The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02595

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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"Jewish Flondian
1U'0
1. Number 43
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Miami, Florida Friday, October 27,1978
By Mail 60 Cents
Two Sections 35 Cents
\ Architect's rendering of the Jewish Federation Housing, Inc
hew project for the elderly, now under construction
Miami Looks Ahead
[Federation Housing
Project on the Way
Jewish Federation Hous-
Inc, a corporation
id by the Greater
liami Jewish Federation,
has begun construction of a
U4-unit apartment build-
ng for the elderly on Miami
Jeach.
Samuel I. Adler, presi-
dent of Jewish Federation
Housing, describes the
project, located at West
Avenue and Eighth Street,
as "a milestone in com-
bining the support services
necessary to allow our
elderly to remain active and
productive in the com-
munity, and to avoid being
Continued on Page 2-A
German Enterprise
|l)eutsclic Bank Eyes
Big Apple Towers
By .11 fRGEN KRAMER
Hannoi ersche Allgemeine
Deutsche Hank's intention to
m the World Truck' Center in
^ York on behalf of financially
'I'm clients has caused a stir in
e American press,
I German investors in the
MM States have been par-
ticularly active since the dollar
started suffering from consump-
tion, but this drew little attention
because the purchases, chiefly
real estate, were handled dis-
creetly, and there were no spec-
tacular deals to attract headlines.
THE PURCHASE by a Ger-
man consortium of banks headed
Continued on Page 13-A
Cluing
Peace Treaty Given
Eagle-Eye Exam
Anwar Has Questions. ,6-A
Deep Down, They Know. 7-A
JERUSALKM Talks between Israel and
Egypt were expected to resume Friday following
the return to Washington of Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan and Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman, head of the Israeli delegation to the
peace treaty negotiations.
Dayan and Weizman, along with their
Egyptian delegation counterparts, returned home
from Blair House last weekend for further in-
structions following what appeared to be a
growing impasse in the negotiating process for a
peace treaty.
ISRAEL LATE Wednesday gave provisional
approval, as expected, to the draft proposal
Weizman and Dayan brought back over the
weekend. Approval followed an 11-hour marathon
debate involving Cabinet members and Prime
Minister Menachem Begin. Approval was by a
vote of 15-0 with two abstentions.
The text of the Israeli approval reads:
"The government approves in principle the
draft peace treaty (and) the amendments
proposed by the prime minister The cabinet
has given appropriate guidelines to the
delegation, and has authorized its members to
continue the negotiations for the conclusion of a
peace treaty.
MINISTER OF Justice Shmuel Tamir made
legal suggestions in the wording of the draft
treaty that led to the provisional approval Tamir
emphasized that the changes in wording were not
a hardening of Israel's position.
Foreign Minister Dayan was quick to declare
that the new instructions he was bringing back to
Washington would not "overturn the negotiating
applecart."
At issue is the linkage problem the peace
treaty between Israel and Egypt links to a
demand that Israel make a statement on ultimate
withdrawal from the West Bank and Gaza. All
along, Israel has maintained the two must be
treated as separate items, while Egyptian
President Sadat has pressed for just such an
Israeli commitment, particularly relating to the
future of the Palestinians
IT WAS the linkage debate in Washington's
Blair House between the two delegations mat
Continued on Page 6-A
'World Peace Forum'
Cuckoos Reign Supreme Among
'Non-Aligned' Order at UN
By HARRIS SCHOENBERG
Darth Vader would rejoice. The
United Nations General
Assembly is in session again.
While it is an exclusive club, the
only qualification for mem-
bership is territorial power.
So megalomaniacs and even
cannibals can drive up in
limousines, make speeches, and
host gala receptions. And
everything they or their
representatives decide is justified
on the basis of principles solely
available to those who
manipulate the votes.
THE TONE of this 33rd
session was set during the
summer at the Belgrade Con-
ference of Non-Aligned States
and in Geneva at the UN's World
Conference to Combat Racism
and Racial Discrimination.
The "Non-Aligned" annually
adopt radical positions to
preserve an illusion of Third
World unity.
The Racism Conference,
meeting in late August,
overlooked most of the world's
racial abuses but reaffirmed the
equation of Zionism with racism
and racial discrimination. It then
went on to call for an end to
"racial discrimination" by Israel
and to condemn relations be-
tween Israel anil South Africa.
THE CONFERENCE also
equated criticism of its con-
centrated assault on reality with
support for apartheid.
Eighty-eight governments
voted in favor of the Conference's
final declaration. Just four
Austria. Finland. Sweden, and
Switzerland voted against.
The other Western democracies
walked out in revulsion.
The United States and Israel
did not attend because they
understood that the Conference
had been irrevocably con-
taminated by the original
equation of Zionism and racism
in 1975.
The Soviet bloc countries, with
the exception of Romania, spoke
with one voice.
AND SO IT went. A Con-
ference to combat racism ended
up inciting it. And if past per-
formance holds true, a large
Continued on Page 12-A
Dead Still Cry Out at Babi Yar
times
(Kiri-Htiiu SchAnMd / Dto Rhinpfli)
By JONATHAN SCHENKER
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
After thirty-seven years, there
is still no mention at Babi Yar
marking the infamous ravine
outside of Kiev as the site of Nazi
Germany's massacre of 100.000
Soviet Jews.
Though the Soviet authorities
have erected a memorial after
years of public debate both
within and outside the USSR, the
50 foot high monument consists
of eleven bronzed figures in-
cluding a Communist guerrilla
No Mention Ever
tighter, a Red Army soldier and a
sailor shielding an old woman.
Inscribed on a plaque are the
words. "Here in 1941-1943 the
German Fascist Invaders
executed over 100,000 citizens of
Kiev and prisoners of war."
There is no mention of the
Jews, and as a Jew I am
outraged.
THEIR DEATHS have been
ignored by the Kremlin, which
continues to deny that Jews were
the particular prey of a totali-
tarian regime. An all too familiar
scenario in Soviet-Jewish history.
The systematic murder of
Kiev's Jews by a 150 man SS
extermination squad, began on
Sept. 29. 1941, ending only 36
hours later when this singular
action in Hitler's vast Final
Solution had killed more than
Continued on Page 15-A
m&mmmm
IMNM
b Sadat's Peace Pipe a Smokescreen?...10-A


rr.
^6l
'Mt^im*
Tiaay, October z,
Dr. Thomas P. Melody (right), the last U.S. Ambassador to Uganda, and his wife,
Margaret, receive the National Mass Media Award fromDr. David Hyatt, president of the
National Conference of Christians and Jews for their book, "Idi Amin Dada: Hitler in
Africa," at a reception in the Melodys' honor at NCCJ's New York headquarters Dr
Hyatt called the book "an outstanding contribution to the cause of brotherhood and
understanding," and said it was "a stunning indictment of Idi Amin as a criminal against
humanity."__________________________^_1^
Headlines
Soviets Still Use Draft to Punish
Using the draft to persecute Jews is an old
Russian tradition. In Czarist days, Jewish boys
as young as eight years old were torn from their
parents to serve thirty long years in the Czar"s
Army. This system had only the faint virtue of
predictability. After 30 hard years, a man was
free to pursue his own life.
The Soviets are again using the draft to punish
Jews, but with a cruel new twist. In modern-day
Russia, you can serve your time and then, just as
you expect finally to be allowed to emigrate to
Israel, be called up for the draft again. This
cynical new trick is apparently being used on the
young Moscow Jew Anatoly Malkin.
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization
of America, which is the largest women's volun-
teer organization in the U.S., raised over $30
million this year, it was announced at the 64th
annual convention.
Bess Katz, of White Plains, N.Y., national
treasurer, explained in her report that even
though the members responsible for fund-raising
achieved a remarkable feat, in light of the in-
flation. Hadassah will be forced to achieve higher
collections for 1978-79.
*

1*1
Dr. Compton
Dr. Lederberg
to many Jewish youth, their religion has no more
relevance than the color of their hair."
Becker said that, Our survival depends on
education," and declared that "too many young
Jews receive too little Jewish education."
Israel Prime Minister Menachem Begin will be
guest of honor on Saturday, Dec. 9, at a banquet
celebrating the United Jewish Appeal's 40th
anniversary during the organization's national
conference at the New York Hilton Hotel.
The announcement, by UJA National Chair-
man Irwin S. Field in New York, confirmed plans
the Prime Minister first revealed in a national
broadcast to the people of Israel early last month
for a special trip to the United States to salute the
UJA milestone.
A new name and a new look has been
assumed by the former Hapoel Hamizrachi
Women's Organization. Now known as "Emunah
Women of America," the religious Zionist
organization's name change was in conformance
with similar name changes made by all its sister
organizations in 11 countries. All are affiliates of
an international confederation of religious women
supporting an extensive network of institutions
in Israel and all have uniformly ratified their new
name as "Emunah."
Saying that American Jewish youth are being
ravaged by and intermarriage, the Jewish Defense League in
Miami declared that the situation can now be
described as a crisis and threatens the Jewish
community with disaster.
"We are in a struggle for the soul of the young
Jew," said South Florida JDL Director Brett
Becker. "Jewish youth are filling the ranks of a
number of religious cults, experimenting in drugs
and intermarrying at a rate of 50 percent in some
U.S. cities. Even greater numbers of Jewish
youth are apathetic and indifferent to matters
affecting the Jewish community, and we find that
Even as a terrorist bomb exploded in
Jerusalem, a symposium took place at Tel Aviv
University on the subject of terrorism. The sym-
posium, sponsored by Tel Aviv University's
Center for Strategic Studies, was attended by
high-ranking officials of the Israeli Defense and
Security Establishment, who first discussed the
problem in a classified forum and then discussed
approaches to coping with terrorism in an open
forum.
In the past 13 years, approximately 11,000
terrorist incidents have occurred in Israel. But
while 700 deaths occur annually in Israeli traffic
accidents, there have only been 670 deaths in 13
years as a result of terrorist activities.
Two distinguished American scientists Dr.
Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Laureate in
Medicine, who is the newly-elected president of
Rockefeller University, and Dr. Walter Ames
Compton, chairman and chief executive officer of
Miles Laboratories Inc., a leader in U.S. pharma-
ceutical research and manufacture will be
guests of honor at the 33rd annual Weizmann
Dinner tendered the American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science on Sunday, Oct.
29, at the Americana Hotel in New York.
The regional promise and global impact of the
Institute's wide-ranging research advances in
such areas as cancer, leukemia, aging, heart
disease, immunology, bio-medical engineering,
food production, solar energy, pollution control,
nuclear physics recently stepped up the Camp
David accords, highlight the dinner whose theme
is "Weizmann Science on the International
Scene."
American Association for Ethiopian Jews, at
its recent annual meeting in New York, elected
Prof. Howard M. Lenhoff of the University of
California as its president. Prof. Lenhoff succeeds
Dr. Graenum Berger, the first president and
founder of the organization.
Miami Looks Ahead
Federation Housing
Project for Elderly
Begins Construction
Continued from Page 1-A
institutionalized."
WHEN COMPLETED in
1979, the building will include the
availability of emergency health
response, housekeeping assis-
tance, recreation, educational and
cultural programming, telephone
reassurance, escort, shopping
and transportation assistance
and others, all to be provided
through the Federation's family
of local agencies.
The housing units, including
76 efficiencies and 38 one-
bedroom apartments, will be
rented to low-income tenants who
will receive rent subsidies under
the Section 8 Housing Assistance
Payment Program under Section
202 of the U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment.
"Our growing ability to deal
effectively with the special needs
of the elderly through a com-
bination of local agency
programs." said Federate,
President L. Jules Arkin. "wiu"J
m0Stu.e^entA here on Miami
Beach s West Avenue.
"The Jewish community o(
Greater Miami, acting in concert
with the Federal government and
with the cooperation of the City
of Miami Beach, is making avail. |
able a much-needed housing
facility that is ideally suited w
our sizeable elderly population.
"TRUE TO the Jewish tnv
ditions by which we operate,
Arkin said, "this project is aimed
not only at improving people's
lives, but also at improving their
environment and their .
munity.
com-
"We look forward to theI
opening of this and other
facilities which can enhance the
quality of life here in Greater
Miami for groups of citizens who
are disadvantaged or in need, yet
can remain productive with our |
help."
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom. For
this reason we do not allow our name to be
represented by any other organization. Each
chapel isexclusivelya Riverside Chapel.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition and honor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a fami ly of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've never taken lightly.
MIAMI BEACH:
1920 Alton Road at 19th Street/531-1151
1250Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI:
Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street/ 443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH:
16480 N.E. 19th Avenue/ 947-8691
HOLLYWOOD:
2230 Hollywood Boulevard/920-1010
SUNRISE: rr,^
1171 Northwest 61st Avenue(Sunset Strip)/ 584-6060
WEST PALM BEACH:
47i4 Okeechobee Boulevard/683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan area
Riverside
Memorial Chapel, Inc. / Funeral Directors.
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
M10-17.71
M10-27-71
M10-27-71


Religion Editor on the Griddle
AJCong. Withdraws Award to Herald's Adon Taft
The Southeast Region of
L American Jewish Con-
Is this week withdrew
id award it was planning to
Ue to a Miami newspaper-
Lg because of a column he
rote in which, among
her things, he wrote that
fMoses ... committed
Lder... as a youth and
his later years com-
nanded the Jews to kill
Lery male child of the
llidianites and every
parried woman but to keep
Ce young girls for them-
ielves."
Adon Taft, religion
ditor of the Miami Herald,
Idded in his column of Oct.
that David's record
. is not any better" in
lejng "remembered for
heir atrocities (committed
By Jews).
RABBI RALPH Kingsley.
president of the Southeast Re-
i in a :euer to Taft that
\s you Know, we of the
nerican Jewish Congress had
etl to give you an award on
Jlonday. Oct. 30. in recognition
urnalistfc skills over the
Mrs. while we would in no way
eek to deny j ou the right to free
repression, we cannot in good
pnscience. however, give you the
nard at this time. Nor am I
Adon Taft
certain that you would feel com-
fortable accepting it. especially
from a descendant of the mur-
derer Moses."
The American Jewish Con-
gress reaction was the climax
here to other angry community
response to Taft's Oct. 20
column, which begins innocently
enough as a book review of Elie
Wiesel's new A Jew Today
published by Random House.
Taft calls Wiesel "unreservedly
one of the most committed and
knowledgeable Jews writing
today."
But Taft notes that "Wiesei
weakens the impact of his
message by distorting history as
he views every event in terms of
the Jewish experience, par-
ticularly his own in Nazi con-
centration camps."
WHILE TAFT acknowledges
that Wiesel is "undeniably
qualified to speak out for the
survivors and in memory of the
victims of the Nazi Holocaust,"
he argues that "In none of his
books does Wiesel really
acknowledge that more non-
Jews, many of them Christians,
than Jews died in the con-
centration camps. He barely
mentions anyone other than Jews
suffering during the Holocaust or
during any other period of perse-
cution."
Adds Taft: "Neither does he
differentiate between Gentiles,
nominal Christians, and com-
mitted Christians Just as
non-Jews too often lump all Jews
together in stereotypes that lead
to discrimination, he commits the
same kind of injustice toward
non-Jews."
Taft takes exception to what
he calls Wiesel's claim that
Judaism excludes racism" and
notes that the claim of 'ethical
superiority tor Jews .
historically is unfounded."
IT IS IN this context that Taft
takes out after Moses and David,
adding that "Many of the Jewish
prophets suffered persecution
and death at the hands of their
fellow Jews." Waxing political,
he adds: "And many non-Jews
have reason to be bitter about
some of the activities of the Stern
gang in pre-Israel Palestine."
In announcing to Taft the
withdrawal of the American
Jewish Congress award. Rabbi
Kingsley told Taft that "I find
your review to be not only
inaccurate in terms of your
statement of facts, but a gross
insult not only to every victim of
the Holocaust, but indeed to
every survivor, and more than
that, to the entire Jewish
community .
"You say that Wiesel barely
mentions anyone other than Jews
suffering during the Holocause or
during any other period of perse-
cution. Apparently you have not
read his poignant essay in the
same book, A Jew Today, en-
titled "Biafra, the End," in which
he so poignantly asks, 'How did
you succeed in clinging to your
mangled ailing land? and
what have we done for you? Not
much. Not enough And
what of the very moving essay
addressed 'To a Young
Palestinian Arab' in which he
speaks of the two sufferings,'
that of Arab and Jew? These
. should unite us. but they
divide us." he writes. 'I do feel
responsible for what happened to
you for your sorrow. "
REACTING SHARPLY
South Beach Vigil
JDL Joins Beach Police in Search
| The Jewish Defense League
declared here that it would
kin patroling the streets of
kuth Miami Beach in the wake
I the murder of Rachel Harris, of
p Michigan Ave., and the rape
I assault of a woman Oct. 20,
Hh of whom were residents of
uth Beach.
The JDL patrol joined Miami
pen police in an effort to find
(young man who attacked 54-
r-old Aida Tickner, of 944
Iferson Ave., and whom police
also believe to be responsible for
the Harris murder.
"WE WILL continue our
patrols until we believe the
elderly of South Beach are
adequately protected by the
proper authorities," said Brett
Becker, South Florida regional
director of the JDL.
He added that "Our members
will be legally armed and will
only act should the security of
any individual be threatened. We
will not stand idly by while the
defenseless elderly are gripped in
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Coblers
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fear of being raped, robbed and
assaulted. They have to know
that the JDL is in the area."
Meanwhile, Beach Police Lt.
Don Hasley announced the
doubling of the nightly patrol in
the area where both attacks
occurred.
TICKNER'S attacker crawled
into her apartment through a
bathroom window. He silenced
her screams by smashing her
over the head. He then stabbed
her with a pair of scissors on the
face and extensively on her body.
Before undergoing extensive
surgery at Mt. Sinai Hospital,
she described her assailant as
perhaps 15 to 20 years of age with
close-cropped hair and wearing a
dark blue tank top, cut-off shorts
and knee-high athletic socks.
Rabbi Ralph Kingsley
against Taft's comments on
Moses and David, Rabbi
Kingsley noted. 'How un-
believable that you could
somehow lump Moses and David
. (together) and imply that
somehow they too are to be
judged in the same way that
Hitler ... is to be judged .
Since when does one equate the
actions of individuals with the
teachings of a religious system?
And how dare you even suggest
such a contrast when in point of
fact Hitler's plan was that of
genocide the conscious
destruction and elimination of all
Jews from the world?"
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"A,
SO xt-n
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:%l#fofito^
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Keeping
Community
Informed
Last week was our 50th anniversary
edition. This week, The Jewish Floridian is 50
years old, plus one week. We don't feel any
different.
We take this opportunity to thank the
many community leaders and our readers who
have taken time out to congratulate us on this
special occasion for us.
In anticipation of future issues during our
50th anniversary year when we may again take
note of the observance, we commit ourselves to
doing what we have done during the past half-
century, and that is to help keep the Jewish
community informed on the many vital issues
that concern it, and therefore us.
The High Cost of Peace
PunrMtiy can be worse than dangerous. It can
become an obsession. Still, it is not exactly punditry
to anticipate that both Israel and Egypt will
ultimately accept and sign a peace treaty ending
thirty years of bitter struggle between them.
But Labor Opposition leader Shimon Peres hit
the nail on the head for us this week when he ob-
served that, somehow, Israel feels less and less that
it is negotiating with Egypt and more and more,
with the United States.
There can be no doubt that that was precisely
what President Sadat of Egypt had in mind when he
insisted on a central role for President Carter. He
knew that Carter would do his own bidding long
distance. It was clear, from the beginning, that Sadat
expected Carter to do all the arm-twisting.
The sudden change in atmosphere from euphoric
optimism in Washington last week to controlled
pessimism in Jerusalem this week demonstrates just
how successful President Sadat's plans have been.
President Carter is doing his arm-twisting chores
mighty effectively and then some. The issue, of
course, is linkage.
Sadat may want peace with Israel need peace
with Israel as desperately as Israel wants and
needs peace with Egypt. The price Israel has paid is
the Sinai desert.
Seemingly, the price Sadat is paying is disaf-
fection from the rest of the Arab world. But that is a
high cost that Sadat doesn't want to bear, and so
while he declares that there is no real linkage between
the peace treaty and the disposition of the West
Bank and Gaza, President Carter can insist that
there is. In Sadat's behalf he can make that in-
sistence hurt. He can bring tears to Israel's eyes.
When Shimon Peres said what he did early this
week, his arm sure was hurting and, just as surely,
there were tears in his eyes. And in all of Israel's.
Decision on Appeal
It is good that the Justice Department has
decided to appeal a Federal Court decision per-
mitting Miami Beachite Feodor Fedorenko to keep
his American citizenship.
The trial last July in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and
the Federal Judge's decision have evoked a storm of
criticism on the basis that we simply are not taking
seriously enough the former Nazis in our midst who
are living out their lives in peace and serenity after
denying Concentration Camp Jews the right to a
similarly happy destiny. Fedorenko is alleged to have
been one such Nazi tool.
There are simply too many questions that have
been raised by the decision, and the American Jewish
Congress is to be congratulated for having made the
"urgent request" to the Justice Department that has
finally gotten the appeal ball rolling.
Memo: Things to Write About
I'VE NEVER yet written a
word about Anita Bryant. In a
world where her name has be-
come a household word, I sud-
denly find my indifference to her
a curious thing.
I've tried to explain this indif-
ference in many ways. For
example, I've told myself that I
don't particularly care for her
kind of music.
To me, it sounds like a melding
of Lawrence Welk and the late
Guy Lombardo spineless, gut-
less mush for the human
vegetable mind with a pinch of
St. John of the Cross thrown in
for good measure.
ST. JOHN of the Cross, born
John Chrysostom, is not one of
m&im
Leo
Mindlin
my favorite saints. In fact, this
Constantinople Cossack was one
of the most vicious anti-Semites
in Roman Catholic history.
One of the original hands at
delivering fire sermons, he
BASHevis sm^eMHD ms world
promised Jews hell and d,m
nation for their religious biff
ness in failing to accept Jesus
messianic and gave it to them
himself just to make sure of ,1
fulfillment of his own prophecy
St. John of the Cross stiff.
the spine of the Welk-LombaS
musical amalgam in a strand
born-again way when Aniu
Bryant takes to her fundament*
list microphones, but the whole
combination only increases mv
indifference to her. And it
shouldn't.
IN A WAY. Anita Bryant j.
the St. John of the Cross of our
own day. She is a fire sermonuer
too: Didn't she deny the Jews
entry into heaven in a Playboy
interview last May, and promise
them hell and damnation for their
wayward souls?
The way I figure it, the dif-
ference between them is that she
can't do as much damage to us as
St. John of the Cross did. He had
a lot more clout. He could set up
a noerom better than just about
anyone in Christendom back
there in the fourth and fifth cen-
turies.
Or maybe I'm figuring it
wrong. Anita Bryant has been
doing right well in that depart-
ment, too, come to think of it.
TAKE THIS Concerned Chris-
tian Mothers organization of
hers. These disciples have been
busy preaching the gospel ac-
cording to Anita Bryant all over
the place.
Mainly, I wouldn't doubt that
the gospel as annunciated in
Playhoy, a testament to reckon
with, reeks with gobs of Anita's
anti-Semitic sentiments.
In fact, on Oct. 17, Temple
Israel of Greater Miami
presented a program as part of
National Family Sex Education
Week, and Concerned Christian
Mothers applied every con-
ceivable pressure on the Dade
County School Board to block
Continued on Page 13-A
Liberalism in Deep Freeze
Early this year, Prof. Warren
E. Miller, director of the
University of Michigan's Center
for Political Studies, looked up
from his books and opinion tabu-
lations to make what seems now
a startling pronouncement:
Americans are no more conserva-
tive today than they were in the
Kennedy and Johnson eras. His
statistics had it that liberals out-
numbered conservatives three to
one.
In the months following, Prof.
Miller must surely have observed
a strong rise in conservative
leanings and a precipitate drop in
liberal temperature. If not, then
the upsets in Minnesota, New
Jersey, and Massachusetts must
have escaped his attention.
IN MINNESOTA, Rep.
Donald M. Fraser, one of the
nation's most effective fighters
for social justice, was beaten by a
conservative millionaire, Robert
Short, in the Democratic primary
contest for the seat of the late
Hubert H. Humphrey.
In New Jersey, Republican
liberal Clifford P. Chase, a 24-
year Senate veteran, lost a pri-
mary fight to Jeff Bell, 34. a
former aide to Ronald Reagan.
And in Massachusetts, Edward
J, King, a newcomer to politics,
chased Gov. Michael Dukakis off
the Democratic boards in a pri-
mary that saw liberal Republi-
can, Edward W. Brooke, the
Senate's only Black, winning by
a few whiskers over Radio Talk-
master Avi Nelson, whose ultra-
conservative views had attracted
a wide listening audience.
In this season twixt primaries
and the November elections, it is
hazardous to try to pick ultimate
winners and losers. But there is
little uncertainty about the
causes for the steep upturn in
Robert
Segal
conservative and, indeed, reac-
tionary, popularity.
"THERE IS raw anger in the
polling booths," one defeated
high office holder said. People
can't wait to get their hands on
the voting triggers. Inflation is
eating through their pocket-
books; fear of crime is keeping
them off the streets at night:
bureaucratic arrogance and over-
spending are killing their pre-
vious willingness to suffer
political graft and mismanage-
ment.
The list of grievances seems
endless. Each year, thanks in
part to the ease with which
single-issue candidates can raise
war chests and put the magic of
radio and television to work for
their pet cause, political
unknowns are moving to the top.
Proposition 13 supplies one
magic success formula: crusades
against abortion grow more
important for candidates than
striving for world peace; money
for aspirants who oppose hand-
gun control flows generously
from the National Rifle
Association.
THERE ARE numerous other
happy hunting grounds for ultra-
conservatives in need of funds to
mount campaigns. The National
Conservative Political Action
Committee, Young Americans for
Freedom, the American Security
Council, the Committee for the
Survival of a Free Congress area
few of the burgeoning sources of
help.
Paced by Richard Viguerie.
whose access to the big money
via direct mail appeals keeps him
in heavy demand by activists on
the right, the heavy finance
operators are busier ihan ever.
Now in the twilight of his
Continued on Page 13-A
"Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT -laON.E fith.si Miami. Fla S31SS Phone***1
P O. Hox 2973. Miami Honda 33101
FRKDK SHOCHET LEO MINDLIN SUZANNE SHOCHBT
hditor and Publisher Associate rWilor Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Nat Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Ad\,-rUsed lulls Columns
Published every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla 275320
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish 1Mb and the Jewish *"*A
Member ol the Jewish Telegraphic Arencv. Seven Arts Feature M .
World*id.- News Service. National r.ditnrtal Association. American *"""f'*.ul,n
Fngllsh Jewish Newspapers. and the Florida Pres^*^l!_
SI IBM -KIPTION RATES! (Ix>ml Area) One Year-IU.OO; Two lean-Us*
Three Years- M0.00
Friday, October 27,1978
Volume 51
26TISHRI5739
Number


^y,0ctober2V197^
*Jewislifhrk/irtr
Page 5-A
,;:; :/
Anwar Has Questions
Draft of Treaty Needs Clarification
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JJA) -
The questioning by President
lwar Sadat cf the draft peace
freatv agreed to by the Israeli
^Egyptian delegations here
Saturday was officially described
t the State Department as a
! -quest for "clarifications and
not "modifications" in the text.
George Sherman, official
spokesman for the Blair House
conferees, said "The Egyptian
government has asked its
delegation here to get
clarifications from other
delegations as to certain points in
the treaty draft and report those
clarifications back to Cairo."
APPARENTLY seeking to
allay any fear that the request
from Cairo signaled a possible
breakdown in the peace talks,
Sherman stated that "in the
Egyptian view, the Egyptians
[ consider this a normal procedure
in their consideration of the
treaty draft."'
He added that "the Egyptians
state further that this action does
not signify rejection of that draft.
It means the Egyptian delegation
will be discussing certain points
further with the other delegations
(American and Israeli) so as to
report further clarifications back
I toCairo."
Sherman said the discussions
[will continue over the next
I several days and that the
I Egyptian request was no surprise
I to the U.S.
WHEN PRESSED as to
I whether his stress on
"clarifications" rather than
modifications" was an accurate
description of what the Egyt-
pians wanted, Sherman replied,
"The terminology is what the
Egyptians told me to state."
Sherman's explanation ap-
peared to be borne out by reports
from Cairo which quoted Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat's spokesman,
Saad Zaghloul Nassar, as saying
that "President Sadat has sent
instructions to the Egytpian
delegation in Washington saying
that the draft needs further study
in some of its parts. This study is
necessary before the treaty can
be ready for signature."
The Egyptian spokesman
would not say which parts need
to be clarified. But Egyptian
Foreign Ministry sources in-
dicated that one issue was the
linkage between the Egyptian-
Israeli treaty and progress in
resolving the West Bank Gaza
Strip issues.
THE SOURCES implied that
it was the legal terminology, not
principles, that needed
clarification and made it clear
that the draft treaty had not been
rejected.
Sherman pointed out that the
three annexes to the draft treaty
have not yet been completed and
have not been referred to the
Egyptian and Israeli govern-
ments. He announced, at the
same time, that the acting chief
of the U.S. delegation, Ambas-
sador Alfred L. Atherton and
Egypt's Acting Foreign Minister
Boutros Ghali met for four hours
at Blair House and were con-
tinuing their meetings. The
military members of the Israeli
and Egyptian delegations met
informally this morning at the
Madison Hotel where the
delegations are quartered.
Sherman said that economic
subjects are also being discussed
by the Israelis and Egyptians
with the participation of oil
experts from both countries.
"Work continues on the an-
nexes," Sherman said. He
repeated that "some of the un-
resolved issues have been
referred to the governments for
discussion and some (dis-
cussions) are being held here."
ASKED IF Nov. 19, the first
anniversary of Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem, would be the date for
the signing of a peace treaty by
Israel and Egypt, Sherman
repeated what he told the press,
that no time or place has been
selected yet for the signing
ceremony.
Sherman was asked to com-
ment on reports that some circles
in Israel were irked by his an-
nouncement that a draft treaty
had been agreed to be the Israeli
and Egyptian delegations before
consulting with the Israeli
government. Sherman replied, "I
said nothing that was not said by
both sides. In any case, my
statement was done with the
knowledge of both sides here."
Asked what the level of
consultation was, the spokesman
delcared, "It is sufficient to say it
was done with the knowledge of
appropriate officials with whom I
deal in the Egyptian and Israeli
delegations."
It was announced, meanwhile,
that King Khalid of Saudi
Arabia, recovering from heart
surgery in Cleveland, will lunch
with President Carter at the
White House today. The Israeli-
Egyptian treaty negotiations are
expected to figure in their
discussions.
V
y ^hmR:^ ,v_ _*tfufS.
Inscribing the Book of Life with Peace for the New Year
Wagner Extradition Pleas Rejected
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) The Attorney General of
Brazil, Henrique Fonseca de Araujo, has rejected extradition
requests by Israel, Poland and Austria for wanted Nazi war
criminal Gustav Franz Wagner who has been living in Brazil
for nearly 30 years. In an opinion presented to the Federal
Supreme Court in Brasilia, he denied Israel's right to
prosecute Wagner on grounds that Israel did not exist when
the fugitive committed his crimes.
He ruled out Poland and Austria because of the statute of
limitations but agreed that Wagner could be extradited to
West Germany if the Bonn authorities provided new
evidence that the statute of limitations was interrupted in
Wagner's case.
IT'S TIME FOR A CHANGE
.... POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS TODAY HAVE BECOME A
GAME OF WHO CAN PROMISE THE MOST. IMPORTANT
ISSUES, THEIR CAUSES AND EFFECTS ARE RARELY
DISCUSSED. I FOR ONE, AM WILLING TO SPEAK FRANKLY
AND CANDIDLY TO ALL OF YOU. IF I CAN'T SAY NO TO SOME
OF YOU NOW, HOW CAN YOU EXPECT ME TO SAY NO TO
LEGISLATION THAT IS UNNECESSARY AND UNWARRANTED
AL CARDENAS
FOR CONGRESS
Republican
A copy of oa foort M 'IW *h **** Election Comrrtmon ma It waiabta tor pun* from
in. Fidni Election Comrrtttlon. MMilngKm. DC
Md tor by Cwi*n tor CongraM Commm-clrt Mm*. Tiwunr


Page 6-A
'fJewisMihnrAUeun _
fJknist flcridfian
-
Friday, October 27
197fl
Eagle-Eye Exam for Treaty
Sober Mood in Jerusalem Contrasts With Hopeful Washington
Continued from Page 1-A
finally sent them scurrying home, each delegation
insisting optimistically that there were only
minor hitches that needed ironing out both in
Jerusalem and Cairo and that the treaty would be
signed. Talk was that a signing ceremony might
be set up for Nov. 19, the first anniversary of
President Sadat's trip to Jerusalem.
The State Department was especially firm in its
position that linkage was not the problem. But
there was growing evidence to the contrary.
Both Dayan and Weizman were far less op-
timistic when they had arrived here with the draft
for cabinet debate.
IN WASHINGTON, the story was that
linkages between an Israel-Egypt peace treaty
and the future of the West Bank and Gaza are not
a "sticking point."
But as late as Wednesday of this week. Labor
Opposition leader Shimon Peres laid it straight on
the line here when, after 11 hours of intensive
Cabinet debate over the draft proposal, he ob-
served that "America is appearing more and more
as the party that proposes the final drafts our
people are "a little bit taken aback by this fact.
with the feeling that we are losing a little bit of
our independence in the conduct of the
negotiations."
Peres, himself ordinarily optimistic about a
future Israel-Egypt peace treaty, and critical of
some of the supposed "hardline" positions that
Prime Minister Menachem Begin has taken in the
past, observed rather pessimistically this time: "I
cannot see an alternative."
PRIME MINISTER BEGIN himself noted
that "It is a long debate, and no wonder, because
we are dealing with the most serious problem
concerning the future of our nation."
The 'Sporting' Spirit
Thai's Intend to Bar Israel from Games
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Chaim Glovinsky, secretary of
the Israel Olympic Committee, en
route to Brazil for a conference of
the 30-odd nations comprising
Intertoto, the international
soccer lottery prevailing in those
countries, stopped off in New
York long enough to have dinner
with this reporter.
Glovinsky revealed that the
International Amateur Athletics
Federation (IAAF) has advised
Thailand that if Israel is not
ARTHRITIS
SUFFERERS:
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The pain reliever in Anacin* is the
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follow all label directions.
While Glovinsky wouldn't
comment on the 30 Asian
nations' fear of reprisal
(the barring of their ath-
' feres from the 1980 Mos-
cow Olympics), it is this
writer's conviction that
the Games will take place,
unsanctioned in Bangkok.
invited to participate in the
Asian Games to be held in Bang-
kok in December, all competitors
in the Games will be barred from
competing in the 1980 Olympics.
"We have learned that
Thailand has no intention of
inviting us and will defy the
International Olympic Com-
mittee which has ruled that the
Games cannot take place under
IOC auspices unless we are in-
vited," Glovinsky advised the
JTA.
ISRAEL'S "Mr. Sport,''
recuperating from a mild in-
fection, informed this cor-
respondent that at the IAAF
world congress in San Juan,
Puerto Rico, the 138 delegates,
representing 75 countries, voted
by an overwhelming margin not
to sanction the athletic events in
the Asian Games in Bangkok or
the Asian championships in
Tokyo next year unless Israeli
athletes are invited.
The vote was taken after the
IAAF's executive council told
the congress that-the 19-member
council had decided unanimously
"that Israel must be invited" or a
permit will not be issued by the
IAAF, the ruling body for track
and field sports.
THE organizing committee for
the Asian Games had requested
permission from the IAAF con-
gress to stage the games without
inviting Israel on the grounds
that no Asian country was
willing to compete if Israel is
invited.
Glovinsky, a founding member
of the Asian Games Federation in
1952, revealed that Israel has
participated in all of the Games
since they began and has com-
peted twice before in Bangkok,
taking sixth place there in 1970.
While Glovinsky wouldn't
comment on the 30 Asian
nations' fear of reprisal (the
barring of their athletes from the
1980 Moscow Olympics), it is this
writer's conviction that the
Games will take place, unsanc-
tioned in Bangkok, with the com-
peting countries taking the risk
of being refused entry to the
Russian-held Olympiada.
Trick or Treat in a
Superhero Costume.
Choose scary costumes of Spiderman, King Kong or
The Hulk. Adventure outfits of Captain Marvel,
Wonder Woman, Superman, Batman and The Bionic
Woman. Or science-fiction costumes of your favorite
Star Wars and Star Trek characters.
This year, trick or treat in a Superhero costume.
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^y, October
27,1978
*Jmistiflcrio/i^jn
Page 7-A
Deep Down, They Know
West Bank and the Way of All Flesh
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ Even though Israel has
not given away one single
Jh of the West Bank
even though no real
negotiations have yet
begun over the West Bank,
it is a fact that much of the
ul'ra-hardline criticism here
of the Camp David
agreements focuses on the
West Bank rather than on
the Sinai which is to be
completely evacuated.
Geula Cohen, the Herut
firebrand who has been in
the forefront of attacks on
Premier Menachem Begin
scarcely mentions the Sinai
in her speeches and articles.
Neither Sharm el-Sheikh
nor the Rafah salient
settlements figure in her
criticism of the Camp
David accords. Her con-
demnation of Begin is for
his "betrayal of Eretz
Israel."
NOR DO ANY of Begins
protestations that he has not
betrayed Eretz Israel, that his
claim to sovereignty over the
West Bank is still valid, that no
settlements will ever be removed
from there, that, on the contrary,
new ones will be built none of
this seems to affect Cohen and
her allies in the slightest.
Cohen herself, and certain
critics of Begin in the Labor
camp, have, in fact, been entirely
consistent. Last January, when
the Premier first presented his
plan for autonomy on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, Cohen and
the others warned that the plan
"sowed the seeds of a Palestinian
state."
Now, with the "precedent" of
the Sinai withdrawal to cite in
argument, the ultra hard-line
opposition is redoubling its
asserting that Begin, determined
to avoid a "repartition" of the
West Bank, has in fact triggered
a process that will result in the
whole of the area becoming, one
day, an independent Palestinian
state. The autonomy, they
intend, will develop a momen-
tum of its own. The process is
probably irreversible.
BEGIN HIMSELF, asked
about this in a Rosh Hashanah
interview with Maariv, declared,
There will never be a Palestinian
state under any conditions. As a
Jew. he said. "I can say I shall
always be proud that a Jewish
government proposed autonomy
'or the inhabitants of Judea,
aamaria and Gaza. A Palestinian
Geula Cohen
state however shall not arise.
Under no condition shall it arise.
We are responsible for that. The
Israel army in Judea, Samaria
and Gaza will be responsible for
that."
But what would happen, the
interviewer persisted, if the auto-
nomous council one day
proclaimed an independent state?
Begin cut him short. "If it pro-
claims a state it will be in breach
of the law and of the agreements
and we will not stand for it.
"Therefore this fear should be
removed from the hearts of
Israeli citizens ... We have not
proposed an autonomy from
which will grow an independent
state, which would be a mortal
danger for the very existence of
the Jewish State and would cause
constant bloodshed and eventual
all-out war in difficult conditions
for Israel. .
"WE PROPOSED autonomy,
not a state. The difference is vast
... A state has a parliament, a
government, an army, diplomatic
relations with other states, and
other characteristics The in-
habitants of Judaea, Samaria and
Gaza cannot have these things
because if they had them, they
would determine not only their
own fate, but also our fate
they would determine us for
murder, bloodshed and violence.
We will never agree to this.
Never."
The Prime Minister was
voicing these assurances to a
public that has been taught for a
decade and more that a separate
Palestinian state would be a
disaster for Israel to be avoided
at any cost. And that teaching is
still very much a part of the
"national consensus."
Indeed, an opinion poll
commissioned by Yediot
Achronot and published earlier
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this month showed that 90
percent of Israelis were totally
opposed to the creation of a
Palestinian state on the West
Bank and Gaza.
BUT AT the same time and
this is a potentially vital develop-
ment following Camp David
the scepticism regarding Begin *s
promise that such a state will
"never" arise is not confined to
his relatively few hawkish op-
ponents. Fully 50 percent of the
public, that same poll showed,
believe that a Palestinian state
will in fact evolve on the West
Bank and Gaza as a result of the
Camp David accords.
To perceive the full signifi-
cance of these figures, a third
result of the same poll must be
introduced: some 80 percent of
those asked professed themselves
supportive of the Camp David
accords.
In other words, a majority of
those who believed the accords
will result in a Palestinian state
nevertheless declared that they
backed the accords. What, then,
of the "national consensus"
opposing a separate Palestinian
state at all costs?
IN PART, of course, the
answer must be that polls are
notoriously unscientific and
therefore not worthy of such
portentous political analysis. So
much depends on how the
questions are phrased. If the
pollsters had asked, "Do you
want peace if the price is a
Palestinian state?" the number of
positive replies might have been
less than 50 percent. But, having
noted the precarious nature of
poll-analysis, one can scarcely
avoid noting, nevertheless, that
the "national consensus" seems
to be wearing thin.
Indeed a dispassionate look at
the past 11 months shows that
"consensus" has not stood up
well to the ravages of reality, to
the buffeting of Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat's peace
initiative. Whole chunks of it
have fallen by the wayside. First,
there was Sharm el-Sheikh.
For 10 years, the "national
consensus" dictated that Israel
would not leave the strategic spot
ever again. But in December,
Prime Minister Begin ceded it to
Egypt and hardly a whimper
was raised in protest.
THE RAFAH salient, with its
solidly established Jewish set-
tlements, was another pillar of
the "national consensus."
Indeed, Begin himself referred to
it as such only weeks before
Camp David.
But that pillar, too, has fallen
almost soundlessly for the
tumult in the Knesset recently
was, as we have seen, more over
fears for the West Bank than
over the fate of Rafah and its
settlements.
Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan, who some years ago said
he would prefer Sharm el-Sheikh
without peace than peace without
Sharm el-Sheikh, today concedes
that the new situation has caused
him to change his mind and to
recommend giving up the area for
the chance of peace. The ultra-
hardliners, however, have not
shifted with the circumstances.
The positions they adopted in
advance of peace still pertain
today, now that peace is at hand.
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Page8-A
'^jmshtkridkm
Friday, October 27,1978
New Pope John Paul a Question Mark
NEW YORK (JTA) Pope
John Paul II, the former Cardinal
Karol Wojtyla of Cracow,
Poland, is an unknown quantity
among Jews as he was for most
Christians when he was elected.
Jewish spokesmen involved with
ecumenical affairs were trying to
pinpoint his position on various
issues concerning Jews.
But they saw reason for op-
timism in that the 58-year-old
Pontiff took the name of his
predecessor, John Paul I, who,
although he had served only 34
days before he died Sept. 28, had
made a strong favorable im-
pression among Jews.
THE JEWISH spokesmen
also pointed to his anti-Nazi
activities during World War II
and to a belief that he may seek
to press for more religious
freedom in the Soviet Union and
other Fast European countries.
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
director oi interreligious affairs
for the American Jewish Com-
mittee, said that the AJCom-
mittee was sending its European
director from Paris to Rome to
try to learn the new Pope's views
on Jews, Judaism and Israel and
the status of Jerusalem.
All Jewish spokesmen in-
terviewed by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency noted that Pope
John Paul II had never taken a
position on Israel as far as it is
known, although Tanenbaum
noted that the Polish Catholic
hierarchy maintains a CathoUc
Polish House of Studies in
Jerusalem.
TANENBAUM SAID it is
hoped by taking the name John
Paul II, the new Pope will be as
understanding of Jews in re-
ligious affairs and on Israel as
was his predecessor. He also
stressed the importance seen in
that the Pontiff had been
strongly anti-Nazi as a young
man.
Born in the village of
Wadowice, near Cracow on May
18, 1920, the son of a factory
worker, John Paul himself
worked in a factory while going
to school.
During the German occupation
of Poland, he did forced labor in a
quarry and later in a chemical
plant. It was during this time he
studied for the priesthood in an
underground seminary in
Cracow. After his ordination, he
went to Rome for two years but
returned to Cracow in 1948 just
as the Communists were taking
control of Poland.
KNOWN AS an intellectual, he
became Archbishop in 1964 and a
Cardinal in 1967. Along with
Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski,
Patriarch of Warsaw, he has
become a leader in the Roman
Catholic Church "s position in
Poland as the political opposition
to the Communist government.
At the same time, John Paul has
been more conciliatory than
Wyszynski and has actively
promoted better church-state
relations.
Tanenbaum noted that the
Pope's defense of liberty and
human rights, as well as social
justice, could be a key factor. He
said if John Paul pushes for
greater religious freedom for
Christians in the Soviet Union
and elsewhere in the Soviet bloc
it will also have an impact on
religious freedom for Soviet
Jews.
Jews recently from Poland
noted that John Paul II, like
Wyszynski, has spoken up in
suoport of Jews in Poland
fpiowing the 1968 upheaval in
which the majority of Jews living
in Poland left the country. But
they said they see this as part of
his anti-government stand.
RABBI ARTHUR Schneier,
president of the Appeal of
Conscience Foundation which
seeks to promote religious
freedom in East Europe, said
most of his dealings have been
with Wyszynski, who over-
shadowed the Cracow Cardinal in
Poland.
But he noted that Auschwitz
was part of John Paul's diocese,
only some 50 kilometers from
Cracow. The new Pope ex-
perienced the Holocaust and had
in his own diocese a constant
reminder of the destruction of the
Holocaust, Schneier noted.
He said that both Wyszynski
and John Paul II had written
pastoral letters urging that
young Polish Catholics help clean
up the Jewish cemeteries which
had been neglected and some
youth groups did take up this
project.
Schneier, who is also rabbi of
Manhattan's Park East
Synagogue, stressed that the new
Pope knows how religious groups
can suffer under Communism and
also how they can survive. He
said this could "rekindle hope"
for religious freedom. In a speech
to the College of Cardinals,
Pope John Paul II pointed out
that people were still being
imprisoned for their Christian
belief.
RABBI ALEXANDER M.
Schindler, president of the
' Federation of Polish Jews, said
that although he had never met
the new Pope he attended a
service in his church and was
amazed by the large turnout in
what was basically a country that
stressed atheism.
Schindler, who is also
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congre-
gations, said he hoped that a man
who experienced persecution
under the Nazis will show un-
derstanding and sympathy for
the suffering and aspirations of
the Jewish people.
Tanenbaum said he was told
by a Polish Catholic authority
that he believed that the new
Pope had been the most friendly
of all contemporary Polish
bishops toward the Jewish
people. His chancery sponsored
an official publication which
included articles commemorating
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and
the Holocaust and a series of
articles and book reviews on
Jewish history, religion and
culture.
AMERICAN JEWISH
organizations, meanwhile, ex-
pressed their congratulations to
the new Pope. Richard Maass,
president of the AJCommittee,
said it was hoped that by taking
the name of his predecessor, the
new Pope will continue "Pope
John Paul's contagious spirit of
love and respect for all human
beings, including respect for the
integrity of the Jewish people
and Judaism, for Israel and for
Jerusalem as a united city."
B'nai B'rith President Jack J.
Spitzer expressed the hope that
John Paul II will "continue to
eliminate unsympathetic
treatment of Jews in church
teachings and liturgy." He also
said B'nai B'rith hoped that the
new Pope would recognize the
State of Israel with Jerusalem as
its capital.
PLO, Argentine Terrorists Linked
BUENOS AIRES, (JTA) Vice Admiral Oscar
Montes, the Foreign Minister of Argentina, expressed
concern to Arab diplomats here over contacts between the
Palestine Liberation Organization and Argentine terrorists.
According to La Prensa, Montes summoned the
Ambassadors of Syria and Algeria to discuss that subject
and the general situation in the Middle East.
The two envoys confirmed that Montes was disturbed by
information about meetings between PLO representatives
and leaders of terrorist groups in Argentina, La Prensa
reported. The Foreign Minister received the Egyptian
Ambassador separately but they refused to comment on the
content of their meeting.
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Friday. October2711978_
*JeisHlrrirl^r
Page 9-A
Israel's Prexy Expected
At CJF General Assembly in Frisco
NEW
YORK Yitzhak
n. newly-elected
President of Israel, will
address more than 3,000
leaders of North American
wry at the 47th General
Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations,
November 8 to 12 in San
Francisco.
Appearing in his first of-
ficial visit to the United
States, President Navon
will speak at the Plenary
Session on Saturday, Nov.
Jfe'. 9:15 p.m.. in the
u "rairmont Hotel.
ISRAEL'S AMBASSADOR
to the United States, Simcha
Dinitz, in a farewell appearance
before his return to Israel, will
also take part in the Saturday
plenary.
President Navon and
Ambassador Dinitz will join
leading political, academic and
cultural figures of world Jewry
such as novelist Chaim Potok,
philosopher David Hartman and
historian Raul Hilberg at the
47th General Assembly.
CJF President Jerold C. Hoff-
berger will open the convocation
at the first Plenary Session Wed-
nesday, Nov. 8, 9 p.m. He will
'ew the highlights of his three
years in office, discussing "CJF:
Retrospect and Prospect." The
new President of the Council will
be elected during the Assembly.
DR. HARTMAN of Hebrew
University, is Louis Stern
Scholar-in-Residence for the 1978
General Assembly. He will speak
at the second Plenary Session,
8:45 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 9, on
"Jewish Values and Aspirations
and the Federation Agenda," and
will offer "Perspectives" at the
closing Plenary on Sunday.
President Navon
Widely-lauded as a creative
contemporary Jewish thinker and
educator, Dr. Hartman is also an
author who received the National
Jewish Book Council's Cohen
Award in 1977. He is founder and
director of the Shalom Hartman
Institute for Judaic Studies in
Jerusalem.
Chaim Potok, author of The
Chosen, In the Beginning and
other best-selling novels, will be
featured in the Friday evening
Oneg Shabbat, Nov. 10, 9:15
p.m., together with Sidney Vin-
cent, executive director emeritus
of the Cleveland Federation. The
meeting will be dedicated to the
"Jewish Cultural Renaissance."
ON SATURDAY, the Oneg
Shabbat convocation will be
devoted to "Transmitting the
Meaning of the Holocaust."
Speakers will be Dr. Raul
Hilberg, author of The Destruc-
tion of European Jews, and Rev.
Douglas K. Huneke, Presbyter-
ian University Chaplain of the
Westminster Foundation at the
University of Oregon and author
of Auschwitz to Jerusalem: The
Journal of a Personal Pilgrimage,
who will offer a Christian
response. The meeting will be
held at 4:15 p.m.
In addition to these special
meetings and Plenaries, the
General Assembly will include
four forums on crucial issues in
the coming year: "Making Peace
in the Middle East" Thursday,
1:45 p.m.; "The Struggle for
Soviet Jewry A New Phase,"
Friday, 8 a.m.; "World Jewry
A Panel of Leaders from
Abroad," Friday, 11 a.m.; and
"Domestic Social Problems and
Their Impact on the American
Jewish Community," Friday,
2:15 p.m.
BEGINNING AT 8 a.m. on
Thursday, a special leadership
development / community plan-
ning Mini-Forum will be intro-
duced with an address by Dr.
Hartman on "Jewish Education
and Jewish Identification The
Role of Leadership in Planning
for the Future."
The opening lecture will be
followed by six related con-
current workshops.
"The Jewish Family in
America: Today and Tomorrow"
will be the topic of a community
planning Mini-Forum, Friday,
Nov. 10, beginning at 8 a.m.
Concurrent workshops will be
held.
In addition to the Plenary
Sessions, the Forums and Mini-
Forums, more than 70 workshops
will deal with every major aspect
of Jewish communal concern,
including endowment funds,
Federation-synagogue relations,
campaign, women's communal
services, public relations, college
youth and faculty, budgeting and
others. LCBC Budget Review
sessions are scheduled and a
special meeting will focus on pro-
grams and costs in the urban ser-
vices area.
Storm Over Paris
Minister's Remark Elicits Resignation
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) French
Foreign Minister Louis de
Guiringaud is expected to resign
before the end of the year and be
replaced by the Elysee Palace
Secretary General Jean Francois-
'J^oncH
De Guiringaud has been at the
tenter of a political storm after he
told a press conference here
Monday that Israel and the
Lebanese Christians were
responsible for the blood bath in
'ebanon.
FRENCH POLITICAL
sources stress, however, that
<|>;s,d,.nt Valery Giscard
**n is not connected with the
ve of nationwide protests his
statement had raised. These
sources told the Jewish
'Hi'Kraphic Agency that the
president has been considering
or some time
replacement of de
who is 67 years old.
All French political parties,
mcludmg a number of Gaullist
Personalities, have protested de
Former Gaullist Premier
Pierre Messmer told Par-
liament, 'I am ashamed of
what he (de Guiringaud)
said.' Another former
Gaullist Premier, Michel
Debre, was equally em-
phatic in his criticism of
the Foreign Minister's
'undiplomatic state-
ments.'
It seems de Guiringaud made
his statement with the full
knowledge of Giscard, whose aim
was to defuse the Lebanese
situation by clearly notifying the
Christians that they can expect
no help from France and that the
chances of foreign interventions
are nil..
UN Campaign For
Half-Million Rapped
NEW YORK (JTA) A
$500,000 campaign by the United
Nations Secretariat to "promote"
Palestinian rights was denounced
here by the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations as a "crude
attempt to glorify Arab terrorism
and the murderous PLO."
Theodore R. Mann, chairman
of the Conference of Presidents,
called on UN Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim and U.S.
Ambassador to the UN Andrew
Young to "take no part in this
blatant effort to attack the
legitimacy of the State of Israel."
MANN CALLED the cam-
paign which includes a pro-
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion film starring Yasir Arafat to
be premiered at the United
Nations on Nov. 29 "an effort
to distort the history of the
Middle East, to justify the
terrorist slaughter of innocent
women and children and to
canonize Arafat as a great hero of
national liberation. It is a
grievous affront to the cause of
peace and an indignity to the
American people, whose taxes are
paying for 25 percent of it."
The UN drive is based on a
General Assembly resolution last
December establishing a "Special
Unit on the Palestinian People"
with an appropriation of
$500,000.
IT INCLUDES, in addition to
the pro-PLO film, the publication
of a newsletter and a series of
pamphlets. The publicity drive
will peak on Nov. 29, which will
be celebrated as "International'
Day of Solidarity with the Pales-
tinian People."
That date, which marks the
31st anniversary of the UN
Palestine Partition Plan, will be
marked at the UN by a per-
formance of a Palestinian dance
troupe, a photo exhibition on
Palestinian rights in the UN
lobby and a series of speeches in
the General Assembly.
Mann said the film "condones
PLO terrorism by presenting
moderate' Palestinians who say
such attacks are necessary as a
last resort.' "
HE ADDED: "At a time when
the Camp David accords have
brought about a new spirit, a
fresh hope and the real promise of
an end to old hatreds and an-
tagonisms, it is particularly
regrettable that the UN
Secretariat should launch an
effort that not only does violence
to the UN charter but subverts
the possibility of progress toward
peace."
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now" the
Guiringaud
Guiringaud's statement on
'-ebanon.
Former Gaullist Premier Pierre
Messmer told Parliament, "I am
shamed of what he (de
ngaud) said." Another
'rrner Gaullist Premier, Michel
ueore, was equally emphatic in
l"ls criticism
Minister's
tatements.'
EVEN PRIME
of the Foreign
"undiplomatic
Minister
Raymond Barre. who defended
his government's policy in
Parliament, in the absence of de
Guiringaud who failed to attend
the session devoted to
parliamentary questions on his
statement, turned against his
government colleague.
Barre told a stormy House:
"What is important is not to
judge, let alone condemn, even if
it is sometimes necessary to
recall that neither emotion nor
sympathy should result in
partiality."
De Guiringaud himself told
reporters that he had stayed
away from Parliament "because I
did not feel like attending." He
added that he does not "have the
feeling that the Prime Minister
disavowed me."
THE LEADER of de
Guiringaud's own political group,
Claude Labbe, head of the
Gaullist parliamentary party,
said, however: "De Guiringaud
should draw the conclusions and
resign."
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1 MM



Anwar's Peace Has a Purpose
Egypt's Economy Faces Worse Than Biblical Ten Plagues
By MITCHELL COHEN
IF ANWAR SADAT had to
face ten plagues today, as did
Egypt's ancient Pharaoh, they
would probably not make things
much worse for his country's
economy. The fact is that the
Egyptian economy is nearly
devastated. And as the ten
biblical plagues forced the
Pharaoh to come to grips with
the ancient Israelites, the woes of
contemporary Egypt have forced
its President to try to come to
grips with modern Israel.
Standing before the Egyptian
Parliament in September, 1974,
Anwar Sadat asserted that the
Egyptian economy had been "at
point zero" when he ordered his
troops to launch a war against
Israel eleven months earlier.
THREE YEARS after the
Yom Kippur war. the same Sadat
stood before the Israeli
Parliament calling for an end to
the thirty-year war between the
Jewish State and the Arab world.
Most news commentators were
quick to point out that a
deteriorating Egyptian domestic
situation had brought Sadat to
Jerusalem as much if not more
than any other single factor.
Egyptian foreign and domestic
policies cannot be separated. The
success of any nation's foreign
policy depends equally on its real
capabilities and its skillful
diplomatic maneuvering. In the
case of Egypt, a glance at the
map can prove to be very
deceptive. Egypt's size, both in
terms of geography and
population, disguises what is
really a small country with few
resources.
Egypt is 97 percent desert. Its
fast-growing population (with a
birthrate of over 800,000 an-
nually) is forced to live in the
remaining 3 percent of the
*^
Political Analysis
Egypt's size, both in terms of geography and population,
disguises what is really a very small country with few
natural resources.
country, mostly along the Nile
River. That "Egypt is the Gift of
the Nile" is a cliche constantly
Susan Panoff
The Jews
Against Hitler
Jews Against Hitler. (Originally published in English as Not as
a Lamb). By Lucien Steinberg. London: Gordon and
Cremonesi, 358 pp.. S8.50, paperback edition.
THIS IS, as the subtitle indicates, "the seminal work on
the Jewish resistance." Written in an objective, straightforward
style, this book covers every aspect of Jewish resistance during
World War II. Separate units deal with Jews in the French
Resistance; what happened in Belgium and Holland; ghetto up-
risings; revolt in the death camps; and situations in Central
Europe and the Balkans.
Steinberg's intent in writing this volume was to show how
the Jews had stood up to the Germans and fought them. He
demonstrates that Jewish resistance was unlike the resistance
which motivated most resistors in modern history.
THE LATTER were resisting occupying enemy forces to
gain or regain national liberty or to gain acceptance of their own
views.
The Jews' position was entirely different. Whenever they
fought, no matter the varying motives, the main reason was
their survival. The combatants of the ghettos of Warsaw and
Vilna, and concentration camp resistors succeeded in
preserving the collective existence of the Jewish people.
History gives us many examples of peoples who completely
disappeared after some terrible blood-letting simply because
they had lost the will to live. By fighting for their honor, the
Eastern European Jews kept the will to survive alive in the
Jewish people."
THE AUTHOR is certain that the resistance displayed by
all Jewish resistors during World War II proves something of
universal value and significance: "resistance alone can save."
The apparent or real success of desperate actions is insig-
nificant their importance lies in the undertaking and per-
severance of these actions in spite of their failure. Steinberg's
ideas and conclusions are a significant contribution to the
philosophical as well as historical literature dealing with Jewish
resistance during World War II.
w
.v .
repeated, but it remains as valid
today as when the ancient Greek
historian Herodotus wrote those
famous words.
ABOUT HALF of the
Egyptian population depends on
agriculture for its livelihood. The
Nile, therefore, is the single most
important geographic reality
effecting the country's economy
with important repercussions.
The other half of the Egyptian
population lives either in a city or
is moving to one, causing
tremendous urbanization
problems. Eight million people
are now living in Cairo.
Egypt's economy is not only
dependent on agriculture, it is
dependent on one major crop,
cotton, which makes up 80
percent of the country's exports.
Thus the economy is vulnerable
to fluctuations in the in-
ternational cotton market (and is
adversely effected by the in-
creased production of synthetic
fibers throughout the world).
IN SHORT, because of its
dependence on cotton, Egypt's
economy is undiversified. Since
the mid-1950's, Egypt has traded
primarily with the USSR,
causing further problems. Most
of the cotton traded during the
two decades after Nasser's
takeover was bartered to the
Soviet Union in payment for the
Aswan Dam and other projects.
('It should be emphasized that
the cotton was bartered, not sold,
to the USSR, a country which
does not like to see its rubles on
the international market. And
although only 1.4 percent of
Egypt's exports went to the
Russians in 1952, by the time of
the Yom Kippur War the figure
had reached the 50 percent
mark.)
Egypt has therefore retained
little or no resources to repay the
huge foreign debts owed in hard
currency. Without hard currency
to pay debts, Egypt's credit
becomes worthless and potential
foreign investors are scared
away. Furthermore, the loss of
the Suez Canal in 1967 cost
Egypt an estimated two billion
dollars in hard revenue.
THE STATE of the Egyptian
population, which suffers directly
from the country's inability to
modernize, has significant
ramifications for Egypt's
development and potential in
foreign affairs. Simply put, we
are talking of an Egyptian
population of 40 million people,
three quarters of whom are
illiterate and diseased.
It should not therefore be
surprising that Egypt, although
having a population of 40 million,
has an army whose mobilization
capacity is not much larger than
that of Israel, with a population
of less than 4 million.
As far as illiteracy is con-
cerned, it should be noted that
Nasser's attempts to deal with
the problem by expanding
secondary and university
education backfired. It only
resulted in a surplus of educated
people without jobs.
IN ADDITION to all of this,
Egypt has been unable to
produce enough food for its fast
growing population and must
purchase supplies from abroad.
Even the Aswan Dam project,
hailed in the 1950s as a savior for
the country, turned out to be a
double-edged sword.
Although the Dam increased
the productive capacity of a great
deal of land (it also increased the
country's electric capacity) much
silt, needed to enrich and fertilize
land in the Nile Delta, has
become trapped behind the Dam,
thus injuring the productive
capacity of land needed for
growing cotton and other crops.
Finally, and most crucially,
over 25 percent ot the total
Egyptian national budget goes
into defense. This has major
ramifications for the growth of
the economy. Israel and Egypt
have the same Gross National
Product today (approximately
$12 billion), while 25 years ago,
Israel's GNP was one fifth that of
Egypt's. It is evident that rid-
ding Egypt of her massive war
burden would be a major factor in
dealing with her domestic ills.
IN SEPTEMBER, 1974 at the
"economy debate" in the
Egyptian Parliament, Henry
Tanner, of the New York Times,
wrote that "Egyptian leaders
have often said that one of the
reasons for the decision to attack
(Israel in 1973) was that Egypt
could not bear the military
burden indefinitely and at the
same time provide economic
development and a decent living
for the growing population
without large scale foreign
capital and foreign assistance."
Undoubtedly this was the case
in part: the "no war no peace"
situation and the general state of
the country's economy had
brought the country to financial
ruin and Sadat used war to break
the diplomatic logjam.
It is highly unlikely that Sadat
believed he would defeat Israel in
the Yom Kippur War, but he
certainly hoped that in the war's
aftermath he could win
diplomatically what he was
unable to win militarily. If he
successfully stabilized the
Mideast, he could turn his at-
tention (and budget) to Egypt's
domestic problems and attract
the foreign capital he felt Egypt
required to extract its economy
from "point zero."
HIS CHIEF aim was to ex-
tract himself (on his own terms)
from a conflict that had proved
too costly. Indeed, in human
terms alone, Egypt had suffered
more loss of lives than Israel,
Jordan and Syria combined, in
1967.
In 1973, Sadat succeeded in
getting the ball rolling in the
diplomatic arena and placing
Israel on the defensive. The
process began with a radical step
attacking Israel. His problems
at home were a constant reminder
that the ball had to keep rolling.
In 1974, Sadat's government
failed to cope with deficiencies in
commodities essential to the
population such as rice, sugar,
chicken and soap. And mer-
chants, in the meantime, were
hoarding goods.
IN EARLY 1977, Egypt
witnessed its worst rioting since
the upheavals of the early 1950's.
The riots were a result of the
government's decision to let food
prices rise. Eighty people were
killed and another 1,000 arrested.
Nine months later, Anwar Sadat,
president of a country which
appears large in size and
population, but much smaller in
terms of its real capabilities and
human resources, flew to Israel,
a country which had been at-
tacked more than once by the
Egyptian armed forces.
Next issue: Nasser's legacy and
its price.


Lr 27,1978
* Jewish fhridiar
Page 11-A
,t You Have No Tail'
iain's Jews Experiencing Renaissance
TH ROVNER
like a tale from
ps, yet it really hap-
ax "Kljarrat not so
ao come to Madrid,
. parents hurried to
kreet them. Since it
ght. they decided to
pie Shabbat right in
E. Just as they were
Indies, a young
I walked in.
. you doing?" she
[she watched them
lax explained they
"and observing their
stared at them
then stared some
lally blurted out,
impossible! You
- you don't have
|d of thing still
etimes in Spain,"
i we sit eating lunch
downtown Madrid
espite the summer
fact that he has a
|d medical exams to
(who doesn't even
Jlingly hobbled over
> to meet me.
to talk to a young
| Max Eljarrat, 22, a
it at the University
national president
si- Jewish Student
I seems the ideal
ne.
the chambermaid
tiout a trace of
lis is. after all, a
\ Jews are so rare
in a population of
and were forbidden
kat myths and mis-
is still persist.
m just among
5. either, Max con-
uneasy that I
tie wrong way, that
eagues in medical
mes forget them-
the word Judeo
sense (Jew), but
K]uent usage it has
term of scorn or in-
toss around the
kinkingly, and in-
lo many Spaniards
Jked up the habit of
|but hardly harbor
I Jews.
bt his friends ac-
someone Jewish,
Spaniards do not,
in for some con-
fusing. "I said to
I If you want to be
\'t use that word,"
now they try to
1ETIMES finds
I with lavish praise
hink he deserves,
[of typical Spanish
flings about Jews.
ebbe," he recalls,
walked into the
my friends would
fthe back and say
|onderful!' as if it
rsonal operation.
iratulated me for
I congratulated me
(i won a folk-song
pr anything that
rO/lNC.
i* em Articles
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pton Ave. 672-7017
looking young man with warm
brown eyes, an engaging smile,
and courtly Spanish charm.
("Oh, no." he protests when I try
to pay for my lunch, "impossible
in Spain to let a woman pay.")
And despite my usually
staunch feminism, 1 am utterly
disarmed by his genuine charm
and graciousness.
In fact. Max, who's a Jewish
doctor in the making, seems the
answer to any Jewish mother's
prayers, except that he already
Sample of the graffiti and anti-Israel work of neo-Nazis in hai> f htient ?!;
Madrid which young Spanish Jews have been campaigning to 'Sl^SiS^SSSX
..r i c-" l l l j j i.nr j *l right at the Jewish community
remove. Israel Si has been changed to read No and the ^ in Madrid where both
Jewish star crossed out, while Israel is replaced with were taking an advanced course
"Palestina." in Judaism.
happens in Israel. And in the
summer, they ask, "Are you
going to visit your country this
summer?' and I have to answer,
"My country is Spain. Then I try
to explain that Jew and Israeli
are not the same."
INDEED HIS country is
Spain, even though it's his
adopted country. Like most other
Jews here, young or old, Max is
not a native. Six years ago, he
and his family emigrated from
Tangiers ("the ambience in
Morocco was not good there for
Jews") where he had lived all his
life. At 16, it was not easy to
leave home and friends; but. he
says, adapting to Spain was
beautifully simple.
"I love Spain. There's a fan-
tastic spirit here. The Spanish
people are very open, very warm.
They give you invitations
quickly. They make friends right
away. We are very, very happy
here," Max says.
And while he admits that "it's
a bit difficult" to be a young Jew-
in Spain, it's also a challenge.
Precisely because there are still
misunderstandings about Jews,
and because Spaniards are not by
nature malicious or prejudiced,
the big mission, as he sees it, is
simply "to inform.''
RATHER THAN direct them-
selves inward, the 400-member
Spanish Jewish Student Asso-
ciation concentrate their efforts
on their non-Jewish countrymen.
Recently, for instance, on the
anniversary of the Holocaust,
they planned a special exhibit,
put up posters all over Madrid,
gathered photos of the Treblinka
death camps, and made public
announcements "the first time
we went out on the streets," he
says proudly.
The group is only four years
old, born during the Franco
regime, and just beginning to be
more aggressive in its thrust.
In still another way Max feels
young Jews here have a special
challenge. Spain is not different
from other European countries in
having a small but active band of
neo-Nazis. In fact, I quickly dis-
covered it simply by viewing
some of the anti-Israel and
swastika-decorated graffiti scat-
tered throughout Madrid.
BUT SPAIN is different in
having no formal diplomatic
relations with Israel (a sore spot,
of course, with every Jew I meet)
and therefore no Israel embassy
or consulate, no formal group to
confront and challenge the anti-
Israel propaganda.
"And so we, in a small way.
have to take on this respon-
sibility." says Max.
Recently, the young Jews went
around and removed all traces of
anti-Jewish graffiti on the streets
of Madrid, replacing it with
posters of their own, "Stop the
barbarism of the Nazis!" to tie in
with their Holocaust project.
The tug-of-war persisted. A
week later, not one of their own
posters remained, having been
removed in turn by the young
Nazis.
"STILL, our purpose was to
inform, and I think we accom-
plished it. Many people read and
talked about those posters while
they were up," says Max.
He talks earnestly, and with
much spirit, this tall, dark, good-
American
Israeli
LARGE SELECTION OF
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"IT'S MY OWN dream." he
confides, "that Spain will become
another great Jewish intellectual
center just as it was in the days
of Maimonides. I would like so
much to see a good, strong,
important Jewish community in
Spain."
Will his dream come true?
"Not yet, but perhaps in 30 or 50
years, yes. Now we have full
religious freedom in Spain, there
is democracy, not dictatorship,
and now there are many more
young Jews attending the
universities than before. If these
people will stay, then the dream
is possible."
Even more possible if someone
like Max himself remains.
Jewish Time*
Soldiers Clear Squatters
From Kiryat Arba
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israeli soldiers cleared an ancient
synagogue in Hebron. They
forcibly removed about 30
residents of the nearby Orthodox
township of Kiryat Arba who
took over the Avraham Ayinu
Synagogue in defiance of military
government orders.
The squatters said they would
remain on the premises until the
Defense Ministry carried out its
promise to refurbish the shrine.
A MINISTRY spokesman said
the military would not be bullied
or dictated to. Soldiers dragged
the squatters into buses which
took them to the Beersheba
police station. They were charged
and subsequently released.
The Avraham Avinu
Synagogue and other remnants
of the former Jewish community
in Hebron have become a cause
celebre of Kiryat Arba, a hotbed
of Gush Emunim ultra-na-
tionalism and religious zealotry.
Their aim is to force the
government to re-establish a
Jewish community in Hebron
where the entire population is
Arab. The last Jews fled during
the Arab riots and massacres in
1929.
THE AMERICAN Sephardi
Rabbinical Union meanwhile has
called on the Israel government
to restore the Avraham Avinu
Synagogue in time to mark the
50th anniversary of the Arab
uprising. Abraham Duek of New
York, director of the organiza-
tion, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he has made repre-
sentations to Interior Minister
Yosef Burg and Religious Affairs
Minister Aharon Abu-Hatzeira
on the subject, but received no
commitment.
Duek said the American
Sephardis would finance the
restoration work on the
synagogue. They are also
prepared to finance enlargement
of the Biblical Pool of Siloam if
the government undertakes the
work. The Sephardi Union's
interest seems to be purely
religious with no political
motivations.
Planning A Trip?
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Relax, it was a UFO. not UNO
The Star
London Times
Escapes Censure
LONDON (JTA) The
Press Council, the watchdog on
ethics in the British press, has
rejected a complaint about
allegations in the Sunday Times
that Israel had tortured Arab
prisoners. Following a complaint
by Labor MP Eric Moonman,
chairman of the Zionist
Federation, and after hearing
evidence on his behalf from
Jerusalem Post journalist David
Krivine, the Council said that it
was not its function to decide
whether the allegations in detail
were true but considered that
Sunday Times editor Harold
Evans had reasonable grounds at
the time for believing them.
Moonman made his complaint
to the Press Council following the
June 19, 1977 front page report
by the Sunday Times' insight
team.
THE ARTICLE caused
worldwide controversy, and the
paper published a strong denial
by the Israel Embassy. Moon-
man, who is also chairman of
Labor's Parliamentary
newspaper group, condemned the
Press Council's refusal to uphold
his complaint and called for
publication of all the evidence
placed before it.
Moonman said he would ask
Prime Minister James Callaghan
to consider altering the proced-
ures of the Press Council, as they
did not give an ordinary com-
plainant a fair chance and were
heavily weighted" against the
complainant.
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Page 12-A
fJewist ilcridfian

Play Rouses Passions
TV Trial of Jesus Causes Ruckus
Friday, October 27,1978
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) A
four-hour play on the crucifixion,
produced by an emigre Polish
film director for the educational
television arm of the Ontario
government, is threatening to
upset the equilibrium of the
religious and artistic establish-
ment in this province of Canada.
The play, which costs half a
million dollars (a sore point in
these days of promised govern-
mental austerites) is called The
Jesus Trial and it purports to
examine the 2,000-year-old
Christian legacy of the deicide. It
is based on an actual courtroom
case that took place in 1974 in the
French city of Troyes.
A FRENCH lawyer named
Jacques Isorni wrote a book, Le
Vrai Proces de Jesus (The True
Trial of Jesus), in which he
argued that historically it was
not the Jews but the Roman Pro-
curator Pontius Filate who bears
the responsibility for Jesus'
execution. He was challenged by
a cleric, Abbe Georges de Nantes.
A libel suit ensued which
eventually was won by the
lawyer.
The film enacts the French
trial based on its reported text. It
also interweaves shots from a
Mexican passion play that has
been performed in Ixtapalapa for
the past 150 years, a performance
of startling realism since at times
the person playing Jesus has not
survived to reach the cross, so
acute are the actual tortures.
Also shown are actual films of
Nazi concentration and death
camps in their full horror (unlike
those shown in the recent
Holocaust TV program, these are
real). In addition, continuing
interreligious strife and killing is
shown in scenes from today's
Ireland and Lebanon.
THERE ARE interviews with
and comments throughout the
production by a wide variety of
theologians, scholars, writers and
churchmen from Canada, the
U.S., Great Britain and Israel,
including such persons as
Canadian Jewish poet Irving
Layton, British writer Hugh
Schonfield, Prof. Emil
Fackenheim, Rabbi W. Gunther
Plaut, Rev. Franklin Littell,
Father Gregory Baum, Sister
Charlotte Stein and Prof. Nor-
throp Frye.
Though the program will not
be shown publicly until early
November, already pre-
screenings have caused con-
siderable controversy and
dissent.
Roman Catholics have com-
plained that The Jesus Trial does
not adequately take into account
the Second Vatican Council con-
vened by the late Pope John
XXIII and all that has happened
flowing from this council to alter
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the church's basic position on the
crucifixion and the deicide.
THEY ALSO point out that
Father de Nantes, presented in
the film as a typical Roman
Catholic spokesman, is now con-
sidered virtually a heretic in
church circles and is
diametrically opposed to current
accepted church policies.
Some religious leaders have
expressed concern that the film
displays antagonism to religion
per se. It states at the beginning
that religion is "the bedmate" of
intolerance and ideology in
producing hatred; that it may
have the counter-effect of rein-
forcing in the minds of some
viewers the so-called guilt of the
Jews in stressing their suffering
and persecution, seen by some as
their "just desserts"; that TV
Ontario, as an educational arm of
the government, should not
introduce it into the schools
where it could be mishandled by
unskilled teachers.
Others see it as a courageous
effort to redress the wrong that
has lasted 2,000 years. The
producer-director, Tad Jaworski,
is a 53-year-old Polish filmmaker
raised a Catholic and now an
agnostic.
OF MIXED parentage (his
mother is reported to be Jewish), t
he was expelled from Poland in
1968 and also had his citizenship
revoked during Gomulka's purge
of that period.
Jaworski travelled to the
United States, Mexico, Europe
and Israel in the making of the
television show. It will be shown
in two installments, each one
repeated on a second night.
UN Platform
Cuckoos Are Out
In Force As
Assembly Begins
Continued from Page 1-A
portion of this Assembly session
will be devoted to endorsing
these and other measures for-
mulated to delegitimize and
isolate Israel. Iraq, for example,
will push for a worldwide military
boycott of Israel.
During this Assembly session,
we will also see an unprecedented
publicity campaign by the UN on
behalf of the PLO. A special
propaganda unit servicing the
UN's Palestinian Committee has
been busy all year producing
newsletters, booklets and a
motion picture that will
glamorize the PLO and glorify
Yasir Arafat.
The film's premiere is
scheduled for Nov. 29, marking
the anniversary of the adoption
in 1947 of the Assembly's
Partition Plan resolution.
THAT DATE is now
scheduled by the UN to become a
day for stirring up hatred of
Israel. By financing a quarter of
the whole UN budget, the United
States pays for 25 percent of this
anti-Israel, pro-PLO propaganda.
Oil-rich Saudi Arabia, it might be
noted, pays one-quarter of the 1
percent.
Last year, when the PLO
rejected peace negotiations with
Israel and threatened to
assassinate the Egyptian
President and the Palestinian
Arabs who support his peace
efforts, the Assembly reiterated
its recognition of that terrorist
coalition as the "sole legitimate
representative" of the
Palestinian people.
This year it may be asked
again to strengthen its en-
dorsement of the PLO's political
program as expressed in the
report of the PLO-dominated
Palestinian Committee.
SIMPLY PUT, implementa-
tion of this report would entail
Israel's destruction.
As we approach the 30th
anniversary of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights on
Dec. 10, we can expect further
moves in the General Assembly
to undermine the emphasis of
that document on the rights of
the individual and to focus in-
stead on the rights of states.
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Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D.,
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with Senators Frank Church (D.*
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TIT


M.ndlin
kmo: Things to Write About
J from Page 4-A
olers throughout the
i Board's jurisdiction
ticipating.
ppOSE that was their
ilthough it appears they
entirely successful. It
i their right, according to
finciples of what is
iv called "a free press,
,oted in the Miami News
10 that "Schools should
norai values, not take
to synagogue to teach
nguage."
It's the good old Anita
ft gospel: Moral values are,
fe definition of any stunted
religious values sui
[is. And what values are you
\ to find in a synagogue but
those characteristic of street
language?
By such a circuitous route does
my indifference to Antia Bryant
take me to Ordinance 269 on the
Dade County ballot Nov. 7.
THE ORDINANCE calls for
full equality for all citizens in
matters pertaining to health and
social services and equal oppor-
tunity for employment, public
accommodations and housing
without discrimination.
Discrimination is defined as
prejudice on the grounds of
"race, color, creed, religion,
ancestry, national origin, age,
sex, physical handicap, place of
birth, creed..."
Well, no decent Concerned
Christian Mothers klatch is going
to stand for that nonsense. Anita
[Segal: Liberalism Seen
As in Deep Freeze
Continued from Page 4-A
gzing political career,
lama's George C. Wallace,
(won office primarily on the
issue of fighting school
ation, said the other day:
Jople can't make ends meet;
Jif something's not done, they
|become radicalized."
is a sage observation. But
cognizes only a part of a
__J truth. He claims credit
stirring revolt among middle
is Americans, but he doesn't
w, or has forgotten, that the
ential for radicalization
ing the millions below the
Iddle class has never been
ater.
CURRENT VOTING trends
age a new ironbound conser-
era in America. Herbert
over's regime, marked by the
nation's worst economic de-
pression, may appear as flaming
liberalism compared with what is
now descending upon us. Tax
loopholes will be larger than
ever; congressional pork barrels
will burst their bounds; health
care legislation will be crushed;
the honorable needy will be
catalogued along with welfare
cheaters; inner city housing will
decay; mental institutions will be
starved by lawmakers; food
stamps will become relics of the
past; the jobless will go uncham-
pioned.
At the end of those days,
George Wallace's law will make
more sense than ever, with an
important amendment: "Poor,
aged, and other neglected people
can't make ends meet; and if
something's not done, they will
become radicalized."
Walter Riemann Is Now Our
Director Of Catering,
But IdoIc What HeWfcntlWigh
16 Get Here.
After graduating from hotel school in the 1950*s,
Waker completed his apprenticeship at the Plaza Hotel
in New York under the leadership of the renowned
Pierre Bin.
From there he moved across Fifth Avenue to
the Savoy Plaza and, later, to the Garden City Hotel in
Long Island.
Shortly after it opened, Walter began an eight -
year love affair with the New York Hilton, where he
developed a widespread reputation for his specialty, all-
K-osner affairs.
On the way to Miami Beach, he made one more
stop, The Tarrytown Hilton, where he was director of
catering for four years.
Walter was carefully chosen to meet the needs
of the demanding clientele in the Miami area.
Call him today at 538-8811 to discuss any
occasion. You*U be immensely pleased with his ability to
combine flair, functionahsm and fine food.
. Walter Riemann. He's here at last. You should get
to know him. _^
^ I^NTAINEBLEAU \
V Hilton **
Bryant has already told us about
religion in Playboy, and she's
made no secret about her op-
position to the ERA, which takes
care of her electric views on
sexual equality.
BUT ORDINANCE 269 adds
among the criteria constituting
grounds for discriminatory
practice "affectional and sexual
preferences," which means that
Ordinance 269 calls for equality
for homosexuals as well, a status
gays achieved in Dade County a
while back, but which they lost
on a subsequent Anita Bryant-
initiated referendum.
Well, now. That's another sub-
ject, it strikes me, I have never
really written about. First, Anita
Bryant. Now gays, to whom I am
also indifferent mainly because I
have never given them much
thought one way or another
either. Maybe it's because I know
nothing about their musical
preferences.
Still, there's no doubting it:
Both these subjects are smack in
the middle of Ordinance 269
containing gobs of anti-discrimi-
natory measures in whose behalf
I have written, and copiously,
over the years.
FURTHERMORE, both these
subjects are deadly antagonists,
which should certainly rouse a
writer from his sloth if not to
examine their counter-allegations
that the Anita Bryant forces are
fascists and that the gays will de-
stroy civilization (Christian only,
of course, there being no other),
then possibly to consider that
neither of these claims is true.
Or maybe both are. The gays
argue that the successful Anita
Bryant referendum against their
equal rights in Dade County has
led to similar moves in St. Paul,
Wichita and Eugene. And come
Nov. 7, throughout California
and in Seattle, Wash. They call
this "Hitlerian."
As for the Anita Bryant forces,
for example Concerned Christian
Mothers, well they have already
spoken here for themselves,
among other things on
synagogues and their compelling
tie to street language, being the
new cleansers of the Temple, they
would have us believe.
WHAT I suppose I am getting
at is that somewhere along the
way, there ought to be an end to
indifference in a columnist whom
some readers all too frequently
characterize as a frank polemi-
cist. The two just don't go
together. There ought to be a
word on two such turbulor.t
matters as Anita Bryant and
gays.
So expect a word anytime now.
Smuts is gone: Pass it on"
The Argus
Deutsche Bank Eyes
Gotham Towers Purchase
Continued from Page 1 -A
by Deutsche Bank of Pennzoil
Plaza and the Shell Oil Tower in
Houston, Tex., was a major deal
but Texas yardsticks are
different.
It is, however, definitely head-
line news when German investors
consider buying Manhattan's
tallest skyscraper, the World
Trade Center with its twin 411-
meter towers.
The two towers are, so to
speak, the watchtowers of Wall
Street, and to have them pass
into German hands could appear
as if the deutschemark and the
economic potential behind it had
taken control of the citadel'of the
dollar. No other investment
would more dramatically
exemplify the change in currency
relations between deutschemark
and dollar.
THE DEAL has not yet been
completed, but first talks with
the owners of the World Trade
Center, the Port Authority of
New York and New Jersey, were
initiated by Deutsche Bank in
mid-August. Deutsche Bank,
with its 120 billion deutschemark
deposits, is the world's third
largest after Bank of America
and Citybank, New York.
The World Trade Center was
built between 1969 and 1973 at a
cost of one billion dollars. It is
not known what Deutsche Bank
will have to pay for it if the deal
comes off. The question of price
has not yet come up in the pre-
liminary negotiations, say
reports. Estimates speak of four
billion deutschemarks.
Why is the Port Authority
contemplating this sale
especially in view of the symbolic
character of the World Trade
Center?
NEW YORKERS have a ready
reply. Americans have considered
the World Trade Center a white
elephant since its completion.
Even now, only 90 percent of the
floor area is rented and only
because the Port Authority
accepted rentals below cost.
It is hard to imagine that
Deutsche Bank has not carefully
weighed this real estate deal of
the century.
The problems surrounding the
World Trade Center are closely
linked with the fact that com-
pletion coincided with the reces-
sion that diminished demand for
office space. The situation was
further aggravated by excessive
office construction in Manhattan
in the late 60s, bringing a glut.
THE WORLD Trade Center
with its 1.2 million square meters
of office space (the equivalent of
1,000 housing blocks) could not
have been built at a less favorable
time. In fact, it is a success that
90 percent is rented even
though this was done at dumping
prices.
It must not be overlooked that
the Port Authority as a public
institution pays no real estate
tax. German owners would have
to pay about 60 million dollars a
year, as New York's Mayoer
Edward Koch, in sore need of
every million he can lay his hands
on, said recently.
So what prompted Deutsche
Bank to consider the deal?
Said a satisfied Peter Gold-
mark, director of the Port
Authority, after the first round of
talks: "The gentlemen from
Deutsche Bank have done their
homework."
Country Club Aventura is now ac-
cepting reservations for parties
and functions accommodating up
to 500 people, in the new Garden
Room on the Green.
Charlotte Horn
Catering Director
COUNTRY CLUB
AVENTURA
|V9lh Street and Bisca>nc Bouloard
Phone:931-3110


"6c ifn
14-A
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'Friday, October?
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s
res
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 71-7133
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THERESE RUBIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AOAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of Therese Rubin,
deceased, File Number 78-7133,
Is pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is
73 West Flagler Street. Miami,
FL. The personal representative
of the estate Is David Rubin,
whose address Is 13630 West
Dixie Highway. North Miami,
FL. The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
reoulred. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due, the
date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured.
.he security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
thev may have that challenges
the' validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 20.1978.
David Rubin
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Therese Rubin
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
David E. Stone, Esq.
Stone. Sostchin it
Gonzalez. P.A.
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. FL 33128
Telephone: (308)324-4666
02931 Oct. 20, 27,1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Probate No: 7J-7M7
Division: 01
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN W. NEWMAN
Deceased.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the Estate of HELEN W. NEW-
MAN, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, has commenced
in the captloned proceeding. The
address of the Personal
Representative listed below Is
8821 SW 17 Street, Plantation.
Florida 33317
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the
Estate, any challenge to the
validity of the Will admitted for
probate, or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Juris-
diction of the Court, ALL WITH
IN THREE (3) MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE WITH THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF DADE COUNTY AT
73 West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First publication of this Notice
is on the 20 day of October, 1978.
ROSE HUBBELL,
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HELEN W. NEWMAN,
Deceased
BROAD AND CASSEL,
Attorneys for Personal
Representative
1108 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 83184
Phone: 308/888-1000
By Louis C Hooks
02918 Oct. 20, 27,1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name Alton Road
Animal Hospital at Miami
Beach, Florida Intends to
register said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Owner: Harold Nass. D.V.M.
03899 Oct 18. 20, rt, Nov. >. 1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11 TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
UADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
Case No. 76-13427 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
FRANK LUBIN.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
DIN A LUBIN.
Respondent-Wife.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, DINA LUBIN. Rue IS
F.G. N'oi 28, Cap Haitian. Haiti,
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the
Petition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you, upon
Husbands attorney. GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQUIRE, 812 NW
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida
33138, and file original with the
Clerk of the Court on or before
November 27, 1978; otherwise
the Petition will be confessed by
you.
DATED this 16th day of
October. 1978.
Richard P. Blinker, Clerk
By Barbara J. Coleman
Deputy Clerk
02928 Oct. 20. 27; Nov. 3.10,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINAND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-138*2
ACTION TO FORECLOSE
A MECHANIC'S LIEN
FLORIDA LUMBER
COMPANY, INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERTO DARIAS. etal.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO DARIAS
Residence I'nknown
BICENTENNIAL CON
STRUCTION COR-
PORATION
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to foreclose
a mechanic's lien on the
following real property In Dade
County has been filed against
you:
Lots 4. 6. 7 and 8. IVAN SUB-
DIVISION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 99. at Page 13, of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida a. k a
12220, 12140. 12141, and 12201
SW 101 Avenue, Miami.
Florida, respectively.
You are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, If
any, to It on GARY B. SACK,
ESQ.. attorney, whose address Is
801 Dade Federal Building, 101
East Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above-styled court on or before
Novemoer 27, 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of October.
1978.
RICHARD P. H1UNKKH.
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByN.A.Hewett
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal l
Gary B. Sack. Esquire
Attorney for Plaintiff
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33131
Phone: 358-6090
02923 Oct. 20. 27; Nov. 3.10.1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Family Court Division
CMN0.76-132M(FC-1J)
NOTICE OF ACTION
In Re The Marriage of
RICHARD JAY HACK,
Petitioner.
and
ROBERTA SCHWAM HACK.
Respondent.
TO: ROBERTA SCHWAM
HACK
280 Gorge Road
Apartment 10-J
CUffslde Park,
New Jersey 07010
You. ROBERTA SCHWAM
HACK, are hereby notified that a
petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and
commenced In this Court and you
are required to file your written
defenses thereto. If any. In this
Court and serve a copy thereof
on L. J. Cushman, Esq..
Attorney for RICHARD JAY
HACK, whose address Is 18th
Floor. Dade Federal Building, 21
NE First Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33132, on or before (he 27
day of November 1978, otherwise
_ default Judgment will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In said petition for
dissolution.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
Witness my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami. Dade
County. Florida, on this 13th day
of October 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
as Clerk of the
Circuit Court.
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
Deputy Clerk
L.J. CUSHMAN
Attorney for Petitolner.
15th Floor.
Dade Federal Bldg.
21 NE First Avenue
Miami. Florida 33132
Phone (3061379-7689
02922 Oct. 20. 27; Nov. 3, 10.1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE11THJUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
C.S. NO. 78-H753 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOUIS L. LIPHETE.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
CILIA LIPHETE.
Respondent Wife. ___
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, CILIA LIPHETE. C/o
pere Demesse, Anssa Folait 3e
Section., Haiti, are hereby
notified to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition For Dis-
solution of Marriage filed
Salnst you. upon Husband s
torney, George Nicholas, Es-
quire, 612 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33136. and file the
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before November 13.
1978; otherwise the Petition will
be confessed by you.
DATED this 29 day of Sep-
tember. 1978.
Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
By:M.J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
12877 Oct. 8,13. 20. 27.1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-11533 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
R. T. JONES,
Petitioner,
and
MONNIE JONES.
Respondent.
TO: MONNIE JONES
(Resident address
unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is 9000 Biscayne Blvd.,
Suite 318, Miami, Florida 33137,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before November 27, 1978;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint 'or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day of October,
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lawrence M. Shoot, Esq.
8000 Blacayne Blvd.
Suite 816,
Miami. Florid*. 88187
Tel. (SOB) 573-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
02920 Oct 20,27; Nov. 3. 10,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-13487 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DONALD ALBERTA.
Husband Petitioner,
and
DOLORES ALBERTA,
Wife Respondent.
TO: Mrs. Dolores Alberta
7 Webster Street
Newark, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dls
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Michael A. Relchman, Esq.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 3041 NW 7th Street.
Suite 100, Miami, Florida 3312!".
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before November 27. 1978;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 17 day of October.
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByG.S.Carlle
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Michael A Relchman. Esquire
3041 NW 7th Street
Suite 100
Miami. Florida 33125
02924 Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10,1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name "THE HAPPY
BOOKERS'' at 266 Seavlew
Drive, Key Blscayne, Florida
33149 Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florid*.
DEANNA BON SALLE
BARBARA WHE ELOCK
MERETHE JOHNSON
FRANCESCA FINE
JOSEPH D1BARTOLOMEO
Attorney
8400 Bird Road
Miami, Florida 33168
Tel.: 226-2276
02886 Oct. 6, IS. 20. 27.1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-13000
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PAUL B. WILEMON,
Petitioner,
and
GLADYS WILEMON.
Respondent.
TO: GLADYS WILEMON
i Address Unknown i
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage nas been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LAWRENCE If. SHOOT. ESQ..
attorney tor Petitioner, wnose
address is 3000 Blscayne Blvd.
Suite 315. Miami. Florida 33137.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before Nov. i". 1978; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 5 day of October.
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Lawrence M. Shoot, Esquire
3000 Blscayne Boulevard
Suite 315
Miami, Florida 33137
Tel. (305)573-8010
Attorney for Petitioner
02897 Oct. 13. 20.27: Nov. 3.1978
NOTICE UNDER
- FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUNNYLAND
GULF SERVICE at number 1240
W. Flagler. In the City of Miami
Florida, Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
28 day of September. 1978.
MANUEL RODRIGUEZ
Gulllermo Sost chin
Stone. Sostchln A
Gonzalez, P.A.
Attorney for Applicant
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida
02887 Oct. (.18. 20. 27.19781
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 7811 111 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOURDES DAY PALMIERI.
Wife,
and
DANTE PALMIERI.
Husband.
TO: Mr. Dante Palmleri
2700 Nellson Way.
Apt. 331
Santa Monica,
California 90406
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Richard R. Booth. Esq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
800 Alnsiey Bldg.. Miami. Fla..
33132, ana tile the original witn
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 13,
1978; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29th day of
September, 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByN.A.Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
02879 Oct. 6,13, 20, 27,1978
IWTHEclRCbiTc6URf6r
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 78*7*1
Probate Division 01
IN THE MATTER OF
THE ESTATE OF
RAUL HERNANDEZ,
an Absentee.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU. RAUL HERNANDEZ,
an Absentee, are hereby notified
to serve a copy of your Answer to
the Petition and Application for
Order Establishing Legal
Presumption of Death filed
against you upon Wife's at-
torney, George Nicholas,
Esquire, 812 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida S31S6, and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before November 13,
1978; otherwise the Petition will
be confessed by you.
DATED this 6 day of October,
1978.
Richard P. Brlnker. Clerk
By Charlotte W. GIrard
Deputy Clerk
First publication on October
13.1978.
02890 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE 11 TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
No 78 13016 FC
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: Petition of
I.ARRY LEE BLYTHE,
Petitioner.
TO SAMUEL ANTHONY
MATTHEWS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Adoption with the Clerk of this
Court and mall a copy of same to
Petitioner's attorney.
NATHANIEL I. BARONE, JR..
777 NE 79th Street, Miami.
Florida 33138, on or before the 17
day of November. 1978, else the
Petition will be taken as con-
fessed.
DATED: Octobers, 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
02892 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3.1978
MOTICEOF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-12994 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ANTONIETA DIAZ,
Wife,
and
HUMBERTO J.DIAZ.
Husband.
TO: HUMBERTO J. DIAZ
Arturo Prat No.30
Poblaclon Davlla
Santiago, Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Albert L. Carricarte, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
2491 NW 7th Street. Miami,
Florida 33125. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 17. 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 5th day of
October, 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
Albert L. Carricarte, P.A.
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Fla. 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone No. 649-7917
02893 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name of SCHREIBER IN-
DUSTRIES at 228 NE 59th
Street, Miami, Florida 33137,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
PAULBARNETT, INC
By:Sol3chrelber.
President
Law Offices of
Alnslee R. Fertile
Attorneys for
Paul Bamett, Inc.
02878 Oct. 6.18. 20. 27,1978
---------NOTICE Under------
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious names 3R RESTAURANT
CORPORATION D/B/A
DADELAND PIZZERIA, SOL'S
KENDALL PIZZERIA. KEN
DALL PIZZERIA & SANDWICH
SHOP at 9400 SW 77th Avenue,
Miami, Florida Intends to
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
SR RESTAURANT
CORPORATION
By: Sol Shalom.
President
02913 Oct. 18,20.27; Nov. 8,1978
------------N6TICE UNDER--------
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious names Law Offices,
Hacker, Phelps k Matters at
Suite 1400. Alnsiey Building. 14
NE 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
33132. Intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Michael S. Hacker, a
sole legal practitioner
J. Bruce Phelps. a '
sole legal practitioner
Michael A. Matters, a
sole legal practitioner
02868 Oct. 6.18. 20. 27.1978
AND FOR DADE COUNT?
Civil Action No 7, ijl II
ACTIONIfWlfiSSSL
OF MARRIAGE 0N
m RE: The Marriage of
NELVIN MONROE
Petitioner,
and
LEROY ALLAN MONROE
Respondent.
TO: LEROY ALLAN MONRnp
(Residence Unknown;
FIED that an action for Dii.
solution of Marriage has h.
filed against you anVvou"^
re(}^redJt; "erVe a ePy Of your
written defenses, if any to R"
Lawrence M. Shoot, Es,. a to-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress Is 3000 Blscayne Blva
SUH%?,15'.i,'aml'Flor^a37
and file the original with th,
"*' the above styled coWjj
or before November 17 5!
otherwise a default win be
tered against you (or the relief
demanded In the complain, or
This notice shall be published
once each week (or four con.
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN j*-wbh
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 6 dav of 0ctoh.r
1978. "*''
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Diane Nyet
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal
Lawrence M. Shoot Esquire
3000 Blscayne Blvd
Suite 318
Miami. Florida 33137
Tel. (305I 573-5010
Attorney (or Petitioner
02894 Oct 18,20,27: Nov. a. Iff!
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
1 NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURT0F
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 7?. 13584 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriageol
LUIS GALVEZ.
Husband
and
NANCY GALVKZ
Wife
TO: NANCY GALVKZ
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HERKHY NOTI-
FIED that an action lor
Dissolution of Marriage nas been
filed against you and you art
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any to it on
Albert L. Carricate P A., attor-
ney for Petitioner *nose ad-
dress is 2491 NW 7th Street.
Miami. Florida 33125. and (lie Die
original with the clerk ol the
above styled court on or before
November 27, 1978; otherwliei
default will be entered again*
you for the relief demanded to
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for (our consecu-
tive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this l9dayofOctober.
1978.
RICHARD P HI'.INKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By G.S Cariif
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Courts.
Albert L.Carrlcart.' P.A.
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida 331
(308)649-7917
Attorney for Petit'.'Hier
02933 Oct. 20. 71 \ NOV. 3.10. U
IN THE CIRCUIT COUK.ur"
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDF0R
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 7H 737 FC
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
N RE: The Marriage of
VIARJORIE ELOISE
KERR.Wife
uid
[RVIN KERR, JR.
Husband
TO:IRVINKERR JR- ,
Jt^P^onforUlssol^
Marriage has been 'l'~J*J3
you and you are ^reb* "X
^.erveacopyof^ura^ (
other pleading to the Feuu
the Wife's attorney. Har"U t
Rogers, whose *"* J^
NW 17 Avenue. "JlSjS
33126. and file the *g*a
the Clerk of the V"ffl
Court on or before U*H|
November, 1978, or a Defaun
be entered agalnslI you.
DATED this 16 day'00""
1978RICHARDP BRINKS*
CTerkofOrcultCouri
By Deborah G "
Deputy Cleric ,
02921 Oct.20.27;Nli^>
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NMMMSsJ
NOTICE IS HEKEBY G ,
that the undersigned. *i ^ a
engage In business "J*^ J
tltfous names Miami =* g,,,
Boat Show, MtamlSumr-
Show,- Miami Dinner
Summer Boat.Show'jffiB
Road. Suite 202 Sou* W53
Florida W**"SdT3i
intends to register said
with the Clerk 0 thf ^
Court of Dade County. Flo* .
Sole Owner: Victor Log" 0t
02898 Oct IS. 20,27; Nov.'.'


W7
[eral hundred Miamians gathered in support of Soviet Jewry
eek at a rally at the North Miami Beach City Hall. They
lid Soviet refusnik Janella Goods (second from right) plead
Ibehalf of her husband, Igor, who is still in the Soviet Union,
ling been denied an exit visa. Among those attending the
\v which was sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish
derations South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, acorn-
L#p of the Community Relations Committee, were (left to
I Conference Chairman Dr. Joel Sandberg, Commissioner
iD. Schreiber, and U.S. Rep. William Lehman.
No Mention
Dead Still Cry
Out at Babi Yar
(Continued from Page 1-A
Jews. Even the ovens of
hwitz could not surpass this
lency of genocide.
In eyewitness later reported
[grim finale of the procession
|ews marching out of Kiev to
desolate ravine in the
hbull forest
They were ordered to deposit
i ground in a neat pile all
donginga they hail brought
them and then, in tight
|mns ot one hundred each,
marched to the ravine. .
could sec well, how at the
decades, all efforts to build a
memorial to the Jewish victims
have hinged on the Kremlin's un-
willingness to acknowledge their
deaths.
On March 13, 1961, the ravine
took revenge upon those that
ignored its tragic hold. The soil,
loosened by a spring flood, came
down upon the lower part of the
city. The desecrated remains of
the Jews, which had been hastily
burned by retreating Nazis, the
ashes, charred bones and skulls.
suddenly came to the surface and
froze on the immobile sand and
clav river.
was 32 years ago this week that 100,000 innocent
tviet men, women and children began to be brutally
assacred at the Babi Yar site in Russia. All of them
We Jews.
ne's edge the columns were
how everyone was
bped naked, their clothes
in orderly bundles. Then
' were put in a row at the ends
he ravine and shot in the
k; children were thrown alive
|the ravine."
MACHINE guns
only long enough for
ers to shovel sand over each
r of the dead and dying.
hereafter the site was
nely used as an extermina-
point of Jews and other
t nationalities. By 1943 it is
Dated that more than 100,000
' died at the hands of the
[the end of the forties during
P s bloody purge against the
Ltk lS and their culture.
p the best representatives of
f.... j ""y were imprisoned
[""led when the word Jew
PPeared from the everyday
*"'ary of the Soviet people,
the concept of the Jewish
P too was doomed to
ppear, Babi Yar was turned
n c'ty dump for refuse and
ft,
IJ951, it Was decided to raze
Tlh'nK to the ground and
P,sn a sports complex with a
Pro and a swimming pool.
Ps it was only a gruesome
oence that ten years earlier,
he dead had scarcely been
y a thin layer of earth,
'too wished to play football
BDonesofthelews
MORE than three
That same year Soviet poet,
Yevgeny Yevtushenko, im-
mortalized the symbol of Jewish
martyrdom in his poem Babi Yar,
while composer Dimitri
Shostakovich used Babi Yar as a
theme for his 13th Symphony.
Both were rebuked by the
Kremlin, but the international
cause celebre could not be
stopped by the government.
IN ENSUING years Soviet
Jews attempting to com-
memorate the anniversary date
have been jailed by local police.
Today, the site according to
Soviet ideologists is as much a
symbol of "bourgeois Jewish
nationalism," as it is for us a
symbol of Jewish martyrdom.
The erection of the stone
edifice which the government had
hoped would end all controversy
is as much a symbol of anti-
Semitism as the ravine itself.
There is still no peace at Babi
Yar.
After thirty-seven years the
dead remain unnamed and rather
than answering Yevtushenko's
pleas for memorialization,
today's monument underscores
the fact that the Soviet govern-
ment continues to obliterate any
source of Jewish identity, to
make the Jews cultural am-
nesiacs. As Yevtushenko wrote,
"Here all things scream silently,
and baring my head slowly I feel
myself turning gray. And I
myself am one massive soundless
scream above the hundred
thousand buried here."
Withhold UN Funds
28 Senators in Plea to President
By ROCHELLE WOLK
ALBANY. N.Y. (JTA) -
Spearheaded by Sen. Daniel P.
Moynihan (D., N.Y.), 28 U.S.
Senators have sent a letter to
President Carter to express their
"strong expectation" that the
President will withhold $190,000
from this country's contribution
to the United Nations, according
to Dr. Harris Schoenberg,
director of the UN office of B'nai
B'rith International.
The $190,000 represents the
United States' proportionate
support of the UN Special Unit
on Palestinian Rights.
IN AN INTERVIEW with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Schoenberg said that B'nai B'rith
has information about activities
organized by the Special Unit
and slated to take place at UN
headquarters in New York City
on Nov. 29 when the first annual
celebration of UN International
Day of Solidarity with the Pales-
tinian People is scheduled.
On that day the Special Unit
on Palestinian Rights, which was
created last year by the General
Assembly, will present a film
that is being produced especially
for the occasion.
There will also be an exhibit of
photographs and posters
depicting Palestinians in the TIN
Visitors' Lounge during that
week with photos selected by
representatives of Senegal,
Guinea and the Palestine
Liberation Organization. Six
studies on the Palestinians will
also be published by the UN
Special Unit.
Dr. William Korey, the director
of B'nai B'rith's international
research and an expert on the
UN, described the forthcoming
film to leaders of the Greater
Albany Jewish Federation last
week.
KOREY, who said he was one
of the few people who had seen an
outline of the script, explained
that the purpose of the film is to
"glorify Yasir Arafat and the
PLO."
The movie, he continued, "is
going to show a number of PLO
terrorist raids and justify them"
and "then condemn Israel for any
responsiveness. It will be an anti-
Israeli film which, in effect, says
that Israel has usurped historic
Arab homeland' and made the
Palestinians homeless and
oppressed.' A determined effort
will then be made by the UN
Special Unit on Palestinian
Rights to have the film aired on
American television as well as on
television throughout the world.
"This special unit is planning
to be in business permanently,"
Korey warned, "and Nov. 29, the
anniversary of the 1947 UN
partition of Palestine, is to be
celebrated annually as a day of
mourning."
THE SPECIAL unit, a section
of the UN Secretariat, has the
purpose of serving the Palestine
Committee, Schoenberg ex-
plained. "The unit was voted on
and authorized by the General
Assembly on Dec. 2, 1977," he
added, "only 12 days after
Egyptian President (Anwar)
Sadat's peace mission to Jeru-
salem. Instead of hailing this
breakthrough as a tremendous
step forward, the General
Assembly chose to glorify the
PLO by setting up this special
unit.
"When the unit was created,"
Schoenberg continued, "the vote
on the resolution was 95 in favor,
20 against and 26 abstentions.
The 20 states that opposed the
creation of the unit, including the
U.S. and other Western
democracies, said then that it
was subversive of the UN
charter concept of an impartial
international civil service," but
these 20 nations have ended up
paying 60 percent of the unit's
budget.
SCHOENBERG explained
that despite their monetary con-
tributions they have no part in
policy formulation. "On the
instructions of the chairman of
the Palestinian Committee,
which is made to guide the
operations of the special unit, no
national from these 20 countries
is permitted to serve on the
staff," he said.
In addition to the Nov. 29
observance and film premier,
Schoenberg said "the special unit
will issue news bulletins
throughout the year and will
report on actions and resolutions
of the UN on behalf of the PLO
that support the delpRitimization
of Israel and Zionism."
Referring to the six studies on
the Palestinians that the special
unit is planning to publish,
Schoenberg called them
"primitively distorted or
maliciously false." Korey said
they were "tendentious and
heavily biased."
Picket 'Boys from Brazil9
TORONTO (JTA) The Boys From Brazil, a movie
about the search for Nazi war criminals in South America,
was picketed here by a group calling itself "Concerned
Parents of German Descent." Ernst Zundl of Toronto, a
German-born commercial artist, who led the pickets, told
reporters he was protesting the "smearing" and
"harrassment" of Germans. Last April, when Zundl led a
similar demonstration against the NBC-TV Holocaust
series, it was revealed that he was the author, under the
assumed name of Christoff F^edrich, of a book entitled "The
Hitler We Loved and Why."
Endorsed by Richard Gerstein,
State Attorney for 20 years
and named Woman of the Year,
1978, by Voters, Inc.
Carol King Guralnick's opponent-
BARAD-the former Traffic Judge
does not have this criminal circuit
court experience.
CIRCUIT
JUDGE
Carol King Guralnick worked for Richard
Gerstein in the State Attorney's Office from
1970-1978. As a Prosecuting Attorney Carol
was assigned to Circuit Court where she
prosecuted major crimes like rape and
murder. Last year, Carol won 30 of 32 major
crimes. Her years of courtroom experience
makes her QUALIFIED.
CAROL KING GURALNICK
CIRCUIT JUDGE-GROUP 30-PUNCH 96
Pd. Pol. Adv. Guralnick Camp. Treas.


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mencan Jewisn u>mmittee to Honor Sen. Myers
i' ^. Sunday, Nov. 5, the
Uter MiJi Chapter of the
I Sin Jewish Committee will
ISt Sen. Kenneth M.Myers
ETC Human Relations Award
\t S International Hotel
Kn Howard I. Friedman,
ESS of the Board of
E^of the American Jewish
Pgi will be keynote
Itpemker.
I <5<>n Myers served m the
IHouse'of Representatives for four
I 1964-1968 and was elected
IrSe Senate in 1968. He has
|been the author and chief sponsor
of over 150 laws, including the
Florida Health Planning Act, the
Community Mental Health Act,
the Florida Drug Abuse Act, the
Landlord / Tenant Act among
others. Senator Myers is
Chairman of the Senate Tran-
sportation Committee and a
member of the Senate Rules
Committee, the Finance and Tax
Committee and the Committee on
Appropriations. He is also a
member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Jewish Home for
the Aged, Douglas Gardens.
Sen. Myers received his A.B.
degree at the University of North
Carolina, Phi Beta Kappa; and
his law degree at the University
of Florida. He is a member of the
American, Florida and Dade.
County Bar Associations.
In announcing the Human
Relations Award, Robert I.
Shapiro, chapter chairman
stated: "Sen. Myers has
demonstrated in his public and
private life a commitment to
United Way Campaign
Reaches 67% of Goal
United Way Campaign Chairman John McMullan announces
the 1978 effort has raised $7,375,054 of the $11,055,000 goal or
67 percent.
McMullan, who is executive editor of The Miami Herald said,
"All of us can take pride in what United Way has done to assist
those in need and to insure the most effective use of our givers'
dollars. But we can't afford to slow down now. The toughest
part of our job lies ahead. The campaign goal must be achieved
by Nov. 21."
United Way President Marshall S. Harris reiterated the
importance of everyone's help in making the 1978 goal a reality.
"Now is the time for each of us to pitch in and do our share,"
said Harris. "United Way touches the lives of everyone in Dade
County and it is everyone's responsibility to provide the support
we need to achieve a successful campaign."
The Dade County United Way kicked off its campaign effort
in mid-September with a luncheon at the Omni International
Hotel. Arthur Godfrey was the featured speaker.
More than 1,000 volunteers are expected to attend the victory
dinner, which climaxes the campaign effort. The dinner is
scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 21 at the Omni.
President Carter was to make
a one-day visit to Miami
Beach on Thursday to attend
a public rally at the beach-
front park on Collins Avenue
and 73rd Street. Carter was to
deliver an address and be
welcomed by U.S. Rep. Claude
Pepper and Miami Beach
Mayor Leonard Haber.
400 Pioneer Women to Hear Kleinberg
Howard Kleinberg, editor of
\The Miami News, will take part
[in a panel discussion of the
dramatic moves towards peace in
the Middle East Tuesday, Oct.
131, at a luncheon highlighting the
annual leadership seminar of the
Pioneer Women Council of South
I Florida.
. More than 400 leaders of
I Pioneer Women are expected to
I attend the one-day workshop
[meeting at the Eden Roc Hotel in
I Miami Beach. The sessions get
lunderway at 10 a.m., with the
[luncheon beginning at noon.
Joining Kleinberg on the panel
Iwill be Ben Stone, correspondent
|for WTVJ (Channel 4) and Allan
Margolis, owner of radio
Illations WMBM-AM and
Howard Kleinberg
assist those members of our
society who are too easily
neglected and too often over-
looked. The Greater Miami
Chapter is proud to recognize
Senator Myers for his years of
humanitarian achievement."
Friedman, who will speak on
the topic "The A.J.C.'s Role in
the Jewish Community," is, in
addition to serving as the
chairman of the Board of
Trustees of the American Jewish
Committee is also Chairman of
the Board of Overseers Hebrew
Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion, California
/School, and is also serving as a
member of the Board of
Governors of the National
Overseers Hebrew Union College
Jewish Institute of Religion.
He is a member of the Board of
Trustees of the University of
Judaism, the West Coast affiliate
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. He has
been a member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish
Federation Council of Los
Angeles, and presently serves as
legal counsel to the Interracial
Council for Business Oppor-
tunities in Los Angeles.
Past recipients of the Human
Relations Award include Dr.
Charles Beber, Reva Wexler and
Howard Scharlin.
For further information
concerning this event, contact
Brenda B. Shapiro, Florida Area
Director of the American Jewish
Committee.
Howard Friedman
Ambassador Ramati to Speak
At Histadrut Council Lunch
WWWL-FM and a national com-
missioner of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. Both
Stone and Margolis took part in
the 1978 media survey mission to
Israel sponsored by the American
Zionist Federation, of which
Pioneer Women is a member or-
ganization.
Harriet Green, president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida and president of
the Pioneer Women Council
which embraces more than 25
chapters and clubs in Dade and
Broward counties, will moderate
the panel.
Kleinberg, who has been with
The Miami News since 1949, is
former managing editor and
executive sports editor of the Cox
newspaper, Miami's oldest daily.
He has traveled throughout the
Middle East, including visits to
Israel, Egypt and Jordan, and
has covered several national
Democratic and Republican
conventions.
'Roots of Judaism'
Mrs. Rose Silverstone, Zionist
Affairs chairperson of Menorah
Chapter of Hadassah will review
Roots of Judaism for the First
Study Group Session of the New
Year at the home of Mrs. Harvey
Freidman, Monday, Nov. 6 at 10
a.m.
Ambassador Shaul Ramati,
director of the World Jewish
Affairs division of Israel's
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, will
be the keynote speaker at the an-
nual awards luncheon of the
Israel Histadrut Council of South
Florida Sunday, Nov. 5, at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel, it
was announced by Moe Levin,
board chairman, and Council
President Morris Newmark.
The Histadrut Women's
Council, which helps sponsor
scholarships for underprivileged
children in Israel, will be honored
at the luncheon. Accepting the
award will be Betty Traugot and
Ruth Glasco, presidium
presidents of the Women's
Council, and Mildred Sahl,
immediate past president.
Ambassador Ramati, who
recently served with Israel's
delegation to the United Nations,
will lead the tribute to the
Histadrut Women's Council,
which has pledged to sponsor a
department at one of the 33 Amal
vocational schools maintained by
the Histadrut in Israel.
The documentary film "A
Finger on the Pulse," which
depicts the comprehensive health
arm of Histadrut (Kupat Holim)
in action, will be shown at the
luncheon. Kupat Holim serves
the health needs of more than 75
percent of Israel's population,
Shaul Ramati
through 19 major hospitals and
1.200 clinics.
Ramati was Israel's chief
envoy to Japan from 1974-1977,
and earlier served as consul
general in Chicago and Midwest.
Born in Poland, he served with
the British Army and Jewish
Brigade, and later in the Israel
Defense Forces. He has published
numerous articles on military,
economic and political subjects.
Tickets for the luncheon are
available through the Histadrut
office in Miami Beach.
UM Slates Conference on Holocaust
ey Lefcourt (left), who is serving as chairman of the
PhiterL Miami Jewish Federation's Foundation uf Jewish
rn"anthropies, met with Harry B. Smith (right) and Jay I.
mitt ^ a. recent meeting of the Foundation Operating Com-
w. Smith, a past chairman of the Foundation and a past
mitt f Federation> 's serving as chairman of that Com-
I tee. Kislak serves as chairman of the Foundation's
[^Stment Committee. The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
" 0Pies is the Federation's endowment and bequest program.
acts through its committees to develop financial resources by
fatta"* beauests- endowments, legacies, insurance proceeds,
and Philanthropic funds to provide seed money for pilot
tunfrv*' emer^encies and future needs of the Jewish corn-
Monday, Nov. 6, is the dead-
line to pre-register for the Uni-
versity of Miami's three-day con-
ference on "The Moral Signi-
ficance of the Holocaust: What
Can We Learn and Teach?" to be
held Nov. 19-21 at Sheraton
River House.
Sponsored by the Judaic
Studies Program, the nonde-
nominational conference is
supported by a grant from the
Florida Endowment for the
Humanities. It is open to the
public without charge, but guests
must call UM conference ser-
vices, or Judaic Studies, to pre-
register. Call between 8:30 am.
Dr. Helen Fagin, acting chair-
man of Judaic Studies, is con-
ference chairman.
and 5 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day, for the conference schedule
which includes two dinner
programs. ^^^^^^^^MHBM
Dr. Franklin H. Littell,
stitute on the1 Holocaust. ^u Home for the Ageo
speak on Sunday, Nov. 19 at 7
p.m. His topic will be the Holo-
caust: A Moral Crisis for Chris-
tianity."
The dinner on Monday, Nov.
20 will feature a 7:30 p.m. sym-
posium on "Moral Implications
of the Holocaust: The Responsi-
bility of Government, Education
and Religion."
"Je wish Flor idian
Miami, Florida Friday, October 27,1978
SECTION B
Auxiliary Meets
The Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary, Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Douglas
Gardens, will hold its monthly
luncheon meeting on Tuesday,
Oct. 31 at noon at the Shelborne
Hotel.
, Mrs. Frances Makovsky,
program chairman, has arranged
to have Mrs. Jennifer S. Rice-
Falkowitz, communications coor-
I dinator of the Home show many
slides on activities of the
residents.


Page2-B

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Friday, October 27
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Sandy Says:
More Debate:
Women Rabbis?
SANDY
Last week, 7 out of 11 women
agreed with the following
statement on female rabbis:
It is hard to believe that the
issue of female rabbis is in 1978
controversial enough for debate.
Most of the legal arguments
against women in the clergy have
long been explained away by
clear-thinking scholars. And the
remaining objections stem only
from the social and psychological
attitudes preserved by the tradi-
tionalists.
Still, the June, 1973 ordination
of Rabbi Sally Preisand has
aroused a variety of reactions
among us: enthusiasm, ambi-
valence, disgust. It is from the
ranks of Reform Judaism that we
would expect the first woman
rabbi to emerge, as indeed she
has. Hopefully, the Conservative
movement and someday the
Orthodox will follow suit. The
road to the rabbinate is rough
enough without the intervention
of narrowminded, albeit well-
meaning, convictions.
Here is what some men, rabbis
included, have to say:
9 Harry Abelson, retired
vending machine salesman,
Miami Beach:
"Why not? I think they should
be allowed. Women are even in
the police force and army today."
9 Barry Goldin, attorney, S.
Miami:
"I have no objection. I would
make my decision solely on her
qualifications as a rabbi."
9 Dr. Leon Kronish, rabbi,
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach:
"This is not an issue of Jewish
law or principle with a liberal
rabbi. We recognized the equality
of men and women a long time
ago in terms of seating. Bat
Mitzvahs, and alivot. The
problem is to educate the public-
at-large. Influencing the at-
titudes of the average congregant
is a slow process. But. in terms of
the few synagogues where it is
happening, 1 accept the pro-
position that we will see more and
more in our lifetime."
9 Ike Goldemberg, builder,
Surf side:
"While it might create turmoil,
I am for it. If my temple hired a
female rabbi, I would not resign.
People are people. From a
traditional point of view, there
have been none for thousands of
years. Cognizant of the past, we
can take a good look at the inf. re-
structure of all synagogues and
analyze what other changes
should be made. Other faiths
have worldwide councils to
bridge gaps and make religion
responsive. Judaism also needs
stable parameters."
0 Phineas Weberman,
Orthodox rabbi, Ohev Shalom,
Miami Beach:
"Even though we find women
as spiritual leaders in history,
especially Deborah and the
prophetesses, Sarah and Miriam,
it is still not within Jewish
tradition for women to be rabbis.
This is particularly true today. If
it involved just scholarly
opinions or prophetic decisions,
then it would be all right. But,
today's rabbi is in the public eye.
Now we also act as managers and
fundraisers. This does not go
along with the traditional
modesty of Jewish women. Even
Deborah acted as judge while
sitting under a date palm. But, I
have no objection to women
taking on positions of spiritual
leadership."
9 Scott
Miami:
"There will be a great deal of
resistance because of people's
traditional expectations. Many
Barnett, attorney,
see the role only as paternal
leader of a flock. Personally, I
have no objections since rabbis
originally were teachers who
interpret religious literature. This
role plus the guidance and
spiritual focus that rabbis
provide, can certainly be applied
to today."
9 Mel Chavinsky, retired, Ft.
Lauderdale:
"Call me old-fashioned. I have
definite feelings about the roles of
men and women. Someone must
be home to guide the children and
for a variety of reasons, right or
wrong, women usually do the job.
Important things are too often
neglected.
9 Irving Lehrman, Conserva-
tive rabbi, Temple Emanu-EI,
Miami Beach:
"Intellectually, I don't see why
not, since rabbi means "teacher."
At the Seminary we have women
who give courses. Henrietta
Szold graduated with a Master's
degree in Hebrew Literature but
was not ordained as a rabbi.
Throughout history, there have
been wise matriarchs: Deborah,
the prophetess, Miriam. Now it is
a subject to be seriously dis-
cussed by the Rabbinic Associa-
tion. The Seminary has no official
position yet. So far no one has
been ordained except in the Re-
form Movement. But
traditionally. I am not ready to
accept it. In five years, I may
change my whole emotional
approach. I believe in change by
virture of authority, not the will
of the masses. Judaism is like a
flowing body of water that should
not be put into a deep freeze and
held there. With a fence around
the Torah. we can work within
the framework of tradition.
0 Eric Sisser, lobbyist, Miami:
"Within the dictates of
Orthodoxy, I imagine it would be
very difficult. The separation of
male and female is a very chau-
vinistic concept. Personally, I
don't see anything wrong with
female rabbis."
9 Ron Weingarten, retailer, S.
Miami:
"If a woman is qualified, then
it is a good idea. Realistically,
most men are still too prejudiced
to relate to her. That is why ERA
is not yet passed. Education is
the answer. In time things will
change. Women can do anything
a man can do, sometimes better."
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Hillel Honors Friedmans at Annual Ball
The ninth annual Scholarship
Ball of the Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School has been
announced by the school vice
president of finance, Irving
,Canner. The event will be
I Saturday, Nov. 4.
j "We are proud to announce,"
'says Canner, that this year's ball
will be honoring Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob L. Friedman of North
Miami Beach, avid supporters of
Hillel. Originally from Baltimore,
Friedman has been in real estate
and land development for 55
years. He was an active leader for
40 years at Beth Tfiloh
Synagogue in Baltimore, where
he founded the Beth Tfiloh Camp
and served as vice chairman of
the Building Fund.
Friedman is the original
founder of Oriole Estates and
other corporations which later
became Oriole Homes Cor-
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Friedman
poration. He served as or.,;,
and chairman of the boardL 'I
Mrs. Friedman is an intJ
designer and decorator and i,.
member of the National Ho^
Fashion League. She andT
husband are members of C
Torah Congregation andT
Board of Governors of Hilto
Friedman serves as a vice or*
dent on the Executive Board 7,
member of the Steering (V
mittee, Building Committee 3
Grant-in-Aid Committee 7f
Hillel.
This year's chairmen of J
Scholarship Ball are Dr. andMnJ
Ira Ginsberg, Dr. and Mrs MjkJ
Kuttler and Mr. and Mrs Saull
Schreiber. The Scholarship Bill
is open to the entire community
and further information mavU
obtained by calling the school
office.
Sam Topf Appointed Dinner Chairman
Sam Kosman, president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Technion Society,
announces the appointment of
Sam B. Topf as chairman of the
annual dinner-dance of the Chap-
ter, to take place on Sunday
evening, Nov. 12 at 6 p.m. at the
Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach.
Topf is a member of the Board
of Directors of the Greater Miami
Chapter, ATS. He is active in the
Florida Israel Chamber of Com-
merce, and chairman for Con-
sultants for Israel Industry.
Topf stated, "The next major
effort to assist Israel must be in
the development of its economy,
by enabling its present industry
and technological development to
grow. Further involvement by
American businessmen in
building and in establishing new
business in Israel is a top
priority. The Technion Israel
Institute of Technology will play
a vital role in Israel's future
development in these areas."
Beth David Books Candidates
On Oct. 29, an open discussion
is set between the incumbent
Congressman. Dante B. Fascell,
Democrat of the 15th Con-
gressional District, and his chal-
lenger. Herbert J. Hoodwin.
Republican.
The event will take place in the
Social Hall of Beth David Con-
gregation South Campus. Miami,
at 9:30 a.m.
Moderator will be Bill Smith,
former broadcaster and host of
radio and television debates.
Currently, he is an educator
working in out-classes of adult
education courses in contem-
porary history.
This program is being
presented under the auspices of
Political Satire
An exhibit, "The Art of Social
Satire," by political satirist Hank
Virgona will be on display at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery of
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach, through Nov. 2. Hours are
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Saturday,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Sunday 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.
QTUDI0
Beth David Congregation, where
Dr. Sol Landau is spiritual
leader. The public is invited.
Sam B. Topf
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October 27,1978
Jewistfhridirtn
n j. nit t\ j i-i Lorraine Greenberg Named Chairman
Cohen to Hintertain at Ijalahad Dade C For 1978 Ambassador's Ball, Dec. 25
Itate
r ..rtAiner Emil Cohen wiU be
EDS^3 guest at Galahad
mJT, Sunday evening at 8
r net 29 on behalf of the
, Of Israel Bonds
nization.
special feature of the
1JT events will be the
"TSution of the Israel
SaS Award to Mickey
Jim. a noted member of the
(ewjsh community.
I Since estabUshing himself as a
L humorist, raconteur and
alist at Grossingers Hotel
| Country Club, Cohen has
Beared in major nightclubs,
tels and theaters throughout
ue country. He has been seen on
Lmerous television programs
,nd has been heard on many
radio shows.
I George Pottash, chairman of
L Galahad Dade C Bonds Com-
mittee, noted that "the Night in
Israel" is expected to bring
ord attendance in support of
ne Israel Bond Organization.
hVe know that all of Mickey
Balsam's friends and associates
| want to attend this event to
Emil Cohen
pay tribute to a man so dedicated
to the welfare of the Jewish
people."
Pottash said that co-ordinating
chairmen for the "Night in Israel
are: Hy Fried, Saul Fischer,
Hiram Goldstein, Herman
Lazarus, Mildred Mintz, and
Bess Szerlip.
Members of the committee are:
Ms. Helen Caiman, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Cherbin, Mr. and Mrs.
George Cohen, Mr. and Mrs.
Victor Cooper, Saul Deckelbaum,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Estrin, Mr.
and Mrs. Saul Fisher and Dr. and
Mrs. Samuel Fox; also, Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Goldsmith, Dr. and
Mrs. Philip Gottlieb, Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Greenblatt, Mr. and
Mrs. Danny Gross, Mr. and Mrs.
Max Liever, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Nadel, Mr. and Mrs. Milton J.
Neumann and Mr. and Mrs.
Herman Reich; also, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Bobbins. Mr. and
Mrs. George Rosenbloom, Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Schapiro, Mr.
and Mrs. Ben Segal, Mr. and
Mrs. Dave Silverstein, Mr. and
Mrs. Allan Sommer and Mr. and
Mrs. Aaron Soroker; also, Mr.
and Mrs. Ed Sorokin, Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Traub, Dr. and Mrs.
Harry Wesley, Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Wolff, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Zasloff and Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Sperber.
Lorraine Greenberg, Miami
Beach Jewish communal leader,
has been named chairman of the
1978 Ambassador's Ball of the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion. The appointment was made
by Gary R. Gerson, general cam-
paign chairman of the Israel
Bond Organization.
The Ambassador's Ball, a
Miami tradition, will culminate
the organization's calendar of
events and will take place on Dec.
25 at the Konover Hotel. Gerson
said the ball will be under the
patronage of the Ambassador of
Israel.
Mrs. Greenberg and her
husband Carol have been honored
with the David Ben Gurion
Award of the Israel Bond
Organization. She is a member of
the board of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's
Division and Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood.
Active with Hadassah and the
Sunrise School for Mentally
Retarded, Mrs. Greenberg is also
a member of the Miami Ballet
Society. She is a member of the
Lorraine Greenberg
Metropolitan Museum and Art
Center and on the board of Con-
cept House, a drug rehabilitation
center.
Mrs. Greenberg was president
of the Temple Emanu-El PTA,
co-chairman and chairman of the
Temple's Scholarship Balls and
was also a member of the
Temple's board of directors.
Bramans to Chair Muss Bonds Tribute
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Braman
lave been chosen as chairpersons
the Temple Emanu-El Israel
binner of State to be held
Saturday evening, Nov. 11 at the
Fontainebleau Hotel. Sponsored
lv the State of Israel Bonds Or-
nization. The highlight of the
g will be the presentation
the Eleanor Roosevelt
humanitarian Award to Stephen
ind Maureen Muss.
According to Rabbi Irving
ehrman, spiritual leader of
temple Emanu-El, Norman and
Irma Braman were selected to
lead the tribute evening
[because of their continued deep
oncern for the State of Israel
nd their dynamic leadership in
his community." Rabbi
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Braman
Lehrman said that both Mr. and
Mrs. Braman were raised in the
highest traditions of Jewish
ideals and their participation in
the Muss tribute will ensure a
successful evening for the sup-
port of the economic development
of the Jewish State.
Braman, president of Braman
Motors, has been a Jewish com-
munal leader both here in South
Florida and in his native
Philadelphia. Active with the
State of Israel Bonds
Organization, he is also a member
of several committees of the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He has made many
trips to Israel including the Israel
Prime Minister's Mission.
Doctors at Mount Sinai Medical Center showed who's best
among the golfers, tennis players and softball enthusiasts at
the recent Doctors Day games. Shown are tennis winners, from
left, Dr. Steven Kulvin, Dr. Fred Rosenbloom, Dr. Ronald
Shane, Dr. Joel Hauptman and Dr. David Rosenbaum. Best in
golf were Dr. Stuart Glassman, Dr. Michael King, Dr. Marc
Saltzman and Dr. Warren Siegel.
Israel Trip for Women's League Members What aluTlPlV
Women's T.pntrua fnr Tempi 1Q U/ Women's League for Israel is
elebrating its 50th anniversary
nth a trip to Israel. Over 200
ivelers will depart on Oct. 31
|for two weeks of touring.
Chapter chairman Celia
|Engelmeyer of Margate, and Bea
" lin of Hallandale will head the
Jcontingent of 50 leaving from
|Fort Lauderdale.
The high point of the trip will
* the dedication of two new
buildings added to the existing
|Rehabilitation and Vocational
mining Center in Nathanya.
There will be a reception at the
esidencc of President and Mrs.
avon. u reception by Mayor
IKolIek at the National Museum
land a naming of a street after
Women's League for Israel.
Women's League has built and
maintains four homes in the
major cities of Israel, Haifa, Tel
Aviv, Jerusalem and Nathanya,
housing young women immi-
grants in Israel, giving them
vocational training until they can
become an integral part of Israeli
life.
For any information con-
cerning Women's League for
Israel, contact Florida
Representative Ruth Sperber,
North Miami Beach.
Women's League for Israel
announces the formation of its
10th chapter in Florida ORAH
(Hebrew for light) in Century
Village, Deerfield Beach. Chapter
chairman is Mae L. Dubin;
treasurer is Sally Findling; and
secretary is Blossom Miller. New
members are wanted.
Nick De Martino
Specializes in office Isasirvg and commercial it industrial properties.
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Baron De Hirsch Meyer Memorial Dedicated
Friends and family of Mrs.
Baron (Polly) De Hirsch Meyer
joined in ceremonies dedicating
the Baron De Hirsch Meyer
memorial at Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
The late Baron De Hirsch
Meyer was Mbunt Sinai's first
president and served again in
that position from 1967 to 1970.
He also was elected to three
terms as vice chairman of the
Board of Trustees and in 1973,
was named honorary chairman of
the Board.
Chairman of the dedication
program was builder, Cal
Kovens, who was assisted by
Maurice Koven in planning and
coordinating. Cocktails and
dinner were served in the
Founders Dining Room at the
hospital to more than one
hundred guests.
Max Orovitz, Chairman of the
Board of Trustees, delivered the
tribute and dedication and
President Lila G. Heatter
welcomed guests.
Representative Claude Pepper
sent a telegram saying that
critical legislation in Congress
kept him and his wife, Mildred,
away from honoring their close
and cherished friend. Senator
Richard Stone also sent regrets.
Members of Mrs. De Hirsch
Meyer's family, including Mr.
and Mrs. H.L. Steadman, Mr.
and Mrs. John G. Lux and
Walter Lux, joined her at the
affair. Other institutions which
have benefited from the De
Hirsch Meyer's generosity also
sent representatives: from the
University of Miami, Dean
Jeanette Hausler, Dean of
Students at the Law School, and
her husband Professor Richard
Hausler; from Biscayne College,
Father John Farrel, President,
and his assistant Father Thomas
Cook; and from the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation,
President Jules Arkin.
The Baron De Hirsch Meyer
Memorial is on display in Mount
Sinai Medical Center's Main
Lobby.
::
L
Max Orovitz, chairman of the Board of Trustees of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, headed festivities honoring the late Baron De
Hirsch Meyer. Pictured with him are Mrs. Baron (Polly) De
Hirsch Meyer, Executive Director Alvin Goldberg, and
President Lila G. Heatter.
Rep. Fascell to Receive Pallot Award
U.S. Congressman Dante B.
Fascell will receive the fourth
annual Bill Pallot International
Achievement Award Oct. 27 at a
banquet at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel in Miami.
The award, given by the Inter-
national Center of Florida, an or-
ganization of community leaders
whose goal is to strengthen inter-
national trade and cultural ties, is
"for outstanding contributions in
the fields of international finance,
trade, business and cultural
interchanges."
Pallot, long-time Miami civic
leader and founder of the Inter-
national Center, will present the
award to Congressman Fascell.
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Koven, right, who helped plan dedication
ceremonies of the Baron De Hirsch Meyer memorial are pic-
tured with Mrs. Baron (Polly) De Hirsch Meyer.
Allard Lowenstein to Speak
Hadassah of Miami Beach
Shows Jerusalem Fashions
Allard M. Lowenstein, former
U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. for
Special Political Affairs will be
On Nov. 6 at 1 p.m. at the
Theatre of Performing Arts, The
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah will feature clothes by
students of the
Seligsberg / Brandeis Compre-
hensive High School in
Jerusalem.
Mrs. Jean Fein berg president
of Miami Beach Region, explains
that "the show will be given in
cities throughout the United
States by local chapters for the
benefit of the H.I.E.S. which
maintains a comprehensive co-
education high school, the
Hadassah Community College,
and the Hadassah Vocational
Guidance Institute in
Jerusalem."
The models will be the
daughters of members of the
Inter-American Chapter of
Hadassah. The producer for the
fashion show will be Mrs. Raquel
Wax and her co-producer is
Loretta Susi.
The liighlight of the afternoon
children, in this International
Year of Children.
The fund-raising luncheon,
held annually, supports Greater
Miami Section's projects which
fulfill unmet needs of children in
our community: a day care center
for children of working parents,
another for children of Russian
refugees and two projects
relating to abused children.
Reservations are available to
contributors in $30, $60, $100 and
$150 categories.
Ko'ach to Hear
Convention Report
The Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah will
meet on Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. in the
Tavern of the Jefferson National
Bank located at 41st Street and
Pine Tree Drive.
Maryon Glasser, president of
this business and professional
group will report on her in,.
pressions of Hadassah's 64th
Annual Convention in Israel last
month. Also to be featured that
evening will be a skit on October
holidays by Marilyn Berney,
Zena Hirsh, Tomar Mayer and
Ruthe Muller.
Vice president of membership,
Sylvia Leven invites all working
professional women who are
concerned about the welfare of
Israel and are interested in the
humanitarian work of Hadassah
to join this Chapter.
Ko'ach meets the third
Tuesday evening of each month
at the Jefferson National Bank.
For more information, call the
office of the Miami Beach Region
of Hadassah.
War Veterans
Auxiliary to Meet
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223,
Jewish War Veterans, will hold
its monthly meeting on Wed-
nesday, Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. at the
Senior Citizens Room in West
Miami Town Hall, 901 S.W. 62nd
Ave., West Miami. A Crime
Watch program will be presented
by Steve Grossman of the
Citizens Crime Watch of Dade
County.
Ruth Herman, hospital
chairman and her committee will
hold a recreation hall party at
7:30 p.m. on Wednesday evening
at the Veterans Administration
Hospital. On Saturday, Nov. 4at
2 p.m., Senior Citizens chairman,
Ruth Burman and her committee
will visit at Snapper Creek Con-
valescent Home.
Business
Opportunities
Sub and Deli shop, beer and wine,
land and building, good location in
Homestead. Asking price $175,000.
By owner. Writt P.O. Box 211a,
Naranja, Fla. J30JJ.
will be the presentation of the
Myrtle Wreath Award to
Florida's Congressman Dante B.
Fascell. The Myrtle Wreath is a
citation of honor awarded to civic
leaders in the Miami Beach area
who have distinguished them-
selves for their outstanding con-
tributions to all mankind.
aia4>a*4fkfkVfy
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*
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the guest speaker at the National
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Greater Miami Section's Children
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Wednesday, Dec. 6 at the
Fontainebleau Hotel on Miami
Beach.
Lowenstoin, nationally
identified by his concern for
human rights, has served as
congressman from the 5th Con-
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foreign policy assistant to Sen.
Hubert Humphrey, and delegate
to the U.N. General Assembly
and UNESCO. He also taught at
several universities, lectures
widely and received the Overseas
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improving the quality of life for
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Friday, October271l9m
vJenistiflcricfftun
Page 5-B
Florida Region Delegates to Attend
ORT National Board Conference
! 1 T) --i ;-_ ^ n .-. (tVIUMli Kill HAmm I t t mi n 1_ n I
Histadrut Foundation President to Speak
southeastern Florida Region
delegate
national
, will attend the 12th
conference
Ann Speroni
Women's American ORT in
Dearborn, Mich., Oct. 30-Nov. 2.
The delegates representing
6,000 members will include the
following local residents: Ann
Speroni, president; Jean Rose,
executive committee chairman;
Charlotte Horn, Florence Kanter,
Henny Apner, Bea Shultz, Mimi
Weiner and Maxine Siegel.
. Mrs. Speroni said, "The con-
Terence will focus on actively
supporting the peace initiative in
the Middle East; increasing our
efforts to promote quality
education in the United States
and to expand the dynamic new
Bramson ORT Training Center
recently established in New York
City." The conference also will
focus on taking an active stand in
the communities on defending
human rights of every man,
woman and child.
Key speaker of the conference
will be Mark Seigel, former
deputy assistant to President
Carter.
Women's American ORT is the
largest of organizations in 40 na-
tions which support the global
vocational education and training
operations of ORT. ORT
currently operates over 700 voca-
tional installations on five con-
tinents. ORT is the vocational
education program of the Jewish
people.
An updated report on the fin-
ancial needs of the Histadrut
social service programs in Israel
will be offered by Dr. Sol Stein,
national president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation (IHF),
during his annual report on the
status of the Foundation Sunday,
Nov. 12, at a breakfast meeting
at the Eden Roc Hotel.
Dr. Stein also will discuss
details of his recent meetings
with Israel Kessar, deputy secre-
tary-general of the Histadrut,
1 who was in Miami earlier this
month confering with national
IFH leaders. The Histadrut
Foundation, through the Hista-
drut Assistance Fund, plays a
major role in supporting the
health, welfare and educational
programs of the Histadrut, which
serve the needs of more than 75
percent of Israel's population.
Dr. Stein will address himself
as well to the current peace
negotiations and the aftermath of
Camp David, and the vast
economic resources which would
have to be mobilized to im-
plement a peace settlement in the
Middle East.
Also participating in the Nov.
12 meeting will be Dr. Leon
Kronish, national chairman of the
board; Moe Levin, a national vice
president who will chair the
session; and Ben Zion Steinberg,
IHF executive director in South
Florida, who will present the
Foundation's plans for the
coming year.
Among those IHF activities
already scheduled are the annual
Founder's Day luncheon Dec. 3, a
farewell tribute to Ambassador
Simcha Dinitz Dec. 30, the four-
day Economic Conference for
Israel in February, and a Wo-
men's Day seminar and luncheon
in June.
Organized in 1960, the Israel
Histadrut Foundation has to
date raised nearly $55 million in
annuities, bequests,
testamentary trusts and other
; long-range commitments for
r Histadrut programs in Israel.
Kislak to Head Tribute to Ambassador
Sills In Concert For Beth Sholom Dr. Aneh Pbtkin
i i_ j *.* j;., the Temple's projected new fund,
t,1tlLnfi, ^re/ou"d"io" <' Dr. Arieh Plotkin
the Fort Lauderdale Symphony, _
Emerson Buckley conducting. Judy Drucker, announced QttOgt Sneaker At
will appear at the Miami Beach tickets are now on sale to the v.*,o* a^j^wvw x*
Theater of the Performing Arts in public at $25, $20, $15, $10 and Mi-rnt'hi Fiwnt
a special concert honoring the $7.50. iHttf/Utllf E/Vtfll
36th Anniversary of Temple Beth Available are a limited number A_^K DWM* )
j Sholom of Greater Miami of patron ticketa which include -jSLjJzfimJjEEL JEE
c,u the Gala Ball at which Miss Sills authwity on Mid-Eastern affa^s
The event will be Sunday, Feb. wil] ^ t of honor c^^. wiU be, the guest speaker at the
4,t8pm persons of the Ball are Mra. Anna jEf^A"ftS1 l22!
All proceeds of the evening, Siller and Mr. and Mra. Jack ^SuWSuJClt iZ rv'
which will include an after-per- Hartley. Information is available ST^ottSStaJiHSl
formance Ball at the Doral Beach at the Temple, 4144 Chase oattherontameDieauriote .
Hotel, will be directed towards Avenue. Mrs. Roee Shapiro will be
presented with the highest honor
^ the Israel Bond Organization can
bestow upon' a woman, the
Woman of Valor Award, in
recognition of a lifetime of
* 4**Mfc latv/ dedication to Mizraebi and
W ^l fftaV W^ numerous other causes in Israel
Vklll w f\4^i^r as well as this community.
Dr. Plotkin is a recognized
r j authority on international
** ~ relations, international law and
I comparative government. He was
educated at the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem and the
University of London. He was
the first citizen of Israel to be
admitted to the Woodrow Wilson
School at Princeton University.
It is expected that he will discuss
the most up-to-the-minute details
n* 10th annual "Affair of the Heart" Luncheon, hosted by the of the current Middle-East
Auxiliary of Miami Heart Institute, is planned Nov. 29 at the situation.
UeauviUe Hotel. In the photo, from left, are this year's lun- Bea Klein is iuncheon chair-
cneon sponsor, Mrs. Charles A. (Carrie) Mastronardi, with person
chairmen Mrs. Ivor (Gert) Blacker, Mrs. Harry (Peggy) Brick-
"wn and Mrs. Irving (Florence) Weinberg. For ticket in-
formation and reservations, call the auxiliary office at Miami
Heart Institute.
Sculpture Exhibit Set at Emanu-El
A showing of the works of During the exhibition, the
sculptor Ann Froman is planned children of the Lehrman Day
from Nov. 29-Dec. 3 in the Mural School will participate in an
Room at Temple Emanu-El, essay contest on Women of the
Miami Beach, sponsored by the Bible and three awards will be
Sisterhood of the Temple. Among presented by Ann Froman at the
the works is "Women of the semi-annual Family Night on
Blb" Dec. 3.
On Friday, Dec. 1, Dr. Irving An invitation will be in the
Lehrman will devote his sermon mail for a special Pre-View gala
'Women of the Bible." on Nov. 28.
Children's Home Director Visits Miami
Yecheskiel Cohen, director of 14 years old. Mrs. Morton V. BttUjhof
the B'nai B'rith Women Cohen began working at the Spring Valley, N.Y., chairman
Children's Home in Israel, a Children's Home in 1957 as a of the Expansion and
residential treatment center for counselor and later as educa- DeveU)pment Department of
emotionally disturbed boys, will tional coordinator. the national Hadassah organ-
be touring the U.S., including a Millman Is Elected ization, will speak at the
stop in Miami, until Nov. 19. ffliuman IB urevwu chapter's annual
e.otionaJMistu^dchildrer, tion of ewish ^Commmty ^^tTa^CountryC^
dfrectoTofthpH6" ^ uSu denof the International Con- Song stylist and accordionist,
8352 wUS jSSwrt ference of Jewish Communal Ser- Patrida Gayle wM perform.
*53 iSJ&SSSSL vice' *cceedine Charles Z,bbell, Chairpersons are Mrs Max
tl Children H^e is Sonlv associate executive director, Jacobson and Mrs. Murray
Privately IstabS LdtuS Council of Jewish Federations Smith. The public is invtted.
>ts kind in Israel for boys 8 to (CJF).
Jay L. Kislak, head of a
national finance and real estate
company, has been named
chairman of the Farewell Tribute
Dinner for Israel's Ambassador
to the United States Simcha
Dinitz. The tribute, in support of
the South Florida Israel Bonds
Organization, will be held
Saturday evening, Nov. 25 at the
Konover Hotel, Miami Beach.
Kislak, a leader in the Israel
Bonds Organization, is also a
member of the Board of Directors
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He is a past
Federation treasurer and was
general campaign chairman of
the Combined Jewish Appeal.
He is currently chairman of the
Investment Committee of the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies and a member of the
Jay Kislak
Board of Governors of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion.
Balsam to Receive Solidarity Award
A Night in Israel will be
celebrated by residents of the
Galahad Dade C when Mickey
Balsam will be the recipient of
the Israel Solidarity Award of the
State of Israel Bonds
Organization.
Emil Cohen, American-Jewish
folk humorist, will be the special
guest at the event slated for
8 p.m. Oct. 29.
Balsam will be honored for his
many years of service to the
people of Israel and to Jewish
people in this community. He is a
board member of the Presidents
Club of South Florida and im-
mediate past president of the
Galahad Dade C Social Club. He
is also chairman of the Adult
Jewish Education B'nai B'rith
Ben Yehuda Lodge.
A member of Temple B'nai
Zion, he is past commander of the
American Legion Department of
Finance Post in New York.
Basketball, Tennis Offered at JCC
The Jewish Community Center
Community Sports Basketball
League will begin Sunday, Oct.
29, at 2 p.m. Senior high teen
members are invited, as well as
outside Jewish youth groups.
The Wise Gymnasium of the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900
N.E. 25th Ave., North Miami
Beach is the place to meet.
On Monday evenings, Oct. 30,
Nov. 6,13,20 and 27 the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC, a series of
classical tennis instruction is
planned, directed by Ray Mit-
chell, U.S.P.T.A. The clinic
consists of basic strokes,
strategy as well as physical
exercises.
There is a limited enrollment so
register immediately at the
Center.
Temple Judea Announces Courses
Temple Judea invites the
community to "ReJEWvenate in
78." The Temple, located at 5500
Granada Blvd., Coral Gables,
(opposite the U. of Miami) is
offering courses ranging from
prophetic Judaism to making
objects of Jewish ceremonial art,
from beginning and intermediate
Hebrew to "Passages" (coping
with changes). Other workshops
and discussion groups being pre-
sented as part of this years
Adult Education Program in-
clude Yiddish, Basic Jewish Be-
liefs, Israel Folk Dancing and
Folklore, which meet on Tuesday
and Wednesday evenings and
Tuesday and Saturday mornings.
Courses meet for six consecu-
tive weeks beginning Saturday,
Oct. 28.
Musical Program Set
Marty Lovitt, a clarinet
soloist, and singer Harriet Kane
will be the featured performers
Oct. 29, starting at 9:30 p.m., at
the Hall an dale Jewish Center.
The presentation is being spon-
sored by B'nai B'rith. Levitt, a
New York orchestra leader now
making his home in North Miami
Beach, commutes regularly for
engagements and recordings.
Both he and Ms. Kane have made
several albums.
CHECK OUR
PRICES
WHY BUY NEW?
WHEN YOU CAN RENEW I
1
IN BUSINESS SINCE 1968
12605 N.E. 14th Ave. North Miami
(Just oil 125th St.) Mo
CUSTOM
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Phone
895-5735
Mon.-Fri.-9:30-5:30


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Page 6-B

Community Comer
Volunteers Needed: Performing Arts for Community and
Education, the company that puts on all those free concerts
around town, needs volunteers in the public relations depart-
ment and for the production crew. Office help also is needed.
Film Festival: The Greater Miami International Film Festival
has selected Gusman Cultural Center as its main festival theater
for the Nov. 10-19 event. Season tickets are available from the
festival office. Some 100 feature motion picture premieres have
been arranged plus more than 300 new short films.
Free and Clear: Villa Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is "free
and clear" of the $1 million mortgage it has held since 1952.
Monies were raised through a collaboration of government,
major benefactors and thousands of volunteers.
To UNESCO Conference: Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre is in
Paris for the 20th General Conference of UNESCO as an
alternate delegate to the international forum.
Poetry for Pleasure: A poetry class is now open to the public
at Ida Fisher School, Miami Beach, every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.
Arnold Kleiner is lecturer.
Tracing Your Roots? Floridians who are tracing their ancestry
will congregate at Winter Park on Nov. 17 and 18 when the
Florida State Genealogical Society Inc., holds its second annual
conference at the Langford Resort Hotel. For information, write
Col. Leonard Smith 1660 Harmony Dr., Clearwater, 33516.
Law School Council: Fifteen attorneys, bankers and corporate
executives from Miami and other Florida cities have agreed to
serve as a Community Advisory Council to the Law and
economics Center at the University of Miami School of Law. The
Council will assist the Center to be more helpful to the business
and legal communities, said Dr. Henry G. Manne, director.
Need a Diploma?: Miami Beach Senior High Community
School is offering a G.E.D. Program for people who need a high
school diploma. For information, call Dan Zinn at the school
after 2 p.m.
Calling AU Barry Alumni: Barry College has lost 300 alumni
in South Florida it wants to find. Alumni are sought for a
workshop of STAR (Students Through Alumni Recruitment),
^hedutot Ort. 28 in the Barry College Red Room.
Teen Volunteers: Five local tecti? representing Parkway
General Hospital's Teenage Volunteer Corps, attended a con-
vention in Orlando with 400 representatives of Florida hospitals.
Thev are Debbie Lipman, North Miami Beach Senior High
School; Abby Brower, Miami Dade Community College; Bonnie
Gaughan, North Miami Senior High School; Kathy Bradley,
Madonna Academy; and Judy Wysong, Madonna Academy.
The Dialysis Patient: The National Association of Patients on
Hermodialysis and Transplantation will meet Oct. 29 at 3 p.m.
in the auditorium of Parkway General Hospital, North Miami
Beach. Dr. John E. Cunio, Miami nephrologist, will be speaker
on "Medication and the Dialysis Patient."
Singer in New Jersey: Nobel Laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer
of Surfside was featured speaker at a community meeting of the
Fair Lawn / Peterson Section of the National Council of Jewish
Women in New Jersey. He spoke on his philosophy as a Jewish
writer.
Convention Delegates: Mr. and Mrs. Leo Plotkin, members of
the Dade County Association for Retarded Citizens, will attend
the Boston convention of the National Association for Retarded
Citizens, Nov. 15-18.
Airman Promoted: Sam K. Harris, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore A. Harris of Miami, has been promoted to airman first
class in the U.S. Air Force. A fire protection specialist, he is
assigned at Homestead AFB. He is a 1974 graduate of South
Miami Senior High School.
Paintings on Display: Eleven paintings by Lynn Gelfman are
on display at the New World Center Campus of Miami Dade
Community College. The Miami artist uses glowing lyrical
colors in geometric all-over patterns. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.
t^ < p.m. The displav will continue through Nov. 8.
At White House Conference: Eighteen persons from Florida
weie elected to represent their state at the White House Con-
ference on Small Business to be held in Washington in January
1980.
Those elected were: Sam M. Bloom, Miami; Beth Collier,
Miami; Allan B. Cowan, Pensacola, Robert A. Dishell, North
Bay Village, Willie Calhoun, Miami; Claire Shulman, Miami;
Carol Scott, North Miami; Dr. Dan Steinhoff, Miami; Nikki
Beare, Miami; Evodio Llevada, Miami; L.W. Llewellyn, Miami;
David L. McDuffie, Miami; Laura O'Brian, Jacksonville;
Patrick Range, Miami; Don Everett Perry; Dan Grant, Fort
Lauderdale; David Fincber, Miami; and Robert W. Harper,
Miami.
Forum to Meet: Dr. Abraham Wolfson-Forum meets every
Thursday at 10 a.m. at the Washington Federal Bank, 1234
Washington Ave., Miami Beach. Guest speaker Nov. 2 will be
rwt* w;Hh~- -- tho Constitution Provision. On Nov. 9,
Bernard Kaplan will speak on consumer protection.
9K V^#^ Ja*-**'

Friday, October 27,197J
Public Health Trust Names Officers

Msgr. Bryan O. Walsh,
Catholic Services, Miami, was
reelected chairman of the Board
of Trustees of the Public Health
Trust of Dade County at the
board's regular monthlv meeting.
The Public Health Trust is the
governing board of Jackson
Memorial Hospital.
Also reelected was the vice
chairman, Catherine H.
Fahringer, senior vice president
and secretary, Dade Federal
Savings and Loan. Other officers
are secretary, Cyrus M.
Jollivette, director, foundations
and corporate relations, Univer-
sity of Miami; treasurer, Enrique
Viciana, Viciana, Ligerman &
Mastrapa; and member-at-large
on the Executive Committee,
Carol Wien to Talk on Patchwork Quilu
Carol Wien, instructor in the
art of patchwork quilting at the
University of Miami School of
Continuing Studies, will speak on
The Fine Arts of Beth David
Series, "Appreciation of Contem-
porary Artists," Wednesday,
Nov. 1, 8-9 p.m., at Beth David's
South Campus, Miami.
Carol Wien will discuss
"Patchwork Oujlts as an
American Art." In presenting the
history of quilts, she will both
show slides of antique quilts and
exhibit her own highly acclaimed
quilt designs.
Carol Wien studied art at
Syracuse University, Georgia
State, and the Art Students
League of New York City. In
1968, she graduated from the
University of Miami with a BA
degree. She held one-person
showings at the American
Foundation For The Arts at the
Coconut Grove Theatre in 1975,
and at the Miami Dade Public
Library in 1976. She has
frequently appeared in lectures
and on television. Her quilts are
in numerous private collections.
For registration and in-
formation, call Beth David
Congregation.
Carol Wien
Hollywood Midrasha Offers 14 Courses
A unique concept in adult
Jewish education will be avail-
able to the entire Hollywood
community, reports the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, a
beneficiary of the South Broward
Jewish Federation.
Beginning on Oct. 30, the fall
term of the Hollywood Midrasha
will offer 14 courses in a variety
of Jewish related subjects at four
area synagogues. The four
sponsoiing synagogues
Temple Beth Shalom, Temple
Beth Emet, Temple in the Pines
and Temple Israel of Miramar
have pooled their resources to
offer a more complete program
than would be possible at each
separate institution.
The Midrasha program is de-
signed to offer quality Jewish
education to adults, and to
provide teachers in Jewish
schools the opportunity to
broaden their background.
Some of the subjects offered
are Politics of the Middle East,
Soviet Jewry Today, Life Cycle
of the Jew, The World of Eastern
European Jewry, A Tour
Through Israel, and An Answer
to the Missionaries. Classes will
be taught by Rabbi Bernard P.
Shoter, Rabbi Bennet Greenspon,
Rabbi Paul Plotkin,
Morton Malavsky, and area'edu-'
cational directors and specialists
in their fields.
The Midrasha classes ,
offered once a week, for ei
weeks. Both morning andI
evening classes are scheduled on
Mondays and Tuesdays, withI
special Wednesday class called
"You and Your Child."
For further information and 1
schedules, contact any of the I
synagogues in the Midrasha, or I
call Judy Matz at the Central I
Agency for Jewish Education.
Del Rubin Named Art Auction Chairman
Del Rubin has been named
chairman for the third con-
secutive year of Channel 2's Fine
Arts and Antiques Auction,
scheduled for March 30 and 31.
A longtime South Florida
resident, Mrs. Rubin is a member
of the Metropolitan Museum and
Art Center's Board of Metro-
politans, a docent at the Lowe
Museum, and is active in South
Florida's art world.
Mrs. Rubin, who holds a
Master's in psychology from
Columbia University, was
recipient of a citation from
President Truman for her vol-
unteer work during World War
II. She is a former president both
of the Greater Miami Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women and that organization's
Shores Chapter. She has served
on the Dade County School
Board, the Community Relations
Board, and the Boards of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, Jewish Family and
Children's Service, Sisterhood of
Temple Israel, and Women in
Community Service.
Mrs. Rubin and her husband,
Raymond, live in Miami Shores.
Del Rubin
New Hadassah Chapter in Miami Beach
Jean Feinberg, president of
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah announces that the
newest chartered Hadassah
chapter will be named the Rose
Halprin / Bal-Moral Chapter of
Hadassah.
This is the 35th Hadassah
chapter for Miami Beach Region
and was named for the late Rose
Halprin who was Hadassah's
national president from 1932 to
1934 and again from 1947 to
1952. The late Mrs. Halprin was a
founding member of the World
Confederation of General Zionists
in 1949 and was the honorary vice
president of this body which is
now known as The World Con-
federation of United Zionists and
was the Chairman for many years
of the American Section of the
World Zionist Executives.
Mrs. Betty Goldstein,
president of this newly formed
chapter announced their first
meeting will be on Oct. 30 at noon
in the Blue Room of the Bal-
Moral Apartments, 9801 Collins
Avenue, Bal Harbour. Highlight-
ing the afternoon will be a book
review given by Arlene Ditchegl
and Lana Goldberg of Evergnm. j
For more information regard;
ing this chapter, call the Miami |
Beach Region office of Hadassah
Juvenile Diabetes Foundation Meets
Myron Berezin, new executive
director of the Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation, will an-
nounce the foundation's plans for
fund raising at a general
membership meeting Oct. 30.
The session will be at 7:30pm
at the University of Miami Mail-
man Center. Dr. Joshua Miller,,
chief of the Division of Traw
plantation and professor of sur-
gery and microbiology, |
speak.
Michael Shores, attorney-at-law.
Sworn in as a new member of
the Board was Henrietta E.
Waters, associate professor in the
School of Social Work at Barry
College. Reappointed to the
Board by the Dade County Board
of Commissioners were Mon-
signor Walsh, Cyrus Jollivette,
Michael Shores and R. Bunn
Gautier, Jr., Woriey Gautier &
Sams.
Card Party Set
Coral Division, National
Council of Jewish Women, is
holding a card party on Wed-
nesday, Nov. 1, at noon at
Temple Zamora, 44 Zamora
Avenue, Coral Gables. There will
be a short business meeting.
ibJewdUBoiPi(Jliiciun
FUrMa'i Nut Coaplitt Iiflish-Itwisk Weeki.
Printed In English
4c/A0W&uayMtAter/ssv:'
*OIIF to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the wow-
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
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October 27,1978
vJenisti fkriati tr
Page 7-B
Skewer
f" ancient and primitive
"^ skills. From its early
fflg Sewer cooking has
rS to suit the palates of
K cultures. That stick or
fir means shish kebab or
fib in the Middle East.
ashlik to the Russians, tenyak.
fjapan. and sate to Indo-
I jesians.
Any "go^" Piece of meat !,ay
I te used for skewers. Less tender
L with not as much marbling
Lefit from longer marinating.
Us the marinade and the condi-
ts that accompany the
hewers that give the dish its
ethnic identity. The marinade for
his recipe is flavored with garlic
and lemon juice, typical of
Middle East cuisine. And the
"bed" of Kasha served with these
shish kebabs reflects similar
origins.
Skewers laced with combina-
tions of meat cubes and colorful
vegetables make handsome jewel-
like spears. But such com-
binations require more soaking
skill to achieve proper doneness
of all components. Parboiling
green peppers and onions helps
arrive at compatible tenderness.
Peppers need only a quick dip in
boiling water. About a minute
"plunge" is adequate for onions.
Easier on the chef is broiling
one-nfa-kind skewers. Then each
food can be precisely timed for
peak doneness.
For six persons, 3'/-4 pounds
of cubed beef will yield generous
portions. Quantities can be easily
expanded or reduced to serve
larger or smaller numbers.
Although kasha tender ker-
nels of toasted buckwheat is a
tasty "side dish" just plain, it's
an especially flavorsome accom-
paniment cooked with onions,
chopped mushrooms, and pasta
bowknots. If bowknots are not
available, then any speciality
shape of pasta may be sub-
stituted or you may omit pasta
entirely.
SHISH KEBABS
WITH KASHA BOWKNOTS
3'-a-4 pounds tender beef (l'/a"
cubes)
2-3 green peppers, seeded and
cut into 1" squares
6-8 small white onions halfed if
large
Mushroom caps
Cherry tomatoes
Marinade
1 cup salad oil
-! cup red wine
2 tbsp. lemon juice
"2 tsp. garlic powder
12 tsp. salt
'/2 tsp. pepper
Combine ingredients for mari-
nade; marinate meat cubes for at
least one hour (longer if
refrigerated). Parboil green
peppers (quick dip) and onions
lone minute) if combinations
skewers are desired. Arrange
meat and vegetables on skewers.
Broil over charcoal or in oven-
broiler until desired doneness is
achieved (about 3 minutes per
side). Serve on a bed of Kasha
Bowknots. Yield: 6 servings.
KASHA BOWKNOTS
'2 cup onions chopped fine
' 2 cup mushrooms chopped
' cup oil or margarine
1 cup Kasha
1 large egg slightly beaten
2 cups boiling beef, broth or
bouillon
1 tsp. salt
'-tsp. pepper
''2 lb. bowknot noodles (op-
tional)
Stir beaten egg into Kasha.
saute onions and mushrooms in
the oil in two quart sauce pan
until soft. Add kasha and egg
nature and seasonings and
saute 2 minutes on high flame.
Add 2 cups of boiling stock and
cook tightly covered for 15
minutes or until kasha is done.
While Kasha. is cooking,
prepare: '/2 lb. bowknot noodles
as directed on package and drain.
Combine with kasha.
T eerye:- arrange a bed of
Cooking Suits Palates of Many Cultures
Kasha Bowknots on a serving
platter and top with shish
kebabs.
BASIC KASHA
PREPARATION
1 cup kasha
1 egg slightly beaten
2 cups boiling water, broth, or
canned bouillon
1 tsp. salt
14 tsp. pepper
2 tbsp. butter or margarine
(optional)
In a two quart saucepan,
combine kasha, egg and
seasonings. Stir constantly over
medium heat for about two
minutes or until the egg is "set"
and each grain is separate and
dry. Add boiling liquid, cover pan
tightly, and cook gently over low
heat for 15 minutes or until kasha
grains are tender. If desired, stir
in 2 tablespoons butter or
margarine. Yield: 6 servings.
By NORMA BARACH
VEAL CHOPS
All of the holidays at this time of year set one to thinking of
different things to serve. For a meat dish, veal chops provide variety
to the traditional roasts, chickens or turkey.
Buckwheat: A 'New'
Old Food Discovery
lbs. veal chops
(second cut)
garlic powder
3 tablespoons oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 small green pepper,
diced
Vi lb. fresh mushrooms
Vi teaspoon sweet basil
1 Vi teaspoons salt
'/ teaspoon white pepper
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 cup chicken bouillon
fresh parsley
fresh lemon wedges
Food like fashion is
subject to revivals of old
favorites. "Whole grains" are
among the most recent food re-
discoveries, especially as con-
scientious eaters develop new
concern about nutrition, fiber,
cholesterol and non-meat sources
of protein.
Unique among the lengthy
repertory of popular "whole
grains" is the only one that's
triangular shaped. This fairly
tiny seed has two identities. In
its plain form, it's known as
buckwheat. But when the seeds
(sometimes called groats) are
roasted, it's known as kasha
an old Russian term.
Centuries ago, buckwheat was
grown not only for these excellent
kernels, but also for the special
dark-hued honey extracted from
its blossoms. Botanically
speaking, buckwheat is a fruit
related to the rhubarb plant.
However, all its other character-
istics are grain-like.
Buckwheat is frequently
ground into a speckled flour
that's been unequaled since
pioneer days for flap-jack
pancakes. These homey,
American favorites are probably
descendants of Russian "Blini a
far more sophisticated ancestor,
especially when served with sour
cream and red caviar.
Kasha, the toasted buckwheat
kernels, makes an excellent side
dish for any meat, poultry, or
fish. It also makes a hearty hot
cereal. Kasha is steamed or boiled
similarly to rice or pasta, and in
about the same amount of time.
From a health standpoint,
buckwheat is the best source of
high biological protein in the
entire plant kingdom. It has over
90 percent of the protein value ot
non-fat milk solids and over 80
percent of whole eggs, while
being low in cholesterol.
Buckwheat also contains twice
as much vitamin B as wheat,
which is widely-acclaimed for its
store of B vitamins. Buckwheat
is also high in potassium,
phosphorous, and rutin a sub-
stance that aids in the prevention
of arteriosclerosis.
Ideas for using kasha have
been compiled in a colorful $1
recipe booklet that's available by
writing to Wolff's Kasha, P.O.
Box 440, Penn Yan, N.Y., 14527.
Among the recipes in the cook-
book is this one for wholesome
Crunchy Raisin Muffins.
CRUNCHY RAISIN
MUFFINS
Vi cup shortening
3 tbsp. sugar
2 tbsp. molasses
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk
3/ cup kasha
2 tsp. baking powder
Vi tsp. baking soda
Vi tsp. salt
'/4 tsp. ginger
'4 tsp. cinnamon
'/s tsp. cloves
'/4 cup raisins or candied mixed
fruit.
Pour buttermilk over kasha
and let set while measuring and
mixing other ingredients. Cream
shortening, sugar, molasses and
egg until fluffy. Sift dry
ingredients together. Add dry in-
gredients to creamed mixture
alternately with the kasha-but-
termilk, stirring only until dry
ingredients are moistened. Stir in
raisins. Fill well-oiled muffin
pans half full of batter. Bake at
425 degrees F. for 20 minutes or
until done. Yield: 12-15 muffins.
Season chops with garlic powder. Brown in oil (preferably in
teflon frying pan). Drain chops on paper toweling. To hot oil in pan,
add onion, green pepper and mushrooms. Saute until onions are
golden. Add spices, lemon juice and bouillon. Bring to a slow boil. Stir
well. Place veal chops in a 9xl3-inch baking pan. Pour vegetable-
bouillon mixture over them. Bake in preheated 350-degree oven for 50
minutes or until meat is tender. Baste several times. Remove from
oven. Garnish with fresh parsley and lemon wedges.
BEEF, Okra N NOODLES
2 lbs. ground beef
1 chopped onion
2 stalks chopped celery
2 tbsp. oil
1 cup catsup
1 15-oz. can stewed tomatoes
12 oz. cooked, medium noodles
1 lb. frozen okra
Brown beef, onion and celery in oil. Drain off fat. Stir in remaining
ingredients. Bake covered in preheated 350-degree oven for 20
minutes. Makes eight large servings.
FRIED FISH
1 lb. cod or flounder fillet
Seasoned salt
Pancake mix (dry)
1 egg, beaten
Oil
Season fix fillets with seasoned salt. Dip in beaten egg, then pan-
cake mix. Fry in hot oil until golden on all sides. Serve at once. Serves
4 CHERRY FRUIT SLICES
On a recent visit to Chicago, I had a chance to sample these
delicious fruit slices, made by a cousin. A word of caution, though:
they do not freeze well.
l'/ sticks margarine
1 cup sugar
3 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
2 cups flour
1' 1 tsps. baking powder
1 can cherry pie filling with
14 tsp. almond extract added
Mix all ingredients together except for cherry pie filling. Grease a
9X13-inch pan. Pour in one-half the batter. Top with pie filling. Cover
with remaining batter. Bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 minutes. Coo
and slice.
American Savings'Earnings
CHANGE OF
ADDRESS
If you're moving. pleas let ua know two weeks before
changing your address
Morris N. Broad, president of
American Savings & Loan Asso-
ciation of Florida, announces that
American Savings net earnings
for the fiscal year ended Sept. 30
amounted to $9,278,463 or $4.22
per share. Earnings for the fiscal
year were up 67.1 percent from
the $5,552,163 earned during the
fiscal year ended Sept. 30, 1977.
Earnings for 1977 amounted to
$2.83 per share. Earnings for
fiscal year 1978 are unaudited.
Earnings for the fourth quarter
ended Sept. 30, were $2,685 776,
as compared with $2,483 302 for
the prior quarter t*1-7'^
for the quarter ended bept. JU,
1977, representing an increase ot
8 2 percent over the prior quarter
and an increase of 55.2 percent
over the quarter ended Sept. 30,
1977. Earnings per share were
$1.20 as compared with $1.13 tor
the prior quarter and $0.83 for
the quarter ended oept- >w. ivt 1.
American Savings has 23
offices throughout South
Florida's Gold Coast. The Asso-
ciation has 10 Dade county of-
fices including five in Miami
Beach, and one each in Bay
Harbor Islands, North Miami
Beach, Kendall, North Miami
and its newest facility in Coral
Gables. Twelve Broward county
offices are located in Hollywood,
Deerfield Beach, Fort Lauder-
dale, Hallandale, Lauderhill,
Margate, Plantation, Pompano
Beach, Pembroke Lakes,
Tamarac and its newest facility is
in Sunrise. In addition, a Palm
Beach office is located in Boca
Raton. Its subsidiaries,
American Savings Mortgage
Corporation and American
Southern Mortgage Corporation,
currently operate seven mortgage
origination offices in Miami.
North Miami Beach, Plantation,
Delray Beach, West Plam Beach,
Orlando and Atlanta, Ga......
1
1!
1
1
I-----------------PLEASE TAPE YOUR MAILING LABEL HERE---------------
Name
Old Address
City

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Apt. No.
Zip
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Zip
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Please clip this coupon and mail to
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Friday, October 27,1978
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Does Territory Equal Security?
In a recent article, Anthony
Verrier, a British journalist who
has been on an extended visit to
the Middle East, took a con-
troversial look at the Israel
Defense Forces and their future
role as peace-keepers. In this
article, he poses the question
about the necessity of territory as
well as arms for Israel's defense.
By ANTHONY VERRIER
London Chronicle Syndicate
Given the State of armament
in the Israeli Defense Forces,
does territory equal security? The
question has been asked since
1948, but its origins lie in the
1930s, and the conflicts then
between Jew and Arab for the
control of settlements and
villages, which were seen as
elements in what, it was hoped,
would eventually be an indepen-
dent Israel or Palestine.
Although the IDF has always
asserted that territory does equal
security, and continues by and
large, to do so, the question needs
to be asked again, and for three
reasons: recent hints about
"territorial compromise,"
strategic developments since the
1973 war, the Israeli Arab
balance of military strengths and
weaknesses.
AS TO THE first reason, the
ambiguity of hints dropped by
Prime Minister Begin and others
makes comment difficult. But in
the vital matter of defining terms
which apply to different types of
territory, it can be objectively
stated that the possession or
control is relevant if a direct
attack on the homeland is
threatened.
If, however, the threat stems
from subversion or terrorism, the
strategy of occupying territory
which is not legally part of the
homeland can be a positive
danger and, if history is any
guide, imposes strains on the
occupying power which can only
increase with time.
All that said, it is the threat of
a direct attack on Israel which
continues to dominate the
strategic thought and plans of
the IDF, and there is no sign that
much of a distinction is drawn
between types of territory or
threat. Although the IDF's
planners do not prepare for the
next war by fighting the last,
there is no doubt that the ex-
periences of October 1973 have
bitten more deeply into their
minds than those of previous
encounters with Arab States.
BELIEF IN the necessity to
have depth on the ground and
space in the air was vindicated in
1973 when, for the first time and
for reasons which remain ob-
scure, the IDF did not preempt a
threatened attack and was forced
to defend desperately for the
dangerously-long period of ten
days.
Although some Arab
strategists assert that depth and
space gave a false sense of
security to Israel in 1973
which may well have been true
lack of either might have led to
disaster. If a country of Israel's
size is really threatened with
attack or, which comes to the
same thing, genuinely believes
that it is always likely depth
and space are essential.
The only alternative to a
strategy based on this premise is
a totally preemptive one.
Without going into the
hypotheses to which nuclear and
missile strategists are so much
addicted, it can be said that
preemption is no longer available
co Israel, except in localized and
limited terms.
EGYPT AND Syria's forces
ire in poor shape today, but
-nough of their medium-range
urface-to-surface missiles would
urvive Israeli preemption to
nsure that retaliation would, if
mbarked on, inflict terrible
amage on the attacker.
Moreover, although Israel un-
doubtedly can make nuclear
weapons, no responsible Israeli
has ever suggested that a nuclear
strategy unavoidably
preemptive comes within the
country's range of choices.
In one sense, the question to
which this article addresses itself
can only be answered with a
"Yes." However, some basic
changes in operational doctrine
have occurred in the IDF since
1973, reflecting not only strategic
developments of which the
continued Russian supply of
surface-to-surface missiles to
Syria is probably the most im-
portant but lessons learned
then and American arms supplied
to Israel thereafter.
Until October, 1973, Israeli
planners reckoned to neutralize
enemy air forces by preemption
plus superior fighting qualities
once battle commenced; to out-
maneuver enemy armor and then
destroy Egyptian formations in
Sinai quickly, the rest elsewhere
piecemeal.
THE ENTIRE approach was
based not only on the necessity
for Israel to utilize its swiftly-
mobilized society as economically
as possible, but also on the belief
that although no Arab State
could fly aircraft or operate
armor for more than a few days,
those days could prove decisive.
In 1973, the Israeli forces
discovered that the Arabs could
fight for long enough to
jeopardize Israel's entire
existence in terms of political and
economical factors heavy
casualties, utter dependence on
the United States, strained
resources everywhere.
The discovery that Arab
States could prolong conflict to a
length which cost Israel dear,
even if the results remained
indecisive, and that strategic
preemption was virtually ruled
out, led to an intense
examination by the IDF of
variations on a policy which was
still based on the retention of
territory.
INITIALLY, and for about
two years, the examination
concentrated on the problems
posed by the very large numbers
of anti-aircraft and anti-tank
missiles possessed by the
Egyptians, in particular. But by
late 1975, and in the course of a
public discussion of these matter,
which many Western
in
strategists played a notable part,
the conclusion was drawn that
the basic change required was in
tactics.
In short, and for the first time,
Israeli forces were to be armed,
plan, and train for defensive war,
in which territory would be held,
and where the enemy would be
destroyed. Only thus, it is now
believed, can Israel avoid the
trap which Egypt and Syria or
even these States acting indepen-
dently can again set. But, in
this context, depth and space
become more, not less important.
SOME PART of this very
fundamental change in policy and
outlook must be attributed to the
kind of weapons and "systems"
which the United States has
supplied to Israel since 1973
those which remain undamaged
in the Egyptian armory, and
which continue to be supplied tc
Syria.
The bulk of such weapons and
systems are defensive in nature,
not at all reflecting a
U.S. Soviet attempt at
strategic balance, but certainly
reflecting the fact that, for the
time being, the defense has
triumphed over the defense as
happens intermittently.
The IDF has thus almost been
forced into a defensive strategy,
and although the naturally
"thrusting" tendencies of the
Israeli armored corps will
doubtless again settle the issue in
any future conflict, the caution
which the lessons of 1973 have
taught must be appreciated as a
new factor in the country's at-
titudes to its Arab neighbors.
Yet, ironically, this change has
occurred during a period when
the Egyptian and Syrian forces
have probably declined from the
standards which they attained in
1973, and are, as before, at the
level where desire outruns
performance.
Egypt now has no regular
source of offensive weapons, and
although Britain and France are
eager to remedy this deficiency, it
is an open question whether
either could do much to rebuild
the reciRient's forces so that they
regained the operational stan-
dard which, after years of
unremitting effort by the
Russians, they reached in 1973.
THESE FACTORS apart,
Egyptian forces have com-
manders who appear to have
their minds concentrated on
internal issues rather than ex-
ternal events. As President Sadat
struggles to control one of
Egypt's recurring floods of
protest, his armies are more than
ever likely to be committed to
internal security or king-
making.
So far as Syria goes, it is now
the opinion of independent ob-
servers that the strains of oc-
cupying Lebanon are proving too
much for a military establish-
ment which has always been
committed, and to a far greater
degree than in Egypt, to
maintaining the ruling regime in
power. A country which is
determined to threaten an ad-
versary has to commit its forces
to preparation for war, not fritter
them away in punitive operations
abroad and at home.
The IDF is well aware of these
Egyptian and Syrian deficiencies,
but still does not relish the
thought of another conflict like
that in 1973, even if the enemy
failed to strike first, and despite
the considerable rearming of the
Israeli Army and Air Force which
has taken place in recent years.
THERE ARE a few signs,
nevertheless, that "defensive-
mindedness" is becoming un-
popular with senior officers.
Saadia Amiel, director of long-
range planning in the Israeli
Ministry of Defense, and for
some years an extremely in-
fluential proponent of defensive
tactics on the battlefield, has now
modified his views. A recent
article by him concludes:
"A balanced multi-optional
strategy is recommended as the
best way of achieving politico- .
strategic stability in the
correlation of military forces .
Such a balanced multi-optional
approach calls for a land force
structure of two components: one
consisting of defensive combined
arms teams and the second of
offensive combined arms for-
mations, where manuverability is
at a premium."
Yet even this piece of analysis
does not settle the question of
territory and security; it is
simply a stage in the debate
about the use of territory.
Whether territory equals security
for Israel, are political questions,
to which only an Israeli
Government can give an answer.
So far as the IDF is concerned,
the more territory Israel has, the
more secure it is.
Brotherhood of Temple Beth Sholom
Sets Monthly Breakfast Meetings
The first monthly breakfast of
the new season of the
Brotherhood of Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami will
take place on Sunday, Oct. 29, at
10:30 a.m., at the Temple, Miami
Beach, according to an an-
nouncement by Aaron Farr,
brotherhood president.
"Each year we begin our
monthly breakfasts with a
program devoted to a report by
some of Beth Sholom's Con-
firmation students who had spent
the summer in Israel on a
pilgrimage, sponsored each
summer by the Brotherhood. Six
out of the nine young people will
report this year," stated Farr.
The Oct. 29 function is open to
the general public.
4*H
Book Discussion Group Meets Nov. 2
The Great Jewish Book Dis-
cussion Group will meet on
Thursday, Nov. 2 at 1:30 p.m. in
the Miami Beach Public Library
on Collins Avenue.
Discussion leader Abraham J.
Gittelson, associate director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, will discuss the Book
of Psalms. Group coordinator is
Samuel Reiser.
Beth Am Sisterhood Slates Lunch
A book review of Sadie Shapiro
in Miami by Robert Lewis will be
given by Miami's drama duet,
Blanche Brass and Helaine
Lipinsky. They will be featured
on the program of Temple Beth
Am Sisterhood's luncheon in the
social hall on Wednesday, Nov. 8
at 9:15 a.m.
Following the program, a
Judaic Book Fair, a display of the
latest Jewish Books is planned.
Sales will benefit the Temple
Beth Am Day School's
Scholarship Fund. For reser-
vations and information call the
temple office.
Aaron Farr
Beth Am Singles
Beth Am Singles (over 40) plan
a Halloween party and square
dance Sunday, Oct. 29, at 8 p.m.
at Temple Beth Am Youth
Lounge, 5950 N. Kendall Dr
Miami.
Stephen Wise
Hadassah Group
Stephen S. Wise chapter of
Hadassah will hold special
membership drawings at a meet-
ing on Monday, Nov. 6 at noon at
the Montmarte Hotel.
Guest speaker is Mrs. Sherman
(Betty) Fast. Membership
chairman is Goldie Ringer and
life membership chairman, Jennie
Fishman. For reservations call
Mary Silverberg.
E. Albert Pallot
Pallot to Speak
At B'nai B'rith
E. Albert Pallot, a vice pres-
ident of the B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional Council will be the guest
speaker for the Lake Carmel
B'nai B'rith lodge installation to
be held at the H Merest Country
Chib on Sunday evening, Nov. 5.
Morris Bender will be installed
as president and Harvey Herman
is chairman for the evening. Also
participating in the program will
be CoL Phil Cohen, regional di-
rector, Jack Glick, new lodge
membership director and Fred
Snyder, national Hillel com-
missioner.
Insurance executive Marshal
E. Rosenberg has been named
chairman of the University of
Miami Baseball Coaches
Committee. As chairman,
Rosenberg will help enlist
alumni and community sup-
port for the championship
Hurricane nine in the upcom-
ing season.
Schwartz Agency
Names Bieber
Raymond Bieber, former art
director and art studio manager
of Bozell and Jacobs advertising
agency in New York City, has
been elected senior vice president
and creative director of the
Gerald Schwartz Agency, a
Miami Beach-headquartered ad-
vertising, public relations and
marketing agency.
Bieber worked for Bozell and
Jacobs for three years after nine
years as an art studio director for
Avon Products, Inc., in New
York. He previously served as
artist for Marsteller Advertising
Agency in New York.
A graduate of New York City
Community College in ad-
vertising design, he did graduate
work at New York University in
executive management commun-
ications.
Among the clients served by
Bieber are Mutual of Omaha
Leyland Motor Sales. BrtWH
Leyland Motors, Manhattan
Savings Bank, American WWW
Council, Association of Ameruan
Railroads, Purolator and Artnur
Treacher's Fish and Chips
The Gerald Schwartz Agency,
founded in 1949, has aftilwa
firms in New York. Chicago,
Detroit, Houston. Danver,
Boston and other major Amen
can and Canadian cities.


, October 27,W
ifl
+JmisHk>rkttan
Page9-B
C
/ean<>
r Stern, left, president of the Hebrew Academy
men joins with Mrs. Bonnie Slavin, president of the
Khreu Academy PTA, in planning their first event of the New
[y a Mini Bazaar on Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the
wnds of the Academy.
lazaar at Hebrew Academy
. go, Eleanor Stern, president
lf'the more than 800-member
I Hebrew Academy Women, an-
Inounces a Mini Bazaar on Sun-
Ly, Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2
Ipm. on the Academy grounds at
12400 Pine Tree Drive. The Bazaar
[benefits the Hebrew Academy
Ithere more than 55 percent of the
1800 students are on scholarship.
The Hebrew Academy PTA,
under the leadership of Mrs.
Bonnie Slavin, also sponsors the
Bazaar.
According to Mrs. Stern, "The
bazaar will feature fabrics,
clothing, knick-knacks and
plants. Food will be served. The
highlight at 2 p.m. features the
Treasure Box Prize.'*
Voice of Yankees'
temains a Gentleman
I^By HASKELL COHEN
j" You don't hear too much about
aim any more, he isn't on radio
[wo frequently, but nevertheless
| his fans, still legion, haven't
| forgotten the Voice of the
[Yankees, Mel Allen ne Israel.
|Allen hasn't been on the air for
| the Yankees since 1966, not on a
Iregular basis, just marginally,
[but he still retains the mellifluent
Ivoice that made him the "Voice
|oftheY'ankees."
His side-kick, Red Barber,
[often proclaimed the best an-
|nouncer in baseball history,
.ccinctly describes the demise of
I the Yankee mouthpiece in these
I pithy words, "He gave the
lYankees his life and they broke
|his heart."
. Allen, the son of traditional
I Jewish parents surnamed Israel,
[grew up in the Alabama area. His
Ivoice apparently came naturally
[to him since the Israel family
| boasted of several cantors. As a
[matter of fact, in his early youth,
I Allen seemed destined to become
| a chazan. However, his love for
[sports pushed him into the broad-
Icasting field, where he together
fwith Barber emerged as the finest
rksseball duo reporters in sports-
Icasting history. Nobody since
[these men backed out of the field
[has come along to emulate either
I Allen or Barber. And the
I likelihood is there never will be a
I talk team in sports equal to them
I in know ledge and voice.
There are those who will tell
I you the decline of the New York
I'ankees started when Allen was
I shunted aside. He announced
Kankee contests from 1939
Lnrough 1965, the great years in
|Jnkee history. Once he was
[japped the Yanks dropped with
I him in the standings, only to
I"turn to their winning ways in
I recent years.
Nobody knows exactly why the
I' ankees dropped Allen. Oh, there
I we some who claim he couldn't
jstop talking. Once he got going
ln his favorite nine, the words
I came out in a torrent and never
Iceased. His biggest trouble was
|T nl talking whether he was
"oadcasting or relating to fellow
workers. Not too long ago he
rot on the air with Marv Albert,
P'nt s popular young sports
announcer, who reverently asked
a a[e air lime- "Mel- p,eaae try
and keep your answers short. We
pn'y have a few minutes of air
I time.
Slate, Marv, anything you
say, just cut me off anytime,"
replied the air sage.
I remember back to our New
York B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge
dinners, some years ago, when I
was president of the Lodge, and
had to tug furtively on Allen's
jacket to cut down on his in-
troductions. While Mel MC'd
beautifully, our dinners generally
ended at midnight. These days
we knock off the same affair,
annually, by 10:30 p.m.
Nevertheless. Allen was and
still is a gentlemen. It was a
pleasure talking to him at all
times. You always knew you had
to have plenty of time on your
hands if vou engaged him in
conversation. Nothing wrong
with that. Most people were
aware of his glibness and stuck it
out. It was galling to watch some
of the inconsiderate Yankees give
Allen the brush, or tum on their
heels and stomp away from him
while he was in the middle of a
sentence. Mickey Mantle in
particular was a constant of-
fender in this respect. But then
Mantle found it hard to relate
with people most of the time,
anyway.
Unlike so many of his Jewish
associates in the broadcasting
field, Allen found time to visit
Israel to associate with guys like
Chaim Glovinsky. then and to
this day Mr. Sports of the Holy
Land.
While he has dropped out of
the limelight with the Yankees,
except for sporadic appearances
on Old Timers days, it will not be
necessary to pass the hat around
for Allen. At 65, with a voice 20
years younger, he owns a radio
station in Bi"nin8hf1m;
Alabama, managed by brother
Larry, and does public relations
work for the Canada Dry Bot-
tling Co. He still does commercial
vote-overs. Last year he did the
University of Miami football
games and conceivably might be
back with the Yanks for a pre or
oost game show, since George
Sbrenner. the New York
owner, holds great respect forth,
man who gave so much of his
Ume and energy to the perennial
American League champions.
Whv didn't Allen catch on with
one of the other teams in
baseball? Mel just d.dn t want
anybody but the Yanks. Charley
Key. the oddball owner of the
Oakland nine chased Allen for a
time, but Mel didn't bite. He was
a Yankee all the wav.
Temple Sinai
Brotherhood Sets
Art Auction
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai of North Dade will sponsor
an art auction on Saturday
evening, Oct. 28, in the Temple
Sinai social hall.
Early viewing of the art will be
at 8 p.m. with the auction
starting at 9.
A collection of original oils,
watercolors, graphics and
enamels by such art luminaries as
Leroy Neiman, Rosenthal and
Hibler will be auctioned.
Additionally, a feature of the
show will be a "collector's cor-
ner," with art in all media
available for the collector.
Chairman is Marvin Dorn, and
the auction open to the public.
Refreshments will be served
throughout the evening.
The auction is coordinated by
SAKAL Galleries Ltd. of Fort
Lauderdale and New Rochelle,
N.Y.
Veterans Council
of Administration
Sidney Potlock, commander of
the Department of Florida,
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States of America, an-
nounces that the annual "out-of-
town" Council of Administration
meeting will take place at the
Causeway Inn, Tampa, the
weekend of Oct. 28 and Oct. 29.
On Saturday morning,
Commander Potlock and some of
his staff will make a presentation
to the Veterans Administration
Hospital in Tampa. Various
seminars and workshops will be
held in the afternoon.
The meeting on Sunday will
start at 9:30 a.m., and memorial
services at 11 a.m. will be con-
ducted by Al Parker, chaplain.
Hospital Observes
High Holy Days
Rabbi Phineas Weberman from
Temple Ohev Shalom sounded
the shofar in a hallway of St.
Francis Hospital on Miami Beach
during the High Holy Days.
The Rabbi's visit was one part
of the hospital's celebration of
the High Holy Days. Services
were also held for patients,
visitors and employes with Rabbi
Harry Jolt of Temple Beth
Sholom officiating. Rabbi Jolt is
a member of the Pastoral Care
Team of St. Francis Hospital.
Region Director
Rabbi David Goldwasser has
been appointed the new Region
Director for the South of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America and its
Youth Movement, NCSY. the
National Conference of
Synagogue Youth. Rabbi
Goldwasser's appointment was
announced by Larry Brown of
Memphis, Term., chairman of the
UCJC Southern Region Youth
Commission and by Ronald
Greenwald, chairman of the
UOJC National Youth Com-
mission.
A citation from the Zionist Organization of America was
presented recently to Isaac Bashevis Singer, Surfside resident
and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, by Vice Mayor
Louis Hoberman, president of the Zionist Organization of
America, Brandeis District of Greater Miami. Singer is a life
member of the Z.O.A. In the photo are, left to right, Mrs.
Singer, Isaac Singer, Mrs. Louis Hoberman and Louis
ll'iliprman.
Else McClelland (center) celebrated her 80th birthday recently
with friends from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Volunteer Service Bureau. Mrs. McClelland is among hundreds
of volunteers who donate their time to serve Federation and the
Jewish community. Serving as hostess for the surprise party
was Florence Schaap (right) along with Evelyn B. Kopelman
who staffs the Bureau.
Mizrachi Women
Hadar chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
membership meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 2, at noon. The event
v. :11 be at Arlen House East Card
Room at 100 Bay view Drive.
birth Announcement
Harvey and Jane Bern-
stein of Miami announce the
birth of their first child.
David Michael, on Aug. 7.
The grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. Isadore Bernstein
of South Miami and Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Michaels of
Miami.
i *:. -Jki
Discussing the upcoming Ulpan, adult conversational Hebrew
classes, are instructors: (left to right) Mali Lipson, Educational
Supervisor Shula Ben David, Ziva Bar Navon, and Ellia
Edelstein. Classes begin Oct. 30 at locations in Miami Beach,
North Dade, Southwest Dade and Hollywood. For information,
call Judy Matz at the Central Agency for Jewish Education.
Judge Goldstein at Training Session
Judge Harvey L. Goldstein of
the Circuit Court, North Miami,
has just completed an intensive
three-week judicial training and
education session at The Na-
tional Judicial College, located on
the Reno campus of The Univer-
sity of Nevada.
The General Jurisdiction. Fall
session is designed for new
judges seeking an intensive
awareness of the judicial process
and for experienced judges desir-
ing to keep up-to-date of recent
legal developments.
Brandeis Women Set Casino Debate
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, North
Dade Chapter, will meet
Tuesday, Oct. 31, at 12:45 p.m.
at First Federal Savings & Loan,
18301 Biscayne Blvd., North
Miami Beach.
Guest speakers are Ramon
Benatar Fisch, active in various
civic affairs, and Ms. Linda
Elfman, active in the "Let's Help
Florida." Their topic is "Pro and
Anti-Casino Gambling" The
public is welcome.
Hallandale B'nai B'rith Sets Dance
Hallandale Lodge B'nai B'rith
will hold its annual dance and en-
tertainment at The Hallandale
Jewish Center on Sunday. Oct. 29
at 8:30 p.m. Members and guests
are invited. Reservations and
table arrangements can be made
by calling Jack Finn or Joe
Nagelberg.
Features of the evening will be
a door prize drawing and enter-
tainment by Harriet Kane and
Marty Levitt with dance music
by Ralph Kahn and his orchestra.


c if/\
____*. i^ifidh flarirUm**
Page 10-B
fJknisti Fk>riaf/a/n_
Friday, October 27,1978

Pioneer Women Schedule Meetings
A musical program will
highlight the annual "Get-
Together" dinner of the Aviva
Chapter of Pioneer Women
Sunday, Oct. 29, at 6:30 p.m. in
the civic auditorium of
Washington Federal Auditorium,
633 N.E. 167th Street, North
Miami Beach.
Four members of the organiza-
tion will receive special recogni-
tion at the dinner. They are
Margot Amstel, Helen Fisher,
Gisela Gutter and Esther
Weinstein. Mrs. Amstel,
president of Aviva Chapter, said
friends are welcome.
A member-bring-a-member
meeting will be held by the Sabra
Chapter of Pioneer Women Mon-
day, Oct. 30 at 7:30 p.m. at the
First Federal Bank Bldg., 18301
Biscayne Boulevard.
Harriet Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council of South
Florida and president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida, will speak on the
current Middle East situation.
Annette Hockman and Miriam
Gross, presidents of the Sabra
Chapter, will chair the meeting.
Refreshments will be served.
Dimona Beth Chapter of
Pioneer Women will hold a
luncheon and card party on
Monday, October 30, at 12:30
p.m. in the civic room of the First
Federal Bank Bldg., 18301
Biscayne Blvd.
According to Sylvia Rosier,
president, the affair is open to the
general public.
Kadimah Chapter of Pioneer
Women will meet on Monday,
Oct. 30, at 1 p.m. at Beth Kodesh
Congregation, 1101 S.W. 12th
Ave., Miami. Mrs. Dora Hill, an
active member of the organiza-
tion who just returned from an
extensive trip to Israel, will
speak on her experiences in that
country.
Tillie Sandier, president of the
Kadimah Chapter, said ad-
mission is free and open to the
public. Refreshments will be
served.
Moscow
Succoth
Celebrated
NEW YORK (JTA) The
opening days of Succoth were
celebrated in Moscow with songs
of celebration, according to in-
formation received from the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry. One hundred
Soviet Jews observed the start of
the Succoth holiday while 150
plainclothes policemen followed
them. As the Jews sang, the
police revved up a tractor to
drown out the song. Soviet Jews
are expected to participate in
Simchat Torah festivities in
Moscow's Arkhipova Street, the
Conference reported.
ZOA to Meet
The next regular monthly
meeting of the Miami Beach
District ZOA will be held at the
American Savings and Loan
bank building, 1200 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach, on Monday,
Oct. 30 at 1 p.m.
The program will be a
travelogue on Israel, produced
and narrated by Mr. and Mrs.
Barnett Lerner.
Sharon Hadassah
Sharon Hadassah, New
Chapter Young Women, Norths
Miami Beach Ara, is having a
paid-up membership fashion
show and dessert Oct. 30, at 8
p.m. at First Federal Savings &
Loan, Biscayne Blvd.
Ida Chinsky, president of Club
II of Pioneer Women, will speak
on the "Aftermath of Camp
David" at the Thursday, Nov. 2
meeting of Club II. The session
will be held in the civic
auditorium of Financial Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
755 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach. Mrs. Chinsky will also
outline the future activities for
the calendar year for the group.
After Camp David
Saunders A ttempts
To Rally Arabs
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Assistant Secretary of State
Harold Saunders arrived here
over the weekend for meetings
with Prime Minister Menachem
Begin and other top officials.
Saunders, whose venue is the
Middle East apprised Begin of
the answers the U.S. has given to
the 14 questions posed by King
Hussein of Jordan on the future
of the West Bank and the
Palestinians within the Camp
David frameworks.
Saunders brought the answers
to Hussein in Amman and
relayed them to Saudi Arabian
leaders whom he met in Jidda.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS are
fairly certain that the answers
reflect the differences between
Israel and the U.S. on key issues
relating to the West Bank and
East Jerusalem. But they do not
believe that this will necessarily
cast a shadow over the Israeli-
Egyptian talks currently going
on in Washington for a peace
treaty.
One aspect of Saunders'
mission is to rally as many Arab
moderates as possible to a
favorable view of the Camp
David accords. Special
Ambassador Alfred L. Atherton
made such efforts directly after
the summit conference last
month without notable success.
U.S. Consular officials have
been busy arranging meetings for
Saunders with moderate leaders
on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, while pro-PLO elements
are doing their best to pressure
possible invitees not to meet with
the American diplomat.
VIRTUALLY ALL of the
Arab mayors have taken a dim
view of the Camp David
frameworks, at least publicly. A
few, like Mayor Rashad Shawa of
Gaza, who appeared to be open-
minded on the subject originally,
denounced the accords. Similarly,
the moderate Faed Kawassme,
Mayor of Hebron, has hardened
his position on Camp David.
The moderate Elias Freij,
Mayor of Bethlehem, at a
meeting of West Bank mayors
earlier this week at Bethlehem
University, joined his colleagues
in condemning the Camp David
accords as a "betrayal of the
Public Is Invited to
Tour Aviva Manor
Aviva Manor, Broward
County's only strictly kosher
nursing facility, offers nursing
care coupled with individualized
patient care programs, according
to executive director Gary L.
Lampert. The facility is located
at 3370 NW 47th Terrace,
Lauderdale Lakes.
An extensive program of
physical, inhalation, speech and
rehabilitative therapy is
available, said Lampert, and each
resident is encouraged to par-
ticipate. These services also are
offered on an out-patient basis.
A rabbi or other religious
counsel is on call 24 hours a day.
Sabbath and other religious
services are conducted in the
chapel.
Lampert says South Floridians
are invited to inspect the
facilities. He describes the rooms
as "spacious, sunny, completely
air-conditioned and elegantly
decorated."
Also available are "well-
equipped activity and social
rooms, including library,
television room and card room."
Palestinians" and upheld the
PLO as the Palestinians' sole
representative.
This was a departure from
Freij's lavish praise of the Camp
David agreements after they
were signed on Sept. 17.
MAYOR BASSEM SHAKA
of Nablus said the autonomy plan
for the West Bank and Gaza
Strip was a disguise for con-
tinued Israeli occupation.
"Nothing can come from Camp
David which brought together
Begin, the representative of
Zionism, (President) Carter, the
representative of imperialism and
(President Anwar) Sadat, the re-
presentative of Arab reaction-
aries," Shaka said.
The meeting in Bethlehem was
seen as a response to Saunders'
efforts to persuade Hussein to
join in the Israeli-Egyptian peace
process. Most of the speakers
were careful not to attack
Hussein, presumably so as not to
tilt him toward Camp David. An
exception was Mayor Karim
Khalaf of Ramallah who
denounced Hussein as "a partner
to the conspiracy" at Camp
David.
BUT ISRAELI sources
profess not to be unduly
disheartened by the widespread
rejection of the Camp David
agreements. Well aware of the
outside pressures being brought
to bear on the moderates by the
Arab rejectionist states and the
PLO, the Israelis believe that if
the U.S. succeeds in bringing
Hussein into the peace process
there will be a sudden upsurge of
moderate support for Camp
David on the West Bank.
Even if Hussein remains aloof,
the feeling in some Israeli circles
is that the few moderates who
back the accords and there
may be more of them than super-
ficial impressions indicate can
be welded into the nucleus of the
representative council envisioned
in the autonomy plan for the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Saunders, therefore, is ex-
pected to do his best to encourage
support for the autonomy scheme
and Israelis will back him in this
effort even though he is likely to
stress American positions on the
West Bank and East Jerusalem
that are unpalatable to Israel.
Pictured with Fred Hirt, executive director of Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged are Barbara Sch-
wartz, Linda Jones, Lisa Spiva, Lauri Moss, Evelyn
Davidson, Nan Perry, Sharon Werdebaugh and Bonnie
Cohen.
Volunteering with Elderly
Newest volunteers at the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged are the Miami Chapter of the Eastern Airlines
Silverliners.
"We wanted to get involved with the elderly on a personal
level," explained Barbara Schwartz, chapter president.
Following an orientation and tour of Douglas Gardens con-
ducted by Fred Hirt, executive director and Ann Berner,
director of volunteers, the Silverliners made plans for the type of
activities they will lead at the Home.
"We'll be coming to the Home on an individual basis. As a
group we'll be having a fashion show, travelogues, a
cosmetology workshop and visit the residents for the holidays,"
Mrs. Schwartz said.
The 26 members of the flight attendants service organization
are looking forward to their experience with the residents of
Douglas Gardens, said Mrs. Schwartz.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the United Way of Dade County.
Business Notes
Passenger Traffic Increases at Delta
iStS
Passenger traffic at Delta Air
Lines' Miami International
Airport facility continued to
climb during September when the
carrier boarded nearly 24 per cent
more passengers than in Sep-
tember of 1977.
"September's traffic has made
possible a 12 per cent increase in
our nine month year-to-date
results," said Walter Jureski,
Delta's district director of
marketing. He noted that cargo
traffic has also increased with
year-to-date records reflecting a
17 per cent rise. "This result," he
said, "indicates a sustained
improvement in the economy and
output of our industrial and
agricultural partners in Dade
County." He observed that all in-
dicators point to a continued
strong demand throughout the
remainder of 1978.
Air Florida to Begin Bahamas Service
The Civil Aeronautics Board
has granted Air Florida tem-
porary authority to begin jet
service to the Bahamas.
Initial plans call for a daily
flight from Miami to Nassau and
Rock Sound beginning Nov. 21.
Fort Lauderdale service to those
destinations will begin Dec. 1.
Air Florida plans to operate its
DC-9s and 737s for this new
service.
"This is the first international
route granted to Air Florida. As a
result, we will now be able to link
Florida and the Bahamas with
reliable, scheduled jet service, as
well as provide connecting ser-
vice with all major airlines." C.
Richard Bergner, Senior Vice
President of Marketing, stated.
*r,
Intercontinental Bank Opens Branches
The comptroller of the state of
Florida has granted
authorization to Intercontinental
Bank to open two new branches.
The announcement was made
by Benjamin Shulman, chairman
of the board, who added: "The
opening of the Westchester
branch and the North Miami
branch will fill the needs and con-
veniences of these two important
and fast growing areas of Dade
County."
North Miami Branch will be
located at 501 North Miami
Beach Boulevard (167 Street),
and the Westchester branch at
8755 SW 24 St. (Coral Way),
Miami.
Assistant Insurance Commissioner
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Insurance
has a new Assistant Insurance
Commissioner.
He is Allan J. Kay, executive
assistant to Insurance Com-
Career Representative
Sandra I Reiseman of Miami
has been named a career repre-
sentative of the Miami-Glass ford
Agency of National Life
Insurance Company of Vermont.
Her appointment to the field
force of the 128-year-old Mont-
pelier, mutal life insurance firm
was announced by General Agent
William H. Glassford whose
agency serves policyowners in
.V.'.V.V..'/...,.'A
missioner Bill Guater, who took
over as second-in-command Oct.
1.
For the past five months, Katz
served as executive assistant res-
ponsible for the coordination of
the activities of the Department
of Insurance. Katz fills the va-
cancy created last July when Ed
Trombetta resigned.
FPL Signs Contract
Florida Power & Light Co. and J
International Minerals and
Chemical Corporation have
signed the second of two long-
term contracts for IMC to supply
uranium to FPL's nuclear power
miwBoririij
Mm&x&ak


Ur27.1978
*Jewisti ikridiaun
Pagell-B
id Haber, mayor of the city of Miami Beach, presents
I city to Zvi Redlich, new district manager of El Al
lines in Miami Beach.
S=E
Bar Mitzvahs
is are
Tern-!
Ireira
IRab-
Jordan Golin
conduct the service
shared is planning.
tie service his parents
reception at their
\s an eighth grade
Arvida Jr. High
plays the saxophone
hool band. He is a
jthe Temple Bet Breira
i and a former officer.
town guests include
[grandmother, Mrs.
Tin, cousins Mr. and
olton of Detroit and
b. Ben Lipson of Port
LD BENDHEIM
endheim, son of Bernd
Bendheim will ob-
|Bar Mitzvah at the
rah Congregation,
, at 8:30 a.m., with Dr.
Lipschitz, spiritual
the Congregation
! the service.
lipschitz will charge
Ih entrance into the
adult Jewish Community and will
present him with a Bible on
behalf of the Mollie Kahaner
Sisterhood of the Congregation
and Men's Club of Beth Torah.
Gerald is a student in the pre-
confirmation class of the Beth
Torah Harold Wolk Religious
School. Gerald is an eighth grade
student at Highland Oaks Junior
High School and his hobbies are
water skiing and motor cycling.
In Gerald's honor, his parents
will sponsor the Kiddush
following the services.
In addition to chanting the
Haftorah. Gerald will also
conduct a portion of the Shabbat
services and read a part of the
Torah selection for the Shabbat.
The guests will include his
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry Anisef. Other guests
include Mr. and Mrs. Erwin
Bendheim of Brazil. Mrs. George
Anisef, Mrs. Paul Anisef and
daughter, and Mrs. Israel Baich-
man all from Toronto. Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Krieger of New York
and Mrs. Selma Stern of New
York, also will be among the
guests.
ERIC MARMUREK
Eric Marmurek, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Marmurek, will be
called to the Torah on the oc-
casion of his Bar Mitzvah at
11:15 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 28 at
Temple Judea of Coral Gables.
opsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
B'Rayshis
JSHIS In the very beginning, God created the heaven
th. The earth had no form and darkness covered the
i And God said:
et there be light!"
fcd there was light. God called the light Day and the dark-
' called Night. And evening and morning made one day.
pn God said, "Let there be a sky between the waters."
i called the sky Heaven. That was on the second day.
r the third day, God gathered the waters together and
Ihe gathered waters Seas, and the dry land Earth. And
e Earth sprouted fruit trees, and plants, and vegetables,
i the fourth day God created the Sun, and the Moon, and
rs, to give light upon the Earth. The fifth day saw the
i of fish that swim and birds that fly.
en God created animals, reptiles and wild beasts and,
I man and woman. That was the sixth day.
pus was the world created. On the seventh day, God
J He blessed that day and called it holy, because on the
nth day Shabbat God rested from His work of
p>. (Genesis 1:1 6:8)
counting ol th. Weekly Portion of tit. Law *222fft W****
W Graphic History ol th. Jewish H.rit.ga." eMttJ?22f
|*iS, published by ShtngoM. Th. volum. is availabU """*"
r York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is pr.sld.nt ol th. sociV
^9 the volum..)
............. ^^^^^mt............
:j:-: Devoted to discussion of rhemes ond issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
{S Under ihe auspices of the RABBI EMANUEL GREEN, Ph.D., D.D.
m GREATER MIAMI RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION Coordinator
Your Rabbi Speaks
Better World Is Up to Us
i
1
By RABBI
DR. CHARLES M. RUBEL
Temple Beth Tov
Students of the Bible have
posed this problem. In the first
commandment we read, I am the
Lord Thy God who brought thee
forth from the Land of Egypt,
from the House of bondage. Why
did not the Lord refer to Himself
rather as the Creator of Heaven
and Earth, than to limit His
appeal to one historical event,
namely the Exodus from Egypt?
But the answer is, that the Bible
wished to emphasize that the
Lord is the author of human
freedom. God wants man to live
in His world in brotherhood,
liberty, and equality, that no man
may oppress another. When God
broke the chains of Egyptian
oppression, He emancipated all
human beings. The references to
Egyptian emancipation are so
many in the Bible and are re-
peated so often that we cannot
help but realize that in crushing
Pharoah, God crushed all
tyranny, and revealed Himself as
the Father of freedom for all His
children, everywhere, and at all
times.
In return God says You
make me and my moral law the
standard of your conduct and
accept me as the source of your
life, and I guarantee you a life of
joy and contentment. But man
refuses to listen to the voice of
the Lord. Man has gone astray
from His moral law, and instead
has chosen the path of death
the road to utter destruction. We
could have done so much for the
benefit of man by God's gift of
the human mind, our advances in
the sciences have been so
astounding that only two decades
ago, man would not have
dreamed of such possibilities as
we have today, to make man's life
on earth easier and happier. But
what have we done with our great
advances, we have created a
monster, a Frankenstein Atom
and H Bombs, missiles and
rockets, which now are closing in
on us with destructive tentacles,
closer and closer they come, to
eventually revert this planet to
Tohu vovohu the emptiness
which existed before God created
the world.
THE STORY is told of a man
who was persuaded by his
minister that 10 percent of all he
had belonged to God. Being a
farmer with a large field he set
aside one tenth of his field for
God. The following year the
minister returned to visit him
and he found that nine tenths of
the farm was cultivated and
growing fine crops and fruits, but
the other tenth was covered with
weeds. How does it happen,
asked the minister, that one part
of your field is so sadly
neglected? The farmer replied
didn't you tell me that one tenth
,elongs to God, so I left it for
-lim. to take care of it, now look
vhat a mess the Lord made of
lis share.
Now we all realize that God's
^nth we must also cultivate to
reap the good harvest. We must
learn to cultivate good habits,
good character, to live according
to God's teachings in all our daily
lives. Only then by living thus,
and teaching our children the
ways of the Lord, the good life,
can we hope to reap the harvest
of a better world and a happier
day for mankind. Let us not sit
back and say that God will do it
for us. It is we who can and must
make the better world. Yes, say
the Hebrew sages, he who wishes
to live the good life, the Lord
comes to his aid, but if we show
apathy, then we are indeed in
danger of reaping weeds, and not
the good fruits of God's world.
Thus can we hope that the I^ord
will bless the labors of our hands,
and give mankind the blessings
of His treasure houses. Amen.
1
By RABBI SAMUEL FOX
Question: Why is the Book of
"Ecclesiastes" read during the
Succoth holiday?
Answer: A variety of reasons
are offered for this practice. For
one thing, its author, the wise
King Solomon, gathered his
people together during this
festival. The name Koheleth
refers to a "gathering" which
used to take place during this
holiday and this is the meaning of
the word Ecclesiastes. Secondly,
the contents of the book are
somewhat cynical, especially
when the author says: "Vanity of
vanity all is vanity." The time
of the festival was the end of the
harvest season and it was the
most happy festival of the year.
Lest the populace become too
extreme in their celebration over
the plentiful crops which signify
nhvsical achievement, the cynical
text reminds them to temper
their joys with reality. The final
haivtsl ot the- sedsuu is also com-
pared with old age. It was during
his old age that King Solomon
wrote this cynical treatise. It
thus became a realistic treatise
for harvest time to remind the
worshippers that old age might
be a cynical time but one has to
remember that one should always
be optimistic and realistic with
the spirit of the Almighty within
that can help overcome any sense
of cynicism or despondency that
is liable to take over during old
age.
Question: What is the reason
for the establishment of the
festival of Simchas Torah?
Answer: The last day of the
fall festival series obviously was
the happy climax of a festive
season. When the practice
developed of finishing the Torah
reading of the Five Books of
Moses annually, the last day of
the Succoth festival became the
occasion for concluding this
reading. The conclusion of the
reading of any basic religious
text is an occasion for joy. Hence,
this day received the name of
"Yom Hasefer," the day of the
conclusion of the reading of the
Book (i.e., the "Five Books of
Moses"). Some claim that the
idea was later developed to call it
Simchas Torah since the act of
concluding the reading is an
occasion of joy and the real joy of
any Jew is his involvement with
the Torah. The annual conclusion
of the reading demonstrates that
the reading was performed all
through the year and thus this
ending climax is a sign of ac-
complishment in practice of the
faith.
QUESTION: Why is the
Kaddish recited in mostly
Aramaic dialect instead of all
Hebrew f
ANSWER: A variety of an-
swers are offered for this
phenomenon. A popular reason is
given in the Talmud which claims
that this is done so that the
angels would not comprehend its
recital. It was feared that the
angels would resent this offering
of praise to the Almighty because
it is their function to offer the
praises to the Almighty. Their
resentfulness might prompt them
to argue against the redemption
of the Jewish people and the
Kaddish is recited as a hope for
that redemption. A second reason
contends that the Aramaic
dialect, which is used instead of
the Hebrew, is meant to display a
sense of embarrassment over the
fact that the Jewish people are
still in the diaspora since the
KnrMich acknowllf" the fact
and expresses hope for redemp-
tion from diaspora. Some
suggest that the KaJdiflli i
recited in Aramaic to overcome
the prejudice that might be
awakened by oppressive enemies
who are in power where Jews live.
Since Aramaic is a different
language, they might not un-
derstand it like pure Hebrew
would be understood. Even
though some Jews live in lands
where no such fear exists today,
the Aramaic language still
persists to show what we had to
go through to retain our
traditions against the wishes of
the oppressors. There are some
who claim that the Kaildish is
recitpn" in AromoJ/. V,w*-.>. ot
certain time Aramaic was the
street language wrucn was
common to the ordinary Jew.
This praise for the Almighty and
the optimism expressed through
the Kaddish in anticipation for
the redemption was something
the rabbis wanted all Jews to
understand, regardless of their
degree of knowledge.
QUESTION: Why do
mourners recite Kaddish in
memory of their parents ?
ANSWER: The Kaddish is
recited by the cantor after every
section of the prayer service and
by the teacher or his student
after every Talmudic lecture.
Basically, it is required of a son
to bring the memory of his
parents to the attention of the
community for the first eleven
months after their death by
assuming a public role as a cantor
or lecturer. Since circumstances
developed where only a minority
of Jews can do this, the Kaddish
for mourners was instituted so
that any mourner, regardless of
the degree of his Jewish
education, could lead a minute
portion of the prayer service by
reciting the Kaddish to which the
congregation responds in the
appropriate places. Since the
Kaddish emphasizes the theme of
redemption for the Jewish people
as a whole, it is especially fitting
for mourners to express their
hepe for the redemption which is
supposed to bring back the
deceased and to reunite the
people and their families. Thus
the mourners recite certain
recitations of the Kaddish at the
appropriate parts of the service
and also after a Talmudic lecture.
Hebrew Classes
Every Wednesday from 7 to
8:30 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center at 9990 N. Kendall
Drive (Temple Israel) persons
interested in learning Hebrew as
a family will meet. The families
will learn conversational Hebrew
and then after class practice at
home. For details about joining
this family-oriented activity call
Sondie Kaiser.


(',-.. Ill A
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Page 12-B
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Friday, October 271
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INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 7t-13U3 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marrtejre of
RAMA PIERRE.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
RENIA PIERRE.
Respondent-Wife.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU. RENIA PIERRE. 3J
Rue Montalait 28. Port-Au-
Prlnce, Haiti, are hereby notified
to serve a copy of your Answer to
the Petition For Dissolution of
Marriage filed against you. upon
Husbai.ds attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQUIRE, 613 NW
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida
S3U6. and file original with the
Clerk of the Court on or before
December 1. 1*78; otherwise the
Petition will be confessed by you.
DATED this 34 day of October,
1978.
Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
By: Barbara J. Coleman
Deputy Clerk
02M3 Oct. 27; Nov. S. 10,17.1*78
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Csse No. 7B-13435FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA ANTONIA GARCIA,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
ORLANDO A. GARCIA,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, ORLANDO A. GARCIA.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN, are
hereby notified to serve a copy of
your Answer to the Petition For
Dissolution of Marriage filed
against you. upon Wife's attor-
ney, GEORGE NICHOLAS, ES-
QUIRE, 612 NW 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33136, and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before Dec. 1, 1*78:
otherwise the Petition will be
confessed by you.
DATED this IS day of October,
1978.
Richard P. Blinker, Clerk
By: B Upps
Deputy Clerk
02*44 Oct. 27; Nov. 3,10,17,1*78
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 76-13627 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
LUCILLE CAMBRIDGE.
Wile,
and
JOSEPH CAMBRIDGE.
Husband
YOU, JOSEPH CAMBRIDGE,
' residence unknown, are required
to fUe your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney, Herman
Cohen, Esq., 822 SW 1st Street,
Miami. Florida, 33130 on or
before December 1. 1*78, or else
petition will be confessed.
Dated: October 1, 1BTB.
Richard P. Brlnker
Clerk, Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
03*46 Oct. 27. Nov. 3, 10, 17. 1978
IN THE ClRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FIN Number 7I-7J4I
Division 62
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NAMIN HUTKXN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of NAMIN HUTKTN.
deceased, File Number 78-7841.
Is pending tn the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is
71 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 53130 The personal
representatives of the estate are
HILDA FRIEDMAN and ANNE
FRIEDMAN, whose address Is
8798 Jerusalem Avenue. Seazbrd,
New York 11783. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due. the
date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim U secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim lo the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges
the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLADiS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
Oct. 27,1978.
HILDA FRIEDMAN
ANNE FRIEDMAN
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
NAMIN HUTKTN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
SAMUEL W. FRIED
SMITH. MANDLER, SMITH,
WEr.NER. JACOBOWTTZ
A FRIED. P.A.
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306)538-6361
02936 OcL 27; Nov. 3.1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name CAS Jewelry
Creations at 22 NW 1st Street.
Miami. Florida Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Owners: CAS Jewelry
Mfg.. Inc..
a Florida Corp. B0 percent
Ovldio A Carmen Mljarea 80
percent
02933 Oct27;Nov.3.10,17,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
NO. 76-137*4 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DONALD S. GALKA.
Petitioner.
and
BLANCHE ULLMAN
GALKA, Respondent
TO: BLANCHE ULLMAN
GALKA
. c, oCarolTaub
137 Riverside Drive
"Haw York, New York
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage ha*
been filed and commenced In this
court and you art) required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on
NATHANIEL L BARONE. JR,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 777 NE 79th Street,
Miami. Florida 33138. and file the
orlguesJ with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 1, 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of October,
1*78.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B. Lapps
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
02942 OcL 27; Nov. 10,17,1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil A ction No. 7a.|]M FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
EUGENIA ANDERSON, wife,
and
JOHN J ANDERSON,
husband.
TO: JOHN J. ANDERSON
London Terrace
Apartments
W 23 SLA 9th Avenue
New York City.
New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR H LTPSON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1515 NW 167 Street. Suite 110-B
Miami. Florida 33169. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 1. 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of October
1*78.
RICHARD P BRTNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Diane Nycz
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
02*41 Oct. 37; Nov. 3, 10. 17,1*78
Religious Directory
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGRETATION.
995 SW67th Ave Orthodox
ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION. 2533
,fw 19th Ave. Conservative.
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION
107SS SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 13 A)
TEMPLE BETH AM
StSON Kendall Drive
South Miami447 J587
Dr. Herbert
Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Mitchell Chefiti Associate Rabbi
Friday Religious Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
will preach on
i "Living Alone"
Saturday Morning
Torah Service 11:15 a.m.
Sunday, breakfast at 9:30 a.m
BETH DAVID 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. (4-A)
BETH.DAVID SOUTH..7500 SW 120th
St Conservative Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lipson. (4 B)
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional 156-4334
noi sw nth Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro-Cantor Leon Segal
Daily Mlnyon for Yahneiten
Daily 7:45 a.m., 4:30 p.m.
Sunday a.m.
Saturday Service-6:45a.m.
The Rabbi will speak on
"In the Beginning."
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th St
Conservative. Rabbi Charles Rubel
(8)
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 7600
SW 123rd Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Ralph Glixman (8-A) .
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zweiling. Cantor
" Jack Lernar. (36) .
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF ,
GREATER MIAMI South Florida s
137 NE ltth St. Miami F'onaer Reform
573-JN* Synagogue
Dr. Narot will discuss
? "The Good Old Days''
Dr. Goldstein will discuss
"Are We at Home?"
at the Kendall Branch,
999* N.Kendall Drive
ISRAEL TEMPLE KENDALL. 9990 N.
Kendall Drive. Rabbis Joseph Narot.
Bratt Goldstein
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg Cantor Hyman Litshin
(11)
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th SI
Conservative. Cantor P. Hillel
Brummer. (13)
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Second Floor. Conservative
abbi Edwin P. Farber. (9)
SYNAGOGUE OF KENDALE LAKES
CHABAD 14456 Kendale Lakes Blvd ,
Miami 33183 Orthodox. Rabbi Elieier
Meyer.
TEMPLE ZION"
Conservative
8060 Miller Road
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Cantor Ben Dickson
Herzl Honor-Educational Director
Avron Smolensky Musical Director
Janet Stone-Early Childhood Dir.
Pearl Sagon* Coordinator
Friday Service- : IS p.m.
Dr. Norman Shapiro will I
officiate and spaatt.
Saturday Service 9 a.m.
Bar Mitzvah, Steven Mackler,
son of Dr. and Mrs.
Melvin Mackler
Membership Inquiries Invited.
MIAMI LAKES
KINNERETH CONGREGATION
1550 West U St. Rabbi Bernard A.
Silver Conservative
HIALEAH
TIFERETH JACOB TEMPLE 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Nathan H. Zwitman (15)
NORTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
2225 NE 121st St Conservative Rabbi
Louis Lederman. Rabbi Emeritus
Joseph Goriinkle Cantor Moshe
Friwller (35)
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N Ever
(17) ---------
BETH EL 2400 Pine Tree Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. (5)
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St Orthodox
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro (18)
BETH JACOB 301 Wasn.ng'on Ave
Orthodox Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swir
sky Cantor Maurice Mamches (19)
B'NAI SEPHARDIM. 44 N.W. 150th St.,
Miami Beach. Dr. Leon Suissa, spiri
tual leader. Traditional services
before sundown
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL 1545 Jef
ferson Ave Miami Beach Con
servative Dr Ephraim F. Mandel-
corn. Rabbi Cantor Saul H Breeh
BETM YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA
TION 843 Meridian Ave Orthodox
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. (22A)
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Avenue at 41 st St.
Dr. Leon Kronlsh 536-7231 Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Friday Services 8: IS p.m.
Organ Prelude -7:4J p.m.
Rabbi Harry Jolt
will speak
Sabbath Services 10:45 a.m.
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION. 935
Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Israel
M. Tropper. Cantor Heryry Fuehs.
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd
Orthodox Rabbi Joseph Biston. (66)
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
1700 Michigan Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Dow Rozencwaig. (23)
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 715 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Melamed. (23-A)
TALMUDIC COLLEGE OF FLORIDA
1910 Alton Road. Orthodox. Rabbi
Yochanan Zweig.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL-
1701 Washington Avenue
536-2503
Conservative
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Cantor Zvi Adler
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
will officiate.
Cantor Zvi Adler
will chant.
Rosh Hodesh, Tuesday
and Wednesday.
Membership Inquiries Invited. .
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. (32)
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE. 6446
Collins Avenue. Conservative. Rabbi
Maurice Klein. Cantor Eugene Roth.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. (25)
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY SY
NAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Cantor
Meyer Enoel (36
KING SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031 Lin
coin Rd. Modem Conservative. Rabbi
David Raab. Cantor Nathan Parnass
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfieid
Cantor Abraham Self (27)
LUBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ave. Oalhodox Rabbi
, Abraham Korf (671
TEMPLE MENORAH. 620 75ttl St.
Conservative Rabbi Mayor Abramo-
wrtz. Cantor Ntco Fajdman.
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Laboviti Cantor Edward
Klein. (29) _____
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 7800 Hispanole Ave
Conservative Rabbi Marvin Rose
Cantor Murray Yavneh. (32-A)
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A-
Weberman. Cantor Sydney W.
Feinsmith (80)
OHR HACHAIM CONGREGATION."317
47 St Rabbi Tsvi G. Schur. Orthodox
PAVILION HEBREW STUDY GROUP
5601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Con
servative. Rabbi Nathan Zoiondek.
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER
OF GREATER MIAMI, INC.
445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
The only English speaking
Sephardic Tempt* in Florida.
Rabbi Sadl Nahmias (3D
WEST AVENUE JEWISH CEN
TER. 1140 Alton Road. Orth*
dox. Rabbi Shokvn D. Lipskar,
Rabbi Yitzchok Marcus, assis
tant rabbi. ______
NORTHMIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr Conservative.
Rabbi Simcha Freedmen Cantor lan
Alpern.(33) ______
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center 19255
NE 3rd Ave Orthodox. (33-A)
BETH TORAH ,
CONGREGATION Conservative
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
947-7528
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Cantor David Levine
No Late Friday Services
until after High Holidays
Bat Mitzvah of
Debra Stark man, Oct. 27
Bar Mitzvah of
|Gerald Bendheim. David Faren.Oct. U
Daily Chapel Services
7:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.
Sabbath Morning Services-* 130 a.m.
AVENTURA JEWIShTenTeT^T?
Aventura Blvd North Miami Beach
Conservative Rabbi Seymour Fried
man. ---------
B NAI ZION TEMPLE 200 178th St
Conservative Rabbi Jacob S Green
Cantor Jacob E. Tambor (22 B)
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER, 571
NE 171st St. Rabbi Nesir^Gambach.
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH,
18801 NE 2*0 Ave D
Ralph P. Kingsley d,^?* ,
Cook. Cantor l^s^Jjl
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE m.I
19th Ave. OrthJao %2il
Bidnick (38) ***
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATcj
rvL9eHN(!,,)7'S'S'd
coral gables
HILLEL JEWISH STUDBlT
ter, college student,S
GOGUE. Univers.ty otffiLfl
Miller Drive. Rabb Robert? '
Ass. Dir Morton Aroii
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd
Coral Gables
Rabbi Michael BEisenitil
I mmadlate Membership Avanj
Friday Service, iB
ZAMORA TEMP~Eiz7Sn
Conservative Rabbi >
Brilliant Cantor Louis
141)
Hri
SURFSlOE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGilJ
9348 Harding Ave Orthoon
Isaac D Vine (50
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CEll
TER. 183 NE 8 St Conl
vative. Rabbi Sherman ..I
shner. (51)
HOLLYWOOD
BETH AHM TEMPLE 310 <*l
Ave. Conservative Racbi
Landman (47 Bi
TEMPLE BETH EL 1351 S lift]
Reform Rabbi Samuel j
Assistant Rabbi Jonathan *.t i
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE
Arthur St Conservative
Morton Malavsky Cantor
Gold. (46)
SINAI TEMPLE 1201 JohnsonStl!
servative Rabbi Paul M Katij
Emeritus David Shapiro. (45)
TEMPLE SOLEL 5100 Sheridal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P.
Cantor Phyllis Cole (47Q
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH C0NGI
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. LitMrt
form. Rabbi Sheldon j. Harr. (til
RECONSTRUCTIONS ill
GOGUE. 7473 NW4thSt. (M)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMRLE 6920 SW !
Conservative. Rabbi Paul
Cantor YehudahHeilbraun. iw|
DEERFIELD BEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL.
Village East Conservative
David Berent President tt4jU
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION!
Margate Blvd. Conservative. I
Joseph E. Berglas.
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. |
NW 9 St. Conservative. Ha
Solomon Geld. Cantor Ma I
(44B).
SHOLOM TEMPLE 132 SE 1J
Conservative Rabbi Morns f
Cantor Yaacov Renier (*)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOU
FORT LAUDERDALE, 01
Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Bonwr coral1p"rings
TEMPLE BETH ORR, 2151
Drive. Reform Rabbi Leoni
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CEIJ
416 NE 8th Ave Cons*rvati*|
Carl Klein. Ph.D DO.Rat* I
PEMBROKE PINES
BETH EMET TEMPLE M.I
Douglas Rd Liberal Reform
Goldstein, ed dir
TEMPLE IN THE PINES J
Street. Conservat ve Ra"
P Shoter
FORT. LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPJX"
Oakland Park Bivd.COT
Rabbi Philip a -abowitt
Maurice Neu 142)__
EMANU EL TEMPLE 3ML
land Park Blvd fJ"%"*J
S.'Goor Cantor Jerome H***IJ
OHEL B'NAI RAPHAEL IS
4351 W.Oakland Park Blv*'
Rabbi Saul D Herman.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTE",
NW 57th St Conservat"
Israel Zimmerman i*"-i
RABBINICA.ASSOOATII
OFGREATERMI**'
4200 Biscayne BlvO ^'"'(.J (|
576 4000 Rabbi Soionon Stnffi*
live Vice President ,.,
UN ION OF AMERICAN"."
CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler S< M.am., ri
379 4553 Rabbi W*,|
Director. Union of America"
Congregations cnciMft
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OMJfl
1110 NE 163rd St North ^"'
Fla. 33162. 47o094*Wrr
Friedman, Executve Direct"
CANDLELIGHTIN
O
TIME
6:21
26 TISHW-sn,|


pcNotices
BSSuMrrH judicial
BSaaC
Von FOR DISSOLUTION
The Marriage of
SBANCO,
Uoner,
liEBANGO.
J! defenaei. If any. to It on
I. Tallanoff. attorney for
ti whose address la Law
I1 (fi*oree J Tallanoff,
ft |5 South Bay shore
Lwiami Fla. 33133, and file
ySTWlO. the clerk of th
Pgud court on or before
It 10, 1978. otherwise a
Kme relief demanded In
xnplalnt or petition
^notice shall be published
[eh week for four con-
Llweeks in THE JEWISH
IDIAN
MESS my hand and the
[of said court at Miami,
a on this 3 day of October,
gUCHABDPBRINKER
lAsOerk, Circuit Court
iDadeCounty. Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
Ai Deputy Clerk
ult Court Seal I
j Tallanoff. Esquire
roc
BouUiBayshore Drive
b Florida 33133
[No. (SOB) 858-3320
mey for Petitioner ___
Oct. 6.13, 20, 27,1878
[NOTICE OF ACTION
MSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(no property)
.thecircuitcourtof
|e eleventh judicial
IrCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
NDFORDADE COUNTY
Action NO. U-UMO-FC (02)
UMILYCIVILOIVISION
OTICE OF ADOPTION
C: The Matter of
lot Minor*
JIS CAME JO,
tlUoner
Kr Miguel Angel
Valdes
.ksldence Unknown
IU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
) that a petition for Adoption
een filed and commenced In
urt and you are required to
> copy of your written
lues, If any, to It on GUIL-
MO SOSTCHIN. ESQ.,
i, Soslchln & Gonzalez, P.A.,
ney for Petitioner, whose
us Is 101 NW 12 Avenue,
hi, Florida 33128, (324-4556),
file the original with the
I of the above styled court on
[fore November. 10, 1078;
vise a default will be en-
I against you for the relief
for In the complaint or
ML
I notice shall be published
I each week for four con-
fcve weeks In THE JEWISH
Judian.
TiESS my hand and the
| of said court at Miami,
i on this 2 day of October,
llCHARD P. BRINKER,
(As Clerk. Circuit Court
1 Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
ult Court Seal)
SRMOSOSTCHIN, ESQ.
|.Soitchln
lonazalei, P.A.
|.W. 12 Avenue
II, Florida 33128
M)
iey for Petitioner
Oct. 6,13. 20, 27,1978
EraaUUiTOHMTSP
!!rllr,^ENTHJUDIC|A'-
T^ITOF FLORIDA, IN
1* FR DftDE COUNTY
f iA?l0n No- 'i-13U7 FC
lHJJJW division
tion for dissolution
of marriage
! The Marriage of
x LAKE, husband.
g'CIA LAKE, wife.
^PATRICIA LAKE
I Box 1582
IFREDERICKSTED
I^CROIX
VIRGIN ISLANDS
1L ARE HEREBY NOTI-
that an action for Dls-
|aiL,Man"lage nas been
[aainsl you and you are
KUE? scopy of yur
RutL '-'PSON. attorney
putloner. whose address la
fcl sw.St- Sulle "0-B.
Staini? ^ 33168' <""> Ale
PtSta-Wl,h U>e clerk
Kii k 9?8: oterwlse a
in, it be entered against
ten,""" *wK in
rn;PJs'",or Petition.
lot 9R,my hand an<> the
te^P-BRINKER
3.20,27;Nov.S,m8
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.7a.fSfl FC
FAMILY DIVISION
AMENDED
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEROY PATRICK.
Petitioner.
and
MARGIE CARSWELL
PATRICK,
Respondent.
TO: MARGIE CARSWELL
PATRICK
14664 Seymour Street
' Detroit, Michigan 48213
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
HENRY NORTON, ESQ.. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is 1201 Blscayne Building.
10 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 10, 1078; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 4 day of October,
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HENRY NORTON, ESQ.
10 W. Flagler Street,
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
IW888 Ort 8 13 5*1 27 1078
IN THE CIRCUIT CdUftTdF
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR '
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 71-132]) FC
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA DOLORES
V1LELLA ROFES, Wife
and JORGE ZANDALINAS,
Husband
TO: JORGE ZANDALINAS
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are hereby required
to serve a copy of your answer or
other pleading to the Petition on
the Wife's attorney, HARVEY D.
ROGERS, whose address Is 1401
NW 17 Avenue, Miami, Florida
33125. and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 17 day of
November. 1078, or a Default will
be entered against you.
DATED this 11 day of October,
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
ByG.S. Carlle
02908 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3.1078
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-11742 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA CENDAN,
Petitioner,
and
JOSE CENDAN,
Respondent.
TO: JOSE CENDAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Milton C. Goodman, Esq., at-;
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is Suite 520, 10 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 13, |
1078: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 20 day of Septem-
ber. 1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Diane Nycz
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MILTON C. GOODMAN. ESQ.
Suite 520,
10 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
370-1885
Attorney for Petitioner
02878 Oct. 8,13, 20, 27.1078
-------notice of action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE II TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 71-13258 FC
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARY FRENCH,
Petitioner, Wife
and
CURTIS JOSEPH
FRENCH, JR.,
Respondent / Husband
TO: CURTIS JOSEPH
FRENCH, JR.
_ / o Debbie Wlesen
514 Washbum Avenue
Louisville, Kentucky 40222
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In this
court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to it on JAMES
A. MOLANS, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner / Wife, whose address
is HI SW 3rd Street, Suite 701,
Miami, Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 17, 1078; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on the 11th day of
October, 1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Clrcult Court.
I Dade County. FL
By A. D. Wade
1 As Deputy Clerk
James A. Molans, Esq.
Attorney for
Petitioner / Wife
111 SW 3rd Street
Suite 701
Miami, Florida 33130
(305)358-8800
02005 Oct. 13. 20,27; Nov. 3,1078
notice of action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 7813197 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ONE IDA E. CARBAJAL,
Petitioner / Wife,
and
OSCAR CARBAJAL.
Respondent / Husband
TO: OscarCarbajal
7KaUvoS.A.
Apartado No. 193
San Pedro Sula,
Honduras, C.A.
YOU ARE HREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
W. Stephen Arnovltz, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 450,
Miami Beach, Florida 33130.
U.S.A., and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 17,
1078; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 10 day of October,
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Willie Bradshaw. Jr.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
W. Stephen Arnovltz, Esquire
Law Offices of
Bums It Arnovltz
i420 Lincoln Road, Suite 450
Miami Beach, Florida 33180
Phone: (305)638-4421
Attorney for Petitioner
W20O3 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1078
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 20 day of October,
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. D. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, ESQ.
2085 W. 4th Avenue
Hlaleah, Fla. 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
02948 Oct. 27; Nov. 3,10,17,1078
INTHECIrCUITCoUrToF j
the eleventh judicial
circuit of florida, in
and for dade county
Civil Action No 78-1 3124
Family Division FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ENRIQUE TORRES,
husband,
and
LAYDA O. TORRES,
wife.
TO: LAYDA O. TORRES
11o-73rd Street, Apt. 2A
NORTH BERGEN.
NEWJERSEY
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action foi
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1515 NW 167 Street, Suite HOB,
Miami, Florida 33160, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 17, 1078; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 10 day of October,
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByG.S. Carlle
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
02004 Oct. 13,20.27; Nov. 3,1078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 78 1969 GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NATIONAL HOMES
ACCE FT A NCE CORP..
Plaintiff,
vs.
FAUSTINO A. BLANCO
AND MARIA L. BLANCO, his
wife. and THE NORTH
HIALEAH FIRST STATE
BANK.
Defendants
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: FAUSTINO A. BLANCO
and
MARIA L.BLANCO,
his wife
Residence Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Complaint to Fore-
close Mortgage on the following
described property
Lot 6, In Block 151 of
SEVENTH ADDITION TO
CAROL CITY, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
In Plat Book 80, at Page 88, of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your Answer or pleadings to
said Complaint to the Plaintiff's
attorneys. HARLAN STREET,
P.A., 12700 Blscayne Boulevard,
Suite 410. North Miami. Florida,
33181 and file the original Answer
or pleading with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, on
before the 1st day of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Probate No. 7t-7420
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABE SMILOFF.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 78-13*13 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
LENA HALL. wife.
and
ERNEST HALL, husband.
TO:ERNEST HALL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1516 NW 167 Street, Suite 110-B,
Miami, Florida 33160, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Dec. 1, 1078; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 25 day of October,
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByG.S. Carlle
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
02947 Oct. 27; Nov. 3,10, 17.1078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE I1TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
Case No. 78-1378* FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
PAUL FERTLUS VILSAINT,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
MADELEINE LOUIS
RENETTE VILSAINT.
Respondent-Wife.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU. MADELEINE LOUIS
RENETTE VILSAINT, M. Tous
Marseille, Port-de-Palx,
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING saint
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS Haiti are hereby notified toserve
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND a copy of your Answer to the
OTHER PERSONS INTER- Petition For Dissolution of Mar
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE: riage filed against you, upon
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI- Husband's attorney, George
FIED that the administration of Nicholas, Esquire, 812 NW 12th
the Estate of ABE SMILOFF. Avenue, Miami, Florida X
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida, has commenced In the
captloned proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to Hie
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Estate
and to file any challenge to the
validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate. If
any. or any objection to the qua-
lifications of the Personal Repre-
sentative, venue or Jurisdiction
of the Court, with the Court,
Dade County Courthouse. 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130, WITHIN: THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR YOUR
RIGHT TO DO SO WILL BE for-
ever barred.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First publication of this Notice
on the 27 day of October. 1078.
HymanP.Galbut,
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ABE SMILOFF
Deceased
4630 Royal Palm Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. 33140
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida, 33130
Telephone: 672-3100
02940 Oct. 27. Nov. 3. 1078
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 7|-1*f3 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAFAEL CAMPOS,
Petitioner,
and
DORA C.CAMPOS,
Respondent.
TO: DORA C.CAMPOS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
petitlon for
- FIED that a ,
December. 1078. If you fall to do Dissolution of your Marriage has
so judgment by default wiU be, been filed and commenced in this
token a^mst you for the relief court and you are required to
m* i th.Cnmnlalnt. serve a copy of your written
demanded In the Complaint.
This Notice of Suit shall be
published once each week for
four consecutive weeks In the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DATED at Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this 26 day of
October. 1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By DEBORAH G. HESS
Deputy Clerk
HARLAN STREET, P.A.
12700 Blscayne Boulevard
Suite 410
North Miami. Florida33181
By WILLIAM S ISENBERG
02050Oct. 27. Nov. 3, 10. 17,1078
serve a copy of you
defenses, If any. to it, on
CARLOS M. MENDEZ. ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2085 W. 4th Avenue.
Hlaleah, Florida 33012, and file
the original with the clerk of the
styled court on or befor
December 1, 1078; otherwi
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN, MIAMI.
WITNESS my hand and the
and file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before December
1, 1078; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 23 day of October,
1078.
Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
By: B. IJpps
Deputy Clerk
02946 Oct. 27; Nov. 3.10, 17,1078
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious names The Candy Man
and / or The Candy Man Mal-
colm's Original Creole Pralines
at 22400 Old Dixie Highway,
Goulds. Florida 33170, Intends to
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Owner: Malcolm C. Hicks
02030 Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3,10,1078
representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of AdmlnlstraUon haa
| been mailed are required
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will,
the qualifications of the personal
. representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 27,1078.
Leo B. Kulp
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Dorothy Kulp
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Cohen, Shapiro, Polisher,
Shlekman A Cohen
Suite 806
3050 Blscayne Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (305)573-6111
J12fi3J________Oct 27; Nov. 3.1078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 78-4911
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY KULP.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of DOROTHY KULP.
deceased. File Number 78-6011,
is pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is
73 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The name and
address of the personal
representative of the estate is
Leo B. Kulp, whose address Is
1121 Crandon Blvd., Key
Blscayne, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due, the
date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each personal
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 78 13*25 FC
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHN C. QUINN,
Husband,
VI
AUDREY LEE QUINN.
Wife.
TO: AUDREY LEE QUINN
Residence Unknown
YOU, AUDREY LEE QUINN,
are hereby notified to file your
Answer or other pleading with
the Court's Clerk, and mall a
copy of same to Petitioner's
attorney, DANIEL M. KEIL.
Esq. 58 East 5th Street, Hlaleah,
Florida, 33010, on or before the
1st day of December, 1078, else
petition will be taken as con-
fessed.
DATED this 10 day of October.
1078.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: B. Lipps
Deputy Clerk
DAN TEL M. KEIL. ESQ.
Attorney for
the Husband
58 East 5th Street
Hlaleah. Florida 33010
Phone-883-6600
02038 Oct. 27; Nov. 3,10. 17,1078
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 71-7013
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ADELE KAMLOT.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of ADELE KAMLOT.
deceased, File Number 78-7033,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is
Dade County Courthouse, 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate Is
PAUL S. KAMLOT. whose ad
dress is 1776 James Avenue. Unit
7-B, Miami Beach, Florida 33130.
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court awrltten
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due, the
date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges
the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
.October 27,1078.
PAULS. KAMLOT
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ADELE KAMLOT
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY NORTON
10 W. Flagler St.. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-3118
02040 Oct. 27; Nov 3.1078


mme
"
Page 14-B
*JenistncridiO_
Friday, October 27
Public Notices
------M6TICE OP ACTION------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 71-13035 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
AURORA APONTE.
Petitioner,
and
CARMELO N1EL APONTE.
Respondent
TO: Mr.CarmeloNlel
Aponte
Last Known Residence
4350 N.W. 8th Terrace
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Gulllermo Sostchln, Esq., at
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 101 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33128. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 17, 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal uf said court at Miami.
F'orida on this 6 day of October,
i9?8
KICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Gulllermo Sostchln. Esquire
Stone. Sostohln
& Gonzalez. P. A.
101 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami. FL33128
13051 324-4565
Attorney for Petitioner
02907 Oct. 13. 20.27; Nov. 3.1978
--------n6ticE6F ActlON-------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-13191
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: STELLA GARCIA
and
RAMON ARROYAVE
TO: RAMON ARROYAVE
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
BENNETT FULTZ, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 619
SW 12th Avenue. Miami, Florida,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before November 17, 1978;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 20 day of October.
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seali
02908 Oct. 13. 20.27; Nov. 3.1978
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Case No 75-657 (01)
NOTICE OF PETITION
FOR DETERMINATION
OFHEIRS
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHNGECZIK.
Deceased.
TO: TO ALL PERSONS
WHO ARE OR MAY BE
INTERESTED IN THE
SUBJECT MATTER OF
THESE PROCEEDINGS,
INCLUDING THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS OF PAR-
TIES HOLDING BY,
THROUGH, OR UNDER
JOHN GECZIK, DE-
CEASED
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 78-1245* FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIO CAMPOS,
Petitioner,
and
SONIA SOTO CAMPOS.
Respondent.
TO: SonlaSotoCampos
Last Known
Residence
Apartado521B
San Jose.
Costa Rica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Gulllermo Sostchln, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
Stone, Sostchln & Gonzalez, P.A..
101 NW 12th Ave.. Miami,
Florida 33128. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Nov. 13,1978; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of Sep-
tember. 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Cqurt Seal)
Gulllermo Sostchln. Esquire
Stone, Sostchln &
Gonzalez, P.A.
101 NW 12th Avenue.
Miami. FL 33128
(3051 324-4565
Attorney for Petitioner
02867_______Oct. 6. 13, 20, 27,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-12(87 FC ',
FAMILY CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
IN RE: The Matter of I
Petition for Adoption
By LORENZO HAN
and YOLANDA HAN
TO: Mrs. Claudia Han
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Adoption
has been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on J.
ROBERTO ROJAS. ESQ., Stone,
Sostchln A Gonzalez. P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 300 East 37th Street,
Hlaleah, Florida 33013. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 13, 1978; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 3 day of October,
1978
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B. Lipps
As Deputy Clerk
iCircuit Court Seal)
R Roberto Rojas. Esq.
Stone, Sostchln &
Gonzalez. P A
900 Hialeah Drive
Hialeah. Florida 33010
i 305 i SK8-5544
Attorney for Petitioner
02881 Oct. fi, 13. 20, 27. 1978
INTHECIRCUIT COURTOF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 78-12616 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JASMINE FRASER,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
ALFRED FRASER,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, ALFRED FRASER,
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN, are
hereby notified to serve a copy of
your Answer to the Petition For
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THEUTHJUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
Case No. 78 13055 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ADELINE ROUSSEAU,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
GUY EDGAR ROUSSEAU,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU, GUY EDGAR ROUS-
SEAU, 7S73 Stirling Place, Apt.
C7, Brooklyn, N.Y., are hereby
notified to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition For Dis-
solution of Marriage filed
against you, upon Petitioner's
attorney, George Nicholas,
Esquire, (12 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33136. and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before Nov. 17,1978;
otherwise the Petition will be
confessed by you.
DATED this 6 day of October,
1978.
Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
By: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
102896 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1978
------notice op action
constructive service
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 78 13204 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CARMEN WALKER.
Petitioner,
and
LESLIE WALKER.
Respondent.
TO: LESLIE WALKER
(Resident Address
Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT, ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 3000 Blscayne Blvd.,
Suite 315, Miami. Florida 33137.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before November 17. 1978;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 10 day of October,
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByG.S.Carlle
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal I
Lawrence M. Shoot, Esquire
3000 Blscayne Boulevard
Suite 315
Miami. Florida 33137
Tel. (3051573-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
02902 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1978
Dissolution of Marriage filed
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a against you, upon Wife's attor
Petition for Determination of ney, George Nicholas, Esquire,
Heirs whose names and ad 612 NW 12th Avenue, Miami!
dresses are unknown has been Florida 33136, and file the
filed against you and you are original with the Clerk of the
required to serve a copy of your Court on or before Nov. 13, 1978;
written defenses, if any. to It on otherwise the Petition will be
The Law Offices of Alnslee R. confessed by you.
Ferdle, attorneys for Louis Gouz, DATED this 27 day of Sap-
Curator, whose address is 717 tember, 1978.
Ponce De Leon Boulevard, Suite Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
215, Coral Gables, Florida, on or By: C. P. Copeland
before the 6th day of November. Deputy Clerk
1978. and file the original with the 02875 Oct. 6,13.20. 27.1978
Clerk of the Court either before
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name Badlas Pub at 4735
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33134 Intends to register'
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Owner:
Badlas Pub. Inc.
Blairl. Zlmmett, PA.
1778 West Flagler St.
Miami, FL 33135
Attorneys for Owner
02873 Oct 6,13, 20. 27.1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name KELLER CASUAL
at 805 NW 159th Drive. Miami
Florida 33169 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv
Florida. *
Keller Industries, Inc.
By Henry A. Keller,
President
02900 Oct. 13, 20,27; Nov. 3,1978
service on Petitioner's attorney
or Immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be en
tered aealnstvou for therelief """ the undersigned, desiring to
drman^m^PeUtion18 W *-"?r
u/iTurcs m, h.nrt anrt ik. uuous name MIA &!_,*,(,-

WITNESS my hand and
seal of this Court on Sept.
1978.
Richard P. Brlnker, Clerk
of the Circuit Court
By: Charlotte W. Glrard
03872
Oct. (.13. 20, 27,1978
NOTICE UNDER f
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
NOTICE UNDER------------
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name Studio of Dance
Arts at 17045 S. Dixie Highway
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Ralph Steels, Co-owner
10730 S W166th Terrace,
Miami. Florida
Sue Steele, Co-owner
10730 SW 168 th Terrace,
Miami, Florida
02928 Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10,1978
*-.* Ukfc*X*'*sS.VJf- '
TRONICS at 1370 NW 88th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33170,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Sole Owner:
Mia International, Inc.,
A Florida Corp.
02*69 Oct. 6.1? 20.97. 1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name Prince Motel at 9068
Collins Avenue, Surf side, Florida
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Lou LJubisa Krkljus
RadmllaSurduckl
Mllllka Krkljus
Gerald SUverman
Attorney for Applicants
02927 Oct. 20,27; Nov. 3,10,1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious name ALL DADE
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM,
at 14995 NE 20th Avenue, North
Miami, Florida Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Aircraft Taxi Co.. AAA Auto
Leasing, Inc., d/b/a White
Cab, Art-Mar Corporation,
Hurricane Taxi Inc., Morse
Taxlcab A Baggage Com-
pany, Inc., d/b/a South
Florida Paratranslt As-
sociation.
By: Slgmund Zllber, Agent
By: Edward Steinberg, Agent
Franklin D. Kreutzer, Esquire
Attorney for Applicants
02874 Oct. 6.13. 20, 27,1978
------------NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious names Custom Auto Vinyl
Tops of Miami. Inc. d/b/a Con-
cept Cars Company at 2761 Coral
Way. Miami, Florida 33146 In-
tends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Custom Auto Vinyl Tops
of Miami, Inc.
02914 Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3,10.1978
------------NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the fic-
titious names Custom Auto Vinyl
Tops of Miami. Inc. d/b a
Cave Manufacturing Co., at 2761
Coral Way, Miami, Florida
33145. Intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Custom Auto Vinyl Tops
of Miami, Inc.
02914 Oct. 20. 27; Nov. 3, 10, 1978
INTHECIRCUIT COURTOF
THEUTHJUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division 7(-70S*
File No. 01
iNRE: ESTATE OF
AWRAM YSUCHER
BREZINER a k a
ABRAHAM ISUCHER
BREZINER, Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration of
the estate of AWRAM YSUCHER
BREZINER a / k / a ABRAHAM
ISUCHER BREZINER.
deceased, late of GTVATAIM.
ISRAEL, File Number 78-7069. Is
pending In the Circuit Court In
and for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of
this estate Is Gary B. Sack, Es-
quire, whose address Is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East
Flagler St.. Miami, Florida
33131. The name and address of
the attorney for the personal rep-
resentative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have Each
claim must be In writing and
must indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the
date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to
mall one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
DATED at Miami, Florida this
18 day of September, 1978.
Gary B. Sack
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
A wram Ysucher Brezlner
a/k/a
Abraham Isucher Brezlner
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 20 day of
October, 1978.
Gary Bruce Sack
Of Law Offices of
Retter A Sack
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone 368-6090
Attorney for |
Personal Representative
02917 Oct. 20, 27,1978
. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATEOIVISION
File Number 76 6*27
Division 01
INRE: ESTATE OF
ARTHUR LOEWITUS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of Arthur Loew'tus,
deceased, File Number 78-6927,
Is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is
73 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida. The personal rep-
resentative of the estate is Mrs.
Rose Pappler, whose address Is
1128 West Avenue, Apt. 206,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139. The
name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due. the
date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
representative.
Ail persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges
the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 20. 1978.
Mrs. Rose Pappler
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Arthur Loewltus
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Harry L.Bassett
2100 First Federal Building
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 377-3661
02916 Oct. 20. 27.1978
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
tltlous name SOUTH AMERI-
CAN SERVICES CO. at 19320
West St. Andrews Drive,
Hialeah, Florida 33015 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RON NITZBERG
ASSOCIATES, INC.
by: s RonaldD. Nltzberg
19320 West St. Andrews Drive
Hialeah, Florida
02885 Oct. 6,13, 20. 27,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78 13428 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE:
BLONEVA PATRICIA
BULLARD, Petitioner
and
WILFRED BULLARD.
Respondent
TO: WILFRED BULLARD"
c / o Customs Department
Georgetown,
Exuma, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
BENNETT D. FULTZ, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
619 SW 12 Ave.. Miami, Florida,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before November 27, 1978;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of October,
1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bennett D. Fultz
Attorney for Petitioner
02926 Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3.10,1978
"Uttyi^'TCouiTi
DADE COUNTY, n 09,nr
PROBATE DlVISioy"*
File Number 7I4 ,N
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OK
ANNA ALBERT
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMIN ISTRATlnu
TO ALL. PER^X-
CLAIMS OR upu.'.1"
AGAINST THE iNC
ESTATE AND ALI rSSlI
PERSONS INTEREST^
THE ESTATE ""-^D EN I
YOU ARE HEREBY Mm.
FIED that the adminSjjSE'
the estate of ANNA albp
deceased. File Number ffi
hi pending In the arcultCsurTE:
Dade County, Florida pl^'
Division, the address oiSffB
Dade County Court bE.
Miami. Florida IttlLlB
personal representative of n.i
estate Is RON ALBERT mS
address is 100 North Bk29
Boulevard, Suite 601 SSI
Florida 33131. The n'am*^
i address of the personal "
resentatlve's attorney u,m\
forth below. *1
I All persons having claim,.,
demands against the esUteuI
required, WITHIN THRti
MONTHS FROM THE DATEW
THE FIRST PUBLICATIONS I
THIS NOTICE, to 111, i2 |
clerk of the above courtawtS
statemen of any claim o 1
demand they mav have Ear,
claim must be in writing J
must Indicate the basis (or in
claim, the name and address,.
the creditor or his a^ent out
torney. and the amount claimn
If the claim is not yet due u*
date when it will becomes
shall be stated If the claim.
contingent or unliquidated ife
nature of the uncertainty shallt*
stated If the claim Is secured
the security shall be describe!
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim tothi
clerk to enable the clerk to msj
one copy to each persons!
representative.
All persons interested In u>
estate to whom a copy of this I
Notice of Administration has I
been mailed are required I
WITHIN THREE MONTH!
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection!
they may have that challenge
the validity of the decedents
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the-
venue or Jurisdiction of the court ,
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER |
BARRED.
Date of the first publication i |
this Notice of Administration:
October 20,1978.
RON ALBERT
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANNA ALBERT
DwnwI I
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Edward E. Levlnson. Esquire
Myers, Kaplan, Levlnson.
Kenln A Richards
1428 Brtckell Avenue
Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (3051 371-9041
(12919 Oct 20. 27.117! |
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVES I
that the undersigned, desirtagto j
engage In business under the
fictitious name Carnage Works
Limited Inc. at 1969 NE 148th
Street. North Miami, Florida
33181. Intends to register will
name with the Clerk of the |
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Owner: RobertTrathen
02929 Oct. 20. 27: Nov. 3.10, lffl
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTYI
INTHECIRCUITCOURT0F
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,IN
ANDFOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 78-13S30FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LUZ MARINA RODRIGLEi.
Petitioner,
and
JOSE C. RODRIGUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: JOSE C RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOW
FIED that a petition for D*
solution of your Marriage J"
been filed and commenced mm
court and you are required"
serve a copy of Ml gB I
defenses, If any. "
LOS M. MENDEZ. Wg-f5
ney for Petitioner. *
dress is 2988 W. 4th Avenue.
lean. Fla. 33012. V* g
original with the clerk of w
stvled court on or oeiori
November 27.1.78.^^.
default will be """''?g(07 *
you for the relief prayed for
the complaint or Pell,'0"ubW*!
This notice shall be pub'
once each week.for tour
secutive weeks In THfc. j&
FLORIDIAN. MIAMI, ^
WITNESS my hand
seal of said court at -
Florida on this 18 day of ocu"
^RICHARD P -BRINKER-
As CTerk.CTrcult Court
Dade County, Florid*
By AD Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Carlos M. Mender. Esq.
2988 W. 4th Avenue
Hialeah, Fla. 33012 10
02932 Oct. 20, 27; Nov 8, "


October 2U978_
*Jenistncrklk>n
Key West Merchant Dies
I .,. m AoDelrouth, a native
C^eTand one of that
RAGOSIN
GOCH
WEINER
^Cding merchants, died
EtJ S suffering a heart
Pck.Hewas54.
1m hd served three terms as
KnofSe Port and Transit
Kritv in Key West.
tpreWoftheKeyWest
Cher of Commerce, Appel-
Swtf e of the leuade'? 5
>- revitalize the city s
i. He was owner of
West.
Appelrouth also served as
president of the B'nai Zion Con-
gregation and was on the Board
of Regents for the Florida Keys
Community College.
He is survived by his wife,
Rachel; son, Stewart and
daughter, Eileen, both of Miami;
a sister, Barbara Tuerk of New
York; and four brothers, Danny,
of Atlanta, Mitchell, of Virginia,
Robert, of Iran, and Henry Sch-
wartz, of New Jersey.
MAURICE JOHN, formerly of
Youngatown, Ohio and a resident of
Miami Beach for the past 26 years.
Surviving are his wife. Esther; brother.
Samuel; sisters, Minnie Swalm, Eva
Wald, Rose Brody; nieces and nephews.
Services Sunday at the Riverside chapel
with Interment at Lakeside.
WP6
^ntnwn area, tie was u ..=.
SSh's Shoe Store in Key
rnie Serkin, Real Estate Salesman
I Serkin, 59, of Coral He was a Shriner and secretary
LEV real estate salesman,
I at the National Children s
diac Hospital.
I Rom in Knoxville, Tenn., he
I been a Miami resident since
K5 From 1941 to 1969 he was
sociated with his family's
ny surplus store.
of the Kiwanis Club of Midtown
Miami.
Surviving are his wife Marion;
a son, Michael; a daughter
Sandra Gaffney; three brothers,
Manuel, I.D. and Reuben; and
four grandchildren.
Services were held at the
Gordon Funeral Home.
Attorney Emanuel Levenson Dies
| Services for Emanuel
venson, 60, past president of
I'nai B'rith Isaac Levin Lodge
hd trustee of Hope School for
|etarded Children, were
Thursday in the Stanfill Kendall
*pel
J An attorney who was active
lith the Shriners, Levenson died
of a heart attack Monday at a
family reunion in New Port
Richey.
Levenson was a practicing
attorney in Dade County for the
past 32 years. Surviving are his
wife Catherine; two sons,
Stephen P. and Robert J.; a
brother, Abraham; and two
grandchildren.
Sarah Lebowitz, Club Woman
I Sarah Lebowitz, 70, an active
lub woman and fund raiser for
be March of Dimes and
Juscular Dystrophy
Issociation, died Oct. 24.
J Mrs. Lebowitz came here from
lewark. N.J., 45 years ago. She
Irved as chaplain and district
Jeputy of the Florida Rebecca
\ ion and was active in the
r.\. Democratic Women of
liami Heath, Eastern Star and
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OADECOUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 78 7l?8
Divisional
l.\KK: ESTATE OF
DORIS PARKER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
| FIKI) that the administration of
Uie estate of DORIS PARKER,
deceased, File Number 78-7198.
Is pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is
73 West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida The personal represen-
latlve of the estate Is Sharon P.
Knight, whose address Is 366
Whitethorn Drive, Miami
bprings, Florida. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth helow
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to fUe with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must indicate the basis for the
Jjaim, the name and address of
Uw creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed
J the claim la not yet due. the
te when It will become due
wall be stated. If the claim la
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
Uled if the claim u soured,
"je security shall be described,
* claimant shall deliver
ufflcient coplei of the claim to
J clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each peraonal
"pre tentative.
..M P*"n Interested In the
wale to whom a copy of thte
Notice of AdmlnlatraUon haa
Wi*TH,Eal,ed *re required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
SSSJ9 DATE OF THE
NrvV,L?UBUCATION OF THIS
"OTICE, to file any obJecUons
v.iLmay have ** challenge the
validity of the decedent's will.
qualification, of the personal
'presentaUve, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
,"^nCUUfS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
BAR&D*1"' BE FOREVER
thS* m .' flr,t Publication of
Notice of AdmlnlstraUon:
Beth Israel Congregation.
Surviving are her husband
George; a son Waller; two
daughters. Barbara Seigelman
and Helene Zeltzer; a sister.
Mary Altman; two brothers, Ben
and Sy Kaplan; and eight
grandchildren.
Services were held Thursday at
the Newman Funeral Home with
entombment at Mt. Nebo.
HOCHBERG
IOE M Miami Beach, Oct. 20. A
resident ol Miami Beach for over 2u
yean formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y He
WOI active In the Workmen's Circle
Hi.,n. h 28, Meyer I.ondon and the
Golden Ring Club of Miami Beach
Surviving are Ins wife of 67 years.
Mollie. son. Max of l.os Angeles;
daughter Betty of Miami Beach; three
grandchildren and six great-grand-
children. Services Sunday at Rubin
Memorial.
October 27, 1978
Sharon P. Knight
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Doris Parker
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Jack Ankus
5660 La Gorce Drive ___
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: 864-7045
02937 Oct. 27; Nov. 3,1978
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVESERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
rivil Action No ? 13*01 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE :ENE ALEXIS
Petitioner
BENITA PIERRE ALEXIS
Respondent
TO BENITA PIERRE
ALEXIS
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
DlssoluUon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
BENNETT FULTZ attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 1
SW 12 Ave., Miami. FL. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above ityled court on or before
December 1. WTS; u\er*1* *
default will be entered against
Ton for the relief demanded In
Uie complaint or petition.
This notice shall be P*rtUM4
oncTeach week W .W COH
aecuUve weeks In THE JEWISH
^ITN^myhan^^Jhe
"^RICHARD P. BRINKBR
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By AD. Wade
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bennett Fulti
Attorney for PeUUoner
02938 Oct. 27; Nov. S. 10.17.1978
COLE
DAVID S.. 91. a 40 year resident of
Miami, died Oct. 23. A former real
cstaf i' developer and more recently with
Wometco's Seaquaiium for 10 years
until his retirement in 1971. Surviving
are his wife Florence; a son Ed and
daughter-in-law Kathy and two gran-
dsons. Services at Lakeside under
direction of Gordon Funeral Home.
LEWIS
LOUIS. 85, Miami Beach. Oct. 23. He
came to Florida 30 yearj ago from New
York City. Surviving are his wife Helen;
step-children Ruth and Robert Seder;
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Riverside.
GLASS
GOLD1E. Formerly of Chicago, and a
resident of Miami Beach for 28 years.
She was the widow of Morris Glass.
Surviving are her daughters, Lucille
Herron and Beverly Sklan, both of
Miami Beach; four grandchildren: and
a brother, Edward Park of Lake
Charles, La. Services at Lakeside
Memorial Park with the Riverside in
charge.
WOLFER. Jennie, 84. of North
Miami Beach, on Aug. 31.
Levitt.
I.ASKER. Herman, 80. of North
Miami Beach, on Sept. 2.
Levitt.
WOI.OWITZ, Albert, 21, of North
Miami Beach, on Sept. 1.
Riverside.
BEHAR. Marcos, of Miami
Beach. Rubin.
ZUCKERMAN. Dr. Edward. 84,
on Sept. 3. Riverside.
CORMAN. Alfred L.. 79,
Hallandale. Sept. 20. River-
side.
LITVIN. Mrs. Gertrude S.
lOelb), 72, formerly of Miami
H.-ach, Sept. 16.
MANFIKLD. Harry. 71.
Hollywood, Sept. 19. Riverside.
RAPPAPORT, Morris. 76,
Miami Beach. Gordon.
SHERWOOD. Carolyn. 78,
Hollywood. Riverside.
STERLING, Martha, Sept. 20.
Menorah.
I NQER, Max. 69, North Miami
Beach. Sept 19 Riverside
MONUMENTS INC
Open Evary Day Cloaad Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
IVAN JAY, North Miami Beach, died
Oct. 18 at the age of 49. A resident here
for 20 years, coming from New York.
Members of Temple Slnal of North
Dade. Surviving are his wife Gloria;
son, Kevin; daughter. Lisa; two sisters,
Ruth Mortel and Edythe Kantor; one
brother, Seymour Goch. Services at
Temple Slnal. Riverside.
AARONS, Max. Miami Beach.
Oct. 23
ADLER. James L.. 28. Miami.
Oct. 23. Riverside.
COEN, Helen, 88, Miami Beach.
Gordon.
ELBAUM. Max Joseph. Miami
Beach. Oct 23. Riverside.
ELLIOT, Sid, 50, Miami Beach.
Rubin.
FEINER, Joseph, Lauderdale
ljkes,Oct. 22.
GOODMAN, Mrs. Eva. 84.
Miami Beach. Rubin.
GREENBERG, Martha L. 83.
Miami Beach, Oct. 21.
Riverside.
GROSS, Alexander, 68, Hallan-
dale, Oct. 22. Riverside.
JACOBSON, Lazarus, 85,
Hallandale, Oct. 23. Newman.
KAZLOW, Jean. 79. Bay Harbor
Island. Gordon.
KLASHMAN, Celia, 78. North
Miami. Oct. 22. Mt. Nebo.
Riverside.
NEWMAN. I. Buddy, 54, Miami,
Oct. 23. Gordon.
ROTHMAN, Shirley. 68, Miami
Beach. Gordon.
SCHNEIDER, Lillian G., 62,
Miami Beach. Oct. 23.
Riverside.
SCHWARTZ, Samuel. 91. Oct. 11.
Rubin. Mt. Nebo.
DICK. Anne. 73, Oct. 13. Gordon.
Mt. Nebo.
LEFKOWITZ, Abraham, 74, Oct.
13. Riverside Alton. Mt. Nebo.
KAGAN, Cella, 85. Oct. 18.
Gordon. Mt. Nebo.
SIMON, Jacob J., 77, Oct. 14.
Levitt. Mt. Nebo.
CLICK. Louis. 85, Oct. 15. River-
side Normandy Isle. Mt. Nebo.
MAHLER, Rose. 80, Oct. 14. Mt.
Nebo.
LEVI. Walter. 68, Oct. 12. River-
sle.Mt.Nebo.
BLAUSTEIN. Alan J., 73, Holly-
wood. Oct. 19. Riverside.
HELLER. Gertrude Giddy. Oct.
20. Rubin.
HERSKOVITZ, Irving. 72,
Miami Beach. Oct. 19. Rubin.
HILTON. Amy Beth. 23. North
Miami Beach. Levitt.
HOCHBERG, Joe. 91. Miami
Beach. Rubin.
IMBERMAN. Mrs. Hilda, 75.
Miami Beach, Oct. 20. Rubin.
KATZENSTEIN. Max. Bal
Harbour, Oct. 16.
Levitt
memorial chapelt
1921 P.mbfokf Rd
Hollywood. Flo.
921-7200
S0NNT lIVITT. f.D.
13385 W. Di.if Hy
North Miami, Flo.
949-6315
CITY MEMORIAL AND
MONUMENT INC.
Monument-Markers
Granite and Bronze
7610 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33138
RABBI MAURICE KLEIN
OFFICE: 759-1669
RES. 673-3923
When death occurs-
in MjamiTteadi and
Greater Miami call
Blank Brothers Inc.
Area Code 412-682-4000
We handle all necessary
arrangements and require-
ments for local burial or direct
shipment of remains by .
airplane for the funeral in
Pittsburgh, New York
throughout the United States,
Europe, Israel, and inter-
nationally.
$lanfe$ros,Jnc.
FI.HIIAI.KMI
Three Generations of
Distinctive Serv ice
ATA WTION AND SACMtO TRUST
a-tMMSCwitA.......,HhmmfVIW
V Alan M. Blank
President and Supervisor
6
BYRDE (Markowttz). A resident of
Miami Beach for 26 years, formerly of
New York City. Wife of the late Oscar
Welner, chairman of the Board ana
president of New York Textile Print
Corp. and York Screen Processing
Corp. Surviving are her daughter, Mrs.
Carol Miller and grandson. Dr Barry
Miller. She was a founder of the Hebrew
Home for the Aged of NY., member of
Hadassah, B'nal B'rith, Women s
American ORT, City of Hope, the
American Cancer Society and
American Jewish Congress. Riverside.
NEWMAN, Michael Loren, 31.
Hollywood, Oct. 18.
TAUBER, Edith Mendelson, Oct.
20.
VALLEY. Martha. 67, North
Miami Beach. Levitt.
ZESERSON. Maurice, Miami
Beach. Rubin.
FELDMAN. Isadore, 96, North
Miami Beach, Oct. 18. Levitt
ADLER. Lilian. 74, Bay Harbor,
Oct. 20. Riverside.
ELLISON, Milton (Mickey). 70,
North Miami Beach. Oct. 20
Riverside.
GROSSMAN, Harry N., 69.
Hallandale, Oct. 21. Levitt.
HELLER, Mrs. Gertrude.
Rubin.
MITTMAN, Mrs. Bella, 94.
Miami Beach. Rubin.
NALLY, Mrs. Ruth, 69, Miami,
Oct. 20. Rubin.
SACHAR, Anna, 96, Miami
Beach. Oct. 21. Levitt.
COHEN. Marion K.. Hollywood.
Oct. 19.
ELLIOT. Sid, 50, Miami Beach.
Rubin.
FLICKER, Howard D., 67, North
Miami. Oct. 23.
GRAY. William, 65. Miami
Beach. Oct. 23. Riverside.
JACOBS, Leonard R., 70. Holly-
wood. Oct. 24. Riverside.
GOLDBERG, Florence, Lauder-
dale Lakes.
LANGFORD, Fred. Miami, Oct.
18. Gordon.
LEVINE. Bessie, 76. Oct. 17.
PECK. Emanuel, 80, Miami, Oct.
18. Gordon.
WARSHOWSKY, Irving. 62.
North Miami Beach, Oct. 18.
Riverside.
ZESERSON, Maurice, 66, Miami
Beach, Oct. 18. Rubin.
WEINER, Minnie, 72, of Bal
Harbour, on Sept. 9. Riverside.
BERLINER, Sydney, of Miami
Beach
BLIER, Jacqueline E.. of Miami
Beach. Burial Mt. Nebo.
ELMAN, Alexander, of Miami
Beach.
FARHMAN. Sol. 65. of North
Miami, on Sept. 8. Gordon
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
l J385 Wesi Dixie Highwav
Rcjiri -mud In > I run. r I)
NtwYoik:tJ1Ji263-7MQuwnBlvd c. "6th Rd Forest Hills. N.Y
Broward County
925-3396
1<)21 Pembroke Rd
RUBIN
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
Florida's newest, largest, most beautiful
traditional Jewish chapel.
Every service personally arranged
and conducted by
MURRAY N. RUBIN, F.D.
1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida
538-6371


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* REDEEM ONE OR
All COUPONS WITH
THE SAME $7 ORDER
OR MORE. EXCLUDING
OOARETTES.
FIRST OF THE SEASON
U.S. No. 1 Florida White
GRAPEFRUIT
U.S. No. I ALL PURPOSE WHITE
Maine Potatoes 10B B 89'
Tilde
LARGE
PICK YOUR OWN
FROM A
LOOSE DISPLAY,
WESTERN ^Ok^Ok
Cantaloupes each 69'
federai
FOOD STAMPS pR|CES EFFECT|VE THURS oc|
FUirHFff ,hr WED- N0V AT AU
AT PANTRY PRIDES FROM FT. PIE
PANTRY PR/DE TO KEY WEST
TOM OW*a MOM A IOOU B1#LT
U.S. NO. i Ail PUtOSI
PICK *OUt OWN (IOW A tOOSI DISPLAY
<
HIAltHIUl 1ND OOOO
PRISM IIIMMID WISIIIN UITUCI
Romaine..................m0 39*
TOP QUAlItT (MIOIUM 1*3 SIZII D ANJOU
Pears 10;., 89*
IMM HIAOS GIIIN
Cabbage u. 17*
uuMBNM(mioiu-ioomuimmkni Yellow Onions L. I V Green Squash *
Lemons.........10 ,To 89< mV.nVosV""'0"""D,u" "'____ wM ,.UD
Papers'"!49< Apples 3.?, 79* Tomatoes 6 JL.
FLA. OR SHIPPED WHC
Premium Fn
Fryers
55"
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
n Lots of
^ Chicken
3 BREAST QTRS
W BACKS
J UC QTRS
W BACKS
3 OIBIII PKCS
49
IB.
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Btm. Round Roast$1
$169
LB.
FRESH VAUF.Y USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
Pot Roast *18"
LB.
>ISH VAllIT U i D 1 CHOICI
IIF CHUCK IONIIISS
Shoulder Steak J
push vaiuy u so > cnoiciml
Rib Roast ^ 4
IPISH V AUIY USD CHOICI III
R.. r. IMUIN|
lb Steak inu.
HEINZ
Vegetarian 0
Beans..........3
SACPAMINIO
Tomato Juice T.n2 79*
Apple Juice ".,?r99<
MIPS FOOD FIISh
Glad Wrop,0?.ic"55<
ASSt D FLAVOib
PANIRY PtlOI POWDtMO
Drink Mixes JSS? 99*
CTCll M.1.10M OIT
Dog Food 5.:o$l49
PIPPIIIDGi >M
IIOZIN IAYIP ,,
Cakes........=!J5S $149
SAIA III IIOZIN
Apple Pie 3,P?oI$l79
REFRESHING TAB SPRITE OR
Coca-Cola
67.6-OZ.
NO RET.
BTl
109
1
U-OJ
CANS
STOKIIY IIOZIN MIXID
VIGHAIUS OR
Green Peas 69
<
SHOP PANTRY PRIDE AND SAVE YOUR BLUE REGISTER TAPES FOr|
FREE GIFTS
YOU & YOURS
DAIRY & DtU OfPT.1
PANTRY PRIDE
Beet fl(
Franks 9!
PANTtY PIIOI MIAI 01 III'
Bologna.................'.
PANIIY PIIOI
Cream Cheese^.
IANO O FOSI ASSOItIO
5UCI0 SMOKIO
Meats 2 iSi
M AGGIO r All SKIM
Mozzarella
IIUI IONNII SPtlAD
Margarine 2
i oi Cl
10m
HAMILTON BEACH
BAG SEALER
FREE WITH $400 IN
BLUE TAPES
Se Our Com
plel* Store
Display at
Your Neores'
Pan fry frldt
OFFER ENDS
DEC. 13, 1970
V.\
PROCTOR SILEX
TOASTER OVEN
FREE WITH $1,250 IN
BLUE TAPES
SUNBEAM
POPCORN MACHINE
FREE WITH $1050
IN BLUE TAPES
mm BAUD GOODS
PANTRY PRIDE KING SIZE -
White Bread .$
mna apprize*
Tu^'i'^.^rsfsV^i^oZ."
LOIIAINI DILICIOUS
Swiss Cheese T.l'$l25
swms mil uni
Hard Salami ^tT'79*
KN All WHIII MIAI
Turkey Roll T.'$lw
MOMY'S PiPPIHO
Lean Pastrami i.$2"
HIUO SIONO
Liverwurst u.89*
DOIMAN i impoitio AUSTIIAN
Swiss CheeseJ3L*\"
1
A IASTI Of AUTUMN" PANTIY PIIOI
Pumpkin Pie JRffM"
MIYIIS SOU! DOUGH CM INGUSH
Muffins 3 WM
IUI IONNII IN QUAIIIIS
Margarine 2 m
OBH s ouanc.i
Citrus Punch <
MH Jt
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Borden ||_
LITE LINE YOGURT
PANTRY PRIDE ALL NATURAL CREAMED m.f%
Cottage Cheese 99
YVE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMt QOANT.t.ES. NONE SOiD TO MAIM NOT RESRONS.BtE FOB TVPOG.AP,C Al
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