The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02529

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
arfgj Organization Convention Report..* Page 1-B
"Jewish Floridlian
ilume 50 Number 28
Combining THt JEWISH UNITY and THl JEWISH WMLY
Miami, Florida Friday, July 22,1977
By Mail M cents Two Sections Price 35 Cents

m
MAN WHO CAME TO WASHINGTON
Race Toward Peace
In the Middle East
a few girlish pounds.
Bathing Suits:
Summer Trauma
By HELEN MINTZ
I I think I just wore out my
Hbdy. For good. Forever! Out of a
Election of 4(M). I finally found
Sie bathing suit to fit. It's been a
husband knew it for sure. 1 had
put on a few "girlish pounds."
The rest of the world saw me
cleverly disguised in long tunics
over slim slacks with elasticized
waists. The layered look was a
WOMEN'S WOES
Wbng winter, and all spring long I
B\my way through my religion.
| une luncheon after another,
ompletelv oblivious to what my
IVfcrror told me was happening.
Bnven the calendar on the wall
^pemed to shout. "Summer is
.iling, summer is coming!"
WSLL THEY knew it. and my
natural. Little did they know the
layers were man-made by eating.
1 can see why people take mid-
winter vacations. Halfway
through my hibernation period,
they have a chance to put right
what I've been putting off, or on
as the case might be. I go
Continued on Page 5-A
It's an interesting display of
shadow boxing between old
friends. Israel and the United
States, both led by recent
arrivals, have been sparring in
the run-up to Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's visit to
Washington, getting the measure
of the new order of things and
probing positions. When Begin
stepped off the plane in
Washington on July 19 for his
two-day meeting with President
Carterthe first between the two
leaders the arguments were all
aired: what remained was how far
each side will be able to bring the
other around to its way of
thinking.
In many ways, the meeting
was unique. Jimmy Carter's
presidency has been marked by a
more even-handed approach to
the Middle East problem than
that of any other president, while
the right-wing Likud victory in
the recent Israel elections has
upset almost 30 years of con-
tinuity in Israel politics.
THE ARRIVAL in office of
the two men, poles apart in
personal temperament, could well
mark a fundamental change in
the most important alignment in
the Middle East, and it is the
Washington meeting which
revealed the extent of this
change.
From the start, Carter has not
provided to Israel the sort of
total backing it has come to
expect from the United States.
True, in recent weeks, he
proposed that Congress approve
the sale of arms worth some $155
million to Israel, consisting of a
package of 200 wire-guided anti-
tank missiles, 700 M-13 armoured
Continued on Page 12-A
German Career Consul Here
Reflects on War-Time Debt
By NORMA A. OROVITZ
Hans-George Schattner,
[iami's German Vice Con-
"It is quite clear that we
started World War I and
II. We had to take respon-
sibility."
sul, never had the oppor-
tunity to ask his father
what he did during the war.
Schattner's father, a lieu-
fleeing the Russian army
with his widowed mother.
If his father could not
answer his questions,
neither could his mother.
"As a woman, a widow,"
Schattner said, whe under-
stood the war and the
Holocaust in a "very per-
sonal way" without ap-
Miami
Vice Consul Schattner
in a 1968 photo
tenant in the German Army
during World War II, was
killed in an accident while
stationed in Schlossberg.
That is where Schattner
was born 35 years ago only
to spend his first years
preciation of the greater
ghastly picture.
SCHATTNER'S frame of
reference necessarily includes
appreciation of that time that
history will never forget. As Vice
Continued on Page 2-A
Begin greets Dayan: will Carter's welcome be as warm:
LONG HOT SUMMER
Black Anti-Semitism
Spurs B'klyn. Tension
By BRIAN LIPSITZ
NEW YORK (JTA) "Latent
anti-Semitism" is at the root of
the mounting tensions between
Blacks and Hasidim in the Crown
alleged was deliberately
harassing and physically abusing
Blacks.
ABOUT 500 BLACKS
demonstrated outside the local
U.S.Scene
Heights section of Brooklyn,
Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky, a
spokesman for the Lubavitcher
Hasidim, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
The remark came in the wake
of a demonstration by Blacks
Saturday demanding an end to
the Crown Heights Community
Patrol, a civilian anti-crime unit
run by the Hasidim, which they
police precinct and then marched
to the nearby headquarters of the
world Lubavitch movement and
the home of its spiritual leader,
Rabbi Menachem Schneerson.
Some 300 police were on hand,
but there were no disorders. The
Blacks also criticized the special
police protection given to
Continued on Page 12-A
Leonid Brezhnev: "You guys should rather stop this race to
prevent things from becoming serious" Die Valluridad
NNMINUNIIIIMINIHNNMm^
Carter/Begin Update Page 1-B
WIHIiUKWIIIimHMMaMBHMMMItttMIHUUHM^


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Georg Schattner. AJthoogh his
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choice for his life's work has cast
him in a far more sensitive rote.
At 35. tne 12-year diplomat
carries the job off with dignity
and compassion.
PLANNING I
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
eJS-*SS4seeJ
U.S.
A I VAN UNES INC.
SYSTEMS FOR SECURITY, Inc. ^
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.TTa-. IXiX XS A XIX -*!*- *i'**
DADf: 634-3581
BROWAFD: 522-7776
.
When we put
our name on
a chapel,
it's exclusively a
Riverside chapel.
Unlike many other Jew shfunera
c -e:::-s r :- za z ,ers :e 5-::
-e^'ese'Te: by a-,, other :rg3- za: or
Eacti R .e's ceC^ace ser\ -gDade.
Broward a^c pa m 5ea:- counties Is
exclusiveryaR .s^s ce Chapel, manned by
the largest Jew 5- staffavailableinthe
State.The) are:e:_:ie who understand
Jewish tradition and fxxior it.And intha:
tradition we ser/e e.er> family, regardless
of financial circumstance.
VIA'.' BEACH
1920# tor Roadal I9tti Street 531-1151
125 '.;~5--. Dr .e 531-1151
MIAMI:
g as Road at 1 .*. 17tr S:-ee: -43-2221
*,:=-- v -v =-:-
16480N.E.19thA^er.e 5-7-6891
-:--/.:'.:
223S-x /*ood Boulevard 920-1010
SUNRISE:
117: Nc^aes: 51s: -.e-.e Sunset Str p 5S4-6060
lEST PALM 5EACH:
- .- .-- -xx=:. e^ard 683-S676
Fivfecrtapeis serving the New forkMetropa ranarea
EH Riverside
MemorfsJCrwM -.-- tors
For generates a symbol o* Jewish tradition.
M7.2^77
M7-M.77
A-n-77


Friday, July 22,1977
*Jeniti fk ridHknn
Page 3-A
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Begin Takes Strong Stand
On Media Leaks from Cabinet I
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
IPrime Minister Menachem Begin
Ihas laid down the law to his
Cabinet: No smoking during
ICabinet meetings, no talking to
[journalists afterwards. The ban
|on talking is aimed primarily at
avoiding "leaks" to the press of
senisitive matters, a situation
Ithat distressed previous
[governments.
Begin is adamant on the
I subject. "There will be no leaks
from this Cabinet," he told his
colleagues. He characterized
"leaks" as "destructive on the
domestic scene and even more so
where our international relations
are concerned."
TO ENSURE a leak-proof
Cabinet, the Premier has also
banned the presence of ministers'
aides and advisors at Cabinet
sessions. Under his ruling, any
minister who needs an aide or
advisor during discussion of a
specific subject must apply for
permission beforehand. The aide
would be allowed to attend only
while the particular subject is
being disucssed.
Begin also enjoined his
ministers to tell journalists not to
contact them at their homes after
Cabinet sessions. He promised
that the Cabinet secretary will
report to the news media on
Cabinet matters "in the fullest
possible detail" except on
'classified subjects".
These instructions were
followed by Cabinet members
who declined to provide any
statement, as had been the case
in the past, to journalists waiting
outside the Cabinet after its
weekly session ended.
ACCORDING TO the strict
new rules, an official an-
nouncement stated merely that
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
States, briefed the Cabinet on the
latest developments in
Washington regarding the Carter
Administration's attitude
toward Middle East develop-
ments, the attitude of the media
toward Israel and the Arab view
of a peace settlement as told him
by members of the Carter
Administration.
It was learned, however, that
Begin told the Cabinet he had no
intention of replacing Dinitz and
that he praised the envoy for his
excellent job in Washington.
Another official Cabinet an-
nouncement noted that Likud
Knesseter Yoram Aridor will be a
Deputy Minister in the Prime
Minister's Office and that
Ephraim Evron has been ap-
pointed director general of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
BEGIN ALSO made it clear
that he would not tolerate
smoking during Cabinet
meetings, especially cigars which
he called "most disturbing"
He was reportedly asked by
one minister how he would deal
with Prof. Yigael Yadin, an
inveterate pipe-smoker, should
Yadin's Democratic Movement
for Change (DMC) join the
government coalition. Begin
replied that when the time comes
he would discuss the smoking
issue with Yadin.
DONT PUTALLYOUR
NEST EGG IN ONE BASKET
First Federal of Miami introduces Balanced Savings. To give you
yield with less worry about early withdrawal interest penalties
Savings Plan. You divide your funds, in any
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2) Short-term certificates for higher
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Your aim is to make your money For example5 here's a suggested Balanced
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But if s hard to anticipate future
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Total Plan 6.95% Weighted Average Rate $ 5,000 Total Deposit 7.20% Actual Annual Yield*
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Instead of putting all your savings in a
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Argentine Bigotry

e:

.'-'-*.'. (sxr:~ .:'**. .'-
*%-. 4 for-.'..-^.- c f.ASjr. ~.r. '.r.h '.<*>. 'A :-~ a.i*..-.SeniitJc
tfcrcatfl i^.iw. thfe rjHr..7>.:/,:. KpraMBlMm and his
1'j mur.'*r :- >:.;^r^.\ r/idter*teeottimArmmtkm
//y.*rrjTj*r.'. v. -..-A r.=-...-.^ -..^ of *r.'uSetmusm in that
'/.f-ntry an indifference wruch th* govenanent denies
exist* Richard Maa%% president 0* the AJ Committee
Mod that his '>rgamzauon inJJ not reopen the office until it
reive phyncal not jut verbaJ, assurances that those
who make ant*-Semitic threats will be found and punished
Such a step has been sordy needed. Jews in Argen-
tina have been threatened, arrested, or have just plain dis-
appeared. Jewish institutions and Jewish-owned proper-
ties have been bombed. An investigation into a Wtmdkk
scandal has been used by vxne newspapers tn the country
to launch an anti-Semitic campaign Anti-Semitic and pro-
Naza literature is sold widely throughout Argentina
The government of Pre*dent Jorge Rafael Vtdela has
condemned discrimination and racism, if not anu-
Semstiam directly, partly because it believes that the bad
publicity it has received abroad, particularly in the United
States, has harmed Argentina's image.
But the feet u that AJCommiUee believes that the
threats against its representative, Jacobo Kovadioff, a
fifth generation Argentinian, and his family, were made
by right-wing elements in the government to embarrass
Videls. and so the government's daim that it cannot fully
control the right-wing element* hardly seems to be valid.
The 400.000-some Argentine Jewish community has
made major contributions to Argentina and has proved ita
loyalty to the country. It should not have to tolerate the
type of abuse that is being allowed against Jews there as
individuals and aa a group.
"Jewish Floridian
orrics ms ptjucr- is* a csth St.. MassVPavMi pimm
PO Box 3*71. Miunl. Florida 1
riUEDK SHOCMBT (ZOWNDUN SCUMA M THOMPSON
Editor SJaf PubdatMr ftni^U TSWili AaaUUnito PuMlahcr
TW imwUk rtorldl D Wt OarMMi Tte Kmih tt
,^^.-M---------^.--... .. -!,' |M|,
PubUalMd every TrMiay mnem 1STT by Th Jtwuti PlorlSUn
Sacorul-CUai PoaUc Paid at Miami. PI* 77M20
I-ay a>4 Sm lewtoa Weekly.
jOTrlah TatografWc Afaaey. Sbtm Arta PaaMra Bydleale,
Worldwide Nawa Sarvlea. WattaJ Mhartal Aaaaela*. Amerlcaa Aaaaetettaaaf
r.aalUa lewlak NeweMpere, aad Ike Plarlda Preaa AaaaclaUaa.
4JBMCB4PTKIN SATES: (Local Are*, Oa* Yoar-M.M; Two V
Q>rlaTwwUaaiSiaat. ,______________________________________
US.M.
Friday, July 22, 1977
Volume 50
WASHINGTON
Menachem Begin's Place in History
Robert
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Cooiinued on Paae 1 VA
How to Become Famous in Israel
MY FRIEND Hirsch stops me
the other day. Listen, he says. I
am m a hurry. Ive got to catch a
bos. but I want to ask you why
don't you Jewish newspaper
people write the right things?
What do you mesa, I said, we
always write the right things.
You are always writing about
the troubles m Israel said
Hirsch. Why don't yea write
about the positive side. Look,
said Hirach, Aan Dauuu*. is at
Israel SsssM with Golds. Soon
a pkty about Goida wU be shown
in
7 AB 5737
Number 28
OTTO PREMINGE1 is
preparing sunuariy a play bar
America about afoahe Dayan.
Here are two plays being
piepaied for the American
theater goers about Israeli
personahtaaa. How many plays
have been written about
American Jewish personalities?
None. Don't you see, said Hirsch,
as he started to rush off, that
Israel is really the land of op-
portunity? Why don't you write
about Israel aa the land of op-
portunity?
Aa Hirsch left I got to
thinking. Maybe be is right.
There are 29 Jews in the
American Congress. This is an
all-time record, but we may be
sure no one will ever write a play
about any of them for America.
In the past there have been
some prominent Jews in the
political field There was Judah
P. Benjamin, Senator from
Louisiana and later Secretary of
State in the Southern Con-
federacy. Sometimes he was
dubbed "the brains of the
I David
I Schwartz
Coniederacy." but no one wrote
any pkrys about him.
IF A JEW wants to become
famous, the best thing for ban to
do is to move to laraeL The Jew
in Israel also seams to be most
effective in the world at large.
Take the case of Mrs. Meir. No
one, it seems to me, has really
done more for the women's lib
movement than Golds. She
didn't theorize. She just acted.
She avoided extremes.
No man, try as hard as he may,
can givt birth to a child and there
are some things men can do that
women can't. Women can't be
football players and are no good
for building construction or
digging ditches. But Goida
proved that women can be good
Prime Ministers. Women have
long experience at that
Usually, they are the Prime
Ministers in their own homes.
Plato said that statesmanship
was really a matter of house-
keeping and women surely know
more about that than men, so
they should take a foremost part
in the political scene. No doubt it
would be better if they did.
I REMEMBER in the first
World War, the only member of
the House to vote against the war
was Jeannette Rankin. Men want
to be heroes, so we have war. A
woman would rather ha\e her
man alive, so he could support
her rather than be a dead hero So
women wouldn't permit war The
real thing st the bottom of the
war is this hero business. If *e
would get rid of that, there would
be no war.
The male is too much of
sentimental creature, but we need
as much the female realism and it
seems we are destined from now
on to get both. Women are in-
creasingly more in the papers,
and that is a good sign.
Recently. Simcha DiniU the
Israeli Ambassador to the United
States, revealed that an
American Jewish
woman-Elizabeth Taylor, who
was converted to
Judaismoffered at the time of
the Entebbe incident to go to
Uganda as s replacement hostage
for the 100 Jews.
SHE WANTED to fly to
Uganda and make the offer to
Amin. Elizabeth Taylor values
IsraeL She calls to mind a parallel
case in ancient
Israel-Ruth-who said. Thy
people are my people and whither
thougoeat, I will go."
Another woman lover of Israel
in the news is Bess Myerson. who
left her post of New York City
Commissioner of Consumer
Affairs. She was offered S35O.000
to spend six days shooting ad-
vertisements for some
automobile company but turned
it down. I recall Bess Myerson
once telling me that she would
never forget the day Israel
declared its independence. It "*
also the day she gave birth to her
baby.


friday, July 22,1977
*Jkwit FhridHrJin
Page 5-A
:erstothedrtor
* Schizophrenic Polities'
i
jFew Girlish Pounds)
JDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Your editorial, "Schizophrenic
Politics," on July 8, condemns
ir. Begin for the sins of the
emocratic Party for Change and
i Labor Party.
If, as you say, Mr. Begin has
to "wheel and deal" with the
Dligious Faction, it is only
mse he is being stabbed in the
ick by the other parties who
ave rejected his appeal for a
itional government.
HOW TRAGIC it is that Is-
iel, so beset by enemies on every
order, by dangerous waffling in
jr own U.S. support, by hoe-
lity from every corner of the
arid, should still be playing
olitics as usual!"
t's like Nero fiddling while
Dme burns.
The pity is that any student of
(wish history knows that the
ability to get together and
ent a united front to the
arid has caused as many disas-
as the armed foe outside.
t we witness this again in our
rn time?
Let the members of Labor and
Democratic Movement for
inge accept the fact that Mr.
sgin's Likud Party was
locratically elected.
IT IS time for them to cut out
sniping and childish
tulance with which they are
bhaving.
Mr. Begin would not be be-
olden to any one faction if the
tier parties behaved like states-
instead of sore-loser
liticians. If they were truly
iders, they would stand up with
and help to cope with the ter-
e problems which face their
titry.
Mr. Begin deserves a chance
id so does Israel.
FRANCES NUSBAUM
Deerfidd Beach
)ITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
.., me commend you on your
^cellent paper. I enjoy reading
iward Cohen's pieces and look
or ward eagerly to Leo Mindlin's.
JMindlin's articles are
^netrating, fact-filled, eye-
eners, highly readable, and
i not devoid of humor.
[May we continue hoping that
" "RABBI- "
NOW AVAILABLE
torah,
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in chant, read
lofar etc. Miami
>4-5339. Write R.B. c/oj
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Be sure it's
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Imitated but never equalled.
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he will have even more helpful
critiques for our enlightenment?
IDA K. KIMBRIG
Hallandale
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
As Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin arrived for con-
ferences with President Carter, it
would have been appropriate for
us to look at the contest from all
sides.
In particular, we should
examine the Arab record in
recent OPEC dealings. Six
months ago, OPEC majority
demanded a 10 percent increase
of oil to be added in two stages.
Saudi Arabia claimed it would
only take one 5 percent increase.
FOR THIS grand show of
magnanimity, the Saudis
demanded from the United
States a show of gratitude for
holding the price of oil down in
the face of the greed of the other
Arabs. In fact, they were very
specific in what they meant by
gratitude: that Carter should
apply extreme pressure on Israel
to surrender its security.
First of all, what was that
favor the Saudis gave the world?
It was that they increased the
price of oil by 70 cents per barrel
while it still costs them only '25-
35 cents to take out of the ground
and deliver into the cargo holds
of the tankers.
SECOND, now that Carter has
submitted to the pressure, I
mean, now that he has shown his
gratitude, what is the result of
Arab magnanimity? Well, the
first stage went, and lo and
behold, the Saudis also increased
their prices by the second b
percent, the same as their erst-
while OPEC opponents.
It is now again quite apparent
that the word of Arab leaders is
nothing to rely on, and they'll
probably never change in your
lifetime or mine, and Begin
shouldn't hesitate in making it a
strong point in his discussions.
ARTHUR ROTH
Miami
Continued from Page 1-A
through my own personal agony
and the ecstasy every year. You'd
think I'd learn by now, "what
you get is what you eat!"
Men pick up a pair of swim
trunks and bring it home. Easy
one, two, three. Let me fill you
men in on the yet to be revealed
fact of life your wife goes
through.
Since you are only allowed
three bathing suits at a time in
the dressing room, the odds are
you'll never make it to the 400
mark. Not only that, the summer
will be over by then. Your only
resource is to take along your
canasta game.
Add it up. Four women times
three suits apiece, gives you an
edge. While you're trying on, so
it shouldn't be a total loss, they
can deal a few hands.
NEXT WEEK, with the
situation in reverse, you'll go
with them. The first try-ons are
the hardest. That's when you find
out you're in the wrong size. A
beautiful size eight in the
dressing room next to yours has
the nerve to ask if she looks fat.
When only one-half of you
looks like her and the other half
matches the lady on the other
side, words are superfluous.
If self-pity weren't so fatten-
ing, you could indulge in that. So
you repeat the whole trying-on
procedure again and again until
you raise a few blisters. That's
nature's way of warning you it's
time to make a decision. By then,
money is no object.
Forget about being exclusive.
Believe me the manufacturer
wouldn't throw away the pattern
after one cutting for his own
mother.
SO THERE are 5,000 of your
style around. Hopefully you
won't run into all of them at once.
But don't count on it. Didn't the
salesgirl tell you how everyone
doesn't look the same? The other
4,000 women believed her, so why
not you?
One thing I can tell you. Mine
will be different. I'll give you a
clue. It has a long tunic top and
sort of resembles what I wore all
winter to hide the you know
what! JewiahPo*
and Opinion
!- K.IKHDt IUUKCOCO
"\fontage is solving
a lot of my problems
about smoking?
"You see, I really enjoy
smoking. To me, its a pleasure.
But it was no pleasure hearing
all the things being said against
high-tar cigarettes.
"Of course, I used to kid
myself a lot about giving up the
taste of my old high-tar cigarette
for one of those new low-tar
brands. But every one I tried
left my taste unsatisfied.
"Then someone offered
me a Vantage. Sure Id read
about them. But I thought they
were like all the others. I was
wrong.
"Vantage was right. It satisfied
like my old brand. Yet it had nearly
half the tar
"Its been
about a year
since I started
smoking
Vantage, And it.
looks like I'm
going to be smoking
them for a long time
to come."
Bernard Schoenfeld
Westchester. New York

Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
FILTER 10 mg "tai", 0.7 mgmcoime
av. pei cigarette. FTC Repon DEC. 76;
Regular,Menthol, ^^vT
and Vantage 100 s. ^^n^
MENTHOL: 11 mg "lar". 07 mg.nicoiine.
FILTER 100'j: 11 mg. "tar". 0.9 mg. nicotine av pei cigarene by FTC method.


?VBtA
+ M*i*tFkrrti9r
Friday. ji:, 22
!*
Course Encouraging
Catholic Conversion?
Sports Stadium to Proceed
B* TWIA SfENDELSON
li:
.'EP.VSALEM-
TA -
t-.-r..
B7 BRIA.V LIPS7T7
I :~.k -Tie
'. *-- '-.--.-.-. ?>. a: /-jr.*
^ acr.-_e: -..v '_-..-. e- -
Y.*-**.. -.' rpcr_%orrur t seres .'
..tj.'j: K.^erx.1 sr* eny/i-i^w: v.
er*. v. -*<.*? t. Cacfcofacam
*. ~#r:x.r%zf.. m *r. -.' -.^e
JCP.B sa*: Moreover t' i-
yp-jpx'^KJCJ: --nxr -,f f'jrmer
I HP Integr*:>: Hxr*r..'.*s>
Program, r,.cu are now 3 tne
BececL^t^ne aceaatr> a: Fo-at-
IN A PHONE aaer-oew
David Goldstein JCP.B
exeeotrve -trwrv-jr totd the
Jewh Tetyapmc Agency that
X geceralry oineeOed that
m the Abby there are cot
former I HP ru^enta of whom
time are behaved v. be .'*---
Goldstein Hid be a cerum two
are Jewish, after tbetr identities
became known when they
returned home to v then*
parent*
According It the JCRB memo
titled. A Warning About the In-
tegrated Humanities Program at
the University of Kansas. wfajch
waj aent aa an alert to various
Jewish communities. The
Catalog 'explaining the course*
does not discuss the student tripe
to this monastery organized by
the I HP faculty, or the lift
student trip to a remote island m
Western Ireland where instruc-
tion m Roman Catholicism, using
a Roman Catholic catechism was
given '
According to the JCRB, the
program at the state school in
Lawrence. Kan., is described
by the catalog aa a freshman-
sophoroore program devoted
to an introductory study of great
philosophical. historical dn
literary books of Western
Civilization from Homer to Dos-
toyevski.
IT CONSISTS of four six-
credo-hour courses taught by
Profs. Dennis Quinn, Franklyn
Nelick and John Senior.
The memo adds While the
I HP faculty deny they are brain-
washing,' it seems evident to
many observers that the great
books are used to introduce
young students to only one point
of view, that of medieval Roman
Catholicism.
"All published reports agree
that contrary views are not aired
in the IHP classes. Memorization
is r-tressed, but not dialogue and
analysis The Bible is read, but
without scholarly methods of
study. Students are not per-
mitted to take notes in class or to
ask questions. They are told not
to read even the footnotes and
commentaries in the editions of
the books they use. They are
warned against television, radio,
newspapers, magazines and
drama.
CONTACTED by the JTA,
Theodore A. Wilson, associate
dean of the College of Liberal
Arts at the University of Kansas,
aid: "It is a very ambiguous
issue involving claims of
academic freedom and involving
questions of the separation of
church and state." He added:
"The statements in the release
(JCRB memo) are accurate."
Wilson said the unviersity has
difficulty separating what goes
on in the classroom from what
may occur outside the classroom
as regards the student-professor
relationship. The professors offer
personal counseling, Wilson said.
Yet, there is "no evidence the
professors have stepped over that
line (dictated by the separation of
church and state)," within the
classroom. It would be difficult to
prove, as no written records exist
of the classes since note-taking is
banned, he said. In addition.
- ~~-.'. ;
v. : q.-.g* z>. poaxf.- ;i
acaoemx free*:
-- : -~ ::ag.-ses
THE COURSES i_- M
recrec: WJacc *-*-tC *.jc are
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"A r_e -^jz -n..*---.
.esr:.ga:.r.g _-.-:
"A'_y.r. said :z*.
z*& zsjr.erm+r. ic^de-nts --.-. .'.
\aaz rxzjar&t wtrrtjmA Although
ne did Ml eia:ra2e be said I
:r..r.t -jjt *Z*%k,sjzs :zx: have
rxxr. rksnA are senocj
According M Goidstec: *cs-
dect.i atfc have isnch at
professors aomea. wfaxh. he
aid. m and of tseif. wooid be a
x-.>-.,'.-.-..'^ *:-..-.-> BM bWbV
tern alleged that an atmosphere
encouraging conversion to
Catholicism exana at the kzncbes
FURTHERMORE, be said.
student* and professors some-
times go to mass together,
presumably to help '.hem m
then* Latin 'eccfes-astiral Late.
not classical >." And ah hough the
.r.p v. Ireiand BBMHMMj
a vorantary activity. Goldstein
asserted that there wa a lot of
pressure to take it
Wilson said college credit for
the Ireland program has stopped
because of reports of prosely-
tizing. According to Goldstein,
about 300 students were m the
IHP last year Wilson said at
us height. 100 students out of
2', '//j students at the school"
were taking the course
An interfaith committee called
The Committee for Academic
and Religious Freedom has been
formed. Goldstein said, with its
primary goal being to inform
potential students about the
actual program. Beyond that.
Goldstein said the committee
would like to see the program
modified so that opposite points
of view are aired.
HE SAID: This is not in any
Continued on Page "-A
; -.at r-ac^rr;
-.-. :-j ari~..:;- ::
r*c- -xtse ten
-r.r*jOOC :r T%--e-: *
-jeeded f-.r -xber pr:?sct
i ..
THE MAYOR. = a
ar^ptzr ..=:-*<: here ace-sec
xg-- facts anoct the proposed sports
center and or gar, .tit g a pre*^re
Kouek s office has recer.eC
close to 5000 letters from the U S
Funeral Held For
Bus Hijack Victim
NEW YORK- JTA -Funeral
services were head here for Mrs
Sett* Blassberg. the 5T-year-c4d
Greenfield. Mas* woman killed
by the hijacker of a bus here July
V Rabb: Kalmar. New-field of
Tempi* Israel m Greenfield toid
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that Mrs. Blassberg was an
active member of the temple and
cs sisterhood sang m the temple
choir and was a member of
Hadassah.
She worked as a clerk a: the
Mammoth Mart store in
Greenfield Mrs Blassberg and
her husband. David, who
operates a newsstand and lunch
counter at the courthouse in
Greenfield, were returning from a
visit to their daughter in
Washington when a gunman
seized a Vermont Transit bus
after it left New York's Port
Authority bus terminal and
forced it to go to Kennedy
International Airport.
Robinson wounded two other
passengers, one of whom. Jimmy
Lo. 36. of Hong Kong, was in
critical condition. Robinson, who
was charged with murdering two
people and kidnapping 25. was
ordered held for psychiatric
examinations.
(.KONSI.VGllirs PRESENTS
SEWtflTOXAL SUMMER'77
Follow your best instincts, indulge all your senses
in the pleasures of a Grossinger vacation
27 Holes of Great Golf. Indoor-Outdoor Tennis A Pools
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SINGLES SUMMER WEEK:
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write or call for your FREE magazine
See your travel agent or call our Reservation Office
914-292-5000 (Open 7 days a week 9 a.m. to 11 p.m )
DIRECT NYC PHONE:212-563-3700
Or write Grossinger's. Box JF1. Grossinger. NY 12734
DIRECT NYC PHONE: 212-563-3700
For Group Outings and Conferences call
(212) 563-3704. Ext 172
FULL AMERICAN PLAN 3 MEALS DAILY
-:. .-


se :
pawl
.-j-r-r -T-. r. -.-.-. i .r- --
-g-t-.*-: from iat U 5
KoflesL =rwever has *~>de
;.:_: ?-:cr.r? fax thl ru:^~ A
;*:.:-.:- i: =>-.re \r^r. 4: '
ri: -r rriocrsL^g :: a
presented to r:rr.
THE CONTROVERSY has
risec fears hoe%'er
x---:r.T.y.r. ~crs :^j:
erzpr. berweer: ncn-re-^ious
sporj fazs and the C>rthodox
*ho seem :c save become bolder
z zaerz >'-*<"- since Premjer
Mesachem Begm formed a
a^atJM government m part-
nership wnh the religious parties
:sa: ber
asses siv
0*Dser-.er pc=t*c -..-. --j. .^
)
"~--a-~* "----" :-. :-,
SsMmUl Itvlbet
away from r.-sagc^joa an,!
;..---.:: :^i- -=.-.. -<^ .,
y. r.r- are sa : .-.* M ;-. m .:" f
IT WILL not be
^ but -_: eaataa Mauiari
modest 25.000 soccer i.-.: v-^,
sports fans.
Fmally. KoDek Mted. M
go%emment or maaic.pe. hadi
are involved Half .:' -^
estimated IL70 mfliwv Xr wj]
come from the football ^.rfrv
and the rest from privttc ioaon
here and abroad. The r^diia
will take about three year? ^
?r.-p.e-.*
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Friday, July 22,1977
*Jenifri Fkridfian
Page 7-A
1
Hole In Your Image, Dear Henry
i
i
It sounded like a voice from the
past, which it was of course,
though not the too distant past.
Henry Kissinger"s warning on
the rise of Eurocommunism was
his most telling political con-
tribution since quitting as
Secretary of State. At almost the
same time as President Jimmy
Carter was telling Americans
they were now mature enough,
secure enough, not to let a few
"little ole Communists" worry
them, Kissinger was saying
America must do its utmost to
stop the Berlinguers and Mar-
chais.
If Kissinger's counsel had the
ring of last year's thinking about
it, his argument was compelling;
and at least he did not choose
Playboy in which to postulate.
"One need not be a cynic to
wonder at the decision of the
French Communists,
traditionally the most Stalinist
party in Western Europe, to
renounce the Soviet concept of
dictatorship of the proletariat
without a single dissenting voice
among the 1,700 delegates, as
they did at their party congress
in February, when all previous
party congresses had endorsed
the same dictatorship of the
proleteriat by a similar
unanimous vote of 1,700 to
none," he said.
KISSINGER has always had a
knack of putting his hands on the
facts when emotion is
threatening to run away with the
argument. In the Middle East
and in Africa, Kissinger brought
belligerents to the table and set
about finding the middle ground,
or creating it if there was none.
"A good negotiator," Kissin-
ger told the London Observer in a
candid interview recently, "is
somebody who can give others
the confidence to move in what
they must each perceive to be
their own interest, and since they
arc responsible lor the future of
their country, you would be
reckless if you try to trick them
about that."
But how do you do that with
protagonists as sundered as thi
Jews and Arabs? "What you can
do is to affect the margins of theii
perception, and I considered that
my principal role," he said in the
same interview.
FOR THE former Secretary ol
State, six months after leaving
office, every situation has its own
irony and absurdity. Looking
back, he says: "Of course, as my
time from office goes on, my
infallibility increases geo-
[ metrically."
And Kissinger's past is begin-
ning to rear up. Kissinger the
master negotiator, Kissinger the
I peacemaker for some has become
Kissinger the architect of the
[ Vietnam war policy. One example
is the academic fury aroused by
[Columbia University's offer to
[endow a chair in diplomacy for
I him.
Faculty members and students
I sharply attacked the idea, saying
! the university was engaged in an
unseemly chase after a celebrity.
To endow a chair such as the one
proposed would cost $1-2 million,
and since most of it was expected
to come from Kissinger's long-
time benefactor, former Vice
President Nelson Rockefeller, it
would compromise the school's
academic integrity.
THE PRO-KISSINGER ele-
I ments drew a parallel to the free
speech issues raised by the case
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of Dr. William Shockley, the
Nobel prize-winning physicist
who espouses controversial
theories about connections
between race and intelligence. Dr.
Shockley was denied permission
to speak at several campuses.
Prof. Seymour Melmen, of
Columbia's engineering school, a
Kissinger opponent and left-wing
activist, said: "This is nothing
like the Shockley case. No one is
denying him a right to speak. If
he were invited here I would be
delighted and I would go.
Fundamentally, the question is
what do we do in this society with
those who were primarily respon-
sible for theVietnam war?"
Another radical, H. Bruce
Franklin, now professor of
English at Rutgers University,
wrote in the New York Times:
"Rather than giving this chair to
a man whose theories were
proved to be nonsensical, why
not give it to one of those
political scientists who demon-
strated as early as 1965 that the
Indo-China war would end with
the military and political defeat
of the U.S."
AN AD HOC group of Colum-
bia students formed to oppose
those attempting to prevent
Kissinger's appointment termed
the campaign "a crude form of
McCarthyism."
In the event none of this
mattered, Kissinger accepted a
one-year appointment as
Professor of Diplomacy in
Georgetown University's School
of Foreign Service in Washing-
ton, D.C. Aides said he had
decided on Georgetown for
geographic and personal reasons.
Critics savage him not only as
the chief architect of America's
war in Asia, but for his passion
for secrecy, his sanction of illegal
surveillance of his own aides and
newspapermen, his icy disdain
for human rights, his Chilean
policy, his belated attention to
Africa.
ALL ARE gone now but not
forgotten in any assessment of a
man not yet turned 54. whose
panache his opponents called
it chutzpa captured headlines
worldwide.
His supporters cite his schol-
arly record at Harvard, his eight
years as National Security Ad-
visor and Secretary of State and
point to him as the prime planner
and moving force behind the
opening to China, the thaw with
the Soviet Union, the tortuous
effort for peace in the Middle
East and Rhodesia.
Kissinger himself feels he
helped to solve the problem of
preserving "the American spirit"
and "the American commitments
around the world" as he planned
the disengagement of more than
one-half million Americans from
Vietnam.
Now more relaxed, leaner and
more tanned, Kissinger spends
his mornings in a well-guarded
downtown Washington office,
and his afternoons in a specially
reserved room in the Library of
Congress. He researches his book
to be written for Little, Brown
and Company at a reported $2
million.
HE MEETS with colleagues
from Georgetown where he is
visiting and acts on occasion as a
foreign policy consultant to the
National Broadcasting Company.
For a reported $1.5 million he
serves as vice chairman of the
Chase Manhattan banks inter-
national advisory committee.
He and Nancy go out for
dinner often, on occasion to the
White House. He spoke to the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce at a
meeting down the street for a fee
of $5,000. and to a group of IBM
executives in Bermuda (fee
unknown).
Is he laying down the foun-
dation for a return to public
office? Possibly, admirers say.
Kissinger, for the moment, says
nothing. Except, the other day.
looking back at his career in dip-
lomacy and government, he said
with his usual mockery: "I did no
more than any other genius
would have done."
To the Point International
Course Encouraging Conversion?
Continued from Page 6-A
way a Jewish issue."
One well-informed observer
said he felt there was a reluctance
to challenge state officials pub-
licly because of, what he believes
to be, grass-roots support for the
program from many small town
parents who fear their children
will become "hippies" or
radicalized when sent away to
college.
Although their children may
convert from being Baptists to
Catholics, they view this as being
a far lesser evil.
That observer added that a
low-keyed approach is preferred
to prevent the issue from
becoming so controversial that
students will take the course out
of curiosity. Wilson also said the
program has "very strong defen-
ders," particularly parents whose
children (with, for example, drug
problems) were straightened out.
ONE university official close to
the issue, who requested that his
name not be used, said: "The ad-
ministration is taking a position
of benevolent neglect. By
gradually withholding support
for the program... the prospectus
over the next year or so is that
the program will decline... ," as
it loses its publicity and "sense of
specialness," which is "its main
motivating force."
Beyond that, the official said,
the university would drop the
course it legal action showed the
professors were proselytizing.
Dr. K: "Did no more than any
genius would have done."
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Pa#e8-A
>M*istfkrrtk>r
Priday,JoJy22.19:7
Don't Overlook Million Jews in Far Cast]
By SEYMOUR B LIEBMAN
Israel so preoccupies the atten-
tion of American Jewry that the
existence of almost one million
Jews in Latin America receives
scant attention, and then only
when one of oar national defense
agencies cries. anti-Semitism!
Even less attention is directed to
the Jews of the Far East.
This may be due to the com-
parative insignificant size of the
communities in Tokyo. Hong
Kong. Singapore. Bangkok and
Manila Another factor is that
Buddhism and Shintoism do not
foster anti-Semitism or even
anti-Judaism. Far Eastern faiths
are primarily ethical, philoso-
phical and humanitarian and are
not competitive
RECOURSE to demographic
figures in the most recent edition
of the American Jewish Yearbook
often provides guesstimates'
and should not be considered
Torah me Sinai This book gives
the Jewish population of Japan
as 500 "community reports 400-
5001: Bangkok, the capital of
Thailand. 0 'community reports
270 membership. "0 families!.
These figure variations may be
due to a count of families instead
of individuals, or vice versa
Saving lives
in Israel is
our concern'
Samuel Reinhard
Chairman Florida Region
American Red Maqen Da.id
or hrael tARMDIi. thanks
Mr.aMn.Hnrj R.Auerbach
of Miami Beach. Fla for sav-
ing lives in Israel tnrough their
generous contribution of a
fullv equipped ambulance to
Magen David Adorn 'MDAi
Israel's National Red Cross
Societv The people of Israel
and Magen David Adorn de-
pend on the friends of Ameri-
can Red Magen David for Is-
rael who help provide the vital
lifesaving equipment needed
to operate and maintain the
MDA Ambulance Fleet. MDA
First Aid Stations and the
MDA Blood Center
Qt
support
American Red Magen David
for Israel
420 Lineotri M.. Suite K*
Miami Beach. Fla 33139
Enclosed > my contribution of
S____________ Pltast enroll me as
Q ARMDI-MDA Blood Bat*
Member $50
Q AHMDt Suaponuig Member S25
Q ARMDI Chai Member til
I wisn to five a GIFT OF LIFE"
? la Memory of -----------------------
Qlf tin-nrnf

Scad information re G MDA Ambulance* ABMDI Ufacy Program "iffT
.....
n.T
ha* Zip
American Red Magen David for luael.
an atflwruad ta eternal organization.
ii the tote support ana a the tinned
Stares of Magen David Adorn la Israel.
Another factor is the existence of
unaffiliated Jews J. I. Fishbein.
editor of The Jewish Sentinel
wrote a few years ago. anent
Hong Kong Jewry, that those
who do not belong say they don't
want to mix with Sephardic
Jews.
The Sephardim did found the
communal centers in Hong Kong
and Singapore. They are also the
wealthiest and most powerful in
these places the Ashkenazim
predominate in Tokyo and Bang-
kok. In the former, the Ash-
kenazim Russian. English.
American. French and other
Europeans are the principal
communal leaders.
SINCE Malvina and I spent
some time in the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Japan. 'Tokyo
to be exacti. with several of its
members and its lay spiritual
leader. I will discuss this Jewish
community The community was
started 'not officially founded in
1921 by the inffuxof many
Russian Jews who had fled the
Russian Revolution and migrated
to Shanghai.
When economic conditions in
Shanghai became almost in-
tolerable, they moved to Tokyo.
My own research in connection
with the history of Jews in the
New World led to my knowledge
of Jews in the Far East 'Macao.
China and Japani in the !6th and
l"th centuries. There was also a
community of Chinese Jews in
Kai-feng Fu. 750 miles west of
Shanghai which was in existence
until 1859.
Rabbi If. Tokayer, a former
U.S. chaplain in Japan, met one
of the descendants of the Jews of
Kai-feng Fu who also left Shang-
hai for Tokyo 'Pearl Buck wrote
Peony, historical novel con-
cerning the demise of the Chinese
Jewish community See also Mal-
vina W Leibman's book Jeuish
' ktry from Boston to Baghdad
for more data on the Chinese
Jews I.
From 1921 to 1953. the Jews
met in private homes for religious
services During this period Jews
from America and Europe joined
the founders. After World War II
and the McArthur occupation.
American businessmen, among
them Jews, saw new markets
opening and came to Japan. The
Jews finally incorporated as a
nonprofit religious organization
under the new constitution
drafted by the American ad-
visors.
THE PRESENT Center mem-
>ership is 120 families com-
prising 300 souls.The estimated
total Jewish population, in-
cluding a few from Osaka and
other cities, is over 800. The
unaffiliated are the lost sheep of
Israel whose numbers signal a
coming crisis in the total Jewish
population of the world. Despite
the press releases of the Reform
movement of the early 1950s
about the thousands of Japanese
who either converted to Judaism
or sought conversion, there are
only three recognized Japanese
families which converted. One of
these is in the United States. The
son of one family in Japan is now
studying for his Bar Mitzvah.
The present lay leader and
educator of the Center, Mr. Ab-
raham Aviner, is an Israeli who
studied in the U.S. and is marry-
ing an American girl employed as
a secretary by a Japanese adver-
tising company. Mr. Aviner is
strictly Orthodox. The Birnbaum
Sabbath Siddur it used.
The baal schachrus and baai
koreh was an Iraqi Jew who is
married to an Israeli. He also of-
ficiated at the mincha services
which followed the kidduth
I HAD the privilege of speak-
ing at the elaborate kiddush after
the services. Mr. Rimati, the Is-
raeli Ambassador to Japan, who
is completing his tour of service
there, also spoke.
The Center occupies s beautiful
former three-story private
residence. The shui was a 196e
addition to the original structure.
This was financed by a donation
of the Eisenberg family.
The building library contains
books on many aspects of
Judaism in English. French and
Hebrew The Center includes a
mikieh and maintains a Jewish
section of the Yokahama
cemetery, a heim kadisha and a
kosher dairy restaurant. It
assists members in importing
Kosher meat. 400 pounds at a
time, as well as Passover foods.
THE MEMBERSHIP, almost
as diverse as the places in the
world where Jews live, are
French. American. British. South
African. Latin American and
others Inter-marriage between
Jews and Japanese is rare, al-
though we spent some very
pleasant hours with a Jewish
woman who is married to a
Japanese
To prognosticate on the future
of Jews in Japan is foolhardy, al-
though there are some facts to
consider. There is no anti-
Semitism in Japan, and if one
believes that anti-Semitism is
necessary for the survival of
Judaism this may be a factor.
However, there is little chance'
of Jewish assimilation into the
dominant culture. Jews in Japan
are interested in Israel and some
migrate there. Jewish youth \i
frequently sent out of the country
for secondary education, usually
to Australia. Canada. England or
the U.S.
MANY OF the Jews now in
Japan, like so many Jews else-
where, are more interested in the
secular and ethnic aspects of
Judaism than in the religious
Any political change may also
have an effect.
From my vantage point of
limited knowledge of the
Japanese situation specifically,
but with much knowledge of the
Jews. I'd say that almost any-
thing can happen in the course of
vears.
Jeuish Community Center of Hong Kong
Interior of Synagogue in Hong Kong
Washington
. .
Federal
SAVINGS AMO LOAN ASSOCIATION
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MAIN OFFICE
1701 MERIDIAN AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
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Ctaivwa/ttaaaaW


JjViday, July 22,1977
%+
+Jewit fkrklkiti
Page9-A
ADL Welcomes 'Reverse Discrimination'
Settlement At City College
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith welcomed the final set-
tlement of a class action at-
tacking "reverse discrimination"
in the admissions practices of the
City College Center for
Biomedical Education. The
settlement requires the school
either to grant admission or
9 ^compense students rejected
from a special program in 1974.
The "stipulation of set-
tlement" concluded a case
initiated in January, 1975, by two
of the rejected students, Kenneth
Hupart and Michael
Scognamiglio, for themselves and
19 other applicants. It was ap-
proved in the Federal Southern
District Court by Judge Marvin
E. Frankel.
THE SUIT was initiated after
ADL investigated the situation,
filed a complaint with the Board
of Higher Education and asked
Victor J. Herwitz, vice chairman
of the League's national law
committee, to art as counsel.
Under the terms of the set-
tlement:
Four places in the Center's
incoming September, 1977 class
will be proffered to four of the
original 21 applicants who had
never been offered admission;
# Should any of these reject
the offer, the opportunity for
admission will be given to nine
others who had previously been
accepted for entrance but had
rejected the offer. The other eight
students were admitted to the
program after the suit was filed;
Each of the applicants who
is not in the Center's program
will receive $1,500 in damages.
The school will also pay court
costs and attorneys' fees;
9 Tuition will be "waived"
for 12 students the eight
already in the school and the four
to be admitted in September
I
j? Rabbis Group Endorses Textile Boycotts
NEW YORK (JTA) The
growing national consumer
boycott against products made
by the giant J.P.Stevens textile
corporation received a significant
boost when the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis
(CCAR), at its annual convention
held at Grossinger, New York, on
June 23, voted unanimously to
endorse the boycott, it was
reported here by the
Amalgamated Clothing and
Textile Workers Union, AFL-
CIO, Canadian Labor Congress.
^.The endorsement by the
CCAR, the 1,300-member
irganization of Reform rabbis in
.he U.S. and Canada, came in the
form of a resolution which urged
"that the boycott of the
J.P.Stevens Company products
be supported until such time as
collective bargaining takes place
in good faith"; and that "en-
couraged" members of the CCAR

"to support and strengthen the
Stevens boycott."
CITING "the condition of the
textile workers at the J.P.
Stevens Company," and the
numerous judgements by the
National Labor Relations Board
and various federal courts that
found the Stevens Corporation
guilty of unfair labor practices,
the resolution said the CCAR
came "to the considered
judgement that the J.P. Stevens
Company has refused to
recognize the legal right of its
workers to organize and
bargain."
The resolution endorsed the
boycott as a means of supporting
the Stevens workers* struggle "to
achieve economic justice and
humane safe working conditions
through collective bargaining."
Prior to the endorsement vote,
the discussion stressed that
adoption of the resolution in-
volved an obligation to enlist
support for the boycott among
the member-rabbi's
congregations and other
members of the community, the
union reported.
"THE UNANIMOUS backing
of the Stevens boycott of the
CCAR is particularly striking
since it is the first major Jewish
organization to consider the issue
at the national level," union
officials said. The mammoth
Southern-based Stevens cor-
poration, the nation's second
largest textile producer, has
increasingly become the target of
concerned community, religious,
labor and campus organizations.
"A resurgence of the Civil
Rights coalition of the 1960s, in
which the Jewish community
played such a significant role,
appears to be growing in support
of Stevens' 45,000 workers," the
union noted.
since the program, as originally
offered, was tuition free and, as a
result of state law, fees are now
charged.
DISCUSSING THE set-
tlement, Larry M. Lavinsky,
chairman of ADL's civil rights
committee, said that the
Biomedical Center case reveals
"only the tip of the iceberg of
preferential treatment on the
basis of race in universities and
professional schools."
He pointed out that the two
young men had been rejected
only because they were white,
although they had more than
adequately fulfilled the
prerequisites for the center's
program: need, community
service and willingness to serve
in ghetto communities after
graduation.
"There is no way," he stated,
"that society can benefit from the
exclusion of such outstanding
students from an opportunity to
obtain a medical education. In
the end. all people, minority and
majority alike, would suffer the
loss."
HE EXPRESSED the hope
that the decision expected this
fall by the U.S. Supreme Court in
the Bakke case "will eliminate
the need for such class actions in
the future and put an end, once
and for all, to racial
discrimination in universities and
professional schools, whatever
the race of the applicant."
The final settlement was based
upon a decision handed down by
Judge Frankel in August, 1976,
which declared that the
Biomedical Center had:
Intentionally eliminated 19
Asians and Caucasians on the
basis of race during the selection
in 1974:
0 Discriminated against the
selection of 14 alternates solely
on the basis of race;
Set a 50 percent quota for
blacks and Hispanics as a desired
'goal of the subcommittee in
making its selections.
THE SUIT, which charged
"reverse discrimination," was
filed in Federal Court against the
Board of Higher Education of the
City of New York, the City
'College of the City University,
the Center for Biomedical
I Education of the City College,
I Robert E Marshak, the president
of City College; Alfred Gellhorn,
the director of the Center for
Biomedical Education; Robert J.
Kibbee, the chancellor of the City
University, and Alfred Giardino,
chairman of the Board of Higher
Education.
The Biomedical Center, created
by the Board of Higher
Education as an integral part of
City College, offers a six-year-
curriculum leading to a com-
bination BS-MD degree.
In ADL's original complaint,
Arnold Forster, the agency's
general counsel charged that the
Center was excluding highly-
qualified whites "simply because
they are white."
He said that the selection
procedures were based upon race
and that replacement for those
who declined to accept places in
the program was also along
strictly racial lines "black for
black and white for white, etc."
from four separate lists labeled
"Caucasian, black. Asian and
Latin."
IN HIS DECISION. Judge
Frankel said that the Biomedical
Center and the other defendants
had "steadfastly maintained that
they did not intentionally
discriminate on the basis of race
prior to the selection of the
alternates, and that any
discrimination that did occur
violated Committee. University,
and Board policy.
In these circumstances, the
intentional racial discrimination
found by the court cannot
withstand scrutiny under the
Equal Protection Clause."
IT'S BACK-TO-BASICS
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A unit of A.e<1 Stores
nr


One isRaeli's plan on how to deal With the teRRitoRies
By ILAN CHAIM
In a nation once noted for its
daring prophets, it is certainly
refreshing, if not reassuring, to
have someone step forward and
attempt a timely solution to most
of Israel's problems. Professor
Raanan Weitz, Head of the
Settlement Division of the
Jewish Agency, analyzes and
answers the problems of our
times in his treatise, "Where are
We Headed?-A Planned Frame-
work for Economic, Social, and
Organizational Development
Which Coordinates Possible
Political Solutions."
Since the Six-Day War, Weitz
states, the government of Israel
has failed to seize upon a
singularly meaningful and clear
policy with regard to a number of
fundamentally basic problems
upon whose solution lies the
future, even the destiny, of the
State of Israel.
There are three basic problems
which demand prompt and
correct solutions: our relations
with the Arab /Palestinian
population, the absorption of im-
migration, and the economic
situation.
SINCE THE Yom Kippur
War, these problems have only
worsened: the political seige
tightens around us, there are
segments of the population, and
fundamentally changing absorp-
tion procedures.
IT IS vital to allow political
expression to inhabitants of the
occupied territories, without
which there will be no basis for
peace between us. For social,
economic, and political reasons, it
is desireable not to continue with
a military government for a
number of years; and the social
and economic infrastructure of
the territories should be built up
through planned development to
raise the standard of living.
Independent of any eventual
political solution, it is necessary
to ensure equal rights for all
inhabitants of Israel, and the
right of self-determination to the
Palestinian Arabs so that they
may establish a government and
way of life of their own.
Regionalization is the key
concept. Professor Weitz might
be seen as a regionalization
specialist, having devised a
master plan for agricultural
development in the northwestern
Negev (the Southern Project),
and collaborating with engineer
Meir Batz on a complementary
plan for the rest of the Negev (the
National Industrial Region).
WEITZ sees regionalization as
the only way to focus efficiently
comprehensive programs for
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'i
1 rk 3k

more leaving Israel than making
aliyah, the balance of payments
is about to swallow us. In a nut-
shell, Weitz attempts to solve
these problems by an immediate
restructuring of the State of
Israel and the occupied territories
into semi-autonomous regions for
decentralized, comprehensive,
planned development in all
spheres; economic, political and
social.
These three problems form the
axis about which all our othrr
dilemmas revolve. As Weitz sets
the goals: we must decrease the
mixing of populations between
the territories and Israel, in order
to maintain the Jewish structure
of Israeli society and avoid social
tensions and conflicts based on
national origin.
It is also essential to find a
practical solution to the social
problems of the Jewish
population by speeding up the
settlement of development areas,
the rehabilitation of distressed
IIIIIIHIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIHI
economic development and social
amelioration because the
existing centralized bureaucracy
is too isolated from day to day
problems in the field, and neces-
sarily too truncated to allow any
effective coordination of inter-
departmental effort. So then, not
wanting to keep the assured
success of regionalization in the
Negev a secret, Prof. Weitz
would share it with the rest of the
country by dividing it and the
territories up into eight regional
districts.
Any comprehensive develop-
ment is inextricably linked to
political problems. What Weitz
proposes, however, is an im-
mediate program for action to
develop and improve services in
all the State of Israel as well as
all the territories. "This," Weitz
states, "without fixing in ad-
vance anything regarding the
political solutionthat will be
chosen in its time, and will be
Continued on Following Page
i


aRchBishop makaraos: the key to peace hopes on Cyprus
I
Swift progress towards a
solution to the Cyprus question
appears to have receded through
the poor health of Archbishop
Makarios, the island's president.
Intercommunal talks between the
fractious Greek and Turkish
communities were due to open in
Nicosia in the middle of May. But
most observers believe the dis-
cussions will be able to decide
little of substance, and that
progress may now have to wait
for the next meeting of the two
sides in Vienna, possibly in late
(European) summer.
The failure of the last round of
talks, held under UN auspices in
Vienna from Mar. 31 to Apr. 7,
add to the pessimistic forecasts.
Much will depend on President
Makarios's rate of recovery from
the heart attack he suffered on
Apr. 4. Although he has cut his
work schedule, he is reported to
be doing more than his doctors
advise.
IF HE were to become totally
incapacitated, it would almost
certainly lead to inter-factional
disputes within the Greek-
of a successor to Makarios all the
more urgent.
The present dispute arose from
the 1974 invasion of Cyprus by
Turkish troops, who now occupy
40 percent of the island. Some
200,000 Greeks fled before the
invading troops and are now
refugees. Before the Turkish
incusion, Greek-Cypriots com-
Cypriot leadership, and would
make agreement with Turkish
Cypriots even more remote.
Only Makarios has been able to
prevent the left and right factions
within the Greek Cyrpiot leader-
ship and community from
fighting each other. The deeply-
felt and divergent political views
among Greek-Cypriots now
threaten to become public,
especially as Glafcos Clerides,
former Greek Cypriot negotiator
has virtually withdrawn from
politics. It makes the nomination
prised 80 percent of the 600,000
population.
ON THE Turkish-Cypriot side,
there is a willingness to let
matters drift for a while. Th^
Turkish general elections toolfc
place on June 5, four month*;
earlier than expected, and th\i
result was a defeat for Suleimar)
Demirel's governing Justice'
Party, which has held power in a
coalition of four parties since
April, 1975.
Observers are tipping a victory
Continued on Following Page
>
Makarios: talks depend on the speed of his recovery
Pageio-A *Jenist)HerMi&n
Friday, July 22,1977
- .^ ..- t-..,_


rktay.Jul
> Frkfcy, July 22.1977
*Jeniti fhrirfictn
Page 11-A
'
Susan
Panoff
psychoanalyst
Recalls f Reu6
My Analysis with Freud: Reminiscences by Dr. A. Kardiner. New
York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1977,123p., $6.95.
Since "all" books of Jewish interest do not cross my desk,
and many of no interest do, it is helpful to have friends on the
lookout for unusual material. Such a rabbi friend lent me his copy
of Kardiner's book several months ago. After being swamped with
a number of vanity press publications of little value, this reviewer
was hesitant to sit down with another "reminiscences" type
volume. Thank goodness I did.
My Analysis is a warm, humorous, well-written personal
account of the author's analysis with Freud and a retrospect of
Freud's technique in analysis. The first chapter, "Meeting with
Freud," which introduces us to the Viennese psychoanalyst,
reminded this reviewer of the presentation of Freud's apartments
and offices in the film "The Seven Per Cent Solution."
DR. KARDINER, a young New York psychoanalyst in 1921,
was accepted for analysis by Freud in order to complete his
training as an analyst, and to study with the man who had dis-
covered and opened the door to the mysteries of the human mind.
He recounts his early life as he told it to Freud including Freud's
comments on his story. These comments are valuable as Freud
spoke little to other analysts under his analysis.
Kardiner also gives us a revealing peek at the Vienna of the
1920s: replete with opera and anti-Semitism.
THE SECOND part of the book is a discussion of Freud from
Kardiner's vantage point of fifty years ago and again from 1976.
Kardiner examines Freud's remarkable discoveries and contri-
butions through which man can know and direct himself. The
author emphasizes the importance of respectable recognition of
psychoanalysis by society, as he believes "that psychoanalysis
can become a very essential tool in social as well as human sur-
vival." This portrait of Freud and the author's view of the
psychoanalytic technique make for insightful and entertaining
reading.
Jewish Tract Series, New York: Burning Bush Press, Distributed
by United Synagogue of America Book Service, $7.90 set of
14 tracts.
Two new titles were recently released in the pocket-size
Jewish Tract Series. They are The Mezuzah, by Rabbi Abraham
B. Eckstein, and The Tallit. by Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins.
THE TRACTS are booklets ranging in size from sixteen to
thirty-two pages, which present the basic aspects of Jewish life
and thought as held within the Conservative movement. Fourteen
titles are presently available as a presentation set, boxed for gift"
giving.
Some of the subjects are Avot: The Ethics of the Fathers;
The Shema, Mitzvah and The Marriage Service.
The authors of these booklets are authorities in their fields.
Besides Eckstein and Elkins, Jack Riemer, Ben Zion Bokser and
Ira Eisenstein have written tracts for the series.
makaRios: key to Peace
Continued from Preceding Page
,for Bulent Ecevit s social-demo-
cratic Republican People's Party
with an overall majority of seats
," in the National Assembly.
Last time, they were 50 seats
short and so let Demirel in. A
victory for Ecevit, however, is
not likely to lead to any softening
of Turkish policy towards Cyprus
since it was an Ecevit govern-
ment which ordered the invasion
of Cyrpus.
The lack of urgency in the new
round of talks gives Russian
'diplomats more time to push
their proposal first put for-
ward in August. 1974 for an
international conference under
the UN, attended by Security
Council members plus Greece,
Cyprus and Turkey and certain
other "non-aligned" st&tes.
GREEK CYPRIOT nego
tiator, Tassos Papadopoulos, had
talks with the Kremlin's Cyprus
expert Pushkin, who flew in from
Moscow to observe the talks. The
Cyprus Communist Party
(AKEL) held its Central Com-
mittee plenum during the talks,
and secretary general Ezekias
Papaoannou stresses the need to
internatiionalize still further the
Cyprus problem.
The Greek-Cypriots have made
favorable noises about the
Russian plan, but so far
Makarios had done nothing to
implement it. Russian interest in
the Cyprus dispute derives from
the fact that it involves three
NATO member countries, Britain
as well as Greece and Turkey,
and affects the strategic position
of the island in the eastern
Mediterranean.
To the Point International
Jew Takes St. John Post
MONTREAL-(JTA)-For the first time since the Order
of St. John was founded in the 11th Century, a Jew has been
appointed to high office, it was reported here.
Maj. Louis M. Bloomfield, a well-known attorney and
.philanthropist of Montreal, has been elected president of the
Quebec Council of the St. John Ambulance Association. Bloom-
was named Knight of the Order in 1965 and is the only Jew
to hold that position.
The Protestant order, which was founded in England to
help people in distress, has 5,000 uniformed volunteers in
Quebec Province and provides courses in first aid, home nur-
industrial accident prevention. It also provides am
how to 6eal With teRRitORies
Continued from Preceding Page
based upon the principle of self-
determination of the Arab
population in the occupied
territories. In spite of this, we
aver that it is within the
capability of the plan to halt the
unwanted deterioration of the
economic, social, and political
situation."
WEITZ would divide Israel
into five Jewish and three Arab
districts respectively. Safed
District the Safed region, Ken-
neret, and Ramat Hagolan; Haifa
District the Yisrael region,
Acco, Haifa, Hadera, and the
Jordan Valley (north of Jericho);
Tel Aviv District the Sharon
region, Petach Tikvah, Ramleh,
Rehovoth, Tel Aviv, and Latrun;
Ashdod District Ashkelon, the
Jerusalem region (excluding the
city of Jerusalem) and Gush
Etzion; Beer Sheba District
Beer Sheba and the Negev
region, the Rafiach enclave, and
the Jordan Valley (south of
Jericho). The three Arab
districts: Shechem District
Jenin, Shechem, Tul Karem,
Ramallah and Jericho; Hebron
District Hebron and Beth-
lehem; Gaza Districtthe Gaza
Strip. Jerusalem will be a special
entity unto itself, continuing to
serve as Israel's capital, but now
in a federative sense similar to
Washington, D.C.
While the decentralization of
government and the corres-
ponding increase in local ef-
ficiency might be palatable
arguments for Weitz's plan, and
while Israeli politics might
benefit by Weitz's proposal of a
senatorial body to be elected from
the newly reapportioned
districts, the possible inter-
national political consequences of
the plan might be too prob-
lematic.
HE foresees three possible
solutions with regard to the areas
of Arab population. The first is if
an agreement is reached with
Jordan; then the three Arab
DistrictsShechem, Hebron and
Gazacould be included in Jor-
danian sovereignty. Since the
development plan includes a
road corridor connecting Gaza
and Hebron Districts, the King-
dom of Jordan could have a
(demilitarized) Mediterranean
port at Gaza, and everybody
would be happy.
The second possibility, in the
absence of an agreement with
Jordan, will permit a certain
freedom of action to devolve
gradually upon the Arab
Districts. An Arab District
government, responsible for
internal affairs in the areas of
services and development, will
lay the foundation for the even-
tual establishment of a Pales-
tinian state or participation in a
federative community with
Israel.
The third possibility is ob-
viously the establishment of a
separate Palestinian state, com-
prising the three Arab Districts,
and having full statutory rights
excluding militarization. The
federative state (the United
States of Israel?)with its tederal
capital of Jerusalem would hav
five Jewish and three Arab
Districts, separate state govern-
ments responsible for internal
matters and a federal govern-
ment responsible for security
matters, foreign relations,
currency, customs, and inter-
district coordination.
WHICHEVER possible
solution arises, Weitz insists any
is preferable to the slow, un-
planned and dangerous sliding
annexation of areas of dense
Arab population going on at
present. Each solution would
guarantee the preservation of the
Jewish chaiacter of Israel and a
better, more efficient structure
for the country's development.
Weitz sees his plan as "a real
solution to the problems of the
Jewish state in our time."
While some may question the
ultimate feasibility of certain
aspects of Weitz's proposal, none
should deny its daring, its moral
scope, and its engaging offer of
hope for the future through
action today. Weitz's emphasis is
on the present, on what he sees
possible to accomplish right now.
It is an answer for the times, well
within the prophetic tradition of
answering the demands of one
crucial hour in our people's
history.
Waldheim: Discuss Territories with Begin
PARIS-(JTA)-United
Nations Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim said here that he will
raise the question of occupied
territories when he meets with
Israeli Prime Minister Begin.
Waldheim said he had invited
Begin to meet with him in New
York, on Friday to discuss the
future of the territories and
assess the chances of an early
resumption of the Geneva
conference.
On July 21, the Israeli Premier
was to be guest of honor at a
national dinner of welcome and
tribute in New York under the
auspices of the Israel Bond
Organization.
WALDHEIM TOLD a press
conference here Friday that he
doubted that the Geneva talks
could be resumed Oct. 10 as
Begin suggested recently. He
said the situation regarding the
West Bank, following statements
made by the Premier, had to be
clarified before the Israelis and
the Arabs could start serious
talks.
He added that the par-
ticipation of the Palestine
Libertation Organization in the
Geneva talks had still to be
solved. Waldheim said the
question of Israel's withdrawal
from occupied territories was at
the nucleus of the problems to be
tackled.
HE ADDED: "But there is
also the question of a homeland
for the Palestinian people as
suggested by President Carter
and rejected by the Israeli
government, and of course, the
right of Israel to exist within
secure and recognized bor-
ders...all this has to be done
between now and the resumption
of the Geneva talks". Waldheim
said all parties involved must be
fully prepared to take part in the
talks, "otherwise we run
the risk of a failure".
Demonstrators Clash Over Closing
Tel Aviv Thoroughfare on Sabbath
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TELAVIV (JTA) -
Hundreds of police reen-
forcements and soldiers
were rushed to Bnei Brak
Friday where religious
youths and non-religious
demonstrators battled on
the main street over the
controversial closing of the
thoroughfare to traffic on
the Sabbath. Three police-
men were injured. One was
struck in the face by a rock.
The clash occured a week
after a young Israeli, Herzl
Attaya, was killed when his
jeep crashed into a chain
stretched across Has homer
Street to block traffic. The
street runs through non-
religious neighborhoods as
well as those inhabited by
observant Jews in the ultra-
Orthodox municipality
north of Tel Aviv. Non-
lenging the right of the
township to close the
street.
BUT THE issue appeared to
have been resolved at a meeting
between the two groups held
during the week. The Orthodox
town leaders agreed to allow non-
observant residents to drive
through the street on Saturdays.
But apparently political ele-
ments on both sides continued to
agitate. On Friday evening, a
group of non-religious youths
from outside Bnei Brak con-
verged on police barricades to
protest religious coercion.
Although they had no permit to
demonstrate, the police officer in
charge allowed them to assemble
on condition that they were
orderly. The police are under
standing orders to act with ut-
most restraint toward both sides
in the dispute.
But when the demonstration
became unruly and some of the
youths knocked down barricades,
reenforcements were called in and
the crowd was forcibly dispersed.
NONE OF the demonstrators
rad and no arrests wer
made. Shortly afterwards,
however, large groups of Or-
thodox youths arrived on the
scene and fighting broke out
between them and the demon-
strators. Police and troops inter-
vened but the area was not
cleared until well past midnight.
The incidents have political
ramifications at a time when
many Israelis are concerned by
the religious concessions Prime
Minister Menachem Begin
granted the National Religious
Party (NRP) and the Aguda bloc
to join his coalition government.
The Agudat Israel members of
the Bnei Brak town council have
charged police with violating an
alleged agreement that no traffic
whatsoever would be permitted
on Hashomer Street on the
Sabbath.
Itzhak Meir, Duputy Mayor of
Bnei Brak, implied that the
Aguda was disappointed that the
government has not intervened in
the dispute on the Orhtodox side.
"You cannot sit in the coalition
when the government is acting
QniH _^_


Pagel2-A
*Jei*t fksrJi&r
Friday, July 22
1977
Race Towards Peace j
Coatiaued froea Pag* 1-A
personnel carriers and 15 tank
bulldozers.
This was seen as a move to
boost Israeli confidence on the
eve of Begin s visit, but it follows
a series of unprecedented refusals
by the US. to assist Israel in the
ents field.
In February. Carter cancelled
the sale authorised by President
Ford of the- CBU-~2 concussion
bomb and late last month he
sound a proposal for co-
production with Israel of a
sophisticated new military
communications system.
Previou&ty he rejected similar co-
productjon endeavors involving
the Israel Chariot tank and the
AxDervan-daaiCDed F 15 Eagle
HE DID. bow-ever approve the
sak* of S200 aulboc m tanks and
howitzers during March. Carter s
much more critical approach to
the supply of mdjfcary
to Israel has been a
that the old NixoshFord days of
harking the Jews to the hit
against the Arabs are gone
Another iartration of a new
order which Israel has bad to
accept ie the warmth with whack
Carter has assheariiri the leaders
of the .Arab world Whan the
American leader met Syria s
President Assad in Geneva a
May. be said he looked to .Assad
far guidance, and far advice and
far support" in brcngmg peace to
the Middle Ease Hie dear
adoption of the concept of a
Mastiiiisii "homeland' has also
marked a significant shift
towards the Arabs in American
policy.
FOR MANY who ponder the
Middle East problem the key to
peace lies is the creation of a
state for the Palestinians who
fled Israel, and Carter s
espousement of k has enhanced
hat r*~*T*g in the Arab world
Pro-Israel farces both within
Israel and elsewhere have dubbed
the President inconsistent
because of ha so-called "pen-
3DJQ2E pOOdCS* DQ aO EaKS Xot
Carter administration has
mixed
automatically excluded from
negotiations
Israel s reaction to this was a
pained but dignified denial that a
"no negotiable' tag had ever
been attached to anything
Quoting Begins words, the
Israeli reply said. We shall serve
no ultimatums. The words not
negotiable' do not appear in our
dictionary. Everything is
negotiable. but negotiations
must be free as mentioned fa the
United States Democratic Party
Program, without a solution
imposed from outside '
Privately the Israeh reaction
was one of great annoyance and
charges of 'slander were
bandied about. In fact Bags has
indicated that the Lahnd-fad
government would be moat
reluctant to ghre up the West
Bank, which it considers to be
historically part of Israai and
which s refers to bv the Bmbcal
ISRAEL'S STAND on the
occupied territories, which are
covered under United Nations
Resolution 242 was the chief
wirking point in the discussions
between Begin and Carter. The
State Department spokesman s
affirmation that Israel must
withdraw from not only the West
Bank but the Gaza Strip and
Egyptian Sinai and the Golan
Heights, left Begin with hole
apparent room for maneuver
Washington a moves m the
weeks leading up to the Begin
visa were described as a war of
nerves on the Israeli Prime
Minister One Likud official
aescifoed the Americans hard
hxtmg aiajtuatk as breaking
through as open door
Within Israel tins seems to be
common bebei A recent poll by
the newspaper He art* showed
.hat 61 percent of those in-
awatwass feared that the U.S.
Coataaad frees Page 1-A
Schneerson, caihr.g it jiii juaasfaal
The protest was sponsored by
the Coahuon of People of African
Descent- described as an um-
brella group for Black
organ in tiro* in Crown Heights.
and fad by the Rev Heron Sam of
St. Marks Episcopal Church.
The latest dash between
Blacks and Hasidim apparently
stems from the June 4 skyfag of
1"year-old Abraham Goldman.
son of a Hasidic rabbi, during a
dispute on a Crown Heights
Israel to
be much
it
t
h
I
fi
in dealing wrtk
that it ''* to
about gettmg
One of Washington's chief
potshots to prepare the ground
far Beams vaa was the
statement faaoed at the end at
Jane anaawg Israel of lefaaaig
to negotaa* a withdrwwai from
the Wast Base: sad the Gaza
Str?
THE STATE Department.
wxh clearance from the W'sw
House, dedared that both 1st**,
and as ""flfctiming Arab states
would have to make ;hf5c-J:
caaajaoanaas far peace a the
Middle East and effactiel toic
I
Jorda*
f the
osU he
e-
KEtGO INC.
RiHgtoms Goods, Gift*.
Boosts I Aacorrt*
1507 WASHINGTON
AVENUE. MIAMI BEACH
532-5912
Black Anti-Semitism
Spurs B'klyn Tension
Blacks. Krinsky likened the
Black accusations to the story of
the youth who Maw ha parents
and then asks far rJacj on the
grounds that he a an orphan
SEVERAL aifammetory"
circulars have been datributed
among Blacks m recent weeks,
Knnsky said, to arouse the ire
of the Blacks agamst Jews and
the Hasidim m particular One
fiver portrayed a Hasad H?-r>g
up a Black youth. Krinsky said
One of the flyers urgmg
to demonstrate and:
gam' Stop Hasjdx attacks on
Blacks:" and Blacks anse" End
Gestapo tactics." Krinsky said
the Black assertions are
analogous to when Hitler charged
the Jews of the Warsaw ghetto
wxh aaaa^j Germans.
According to Krinsky. manv
Backs do not understand what
the other Blacks are upset about
because of the relative traacjuihty
of Crown Heights when com-
pared to the surrounding areas of
Brownsville. East Fatbush and
B^orrJ-Scsyvesant- Crown
Heights a an oes^s and it remains
a vabie commxanty because of
the Lubavacher Hasxhm
Krmsky said
UNABLE TO see a rationale fa
the Back point of vaw. Knnsky
s apprehensive that "some
apologetic Jews wiH say there ts
wimethmg wrong wxh the
Hasacbm Apoiogetic self-hating
Jews wiE say there are two sides
of the story He added: "IreaUv
don't comprehend what thev (the
BarJa-i want- It is bas'icaUv
rooted m anti-Semitism."
Street crime is the most serious
asue a Crown Heights, vears
ago a prosperous neighborhood
inhabited mainly by middle class
and affluent Jews Today it is an
officaUy designated "poverty
area, about 60 percent Black and
35 percent Hasidic
THREE HISPANIC youths
are m custody, charged with
stabbing Goldman. Smce then,
according to Backs. Hasidnx
have been terrorizing Black
youths and women. They accuse
pohce of not protecting Blacks
and faihng to arrest Hesackm who
assault Racks Back w*rA>iw
charge that the Community
Patrol is a vigilante"
crgi-KranoE sanctioned by the
pohce.
Bat David Eldad a member of
the Community Council of Crown
Heights, which sponsors the
patrol said the patrofa wal
chasrmaa of the Council has been
quoted as saymg that some of the
ano-enme group may have been
c-ver-wajoos at times and
more or ass o
001 STOti
--5 :'.?;'-isoarjt
?>^** -*o-e Sc*-oc ts vr
- s.- -c -e* ;-** C- -
N17 Wesaaartee Asa. 471- 7117
However he said. "They have
sever failed or stabbed anybody
The most they have done a try to
protect thessnefvee" Dismnasag
the charges agaaat the i ii ilaai
patrol and Hasidic va^aentes.
Knaaky saad the patrob protect
nayuaa aa Crown Heaghta aad
that Blacks have been aavaed to
|aaa
ACCORDING TO Krsnsky.
the Blacks 'are going to create a
be able to deflate. .The Black
accusations i awake fatsat sab-
c amir am and bring hatred mto
the
eould pressurize Israel into
concessions which would en-
danger national security.
A NEW element in the Middle
East debate has been the
European declaration spelling
out the combined view of the
European Economic Community
members towards a peace set-
tlement The EEC has been
rather spineless in taking a
united line on major foreign
policy issues, and June 29s
declaration marks Europe's
unusually firm effort to con-
tribute to peace moves.
In essence, the European
statement, which was made at
the London meeting of the
European Council, echoes the
.American lfae on the Middle
East. Its most significant
departure from previous
European policy is that k con-
tains the first dear re faience to
the need for a Palestinian
homeland.
In the EEC's previous
declaration on the Middle East,
issued almost four years ago.
neither the Netherlands nor West
Germany were willing to use the
term homeland, and the
document eventually issued was
loosely worded and generalized.
The European declaration
emphasizes the need to reopen
negotiations without further
delay- and wihout preconditions
to resolve the dispute. It is
understood that Washington was
kept informed of what the heads
of the Nine were preparing to say.
but it is not dear whether there
was actual liaison between the
EEC and the U.S. in arriving at
the finished declaration
ITS CONTENTS and
timingcoming so soon after the
U.S pronoencements and before
the Begin visit only added to
the pressure upon Israel to adopt
a more moderate line than might
come naturally to the hawks who
are the majority in Likud bk*
and the two religious part*
which form the coaliti0n
government.
An important element in U.S.
Israeli relations has alwavs been
the strength of the "Jewish
lobby" inside the U.S. Although
Jews make up only three percent
of the American population, the
Jewish community has haj
immense influence in Congress
and has been a key factor k
keeping American aid' to Israel at
record levels of $700 a year for
every Jewish inhabitant there.
The Jewish community hit
also given immense amounts of
aid to the Israeli state on its own
account. Last year some S500
million was given in private gifo
taz deductible another sign of
favor from Congress.
FOR AMERICAN Jews, the
election of Begin and the Likud
was something of a shock.
Having grown accustomed to I
Labor Party policies as reflectin| B
a permanent Israeli attitude, this
largely hberal body of people did
not quite know how to react tot
little known set of politicians
whose conservative views were
often alien to their own.
In fact when Begin arrived in
Washington, be found a good
deal of support in the Jewish
community. Having recovered
from their stunned disbelief,
American Jews rallied around the
new government This tran-
sformation has not been brought
about without effort, however,
with Zionist organization leaders
beating the drum around the
country in support of the Likud.
So was the scene M for i
meeting which wiD have major
repercussions for the Middle
East. We differ on fu&
damentals and will make no
secret of it." said Israeli
.\mbassador to the US Simchi
Diniti on the eve of the talks.
'o"B*' -"'nation*
3
Delicious Greek Food
' 394 Giroldo Avenue Phone: 448-1551
Pickle Barrel Deli
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K '- TH ~- PJDAl
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Tr> l'*You ULjS* I --> ^ ri.- -.xSpKt
ROYAL HUNGARIAN.SRE5TAII

.
^tl-tkwTdr*
^aw? :r-
^C >. C .: lm ;
The raagaa that Jews are physseafly ihniiaa Blacks are aafcamh.1. Knaaky toad the JTA. addmg that the detaoe-stratioa aad tanse atiuxapaeie war* raaal remarks by Blacks tamed at Jews are wrraspiaadL a the work of a few rabble
roosars aaakry ckagiauaa. who a*e mrt ag aaaaoaaty for reasons pabhcay
Caargmgthat lOOpercaat of *be craaas caaaaattad m down
.AUCarH
Serving the Most Delkious Food
At Special Summer Prices
30th Anniversary Year
731 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach 538-540
____%___________st*____________*ka\ etas ^ *^_____
The Sea Gull Kosher ^
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all
A
'*!
Aay laaal
'ESE o>a
$ a
** S3M1M 531-1744
ON THE OCCAM AT Ma ST, NaAaa KACM


iy. July 22,1977
*Jenili fkrihtr
Page 13-A
Carter's Technique Criticized
5HINGT0N (JTA) Rep.
Rhodes, the House
rity leader, has criticized the
er administration for the
inique" of its approach to
ng the Middle East Conflict.
said that while Carter was
Inuing the Ford-Kissinger
W of "even-handedness" in
g with the parties, "the
teaft difference between the
I. is that under the Ford-
nger plan we were an honest
Her. We weren't telling
anybody what we thought the
settlement should be."
THE ARIZONA republican
made his remarks on the ABC
Issue and Answers television
program.
"I think possibly the technique
which the Carter administration
uses is in my opinion not the
technique that I would follow to
get the best results," he said.
He explained, "I can't imagine
it was wise of the President to
indicate that Israel was going to
have to give back the whole West
Segal: Begin's Place in History
act
Continued from Page 4-A
ading the character of
lin's Foreign Secretary,
Bt Bevin; in the British
Ionwhen Partition was
|y voted in the UNto
that kind of vacuum in
Sh British-trained Arab
lers were expected to
lower, subdue, and an-
|te the greatly outnumbered
of a poorly-armed and
erienced Jewish nation at
there was terrorism fierce
echoing the cruel
Bgcms employed by Arabs;
Bism born of ^rief suffered
natives of the dead whose
BH lined the Hitler furnaces;
Hism bursting through the
learts "! displaced persons
enied asylum by cowardly
;aders of great nations playing
arnes u ith uprooted Jews.
Deternim-'d to see the new
iflri state wither on the vine of
ts miracuiiiiis hut tenuous birth,
^HEritish schemed to hold
Hi immigration into Israel to
V(>
London's feverish attempts to
the Haganah in its efforts
Hfend Jews harassed by
HB} led inevitably to the in
BwpnYation of activities by
M^erate Jewish extremists
Wtpnilied by Begin and his
mall baud ot followers.
-WHEN ONE turns again to
aim----------------------------
ENJOY THE COOL
TRADE WINDS
^^SCHECHTER'S
I
fmmw
STRICTLY KOSHER
HOTEL (g) GLATT
bur Horn* Away From Home"
M naarby buildinaa shad* our
rWi Wat*. Pool, Patio and
jvate Sandy Baaeh.
tad Tbarapautic Whlrlpoo
m Available F,.
ung a Color TV 4 Radio
Conditionad & Heat
ir, Salt 8. Fat Fraa Diets
Reservations Phone
1805)5310061
O' See Vour T.jvti Afant
Entire Oceant ront Block
to 38th St. MIAMI BEACI
hone: (305) 531 0061
SCHECHTER. Owner-Mar.
Cosher Hotel
$Hf FAMILY JACOBS
' fwary (own Wa'ar.ltw
Color TV
*e / d an t M can f a ch
Strict 01 ar.ry Lawa
Synagogue
Pool Fraa Chalaa.
Social Prof roiiii
1 -'" Pert. Day, DM. Oct.
I I O teaaaJtBaSf.3
Oat. 1
Par ear), eel. act.
feraiiy lleayitn
*. Dec. 1
JACOBS,
0WNER.-MGMT.
I0MI: 531-5721
these dark pages of history, much
more than a clear understanding
of Menachem Begin's career as
Jewish Freedom Fighter is
recalled: for in those same pages
is registered the absorption of the
Arab Palestinians into King
Abdullah's Hashemite kingdom.
And to hear cries now for the
creation of a separate Palestine
State as if one does not already
exist is to make us wonder if
intelligent folks, however well-
intentioned, can ever develop an
appreciation of the odds stacked
against the Jews and a firm
understanding of the facts not
the fiction of history.
Bank or that they should give up
the Golan Heights.... As soon as
we take a position, then the other
parties have to take positions
too, and the first thing you know
you end up before you ever get to
the bargaining table with
everything concrete," Rhodes
said.
HE SAID he agreed with what
President Carter "now says he is
going to do, and that is to sort of
cool it until the parties actually
sit down."
He added, "I don't think we
can operate effectively if we are in
the arena. We are not parties" to
the conflict, and "we should not
be parties."
Meanwhile, in another Middle
East development, it was
reported from Cairo that
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
and King Hussein of Jordan
agreed to forge an "explicit link"
between Jordan and the
Palestinians in order to ensure a
role for the latter in future peace
talks.
EGYPTIAN SOURCES did
not spell out details of the
agreement but said it could
circumvent Israeli opposition to
Palestinian participation in the
Geneva conference by unifying
the Palestinians and Jordanians
in advance.
Extradition of Nazi
\Requested of Argentina
By ASHER MIBASHAN
BUENOS AIRES-(JTA)-The Argentine government
has agreed to consider a request from West Germany that it ex-
tradite a German accused of Nazi war crimes who has been
living in Argentina since 1948. The German, Eduard Rosch-
mann, allegedly was the commander of a death camp in the
Riga area in which 40,000 Jews were killed.
The government had first issued a statement on July 4,
which said it "decided to accept the request" from West Ger-
many to extradite Roschmann. But July 5, a second statement
was released saying "the national government has only agreed
to give due process" to the request.
POLICE SOURCES said the 69-year-old Roschmann has
not been arrested. According to official source, Roschmann
entered Argentina in 1948 with a passport in the name of Fritz
Wegner.
During the war, he was in the Riga area first as an SS
assault leader, head of the Jewish section of the security police
and then commander of the Riga Ghetto. He was tried in ab-
sentia in Hamburg and found guilty of multiple murders carried
out between 1941 and 1944.
If you're going to have on
affair, make sure people
talk about it.
There you are hosting an affair at the
beautiful Deauville Hotel (where
S2.000.000 has just heen spent on
brand-new luxury and elegance!)
And after it's all over, what you
(hough! would he jus! a simple c
affair has turned out !< he Ilie social
(hough! would he jus! a simple catered
affair has turned o
event of the year.
Call Al Sicherer. at H65-S5II and siar!
having an affair everyone will talk about.
Oti the ocean atSTkh Street, 'Miami Beach
i
il; fituunujt
The Sea Gull Kosher Steak House will add
something to your next SlMCHA. We ha
preparing the finest Glatt Kosher cuisine tor a long
time, catering to Weddings. Bar Mitzvahs. Engage-
ments and all Social Functions. Our secret of suc-
cess is simple...traditionally delicious meals, im-
peccable service and a FR0ELICH atmosphere,
all this at affordable prices.
So. the next time you have a tittle naches to
share, let the "TRADITIONALISTS'' at the Kosher
Steak House help you.
We are listma, below some erf the sahsfie* functions we have catered to
aatta.aartah
Mk Israel SaMarhaad
SaNzaurf. lar NiU.alt
UafcaraMn tar lee Mac*
ranrwaa la Rabat l TibiiiielcCiaiiielrla.
telerboe* ol aaatfaft Israel
The Sea Gull Kosher STEAK HOUSE Z
On the Ocean at 21 at Street, Miami Beach
531-4114 or 531-1744
For Information *
Reservations Phone
Charlotte does
it best!
Whether it's an intimate wedding. Bar
/Mitzvah, reception, party or just a special
gathering, Charlotte Horn, Miami Beach's # 1 Catering Director,
does it best And she does it best at the Beach's # 1 Hotel,
the Eden Roc.
So, when your special occasion arises and you want the best...
call Charlotte Horn at 532-2561.
Eden Roc
On the ocean at 45th Street. Miami Beach.Florida 33140
Phone: 532-2561 3v
*
*
,i-t(.
The
KOSHER
l AW QCHaPmaWaaP
Cftottm
mh
"sr
HOTEL Slreeta
An
RESERVE NOW for the HIGH HOLY DAYS
SUMMER SPECIAL
rson.
occ lo Sept (
INCLU0IN6 GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
Tennii FactHliei Hand lall volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Entertainment
Ft* Meek of Private leach TV In Rooms
Dairy Synagogue Services
Service*
Conducted
By Cantor
LEIB RASKIN
KUtnis (Eorttrr
MIAMI BEACH S UNfc S I
KOSHER OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT
t.ii ihcC.ni*i"i^Toui "inlicy.iiii Dmmg treat your QUEEN to A
ROYAL DINNER
also Kosher Chines* Dtshes Served
Open Sunday through Thucdav 5 to 9 P M
For Reservations Phone
531-5771
affair with Heart
at Hotel
ontaineDleau
We truly care
Combined with the elegance and magnificence of Hotel
Fontainebleau. we pride ourselves in lite very special spirit
exhibited by the Fontainebleau family...at all times there
is the realization of the importance of a special event: be it
a Bar Mitzvah. Wedding. Anniversary Party, or a Presiden-
tial Dinner, the emphasis is always on achieving perfec-
tion. You are invited lo visit and experience first-hand the
delights of Fontainebleau.
KOSHER CATERING AVAILABLE
, CALL 538-8811 ] ^jJJ^
BILL GOLDRING
Executive Vice President. Catering


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PJCHART^P BPJMCEP.
AiOrt Clrcufl Court
Da4e Cvjr.ty FV.ndA
ByM ; HartiuK-
Aa Deputy CVtb
Orcwtt Court SaaJ.
ALBERT L CARP.ICAP.TE P A
2-l!TWT0iStrt
afiarr.j rtorvJaBiiS
Att>mey tor PeQOotutr
Phone m Aa-7tl7
July 15. 22 2 Aux 5 1*77
IN THE C'tCJlTCOUBTOFTME
"TH JUOHCiALCIECUIT Ik) AND
FOB DADE COUNTY FLOElDA
6ENEBAL JOtlSOlCTKJN DIVISION
CASE NO tt.JSJa-
NOTICE iY*uPLICATION
3RE THE afAJOBA 3E OF
:-tj :a> l.ttt
PetSDoawr
JOHJt A>OTriovr r: yftt
JOHN ANOTHONT DtTTT
.-t'tm-r. ARE KERE3T
5 TO FTLE your art=e=
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^ siAT-Ajje wjo: Out Clark of out abore
Coart. AMI aerre a copy ape*
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iAMTT ax SAMUEL E BUTB ;JJC
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NOTICE UNDER mil
FICTITIOUS NAME \.A* ,|i|
NOTICE :* HEREBY -- E> ;
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^-Si^9. -roe: x*
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CirrurtCtxr-. >aa-
TANrELM KEI1 EJ,
Attorney tor we
SeE (SSEreec
EaaaMafe FtorttaaSEFlf
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notice under
fictitious name -4*
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file
of Dade County. FkmdA
OSC.AR MORI
Dated jui :s :rr:
RICHARD P BRINKER
BT S PARRISH
Deputy CJerk
'Clrcoft Court SaaJ
MM*** -'our MMMBflM
JEWBH FLORIDLAN
Jury22.2t.Auf 5.12.1ST7
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July is r :* *** Jufl
NOTICE UNOEH og,
FICTrTIOUSNAMELA*1 BE
NOTICE : S HEREB Y G r>,
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m:am: beach electr:'. fF|
Normandy Drl-e Mia-t.: B*a." ..'* iaO
Maiwdi to refiater aaid MB* '-^ fl
Cera of the Circuit Court ""
County. F ion da
SURF ELECTRIC I>C
A FLA CORP
Attorney Jonathan Betoff ,, -.ajB
July 1.8 1' 7L
ATT
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HEI
1401
Mlai
Tele


ky, July 22,1977
*Mnii> fkridHan
Page 15-A
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
PICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
ilgned, desiring to engage In
ss under the fictitious name of
^AL ENTERPRISES at number
f.B. 20th Avenue. In the City of
Miami 33161, Florida, intends to
er the said name with the Clerk of
Srcult Court of Dade County,
at Miami Beach, Florida, this
/of July, 1977.
CRRY MARSHALL MUSICAL
ENTERPRISES, INC.
BY: JERRY MARSHALL
President
CRRY MARSHALL MUSICAL
ENTERPRISES, INC.,
a Florida corporation
lY B. SMITH
ey for Applicant
July 15. 22, 29; Aug. 6, 1977
IE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
JADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IRAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-40249 (25)
lOTICE TO CREDITORS OF
IANSAMERICA CHEMICAL
INDUSTRIES, INC.
LEY LEVITZ and TRANS-
JCA
JCAL INDUSTRIES, INC., a
I corporation,
Jntlffs,
H. HERMAN, ARTHUR
IBERG, SOUTHERN BELL
HONE AND TELEGRAPH
kNY, a Florida corporation,
>:s AMERICAN NATIONAL
BOF NORTH MIAMI, a national
Institution. CITY BANK OF
MIAMI, a national banking In-
on. and UNITED STATES
iLSERVICE, ,
mdants.
lant to the Order of the Hon.
I. Whitworth. Judge of the Clr-
Urt, Notice Is hereby given to all
\ of TRANSAMERICA CHEMI-
)USTRIES, INC., that they are
reqslvd to (Up a Sworn Proof of Claim
wife 6V Clerk. Dade County Circuit
Ming forth any claim that they
ive against TRANSAMERICA
"iL INDUSTRIES, INC., and
ill se rve a copy of the same upon
IE R. FERDIE. as Receiver of
lAMERICA CHEMICAL INDUS-
INC, Suite 215, 717 Ponce de
llvii Coral Gables, Florida
id If such claim Is not filed and
'Ithln four months of the date of
publication of this Notice, the
HtfH be barred pursuant to Florida
StatUltB 607.284.
This Notice shall be published once a
week for four consecutive weeks.
Dated this 1 lth clay of July, A.D., 1977.
AINSLEE R. FERDIE.
as Receiver for
ANSAMERICA CHEMICAL
INDUSTRIES. Inc.
July 15. 22, 29; Aug. 5. 1977
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 77-4428
Division Joseph Nesbift
ESTATE OF
}F. FASSOLD
Iceased
1( !E OF ADMINISTRATION
PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
MANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
E AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
.i^^HESTED IN THE ESTATE :
YOU AKK HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
FLOTD F FASSOI.I). deceased, Kile
, Numr 77-4628. Is pending In the Circuit
..curt I", DADE County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which Is
'r'Wt Flakier Street. Miami. Florida
/(IS*. The personal representative of the
-late Is I'ATRICIA A FASSOI.I), whose
address is ti Harmon Avenue, Waynes-
vUle, North Carolina 28786 The name
and address of the personal repre-
sentative s attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
Me with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
'demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate the
sis for the claim, the name and ad-
^Bf the creditor or his agent or
jttomey. and the amount claimed. If
ttie claim is not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be stated. If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
cleric to mall one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurlaektion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
B^^plEVER BARRED
of the first publication of this
" Administration: July 15,1977.
?ATRICIAA. FASSOLD
Aafcrsonal Representative of the
Etateof FLOYD F. FASSOLD
Deceased
WEV FOR PERSONAL
SENTATIVE:
RT JAY COHEN, P.A.
ckeil Avenue-Suite 1000
Florda 33131
he: (305)358 1544
July 15, 22,1977
NOTICE UNDER---------------
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FISCHER ENGINEERING at 3000
Blscayne Blvd., S-506, Miami, Florida
33137, Intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
OFF-SHORE CONSULTANTS, Inc.
By: FrledrlchL. Fischer, Pres.
July 15, 22, 29; Aug. 5, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
TODAY FASHIONS at number 117 N.E.
1st Ave.. Ste. 1507, in the City of Miami,
Florida. Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami Beach, Florida, this
7th day of July. 1977.
ABRAHAM BERKOWSKI
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Applicant
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 392
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
July 16, 22.29; Aug. 6,1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
"Surroundings'' at 1701 N.E. 115 St
No.l9A, Miami, Florida 33161 Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Diane DuFour Wong
Edward L.Wong
July 15, 22, 29; Aug. 5,1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name
Aquarium Olokum Pet Shop at 1800
Palm Avenue, Hlaleah, Florida 33010
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
OSVALDO ALFONSO, Owner
July 15, 22, 29; Aug. 6,1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 77 3S313
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROBERT MYERS DOWNING,
Petitioner, Husband,
and
MARY FRANCIS DOWNING,
Respondent / Wife.
TO: MARY FRANCIS DOWNING
409 Oak Street
Willlamston, N.C. 27892
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on CEASE b
CEASE, attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2720 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled court
on or before Aug. 19. 1977; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 11
day of July. 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G. S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CEASE & CEASE
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
642-5231
Attorney for Petitioner
July 15, 22 29; Aug. 5,1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FORDADECOUNTY
Civil Action No. 77-35167
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: ADOPTION OF
A Minor
BY:
VANDYE JOSEPH FORRESTER
and JILL HILDA FORRESTER,
his wife,
Petitioners.
TO:EDWARD LEE CLARK
Residence Unknown
YOU AE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Adoption has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If
any, to it on Kwltney. Kroop A
Schelnberg, P.A., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 512, Miami Beach. Florida,
and file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before August
19th, 1977; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 11th
day of July, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Cou rt
Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
PAULKWITNEY.of
KWITNEY, KROOP A SCHEINBERG.
P.A.
420 Lincoln Road-Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
306-538-7576
Attorney for Petitioner
July 15, 22.29; Aug. 5.1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictious name of'
I & M INVESTMENTS at 6386 Palm
Avenue. Hlaleah, Fla., Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
EDWARD KOPLOWITZ
ANITA KOPLOWITZ
EDWIN KUNZMAN
JOYCE M. KUNZMAN
MARTTN KURZWEIL
ALAN KURZWEIL
SUTELLE KURZWEIL
JODI KURZWEIL
ESTA KURZWEIL
TAMARA POZNAK
Morton M.Belgel
Attorney for applicants
July 15, 22, 29; Aug. 5,197
inthecircuITcoUrTofTHE
eleventh judicialcircuit
of florida, in and
for dade county
civil action no. 77 35137
action for dissolution
of marriage
family division
IN RE: The Marriage of
THOMAS M. KAPLAN, husband,
and
JANET L. KAPLAN, Wife.
TO: JANET L. KAPLAN
4621 Middlesex Road
Wilmington, North Carolina 28401
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on ARTHUR H.
LIPSON, attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 9526 BIRD ROAD. MIAMI.
FLORIDA 33165. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 12.1977; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 6
day of July, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
July 8,15. 22, 29,197';
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 77-19987
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
VIOLETA BELTRAN,
Petitioner / Wife
and
PEDRO P. BELTRAN.
Respondent / Husband.
TO: PEDRO P. BELTRAN,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any. to It on ABE KOSS,
attorney for Petitioner, whose address Is
2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Suite 715,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Aug. 12, 1977; other-
wise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. 120 NE 6
Street. Miami. Florida 33132.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami. Florida on this 29 day of
June. 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G. S. Carlie
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Abe Koss, Attorney at Law, P.A.
2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard 715
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Attorney for Petitioner
(306)446-1444 July 8, 15, 22, 29, 1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO.77-17154
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: ADOPTION BY
CHRISTOS ZAFEIRIOU
of two (2) minor male children
and
TO: Mr. Homer Williams
Last Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Adoption has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on GISELA CARDONNE-
DIENSTAG, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is STONE, SOSTCHIN &
GONZALEZ, P.A.. 101 NW 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33128, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August 5th,
1977; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks in
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 24
day of June, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DEBORAH G HESS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GISELA CARDONNE-DIENSTAG
STONE, SOSTCHIN &
GONZALEZ, P.A.
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
1305) 324-455F
Attorney for Petitioner
July 1,8, 15. 22.1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 77 20144
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH MARIE FLANNERY
and
LARRY STEPHEN FLANNERY
TO: LARRY STEPHEN FLANNERY
C / o 1402 W. Church Street
Dade City. Florida 33626
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to It on The Law Offices
Of LIEBERMAN, BERLINSKY k
MENDEZ. PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is M-lll Blscayne Bldg.,
19 West Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130, and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
August 12, 1977; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks in
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami, Florida on this 30 day of
June, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LIEBERMAN, BERLINSKY &
MENDEZ, P.A.
Mill Blscayne Bldg..
19 W. Flagler St.
Miami, Florida33130
STEPHEN J. BERLINSKY
Attorney for Petitioner
July 8, 15,22,29, 1977
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO: 77-4429
Division: Frank B. Dowling
IN RE: ESTATE OF
3EORGE WEINGER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST SAID
ESTATE AND OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the Estate of
GEORGE WEINGER, deceased, late of
Dade County, Florida, has commenced
In the captioned proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
AND REQUIRED to file any claims and
demands which you may have against
the Estate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate, If any,
or any objection to the qualifications of
the Personal Representative, venue or
Jurisdiction of the Court, with the Court.
Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33130.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL BE
forever barred.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
First publication of this Notice on the
15 day of July, 1977.
,'S/ LOUIS WEINGER
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of GEORGE WEINGER
Deceased
4 South Shore Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33131
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HYMANP. GALBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
July 15, 22, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
8600 ASSOCIATES at 8600 NW. South
River Drive, Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Joint Venturers:
PAUL F. HICKS
ROBERT E. SWEENEY
SIDNEY B.LANG
WALTER HENNING
Myers. Kaplan, Levinson & Kenln
Attorneys for 8600 Associates,
a Joint Venture
1428 Brick ell Avenue. 7th Floor
Miami. Florida 33131
JulyB. 15. 22. 29. 1977
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
I1TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 77 19291
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
GUILLERMO LUGO, Husband
and CTNTHIA LUGO, Wife.
TO: CINTHIA LUGO
1011 Peddle Street
Houston. Texas 77009
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of your
answer or other pleading to the Petition
on the Husband's Attorney. LESTER
ROGERS, whose address Is 1454 NW 17
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33126. and file
the original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before this 5 day of
Aug.. 1977. or a Default will be entered
against you.
DATED this 23rd day of June, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By G.S. Carlie
(Circuit Court Seal)
July 1, 8, 15, 22,1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO.77-17407
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GAILA.YANKOVIC
Petitioner
and
ALEX B. YANKOVIC.
Respondent
TO: ALEX B. YANKOVIC
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on RONALD L.
FRIED, attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2699 S. Bayshore Dr.. Suite
400C, Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August 5th.
1977; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 23
day of June, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RONALD L. FRIED, ESQ.
2699 S. Bayshore Dr., Suite 400C
Miami, Florida
(305)854-5003
Attorney for Petitioner
July 1,8.15. 22. 1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 77 35071
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
WILLIAM G. FLAHERTY,
Petitioner, Husband,
and
MADELINE P FLAHERTY,
Respondent, Wife
TO: MADELINE P. FLAHERTY
116 Palmer Lane
West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 15122
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on HAROLD J.
COHEN, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2761 Coral Way,
Miami. Fla. 33145, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 12,1977; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 5th
day of July, 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Deborah G. Hess
As Deputy Clerk
lCircuit Court Seal)
HAROLD J. COHEN. Esq.
Tel. 444-4781
2761 Coral Way, Miami. Fla. 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
July 8.15, 22, 29.1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
OLYMPIA HEIGHTS PHARMACY at
9884 Bird ltd Miami. Florida 33165
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Olympla Discount Drugs, Inc.
July 8, 16, 22, 29, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
BARBET'S at 17210 Collins Avenue,
Sunny Isles, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LADY, INC..
a Florida corporation
By: FRED AKEL, President
A. NORMAN DRUCKER
Attorney for LADY, INC.
July 1,8,15, 22, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
GARCIA PRESSING at 1616 West 31st
Place, Hlaleah, Fla. 33012 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Orlando Garcia. Owner
July 1.8,15, 22. 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
GAMMA INVESTMENTS at 407 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach, Fla. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
Harry B. Smith
Bernard S. Mandler
Samuel S. Smith
Michael B. Wemer
Melvln J. Jacobowltz
July 1.8.16, 22. 1977


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Carter, Begin Look to 1977 for Permanent Md-East Peace
After a day of "frank dis-
jssion of all the issues," Presi-
ent Carter toasted Israeli Prime
[inister Menachem Begin at a
iner in Begin's honor, on the
Fstaunch friendship" that binds
Israel and the United States.
Both men said they feel that
Jhis year is a propitious time to
fcove toward real, permanent
Rf ace in the Middle East.
CARTER SAID, "A recog-
nition by all nations that Israel
has a right to exist, to exist as a
proud and independent nation, to
exist permanently and to exist in
peace."
This week, Begin presented
Carter with a peace plan in-
volving Israeli withdrawals in the
Sinai and the Golan Heights, and
the establishment of an Arab
civil administration on the West
Bank of the Jordan River. The
Israeli plan also calls for a recon-
vening of the Geneva peace con-
ference in the fall. Israel still will
not consider allowing the PLO to
join in the Geneva talks.
At the dinner, Carter reassured
Begin that the U.S. would not
seek to impose a settlement of the
Middle East conflict.
Wfjocal Youths Rank High
I U.S., Israel Neck-in-Neck
I For Maccabiah's Top Honors
RATHER, Carter said, the
U.S. would "act as a trusted in-
termediary, and to deserve that
trust, to give the same point of
view to all the parties who will be
negotiating, not to mislead
anyone, not to avoid a controver-
sial issue, and wherever approp-
riate to open the controver-
sial issues up to public
scrutiny... even when at times it
creates some, hopefully transient,
dissension among people who
have held strongly opposing
views."
TEL AVIV-The Tenth
Maccabiah, the Jewish
Olympics, reached the
Bnidway mark Sunday with
he United States and
srael battling neck-in-neck
for honors in most major
fcvents. Since the games
began July 12, American
athletes have collected 62
Knedals compared to 52 by
the Israelis.
In the gold medal
Category, the margin is
Bnuch smaller 25 for the
MJnited States so far and 23
For Israel. The competitions
rill end Wednesday and
this Maccabiah will be
irought to an official close
'ith ceremonies in
ferusalem on Thursday.
ALAN FINE, 19, the son of
Ir. and Mrs. Irwin Fine of
'lantation, Fla., is one local
Ithlete who will return home with
, gold medal. As a member of the
Jnited States Swimming team,
Han's 800-meter free-style relay
earn clocked the quickest time to
apture the top spot.
University of Miami tennis
jlayer and Florida resident Jody
[Applebaum is still battling for
the women's single tennis
[championship and the American
Igolf team is in the lead with two
{local boys, John M. Pallot, 17, of
-oral Gables and Warren
lurkowitz, 18, of Miami Beach
competing in the international
jurney.
As the track and field events
jot underway, another Miami
fcrea resident, John Citron, 19, a
ptudent at Florida State
University in Tallahassee, took a
gold medal in the 110-meter
hurdles.
Americans excelled in
swimming and tennis in both the
men's and women's events. Mark
Heinrich, of La Jolla, California
and the U.S. Naval Academy
established a new Maccabiah
record in the men's 100-meter
backstroke with a time of one
minute and 00.57 seconds. Lance
Michaelis of Santa Clara, Calif,
came up with a 1.06.62 against
Israel's Joel Kinde's 1.08.8 of
1973.
In track and field, overall,
American athletes took an edge
with five gold medals to Israel's
four as France and Australia took
one each. Besides Citron's gold,
Buddy Kring high-jumped 2:05
meters and Joe Gould, the shot
putter, defended his title suc-
cessfully.
In the 3.000-meter walk, Bob
Rosenkrantz took the title away
from Israel veteran defending
champion Shaul Ladany, who
was disqualified for running on
the last lap after leading all the
way.
The United States Judo Team
won its second consecutive
Maccabiah title with six gold
medals gleaned by Greg Halpern,
(ilen (ioren. Steve Cohen, Irwin
Cohen. Andy Blumenthal and
Berbie Lepkover, competing in
this fourth round of Jewish
games.
BBW to Hold Lunch
The B'nai B'rith Women
Lincoln Chapter 1288, Miami
Beach, will hold a luncheon and
card party on Wednesday, July
27 at noon in the 100 Lincoln
Road Club Room.
IN THE 800-METER free-
style relay, the American team
comprised of Heinrich, Michael
Saphir of Los Altos, Calif.,
Hilary Bergman of Tuscaloosa,
Ala., and Alan Fine took a gold
medal with a time of 7.59.07
which placed them in the world's
top 25 relay teams for the
distance.
In the women's swimming
events, Wendy Weinberg of
Baltimore, a 1968 Olympic
bronze medalist, set a new record
in the 400-meter free-style of
4.26.14. She was followed by
teammates Gayle Berkowitz and
Emily Feldman. Ms. Weinberg
broke her own 1973 Maccabiah
record in the 200-meter butterfly
event with a time of 2.20.80
compared to 2.30.7 four years
ago. Norma Barton, 15, of
California, took second place in
the event and seems to be slated
for big things in the 1980
Olympics.
The Americans were prevented
from a clean sweep in the
swimming competition by Anat
Farkas, a 14-year-old Israeli who
won the women's 100-meter
breaststroke. But the Yanks did
take five of the six events:
Bergman won the 400-meter
men's free-style with a time of
4.04.34; Mark Gordin, of
Cerritus, Calif, took the 200-
meter backstroke by 2.09.59; and
Michaelis the 200-meter
Continued on Page 5-B
Clearfield to Head BBYO
Dr. Sidney M Clearfield has
tbeen appointed international
director of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) effective
Sept. 1. He succeeds Dr. Max
Baer, who will retire after
Idirecting BBYO for 28 years.
Dr. Clearfield, who came to
[BBYO a year ago as assistant
international director of field
services, had been assistant dean
[of the School of Social Work at
[Virginia Commonwealth
Jniversity from 1973-76 and a
member of the faculty there since
1967. Earlier, Dr. Clearfield was
associated with the Philadelphia
Region of BBYO as assistant and
executive director. As a teenager
in Philadelphia, Dr. Clearfield
was a member and officer of
AZA.
Dr. Clearfield received his B.S.
from Temple University, his
M.S.W. from the University of
Pennsylvania, and his D.S.W.
from Catholic University.
'Israet Readu to_PauJti.'
Golda Meir Warns ZO,
Carter went on to say that Is-
rael's security must be guaran-
teed not only in military terms
..."but in the minds and hearts
of the people who live in that
country and... of people who
would disturb that security if
they thought there was hope for
success."
BEGIN SAID that after hav-
ing met with the President, he
was convinced that Carter is
"wholeheartedly, a great friend of
Israel."
Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein of
New York City has been
elected chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal Rabbinical
Advisory Council. He will
succeed Robert I. Kahn of
Houston in the UJA's top
rabbinical leadership post.
The announcement was made
by Rabbi Melvin I. Libman,
RAC director.
Making plans for the upcoming year of Pioneer Women ac-
tivities in Greater Miami are these leaders of the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of America at a meeting of the
Pioneer Women Council of South Florida. From left are Esther
Shedroff, vice president of Club No. 2; Fanny Gibson, presi-
dent of Beba Idelson Chapter; Harriet Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council and of the American Zionist Federa-
tion of South Florida; Katherine Lippman, president of Golda
Meir Chapter; and Irene Portnow, president nfCluh Nn 1
Knesset Approves Ehrlich's Budget,
Defeats No-Confidence Motions
Israel's Likud government won a key coalition vote earlier
this week when Finance Minister Simcha Ehrlich's economic
program was accepted in the Knesset 60-35, thus defeating no-
confidence motions for the program by a comfortable majority.
Two other no-confidence motions were also thrown out by a
show of hands.
The Democratic Movement for Change (DMC), which now
may join the coalition, voted with Likud and its two coalition
parties.
The budget called for a 3.3 percent cutback in defense ex-
penditures and a 25 percent price raise in consumer products
and services, such as subsidized foods, public transportation,
electricity and gasoline.
The government economic program calls for cutbacks of
some S225 million in proposed spending $143 million from
the defense budget and $92 million from other government
agencies.
Chabad Response to Evangelicals:
'We Never Lost It! For 3,289 Years'
BUFFALO-(JTA)-The national Christian evangelical
bumper sticker campaign with the slogan. "I have found it,"
has been countered with the Jewish response of "We never lost
it! for 3,289 years" bumper sticker.
The Jewish stickers are being distributed here, free, by the
Chabad House on Main Street as part of the national Lubavitch
campaign, it was reported in last week's Buffalo Jewish
Review.
THE JEWISH stickers are black and yellow, the same
colors as the evangelical ones, and the words "We never lost
it," are printed inside a Torah scroll.
The phrase, "for 3,289 years," below the scroll, indicates
how long ago the Jews received the Torah on Mt. Sinai.
David Lazerson, assistant student program director of
Chabad House, said these stickers are intended as a thought-
provoker for Jews, not an attack on Christians, according to the
Review.
dfewiis][i Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, July 22,1977
Section B
of Need for True Peace
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
_)olda Meir warned the
3,000 delegates attending
the closing session of the
eightieth annual conven-
tion of the Zionist
rganization of America
that the greatest danger
[facing Israel is to promote
[an illusion of peace when
[there is no real peace.
"We want genuine
peace," she declared, "not
an illusory peace. And for a
genuine peace there is a
majority in Israel that is
ready to pay the price."
THE FORMER Prime Minis-
ter, who was presented with the
ZOA's Theodor Herzl Award by
President Ephraim Katzir,
recalled her two meetings with
Jimmy Carter one in 1972
when he was Governor of Georgia
and the other shortly before his
election. She expressed belief
that President Carter is a friend
of Israel and that he genuinely
wants peace in the Middle East
and a safe and flourishing Israel.
Mrs. Meir also stressed the
need for aliya. She noted that no
one can guarantee that Israel
may not be attacked once again
by the Arabs. "But if we are a
million more Jews in Israel, the
picture would have to be dif-
ferent," she declared.
She also criticized what she
termed dangerous statements by
friends and foes "who talk of
guarantees, international or
other. These will not prevent
another war. War can be
prevented only if Israel is strong.
At the same time, a peace would
not last if Israel is not strong and
secure." She said the wars Israel
went through would be justified
only if they ensured the con-
tinuation of Jewish existence.
THE CLOSING session w s
also addressed by Rabbi Jo.--
Sternstein, who was re-elevUo
president of the ZOA. Jacques
Torczyner, chairman of the
convention committee, chaired
the session.


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Miami Judaic Studies Program Seeks Matching Funds to Endow Chair
Stanley Arkin, vice
president of Arkin Con-
struction Company and
former alumni trustee of
the University of Miami, is
chairman of the recently
organized volunteer com-
mittee which is seeking a
total of S500.000 to endow a
permanent Chair in Judaic
Studies for the Judaic
Studies Program at the
University of Miami.
A challenge grant of
SI00,000 is available for the
Chair in Judaica, con-
tingent on the University s
JWVA Convention Nearing
The official opening of the
fiftieth annual convention of the
Ladies Auxiliaries of the Jewish
War Veterans of the United
States will take place on
Tuesday. Aug. 2 at 2 p.m. in the
Regency Room of the Diplomat
Hotel. Hollywood The con-
vention theme will be "JWVA in
Pursuit of Progress."
Participating wil] be National
President Rose L. Toye: Con-
vention Chairman Sylvia R.
Piltch. past national president:
Convention Cochairman Frances
L Forman. past national
president; local coordinator Billie
Kem. past national president.
Ann N arc us. Department of
Florida president; National
Treasurer Ceil Schwartz, past
national president; and Marcia
Kozlow. past national president.
The theme of Wednesday's
program will be "JWVA in
Pursuit of Service" with a
workshop narrated by Anita
Gotthoffer and a panel which will
include Sylvia Herman, national
first junior vice president:
Frances Wapnick. national senior
vice president and Jessie
Gneshin. past national president.
The afternoon session's
subject: "JWVA in Pursuit of
Change." will be chaired by Rose
Schorr, past national president.
In the evening, a reception and
tea will be held Billie Kern will
chair the reception with
Henrietta Kraditor. past national
president, cochairman.
Report: PLO Investing In
U.S. Blue Chip Stocks
NEW YORK -I JTAI -Time
Magazine said in its current issue
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization has built up an
investment portfolio amounting
"to an estimated $60-100 million"
which includes shares in "blue
chip American companies that
have operations in the Middle
East."
Describing the PLO as
"probably the richest, best
financed revolutionary-terrorist
organization in history," Time
said its other holdings include
two Beirut hotels, shares in
shipyards and oil tankers and a
youth hostel under construction
in Cairo
TIME' SAID that "Some of
this money has even been used
for the quiet purchase of land on
the West Bank that local
Palestinians might otherwise be
tempted to sell to the Israelis."
According to the report, "The
Palestinians also claim to make
$5 million a year operating an
illegal drug market inside Israel,
using Oriental Jews as pusher."
But the PLOs principal
sources of income are sub-
ventions from the oil-producing
Arab states, notably Saudi
Arabia and from other Arab
states which totals about $70
million a year.
Another $10 million comes
from the 300,000 Palestinians
living in the Arab oil states where
5 percent of their wages are
routinely withheld as a con-
tribution to the Palestinian
movement.
"Every so often, the
Palestinian coffers have been
replenished with income ex-
tracted by terrorism,'' Time
reported. The magazine referred
to the $25 million ransom paid
jointly by Iran and Saudi Arabia
for the 81 hostages taken at the
OPEC meeting in Vienna in
December, 1975.
According to Time, the PLOs
assets "are mainly held through
numbered bank accounts and
blind names to prevent Israeli
retaliation and also to
camouflage the wealth of a
movement that prides itself on its
warrior image."
SECRETARY FOR TEMPLE
OFFICE. SHORTHAND
AND OFFICE EXPERIENCE
NECCESSARY TEMPLE
ZION 271-2311
OFFICE MANAGER
Co-Ordinator with Book-
keeping Experience Temple
Zion 271-2311
ISRAEL M250
4 WEEKS-3 MEALS DAILY
Monthly departures Beginning September
FULL SIGHTSEEING DAILY PROGRAMS
YOUNG ISRAEL TOURS
103 Park Ave New York N Y 10017
|f >"."; H 3051 :
'*&'&,
securing $400,000 toward
the $500,000 needed to
endow it. Arkin said.
ESTABLISHED in 1973 as an
interdepartmental program
offering ten courses, the Judaic
Studies Program has since
doubled in size, and last year
attracted nearly 300 students.
Open to Jews and non-Jews, the
program focuses on the various
facets of Judaism and em-
phasizes the significant role the
Jewish people have played in the
development of the cultural
heritage of Western civilization.
The major for the program
consists of 36 credits, of which 18
are requirements in Hebrew
language. Jewish history and
Jewish literature. In addition to
the required courses, students
also undertake a minimum 0f 12
credits of Judaic Studies related
courses in one departmental dis-
cipline such as history, sociology,
religion or language. Offered in
the College of Arts and Sciences,
the program leads to the
Bachelor of Arts degree with a
major in Judaic Studies and
parallel major in the other dis-
cipline of the student's choice.
A related program for educa-
tion majors, established in 1975.
is also offered through the School
of Education. This program leads
to the bachelor of education in
either social studies on the
secondary level or in elementary
education, with a concentration
in Judaic Studies.
ISRAEL
15 DAYS DELUXE TOUR plu^day crE.se
LED BY DR. EMANUEL SCHENK w.oo
OCTOBER 17-OCTOBER 31 DR. E. SCHENK
$1^nQ FR0M MIAMI based on double 733-1856
4> I OW occupancy plus S3 Intl Tax:
INCLUDES:
AIR TRANSFERS DELUXE HOTELS MEALS
SIGHTSEEING AND ESCORT FROM MIAMI
TRANS OLYMPIA TOURS SHALOM TOURS
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Hollywood 925-8220 Miami 944-4879 I
COMMUNITY interest in the
program, strong from its incep-
tion, gained momentum with the
appointment in August 1976 of
Dr. Yehuda Shamir, Jewish
scholar, author and teacher, as
director of the program and
associate professor of religion.
Born in Tel Aviv. Dr. Shamir
did his undergraduate work at
Hebrew University in Jerusalem
where he studied Jewish history,
philosophy and Kabbalah. After
initial graduate studies at
Hebrew University in these
areas, he came to the United
States where he earned his Ph.D.
in Jewish history, philosophy and
Arabic from Dropsie University,
Pa. Before coming to the Univer-
sity of Miami, he had been
director of Judaic Studies at the
University of Cincinnati for three
years, and prior to that for four
years had been coordinator of
Hebrew Studies at the University
of Texas.
Since the Judaic Studies
program is interdisciplinary in
nature. the ten professors
currently involved with the
teaching program devote only
part of their time to it. The only
full-time member is Dr. Shamir,
whose vision for the program em-
braces a senior faculty member as
Professor of Judaic Studies who
would devote his full time to the
program.
WHILE THE curriculum now
includes some twenty courses in
history, politics and public af-
fairs, Hebrew, religion, music
and literature, Dr. Shamir sees
an urgent need to add at least
five basic areas of study the
Bible, Talmud, Judeo-Christian
Relations, Advanced Hebrew and
Israeli Literature.
"The endowment of a per-
manent Chair in Judaic Studies
would enable the program to
make certain that the great con-
tributions of the Jewish nation to
the western world will be
studied," Dr. Shamir said.
While developing additional
courses for the program taught
by experienced professors in the
various departments, Dr. Shamir
also had brought visiting authors
and professors as guest lecturers
and seminar leaders. These
programs are open to the public
as well as to students.
DR. SHAMIR sees the Judaic
Studies Program as of special
interest to the Jewish community
of Miami. As he says:
DR. YEHUDA SHAMIR
The program seeks to develop
academic excellence among
students and faculty, while also
helping to meet the intellectual
needs of the Jewish community
of Miami. As the program
develops, it can aid in the
preparation of teachers, social
workers, and others who plan
careers in the Jewish com-
munity."
Support for the program for
library acquisitions, for visiting
lecturers, for scholarships has
already come from several
sources. Dr. Shamir said.
THE FIRST major gift of
$125.000 over a five-year period
came in December 1976 from the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion which has been supportive
of the program from its inception.
At that time, Morton Sifberman,
Federation president and chair-
man of the University's Advisory
Council for Judaic Studies, said:
"The Federation considers
Jewish education of our youth a
high priority in meeting the
needs of tomorrow's Jewish com-
munity. College students are at a
critical stage in their religious
and cultural development and it
is important to be able to offer
this education opportunity at
this time in their lives.''
Another grant came in April
1977, when the Sandra and L.
Jules Arkin Philanthropic Fund
committed So.000 to the program
over a five-year period.
MORE recently, the Miami
Beach Branch of the Workman's
Circle pledged S10.500 over the
next four years to support
courses in the Yiddish language
as part of the program.
While general support is neces-
sary to the program for the pur-
chase of library materials, for the
lecture series, conferences and
visiting professors. Dr. Shamir
places high priority on estab-
lishing the endowed Chair in
Judaic Studies.
"This Chair." he said, "will
provide permanent recognition
for Judaic Studies, thereby
assuring that research, serious
scholarship and quality of
STANLEY ARKIN
teaching and learning will
continue uninterruptedly In
addition. Jewish students will
develop an understanding and
appreciation of their own heritage
and identity through learning
about the creative cultural ex-
perience of the Jewish people
during their 3.000-year history A
more significant way to register
an impact on future generations
and to express a respect for
scholarship would be difficult to
achieve."
Planning A Trip?
COUNCIL'S NEW AND
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Phone 324-1855
Wiping Ita(iai\jsty(e is as
easyas JUef ^ais.'.Witi^
l\e|p fron\Chef 6Boy-ar-dee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
to cook for you when
you long for a delicious meatless
meal. His Cheese Ravioli
really hits the spot1 Perfect for the
children's lunch, for an easy supper
or even a late-night snack. If you
like kreplach. you'll love the Chef's
Cheese Ravioli. Bite-size chock
full of tangy Italian-style cheese,
simmered in rich, hearty tomato
sauce. And. all you do is heat-and
enjoy. For a thrifty, meatless
mechayeh you couldn't do bel

m
i


Friday, July 22,1977
* Jewish itorttMaun
Page 3-B
White House Denies Brzezinski
Made Middle East Policy Statement
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON-(JTA)-The
White House and the State
Department both contended last
week that National Security
Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski
neither initiated nor caused the
initiation of the State Depart-
ment's statement of June 27
warning Israel its surrender of
the West Bank is essential to a
peace settlement.
However, neither the White
House nor the State Department
would identify the originator of
the statement which caused a
furor among Israeli supporters
and brought a barrage of
criticism against the Carter
Administration by members of
the Jewish community and the
Congress.
ALTHOUGH PRESIDENT
Carter put a lid on further
discussion by his administration
of the Middle East situation until
Premier Menachem Begin visited
him here, both Presidential Press
Secretary Jody Powell and
Department spokesman John
Trattner took issue with a
telecast that said "indirectly, the
President seemed to be ad-
mitting" the State Department's
policy statement 'was a blun-
der."
CBS diplomatic correspondent
Marvin Kalb added that the
statement was "initiated" by
Brzezinski and that it was
"Brzezinski who added the
section most critical of Israel's
leaders, namely, the warning that
the subject of Israel's withdrawal
from the West Bank cannot be
excluded from the negotiations."
Trattner said Friday that the
statement in its "final form was
the product of consultations by
the Secretary of State with other
officials and the National
Security Council". He said the
original statement was drafted in
the Department.
KALB'S REPORT, he said,
contained "a misunderstanding."
But he did not give details.
Among unanswered questions
was who called Undersecretary of
State Philip Habib to start the
entire process of drafting a
statement.
While official responses were
made about the telecast, the
Carter administration continued
to refuse to comment on
statements and actions in the
Arab world impinging directly on
U.S. policy for a Middle East
settlement.
Eastern Proposes Low-Fare Package
Southeast Florida tourism will
get a hefty boost this fall if the
Civil Aeronautics Board ap-
proves low motionai fares
proposed by Eastern Airlines
amis up <
iome routes ami
: .in
a a
idem
for Florida and the Bahamas,
said "We all recognize that
Florida travel urgently needs
stimulation elieve these
fares will result in a iharp in-
i

JCC Seniors Camp Session Underway
th Florid
Summer Vacation ''amp
located at the
Boulevard Hotel. Miami Beach is
now underway.
Teenagers assigned to work in
the agency by STEP (Summer
Teen Employment Program!
have added a new dimension to
the program. Six high school
students five males and one
female, are assistant counselors
to the staff.
tarticipating in th.
camp -1 >ion in > id in ail
day tr i "r',!
sporl programs including
swimming instruction.
Applications for the second
four week session, July 18-Aug.
12 are now being accepted. The
fee includes door to door tran-
sportation. Prospective campers
can contact Marty Friedman or
Debbie Averbook at the JCC-
South Beach Activities Center.
CTUDI0
Asher Tzri Yanich
Yusi and Lori Yanich of
North Miami announce the
birth of their son, Asher
Tzvi, on July 13 at Mercy
Hospital.
The 7 lbs. 11 oz. boy is the
seventh grandson for
Nechame Yanich, now of
Jerusalem, and the first for
Leonard and Beverly Tobin
of Miami Beach. Asher's
great-grandparents are Jack
and Ruth Bernstein, of Man-
hattan Beach and Miami
Beach.
Yusi Yanich, ACSW, is
the Southern Regional direc-
tor of the Workmen's Circle
and an Israeli folk dance in-
structor. Mother, Lori, is co-
owner of the Upstairs Shop
on Miami Beach.
^afcw
w ""iiiiiniii""
''Hiniin
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
welcomes
you back to
his renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lor a unique
dining experience
Match your table to your
mood in one ol 5 individual
rooms The Tent.
Wine Cellar. Studio. Place
Pigalle.' Swiss Chalet
David Maddern
at the Piano
OPENS AT 5 P.M. '
(private Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THI GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondays
SLOMOVITZ
Slomovitz to Direct
Judaic Studies For
The 'Special' Child
The United Synagogue of
America has announced the
launching of a Judaic studies
program for special education
students under the direction of
Estelle Slomovitz.
The goals of
the program are,
according to Slo-
movitz, "giving
every Jewish
child from 5 to 18
years of age the
right to learn a-
bout his or her
roots and heri-
tage.
"We will furnish the know-
ledge and appreciation of Jewish
values, together with holiday ob-
servances. A proper social,
emotional and vocational adjust-
ment on the part of the special
child is made easier, indeed pos-
sible, when the child or adoles-
cent is properly adjusted to his
religious community," Slomovitz
said.
The program will be financially
supported by the community-at-
large.
AMC Delegates
To Meet in Denver
Seventy delegates from Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
counties representing twelve
Florida Chapters of I he A merican
Mi dical Center of Denver Cancer
Rese ind Hospital, 'ill
lital




ADAMS
OVERHOLT
United Way Names Leaders
Stewart P. Thomas, general manager of South Florida
Group, Sears, Roebuck & Co., and 1977 United Way general
campaign chairman has announced the following appointments
to United Way leadership:
Larry H. Adams, Division general manager, Florida Power
& Light Co., has been named chairman of Campaign Unit D.
Unit D is responsible for raising United Way contributions
from Dade County's media industry and power companies.
Adams has been involved in United Way campaigns for
several years.
Rod Overholt, president of M. R. Harrison Construction
Corp., has been appointed chairman of United Way's campaign
Unit E.
Unit E is responsible for raising United Way contributions
from Dade's telephone and construction industries.
Overholt served as a Division chairman of Unit E last year.
Russell Ray, senior vice president of Marketing, Eastern
Airlines. Inc.. has been appointed chairman of United Way's
Campaign Unit G, which is responsible for securing con-
tributions from Dade's air services industry, business services
and hotels.
This will be Ray's second consecutive year as chairman of
('nil ('.
Temple Destruction Commemoration
To Be Broadcast This Sunday


i
High Holidays 5738
ENJOY THE HOLIDAYS AMONG FRIENDS
Miami Beach's finest Kosher hotel is offering six delightful
holiday packages for this Rosh Hashonah Season
4-WEEK
PACKAGE
Sept. 11 Oct. 9
Rosh Hashonah,
Yom Kippur and
Succouth
TWO 14-NIGHTS
PACKAGES
Sept. 11-25
Rosh Hashonah
and Yom Kippur
or Sept. 23 -
Oct. 7 Succouth
11 NIGHTS
Sept. 12-23
Rosh Hashonah
and Yom Kippur
or 10 nights
Sept. 26 Oct. 6
Succouth
or if you prefer to split your vacation
then take advantage of the six day five night split stay
Sept. 12 15 and Sept. 21-23.
Packages as low as $160.00 per person double occupancy
HIRSCH'S
Strictly Kosher Under (0) Supervision.
l&crs
HOTEL
Ocean front
from 25th Street to 26th Street
Miami Beach, Florida
For reservations and information: (305) 531-6061
Services will be conducted by a prominent Cantor.


Page4-B
*Jenit ihrk/iam
Friday. Jul
-v 22.197:
Community Corner
Honorable Mention Menschen: Bernard Schechterman. profes-
sor of politics and public affairs at the University of Miami, has been
elected to the National Executive Committee of the American Profes-
sors for Peace in the Middle East...Prof. Seymour B. Liebman.
president of the Jewish Historical Society, recently had an article
entitled "A Woman of Valor" published in the Jewish Spec-
tator... Louis I. Fein, M.S., director of the South Miami Speech Clinic,
has been reappointed for the fifth year to the faculty of the University
of Miami School of Medicine as an adjunct assistant professor in the
Department of Otolaryngology... Joel A. Lefkowitz has been ap-
pointed assistant administrator of Biscayne Medical Center...Dov
Kolani, director of the Israel Government Tourist office, Southern
Region, recently conferred the Ministry of Tourism award on Sam R
osenkranz, president of Bon Voyage Travel and Israel Travel Head-
quarters in North Miami Beach.
For Local Groupies: Reynolds Metals Company will donate one
penny to the Muscular Dystrophy Association for every pound of
aluminum recycled by the company's nationwide recycling program
during the month of August. "Pennies from Heaven" is the theme of
the 1977 Jerry Lewis MDA campaign...Al Dilthey, Miami Herald
personnel director will address the International Toastmistresses Club
of the Herald at its tenth annual anniversary meeting July 29 at the
Green Dolphin Restaurant at Miamarina. Incoming officers will be
installed by Dianna Marsicanno, president-elect of the international
organization's Council 5. Officers are Peggy Kinnon, president;
Sherry Stein, vice president; Henrietta Gaylee, secretary; Bea Hines,
treasurer and Shirley Wiezenthal, council delegate... Some 40
delegates of the National Asthma Center of Denver will attend the
Colorado convention beginning July 22 and continuing through July
27... A meeting to determine the feasibility of forming a South Florida
Chapter of the Association of Parents of American Israelis will be held
on Sunday, July 24, at 1 p.m. in Room A of the Washington Federal
Savings and Loan, 633 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach... The Mus-
cular Dystrophy Association will be given another boost on Aug. 1
when Skipper Chuck will host the eleventh annual junior golf open at
the California Club. All proceeds to to MDA... The roster of officers
and directors of the Dade County Youth Fair was confirmed at the
organization's annual meeting .Judge George Orr is the newly elected
president; Bob Anderson replaces retiring Bill Moore as vice
president; Bill Binder is the group's new secretary and Walter B.
Arnold Jr. will retain his treasurer's post. Directors are: Nicholas
Levandoski, Norma Banas, Ben Demby, Ralph Lemon, Scottie
McGregor, Marie Nickels, Mary Reilly. Ray Goode, Jack Griffith and
John Worablc.The Miami Chapter of Executive Women Inter-
national (formerly Executive Secretaries, Inc.) will celebrate the sixth
birthday of the organization of July 26 with cocktails and dinner at the
Konover Hotel, Miami Beach. Jan Hoffar of radio WAXY announced
that guest speaker would be Margaret Rittenhouse of St. Louis,
organizing director of EWI.
A Pretty Face: The Ms. Nursing Home District I Contest will be
held in the Ruby Auditorium of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged on Thursday, July 28. Four nursing homes will compete
in this year's contest: Arch Creek Nursing and Convalescent Home,
Fountainhead Nursing and Convalescent Home, Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged and Villa Maria Nursing and Rehabilitation
Center. The average age of the contestant's is in the 80's.
For the Kinder: Morton Mayberg, president of the Landow
Yeshiva/Lubavitch Educational Center, has announced that the
school recently attained its goal of offering a Jewish education from
nursery school through Rabbinical College by adding a twelfth grade
to its curriculum.
by ditk ^ipp
DR. HAROLD GLICK
Glick Takes
Sinai Staff
Presidency
The newly elected president of
the medical staff at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, Dr. Harold
Glick, has officially taken office.
Dr. Glick, a Miami Beach
surgeon, will serve a two-year
term. He succeeds Dr. Everett
Shocket, surgeon, also of Miami
Beach.
Elected with him were in-
ternists Dr. Robert J. Jaffe, first
vice president, and Dr. Stuart
Gottlieb, second vice president.
In addition, six new members
were elected to serve on the
Medical Executive Committee,
the governing body of the
medical staff. They are: Dr.
Stephen T. Cogen, internist; Dr.
Joel S. Dokson, internist: Dr.
Robert T. Bass, surgeon; Dr.
Irvin H. Willis, surgeon; Dr. L.
Marshall Goldstein, family
medicine; and Dr. Jerome
Jacobs, dentist.
Melchels
By NORMA BARACH
Peach Kuchen
Something special for breakfast, brunch or snack is this kuchen.
The recipe, which makes two of them, is if you might want to freeze
one for later use. If so, the one you intend to freeze should be taken out
of the oven 10 minutes earlier and when you want to serve it, place it
frozen into a preheated 376-degree oven to finish baking.
2 pkgs. dry yeast 1 tsp. grated orange rind
V* cup warm milk 5 cups flour
l'/i sticks margarine '/, stick melted margarine
'/ cup sugar >/* cup chopped nuts
3 eggs 1 can peach pie filling
1 cup sour cream
Dissolve yeast in milk. Let stand about 10 minutes. Cream mar-
garine (l'/i sticks) and sugar. Add eggs, sour cream and orange rind,
then add yeast mixture. On a floured board knead until satiny. Put in
a large bowl; sprinkle top with flour; cover with a towel. Let it rise
eight hours in a warm place. Punch dough down. Knead for a few
minutes. Divide into two balls and roll each into a '/.-inch thick rec-
tangle. Brush with melted margarine, sprinkle nuts and spread pie
Riling. (The pie filling should be spread mostly near the end where you
begin to roll) Roll like a jelly roll. Shape like a half moon. Brush top
with melted margarine and make a few shallow cuts diagonally across
the top. Place on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 375 degrees for 45
minutes.
Applesauce Lokshen Kugel
lunchtn^buffeT1' ^ HOt r "*" *!* mak68 a hit at *
1 16-oz. pkg. noodles
'/ stick margarine
8 ozs. cottage cheese
1 cup sour cream
1 cup applesauce
4 eggs, well beaten
1 tsp. salt
'/ tsp. cinnamon
Cook noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse
then combine with rest of ingredients. '
Grease a 9xl3-inch pan. Pour mixture into pan and bake at 350
degrees for about one hour. Serves 8-10.
Intercontinental
Assets Up 37%
An increase of more than $41
million in total assets for the past
year has been reported by
Intercontinental Banks of Miami
Beach and Miami, reflecting a
rise of more than 37 percent.
Benjamin I. Shulman, chairman
of the board of Intercontinental
Bank of Miami Beach and vice
chairman of Intercontinental
Bank of Miami, said total assets
of the two banks were
$150,'77,139asof June 30,1977.
Lenore and Marty Hochman
back from a most interesting trip
to India and the Orient... they
said that everything was so
diversified.
At Khatmandu, Nepal, which
is at the foot at Mt. Everest, they
found a few modern buildings in
an old city living with century old
traditions. There they saw the
"Living Goddess," a young girl
selected at age five, who has no
blemishes and a perfect body.
She must watch the slaughter of
an animal without flinching or
crying. She is then taken from
her family and put into a temple
where she lives and reigns until
the age of puberty, when she is
led out into society to fend for
herself. All this amidst a modem
air conditioned hotel with a
swimming pool, and a group of
Israeli tourists.
They found India quite
poverty stricken. The Ganges
River was terribly polluted,
especially with the dead. It is
their custom to throw the bodies
of priests and children into the
river, where vultures attack and
feed upon them. To those in
India it is considered "holy
water"... to the Hochmans it was
fascinating but unbelievable.
While in Bangkok they saw a
solid gold Buddah. It weighed
five and a half tons. The story
goes that many years ago the
people were afraid of an invasion
so they covered the statue with
cement. It was recently
rediscovered. They found the Taj
Mahal exquisite, and Hong Kong
one giant shopping center.
They lived on a houseboat in
the city of Srinigar, located in the
state of Kashmir, in India. It was
like an adult camp... every thing
there is done by hand. They saw
girls of 12 who were already
pregnant with their second child.
They also got caught in a messy
political situation while there.
LENORE was amazed at some
of the art sculptured on the
temple walls. At one period in
time the birth rate was quite low
in India, so erotic art taught the
people everything they needed to
know. All kinds of perversion is
also included...just in case the
population needed any ideas.
They found Seoul, Korea very
modern. Their hotel was modem
with good service. The band
played for dancing... not up ^
the hustle yet, but lots of rock
and roll. However, there was
strictly enforced curfew from |!
p.m. to 4 a.m. and tight security
at the airport.
Honolulu was a rest stop m
the way home. They enjoyed the
island of Oahu and the beach it
Waikiki. Marty didn't realize
how strong the sun was there
and the nest morning had trouble
getting his shoes on because his
feet were so badly burned.
IT WAS A full vacation
constantly on the go, up some
mornings as early as 4 a.m., and
all kinds of experiences They en-
joyed it all, but are so very glad
to be back home.
EUa and Allen Greenberg just
had their first son. He joins their
daughter, Dina who is now two
years old. This makes the first
grandson for both sets of
grandparents, Shirley and Sidney
Greenberg and Yetta and Leo
Gelvan. Ella and Allen are
building a new home in the
Kendall area. It will have a
swimming pool and tennis courts.
Stephanie Stone and Stuut
Hoffman are planning to be
married the end of July at The
Mutiny at Sailboat Bay in
Coconut Grove. Stephanie's
parents are Ruth and Phil
Heckerling of Miami. Stuart's
family is from Philadelphia. 1 '
practicing law here nov, -.-
Stephanie is an interior
decorator.
Progress Club
Appoints
Freedman
The Progress Club of Miami,
Inc., comprising more than 70
major Miami area business,
professional and industrial firms,
has appointed Morty Freedman
and Associates, Inc. of Coconut
Grove to create and direct a
public relations program for the
organization. ._
ESTATE SALE SINGLE FAMILY
SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL LOT 87 by 120 ft. LO-
CATED IN PUNTA GORDA ISLES. SIMILAR LOTS
WERE SELLING FOR $9,100.00 IN MARCH, 1976
THROUGH THE DEVELOPER. ASKING PRICE
$7,500.00

"*!

'"%
Wl#*mjy CANADIAN IMPORT
W FINDITATPUBLIX WHICH IS *
........^ATURWG A.S.PECIAL PRICE THIS WEEK '
&


iYiday, July 22,1977
* k /#> Fkridfian
Page 5-B
Local Woman to Lead
Brandeis U. Women
WALTHAM, Mass. A
jrominent Greater Miami civic
eader has been elected to a one-
year term as national president
!>f Brandeis Uni-
versity's Nation-
Women's
Committee
(NWC).
Mrs. Sidney
Schwartz of,
Jal Harbour as-
sumed her office
luring the orga-
nization's twen-
ty-ninth annual
conference held'
cently at the SCHWARTZ
Irandeis campus.
THE WOMEN'S Committee
vas formed shortly before Bran
lleis opened in 1948 and today
lias more than 60,000 members
(cross the country. The com-
mittee annually raises about $1
lillion in support of the Univer-
lity's libraries, which today have
early 700,000 bound volumes.
By virtue of her office, Mrs.
Schwartz will sit as a member of
the University's Board of Trus-
es. She has previously been a
Jrandeis President's Councilor
and a Fellow of the University.
A native of Chicago, Mrs. Sch-
wartz graduated from the
Jniversity of Illinois (B.A.
psychology) and served three
years as a medical social worker.
HER SERVICE to the Na
tional Women's Committee and
to the University spans more
than 20 years, and she has held a
number of executive posts. She
was elected to the Honorary
National Board, twice served on
the National Nominating Com-
mittee and was the founding
president of the Southeast
Regional Chapter.
She is a former national vice
president, and Greater Miami
Chapter treasurer and president.
Her commitment as a volun-
teer worker stretches beyond the
academic environs to communal
and civic endeavors.
MRS. SCHWARTZ is a mem-
ber of the American Association
of University Women and a life
member of the Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Shalom, Mt. Sinai
Hospital Auxiliary and the
Douglas Gardens Jewish Home
for the Aged. She is a past cam-
paign chairman, Women's
Division, of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and a trustee
of Surf-Bal-Ray Florida Public
Library.
A resident of Greater Miami
for the past 26 years, she lives
with her husband on Miami
Beach.
Prof. Poses Solution
To Paletinian Problem
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Prof. Ranaan Weitz.
'head of the Jewish
[Agency's settlement
[department, has proposed
"hiding up Israel and the
'ccupied territories into
Mght administrative
[districts as a means of
solving the Palestinian
[problem.
He said five of the
listricts would be
apulated mainly by Jews
1 the other three on the
Zest Bank, and the Gaza
RStrip would be admin-
istered by Arabs. Jeru-
salem would be a separate
^district "in itself" accord-
ing to the Weitz plan.
WEITZ, a member of the
Labor Party, presented his
proposal to the party's political
committee which is scheduled to
discuss it. One committee
member noted that the plan is
original and will stir a heated
debate.
t In his proposal, Weitz argues
that Israel must minimize the
"physical involvement" of
Palestinian Arabs in Israel,
^particularly the large number of
Arab workers from the admin-
istered territories who work in
Israeli towns.
He said that if something is
plot done to develop the econo-
mies of the West Bank and the
Gaza Strip "Arabs will continue
po be the cheap labor providers"
and this will develop into a
permanent status.
WEITZ ALSO argues that
fArabs in these areas must have
their own "political expression"
[without which there will never be
ace between the Israelis and
be Palestinians. He notes that
locially, economically and
litically it is not desirable to
Continue a military admin-
istration in the areas for many
inore years.
He says that in any political
kgreement all citizens of Israel
pust have equal rights while in
Ihe territories the Palestinians
must have the right of self-
determination.
It is for this reason that Weitz
has suggested dividing up the
country into eight districts. The
five Jewish districts would be
Saead, Haifa. Tel Aviv. Ashdod
and Beersheba. The three Arab
districts would be Nablus.
Hebron and Gaza.
ACCORDING to Weitz s plan,
each district will have its own
administration in charge of the
district's internal affairs. The
Israeli government will deal
mainly with defense, economy
and foreign policy.
Weitz maintains that dividing
the country into districts will not
prevent a possible political agree-
ment in the area. If there is an
agreement with Jordan, Weitz
says, then according to the plan,
all three Arab districts would
become part of Jordan.
(The plan includes building a
highway from Hebron to the
Gaza Strip that will not go
through Jewish settlements.)
The Gaza Port would serve
Jordan with the exception of
receiving imports of arms and
military equipment.
IF THERE is no hope for a
peace agreement with Jordan,
Weitz notes, then the two
remaining possibilities are a
Palestinian state or a federal
system. According to Weitz, the
unification of all three Arab
districts with all rights except
the establishment of an army,
would in effect be a Palestinian
state.
The third option would be a
federal state made up of the eight
suggested districts with
Jerusalem as the capital. As far
as defense and foreign policy are
concerned, "Eretz Israel" will be
one unit run by a central govern-
ment, Weitz says.
All domestic and internal
affairs would be handled by the
local administrations of the
various districts.
IN HIS plan, Weitz gives top
priority to an agreement with
Jordan concessions should be
considered even in his plan.
Flagler Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation officially opened its newest office on
June 29. A ribbon cutting of $20 bills and
entertainment marked the opening of
Flagler's Omni office. Cutting the ribbon
(from left) are Albert J. Beer, Herschel
Rosen thai, president of Flagler Federal;
Mrs. Nathan Meltzer, Seymour D. Keith,
chairman of the board of Flagler Federal; the
Rev. Theodore Gibson, vice mayor of Miami;
Commissioner Beverly Phillips and Alfred B.
Parker.
U.S., Israel Neck-in-Neck
For Maccabian's Top Honors
Continued from Page 1-B
breaststroke with a time of
2.25.26. Weinberg won the
women's 200-meter free-style in
2.08.96.
IN THE WOMEN'S 100-meter
relay free-style her time was
4.10.09. Teammates Donna
Goldbloom of Chevy Chase, Md.
had a time of 1.02.97; Sara
Shuster, 2.06.00; and Norma
Barton, 3.07.29. Israel came in
second in the relay, followed by
Canada. Gillian Peters, of
Australia, triumphed over Lisa
Denaburg of the United States in
the 100-meter backstroke with a
record-breaking time of 1.10.33.
Denaburg finished ahead of
Elaine Luxemberg of Canada.
In women's tennis, Dana
Gilbert of Piedmont, Calif, scored
an upset victory over U.S. pro-
tennis star Robin Tenney in two
sets while Donna Rubin, of Rye,
New York, beat Israel's best,
Pauline Peled.
Three other Americans who
remain in the battle for the
women's single tennis cham-
pionship are Linda Siegelman, of
New York, Stacy Margolin of
Beverly Hills, Calif, and Jody
Applebaum.
Among the men, Joel Ross, of
Hartsdale, N.Y. Steve Krulevitz
of Baltimore, and Larry Loeb
won their matches to assure a
United States position in the
finals. In senior tennis, Mort
Greenberg defeated Emanuel
Bardan of Israel 6-4, 6-1. He
teamed up with Hal Landesberg
to whip Bardan and Shmuel
Rivlin in the doubles match 7-5,
6-1.
SHARON SHAPIRO, a
youngster from Arleta, Calif, won
five gold medals in the single and
team gymnastics and was hailed
as the "Nadia Commenici" of
Jewish gymnastics. She is a
definite starter for the United
States in the 1980 Moscow
Olympics.
In the weight-lifting com-
petition, Jason Farrow of
Monticello, N.Y. won a bronze
medal in the lightweight
division; Michael Cohen, of
Savannah, Ga. took a gold medal
in the middleweight division and
teammate Barry Herman took a
silver medal. Cohen broke two
Maccabiah records by lifting a
total of 610-'2 lbs. in the clean-
and-jerk and snatch-and-lift.
Ronald Krelstein of Ger-
mantown, Tenn., won a gold
medal for the U.S. in the 50-
meters pistol shooting to break
his own 1973 Maccabiah record.
In the free-pistol event, the
American team scored 2091
points against 2022 for the Israeli
team
In golf, the American team is
leading with 296 followed by
South Africa (300), Great Britain
(304) and Israel (310). But Brazil
easily whipped the Americans in
table tennis, 5-1, although the
American women eked out a 3-2
victory over the Israeli women.
Americans scored a clean
sweep in the sabre competition
with Edgar House and Joel
Glucksman, of New York City,
taking gold and silver medals,
and Richard Maxwell of
Philadelphia, a bronze medal.
The United States team sur-
prised all by beating Argentina
in soccer, 2-1. The Americans
were held to a 2-2 tie by Peru. In
volleyball, the Americans fell
. before a tough Israeli squad after
downing France.
The United States basketball
five swept to an easy 108-32 win
over a Colombia quintet. Stu
Kitenic, of the Unitersity of
South Carolina, led the scoring
with 19 baskets, followed by 17-
year-old Dan Schayes who scored
17 points. The American water
polo team swamped Belgium 6-1.
On the deficit side, all six
American boxers lost their
matches and were eliminated
from competition. But America
beat the highly touted British
squash team 2-1. In bridge, which
is an auxiliary event, the United
States dropped to third place
Friday after losing to South
Africa but gained a second place
tie with the South Africans
Saturday night.
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^


Page 6- B
*Jmisti Ikiidlkin
*fa&
I Nationally
t Advertised
cP!Hde
ELECTRIC APPLIANCES
JUST FOR SHOPPING PANTRY PRIDE AND
SAVING YOUR GREEN CASH REGISTER TAPES.
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LARGE SIZE 70 SERIES
GOOD EATING-PICK YOUR OWN
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FIERY RED SWEET EATING WHOLE
Watermelons
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it
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TOP QUALITY-CALIFORNIA DRISCOLL
EACH
Strawberries js&,4Vc |J
TOP QUALITY GOOD EATING
Pineapples
HAWAIIAN
LARGE
6 SIZE
SAVE 36c
Kt AL
Hellmann's
Mayonnaise
GAIDIN illtHlim Ml AD
U.S. NO. 1 EASTERN SHORE ALL PURPOSE
Potatoes
1(L.99C
SAVE 80*,
FOR BRIGHTER TEETH
Gleem
Toothpaste
cooi a iiiishing fiish fia.
Green Cabbage..........u. I 3 Limes.K,... 5.o. 49'
FOR A SATISFYING- VIGII All I US I AIL PUIPOSI (PICK YOUR OWN)
Fresh Egg Plant ... 29* Yellow Onions 19*
TOP QUAUTV CAUF. IMIOIUM SIZI JOCl) SUNKIST GAIDIN HUH Ml AITH*Ul A GOOD
Lemons 10 Si* 79* Yellow Squash 29*
TOPS IN VITAMIN A
AOO HIT TO VOUI SAIAO G AIDIN 'IIlM INOIVl 01
Calif. Carrots iic 29* Escarole H..o 29*
GAIMN FIISH CUSP *** MIAKSTOW All VAtlfTMS
Red Radishes 2 .*&','39* Salad Dressings !?.r59*
i
SAVE 30c
FOR YOUR LAUNDRY
Punch
Detergent
FULLOFFLAVOR-LARCfE
Westen
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32 OZ.
JAR
# UMIT ONI PUASI WI1M J7 00 OIDII
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WISI TWIN-PACK
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JOAN OF AIC
Butter Beans..........
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SPIITI. FIISCA, Ml. Pill II& Ol nil I
Coke or Tab 6 8$lw
All VAIIITII S CHAIM1N IOII
Bath Tissue 4 & 89*
JOAN Of AIC IIGMT 110
Kidney Beans 3 5ffl
VIGIIAIII SHOITINING
Crisco 3 c.'n $169
FUNGUS TWIN PACK ^^
Potato Chips X2Z 79*
5 0Z.
TUBE
* UMIT TWO PIEASI Wll h %1 00 OIDII
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49 OZ.
BOX
1 UMIT ONI PICAS! Wll H 11 00 OIDII
Ol MOIF. IJCIUDING CIGAIITTIS .
* YOU MAY PURCHASE ONE OR ALL STARRED ITEMS, WITH
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BUY 1,
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"' Ice Cream

HALF GALLON CONTAINER
* WITH $7.00 ORDER OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
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84
22-OZ.
BTL
SAVE 30
HUDSON
I
Mr. Big Napkins
300 CT.
PKG.
* LIMIT ONE PKG., PLEASE, WITH S7.00 ORDER
OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Wexf ord S
ANY FEATURE PIECE ^ ^
c
ENTERTAINERS
COLLECTION
ANY FEATURE PIECE
FOR ONLY
59
FINAL
mix
CUP & SAUCER HOSTESS PLATE
2/BREAD & BUTTER 2 SOUP BOWLS
NO ADDITIONAL PURCHASE REQUIRED!
FRESH BAKED GOODS
PANTRY PRIDE SOUR DOUGH OR MEYERS
English q -|
Muffins tl 1
PANTIT PIIDI CINNAMON 0 0<
Pecan Twirls.........2 o"
PANTIT PIIDI .(
Rye Bread.........................!f 3D
NORMAL. OILY OR DRY
Short & Sassy
Shampoo
$119
7 0Z.
SCENTED UNSCENTED OR QUICK DRY
Ban Roll-On
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$J49
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FOR QUICK RELIEF
Excedrin P.M.
Tablets
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27
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$


tiday, July 22,1977
*Jenii> lit rili ir
r Fry H Baby 11 DEEP FRYER T'pneef WITH $500 IN TAPES Presto Burger HAMBURGER COOKER 0?nee! WITH $300 IN TAPES Smoke Siren SMOKE ALARM 'heel WITH $800 IN TAPES
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Grade A
^details on display at your nearby Pantry Pride store.
* UST 27,1977... START COLLECTING YOUR TAPES NOW!
Lots O'Chicken
waste
ou It's
IVAllEY
JlCt BEEF ROUND
?Horn
id Roast
49
LB.
NATURALLY
TENDER BEE&
K
EACH PKG. CONTAINS: 3 BREAST QTRS. W/BACKS,
3LEGQTRS. W BACKS 3 WINGS 3 NECKS 3 GIBLET PKGS.
FRESH VALLEYUSDA CHOICE
Beef Chuck
Blade Steak
E253
cPnde
CHOICE,
PRICES EFFECTIVE '"'V!11" UV^*"" T" "*% I 29
THRU SAT. JULY 23 5hldr. Hot KOOSTu. I
AT ALL STORES ""H.V*U,Y "i0A CHO;c''"' T" $ 1 39
from ft. pierce 5hldr. Steak Bnlsu, I
TO KEY WEST. m c Qt
Beef Liver..............................u. 3V
Beef Chuck ,. 99*
(( E 36 SIZE
SAVE 56^-
FROZEN
Shoestring
Potatoes
USDA CHOICE
FRESH VALLEY USDA CHOICE
SMALL END BONELESS
Beef Rib
Steak
Veal Shldr.
Blade Steak
A UMIT hOU> PHASE WITH S 00 0DI
OH MORE EXCIUDINC CIGARETTES
39 frr^Ti
.CHOICE,
VEAL SHLDR.
ARM STEAK
VEAL BREAST.
I
i
3
3
15'i-OZ. $1
CANS
16 OZ
CANS
89
A
IhOf ARC
i'\ Beans
- aetables
lOI INSTANT _a
ea Mix.................jm I
VOIS(AIN1ION SUNDIB
left Drinks 3 cans 99
il-iSTI STRAWBIRRT m*%t\t
reserves ..............2 ". 99
I All FLAVORS .
Mixes Sff-994
mi prim aii riA
rink Mix
10'. OZ
.....PKG.
TASTY FROZEN FOODS
R^jRfcAR DEE FROZEN SAUSAGE OR
Cheese
\LiAX.........pkc.
till FROZIN RIGUIAR
ound Cake
I-. GIANT FROZIN CRIAMIO .
pihach................................3SS: 49*
IN ClANT FROZIN lll SIIVI
jt Broccoli w chiisi ,0fo OV
IN GIANT FROZIN -_.
reamed Peas 3S1 69*
IN GIANT FROZIN *t\t
auliflower w/chiisi.'.pc. OV
[IN ClANT UOZIN CIIAMIO OR ,
(hole Corn 5S 49*
SERVICE APPETIZERS
IRISH VAUIY USDA CHOICI BEEF CHUCK BNIS
Underblade Steak ,. I
RICH'S GOURMET DELITE ALL WHITE MEAT ,lA ol im,0 primium f.ish gradi a
FRIIZIR OUIIN
Turkey QQc
Roll t""
Fryer Parts
A FRIIZIR QUIIN __ .
. 89* Frozen Dinners 2 ,Lo 99*
Roll
DORMANS IMPORTED AUSTRIAN g*.f%t
Swiss Cheese u. 99
IHIGMl-DIUMITICHl'IIIASTW Ml
FLO SUN
| V..-..IT' -I. I '"
, CMAffttOH til' .".! MAN tUI III' PBP1MI
SWIFTS FRANKUN HARD OR _
Genoa Salami "" OV
AVAIL ABIC ON1Y AI STORES WITH SIDVICI COUNTERS
All IUNCH MEATS* CHEESES SUCCO TO TOUR ORDER
Orange Juice. 3^99*
19
BLUI BONNET _
Spread jm
All ElAVORS af>Ac
Borden Yogurt 4 cum W
English Muffins Sff 39*
SiALTIST CM A MID
HALIIJI MIMIBIW
Cottage Cheese cuV 55*
PIAIN -CAfOIN SAI AD "Pi ACM 4 PIHIAPPLI
FtllNOSHIP _
Sour Treat 2S 45*
BORDIN CHUNK r%<"^<"
Longhorn Cheese %o9V
in am $125
II PKG
t Ol
..PKG.
B-OZ.
PKC
B-OZ
..CHUB
59*
89*
59*
IANDO LAKES 1ICHTITSALTEO SWEET
Cream Butter
PANTRT PRIOI
Cream Cheese.......
OSCAR MATER SI KID COTTOSAIAMI OR
Olive Loaf................
OSCAR MATER IRAUNSCHWEICER
Liver Sausage
AMERICAN KOSHER FRANKS OR ,_
mm U-OZ. $1 19
Knock s.....................................p I
RICH'S TURKIT -
Breast Slices SR *1 w
(WHOIIS OR HAIVESIVIASIC KOSHER KfjMBAA
Deli Dills 79*
SILVII flOSS
Sauerkraut 2i
KAHN'S SlICIO SPICIO IUNCHEON MEAT OR
Beef Salami AS 89*
HIBRIW NATIONAL SlICIO ttl.mmm m x
Salami or Bologna 'KC 75*
COPILAND SLICED __
Variety Pak 38$1 ,9
I BAG
49<
HAIR GROOM
jVitalis
Hair Tonic
$]39
10' PRICE REDUCTION
15C PRICE REDUCTION 5 PRICE REDUCTION^ 10'PRICE REDUCTION
7-OZ.
BTl.
I
I
I
I
I ONI
I COUPON
I M"
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THE AMOUNT SHOWN Will BE
DIOUCTED FROM REG PRICE
Sa BS1 ,6-OZ.CAN
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p.* CLEANER
GOOD THRU SA" /JITS'
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| ONE
, COUPON
PER
PERSON
THE AMOUNT SHOWN Will BE
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U-OZ. CAN TNT
FLYING INSECT !
BOMB
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THE AMOUNT SHOWN Will BE I
DEDUCTED'ROM REG PRICE I
I I
NO. 41 IBS
A CASH REBATE WHl
Bl GIVEN WITH THI
PURCHASE OF
GOOD THRU SAT JUIY U
THE AMOUNT SHOWN Will Bl ]
D.DUCTID FROM RIG PRICI J l^gggM ---------------- l^|^ MB. CAN
12-OZ.BTL. (PLASTIC) J 1 S'/.-OZ JAR SPAGHETTI [ ^^^ MAXWELL
boh WINDEX coupon ALL FLAVORS i house coffee e|
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\\,S SPRAT ,N MSUMObt COOOI.USA> ,UIT
I I GOOD THRU SAT JUIV13 I I GOOO THRU SAT JULY Jl > \ ONE COUPON PER PIRSON
ONE
' \_


Page 8-B
* Je w isii Fkridlian
Friday, July 22, 1977
SYNOPSIS, Of THI WEEKLY tOftAH PORTION
Devarim
"Beyond the Jordan, in the land of Moab, took Moses
upon him to expound this law" (Deut. 1.5).
DEVARIM, The first few verses introduce the
I entire book of Deuteronomy, which contains Moses'
- address to the Israelites in Transjordan after the defeat of
I the Amorites and Bashan. In this speech Moses sum-
* marizes the Torah as a whole. He reviews the causes that
| had led him to appoint judges and officials: "How can I
- myself alone bear your cumbrance, and your burden, and
| your strife?... And I charged your judges at that time,
saying: 'Hear the causes between your brethren, and judge
| righteously between a man and his brother, and the
stranger that is with him. Ye shall not respect persons in
judgment; ye shall hear the small and the great alike'"
(Deuteronomy 1.12-17).
Moses goes on to review the incident of the scouts sent
to spy on Canaan, and the consequences of their
pessimistic report. He reminds the Israelites how they had
skirted Edom, Ammon, and Moab; and mentions the
peoples who had formerly inhabited those regions. Finally,
he recounts the story of the conquest of Transjordan, and
the partition of the area between the tribes of Reuben,
Gad, and half of the tribe of Manasseh.
JStiSffSSfSASS. We.h'v Portio" t ,he L,w tKtr-cUd and based i
??? Tlje Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited bv P Wollman
dias?rei'bUNrnWgm.rvko,uNmr '003r JOS,Ph SCh'anfl Pre$iden, MieV I
Religious Directory
~r .
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGATION,
995 SW 67rh Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Zvi
Raphaely. (1)
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
SwirsKy. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
(19)
JUDEA TEMPLE 5500 Granada Blvd
Reform. Rabbi Michael B Eisenstat.
MNSHE EMES CONGREGATION 2533
SW 19th Ave. Conservative.
TEMPLE BETH AM"
5950 N. Kendall Or.
667-SS7
Or. Herbert Baumgard, Senior Rabbi
Early Family Service 7 30 p.m.
Friday Evening Service 8: JO p.m.
Rabbl Mitchell Chefitz will
conduct a workshop entitled:
"Experiential Prayar:
An Exercise In Spontaneity,
Part II".
Member UAHC
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh
(20)
IZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave
Conservative Rabbi Marvin Tokaver
Cantor Jack Rubin. (41)
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Nathan
Parnass. (21 A)
I
I
I
i
i
i
\
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. (3 A)
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. (4 A)
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION 935
Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Israel
M. Tropper Cantor Henry Fuchs._
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION 843 Meridian Ave
Orthodox Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
(22 A)
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. (50)
HOMESTEAD
HN^E^T^fr JEW,SH CENTER. 183
BeEna>r'5l):0nSerVa,iVe RabbiPaul
HOLLYWOOD
"a Ar^JEACPLE 3, SW 62nd I
^maCnn(S4fe7rBVr,,Ve Rabbi M"
B'NAI ZICN TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Conservative Rabbi Dr Abraham I.
jaobSQD_02 b_l
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd
Orthodox Rabbi Joseph Biston (66)
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW 120th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. (4 B)
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
BETH KODESH-
Modern Traditional
1101 SW 12th Avenue
$-6334
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Leon Segal
Friday Early Services6:30 p.m.
Saturday Morning t:45 a.m.
Rabbi Shapiro Will Preach
Sunday Mormng-s a.m.
Daily Minyon for Yahrzeif
Observances 7:45a.m. a 7 p.m.
Detroit Woman to Lead
UJA Young Women's Group
1701 Washington Avenue
5M-2S03
Conservative
Or. Irving Lehrman
Cantor Zvi Adler
Kabbalat Services-Friday 6 p.i
Saturday Morning Service? a i
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
will officiate
,BREPTorl,L T|MPkLE ,35' s "fh Ave.
Reform Rabbi Samuel Jaf'e
Assistant Rabbi Jonathan Woll (45)
BETTT~ SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601'
Arthur St. Conservative Rabbi
Morton Malavsky. Cantor Irvino
Gold. (46) -------------
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnson St
Conservative Rabbi David Shapiro.
(65)
" mM,PLE SOLEL 5100 Sheridan St,,
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Rabbi Robert it
P. Frazin. Cantor Bruce Malin. (C 47)
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd Liberal
Reform Rabbi Sheldon J.Harr (64)
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8fh St
Conservative. Rabbi Charles Rubel.
(8)
NEW YORK-The United
JewishAppeal has established a
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet, designed to develop
leadership potential among
younger American Jewish
women, General Chairman Leo-
nard R. Strelitz has announced.
Jane Sherman of Detroit, a mem-
ber of the UJA's National
Women's Division Board, has
been appointed chairman.
"American Jewish women
have taken a new direction
during the last decade," Streiitz
said. 'While remaining dedicated
to traditional values, they are
oriented toward careers as well as
family life. They are highly
motivated to work for social
change and improvement both at
home and abroad, and it is im-
portant to our community that
their energies be channeled into
the work of UJA and
federations."
RESPONDING TO her ap-
pointment, Mrs. Sherman said:
"We envision a Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet that will offer
the emerging generation of
women increased opportunities to,
play fuller and more independent
roles in American Jewish life. We
expect to take a broadly
educational approach, offering
training in the fund-raising
process, and dialogue and inquiry
in the areas of Jewish values and
responsibilities."
The Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet will work in
close cooperation with the UJA's
Young Leadership Cabinet and
its Women's Division.
Recently appointed members
of the Steering Committee are
Vicki Agron, Englewood, Colo;
Linda Feins tone. New York City;
Karen Firestein, Wayne, N.J.;
Helaine Gould, Roslyn, N.Y.;
Robin Handelman, Evanston,
111.; Sharon M. Jacobs.
Williamsville, N.Y.; Jayne
Mackta, Morristown, N.J.;
Rigmor Offerman, Old Westbury,
N.Y.; Brina Reinstein, Tulsa,
Okla.; Roslyn Rothstein, Yar-
dley. Pa., and Jane Rubenstein,
Kansas City, Mo. Barbara P.
Faske, associate director of the
Young Leadership Cabinet, will
serve as director of the new
Cabinet.
MRS. SHERMAN has been a
national and communtiy leader in
young leadership and women's
division activities. A member of
the UJA National Women's
Division Board and National
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1700 Michigan Ave. Orthodox Rabbi
Dow Rozencwaig. (23)
BN.Al..,ll,PkAE,L AND GREATER CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 7600 CONGREGATION 715 Washington
y?,!JrJZ ,o ?r,nodox Raboi Ralph Ave Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Ghxman. (8 A) Melamed. (23 A)
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelling Cantor
Jack Lerner. (36)
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNA
GOGUE.7473NW4thSt (69)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin
Cantor Abraham Kester (48)
DEERFIELDBEACH
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL, Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. President Joseph Lovy
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION 1544
Washington Ave Orthodox Rabbi
Tsvi G Schur (32)

A
TEMPLE ISRAELOF
GREATER MIAMI
South Florida's Pioneer
Reform Synagogue
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami
573-5900
Dr. Joseph Narot, Senior Rabbi
Services Every
Friday at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Brett Goldstein
will discuss:
"The Nazi Resurgence"
HEBREW ACADEMY 2400 Pine Tree
Dr Orthodox Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. (25)
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE, 5445
Collins Avenue. Conservative
JACOB C COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE 1532 Washington Ave
Orthodox Dr Tibor H Stern Cantor
Meyer Engel (26)
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Seif (27)
MARGATE
BETH HILLELCONGREl"
Margate Blvd Conserv
Charles Perlman.
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SeV
Conservative Rabbi Morris .
Cantor Yaacov Renzer (49)
JANE SHERMAN
Campaign Cabinet, she also
serves on the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds
Leadership Development
Executive Committee.
From 1972-1974, she served as
Michigan State chariman of the
UJA Women's Division. In
Detroit, she is past chairman of
the Women's Division campaign
of the Jewish Welfare Federation
and currently serves on its Board
of Directors and as chairman of
its $500-and-Over Gifts Division.
She is also a member of the
Federation's Community Ser-
vices, Budgeting and Leadership
Development committees and the
Jewish Community Center Board
of Directors. In 1971, Mrs.
Sherman was awarded the Sylvia
Simon Greenberg Award for
Young Leadership. j
CANTOR, BARITONE,
|Considered accomplished.!
ISxPr*5' n Conservative andi
h^hVCs" AV"U- *r ""I
I LEONARDKLIGER |
7412 Byron Ave., Apt. 3
ISRAELITE CENTER 3175 SW 25th
St Conservative Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg Cantor Hyman Lifshin
LUBAVITCH CONGREGATION 1120
Collins Ave. Orthodox Rabbi
Abraham Korf (67)
TEMPLE ZION
Conservative
8000 Miller Road
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Cantor Ben Dickson
Herzl Honor-Educational Director
Avran Smolensky Musical Director'
RaeSimonhoff; Early Childhood Dir.
Friday 8:15 p.m.
Chai Club Service
Saturday 9 a.m.
Services In Chapel
MENORAH TEMPLE 620 75th St
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz Cantor Nico Feldman
(28)
NER TAMID TEMPLE 80th St and
Tatum Waterway Conservative. Dr
Eugene Labovitz Cantor Edward
Klein (29)
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER 7800 Hispanola Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Marvin Rose
Cantor Murray Yavneh (32 A)
CORAL SPRINGS
TEMPLE BETH ORR 2151 Riverside
Drive Reform (44)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservaitve. Dr
Carl Klein, PhD., D.D., Rabbi. (12)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9139 Taft
Street Conservative Rabbi Sidney I.
Lubin (63)
FORT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W
Oakland "ark Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu (42)
EMANU EL TEMPLE 3245 W
Oakland Park Blvd Reform Rabbi
Joel S Goor Cantor Jerome Klement
(43)
Ohel B'nai Raphael Temple. 4351 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Saul D. Herman.
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th St
Conservative. Rabbi Sherman Kir
shner. Cantor P. Hillel Brummer (13)
OHEV SHALOM 7055 Bonita Dr
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A Weber
man (80)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
NW 57th St Conservative Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman (44 A)
ISRAEL SOUTH TEMPLE (formerly
Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Reform
Rabbi Joseph R Narot. (13 A)
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmias. (31)
SAMU EL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Second Floor. Conservative.
Rabbi Edwin P. Farber. (9)
NORTHMIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conservative
Rabbi Simcha Freedman Cantor Ian
Alpern. (33)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF.
HOLLYWOOD
MIAMI LAKES
KINNERETH CONGREGATION. 14040
NW 58 Ct. Conservative.
4*2301
I
|inlovingmemory|
of my dearly
| BELOVED HUSBANDl
ALBERT A. ZALKA
You will always be in
my Heart and
Thoughts
BETTY S. ZALKA
HIALEAH
TIFERETH JACOB TEMPLE 951 E
4th Ave. Conservative. (15)
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center 19255
NE 3rd Ave Orthodox. Rabbi Jacob I
Nislick (33 A)
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER, 2972
Aventura biva.. Norm Miami Beach
Conservative Rabbi Seymour Fried
man.
3291 Sterling Road
791-2300
Rabbi Mo she E Bomzer
Services: Friday 6:30p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m., Sunday a.m.
Daily 7:30a.m. and 7.30 p.m
Rabbl Bomzer will preach
NORTHMIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION 2225
NE 121st St. Conservative. Rabbi
Joseph Gorfinkle, Rabbi Emeritus
Cantor MosheFriedler. (35)
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaim
ovits. (32 B)
Member of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami.
BETH TOR AH-
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever!
CONGREGATION
1051 N.Miami Bch. Blvd.
947-752*
Conservative
Dr. Max A. Lipschiti, Rabbl
Kabbalat Shabbat Services
Friday 5:30 p.m.
Late Friday Services-* p.m.
Saturday Services 130a.m.
Daily Chapel Services
7:30 a.m., 5:34)p.m.
Sunday! a.m., 5:30 p.m.
B^J^- l*l 240 Pin Tree Dr
Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. (5)
BETH ISRAEjL 770 40th St. Orthodox
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. (18)
SEPHARDIC CENTER. 571 NE 171st
GamchSerVa,iVe Rabbi Nesim
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM'
Chase Avenue at 41st Street
------S3S-723T Liberal
Dr. LeonKronish
Cantor David Conviser
Friday Services 1:15 p.m.
Organ Prelude7:45p.m.
Rabbi Harry Jolt will officiate .
Sabbath Services at 10:4s a.m.
"moi nIMLJ,of NoORTH dade
SSL1. "nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
ShaJfkhesP,37!<,ngS,ey Can,r lrvi"v
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 33137
576 4000. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW
CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla. 33131.
379 4553. Rabbi Sanford Shapero,
Director.
UNI TED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach,
Fla. 33162.947-6094.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
_____ Executive Director.
SKiL.LA.KE SYNAGOGUE 18151 NE
BTdhnickAV,e38,0r,h0d0,< RaDbi Dov
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER
CORALGABLES
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CFN
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA
SSVf< Univ,ersi,v of Miami no.
Miller Drive. Traditional and Libert
Serv.ces. Rabbi Sanford H. Shudnow


1977
+Jewish fkridiaiti
ige9-B
Sasta in
h
frnnoise
Study Says UN Adopts Double Stand* rd
I a way to combine vegetables and pasta to create a light
1 for the soup lover.
Mta is floated in broth. Fresh, frozen or in-season vegetables
the "Brunoise" as the sauteed ingredients are called. Then
for a ndividual touch, several sauteed vegetables are served on the
side < bring each person the opportunity to garnish with some or all of
iheh* favorite vegetables.
B with a basket of bread and a glass of red wine. The result is
satisfying meal.
chopped parsley
opped onions
butter or margarine
5 oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee(R) Cheese
'li in Tomato Sauce
ater
etG. Washington's (R| Golden
oning & Broth
chopped green pepper
10 oz.) chopped broccoli,
iked and drained
1 cop small white onions, cooked and drained
'* cop butter or margarine
Saute chopped parsley and onions in 1 tablespoon butter.
bine parsley, onions, Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli in Tomato
fe, water and G. Washington's Golden Seasoning & Broth in a 2-
saucepan Cover; simmer for 10 minutes. Meantime saute green
Pper in 1 t
t saute er
ch vegei
Serve
hoose which
ipoon butter. Remove to warm serving dish. Continue
-getable separately in one tablespoon butter. Remove
separate warm dish.
with vegetables on side as garnishes. Diners may
i egetables they prefer for adding to soup.
Serves four.S.T.
NEW YORK An
American Jewish Congress
study says that South
Africa's armed forces are
equipped with British
tanks, French and British
armored cars, French and
British missiles, French
submarines, British heli-
copters, British patrol
boats, British bombers,
French jet fighters, Italian
and French air transports,
French helicopters and
American and Italian train-
ing planes.
Israel's military relation-
ship with Pretoria "pales
into insignificance" com-
pared with South Africa's
arms traffic with other
countries, the study says,
adding:
"THE SUM total of Israels
arms deals with South Africa
consists of two items:
Israel is building six Ramta-
class patrol boats, essentially
corvettes, for South Africa;
Expo/Center to Be
Photo Show Site
Edward Coti, executive
director of the International
Photo Optical Show Association,
Inc. (IPOSA). and Robert A.
Lefcort, general manager of
Miami Expo/Center, have
jointly announced that the
PhotoShow International, one of
the largest photographic ex-
positions in the country, will be
held at the Miami Expo /Center
on Feb. 9 through 12.
? ?Question Box? ?
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
MTIARS
CATERING TO
THE 8A*
ITZVAH MY
MATIONAL BRANDS
Pierre Cardm
HPalm Beach
I & Others
& Regulars
I Huskies
ms-AII Sizes
R WIN'S
ASHINGTON AVE.
532-4061
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why does Jewish
law require a person to pronounce
a benediction before and after
eating something?
Answer: A variety of proofs
and sources are offered as the
basis for this requirement.
Sources in the Talmud state that
a person who would eat or derive
pleasure from something in this
world without pronouncing a
benediction first would be guilty
of misappropriating property
that does not belong to him
(B'Rachot35a).
Quoting a verse in the Bible
which reads that the "earth
belongs to the Lord" (Psalms
24:1), the Talmud states that the
benediction is the price which the
Almighty expects man to pay for
the privilege of enjoying
something which belongs to the
Creator who made the world. He
would actually be considered a
thief if he failed to do this
(B'Rachot35b).
SOME other sources in the
Talmud quote the popular verse
which states that one "should
eat, be satisfied and bless the
Lord." While this indicates only
the blessing after one eats, the
Talmud adds that if one
recognizes the value of the food
or enjoyment after he has con-
sumed it, how much more should
he recognize the heavenly source
before he consumes it.
Some commentaries have
stated that this whole practice
reflects the rights and property
priorities of others which have to
be respected. Man is allowed to
enjoy the world prepared by the
Almighty provided he recognizes
its ultimate source. This divine
source has to be recognized both
before and after he enjoys the
food. Before he enjoys the food he
acknowledges its heavenly source
in awe for the pleasure he is ready
to enjoy.
After he consumes it he is to
express his thanks for what he
has enjoyed. Thus, he is not to
steal trom eitner uod or man to
enjoy life.
THE BLESSING beforehand
indicates that he is taking it with
permission. He is also to remain
grateful for the favors of the past
from both God and man. Thus,
the benediction after eating
indicates the positive relation-
ship a person should establish
with his fellow man to be forever
grateful for the benefits of society
in this world.
Peters to Launch
Theatre Season
Metropolitan Opera star,
Roberta Peters in the role of
Sonia, will be joined by co-stars
Werner Klemperer, Laurence
Guittard, Harry Danner and
Judith McCauley in Franz
Lehar's operetta, "The Merry
Widow." Launching producer
Zev Bufman's four production
musical summer productions,
Tuesday, July 26, at 8:30 p.m., at
the Theatre of the Performing
Arts, Miami Beach, will play
through Sunday, July 31.
T.V. Programs
Sunday, July 24
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Dov Bidnick
Sunday, July 24
"Still Small Voice
WCKT-TV Ch. 78:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Guests:
Prof. Thelma Altshuler
Ms. Nina Tassler
Mr. Michael Bast
Topic:
"Yiddish Playwrights"
Israel is supplying .i
quantity of Gabriel II surface-!"
surface missiles to arm the six
corvettes. And that is the whole
of it."
In a letter to UN Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim accom-
panying the report, Rabbi Arthur
Hertzberg, president of the
AJCongress, accused the United
Nations Special Committee on
Apartheid of adopting a "double
standard." The committee's
purpose, Rabbi Hertzberg said,
was "not to combat racism but to
vilify Israel."
HERTZBERG said his or-
ganization did not seek to
condone Israel's contract to sell
six armed corvettes to South
Africa.
"Within the context of South
Africa's huge arms purchases,
however, Israel's role is dwarfed
into the insignificant and incon-
sequential. It is this iouble
standard of morality that the
report seeks to docurm t and
expose." he declared.
Among examples of Israel's
close ties with Black Africa,
according to the American Jew-
ish Congress report, arethi <
0 Members of Zambia's
parliament called for a return of
the Israeli agriculture experts
who had been forced to leave
when Zambia broke of diplomatic
relations with Israel under heavy
Arab pressure:
0 Several Black African
countries that had severed
relations with Israel in 1973 have
quietly resumed sending per-
sonnel to Israel for special train-
ing courses:
CANTORIAL SOLOIST
Traditioal
Willie Shift 1975 Washing-
ton Ave., Apt. 5, Miami
Beach, Florida 33139
Phone 538-5531
B'nal B'rlth Is looking for someone to
work with lodges In South Florida In
all aspects of administration,
membership, leadership, etc. Full
time employment. Salary open de-
pending on prior experience. Send re-
sume direct to Arnold D. Ellison, Exe-
cutive VP., PO Box548*6, Atlanta. Oa.
30308
In Memory of Rose Leek
The Officers of BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY Mourn the
death of a committed supporter whose exemplary
benefactions to BRANDEIS are reflected in the
Rose and Herman Leeks Chemistry Building
To the bereaved family we extend heartfelt con-
dolences
MarverH. Bernstein, President
Robert S. Benjamin, Chairman, Board of Trustees
Abram L. Sachar, Chancellor
Under NO circumstances can a
person believe in Christ and
still call himself a Jew.
We vehemently urge all mem-
bers of the Jewish faith to be
wary of prosletyzers who act
under the guise of the "Jews
for Jesus movement."
(signed)
membership of
Temple Israel
Of Greater Miami
*iim............<............">"


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HOTICf O* ACTION
cONtraucTivi tcavici
(aomorinn
INTMI CIRCUIT COURT CH> THE
LI VINTM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Of FLORIDA. IN AND
FOR DAD* COUNT f
CIVIL ACTION MO. TJ 9VV
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOl
RAAMLV DIVISION
WM TTk wUrriMf of
TKFUEarTA HCRNANbEZ
hinawi wtto
and
ME VKK/NO HCKNANOBZ
lUKKirulanV Huafeaajd
TO BBVXRDIOHEIUIANbCZ
Kaaldanc* and Addraaa Unknown
Y'/i: ARC HERJEBT NOTirn> that
an action for blaeolutlon of aUrHag*
haa bean fn*d agalnat you and you are
raoulrad to aarva a copy of your written
dafanaaa. If any, to H on Antonio J
I'lnalro, it attorney for Petitioner,
whrjea addreaa la A'il.'I^O ANTON A
f INCIKO, C A JM7 8W STthe Avenue,
afuunl, riorlda. and flie the original
with the clef* of the abova etyled court
on or be lore Auffuet X, 1ST7. otharwtee a
defAult will be entered agalnat you lor
the relief demanded In the complaint or
petition
Trite notice ehall be pubUehed once
eon weak tor tour eonaacutlve weeka In
THE JEWISH nXlRJDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the aeal of
aald court at Miami, Florida on thl SO
day of July, 1S77
MgHAJIDF bhinker
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnelt
Aa deputy Cler*
(Circuit f>urt Seel)
ANTONIO J PINEIRO, JR.
AOUDO, ANTON A I'lNKIRTt, V A
IS47HW TTth Avenue
Miami. Florida M148
Talapnona; (WOtaiMastD
Atuimay for I'aUtioner
July 22, 29. Au 6. 12, IIT77

' --
-
Ae L ii ss a v '. i am
INTMetlRUCUITCOURTOFTHE-
ELEVENTM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTT, FLORIDA
CASE NO 77 2425
____ NOTIC* OF SUIT
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION
PlalnUff.
ra
THOMAS E CRAJO and THELMA L.
CRAIO. hte wife and LOCAL
FINANCE COMPANY OF FLORIDA
Defandanta
TO: THOMAS C CRAJO
Riatoenn "Unknown"
THELMA L CRAIO
Realdenea "Unknown
TOC ARE HEREBY NOTiriED that
a Complaint to Forecloee Mortar* on
the foitowin, dear, ribed property
Lol 11, Block S3* CLRTISS PARK
accordlnff to the Ptat thereof aa
recorded In Plat Book 80 at Pare 2
of the Public Record* of Bade
County, Florida
naa been filed agalnat you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your Anawer
or pleading* to aald Complaint to the
JJ*1;";'' attorney*. HARLAN
52PE P A 1*700 B"yn Boule-
i.^' ^J10- Nortn Mtom1' FtorW-
SS1S1 and Ola the ortglnaj Anawer
pleadtoa with the CterHf UwT^euU
Court of Dad* County, on or before the
SSth day of Auguet. 1*77 If you fall to do
ao. Judgment by default will be taken
u^p'Ent0r "* """ ,Wn<,"1 ta
Thl* Nouce of Suit shall b* publlahad
once each week tor four whaecuUve
weeka in the JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Deled at Miami. Dade County
Florida, thlallth day of July MR '"*
RICHARD P BftlNKER, Clerk
By DEBORAH O HESS
_____ Deputy Clerk
HARI.AN STREET, P A
12700 iilacayne Boulevard
Suite 410
North Miami, Florida 381 A]
BY WILLIAMS I8ENBERO ESO
July 22, 29; Aug. 8, 12. 1S77



So DM
P' Jm> Blimr^f frf
Folk Dance Set
The Miami Beach Recreation
Department, in cooperation with
the Miami Israel Folk Dance
Center. wiJJ sponsor on Friday.
July 22 an Israel Folk Dance
Party at the North Shore Open
Space Park. Miami Beach. The
public is invited.
the
W'
. S
Gof 2 trswi '
I
Trai <.- o Tht
Floridian. PO B
Miami. Flo. 33101
interest questions uill bean-
suertd in this coiu"-.'. CWv
Offers uifA self- stamped envelopes will bi
answered personally Pleas*
allow 4 to 6 weeks for a reply
I
nai
oil
TR
SAVE ELECTRICITY SAVE MONEY
ENERGY-PROOF (INSULAH) Y0U WINDOWS
with .a-aaatataCa* |T||
CONTROL GLARE
SUN
FADE
REFLECTOR FILM
ILETS IN LIGHT. REFLECTS AWAY THE SUN'S HEAT
I IT REALLY WORKS!
... BLOCKS OUT
HEAT ami GLARE
NOT THE VIEW!
I EVERTLT INSTALLED J
as law as
FREE ESTIMATE! FREE DEMONSTRATION: Phone 615-1592
Keeps rsssrc cooler
Sim sf to 3S* si
m csstttissMt casts
St*ys ISS It Haft (J'"
lessees laoM(
m Mates (lass safer
WHY PAT MORE'
par if. N.
COME SEE!
[ COME SAVE!
WE "IISIUTE" CM W1RMWS, TN!
LSfal FilB-rTifMiiiaalljf MltsRSa
COME SEE!
COME SAVE!
Cssltt* sslectiss sf PO-IT-TIIJRSELF Materials
UN CONTROL PRODUCTS. INC. 13625 N.W. 7th Ave., N. MiamiJ
SAVE MONEY SAVE ELECTRICITY
KB
VII
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Flf
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nn


iy. July 22,1977
*Jkniti ftrrirffar
Page 1 IB
LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICES
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
[ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
signed, desiring to engage In
ess under the fictitious name of
5CINE at 849 8.W. 1st St., Miami,
133130 Intends to register said name
] the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Ida
Tele-Cine, Inc.
July 22, 29; Aug. B. 12, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
,riCE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
d-slened. desiring to engage In
Eess under the fictitious name of
SE8T INVESTMENT CO. at 2800
HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD..
^ANDALE. FLA. Intend to register
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
t of Dade County, Florida.
FORREST B.RAFFEL
LEROY B. RAFFEL
Jul.22, 29; Aug. (S, 12,1977
NOTICE OF ACTION
[constructive SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
THE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
= VENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
| CIVIL ACTION NO. 77-3S460
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I: THE MARRIAGE OF
ID.GEFFNER,
etltloner,
KHAM H. GEFFNER,
lespondent.
iBRAHAM H. GEFFNER
o George Washington Hotel, 6th
ue
(ew York. New York
U ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
i for Dissolution of Marriage
een filed against you and you are
red to serve a copy of your written
ses. if any, to It on MICHAEL P
E. PA., attorney for Petitioner,
address Is 18924 N.E. 19th
ue. North Miami Beach. Florida.
I and file the original with the clerk
above styled court on or before
it 28, 1977; otherwise a default will
ntered against you for the relief
indi'ii In the complaint or petition,
i notice shall be published once
veek for four consecutive weeks In
JEWISH FLORIDI AN
TNESS my hand and the seal of
jrt at Miami. Florida on this 19
[July. 1977.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C. P.COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
fcult Court Seal I
IAEI.P CHASE. PA.
E. 19th Avenue
I Miami Beach. Florida 33162
ney for Petitioner
July 22, 29; Aug. 5, 12, 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
rslgned, desiring to engage In
less under the fictitious name of
REPAIRS at 444 Brlckell Ave..
l 33131. Intends to register said
i with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
tie County. Florida. EXECUTIVE
,F.l.
CLUB, INC.
444BRICKELLAVE.
MIAMI. FLA. 33131
Attorney for Petitioner
Steinberg & Sorota
July 22. 29; Aug. 5. 12, 1977
|THE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
.EVENTH JUDICIALCIRCUIT
IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 77 20895
IERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICEOF SUIT
DIAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE
fclATION,
ialntlff,
LlN CARTAGENA RIVERA,
IINIACAKTACF.NA RIVERA.
fe.a k a VIRGINIA
TAGENA. PEOPLES
IONA1.KANKOF
MERCK, a national bankers
IralKin. and BENEFICIAL
NC'E COMPANY OF
CSTEAO, a corporation.
Bfendants.
t FEND ANTS:
HtAIN CARTAGENA RIVERA
(sidencc "Unknown"
IRGINIA CARTAGENA
IA.
'k a VIRGINIA CARTAGENA
Isidence "Unknown"
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
iplainl lo Foreclose Mortgage on
llowing described property:
1. Block 25, of AMENDED
kT OF THE TROPICS, ac-
ling to the Plat thereof,
oicl.-il in Plat Book lo, at Page
Of the Public Records of Dade
nty. Florida.
ken filed against you and you are
red to serve a copy of your Answer
ladings to said Complaint to the
tiff's attorneys. HARLAN
IET, PA. 12700 Biscayne
vard, Suite 410, North Miami,
331 Hi and file the original
(i'"r pleading with theClerk of the
|t Court of Dade County, on or
the 16 day of Aug.. 1977. If you
| ii(i so, judgment by default will be
against you for the relief
tided in the Complaint
Notice of Suit shall be published
lach week for four consecutive
IEWISH FI.DRIDIAN.
|ED at Miami. Dade County,
tins 14 day of July, 1977
Bye s CarlU
I leputy Clerk
^ STREET. P A
} rne Boulevard
I berg
July 22, 29; Aug
SUMMONS WITH NOTICE
OF OBJECT OF ACTION
SUPREME COURT OF THE
STATE OF NEW YORK
COUNTY OF NASSAU
ADELE K. RJTTER.Plalntlff, Index
No. 4870-1977 Plaintiff designates
Nassau County as the place of trial. The
basis of the venue Is Defendant's prop-
erty to be attached In Nassau County.
Summons. Plaintiff resides at 209 Car-
lisle Pike, Mechanlcsburg, Pa. 17086.
against ROBERT R. RITTER, Defen-
dant.
To the above named Defendant
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to
answer the complaint In this action and
to serve a copy of your answer, or, If the
complaint Is not served with this sum-
mons, to serve a notice of appearance,
on the Plaintiffs Attorneys within 20
days after the service of this summons,
exclusive of the day of service (or
within 30 days after the service is com-
plete If this summons Is not personally
delivered to you within the State of New
York); and In case of your failure to
appear or answer, judgment will be
taken against you by default for the
relief demanded In the complaint.
Dated, March 7th, 1977
Defendant's address: Unknown.
WOLFF & DIAMOND
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Post Office Address
100 G arden City Plaza
Garden City. New York 11630
Tel. No. (816)742-2440
To: Defendant ROBERTR RITTER:
The foregoing Summons and Notice is
served upon you by publication pur-
suant to an order by Hon. Andrew J.
KIPaola, a Justice of the Supreme Court
of the State of New York dated July 8th,
1977 and filed with the complaint and
other papers In the office of the Clerk of
the County of Nassau at Mlneola, New
York. The object of the action and the
relief sought Is to recover a judgment
for money damages for $8,400.00 based
ona Judgment obtained against you by
plaintiff Adele K. Rltter on August 8th.
1976 In the Court of Common Pleas,
Cumberland County, Carlisle. Pennsyl-
vania, limited to $4,306.21 attached In
Nassau County. New York
WOLFF DIAMOND
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Dated. July 11th 1977.
July 22. 29; Aug. 5. 12. 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
GRABBER SOUTHEAST at Suite 702,
9300 South Dadeland Blvd. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Flllmore Management Corp.
July 22, 29; Aug. 5. 12.1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NTOICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
GYPSY'S PUB at 7400 BIRD RD.
MIAMI. Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida SMATTEN-
TERPRISES. INC.
7400 BIRD RD.
MIAMI. FLA.
STEINBERG* SOROTA. PA.
Attorneys for GYPSY'S PUB
July 22. 29; Aug. 8, 12. 1977
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name X-
PERT AUTOMOTIVES at 12143 S.W.
114 PLACE. MIAMI, FLA 33176 Intends
to register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
XPERT AUTOMOTIVES INC.
Attorneys for Applicant Wolf &
Schonlnger P.A.
9300 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 702
S. Miami. Fla. 33156
July 22, 29; Aug. 8, 12. 1977
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
11TH JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-6912
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LENA FRUITMAN, Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMAND AGAINST SAID ES-
TATE AND OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
publication of Notice of Administration
in the Estate of LENA FRUITMAN,
deceased, late of Dade County, Florida
has begun in the captloned proceeding,
on the date Indicated below.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
AND REQUIRED to file any claims and
demands which you may have against
the Estate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and Testa-
ment offered for probate, if any. or any
objection to the qualifications of the
Personal Representative, venue or
Jurisdiction of the Court, with the Cir-
cuit Court, Probate Division, Room 307.
73 West Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
First Publication of this Notice on the
22 day of July, 1977.
MILDRED SCHLACHMAN
10B0-93rd Street
Bay harbor Island
Florida 33194;
RHOOASCHARF
GAIESTC NEW MEXICO 87640;
MAXL ROSENSTEIN.ESQ
5161 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REP
RESENT ATTVE:
MAX I.. ROSENSTE1N
5161 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33 Hi'
Telephone: 1305' 864-6858
July 22. 29.1977
Maurice 'Doc' Klein Dies Here
A 40-year resident of Miami
Beach, coming from New York in
1928, Maurice 'Doc" Klein, died
on Sunday, July 17, after a long
illness, in the Veterans
Administration Hospital.
Mr. Klein, a former Miami
Beach Councilman and vice
mayor, was active in many
organizations in addition to his
city offices. He was chairman of
Americanism for Boys State,
Patriotic Observances for the
American Legion, Elks and
Jewish War Veterans for more
than 30 years. He was twice
commander of the American
Legion Post 85, twice commander
of the Jewish War Veterans Post
330, state commander of the
JWV, director of Civil Defense in
Miami Beach during World War
II, a board director for six years
of the American Red Cross and a
director of the Miami Beach
Servicemen's Center for 17 years.
He is survived by his wife,
Rose Field Klein; son, Judge
Gerald Klein and daughter-in-
law. Judge Rhea Grossman of
Miami Beach; step-children. Ron
and Muriel Field; and grand-
children. Greg, Ruth and Mark
Field of Murraysville, Pa. Ser-
vices were held on July 19 with
Blasberg in charge of
arrangements.
Louis Shafkin, Former MB Councilman, Vice Mayor
Pioneer Miamian,
Dies at Age 89
A jeweler and 50-year resident
of Miami Beach, Louis Shafkin
died at the Greynolds Park
Manor Convalescent Home at the
age of 89.
A chairman of the Miami
Beach Planning Board and later
chairman emeritus, Mr. Shafkin
failed to win a seat on the Beach
City Council twice, in 1949 and
1951.
He was a member of the Beth
Jacob Congregation, Masons,
Elks, Scottish Rite, life president
of the South Shore Citizens Club,
Mahi Shrine and B'nai B"rith.
Mr. Shafkin is survived by
wife, Yetta; sister, Mollie Metzof
New York; four nephews and four
nieces. Interment Mt. Sinai.
Newman.
Restauranteur
Kurt Weill, Dies
A 39-year resident of Miami
Beach, Kurt Weill, died here at
the age of 75. Mr. Weill, a
restauranteur from 1938 until his
retirement, came to this country
from Germany.
Mr. Weill is survived by his
sons, Dr. Hans Weill of New
Orleans, La., and Peter Weill of
Boston, Mass.; three grand-
children; a brother, Walter Weill
of Lincoln, Neb.; and a sister,
Selma Holz, Denver, Colo.
Services were held July 17 at
Riverside. Interment Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
Oida Rubin, 33-Year Resident Dies
FELDMAN
MAE ROTH. 78, of Miami Beach, on
July 13. A resident here for the last IB
years coming from New York City, Mrs
Feldman was a member of Beth Jacob
Congregation, Miami Beach ORT and
the Treasure Isle Chapter of the City of
Hope. She Is survived by three sons,
Donald of Brooklyn, NY., Edwin of Al-
buquerque, N.M., and Michael of
Atlanta, Ga.; five brothers, Mack Roth
of Daytona Beach, Nat of Miami. Alan,
Dan and Burnett Roth, all of Miami
Beach; two sisters, Sylvia Krugman of
North Bay Village and Anna Berger of
Miami Beach; seven grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren. Services were
held on July 15 at Newman. Arrange-
ments by Gordon.
QREENFELD, Maurice, of North
Miiimi Reach, on July 6. I^evltt.
MILLER, Beatrice, 81. of Miami Beach,
on July 5, Interment Mt. Nebo.
Riverside
ABISCH. Lillian, 74. of Miami, on July 6.
< Sordon.
BERNEY, Cele I Fannie Jacobs), 91. of
Miami, on July 8 Riverside.
COOPER Belle. BS, of North Miami
Beach, on July 7. Levitt
I'EREZ. Isaac 53. of Miami, on July 7.
Interment Ml Slnal Gordon
WEINBERG, Morris. 71, of North
Miami Beach, on July 5. Levitt.
ZIMMERMAN. Benjamin W.. 86. of
Miami Reach, on July 7. Riverside.
BRAZIN Moe, 78. of North Miami, on
July 4. Interment Mt Sinai. Levitt.
FLEDERMAN, Alfred. 67. of Miami
Beach, on July 4 Riverside
l-l NT, Abraham. 82, of Hal Harbour, on
July 5. Riverside.
MARCUS, Ida, 84. of Miami Reach, on
July 4. Cordon.
NESHKIN, Dora. 78. of Miami Reach,
on July 4. Interment Mt. Sinai. River-
side.
PAULL, Ida, 72. on July 4. Interment
Star of David. Ix-vitt.
COHEN. Ralph, of Miami Beach, on
July 16. Riverside
KLEIN, Jerome, of Miami Beach, on
July 16. Interment Mt. Slnal. New-
man.
OPPENHEIMER, Rita, of Miami
Beach, on July 17. Gordon.
COHEN, Jane, 78, of Las Vegas.
FOX, Philip, 71, of Miami. Services and
interment in Philadelphia. Blasberg.
GOLDBERG, Sadie, 76, of Malml
Beach. Services and Interment in New
York. Blasberg.
COHEN, Morris, 77, of Bay Harbor
Blasberg.
DUBOFF, Murray, 68. of Miami Beach,
on July 14. Interment Lakeside
Memorial Park. Riverside
GRUBER, Julius, 70, of North Miami
Beach, on July 16.
JANOSI, Alfred Harry. 80, of West
Miami, on July 14. Interment Mt
Slnal. Gordon.
SHERMAN. Essie, 68, of Miami Heach,
on July 13. Interment Beth El. River-
side.
SULTAN, James. 75. on July 10. Inter-
ment Mt. Nebo. Riverside.
PLOTKIN, Gladys. 61. on July 8. Inter
ment Mt Nebo Gordon.
STEIN. Harry 64. on July 12. Interment
Mt. Nebo Newman
KLEIN Jerome, of Miami Beach, on
Interment M-.. Slnal
Newman
if Miami ;
HAHN Rhea 8., of Bal Harbour, on July
Pioneer Miamian Oida C.
Rubin, a resident of Miami since
1924, born in Atlanta, Ga., and
coming from Charleston, B.C.,
died at the age of 77.
She and her family founded the
original Rubin's Jewelry Store on
Miami Avenue and Second
Street, where it still operates.
She was an active member of
Temple Israel, Beth David
Synagogue, a founding member
of Hadassah of Miami Beach,
founder and past president of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, member of the board
of governors of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem and a
member of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
She is survived by her brothers
and sisters, Joe and Ruby Cohen,
Esta Cohen and Lillian and Sam
Simonhoff: children, Sy and
Sylvia Robins of New York City,
Charles and Mary Louise Robins
of Cleveland, Ohio and Rosemond
and Daniel Hammond of Miami;
LEVINE
PEARL, 78, of Coral Gables, on Sunday,
July 17. Mrs. Irvine Is survived by her
son. Howard of Hollywood; daughters,
Eleanor Kramer of New York City and
Helalne l.lplnsky of Coral Gables: one
brother, six grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren; Mrs. Irvine, born
In Russia was a resident for 14 years
coming from Passalc, N.J. She was a
charter member and soloist of Hadas-
sah, a member of the Eastern Star and
the National Council of Jewish Women.
Services and Interment In Passalc.
Shiva was observed Wednesday and
was to be observed Thursday at the
Liplnsky residence, 4880 Ronda St.,
Coral Gables. Local arrangements by
Newman.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open titty Day Close*" Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
grandchildren, Claudia Baldwin
of Portland, James Robins of
Philadelphia, Pa., Helen and Sara
Leah Hammond of Miami,
Deborah Robins of New York
City and Jeremiah Robins of
Cleveland, Ohio. Riverside.
Bertha Kuttler,
School Founder,
Dies at 56
A member of the Board of
Governors and a founder of the
Hillel Community Day School,
Bertha F. Kuttler of North
Miami Beach, passed away on
July 16. She was 56.
Mrs. Kuttler was also affiliated
with Beth Torah Congregation
and Hadassah.
She is survived by husband,
Irving; sons, Dr. Miles and
Sanford of North Miami Beach;
grandchildren, Matthew Ben-
jamin Kuttler and Noah Gregg
Kuttler. Levitt.
Levitt
memorial chapels
1921 Pembroke Rd 13385 W. Dili* Hy.
Hollywood, Flo. North Miami, Fla.
9217200 949 6315
SONNY LEVITT f D
CITY MEMORIAL AND
MONUMENT INC.
Monument-Markers
Granite and Bronze
7610 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33138
RABBI MAURICE KLEIN
OFFICE: 759-1669
RES. 673-3923
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
'I Pembroke Kri
I I W> Wesl I hwJN
Nevt > ork: \ Y


Pag*12-B
* kisl fkricfian
Friday,
JuU
Singles Groups Not the Answer
To This Woman's Loneliness
EDITOR, The Jewish Fbridkn:
I read with much interest the
article in your July 15 issue
"Chicago Report Divorced
Men and Women Feel Ache of
Loneliness.'' and would like to
comment on the article.
My first reaction was to
wonder why it should be entitled
"Chicago Report.'' The situation
exists, undoubtedly everywhere
here in the United States but
at this point I can speak only of
here in South Florida, and for
myself and my dozen or more
divorced friends
I SHALL not speak of their
isolation from the world of mar-
rieds to which they formerly
belonged that's a unique and
sore topic in itself but rather,
of the attempts made over and
over and over again by the once
marrieds to find some semblance
of a new place in our painful
society of the singles and of the
final outcome for most frus-
tration, disgust, despair and ul-
timately the almost, but never
quite complete, abandonment of
the idea of remarriage.
A number of organizations
have been formed all ad-
dressing themselves to the
vulnerability of the single person.
From personal knowledge, I can
say one organization purports to
cater only to the younger group
of divorced people of a profes-
sional level, another to the older
professionals (professional
whats? I'd like to ask). Another
purports to promise at their
meetings only an equal number of
both sexes. Other organizations
are for parents, others are aimed
at specific religious groups. And,
choice of choice forms of enter-
tainment, some organizations
offer "dances" My God! What
horrors as the women sit clus-
tered at tables waiting, silently
praying to be asked to dance by
anything, even the refugee from
the "Bathless Club."
And need I mention, that for
the most part there is quite a stiff
charge for the privilege of attend-
ing these groups? Three or four
dollars is usually the fee. And
what does one get for their
money? A gracious host or hos-
tess? One who might make the
guests feel welcome? That's un-
heard of. "You pays your money,
and you takes your chances," as
the saying goes.
INSTEAD, you are given a
paste-on name card, a wave of the
hand to indicate a seat or
standing room, and wait until a
speaker of sorts begins to gamely
and hopefully entertain a room
filled to capacity with 90 to 95
percent women and perhaps 5 to
10 percent men. Thus, hopes and
chances of meeting a man, let
alone a compatible man, are
minimal but we'll get to that
in a moment.
The speaker is introduced:
"Sorry, but the promised speaker
couldn't make it," or, sometimes,
even that excuse isn't given and
lo and behold, some one, few
indeed would have come to hear.
For instance, the speaker, what-
ever her name was, who ad-
dressed a group of 50's and up on
the "Pleasures and Techniques of
Sex" with a short question period
afterwards. Need I say that that
was the last subject in the world
the 50's needed to hear about
not because sex was abhorrent to
them, but because if they hadn't
learned about sex by 50, they
weren't going to learn much
about it then, and too, some or
most of these were people who
were there because they needed
the loving touch of a member of
the opposite sex and/or the
actual act of sexual intercourse as
desperately as a drowning man
needs a life raft.
Why rub their noses in the
misery of their loneliness and
longing? And for this a substan-
tial fee was charged and a
promise of a fairly equal dis-
tribution of sexes offered, which,
of course, did not exist. Chalk off
that group!
WE ARE all, men and women
made of the same basic materials
needs and desires. We all need as'
desperately, as the newborn
infant, love, warmth and com-
panionship and most of us want
and crave it from members of the
opposite sex.
But it's still a man's world
and the man definitely still has
the mammoth advantage over
the woman. He is free to pick up
the phone for a chat, to ask for a
woman's company at dinner, to
play tennis, or to just enjoy the
sublime pleasure of a mutually
interesting conversation. He is
the one who can initiate a conver-
sation at a coffee shop counter
or invite a single woman diner in
a restaurant to join him for
dinner Women's Lib or No
Women's Lib!
Don's Kearns Goodwin (second from left), a Harvard University
faculty member, recently received the Abram L. Sachar Silver
Medallion from Brandeis University's National Women's Com-
mittee (NWC) during its twenty-ninth annual conference at
Brandeis. The medallion, given annually to a prominent woman
in education, honors the founding president of Brandeis who is
now its chancellor. With Ms. Kearns (from left) are: Jen Kowal
of Newton, outgoing NWC president; Chancellor Sachar of
Newton; and Esther Schwartz of Bal Harbour, Fla., newly
elected NWC president. Prof. Goodwin is the author of "Lyn-
don Johnson and the American Dream."
ISRAEL'S ACCLAIMED MIME
YACOV NOY
BRILLIANT. PANTOMIME AT ITS BEST"
uiiim
_With Guest Apparanc By Mlmlwri
done*
company
" utoi appearance By MlmMri
fusion 1:z\
COCONUT
GROVE PLAYHOUSE
FRIDAY A SATURDAY, JULY 3* A 30 130 P.M.
TICKITS: $4.00 $7.50 J9.00
Dim ., f., >.,. ,. CltllMi .n ?
A.aNaM. Itoiw ft|. .". l.n.,..,
MM
Mime Yacov Noy to Appear
Israel's pantomime artist,
Yacov Noy, will present a one-
man show at the Coconut Grove
And, last, but not least, where
are these so-called lonely men
(and some women, too) as des-
cribed in your article? At the
"body exchanges?" (the club and
hotel bars) as described by one of
Miami's most outstanding psy-
chiatrists. A drink, a short chat,
and off to bed wheeeeee
go... never again to darken each
other's door. What could possibly
indicate more loneliness and des-
peration?
BUT LET'S attempt to be fair,
it is not all the fault of the indivi-
dual, for are we not each other's
keeper to some degree? Where are
the friends who have friends to
whom to introduce the singles?
True. South Florida is a new and
transient society, and this
presents a problem.
But, let us not despair com-
pletely. Perhaps there's hope.
One who complains should not do
so and not attempt to ameliorate
conditions. And so, with hopes
and plans for the future, a few of
my friends and I are hoping to
change the formidably ugly face
of the singles scene by starting a
group for 45's and up that will
have as its guiding principles
warmth, charm and mutual in-
terests that will be uplifting,
rewarding and fulfilling.
Those who are interested in
helping are most welcome to get
in touch with me.
ARLENE STELZER
Miami
MIME YACOV NOY
Playhouse on Friday, July 29 and
Saturday, July 30 at 8:30 p.m.
At Noy's last Miami ap-
pearance in May, he was the
featured guest artist with the
Fusion Dance Company at the
Playhouse. This time. Fusion will
be the guest while Noy displays
14 original works.
Known in his home country as
an actor and comedian as well as
a mime, Noy frequently appears
in Israeli motion pictures and
television productions.
"I have always enjoyed being
an entertainer, but my greatest
satisfaction comes from pan-
tomime. It allows me to express
my deepest feeling, a,,,,,
to audiences of 5
countries without so' ,
speaking a single word fil
no language barrier." [jjj
These two concerts ,u
presented by Fusion u7>
installment of jts JJ*1
series. Tickets can R
at the Oak Feed Store fL,
Grove. Allegro MusTc H
Coral Gables. Aral S
Dadeland Mall Jj&M
Avenue on Lincoln Road
Psoriasis Group
Re-Elects Frieda^
Lester M. Friedman of.\.
Miami Beach was re-eie
president for the sixth a
secutive year of the Su(
Florida Division of the Sltl
Psoriasis Foundation.
The Foundation is anon-s,
tax exempt, volunteer m
scientific-educational J
research funding. 15 natiosJ
Divisions organization.
Other North Dade .,
elected to the Executive Bd|
were Ruth Newman. I N
president; Hy Weiner, sa*
vice president; Lynne hW of
secretary; Joseph Pe,i MH
treasurer and Paul Rew
Berglund, legal counsel.
THEATER OF THE PERFORMING ARTS
1700 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
OPENS TUESDAY!
One Week Only!
PLEASE RESERVE NOW!
ROBERTA ,
PETERS (
TICKET LOCATIONS oumovom mm......i.-
l... km I .,..,1 Oat* -n i imc t>*to,j v .,-, i i
hr i *
for further Information Call 444-7171
ROBERTA PETERS
WERNER KLEMPERER '""lauRENCE GUITTARD
ana
HARRY JUDITH
DANNER McCAULEV
,______________________ ___
Some Season Tickets Still Available.
Box Office Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ,
CHARGE YOUR TICKETS BY PHONE $
DADE: 673-8300 BROWARD: 467-285 >
Tickets on Sale ai all SEARS STORES in Dade CounlJ
PRICES & PERFORMANCES
Tue.. Wed., Thur. Eves, at 8:30: $10 90 9 90 8 90.7 90
Frl. & Sat. Eve. at 8:30: $1 1 90 10 90 9 90. 8 90
Mat. Sat. & Sun. at 2:00: S9 90 8 90 7 90 6 90
Mat. Thur. at 2:00: $8 50 7 50 6 00 4 50
U1VUMUII


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