The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02475

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
A NATURAL EWEMY' OF ISRAEL
f Carter is elected, George Ball may be sec'y of state
VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK
In a recent television in-
erview, former Under Sec-
etary of State George W.
all modestly disclaimed re-
orts that he was Jimmy
barter's principal adviser on
foreign affairs and would be
his designee as Secretary of
State in the highly likely
event that Carter receives
the Democratic Party nomi-
nation and goes on to win
the presidency in November.
The Wall Street Journal,
reporting the interplay in
the Democratic camp, flatly
asserts that the former Un-
der Secretary of State "an-
gles for the top diplomatic
post."
LETS HOPE that the Middle
East situation is not one of
those on which Carter turns to
Ball for guidance because Ball
has shfWn himself to be one of
the country's most vocal and
effective opponents of an Amer-
ican policy of all-out support
for Israel and, particularly, of
extensive military assistance so
long as Israel retains control of
the territories it occupied in
the 1967 Six-Day War.
He maintains that Israel's
hold of these areas is the rea-
son for the Arab refusal to
make peace. Ball recently went
on record expressing his con-
viction that massive American
Continued on Page IS-A
~e)ewish Floridian
CffcMl riff JEWKH UMITY ud THt JEWISH WiULY
jlume 49 Number 28 Miami. Florida Friday, July 9, 1976 Frd K- dx- ** B* "" 50 Cen, Two Sections Price 25 cents
EXCEPTION 'UNDERLINED'
UJS. Says PLO
Policy Unchanged
PRESIDENT FORD
Ford Meets
With Top
Jewish Brass
Protects March 2-A
ZOA Objects 11-A
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford discussed
latters of national and in-
ternational concern with 30
Jewish community leaders
pom all parts of the coun-
ry at a meeting in the White
louse.
The meeting, which was
jiot announced to the press
jforehand, was described
?v White House Press Secre-
ary Ron Nessen as having
kothing to do with politics.
The Jewish representatives
^tending were leaders on
ie "grass roots" level rath-
than the heads of major
Rational organizations.
DURING THE course of their
Continued on Page 14-A
Objections Voiced 8-A
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
State Department spokes-
man Frederick Brown stat-
ed emphatically that the
meeting of PLO representa-
tive Shawfiq Al-Hut with
more than a dozen senators
here "in no way reflects a
change in U.S. government
policy toward the PLO."
Brown, who told report-
ers to "underline that state-
ment," made the remark in
explaining why the Depart-
ment granted permission to
the PLO spokesman to travel
to Washington. PLO repre-
sentatives who have been
granted observer status by
the United Nations, are re-
stricted by the U.S. govern-
ment to an area of 25 miles
from Columbus Circle in
SHAWFIQ AL-HUT
Manhattan. The U.S. does
not recognize the PLO.
AL-HUT WAS invited to a
luncheon by Sen. James Abou-
rezk (D., S.D.) who is of Le-
banese descent. The luncheon
was attended by prominent
senators of both parties, includ-
ing such staunchly pro-Israel
legislators as Abraham Ribicoff
(D.. Conn.), Charles Mathias
(R., Md.) and Gaylord Nelson
(D.. Wise.).
Brown said the State Depart-
ment waived the travel restric-
tion at Abourezk's request. "In
the Dast we have granted per-
Continued on Page 9-A
State Dep't. Admits
PLO Rep in Violation
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department has ack-
nowledged that PLO represen-
tative Shawfiq Al-Hut violated
the conditions under which he
was permitted to come to Wash-
ington last week for a lunch-
eon meeting with U.S. Senators
hosted by Sen. James Abourezk
(D., S.D.).
Department spokesman Rob-
ert Funseth said June 29 Al-
Hut was interviewed on a local
television program without hav
ing been granted permission by
the State Department. Repre-
sentatives of the PLO who have
observer status at the United
Nations are not permitted tc
travel beyond a 25-mile radius
of New York City without ex-
press permission of the State
Department.
SUCH PERMISSION is condi-
tional on their not engaging in
public political activities. "We
approved his (Al-Hut's) visit to
Washington with the standard
condition that he engage in no
political activity. In our view
this (the interview) was incon
sistent with the conditions of
Continued on Page S-A
We'll Never
Know Details
Of Big Raid
Ford Expresses 'Great Satisfaction' ... 8-A
Vigil at Ben Gurion Airport 11-A
TEL AVIV What happened, no one except the high-
est officials in the Israel government and their military
commanders is ever likely to know. That is to say, HOW
it happened.
But at 12 a.m. (Miami time), July 4, just seven hours
before seven Palestinian terrorists said they would blow
up their 104 hostages, three Israeli military planes, two
military Boeing 707's and a Hercules C130 transport, swoop-
ed down out of the skies over Entebbe Airfield in Kampala,
Continued on Page 14-A
Even in Paris, They
Chanted 'Israel... Israel9
KAMPALA, Uganda Israeli and French hos-
tages were held here in several rooms of a mosquito-
ridden terminal at Entebbe Airfield. A total of 104 in num-
ber, including the Air France jetliner crew, they were
split off mid-last week from 149 others, who were freed
and returned to Paris.
This was the group that was threatened with death
if Israel, France, Switzerland and Kenya but mainly Is-
rael refused to give in to the demands of the hijackers.
THEIR DEMAND was that 53
terrorists jailed in these coun-
tries be freed. The hijackers
claimed to be members of the
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine.
The hijacking occurred just
eight days before on an Air
France plane bound from Tel
Aviv to Paris, with a stopover
in Athens, where the plane was
taken over in midair shortly
after leaving Athens.
At the time. Israel promptly
Continued on Page 3-A
IMPLICATED
lack Panthers Group Speaks Out in Israel
By SHLOMO TSADOK
Saadya Marciano was one
the five original members
a group of young Israelis
If Moroccan descent who
lamed themselves "The Is-
raeli Black Panthers" in
1969. They chose that name
not out of political sympa-
thy with the U.S. Black Pan-
thers but, as Saadya, spokes-
man for the group since its
beginnings, recounted re-
cently, "just to shock peo-
ple. What is this Panther
business? asked Golda when
she heard of us people
heard the name and went
crazy."
Demanding a closing of
the social and economic gap
between Oriental and West-
ern Israeli Jews, the Pan-
thers staged several demon-
strations in Jerusalem which
drew enthusiastic, and an-
gry, crowds of largely Ori-
C'ontinued on Page 2-A
Amin Furious
Over
Ingratitude
TEL AVIV Strong man
Idi Amin Dada of Uganda is
angry. While he was away
attending a meeting of the
Organization of African
Unity, Israeli commando
troops in two Boeing 707 jets
and one Hercules C-130 flew
over 2,000 miles to Kampala
to rescue more than 100
hostages held captive by Pal-
Continued on Page 9-A



Page 2-A
. ..
*Jcni*fi Ik 11 In i
Friday, July 9
1970
Black Panthers Group Speaks Out in Israel prexy Nixes
Continued from Pase 1-A
ental supporters. In the last
few years, however, the
Black Panthers concentrated
on establishing themselves
as a political party, and won
representation in the Hista-
drut.
-d ft &
Tsadok: We haven't heard
about massive Panther demon-
strations in the last few years.
What other tactics have you
been using to deal with Israel's
social problems?
Marciano: First of all, great
changes happened to those peo-
ple who worked and demon-
strated with us in those first
years. I even noticed this change
in myself. We have engaged in
all kinds of practical politics,
for example: We saw that the
aliya from Russia was beginning.
We naturally accepted them
and wanted more to come. But
we saw that they were getting
things Oriental Jews never
dreamed of gettingapartments,
good jobs, good schools, even
cars. A family with an awful
disease came to us. They would
iust go to the hospital and come
home to the same rotten place.
WE KNEW there were apart-
ments for new immigrants which
were closed for over half a year
because the new immigrants
didn't yet come. We took the
family to an apartment, broke
the door down and we put them
inside. There was a struggle
with the oolice and a struggle
with the housing office. In the
end they left the family there.
We saw that we had to power
to get things done.
But still, the things we ob-
taind were just specific, parti-
cular things and we recognized
that the problem was a more
general one. We continued the
demonstrations but soon real-
ized that onlv holding demon-
strations wouldn't help. We at-
tempted to find a more general
solution to the Droblem.
We established a relationship
with Dr. Yisrael Katz. head of
Israel National Insurance and
with social workers and all
sorts of other people we met
during our struggles. They were
dying to help and we formed
this connection because they
recognized that we were help-
ing them.
THE MINUTE we demonstrat-
ed, they would get more money
for their budgets, and when we
stop, everything stays the same.
And then their budgets are cut.
We sat long nights with Yisrael
Katz. And because of our pres-
sure he did remarkable things
with National Insurance: He
convinced them to grant great-
er benefits, and was able to
change laws for voung crim-
inals and pregnant women.
If there were more people
like him in those kinds of of-
fices it would be a blessing. We
<-ame to the conclusion that we
had to force the government to
allow Dr. Katz to prepare some
kind of program. Sc we met
with Golda Meir: she didn't
understand the problem. She
lives in a strange world. She
tned the same stupid method
that is accepted by European
descendants namelv. if some-
one veils and has anv kind of
nower. vou buy him off.
She thought she could give us
a hundred thousand lirot and
finish the whole business. She
didn't understand that the prob-
lem is deeper. We left her office
verv disappointed and we staged
additional demonstrations. At
nn-? of our demonstrations a
Molotov cocktail was thrown
No one was hurt but it served
its purpose: The next day the
eovernment gave another mil-
lion lirot to the welfare office to
ouell the violence.
WE CONTINUED to demon-
strate and then they finally
came to us. Golda Meir gave
Dr Katz a large budget to pre-
pare an in-deoth report. The
report took a vear and a half
to write. It was very serious and
we thought that if the govern-
ment took it seriously we could
eo home
Itzhik Manger
Writing Awards
Go to Quartet
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Itzhik Manger awards for
Yiddish creations was awarded here to the Israeli poet,
Aryem Shamri and the Swiss poet, Leiser Eichenrand; to
the writer, Eliezer Rubinstein; and to the Yiddish stage
artist, Shimon Djigan.
The festive ceremony at the Habiraah Theatre hall was
attended by President Katzir, Minister Yehoshua Rabino-
witz, Jewish Agency Treasurer Aryeh Dultzin, and Tel Aviv
Mayor Shlomo Lahat, who surprised the audience when
delivering his greetings in Yiddish, stressing that "this
evening may mark the end of the Kultur Kampf between
Hebrew and Yiddish which started 70 years ago in Czerno-
wicz."
Maariv editor Shalom Rosenfeld, who heads the
awards committee, officiated. He read greeting letters from
Golda Meir and Meir Weisgal, of the Weizmann Institute.
Professor Leiser Podriatzik, of the Tel Aviv Univer-
sity, spoke on Itzik manager.
MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT
104 N.E. 1st STREET -PHONE 373-8432
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
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We had a slogan than that if
poverty is finished then the
Panthers will be finished. They
put the report in some drawer
and threw away the key. The
problems continued and grew
worse. You see, if the country'
says it doesn't have enough
money, it shouldn't bring in im-
migrants from Russia. They
shouldn't waste the money on
them, they should give it to the
people in Israel who are hav-
ing children. It's like industry.
Why import something from out-
side when you can make it at
home?
Tsadok: In other words you
say you have more of a right to
Israel than an immigrant who
comes from Russia?
Marciano: No doubt. It's nat-
ural since we served in the
armv. This is also in reference
to olim from America. A person
who lives in Israel is a true
Jew.
Tsadok: What other kinds of
specifically constructive actions
have vou initiated? For instance,
in the area of education: Have
vou done any action other than
ones to publicize your demands
on the outside?
Marciano: Our major activ-
ities in the beginning were dem-
onstrations but since then we
have been slowly organizing,
establishing new local offices,
getting new members, putting
out newspapers, and so forth.
As for the activities, let me give
vou an example: There are what
is called ma'abarot in Israel.
There are wooden bunks, that
lie like thorns inside of various
valleys in Israel cities. It's dis-
gusting to live in these places,
and only criminals come out of
them.
NOT ONE person from a ma'-
abara goes on to the university
or something equivalent. We
noticed that Ma'abarat Asbes-
tonim in Jerusalem was only
three or four kilometers (two
or three miles) from Rechavia.
a neighborhood of mainly Eu-
ropean descendants who Kve
comfortably. People near there,
however, are living like animals.
So we decided to teach the
people of Rechavia about the
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other people. We went to Re-
chavia and took all the milk
from the houses' porches and
distributed it in the ma'abarot.
We gave each family 3 bottles
with a note describing what was
the situation of their children,
and calling for them to wake up
and cry out and not continue
to live indifferently.
The next morning, everyone
in Rechavia knew there was a
group which wouldn't allow
them to continue to act indif-
ferently toward the people liv-
ing miserably nearfov. In addi-
tion, we gave the people living
in the Ahbestonim the knowl-
edge that if they do things for
themselves it helps.
Stories were soon printed in
the papers about how the peo-
ple lived in these neighbor-
hoods, how often there are
buses, how they eat, what kinds
of schools they have. Their
problems were brought to the
forefront because of a bottle
of milk. The question was soon
brought up in the Knesset.
Tsadok: The Panthers seem
to be fighting mainly as a pol-
itical party. How did this change
come about?
Marciano: The demonstrations
stopped for a while. The Katz
commission was not acted on.
And about a year before the
1973 elections we had a large
meeting. Some thought we
should continue to use the same
means, and to remain a social
pressure group. Others argued
that we need our own leader-
ship and that we should solve
our problems through political
means. The decision was to be-
come political. For politics in
Israel vou need money. For a
strong organization vou need
money.
In addition, we needed some
other support in the Knesset.
We saw Shalom Cohen, former-
ly of the "Haolam Hazeh." as
our man. He recognized that the
Panthers represented significant
power, and that we had a base
and roots. He joined us and we
accepted him because of his
organizational talents and mon-
ey. United with him. we decided
to run for the Histadrut elec-
tion.
NEXT WEEK :Sephardic indivi-
duals who managed to keep
their independence.
Attempt To
Halt Nazis
WASHINGTON (jTA) __
The Ford Administration rT
jected a demand by Wash.nj,'
ton area Jewish groups that
President Ford rescind a pe
for a local neo-Nazi "White
Power" rally in front of ,h.
White House last Friday The
group was dressed in full Nazi
regalia with storm trooper unj.
forms, swastika arm bands and
Nazi nags for the demonstra-
tion timed for the Bicentennial
weekend.
The Administration s answer
came at a meeting Sen J Glenn
Beall Jr. (R.. Md.) and Jewish
community leaders had with
John Kyi. Assistant Secretary
of the Interior, and officials of
the National Capital Parks Sen'.
ice and police.
MEMBERS of Club Shalom.
an organization of Holocaust
survivors, made an impassioned
appeal to Kyi for cancelling the
permit.
The Administration officials
cited various park regulations
and maintained that the permit
would not be cancelled A sug-
gestion by Beall to change the
location of the Nazi demonstra-
tion for a place less central and
safer was also rejected
Dr. William Perl, chairman of
the international advisorv coun-
cil of the Jewish Defense
League, said that the Nazi Party
is a forbidden organization "in .
all civilized countries." includ-
ing Germany.
HE ALSO stressed that "this
is not a matter of offending
Jews only, but all those who
fought the Nazis in World War
II and were killed by them."
He said. "It is a betrayal of
those buried here in Arlington
Cemetery." Perl demanded that
Ford personally step into the
dispute and cancel the permit
granted to the Nazis
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day, July 9, 1976
+ h>i sli tkx Mini
Page 3-A
Lust for Money Explains Agnew's Stand
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
Part II in Series
WASHINGTONLust for
|oney, vengefulness, latent
iti Semitism, hypocrisy,
id insensitivity are among
tplanations for Spiro T.
[gnew's anti-Semitic attacks
his writing and interviews
jainst the American media
id U.S. policy of support
Israel.
This is the same Agnew
Jhom Jews helped become
jvernor of Maryland from
Jhere he leaped to the Vice
residency and came within
jht of occupancy of the
fhite House itself. Jews
re among his most im-
Drtant associates while he
las in office at Annapolis
and later in Washington. He
is also the same Agnew who,
after his disgrace, engaged
in the lucrative business re-
lated to Arabs and now says
he always thought U.S. pol-
icy towards Israel was
wrong.
A MEASURE of the range of
views is the difference in the
opinions of Victor. Gold, Agnew's
press man for three years when
he was Vice President, and Wil-
liam Safire, a former White
House speech writer for Richard
Nixon and a colleague of Agnew
in his heyday. Safire, now a
New York Times columnist, says
"the Ted Agnew of 1970 was
neither anti-Zionist nor anti-
Jewish."
What "turned him around" is
his "embittered" reaction to
Jewish businessmen in Balti-
more who became state wit-
nesses against him in Mary-
land's political scandals and
forced him to resign the Vice
Presidency in disgrace.
Gold contends Agnew's "ren-
dering of variations on a theme
by the Grand Kleagle has no-
thing to do with more ideological
conviction" but "it has to do
with seHing Spiro. Agnew, high
bidder take all, until a better
offer comes along, of course."
AGREEING with both Gold
and Safire, a Baltimore Jewish
community leader familiar with
Agnew's Maryland career told
JTA both revenge and profit are
behind Agnew's spewing. Ag-
new's purpose, he said, is "crass
commercialism to sell his book
and further his business inter-
ests."
Baltimore City Comptroller
Hyman Pressman, who opposed
Agnew in 1966 as an independ-
ent candidate for governor, but
supported him in the 1972 elec-
tion, sees Agnew as a business-
man pleasing Arabs because he
"has attempted to make profit
from the oil barons and cur-
Even in Paris, They Cheered
Continue from Pax* 1-A
tensed France of being at
|uIt Israeli officials declared
at they had been warning
leir nationals not to fly Air
ranee because of the airline's
k security regulations for the
karding of passengers.
THE OFFICIALS said that,
cause the French were coop-
erating so avidly with the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
and other dissident Arab groups,
they considered their planes
immune from terrorist attack.
In Paris, after the piracy oc-
curred, the French weekly, L'-
Express. said that Wadi Had-
dad. principal assistant to
George Habash, leader of the
Popular Front for the Libera
Government Okays
New Settlements
By DAVID LANDAU
[JERUSALEM (JTA)
ie government has approv-
two new settlement sites,
ith on the eastern fringe of
le Samaria region of the
rest Bank.
One is in the Jordan Val-
)y and the other in the hills
/erlooking the Jordan rift.
ie ministerial settlement
Jmnuttee also decided that
e Nahal (para-military)
tnlement of Kohav Hasha-
ar in the same region
)uld be converted into a
Ivilian settlement.
I THE ANNOUNCEMENT had
}re than usual significance
kcause it indicated that the
Kemment continues to follow
Allon plan which has come
Mer attack by militant na-
|>nalist elements in determin-
lts settlement policy.
[The committee, headed by
|inister-Without-Portfolio Is-
1 Galili, also seemed to want
demonstrate that govern-
ment approved settlement of
k West Bank is proceeding
Ithout delay..
Negotiations continued, mean-
while, with the Gush Emunim
over alternative settlement sites
for the Kadum squatters.
UP TO NOW. the Gush have
refused to accept offers made
by the ministerial settlement
committee and insist on remain-
ing in the "heart of Samaria."
Government policy, guided by
the unofficial Allon plan, seeks
to create a string of Israeli set-
tlements in the Jordan Valley
as a security barrier and to
avoid settlement in the Samar-
ian highlands where the large
Arab population centers are
located.
During Sunday's Cabinet
meeting. Premier Yitzhak Rabin
flatlv rejected a demand by the
Gush Emunim that the Cabi-
net hold a full dress debate on
West Bank settlement policies
as a condition for their accept-
ance of a settlement site of-
fered by the government. The
Cabinet decided on May 9 to
offer the Gush squatters alter-
native sites. If they reject the
offer, they will be removed
from Kadum, by force if neces-
sary, the Cabinet said.
tion of Palestine, which does
not see eye-to-eye with Yasir
Arafat's Palestine Liberation
Organization, was in charge of
the hijacking.
During the remainder of the
week. Israeli officials were re-
laying their negotiating stand
for the freeing of the hostages
through the French government
and the French Ambassador to
Uganda.
UGANDA TOOK what ap-
peared to ue particular pleasure
in the hijacking. Contrary to
initial reports about President
Idi Amin's "great concern" for
the welfare of the hostages,
freed French hostages, back late
Sunday in Paris after the suc-
cessfully daring Israeli raid on
Entebbe, said that they were
not only guarded by the Pales-
tinian terrorists, but also by
Ugandan soldiers.
In fact, on the arrival of the
commandeered Air France liner
in Entebbe, the terrorists were
greeted warmly by the Ugan-
dans, and they even exchanged
weapons among themselves.
According to freed Israeli
hostages, Ugandan troops, sup-
plied by the Soviets, were co-
operating openly with the hi-
jackers.
DECLARED DEFENSE Min-
ister of Israel Shimon Peres, "1
can not remember, in the an-
nals of terrorism, such full co-
operation between the hijack-
ers and the host country
in this case, Field Marshal Idi
Amin."
According to the hostages,
there were seven terrorists
five Palestinians and a German
couple. All seven were killed in
the Israeli operation. Haddad
was identified as being respon-
sible for the kidnapping and
murder in Beirut last month of
I' S Ambassador Francis Me-
loy Jr.. his economic adviser
and their Lebanese chauffeur.
rently is continuing on that
road even if he has to foment
hatred against the Jews."
A member of the prosecution
staff that brought Agnew's dis-
grace remarked to JTA. "I'll be
damned if I know what moti-
vates him." He said he saw no
trace of anti-Semitism in Agnew
during the prosecution "but
then we didn't look for that.
But that it does exist is evident
by his book and the words from
his mouth on television."
AGNEW HIMSELF, however,
said, in his interview with NBC's
Barbara Walters that blew up
the dirty storm, that he has
been against support for Israel
and pro-Arab all along. He
pointed out that when he made
his trip to the Middle East as
Vice President he avoided Is-
ael as a tell-tale sign of his
views but he could not express
his feelings at the time for
pragmatic political reasons.
The Washington Star cartoon-
ist Oliphant may have caught
the cynicism and hypocrisy as-
sociated with Agnewism. He
showed Agnew at a table with
copies of his novel piled about
him.
Behind is a placard saying
Agnew will autograph the books.
Addressing him is a customer
who asks: "Would you please
write ... "to one of my best
friends. Hymie Weinberg. with
warm and affectionate regards
from your great admirer.
Spiro' ?"
AGNEW'S insensitivity was
indicated by Hyman Bookbinder
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee. He recalled Agnew tell-
ing a group of Jewish leaders
"literally six times" in a 45-
minute get-acquainted meeting
after he had become Vice Presi-
dent that "some of my best
friends are Jews" but "he did
not know what those words
meant to us."
In another example of his
traits, Gold recalls that Agnew
on June 13, 1972, received "with
no reluctance whatever" a pla-
que shaped like a mezuzah from
the Religious Zionists of Amer-
ica. The same Agnew a year
earlier. Gold pointed out. had
accepted from his host in Saudi
Arabia. King Faisal, a copy of
the Protocols of the Elders of
Zion.
If Agnew's motivations are
uncertain, the quality of his
novel is definite. "Despite all
the speculation to the contrary,
says Christopher Lehmann-
Haupt in The New York Times.
"Agnew appears to/ have writ-
ten it all by himself. In fact,
it is an insult to the writing
profession to suggest that any-
one was paid to help perpetrate
this bilge."
DAVID BRAATEN in The
Washington Star, characterized
the "trash" with its "rampant
anti-Semitism" this way: "The
plot requires a suspense of rea-
son for any reader who is not a
cardcarrying believer in the
Protocols of the Elders of Zion."
Which is what Agnew received
from King Faisal!
Most troublesome about Ag-
newism to some students of
American history over the past
50 years is that there exists
within the American people a
large and appreciative audience
for the demagoguery that Ag-
new now manifests. His motiva-
tions may be confused or cynical
and his allegations are easily
refuted by facts. But Father
Coughlin and Joe McCarthy
strode the national horizons
without foundations for their
charges and they won follow-
ings more huge and dangerous
than themselves.
bur savings at Dade Federal
toes make a difference
HAM OmCS: 101IAST FLAOLIII
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i:4650 W. Oakland Park Bhrd (Laudardaia Lakaa)


Page 4-A
. v
* Jews/? FkrkJian
Friday, July 9, 1976'
Stiffening of Backs
More than the freeing of the 104 hostages is the
fruit of the daring Israeli raid into Uganda last Sunday,
although that was miracle enough.
The event has stiffened the backs of Israelis with
pride in their nation once more a pride they seem
to have lost since the Yom Kippur War.
Since then, it has almost seemed that Israel could
do nothing right, neither in her defense nor in her deal-
ing with domestic political and economic problems.
The raid brings back to Israel the sense of invinci-
bility she felt since the great War of Liberation.
More than that, it is an announcement to the world
that she will not be pushed too far. Israel has said this
over and over again, but in the diminishing of her pride
since Yom Kippur, 1973, the statement)' seemed to be
more bravado than anything else.
Sunday, however, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
laid it out so that there should be no future misunder-
standing. "There is no law anywhere," he declared,
"that will prohibit our activity against this kind of ter-
rorism" in the future.
French Cowardice at Issue
The daring Israeli raid reminds us of two things:
the equally daring assault on Egypt from the west that
launched the 1967 War and the "Cherbourg Ships" in-
cident the Israeli seizure of ten ships in the French
harbor of Cherbourg on a Christmas night when most
Frenchmen were asleep, but when other Frenchmen
with a conscience joined the raiders to help them slip
the ships out of the harbor and sail them to Israel,
where they belonged.
Israel had long since bought and paid for the ships,
but in France's new self-assumed role as arbiter of
Europe's expediency in an increasingly dominant Arab
world, the French reneged. Not only did they refuse
to deliver the ships; they refused to return the money.
The "Cherbourg Ships" remind us of yet another
thing the instant reaction in Nairobi of France's Am-
bassador to Kenya Olivier Beleau to the raid. He want-
ed all of the Arabs and Africa to know that the Israeli
raid on Entebbe was carried out without French knowl-
edge or French participation.
What cowirdice! It was a French jet involved, and
still the French were, and still they are willing to act
like shoeshine boys among the boots of beasts.
It is the beleaguered Israelis who have shown
them what national pride can achieve, as the 1967
war showed it, and the "Cherbourg Ships" too.
Balm to Our Own Soul
And so, in the end, the daring Israeli raid is more
than a back-stiffener for the Israelis. It is a lesson to
the toady European and, yes, toady American too, who
have been bowing and scraping before Arab terrorism
since this new and despicable phenomenon first hit the
world.
How shocking an event the raid was to the Third
World-Arab-Soviet bloc is apparent by the reactions of
their leaders, who promptly cried phony tears over the
Israeli act of "aggression" against Uganda, but who
to our knowledge had said not a word throughout the
agonizing week that the terrorists held the hostages in
preparation for murder should their demands not be
met.
If this does not help those Americans and those
Europeans who continue to bow and scrape before Arab
blackmail see just exactly what the Israelis see, and
what they have been talking about all along, then we
suppose nothing will.
If it does not wake them up. then at least the raid
was balm to the troubled Israeli soul. It was a miracle
__just one mo-e of those miracles Israel has performed
since her rebirth in our time, and which we too have
come to be waiting for since Yom Kippur, 1973, with
equally troubled soul.
Jewish Floridian
OKFUK and PI^ANT It*. N K Mh St Miami. Kla 3313: Phone 373-4805
P.O Box L'!<:3. Miami ni.ri.1a 33101
KRKD K BHOCHET UBO M1MH.IN SKI.MA M THOMPSON
BdltOT and Publisher A'xiate Kdllor AsxlRtant to Piibllaher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandiae Advertised In Ita Columns
Published verv Friday sim-e 1927 by The Jewish Floridian
Bacona-Claaa Postage Paid at Miami. Fla
O Fred K. Shochct Friday. July t. 17
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Teleoraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English.Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
Why is Smathers Still Silent?
'THE OLD saying, "like father
like son," is only that
just an old saying. It's an old
saying, but that doesn't mean it
is always true.
I can never imagine George
Smathers, in the heyday of his
power as a United States Sena-
tor, sitting back cooling his
heels in the face of an injustice.
But that's what his son. Flor-
ida Secretary of State Bruce
Smathers. seems to be doing.
BY HIS apparent indifference
to the very justified anger of
many South Floridians over the
publication of an anti-Semitic
column in the February, 1976
edition of the "Florida Profes
sional Educator," young Sma-
thers shows himself to be any-
thing but a chip off the old
block, another old saying which
Mindlin
U
is just that just another old
saying, nothing more, and not
necessarily true.
The question at issue is a
column. "Confederate Shots."
written under the apparent
pseudonym. Jefferson Davis
Lee. in which the writer areues
Muqfiy SLAH^iH-mecAMP
OIA
that Gov. Reubin Askew js ,
lame duck and that his term
"is running out faster than
Columbia County's Ichetucknee
Springs propels skin divers to-
ward the Santa Fe River
I'M NOT quite sure what this I
means. If my dear old friend
William Calhoun Baggs WerJ
still with us. he might explain I
it all with one of his stories in
which the "Confederate Shots'
column would wind up a gob-
bling turkey and the pseudony-
mous Jefferson Davis Lee a
coon who has outsmarted him
self.
In any case. I suppose the
point "Lee" makes is that the
1978 Florida Gubernatorial race
will soon be upon us and that
it is not too early to begin
thinking of qualified candidates
The hitch occurs precisely at'
the point that coon "Lee" de-
clares what "qualified" is to be
He gets his turkey of a column
gobbling with the frightening
notion that Florida Attorney
General Robert Shevin. whom
he calls "Miami Bob," may very W
well be a viable candidate
AFTER ALL, he argues
"Since Dick Stone's upset win
of a U.S. Senate seat in 1974
(upset? upsetting to whom?i
Shevin is convinced that beiaj
a Miami non-Arian (sic) is no
longer an insurmountable handi-
cap."
Furthermore, according to
"Lee," the Attorney General has
already "built himself a cam-
paign war chest of nearly a
quarter of a million dollars'
which is "drawing a fat inter-
est every day in a savings ac
count."
This last bit of a presumable
Florida educator's gobbledygook
is meant to evoke a picture ol
Jews in one's mind with their f
alleged obsession for money
Other people, not Jewish
the Pentagon, the jetfighter
and bomber manufacturers, the
arms merchants, the oil cartel-
Continued on Page 13-A
On Turning Myth into Reality
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year
Three Years*S0 00. 0%>t of Town Upon Request.
11200: Two Years22.00:
Volume 49
Friday, July 9, 1976
Number 28
11 TAMUZ 5736
Blame part of the problems
many are having with politics
these days on our tendency to
turn myth into reality.
While chairing a meeting the
other day, I was called upon to
referee a debate as to why this
liberal organization was not
about to recommend endorsing
Claude Pepper for another term
in the House of Representatives.
It had little to do with his age
although a lot of people be-
lieve the venerable Pepper is
well past his useful time but
the record which demonstrates
clearly that this vestige of the
New Deal is not a liberal.
On important conservation,
military spending, consumer
and other bills which liberals
consider important. Rep. Pep-
per is rated "wrong" too many
times to be considered in the
same class as. for instance, his
two Dade County colleagues.
Reps. Dante Fascell and William
Lehman.
YET, AMONG senior citizens
who remember that Claude Pep-
per was a strong supporter of
the Roosevelt New Deal as
were most Southern Congress-
men at first that connection
has never faded from memory
and has become an unshakeable
conviction of his liberalism.
It must be added that when
it comes to votes on behalf of
legislation favorable for the eld-
erly, Claude Pepper has a 100
Dercent rating. And that doesn't
hurt the 1936 image.
There's a somewhat different
problem with U.S. Sen. Dick
Stone, since the myth of his
liberalism has no local base,
and there is nothing in his two-
year voting record that would
EDWARD
COHEN
mark him as anything but a
conservative.
BUT HE'S Jewish, and since
he owns no newspapers, radio
or television stations or banks
(Gen. Brown please note), he is
automatically mythologized as
a "liberal." Like Javits. Ribi-
coff, Abzug and other.
Moreover, folks tend to for-
get there is also Congressman
Sam Steiger from Arizona, a
Republican who appears to
sway slightly to the right of
Barry Goldwater (only partly
Jewish).
In recent days I have been
called by people representing
religious or liberal organiza-
tions in New York. Illinois and
California either expressing
pain because Sen. Stone voted
to prohibit the use of Federal
funds to finance abortions for
indigent women or hope that I
could convince him to "Stop the
Bl."
IT WASNT because of my
natural modesty that I declined
the task but the knowledge that
there are few Senators who
equal Dick Stone's devotion to
the sacredness of military ap-
propriations no matter what
the cost or purpose.
Politicians are not above help-
ing to create the myth that de-
fies reality. Probably the worst
fraud that shakes a citizen's
confidence is in those military'
appropriations where Congress-
men who boast of their "fiscal
conservatism" suddenly lose all
sense and vote for hardware
and bases that are demonstrably
fiscally irresponsible like the ,
Bl bomber or the Boca Chica
Naval Air Base in Key Wt -'
There's a good tale that comes
out of the Florida Senate on the
latter. A resolution memorial-
izing Congress to save the sta-
tion passed with only two dis-
senting votes: that of Jack Gor-
don and Sen. Ken Plant, who
was the only one convinced by
Gordon's argument that :he
economy-minded Senate would
look foolish, indeed, voting to
maintain an expensive base that
even the wasteful Pentagon con-
sidered surplus.
NO MATTER, economv isa
word Senators use to keep food
stamps or abortions from the
poor, not funds from the mili-
tarv-industrial complex.
In simpler terms, the charges
by people like former Defense
Secretary Clark Clifford that
Bl is unnecessary, obsolescent
in advance and damned expen-
sive (there's no sense in even
estimating the billions it wi I
cost ultimately since they ai-
ways prove to be more anyhow)
will have no effect on the vot-
ing pattern of those committed
to following the Pentagon wher-
ever it goes.
Someone has written that the
Bl will be built because it can
be built and for no other rea-
son. That has been the driving
realitv behind our whole in-
credible arms development pro-
gram and not the myth of de-
fense necessity.


rriday, July 9, 1976
* Jcist> Hcrkikir
Page 5-A
Finally: Someone Can
Stand Up to Henry
iackanctefson
WASHINGTON We've final-
ly found someone who can stand
up to Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger. Her name is June
Brown. Here are the details.
The American ambassador to
Lebanon. Francis Meloy, was
recently killed by Arab extrem-
es. Kissinger was eager to rush
experienced diplomat to Le-
banon to continue the peace ef-
forts there.
Kissinger selected the distin-
guished L. Dean Brown, who
had headed an earlier, special
j.eace mission to Lebanon. He
vnt five weeks in war-torn
Beirut and received several as-
sassination threats for his ef-
forts.
BROWN WAS willing to go
back as permanent ambassador
but only on one condition. He
call his wife and get her ap-
ivaL
Kissinger telephoned Mrs.
Brown. He is world-famous for
towera of persuasion, and
', used them on her. But June
brown was adamant. There was
no way." she said, that she
would approve her husband's
returning to Beirut.
She explained that the slain
ambassador had been a friend
of hers. Under the tragic
circumstances, she said, she
couldn't possiblv agree to the
appointment of her husband as
Francis Melov's replacement.
Kissinger reluctantly accept-
ed her veto, and another diplo-
mat Denutv Assistant Secretary
of State Talcott Seelye. was
chosen for the iob.
ON THE ROAD Transporta-
tion Secretarv William Coleman
r-auir^s a lot of transportation.
He takes more trips than any
other member of the Cabinet.
He beean traveling iust one day
aft**r he was sworn into office.
and he has been on the road
constantly ever since.
From government files, we
hive obtained the documents
on his travels. We have counted
State Dep't.
Admits PLO
Violation
Continue from Pane 1-A
the visit and we have informed
the PLO in New York of this."
Funseth said.
Asked whether Abourezk had
apologized for the violation by
his guest. Funseth said. "I have
no way of knowing whether the
Senator was involved with this
man holding an interview."
He explained that Al-Hut was
invited by a reporter for an off-
the-record breakfast "that would
not be in violation of the regu-
lation" because it is not regard-
ed as "a public activity." But
the TV interview materialized.
FUNSETH SAID, "I under
stand the Israel Embassy has
made known its concerns to us
and we have given them the
explanation we have given you.
Their Embassy is concerned
about what they regard as pub-
he political activity"
Observers here expressed
surprise that the State Depart-
ment had no knowledge, or did
not incicatc it had knowledge.
of Al-Hut's violation until June
28. Department spokesman
Frederick Brown made no men-
tion of the TV interview when
he briefed reporters on the PLO
representative's visit.
71 separate trips during his first
14 months on the job. The list
of places he has visited reads
like an atlas from Miami to
Montreal, from Boston to Los
Angeles, from Seattle to New
Orleans.
He flies off on the slightest
excuse to make a speech, for
example, or to pick up a trophy.
Wherever he flies, he travels in
style in one of the Coast Guard's
sleek planes. It costs the tax-
payers $532 an hour to keep
the secretary in the air.
We tried to get his comment,
but he was out of town on an-
other junket. When he return-
ed, he called to say that his
trips help him to understand
transportation. He uses a Coast
Guard plane, he said, to save
time.
ULTERIOR MOTIVES Sec-
retary of State Henry Kissin-
ger's abrupt endorsement of
black majority rule in Africa
was dictated in part by harsh
economic reality.
U.S. trade with African na-
tions is on the upswing. During
the recession year of 1974, for
example. American imports of
raw materials from Africa rose
steadily.
State Department economists
predict, moreover, that West-
ern dependence on African raw
materials and markets will con-
tinue to grow. Furthermore.
U.S. trade with black African
nations is increasing, while
American business with the
white-ruled countries is slowly
dwindling.
At the same time, the African
continent is in political turmoil.
All across Africa, Communist-
backed "liberation" movements
are fighting for control of gov-
ernments.
In order to stem this "red
tide," Kissinger went to Africa
in May and proclaimed a r#w
U.S. African policy which em-
phasizes "majority rule." This
would mean bringing African
blacks into the white-controlled
governments of Southern Af-
rica.
KISSINGER couched this new
approach in highly moral tones.
But the classified accounts of
his trip reveal less honorable
motives. According to the secret
State Departmeni documents,
Kissinger was attempting to "or-
ganize assistance to African
states in return for political sup-
port."
Why? Because, said the con-
fidential reports, "The natural
resources on which the world
depends are threatened."
Henry Kissinger, in short,
has looked into his crystal ball
and seen that the future of Af-
rica is painted black. If we are
to remain economically healthy,
he has determined, we have to
go with the winner.
CONDITION Confusion The
brass hats apparently don't
know what there own secret
code signals mean.
A few days ago, we called the
Pentagon to inquire about the
meaning of the phrase "De-
fense Condition One." The Army
colonel who took the call said
he had never heard the term
used. He took an informal poll
of his office. The "general con-
sensus," he then told us. was
that "Defense Condition One"
meant that everything was in a
normal state.
Several minutes later, the
embarrassed officer called us
back to tell us he had been
mistaken. "Defense Condition
One," he said, is the military
signal for an all-out nuclear at-
tack.
HALE TO the Cheef?Presi-
dent Ford has been portrayed
unfairly as a dullard. It may
hurt him. but he can still make
lifjht of it. Recently, he gave a
Rose Garden greeting to the
young participants of the Na-
tional Spelling Bee. and he con-
gratulated them on their ability
to spell difficult words. He was
especially impressed, he said,
because he couldn't even pro-
nounce many of the words, let
alone spell them.
Why it has to be said.
The services we render reflect the traditions and practices of the Jewish
community. In this respect, we are accountable to the commumtv ind to each of il
members for the performance of our responsibilities in a mann- tentwithits
expectations and the high standards evoked by Jewish Law and Custom.
Implicit in this obligation is the responsibility to provide factual information in
order for the public to develop a better understandmguf funeral servii e in termsi f
the alternatives, prices and assistance we make available, if the need should arise.
The explanation of our policies and services as listed below is one of the ways
we are trying to fulfill our responsibility to the community.
We're trying to help provide a way for families to compare
funeral charges.
We quote our prices over the phone, without obligation.
We explain every funeral arrangement and itemize the charges for each.
We give counsel on funeral pre-arrangement without charge.
We're trying to help make funeral arrangements less
complicated.
We provide a listing of all available funeral arrangements itemized by price.
We display caskets in all price ranges, with each price clearly indicated.
We offer need-oriented counseling,answerall questions fully and assureeach
family the time and privacy they require to reach a decision.
We do everything possible to see to the comfort and well-being
of each family.
We maintain our own spacious, comfortable facilities convenient to all
communities in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.
We try to be genuinely helpful, attentive to the needs and wishes of each
family in the spirit of Jewish tradition. In that tradition, we serve every family,regard-
less of financial circumstance.
We provide the expert services of the largest Jewish staff in South Florida.
We are available to families for assistance in every possible way after
the funeral.
We provide accommodations of special importance to Jewish
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and all other states.
We arrange burial in Israel within 24 hours.
We maintain Yahrzeit records for a family's use if needed.
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NORMANDY ISLE: 1250 Normandy Drive/531-1151
MIAMI: Douglas Road at S.W. 17th Street: 443-2221
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A G'OSSberg.L F D



Hage 6-A
JmUHkrMm
Friday, July 9 l97j
Israeli Combat Craft In July 4 Flotilla
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The two combat craft that repre-
sented Israel's navy at the Bi-
centennial maritime review in
New York Harbor on July 4 are
the missile boats Yaffo and
Tarshish
The vessels were designed and
built in Israel and are of the
"Reshef" class, armed with six
Israel-made Gabriel surface-to-
surface missiles, two 76MM and
two 20MM. guns. They also car-
ry depth charges. They were
guests of the U.S. navy.
THE YAFFO was launched in
April. 1975, and the Tarshish in
October. 1974. They are model-
ed after the Saar IV "Cher-
bourg" class missile boats built
for Israel in France in the late
1960s.
They are powered by four
Maybach diesel engines, of
2,670 I.H.P., each of which pro-
vides a sea speed of 32 knots.
36.8 land miles per hour.
According to an embassy re-
lease, ships of this class have
made the oassage from Haifa
to Sharm El-Sheikh via Gibral-
tar and the Cape of Good Hope
a distance of about 12.500
nautical miles. Some of them
saw service in the Yom Kippur
War.
THE YAFFO and Tarshish
were in New York July 4 to 6
and remained in American wa-
ters for special events in New
York, Philadelphia, Baltimore
and Washington, the embassy
said.
Uri Ben Ari, Consul General
of Israel in New York, and the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations announced that they
would hold a special reception
to honor the Israel navy par-
ticipants in the Bicentennial
event at the Essex House this
week.
The two missile boats were
dispatched from Haifa last week
SPECIAL BICENTENNIAL FEATURE
Did Poe Understand Hebrew?
By PHILIP SLOMOVTTZ
Detroit Jewish News
American traditions have
their roots in the Bible and in
Hebraic traditions. The Found-
ing Fathers were devoutly reli-
gious and their heritage was
from ancient Israel.
They named their children
after Bible characters. They
looked to Jerusalem as their
spiritual haven.
The highly cultured even
learned Hebrew. Not only Ezra
Stiles of Yale University, who
authored a grammar and mas-
tered Hebrew. Others like him
were dedicated to the Hebrew
tongue, and knowledge of Bible
lore was like a compelling force
for teachers and students, for
diplomats and the clergy.
EDGAR ALLAN Poe may
hold a leading position among
American writers who knew,
perhaps even mastered. He-
brew.
Impressively researched. "Bi-
blical Allusions in Poe," by
Prof. William Menrzel Forrest,
then the John B. Cary Memorial
Professor of Biblical History
and Literature at the University
of Virginia, published by the
Macmillan Co. in 1928, present-
ed interesting factual material
as an enlightenment on the sub-
ject.
Prof. Forrest makes a study,
and a very interesting one. of
Poe's spirituality, pantheism
and mysticism. He devotes chap-
ters to a review of Poe's refer-
ences to "death" "beyond
death" and "World end and
judgment." later proceeding to
a study of his prose and poetic
resemblances to the Bible and
devotes a chapter to "The Bible
in Poe"
OF UNUSUAL value for the
biblical student is the appendix,
in this case a very necessary
item in the study, containing
auotations. Hebraic phrases.
Scripture proper names and an
interesting section on the ques-
tion of whether Poe knew He-
brew.
The author makes a compari-
son, in discussing Poe's mysti-
cism, between the Jewish bi-
blical writers and Poe: "In the
case of both the Jewish writers
Foreign Aid Bill
Compromise Battle
Coming to Close
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The House on June 29 adopted
bv a 238-169 vote a 1977 for-
eign aid bill totaling S4.95 bil-
lion, including $1735 billion for
hrael. The Senate is expected
to act on it very soon. The ap-
propriation for Israel for the
fiscal year which starts Oct. 2
includes $1 billion in foreign
military credit sales, of which
half can be forgiven, and $735
million in economic aid.
The bill also provides $700
million for Egypt, $70 million
for Jordan and $80 million for
Syria, all of it in economic aid.
Jordan will also receive addi-
tional funds under the military
assistance, the international
military education and training,
and the military credit sales
programs, but the specific sums
were not earmarked.
P? ADDITION. $35 million
will be available for the Middle
East in a special requirements
fund. But the bill bans use of
any of this money for the Unit-
ed Nations Relief and Works
Agency for Palestine Refugees
in the Near East.
The Senate June 29 by a voice
vote adopted the $5.6 billion
foreign aid bill for the 1976 fis-
cal year which ended June 30
and the transitional quarter be-
tween the 1976 and 1977 fiscal
years. The bill was approved
earlier by the House. It has
now gone to President Ford for
his signature. This bill includes
$275 million in transitional
quarter aid for Israel.
A dispute between the Ford
Administration and Congres-
sional supporters of Israel over
the transitional quarter fund-
ing had delayed the adoption
of the foreign aid programs.
and Poe the explanation is found
in the contrast between what
was and what ought to be ac-
cording to their ideal. With Is-
rael the wailing arose from
measuring their condition by
the glorious rhapsodies concern-
ing national triumphs and splen-
dors which the early prophets
sang to them in times of calam-
ity.
"Thev had reestablished their
state after the Exile with such
hopes luring them on. Then
weary centuries wore away and
their enemies continued to rule
them instead of coming to lick
the dust at their feet. Prophetic
voices no longer spoke to them.
. Then arose the new order of
seers. In new fashion the hope
of Israel found voice; in strange
guise the mysteries of life were
expounded. The prophecies
were not to fail. God would yet
avenge."
PROF. FORREST points to
the fact that the Bible in gen-
eral is against "vain repeti-
tions." and declares that "this
finds its Drecise analogy in Poe.
No man ever hated verbosity
more than he. None other ever '
so aDDreciated the value of
brevitv stories must be short:
poems must be short."
The refrain in "The Raven"
is compared to the refrain in
the 26 stanzas in Psalm 136.
"For his mercy endureth for-
ever." The double refrain, al-
though faintlv suggested in Poe.
is traced to Psalm 107.
W learn from Prof. Forrest's
concluding section to his ap-
TvnHir that "numerous nas-
saees in Poe express or implv
somp knowledge of Hebrew."
Th author ntiblishes a list of
rfrpncs to these passages.
Complete
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Promptly Relieved
after the government reversed
an earlier decision not to send
them to the U.S.
DEFENSE Minister Shimon
Peres informed the cabinet sev-
eral weeks ago that he had.
regretfully, decided to cancel
Israel's participation in the Bi-
centennial event because their
IL 2.5 million cost of sending
the boats was too much at a
rime when all ministries were
being forced to cut down their
expenditures.
But Yitzhak Navon. chairman
of the Knesset's Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee, said it
was unthinkable that Israel
should not take part in the in-
ternational tribute to the U.S.
He was supported by most
committee members who con-
veyed their views to Premier
Yitzhak Rabin. After consulta-
tions in the cabinet, it was de-
cided to send the vessels.
Nazi Books
Appearing
In Argentina
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
Nazi books and pamphlets a
appearing more and more or*
minently on newsstands her.
The DAIA. the central reD
sentative body 0f Argentlnt
Jewry, has met recently with
high government and militarv
officials to express its concern
Although the material is Dre
sented as historical records
they do not disguise their Drr>
Nazi support.
ONE SERIES published bv
the Milicia Publishing House
has titles such as "The Lie of
Auschwitz" and "Judaism and
Catholicism" which claim that
the concentration camps did not
exist, that the gas chambers
were invented by the Allies and
that Hitler did not murder six
million Jews.
your precious jewels
to the most prestigious
lewelers in the South
Call Lewis Rustem Hhone: 445-2HH
Herb Schocnbere SJI-0 '
When
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your attorney?
How long has it been
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YOUR WILL?
Circumstances change.
Maybe your Will
requires some changes too?
And while you are at it,
make sure that you have not
forgotten one of your most
IMPORTANT RELATIVES ...
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAELI
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
"I give and bequeath $
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Will help maintain the flow of
financial support to Israel for tht
constructive programs of Histadrut.
For turthar particular*, pleas* contact:
llsra.1 Hijudru77o.!ndtio7, InT
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Miami Beach, Florida 33139
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Friday, July 9, 1976
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Page 8-A
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Friday, July 9, 1976
'6*147 SATISfACTON1 OF AMOtKAN ffOPtf
Ford Hails Entebbe Raid
WASHINGTON In a letter
sent to Israel Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin on the success-
ful completion of the raid Sun-
day. President Gerald Ford ex-
pressed "the great satisfaction*'
of the American people over
the commando raid to free hos-
tages from the Palestinian hi
lacking of an Air France jet.
President Ford noted in his
letter that the rescue "thwarted
a senseless act of terrorism."
IN A White House briefing
of journalists. Press Secretary
Ron Nessen spoke in behalf of
the President, who was that mo-
ment delivering a Bicentennial
address to the nation at Phila-
delphia's Independence Hall.
Nessen declared that Israel
had not divulged its rescue
plans to the U.S. in advance.
In Europe, there were simi-
lar accolades West German
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt ca-
Catholic-Jewish
Dialogue Sought
LOUISVILLE (JTA) A
prominent Catholic prelate has
urged an assembly of Jewish
community relations leaders to
encourage greater Catholic-
Jewish dialogue that "openly
and frankly" probes theological
questions and "any and all pub-
lic policy issues" on which the
two groups may be divided
The Rev Msgr. George G.
Hicgins. of the U.S. Catholic
Conference, speaking 00 religi
ous pluralism at the annual
plenary of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council, said that difficulties
and frustrations" can be expect-
ed in such exchanges, but Cath-
olics promoting dialogue would
"reject and repudiate" any ef-
forts by fellow Christians to
"misuse it" as a means of pres-
suring Jews into supporting
Catholic positions on such con-
troversial issues as parochiaid
or abortion.
AT A LATEX session, a pol-
icy statement adopted by the
V-O delegates, representing nine
national Jewish organizations
and 100 community relations
councils, reaffirmed the long-
standing opposition of the
NJCRAC agencies to prayer
and other religious observances
in public schools, and to the
use of tax funds for parochial
schools
Orthodox Judaism, represent-
ed here bv the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations of
America again, as in past vears
dissented on the parochiaid is-
sue
Another section of the policy
declaration, submitted m draft
bv SJCRACs commission on
inter- religious relationships, had
"welcomed" a recent statement
>t the executive board of the
National Council of Churches.
the maw coalition of Protest-
ant denominations, recognizing
Israel's need for secure boun-
daries
THE DRAFT, after floor de-
hate was amended to add lan-
guage "deploring the failure of
the National Council's govern-
ing hoard, its decision-making
body, ever to affirm publicly
the legitimacy of an independ-
ent Israel."
In his appeal for interriligi-
ous exchange. Higgins said that
American Christions "must be
prepared" to urge a U.S. walk-
out at the UN General Assem-
bly if the Arab-Third World
bloc persists with efforts to
expel Israel.
The "silence" of the Christian
clergy during the Six-Day War.
which led many disillusioned
Jewish groups to discontinue
interreligious discussions, was
"an argument for rather than
against dialogue." Higgins de-
clared
CHRISTIANS, then and now.
"do not fully understand what
Israel means to the Jews in
theological terms. Jews them-
selves are the only ones who
can help us to overcome this
gap." he said.
Noting that past dialogues
had generally been initiated by
Jews. Higgins. who is consultant
to the Bishoos Committee on
Catholic-Jewish Relations, said
that Catholics now need to re-
verse the process "in a spirit
of deep repentance for past of-
fenses and crimes committed by
Christians against Jew? "
The 350 delegates approved
unanimously a statement de-
nouncing Gen George S Brown,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, for statements he made
m testimony at a hearing be-
fore the Senate Armed Forces
Committee.
THE STATEMENT declared
that Browns statements "re-
flected again his marked .nsen-
sitivirv to a basic aspect of the
American system "
The statement added that "the
application of such insensitivity
and urnorance in the field of
milhan preparedness and intel-
'.lgence would plainly pose 1
serious hazard to the interests
of the nation
Historic Cemetery
At Minsk Fading
NEW YORK (JTA] According to reports reach-
ing the National Conference on Soviet Jewry, all that re-
mains of the historic Minsk cemetery is "one part of one
too. .'stone." the rest has been completely desecrated and
destrwex: If the Sonet authorities
A recent visitor said that the Soviet officials had bull-
doced the entire .-emetery to make way for a dance floor
Trenches cut across the vast area and a soccer field has
alreadv been erected in one section of the cemetery
We literally walked on the bones of the dead, which
surfaced when excavation work began." the vkhot con-
fided A Minsk actmst told as that the destruction began
the day after the Six-Day War when aa iroa feace which
had surrounded the nmffrry was liaainrirrl and sold to
a cooperative fa
bled Rabin, declaring his na-
tion's "satisfaction and relief."
"THE GOVERNMENT ex-
presses its satisfaction and re-
lief that there was success in
freeing the hostages from the
power of the terrorists," spokes-
man Klaus Boelling said. "The
behavior of the authorities in
Uganda still needs clarifica-
tion."
Boelling said that West Ger-
many never for a moment con-
sidered releasing the six ter-
rorists it holds in prisons, al-
leged members of the Bander
Meinhof terrorist gang. Boel-
ling also declared that it did not
know of the raid in advance.
In Paris. French Ambassador
to Israel Jean Herly said the
freeing of the hostages was a
"victory over brutal force."
IN THE Arab world and in
the Soviet Union, the reaction
was at predictable odds to the
American and European praise
of Israel's daring raid.
Egypt called the rescue "an
act of aggression" against Ugan-
da and all of Africa. Egypt urg-
ed the African conference in
Port Louis, Mauritius, to con-
demn Israel.
Mauritius promptly announc-
ed it would sever relations with
Israel
Egypt's Foreign Minister Is-
mail Fahmi said the Israeli raid
came at a time "when negotia
tions would have led. as in pre-
vious cases, to saving the hos-
tages."
FAHMI ADDED that Egypt
has always opposed terrorist
acts or plane hijackings in
which innocent individuals are
victimized."
In Moscow, the Soviet news
agency. Tass. called the rescue
the latest act of piracy by the
Israeli military."
As for President Idi Amin of
Uganda. Amin reminded Israel
that it had cost his country-
$1,800 a day to feed the hos-
tages
Late Tuesday. Amin threaten
ed Israel by declaring that
those responsible"' for the raid
will "pay heavily." including in-
side Israel
Israel Objects
To PLO Activity
In Washington
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has expressed objec-
tions to the U.S. government over the recent activities of
top PLO officials in Washington. Shawfiq Al-Hut, a PLO
political leader, briefed Senators and newsmen in the U.S
capital after having obtained express permission to do $0
from the State Department. Israeli newspapers reported to-
day that the permit was issued on President Ford's orders.
Officials here said the Embassy in Washington had con-
veyed Israel's objections to the State Department
FOREIGN MINISTER Yigal Allon told the Cabinet it
would be a mistake for Israel to overplay America's recent
public expression of thanks voiced by both Ford and Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kissinger to the PLO for its role
in the Beirut evacuation. Israel had lodged its official res-
ervations with Washington, Allon said.
But the Administration explained that its thanks had
been conveyed orally to all parties involved in the Lebanon
evacuation, via the British Embassy, and this should not
be seen as a direct or indirect recognition of the PLO Some
ministers said later they felt Allon was being "too calm"
about these signs of change in the U.S. attitude towards
the PLO.
Moked Recognizes
Palestinian Rights
TEL AVTV (JTA)
The Left-Wing Moked faction
adopted a platform at the
close of its first political
convention here, which rec-
ognized the primacy of Zion-
ism as the national libera-
tion movement of the Jew-
ish people while at the same
time recognizing the rights
of the Palestinian people to
Special 'Tallii'
Marks A
merica s
Bicentennial
NEW YORK ^JTA> The
Bicentennial celebration has in-
spired products galore There is
something for every person's
taste, whim and sentiment at
prices ranging up to thousands
of dollars But now along comes
an item specifically designed
for the observant Jew who may
want to combine prayer with a
subhmtnal reminder of Amer-
ica's 200th anniversary a Bi-
centennial "Yankee taint"
A new company calling itself
the Yankee Taint Works, located
:n New York, is offeimg a talln
tnadc of hghtwugh; kettledoth
deann. braided atarah. orange
decorative stitching and natural
maw
A SPOKESMAN for the firs
said the taint "has 100 percent
wool aa; r.ra*: fringes' tied
by a carefaDy selected staff of
the most rigid
It was also designed, he add-
ed, to attract younger people
"who believe that prayer should
and could be a less formal ex-
*>enence without having to de-
iate from tradition or halacha "
YAAKOV GROSS, a graphics
designer who designed the tal-
vaid the idea came about
from a conversation he had
with two fnends, Haim Plotxker.
a Fordham University political
scientist, and Edya Am of the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism
They said there was a need
for an American-designed tallit
and Gross went to work on it
PWxzker is acting as production
manager of the firm
The Oral Yankee talht" aai
presented to Rabbi Alexander
Schindler. chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
and president of the Union of
American Hedrew Congrega
twos, according to the firm's
spokesman The spokesman said
that Schindler upon trring on
the new talht. said it 'is an ex-
cahag idea which should appeal
the voung American Jew."
a national state of their own
which would co-exist side-
by-with Israel.
Moked leader Meir Payil,
the faction's only Knesset
member, declared that Is-
rael should welcome a Pales-
tinian state because the na-
tional movement of the
Palestinians and the Jewish
national movement Zion-
ismare lige Siamese twins
that developed and crystal-
ized together
HE DENOUNCED the two
superpowers U.S and I'SSR
for what he called meddling
in the region and using the
Israeli-Arab conflict to promote
their own interest*
The Moked platform advo-
cated a coalition of the social-
ist groups and radical elements
within the Ziomst movement
It viewed Moked as a potential
partner in such a coalition that
would include the '.eft-wing
the Labor Party and Labor align-
ment. Socialists from the religi-
ous factions, the Black Panthers
and the radical intelligentsia.
Moked supported J e wi 11
strivings to exist as a people m
its own homeland with its own
language and culture Loyalty W
the independence, sovereignty
and security of Israe' eat de-
scribed as the starting point for
ay Israeli-Arab peace move-
ment
BIT ISRAEL must recognue
the right of NaT detent**
tion of the Palesnmaa reoPe
which could be reahied oni>
through peaceful coexistence
with Israel in a Paleanman stite
ssde-bv-side with Id ,
The MokeC 5Sff
that neace agreements -ust
the result of negotiations be-
tween the Parties free of dictate'
or pre-conditions
Israel matt make it clear that
she is not seeking to annex ter-
ritories but the areas taken
the defensive war of !W" **
be held as a guarantee and re-
turned in exchange for peace
the platform said


iday, July 9. 1976
**w/*#//fcr**r/
Page 9-A
Amin Angered by Israel's Ingratitude
PRESIDENT AMIN
Continued from Page 1-A
estinian terrorists for a
week
Amin feels that Israel
should have been grateful
for his "hospitality." It cost
him, he angrily told the
world, some $1,800 daily to
feed and house the hostages.
The raid that killed the ter-
rorists and many Uganda
troops was, in Amin's view,
poor thanks indeed.
THE THREE planes return-
ed Sunday to a cheering crowd
at the airport here, and while
on the other side of the world
Americans were celebrating
their 200th birthday (July 4),
all Israel went wild with joy-
ous thanks for the deliverance
of the hostages. They were
also seized with a spirit of na-
tional pride that somehow seem-
ed to leave them in the wake
of the 1973 Yom Kippur War.
With the delivered Israelis
were 12 crew members of the
Air France jetliner, who flew
home Sunday and were greeted
by mobs at Orly Airfield in
Paris shouting "Israel, Israel."
This was a strange chant in
a country which Israel accused
immediately after the hijacking
of responsibility for the latest
act of air terrorism.
Of the original strike force
that attacked the airfield in
Entebbe, Uganda, exactly eight
days after the hijacking, one
commando, Col. Yehonatan Ne-
tanyahu, 30, an Israeli immi-
grant from the United States,
was killed.
Gush Policy 'Irreversible'
LONG BEACH, N.Y. (JTA)
_-The Gush Emunim movement
Is "championing a dangerously
* Irreversible policy" toward the
administered areas, Rabbi Saul
Jerman, of the Stern College
lor Women, told the 64th annual
convention of Young Israel
here.
But he agreed with Rabbi
abian SchonfeW. immediate
past president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, that Gush
Emunim had matched Zionist
feelings to action in its deter
lination to oppose Israeli with-
Jrawal from the West Bank.
RABBI SCHONFELD also told
the 600 delegates that the Gush
kmunim policy was an Amer-
pcan issue "because of the ac-
Jtions of the Secretary of State."
*JHe argued that if Secretary of
|State Henry A. Kissinger had
[not stopped Israeli forces dur-
ling the Yom Kippur War, there
[would not have been a Gush
iF.munim.
He said he supported Gush
[Emunim because it was the only
[group in Israel to oppose the
[wishes of Kissinger and "to tell
|him 'no'."
Herman Rosenbaum of New
IYork, who was elected to a third
Iterm as president of the organ-
ization of Orthodox synagogues.
challenged American Jewish
critics of Israeli policy, de-
nouncing Breira. an organiza-
tion of American Jews which
urges debate on that policy.
ROSENBAUM assailed "those
who would criticize the govern-
ment of Israel from the sanc-
tuary of distant shores," citing
critics like those of Breira "who.
7,000 miles away in safety and
comfort, direct others."
Rabbi Israel Miller, former
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations and for-
mer president of the American
Zionist Federation, addressing
one of the weekend sessions,
urged the Young Israel move-
ment to join the American Zion-
ist Federation.
But Rabbi Samuel Fink of
Brooklyn said he doubted that
the Young Israel membership
would have any input in the
AZF and suggested there might
be "considered religious rea- ,
sons" against joining the AZF.
MILLER TOLD the delegates
that "at a time when the Zion-
ist cause has come under in-
creasing, concerted attack, it is
important that all of us pull '
together in support of Israel
and Zionism."
He said the AZF included
groups representing a wide
range of political beliefs and
religious affiliations and added
US. Denies PLO
Policies May
Be Changing Soon
Continued from Page 1-A
I mission on a case-by-case basis
| to members of the PLO delega-
tion wanting to travel outside
|that (the 25-mile radius) area
I for special invitations with the
strict understanding that they
[are not to engage in public pol-
[itical activities," Brown stated.
He said the luncheon "was
I represented as a private meet-
ing and we still do" (represent
[it that way).
BROWN SAID that Al-Hut
I remained in Washington about
two days and added, in reply
| to a question, that he didn't
[think that was strange. He also
I said he '"did not know of any
restrictions" imposed on PLO
members "within the 25-mile
I radius" from New York.
Asked whether any country
I had complained about Al-Hut's
visit to Washington, the Depart -
[ment spokesman said "I am not
[aware of any complaint receiv-
|ed about the visit."
An aide to Ribicoff told the
[Jewish Telegraphic Agency to-
day that the Senator had "at-
tended at the request of Sen.
Abourezk and indicated that he
would go and listen to anybody."
The aide said that "Sen. Ribi-
coff has made no further state-
ment about the meeting or its
content."
OTHER SENATORS who at-
tended included George S. Mc-
Govern (D., S.D.); Thomas
Eagleton (D.. Mo); Robert Mor-
gan (D NO; and Walter Hud-
dleston (D.. La.>
In emphasizing that the State
Department waived its travel
restrictions on a case-by-case
basis. Brown confirmed that last
November another PLO repr-
sentative. Abdul Salleh. visited
narts of the U.S. over the
Thanksgiving Day holiday and
that he had made a political
sneech in Chicago and held a
nress conference in Washing-
ton, in violation of the condi-
tions imposed.
He did not say what action,
if anv. was taken bv the De-
partment.
that "it is exactly to provide for
the unity of such diverse groups
and thus to strengthen our sup
ort for Israel, that the Federa-
tion exists." The convention did
not act on the proposal for af-
filiation.
Two seriously injured Israelis
were hospitalized in Nairobi
when the three Israeli planes
returning home with the freed
hostages stopped over in Ken-
ya, where officials later report-
ed that one of the injured died.
Borne back dead were two
other Israelis, Ida Borkhovitch
and Jacques Mimouni. In addi-
tion, there were 11 less serious-
ly injured Israelis immediately
taken to hospitals outside Tel
Aviv on their return here.
Israel television and Kol Yis-
rael, reporting the miraculous
operation, said that in all there
were 61 Israelis freed, 21
French, a number of Jews with
dual nationalities carrying Is-
raeli passports, and the Air
France crew.
FRENCH HOSTAGES wre in
sharp contrast in their report
about what occurred in Kam-
pala to the formal statement
made after the hijacking and
the flight to Libya and then
Kampala by Commandant Mi-
chel Bacos, 52, pilot of the Air
France jet.
At the time, Bacos praised
Amin, particularly "for his con-
stant concern designed to in-
sure our security, our material
comfort and health."
Israelis
Intercept
Terrorists
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israeli
forces intercepted and killed
three terrorists who tried to
infiltrate Israeli territory from
Jordan. A military spokesman
said the terrorists came from a
base in Syria. He said that con-
tact was made shortly before
midnight north of the Adam
Bridge across the Jordan River.
The infiltrators were detected
by an Israeli patrol and killed
in a brief exchange of gunfire.
Three Kalachnikov assault ri-
fles, a silencer and other equip-
ment were found on the bodies.
There were no Israeli casual-
ties.
THE ENCOUNTER was the
first in seven months with ter-
rorists using Jordan as a cor-
ridor to enter Israel. The last
such incident occurred south of
the Dead Sea.
Meanwhile, new tension grip-
ped East Jerusalem this after-
non as funeral services were
held for 21-year-old Mahmoud
Kurd who was fatally wounded
by Israeli security forces this
morning when disturbances
erupted inside the Old City
walls.

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For me, Winston is for real.
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health.
18 mg. "ui". 1.2 mj. meow* n pti oowirtt. FTC Rtpon APR. '78.



An Old
Agnew In
A New Role
*^HOSE BREAD I eat. his song I sing." So it was written
long ago. And now that Spiro T. Agnew, one-time stern
lecturer on the moral degradation of American youth, is out
in the open as an unblushing apologist for Arab's anti-Israel
policies, the truth of that ancient adage is deeply etched on
what's left of the Agnew coat of arms.
It was only two years ago that the press reported Amer-
ica's deposed former Vice President was using American em-
bassies in the Middle East in connection with his appointments
and travel arrangements. In the same season Business De-
veloper Agnew was trying to sell a 1.600-acre tract of Ken-
tucky island to Arab investors after his trips to Kuwait.
WHY SHOULD anyone be surprised, then, to learn Mr,
Agnew is now denouncing "Israeli imperialism," hailing Saudi
Arabia as a staunch friend of the U.S., and declaring that "the
Zionist influence in the U.S. is dragging the U.S. into a rather
disorganized approach to the Middle East problem"?
When Spiro Agnew was out campaigning for reelection
as Vice President in 1972, he minded not at all that the Repub
lican platform he was upholding spoke highly of Israel, sup-
porting that nation's right "to survive and prosper in peace."
That platform promised to provide Israel with "support es-
sential for her security, including aircraft, training, and mod-
ern and sophisticated military equipment." Did Agnew possess
secret knowledge then of "Israeli imperialism" and was he
fearful of spoiling his reelection chances if he unveiled it?
NOW AS he goes about promoting his novel, "The Can-
field Decision." Mr. Agnew will have to keep dodging ques-
tions about his responsibility for depicting characters prattling
about "the Jewish cabal" and the Jewish Zionist lobby with all
that influence over Congress. But the book will sell, and the
author will add to his bankroll; and cries from an outraged
Jewish community will probably faze him not at all.
For this fallen Vice President and disbarred lawyer has
been dodging challenges, shifting positions, and abandoning
valued principles for some time. He it was who kept calling
for law and order when pursuing the second highest office in
the land, yet found it convenient to plead no contest to a
single charge of income tax evasion in October. 1973 a ploy
by which he forestalled litigation of a far more serious nature.
THIS IS the same leader who accused "arrogant, reckless
elements within our society" of "insidiously destroying the
taonc of American democracy."
Traveling the low oratorical road for his party during
most of his eight years in office. Spiro Agnew established a
record of character defamation and abuse of the prerogatives
of high position not likely ever again to be surpassed.
HIS GAUCHERTE of expression betrayed his claim to
dignity: he referred to Polish-Americans as "Polacks called
a Japanese-American reporter the fat Jap," and revealed the
low level of his regard for the nations poor by declaring "if
you've seen one city slum, you've seen them all-
in 1969 Eric Sevareid observed that if media people em-
ployed the same language Agnew used, they would soon be
ruled off the air. The adventurer from Maryland excoriated
television, radio, and press in the days he held high office;
but they are handy tools for him now as he appears on talk
shows to exploit his novel.
GOD HELP the American public if it fails to learn from
the Agnew caper. If the naive among us continue to agree
with him that much reporting regarding hunger and poverty
in this nation is exaggerated; if the easily duped go on ac-
cepting the Agnew creed that contends disturbances are caused
not by evil circumstances but by evil men. then we shall be
in grave trouble
Herbert Bruckner, a former president of the American
Society of Newspaper Editors, observed in days when Agnew
was riding high that the man who had been elected Vice Presi-
dent was "just Big Brother wired for sound." Although this
newest public figure to be listed as an anti-Semite continues
wired for sound, the fates are kind to us in denying him the
opportunity to continue to play a Big Brother role.
Page 10-A JewistncrHtor Friday. July 9. 1976
S.
utan
V*ff
The Notebooks Of
Jacob Marateck
The Samurai of Vishogrod: the Notebooks of
Jacob Marateck. Retold by Shimon and
Anita Wincelberg. Jewish Publication So-
ciety. $7.95.
The samurai of Vishogrod was Yonah the
messenger, one of Vishogrod's "men of valor."
In Russia in the late 19th century hordes of
peasants were "something of a hazard," as
Jacob puts it, to the Jewish communities.
Vishogrod was blessed with a number of
good ferocious Jewish ruffians who protected
the town against mobs of drunken bloodthirsty
peasants. Yonah was the leader of these "sa-
murai."
JACOB MARATECK aspired to be like Yo-
nah when he grew up. Yonah's local military
successes were not the only cause of Jacob's
enthusiasm for a physical sort of life. He lived
among other poor children who spent years
on hard benches learning and studying. Chil-
dren who were so stunted from malnutrition
and lack of fresh air that they looked almost
tubercular.
Our young author candidly directs our
sympathies toward the Yonahs, rather than
the pale and languid talmidim. In another
episode, Jacob again challenges our tradition-
al loyalties.
HE INNOCENTLY tells us how here, "in
Columbus s country, it is fashionable to lose
ourselves in fantasies about the magical sweet-
ness of our grandmother's cookery." Marateck
proceeds to demolish us with a story about a
grandmother whose cooking makes you "gag
like a man who had swallowed a chew of
tobacco."
Jacob's memories are thought-provoking.
He questions our glorification of the shtetl -
our "patronizing" attempt to immortalize what
was actually a horrid and fearful life of mas-
sacre and starvation. His reminiscences are
warm and compassionate. Despite dire pov-
erty, Jacob was brought up in a pious and
virtuous home.
HE PRESERVED and defended his faith
from the dark streets of Warsaw to the steam-
ing kettles of Siberia.
These engaging stories are told with hu-
mor and wit. Marateck is Twain and Dickens
Huck Finn and Oliver Twist as well. He is
both author and protagonist.
"The Samurai of Vishogrod" is drawn from
the first 16 of 28 of Jacob's notebooks His
daughter and son-in-law have carefully pre-
served their father's youthful observations of
the colorful and violent period preceding the
Russian Revolution. This reviewer looks for-
ward to publication of the remaining 12 note-
books.
Tuvia Schwartz May
Be a Famous Name
Car/
&4h
'pert
Haifa
T'HE NAME of Tuvia Schwartz is relatively
unknown today, but if present events con-
tinue their normal course, it may be attached
to a new and dramatic cause celebre center-
ing around Israel-US. relations.
The background is relatively simple. Young
Schwartz is charged by the American author
ities with having fire-bombed an automobile
in Los Angeles belonging to one John Artu-
kovic.
THIS WAS said to be Schwartz's way of
calling public attention to the fact that John's
brother. Andrei Artukovic. a Nazi war crim-
inal, had been convicted by the Yugoslav
courts of murdering Serbs. Jews and gypsies
when he had been a minister in the Nazi Croat-
ian State. Requests for his extradition to
Yugoslavia to receive his punishment had been
turned aside
Schwartz was arrested, jumped bail, and
went to Israel. There he took on Israel citizen-
ship and enrolled in the Israel army. The U.S.
Government is now requesting his extradition
to face charges.
The pubbc controversy is just getting un-
der way. Extradition is frequently (though not
always) a two-way passage, and if Israel ex-
pects the United States to abide by its agree-
ment for mutual honoring of extradition re-
quests under defined conditions, it is not easy
for Israel to plead 'exceptions''
THIS COUNTRY has had about 100 de-
mands from various countries to hand over
fugitives who had sought refuge in the Holy
Land. Of these about 20 had been sent back.
under circumstances which attracted little at-
tention. In most of the other cases, the sought-
for individuals elected to return of their own
free will, or the requesting state eventually
withdrew its request.
In two related cases Israel's experience
was most unpleasant. Some years ago Jeru-
salem was asked to send back Robert Soblen.
accused by the American government of aid
ing the Rosenberg couple, convicted of atomic
espionage. Feelings ran high.
THE ISRAEL authorities tried to save face
by avoiding decision on extradition, but de-
clared Soblen personal non grata and put him
aboard a plane for deportation to wherever
he wished to go It was said that a IS mar-
shal was conveniently on board the same
plane. At any rate. Soblen committed suicide
just before the plane was due to lanJ at Lon-
don
However, a new line of advice has been
suggested. Rather than involve Israel in a
legal dispute with the U.S. in a matter which
is not really related to defense and security.
Tuvia should carry to its logical conclusions
the intentions of his original act: to focus
public attention on a policy which harbors
Na?i criminals. He should therefore volun-
tarily go back to America to face trial, and
American Jews should see to it that the trial
becomes a platform for broad indictment of
all cover-up of Nazis. Such a trial would
achieve in dramatic form what Schwartz orig-
inally had in mind, far more than his flight to
Israel and his battle against extradition.
Lincoln in Israel: Salute to Leo Gildesgame
IT IS TIME to salute Leo Gildesgame.
One of the leading philanthropists of our na-
tion. Mr. Gildesgame is a former yeshiva bachur
and veteran of the battlefields of Israel where he
fought with Trumpeldor's Legion. He is an honored
resident of Mt Kisco. NY
Mr. Gildesgame s career is full of glorious serv-
ices to the causes of humanitarianiszn. Hebrew
scholarship and religion. He is a leader in a cluster
of national organizations.
THIS YEAR he did something which will for-
ever be remembered.
He funded the transfer of an eight-foot statue
rf Lincoln from Chicago to Ramat Gan. That statue,
laborately dedicated a few Sundays ago in the
rKatbi
ver
presence of dignitaries of the State of Israel and
the VS. Government, will be the equivalent of the
-tatue of Liberty in this nation.
Just as the Statue of Liberty was given to us
iy France as a sign of its kinship, so will the Gil-
iesgame-arranged statue of Lincoln stand as a bond
wtween the two denjocraoes of the U.S. and Israel.
So appealing was Mr Gildesgame s offer to give
he statue to the U.S. so that our nation could, m
turn, give it to Israel on the occasion of our m
centennial, that both houses of Congress unanimous
ly endorsed the idea and President Ford enthusias
ticallly signed the bill authorizing the transfer
IT MAY be the only thing which our entire
Senate and House of Representatives have agreeo
upon lately.
Modest but imaginative. Mr. Gildesgame has
not only honored history but has made it His ute-
partner. the former Ruth Oppenheim. deserves ku-
dos, too. for supporting this project, as we" w
many others.
Lincoln is indeed a link between our two repub-
lics. We gladly salute Mr. Gildesgame for a supere
way of dramatizing that link.


Friday, July 9, 1976
Je*isti Flcridlian
Pagt 11-A
They Held All Night Vigil Administration Cold
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Thou-
sands of Israelis maintained an
all-night vigil by their radios
after the Air France plane which
was hijacked in Athens took off
from Benghazi, Libya, with a
limited amount of fuel. Its 229
passengers included at least 70
Israelis and 10 or more Jews of
other nationalities.
Kol Israel Radio, which nor-
mally goes off the air at 1 a.m.
local time, continued to relay
news bulletins as they came in
after that hour.
AN ALERT was maintained at
Ben Gurion Airport throughout
the night as is the practice when
an aircraft is hijacked anywhere
in the region. Relatives of Is-
raelis known to be aboard the
jet spent a sleepless night at
the Air France office. The air-
hne was able to provide only
meagre information.
MMMMMN i i
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
Israelis were especially anger-
ed over the French national air
carrier's apparently lax security
measures. The French were be-
lieved to have considered their
planes immune from Arab ter-
rorist attack because of their
Middle East policies.
The wide-bodied, twin jet "air
bus" hijacked was the first
French airliner ever seized by
terrorists.
MORE THAN 30 passenger
planes of various nationalities
have been hijacked since 1968
for reasons connected with the
Middle East conflict. The first
plane was an El Al jet on a
flight from Rome to Tel Aviv
which was taken over by Arab
terrorists on July 23, 1968. and
forced to land in Algeria.
The wave of hijackings that
followed in the late '60s and
early '70s caused stringent se-
curity measures to be taken by
most international air carriers.
But Air France took the least
precautions.
It was only after repeated
persuasion by Israeli authorities
that the French company re-
quired its passengers boarding
at Tel Aviv to undergo thorough
inspections of both their per-
sons and their luggage. Israeli
officials going abroad are urged
to travel in Israeli planes wher-
ever possible and especially to
avoid Air France.
\Lebanon Israel's Fault-Moscow
UNITED NATIONS
,jTA) The Soviet Union
has said that the situation in
Lebanon was the result of
actions "by the forces of im-
perialism and Zionism."
The statement was made
in the Security Council by
Ambassador Yakov Malik,
who said the imperialist
forces had brought about the
current events in Lebanon
to stop dissension and divert
attention from efforts to li-
berate the occupied Arab
territories.
THEY WANT to strike a blow,
said Malik, against the Palestin-
ian resistance and the national
patriotic forces of Lebanon, and
to delay a Middle East settle-
ment.
The Security Council was dis-
| cussing the report of the com-
mittee on Palestine rights which
recommends, among other
things, a timetable for Israeli
withdrawal from the occupied
territories by June 1 next year,
and a two-phase plan for re-
turn of the Palestinians to their
homes.
Malik said the Soviet Union
fully supported the committee's
report. The Security Council, he
said, should take decisive, ef-
fective and immediate measures
to confirm the inalienable rights
of the Palestinian people.
AMBASSADOR Piero Vinci of
Italy said he thought the Pales-
tinian question had been singled
out from tfie larger context of
the whole Middle East problem,
and that other essential com-
ponents had been overlooked.
The best way to bring about im-
plementation of Palestinian
rights was to speed up the re-
sumption of the negotiating
process.
The committee's report, con-
centrating on only one aspect of
the complex Middle East crisis,
did not reflect political realities
in the area, which had been cov-
ered by Security Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338.
The Italian delegate said
omission from the report of any
consideration of the existence
of a member-state of the United
Nations, which was a recipient
of all the rights and duties
which went with such status,
was serious.
No committee could envisage
measures which might hamper
the basic right of a member-
state to live in peace within
secure and recognized frontiers.
KAJ SUNDBERG, of Sweden,
said that while he shared the
basic proposition of the com-
mittee's report that the solution
of the Palestinian question was
a necessary prerequisite for
lasting peace in the Middle East,
the report was "seriously de-
ficient" on the matter of im-
plementing its proposals within
the framework of an overall
settlement.
It would not be possible, he
said, to solve the Palestinian
question in isolation from the
other elements.
The Swedish delegate said
the time had come for Israel to
recognize the legitimate rights
and interests of the Palestin-
ians, and the PLO must accept
the right of Israel to continued
existence within secure and
recognized borders.
Body Back From Latin Tour
NEW YORK (JTA) Carl
Glick, HIAS president, and Gay-
nor I. Jacobson, executive vice
president, who have just return-
ed from a fact-finding mission
to major Jewish communities in
| Argentina, Chile, Brazil and
Uruguay, reported that they met
iwith diplomats of the United
[States and other nations, Jew-
ish community leaders, officials
of the intergovernmental Com-
mission on European Migration
and the United Nations High
[Commission on Refugees.
According to Glick, a major
[concern of MAS was the well-
being of 560,000 Argentinan
Jews. Under the Peronist gov-
ernment, the country had suf-
fered from political turmoil, so-
cial unrest and heavy inflation
pressures.
THE HIAS group arrived in
Buenos Aires simultaneously
with the revolutionary takeover
by a military government in
support of the new regime, the
Jewish community participates
in the rebuilding of the country
and hopes for an end to in-
stability and urban terror.
The Jewish communities of
Santiago, Chile and Montevideo,
Uruguay, are primarily middle
St. Louis Orthodox Jews
Hail New Kashruth BUI
. ST. LOUIS (JTA) The
I United Orthodox Jewish Com-
Imunity of Saint Louis has hail-
led a new kosher food bill de-
signed to protect observant
iJews from fraud in the sale of
kosher meat and other kosher
Ifood items. The measure, intro-
jduced by Sen. Maurice Schech-
jter and adopted at the 78th gen-
ie ral assembly of the Missouri
legislature, was just signed by
Ipov. Christopher S. Bond and
]takes effect Aug. 13.
It provides for a fine of not
less that $25 or more than $500
pr imprisonment for not less
pan 30 days or more than one
Tear for offenders.
ACCORDING to Rabbi M. H.
Eichenstein, Chief Rabbi of the
Orthodox community, the new
law will replace a 1927 law that
was vaguely written and diffi-
cult to enforce. The old law
referred only to kosher meat
and meat preparation and re-
quired kosher certification only
for raw meaf. poultry and deli-
catessen.
The new bill itemizes all pro-
ducts in addition to meat that
require certification and there-
by takes cognizance of the ex-
tensive kosher food industry
that has developed since the
original law
class and have suffered serious
economic distress as a result of
rampant inflation.
The great majority of Jews in
Chile and Uruguay support the
present military governments.
While coping with the ongoing
pressure of inflation, the Jewish
communities are maintaining
their religious and educational
institutions, Glick and Jacobson
reported.
THEY OBSERVED that Brazil
afforded its citizens the largest
measure of freedom of those
nations visited. This was strik-
ingly indicated when a delega-
tion of Brazilian Jewish leaders
were encouraged to visit with
President Ernesto Geisel to ex-
press concern about Brazil's
anti-Zionist vote in the UN in
November. 1975.
It was indicated to the Jew-
ish community .that this position
in tMe UN reflected Brazil's
large balance of payments de-
ficit caused principally by the
increase in the price of import-
ed oil and efforts to encourage
Arab petro-dollar investments.
While in Brazil, the MAS
representatives were cordially
received by Foreign Minister
Azaredo da Silveira and Justice
Minister Armando Falcao. The
ministers expressed high regard
for the constructive accomplish-
ments of the Brazilian Jewish
community. Glick and Jacobson
were accompanied on their tour
by Fred Weinstein. HIAS direc-
tor of Latin American opera-
tions.
To Zionist Plea
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A meeting was sought by
a number of Jewish and non-
Jewish groups with Presi-
dent Ford to seek to persuade
him to arrange cancellation
of a permit to a local neo-
Nazi group to stage a "White
Power" rally in front of the
White House on the Bicen-
tennial weekend.
The permit for the rally,
scheduled for noon on July
3, was granted to the Nazis
by the Park Police.
SEN. J. GLENN Beall. Jr. (R.,
Md.) aided the groups in the
effort to meet with the Presi-
dent. The groups included the
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, the Shalom Club, an or-
ganization of Holocaust surviv-
ors, the Silver Spring (Md.)
Jewish Center, the Gold Star
Mothers, the Gold Star Wives.
the Jewish War Veterans and
supporters from both Black and
white Christian groups.
Fred Schulman, public affairs
director for the ZOA in Wash-
ington, who is spokesman for
the groups, said "no group
should be allowed publicly to
urge the violation of the first
amendment rights of Blacks and
Jews, as the Nazis so consistent-
ly do."
HE NOTED that at a recent
Nazi White Power rally in Chi-
cago, 14 persons were injured,
32 arrested and an injunction
issued against Frank Collin, a
Nazi leader and his followers.
Schulman said the injunction
prohibits the urging "of the vio-
lation of the rigbts of Blacks in
the area, where such action is
directed to inciting or producing
imminent lawless action and is
likely to incite or produce such
action."
Supreme Court Won't Hear
Review of JDL's Case
WASHINGTON(JTA)The
Supreme Court has refused to
hear a suit brought by members
of the Jewish Defense League
asking for damages from gov-
ernment officials who conduct-
ed an "illegal" wiretap against
them in 1970 and 1971.
The High Court let stand a
decision by a United States
Court of Appeals in the District
of Columbia that suggested that
officials may escape paying
damages if they could demon-
strate that they had sincerely
believed the wiretap to be pro-
per.
THE JDL suit was against
former Attorney General John
Mitchell and nine present or
former members of the FBI.
During a trial against 13 JDL
members for gun conspiracy in
June, 1970. the government re-
vealed it had wiretapped con-
versations of 10 of the defend-
ants without a warrant.
The District of Columbia
Court of Appeals ruled that the
wiretaps were illegal since the
government may use wiretaps
without warrants only if the evi-
dence that the target of the
wiretap was a foreign agent or
a collaborator with a foreign
agent.
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Page 12-A
+Jewish ncrkMan
Friday, July 9. i976
AJCom. Exec Rejects Anti-Catholic Charge
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
national director of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee's Interreligious Depart-
ment, has strongly criticized
the Rev. Andrew Greeley for
saying that "there is a strong
and powerful anti-Catholic
feeling in the Jewish com-
munity."
Tanenbaum said Greeley,
a Chicago priest and sociol-
ogist, in making the state-
Soviet Presses Roll On
With Anti-Zionist Lies
NEW YORK (JTA)
"Zionist Falsehoods," print-
ed by the Novosti Press
Agency in Moscow and re-
cently obtained by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry, claims that second-
ary students in Israel are'
taught that "Jews are enti-
tled to slaves."
Printed in English for ex-
port just over a year ago,
the book accuses Jews of be-
ing taught that "they are the
elite of the human race and
were especially created to
pav homage to the Creator.
Because of this they deserve
to have slaves and these
must be non-Jews because a
Jewish slave would not de-
vote himself entirely to
God"
THE BOOK, written by B.
Bakanov. is divided into four
chapters -Zionism Yesterday
and Todav." "The Call of the
Promised Land." "The True
Face of Israel." and "The De-
ceived Open Their Eyes."
Reminscent of the most noto-
rious anti-Semitic literature of
the Nazi era. the book pretends
to show that Zionists have al-
ways welcomed anti-Semitism,
'oecause it is this that has al- I
ways justified their existence "
The book continues. "It was
fascism that brought death and
suffering to millions of people,
that enabled the Zionists to
make a 'selection" of settlers to
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the future Israeli state."
The book says that Zionists
put a high emphasis on anti-
Semitism so that Jews will rec-
ognize, "that all non-Jews should
be treated as anti-Semites."
ment in an article in the
New York Times June 19,
had "not a single piece of
data" to back his charge.
ANSWERING Greeley yester-
day during his weekjy radio
program over WINS, the local
Westinghouse Radio station
here. Tanenbaum noted that
when Greeley charges that many
Jews in the media and univer-
sities "propogate anti-white
ethnic bigotry." he ignored the
fact that the AJCommittee was
the first organization to create
a program to win understanding
of ethnic aspirations and that
Greeley himself had written a
pamphlet on the subject for the
AJCommittee.
Tanenbaum said that Greeley
charged that some Jews aided
the "myth of Catholic intellec-
tual inferiority," but the AJCom-
mittee official noted that Gree-
ley himself '"smeared all Cath-
olic universities as 'mediocre',"
called major Catholic publica-
tions "semi-literate" and "ac-
cused the American Catholic
Bishops of 'intellectual dishon-
esty'."
"With regard to Catholic pa-
rochial schools, few Jews have
worked more closely with Cath-
olic educators than has this
writer in the program to uproot
the sources of anti-Semitism in
certain inherited traditions of
Catholic teaching." Tanenbaum
said.
"ON NUMEROUS occasions.
we have acknowledged to Cath-
olic authorities our appreciation
for this contribution to the im-
provement of Catholic-Jewish
understanding, while making it
clear that we regard combatting
anti-Semitism a moral obliga
tion in service to justice and
truth rather than a favor"
Tanenbaum said that because
the AJCommittee knows the
value of Catholic and Jewish
parochial schools to American
society it "has adopted a posi.
tion in support of auxiliary
services to parochial schools
compatible with our firm com-
mitment to church-state separa-
tion."
Tanenbaum said that despite
disclaimers by Greeley. the
AJCommittee has responded ac-
tively to every Catholic request
for cooperation in humanitarian
causes in Northern Ireland and
throughout the world
mm Raster Federal
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American Israeli! %%"
Q All Brlijioui ArticUi Q
i. Synogoqart Scheoli Hm*
1357 WASHINGTON AVE-
tt 1-7722 $. Schwarti
RELGO, INC
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books I Records
w7 wmmm *
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ederal AW Flask?
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Slndmg from tell lo right C Guthn* Bbcock Vic* Prejident Realtor. Alfred 8 Parker, FAIA. Sr Vtc* President.
Architect/Samuel Seitlin. Inaurance' Albert J Beer Certified Public Accountant Sitting from left to right
Seymour D. Keith Chairman Executive Committee/Paul H. Marks. Chairman Ementui/Nathan Meltzer. Chairman
of the Board/Herschel Rosenthal C. P. A.. Preaident Not pictured above: Sy Reese Investments.
FLAGLER FEDERAL
TWENTY YEARS OF DYNAMIC GROWTH.
The true measure of a financial institution is its thriving growth pattern,
accompanied by the soundness of its assets. During the two decades since the birth
of Flagter Federal, our policy has been one of systematic growth. ser> ke and the
security of our earnings.
Service institutions such as Flagler Federal depend for their success upon favorable
acceptance by the public. We are gratified that, as the results indicate, you, our
public, have created our success.
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
ASSETS
June .t(>. 1976
( j-h. ( .S. (.iivrriinii'iii and Gov'l Agrnr> Obligation*..... S .6..'106..170
Finn Mortgage Loan*.......................................................273.658.304
Loan on Sating* \rrouni-.......................................................892.343
Stork in Federal Home Loan Bank.......................................2.(':>.(HHI
l-and. Office Building* and Fquipmrnt Mel.........................4.807.182
Prepaid Federal Insurance Reserve Premium...........................925.299
fhher \>*el* and Inferred Charge*..........................................979.938
Total *.*m.|*...................................................................t339.hht.436
LIABILITIES AND RESERVES !-------------
Sating* Areounl*............................................................t313.109.799
4danre* from Federal Home I ..an Bank............................. l.fi7(I.IHMI
\greemenl lo Repurrha*e......................................................
I "-in- in Prores*..................................................................2,521. l' I
FImtow for Taxe* and Insurance...........................................3.595,522
Other Liabililie*.................................................................. I Jfi'l. I Deferred In. ..in.................................................................. 1.657,198
Re*ere* and Surplus......................................................... 13.841.233
Total Liabililie* and Re*erte* t339.6frt.436
mK
Flagler Federal
SAVTNCS G LOAN ASSOCIATION
DOVNTOV.NS4lMII0IM linltmur SI SHSt SI'S Wetl Sumne tltd V.I SICMI Sll ( MM I
kCoriiWo ltM*>SISM<>mNcri*/s-ONt SlslSlfW NOIMMIMISI*(MI6-,0IM U.h
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44*.*Hntrm4. C(XONlICIU4IOICo.oulCrtili SOStH S*> VIU*CI I "W "1th Mrrrl
June 30. 1975
t 38.762.782
242.505^93
573,405
1.947.000
4.307.182
960.888
825.787
t289,882,337
t254.2IS.797
9.670.000
3. t80.000
4,928.784
3.103,496
1.327.170
1.270.817
11,886,273
t289.882.337
J30
M*+"
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Friday, July 9, 1976
+ kisUkridk}ri
Page 13-A
IIP MINDLIN
Why Won't Smathers Eye MacISamara?
Continued from Page 4-A
ists. the communications mono-
polists, the agriculture satraps
ih 'V. of course, have no inter-
est in money whatsoever.
BUT NEVER fear, Jefferson
Davis Lee offers Hans Tanzler
to the proper Floridian in a
paragraph of consolation, "Jack-
sonville's impressive mayor,"
whose "Arian lineage (sic),
Arian name (sic) and Arian at-
titudes (sic) will make him a
natural contrast to his non
Arian (sic) opponent from Dade
County," meaning "Miami (Jew)
Bob" and his "fat interest ev-
ery day."
What is the "Florida Educa-
tor"? On its surface, it is a
newspaper whose illiterate mis-
spellings tell us something
about why the Florida school
system is one of the worst in
the nation.
Its editor is Robert B. Nor-
ris. and editorial offices are in
Jacksonville.
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Presumably, the "Florida Pro-
fessional Educator" is the pub-
lication of the Florida Profes-
sional Educators, an organiza-
tion formed in April, 1975 as
an alternative for teachers to
Florida's law giving public em-
ployees the right to collective
bargaining a law that has
opened the way to attempts to
unionize the teaching profes-
sion throughout the state, which
many teachers oppose as un-
professional.
THE "LEE" column is espe-
cially controversial because
the February edition of the
"Florida Professional Educator"
was the first newspaper pub-
lished by the Florida Profes-
sional Educators organization,
and hence a poor showcase for
its ideals.
President of the FPE is Ed-
ward J. Arahill, principal of
Killian High School in Miami,
who has repudiated the column
by declaring that "We just can't
have that kind of image," a no-
ble expression of anguish at the
prospect of anti-Semitism in his
backyard if ever I heard one.
Then where were Arahill and
his organization when "Lee"
did his dirty work? "It slipped
by us in getting this paper out,"
he has declared in a monumen-
tal dangling modifier, an atro-
cious error in English gram-
mar, than which there are few
more heinous.
SOME SLIP. But Arahill did
identify the pseudonymous
"Lee" as David MacNamara, as-
sistant to Secretary of State
Bruce Smathers.
Why such a politically-inspir-
ed column, with its obvious
prejudices, partisan and reli-
gious, should have been pub-
lished by the "Florida Profes-
sional Educator" in the first
place is a question that has yet
to be asked.
Why the assistant to the Sec- i
retary of State should have al- j
legedly written it in the second i
place (is he an educator?) has
also to be asked.
BUT THE Florida office of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith had a battery of its
own questions to ask, including
inquiries into a whole host of
conflicting statements that have
since emerged out of the "Lee"
turkey that no one seems will-
ing to answer:
As editor and publisher of
the "Florida Professional Edu-
cator." Robert Norris most re-
cently assumed responsibility
for writing the column, but in
earlier statements, he was quot-
ed as saying that Smathers' as-
sistant (MacNamara) "did give
me the column." Why the
switch in stories?
On one occasion, Norris
confessed that the column
"came from the Secretary of
State's office, but I do not know
who wrote it." Later, he said,
"I did not get more than one
or two words or sentences from
MacNamara." Which, if either.
is true?
Killian's Dr. Arahill main-
tains his position that MacNa-
mara is the pseudonymous
"Lee." Whoever the writer was.
why did Norris publish it at all?
And if, as it is now alleged.
Norris' intentions were bigoted,
doesn't the Florida Profession-
al Educators organization have
an editorial board that could
have rejected the article for its
newspaper?
MacNamara denies all
statements implicating him in
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the "Lee" column's writings and
anti-Semitic sentiments. Thus,
in effect, he brands Publisher
Norris as a liar. But, as the
ADL has written to Secretary
of State Smathers, Norris will
not comment "on any possible
knowledge he may have regard-
ing the authorship of the col-
umn." Why?
Smathers concedes in con-
tacts with the ADL that Norris
and MacNamara are "the only
competent evidence which I
have in the case." But Sma-
thers seems unwilling to move
Is their conflicting evidence
sufficient for him to make a
unilateral decision?
WHAT THE Anti-Defamation
League is now calling for is a
non-judicial proceeding in
which MacNamara, Norris and
Arahill can confront one anoth-
er with sworn testimony regard-
ing the anti-Semitic "Lee" col-
umn and in which, as Arthur
N. Teitelbaum. director of the
ADL's Southern Area, has writ-
ten to Smathers, "the parties
may question one another un-
der oath."
The ultimate question the
:tltimate unsupplied answer
is Smathers and his failure to
react to this net of religious
filth and obvious prevarication
in the name of a cover-up.
One would think that Smath-
ers, as a high Florida State of-
ficial, would want the role of
his assistant clarified in an is-
sue where his assistant should
ha\e played no role at all in
the first place and where, once
having played it. he is now al-
leged to be the author of Hit-
lerian sentiments down to the
last misspelling of the key
Aryan word.
SO LONG as Smathers re-
mains coy. he encourages Flor-
ida's not so-educated educators
to educate our state's teachers
in the ways of bigotry. Add this
to the natural illiteracy among
some of them, and you have a
potent weapon with which to
crush our kids some more. The
public schools are bad enough
these days.
William Calhoun Baggs would
surely have had a possum
story in ultimate commentary
on this coon turkey.
Youthful Israeli Wins Water
Competition in Luxembourg
BRUSSELS (JTA) A 16-year-old Israeli, Nir
Shamir, won the 200-meter swimming competition at the
Inter-European Youth Championship held in Luxembourg.
The young Israeli won two gold medals and was pronounc-
ed "best overall swimmer." The six-man Israeli team, four
boys and two girls, reached the finals. The competition
was attended by 1700 youngsters from Western Europe.
The
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\.^'


**
Page 14-A
*Jewist>noric0su7
Friday, July
Well Never Know Details of the Big Raid
Continue from Pace 1-A
Uganda, and some 30 minutes later, the hostages were all
aboard and on their way to Nairobi in Kenya.
IN NAIROBI, the planes left behind two wounded Is-
raelis in Kenyan hospitals. Their next stop was Tel Aviv.
Under the guise of coming to Kampala to bring jailed
Arab terrorists in exchange for the hostages, the three
planes landed, rolled up to the ancient, wooden, mosquito-
ridden quarters in which the hostages were kept isolated
and ringed by dynamite, and launched an attack on the
quarters and their captors.
There is no particular information available on how
the daring raid was coordinated, but the underside of the
Hercules dropped open and out poured jeeps, armed
command cars, and crack Israeli commando troops. On the
way to the building, they destroyed ten Uganda Air Force
Soviet-supplied MIG fighters.
FOR THE next half-hour, there were shooting, scream-
ing, shouts of instructions to the hostages, who at first
thought they were about to be massacred, and only later
realized that they were being liberated by Israeli forces.
President Idi Amin reports that 20 of his troops were
killed and 32 injured. But how the Israeli commando and
other hostages were killed and wounded is not yet clear.
The hostages themselves said that one of the terrorists
tossed a grenade into one of the rooms in which they were
confined before he died.
BRIG. DAN SHOMRON, commander of the operation,
reported on the return to Tel Aviv that all seven of the
teirorists were killed, "and that is almost all the terrorists
we think there were."
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin told the Knesset Sun-
day, "Throughout the entire time since the capture of the
plane, we sought ways and means to foil the terrorists'
scheme by our own devices. The army and the intelligence
community lost not a single hour required for thinking,
planning and preparation. When the opportune moment
arrived, the plan was submitted for the cabinet's consider-
ation. The cabinet approved it unanimously."
President Ford Meets Top Jewish Brass
Continue from Page 1-A
discussion which lasted two
hours, though originally sched-
uled for less than one hour,
Ford characterized Israel as
"the hinch-pin for the area (the
Middle East) in terms of peace
and security there." reiternated
the U.S. military and moral
commitment to Israel, which he
said was very evident and in-
dicated that he was amenable
to a compromise with respect to
funding Israel's economic and
military needs for the transi-
tional quarter between the end
of fiscal 1976 and the start of
fiscal 1977.
The meeting was reported to
have been arranged by Max
Fisher of Detroit, a national
Jewish leader and personal
friend of the President.
Ranking Administration offi-
cials attending included Gen-
Brent Scowcroft. chairman of
the National Security Council,
and Alan Greenspan, chairman
of the Council of Economic Ad-
visors. According to Nessen, the
meetings was "one of a series'*
the President has been having
"not just with Jewish leaders "
ONE OF the participants said
afterwards "it was one of the
best meetings I have ever seen
the President have with any
group. It was a candid exchange
of views and I think the group
left with the sense that the
President has been honest with
them. Although he didn't an-
swer their questions 100 percent
as they might have wanted, it
was a very warm and friendly
atmosphere."
With respect to the $375 mil-
lion in transitional quarter fund-
ing approved for Israel in the
Senate's version of the foreign
aid bill. Ford said he could not
see his way, "in terms of our
own budget situation of agree-
ing to $375 million but some-
where within those figures there
is a way we can compromise it
without a stalemate."
He was referring to the dif-
ference between the $375 mil-
lion and the $200 million ceil-
ing proposed by the Administra-
tion.
FORD DENTED reports that
E vary one* In a whito
a Famous Rastsurant
isl
i in 11
Com* tot out mmilcn^'
Itmiciaant
71 WAMMNOTONAVMNM
MIAMI MACK 31-*M7

MAX FISHER
he had told Congressional lead-
ers he would veto any measure
that enntainod one dollar above
the $200 million
He said he was aware that
the Israelis have indicated they
would have a short-fall of $80
million by the end of the tran-
sitional period if they received
only $200 million but observed
that "If reasonable people can
get together, we hope to be able
to solve it so that Israel will
not have a short-fall."
Ford assured the group that
he was absolutely committed to
Israel and "could not stand idly
by when there were questions
about Israel's security and sur-
vival. Israel occupies a very
Israel Jet Flies
To West Coast
WILMINGTON, Delaware (JTA) The Westwind,
the Israel-made executive jet, successfully completed its
first non-stop coast-to-coast flight last week, it was an-
nounced here by Atlantic aviation, North American dis-
tributors of the plane.
According to Atlantic aviation, a demonstrator model
carrying four passengers, flew 2,500 miles from LaGuardia
Airport, New York, to Los Angeles International Airport
in six hours, 22 minutes without refueling and had an
adequate reserve of fuel when it landed.
The aircraft flew at an average cruising speed of 470
m.p.h. at an altitude of 43,000 feet. It carried baggage for
six persons and 200 pounds of additional equipment. The
Westwind was designed and built by Israel Aircraft In-
dustries.
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strategic piece of Land in an
area of importance to all the
world, although Israel does not
have some of the mineral re-
sources other countries in that
area have. Israel is the Linch-
pin for the area in terms of
neace and security there."
HE MADE the point that in
two years that he has been
President, Israel received more
than 40 percent of the total aid
it has gotten from the U.S. be-
tween 1948-1975.
He stated that Israel received
$6.5 billion in U.S. aid during
the 27 months of Ford Admin-
istration budgets, including
transitional quarter funding.
The President said he would
have to complete his review of
the specifics of legislation now
pending to combaj the Arab
boycott of Israel before discuss-
ing them or taking a strong
stand. But he reiterated his
strong personal views against
discriminatory boycotts.
With respect to Soviet Jew-
ry, the group agreed with Ford
that it was too late in the year
to provide aid from a legisla-
tive viewpoint. Ford said, how-
ever, that he hoped ways could
be found to "break the log
jam." He said he was "not inter-
ested in talking about blame in
the situation but how do we
improve It."
Calif. Gives
Schwartz
Information
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
speedy response by California
authorities to Israel's request
for further information in the
case of Tuvia Schwartz whose
extradition California seeks is
expected to force Israel to de-
cide sooner than expected whe-
ther or not to comply with the
extradition request.
There is widespread public
sentiment here against return-
ing Schwartz, an American who
has become an Israel citizen, to
face criminal charges in thr
US.
SCHWARTZ was arrested in
Los Angeles in January. 1975
in connection with the fire
bombing of the car of John
Artucovic. a San Francisco con-
tractor. He jumped bail and
fled to Israel where he subse-
quently married and joined the
army.
He is viewed by many Israelis
as a political refugee whose al-
leged crime is a political act.
John Artucovic is the brother
of Andrea Artucovic. said to
have been the Interior Minister
in the Nazi puppet state of
Croatia during World War II,
responsible for the deportations
and deaths of thousands of Jews
and others.
Andrea Articuvic is one of
several score former Na7: war
criminals believed to be resid-
ing in the U.S.
AMERICAN authorities have
rejected requests by Yugoslavia
for his extradition on grounds
that he is a political refugee.
Justice Minister Haim Zadok
was urged by a number of Knes-
set members late last month not
to bring the Schwartz case to
court for a decision as to whe-
ther he is extraditable.
Zadok disclosed at the time
that he had returned the extra-
dition request to Sacramento
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I
Friday, July 9, 1976
-JeHlstfkxkMain
Page 15-A
\lf Carter Elected, George Ball May Be Sec9y of State
Continue from Page 1-A
military support for Israel rep-
resented one of the worst pos-
sible blunders of the Ford-
Kissinger diplomacy.
It would be difficult to re-
concile Carter's forceful pledge
of June 23 to "strengthen our
commitment to give Israel what-
ever defense mechanisms or
economic aid is necessary to
let them meet any potential at-
tack" with the selection of
George Ball as his Secretary of
1 State.
GEORGE BALL has emerged
[as the successor to former Sen.
Ij William Fulbright as the
country's most articulate intel-
lectual critic of Israel. If any-
thing, Ball goes further than
the Arkansan who conceded
during his last days in power
in Washington that there just
might be a case for Israel re-
taining control of some part of
the Golan Heights and for real
guarantees of freedom of pas-
sage for Israeli shipping in the
Red Sea.
Ball's most recent attack on
American Israel policy and on
Israel's stance appears in a new
book, "Diplomacy for a Crowd-
ed World," extracts of which
were published in the Saturday
Review. The extract, entitled.
Israel, Bonn Come
\To Economic Terms
By JON FEDLER
BONN (JTA) Israeli
I Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
and his West German counter-
part. Hans-Dietrich Genscher,
signed an agreement here aimed
at strengthening and expanding
economic relations between Is-
rael and the Federal Republic.
The agreement includes mea-
sures to promote and safeguard
West German investments in
Israel and the exchange of in-
formation and other measures
that would assist Israeli exports
to West Germany.
ALLON ARRIVED here at the
head of Israel's delegation to
the first meeting of the Israel-
West German Joint Economic
Commission established earlier
in the year to increase bilateral
trade.
The commission is composed
of high ranking Israeli and Ger-
man political and economic
leaders. During his stay here,
Allon had meetings with Chan-
cellor Helmut Schmidt, former
Chancellor Willy Brandt and
Helmuth Bohl leader of the
Christian Democratic opposi-
tion party who said he would
visit Israel after the elections.
Political rather than eco-
nomic matters were stressed in
speeches by Genscher and Al-
lon at a dinner given in honor
of the visiting Israeli minister
bv the West German Foreign
Minister.
GENSCHER, who greeted Al-
lon as "my respected colleague
and dear friend, Yigal," called
for "concessions by both sides."
to end the Middle East conflict
"which affects or burdens all of
us."
He said that leading Arab pol-
iticians who have visited West
Germany have made it clear
that they no longer questioned
Israel's existence, and "in this
respect it seems an important
development has indeed been
initiated, making it easier for
Israel to take the steps neces-
sary from its side for a peace
settlement."
He said West Germany has
repeatedly made clear its posi-
tion, including Israel's right to
exist, and "what is needed is to
show signs of good will and
strive vigorously for a compre-
hensive peace settlement."
IN HIS speech, Allon deliv-
ered a vigorous defense of
Zionism which he described as
the Jewish response to "the
most terrible abomination, the
Holocaust which the Hitler re-
gime brought upon us."
He said that "Zionism incor-
porated the wish to build a fu-
ture in which such tragedies
would be avoided. It represents
the best in modern Judaism,"
and "no malicious distortion
and no downright lies can alter
this truth even when the oppo-
site is decided three times week-
ly at relevant and irrelevant
meetings, including the institu-
tion which calls itself the United
Nations."
ALLON SAID Israel "rejected
totally" the possibility of a
stalemate in peace moves. It
would prefer immediate peace
negotiations, but if the condi-
tions for this are not yet ripe,
Israel is prepared "to conclude
a far-reaching political agree-
ment combatting the specter of
a new war and the enmity of
our neighbors."
The economic agreement sign-
ed here included provisions for
the establishment of a Trade
Center in Israel to keep Israeli
manufacturers informed of ex-
port possibilities in West Ger-
many and to provide them with
vital information about the West
German market.
The pact also provides the
benefits normally granted to de-
veloped countries, including
subsidies for exhibitions of Is-
raeli goods in West Germany
and visits by West German ex-
perts to Israel.
AN AD HOC working group
will be set up to examine ques-
tions of industrial cooperation
between the two countries, espe-
cially ^n the chemical, elec-
tronics and metal sectors, in-
dustrial research and develop-
ment and trade promotion.
The two delegations discuss-
ed the Arab boycott. According
to an official communique, the
German side "reiterated its posi-
tion considering the boycott an
obstacle to trade and a practice
incompatible with its policy of
a free economy."
"The Disenchantment With Kis-
singer," deals in large part with
Secretary Kissinger's conduct
of the office to which Ball re-
putedly aspires.
A CENTRAL theme is Secre-
tary Kissinger's failure as
Ball sees it to work within
the framework of United Na-
tions Security Council Resolu-
tion 242 "on which," he said,
"the major parties to the con-
flict had agreed."
The Ball interpretation is that
this, resolution would require
Israel to withdraw not only
from the Sinai Peninsula but
also from "the Gaza Strip, the
Golan Heights, the West Bank
of the Jordan, and Old Jeru-
salem."
Nowhere in the published ex-
cerpt does Ball explain why the
Jordanian Army's seizure of the
Old City in 1948 was valid al-
though by UN decision Jeru-
salem was to have been inter-
nationalized, while the Israeli
liberation of the Old City in
1967 was an aggression that had
to be undone.
NOR DID he explain why the
Egyptian Army's crossing of the
international boundary to oc-
cupy the Gaza Strip in 1948 was
more valid than an Israeli oc-
cupation of the territory in 1967
which at least restored it to its
original status as part of Pales-
tine.
Efforts were made. Ball con-
ceded, to carry out Resolution
242 but none succeeded, he said,
"even though experience in
other situations had clearly
shown that, so long as Israel
continued to hold the occupied
territories, there could be no
lasting peace in the Middle
East."
To support his thesis. Ball
quoted an Arab journalist "close
to Nasser" who reported that
the Arabs, "under Egyptian
leadership began immediately
after the 1967 cease-fire to pre-
pare the counter-offensive which
finally culminated in the 1973
October War."
BUT ISRAEL did not occupy
the disputed territories until
1967 and Ball, in the published
excerpts, does not explain why,
from 1948 to 1967. the AraD
states continued to wage un-
declared war on Israel through
terrorist attacks on Israeli ter-
ritory mounted from Jordan,
Lebanon. Syria and the Egypt-
ian-held Gaza Strip, the shelling
of Israeli settlements in the
shadow of the Golan Heights by
Iraqi artillery, rifle and ma-
chine-gun fire from the Old City
by Jordanian forces, an eco-
nomic blockade of Israel which
included the barring from the
Suez Canal of vessels sailing to
or from Israeli ports.
Nor does his argument that
all the difficulties are due to
Israeli retention of Arab lands
explain or justify the Arab re-
fusal to discuss peace with Is-
rael during the 19 year interval
between establishment of the
Jewish State in 1948 and June
1967 when the Israelis hurled
back the invading armies of
three Arab states and occupied
the territories now in dispute.
Secretary Kissinger's big mis-
take in the Middle East. Ball
asserts, was that "instead of try-
ing to secure the enforcement
of that resolution (242) or using
it as the framework for a final
settlement, the Secretary sought
to exploit Egyptian anxiety for
a period or respite by arranging
a truce with only one of the
front-line Arab states." This he
accomplished, according to Ball,
in "a complex bargain with
largess for both sides."
THE NET result of the Amer-
ican (Kissinger) tactics in the
Middle East, according to Ball,
"will have been: (1) to side-
track any serious movement to-
ward a final solution and (2)
to give one party to the con-
flict a massive arsenal to de-
fend its continued occupation
of territories taken by force
without regard to accepted
principles of international law
or of the United Nations Char-
ter as interpreted by one Se-
curity Council resolution and
reaffirmed by another."
Comments Ball: "History will
not mark this down as the fin-
est hour for American diplo-
macy."
There is much to criticize in
Henry Kissinger's devious ac-
tivities in the Middle East, and
Israelis and American Jews may
have no little reason to suspect
that the Secretary has played
fast and loose with Israel's se-
curity in his efforts to put over
some grand plan for "a genera-
tion of peace."
THE SECRETARY of State
has not hesitated to put cruel
pressures on Israel, but he has
at least recognized that Israel
alone is not to blame for the
state of affairs.
We may suspect that because
of his leverage on Israel he ex-
pects Israel to ante up the big-
ger share of the tab for a state
of non-belligerency in the Mid-
dle East but that differs
greatly from Ball's determina-
tion to push Israel back behind
its 1967 borders and rest its
security on the Rood faith of
the Arabs.
Designation of George Ball as
Secretary of State would signal
a greater danger to Israel than
a new massing of Arab forces
on Israel's frontiers. There is
something intriguing in the fact
that George Ball is a partner in
the Lehman Brothers banking
firm, while the man who for
many vears directed France's
anti-Israel policy. President
Georges Pompidou, had been
the president of the Rothschild
Bank in Paris.
TO SOLVE COMMUNITY RELATIONS PROBLEMS
Gotham Forms New Jewish Body
Aussies Join UNEF Guards
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) An Australian heli-
copter unit is to join the United Nations peace-keeping
force in the Sinai. The UN said today that the unit
comprising four Iroquois helicopters, nine pilots and 37
support personnel would arrive early the month in the
operational area of the force.
The Australian offer to provide the unit came after
the Secretary-General's report to the Security Council last
October that UNEF would require additional personnel and
equipment.
The Secretary-General has expressed his deep appre-
ciation to the Australian government for the support it has
given to the UN Middle East peacekeeping operation.
NEW YORK (JTA)
The first organization in the
modern history of the New
York Jewish community to
unify the community's re-
sponse to its community re-
lations problems was an-
nounced here.
The Jewish Community
Relations Council of New
York was established by
Jewish community and or-
ganizational leaders because
of increasing awareness of
the severity of the problems
facing the Jewish commun-
ity, it was reported at a press
conference here. Its officers
were elected and its by-laws
adopted at a meeting last
week.
ATTENDING the news con-
ference were Richard Ravitch,
the JCRC president, and four
vice presidents. Laurence A.
Tisch, chairman of the board of
the United "Jewish Appeal-Fed-
eration of Jewish Philanthropies
Joint Campaign; Rabbi Israel
Miller, former chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Majbr American Jewish Organ-
izations; George Klein, member
of the board of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America; and Daniel S. Sha-
piro, past president of the New
York chanter of the American
Jewish Committee.
Malcolm Hoenlein. executive
director of the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet Jew-
ry, wars named JRC executive
director.
Officials said New York, which
has the world's largest Jewish
community and is headquarters
for many national and interna-
tional Jewish organizations, has
been the only major city with-
out a central Jewish community
relations coordinating agency.
INITIAL FUNDING for the
new JCRC was provided by the
Federation in the form of a spe-
cial grant for two years. Offi-
cials said financial support will
also be received through mem-
bership fees and independent
contributions.
Ravitch said that many Jew-
ish organizations "have sepa-
rately tried to cope with mat-
ters which universally affect
the New York Jewish commu-
nity, including neighborhood
stability, police relations, rela-
tions with other ethnic groups,
loss of 1obs and security arising
from the city's fiscal crisis, leg-
islation and other matters relat-
ing to the continuity and vitality
of Jewish life in New York
City."
Adding that each organiza-
tion has "traditionally spoken
for itself alone." he said that
the" JCRC "hopefully will have
the funds and the organization-
al' support to act effectively and
in'a unified fashion on all mat-
ters of vital interest to the Jew-
is community."
'SHAPIRO SAID that "we have
been at all times mindful of the
fact that the autonomy of each
of the organizations participat-
ing be respected and that we do
not in any Way derogate from
that. Nevertheless, the New
York Jewish community faces
unprecedented challenges, and
it has become essential to rec-
ognize the need for an overall
coordinating mechanism con-
cerned w th community rela-
tions."
Hoenlein said that "at a time
when we face unprecedented
problems, it is all the more im-
portant that we be able to mo-
bilize our resources and
strengths for considered delibra-
tion and coordinated action."
Other JCKC officers include
Jack Weiler. chairman of the
Joint Distribution. Committee,
honorary JCRC president; Max-
well Raab, president of Temple
Emanuel, vice president; Irving
Silverman, president of the
United Synagogue Metropolitan
Region, treasurer; and Irving
Husin. honorary president of
the New York Federation of Re-
form Synagogues, secretary.
FOUNDING member organ-
izations of the JCRC include the
American Jewish Committee.
American Jewish Congress, Jew-
ish Labor Committee, Jewish
War Veterans, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions. United Synagogue of
America. Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of Amer-
ica, Federation of Jewish Phil-
anthropies, Labor Zionist Al-
liance, and the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America.
Also, the United Jewish Ap-
peal, Hadassah, New York Board
of Rabbis. National Council of
Young Israel. ^Workmen s Circle,
Council of Jewish Organizations
in Civil Service, and the bo-
rough-wide Jewish Community
Councils of the Bronx, Queens
and Staten Island. Hoenlein said
other organizations are expect-
ed to join in the coming months.


16-A
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'Jewish Flor idian
Miami, Florida Friday, July 9, 1976
Section B
ISRAEL WANTS TO CLOSE EXPECTATION GAP
Aliyah More Useful Than Money
But Hopes, Reality Don't Jibe
By RACHEL WH1TEBOOK
In mid-June Nahum Astar, Consul General of Israel in
Atlanta, wished an official Bon Voyage to 35 olim (emi-
grants) from the Miami area who are leaving this summer
to begin a new life in Israel.
Eliezer Kroll, shaliach (representative) in Miami of
the Israel Aliyah Center, anticipates an increase in emigra-
tion of 50 percent over last year and notes with pleasure
that a number of families are included. In 1975 more than
100 area residents emigrated to Israel and so far, in 1976,
more than 150 have done so.
FEW OLIM, however, says than money does, because it
Yehiel Leket, of the Israel Ali-
yah Center in New York, have
any genuine commitment. There
is a vast gap, he finds, between
expectation and reality, between
j the oleh's often romantic ideal-
ism and his ability to sustain it
when confronted with the ac-
I tuality of life in Israel.
Of the emigrants, 50 percent
[are in the 19-to-29 age group.
which means they have no
first-hand memories of the Holo-
caust and thus no empathy with
what Israel represents to their
elders. Young people often go
experimentally, not recognizing
that life on a kibbutz is not like
[eight weeks at summer camp.
LEKET DESCRIBES the re-
I suits of a five-year study of two
groups of oleh: those whose
ideology and commitment are
strong are likelier to stay in Is-
rael, despite hardship, discom-
fort and plain homesickness,
than are those who experience
what he calls "the gap in ex-
pectations and reality."
The Droof is in the statistics:
lof each 100 persons who emi-
Igrate from to the U.S. or Canada
|to Israel with the intention of
living there permanently. 40
eventually return, 24 within the
[first vear. Of the 35 Miamians
[leaving this summer, it thus can
Ibe projected that eight will
lleave Israel almost immediate-
llv. and six more will do so
I within five years.
THE OVERALL return rate is
[high, and many come back with
Ihones tarnished. Tarnished, but
jnot destroyed because, Leket
I says, some do go back again to
Israel, aware this time of the
[financial, emotional, intellectual
[costs of living and better pre-
pared to meet the demands of
|each day's dailiness.
What can be done to diminish
Ithe number of returnees, to in-
Icrease the numbers of those
Iwho go and stay? The State
of Israel's eagerness to encour-
Jage immigration, Leket sayte,
[must be matched bv the Israeli
people: they could and should
[be far more helpful than they
tend to be in their contacts with
I new arrivals from America and
|Canada.
Considerable effort is made
Ito some extent for admittedly
propaganda mirposesto make
[welcome and absorb immi-
Isrants from the Soviet Union,
[Middle Europe and elsewhere.
[But the effort where Americans
[are concerned is negligible and
loften negligent, discouraging,
pnuelcoming.
AND YET we hear increas-
ingly that Soviet immigrants to
Israel often are not truly de-
feated to life there, but rather
ise their Israel visas as what
-eket calls "an escape from
Russia," frequently leaving Is-
rael quickly, sometimes not get-
ting there at all, having chang-
ed plans and planes in Vienna
3r Rome.
Aliyah strengthens Israel's
tconomy, Leket insists, more
provides desperately needed
manpower and skills, adds con-
siderable variety to the Israeli
lifestyle and quality of life, per-
mitting interaction among Jews
of many cultures and national
backgrounds.
What would make aliyah more
permanently attractive? Leket
and Kroll urge that Americans
not immediately try to live in
villages or small towns, mo-
shavim or kibbutzim but
rather acclimatize themselves
in cities or at least large towns
where the language problem is
minimal, where the "culture
shock" is necessarily less pro-
found, where at least some of
life's familiar aspects are vis-
ible and its demands tolerable.
ADJUSTMENT and orienta-
tion are easier, Leket adds, in
"ghe'tos," enclaves of Amer-
icans or other English-speakers
with whom communication is
uncomplicated and who have
themselves experienced the new
arrivals' problems and adjusted
to them.
Leket and Kroll are therefore
grateful to fliose enthusiastic
olim who return here for a few
months' stay to share their ex-
periences of life in Israel, be-
cause this eyewitness account
of what-life-is-like-for-an-Amer-
ican provides advance orienta-
tion and encouragement, bol-
sters wavering commitment,
serves as a trustworthy eye-
opener. The view through a fel-
low American's eyes is neces-
sarily more valid than through
an Israel's.
"Olim-in-residence" in Miami
describe their personal experi-
ences, explain how to get about,
define problems new olim will
confront in obtaining housing,
jobs, education.
THEY PROVIDE lists of what
should be taken and what left
behind, and explain that, while
bureaucracy abounds, taxes are
high and salaries low un-
contested deterrents to Amer-
icans used to high living stand-
ards free schooling through
tenth grade is available for im-
migrant children as is financial
assistance, there are tax breaks
of various sorts and, most im-
portant, life in Israel is filled
with compensations for the Jew
that life elsewhere is not.
The culture gaps and shocks
will diminish as more people go,
Leket continues, but aliyah, he
contends, is not sufficiently en-
couraged here by rabbis, tem-
Dles. Jewish organizations.
"Rabbis and Federations and
other groups should raise
bodies, not money," he says, ad-
ding that "aliyah protects the
Jew against assimilation into
national cultures" and that the
Jew of any nationality who goes
to Israel to live, to be a citizen,
"gains a sense of belonging as a
Jew in his own home" rather
than as a guest in someone
else's because he IS home."
"A Jew," heconcludes,
"should live in Israel to have a
better life as a Jew."
LEKET
Aliyah Director
Israeli-born Yehiel Leket, the
new national director of the Is-
raeli Aliyah Center in New
York, became a member of Kib-
butz Mishmar David when he
was 18 and later studied phil-
osophy and political science at
the Hebrew University, grad-
uating in 1963. He served for
a year as youth leader in the
suburbs of Jerusalem, was om-
budsman for the Ministry of
labor and editor of its official
monthly publication.
From 1965 until he assumed
his current position, he was a
Ministry of Education spokes-
man and chairman of all gov-
ernment and public institution
.spokesmen, as well as chairman
of the Young Leadership of the
Labor Party and its candidate
for Knesset.
LONG INVOLVED in. Zionist
activities, Leket has been a dele-
KROLL
Is Active Zionist
gate to the Zionist Congress, a
member of the Zionist Action
Committee and Jewish Agency
Assembly and of the board of
directors of the Zionist Council
in Israel.
Leket says that members of
the Israeli Diplomatic Corps and
representatives of the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs recently have
begun offering their assistance
in promoting Aliyah, inviting
potential olim (emigres) to spe-
cial briefings on foreign policy
and political affairs and provid-
ing other pertinent information.
ELIEZER KROLL is shaliach
of the Israel Aliyah Center's re-
gional office in Miami, super-
vising the local Chug Aliyah, an
organization of potential olim
affiliated with the nationwide
Association of American and
Canadians for Aliyah (AACA).
Israel Bond Sales
Highest in Miami
With the sale of nearly $1
million in Israel Bonds during
June, the sale of Israel Bonds
in the South Florida area has
jumped to a record $9,741,200
since Jan. 1.
This is an 11 percent increase
over 1975, the year with the
largest sale of Israel Bonds
since the organization's incep-
tion in 1951.
The announcement was made
by Gary Gerson, chairman of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond
campaign, who lauded his pre-
decessor, Robert L. Siegel, un-
der whose direction Israel Bond
sales in Miami were the high-
est per capita of any of the 15
major Jewish communities in
the United States.
GERSON TOLD The Jewish
Floridian that activity in the
next six months will exceed
the pace of the first six months
of the year. He added that "Jew-
ish and non-Jewish communi-
ties in Miami which have been
purchasing Israel Bonds have
recognized Israel's need for
development dollars. The re-
GARY GERSON
cent cut-off of United States
funds to meet Israel's economic
problems has caused us to in-
tensify and double our efforts.
We have made a commitment
and we are keeping it."
Local Men's Club Leaders
Get Convention Assignments
Several men's club leaders
from the Florida region have
received assignments in connec-
tion with the 47th annual con-
vention of the National Federa-
tion of Jewish Men's Clubs at
the Concord Hotel, Kiamesha
Lake. NY., July 25-29.
Those appointed are Florida
Region president Joseph Abe-
low of Miami Beach, Edward I.
Rosenfeld of North Miami, Jack
Chaiken of North Miami Beach,
Ralph Fistel of Miami and Mil-
ton Berger of Bal Harbour, a
past national president.
Convention chairmen I. Mur-
ray Jacobs and Samuel G. Ber-
lin announced that this year's
Convention will be geared to the
Bicentennial and the theme
"Judaic Ideals Reaffirmed."
Abraham A. Silver of Erie, Pa.,
is president of the Federation
and Rabbi Joel S. Geffen of
New York City is spiritual ad-
visor.
The National Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs, a constit-
uent body of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America
and the United Synagogue of
America, is composed of 375
Brotherhoods affiliated with
American and Canadian Con-
servative synagogues.
Ms. Ditchek IS anted
Lehrman Principal
Her junior vear in Israel at
the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem on a fellowship spon-
sored bv Brandeis University
started Ellen Ditchek on a
oath of Jewish positivism.
That oath led to her recent
appointment as principal of the
Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-El.
After returning to New York
from Jerusalem and graduat-
ing from Hunter College with a
B.A.. Ms. Ditcheck earned her
Master's degree at Boston Uni-
versity in educational adminis-
tration and as a reading special-
ist.
For nearly for years, before
moving to Miami Beach in 1970,
she taught in New York public
schools, guiding gifted and re-
medial students.
She i.oined the Lehrman Day
School faculty jn 1970 and after
a vear in the English and He-
brew Departments, she was
named assistant principal.
Last month Mrs. Mae Pearl-
stein retired as principal, and
her chi?f assistant of five years
was appointed principal.
Ms Ditchek is on the steer-
ELLEN DITCHEK
ing committee of the Young
Adults of the Jewish Federation
and on the education and execu-
tive committees of the Anti-
Defamation League.
In the latter oart of August
Ms. Ditchek and Daniel Aver-
book will be married by Dr.
Lehrman at Temple Emanu-El.
Averbook. a Miami attorney and
CPA. is a third-generation mem-
ber of the synagogue.
Golden Reelected ADL Commissioner
Alfred Golden was reelected
for the second two-year term as
national Anti-Defamation League
commissioner at the recent
B'nai B'rith District 5 conven
tion in Baltimore.
District 5 encompasses all
the states from Maryland to
Florida, with a total member-
ship of approximately 25,000
men.
Golden, who is a vice presi-
dent of Riverside Memorial
Chapels, is a member of the
Dade County Personnel Advis-
ory Board, of the board of di-
rectors of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. He is an officer
and member of the board of
directors of Temple Beth-El in
Hollywood.


Page 2-B
: Community'
I Corner:
Riding the lecture circuit:
State legislator Barry Katun,
home from the Tallahassee hill,
spoke to Northshore Kiwanians
. Mayor Sam Brenner of Surf-
side spoke so eloquently at his
town's Memorial Day event that
Rep. Claude Pepper had the
Mayor's remarks included in
the Congressional Record .
Prof. Robert Sandier on vaca-
tion from his University of Mi-
ami lecturing duties filled the
void by speaking at Temple Is-
rael as part of the Summer in
the Synagogue series.
Comings and goings: New
rabbis to Miami Brett Gold-
stein arrives at Temple Israel
while predecessor Robert Ork-
and goes on to his new pulpit in
Rockford. 111. Edwin Farber
at Temple Samu-El.
JL
In the "My Son" Departs -
Douglas, son of June and Srn
Jacobs, recently elected p
dent of ZBT fraternity at Tulane
Robert Levin (Dr. and Mrs.
Burton) was named a "1976
Presidential Scholar." He's one
of only 121 high school students
to be so honored Ronald
Berliner received the Rotary-
Senior Boy of the Year Award
. Edward Anapol graduated
from Duke University with a
Magna Cum Laude on his sheep-
skin.
Community Corner Salutes:
Milton Fisher on being named
The Florida International Busi-
nessman of the Year by the
Florida Council for Internation-
al Development Mr. and
Mrs. Josef Zola on bridging the
Vtioo gap. They traveled
.'oast to celebrate
edding of one grandson
- J the Bar Mitzvah of another!

Have you heard' Bet Breira.
the -- ratfrt liberal congrepa-
the Southwest section.
nnimz Temple-ware" parties.
. :o a Templeware party
go home with a member-
ship
______+Jewist fhrkUan
Registration Open
At Beth Moshe
Registration for all depart-
ments of the Temple Beth Mo-
she Popiel Religious School is
under way for the coming
school year.
The nursery school program,
for two-to-four-year-olds, offers
many educational activities and
experiences for the pre-school-
er.
Morning and afternoon religi-
ous school is geared to accom-
modate children from kinder-
garten through 12th grade.
Kidima Junior and Senior
USY groups are open to chil-
dren in erades 5 to 12. The
vouth groups program focuses
on cultural, social, religious
and athletic activities.
The secondary junior and
senior high school program is
conducted iointlv with the Cen-
tral Agencv for Jewish Educa-
tion.
The director of education is
Jules Einhom. the Nursery-
School director is Mrs Barbara
Shulman.
For further information,
please call Temple Beth Moshe.
Friday, July 9- 19?6
Lawrence Robbins, M.D., plastic surgeon at Mount Si-
nai Medical Center, congratulates Chaim Ashkerum,
M.D., on completion of his fellowship. Dr. Ashkenazi mil
return to Israel, where he will practice at Mount Sinai's
sister hospital, Chaim Sheba Medical Center in Tel Ha-
shomer.
Mt. Sinai Nurses Are Big Sisters
Annabellc Metzler. a Regis-
tered Nurse at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, has set a rec-
With Mrs. Frances Wolf son (2nd from right), in whose
name the Frances Wolfson Art Scholarship Fund Awards
are made through a gift from the Mitchell Wolfson Fam-
ily Foundation, are Miami-Dade Community College art
majors Jody Morlock (left). Juan Pumerol and Lori
Decker. Mrs. Wolfson presented the awards at a recent
luncheon for the winners. Judging for scholarships is
based on portfolios of work submitted by contestants
and is dom by members of the school's art faculty and a
representative of the donor.

PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
A A C G C 0 U N T Y M E P
I C H 0 N ?BDTH L c
H H I X E INIMBE U D
P S C E G 0 Q E W S W c N
L E A G R Y V P E S Y L E R G P E P Y L 0 E 0 V T
D A 0 Q B R E X Z M R K A R H Z G G W U I N K B N
L 0 P H N H S A L D C S I
I T Y A A I M T K U I K B?
H S S Q I I B J S J T T S
P 0 B I Z R T C A R Y C A
MRS. BERMAN
Menorah Has
New Principal
Mrs Bryna Berman has been
appointed principal of Temple
Menorah Religious School. Dr
Morton Korn. school board
chairman, announced
Formerly the head of the
Secular Department of the Me
norah Day School and supervi-
sor of the Pre-School Program.
Bryna Berman will direct the
religious education and the
Parent-Involvement Programs
for the coming year under the
supervision of Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz. the temple's spirit-
ual leader.
MS. METZLER MRS. NESTLER
ord in trips to the beach, on
tomato-picking expeditions and
in other adventures shared with
a young t?irl.
Ms. Metzler is a volunteer
for Big Brothers and Big Sisters
of Greater Miami, and her rela-
tionship with her 13-year-old
friend is the longest-standing
"match" between a Big and Lit-
tle Sister in Dade County.
Another Mount Sinai nurse.
Mrs. Sheila Nestler, was as-
signed an 8 year old Little
Brother a year ago hecause the
agency had a shortage of male
volunteers. She says I have
really enjoyed watching hirr
mature and develop from a lit-
tle boy into a young man."
BEAT IT!
RAISED PRINTING
Imagine 1,000 Business Cards
HIGH QUALITY
Red, Blue or
Black frorr $195
Any Two
Colors Above frc~ $1070
FREE PICK UP A DELIVERY
PERPETUAL REBATE
PROGRAM
651-1467
SEVEN OAVI
*Dii\ing Ita(iai\jsty[e is as
easyas JUer cBais.'.Witi\
l\e|p froni^Chef 'Boy-ardee
|Boy^(leeJ
LBALTIMOREDJW
Listed below and hidden in this puzzle are the
names of 10 American locales with a Jewish population
in excess of 100,000. The city names are placed hori-
zontally vertically, diagonally, forward and backward.
How many can you find' Answers are on page 6-B.
LOS ANGELES BOSTON
WASHINGTON DC BERGEN COUNTY
MIAMI ESSEX COUNTY
CHICAGO NEW YORK CITY
BALTIMORE PHILADELPHIA
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TEACHERS
for 3rd, 7rh 9th Grade*
We also need a Music Teacher
Temple Beth El (of Hollywood)
Call 944-7773
COMPLETE
Cheese
Pizza
Invite Cnef Boy-Ar-Dee"
to your house when the
youngsters call for pizza1
Just open up the Chef s
Cheese Pizza and you've
practically got it made
Everything s right there
Pizza flour mix. the Che' j SfM
savory sauce, real Italian cheese
and easy directions .' JSt 20 minutes
in your oven and yc.. II have a
delicious, home-made"myche!'
A sizzling tangy pizza to set
before the kids They'll
just flip for it1
Attention Organizations!!!
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION NEED $$$. .
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DO FUND RAISING??
We have a variety of plans that will not only
raise funds hut serve as splendid
MORALE BUILDERS!
Writ. MHS c/o Jewish Floridion Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101
G'nt name of organization and number of members,
how long in existence.


rridav. July 9, 1976
+Jeisti Her Mian
Page 3-B
Intercontinental Bank Appointments
Augusto Godoy has been
named international officer of
Intercontinental Bank of Mi-
ami Beach, according to an an-
nouncement by Benjamin I.
Shulman, chairman of the
board.
Prior to joining Interconti-
nental Bank, Godoy was with
I Southeast First National Bank
of Miami as a commercial loan
officer in the International Cor-
porate Department. His duties
were export and import financ-
ing. FCIA and Eximbank pro-
grams, business development,
foreign travel, credit analysis
and account management.
A member of Phi Beta Kappa
and Phi Eta Sigma, Godoy has
[attended seminars on interna-
tional banking at the American
Management Association and at
I the Export-Import Bank of the
I United States.
SHULMAN ALSO announced
I the appointment of two assist-
ant cashiers, Rosa L. Machado
land Robert C. Elliot.
Prior to joining Interconti-
nental Bank, Ms. Machado was
[head teller-note teller at First
National City Bank in New
I York.
Elliot was associated with
Hebrew Home Has
Musical Party
Morty Reid and his orches-
tra recently entertained the
residents of the Miami Beach
Hebrew Home for the Aged at
a combined Mothers and Fa-
thers Day party.
Koz Dawson sang the resi-
I dents' favorite songs, and Mrs.
Dorothy Singer, director of vol-
unteers, and her crew present-
ed gifts donated by the Free
Sons of Israel.
.1
X>A?a22&#
Wholesale Distributors of
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Proeeuori and Exporter!
of the finest !/.$. Govt. In.pectod
KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
AUGUSTO GODOY
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Essen (left) and Mr.
and Mrs. David Coleman chatted with
Given and Allan B. Margolis (right) at an
awards social evening and kickof) of the
"Florida Thousand," a statewide pro-
gram aimed at recruiting 1,000 thousand-
dollar-and-over members of the Florida
Chapter of the Society of Fellows of the
Anti-Defamation League. The wine-and-
cheese party at the Margolis' Keystone
Point home honored those who were ac-
tive in the 1975 campaign and members
of the Jewish community. Margolis is
chairman of the Florida Chapter of the
Society of Fellows. Florida State legisla-
tor Gwen Margolis is active in the Anti-
Defamation League.
Hialeah Miami Springs First
State Bank, where he was in- WTW/T7 A mw g~i .
stallment loan officer, and with J W \ AUXlllUrieS tlOllOred ttt LOIlVentlOIl
Citizens Federal Savings and
Lean as assistant branch man-
ager.
Aracely S. Crespo, who join-
ed Intercontinental in 1965 as
a bookke.-ping clerk, has been
promcteJ to assistant vice pres-
ident and assistant cashier,
said Shulman.
SABRA
COOKBOOK
112 PAGE
. .' <:
101
Award Winning
Recipes
THE BEST OF 8,000
RECIPES SUBMITTED IN A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
(No Stamps please)
Your Name 8. Address to:
SABRA COOKBOOK
SEND $1.00
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
H'CKSVIUE. NY 11816
NURSING &
HOMEMAKER
SERVICES
*c i the business of helping people COMCARE not only
provides suited rwsing care, but also "homemaker" services A home
maker will shop, cook, do light housekeeping and all those extras that
will make life easier tor you.
COMprffwnsiv* HnWi
CARf Swvtras
Speculum^ in Hejttti PeisonnH
Since 1969
CQMCARE
INC.
Registered Nurses Licensed Practical Nurses Nurses Aides dedicated
to caring lor the sick or eWerly in their own homes, in nursing homes, or in
hospitals.
NOW SERVING YOU WITH HOMEMAKERS
24 HOUR SERVICE 751-6280 CALL ANYTIME
Belle Swartz, a member of
JWV Norman Bryce Brown
Auxiliary No. 174, was elected
national president at the recent
state convention at the Amer-
icana Hotel. May Schreiber was
elected Department of Florida
chaplain.
The Edith Feibelman Award
went to Catherine Morris, and
the entire Auxiliary received a
trophv for child welfare work
as well as two citations for cul-
tural effort.
EVELYN CLEIN. president of
South Dade Auxiliary No. 778.
was called to the podium eight
times to receive awards in the
less-than-75-members category.
3
Members of the Ladies Auxiliary of JWV South Dade
Post No. 773 received several first-place trophies at the
recent Department of Florida convention. With some of
the trophies are (from left) Trudy Woolfstead, Molly
Brown, president Evelyn Clein, vice president Anita
Novins and Leah Eisenman.
Hebrew Academy Women Plan Party
Tickets are on sale for the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy Women's annual card and
air-conditioner unit for the
building.
Reservations and tickets are
available at the Hebrew Acad-
emy Women's office.
The Auxiliary was honored
in the Aid to Israel. American-
ism. Child Welfare, Legislation.
Senior Citizens. Programming
and Historian categories and
received a citation for work in
Servicemen's Service.
In the audience were Edith
Novins, senior vice president;
Mollie Brown, donor chairman:
Jackie Rose, patriotic instruc-
tor; and Leah Eisenman, depart-
ment treasurer, who was elect-
ed conductress for the Depart-
ment of Florida..
President Clein recently ap-
peared with Rabbi Sol Landau,
cbarflain of Homestead Air
Force Base, in a televised dis-
cussion of "The Jewish Contri-
bution to the American Service-
man."
ABE HORROW1TZ Auxiliary
No. 682 received several awards
at the convention, including one
for the Historian's Book, com-
piled by historian Elsie Gree-
bel, which won top honors and
a trophy.
Shirley Morton. Elsie Greebel
nd Alice Brenner won runner-
nr certificates for the Edith
F:belman, Bertha Lach and
Woman of the Year Awards.
Ar elections Ceril Steinberg
was named treasurer and Elay-
ne Uhr senior vice president
of the Department of Florida
Auxiliary.
ANNOUNCING...
SADIE PEDIS
game partv scheduled for
Wednesday, July 21, at 8 p.m.
in the school's auditorium.
According to Sadie (Mrs.
Jack) Pedis, chairperson of the
event, the price of a ticket in-
cludes refreshments and a
chance on a door prize. Irene
(Mrs. Leonard) Adler, presi-
dent, added that men are in-
vited to the party, proceeds
from which will go toward an
MARRIAGES, JEWISH,
INTER-FAITH, CIVH, BY
REVEREND CANTOR,
534-4711
a new addition to the
Falls Signature Collection.
Consumers, in our opinion, should be label
conscious, and we at Falls are very proud
of what we call our signature collection of
labels.
First, we have the Falls name, recognized
nationwide as one of the finest all natural,
Kosher, clean Chickens.
Next, we have the signature of the United
States Department of Agriculture, assuring
you of unrivaled wholesomeness.
And now, we have added the signature of
the most respected name in National
Kosher supervision, the granted by the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The Falls Signature Collection....
a status symbol for your table
THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
FALLS KOSHER POULTRY
SOUTH FALLSBURG, NY 12779


** 4-B
kistfhrH**n
Friday, Julv 9
United Way Announce* Appointments
1976
DAMS
WOLFSOS
UTREY
Airport Bridge \^ ins Award*
rtz and Ae-
vx-ate* Inc a nationally
knoT. coos-
HERBERT SCHWARTZ
re-
Una, was recently named
apient of three major awards
for the design and engineering
of the Barrel Shell Bridge at
Miami International Airport
Two awards were in national
competition, one was for en-
tries from Florida only
The prizes includes an Honor
' Award from the American Con-
' suiting Engineers Council in
their 19^6 Engineering Excel-
m&.
MIA Ml CENTRAL
I-95.Exitat_79St
Featuring a
LUNCHEON
BUFFET
Monday-fridav 1130to230
$050
Enjoy a Taste Tempting
Chefs Special
Every evening____
* Chicken Cordon ilott
* fciby Beef Ribs
* Beef Strogonoff
EVERY SUNDAY
CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH
10 a.m. to 3 fjm.
MIAMI CENTRAL
75* Street & 7th Asenue
1-95, Exit at 79 St.
759-1561
Plenty of Perking Space

-
-.*:- Z~ -
1 Ir-
"._"
: ------;
- : ~ -
recfly coMtr-
" -." -
and arts: I ri
'-

HERBERT M [Tchasattl the
'iistiuai officer -----
and a registered t~z
Florida Petmsrhania and
Louisiana has been president
of tb Mi*~: Structural Engi-
n~-s Council and is the imme-
rSat* n ^resident of the Mi-
ami Chanter of the Florida En-
ring Societv
He was chosen bv his col-
e?gues as Engine-' of the Year
ir 19"4 and received an award
of merit fror the Florida South
iMMer of the American In-
stitute of Architects during the
oast rear
Tennis. Evervone!
RxFTt K-rhin in the tennis complex
at Mm n-w Vfjchael-Ann Russell
Ommunitv C-nter in North Mi-
ami Beach.
Donald J Reiff. president of
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida, made the an-
nouncement and added that the
Pro lighting on the nine courts
permits night as well as day-
time tennis
PRIVATE LESSONS are avail
able as are clinics for children
and adults. Social events for
tennis members are also plan-
ned
On Sunday. July 18. from 9
a.m. to noon. Ray Mitchell, the
tennis director, will be on hand
to meet everyone Refreshments
will be served and tennis play-
ed
For information on annual
membership and fees, call Eve-
lyn Freilich at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Cen-
ter
CANTOR
needed for High Holy Days
at West Palm Beach's GOLD-
EN LAKES VILLAGE. Please
Call Louis Gluckstern. Mi
ami: 944-1161 West Palm
Beach: 696-1120.
cney Marshall S. Harris,
of Hams and Strkin. 19~6
i Way general campaign
1 iiiman has announced the
accomcner:: of Norman Dav.-
son as cochair-
lic In-
formation Committee
! committee is responsible
ag campaign rromo-
-
"STT D Driiaoa chairman
r^gtr of
-
-.^xuntee r Jeader
^sored Ei
r-i- He w-.i: be re
z about 50
urea
.ocg bee- -
United Way and is
-iber of the board of di-
--LStees as t
:-"; F an
Happening"
Gift of Life Chapter of
- National Asthma Center wiO
hold its annual summer brunch
meeting at 10 a.m. on Tuesday.
'.- at the Courtyard Inn
Restaurant-
1- 6 A
The general meeting of the
Dade-Broward Chapter of the
Renmns Picmentoaa Foundation
is scheduled for 8 p.m. on Fri-
day. July 16. at the First Fed-
eral Savings building. 18301
Biscayne Blvd. Dr Ann Ruben
will discuss the psychological
problems of people with this
disease
The Small Business Adminis-
tration and SCORE Service
Corps of Retired Executives)
will hold their monthly con-
ference on Tuesday. Julv 13. in
Room 208 of the Federal Office
Building from 8:30 a.m to 4
p.m.
-*- -s -s
Voters Incorporated will hold
an ooen to-the-public meeting
on Tuesday. Julv 13. at 8 pjn
in the Washington Federal audi-
torium. 1234 Washington Ave.
Guest speakers are Earl Carroll,
John J. Gibson. Jr., Terry Mar-
tling and Bayard Strell. Harry
Levy, president, will moderate
Round Town
Murray and Jean Trantman
share a proud moment with son
David as he displays his shirt
proclaiming him the first baby
born in South Miami Hospital.
The Trautmans were guests of
honor at the dedication of the
hospitals newly expanded ob-
stetrics unit David, who in 16
years has been followed by
nearly 14.000 more babies, is a
student at South Miami High
School
ENJOY BETTER HEARING
$2M OFF with this il
0MCUA
r tfPAWING
20% OFF..
HEARING AIDS
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S BROAD
M BROAD
FRIEDMAN

Executive Changes Announced
At American Savings & Loan
Morns N Broad has been re-
and chief
! officer of American
la In a related move.
da In a related moved,
ird Broad, founder and
man of the board for 23
years, has been reelected chair-
made
28th board of di-
rect ng
Dr Harris C Friedman, for-
mer chief economist and direc-
tor of the Office of Economic
Research of the Federal Home
Loan Bank Board, the regula-
tory agency for the 5.000 sav-
and loan associations in
the United States, was elevated
from vice president for cor-
porate development to senior
vice president for savings His
responsibilities include supervi-
sion and coordination of Amer-
ican Savings' 16 offices in South
Florida.
ALBERT J. FINCH, named
if g.
oanee, joined Am
1973 as treasui ;a!W
- presiden*
was previously
the US Postal -
rector of ca-" j^j
- also s e r.
analyst of the F<
Mortgage
Morris N Bros
sumed the y^.
tion he had held .ears.
Shepard Broad I i-.er-
.......: l, .i
1950. at thai -:ng!V
chairman of the b
tion he is reass
American Savin the
firat savings arid >ocia-
tion in Florida to convert to I
public stock corporation by the
successful sale of 500 000 shares
of its capital stock in its initial
offering on April ~ 19"6 The
stock is traded over the coun-
ter
JFCS Elects Officers
Mrs. Harold Rand has been
elected president of the Jewish
Family and Children's Sen-ice
for 19"*6-77 at the June meet-
ing of the board of directors
Others elected are Samuel S
Smith and Mrs. Morton Silber-
man. rice presidents; Mrs Eu-
gene R. Karz. treasurer: Mrs.
Bernard Nemeroff. secretary;
and Mrs Emanuel Papper. hon-
orary president
Members of the board of di-
rectors reelected for a three-
year term expiring May. 1979.
are Mrs Burton Goldstein. Mrs.
Bernard Nemeroff. Mrs. Morton
Silberman and Michael N Weiss.
Honorary' board members re-
elected for a one-year term ex-
piring May. 1977, are David P
Catsman. Irvin Korach. Sidney
Lefcourt and Harold Thurman
Walter S Falk was elected for
a one-year term as honorary
director
Other board members include
Mrs Samuel Adler. Ronald
Ager. Norman Baum. Dr Mel-
vin Becker. Mrs Leonard Beld-
ner. Mrs David Fleeman. Mrs
Sol Goldstein. Mrs David Kirsh.
Walter C Kovner. Donald E
Lefton. Mrs. Burton Levey
Richard Levy. Richard Masinj-
ton. Maurice PavSow, Mrs
Elaine Soonder. Arnold J Stem.
Har"old Tannen and Leon D
Fisher, executive director
The JFCS. supported through
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and United Fund of
Dade County, provides counsel-
ing and child welfare services
to the Jewish community
M.B. High School
Celebrating 50th Reunion
Miami Beach H:*h School
(formerly Ida M Fisher High)
is celebrating its 50th annivef
sary with a three-dav reunion
July 23-25 fo rail alumni
Included in the plans is the
closing night performance of,
Hooray USA!
Insurance executive Stuart
Jacobs is heading the massive
effort to contact all graduate*
aided bv Financial lederals
Milton Weiss and builder Dane
Fleeman For more information. I
contact Stuart Jacob- at his Du-
oont Plaza office ___
3 Years through 8th Grade
Traditional Jndaica Stadies
All Certified Teachers
Comprehensive Bs^sssw Program
Individuauzed Instruction
Limited Enrollment The Academy admits 11 "01 S.W "4th Ave. of any race, color and
Call: 253-2300 nationai or ethnic origin
THE HEBREW ACADEMY
Announces Its PreSchool Schedule
NURSERY CLASSES 9 A.M. to 12:" rJ\
(Lunch served before di$mlt
PRE^INDERCARTEN CLASSES 820 AM. to 330 P.J
KINDERGARTEN CLASSES 9:20 A.M. to 330 PM
KGimATIO* MOW OPEN FOR ALL OMDfS...
NURSERY THROUGH 12th
2400 PINE TREE DRIVE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 532-6421


Friday, July 9, 1976
* k-nistHrrkilnri
Page 5-B
Birth Control Data
Needed for Study
Norma Orovitz is preparing material for a series of
columns on abortion and birth control in the Jewish
community- You are invited to participate, whether mar-
ried or not, by providing background information. If you
have not already done so, please complete the follow-
ing survey questionnaire and mail to: The Jewish Flor-
idian, P.O. Box 01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101.
1. Age: Husband Wife
2. Affiliation: Orthodox Conservative
3.
4
5
Reform Unaff ilia ted ....
Age at birth of first child: Husband Wife
Birth controlIf responsibility is husband's.
Device
Sterlization
Birth controlIf responsibility is wife's:
Device
Sterlization
6. No birth control practiced by either husband or wife
7. Number of children:
8. Were children planned? 1 2 3 4
9. Has wife ever had an abortion?
10. Do you approve of abortion? Husband Wife
11. Could you decide for an abortion if faced with the
decision? Husband Wife
12 Would you favor a Constitutional amendment sev-
erely limiting abortion to availability only if a wom-
an's life were in physical danger?
Husband Wife
Making plans for a Godmothers brunch
in September and a December luncheon at
the Eden Roc Hotel are members of the
Mount Sinai Medical Center Organization
(from left): Helene (Mrs. Murry) Koretz-
ky, Mrs. Helen Sirkin, Doris (Mrs. Abe)
Solins, Rosalie (Mrs. Theodore) Pincus,
cochairman of the luncheon, and Auxiliary
president Shirlie (Mrs. Max) Kesselman.
Area residents visiting Israel include
George Shaeffer (left), who met with
Israel's Housing Minister Avraham Ofer
at a conference dealing with housing
problems, and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Foo-
saner, who chatted with Foreign Affairs
Minister Yigal Allon (center, photo at
right) at an Israel Bonds reception.
FINE VALUES DESIGNED
FOR GOOD LIVING
SAVE MOO
AMANA RADARANGE -
A MIRACLE WORKER!
$399 REG. $499
It's the new, delicious way to cook. So easy
and quick, it's totally automatic. Defrosts
and cooks in less time and with less loss
of natural juices. Plus, you save from 50%
to 75% electricity. # RR-4D.
New Era Electronics, at all jm stores
except lauderhill and pompano
SALE!
SONY TV'S ARE
GREAT PERFORMERS
$479 REG. $530
The whole family will enjoy
performances on Sony's new 17"
diagonal color portable TV. It
boasts integrated circuits for
maximum stability and improved
VHF tuner for cool, dependable
service. Trinitron Color.
# KV-1712
Televisions, at all jm stores except
lauderhill and pompano
jordan-
Jmar5h
A unit of Alt*d Slo>
COLOR PORTABLES
$479
REG. 549.95. Select from RCA's 19"
diagonal color TV's in many different
styles. 100% solid state. Televisions
BLACK Et WHITE TV
148
REG. 199.95. AC or battery operated
portable is a great second set. From
RCA, it is a 12" diagonal. Televisions
DIGITAL CLOCK RADIO
29.95
SPECIAL PURCHASE! Ambassador's
sleek clock radio soothes you to sleep,
wakes you up, keeps you on time!
Sound Center
FISHER STEREO SYSTEM
?329
If purchased separately. 459.80.
Fisher's component 8-track player/
recorder and turntable. Sound Center
GRAND PRIX CB RADIO
?149
REG. 199.95. Our 23 channel, 2-way radio
with Delta Tune and noise limiting is a
great communicator. New Era Electronics


Page 6-B
Friday, July 2, 197{
n
*
1 p f~^oi*ts of L j'ew
I V .;.._
*r ^r

JWV Pot 243
Will Award
Scholarships
r*"v m.
RJB1
*

COCLD MY hnabarc r: c
- -is; i
r-s. wccjd the nf-
Post
N: T43 r^. award four scholar -
skips for the seventh conseco-
5Lt <" :_ir?.-..r
eaBOQDCed
B?ry/ F. Slomoritz U Married To
Mark S. Glansberg, JVS Foreman
I "r^ x *
read oc
.' ** IUI SOCfa gUtST fsnnp-
non as (hsptayed by the Israe_
trrce gen-
.ac aot night*
reared about Lh Amu and siry-
jacir-ngs surety they bad known
toe I^Ttm-p nfm^ wu 1v^ iaTT4* 2
pogroms and smaj-iowr Au-
strtanHikers.
WHY ELSE wouJd they hafe
braved the high seas ai uncer-
saihag to as 3D-
of Oi?
I attest wonder if I bad bees
-"t~^~.-i aaaaaan,
I bare dared to throw
home aad hearth for a
- How many of as today
a-se oar unlse rates
shade over auiaigy aad ooec-

shade 1 1
ehgsbae the appocaat
--->-.- :< the Ipaial
ids or cs Lades Abb-
desceaaaat of a
-
Wou-t 1 >t accarci-
dobs of oar >*- 'n: ssr
basenesses re srrte: jrr: -
small dow^tuw-. area a be
known as "'Viam. ?oc:
Far-fetched'
I DOVT the* so.
The German Jews were as
comfortable as we are
The Cabas Jews were as
re b*e te rhrw
aary x
iiwinriiiBil goal
- --- r-tead
p sac ?wt or A-mnary
-j --. ; ;-.!; -aBB-
rc-x: T X I
Arc p be submrt-
tec a Bar by Monday Aag 9
last Tears a-e-s were Ma-
- 5e-nar: Weir
-.-tz 13d Jeffrey
- ; -
^ soohaxkated
to
Me of only a hyiMheura' bw>
aac man"
I wonder
I 3ar*ei at ary Cabas friends
and icae-iae their suuatiua m
IF THE restrjcaom of Bal
Harbonr and Incbar Creese bad
erect ont of the corners to see?
Beach, and -f I were forced
across the Bay and then down
to the Keys and eventually onto
a freedom flight to a friend!?
-s-aryi >'i'mnr f 1. haw
t be'
aiy aaKaove hisjh
coGese Soarnsh sap-
comfortabie f-uencv
Or wooid arj
alow sx ary
tonroe asril inch tnae
cooid converse auburn
;*drer rjffit
ia school- Or
aa
for
The Israehs know better
Ther sbu= cocrriaceacy
The soerit of the Israelis, the
Aaervcans and aZ ocr
are one
Wl cocje froc: tood stock.
Wi.. ^oe zty becocse ap*
ttsreat a oar ives'
Hadassah
Grwap at Winstoo
has dispensed with
-eer-ags for the summer
A hmcheoc and card
has beer, scheduled, bow-
i-^r fc- Tjesdav ;..-. U at
aaaa a the Tower 400 aodi-
torsaat. Another hincheoo a
paaaed for Monday Aug 30
at aooc 2 Tower 30C'
Ben'l Francine Sloinovitz and
Mark Steven Glansberj? were
.ed on June 13 at Beth
Torah Congregation, wrth Rabbis
Alexander Gross. David Lehr-
field and Max LiDschitz and
Chazzas Jacob Mendelson of-
The bride is the daughter of
David and Estelle Slomovitz.
and the groorr. s oarems are Mr
ar i iney Glansberg The
bride's grandparents are Mr
Mrs Sarr: Feld-r.an of Miam:
Beach The groom's grandmoth-
Mrs Rose Glansberg. also
of Miami Beach, was escorted
her granddaughter. Mrs
Dsane Brodsky of New York.
The groorr. s sister Ellen, was
maid of honor and the bride's
rrother Haroid as best man
Bin Glansberg was attended by
her sister-in-law. Gail Sloroo-
vitz of New Jersev and her
cousin. Jill Ellis of ew York,
along with Esther Dennis. Jean-
ete Hirr.eisteir. S* ah Resnick.
Racoue! Silberberg and Marta
Man
THE BRIDE'S brother Albert
and her cousin. Marshall Jaffe
were ushers as were the groom's
brother. Mitchell, and Steven
Goldberg Richard Kadin. Randy
Phillins and Ira Weissman
Nicol* Bonsanti was flower
girl.
Mrs. Glansberg. a graduate of
the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy is a student at Miami-
Dade Community College Her
i
MR. AND MRS. GLANSBERG
husband is the Workshop Fore-
man for the Jewish Vocational
Service and a student a: Flor-
ida International Ur..vCrsin
On their return fro- a wed-
ding trio to Israe! -he couple
will make their home ;.- Miami.
Control ler
Of Jewtsfi ladciuliofK
The appointment of S Allan
Dubow as controller and direc-
tor of office admin.stration of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds. Inc,
has been announced by Philip
Bernstein, Council executive
vice president
Music Scholarship Competition
Srndena of senoas
r- ajacy ':- V-.V.t. -s.
jc-t^jp-.r- the foarrh it.
= -*. .- _rLi--c.a. F*ie-i- ns .-rjr?
and Loan Assoaarjoc Maacal
Showcase
Ooiy a :ts foarth year the
aeaacaai ^ bm < tm aaaaai
I Baaai of schoiarsci?
awarded, saad Miioc
-ancial Federai presi-
iaai
Wmners a voice
ao and wind bras*
t^I compete a the fina:"
October V
be 25 or
Griselle Rozen Wed at Diplomat
pia-
er. and Tocahsts should be 2"
or yonnper Auditions are
ichedaled for September
Wirrj*.- each category will
receive a $1,000 grant and the
grand rrae winner wiD receive
an addrtwoa: $2,000
~ caoons are available
from the Paboc RelatMos De-
aamaaai at F-iarial Fe^c-a:
Savings anc Loan Association
oc Lmcoir. .-; rhj deadhne
" -s .'..- 15
Hu*ir
>9 < ^^^ i-i fc s c-.- 5ce< #
-.'-. -z >:-<$* 65:-26C3
JCC Women
To Sponsor
Sale and Auction
Griselle Rozen and Peter Da-
:i Farbman. graduates of Mr
aaj Beach High School, were
married on Sunday at the Dip-
lomat Hotel m HoU>-wood
Mrs Farbman. daughter of
Dr ar.J Mrs Simon Rozen of
Sarfaati attended the Univer-
sity of Miami and will gradu-
ate aplai Term I State
DaiiuaHj
The son of Mr and Mrs Jack
Farbman of Miami Beach. Mr
Farbman is a graduate of Flor-
ida International University
and a student at Southern Coi-
k*e of O: f :r. Memphis,
whert -xiple will make
their home on returning from
- to Mexico
MRS PETER D F\RBMA.N
Temple Israel
t Anrwers
^G(CQTJM?Y;K 8 f
a
B
0
T
I
I
HI
S
A
AL f I MO RBiD
ters cf Snath Florida will bold
a Bicentenmai sale aad aucrioa .
ii at the south Dade Holds NxicMlraiiia
^cation. The sale begins at 11
Gar%- Eaenberg. actinties di-
rector of Temple Israe! of
Greater Miami, will lead a
grour axiodnaa, The Impon-
at Thmgs of Judaism." this
evening at Temple Israel South
presa-
ANSWERS Los .Angeles, Washington DC, Miami.
Chicago. Baltimore, Boston. Bergen County Essex
County. New York City. Philadelphia
am. and cnatinuea until 3 r -
The ancbon starts at 1 pjn.
Mrs. Laurel Shapiro.
dent of the Y Wc
of the event has said there u
math new merchandise for sale.
hahng appliances, toys, cloth-
ing, jewelry art. raw^n1
dinners aad hotel weekends.
Proceeds benefit the JCC
2SEE?r*T Camp Scholarship
faad. The puboc is mvited
On '.Vedr.esda% Julv 14. the
Youns CaBBha Group of Tem-
ole Israel wfl re hosts at a
aarty for Rabbi and Mrs Brett
Go***""- He is the
new assistant rabbi
temple's
\UjJax\
OAK ROOM LOUNGE
> G.t*r A Pi-:
Tmmii t Satra>
. :IAS
.
COCKTAR HOW 5 7
HOT MOMS DOtvVSES
LADIES ORiNK i P :t
ill' L -
YOUNG CAKTOt
Lyric tenor nk pwrsonafiry.
Mking poawion fee Kgh i
Hory Days. Excaffcnt referenc-1
"froai previews Temples
Can 534-9045
BUT IT!
*AJSH> WKTINC
1,000 Buna Cards
- :- 3_a.^'
roai U 95
lad. Maa
Black
Aay T we
Colors Ahowa fror- $10.70
* F".^'i^ U'* DCUIVEWV
tnru*L MiUTt
PMOOKAM
651-1467
aVEN D*V|
EXPERIENCED
YOUNG
ORTHODOX
RABBI
WANTING TO tBOCATE
NTHE SOUTH
BAL KRIAH
Al mAH BAL ri(UH
WriH RAMi ty
Ooaan View to* Office
8*" 40-2583
*iami Bea**,, pj, M140
S*ogatonge>e^\

tv
Th the fnerj
The OAK ROOM
LOUNGE
MIAMI CENTRAL
TPdi STREET b 7th AVENOf
1-95, Exit at 79 Sf.
759-1561
rUmtytiPartmgSpau


iday, July 2, 1976
+Jenist> fkrktknn
Page 7-E
SNp
^abhuttcal T$n$t
co-ordinated by tfw
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
coditors
Dr. Max A. Lipachitz Rabbi Robert J. Or*.and
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
YOUR RABBI SPEAKS
temiine Versus Ersatz Judaism
[By RABBI DAVID SHAPIRO
Temple Sinai, Hollywood
We often read on the show
irds of advertising firms the
agan "Beware of Substitutes,
bist on the Genuine Article."
tiese words may well be ap-
Jied not only to the business
::li!. but to matters affecting
lidaism as well.
There was a time when being
Jew meant that one earned
ke status not so much by mere
|rth. but as by his Jewish way
life. When we spoke of Jew-
mess or Yiddishkeit, it could
bean only one thing: the faith,
he ideals, the traditions the
ie of the Jewish religion by
khich one lived. But of late the
jrm Jewishness has come to
ean something else altogether.
People claim that they show
euishness through philan-
krophy alone or through com-
munity affiliation with other
ews, such as membership in
iges or fraternal groups or a
Sonist organization. Some iden-
fy fheir Jewishness by the
ewish food they eat. Dr. Max
lordau called them "Bauch
faden."
ALL OF these are, of course,
jmirable only when they are
ithin the frame of the Torah.
|ut when these activities are
tmoved from the frame of To-
lh. then their Jewishness be-
Dmes a mere matter of some
ie or community pressure
Hiich cannot long endure.
here was a time, for exam-
le. when such Jewish fraternal
cieties known as "Landsmann-
hoften" enjoyed vast member-
flips and their meetings were
ery well attended.
The picture today is not en-
Duraging at all. It takes often
urgent crisis to arouse the
eople within these groups,
bur sages expressed this situa-
tion in these words: Jewishness
which is dependent on some-
thing temporary, when that
something temporary disap-
pears, the attachment to Jew-
ishness goes with it. The only
institution in Jewish life which
is constant and permanent is
our religious way of life.
To a religious Jew, Torah is
as indispensable as the air he
breathes. The Jew who is truly
guided by Torah will always
practice charity, devotion to the
land and the people of Israel;
but the Torah being removed,
their program, what they have
left, is charity without Torah,
nationalism without Torah.
lodges without Torah, which for
a time may be strong and crea-
tive, but only for a time.
YOU CANNOT inspire the
young generation merely with
language, cultural values or a
nationalism which is a product
of anti-Semitism. It is only an
attachment to Torah which will
guarantee that our children be-
come concerned with the wel-
fare of the Jewish people and
the land of Israel.
Many prominent Jews of the
19th century who were very
philanthropic in their day have
descendants who are today
members of the Episcopalian or
the Catholic Churches because
their link with Judaism was
only philanthropy.
Ou- sages express this basic
concept of Jewish survival when
they say, "Israel, the Torah and
God are one." As the fish can-
not live without water and as
man cannot live without air, the
Jew cannot live without his faith
in God and devotion to the
eternal values of our Torah.
QUESTION BOX
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Q. What are the principal
differences between Bar Mltz-
vah and Confirmation?
A. Reform congregations
have instituted what is known
as a Confirmation ceremony.
This originated in the 19th-cen-
tury German Reform movement
as a substitute for Bar Mitzvah.
The ceremony was held at a
later age 16 or 17 on the
grounds that before that age a
voung person cannot really un-
derstand the implications of the
rituals.
In modern times, especially
in the U.S.. confirmation has
been adopted as a ceremony in
addition to Bar Mitzvah. which
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
is celebrated in a more tradi-
tional manner. The main inten-
tion of confirmation was to pro-
long the period of a child's Jew-
ish education, the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica states. The cere-
mony is usually held on or
about Shavuot. Thr confirm-
ands recite vanour sections
from Scriptures and publicly
declare their devotion to Juda-
ism.
Ml
CANDLEIIGHTING TIME
11 TAMUZ 7:56
\ilse Labels On American Jews
RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP Temple Sholom, Pompano Beach
On July 4th we American Jews joined with our fellow
kitizens in commemorating our Bicentennial. Despite our
ragic history filled with indelible memories of Inquisitions,
ogroms, crematoria and a flood of intermarriages, we
American Jews take pride in living in a free America,
khere some 6 million citizens are known as Jews and com-
prise the largest aggregate of Jewish people ever to live
In a land with equal rights and liberty of conscience.
But the labels which Jews old Halacha to an America.
arry are often false and mis-
eading. As we face the last
luarter of our century, serious
Ifforts are being made to iden-
tify the "way of life" as Amer-
can Jews. Reform Jews have
teen veering to the right in
Jewish traditions, introducing
Dieir new prayerbook and tra-
ditional ceremonies practiced
fy Conservative and Orthodox
lews.
Conservative Jews have
prayed from the observance of
vashrut and strict Sabbath ob-
ervance, eating at public res-
au rants, riding on the Sabbath
knd Holy Days, and innovating
English-language prayers and
Husic at their services.
Many Orthodox Jews recog-
nize that changes in ritual and
tustom are necessary for a
neamngful Judaism, and are
to adjust the centuries-
Jewish way of life.
Many so-called Reform Jews
live a Conservative Jewish way
cf life, many Conservative Jews
are as Reform in their ideology
as Reform Jews. Many Orthodox
Jews like the label, but prac-
tice liberal Judaism in their
daily living.
The labels in America are
false labels. But being in the
third generation of American
citizenship, changes are taking
place and efforts are being
made to develop an American
Judaism.
Efforts are being made to
make the labels more honest.
Answers are being sought by
thinking Jews: What does a Re-
form Jew believe and how does
he actually practice his Juda-
ism? What are Conservative
Jews using as guidelines for
their middle-of-the-road ap-
proach to Halacha Jewish
Law and what changes are
urgent upon Conservative Jew-
ish living?
E\-en Orthodox Jews know
that changes must be made.
Blessed with a free America,
we may yet see an American
Judaism emerging.
TV Programs
Sunday, July 11
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Avrom Drazin
Temple Israel of Miramar
6
"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch.710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Guests:
Jack Burstein
Mrs. Barbara Rosenblatt
Mrs. Donna Neimark
and
Leon Oldac
Topic:
"Creative Life within
a Synagogue"
Inside Judaica
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Q. What is the Jewish at-
titude toward medicine?
A. From the beginning of
their history until modern times
Jews have exercised a tremen-
dous influence on the develop-
ment of medical science. They
have always been solicitous in
their care of the sick and have
held the medical profession in
great esteem.
In ancient times medicine and
religions were closely connect-
ed. The priests were the cus-
todians of public health, the
Encyclopaedia Judaica says. The
dispute as to the propriety of
human interference in sickness,
regarded as divine retribution,
ceased to trouble the Jews. Ra-
ther, they came to regard the
physicians as the instrument
through whom God could effect
the cure.
Jewish physicians, therefore,
considered their vocation as
spiritually endowed and not
merely an ordinary profession.
By the same token, great de-
mands were made on them and
the ethical standards have al-
ways been very high.
The importance of medicine
and physicians among the Jews
is best seen in the long line of
rabbi physicians that started
during the Talmudic period and
continued until comparatively
recently. According to the EJ,
various factors were responsible
for this combination of profes-
sions. Medicine was sanctioned
by Biblical and Talmudic law
and had an important bearing
upon religious matters.
Since teaching or studying
the word of God for reward was
not considered ethical, the prac-
tice of medicine was most often
chosen as a means of livelihood.
This trend was further strength-
ened by the fact that during the
greater part of the Middle
Ages. Jews were excluded from
almost all other occupations, in-
cluding public office, and medi-
cine was left as one of the few
dienified occupations by which
they could earn their living.
Jews have contributed to
medicine, both by the creation
of new medical concepts and by
the transmission of medical
knowledge. It was through the
Medieval Jewish physician-
translators that the medical
knowledge of the East and much
of ancient Greek medical lore
was preserved and transmitted
to the West.
During the last two centuries
Jews throughout the world have
excelled not only in the prac-
tice of medicine but in all fields
of medicine research and teach-
ing. It is significant, the Ency-
clopedia Judaica believes, that
over 20 percent of all winners
of the Nobel Prize for Medicine
are Jewish.
Hukkat-Balak
And Moses smote the rock with his rod
twice: and water came forth abundantly (Num.
20:11).
HUKKAT The portion begins with "the statute
of the law" of the red heifer, whose ashes "shall be
kept for the congregation of Israel as a water of
sprinkling ... a purification from sin" (Numbers 19:9).
At the outset of their fortieth year in the wilderness, the
children of Israel reached the desert of Zin and halted
at Kadesh. There Miriam died. When the water gave
out, God instructed Moses and Aaron to gather the
Israelites before a rock; Moses was to speak to the rock
and it would gush water. But Moses, irritated at the
people's complaints, struck the rock with his rod. For
this lack of faith in the divine power, Moses and Aaron
were punished with never being able to enter the Prom-
ised Land. From Kadesh the children of Israel moved
on to mount Hor, where Aaron died. Thence they circled
the land of Edom, and arrived at Transjordan from the
east, defeating the forces of Sihon, king of the Amorites,
and Og, king of Bashan.
"And Balaam saw Israel and said: .
How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob, thy dwellings,
O Israel" (Num. 24:2-5).
BALAK Hearing of the Israelites' victory over
the Amorites, Balak, king of Moab, became frightened.
Jointly with the elders of Midian, he sent messengers
to Balaam, the son of Beor, urging him to curse Israel.
Balaam was both a soothsayer and a prophet, and it
was believed that his curse would lead to the defeat of
the Israelites. But Balaam, hearkening to the voice of
God, twice refused to accompany Balak's messengers
on the hostile mission. Finally God said to Balaam: "Go
with the men; but only the word that I shall speak unto
thee, that thou shalt speak" (Numbers 23:35). En route
to Balak, an angel warned Balaam. When he arrived,
he had Balak build seven altars and make appropriate
sacrificial offerings preliminary to Balaam's cursing Is-
rael. But when the time came, Balaam gave the Israel-
ites his blessing instead of his curse. This reversal was
repeated three times.
Moabite and Midianite women seduced some of the
Israelites, persuading them to worship the idol Baal of
Peor. As a result, a plague broke out in the Israelite
camp. The plague ceased only when Phinehas stabbed
an Israelite man to death for consorting with a Midianite
woman.


Page 8-B
*JewlstncridHar>
Friday, July 0( j976
Religious Directory
MIAMI
AHAVAT 8HALOM CONGREGA-
TION, 9*5 SW 67th Avi. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Ban Aron. 1
ANSHE EMES CONQREGATION.
2533 SW 19th Ava. Conaarvatlva.
Cantor Sol Pakowitz. 2
BETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Kan-
Jail Dr. Raform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Aaaociata Rabbi Mitchall
Chafitz. S
'EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conaarvative. Dr. Irving
lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adlar. 24
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE'
5445 Collins
Conservative
Services Every
Saturday atla.m.
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabschnikoff. 3-A
BETH DAVID. 225 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipaon. 4.A
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 8W
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipson, 4-B
-------------a-------------
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Avs.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
del Gutterman. 6
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pina
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
S. Groaa. 25
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
YNAGOGUE. 1582 Washington Ave
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel. 24
BETH TOV TEMPLE. MM SW Sth
t Conaervative. Rabbi Charlea Ru-
bel. g
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER
Orthodox
571 NE 171st Str.
451-*0
Rabbi NesimGambach
Cantor Joseph Nahoum
Friday services- p.m.
_ Saturday services-1 a.m.
Friday- Bicentennial Oneg Shabbdt.
Guests: 1.8. Conareaa
William Lehman
Miami Hrarh Mayor
Walter Peeetsky
and
Vice-Mayor
Milton Uttman
KNESETH ISRAEL. 147S Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Ckntor Abraham Self. 2?
lUBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. 87
MENORAH TEMPLE. 820 78th St
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. Cantor Nice Feldman. 28
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conaervative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
-------------a-------------
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 846
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmiaa. 81
S'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Svnaet Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Qlixman. 8-A
3HEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonus Dr. Or
thodox. Rabbi Phinaaa A. .vsber
man. I0
--------a--------
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1844
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Tavi G. Schur. S2
Harold Slater, of the Greens
of Inverrary, Fort Louder-
dale, has been named re-
cipient of the Eleanor
Roosevelt Humanitarian
Award. Michael Arnon,
president of the Israel Bond
Organization, made the an-
nouncement and said the
award will be presented at
a dinner sponsored by B'nai
B'rith in December.
Spanish Art At
Coral Gables Temple Is Setting
Of Herris-Baskin Wedding Monday
Elayne Susan Herris. daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Her-
ris, and Marc Nathaniel Baskin.
son of Mrs. Meyer Baskin and
the late Mr. Baskin. were mar-
ried on Monday afternoon at
Temple Judea. Mrs. Baskin is
the granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Max Shifke and Mr. and
Mrs. Abe Herscovit. The newly-
weds' families all are Coral
Gables residents.
Mrs. Baskin, who wore a
gown of candlelight Qiana with
lace appliques, carried a cas-
cade of cymbidium orchids, car-
nations and baby's breath. Her
maids of honorwearing gowns
of pale-blue Qiana md carry-
ing French nosegays of pink
roses and baby's breathwere
her sisters. Barbara and Mari-
lyn.
Mr. Baskin, a graduate of
Harvard College, will teach at
the University of Miami. Mrs.
Baskin is a graduate of the
University of Florida. For the
nast three years she has lived
in Brookfine. Mass., and work-
ed as a legal secretary and as
a nursery school teacher at Con-
gregation Kellith Israel.
At the champagne reception
MRS. MARC N. BASKIN
at the temple following the
ceremony both grandfathers
blessed the challah and Jona-
thon Baskin offered the initial
toast to the couple. On their re-
turn from a six-week automo-
bile trip to California, the Bas-
kins will make their home in
Coral Gables.
Bacardi Gallery Folk-Dancing at New JCC
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
*40i NW 183rd St. Conaervative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelllng. Cantor
Jack Lerner. gg
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
nett. S2.A
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF'
GREATER MIAMI
-*-
South Florida's Pioneer
Raform Synagogue
137 NEI9th Str., Miami
573-5*00
Dr. Joseph R. Narot Senior Rabbi
Service-a Every
Friday At ".p.m.
Rabli Brett Goldstein
will discuss
"Women. Women, Woman"
AGUDASACHIM NUBACH SEFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 Sth St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimovita.
S2-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1021
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conaerva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. 13
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religioua Community Center. 19251
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. J3-A
ISRAELITE CENTER. 8175 8W 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberp. Cantor Nathan Par
near n
OPi OLOM TEMPLE. 8758 SW 18th
St. Conaervative. Rabbi David M.
Baron. 13
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
aervative. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
34
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 671
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Na-
aim Gambach. 36.a
ISRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Beth T.kva). 9025 sunset Or. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
----------------
SAMU-EL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conaarvative. Rab-
bi Edwin P. Farber. 9
ZION TIMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
aervative. Rabbi Norman N Shapiro.
Cantor Ben Dickaon. 16
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
-8801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick 3a
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171at St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zav Leff. 39
An exhibition of Spanish Im-
pressionist paintings will be
presented in homage to the Bi-
centennial at the Bacardi Gal-
lery from July 12 to 16.
The 20 paintings by 13 of
Spain's leading artists are be-
ing exhibited in cooperation
with the Institute, of Hispanic
Culture of Madrid through the
Consulate General of Spain in
Miami and Bacardi Imports,
Inc.
Two of Joaquin Sorolla's most
famous works, "Gitanas" (Gyp-
sies) and "Oriamendi" (Land-
scape of Northern Spain), are
included, along with works by
Santiago Rusino and Joaquin
Mir.
The Bacardi Gallery is free
and open daily to the public
during business hours.
HAILANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
?16 NE 8th Ave. Conaervative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Dannger 1J
The Michael Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in
North Miami Beach has sched-
uled Israeli folk dance classes
on Monday nights, beginning
July 12. People of all ages are
invited, and there will be be-
ginner, intermediate and ad-
vanced classes.
Beginner and intermediate
classes start at 7:30 p.m.. ad-
vanced and dance request"; at
8:30.
The instructor is Yosi Vanich.
well known in Miami as an Is-
raeli dance instructor
The community is invited,
bring the whole family For
further information contact
Larry Herring at the center.
Real Estate Course at Miami-Dade J
Five real estate courses will
be offered in the Fall term at
Miami-Dade Community Col-
lege, North. They include the
required courses for a sales-
man and broker license, as well
as advanced courses in real
estate education and training.
All are three-credit courses
and may be applied to a one
year certificate and or a two-
year Associate degree program
in real estate.
Registration is open and
classes begin Tuesday. Aug. 24.
For additional information, call
the Management Department.
HIAIEAH
TIFERETH jmCOB TEMPLE. 881 E.
4th Ave. Conaervative. 15
----------a----------
NORTH MIAMI
*EJH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121a'. St. Conaarvative. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Fingarer. Cantor
Yehuda Blnyamin. 33
CORAL GABIES
'JoD5Ao TEMPLE. 6550 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
aenatat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
2AMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave..
Conservative. 41
41
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. (3
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodix. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
H'LL.EL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT 8YNA-
OOpUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Servicea. Rabbi Richard A.
Davia.
Davia. (3
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Asaiatant Rabbi Harvey M Rosen-
" 45
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Groaa. 8
SSKTH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordacal Shapiro. 18
SURFSIDE
M22f DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4801 Ar-
thur St. Conaervative. Rabbi Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold. 48
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro
Aaaociata Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
88
BETH JACOB. 801 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi ShmaryeMs T.
wlraky. Cantor Maurice Mamchee.
18
HOMESTEAD
H?E3IE.AD JEWIH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 81
BETH AHM TEMPLE. S10 SW 82nd
Ave. Conaervative. Rabbi David Ro-
aenfield. 47-B
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47- C
*!* RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1848
Jeffereon Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winegred. Cantor Bawl Breeh.
28
fORT lAUDRDAU
*BTH '"*- TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip /. Lahowit. Cantor
Maurice Nsu 4*
STH SHOLOM
Cbaae Ave. Liberal. .
iah. Cantor David Convieer
* TEMPLE. 4144 "B^atlfi- JEMPLE. 3248 W. Oak-
rat, Dr. Leon Kron. ''"' Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
id Convieer. 21 r- Cantor Jerome Klement.
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1081
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conaervative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardelnl. .A
48
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 8108
NW 57th St. Conaervative. Rabbi
arael Zimmerman. 44-A
BETH TPILAH CONGREGATION.
888 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 23
VU7NV!i?AK^-OF HOLLYWOOD.
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
asoahe Bomzer. jj
ETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacebeon 22-B
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph Blston. 88
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Waahington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 28
-------------a-------------
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 718 Waahington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Melr Masliah
Melamad. 28-A
DEERFIELD BEACH
J Mr,*rtifefKI?5 BKTH '"ABL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village Eaat. Conaervative. Rabbi
David Berent. (2
----------a----------
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
aervative. 8101 NW 8th St. 44-B
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd Re-
oral Reform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
" N.fLRU..CI,ON,8T YNAOOGUE
7478 N.W. 4th St. gg
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8820 SW SSth St
Conaervative. Rabbi Avrom Draxin
Cantor Abraham Keatar. 4a.
Member of the Rabbinic.! Association
"f Creator Miami
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION Of
GREATER MIAMI
gL,l*MS Blvd., Miami, Pia.
SSee l7*-400?- bbl Solomon
Sehlff. Executive Vice President.
More than 120 members, employees and guests of the
Men s Fashion Guild met at the Fontainebleau recently
to celebrate the guild's 29th anniversary and install new
officers (from left): Milton Nadel, secretary; Martin
wexler, treasurer; Art Alter, vice president; Mickey
Hayes, president. Lewis Cohen is also a vice president.
Installation was conducted by outgoing president David
A*VW*4V
*asO%asfrae%w%aOa%ee%aeaejajaaP,aP,ae>JP
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 182 SB 11th Ava.
Conaervative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Rimer *a
UNION OP AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
iJ?tiE- t5*fi st- Mi,m'- F|
?J. S7!;?*M- R,bbl Senford
Shapero, Director.
"aA.A.*,.^^,, nnaai lrL,-u^^.rL.a_s_a_a_H i --

CORAL SPRINGS
CR.A.L,.iPR,NQ8 HEBREW CON-
OREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Max Waltz. 44
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OP AMERICA
1820 NE 183rd St.. North Miami
gg*g Redman Executive
Beach, Fla. 38182. 847-8084. Rabbi
JEFFREY L, COHEN
Jeffrey Louis, son of Mr. and
Mrs Lester Cohen, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning
at Congregation B'nai RaphaeT
During the service Jeff will
receive Scoutings highest reli-
gious award, the Ner Tamid
Award. He is an eighth-grade
student at Norland Junior High
At a reception in Jeffs hon
or at the Forte Towers special
guests will include his great-
grandfather, Isidore Weiner;
his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs
Abe Cohen and Mr. and Mrs
Haskell Levin; Rabbi Nahum
Cohen, his uncle, who is com-
ing from Israel for the occa-
sion; and his cousins, Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Levenson of Scran-
ton, Pa.
the i
l in
8BAI
Street
ister
the (
Florid


Friday, July 9, 1976
'Jen1st Ikricfiar
Fage f-B
LECAl NCTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IECAI NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4018
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
iv RE: ESTATE OF
SADIE SCHWARTZ.
I leceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
M.I. PERSONS HAVIMi
\ i MS nK DEMANDS. AGAINST
hi: above kstatk and ai.i.
Tllli: PERSON8 INTERESTED
\ THE KSTATK
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
., administration of the estate
Sadie Bchwarti. deceased, File
Vumbe i 76-4018, i.- pending In the
i '.>urt f"> ii Hi.- County, Flor-
i" i on, the addreai of
,. Tl West Flagli i Street, M
; iiia. Tht : presen -
i the Mtati at Michael R.
-z and nan National
I Miami Beach whose address
Flagship First National Bank
ICl 1111 UlK oil.
Miami Beach, Florida MISS The
.mil address of tin personal rep-
attorney are sel lorth
ersona having claims or da-
ns! thl ,t. are re-eiuir-
. "IHIX THREE MONTHS FROM
DATE OF Till FIRST ITH1.I-
\ OF THIS NOTICE, to Hie
clerk of the above court a
Btatemenl of any -laim or
they may have Each claim
in writing and must Indicate
. for the i laim. thi name and
--. of the creditor or iiis agent
ney, and the amount lalmed
claim is not yet due, the date
arm become due shall be stat-
! If the claim Is contingent or un-
midated, the nature of the unoer-
-. shall stated if the claim is
ured the securlti shall be daacrlb-
The lalmanl shall deliver suffi-
iplei of the claim to the clerk
t. enable the Olerk to mall one copy
personal representative
All persons Interested in th,* estate
! in a COPY Of this Notice of Ad-
tratlon lias I.....n mailed are re-
W1TH1N THREE M< 'NTHS
FK(M TIIK DATE OF Till: FIR8T
LICATION OF THfl NOTICE, tn
. .if \ objections they mav have that
. hallenges the validity of the dece-
srlll, the ouallfleatlons of the
nal representative, or the venue
ol lunsdlctlon of the court,
AI.I. CLAIMS, DEMAND8 AND OB-
IECTION8 NOT 80 FILED WII.I. HE
FOREVER BARRED.
of the firm publication of this
Notice of Administration: Jui" 2. 1976.
MICHAEL R. SCHWARTZ
FLAGSHIP FIRST NATIONAL
HANK OF MIAMI REACH
By I'EI.IX J MARTINEZ
\-- Personal Representative of the
Estate of Sadie Schwartx
Deceased
MTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Sparber, Zemel. Roskln.
Heilhronner and Karu. P.A.
s K 3 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 358-7990
7/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3412
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OK
\ Mi' IN BERQ
I leceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
Tn M.L PERSONS HAVING
il.MMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
TIIK ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
Vcir ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of AARON BERG, deceased. File
Number 76-3412. Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
Which Is 73 W Flagler St.. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal represen-
of the estate Is Fav Berg.
whose address Is 6770 Indian Creek
Drive. Apt. 15 A. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attomev are
set forth beow.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THI8 NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim la not vet due. the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
t', ...id. the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
ii whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
tulred. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
PROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
IMH1.ICATION OF THS NOTICE, to
'He any objections thev mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent'l will, the Qualifications of the
nersonal representative, or the venue
or -uri-di. tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
KCTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Nonce of Administration: Julv 2. 1976
FAY BERG
\l Personal Representative of the
Estate of Aaron Berg
Deceased
XTTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
FAUNCB, FINK & FORMAN
1000 Rlscayne Blvd.. Suite 402
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: 371-5471
7/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice is hereby given that
;h- undersigned, desiring to engage
I" I'usiness under the fictitious name
SF.AL ENTERPRISES at 190 NE 91st
Street. Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of
'he Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
LATIN TEEN at 12740 SW 30 Terr..
Miami, Fla 1I1M Intend to regi
said name with the Clerk of the Clr-
i uit Curt of Mad, County, Florida.
PRANK M CORDOVES
RODOLFO M. l'RIETO
7 8-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N< ITICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
DADE BILLING SERVICE at 778
I '.'I'l' Blvd Miami Beach. FU in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida,
ROBERT SHORE
STATE BUILDERS, INC
Bj : KRKD R PERLMAN Pri
Mil I1AKI. P CHASE
Attorney f-r state Builders, in
: t-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business uinl.r the fictitious name of
DESIGN GROUP. LTD at 178 N.E
luth Street. Suite 204, Miami. Fla In-
tends to reglstei said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
JI'DY WERNER
INTERIORS, INC
6/25 7/8-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19519
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE I >F
OLIVER sol..i.M(..\ NEALON
PETERS, Husband
and
L.YNETTE YVONNE l'ETKRS.
Wife
To: Oliver Solomon Nealon Peters
Calls San Cristobal
* 131 l-i I'astora
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
tiagc has loan file clagalnst you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sol Alexander, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 19 W. Flag-
ler Street. Suite 317. Miami. Florida
33130. and file the original with th.'
clerk of the above styled court on or
before July 30, 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will he entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on this
ISnd day of June, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dads County. Florida
By WILLIE BRADSHAW JR.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CIRCIITO TEATRA1. 1.ATINO
AMERICANO at 612 Ainsley Building.
Miami 33132 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Daile County. Florida.
TRIANON THEATRE. INC
DANIEL M. KEI1.
a Fla. Corp.
DANIEL M. KEI1.
Attornev for applicant
6/18-25 7/2-9
George A 8ello
7'2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-9054
(Dlv. 31 WEAVER)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR PETITION
FOR ADOPTION
IN RE:
The Matter of the Adoption bv
J. BARRY McCALLEY and
VIVIEN McCALLEY
TO: Ronald Nlxon
Residence Unknown
Address Unknown
YOIT ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Petition of Adop-
tion has been filed In the above cap-
tloned case wherein you have been
named as the punitive Father of a
baby girl born on the 25th day of
r'ebruary. 1976. at Mt Slnal Hospi-
tal. Miami Beach. Dade Count v. Flor-
ida to KATHRVN REWJIK a/k/a
KATHY REWJL'K. out of wedlock
and, you have been named as the
punitive F'ather of said Infant child
and this cause shall come on to be
heard for Final Hearing and. If vou
have any objections thereto, vou are
required to serve a i-opv of said ob-
jections. If any. on Robert H Burns.
Esq.. Attornev for Petitioner whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road. Suite
(SO Miami Beach. Florida 33139. and
file the original with the Clerk of the
above styled court on or before Au-
gust 2. mt: Otherwise, a Default will
bo entered against vou for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or Peti-
tion and anv rights that vou mav
have had. shall be terminated.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI/1RIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23rd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: L SNEEDEN
As Deoutv Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
ROBERT H. BURNS. ESO
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 450
MlaroJ Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone No 536-4421
\ttornev for Petitioner y/s-j-U-Ji
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19616
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE IF
HI GO INDRADE
Husband
JOSEPHINE ANDRADE
W ,:.
T< >. Jo.-, phn.. Andrade
74-08 Dltman Blvd
'.'ii. i... New York
VOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage hat been filed againsl vou and
you are I equln d to serve "i|V Ol
your written defens. -. [f any, t<
STANLEY i: GOODMAN, attorney
for Pc titioni in addn
N w (2nd Street, Miami. Florida
SS147, and file the original with the
clerk ol thi ibovi n |< d court on or
In fore Jul> 30th, 1976; otherw Ise de
fault will be in. r, d againsl vou for
the r.li. f demanded In the complain!
oi petition
This notice shall be published once
each week foi four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWI8H Fl.oRIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said i "iirt at Miami. Florida on this
23rd day of June 1976
RICHARD I' BRINKER
\ 'lerk, Circuit Court
Pole County, Florida
By s PARRI8H
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
stanles i: Qoodman
2688 S W '.-ml Street
Miami. Florida 33147
Attornev for Petitioner
( 25 7 '*--!
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19547
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: Th.- Marriage of
vnoiiK VALUES,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JOSE VAI.DES.
Respondent Husband.
TO: JOSE VALDES
752 West 178th Street.
Apt. 2-A
New York. New York 10033
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riagc has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
CARLOS I.1DSKY. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2121 Pon-
ce de lain Boulevard Suite 420, Co-
ral Gables. Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July 30. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23rd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARLOS I.IDSKY, ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
i 'oral Cables. Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 442-8624
Attorney for Petitioner
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SNAPPER CREEK DAY CAMP at
6509 S.W. 113th Ave.. Miami, Fla.. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
HUNTER ASSOCIATES. INC.
6651 S.W. 117th Ave Miami. Fla
STEPHEN H. ROSEN
Attorney for Hunter Associates. Inc.
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring: to engage
in business under the fictitious nume
of THE CHINA EXPRESS RESTAU-
RANT at 9501 Collins Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
HAM LEE INCORPORATED
a Florida corporation
HAROLD CEASE
Attornev for HAM LEE
INCORPORATED
272" West Flngler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Phone 64I-S231 s/25 7/2_9_u
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-9552
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: PETITION OF HENISOI
TO: JEAN EL1E DORISMOND
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has been
filed for a minor child and vou are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer or other pleading to the
Petition for Adoption on the Petition-
er's Attorney, harvey d Rogers.
Suite 200. 1454 N.W. 17th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida 33125. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 23rd day of
July. 1976. or a Default will be enter-
ed against you.
DATED This 11th dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: N. A HEWETT
Deoutv Clerk
6/11-25 7/3-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-20306
IN RE: THE MARRIAOE OF
(ill ll.I >.\ GAB ELL.
Petitioner,
JEROME HOWARD OABELL
l:> Bpondenl
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
V' >U JEROME HOWARD OABELL.
residence unknown ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED TO FILE ur
e to tin- action for dissolution
i lage, m Ith the 'lerk of t he
Court, .mil serve a com
Petltlol Lttoi ii, vs. BAI I. T \ iN
I", sun.- 850. 1320 South Dixie
Highway, ""oral Gables, Fl Id
before the 6th d i Augu I
Ise tl p. iiti.,n for D
of Marriage uiii be taken ai
"Kl i June !9, 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
By l P COPELAND
I put v Clerk
ii 'ir, uit Court Seal)
published four consecutive wei
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
7 2.9.1.2J
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRlJIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20287
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IIELMIRA M V1I.AS.
Wife/Petitioner
and
JOAQUIM VII.AS.
Husband / Respondent
TO: Jl IAQUIM VII.AS
lll'A l'S BOMBEIR08, No 13
BOMBARRAL PORTUGAL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy Of
M>ur written defenses, if anv. to it on
WILLIAM HRODY. attornev for Pe-
titioner, whose address |s 407 LIN-
COLN ROAD. MIAMI REACH. FLOR-
IDA 33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before August 4. 197*:: otherwise a
default will he entered against vou
for the relief demanded in 'he eon*
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.OHIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 dav of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
As Deputy '"'lerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WILLIAM BRODY
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attornev for Petitioner
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
WET PAINT at 12620 North Kendall
Drive. Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
MAUREEN JORDAN 100%
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attornev for Wet Paint
1454 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33125
Phone: 325-1561
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
CENTREX TRADE SERVICES. INC.
at P.O. Box 011337. Miami 33101 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
JOSE PELLEYA
EDUARDO BERTOT
HARRY' HURLEY
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7619159
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
.MARIA MERCEDES GUTIERREZ.
de ZAPATA
Wife. Petitioner.
and
DIEOO ZAPATA.
Husband. Respondent.
TO: DIEOO ZAPATA
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed against vou and
you are reouired to serve a copv of
vour written defenses, if anv. to it on
DANIEL BETTER, attornev for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is S01 Dade
Federal Building. 1"1 East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Julv
30, 1!'7R; otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall he published once
, mil week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
aid court at Miami. Florida on this
ISth dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPHLAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ___
DANIEL RETTBR. ESQUIRE
Attornev for Petitioner
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 356-6090
Attornev for Petitioner
/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7620458
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK The Marriag. of
ANNA '!' lUSSAINT kOA
Petit loner.
and
CEDERNIER AOA.
l:. spondi nt
TO CEDERNIER ADA
Kltal
VOU ARE HEREBc I i'IFIED
that an action for Dlssolul ( Mar-
riage- has been filed ag and
\ ..u an n .iu:r, d to ol
u i Itten to It
EDWARD .1 NAURISt ttor-
nej i tn "hc
N E 71 Sir,-, M '
-. and fill the
of the above n or
ii.for, Au 13, 1876; oth de-
ill I,, entered again i u for
the rcinf demanded In thi omplalnt
ol petition
Tins notice shall be pu once
,-ks
n THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNES8 m\ hai 1 Of
Miami, Fl this
das "f June.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
\- i 1,-rk l 'ir. uit Courl
I lade < 'ountv Floi
By 8, PARRISH
a- DepuD Clerl
c i 'ircull Court Seal l
EDWARD J NAURISON, '
N K 71 Street
Florida I81J8
Attornei for Petition) t
T -23-30.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 7620617
NOTICE OF SUIT OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE I
HUBERT -I liKTTWl
Petti lc iner- Husband
and
JEAN M BETTW Y,
Respondent-Wife
To: JEAN M BETTW?
1809 16th Avenue
Altoona, Pennej Ivanla
YoC, JEAN M BETTW Y, are
hereby notified that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage- has been
filed, and you are- required to serve a
copy of your Answer or Pleading to
said Petition "ti the Petitioner's attor-
ney. Ronald 1. Davis, Esq. PA., Suite
417 lliscayne Building 19 W. Flag-
ler Stre-.t. Miami. Florida 33130
Phone: 379-1861, and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the office of
the Clerk of the- Circuit Court on or
before the 13th day of August, 1976.
If you fail to do so. Judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the Petition for
Dissolution c.f Marriage.
THIS NOTICE shall be published
once each week for four (4) consecu-
tive weeks in the JEWISH FI.OR-
IDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 1st day of July. 1976
RICHARD P RR'NKER Clerk
Circuit Court
Dade Coeintv Florida
nv R itpps
Deutv Clerk
rCh-ctill Conrl Seal)
7/ NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-15442
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DEI.ORME LATOI'R.
Petitioner,
and
OUTLINE GARDINER I.ATOUR.
Respondent
TO: QUYLINE GARDINER
LATOUR
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reouired to serve a copy of
vnur written defenses, if any. to It on
EDWARD J. NAURISON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 568
N E "1 Street. Miami. Florida 33138.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or be-
fore August fi. 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
ssld court at Miami. Florida on this
3flth day of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv, Florida
By A CRUTCHER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD J NAURISON. ESQ
:.6R N.E, 71 Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attornev for Petitioner
7/2-9-16-33
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the unde-rslgned. desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
OASIS APARTMENTS at 6620 Indian
Creek Drive- Miami Beach. Fla In-
lends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
DELTA INVESTMENTS
a Kla General Partnership as Trustee
fi'2', 7/3-8-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SAGITTARIUS SALES at 777 NW 72
Ave.. Miami. Fla.. Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
LARRY ZARSKY
NAT WEINIOER
RICHARD IAN BRICKMAN
Attornev for applicant
7/2-9-16-23


Page 10-B
+Jewlst> fkrkMan
Friday, July 9, 19?6
Campers Participate
In Local Maccabiad
1I6AL NOTKt
Over 1,200 summer campers
from all parts of Dade County
gathered on July 7 to compete
in the Third Annual Maccabiah
Games. The event, sponsored
by the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida annually
to promote good sportsmanship
among the community's youth,
are Miami's youth centered
equivalent of Israel's interna-
tional Maccabiah Games.
Campers between the ages of
3 and 15 joined the Blue or
White teams and participated
in various daylong field and
swimming events after taking
the Oath of Good Sportsman-
ship administered by JCC vice
president Fran Levey.
THE THEME of the Macca-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4025
IN RE ESTATE OF
POLD STERN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
I PERSONS HAVING
CUI.VI.1 OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND AI.I.
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN said STATE:
rOt' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of LEOPOLD STERN deceased. late
the event was Witnessed bv par- Ol Dd County. Florida. File Number
ents and other guests.
biad was "Jews Across the
World," highlighting the unity
of Jewish people everywhere.
Sponsored by the JCC's largest
day camping program to date,
Leading the effort for the
JCC progressive camping pro-
grams are Center president
Donald J. Reiff; North Dade
camping committee cochairmen
Allan B. Margolis and Max
Chira, and South Dade Commit-
tee cochairmen Evan and Na-
omi Olster.
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida is a mem-
ber of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's family of local
agencies.
At the recent installation of officers of the Dade County
Optometric Association the new president, Dr. Donald
Albert, chatted with new Auxiliary president Carol (Mrs.
Frederick) Bergman. Dr. Albert, a Miami resident for
over 30 years, is an ex-officio member of the Dade Coun-
ty Medical Association School Advisory Committee and
a clinical consultant at the U. of Miami's School of Fami-
ly Medicine. Mrs. Bergman, whose husband is past presi-
dent of the Dade County and Florida Optometric Asso-
ciations, has been managing a Miami Beach law office
for ten years.
IfOAl NOTKf
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4386
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THERESA LOERZEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
i I.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
HER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of THERESA LOERZEL. deceased
File Number 76-4395. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flakier Street. Mi-
ami. Florida. The personal representa-
tive of the estate is ROBERT LO-
ERZEL. whose address is RR1
Shagbark Road. Onanra. Illinois.
60955. The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the .state- are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, tf,
file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedents will, the qualifications of
the personal representative, or the ve-
nue or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration. Julv 9 1976
ROBERT LOERZEL
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of THERESA IXERZEL
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ABRAHAM AL GALBITT. Esq
OALBUT .A- OALBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
7/9-1*
Mrs. Harriet Green, of
Coral Gables, communal
and Zionist leader, has been
elected to the national
Board of Overseers of Bar-
Ilan University. The an-
nouncement was made by
Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein,
chancellor of the univer-
sity and national president
of the Synagogue Council
of America.
UGAl NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
KINO S DELI at 1580 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach. Fla. Intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Luis Fernando Vaxquei ft
Ana Vaxauei. his wife
6/25 7/2-9-16
6-4025 is pending in the Circuit Court
in and for Dade Coujjty. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 3rd Floor. Dade County Courthouse.
73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33130. The personal representative
of this estate Is MARIA MAGDA-
l.ENA STERN, whose address is 1500
11. iv Road. Apartment Ml Miami
Beach. Florida. The name and address
of the attorney for the personal rep-
resentative is set forth below.
All persona having, claims, or da-
is-.oust this estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS PROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUHL1-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with th. clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
r attorney, ami the amount claimed
If the claim is not v.t due, tin dati
wh.n it will become due shall be Mat-
f the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the um er-
tainty shall be itati .1 ii the claim is
secured thi security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cleni 11 pit i ol til. claim to the clerk
Of the above styled court to enable the
clerk to mail one copy lo each personal
representative
All persons interested in the estate
Whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
1'CHLICATION OF THS NOTICE to
file any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND (IB-
lEi-TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on this
15th day of June. 1976.
MARIA MAODALENA STERN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of LEOPOLD STERN
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 2nd dav of
Julv, 1976
HENRY NORTON
1201 Blscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone (305) 374-3116
Attorney For Personal Representative
7/2-9
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE COUNTY COURT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Division
Case No. 76-3439 CC-06
SOUTHERN DISCOUNT COMPANY.
Plaintiff.
VI
MARVIN L CALLAHAN and
SANDRA L. CALLAHAN. his wife.
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Marvin 1. Callahan and Sandra
I. Callahan .his wife
Residence: General Delivery.
Scotland, Arkansas 72141
You are hereby notified that an
action has been brought against you
by attachment of the following de-
s, rlbed real property located in Dade
County, Florida, to wit
Ijot Eighteen (18i In Block Eight
oi of McCLURE MANORS, ac-
cording to the plat thereof, as re-
corded In Plat Book Twenty-four
(34) at pain twenty-seven (27> ol
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
seeking the entry of ludgment against
you in the amount of 11.500.00 and for
the satisfaction "f said (udgmenl "Ui
of the aboyi described property You
are hereby reoulrud to serve your an-
swer or other pleading to the said
omplalnl on Elliot i. Miller. (II N E
mm street. Miami. Florida. 83117. and
file the original answer or pleading
with the Clerk of this Court on or
before the lOth dav of August |97(
l( you fall to 'I" SO, judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you for th.
relief demanded In the said complaint
and writ "f attachment
WITNESS my hand and seal of thli
Court "n this '.th day of July 1976
RICHARD P BRINKBR
cierk of the County Courl (seal)
Bl 11 JONES
I 'etiutv Clerk
7 B-16-2J-J0
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of:
DAVID TRUE8DALE
Petitioner,
and
MARGARET THo.MPS- >N
TRUE8DALE
Respondent
To MARGARET THOMP80N
TRUE8DALE
Mill Pond Road. Apt |4H
Broadbrook, Connecticut
yOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If anv. to It
on EDWARD .1 NAURISON. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address Is
.-. N E 71 Street. Miami. Florida
33138. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before August 13. 1976: otherwise a
I. fault will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and th.- seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30th dav of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKBR
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
Bv S PARR1SH
As Deputv (Terk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD J NAURISON. ESQ
568 N E. 71 Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
________________ 7/9-16-23-30
LEGAL N0TKE
nue. Miami Beach. Florid.,
register said name with th.
(he Circuit Court of Dad.
Florida.
Intend to
' ounty,
INTERCONTINENTAL RAW
OF MIAMI HKA.-l| K
H\ Jaime Pino Pr. aid.....
INTERCONTINENTAL RANK
OF MIAMI ANK
Kv Jose A Maruri. Pr.
CTPEN NEVINS
Attorneys for Applicant
L'.", Arthur Godfrev Road
Miami Beach. Florida 11146
; _-,
I .
IN
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4264
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
RE ESTATE OF '
SAMUEL l BIEOEL a/k/a
SAM I SIEGEL a/k/a
SAMUEL IRA SIECEi.
I'. ceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSo.vs HAVING
Cl VIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE A i Cl.'l
OTHER PERSONS INTER! STFt'i
IN THE ESTATE
YOU
that th.
ARE HEREBY
ndminlstn.....n
of SAMUEL I SIEGEL d<
Number 76-4164, i- pending in th
i ir. uit Court f..r Dad.' C Unl


NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of JOHN W at 1612 Pennsylvania
Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida. 33139
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
JOHN WAJCMAN
OALBUT A OALBUT
Attorneys for JOHN W
721 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
6/11-18-21 T/2
---------------------------------------------------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4286
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
'ICIDo JOHN MIS8IO a/k/a
OUTDO J MISSIO
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
ft) ALL PERSONS HAVING
' AIMS oR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
'HER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE-
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of GUIDO J MISSIO. deceased. File
Number 76-4286. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade Countv. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami. Florida. The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is MARY J MIS-
SIO. whose addres Is 428 SW 29th
Road. Miami, Florida The name and
address of the personal representati-
ve s attorney are set forth below-
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are reaulred
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the. claim, the name and
iddress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed It
the claim Is not yet due, the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed, if the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim is
"!k0,,rd- "" ""-"unty shall be describe
ed The claimant shall deliver iwfll
.lent copies of the claim to the cleVk
to enable the clerk to mall one crfpy
to each personal representative
All persons interested in the estate
(" whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are r.-
'i'm.'.T,' "ITMIN THREE MONTHS
m-.,', K "ATK "K THE F'KST
HI.!. ATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
rue an, objections they may have
that challenges the validity ol the
* "d.nts will, the qualifications of
the personal representative, or the ve-
nue or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT goFiLED Will' i! "STAIM? N"T -S" *'"'ED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED BE POREVER_BARRED
Date of the first nubll
Notice of Admlnlstra
H ATT IE DAMPF
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of HERMAN DAMPF
___ Deceased
ATTORNEY Po. B.KSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
A NORMAN DRUCKER
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
7/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 75-6784
in re estate of
Herman dampf.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of HERMAN DAMPF. deceased. File
Number 76-6785. Is pending In the
circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Fla. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate Is HATTIE
DAMPF. whose address Is 1777 Col-
lins Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida.
The name and address of the personal
representatives attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one COM
to each personal representative
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE .MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to
file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedents will, the qualifications Ol
the personal representative, or th. \.
nue oi Jurisdiction of the court
,\l.!.-.-,.',.'l;A!^s DEMANDS AND
i ir. uit Court f..r Dad.- Count
Ida, Probate Division, the addr
which la Had.- Count)
H .si Flagler Street, lil
IS1S0 The personal repi
th< estat. i- MAMIE A SIEGI
whom address Ii MIS Colllti
Apt SD, Miami B. |
Tl name and ad
personal representative'! atl -
v. t forth Ii. low
aii persons bavins claim
mands against the .st.it, .,.. ,, ...ir...i
WITHIN THREE .Months from
THE DATE OF THE FIRST I'liui-
c.\T|o.\ | ip THIS NOTII L to fi|,.
with the ci.rk ..f the abov.
written statement of anj
mand Ihej nay bavi r ,,
must be In writing and mils:
the basis for th,- claim tl inn and
address ,,f the creditor i
or attorney, and the amount
If the claim is not yet due. II
when It will b.coni. ,iu. shall be
tai.d if the claim Ii com
unliquidated, the nature of th.
taint) shall be stated if th. lalni i-
secured. the security shall b. describ-
ed Th. claimant shall deliver suffi-
.i. nt copi.-s of the claim to tl, clerk
to liable the clerk to mall 01
to each personal represent.|| \y ,
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of ihis Notice ol Ad-
ministration has been mailed ,.r. re-
quired, WITHIN THREE Mi
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO
file any objection! they niav havi that
challenges the validity of th.
d. nt win. the qualiflcatloni
personal representative, or th. Venn
or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
JECTIONS Not SO FILED 'All I
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration Juh
MAMIE A SIEGEL
As Personal Representative f the
Estate of SAMUEL I. SIEGEL
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
KEPRESENTATIVE
HERBERT S SHAPIRO
SHAPIRO, FRIED. WEIL A
SCHEER
107 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-6361
: -n
ubiicatlon of this saitc* ,?/ l^Jl?1. DU1b'-ation of this
tion: July 9. 1976 &'.", ".'" r".l.'',>no.Julv 9- ,97fi
>AMPF .. MA in J MISSIO
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of OUTDO J MISSIO
ATTOKN'KV FcXT'",,Wl
PER8M >N AI It EPR ESENTATIVE:
Herbert 7. Marvin, for the firm of
.Marvin & Sneppard. 9150 SW 87th
Ave Miami. Fla. 33176
Telephone: 279-0730
7/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANO
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 75-15825
NOTICE OF ACTION
COPLAN PIPE A SUPPLY CO INC
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
CENTRAL BANK A TRUST
Cl '.MI'ANY.
a banking corporation:
SUNRISE POINT. INC
a Florida corporation:
HERYDAN ELECTRIC. INC
a Florida corporation:
BOYS ELECTRIC CORPORATION.
a Florida corporation.
HERYDAN ELECTRIC INC
a Florida corporation:
WEATHERMATIC CORPORATION,
a Florida corporation: and
VALMOR DISTRIBUTORS INC
a Florida Corporation.
Defendants.
To RELIABLE PLUMBING INC
Edward J Flaccavento Director,
Patrick M. Erra. Director
Fllomena Cantone. Director
Residence of Directors unknown.
Ton are hereby notified that an ac-
tion has been commenced to foreclose
a mechanic's lien on the following retl
property lying and being and situate
in Dade County. Florida, more Dsr- ,
tl.ularly described as follows
The 8E % of the SE '. of the
NW 35 So Range 40 E. less th- B
137.00 feet excluding th. No 3 30
feet of said E 137.00 feet and less
the So. 137.00 feet excluding DM
W 3!'.60 feet of said So 137.1
Lot 9 of the unrecorded plat f
COWAN SUBDIVISION bl E B
Browne!) Assoc. Inc.. dated De-
cember. 1971. as more partlcUlaHJ
described in OR Book s : are
1905. NO 7IR-MM44: ;i k Su'1'
rise Point, located at >-'d "
l-'Mh street. Miami. Florida .
This action has been filed
vou and vou are required to
copy of y,,ur written defensi
to it on HERMAN ORATSO.N r.SU
" 1.....1 Uncoln Road. Miami <*"..
Florida 33139. and file Ull r"1"*.' I
with the Clerk of the above stvieo
Court on or before the ttrd a ';
July. 1976. otherwise I default '
be entered against vou for the relief
demanded In the complaint .
WITNESS mv hand and th. seal
f said Court at Miami. Florida. tn
lth dav of June. 1976
RICHARD P DRINKER
As Clerk of said Court
By N A HEWETT
As Deoutv Clerk
(Courl seal I
6/18-25 7/I-



Friday, July 9, 1976
*Jenist Meridian
Page 11-B
Obituaries
IEGAI NOTICE
NEHAM
Irv|n (Sonny). M. native bom II}-
',;, died tnwaday July 1st In Mi-
ami Heart Institute H* WM 8a-
.,- II of the City Of Miami
>, ,. i, Recreation Department Son-
., life imiK resident of Ml-
,,, Beach and uraduate of Miami
g< nlor Hitch. In held a bach-
educatlon degree from the
of Miami He way with
i u of Miami Beach Ri
tmi foi He li
,i by his wlf* Angell
., ,ri.-. slaters. Mrs Sophie
Mrs Gertrude Bent, and
dartha Edelstein Bevlces were
,- ihr Rlveralde, Alton Road
in lien of flower* family re-
all donation! be made to
Beth Sholom.
RUBIN
,f 1139 8 W. 23rd Street,
away Wednesday She had
resident here for the past 19
i iniiiK from Detroit. Mlchl-
Sh. as a member of lletb Da-
ilsterhood and Avlva Chapter
i Miirachl. .
- survived by son. Moms
. in. nf North Miami Beach: :i
Rose Bchreldell, of HI-
Sophie (Jlanoff and E5vs Reuben.
- uthfleld. Michigan; S grand-
children and i"> great grandchildren,
gervli te were to be helil Thurs.. Julv
ID p.m. at Gordon Funeral
ii me with Interment In Mt. Sinai
remeter) Shiva will be observed
s W 23rd Street In lieu of
.lunations mav be made t"
David Consrrejratlon or Mil-
ii hi
FREDMAN
.i.ini'i. mi. of Miami Beach, pasjaed
away Julv 4 Mrs Friedman and
her late husband, William, came lo
Miami SO yean ago from New York
City sin- was a pioneer member of
Beth i'avid Congregation, member
of BJmunah Chapter OB8. the Loy-
alty Club, the Jewlah Home for the
\,-..i and B'nal Until, and a foun-
der of BB Women Miami Chapter
Sh< also served as secretary in the
ywha Mrs Friedman is survived
bj a son, Judaic Milton, of Miami.
,i dauiihter, Rosalind Sutta, of
i'oral Gables: seven grandchildren
and one great grandchild s. i vices
loid Thursday, with Interment al
mi Nebo Cemetery,
SKLAROFF
Martin. 44. of North Miami, passed
away June 80. He came to Miami
25 years ago from Philadelphia,
wlore lie attended Pierce Sehool of
Business and Temple IT. Sehool of
\ luntliur. Was a member of
Temple Emanu-EI and HIM" Elks
No l01 M H He is survived lu-
lus wife. Jennine Buaette: his
daughters. Lisa Beth and Amy
Wyn; and his parents. Fave and
Jeaae Sklaroff Services were held
Sunday, with Interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery
KRASHINSKY
n of Miami Beach passed away
,lul 1st Survived by Wife Sara, son
i dauiihter Esther, Brother
later Mary, 1 grandchildren,
. it-arandchlldren Services In
Montreal, Canada, arrangement by
I'unerai Chapel. T:a Seven-
sir.ei. Miami Beach
S'ER. Hose. 87 Riv( ralde
KKAFT. Joseph. S4. Gordon.
- Morris, 78, In Italy River-
STEIN, Bertha. 18 Gordon.
SCIH'LMAN, Sam. 7" Phllbrlck,
FKINBERG, Albert, BJ Levitt
ZENBERG. isaae. 85 Gordon
M v K Jean. 82 Gordon,
IVi h >I.FE, Bettv M 74 Riverside
slMoNS, Harry, 73. of Hollywood.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
1K1 PembnU n*. 1JM5 W 0..I. My.
Hollywood, Fla. North Miami, Fla.
SONNY LEVITT. F.O.
AUZED MEMORlAt*
cuaroM crastso
IN OUR WORMHCT
M44HI* 444-0W2
32WS.W.84* ST MIAMI
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME.
Seonf the Ifwuh Community since Hi*
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_________ RErORM SERVICES
1-jnuHGoHon (15461 Ike Cordtn
HinyOoirlan 119*4) lames B Cardan
_____.Telephone S68 S544
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open litry Day Closes' Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
ROTHAUS MONUMENT CO., INC.
E=
18200 Wast Dixie Highway
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33100
1306) 931-6111
BRONZE & GRANITE
PLAQUES
MONUMENTS
MEMORIALS
ALL MIAMI AND
N.Y. CEMETERIES
Ron & Barbara Rolhaus
When a loss occurs
away from home.
mm BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
New v^rl<: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-555
IN RE: E8TATE of
MAUDE J HAKI'KH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
To Al.l. PERSONS HAVING
ri.AI.MS iii: DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED.
IN THE ESTATE:
VOl' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai the administration of the estate
of MAUDE .1 HARPER, d.. ea a,
Pile Number 76-555, Is pending In the
Clrcuil Courl for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, ih,. address of
which is 7:: West Floglei Street, Mi-
ami, Plorlda 13130, The personal rep-
ntatlve of the estate is Donna s.
Hell, whose address Is 1377 xw 34th
Street, Miami, Florida. The name and
address ..f the personal representa-
tlvi attorney are set forth below,
All persons having claims or de-
ni.in,i- ngalnsl thii i state are re-
,11111., I. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
I'lt'i.M THE PATK OF Till: FIRST
i'l'ULICATION i IF this Nl ITICE, to
ill, with the clerk ..f the above court
.i written statement of any claim or
.i.in.,n,i they may have Bach claim
musl be in writing and mu-t Indicate
tic basis for thi. claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim l not yet due, the date
when it will beromi' ilu,' shall be
stat,'d If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated, if th- claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
u-iii copies of the claim to the clerk
io enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative
All persons Interested in the "state
t,. whom .i copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed .hi re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PI'lil.H ATlii.N OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection) thej ma* have thai
challenges the validity of the deca-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
ir lurisdli iion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, VND
OBJECTIONS NOT So FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Hair of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Julv 2. 1978
DONNA s BELL
As Pesonal Representative <>f the
Estate of MAVDE .1 HARPER
11. ci nsed
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
ESSEN A ESSEN, ESQS
1208 Alnsley MMg.
Miami Fla, 33132
Telephone: 371-2675
7/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3826
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETTA D SCHULZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PER8ON8 HAV1NC5
I AIMS olt DEMANDS AGAINST
THE AMOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PER80NS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
vol ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
Of ETTA l> SCHI'I.Z. ileo ased File
Number 76-3826, is pending In the
Circuit Courl for bade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address i>f
which is 7.1 W. Flogler Street. Miami.
Plorlda The personal representative
,,f the .stat.- is WILLIAM BARNBTT.
whose address is 101 182nd Drive, Mi-
ami Beach, Florida The name and
addr.ss of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are sel forth below
All persons having claims or de-
mand- agalnsl this estate are requir-
ed WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statemenl of any claim or
demand ilnv may hav. Bach claim
musl be In writing and must indicate
th, basis for the claim, the name and
address ,,f the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not vet due the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall he stated If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
i, in epics of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one cony
to each personal representative
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
HUired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THS NOTICE, to
file anv objections thev mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS AND OB-
JECTION'S NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Julv I. 1976.
WILLIAM BARNETT
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Etta D Schuli
I le, eased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
KLINE. MOORE. KLEIN &
HERRON, PA.
l,v JOSEPH PERLSTE1N
47 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla 33138
Telephone 528-4T71
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engaae
in business under the fictitious name
of AZOY LABORATORIES INC. at
7181 SW 7th Street. Miami. Florida
33144 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
FRANCISCO AZOY
71SI SW 7th Street. Miami. Florida
____________________7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names
,.f ECONO-OPTICS, ECONO-VISION
and BCONO-SYE GLASSES at 946
East :.".th Street. Hialeah. Florida In-
tends to registei said names ith the
Clerk .>f the Circuit Court nf Dade
County, Florida
JOHN COSCUELA (1.....I '
6/18-::. 7 8-8
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 76-16426
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
in Re The Marriage < f:
JUAN CID, husband and
VIRGINIA oil), wife
n i VIRGINIA CID
Residence I'lllillown
YOV ARE HEREBY notified that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed agalnsl you* and vou
are hereb) required to serve copy
of your answer or other pleading to
the Petition on the Husband's Attor-
ney. LESTER ROGERS, whose ad-
1454 N.W I" Vvenue, Mi-
ami. Florida ::::1L'.'.. and fill the orig-
inal with th, Clerk of the above styl-
. i Courl on or before this 30th dav
o| Julv. 1976, or a Di faull ill he en-
s red ngalnsl vou.
DATED tin- 1Mb das of June. 1978.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
B) \ A HEWETT
t 25 7 8-9-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4124
IN RE ESTATE I IF
NAT NELSON.
I leceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
To ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ., .1.
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE E8TATE
VOl' ART: HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai the administration of the estate
of NAT NELSON deceased, File
Number 76-4124. is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
winch is Courthouse. 7:t Wcsi Plagler
Street, Miami Florida, 3313". The per-
sonal representative of the estate is
REV A nelson whose address is
18410 Miami Driv,. North Miami
Beach, Florida, 33162 The name and
address of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or de-
mand-, ngalnsl the .tat, are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
u illi the I. ii, ..f the above curl a
written statement of nnj claim or de-
mand tin \ mav have Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis ol th, claim, the name and
address nf the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
u I., n it w ill become due shall be
stated if th, claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tain!) shall be stated If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim t,> the clerk
to enable the clerl to mail one copy
t, each personal representative.
All persons interested m the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice ol Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
PROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may hav, that
challenges the validity ,.f the dace-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
..i jurisdiction ,,f tin curt
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO PILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Hate of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration Julv 2. 1878.
REVA NELSON
At Personal Representative of the
Estate of NAT NELSON.
I deceased
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
R( ITHENBERO, K< IQAN.
KORNBLUM A BENJAMIN
p'4 Biscayne Building
19 Wi st Plagler street
Miami, Florida. 33130
Telephone 379-1754
7/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of WASHINGTON PHARMACY at
numbei 1805 Washington Avenue, In
the i it\ of Miami Beach. Florida, in-
tends to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad,
County, Florida
Dated at Miami Beach. Florida, this
11th day "f June 1976
WASHINGTON DRUG COMPANY
B) Lloyd I. Ruskm Vice President
LLOYD I. RU8KIN
Attorney for Applicant
4"7 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 331.19
7/2-9-16-23
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ih. undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SNAPPER VILLAGE EARLY DEV-
ELOPMENT and hay CARE CEN-
TER at 6651 B.W 117th Aiv. Miami.
l-'la Intends t<. register said name
with the i'erk of the Circuit Court of
i lade County, Florida
HUNTER ASSl ICIATES, INC
S W 117th Ave Miami. Fla.
STEPHEN N Ri 'SEN
Attorney foi Huntei Isso lates, Inc.
8 25 7 2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to eneasre
in business under the fictitious name
of ITALIAN TILES GALLERY at
10001 S Dixie Highway, Miami Flor-
ida intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv Florida
ITALIAN TILES SOUTH. INC
S Eli 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BEACHCOMBER RESORT MOTEL
a/k/a BEACHCOMBER MOTEL at
IN!'::.". Collins Avenue Miami Beach.
Florida 321M intends to registei said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
BEACHCOMBER REVISITED. INC
SHIRLEY WHOLE. B8Q
Attorney lor Beachcomber
Revisited. Inc.
Suit. 811, *-" Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 82128
Phone inr,-:,,11-15417
7/2-S-1H-23
NOTIOE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of O A W TRUCK PARTS AND
EQUIPMENT CO. at 11038 NW South
River Drive. Medley. Florida intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Countr.
Florida
Waldo A. Ylncente (Individual)
7/8-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t. engage
in business und.r the flctltloui name
of BEACH) ') iMBER RE> ISITED,
INC Ivi nue. .Miami
lleach, Floi 154 lnt< nds to re*
later said name with the Cerk of the
Circuit i ourl of Dade Countv. Florida
Bi h mi.. Revisited, Inc d b a
hi mbi i Ri sort Motel a i. a
I.. h< umber Motel
s|iii:i.i;\ \\. ii >i.i'. ESQUIRE
At :,i ne\ for ltea.h, omber
Revisited. Inc
6 -" 7 2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 76-18855
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re: The Marriage Of
ARID Mi FERNANDEZ,
Wif,
I A/.ARo it FERNANDEZ,
Tl l LAZARt i l; FERNANDEZ
Address Unknown
yOU ARE HEREBY notified that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against vou and v.,u
are hereby required to serve a coo*
of vour answer oi other pleading to
the Petition on th< u Ife's attorney
in iWAR! i J R< iSEN. whose addi
It ion n w 37th Avenui end Floor!
Miami. Plorlda 33125 and file the
original with the Clerk of the above
,,i l, ,i Court, on i before the -3rd dav
,.f Julv. 1976, or a Default will be en-
t< red against vou
D VTED tins Idth da> of June 1978,
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk ol ih. Circuit Curt
Bi M HERRERA
7 2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Nc 76-18842
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The mat rlage of
LAF' 'NT A NT JEAN.
Husband
and
ALMA JEAN.
Wife
YOU ALMA JEAN, residence un-
known, ar. r.nuir.d lo file VOW an-
swer t" the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the above
Courl and sen,- a com thereol upon
the petltoner's attorne!! Herman Co-
hen Esq., 622 s.W lt Street. Miami.
Florida. 33130, on or before Jus -3.
1976 ..I else petition will be confessed.
lilted June 16, 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk Clrcuil Courl
Bj i p COPELAND
Denutv Clerk .
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1TTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-19470
General Jurisdiction Division
IN RE Th. Maniac
CHRISTINE T I'.R.'U \
IVIfi
ii ml
WALTER i: BR' 'W S
Husband
Ti I; WALTER i: BR< >\\ N
1535 Cnrlen Courl
K\ ergn n i '.i
VOU ARK HHREin NOTIFIED
thai a Petition tor Dissolution ol Mar-
riage has been filed agalnsl vou and
>.. .,,, required to serve a copy of
iur written defenses, if anv. to it on
I HKoBAI.D II ENC.ELHARDT. .lit
llttomey for Petitioner. Whose address
i- ~.v'. Sunset Drive, suite :'"7. South
Miami. Florida, and file the original
u it li the i lei k ,.f the above styled
, ourl on or before July 30, 1976: other-
wise a Judgment by default will be
ntered agalnsl \ "U
DATED this 22 dav of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk
Bv 11 LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
,Circuit Court Seall
.. 26 7/2-9-16
NOTICE Ol- ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-18056 (101
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
SAMUEL JOHN. Petitioner.
BARBARA SANDERS JOHN.
Resnondent.
I'o. Mrs Barbara Sanders John
Residence Unknown.
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed agalnsl VOU and
you are required lo serve a copy of
\ our Written defenses, if 1111V. to it
.....(LADY'S GERSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is Inl N \\
12 Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. (3051
324-4585, and file the original with the
clerk of the ai,..\e styled court on
i before Julv 30th. 1976: otherwise a
l.fault will be entered against vou tol
the relief demanded in the complaint
.1 petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
n THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
aid curt at Miami. Florida on this
lith dav of June. 1818
RICHARD P BRINKER
At Clerk Clrcuil Court
Dade Countv Florida
Rv A CRUTCHER
As Denutv clerk
(Circuit Court Seal*
Gladys Qerson. Esouire
stone Soatchtn & Koss. PA
'hi N W 12 Avenue
Miami. Fl. 33128 (324-45551
6/25 7/2-9-18


Page 12-B
fJetvisti HcrkBrui
Friday, July 9, 197(.
SAVE 40
Pantry Pride
Grade 'A' Eggs
49e
FLORIDA
FRESH
MEDIUMS
DOZEN
. LIMIT TWO DOZEN PlI ASI WITH OTHR PURCHASES
W OF $7.00 OH MOIE EXCIUOINC CIGARf TTCS
^PSAVE 37
Borden
Sour Cream
, UMIT TWO PINTS. PLEASE WITH OTHER PUCH ASSS
W OF $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
%xl
I Croc* your table with mtquitilt china...
weekly Itaturtt tnabltt you o odd 'o
or irorf collecting thlt lovely pattern of...
IMPORTED PORCELAIN CHINA
this weeks Sculptured
FEATURED r
PIECE UUP 1
49
WITH
CIACH
M
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7pc. with S10
Ipo. with 113
[^Basic
[bargain
ALL GRINDS
COFFEE
SAVE 33
Maxwell
House
$J16
MB
BAG
. UMIT ONE SAC PLEAS*. WITH OTHi* PURCHASES
* QH7 00 OR MORI EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. JULY 10th AT
AIL PANTRY PRIDE STORES
FROM FORT PIERCE
TO KEY WEST
ClrttOMIt MAT FUtCHAll OM
O* All STAMIOIHIM WITH
ONI t' 00 UOCHAU OO MOtl
1ICIUCMNG CIGAIITTft
fi-ffi-j YOUR FOOD STAMPS
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69
76*
79*
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Our U.S. Gov'f. Inspected and Graded
US DA. Choice Beef Cuts are guaranteed
to be naturally tender and juicy!
BEEF ROUND BOTTOM
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
WESTERN CORN FED
Round
Roast i
$119
IaIK
lAtctm
1
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U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF
Rib Steak:::: l9.9
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PANTRY PRIDE
^^^^ ORANGE
/ mi, 1 .GRAPE
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(Alt FLAVORS)
46 OZ
CAN
Fruit Drinks
39*
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$
49*
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Fruit Cocktail 3
MUNIS
Tomato Paste
IAS* TO III
Mahatma Rice
NAAISCO
American Fries
WrOIIIO
Wine Vinegar
AMIIICAN SIAUlY
Butter Beans
AMIUCAM ll..'>
Blackeye Peas 2;.*49c
AM I tit an II Au" IIGMt 110
Kidney Beans '^33*
HOIDS U# TO 'ivi OUNCti
Dixie Cup Refills SSS 99*
SIVIN SIAS Gllf N GODDISS
Salad Dressing JSSt,lw
Trash Bags BS 99*
67*
'^'39*
27*
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CAN
SMAU [NO
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U S 0 A CHOICI Will COIN 110 0111
Chuck Blade Roast
U SO A CHOKI
Beef Brisket aSSus
US 0 A ChOKI HI* CNUCl IONI1IS1
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Chuck Blade Steak
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U.S.O.A CHOICI llll OOUNO
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US CHOKI will COIN MO Mil lOIS
Porterhouse Steaks
$11 CIO
Beef Liver 69
79*
SI 29
$| 39
89*
$1 39
SI 39
48*
59*
SI 79
SI 19
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Sirloin r
Steak $179
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Sliced Bologna
99c 6
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11.01 I 49
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Variety Pak !5g $
OSCAI MATH -C.IOI
Beef Bologna i0'$109
wholi oi spiais
Claussen's Pickles ,?.' 99*
schwigiii hmg
Beef Bologna itt $ 149
coniANO inciD lumcnion miat 01
Cooked Salami 7.^99*
AMIIKAN AOSMII KHOGHA Ol
Midget Salami SSrU"
t*ANTir PtlOl MiOGIT
Liverwurst c"h. 49*
WE MSMVE THE IIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOlD TQ p Summers Eve Douche
49c
REGULAR OR
HERBAL
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BOTTLE
Crest
REGULAR OR
MINT
TOOTHPASTE
49
C 3-OZ.
TUBE
PURE
VEGETABLE
OIL
SAVE 46
Wesson
Oil
$J09
48-OZ.
BOTTLE
, LIMIT ONE tOTTLE PLEASE WITH OTHIR PUICHASES
* OF f 7 00 OIMOE EXCLUDING CFGARETTIS
CALIFORNIA
SAVE 40
Red Pack
Tomatoes
19*
16-OZ.
CAN
^
LIMIT TWO CANS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OP MOPE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
TOP QUALITY LARGE 70 SERIES
Nectarines
2 76c
Iceberg Lettuce
3 76
PICK
YOUR OWN
, iAJIC
lltCII*
GARDEN FRESH
WESTERN
i.AIMN .111., IASIT
Fla. Avocados 2 L"% 76*
Apples '' : 2 M 76'
MM CABMN !%. -vi stitN
Scallions M 17*
OIL MONTI GOlMN ntPl
Bananas 5 76c
MAI VIM PUSH TIHOW
U.S. tt\ Onions a^ ..17*
CAtOIN IIISM
Green Squash ,.17*
SUNWISI (A.iOINA
Lemons """ 11 j, 76'
Idaho Potatoes
5 a 76c
FOR BAKING OR
FRENCH FRIES
SARA LEE FROZEN
Pound
Cake
'ANIIT .liDI IIOIIN
Whipped Topping
MINT FLAVORED
MOUTHWASH
Listermint
99
12-OZ.
BOTTLE


Full Text
Friday, July 9, 1976
* Jewish fkridiian
Pagt 11 A
They Held All Night Vigil Administration Cold
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Thou-
sands of Israelis maintained an
all-night vigil by their radios
after the Air France plane which
was hijacked in Athens took off
from Benghazi, Libya, with a
limited amount of fuel. Its 229
passengers included at least 70
Israelis and 10 or more Jews of
other nationalities.
Kol Israel Radio, which nor-
mally goes off the air at 1 a.m.
local time, continued to relay
news bulletins as they came in
after that hour.
AN ALERT was maintained at
Ben Gurion Airport throughout
the night as is the practice when
an aircraft is hijacked anywhere
in the region. Relatives of Is-
raelis known to be aboard the
jet spent a sleepless night at
the Air France office. The air-
line was able'to provide only
meagre information.
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
Israelis were especially anger-
ed over the French national air
carriers apparently lax security
measures. The French were be-
lieved to have considered their
planes immune from Arab ter-
rorist attack because of their
Middle East policies.
The wide-bodied, twin jet "air
bus" hijacked was the first
French airliner ever seized by
terrorists.
MORE THAN 30 passenger
planes of various nationalities
have been hijacked since 1968
for reasons connected with the
Middle East conflict. The first
plane was an El Al jet on a
flight from Rome to Tel Aviv
which was taken over by Arab
terrorists on July 23, 1968, and
forced to land in Algeria.
The wave of hijackings that
followed in the late '60s and
early '70s caused stringent se-
curity measures to be taken by
most international air carriers.
But Air France took the least
precautions.
It was only after repeated
persuasion by Israeli authorities
that the French company re-
quired its passengers boarding
at Tel Aviv to undergo thorough
inspections of both their per-
sons and their luggage. Israeli
officials going abroad are urged
to travel in Israeli planes wher-
ever possible and especially to
avoid Air France.
\Lebanon Israel's Fault-Moscow
UNITED NATIONS
JTA) The Soviet Union
has said that the situation in
Lebanon was the result of
actions "by the forces of im-
perialism and Zionism."
The statement was made
in the Security Council by
Ambassador Yakov Malik,
who said the imperialist
forces had brought about the
current events in Lebanon
to stop dissension and divert
attention from efforts to li-
berate the occupied Arab
territories.
THEY WANT to strike a blow.
said Malik, against the Palestin-
ian resistance and the national
patriotic forces of Lebanon, and
to delay a Middle East settle-
ment.
The Security Council was dis-
cussing the report of the com-
mittee on Palestine rights which
recommends, among other
things, a timetable for Israeli
withdrawal from the occupied
territories by June 1 next year,
and a two-phase plan for re-
turn of the Palestinians to their
homes.
Malik said the Soviet Union
fully supported the committee's
report. The Security Council, he
said, should take decisive, ef-
fective and immediate measures
to confirm the inalienable rights
of the Palestinian people.
AMBASSADOR Piero Vinci of
Italy said he thought the Pales-
tinian question had been singled
out from tfie larger context of
the whole Middle East problem,
and that other essential com-
ponents had been overlooked.
The best way to bring about im-
plementation of Palestinian
rights was to speed up the re-
sumption of the negotiating
process.
The committee's report, con-
centrating on only one aspect of
the complex Middle East crisis,
did not reflect political realities
in the area, which had been cov-
ered by Security Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338.
The Italian delegate said
omission from the report of any
consideration of the existence
of a member-state of the United
Nations, which was a recipient
of all the rights and duties
which went with such status,
was serious.
No committee could envisage
measures which might hamper
the basic right of a member-
state to live in peace within
secure and recognized frontiers.
KAJ SUNDBERG, of Sweden,
said that while he shared the
basic proposition of the com-
mittee's report that the solution
of the Palestinian question was
a necessary prerequisite for
lasting peace in the Middle East,
the report was "seriously de-
ficient" on the matter of im-
plementing its proposals within
the framework of an overall
settlement.
It would not be possible, he
said, to solve the Palestinian
question in isolation from the
other elements.
The Swedish delegate said
the time had come for Israel to
recognize the legitimate rights
and interests of the Palestin-
ians, and the PLO must accept
the right of Israel to continued
existence within secure and
recognized borders.
Body Back From Latin Tour
NEW YORK (JTA) Carl
Glick, HIAS president, and Gay-
nor I. Jacobson, executive vice
president, who have just return-
ed from a fact-finding mission
I to major Jewish communities in
[Argentina, Chile, Brazil and
I Uruguay, reported that they met
I with diplomats of the United
I States and other nations, Jew-
[ish community leaders, officials
I of the intergovernmental Com-
Imission on European Migration
[and the United Nations High
[Commission on Refugees.
According to Glick, a major
| concern of HIAS was the well-
being of 560,000 Argentinan
Jews. Under the Peronist gov-
ernment, the country had suf-
fered from political turmoil, so-
cial unrest and heavy inflation
pressures.
THE HIAS group arrived in
Buenos Aires simultaneously
with the revolutionary takeover
by a military government in
support of the new regime, the
Jewish community participates
in the rebuilding of the country
and hopes for an end to in-
stability and urban terror.
The Jewish communities of
Santiago, Chile and Montevideo,
Uruguay, are primarily middle
St. Louis Orthodox Jews
Hail New Kashruth Bill
ST. LOUIS (JTA) The
Jnited Orthodox Jewish Com-
munity of Saint Louis has hail-
ed a new kosher food bill de-
signed to protect observant
Jews from fraud in the sale of
kosher meat and other kosher
food items. The measure, intro-
duced by Sen. Maurice Schech-
fler and adopted at the 78th gen-
eral assembly of the Missouri
[egislature. was just signed by
ov. Christopher S. Bond and
fakes effect Aug. 13.
It provides for a fine of not
less that $25 or more than $500
T>r imprisonment for not less
pan 30 days or more than one
fear for offenders.
ACCORDING to Rabbi M H.
Eichenstein, Chief Rabbi of the
Orthodox community, the new
law will replace a 1927 law that
was vaguely written and diffi-
cult to enforce. The old law
referred only to kosher meat
and meat preparation and re-
quired kosher certification only
for raw meat, poultry and deli-
catessen.
The new bill itemizes all pro-
ducts in addition to meat that
require certification and there-
by takes cognizance of the ex-
tensive kosher food industry
that has developed since the
original law
class and have suffered serious
economic distress as a result of
rampant inflation.
The great majority of Jews in
Chile and Uruguay support the
present military governments.
While coping with the ongoing
pressure of inflation, the Jewish
communities are maintaining
their religious and educational
institutions, Glick and Jacobson
reported.
THEY OBSERVED that Brazil
afforded its citizens the largest
measure of freedom of those
nations visited. This was strik-
ingly indicated when a delega-
tion of Brazilian Jewish leaders
were encouraged to visit with
President Ernesto Geisel to ex-
press concern about Brazil's
anti-Zionist vote in the UN in
November. 1975.
It was indicated to the Jew-
ish community .that this position
in thfe UN reflected Brazil's
large balance of payments de-
ficit caused principally by the
increase in the price of import-
ed oil and efforts to encourage
Arab petro-dollar investments.
While in Brazil, the HIAS
representatives were cordially
received by Foreign Minister
Azaredo da Silveira and Justice
Minister Armando Falcao. The
ministers expressed high regard
for the constructive accomplish-
ments of the Brazilian Jewish
community. Glick and Jacobson
were accompanied on their tour
by Fred Weinstein, HIAS direc-
tor of Latin American opera-
tions.
To Zionist Plea
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A meeting was sought by
a number of Jewish and non-
Jewish groups with Presi-
dent Ford to seek to persuade
him to arrange cancellation
of a permit to a local neo-
Nazi group to stage a "White
Power" rally in front of the
White House on the Bicen-
tennial weekend.
The permit for the rally,
scheduled for noon on July
3, was granted to the Nazis
by the Park Police.
SEN. J. GLENN Beall, Jr. (R..
Md.) aided the groups in the
effort to meet with the Presi-
dent. The groups included the
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, the Shalom Club, an or-
ganization of Holocaust surviv-
ors, the Silver Spring (Md.)
Jewish Center, the Gold Star
Mothers, the Gold Star Wives.
the Jewish War Veterans and
supporters from both Black and
white Christian groups.
Fred Schulman. public affairs
director for the ZOA in Wash-
ington, who is spokesman for
the groups, said "no group
should be allowed publicly to
urge the violation of the first
amendment rights of Blacks and
Jews, as the Nazis so consistent-
ly do."
HE NOTED that at a recent
Nazi White Power rally in Chi-
cago. 14 persons were injured,
32 arrested and an injunction
issued against Frank Collin, a
Nazi leader and his followers.
Schulman said the injunction
prohibits the urging "of the vio-
lation of the rights of Blacks in
the area, where such action is
directed to inciting or producing
imminent lawless action and is
likely to incite or produce such
action."
Supreme Court Won't Hear
Review of JDL's Case
WASHINGTON(JTA)The
Supreme Court has refused to
hear a suit brought by members
of the Jewish Defense League
asking for damages from gov-
ernment officials who conduct-
ed an "illegal" wiretap against
them in 1970 and 1971.
The High Court let stand a
decision by a United States
Court of Appeals in the District
of Columbia that suggested that
officials may escape paying
damages if they could demon-
strate that they had sincerely
believed the wiretap to be pro-
per.
THE JDL suit was against
former Attorney General John
Mitchell and nine present or
former members of the FBI.
During a trial against 13 JDL
members for gun conspiracy in
June, 1970. the government re-
vealed it had wiretapped con-
versations of 10 of the defend-
ants without a warrant.
The District of Columbia
Court of Appeals ruled that the
wiretaps were illegal since the
government may use wiretaps
without warrants only if the evi-
dence that the target of the
wiretap was a foreign agent or
a collaborator with a foreign
agent.
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An Old
Agnew In
A New Role
*^HOSE BREAD I eat. his song I sing." So it was written
long ago. And now that Spiro T. Agnew, one-time stern
lecturer on the moral degradation of American youth, is out
in the open as an unblushing apologist for Arab's anti-Israel
policies, the truth of that ancient adage is deeply etched on
what's left of the Agnew coat of arms.
It was only two years ago that the press reported Amer-
ica's deposed former Vice President was using American em-
bassies in the Middle East in connection with his appointments
and travel arrangements. In the same season Business De-
veloper Agnew was trying to sell a 1,600-acre tract of Ken-
tucky island to Arab investors after his trips to Kuwait.
WHY SHOULD anyone be surprised, then, to learn Mr.
Agnew is now denouncing "Israeli imperialism," hailing Saudi
Arabia as a staunch friend of the U.S., and declaring that "the
Zionist influence in the U.S. is dragging the U.S. into a rather
disorganized approach to the Middle East problem"?
When Spiro Agnew was out campaigning for reelection
as Vice President in 1972, he minded not at all that the Repub
lican platform he was upholding spoke highly of Israel, sup-
porting that nation's right "to survive and prosper in peace."
That platform promised to provide Israel with "support es-
sential for her security, including aircraft, training, and mod-
ern and sophisticated military equipment." Did Agnew possess
secret knowledge then of "Israeli imperialism" and was he
fearful of spoiling his reelection chances if he unveiled it?
NOW AS he goes about promoting his novel "The Can-
field Decision," Mr. Agnew will have to keep dodging ques-
tions about his responsibility for depicting characters prattling
about "the Jewish cabal" and the Jewish Zionist lobby with all
that influence over Congress. But the book will sell, and the
author will add to his bankroll; and cries from an outraged
Jewish community will probably faze him not at all
For this fallen Vice President and disbarred lawyer has
been dodging challenges, shifting positions, and abandoning
valued principles for some time. He it was who kept calling
ror law and order when pursuing the second highest office in
the land, yet found it convenient to plead no contest to a
single charge of income tax evasion in October, 1973 a dIov
by which he forestalled litigation of a far more serious nature
THIS IS the same leader who accused "arrogant, reckless
SET! r ""I SCiety" f *** destroying the
fabric of American democracy."
mnT^Vt.Un8 5! l0W oratorical '< his party during
most of his eight years in office, Spiro Agnew established a
record of character defamation and abuse of the prerogatives
of high position not likely ever again to be surpassed
HIS GAUCHERIE of expression betrayed his claim to
dignity: he referred to Polish-Americans as "Polacks," called
a Japanese-American reporter "the fat Jap," and revealed the
low level of his regard for the nations poor by declaring "il
you've seen one city slum, you've seen them all."
In 1969 Eric Sevareid observed that if media people em-
ployed the same language Agnew used, they would soon be
ruled off the air. The adventurer from Maryland excoriated
television, radio, and press in the days he held high office;
but they are handy tools for him now as he appears on talk
shows to exploit his novel.
GOD HELP the American public if it fails to learn from
the Agnew caper. If the naive among us continue to agree
with him that much reporting regarding hunger and poverty
in this nation is exaggerated; if the easily duped go on ac-
cepting the Agnew creed that contends disturbances are caused
not by evil circumstances but by evil men, then we shall be
in grave trouble.
Herbert Bruckner, a former president of the American
Society of Newspaper Editors, observed in days when Agnew
was riding high that the man who had been elected Vice Presi-
dent was "just Big Brother wired for sound." Although this
newest public figure to be listed as an anti-Semite continues
wired for sound, the fates are kind to us in denying him the
opportunity to continue to play a Big Brother role.
Page 10-A Jewistifhr*M3tr? Friday, July 9, 1976
S.
usan
Vff
The Notebooks Of
Jacob Marateck
The Samurai of Vlahogrod: the Notebooks of
Jacob Marateck. Retold by Shimon and
Anita Wincelberg. Jewish Publication So-
ciety. $7.95.
The samurai of Vishogrod was Yonah the
messenger, one of Vishogrod s "men of valor."
In Russia in the late 19th century hordes of
peasants were "something of a hazard," as
Jacob puts it, to the Jewish communities.
Vishogrod was blessed with a number of
good ferocious Jewish ruffians who protected
the town against mobs of drunken bloodthirsty
peasants. Yonah was the leader of these "sa-
murai."
JACOB MARATECK aspired to be like Yo-
nah when he grew up. Yonah's local military
successes were not the only cause of Jacob's
enthusiasm for a physical sort of life. He lived
among other poor children who spent years
on hard benches learning and studying. Chil-
dren who were so stunted from malnutrition
and lack of fresh air that they looked almost
tubercular.
Our young author candidly directs our
sympathies toward the Yonahs, rather than
the pale and languid talmidim. In another
episode, Jacob again challenges our tradition-
al loyalties.
HE INNOCENTLY tells us how here, "in
Columbus s country, it is fashionable to lose
ourselves in fantasies about the magical sweet-
ness of our grandmother's cookery." Marateck
proceeds to demolish us with a story about a
grandmother whose cooking makes you "gag
like a man who had swallowed a chew of
tobacco."
Jacob's memories are thought-provoking.
He questions our glorification of the shtetl -
our "patronizing" attempt to immortalize what
was actually a horrid and fearful life of mas
sacre and starvation. His reminiscences are
warm and compassionate. Despite dire pov-
erty, Jacob was brought up in a pious and
virtuous home.
HE PRESERVED and defended his faith
from the dark streets of Warsaw to the steam-
ing kettles of Siberia.
These engaging stories are told with hu-
mor and wit. Marateck is Twain and Dickens
Huck Finn and Oliver Twist as well. He is
both author and protagonist.
"The Samurai of Vishogrod" is drawn from
the first 16 of 28 of Jacob's notebooks. Hu
daughter and son-in-law have carefully pre-
served their father's youthful observations of
the colorful and violent period preceding the
Russian Revolution. This reviewer looks for-
ward to publication of the remaining 12 note-
books.
Tuvia Schwartz May
Be a Famous Name
Carl
*4L
'pert
jmE
Haifa
NAME of Tuvia Schwartz is relatively
unknown today, but if present events con-
tinue their normal course, it may be attached
to a new and dramatic cause celebre center-
ing around Israeli" S. relations.
The background is relatively simple. Young
Schwartz is charged by the American author
ities with having fire-bombed an automobile
in Los Angeles belonging to one John Artu-
kovic.
THIS WAS said to be Schwartz's way of
calling public attention to the fact that John's
brother, Andrei Artukovic, a Nazi war crim-
inal, had been convicted by the Yugoslav
courts of murdering Serbs. Jews and gypsies
when he had been a minister in the Nazi Croat-
ian State. Requests for his extradition to
Yugoslavia to receive his punishment had been
turned aside.
Schwartz was arrested, jumped bail, and
went to Israel. There he took on Israel citizen-
ship and enrolled in the Israel army. The U.S.
Government is now requesting his extradition
to face charges.
The public controversy is just getting un-
der way. Extradition is frequently (though not
always) a two-way passage, and if Israel ex-
pects the United States to abide by its agree-
ment for mutual honoring of extradition re-
quests under defined conditions, it is not easy
for Israel to plead "exceptions."
THIS COUNTRY has had about 100 de-
mands from various countries to hand over
fugitives who had sought refuge in the Holy
Land. Of these about 20 had been sent back,
under circumstances which attracted little at-
tention. In most of the other cases, the sought-
for individuals elected to return of their own
free will, or the requesting state eventually
withdrew its request.
In two related cases Israel's experience
was most unpleasant. Some years ago Jeru-
salem was asked to send back Robert Soblen.
accused by the American government of aid
ing the Rosenberg couple, convicted of atomic
espionage. Feelings ran high.
THE ISRAEL authorities tried to save face
by avoiding decision on extradition, but de-
clared Soblen personal non grata and put him
aboard a plane for deportation to wherever
he wished to go. It was said that a US mar-
shal was conveniently on board the same
plane At any rate. Soblen committed suicide
just before the plane was due to land at Lon-
don.
However, a new line of advice has been
suggested. Rather than involve Israel in a
legal dispute with the U.S. in a matter which
is not really related to defense and security.
Tuvia should carry to its logical conclusions
the intentions of his original act: to focus
public attention on a policy which harbors
Nazi criminals. He should therefore volun-
tarily go back to America to face trial, and
American Jews should see to it that the mal
becomes a platform for broad indictment of
all cover-up of Nazis. Such a trial would
achieve in dramatic form what Schwartz orig-
inally had in mind, far more than his flight to
Israel and his battle against extradition.
Lincoln iii Israel: Salute to Leo Gildesgame
IT IS TIME to salute Leo Gildesgame.
One of the leading philanthropists of our na-
tion, Mr. Gildesgame is a former yeahiva bachur
and veteran of the battlefields of Israel where he
fought with Trumpeldor's Legion. He is an honored
resident of Mt. Kisco, N.Y.
Mr. Gildesgame's career is full of glorious serv-
ices to the causes of humanitarianism, Hebrew
scholarship and religion. He is a leader in a cluster
of national organizations.
THIS YEAR he did something which will for-
ever be remembered.
He funded the transfer of an eight-foot statue
of Lincoln from Chicago to Ramat Gan. That statue,
elaborately dedicated a few Sundays ago in the
presence of dignitaries of the State of Israel and
the U.S. Government, will be the equivalent of the
Statue of Liberty in this nation.
Just as the Statin*' of Liberty was given to us
jy France as a sign of its kinship, so will the Gil-
iesgame-arranged statue of Lincoln stand as a bond
between the two democracies of the U.S. and Israel.
So appealing was Mr. Gildesgame's offer to give
he statue to the U.S. so that our nation could, ">
turn, give it to Israel on the occasion of our Hi
centennial, that both houses of Congress unanimous
ly endorsed the idea and President Ford enthusiaJ
ticallly signed the bill authorizing the transfer
IT MAY be the only thing which our enmj
Senate and House of Representatives have agreeo
upon lately.
Modest but imaginative, Mr. Gildesgame has
not only honored history but has made it His u
partner, the former Ruth Oppenheim, deserves K -
dos, too, for supporting this project, as well
many others.
Lincoln is indeed a link between our two repute
lies We gladly salute Mr. Gildesgame for a supero
way of dramatizing that link.


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