences."
The climax of the afternoon
will be a reading from the classic
works of Sholom Aleichem.
The Ocean Point Club is one of
14 such culture clubs meeting il
greater Miami, preserving the I
Yiddish language; it draws froul
300 to 400 people at eveijl
meeting.
Jewish Book
Discussion Group\
Abraham Gittelson. associau
director of the Central Agency!
Jewish Education, will leadtlel
Great Jewish Book DiscusskMl
Groups on Thursday. Nov. l,l
1:30 p.m. in the Miami Beach|
Public Library
Gittelson will discuss Thti
Book of Jonah. All are wekomtl
Group coordinator is SamuJ
Reiser.
Th Jewii^lh FllcMriidliioiin
riarlli'i Mtil Ctaplttt llfllisk-ltv.sk Bit
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CocWber26.1979
* krn\t fhridliari
Pagel3-B
^kjjcjtotices
untlCE UNDER
. JParvah
l*rC "Eutious names
|inder ,vL rt b a Leisure
iTomag C0IJ j, register said
I (WWW intend'ok Qf ^
pVoCrfof Dade County,
'"^unley M.Lambert.
president
Irving M.Finn.
NOTICE UNDER
. dxourtt
|*SJ" the li.-titious name of
iMrtheMt 7Snd StrMt. Miami
IKs IUM. intends to
IS***,,ame sith-the,
I nerk of II"- CW* Court of
Lade County. Florida
I Joanna Zillcruelo
M LK8IBBSAAL
I Attorney for
I joinni ZUIeruelo
I attest Flagier street
nortdssun
LiM Oct 26;NOV 2.9.16.1979
TfrndCIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CaseNO.;9 95J3-FC-04
FAMILY DIVISION
I in BE The Marriage of
lERNESTJ OALLO
Pftltioner Husband
I and
Iblainegallo
Respondent Wife
NOTICE OF AlTION
Ito elaineoallo
252Sl'l.l'NKKTTST.
HOLLYWOOD, FLA.
I iWiO
VOI Al'.K NOTIFIED that
I ji; action for dissolution of
I marriage has been filed
plnil you and you are
[ required to serve a copy of your
I written defenses, if any. to it on
I BRIAN H UKODY. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
addrea U 883 NE 167 Street.
North Miami Beach, Florida
un or before 28 day
November 1979. and file the
| il with the clerk of this
iourt either before service on
I'dilioner or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
mil be entered against you for
'.he relief demanded in the
nimplainlor petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
csl of this Court on Oct. 18,
Itll
KICHARDP HKINKER
ts Clerk of the Court
Bj Karleen I'reece
\.-i leputy Clerk
1 IHI 26; Nov 2, 9. 16, 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Case No. 79 119*1 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE The Marriage of
UILSEDELA VEGA,
Wife
and
ANGEL DE LA VEGA.
Husband
TO ANGEL DE LA VEGA
Calixto Garcia 317
Onente.Cuba
YOU AKE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALBEKT L. CARRICARTE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2491 NW 7th Street,
Miami. Florida 33128, and file
the original with the clerk of
Uie above styled court on or
before November 29, 1979;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
1SHKLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
*l of said court at Miami,
Honda on this 19 day of
October, 1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Hade County, Florida
By Karleen Preece
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal I
Albert I. Carricarte
91 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
'hone: (306)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
0*11,7 Oct. 26; Nov. 2, 9, 16. 1979
Firr ,TICE UNDER
\,,t!T.I0US "AWE LAW
GIVBnS IS hereby
,.'Ir the undersigned,
unlK,',t,n8^ n business
RUi I. ml"' "c'tious name
\I,, '^,a,381*NE 2 Avenue,
to Z ,Honua 33137. Intends
tojregister said name with the
I, I..'" 1" c'"ult Court of
"'"'tminty. Florida
,. RCK. INC.
">'Catherine Bleemer
1'Vi.i.v ''resldent
' V tN*NEVINS
'"'or Applicant
V^1?"" Godfrey Road
"' Florida 33140
Oct. 5,12. 19,26.1979
NOTICE OF ACTION-------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13361 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
KLORRENCE MITCHELL.
Wife Petitioner,
and
HARRY MITCHELL,
Husband Respondent
TO: HARRY MITCHELL:
Respondent
1061-53rd Street
Brooklyn. NY. 11219
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on HARVEY S. SWICKLE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 382. Miami Beach,
Florida 8818V, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Nov. 16, 1979; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 4 day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD I'. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
l Circuit Court Seal I
HARVEY S. SWICKLE
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 382
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
538-5657
Attorney for Petitioner
08116Oct. 12.19.26. Nov. 2. 1971
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Roney Foods at number 2387
Collins Avenue, in the City of
Miami Beach. Florida, intends
Id legisler the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
I lateel at Miami. Florida, this
r.tlulay of October, 1979
Jaime Esquenazi
GmllermoSoslchin. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
lldl West Flagier Street
Miami. Fl.33135
08144 Oct 19. 26; Nov. 2.9,1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
DISCO ICE CREAM Intend to
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Carlos Benedetto
Maria 1. Benedetto
08098 OCt 5. 12. 19.26, 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13078 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
CARLOS M LABARCA,
Petitioner Husband,
and
BERNARDITA G. LABARCA,
Respondent. Wife.
TO BERNARDITA G.
LABARCA
Villa Santiago Amengual
Calle Dolar Canadiense
8572 San Pablo
Pudahuel,
Santiago.de Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on ARTHUR H. LIPSON,
attorney for PetlUoner, whose
address is 1515 NW 167 Street,
Suite 110-B, Miami, Florida,
33169, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
16, 1979; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of Sep-
tember, 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Ciarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
08093 Oct. 5, 12, 19,26. 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
DADE EQUIPMENT SER-
VICE at number 960 West 22nd
Street. In the City of Hlaleah.
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida. _, .,
Dated at Hlaleah Florida.
this 25 day of September, lyre.
WAYNE FOSTER, INC.
By Wayne Foster,
President
MARVIN iSKEPPARD
Attorney for Applicant
H585 Sunsel Drive-Suite 190
Miami, Florida 33143
0BU86 Oct. 5. 12. 19.2b. 19.9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE UTH JUDICIAL.
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 02
FILE NO. 79-7084
IN UK: ESTATE OF
HARRIET EDWARDS
a k a HATTIE EDWARDS.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIKD that the administration
Of the estate of HARRIET ED
WAR] )S, Deceased, File No. 79-
7086, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida.
The Personal Representative
of the estate is JOAN KLEIN,
whose address Is 430 NE 157th
Terrace, North Miami Beach,
Florida. The name and address
of the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim
must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed If the claim is not yet
due, the date when it will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the
security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
del client's will. the
qualification! of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: Oct. 26. 1979.
Joan Klein
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Harriet Edwards
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
BURTON I) GREENFIELD.
ESQ.
2500 Douglas Road-Suite B
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: 442-2122 (305i
08165 Oct. 26. Nov 2, 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7? 13988 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
DAVID BENSOL
VIVIAN JUENGER BENSOL
TO:
VIVIAN JUENGER BENSOL
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
' required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses. If
any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP. ESQ., plaintiff's
attorney, whose address Is 2355
Salzedo Street. Suite 309. Coral
Gables, Florida 33134, on or
before November 30th, 1979;
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on Oct. 18.
1979
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByG.S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
08157 Oct. 26; Nov. 2. 9, 16,1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAMELAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
LOUVRE APARTMENTS at
;I245 Darwin Street. Coconut
Grove, Florida, intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
I i.ule County. F*lorlda.
ROBERTO E SMITH. JR..
for MIGUEL T.NINO
and JOSE ANTONIO
HERNANDEZROURA
by and through
Power of Attorney
KOBERTJ MERLIN,
ESQUIRE
Attorney i"i
LOUVRE APARTMENTS
08018Ocl 12, 19.26; Nov. 2. 19
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADECOUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79-7331
Division 01
INRE: ESTATE OF
| EMMA LEE GOODWIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
|TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
I AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of EMMA LEE
GOODWIN. deceased, File
Number 79-7331. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate
I llvlslon, the address of which
is 73 W, Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida. The personal rep-
resentative of the estate Is
YVETTE SAMUELS. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
[MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB-
'LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the
Creditor or his agent or at-
torney and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet
due. the date when it will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All pei-sons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: October 26.
1979
YVETTE SAMUELS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EMMA LEE GOODWIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
COl'GI.IN AND APPLETON
1175 NE 125 St.
\ Miami FL 33161
Telphone: 891 1504
08162 Oct. 26; Nov. 2.1971
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79 1307* FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE. The marriage of
RAO.UELG. BAIRAKTARIS,
Petitioner Wife,
and
ANTONIOS BAIRAKTARIS.
Respondent Husband.
TO: ANTONIOS
BAIRAKTARIS
i Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
[Dissolution of Marriage has
i been tiled against you and you
jare required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on ARTHUR H. LIPSON.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1515 NW 167 Street,
i Suite 110-B. Miami. Florida
'33169. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
16, 1979: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
omplaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of Sep-
tember, 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
08095 Oct. 5, 12. 19. 26, 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79-7244
INRE ESTATE OF
SHIRLESCHIFF,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
0l Hi. .stale Of SHIRLE
SCHIFF, deceased. File
Number 79-7244. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division the address of which
is 73 West Flagier Street,
Miami. Florida. The Co-
personal representatives of the
estate are: MICHAEL ALAN
SCHIFF, and JOSEPH SCH
MIER whose address is 7 Wild
wood Road, and 2500 East
Hallandale Beach Blvd., Suite
611, Hallandale. Fl. 33009. The
. name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
] All persons having claims or
I demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
slated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be suited. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to et"h
personal representative.
All persons interested in the
esUite to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob
jections I hey may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice ol
Administration Oct. 26.1979.
MICHAEL ALAN SCHIFF
JOSEPHSCHMIER
As Co-Personal
Representatives
of the Estate of
SHIRLESCHIFF
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Joseph Schmler
Law Offices of
Joseph Schmler
2800 East Hallandale
Beach Blvd. Suite 611
Hallandale. Florida 33009
Telephone 945 1586
081B:( Oct.26; Nov. 2. 1979
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 79-13028 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
FRANCISCOJAVIER
PRIETO TORRES.
Petitioner Husband,
and
M E RCE DE S LI N A RTE
PRIETO.
Respondent Wife.
TO: MERCEDES LINARTE
PRIETO
Respondent Wife
47 Lexington Avenue
S. Norwalk, Connecticut
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
it on HARVEY D. FRIED
MAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 392, Miami Beach.
Fla and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 9.
1 1979; otherwise a default will
I be entered against you for the
! relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 27 day of Sep
lember, 1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Willie Bradshaw Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 392
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
08090 Oct. 5, 12. 19. 26. 1979
I NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No .79 14006 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE: The Marriage of
LARRY McFARLEY,
Petitioner
and
PRICILLA McFARLEY,
Respondent
TO PRICILLA McFARLEY
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
HIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, lo It on
HOWARD HIM. HENNKTT.
j attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 19 West Flagier
Street. Suite 520 Biscayne
Bldg., Miami. Florida, and file
I the original with the clerk of
i the above styled court on or
I before November 30, 1979;
I otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISHFLOR1DIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
I Florida on this 18th day of
October. 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By AD. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
Howard Hill Bennett
Attorney for Petitioner
19 West Flagier Street
Suite 520 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33130
08156 Oct. 26; Nov. 2. 9. 16.1979
T-----------------------------------------------
IN THE CIRCUIT COUPT OF
THEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 79 13986 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
GEORGE MARLS'
VS.
ESPERANZA MARIN
TO:
KSI'ERANZA MARIN
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
v. ritlen answer and defenses, if
any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP. ESg., plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is 2355
Salzedo Street. Suite 309. Coral
Gabies, Florida 33134, on or
before November 30th. 1979;
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on Oct. 18.
1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByG.S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
08158 Oct. 26: Nov. 2.9. 16.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 79-13987 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
FAMILY DIVISION
1SOLINAOCHOA
vs.
WILLIAM OCHOA
TO:
WILLIAM OCHOA
Perez Zorrilla
EdlflcloT, Apto. F
Holquin, Oriente, Cuba
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, il
any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP, ESg.. plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 2355
Salzedo Street. Suite 309, Coral
Jables. Florida 33134, on or
before November 30. 1979; and
file the original with clerk of
this court either before service
on plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
leal of this court on Oct. 18.
1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Clerk of the Court
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
08156 Oct 26. Nov 2. 9. 16. 1979
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CSM No. 79-13983 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
DARIOPUERTA
\ s.
/.ENAIDA PUERTA
TO:
ZENAIDA PUERTA
400Olive St. Apt.C8
Bridgeport.
Conn. 06604
YOU ARE NOTIFED that an
action for DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, if
any. to It on DANIEL
GALLUP. ESg.. plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is 2355
Salzedo Street. Suite 309. Coral
Gables, Florida 33134, on or
before November 30th. 1979;
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against yoi. for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on Oct. 18.
1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByG.S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
HM59 Oct. 26. Nov. 2. 9.16.1979


Pagel4-B
+Jmistifkr*Mar
Fr>day. October 26, M
:
IN THI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
ClKNl.7HOH FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the
Adoption of
minor child
GERALD RC3EN
Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO MR JACK3CHWTNKER
Residence Unknown'
YOU ARK NOTIFIED that
an action tor the adoption of
minor baa been filed herewith
and you an required to serve a
copy of your written objection,
if any, to It on Brian H. Brody.
Esq attorney tor Petitioner.
whose addraaa 03 NT 167th
SI. N Miami Baaeh, Florfcla.
33162. on or batort November
30. in, aad Ola tha original
with tha clark of tola court
cither before service on
Petitioner or immeduuely
-tereaftar. otherwise a default
will ba mind against you tor
UM relief demandad In tha
ADOPTION petition.
WITNESS my hand aad the
ical of thla Court on Oct 22
ttta
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clark of the Court
By Clannda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
0S175 Ocl 26. Nov 2,1.1a. UK
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7*14223 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the
Adoption of
a minor child
By
JULIAN PUIG
Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO GLILLERMOSUAREZ
Keaidence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for the adoption of
' minor haa been filed herewith
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written objection,
if any to it on Brian H Brody.
Esq attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 633 NE 167th
St M Miami Beach Florida.
33162. on or before November
30. 1976 and file the original
with the clerk of this court
either before service on
Petitioner or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demarded in the
ADOPTION petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Oct. 22,
1979
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
0*176 Oct. 26. Nov 2. 9,16. 1979
a
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No M-lOMFC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the
Adoption of
a minor child
By
LOUIS j HALL
a SARAH HALL
Petitioners
Noncx or action
TO WESLEY rRYE
Residence Unkaown'
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
aa action tor tha adoption of
minor haa bean filed herewith
aad you are required to serve a
copy of your written objection,
if any. to It on BRIAN H
BRODY, ESQ. attorney tor
Petitioner whoae address la
633 NE irrth St. N Miami
Beach. Florida. ni62. on or
before November 30. 1979. aad
file tha original with tha clerk
of thta court either before
service on Petitioner or Im-
mediately thereafter other
wise a default will be entered
against you for tha relief
demanded In tha ADOPTION
petition.
WITNESS my hand aad the
seal of thla Court on OcL 23.
1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
08176 Oct. M; Nov 2, t. II. 1979
. The claimant ahaii deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clark to
mail one copy to each personal
representative
Ail persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of thla
Notice of Administration hat
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of tha
decedent's will, the
qualifications of the persona]
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVERf
BARRED
Date of the first publication I
of this NoUce of
Administration. Oct M. 1979
LOUIS GOLDBERG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Benjamin Goldberg
ATTORNEY rOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
WILLIAM C SUSSMAN
9S00S DadelandBlvd..
Suite 703
Miami. Florida MM
Telephone lSOSi Mi.3334
06160 Oct 2*. Nov 2.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case Ho 7*.14222
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the
Adoption of
a minor child
By
LEONELE. REYES
Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO JOSE ERNESTO
CASTRO
"Residence Unknown''
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for the adoption of
minor has been filed herewith
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written objection,
if any, to It on Brian H. Brody,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whoae addresa Is 633 NE 167th
St.. N Miami Beach. Florida.
33162. on or before November
30. 1979, and fUe the original
with the clerk of thla court
either before service on
Petitioner or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
ADOPTION petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Oct. 22,
1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
08177 Oct 26; Nov. 2, 9.16.1979
_;,. ,a 1--------- ,i.
INTHECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cave No Ml 3*15 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
LEWIS JEFFREY
SELZNICK
vs
PATRICIA ANN SELZNICK
TO:
PATRICIA ANN SELZNICK
|_ 40 Argyll Road
London. England W8
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MAP.P.I AGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, if
any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP. Esq. plaintiffs
attorney, whose address Is 2356
Salzedo Street. Suite 309. Coral
Gables. Florida 33134. on or
before November 30th. 1979.
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on October 18
19TB
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByG.S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
08160 Oct. 26. Nov. 2.9, 16.197L
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names of
Miriam Pardo D. B, A Omy
D. Fashion. Intends to register
said names with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Miriam Pardo
0*099 Oct. 5.12, 19,26,1979 ,
INTHECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cast No.71.1439* FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The Marriage of
SUB HASH D DASSANI
Petitioner Husband
and
USHAS DASSANI
Respondent Wile
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO USHA S DASSANI
c oMr K J Kotecha
Ram Dhaval. Swaml
Vivekanand Rd
Raikot Gujarat.
India
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
aa action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Brian H Brody. Esq Attorney
for Petitioner whose address is
633 NE 167th Street Suite 1013.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33162. on or before November
30. 1979 and file the original
with the clerk of this court
either before service on
Petitioner or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Oct 22.
1979
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
08112 Oct. 26. Nov. 2. 9. 16. 1979

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OFTHE11TH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7S34t FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARLYSE EMMANUEL
Petitioner Wife.
and
DIEUFORTEMMANUEL,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE BT
PUBUCATJQJrl
YOU. DIEUFORT1EM .
MANUEL. 2S16 Bedford
Avenue, No. ID, Brooklyn.
N.T., are hereby notified to
serve a copy of your Answer to
the Petition For Dissolution of
Marriage filed against you,
upon Petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE NICHOLAS, ES-
QUIRE, 613 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33136, and file
original with the Clark of the
Court on or before November
16, 1979; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 9 day of
October, 1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
ByR. M.Kiasee
Deputy Clark
06126 Oct 12-19 96 Nor 2 1979 .4
INTHECIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADECOUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 7V-7S24
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN GOLDBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of BENJAMIN
GOLDBERG, deceased. FUe
Number 79-7524, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probati
Division, the address of whlcr
Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The co-
personal representatives of the
estate are: Louis Goldberg,
whose address la 100 Kings
Point Drive, Apt. 1706. North
Miami Beach. Fla. 18160, and
Joseph Herman Goldberg, 10
Royal Oaks Drive, Norwlcr
Connecticut 06360
The name and address of the
personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims oc
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state
ment of any claim or demanr
they may have. Each claim
must be In writing aad must
indicate the basis for the claim,,
the name and address of the I
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet
due, the date when it will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7-l4306 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The Marriage of
IVANGARIB
Petitioner
and
JEANNE GARIB
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MRS JEANNE GARIB
URGANEJA STREET
ST JOSEPH,
TRINIDAD. W.I.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Brian H. Brody, Esq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
633 NE 167 Street. Suite 1015.
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33162,
on or before November 30,1979,
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on Petitioner or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on Oct. 22,
1979
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of th eCourt
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
08173 Oct. 26; Nov. 2, 9,16.1979
**
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Im-
portadora Vavaju, Inc., at
10846 SW 41 Terrace. Miami.
Florida 33166, Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dads County
Florida.
Rafael Valedllos Rodriguez
Maria Lulaa Gonzalei
08161 Oct. 26; Nov. 2, 9,16. 1979,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name.
Cutting Service Corp., Inc. at'
3292 NW 41st Street. Miami.
Fla. 88142. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida. |
SuldUbertoQuevedo
AnaQuevedo
Orlando Romero
,08182 Oct 26; Nov. 2.9.16.1979
-------------- f '"nil-------------------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case Ne.7-14228 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the
Adoption of
a minor child
By
BARRY SHUT-MAN
Petitioner
NOTICE Or ACTION
TOGARYSTARKEY
"Raaldance Unkknown"
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for the adoption of
minor has been filed herewith
sad you are required to serve a
copy of your written objection.
If any, to It on Brian H Brody.
Esq.. attorney for Petitioner
whoae address U 698 NE 167th
SL, N. Miami Beach. Florida.
33162. on or before November
10. 1979, and file the original
with the clerk of this court
either before service on
Petitioner or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
ADOPTION petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on OcL 22.
1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
08174 Oct 26; Nov. 2, 9,16,1971
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TWO
WAY SHIPPING Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
JOSE A MONTESDEOCA
MARIA MONTES DE OCA
08179 Oct. 26: Nov 2. 9.16. 1979
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
INTERDEVCO at P.O. Box
776. Pembroke Pines, FL
33024. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
:- loiida
Glottmann & Cima
I 'v-lopment Corp
By GuillermoSostchin. Sec
GuillermoSostehin. Esq
Attorney fur
Glottmann & Cima
Development Corp
08180 O" I 26, Nov 2.9. 16.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CaseNo.714300FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
VICTOR M. VEGA. JR.
vs
ZOILA R VEGA
TO
ZOILA R. VEGA
P O. Pasto Buton 1466
Moroviz,
Puerto Rico, 00717
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, if
any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP, ESQ., plaintiff's
attorney, whose address Is 2356
Salzedo Street. Suite 309, Coral
Gables. Florida 33134, on or
before November 30. 1979; and
file the original with the clerk
of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint orpetltlon.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on Oct. 24,
1979
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
08183 Oct. 26; Nov. 2, 9. 16.1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No 7*14301 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
WAYNE WITZELL
vs.
STEPHANIE WITZELL
TO:
STEPHANIE WITZELL
Four Linden Court
Brook line Mass 02146
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, If
Any. to it on DANIEL
GALLUP, ESQ., plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is 2866
Salzedo Street, Suite 809, ConU
Gables, Florida 88184. on or
before 30th November. 1979;
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiffs attorney
or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plalat or petit ion
WITNESS my hand and the,
seal of this court on Oct 24 ,'
1979.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By G S Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
08185 Oct 26; Nov. 2, 9.16. 1979
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Ne. 7T.7S69
IN RE ESTATE OF
CORWTN STACY BARTON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FTED that the administration
of the estate of CORWTN
STACY BARTON, deceased.
late of Dade County, Florida.
File Number 79-7500, Is panting
in the Circuit Court In and for
Dade County, riorlda. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 3rd Floor. Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 88130
The personal representative of
this estate is STACY DANIEL
BARTON, whose address is
10222 Varlel. Chatsworth.
California 91311. The name and
address of the attorney for the
personal representative are set
forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUB
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the
above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim
must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount
claimed If the claim is not yet
due the date when it will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If
the claim is secured, the
security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk of the above styled
1 uurt to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each persona1
sentative
All persons interested in the
itate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will. the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 18th day of October. 1979.
Stacy Daniel Barton
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Corwin Stacy Barton
Deceased
First publication of this noUce
of administration on the 26 day
of October. 1979
AINSLEE R. FERDIE
Suite 215
717 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone 13051 445 3657
Attorney For
Personal Representative
08188 Oct. 26; Nov. 2,1979
not yet due. the date
will become due sjaiT"C
UKd If the claim U*
Ungent or unhquidaie,] at
deliver sufficient ooptsTofS
claim to the clerk to,^b,t^
clerk to mall on. cop personal representative
All persons Interested in ,.
estate to whom 1 copy of tX!
Notice of Adauauuitt""*
been mailed are reomiir
WTTHIN THREE i^inw
FROM THE DATE OF TM
TOST PUBLICATION <
THIS NOTICE, toftl. L
jection. they may h.JJ* *
challenges the validity of i
decedent's will, the quiltou
Uons of the personal r^riet
tatlve. or the v,nu, or"J
diction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS SOT vi
FBjEDWILL BE FOR*^
Date of the first pubUcstion
of this Notice of
Administration October a
1979
FRANCES LEE STEELE
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ROBERTJ STEELE
Decease!
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
ABRAHAM H SHUKAT
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla 33139
Telephone. < 305 > 673-4003
8'89 Oct 26 Nov 2.1979
INTHECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7*14303 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY
ROBERTO WHITTAKER
vs
LIDIA MARIA V
WHITTAKER
TO
LIDIA MARIA V
WHITTAKER
39 AveNorte No 232
San Salvador El Salvador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE hat Deen filed
against you ar.a you are
required toservi : of your
written aiunt
to it or. DANIEL
GALLI P ESQ plaintifl -
attorney whose
lo Street. Su 9 Coral
liable.- Florida on or
file the ongina. with we cleric
of this court either before
service on plain'.if; a attorney
or immed: -eafler.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com
plaint orpetltlon
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on Octobers
1979.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
08187 Oct. 26, Nov 2. 9.16.1971
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 79 7445
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERTJ STEELE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ROBERT J
STEELE, deceased. File
Number 79 7446. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 W, Flagler Street, Miami,'
Florida SS180 The personal
representative of the estate Is J>
FRANCES LEE STEELE.
whose address is 2363 N. Bayj
Road. Miami Beach. Florida.
I The name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
r ~ All *.__. L....____,.,_
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7*14311 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The Marriage of
CELESTINE NOTTAGE
Petitioner
and
KENNETH NOTTAGE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KENNETH NOTTAGE.
FRNo.261-171779
BOX 4883
IHAHN AIR BASE 1
GERMANY
A.P.O.. NY 09109
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you at
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. toll on
Brian H. Brody. Esq attorney
for Petitioner, whose address la
633 NE 167th Street. North|
Miami Beach, Fla 33162. onor
before November 30 1979. and
file the original with the clers
of this court either before
service on Petitioner or im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entereo
against you for the reuo
demanded In the complaint 01
petition. ,h,
WITNESS my hand and u"
seal of this Court on Oct.
1979
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
08170 Oct. 96; Nov. 2, 9, II. 1
All persons having claims or'
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE!
MONTHS FROM THE DATE1
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim U
NOTICE UNDEB
FICTITIOUS NAM* LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBT
GIVEN that the undersign**
desiring to engage in businwe
under the fictitious name.
Kaisers A A Union 71 01
20400 West Dixie Highway J-
Miami. Fla. 88180, intends to
register said name *"" J
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. IHorlda
David Kaleer. Sole Owner
Attorney Paul Kwltney
Kwltney. Kroop. Schelnbem
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 612
Miami Beach. Fla. M
08184 Oct21; Nov. 2, 9. II.


October 26.1979
*Jewisttkrkgam
Page flPtf
Q. We're two women in
our 20's planning to see
Europe on our own this
spring. We've figured out
the least expensive
(lights, checking now on
low priced hotels, but
we're not sure about the
cheapest way of getting
from airports to hotels in
Paris. Munich, Budapest
and Prague. Do you
happen to know how air-
port bus rates going into
the cities compare with
taxis? I know this in-
formation is hard to get,
but it would be helpful to
us and probably to other
people going abroad.
Maybe there is a rule of
thumb we could follow so
we're not confused about
i city the minute we
arrive.
A. The rule of thumb is
simple. It's always
cheaper to take the bus if
you are alone. It's still
usually cheaper if there
are two of you and if there
are three or more, differ-
ences could be small and
taxis more convenient.
Savings for individual
travelers run anywhere
from 70 percent down-
wards in every city in the
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY.FLORIDA
Case No. 79-14210 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
INRETheMarrlai
'Mi' um;ktt
Petitioner
BLANCHIE
I'ADCETT
indent
'. Of ACTION
TO MRS BLANCHIE
PADGETT
I'nknown"
VOX IRE NOTIFIED thai
'" aetkii loi dissolution <>r
num.,.. Has been riled
and you ara
I |iv ill your
written rMei .....,, ttnVi tu it on
II BRODY, ESQ
I'etltioner, whose
m: 167 Street,
' rth Miami Beach,
on m before
mm. and file the
-lth the clerk of this
before service on
or immediately
i otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
UW rellel demanded In the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
JSJ "I this Court on Oct. 22,
ItK'HARDI'. BR1NKER
v-Clerk of the Court
By Clarlnda Brown
mm As,)eP"ty Clerk
""I Oct. 26; Nov. 2. 9.16. 1979
"NTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
DADECOUNTY,FLORIDA
Case No. 79-14304 FC
NOTICE OF ACTION
m... N0 p"OPERTY
ROMULOG.DE LEON
V8.
C0RAZON M. DE LEON
CORAZON M. DE LEON
1W Page Street
Apt. I
San Francisco,
California 94117
anYOU ARE NOTIFIED that
"action for DISSOLUTION
W MARRIAGE has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
niien answer and defenses, If
?*!'. ,.\? on DANIEL
i-ALLLP. ESQ., pUlnUffs
;"rney, whose address Is 2365
SHE street- Sulte 3(. Coral
fables. Florida 33134, on or
before 30th November, 1979:
c1,h, ;.,!.e 0ri8lna' *"n the
'"* of 'his court either before
'"vice on plaintiff's attorney
f Immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
i ?d a8a'nst you for the
relief demanded In the com-
Pi*inl or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
gjj of thu court on Oct. 24.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C. S. Carlie
mi.. _Af Deputy Clerk
"18 Oct.M;Nov.2..l,l1
world. However,
remember to cut those
savings by the number of
persons sharing the taxi
cab.
In Paris, it will cost
about $3 for the bus
connection; about $15,
plus tip for the taxi. In
Munich, the bus will cost
$2, the taxi closer to $15.
Behind the Iron Curtain
countries offer more
savings if you opt for
public transportation. In
Prague, the bus will cost
about 30 cents; the taxi
around $6. Same in
Budapest.
Most bus rides take five
or 10 minutes longer than
taxis although they are
called "express." But like
everything else, this is not
always true since in some
cities, buses use express
lanes and beat the taxis
traveling roads with
heavy traffic. Some buses
stop at hotels for drop-
offs, others go to a city
terminal and passengers
then take the shorter taxi
ride to hotels. The same
system works in reverse
when you head back to the
airport. All prices quoted
are in U.S. currency,
based on exchange rates
at press time.
MURPHY, Rose, 75. North Miami. Oct.
in Riverside lakeside.
Ml SIC, Samuel. 97. Hallandale, Oct. 19.
Riverside Sharon Gardens.
NEUWIRTH, Hilda. 72 Coral Gables.
Del rj Riverside. Lakeside.
SCHLEIDER, Yolanda. 81, Miami
lleai h. Riverside
ABRAMS, in llenjamln P., 73. Bay
Harbor, Ocl 22 Levitt
BE1GEL, Hyman Benjamin, Ocl 21
i lordon Starol 1 'avid.
BRENNER, 1'ied. 81, Miami, Oct 22
Riverside
HERSHEY Helen M Miami Beach,
Oct. 23 Riverside Ml Sinai.
ri(SENM in Raphael (Rate),
SHUSTERMAN Dr Samuel (Jack
Hollywood, Oct. 21. Levitt
YARAS, Scull Alan. Del 18
YOHANN, Minnie E Hollywood. Oct
23 Riverside
CITY MEMORIAL AND
MONUMENT, Inc.
7610 N E 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33138
EVELYN or
BERNARD SAR4.S0HN
OFFICE 759-1669
RES: 271-4430
0
Leonard Egert, Resident for 39 Years
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at Gordon Funeral
Home for Leonard G. Egert, 71,
of Coral Gables, who died Oct. 21.
GREENHOUSE
Mitzi. a resident of Miami Beach for 29
years, coming from Rochester, N.Y..
died Oct. 19. She Is survived by her
husband Dr. Julius A., daughter and
son-in-law. Manya and Donald Blech-
man; grandchildren, Barbara and
William and sister Rose Lavlck. She
was a member of Temple Bnth Kodesh,
Rochester, ORT and Hadassah. Ser-
vices were held Oct. 21.
ABRASKIN. Irving.
BERKOWITZ, Marlon. 94. Mlam.
Beach, Oct. 15.
COHEN, Lillian I., North Miami Beach,
Oct. 16. Riverside Lakeside.
COOPER, Mrs. Ann, Miami Beach.
Rubin.
GOZAN. Syd Hanin, Hallandale, Oct. 15.
Riverside. Sharon Gardens.
GREEN, Ann, 85, Miami Beach, Oct. 15.
Riverside.
KOHLIN. Hyman Kappy. 75, Miami,
Oct. 15. Gordon.
ACKER. Shirley. 72. North Miami
Beach. Riverside.
CAUSANSKY. Sonla, 72, Miami
Riverside.
COHEN, Harry H.. Surfside. Oct. 14.
GOLDSTEIN, Nathan, 89, Miami
Beach. Oct. 16. Rubin. Mt. Sinai.
LEV1NE. Maurice, Miami Beach.
Rubin.
STARR, Irving. North Miami Beach.
Riverside. Lakeside.
WEISER. Lena. 84. Miami Beach.
Riverside. Star of David.
ZAMEK, Mrs. Jaya, 71. Miami Beach,
Oct. 17. Rubin. Lakeside.
FKI.I.ERMAN, Louis. North Miami,
Oct. 18. Levitt. Lakeside.
HIRSHEN, Harry, 80. North Miami,
Oct. 17. Rubin. Lakeside.
KANDELL. Rose. 79, Miami Beach.
MARSHALL. Irving. 78. Miami Beach.
Rubin. Mt. Nebo.
Al.VA, Sophie, 54, Miami Beach.
Gordon.
BERLIN. Silas. 81, Fort Lauderdale.
(lordon.
RATNOEF, Dr. Raymond, Miami
Beach, Oct 31, Riverside.
SPITZ, Martin. 88. Surfside. Oct. 22
Newman. Mt. Nebo.
ARLEN, Tillie Benjamin. 80, Oct. 20.
Riverside Mt Nebo.
MUCKER. Mrs. Elsie. 86. Miami
Beach, Oct. 20. Rubin. Mt. Nebo.
EROGEL, Benjamin. 80, Miami, Oct.
20. Newman.
GOLDSTEIN, Rose G., 77, Miami
Bea< h, Oct 20. Riverside. Lakeside.
SMITH. Etta Lillian. S3, North Miami
Beach, Oct. 20. Levitt. Star of David
ALBERTSON, Irving I... 79 Hollywood,
Oct. 16.
BROOKS, Augusta. 78, Miami Beach,
(li 1 III Riverside
GOLDNER, Morns. Hollywood.
Riverside
JACOBSON, Paulyne M North Miami
Beach Riverside Lakeside.
SALTZBURG, Samuel Hollywood
THORNER, Harry. Miami Reach
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open lerr Doy Cleiee* Jofckafh
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Broward County
925-3396
,1921 Pembroke Rd.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. levin, f .D.
New YoHt: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.Forest Hills, NY.
Mr. Egert had been a resident
here for the past 39 years, coming
from New York City. He was a
graduate of New York University
and Harvard Law School and a
member of the Florida Bar
Association, New York Bar
Association, Dade County Bar
Association and American Bar
Association.
He served as president of the
Fapanicolaou Cancer Research
Institute from 1957-1960. He was
a past president of the NYU
Alumni Association.
Surviving are his wife
Nathalie; three daughters, Susan
Smith of Miami, Andrea
Kadomiya of Cambridge, Mass.,
and Joyce Cheplak of Miami; two
aunts, Mrs. Gustave I Ian man of
Miami Beach and Mrs. Joseph
Phillips of Miami.
Interment was in Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.

t*C\i^e
bqCP

.06
A\

,o
\e"
&
$
DEDICATED SERVICE
IN YOURTIMEOF NEED
Gordon Funeral Home
Emanuel Gordon (1946)
Harry Gordon (1964)
Ike Gordon
James B. Gordon
Funeral Directors
#
TELEPHONE 858-5566
L
EVITT WWEINSTEIN
memorial chapels
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood, Fla
921-7200
13385 W. Dixie Hwy.
North Miami, Fla.
949-6315
5411 w. Okeechobee Blvd.
w. Palm Beach, Fla.
689-6700
I Mti$g9
rson a I Jy a r r a nged


I*-B
+ Jemitt fkrHtor
Pnd. .
mH m
congratulations
80
-7
This Week's'
1980 OLDS
NATHAN JANOWITZ
Miomi Beach
Cutlass Supreme Winner
A FREE CAR
PREVIOUS WINNERS
(of CUTLASS SUPREMESl
BE SURE YOU ENTER OUR WEEKLY
DRAWING FOR A 1980 OLDSMOBILE
CUTLASS SUPREME
After eoch Monday night Football Game, if you were not a
cash winner, bring your Pro-Football Game Cord back to
Pantry Pride and deposit it in our ballot box before closing
time Saturday. (Cash winners will be given entry forms
when they "cash in" their Game Cards.)
, ALSO Tox ond Ti,le Not '"eluded
WIN 1,000.'
OR ONE OF 7,497 OTHER CASH PRIZES
BY PLAYING
on monday night
AT PANTRY PRIDE
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OMaR RAMOS Miami
^
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$1000 CASH
WINNERS
EILEEN SUNSHINE. Ft. Laid. JENNIFER TOHIM, Mum

100 WINNERS
MARTIN DAVIDSON,Hallandole
LEE FLETCHER, Miami
MILDRED MIRANDA, M.Beach
BILL GREEN, Miami
JOSEPHINE CIFONE, N. M.Bch.
EDNA BROOKS, Ft. Lauderdale
LILLIE B. FILES, Ft. Lauderdale
JOAN PIERCE, Margate
ROBERT CUOMO, Miramar
BRUCE WATSON, Ft. Lauderdale
LILLIAN MARSDEN, No. Miami
EDITH GOLDBERG, M. Beach
EVA GOLDSTEIN, No. M. Beach
GUILLERMO ANDRADE, M. Bch.
CARMEN GONZALEZ, Miami
NO PURCHASE,
REQUIRED
ALL WINNING
TICKETS MUST
BE REDEEMED
BY THE
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FOLLOWING
THE GAME.
PICK UP YOUR
GAME CARD
EARLY,
QUANTITIES
ARE LIMITED.
ISABEL POLO, Miami
J. RAULERSON, Okeechobee
MARTHA KARR, Jupiter
EDWARD DRINKS, Miami
RETHA SHURE, Miami
ART WETTERER, Pern. Pines
EVELYNE PROSAN, Miami
MARTHA WEINER, Ft. Lauderdale
L.A. WHITE, Ft. Lauderdale
J. BURNER, Plantation
EVA HOSANG, No. Bay Village
MARIA J. DRAESEL, Miami
FRED BERMAN, Mia. Beach
SHARELLA MILLER, Miami
(ADD YOUR NAME HERE)


!>> XIIUK'Ot.tlll

^
*>
""-' Ml.
HI lit *
_,I
1 -_ -
'"ii:
^;:;:riiiji ^^i
**1 ~itej s-!
V
n


Ifig/tt ouer West Berlin: View of the Kaiser WUhelm Gedach tniskirche on the fabled Kurfurstendamm
Report from Germany
30 Years of Freedom, More Powerful Than Ever
Leo
Mindlin
Jewish Floridian
Associate Editor Leo
Mindlin was in
Germany this sum-
mer traveling as a
guest of the Federal
Hepublic. Herewith
w MindUn's report of
his trip.

the vigor of the Federal Republic is undeniable politically, socially, eco-
nomically, West Germany today is the giant building block in The Nine making up
the European Economic Community This report aims to illuminate some
aspects of these statistics in human terms. In historic terms both past and future.
And in the agonizing terms of the Jewish shadow still haunted within them a
shadow bewildered by all of this wealth and power as the tiny island of its nation-
hood in Israel falls upon harder and harder times: -
THE THIRTIETH anniversary of the Federal
Republic of West Germany's Basic Law, its con-
stitution of 1949, was marked on May 23. Less than
one month later, I landed in Frankfurt to begin a
several-weeks tour of the country. This report is the
result of that tour. It does not purport to be a
complete guide to West Germany today.
Sifting through hundreds of thousands of words of
transcribed interview, material gleaned from con-
versations with some of the country's top elected
and career officials in government; with leading
educators, particularly in the field of documentation
of contemporary history and literature; with writers,
editorialists and publicists attached to some of West
Germany's major newspapers; and with "everyday''
citizens shop clerks, taxi-drivers, smal
businessmen, bluecoUar workers, even hippies: all
this has been an arduous and challenging task.
FAR MORE arduous, far more challenging has
been the strict need to achieve a disciplined ap-
proach to the riot of emotions one experiences in a
land where a once vibrant Jewish community is no
more, and with whose surviving spokesmen I had
long sessions in an agonizing twilight of remem-
brances of things past. How does a reporter deal
with these emotions while at the same time seeking
to maintain the kind of objective powers his
reportorial observations demand?
My own answer has been two-fold: (1) to report, in
the best sense of what the reporter's job requires of
him as a professional responsibility; (2) to record
such emotional reactions, both in intensity and
historical perspective, as I experienced in Germany
and now deem necessary for a proper illumination of
the experiences themselves.
Reckoned from all of these points of view, what
appears here is at best a fleeting bird's eye view of a
government and its people only 30-plus years into
their newest freedom, but rich in past history and
richer still in their hope for the future. For a broader
and more complex view, more time would have been
needed, more traveling, more interviewing, more
research of published materials than the itinerary
allotted to me.
THIS REPORT comes at a time when the "special
connection" between the Federal Republic and
the State of Israel, between the Federal Republic
and world Jewry is strained as never before.
Perhaps for this reason especially, it is important
to understand the phenomenal phoenix-like rise of
the German people out of the ashes of their Hitlerian
past to the majestic height of contemporary world
leadership they occupy today much as,
paradoxically, they have watched and even rendered
significant assistance to the phoenix-like rise of the
Jewish people out of the ashes of their Hitlerian
holocaust to modern nationhood.
Germany today is a global power unparalleled in
the European experience. Dismembered into two
nations by the Soviet Union's refusal to allow its
own post-World War II occupation zone to become a
part of the Federal Republic's Basic Law in 1949,
West Germany divided, in its thirtieth year, beheld a
vigorous if at times less than graceful election
campaign that brought Karl Carstens to the
presidency as chancellor Helmut Schmidt's ruling
coalition of Social Democrats (SPD) and Free
Democrats (FDP) jockied for position to keep itself
from flying apart in a "second choice" suoDOrt
of Carstens, a right-wing candidate of the Christian
Democrats (CDU), after it was made clear to the
Continued on Page 2-C


Page2-C
+JeistncrkM*r
Fr*k> OctoberJ
Report from Germany
After 30 Years of Freedom, More Powerful Than Ev<
Continued from Page 1-C
Schmidt coalition that outgoing President Walter
Scheel IFDP) would not seek a second term.
THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC presidency is
largely a ceremonial office- Still, the campaign was
heated enough to rake up Cars ten's political past as
a Nazi in the late 1930s at the same time that it
ignored entirely the Nazi past of Walter Scheel.
whom both the SDP and the FDP would have
embraced with joy a second time around.
Nor. politically, is the Federal Republic's future
settled in the months ahead now that Carstens is
successfully ensconced in office, for 1960 promises,
in the form of a coming attractions announcement
by the candidate himself, that Franz-Josef Strauss,
the Prime Minister of Bavaria, intends to rue m next
year's Bundestag election for the post of Chancellor
against the incumbent Hulmut Schmidt Fur-
thermore. Strauss declares that his Bavarian
Christian Social Union iCSUl is categorically behind
him
The question is not the CSU. whose support of
Strauss would be predictable under any cir-
cumstances, the question is the support of the
CSU s comrade-in-arms party, the CDU. the party of
President Carstens Apparently. Strauss has not
been successful in managing that in the past.
BUT THIS time, he has linked the announcement
of his candidacy simultaneously with Helmut Kohl's
decision to step down as leader of the CDU. thus
leaving the CDU in seemingly hopeless disarray
against Strauss appeal for its underwriting of his
try to unseat Chancellor Schmidt. This is true
particularly because Kohl's successor-designate was
Ernst Albrech. of Lower Saxony, whom many people
preferred to Strauss, but who is a political fledgling
and now out of the picture.
From the political point of view, the cast of
characters is different, but the game is the same as
our own upcoming horse race on Capitol Hill next
year. What this multitude of parties and candidates
spells in West Germany is that things political are
never really settled for the months ahead or. indeed,
any definite period of time in a vigorous democratic
society particularly when it is a leading world power.
Economically for West Germany, the picture is
just as vigorous. The Federal Republic's working
force has an enviable Social Security system, which
does not threaten individual Germans with daily
doomsday predictions of bankruptcy in the same
way that Americans are daily threatened. Operating
under a "social budget" factor, the system deter-
mines on a precise basis the costs to taxpayers and
contributors, thus justifying the actual social
benefits quota in relation to the Gross National
Product.
THE AVERAGE workers' hourly wage in West
Germany is DM11.88 per hour, plus fringe benefits.
These include vacation pay and Kinder gelt (bonus
President Carstens
Chancellor Schmidt
payments to married workers with from one to three
children starting at DM50 on up to DM200). There is
also health insurance, for which the individual
worker pays 5.6 to 6 percent of his monthly gross
earnings, with his employer contributing an equal
amount to make up the average 11.5 percent cost of
membership.
Overall cost to the employee for Social Security
benefits is 9 percent of monthly gross earnings up to
DM3.400. with the employer paying an equal
amount. This makes for an average weekly wage, for
a married worker with one child, of DM554 Igrossl
and DM402 i net i after taxes and other deductions.
THE SOCIAL Security system is matched in the
various aspects of its quality by Federal Republic
Public Welfare and Social Services programs. Of
special interest to Americans, for whom catastrophic
illness is a repetitive nightmare of probability, is the
country's health insurance system guaranteeing free
medical and dental treatment; drugs and medicines.
as well as hospital treatment for indefinite periods of
time; full wages for a period of six weeks paid by the
employer in the event of disability; 78 weeks of
approximate take-home pay from the health in-
surance program thereafter.
The stability of these programs is also matched by
a similarly stable economic structure for the nation's
laboring force.
From statistics I have already cited here, it is
clear that the average wage-earner has some
DM2,500 a month to spend. Families of civil ser-
vants and whitecollar workers on higher incomes
have an average disposal monthly income of
DM4.200 (daw published in July, 1978 based on
figures supplied by the Federal Republic Statistics
Office for 19771. In this economic bracket, income
tax and Social Security deductions approximate 24
percent of gross earnings.
FROM THE industrial point of view, Federal
Republic figures are just as cheerful. Lothar Julitz
reports in the June 21 Frankfurter AUgemeine Zei-
tung that "manufacturers of industrial plants, who
export 83 percent of their output... are confident of
Helmut Kohl
FraruyJose'Stmtt
countri
an austerity I
retaining their world leadership this yea
now (that) economic recovery has spread to maic
European customers, leading to brisker demand I
capital goods."
Reports Julitz: "Economic recover) in
that are West Germany's major European tr
partners has clearly more than offset the (I
recession."
AM I suggesting that West German-, has becon|
the free world's Garden of Eden1 Not even the Wed
Germans, themselves, will admit to that, espeaalivl
if one restricts this assessment to an economic point!
of view. For example. Fritz Krai, writing on businesl
matters in the Frankfurter Rundschau on Julv 9.1
warns that "The situation is explosive oureconomvl
is functioning better than for many years, vetourl
political spokesmen on economics are now calling for!
a change of course. The economy can now get byl
without massive injections of state aid and anl
impressive growth rate of 4 percent this year. Thisif
why the Bonn Cabinet has passed
budget for 1980.
"The Frankfurt Bundesbank will probably tightenl
restrictions on money and loans because thel
specter of inflation is looming up. and there *i|
probably be 5 percent inflation by autumn .. there|
could be another lull in the economy
STILL, the vigor of the Federal Republic is un-1
deniable. What do all these statistics mean, gleaned I
as they are mainly from sober Federal Republic I
leaders anxious to show a visiting reporter that their I
country has proven its mettle? They mean what they'
say: politically, socially, economically West Gsj
many today is the giant building block in the man
making up the European Economic Community -1
and a power on its own terms in the world beyond.
This report aims to illuminate some aspects oil
these statistics in human terms In historic termiI
both past and future. And in the agonizing termsol|
the Jewish shadow still haunted within them -i
shadow bewildered by all of this wealth and powerul
the tiny island of its own nationhood in Israel falii|
upon harder and harder times.
First Steps on German Soil
Berlin Today: A Symbol
FORTY-ONE YEARS AGO: Flames
take hold of a synagogue near Berlin on
'Kristallnacht' in Nazi Germany.
WEST BERLIN It is dif-
ficult for me to set foot onto the
ground at the airport in Frank-
furt. I have missed my con
necting plane to Berlin, and
making new arrangements pre-
occupies me so that I don't have
to cope with the traumatic exper-
ience. Many decades have passed
since the terror of National
Socialism NS, as the Germans
call it. History is, after all, what
was; but here it lingers like a
fearful pall upon me as if it still
is.
I recall numerous occasions in
Europe in the past, when I was
literally within walking distance
of the German border and simply
could not permit myself to cross
it. And suddenly, I am in the
midst of what Adolf Hitler had
promised would be the Thousand-
Year Reich and doing something
as mundane as speaking to Lurt-
hansa clerks who assure me that
everything will be all right about
getting another plane: they will
take care of everything.
NOW THE new arrangements
are completed. The short flight to
Berlin is over, and I am on terra
firma. I am in what was once the
political and military nerve
center of that awful era. I am pre-
pared to hear the smart boots of a
goose-stepping horde, shrink
from the cries of NS enemies in
their agonies. I anticipate a
Yellow Star set upon my sleeve
by some magic of history re-
wound like a giant newsreel of
film so that yesterday is today
renewed, and nothing has
changed.
A day passes, and I sense that
the fears I feel, the sounds I hear,
the past impelled to play out its
drama on a giant screen these
things are my feelings. They are
my compulsions. They are not
here in Berlin on any street or in
any of the people I meet. What
emerges is a sense of German
history somehow gone awry,
which is explained when I press
for explanations, in various ways
depending upon whom I have
managed to buttonhole.
A former Wehrmacht officer
tells me: "The trouble with
Berlin is that there are no Jews
here anymore." I refrain from
reminding him why that is.
Instead, I wait to hear his view of
things. It is matter-of-fact:
"There is no real art in Berlin
no culture anymore. It has all left
with the Jews."
Today, the former Wehrmacht
officer is in the retail fur
business. "Now that the Je'
gone.'he says, "the fun has(
with them even out of t'
There is no excitement in >
business here anymore.
THE CITY itself still bears.
pockmarks here and there,
architectural bruises of tneui
War not yet attended W. or
healed but still showing "P
their newness. Some buiM
are ultra-modernistic. glassJ
concrete and steel compr
little different from, say^
post-war construction you
London.
Others have been
look like the guttedoutI
of old historical sites.
match the design, the te
the color like a perfect false
in a smile; only the brig"
betrays their newnessi uo
phony caryatid in the Erecti-
on the Acropolis in Athens
The Kaiser Wilhetaj.Gj
niskirche on the ?*
furstendamm reti
bombed-out ruins of tne
a defiant badge of course
modernistic twin towers r
Continued on P**
ndo'


on
today
October 26.1979
*kysistfU,,1,>,
Page 3-C
/|/i Island m Iron Curtain Europe
Struggle: German Past, Tinsel Present
WEST BKRLIN The
LfursUmdamrn glitters here
rilh the insouciance of its fabled
usi Like Uu Champs Elysees in
jg or Oxford Street in London,
"Kudamm," as natives in
Ihis city call it. is a mixture of
bquisite shops for the wealthy
[ndexotic kiosks for those with a
um ol mind for distant places
nd their less expensive
bducts.
Like everywhere else in
hrmany. there is an overall
,., of manicured comfort. The
Jercedes and the BMW are King
l,l Queen here (iermans talk
,bui cars costing DM35
wusand and up with the en-
Kusnisiii one would have
fiought unique only to
mencans, and never mind that
is is so expensive, it is sold by
liter la few ounces over our
[ujrii. and already at over DM1
American cars are regarded
tli utter contempt here, not
|nl\ because they are so huge
lid voracious, hut because they
!judged inferior mechanically.
CAR CONSCIOUSNESS
lumps the gap to other
jbiquitous cultural attitudes here
lidi are \merican to the core.
|l we fail the tot in Detroit, in
linn things our thumbprint is
crywhere apparent. In the
traps .it the rim of the Europa
tenter, there is a teeming array
posters glorifying American
eilies, diad and alive: James
lun. Elvis Presley, Marilyn
onrue, John Travolta and even
ihn Wayne, barely departed but
liii'iidy memorialized. All sell for
iilrageously high prices. In the
liscos one hears America
lllgillg, and in the record shops.
In bins are labeled with this
bunlry's favorite fare, not
pgssorily Bach or Mozart, but
Country, Hock.'" "Jazz,"
wul." "Dixieland."
A subsurface struggle exists
be in Berlin between an ancient
lifinun past and a tinsel in-
p-itutional present exemplified
the blinking neon Sony signs
|)kizc alone the "'Kudamm" at
gill. \ visitor senses that the
I'm'ih iv winning as a means of
irgetling the past and what the
wrought to turn the
Hiu inii, international tinsel
kv the capital city of a united
Mion, Berlin today is of a
hIu! Wi Germany; it is not
nmii.
[LIKE AN island in the midst
Inm Curtain Europe, it is
tiwi.iled from the rest of the
uerul Republic not only by
tue of the geopolitical con-
fuat hammered out at Potsdam
[lei the deleut of Hitler; it is
paroled from individual West
proans who prefer in the main
to live there, not to work
Peic. not in (|(, business there.
|bi this sense, West Berlin is a
fualty ol \vrld War II whose
fluids have not been healed.
i*-luch i he rest of the Federal
.public
is not keen to adopt.
*l.Uer|in >s an orphan isolated
11(1,1 "Is own countrymen in
' ) and by a wall the
""lln 'will around it to
lucky prisoners of
any [the
J Republicl within the
I thai
German
ithin the
proletarian
wrmans who live herein West
TO therefore leel
bitad
andoned
not only
in some cases
They are, like
n combat, remunerated
I
oat pay." Understood
" terms, there are ad-
""w-s; v enjoy living in this
Jr showcase of western
piuuist enterprise in contrast
. "' paranoid, depressive.
Cwprivdeged world of the
here Lenin is lionized, and
HORST HAASE: View through a sense of sadness
In this sense, West Berlin is a casualty of World War
II whose wounds have not been healed, and which
the rest of the Federal Republic is not keen to adopt.
West Berlin is an orphan isolated both from its own
countrymen in West Germany and by a wall the
Kremlin built around it to contain the lucky
prisoners of East Germany. within the confines of
that proletarian paradise.
where there is little food. less
clothing and the Ixiring sameness
ot proletarian shelter.
WHETHER or not it is worth-
while for them to live on the
ramparts of this East-West
enjumbment depends upon whom
you talk to \i Die Stachelseh-
weine, a 1920 S'flavored cabaret
in the Europa ("enter, a play.
Kreishaputstadt Berlin ("Dis-
trict Town Berlin") ad-
dresses itself to just this
question. True to the name of the
cabaret Stachelschweine in
German means "porcupine"
the play comes up with a prickly
answer: no. Even the title of the
play is satiric.
In reality. Berlin is not a
"district town." It is the capital
City of the State of Berlin, and to
call it a "district town" is to
demean it. But authors Rolf
Ulrich and Wolfgang Gruner
have three Berlin bears,
traditional symbols of the city,
which appear before the cabaret
curtain and sing (translation
mine):
But then came World War No.
2. .
And after that, the dividing tof
the country)
The east hecame a capital city
tof the (',1)111
And we are a District Town!
IN THE END, Berlin, once the
political and intellectual center of
Germany, is today an out-island
filling up with increasing
numbers of immigrants from
Turkey. Greece, Pakistan, India
and the Arab countries all in
the guise of Gastarbeiter, visiting
workers. (As a matter of official
policy. Italians in large numbers
are shunted off elsewhere because
so many of them are Com-
munists, ami their presence in the
divided city is considered a
security risk. I
Native Berliners enjoy this in
the sense that now they have a
working population to do for
t hi-m what they would never do
themselves: sweep streets, wash
dishes in a busy restaurant, do
road work, lake in laundry.
On the other hand, when their
children in school are out-
numbered by alien students
speaking, say. Turkish, what is
Germany coming to? This is the
:-:-:-v:-;;v"'..:.'.-;:::::'-:--.^-'.....
essence of the question that
Kreishauptstadt Berlin asks
true to its prickly nature, the
play answers nothing. The
cabaret audience roars at this
critical commentary, and when
another character in the play
commiserates and asks the com-
mentator what part of Berlin he
comes from, the critic replies,
offended: "I live in Bonn."
Die Stachelschweine
production stales the case as an
artistic lour de force with the
kind of humor characteristic of
its sentimental cabaret setting.
the whole thing wrapped in a
deliciously decadent flavor.
HORST HAASE. of the Berlin
Slate Information Center, can
hardly afford such decadence.
Berliners, he tells me. dream of
the bustling, heroic days of the
1948 airlift and even the 1950's,
when the city was still being
cleared of war rubble, and the
energy of experimental ar-
chitectural achievements
replaced the bombed-out past
with a sense of futuristic
newness.
Haase is a small, mildly red-
faced, heavy smoking official of
the old days. He corrects, with a
sense of sadness, my view of
Berlin today its flashy cars,
the sexpot posters, the
ubiquitous American-style T-
shirts with their strange disco-
charged legends emblazoned on
them in psychedelic colors.
"We are no longer energetic,
young, vibrant," he says in a
cloud of smoke The statistics he
reels off are relentless: Berlin is
divided into 12 administrative
districts it is in fact not only a
city but one of the Federal
Republic's 11 self-governing
stales.
"WE HAVE a population of
two million," he says, "but look
al us. Over 25 percent are on
pension they are 65 years of
age or older." Haase is quick with
the figures. "This group con-
stitutes only about l-f percent of
the total population in the rest of
the Federal Republic."
\dd to this these facts: In
Berlin, there are 1,262 women for
every 1.000 men an un-
balanced relic of the Hitler war
years. A foreign community of
Gastarbeiter boasts 169.000
pei sons and growing.
"Simultaneously,-* says
Haase, "20.000 more Berliners
i lie than are born. Forget your
view of the city," he cautious me.
as youth-oriented and vibrant.
Do you believe that the Lan-
desregierung actually advertizes
throughout Germany for young
people to move here? It does no
,4ood. Young people, in fact, are
leaving Berlin for other parts of
the country every day. They go
to Munich and Nuremberg
that's where the jobs are."
HAASE ESPECIALLY has in
mind some 10.000 graduate
engineers from the Technical
University here, who have no
outlet for their expertise in
Berlin. This naturally leads back
to the view of Berlin as an orphan
in the political and economic
renaissance of West Germany at
large. Quite naturally, in his
views, German industrial and
commercial enterprise sidesteps
the challenge ol investing in the
West Berlin showcase situated
LH) miles inside of East Ger-
many.
The post-war history of the
city supports their anxieties: the
Soviet attempt to blockade
Berlin in 1948; the GDR Wall,
which appearetl overnight as
barbed wire and sharp metal-
chisiered barricades in August,
1961; the vulnerability of West
Bel lin as a de jure state of the
federal Republic, which the
Western powers and NATO are
committed to defend against
"anj attack. from any quarter
as an attack upon their forces and
themselves' (London
Declaration of October 3, 195 I).
This is hardly calculated to
excite West German investment,
and Haase points to a token
DM44 million input into small
business enterprise as West
Berlin's "share" of an otherwise
busk and innovative West
German commercial-industrial
enterprise. Essentially, the in-
ternationally prestigious
Sc he ring Pharmaceutical
Company is the only giant
complex that still maintains its
home office here.
FOR BERLIN, says Haase.
not even the inauguration of
Ostpolitik policy with the
Quadripartite agreement of 1972
guaranteeing the transit of
civ ilians and goods between Hast
and West Germany more
specifically the two Berlins
lias helped to stimulate West
German investment in this once
great political, cultural and
industrial center.
Only electrical engineering and
the production ol electrical
Continued on Page 4-C
East German Soldier Stands Guard
l_JL
JC
National Militia Guardsman stands before the 'Neue Wache' [today, Memorial for
the Victims of Fascism] on Unter den Linden in East Berlin


Page4-C
+Jeist> fhricUar
Friday. October 26
History Statistics Support Anxieties of West Berlin
Continued from Page 3-C
energy is West Berlin's major
significant enterprise. "We must
be self-sufficient.'' explains
Haase. The GDR won't provide
us with power and. isolated as we
are. we can't get it from our home
bases in West Germany either
Statistics: West Berlin
produces 2.250 megawatts of
elect ncal power against a need of
1.800 megawatts, leaving a
slender 450 megawatt reserve. In
a word, this is West Berlin's only
major industry, accounting for a
whopping 28 percent of its total
enterprise.
WHAT IS West Berlins
future beyond its symbolic
status, where nostalgia for the
greatness of the past is tampered
by a gaudy, quick-tempoed
western, more specifically
American, surface of decadent
splendor?
Haase smokes and sighs. "We
try to attract other West Ger-
mans here for conventions, or
even as tourists. We are at-
tempting to resuscitate the old
Berlin as a center of our ancient
history, culture and tradition."
To give a boost to Berlin as a
center of prominence, the Federal
Republic recently established the
Federal Office of Environmental
Protection here a government
agency in this outpost of West
German civilization.
OTHER SIGHTS, however,
seem less optimistic. Culturally,
the city is vibrant on the surface
but. as Die Stachelschweine
production indicates, it is a
vibrance not self-motivating, but
merely swinging to the
memorized tunes of a long-gone
past.
The once-great University of
Berlin is now the Free University
founded in Dahlem by students
and teachers in 1948. But the
tripling of its student body since
then to some 35.000 and more
today, coupled with the Rudi
Dutschke demonstrations of the
era marked by student unrest,
has fashioned it into a politically
left-leaning campus with little of
the spirit or the academic en-
terprise it once boasted.
The new house of the Deutsche
:: i!:; a. Bil" :> \l M 't S
jj*md n .
:ij^xj _
View of East Berlin: Left is St. Mary's Church Center is the ubiquitous
Television Tower a visitor can see from the air and from anywhere in West Berlin
along the Wall. Right is the House of the Council of Ministers.
Oper Berlin, opened in Sep-
tember. 1961. is again a pale
reflection of an illustrious past. A
production I saw of Wagner's
Der Fliegende Hollander there
was disappointing in every
respect. To understand what a
German opera can be at its
breathtaking best, I had to wail
for a performance of Mozart's
Zauberflote at the National
Opera Theatre in Munich. Berlin
seems to have lost much of the
capacity for its once-great
musical genius too.
HAASE MINCES no words.
Bj 1990. West Berlin's In-
digenous German population
aj well fall to 1.5 million, and
our foreign community may well
rise above the 200.000 mark. We
do not reproduce ourselves
despite government incentives.
Kindergelt. of monthly
allowances to couples for from
din- to up to three children.''
He laughs raspingly. the
cigaret smoke escaping from him
in bursting clouds ot blue. "But
the Pakistanis, the Turks, the
A former 'Wehrmacht' officer tells me: 'The trouble with Berlin is that there are no
Jews here anymore.' I refrain from reminding him why that is. Instead, I wait to
hear his view of things. It is matter-of-fact: 'There is no real art in Berlin no
culture anymore. It has all left with the Jews'. The post-war history of the city
supports [these]. anxieties: the Soviet attempt to blockade Berlin in 1948;
the GDR Wail, which appeared overnight as barbed wire and sharp metal-
clustered barricades in August, 1961; the vulnerability of West Berlin as a dejure
state of the Federal Republic, which the Western powers and NATO are com-
mitted to defend against 'any attack from any quarter as an attack upon their
forces and themselves

Greeks, the Yugoslavs
Italians they take t3
allowances seriously
Haase. a good politician.dm-
no verbal conclusion, but thl
implication is clear the "wrongl
people are having all the babies I
I ASK Haase about GermJ
reunification. Is it a distanT
possibility? I recall the]
Rooseveltian imperative u
ignore Winston Churchill",
warning about the Russians an
the Stalinist legacy he left to i
angry Harry Truman at Potsd
with no choice but to agree t
divided Berlin and a divide
Germany.
For a moment. Haase loses!
himself as no other official I hav
spoken to here or elsewhere m
Germany has permuted himsebL
to do. He refers to Karl DoeniuJ
^rand admiral and architect o
.he German U-Boat fleet, wb
ook over as Chancellor
Germany for 23 days in May,
1945. after Hitlers self]
immolation in a Berlin bunker.
"We had nothing left, sa.nl
Haase. "no planes, no ships, nol
guns. Doenitz begged the AUiesI
to let his forces join them ml
rousting out the Russians. Wei
were no threat anymore, and wel
could have been a help They|
wouldn't listen
"But," I say. we didn't.._
you to roust out the Russians I
us. We could have kept theme.
ourselves if we wanted to.Ontb
contrary, it was our decision I
let them in.'
"NOTHING HAS changed, j
says Haase. "Even ill
reunification were possible, thej|
don't want it."
Who' I ask.
"None of the old Allies."
says. "All "I you let them in."
In all m> sta) in Germany!
this is as close as 1 get tobiitsl
commentary from .i dermal
official about World War II.
Haase pull- himsell togeibal
and returns diplomatically total
subject at hand, the future oil
West Berlin. "We .ire trying |
energize it." he says hopefullyf
But Die Stachehchu-eine n|
belling against him
First Steps on German Soil
Berlin Today: Nucleus of a State, Isolated Outpost
Continued from Page 2-C
on either side of it to memorialize
an even earlier German past.
ONE SENSES in this archi-
tectural polyglot the ambivalent
national need to concede the
justice of Germany's defeat in the
Hitler era. At the same time, the
twin towers frame the evidence in
the old baroque Gedachtniskirche
of the barbarity of the bombing
of Berlin and a clear willing-
ness to concede to the barbarity
of war itself. Its stairway, now
visible to the outside like an
eviscerated corpse and ascending
nowhere, emphasizes the am-
bivalence toward two German
pasts projected upon a feeling of
confidence in a vigorous and
democratic German future.
An ironic twist is that daily
here, at this site so fraught with
symbols of what was and is yet tc
be, gather the city's disaffected:
young hippie-types naked to the
waste, smoking and drinking and
carrying on a constant, mildly-
intoxicated, naively political
badinage with passers-by. If the
Gedacntniskirche attempts to
suggest a new German har-
monious whole, they do not. And
the fact is that a subsurface
struggle exists here in West
Berlin between an ancient
German past and a tinsel inter-
national present marked by pros-
perity and plenty.
THE STRUGGLE is com-
plicated further by the sour,
totalitarian East German
presence in East Berlin only a
stone's throw away and the ana-
chronistic territorial division of
West Berlin among the three
western allied "occupying"
powers the United States,
France and Great Britain. The
Russian sector, of course, is the
crowning glory of East Berlin.
If this trio is largely a geo-
political relic from World War II,
the Soviet-controlled German
Democratic Republic of East
Germany is hardly that at all. On
the contrary, the GDR is like an
amoeba whose nucleus is, simply,
Berlin.
Only to tourists from the west
do GDR police and guides refer
grudgingly to the divided status
of their capital city. Their lips
tighten, their tongues slur as
they make mumbled reference
to West Berlin. It is clear they
prefer not to think of Berlin as
divided, their capital city a
gaping wound. To a western
observer, this is a part of history
they can not rewrite in the same
way that they rewrite it for their
constituents in the east.
FROM THE West German
point of view. Berlin of 1979 is
not Berlin of 1939 or 1900 or
any other time. Berlin is no
longer Germany's capital city
Bonn is. It is not the nucleus of
the state, as it is for the GDR.
For the Federal Republic of
Germany, for West Germany,
Berlin is a throbbing symbol of
ancient glories and a silent hope
for a reunified future about which
not even politicians have spoken
to me here except in the most
vaguely idealistic terms.
If the GDR is an amoeba and
Berlin its nucleus, West Berlin
for the Federal Republic is an
isolated outpost in the Iron
Curtain heartland, a determined
sign that the last word on the
boundaries of Eastern Europe
were far from spoken at Potsdam
after World War II.
Still, there is evidence that
Berlin is such a sign only for
West Berliners themselves, and
perhaps even for them not as
much as it once was. For people
elsewhere to whom I have spoken
in Germany, Berlin is a distant
place, suitably symbolic, yes.
indeed almost mystical. But that
is the problem with Berlin. It is
almost too distant. It poses too
many logistical problems for the
rest of the country. Like all
symbols, it is essentially a fable.
And the persistent question
repeats itself: Is it worth all the
trouble?
TO A West German, say. in
- Hamburg or even in the fairvlana
of Garmisch-Partenkirchen or
Oberammergau, the answer is
clear. Berlin is a symbol they do
not care to afford. The geo-
political isolation of Berlin, tne
vast attendant economic
problems involved in maintaining
Berlin as a western showcase in
Communist Eastern Europe
these are objectives that have no
meaning for them. In fact. *
makes them nervous.
What can be deduced from all
of this is that Berlin, once
flourishing center of art. scJenT
philosophy, commerce and >
dustry, is today a weighty s>m-
bol recalling unhappy memone*
of the Great War and st.U
"proof today that the Grea
War is far from over, a
needing dedicated and W
support both from all1 of
Federal Republic and what new
become its alliance partners.
m


^.October 26, lfW
+Jmlstl Ihiiiicir
Page5-C
A Sad
1 Remnant
Of Jews
ffEST BERLIN The
IJewish Community Center on the
[fasanenstrasse
here
is
Imodemistic building. Before its
ands in niemonain the
radit.onal styled entranceway
& old synagogue situated on
tt, 7s hi) that was
Idestroved on Kristallnacht
lv;uirll. B, the infamous
[niirtil ol ili'' Nazi destruction of
l0ur MX) Jewish houses of
Iworshipthroughout Germany.
The old entranceway is all that
|. left ol 11"' <'i'1' renowned
Synagogue Today, security
Iniliiv patrol llie Center and its
[facilities with machineguns
Erawn and at the ready.
IF NOTHING else is left of the
.Id synagogue, someone, a man
|of considerable distinction, has
[managed to survive the Hiterlian
[decimation of Berlin's pre-
ISalional Socialist community of
172,000 Jews. He is Heinz
iGalinski.
Galinski, mostly bald, has an
Itnergy that belies his having
[lived through this agonizing
lexperience. I am struck by his
youthful appearance
[the smoothness and clarity of his
[skin, the brilliant determination
|of his eyes.
It is astonishing to learn that
|he survived forced labor at
Siemens in Berlin and later
deportation to Auschwitz, where
he saw the murder of his first wife
and of his mother. His father,
erhaps mercifully, died under
rrest in a Berlin police station.
\uschwitz was not Galinski s
bnly torture. There were also
DoraNordhausen and Bergen-
Belsen. All of these, he survived
is well.
GALINSKTS expression is
Essentially deadpan. He does not
dk about these experiences with
^motion of any kind that I can
ear or see. They are over. Now,
here is the present his
ciation with the Central
federation of the Jews of Ger-
many as director of the Jewish
ommunity of Berlin and the
Jewish Community Center itself
pre on the Fasanenstrasse.
It is this cold realism that
lives Galinski his reputation as
i "tough customer" with the
Mnite determination of the old
ynagogue entranceway that has
pso managed to survive its
pstart tormentors. I am warned
\y some German friends to be
"fill not to ask dull or
ointless questions, with which
Minski, I am promised, will
how no patience at all.
No one defines for me what
PgfU would consider dull or
Dtless, and so I don't know
* to prepare myself for our
leeting. It is only days later, in
fy talks with other German
aers, when Galinski's name is
sually mentioned, that they
ar at me in awe and ask: "And
ou managed to survive him ?"
AS GERMANY'S official
ollective Jew, Galinski's name in
"ght quarters never fails to
wise Some secret sense of
puecuve guilt. It is not an at-
PWe of hostility with which
r8?, leaders are reacting out-
Cm y lward Galinski and his
JPfosedly difficult nature;
B. ll, is a Profound ad-
Fation for him tinged with a
forael of Sehnsucht, an inner
[ l ining over the tragedy of past
"ery and what it has wrought,
aBr*} have already learned
>>. v,when to Pursue and when
' avoid.
' Galinski is considered a
Rebuilt Jewish Community Center on the Fasanenstrasse in West Berlin
HEINZ GALINSKI: A reputation as a 'tough customer'
the local and state governments'
willingness to assist.
PAST THE machinegun -
toting police in the courtyard
outside is a glass-enclosed
security office in the Community
Center hallway. Despite my
status as a government guest,
despite my guide who flashes her
official verification documents,
despite my name on an ap-
pointment log posted in the
security office for that hour on
that day, I am requested to open
jew, a*m
%tZnse oJcoUectwe guOL It is not an attitude of
hoZty with which these leaders are reacting out'
^ttllllrlrf^WNN'j*.**
"tough customer" who, like the
traditional entranceway to the
old Fasanenstrasse synagogue
'managed to survive, it is that he
has been a tough bargainer for
the rights of the remnant 6,000-
member Jewish community here
and for the memory of the
165,000 plus Jews who did not.
Both the Federal Republic and
West Berlin itself have responded
admirably to his demands in their
behalf, but the public relations
price Galinski has had to pay is
high. So is the price high for both

my camera bag. All of my lenses
are removed from their individual
cases and examined. I am told to
point my camera away from us
toward the ground, and to fire off
a shot.
The shutter clicks and
reverberates in the stony silence
of the marble corridors beyond.
Apparently, I pass the test and
am waved forward with a patient
smile, while I fumble with the
gadgets of optical paraphernalia
that somehow seem denuded and
violated and that are begging to
.be returned to the safety of their
plush cases and the darkness of
my camera bag.
IN HIS office, Heinz Galinski
sits impassively, challenging me
to begin the interview. I try to
make a mental note about the
dull and pointless questions to
.avoid. I begin, as Aristotle in-
structed us all, at the beginning:
"If there are 6,000 Jews in
Berlin "
"More or less," Galinski in-
terrupts me, and it seems that
already I have done something
wrong. "It may be as few as 5,000
or more than six. Not everyone
who is Jewish reports this to the
community."
That is an important issue, I
learn, because there is a "church
head tax" which helps to support
houses of worship.
"How many Jews are there in
Germany today?"
"Possibly 28,000. Possibly
30,000. What you are getting at,"
he says, "is a comparison with
pre-Nazi figures."
"Yes."
"We had a Jewish community
of 172,000 in Berlin and 540.000
in all of Germany."
THE CONTRAST, although
well known to me, is shocking
nevertheless, and it brings
stinging tears of resentment to
my eyes. Galinski ignores the
moment of emotion in me with
but a trace of irritation. His
furrowless face, his milk white
skin without a single blemish or
wrinkle, his rosy cheeks seem
almost sculpturesque. I see in it
two Germanys a replica of the
two entranceways to the Com-
munity Center outside.
"What brought you back," I
ask, "after the holocaust?"
"You mean," he says with the
cutting edge of a razorblade,
"why didn't I go to Palestine? Or
to the United States?"
' "Yes."
"What makes you feel safer as
la Jew in America?" Galinski
wants to know. "I read that you
ire experiencing a growing
current of anti-Semitism over
|there. As for Nazi hate literature
,in Germany, most of it comes to
us from Nebraska and Virginia."
CLEARLY, that was one of
i.he dull and pointless questions I
Iliad been warned not to ask. Still,
.ialinski's answer seems both
agitated and inaccurate. It is true
that the Nazi hate literature
coming to West Germany from
America is considerable in
volume, but there is enough of
,he home grown variety here to
satisfy an army of anti-Semites. I
want to tell Galinski that there
are no police with machineguns
patrolling American synagogues
either, at least not yet, or glass
cage security offices in their
entrance lobbies.
i "It is very simple," Galinski
says, his voice suddenly sof-
tening. "I came back to Berlin
' after the liberation to look for
| members of my family. I had no
other purpose no other plans. I
i began helping the Joint
Distribution Committee in their
work with the DP's. And then the
government asked me to remain
here to assist in reorganizing
the Jewish community, or what
was left of it," he adds with no
trace of bitterness.
OFFICIALLY, Galinski
became chairman of the Jewish
community on April 1, 1949. "I
also came back," he explains,
"because of the extremely liberal
attitude toward the Jews and
because of the attractive Jewish
life one can live in Berlin."
"And you are not afraid of
another attack a second
holocaust?" I ask.
"In God's name, no. Are you
Continued on Page 15-C


Page6-C
1
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Extremism on Right
Germany's 'CIA' on Guard
Against Enemies of Freedom
BONN This capital city
the West German Federal
Republic residents here prefer
to call Bonn a "village" boasts
the presence amid its exotic
medieval streets of the house in
which Ludwig Van Beethoven
was born and lived his early life.
Beethoven was one of those
odd characters who made much
of freedom. He dedicated his
Symphony N. 3, the Eroica. to
Napoleon I when Beethoven
regarded Napolean as the
salvation of Europe.
And he tore up the dedication
page when in the end it was clear
to him. with Napoleon ham
mering away at the gates of
Vienna, that the French Emperor
was no savior at all. but in fact an
extremist dictator.
EXTREMISM and dic-
tatorship are still very much a
part of the conscious concerns of
Bonn today. Here, at the
Ministry of the Interior, the man
in charge of internal intelligence
for the Vervassungsschutz of the
West German Federal Republic
wages a complex war against
political extremism and counter-
espionage. He also masterminds
the surveillance of what are
tactfully called "risky
foreigners."
He is Dr. Gerhard Kohler, who
has had a varied career prior to
his present post, which he took
up in 1969. Before that. Kohler
was involved in civil aviation
security. He has had legal
training, and he did a tour of
duty at the NATO Defense
College.
Kohler explains the Federal
Court's ban of the National'
Socialist Party back in 195? by
commenting on the new Ger-
many's democratic system. "The
ban must be understood.' he
says, "in terms of how we define
a democratic system."
THE BAN. says Kohler, is a
juridical, not a political decision
"It is the Federal Court that ha-
decided against the Nazi Party in
the sense that if you legalize your
enemies, then your enemies are
free to attempt to destroy you."
The allusion is to the great
pre-HiUer Weimar Republic.
What good, argues Kohler, is a
democratic system, so superb in
its tolerance, that it permits itself
to be destroyed by subversive
forces a democratic system
which, in the end, does not
survive to achieve its mandated
purposes?
The 1952 Federal Court ban al-
so excluded the Communists as
a legal party for just as potent a
reason the Federal Republic's
proximity to East Germany
particularly, and the Soviet
empire in Eastern Europe
generally.
BUT NEITHER the ban
against the Nazis nor the
Communists has cleansed the
Federal Republic of the
challenges these extremist forces
constantly pose. Kohler concedes
that Germany today is a proving
ground for terrorism from both
the extreme right and the ex-
treme left, although he would like
it to be understood that terrorism
exists elsewhere, as well. In Italy,
for example, it is a political way
of life that challenges the very
existence of the government. And
then there was the attempt on the
life of NATO Chief Commander
Alexander Haig just days before
Kohler was making this very
point.
Despite the problem in Ger-
many, it is minuscule compared
to the Italian problem. And to
place all of that into clearer
perspective still, Dr. Kohler
emphasizes that only a decade
ago things were even worse. "We
had 28,000 known members of
the Nationaldemokratische
Partei Deutschlands (NPD) in
1969. and we actually feared for
the outcome of our elections.
A 5 percent clause in the
Federal Republic's election laws
assures that fractional parties are
ineligible for seats in the
Parliament, and this has ap-
parently achieved wonders in
keeping the number of viable
parties down to a healthy
working coalition in straining
away "mini-winners."
THIS RULE also works
against known extremists whose
parties masquerade in the cloak
of political respectability since
the 1952 Federal Court ban
against the National Socialists.
"What we were afraid of in
1969,' emphasizes Kohler. "is
that there would be enough
extremists to break through the 5
percent barrier. In politics as in
anything else, whenever you give
certification to fractional forces,
you encourage the creation of
counterproductive coalitions
whose purpose may well be to
destroy the legitimate state. In
and of themselves, each is a
security risk. United, they
become a threat."
But then, an observer here
notes, the 5 percent barrier may
also deny legitimacy to :,erfectly
innocent parties whose intent is
to help the dominant democratic
system achieve its mandated
purposes in a perfectly innocent
way parties which are outside
the political mainstream for
legitimate reasons. Doesn't this
lead to yet another problem,
which is to rationalize the new
Germany's democratic system
with a ruling that, on an ar-
bitrary mathematical basis,
frustrates political dissent?
KOHLER denies this. The 5
percent barrier is intended to
frustrate extremism, not dissent,
unless the object of our
discussion is to widen the
meaning of dissent to embrace
extremism. If the Weimar
Republic's tragic demise fails to
make the point sufficiently clear,
Kohler points to Charles de
Gaulle's struggle against the
proliferation of political parties in
France that repeatedly
precipitated governmental crises
because there was simply no way
for representative government to
function under those corrosive
circumstances.
And to David Ben-Gurion in
Israel, who had a problem almost
exactly duplicating the French,
and that also sent him into the
lists to cut down political party
fractionalism.
To whatever extent the 5
percent barrier may or may not
be responsible for it. the fact is.
savs Kohler. that in 1979 the
Nationaldemokratische Partei
Deutschlands may still be our
biggest extreme right
organization. But its membership
has fallen to below 8.000, or .01
percent of the barrier. This means
it has lost two-thirds of its power
potential of a decade ago." That
is why. he observes, things have
"much improved" since 1969.
IN WHAT way is the NPD
different from the NS Party
against which the Federal Court
ruled in 1952?
"The National Socialists were
open and frank in their attempt
to revive Hitlerian Nazism. The
NPD appears to be less blatant.
There is no doubt about what
they have in mind, but they
disguise it more successfully."
If there is no doubt about what
they have in mind, why doesn't
the Federal Court move against
the NPD also, which was founded
us late as November. 1964 and
which only four years later
worried Germany so?
"As I said before, banning a
party or any political movement
is a juridical and not a political
decision. We would have to run
the risk that the court wouldn't
agree with our assessment of the
parly as a threat to the stability
of the Federal Republic. The
court might, for example, follow
your argument: that to declare
ihem illegitimate would be to
deny their right of dissent. This
kind of blow to the government's
case would only add prestige to
the party in the eyes of the
public.
"IN EFFECT." argues Kohler.
the public would conclude that
if the government finds nothing
wrong' with the NPD. then the
NPD must be respectable. We
believe that by refusing to
challenge the NPD in the courts,
we have let the party speak for
itself. Its consistently declining
fortune at the polls makes it a far
less serious political force than
ever."
Adds Kohler: "In fact, the
party today is debt-ridden and in
serious trouble."
Does the 5 percent barrier work
against other Nazi parties or
organizations or movements in
Germany that the government
has marked for prosecution?
"First of all." says Kohler,
"the 1952 Federal Court ban
applies to all such organizations.
Their literature is forbidden. So
are traditional Nazi symbols and
demonstrations that can not be
distinguished from agitation. In
a word, Nazis and Nazi activity
are forbidden in Germany by
federal law.
"BUT TO answer the question
specifically: Here, in our section
ot the Interior Ministry, we
Continued on Page 7-C
The ban, says Kohner, i* a juridical, not apolitical decision. 'It is the Federal
Court that has decided agamnt the NaziParty in the sense that if you legalize
your enemies, then your enemies are free to attempt to destroy you.' the
allusion is to the great pre-HUler Weimar Republic. What good, argues
Kohler, is a democratic system, so superb in its tolerance, that H permits
itself to be destroyed by subversive forces a democratic system which, in'
the end, does not survive to achieve its mandated purposes t
DR. GERHARD KOHLER: A juridical decision
tfmmsnsawnwsnreuwnwnnummwnMnwnmnmmnwneaai '
] Active Prosecution
Of Nazis Continuing

BONN Speak of Germany,
and invariably someone will say
thai political extremism did not
die with the death of Adolf
Hitler. Furthermore, it will be
said that extremism exists in
Germany because too many
Germans remain sympathetic to
their various causes and that the
government does precious little
either to discourage or to punish
it.
During my stay here, the
following things occur:
I Bremen Social Democrat
Hans Stefan Seifriz, senator for
construction and public works,
resigns from the Bundestag:
t Erwin Schonborn, leader of
the Kampfbund deutsher Solda-
ten, a right wing extremist
organization, is sentenced to 18
months imprisonment;
0 Former Concentration Camp
Dr. Aribert Heim is fined DM500
thousand (approximately a
quarter of a million dollars I;
9 Four defendants are arrested
in the by now 'spectacular
Dusseldorf trial of war criminals
(it has been going on over three
and a half years) for their role in
the slaying of hundreds of
thousands of victims at
Maidanek Concentration Camp;
The Federal Republic tries,
unsuccessfully, to extradite
former Concentration Camp
Commander Gustav Franz
Wagner from Brazil;
The Federal Republic
focuses on the notorious Dr.
Josef Mengele, citizen of
Paraguay, whose presence in
Paraguay one month later would
bring President Alfred
Stroessner's growing em-
barrassment to a head, causing
Paraguay to revoke Mengele's
citizenship, which Stroessner
conferred on Mengele in the first
place, and the possibility of his
extradition one step closer;
9 Preparations are finalized for
the trial in Cologne on Oct. 23 of
Dr. Kurt Lischka and two other
former Gestapo members, Ernst
Heinrichsohn and Herberg
Hagen, on charges of respon-
sibility and complicity in the
deporting of at least 73.000
French Jews to Auschwitz and in
the murder of at least 33.000 of
these people
None of these items even
faintly matches the government's
incalculable achievement on July
3. in eliminating the Statute of
Limitations on the prosecution of
war criminals beyond its
December 31. 1979 deadline. But
they give at least some sense of
insecurity to the argument that
Bonn is insensitive to or remiss in
punishing extremists and former
Nazi murderers in their midst
under any and all circumstances
HANS Stefan Seifriz is a case
in point. At age 17, in a Nazi
newspaper, he equated Jewry
with Bolshevism and capitalism
and wrote that they must be
"totally annihilated.''
In 1961. Seifriz ran for election
to the Bundestag and made I
frank public confession of his
past. He won on the basis thati
man ought to have the right to
say he was wrong and be given
the opportunity for a fresh start
Doubtless, he also won because
there were many Germans who
voted for Seifriz precisely
because they continued to agree
with his ugly sentiments at age
17. But election as a senator is
one thing. Elevation to the post
of a cabinet minister is another.
The former is popular consensus
- the will of the voting pubW-
The latter is a governmental
decision. A cabinet miniiMj
ought to be beyond reproach
least, so argued the Bundestag"
its move to unseat him from V
construction and public wono
responsibilities. Hence
resignation.
ERWIN SCHONBORNScase
is less morally complicate.
Seifriz resigned after yean"
public service in high 0W
Schonborn, 64. never gave "F
being the Nazi. His 18-month
sentence in Frankfurt "
punishment for hto Mg
Strdcher-like mocking of we**
tims of the Nazi regime^
pamphlets published Dy
organization.
Sentencing Judge Wen*
Kunish called Schojbjj
'completely incorrigible, n
Continued on Page 9-C


Friday, October 26,1979
+JewistiFk>ridHan
Page 7-C
On Guard Against Extreme Right- Wing Activists
Continued from Page 6-C
distinguish between Nazi and
neo-Nazi.*'
Is it denied officially, then,
that there is no Nazi activity in
Germany today?
"To the contrary. But we call
this activity neo-Nazi. That
doesn't make the neo-Nazis legal.
It doesn't give them respec-
tability. But the distinction in
terminology is important. It
shows a national awareness that
the ld Nazi ways are not legal,
air not respectable. It puts
extreme right-wingers on notice
thai they have no structure
available to them around which
they can rally today.
"As for Nazis." Here. Dr.
Kohler points at me. "Old-line
Nazism." he declares, "comes
from your part of the world."
And he readily confesses that
U.S.-brand Nazism is a thorn in
the side of the Ver-
fassungsschutz.
So much Nazi literature
comes from the United States,"
he says. "For example, Lincoln,
Nilii.. and Arlington, Va. We
can't slop the flow as much as we
would like. America is not our
only headache. The British
National Front has strong ties
here, too."
IN TERMS of neo-Nazis, then,
does the government forbid their
activities, prosecute their
leaders? Aren't they more blatant
than, say, the NPD, if that is the
government's measure for
prosecution?
"All the time, and successfully,
loo. The NPD is only one neo-
Nazi organization in Germany,
and it has its own youth group.
Die Jungen Nationaldemokraten
but we are well-informed on 24
more," with what Kohler
estimates to be a membership of
some 1.300 persons. "You can see
how fractionated they are."
Besides, there are other extremist
right-wing bodies than neo-Nazi,
and the Verfassungsschutz
counts in all 83, with a mem-
bcrship of 17.800 (this figure
steins from late 1977-early 1978).
Who belongs to such
organizations? Germany today is
the most powerful nation in
Western Europe. There are no
"old wounds" to avenge, such as
Versailles after World War I. The
middle class is wealthy. Workers
arc well-paid. As for anti-
Semitism and the fabled canard
that Jews "control everything so
that there is nothing left for real
Germans,' "' the Jewish com-
munity is a pathetic remnant of
less than 30,000 souls from its
pre-Hitler half-million.
"YOU WILL always find
fanatics." observes Kohler.
'Ours is a marvelous democratic
society today I hope you agree
- but it is only three decades
old. with a rejectionist history
that is frightening. We don't
have a 400-year-old American
Pilgrim tradition of freedom, a
1.500-year-old British tradition
that lists London's lord mayors
beginning with the sixth century
on a commemorative tablet in St.
Paul's Cathedral. In Germany,
we celebrated the Bun-
desregierung's 30th anniversary
only last May. The unhappy fact
is there are malcontents who'd
like to do it in."
Like whom?
"Right-wing extremism is a
catch-all for laborers, the less
educated, the unskilled, what you
call blue-collar people. They are
not sophisticated. There is no real
ideology but the discontent it-
self."
I FURTHERMORE, right-wing
extremists don't cooperate with
one another and for this reason,
observes Kohler, they are less
dangerous than they would be
otherwise.
"We are lucky in this, but
unlucky in the fact that they look
WHERE AND HOW IT ALL STARTED: Hitler hoodlums battle in the streets of Munich in their
infamous Putsch of November 9,1923. Shown with the flag is Heinrich Himmler.
A wildly-cheering SA formation in Berlin's Olympic Stadium awaits an address by Adolf Hitler.
for central ideology and support
from abroad," he says, "the old-
line Nazi prototypes, and that's
why the hate literature coming in
from other countries is such a
problem. It galvanizes the mal-
contents in a way that their
clandestine movements can't and
it makes them hard-core."
Kohler confesses, however,
that there is plenty of German
right-wing literature to deal
with, as well. There has been a
significant decline from a high of
extreme right-wing publications
in 1975 of 93,800 copies to 60,000
copies at the beginning of 1978
(last available tabulation). But
decline or not, this is a sub-
stantial number.
These figures include
periodicals ranging from Nation-
aldemokratische Schriften (NPD
literature) to Schriften derNeuen
Rechten (literature of the New
Right).
If West Germany has extreme
right-wing problems, it also has
them on the left, and the Verfas-
sungsschutz is in some ways
more taken up with their ac-
tivities than with those of the
right.
"SO FAR," explains Kohler,
"there have been no murders
attributed to right-wing hangers-
on. The left-wing commits
murders as a matter of political
policy. It is also better organized,
better financed."
This is at least true for the
Moscow trained Communists
in West Germany's midst. The
Maoists (Red i_nina-onented
Historic photo shows Hitler as he leaves Landsberg Prison after six
months of incarceration.
Communists) are by no means as
well organized, he declares.
Generally, what makes the left-
wing extremists more of a
security concern than their right-
wing counterparts is that they
are far better educated. Their
activities bear Kohler out.
The right-wingers, fractionated
and in debt, demonstrate, publish
hate literature, make threatening
noises, engage in bank robbery to
bolster their sagging finances
and to acquire weapons. They are
anti-Semitic and enjoy van-
dalizing Jewish institutions such
as are left in Germany today,
including cemeteries and national
"shrines of shame" reminding
Germans of the Hitler period.
A FAVORITE target, for
example, is the prestigious
Institute for Contemporary
History in Munich, which is
dedicated to documenting the
Hitler era and the Nazi "final
solution" to the Jewish problem.
Continued on Page 8-C


Page8-C
u--------
+Je*ist> tTcrMian
Friday, October 26,]
On Guard
Againt
The Right
Continued from Page 7-C
They call the Institute eine Sch-
windelfirma a swindle
organization.'' Or else, say, the
Kampfbund Deutcher Soldaten
iKDS) argues that "not a single
Jew (was) gassed in a
German concentration camp."
The variations of their work are
predictable and infinite
But left-wing extremists, being
more sophisticated are. as Kohler
points out. also more deadly.
Their organizations have a broad
range of political opinion which is
more sharply focused
ideologically, appealing to
support against social and
economic injustice rather than to
the old Nazi racial proverbs.
Those who come to identify with
left-wing extremism do not feel
that they are responding to the
kind of bankrupt theories that
destroyed Germany in World
War II, which were tested and
found wanting morally and every
other way. Communism has not
been tested in West Germany,
and to its adherents, it seems
that Communism is a more egal-
itarian, more successful force
than the Western Capitalism
which came into an easy alliance
with surviving Nazi remnants
after the war.
IF THEIR motivation is a
delusion, the organizations they
have built up are not. Among
them:
Deutsche Kommunistische
Partei (DKP);
$ Sozialistische Einheits
Partei Westberlins I SEW I;
Marxistische Studenten-
band Spartakus I MSB I;
9 Sozialistische Deutsche
Arbeiterjugend ISDAJ).
9 Rote Armee Fraktion
[RAF).
There are, among others,
orthodox Soviet-oriented groups
as opposed to the New Left,
which is Maoist-oriented and of
which Der Kommunistische
Bund Westdeutschland (KBW| is
by far the strongest, although no
match for the more militant,
better-financed Muscovites.
In addition to being better
organized. extreme left
hangers on are more numerous
than the neo-Nazis and the New
Right. Figures for the end of
1977-beginning of 1978 (the most
recent available) show a healthy
affiliation of 100,300 and the
impact, therefore, of the powerful
support they receive firm their
Muscovite sources.
THE QUESTION is put
again: If Germany has made
such a remarkable social and
economic recovery from the
Hitler era, and if things seem to
be going so well for the nation,
then why is it such a magnet for
political extremism of the right
and left wings? And this raises
yet another question: Why has
Germany attracted extremist am:
terrorist organizations on boti-
sides of the political spectrun
from other nations, as well, noi I
only Nazis in America and
England, but, say, the Japanese
Red Army with its ties to the
indigenous Rote Armee Fraktion
(RAF), the Irian Republican
Army, ana the Palestine
Liberation Organization?
Can it be that they anticipated
sympathetic German reaction to
their activities in the light of past
history? f
Kohler denies this out of hand.
The Palestinians and the IRA, he
says, are more exotic facets of the
kind of extremism that
Europeans and Americans are
generally accustomed to. But the
Communists and their offshoots
mainly seek to destabilize the
state and to frighten the country
Montage of the must heads of
extreme left-wing publica-
tions Verfass tngsschuti
surveillance keep- an eye on
the left, us well as the right
Bonn see- thi "mtc
dangerous than :>;> nitht be-
cause it is -<> well-financed
by brutal crimes, including, of
course, murder. They seek to
offer evidence that the state is
incapable of defending the public
against them. That is why.
mainly, they victimize people of
high profile socially, econom-
ically, politically.
WHAT GERMANY
demonstrates, declares Kohler, is
what Italy has long since
demonstrated and what
Americans, especially, have not
yet seen at first hand the
brutality of the extreme left that
is not PLO or IRA: the brutality
of mainline Communism, whether
of the Muscovite or the Maoist
persuasions. The RAF is an
exquisite example. There is
nothing in the German social
experience itself that makes
Germany a stage for this, argues
Kohler. Rather, it is in the
German Communists and their
left-wing extremist prototypes
themselves, who are gambling
that they can be successful at
embarrassing the state because
German democracy is still so
young.
As key to understanding this,
Kohler emphasizes the need to
question why right wing ex-
tremism here has few leaders of
international reputation. But the
leftists make world headlines
with Ingrid Schubert, Helmut
Pohl, Gudrun Ensalin and Jan-
Carl Raspe not to mention the
fabled Andreas Baader Ulrike
Meinhof duo, whose manifesto
was, "You can kill revo-
lutionaries not the revo-
lution," and which rationalized
kidnaping and murder as "an
armed anti-imperialistic of-
fensive." Also making headlines
were some of their most notorious
murders:
Jurgen Ponto. chairman of
the board. Deutsche Bank:
Dr. Hanns Martin Schley-
er, president of the Board of
German Industries;
Siegfried Buback, Federal
Republic Attorney General,
charged by the RAF with "direct
responsibility for the murder of
Holger Meins, Siegfried Hausner
and Ulrike Meinhof";
Wolfgang Gobel, George
Wurster. Heinz Marcisz. Helmut
Ulmer, Reinhold Brandle and
Roland Pieler, in the company of
Ponto. Schleyer and Buback
when they were attacked.
"Exotic" though the PLO
may be in European and
American terms. Kohler does not
deny the impact of Palestinian
terrorism in West Germany.
"They scored heavily and
tragically" in Munich in 1972, he
says, recalling the PLO murder of
11 Israeli athletes at the Olympic
Games. "The result is," he ob-
serves, "that the Israelis doubt
whether we do enough in our
struggle against extremism, left
or right."
Nazism particularly?
"THAT, of course, but against
extremism generally. and
especially the Palestinians. The
Israelis try to confront the PLO
all over the world, and the
Federal Republic is no exception
lor them, ihis can cause
problems, when the secret police
of another country engages its
enemies in one's own country. We
have good cooperation with other
authorities abroad on the PLO.
including Israel. But we can't
tolerate foreign intelligence
operations in West Germany
not when it is against our in-
terests."
And now especially it is
against Germany's interests,
when there is a radical shift in the
Federal Republic's policy toward
the Palestinians? In effect, by
German interests, you mean
Arab oil?
"That is a blunt question, and
it presupposes an entirely ex-
pedient political condition. It
igonores. for example, the 11
Palestinians who were recently
arrested trying to enter Ger-
many, and our intelligence leads
up to believe that their target
was Israeli interests, not Federal
Republic interests.
"IT ALSO ignores the fact
that the PLO has a bureau in
East Berlin not in our country.
Or that we suffer their activities
here because we are absolutely
determined in our commitment to
Jews generally and Israel
specifically to make
restitution for the past."
Wiedergutmachung?
"Yes," says Dr. Kohler.
"That's a part of it. If we have a
special, positive relationship to
Jews, then the PLO sees us as a
special target of theirs. But we
change none of our principles,
none of our moral obligations to
lessen our vulnerability."
If the PLO is exotic," then
what about the Baader-Meinhof
gang? Weren't the) exotic, too,
considered in terms of the more
traditional forms of political
Marxism?
"The Rote Armee Fraktion
was and is absolutely kamikaze
The Palestinians are not. Abfc
the Palestinians operate in the
Federal Republic as a means of
influencing its foreign policy in
the Middle East. The RAF.
the Baader Meinhof gang
specifically, was one of the first of
the leftist extremists to appeal to
the German laborer by attempt-
ing to discredit the West German
democratic system. It is among
the laboring class, the less well-
educated, that one finds ngM-
wing extremists. Baader Mein
hof made a direct appeal to tne
traditional source of right-wing
extremism for allegiance to tne
left.
"THIS IS important because
after the Baader MnM
suicides, there are successors to
Ulrike Meinhof. mcludm
revolutionary cells of the Kjr.
tlie Bewegung 2 Jum //, nu
Benno Ohnzorg.
"But things are getting better
for us in the struggle against tne
extreme left." Kohler says em
phaticallv. "despite the tact torn
German terrorists have intensive
links abroad -in Ireland. Jape-
the Middle East and IW-
Things are getting better becauj
we don't really believe that, m
the end. the leftists are any mo*
successful than the rightists.
Then why all the surveillance
at the Verfassungsschut:
"Our surveillance contribute
Continued on Page 9C


October 26. 1979
*knisti fhridfinr
Page 9-C
.1979
^erm an/s^Verfassungsschu^
4
Continued from Page 8-C
I [heir low
, success ratio, among
But our
real
thing?
I SLnisthal Cermanys young
KWalke therms
'Steed bj our democrat*
< ,urcl> for granted.For
lh,: .t >- Kruni zerof ThT
, o under standing of past
" w M il,. reason for these
Beedoms. or the price we have
U for them Perhaps they do
fot cherish'. as much as those o
L who cherish them by contrast
the dark National Socialist
ist."
I THINK of the hippie-types.
Led to the waist, intoxicated
lv midday, seated aimlessly
Lund the t.edachnitskirche on
|he Kurfurstendamn in West
Berlin.
.|Sk Is it they who are the
Ljdims ,.f adventurist
Llcontents? Is it they who want
V destroy a society that gives
Iht-m so much? And why don t
know German history?
I\re'n'l their schools leaching il to
Ihem?
Dr. Kohler is an intelligence
Officer. One gets the sense.
hough he would not confirm it,
thai he knows the name of every
right and left wing extremist
individual and organization in
West Germany.
That extremism in the Federal
Republic is on the decline and the
control of it astonishingly ef-
ficient is a tribute to the Verfas-
sungsschutt. But the persistent
demand for sociological analysis
of the movitation behind ex-
tremist hangers on strains the
parameters of intelligence ex-
pertise. Why does a nation sit
back and let the malcontents pick
it to pieces, especially when Ihe
reasons for malcontent are not
rooted in the classical political,
social and ecomic dissatisfac-
tions?
THE INTELLIGENCE ex
pertise is there to guard the body
politic from its own worst follies,
as Dr. Kohler and his
organization amply demonstrate.
But perhaps it is time for the
analysis lo be given equal op-
portunity, support and funds to
discover the answer to this
question not only in Germany
but elsewhere in the free world.
notably in America, where the
Joseph Goebbels, Gauleiter of Berlin, was next to Adolf Hitler
the most charismatic propagandist and orator of the Nazi era.
extremists and the terrorists are
only now beginning to flex their
muscles.
11 is nol a question lhat is
academic, and our survival may
well depend upon an effective
Ongoing Prosecution
Liberal Spirit Triumphs in Search of the Nazi Past
Continued from Page6-C
being the first leader of the
Nazi "Reich Labor Service." his
fcpwial stock-in-trade is to deny
lih.it .lews were gassed in con-
Icentration camps, especially
Auschwitz, and that anyone who
(believes they were "must be an
|ass. a thickhead or a criminal."
Schonborn also denies the
uthenticity of the Anne Frank
[diaries, and he once wrote a letter
the Mainz Carnival
Organization, suggesting that
future carnival processions in-
.lude participants dressed in
[concentration camp uniforms so
lhat people should really have
Something to laugh at.
HOW IS IT that former
Concentration Camp Dr. Aribert
Nairn was fined DM 500
thousand, with no other punish-
jinent, when the record indicates
[thai he enjoyed the Nazi era by
murdering his victims with in-
fections into the heart?
Quite simply. Dr. Haim has
disappeared over the past 17
years. But he bought a house in
Baden-Baden in the late 1950's,
Hsing his real name. A court has
[now tried him in absentia, and
[when ihe house is compulsorily
auctioned, ihe proceeds will be
I used to pay the fine.
In the case of the Dusseldorf
[trial, the four arrested defendants
I include two former SS women.
Ij'nt' is former SS Supervisor
IHwmine Braunsteiner, who
I achieved inlernational notoriety
Lwhen she married an American
Isoldier. Russel Ryan, in Vienna
hi the end of the war, went to the
iccn and became a citizen in
11*3. But as a result of a 1972
lw York Times report, she was
[exposed and extradited to the
]federal Republic a year later. If
[convicted, she faces a life sen-
tence.
Alina Rawska-Bot, a state
r'tness, told the Dusseldorf
wt that Lochert frequently
rode through concentration
camps on a horse with a camp
nuT forced to "TO at her sde
n all fours like a dog. Lochert is
[a'so reported, on one occasion, to
ave set a dog on a pregnant
newish woman and watched the
>K rip her belly open. Like
nraunstein Ryan, Lochert also
aces the possibility of a life term.
WTTO FOR the two men
defendants, (ft is former
IfPuty Commandant and SS
aauPtsturmfuhrer Hermann
Ileckmann. who is charged with
having shot sick Russian
prisoners and ordering the
shooting of hundreds of children
in the woods behind a con-
centration camp.
The other is Emil Laurisch,
who was originally picked up on
suspicion of complicity in
murder.
As for ihe Federal Republic's
unsuccessful effort to extradite
Wagner for trial on charges of
mass murder, it was stymied by
the Brazil Supreme Court.
Interpreters of the court's
decision argue in support of the
court that Brazil was not an
enemy of Germany during World
War II. and in any case Wagner's
crimes were not individual, but
acts of war done in the name of
Germany.
The Brazil denial of extradition
has left some bitter feeling in
Bonn. Still, during my visit here,
there has been enough govern-
ment action against war
criminals throughout the country
to suggest that blanket charges
of national German indifference,
or even sympathy for the
criminals, are simplistic.
FOR EXAMPLE, the Lischka
trial will zero in on the wartime
Nazi security chief in Paris.
While Lischka has thus far failed
to reply to the charges,
Heinrichsohn and Hagen are
already claiming that they did
not know why the 73,000 French
Jews were being deported that
they thought the Jews were
"merely" being sent to labor
camps.
But the Federal Republic
prosecution hopes to pin the trio
down at a novel jumping off point
his sentencing in absentia in
1950 to life imprisonment by a
French court for complicity in the
deportation of 100,000 French
Jews. In 1975, the Federal
Republic ratified a treaty with
France providing for the retrial of
war criminals convicted by Allied
courts.
As for the Mengele affair, only
time will tell. Israeli secret
service personnel have been
tracking him for years, along
with Simon Wiesenthal, of the
Nazi Documentation Center in
Vienna. Mengele has proven to be
as elusive as he was thorough as
a medical extermination wizzard
in the Hitler era. But now that he
can no longer hide with impunity
in Paraguay, he may find it
tougher going to avoid possible
extradition.
Does all this mean that
Germany is going full steam
ahead to pick out the rotten
apples of the past? The answer
depends on just what is meant by
"Germany."
IN AMERICAN today, it is
probably true that the American
IK'ople are far more represen-
tative of traditional American
democratic idealism than is the
distant, bureaucratic American
government.
In Germany, hardly 35 years
after the destruction of the Nazi
!>east, my feeling here is that the
German government is more
representative of the democratic
ideals of the Federal Republic
than are the German people.
I am only guessing, but my
hunch is that, left to themselves,
the (ierman people might not be
as steadfastly engaged in war
crimes litigation as is their
government.
This may be as utterly sim-
plistic a conclusion as the one
drawn by some observers that
Germany is "soft" on the old
Nazis because there are so many
of them around in the German
government and in high German
society, industry, art. education,
and even the law today. For one
thing, it ignores the issue of
regionalism. The politics of a
West Berliner are not at all the
same as the politics of a
Bavarian, say, someone from
Nuremberg or Munich.
PERHAPS THIS can best be
understood in terms of another
American parallelism. The
politics of a New Yorker or a
Bostonian or a Philadelphian are
not at all the same as the politics
of a North Carolinian or an
Arkansan or a Georgian.
But in the end, the liberal spirit
in West Germany thus far
manages to prevail even as the
liberal Fast Coast Establishment
of the United States has in-
variably managed to retain the
ascendant balance of power in
America.
With respect to war crimes
here, this is also true. The
Statute of Limitations removal is
the principal case in point.
A Who's Who Listing of Some Of
Germany's Top Right-Wing Extremists
Who are some of the right-wing personalities
that the West German Verfassungsschutz keeps a
constant eye on?
f Karl-Heinz Hoffman, 42, of Heroldsberg, a
graphic artist, who heads a Wehrsportgruppe
(WSG|, Arms Sports Group, with some 200
members. Related to this is a Freundeskreis zur
Forderung der Wehrsportgruppe Hoffman,
Friends of the Demands of the Hoffman Arms
Sports Group. Activities include mititary
maneuvers with weapons. Hoffman achieved
notoriety following his interview in the Italian
illustrated Oggi (September, 1977) in which he
declared that democracy is incapable of solving
national problems. In contrast, only a dictator
can "achieve everything for a people." Hoffman's
overriding WSG principle is a "combat force .
standing by for the crisis and fall of democracy":
Manfred Roeder, 53, of Schwarzen-
born/KnuU, with the Deutsche Burger-
iniative (DBI), the "German Citizens Initiative,"
membership approximately 100, which conducts
monthly meetings for "friends" to encourage neo-
Nazi activity. Roeder has considerably extensive
ties to right-wing extremists abroad, notably in
England, andpublishes hate literature, including
Briefe (Notes) and Der Wind schlagt um ("The
Tide is Turning");
t Wilhelm Wubbels, 55, of Bocholt, of the
Reichsleitung der NSDAP, Governing Council of
the German National Socialist Workers Party
(Nazi), who sees himself as overall coordinator of
NSDAP groups, especially in Frankfurt,
Mannheim, lianau and West Berlin, and who is
{prolific in the publication of such extremist
iterature as the Nationalsozialistischen
Reichszeitung, NSDAP Reich Newspaper.
Wubbels maintains close ties with Danish Nazi
Paul Rijs-Knudsen;
Thies Christophersen, 61, of Mohrkirch,
journalist, who publishes his Burger und Bauern-
initiative, "Citizens and Farmers Initiative,"
which takes its name from the name of his party
affiliation (DBI). He also publishes various
pamphlets under the imprimatur of the Kritik
Verlag, Critical Review Publications. One of these
pamphlets, by neo-Nazi Wilhelm Staglich, at-
tacks the Institute for Contemporary History in
Munich, whose purpose is to document the
history of National Socialism in Germany, as a
"swindle firm." Christophersen has excellent neo-
Nazi contacts abroad;
t Henry Beier, 51, of Frankfurt, metal-worker,
who competes against Wilhelm Wubbels'
Reichsleitung with a neo-Nazi creation of his own
awesomely entitled, Kampfgruppe Grossdeutsch-
land. Combat Force of Greater Germany. Beier
also challenges the NSDAP of Frankfurt am
Main for topdog status, whose hate sheet, Das
Braune Battaillon, "The Brown Battalion,"
reported proudly in August, 1977 that "it won't
take much longer, and our swastikas will be
hoisted onto Police Headquarters";
9 Werner Braun, 29, of Karlsruhe, merchant,
who heads the Deutsch-Volkische Gemeinschaft
(DVG) German Peoples Association, and who
publishes such pamphlets as Der Angnff, "The
Attack," reminiscent presumably of the Hitler
era publication of the same name, and Die
Wahrheit fur Deutschland, "Truth for Ger-
many." Its main propagandists fare is to deny
Continued on Page 20-C


Page 10-C

*Jenist> fkriJiar
Friday, October 26,
9"9
Visit to Dachau
Where Evil is Reduced to Banality
DACHAU The skies are
leaden. This is the first day in
more than a week that is not
warm and sunny. On the way to
the concentration camp, I insert a
fresh cassette of film into my
camera. The winding mechanism
refuses to work. I tinker with
levers, gears, a balky ratchet, and
so I miss viewing the countryside
from Munich to Dachau, from
Dachau to the camp.
The chauffeur listens sym-
pathetically as I remark with
considerable anxiety that this
very camera has accompanied me
on many trips to the highest
peaks of the Jungfrau. the depths
of the dank Vjetrenika caves in
Yugoslavia, the incredible heat of
the Negev desert. It has been
with me on cool walks in the
Cotswolds, on ships and planes
threading the purple Aegean eye
of heavenly Greek islands and
Turkish seashore.
EVERYWHERE. I say almost
angrily, the camera has worked
like a charm. Now. on the way to
Dachau, it breaks. It is an omen,
I say. My guide asks of what,
trying to humor me. The
chauffeur promises to fix it when
we arrive. "I am good at these
things." he assures me. "You'll
see."
"Why isn't the sun out
today?" I want to know. "Why is
the sky so gray?"
Suddenly, we are there, just
beyond a giant parking lot filled
with busloads of tourists and
school children on outing. It all
seems so casual. The con-
centration camp wall parallels a
well-traveled two-lane highway.
It is perhaps ten feet in height, no
more than that. Barbed wire runs
its length on all sides of the
camp, a crown of thoms reflected
in a moat paralleling the wall on
the inside.
THE CHAUFFEUR tinkers
with my camera. Now, it is my
guide who is nervous. "Hurry,"
he says, "I want to get the
tickets before it becomes too
crowded. And then, don't forget
your interview at one o'clock in
Munich."
The chauffeur observes
triumphantly that he has fixed
the camera "by breaking it a
little bit more. At least, it will
work for a while." I thread my
film and am ready to snap away
as if I were getting ready for a
tour of Disney World. We race to
get our tickets.
"I wonder, did they race to get
in here, too?"
"Who?" asks my guide. He
knows that I mean the victims
who were incinerated here, who
were shot here, who were gassed
here, who were beaten to death
here, who were hanged here, who
committed suicide here. But he
sees that I am depressed, and he
is trying to introduce a note of
respectful levity into the oc-
casion.
"BUT IT is so small," I
complain. My eye sweeps the
grounds from the entrance
building and the museum across
the camp to the crematoria
adjacent to them and the
memorial synagogue and
Christian chapels beyond.
"But Dachau is so small," I
complain again. "Surely, they
couldn't have committed all that
murder and brutality in so small
a facility."
The word, facility, touches me.
I think it is like the word, device,
which we use for an atom bomb.
We do not say atom bomb. We
say nuclear device. It is more
ambiguous that way, and so is
calling Dachau Concentration
Camp a facility more ambiguous.
It removes the edge of pain.
Bodies were burned in this oven wholesale
Wrought iron gate reads: 'Work liberates

I THREAD my way through
the memorial museum. The
exhibits feature original barracks
furniture. whipping blocks,
prison uniforms, Nazi archive
photos of medical and high
altitude "experiments." I attend
a German and then English-
language motion picture showing
on Dachau to see if there is a
difference in emotional tone I can
detect in them. It is the same,
except that large contingents of
school children are at the Ger-
man-language showing, and they
whisper, giggle and pick at one
another with mischievous hands
until a stern teacher silences
them with the warning that they
better show reverence for where
they are, or else.
Outside, I steel myself for the
ordeal of the crematoria.
"Perhaps you think it 2
small. my guide obs
because almost all 0f ,t
barracks buildings were blown J
when the camps were liberated P
He is right. Nothing remainsin
the central concentration S
area but the carefully-K
foundationstones of what\?
once barracks-upon barracks
the Nazi heyday of their mon
strosity here. w
FILLING THE long rec
tangular shapes they make and
spilling out onto the pounds are
granite-gray rocks. It ,-difficult
to walk on them, and the impulse
at first is to complain, to wonder
why the State of Bavaria can"
make the memorial site easier on
the feet, more attractive
The gray rocks blend with the
leaden sky. I walk through a
wrought iron gate the center of
which declares: Arbeit A/ac/it
Frei "Work Liberates." It js
another one of the myriad Third
Reich deceptions that expected to
make incoming prisoners believe
at least for the moment that thev
had simply been "relocated." Or
else that they were just political
prisoners, but that their stay at
Dachau would be pleasant,
productive.
It is the crematoria that shock
the most. They are handsomely-
kept on the outside, with beds of
flowers surrounding them. I am
not expert in these things, but I
think they are geraniums Their
color is a perfect match tor the red
brick walls that seem manicured
in their pristine condition. Inside,
almost mechanically. I go
through the gassing rooms, the
rooms where the ovens stand, the
overhead contraptions from
which prisoners were hung.
I WONDER whether it isn't all
a mistake. I tell myself that the
ovens must have been used to
bake bread. Brass plates affixed
to the sides of the ovens proudly
announce the name of the
manufacturer. Surely, no
manufacturer would want to take
credit for producing such infernal
machines.
I tune my ear to the sound of
Continued on Page 11-C
Smokestack crowns a well-kept crematorium
'IDon't Need The
Trouble-And
The Pack of Lies'
DACHAU Conversation between a tod-
driver and a desperate newspaperman late for to
interview:
L.M. I need to be at the Spatenhaus on the
Residensstrasse in Munich at 1 o'clock. What are ths
chances?
Driver None. I can patch through on my
radio and tell them you'll be late,
L.M. Thank you. What's that building up
there on the hill? It looks like a castle.
Driver It has an excellent restaurant. That's
where you should have gone. Not to the con-
centration camp. What's at the camp? The camp
dead history, and besides, who knows? They tell t
pack of lies.
L.M. You look old enough to remember the
war. Didn't anybody ever smell anything strange m
the air here? Wasn't anybody suspicious about what
was going on at the camp?
Driver You know about license plates in
Germany? You can tell right off just what city a car
comes from. Last summer, I took my family on a tnp
to Italy. People would see our plates and throw
stones at us. Nobody would sell us any gas. That's ail
the concentration camp is good for. It makes trouble
for decent people living in Dachau.
L.M. Is it possible to live here but get plates
from another city?
Driver I just bought a Kawasaki. And you
can bet your boots my plates are from Munich-i
don't need the trouble of Dachau. And the pack oi
lies.


October 26, 1979
vJewisii fkridiar
Pagell-C
ie Banality
Of Evil
Lntinued from Page 10-C
1 I try to evoke cnes,
& fear, whispered prayers
Lngth to meet the ordeal.
I of gratitude that death
fad end the agony soon. It is
I wod- 9'lence tnumPhs-
(side 1 Pr upward toward
[summit of the smokestacks.
L ^ manicured and pristine.
[like the beds of flowers
ounding the building. They
. no longer, belch no more
Ike spew no stench of seenng
and bone into the at-
kphere of the Dachau coun-
kide.
Ill along. 1 have been snap-
, away with my camera. The
, and ratchet grow balky
n. They will break at any
jent. the next frame or the
I after that. My eye assesses
number of "tourist at-
lions" I have yet to record on
I and I grow sullen because I
L the camera won't last.
Jcularly, the firing squad wall,
whitewashed and pure to
jld, attracts me. I must have
lure of it.
'IS HERE, at this moment,
Hannah Arendt can be
lerstood better than at any
^r place and at any other
nent. There is a banality in
that makes the evil so un-
levable that ultimately we
sto be irritated by it. And, in
Stages in High-Altitude Experiment At Dachau
OFFICIAL NAZI PHOTOS: Victim suffers agaoizing stages of anoxia in work done by SS Li. Rascher
the end. to be bored by it and
even indifferent to it. The
magnitude of human bestiality,
though known to us in its
awesome capacity, is something
that our humanity rejects. And
soon we refuse to believe that it
ever happened at all here at
Dachau. It is easier that way.
The gray day and a broken
camera what can be more
upsetting to a sightseer on tour
in a foreign land? Like evil itself,
what can be more banal?
hen....the End
Dachau: A History of Germany's
First Factory of Mass Slaughter
\CHAU In the beginning,
was an abandoned World
I munitions factory. On
Ich 20, 1933, just 11 days
r becoming Munich's Chief of
re, Heinrich Himmler an-
kced the establishment of the
hau Concentration Camp. At
I height of the Nazi era, it
pe an SS training ground for
der.
leodor Eicke was Dachau's
commander. In June, 1933,
established a table of
imzation for camp life. With
ir exception, it became the
rn for concentration camps
set up throughout Germany
in Eastern Europe. It was
e who designed the
mers' quarters surrounded
high tension fence and guard
W. Separate from these
lities, was a command area
administrative buildings
barracks.
IACHAITS FIRST Jewish
ites came in significant
loers after the infamous
'taOhacht of November, 1938.
10,000 Jews were brought
all over Germany. Each
>ved a number and colored
VN designating his status as
"'ish prisoner.
larbara Distel has written a
I' history of Dachau published
'he Dachau International
ittee in Brussells, in which
notes that "Their nameless
,{*"cf as outcasts" was
d by a daily routine "filled
."work, hunger, exhaustion
fear of the brutality of the
"tic SS guards. The value of
jam labor that the prisoners
P'd provide was quickly
MUMd and ruthlessly ex-
pand industry at the con-
nation camp here became so
PPlex that by 1938 it was
/"alized in a main office in
I'm called Wirtschafliche
("vehmungen der SS "SS
Puatnes."
pT8 THE coming of World
Ui the camp at Dachau
alone had, besides numerous
smaller ones, 36 large subsidiary
camps in which some 37,000
prisoners worked almost ex-
clusively on armaments. As in
World War I. Dachau returned to
its original enterprise.
By 1942, when for a while it
seemed that nothing would stop
the Nazi hordes from their
achievement of ultimate victory,
Dachau like other concentration
camps became a center for the
systematic murder of "inferior
races."
"Weakened and un-
dernourished, writes Distel.
"they had to work at least 11
hours a day. In addition, there
was the often long journey to and
from work, as well as the morning
and evening roll call so that many
prisoners had only a few hours of
sleep.
"Private firms had the op-
portunity to hire slave
laborers...For the prisoners, who
worked for them under SS guard,
they paid a daily rate to the main
office of the SS economic
division. The prisoners, however,
received nothing."
FROM THE beginning, Eicke
had instituted a penal code for
prisoners that was applied even
for so simple an offense as a
missing button from a jacket or a
short pause to catch one's breath.
Forms of punishment were:
% Tree or pole-hanging. The
prisoner was suspended for hours
with his hands tied behind his
back;
Standing punishment. The
prisoner, regardless of the
weather, had to stand without
moving for days in the roll-call
square;
Cutting off of rations. This
could be applied to individual
prisoners or groups;
Detention in a "bunker."
The prisoner was confined in the
camp prison, often held in chains
and deprived of rations;
Death penalty- Prisoners
were executed at the discretion of
individual SS men who deter-
mined the seriousness of an
alleged offense;
Penal colony. This "facility"
existed in Dachau in the pre-war
years, with conditions, if
imaginable, even far worse than
in the rest of the camp. Prisoners
confined here were most often
given a rope with the command
to hang themselves. They would
comply, considering this
preferable to death by torture.
IN ADDITION to industrial
enterprise here, a major activity
was Himmler's development of
an SS science program. For
example. Dr. Claus Schilling,
well-known researcher in tropical
medicine, began in 1942 to
engage in malaria management
experimentation and infected
some 1,000 prisoners with the
disease.
He continued these ex-
periments until April 5, 1945,
when they were stopped under
orders from Himmler, who an-
ticipated the defeat of Germany
and wanted to hide as much
evidence of concentration camp
carnage as he possibly could.
Then there was SS Lt. Dr.
Siegmund Rascher, who played a
key role in high altitude ex-
periments. His object was to
study the effects of decom-
pression, or sudden loss of
pressure and lack of oxygen, in
order to consider means available
to pilots who had to jump from
disabled planes at great heights.
Rascher, in a letter to Himmler
on May 15, 1942, wondered
whether professional criminals
could be made available to him
for his experiments. Himmler
simply made the inmates of
Dachau his cadre of "volun-
teers."
ACCORDING TO the
testimony of Walter Neff, a
prisoner nurse who was an eye
witness, some 70-to-80 inmates
died out of 200 subjects in the
Rascher experiments.
These were in addition to
. .Andautopsy
"freezing" experiments carried
out for the Air Force by one Dr.
Holzlohner and one Dr. Finke
under the direction of Rascher at
Dachau. The results were
summarized in a paper entitled,
"Concerning Experiments in
Freezing the Human Organism"
at a scientific conclave of the
medical branch of the Air Force
on October 26 and 27,1942.
Prisoners transported here
were locked up by the hundreds
in cattle or freight cars with only
a piece of bread, no drinking
water, insufficient oxygen or
sanitary arrangements for travel
frequently lasting days.
Reports Distal: "Of 2,521
prisoners, 984 perished in a
transport which left Compiegne,
France on July 2, 1944, and
arrived in Dachau on Jury 6. The
horror at the arrival of this train
shook even the prisoners who had
been living in the. hell of the
concentration camp for years."
EVENTUALLY, more than
30,000 prisoners had to be
quartered at Dachau, which was
originally intended for 5,000. The
American soldiers who liberated
Dachau on April 29, 1945 found,
even before they reached the
camp itself, a freight train filled
with dead. In the confusion of the
last days of the war, the train had
never been unloaded. At night,
up to 1,600 persons were crowded
into barracks originally intended
for 200.
During the last four months
preceding the liberation of
Dachau, over 13,000 prisoners
died. Of the more than 200,000
registered inmates who went
through the concentration camp
at Dachau, 31,951 cases of death
were recorded, according to the
International Tracing Service at
Arolsen.
Notes Barbara Distel: "The
actual number of deaths at the
Dachau camp can no longer be
ascertained."


Pag12-C
*JewiitncridkU}
Frid*y. October
26,
Report from Bonn
Foreign Policy-Makers Anxious About U.S. Leadershi
BONN Speak to highly
placed Federal Republic officials
here, and an American visitor
comes away with three im-
pressions:
The United States is so
selfishly energy-hungry that it
pays any price for oil on the
international market, thus
driving up the price that Europe
has to pay. which Europe can ill-
afford:
Salt II. a treaty between the
United States and the Soviet
Union, is in itself of little con-
sequence to Europe except as a
prelude to Salt III. which will
deal with controlling the military
presence of the Soviets in
Eastern Europe based on the
curbing of military preparedness
in the west. For that reason
alone, there must be no obstacle
in the US. to ultimate Senate
approval;
West German policy toward
Israel is not changing at all. this
despite the visits of top-level
Federal Republic officials in Arab
countries, including Foreign
Minister Genscher, and
statements by persons as
distinguished as Willy Brandt
showing a growing enthusiasm
for the Palestine Liberation
Organization and its chief. Yasir
Arafat.
WOLFGANG GERZ heads
the American desk in the
Political Division of the Federal
Republic's Foreign Office on the
Adenauer Allee here in Bonn.
Specifically, Dr. Gerz deals with
defense, nuciear power and
economics.
"Sometimes." he confesses,
"my work touches on protocol.
That's when it becomes dif-
ficult."
On my arrival here, the
newspapers are filled with angry
European commentary about
America's energy policies, which
is to say that, from Europe's
point of view, there are no
American policies other than to
grab whatever oil the country can
at no matter what price.
President Carter has just
returned from the Vienna con-
ference, and the Austrians are
already roasting him for the
"police state brutality" of his
security men whose machineguns
were carried openly in Vienna and
at the ready. The German press
reports the Austrian anti-Carter
broadside gleefully.
I REMARK trf Gerz that
America suffered three political
assassinations in the 1960s and
that it is going all-out to avoid
anymore of them. I declare that
the history of Europe does not
suggest that at another time its
countries would survive similar
assassinations with the or-
derliness, let alone the tragic
grace, of the American people in
that turbulent decade. What were
President Carter's security men i
to do? Carry no weapons? i
For example, there is not a
single West German airport in
which I've landed where I've not
seen security personnel on patrol,
machineguns in open view and at
the ready. I can, I say, un-
derstand the need for them, given
the recent spate of terrorist
attacks at airports all over
Europe. Why can not Europe
understand Carter's security men
in Vienna? Why did they offend
Europe so? Why did the West
German press rub its hands in
glee as it reported the Austrian
reaction?
Gerz listens politely. 'Already
into the difficulties of protocol
when perhaps he least expected
it, he biyshes my questions aside
diplomatically After all, he is not
responsible for press opinion
either in his own country or
anywhere else, and he certainly
can not speak for the Austrians.
Frontispiece of one of West Germany's top publications, 'Der Spiegel,' needs no caption.
"Look here," he says instead.
"Europeans are aware that they
can do nothing without the
United States. This is true in
almost any military or economic
situation even in some
political situations."
GERZ IS not apologizing for
what an American visitor
believes to be Europe's bad
manners particularly its own
selfishness, say, in energy, which
it manages only to see in the U.S.
Neither is he pleading for un-
derstanding of European sen-
sibilities or even strategic
European difficulties. But the
inference one is intended to draw
is clear: insipient irritation with
America only three and a half
decades after the war should be
perfectly understandable given
Europe's continued dependence
upon America's well-being.
"That's what the French force
de frappe was about," Gerz
observes. "It was one European
country's persistent need for
retaliatory atomic capability
independent of the United States,
which France did achieve," he
emphasizes.
And that's what West Ger-
many's Ostpolitih is all about,
isn't it? Isn't it a kind of French
force de frappe defined in political
terms?
"YES, the capacity to deal
with the Soviet Union and the
other East European countries
face-to-face and without a
prerequisite American okay to do
so.
"But in the end, it is America
really that holds the European
balance of power in its hands.
Some here may not like it, but all
of us know it. Take the question
of energy: if Europe decides to
conserve, it doesn't mean a thing
should the United States not
conserve, too."
There are, declares Gerz,
showing his own sympathetic
understanding, "profound
psychological problems for
America that militate against
conservation. In the past," he
adds, "is an experience Europe
never shared oil that was both
cheap and plentiful in the U.S."
I note that our distances are
vast also, and that to deny an
American the capacity to travel
these distances is the equivalent
of abridging one of his human
rights. Europeans can not un-
derstand this unless they've
spent some time in America and
become acquainted with this
macrogeographic phenomenon. It
is something they have to learn
personally before they can be
expected to bridle some of their
hostilities.
GERZ SHIFTS gears quickly.
"The answer, at least for
the moment, is nuclear power.
There are other sources also
solar, wind, shale but these
must be explored first and will
require vast funding for research
and the development of suitable
technologies before we can
consider them on a practical
basis. The sad fact is that nuclear
energy is already here, ready to
serve us."
Gerz explains: "I say sad'
because of your Three Mile
Island incident. What happened
there? The truth is that nothing
happened at Three Mile Island,
however inadequate reports say
that the safety precautions were.
Still, nuclear energy is an
emotional issue in the United
States and in the Federal
Republic. In fact, in all of Europe
and, of course, Japan.
"The question is not what
happened at Three Mile Island
but away from there. It has given
a boost to the very emotional
anti-nuclear forces. But in the
end, we'll have to rely on nuclear
power more and more until the
other technologies are ready to
substitute for it.
"THAT IS what Chancellor
Schmidt has been saying over
and over despite the angry
response of our own anti-nuclear
contingent here That is what
President Carter has been say-
ing, too. only a good deal less
pointedly because Three Mile
Island forces him to be discreet
about what should be obvious.
"But discretion means more
barrels of oil that are burned." he
smiles sympathetically. "And so
do your vast distances."
If the United States is a
European bete noir at the
moment in terms of oil con-
sumption, how about America's
contribution to Europe's military
stability?
"THE
wouldn't
States is a
Gerz. "But
FEDERAL Republic
agree that the United
bete noir," replies
at the same time
there is a fear that your fuel
consumption rate shows in-
difference to the impact of this
policy on Europe. Also at the
same time, we have an absolute
understanding of the U.S.
contribution to NATO and to the
general defense posture of the
European community. I would
say that, in this, all of the
European community is
unanimous."
Europe, I inquire, may be
America's first line of defense,
but America is Europe's ultimate
defense is that it?
Gerz clarifies: "If we show
concern about SALT II, for
instance, it is precisely because
we do understand the ascendant
American role in NATO. SALT
II actually means nothing to us
because it is purely an agreement
between the United States;
the Soviet Union to limit lb
atomic arsenals Kui as ta
Foreign Minister Gromyko I
warned us. without SALT
there can be no SALT III."
IS THIS a Russian cnH
designed to get Europe to sita)
America for Senate approval l|
SALT 11?
"It is SALT III that willb
Western Europe into the pici
in a big way for the first timt|
Gerz observes, "which
precisely what the U.S.
wanted all along. No
imagines that the Soviet Un
presence in Eastern Europe <
be diminished by SALT III, i
what we do hope for is that l
III will achieve for us w
SALT I and. it is to be
ticipated, SALT II. achievesJ
the United States the r
plication of restraint M
proliferating military arsenal.
How would that bring Eu
into the picture for the first u
Gerz discusses the issue
precisely the same terms
Immanuel Birnbaum, x"
editor emeritus of Suddeutsc^
Zeitung, used in my discuss*
with him in Munich: the Uiu
States does not want repea
arms escalations in order
maintain parity-plus. B
outright superiority, over
Soviet Union. Neither
Western Europe want
creasingly threatening
presence in Eastern
which it can only hope to
through more and more
NATO activity.
BUT A SOVIET P
linked to arms limitations
mean a more realistic t
Sovi
T^rw he [Wolfgang (ten) $*ysm$t*& 'Europeans an aware that they
mTSSSKSSS^ V*i**S*tm. TkiaU tru* m almost any military
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^*^J-- --------------- -*


Friday. October 26,1979
* Jewish FkrMton
Page13-C
u for Western Europe corn-
el its own defense at least
ST America can get going in
AS of an attack. Th* is
t fundamental issue says
Ten "not some hurr-w
Stations about possible
&an irritation with the
United States." which is a
cosmetic consideration at best.
Gen does admit in carefully-
turned phrases that Europe is
deemed not critical., but
Toncemed- about theseemmgly
overall weakn8 .of US"
leadership in world affairs.
-We are not." he says, "the
judges of American foreign
' to. but the Carter ad-
ministration does appear to be
going through an extraordinarily
difficult phase in U.S. history."
Why? Is it President Carter
himself who has brought it on?
"FIRST OF all. the world itself
is going through an ex-
traordinarily difficult phase: the
challenge of OPEC; Europe's
search for greater self-
issertivenass, which causes
friction between us and the U.S.
in such matters as OPEC and. of
course, the related Israel-Arab
problem, the opening up of
China, which forces us to become
preoccupied all over again with
Southeast Asia Vietnam and
Cambodia especially; and the
industrial and technological
challenge Japan poses to both of
us, the United States and
Europe, a challenge we must deal
with very carefully because
Japan is our ally.
"But there were higher hopes
for a more effective leadership
role from the U.S. at this time,
and there are those who believe it
has not been forthcoming."
Then the difficulty lies in the
President himself?
REPLIES GERZ: "I per
sonally understand the
President's moral imperatives,
but what are we to do?"
By "moral imperatives" you
mean human rights in the Soviet
Union and the Middle East?
"There, yes, and elsewhere.
The President is morally
motivated religiously
motivated. But in the post-
Watergate era, in the post-
Vietnam era. which has involved
the U.S. in foreign affairs more
prominently than ever, there
must be more that we can count
on than the President's hope
that, in the end, people do the
right thing."
ARE THE Federal Republic
and Western Europe searching
for the "more we can count on" in
their new initiatives with the
confrontation Arab cause, the
PLO and its partners or sym-
pathizers, for example? Has this
new imi.iiivc been born by the
disappointment in Mr. Carter's
go-slow stance on Israel because
ARAB
'Your money .'
it makes OPEC doubly difficult
to deal with and the price of oil
rising higher and higher?
"I do not speak for Western
Europe, but this suggests that
the Federal Republic is turning
anti-Israel because of Arab oil."
Yes, and that this is one
perfect example of the Federal
Republic's and Western Europe's
clear independence of American
influence. The European com-
munity seems well able to do
what they like when it suits
them.
"I MUST deny both premises,
at least for West Germany. We
are not anti-Israel, and I do not
believe that our Middle East
policies are entirely shaped by oil.
But the Middle East is not the
area of expertise of my desk,"
says Gerz, "and I should not talk
about it. I do, however, think
that President Carter's handling
of this problem has left us
more difficult choices."
Why more difficult?
"Because when we began to
make them, we were alone and,
by contrast, they seemed more
difficult. The President is only
now coming to the same choices,
and he is taking a terrible beating
for it."
Then they are no longer as
difficult as before, now that the
new light shining in the
American eye is quite frankly
courtesy of the Arab pipeline?
The Daily News
"There may be a greater
consensus between us now, but I
am not sure that it is for the
reason you give."
THEN IS it really true that
the European community can do
nothing effectively without prior
American assent or commitment?
Did not the Europeans contribute
to a better American vision in
this case?
"It is really true." says Dr.
Gerz. "It is still true, and I can
not foresee a time when it won't
be true. That is why American
indecisiveness at this time
worries us so in these other areas
- SALT II, energy."
About Israel .
"That is not my desk."
Diplomat Declares
There's No West German Policy Change Toward Israel
BONN Hasso Buchrucker
heads the Federal Republic's
desk for Middle Eastern affairs.
It is difficult to get down to brass
tacks with him.
Buchrucker is scholarly. He is
an academic. For four and a half
years, he was a cultural counselor
in the West German Embassy in
Tel Aviv.
But he spent last year at
Harvard University's Inter-
national Affairs School, and the
inclination to lecture a visitor
shows.
QUESTION: It is obvious that
West Germany's policy toward
Israel has been changing
dramatically. How do you ac-
count for this in light of the
government's repeated assertion
that there is a special relationship
that exists between the German
People and Israel?
"Germany bears in mind the
six-million Jewish martyrs of the
Nazi era. Germany can not forget
them. Buckrucker replies.
What foUows is a foreign
diplomats discourse on the
historical ties between Germany
and Israel as they developed out
! 'he establishment of the State
of Israel in 1948.
"THERE WERE no real ties
that we had to begin with,"
Buckrucker explains. "The
federal Republic did not create
any with Israel untU 1952 with
the Luxemburg Agreement,
which established the principle of
Hiedergutmachung
reparations paid to Israel to the
tune of DM3 billion for Nazi
crimes against the German
Jewish community.
"That was quite something,"
Buchrucker says. He does not
mean the sum of money, but the
precedent of paying reparations
to a country that did not exist for
crimes committed in another
country at an earlier time by a
government no longer in
existence.
"for Israel," he says, ex-
plaining what he has already said
rom another perspective, "it
meant having to talk to the
successors to the Third Reich.
Ana for Germany, it meant
Tokyo trek of industrialized nations sloshes in oil
debate over assuming respon-
sibility for crimes perpetrated
before either country came into
being. It was a time of trauma on
both sides."
There were Israelis and Jews
elsewhere, I observe, who didn't
want to talk about Wiedergut-
machung under any circum-
stances. They called it blood-
money and hoped to deny
Germany the opportunity of
"paying back" what can never be
paid back.
"THERE WERE Germans,"
says Buchrucker, "who ignored
the moral responsibility entirely
there still are some today. And
who didn't want us even to at-
tempt to pay back what can
never be paid back."
Since those early days, he
reckons, the Federal Republic has
paid out some DM50 billion to
victims of the Hitler era, with
over a third of that going to
Israel.
The question is restated: That
was in the era of good feeling
between Konrad Adenauer and
David Ben Gurion, admittedly
two master statesmen with an
eye on future history. But things
have taken a downward turn.
There has been a dramatic
change in Federal Republic policy
toward Israel. Why?
"Yes." reminisces Buchrucker.
"It was in 1961. The two men met
in New York in secret not so
much for Adenauer's sake as for
Ben Gurion's, who feared that
the meeting itself, not just a new
and more intimate phase in the
relationship between Israel and
the Federal Republic, would
bring his government down."
BUCHRUCKER recalls that
Ben Gurion slipped the meeting
past the Israelis all right, but
when he got back to Jerusalem,
and with the news already out, he
faced a stormy debate. The
scholar triumphs in him.
Buchrucker paraphrases Ben
Gurion's stand in the Knesset in
Jerusalem almost as if he were an
actor reliving the scene: "If
Israel wants to exist in the
Middle East, it must come to
terms with Germany and start
relations with the most in-
dustrialized power in Europe."
"Notice," Buchrucker
declares: "By relations, Ben
Gurion meant political and in-
dustrial not cultural." He
emphasizes this to define the
principle that German reluctance
to embrace the survivors of the
Hicks copyright DIE WELT
Holocaust was matched by
perhaps even more vehement
Israeli reluctance to embrace the
successors to the Third Reich.
"Still," Buchrucker observes,
"formal relations were opened in
1965, and at great expense to the
Federal government. Instantly,
the Arabs hit us with all sorts of
boycott threats.
"EVEN WORSE, for the first
time, East Germany scored a
diplomatic triumph. Cairo turned
from Bonn to East Berlin."
About the downward turn in
West German-Israeli affairs .
"I believe,"says Buchrucker,
that the banner year was 1967
the year of the Six-Day War."
I observe that it was a banner
year for Israel and just about
every other western country, too.
All the world loves a winner,
especially when victory brings no
problems to anybody else, as for
example, the Israeli victory has
in the Yom Kippur War of 1973.
I am not sure he has really
listened.
"YES. The 1967 war was most
important psychologically. There
was an instant and sizable
sympathy that developed toward
Israel in every segment of our
' society. And there was a sudden
realization in Israel that to
continue to hate Germans across
the board was not right. Perhaps,
in fact, as wrong as to believe
that Germany across the board
hates Jews. Adenauer and Ben
Gurion were correct in their
assumption: a new history had to
be built. The 1967 war started in
the thaw in relations."
Buchrucker lectures, "that have
been steadily improving ever
since."
First, there was Foreign
Minister Walter Scheel's visit to
Israel in 1971, he wants me to
note. There were no demon-
strations. Every courtesy,
diplomatic and personal, was
extended to him. Two years
later Chancellor Willy Brandt
made the same trip with equally
i positive results.
Says Buchrucker: "We saw
eye-to-eye with the Israelis on
every issue. Except energy."
I SENSE the end of this part
of his discourse, symmetrical
with the end of the honeymoon he
has been describing.
In July, 1973, Chancellor
Brandt said to Prime Minister
Golda Meir Buchrucker takes
up Phase II, acting it all out
again: 'You'll have to watch
one situation, you know
energy.' To which the Prime
Minister replied: 'The Arabs will
have to go on selling it. They
can't drink all that oil. Don't
worry." Next, of course, came the
Yom Kippur War."
Two things emerge here:
Israel's erroneous
assessment that the post-
Six-Day War status quo could go
on torever and, particularly, that
the Arabs would not ultimately
come to see oil as an economic
atom bomb capable of wreaking
havoc on the stability of the
industrialized nations;
The first four days of the
Yom Kippur War, during which
Israel was literally holding onto
the ropes, performing poorly in
the air and on the battlefield,
became an Arab victory, no
matter what the decisive nature
Continued on Page 19-C


Pagel4-C
+Jeistfhrk&*r
Friday, October 26,1979
Key Conspirators in the Plot to Assassinate Adolf Hitler
GrafSchenh 1 on Stauffenberg
Lulling Beck
Ritter Sferti ion Quirnheim
Fnednch Olbrecht
A t the Resistance Museum
A Military Decision or A Genuine Change of Heart?
WEST BERLIN Here near the Tiergarten on the
Stauffenbergstrasse are the former headquarters of Adolf
Hitler's Army High Command. The street was then known as
the Bendlerstrasse.
Among other things, theae War Ministry Headquarters
accommodated the General Army Office, headed by Gen.
Olbricht: and the office of the Commander-in-Chief of the Home
Army. Col-Gen. Fromm. whose Chief of Staff was Col. Graf von
Stauffenberg
Today, these former headquarters are an ever-expanding
Resistance Museum to National Socialism. The museum, in its
many exhibitions, documents the resistance of Germans to the
Nazi regime.
ONE SUCH exhibit features multi-colored lights on a map
of Berlin which visitors are free to operate to give a picture of the
centers, of military, church, trade union and political counter-
struggle to National Socialism.
Particularly, this exhibit makes much of the persecution of
the Jews by the SS and the Gestapo; and it highlights the
Berliners who laid their lives on the line to hide Jews from an
otherwise certain concentration camp demise.
These "unsung heroes,'' as the Resistance Museum calls
them, are not in fact the focal point of the museum thus far. In
this sense, from a foreign visitor's point of view, the exhibits
seem to be especially weak, but officials with whom I have
spoken hen emind me that the museum is constantly ex-
panding and inat, if the focus seems distorted today, it surely
will not be tomorrow which is to say several years down the
road.
THE RESISTANCE Museum on the Stauffenbergstrasse
is, itself, an extension of the Plotzensee Memorial in Berlin to
members of Hitler's High Command who, led by Claus Graf
Schenk von Stauffenberg, plotted the assassination of Hitler at
his Wolfsschanze in Rastenburg, East Prussia. The plot failed.
Von Stauffenberg was shot in the courtyard of Command
Headquarters on the Bendlerstrasse here shortly after midnight
of July 21, 1944 the bomb he placed in the conference room of
the Wolfsschanze had injured Hitler only slightly but a scant 12
hours before.
Also executed were Gen. Friedrich Olbricht, Col. Albrecht
Ritter Mertz von Quirnheim, Lt. Werner von Hoeften, Col.-Gen.
Ludwig Beck and some 180-to-200 other conspirators 89 of
them at Plotzensee.
IT IS TRUE that the deaths by execution of some 2,400
Germans, Dutch, French and Czechs at the Plotzensee Prison in
northwest Berlin where Chariottenburg and Wedding meet are
also recalled. But in Von Stauffenberg's honor, the Bend-
lerstrasse was renamed Stauffenbergstrasse, and the Plotzensee
monument especially memorializes his death and the deaths of
the "Bendler Block," his immediate co-conspirators.
This is why the Resistance Museum's focus is thus far
slightly askew. One does not get a sense of a vigorous, unified
underground opposed to Hitler's ideology that is being
memorialized. Rather, the sense is of Nazi officers who sought to
oppose Nazism in the end primarily on military grounds on
grounds that it had become increasingly clear that the war
would soon be lost and that, without Hitler, possibly a better
accommodation than unconditional surrender could be
negotiated with the Allies.
It is this reaction that officials here say is a misconception.
THE GERMAN resistance movement to Hitler was far more
deeply ideological than this, although they confess, and the
Plotzensee Memorial publication observes that, "A further
weakness of the German resistance lay in the fact that it was
impossible to create a disciplined organization. The individual
groups were small, overlapping circles of like-minded people,
thrown together by their official duties or personal relationships
and often gathered around one particularly strong personality
like (Helmuth James) Graf von Moltke." In essence,
there was little coordination.
If there is an overriding philosophy here at the Resistance
Museum, it is best defined bv the motto of the Bismarck era's
Helmuth von Moltke (1800-1891). great-grand uncle of Helmuth
James Graf von Moltke. arrested on January 2. 1944 and
sentenced to death by the People's Court on January 11, 1945.
followed by execution at Plotzensee 12 days later. At the en-
trance to the museum's exhibits, the elder Von Moltke's motto
reads: Obedience is a principle man is above principle.''
THIS PHILOSOPHY, strangely, was echoed by one of the
Von Stauffenberg co-conspirators. Gen. Beck, in a lecture to
general officers on July 16.1938 a date deep into the brutality
of the Nazi regime: "Your obedience as soldiers finds its limits
where your conscience and your responsibility prohibit the
execution of an order.
These are fine sentiments, and they cause one to wonder
how Hitler and the German nation could have strayed so far
from them and the lesson they teach in the moral responsibility
of the military to a nation it serves. For not even at Nuremberg,
to save their souls, let alone their lives, did war criminals show
an awareness either of the Von Moltke or of the Beck
philosophies.
And so here, at the museum, more, much more, must be
made of those who resisted than what primarily seems is now
being made of them in lieu of those who sought, by their nth-
hour rejection of Hitler, merely to regroup.
For resistance, genuine resistance, is a people's will, not a
military or even a political dictum from on high. Here, the
people's will, the people's voice still seems muffled by the
military expediency of strategic concerns rather than ideological
choice and personal sacrifice.
AS THE Resistance Museum grows in scope, that is likely
to occur. But perhaps its very location in Hitler's High Com-
mand on the Stauffenbergstrasse is a hindrance toward that
end.
Under any circumstances, the museum is supremeh
enlightening particularly for world sentiment which persists
in the notion that all Germans followed Hitler rabidly with nary
a nay-saver among them. The number of ordinary, everyday
Germans and other Europeans overwhelmed by the Nazis who
said "no" and paid with their lives for so simple and so noble a
sentiment are legion. It is they whose efforts must be
documented and memorialized more and more.
When the Resistance Museum here near the Tiergarten
finally does that, it will be an historical institution whose
promise is fulfilled.
The Resistance Museum on
the Stauffenbergstrasse is,
itself, an extension of the
Plotzensee Memorial in Ber-
lin to members of Hitler's
High Command who, led by
Claus Graf Schenk von
Stauffenberg, plotted the as-
sassination of Hitler at his
Wolfsschanze in Rastenburg,
Bast Prussia. The plot failed.
Von Stauffenberg was that
in the courtyard of Com-
mand Hdouarter* on the
Duitdhntrnf shortly after
midnight W**h '<
Statue in the gardens at former
Nazi High Command Headquar-
ters in West Berlin is jn
memoriam to those who resisted.
AJ
HI IMM
Ml MM! 19*1 "*
"* *


-

*'.
View of Plotzensee Memorial. The stone urn, right foreground,
contains earth from Nazi concentration camps.


HI l*iay.ctober26j979
*Jenist fhridf/ar
Pagel5-C
The Sound of History
On Talking to School Children About the German Past
ii-FST BERLIN I feel his-
J* here in the Resistance
useum to National Socialism as
IM it in few other places on
Ife heieht overlooking the great
lin at Megiddo in northern
Ihnel. where it is said Arma-
jon will occur; on the
lAcropolis in Athens above the
,av and the Aegean Sea to the
.pjlis and a prison beyond, where
ISocrates spent his final hours
Idescribed in Plato's Phaedo; on a
(drive westward from Dover to
iFolkestone along the southern
Icoast of England, where the
Ipitiful barbed wire barricades
1 stand in memoriam to the
'invasion across the channel by
Ithe Hitlerian horde that never
lame, and that would not have
Icontained them if they had come,
land where the Martello towers
keep their silent watch as in
lancient times to sound the alarm.
In the corner of a lovely room,
Iceiling-high windows come to-
Igether at a right angle. Set
snugly into their juncture are a
Idesk and fairly modest chair. On
(yet a third wall a radiator is
installed above which hands a
(documentary photograph of the
[windows, the desk, the chair, the
(third wall easily identifiable by
(the radiator. The room I am
(standing in was the office of
Claus Graf Schenk von Stauffen-
[berg in the former headquarters
lot the Third Reich Army High
I Command.
HERE, Stauffenberg and the
I Bendler Block" plotted the
assassination of Adolf Hitler. It
was to this office that he returned
from the W'ulfsschanze in East
Prussia on July 20, 1944 ab-
I solutely certain that the bomb he
[placed in a conference room of the
IFuhrerhauptquartier had gone
I off and killed Hitler.
It may well have been that,
I seated in this very chair at this
very desk against the high win-
I dows of a mid-summer's evening,
IStauffenberg discovered he had
I failed and was taken away but a
hundred yards or so downstairs
into the courtyard of the War
Ministry below, where he was
I shot.
I stand at the desk and the
I chair. The photograph, as
documentation, seems more real
than the reality of the setting. I
assure myself that I am indeed in
Stauffenberg's headquarters by
the self-deluding "fact" that the
Photo is "proof" of this.
Especially the radiator in the
photo and the windows with soft
lights filtering through them
onto the desk tell me that this not
another office in another place at
I another time.
I ATTEMPT to feel Stauf-
lenbergs elation, to await im-
patiently the moment when he
would issue the teletype code
*ord. Valkyrie, that the deed had
been done. I breathe his breath.
Perhaps drum his fingers on the
oesk imagine the turning of the
J oreadful course of Nazi destiny.
I I hear the guard coming -
lfarn the disappointing truth.
110a "' wiH mobilize nothing
and no one to a turning of the
oreadful course of Nazi destiny
"iceP' Perhaps in distant Paris,
Whefe the news is slow in
driving, and Stauffenberg's co-
r'nspirators seize momentary
power, certain of their success,
even as Stauffenberg is being
Prepared for his midnight
[execution.
History is mere chronology
the course of human even;
'i on a calendar. Or else, it
What 1 fee] here in this room, a
mplex of human probability
woven on a loom of tragedy. Why
0j< Stauffenberg fail? Why did
""'er.it that moment survive?
MY THOUGHTS are
disturbed by the voices of
children entering the room, and
for a moment I feel they are
intruders on my priviate rendez-
vous They turn out to be students
accompanied on a tour of the
Resistance Museum by a teacher
who wears a Chai on a gold chain
around her neck. We talk brief!,'.
She is not Jewish. The Chai is a
symbol, she says, of her own
resistance a statement that it
must not happen again. I have
seen many Germans wearing
both the Christian cross and the
Star of David, and the teacher
says that the Star of David is like
her Chai. More and more, she
says, there are Germans who fell
this way.
A lot?
"Many." she says, "Many
more than ever bctore." And then
she adds: "The TV movie,
Holocaust, had much to do with
it."
Silently, I am amazed. Again
and again, I am amazed here in
Germany at how that piece of
Hollywood froth has had such a
profound impact.
Do your students they seem
to be about 16 years old on
average do they know what
the Chai means?
"I HAVE told them," she
says. T am not sure they really
understand. I wanted to arrange
a trip to Israel for them this
summer," the teacher adds, "but
too many parents didn't care to
send their children so far away.
Sometimes, I think it was an
excuse. "
I search their eyes. I wonder
what they feel here in this room
in this museum. The teacher
has already been told under what
circumstances I am in Germany
and. of course, that I am a Jew.
Surely, they know. She urges
me to address her students. They
are largely quiet and well-
behaved. They seem a bit with-
drawn.
[ by to avoid the teachers
invitation, saying that, as a
teacher myself, I am accustomed
to lecturing to adults in a college
classroom. I wouldn't, I say,
know how to speak to children.
THE TEACHER persists. I
begin. I ask them how it is, in
their view, that the Germans per-
mitted a dictator like Hitler to
take their freedom away from
them.
"It was a time of disorder,"
says one young man. "We needed
someone to bring order to the
people. A nation can not live
without order. Also, things were
going very badly for us."
He speaks quietly, respect-
fully. I am not at all surprised
that I have heard this before it
is as if it were something brand
new. The convictions are so firm
that they sound original.
I ask how Germany was
without order. I ask in what way.
"There were too many people
talking all at once. Everybody
had an opinion on how to solve
our problems. A country needs a
leader with a singleness of mind. '
I ASK: When everybody has
an opinion, is that bad? Is it
perhaps too noisy? Or is thafc
what is called freedom?
He shrugs and takes to playing
with his fingernails. I ask: Isn't
what you call disorder only
another form ot order! He shrugs
again. He has. made his con-
tribution and doesn't appear
inter, ed 10 continue. T^e
teacher .uspera to me that her
students are only what in
America arc called tenth-gradei
Perhaps my last question is too
complicated.
!WWWW IJJ-.Wt' -S
A beautiful young girl in
striped overalls raises a
respectful hand. "It was good we
lost the war," she offers. "If
Hitler had won, all the terrible
things he did to the Jews would
have happened to everybody. He
was an evil man."
AFTER A LONG pause, a
third student apologizes: "My
mother didn't want me to come
here to the museum today. She
said it would be upsetting and
that it (licjn t happen anyway, not
like we're being taught now."
The students leave. I ask the
teacher if it is required of
students to come to such places
,8s the Resistance Museum. She
fingers her Chai with fierce pride.
"If the teacher requires it," she
replies. "Although the trip to
Israel I couldn't require that."
In the brilliant sui in the
courtyard below, here where
Graf von Stauffenberg and the
"Bendler Block" were executed,
stands a statue of a naked youth
symbolic perhaps of a people
who, like the statue itself, felt
naked and had little with which
to defend themselves against the
Hitler beast's enslavement.
IN TRANSLATION, the
legend on the pedestal reads:
"You refused to bear the
shame/ You resisted/ You gave
the signal to turn back And
sacrificed your precious lives /
For freedom, justice and honor."
The shots ring out here in the
courtyard over and over again.
History still breathes here just
across from the Tiergarten. No
bridge is needed between past
and present, not even in the
hearts of school children.
.-.-;.;. |

*-V&."-' I


Memorial to the Martyrs at the Fasanenstrasse Jewish Community
Center in West Berlin features names of infamous concentration
camps of the Nazi era.
Remnant of German Jewry
Machineguns at the Ready
Continued from Page 5-C
afraid of one in America?"
The police still circle the
courtyard outside with
machineguns at the ready. In
Galinski's office, I can not see
them, but I know they are there,
and I wonder silently how they
add to the attractive Jewish life
one can live in Berlin.
"You were in Jewish com-
munity activity before a social
worker, a religious school
teacher?"
GALINSKI SHAKES his
head no. He was. in fact, a textile
merchant before the Hitler era.
He does not talk about how he
made the transition to his present
status other than what can be
understood from his reasons for
returning to Berlin and that he
was officially asked to stay.
The new Jewish Community
Center on the Fasanenstasse is
one of four here in West Berlin.
The city boasts two rabbis one
Liberal, the other Orthodox
and five cantors.
There are, Galinski reports,
some 200 children in the city's
religious schools, and they attend
two afternoons a week, studying
for Bar and Bat Mitzvah.
Training usually begins at age
seven. The Community Center, in
addition to its religious school,
has meeting rooms; a cultural
lecture series featuring guest
speakers who are both Jewish
non-Jewish in talks on history.
art, music, literature, politics,
religion: and even a fine kosher
restaurant.
The Center participates,
besides all this, in drives in
support of the Jewish National
Fund, Israel Bonds, Hebrew
University and Youth Aliyah.
"DOES THE Jewish com-
munity have good relations with
the non-Jewish community?"
"Do you mean is there anti-
Semitism still?" Galinski asks.
I didn't mean that at all. But
he continues quickly: "Our
lecture series attracts not only
non-Jewish speakers, but many
non-Jewish Berliners" a fact
many American Jews, by their
own experience in such cultural
activities, can easily appreciate.
"And we also have contact with
Berlin's church leaders, who
frequently meet here in the spirit
of good neighborliness."
The Center is somewhat
austerely-appointed, but it is
commodious, attractive and
modernistic inside, as well as out.
A heartrendingly beautiful
memorial to the martyrs of the
Nazi concentration camps takes
up a quiet, awesome corner in a
patio garden setting outside I
see through the window behind
Galinski's desk. For all of the
Center's functional design, the
budget must be large certainly
larger than 5,000, possibly 6,000
Berlin Jews can afford.
FOR THE first time, a twinklt
seizes Galinski's otherwise bland
blues eyes. "There is the church
lax," he explains, "and then,
beyond that, if there is still a
deficit, the Senate of Berlin takes
care of it."
My guide speaks for the first
time. She offers an enthusiastic
explanation of Galinski's role in
achieving that remarkable ac-
commodation with the Berlin
Senate. It is an unprofessional
interruption she would not have
permitted herself otherwise,
except for Galinski's silence on
the matter. A Christian herself,
she is proud of it and would like
me to know the thorny details.
"It was not easy," she says.
ialinski waves her off, and she
tops her explanation mid-
entence.
More and more, it is clear why
Galinski has his "tough
customer" reputation.
"WHAT IS the Berlin Jewish
community's average age?" I ask
him.
"Forty. Maybe 41." he replies.
"We've had 1.600 births." but
Galinski doesn't say over what
period of time. He senses the
working of my mind. "Listen,"
he says, "we're the only Jewish
community in all of Germany
that experiences any increase at
all" a fact that Stefan Sch-
. waHi who heads the Jewish
Continued on Page 16-C
/ think for an odd moment about Galinski's parting shot, and now I understand
why his reputation precedes him as precise and practical. Above all things-,'
Galinski is non-sentimental, and that is why he is a survivor. In fas Jewish Com-
munity Center he directs all sorts of activity in behalf of the Jewish National
Fund, Israel Bonds, Youth Aliyah But for Heinz Galinski there will always be
a Berlin Jewish community, even if it has to be transplanted from the Soviet
Union. As a survivor, Galinski speaks of his roots. They are where he comes from,
and they have little to do with mystical probabilities about 'Klal YisraeV in
another land.


Pagel^C
-Jemist fhrkHar
Jews of Bavaria
Stefan Schwarz of Munich
H ft
.. --_-.;
-. -
tmriftm*-'.-u rsrc* :z* lenriafc
:.-.:
7 aaaai Sotiaa Se
coo Ihm*4m
#*- :^r
GALINSKI -:
-a_-.-< H- ....* _xe axvc -a
: >- -. -tec.:..i -: r_-t s
i ; 7 -.:
no-Mr* ..safe spec ana Be
acersjcjoce -----,
-,-.--.-- .- fot
--:- :.-.;. -
.-..-. i .-*r*.-. _mer.: going back
v. r_T.er.t ..'. FTossen-
XL-g concentration camp He
*_ ~.a r. J ew ish pa si on
h -xx as a mark of
- ;. but '.' tbc
of a.-, ers .-..-<*: by aJJ mankind
*nt victims, their
pal ton
Ha rheu.T.;. eyas behind thick
lenses magr..fy the anguish of a
burtened tool He sighs deeply
am: banuentrj from his wallet.
be extracts the tattered calling
card', of Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum.
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee m New York. Richard
Cohen. American Jewish Con-
gress Miriam Syrkin. the Jewish
writer and pamphleteer There
are others
THE'/ HAVE all visited him
at one tune or another and are his
links to the world outside. Sch-
warz asks me if I have heard of
them I assure him that I have.
and even know one or two of
them personally He smiles, but
it is as if he is about to weep He
sighs again, now assured that his
ties outside are intact He is
visibly disturbed when he learns
that I have no card to add to his
collection I tell him that I have
never owned any
Promptly, he builds a tie in
reverse. Schwarz presents me
with various publications of his
own authorship, personally
STEFAN SCHWARZ Tht net er let us forget'
..T.piores me to
irritc abc .- -..--.-. i" -.-.:
the articles when the) an
pnnted
This is not an a own
ago out of selfless wflL The pub-
lications that he gives me. like his
own deeply-scarred lie are state-
ments about Jewish history, and
Schwarz wants to maxe sure that
the outside world will not forget
what happened here They in-
clude:
t [j.t udti '. GttUmkstattt in
Daekati Jewish Memorials in
Dachau. a booklet on the
history of the development of
Dachau concentration camp as a
museum site.
Die Juden in Bayern. Jews
of Havana. a weighty study of
the Bavarian Jewish community,
with historical references to the
Jewish condition in Bavaria as
far back as the loth century:
Sag nie. Du gehtt den let-
zten Weg. "Don't Ever Say You
biofjn -' Sen-
mx life the titV
i ngbj the poet. Hemrich
-~ :'
Fot lighters :' "
BESIDES these. Schwarz has
written other works, including a
study of Thomas Masaryk and
his heip to the Jews of Ca
Slovakia. A graduate chemical
engineer he studied in Prague
Schwarz counts among his
treasured memorabilia his Er
ship with Max Brod there Brod
was the confidant and executor of
the immortal Franz Kafka's
literary estate
I ask what made him come
back to Munich after the
liberation It is the same question
I asked Heinz Galinski in Berlin.
After Flossenburg." he says
arz. my health was broken.
My heart, you know To
Schwarz is physically broken, with a heart ailment
going back to his imprisonment in Flossenburg
concentration camp. He wears the German Jewish
past on his sleeve, not as a mark of personal agony,
but of the agony of an era shared by all mankind
the innocent victims, their guilty tormentors.
Autnue. he touches ha chest.
*.-.r.i-jiy.-- ft Mag heath
-AMD THEN :he world of
EheBHCrj had hi (hi aanjthna
paaaed ne bj Befen Ifiths I
wrote many papers the field,
the end of the war. while
chemistry had continued to go
forward.' I was left hopelessly
behmd. I mean academic*-
course
He sighs It is a deep sigh torn
from some inner unresoS'ed
agony Anyway in the mean-
...- -'
s -". ;. r : my
brother and it became a i trj
aeeeaafoJ paper! aea
tenure aa
i z .-..-.-.-- :.- : -" -' '-"- -'-"
pat Regens-
a strange German :.".; r
-. -
:' the
:- -
at rannion back
.- I mange for
Schwarz. whose van h -;-rr.-
ind ah) not bis actk as
HE RETURNS to the onaa-
-.. n '' here could I have gone if
~.t A
tad by all
sorts ol unrealistic
rj ne but himself,
prefers to hear Israel But
I Scbi .;- meant and
still meant Stranbing about
km. from Munkh
It still means home for
;rz today He works in
Munich luring the week but
spends his weekends in
Straubmg
I has an active Jewish
Bununit) he -a;.-, and lists
two synagogues, an unspecified
number of private congre-
gations, one rabbi and one
cantor
WHAT about young people'
The engineer in Schwarz ap-
proaches the emotional, the sheer
survival implications of the ques-
with cool statistics It seems
too painful otherwise:
In Berlin, they i meaning
Heinz Galinskii will tell you there
is a Jewish community of 6.000
that is at least holding its own. I
have to tell you there are 4.000
Jews in Munich and 2.000 more
throughout Bavaria. We have the,
same statistics as Berlin's but we
are not holding our own. Our
average age is 44. but more are
dying, or leaving, than are being
bom.
Leaving for where?
America and Israel mainly.
Since 1945. our community has
declined by more than 900."
THE QUESTION is repeated:
What about young people?
Fnda> 0-.v-,:.6:g;||
Schwarz -.^
Yidcakh and Hebrew '-.Jt^
eWf^otjroKaa.pu**
JewttAeoMhesc. gj
Je-wa* coeammut. ,rlr
for rhta by taad **
H.s own ad ,T*
^lonist Orgaeuzauoc md u-,
Bond, rmke bo
resource perv-
these areas, and
involved in
tional programs:
ind
. i Sehwan
sterling ^
k)Sm are
isolated." he : th{
message is painfu.
He sighs aga- u thtroraof
those diaspora sif ^.
iedeycaaeel ,-dthe
trees outsic- ^nch
window-
as if the perva- _~e o(
ultimate disa| js
inescapable
HE CALLs
he observes that I haa 126
Jewish cemetenr- -a^(
of vandalisrr. rtumed head-
stones, swastil obscene
graffiti. The accon at
Flossenberg. whe-- Sehwan lost
his heart Or.: h......nas.Dk
H. .- -
the Ba jstles
Administrat. Sehwan
to take charge restoration
activity
I remark the
Vet rftung as administrators of
Jewish cemeteries -'.range
combination Are :- emeterio
national histor...
"No more than Dacr.au itself.''
-ays Schwarz. wh -Aa< called
upon to help set up the museum
at the concentration camp there,
as well.
WHAT DO Jews here?
"We are businesspeople." he
says. "We are physicians, en-
gineers, students, atomic scien-
tists for the goverr.rr.ent And
even the press secretary of Franz-
Josef Strauss, the Prime
Minister, is Jewish Godell
Rosenberg."
You said doctors?
"Many of them
Then they don't think of you as
Jews here in Bavaria? I mean.
you have doctors, atomic
scientists for the government
Then they have forgotten all
about that National Socialism
business?
The author of Die iudische
Gedenkstatte in Dachau replies:
"They never let us forget."
Open Doors in the Soviet Union
For Heinz Galinski, A Berlin Jewish Community Always
Continued from Page 15-C
community of Bavaria, would
confirm for me in Munich a week
later. "At worst," he says,
"despite the natural deaths, our
number," now he pegs it at 6,000,
"remains constant."
"Do you lose young people,
like we do in America, through
intermarriage?'
"In most cases of in-
termarriage," Galinski answers,
"the couples opt to be Jewish.
And most young people also opt
to remain in Berlin" a
statement at variance with Horst
Haase. of the Berlin Senate, who
tells me just the opposite the day
before, although he speaks of
young people here generally.
"Other^radds Galinski, "go off
to IsraeT^r even America."
It is as if America is a poor
second choice, and I laugh,
feeling comfortable enough with
Galinski to do that for the first
time.
"UNDERSTAND me," he
says. "We this Jewish
community, this rebuilt Center
and synagogue on the
Fasanenstrasse we are open
and free. To everybody. I mean to
make Jews and Judaism tran-
sparent here to all who will come
and listen. Transparent not
mystical. No one is forced to stay
with us as members or to live in
Berlin, either. I live here
voluntarily, just as you live
voluntarily in America. So do the
others in our community. It is a
good life."
Through the windows behind
his desk, I can see the memorial
with the names in gold letters of
the concentrations camps in
which die Opfern (the martyrs)
met their end those who did
not have a good life in Berlin, or
anywhere else in Germany.
"What do you look forward
to?" I ask.
"I am no prophet," snaps
Heinz Galinski. Promptly, he
prophesies: There will always be
a Jewish community here in
Berlin."
THERE IS, I sense, a silent,
antagonistic moment between us.
"Our people are workers,
technicians, artists, physicians,
teachers, musician? At the same
time. Nazi activity has
heightened." Galinski confesses.
"I see no difference between our
experience now and, say, in 1944.
But there will always be a Jewish
community here," he repeats,
seemingly as a challenge so that I
am impelled in some distant
future to see yet a third granite
entranceway to the synagogue
here on the Fasanenstrasse.
"How can you be so sure?" I
wonder, and my blood runs cold
as he replies: "We look forward
to the opening of the doors of the
Soviet Union."
Galinski s hope is based on the
bankruptcy of Soviet Jewish
aliyah to Israel. "Well, they are
coming in droves to the United
States, too," he says as a
statistical matter of fact.
GALINSKI seems to be
suggesting that Jews are always
destined to live in Galut, but I do
not ask him about that. It mav be
another one of those dull and
pointless questions I have been
advised to avoid. But what he
says about Soviet Jews is true. I
have seen many of them on the
streets of Berlin here since my
arrival. They look like exotic
shtetl characters out of Sholem
Aleichem.
Outside, on the Fasanen-
strasse. the machinegun-toting
police circle the courtyard of the
Jewish Community Center in
their endless patrol. For the first
time, I am told why. "There are
frequent bomb threats," my
government guide whispers.
A Russian Jew races past us,
the corners of his or6a kanfot
jiggling nervously in his anxiety.
He pauses for a moment, gazes at
the two entranceways, then at
the police. His hands rise to his
head now shaking sideways in
wonderment if not fear. Perhaps
nothing has changed for him in
his move westward from Russia
to Germany. I want to speak to
him. but he runs away
I THINK for an odd moment
about Galinski's parting shot,
and now I understand why his
reputation precedes him as
precise and practical Above an
things. Galinski is non
sentimental, and that is why hetf
a survivor. In h.s Jewish
Community Center here
Berlin, he directs all sorts
activity in behalf of the Jewish
National Fund. Israel Bonds.
Youth Aliyah. That is as
should be it is part of tne
Jewish transparency he maK
much about.
But for Heinz Galinski the"
will always be a Berlin Je"
community, even if it has
transplanted from the J
Union. As a sumvor. Gan
speaks of his roots, inev
where he comes from_ an lJ%
have little to do with mv
probabilities about Klai rw-
in another land.


October 26.1979
+Jenist> floridUan
Page 17-C
East Berlin
Through the Wall
-And There's A
World of Fear
EAST BERLIN Seated over lunch atop the
Axel Springer Verlag Building on the Kochstrasse in
West Berlin, a visitor gets an awesome view of East
Berlin especially of the fabled East German Wall.
Springer built his publishing headquarters here as a
symbol to the people of the German Democratic
Republic that freedom of the press, which is at the
heart of a free society, is but a stone's throw away.
Actually, that "stone's throw away" is a
treacherous obstacle course all its own, which many
East Berliners have tried to run since the Wall was
first built. Many have died trying to run it. From
high atop the Springer Building, the barricades glint
in the sun like miniature chess pieces far below. But
their razor-like sharpness is well-documented in the
tragedies of those who succumbed trying to scale
them. To the west of them, only feet away, is the
Wall itself, with barbed wire twisting atop its ser-
pentine length.
CHECKPOINT CHARLIE is the doorway
through the Wall that the Communists built over-
night back in 1961. The Wall surrounds West Berlin
to isolate it even further as a western outpost deep in
GDR territory. The Wall literally goes straight
through houses that stood smack upon the border
and that were vacated and walled up in the early
hours of the morning of August 13,1961 with mortar,
the barbed wire and the barricades.
Before then, literally thousands of East
Berliners fled daily to West Berlin. Since then, ef-
forts made to scale the Wall have led to brutal
machinegunning. The Wall is a blood-soaked site for
the graves of those East Berliners who attempted to
scale it after August 31, 1961, when the people's pro-
letarian paradise could not longer tolerate the flood
of East Germans fleeing westward to the fleshpots of
decadent Capitalism.
Since that time, the Quadripartite Agreement on
Berlin (June 3, 1972) has established arrangements
reached on December 17 and 20, 1971 guaranteeing
West Berliners the right to visit East Berlin and the
GDR for up to 30 days a year. This agreement has
done much to reunite families divided by a divided
Germany.
THE SERPENTINE length of the Wall in West
Berlin snakes through the French, the English, the
American occupation zones. At the Reichstag
Building (West Berlin), virtually in the shadow of the
Brandenburg Gate (East Berlin), the Wall becomes
an artistic creation of colorful political graffiti, with
swastikas emblazoned on them to call attention to
the legend rewritten in an infinite variety of ways:
Tod dem Faschismus Death to Fascism.
Beyond the park at the Glienicker Brucke, you
look across the bridge to Potsdam, see the GDR
soldiers on patrol, and recall the twisted history
made there after our own vow of death to fascism.
After the Great War. After our gift to Moscow of
Eastern Europe.
At Checkpoint Charlie. I sit in a special bus,
waiting for over an hour in the summer sun for
authorization from East German police to go through
the gate into East Berlin. Rock music plays softly on
the intercom. Shadowy faces of East Berliners ap-
pear at second- and third-story windows of apart-
ment buildings just at the border and look im-
passively below. Occasional West Berliners walk a
duckboard, show their identification papers and
cross back and forth home to the forbidden city.
SUDDENLY, the music stops. Two GDR
guards enter the bus and demand our passports and
to know if we have any printed matter which is not
Permitted to be imported into East Germany. No
such printed matter is permitted, all of which is con-
sidered dangerous propaganda against the GDR.
Another quarter of an hour passes. The atmosphere
Becomes oppressive and fearful. A sense of being
ciosed-m fails upon one like a pall. Then, the bus
Continued on Page 24 C
CHECKPOINT CHARLIE: Photographs are forbidden by Communist police
picture postcards are on sale just a few steps away
but
<>
yt

10
10
LENIN EVERYWHERE: Behind rises a palace of
boringly similar proletarian apartments

VIEW OF THE WALL from West Berlin. Barricades are in clear
evidence in East Berlin immediately behind. Graffiti reads Tod dem
Faschismus 'Death to Fascism.'


PagelfrC
* Jen i sifkridiar
Heinz Rosenbauer
Planning for Labor and Social Welfare
MUNICH Dr. Heinz
Rosenbauer is 41 and handsome,
with pale eyes that sometimes
seem watery blue and sometimes
aquamarine, depending upon the
light and whether or not. and to
what extent, he is laughing as he
speaks.
Dr. Rosenbauer is State
Secretary of Labor and Social
Affairs in the Bavarian Ministry.
He might as easily be a movie
idol. Being a politician comes to
the same thing. For him. it is a
good, close second choice.
We concern ourselves with
the social and labor aspects of
Bavaria's work-politic." he
explains over a superb lunch.
"This includes the educational
curricula of workers their
occupational training. In our
ministry, we are not involved
with education in any other way.
for example, academically "
ON ITS face, this would
suggest that Dr. Rosenbauer's
office is not too much different,
say. from our own Department of
Health. Education and Welfare
with some of the responsibilities
of the Department of Labor
thrown in for good measure.
An American reporter, in any
case, would like to think so. The
trouble is that the Ministry for
Labor and Social Affairs in
Bavaria, and largely as such
ministries are constituted in
other German states, shows up
our own "social affairs" public
sector as an ineffective,
beaureaucratically bloated
stopgap by comparison.
Dr. Rosenbauer's job not only
involves regulation of oc-
cupational training programs
which are a modernized version of
the medieval European ap-
prenticeship system. It also
arbitrates employer-employee
negotiation in questions such as
salary.
And health.
DR. HEINZ ROSENBA UER: welcome to the club
The Gastarbeiter phenomenon jolts Am American observer into
a poignant aware net $. Par the first time, America is not neces-
sarily the best place to migrate to, for all the promise of citizen-
ship the nation holds out. Free Europe has turned around; it has
its own attractiveness to other Europeans, who appear to be
satisfied to go no further.
IN FACT, the health of
Germany's working force is a
major preoccupation of the
separate states, "which do not
interfere but merely exercise
juridical control over the laws
governing workers' rights," Dr.
Rosenbauer emplains.
There is no way of saying this
delicately to an American:
Germany is light years ahead of
us on health management,
hospitals and hospitalization.
and regulation of doctors who are
organized to protect their own
best interests professionally and
financially, but who in the end
must commit themselves to
serving the medical needs of
individuals as their top priority.
In a word, in Germany, there
are such things as catastrophic
illness just as anywhere else in
the world.
"BUT NOT catastrophic
illness that can bankrupt the
individual financially or the
individual's family," says Dr.
Rosenbauer. The worker has
comprehensive health insurance
upon which he can call any time
and in any amount when he needs
medical attention, and the
government pays the bill.
This does not result in reduced
remuneration for physicians from
a realistic level of reward for their
services. It does not, as has been
said of many physicians in
England, either professionally
demean or discourage the
physician from performing his
medical duties st the highest
level of the contemporary medical
art and science. The best is
available to all.
This view comes bard to an
American reporter in whose own
country physicians are fighting
tooth and nail every reasonable
public health care plan and where
bankruptcy from catastrophic
illness is a way of life. It comes
especially hard for a reporter
brought up in the scalding
crucible of the Hitler years, when
respect in Germany for the
dignity of an individual's life was
hardly the hallmark of that era.
This reporter says so.
DR. ROSENBAUER arches
his brows a gesture half in
regretful agreement half, I
suppose, in regret that the point
has been made at all. Like just
about every other political leader,
he offers no apologies for the
past. Nor does he flinch from it.
He does not, for example, say,
"Look, I was born in 1938. It was
none of my doing."
Instead: "People tend to forget
that we had a social security
system in Germany, anyway, half
a century before your own," says
Dr. Rosenbauer. "Even further
back than that."
I do not answer, although I'm
sure he knows that our own social
security system is about as
secure as a wet hen on a
telephone wire being battered by
hurricane winds. The mode these
days is to threaten us with its
bankruptcy, let alone our own
should we be seized by
catastrophic illness.
DR. ROSENBAUER tries to
get off the subject because he
senses that I am worrying it
obsessively, and he doesn't want
to talk about things as they are in
America for obvious diplomatic
reasons.
"Our ministry," he says, "also
regulates questions involving
workmen's compensation."
"What about hospitals? How
do you control the spiralling cost
of hospitalization?"
"Until just four years ago," he
explains, "hospital planning was
as egotistical as it is in your own
country. An individual doctor or
a group of doctors could get
together and decide to put up a
them next door to anothei
hospital if they chose and
thought they could make a go of
it. But since in Bavaria, and
everywhere else in our country,
the state pays the investment
cost of a hospital institution,
together with the town in which
the hospital is to be situated, it
became a matter of medical ef-
ficiency and just plain sensible
money management to curb the
unnecessary duplication of
facilities."
OUT OF that decision grew
what is called a Krankenhaus-
bedarfsplan an overall table of
organization designating areas of
hospital need. Doctors still have
the right to build wherever and
whenever they get the urge. But
if it doesn't tally with the Krank-
enhausbedarfsplan, they have to
do it on their own.
Meaning no state and local
assistance?
Dr.
"Precisely,"
clarifies.
Rosenbauer
Availability of effective health
facilities is of special significance
to Dr. Rosenbauer's ministry.
For the first time, Germany and
other countries of the European
community, are beginning to feel
the impact of immigration
movements and the inevitable
strains resulting from them that
have been characteristic of the
American national experience
since its very beginning.
FOR GERMANY, for Europe,
the experience is new and un-
characteristic. For Germany, for
Europe, in many ways it is
dislocating. Dr. Rosenbauer
offers immigration figures that
statistically approximate those of
Horst Haase, of the Senate of
West Berlin Information Office,
on this same question. "We have
huge numbers of new arrivals,"
he says. "By now, in excess of
150,000 from India, Pakistan,
Yugoslavia, Greece and Italy."
With such a large contingent of
Gastarbeiter, Rosenbauer
declares that employment
beginning to emerge for the first
time. "It is hard enough." he
emphasizes, "to find jobs for
native Germans."
The problem here is apparently
compounded by the fact that
when work grows harder to find,
even in terms of pay scale, de
jure, foreigners won't take a job
for less pay than anyone else. But
it is practically true that de facto.
they do.
Foreign sources of employment
are only one aspect of population
growth that calls upon the ef-
fective administration of the
state's health system. The other
is population growth by natural
increase.
"THERE IS the question."
a. I)r Rosenbauer. "of Kinder-
gelt government subsidies to
parents with up to three children.
Working parents with one child
get DM50 extra. DM 80 for the
second: DM150 for each ad-
ditional. The object is to
stimulate natural increase."
Bui Rosenbauer echoes Haase
in West Berlin: "the wrong"
people have the children. "Native
Germans," he says, "are like the
Israelis they do you a favor if
they have. say. .8-to-1.2 children
per couple." Rosenbauer's
statistics are not precise, but
they're close enough to give a
jaundiced view of his country's
zero population impulses.
"It is the Arabs in Israel who
are making childbirth records,
not the Israelis. The same with us
in Germany: with Kindergelt
incentives, we are encouraging
our foreign residents to out-
populate us."
IT IS CLEAR why Dr.
Rosenbauer's example applies to
the need for effective health
insurance administration, but it
also sounds a discordant note.
"By the year 2000. he observes,
"the cost of Kindergelt to
maintain Germany's native
population level on a favorable
ratio with foreign childbirth
projections will double, since
most of these subsidies are en-
joyed by foreigners '
But the country will
fact, maintain a favorableratJ
In the end, I must admire\
Germany's health Ym
system as Dr. Rosenbauer"
plains it. In fact, I cannot I
envying it. There is also a
of regard that is undeniable ml
face of the fact that VVesti
many offers its Gastarb,
social benefits m the ton]
Kindergelt. health insurancei
vocational instruction that
offered to native-born Germ*
as well. Indeed, in the face oil
fact that officials like
Rosenbauer do not believe i
their country can maintainl
favorable ratio of native-bonJ
foreign childbirth projectd
over the next two decades.
THIS IS best defined by
feeling of entrapmed
predominant in AmericJ
society. where seeming
ceaseless waves ol immigrate
burden our social welfare svsti
to the near point of bankrupts
and threaten the crucible ofoj
cultural indivisibility
American visitor here might I
tempted to respond to the We]
German concern a!
Gastarbeiter that, in his
country, the American toreigi
today is the American citiz
tomorrow a transition that|
not permitted in Germany
indeed. in other Huron
countries, either, except
great difficutly.
Theoretically, at least, t|,
American citizen tomorroi
assumes his share of the socj
welfare burden Rut that isi
alw'ays true, and besides it miss
an inescapable point.
The Gastarbeiter phenomeni
jolts the American observer!
a poignant awareness. For
first time. America is
necessarily the best place
migrate to. for all the promised
citizenship the nation holds oil
Free Europe has turned aroum
it has its own attractiveness I
other Europeans, who appearl1
be satisfied to go no further.
AND SO in addition toi
vying Dr. Rosenbauer
benefits with which his minis
deals, I can only say menacifl
to him. as he sets out in i
sharper detail the Gasta
phenomenon than it was:
for me at the Berlin
"Welcome to the club."
> t
'
hospital anywhere convenient to problems in Germany
are
VIEW from Government House toward twin dona***
Frauenkirche, which dominate the Munich horizon


*ober26
wfl]
1979

+Jewish ncridton
Page 19-C
i his
i toreig
an citii
ion that |
rmany
Kurop
:ept -*-i(j
east,
iomorro
the socil
hat is i
i it mis
Pedestrian zone built at the Neuhauser Strasse, with view of the Karlstor
Institute for Contemporary History
\cumenting National Socialism
ippear I
her.
IUNICH On the
jnrodstrasse here is the
ititut fur Zeitgeschichte the
titute for Contemporary
itory. A white, squarish
iking building without
mtious design, its ar-
itecture is functional, no
nse, a reflection of the
wusness of the work done
iide.
:holars in history, political
social science as far back as
lober, 1947 banded together
Ihe purpose of investigating,
;aging in research and
:umenting the National
:ialist period in Germany
era of the Hitler Third Reich.
INSTITUTE is an
lemic center only in the sense
it it has informal ties to the
[dwig Maximillian University
and to other universities in
Germany, as well. Institute
ff members give lectures at
ise universities, and students
throughout the country
I. in fact, the world visit to do
irch in its archives and
try.
['Mainly, we are a scientific
titution," explains Dr. Ino
idt, one of some 20 full-tune
ilare and writers on the IFZ
[n whose investigative activity
"" an ancillary group of 50 or-
sational workers hopping.
Arndt, whose credentials
include graduate study in
'eland at Case Western
!rve, has an aura of positive
Wy about her that belies the
anally eroding nature of
work.
W HER DESK is a recent
Nation of Yad Vashem in
^salem. Her office library, a
lined wall behind the
. includes a huge volume on
el in Hebrew.
A important tht the NS
be documented scien-
y. declares Dr. Arndt.
^"^ People would rather
P Or even believe that the
JJ of the Nazi period are a
E Arndt 8m"es softly, and
J answers with an equally soft
Erf- at "^ Certinly, the
>* of people are important,
P where these attitudes are
on ignorance, prejudice or
Ihont Sfr,ate,y twi8ted '*.
Pope that our work here will
COrreCt this" But ovr
mi tim P^pose is to
f^tory. We see to fit/by our
' research, that it speaks for it-
self."
DR. ARNDT is, herself, the co-
author of a recent paper on the
organized Nazi terror against the
Jews of Germany. And the In-
stitut fur Zeitgeschichte has pub-
lished a hundred or more im-
portant volumes on the National
Socialist period since it was
organized.
In addition, there is the
Institute's Vierteljahreshefte fur
Zeitgeschichte, a periodical
published four times yearly,
which makes available worldwide
the IFZ's latest research
developments.
But people are generally not
scholars. With your work on such
a highly-developed academic
level, how can it be useful where
it is most needed? I mean among
the masses, who are either
ignorant of or indifferent to the
NS period.
Dr. Arndt listens patiently.
"We have made our mark," she
says with some quiet pride. "It is
true that to reach the masses of
people, you must be emotional
as Hitler himself was in a
negative way. But we cannot be
emotional."
SHE PAUSES, thinks deeply
about her last statement, then
proceeds: "Our job is to be
scientific, not emotional. That is
the nature of the scholar." She
adds: "Not that the material
with which we deal on concen-
tration camps, extermination
programs. Third Reich orders to
implement the political and
military objectives of the Nazi
era is not in itself personally
heartrending. You can not deal
with the material on any level,
even scientific, and not be af-
fected."
You mean like the TV series.
Holocaust?
Yes, she smiles. "We can not
document in a cosmetic way
not like Holocaust, which was
genuinely emotional. The impact
of the series in all of Germany
was absolutely unbelievable. It
has made people far more in-
terested in the NS period than
ever before."
But Holocaust was pure
Hollywood. Do you think it was
an accurate representation of the
Jewish experience under the
Nazis?
"In your terms," she says,
"does it matter? You wonder
about the effectiveness of our
work here at the Institute
because it is scientific
meaning, I believe, accurate
and academic. Because it is
scientific and academic, you
question what kind of a mass
impact it can have.
"ON THE other hand,
Holocaust, which is neither
scientific nor academic, which is
what you call Hollywood,
meaning in this case emotional,
has done precisely what you want
what all of us want. It has
helped awaken so many more
Germans to the Hitler atrocity,
the Hitler obscenity, than any-
thing ever before. Why should we
criticize it? Holocaust has its
place. And so do we here at the
Institute."
Perhaps the work of the
Institute ought to be given just a
touch of Hollywood? Say, Franco
ZeffireUi?
Dr. Arndt sums it up: "Both
are needed. As for ourselves, we
must do our job as we see it." She
smiles: "Especially, no ZeffireUi,
pleas."
The nature of the Institute's
work takes the research done here
as far back as World War I in
order to document the Hitlerian
roots as precisely as possible, and
through the Vierteljahreshefte,
the Institute publishes its
research into current German
political affairs and NS attempts
at a renascence in its various
forms.
WHO PAYS for it all?
"For our publications," says
Dr. Arndt, the Landestentrale
fur Politische Bildungsarbeit, the
Federal Republic agency with
state bureaus engaged in a
variety of such related activities
for example, the Berlin
Bureau's Gedenk und
Bildungsstatte Stauf-
fenbergstrasse section, which is
the Museum for Resistance to
National Socialism in West
Berlin. "But most of our budget
is supported by foundations like
Volkswagen. And others."
Last year, says Dr. Arndt, who
modestly and in the politest way
possible begs not to be
photographed, there were 2,223
visitors to the Institute here on
the Leonrodstrasse using its
archives. From an ellipse-
shaped balcony, like a race track
above an inside gymnasium, I
look down on a reading room
filled with people in silent study.
The IFZ boasts a library of
some 80,000 volumes on the
National Socialist period. By
'On the other hand, 'Holocaust,' which is neither scientific norl
academic, which is what you call Hollywood, moaning in this!
j com emotional, has done precisely what you want what aUoff
\ us want. It has helped awaken so many more Germans to tneM
i Hitler atrocity, the Hitler obscenity, than anything ever before, f
\ Why should we criticize it? 'Holocaust' has its place. And so do\
we here at the Institute. Bath are needed. As for ourselves, <
r must do ourjob as we see It'
elevator, Dr. Arndt takes me
down into the depths of the
building and its carefully air-con-
ditioned archives of documents,
some original, many photo-
graphic copies.
"WE HAVE access to the files
of the U.S. Military in Alexan-
dria, Va., on the NS period," says
Dr. Arndt. "And to the National
Socialist library here in Bavaria."
Where it all began, meaning
Munich and Nuremberg?
"Yes, Nuremberg," she replies
selectively and takes a huge file
from a shelf filled with copies of
testimony and procedure at the
war crimes trials after World War
II.
"This is of special interest,"
she says of another file in
Hebrew, which documents the
decline and fall of Adolf Eich-
mann in Jerusalem.
"Israel's Attorney General
then, Gideon Hausner," says Dr.
Arndt, "was most cooperative."
In a western world that sees in
Germany the will to forget, there
is clear evidence that this may
not be entirely true. That ex-
treme right wing neo-Nazi
organizations in West Germany
single out the Institut fur
Zeitgeschichte for repeated abuse
as an alleged center of fraudulent
propaganda against the Hitler
regime's genocidal policies, which
the extremists deny ever existed,
is proof in itself of the ef-
fectiveness of its activity.
HERE AT the IFZ, Dr. Arndt
and her colleagues document the
Hitler era with photographic
precision. They are making every
possible effort to assure that
Germany will not forget.
Does she see the establishment
of the IFZ in Bavaria as sym-
bolic?
"I never thought of it in
those terms," she confesses.
"But perhaps it is. Perhaps from
Bavaria comes the message that
all of us must remember. At
least,'" says Dr. Arndt, "Bavaria
is making sure that the history of
the NS period is available for all
of us to study."
Diplomat Insists:
No Policy Change
Continued from Page 13-C
and the magnitude of Israel's
ultimate triumph were.
WITH RESPECT to the first,
Buchrucker says simply: "The
Israeli government's assessment
of the Middle East situation at
the time showed the kind of gross
insensitivity to the political
realities that the world had not
come to expect from a previously
consistent winner and knowledg-
able people.
With respect to the second,
Buchrucker declares: "In those
first four davs. Israel's image as
a beleaguered David suddenly
disappeared. The flatfooted
youth armed with the might of
divine guidance and protection
from ancient enemies not only
faltered, but failed."
Says Buchrucker: "The
diplomatic error in the first set of
conditions and the military
clumsiness during the first days
of the second set of conditions
recast Israel's image in-
ternationally in the kind of
unfavorable light which she has
not yet overcome and which
she is not likely to overcome in
the near future. Suddenly, Israel
is a nation like most all others
and is judged not by a special set
of rules, but by the same rules
governing everyone else."
IN BUCHRUCKER'S view, a
decisive Israeli victory in the
Yom Kippur War on the
magnitude of the 1967 victory
might have compromised the
Arab oil war against the in-
dustrialized nations. And Israel's
ultimately having to come to a
rapprochment with the Arabs on
territories and the Palestinian
issue would have been on terms
far more favorable to Israel's
view of a comprehensive Middle
East settlement than is now in
the offering.
As for West Germany, says
Buchrucker, "It is wrong to say
that our attitude toward Israel is
changing. The fact is that there is
no West German attitude toward
Israel as such not since 1972."
By this, Buchrucker means the
six nations of the European
Economic Community since that
year, "which launched a coor-
dinated Middle East policy based
on cooperation with the entire
area.
Since 1977, the EEC has come
to be known as The Nine, adding
three more European member
nations, and Buchrucker argues
Continued on Page 20-C
mMMM
Strauss ante portas
(Cutnon- Horn Haimnfer / Luhckn NachrKhten)


Pa; C
I
onn Viewpoint
*Jcmirf fkrkl&r
Fnca-.
Who's Who of Right-Wing Extremist
No Policy Change
In Middle East
i Page 19-C
ESTION .---
----



it iten
ermao
- -
-
erman repeats
Ik ::.
- Middle East as
Unxtec Nations Beeoietaoe 242.
iding the right! '.? the
Palestinians
1>< r*re r.e -.-..serves We
all abeal 'Aest Getaway and
East Germany How can e tax*
; ..- ether :.-.an one *.-.*:^
:.\,y.r>. the igr.t of a people to
eif-cetercninatjon?'
THE IMPLICATION j clear:
Eaet Gemaay does not have that
right, in BuchruckeT s opinion.
and so is tied to an alien poetical
condition. To be consistent, the
Feoeral Republic must demand
the right of self<:>.Tr._-ation for
the Ptlftminr.^ too
long. Buchrucker
declares, observing all the
amenities, as this is understood
in terms of a general Arab
consensus on the right of Israel
to exist as a free and respected
nation.
Says Buchrucker: We have
been heartened by the Mar 26
peace treaty between Israel and
Egypt." We do not struggle over
his "we" whether it means the
Federal Republic or The Nine. Is
France, for example, "hear-
tened '? This is a question I do
not ask.
"But then there is the Mar. 29
resolution at Baghdad to isolate
Egypt- If the present autonomy
talks do not yield significant
results, the continuing isolation
of President Sadat may polarize
the Arabs even further."
IN THIS sense, argues
Buchrucker, Israel is reliving the
status quo dilemma between the
1967 and the 1973 wars, hoping
that an autonomy talks
stalemate will be of little con-
sequence. But, as he sees it.
changes are occurring too rapidly
today for that kind of leisurely
deterioration. Furthermore, time
is on the side of the radical Arabs
and against moderation within
the moderate Arab camp and in
Israel itself.
"What we fear is peace drifting
away toward another crisis,"
Buchrucker declares. This, he
says, explains the EEC
statement of June 18, calling for
a halt to Israeli settlement of
occupied territories and
regretting the Israeli claim to
sovereignty wver the West Bank.
Finally, the question asserts
itself: You keep saying "we." Is
this the Federal Republic or the
nine nations of the EEC you are
talking about? The French, for
example, are quite explicit about
their petrodipfomacy. Why does
Germany pretend magnanimous
disinterest? Genscher's Middle
East tour was not a study in
national disinterest, in national
self-abnegation.
BUCHRUCKER agrees, but
adds: "It would be incomplete to
say that our policy toward Israel
is pure petrodiplomacy. Genscher
would have gone to visit the Arab
Foreign '!.'. : G* '.-::
for
on
VUiy Brandt
leaders even if all they had to sell
is water.'
To a visiting journalist in
Bonn, the claim rings hollowly in
the late afternoon sun filtering
through windows in the office of
the Middle East desk here on
the Adenauer Allee.
Buchrucker persists: "Gen-
scher's purpose our purpose
is to achieve peace as quickly as
possible. To achieve peace before
the Arabs themselves create a
Middle East vacuum into which
the Soviets could enter with
virtual impunity."
Why doesn't the Federal
Republic why doesn't The
Nine give Israel credit
deterring that eventuality?
"It is widely appreciated."
By EEC declarations
settlements and expressions of
regret over Israel's view of its
West Bank hegemony?
SAYS BUCHRUCKER: "We
have never said there should be a
new Palestinian state only a
homeland.' We have never
pronounced ourselves on a role
for the PLO. Our view of the PLO
is identical to the American
view."
Did not a member of
Parliament, Jurgen W.
Moeuerman, declare his in-
tentions of visiting Yasir Arafat
in August?
"His would be the third.
Gerhardt Schroeder saw Arafat
in 1974. Herr Thusing saw him in
1978."
And the Federal Republic has
no policy of its own toward Israel
apart from the policy of The
Nine? And there has been no
change in Federal Republic
sentiment toward Israel since,
say, the Yom Kippur War, which
you yourself say marked the
beginning of a downward in-
ternational sentiment away from
Israel and toward Arabs?
"Not really."
Continued from Page 9-C
listed or that Hitler
conducted a genocidal campaign against the
les
Wolf Difter Eckart. -
Si
Gerhard Fr*> BBC rig)
F.

United Freedom. In
Ikrumi D\ German Peoples Union One
.:lie Ken Rat
tbf igh which he coordinates
_-,- Nazi organizations as
erman Biock.
-. Eagle md East
. -.. man Property Owners and
..:.-.
Wolfgang Nahrath. '-'. r.. is chairman of
Lr.i ''.'..'.; Jugend WJ the nrj .vasaation
[ reedcra Council
that is really weC-knowr. WJ envisions itself as
an up and coming elitist force, and it lndoctrin-
..-..- _*.-. .-.- camp outings. sessions
dedicated to the homeland and weapons
training :n carefully-prepared military
maneuvers. Particularly, Nahrath's organization
has good communication with similar youth
organizations in Belgium. France and Italy.
Nahrath s motto is The Northland lives the
land of the German gods the land of our
forefather! thebioodof our ancestors":
Michal Borchardt. 30. metal-worker of
Hamburg, who heads an essentially one-man
organization called Faschistische Front
This is by no means a complete listing of ex-
treme right-wing activists in West Germany, but
it offers some insight into their feverish affairs
and the work cut out for the Verfassungsschutz to
keep them under surveillance
It would be impossible here to enumerate the
enormous variety of their endeavors their
demonstrations, their preparation for the return
of Adolf Hitler II. their defamation of the homes,
memorials and places of employment of the
pathetic remainder of the German Jewish
community with Nazi slogans, swastikas and
threats.
Neither should it be said of them, as recently it
was said of Michael Kuhnen on American
television, that he is nothing but a "Boy Scout."
They are all more than that, the offense to the
Boy Scout movement apart, and Kuhnen par-
ticularly. Kuhnen. 24. of Hamburg, is currently in
jail after leading a raid on an armory to conSscate
weapons for his organization. Aktionsfront
Xationaler Soziaiisten IANS). He has been an
official functionary of the umbrella Nazi
organization in Hamburg, Freiheitverein Hansa,
Freedom League, and another such group called
SA Sturm 8 Mai. which publishes Der Sturm,
whose title is reminiscent of the infamous anti-
Semitic Julius Streicher's Der Sturmer in the
heyday of the Hitler era.
KUHNEN BELIEVES that Hitler wfll
someday appear in history as a hero much like
Napoleon I. His incarceration is not only in
punishment for his raid on the armory, but also
for his prodigious collection of Nazi uniforms,
symbols and other such paraphernalia.
No less a Nazi-hunter than Simon Wiesenthal,
of the Nazi Documentation Center in Veinna, has
estimated that Kuhnen and his Hamburg con-
nect, .-.tain an index -'
I

' -' l AmerKa.- '. r.
--
-.-cause Lauck

-. ib Germ
ppeai .-.
la addition. Lao
: the right .J.*
meat* '" v uc
It
Kuhnen
is this nunner. -
eicaa Nazi that
proui What he is prevent* loinabv
r ederal Republic
ibst activity in Germany. U -or(liZ
-erica. Lauck sees himselifas
vioif Hitler His overriding
the magic of the nrastik
strongest psychological weapon .-
the Nazi movement.
LAUCK S AMBITION this
unjust state I America i by force and to sub-
.* for it an NS state, a new order with
racial foundationstones throughou: the entire
Aryan world.
He repeatedly threatens that hi bet not ei.
elude violent activity in West German -
particuraly if what he calls "police terrorism''
against neo-Nazism here continues unbated.
If the Verfassungsschutz must be ceaselessly
concerned about the extreme right and left-wing
activity in the Federal Republic, a responsibility
which Lauck. himself, best illustrates the need
for. its vigilance extends outward into the ex-
tremist political arena of other nations, as well.
The proliferation of the Republic s own hate
literature is compounded by the constant influx of
literature from abroad. Lauck s included. Then
there are:
t Mathias Koehl. 44. of Arlington Vs..
of the National Socialist White Peonle s Partv
iNSWPPi. and secretary of the World Union of
National Socialists iWUNSi. Koer.: is a prolific
distributer of Nazi propaganda.
Albert Arm and Erikson. 45. of Antwerp.
Belgium, self-proclaimed Fuhrtr of the \laamse
Vilitanten Orde. Flemish Military Society He
maintains brilliant contact with trwin scnon-
born. 65. head of the Kampfbund deutscher
Soldaten in Frankfurt. Together with Schonborn.
the vigorous Eriksson held a European meeting
to honor the Nazi dead at Diksmuide in 1977.
which was attended by sympathizers from
Belgium. Denmark. France, Finland. Great
Britain. Ireland. Canada. Austria. Sweden. Spain.
the Netherlands, and the U.S.A.
Dr. Marcel If frig. 52, of Diemegingen in
Alsace, who is chairman of the international
committee of Seues Sationales Ewope iNXEl,
New National Europe. His immediate aim is
autonomy for Alsace-Lothringen and. thereafter,
a national European union, of course drawn along
the old Nazi ideological lines;
I Wafried Kembach, 52. of Jersey City, NJ,
who propagandizes in behalf of American
memorials to the Third Reich through his Gtr-
mania International (GI) movement Kernbach
maintains a contact point in Braunschweig with
neo-Nazis throughout the Federal Republic. He is
also the self-proclaimed leader of an American
society he calls Friends of Germany:
Mike McLaughMn. 37. of Bebington.
England, head of the British Movement.
View of the Olympic Stadium in West BerUn



Lay. October 26.1979
+Jenisi> ik>rid/an
Page21-C
IMMANUEL BIRNBAUM: spans modern Europe
'Journalistic Giant'
Views World Affairs As
New Europe Sees Them
MUNICH Immanuel Birnbaum is senior editor
emeritus of one of the world's great newspapers,
Suddeutsche Zeitung, published here. Born in
Konigsberg in 1894, he was a student at the
University of Freiburg and of Munich from 1912
through 1919. His eyes, now somewhat weary behind
thick glasses, saw the decline and fall of European
royalty in the years prior to and following World War
I.
By the time the Hitler era rolled around, Birnbaum
had already served as editor in chief of the Bremer
Volksblatt and the Breslauer Volksblatt and did a
stint as foreign correspondent in Warsaw for such
newspapers as the Frankfurter Zeitung. Through
1952, he was a foreign correspondent for newspapers
in Switzerland, Austria and the Scandinavian
countries.
AFTER HITLER, Birnbaum returned to Munich
and became foreign editor, then assistant editor-in-
chief of Suddeutsche Zeitung.He "retired" in 1975.
"Oh, no," he explains, "I don't go into the office
these days any more than three, four, maybe five
times a week." There is no smile. The octogenarian-
plus-five does not intend it as a joke. Birnbaum is
serious.
The author of numerous works, among them
Achtzig Jahre Dabei Gewesen, "Eighty Years at It,
ppblished in 1974, he is still actively involved m his
craft. He also holds the coveted Theodor Wolff Prize in
Journalism sponsored by the Axel Springer
Publications, as well as other awards showered upon
him in Austria, Sweden and Finland.
BIRNBAUM SPEAKS of "my good friend, Walter
Lippmann," with not the slightest hint of name-drop-
ping. These were his peers in his heyday. There is no
sense of nostalgia for the past either, nor even a trace
of bitterness that the past was for a period of time less
than kind to him. Others did not survive the hateful
Nazi era at all.
Today, Hans Rosenbauer, secretary of Bavaria's
state ministry for employment and social welfare,
speaks of him as "one of our journalistic giants. Un
gigantic world affairs, Birnbaum declares himself as
follows:
ENERGY
"After Harrisburg, the anti-atomic energy forces
are stronger than ever before. They do not serve a
worthwhile purpose because they give the impression
that we can not handle this kind of energy. It simply is
not true. What happened at Harrisburg is an even
greater disservice than the forces it unleashed.
Besides, at this stage of the game, we have no
alternative. Other forms of energy need much
development and study before they can replace either
oil or the atom.
"In addition to the fact that Harrisburg muddied
: the waters of energy alternatives, the United States
generally expends a disproportionate share of the
world's energy reserves. This makes it all the more
expensive for the rest of us, including Europe, of
course.
"The world price of oil is the result of American
waste, which merely flirts with limiting its voracious
needs. In this sense, you (meaning the United States)
are our competition, not our helper. No part of
American governmental policy is as badly
mismanaged as energy. Your private companies have
too much power, too much influence."
SALT II
"This agreement is necessary, but it won't solve any
big problems, certainly not for Europe. SALT II is a
U.S.-Soviet attempt at rapprochment. It only serves
us (meaning Europe, more specifically Germany) as a
prelude to SALT III, which will concern itself with
armament and disarmament in our neighborhood.
"What we envision is the limitation of Soviet power
in Eastern Europe. Quite frankly, we also envision the
limitation of American power as a means of achieving
equivalent limits that the Soviets will find acceptable
and impose upon themselves.
"It is no longer a question of yes or no, as the
United States Senate seems to be suggesting in its
threats to reject SALT II. The question really is 'how
much?' The constant escalation of arms is becoming
too expensive for the Western economies to endure,
especially now that the cost of weapons systems is
related to the astronomic increase in the cost of
energy."
ISRAEL
"I think that Prime Minister Menachem Begin is
unpopular now throughout the whole of Europe.
Primarily, it has to do with his policy of settlements in
.the occupied territories. Begin simply is not reliable.
"(Defense Minister Ezer) Weizman and (Foreign
Minister Moshe) Dayan are far more reliable.
"The truth, as Europe sees it, is that Begin is killing
President Sadat I mean Sadat's link to the more
moderate Arab nations. Previously, Egypt was the
leader of the moderate Arabs, Saudi Arabia especially.
Now, the moderates are being forced to establish links
to activist anti-peace forces in the Middle East such as
Libya's Qaddafi.
"The trouble is that nobody seems to be able to stop
Begin from making injudicious statements and
fomenting injudicious actions.
,"For a long time after the defeat of Hitler, the
German people were enthusiastic in their support of
Israel. I recall how popular Mr. Ben-Gurion was. But
Jerusalem is making it very difficult for everybody
these days. Perhaps Begin can win elections in Israel,
but he will not win the peace."
GERMAN POLICY
(Israel)
"Our (Foreign Minister Hans Dietrich) Genscher, in
my opinion, speaks moderately. We are not like the
French, who felt impelled to embrace the Arab cause
from the very beginning I mean the Yom Kippur
War, when Israel's international fortunes began to
change. We did not do the same. But now we feel we
must.
"No, it is not a question that German policy is being
influenced by oil needs. And you (Leo Mindlin) are
wrong when you say that the Germans are like the
French, that Germany did change its attitude toward
Israel after the Yom Kippur War.
"Yes, I recall in that war that we denied the United
States landing rights of its big cargo planes on then-
way to rearm Israel after the first few days, when
things were going so badly on the battlefield. But that
was not because we suddenly became anti-Israel and
pro-Arab. We were simply protecting our neutral
status as non-combattants.
"I have been in Israel, and most Arabs have told me
that they feel they are second class citizens. Germany
Continued on Page 24-C


?u--. '.
? Jew/*/ Fkrrttar
Friday, fjruj^r-
Beauty Aplenty--But One Is Not to Forget History
SICH T-ut rmtv**-A
- ;:'
-. .*! is tie
'-epobbc of
'A outer states
* p*.-..sa= ai
i. aria andoobtedry.
9re*sca The Aips. ow-
.- i
.-^a.is-.x a
;-- ..:':' .:'
He.:. ..-ans-
-. -
dd v> pervasive Caderefia
- : i..-
' ":
^- -
i period -
HI

i -
pea net
-,;
-..-. a -
ace ..-.
:'.
-.s.-'r
the fa me of
the '' Bayer* ''. -
of beer of the opulent National
.' be. of AdoM Hitler's
Munich
beet fanciful a.', i
a of the typical
...age
I take the route toward
Germisch Partenkirchen and
OberaaHnergan that the great
Goetl -rated
to Itat) High above the
Waknensee. Goethe stands re-
vcarnated. a bronze statue com-
memorating his tour through this
very spot, overlooking the water
far below and the splendorous
mountain1! beyond.
I WANT to visit the home of
ird Strauss in Garmisch. I
beer in my mind's ear the
Marschallin in Rosenka renity and musical
Strauss achieved in hi
Aw Aour Songs, which he com-
pos* was already into
ightiei th<: robust self-
.g satire of his youthful Don
Quixote The hope is thwarted
borne is privately-owned
;jen to the public Or a:
..-ids good to say that. I
will not see the study, touch the
' [eel the piano upon which
rked as 1 do days later in
Bonn in the house in which
fleethoven was born and spent
his early years.

1



AIR PAISTISG on quaint building in Garmisch-Partenkirchen
uiuista and Ober-
tbe sight of the
.-. pat) which this time
;.- .:/-. '... *.ng an inter-
nal straggle with Jcwisli
nd leaders, will be
:r.ti-Semitic in its flavor
than ever before, stands the
'rkirche of the Dominican
r, a beautiful cathedral with
typical:;, onion-shaped
German domes giving the exotic
architectural feeling of Eastern
Orthodoxy
IN THE church, on a study
door off to one side, hangs a
p -- '- message on tnis
sems strange
..-. a medieval Bavarian world
The poster announces. Diaspora
S Brwlerlichkeit (Diaspora Sun-
oa;. Diaspora Needs Brother-
hood
I ask nine visitors emerging
from their silent prayer how they
ibout the sign Uniformly,
but for one. they smile ner.
and they don't know
what the message means The
.on is a
tils me he has converted to
nmodate his wife He. too.
but for a
different reason
\t Oberammergau. just a few
sy, the community has
been torn by dissension over the
hundreds of years old text of
their world-famous Passion play
now modified to be less offensive
lews. 1 efusals
pan in the cast I
. posed rules
be number -._~.es ar.
- can pla;. lb f Jesus
g tenures in thi
-.-:' ------
.-. jlting them l
.-.- i ~.
a.;- -:' ..-.
must
ne star ii I
effigy of himi: the clear
determined insistence explained
by New Testament theology that
women over 35 years of age
should not be permitted to take
part
AT OBERAMMERGAU. I
mfortable. The
enlin is : reo ipied ith
Jesus and the
ited every-
where: in tings on count-
less r. uses in -j.id carvings I
testament
ever) tourist shop.
i
- -'.aged.
and
ram-
f no tii
then and
Although the play has only
run e. -rammer-
gau ->eems to constant
ration for the event In be-
tween runs, the wood carvings
are a constant reminder of the
staging, the cast of characters.
World-famous National Theatre is home of the opera in Munich
. i with .".- inevitable con-
- nUesa array
- and. of course.
. ifixes
At the Klosterkirche in
Benedikt Beuren. I feel far more
at home even though Diaspora
Sonntage is dimly understood, if
at all At the Klosterkirche. there
turn the
light -. even in the exotic far
: Havana, and I feel a
- Fgratitude to the religious
who came up with the
notion that it would be a good
to sermonize on Diaspora
Braucht Bruderlichkeit -when
- away, ui Ober-
eople are still angry
knuckling under to the
Jews.' Especially when, on this
Sunday. Diaspora is stretched to
include the Boat People" of
whom the press makes much,
comparing them to the latest
victims of a new Nazism in the
Orient
At the Klosterkirche. the
Tied Vmerican Jew tells me
that hisu ...-en unkind to
- that's '..-.-. he didn't
mind converting. To which I
is .:- much
I re people
listorj And I wonder
wife have
' >berammergau
and ho* he felt there He has
already made his history. What
owuld ior didi people make of his
new history in Oberammergau?
Was he not. in the end. still a
Jew.'
THE BEAUTY of the
Bavarian countryside is
heightened by a visit to the
Linderhof Castle of King Ludwig
II. where the tons of tourists
trooping. through it set me
scurrying from the castle's Ver-
sailles-like splendor in dollhouse
miniature, although it is not
nearly so grandiose. I am told, as
Neuschwanstein along the
Chiemeee.
And then, back to Oarmisch
I here. I brood over Richard
ra anti-Semitic inclin-
ations, his frequent operatic col-
laboration with the Jewish Hugo
Von Hofmansthal notwith-
standing, and I try to assess the
possibilities for success in
Bavaria, indeed in all of Ger-
many, for such things as Dias-
pora Sonntag.
Obviously, no answer to such
speculation is possible except
the effort itself to preach on the
Diaspora, which must speak for
itself in the same sense that it is
not possible to determine the
effect on Bavarian *< .,1
children who are required by
i
' en)|

state law to v,
ooce during the
1
BAVARIA S : -, .
Federal Rep.
reminiscent of _,y
runs high in this
--'
the scrappy ,:.; rfu] Fran-
Josef '..-.--- -
Prime Mhuster
ullra<<
national
cour- bM
thing- ban Helmut
Schmidt -
The odds do n
him
hanrj I
'
European world m n than my.
V' iorgetl iberam-l
nergau lesptte j
for m*
ID .,
hoi ...and
Munidi
nr:- -^ no
nly shop up shop.!
P-1- theaters and
outd'jor caf- -.edrals
and pla. -omen
rear quainl alpine
cuslu
But Bavaria is
as -.. f Da \r.d of]
Regensburg. Th German;
list Gunt --minds
ito : K. gensl jrg Katt mi
Maus Cat I Says
Grass I Pilar's rch for]
Ma hike after I that "ml
October 1959 I *i ". : Regens-
bur^.- to a meeting I those sur
vivors of the *^ like you |
iMahlkel has ma Knight's
Cn ss I Jdmit mei
to the hall. Insidi :^ndewehr|
iijiicj m .1- pla) "-
KNIGHTS CROS.s
kreutz* f. iki jnhappy
emories pn as Grass
intends. One .- to be
bewitched b) i r. it) of the
coui rys -meant
not to furgt-t hist for it is at
Regensburg >- n th m who
earned the Iron Cr -- in World |
War II gatix-:
: so, .:i Mu alk the
sin again
and again. I see a lazed Gen
Ludend -hanje
and a conti :-'[ IU '' '''
destined for pr;- l marching into th I drive
past i he Olym| i i 'A'lw
11 Israeli athlete- m re murdered
by terrorists in '. (72
Rii-koned in these term*, I *
think Garmisch What is inv
porunt is not that R'chard
Strauss once lived there, but
lunch I have at a lovely garden
restaurant, where 1 hear an
argument between ar. American
tourist and a waiter, not German
but obviously Italian
THE AMERICAN fails to
understand the waiter's bill He
argues vociferously When il;
all settled and the American W
left, the waiter gathers mtn M
colli
, _- -iure with his right hand
es his :.- ai '" heav
kalu.n accented
declares: These aW*1
deleted) Am .; B.cu!
vou opi-n for a lollai rl '";
Communist, and he goes on *
on about Americana
Horat Haa.-e. oi the Be J
Senate, has told me that Italian
Gastarbeiter in sizeable numiw>
iirekeptoutofBerynasaniiH|
of political security, .md no
can see why.
Beauty is here aplenty, but one
is meant not to forget history
not the historv of former_ aUJ
not of new ones: no. the hiswrj
of former enemies nor c
friends.


Fnday, October 26,1979
+Jenisti fhridlian
After Corrosive Debate, A Triumph of Law
BONN After an almost
eleven-hour debate, the Bun-
destag has abolished the Statute
of Limitations for murder. The
255-222 vote comes on July 3. For
an American reporter traveling
here, it is a significant date, just
one day before our own
Independence Day.
But the national debate
preceding the one in the Bun-
destag does not suggest that
people believe abolishing the
Statute will necessarily be a
liberating force in West Ger-
many, a blow for freedom
demonstrating that the Federal
Republic is finally willing to come
to terms with the unspeakable
criminality of the Hitler Third
Reich.
ONE WOULD think that to
remove the protective shield due
to expire on December 31, 1979
behind which still-unprosecuted
Nazi war criminals have been
hiding would be a top priority for
a people determined to purge
their history of its greatest stain.
This is not necessarily so.
There are many who believe there
is no such stain at all that it
simply does not exist. There are
others who are still sympathetic
to the National Socialist cause.
For them, the war has not ended.
But it would be erroneous to
conclude that all opponents to
lifting the Statute of Limitations
necessarily fall in either one of
these categoreis. As I learn
quickly and soberingly, there are
many decent-minded people in
the country, and in government,
who have opposed lifting the
Statute for a long time and
with reasons one grows to
respect. It is a glib and facile
opinion that those who oppose
the move are overt or else closet
Nazi-sympathizers.
THE PARALLEL American
experience would be the feeling
one has for civil libertarians who
defend the right of American
anti-Semites generally, and neo-
Nazis specifically, to gather, to
demonstrate, in fact to exist in
the body politic. The impulse is
to abuse the civil libertarians for
protecting the constitutionally-
guaranteed rights of these
retrograde forces their
freedom of speech and assembly.
The impulse is to confuse them
with the anti-Semites them-
selves. But the truth is that it is
democratic principles they are
defending in their defense of
those who would destroy these
principles. So it is with those who
oppose lifting the Statute of
Limitations here.
Dr. Hans de With is State
Secretary for the Ministry of
Justice in Bonn. De With's
DR. HANSDE WITH: It can never be too late'
arguments for lifting the Statute
are compelling. In the end, they
tip the balance in the Bundestag.
"If we fail," he says, "from the
end of this year, starting
precisely on January 1, 1980, no
new cases can be brought against
Nazi war criminals.
"NOBODY CAN exclude the
fact that after that date
criminals, and evidence against
them, will not be discovered.
"And should they be
discovered, why then, the Public
Prosecutor will simply be forced
to say, 'Sorry, but it's too late.'
The unspeakable nature of the
crimes we are talking about must
not be lost in their proper focus:
It can never be too late."
De With traces the history of
the Statute of Limitations. After
the war, legal powers to deal with
criminals rested with the Allies in
Nuremberg, and their sentences
in such litigation ranged from
imprisonment to execution.
THE FEDERAL Republic of
West Germany was founded in
1949, and by 1955, the govern-
ment here was in full pursuit of
war criminals.
"We had a Statute for second
degree murder," explains De
With, "and by 1960, the SPD
faction called for an extension of
the Statute for fear that Nazis
would slip through un-
prosecuted."
An added factor in the debate
at that time was the mounting
cry for first degree murder
convictions. This led to the 1965
Statute of Limitations on the
prosecution of murder in the case
of Nazi crimes. But a rash of new
criminals, and evidence against
them, was discovered shortly
after that.
"In 1969," says De With, "the
coalition of Kurt-Georg
Kiesinger introduced a com-
promise measure. The Cabinet
agreed to extend the Statute
through 1979."
CONSIDERING the alter-
native possibilities on the eve of
the July 3 debate, De With saw
only three alternatives:
Do nothing, except to get as
much evidence as possible
against known criminals for
prosecution beyond 1980. with
the full awareness that new
information and the unearthing
of new criminals would make the
information useless and leave the
criminals immune thereafter;
Call for yet another ex-
BIRTHPLACE of Ludwig Van Beethoven in Bonn, where the immortal composer
spent his early years
I tention on the Statute and
engage in the interminable
debate that has been going on
since 1949, with the problem
continuing unresolved except on
a short-term basis;
Abandon the Statute.
"WE HAVE OPTED for the
last. Obviously, the issue is not
that those who oppose this view
are in favor of the Hitler past.
Our differences include aban-
donment of limitations on
prosecution of murder cases
not just those of the Nazi era."
Says De With: "Our op-
ponents point to German
juridical history as precedent.
For example, the prosecution of
genocide is not subject to
statutory limitations. On the
other hand, this applies only to
prosecution which did not enter
into force until 1955. Finally, this
prohibition does not, in turn,
apply to Nazi crimes of violence
because it is forbidden to impose
statutory provisions with
retrospective effect."
Then, there is the question of
Rechtsfrieden. Doesn't a person
have the right to demonstrate by
the example of his life after so
many decades that he has made
proper amends and to be per-
mitted to continue that life
immune from the threat of what
many regard as ex-post facto
punishment?
"In response to that," argues
De With, "is still another
question: Can you apply the
concept of Rechtsfrieden to
systematized murder? Is it not
better tor freedom to prosecute
the guilty? The fact is that we
can't simply turn our backs on
history.
DE WITH speaks with cynical
bitterness about such arguments.
They evoke "the right to life,
liberty and the pursuit of hap-
piness" in the Jeffersonian
Declaration of Independence.
"These Hitler murderers," he
says simply, "should have no
rechtsfrieden to emphasize the
sacredness of life. That would be
a philosophical absurdity and a
cruel abuse of our German
history from which we must not
flinch."
Supporting De With's point of
view is Dr. Johann Baptist
Gradl, of the CDU: "Who of us
could fail to understand the
desire to call it a day at long last
and quit repeatedly recalling
dreadful memories, especially
now when an entire generation
has grown up that has absolutely
nothing personally to do with the
crimes? But none of us,
young or old. can quit the history
of our people .
"IT IS true, you know, there
were Germans who offered
resistance And there were
plenty of them. But the other side
of the ledger is too ghastly: the
number of Jewish fellow-citizens
and other nationalities who were
victims of Nazi murder. .
"So we must respect the
feelings of the victims and their
next-of-kin for whom the idea is
unbearable that murderers
hitherto undetected might in the
future, from the end of this year,
get off scot-free merely because
they were able to avoid detec-
tion."
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, of
the ruling SPD: "I personally
advocate abolishing the Statute
of Limitations My view is
based on the fact that the
deliberate destruction of human
life in circumstances that can
only be termed murder can not be
undone by the passage of time
any more than it can or ought to
be forgotten. We have no way of
knowing what murders may yet
come to light, being also
I painfully aware that our courts
Page23-C
have oeen able to do little by way
>of atonement for the extent of
Icrimes committed in the days
"when Nazi violence reigned."
ERIK BLUMENFELD, of the
CDU, an Auschwitz and
Buchenwald internee: ". it
vould be inconceivable to us if
Nazi criminals, people guilty of
serious offenses, were to get off
scot-free merely because they
went undetected until after
December 31. 1979, escaping
prosecution solely by virtue of a
deadline technicality these
crimes against humanity, and I
say so as a victim, have cast dark
shadows on our country. I stand
with you all in joint respon-
sibility for our common history
and have no intention of running
away from this responsibility .
"A point of particular im-
portance ... is that Basic Law,
our constitution, values no legal
right more highly than life itself,
assigning it priority over all
others. So murder must not be
subject to the Statute of
Limitations Life is indivisible
and murder is illimitable."
BUT THEN there is the other
side. Detlef Kleinert, of the
liberal FDP faction in the
Bundestag here, a simple, un-
pretentious politican who looks a
reporter squarely in the eye with
much laughter and the kind of
genuine human feeling that
radiates from his every pore,
believes that lifting the Statute
of Limitations "moves people to
lose respect for the law."
In effect, argues Kleinert,
"exceptions, no matter how well-
intended, suggest that the law
may be changed to satisfy ex-
pedient needs." Isn't this, he
wonders, precisely what the
Nazis did?
In this, Kleinert is echoed by
Franz Ludwig Schenk Graf von
Stauffenberg, of the CSU:
"There is a widespread im-
pression that the world is
determined to judge by the
yardstick of the Statute of
Limitations whether or not the
German people have truly,
honestly, permanently and
unconditionally turned their
backs on National Socialism. But
the Statute of Limitations, in-
deed, is neither here nor there in
this context. It is an impression
that makes one feel distinctly ill
at ease .
"THE INHUMAN spirit of
Hitler's disregard for humanity
lives on ... in many parts of the
world. The true legacy, the
overriding legacy to which the
dead commit us is, or so it seems
to me, to help people who are
undergoing hardship, who are ill-
treated and oppressed today and
to side inexorably with
humanity."
Argues Graf von Stauffenberg:
!"That is why it is wrong...to
say that in so-called con-
centration camp trials the crimes
of the entire National Socialist
system are in the dock there
is not a dock in the world large
enough for the dreadful crimes
Nationsl Socialism committed
. The clear, indeed the only
valid answer the Germans have
had for the criminal National
Socialist regime, was to establish
firmly, reliably and remarkably
the rule of law ."
In Von Stauffenberg s view, as
indeed in Kleinert's, both men
coming from vastly opposing
social and political backgrounds,
to alter the law even to rectify
wrongs is to wrong the law itself.
IT IS against this background
that the Statute of Limitations
has been finally lifted. A motion
by Werner Maihofer to abolish
the Statute only for genocide, but
to allow it to continue to apply to
murder, is defeated.
In a speech for abolition,
Justice Minister Hans-Jochen
Vogel, of the SPD, hits the final
chord of victory: He asks who
will guarantee that "all mass
murderers are really dead?" Ht
declares that for "our own self-
j respect, no murder must be
| forgiven after Auschwitz."


Page24-C
m
fiewistncridHan
Friday, October 26, lJ
BRANDENBURG GATE: Walled in by Communists
on August 13,1961
MONUMENT to victory and peace is typical
Soviet-style sculpture of kneeling soldier, four-
square and naive in artistic form
i
SOLDIER [above] seen at a distance in perspective in East Berlin
park. Hammer and sickle crowns the memorial.
Credits
: Photos and other illustrations in this Report from Germany are by:
i it Leo Mindlin;
\ v.- Courtesy of the Federal Republic of West German and Inter Nationes;
a 'Betrifft:' Publication of the Verfassungsschutz of the Ministry of the Interior;
i A Publications of the Plotzensee and Resistance Museums, West Berlin;
6 Information zur Polltischen Bildung, Neudruck 1978;
it Publications of the International Committee for Dachau in Brussels;
ft Cartoon, courtesy Die Welt;
:, Frontispiece, courtesy Der Spiegel.
East Berlin
Through the Wall-And
Into a World of Fear
Continued from Page 17-C
motor shudders and revs to life. We are on our way
The driver is a West Berliner. The guide is from the
East.
Gazing through the window, I get the sense of
being in a netherworld. The streets are ill-kempt.
Pedestrians have a peculiar air of depression about
them. The guide points out the landmarks, including
the Workers This, the Peoples That. Once, they were
famous, glittering Berlin attractions, including
Unter den Linden, which now seems seedy and over-
grown by brush.
Statues of Lenin are ubiquitous. Posters with
the clenched fist of Marxism emblazoned on them
give a visitor the sense that this may be an im-
possible nightmare, but it is all very real indeed. The
fist may be a home-grown symbol of social achieve-
ment, economic determination. To a western visitor,
it is a threat: the Communist annunciation of the
prince of the proletariat.
THE GUIDE is relentless in her statistics on
labor achievements, educational requirements for
children a veritable paradise of life and love. Out-
side butcher shops, long lines are queued up, waiting
to enter.
In a gigantic East Berlin park, we are treated to
the highlight of this Grand GDR Tour: the Soviet
monument to victory and peace. Its architecture is
stark and naive, echoing the architecture and
sculpture of the Fascist period in Italy, Spain, and
Germany, which I have seen in the Olympic Stadium
in West Berlin and in Hitler-era buildings near the
English Gardens in Munich.
Back at Checkpoint Charlie, GDR police
demand that the empty luggage compartment of the
bus (no one had any to begin with) be opened. It is
inspected with giant searchlights and mirrors. Ditto
for the bottom of the bus, lest an East German has
managed somehow to hide himself there, too.
THE GATE back to West Berlin opens. We
drive away. Suddenly, the bus intercom is playing
rock music again. There is a burst of applause. The
streets of the free city beyond the Wall, the ramparts
and the barbed wire, seem wide and golden.
Journalistic Giant'
'Suddeutsche Zeitung'
Editor Sees Tilings
From Europe's Viewpoint
Continued from Page 21-C
is not calling for a Palestinian state necessarily. What
we do support is equal rights for the Arabs."
GERMAN POLICY
(America)
"What President Carter is doing is too little and too
late. That is how we see it. Vacillation over SALT II is
an example of his ineffectiveness in dealing with the
Russians. If he wants the treaty signed, then he
should be able to block the Senate from black-mailing
him by linking their assent to other considerations.
"Take Nicaragua. For too long, America helped
(President Anastasio) Samosa. American policy has
simply resulted in tacit support of Castro Cuba a
ambitions in the Caribbean.
."The fact is that the Russians don't have to do a
thing about spreading revolution in Latin America.
U.S. policy is doing it for them. Bonn worries about
that.
"Under (Franklin Delano) Roosevelt, the good
neighbor' policy attempted to reverse U.S. ba"aIr
republic diplomacy. But today, you have returned w
it. A good part of U.S. policy is not made in the White
House; it is made on Wall Street.
"I think the downward turn in American fortunes so
far as world leadership is concerned came
with
America's failure in Vietnam. There is a consensus in
West Germany, and in all of Europe and the tree
world, that America no longer handles the big
problems either effectively or altogether altrui
tically."


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