The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02479

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
~ Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 32 Frtd k. Shechtt Aug. e. i76
Miami, Florida Friday, August 6, 1976
By Mail 50 Cents Two sections Price 25 cent?.
SKN. GEORGE McGOVERN
in mideast
Russians
Don'tMatch
Peace Moves
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
llJTAl The United States
[has often tried to persuade
Dsrael to go beyond its
established position in
[American efforts toward a
Middle Fast settlement.
nit the Soviet Union has
not taken a similar step
kith any Arab leader.
according to former Under-
secretary of State Joseph J.
lisco.
In an interview here with
CBS, the former diplomat
said the "commitment" of
the U.S. and of the West is
for a practical solution'* of
1 he \ rab-1 sraeli dispute.
WHAT I have found wan-
tin- Sisco observed, "in Soviet
bolin bused on my own ex-
cel ence has been this: that when
tht n has b>en a negotiation, and
then the United States has
played a role. I have never found
ihiii the Soviet Union has been
filling to apply its own per-
suasion vis-a-vis those with
*hom it is close that would go
Jbeyond a position that a given
lArnb leader or a given Arab state
|w;is taking at the time."
Continuing, Sisco said; "There
lore many occasions in our re-
lationship, special as it is. with
Continued Page 7-A
McGovern Denies Finances
Influence His Israel Views
WASHINGTON (JTA> Sen. George McGovern
(D., S.D.) has denounced a report in the Washington Post
which, he said, implied that "my public position on the
State of Israel is influenced by the fact that a piece of
property I own has been rented to the Syrian
Ambassador."
The implication was contained in a story last week
under the by-line of Eugene L. Meyer who noted that
McGovern has been receiving rental income from Syrian
Ambassador Sabaah Kabani since March, 1975, and "has
come under increasing criticism from pro-Israel groups
here for what they consider stands more sympathetic to
the Arab cause and critical of Israeli policies."
to assure safe evacuation
U.S. Acknowledges
Contacts WithPLO
McGOVERN, who has asked
the six-member non-partisan
Senate Ethics Committee headed
by Sen. Howard Cannon (D.
Nev.) to determine whether h
has done "anything unethical 01
improper." was vigorously de-
fended on the Senate floor by two
staunchly pro-Israel Senators.
Abraham Ribicoff (D.. Conn.)
and Hubert H. Humphrey (D..
Minn.I.
Ribicoff declared, "It is un-
thinkable to me that George
McGovern would permit any
financial consideration to de-
termine his position on any issue
affecting the welfare of this
country or the peace of the
world."
He said he rejected the Post's
story "completely."
Continued on Page 8-A
potential vice president
Schweiker Has Good
Record on Israel Issues
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sen. Richard Schweiker of Penn-
sylvania, selected by Ronald
Reagan to be his running-mate if
he wins the Republican
nomination for the Presidency, is
easily one of the strongest sup-
porters of Congressional legis-
lation in support of Israel's
requirements and Soviet Jewry.
Frequently honored by Jewish
organizations for his activities on
liberal causes and issues affecting
the Jewish community during his
16 years in the House and Senate.
Schweiker has been outspoken in
insisting on economic and
military assistance for Israel and
in providing teeth in laws to help
the emigration of Jews and
others from the Soviet Union.
The 50-year-old Schweiker,
who was reelected two years ago
to his second Senate term, was
one of 34 Senators who last
month opposed the retention of
Air Force General George S.
Brown as chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
SCHWEIKER also authored
the ethnic studies program to
bring national attention to the
contributions to America of im-
migrant peoples, including Jews.
In his consistent voting record
for aid to Israel and in exhorting
the President to maintain Israel's
needs. Schweiker backed the
amendment by Sen. Henry M.
Continued on Page 5-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Ford
skirted the delicate issue of
official American relations
with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization in ex-
pressing his thanks and
congratulations to "all"
who aided in the evacuation
by sea of some 300 Ameri-
cans and other foreign na-
tionals from strife-torn
Lebanon.
The State Department
acknowledged that it has
been "dealing" with the
terrorist organization to
obtain assurances that the
evacuation would be con-
ducted safely.
IT WAS the first time the
United States has said it was in
contact with the PLO. Declared
U.S. policy has been that it would
not deal with the Palestinians
until they recognized Israel's
right to exist as an independent
state. The Israeli position is
against dealing with the PLO
under any circumstances.
i ihii inucd on Page 15-A
Charges Fly at Press
Conference with Rabin
TEL
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
AVIV (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin and
Israel's journalistic establishment clashed angrily at a meeting
of the Israeli Press Council here. The Premier accused the press
of being unfair, unbalanced and alarmist in its presentation of
the news and accused it of publishing stories without checking
the facts.
The journalists retorted that the government suppressed
information or gave misinformation. The only agreement to
emerge from the meeting was that the debate begun Friday will
be continued.
RABIN CLAIMED that if Israel had libel laws as tough as
Continued on Page 5-A
A\\\ \H S \|),M
Tough Sadat
Talk Worries
Many Israelis
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
There is some concern in
Jerusalem at the content of
a major speech to the
Egyptian Parliament by
President Anwar Sadat.
Israeli analysts point to a
tougher line taken by Sadat
vis-a-vis Israel and the
United States and
equally worrisome a very
broad hint thrown out by
the Egyptian leader to
Moscow.
Sadat said Cairo would
be ready to "rebuild its
bridges" with Moscow if
the Soviets honored their
pledges of aid to the Arab
states and if they ceased
supporting Arab radical
states against Egypt.
THIS IS the first time since
( on i imied on Page 2-A
Were Three Terrorists Captured Alive?
JOSEPH J. SISCO
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Israeli commandos who rescued
more than 100 hostages at En-
tebbe Airport, Uganda, captured
three of the terrorists alive and
have taken them to Israel for in-
terrogation, according to a book,
"90 Minutes at Entebbe," pub-
lished here.
The book, authored by William
Stevenson and published by
Bantam Books, disclosed that
"Out of 10 terrorists seven were
killed and their fingerprints and
photographs recorded. Three
other terrorists, it would seem,
despite Israeli denials, were
taken alive for interrogation."
ACCORDING TO the pub-
lisher, the 216-page book is based
on interviews with Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin, members of the rescue
team, hostages and intelligence
sources.
Stevenson, a Canadian who
had served as a reporter in Kenya
and Uganda from 1962 to 1964,
spent 11 days in Israel gathering
information for his book.
According to Stevenson, an
intelligence group of 50 Israeli
agents, disguised as business-
men, flew to Nairobi three days
before the raid at Entebbe and
set up a headquarters at the
private house of an Israeli trader
for the upcoming operation.
THE BOOK also claims that
once in Nairobi, the Israeli agents
made contact with Lionel Bryn
Davies. chief of Nairobi police,
and Bruce McKenzie, a former
British commander with close
ties to Kenyan President Jomo
Kenyatta.
Kenya, the book asserts,
agreed to "turn a blind eye" to
the refueling of the Israeli planes
providing the aircraft were
disguised as Israeli commercial
planes and the airport area was
sealed off during the stopover.
The Stevenson account also
makes the following claims:
Israeli Cabinet ministers listened
Continued on Page 2-A


Page2-A'
+Jewi$t> fkrkUan
Friday. August 6.1976
It's All Sweetness Between Israel and Mexico
By CHAIM LAZDEISKI
MEXICO CITY (JTA) -
The semi-official daily El
Nacional reported that Israeli
and Mexican diplomats "shook
hands" and drank coffee together'
after the Israelis heard an ex-
planation by Foreign Ministry
officials of the letter Mexico sent
to the UN Security Council last:
month.
Teen-Age Band'Wins
Big Festival Award
BOTTINEAU. N.D. (JTA)
The symphony band fron
Kiryat Ono, a suburb of Tel Aviv,
made its first trip to the United
States a resounding success when
it won the top award in the Inter-
national Youth Band Festival
here. Thirty-three bands from 22
states and nine countries com-
peted in the three-day music
festival.
Aharon Alkalay.
The band, which has won
international competitions in
Britain. Austria and the
Netherlands, was formed in 1961
by Alkalay.
The letter was widely viewed
as an implicit attack on Israel for
its rescue of the Air France hijack
hostages at Entebbe Airport in
Uganda July 3.
VINCENTE MONTANO.
writing in El Nacional. said Israel
Embassy officials visited the
Foreign Ministry here to com-
plain about the letter. The letter's
complete text was read to them
to prove that no attack on Israel
was intended since Israel was not
mentioned in the text.
Afterwards. Montano wrote,
the Israelis and Mexicans "shook
hands, drank coffee and ended
(their meeting) as friendly as
ever."
Nevertheless, the PLO repre-
sentative here, Marwan Tahoub,
expressed high praise for Mexi-
co's foreign policy and its letter
to the Security Council. Speaking
at a reception at the Egyptian
Embassy, Tahoub. according to a
report in El Nacional. stated that
Mexican policy coincided with
that of the PLO and that both
condemned air piracy.
MEANWHILE. Foreign
Minister Alfonso Garcia Robles
said at a press conference that he
did not expect a new Jewish boy-
cott of Mexico because such
action was contrary to the in-
terests and wishes of Israel ex-
pressed by Israeli Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allon during his
official visit to Mexico last
March.
The newspaper Excelsior pub-
lished an economic study today
made by the financial trust.
Banamex, which attributed the
decline of tourism in Mexico to
factors other than the Jewish
boycott instituted last winter
after Mexico voted for the
General Assembly resolution
equating Zionism with racism.
According to the survey. Mex-
ico suffered a loss of tourists
because of high prices and the
competition of cheaper package
tours to Hawaii and Puerto Rico
marketed by American travel
agents.
Israel Buys Tobacco from Lebanon
The Israeli group, composed of
50 teen-agers between the ages of
12 and 20. were awarded the top
prize on the basis of musicianship
in the symphony competition, the
highest of three categories.
THEY PLAYED "Symphonia
Noblissima." by Jaeger.
Hebrew Suite." by Petrushka;
and the "Slavonic Dances." by
Dvorak.
The teen-agers, who have been
in the U.S. since July 12. warmed
up for their competition by
playing 11 concerts, including
one last week at Mt. Rushmore
and another at the Centennial
celebration in Rapid City, S.D.
The latter concert also marked
the 51st birthday of the sym-
phony's founder and director.
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By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Dubek Cigarette Co.. Israel's
largest cigarette manufacturer,
bought 20 tons of tobacco from
Lebanese growers in the first
large scale commercial tran-
saction across the northern
border. Up to now. all trade has
been on an individual basis but
tobacco growers organized and
elected a representative to deal
with the Israelis.
Tough Sadat
Talk Worries
i
Many Israelis
Continued from Page 1-A
the interim Sinai agreement last
September, observers here note,
that Sadat has allowed a more
positive tone on the Soviets to
creep into a public address.
He flayed at the Americans for
slowing the pace of Mideast
peace-making and cited them, by
implication, as Syria's allies in
hounding the Palestine
Liberation Organization in
I-ebanon.
Sadat was especially tough in
his assault on President Hafez
Assad of Syria over the Lebanon
issue returning in full measure
Assad's own strictures delivered
in a speech earlier last week.
THE TWO speeches were
analyzed in depth by officials and
army intelligence men at
yesterday's Cabinet meeting. The
consensus, according to informed
sources, was that the Sadat
address presages no immediate
threat of a change in policy.
Nevertheless, the markedly
changed tone has kindled
cautionary lights in Jerusalem,
i With the Sinai interim agreement
now approaching its first an-
niversary and its first renewal
date Israel is watching
Icarefully to detect any sign of
'backtracking on Egypt's part as
a result of the Lebanese im-
broglio.
The Sinai agreement resulted
in Egypt's alignment with the
U.S. while Syria was backed by
the Soviets in opposing the
American-orchestrated pact.
BUT THE I^ebanese war has
shaken up that alignment to
some extent, and observers here
are anxious lest the repercussions
of the inter-Arab feuding over
Lebanon could affect Egypt's
policy toward the Sinai agree-
ment and toward the U.S. as the
prime Mideast peace-making
force.
Pnp<-'
Irvin
J Vv K
The growers were paid in
Israeli currency which can be
used to buy food, fuel and other
commodities in short supply in
southern Lebanon. Israel is ex-
pected to buy hundreds of tons of
tobacco from the Lebanese
farmers.
ALTHOUGH southern
Lebanon has been spared the
ravages of the civil war. the
economic situation there is bad.
Many people are out of work and
Terrorists
Captured
Alive?
Continued from Page 1-rt
to live transmissions of the
rescue operation, relayed over a
prearranged radio channel from
Entebbe to Tel Aviv; President
Idi Amin slept at his house, not
far from Entebbe, throughout the
raid; some of the hostages who
were released before the raid were
hypnotized in Paris by Israeli ex-
perts to obtain details on their
capture and detention; Israeli
officials debated a plan to capture
Amin but finally dropped the
plan; and Israel was aided by-
British intelligence sources in
Kenya before the raid.
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there have been several requests
that Israeli authorities allow the
Lebanese to take jobs in Israel.
However, there are several
problems that would have to be
worked out first, including what
the effect would be on West Bank
workers.
If permission is granted it will
probably be only for agricultural
workers, although construction
workers and technicians might be
included at a later date. Mean-
while, it was learned that the
Syrians are publishing a paper
for the areas of Lebanon they
hold which provides the Syrian
position in the Lebanese
situation.
New Salaries for Ministers
JERUSALEM (JTA) New regulations stipulating
salaries of Israel's top public officials were approved here by the
Knesset House Committee. The President will receive a basic
monthly salary of IL 6.000. the Premier IL 5.800 and Knesset
members IL 3,600.
Only the President's salary is tax-free. In addition to the
basic salaries, the officials will receive an average of IL 100 per
day for expenses.
Basic salaries will rise with the cost-of-living index as they
do for all Israelis and the officials will also enjoy family
allowances. Fringe benefits include holiday grants, book,
newspaper and hotel allowances. These will bring the earnings
of top ranking officials to about IL 7,000 to 10.000 per month
When we put
ournamcon
achapel,
it'sexclusivelya
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Unlike many other Jewish funeral
directors in Florida, Riverside is not
represented by any other organization.
Each Riverside Chapel serving Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties is
exclusively a Riverside Chapel, manned by
the largest Jewish staff available in the
State. They are people who understand
Jewish tradition and honor it. And in that
tradition we serve every family, regardless
of financial circumstance.
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MIAMI:
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HOLLYWOOD:
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Five chapels serving the New York City Metropolitan area
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition
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M 8-6 76
M 8-6-76
M 8-6 76


idav. August 6. 1976
rJenifli fhridiir
Page 3-A
Holocaust Studies Chair Revealed at Yeshiva
NEW YORK icy S. Dawidowicz, author of
he War Against the Jews,"
ofessor of Social History at
em College for Women, has
en appointed to the nation's
st professorial chair in Inter-
sciplinary Holocaust Studies
Yeshiva University, it was
nounced by Dean David
irsky. acting vice president for
cade'mic Affairs.
The Eli and Diana Zborowski
was planned by the late Dr.
uel Belkin, president of
hiva University for 32 years,
o died in April, as the first
,ge of a multiphased program
Holocaust studies at the in
tution.
NDER THE auspices of the
rowski Chair, a program of
deorraduate and graduate
rSe< correlating the per-
spectives of many disciplines is
being developed.
Among the fields of study
being drawn upon for analysis of
the Holocaust era are philos-
ophy, history, Judaic studies,
literature, psychology and so-
ciology.
According to Dean Mirsky, foi
the first time "There will be a
higher educational program in
Holocaust studies sufficiently
comprehensive to enable
students to major in the field at
both the undergraduate and
graduate levels.
"We plan to offer young men
and women of commitment the
skills to become teachers,
scholars and specialists in Hol-
ocaust studies who can create
and implement programs in the
field at other universities, in high
schools and at other educational
labin Hails Portugal's Chief
JERUSALEM (JTA) In a message con-
tulating Portuguese Socialist Premier Mario Soares on
assumption of office. Premier Yitzhak Rabin ex-
tesed the hope that relations between Israel and
(rtugal "will develop to our mutual satisfaction.*'
There has been some optimism here as to the pros-
tt dt Soares' regime establishing full diplomatic ties
[h Israel. At present only consular relations exist
[ween the two countries the situation that pertained
fingthe Salazar regime.
Recently a top Portuguese Socialist Party official
lited here as guest of Israel's Mapai Party and this
jhtened speculation that a possible upgrading of
Itions was in the offing.

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institutions and cultural cen-
ters."
The second stage of the new
studies program calls for the
creation of the Yeshiva
University Center for Ongoing
Research on the Holocaust, with
units for a commemorative
library, museum exhibit area,
department of aural and visual
records, annual conference
program, a department of
research, and Fellowship
assistance program, Mirsky said.
PROF. DAWIDOWICZ has
gained international acclaim
through her authorship of "The
War Against the Jews: 1933-
1945," published by Holt,
Rinehart and Winston in 1975.
Described as the definitive
work on the Holocaust, the
murder of six million Jews during
the Nazi era, it was selected
by the Book-of-the-Month Club.
History Book Club, Commentary
Library and the Jewish
Publication Society. The book
earned for Prof. Dawidowicz the
Anisfield-Wolf Prize.
In April, Prof. Dawidowicz was
awarded the John Simon
Guggenheim Memorial Foun-
dation Fellowship for a study of
the history of Jews in America.
Prior to joining Yeshiva
University in 1969, she was
director of research at YIVO
Institute for Jewish Research,
and education officer in DP
camps for the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee.
SHE IS a frequent lecturer on
the Holocaust and European
history at universities in the U.S.
and Canada. Her most recent
book is the "Holocaust Reader,"
published by Behrman House.
Eli Zborowski has sponsored
the Yeshiva University
Holocaust Memorial Day ob-
servance for the past seven years
and has had a major role in
bringing exhibits from Yad
Vashem. the Holocaust Memorial
Institute in Israel, to Jewish
centers, synagogues and
museums throughout the U.S.
A MEMBER of the
Underground in Poland during
World War II, he was a key
participant in later efforts to
organize youth and to lead
survivors from Poland to areas of
Europe under American oc-
cupation.
Since coming to the U.S. ir
1952, he has been a leader in
numerous Jewish organizations.
He is past president of the Young
Israel of Forest Hills, served foi
12 years as a member of the
Board of Trustees of the
American Zionist Youth
Foundation and is currently
active in UJA, Israel Bonds and
Forest Hills community groups.
Zborowski is president of the
American Federation of Jewish
Fighters, Camp Inmates and
Nazi Victims.
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Page4-A
?Jew il> fkridian
Friday, Aurum 6 ,Q,J
Agnew's New Bigotry
It is sad to see the extent to which a former high
American official has fallen, not only in his personal
life, but in his new and vengeful ways.
We mean, of course, Spiro T. Agnew.
Let it not be forgotten: Agnew is a convicted
felon. The unhappy fact is that, in addition, he has
taken up a new life of anti-Semitic activity.
So far as he, himself, is concerned, we could care
less. One variety of anti-Semite is neither better nor
worse than another. That Agnew is a former Vice
President of the United States makes his bigotry all
the more breathtaking, but not particularly more
virulent or dangerous.
With one exception: And that is that the in-
creasing incidence of his anti-Semitic activity gives
credence to the anti-Semite's general conviction that
Jews are especially untrustworthy because they are in
alleged control of mass communications and have an
allegedly inordinate amount of power in the high halls
of government.
These are the basic premises of Agnew's anti-
Semitism today, and because he is a former Vice
President, the premises in the mind of the uninformed
take on a tone of authority they would not otherwise
have.
We can only hope that most Americans are not
fooled by Agnew's statements and that they recognize
them as spiteful attempts to justify his own felony.
The Fruit of Anger
Anger and resentment can often be creative and
fruitful. An example is New York Timesman William
Safire.
Safire is a former speech writer for former
President Nixon and former Vice President Agnew.
Safire is one of those Americans who still cannot
believe that the Nixon-Agnew tragedy ever took place.
Safire's adulation of Nixon and Agnew is well-
documented. Whether he can believe the tragedy or
not, he lives day-to-day in the cold reality of its af-
termath.
The result has been a sense of personal betrayal in
him leading to a series of brilliant journalistic tri-
umphs mainly centering on exposing Agnew's recent
anti-Semitic movements.
Now. the Times columnist has set his sights on
newer fields, and the latest fruit of his work is the
expose involving Democratic hopeful Jimmy Carter's
pollster, Patrick Caddell.
It turns out that Caddell owns 35 percent of an
organization doing public relations work for Saudi
Arabia. Other Caddell clients are such oil-rich Amer-
ican enterprises as Exxon, Arco, Shell and Sun.
Praise for a Newsman
Carter, who at least publicly has shown explicit
concern for the so-called Jewish vote, insists that
Caddell's highly-specialized clientele (to say the least!
can have no ideological effect either on his own
Presidential aspirations or on the campaign
generally.
But Safire observes that any Carter decision,
either as a nominee or in the event of his election in
November, might readily be purchased "to help lay
the basis for Arab propaganda in America'' should
Carter continue to insist that Caddell's extra-
curricular activity can have no ideological effect on
him.
We agree with Safire. Carter's stand is in-
comprehensible. And Safire must be praised for
having dug out the information in the first place.
Jewish Floridian
OFFICI and TLjVNT 110 N.E. th St. Miami. Fla JJ1J2 Phone J7J-4805
P.O Box 2*73. Miami Florida 13101
FRED K. 8HOCHET LEO MINDLIN SELMA M THOMP80N
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Doss Not Gusrsntee The Ksshrvth
Of The Msrthsndise Advertised In Its Column*
Published every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Postase Pa'd at Miami. Fla
FrtdK. SnocttcrFriday, .Aug 8.1970__________________
TIM Jewish Floridian haa absorbed the Jewish Unity and th* Jawiah Weekly.
Munur of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
eate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
aviation of Kn#HeH-Jewlah Newspaper*, and tha Florida Proaa Association.
UMCRIrTION RATES: (Loeal Area) One Year12.00: Two YaaraSB.OO:
Ttirae V* SSQ.00. Q* af Town Upon Hogat._______________________________
Friday, August 6. 1976 10 AB
Volume 49 Number 32
Kreisky Cries for Cronies
By ROBERT E.SEGAL
'These stories from long ago
must finally come to an end."
It is the exasperated cry of
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky, the
popular Jewish-born, now as-
similated. Austrian leader. The
cry arose in the course of a bitter
fight between Kreisky and Simon
Wiesenthal. who gives most of
his waking hours to hunting
down old Nazis. Wiesenthal had
claimed that Friedrich Peter,
whom Chancellor Kreisky was
thinking of selecting as his
deputy in a coalition move, had
served in the infamous Nazi SS.
KREISKY. now firmly in-
stalled in his Vienna post, and
Wiesenthal, who had been sued
for slander by Kreisky, seem to
have reached a truce; but
Kreisky's words about the need
to forget are by no means for-
gotten.
NEW OLYMPIC SPIr^TT
**R>2
>n.t
\jr>v

MONTREAL'76
The words linger because h,
not heeding them, Rotanansth.
world over forced the withdraw
of Wolfgang Wick from C|
International s top post i
wealthy Austrian industrial^
and tireless worker for Ho,^
good deeds, Wick according
Wiesenthal had also been!
member of Hitler s black-shirt*
elite corps, the Schutzstaffel
WICK DID not deny ,
charge. Indeed, he admitted h.
had been an active Nazi But hj
version of service to Flitter ha(
one time tag. Wisenthal'
another. The Rotarian said itwai
not until February. 19i,i. thn*
months before Hitler's empire
was shattered, that he joined the
So.
The law required such en-
rollment. Wick said, obligin.
those born after 1906 to enter tS
SS lists. Yet according to
Wiesenthal. it was wav hack it
1933 that Wick joined' the N'aa
Party in Austria.
Wick's rise to eminence ii
Rotary International, his desig
nation as Presidentto-he, hii
withdrawal in light of Wiesen-
thal's revelations, the decision of
the Rotary power structure not
accept his withdrawal, t
Wick's ultimate decision not
take the post are all of too much
significance to disappear
abruptly from the thoughts of
people who care.
"THESE STORIES from Ion*
ago" must not be forgotten Our
children and grandchildren can
never leam too much about
Hitler, the power he exercised
over the minds of millions, the
Continued on Page II A
Jewish Participation in Olympics
By HASKELL COHEN
While the Jewish male athletes
have made their mark in Olympic
competition, they have not out-
done the accomplishments of
their female counterparts in
many instances As a matter of
fact, it was the Jewish female
athlete who played an important
role in the pioiver work of paving
the road into sports for women as
a whole.
When female swimming was
first introduced in the Stockholm
Olympics, the Austrian team,
which won the bronze medals in
the 4x100 meter relay, introduced
three Jewish swimmers. Many
years later, swimmers like Eva
Szekely of Hungary and Marilyn
Ramenovsky of the United
States, a Maccabiah Games
champion, carried on the same
winning tradition.
FEMALE participants were
first permitted to compete in
track and field in the Amsterdam
Olympics, and Fanny Rosenfeld
of Canada became the only
winner of two gold medals. Also
in those Games found among the
medal winners was the late Lil-
lian Copeland of the United
States, who came back in 1932 to
win the discus throw gold medal
at the Los Angeles Games.
So far as numbers of medals
won by female Jewish athletes is
concerned. Agnes Keleti of
Czechoslovakia ranks second to
Mark Spitz in the number of total
medals won by an individual per-
former. Miss Keleti won five
gold, three silver and two bronze
medals in gymnastics at the
Games in Helsinki and Mel-
bourne.
Her achievement at these two
sets of Olympics has been out-
done only by Spitz's total of nine
gold medals, one silver medal and
one bronze medal. Spitz, in-
cidentally, ranks fourth among
Olympic medal winners, serving
as a runner-up of Ray Ewry,
Larissa Latynina and Paavo
Nurmi.
MISS KELETI'S achieve-
ments have served her well since
at this moment she serves on the
staff of the Wingate Institute of
Physical Education in Netanya.
where for the past 16 years she
has headed up her segment of the
physical education staff. Today
she is known as Mrs. Keleti-Biro.
The honor of being the best
Jewish female athlete in recent
years belongs to Irena Kirszen-
stein of Poland. Miss Kirszen-
stein, known as Szewinska today,
is one of the best sprinters in the
world and has stayed at the top
in the 100 and 200 meter sprints
for close to a decade.
All in all. we know that the list
of Jewish medal winners in the
Games ranging from Athens to
Tokyo includes 98 gold. 62 silver
and 59 bronze by athletes of the
Jewish faith from all over the
world.
TODAY, of course, the Olym-
pic Games possibly serve little
purpose, and, quite frankly, may
be on the way out. There is no
question that the Games have
become a political football, and
students of the history of the
Games realize now that the first
political disturbances began with
the Olympic Games in Berlin in
1936, when they actually became
a means toward political ends
and where discrimination on the
basis of creed was practiced
openly.
At that time, considerable
pressure was exerted on the late
Avery Brundage, the Olympic
czar, to have the Games trans-
ferred out of Germany, but after
visiting that country, he pro-
claimed, "Hitler is going to make
this set of Games the finest
ever."
IN ORDER to overcome the
avalanche of protests which came
in from all over the world, the
Nazis at that point nominated 21
Jewish athletes for training
camps to participate in the i
man Olympic Games in 1934. A
tually, none of the 21 were ew|
invited to attend the camps.
In desperation, in order
show their impartiality, the Na
finally selected a half Jewii
fencer, Helene Mayer, who w
studying in California, to
ticipate as a fencer Shi' nasoi
of the finest female fencers ofi
time, and her presence was ne
sitated by the Nazis to prove th
they did not discriminate aga
Jews just as they had done int
preceding winter games wo
Rudi Ball, a hockey player, vS\
included on the German squad
MISS MAYER, to her eve
lasting discredit, saluted Hitla
on the victory stand with to
Nazi greeting of the extend
raised right hand.
The height of ludicrousn
was reached in the years
ceding World War II when!
United States pro-Fascist. Gftj
Charles H. Sherrill. went so far*
to justify the discriminate
against the Jewish people
stating, "There never was
prominent Jewish athlete
history."
To their everlasting crediJ
many prominent Jewish athleu
from all over the world refusf
proudly to represent their resp
tive countries in Nazi Germany
As a matter of fact, many '
punished for their refusal to<
so. Perhaps the most famouscs
was that of Austria's swi~"
Judith Deutsch, who now resK
in Israel.
IT SHOULD be noted in
elusion that Israel's flag enten
the Olympic arena for the
time in 1952 in Finland, when to.
United States Committee Sp
for Israel, under the strc
leadership of the late H
Henshel and the late CM
Ornstein. was instrumental
getting the IOC to recog
Israel as an entity and
immensely in helping to rau*1
necessary funds to get the tw
from the Holy Land to the so-
dinavian country.


Friday. August 6.1976
U.S. Knew About
Entebbe Beforehand
anderson
*Jeniii fhrtdkar
Page 5-A
WASHINGTON Israels
[tunning, July 3 commando raid
nto Uganda did nor catch the
Jnited States by surprise. The
.aiders rescued the passengers
irom a hijacked airliner held by
ron-is.
It has taken a little time to
[\ece together the tightly-held
itory of the U.S. role in the
Paring raid. The story hasn't
>en easy to get; those who know
|he (aits have been sworn to
lilenet'
OFFICIALLY, the United
States didn't learn about the
trike until Israeli Ambassador
limcha Dinitz telephoned
(ecretary of State Henry
(issinger the evening of July 3.
The rescue was almost completed
before the call was placed.
But unofficially, U.S. in-
elligence sources knew some-
hinj: was afoot. Their
|ophisi icated electronic
quipment. which can intercept
nmmunications. gave them
Dme clues
Undercover American agents
llso provided additional clues.
(he Israeli raiders, for example.
|re an elite group. U.S. in-
plligence watches them closely,
soon as the commandos
hanged their normal pattern.
\ur intelligence analysts knew
smething was being planned.
THE ONLY crisis was the
loldin^- of the hostages in
Uganda Our analysts simply
leduied that the commandos
lire preparing to rescue the
|os tages
U.S. tracking equipment in the
liddle East reportedly picked up
flight of the commando
Banes over the Red Sea along the
|frican coast.
But it was after the raid that
he United States played its most
nportant role. There was con-
em that Uganda's volatile dic-
Btor. Idi Amin. might retaliate
nth an attack on Kenya.
Jganda's African neighbor,
fhich Israel used as a refueling
op.
SO THE Pentagon made a
lumber of quiet moves. First, a
[ve-ship task force, led by air-
aft carrier Ranger, was dis-
patched from Singapore toward
Africa.
Meanwhile, an American
frigate, the USS Beary, sailed
into the Kenyan port of Mom-
basa. At the same time, a P-3
Navy patrol plane flew over 5,500
miles from the Philippines to
Kenya. It was the first time a P-3
had landed in Kenya. The plane
returned to the Philippines a few
days later. But it was im-
mediately replaced by another
patrol plane. The second one
didn't leave Kenya until July 18.
These military moves were in-
tended, first, as a warning to
Dictator Amin to behave himself;
and. second, as reassurance to
Kenya. At the same time, the
moves were carefully limited to
avoid an international incident.
DIPLOMATIC SHUFFLE:
Egypt's Bicentennial gift to
America almost got lost in the
July 4th shuffle.
The Egyptians carefully
selected an appropriate gift, an
ancient memorial tablet carved
more than 3.000 years ago. It
shows an Egyptian family
pleading for eternal life for their
dead son.
The Egyptians also went to
great pains to deliver the gift in a
dramatic way. The valuable
artifact was loaded aboard a 111-
year-old vessel, which set forth
on its first trip across the
Atlantic.
BUT NO one paid any atten-
tion to the Egyptians when they
arrived. Admiral Fouad Zikri, the
commander of the Egyptian
Navy, tried to present the gift to
President Ford. But Zikri
couldn't get past the White
House gate.
One of our reporters. Barbara
Takei, finally called the White
House to ask about the Egyp-
tians. White House aides told her
they didn't even know the Egyp-
tians wanted to present a gift.
The Egyptian delegation,
meanwhile, had been cooling
their heels for five days. Their
ancient vessel was scheduled to
take them home to Egypt July
15.
In the nick of time, President
Ford summoned the Egyptians
to the White House on July 14.
Admiral Zikri presented the
3,000-year-old tablet, and the
President accepted it. The whole
ceremony lasted precisely seven
minutes.
The next day, the colorful old
ship sailed away almost as un-
obtrusively as it had arrived.
CONVENTION CHEERLEA-
DERS: President Ford's son
Jack recently sent out 10,000
letters to young, freshly-
scrubbed Americans. He's trying
to recruit 500 of then to cheer for
his father at the Kansas City
Convention.
Young Ford's letter offers
them the chance to be "Presiden-
tials." For this opportunity, they
have to pay a $130 fee. They also
have to pay their transportation
costs. But once in Kansas City,
their expenses will be picked up
by the President's campaign
committee.
THE PRESIDENTIALS"
will be admitted inside the con-
vention hall. Jack Ford promises.
They won't actually be allowed
on the convention floor, but
they'll participate in rallies and
domonstrations.
Or. to use Jack Ford's words,
they'll "provide the enthusiasm
my father will need to win."
The Presidential" should be
easy to spot on your television
screen. They'll be young,
probably somewhat hoarse,
dressed in red-andwhite tee-
shirts emblazoned. "President
Ford: "76."
SEX PROBE: The House
Ethics Committee waited until
the top Washington corres-
pondents left town to cover the
Democratic Convention. Then
the committee quietly brought in
Klizabeth Ray for questioning.
Two committee investigators
interviewed her behind closed
doors at the old FBI building.
They questioned her about her
sex exploits on Capitol Hill. The
congressman who hired her to be
his mistress. Wayne Hays, also
stayed away from the con-
vention. Our sources say he
remained on his Ohio farm where
he is deciding whether to run for
reelection.
r-------. B'NAI ISRAEL -------
| IGr. Miami Youth Syn. (Orthod.)
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High Holiday Services will be
conducted by:
J Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman and Choir
At Our OWN Home
onS W. 123 Ave
Het Sunset* Kendall
Limited Seatlng-for tickets
and Information call: X74-S6M
Schweiker Has Goo'd
Record on Israel Issues
Continued from Page 1-A
Jackson (D., Wash.) to the
Defense Procurement Act that
provides unlimited loan credit
until Dec. 13, 1977, that Israel
finds necessary to buy American
aircraft and related equipment.
He also backed the Jackson
proviso to the SALT agreement
with the Soviet Union that pro-
vides for the President to seek
easing by the USSR of its em-
igration restrictions.
This is in addition to the
Jackson-Vanik legislation in the
Trade Reform Bill for the same
purpose.
IN DEALING with the Arab
boycott, Schweiker has been a
sponsor as well as supporter of
legislation to combat Arab boy-
cott against firms doing business
with Israel and firms with Jews
in their ownership or manage-
ment.
Among his legislative actions
was to seek the withdrawal of the
United States from the Inter-
national Labor Organization of
the United Nations because it in-
cluded the PLO in its
deliberations.
Schweiker is considered one of
the most liberal Republicans in
the Senate. The Americans for
Democratic Action gave him a
score of 89 percent last year and
85 percent the year before.
THE CONSERVATIVE
Americans for Constitutional
Action, however, gave him only
eight percent last year and 16
percent the year before.
Honors given to Schweiker by
Jewish organizations include the
Histadrut F'reedom Award by the
Pittsburgh National Committee
for Labor Israel, the Bringer of
Light Award by the Jewish
National Fund and the Samuel
H. Daroff Humanitarian Award
by the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith. all presented in
1971.
Charges Fly at Press
Conference with Rabin
Continued from Page 1-A
those in Canada, newspapers here would forever be paying
damages. He differentiated between freedom of the press and
what he said was the responsibility of the press to check facts.
He cited examples of what he considered the Israeli press'
carelessness with facts. He said that during his five years as
Ambassador to Washington. American journalists invariably
checked with his office and solicited his viewpoint before
printing stories related to Israel. "Be hostile, but be accurate,"
Rabin declared.
JOURNALISTS RESPONDED to Rabin's remarks by
accusing the government of failure to provide facts or providing
erroneous facts.
They noted that the Rabin Administration has abolished
the weekly press briefings. "At least give us the right to ask
questions even if you retain the right to refuse to answer." one
journalist told Rabin.
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Page 6-A
fJewisti fkridiftr
Frida
y> August 6,
I
Lady Bird in Visit to Israel
By DA VID LAND A U and GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) "I am touched by the
feeling for Lyndon I find in this land and grateful."
This was the brief inscription Lady Bird Johnson, widow
of the late President Lyndon B. Johnson, wrote on a copy
of his book "The Vantage Point," on display at the
Hebrew University here.
Mrs. Johnson visited the
university with her daughter.
Luci Nugent, during her week-
long unofficial visit to Israel that
began July 19. The Hebrew
University is holding an
exhibition of Americana as its
tribute to the Bicentennial.
THE JOHNSON book is one of
the displays. Although her visit
was nominally unofficial. Mrs.
Johnson and her two daughters
met with many of Israel's top
leaders, including Premier
Yitzhak Rabin and Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon. during
their visit.
The former First Lady visited
the Lyndon B. Johnson Forest
near Jerusalem to plant a tree.
"This a thrilling moment for
me," she said. "My husband
would have been so pleased with
this gesture."
She and Mrs. Nugent were the
guests of the Jewish National
Fund to see the JNF af-
forestation in action and to learn
about the projects for the beauti-
fication and improvement of the
environment in Israel.
MRS. JOHNSON expressed
her admiration for the country's
vitality in dealing with various
aspects of environmental im-
provement and safeguarding
natural resources. Both mother
and daughter were presented
with certificates of the tree
planting and two pine cones from
the Johnson Forest as mementos
of the occasion.
Mrs. Johnson and her daugh-
ters also visited the Yad Vashem
Holocaust Memorial and called
on President Ephraim Katzir at
his official residence.
Kosher Chickens for Lebanon
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Lebanese villagers will soon be
eating kosher chicken. A truck-
load of frozen poultry, wrapped in
nylon bags bearing the approval
of the Safad Rabbinate, along
with live poultry, was on its way
to Kiryat Shemona to be sent
across the breaks in the security
fence to southern Lebanon.
Meanwhile, two merchants
from southern Lebanon were in
Kiryat Shemona buying cooking
oil, rice, sugar and detergents.
One of the merchants told Israeli
newsmen that the "mob" (Arab
terrorists) set fire to an apple
orchard whose owner had ac-
cepted medical aid from Israel.
"WHEN your stomach is
empty, and your throat is dry.
relations with Israel are the only
way to exist." the merchant said.
He was referring to the lack of
AFL-CIO Takes Stand
On Arab Boycott
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The AFL-CIO Executive Council,
at its quarterly meeting, adopted
twin statements on the subjects
of terrorism and the Arab boy-
cott, it was announced by Jacob
Sheinkman. president of the
Jewish Labor Committee.
Despite
with the
candidate
Executive
their preoccupation
endorsement of a
for President, the
Council "con-
gratulated the people of Israel
for their bold initiative and com-
mended the people of Kenya."
THE STATEMENT alsc
noted that "Israel's courageous
action demonstrates the only
effective method of dealing with
terrorists and putting an end to
their bloody plots. The rescue is a
clear example of how the free
world must henceforth deal with
hijackers and political black-
mailers.
The Council's statement called
upon "the nations of the free
world" to "work together for
effective methods of dealing with
terrorism. including strong
political and economic sanctions
gainst any government which
harbors, encourages or supports
terrorists."
In another statement, the
Executive Council declared that
the Arab boycott "raises issues
which go far beyond those of Is-
rael's rights as a free nation. By
imposing secondary and tertiary
boycotts, the Arabs have put at
issue America's willingness to
defend its own principles and
sovereignty."
IN DEMANDING an end to
cooperation with the Arab boy-
cott on American soil, the Coun-
j cil "called upon the Congress and
, the Administration to move
' swiftly to enact legislation and to
take such other measures as
necessary to achieve this goal."
Sheinkman, who is also
I secretary-treasurer of the
' Amalgamated Clothing and Tex-
tile Workers Union, hailed the
, Executive Council statement and
called for speedy enactment of
the bills which would make the
secondary and tertiary boycotts
illegal and would deprive
American companies cooperating
with it of the special tax benefits
given to encourage foreign trade.
food and water in southern
Lebanon.
The Israel-Lebanese border is
especially hectic. Representatives
in the various southern Lebanese
villages had been told that Israel
would supply gas for kitchen
containers.
Within a short time there were
lines of farmers and villagers
carrying containers. Isrueli
trucks picked up the containers
at the border and took them to a
gas station. The containers were
returned, providing the Lebanese
gas for their kitchen stoves.
THE MEDICAL clinics at the
border continue to operate at full
capacity. Apparently many Leb-
anese doctors send their patients
to the Israeli clinics with letters
describing the patients' symp-
toms
One Palestinian doctor in-
cluded anti-Israeli slogans while
at the same time hailing the
professional knowledge of the
Israeli physicians.
Meanwhile, it was reliably
learned that many members of El
Fatah, as well as other terrorist
organizations, are fleeing into
south Lebanon because of
Lebanese Christian and Syrian
pressure.
It has been estimated that
some 10,000 Palestinian
terrorists are among the 30,000
people who have been killed in
the Lebanese civil war. Tens of
thousands of Palestinians have
been injured.
Jewish
social agency
seeks half-time executive sec-
retary for women's auxiliary.
Organisational experience and
knowledge of community es-
sential.
Reply to J.S.
P.O. Box 01-2973
Miami, Fla 33101
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Friday, August 6, 1976
+ Aniot>fkridr**r
Page 7-A
Woman Leader Scores Major Success at Vancouver
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The head of the Council of
Women's Organizations in Israel,
Mrs. Pnina Herzog, scored a re-
markable success in an inter-
national forum recently, when
she was voted chairman of the
health committee of the Inter-
national Council of Women at its
convention in Vancouver,
Canada.
Mrs. Herzog received 80 votes,
while a Belgian candidate for the
honorary post received 30.
Delegates from 68 countries
attended the convention, Mrs.
Herzog told the JTA in an inter-
view. There were no Arab dele-
gations present, she said, and
everyone made strenuous efforts
to keep politics out of the
deliberations.
SHE RECOUNTED one par
titular achievement during the
debate: at the Asia and Oceania
caucus, of which Israel is a mem-
ber, the Iranian delegate pro-
posed that that caucus recom-
mend to the plenary that it adopt
a resolution endorsing the
"Declaration of Mexico" on
women's rights.
This declaration included a re-
statement of the UN General
Assembly resolution equating
Zionism with racism. The Aus-
tralian delegate at Vancouver
demanded as a holding action
that copies of the Mexico text
be circulated before the vote be
taken on whether to endorse it.
Mrs. Herzog asked for the floor
to propose that instead of en-
dorsing the Mexico declaration,
the plenary should be asked to
endorse instead the "World Plan
of Action" which was the
original draft of the declaration of
Mexico without the offensive
anti-Zionism reference.
THIS WAS
opposition by
carried without
the Asia and
Oceania caucus and later by the
full plenary.
Mrs. Herzog, widow of the late
top Israeli diplomat, Yaacov
Herzog, also presented motions
on social issues which were well
received. She told the JTA the
next meeting of the Asia and
Oceania caucus would probably
be held in Israel during 1978, her
invitation having been well re-
ceived by fellow caucus
delegates.
Repeat Customers: Focus Of
National's Ad Campaign
"National Airlines, take me, I'm yours" is the theme of the
airline's new advertising campaign. It is based on the fact that three
out of four National passengers are repeat customers.
The multimedia campaign, created by Ted Rates & Company,
New York, was launched Aug. 2 on TV and radio and in newspapers
across the carrier's system.
J. Dan Brock, vice president of marketing, said, "This program
highlights passenger reaction to our service on the ground and in the
air It hammers home the message that we're the best, since so many
of our passengers are repeaters."
A substantial portion of the $12 million campaign will go into 30-
and fill-second TV commercials in National's 10 major markets.
Emphasis will also be placed on newspaper advertising and 60-second
radio spots. Trade magazine ads and billboards will round out the
program.
A strong clement of the TV and radio campaign is a high iden-
tification song and lyrics:
I vc decided to lose all my air travel blues
And now that I ve made up my mind,
1 \ e decided to switch to the one airline which
Really leaves all the others behind.
National treats each passenger like
he's the onlv one aboard.
SO NATIONAL AIRLINES. TAKE ME. I'M YOURS."
National's care on the ground, in the air.
Its the best you can ever come by.
And that's why people feel,
that there's no better deal
Anywhere else in the sky.
National treats each passenger like
he's the onlv one aboard.
SO NATIONAL AIRLINES. TAKE ME, I'M YOURS."
TYPICAL OF THE TV commercials is one dubbed "The Run
ning Man." Focusing on a passenger catching a wide-bodied DC-10, it
highlights the excellence of inflight service, pointing out that the
airline pays attention to details, like keeping a hot meal hot and
offering more coffee before you ask. And nobody saves you more
money than National when it comes to fares."
Throughout the presentation happy travelers come back to the
carrier's basic theme: "National Airlines, take me, I'm yours."
A voice announces: "No wonder three out of four passengers have
flown with us before." The ad concludes by urging viewers to "Call
your travel agent or National Airlines."
Print ads also emphasize the fact that National travelers are
satisfied passengers. Smiling customers, their arms outstretched to
embrace National's service," lead off with the "Take me" theme.
The copy reads, in part: "Something's new at National. People
are walking up to us at ticket counters and they're saying, 'National
Airlines, take me. I'm yours' for a lot of reasons. They're finding
a hot meal is still hot. even in the back row. A flight attendant comes
over as soon as she's called And baggage marked Handle with Care'
is handled with care."
The print ads end with: "We're doing so much to make flying a
breeze, people are saying Take me, I'm yours' over and over. Three
out of every four passengers on every National flight have flown with
us before. Find out why so many people do."
Doctors and Pythians
Help Kids Go to Camp
With a little help from Mount
Sinai Medical Center pedi-
atricians and the Knights of
Pythias, 50 indigent children
from Dade County will enjoy two
weeks of summer camp in
Immokalee.
Physicians in the Departments
of Pediatrics and Family Medi-
cine have volunteered their time
and were joined by a nurse and
two teen-age volunteers in per-
forming free physical examina-
tions required by the camp.
Russians
Don't Match
Peace Moves
Continued from Page 1 A
Israel, where we have tended to
try to encourage them (Israelis)
to go perhaps beyond where their
established position may be" but
"I cannot find any really concrete
evidence where the Soviet has
taken this sort of position."
Sisco, now president of the
American University here, said
the U.S. and the Soviet Union
"have always agreed to disgree
when it comes to the substance of
a settlement."
HE SAID he has always felt
that the U.S. and the West have
much more to gain from a peace-
ful resolution than does the
Soviet Union.
"We can out-compete the
Soviet Union in circumstances of
peace." Sisco said.
Sisco's remarks followed CBS
interviewer Richard Hottelot's
comment that some in Washing-
ton think Soviet public support
for the PLO and coolness toward
Syria in the Lebanese situation,
despite the close relationship
between Syria and Soviet Union
over the past 25 years, is because
Syria sees an independent con-
vergence of interests by Syria,
Jordan. Egypt, the United States
and "even Israel" toward a nego-
tiated peace and the Soviets want
to block that because if there is
peace in the Middle East there is
no room there for the USSR.
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Page8-A
*Jenist fkrkJian
Friday, August 6,1976
Senate Votes 86-1 to Penalize U.S.
Firms Bowing to Boycott
WASHINGTON
(JTA) The Senate voted
86-1 to penalize American
corporations that resort to
bribery or compliance with
the Arab boycott of Israel
to generate sales abroad.
The provisions, known as
Title Ten of the Tax Reform
Act, incorporate the recom-
mendations of the Senate
Finance Committee and are
much tougher than the
Ford Administration has
recommended. They must
be approved, however, by
the House.
TITLE TEN would subject
corporate executives to penalties
including up to a year in jail for
failure to report any corporate
income derived as a result of a
bribe or earnings in any countrj
that requires participation in t
boycott.
Congressional aides estimated
that the provisions on boycotts
and bribes will cost offending
firms $100 million in 1977.
The Finance Committee acted
in the wake of disclosures that
some of the nations largest cor
porations cooperated in the Arab
boycott of Israel and Jewish
businessmen in the U.S. and that
others routinely paid bribes to
foreign officials to generate
business.
The anti-boycott provisions
would affect transactions made
30 days or more after the pro-
vision becomes law. The anti-
bribe section would become
effective retroactive to Jan. 1.
1976.
THE LONE vote against Title
Ten was cast by Sen. Floyd Has-
kell (D.. Colo.). An aide to
Haskell told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the Senator
had favored the anti-boycott and
anti-bribery provisions which
were prepared by Sen. Abraham
Ribicoff (D.Conn.).
However, Haskell opposed the
Tax Reform Bill as a whole and
therefore was voting against in-
dividual sections of it, the aide
said.
Meanwhile, the House sub-
committee on government in-
formation and individual rights,
chaired by Rep. Bella Abzug (D.,
N.Y.I, is considering legislation
Bomb Wrecks Jewish Office
By EDWINEYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A bomb today wrecked the
offices of a local Jewish organization active in fighting
anti-Semitism and resurgent Nazism. The bomb, a home-
made device consisting of a gas canister, damaged the
Paris bureau of the International League against Racism
and anti-Semitism (LICA). There were no casualties as
the bomb exploded early in the morning before the staff
arrived for work.
Police officials link the explosion to other attacks on
Jewish organizations in Marseilles, Nice and Paris. Police
say they found on the wall against which the bomb was
set the inscription, "Peiper Will Be Avenged."
JOACHIM PEIPER is the former SS colonel whose
charred body was found last month. Police believe the
former Nazi officer was killed by former resistance
fighters or deportees who resented his presence in France.
Since Peiper's death a number of anti- Jewish attacks
have taken place. Most of these took place in Marseilles,
but police believe the attackers may now have moved to
Paris.
to make non-discrimination man-
datory in the overseas assign-
ment policies of federal agencies.
REPRESENTATIVES of
Jewish organizations, testifying
before the subcommittee here,
welcomed Administration efforts
to eliminate discrimination based
on sex, color, religion or national
origin. But they stressed that
legislation is required to make
such efforts effective.
Witnesses included Hyman
Bookbinder. Washington repre-
sentative of the American Jewish
Committee, David A. Brody.
Washington director of the B'nai
B'rith Anti-Defamation League,
and Lawrence Rubin, Washing-
ton representative of the
American Jewish Congress.
Bookbinder said that "until
and unless the Congress passes
some general legislation that
makes real, meaningful
effective'* the country's
commitment to resist
and
basic
Arab
boycott measures, "We will never
feel confident that even federal
agencies will act in full support of
such a policy."
BOOKBINDER stressed that
diplomacy "must be undergirded
by a clear legislative mandate"
that will impress upon "any and
all nations whose self-interest re-
quires trade relations with the
United States that such relations
must be free of secondary and
tertiary boycotts and must not
include discriminatory actions
against any Americans based on
religion, race or sex."
Brody welcomed Treasun
retary William Simon's JuK i;
letter reporting that the Saudi
Arabian government no longer
requires certificates or proof of
religion from visa applicants
However, Brody observed that
"As the Secretary himself ,,r
knowledges, the question con-
cerning religion is still on the
visa application form." He
the elimination of proof only
means that American Jew*
want to go to Saudi Arabia
"either will have to leave the
ques-tion (on religion) un
answered which may. of course,
be a signal to the Saudis, or dis-
semble about their religion."
Death Sentence Commuted
NEW YORK (JTA) The
death sentence imposed by the
Moscow Municipal Court in
December, 1974, on Mikhail
Leviev has been commuted to 15
years in prison, according to
reports received by the Greater
New York Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Leviev, the manager of a store
in Moscow, had been charged
with "economic crimes" and
"anti-Soviet activity."
ACCORDING TO Malcolm
Hoenlein, GNYCSJ director,
Leviev had applied for and
received permission to emigrate
to Israel together with his family.
A few days prior to their
scheduled departure, Leviev was
detained by Soviet police and
held incommunicado while a two-
and-a-half-year investigation was
undertaken, leading to the trial.
Three non-Jews, tried along
with Leviev on similar charges,
received five to nine years
sentences. Because Leviev
allegedly would not cooperate
with the prosecutor, he alone was
condemned to death.
As soon as word of the death
sentence was received in the
West, thousands of telegrams
and appeals were sent to the
Moscow Procurator and other
Soviet officials.
PART OF the campaign in the
West included demonstrations
organized by the GNYCSJ and
other Soviet Jewry groups;
protests by Congressmen.
District Attorneys and other
elected officials, as well as ap-
peals by Leviev's wife.
Robert Abrams, GNYCSJ
chairman, said that the com-
mutation is once again an in-
dication of the potential ef-
fectiveness of pressure from the
West. He added that these ac-
tions, and many others, may well
have been the critical factors in
saving Leviev s life.
Arab Visitors to Territories
On Summer's Rise
JERUSALEM (JTA) During the first 45 days
of this year's summer visit program, which allows visitors
from Arab countries into the administered territories,
some 46,000 visitors crossed the Jordan River bridges, it
was reported here. The summer visits have taken place
since the Six-Day War.
It is expected that the number of visitors will reach a
new peak this year. The number of visitors last year was
almost 100,000, bringing the total since 1968 to 730,000
Arab citizens visiting their relatives in the Israel ad-
ministered areas.
Visitors arriving between June 1 and Aug. 15 may
stay for periods ranging from 60 to 90 days.
SI I u 1* your precious jewels ~L Herb Schoenoerg sji-uue/,
McGovern Denies Finances
Influence His Israel Views
Continued from Page 1-A
Humphrey, associating himself
with Ribicoff's remarks, said
McGovern "has had the courage
to speak with people of different
persuasions in the Middle East"
but "that does not in any way
mean that he is the captive of any
one group or that he has an
allegiance or alliance with any
group that would in any way
violate his own sense of what is
right for the national interest of
the United States."
McGOVERN, who is chairman
of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee's Subcommittee on
Near Eastern Affairs, called
Meyer's story in the Post "the
crudest example of yellow jour-
nalism that I have witnessed in
many years."
The story quoted Hyman
Bookbinder. Washington
representative of the American
Jewish Committee, as saying
that while McGovern's record on
aid to Israel is "generally good,"
he has "more often than others
. indicated some less than
total support for the current
Israeli position."
The AJCommittee official was
also quoted as saying that plenti-
ful Arab money developed "a
potentially general softness and
attitude about your client."
BOOKBINDER said that he
was "distressed over Meyer's
reckless stringing together of un-
related comments to give the im-
pression that I believe Sen.
McGovern's position on the
Middle East may have been the
result of the rental of his house."
McGovern, who asked that the
text of the Post story and Book-
binder's remarks be inserted inti
the Congressional Record, ex
plained that the property in
question was rented by his at
torneys.
He told the Senate last Wed
nesday that while he does not
agree "down to the last detail
with every single position the
Israeli government has taken, I
think it would be catastrophic if
Israel's independence, freedom or
survival was destroyed" and "I
am determined to do all in my
power to prevent that."
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Friday, August 6,1976
+Jewisti fkrrafi&n
Page 9-A
Protest Nazi Film-Maker at Olympics
MONTREAL (JTA) The
Canadian Jewish Congress
strongly protested to the
Organizational Committee for the
Olympic Games for its invitation
to Leni Riefenstahl, who was a
leading Nazi film propagandist,
to attend the games.
The CJC demanded that
Robert Andras, Minister of Man-
power and Immigration, have her
"deported forthwith."
IN TELEGRAMS signed by
Alan Rose, the CJC's national
executive director, the repre-
sentative organization of Can-
adian Jewry said Riefenstahl was
a "leading Nazi propagandist
employed by Goebbels and
producer of films glorifying
Hitler, genocide and hateful
Hitlerite master race
philosophy."
The CJC said it was "ap-
palled" that the Olympic com-
mittee should invite Riefenstahl
and termed the invitation "action
Canadian Jewry regards as
grievous insult" as well as "ab-
horrent to the Olympic spirit."
At National, we've noticed some-
thing new. People are walking up
to us at ticket counters and say-
ing "National Airlines, take me,
I'm yours."
They're saying "National
Airlines, take me, I'm yours," for
a lot of reasons. They're finding a
hot meal is still hot, even in the
back row. There's complimentary
champagne when they fly to
Houston, Las Vegas, Los Angeles,
San Francisco and non-stop to
New York and Washington
even in coach. And baggage
marked "handle with care," is
handled with care.
But we hear "National
Airlines, take me, I'm yours," for
other reasons, too.
Like our Birthday Fares.
They're our way of celebrating
America's 200th birthday. And
they let you fly everywhere we
fly for 15% -20%* less, round-trip.
All so you can see more of what
America's about for less.
Wherever National flies,
there's almost always a flight
going when you want to go. In-
cluding non-stop DC-10 service
to London.
And National thinks about
your vacation even before you do.
We call your travel agent's office
The Vacation Store because he's
stocked with hundreds of exciting
vacations all over the world.
We're doing so much to make
flying a breeze, people are saying
"Take me, I'm yours," over and
over. It underscores the fact that
three out of four of our passengers
have flown with us before.
Next time you're flying where
National flies, find out why so
many people are saying, "National
Airlines, take me, I'm yours."
For reservations call your
travel agent or National Airlines.
In Miami call 874-
5000. In Fort
Lauderdale and
Hollywood call
525-6601.
'There are advance purchase and
reservation requirements, restnctions
on travel duration and times.
National Airlines


Jewish Women &
An6 BReast CanceR ^4 i
ROSE KUSHNER. Breast Cancer: a personal
history and an investigative report. Harcourt
Brace Jovanovich, S10. 400 pp.
ROSE KUSHNER has written a very im-
portant book. "Breast Cancer" attempts to
alert all women to the importance of early detec-
tion and to get the best care possible pre- and
post-operative.
This not a book for doctors. It is for the
layperson, and Mrs. Kushner, a medical jour-
nalist, purports to inform women about all
surgical alternatives which she has found many
oncologists (cancer specialists) are not willing to
inform or perform.
SHE EMPHASIZES the importance of BSE
(Breast Self-Examination), and she charts breast
cancer risks for American women. Among those
in the high risk group are Jews of European an-
cestry, whereas Jews of North African or Asian
ancestries are in the low risk group. The point is
to help women determine their risk on the chart,
and thereby take advantage of finding a breast
cancer early enough to be cured.
Kushner has done extensive research, as in-
dicated by her bibliography, which has been
prepared with the average woman in mind. It
includes articles of substance and authority, but
which can be read and understood without a
medical background.
CHOOSING A doctor is of the utmost im-
portance, preferably aii oncologist a doctor
who deals exclusively with cancer patients; and
even more preferably one who deals with breast
cancer. Kushner is adamant on this point.
She insists that women who may have breast
cancer should see a cancer specialist and not rely
on family doctors or general surgeons to either
"wait and see" or to perform the surgery itself.
There are only twenty-two oncology or cancer
centers in the country. One of them is the
University of Miami School of Medicine.
"BREAST CANCER" has caused stirs this
year in the medical community for the reason that
the author challenges the quality of care women
receive in America. After comparing our
procedures with those in a variety of European
countries, she concludes that American women
with breast cancer are usually the victims of a
blind one-step biopsy-mastectomy procedure
they do not need.
Kushner provides the mastectomee with
personal observations and informative data on
post-operative recovery, a little discussed aspect
of breast cancer surgery: shopping for clothes;
and the psychological reactions of family and
friends. Kushner's expertise and interest in this
traumatic and oftimes shattering operation
comes from her own experience.
Upon going through a mastectomy herself, she
discovered the need to provide women with
certain basic information which she, as a medical
writer, could research, but which was and is not
easily forthcoming to most breast cancer
patients.
One out of every 15 women will develop a
breast cancer sometime in her life. "Breast
Cancer" is a significant step in helping women
determine, understand and be part of their fates
on the surgical table.
SegaC
Air picacy must Be en6e6
JEFFERSON'S FELICITOUS line, a
decent respect for the opinions of
mankind," has jumped out of historical context
these past few days for application to Israel's
miraculous rescue of 103 hostages at Uganda's
Entebbe International Airport.
To be sure. Israel has not won respect from the
national blocs that insist on treating the Jewish
State with disdain at all times; but it is en-
heartening to note that Chaim Herzog, Israel's
principal delegate to the UN, has reported that
among congratulatory messages pouring into
Jerusalem were several from countries that had
severed diplomatic relations with Israel because .
of Arab economic and political pressure.
PLAYWRIGHTS WILL be hard put to
fashion dramas more electrifying than Israel's
rescue in 53 minutes flat of innocent Jews
held prisoner by Arab and West German
terrorists who were assisted by Ugandan guards.
And for Americans marveling at the escapade,
the date of rescue carried an added satisfaction
the weekend of celebration of this nation's
Bicentennial.
Now the international community faces stern
challenges growing out of the latest skyjacking.
A secondary problem is to keep the record
straight about Uganda's share of responsibility
for the outrage. Far more important is the job of
putting a decisive end to jet-age kidnapping.
AS TO the minor issue: Uganda. The scorn
directed by officials of Kenya against Uganda's
president, General Idi Amin, should serve to
awaken other Third World leaders to the
hypocrisy and cruelty attending so many of
Amin's actions. Stung by Amin's sharp criticism
of any assistance neighboring Kenya may have
given the Israeli rescuers, the Nairobi govern-
ment has openly branded Amin "the world's
greatest dictator, a fascist, a warmonger, and a
sadist."
The statement out of Nairobi further assailed
the blustering Amin as a troublemaker "whose
meaning of leadership for the last five years has
been savagery, torture and mass murders of
innocent people."
BRANDED "a racist murderer" in the UN by
Daniel Patrick Moynihan last October, Amin has
to his shame put to death at least 100,000 of his
compatriots, according to the boasts of his own
ministers.
Of far more consequence than the sickening
matter of Gen. Amin's cruelty and duplicity is the
urgent call to the international community to get
on at last with a practical and effective plan for
frustrating potential hijackers, putting an end to
blackmail, designing techniques for rescuing
prisoners of the outlaws, and imposing sanctions
against nations that continue to cooperate with
this new breed of pirates.
ninety
minutes
at enteBBe
at
"VT'INETY MINUTES at Entebbe," announced by
J^l Paramount on July 12, based on the factual novel by Uri
Dan and William Stevenson, and written while the events of the
rescue operation by the daring Israeli commandos unravelled only a
week earlier, has a screenplay by Paddy Chayefsky with Sidney
Lumet set to direct. The book by Dan and Stevenson was published
by Bantam Books July 19.
In making the announcement, David V. Picker admitted that
the Paramount version will be the fourth picture dealing with the
freeing of the hijacked hostages from the Air France plane in
Uganda, but one based on extensive interviews with key Israeli and
military sources who were behind the Entebbe rescue mission.
UNIVERSAL STUDIOS came up with their project "Rescue
at Entebbe" within 24 hours after the news broke on the wire
service. Their epic is being produced and directed by George Roy
Hill, winner of an Academy Award for "The Sting," previously
lauded for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid." "Slaughter-
house Five" and "Hawaii."
Hill is just completing post-production at Universal on Slap
Shot" starring Paul Newman, but is already at work developing his
dramatization of the commando raid termed the most daring rescue
operation in recent military history.
ANOTHER FEATURE film is being planned by Murray
Schwartz, president of Merv Griffin Production, who by chance
happened to be on the hijacked Air France plane from Athens to
Paris. His epic is being labeled "Odyssey of 139" and should be the
most revealing one since he actually was a bystander to the crime of
the hijackers.
"Assault on Entebbe" is the title of a picture the enterprising
Elliott Kastner is preparing at this time. Producer of many suc-
cessful pictures, Kastner currently is represented on the screen
with "The Missouri Breaks," the Marlon Brando-Jack Nicholson
Western. Kastner employs the services of Shmuel Erde and Geoff
Berkin for the story with Erde joined by Kastner associate Jerry
Gershwin during the actual production of the film .
UNIVERSAL'S GEORGE Eckstein is producing a three hour
television film dealing with the shenanigans of the late U.S.
Senator Joseph E. McCarthy and his alleged relations with Joseph
Kennedy and Richard Nixon. NBC is televising the epic entitled.
"Tall Gunner Joe," budgeted at $1.5 million and written by Lane
Slate as a strange contribution to our Bicentennial. .
Lionel Stander, a near-victim of the McCarthy period of
hysteria and a voluntary exile for almost a quarter of a century.
makes his Hollywood comeback in Robert Chartoff and Irwin
Winkler's production for United Artists, "New York, New York."
thereby joining Liza Minelli who portrays the central character.
Stander plays the part of an artist's agent, almost the same type of
role for which he won an Oscar nomination in the Janet Gaynor-
Frederic March film, "A Star is Bom". .
HITLER RIDES AGAIN in the 20th Century-Fox television
spectacular, a three-hour epic for ABC written by Lionel Chetwynd
for executive producer Jack Haley. Jr. The teleplay is based on the
premise that Hitler was captured trying to escape from Berlin in
1945 and subsequently tried for war crimes by an international
court of justice. The intriguing yarn, from a story idea by Haley
and Ronald Lyon, is titled "The Capture and Trial of Adolf Hitler
It will do well in Germany. .
Bette Midler, who rose to fame in the Broadway product ion of
"Fiddler on the Roof." then dazzled theater and concert audiences
with her renditions of the 1940s, '50s and '60s song hits, and is
today the top singer headlining in nightclubs and television as the
nation's top moneymaker in the recording field, has gone Holly-
wood. She is opening an office at the Burbank studios and
developing her own screenplays fashioned by her and her
production executive Aaron Russo. .
LEE STRASBERG, the almost legendary head of Acton
Studio, upon return from his motion picture assignment in
"Cassandra Crossing" abroad, has joined 20th Century-Fox TV
and Four Star International in a joint production deal to present
series of major plays on Broadway.
Page 10-A +Jewist flcrktton Friday. August 6.1976

OiveRtinq Attention to the Sins of OtheRs
ONE MAN who certainly would have approved
the Israeli action was Thomas Jefferson. He
wrote the Declaration of Independence, which was
adopted on July 4, and he no doubt would have been
very pleased at the saving of the innocent hostages
from the hijackers on that day. What better way could
there be for celebrating the day dedicated to "life,
liberty and the pursuit of happiness?"
Jefferson knew all about these hijackers. In his day,
it flourished in the same section of the world as today.
It was highly popular among the so-called Barbery
states Algeria, Tunis, Morocco and Tripoli. Any ship
^Dai/id Scfcu/artg
going through the Mediterranean faced the likelihood of
its crew and passengers being kidnapped and held for
ransom unless regular tribute was paid to the Barbery
states.
THE BARBARY hijackings were not ended until
1815, when Commodore Decatur paid a visit to Algeria
and taught it the kind of lesson Uganda has just
received.
Some at the United Nations say that while the
rescuing of the hostages is to be commended, the Israeli
action was an aggression against the sovereignty of an
independent state, and so it is to be condemned.
Actually, the beauty of the Israeli action lies in this
very thing. It is the governments who allow
hijackers to land and function on their soil who are as
culpable as the hijackers. They make the hijacking
possible. Without the government sanction, most of
them would find it impossible to operate.
In the case of Idi Amin, the collusion between his
government and the hijackers is more palpable. Amin
has not only praised Hitler, but imitated him in his
killing of thousands of his own people.


Friday, August 6, 1976
+Jewish fhrk/iain
i Page 11-A
Hail Decision Against Executive Suite Bias
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
The Philadelphia Chapter of
the American Jewish Committee
has hailed what it termed "a
landmark agreement" between
the Pennsylvania Human Re-
lations Commission and the
Provident Mutual Life Insurance
Company, a major national in-
surance company with head-
quarters in Philadelphia.to
broaden the involvement of Jews
in the management of that
company.
The agreement under which
Provident Mutual will start an
affirmative action program
stemmed from a complaint
Rule Air Force GFs
May Wear Beards
WASHINGTON (JTA) A. U.S. District Court has
ruled that the U.S.Air Force has no right to penalize personnel
who wear beards for religious reasons.
Judge Aubrey E. Robinson, Jr. handed down this decision
in directing the Air Force to reinstate Lt. Col. Mitchell D.
(ieller. an Orthodox rabbi, to his former status as an active
reserve chaplain and give him all promotions due him since
1972 and back pay since 1973.
GELLER, who lives in Nor-
wich. Conn., said when he joined
(he Air Force in 1950, he did not
feel a religious obligation to wear
a beard. But when his father died
in 1966, he felt he then did have a
personal obligation to do so. For
is years he was not challenged.
Hut then the commander of
Uestover Air Force Base in
Massachusets ordered Geller to
shave off his beard, he refused
and subsequently was reassigned
t" inactive reserve status.
Geller sued the Secretary of
! lefense and the Secretary of the
\ir Force, charging his First
\mendment right to freedom of
religion was being violated.
MIS LAWYER. Nathan
Lewin, called it ironic that the
Air Force appointed Geller for
World's Oldest Profession
Alive, Doing Very Well
IKRUSALKM (JTA) The worlds oldest profession
is flourishing in Israel where prostitutes can earn up to IL 1.000
labout $130) a day. according to Hebrew University researcher
I >r. \lenahem Amir, who gave a learned lecture on the subject
on ,i radio economics program here.
Street walkers with a strong work ethic accommodate 12 to
i") clients a day. Amir said. Higher class call girls take fewer
clients but charge much more, he said.
AMIR REPORTED that according to police figures, there
id to 800 known prostitutes working in Tel Aviv. Israel's
largest city.
In Jerusalem, the second largest, only about 80 are known
i" ixilice. and in the third largest city, Haifa, there are no more
than 40 although Haifa is Israel's main port visited by seamen
from all over the world.
Israeli prostitutes might well be the envy of their sisters in
other parts of the globe. Only 15 to 20 percent have pimps.
Most of the girls keep all of their earnings for themselves. Amir
said,
brought by the AJCommittee
chapter together with the Jewish
Employment Vocational Service
of Philadelphia, charging that the
insurance company had dis-
criminated against Jews in its
hiring and promotion policies, es-
pecially at executive levels.
THE HUMAN Relations
Commission found probable
cause in the complaint, and the
insurance company, without ad-
mitting any violation of the State
Human Relations Act, agreed to
initiate an affirmative action
program to remedy the situation.
Michael Steinig, chairman of
the AJCommittee chapter's
executive advisory program, in a
letter to Joseph X. Yaffe, chair-
person of the Commission,
stated: "To the best of our
knowledge, this is the first case of
its kind in the country where a
Human Relations Commission
has found a pattern of exclusion
with regard to Jews existing in a
company and entered into an
affirmative action program with
that company to remedy the
situation
"It is our hope, and indeed
expectation, that the process
worked out in this instance can
serve as a precedent in the battle
against 'executive suite' dis-
crimination that has plagued the
Jewish community for decades."
STEINIG, in a separate state-
ment, pointed out that, as part of
the agreement with the Human
Relations Commission, Provident
Mutual had "agreed to notify all
employes of the existence of the
agreement, reaffirm its nondis-
criminatory policy, advertise in
media specifically directed
toward the Jewish community,
and conduct management
seminars for officers and lper-
visors once a year emphasizing
its equal employment op-
portunity policy with regard to
Jewish persons."
The AJCommittee expressed
some reservation with regard to a
portion of the agreement in which
the company stated it would
"make every good faith effort"
through its hiring, transfer,
retention and / or promotion
procedures to achieve at least a
5.3 percent representation of
Jewish persons in its total officer
work force, and nine percent
Jewish persons in several of its
top job classifications by June,
1979.
STENIG stressed the AJCom-
mittee's concern that "in the
process of broadening the in-
volvement of Jews in the
management of the company, the
percentage figures not become
quotas.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee is not opposed to goals
and timetables except when they
lead to quotas."
religious purposes as a chaplain
but was trying to "prevent that
religious leader's exercise of his
religious obligation."
The Air Force contended Geller
"must accept the fact that as a
military officer he must adhere to
the Air Force appearance and
dress standards" and that it was
requiring no more or less of him
than is required of other members
of the Air Force.
In upholding Geller's claim.
Robinson ruled that the court is
persuaded by the record that
'the wearing of beards, although
not required, is a well-established
religious tradition among
members of the Jewish faith."
and that Geller "wore his beard
in furtherance of that religious
practice."
Federation Wins Grant to Aid Asians
CHICAGO (JTA) The
Jewish Federation of
Metropolitan Chicago has been
awarded a $90,000 contract from
the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW) to
find and upgrade jobs for Indo-
Chinese refugees in the Chicago
area, it was announced by
Richard E. Friedman. HEW
regional director and James P.
Rice, executive vice president of
the Jewish Federation.
The Federation will subcon-
tract with five other voluntary
social service agencies ex-
perienced in the resettlement of
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refugees to provide a team ap-
proach to job finding and
development, vocational coun
seling and training.
The agencies are: Lutheran
Child and Family Service.
Catholic Charities of Chicago,
Travelers Aid of Metropolitan
Chicago, the Jewish Family and
Community Service, and the
Jewish Vocational Service of
Chicago.
THE CONTRACT calls for
hiring of two vocational coun-
selor-job developers for the
Jewish Vocational Service and
the Catholic Charities: a skill
training coordinator with the
Jewish Vocational Service, four
social workers attached to each of
four of the agencies, and part-
time interpreters. The contract
runs from July 15, 1976, to
July 14. 1977.
The project will operate with
the cooperation of the Illinois
Department of Public Aid and
the Illinois Governor's Indo-
chinese Resettlement Office. The
resettlement office is a new one
established to supervise reset-
tlement in Illinois.
Friedman said the project is
designed to provide whatever
supportive services may be
needed by individual refugees to
remove them from welfare rolls
and to help them be self-sufficient
and self-supporting.
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Page12-A
Mm ist> fkr/kfian
Friday, August 6. 197g
Fight Shapes Up Over Health Insurance
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
compulsory national health
insurance bill that will not take
effect before April 1978 has
already stirred a bitter battle
between proponents and op-
ponents of the measure.
The opposition is not against
the principle of national health
insurance but to the contents of
the draft measure approved last
week by the Knesset's Public
Services Committee.
THE BILL would introduce
compulsory health insurance
through any one of the existing
health funds, most of which are
affiliated with political parties
and the largest of all, run by
Histadrut. It is expected to pass
its final reading before the
Knesset adjourns for summer
recess at the end of July.
The bill in its present form is
supported by the Labor Align-
ment and the Rakah Communist
Party.
Most other parties oppose it
for a variety of reasons and their
opposition has been strengthened
by the Israel Medical
Association, the Pharmacists
Association and other large
groups in the medical and health
fields.
Large advertisements critical
of the measure appear daily in the
press.
ONE OF the main points of
controversy is the establish-
ment of compulsory insurance
through existing funds rather
than a State-financed in-
dependent health service. Critics
say that the existing funds are
inefficient and that the State-run
Institute of Social Insurance can
provide the same services at a
fraction of the cost.
The proposed bill would have
the Minister of Health determine
the premiums. Opponents want a
public council to make that
decision.
But the greatest opposition
has been engendered by the bill's
failure to guarantee that a sub-
scriber who wishes to leave one
fund for another will not be sub-
ject to reprisals from the health
fund he is quitting.
UNDER THE present system,
a worker cannot benefit from the
Histadrut medical services unless
he is a member of Histadrut and
if he is a member he is required to
subscribe to the Histadrut sick
fund.
Under the proposed measure, a
worker may transfer to another
fund at six-month intervals but
has no guarantee that if he does
so, he will not suffer sanctions at
the hands of the giant trade
union federation.
The Independent Liberal
Party, a coalition partner, has
threatened to vote against the
bill unless guarantees are written
into it. Most observers expect the
draft to be revised several times
before it is implemented nearly
two years from now.
Pitch for Aliyand and How UJA Solon Sees It
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) It
is not common to hear from a
leading American Jewish giver
and fund-raiser a hard sell
"pitch" for aliya. That kind of
talk has traditionally been left to
the "organized Zionist"
leadership, while the United
Jewish Appeal men have quietly
gotten on with the job of raising
the funds to pay for whole areas
of social and educational en-
deavor which the Israel govern-
ment itself simply cannot afford
to cover.
But things are changing, said
Stanley Sloane of New Jersey,
one of the UJA's 15 national
chairmen and a shrewd and
sophisticated observer of the
trends of Jewish history.
IT WAS Pinhas Sapir. who. as
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization, first called for the
challenge of aliya to be trans-
ferred from the sole "jurisdiction
of Israel" into the hands and
responsibility of diaspora com-
munities themselves.
Some moves in that direction
have already been made. But
first, of course, the need for the
change has to percolate through
to the awareness and conviction
of the diaspora leadership and
particularly of the American
Jewish leaders, Sloane observed.
This, he believes, is what is in
fact happening at this present
time and he saw convincing
evidence of it at the Jewish
Agency Assembly held here last
week.
"WE AMERICANS came
away with the conclusion that it's
up to us to get involved in aliya
... to exhort our fellow citizens
. and to act in a practical way
to turn exhortation into
realization ," he said. The
Zionist proponents of aliya,
urging others to go but not
showing the example themselves,
have been positively detrimental
to aliya, Sloane said, referring to
the leaders of the various large
American Zionist organizations
His own recommendation it
is still in the form of general,
personal thoughts that have been
running through his mind is
for the American Jewish leader-
ship to "identify the people who
are the potential for aliya" and to
encourage them, materially and
morally, to make the move to
Israel.
The aliya potential, Sloane
observed, is among the estimated
two million urban American
Jews. About one-half of these are
elderly, but the others are the
obvious reservoir for an initial
mass movement of American
olimto Israel.
THESE URBAN Jews,
usually in the middle or lower-
middle income brackets, are
struggling constantly to make a
living, and at the same time face
worsening problems of ecology
and quality of life.
Eventually and for most of
them within the next decade
the need to make a physical
relocation will become pressing.
Their options as they see them
are to hop over to a nearby neigh-
borhood, moving piecemeal away
from negative social influences,
or to make the more difficult
move to suburbia, where life is
more expensive.
The task facing American
Jewry. Sloane stated with
conviction, is to persuade these
young urban Jewish families,
many of them only loosely af-
filiated with organized Jewry.
that they have a third option:
Israel.
PART OF this persuasion
must be in the form of material
arrangements efficiently made
and adequately explained for
their settlement and absorption
in Israel. A moderate success
say in the realm of two percent
annually would mean 20.000
American Jews to Israel each
year. And that would be just a
start.
As throughout Jewish history.
migration movements are begun
by the economically weak but
the more affluent quickly catch
on and follow suit. Sloane ob-
served. This was the case when
mass Eastern European Jewish
immigration hit America. First it
was the poor but the more
affluent quickly followed.
Thus. Sloane observed, the
successful absorption of a
substantial number of urban
American Jews in Israel would
certainly catalyze an aliya
process among young suburban
Jewish families who would
come in even greater numbers
and would need much less in the
way of material aid and support.
THE ALIYA of say half a
School Board Integrates School
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) The
Board of Education of North
York, a borough within Metro-
politan Toronto, has voted un-
animously to integrate part of a
Jewish day school into its struc-
ture and pay all costs. The in-
tegration will take place in
September if the province's
Ministry of Education gives
approval.
This move, which may be a
historic one. culminates negotia-
tions, campaigns and discussions
which have been going on for
vears to obtain tax aid for the
Joseph Hoffman, longtime Pioneer Women supporter, recently
was honored for faithful service and financial aid to the
organization. Mrs. Harriet Green, president of the South
Florida Council of Pioneer Women, presented the plaque to
Hoffman at an awards luncheon at the Eden Roc Hotel.
s.
on
rew
tit 3baJ<
ent\
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11 "01 S.W. 74th Ave.
Call: 253-2300
3 Years through 8th Grade
Traditional Judaica Studies
AU Certified Teachers
Comprehensive English Program
Individualized Instruction
The Academy admits students
of any race, color and
national or ethnic origin.
Jewish day school and alleviate
the heavy burden on Jewish (lav-
school parents whose full tuition
fee for such schooling has been
$1,525 per year and who pay
school taxes as well.
THE PROPOSAL is regarded
as an experiment and will affect
grades 7, 8 and 9 in effect, the
400 pupils of the Junior High
School of the Associated Hebrew
Schools, one of Canada's largest
Jewish all-day schools.
During the two-year ex-
periment this Jewish junior high
school will be treated the same as
all other North York public
schools, with the teachers receiv-
ing regular North York salaries,
and with the same student-
teacher ratio and the same sup-
port services such as health.
Hebrew-languages courses will
be considered as part of the
general curriculum. Purely relig-
ious studies, however, will be
given after official hours and will
be paid for out of Jewish com-
munity funds. No fees will be
paid by students.
It has not yet been announced
which studies will be considered
"Hebrew-language" and which
"religious." Because the school is
part of the public system, chil-
dren of all faiths will be admitted
providing they are willing to
accept the Hebrew part of th<
curriculum.
RECEPTION OF the news has
not been unanimous. The
Toronto Star, the country's
largest daily, last week headed an
editorial with the caption "A
Jewish School is No Public
School."
It criticized the plan as
"merely a method of opening the
door to public funding of private
schools" and advising the
minister of education "to reject
it."
North York, a populous suburb
within Metropolitan Toronto,
contains about 75-80 percent of
Toronto's Jewish population.
Jews constitute about 20 percent
of the borough's population.
million Jews from America to
Israel. Sloane said, far from
weakening the U.S. Jewish
community, would actually
strengthen it.
Sloane is similarly bold and
sweeping when he surveys the
UJA's current situation. The
time has come, in terms of Jew ish
need, for American Jewry to step
up the giving," he said firmly
"We have come up in a relatively
short time from fifty million to
five hundred million dollar- a
year Now we must state our
aim: one billion dollars a year
. and having stated it. e
must strive to attain it."
The aim must be achieved
within "a few years" and it
can be achieved. Sloane is con
v inced. if UJA broadens its front
"Frank Lautenberg (I IA
general chairman) was right
when he spoke of UJA giving as
self-taxation I want to add to
that the need for tax reform.
Sloane said. "We have to reach
more people while at the same
time maintaining the level ol
intensity of our operations
HE ESTIMATED that UJA
reaches presently just less than
half of all American Jews. But
only half of them give
"responsibly." he said. "We
must get up to fifty percent
responsible giving among all
American Jews."' Sloane
asserted. He did not quantify
"responsibility" in dollars and
cents terms.
As a national chairman, and an
able fundraiser. Sloane is called
upon by national UJA on the
average of once a fortnight to fly
off to some other town it can
be anywhere in the U.S. and
make a major solicitation.
When Pinhas Sapir was
Finance Minister and later the
chairman of the Jewish Agency
he would often take Sloane with
him on his whirlwind fund-raising
missions which could last three or
four hectic days.
HIS OWN method. Sloane
said, is to work towards a
moment of intense, almost an-
guished silence during the
soliciting conversation.
This is the moment, he knows,
when the man he is visiting is
digging deep into his own soul
and circumstances, coming to
terms with his various conflicting
considerations: Jewishness.
family needs, business com-
mitments. Sloane and other top
fundraisers can help often by
citing their own personal gifts
and efforts by way of example -
but ultimately each man must
make this decision himself, he
said.


Friday, August 6,1976
*Jeni) fkridTftun
Page 13-A
Herzog Says Free World Can Help Lawmakers Want Assurances
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Chaim Herzog, Israels
Ambassador to the United
Nations, observed here that the
Western bloc emerged united
from the debate in the Security
Council on the Israeli rescue
operation in Uganda, while the
Area Rabbis Named
To Seminary Board
Kabbis Mayer Abramowitz
and Irving Lehrman have been
elected i> the board of overseers
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America.
Rabbis Abramowitz and Lehr-
man will represent the Rabbinical
tssemblv, the professional
organization of Conservative
rabbis, on the board, the national
las consultative body for the
seminary,
African bloc and its Communist
and Arab supporters were
divided to the point where the
Africans had to withdraw their
anti-Israel resolution.
Interviewed on W ABC-TV
"Eyewitness News," Herzog
stressed that international
terrorism can be defeated only by
a concerted effort of the free
world.
HE SAID that the free world
countries should boycott any
country that supports terrorism
in any way. The Israeli envoy
accused Libya of being the
"paymaster" of international
terrorism.
He said that Libya can be
pressured on this subject by
countries which have economic
and political relations with it by
severing all relations with Libya
until it stops its support of terror.
Herzog disclosed that many
African delegates privately con-
gratulated Israel during the
Security Council debate on the
spectacular rescue mission at En-
tebbe Airport in Uganda.
"THE FEELING that we
got," Herzog said, "was that
Africa can no longer tolerate
President Idi Amin."
Asked why 20 Ugandan
soldiers were killed during the
rescue operation, Herzog said
they were killed because they
guarded the hostages.
He said that Mrs. Dora Bloch,
the 75-year-old missing hostage,
who is presumed to be dead, is a
victim of international terrorism.
He added that if the Ugandan
authorities are in control of
Uganda as they claim, they must
know what happened to Mrs.
Bloch.
Kreisky Cries for Cronies
Continued from Page 4-A
maneuvers by which he achieved
the legalization of anarchy and
the approval of genocide.
The Chancellor born a Jew
Bruno Kreisky may reeom-
mend that we forget Wolfgang
Wick may prefer that we forget.
The hundreds of neo-Nazis scat-
tered about the world today may
i xpect us to forget. But senti-
ment to the contrary must
prevail in the end.
Those members of Rotary who
vowed they could not forget and
insisted that Wick's identifi-
cation with the SS precluded final
consideration of this election as
world leader of Rotary deserve
full credit for adhering to a
precious principle.
THE SS was not just another
squad of Hitler's skillfully or-
ganized machinery for conquest.
Heinrich Himmler, shrewd archi-
tect of Jewish destruction, was
Hitler's ultimate choice as com-
mander-in-chief of the SS. That
body came eventually to
dominate Germany, to terrorize
anti-Nazis in many lands, to
serve as Hitler's and Himmler's
battering ram against defenseless
Jews.
In Brian Connell's "A Watcher
on the Rhine," the author asserts
that he was not disturbed so
much by the 40 percent of the
Germans who followed Hitler as
by the 60 percent who tolerated
him.
"In the whole of my years in
Germany." he writes. "I do not
think I have heard more than half
a dozen honestly admitted con-
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Olympics will be Politics-Free
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Soviet Union was called
upon last Thursday in both
Houses of Congress for
assurances against politicization
of the Olympic Games scheduled
for Moscow in 1980.
Criticizing Canada's stand
against Taiwan in the current
Montreal Games, Sen. James B.
Pearson (R., Kans.l asked in a
Senate speech whether the
Canadian precedent would form a
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the Israelis at the request of the
Arabs" or the West Germans by
the East Germans or the United
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"I URGE both the Inter-
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pics," Pearson, a member of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, said.
"If the Soviet Union should
decide, for whatever reason, to
refuse any athletic team per-
mission to participate, then the
IOC should select an alternative
site for the games.
In the House, Rep. William S.
Bromfield (R., Mich.), ranking
minority member on the House
International Relations Com-
mittee, spoke of the "ugliness of
international terrorism injected
into the Olympiad" in Munich
four years ago when 11 Isiatli
athletes were murdered and
"further debasing" of the
"Olympic ideal by permitting
political considerations to dictate
standards of eligibility" in
Montreal.
"One would hope," Bromfield
said, "that the Soviets will honor
and abide by their commitment
to the IOC and not attempt to
exercise restraint or control over
the participants."
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Page 14-A
*Jen ist> fkrkHan
Friday, August 6.1976
LEOAL NOTICE
WOTtCE tTafTJEu:
LEGAL NOTICE
LEOALI NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
GUARDIAN MORTGAGE COR- '
POR ATI ON at 717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables. Fla., Intend* to register
mid name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florid*
ASHIN. INC.
,_____________July 30; Aug. 8, IS, JO
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
THE BISCAYNE BUILDING at 19 W.
Flagler St Miami. Fla 33130 Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
DANTE M FIORINI
7/16-33-30 v
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of H. 8. PHARMACAL CO. at 3505
N W 112th Street. Miami. Florida
331(7. Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
HOYT A SMITH ENTERPRISES.
INC
// Hovt A Smith. President
GAIItl'T A GALBUT
711 Washington Ave
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorneys for HoVT A
ENTERPRISES. INC
SMITH
16-23-30
R/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious names
of ENERGY CONSERVATION
GROUP; ENERGY CONSERVATION
PROOrCTS: ENERGY CONSERVA-
TION SYSTEMS at 1131 NE 175
St.. N Miami Beach. Florida 33162. in-
tends to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv Florida
MARK-STEVEN INTERNATIONAL
INC A Fla Corn.
J/1S-23-30: .. f
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
noUce la hereby given that the un-
dersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of T
A T Advertising at 3041 NW 7th Street
(Suite 101). Miami. Fla 33128 Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida
TOBY TULIP INC .
a Florida Corporation CHARLESB
FOLDS. PRESIDENT
_____________________July 23. 30; Aug. 6. 13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
TOBY A TULIP at 3041 NW 7th Street
(Suite 100). Miami. Florida 33126 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florid*
TOBY A TULIP. INC.,
a Florid* corporation
CHARLES B FOLDS. President
,___________ July 23,30; Aug. 6.13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE I* HEREBY OD/EN th*t the
underatgne*\ desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
ADVEKTURsI PRESS, ADVENTURE
DESIGNS INTERNATIONAL AD-
VENTURE tWATING AND 8UP-
PLTES.at lease West Dixie Highway.
Miami. Florida, intends to register said
name* with she Clark of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
KENNETH J RISCH
Juiy-33. SO; Aug. 6,13
IN THE eiftCUtT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DA0E COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 7-2122
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of;
ROSA MAE CLINTON Wife,
and GEORGE ROBERT GLINTON.
HuabawC
TO GEORGE KOIIERT GLINTON
(Residence t'nknownl
TOI' ARE HEREBY notified that,
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against vou and vou
are hereby reqiilreu I" serve a cot of
your answer or other uleadlng to the
Petition on the Wife's Attonev. HAR-
VEY P ROGERS, whose address Is
1454 N W IT Avenue. Miami. Florida
33125. and file the original with the
Clerk of tee shove stvled Court on or
before this 20th d:iv of August. 1976.
or a ("fault will l- entered sgalnsl
VOS).
DATED this Mh day of Julv. 197*
ItlCHARD P. BRISKER |
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv WILLIE HRADSHAW JR
7,16-23-30 S/<
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
OAK RIDGE FARMS at 6100 SW 125
Ave.. Miami. Fla intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Flrlda.
LESLIE SHAROFF
LAWRENCE S KATZ
Attornev for Apllicant
7/16-23-30 8/
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUITCOURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 74-2232*
DIVORCE SUIT NOTICE
In Re The Marriage of
BARBARA MUELLE. Wife,
And. JOSE M. MUELLE. Husband
YOU. JOSE M. MUELLE. Calle 36
No. 40-39. Barranqullla. Colombia, take
Notice that a suit for divorce (marriage
dissolution) has been filed against you
by your wife, and You are required by
Law to Pile an Answer or paper with the
undersigned Clerk and send s copy
thereof ot lawyer JOSEPH C.
LAUSSEL. ESQ.. 12683 NW 7 Avenue,
Miami, Florida, not later than Sep-
tember 8, 1976. otherwise a Default will
be entered as provided for by the
Florid* SUtutes. DATED: July 21, 1976
Richard P. Brlnker.
Clerk of the Court.
By A. CRUTCHER. DC.
July 30; Aug. 6, 13.20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
CENTURY MACHINE TOOLS at 2818
NE 188 St.. N Miami Beach. Fla. 33160.
intends to register said name with the
cu-rk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
CALIBRATED INSTRUMENTS. INC
a Florida Corp.
Leon A. Epstein
Attorney for applicant
____________________July 30; Aug 6. 13.20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
'lie undersianed, desiring t" engage in
business under the fictitious name of
GALGREEN. a partnership .it 19J9-
1 !*.".! North Glades I 'rtv. North Miami
Ueach. Florida intend < register said
with tiie Clerk of the Circuit
Curt of Dade Countv. Florida
HYMAN P GALBUT
BESSIE D. GA13DT
HOWARD X. GALBUT
M.\l;\ IN GKKHNWALD
EDITH GREENWALD
GALBUT A GALBUT
21 u Rxhingti Avenue
Miami n. ri i Florida
Alt..I IK \ foi
n MJlREEX .. nartn< rshln
; '16.23. '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN th.it
the undersianed. d< Hiring to enaaae in
business under the fictitious name of
GALMEN, partnershlo al 32.....*an
Drive. Minmi Reach. Florida 13133 m-
dend to register cald name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
<"ountv. Florida
HYMAN P. GALBUT
BESSIE I' GALBUT
HOWARD N GALIHT
BARKY MENIN
MIRIAM MENIN
GAI BIT A GALBUT
721 Washington Ave
Miami Bench. Florida 33139
Attorneys for
GALMEN. a partnership
7/16-23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 7*4860
IN RE; ESTATE OF
GERSONSTEIN
Deceased
NOTKTE OP ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
GERSON STEIN, deceased, File
Number 76-4860, Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida,
rebate Division, the address of which
is 73 W Flagler St.. Miami. Florida The
personal representative of the estate is
ZEV W. KOGAN. whose address Is 420
Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach, Florida. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
igalnst the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount clal ned. If
the claim is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated. If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk lo mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or juris-
diction of the court
M.l. claims DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT so FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Hale of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration July 30, 1976
ZEVW) KOGAN
\t I 'er-sonal Representative of the
Batata of GERSON STEIN
I iei eased
ATTORNEY For PERSONAL
REPRESENTATn E
Rotnenberg, Kogan,
KomblumA Benjamin
ISO Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach. Florida
Bj /.e\ u Kogan
Telephone 5.14 1
________________________Julv.10. All*; l".
/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE JS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underssgaMKl. eaaliaig to engage in
huetnsea under the fictitious name of
NATIONAL CITIZENS RADIO
A8SOCIATJD*! at 1417 Opa Locks
Blvd.. N. Miami PI* intends to
register said name wttk the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
ROBERT TANNEY
July 13. SO: Aug. 6.13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTKTaVM HEREBY GIVEN that
the undo Italia 6. desiring to engage in
business WSMBT the fictitious names of
C E L lTBc.EUU *t 15300 P*l-
snet'o laSa Drive. Miami. Florid*
U.1S7 Inteass* to rearhrter said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
UtoS 4% LEARKINO, INC
MleaMi J
Attorney
l/MUtt-W
/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
CIRCE ART CREATIONS and
CHARMS at 13038 N.W. 7th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33168 intends to regis-
ter said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
OONTINENTA1. INVBSTMENT
ENTERPRISES INC
Michael J Freeman. Baa
Attornev for Applicant
7/16-23-30 8/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 76-17473
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
(STEP-PARENT)
IN RE: THE PETITION OF ADOP-
TION
OF A MINOR
BY: DAVID FREDDY LONDON.
Petitioner.
TO: Henry Boswell Lucien
9 Tuft Street
Somervllle, Massachusetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Petition of a Minor by
David Freddy London has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defense*, if
any, to It on Alvln Goodman, attorney
tor Petitioner, whose address Is 8688
Sunset Drive. Suite 180. Miami. Florida
S314S. and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
August 19th. 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for tour consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLO RID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
aid court at Miami. Florida on this 16th
day of July. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florid*
By BARBARA ROBERSON
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
AMn Goodman
8666 Sunset Drive. Suite ISO
Miami. Flo rids 33143
SfMM
Attorney tor Petitioner
July 23.10; Aug 6, II
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 74-3271
Division: BLANTON, J
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LESTER O. GOLDSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
LESTOR O. GOLDSTEIN, deceased.
Pile Number 76-3278. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is 73 W Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33128. The personal representative of
the estate is RUTH M GOLDSTEIN,
whose address Is 2371 Collins Avenue.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or at-
torney, and the amount claimed. If the
claim is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated. If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OP THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: July 80. 1976.
SRITHM GOLDSTEIN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of
LESTERO GOLDSTEIN, Deceased
ATTORNEY POR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY M WAITZKIN
740 71st Street
Miami Beach, Florida 83141
Telephone: 866-0663
July SC; Aug. 6 ,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-23304
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EMILIOCERVERA.
PETITIONER,
and
VITERVA CERVERA.
RESPONDENT.
TO: Mrs VltervaCervera
Last known residence
Is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to it on GLADYS
GERSON. ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 101 NW
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Sep-
tember 3. 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 27th
day of July. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
HvC P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
STONE. SOSTCHIN A KOSS PA
l"l NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
_____ July 30. Aug. 6. 13. 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-21471
NOTICE OF ACTION
OF ADOPTION
IN RE
ADOPTION BY
RICARDOENRlgl'E SERRANO
of a minor male child
TO Rolando Jimenez
Caparra Terrace
San Juan, Puerto Rico
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition
for ADOPTION of your minor son has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defense, If any. to it on GLADYS
GERSON. ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 101 NW
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. and
file the original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before Sep-
tembers. 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive weeks In
the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
Court at Miami. Dade County, Florida
on this 26th day of July. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A CRUTCHER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN A KOSS. P A
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorneys for Petitioner
July 30; Aug 6. 13.20
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C IRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-231*3
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CHRISTINE FIERRO.
Petitioner/Wife.
and
SALVATORE FIERRO,
Respondent / Husband.
TO: SALVATORE FIERRO
6610 Duryea Court
Brooklyn. New YorK
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on ANTONIO J.
PINEIRO, JR attorney for Petitioner.
whose address Is AGUDO, ANTON A
PINEIRO, 1647 SW 27 Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33143. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on or
before Sept 3. 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 26th
day of July. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Antonio J. Pineiro. Jr
AGUDO, ANTON A PINEIRO
1647 SW 27th Avenue
Miami. Florid* 33140
Attorney for Petitioner
Ph No. (306)854 2643. .
July 30; Aug. 6.13. SO
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THr
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-21472
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISIOK
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARIA ROSARIO JARA
DE DAVALOS
WIfe-Petltloner
and
RUBEN DAVALOS.
Husband-Respondent
TO: RUBEN DAVALOS
377 JUAN DAVALOS
Dlstrlto San Juan de Mlra Plow
i hi.lad de Dlos. Lima. Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIPIEP
that an action for Dissolution of M .-
rlage has been filed against vou
vou are reaulred to serve a com
your written defenses. If any to it .,,
MAX A. OOLDFARB. attornev for
Petitioner, whose address is 1!' \\. m
Flagler Street. Room 818. Miami
Florida 33130. and file the original
with the clerk of the above itvlerl
rourt on or before August 20.
otherwise a default will be enti
against vou for the relief demand, ,1
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
eaeh week for four consecutive \\.-ks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the .-.
said court at Miami. Florida on I
1.1th day of July. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Hv c P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
iCircuit Court Sealt
MAX A OOLDFARB
IS West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida .1113"
Attornev for Petitioner
7 16-23-3" i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUI'
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-21484
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE TIIE MARRIAGE OF
i mm \ BEN POR ADO de S1DI
anil
JACOBO BENADAVA SUM
T< I: Jacobo Benadava Sldl
Carlos Animate T* :"
Santiago. Chile
South Am. rli i
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIKI'
thai an action f..r Dissolutlot f M
riagi in- been filed again.t vou
\<-u ar. reaulred t*. servi .. (
i.ur written defensei if anv. to It i
I...UI- II .Mailman, attorney for I '
tlnni r 'a h n. ad.in ss is 4o" Li-
Itoad Miami Beach Florida
and file the original uith tli.
the shovi styled court on m I
luinisl '." 1976; otherwise .. del
\v ill be entered against v<"U for Ih- -
lief demanded in the complaint
tltlon
WITNESS n>\ hand and th<
Maid court at Miami Florida i
!2th -lav of Julv. 1971
ItlCHARD P RKINKER
\- Clerk Circuit Coort
Dade Countv. Florida
n\ M KLIMIXSK1
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Cln Uit Court Seali
7 16-33-30 i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-21473
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE <>F
i\ in VELE2.
('tit loner.
BLANCA I VELEZ
Respondent
TO Rlanca I Veles
l.ast known residence i>
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFTEP
lhal an action for Dissolution of v r
':.a'. has been filed aaraln*! vou
yon are required t. aerv< a "i>\ '
'"Ur written defenses, if anv !
GLADYS GER80N. attornev foi I
utioner. whose address is I"! N \\
12 th Avenue. Miami. Florid*
anil file the original with the clerk of
the Above styled court on or befori
Aug 2". 1976; otherwise a default
u ill be entered against VOU foi '
relief demanded in the complaint or
... tuion
This notice shall be publish*
ai h week for four consecutive week*
in THE JEWISH FIjORIIMAN
WITNESS mv hand and th- w il
-aid court at Miami. Florida i
12th dav of Julv 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Ilv WILLIE BHAHSHAW JK
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court s. ai.
stunk SOSTCHIN A KOSS F"
101 N \V 12th Avenue
Miami Florida 31131
Attornev for Petition* r
T 16-23-3"

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned desiring li I naat
business under the fletitious nani.
TROJAN PARK INVESTMENTS ,.l
I'alm Avenue llialeah. Fla I
tend to register s:,,,l num. uith thi
Clerk of Ih.' Circuit Curt of I
Countv. Florida
King Rich (Individual!' A a- truste.
SherM Rleh. Alan Kurtwell. Suet.'I.
Kurswell Martin Kurswell. Bhlrlri
Kurcueil. Elaine I.vnn Kurwweil
\- ll.avard Km Kuriweil
Morton II Selgel.
Attorney for antiicnnts
7/l-J-3 '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN '
the undersigned, di siring to rncagi in
business under the fictitious nami
THE EYEGLASS factory al '
Washington Ave Miami Beach ria
33133 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of th. Circuit Cnurl
Dade Countv Florida
ROBERTS CHEMICALCO.. IN'
: ictl-sa > <




Friday. August 6. 1976
Jewistfhrid/ain
Page 15-A
For Russianologists, Two
Studies Of Stalin, Trotsky
By BORIS SMOLAR
Two books one on Stalin
nd the other on Trotsky have
ust appeared in this country
rritten by the same author. The
uthor is Joel Carmichael, an
ckknowledged expert on old and
odern Russia. whose
Illustrated History of Russia"
considered a classic.
Both volumes constitute
rofound studies of the charac-
rs of each of the two Com-
unist leaders. They are also
rt of the background which led
inner quarrels within the
ommunist leadership ranks in
e 1SSR and to the exile and
hsequent assassination of
rot sky in Mexico by a Stalin
ent
THE BOOK on Stalin
ntitled "Stalin's Masterpiece"
is an analytical exposure of
talin s satanic manipulations to
iminate. and later exterminate.
Old Bolsheviks after Lenin's
ath. in order to become the sole
ler of the Communist Party
d the dictator of the Soviet
nion
Written on the basis of solid
search, the book contains
velations and evaluations
rowing strong light on Stalin's
rocity and hatred of the Old
olsheviks and his ruthlessness
sending literally millions of
nocent people to their deaths
rough executions or mass
pulsions to remote camps in
iberia
Carmichael's book presents a
icture of Stalin showing him as
e greatest monster of modern
mes, equaled only by Hitler in
humanity. The facts related by
author analyzed against a
ide background are beyond
grasp of normal human
irui-
THEY PORTRAY Stalin as a
Iculating. vicious maniac who
ver stopped at anything in
inging about the "elimination"
anybody whom he suspected
being even remotely not on his
de including heads of his own
Tit service and of at least
.000 higher officers of the Red
rmy
In the course of bringing out
talin s true character, Car-
kichael also touches upon his
ptt-Jewish feelings which he
nouflaged carefully but which
Remmibc thm way
MAMA ud to cook
forth* holidays?"
swish food
3me' 'welve Tribes
^f >23rdStr|
'fWayneBlvd
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OPEN
Except Monday)
89! 5600
he indicated in his "inner circle"
in various ways. He had shown
them by particularly enjoying
anti-Jewish jokes.
ONE OF his chief bodyguards
a Hungarian-born former
barber had made himself a
favorite of Stalin through his
anti-Jewish jokes and his
mimicking of Jewish types. One
finds in "Stalin's Masterpiece" a
story of a little party given by
Stalin to some of the chiefs of his
political police. The former
barber, who became the closest
bodyguard of Stalin, elevated to
the post of Military General, put
on at the party a skit in imitation
of the behavior of the Communist
leader Zinoviev who was just
sentenced to death at one of the
notorious "purge trials."
Stalin and the others at the
party roared when the ex-barber
named Pauker poked fun at
Zinoviev's being Jewish. Because
of its "success," the skit was
repeated. This time, however, a
new note of impersonating
Zinoviev was added. He was
presented as lifting his arms and
crying out "Shema Yisroel'the
traditional Jewish prayer "Hear
O Israel, the lx>rd is Our God and
is one God!"
At this scene Stalin is reported
in the book to have lost control of
himself: unable to contain his
laughter, he begged Pauker to
stop.
LATER, in 1938. Pauker was
accused by the Soviet Secret
Service of being a spy for the
Germans. This was his end, but
not the end of Stalin's anti-
Semitism. On the contrary.
Stalin's ferocity had increased
after his pact with Hitler in 1939.
It found its expression at the end
of the war in the dissolution of
the Jewish Anti-Fascist Com-
mittee in Moscow, in closing
down all Jewish institutions and
in the mass murder of all Jewish
writers, artists and other in-
tellectuals including the most
ardent Communists among them.
The culmination point of
Stalin's brutal strategy against
all elements in Soviet Jewry was
his staging in 1953 the so-called
Doctors' Plot" in which
prominent Jewish physicians
working in the Kremlin were
charged with planning to poison
Stalin. The "plot" launched a
flood of denunciations, arrests
and demotions of Jews all over
the Soviet Union.
A LARGE number of ordinary
Jews were imprisoned or sent to
concentration camps. This was
accompanied by a torrent of
propaganda demonstrating that
Jews were by nature traitors and
spies for imperialist countries.
The Jews all over the USSR
were living in mortal fear while
the trial of the accused doctors
was in preparation. It was in-
dicated that, under Stalin's
orders, the verdict in the trial was
to serve as a signal to start mass
pogroms of Jews with eventual
deportations of all the Jews
their passports had been marked
with the word "Jew" several
years earlier to distant labor
camps in Sibera under the
pretext of "rescuing" them from
the 'infuriated mobs" in the
places where they lived.
Stalin did not live to hear the
verdict. He died suddenly of a
stroke just a day prior to the
issuance of the verdict in March
1953. The "plot" was thereupon
officially denounced as a
fabrication and all prisoners were
released.
THE JEWS in the Soviet
Union breathed freely, but not for
long. Anti-Jewish propaganda
was resumed when the Kremlin
decided to break off relations
with Israel and provide the Arabs
with arms and instructors to
fight Israel. The anti-Jewish
policy in the Kremlin served also
as a line of guidance to Soviet
satellite countries, especially
Poland. Czechoslovakia and
Hungary.
Carmichael s excellent book on
Stalin will remain indispensable
reading for all times for students
of Soviet history, especially of
the period of the "purges." In
this connection it is regrettable
that "Stalin's Masterpiece"
contains nothing about the
liquidation by Stalin of the entire
Jewish cultural life which had
flowered in the Soviet Union in
the early years of the Revolution,
and that nothing is mentioned
about the deliberate mass killing
of the entire Jewish in-
telligentsia.
In his "Trotsky" book, written
with great insight and depth,
Carmichael emphasizes that
Trotsky hated to be reminded of
his Jewishness. He brings out a
picture of him as a co-founder
with Lenin of the Soviet state, a
man of great ability, a writer,
organizer and orator who felt
hamstrung by an inner em-
barrassment about his Jewish
origin. He always told inter-
viewers, "I am a Bolshevik, and I
am not a Jew." He told the same
to a Jewish delegation.
JEvery oncoina whilo
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Coma anjoy ou' ml ar nationally
lamous cuiai na
Im.^sh,mqtom avbhu
lm'ami beach 531-3987
US Acknowledges
Contacts with PLO
Continued from Page 1-A
Presidential news secretary
Ron Nessen said that Ford had
monitored the evacuation
procedures in Lebanon on tele-
vision for 80 minutes at the
White House. Nessen noted that
the evacuation was "completed
successfully without incident"
and that the evacuees were
aboard the USS Coronado en
route to Athens.
HE ADDED that Ford con-
gratulated Defense Secretary
Donald Rumsfeld. Under-
secretary of State Philip Habib,
the personnel of the Sixth Fleet
and the American Emba ..-.y in
Beirut for the "safe and orderly
evacuation." Nessen added:
"The President also wants to
express his gratitude and sincere
thanks to all others who gave
their cooperation to facilitate
their departure."
The State Department had
said that the U.S. was in contact
with "all parties" involved in the
strife in I^banon to arrange the
evacuation which was carried out
a week after it was scheduled.
ORIGINALLY it was to have
been a movement overland to
Damascus, like previous trans-
fers. American officials were in-
formed, however, that this time
guarantees of safe conduct by
land could not be given.
The sources for the uncertainty
of safety were not disclosed.
Nessen, in response to a re-
porter's question, said that "all
parties" to which the State De-
partment referred included the
PLO.
When the Department in-
dicated that it was com-
municating directly with the
PLO. Israeli Embassy press
counsellor Avi Pazner said the
Embassy had raised the question
of U.S. contact with the PLO.
HE ADDED: We have ex-
pressed our sorrow that it was
found necessary because of the
situation for America to deal
directly with the PLO. At the
same time we have been assured
that there is no change in U.S.
policy toward the PLO."
Meanwhile, speculation varied
on the ultimate result of the U.S.-
PLO communication. Some
Israeli sources indicated they
accept the U.S. contention that
no change in American policy has
taken place in view of the fact
that the PLO is a shrinking force
in the Arab world and it would be
unwise for the U.S. to change its
policy now toward the PLO.
OTHERS FELT that the move
represents a breakthrough to the
great advantage of the PLO and
that the way is now open for
deepening the relationship. How
deep, is the major question ac-
cording to them.
This may not immediately be
known. It was not ruled out,
however, by some observers that
a dramatic turnabout in the
Israeli-Arab conflict may come in
early autumn and that the U.S.-
PLO contacts may be the fore-
runner of it.
With Americans now talking
to Palestinians as well as all other
parties in the Middle East, the
U.S. may move on two fronts
simultaneously: to end the fight-
ing in Lebanon by negotiating
with the various elements and to
move to end "the stalemate" in .
the Arab-Israeli conflict.
O
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16-A
* Jen ist fkridi&n
Friday, August 6 197^
NORTON TIRE COMPANY
11N THE MARKET
#
Why? Because we honestly seek to give each
and every customer the very best product at
the very best price. We strive to give you the
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our customers, only serves to convey our
company's attitude toward all who do business
with us. At Norton Tire Company you are the
important one.
'no* thi orsK or May Jl ( j q^
President
Norton Tire Company
Dear Sir;
that I expressed a hough tor t k'^9 Verdue
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As I'd like to exoerf f
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SS %TLriS.f2S f-J ,ocation *
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How fortunate you are Jo ha" t0 be f servi.
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DR78-14 55.52
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FR78-14 60.56
GR78-14 63.23
HR78-14 66 54
GR78-15 66.38
HR78-15 6822
JR78-15 70.51
LR78-15 75.25
SALE F.E. TAX
40.36 2.11
42.57 2.31
44.42 2.42
46.43 2.49
48.45 2.69
50.58 2.89
53.23 3.07
53.10 2.97
54.58 3.15
56.41 3.31
60.20 3.47
All Prices Plus F E Tax 2 11 to 3 47 per tire
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N. MIAMI REACH
1700NE 163 St 945-7454
MIAMI REACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADC
9001 S Dixie Hwy 687-7575
HIALEAH/RALM SPRINGS MILE
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CUTLER Rl DOE
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WEST MIAMI
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HOMESTEAD
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W. HOLLYWOOD
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FT. LAUOEROALE
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POMPANO REACH
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WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dixla 832-3044
LAKE PARK/N PALM REACH
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FT. FIERCE
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ORLANDO
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Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, August 6. 1976
Section B
Israeli Crews' Discovery
'It's a Small World, After Air
Israeli naval officers and crewmen from the missile ships Yaffo
and Tarshish saw recreation at its finest during their visit to
Walt Disney World. The trip was scheduled during a weekend
of hospitality, dinner dances and parties sponsored by Miami's
Jewish community.
By JANE SILVIA
The disciplined and war-
hardened exterior of Israeli navy
men melted away when the 100
officers and crewmen of the mis-
sile ships Yaffo and Tarshish en-
tered the gates of the Magic
Kingdom at Walt Disney World.
Their faces glowed with anticipa-
tion and excitement as they
waited in line for entertainment
tickets. Once through the line
they scattered like children at re-
cess. "They are like 10-year-old
children!" exclaimed Capt. Eli
. 1 highlight of the weekend of activities for Israeli naval officers and crewmen was a trip to Walt
Disne} World, courtesy of Air Florida and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The men
visited South Florida after representing Israel's navy in the Bicentennial maritime review in New
York HurhoronJulx 4.
U.S. Firms Cooperating With Boycott
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Ann Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has charged that four
American firms have cooperated
with the Arab boycott against
Israel by certifying that goods
they provide their Arab cus-
tomers are not manufactured in
Israel and do not contain Israeli
materials.
The ADL said one of the
companies, York, a division of
Borg-Warner of Chicago, made
such a declaration for the air-con-
ditioners it sent to Saudi Arabia.
The other companies were iden-
tified as IRI Research Institute,
a non-profit organization, Berger
and Plate, a San Francisco im-
port-export firm, and Fruin-
Colnon, a St. Louis construction
company. Officials of the com-
panies denied cooperating with
the boycott.
The ADL said that the con-
tinued compliance with the boy-
cott shows that public opinion is
not having any effect and com-
pliance can only be stopped by
strong laws such as pending
legislation that would deny
certain tax benefits to companies
that cooperate with the boycott.
JWV Ladies To
Get Acquainted
A get-acquainted gathering
with brunch for all officers and
chairpersons of the JWV Depart-
ment of Florida Ladies Auxiliary
will be held at the home of Belle
Swartz, president, on Sunday.
Aug. 8. at 10 a.m.
JWV Convention
Expects 1,500
Aug. 15 to 22
Israeli Ambassador Simcha Dinitz will speak at the
Commander's Banquet which culminates the week-long
annual national convention of the Jewish War
^ eterans of the U.S.A. in Hollywood.
In announcing Ambassador Dinitz*s acceptance,
Judge Paul Ribner, of Philadelphia, National JWV
Commander, said the convention will be held from Aug.
15 through Aug. 22. Dinitz will speak on Saturday
evening, Aug. 21
AMBASSADOR Dinitz heads the list of prominent
quests who will attend the JWV convention. Others in-
clude William E. Simon, Secretary of the Treasury;
Milton E. Mutler, Special Assistant to the President for
Bicentennial Affairs; and Gen. Fred C. Weyand, U.S.
Army Chief of Staff.
Prior to the general sessions^at which 1,500 delegates
are expected, the JWV policy committee and National
Executive Committee will convene.
Two Jews Vanish
In Santiago
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has expressed concern over
the recent disappearance in
Santiago, Chile, of two Jewish
brothers who are believed now to
be political prisoners. Four other
Chilean Jews are among hun-
dreds of Chileans missing there
for more than a year.
According to Burton S. Lev-
inson, chairman of ADL's Latin
American Affairs Department,
the brothers, Julio and Eduardo
Hudnik Schwartzman. who had
held important industrial posts
under the deposed leftist Sal-
vador Allende government, were
last seen on July 22.
"It is suspected that agents of
DIN A, the Chilean military in-
telligence agency, took the
brothers into custody because of
the similarity of the Budniks'
disappearance with that of other
Chileans," Levin said.
Authorities there, however, have
disclaimed any knowledge that
the pair is in custody.
The ADL said the brothers'
office was ransacked and their
cars removed from an adjacent
parking lot. On July 24 the Hud
nik family received an anony-
mous phonecall, directing it to
where the cars were found, near
the National Stadium.
Lowenstein Named
U. of Florida Dean
Dr. Ralph Lowenstein, of the
University of Missouri School of
Journalism, has been named dean
of the University of Florida jour-
nalism program.
Lowenstein, whose ap-
pointment will go to the Regents
in July, is expected to begin work
in Gainesville Sept. 1.
Rahav. "They are on their own
time and I cannot control them!"
The trip, courtesy of Air
Florida and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, followed a
weekend of hospitality, dinner
dances and parties sponsored by
Miami's Jewish community.
Visiting South Florida after
representing Israel's navy at the
Bicentennial maritime review in
New York Harbor July 4, they
welcomed this opportunity to
travel inland.
Their journey to Fantasyland,
Tomorrowland and Frontierland
was unlike any other. Cameras in
hand, they took in every sight.
Exhausted, they piled one by one
into the bus for the trip back to
the airport. "I have never seen a
more spectacular, perfect world
as the one created by Walt Dis-
ney World," said one crewman,
commenting on the day. "There
is no pollution or corruption and
a sense of harmony and peace
pervades Tomorrowland."
Perhaps what made the sailors
relate so well to their experiences
was the amusement theme they
loved most, "It's a Small World,
After All," which ties in the com-
mon denominators of peoples
from every land, in every time of
history.
"I was proud to see the great
speeches of America's Presidents
in the Hall of Presidents," said
one crewman. "It impressed me
that the Americans and Israelis
have so much in common in their
democratic ideology and spirit."
"I liked the Monsanto exhibit
the best," commented another.
"Through the film 'America the
Beautiful' I had an opportunity
to see places in the U.S. that I
will never get to see in person.
From the Grand Canyon to the
far reaches in the West and
Alaska it was all so beautiful."
And still another added, "I've
never had as much fun since I
was a small boy. The Haunted
House and Peter Pan's Flight
were really something! It made
me realize that there is a whole
generation of people from all over
the world that grew up on Disney
Fantasies and that we all share
the same dreams."
Riding back to the airport,
they settled down into con-
templation. There was a low hum
one could hear over the noise of
the engines it was the tune of
"It's a Small World. After All."
Bull's Memoirs Focus
On Israel, Arab Relations
LONDON Gen. Odd Bull,
former commander of the UN
Truce Supervisory Organization
in the Middle East, has come out
in strong support of a Palestinian
Arab State.
Summing up his experiences
from 1963 to 1970, the Norwegian
general writes in the English
edition of his memoirs, published
here, that "Justice in the Middle
East means, among other things,
that the rights of the Palestinian
Arabs must be recognised and
that they must be given the op-
portunity for self-determination
in those parts of Palestine which
they occupied before the 1967
war."
Gen. Bull says that "The prin-
ciple of repatriation should be ac-
cepted," adding that since the Is-
raelis would not hand over the
areas to the PLO unless defeated
in another war, "it woulc
probably be necessary for the
areas to be taken into temporary
UN trusteeship."
THE 1975 Sinai Agreement.
Bull claims, did nothing to halt
the arms race, thus opening the
way to nuclear weapons. It also
did nothing about the main-
tenance of the status quo in the
occupied areas by forbidding the
setting up of new settlements
there.
The book, first published in
Norwegian, sheds light on the ex-
changes between Israel and her
neighbors for which Bull was the
intermediary- Thus he confirms
that on the first day of the Six-
Day War he conveyed to Jordan
Israel's offer of mutual non-
aggression.
However, in Bull's view the
Israeli offer was "a threat pure
and simple, and it is not the
normal practice of the UN to pass
on threats from one government
to another. But this message
seemed so important that we
quickly sent it. King Hussein
received the message before
10:30 the same morning (June
5)."
At 11:25 the Jordanians
opened fire. At noon both sides
agreed to a cease-fire, but
although the shooting slackened.
it did not stop. In all, three dead-
lines were agreed that day, but
were not respected.
REFERRING TO the Jor-
danian troops' seizure of Govern-
ment House, the UN head-
quarters. Gen. Bull said it was a
military blunder and the Jor-
danians should first have taken
the Israeli enclave on Mount
Scopus. He suggests that Israeli
Intelligence might have had a
hand in the Jordanian mistake.
Although the writer's sym-
pathies tend to lie with the
Arabs, he nonetheless confirms
that an agreement to free the
stranded vessels from the Suez
Canal early in 1968 failed when
the Egyptians tried to navigate
the northern part of the canal
before freeing them southward as
had been agreed earlier through
UNTSO's good offices.
Gen. Bull seems to have mixed
feelings about the Israeli leaders
with whom he dealt. He describes
Moshe Dayan as being "always a
straightforward person to deal
with." Golda Meir struck him as
"a very impressive and per-
suasive personality, though she
has shown little or no under-
standing for the Arabs of Pales-
tine or for the justice of their
demands.'
Tay-Sachs Disease
Is Preventable
Tay-Sachs Disease, a ile-
generative hereditary disorder
thai leads to blindness, motor
disorders and early death, is 100
times more common among Ash-
kenazi (Central European and
Russian) Jewish children than
any other group.
Hut the disease can be
eliminated. Testing programs at
the University of Miami's Mail-
man Center for Child Develop-
ment. Mount Sinai Medical Cen-
ter. Community Hospital of
South Broward and North Beach
Medical Center in Fort Lauder-
dale screen individuals of child-
bearing age to identify carriers of
the defective gene and monitor
pregnancies where risk has been
determined.


Page 2-B
+Jenit thiiJicir
Friday, August 6. 1976
Jewish Chapel OK'd at West Point
Secretary of the Army Martin
R. Hoffman formally presented a
right-of-entry document and a
license authorizing the con-
struction of a Jewish chapel at
West Point. NY., by the West
Point Jewish Chapel Fund.
Witnessing the historic event
was a distinguished group of
Academy alumni, military of-
ficers and leaders of major Jewish
organizations, including Judge
Paul Ribner of Philadelphia.
National Commander of the Jew-
ish War Veterans of the U.S.A.
The chapel which will be the
first Jewish house of worship in
the Military Academy's 174-year
hi- lory, also will serve as a center
ir which cadets and visitors can
learn about Jewish mtributions
to America's defe n every war
fought by the Un. -o States.
DESIGNED BY Max Abram-
ovitz. the facility will be located
at a focal point on Academy
grounds, midway between the
Protestant and the Catholic
.anels. overlooking the parade
ounds and the Hudson River.
Us stonework and architecture
will be the color and character of
that used in the Cadet chapel and
other Academy buildings.
;ie Jewish chapel will include
classrooms, a library, a gallery-
museum and a seminar room in
addition to the sanctuary and
rabbi's quarters. The library and
the gallery-museum will house
books, manuscripts and other
items noting military services of
Jewish alumni and non-alumni.
Among them was Simon Levy,
one of two men commissioned
second lieutenants in the
Academy's first graduating class
in October. 1802.
The construction of a West
Point Jewish chapel has been dis-
cussed bv Jewish alumni of the
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Academy for nearly two decades.
In mid-1975 an ad hoc committee
headed by Herbert M. Ames of
Wilmington. Del., was formed to
organize a campaign. Sub-
sequently a National Advisory
Committee for the West Point
Jewish Chapel Fund came into
existence. Besides Judge Ribner.
its participants include Senators
Jacob K. Javits. Abraham Ribi-
coff and Barry Goldwater.
"The Jewish War Veterans
anticipate playing a major role in
bringing about the construction
of the chapel building." Judge
Ribner said. "We feel this is one
of the most important projects
involving the military "
Af Convention Center, Aug. 12
JCC's Jewish World's Fair
Culminates Camp Program
"Jews Throughout the Ages"
is the focus of the second Jewish
World's Fair, sponsored by the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida. Aug. 12 at Miami
Beach Convention Center-North
Hall.
"We expect that more than
10.000 will take part in the fair
this year." said JCC president
Donald J. Reiff. "with its attrac-
tions representing various phases
in Jewish history, past, present
and future, and the public is in-
vited to take part in the annual
event."
Opening at 6:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, with a ribbon-cutting cere-
mony attended by a number of
South Florida officials and dig-
nitaries, the event culminates the
eight-week summer camping pro-
grams sponsored by the JCC. in
which nearly 1.700 South Florida
youngsters have participated
since June 21.
'ALL THE CAMPERS.
ranging in age from 3 to 15, have
taken part in the creation of this
year's fair." explained Reiff.
"There will be more than 70
booths and attractions, including
art displays, original crafts,
music, exhibits documenting
American Jewish history, and
bakery goods. Special game
booths assured to delight the
youngsters will include 'Instant
Aid to Israel.' 'Load Noah's Ark,"
Mordechai Fishing for Gelt' and
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Proceeds of the event will be
used to augment the Centers'
Camp Scholarship Fund, pro-
viding summer programs for
boys and girls with financial
need. The excitement of the fair,
and the total effort toward bring-
ing about more camp scholar-
ships, will bring together all 1976
campers from the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Cen-
ter in North Miami Beach,
serving North Dade and South
Broward. and the Jewish Com-
nunity Center of South Dade.
The Jewish Community Centers
is a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's family of
local agencies.
Additional information on the
Jewish World's Fair is available
through Mr. Leiberman at the
JCC.
Ader Seeking Vacant
County Court Seat
Marshall H. Ader is candidate
for a vacant judgeship in Dade
County. He received his J.D. in
1950 from the University of
Miami and is admitted to prac-
tice in Illinois and Florida.
United States District Courts
and before the U.S. Supreme
Court.
Much of his practice has been
in the Civil Division of the Dade
County Court. He has been a
member of Florida Bar com-
mittees, including that on legal
education, and has served as a
referee and on arbitration boards.
Gershwin Ladies Meet
The Ladies Auxiliary of
George Gershwin Lodge 196
Knights of Pythias has an-
nounced a general meeting for
Monday, Aug. 16, at 8 p.m. at the
Surfside Community Center.
Mrs. Joseph Seglin and Mrs.
Abraham Fingerman, presidium,
say that the program will be
musical.
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Judge Paul Ribner fleftl, national commander of the /i
War Veterans, greets Secretary of the Army Martin R. n
man at ceremonies authorizing construction of a Jewish chapel
at West Point.
PllZZled ByNormaOrowitz
LAACANADIANJR
AACSZMBYLXKOI
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members The names are placed hori nntally, vertical!)
diagonally, forward and backward How many can you find
Answers are on Page 7
CANADIAN Archie BENNETT
JEWISH Monroe ABBEY
CONGRESS SolKANEE
Samuel BRONFMAN BECKER
MichaelGARBER Benj. ROBINSON
Harold LANDE All rights reserved
Ziskind of Cedars Receives Degree
At Nova University Ceremonies
Nova University has an-
nounced the awarding on Aug. 1
of the Doctor of Public Ad-
ministration degree to J. A.
Ziskind, executive director of
Cedars of Lebanon Health Care
Center. Dr. Elmer B. Staats.
Comptroller General of the
United States, delivered the com-
mencement address in Fort
Lauderdale.
Dr. Ziskind holds a Bachelor's
degree from Syracuse University,
a Master's in Business Ad-
ministration from George Wash-
ington University and a Master's
in Public Administration from
Nova University.
While pursuing his doctoral
degree, Dr. Ziskind has, as
executive director of Cedars of
Lebanon Health Care Center,
been instrumental in effecting
"the most amazing turnaround of
a medical institution ever wit-
nessed," according to an
authority in the field.
Few major medical institutions
have met and so successfully
overcome such enormous finan-
cial and management problems in
so short a time as has Cedars.
A native of New England, 30-
year-old Dr. Ziskind has lived in
Miami for the past seven years.
He serves on the board of direc-
tors of the South Florida Hos-
J. A. ZISKIND
pital Association, on the cam-
paign cabinet of the United Way
of Dade County and is a member
of the board and treasurer of the
Florida League for Nursing.
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Seeks position for High Holy
Days or Yearly. References
Excellent Toroh Reader. Conduct
Conservative or Orthodox
Services. Call Cantor Alpert a'
531-5738________________________


Friday, August 6, 1976
*Jemi>fhridian
Page 3-B
Florida JWV Auxiliary Is
National Confab Hostess
The Jewish War Veterans De-
partment of Florida-Ladies
Auxiliary will hostess the or-
ganization's "Stars, Stripes and
Service" 49th national conven-
tion. Aug. 15 to 22, at the Dip-
lomat Hotel in Hollywood.
Ceil Zucker, immediate past
president of the Department of
Florida-Ladies Auxiliary, is the
local coordinator and with her
committee is in charge of the hos-
pitality room for all delegates and
guests.
On Sunday. Aug. 15, Belle
Swartz, president of the hostess
area, and Mrs. Zucker and de-
partment officers will accompany
Elaine Maas. national president.
and her national officers for a
presentation at the Operation Re-
Entry facility in Miami Beach.
ON MONDAY. Aug. 16. Mrs
Swartz, with Lee Haspil.
Veterans Administration Volun-
tary Service (VAVS) officer, Mae
Schreiber, department hospital
chairman, and Mrs. Zucker, will
be with Mrs. Maas and the na-
tional officers for a presentation
to the new Veterans Administra-
tion Outpatient Clinic at Riviera
Beach.
The official opening of the na-
tional convention is on Wed-
nesday. Aug. 18, at 9 a.m. with
guest speaker Nikki Beare, a
local public relations executive
and women's rights advocate.
On Friday, Aug. 20, Mrs.
Swartz will be one of the
hostesses at the distinguished
guest session and tea at which
Congressman Bill Lehman is to
be guest speaker.
The Department of Florida-
Ladies Auxiliary is sponsoring
two candidates for national
offices. Malvina V. Freeman of
Hollywood, a past national pres-
ident as judge advocate, and
Irene Cooperman of Miami
Beach, a past department pres-
ident, as conductress.
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Michael Scheck has been re-
elected president of the Hillel
Community Day School of
North Miami Beach for a
fourth term. A CPA and
president of the Sweet Paper
Sales Corp.. Scheck is a mem-
ber of the B'nai B'rith Op-
timist Club, the Jewish Com-
munity Center and Beth
Torah Congregation, on whose
board he has scried.
Agudath Israel
Celebrates 25th Year
In commemoration of Agudath
Israel Hebrew Institute's 25th
anniversary, Rabbi Dr. Isaac
Hirsh Ever will deliver a sermon
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday on The
Voice of Comfort and Prospects
for Brighter Times." A gala
reception will follow services.
Summer in The
Synagogue Ending
Following Sabbath services
i his evening at Temple Israel,
Cantor Jacob Mornstein will lead
the last Summer in the Syna-
gogue Sabbath eve dinner and
Dany Amihud will be in charge of
the singing and dancing that are
a feature of the event.
Rabbi Gorfinkel
Is Beth Moshe Guest
At Beth Moshe Congregation
this evening at S Rabbi Emeritus
.1. A Gorfinkel will conduct ser-
vices and describe "Facts That
Community and Temple Mem
bers Need to Know Now."
Everyone is invited to attend.
Joey Adams, well-known Jewish comedian and host of popular
interview show on WEVD-Radio in New York, is on a working
vacation in the Far Fast as Good Will Ambassador for Pan
American World Aim ays. He is shown here in a hotel in Hong
Kong with u man whose friendship he has treasured for many
years. Moshe Davun.
Rabbi Shapiro Returns
To Temple Zion
After B month's absence Rabbi
Norman V Shapiro will return to
Temple Zion this evening at 8:15.
His topic is "Is Criticism of Is-
rael Outside of Israel Justified'.'"
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Page 4-B
*jififkr*09n
Friday, August 6,
1976'
by QM %\pp
According to the New York de-
signers, iheir collections for Fall
are an interaction between
history and clothes. They feel
that the U.S.A. is emerging into
an optimistic period and they are
designing with imagination and
not too much nostalgia.
Clothes soon to be available in-
clude those that are wrapped,
layered and abound with dif-
ferent textures and colors. In-
stead of the emphasis on con-
struction and cut you'll find
contrasts like a strictly man-
tailored suit and topcoat hanging
next to a wisp of angora chiffon
knit and a lush mohair or Ultra-
suede steamer coat. Tailoring is a
triumph of smooth line minus the
oldtime armature of canvas and
padding. Several collections are
almost entirely bias-cut.
Pants are skinnier and skirts
are fuller. Sleeves have a ten-
dency to balloon out and neck-
lines to open out. Turtlenecks ex-
pand into hoods and hoods
are back and mixing tex-
tures rather than patterns is a
fashion fixation. Donegal tweed,
cable knit, printed velvet and
moire often turn up in a single
costume. Another combination is
fluffy mohair, flat gabardine and
plaid cotton. Two or three layers
of thin silk crepe in brilliant
colors make an evening pajama
into a walking abstract painting.
Be careful in trying to put your
own textures together. Gone is
the "do your own thing" look.
These mixtures of textures are
carefully worked out with tactile
as well as eye appeal. The result-
ing collage is never ad lib or
accidental.
European designers seem to be
going back to the costume look
that is heavy. American de-
signers are layering without the
bulk.
nel hoods, a slightly raised waist-
line, narrow tubular tunics and
pants that fall straight. He also
combines chiffon-weight angora
jersey dresses with melton or
cashmere coats the effect is
bulkless. For evening he tops
pure silk crepe with pure cash-
mere full-length evening coats
that are yarn-dyed matched to
the gown.
Sally and Harry Robbing are
the happy parents of Terry Craig.
He is their first child and the first
grandchild on both sides of the
family. Sally's parents are
Marion and Howard Richman
and Harry's parents are Helen
and Leonard Robbins. Both sets
of grandparents are busy visiting
the new offspring in his new
home in North Miami Beach.
Lillian and Al Beer had their
daughter, Shelley Beth, home for
the summer from Israel. They
alternate every year with a trip to
see her then she comes
home. This year was well planned
out as she attended her brother's
high school graduation. T.R. is
now going to the University of
Florida, which is the alma mater
of Shelley and their father, Al.
Shelley is a graphic designer
for Ruder and Finn and did a
great deal of the design work for
the Jerusalem Hilton. Her boss is
the niece of Shaloma (Dr.
Howard) Lessner. On her way
home she visited Esther and
Howard Miller in Geneva.
Howard is a former partner of
Al's and the Millers are soon
due for a visit to Miami. Her
return trip includes stops in
Washington, D.C., and Amster-
dam, then it's back to work on
the Hilton magazine.
Jacques Tiffeau is the first
French designer of renown in
both haute couture and pret a
porter (ready-to-wear) to design
directly for a major American
fashion firm. Originals has re-
grouped for Tiffeau with the
same perfectionist standards for
fabrics and workmanship and
blended the American and
French concepts.
Tiffeau's characteristic look,
which he describes as "angular
softness," might be subtitled
"how to look skinny in layers."
He has created the American-
looking line of elongating the sil-
houette by his cut, the use of fun-
Paula and Randy Rieger are
the proud parents of a new little
girl, Gina Danielle who joins
brother Matthew. Marilyn and
Joe Solomon are Paula's parents,
and they are often tapped for
babysitting. Sharing honors are
Natalie and Jerry Rieger. Randy
had great-grandparents for his
children. Eva Rieger, who resides
on Normandy Isle, and Pauline
and Marcus Paulson, his
mother's parents, who live on
Miami Beach. Gina's aunt, Karol
Solomon, has just graduated
from the University of Miami
with a degree in psychology and
is entering Florida International
University for her graduate work
in counseling.
Our
Readers
Write
"Let Thy Words Be Brief"
Koheleth lEcclesiastes)
Levitt to Chair Meeting of Funeral Directors
Sonny Levitt, vice president of
Levitt Memorial Chapels, Inc..
has returned from Quebec City,
SONNY LEVITT
Canada, where he attended the
board meeting of the* Jewish
Funeral Directors of America and
Canada.
A member of the JFDA board
of directors for the past three
years, he has been appointed na-
tional chairman of the convention
scheduled for September, 1978.
Levitt has addressed many
synagogues, civic organizations
and condominium groups on
"The Jewish Way of Dying and
Mourning" and is available to
lecture upon request by calling
Levitt Memorial Chapels.
Golden Is Adath
Yeshurun Guest
Al Golden, a member of the
National Anti- Defamation
League Commission and chair-
man of the Florida Hillel board,
will be guest speaker this evening
at 8:15 at Temple Adath
Yeshurun. His topic is "Is
HoonWay R#-^I1> Near?"
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
In a JTA news item from Israel
in the July 30 issue of The Jewish
Floridian carried over from the
front page to page 7-A. the final
paragraph reads:
"Rabin, speaking to a meeting
of volunteers at the educational
center in Zemach. had some un-
expected praise for former Presi-
dent Nixon. According to Rabin,
the former chief executive did
more for*Israel than any other
American President."
This is also precisely what
Golda Meir said on page 430 of
her autobiography "My Life"
about Nixon, that "it must also
be put on the record forever that
he did not break a single one of
the promises he made to us It is
also precisely what Dayan and
other Israeli leaders said about
Richard Nixon.
Yet the two Jewish Floridian
columnists on the editorial page,
one an associate editor, speak
only with venom and hate any
time they mention Nixon. It is
ironic because the two columnists
surely are dedicated and faithful
friends of Israel. Therefore, their
perpetual outbursts and raging
and snarling at Nixon, their cuss-
ing and cursing him. can only be
attributed to incurable anti-
Nixonitis.
The poor fellows, suffering
from a pathological anti-Nixon
compulsion, simply cannot help
themselves, so that any time they
write about Nixon, their pens
automatically dip into a
venomous Nixon-hate inkwell.
Better that the two poor and
helpless fellows, beyond self
control and restraint when it
comes to Nixon, never writ*
about Nixon. Rather for them tc
boycott that evil monster Nixor
with the demon's horns than
accentuating their ami -Nixonitis
as we read, in contrast, the ac-
claim of Nixon's help to Israel by
Rabin and Golda Meir, and other
Israeli leaders.
SAMUEL LEVITZ
Miami Beach
UM Prof. IIosman Is
State House Hopeful
A candidate for the State
House of Representatives in
District 113, Robert S. Hosman.
an associate professor of English
at University of Miami, is con-
cerned with tax-exemptions for
private businesses operating on
leased public land, contending
that the revenues must be made
up by higher taxes on home-
owners. Hosman, who owns a
Miami restaurant, is public ad-
visory board chairman for the
Lowe Art Museum, holds a
Master's and PhD from Arizona
State University and has ap-
peared in aeries on WPBT-TV,
Miami's Public Television
station.
Mrs. Reynolds Will Run
For Florida House
Mrs. Argie Reynolds, who has
long been active at the com-
munity level in the political
process, plans to campaign for
the State Legislature in District
111. She believes that her ex-
perience as campaign co-
ordinator, precinct captain and
headquarters manager has given
her "considerable insight into the
workings of government."
c*
V
Mrs. Marylin Tell Holzberg of North Miami has become :
member of the President's Council at Brandeis University A\
member of the Brandeis class of '63, she uas inducted b\\
Brandeis president Marver H. Bernstein at ceremonies during!
the recent 28th annual conference of the Brandeis National!
Women's Committee on the Brandeis campus. Mrs Hnhhergisl
treasurer of the Greater Miami Chapter of the NWC.
,/euish War Veterans South Dade Post No. 778 and Auxili .
recently donated a coffee pot to the fourth-floor patient. at tk.
Miami VA Hospital. Ben Clein (left), past Post command*!
and Evelyn Clein, president of the Ladies Auxiliary, presentr
the gift to Thomas Doherty of the hospital.
Teenagers Home from Study Tour
Thirty-one teenagers will re-
turn from a seven-week study
tour of Israel on Aug. 6, accord-
ing to an announcement by
James S. Knopke. president of
Temple Beth Sholom.
"The youngsters were part of
Beth Sholom's Annual Confirma-
tion Class Pilgrimage to Israel,
sponsored by Beth Sholom's
Brotherhood Scholarship Pro-
gram," Knopke said. "The young
people, under the professional
guidance of Barak Yaron of the
temple's educational staff,
studied the geography, history
and sociology of Israel, through
formal classes and field trips and
reconfirmed their faith at Mount
Sinai."
Among the participants in the
project, seven of whom are mem-
bers of Temple Israel, who an-
nually send a group of teen-agers
to join this group, are Gary
Ark in, Robert Arkin. Jonathan
Bogner, Craig Burger. ChucM
Coleman, Max Ellis. Howard^
Euster, Marcy Feigin. Vick|
Friedland, Stacey Gordon. Launl
Holt*
Also Steven Jaffe, Ca
Kohlenberg, Pamela Koh
Robyn Lefton, Leonard L
Elizabeth Miller, Arthur Mall)
Jack Miller, Deborah Mumjl
Sara Nemser, Amy Rosenbloool
Julie Rusain, Mark Sarasohil
Denise Schine, Michael Somerl
stein, Betty Sonne, Debbie Weifrl
stein, Bruce Wilson. JoanWJ
Zaiac and Maria Popkin.
Meeting the youngsters at tW
airport will be Knopke: Haroldl
Vinik Brotherhood presidentl
Phyliss Miller, cochairman l
Beth Sholom's Board of Ed**!
tion; and Stanley Liedeker Bel
Sholom's new director of edu<*|
tion and youth activities T*
parents, of course, will be tnenj
too.


Friday. August 6. 1976
*Jenit> Flcridliari
Page 5-B
Hadassah Chapter Members
Attending National Confab
Harold Wilson, former Prime
Minister of England, will receive
Hadassah *s Henrietta Szold
Award at the 62nd annual
Hadassah convention at the
Hilton Hotel in Washington,
Aug. 15 to 18, according to Mrs
Jean Feinberg, president of the
Miami Beach Chapter. Daniel P.
Moynihan, former United States
Ambassador to the United
Nations; Dr. Kalman J. Mann,
director general of the Hadassah
Medical Organization; AIPAC's
Morris Amitay and Dr. Robert I.
Levy of the National Institute of
Health will be among the conven-
tion's guest speakers.
A large delegation from Miami
Beach will attend the convention,
including Jean Feinberg, presi-
dent of the chapter; Gus Mentz,
vice president of the Florida
Region; and Louella Shapiro,
area Big Gifts chairman. The
women, all members of the na-
tional board, will attend the na-
tional board meetings Aug. 11 to
15. On Aug. 12 they will be the
guests of Mrs. Gerald Ford at a
White House reception.
Among those who will repre-
sent the 10,000 Miami Beach
members are Florence Schemer.
president of Bay Harbor Group;
Edith Saffir, president of Louis
D. Brandeis Group; Shirley Fish-
man, president of Eddie Cantor
Group; Geraldine Rice, president
of Forte Towers Group; Susana
Behar, president of Inter-
American Group; Pearl Rachles,
president of Emma Lazarus
Group; Nellie Weisman, presi-
dent of Lincoln Group; Sylvia
Meyers, president of Maison
Grande Group; Dora Krimsky,
president of Morton Towers
Group; Henny Nortman, pres-
ident of Natanya Group; Rose
Milier. president of Plaza 800
Group; InezTownsand, president
of Hanna Senesch Group; Ann
Levine, president of Southgate
Group; Bertha Kohansov, presi-
dent of Haim Yassky Group.
Also Irene Fink and Betty
Kestenbaum, presidium of
Sophie Tucker Group; Betty
Miller, membership coordinator
and Florida Region Conference
Workshop chairman; Pauline
Lessem, membership vice presi-
dent; Hose Podden, organization
vice president; Fanny Houtz,
education vice president; Edith
Jacobson, education coordinator;
Ann Greif, Molly Lipsky, Raquel
Wax, area vice presidents; Lillian
Martel, Youth Aliyah chairman:
Sophie Schwartzbaum, Youth
Activities chairman; Joseph
Kestenbaum, Hadassah
Associate; Shirley Rosenman,
Gladys Bunim, Frances Cohen,
Malka Majerowicz, Clara
Sapoznik, Frieda Sapoznick and
Bea Orseck.
MRS. FEINBERG recently
returned from a special study
mission in conjunction with the
double dedications of the Sieg-
fried and Irma Ullman Building
for Cancer and Allied Diseases
and the Daniel and Florence
Guggenheim Rehabilitation
Pavilion of the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center in
Jerusalem. Dr. Howard Rusk,
head of the Department of Re-
habilitation Medicine and direc-
tor of the Institute of Rehabili-
tation Medicine at New York
University Medical Center, ad-
dressed the Guggenheim
dedication.
At a special seminar for
laymen, 'Cancer Can Be Cured,"
Dr. Henry S. Kaplan, chairman
of the Department of Radiology,
Stanford University School of
Medicine, gave the major
presentation.
A SIMILARLY LARGE
Miami Chapter delegation is
attending the convention, led by
president Gloria Friedman.
Among Miami's delegates are
national board members Helen
Weisberg, Charlotte Wolpe, Ellen
Mandler, and members of the
Chapter executive board Rene
Brodsky and Edythe Freeman.
Group presidents representing
Miami Chapter's 7,500 members
include Yvette Baumann, Mimi
Dickerman, Mollie Feirson, Ella
Jay, Belle Meyers, Nora
Osheroff, Shirley Schreiber,
Harriet Shapiro, Dorothy
Spector, Briana Tecosky and
delegates Miriam ('apian and
Rose Davidow.
Mrs. Jean Feinberg of North Miami Beach (center}, accompanied by (from left) Michael
freeman Mrs. Sue Freeman and Craig Gordon were presented to Leah (Mrs. Yitzhak) Rabin (in
striped dress) by Mrs. Bryna Lieberman, national Big Gifts chairman of Hadassah, and Mrs.
Hose Matzkin, national president of Hadassah. The occasion was a garden party at the Rabins'
Jerusalem home. Mrs. Feinberg is regional president of the Florida Region of Hadassah and a
founder of the new Siegfried and Irma Ullmann Cancer Institute in Jerusalem, which was
dedicated in Jerusalem during the recent Hadassah Double Dedication Tour of Israel.
r--------B'NAI ISRAEL--------
I *Gr. Miami Youth Syn. (Orfhod.)
I
High Holiday Services will be
conducted by:
j Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman and Choir
At Our OWN Home
onS.W. 123Ave.
Bet Sunset A Kendall
Limited Seating for tickets
and Information call IN-MM
SUNSHINE HEARING
AID CENTER
2515 COLLINS AVENUE, M.B.
(Same block as Algiers Hotel)
MON-FRI 9:30 to 4:30
SAT 9:30 to 12:30
FREE HEARING TEST
GRAND OPENING BATTERY PRICES
I13-S2.00 #675-$2.00
#41-$2.00 #76-$2.50
#312-$2.00 #401-$1.25
Trode-lnsUpToSlOO
Sale & Service on Most Brands
Mont: 473-2*73
1
WANTED!
Your beautiful nearly new clothes to sell
on consignment. We'll get you good prices.
CHECK YOUR CLOSETS for those lovely
clothes all your friends have seen.
Free pickup for over Wgarmets Also shoes,
handbags, /ewelry and accessories.
OUR THEME IS FULFILLING YOUR
DREAMS WITH SAVINGS ON THINGS
FOR YOU
SANDRA ST. JOHNS
HEW I MEAHLf MEW SHOP
10524 W. FLA6LER
MIAMI
305-223-1500
Tun* To Sava
Announces its
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
in the Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts
Dr. Irving Lehrman will officiate
Cantor lv\ Adler will chant
Assisted by the Temple Choir,
Under the direction of Shmuel Fershko
ADULT AUXILIARY SERVICES
will be held in the Main Sanctuary of the Temple
Rabbi Maxwell Berger will officiate
Cantor Eleazer Bernstein will chant
Assisted by a special choir
TICKETS MAY BE SECURED NOW
|AT THE TEMPLE OFFICE, 1701 Washington Avenue)
IHE LEHRMAN DAY SCHOOL
All Departments of Religious School
and Nursery School
Still Accepting Registrations
ROSH HASHONAH BEGINS FRIDAY EVENING,
_________SEPTEMBER 24, 1976
| Temple Office
538-2503
School Office
866-2771


Page 6-B
*km si IhiidUan
Friday, August 6,1976
New Yorkers are still polishing
up the Big Apple after the Demo-
cratic Convention. For all its lack
of suspense, the donkey serenade
was, at least, peaceful. It is not
likely, after Reagan's precipitous
move, that the Republican Con-
vention will present its captive
audience with more intrigue.
Considering the quiet circum-
stances, some of the Democratic
Convention highlights were
provided by the media celebrities
covering the activities in
Madison Square Garden.
NBC's anchormen David
Brinkley and John Chancellor or-
chestrated an impressive cast of
journalistic johnnies-on-the-spot
throughout the convention hall.
The only cacophony in an other-
wise mellifluous rendition was
from Tom Brokaw. On July 14,
the night before the not-so-sur-
prising selection of Walter Mon-
dale as Vice Presidential running
mate to Jimmy Carter, Brinkley
and Chancellor presented a run-
down on the six hopeful heirs to
the VP nomination. In assessing
possible Vice Presidential can-
didates, the newscasters listed
political pros and cons of each of
the men being considered.
In discussing Henry Jackson,
Tom Brokaw said that Scoop's
"plus" was his popularity with
the Jewish bloc. Paraphrasing his
next comment, he said, however,
that this year the Jewish vote
was not so important as tbt
Federal government in sub-
sidizing the Presidential cam-
paigns.
The blatant implication was, of
course, that Jewish money deter-
mines a candidate's chances of
moving into 1600 Pennsylvania
Avenue.
The audio double-take was
caused, not by the remark, but by
its source. We are all accustomed
to General Brown-type remarks
from General Brown types. How-
ever, it is worth noting that this
prejudicially pregnant statement
was made by a respected White
House correspondent in an
Judgeship Is
Schwartz Goal
Richard Alan Schwartz, vice
president of the South Dade
Chamber of Commerce, is a can-
didate for County Judge in
Group 17. Schwartz, who has also
been chairman of the Chamber's
education and transportation
committees, initiated and was
first president of the South Dade
Bar Association in 1973. He is
also a member of the Dade
County. Florida and American
Bar Associations.
Schwartz was graduated from
the University of Florida and re-
ceived his law degree from the
University of Miami Law School.
Lieberman Is State
House Candidate
Attorney Ronald S. Lieber-
man, candidate for the Florida
House from District 113, is
executive vice president of
Florida Young Democrats.
A former Assistant State At-
torney, he has been involved in
Transition. Inc. a rehabili-
tation program for ex-offenders
and was secretary of the
Young Lawyers Section of the
County Bar Association. He is a
member of the Common Cause
steering committee and the
ACLU legal panel.
aprioristic manner. The remark
came from a representative of the
very media that General Brown
thinks are unduly influenced by
Jews! I. for one, do not care to
bend over backward to reassure
General Brown and his ilk that
the press is not unduly in-
fluenced. And besides, that was
surely not Brokaw's intention. If
Brown needed a placating pat on
the back, he got it with his re-
appointment as chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
What is important here is that
a respected journalist made an
uncontested value judgment that
is not only fallacious but
dangerous. It is just such heinous
drivel, accepted by the great
silent majority, that makes the
Christ-killer theory a slow-to-die
myth.
In recent years the fourth
estate has been taken to task for
publicizing our nation's prob-
lems. In actuality, the men who
caused our troubles were seeking
a scapegoat. They tried to blame
many of their difficulties on a so-
called negative press.
We have learned many lessons
in the wake of Watergate. One of
the most important object les-
sons has been that a free press,
permitted access to all avenues of
American life, is a sign of a
healthy ongoing democracy. We
can thank Bob Woodward', Carl
Bernstein, Ben Brad lee and
Katherine Graham for that.
There has never been a
prouder, more positive time than
right now to be associated with
the news media and to be called a
journalist.
However, that pride and free-
dom demand responsibility. We,
as professional journalists, owe
responsible actions to ourselves
and to the American people we
serve.
Tom Brokaw'8 sloppy remark
is not worthy of the man's
reputation. Let us hope that he
and his colleagues do their home-
work before the Republicans
meet in Kansas City.
Brummer Is Running
For Public Defender
Bennett H. Brummer, chief of
the Appellate Division of the
Public Defender's Office, is a
candidate for the office of Public
Defender in Dade County. The
incumbent is not seeking re-
election. At the University of
Miami Law School, his alma
mater, he teaches criminal de-
fense appellate procedures. Ad-
mitted to practice before the
Florida, New York and Federal
courts, he served in the Peace
Corps and held a fellowship from
the University of Pennsylvania
to work for Legal Services of
Greater Miami. He is a member
of the ACLU Legal Panel, Com-
mon Cause and Concerned
Democrats.
Reelection Is
Margolis Focus
Gwen Margolis is seeking re-
election to her House seat in
District 102. A member of the
Finance and Taxation and
Growth and Energy Committees,
she is chairman of the Select
Committee on Nuclear Power and
has sponsored legislation on con-
dominium, landlord-tenant and
tax reform.
She is a member of the South
Florida Planning and Zoning As-
sociation and of the Women's
Council of Realtors. She is listed
in Who's Who of American
Women and Who's Who of
Women in the World. She re-
ceived the City of Hope Star
Chapter's Humanitarian of the
Year award and in 1974 was
named Outstanding Woman in
Politics by the Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Association.
Eisenberg Seeks
School Board Seat
Active in the development of
community service programs for
the past six years. Annette
Eisenberg has announced her
candidacy for the Dade County
School Board. She is concerned
that Dade's school system "is
rated as only 40th best in the
nation," and feels there is a
"drastic need for reform."
Mrs. Eisenberg is a member of
the Miami Police Advisory Com-
mission, vice chairman of the
Edison Little River Self-Help
Community Council and of Parks
for People District 2, and a mem-
ber of the City of Miami Revenue
Sharing Board.
The City of Miami named the
Annette Eisenberg Community
Center for her, and she is the re-
cipient of the Martin Luther King
Brotherhood Award and was
named a Community Headliner
by Women in Communications.
Florida Environment
Is Simonhoff Focus
Architect Mike Simonhoff,
candidate for the State Senate in
District 39, is chairman of
Miami's City Environmental
Preservation Board. His focus is
on redevelopment of downtown,
mass transit and solar energy
research.
He authored Miami's Environ-
mental Ordinance and was ap-
pointed the City Commission's
environmentalist. He served on
the architects and planners com-
mittee for Downtown Miami.
Cohen Running For
House in District 105
Seeking the Dade District 105
seat in the Florida House of
Representatives, Ted Cohen is
coauthor of the condominium
reform bill and was a prime
backer of election reform statutes
and a spokesman for protection
of tenants' rights.
A past chairman of the Dade
Democratic Party and member of
the legislature in 1972-74. he also
served as state committeeman on
the Democratic Executive
Committee of Florida.
Transit Expert H olio way
Seeking Reelection
Called "Mr. Transportation''
by his colleagues, Vernon C.
Holloway is seeking reelection to
the 39th District Senate seat. A
Democrat who served eight years
in the House, he served on House
and Senate Transportation Com-
mittees and was prime sponsor of
several transportation bills in
1975.
He is credited with legislation
establishing the first state De-
partment of Transportation and
his mass transit bill has served as
a model for other states.
Commissioner Cain
Seeks Reelection
Harry P. Cain is seeking
reelection to the Dade County
Commission on which he has
been active in committees on
public health, local trans-
portation, building and construc-
tion. He was director of and
Metro's representative to the
State Association of County
Commissioners, and the Florida,
Dade County and National
Leagues of Cities.
He is active in the Better
Business Bureau, the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce and
United Way.
Mrs. FarrNCJWDelegate
To Women's Conferences
By ISABEL GROVE
Community leader Myra (Mrs.
Aaron) Farr was appointed by
Esther Landa, president. Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
as the official delegate to the 18th
Assembly of the Inter-American
Commission of Women. It
opened at the Sheraton Four
Ambassadors on July 27 and was
to continue through Thursday,
Aug. 5.
This is the first time the
Commission has met in other
than a capital city. Miami was
chosen because of its status as
one of the five official Bicen-
tennial cities.
The inaugural session on July
27 was very impressive, with
greetings from President Gerald
Ford presented by Herbert
Mitchell of the International Re-
lations Office of the State De-
partment, and welcomes from
Mayors Steve Clark and Maurice
Ferre. The major address of the
evening was given by Organiza-
tion of American States (OASl
secretary Dr. Jorge Luis Zelaya
Coronado.
The president, Senora Isabel
Arrua Valleuo, introduced the
Hon Rita Johnston, U.S. dele-
gate, who highlighted the first
national agenda of the Women's
Action Alliance and outlined 11
special areas of concern.
Mrs. Farr, a former national
vice president of NCJW, is also
representing the NCJW at the
Hemispheric Conference for
MYRA FARR
Women, which was to open at the
Fontainebleau Hotel on Thurs-
day with a reception by Dade
County and is to end on Sunday
Aug. 8.
Some 40 NCJW volunteers will
participate in the four-day Con-
ference, which brings together
representatives from North.
South and Central America
Among her many activities.
Mrs. Farr is on the board of
directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and is vice
chairman of its Community Re-
lations Committee. She is also on
five international groups, in-
cluding the International Affairs
Committee and Annual National
Support (ANSI.
Steinberg Seeks
House Reelection Baggett Is Candidate
Active in landlord-tenant law
and condominium reform. State
Rep. Paul B. Steinberg ID..
Miami) is seeking reelection to
the District 101 seat. Steinberg
sponsored consumer legislation
while a member of the Dade
Legislative Delegation, was the
prime sponsor of the new no-fault
insurance law and of medical
malpractice legislation, and has
been chairman of the House In-
surance Subcommittee.
Steinberg has served as vice
chairman of the Commerce Com-
mittee, and as a member of the
Natural Resources Committee
was instrumental in obtaining
the appropriation for redevelop-
ing Dade's beaches. The St.
Petersburg Times named him one
of the House's ten most valuable
legislators. A cum laude graduate
of the University of Miami and
Stetson Law School, he was
chosen one of the Outstanding
Young Men of America.
Allen Is Candidate For
County Commission
Charlie Allen, candidate for
County Commission in District 4,
believes that major areas of Dade
County are being shortchanged
because of population and repre-
sentation inequities in the eight
districts. He also sees "un-
authorized compensation" as a
major hazard in the Commission
and thus filed a full net-worth
statement.
Shack Candidate For
County Commission
Ruth Shack, candidate for
County Commission from Dis-
trict 4, was chairperson of the
education committee of Third
Century, U.S.A., and is a mem-
ber of Dade's Youth Planning
Council as well as of FIU's Title
IV Advisory Council.
She is active in the League of
Women Voters and was chair-
person of Dade's Women's
Political Caucus.
For Metro Commission
Retired Metro Police super-
visor Jimmy E. Baggett is a can-
didate for the County Cora-
mission in District 7. He believes
that metropolitan government
"must get closer to the people"
and that regional offices are
needed to provide greater access
to Metro's services. Educated at
Dade Junior College and the
Walsh School of Business Ad
ministration, he is past president
of the Dade County Police
Benevolent Association and is
active in numerous civic or-
ganizations and clubs.
Black Seeks Election
As State Rep
Hugo Black III is a candidate
for the Democratic nomination
for State Representative in
District 119. Grandson of the late
Supreme Court Justice. 23-year-
old Black wants to give younger
voters a voice in Tallahassee.
Class valedictorian at Palmetto
Senior High, he received a Silver
Knight honorable mention and
attended Yale University In
1974 he was a legislative as-
sistant in the Florida Legislature,
working on water quality control.
Gordon Seeking
Third House Term
Elaine Gordon is seeking her
third term as State Represen
tative from District 98. During
the 1974 session she chaired the
Select Committee on Human
Rights and worked to get the
Equal Rights Amendment
through the House.
She was appointed chairman of
the Health and Rehabilitative
Services Committee, which
resulted in laws on nursing
homes, state-subsidized adop
tions, and funding for training
family-practice physicians.
of


Friday. August 6. 1976
*Jenifi Ik mil m
Page 7-B
Miss Berman and Mr. Freedman
Are Married in Coconut Grove
Happenings
MRS. DAVID A. FREEDMAN
Fox Is Candidate
From District 110
Roberta Fox. candidate for
State Kepresentative from Dis-
rupt 110. has been endorsed by
"oncerned Democrats. She is
Ctive m the Women's Political
aucus and the National
rganization for Women. She
as chairperson of the Sex-Based
iscrimination Committee and of
he \d Hoc Committee on
amily Law for the Dade County
ommission on the Status of
omen. In 1975 Governor
skew appointed her to the Com-
ission on Marriage and the
amily Unit.
ISwann Seeks Seat On
Florida High Bench
Richard H. "Max" Swann,
|ormer chief judge in the Third
district Court of Appeal, is seek-
ng the Group I Florida Supreme
*ourt judgeship being vacated
i>y Justice B. K. Roberts. Swann
eived statewide recognition
irhen he challenged the price-
fix inn powers of the Florida Milk
Commission and also led the
Florida ^apportionment cam-
paign He has been a City of
amey for the city in right-of-way
nd public utilities matters. A
raduate of University of Miami
[aw School, he was recently ap-
ointed by the Governor to the
touncil of International
Development.
In a double-ring ceremony at
the Coconut Grove Hotel on July
25 Debra Lynn Berman and
David Allan Freedman wert
married by Rabbi Mitchel.
Chefitz. The bride's parents are
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Berman, her
husband's parents are Mr. and
Mrs. Barnett Freedman. all of
Southwest Miami.
Mrs. Freedman's sister-in-law,
Lisa Berman. was her matron of
honor, and the groom's father
served as his best man. The
flower girl was Storey Anne
Berman.
Mr. Freedman is an attorney
and Mrs. Freedman is a teacher.
On (heir return from a wedding
trip to San Francisco, Oregon
and Las Vegas, they will make
their home in the Kendale Lakes
area.
Hanken Is Candidate
For Metro Commission
Isadore Tzzy" Hanken. who
has never previously run for
office, is a candidate for Metro
Commission from District 4. Re-
tired from the U.S. Civil Service,
he is a graduate of the Pennsyl-
vania Institute of Criminology.
He was on the Community Ad-
visory Board of the Miami Police
in 1973 and has worked for the
police departments in Miami
Beach and Dade County and in
the Federal Border Patrol.
Hoodwin Is Candidate
For U.S. Congress
Herb Hoodwin, Republican
candidate for U.S. Congress from
District 14, has centered his plat-
form on the nation's economy.
An engineer and general con-
tractor, Hoodwin was instru-
mental in the development of the
South Florida Building Code. He
is a member of the Dade County
Board of Rules and Appeals and
is past secretary and chief
examiner of the City of Miami
Civil Service Board.
Ty Durham Running
For Metro Commission
Kendall businessman Tyrone
"Ty" Durham is seeking election
to the Metro Commission in
District 8. He is a member of the
Florida Electronics Service
Association and is on the state
board of directors. A native
Floridian who grew up in Miami,
he has served in various Lion's
Club offices.
A membership drive will be
kicked off this month by the Gift
of Life Chapter of the National
Asthma Center. Chapter presi-
dent >'.:;/ Rimland has said that a
coffee for prospective members
will be held Monday, August 16,
at 8 p.m. Details are available
from Judy Mann.
Concerned Citizens of
Operation Re-Entry's monthly
:oin and stamp show will be held
Sunday, Aug. 8, at Westland
Mall, 103rd St. exit of the
'almetto Expressway.
State Sen. Sherman S. Winn
ID., District 34) has been elected
to the board of directors of
Jefferson National Bank at Sun-
ny Isles, it was announced by
Arthur H. Courshon, chairman of
the board.
Sen. Winn has been general
manager of the Balmoral Hotel
and now The Suites of Balmoral,
a rental complex in Bal Harbour,
for 18 years. He was elected to
the Florida House in 1970, to the
Florida Senate in 1972, and re-
elected to the Senate in 1974 for a
four-year term. During the 1975
session, Sen. Winn was elected
president pro-tempore designate
for 1977-78.
Commissioner Redford
Seeking Reelection
Dade County Commissioner
James Redford, Jr., is seeking re-
election from District 6. His focus
has been on water reform (quality
and availability) and on saving
Biscayne Bay from exploitation
by commercial fishing interests.
Other environmental concerns on
which he has concentrated in-
clude better fiscal management in
the park and marinas and con-
tinued opposition to a regional
jetport in North Dade.
Early Miamian Watson
Seeks District 13 Seat
Dick Watson, candidate for the
U.S. Congress from District 13, is
among Miami's early settlers. He
attended local schools and was
graduated from the University of
Florida. The owner of a golf-
equipment business, he is
especially interested in prevalent
prime interest rates and the ef-
fects of their fluctuations and
control on the U.S. economy,
especially the problems of
unemployement.
ARMDI Chapter Names Board Members
And Announces Chanukah Festival
North Miami Beach Vice
Mayor Milton Littman and Dr.
Daniel Neal Reinhard of Miami
Beach have been elected to the
board of directors of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the American
Red Magen David for Israel.
Their election was announced
by Howard G. Kaufman, pres-
ident of the chapter, and by
Samuel Reinhard of Miami
Beach, Florida state chairman.
David Coleman is Florida presi-
dent of ARMDI, which has re-
gional offices in Miami Beach.
Littman is past president of
the North Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce, a director of the
Second National Bank of North
Miami Beach, a former trustee of
the Sephardic Jewish Center of
North Miami Beach and o mem-
ber of the Governor's Conference,
Right to Read Commission.
DR. REINHARD. a graduate
of Yeshiva University and of the
Howard University College of
Medicine, completed his training
at Mount Sinai Hospital in New
York. He is a diplomate of the
American Board of Internal
Medicine.
ARMDI also announced that
COUNCILMAN LITTMAN
the organization will present a
communitywide Chanukah Festi-
val for Israel and Salute to En-
tebbe at the Miami Beach
Theater of the Performing Arts,
Thursday night, Dec. 16.
All proceeds from the event,
scheduled for the first night of
Chanukah, will go to the building
by Magen David Adorn, Israel's
official Red Cross agency, of a
$10 million national blood bank.
Puzzled! Answers
aCcan
^ S Z H
N\JI S U
0 C f\D\S R
BHG H\E)E
(BECK f~l) N,
F T Y
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(CONGRESS) S U
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ANSWERS: Canadian, Jewish, Congress. Bronfman, Garber,
Lande. Robinson, Bennett. Abbey. Kanee, Becker.
fWS^WWW^^^^^^Wr^WMAWWriWftWArWWWW;


Page8-B
Jenist Ikridmr
Friday, August
6> 1976
i Wqt Ti
iRabbtmcal Page
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr Max A. lipschitz Rabbi Robert J. Orkand
Issues and Answers
Judaism: A Social System
Your Rabbi Speaks
By Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Congregation Bet Breira
Iaane: "Rabbi, I don't need a
synagogue to be Jewish."
Answer: This oft-repeated
comment is a self-indictment and
reflects a total lack of sensitivity
to the fundamental values of
Judaism. One cannot live a Jew-
ish life in isolation. From the time
of Hillel, who is quoted in Avoth
as saying "Do not separate your-
self from the community," to our
own time, when Federation's
rallying cry is "We Are One,"
Judaism in theory and in practice
has been a social system as well
as an individual belief system.
It is true that one is Jewish by
birth or choice and that this
identity carries through for a life-
time. It is likewise true that one
retains a Jewish dimension in-
dependent of the level of ob-
servance, ritual involvement,
study commitment or organiza-
tional participation. However, of
the many facets of Jewish ex-
pression, the synagogue is unique
as a vehicle that not only teaches
and practices Judaism but also
protects its very existence.
Historically, the synagogue
has been the place where Jewish
values have been preserved,
practiced, passed on to the next
generation. Philanthropy has
taken root out of the synagogue.
Scholarship has flourished,
because of the synagogue. Ritual
observance, personal identity,
cultural growth all of these
have flourished because of the
central strength of the religious
community, the "qahal" or con-
gregation whose heart is the
synagogue.
Today, more than ever,
vicarious fulfillment is in-
adequate. We cannot let Israel
speak for us any more than we
can speak for them. We cannot
forfeit the very opportunities
that our Soviet cousins long for.
Our dollars will be wasted if we
fail to commit ourselves in deeds
as well as dollars to the
strengthening of our individual
synagogues.
More Sharing Is Needed
Inside Judaica
Q What has been the Jewish
attitude toward sport*?
A. There is only one clear
reference to sports in the Bible.
namely, to archery as can be seen
from the story of David and
Jonathan (I Samuel 20:21-22).
but this omission might have
been purely coincidental.
At the beginning of the Mac
cabean periods, in the second
century B.C.E., circumstances
conspired to make sporting
activities as such, "for the sake of
the game," repugnant to Jews as
the very antithesis of Jewish
(deals, and this approach
remained characteristic of
Judaism until the dawn of the
modern period, according to the
Encyclopaedia Judaica.
One of the overt signs of the
attempt to Hellenize Judea was
the establishment in 174 B.C.E.:
of a gymnasium in Jerusalem
where the participants engaged
in their sporting activities in the
nude. Sport thus became
associated with the alien and
dangerous Hellenistic culture.
The Olympic Games were con-
nected with the idolatrous cult.
There is evidence nevertheless
that in countries under Greek
influence sports were indulged in
by Jews. The opposition to sports
became more outspoken when
Roman theaters and circuses
were linked together as the very
antithesis of "synagogue and
school, according to the EJ.
An added factor was the great
cruelty associated with Roman
sport, which was not confined to
the characteristic aspect of
gladiatorial contests, and the
humane aspect of the Jewish op-
position finds expression in the
ruling that "one is permitted to
go to stadiums if by his shouting,
he may save the victim's life "
The first Jewish ruler to en-
courage sports was Herod, who,
between 37 and 4 B.C.E.. erected
sports stadia in some cities
and introduced a Palestinian
Olympiad for which he brought
athletes from all parts of the
world.
There are few references to
organized sport during the
Middle Ages. Jews in Spain dis-
tinguished themselves in the art
of fencing, but otherwise the
sports Jews indulged in belonged
either to recreations or in-
tellectual pastimes or to chil-
dren's games. The most popular
sport in the Middle Ages appears
to have been ball games, which
were permitted even on Sabbath,
though the Midrash gives as one
of the reasons for the destruction
of Jerusalem that "they played
ball on the Sabbath."
In 1386 there were Jewish
tournaments in Germany, where,
later in the 15th century, Jews
participated in competitions in
running, jumping, throwing and
bowling. Jews distinguished
themselves in sports com-
petitions in Rome in 1487, 1502
and 1596. There is even a song
about Jewish runners composed
in 1513.
Though most of the Jews in the
19th century lived in conditions
unfavorable to athletic pursuits,
a number of them did well in
Europe and America: in 1896
seven Jewish athletes won 13
medals at the first modern Olym-
pic Games in Athens.
In a speech before the Fifth
Zionist Congress in 1901 Max
Nordau asked the Jewish people
to renew their interest in sports
and physical fitness. His call was
answered by the Maccabi move
ment, which spread around the
world. It was Hungary that
produced the most successful
Jewish athletes in Europe. Early
in the 20th century immigrant
children learned the games of
their new countries, while
professional sports attracted
many Jews throughout the
world.
By WILLIAM H. SHAPIRO
Rabbi. Temple Beth El
West Palm Beach
"How can I myself alone bear
your cumbrance. and your
burden, and your strife? Get you.
from each of your tribes, wise
men, and understanding, and full
knowledge, and I will make them
heads over you" (1,12-13).
On Shabbat Chazon. we read
the first chapters in
Deuteronomy. Coming just
before Tisha b' Av. thi9 portion is
well suited for the Sabbath, the
Haftorah. the first chapter of
Isaiah. Like that chapter, it is
marked by the note of criticism,
complaint and fault-finding.
We must admit that Moses
was not so much scolding his
people as endeavoring to help
them help themselves.
He realized that even a God-
appointed leader like himself
needed human assistance as well
as divine help.
MAY NOT WE TODAY adopt
this attitude of Moses for our
own guidance? What is our
greatest present-day need? It is
more cooperation, more sharing
T.V. Programs
Sunday. Aug. 8
"Jewish Warship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi
Solomon H. Waldenberg
Israelite Center Temple
CANDLELIGHTING
TIME
-1- 10 AB 5736 -*
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: What is the opinion of
Jewish tradition in regard to
dealing with kidnappers or
hijackers when it is a question of
saving the victim's life or
jeopardizing the rest of the
community to further incidents?
Answer: It must be stated at
the outset that such cases require
individual review in each incident
and can never rely upon a blanket
rule covering all cases. In
Talmudic literature we have a
strange enigma of analysis.
On the one hand, redeeming
captives ("Pidyon Sh'vuin") is
considered among the greatest of
virtuous deeds (Baba Batra 8a).
One may even sell a Holy Scroll
in order to be able to ransom such
a victim (Tosafot Baba Bathra
8b).
On the other hand, the amount
to which one can go in payment is
limited "for the sake of the
preservation of order in society"
(Gittin, Mishnah 4:6).
Medievalists are well aware of the
case of the famous Rabbi Meir of
Ruttenberg in the 13th century
who forbade the community to
pay the excessive ransom that
was asked for his release lest it
unleash a pattern of kidnappings
which would endanger the lives of
many in the community.
He eventually died in captivity
and his body had to be ransomed
in order to receive the proper and
traditional Jewish burial It is
thus obvious that the Jewish
community has had to face this
issue squarely a number of times
in the past. Yet each case
received individual con-
sideration.
of tasks and burdens, more
participation in the work which
every well-organized, properly
functioning, well-ordered
community requires.
Scan the list of workers in any
community. Analyze the
directorates of the average
Jewish institutions. See how few
workers there are, how the same
names occur again and again in
the various boards!
Why should it be so? Can there
be, should there be, a monopoly
in benevolent work? Are they not
doing the work of the whole
community? Then why should
their burden and responsibility
fall on the shoulders of just a
few?
What were the qualifications
he expected in those who were to
cooperate with Moses? They were
to be "wise and understanding
men," and full of knowledge
the learning, the literature and
the life that has ever made the
Jew distinctive.
HOW CAN WE GET more
Jews to assume their share of the
burdens and privileges of
Jewish communal life? Do not the
two factors go hand in hand? Is
not our leadership limited
because Jewish knowledge is at
so low an ebb? The average of
Jewish learning is far too low;
men of Hebrew letters are far too
few.
That is why there is not
enough sense of responsibility,
not enough capacity for sacrifice,
not enough readiness to assume
public duty and communal tasks.
This is an age of specialization
We are only too eager to leave
matters to the expert.
Perhaps that is why Jews w
willing to leave Jewish study to
the very old and very pwa
praying and meditation to the
rabbi, Jewish education to the
professional teacher, relief work
to the welfare worker, the effort
on behalf of Israel to a few I
Zionist idealists.
But how shall we proceed tc I
remedy these defects? Moses'
may have wished. "Would that:
all the Lord's people were
prophets." But he began the I
selection of leaders on a smaller
scale.
We believe that present-day
Jewry still has the will to live. We
believe this generation feels that
the phrase "God has implanted
everlasting life in our midst
applies to us no less than to our
predecessors.
THEN LET A LARGER and j
an ever-increasing number o(
Jews turn again to their Jewisfc
heritage. Let them equip
themselves with knowledge
brace themselves with loyalty
enlighten their lives withl
devotion to things Jewish.
Thus will they prepare for]
intelligent, consecrated, purl
poseful participation in Jewish I
life. Taking their stand by tat'
side of the leaders who are x
eager to share their authority
with all "who come in the name of
the Lord," they will be inspired]
by the thought that they can be
builders and rebuilders of Is-[
reel's destiny.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Vaethanan
\"Hear, O Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is One" 'Deut
6.4).
ae than an The portion begins with Moses' plea to God for
rmission to enter the Promised Land and God's refusal The
iaw-giver warns the children of Israel against practicing
idolatry in Canaan, calling their attention to their specia
istory and mission. "Did ever a people hear the voice of ('"
speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, ant
live? Or hath God assayed to go and take Him a nation from
.he midst of another nation, by trials, by signs, and by
venders, and by war, and by a mighty hand, and by an out
itretched arm, and by great terrors, according to all that th
>rd your God did for you in Egypt before thine eyes?"
Deuteronomy 4.33-34). Moses sets aside three cities of refugi
>n the east side of the Jordan. He repeats the Ten Command
tents, with slight variations for the purpose of clarity. Thi
st section of the Shema, beginning "Thou shalt love th<
rd thy God with all thy heart" and ending "And thou shalt
write them upon the door-posts of thy house, and upon thy
jates," is in this portion (Deuteronomy 6.4-9). Moses urge*
[the Israelites to show no mercy to the seven CanaaniU
[nations. "And when the Lord thy God shall deliver them uf
(fore thee, and thou shalt smite them; then thou shalt utter
ly destroy them; thou shalt make no covenant with them, noi
show mercy unto them; neither shalt thou make marriage!
|with them: thy daughter thou shalt not give unto his son, nor
this daughter shalt thou take unto thy son For thou art j
holy people unto the Lord thy God: the Lord thy God hat!
chosen thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that art
upon the face of the earth" (Deuteronomy 7.2-6). Finally
Moses stresses the need for strict observance of the variou^
ritual commandments.


Friday, August 6,1976
*Jewiti IhrHictr
Page 9-B
Religious Directory
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGATION,
fts SW 47th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Zvl
Raphaely. Cantor Aron Ban Aron. (1)
ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION. 2533
SW "th Ava. Conservative Cantor
Sol Pakowltz. (2)
BETH AM TEMPLE. SSO N. Kendall
Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Chetitz. (3)
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
107SS SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabaehnikoff (3-A)
(BETH DAVID. 2*25 SW 3rd Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. (4-A)
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW 120th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. M-B)
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ava.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max
Shapiro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev.
Mendel Gutterman. (*)
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 4431 SW tth St.
Conservative. Rabbi Charles Rubel.
(8)
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. MOO
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman.(S-A)
(B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 113rd St. Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelling. Cantor
J.ick Lerner (34)
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF'
GREATER MIAMI
South Florida's Pioneer
Reform Synagogue
137 NE 19th St Miami
571-5900
Dr Joseph R Narot Senior Rabbi
Services Every
Friday atl p.m.
Rabbi Narot will discuss
l.i .i. I mil I imiiiI.i. Hi Mnr\ i>f
Thr K4-MIH- nf the Haulage*"
Membership Inquiries Welcomed
(ISRAELITE CENTER. 317S SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass.
(U)
OR OLOM TEMPLE. I7SS SW 14th St.
Conservative. Rabbi David M. Baron.
(13)
(ISRAEL SOUTH TEMPLE (formerly
Beth Tikva). V02S Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. (13-A)
(SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 304. Conservative. Rabbi
Edwin P. Farber. (t)
(ZION TEMPLE. WOO Miller Rd.
Conservative. Rabbi Norman N.
Shapiro. Cantor Ben Dickson. (14)
HIALEAH
TIFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. (SI E.
4th Ave. Conservative. (IS)
NORTH MIAMI
(BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2725 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rabbi
Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. (35)
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7001 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
(17)
BETH EL. 2400 Pint Tree Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. (5)
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. (II)
(BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
(1)
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1S45
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
(20)
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. (21)
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. (21-A)
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION. 935
Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I. M.
Trooper. (22)
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CON-
GREGATION. 4*4 Meridian Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig.
(22-A)
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 17tth St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson. (22 B)
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph Blston. (44)
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. (23)
CUBAN SEPMARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 71S Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Melamed. (23 A)
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701
Washington Ave. Conservative. Dr.
Irving Lehrman. Cantor Zvl Adler.
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE
5445 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach
Conservative
Services every Saturday
at (a.m.
844-4353
)
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. (25)
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Or. Tibor H. Stern. Cantor
Meyer Engel. (24)
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. (27)
LUBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Korf. (47)
MENORAH TEMPLE. 420 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz. Cantor Nico Feldman.
(2i)
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein.(29)
0SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 445
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmias. (31)
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A.
Weberman. (80)
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
TsviG. Schur (321
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. (32-A)
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai
Chaimovits. (32-B)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
(ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conservative.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Cantor Ian
Alpern. (33)
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE3rd Ave. Orthodox. (33-A)
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
I0S1 Interama Blvd. Conservative.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. (34)
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER
571 NE 171st Street
North Miami Beach
451-9042
Rabbi Nesim Gambach
Friday services 8 p.m.
Saturday services-9a.m.
(34)
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Oov
Bidnick. (38)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER
MIAMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi ZevLeH. (39)
CORAL GABLES
8JUDEA TEMPLE. 5S50 Granada Blvd.
Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat.
Canter Rita Shore. (40)
8ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.
Conservative. (41)
8HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT
SYNAGOGUE. University of Miami.
1100 Miller Drive. Traditional and
Liberal Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis. (48)
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. (SO)
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER. 1*3
NE Sth St. Conservative. (51)
FORT LAUDERDALE
8BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowltz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. (42)
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3245 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi
Joel S. Goor Cantor Jerome Klement.
(43)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. (44-A)
Bar Mitzvah
MARK D. GOLDSTEIN
On Saturday at 8:45 a.m. in
the main sanctuary of Temple
Ner Tamid, Mark Damon, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Goldstein
of North Miami Beach, will be
Bar Mitzvah.
Mark is a student at the He-
brew Academy, where he has
received honors in math and
Hebrew. He enjoys fishing, boat-
ing and baseball.
Goldstein Running For
County Court Post
Harvey L. Goldstein has an-
nounced his candidacy for elec-
tion to Dade County Court,
Group 6. A former Assistant
State Attorney, he resigned his
position to avoid conflict while
campaigning.
Goldstein holds B.A. and J.D.
degrees from University of
Florida, and served as Chief
Prosecutor in environmental
crimes and pollution control and
in the County Court Division,
where he headed a staff of 11
attorneys. He is a member of the
Dade, Florida and American Bar
Associations. ACLU and the
Dade County Democratic
Executive Committee.
RABBI NICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
oo Biscayne Blvd., Miami, KU. SS1S7.
.1784000. Rabbi Solomon Schlff,
Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICANHEBREW
CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flaglrr St. Miami, Fla. ssi.il.
S78-4SBS. Rabbi San ford Shapero,
Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1110 NE 16.1rd St., North Miami Beach,
Kla.SSlK.B41 4U1H.
Kabbl Seymour Friedman,
Executive Director.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
MosheBomier.(S2>
DEERFIELDBEACH
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
BETH ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE.
Century Village East. Conservative.
Rabbi David Berent. (42)
MARGATE
BETH HILLEL CONGREGATION. 7440
Margate Blvd. Conservative. Cantor
Charles Perlman.
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. (49)
CORALSPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 3721 NW 100th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Max Weitz. (44)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
414 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danriaer /171
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900
University Drive. Conservative.
Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin. (43)
HOLLYWOOD
8BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 42nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47-B)
'Championship Season' Opening
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosen
feM. (45)
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4401
Arthur St. Conservative. Rabbi
Morton Malavsky. Cantor Irving
Gold. (44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
Cantor Yehuda Heilbraun. (45)
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. (47-C)
PLANTATION
0PLANTATION JEWISH
CONGREGATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J.
Harr.(44)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (49)
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 4920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. (48)
Member of the Rabbinical Association
ot Greater Miami
In yet another coup for local
jtheatergoers, William Conrad,
TV's "Cannon," will appear in a
rare in-person performance
during a week's run of Jason
Millers award-winning drama.
"That Championship Season,"
opening at the Miami Beach
Theater of the Performing Arts
Rossmoor Coconut
Creek Is Growing
Rossmoor Coconut Creek, the
adults-only community being de-
veloped by Rossmoor Corp. on a
600-acre site between Pompano
Beach and Margate, continues at
a steady rate with sales in excess
of $21 million and construction in
its fifth stage.
Construction at Rossmoor
Coconut Creek, located a half-
mile west of the Florida Tu.npike
Exit 24, began in 1973 with the
304 condominium apartments of
Bahama Village.
Rossmoor's prices range from
$21,900 to $45,500, and six dif-
ferent condominium floor plans
are available. There is no recrea-
tion or land lease, and all deposits
are placed in escrow to bear in-
terest to the purchaser at the
existing passbook rate.
A total-environment com-
munity. Rossmoor has a $2.5
million clubhouse and recrea-
tional center, 18-hole golf course,
tennis courts, three swimming
pools, cycling and jogging paths,
a health services center, com-
munity-owned transportation
system and many other features
and facilities.
Rossmoor Coconut Creek
eventually will have 24 villages
with a Caribbean theme and an
overall population of ap-
proximately 10,000. Residents
must be at least 21 and one
resident member of each house-
hold must be at least 45.
Dermer, Teacher,
Runs for School Board
Dr. Al Dermer is seeking
election to the School Board in
District 5. He has taught at the
elementary, junior high, adult
education senior high levels and
at Miami-Dade, Barry College
and Florida A & M. He was as-
sistant director of the Washing-
ton, D.C., Head Start Program,
first vice president of the Class-
room Teachers Association and is
active in the Florida and National
Education Associations. He is
concerned with improved cur-
riculum and greater respect for
performance and results.
Nikki Beare Is
House Hopeful
Public relations executive
Nikki Beare is a candidate for
State Representative in District
118. Recently appointed to the
Florida Insurance Commissions
Task Force and chairperson of
the Dade Fair Housing and Em-
ployment Appeals Board, she has
been active in many local com-
munity organizations and on
planning boards and was County
vice chairperson for Jimmy
Carter's primary campaign.
Ex-Rep. Malloy Seeks
New House Seat
Former State Rep. John Cyril
Malloy, the first Republican ever
elected to the Florida House from
Dade County, is running for the
District 118 seat vacated by
House Majority Leader Dick
Clark. As a member of the House
Environmental Protection Com-
mittee, Malloy drafted the legis-
lation under which Biscayne Bay
has become a state park and
aquatic preserve. A past presi-
dent of the Federal Bar Associa-
tion in South Florida, Malloy is a
member of the National Highway
Commission.
on Tuesday, Aug. 10 at 8:30
p.m.
Directed by Jerry Adler, who
was nominated by the New York
Drama Desk as Best Director for
the current revival ol My Fair
Lady," the play also stars Danny
Aiello, Michael Fairman, Eddie
Jones and Peter Masterson.
Presented by Zev Mufman in
association with Theater Now,
Inc., "That Championship Sea-
son" follows the Aug. 8closing of
"Mame" starring Angela Lans-
bury and will run through
Sunday, Aug. 15.
Rep. Bloom
Seeks Reelection
District 100 Rep. Elaine Bloom
is seeking reelection to the
Florida House from her district.
During her first term she was
prime sponsor of several bills
that are now law in Florida and
has served on the Committees on
Appropriations, Education and
Natural Resources. She also
holds positions on the Florida
Human Relations Commission,
the Right to Read Advisory
Council and the Juvenile De-
linquency Task Force of the
Governor's Commission on
Criminal Justice Standards and
Goals.
Rep. Bloom, who was House
delegate to the Senate's Select
Committee on Property Rights,
attended the recent Democratic
National Convention as an
alternate. In 1975 she served as a
House negotiator on the En-
vironmental Reorganization Act
panel, the only first-term legis-
lator to be appointed to a major
conference committee. In 1976
she was appointed to the con-
ference committee on the budget
and on educational funding.
Rep. Bloom's achievements
have been acknowledged by
certificates of appreciation from
the Metro Commission, Metro
Firefighters, FIU and the Com-
munications Workers of America,
who made her an honorary mem-
ber. She is the recipient of the
Hannah G. Solomon Award of
the National Council of Jewish
Women and last year was named
Outstanding Woman in Politics
by the Dade Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Club.
Ex-Vice Mayor Rubin
Seeks Circuit Judgeship
G. Milton Rubin has an-
nounced his candidacy for Circuit
Judge in Dade County. Holder of
an LL. B. from Northeastern
University and a J.D. from
University of Miami Law School,
he is admitted to practice in
Florida. Massachusetts, the Fifth
U.S. Court of Appeals and the
Federal Court for the Southern
District of Florida and the Dis-
trict of Massachusetts.
A member of the Dade,
Florida, Massachusetts and
American Bar Associations, he
was elected to three terms as Vice
Mayor and City Councilman in
North Miami Beach, retiring un-
defeated in 1975.
Martin Running For
Circuit Judgeship
Wm. "Bill C. Martin has
announced his candidacy for
Dade Circuit Court Judge, Group
6. A former judge on Police and
Fireman Trial Boards in
Washington and trial judge for
the Florida Industrial Com-
mission, Martin has been an
attorney for 30 years and holds
three degrees from George
Washington University. He
served on the University of
Miami Law Center board of
governors and is a former vice
president of the Federal Bar,
South Florida Chapter. He is a
founder and former president of
Big Brothers Association of Dade
and was named Big Brother of
the Year in 1968.


PagelO-B
* Jen iti fkr/cJiar
Friday, August 6.1975
Sipkin In County Commission Race
George Sipkin. who helped l waa in8trumentol
found the Condominium Execu-
tives Council of Florida and has
been Condominium Com-
missioner, is a candidate for Dade
County Commissioner, District 1.
A retired Federal employe, he
helped draft and secure passage
of the State Condominium Act
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-494*
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE ESTATE OF
ARCHER U. RODNEY
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE
YOl/ ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
ARCHER U. RODNEY, deceased. File
Number 76-4M6. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flakier Street. Miami. FL 33130 The co-
personal representatives of the estate
are RE NEE Ll'CILLE RODNEY and
GLORIA MARGOLIN whose addresses
are 1190 NE 86th Street. Miami. FL
3313* and 1940 Biarritz Drive Miami
Beach. FL 33141. respectively The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim Is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each personal
representative
All persons Interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representatives, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration. August 6.
1976
RENEE LUCILLE RODNEY
and
GLORIA MARGOLIN
As Co-Personal Representatives of the
Estate of ARCHER U RODNEY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
SPARBER ZEMEL. ROSKIN.
HEILBRONNER AND KARP PA.
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami. FI.S3131
Telephone: (306 388-7990
Aug 6. 13. 1976
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
ZALDIVAR COOPERATIVE at 9300
South Dadeland Blvd.. Suite 702. Miami,
Fla.. 33156 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ZALDIVAR ASSOCIATION. INC
a Florida Corp.
WOLF ft SCHONINGER. P.A.
Attorneys for Applicant
Aug. 6, IS, 20, 27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
NGJ PARTNERSHIP at 2401 Brlckell
Avenue. Suite 6-T. Miami. Fla., 33129
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
NORMAN GA8LOWTTZ.
joined by Ms wife
JOAN GASLOWTTZ. 33 1-3 percent
GERARD M SCHOCKEN. SS 1-3 per-
cent
JOEL R LEVINE 331-1 percent
Aug. 6.13. 20.27
NOTICE UNDER
ncrmoi s name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SECURITT STORAGE CLOSETS at
1440 NE 131 St.. N. Miami. Fla. intend to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dada County. Florid*
ROBERTD. GROSSMAN. SR
CAROLYN FR AN Kl JN GROSS MAN
DAVID M ABEL
IRENE ABEL
ALANM MEDOF
Attorney for Applicant .,.,-,
Aug. 6, 13.20,27
-------------NO+ld UN6I1
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring to 'nsraire In
busmen under Jhe fictitious name of
8ANFORD H KRAMER. PA at HM
NW 14th St Miami. "* "*"*"
to reelster said name with the Clem
of tne Orcult Court of Dade Countv.
F,"r'd"sANFORD H KRAMER
SANFORD H KRAMER
Attomev for ..._ .
SANFORD H KRAMER PA
1150 NW 14th St Miami s_^
was instrumental m pre-
paring the Dade County Compre-
hensive Land Use Development
Plan._________________________
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 74-4493
Division JOSE PH NESBITT
IN RE ESTATE OF
MANYAT ADLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
MANYA T. ADLER. deceased. File
Number 76-4693. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 5 Island Avenue. Miami Beach,
Florida The personal representative of
the estate Is THEODORE SCHEIN.
whose address Is 523 Forest Avenue,
Paramus, New Jersey. The name and
address of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim Is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons Interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this NoUce of
Administration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration Aug 6.1976
THEODORE SCHEIN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of MANYAT ADLER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MICHAEL A BIENSTOCK
SHAPIRO. FRIED. WEIL
ftSCHEER
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone O0SI 638-6361
Aug, 6. 13.1976
'I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 74-5012
Division JOHN R BLANTON
IN RE ESTATE OF
DAVID EISENSTEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
Y< >I ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
DAVID EISENSTEIN deceased. File
Number 76-5012. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida The personal representative of
the estate Is LEO EISENSTEIN, whose
address Is Apt. 28, 900 Sixth Street,
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
fill- with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated. If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each personal
representative.
All persona Interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent's
win. the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
NoUce of Administration: August 6,
1976
S-LEO EISENSTEIN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of DAVID EISENSTEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT AND GALBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone 672-3100
Aug 6. 13,1976
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
HTM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 74-23*70
In Re the Marriage of
MARVIN MOODY. Husband.
and
JANET V. MOODY. Wife.
NOTICE Or ACTION
TO JANETV MOODY
450 Liberty Street
Boonton, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
-defense to It. If any. upon STEPHEN L.
RASKIN. PeUUoners attorney, whose
address Is 7200 Bird Road, P.O. Box
7602. Miami. Florida. 33155. on or before
Sept 10. 1976. and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand the seal of this
Court on July 30.1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of Said Court
By WILLIE BRADSHAW JR
As Deputy Clerk
Aug. 6. 13.20.27. 1976
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-23535
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
SAUL SILVERS TONE.
Husband.
and
ROSALYN SILVERSTONE.
Wife
TO: ROSALYN SILVERSTONE
c o Michael White
4938 Jean Brlllant
Montreal, Quebec. Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an acUon for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If an v. to It on KWTTNEY
KROOP ft SCHEINBERG. P A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose address Is
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
September 10. 1976. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 29th
day of July. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM KLIMINSKI
As Deputv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
KWTTNEY. KROOP ft
SCHEINBERG. PA
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Aug. 6, 13.20.27.1976
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MADEIRA VILLAGE at 202 Roberts
Bldg 28 W Flagler St.. Miami. Fla .
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
NIVARIA INVESTMENTS. INC.
A FLA CORP
Alvaro J Cabrera. President
LOPEZ* HARRIS
ELLIOT HARRIS
202 Roberts Bldg
Miami, Fla
Attorneys for Applicant
Aug 6. 13,20,27. 1976
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
BISCAYNE 22 at Suite 6-T. 2451 Brlckell
Avenue, Miami, Fla.. 33129 Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida
NORMA N GASLOWITZ AND
JOAN GASLOWTTZ. His Wife, 33 1-3
percent
GE RARD SCHOCKEN, S3 1-3 percent
JOEL R LEVINE. 33 1-3 percent
Aug. 6. IS. 20, 27.1976
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
ANNUAL REPORT
The annual report of the private
foundation of The Louis Schwartsman
Scholarship Fund, required to be Bled
under secUon 5080 of the Internal
Revenue Code, is available for public
Inspection at its office 3122 Pine Trite
Dr.. Miami Beach. Fla 83140 on busi-
ness days from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M
by any dtlsen, upon request, within 180
days after this publication
JACOB KATZMAN
Chairman of the Trustee
Aug. 8.1*78
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
MARSEILLE ASSOCIATES, at 1168
Marseilles Drive, Miami Beach, Florida
Intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ELENA GART
ALEX GARDNER
SYLVIA GARDNER
MIL TON GART
WAYNE GART
BENJAMIN COREN
CHESNACOREN
Aug. 8.13. 20, 27,1976
LEGAL NOTICE__________
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 74 4715
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RALPH T. EILAND.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
RALPH T. EILAND. deceased. File
Number 76-4785, Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 73 W Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of the
estate Is VIRGINIA E MAURER.
whose address Is 2002 Bramblewood
Drive, N.E.. Atlanta. Ga 30329 The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated If the
claim Is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
suited If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described The claim-
ant shall deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the clerk to
mall one ropy to each personal
representative
All persons interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed a re
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE I'ATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the decedent s
will, the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTION'S NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration August 6.
1976
VIRGINIA E MAURER
At Personal Representative of the
Estate of RALPH T EILAND
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
HARRY I. BASSETT
1401 Brlckell Ave. Suite 806
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone 377 3561
______________________Aug. 6. 13. 1976
LEGAL NOTICE
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO 76 2945
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTALDENa k a
ABRAHAM GOLDSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE
YOl' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
ALBERT ALDEN a k a ABRAHAM
GOLDSTEIN, deceased, late of Dade
County. Florida. File Number 76-2945 Is
pending In the Circuit Court in and for
Dade County.Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which Is 3rd Floor. Dade
County Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130 The
personal representative of this estate is
MORRIS GOLDSTEIN, whose address
Is 20251 NE 2nd Avenue. North Miami.
Florida 33179 The name and address of
the attorney for the personal
representaUve are set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against this estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim la not yet due, the date when It
win become due shall be stated If the
claim is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk of the above
styled court to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal represen-
tative.
All persona Interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the decedent's
will, the qualifications of the personal
representaUve, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Florida on this 28th
day of July. 1976.
MORRIS GOLDSTEIN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of ALBERT ALDEN
a / k / a ABRAHAM GOLDSTEIN
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 6th day of August
1976
THEODORE M TRUSHDN
LAW OFFICES, PA.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 600
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone 582-4801
Attorney For
Personal RepresentaUve
Aug 6. IS, 1976
IN THE CIRCUIT COuTtof~TmT~
HTHJUDICIALCIRCUITINANr;
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORID*
GENERAL JURISDICTION Division
CASE NO. 74-227.5 N
NOTICE OF SUIT
IN RE: The Marriage of
MAGGIE TAYLOR.
PeUtloner*/ Wife,
and
JAMES TAYLOR.
Respondent i Husband
TO: JAMES TAYLOR
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED thai
a Petition for DlssoluUon of Marrtam
has been filed against you bv vour WtfL
MAGGIE TAYLOR The I'etlUon
contains a statement that vour Wtf.
MAGGIE TAYLOR, has a special
equity In the followlngdesi rlbed
property and petitions this Honorable
Court to award her the entire property
Lot 5. Block 2. PINEWOOD. accord'int
to the Plat thereof, as recorded In
Plat Book 6. at Page 103. f Ui
Public Records of Dade County
Florida: ai.k^a 1128 Northwest sin
Terrace. Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY REQl'IKEDto
serve a copy of your Answer thereto on
Wife's Attorney. SHELDON B
P ALLEY. 1497 Northwest 7th Street
Miami. Florida. 33125. and tile ine
original Answer In the office of
of the Circuit Court on or before the 3rd
day of Sept. 1976. other:*e a,,
allegations of said Petition will be taken
as confessed against vou
DATED at Miami. Dad. I
Florida, this 22nd day of Jul\
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Said Court
By M .1 HARTNETT
DEPUTY CLERK
____________________July 30: Aug
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C IRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO: 74-22910
NOTICE OF ACTION OF
ADOPTION
IN HE
The matter of the Adoption by
MILTON LEONARD KLEIN
LINDA LEE KLEIN
TO Richard Bowling
Residence Unknown
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Petition of Adoption has
been filed in the above cap'.,
wherein you have been name! ai the
putative Father of a baby boy burr on
the 5th day of July. 197 at Ml
Hospital. Miami Beach DAdi
Florida to MAHTA WEISSBER IER
out of wedlock, and you havi been
named as the putative Father of laid in
fant child and this cause shall con
to be heard for Final Hearing ai": fyou
have any objections therein \
required to serve a copy of -
jectlons. If any. on ROBERT H
BURNS, ESQ. Attorney for Pet
whose address Is 420 Uncoil
Suite 480, Miami Beach, El
and file the original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or bel
tember3. 1976. otherwise a Iktfa
be entered against you for your relief
demanded In the Complaint or I
and any rights that you have had shall
be terminated
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive *
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
court at Miami. Florida on this 2
of July. 1976.
RICHARD I' BRINKEH
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY C P COPELAND
AS DEPUTYCLERK
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL i
ROBERT H BURNS. ESQ.
Law Offices of Burns It Arnovlux
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 450
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
1338 4421 I
Attorney for Petitioner
_____________ July SO: Aug .13.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO.: 74-229';
NOTICE OF ACTION OF
ADOPTION
IN RE:
ADOPTION BY : WARREN BULLIS
of a minor female child
TO: William Jacobsen
Last Known residence
unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a 1 eutloo
for ADOPTION of your minor daughttr
has been filed against you and you art
required to serve a copy of your written
defense. If any, to It on GLADYS
GERSON. ESQUIRE, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address la 101 NW l2tt
Avenue, Miami. Florida SS128, and OK
the original with the Clerk of the above-
styled Court on or before September I.
19781 otherwise a default will be entrred
against you lor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive weeki In
the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
Court at Miami. Dade County. Florid*
this 23rd day of July. 1978.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
STONE, SOSTCHTN.
KOSS A GONZALEZ PA
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida S3128
Attorney for PeUUoner
July SO; Aug 6.13.


[ Friday. August 6. 1976
knisti flcridliair)
Page 11-B
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
, lNTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
c.EVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-22I4*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
LltK The marriage of
li is BARR. husband, and
L\H\KK.wlfe
k ANN HARR
...OI'KAM'ARKWAY
t,.KI.YN. NEW YORK
fvoi \RK HEREBY NOTIFIED that
In ictloil tor Dissolution of Marriage
I n filed against you and you are
U.ilred to serve a copy of your written
C,.nws if Miy. to It on ARTHUR H
FtpsON .niomey for Petitioner, whose
|ri,lre.. is 1980 South Ocean Drive.
V, Uldale, Florida 33008. and file the
rlKtnal with the clerk of the above
(vied court on or before August 27th.
Vii otherwise a default will be entered
kalnsl you for the relief demanded In
V complaint or petition.
[WITNESS my hand and the seal of
hid court at Miami. Florida on this 16th
v of July. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I lade County. Florida
ByM KI.IMINSKI
As Deputy Clerk
Icircuit Court Sean
July 23,30. Aug. 6.13
7tme CIRCUIT COURTOFTHE
IITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
[ENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO '4 22402
NOTICE OF ACTION
k KK The Marriage of
\ \i l in A HENDEZl'. Petitioner.
Iicl
fc'UOBENDEZI .Respondent.
In Jl'LIO HENDEZU
, ; ran 338-43
i Victoria
I Peru
| V( II ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
Petition for Dissolution of your
I has been filed and com-
k : in this Court and you are
Iqiured to serve a copy of your written
I it any. to It on MIU.ER AND
SSKI.I. attorneys for Petitioner,
jtOM address Is 1408 Alnsley Building,
ji.imi Klorlda 33132, U.S.A., and file
original with the Clerk of the above-
tried Court on or before August 27.
It* otherwise a default will be entered
Jams! you for the relief prayed for In
Petition
Ins Notice shall be published once
t .. ok lor lour consecutive weeks In
HE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
IWITNB88 my hand and the seal of
lid Court at Miami, Dade County.
|orida this 20th day of July. 1976
RICHARD I' BRINKER
As Clerk of said Court
By WILLIE bradshaw JR
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal I
ILLER AND RU8SBLL
lomeyi (or Petitioner
l Huildlng
|anu Klorlda 33132
-
July88.30: AUg R. 13
llNTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE
>H JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
I FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
ENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No 76 222 50
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Re The Marriage Of
IMI KI.KITCHER. husband
fll N KUTCHER, wife
HELEN Kl TCHER
..leliellcatessen
I Ul Avenue
k Vork. New York
I \P.E HEREBY notfled that a
Itition for Dissolution of Marriage has
"en filed against you and you are
Irvhv required to serve a copy of your
Vier or other pleading to the Petition
the Husband's Attorney. LESTER
KJER8, whose address Is 1464 NW 17
enue. Miami. Florida 33128. and file
i orimnal with the aerk of the above
?led Court on or before this 3rd day of
pt 1976, or a Default will be entered
ainst you
OATED this 19th day of July. 1978
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By WILLIE BRADSHAW JR.
July 13.30; Aufl.4,13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
IITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
'ENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 74-22277
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
< RE The Marriage of
SAY WOOD MITCHELL, Petitioner,
ind
Elizabeth Mitchell. Respondent.
It) ELIZABETH MITCHELL
|102 West Broad Street
vannah. Georgia
for ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to
B,,.0ur Answer or other pleading to the
Mion for Dissolution of Marriage
* the Courts Clerk and mall a copy
Jr*m t Petitioner'* Attorney.
KED d BIELEY. ESQ.. 211
cayne Building, 19 W. Flagler Street.
mi. Florida, 331S0, on or before the
I aay of Sept.. 178, else Petition will
Mken as confessed.
r IJ.I'iP mia 19tn dy July.1978
KIC HARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court of Dade County
ByB.UPPS
Deputy Oerk
"tEDD BIELEY. ESQ.
orney for Petitioner
M'lscayne Building
f stagier Street
fmi. Florida SS1S0
July 23, 34, Aug.*,13
LEGAL NOTiCsT"
lNTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-170*0
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: PETITION OF
ROBERT I.EE HARRIS
TO: OURLEY ROGERS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
Petition for Adoption has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MARTIN STARR. Altomey
for Petitioner, whose add real is 420
Lincoln Road Miami Reach. Florida
33i:w, and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
September 8, 1976, otherwise a default
win be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said COUrt al Miami. Florida on this 27th
das "I Julv ii7R
RICHARD p BRINKER
\ Clerk. Circuit Court
Hade County. Florida
ByC P COPELAND
\- I leputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
___________________July 30; Aug. 8. 13. '31
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of EL
COIX)MBIANO at 612 Alnsley Bldg..
Miami Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
COLUMBIA OCF.ANOGRAPHIC
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
INSTITUTE. INC.
a Florida corp
. DANIEL M KF.IL
Attorney for Applicant
July 16.23. 30: Aug. 6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
IITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-71934
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
MARIE ANNE HORNE, Wife.
Petitioner, and
JAMES HORNE. Husband.
Respondent.
TO JAMESHORNE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on DANIEL
RETTER. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 801 Dade Federal
Building. 101 East Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August 27th,
1976; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLOR11>I AN
Witness my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami. Florida on this 15th day
of Julv. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: C P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Petitioner
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 348 6090
Attorney for Petitioner
July 73. 30; Aug. 4. 13
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
lNTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C IRCUIT
OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-21*44
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
JUDY SUHL a / k / a JUDY MARTIN,
Petitioner, and
JAY R SUHL, Respondent
TO: Mr Jay R. Suhl,
Last known residence:
Box 382
Allaire Road
R.D.No. 1
Belmar.N.J. 07719
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on GLADYS
GERSON, ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la 101 NW
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before August
27th. 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petiUon.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLO RID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 18th
day of July, 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Oerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHTN KOSS, PA.
101 NW 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida SS128
Attorney for Petitioner
July 73, 30,Aug.4, 13
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 74847
Division 32
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHARLES WEINBERG.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: SOPHIE DA WOOD
Address Unknown:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition
for determination of beneficiaries of the
above Estate has been filed In this court
and you are required to file your written
defenses to the petition with the clerk of
this court and to serve a copy thereof
not later than 28 days after first
publication of this notice, on petitioner's
attorney, whose name and address are:
SPARSER, ZEMEL, ROSKIN,
HKII.BRONNER AND KARP. PA .
One Southeast Third Avenue. Miami,
Florida 33131 If you fall to do so,
judgment may be entered In due course
upon the petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
tins court on 23 July. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER, CLERK
Al < 'lerk of the Court
By MIRIAM B HKNDRICKSON
As Deputy Clerk
First publication or posting on
July 30. 1976
i CIRCUIT COURT SEAL'
_________________July 30. Aug. 6. 13.20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CLASSIC MARBLE COMPANY at 7460
NW 66th Street. Miami, Florida. Intends
to register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
I.ORENE CORPORATION
By: BERTHOLDJEKEL, Pres
AFL-CIO Exec Dead at 59
July 23.30; Aug. 6. 13
IN THL CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-22028
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JACK H LAAN, Petitioner,
and
JOSINA LAAN. Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
You. JOSINA LAAN. 542 Miller
Avenue. Freeport. New York 11520. are
hereby notified to file your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
with the Clerk of the Court and mail a
copy to the Petitioner's Attorney.
HENRY M WAITZKIN. 740 71st
Street. Miami Beach. Florida 33141. on
or before the 27th day of August. 1976; or
this Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you will be taken as con-
fessed
DATED, this 15th day of July. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
ByM KI.IMINSKI
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30; Aug. 4, 13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-22027
IN RE THE MARRIAGE Of
WALBUKGAH TSIRONIS,
Petitioner, and
NICHOLAS TSIRONIS,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
You, NICHOLAS TSIRONIS, Tappan
Zee Inn. Room 144, Route No 59. Nyack.
New York 10960, are hereby notified to
file your Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the Clerk
of the Court and mall a copy to the
Petitioners Attorney, HENRY M.
WAITZKIN. 740 71st Street. Miami
Beach. Florida 33141. on or before the
27th day of August, 1976; or this PetiUon
for Dissolution of Marriage filed against
you will be taken as confessed.
DATED, this 15th day of July. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hy M KI.IMINSKI
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30; Aug. 4, 13
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHE
IITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 74-22241
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re: The Marriage of
JORGE ESTRADA. HUSBAND
VS.
IRMA IRENE OVIEDO de ESTRADA.
Wife
TO: Sra. Irma Irene Ovledo de Estrada
cyocapltanOvledo
Cuartel de Bombero
de La Chorrerr.
LaChorrera, Panama
Republlca de Panama
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage haa been filed, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Husband's Attorney,
DONALD F FROST, ESQ 26 SW 6th
Street. Miami, Florida 88180, and file
the original with the Office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the 3rd
day of Sept., 1976, or the allegations will
be taken as confessed against you, and a
Default will be entered.
DATED AT MIAMI, Dade County.
Florida this 19th day of July, 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Oerk
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
July 23.10; Aug. 4.11
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Nathaniel Goldfinger. the AFL-
CIO's director of research who
died July 22 of cancer, was
eulogized at his funeral here by
three speakers who recalled his
special regard for the well-being
of Israel and agonized in the
suffering of fellow Jews in lands
not kindly disposed to them.
Goldfinger was closely associ-
ated with Israel's Histadrut for
many years. He had attended
Temple Sinai in Washington.
RABBI David Saperstein of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations said Goldfinger
iMDUR, Morris. 88, of Miami Beach
on July 211 Interment Mt Nebo
i iordon
COHEN, Harris H KB. on July 87, In
Hawthorne. Cal Interment Mt Nebo
(iordon
GOI.UB, Nathan. 74. of Miami Beach.
on July 28. Interment Lakeside
Levitt.
SHOUOER, Samuel, H4. of Florida City.
on July 26 Interment Star of David
< lordoii
STERN, Stanley S 63. of North Miami
Beach, on July 25 Interment lake-
side Riverside.
ZIMMERMAN. Hattie, of I'ompano
Beach, on July 26 Blasberg
BERNSTEIN. Therese. 84. of Miami
Beach, on July 28 Riverside
BUTT. Dr. Jose'ph. 89. of Miami, on July
27 Interment Mt Neho Bla-sberg
IHRWIT. Benjamin. 79. of Hollywood.
on July 27 Gordon
KAPLAN. Saul. 68. of Miami, on July 88
Gordon
KLEIN, Martin. 67. of Miami Shores on
July 28. Interment Mt Nebo
Riverside
l.nWENSTEIN. Leo. of North Miami
on July 28 Riverside
MARKS, lark H 75. of North Miami
Beach, on July 27 Interment lake-
side Riverside
SI SSM AN. 1 ,ouis. of Hollywood, on Julv
27 Interment Beth El I#vltt
WEINSTEIN. Harry. 66. of Miami
Beach, on Julv 27 Interment Mt
Nebo Philbrirk
I'OI.I.OCK. David S of Hollywood, on
July 29 Interment Beth El Levitt.
WEINGART. Alexander O, 78. of North
Miami Beach, on July 28 Newman
LEWIS, Alexander S 57. of Orange
N.J., and Miami, on July 28. In
Orange
SCHNEIDER. Aaron, of Fort Lauder
dale, on July 27
EIDINGKR. Sidney M.. 70. of Miami
Beach, on July 30 Riverside
ZEIOER, Jennie. 76 on July 22 Inter
ment Mt. Nebo Riverside
SHENKMAN. Ida. 79. on July 24 Inter
ment Mt. Nebo. Blasberg
BROWER. Clara. 78. on July 25 Inter
meni Mt Nebo Gordon
BERNSTEIN. Ixxiis. 65. on July 30
Interment Mt Nebo Riverside
applied the basic tenets of Juda-
ism for equality and justice for all
men by his work in the labor
movement.
Lane Kirdland, secretary-trea-
surer of the AFL-CIO. and Prof.
Hester Rapkin. a Princeton
urbanologist who had known
Goldfinger since their high school
days in New York, were other
speakers at services at the Dan-
zansky Goldberg Memorial
Chapel in Rockville. Md.
Burial was in King David
Memorial Garden in nearby
Virginia.
GOLDFINGER, 59, was des-
cribed by the AFL-CIO an-
nouncement of his death as "or-
ganized labor's top economist."
Its president. George Meany,
said Goldfinger "was one of the
most decent, warm human beings
we ever knew."
BASS
LOTTIE, of Miami, passed away July
SI A resident of Miami for 20 years.
Coming from New York, she was the
beloved wife of the late George H Sur
vlved by her son. Rabbi Jerome Bass of
Brooklyn; daughter. Elaine Horush 01
Jerusalem, 8 grandchildren, brother
lames Wells ol Miami sisters Goldle
Hohrman of Atlanta. Frances. Freed
man. Irene Wells. Shirley Shapiro, all of
Charleston W Va Severna Wells of
Washington, D.C She was the mother
in law of Itahbi Naftali I'orush and
Miriam Bass Mrs I!..ss was a member
of Congregation Beth El, Beth Tefllah,
member of Yeshiva Day School and
other organutal lorn Sen i< ea were held
Aug 2 at the Riverside with Interment
al Mount sin.ii cemetery Shiva will be
observed at the Has- residence In
Miami________
PALMERS .
ftMAMI MONUMENT COMPANY l\
HaUZED memorial*
custom crafted
IN our WORKSHOP
4444921 4444922
3279 S.W. Mi ST.. MIAMI
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
5imn| Hi. Jtwun Ommuniiji line* 111*
OUTHOOOJ
CONSERVATIVE
____ KEfORM SERVICES
Einjnutl Gordon (IS46) Ike Gordon
Mjirj Gordon (19641 MmtM B Gordon
Telephone 858 55**
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Ooen fverr Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2868
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Repri'senled by S levill, F D.
New York: (21?) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rcl, Forest Hills, NY
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.


Page12-B
vJenist tkr/kfiatn
Friday, Augugt 6,1975
SAVE 40
ON TWO PKGS
Bargain
Pantry Pride
Meat Franks
*ff IIMIT TWO PIGS PlIAM WTTHOTHRRPURCHASiS
1 sciuotNc ciCAMna
SAVE 72c
Joy Liquid
Dish Detergent
$J19
SAVE24' TFH SAVE 50
i*MU ON FIVE CANS
FOR
SPARKLING
DISHES
yt imiiowionii iiM *iiOTHiiut(AWi
^ oniooiiicm howiiccich"ii
48 OZ
BOTTLE
Hudson
Paper Towels
29*
DECORATED
SHEET
ROll
IIMIT ONI ROl I PlIASI WITH OTHU PURCHASI1
Q S> OOOIMORS UCluOCOCAllli__
JUMBO SIZE
132-CT.
Frozen
Orange Juice
PANTRY
PRIDE
10c;
dW iiwnriviCAm rtlAU with oiHii ruto.Atii
l OM'Wmnon MflyomcciCAim.,
SAVE 18
ON THREE PKGS
Pantry Pride
Biscuits
HOMESTYIE
OR
BUTTERMILK
7
C.
oz.
PKG.
W IIMIT THRfl PKGS. PlIASI WITHOTMUruKHAMl
Of 17 00 Ot UOII IIC1UOING CICAIITTft
f ^ CUllMMt MAT PURCHASI ONI OR All STARSTlO ITtMS WITH OTM PURCHAS1S Of 17 10 OR MOW HCIUOWC OCAWTTM J ^P*
about the friendliest, and most courteous store in town!
During the third cycle of this exquisite chinaware
add to or complete your service, easily with weekly featured pieces!
BEAUTIFUL. IMPORTED PORCELAIN CHINA THIS WEENS FEATURE
MATCHING ACCISSORV PIICIS AND
CO OROINATIO OVINV.AH AltO
A V All (HI AT IOW PIICIS
Bread ami Butter Plate
49
WITH EACH
$5 00 PURCHASE
EACH
FREE! OLYMPIC GLASS WITH
Coca-Cola. Tab
MR. PIBB FRESCA
OR SPRITE
64-OZ. N.R. BOTTLE
89c
a, CUSTOMER BUYS TWO BTLS.
V_/ OF ANY OF ABOVE SODAS
GETS OLYMPIC GLASS FREE !
no! > e
can M.
si;
1
.4.0* S 1 79
uc
MUD IOOUfl'1 All HAVORS
Kool Aid Handy Can
iflAT CUAPM1
Fantastik Refill
PIAIN UNRUACHID OR SIH RUING _^
Pillsbury Flour 5..' 89
aim us own uivt -_
SUMSMINI ^^m.
KT 85*
IORO Mon
Clamato Juice
KIRDUR
Pecan Sandies
Gravy Train.............
MMMM
Hydrox Cookies
.........! 63c
V'S'97*
O VII NIGHT j.
Pampers Diapers .ST *1
11*11 lAVOHTI ._ .
Hunts Catsup '.f,'47c
ts-49K
FRUIT MINKS All FLAVORS
Hi C Drinks.
flNTI' P1IOI All IIAVOIS RIG4HA1
Sodas.........................................o "canI 99
PANTRY PRIDE DELICIOUS CREAMED
Cottage Cheese
99c
24-OZ.
CUP
(lO SUN GRAPEFRUIT OK
Orange Juice 4 vm $1
paniii phw piocisi chiisi iooo
American Singles V^'99*
PANT1T P1IOI OI1ICIOOS fMk.
Skim Milk ^'79
ioidin i chun a*%a*Ac
Longhorn Cheese z 99
Plain Yogurt cS 39c
'UNOSHIP
Sour Treat
*Wl*5 RM40HT PLAIN
Gruyere Cheese
PINT
CONT
e OZ
PKG
43*
79*
Sa*faat4 at Service Aftfcetcje'i
A All AilE AT STORES WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
All IUNCM MEATS AND CMf f SI SUCK) TO ORDER
FRESH SMOKEC BABY ^. ^ qa
Whitefish *1**
Swiss Cheese M?i'89*
Italian Pepperoni ?3 59*
Rich's Turkey Roll "S 99{
WITH OUR US GOV T GRADED
U.S.DA CHOICE BEEE CUTS!
ISDA
^CHOjCE
Our U.S.D.A. Choice Be' Curs art guarantied to be
naturally lender and juicy, nature't own way
never chemically treated in any manner!
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Sirloin Steak
r^n $169
U S 0 A CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED SEEF LOIN
Porterhouse $
Steaks
Beef Chuck ", ^qc
WESTERN
CORN FED
1
79
Blade Steak
liiiillliin
A it Mill 1000
f
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. AUG. 7ti AT All
PANTRY PRIDE STORES FROM
FT. PIERCE TO KEY WEST
IB
U S 0 A CHOKI MIST CORN FIO
_. .--------- IMAM INO
Beef Rib Steak ~
U.S.D.A. CHOKI WISI CORN FID A*.A^
Ground Beef Chuck t, 99'
USOA CHOKI WIST COIIElHI">"""
St 39
Bottom Round Steak
USOA CHOKI MIST COIN lit).:' .--------
Shoulder Steak Bnls.
USD A CHOKI WIST CORNflO
Beef Brisket""*~..... ,. $lw
U 5 O A CHOKI Will COIN 110 Mil A Am,
Round Rump Roast .. *1
USOA CHOKI WIST CORN 1ID if If 1OUN0
Eye Round Roast $189
ftiizia ouifN ** ***"
Entrees .*> mS 3 3
PANIIt .. JliPKGOIMOl. _.
Great Ground ,69
"einn
.59*
.99e
If W. CtOONC fill U1P* W I Al Nidi AN> VIC \0 NOUN
UOIIOA O* P1IM.UM RUSH
Fryer Quarters
flORIDA OR SMPPIO P1IMHJ
Fryer Parts
FioeioA ots**epiOPAwi*.'ejSH
leaewi e peutxan
.moiieaiRun* tan
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM WHOLE
Fresh Fryers
45c
SEASHORE'S BARREL CURED
Kosher Pickles
69c
OT
JAR
OSCAR MATH SllCIO Mill Ol
Beef Bologna
OSCAI MATH SLICID
Cotto Salami
JONIS
1107 > % <
PKG A
( Ol
PKG
it I
89<
Midget Liverwurst S 69c
Franks or Knocks V'*i35
AAtiRKAM ROSHtl PMOcMI (i M
Salami or Bologna 1.' U39
SCHWIIOIRT S MR AT OR -HA k
Beef Wieners ;.' 99c
COPI1ANO S SU1IIR mm**.
Sandwich Pak i.V 79*
COlE SIAW .POTATO MACARONI
lAND O fROST SLICED
Smoked varieties
iMpafc; pkg
OR SPARKUNG DISHES IIQUit)
Detergent
}]un J FOOD STAMfSOOFURTMia AT PANTRY PtIOE
SWEET EATING EXTRA LARGE 5 SIZE
Honeydews
99
%LW ^at^EACH
PICK YOUR OWN
Green Beans
3 89c
GARDEN
FRESH
TOP OUA1ITT CAUIOINIA
Sunkist Lemons Vg.r79c
CARDRN IRISH f%S\
Green Squash 29'
US I I RKK TOUR OWN g,,.
Yellow Onions >. 19*
SWEET LARGE i SIZE
Hawaiian Pineapples* 99*
HIM 1IPI lAROR SI2I -.
Slicing Tomatoes v49c
US I All POIPOSI -_ _
Potatoes 5.ic69c
'HIT RID AVIIAGI WIIGHT IS lit. ^ --
Whole Watermelons .a$1"
PICK YOUR
OWN
SWEET EATING TOP QUALITY
Green Plums
48'
IB.
J
ALL VARIETIES
Frozen Layer Cakes
PEPPERIDGE #**..#*..*
FARMS %a%eJV 72
\f \T P UNO S HO JIN II IN A PUG
Cheese Pizza ^%129
OH iOT All VAIMTHS fiOHN ^
Stuffed Potatoes 3 lit! 89*
ORCHARD HIllSfROtIN IIUHIRRT
Fruit Pies ;.:'"' 4 S3S $1
PANIRT PRIOI fROZIN
Coffee Lightener 5 c6,n0,' $1
in our 'p'uxjeH Seo^uui case
SEA STAR ICELANDIC FRIED I IS PKG
Fish Sticks ED 89
LA.Ol .1
Fancy Smelts ..g*1
is
RAND
High Fiber"--' 89c
FISRE SRANO
PANTRY PRIDE PARTYFlAKE CIOVER1EAF OR
PKGS
Of IJ
Twin Rolls 3S^$1
Schaefer Beer
CARiiNGS af>i;o, C<
UlDMUWAUKU U u... d
WS RESERVE THE RtGMT TO URATT QUANTITIES NONE SCHD TO DEAIERS


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