The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02476

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"dewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY tad THE JEWISH WEEKLY
lolume 49 Number 29 Miami, Florida Friday, July 16, 1976 Fred K shochet-Fridy, juiy i, 1976 b>- mHii 50 cents Two Sections Price 25 cents
NOW THAT HE'S NOMINATED
Whafs Ahead With Carter?
Ethnic Purity* Over? 3-A
By BOMS SMOLAR
NOMINEE CARTER
FBI Arrests
|jDL Leader
In Capital
W ASHINGTON( JTA )
William Perl, leader of
Washington area Jewish
fense League, was free on
fO.OOO bond after his ar-
st by FBI agents on
larges of conspiracy to
Loot into the apartments of
to Soviet Embassy officials.
I No date has been set for
hearing or arraignment.
|e 70-year-old psycholog-
had been indicted by a
ieral grand jury in Balti-
pre on four counts of con-
iracy to harass foreign
ficials and with violation
federal firearms laws. "
S. WHITE, an as-
CondBaed *m Pw U-A
Now that Jimmy Carter has
been nominated by the National
Convention of the Democratic
Party as candidate for President
of the United States, one can
hear the question among many
Jews in the Eastern states and
in the Midwest: Who is Carter?
... Is he good for the Jews?
Similar questions are also be-
ing asked by liberal Protestants
and Catholics in these states.
A former Governor of Georgia.
Carter was almost unknown out-
side the South until he began
campaigning for nomination for
President.
HIS PERSONALITY will
emerge more clearly before the
Presidential elections take place,
but for the time being, a major
factor in the discussions about
him among voters is the ambiv-
alence in the 20th century en-
counter of noa Evangelical
America with Southern Evangel-
ism now incarnated in Carter's
person.
The negative part of that
ambivalence is attributed in
part to ignorance and fear. Most
Northern Jews and Christians
have no personal experience
with Evangelical Christians.
They base their perceptions on
historical and literary images,
which are overwhelmingly ne-
gative and go back to the times
of the first 10 years of this
country, when in order to be
regarded as a patriotic Amer-
ican, you had to be an Evan-
gelical Christian.
Neither Catholics, Jews nor
dissenting Protestants were al-
lowed to vote nor hold public
office.
THE UNITED States has gone
a long way since those years.
Today, there is a pluralism of
theologies and social visions
among Evangelicals as there is
among Catholics and Jews. This
is what Jews are urged to re-
member.
They are advised by Jewish
leaders not to vote on the basis
of pretudice. mythologies and
ea Pas* S-A
Are All New Singles
A Sexual Threat?
By BEN GALLOB
One of the reasons why mar-
ried people desert persons who
are newly single because of
divorce, which may be a time
when they most urgently need
support and friendship, is that
the single person "on the loose"
is viewed as "a sexual threat"
by married persons, according
to a Jewish Family Service ex-
pert in Los Angeles.
Deborah Sheby, eastern area
RUSSIAN ABSENT
Moynihan and Sakharov
moved by Hebvew Univevsity
By GIL SEDAN
SRUSALEM (JTA)
liel P. Moynihan, the
ier U.S. Ambassador to
DANIEL P. MOYNIHAN
the United Nations, and An-
drei D. Sakharov, the Soviet
physicist and dissident, were
among five distinguished
persons from several coun-
ties to receive honorary
degrees from the Hebrew
University.
Sakharov's absence pro-
vided the theme for Moyni-
han's speech which was a
denunciation of the Soviet
Union, a warning to the free
world to oppose aggression
and a paean to Israel for its
resistance to terrorism.
"ISRAEL HAS become a
metaphor for democracy in the
world" and "so equally have
the unprincipled attacks by ter-
rorists on Israeli civilians be-
Continued on Page 6-A
coordinator of JFS services,
also commented that "the ex-
perience of confronting a now-
single friend often awakens a
married person's fear of single-
ness." The JFS program of help
to such singles is based on the
premise that separation from
one's spouse is only the first
in a series of separations the
single person must face, ac-
cording to Flo Kinsler, acting
director of the West Los Ange-
les district of the JFS, an agency
of the Los Angeles Jewish Fed-
eration Council.
SHE SAID such a single per-
son "feels abandoned by the
coupled' society to which he or
she used to belong. Couples
have a friendship system'
which is composed of other
married people. When an in-
dividual changes marital status,
he or she no longer fits into
that structure."
What usually happens, she
added, is that the newly single
person discovers that social
calls from friends become few-
er and fewer and that party
invitations may stop altogether.
Continued on Page 2-A
Evidence
Against Amin
Rising Anew
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Ugan-
da's collusion with the hijack-
ers of the Air France air bus
has been given by Israel as one
of the main reasons for its
dramatic rescue of the Jewish
hostages and the French crew
from Entebbe Airport. The ex-
tent of this collaboration can
be gauged from the following
selection of news broadcasts in
English on Kampala Radio after
the aircraft landed at Entebbe.
It is taken from monitoring
reports supplied by the British
Broadcasting Corporation and
has been compiled by this cor-
respondent.
June 29: Announcement: "We
now bring you the special an-
nouncement you have been
waiting for.. The following are
the demands of the Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine." (The radio reads out
a s|v-ooint statement by the
PFLP.)
JUNE 30: Announcement:
"The PFLP hijackers have told
President (Idi) Amin that they
will blow up the plane and all
Continued on Page 8-A
>\.'i.:!!!'... 1 iimu:' 111
PHONE ANSWERS
:.JTj
Who Is |
Uganda's |
Stvongman? I
JERUSALEM Who is
Uganda's President Idi Amin
Dada?
According to Col. Baruch
Bar-Lev, an Israel reserve
army officer, Amin "has a
split personality."
Bar Lev met Amin in
Kampala in 1972 as head of
an Israeli military mission
there. Late last week, Amin
phoned Bar-Lev here to an-
nounce that "I don't want
to have anything to do" with
Arab terrorists in the future.
ISRAEL'S STUNNING raid
on Entebbe that rescued 104
Continued on Page 9-A
REITERATES gggff NEED
Dr. Kissinger Calls For
Controls Against Terrorists
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary *>f State Henry A.
Kissinger has reiterated the
urgency for an international
convention to curb aerial hi-
jacking in light of the hijack-
ing of the Air France jet by
Palestinian terrorists June 27.
Responding to questions after
addressing the Council on For-
eign Relations and the Mid-
America Committee at the Pal-
mer House in Chicago July 6,
Kissinger noted that "The Presi-
dent has expressed the great
gratification of the American
people at the rescue of the hos-
Dera Bloch S-A
French Cool ... S-A
German Relief ... S-A
Scranton't Praise 6-A
Self-Defense ... S-A
Bold, Resourceful' 11-A
U.S. Veto 14-A
British Applause 15-A
,. -......;'M I.-' t Pi --:.. ':n 'l I
tages."
However, the Secretary said,
"It is very difficult to establish
a general rule in a situation like
this. Clearly, the attack on an
Continued on Page 15-A
Summer Conversion Drive Seen
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Presbyterian minister with close
ties to the Jewish community
warned here that Christian mis-
sionaries have launched a major
effort to convert Jews this sum-
mer. The Rev. Paul R. Carlson,
pastor of the Glen Morris Pres-
byterian Church of Ozone Park,
Queens, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the effort,
known as "Operation Birthday
Cake," is more of a threat to
the Jewish community than was
the nationwide "Key 73" pro-
gram three years ago.
Carlson, a journalist and au-
thor of a book, "O Christian! O
Jew!" which explains Judaism
to Christians, said the operation
involves all the missionary or-
ganizations.
HE SAID this includes ones
such as the old American Board
of Mission to the Jews which
seeks to convert Jews outright
and the so-called Hebrew Chris-
tians who espouse the "fraud"
Continued on Pag* 2-A


Fage 2-A
Jewisii fkrXffaun
Friday, July 16,
1976
Summer Conversion Drive Seen Oil Prospecting
Rights Bring Row
Continued from Page 1-A
that Christianity is the true Ju-
daism.
"Operation Birthday Cake"
calls for massive street corner
missionary drives in every ma-
jor city in the country. Carlson
said. He reported that in Phila-
delphia 70 Bible students re-
cently completed a course in
street corner preaching. Carl-
son said one of the Hebrew
Christian groups, Jews for Je-
sus, which aims its message at
voung Jews, has announced it
plans a major campaign aimed
at Bicentennial crowds in New
York. Philadelphia and Wash-
ington.
Evidence for this was seen
last week in midtown Manhat-
tan where the group was flood-
ing the streets with leaflets.
THE MINISTER JOURNAL-
IST, who is working on a doc-
toral dissertation on the Holo-
caust and teaches a course on
the Holocaust at his church,
said that from his experience
with Hebrew Christians they
are either self-hating Jews or
Jews whose Judaism ended with
their Bar or Bat Mitzvah.
He said Jews who are aware
of their religious heritage do
not convert. Carlson said he
experienced this Jewish self-
hatreu recently when he was
asked to speak on the Holocaust
at a conference on "God. the
-a and You." at the First
-nan and Missionary Al-
liance Church in Manhattan
He said the Hebrew Chris-
f.ans at the conference attack-
ed Judaism, distorted Jewish
historv. and made numerous
anti Semitic references He
found himself defending Juda-
Are All New
Singles Considered
A Sexual Threat?
Continue from Page 1-A
In effect, she said, this constit-
utes a second very real and
painful separation.
The single man. in addition
to feeling alienated from
friends, feels increasingly isolat-
ed from his family and is hit
hard by his loss of role as. a
father, Ms. Kinsler remarked.
"A man moves out of his
home, perhaps initially with
fantasies of leading a swinging,
glamorous life" but "soon he
realizes that he is alone. His
children, who are part of him,
have been taken away." since
custody is usually awarded to
the mother, "and he becomes
a displaced parent.
SHE ASSERTED also that
what makes the separation from
children even more painful for
many Jewish men is the "pas-
sionate desire" to carrv out the
Jewish tradition of fathering
She said "the strong Jewish
rthos of parental responsibility
riward offspring creates an
anguished conflict for many
men who feel thev are fading
from the family picture."
She aid there are also the
losses newly single persons face
in the separations they suffer
on the religious and community
level, declaring that "single
people feel uncomfortable in
the temple and the organized
Jewish community because they
feel they are being viewed as
failures. Many are unable to
nay costly temple membership
fees so they feel barred from
participating in religious life"
for that reason.
The two JFS experts agreed
that very often the synagogue
and the Jewish community do
discourage the single person
from becoming involved by not
reaching out in a convincing
way to them but. they added,
several area synagogues have
recentlv begun to deal with such
singles in a more sensitive and
understanding way.
MS. KINSLER said one way
to bridge the "separation gap"
is to start to break down some
of the long-held and fallacious
notions clung to by both mar-
rieds and singles, and perpet-
uated in the past by well-mean-
ing social service professionals.
She said "we have to rid our-
selves of the myth that single
people are socially crippled and
miserable and thai married peo-
ple are haopy." Single people,
she said, have the responsibilitv
of helning their married friends
"face the fact that singleness"
can be "a productive viable life-
stvle."
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ism at the conference.
CARLSON noted that many of
these Hebrew Christians claim
that they come from Orthodox
homes whose parents threw
them out, a statement he says
he cannot believe.
He said he thinks they claim
to have been Orthodox as a
means of pleasing Christians,
ana most of them know nothing
about Judaism. Carlson believes
that much of the money for the
missionary effort comes from
Christians who are guilty over
the Holocaust and are "suck-
ered" into believing that they
can help the Jews through con-
verting them.
But Carlson said he has al-
ways preached that neither con-
version nor assimilation works.
Carlson, who calls himself a
Zionist, said that one of the pro-
blems for the Jewish commu-
nitv is that the very evangelical
Christians who seek to convert
Jews are also the most pro-
Israel.
HE NOTED that up to the Six-
Day War, Jewish organizations
sought to work only with liberal
Christians, but it is those li-
berals who have been anti-
Israel during the Six-Day War
and later the Yom Kippur War
Carlson said liberal Christians
cannot come to terms with the
particularism of Israel. He said
that in Germany it was liberal
clergymen who joined the Nazis
while the conservatives opposed
Hitler.
Explaining this. Carlson said
a noted Christian scholar re-
centlv said that in the eyes of
the church the only good Jew
was a dead one or a converted
one. He said the liberals have
onted for killing Jews while the
conservatives have sought to
con%ert them. Carlson said that
he has no ready answer for the
Jewish community to meet the
missionary effort. He said that
both the church and synagogue
in the United States were going
through a crisis of faith and it
was necessary to bring even-
body back to their own religion
and have the various faiths
work in brotherhood with each
other.
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By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
angry controversy has erupted
over the government's assign-
ment of oil prospecting rights
in an area of southern Sinai to
an American company in which
a very prominent, but uniden-
tified. American Jew with a
long record of activity in be-
half of Israel is a key figure.
The contract was signed on
the '"ve of Independence Day
and does not require approval
by the Knesset because the gov-
ernment has the authority to
make such deals. The Knesset
finance committee intends to
hold hearings on the issue
nevertheless and many MKs
and persons associated with Is-
rael's oil industry are question-
ing the properiety of awarding
a potentially lucrative conn act
to a foreign company when Is-
rael possesses the manpower
and resources to undertake the
prospecting alone.
DR. MICHAEL Kisch, head
of the government-owned Sinai
oil prospecting company who
had forcefully opposed the deal
has been sent on a six-month
involuntary leave of absence.
in effect suspended temporarily
from his job.
Tight secrecy has surrounded
the project. The government
has refused to identify the
American company, the pro-
minent American Jew or the
exact area of Sinai where the
drilling will take place.
But government sources de-
fend the contract on grounds
that it was essential to bring in
an experienced foreign com
pany to handle the drilling and
supply the necessary equinmem
and trained manpower
THE SOURCES also noted
that the area where the oil
search will be carried out mav
eventually have to be evacuated
bv Israel, in which case the
presence of a foreign conces-
sionaire would protect Israel's
interests.
It was learned here that un-
der the contract the American
company will bear SO percent
of the drilling costs and will
receive 25 percent of the net
income from any oil that is
found. The Israeli government
will get 75 percent.
According to Dr. Kisch and
others opposed to the agree-
ment, the area of Sinai has al-
ready been surveyed by geolo-
gists and is very promising.
They say that oil can be ex-
pected to be found very quick-
ly and the American company.
which assumes little risk, will
be able to cover its Investment
in a short time and reap large
profits.
THEY ALLEGE that the pro-
minent American Jew. and an-
other Jewish personality, not
as well known as the first, were
in fact being rewarded for their
past activities on behalf of Is-
rael and will enrich themselves
handsomely.
According to circles close to
Dr. Kisch. income from the new
oil field will amount to some
$46 million by March, W*
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M7.1S-76


Friday, July 16, 1976
-.imisttkrkUaii
Page 3-A
Carter's 'Ethnic Purity' Thing of Past
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Jimmy Carter has a friendly
smile for all the voters and
seems to be a good sort of a
guy. But even if he hadn't taken
his medicine like a man some
time ago by apologizing graci-
ously for his ill-advised use of
the term 'ethnic purity,' he would
have been headed off at the
pass by the Supreme Court's
stunning 8-to-0 decision which
orders foot-dragging federal of-
ficials actively to promote low-
income housing for members of
socalled minority groups.
Mo Udall, Scoop Jackson, and
Jerry Ford, who were all quick
to hop on Jimmy for his "ethnic
purity" lapse, can profit along
with Carter qy backtracking on
a portion of their observations
about housing also.
IN THE MAD rush to hug the
center of the political spectrum,
the Democrats, as well as the
President, displayed a tendency
to tread lightly on the highly
explosive housing issue. For-
tunately, the Supreme Court
justices are not up for election
or reelection; so they all clasp-
ed hands tightly and called on
Potter Stuart to write for the
whole bench a decision which
may prove as significant as the
1954 school desegregation rul-
ing.
Even more important, by
mandating t h e long-hesitant
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment office to get on with the
essential work of making it
practically impossible for sub-
urban power establishments to
keep out low-income people, the
top court may have set in mo-
tion activity pointing to the
real solution for the school de-
segregation problem.
NO PAN-URBAN planner can
henceforth deny the moral and
practical necessity of clearing
away all nitpicking obstacles to
the erection of housing for the
less wealthy and often discrim-
minated-against in the lush
'Grave Concern9 for Dora Bloch
LONDON (JTA) The
British government has ex-
pressed "grave concern" over
the unknown fate of Mrs. Dora
Bloch, one of the hostages on
the hijacked Air France jet,
who disappeared under suspi-
cious circumstances from Mula-
::.io Hospital in Kampala, Ugan-
da, over the last weekend.
Edward Rowlands. Minister
of State at the Foreign Office.
told Parliament July 7 that
urgent inquiries made through
the British acting High Com-
missioner in Uganda have fail-
ed to elicit information from
Uganda authorities as to the
whereabouts of the 74-year-old
woman who is a British subject
and also a citizen of Israel
where she resides.
SERIOUS concern was ex-
pressed in Israel July 8 that
Mrs. Bloch may have been
harmed. Foreign press reports
nicked up by Israeli newspapers
said she was dragged from the
hospital screaming by four "se-
curity men on Idi Amin's orders
Sunday night," the night after
Israeli commandos succeeded in
liberating most of the hostages
held at Entebbe Airnort.
Israeli diplomats have ap-
pealed to the International Red
Cross in Geneva to intervene
but the IRC reportedly declined
to act unless requested to do
so by the British and French
governments as well. Chief Rab-
bi Shlomo Goren sent urgent
appeals to the Pope, to the
World Council of Churches in
Geneva, to UN Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim and to
President Ford. Official circles
in Jerusalem said privately that
the chances of Mrs. Bloch be-
ing found alive were slim. How-
ever, some suggested that Ugan-
dan President Idi Amin may be
holding her with the intent of
extracting some humiliating
gesture from Israel in exchange
for her safety.
MRS. BLOCH, accompanied
by one of her sons, economist
Ilan Hartuv. was enroute to
New York to attend the wed-
ding of another son when the
Air France "air bus" was hi-
jacked shortly after leaving
Athens airport June 27. She was
taken to the Ugandan hospital
from Entebbe Airport when she
choked on food supplied the
hostages after the landing. Her
son was among the 102 hostages
rescued by Israeli forces July 3.
Rowlands told Parliament that
Mrs. Bloch was visited at the
hospital bv a British official on
French 'CooP
But Very Proper
About Entebbe Raid
July 1. The official was told by
two Ugandan plainclothesmen
that she would be transferred
to the Imperial Hotel in Kam-
pala.
When he returned to the hos-
pital an hour later with food
for Mrs. Bloch. the official was
not allowed through the main
gate. Rowlands reported. Since
then the acting British High
Commissioner in Kampala has
been trying to contact Mrs.
Bloch through every channel,
including a search bv Ugandan
police.
BUT THE Ugandan author-
ities now say they have no
knowledge of her whereabouts
and that Uganda ceased to be
responsible for the hostages
after the Israeli rescue opera-
tion at Entebbe. "The situation
clearly gives cause for grave
concern." Rowlands said. He
said High Commissioner James
Henessv returned July 8 to
Kampala with instructions to re-
port immediaMv his findings
in the matter. Rowlands stated
that Britain could not accept
Uganda's claim that it had no
knowledge of Mrs. Bloch.
In Jerusalem. Hartuv. who
had acted as translator when
Amin addressed the Israeli
hostages before the rescue took
place, annealed to the Ugandan
leader to release his mother.
"On behalf of her children and
her grandchildren, we beg vou
to release Dora Bloch and send
her back to her family." Hartuv
stated in a cable to Amin.
Meanwhile, according to a re-
port from Nairobi, a Ugandan
official asked about Mrs. Bloch's
whereabouts, said: "Don't ask
us, ask Israel."
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) States-
men and the news media
throughout Western Europe
expressed their admiration
and joy for the daring and
skill of the Israeli rescue
mission. The French Foreign
Ministry issued a brief state-
ment expressing satisfaction
at the outcome of the mis-
sion but deplored the casual-
ties.
Otherwise, the French
government has adopted a
more reserved attitude
which some observers here
describe as "frankly disap-
pointing." The public, how-
ever, reacted enthusiastical-
ly to the Israeli action.
SOURCES HERE confirmed
that Israeli Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon had informed his
French counterpart, Jean Sau-
vagnargues, of the mission as
soon as it was completed. Later,
Israeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin
called President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing to inform him of the
mission's successful outcome.
However Giscard did not
respond to Rabin's message, nor
has Sauvagnargues responded
to Allon's message.
Israeli circles are unhappy
with the statement read out by
a representative of the Air
France crew upon their arrival
in Paris. The crew paid tribute
to Uganda President Idi Amin
and stressed his "constant care
to ensure our safety, our mate-
rial comfort and even our
health."
These circles believe French
officials are behind the state-
ment.
THE FRENCH, observers here
believe, are embarrassed and
fear the possible consequences
of the Israeli action both in
Africa and among the various
Arab states. The French press,
on the other hand, in its major-
ity warmly approved the mis-
sion. In Snain, Italy and Scan-
dinavia the Israeli action was
also flashed throughout the day
on radio and television stations.
A number of African embas-
sies in Western Europe contact-
ed bv Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cv correspondents refused to
comment on the action. The So-
viet Union denounced the Israeli
action as another manifestation
of "Zionist aggression" and a
violation of Uga.nda's sovereign-
suburbs. And metropolitanized
school integration is bound to
follow.
Henceforth, those elected of-
ficials, real estate men, and fi-
nanciers who have helped shore
up the fear of and prejudice
against minority peoples in the
suburbs will either have to as-
sist with the construction of
low-income housing or else pass
up those juicy HUD grant pro-
grams for water and sewer sys-
tems and open space develop-
ment.
Judging by past history, we
can expect this powerful frater-
nity to temporize and try to
find ways to zone out the less
affluent. But there will always
be some business men smart
enough to realize that industry
is moving to the suburbs, that
modest housing will have to be
produced in the suburbs to
meet the demands of labor, and
that eventually no obstruction-
ist will be strong enough to
stop progress.
THIS STILL leaves us with
the obligation to thank Jimmy
Carter for wandering into that
minestrewn territory where
words like "ethnic purity" can
get a candidate into a peck of
trouble. Now that Jimmy has
finished with the term, it would
be a big assist to the cause of
mutual respect among all groups
if the roots of the words em-
ployed were examined anew.
For today, when we speak so
elibly of ethnics and ethnicity,
we are groping for words that
transcend race, religion, na-
tionality, culture. We have that
whole bundle of categories in
mind.
Yet a peek into your diction-
ary will bring you the surpris-
ing information that in bygone
times, folks had "primitive
characteristics" in mind when
they referred to "ethnic groups."
IN SOME cases, those em-
ploying the term did so to iden-
tify "non-Christians." Take your
Webster off the shelf and note
that "ethnic" may also be de-
fined as "neither Jewish nor
Christian; nagan." That's bound
to hurt somewhere.
Pure? And purity? Well that
suggests "free of contamina-
tion," "free from anything dif-
ferent or inferior." So we're
back to friend Jimmy Carter
again: maybe he just set out to
gather some heather; but he got
impaled on an acre of thorns.
T\
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Federal
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relationship between patron and mer-
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and banker have almost been elimin-
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always exceptions to every rule. We
like to think Washington Federal is
just such an exception. Our customers
find not only a full range of services
and maximum dividends they find a
full measure of warm, interested
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Page 4-A
*Je*istncrkto*ti
Friday, July 16, 1976
Waldheim's Objectivity
Many important personalities and organizations
are rightly indicting UN Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim's instantaneous reaction to the Israeli raid on En-
tebbe as a "violation" of Uganda's integrity.
What about the terrorists' violation of the human
rights of those whom they hijacked? What about the
violation by Idi Amin of the right to security of the
102 hostages whom he separated from the 140-odd other
non-Jewish hostages ana sent on their way?
What about the UN's silence, and Dr. Waldheim's
silence, in response to the hijacking and the long,
agonizing week that followed the hijacking, during
which "only" Israelis and Jews were being abused?
Why Dr. Waldheim's sudden burst of energy and
oratory when the rescue operation took place?
We join fhe personalities and organizations indict-
ing Waldheim and calling for his resignation.
Gen. Brown and Entebbe Raid
Dr. Kissinger's Campaign
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is correct in
pressing for international legislation against hijacking
of airplanes. It is not certain, even if the legislation
is passed, that nations, particularly in the Third World-
Arab-Soviet bloc, would comply.
But at least it would be a beginning. It would
mean that signatories to the accord would deny land-
ing privileges to terrorists on such phony "humanitar-
ian" grounds as Uganda's Idi Amin proposed as his
reason for sheltering them, hence putting a substantial
crimp into their contemptible operations.
Dr. Kissinger is zeroing in on the United Nations
as the logical place for his latest campaign. We hold
out little hope that the Third World-Arab-Soviet bloc
there will be any more responsible in this matter than
it has been in others in the past.
Still, now is the time. Even among Israel's ene-
mies, there is hardly anything but profound admira-
tion, silent or not, for the Entebbe raid. Joseph Pola-
koff, chief of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency Bureau
in Washington, reports that on his trip to India while
the rescue operation took place, he found "overwhelm-
ing support for Israel's achievement among Hindus
and Sikhs" whom he questioned.
Now is the time, and we wish Dr. Kissinger well.
Anti-Boycott Legislation
Despite the continued opposition of the Ford Ad-
ministration, the evidence continues to pile up that
strong legislation is needed to prevent the compliance
of American business firms with the Arab boycott
against Israel. Voluntary measures have not worked.
Treasury Secretary William Simon, in a recent
appearance before the House International Relations
Committee, opposed any new legislation as a hindrance
to Middle East peace efforts and against American in-
terests in the United States and the Middle East. "It
is our considered judgement that confrontational poli-
cies will not move to remove the boycott and could un-
dermine the delicate search for peace in that troubled
region of the world," Simon told the congressmen.
No one wants peace in the Mideast more than Is-
rael and American Jews. But it is outrageous for an
American governmental official to argue that peace
will be blocked unless the United States abandons its
opposition to discrimination and its principles of de-
cency.
Jewish leaders have long argued that if American
firms stand up to the Arabs the latter will back down
because they need the economic power and know-how
that only the United States can give them. Jewish lead-
ers and many congressmen are now also saying that
American firms want to buck the boycott but they
need strong laws to back them up.
Dr. Arthur F. Burns, chairman of the Federal Re-
serve Board, told a congressional subcommittee, and
we agree, if diplomacy will not end American com-
pliance with the boycott, then Congress has to pass the
laws that will do it.
Jewish Florxdian
OFFICE and PI^ANT 120 N E 6th Sf, Miami, Ha. 33132 Phone 373-4605
P.O. Box 2973. Miami Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET LEO MINDIJN SKI.MA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor Assistant to Publisher
The Jewieh Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published every Friday since 1*.'27 by The Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Postage Pa'd at Miami. Fla
O Fred K. ShochetFriday. July 16. 1976
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weakly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
WHAT WOULD have happen-
ed were the debate over the
reappointment of Gen. Brown
as chairman of the Joint Chiefs
to have taken place after the
Entebbe raid rather than before
it?
The answer is, of course, in
the realm of pure speculation,
but the number of votes cast
against the General was sur-
prisingly large, given that con-
firmation seemed a foregone
conclusion.
AND SO, surt;>, it is conceiv-
able that he might have won
by an even narrower margin, or
possibly that he might not have
won at all, although I am con-
vinced of the former, while the
Mindlin
latter seems too much like an
idealist's dream.
At issue was the General's
remarks on June 28 before the
Senate Committee on Armed
Services in which he repeated
his stand in 1974 that the
American Jewish community
"has undue influence on the
Congress of the United States."
The first time out, Gen.
Brown apologized for such
seemingly anti-Semitic decora-
tions to his cake as that Jews
control the American press and
the American banking estab-
lishment, too.
A BATTERY cf facts it wcl
to prove him wrong that led to
his recanting. But obviously, he
has not changed his mind oth-
erwise and, in all frankness, I
would have been disappointed
if he had.
Apart from Brown's biagga-
docio manner, which I find both
inexcusable and dangerous in
a man now occupying his high
position for a second time, all I
would have demanded from
Brown on this second occasion
of his demonstration of the
simplistic, demagogic military
mind would be an explanation
of his qualifying term, "undue."
The Congressional Record of
July 1 features an address to
the Senate by Florida's Richard
Stone who feared that, without
explanation, the General's view
would henceforward "have their
own undue influence over our
military policy."
IN URGING a "nay" vote
against confirmation. Sen. Stone
reminded his colleagues "that
the first time someone does
something to you, shame on
him. But the second time some-
one does something to you,
shame on us."
Stone did not want "shame
on us" in letting Brown off the
hook once more, but he missed
the point entirely when he re-
minded the Senate of Brown's
apparent lack of contrition in
his June 28 statement.
"In all candor, I do," the
General declared on June 28 tp
those members of the Senate
Continued on Page 13-A
'Irrelevance' of Olympic 'Games'
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year12.00; Two Years*22.00:
Three Years S30 00. Out of Town Upon Request.
18 TAMUZ 5736
Number 29
Friday, July 16, 1976
Volume 49
I once wrote here of the
"monumental irrelevance" of
the sports pages, presented seri-
ously as world-shaking or local-
shaking events. In recent weeks
that would be the cliff-hanger
as to whether or not Irving
Cowan could capture the Buf-
falo Braves basketball team for
South Florida or the signing of
a new lease by the Miami Dol-
phins.
Take it all back. Arthur Ashe
(the black tennis star for those
of you not familiar with the
sporting world) put it in its
present status ver well. "Short
of going to war," he is quoted
as saying, "you say T won't play
you'."
I AM NOT jesting when I say
that I think this a beautiful
statement. Mull it over in your
own mind. It speaks of a child's
reaction to a friend's hurt, not
with sticks and stones, but with
"I won't play with you."
If you have been following
the news closer than you should
be, you no doubt are aware that
two international crises have
been confronting us in that
weird world of sports. As I
write this one the weekend be-
fore the opening of the Olympic
Games in Montreal scheduled
for Saturday there was some
press doubt that all would be-
gin as planned.
It seems that host Canada,
not wishing to offend the Peo-
ple's Republic of China, was not
about to permit the Republic
of China to parade under that
uise but onlv as Taiwan.
THE TEAPOT tempest to most
of us but a big deal tc the
international idiots who still
sneak of the "ideals of the
Olympic movement" will not
EDWARD
COHEN
prevent the Games from start-
ing. Not with the Canadian gov-
ernment in the hole for hun-
dreds of millions of dollars.
And true to form, Washington
lets us know that the United
States will compete even if our
Olympic Committee objects to
this particular political act, if
not to others.
Of course, it is now under
new leadership and cannot be
blamed for the past activities of
Avery Brundage, who turned
his head away from the politics
of Hitler's Olympics in 1936
over the protests of Christian
and Jewish spokesmen, and
from the tragedv at the same
site in 1972.
AS RUSSELL Baker, the New
York Times columnist, has writ-
ten: "To see really rotten sports
in full cry, you have to go to
the Olympics, where the nations
of the earth invariably yield to
the temptation to do their ab-
solute worst ... at the last
games in Munich the memor-
able news was not a mere Hit-
lerian snub but trie political
murder of 11 Israeli athletes
by Palestinian killers. The Pal-
estinians were not in the games,
of course, but they were follow-
ing in politics the new sports
dictum that winning justifies
all."
The International Olympics
Committee, ever alert to pol-
itical implications, refused to
sanction a memorial service for
those martyred Israelis this
year at Montreal. Got to stay
away from politics, you see.
MORE PRAGMATIC is Ar-
thur Ashe, reacting to the threat
by the United States to with-
draw from Davis Cup tennis
competition because some teams
refused to play South Africa.
"We find it intolerable to mix
tennis with politics." according
to the U.S. spokesman. "They're
in a dream world," comments
Ashe. "You can never separate
politics and sports," adding the
statement I quoted earlier about
war and play.
Neither can you separate
commercialism and sports nor
diminish the chutzpah of profes-
sional promoters. In communitv
after community, they have ex-
ploited the taxnayers for new
and costlv stadiums in the name
of civic spirit.
ANYONE WHO has followed
some of the peripatetic promo-
ters in their journey from suck-
pr citv to sucker citv knows
how nhonv this anneal is as
nhonv as the notion of the
ideals that guide the Olympic
Games.
Yes. indeed, the news on the
snorts nases these davs is rele-
"*nt for those who recognize
that what we read is serious
hnsinp of "nort" defined in the dic-
tionary- a a "nleasant nastime.
rli"orion."
tf wp snnHvp the Montreal
ovnenonro thr-rp j<; alwaVS Mos-
r>ow to 1oV forward to in 1980.
a., fn- 1Q84 vou'll hnvp to turn
to fianrop Orwpll for that nre-
Hiction.


Friday, July 16, 1976
Jewisti tkfkUam
Page 5-A

I
Don Bolles Murder
Under Investigation
iackandefson
WASHINGTON Don Bolles.
an investigative reporter for the
Arizona Republic, was murder-
ed early last month
too close to the truth. The last
words he gasped were: "Mafia
. Emprise They finally
got me."
We sent one of our investiga-
tive reporters. Larry Kraftowitz.
to Phoenix to finish the story
that Bolles had started to in-
vestigate. Kraftowitz learned
that Bolles had been in secret
contact with a Phoenix busi-
nessman named Fred Porter. Jr.
PORTER had given Bolles a
file on Emprise Corp., a sha-
dowy snorts consortium, which
he claimed was manipulating
the Arizona Racing Commission.
He spoke with Bolles about Em-
prise shortly before the report-
er left to keep his appointment
with death.
After Bolles was blown up in
his car. Porter spent three hours
at police headquarters. The
Phoenix police withheld his
name and nut him under police
guard for three days.
The same day that the guard
was withdrawn. Porter was slug-
ged over the head twice with
a pipe.
A PASSING patrol car spot-
ted him, stretched out cold on
the street. He was no robbery
victim. His gold watch and
money clip weren't touched.
Apparently, somebody wanted
both the reporter, Bolles, and
his informant, Porter, out of the
way.
There's more to the story. In
neighboring New Mexico, the
mob-linked Teamsters' central
states oension fund took steps
to finance the purchase of the
Santa Fe Downes race track.
New Mexico sent investigators
to Washington to check on the
Teamsters. We were happy to
assist them with their investiga-
tion.
As a result, the Teamsters
have backed off the deal. Now
the state investigators have
learned that Emprise may at-
tempt to buy the race track.
The investigators are worried
that the Bolles murder has
caused so much heat in Arizona
that racketeers may try to move
across the border and set up
shop in New Mexico.
BULL (BLEEP). Most of us
think of manure as something
to keep off our boots. But a
special report claims that ma-
nure is a valuable national as-
set, which we are wasting.
Manure, for example, doesn't
just lie around creating pollu-
tion. It has some very import-
ant uses in this world. It has
been a main source of fertilizer
for our crops.
For a while, chemical ferti-
lizers began to replace old-fash-
ioned manure. But chemical
fertilizers have become so ex-
pensive that manure js now
making a big comeback.
Even more exciting, a num-
ber of scientists believe we can
produce gas from manure, suit-
able for heating homes.
But the General Accounting
Office is aggrieved over the ma-
nure situation. Its auditors have
been investigating how govern-
ment agencies have been han-
dling their manure responsibili-
ties. In this report, they blast
the mishandling of manure.
THE AUDITORS discovered,
for example, that no one really
knows how much manure there
is in America today. There are.
however, a few clues. In 1973.
for example. Minnesota led the
nation in .turkey production
Those amazing turkeys produced
over 19 million cubic feet of
manure in 1973 alone.
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency has taken these
startling turkey statistics, has
added a few other quick cal-
culations and has come up with
a nstional estimate. About two
billion tons of animal manure,
it is estimated, is generated
annually in the United States.
But unhappily, the govern-
ment auditors found an abysmal
lack ot coordination in our fed-
eral manure programs. The gov-
ernment manure detectives also ,
discovered that farmers are us-
ing manure insufficiently and
sometimes incorrectly.
But the farmers shouldn't feel
too badly. It's the bureaucratic
'Relief, Satisfaction9
Felt in W. Germany
BONN (JTA) The West
German government expressed
"relief and satisfaction" f>ver
the success of Israel's rescue
operation in Uganda, observed
that "the behavior of the au-
thorities in Uganda needs clari-
fication" and confirmed that it
never had any intention of sub-
mitting to the hijackers' de-
mands for the release of pro-
Palestinian terrorists imprison-
ed in West Germany.
An official statement released
here referred to a joint state-
ment issued by the Cabinet and
leaders of the opposition parties
before there was any knowledge
that Israel had mounted a res-
cue operation to free the Air
France hijack victims held at
Entebbe Airoort in Uganda.
THAT STATEMENT said Ger-
many was resolved not to re-
lease the six terrorists on the
Hijackers' list because they were
"not freedom fighters" as claim-
ed bv the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine but
"criminals war*'"1 "*" murder
nnd other er
The Bonn authorities called
on all nations concerned with
law and order to "double their
efforts to combat the dangers
emanating from terrorism."
Former Chancellor Willy
Brandt sent a message to the
Israeli Ambassador here de-
claring that the rescue opera-
tion "will go down in history
as an important date in the
struggle against international
terrorism."
OPPOSITION leader Helmut
Kohl, of the Christian Dem-
ocratic Party, expressed grati-
fication that "the hostages were
freed from criminal hands."
West German radio and tele-
vision stations praised the op-
eration as an important inter-
national event that could spell
the end of surrender to terror-
ist blackmail.
Most radio commentators said
that the rescue, carried out
over a distance of 2.50 miles
from Israel's borders, showed
that Israel's military prowess
wns bi 'o its 1967 level.
bunglers in Washington, accord-
ing to this report, who have
been unable to recognize the
gold in manure.
BIG JOHN: Recently, we re-
ported that Congressman John
Fary, otherwise known as "Big
John," is Chicago Mayor Rich-
ard Daley's man in Washington.
Fary is known on Capitol Hill
for passing out toilet-shaped
radios to House leaders. Ac-
companying each gift is a note
explaining that the "Little John"
came from "Big John."
When he isn't passing out
toilet radios, Fary serves faith-
fully as the mayor's messenger.
Daley tells him how to vote and
whom to hire. Accordingly.
Fary has placed three of the
mayor's underlings on the con-
gressional payroll. They are
paid to work for Congress, but
they spend most of their time
doing political chores for Mayor
Daley.
Now, Washington attorney
Joel Joseph has filed a lawsuit
against the mayor and the con-
gressman for fraudulently using
public funds for private pur-
poses. The suit will ask for dou-
ble damages.
SCOTT'S REVENGE: Last
year New Times magazine call-
ed Virginia's Sen. William Scott
the "dumbest man in the Sen-
ate." The magazine has a limit-
ed distribution. Only a handful
of Virginia voters read it.
But Scott called a press con-
ference to declare, with great
indignation, that he is not dumb.
Thereby, he helped to prove
that the magazine was right
about him.
Now Scott is preparing his
revenge. He's quietly drafting
legislation that would make it
easier for public officials to win
libel suits against the press.
FRINGE BENEFITS: The star
of the Washington sex scandals,
Elizabeth Ray. was courted re-
cently by the gossip tabloid Na-
tional Enquirer. The newspa-
per offered her big money to
provide the real names of the
senators and congressmen in
her book, "The Washington
Fringe Benefit."
The Enouirer rented a lux-
urious suite in a Washington
hotel to tape her story. For
two davs. thev wined and dined
her on champagne and lobster.
Finally, she ducked out with-
out telling her story and with-
out signing the contract leav-
ing the Enquirer with a hotel
bill of over $1,000.
KATZIR IN ADDRESS
Jewish NationalFund
Ceremonies Open
Bicentennial Forest
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The successful Israeli army
operation that freed the Air
France hijack hostages in
Uganda added an extra di-
mension of exuberance and
excitement to the dedication
of the Jewish N a ti o n a 1
Fund's Bicentennial Forest
in the hills near Jerusalem
last week.
President Ephraim Katzir,
addressing the throng gath-
ered for the event, termed
the action "3 most happy
coincidence," occurring as
it did on the eve of July 4.
Katzir said the Uganda res-
cue symbolized the triumph
of "human honor and free-
dom," the values represent-
ed by the flags of both Israel
and the U.S., and "deepens
our sense of brotherhood."
OTHER SPEAKERS took up
the same theme. U.S. Ambassa-
dor Malcolm Toon departed
from his prepared text to say
that "all of us were very heart-
ened indeed" to learn of the
Israeli army's success.
He asked the audience to join
him in the hope that the "forces
of hatred" would be eliminated
from world affairs "so that we
who value the decent things in
life can resume our pursuit of
happiness in conditions of peace
and tranquillity."
The Bicentennial Forest,
which, when completed, will
stretch over a 1.000-acre tract
in the Jerusalem hills from Nes
Harim to Beit Shemesh. is Is-
rael's main tribute to the 200th
birthday of the United States.
Ii will also be Israel's largest
recreational area, capable of ac-
commodating up to 100.000 hik-
ers, picnickers and campers at
any given time. It is a project
of the JNF of America.
TOON DECLARED, I con-
gratulate the JNF on its vision
and its wisdom on deciding to
mark the Bicentennial in this
impressive way. All of us. and
I am sure my fellow Americans
at home as well, look forward
to the time when hundreds of
thousands of people from Israel
and from the U.S. indeed
from all iands can walk un-
der trees planted here. And
when that day comes. I hope
it will be to the sound of breezes
singing shalom. shalom. shalom
to the world."
Katzir and Toon later plant-
ed the first trees of the new
forest. President Ford was rep-
resented at the ceremonies by
a personal envoy. Milton Hoff-
man.
HOFFMAN presented Mrs.
Lillian Sage, widow of the late
JNF president Maurice Sage,
with a tape of the impromptu
prayer that Mrs. Betty Ford re-
cited when her husband col-
lapsed while addressing a JNF
dinner in New York last month.
Mrs. Sage responded briefly.
"His work is now our work. We
must dedicate ourselves to con-
tinuing it," she said.
The dedication ceremonies
were opened bv Jacob Tsur.
outgoing world chairman of the
JNF. with a short prayer of
thanksgiving for the rescue in
Ueanda. The ceremony ended
with the blast of dynamite as
JNF workers broke the first
eround for a road to run through
the forest. "The first peaceful
blast in the Middle East." Tsur
remarked.
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Page 6-A

Friday, July 16, 1976
'Guts and Braim9 Behind Raid
UNITED NATIONS"A com-
bination of guts and brains that
has seldom if ever been sur-
passed."
That is how U.S. Ambassador
to the United Nations William
Scranton described the 1-
raid on Entebbe here Monday.
SCRANTON continued to sup-
port the raid at the same time
that he demanded that th<
Security Council "do every-
thing within its power to insure
against a recurrence of this
brutal, callous and senseless in-
ternational crime of hijacking
the crime which ga\e rise
to the Israeli action."
Scranton was joined by Great
Britain in introducing a draft
resolution condemning the Ki-
ng and urging means of
RUSSIAN ABSENT
Movniliaii, Sakharov
Honored By
Hebrew University
Continued frcm Page 1-A
come a metaphor for the gen-
eral assault on democracy and
decency." Moynihan declared
to the audience attending the
award ceremonies in the out-
door amphitheater on the He-
brew University's Mt. Scopus
campus.
Referring to Israel's rescue
mission in Uganda, the former
UN envoy declared that "The
audacity of Israel's resistance
to terrorism has provided us
with the most explicit instruc-
tion both of the demands made
on free men at this time and of
the truth that given brave and
resolute defenders, free men
can and shall prevail."
In all. 154 doctoral degrees
were conferred on university
graduates. Recipients of honor-
ary degrees, in addition to Moy-
nihan and Sakharov, were Axel
Springer, the West German
newspaper publisher: Prof. Na-
than FeinberR, an Israeli scho-
lar in the field of international
law; and Zvi Schwartz, a Jeru-
salem attorney and community
leader.
SAKHAROV accepted his de-
gree in absentia through his
designated representative. Prof.
Yuri Mekler of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity. The refusal by Soviet
authorities to permit him to at-
tend was cited by Moynihan as
a further demonstration of the
Soviet leaders' determination to
oppose the freedom of man.
Moynihan. presently a profes-
sor at Harvard University,
claimed that the Western world
was to blame for failing to dis-
cern the true intentions of the
Soviet Union.
"If the Soviets conclude from
our failure to respond to their
obvious intent to discredit and
dismember the free world that
we are certain to be easy, if
not, indeed, willing victims,
then indeed the democracies are
doomed to repeat their experi-
ence of 1939 and mislead the
aggressors into the apocalypse."
Moynihan warned.
HE SAID there is also the dan-
ger that the Soviet leaders
would conclude from passivity
or silence in face of attacks on
Israel that tie bulk of the West
Jo. s not see that "it is the West
itself that is truly under attack.
"Israel has become a meta-
phor for democracy in the
world And just as Israel has
become a metaphor for dem-
ocracy, so equally, have the ut-
terly unprincipled attacks by
terrorists on Israeli civilians
become a metaphor for the gen-
eral assault on democracy and
decency," Moynihan said.
Duriflg the ceremonies, the
Solomon Bublick Prize was pre-
sented to the American women's
Zionist leader. Mrs. Rose L.
Halnrin. and to Rabbi Philip S.
Bernstein of Rochester, N.Y.
Levi Gertner, a Jewish edu-
cator from Britain, received the
Samuel Rothberg Prize for Jew-
ish education. Dr. Lazar Fried-
land, a recent immigrant from
Riga, was awarded the Aharon
Katzir Prize for excellence in
his Ph.D. work.
The late Aharon Katzir,
brother of President Ephraim
Katzir. was one of the victims
of the 1972 Lod Airport mas-
sacre.
'assuring the safety and reli-
ability of international civil
aviation."
But the resolution ran smack-
up against resolution of the
Third World-Arab-Communist
bloc that condemns "Israel's
flagrant violation of Uganda's
nty" and demands that
pa) compensation to
inda for
ACCORDING TO officials
re, the likelihood is that both
will end in defeat
Sc .inton told the United
tions that the Entebbe raid
"necessarily involved a tempor-
ary breach of the territorial in-
tegrity of Uganda. However
;here is a well-established right
to use limited force for the pro-
tjction of one's own nationals
from an imminent threat of in-
jury or death in a situation
where the state in whose terri-
tory they are located either is
unwilling or unable to protect
them."
In Scranton's address, the .
UN Ambassador declared that
Uganda had failed to act to
free th.- hostages. "In fact.
there is substantial evidence
that the government of Uganda
cooperated with and aided the
hijackers." he declared.
He said that "to ;.iy Arab and
African friends, I say here and
now there may have been mix-
ed pctures concerning some of
the questions that have con-
fronted the Security Council in
the immediate past, but to my
mind there is no doubt on this
one. Not one iota.
"UNDER such circumstances,
the government of Israel invok-
ed one of the most remarkable ,
rescue missions in history. It
electrified millions everywhere,
and I confess I was one of
them."
Mikhail Kharlamov, repre-
sentative of the Soviet Union,
declared that "No reasons
which were brought in here
could justify the fact that a
small state was aggressed by Is-
rael."
Dayan Urges Diaspora Send
Young People to Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Former Defense Minister Moshe
Oayan urged that diaspora
Jews send their young people
to Israel "even if only for short
periods" in order to "fire them
with national pride" and there-
by contribute to the continuity
of the Jewish people.
Only Israel can "inject into
them a feeling of being Jew-
ish." Dayan told the World
Assembly of Jewish War Vet-
erans here. He claimed that
except for the Orthodox, it was
becoming increasingly difficult
to distinguish between Jews in
Western countries and their
non-Jewish neighbors in either
their lifestyles or thought pro-
cesses.
DAYAN noted that aliya fig-
ures were low and conceded
"'
Rabbis Host Luncheon
In Honor of Belgians
NEW YORK (JTA) The New York Board of
Rabbis hosted a luncheon at its headquarters here at
which time it honored the Belgian Consul General,
Rene Van Hauwermeiren, and through him, the Belgian
government itself.
The citation pressed to the Consul General noted
not only the hospitality his government accorded the
World Jewish community, but also its courage in resist-
ing the demands of the Arab world and the Soviet Gov-
ernment, that Belgium cancel the Second World Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, held in Brussels recently.
Rabbi Judah Cahn, pr^idenr of the board, presided.
that there were many unattrac-
tive features about life in Is-
rael. But it is the very blem-
ishes that should serve as a
challenge to Jews to come to
Israel and play a part in cor-
recting them, he said.
He suggested that "a major
part" of the funds raised for
Israel by Jews abroad should
be channeled into projects to
bring young Jews to the coun-
try for varying periods to make
them aware of the "living his-
tory of the land."
Jewish Agency treasurer I
Leon Dulzin, addressing the '
same session of the war vet-
erans' assembly, refuted Soviet
claims that aliya was down
Decause Soviet Jews were no
longer interested in emigrating
to Israel.
ACCORDING to Dulzin, there
are some 160,000 visa applica-
tions pending in the USSR, but
only 9.000 Soviet Jews were'
permitted by the authorities to
leave during 1975.
He said about 50,000 af-
fidavits were sent from Israel
\{ews in the Soviet Union in
1975 at the request of Jews
seeking exit \isas.
He said the affidavits bore
witness to family ties between
the applicants and their rela-
tives in Israel and helped peo-
ple leave under the family re-
unification program which the
Soviets say they honor.
Dulzin disclosed that since
170, 120.000 Jews left the So-
viet Union and 106,000 of them
came to Israel. Of the latter
about 5,000 left subsequently
to settle elsewhere.
HOPES 10 DESIGN PLANES
Miss Israel
Wins Miss Universe
Title in Hong Kong
NEW YORK (JTA) Miss Israel, a 22-year-old
Tel Avi\ Ui udent, won the 1976 Miss Universe
in Hong Kong was broadcast live over
- television
THE NEW .Miss Universe is Rina Messinger, a veteran
of Israel's Women's Army Corp who is studying aerody-
namics. The brown-haired beauty said she wants to design
airplanes.
During the contest. Miss Messinger was asked what
country she would like to visit and replied, "I would like
to go to an Arab country. But I can't, so I would like to go
to Africa." Miss Messinger listed her hobbies as ballet
dancing and glider flying.
m
your precious jewels
to the most prestigious
jewelers in the South
Call Lewis Rustein ftxone: 445-2644
Herb Schocnberg 531 0087
N
Have you Forgotten
YOUR MOST IMPORTANT
RELATIVE...
ISRAEL
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
"I give and bequeath $
to the
ISRAEL HISTAORUT FOUNDATION
Will assure the continued flow
of financial support to
ISRAEL
For the constructive
PROGRAMS OF HISTADRUT
THE
helps you discharge an
important obligation
both to
YOURSELF
AND 1 O THE PEOPLE OF
ISRAEL
For further particulars, please contact:
I Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
- 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 389
I Miami Beach, Florida 33139
I Telephone 531-8702
This 1$ to inform you that I plan lo include in my WILL <
'I
BEQUEST to tha liraal Hiatadrut Foundation, Inc.
KKBT
A06esi
nrr
TTXTT
sr
m. No.


Friday, July 16, 1976
+Jewisirnor*m*n
Page 7-A
I '
If you were planning to pay your CJA-IEF pledge tomorrow,
remember that the Israeli people are paying with their lives every day.
Eleven Olympic athletes died at Munich in 1972.
Last week at the Entebbe Airport in Uganda, more Jewish blood
was shed. Israel's people need our support.
Pay your pledge today.
MM
4
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone: 576 4000
Remembering is not enough,


Np I v
*JewiitncrkMnr
Friday, July 16> 197(.
What's Ahead for Us With Jimmv Carter?
luiKutuvU front Pajcv V
stvrwCymNt, tHit tv remember
ttxr tvdav m?w b'v.nn
plteals who are wvmmittrd to
mV
"on\ it im- |M ..* the
SMfl
"-nx Mb It-it
i Shift He -,-u
t\ coosar
is i^ i mse
i> i
in as
v i
Wl UU ami
a kterad aaruraj "v
n*s vc dear t
KRM
' *v Xfcatfe
Sfcft h mm ,-^-ar ft W
' fc-Varwu -rot-rs
t* *-.-. am ~.
relinquish control over the Go-
tei>thts or the holv places
Jerusalem. He proposes that
v Paiesnne Arabs have their
gam territory to be administer-
evl by Jordan
HE PUBLICLY committed
himseil never to vteid. as Presi-
>rael

:\ the Miooie
iik-.' u >:th -ur-
. i.t-vl tOMTICan -W-
-1 iei
t oouitx any

.r**ttjn> bV trie
' I m -i- h i MBb>
fen i> feni
a inu -canons
Mai -----, n
tn
situ in V.m> vacr
.-raL
">* I I bsribft ie
a* aaa ibjft
kIi^m n hop -Tienwnt.
- -"an >f to -unaru
mat
""HE VMTEP Vanons aaa"
athM bj w
Jtuannx Sonant with -acstn
Inuawu. 3aaaaa jas >w
part, a response to racism
auainst the Jewish people." he
tatad He also strongly con-
demned former Vice President
Agnew tor his "false, mali-
dDOB. .md inri-Semitic re-
marks
His expressed views on Is-
!; m iaaj Ving aualyawl for
iriaaa ritb 'he policy on
he \rar~ m be-
-vsident Ford
rter 0M9 bl com-
iec
House
I bl un-
i-Tre >out
aken
- ?v Ta-
n BSRT MM v- arse
" D
Massachusetts.
"or-
oa -mes ire
vrveer. ctor-
b ^rare.
ews _~3>: trrwren *.o "o 20 Bar*
M n jeneru -iec
tm
In 'ew T r-re~ nw
baa .-ast Tear-v i iaif jr"
90mmtgf |T MC iAMO
Now Aniin Complioin Evidence
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chimi aaab ."irmwn.
Xr aaPM -SfTSKTv
mtt-Mcey
ttaaaaa ba inn aii
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w
nw. -.-.. hi
ntf-.N V-cw ^^-
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bj ro >v -wn to -a crranor
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'-esr.niaas its
1 -scan* n ^^esone
*OSSDS>-- x.-mn -aa iau
i tr-e.* ;j.w "Jaracs 3ar. ai
srrwti -oktw aba Ttierfloaeu
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aaoBM am jfcire msaMiatr'.v
'-r-'^ocr? trv -^9a>9 ^awej^n*ec^.
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tw Tacxac arr aner
;.>oi-. 3ar-e caaai
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nwit ire -r-spunsxba! tjt tie
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^a^a jPTuruiugm in BM
tlaa -^ar *>v
max snow te
*e ?as-
BMfera MS toanomw
."uiv Ha ppu .^ ^.
zoani "!? ?"eiitiu i T^n^e^"t
"u-iuuc JtOti TBQoaais. aha
aiiwerTai 'AM. i3\am t>t
w^-e aoacw TaDaaatmes
>c sraesi Taconats. tae rw

the :,^ijfnr? -eqaaar
readme tj a
"" -' naci bi
-ueusaua a tie aaaltaae "S-
-Mt -or t
las res-aar
L-.JfbEl.4-5 ".i
Austria** Kreiskv
Calk Entebbe Raid
"Setf-Defense
-rae aure can 3M
*"- ti: *.> jc ImijWa uraarr a



"aaa. Haaacs a ~ai
- .
aaaaaa -

the votes in Democratic pri-
maries. Nationally, they cast
four percent of the votes. Be-
cause the majority of the Jews ^.l?^l.i,^T!l0cntic Pa*V
are concentrated in large elec-
uted partly to the fact that Mc-
Govern was vague in answerine
questions at meetings with lead-
ers of Jewish organizations and
partly to the f*rt that certain
elements of Jews have in recent
years begun to shift their inter-
toral votes states their votes
are enough to provide national
victory in close elections.
THE DECLINE in Jewish
votes for the Democratic Party
in the last Presidential elec-
r.ons of 19~2 about 200.000
otes ess for McGovern as com-
pared with the total number of
Jewish votes for Hubert H.
Humphrey, the Democratic
tee :n I9<5 was anrib-
to the Republicans.
The interest of the great ma-
onty of the Jewish population
still lies, however, with the
Democratic Party.
It is estimated that American
Jews normally donate more -nan
half the large, gifts to national
Democratic campaigns ar.d that
they comprise between 10 to 20
percent of all rJatose
involved on the Democratic
side of American politics today.
Memorial Held for Israeli
Athletes Killed in Munich
MONTREAL JTA, A memorial ceremonv for
1H U kml tMnm iiair. during the 19~2 Olympic Games
n Mumcn vas :eic here July 12 at the Shaare Bwhomayn
i.a^'-r-e .-.me Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau attended
"re .-sr-mccy
ci "*" Guntier Plaut, of Toronto's Hoiy Blossom
"entne. wis :zs^an. The program included the lower-
ng :t tanal :1ags by 11 young people, each symbo::;mg
re :f t:e itiLetes murdered by Palestinian terror.sts of
r.e B.acx Serrember movement four years ago at the Mu-
vc Vflbjpe
itaatan :t tne 19*6 Israeli Olympic team ar.d re!a-
tves :r -~e Txtuns participated m the honr-iong lervice
v-.c- vis mder the patronage of Montreal pMmhropist
Bronfman.
121311.W. 7 m. M7-MII
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5
a>-yM


Friday, July 16, 1976
+Jewish tkxkn&n
Page 9-A
Phone Call Tells All About Amin's Madness
Continued from Page 1-A
hostages on July 4, while it has
elicited some of the most viru-
lent anti Israel, anti Zionist
propaganda from the Arab-
Third World-Soviet bloc, has
also since elicited pure con-
tempt for Uganda's ineptitude.
H is conceded here that
Amin's phone call to Bar-Lev
iva, a statement made to ease
his bruised ego. But speaking
over Kol Yisrael Radio, Bar-Lev
warned that Amin can not be
trusted, phone call or no phone
call.
Tomorrow, he will tell the
Palestinians the exact opposite
thing." he said, while reporting
that Amin also told him: "You
can tell (Prime Minister Yit-
zhak) Rabin and the Israel gov-
ernment that I have severed all
contact with them (the Pales-
tinian terrorists), and I will also
announce this in the press."
THE PHONE call came only
hours after an Israeli psychia-
trist announced that before
Uganda severed relations with
Israel, and while Israel was
deeply involved in giving Ugan-
da both military and technical
assistance, he was treating
Amin for what he diagnosed as
general paresis, a congenital
syphilitic disease that ultimate-
ly affects the brain and there-
fore physical and emotional
stability, as well as intellectual
acuity.
In his call to Bar-Lev, the
Uganda leader said that he was
severing his ties with the Pal-
estinians because they had
brought nothing but grief to
his country.
SIMULTANEOUSLY, it was
announced here that among the
hijackers were known accom-
plices of Ilich Ramirez Sanchez,
known internationally as "Car-
los." the Latin American Marx-
ist who is alleged to be the co-
ordinator of worldwide terror-
ism in Europe, Japan and the
Middle East.
Commander of the team that
hijacked the Air France jetlin-
er on June 27 was the German
Wilfred Boese, also involved
with "Carlos," who was recent-
ly cornered by French secur-
ity police in Paris, but who es-
caped them in a shootout.
Boese was killed by the Is-
raelis at Entebbe.
THE AMIN call to Bar-Lev
cast no new light on the fate
of Mrs. Dora Bloch, the sep-
tuagenarian left behind in Kam-
pala when she was taken from
Entebbe to a Kampala hospi-
tal after swallowing and chok-
ing on some food.
Reports are that, on July 4,
in a fit of rage over the Israeli
raid, Amin had her dragged
from the hospital where she
was allegedly suffocated.
In a meeting of the Israel
Cabinet on Sunday. Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon categoric-
ally declared Uganda "as bear-
ing sole responsibility for her
fate."
SIMULTANEOUSLY, in an in-
terview in Beirut, George Ha-
bash, leader of the Popular
Front for the Liberation of Pal-
estine, denied that his organi-
zation had anything to do with
the hijacking.
"The authors of the hijack-
ing were a group of young men
who broke away from the PFLP
some time ago," he declared.
In the summer,
more than the temperature
goes m>.
Here's something you
can do about it*
You've probably noticed that
the temperature isn't the only
thing that rises in the sum-
mertime. There's also your
electric bill.
The cold hard fact
as to why, is your air
conditioner. Your air
conditioning costs
could very well account
for half of your summer
bill. For example, last
year the average elec-
tric bill in April came to
about $24.75. That aver
age bill increased to
$41.23 in July.
In short, your
summer bill in-
creases primarily
because you use
more electricity to keep cool.
But there are some things you can do to
help keep your bill down while the temper-
ature goes up.
Fat and most importantly don t over-
cool. Set your thermostat as close
to 78 degrees as is comfortable
for you.
Weather strip your doors and
windows. It's amazing how much
warm air can seep in through
even the slightest crack.
Shade your windows with
awnings, shutters or reflec-
tive film.
Use light colors on your
walls and nx)f to re-
flect the sun. The
lighter the color the
less the heat. The less
heat the less your
bill during the
summer months.
Shade your
aircondi-
tioning unit with shrubbery,
but don't block the air flow. That way it'll
operate more efficiently. At FPL wdd like
you to know what can happen to your bill
during the summer, because we'd also like
you to know what you can do about it.
FLORIDA POWER ft LIGHT COMPANY


9&/
ert
t^eaal
Demo's Platform
-Then and Now
|?0R REPUBLICAN and Democratic Platform
constructors the flight of four years nec-
essitates that political leaders and their
phrasemongers face up to pressing new prob-
lems, damp down passions over the peren-
nials, and decide how best to bait the traps
for waivering voters.
Four years ago those who built the plat-
forms were agonizing over the return of pris-
oners of war, amnesty, tax reform, the guaran-
teed annual income and women's rights. The
Democrats asserted that their opposition had
failed, as promised, to halt the flood of crime;
and the Republicans boasted that they had
practically put an end to de jure racial se-
gregation.
THE DEMOCRATIC Platform bore the
stamp of McGovern liberalism; Republicans
spoke out for all that President Nixon wanted,
including voluntary prayer in the public
schools.
In this sea*oo spokesmen for Jewish or-
American firms ta^foiBpy with
Arab boycotts.
APPEARING on behalf of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee and the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major American Jew-
ish Organizations, Morris J. Amitay told the
Democratic Platform Committee that Middle
East peace can be achieved only if there is
"an end to the state of war; an end to Arab
economic warfare against Israel; an end to
hostile (Arab) propaganda and political war-
fare; the beginning of normal relations, such
as communications, tourism and trade; and
direct government to government negotia-
tions."
This presentation undoubtedly will be re-
peated when Republicans invite Platform pro-
posals. And 99 percent of the American Jew-
ish community will gladly subscribe to all
that Mr. Amitay has projected.
MANY OTHER issues now being raised in
Platform skull sessions hold deep interest for
all of us. At a time when anti-Washington fever
has raised temperatures in both parties (50
percent of the American people have regis-
tered distrust in the federal government when
polled) and at a time when many Democrats
no longer claim to be liberal just as many
conservatives are flirting with the Democratic
front-runner, we should not lose sight of vital
morn* and economic concerns.
^rne/fl^Wjjfefc can't wax
Panama 'w'Htnry Kissinger as campaign is-
sues will continue to be deeply worried about
our fundamental rights, corporate dishonesty.
Watergate, and Congressional morality.
Jimmy Carter tells us we mt-stn't demand
instant answers to such needs, but we have
to tell him that all this is business listed as
unfinished for so long that further delay in
finding solutions cannot be tolerated.
Lavish Bar Mitzvahs
Object of Youthful Ire

JEWISH ADULTS who react with revulsion
' to the gross vulgarities which frequently
characterize the social aspects of Bar Mitz-
vah rites can take comfort from the results
of a poll of youngsters who, having experi-
enced that particular Jewish rite of passage,
line up solidly with such adults.
The findings of the opinion poll, made at
the 1975 international conventions of Aleph
Zadik Aleph and B'nai B'rith Girls, two com-
ponents of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion, were released recently by the BBYO
OFFICIALS SAID about 100 AZA delegates
and 130 BBG delegates attended the conven-
tions, representing some 13,000 boys and
20,000 girls in the two 13-to-18-year age
groups.
One of the questions dealth with was what
changes, if any, the delegates wanted made
in the requirements for Bar and Bat Mitzvah.
There was widespread agreement that the
lavish party aspects of the ceremonies should
be toned down and some of the delegates
favored elimination of the parties.
A TYPICAL response was the comment of
one girl that she felt that both the Bar and
Bat Mitzvah "are used for social reasons. The
large parties should be de-emphasized and
the ritual aspect of Torah should have more
importance put on it." Another BBG delegate
suggested there should be. for those events,
"less staging, production, expense and com-
mercialism."
An AZA delegate asserted "I believe it
should be such a party. It seems like
it is more for the parents than for the per-
son who becomes Bar Mitzvah."
Another revisionist view was that studies
for either ceremony should be broader. The
youngsters also felt that the ceremony should
be more meaningful in relation to the times.
They also conteinded that the Bar or Bat
Mitzvah's role should be more creative than
merely memorizing a standard text.
While almost two-thirds of the boys felt
that 13 was the most appropriate age for Bar
Mitzvah others argued for higher ages, par-
ticularly 15 and 16. .A little more than half
of the girl respondents approved the age of
13 for Bat Mitzvah but about a fourth pre-
ferred age 12 and the others higher ages
than 13.
n fe-
Jonath
an
^5chcnk
'icr
Activist
Remembers
Davidovich
COVIET JEWISH activist Vitaly Rubin, who recently emigrated
to Israel after a four-year wait, had earlier written a let-
ter to the West, obtained by the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ). describing his special relationship with Col.
Yefin Davidovich, the Minsk activist who died last April.
Rubin recalled that he heard of Davidovich's death on a
Sundav. "and that evening I left with 15 other persons from
Moscow to Minsk on the train," the letter began.
"IN THE TRAIN car where we were sitting there were six
persons accompanying us. Their mission obviously different
than ours thev were sent to follow us. In Minsk they left us
and we were given over to the surveillance of the local au-
thorities."
As the train journeyed across Russia to Minsk, Rubin re-
called Davidovich's last visit with him and his life. "He was a
very special man. and in his presence I always felt a verv spe-
cial joy and inner elation. His last visit to our house was on
lanuary 20." the activist recalled.
"At the time TASS (the Soviet News agency) devoted a
special announcement that said Davidovich intended to re-
nounce his Motherland publicly in Andrei Sakharov's apart-
ment."
"THIS ANNOUNCEMENT," Rubin continued, "was a result
of the bad work of listening devices, or rather, the Soviet au-
thorities did nai-antatestand and were unable to transcribe what
their devices aad) a^fded. We kno*fe)L dg *> w* are
bugged." Rubin aaaafaTed. "and we always rM down what fs
most important. The Soviets were not helped by their special
machines that followed Davidovich everywhere. With all their
technology they failed in a most shameful manner."
When Davidovich finally arrived at the Rubins' apartment,
he told the couple that the spy assigned to follow him was
left downstairs. "Davidovich told us in a wonderful mood that
when the spy tried to get in the same elevator with him a
woman tenant, who was there by chance, said that the elevator
was unable to carry more than two persons."
In answer to the TASS announcement, Davidovich express-
ed his gratitude that the news agency had in fact made more
notice of his arrival than that of Secretary of State Henry-
Kissinger.
LATER, RUBIN accompanied Davidovich to a phone where
the Colonel's statement was read to several journalists. "Those
of us who saw him." Rubin recalled, "could hardly believe he
was so gravely ill."
"He emanated hope, cheerfulness and assurance and trans-
mitted all these feelings to people around him. Looking back I
came to the conclusion that he had led a wonderful life At a
ime when evervthing was already behind him, he was able to
rise to tremendous heights. The people of Minsk called him
'the father of his people'."
Rubin pointed out that Davidovich's funeral was an ex-
>ression of this love for Davidovich. Rubin described the hun-
dreds who attended the ceremony, "people observed from bal-
conies, in the yards, in silence."
FIFTEEN WOMEN carrying funeral wreaths, behind num-
erous women carrying Davidovich's medals on red cushions,
followed the coffin draped in a blue cover with white fringe!
and an Israeli flag. All the participants in the procession wore
blue armbands with a white background.
"At the cemetery after we spoke," Rubin recalled, "the Col-
onel's widow. Maria Karpova, said. "Don't bypass injustice.
Do not let a single case of lies go by. Be proud that you be-
long to his people. Keep your heads high."
"Kaddish was read," Rubin wrote in his letter to the
West, "and then we went to the Minsk synagogue. Before the
war. the large synagogue was turned into a theater, and after
the war the second, smaller of the two shuls was demolished.
The present synagogue is in a simple building outside of Minsk.
Friday, July 16. 1Q76 k,sl FhrkJitr PagelO-A
Chaim Zeldes9 'Brothers9: A New Jewish 'Jaws9?
Chaim Zeldis, "Brothers." N.Y.: Random House,
1976. 497 pp. $10.
WE HAVE become accustomed to desperate hor-
ror-filled scenes on the screen, and gory, dis-
gusting descriptions in print. This type of writing
use to be associated with pulp literature. Now we
find it on the best-seller lists a result of p.r.
promos as well as changing tastes in the reading
public. Witness the box office figures on films like
"Jaws" and "The Exorcist," and anticipate what
"The Omen" will bring in.
After reading "Brothers," this reviewer has no
need to see "The Omen." Zeldis' novel is the story
of a young boy who represents the anti-Christ in
the most literal way possible: he is Jesus' brother.
The boy narrates his own story, an unusual touch,
as he graphically describes his vicious crimes. He
has purposely snuffed out any human compassion
or kindness within himself.
s,
usan
fanoff
AS THE boy becomes a man, he ruthlessly rises
in the power structure of Herod's court. At the
penultimate moment he is foiled in his attempt at
a coup, and he must go into hiding.
Zeldis' favorite phrases in this novel include
"empty eye socket," "black-blooded stumps' and
"running fluid." These are the more delicate ex-
pressions. Zeldis did plenty of research on historical
torture techniques. This is a veritable cabinet of
Dr. Caligari.
WHAT COMPLICATES matters, however, is that
the author offers a clever and shocking alternative
to the Jesus story. The evil brother is determined
to leave a vengeful monument to his existence on
earth. He proposes, through his brother's death, to
invent a new god: "a god who would twist men's
minds so that they would devour others and them-
selves without reason. A god who would clothe him-
self in men's basest fears and desires. A god who
in his own abject self-immolation would seduce the
will of man into seducing itself, and by doing so
vanquish all."
The last 20 pages of the book are fascinating
Zeldis places the origins of Christianity in the hands
of a deranged and self-motivated creator.
IN THESE days of Christian-Jewish brotherhood,
it would be distasteful to praise such a conclusion.
At the same time, perhaps only the Jew, with
his history of Christian-rooted anti-Semitism, can
appreciate the brilliant irony in the finale of this
novel.
!'


jday. July 16, 1976
*knisl Ittridiftn
Page 11-A
.

DON WRIGHT in Miami News
old and Resourceful Effort'
LKM (JTA) "In
Ibold sourceful and sophis-
ffort, the Israeli De-
l have succeeded in
frying out the decision of the
cut of Israel to save
liberate from captivity the
era of the Air France
fine, who were hijacked by
Uestinian terrorists and kept
sorters in Uganda, with their
les in danger."
With these words Premier
pzhak Rabin began his ad-
ess to a jubilant and applaud-
Knesset on what has been
(scribed here and abroad as
most daring and incredible
Bcue mission in military his-
IraMN DID not give many
pails of the operation to the
tciallv convened session at-
Kded by President Ephraim
Jt/ir and other Israeli no-
ples as well as by foreign
plomats who crowded the vis-
Irs gallery.
JThe Israeli Defense Forces
Ive achieved one of their
ost exemplary victories from
ith the human and the moral
\d military operational points
view, a remarkable manifes-
kion of Jewish fraternity and
raeli valor," Rabin declared.
[Continuing, the Premier
ated: Together with the
nilies who have lost their
ar ones, we mourn our dead,
kiformed an4 civilian, vic-
ns of the vile Arab terrorism,
|d send to the wounded our
st wishes for their recovery.
"MEMBERS of the Knesset.
fs operation of redemption of
Wives is worthy of Jewish
' Israeli pride and of world-
tie acclaim. The decision for
ps operation of redemption
as taken by the government of
pel. and on its sole responsi-
P'ty We did not consult with
}V other government in ad-
jnce. nor shall we lay respon-
oility on any other country or
ivernment .
r'n the hijacking of the Air
ance plane to Entebbe, all
("cations showed that the
landa ruler (President Idi
Tim) was collaborating with
terrorists, while using deceit
false nretenses. This was
situation on the eve of July
The time of expiry of
F ultimatum grew increasing-
[closer ... The political ef-
ts bore no fruit. The sand in
hourglass was about to run
l leaving no possibility for
Independent rescue effort.
[Under these conditions, the
nmment of Israel decided
jnimouslv to take the only
U left to rescue our people
'o announce our willingness
release detained terrorists.
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
Close upon that Cabinet's reso-
lution (last Thursday), we ac-
cordingly informed the French
government, through whom the
negotiations were conducted
with the terrorists, we were pre-
naraed to adopt even this alter-
nativein default of any other
to rescue our people.
"MEMBERS of the Knesset,
this was not a timesaving tactic,
and had only this choice been
left, we would have stood by
our decision, as a last resort.
Throughout the entire time
since the capture of the plane,
we sought ways and means to
foil the terrorists' scheme by
our own devices.
"The I.D.F. and the intel-
ligence community lost not a
single hour required for think-
ing, planning and preparation.
When the opportune moment
arrived, the plan was submitted
for the Cabinet's consideration.
The Cabinet approved the opera-
tion unanimously .
"This rescue operation is an
achievement of great value in
our struggle against terrorism.
This is Israel's contribution to
humanity's struggle against ter-
rorism as an international
manifestation but it should
Close ut>on the Cabinet's reso-
not be viewed as an epilogue.
This achievement will help us
in the continuation of our ef-
forts but the struggle is not
over, and new efforts, new
methods and unremitting so-
phistication will be required.
Terrorism will not find us static,
nor adhering to routine."
RABIN SAID there was no
difference between the govern-
ment and the opposition on the
rescue operation. "We deemed
it vital to act out of a united
national approach, unifying all
sections of the people," he said.
He said in every stage of the
negotiations and before deci-
sions were made the govern-
ment consulted with the Knes-
set Defense and Foreign Affairs
Committee and with Likud lead-
ers Menachem Beigin and Eli-
melech Rimalt.
Rabin said they both endors-
ed the decision last Thursday
to negotiate and later the deci-
sion to use force. "The unity
thus revealed is of inestimable
value in a time of struggle and
stress," Rabin said after prais-
ing the two Likud leaders.
BEIGIN ROSE in the Knesset
to praise Rabin for his leader-
ship and the army for its bril-
liant action. The Knesset adopt-
ed a resolution praising the
army. The sole dissenting voice
came from the Rakah Commu-
nist faction.
In a statement to foreign
newsmen later, Rabin called on
the United Nations "to realize
who the so-called PLO is. You
cannot fight terrorism and at
the same time give honor and
respect to terrorists." he said.
Catholic-Jewish Relations
Chief to Resign Oct. 1
WASHINGTON(JTA )
The Rev. Edward J. Flan-
nery, head of Catholic-Jew-
ish Relations of the United
States Conference of Catho-
lic Bishops, will leave that
post Oct. 1 to return to his
home diocese of Providence,
R.I., the Conference an-
nounced here.
Bishop James S. Rausch,
general secretary of the con-
ference, said that Fr. Flan-
nery will coordinate study
programs for diocesan
priests in Providence. No
successor has been named
bv the conference.
FR FLANNERY has directed
the office of Catholic-Jewish
relations for the conference
since its founding at Seton Hall
University in New Jersey ten
years ago. The office was moved
to Washington in 1972.
Bishop Rausch praised him
for having demonstrated "exem-
plary zeal and total commitment
for many years to deepening
the relations between the
church and Judaism."
He also said that Fr. Flannery
has "played a major role among
American churchmen in laying
the groundwork for increased
collaboration between Chris-
tians and Jews on a solid basis
of mutual understanding and
mutual esteem, and many thou-
sands of persons are profoundly
grateful for his achievements."
A NATIVE of Providence, Fr.
Flennery was ordained in 1937.
He was managing editor of the
Providence Diocesan Weekly
when be became associate di-
rector of the Institute of Judaeo-
Christian Studies at Seton Hall
and director of the Bishop's Of-
fice for Catholic-Jewish Rela-
tions.
Israel Celebrates
U.S. Bicentennial
By DAVID LANDAU
And YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S.
Ambassador Malcolm Toon said
nere that he hoped when Israel
celebrates i t s Bicentennial.
ricans will reciprocate the
outpouring of affection and good
will displayed by Israelis dur-
ing the festive Bicentennial
events in Israel over the July
4 weekend.
Toon spoke at the Mann Au-
ditorium in Tel Aviv where he
and Premier Yitzhak Rabin
were guests of honor at a ma-
rathon seven-hour musical trib-
ute to the 200th birthday of the
United States presented a-; the
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra.
a U.S. Army Band, the Mel Kel-
ler dance band and the Bath
Sheba Ballet.
THE BICENTENNIAL cele-
brations bv Israelis and Amer-
icans in Israel were planned
months ago. They were given
extra fillip, however, by the
brilliantly successful rescue
raid to liberate the hostages in
Uganda carried out on the eve
of July 4. Israelis, ebullient and
proud of the operation which
has elicited worldwide admira-
tion, saw a symbolic connection
between it and the successful
battle of the 13 colonies for
their independence two cen-
turies ago.
Official tribute was paid to
the United States by President
Ephraim Katjir and Premier
Rabin in separate messages to
President Ford.
Katzir referred to July 4 as
"a red letter dav in mankind's
calendar and this auspicious an-
niversary gives us the oppor-
tunity to express to the United
States deepest appreciation and
rincerest hone for its happy fu-
ture and its ever-growing con-
tribution to the better and more
peaceful world of our joint
pravers."
RABIN CABLED Ford: "Sin-
cere expressions of friendship,
tribute and respect All Is-
rael shares in this historic event
which is a celebration of dem-
ocracy decency and freedom
everywhere. In gratitude and ir.
brotherhood we salute America
of the free world
as you enter into the third cen-
tury of your independent
The Bicentennial and the
nda rescue wt lated
equally at a formal reception
and garden party given b\ Toon
at his residence in Herzliya. The
national mood of joy over the
rescue pervaded the occasion.
Rabin. Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres and Chief of Staff
Gen. Mordechai Gur who were
among the guests were em-
braced and kissed by other Is-
raeli guests and warmly con-
gratulated bv foreign diplomats.
\ LESS formal and more
vocal celebration was held at
the Hebrew University snorts
stadium in Jerusalem where
some 10.000 gathered to watch
a fireworks display and con-
sume those ubiquitous symbols
of America hot dogs and
Coke.
Thev also viewed a vintage
American movie "Yankee
Doodle Dandy" the filmic
biogranhv of the World War I
froubador. George M. Cohan.
Th- 11-hour spectacular was
arranged bv retired U.S. Army
Col. Anhur Hoffman who
Hedged anv income derived
from the festival to an Israeli
scholarship fund.
Th Mann Auditorium con-
cert last nicht was attended bv
over 3.000 Israelis who enioved
themselves at an American-stvle
snack bar that featured hot
Hogs, soda pop and marshmal-
lows.
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Page 12-A
*Je*rist> Ihridkni
Friday, July i6 l9
Callaehan Forced on Knees
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
Considering the official at-
titudes of the French and Brit-
ish governments over the res-
cue of the hostages from Ugan-
da airport from the brink of
death, we should look at the
utter degeneration of those na-
tions
The French obviously made
a secret deal with Idi Amin for
the release of the airbus and
craw, and abandonment of the
.Jewish hostages to the well-
known bcstin.ity of their cap-
tors and host allies
NOT ONE Official of the
French government made a pub-
"Let Thy Words Be Brief
KAlllth (Ecclcsiutet)
"iimeiit
Labor
Still Debating Ties
To Rabin Bloc
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Dis-
cussions have begun between
Mapam and the Labor Party
that are expected to determine
whether Mapam remains part of
Premier Yitzhak Rabin's Labor
Alignment or strikes out on its
own in the next elections.
Mapam itself is split. A major-
ity of its members, including
veteran leaders like Yaacov Ha-
zan. want the faction to con-
tinue its alignment with tabor
so as to work for changes from
within
Bl'T THERE is growing min-
ority sentiment in Map*"1 fav-
oring a break. This croup is
totally disillusioned with the
Labor Party's Policies in the
political, social and organiza-
tional spheres and is disappoint-
ed with Rabin's leadership Ma-
pam was totally behind the Pre-
mier when he was elected in
10-4
They believed his views coin-
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5M-M11
cided with the "doveish" lean-
ings of Mapam. But several de-
velopments altered that opinion.
One was Rabin's appointment
of the right-wing Gen. Ariel
Sharon, founder of the Likud
opposition^, as his special ad-
visor. Sharon has since resigned
that post. Another was the gov-
ernment's vacillation in face of
the militant Orthodox Gush
Emunim's defiance of govern-
ment policy barring unauthor-
ivd Jewish settlements on the
West Bank.
MANY in Mapam are also
disturbed bv the Rabin govern-
ment's apparent lack of a peace
plan and its failure to take any
new peace initiatives. In the so-
cial arena. Rabin is faulted for
lacking a plan to close the so-
cial and economic gap in Israel
bv raisinc the living standards
of the poor.
Some of his critics sav the
ean between the privileged and
nn1-nrivileeed classes in Is-
rael is widening
Manam has also complained
bitterlv that Rabin and his clos-
est associates ignore the dem-
ocratically elected bodies of the
Labor Alienment when basic
nolicv decisions are made.
A MEETING to discuss these
issues was held here between
the leadership of Mapam and
the labor Partv. Former Pre-
mier Golda Meir led the discus-
sion for Labor bv asking Mapam
to spell out its neace plan and
who in addition to Mapam. is
readv to accent that plan. She
took Maoamfto task for its claim
?hit Israel s policv alienates
friends in the socialist world.
"Who are these friends, these
socialists, that we have to take
them into consideration?" sh#
asked.
'Is it (Austrian Chancellor
Bruno > Kreisky? Or (Sweden's
Premier Olofl Palme? Or is it
(West Germany Chancellor Hel-
mut) Schmidt? We cannot rely
on such friends "
Despite Mapam's contention
that Socialist" are being alien-
ated. Mrs Meir pointed out that
Israel continues to engage in
discussions with Socialist lead-
ers
NO DECISION was taken at
rv-j5 meeting regardine Manam's
future in the alignment., but
talks are to continue The at-
titude of most Labor Parry
sneakers at the meeting was in
favor of continuing the alipn-
meat
A~-ong those present from
Labor was Premier Yitzhak Ra-
bin, defense Minister Shimon
Peres, and Meir Zarmi Manam
was represented by Hazan. Meir
Talmi and Victor Shemtov
lie pronouncement of the af-
fair, except the spontaneous
congratulations of the Ambas-
sador to Israel. The pilot had
only words of praise for Amin.
and his observations of the ac-
tions of the Ugandan troops
were contradicted by every
other occupant of the plane.
He obviously was informed of
the secret deal so that accounts
for his "so what" attitude on
the miraculous release of the
hostages since his release was
shortly expected.
As for the British, we must
recall the galling humiliation
(-'allaghan had to endure as fo-
reign minister when he had to
beg Amin on his hands and
knees for the life of the British
consul in Kampala from trump-
ed up charges of espionage.
THE OFFICIAL British state-
ments on the rescue were cool,
at best, expressing only thanks
for saving the lives of the pas-
sengers.
It seems that Callaghan can-
not stand the success of the
Jews when compared with hu-
miliation he underwent in that
same Kampala, in front of that
same Idi Amin, on the same
mission, of saving lives.
It's 'Doves' Vs. 'Hawks'
On End-of-War Discussions!
ARTHUR
Miami
ROTH
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Labor Alignment continued its
vigorous debate here over the
government's assent to explore
the possibility of ending the
state of war with the Arabs
non-belligerence as a goal of
Middle East diplomacy at the
present time.
The debate, expected to con-
tinue for two weeks, has array-
ed "doves" against "hawks," the
former supporting the govern-
ment's move and the latter
sharply critical of it.
JUSTICE Minister Haim Za-
dok strongly defended end-of-
war diplomacy which, if suc-
cessful, he said, would be tan-
tamount to "passive peace," a
worthwhile basis upon which to
go on to build an "active peace"
replete with human, diplomatic
and economic ties.
Zadok. regarded as a leading
Cabinet "dove." chided other
Labor "doves" such as Yitzhak
Navon and Aharon Yariv, for
their criticism of the end-of-
war policy on grounds that it
compromised Israel's search for
a full, formal peace.
They must surely know, Za-
dok said, that Israel's demands
for full peace on Israel's t
torial terms is doomed to ded
lock.
Informed sources said
Zadok's defense of the se
for non-belligerence may h
hinted at the contents of
torney General Aharon Bard!
report on the legal definition,
end-of-war which has been si
mitted to Premier Yitzhak
bin.
BARAK, like his predecessi
Meir Shamgar, who studied
subject in 1974, is believedj
have concluded that an end-J
war pact would produce a std
of peace, albeit a "passivj
peace bereft of positive polite
content.
Barak, the sources said, ho
to the legal view that thereJ
no intermediate stage in intj
national law. Once the state!
war is ended, a state of pea
ensues.
In his remarks, Zadok
olied that the U.S. was iustilij
in oroposine an end-of-war it)
dative because neither Isn
nor the Arabs was ready at
time to pay the price which
peace would entail.
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[ay, July 16, 1976

'Jewish rkrkttor
Page 13-A
SOMINDUN
\ntebbe and Gen. Brown's Confirmation
| Continued from Page *A
nmittee on Armed Services
questioned him on wheth-
*ie did, indeed, believe in the
btence of "undue Jewish in-
bnce" on the Congress.
|T IS not only Stone who
|sed the point. Most of us
s the roint in rebutting such
hments and repeatedly.
]iere is nothing furtive, il-
or immoral in lobbying.
Illy, the lobbyist supplies in-
flation on a variety of issues
Jenlighten" congressmen so
they should be able to con-
jte to the legislative proc-
fmore knowledgeably.
kpitol Hill is full of lobby-
Tall the time, all of them
Unown and all of them reg-
led with the government as
(yists if they represent for-
interests.
Rial IS furtive, illegal or im-
[al is the manner in which
jc congressmen respond to
wing tactics. And in such
; therefore, the furtive, il-
or immoral tactics them-
lobby forces in Washington:
the Pentagon itself, the mer-
chants of death (weapons, mil-
itary electronics and aeronau-
tical manufacturers), petroleum,
agriculture, pharmaceutical, in-
surance, medical and, the most
recent and daring, the Arab
lobby.
All of them have axes to
grind. All of them attempt to
exert influence on Congress.
Which of them does not attempt
to exert influence at one time
or another? Not a single one,
or they would not be worth
their salt.
"Undue" influence is another
matter. What "undue" means is
when the influence works
when a legislator succumbs to
the outer limit of lobbying,
when he permits the further
flow of "information," pressure
or reward to interfere with his
own convictions.
THE POINT, which most of
us miss, is that it is absurd to
deny the existence of a Jewish
lobby because of course there
is one.
INSIDER THE following The point is that only the
FBI Arrests JDL Leader
Zontinue from Page 1-A
Int IS. Attorney here, said
(charges grew out of a pre-
isly unreported shooting >n-
Int around midnight last
I 23 at the Prince Georges
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Rimgaudas Malishaskas and
Ivan Zavrazhnov, both second
secretaries at the Soviet Em-
bassy. No injuries were re-
ported.
White said Perl was charged
June 29 with purchase of a
stolen 22-caliber rifle and with
trying to hire a former driver
for the Israel Embassy to shoot
out the windows in the apart-
ments of the two Soviet Em- j
bassy officials.
The driver, whose name was
withheld, was not charged. The I
shooting was the first such in- |
cident reported in the Washing- ]
ton area. Soviet diplomats in i
New York City have complained
that shots have been fired into
their residences on several oc-
casions.
qualifying '-undue" should be
an issue, and only this issue
should have been put to Brown
in his confirmation testimony
or raised by stone in his state-
ment to the Senate to empha-
size, not that there is no Jew-
ish lobby, which would be un-
true, but that there is nothing
unique in the existence of a
Jewish lobby.
Furthermore, that "undue" is
a function 0f legislators who
respond to the influence of a
given lobby in a given way, and
not of t"e lobbyists who exer-
cise it.
I NOTICE, for example, no
such phony disclaiming cries
that they have no lobby among
members of the American Med-
ical Association, one of the
strongest lobbies in the coun-
try, or against Secretary of
Agriculture Earl Butz, who con-
tinues t act today as if he still
were a '"'ember of the board of
Ralston purina.
Or against Roger Tamraz, the
American trained Lebanese
who, after the Yom Kippur
War. put us on notice that
henceforth the Arab League
would e buying American
public relations and lobbying
know-how in copious quantity
to bury what he also charac-
terized as "undue" American
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Jewish political (Zionist) influ-
ence.
Does Brown recognize these
important distinctions, or is he
simply raising the Nixon-Agnew
anti-Semitic spectre of a "Jew-
ish cabal"? That should have
been and should be in the fu-
ture the issue for those who
would defend American Jews
and Israel against such absurd-
ities as Brown deals in.
AS TO the original question:
Would Entebbe have made a
difference in the Brown con-
firmation wrangle?
I believe the answer is yes
because it would have weaken-
ed the Brown "warning" to
America's "security miried"
about Jewish influence.
Neither Jevvs nor Israel are a
threat to the security of Amer-
ica as Brown implied. But Sen.
Stone's own argument against
the Brown confirmation is a |
perfect illustration that you can '
neither lick 'em nor join 'em
on Brown's terms without do-
ing more harm than good, for
Stone is, himself, one of Amer-.
ica's "security-minded."
IN HIS objection to the con-
firmation, Stone held that he
must be taken seriously because
he has "a 100 percent record
in supporting every Defense re-'
quest" since he joined the Sen-
ate.
Sui generis. Brown's testi-
mony tags Stone as a Jew, and
hence as a threat to the na-
tion's security because alleged-
ly his Defense, voting record is
a question ot Jewish influence
in behalf ot Israel, not of the
U.S.
Nevertheless, there can be no
doubt that the initial shock of
the 1973 Yom Kippur War ob-
scured its oucome and showed
Israel to be a security liability
even if not a downright threat.
BUT ENTEBBE has at least
for the moment recast Israel in
her more traditional superman
image. In fact, the raid makes
pipsqueaks of the west as a
whole its servile acquies-
cence to Arab terrorism.
After the raid, there would
surely be greater impatience
with Brown's testimony and
surely even more votes against
his confirmation than the sur-
prisingly large number cast
against him in the first place.
Hans H. Marcuse*
Louis Wiikin


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Page 14-A
Jewish ncrXMM?
Friday, July l6
19'
'Black Panthers9 Seek New Respectability
By SHLOMO TSADOK
Saadya Marciano is one
of the five original members
of Israelis of Moroccan de-
scent who named themselves
"The Israeli Panthers" back
in 1969.
Today, the Panthers are
concentrating on establish-
ing themselves as a political
party, and they have won
representation in Histadrut.
They are demanding a
closing of the social and eco-
nomic gap between Oriental
and Western Israeli Jews.
Following is the last in a
two-part interview with Mar-
ciano:
a & &
Tsadok: What did Shalom
Cohen see coming from an
alignment with you?
Marciano: I'll tell you: He is
one of the only Sephardic intel-
lectuals who kept his inde-
pendence. He's a political man,
very talented and sneaky. He
shared a total ideological iden-
tification with the Panthers
ff>m the beginning.
HE CAME to the Panthers in
despair with the Israeli Left
they are intellectuals who have
parties and orgies. They scream
about the territories and Arabs
but the problems of Oriental
communities, which is the most
important social problem of peo-
ple and a problem they had to
bring up at the Knesset, they
didn't bring up and they left for
Likud.
We entered the Histadrut
elections. We put up candidates
with a very small budget that
some called criminals. We re-
ceived over 15,000 votes. This
was the first time that the
Oriental community was direct-
ly represented in the Histadrut.
Tsadok: How many repre-
sentatives did you receive?
Marciano: Three, or 1.73 per-
cent of the total. This gave us
an additional forum. Now we
were recognized not only as
criminals but as a body which
represented people. We receiv-
ed 22 thousand lirot from the
Histadrut everv month. When
we first started we had only 8
lirot. We did more in the His-
tadrut than any other group.
Tsadok: What are your plans
for the next national election?
Marciano: This time we're go-
U.S. Vetoes UN
Move Affirming
Right to Return
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The United States June 29
vetoed in the Security Council
a resolution calling on the Coun-
cil "to affirm the inalienable
rights of the Palestinian people
to self-determination, including
the right of return and the right
to national independence and
sovereignty in Palestine, in ac-
cordance with the Charter of
the United Nations."
The U.S. veto ended the de-
bate on the report of the 20-
membtr Committee on the Exer-
cise of the Inalienable Rights of
the Palestinian People which
started here June 9.
ISRAELI boycotted the de-
bate on the grounds that the
committee's recommendation
was in fact an adoption of the
PLO plan for the destruction of
Israel "in stages." The U.S. cast
the lone negative vote.
Britain, France, Italy and
Sweden abstained. In favor
were Benin (formerly Daho-
mey), China, Japan, Libya, Pa-
kistan. Panama, Rumania, Guy-
ana, the Soviet Union and Tan-
zania.
The veto of the resolution,
which called for Israeli with-
drawal from all Arab territories
by June 1 next year, was the
16th cast by the United States
in the 30-year history of the
UN and the fourth so far this
year.
THREE OF the four Amer-
ican vetoes since January were
against Mideast resolutions
backed by the PLO and its sup-
porters.
Ambassador Albert W .Sherer
Jr., acting United States Repre-
sentative to the UN, told the
Security Council before the
vote that the text of the resolu-
tion "is totallv devoid of bal-
ance, stressing the rights and
interests of one party to the
Middle East dispute and ignor-
ing the rights and interests of
other parties."
He also said that in the view
of the U.S. government "the pol-
itical interests of the Palestin-
ians and their role in a final
Mideast settlement constitute a
matter that must be negotiated
between the parties before it
can be defined in resolutions of
this Council."
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
United Nations, Chaim Herzog,
in a statement issued after the
vote, said that the debate on
the Palestine committee report
was another example "of the
miserable behavior of the
United Nations under Arab in-
stigations engaging in its pa-
ranoiac obsession with Israel
while ignoring the human
tragedy of Lebanon for the fif-
teenth month running.
ing to do something big. We
don't want to fail. We're going
to try to get as many people as
possible into the Knesset. This
time we're not only running as
the Oriental community because
our problems are the problems
of the whole state of Israel.
SO WE looked for people to
align with and found Lova Eliav
and Marcia Freedman of the
Independent Socialists, and Mo-
ked's Meir Pa'il. We are align-
ing with them because they
have many young, Western in-
tellectuals, students who see
what their parents did to con-
tribute to the poverty problem
and feel guilty and really care
about what we're doing and
want to work with us.
We're finally bringing to Is-
rael a coalition which includes
Oriental communities, students
and intellectuals. There are
many serious people in Israel,
journalists, officers in the army,
who won't support the Panthers
alone or wouldn't support Moked
alone. A union they will ac-
cept.
Tsadok: Is your position in
reference to the territories
similar to that of the Israeli
left? Do you support a Palestin-
ian state and if you do so, how
do you think it will influence
the situation?
Marciano: I don't want to get
into this. We will be having our
convention soon and these ques-
tions will be raised. It will be a
heated discussion because with-
in the Panthers you have many
political shades of opinion. I'll
wait until the convention before
I say anything.
Tsadok: In other words the
Black Panthers do not have a
political line concerning the oc-
cupied territories. Because if
and when you do get a Knesset
seat, you'll have to vote on these
issues.
Marciano: Obviously since
there is diverse opinion we'll sit
and argue and come up with a
decision very soon.
Tsadok: What connection do
you have with Oriental high
school students and people who
are the age you were when the
Panthers first began organizing?
Marciano: We have a youth
movement called the "Panther
Cubs" (Guroi Hapanterim). And
the main reason we came to the
U.S. was to collect money for
the Black Panthers' youth vil-
lage. We're doing something no
one has ever done before in set-
ting up this youth village. The
government promised us 6 mil-
lion lirot. We can't set this up
ourselves and we'll get dona-
tions from the devil to open it
up.
Tsadok: Where is the village,
what are its goals?
Marciano: It's between Ramie
and Jerusalem, near Kibbutz
Gezer. In its initial stages it will
have 200 youths. We go to
street gangs and in every street
gang there is a natural leader.
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We take him. By and large these
youths never served in the army
because of minor offences dur-
ing their adolescence.
WE TAKE them and teach
them everything they're miss-
ing. Panthers who were once
criminals became social work-
ers. There was a guy named
Dudu Chezkiyahu in Hatikva.
Every father said to his chil-
dren don't go with Dudu. Now
he's the best counselor in Hatik-
vah, especially with youth work.
He's a Panther now and every
father says I want you to study
with Dudu and no other coun-
selor. These are the types of
counselors we'll have. We'll
teach them everything, math,
Hebrew and to teach them to
be Panthers.
Tsadok: You said that the
government promised you six
million lirot?
Marciano: On paper.
Tsadok: O.K., this six million
lirot is enough to get you start-
ed?
Marciano: For a year.
Tsadok: Mainly young men
and women from street gangs
will participate in the program?
Marciano: No, only boys will
be in the school. We also want
to have a drug clinic.
Tsadok: You haven't as of yet
begun to deal with the problem
of women in Israel. Since the
woman is the basis of the fami-
Iv. if the woman isn't progress-
ing how will there be significant
social change in the Oriental
communitv?
Marciano: Personally I'm for
the fertility of women.
Tsadok: If you say you're for
fertility, what have you learn-
ed from all your activity? You
said that since the government
encouraged Oriental families in
particular to have many chil-
dren this was a cause of many
of your problems. Why don't
you say to yourself. I am going
to educate the mother to read
and write and to work and sot
to have so many children? My
mother for example had eleven
children and can't read and
write. Let's say your father is
educated and you have a beau-
tiful apartment. But your father
can't possibly support 12 peo-
ple?
Marciano: I personally am for i
fertility because I personally j
know I can give them every- I
thing.
Tsadok: Perhaps you person-
ally can afford to take care of
many children, but we're talk-
ing about a more general prob-
lem, aren't we?
Marciano: In general I'm for
fertility. They should get a good
education, good living accom-
modations. But if the same fami-
ly has 7. 12 children and st,,
in a lousy situation, I'm again
it. I would prefer that lnst'
F having dogs and cats Z
yo
goii
aquariums in the house that
have children.
Tsadok: But how are you
ing to educate families to hi3
as many children as they
afford and not depend on ft
government to give them mot*
after the fact?
Marciano: I am not Raw,
Ovadia Yosef and I'm not goii,
to be the one to tell Deoolel
have or not to have child
But I think that if a person
support a family and send
children to the university
have 10 children, that he she
have them. If he cant aff
the children and thev're
to end up in jail he shoul"
have them.
Tsadok: When you now di
onstrate, do the police still
er you?
Marciano: In the beginning
was terrible. Beatings, j a
terms, fines. Now it's more .
ficult for them because we"
better known and we have
resentatives in the Histad
Also we have a rule in the
thers: It doesn't matter
vou were before and what
did, but when you enter
Panthers, you ston all crime
that's the entrance ticket
as a matter of fact 5 pen
of crime went down in Is
because all those who joi
the Panthers stopped th
crimes.
Tsadok: That's odd becau
according to what I've read
the newspapers crime is goit
up in Israel.
Marciano: That's ripht. and
will go up. For example thi
threw Charlie Bitton in iail fi
a vear and a half It was total!
illegal. We said if they're
to use illegal means so wo
we. And this Droved to th
that thev couldn't get awav
illegal means.
Tsadok: But then todav
notice don't reallv bother y
Marciano: Right And t
we don't use the same extre
tactics we used before
Tsadok: That was the
sentence. You use more m
erate. more political means thi
demonstrations.
Marciano: Yes. vou're righ
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Friday, July 16, 1976
+Jm*lstifk*idkMn
Page 15-A
REPORTS ARE 'EXAGGERATED... DISTORTED... PARTICULARIZED... INADEQUATE'
Washington Post's Methodical Campaign Against Israel
By JOSEPH PALOKOFF
Last in Series
WASHINGTON A Sen-
ate Foreign Relations sub-
committee's hearing on
Arab-Israeli problems was
particularly notable for re-
vealing a particular instance
of The Washington Post's
methodology in its critical
campaign against Israeli pol-
icy and the secret liaison it
had with the State Depart-
ment in seeking to elevate
I'l.o chief Yasir Arafat to
respectability as a "mod-
erate."
Under a three-column,
two-line head May 20. The
Post reported "Recent Sen-
ate Visitors Call Arabs Flex-
ible, Israel Rigid." In its
story, The Post said those
Senators "described Arab
leaders as relatively flexible
on crucial points of an
eventual agreement, includ-
ing the right of Israel to
exist, but most of the Sen-
ators described Israeli lead-
ers as intransigent."
CHECKING The Posts ac-
count, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was told by aides of six
of the seven Senators in the
hearing that the account was
exaggerated, distorted, parti-
cularized or an inadequate sum-
mation of the proceedings.
These were aides to Senators
George S. McGovern (D., S.D.).
the subcommittee chairman:
Floyd K. Haskell (D.. Colo.L.
Adlai E. Stevenson (D., 111.),
Jacob K. Javits (R N.Y.), Char-
les Percv (R. 111.) and Clifford
P Case (R., N.J.).
The office of Sen. James
Abourezk (D.. S.D.) did not re-
turn JTA's call.
Later, examining the 17,000-
word transcript of the hearing
to nrepare its own account. JTA
found not only that the aides'
assessments were sound but that
British in 'Correct' Applause
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA)
Prime Minister James Cal-
laghan issued a statement
here saying he was very
anger Ugandan President Idi
Amin and his Arab support-
ers.
The government's attitude
was in sharp contrast to the
pleased at the outcome of reaction in the country at
the Air France hijacking large and in Parliament
affair But his statement did
not take the form of a mes-
sage to Israel which was
seen here as a demonstra-
tion that the British Labor
government did not want to
where MP Phillip Goodhart
described the rescue as "one
of the greatest military ex-
ploits of ail time" and "a
very substantial v i c to r y
PAST EFFORTS TERMED FAILURES
Kissinger Calls
For Controls
Against Terrorism
Continue from Page 1-A
airport is an unprecedented
act. but equally clear is that the
hijacking of airliners, the hold-
in j of 100 innocent people for
n in a situation where the
n eminent, at a mini-
mum, proved impotent to en-
accepted international
law, indicates that we face here
a new international problem."
KISSINGER recalled that "The
United States, over a period of
year, has proposed to the United
Nations an international conven-
tion where no country would
hijacked airliners to land
or whore, automatically, hijack-
ed airplanes that do land are
subject to arrest and will re-
ceive no support whatever from
the government concerned."
Kissinger noted that "For
many years we have failed in
this effort. We believe that it is
essential that some internation-
al arrangement be made to deal
with terrorism because it can-
not be tolerated that innocent
people become the plaything of
international thugs."
The American position in the
upcoming Security Council de-
bate on the Israeli rescue op-
eration in Uganda is expected
to unfold only during the course
of the debate, but diplomatic
sources believe the U.S. will
veto anv resolution condemning
Israel for its action.
A SPOKESMAN for the
French Embassy here told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency July
H 'hat his government has not
reached a decision on its posi-
tion and was in consultation
with the U.S. However, the
spokesman said, "You cannot
focus on the Israeli operation
but what happened before it.
Much depends on how the ques-
tion will be asked in the de-
bate."
Spokesmen at the embassies
of Yugoslavia and India, Third
World states that support the
Palestinians, conformed to the
official silence of their govern-
ments on the Israeli rescue op-
eration.
The Yugoslavian Communist
Party newspaper Borba warned,
however, that the Israeli raid
set a "dangerous precedent"
and said approval of it in the
West was alarming because it
was approval of a violation of
Uganda's sovereignty.
THE INDIAN spokesman ob-
served, however, that "the en-
tire press" in India which is
under government control, has
shown no sympathy for hijack-
ing because It only hurts the
Arabs' cause. He charged, nev-
ertheless, that Israel's action
was a violation of Uganda's
sovereignty. This reporter was
in New Delhi when the rescue
operation took place and found
overwhelming support for Is-
rael's achievement among Hin-
dus and Sikhs whom he ques-
tioned.
A Hindu lawyer said he spoke
with a dozen of his colleagues
about the raid and all backed
Israel. Several Sikhs, who are,
as a whole, described as extra-
ordinarilv strong in favor of Is-
rael praised the commandos in
comments to the JTA. A promi-
nent Sikh from the Puniab said
the raid was necessarv to show
the Palestinians that the Israeli
izovernment can and will pro-
tect its people.
against international terror-
ism for everybody."
MEMBERSof Parliament
have moved a motion urging the
government "to congratulate
the government of Israel on
brilliantly and bravely con-
founding an act of air piracy,
to condemn President Amin for
aiding and arming international
terrorists, and to combat terror-
ism both at home and abroad
with equal vigor and determi-
nation."
Labor MP Greville Janner urg-
ed the government to take ac-
tion against Uganda for its al-
leged collusion with the terror-
ists.
In the Jewish community,
there was rejoicing and thanks-
giving in sharp contrast with
the prayers of intercession read
in svnagogues.
Jewish youth movements held
a big celebration in a park in
northwest London, attended by
a representative of the Israel
Embassy.
SPEAKING on the BBC, Is-
rael Ambassador Gideon Rafael
said he was "proud of the preci-
sion" of the Israel armed forces
operation. It was Israel's reply
to Amin's suggestion that time
was running out and that Is-
rael had to do something, he
stated. Said Hammani, the PLO's
man in London, refused to
sneak to the BBC.
Dr. Immanuel Jakobovits,
Britain's Chief Rabbi, described
the rescue as "one of the most
memorable episodes of our long,
blood-stained history." when he
made a special appearance Sun-
day at the Board of Deputies
of British Jews.
In an atmosphere of relief
and exultation, the Chief Rabbi
told communal leaders that "in
our synagogues we wept and
pleaded with God for his inter-
vention and succor, now we
have witnessed a great salva-
tion."
LORD FISHER, president of
the Board, described the news
of the rescue as a "tremendous
moment" and announced that
telegrams of congratulations
and affecjionate Rood wishes
were being sent to Israeli Presi-
dent Enhraim Katzir and Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin.
Dr. S. Levenberg. Board vice
president, asked where were
the UN. its Secretary General,
and the Securitv Council while
the hostages were being held in
Uganda The world stood aside,
as it did during the Holocaust,
he said.
The Post ignored elements of
prime importance.
While The Post emphasized
criticism of Israeli settlements,
it ignored the Senators' agree-
ment to request the State De-
partment for an analysis of what
the Arabs mean by their "priv-
ate" assurances to Westerners
they recognize Israel and their
continued public attacks on Is-
rael evervwhere else.
THE POST also omitted that
the Senators emphasized for-
mulas for a political process
towards achieving a settlement.
Furthermore, The Post ignored
the major fact on the settle-
ments that Abourezk asked for
an immediate Senate resolution
to condemn Israel but none of
his six colleagues supported
him.
The only response in fact, to
his move was Percv's sugges-
tion that consideration of a
resolution await completion of
the subcommittee's five hear-
ings.
Four Senators Haskell,
Stevenson, Javits and Abourezk
did indeed criticize Israel on
the settlements and Percy im-
plied it bv noting The Post's
"stinging" editorial and other
media criticism. But no one de-
scribed Israel either as "rigid"
or "intransigent." Case heartily
refused to criticize Israeli ac-
tion to defend herself, as he put
it, in the absence of Arab agree-
ments to let her live in peace.
THE OPPOSITION of Javits
and Stevenson to the settle-
ments was not news to The
Post's readers since it had high-
lighted extracts of their speech-
es on its editorial pifee with
reference to that issue. Abou-
rezk's pro-Arab views are well
known.
That left Haskell, whose
words apparently formed the
foundation for The Post's head-
lines. Haskell said that in con-
versation with Arab leaders,
they gave him "the very de-
finite impression" they "recog-
nize Israel was there to stay"
while in Israel he "found a less
flexible attitude" which he
found "depressing."
The Post published that. It
did not report that Haskell. a
member of the Senate Interior
Committee, did not identify the
Arabs nor say what Israel was
"kss flexible" about. Was it
refusal to deal with the terri-
tories? Or the insistence that
the Arab states must recognize
Israel?
SHORTLY AFTER his words
about Israel's attitude. Haskell
defended the PLO's continued
determination to destroy Israel.
Percy pointed out that less than
a month before, on Apr. 27, a
French correspondent (in L'-
Humanite, the Communist Party
organ in Paris) reported that
Arafat in an interview had
again asserted PLO intention to
eliminate the Jewish State.
Percy asked the other Sen-
ators for comments on that.
Only Haskell responded. "The
essence of negotiation," Haskell
said in upholding the PLO, is
"taking the most extreme posi-
tion." The Post published none
of that, either.
Stevenson later exposed the
State Department's liaison with
The Post on a buildup of Ara-
fat as "reasonable and mod-
erate."
AFTER TELLING the Sen-
ators that he had received a
"moderate" expression from
Arafat in their conversation in
February, Stevenson said: "I
was very reluctant when I came
back to sav publicly what Ara-
fat had told me. I did not do
so. I told the State Department,
knowing that if I were to say
this publicly it would be in-
stantly repudiated. But the
report was leaked ... it was an
accurate report ... in The
Washington Post (that) indicat-
ed a far more flexible and mod-
erate position on the part of
the present PLO leadership than
on the part of any other leader-
ship The subsequent repu-
diation (by the PLO) was nec-
essitated by internal divisions
and the threat which he person-
ally faces."
the Post gave top billing on
its front page at that time to the
"moderate" Arafat's statement
he gave to Stevenson, who. in-
cidentally found "no moderates
in the Israeli government or
among the Arabs."
It is noteworthv that Steven-
son applied "flexible" to Arafat
compared with other Arabs, not
Israel.
OMISSION is a tactic in The
Post's methodology on entire
developments, when it suits its
purpose. When the AFL-CIO.
for example, endorsed Israeli
nnlicv at a Washington dinner
with 1700 delegates and guests
honoring Golda Meir. the Post
ignored it.
riut. in another example, it
had space to complain that the
American Jewish Committee
had "lobbied" the media for its
conference. In keeping with ef-
ficient public relations practices
widely used, the AJCommittee
had sent copies of the confer-
ence program in advance to the
media. The Post had plenty of
room for pictures of Israelis in
confrontation with rock-throw-
ing Arabs but no comparative
snace to show that Israelis en-
abled the Arabs to hold a free
election and the first time ever
Arab women anywhere had the
onnortunitv to vote.
The Communists and PLO
election victories were boomed
but the triumphs later of mod-
erate Arabs was downplayed.
The Post's current handling
of Jewish affairs comes as no
surprise to readers over the
yean. From the time the Jack-
son-Vanik amendment was in
the legislative process. The Post
followed the line of the Nixon
Administration that it despised
bv opposing the measure, play-
ing up opposition to it and the
usual omission or downplay of
support.
IN A SURVEY some three
years ago of The Post's activ-
ities, JTA reported The Post
was emphasizing minor develop-
ments critical of the Jewish es-
tablishment like highlighting a
controversial Bas Mitzvah in
Philadelphia, a kosher butcher's
complaint in suburban Mary-
land, and resorting to descrip-
tions of well-gowned ladies at
a fund-raising affair in the style
of anti-Jewish publicists while
ienoring events of community-
wide importance. ^_
Why does The Post do it?
One analyst said its "nihilistic"
nolicv of exploiting news that
disturbs large numbers of peo-
ple helps build circulation and
reader interest. Another ob-
served American official policy
is changing towards the Middle
East and Israel and The Post
sees it the same way.
In this strategy, this analyst
added. Congress has to agree
with the Administration that
Israel must capitulate to a
"settlement" on Arab terms so
that America may begin court-
ing the Third World in earnest
for strategic and commercial
reasons. To help turn Congress
around, a tactic is to divide the
Jewish communitv and thus
weaken its appeal to elected
representatives. Whatever the
reasons. The Post's directional
signals will not be lflng in be-
coming clear.


Pae 16-A
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^day, J^ 16, 1976
NORTON TIRE COMPANY
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Jewish Florldian
Miami, Florida Friday, July 16, 1976
Section B
Askew Signs Bond Purchase Bill
A wider area for the sale of
Israel Bonds in Florida was
opened up on June 16, when
Gov. Reubin Askew signed a
bill permitting state commercial
and savings banks to purchase
State of Israel Bonds. The an-
nouncement was made by Gary
Gerson, chairman of the Great-
er Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, who noted that until now,
only national banks in Florida
Florida Licenses
Yeshiva Gedolah
The State of Florida Board of
Independent Colleges and Uni-
versities has granted a tempor-
ary license to the Yeshiva Ge-
dolah of Greater Miami to serve
as an independent college and
university in the" Florida area,
according to Chapter 246 of the
Florida Statutes. This applies to
the coming calendar year,
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar,
dean of the college, noted his
"great pleasure" when he learn-
ed of the news from the Florida
Board. "It will give the Yeshiva
a tremendous opportunity," he
said, "to attract students to the
Yeshiva. now that it has the
ability to grant degrees to its
graduates."
Rabbi Yehudah Leib Scha-
piro, Rosh Yeshiva, said that
JCC Opens Teen
Coffee House
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida has an-
nounced a Summer Coffee
House program every Tuesday
evening for junior and senior
high students, beginning July

The Coffee House will be at
the JCC Teen Center, 8:30 until
11:30 p.m., and folksinger Patti
Lane is featured.
There is an admission charge
and soft drinks and chips will
be served. All teens in the cam-
munity are invited.
"after so many years of serving
this community in such an ex-
emplary fashion, it is very
gratifying to know that we can
now grant Bachelor of Torah
Education. Bachelor of Hebrew
Letters, Master of Hebrew Edu-
cation and Doctor of Divinity
degrees."
"All of the students who par-
ticipate in the classes offered
bv the Yeshiva Gedolah, said
Rabbi Linskar, "share a total
dedication to the Torah way of
life. The majority of the stu-
dents have indicated that upon
graduation they would Kke to
dedicate their lives to the serv-
ice of Jewish communities
where rabbis and Jewish in-
structors are sorely needed."
could invest in Israel Bonds.
The new law was enacted
only a week after New York's
Gov. Hugh Carey had signed a
similar bill allowing savings
banks, savings and loan associa-
tions, and credit unions in his
state to add Israel Bonds to
their investment portfolios.
Nineteen other states and the
District of Columbia have also
oassed legislation enabling sav-
ings banks to buy Israel Bonds.
SPECIAL THANKS, Gerson
said, must go to State Sen. Jack
Gordon, of Miami Beach, who
introduced the bill, which was
cosponsored by Senators Myers,
Winn. Graham, Firestone and
others. Paul Steinberg of the
Florida House of Representa-
tives and State Comptroller
Gerald A. Lewis also offered
much helpful cooperation.
Shenard Broad, Florida State
chairman for Banking Institu-
tions of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization and chairman of the
board of the American Savings
and Loan Association, and Rab-
bi Leon Kronish. chairman of
the Israel Bond National Rab-
binic Cabinet, welcomed the
new law as a demonstration of
nomilar sunnort for Israel in
Florida and hailed it as an op-
portunity to enlist wider eco-
nomic aid for her at a time of
serious financial difficulty.
Chiles Aide to Hear Complaints
Sen. Lawton Chiles's South
Florida assistant, Tom Hayes,
will visit Dade County on Tues-
day, July 20, to assist people
who are experiencing problems
with federal government agen-
cies.
"I know that many people
are experiencing delays and
other problems with Social Se-
curity. Medicare and other
agencies." said Chiles. "Some-
times we can expedite the han-
dling of these cases, so I hope
anyone who is having a problem
with a federal agency will feel
free to come by and discuss it
with Mr. Hayes."
From 9 to 10:30 a.m. Hayes
will be at the Surfside Town
Hall in the Council Chambers.
From 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. he
will be at the Bay Harbor Is-
lands Town Hall Council Cham-
bers, and from 2:30 to 4 p.m.
he will be at the Miami Beach
City Hall.
JWY Post, Auxiliary 243
Plan Dinner-Dance
JWV Murray Solomon Post
No. 243 and Ladies Auxiliary
will have a dinner-dance on
Aug. 7 aboard the "Biscayne
Belle."
The tax-deductible donation
includes a cocktail and prime
rib dinner.
NJCRAC Executive Committee Elects Lefton
Donald E. Lefton was elected
to the executive committee, the
major governing body of the
National Jewish Community Re-
lations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC), at its recent Plen-
ary Session in Louisville, Ky.
Chairman of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee and a
member, of Federation's board
of directors. Lefton is the only
Floridian serving in this capa-
city
The NJCRAC was created in
144 to promote voluntary co-
DONALD E. LEFTON
operation and coordination
among the Jewish community
relations agencies throughout
the United States. These agen-
cies are concerned with such is-
sues as Soviet Jewry, American
Mideast policy, Jews in Arab
lands, intergroup relations and
civil liberties, among others.
Through it the interests of the
Jewish community in America
may be served.
Among the more than 400
delegates at the Plenary Ses-
sion were Miamians Ainslee
Ferdie. a past national com-
mander of the Jewish War Vet-
erans and member of Federa-
tion's Community Relations
Committee, and Edward Rosen-
thai, CRC director. Special guest
speaker was Israel's Ambassa-
dor to the United States. Sim-
cha Dinitz, who supplied an in-
depth briefing on the current
Mideast situation.
AMONG THE actions taken
during the four-day session,
delegates passed a resolution
unanimously denouncing the
statement to the Senate Armed
Services Committee of Gen.
George S. Brown, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in
which he said that he continues
to believe that Jews have "un-
due influence" over Congress.
Gen. Brown remarked in Octo-
ber, 1974, that Israel had too
much influence on Congress and
that Jews "own ... the banks
in this country; the newspa-
pers." The remark earned him
a rebuke from President Ford.
The NJCRAC resolution de-
clared that Gen. Brown showed
"marked insensitivity to a basic
aspect of the American system"
and questioned his fitness for
office.
Highlights of the session were
programming workshops on vi-
tal Jewish issues. Donald Lefton
chaired a workshop concerning
the use of visiting Jewish Olim
(emigres) from the Soviet
Union in the U.S. Edward Ros-
enthal kevnoted a workshop on
the "Adopt a Russian Jewish
Family" project.
ATTENTION!
YOU HAVE ONLY ONE WEEK IN WHICH TO REGISTER
FOR FALL PRIMARY ELECTIONS
' Registration closes 5 p.m.. Saturday, July 24
V If you have not yet registered to vote or if you need to
change your name, address, or political party affiliation on your
registration record, the following locations are available in
Miami Beach during the week of Monday, July 19, to Satur-
day, July 24:
MIAMI BEACH CITY HALL
1130 Washington Avenue .
Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
SENIOR CITIZEN COUNCIL
429 Lenox Ave.
Tuesday, 1 to 3 p.m.
SOUTH SHORE COMMUNITY CENTER
833 Sixth Street
Monday to Friday, a-m. to $ p.m.
MUSS PARK
4400 Chase Avenue
Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
-
For "further information, call Dade County Elections Dept.,
358-3600
Kislak Joins HUC-JIR Board
Jay I. Kislak, president of J. I.
Kislak, Inc., and J. I. Kislak
Mortgage Corp. and chairman of
the Skylake State Bank execu-
tive committee, was installed
recently as a member of the
board of governors of the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. Dr. Alfred
Gottschalk. president of the col-
lege, and Dr. Jules Backman.
chairman of the board, offi-
ciated at the induction cere-
mony.
Kislak. who has been a mem-
ber of the executive board of
the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, is a trus-
tee of St. Leo College, a member
of the citizens board of the
University of Miami, and Flor-
ida chairman of the capital
funds drive of the University
of Pennsylvania from whose
Wharton School of Finance he
was graduated.
A member of Temple Beth
Am, of which he was a founder,
Kislak received the Harold Bos-
worth Award for Humanitarian
Service and the NCCJ's Medal-
lion Award for Community Serv-
ice. He is a former United Fund
of Dade County chairman and
a former treasurer of the Great-
er Miami Chamber of Com-
merce.
Jay 1. Kislak (right) accepts congratulations from Al-
fred Gottschalk, president of the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion, after being installed as a
governor of the 101-year-old school.
Civic Leader, Author Are Guests
At Temple Israel, Israel South
Civic leader Audrey Finkel-
stein will be the guest speaker
at Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami following services at 8 this
evening. Mrs. Finkelstein, who
EXCLUSIVE TO THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
Jacobson Named to Health Council
Gov. Reubin Askew has an-
nounced the appointment of Gus
Jacobson. a past president of
the Dade County Mental Health
Board and a vice president o
Vanleigh Furniture Showroom,
to the Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services'
District XI Advisory Council.
Jacobson was then elected
chairman of the committee by
fallow members of the council,
which will advise District ad-
ministrator Max B. Rothman on
the administration of HRS pro-
grams and the coordination and
integration of them with those
of other community agencies.
They will also assist the de-
partment in evaluating its op-
erations and act as a forum for
receiving citizen complaints on
general problems relating to
HRS.
has served as chairman of the
Dade County Community Rela-
tions Board, as a national vice
presided of the Girl Scouts and
many other organizations, will
discuss the meaning of Hillel's
injunction "Separate not Thy-
self from the Community."
CiERSHON RUBEN, the new
associate administrator at Tem-
Dle Israel of Greater Miami, will
give the guest sermon during
services at Temple Israel South
this evening at 8.
Co-author with his wife of a
book on marrie, Ruben will
discuss "The Importance of Be-
ing Counted." Services will be
conducted by lay persons under
the direction of Ed Lasoff, chair-
man of the worship committee.


Page 2-B


Friday, July i6| 19?6
JCC Plans Pre-school Program
At the dedication of the East Wall of the
Landow Yeshiva Center were (from left)
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar, Melvin S. Lan-
dow, Theodore Bikel, William G. Mechan-
ic, Dr. Maxwell Dauer and Jack Burstein.
Donald J. Reiff, president of
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida, has announced
that a pre-school program will
begin this fall for children ages
24 to 5 will be conducted on
the 15-acre campus of the new
Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
The full-day day care service
is provided through the help of
the National Council of Jewish
Women. Miami Section, and will
include service from 7:30 a.m.
to 6 p.m. All teachers are fully
qualified learly childhabd de-
velopment instructors, licensed
by the State of Florida The
school is directed by Elaine
Herring, who has had mam-
years of experience in pre.
school education and until re-
cently directed the preschool
program at Temple Sinai of Hoi-
lywood.
Reiff said the school empha-
sizes Jewish cu\ural programs
in such a way that youngsters
can understand the importance
of Jewish life in today's society
All programs are geared to the
child's age level. For further
information and registration,
contact Elaine Herring at the
JCC.
East Wall Dedicated at Landow Yeshiva B'nai Raphael Names Youth Director
More than 400 people attend-
ed June 13 dedication cere-
monies of the Landow Yeshiva
Center's East Wall, a work of
religious art by artist-sculptor
Kenneth Treister.
The ark, which has 17 pic-
tures of the Holocaust on one
side and Chassidim dancing on
the other, bears the inscripjion
"Those who plant in sorrow will
reap in joy." The ark's center
panels open to hold the Torah
scrolls and are designed after
those in the oldest synagogue
in Cracow which was destroyed
by the Germans; it includes all
of the symbols for the Jewish
holidays.
Treister, who devoted many
hours to completing the work,
said at the dedication that "the
work was not done merely as
a piece of art, but was a soul
experience for me and those
involved in its competition."
Six carvers spent four months
finishing the work.
William G. Mechanic, who
dedicated the ark on behalf of
his family, said that for him
"the ark is a dedication to the
past, present and future of the
Jewish people, memorializing
those members of my family
whom I lost and honoring those
who are living."
HOUSED IN the ark is a To-
rah scroll written in Mechanic's
mother's home in Jerusalem.
The scroll, which had been car-
ried by the family to every
community in which they had
lived, now has a permanent
home. Mechanic called the dedi-
cation of the ark "an important
milestone" in his life.
Guest speaker at the event
was Dr. Herman Branover, a
world renowned authority on
magneto hydrodynamic turbul-
ence whose ransom was the
highest ever paid for release
from Russia. Today he heads a
laboratory in Jerusalem.
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar,
dean of the Landow Yeshiva,
explained that, "in keeping with
the tradition of our fathers,
when the Messiah comes, all
synagogues and holy places of
worship will be transported to
Israel. Thus the ark is a tem-
porary place but also an ever-
lasting institution of the Jewish
people."
JWV Post No. 223 and Auxiliary
Are Honored at State Convention
Let's hove another
AFFAIR
The Vuisin is back
Call Lloyd Apple
at 754-7700
/a
At the recent annual conven-
tion of the Department of Flor-
ida, Jewish War Veterans and
Ladies Auxiliary, West Miami
Post No. 223 and its Auxiliary
received several awards, elec-
tions, and appointments. The
Post was named Best Post in
Florida and received an award
for Best Historian Book.
Sidney Potlock, past Post
commander, won the Best Com-
mander Award for 1975-76 and
was elected first junior vice
commander of the department
for 1976-77. Post commander
Stanley Gold received a citation
for bringing in 11 new mem-
bers, and Aaron Slachter. past
Post commander, was appointed
department chief of staff.
In the over-75-members cate-
gory the Auxiliary received five
trophies for Legislation. Sen-
ior Citizens. Program, Commu-
PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
(g\e g s tTDa g h s e n
nity Relations.and Americanism
and second-place citations
for Historian Book and Service-
men's Service.
Thelma Potlock won the Ber-
tha Lach Memorial Award;
Eleanor Pales was appointed
Department historian and cal-
endar chairman; Carol Gold was
named as Department guard and
department community rela-
tions/senior citizens chairman;
Shirley Achtman has been re-
appointed for the sixth year as
Department community rela-
Denartment Sunshine chairman;
oartment publicity chairman.
THE POST and Auxiliary will
hold "The Year That Was," a
first anniversary party for "Ida
and Hugh Gottabekiddin," on
Saturday, July 24, 7:30 p.m. at
the SW Miami home of Post
commander Stan and Carol
Gold. Dinner will be served and
reservations must be made in
advance.
Proceeds from the per-person
donation will go to the Chaim
Sheba Medical Center in Israel, I
a government hospital largely
supported by the JWV Ladies
Auxiliaries.
Event coc>airmen are Marvin
Herman and Auxiliary president
Charlotte Mittler.
Listed below and hidden in this puzzle are the
names of 12 Yiddish actors. Their names are placed
horizontally, vertically, diagonally, forward and back-
ward. How many can you find? Answers are on page 6-B.
Maurice SCHWARTZ Bina ABRAMOVITCH
Rudolph SCHILDKRAUT Samuel GOLDINBERG
Jacob BEN AMI Isidor KASHIER
Ludwig SATZ Bertha GERSTIN
Joseph BULOV Hannah APPEL
Celia ADLER Mark SCHWEID
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Pioneer Women
Aviva Chapter will hold a
garage and rummage sale, from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday, July
18. in North Miami Beach.
According to Mrs. Esther
Weinstein. chairman of the
event, jewelry, clothing, small
appliances. TV sets, etc. will be
for sale. Dora (Mrs. Victor)
Cohen is president and cochair-
man of the sale.
Membership headquarters are
in the Pioneer Women Council
of South Florida office. 605 Lin-
coln Road BuHding. Miami
Beach. Mrs. Harriet Green is ,
president of the council.
Wanted for the High Holidays
in Orthodox Synagogue
B'AAL TEFILAH FOR
MUSAPH.
Write B.T.,
Box 012973, Miami 33101
Harold Slomovitz became
vouth director of Congregation
B'nai Raphael as of July 1. ac-
cording to an announcement by
Mel Bogeslov. vouth committee
chairman.
A senior at FIU. where he is
majoring in history and minor-
ing in music, Slomovitz was a
USY member for four years
and was USY advisor at Beth
Torah Congregation. A coun-
selor at LTI for two years, he
will be. an LTI educator this
year.
Slomovitz, who has begun
formulating plans for B'nai Ra-
phael's USY programs, taught
Sunday school at Temple Sinai
and holds a Florida State Teach-
ing Certificate.
$1776 Is Poetry Contest Prize
A $1776 grand prize will be
awarded in a Bicentennial
Poetry Contest sponsored by the
World of Poetry, a monthly
newsletter for poets.
Poems of all styles on any
subject are eligible to compete
for the grand Prize or for 49
other awards. There are ten
first places of $200 each.
Rules and official entry forms
are available from World of
Poetry, 801 Portola Dr.. Room
211. San Francisco. Calif 0412"
Contest deadline is Julv 31
1976.
CANTOR SEEKING POSITION
FOR THE HIGH HOLIDAYS
Tenor Voice. Well known
for his Nusef Ha Tefilah.
Call 428-0355
(Oeerfield Beach)
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TEACHERS
for 3rd, 7th I 9th Grades.
We also need a Music Teacher
Temple Beth El (of Hollywood)
Call 944-7773
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rrirfav. July 16, 1976
+Je*lstiFhrMton
Page 3-B
Ciment Reelected President Of
Greater Miami Hebrew Academy
South Floridians Participating
In Chassidic Celebration inN.Y.
Miami Beach civic and reli-
gious leader Norman Ciment
has been elected to a second
term as president of the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy.
A former Miami Beach
City Councilman, a member of
the city's Tourist Development
Authority and a former Judge
of the Florida Industrial Claims
Court. Ciment is active in Beth
Israel Congregation and is a
senior partner in a Miami Beach
law firm.
Irving, Firtel. also a Miami
Beach communal leader and at-
torney and immediate past
president of the Hebrew Acad-
emv. was elected president
emeritus. Firtel served four
terms as president of the school.
George Kimmel was elected
chairman of the board and Mor-
ton Perlin was elected associate
chairman of the board.
I H. Abrams was elected
chairman of the Hebrew Acad-
emy executive committee.
THE HEBREW Academy, a
beneficiary agency of the Great-
er Miatsj Jewish Federation,
draws its students from through-
out Dade and South Broward
Counties.
Other officers elected include
l)r David S. Andron and Harry
Genet, honorary presidents;
Jerome Bienenfeld, Joseph Co-
hen. Charles Fruchtman, Henry
Penchansky. Jacob Rifkin, Men-
dell Selig and William Siver-
stein. honorary vice presidents;
Samuel Reinhard. Oscar B.
Schapiro and Oscar Mamber,
senior vice presidents; Irwin
Block, fund-raising vice presi-
dent. Barry Eisenberg. special
events vice president; George
Goidbloom, vice president, plant
and building; Moses J. Grund-
werg. vice president, liaison
with Federation and Jewish
community relations; Dr. Elias
Herschman, vice president,
board of education; Barry Gur-
land. vice president, finances;
Dr Donald Kass, vice president.
student health; Dr. Morton Lie-
berman, vice president, scholar-
ships; Josh Rephun, vice presi-
dent, annual dinner and jour-
nal: Julius Sand, religious serv-
ices vice president; Dr. Alvin
Stein, vice president, of trans-
portation; Joseph Finkelstein,
legal affairs vice president;
Peter Goldring, vice president,
social affairs. Treasurer is Hy-
man Chabner and Sam Leff will
serve as general secretary-
Members of the executive
committee include all officers
and Sherman Baumrind, Milton
Ehrenreich, Dr. Steven Gurland.
Gerald Ness. Alex Paul. Dr.
Arthur Shapiro, Theodore Sig-
man, Dr. Frank Stein, Nathaniel
Zemel and Dr. Aaron Katz.
MEMBERS OF the board of
directors elected are Leonard
Adler, Herman Berk, Joseph
Ristritz. Rubin Blacker, Adolph
Blank. Ted Bodin, Dr. Jonah
Botknecht, Carl Brandes, Mor-
ns Broad, Norman Broad. Louis
Chibnik. Dr. Lawrence Ciment,
Alan Cohen. Max Deakter, Leo
Ciment. Jay Dermer, Robert En-
"n. George Feldenkreis, Leon
Firtel. Morris Fsicher, Dr. Mor-
" S. Fox. Mayer H. Frankel.
Dr. Morton Freiman. Mayshe
t nedberg. Seymour Friend. Hy-
nian Galbut. Joshua Galitzer.
Jr. Lee Goldberg. William Gor-
don. Irwin Gottlieb. Archie
Greenberg, Carol Greenberg,
Jack Greenberg, Henry Grou-
dan. Robert Grover. Tibor Hollo,
Max Heimowitz, Sidney Hecht-
an and Joseph H. Kanter.
Also Rev. Joseph Krantz,
Jack Kukoff. William Landa,
{-eon Lehman. Rabbi David
'ehrfield. Ben Lerner. Harry
J-frner, Joseph Malek. William
Mechanic. Charles Merwitzer,
NORMAN CIMENT
Stuart Mirmelli. Isidore Messer,
Irving E. Miller, Dr. Jack Mil-
ler, A. J. Molasky, Arthur Pearl-
man, Rabbi Gimpel Orimland,
Sidney Poland. Sidney Raymond,
Michael Reinhard, Seymour
Reinhard, Jack Rogers, Joseph
M. Rose. Samuel Rosner, Isa-
dore Schechter, Jerry Schech-
ter, Sam Schechter, Harold Sha-
piro. Herbert S. Shapiro, Al
Shulman. Dr. Joseph Singer.
Irving Somerstein. Isidore Spol- !
ter. Charles Spierer, William
Steinberg, Judge David L. Trask,
Morris Waldman, Mike Weiller,
Samuel Weiss. Dr. Matthew
Zuckerman and. Michael Levin.
Trustees elected include Mich-
ael Adler, Jack Bash. Abbey
Berkowitz. Murray Berkowitz.
Simon Berstein. Dr. Norman
Bloom. David H. Braun. Jack
Chester. Perry Ciment. Harry
P. Cohen. Louis Cohen, Max
L. Cohen. David Coleman, Louis
Decoveny. Gabriel Deutsch,
Bernard Edelstein, Gary Eidel-
stein. Seymour Eisenberg, Mor-
ris Dubler. Herman Eisenberg.
Ashe Fensterheim, Leo Gelvan,
Ike Goldemberg. Sam Gordon.
Mark L. Harris. Dr. Burton S.
Hutman. Hyman Jablon. Robert
Jacobs. Dr. Murray Kane. Nor-
man Kasser. Rev. Jacob Katz,
Murrv Koretzky. Ellison Kosoff
and Michael Lefkowitz.
SABRA
COOKBOOK
112 PAGE
101
Award Winning
Recipes
THE BEST OF 8,000
RECIPES SUBMITTED IN A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
(No Stamps please)
Your Name ft Address to:
SABRA COOKBOOK
SEND $1.00
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
HICKSVIUE, NY. 11816
Also Dr. Oscar Levine. David
Levinson, Sam Luby, Jr., Dr.
Morton Maisel, Dr. Herman
Mechlowitz, Lester Mishcon,
Nicholas Morley, Eugene Moses,
Morris Moss, Jack Muravchick,
Saul Nash, .Dr. Samuel Rand,
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Judge
Daniel Satin, Frank Schneider,
Abe Schwebel. Sam Shapiro,
Benjamin I. Shulman, Solomon
Siegel, B. B. Sigelbaum. Simon
Simkovic, Milton Sirkin, Sher-
win Stauber, Jack Stein, Harold
Tokayer, Dr. Isaac Unterman,
Bernard Wachtel. Samuel Wald-
man, Leonard Wein, Dr. Leo
Whitman, Jerry Wittels, Leon-
ard Zilbert, Richard M. Zimmer-
man, Dr. Joseph Harris and
Harold Vernon.
Rabbi Abraham Korf, Chabad
Lub.i.itch regional director,
led a delegation from the South
Florida Jewish community to
the Chassidic celebration last
weekend in New York, marking
the liberation from Soviet pris-
on of the late Lubavitcher Reb-
be. Rabbi Joseph I. Schneerson
(1880-1950).
Rabbi Korf gave to the
present Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rab-
bi Menachem M. Schneerson, a
key to the new Chabad House-
Jewish Student Center at the
University of Miami.
The July 10-11, event which
commemorated tne 49th anni-
versary of the late Rabbi
Schneerson's r e I e a s e on the
12th-13th day of Tammuz in
1927, was the subject of an
address by the present Rebbe
broadcast from Lubavitch world
headquarters in New York on
Sunday at 9:30 p.m. The ad-
dress was heard via special
communlcattons hookup, over
WEVD-FM in the New York-
New Jersev-Connecticut Metro-
politan area and WVOS radio
in the Catskills, and was re-
layed live to Chabad Centers in
Miami Beach, North Miami
Beach and Tampa.
Spertus College Receives Grant
For Model Holocaust Curriculum
Broward Paper
Names Sales Manager
Broward Paper and Packag-
ing, Inc., of Fort Lauderdale
has announced the appointment
of Richard Lott as commercial
sales manager. Lott was a man-
ager for a wholesale operation
in Southeast Florida.
Spertus College of Judaica of
Chicago, a non-denomiantional
liberal arts college, has an-
nounced receiving formal noti-
fication from the National En-
dowment for the Humanities, an
agency of the Federal govern-
ment, of a grant for $85,521.
The grant, will enable the col-
lege to develop an interdiscipli-
nary curriculum in Holocaust
studies which will serve as the
model curriculum for all Amer-
ican colleges, universities and
theological seminaries offering
courses in Holocaust related
subjects.
Spertus College president Dr.
David Weinstein has appointed
Professor Byron L. Sherwin, a
faculty member and authority
on Holocaust studies, project
director.
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
BENJAMIN NONES 1757-1826
Major in the Continental Army
M
ajor Benjamin Nones lived in
Bordeaux, France at the time the
American colonies were seething
against the repressive British.
"Liberty, independence, rights of man...cre-
ated equal..." these were heady words for the
idealistic Nones, heard from across the ocean.
He was deeply impressed and influenced by
the example of young Lafayette who had out-
fitted his own ship in Bordeaux for sailing to
the aid of the revolutionaries. Nones followed
and soon after landing in America, found him-
self in uniform.
He fought in nearly all the battles of the Caro-
lina campaigns, including the sieges of Charles-
ton and Savannah. His behavior in action, his
bravery and gallant conduct were officially
recognized and in due course he was rewarded
with the rank of Major.
Legend has it that Nones commanded a
battalion of 400 men, fancifully called the
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
"Hebrew Legion" cither because of its leader
or its large number of Jewish enlistments.
Other legends have the major as serving on the
staffs of Generals Washington. Lafayette.
OcKalb and Pulaski.
After Yorktown and the end of war, Major
Nones settled in Philadelphia where he became
active in masonry and Jewish communal
affairs. He served as president of Congregation
Mikvah Israel before and after the turn of the
19th century: and was official interpreter of
French and Spanish for the Board of Health
for the U.S. Government.
Good 10 the LastDrofr* lAXWEU
* JT
MNHUUfOOM L__. j
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 177b
and Famous
Jews ID
American
History
N Ml .ind your children will be thrilled lo read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
Ml! nation. Send *Ot mo sumps! with name
and address to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. I00P




Page 4*
*kniati Ikxkftan
Friday, July 16, 1976
Erner Here as Bank Hapoalim Rep
Shmuel Erner arrived in Mi-
ami in early April this year as
representative of Bank Hapoa-
lim B.M. and director of the
Southern Region for Ampal-
American Israel Corp. and its
group of affiliated companies.
Born in Bendzin. Poland, of
Orthodox parents and educated
at Agudath-Israel and yeshiva.
Erner is the sole survivor of his
family, who like so many other
European Jewish families were
annihilated by the Nazis. Him-
self a "graduate" of concentra-
tion camps, Erner's first work
was educational, with youth
rescued from camps or forests
or repatriated from Russia, in
the Hashomer Hatzair move-
ment, which he joined while
still in the Bendzin ghetto.
ERNER ALSO joined the Ha-
sanah and Bricha movements,
which dealt with organizing
Jews and supervising their im-
migration to what was then
Palestine. The Haganah finally
rtermitted him to emigrate in
1949 to Israel, where he was
unpointed absorption depart-
ment director of the Jewish
Aeencv. He worked at the His-
tadrut Financial Department in
Tel Aviv until the end of 1954
and eraduated with a degree in
law in 1956.
While still studying law and
economics. Erner joined the le-
eal and economic department
of Hevrath-Ovdim of the Gen-
eral Federation of Labor in
1954 and then the legal depart-
ment of the Internal Revenue
Service in Tel Aviv, where he
remained until 1958, when he
was invited by Pinhas Lavon,
Histadrut's secretary general, to
serve as secretary to the board
chairman of Solel Boneh Ltd.
and as legal advisor to the com-
pany's president.
Erner has been a member of
the Solel Boneh board of direc-
tors since 1966 as well as head
of its legal department and its
secretary general. In 1972 he
became the company's repre-
sentative to the U.S. and Canada
as well as vice president of
Revnolds Construction, an af-
filiate company.
Since being in the U.S. Erner
received a Master's degree in
Jewish nhilosonv from Yeshiva
University.
SHMUEL ERNER
Dubow Named Controller
Of Jewish Federations
The appointment of S. Allan
Dubow as controller and direc-
tor of office administration of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds, Inc..
has been announced by Philip
Bernstein. Council executive
vice president.
^ofcutflou
MIAMI CENTRAL
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Samuel Gertner, executive vice president of Mount Si-
nai Medical Center, presents a gift from the board of
trustees to Nor ma Ederer, personnel director of Mount
Sinai, at her 25th anniversary party in the Founders
Dining Room.
Mt Sinai Honors Personnel Head
Mount Sinai Medical Center
administrators and coworkers
gathered recently to honor per-
sonnel director Norma Ederer
for her quarter century at
Mount Sinai.
Miss Ederer, author of many
papers and a nationally distrib-
uted booklet on the changing
personnel picture, was the first
woman elected president of per-
sonnel associations on local,
state and na.tional levels.
During her tenure at Mount
Sinai. Miss Ederer has helped
establish an orientation pro-
gram., employee recognition and
holiday parties, a leisure-time
activities program, employee
newsletters.. Mount Sinai's Dis-
aster Plan and other personnel
and hospitalwide programs.
Among those honoring her at
the luncheon were Alvin Gold-
berg, executive director; Arthur
Pearlman, Founder and new
chairman of the personnel com-
mittee; Paul Faske, assistant
treasurer. Founder and past per-
sonnel committee chairman; and
Samuel J. Heiman, a Life Trus-
tee and Founder.
WholMl Distributors f
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Aug. 02Summer Tour II
Sept. 13 Delray Fall Leis-
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Hawaiian Gardens, Holly-
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Sept. 20 Rosh Hashana &
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Birth Control Data 1
Needed for Study
Jewish Floridian columnist Norma Orovitz is pre-
paring material for a series of columns on abortion
and birth control in the Jewish community. You are
invited to participate, whether married or not, by pro-
viding background information. If you have not al-
ready done so, please complete the following survey
questionnaire and mail to: The Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101.
1. Age: Husband Wife
2. Affiliation: Orthodox Conservative
Reform Unaffiliated
3. Age at birth of first child: Husband Wife
4. Birth controlIf responsibility is husband's:
Device
Sterilization
Birth controlIf responsibility is wife's:
Device
Sterilization
No birth control practiced b either husband or wife:
Number of children:
Were children planned? 1 2 3 4
Has wife ever had an abortion?
Do you approve of abortion? Husband Wife
Could you decide for an abortion if faced with the
decision? Husband Wife
Would you favor a Constitutional amendment sev-
erely limiting abortion to availability only if a wom-
an's life were in physical danger?
Husband Wife
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Temple Beth Moshe Installs Officers
Michael Colodny, Honorory
Mayor of North Miami, installed
officers at a Temple Beth Moshe
dinner and dance on June 27.
Arnie Stern was "Roastmas-
ter," music was supplied by
Luke Salem and his band, and
Sam Diemar chaired the event
sjfei.
nth JLjade
rew
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Limited Enrollment
1H01 S.W. 74th Ave.
Call: 253-2300
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The Academy admits students
of any race, color and
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ANNOUNCING...

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Friday, July 16, 1976
* Jewisii flor Mian
|Pae5-B!
Spiro Agnew's Profile in the U.S.
Muddied by Intense Spite
Ben and Esther Horowitz combined a housewarming
for their exquisite new Mirasol Ocean Condominium with
their 41st wedding anniversary in a festive evening Sat-
urday (June 26) attended by close friends and relatives.
Invited guests included Dr. David Davidson and spouse
Ruth Ellen in an attractive blue frock; redheaded Ruth
Pollack, who selected a soft grey jersey outfit, escorted by
Henry Becker; Irving Weinrich and wife, Tessa, who se-
lected an off-the-shoulder French print ensemble; Harriet
Slote, in an Oriental print with Mandarin collar; and Ellen
Izen, with white blouse topping a long print skirt.
Among relatives were Dr. Ben and Mrs. Lillian Silver-
tein, Edith and Max Shostak, George and Jean Chanler\,
Cousin Shirley Shulman of Milford, N.J., and Miami Beach
ites. Dr. Max and Fritzi Yacht.
Also enjoying the evening, Dudley and Pauline Wuck-
er, Fay and Harry Gurrentz and Edward and Lillian Arnold.
Lil had made her lovely three-piece ensemble, which fea-
tured a bare midriff. Mrs. Louis Robbins talked about her
year in South Africa and Israel, Dr. William Wickman and
blond Reloris in a green print frock and a double string
of opera-length pearls discussed a possible future trip to
Alaska.
Originally from New Jersey, the Horowitz family has
been here for the past 20 years. Lovely blond Esther chose
a fashionable outfit with black bodice and long black and
white print skirt with side slits. Daughter Lois Gaffney with
escort David Lubin was attractive in a long white cotton
frock. The Horowitz granddaughters, adorable Donna, 11,
and Sharon, 13, entertained with their interpretations of
the bump and the hustle.
The mounds of luscious food on the groaning table
seemed never to lessen all prepared by the hostess, well
known for her culinary talent. She even made the huge
coconut layer cake, which must have been responsible for
three to five pounds additional weight on every guest.
A happy, joyful evening for everyone.
Sadat Says France
Will Help Him
With Arms Needs
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat said here
that France has agreed to help
Egypt build its arms industry
and that now such agreements
were being concluded.
He made this statement,
thanking France for its help,
after having met with Presi-
dent Valery Giscard d'Estaing
for extended talks and dinner
at the Elysee Palace.
SADAT arrived in Paris to
try and finalize arrangements
for French military supplies and
help in building an Egyptian
arms industry after his final
break with Moscow, his diffi-
culties in obtaining six C-130
transport planes in the U.S. and
West Germany's flat refusal to
sell him any military equip-
ment.
Sadat told French diplomatic
correspondents here that "arms
agreements with France have
already been signed," and that
France "has agreed to help
Egypt build its arms industry."
He said that talks on these sub-
jects had been going on for
some time.
Diplomatic sources here said
that the agreements already
concluded cover the following
items: delivery of 46 Mirage
F-ls which will constitute a
first-phase Egyptian air force
reconversion to Western equip-
ment.
THIS ORDER could be fol-
lowed by a second one cover-
ing 36 additional planes; and
the delivery of 120 Alpha et
training and ground supporting
jets jointly manufactured by
France and West Germany, but
which will be delivered by
France under its own respon-
sibility.
Also the supply of an undis-
closed number of ground-to-air
"Crotal" and "Roland" missiles,
ground-to-ground "Milan" and
sea-to-sea "Excocet" missiles;
and automotive 155 mm. guns,
believed to number 50, with
their electronic equipment.
IT IS not yet known what
form France's participation will
take in the creation of an Egyp-
tian arms industry.
It is believed the technical
details were discussed when
Sadat meet Giscard d'Estaing
and French Premier Jacques
Chirac for talks.
'
You art cordially invited
te view the exhibit of
"SPANISH PAINTING
OF THE XlXth CENTURY"
Homiiue i" the Bicentennial of the
USA by tin- Institute "' Htsuanlg
Culture of Madrid under the auspice"
of the Consulate General pi Spain
JULY 12 1. 1976
Weekday* B.IH. to 7:30 p.m.
BACARDI ART GALLERY
tlOt Heeeyne *.. tt-m. "enea.
By SEYMOUR GRAUBARD
National Chairman
The Anti-Defamation League
Since the charges that forced
him to resign from the Vice
Presidency in disgrace, Spiro
Agnew has maintained a low
profile on the national scene.
Except for an occasional men-
tion of the novel he was writ-
ing, an item or two connecting
him to American business con-
tracts with Arab nations, and a
network news program which
showed his blinds-drawn, sec-
ond floor, small office in a
Maryland shopping center and
speculated on whether or not
he was a middleman for Arab
contracts, the man who man-
aged to use the words "natter-
ins nabobs of negativism" in a
speech without tripping over
his tongue had not been
heard from.
That is before last month.
IN MAY Spiro Agnew's novel
was Dublished and the new au-
thor kicked off his promotion
efforts with an appearance on
the NBC "Today" show. Before
the month was over, there was
little likelihood of anyone not
knowing that the plot of the
book maligned the American
press, American Jews, Israel,
has a pro-Arab slant and that
the characters may be fictional
but their views are those of
their very real creator.
Those views, including anti-
Semitic canards and the anti-
Israel anti-Jewish lobby's in-
sistence that American Jews
control and manipulate the
media and U.S. foreign policy,
were amplified by Agnew him-
self on the "Today" show and
later in press interviews.
EVEN A reference to ADL
by a character in the book, "the
Anti-Defamation League goes
berserk at the slightest criticism
of Jews," was repeated in dif-
ferent terminology by Agnew
in an interview in the Wash-
ington Star: ". (to) B'nai B'-
rith Anti-Defamation League at
the first breath of anything that
is legitimate criticism, even, of
the Jewish community, it's al-
ways bigotry."
What has been the reaction
to anti-Semitism emanating from
a man who except for his own
transgressions would have been
President of the United States
today?
In public statements, ADL
said his business affiliations with
the Arabs have led him to be-
come a propagandist of the most
evil kind. We also voiced hope
that the American public would
reject his parroting of Arab
and Nazi propaganda.
And, indeed, there were many
who did speak out.
NEW YORK Times columnist
William Safire, a former Nixon
administration speech writer,
said: ". it saddens old friends
to see the former Vice Presi-
dent reduced to the bitterness
of bigoted backbiting."
Describing Agnew as the new
head of the "powerful and
disnarate conglomeration" that
makes up the anti-Israel lobby,
he also said: "Hating individual
Jews does not make you a bigot.
Beine anti-Israel does not make
vou a bigot. But undertaking a
crusade to Dersuade the Amer-
ican people that thev are being
brainwashed and manipulated
bv a cabal of Jews who sit
astride most of the channels of
communications, and thereby
encouraging an irrational hat-
red of Jews that makes you
a bigot."
PRESIDENT Ford. In a let-
ter to me. called the Agnew re-
marks f'wronq both substan-
ti"p|v and ww-Hv." Describing
ADT, ->n rwwmfaatlftei which
"hn<= alvavs h~~n in the fore-
front" >f Hef-'ininc wavs to
"reduce bigotry in the world
and secure a just and lasting
peace," Ford went on to say:
"I want to do everything I can
as President to ensure that,
working together, we can be
successful."
In a letter sent to me and
Benjamin R. Epstein "as repre-
sentatives of one of the most
respected and foremost human
rights organizations in the
United States, and a group
particularly concerned with
anti-Semitism," Presidential can-
didate Jimmy Carter called
Agnew's comments "false, mali-
cious. anti-Semitic."
CARTER ALSO said: "The
preservation of a strong and
viable State of Israel is not only
in Israel's interests and in the
interests of world Jewry, it is
in the national interest of the
United States as well. Israel is
an oasis of democracy and
freedom in the Middle East "
In telegrams to ADL. Gov.
Edmund G. Brown, Jr.. Sen.
Henrv M. Jackson and Sen.
Frank Church also criticized
Agnew.
Gov. Brown said: "Mr. Ag-
new's attacks on the American
Jewish community are destruc-
tive and not worthy of sub-
stantive response. I am sure the
American public will give them
the short shrift they deserve."
Sen. Jackson said that Spiro
Agnew "apparently wants to re-
vive the medieval slander so
tragically directed against the
Jewish people in the past. I
join with all Americans of good
will to utterlv and totally reject
Aenew's cvnical effort to intro-
duce racial and religious bigotry
into our national discourse."
Sen. Church called the Agnew
statements "shocking in their
anti-Semitic tone." He said:
"They should be condemned
and disavowed We cannot
... be divided by those who
would turn us upon one an-
other."
NEWSWEEK magazine point-
ed out the anti-Semitism of the
Agnew book, as did other re-
views most of which receiv-
ed the book poorlv as a literary
work.
Christopher Lehrmann-Haupt,
in the Times book column, said
the book is "overdetailed, the
dialogue overexplicit, the cha-
racters overcliched. and the
work left to the reader's imagi-
nation overlooked" with the re-
sult thnt the story tends to
disappear from sight, "every-
thing, that is. except his (Ag-
new's) theory about overin-
fluential Jews."
Nevertheless, the publisher
Playboy Press book division,
has been used for profit any
book could earn Mr. Agnew
half a million dollars. If so, it
won't be the first time bigotry
has been used for profit any-
more than it is the first time
Jews have been used as scape-
goats.
PERHAPS Washington Star
columnist Edwin M. Yoder, Jr.,
summed up ADL's concern best.
"The disconcerting thing about
Mr. Agnew the functional
mischief." he said, "is not so
much what he savs or how he
savs it. but that this shallow
and tawdry stuff seems to com-
mand an instant and enthusiastic
audience. It is as if. in his off-
kev wav. he sounded a chord
of submerged obsession in the
American neople there is an
audience for Agnewism, past
and present."
Gathering Told U.S.
Actively Working
For Ties With PLO
By DAVID LANDAU
HAIFA (JTA) Two
^erican experts on the
Middle East, participating in
the "International Confer-
ence on the Palestinians and
the Mideast Conflict" at Hai-
fa University, said here that
the U.S. was actively work-
ing to bring about PLO par-
ticipation in Middle East
peace talks.
Prof. Amos Perlmutter, of
the American University in
Washington, said in remarks
to reporters outside the con-
ference hall that he had
been given such informa-
tion two weeks ago in Wash-
ington by way of a hint that
he was to pass on to Israel
government circles.
PROF. LINDA Miller, of Wel-
lesley College, told a session of
the conference that she "sensed"
vigorous new efforts by the U.S.
to engage the PLO in a dialogue
aimed at its acceptance of Se-
curity Council Resolutions 242
and 338 as a prelude to talks
with Israel.
Perlmutter identified the
source of his information as
former Ambassador G. Dean
Brown, director of the Middle
East Institute in Washington,
whom President Ford sent to Le-
banon last week as a special
envoy on a fact-finding mission.
The State Department has not
ruled out contacts with the PLO
though it said they were not
included in Brown's instructions
from the President.
PERLMUTTER. like Miller,
indicated that American efforts
were aimed at getting the PLO
to accept the key UN resolu-
tions so that it would qualify
as a participant in peace talks
with Israel.
He said the U.S. hoped PLO
chieftain Yasir Arafat would
make some sort of declaration
which could be construed as
acceptance of the resolutions.
He also said that Israel's Am-
bassador to the U.S., Simcha
Dinirz. was made aware of this
direction of American policy at
least three months ago.
Miller said that she believed
U.S.-PLO contacts had been
maintained for some time at a
relatively low level.
SHE CITED a letter to her
from a State Department plan-
ner whose name she did not
reveal, asserting that Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger had
read in advance the controver-
sial 'Saunders Paper."
That paper was the testimony
bv Deputv Assistant Secretary
of State for the Middle East
Harold Saunders before a Con-
gressional committee in which
Saunders described the Palestin-
ian nroblem as the heart of the
Middle East conflict. It was re-
garded in Israel as heralding a
change of U.S. policy against
anv dealings with the PLO.



'
Page 6-B
+JewistinarkMm
Friday, July 16, i976
OW .
with NORMA A. OROVITZ
Founders Are Subject of Oral Interviews
A few months ago, The Jew-
ish Floridian received a packet
of cat publicity (on the meow
variety).
At the time, I thought that
"Adopt a Cat" public relations
was a gross promotion. How-
ever, as I had recently become
the reluctant adoptive mother
of a guilt kitten, I took the in-
formation and paw-autographed
photo of Morris the Cat home
to my children.
A GUILT cat is quite a spe-
cial breed among the genus
Felis, species F. Catus. The tell-
tale signs of this pedigree are
manifested, not in the pet, but
in the kitten's surrogate mother.
You can spot a guilt kitten's
new mother by her awkward
approach to the vet (he told me
to imagine the cat was a child
and if it sneezes, call), by the
noble and long-suffering facial
expression as she cleans the lit-
ter box and by her not-so-subtle
reminders ("I got this animal
for you, ~\ fill in appropriate
name).
We got our cat by happen-
stance. A neighbor's cat became
friendly and delivered a litter
of nine. My children had been
reporting daily on the status of
the remaining but dwindling
number of kittens.
BY THE TIME I agreed to in-
spect the progeny ("But I am
only going to look"), there were
three kittens left. One had to
be destroyed she was born
crippled and blind and then
there were two.
A pang of unremitting guilt
caused by never having given
my two younger girls a real pet
struck. A rabbit, some fish and
a turtle do not really count.
Impulsively. I set out to adopt
a cat.
I was almost saved from my
compulsion. Although the cat's
owner strongly suggested I take
the two remaining kittens, she
was willing to let me walk away
with just one. However, the
owner's teen-aged daughter
made an impassioned plea not
to separate the kitten siblings.
I left gratefully empty-handed
I no longer had to do any feline
mea culoas. After all. I had of-
fered to get my kids a cat.
WE HAD just barely made it
home when the cat's owner call-
ed. Her daughter had seen the
light (desperation and coercion
work wonders). She suggested
that I come quickly to pick up
a kitten before the teen-ager
became adamant again.
Feeling the tiniest bit asham-
ed for separating a sister and
brother, I had my husband stand
in for me at the actual adoption
proceedings.
That is how we got Sugar-
puff. She bears a striking re-
semblance to her snow white
mother. The grey streak on her
"keppela" is the scarlet letter
misplaced. A grey neighbor
tom-cat is highly suspect.
My previous pet experience
is limited. A precious apricot
toy poodle died despite my ef-
forts to baby-food feed it. A
chocolate miniature poodle was
a gift from my parents to fill
the void left by Apricot's death.
THE NEW dog lasted two
months. It was the dog or my
daughter. The two simply could
not co-exist. (The word "de-
tente" had not been coined, as
yet.) As my daughter was a de-
fenseless two years old, and the
dog was a wayward four month
old "hunt." the dog went.
I think Sugar-puff will last.
Her surrogate mother is begin-
ning to notice signs of accom-
modation, if not actual affection.
I nonchalantly carry specimens
to the vet in a plastic baggy.
I now can listen sympathetical-
ly, not disdainfully, to sad pet
tales. I cannot bear to watch
my kitten being inoculated. I
feed her just as we sit down to
eat.
I had better be careful. I just
may learn to love .
The Jewish Historical Society
of South Florida, Inc., has an-
nounced the formation of an
Oral History Committee which
will have as its primary func-
tion the collection of oral inter-
views relating to the founders
of the Jewish organizations in
Dade County.
Members of the committee
are Marcia Kanner, chairman,
Lee Aberman, Anne Hertz, Har-
riet Green, David Mesnekoff,
Faith Mesnekoff, Seymour B.
Liebman, Malvina Liebman, Na-
talie B. Lyons and Mitzi Weiss.
The Oral History Collection
of the Jewish Historical Society
of South Florida is housed in a
permanent archive and is avail-
able to scholars.
Liebman, president of the
Jewish Historical Society of
South Florida, spoke earlier this
month at a conference on ethni-
city in Dade County sponsored
Menorah Parents
Install Officers
Parents of Menorah held an
installation brunch emphasizing
its theme for next year, the
unity of the home, family and
temple. Jill Stern and Anita
Burstyn, outgoing presidents,
welcomed the group and thank-
ed them for their support during
the year. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. spiritual leader of Temple
Menorah. discharged then from
office along with Meche Makal-
chuk and Maria Behar, treas-
urer.
Rabbi Abramowitz stressed
the importance of the home in
supporting the lessons of the
classroom and defined the role
of the parents in providing a
Jewish education for their chil-
dren.
by the Bi-Lingual Program of
ESAA State and City Public
Schools. He gave a brief his-
torical sketch of the Jewish
community in Dade County
Liebman was recently elected a
national trustee of the Israel
Seminars Foundation.
BB Women
Officers installed by Rabbi
Abramowitz are treasurer. Ma-
ria Behar; recording secretary.
Plan KfwiL Rpvipw JiU Stern: cor8**"""0* secre-
r,dn DOOK Review tary, Masha Phillips; and presi-
dents Sarah Blacher, Barbara
Havareem Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women of Miami Lakes
Hialeah is sponsoring a sum-
mer book review at 10:30 a.m.
Sundav. Julv 25, at the Holiday
Inn. 103rd St. and the Palmetto
Expressway.
Peter Kleman will discuss his
new book, "The Lower Lounge,"
which deals with drug use by
junior and senior high school
students.
Tickets must be purchased by
July 18 and the public is in-
vited, according to Carolyn Co-
han, communications vice presi-
dent for the chapter.
Rosenblatt
stein.
and Susan Rosen-
Mrs. Bryna Berman, educa-
tion director of Temple Meno-
rah, thanked the outgoing of-
ficers for their efforts and wel-
comed the new presidium. She
presented plans for a new family
education program at the tem-
ple.
Puzzled! Answers
G E R S T I N A C H s E N
A a ? P H D I E W R c S G
I Q L P A P P S I I? V P H'
Q B E D A Z 0 N E 0 0 I C
G R L M I L D Y L H M D T
R E F S X N R U K A z L I
R I N Y E C B W N Q G W V
H H T D I P H E V J 0 c a
R S C G Z G B B R P K M M
A A S Z D H U A P G D E A
J K T K I T E 0 I 7 J B R
B A C Z T R A W H C S L B
S C H I L D K R A D T D A
ANSWERS: Schwartz, Schildkraut, Ben Ami, Satz,
Bulov, Adler, Abramovitch, Goldinberg, Kashier, Ger-
stin, Appel, Schweid.
Rabbi Berger Is
Emomi-EI Guest Saturday
Rabbi Maxwell Berger, auxil-
iary rabbi of Temple Emanu-El
for this year's High Holy Day
Services, will be the guest speak-
er Saturday during the 9 a.m.
service at the Miami Beach con-
gregation.
HOME CARE
We are in the bueinaa of hoping
poop** COMCARE provides your
choc* of prof mi oral nursing or
kieed "hormmalur" service. A
homemeker w* shop, cook, do
light housework end el those extras
that make Ma aaaiar for you.
24 HOUR SERVICE
761-6280
Licanaad Nuraaa Nurses' Aides
* Homamakars
Al dedicated to canng for tha aged
and convalaacant in their own
homes, in nursing homes, or in
hoaprtakt.
CQMCARE
I Sax* 1MB INC.
COMprshensw htearrh CARE Sweat

It was reunion time this month for three sisters of Delta
Phi Epsilon Sorority at the University of Florida, class
of 1967. Susan Nacht Schwartz (center), formerly of Mi-
ami and Plantation and now of Huntsville, Ala., visited
in Hollywood with longtime friends Bonnie Willner
Brooks (left) and Patti Goldin Lurie, who is a graduate
student in the Barry College School of Social Work and
a staff member at Hollywood Memorial Hospital.
Rabbi Tanenbaum Takes Issue
With Greeley and the N.Y. Times
Priest-sociologist Andrew
Greeley, accusing American
Jews of "strong and powerful
anti Catholic f eeling" in an
article on the Op Ed page of
the New York Times, was re-
futed by Rabbi Marc Tanen-
baum, national director of Inter-
religious Affairs of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee.
Rabbi Tanenbaum cited Jew-
ish support of and assistance to
Catholic education, support of
auxiliary services to parochial
schools and also in common ef-
forts to present truth in chang-
ing anti-Semitic aspects of some
Catholic teaching. He also do-
cumented Jewish concerns for
violations worldwide of human
rights, including those of Cath-
olic minorities in Ireland and
>n Communist countries.
"The real issue." says Rabbi
Tanenbaum. "is not why Father
Greeley makes the charge, but
why the Times published the
material without demanding the
high standards of which Father
Greeley is really capable."
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Write J.C.C.
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FOR SALE
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Jewish Classics- 8 Vols.
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Tha Zohar -6 Vols
Jewish Mysticism
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Other Jewish Books Available
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_ .
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OAK ROOM LOUNGE
Featuring TVs OUANE THOMAS
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Tuesday to Saturday 9 to 2 .m
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PfeMify of Parking Space J


Friday, July U, 17
+JmlslifhrkMaw>
Page 7-B
Overweight, Not Sugar, Causes Diabetes
JERUSALEMA team of sci-
entists at the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center in
Jerusalem believe that it is over-
weight, rather than sugar or
starch intake, which contributes
to diabetes.
This is one of several findings
emerging from research on
diabetes carried on as part of
the Israel Ischemic Heart Dis-
ease Project, a collaborative un-
dertaking between the National
Heart and Lung Institute,
Bethesda, Md., the Hadassah
Medical Organization in Israel
and the Israel Ministry of
Health.
HEADED by Prof. J. H. Me-
dalie, the teams included Drs.
J. B. Herman, H. N. Neufeld, E.
Kiss and U. Goldbourt of Israel,
Drs. F. W. Mount, H. Kahn and
C. Bachrach, of N.I.H., and
many others.
Dr. Joseph B. Herman, who
has made diabetes his special
interest for the past 30 years,
has been particularly involved
in the diabetes aspect of the
project. Dr. Herman is chief
physician in Hadassah's Medical
Outpatient Department C, and
immigrated to Israel in 1961
from South Africa where he
worked with Dr. W. P. U. Jack-
son.
He comments: "Israel is an
ideal country for such research
because of the varied popula-
tion. The incidence of diabetes
among more than 10,000 Israeli
male government employees
from different countries of birth
was studied over a period of
five years, 120 independent
variables were tested. In this
research we had a unique op-
portunity to study the details of
the diet of thousands of people
in relation to diabetes.
"A GREAT deal of research
has been done on the occur-
rence of diabetes in experiment-
al animals given various diets,
including sugars or starches.
but this is the first long-term
incidence study involving such
a large number of persons in
the crucial over-40 diabetes-
prone age group.
"In the original sample of
10.059 we found 500 diabetics.
During the five-year period of
the study, approximately 400
additional people developed the
disease. It was possible to pin-
point those who developed
diabetes during the study period
and then go back and examine
the possible factors relating to
the development of the disease."
He continued: "Our first con-
clusion has been that there is
no significant association be-
tween the constituents of the
diet and the subsequent de-
velopment of diabetes. Much
has been written about the as-
sociation of sugar in the diet
with diabetes, and people are
warned that eating too much
sugar involves a greater risk of
developing the disease.
"IN THIS study we found on
repeated analysis that there was
no relationship between sugar
as such in the diet. The same
applies to carbohydrates, the
starchy foods, and to fats. It is
not what you eat, but over-
weight that counts.
"There is a clear relationship
between overweight and the sub-
sequent development of diabetes.
Each age group studied exhibit-
ed the same pattern of increas-
ed incidence of diabetes as the
weight/height index increased.
"This relationship between
overweight and diabetes onset
was known before, but our in-
vestigation has clearly demon-
strated it. If you are too fat, you
can prevent or delay the onset
of diabetes by losing weight.
"SEVERAL theories are of-
fered to explain the relationship
between obesity and diabetes,
as well as the subsequent 're-
versal' of the trend with weight
loss. One theory is that since
obese persons have a high level
of circulating insulin, an added
strain is placed on the pancreas.
which manufactures the insulin,
eventually leading to pancreatic
exhaustion in the genetically
predisposed. Reduction of
weight relieves the strain on
the pancreas and restores
normal function."
Dr. Herman prescribes a
normal balanced diet, with
adequate amounts of protein
and carbohydrates, but with
limited fat to enable the person
to maintain the desired weight
for his height and age.
DR. HERMAN continues:
"Both diabetes and coronary
heart disease occur frequently
in persons over 40, and our
study shows that the associa-
tion between the two is far more
common than is generally rec-
ognized. Persons with latent
diabetes are as prone to develop
heart disease as those with
manifest diabetes, where the
symptoms have already de-
veloped.
"Diseases of the blood ves-
sels, including coronary heart
disease in particular, have been
known for years to be related
to diabetes. But the exact pat-
tern of the relationship between
the development of diseases of
the blood vessels and of diabe-
tes has not yet been fully work-
ed out. Our study shows that:
Disease of the blood ves-
sels of the legs comes as a very
early feature in diabetes, and
even precedes the onset of dia-
betes. In other words, the fac-
tors related to diabetes may be
operative years before the dis-
ease develops.
Overweight, raised blood
pressure and higher cholesterol
tend to be present before the
diabetes becomes manifest.
IT IS to be noted that these
factors are also connected with
the development of vascular
disease. On the whole, the study
shows that diabetes precedes,
rather than follows, heart dis-
ease.
"These results could have im-
portant practical applications.
If, for example, an abnormal
glucose tolerance is accom-
panied by high blood pressure,
abnormally high cholesterol,
overweight and high uric acid
level in the blood, the chances
of developing diabetes and heart
disease are considerably multi-
plied. Timely measures can be
adopted to stave off the advance
of the disease.
"Or, for instance, a person
suffering from blood cnculation
trouble in the leg would have a
glucose tolerance test done for
latent diabetes. If the glucose
is high, the patient can be ad-
vised as to proper diet and care-
ful food hygiene. Gangrene of
the limb, with subsequent loss
of limb, could thus be avoided.
"DIABETES seems to occur
with undue frequency in per-
sons with gout. Our findings
suggests that the connection of
the two diseases may be via uric
acid, and that uric acid or a
similar substance may be con-
nected with the factors leading
to diabetes. Prior to the start of
diabetes, the uric acid level in
the blood is elevated; but, sub-
sequent to the development of
the disease, the uric acid level
falls to below normal.
"The reason for this anomaly
has been investigated by Dr. A.
Heynan and myself. We found
that once the disease becomes
manifest, there is an increased
excretion of uric acid by the
kidnevs. causing the level of
uric acid in the blood to drop
below normal.
'THESE fluctuations of the
uric acid in the blood may help
us to understand the factors
responsible for the development
of diabetes, since we know that
there is more than just a defect
of the pancreas involved in
adult-onset diabetes."
Cleaver Guarantees His Turn-About
NEW YORKEldridge Cleaver
has assured two Reform Jewish
leaders that his condemnation
of the United Nations anti-Zion-
ist resolution and support for
the survival of the State of Is-
rael represents a sincere "ideal-
ogical transformation" which is
neither "transient or superfi-
cial."
In discussing his changed po-
litical attitude with Albert Vors-
pan, vice president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congre-
gations, and Rabbi Erwin L
Herman, UAHC Pacific South-
west Council regional director
in Los Angeles, Cleaver ex-
pressed concern that we are
witnessing a shifting American
government policy towards Is-
rael since the 1973 war capable
of "sacrificing" the middle east-
ern nation.
THE THREE-HOUR interview,
the first with any Jewish lead-
ers, took place in a tiny alcove
in Alameda County Jail in Oak-
land, where he is awaiting trial.
A summary of the interview ap-
pears in the April issue of "Re-
form Judaism," monthly pub-
lication of the UAHC distributed
to the movement's 1.1 million
members in 715 congregations
in the U.S. and Canada.
During the interview, the for-
mer official of the Black Pan-
ther Party elaborated on his
views, described how Castro
tried to "use and manipulate"
him, prodded details on his
racism charges against the
Arabs and Algerians (who, he
said, still buy and sell black
slaves), and how his political
attitudes changed in the light
of the climate in this country in
the post-Watergate. post-Vietnam
era.
BOTH VORSPAN and Her-
man left the afternoon discus-
sion with a cautious note of op-
tismism regarding the sincerity
of his change of heart. They
sought answers on how Cleaver
reconciled his old revolutionary
rhetoric and current views,
whether this change represent-
ec a "pitch for Jewish financial
support" or that these remarks
were really i "quid" for a gov-
ernmental "pro quo" to go easy
on his pending charges.
_ In a letter to Vorspan, Cleaver
emphasized that "my conclu-
sions in support of the existence
and integrity of Israel are not
transient and superficial. It is
a commitment that is depend-
able, reliable, that does not
fluctuate, hot and cold, with
each news broadcast of tactical
events."
HE STATED that he recog-
nized that his return to America
"would be harder than anything
I had undertaken."
"I knew that the political po-
sitions that I had taken would
wreak havoc amongst my old
'new left" friends, and amongst
a formidable array of Blacks
who are imbued with a knee-
jerk Third World skin-game
ideology.
"But I am absolutely con-
vinced that ideologically I am
closer to the future than those
who have howled against me
since my return."
In the interview, Cleaver told
Vorspan and Herman that his
changing viewpoint regarding
the middle east occurred as he
watched a "shift" in American
policy after the 1973 war.
"You have, for the first time,
the use of oil as a weapon, and
so the shift of the American
government towards Israel and,
one could foresee that if that
trend continued, the American
government was capable of sa-
crificing Israel."
SINCE THE release of his pro-
Israel statement, Cleaver told
Vorspan and Herman that he
has been both praised and cri-
ticized by Jews and Blacks.
"Blacks, especially those iden-
tifying with Islam, Third World
and African nationalism, like
the Niger Black Nationalists, at-
tacked me," Cleaver said.
"They wrote me Jews are
white and imperialists, and
therefore it is treason to sup-
port them. Palestinians are
Black and from the Third World,
and the Arabs are Third World,
and therefore we must support
them."
On the other hand, "there
have been blacks who have
made the distinction, based on
their experience, and who said
we're glad you spoke out like
that."
VORSPAN said that, in trying
to assess Cleaver's sincerity, he
was reassured by the fact that
such knowledgeable and respon-
sible blacks as Bayard Rustin
are heading up his defense fund.
But, while we were impressed
with his bearing and his views,
"the only way to iudge a man's
sincerity is to see how he stands
un to time and events."
In his charge that the Castro
regime "tried to use and mani-
pulate him" soon after his ar-
rival in 1969, Cleaver told the
Jewish leaders that he had fled
to the island hoping to join up
with his "proletarian" brothers
and found instead "deep cur-
rents of racism against black
Local Hillel Units
Have New Officers
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun-
dations has appointed Rabbi
Sanford H. Shudnow director
and Morton Aroll associate di-
rector of the Hillel unit at the
University of Miami. Deborah
Bartnoff, a communal worker
and religious school teacher,
was named director of student
activities at the Hillel unit at
Florida International University.
Rabbi Shudnow succeeds Rab-
bi Richard Davis, who has been
transferred to the University of
Rochester. The Aroll and Bart-
noff positions are new ones.
THE HILLEL Foundation
serves some 5,000 Jewish stu-
dents and faculty at the Univer-
sity of Miami and another 1,200
at FIU.
Rabbi Shudnow, 29, was re-
cently ordained at the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York, from which he also re-
ceived his Master's. While at
the seminary, he served congre-
gations in Queens, NY., and
Columbia. Md. He was grad-
uated from Northern Illinois
University and studied also at
Hebrew University in Jerusa-
lem.
Aroll, 27, for four years has
been at Brooklyn College, from
which he holds Bachelor's and
Master's degrees. He also holds
a Master's in Jewish history
from Yeshiva University.
Before joining Hillel in 1972,
Aroll taught in the New York
City Dublic school system and
was executive director of Yav-
neh. the National Religious Jew-
ish Students Association.
Ms. Bartnoff. 24, was a pro-
gram Dlanner and organizer this
nast vear in the Model Cities
Senior Center in Washington,
D.C., and a teacher at Bethesda
Jewish Congregation. She has
been a social worker to Upper
Marlboro, Md., Urlca and Roch-
ester, N.Y.
A graduate of Kirkland Col-
lege in Clinton, N.Y., she re-
ceived her MSW from Catholic
University.
Cubans, some of whom had gone
underground to combat discri-
mination."
HE DESCRIBED how the
Castro regime "blew his cover"
by leaking his identity to a
Reuters repoter. Then the Cas-
tro regime persuaded him to go
to Algeria and upon his arrival
he was told by a member of the
Cuban embassy that the Alger-
ians had changed their mind
and he was handed a ticket to
Amman, Jordan.
"When I checked with the
Algerians, far from saying that
I should leave, they didn't even
know I was there," Cleaver
added.
In Algeria, Cleaver stated, he
found the active practice of
slavery still existing. "I saw
slaves in Algeria. They have
slaves in Maurtania, they have
slaves in all those countries."
CLEAVER therefore told both
Vorspan and Herman that the
years of exile have shown him
that the very societies he had
lionized in the abstract were,
in actual practice, repressive
societies, subjecting their own
oeople to suffering.
The principal reason for his
return, Cleaver indicated, stem-
med from a reexamination of
his political and revolutionary
views in light of startling de-
velopments within the United
States.
He defined these as: Amer-
ican-Chinese relations, expo-
sure of Watergate, the CIA.
Nixon's resignation, and the
fair and impartial trials accord-
ed black radicals.
"In the later 1960s, when I
denounced US society, the Viet-
nam war, racism, police state
techniques, etc., most people
said I was paranoid. Now.
events have overtaken us, every-
body says those things. It's not
the far-out radicals who are
saying these things but senators
and congressmen and column-
ists and candidates.
"I HAD to take another look
at the U.S. The political system
was responding to challenge.
Even though the movement in
the sixties failed to consolidate
its gains and has. in effect, dis-
solved, with blacks focusing in-
ward and old coalitions break-
ing down, the late seventies do
offer a promise for expanding
social iustice in the U.S. through
effective political action."
Cleaver told Vorspan and Her-
man that a Polish Jew. Samuel
Peisar, in Paris, carried out the
negotiations with the govern-
ment regarding his return.
At present his defense fund
has the support of Bayard Rus-
tin. Eleanor Holmes Norton.
Albert Shanker, Julian Bond,
Nat Hentoff. Joe Rauh and Prof.
John P. Roche.


Page 8-B
*JenJst> fhridUain
Friday, July 16. 1976
Miss Martin Marries in Tel Aviv
Sherry Lynn Martin, daugh-
ter of Leo and Gloria Martin,
was married this week to Shaul
Apelker, son of Baruch and
Batia Apelker of Nathanya, Is-
rael, at the Tel Aviv Hilton.
Included among the guests
were 50 out-of-towners from
Miami, New Jersey, New York,
Connecticut, Canada, Mexico,
Germany and Austria. The
groom's parents gave a pre-
wedding party in Nathanya and
the bride had been honored
here by Dora Seidman, Sally
Konigsberg, Genia Offenbach,
Fela Lerna. Rella Herman, Syl-
via Herman, Jean Vogel. Hilda
Bendell and Teri Leidner.
Mrs. Apelker wore a long-
sleeved princess gown of ivory
satipeau embellished with Chan-
tilly lace and ending in a cath-
edral train. Her Camelot veil
was trimmed with matching
lace and she carried a bouquet
of yellow, white and melon
roses.
Lisa Gail Martin was maid of
honor, Yona Apelker was brides-
maid and Gila Perlmurter the
flower girl.
Mr. Apelker's best man was
Yitzack Apelker and the usher
was Perry Bruce Martin.
Mrs. Apelker is a graduate of
Palmetto Senior High School
and Dade Junior College. She is
a member of Tau Sigma Delta
sorority.
Her husband, a graduate of
Tel Aviv School of Aviation,
was recently discharged with
the rank of lieutenant from the
Israel Air Force.
Following a reception at the
Tel Aviv Hilton, the couple left
for a wedding trip to London.
Upon their return, they will
make their home in Miami.
MRS. SHAUL APELKER
Community
Corner
Keeping an eye on the law.
Sidney Pertnoy, a recent Law
School graduate, was appointed
to Attorney General Robert
Shevin's staff in Tallahassee .
Marcia Cypen, who graduated
from the University of Miami
Law School in May, is associat-
ed with Legal Services of Great-
er Miami. She has had articles
oublished in The Florida Bar
Journal and the UM Law Re-
view Heading for Law School
in the fall will be U of Florida
graduate Marc Bimbaum.
6 tr -iz
The medical community is
not to be outdone: Mel van Sha-
Diro, after completing her resi-
dency, took on a new husband,
George Cohen, and a new posi-
tion as pathologist at the U of
Illinois HosDital Leslie Safer
iust granduated from the UM
Medical School and will keep
his talent local as he interns at
Mt. Sinai.
tr it &
Phi Beta Kappa Stanford Uni-
versity graduate Myles Cypen
is son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Cypen Gary Segal graduated
magna cum laude from Boston
U Ben Plotkin took honors
at his U of F commencement
exercises.
& & Plans in the works to honor
Reva Friedman for 20 years'
service to the congregants of
Temple Menorah .
6 -to tr
Community Corner Salutes:
Jay Easter upon his election to
the presidency of the National
Wholesale Furniture Associa-
tion Gertrude Meyerson
and Jean Silverman on sharing
the Sisterhood presidium at
Ohev Shalom Edward Ana-
ool upon being named to the
National En/ineers' honor frat-
ernity Bonnie Birchansky
whose work was exhibited at
the Miami Art Center FTU dis-
Dlay.
fr -C? Special Anniversary Cele-
brants: Mr. and Mrs. Jay Der-
mer and Dr. and Mrs. Sherman
Kaplan Cantor and Mrs.
Max Gallub celebrated their
51st wedding anniversary.
tr & -a
Everything is relative: Israelis
refer to American Jews as
"Anglo-Saxons."
Jill Aaronson, Martin Hershbein
Marry at Beth David Congregation
Jill Aaronson and Martin
Hershbein were married Sun-
day evening at Beth David Con-
gregation, with Rabbi Sol Lam
dau and Cantor William Lipson
officiating. The ceremony was
followed by a dinner reception
in Spector Hall.
The bride, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Wilbur Aaronson, is a
graduate of Palmetto Senior
High School and the University
of South Florida, Tampa. She is
a member of Women in Com-
munications, Inc., and the Pub-
lic Relations Society of America.
The son of Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
thur Hershbein, the groom was
graduated from Miami Senior
High School and the University
of South Florida, where he was
a member of Tau Epsilon Phi
fraternity.
Mrs. Hershbein's sister Cindy
was her maid of honor.. Brides-
maids were Barbara Bretan, An-
dee Hershbein, Jeanie Irwin,
Eddyse Kessler and Linda Klein-
berg.
MRS. MARTIN HERSHBEIN
Best man Neil Bretan attend-
ed the groom, along with ushers
Michael Aaronson, Kenny Fel-
ler, Jim Goeb, Harold Kessler
and Ira Koganovsky.
Morris Green, a Dade Coun-
ty resident for over 28
years, has been elected a
member of the board of Bis-
cayne Federal Savings &
Loan Association. Green, a
food broker, is a partner in
A.A. Green & Co.
Diccfitenniol rilm
Available from Realtors
The Miami Board of Realtors
is promoting patriotism as a
part of the Bicentennial year by
making a film. "Uncle Sam. the
Man and the Legend" narrated
by E. G. Marshall, available
free to interested groups.
The film has been viewed by
members of Temple Beth Tov,
bv visitors to Women's Expo '76
and bv students at Dade Chris-
tian Schools along with many
tian Schools along with viewers
of WPBT-TV. Channel 2. For
further information, call the
Miami Board of Realtors.
So Now There
Are Women
In the Rabbinate
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
So now we hear one rabbi-
nical college has three women
students.
Perhaps the libbers will be
demanding that we stop saying
Amen and say A-woman.
There is another problem. If
the woman becomes a rahfei,
will her husband be a rebbit-
Probably a lot of men would
zin? Probably a lot of men
would not object. The rebbitzen
was highly regarded.
THE IDEA of women minis-
ters is not so new really. It goes
back to the days of Moses. The
Midrash says that when the
Jews came out of Egypt, Moses
first addressed the women re-
garding them as the real teach-
ers of the faith, since they
would have the main care of
the spiritual rearing of the chil-
dren.
In Talmud days, rabbis were
just workmen. Hillel was a
woodchopDer: Joshua, a shoe
maker, another Joshua., a black-
smith; Hosea, a laundry man;
Yehuda, an apothecary.
MAYBE THE reason women
were not rabbis, was the same
reason women were not black-
smiths. Perhaps, if there had
been Day Care Centers, they
might have been rabbis.
In Talmud days, rabbis re-
ceived no pay. They usually
worked at some secular occu-
pation for their sustenance.
Even in much later times. Mai-
monidies earned his living as
a Dhysician and the great Ra-
shi raised grapes for a living.
It was said of one rabbi, if
it weren't for the many fast
days, he would have starved to
death. The Chafetz Chayim, one
of the great Orthodox pillars of
the last century, ran a little
store, but when business got
Rood he closed it. Some were
patronizing it because he was
a rabbi and he thought this
was unfair to his competitor.
THE POSITION of rabbi is
different from that of the clergy-
men of other faiths. The syna-
gogue is a very democratic in-
stitution. The word synagogue
itself is democratic. Synagogue
is a Greek word, a translation
of "beth haknesseth" meaning
simDlv meeting house. Israel's
parliament is also called Knes-
setmeeting house. Also the
Jewish Drayer service is a kind
of working service.
I know work isn't exactly the
right term, but it conveys some-
thing of the picture of Jewish
prayer. It is apt to be more
physical more active. The
worshipper sways as he prays
The Zohar compares the sway-
ing at prayers to flames dan
cing about a candle. The entire
being is supposed to be in-
volved in the prayer.
The rabbi has no special
function at the service. He can
deliver a sermon but that is not
a requisite. He is simply avail-
able at the Orthdox service, if
anvone has a religious problem
THERE WAS, for instance, the
fellow who left Judaism but
later sought to return. He asked
the rabbi. "I will look it up in
the Gemara. Come back at the
end of the month," said the rab-
bi. At the end of the month the
fellow is back. The rabbi says
it is okay he can start going
to the synagogue again. But
now the fellow asks if his rein-
statement can be delayed for a
month. His wife has a jug of
nickled ham and they would
like to finish it off first.
Among Hasidim, the "rebbe."
may on occasion do a little
miracle to help along a mem-
ber. A woman once told her
rebbe that she succeeded in
giving birth to a son without
rabbinical intercession.
"Sometimes." the rabbi ex-
plained, "God wants to show
He can do a miracle just like
the rabbi."
In the more assimilated en
vironment of today, there have
been more marked changes in
the service. Dr. Abraham Feld-
man writing of the changes in
the rabbinate tells of the boy
who explained the difference
between the rabbi and the can-
tor. "The cantor sings and the
rabbi tells what page to turn
to."
"RABBI." said a member of
a congregation. "I heard your
sermon yesterday and lay awake
all night."
"Well." said the rabbi, "my
sermon must have given you
food for thought."
"It is not that," said the mem-
ber. "You see when I sleep dur-
ing the day, I can't sleep at
night."
At one modern congregation,
it is said, they have a wonder-
ful set of buttons. You press
one button, and a prayer book
aDoears. press another button
and you get a talith. One time
a member pressed the wrong
button and the rabbi disappear-
ed.
:.


Friday, July 16, 1976
fJetvisti tkrldi&ri
Page 9-B
rC0ud J
o w n
The Sam Jacobys of Washington, N.C., dined at the Twelvfe
Tribes and told Mike Bacher that their home city has invited all
American cities named Washington to join in a special celebra-
tion this year.
The Carolina city was the first named after George Washing-
ton, according to the Jacobys, and city fathers are inviting other
Washingtons to send floats to participate in a parade in the North
c irolina community later this year. At least half the states in the
nation, the Jacobys told Bacher, have towns named Washington.
Norman Braman of Coral Gables is back from a June visit
,> the family's summer home, Les Falaises, at Cap D'Ail in the
south of France. His wife, Irma, and daughters Debra and Susie
are staying there, and Norman will return sometime around July
25th.
Bicentennial hats off to William Leonard, executive vice
pnsident of Alexander Muss and Sons, and the Seacoast Towers
Dining Club for cohosting a Day After the Fourth cocktail party
for the residents of all five Seacoast buildings. Over 1,500 attend-
ed the fete in the four restaurants and on the spacious terrace
of Seacoast East.
On the flag-waving scene were Mr. and Mrs. Ben Oilier, Leh
Gaffney, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Layton (he's director of activities
and helped put the party together), and Peggy (Mrs. Julius) Ros-
enberg. Also attending were Mr. and Mrs. Harry Herman, Mrs.!
Edward Cowen and Dr. Joseph Safian.
Miriam Pearl Cohen, granddaughter of Mrs. Ella Mandel of
Miami, and daughter of former Miami residents Dr. Jerome and
Faye Cohen, delivered the commencement address at her gradua-
tion from Chandler Junior High in Worcester, Mass., where she
is an honors student.
Jack H. Levin of Miami Beach hosted a dinner party for 75
relatives and "52nd cousins" at Levin Family Trees 49th anniver-
sary at Sardi's in New York.
The theme, "Around the Corner I had a Friend" was read
by the host's grandniece and nephew, Wendy and Clifford Stern.
Special guest of honor, Deputy Consul Gen. Amos Ganon of
Israel, was introduced by Arnold Forster, general counsel of the
Anti-Defamation League.
Among the guests were Lester Waldman, national director
New York Society of the Deaf; Irwin Savelson, editor and publisher
of Metropolitan Star of B'nai B'rith; Larry Pierez, chairman of
ADL's National Civil Rights Committee; Dick Malkin, editor of
Air magazine; Si Seadler of M-G-M; Zelda Bloom, national direc-
tor of B'nai B'rith Tours; and actor Lou Jacobi. The toastmaster
was Miamian Hal Salzman of "How To Make a Million."
Levin Family Tree founder, the late Sophie Levin, was
memorialized by president Arnold Canton.
The Tree's golden anniversary will be celebrated in Miami
Beach.
"O
THE "IN" FOODS ARE INDONESIAN
First Tim* in Florida ...
A Delightful Indonesian Restaurant
SATEH HOUSE
JFCS Women
Name Officers
Mrs. Leonard Beldner has
been elected president of the
Women's Committee of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service. The committee's goal is
to make the community aware
of JFCS services and programs
and to educate and interpret
social work to its membership.
Other officers elected are
Mrs. Harry Orleans and Mrs.
Sam Rosen, vice presidents;
Mrs. Stanley Gilbert, treasurer;
Mrs. Irving Cypen, recording
secretary; Mrs. Bernard Neme-
roff, corresponding secretary;
Mrs. Eugene R. Katz. Mrs. Sol
Goldstein, Mrs. Edwin B. Op-
penheim, Mrs. Morton Wein-
berger and Mrs. Mortimer
Schaffer. honorary vice presi-
dents.
Women's Committee members
elected to the board of directors
include Mrs. Samuel Adler,
Mrs. Philip Bear, Mrs. Stanley
Cohen, Mrs. Max Dinisman, Mrs.
Aaron Farr. Mrs. Martin Fine.
Mrs. Robert Gruder. Mrs. Nor-
man Hill and Mrs. Jacqueline
Hochberg.
Also Mrs. Donald Lefton, Mrs.
Burton Levey, Mrs. William
Levin, Mrs. Richard Levy. Mrs.
Norman Lit>off, Mrs. Ted Nel-
son, Mrs. Renee O'Kean, Mrs.
Donald Rubin. Mrs. Lewis Sil-
berman, Mrs. Howard Scharlin.
Mrs. Martin Smith, Mrs. Arnold
Stern. Mrs. Arthur Winarick
and Mrs. Sol Zellae.
Honorary directors of the
board are Mrs. David P. Cats-
man. Mrs. Walter S. Falk. Mrs
Burton B. Coldstein. Mrs.
Emanuel Pollack. Mrs. Harold
Rand and Mrs. Robert Russell.
0
fit
'
is***1
{Sateh: Meat on a Skewer)
UMCMEONS..
Jr.- '2
**
%gn
DINNERS.............from '4
9050 S. DIXII HIGHWAY, MIAMI 665-3343

Soon: Son* Houm lom in Olo"do Polm Beoch ?'
lovoVdatt. Joetrton>H, lompo. Doytooo Btoch ond Si [
PtHnburg. ______________1
Beth topah
EARLY EDUCATION PROGRAM
oo>
VlSUA*-
AlO*
JEWISH
HOLIDAY
OBSERVANCE
SMALL
INTIMATE
C-AS$es
EREVSHABBAT
PARTIES
V, OAY A AFTERNOON PROGRAMS
TRANSP0RTATI0
1051 North Miami Beach Blvd.
Registration it now being accepted for Nursery and Junior
Kindergarten classes (classes 1% 4'/2) for members and
non-members.
Daily transportation is offered for morning and afternoon
sessions.
CAtl Asenath Elfenbein, Director, at 947-7528 far further
information._______________________________
Rabbi Swirsky's Daughter
Receives M.D. at Einstein
Raananah S w i r s k y Katz,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Shmaryahu T. Swirsky, recently
received her M.D. degree from
Albert Einstein College of Medi-
cine at Yeshiva University. She
completed the medical school
course in three years and plans
to specialize in ophthalmology,
as does her husband. Dr. Jack
Katz. She received the honor
of an internship plus a three-
vear residency at the Einstein
Hospital and will do research in
neuro-ophthalmology and sur-
gery.
Author of two articles pub-
lished in the Journal of Ophthal-
mology. Dr. Katz studied at
Stern College for Women and
received her B.S. from Colum-
bia University and hrr M.A.
from Hunter College.
In her medical school grad-
uation class of 179, she was
one of 13 women who received
degrees from the 26-vear-old
school, which ranks sixth among
medical colleges in the nation,
accordine to the New York
Emanu-El Men to Hear
Fascell and Clark
Rep. Dante B. Fascell (D.,
Fla.) and Metro Mayor Steve
Clark will be guest speakers
Sunday, July 18, at 9:30 a.m. at
a Temple Emanu-El Men's Club
Bicentennial breakfast.
Former State Rep. Ted Cohen
Men's Club president, said that
Congressman Fascell and Mayor
Clark will discuss the 1976
Presidential race and the Mid-
dle East situation.
Reservations for the Sunday
breakfast may be made at the
temple office.
DR. RAANANAH S. KATZ
Times.
DR. KATZ'S father, rabbi of
Beth Jacob Congregation and a
professor of history at Miami-
Dade Community College, in
1975 was selected from among
Florida educators as a member
of the Outstanding Educators of
America. History Division. Her
mother is in the Dade public
school svstem and received her
degree cum laude from the
University of Miami.
Dr. Katz's sister, Avivah, is a
lournalism major at Boston Uni-
versity, where she is entering
her senior year, and will cover
the Democratic National Con-
vention for some Boston week-
lies.
At the medical school grad-
uation the men receiving de-
grees wore varmulkes and the
diplomas were the last to carry
the signature of Dr. Samuel
Belkin as president of the col-
lege.
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Page 10-B
+Jeist>norAMauo
Friday, July 16, 1976
Euphoria Still General Among Ecstatic Israelis
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
general euphoria over the suc-
cessful rescue operation in
Uganda remains unabated. But
the nation also shares the grief
of the families of the four Is-
lis who lost their lives as a re-
sult of the action to free the
hostages at Entebbe Airport.
Two of the civilian victims
Ida Borowitz, 56, and Jean Jac-
ques Maimoni, 18were buried
at Netanya and Bat Yam, their
respective homes.
THE THIRD civilian casual-
ty, Pasco Cohen, 45, of Hadera,
died of his wounds at a hospital
in Nairobi. Kenya. It is not
known when his remains will
be returned to Israel.
Cohen, his wife and their two
children, Zipora, 6, and Jacob,
12, were among the Israeli hos-
tages on the hijacked Air
France jet. During the rescue
operation, Cohen became sep-
arated from his children.
When he stood up to look for
them, he was hit in the back
by a sniper's bullet and fatally
wounded. The rest of his family
was unharmed.
A MILITARY funeral was
held on Mt. Herzl in Jerusalem
for Lt. Col. Jonathan Nethanya-
hu, the American-born Israeli
soldier killed while leading the
rescue assault party. Burial
services were delayed one day
to await the arrival of his par-
ents and two brothers from the
United States.
The 30-vear-old former tank
commander was the son of Prof.
Ben Zion Nethanyahu who
teaches Judaic studies and
Semitic languages at Cornell
University in Ithaca. N.Y
He was born in the U.S. and
brought to Israel at the age of
two. He had studied at Harvard
and at the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem while pursuing, a
successful career in the armv
that made him one of Israel's
voungest high ranking com-
manders.
COL NETHANYAHU was
wounded in the 1967 Six-Day
War, fought in the Yom Kippur
War and was decorated for his
performance in a special unit
that battled the Syrians on the
Golan Heights where he com-
manded a tank unit.
He was .killed during the En-
tebbe operation by a bullet be-
lieved to have been fired by a
Ugandan soldier from the air-
port control tower.
While mourning the dead, Is-
raelis appear to have gained
new confidence and respect for
themselves, their defense forces
and their government as a re-
sult of the Uganda rescue.
THE SKEPTICISM and often
cynical attitude that has pre-
vailed toward politicians and
the military in general since the
Yom Kippur War seems to have
vanished overnight. A notable
example was the cancellation of
a strike that had been called by
railroad workers. Suddenly, the
labor dispute appeared petty
compared to the brilliantly con-
ceived and executed Uganda
operation.
Similarly, work slowdowns
protesting the unpopular value
added tax (VAT) that went into
effect July 1 were called off.
Newspapers are carrying huge
ads saluting the army and gov-
ernment. Many of the aSs were
placed by groups that until last
week had been demanding new
elections and a change of the
regime.
National solidarity, in fact,
seems to have reached a point
equalled only in times of war.
In the oast two days, individuals
and groups have donated mil-
lions of pounds to the soldiers
welfare fund. Workers who have
been demanding more pav for
fewer hours are willingly donat-
ing one or more days of their
vacations for the benefit of Is-
raeli soldiers.
FORMER Premier Golda Meir,
who knows probably better than
any other Israeli the anguish of
decision-making in a time of
crisis, paid a personal tribute
to her successor, Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin, who made the deci-
sion last weekend to rescue the
hostages in Uganda. She sent
him a wreath of red roses and
a message of congratulations on
the successful operation.
Meanwhile, Transport Minis-
ter Gad Yaacobi said on a radio
interview that he wanted legal
power to tighten security mea-
sures at Israel's airports so that
they apply to all carriers, not
only Israel's airlines. A draft
bill submitted to the Knesset
last week would permit the gov-
ernment to penalize foreign
carriers who did not comply
with Israeli safety regulations
anywhere along their routes
between Israel and other coun-
tries.
THE AIR FRANCE jet hijack-
ed June 2/ was seized by heav-
ily armed terrorists who board-
ed undetected at Athens Air-
port. In the interim, Yaacobi
asked all airlines serving Israel
to discontinue intermediate
stops.
In Jerusalem, Israeli officials
vigorously denied that Kenya
had collaborated with Israel in
any way in carrying out the
rescue mission in neighboring
Uganda.
Some foreign press reports
indicated that the Kenyan capi-
tal of Nairobi was swarming
with Israeli agents during the
week the hostages were being
held. The Israeli rescue planes
landed briefly at Nairobi on
their way back to Israel.
THAT FACT and the strained
relations between Kenya and
Uganda have lent some cred-
ence to reports that the Ken-
yans gave at least tacit support
for the rescue. The Kenyan gov-
ernment, however, has flatly
denied this. Kenya does not
have formal diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel.
Security forces, meanwhile,
have been alerted along Israel's
borders and inside the country
and have taken precautionary
measures against possible ter-
rorist attempts to retaliate for
the rescue of the hostages in
Urganda, it was announced. No
details were given of the mea-
sures taken.
!
UN Debate 'Useless, Futile'
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS(JTA)
Israel has charged that the Se-
curity Council debate on the
territories under Israeli control
is "a futile, useless, waste of
time" and that it is a result "of
the volatile, unstable, interne-
cine interrelationship within the
Arab world."
Addressing the Security Coun-
cil, Israeli Ambassador Chaim
Herzog said that Egypt re-
quested the meeting because it
"has to indulge in a game of
one upmanship with Syria and
to take advantage of the tension
and confrontation between Syria
and the PLO in Lebanon."
HERZOG SAID that the Pales-
tinian Arabs are only an excuse
"as always" used by the Arab
states "as pawns in the inter-
Arab game."
Analyzing in depth the situa-
tion in Lebanon, Herzog con-
cluded: "This debate is part of
an Egyptian effort to reassert
itself in the Arab world and to
score over the Syrians within
the framework of the struggle
one with the other."
Turning to the situation in
the West Bank, Herzog cited a
recent case of an Egyptian
woman who came to Hadassah
Hospital in Jerusalem for open
heart surgery. "If the territories
are such a hell on earth for the
Arabs why the long line of
Arabs crossing from every
country in the Middle East to
Israel for treatment?" he asked.
"IF CONDITIONS in the ad-
ministered areas are so unbear-
able, and it is claimed that Is-
rael is committing 'war crimes'
in the areas, why is it that hun-
dreds of thousands of Arabs,
including women and children,
voluntarily cnbss the Jordan
River to spend their vacations
in the very same areas?"
According to the Israeli en-
voy, since June, 1967, 4.5 mil-
lion people crossed the bridges
of the Jordan River in both di-
rections, including 700,000 Arab
tourists arriving from different
Arab countries.
Herzog, referring to Egyptian
accusations at the Council meet-
ing of Israeli mistreatment of
the Gaza population, accused
Egypt of oppressing the people
of the Gaza Strip during the 19
years they were under Egyptian
control.
"You treated them as slaves,"
Herzog said to the Egyptian
representative. "You violated
one human right after another."
The same charges were made
by Herzog against Jordan which
Herzog said "oppressed the
Arab population for 19 years"
while the West Bank was under
Jordanian control.
STATING THAT he does not
ignore the problems that pre-
sently exist in the West Bank,
Herzog said, however, that Is-
rael is proud of its record in
the West Bank. He noted that
Israel has never carried out a
death penalty against an Arab
terrorist, that the standard of
living of the Arabs in the ad-
ministered territories has risen
and that there is freedom to
express any political opinion
"including extreme views op-
posing the. State of Israel." Her-
zog disclosed during his speech
that an investigation is under
wav in Israel concerning the
proposal by a West Bank resi-
dent to a foreign television
crew to organize incidents such
as burning of tires or creating
road blocks in return for a pay-
ment of $300.
He accused Egypt and the
PLO of inciting the disturbances
in the West Bank and charged
that the incitement "is designed
to prevent the development of
a dialogue between the new
leadership (in the West Bank)
and the Israeli administration."
REITERATING Israel's call
for negotiations, Herzog said a
solution to the Mideast conflict
can be achieved only on the
basis of understanding. "You
have no option today but to
choose between the ongoing
force towards peace in the Mid-
dle East" as envisaged in Reso-
lutions 2442 and 338, "or on the
other hand, between the un-
compromising, intransigent at-
titude reflected in the Arab
statement before you which
means a perpetuation of war
and miserv," Herzog stated.
Ahmed Meguid, the Ambas-
sador of Egypt, which asked
for the Security Council meet-
ing, on May 4 urged the Coun-
cil to adopt a resolution con-
demning "Israel's brutal andi
illegal actions" in the adminis-)
tered territories and calling for
"immediate and effective" steps
to stop what he said were viol-
lations of international law.
THE START of the debate
was similar to the start of i
discussion on Israel's occupa-
tion policy last March which!
ended with a United States vetof
of a resolution condemning Is-'
rael.
American Ambassador Wil-
liam Scranton objected May 4
as he did in March to seating
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization. As in March, the PLO
was seated by an 11-1 vote with
Britain. France and Italy ab-
staining.
Israeli Students Don't Know Us
NEW YORK Israeli stu-
dents receive a skimpy and un-
balanced view of the history
and accomplishments of Amer-
ican Jewry in their high school [
studies, due primarily to the
inadequate material on the sub-
ject found in Israeli history
texts.
This finding was reported by
the Israel office of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee, which
just released a two-year study
on "Teaching About American
Jewry in Israeli High Schools."
THE STUDY, which was fi-
nanced by a grant from the
American Jewish Committee's
Jacob Blaustein Institute for the
Advancement of Human Rights,
was conducted by Reuven Sur-
kis, director of the Historical
Society of Israel.
In an introduction to the
study. Dr. M. Bernard Resnikoff,
director of the American Jew-
ish Committee's Israel office,
pointed out that the poor infor-
mation that Israeli students have
about Jews in the United States,
as revealed in the study, ad-
versely affects the understand-
ing of the Jewish community in
the U.S. by Israeli Jews and
therefore makes their compa-
tibility mofe difficult.
He expressed the hope that
the study "will sensitize teach-
ers, curriculum planners and
others to the need for concerted
improvement in this crucial area
of education."
IN HIS study, which included
an examination of textbooks
and teaching materials, and in-
terviews with 212 teachers in
high schools in various regions
of Israel. Surkis found that most
high schools teach about Amer-
ican Jewrv in only one course
on "Jewish Historv in the Mod-
ern Era." in which onlv a mini-
mal amount of time is devoted
to U.S. Jewish history.
Analyzing the textbook mate-
rials used Surkis found the fol-
lowing specific deficiencies:
Kev concerns of American
Jews, including American plural-
ism, the pervasiveness of the
general culture, and church-
state separation are inadequate-
ly discussed;
Some texts relate the his-
tory of American Jewry com-
pletely separate from the life of
other Jewish communities, and
make no comparisons;
The relationships between
American Jews and other ethnic
groups in the U.S. are neglected;
The texts generally ques-
tion the viability of pluralism
in the U.S. and question whether
it is possible to cultivate Jew-
ish life in America;
An undue emphasis is giv-
en to anti-Semitism in the U.S.;
Domestic programs of
American Jewish organizations
are largely ignored;
American Jewish culture
as expressed in English, includ-
ing the works of most American
Jewish novelists who write in
English, are generally overlook-
ed:
The texts fail to appreciate
the role of the Jew as a purvey-
or of culture in America;
Although religion in the
U.S. is treated at length, not
much attention is paid to trends
which may determine Jewish
survival in the U.S.. including
the position of the synagogue
and the rabbi, the secular func-
tion of religion in American
life, and the decline in personal
observance;
Events in American Jew-
ish life since World War II are
inadequately covered.
IN HIS interviews with the
212 Israeli high school history
teachers, about 10 per cent of
the total number in the coun-
try, the author found that only
two teachers lad taken a course
on American Jewry in univer-l]
sity studies.
Further, he found that more'
than 30 per cent of his sample
were pessimistic about the fu-
ture of the American Jewish
community. "Assimilation, inter-1
marriage, diminishing religious I
practice and inadequate Jewish
education were the most fre-
quently expressed concerns." he
reported
The report points out that the
38 teachers in the sample who
had visited the U.S. expressed
the view that "the experience i
had increased their understand-1
ing and appreciation of Amer-
ican Jewish life. Thev also liked'
individual American Jews more
than did their colleagues "
MOST TEACHERS reported
that in preparing lesson plans!
thev relied mainly on the inforl
mation contained in textbooks
Further, few indicated that they I
read American publications or j
books on the historv or sociol-J
ogv of American Jewry.
In their analysis of tonicsI
covered in their classes thitl
dealt with American Jewish his-1
torv. most teachers reported an I
emnhasis on Jewish immigrH
tion to the U.S. and Americanl
Jewish support to world Jewry-[
Few indicated that much timel
was snent on the beginnings il
American Jewish history, thfl
economic life of American Jew-I
rv. or JeVish education in tht|
US
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Friday, July 16, 1976

Page 11-B
flips
^ablriwcal l$n%t
co-orchnatad by H*B)
Gcaatar Miami Rabbinical Ajtooation
<*ditor$
Dr. Max A. lipschitz Rafibi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
Is the Bicentennial Worthwhile?
QUESTION BOX
By RABBI DR. NATHAN H. ZWITMAN
Congregation B'nai Zion
Key West
Our Bicentennial year will prove worthwhile if it rekindles
the light of patriotism which has grown dim in the eyes of so
many Americans during the years in which we were involved
in the Vietnamese war. It will prove more than just worthwhile
if it also succeeds in brightening that light in the eyes of all
Americans. Occasional celebrations in honor of our great na-
tion are necessary to preserve that light and keep it shining
brightly.
Kabbi Abraham Joshua Hes-
chel. of blessed memory, told
the story of the town which had
no watchmaker. In that town
all the clocks became inac-
curate. Many of the owners gave
up in disgust. Others kept wind-
ing their clocks even though
none kept the same time.
One day a watchmaker did
come to town. Everyone rushed
to him with clock problems. It
turned out that the only clocks
he was able to repair were
those which had been kept run-
ning. The others had grown ir-
reparably rusty and were use-
less.
Our Bicentennial celebration
seeks to rewind our timepieces
of patriotism. It is reminding us
of the wonderful things that
America has stood for in the
past, and all that it stands for
in our own day. As one of the
youngest of great nations it has
drawn its strength from all of
the nations.
Now. in her maturity, she gives
strength to older nations which
had strengthened her. She
stands as a bastion of power.
As the years added to her
strength, she became too power-
ful to be destroyed by others
and too powerful to destroy
others.
As immigrants continued to
find her shores of refuge, they
brought with them the skills of
their hands and the ingenuity
of their minds. America absorb-
ed the fruit of their efforts and
became the symbol of success.
Many are the nations which
knew the secret of that success.
Few are the nations that have
used it. Faith it was and faith
it remains faith in ourselves,
faith in each other, and faith
in God.
As we continue our Bicenten-
nial celebration, let us not only
laud our great nation, let us
also resolve to preserve it so
that it may always remain a
bearer of light to all in dark-
ness a champion of peace in
times of war. a messenger of
hone to all in despair, bringers
of knowledge to those in ignor-
ance, helping man to evolve
from selfishness to selflessness,
so that all may gaze upon us
and sav, "Haim zerah baruch
Adonoi" these are children
whom the Lord hath blessed.
Amen.
r^V-V^z-WVWV^-vv,
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Bible Study Is for Everyone
Bv SOLOMON WALDENBERG
Israelite Center Temple
In writing on this issue I
have in mind, in particular, our
day and Hebrew schools, reli-
gious schools, Sunday schools,
and educators in generalhere
and everywhere.
Most of us can recall the
days, not too long ago, when
our "mishpoche" would gather
at the homes of our grandpar-
ents on a Sabbath afternoon;
and while the female members
of the clan would go off in a
corner and chat, and while the
voungsters romped and played,
the male adults sat around the
dining-room table to study and
discuss the Torah portion of the
week or nerhaps to savor a
choice morsel of the Talmud
or some other classic bit of
Hebraica.
We may also remember that
when a bov became a Bar Mitz-
vah. he automatically became
eligible to join the group.
THIS PRACTICE possibly still
exists among some families, but
undoubtedly to a minimal de-
gree. Families are no longer so
closely knit, nor are its mem-
bers in such close proximity to
each other. Besides, other more
mundane interests and pursuits
exert too great a pressure upon
our time and attention.
In retrospect, this is a sad
reflection, for those sessions
lent a special irreplaceable
warmth to family life and spice
to the Sabbath. They created an
aura of reverence for the Bible
and mirrored its high standing.
Throughout the ages the single
most popular literary master-
niece had inevitably been the
Holy Bible. Year in and year
?ut. generation after generation.
headed the best-seller list
*nd best-read list. Almost everv
home boasted at least one cooy.
And vet. today. Dr. Nachum
Sarna states. "In the long hls-
frv of the Western world, to
-~> other zntr^JJkf *** the
Bible been known so little and
regarded so spiritually obsolete
as it is today."
IF THIS be so. then it be-
comes increasingly vital that
we reverse the trend, that there
evolve a boundless resurgence
of regard for the Bible, and that
there be a renaissance of faith
in its power to supply light and
guidance, and to provide the
answers to the problems of life
and living.
The alternative is to be found
in the annals of history. Many
great civilizations, rich in world
possessions of empire, com-
merce, art, architecture and all
the facets of luxury living,
crumbled and collapsed be-
cause thev were lacking in basic
human valuesin moral, ethical
and spiritual fiber. They shrank
from the heights of splendor to
the depths of decadence and
ruin.
Is there a parallel m our 20th
century civilization? Here we
are. comprising the most af-
fluent society in world history,
renowned for our achievements
in science and technology, for
our attainment of the world's
highest standard of living for
ourselves, vet torn by the grav-
est problems inherent in the
lowest standard of living with
e^ch other.
Indeed, this is the age of dis-
content and malcontent, of
strife and unrest, of poverty in
the midst of plenty, of exploring
the glories in outer space while
ignoring the miseries on earth.
Our eroticism and neuroses have
multiplied in juxtaposition with
the lowering of our human
values.
IS OUR civilization, too, fated
for collapse and oblivion? Are
we. then, to resign ourselves to
the oroohets of doom and de-
struction? Or is there an anti-
dote to stem the spread of our
cancerous decay? And wherein
lies that hope?
If we deire definitive an-
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Q: Why is the afternoon
prayer service called "Min-
chah"?
A: A variety of reasons are
advanced for this name. Some
feel the name "Minchah" comes
from the verb "to lead." The
meaning would thus be that this
service, or the sacrifice which
once accompanied it, "lids" a
person to the Almighty.
Another source (Oruch ha-
Shulchan 232) claims that the
term Minchah means a "gift."
The implication is that original-
ly once a day. or one service
of prayer a day. would have
been sufficient. This would have
been an obligation and the in-
dividual would be offering the
sacrifice of the morning or the
morning prayer service as a
payment for a debt (see Maimo-
nides. Tefillah 1:2).
The Jewish tradition added
the afternoon praver as an
added obligation. This added
duty is comparatively a gift that
is offered bv the worshipper. It
is also contended that "Min-
chah" is a term which refers to
the specific time of day when
swer to our enigma, there per-
haps does exist within the pages
of the Bible our one major hope
for survival. In it can be found
the pattern and guidelines for a
trulv Golden Age, if only we
would take it to our hearts, read
it. study it, seek out its teach-
ings and meanings, and tran-
slate its precepts into the deeds
of our daily conduct.
This study and application is
most essential, not only for the
theologian and the religious
teacher, but for the laymen of
the community-at-large. since
survival must depend upon the
masses of the populace.
The Bible's appeal lies in its
universality, its eternity and its
complete relevance and modern-
ity, regardless of the day and
age. At home... in the street and
in the schools (religious schools,
for I am in keeping with the
proposition of separation of
state and church), it provides
an answer to basic needs, to our
desires, our hopes and our am-
bitions.
It also suggests the answer
to manv of the problems which
so sorely beset us during every
living moment. The seekers of
snirifiil unlift and inspiration
will thus not have to turn to
self-stvled prophets in faraway
lands.
THE BIBLE story, pure and
simple, its message, its tenets,
are as alive today as when they
were first set down. Let us
make it a required subject in
our religious schools to save
our vouth from ignorance. Bi-
ble studv is not only for the
rabbi, minister and teacher.
It is for all of the world, any-
time, everywhere, even during
a TV or radio quiz program
when the contestants display
their utter ignorance of simple
historical facts which are so
explicit in the Pentateuch. Bi-
blical scholars, if thev will it,
can rectify it with ease in the
world
By RABBI DR SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why are Jews
forbidden to make graven im-
ages?
Answer: This is expressly for-
bidden in the Ten Command-
ments (Exodus 20:4). Some con-
tend that this is forbidden be-
cause it was a form of idol wor-
ship, which is forbidden to a
Jew. Others claim that the form
of a graven image is finite in
character and thus runs con-
trary to the infinite character
of the Almighty.
By making a graven image,
man casts the Almightv into the
limitation of space, thus de-
stroying the notion of His in-
finity.
\
the prayer is offered. The term
would then come from a root
meaning to "rest," to "recline"
or to "decline." The meaning,
then, is that this is the time of
day when the sun descends or
declines from its height reached
during the noon hour.
ft ft ft
Q: Why is the evening
prayer service referred to by
the name "Maariv"?
A: The original name was
"Arvith" while the name "Ma-
ariv" as used to refer to this
service is supposed to have
been first used in the 16th cen-
tury. It is contended that the
term Maariv was used because
the first benediction of the
evening service uses this word
as its main theme, extolling the
Almighty who (Maariv) "brings
on" the evening.
This is an acknowledgment
that it is the Almighty who
brings about the change in the
nature of the day from "day-
time" to "evening." There are
some who consider the meaning
of the word "Maariv" to mean
"to blend." In this sense it be-
comes obvious that the night
does not occur abruptly.
Rather there is a twilight in
which both day and night blend
with each other. The Almighty
thus brings about this shift in
the nature of tin-e in a gradual
fashion so as not to shock the
human c&server with sudden
darkness.
TV Programs
Sunday, July 18
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Harold Richter
Hollywood
ft
"Still. Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Sol Landau
Guest:
Dr. Emanuel Green
Topic:
"Personal Recollections
of Great 20th-century
American Jews
nfttawTOMMritaiiip! ""- ""la.aaiVWiiauiiMMifmi >t*m Phinehas
"And he took Joshua before Eleazar .
and the congregation. And he laid his hands
upon him" (Num. 27.22-23).
PHINEHAS "And the Lord spoke unto Moses,
saying: 'Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, the son of Aaron
the priest, hath turned My wrath away from the chil-
dren of Israel, in that he was very jealous for My sake
among them, so that I consumed not the children of
Israel in My jealousy. Wherefore say: Behold, I give
unto him My covenant of peace; and it shall be unto
him, and to his seed after him, the covenant of an
everlasting priesthood'" (Numbers 25.10-13). The chil-
dren of Israel were commanded to do battle with the
Midianites. Moses was instructed to give the daughters
of Zelophehad the inheritance of their father who had
died without sons. Moses ordained Joshua as his suc-
cessor. The portion concludes with a description of
the observance of the various holy days.


Page12-B
+Jmlst\fk>rklk*r)
Friday, July l6 197fi
Religious Directory-
Hebrew Academy Honors Jewish Patriots
MIAMI
4HAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION, 996 SW 67th Avt. Orthodaa.
Rabbi Zvl Raphaaly. Cantor Aren
Ban Aren. 1
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pin.
Trts Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Aloxandor
t. Gross 28
ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION.
2533 SW 19th Avsi. Conaorvatlva.
Cantor Sol Pakowitz. 2
BETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Kan-
dall Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Anociite Rabbi Mitchell
Chefiti I
-JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
VNAOOOUE. 1S2 Washington Ava.
Orthodox. Dr. Tlbor H. Stern. Can-
tor Mayor Engal. ft
-BET BREIRA CONOREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tibichnikoff. 3-A
-----------a
-TH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ava.
Conaervative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipaon. 4-A
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1476 Euclid Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Salf. 27
L.UBAVITCH CONOREGATION. 1120
Collina Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. 67
-MENORAH TEMPLE. 620 76th St
Conaervative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
wftx. Cantor Nice Feldman. 28
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7800 SW
120th St. Conaervative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipaon. 4-B
ETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Medem Traditional. Ratbl Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
del Outterman. e
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 64S8 SW th
St Conaervative. Rabbi Charlee Ru-
bel. 8
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conaervative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitx. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
------------------
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Collina Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi 8adl
Nahmiaa. S1
9'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Si-neet Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. 8-A
3HEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonlta Dr. Or
thodox. Rabbi Phineat A. Weber
nan. |e
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1644
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Tevi G. Schur. S2
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St. Conaervative.
Rabbi Victor D Zweltlng. Cantor
Jack Lerner. M
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Cauaeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Vav-
neh. 32-A
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy, led the au-
dience attending Jewish Patriots
Day at the school in special
prayers for all the passengers
and crew members on the Air
France "air bus" hijacked to
Uganda by Arab terrorists.
The highlight of the July 2
celebration (on the 200th anni-
versary of the adoption of the
Declaration of Independence)
was a reading by 10-year-old
Elena Manis, a recent Russian
immigrant, of the poem by Em-
ma Lazarus engraved on the
base of the Statue of Liberty.
Also on the program, honor-
ing Jewish patriots of the Amer-
ican Revolution, the War of
1812, the Civil War and Amer-
ica's first two centuries, was
former Miami Beach Mayor
Harold Shapiro, who delivered
a soliloauy on Haym Salomon,
the Jewish financier of the
American Revolution.
TEMPLE ISRAELOF-
GREATER MIAMI
"*
South Florida's Pioneer
Reform Synagogue
137 NE ltlhStr.. Miami
573-5900
Or. Joseph R. Narot Senior Rabbil
Services Every
Friday At 8 p.m.
Rabbi Brett Goldstein
will discuss:
"Our Jewish System of Mourning"
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Ch*imovita.
32-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1028
NE Miami Gardena Dr. Conaerva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. 88
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 26th
St. Conaervative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
naee 11
OB OLOM TEMPLE. 8766 SW 14th
St Conaervative. Rabbi David M.
Baron. 12
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19266
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
ISRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Beth T/kva). 9025 Sun act Or. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseph R. NaroL 18-A
SAMU-EL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conservative. Rab-
bi Edwin P. Farber. 8
ZION TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
eervative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Ben Dlckaon. 16
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipechltz.
34
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER'
571 NE 171 st Street
North Miami Beach
51-f0e2
Orthodox
Rabbi NesimGambech
Cantor Joseph Nahoum
Friday services- 6 p.m.
Saturday services- a.m.
HIAIEAH
TIFeRKTH JACOB TEMPLE 8S1 .
4th Ave. Conservative. 16
NORTH MIAMI
BBTH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rab-
bi Or. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
Vehude Binyamln. IS
MIAMI BEACH
-AQUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Cariyle Ave.
Orthodi.. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
-------------e>-------------
''BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Gross 6
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DAOE
'8801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18161 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick 88
Ronald T. Cahn, BBY0 Dis-
trict Five Director in At-
lanta, he* been named ex-
ecutive uirector of the Jew-
ish Community Center in
San Jose, Calif.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Left. 88
HAUANDAU
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conaervative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Oanziger. 12
'BETH JACOB. 801 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmary:u T.
Swlrsky. Cantor Maurice Mamchea.
18
CORA! GABUS
JUOEA TEMPLE. 6660 Oranada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
aenatat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1800 Unl-
versily Drive. Conservative Rabbi
Sidney I. Lwbln. 63
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave..
Conservative. 41
41
HOUYWOOO
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1861 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Aaaistant Rabbi Harvey M Rosen-
46
ETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1848
Jeffereon Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Bawl Breeh.
26
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chaee Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kren-
leh. Cantor Oavid Convieer. 21
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT BYNA-
GOQUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services Rabbi Richard A.
Oavia.
Davia. as
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur SL Conaervative. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold. 44)
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Associate Rabbi Chaim 8. Listfield.
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1081 SURFSIOf
Lincoln Rd Modern Conservative. MOGAN OAVID CONGREGATION.
PUbbl David Rastb. Canter Mordecai tS48 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Yerdeini. 21-A Isaac O. Vine. 80
------------------ -----------. .
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
888 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper 23
------------------
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 648 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 82nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
aenfield. 47. n,
Members of the Jewish War der Maurice Weinman and other
Veterans Post No. 330 posted South Florida community iead-
the colors, with Post comman- era participating.
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative 61
SOLEL TEMPLE. 6100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47-C
B'MAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobeoe 22-
i a
CMABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joeeph Blaton. 88
rU6AN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 28
FORT LAUDEtOAlE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conaervative.
Rabbi Philip *. Labowltz. Cantor
Maurice New 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3248 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
S. Ooor. Cantor Jerome Klemont.
43
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONORE-
GATION. 400 8. Nob Hill Rd. Re
oral Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
747* N.W. 4th St. s*
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8820 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drsiin
Cantor Abraham Keater. a
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 716 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Melr Maaliah
Velamed. 2S-A
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conaervative. Rabbi
larael Zimmerman. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 62
Member of the Rnbbinica! Association
< GrvaiiT Miami
-EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Waah-
lngton Ave. Conaervative. Dr. Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE-
M45 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach
Conservative
Service* every Saturday
at*a.m.
844-4353
DEERFIEID BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
. David Berent. 82
OMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
CORAl SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION Of
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biacayne Blvd., Miami, Fla
33137. 576-4000. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Executive Vice Prealdsnt.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379.4583. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
"'NE 163rd St.. North Miami
Beach. Fla. 33162. 947-6094.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Executive Director.
Leah Rabin, wife of Israel's Prime Minister, cut the
ceremonial ribbon officially opening the Israel Tennis
Center. With her were (from left) Rubin Josephs, chair-
man of the board of governors and contractors' over-
seer; Pesah Belkin, Mayor of Ramat Hasharon, Avram
Feiger, chairman of the Israel Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion; Harold Landesberg, general chairman; Joseph D.
Shane (behind Mrs. Rabin), vice chairman of the Is-
rael Tennis Center; and Dr. William Lippy, vice chair-
man and chairman of fund-raising, Israel Tennis Center.
1SCCJ President Elected
International Council V-P
JERUSALEM Dr. David
Hyatt, president of the Nation-
al Conference of Christians and
cation and youth.
Last year's conference, on the
Holocaust, marked the first such
event to be held in Germany
and was jointly sponsored bv
the NCCJ and ICCJ.
The member organizations of
the ICCJ are from Austria.
Brazil, Britain. Canada. France
Germany, Holland, Israel. Italy,
Luxembourg. Switzerland and
the United States.
DR. DAVTD HYATT
Jews, was unanimously elected
vice president of the Interna-
tional Council of Christians and
Jews on July 1 at the opening
of the ICCJ's policy and busi-
ness meeting.
It followed the ICCJ's first
conference ever held in Israel
and was attended by 120 inter-
religious experts, including 15
Americans, from 12 countries
who joined 50 Israelis for dis-
cussions on the conference
theme, "Israel: Its Significance
and Its Realities."
The ICCJ was founded 30
years ago in Oxford in the im-
mediate aftermath of World War
I and the Nazi Holocaust. The
first conference was convened
by the NCCJ and the British
Council of Christians and Jews.
THE ICCJ since then has hld
international conferences on
anti-Semitism, intergroup edu-
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
DISTRESS SALE
ARTS AND
CRAFTS STORE
Owner must sell by end of
month, $100,000 inventory,
27 year goodwill free.
QUICK SALE FOR $85,000
Call Milt Wittenberg, Assoc.
Weekends 672-2232
KEYES COMPANY Realtor
531-5803
If I
I
Notionolly Known
MenMfactvrors...
MNE DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER BLENDS.
Hm acc66iorits_
DORWINS
1572 WASHINGTON AVE.
532-4061
Fl
[NOTIC
unde
1
CO]
la*., M
ni.. w
"Urt f
COIJ
IESEA]
lANIEL
I'lornev


Friday, July 16, 1976
knisl Ik rid id n
Page 13-B
Forest Marks Rossens' Anniversary
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Mr. and Mrs. William Rossen
Lf Bav Harbor Island are estab-
lishing the William and Lydia
Rossen Family Forest in Modin.
Israel, through the Jewish Na-
ional Fund on the occasion of
| [heir 50th wedding anniversary.
In Detroit, where he moved
In 1911. Rossen has been active
I in the Allied Jewish Campaign
land helped organize the Food
[Division. In the retail food busi-
ness for over four decades, he
[is active in the Jewish War Vet-
erans and the Disabled War
[Veterans.
He is a member of Temple
Ixer Tamid here and Congrega-
tion Adat Shalom in the Detroit
1 area and of the Masons, Shrin-
lers, B'ai B'rith. Kiwanis, Cham-
jtwr of Commerce and Vladimi-
|rit7.er Society.
A NATIVE of Boston. Lydia
I Rossen is a mftnber of Amer-
ican Mizrachi Women. Hadas-
[sah. Pioneer Women, and Wom-
MR. AND MRS. ROSSEN
en's American ORT. and active
in work for the Jewish Theol-
ogical Seminary.
The Rossens have two daugh-
ters Phyliss (Mrs. Louis)
Tomarkin and Eunice (Mrs.
Aaron) Galperin five grand-
children and one great-grand-
child.
few Pastoral Counselor at Beth David
Rabbi Sol Landau, spiritual
(leader of Beth David Congrega-
tion, and Stevan S. Simon, presi-
dent, have announced that Dr.
Smanuel Green has been ap-
pointed rabbi-in-residence at
Jeth David Congregation, as
Df July 1. He will be available
|o members of the congregation
Bs nastoral counselor.
An ordained rabbi, Dr. Green
I also Drofessor emeritus of
Comparative literature and lan-
guages and a past president of
the National Association of Pro-
cessors of Hebrew. He served
Ifor a decade as national chair-
man of the Jewish Music Coun-
ted of the National Jewish Wel-
Ifare Board. His clinical pastoral
(studies program at the Grad-
uate Institute of the Institutes
of Religion and Health in New
York prepared him for his work
in marriage, sexuality, family
theranv. individual and group
nsychotherapv. geriatrics, and
counseling in critical human
relations.
Dr. Green is a contributor to
the Encyclopaedia Judaica and
was chosen for inclusion in the
1950 edition of Who's Who in
the East, the 1971 edition of
Outstanding Educators in Amer-
ica, the 1974 editions of Who's
Who in Religion and the Dic-
tionary of American Scholars.
He is a part-time member of
the staff of the Center of Pas-
toral Counseling and Human
Development at Fort Lauder-
dale.
Cancer Society Opens Loan Closet
The American Cancer Society
I has announced the opening of
a loan closet at the First Baptist
Church. 2816 Sheridan Avenue,
Miami Beach, from 11 a.m. to
15 nm. weekdays.
According to Mrs. Richard
' Deimel. service chairman,
i wheelchairs, commodes, walk-
lers. crutches and canes, dress-
lings, hospital gowns, laryngect-
lomv bibs, miscellaneous gift
I items and disposable pads will
I be available.
All cancer patients, including
leukemia and Hodgkins disease,
are urged to call the American
Cancer Society for referral at
377-8832. Hospital beds and
other heavy equipment are ob-
tained from the Society's serv-
ice department.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
11!;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
"ICE IS HKIIKRV GIVEN that
nderalgned. desiring to engage In
w under the fictltloiiH name of
M8CAYNE BUILDING at 19 W.
' St Miami. Fla 33130 Intends
Hater said name with the Clerk
I Circuit Court of Dade County.
I;i
I'ANTE M FIORINI
7/16-23-30 8/6
NOTICE UNDER
. FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HERKBY GIVEN that
un'lersigned. desiring to engage In
''"ess under the fictitious name of
|*yl-'"ltn H. KRAMER. PA. at 1160
X" >th St.. Miami. Florida Intends
[JKlrter said name with the Clerk
the circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Bnda
... SANFORD H. KRAMER
1 -'"< 'Itl> H KRAMER
;, for
,J?FORD H. KRAMER. PA.
M Mv uth St.. Miami
7/16-2S-30 8/6
. NOTICE UNDER
... FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
i.viTlt'E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
, un,'-,r*lgned. desiring to engage in
J I under the fictitious name of
I'- COLOMBIANO at 612 Ainsley
g"J Miami Intends to register said
Ym<- with the Clerk of the Circuit
ourl of Dade Countv. Florida.
, '.''Ll'MBIA STENOGRAPHIC
"i'KARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
INSTITUTE, INC.
...,, a Florida com.
lAMEL M KBTL
ft tome v for Applicant
7/l 10 8/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
OAK RIDGE FARMS at 6100 S\V LM
Ave.. Miami. Fla. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Flrida.
IJiSLIE SHAROFF
UWHENCE S. KATZ
Attorney for Anlllcant
7/16-23-30 8/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
OALMEN a partnership at 320 Ocean
Drive Miami Beach. Florida 33139 in-
dend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
HYMAN P. GALBUT
BESSIE D. GALBUT
HOWARD N. GALBUT
BARRY MENIN
MIRIAM MENIN
GALBUTft GALBUT
721 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorneys for
GAI.MEN. a partnership^^ g/<
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit
of florida. in and for
dade county
civil action no. 76-21672
general jurisdiction division
action for dissolution
of marriage
in re maria r08ario jara
hi: da valor
Wife-Petltlonei
and
It U BEN DAVALOS.
Husband ResDondent
TO: RUBEN DAVAI/iS
377 .MAN DAVAIJ 18
Diatrito San Juan de Mlra Florej
ciudad Dloa. Lima Peru
Vcir ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed against vou and
V"U an required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
.max a GOLDFARB, attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa la 19 Wee)
rkigler Street. Room MS. Miami.
Florida .1313". and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 2". 1976:
otherwise a default will be entered
against yon for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for fmir consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH PLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand anil the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on Ibis
13th day of Julv. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Had.- County. Florida
By C COPELAND
Aa Di'tiutv Clerk
"Circuit Court Seal)
MAX A GOLDFARB
ih w.st Flagler street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
7 16-33-30 s /
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-21484
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK THE MARRIAGE OF
EMMA HENKORADo de SIDI
and
JACOBO BENADAVA SIDI
Ti I; Jacob., Benadava Sidi
Carlos Animate 7< .n
Santiago. Chile
South America
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
v.,u are required to serve a copy of
your written defenaea, if any, to it on
Louis H Stallman. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 407 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach. Florida 33139.
nd file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 20. 1976; otherwise a default
"ill be entered against vou for the re-
lief demanded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
12th dav of Julv. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Itv M KLIMINSKT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
7M6-23-30 8/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-21473
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
IVBN VELEZ.
Petitioner.
and
BLANCA I VELEZ.
Respondent.
TO: Blanca I. Veles
I-ast known residence is
unknown ____
TOO ARE HEREBY NOTIFTED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it on
III-ADYS GERSON. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 101 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida 33128.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
Aug. 20. 1976: otherwise a default
wlfl be entered against vou for the
relief demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI/)RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
saki court at Miami. Florida on this
12th day of Julv. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By WILLIE BRADSHAW JR.
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN & KOSS. PA.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
7/16-23-30 8/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious OUMtl
GAI-GREBN. a partnership at 1939-
1959 North Glades Drive. North Miami
Beach Florida Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
HYMAN P GALBUT
BESSIE D. GALBUT
HOWARD N GAIJJUT
MARVIN OREENWALD
EDITH OREENWALD
GAIJUTT ft GALBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorneys for
OALGREEN. a tnerahlo^ j() g/<
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name oi
TROJAN PARK INVESTMENTS at
538 Palm Avenue. Hlaleah. Fla. In-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
King Rich (Individually as trustee)
Sheryl Rich. Alan Kurawell. Suetelle
Kurxwell. Martin Kurawell. Shirley
Kurawell. Elaine Lynn Kurawell.
Howard Eric Kurawell
Morton B. Selgel.
Attornev for applcants
7/16-23-30 8/8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE EYEGLASS FACTORY at 915
Washington Ave. Miami Beach. Fla.
33139 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida.
ROBERTS CHBMICALCO. INC.
7/16-23-30 /
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
buainess under the fictitious names of
CIRCE ART CREATIONS and
CHARM8 at 13033 N.W. 7th Avenue.
Miami, Florida 83168 intends to regis-
i. i said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Courl of Dade County, Florida
ii INTINENTAL INVESTMENT
ENTERPRISES, INC
Michael J. Freeman. Eao
Attnrm v for Applicant
7/16-23-30 B ;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desirlna to engagi In
buainess under the fictitious name.- of
C E I. I. and C.E I. L at 15300 Pal-
metto Lake Drive, Miami. Florida
33157 Intends to reglater aald names
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dftde County. Florida
CENTRE FOR EXPERIENTIAL
LIVING ft LEARNING, INC
.Michael J Freeman. Esu
Attorney for Applicant
7/16-23-30 3/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Caae No. 76-21292
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of:
ROSA MAE GLINTON, Wife,
and GEORGE ROBERT GLINT! \.
Huaband.
To GEORGE ROBERT GLINTON
(Residence Unknown i
VOU ARE HEREBY notified that
B Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against vou and vou
are hereby required to serve a eopv of
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Wife's Attoney, HAR-
VEY Ii ROGERS, whose addreaa is
I4."i4 N.W 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida
33135, and file the original with the
Clerk of the above atyled Court on or
before tbis 30th day of Aiuruat. 1976.
or a Default will he entered against
V "II
DATED this 9th dav of Julv. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv WILLIE BRAD8HAW JR
7/16-23-30 8/fi
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CHEN thai
id, undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of H S PHARMACAL CO at 3505
N.W. 112th Street. Miami. Florida
33167. Intenda to reglater said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida
HoYT A SMITH ENTERPRISES
INC
lei Hovt A. Smith. President
GALBUT ft GALBUT
7J1 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorneys for HOYT A. SMITH
ENTERPRISES. INC
7/16-23-30 8/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
No. 76-3102
JOHN R. BLANTON
IN UK ESTATE OF
LOUISE SORVILLO.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of LOUISE SORVILLO, deceased. File
Number 76-3102. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade Countv. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami. Florida 33130. The personal rep-
resentative of the estate is JOSEPH
SORVILLO. whose address is 6950
N.W. 186th Street. Apt. 210. Hlaleah.
Florida. The name and address of the
personal representative's attornev are
el forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are reaulr-
ed WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or
demand thev may have Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
addreaa of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THS NOTICE, to
file any objections thev mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
J ECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: July 16.
JOSEPH SORVILLO
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of LOUISE SORVILLO.
deceased
Attornev For
I'ersonal Representative:
MORTIMER S COHEN
Suite 800 Ainslev BIdg.
14 N E. 1st Ave.
Miami. Florida 33132
Phone: 358-1452
__________________7/16-33
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of ENERGY CONSERVATION
GROUP: ENERGY CONSERVATION
PRODUCTS: ENERGY CONSERVA-
TION SYSTEMS at 1231 NE 175
St N Miami Beach. Florida 33162. In-
lands to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
MARK-STEVEN INTERNATIONAL
INC. A Fla. Corp.
7/16-23-30: 8/
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4128
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARK > IIUELMAN
11, eased
NOTICF. OF ADMINISTRATION
PU ALL PERSONS HAVING
claims in: DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE \ND ALL
nTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN Till ESTATE
VOU IRE HEREIN NOTIFIED
thai thi administration ol the estati
..f MARIO GUELMAN, deceased. File
Number 76-4128, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Courl foi I >.i.l. Countv. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
la Hade Count) Courthouse. .Miami.
Florida The personal representative
,,f the estate is STEVEN ll BROT-
MAN, whosi addreaa is um Brickell
Avenue. Miami. Florida The name
and address of the personal represen-
tative's attornev are set forth below
All persons having claims or aa-
mauds ajralnsl this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
I'Ru.M THE DAT1 OP THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS .NOTICE, to
flic nitli the clerk of the at)0V6 court
a written statement of anv claim or
demand Ihej mav have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
ihi basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attornev. anil the amount claimed. If
'In claim is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall he
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
lainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed Tb. claimant shall deliver BUffl-
cnples of the claim to th" clerk
o enable the clerk to mail one coov
to each personal representative
mi persons interested in the estate
lo whom .i cops of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quire.1. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FIK IM THE DATE OF THE FIR8T
PUHLU ATM i.N OP THIS NOTICE, to
file anv objections thev mav have that
.ball, in.-, s tnF vali.lm of the dece-
i.nt's will, the qualifications of the
iin.ii representative, or the venue
>ui Isdii lion .( the court
\l,l, CLAIMS DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED W1I.1.
HE FOREVER BARRED
Dati Of tb. first publication of this
NOtlo of Administration: Julv 16.
STEVEN H. RROTMAN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate .f mario OUELMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSl INAL REPRESENTATIVE:
ENGLANDERft BURNETT
One Lincoln Road Building. Suite 208
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
By Malvin Enelander
Telephone r.38-1443
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20461
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANNA TOUS8AINT AGA.
Petitioner,
and _
CEDERNIBR AGA.
Respondent
TO: CEDERNIER AGA
Fltal Road. Nassau. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a coov of
your written defenses, if anv. to It
on EDWARD J NAURISON. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address la
568 NE 71 Street. Miami. Florida
33138. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before Aug 13. 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal or
said court at Miami. Florida on this
30th day of June. 1976. .._
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv S PARRISH
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD J NAURISON. ESQ
568 N E 71 Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attornev for Petitioner
7/9-16-23-30.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
UTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-20617
NOTICE OF SUIT OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN HE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HI'BERT J. HETTWY.
IV tu a. tor -Husband
and
JEAN 11 HETTWY.
Respondent-Wife
TO: JEAN If. HETTWY
1809 15th Avenue
Altoona, Pennsylvania
hereby notified that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has bee.n
fired, and you are required to aerve a
YOU, JEAN M. BETTWY. are
copy of your Answer or Pleading to
said Petition on the Petitioner's attor-
ney, Ronald I-. Davla Eaq, P.A., Suite
417 Blscayne Building- 19 W Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida 33130
Phone: 379-2851. and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 13th day of August. 1976
if vou fail to do so. iudgment by de-
fault will be taken against you for
ft-.- relief demanded In the PeHtton for
n'olutlon of Marriage.
THIS NOTICE shall be published
once each week for four (4) consecu-
.!> r,k In the JEWISH FLOR-
IDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 1st day of July. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B. LIPPS
Deoutv Clerk
?Circuit Court Seal!
7/9-1 -1-.


Page 14-B
+Jewish tkrkHan
Friday, July l6
1976
UCAl NOTICl
UCAl NOTICl
IECAI NOTKf
LEGAL NOTICE
IMAl MOTKE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to enure
In business under the fictitious name
of THE CHINA EXPRESS RESTAU-
HANT at 9501 Collins Avenue. Miami
Reach. Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HAM LEE INCORPORATED,
a Florida corporation
HAROLD CEASE
Attorney for HAM LEE
INCORPORATED
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Phone: 642-5231
6/25 7/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 78-6784
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERMAN DAMPF.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CI.ALMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19519
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
OLIVER SOLOMON NEALON
PETERS. Husband
and
LYNETTE YVONNE PETERS.
Wife.
TO: Oliver Solomon Nealon Peters
Calle San Cristobal
* 131 La Pastora
Caracas. Venesuela
YOU A>RE HEREBY NOTIFIED
IN THE COUNTY COURT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Division
NOTICE UNDFB ~~
FICTITIOUS NAMF,
NOTICE IS HEREBY JifeftK
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Waldo A. Vincente (Individual)
__________________________T/3-9-1S-H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LATIN TEEN at 12740 SW 50 Terr..
Miami, Fla. 33165 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Clr-
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Marvin L Callahan and Sandra
L. Callahan .his wife
Residence: General Delivery.
Scotland. Arkansas 72141
You are hereby notified that an
INTERCONTINENTAI luw
By: Jaime Pino Pr.i!i .
INTERCONT,NEN^:'?-K
action has been brought against you CYPEN 4NrA'TVsrUrl' p,",|dent
by attachment of the following de- Attorneys fmr am5
scribed real property located In Dade Arthur Oodfrev' RoVd
County. Florida, to wit: Mlaml Be,ch p^,,**4
Lot Eighteen (18) In Block Eight
6/25
that an action for Dissolution of M>r- c" CTlLsKM Vo^nU'v^"1"
riage has been file dagalnst you and BffinfjR StSSSSR
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on Sol Alexander, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 19 W Flag-
ler Street. Suite 317. Miami. Florida
33130. and file the original with the
RODOLFO M PRIETO
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
(8) of McCLURE MANORS, ac-
cording to the plat thereof, as re-
corded in Plat Book Twentv-four
(24) at page twentv-seven (27) of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida. Division JOSEPH "nctn
seeking the entry of ludgment against in RE: ESTATE op neSBITT
you In the amount of $1,500.00 and for SAMI'ELl SIEGFI
the satisfaction of said ludgment out SAM I SIEGEI a/k/ 8
?! ,^_ai>OVe- *K?5,5* *****. You SAM I" EL IRA SI EG El
Deceased
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT cno
OAD| COUNTY. FLOR|0j?R
"iBMTB DIVISION *
File Number 76-4264
-9-11
that the administration of the estate
of HERMAN DAMPF deceased File T/" not'c* 8hal> *>e published once Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Number 75-6785, is pending In the '"'TuJ'kin,[.,,JJr 0"se,c",,lve. week" County. Florida.
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor- '^ ^HE JEW ISH FLORIDIAN. ROBERT SHORE
Ida. Probate Division, the address of WITNtss my hand and the seal STATE BUILDERS. INC.
which is 73 West Flagler Street "' sald court < Miami. Florida on this By: FRED R. PERLMAN. Pres.
22nd day of June. 1976. MICHAEL P. CHASE
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WILLIE BRADSHAW JR.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
6/25 7/2-9-16
with the Clerk of this Court on or
before the 10th day of August 1976.
If you fall to do so. judgment bv de-
fault will be taken against vou for the
Y."Vw A'iE "EKK.HY N-OTIIWn
at the admin strati.... .. "f'H>
Miami. Fla The personal repre-
sentative of the estate is HATTIE
DAMPF. whose address Is 1777 Col-
lins Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida.
The name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below
All persona having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE PATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION of THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be Mat-
ed If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidat.-d. the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed Th.- claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
t" each personal representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
In whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTH8
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
IMItl.lCATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have
that chsllenges the validity of the
decedent's will, th. qualifications of
the personal representative, or the ve-
nue or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS N"T SO FILED WILL
UK forever barred
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Julv 9. 1976.
HATTIE DAMPF
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of HERMAN DAMPF
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
A NORMAN DRUCKER
42" l.m, oin Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
7/9-16
Attorney for State Builders. Inc.
7/2-9-16-23
lauu win ut iHKrii hkhiiis. vou ior me .),, .*. ,.,_,.. -wor
relief demanded In the said complaint S'fuStlRt^ arsmU.n "' "" M
and writ of attachment. v-iSS. -c.n*,.FA- ne<-aed
WITNESS mv hand and seal of this Circuit Court to-- n f*nJin* ">'
Court on this 6th dav of Julv. 1976 hi. ^dLk""" .!?'. Pad'- Count,. F
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19547
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN HE: The Marriage of
YDORE VALDES.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JOSE VALDES,
Respondent-Husband
TO: JOSE VALDES
752 West 178th Street.
Apt. 2-A
New York. New York 10033
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed atralnsl vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 2121 Pon-
ce ile Leon Boulevard Suite 420. Co-
ral Gables, Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July 30. 1976:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
DESIGN GROUP. LTD at ITS NE
40th Street. Suite 204. Miami. Fla. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dado
County. Florida
JUDY WERNER
INTERIORS. INC.
1/13 7/2-9-16
NOTICC UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QIVEN that TRUE8DALE
RICHARD P, BRINKER
Clerk of the Countv Court (seal)
H\ I' JONES
Deputy Clerk
7/9-16-23-30.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OK
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DAVID TRUE8DALE,
Petitioner
M IRQARET THOMPSON
ida. Probate Division.
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
SEAL ENTERPRISES at IM NE .'1st
Street. Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
George A. Seijo
7 t-9-lf-U
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-9054
(Div. 31 WEAVER)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR PETITION
FOR ADOPTION
IN RE:
Respondent.
To MARGARET THOMPSON
TRI ESDAI.E
Mill Pond Road Apt 24H
Broadbrook, Connecticut
rot' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
nag.- has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It
on EDWARD J NAURISON. attor-
nej for Petitioner, whose address Is
SSI N E 71 Street. Miami. Florida
33138, and file the original with the
i lerk of the above styled court on or
oefon August IS, l7: otherwise a
defaull iii be entered against vou
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall he published once
'ate
Pile
th*
-. Flor.
which Is Dade County Cour'thoSS ?,
West Flagler Street. IMsml pEh2
33130. The personal reprVsTntaM
the estate Is MAMIE \ "iFrr?
whose address Is 5825 Collins ult
- Apt 3D. Miami Beach fIohS.'
33140 The name and sddrJssTO
personal representative ,-- .nfv
set forth below "
All persons having claims a. ,
mands ngalnsl the estati are rmij
WITHIN THREE Month- S& ,
THE DATE OP Till: Kli:s! pfju '
CATION OF THIS NOTICE tt
with the clerk of ,e ,| ,. ""J
written statement of an) lain r d,.
man.I they may haw
must be In writing and mu-t ,va
the basis for the claim, th. nam- and
address of the creditor di his agent
or ttorney, and th. an eta3
If the claim Is not yet ,|. ih- d,
when it will becom. du. shall h.
Mated If ,.. clam, ,,.', J
unliquidated, the naturi .- ..;
talnty shall be stated II
cured, the security -h..
ed. The claimant shall I.live! .U'f|.
i lent copies of th.- claim ,|e,k
to enable th. clerk t.. m
i .a.h personal repr.
All persons Interested
' Whom a copy ,,f th,-
ministration has been mailed
iuire.1. WITHIN THHEI
KHOM THE DATE OF Till: FIRST
PIBLICATION OF Tills S'OTI
file an) objections ih.) m
I hallenges the Valldlt)
dents win, the qualifiral
".'. "'.' k.' r .'"ur,' nsecuiive weeks personal representative
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4395
Divisien JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE. ESTATE OF
THERESA LOERZEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
-I.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
'HER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE
YOU
that
of TH
File
Circuit Court for Dade "County Flor"- County. Florida,
ida. Probate Division, the address of HUNTER A
which is 73 West Flagler Street. Ml-
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 442-8624
Attorney for Petitioner
6/25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
that an action for Petition of Adop-
tion has been filed In the above cao-
tioned case wherein vou have been
named as the punitive Father of a
baby girl born on the 25th day of
February. 1976. at Mt. Sinai Hospi-
tal. Miami Beach. Dade Countv. Flor-
ida to KATHRYN REWJUK a/k/a
kATH* REWJUK. out of wedlock
>/> i and- vou have been named as the
7/.-9-16 punitive Father of said Infant child
and this cause shaU come on to be
heard for Final Hearing and. if vou
have any objections thereto, vou are
In THE JEWISH F1.0RIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
f said court at Miami Florida on
this 30th day of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By S PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
.Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD J NAI'RISON. ESQ
.'.68 N E 71 Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
___________________ '.'-16-23-30.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-42S6
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
or Jurisdiction of the curt
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS \ND"B-1
JECTIONS Not SO FILED
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first DUbll | tail
Notli of Administration .lulv
MAMIE A BIEGEI.
As Personal Repr.-. | th.
Estate of SAMUEL I SIEGEL
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
HERBERT S SHAPIRO
SHAPIRO. FHIED. WEIL &
SCHEER
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 11139
Telephone: (305) 538-6361

ih
required to serve a copv'of'said ob- OUIDO JOHN^MlssIo /k .
Fan A,lm-r ^rt BUJ OtTIDOJ MISSR?8' "*'*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Kfte-T taTS iT P.e,ltjn*r "1"" Deceased
,gage SfflfTB-JS Be0achUnF?o?.d.R3a3d.-39."Sj roTtt^W110"
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 71-16426
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
JI'AN CID. husband and
VIRGINIA CID. wife
TO VIRGINIA CID
ASSOCIATES. I."
6651 S.W. 117th Ave.. Miami,
ami. Florida The personal reoresinta- STEPHEN H ROSEN
live of the estate Is ROBERT LO-
ERZEL whose address Is RR1
Shagbark Road. Onarga. Illinois.
60955 The name ana address of the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the
attorney for Hunler Associates.
6/25
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
.C'VIL ACTION NO. 76-19616
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
address of the creditor or his agent or |V Re. THR llTsBUnv ne
attorney, and the amount claimed. If H,'Go xndraAf *" h :
the claim Is not vet due. the date Hubd
when ,t will become due shall be stat- and
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
BY: L SNEEDEN
__ As in-null Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
ROBERT H. BURNS. ESQ
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 450
MiarqJ Beach. Florida 33139-
Telephone No. 538-4421
Attorney for Petitioner IrtttelTaiatlSILI? V* ahovp ru.'
7,2-9.16-23 KSrjSfTK IS? 5 V&
Rosd. Mi.m..-F,Tr,da,"Th2e8 name ?
ve'sTnorn.!^ n"r,,"nal epres^ntStl-
ye s attorney are set forth below
m,A'' I"-"'"!" having claims or de-
5S52!.!rw!!al '*" '"tale are required
WITH iv iir,, -'> .ire requireu.
Tl K i.'^tJ f!L^MoN's "OM
CATt/.v nr tTHK K,UST P'-RLI-
vfth ,h ,F J",S *TICE. t f||,
' 'h".._r"k "' I."- above court a
ami. Florida 33125. and fil. th.- orif-
inal with the Clerk of th* sbove stal-
ed Court on or before th 10th ** I
of Julv. 1976. or a Default will I" ,n'
tered against you ... ,
DATED this 18th dav of June. 1.
RICHARD P URINKKR
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv N A HEWETT ...
; ji 7 l-W|
ed. If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
JOSEPHINE AN'DRADE
W i f e
TO. Josephine Andrade
74-08 Dltmars Blvd.
Queens. New York
VOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED
.':: :rh','persr,n,,*-rrepr';semn1Ja,.vee ^ ^S^^JP^**^
All persons Int.rested in he estate vou .re renterJf "'nrt you and
h'-rom s^rrsns/SA %**A -" ^ess^nis
Luis Fernando Vazquez &
Ana Vazquez, his wife
_____ 6/25 7/2-9-16
,_NPT|CE UNDER
v Jf,'i;T,TIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN
t"Tnahh'7h''f {*_** "> the .lerk
n.,l,ie the clerk to mall one copy
10 each personal representative '
A 1 persons interested In the estate
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
Dated at Miami Reach Kl'rida ""
nth day of June 19*6 ..w
WASHINGTON DRU(i COMPAJ"
By: Lloyd L. Ruskin. Vi President,
LLOYD L RUSKIN
Attorney for Applicant
REPRESENTATIVE:
ABRAHAM AL GALBUT, Esa
OALBUT A GALBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
7/9-16
By S PARRISH
,-,. *. A* Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Stanley E Goodman
2688 N.W 62nd Street
Miami. Florida 33147
Attorney for Petitioner
6/25
7/2-9-16
TlVI^' 7[nAIs?rRA,T^ T ^ E"t"' "' "* J MIMIO
Mli48S.ends to^i,.^mBa,anorJ*- ATTORNEY F^""B'd
D^e 'counr ^S^^^ H8BlHtPW
FRANCISCO AZOY
.181 SW 7th Street. Miami. Florida
7/2-9-16-23
of HerbVrt"z"M;V?rn'SENTATrvE:
Ave Miami. Fla 33176
Telephone: 279-0730
7/9-16
. the Clerk of th*
Court of Dade County. W"'',vr
BEACHCOMBER REVISIT KP. "
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQ
Attorney for Beachcomber
Revisited. Inc.
Suite III. 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone S06-5S1-641T ,|j
Dad
949-
13385
Represe
New'



Lay, July 16, 1976
* Jeni sii fhridian

Page 15-B
Obituaries
MEN
t-.rv H 79. of Miami, formerly of
||iml Heach. on July 11. She had
f,;,l lure for the pant 41 years.
LminK from Stamford. Conn. Mrs.
I.h.ii was a member of Temple
tr ,! of Greater Miami. United Or-
\, .f True Sisters. Hadassah and
i ,iional Council of Jewish
k She I" survived by a son.
br Man H ot Coral Gables; a
r, Mrs. Beverly Robins, of
ami two brothers. Harry Berman
th .Miami Beach and Joseph
ol Bridgeport. Conn.; and
indi hildren. Services were
Li,'| Tui-sdav at Gordon, with Inter-
L t Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
)URSH
; ol SW Miami, on Juy 11. A
mu resident for 53 vears. he was
T hi restaurant management
I mii'. having owned and oo-
[ the Everglades Hotel Coffee
I i the I/eamlnsrton Hotel Dln-
L- |{. m; had been a maltre d*
| the Latin Quarter and Copaeaba
nd manager of the East Knd Casino
j \,w Jersey. He Is survived bv his
|,tv Dotty; a son. S.W. Tourah: a
VuRhter. Mrs. June Pavlow. Miami:
faiul. hildren Shara Pavlow and
' Teply; and a great-grand-
iiilil Terri Tenlv. Services and In-
Irm-Mt were Tuesday at Mt. Nebo.
[reded br Gordon.
JEFFER *
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
lDR(C10"S
ll'w Je"f MedwmJetter AlvinJerlei
KWVM
5 MliiSIMArt.HOlUS.il. NY
|283 CONEY ISIANO Art BXIYN N Y
M 2/776-8100
I11 OHIO A
tlO *> l3385WrjXlf MWY
J47-1185 pc hSorml* fO
BOWMU COUNTY 1921 PEMBROKE HO
)25'2743 Hpc !HSoneIm* ID
UM BfACH COUNTY 625 S MIW Art
I-925-2743 RrotrtPwwjier, to
Sbwcps jvadaol* m in com
V* Yoik and rhrooqhou!
tie Cvejip Mann vet
BERKOWITZ
Lillian Lee. 61. of Coral Gables, on
July 9. A Miami resident for 33
years, coming from Washington.
D.C.. she was an officer of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women.
Women's American ORT. Beth
David Congregation Sisterhood. Ha-
dussah. Mt Sinai Women's Auxiliary
and Breath of Ufe. She was a
benefactress, of Variety ChlMren'1
Hospital. .\ation;,i Children'! Car-
li.i. Hoapltal and th.- Museum ol
Science and a former president ol
Temple Judea PTA She is survived
by her husband. Al. sons I^eonard
of York. Pa., and Arthur of Miami:
daughter. Kranclne. of Miami: broth-
ers Max Klevit of Phiadelohla and
Robert Klevit Of Silver Spring. Mil .
sisters Sophie Shapiro. Ksther l.-iza-
rus and Sadie Singer, all of Silver
Spring: and grandchildren Pamela.
Sharon and Joshua. Services were
held Sunday at Gordon, with Inter-
ment at Woodlawn Park.
GOREN, Mary. 80. n July 8.
in Orlando Interment Mt. Nebo.
( Jordon.
ROBCHER. Morris. 65. of
Miami Heach. on July 8.
Interment Mt. Nebo. Riverside.
HIRSCH. I-awrence I. 64.
of Lauderhill. on July 9 Menorah.
I8AAC8ON, Israel. 84. of Hollywood.
on July I". Interment Mt. Sinai.
Riverside.
WELKIND
Cella Judith, on July 11. A resident
of Miami for 37 years, coming from
New Jersey, she is survived by her
.laughter. Mrs. Arthur (Dorothy)
Apple of Coral Cables, a aon. Bern-
ard, of Miami: eight grandchildren
and five great-grandchildren. Grave-
ilde services were held Tuesday at
Star of David Memorial Park, with
Riverside in charge. Donations mav
lie made to the Welklnd Neurological
Hoapltal In Chester. N.J.. which was
named In memory of one of Its foun-
ders, Dr Allen A Welkind. late son
of Mr- (Vila Welklnd.
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
KLEINBERG
IEVITT
memorial Chap*ls
ai Pimbniu n*. tnas w. oimi. n<*y.
I Hollywood, Fls. North Miami, FIs.
U172O0 Ml Uii
SONNY LEVITT. F.D.
friendship...
means someone cares
, GORDON FUNERAL HOME/
Straini the itwuh Community wit IIM
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_________ mrogii wtwcg
|fn |x<"YCidtntiM4) JjsimO Cento*
^.Telephone M *lf__________
PALMER'S
MONUMENT COMPANY/
kmonauzed memokiaui
cotton chatted
mowwomotmt
4444921 'oMMNI
J2TSW. Srfc. ST MIAMI
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Optn litry Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Ivnian. 85. of Miami li.a. h. on Julv
11 He came to Florida in 1949 from
New )..rk Survived by his wife. Ell-
'.....In! sons William of Cairo. III.
and Robert J of Miami: daughters
Blanche l.ovino of Miami Heach and
Florence Sandier of Haltlmore: broth-
ers Joaeph "f Miami anil Sol "f Mi-
ami Heach: sisters Bessie Lasker
and BODhle Kamish. both of Miami:
and nine grandchidren Services
were held Julv 13 at the Kiverslde,
with Interment at lakeside.
MANN. Myron. 45. of Miami Beach.
Entombment Lakeside. Riverside
?LOCK, Benjamin. On July 10.
Interment Lakeside. Newman
ROSENBERG. Bert J.. 78.
of Hal Harbour, on June 14.
Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
SANDLER. Alfred, of Miami, on
June 14. Interment Temole Israel
i emeterv Riverside.
SCHENKER. Mollic Kean. 84.
of Miami Heach. on June 12.
Interment Mt. Nebo. Riverside.
ZIEVE, Hose. 82. of Hollywood.
on June II Newman.
BAND, Alvln. 75. of Hallandale.
on June IS. Interment Star of David.
Kiverslde.
AN DELL. Sanfnfd Jay. 52.
of Miami, on June 15.
Interment Lakeside Kiverslde.
ODBER, Nathan. M. of North
Bay Village, on June 16,
Interment Lakeside. Riverside
'.OOM. Irwin M.. of Hollvwood.
'< u: Riverside
IRODNER. Plncua, M. of
.Miami Beach, on June 17.
Interment Mt Sinai c.meterv.
. lordon,
EHLMAN. Sheila, of Miami Heach.
Interment Temple Israel Cemetery.
Riverside,
IMK1N. Meyer. 104. of Miami Beach,
on June 16. Interment Star
of David Riverside
IETZKT. Samuel. 81. of Lauderhlll.
on June 17. Interment Beth El.
Riverside.
KAWITZ. Julius, of Miami Beach.
on June 18. Interment Lakeside
Riverside
KVINE, Irving J.. 59. of Aventura.
Interment Sharon Gardens I^evitt.
"GATZ. Etta L. 7.
of North Miami Reach, on June 18.
Interment Mt. Nebo. I>vltt.
OLDMAN, Jacob. 76. of Miami.
on June 21. Interment Star of David.
(jordon,
iAZBR, Katie. 82. of Miami Beach.
on June 21 Interment I-akeside.
Cordon.
II.VER. John. 73. of Miami Beach.
Kiverslde.
!< >I.I>MAN. Milton, of North
Miami Beach, OH June 24. Blasberg.
CASTIN. Philip. 83, of Miami Beach.
of June 24 Interment Lakeside
Kiverslde.
EMON. Julia I... 69. of
North Miami Heach. on June 25
Interment lakeside Riverside.
LEGAL NOTICE
[ROTHAUS MONUMENT CO., INC.
=E:
18300 We,. Dixie Highwoy
North Miomi Booch,
Florida 33160
(3061 931-5111
BRONZE & GRANITE
PLAQUES
MONUMENTS
MEMORIALS
ALL MIAMI AND
N.Y. CEMETERIES
Ron & Barbara Rothaus
When a loss occurs
away from home.
mm mm
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding sen/ice.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
New v^rL-. (212) 263-7600 QueensBlvd & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-15342
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN HE; The Marriage of:
DBLORME l.ATOUR.
Petitioner,
and
OUTLINE GARDINER LATOUR.
Respondent
TO: yUYLINE GARDINER
LATOUB
Resilience Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it on
EDWARD J. NAURISON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 568
N.E 71 Street. Miami. Florida 33138.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or be-
fore August 6. 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
3nth day of June. 1976
RICHARD P. BHINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dude County. Florida
By A CRUTCHER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD J. NAURISON. ESQ.
:,KS N E 71 Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, deslrlnar to enaaare In
business under the fictitious name of
OASIS APARTMENTS at 6620 Indian
Creek Drive, Miami Beach. Fla. In-
i.ii.ls to register said name with the
Clerk "t the circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
DELTA INVESTMENTS
i Fla Qeneral Partnership us Trustee
8 25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the un.lersicne.l. desiring to enaasre In
business under the fictitious name of
S \GITTARIUS SALES lit 777 NW It
An Miami. Fla.. Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv Florida.
LARRY ZAR8KY
NAT WEI NIGER
RICHARD IAN BRICKMAN
Attorney for applicant ,,,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-20306
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
('HILDA GABELL.
Petitioner,
vs.
JEROME HOWARD GABELL.
Respondent.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
VIII' JEROME HOWARD GAlil.l.I..
residence unknown are hereby
NOTIFIED TO PILE i-ur written
response to this action for dissolution
Of man.inc. with tlie Clerk of the
above Court, and serve a coojr upon
Petitioner's Attorneys. SAUL T. VON
ZAMFT, Suite 83". 1320 South Dixie
Highway. Coral Gables. Florida 33146.
on or before the 6th .lav of August.
197K. else the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage will be taken as con-
fessed.
DATED: June 29. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
By: C. P. COPELAND
Demit v Clerk
iCircuit Court Seal)
Published four consecutive weeks in
THE JEWISH FI.iiRIDIAN.
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCC.'T
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20287
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
HEI.MIRA M. VILAS
Wife/Petitioner
and
JoAUl l.ii VILAS.
Husband/Respondent
TO: .li lAUl'IM VILAS
Itl'A DOS Rt'MBEIROS. No. 13
BO.MRAKKAL. I'lHITI'llAI,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required t" serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
WILLIAM BRODY, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 4"" LIN-
COLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH. FLOR-
IDA 3.113'... and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before August 4. 1976: otherwise a
default will be entl red against vou
for the relief demanded In the com-
ulniB/ or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in Till: JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21' day of June. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WILLIAM BRODY
4"7 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
7'2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the uinl.rMgn.il. desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
WET PAINT at 12626 North Kendall
Drive. Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
MAUREEN JORDAN 1""
HARVEY D ROGERS
Attorney for Wet Paint
1454 N W. 17th Avenue
Miami Florida 33125
Phone S2S-1B6I
~. 2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the underslimed, desiring to engage In
business under (lie fictitious name of
CENTREX TRADE SERVICES, INC
at P.O. Box 011117, Miami 33101 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
JOSE PELLEYA
EDUARDO HERTor
HARRY HURLEY
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19159
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA MERCEDES Ol'TIERREZ.
de ZAl'ATA
Wife. Petilioner.
and
DIEGO ZAPATA.
Husband. Respondent
TO: DIEGO ZAPATA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reaulred to serve a codv of
your written defenses, if anv. to It on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 801 Dade
Federal Building. KM East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Julv
SO, 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
1Mb dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As DeDutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ____
DANIEL RETTER. ESQTJTRE
Attorney for Petitioner
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 331S1
Phone: 358-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SNAPPER VILLAGE EARLY' DEV-
ELOPMENT AND DAY CARE CEN-
TER at 6651 S.W. 117th Ave.. Miami.
Fla., intends to register said name
with the Cerk of the Circuit Court of
Dad.- County, Florida
HUNTER associates. INC.
66S1 s W 117th Ave Miami. Fla
STEPHEN X ROSEN
Attorney for Hunter Associates. Inc.
7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious naric
of BEACHCOMBER REVISITED.
INC. at 1892S Collins Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida 33154 intends to reg-
ister said name with the Cerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
Beachcomber Revisited. Inc. d/b/a
Beachcomber Resort Motel a/k/a
Bea. hcomber Motel
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Beachcomber
Revisited, inc. 6/2. 7/2_9_16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 76-18855
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re: The Marriage Of:
CAHIDAD FERNANDEZ.
Wife.
I.A/.ARO R FERNANDEZ.
TO: LAZARO R FERNANDEZ
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
., Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against vou and vou
are her. I.v required to serve a copv
,.f your answer or other pleading to
the Petition "ii tile Wife's attorney.
Howard J ROSEN. Whose address
is in" N W 37th Avenue (2nd Floor!
Miami. Florida JS125, and file (tie
original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court, on or before the 23rd dav
of July, 1976. or a Default will be en-
tered against vou.
D\Tl.l' tins Hith dav of June l7
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Cln uit curt
Bv M HERREHA
6/2S 7/8-9-H
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
Nc 76-18842
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
LAPONTANT JEAN.
Husband,
and
ALMA JEAN.
YoV ALMA JEAN residence un-
known, are re.iuir.d to file vour an-
wer to the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the above
Curt and serve a copy thereof upon
th. penn.ners attorney. Herman Cto-
Iiiii Es.i.. 621 SW 1st Street .Miami.
r;!;r':;re^:;;:;.,;non,,ntr:,.n^sei-
"il"'1 ,S.1'1 'i' "mINKK.<
Clerk. Circuit Court
By C P COPELAND
Deputv ci.rk _
.', "a fS--H
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-19470
General Jurisdiction Division
IN RE The Marriage of
CHRISTINE T BROWN.
Wife,
and
WALTER E BROWN.
Husband
TO WALTER E BROWN
I5SS Carl, n Court
i*\ ci green 'olorado
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed attains! vou and
vou are required to serve copj ol
vour written defenses, if anv. to It on
THEOBALD H ENOELHARDT. JR..
attorney for Petitioner, whose address
I. 5626 Sunset Dove. Suite 107. south
Miami. Florida, and fib- the original
ith the tlerk ol the abovi styled
court on or before Julv 30. 1976: other-
Wise a judgment bv default will be
entered against vou
DATED (his 12 day of June. I
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk
By B 1.1 PI'S
Deputv Clerk
.Circuit Court Seal) 7/J..16
NOTICE Of- ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-18056 (10)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SAMUEL JOHN. Petitioner.
BARBARA SANDERS JOHN.
Respondent.
To: Mrs. Barbara Sanders John
Residence Unknown
YOV ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
(hat an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are required to serve a codv of
vour written defenses, if anv. to it
on GLADYS GERSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 101 N-W.
It Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. (305)
324-4555. and file the original with the
clerk of the above stvled court on
,.r before Julv 30th. 1076: otherwise a
default will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
ach week for four consecutive weeks
n THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
isth dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By A CRUTCHER
As Deputv Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal)
Gladys Qeraon, Esaulre
Stone. Sostchin & Koss. P.A.
mi N W 12 Avenue
Miami. FL 33128 (324-4555)
6/25 7/2-9-16


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American
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79
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69c
32-OZ
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89c
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99c
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Onion Soup Mix 2 'AS 57c
Potato Buds______8TM*
Tomato Juice______STeW
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Borden Egg Nog & 99c
Orange Juice 4^1
Ground Beef Chuck
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Fryer Quarters 59c
Fryer Parts 99*
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48
TOP QUALITY
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Fresh Pineapples .- 49*
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5.69c
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49c
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Creamed Herring V%lm
Sandwich Spread ^.49*
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Perch Fillet v^$l49
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