The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02474

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"tFewilslli Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
jlume 49 Number 27 Miami, Florida Friday, July 2, 1976 Frd K- hocht Fridy, July 2, ttn By Man 50 cents xw0 Sections Price 25 cents
Jewish Roots Deeply Entwined
In Beginnings of Our Nation
Sunday, July 4, is Bicentennial Day. On f;reat contributions made by the American
rus special Independence Day occasion, Jewish community from the days preced-
fcir nation will celebrate 200 years of ing the Revolution to our own time.
Teedom. Herewith, we take note of the
By FRED BERTRAM
Secretary
Judaic Heritage Society
WISH LIFE in the Western
*^ World began in 1492 when
Spanish converso Louis de
ties climbed down the side
|nne of Columbus' ships to
in his job as interpreter with
Caribbean natives.
swish community life in what
now the United States of
erica began in early Septem-
1654, when the French frig-
Ste. Catherine sailed into
mingled waters of the Hud-
River and the Atlantic
an. The vessel brought to
scraggly shores of Dutch
Amsterdam the founding
lers of the colony's first
ish community.
ALTHOUGH individual Jew-
ish settlers had reached the
continent earlier, the arrival of
"the 23" marked the beginning
of organized Jewish life in Col-
onial America, to embrace, three
centuries later, nearly six mil-
lion Jews the largest, the
wealthiest Jewish community
the world has ever known.
The "Arrival of the 23" was
the subject of the first medal
of the series of 120 medals of
the Medallic History of the
Jews of America created by the
Judaic Heritage Society. This
medallic chronicle, with its ac-
companying historical notes,
has done much to fill a void,
through numismatics, in the
printed historical record of the
Jews of America.
SINCE THEIR earliest days
on American shores, the Jews,
Professor Jacob Rader Marcus
records, "have been an organ-
ized group, united by common
institutions, traditions, beliefs,
an inspiring past, and an un-
usually strong sense of kinship
... As a tightly-knit fellowship,
they have shared common ex-
periences, and the totality of
these makes up American Jew-
ish history Any study of
American Jewish life is bound
to throw light on the larger his-
tory of the American people."
In the colorful mosaic of
American Jewish history, fami-
lies and folkways of the Old
World were an integral part.
Talents and character develop-
ed in ancestral lands abroad
were fed into the bloodstream
of a burgeoning America. Cul-
tural seeds sown centuries back
Continued on Page 11-A
Police Quell
Visa Riots
In Tel Aviv
TEL AVIV (JTA) Police were called to the
United States Embassy here to restore order after disturb-
ances broke out among hundreds of Israelis waiting in line
outside to apply for American tourist visas. The disputes
were mostly over who was first in line.
Many visa applicants camped outside the Embassy
grounds overnight, and many more were forced to wait for
hours under a hot sun which aggravated frayed tempers.'
AMERICAN OFFICIALS at the Consular Section which
issues visas said the reason for the long waits was the meti-
culous check that is made of every visa application. They
said the scrutiny was nothing out of the ordinary but was
necessary because past experience showed that many Is-
raelis who went to the U.S. as tourists remained there and
tried to get permanent residence permits.
The result is that it now takes weeks for some visas to
be issued.
Arabs Buy Popular
Hotel Site in London
LONDON (JTA) The Dorchester, a famous Lon-
don hotel popular with Israeli visitors, which housed Pres-
ident Ephraim Katzir and Mrs. Katzir during their visit
here last week, is to be sold to a consortium of Arab busi-
nessmen, it was announced today.
The buyers, mostly from Saudi Arabia and Persian
Gulf oil states, are paying about $20 million.
THEY WILL be represented on the board of a new
holding company by Sheikh Najib Alamuddin, a Lebanese
who is chairman of Middle East Airlines.
The Dorchester is frequented by wealthy Arabs who
often rub shoulders with prominent Israeli guests. The sell-
ing company, which will be represented on the new board
of directors, has given assurances that nothing will be done
to make Jewish guests feel unwelcome.
IT'S NO EASY DECISION
Russians are Coming How
Do We Absorb Them All?
By PAUL S. APPELBAUM
There he was on the front
page of "The Boston Globe." his
smiling flat Slavic face bright
with nride over his new pur-
chase'lt was December in Bos-
ton, the time when everyone
takes a day out to go downtown
with the family to pick out a
Christmas tree.
It is no easy decision: natural
or artificial, spruce or pine or
fir, will it be too tall for the
living room ceiling? But with
one look at the face of this sat-
isfied customer you could tell
he had found his perfect tree.
In a way, it was like a dream
this was his first Christmas
in America; in a way, it was
like a nightmare the ittfifl
was a Soviet Jew.
THERE ARE about 12.000 for-
mer Soviet Jews in the United
States. This is only 10 percent
of the total number of Soviet
Jewish emigrants, but in recent
years more and more Jews
choosing to make their home
outside the Iron Curtain's rusty
links are settling in the West
rather than Israel.
In 1973. some 33 percent of
the Jews leaving the Soviet
Union did not go to Israel, and
most of these came to the
United States. By April. 176
this statistic was up to 60 per-
cent.
Thev come for many reasons:
some to rejoin their families,
others after failing to adjust in
Israel, still others simply to
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A
*Je*ist flcrkiian
Friday, July 2, 1976
How Can We Absorb All Those Russians?
Continued from Page 1-A
find a better life. It has been a
quiet migration. Few Americans
realize that there are Soviet
Jews newly settled in almost
every major city coast-to-coast.
These newcomers have blended
in quickly. Too quickly. For un-
less an effort is made, and made
soon, the Jews we fought to
save in anti-Semitic Russia, we
mav lose in tolerant America.
Their absorption, like most
issues of vital importance to the
American Jewish community, is
handled by agencies of the Jew-
ish establishment, without the
knowledge or consent of the
majority of American Jews, but
certainly with their financial
support.
ONCE THE Russian Jews
arrive in Vienna, those who are
to go on to Israel are handed
over to the care of the Jewish
Agency. Those who have chosen
to find a home elsewhere are
placed in the charge of the He-
brew Immigrant Aid Society
(HIAS). HIAS will provide
transportation to the desired
country and there turn over the
emigrants to a local settlement
group.
Since 1973. when the Attor-
ney General's parole authority
' | ".! IT'IIH'IIII"!-!'!
"Social workers are essentially suburban bagel-
and-lox Jews The 7 read Philip Roth' Judaism they
can offer the Russians has no meaning for them. Not
only is no attempt made, in many cases, to link up
the immigrants with the Jewish community, but the
effort is actually obstructed" on the grounds of "pro-
fessional ethics."
to admit refugees from com-
munist countries was applied to
Soviet Jews, those who wish to
come here have had few prob-
lems.
HIAS apportions out those
without relatives among the
Jewish population centers; New
York is the primary assignment,
but Houston, Des Moines, and
other smaller Jewish communi-
ties receive their allotments,
too. Once there, the care of the
Jews becomes the responsibility
of the local Jewish Family and
Children's Service, except in
New York, where a special
group, the New York Associa-
tion for New Americans
(NYANA), has been established.
EACH FAMILY is assigned
to a social worker. This person,
usually without special training
in working with immigrants and
GOP Asked to Disavow
Imposed Middle East Solution
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Zionist Organization
of America wants the Re-
publican Party to promise,
in its 1976 Presidential plat-
form, to continue efforts for
peace in the Middle East
through direct negotiations
between the conflicting par-
ties, to reaffirm that there
will be no imposed solution
and no settlement at the ex-
pense of Israel and to pledge
to keep Israel strong with-
in defensible borders.
The ZOA's draft propos-
als were submitted to the
Republican National Com-
mittee by Allen Lesser, di-
rector of the ZOA's Washing-
ton office. The Committee is
meeting here under the
chairmanship of Gov. Rob-
ert D. Ray of Iowa to receive
platform proposals.
THE FINAL platform will be
determined at hearings in Kan-
sas City Aug. 9 to 11. the week
before the Republican National
Convention opens there.
The ZOA asked that the plat-
form pledge that "A Republican
Administration will continue
with the efforts to bring the
conflicting parties in the Mid-
dle East to negotiate directly
for a just and durable peace in
the area" and that "the Repub-
lican Administration will re-
main faithful to the pledges
made by the Republican Presi-
dent against imposing a solution
on the parties in the Middle
East conflict."
The ZOA wants the Repub-
lican platform to state further
that "A reasonable and just
solution can only be reached by
the parties themselves, negotiat-
ing in good faith."
THE ZOA statement recalled
President Ford's recommenda-
tion, when he was House Repub-
lican Minority Leader, that the
united dfcy of Jerusalem be
recognized as the capital of Is-
rael and the U.S. embassy be
transferred there from Tel
Aviv. It recommended that this
b" included in the Republican
platform. Such a recommenda-
tion was included in the Dem-
ocratic Party's platform adopted
here last week.
WINDOW SPECIALISTS
Maintenance Inc.
REPAIRS AND AAAINTENANCE OF All TYPES
WINDOWS AND JALOUSIES
SERVICE WE'RE PROUD OF
Complete Stock of Replacement Parts
290 N.E. 79th STREET MIAMI, FIA. 33138
Phone 751-4584
* h* 1.
IIUjIHIf f
MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT
104 N.E. 1st STREET -PHONE 373-8432
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE INSURANCE

A
mebuxm
^ TITLE
without knowledge of Russian,
helps the family find an apart-
ment, hopefully a job, and some
place where they can learn
English. Considered strictly
from the viewpoint of achiev-
ing stated goals, the process is
deeply flawed.
George Johnson, of the In-
stitute for Jewish Policy Plan-
ning, shook the social work
agencies in late 1974 with a
penetrating analysis of the prob-
lems in absorption. The situa-
tion has changed little since
then.
Johnson noted that the social
workers, who prefer to deal
with their clients' psychological
problems, show little concern
for the practical needs of the
new immigrants. The Jews are
left to stumble alone through
the maze of job-finding (only
referrals are offered and only
for the first job), licensing and
retraining. Explanations of the
basic items of day-to-day life
checking accounts and health
insurance, bus routes and bud-
gets are rarely offered.
ONLY RECENTLY have some
agencies begun to create writ-
ten instructional materials for
the Russians, as well as for the
workers who must help them.
Even the things to which social
work agencies traditionally give
liD-service, such as helping
clients to help themselves, are
being done poorly.
The Society of Former So-
viet Jews in Los Angeles ob-
jected to the agencies' preoc-
cupation "with doing things for
the newcomers while ne-
glecting the opportunity of do-
ine the same things with them."
Looking merely at concrete
services alone, the absorption
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Rattier, 635-6554 and
let me quote you rates. Also
local moving ft long distance
moving anywhere in the U.S.
-" overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
Honoring 1771) jnd
Famous |e .
in Ann-fit .in HiMory

M7.2-7S
SEND FOR BOOKLET
HONORING 1776 AND
FAMOUS JEWS IN
AMWICAN HISTORY
IxcItU, kihiN .r JtwMl
trl.H la lb* creeHee eea *(,
f ft tl. VeWefcfo riMltai for
II eves. Mm 50c (NO STAMPS
niAlt) TO. few!* PeMeta, lei
4M< tffN CMfPVi Station, M,Y ,
1.1. 10017.
M7-2-7S
effort has left the agencies with
a badly bruised reputation.
THE STAKE of the Jewish
community as a whole in the
practical side of absorption is
made painfully obvious by the
Christian missionaries who stand
outside the entrance to NYANA's
offices, ready to comfort and
aid the disappointed Jews. Hav-
ing negatively identified with
Judaism for a lifetime in the
Soviet Union, some Jews jump
at the chance to receive aid
from a Christian group.
Yet despite the day-to-day
disappointments for the Jewish
immigrants, they would remain
a part of the Jewish community
if something else were offered.
These people have known for
years the difficulties of being
a Jew.
They must now be offered a
chance to see the other side.
They are not being given this
chance, and this is our greatest
failure.
SOCIAL workers, and their
supervisors, are essentially su-
burban bagel and lox Jews.
Their identification is ethnic,
not religious or even truly cul-
tural. The "I read Philip Roth"
Judaism they can offer the Rus-
sians has no meaning for them.
Not only is no attempt made,
in many cases, to link up the
immigrants with the Jewish
community, but the effort is
actually obstructed.
Claiming that it goes against
their "professional ethics," the
agencies in most cities refuse
to release the names of newly
arrived Jews to Synagogue
groups, rabbis. Soviet Jewry
organizations and others who
would like to show them how to
be proud Jews and what there
is to be proud of. This results
in such absurdities as the situa-
tion in Brighton Beach, Brook-
lyn, where many of the immi-
grants are settled: The local
group that seeks to aid immi-
grants was reduced to walking
the Boardwalk, listening for
conversations in Russian to
locate new arrivals.
WHEN a Manhattan business-
man obtained free advertise-
ments in New York's "Jewish
Press" for jobs for the Russians
NYANA objected that such ads
would make it appear as if they
were not doing their job. They
were not and six Russians
got jobs from the ads.
Much of the work with the
Russian Jews is being done
despite the Jewish agencies not
because of them. In Boston, the
local Soviet Jewry activist
group. Action for Soviet Jewry
was refused the list of local im-
migrants.
Working from chance con-
tacts, thev assembled a com-
plete list "of families. Regular
mailings in Russian are sent out
to them and an offer of free
books in Russian on Jewish sub-
jects evoked a positive respor-c
from every family. All were in-
vited this Passover to two group
seders at the Young Israel of
Brookline and those few who
declined were given gifts of
matzohs. wine and haggadahs.
A GUIDE-BOOK for every
day life, in Russian, is now be
ing prepared. Many Russians
have now registered their chil-
dren in Hebrew day schools or
yeshivas, and many others reg
nlarlv attend Soviet Jewry meet
ings and events. Above all.
many now think of themselves h
as Jews oroud Jews for f.
the first time in their lives.
This is the kind of effort that
must be made in all cities
What's so nice
about this
lamp?
It's good furniture,
sure. But last year it
also helped purchase
all the medical supplies
and drugs for Douglas
Garden s 227 aged
residents, 65o of them
on welfare.
That s what our
Thrift Shop accomplished
thanks to the generous
hearts of our friends
who filled our store
with quality new and used articles (furniture,
appliances, books and so on).
Please call us at 696-2101 for free pick-up when
that couch, or desk or those old clothes are no
longer needed. Because someone else needs them
very much.
TheThrift Shop
THE MIAMI JEWISH HOME
AND HOSPITAL
FOR THE AGED AT
DOUGLAS GARDENS
(Formerly the Jewish Home for the Aged)
696-2101
Donations Tax Deductible
AARON KRAVITZ, MJHHA President;
Chairman Thrift Shop Commirtc
1
Hi
you
M72.7


today, July 2, 1976
vJmisti fkridikjr
Page 3-A
ashington Post and Agnew Elicit Anger

By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON Anger
ithin Washington's Jewish
immunity of 12 0,000
I ;ainst The Washington
s news treatment and
< immentaries about Middle
] as! events and its manifest
\ elcome of "public" divi-
sion among American Jews
toward Jerusalem's policy
v as reaching high heat
hen along came Spiro T.
[Xgnew's novel and inter-
,-iews that piled irony upon
rony and created special
elights for anti liberals,
enti-Semites and all those
Vho would like to see Is-
rael squelched.
The Post's policy came
tinder protest from spokes-
nen of major Jewish organ-
zations and others who saw
he Post deliberately select-
ng and emphasizing those
tarts of news events that
larken Israel's image and
Create an impression of
American Jewry publicly.
last, breaking up from
olid support for the Jewish
tate.
AT THE same time, the critics
iw The Post, omitting or bury
lg information that would tend
i bolster Israel's morale while
ninting up developments that
ftnded to encourage Arab pol-
icians and the I'l.O. too. that
merica is turning awav from
Irael
The Post's treatment reached
point where Israel Ambassa-
!or Chaim Her/.og protested
rmally against The Post's cha-
fccterization of his remarks at
|he UN Security Council re-
arding Israeli settlements as
arking an Israel-US. "clash."
The Post had made the
lash" a top. front-page story,
ced by intense criticism. The
st finally edRed back some,
ggesting in a commentary
at the U.S. should urge the
ab states to recognize Israel.
AS THE Post's compaigning
thered momentum. Agnew's
vel about a fictional U.S. Vice
sident rolled off the Dress
d the disgraced ex-Vice Presi-
nt was on the airwaves and
ewhere charging Jews dom-
te the American "national
pact media" that in turn per-
ade the Administration and
e Congress to favor Israel and
_ Dress Arabs.
While plainly not in accord
all their charges. Agnew and
Jie Post both welcomed the
ivision" within Jewish ranks,
addition, a Post individual of
nsiderable stature who be-
me irked bv hearing samples
selected news treatment, de-
ired "Jews were too sensi-
"*" to criticism.
Reminded Agnew said that
9Jn. The Post nerson reDlied

GORDON ROOFING
AND SHEET METAL
WORKS, INC.
1450 N.W. 21st STREET
Phone 325-8287
Hava Your roof ropiirod now;
you will uvi on a now roof later
"SATISFACTORY WORK BY
EXPERIENCED MEN"
KAMI HEALTH INSTITUTE
7335 IIKAYNf BLVD., MIAMI
Health thro Nufrifiaii um4
Ci-OrdltattJ Thtrifutict
Qtneral Diagnotia and X-Ray
Ganarai Physical Theraay
Including Corractional Colon
Thorapy Laboratory Analyst*
toociric Nutrition
r ;n>mtm,ml a*..e 757-71*6
LDR O. F. EHK1.1NK Director
Nnturopathlc Phyaiclan
I
"personally. I agree with him
on that ooint."
ANOTHER Post personality,
however, saw The Post as help-
ing prepare the groundwork for
an attempt by some within the
Administration to break Amer-
ican Jewish political power and
thereby enable it to work freely
towards a "settlement" on Arab
terms with a cosmetic cover of
"fairness'' to satisfy most Amer-
icans the Middle East problem
is settled and America can pro-
ceed with patching up its rela-
tions with the Arab states and
the Third World.
Perhaps the first irony is that
The Post, generally regarded as
liberal, has been carping to-
ward Israel since the Yom Kip-
pur War despite the fact that
the Israelis are the only dem-
ocratic citizenry in the Middle
Bast. More irony is that The
Post, which has been touting
"moderate" Arabs, is among the
very media that Agnew has at-
tacked as "Jewish" and "pro-
Israeli."
Benjamin C. Bradlee, The
Post's executive editor, pointed
to the irony himself when ask-
ed bv JTA for a statement on
his newspaper's offerings. "I
find it ironic that at the same
time Agnew is accusing The
Post of being Zionist, we're
hearing reports of some ele-
ments in the Jewish communitv
-a\ inc that we are anti-Israel."
he said.
IN ASSESSING the feeling
against The Post as coming from
some" elements, Bradlee seem-
ed to indicate that The Post's
viewpoint has wide Jewish sup-
port, too.
"We had Nahum Goldmann
in here." Bradlee noted, refer-
ring to a visit of the World
Jewish Congress president, who
has long been at odds with suc-
cessive Israeli governments.
The Post also had support in
statements like that of Sen.
Jacob K. Javits' warning to Is-
rael on the issue of West Bank
settlements, the opposition to
Israeli policy by a hundred
rabbis and others in New York;
the Social Action Commission
of the United American Hebrew
Congregations, and Breira's
drive for its support among
Jewish Americans of "alterna-
tives" to Israel policies.
IT WAS seen as not merely
coincidental that Sen. George
S. McGovern (D.. S.D.). who
favored Breira with a full-blown
description of it in the Congres-
sional Record, scheduled just at
this time a series of five hear-
ings on the Arab-Israeli con-
flict to get Senatorial perspec-
tives.
Ironic, too. is that television
companies that he attacked has
given Agnew wide exposure.
Disturbed by the quality of
some of the interviewers' ques-
tioning of Agnew. Hvman Book-
binder of the American Jewish
Committee suggested that in-
terviewers should "do their
homework" before taking on
Agnew.
Ivan M. Schaeffer. of the
American Jewish Congress in
Washington, specifically won-
dered why WTTG-TV had to of-
fer its 50-minute interview
twice in three davs. Asked about
this bv JTA. Vice President and
program director Stanley Ru-
dick explained that the first
show was for a davtime audience
and the second for night-time
viewers.
"THE INTERVIEW was fas-
cinating." Rudick said, adding
SEC Admits Laws
Bow to Boycott
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Securities and Exchange
Commission has acknowledg-
ed that the securities laws
require American corpora-
tions to disclose whether
they are complying with the
Arab boycott of Israel.
This was stated in a letter
from SEC Chairman Roder-
ick M. Hills to Rep. Bella S.
Abzug (D.L., N.Y.) who had
requested "the opinion of
the Commission as to the
conditions under which par-
ticipation by a corporation
in an economic boycott must
be reported to the SEC and
to the public."
HILLS SAID in his letter that
companies participating in such
boycotts must disclose their par-
ticipation in any instance where
it has a material adverse effect
upon corporate "income, assets
(including good will) or prof-
its."
The securities laws disclosure
requirement also applies to any
boycott participation that would
be "of importance to investors."
Abzug. chairperson of the
House Government Information
and Individual Rights Subcom-
mittee, said that this statement
marks the first instance in
which the U.S. securities laws
have been interpreted to re-
quire disclosure of boycott par-
ticioation.
ABZUG expressed the hope
that "this determination on the
SEC's Dart marks the beginning
of an active effort to enforce
strictly this requirement."
She added that "The public
has the right to know which
corporations are participating in
the Arab boycott Private
citizens, as well as the SEC,
may go to court to require dis-
closure and I hope that this val-
uable tool will receive frequent
and successful use in efforts to
crush the boycott."
A recent study by another
House subcommittee revealed
that over 90 Dercent of the 637
corporations reporting to the
Department of Commerce on
boycott participation had com-
plied with boycott demands
from Arab countries.
he felt the interviewers' com-
ments and questions put Agnew
"in perspective."
More deeplv disturbing to
some observers than The Post's
methodology or Agnew's expo-
sure is that they seem to be
part of a trend that was con-
sidered unthinkable a half-
dozen years ago. The New York
Times has reported that anti-
Semitism exists in the State De-
partment while noting that it is
less there than what prevails in
Britain's Foreign Office.
In a CBS broadcast on attacks
against Secretary of State Hen-
ry A. Kissinger in the presi-
dential primaries, commentator
Dan Rather said flatly that
anti-Semitism is a factor. After
the criticism leveled by many
Israelis and American Jews at
tiger's Middle East policy
and the praise he is getting
from Arabs, the attack on him
from an anti-Semitic standpoint
is seen as the most ludicrous
hut also the most dangerous, of
the ironies in the political mud
puddle.
More Talks Needed
On Interim Aid
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate Appropriations
Committee approved a $5.35 billion foreign aid package for
fiscal 1977 on June 23 of which approximately $1.75 billion
would be earmarked for Israel in the form of military pur-
chase credits and economic supportive assistance.
An aide to Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D., Hawaii), chair-
man of the subcommittee on foreign operations, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that further discussions would
be necessary to reach a compromise with the Ford Admin-
istration on transitional quarter funding for Israel.
INOUYE AND Sens. Clifford Case (R.. N.J.), Hubert H,
Humphrey (D., Minn.) and Jacob K. Javits (R.. N.Y.) were
part of a Congressional delegation that visited President
Ford at the White House. They and other supporters of in-
creased assistance to Israel reportedly suggested a com-
promise of $375 million to fund that country's military and
economic needs for the three-month period between the
end of fiscal 1976 on June 30 and the start of fiscal 1977
Oct. 1.
This is $175 million less than Israel would receive if
the Senate formula for transitional quarter funding was
accepted. The latter would have earmarked $550 million in
interim funding or 25 percent of the assistance granted Is-
rael for fiscal 1975-76. The Administration has reportedly
placed a ceiling of $200 million on transitional quarter fund-
ing for Israel.
TWIN CITY GLASS CO
SUAKANTilD miMMMtS STOf E HONTS FUKNIlUtl TOPS
f.miQUl AMD fSAMtD MIRROKS
Plate & Window Glass Replacements
770 ISth St., MB Vr.it oor SKorootti 673-2967
(Corner 16th I Alton
WWWWWWWWWWWWW
,-WN~^\^WWA~*\_
YOU can kr SUM af the BEST at ^}
Toild's BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
mow shppihg riOKiDA'S nuts, ftuir
BASKETS t GIFTS
116 VALENCIA AVI., COKAL CABLES Tel. 448 5215
T\
people
Washington
Federal
SAVINGS ANO LOAN ASSOCIATION
ASSETS EXCEED $550,000,000
MAIN OFFICE
1701 MERIDIAN AVE MIAMI BEACH
PHONE 674-6500
CONVENIENT Of FICES TO SERVE YOU IN
MIAMI BEACH CORAL GABLES
BAY HARBOR ISLANDS NORTH MIAMI BEACH
HOLLYWOOD BOCA RATON
JACK D. 60RD0N ARTHUR H COURSHON
hisiSi'l Chu/miM tl (At Bitrt
OUR
BIGGEST
ASSET
Our statement of condition shows
assets exceeding 550 million dollars.
A lot of money, fcven more impor-
tant, a lot of people. People we
know and like, people who know
us and like to do business with us.
Whether it's a savings account,
arranging for a mortgage to build or
buy a home, refinancing an existing
mortgage or just asking information
about financial problems, we do all
our business with people. People
who like service, personal attention
and a minimum of red tape. That's
what we try to supply at all our
convenient offices. Why not drop
in and open your account. It's like
making a new friend.

<




Page 4-A
*Jenistf fhrMSa/n
Friday, July 2, 1976
American Bicentennial
The American Jewish community is playing an
active part in the celebration of the Bicentennial of
the United States. The last year has been passed in
bringing to the attention of Jews and non-Jews alike
the history of American Jewry, as well as the rich
contributions Jews have made to American life.
Primarily, Jews have a spiritual affinity with the
spirit of the Revolution, especially its message of dig-
nity and freedom.
There has of course been prejudice and discrimi-
nation in the U.S. But as one Jewish leader said re-
cently, in no country in the diaspora have Jews been
more at home and more part of the country.
The one event of the Bicentennial celebration that
should have the most meaning to American Jews is the
recent opening of Ellis Island in New York as a land-
mark. It is safe to say that the majority of American
Jews either personally immigrated through its huge re-
ception hall or are the descendants of people who
came to the U.S. via that island.
The persons who came through Ellis Island feared
that they might be rejected for some health reason.
But they had the hope of a new and better homeland
which, despite poverty and enormous struggling, was
ultimately realized.
a # a
Some Historic Sidelights
In this issue of The Jewish Floridian, we present
several related features calling attention to the note-
worthy contribution of Jews to the development of our
nation.
Of particularly historic significance to us all is
the close affinity that our forefathers had with the
Old Testament tradition.
It is not generally known, but one of the first pro-
posals for the Great Seal of the United States was a
view of the Israelites being led by Moses across the
Red Sea a symbolic reference to the voyage of the
early settlers of New England who came from European
oppression.
It is also not generally known but another early
proposal was Hebrew as the language of the new colo-
nial world to emphasize its split from an oppressive
Mother England at the same time that it underscored
the pilgrims' close identification with the Hebrew
Bible.
While neither of these proposals came to fruition,
the fact is that the profoundly religious impulses of
the Founding Fathers is a historical fact with which
American Jews have since come to identify proudly.
On this Bicentennial occasion, Americans of all
faiths, Jews included, take note of our past and offer
up prayers for an equally fruitful and progressive na-
tional future.
Pressure on Israel
The underlying anxiety in the American Jewish
community and in Israel is that the support of the
United States government for Israel is eroding. Feared
is increased pressure that will be put on Israel to make
more major concessions which is now being articulated
more openly by prominent people.
Both Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (D., Minn.) and
former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger in recent
speeches in Washington accused the Ford Administra-
tion of putting undue pressure on Israel. Humphrey
stressed that the Administration simply does not un-
derstand that actions which are perceived to weaken
the American commitment to Israel will not bring peace
to ihe Middle East.
All this should not come as a surprise. It is time
now for both the Israeli government and the American
Jewish community to work on their strategies for com-
batting this development. Crying "Gevalt" next Jan-
uary will be too late.
Jewish Floridian
I'M. mi. 373-460J
OFFICE and PLANT 130 N E (Ih 81 Miami, Pla
I'n Box W71, Miami Florida SS10I
RUED K 8HOCHET LEO MINIM.IN SKI.MA M THOMPSON
BdJItor and Publisher Associate Editor Assistant t.. Publisher
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Ksshruth
Of The Msrchsndise Advertised In Its Columns
Published every Friday since IM7 by The Jewish Floridian
Siii.ml-Class Postage Paiil at Miami. Pla
fl Fred K. Shochet Friday, July 2. 1976
Ths Jewish Floridisn hss sbsorbed the Jewish Unity snd the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegrsphic Aaency. Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. Nationsl Editorial Association. American As-
socistion of English-Jewish Nswspapers. and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ares) Ons Vssr$12.00; Two YssrsS22.00:
Three Yssrs$30 00. Out of Town Upon Request.
4 TAMUZ 5736
Number 27
Bicentennial and U.S. Survival
HPHE MOMENT is at hand. It
seems that talk of and prep-
aration for the Bicentennial cel-
ebration have lasted almost as
long as the nation itself since
independence.
A sense of weariness brought
on by the anticipation some-
how dulls the occasion. This is
a personal emotional reaction.
Still, I have heard it from oth-
ers, as well.
I'm not big on birthdays and
anniversaries. Too often, sen-
timentality cheapens rather
than exalts the moment. Things
are said in salute that aren't
really meant. They are said be-
cause they sound good.
FOR MYSELF, on our Bicen-
tennial occasion, I keep think-
ing of the ideological struggle
Mindlin
L_
between Jefferson and Hamil-
ton.
Jefferson was a democrat in
the true Greek meaning of the
word. Inspired by the British
philosopher, John Locke, and
the French philosopher-novel-
ist, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Jef
ferson believed profoundly |g
"demos," rule of the peonle.
Hamilton was an aristocrat in
the true Greek meaning of the
word. Mirroring the political
understanding of Plato and
Aristotle, Hamilton believed
profoundly in "aristoi." the rule
of the best.
JEFFERSON was a populist
Hamilton an elitist. Jefferson
held that a well-informed peo-
pie constituted the highest hope
for a free society.
Hamilton frankly said of thi
people that they "are an ass,'
that their natural inclination is
to be lazy, ignorant and indif-
ferent to matters of self-govern
ment.
In fact, in Jefferson's own
philosophical hero, Rousseau
Hamilton caught the nub of tht
democratic weakness.
IN HIS "Social Contract;
Rousseau lays down the ground
rules for a democratic society
but he warns that neither tht
rules nor the society itself can
work for a community of up-
wards of 20,000 souls.
Rousseau was talking about
democracy on a one-to-one ba-
sis, about direct participation
in the governing process by in-
dividuals. It is clear that he was
suspicious of what we later
came to call proportional rep
resentation.
What Jefferson hoped for was
a Rousseauistic America based
on proportional representation
He fantasized that representa-
tives would be so noble, so
idealistic, that they would pur
sue the best interests of their
constituents and of the nation
as if those interests were their
own.
FURTHERMORE, he envi-
sioned an enlightened America
in which an educated people
would, by the check of their
knowledge, make it impossible
for representatives to do other
that act on a one-to-one Kous-
Continued on Page ISA
*
The Dow May Break July 4th
Friday, July 2, 1976
Volume 49
Having suffered through a
year of preparation for the Bi-
centennial of our Independence,
it was no surprise to hear one
of the radio stock market
analysts sing out with vigor:
"It would be appropriate for the
Dow to peak just around July
Fourth."
You don't have to ask appro-
priate to what. You, too, have
been stunned by the commer-
cialization of this historic event.
If "whipped cream stars and
strawberry stripes the Bicen-
tennial Cake" hasn't done it for
you. drool over the rising Dow.
AN OLD historian favorite of
mine was Charles Beard. If the
name isn't familiar to the young
er set. he scandalized an even
older generation than mine with
several of his early works, pri-
marily "An Economic Interpre-
tation of the Constitution" and
the "Economic Origins of Jef-
fersonian Democracy."
It occurred to him and
others since that all was not
revolutionary ardor for freedom
back in those days when our
nation was going through its
birth nains The Dow wasn't
thought of then but the liberty
and justice spoken of was pri-
marily for a privileged class.
Be that as it may, the De-
claration of Independence is a
remarkable document and pro-
perly revered.
SOME MAY watch with dis-
may as the Nixon-Ford Supreme
Court chips away at the rights
that were expressed in that do-
cument and written later into
our Constitution but most will
probably be keeping an eye on
the market averages and the
cake covered with patriotic goo.
Given my own mind-set. I am
EDWARD
COHEN
most intrigued by two of the
observances planned for the
Fourth in Philadelphia and
Washington. They have caused
some panic in certain circles.
Super-cop Mayor Rizzo of
Philadelphia has appealed for
Federal troops to protect the
city where the Declaration was
debated, written and signed
against a "Parade of the Peo-
ple" planned by the July 4
Coalition.
KNOWING a lot of the peo-
nle and organizations who have
become the Coalition it is dif-
ficult to believe that these paci-
fists and religion:sts at least
in the leadership will do any-
thing but demonstrate peaceful-
ly With Rizzo's record, what
we have come to recognize as
a "police riot" is not beyond
the realm of possibility.
In both Philadelphia and
Washington the day of demon-
stration both, incidentally,
take their aim at Big Business
and Big Government to carry
on the Beard thesis will be-
gin with ecumenical religious
services.
I am particularly intrigued
with the naming of the People's
Bicentennial Commission's serv-
ice at the Jefferson Memorial
It is labeled "The Continuing
American Revolution Call for
an American Jubilee."
FROM THE 25th chapter of
Leviticus comes the inscription
which gave the Liberty Bell its
name: "Proclaim Liberty
throughout the Land unto all
the inhabitants thereof."
Recollect that this revolution it
ary concept, which set the He-
brews aside from all others
then and to this day, declared
that every seven years the land
is to lie fallow, slaves are to be
freed .debts canceled and the
land redistributed.
As a tradition, one need not
state. Jubilee has been honored
more in the breach than in its
practice. It lessons, if nothing
else, are those of being mind
ful of social justice, of dispers-
ing economic power, as well as
social equality, throughout the
nopulation. and setting guide-.
nosts in the Quest for liberation
IF THE men who wrote the
Constitution were consciously
protecting their economic status.
those who contributed the De-
claration of Independence elev-
en vears earlier were conscious-
ly issuine a revolutionary call
in the Jubilee Tradition i
One of the Jewish leaders of
the Washington demonstration
Arthur Waskow. calls for a re-
ligioufl approach in celebrating
the American Jubilee Year ana,
uses the Leviticus theme as a
path to social justice
I confess that in turning to
that portion of the Bible for
mv reading this nast wee*
have derived not onlv neW
>.-nse of the direction we mign
be taking in this nation as we,
eo for "Third Century. IW-
but even greater respect for w
wisdom and courage of our Je
ish ancestors which is still t
relevant for our day
Ith
h
in
st
at
wl
in
be
pi
mi
be
Stl
th
ti\
wl
thi
p;i
r
m
bo
po
Hi
be
ilh
thi
W<
ca
en
rei
be
ha'
ful


Friday, July 2, 1976
vJewisti Fhrkfian
Page 5-A
Silent Majority Speaks;
.gnew's Jewish Obsessio:
iackanderson
WASHINGTON The silent
majority isn't keeping silent
about the sex scandals in Wash-
ington. Judging from our mail,
they are upset over the moral
conduct on Capitol Hill.
The public is asking whether
the sex stories are typical of
the conduct in Congress. Our
investigation indicates the moral
standards on Capitol Hill are
about the same as they are any-
where.
BUT THE rules and customs
in Congress prohibit one mem-
ber from disparaging another in
public. Senators and congress-
men can also shut themselves
behind thick oaken dors. Their
staffs act as buffers between
them and unwanted intrusions.
This has produced a protec-
tive, permissive atmosphere
which, in the past, has shielded
the philanderers. But the hanky-
panky in the backrooms of Con-
gress doesn't appear to be any
worse, for example, than in the
board rooms of the great cor-
porations.
Most of the affairs on Capitol
Hill are normal office romances
between consenting adults. To
illustrate, here are a few stories
that our staff has checked out.
We are omitting the names be-
cause these girls earn their gov-
ernment salaries. They aren't
really paid by the taxpayers to
be mistresses.
A SOUTHWESTERN Senator
has squired a number of beauti-
ful girls to a dimly lit, Capitol
Hill watering hole. One evening
he showed up with his wife.
The waitress, in a naughty
stage whisper, said to the sen-
ator: "Not up to your usual
standards, Senator."
A FEW congressmen have
maneuvered to take their lovers
along on overseas trips. A Penn-
sylvania congressman carefully
arranged for his paramour to
take a separate Diane and meet
him in Colombia.
A New Jersey congressman
slips out with his secretary al-
most every day to spend an
hour necking, like a couple of
high school kids, in his car in
the Rayburn garage.
There are perhaps a dozen
more such stories. But these are
the exceptions. The average
Membe? of Congress seems to
be as moral as the people who
sent him to Congress.
FRIENDLY Investigator: La-
bor Secretary William Usery
recently gave a resounding en-
dorsement to the mob-linked
Teamsters Union and its embat-
tled president, Frank Fitzsim-
mons. Yet this same Usery is
in charge of investigating the
Teamsters.
While he was praising the
Teamsters to the rafters at the
union's Las Vegas convention,
his own Labor Department was
investigating underworld infil-
tration of the Teamsters. His
investigators have alleged that
mobsters have their hands on
the Teamsters' central states
pension fund.
This raises a serious ques-
tion. Can the Labor Secretary
conduct an honest investigation
of a union that he has publicly
embraced? Our associate. Marc
Smolonsky, called the Labor De-
partment, but Usery refused to
retract his praise of the union.
HIS INVESTIGATORS told us
privately that they were sur-
prised at his remarks. But they
insisted the secretary has not
tried to impede their investiga-
tion.
The secretary's statement also
sounded like an election endor-
sement of Fitzsimmons. who re-
cently came up for reelection.
As an example of Teamsters
democracy. Fitzsimmons barred
his critics from the convention
hall.
Nine of Fitzsimmons' goons
escorted the dissidents out the
door. When they attempted to
protest from the sidewalk, the
Las Vegas police forced them to
leave. The police claimed the
sidewalks were rented by the
Teamsters. It's worth mention-
ing that the Teamsters have
loaned more than $130 million
to hotel and gambling casinos
in Las Vegas.
Of course, the Labor Secre-
tary is not supposed to take
sides in union politics. Yet he
not onlv endorsed Fitzsimmons
but sat through these strong-
arm tactics without a protest.
SPIRO'S REVENGE: Sources
close to Spiro Agnew say he la
planning another crusade
against the press. As vice presi-
dent, he kept up a continuing
attack upon the three TV net-
works and the leading Eastern
newspapers. He accused them
of a liberal bias.
Now Agnew has confided to
friends that he may resume his
regular broadsides against the
press. But he has a new charges
to add. He will also accuse the
major newspapers and networks
of a "pro-Jewish" bias.
HE HAS already used this
line on television talk shows.
He was encouraged afterward
by the congratulatory mail that
flooded in. He believes he can
build the issue into another na-
tional crusade against the press.
He has discussed using an edu-
cational foundation to finance
his anti-press campaign.
It appears as if Agnew, by harp-
ing on the Jewish influence in
the press, hopes to attract Arab
money. But in fairness, he has
actually said nothing about soli-
citing Arab contributions. But
he did say that he intends to
charge in his memoirs that he
was the victim of a plot to drive
him out of the government.
Denounce Bar to Seating
Reform Rabbi on Council
OLAM TRAVEL NETWORK. INC.
uniTED AiRLines
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Board of Governors of Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute
of Religion has denounced the
denial of a seat on the Jeru-
salem Religious Council to Rab-
bi Moses C. Weiler as "a trav-
esty as well as an affront to the
Reform and Progressive Move-
ments in Judaism."
Rabbi Weiler. a member of
the Movement of Progressive
Judaism, had been selected bv
Israel's Independent Liberal
Partv to represent it on the
was
Jerusalem religious body.
BUT HIS appointment
summarily cancelled last month
bv Religious Affairs Minister
Yitzhak Rafael who overrode
the previous approval of his
Ministry's director general.
"The sole reason given was
Dr. Weiler's membership in the
Movement of Progressive Ju-
daism," the HUC-JIR Board of
Governors said in a resolution
adopted at a recent meeting.
4.0KOMII It
SEE AMEiKA THE KOSHER WAY
EXCITING TOURS TO
CALIFORNIA LAS VEOAS GRAND CANYON -
LAKE TAMOf-SIERRAS-CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ROCKIES
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS
ALIZA BRENNER TKAVIL SERVICE INC.
605 LINCOLN RD MIAMI BEACH PHONE 531-5865
HMRFieniMRS OF CREATIVE QUALITY PRODUCTS
BUY DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER
AND SAVE UP TO 50',
l" eiRTEHPORART ACRYLIC WILL UNIT
S5. 1,395
IIO. $2 450
WOODHAVEN INC.
SPICIALIZINOIN
"TMI MODIIN IOOK"
WILL KNITS
IMS
t KITOMEM C1SINETS WITH THE
FUR0PE1N LOOK
IEMO0NS
COCKTAIL. COFFEE. END MILES
NElMIIMS. PLATFORM IEIS
CHOICE OF HNIf.HIS
VISIT OUR FACTORY
SHOWROOM AT
12454 N.E. 13 PL.
PH: 891-1597
DICORATORS WflCOMI
OPEN DAILY 1-5 SAT. 11-4
Let your personality
speak for itself

687-O808
ia5?
SALES SERVICE PARTS
SPECIAL SALE
CUSTOM MADE
SCREENS
2.99
WINDOW SIZI
RE-SCREEN
YOUR SCREEN
FRAME
1.99
WINDOW SIZI
SINGH HUNG
14.90
16.40
18.25
21.25
WINDOWS
37X38>i
37i50Vi
53'/iX3S>/i
53 iX50s.
AWNING
20.50
24.50
25.90
31.25
AUTOMATIC LOCKING DIVICI
123301.W. 7 HE. 687-0808
With newDesign Line phones from Southern Bell.
They're the talk of ihe lown. And there's one thai
matches your decor and personality. Simnlx pick the
conversation piece thai fits you. Choose from these ten
Design Line* models, in over sivt> striking style, texture
anil color variations. They're available now, for a one-
time charge at prices that range from S59.95 to SI09.95.
There's also a sin-month payment plan available.
There is no monthl) charge beyond the regular basic
sen ice rate, if it's to Ix.- your onl> phone* If used as an ex-
tension, you pa) onl\ the regular monthl> extension rate.
\ six-month warrant) is included with youi purchase
of the phone housing. To assure qualit) phone sen ice.
the working parts remain the proper!) and responsibilit)
of Southern Hell. So anytime these parts need repair.
we'll fix them without additional charge.
Toorileror for more information, call youi
Southern Bell business office.
And let your personulit) speak for itself.
V Median.inc.in!
B. Chestpnonet .
C. Stowawa)......
I) Accent........
E.Celebrit) .....
v"> 'i- i i art) Americant
$99.95 G Candlestick". .
$99.95 II Antique GoMt.
$69.95 I Elite...........
S M 95 I xeter.........
. SW.95
$109.95
$H4.95
$59.95
Price*- ind* illaimn ventt t
nut iv app
"Tnmtt i rJrJ tithl> cturfpe loi roucti l<">
Ti Jenwrtol Ktm k in telephone-ml Map iph itmpam
ReirmemJ lr rdemarti >i fcnencan tetecummu h i
,ii l.-lc. .'iimn.'i
Southern Bel!



.
*age 6-A
+Je*ist Ikrititt
Brown Has Foot In Mouth Again
Friday, July 2| 19714|==
GEN. BROWN
WASHINGTON In 197 4
President Ford rebuked Gen
George S. Brown for saying
Jews own the banks and news-
papers and have too much in
fluence over Congress. On Mon-
day. Brown told the Senate
Armed Services Committee he
still believes Jews have "undue
influence" over Congress.
Questioned later by Sen. Sam
Nunn (D., Ga.). Brown backed
away from "undue influence,"
and said he sees nothing "sin-
ister, wrong or illegal" about
Jewish lobbying efforts on be-
half of Israel.
The statements were made
as the committee considered
whether to approve a second
two-year term for Brown as
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff.
BROWN'S original remarks
were made about Israel and the
Jewish lobby at a Duke Uni-
versity seminar on Oct. 10.
1974. when Brown, already Joint
Chiefs chairman, responded tc
a question by suggesting that
Terrorists' Freedom Demanded
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV Terrorists who hijacked the Air France
jet that landed at Entebbe, Uganda, early this week de-
manded that 53 "Palestinian freedom-fighters" be released
from jails in Israel, West Germany and other European
nations as ransom for the passengers and the plane.
Fear for the safety of the
most international air carriers.
But Air France took the least
precautions. It was only after
repeated persuasion by Israel
authorities that the French com-
pany required its passengers
boarding at Tel Aviv to undergo
thorough inspections of both
their persons and their luggage.
Israeli officials going aboard
are urged to travel in Israeli
planes wherever possible and
especially to avoid Air France
Israeli passengers mounted
when it was learned that
Uganda's erratic and psy-
chopathically anti Israel
President Idi Amin had tak-
en personal charge of nego-
tiations with the hijackers.
REPORTS rrom the Ugandan
City that Amin was handling
the matter as a military opera-
tion only increased the appre-
hension. But an Israel journalist
who telephoned the Entebbe
Airport said he was told by an
official there not to worry be-
cause everything was fine.
Thousand of Israelis main-
tained an all-night vigil by their
radios after the plane, which was
hijacked at Athen sunday, took
off from Benghazi, Libya, for
an unknown destination with a
limited amount of fuel. Its 229
passengers include at least 70
Israelis and ten or more Jews
of other nationalities.
Kol Israel Radio, which nor-
mally goes off the air at 1 a.m.,
local time, continued to relay
news bulletins as they came in
after that hour. An alert was
maintained at Ben Gurion Air-
port throughout the night as is
the practice when an aircraft
is hijacked anywhere in the re-
gion.
RELATIVES of Israelis known
to be aboard the jet spent a
sleepless night at the Air
France office. The airline was
able to provide only meager in-
formation.
Israelis were especially anger-
ed over the French national air
carrier's apDarently lax security
measures. The French are be-
lieved to have considered their
planes immune from Arab ter-
rorist attack because of their
Middle East policies. The wide-
bodied, twin-jet "Air Bus," tak-
en over by five Palestinians at
Athens is believed to be the
first French airliner ever seized
bv terrorists
More than 30 passenger planes
of various nationalities have
been hijacked since 1968 for
r>8sons connected with the Mid-
dle East conflict.
THE FIRST plane was an El
Al iet on a flight from Rome to
Tel Aviv which was taken over
bv Arab terrorists on July 23,
1 <><; and forced to land in
Aleeria.
The wave of hijackings that
followed in the late '60s and
arhp '70s caused stringent se-
curity measures to be taken by
AS THE latest air hijack
drama unfolded, conflicting re-
ports reached here as to the
terrorists' ideniy. A firs hey
were believed to be members
of George Habash's popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine. However, reports
from Paris attributed the crime
o members cf Naif Hawaheh's
Popular Dpmocratic front for
the Liberation of Palestine.
Sources whc believe he PFLP
is responsible attribute the hi-
iack do t.- operations officer,
Was Wadia El-Haddad, who has
PRESIDENT AMIN
master-minded several terrorist
operations, often without the
knowledge of Habash. Haddad
is believed to have planned the
operation that was aborted on
May 23 when a suspected ter-
rorist was killed when he open-
ed a booby-trapped valise at
Ben Gurion Airport.
An Israeli woman security
officer was also killed. The ter-
rorist was identified later as
Brent Hausmann, a West Ger-
man traveling on a Dutch pass-
port.
French Order Equal
Treatment for Israelis
Complete
Window Service
*FMflTS
PLACING REGLAZING
'ntt Service Free Estimetet
PHONE 666-3339
Ml WINDOW REPAIR
TI3 BIRD ROAD
PARIS (JTA) French
President Valery Giscard
D'Estaing has ordered
French officials to treat the
Israeli passengers aboard
the hijacked Air France
plane "the same as all other
passengers, including the
French."
The French President, whc
was in San Juan, Puerto
Rico, attending the Western
Economic Summit Confer-
ence, phoned his instruc-
tions to the Elysee Palace.
Later, a high French official
reiterated the President's
promise in a phone call tc
the Israeli Embassy in Paris
FRENCH sources here say
Giscard decided to adopt a "high
profile" in this matter. He per-
sonally ordered the French at-
titude which basically consists
of an adamant refusal to ac-
cept the repatriation of the non-
Israeli passengers aboard the
Diane.
These sources say the French
"Air Bus" left Benghazi after
France made this position clear
to Libyan President Mouamar
Qadaffi. The Libyan leader,
these sources say. preferred to
have the plane fly off rather
than free all the passengers as
the French demanded.
There were two recent points
of friction between the two
countries. The first occurred
several vear ago when a
iho( a film
portraying Idi Amin's life and
career.
Amin asked the French gov-
ernment to have several scenes,
which he considered disparag-
ing, deleted and the film's dis-
tributors accepted to do so at
the request of the French au-
thorities.
A FEW years later, tension
between France and Uganda er-
upted anew when Idi Amin ac-
cused an "unknown white
Frenchman" of having had in-
timate relations with his then
foreign minister in the ladies'
room at Orly Airport.
Negotiations between France
and Uganda are currently car-
ried out by the French Ambas-
sador in Kampala, Pierre Re-
nard, but the French intend to
send a senior negotiator should
the issue not be solved within
a couple of days.
Immediately after the Air
France plane landed at Entebbe,
a small airport some 30 miles
south of Kampala situated on
the northern tip of Lake Vic-
toria, the French Ambassador
arrived on the ate.
SEVERAL hours later, Idi
Amin himself also reached the
"old airport" runway to which
the plane had taxied minutes
after it landed at the request of
the Uganda police.
The Air France plane, which
took off from Ben Gurion Air-
nort near Tel Aviv on a routine
flieht to Paris with 236 pas-
sengers, including 83 Israelis
and 12 French crew members
h morning (Paris time) at Enteb-
be Airnort in Uganda.
Israel had too much influence
in Congress and said, "Jews
own. you know, the banks in
this country, the newspapers."
Brcwn was rebuked by the
President and then Defense
Secretary James R. Schlesinger.
but apologized and remained in
his post, to which he has now
b?en named for another term.
Brown acknowledged on Mon-
lay to Sen. Robert Taft, Jr.
(R., Ohio) that he had said two
"wrong" things and one "inap-
propriate." The "wrong" asser-
tions were about banks and
newspapers. Asked about the
"inappropriate" remark. Brown
said, "I felt the Jewish com-
munity in the U.S. had an un-
due influence on the Congress
of the U.S."
ASKED BY Taft if ho "still
feels that is true," Brown re
sponded, "In all candor I do.
but I feel it is not unusual.
There are other special int,
est groups that have influenc*
or seek to achieve influence on
the Congress of the U.S."
When questioned by \Un,
however. Brown retreated froj
his earlier answer to Taft sav
mg he supports the survival c
the State of Israel and ren!
diating "undue influence "
The dialogue, in part, was;
Nunn: "Do you believe tb
American Jewish people havi
undue influence with Co;
gress?"
Brown: "I felt the influen
of Jewish people was onlv on?
of many lobbying activities"
NUNN ASKED again whetha
Brown believes Jews have un-
due influence and Brown said/
"The Senator is better able t
answer that than I."
He added, "I would say tha
I think that Jewish influent
in the interest of Israel j.
absolutely proportional to tb)
effort they put in they wort
hard at it ... I have never im
plied anything sinister wrom
or illegal."
your precious jewels
to the most prestigious
jewelers In the South
Call Lewis Rustcin Phone: 445-26-h
Herb Schoenberg 531-0087
Have you Forgotten
YOUR MOST IMPORTANT
RELATIVE...
ISRAEL
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
r\
'I give and bequeath $
to the

ISRAEL HISTA0RUT FOUNDATION
Will assure the continued flow
of financial support to
ISRAEL
For the constructive
PROGRAMS OF HISTADRUT
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
helps you discharge an
important obligation
both to
YOURSELF
AND 7 O THE PEOPLE OF
ISRAEL
For further particulars, please contact _
Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 389 .
| Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone 531-8702
This it to inform you that I plan to include in my WILL *
BEQUEST to the Itrael Htatadrut Foundation. Inc.
urn----------------------------------------
A06ft(SS
H
tin-
-mrr
T1W"


Friday, July 2, 1976
*Jewisti Flcrkiiati
Page 7-A
Carmichael Stand Repudiated
KNESSET MEMBERS CJTfD
NEW YORK (JTA) Three major national Jew-
ish organizations have sharply condemned anti-Zionist re-
marks made by Black activist Stokely Carmichael during
ID interview on the WABC-TV "Like It Is" program Sun-
day. Two of them have asked for equal time to rebut Car-
michael's statements.
Naomi Levine, executive di-
rector of the American Jewish
Congress, who requested the
right to appear on "Like It Is"
"to respond to Carmichael's
vicious lies," declared that it
was "deeply regrettable" that
ELECTION DECISION
Mapam Will
Remain
In Coalition
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Mapam convention ended here
with a decision to remain with-
in the Labor Alignment for the
time being. At the same time,
Mapam will prepare for a sep-
arate election list next year
should the partnership with the
Labor Party prove to be in-
compatible with its foreign and
domestic political goals.
That will be determined by
the course Labor charts at its '
own convention in December.
Mapam will reconvene after-
wards to decide the Alignment's
future.
THE THREE-DAY convention
here closed with the adoption
of a series of resolutions that
were tantamount to a warning
to the Labor Party that the
Alignment could founder if no
common denominator is found i
between its constituents.
The resolutions reiterated Ma-
nam's policies with respect to
the administered territories
which call for major Israeli
withdrawals consistent with na-
tional security and recognition
of Palestinian national rights in
a state of their own.
A resolution calling for an
immediate break with Labor
was not brought to a vote dur-
ing the convention. Its propo-
nents were persuaded that a
vote could have exacerbated di-
visions within Mapam.
BUT MAPAM Secretary Gen-
eral Meir Talmi agreed that the
nartv was paving a high price
bv subordinating itself to its
much larger Alignment partner.
The price was necessary, he
said, because of the consolida-
tion of rightwing factions in Li-
kud.
But it would be a mistake to
think that Mapam will maintain
the Alignment at any price, Tal-
mi warned.
The resolutions adopted in-
cluded a demand that the gov-
ernment prepare an overall
oeace plan that would ensure
Israel's security while not ad-
ding any territories. Israel was
urged to announce its willing-
ness to carry out large scale
withdrawals from the Sinai,
West Bank and Golan Heights.
THE EVACUATED area on
the Heights should be perma-
nently demilitarized, Mapam
said. Freedom of navigation on
the Red Sea should be assured
by some form of Israeli pres-
ence at Sharm el-Sheikh. Ma-
oam would not return the Gaza
Strip to Egyptian control but
would determine its future
status bv Israel's security needs
and the wishes of the local pop-
ulation.
Maoam proposed that nego-
tiations be conducted with Jor-
dan on the assumption that
two sovereign independent
states Israel and a Palestin-
ian Arab entity will exist
once the Palestinians have made
their political choice.
WABC-TV "has seen fit to have
as its guest on June 20 Stokely
Carmichael, an incendiary revo-
lutionary with anti-Semitic and
anti-American views."
HASKELL L. Lazere, execu-
tive director of die New York
Chapter of the American Jew-
ish Committee, wrote to Ken-
neth H. MacQueen, vice presi-
dent and general manager of
VVABC TV,, requesting that
"equal time should be given to
provide your viewers with an
opportunity to hear from re-
sponsible Black leaders and
spokesmen."
He characterized Carmichael's
remarks as "an incitement to
violence, murder and to the
destruction of a member of the
family of nations."
The Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy was unable to reach any
WABC-TV official for comment.
BENJAMIN R. Epstein, na-
tional director of the B'nai B'-
rith Anti-Defamation League,
expressed "deep concern and
dismay, but not surprise" at
Carmichael's "parroting of anti-
Jewish, anti-Israel propaganda"
because he "has a long history
of anti-Semitism and bitter hos-
tility to Israel." The ADL is not
known to have requested equal
time.
According to transcripts of
the interview, Carmichael, who
is chairman of the All African
People's Revolutionary Party,
said "It is totally improper that
the (U.S.) Government should
continue to send our tax dollars
to Israel" and that "Zionists
remain the primary supporters
of the repressive South African
regime and unjustly occupy land
belonging to Egypt."
Poor Hebrew of Israelis
Comes Under Sharp Attack
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
significant number of Knesset
members representing a broad
spectrum of political factions
have reached agreement that
many Israelis cannot speak pro-
per Hebrew.
Shalom Levin, of the Labor
Alignment, who happens to be
chairman of the National Teach-
ers Association, introduced an
agenda motion on "'The State of
the Hebrew Language" in Is-
rael, which he found to be poor.
HE SUGGESTED that Knes-
set members should be provid-
ed with special language ad-
visors to check their speeches
before and after delivery
for correct usage.
Levin claimed that very few
Israelis could say they have
mastered the Hebrew language.
Specifically, he charged, "most
radio and TV broadcasters, pub-
lic figures, Knesset members
and even university professors
harm the language, sometimes
because of disrespect for it and
sometimes merely because they
don't know better."
Most of Levin's colleagues
concurred. But Likud MK Yitz-
hak Modai thought the Knesset
should devote itiself to more
pressing matters. Modai has
been trying to introduce an
agenda motion critical of the
new value added tax (VAT)
that goes into effect July 1. He
charged that whenever the
Knesset presidium wanted to
avoid an embarrassing subject,
it took up such topics as the
state of the Hebrew language.
??15MI1
'0yM> ,*..,
U.S. Office
MOO 5 Ht Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11219
Tol. 436-4757
Special K^ampaian
for the
I Ion J- rof it -rood L^ent
et
in
s-rerttSatent, ^ssruet
supplying large and needy
families, with groceries
less than wholesale prices.
Worthy Friends:
The economic situation that Israel is going through at this time is unbearable. A
daily crisis is encountered with the food co its which have risen sky-high, numerous fam-
ilies find great difficulty meeting food expenses.
BESHARAICH YERUSHALAIM is devoted to rescue and aid these needy families.
We provide food at below wholesale ro tunity of feeding and raising their young properly.
Please have a share in this noble undertaking. In the merit of this Mitzvah may
Hashem bless you.
The Management of Beshcrairh Yerushalaim
May I hereby take this opportunity to recommend the
Institution Besharaich Yorushalaim, whose activities are well
known here. The above institution extends a helping hand
to our needy brothers.
With Torah greetings,
Ovadia Yossef, Richon L'Zion, Chief Rabbi of Israel
The holy ideal of the Institution Besharaich Yerushalaim
is to aid our need" 'llies with their daily living expenses,
and to dispense chsrity to the poor in a most honorable
manner.
Rabbi Bezalel Zolty. Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem
I hereby strengthen the hands who are doing good
acts at this time that the cost of living are very high, and
the hardship of the Bnai Torah and poor families are very
great. The Institution Besharaich Yerushalaim established a
good goal with their non-profit food center, to help the
needy with groceries at below wholesale cost, as same to
help needy with allowance aid.
Rabbi Shlomo Zalmen Auerbach, Jerusalem
The Institution Bcsharaich Yeruihalaim has organized
outlets to provide food at below wholesale cost for needy
families, this worthy project deserves our utmest respect and
assistance.
Rabbi Yehuda Zadka, Rosh Yeshivath Porafh Yoseph
The WitiQip'oad activities of BESHARAICh
YJ?( iSHALAIM are already widely known everywhere.
Rabbi Jacob Mussapi, Chief Rabbi ol Sephardic Community in lerusalem
Rabbi Ovadia Levl, Kiryat tkron
Rabbi Shlomo Hacohen, Katamon. Jerusalem
Rabbi Biyahu Abuchzira, Nazareth-Alith
Rabbi Moshe Malmum, Kiryat Ma
Rabbi Israel Grossman, lerusalem
Rabbi Yoseph RouskUah, Beth Shemesh
Rabbi SaVman Chugi Abudi, Presiding judge in Jerusalem
Rabbi Yehuda Meyer Getz, lerusalem
Rabbi Salamon Yaluz, Ashdod
SEND YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO
BESHARACH YERUSHALAIM P.O. 10X 296, BROOKLYN N.Y. 11230
YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE TAX-OEOUCTIBIE


Page 8-A
^JmistncrkUar
Friday, July 2, 1976
JNF President Sage Dies at Testimonial
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.
Maurice S. Sage, president of the
Jewish National Fund of Amer-
ica, collapsed June 22, short-
ly after he introduced Mrs. Bet-
ty Ford to the 2,500 persons
attending the JNF's Gala Bicen-
tennial Dinner. President Ford's
wife, visibly shaken and her
voice trembling, asked the au-
dience to bow their heads and
join her in a prayer for Dr.
Sage.
"Can we all bow our heads
for Rabbi Sage?" Mrs.
Ford asked the stunned
audience at the Hilton Hotel as
a doctor and Secret Servicemen
were trying to revive the 59-
year-old Zionist leader.
"DEAR FATHER in Heaven,"
Mrs. Ford prayed, '"we ask Thy
blessing on this magnificent
man. We know You can take
care of him. We know You can
bring us back our leader. You
are our strength. You are what
life is all about, love, and love
of fellow man is what we all
need and depend on. Please,
dear God. Let's all join together
in silent prayer for Rabbi Sage."
The incident occurred toward
the end of the evening in
which the First Lady was hon-
ored and was about to be pre-
sented with a Jerusalem silver
Bible and a key to the JNF Bi-
centennial Park near Jerusalem.
Dr. Sage was pronounced dead
at 11 p.m. in Polyclinic Hospi-
tal here of a heart attack.
The $150-a-plate dinner June
22 launched the American Bi-
centennial National Park south-
east of Jerusalem.
MINUTES before he collaps-
ed. Dr. Sage told the audience
that the $6 million park, "which
is the largest project endorsed
by the American Revolution
Bicentennial Administration in
celebration of our nation's her-
itage, will be dedicated in Is-
U.S. Expresses Thanks for 'Palestinian' Assist
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
confirmed that a message of
thanks was sent by the U.S.,
through "third parties," to
the "Palestinian leadership"
in Lebanon for its role in
the evacuation of Americans
from that country and in
moving the remains of
American Ambassador Fran-
cis B. Meloy and the Econ-
omic Counselor Robert 0.
Waring who were murdered
in Beirut last week.
The Department issued a
brief statement today in re-
sponse to a question raised
yesterday after the Pales-
tinian news agency Wafa
reported from Beirut that
Farouk Khaddoumi had re-
ceived a message of thanks
from Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger.
KHADDOUMI is the "foreign
minister" of the Palestine Li-
beration Organization. Accord-
ing to Wafa. the message said
that Kissinger "wishes to in-
form the Palestinian leadership
of his appreciation of the great
and 'constructive dole under-
taken by the Palestinians."
The State Department's state-
ment said: "There has been no
written communication to the
PLO.
"However, on instructions of
the Secretary, the American
Anti-Semitism Doomed Here?
NEW YORK (JTA)
A leading Catholic theolo-
gian foresees the disappear-
ance of Christian religious
anti-Semitism and Vatican
recognition of Israel. The
prediction was made by the
Rev. Edward H. Flannery,
executive secretary of the
Secretariat for Catholic-Jew-
ish Relations of the U.S.
Bishops Conference, in an
essay in the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith
interreligious quarterly
"Face to Face."
The issue, entitled "Jew-
ish Christian Relations:
Looking to the Twenty-First
Century," features the views
of Catholics, Protestants and
Jews who have been promi-
nent in the Jewish-Christian
dialogue.
FATHER FLANNERY anti-
cipates that "anti-Semitism of a
religious or theological kind will
be the first to disappear, leav-
ing the field to secular or reli-
gious varieties."
He said that for Christian
churches, "which contributed so
potently to the creation and
growth of anti-Judaism and
anti-Semitism," to be among
the first to repudiate it is "a
historical reversal." He de-
scribed the principal forms of
Secret Diary
Confirms Soviet
Disturbances
Camp
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVTV (JTA) A
secret diary written by an in-
mate of a Soviet forced labor
camp in the Perm region of
Russia disclosed that a serious
disturbance occurred there last
year in protest against the dra-
conian measures taken by the
camp guards, especially against
Anatolv Altman. who was sen-
tenced to ten years at hard la-
bor at the first. Leningrad hi-
jack trial in 1970.
A copy of the diary, typewrit-
ten ;n Russian on white paper,
has reached Kibbutz Yagur
which has adopted Altman as
an honorary member.
ACCORDING to the writer,
Altman was subjected to severe
punishment between May and
August, 1975, because he refus-
ed to shave his beard. The diary
says Altman was chained and
forcibly shaved As punishment,
he was denied permission to re-
ceive visitors
He went on a hunger strike
in protest and was joined by 20
other inmates. As a result. Alt-
man was put in solitary con-
finement for ten days and
denied the right to purchase
food at the camp commissary
the diary stated,
in his release from confine-
"i Sept. 18. he was imme-
back in solitary for
another 15 days. Fellow pris-
oners demonstrated in protest
and threatened to react even
more violently unless a petition
they addressed to President Ni-
kolai Podgorny of the Supreme
Soviet was delivered.
The petition demanded better
conditions and a cessation of
harsh punishment at the camp.
ACCORDING to the diary,
manv Jews were out in solitary
confinement for staging hunger
strikes in protest against severe
punishment ordered by the
camp commandant. One prison-
er was nut en trial for alleged-
lv passing information on camp
conditions to outside sources.
The diary says that inmates
are punished for such offenses
as having a cup of tea during
working hours, coming to in-
soection late or wearing their
orison garb in a way that did
not suit the guards.
A PRISONER surnamed Li-
chiak was given seven days'
solitary confinement because he
stacked books on shelves in-
stead of under them.
Another prisoner, surnamed
Basrab. who has spent 23 years
in detention, was denied per-
mission to buy food because he
complained to the camp author-
ities that, after suffering two
heart attacks, he was unable to
perform physical labor, the
diary reported.
anti-Semitism today as being
"completely laioiaed. such as
those found in Soviet Russia,
the Middle East, fascist parties
and some 'liberal' ideologies."
These varieties, he continued,
"live an existence of their own,
independent of all religious sus-
tenance, and are impervious to
all ecclesiastical influence or
effort."
DR. DAVTD R. Hunter, for-
merly deputy general secretary
of the National Council of
Churches, stated that a major
obstacle to eliminating anti-
Semitism is the root of the pre-
judice in the New Testament
and the writings of such rever-
ed leaders as St. John Chrysos-
tom and Martin Luther.
Commenting that this has
been "a paralyzing force." he
observed that "it will probably
take another John XXIII. sup-
ported by a non-temporizing
Curia, a courageous World
Council of Churches, and a host
of faithful lay people around
the world really to change the
course of history and finally
remove the religious sanctions
for anti-Semitism."
Dr. Franklin H. Littell. foun-
der of Christians Concerned for
Israel, called for a fundamental
reexamination of Christian
theology in the light of the Holo-
caust and a returned Israel.
HE WENT on to pose ques-
tions about the credibility of
Christianity after 6,000,000
Jews were murdered by bap-
tized Christians, whether or not
Jesus dould be considered a
"false Messiah" and, "if Jesus
is the true Messiah, where are
the signs of the Messianic age?"
Prof. Michael Wsychogrod, of
Baruch College, urged that
Christianity "not lose its self-
confidence" in the next century
because of "a sense of horror
at Christian anti-Semitism."
which, he noted, is at times "the
result not so much of compas-
sion at the suffering of Jews"
as using the Jewish issue to in-
jure the church.
HE SAID Nazism and Com-
munism are the two greatest
enemies of Jews and Judaism
in this centurv and are also "the
most virulent ami Christian
forces."
According to Wsvchogrod
"while Jewish existence under
Christian rule left much to be
desired. Jewish existence under
anti-Christian rule is far. far
worse TV continuation of liv-
me Christianity is vital to
Jews."
Embassy in Beirut has convey-
ed orally, through third parties,
to the Palestinian leadership,
his appreciation for the assist-
ance provided during the move-
ment of the remains of Ambas-
sador Meloy and Mr. Waring
and the evacuation from West
Beirut."
ACCORDING to sources here,
the message was the first com-
munication by the U.S. govern-
ment to the PLO, directly or in-
directly. American policy has
been to avoid any official con-
tact with the PLO and accord-
ing to the State Department that
policy remains unchanged.
Meanwhile. Kissinger, who
was visiting West Germany,
summoned the U.S. Ambassa-
dors to Egypt, Saudi Arabia,
Jordan and Syria there for a
meeting on the situation in Le-
banon.
The White House announced
the interim appointment of Am-
bassador Talcott Seelye as spe-
cial representative to Lebanon
The State Department said that
Seelve participated in the meet-
ing with Kissinger in Bonn.
ACCORDING to Wafa. Khad
doumi responded to Kissinger's
message as follows:
"In spite of our basic and
principal differences with the
U.S. government, which takes
a stand hostile to Palestinian
and Arab national aspirations,
the leadership of the Palestin-
ian revolution is well aware of
its international and local re-
sponsibilities and is very much
concerned to deal with all on
the bases of justice and the
legitimate objectives for which
the Palestinian revolution was
launched."
rael on the 4th of July in the
presence of the President of i,
rael, Ephraim Katzir, US Am
bassador to Israel Malcolm
Toon, top Israeli and American
dignitaries and a large delega
tion of American communal
leaders."
Abram Salomon, JNF execu
tive vice president, said that
$2,251,300 has been raised so
far for the Park in the United
States. Addressing the gather-
ing earlier in the evening- is-
rael's Ambassador to the United
States, Simcha Dinitz. declared
that the United States "was and
always will be a great friend
of Israel."
He said that the US wants
strong allies and a strong Israel
"is an asset to the U.S. A weak
Israel is a liability for Amer-
ica."
STATING that strengthening
Israel is "advancing the cause
of peace in the Mideast." Dinitz
observed that only with a strong
Israel will the Arabs realize that
the only way for a settlement
is through negotiations.
Jacob Tzur. world chairman
of the JNF in Jerusalem, said
that the Bicentennial Park in
Israel "will remind every citizen
of Jerusalem, every citizen of
Israel, of the great democracy
overseas, who taught us bv its
example how to stand guard
over remote and difficult
stretches of land, who inspired
us in our pioneering tradition.
who has stood bv us in difficult
times."
Dr. Sage, an internationally-
known chemist, had been presi-
dent of the JNF for eight
months. Prior to that he had
served as treasurer and a mem-
ber of the board for several
years.
HE WAS formerly president
of the Religious Zionists of
America. He was also a for-
mer treasurer of the Conference
of Presidents of Major Amer-
ican Jewish Organizations, a
member of the United Jewish
Appeal Cattnet. chairman of
special projects for State of Is-
rael Bonds, a member of the
board of Bar-Han University
vice president of the World
Zionist Congress and chairman
of the board of the Jewish
Week, a weekly in New York
Citv.
Dr. Sage was born in Russia
and moved with his familv to
Paris after World War I He
received his education at the
Rabbinical Seminarv in Paris
and later graduated from the
Faculty of Science at the Uni-
versity of Paris.
Administration
Cools Boycott Laws
t
WASHINGTON (JTA)
"The Ford Administration con-
tinued to reiterate late last week
its opposition to Congressional
legislation aimed at strengthen-
ing action against American
firms complying with the Arab
boycott against Israel.
In testimony before the House
International Relations Commit-
tee. Commerce Secretary Elliot
L. Richardson said that the Ad-
ministration opposes additional
legislation "as being both un-
timely and unnecessary and
potentially counter-productive."
RICHARDSON stressed that
the Administration has already
taken steps "to assure that the
boycott is free of discrimination
against United States citizens
to deal with secondary boycott
practices that interfere with
economic relations among dom-
estic firms, and to seek diplo-
matic modification of the more
obiectionable manifestations of
the boycott."
The Commerce Secretary said
the only new legislation needed
is the Administration-sponsored
bill introduced by Rep. Edward
Hutcninson of Michigan, the
ranking Republican on the
House Judiciary Committee. It
is considered much weaker than
other bills now before Congress
Richard repeated Administra-
tion claims that "passage of leg-
islation at this time might jeo-
pardize our ability to continue
to work effectively with Arab
nations to achieve a just and
Permanent Mideast peace, which
is after all. he added, "the only
realistic way to end the Arab
boycott of Israel."
HE DECLARED that the Ad-
ministration "stronglv" ODDOW
and has prohibited compliance
with bovcott practices involving
anv discrimination again*! I S
citizens
He said that durint the per-
iod of October 1. 1975. through
last Mar. 31. the Commerce De-
partment received about 14.2W
bovcott reports dealing witn
about 29.700 transactions
Of the 14.200 reports, six re-
vealed bovcott-related reouests
which would clearlv discrimi-
nate against American citizens.
he said, and several hundred
additional reports revealed re-
ouests that goods not be mark-
ed with the Star of David


iday, July 2. 1976
* k-nisl flcrk/l&ii
Page 9-A
Reaffirm Commitment to Israel-Carter
NEW YORK (JTA)
limmy Carter said here that
[public statements by lead-
ers of our country in the
ast few months" cast doubt
America's commitment
Israel's right "to exist in
beace as a Jewish State"
[nd that commitment should
unequivocally reasserted.
The former governor of
Jeorgia who is expected to
nominated for President
the Democratic Party
invention here this month,
lade his remarks during a
[uestion-and-answer period
allowing an address he de-
Ivered before the Foreign
policy Association.
HE SAID he favored a "gen-
ral" rather than a "step-by-
step" approach to a Middle
East settlement. Carter did not
refer to the Middle East in his
speech nor did he specify what
public statements by American
leaders might have cast doubt
on the U.S. commitment to Is-
rael.
But he made it clear that in
his own view a solution of the
Middle East conflict must be
reached by direct negotiations
between Israel and the Arabs
in the framework of Security
Council Resolution 242 and bas-
ed on the Arabs' recognition of
"the permanent existence of
Israel" and their adoption of a
policy of non-belligerence to-
ward that country.
Carter also said, "I think we
should strengthen our commit-
ment to give Israel whatever
defense mechanisms or econo-
Religious Body to Litigate
Against School Aid Ban
By BEN GALLOB
1970 state law providing for
cur vnov ,-,,,, such reimbursement, whjfch the
NEW (JIA) Supreme Court struck down as
unconstitutional. The 1974 law
was challenged by the Commit-
tee for Public Education and
Religious Liberty (PEARL),
to Orthodox leader here
aid an appeal will be made
the U.S. Supreme Court
rom a decision by a federal
lourt in Manhattan voiding
\s unconstitutional a 1974
tjew York State law reim-;
pursing religious schools for;
le costs of state-mandated
esting and record-keeping.
At the same time, Sidney
(westel, president of the
"Jational Jewish Commission
on Law and Public Affairs
ICOLPA) said COLPA be-
lieves that the 1974 law does
not violate previous Su-
preme Court rulings in that
irea of public assistance.
KWESTEL ALSO told the
lewish Telegraphic Agency
lat COLPA intends to file a
^rief in support of Jewish day
chool and yeshiva students in
\x\y appeal of the decision.
Rabbi Moshe Sherer. execu-
Ive president of Agudath Israel
p America, in reporting that
he lower court decision would
appealed, "by a group of
fcon-nublic schools." called the
ower court decision "a serious
Jrror in judgement."
Rabbi Bernard Goldenberg,
lirector of school organization
Ind professional services of To-
ih Umesorak. the National So-
lety for Hebrew Day Schools,
Iso criticized the decision. De-
lating that there are some 200
keshivas and Hebrew day
chools in the state, he said
could "feel this financial blow."
lat, at this time of inflation.
hey would "feel this financial
blow."
THE SPECIAL three-judge fed-
eral court struck down a provis-
on of the 1974 state law under
vhich the state paid up to $10
lillion a year to the non-public
chools for the costs of admin-
stering Regents examinations,
keeping pupil attendance rec-
ords and other state-mandated
aperwork.
The court said it was "clear"
lhat the aid to the secular func-
pons of "sectarian schools is in
set aid to the sectarian school
iterorise as a whole and re-
ilts in the direct advancement
religion." The two rabbis
ive differing totals for the
lounts received by Jewish day
chools annually under the 1974
iw. Goldenbejrg estimated the
Amount as $1.5 million. Rabbi
herer's estimate was $750,000.
The 1974 law represented a
^ate effort to meet U.S. Su-
reme Court objections to a
mic aid is necessary to let them
meet any potential attack."
CARTER STRESSED that he
would never send American
troops to Israel and added "I've
never met an Israeli who advo-
cated that."
Carter made his statements
on the Middle East when he
was asked what "new ideas do
you have beside the present
declared U.S. policy concerning
Middle East questions?" He re-
plied: "one of the new commit-
ments that I think should be
made is an unequivocal, con-
stant commitment to the world
that is well understood by all
people that we guarantee the
right of Israel to exist in peace
as a Jewish state.
"I think there's been too
much equivocation about that
and doubt cast upon the factor
by public statements made by
leaders of our country in the
last few months. That ought to
be one basic charge."
CARTER CONTINUED: "I be-
lieve that we should pursue ag-
gressively the effort as spelled
out under United Nations Res-
olution 242 that the individual
countries surrounding Israel
should negotiate directly with
Israel, recognizing two things:
one, the permanent existence
of Israel, and secondly, adopt-
ing a position of non-belligeren-
cy toward the State of Israel.
"We. I think, can play a role
that's presently been requested
of President Ford by Mr. Ra-
bin (Premier Yitzhak Rabin of
Israel) and others of Israel,
which I don't know yet if it's
been pursued or not. I would
maintain a strong naval force
in the eastern Mediterranean."
Carter warned against out-
side intervention in the Middle
East. "I would let it be clear
to the Soviet Union and others
that neither we nor they nor
anyone else should prospective-
ly plan an involvement in any
Middle Eastern confrontation
that includes combat.
"I think we should strength-
en our commitment to give Is-
rael whatever defense mecha-
nisms or economic aid is nec-
essary to let them meet any
potential attack."
CARTER SAID he would also
favor, "whenever Israel and
the other countries are ready,
the pursuit of a general ap-
proach to the Middle Eastern
question rather than a step-by-
step approach.
"But in the meantime, encour-
age Jordan, perhaps Syria, Leb-
anon, when their crisis is over,
to negotiate with Israel on a
mutual basis," said said.
Terrorists
Arrested
In Bombing
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Five sus-
pected terrorists were arrested
here Friday in connection with
a bomb explosion that severely
damaged a branch of the Roth-
schild Bank in central Paris dur-
ing the night on May 29. An
elderly woman and a child were
injured by flying glass. Accord-
ing to police sources, the sus-
pects have admitted responsi-
bility for the bombing and more
arrests are expected.
One of the suspects is Evelyne
Barge. 32, who was sentenced
in Israel to 14 years' imprison-
ment in 1971 for smuggling ex-
plosives into the country on be-
half of Arab terrorists.
THE OTHER members of a
group known as "The Easter
Commando" admitted at their
trial that they had intended to
bomb several Tel Aviv hotels.
All were released in 1975 on
humanitarian grounds. Since re-
turning to Paris, Ms. Barge is
known to have been active in
leftist and anarchist circles.
AND MEET SOME INTERESTING AMERICANS.
American Savings has a super gift to
help you celebrate the Bicentennial.
It's a set of beautiful placemats with
reproductions of our award-winning
patriotic mosaics on the American Savings
Building. It includes scenes depicting
Betsy Ross, Abe Lincoln, the Flag raising
at Iwojima and the Man on the Moon.
It's yours just for stopping by to say hello.
If you've never been to American
Savings, no problem. Since we have more
offices in South Florida than just about
anyone else in the business, we're probably
right around the corner from you.
Stop by. We can make your Bicentennial
a little more interesting, and your savings
a lot more convenient.
9
~^te
ERICAN SAVINGS
k Ixtan Association of Florida
Miami Beach: Comer of Lincoln & Washington (Main Ofc.): Comer of Lincoln & Alton Rds.; Comer of 71st St. & Colons: 2895 Colons Ave (Tnton Towers)
Bay Harbor Island*: U00 Kane Concourse North Miami Beach: 1899 N.E 163rd St North Miami: 12155 Biscayne Boulevard (Causeway Pfcua)
HalUndak 2500 East Hallandale Beach Boulevard Plantation: 268 S lauderhill: 5581 W Oakland Park Blvd (Main Entrance to Inverrar) ') West Hollywood: 100So. State Road 7 (Comer of Hollywood Blvd. and 441)
Hollywood: 113 So 17th Ave. (East of Young Circle) Margate: 5700 Margate Blvd. (Comer of U.S. 441) / Pompano Beach: 2575 East Atlantic Blvd
IVertieW Beach: Administration Building at Century Village Fort Lauderdale: 3316 N. E 34th Street on the Gait Ocean Mile .-
In Dade Phone 673-5566. In Broward Phone 523-7455. Gifts subject to availability Your Savings Insured to $40,000. FSIX


Page 10-A
vjewisti Hcrtafiatn
Friday, July 2, 1976
**-
<*>;
W
6 Good Reasons to Keep Smiling!
HIGH INTEREST
FOR SAVERS!
Compounded Daily & Paid Monthly
FINANCIAL FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
7%% 8.06
%
ANNUAL
INTEREST
ANNUAL
YIELD
Min. Term: 6 Years Min Amount: $1.000
TA
2
%
7.79
%
ANNUAL
INTEREST
ANNUAL
YIELD
Min. Term: 4 Years Mm. Amount $1.000
e%%
ANNUAL
INTEREST
6.98
%
6V2% 6.72
%

ANNUAL
YIELD
ANNUAL
INTEREST
ANNUAL
YIELD
Min Term: 30 Months Min. Amount: $1.000
Min Term One Year Min Amount $1,000
5%% 5.92
%
ANNUAL
INTEREST
ANNUAL
YIELD
Min. Term: 90-Days Min Amount: $500
A substantial interest penalty is required by law for early
withdrawal from any of these certificates.
PASSBOOK SAVINGS
5!4% 5.39
%
ANNUAL
INTEREST
ANNUAL
YIELD
We make no charge to transfer your savings from anywhere
in the continental USA. to Financial Federal
Ask about:
Direct Deposit Accounts
Dial-Accounts
Saving by Mail
Tax Deferred Retirement Accounts
(Keogh & IRA.)
Mortgage Loans
FINANCIAL
I FEDERAL
YOUR SAVINGS INSURED
TO $40,000
by an agency of the
Federal Government
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION
THE TOWER OF THRIFT FOR ALL SOUTH FLORIDA
FOUNDED 1933
Second Oldest in the USA
ESEE
*


Friday, July 2, 1976
knist tkrkltnr
Page 11-A
Jewish Roots Entwined in Beginnings of Our Nation
Continued from Pane 1-A
in furrows of the Old World
came to flower in the New.
Some Jews came to America
well supplied with this world's
goods and with merchandising
abilities. Others entered Amer-
ican history via the hot, crowd-
ed, stuffy and windowless quar-
ters of steerage accommoda-
tions, their pockets often stuffed
with bread and sausage for sus-
tenance during the long voyage.
SOME JEWS left their Old
World homes of their own free
will. Many more left to save
their lives. Some Jews arrived
in America with business or
educational and religious re-
putations well established.Others
came with noting but pioneer-
ing snirits and determination.
Amid the frontier living condi-
tions of 18th century America,
the Jews were for the most part
preoccupied with the business
of making a living and provid-
ing for their modest synagogues,
their cemeteries and their poor
In the epic panorama of
American Jewish history, good
Jews became good Americans.
In the building of America,
American Jewry contributed far
beyond the significance of its
modest numbers.
VOLUMES not yet written
will be required to record the
enic which saw the fusion of
the Jews of half of Europe's
lands to produce the new ethnic
tvne the "American" Jew
The first and to date the only
rounded-out work of scientific
rnliber describing in detail the
American Jewish unfolding cov-
ers onlv the Colonial vears to
1776. ("The Colonial American
Jew." Professor Jacob Rader
Marcus, 1970. three volumes.)
Professor Marcus' study is the
fruit of years of hewing through
what he describes as "a jungle
Arrival of the first Jewish settlers in America, 23 refu-
gees from Brazil, is captured in the medal by Karen
Worth for the Judaic Heritage Society. The 23 came to
Dutch New Amsterdam in September, 1654.
of fact, half-fact, and enthno-
centric schmoose." Professor
Marcus, who is without doubt
the dean of American Jewish
historians, who is himself part
of American Jewish history, is
now actively at work on the
extension of his definitive Col-
onial-period work.
Anyone who will take the
trouble to look into the day-to-
day lives of the Jews of Amer-
ica since the September 1654
arrival of "the 23" may see two
underlying or overlaying forces
common to the developing
years. One is the pattern of
struggle, struggle for "rights."
beginning with the struggle of
the arriving founding fathers
just to be allowed to remain in
the colony of Dutch New Am-
sterdam. The other "force" is
the strength inherent in the
Jewish heritage enabling the
new Americans to survive as
Jews a strength that has en-
abled the Jewish people to sur-
vive through 4,000 years of war.
dispersion and exile.
IN THEIR first struggles for
"rights," the Jewish "Pilgrim
Fathers" had to fight the me-
dieval-minded Peter Stuyvesant
and his cohorts governing the
colony who sought to deny the !
Jews nearly all rights. One Jew,
Asser Levy, stands out in the
beginning history of the Jews
of America for his dogged per-
sistence in fighting for the right
of a Jew to bear arms with his
fellow colonists in defense of
the town against the Indians
and the consequent special taxa-
tion for the enforced exemp-
tion from service.
Except for the Mexican Mar-
ranos, Levy is considered to
have been the first colonist of
Jewish antecedents to bear arms
for the defense of an organized
community in North America.
Within three years, the Jews
had won the right to trade, own
land and hold services of wor-
ship in private. These rights
were extended under English
rule. By 1740, according to Mar-
cus, the Jew had almost un-
limited economic opportun.ty in
the British Empire as a whole,
as well as in the American
provinces civil equality, of
course, not being political eo.ua 1-
ity, another story.
IN THE struggle for religious
liberty, the Medallic History of
the Jews of America marks the
milestone of the first synagogue
designed and built in continen-
tal North America, 35 feet
square and 21 feet high, con-
secrated on the seventh day of
Passover, April 8, 1730.
The small band of proud
Jews who braved the spiritual
wilderness of Colonial America
had cause for deep and abiding
satisfaction as they plodded
through the ever-present mud
and dust of New York's Mill
Street to their Sabbath morning
services.
THROUGH the ensuing years,
other synagogues took shane in
Emma Lazarus and U.S. Vision
By PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
Detroit Jewish News
|MMA LAZARUS is a name
indelibly recorded in Amer-
ican-Jewish history. "The New
Colossus," which has given her
world fame as a champion of
rights for homeless is engrayed
for all generations on the Statue
of Liberty on Bedloes Island in
New York Harbor.
The basic facts are recorded
and frequently repeated as a
reminder of the eminent poet's
role as an interpreter of Jew-
ish ideals.
She was born in New York
City July 22, 1849. wrote her
first poem when she was 14,
and in 1871 her first book of
verse came off the press.
The year 1971, therefore, mark-
ed the centenary of her emer-
gence as a poet of note whose
writings were commended by
Ralph Waldo Emerson and other
noted American writers.
FIFTEEN years later she was
to become world famous for her
noem "The New Colossus"
which was engraved on the
Statue of Liberty to be read by
millions to this day.
During its Bicentennial, this
nation observes the 104th year
of the appearance on the Amer-
ican scene of the eminent lady
whose verses grace the plaque
of the imperishable statue that
was the creation of Frederic
August Bartholdi and was the
Kift of France to the United
States.
This statue is 50 feet higher
than the Colossus of Rhodes to
which Emma Lazarus referred
in the first line of her famous
poem:
Not like the brazen giant
of Greek jame,
With conquering limbs
astride from land to land,
Here at our sea-washed
Sunset gates shall stand,
A mighty woman, with a
torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning,
and her name
Mother of Exiles .
WHEN HER poem "The New
Colossus" was chosen for the
Bartholdi monument, it was a
bright occasion for the noted
poet who died in her 38th year
Nov. 19, 1887 only one
year after the poem was im-
mortalized on the national
monument, the Statue of Liber-
ty Enlightening the World.
It was on Oct. 28, 1886, that
President G r o v e r Cleveland
formally dedicated the Statue
of Liberty.
Emma Lazarus, one of the un-
forgotten geniuses of American
Jewry, was the daughter of
Moses and Esther Lazarus, Or-
thodox Jews of aristocratic
Portuguese lineage. Raised in
welathy and sheltered surround-
ings, she was educated by pri-
vate tutors and spent her youth
among the well-to-do.
FULLY a decade before Dr.
Theodor Herzl convened the
First World Zionist Congress in
Basle, in 1897, Emma Lazarus'
imagination was fired by the
Palestine idea and she wrote a
series of "Epistles to the He-
brews" in which she outlined a
plan for the repatriation of the
Jews to their ancient homeland.
In prose and in verse she
pleaded for justice to the Jew.
The vigor of her writings and
the sincerity of her pleas gave
notice that a giant advocate had
arisen to defend the rights of
the Jews. In poem after poem,
she counseled a Zion rebuilt,
depicted the tragedy of a ha-
rassed Israel and created word
pictures which, for prophetic
and beautiful expression of the
age-long cry of the Jews, have
seldom been equaled.
The writing of "The New Col-
ossus" was a direct outgrowth
of Emma Lazarus' belated but
passionate concern for the safe-
ty of her fellow Jews. Despite
her delicate health, she spent
many days visiting the haggard
and ragged Jewish immigrants
from Russia and Rumania who
crowded the immigration sta-
tion on War Island in 1881 and
1882.
THOSE WERE the years when
Americans were asked to con-
tribute to the $300,000 fund to
build the pedestal on which the
Statue of Liberty was to stand.
Money was slow in coming.
Many devices were used to
raise the funds.
Constance Gary Harrison was
one of the group of public spirit-
ed women who arranged rum-
mage sales and sold souvenirs
to secure the necessary funds
for that purpose. She was col-
lecting poems, drawings and
stories for publication in a
souvenir book to be sold for the
benefit of the pedestal fund.
Emma Lazarus was not keen to
write for souvenir books and at
first declined Mrs. Harrison's
reauest for a poem.
But when Mrs. Harrison re-
minded Miss Lazarus "of the
Goddess standing on the pedes- ,
tal down yonder in the bay and
holding her torch to those Rus- I
sian refugees of yours whom
vou are so fond of visiting," the
Jewish ooet was galvanized into j
action. "The New Colossus" was j
her contribution to Mrs. Har-
rison's souvenir book and it \
soon became the poem to be j
fastened to the inside of the
base of the Statue of Liberty.
a growing America and a pa-
rade of sturdy religious leaders
who served generations of con-
gregants is permanently record-
ed in the medallic history.
"The stability of Judaism in
America," Henry Samuel Mo-
rais wrote in 1880, "is supreme-
ly due to the endeavors of a
few ministers of foreign birth
who labored with a singleness
of purpose." Theirs were the
skillful hands needed "to weed,
to prune, and to plant anew" in
the "wild, uncultivated plain"
of the communal condition of
the Hebrews in this country.
Eighteenth century Jewish life
as portrayed in the various sub-
jects of the Medallic History of
the Jews of America reveals the
American Jew's prominence in
the world of commerce. Jacob
Franks (1688-1769). and family,
of German and English origin,
has been considered a classic
example of a familv working
closelv together in business, a
situation frequently found in
Colonial and post-Revolutionary
America.
BY THE middle of the cen-
tury. Jacob was considered the
outstanding Jewish merchant in
all North America. Among the
important tidewater merchant
shippers of Newport. New York
and Philadelphia. Newport's
Aaron Lopez was at the height
of his career one of the great-
est Jewish merchant shippers of
the 18th centurv. The pioneer
Jewish merchant of Colonial
America did more than his
share to make life more com-
fortable through the necessities
and luxuries he provided by im-
port, manufacture and distribu-
tion.
T
TV
The New
$50 :
Family Sail
Children under 16.
in same room with
2 adults, on cruises ot
June. July. August.
3 NIGHTS to
NASSAU from MIAMI
$140 loS250 on...
SI55 tO $290 oh .,on
Every Friday Year Round
4 nights'uTfreeport
* NASSAU from MIAMI
$170 to $295 oftHDn
$190 tO $345 on MM,
Every Monday Year Round
plus port iji tervtce
Group rates on request
ON I. C"*S.bu.
B,aa,nton S. ye
T.mpa c'","do Melbourne
Ft M.e. Or>" ,,,.on
Coco. %, **
""'p'oC-W^
uudf"*"
The Deluxe Cruise Ship
to the Bahamas from Miami
Elegance and Luxury in the Grand Manner
You never have had the opportunity to
sail on 3 night and 4 night cruises to the
Bahamas in such splendid style! And. it
is likely that you have seldom seen such
a beautiful ship, specifically designed
for world cruising. For spaciousness, lor
luxury, lor service, for attention, for
magnificent facilities and
accommodations. It's the Monarch Sun!
Super-spacious staterooms, each with
private facilities, phone, music console,
individually controlled air conditioning
(and. 92*\> of rooms are outside
doubles). A magnificent dining room
with superlative continental cuisine and
service. Theater. Lounge. Night Clubs.
5 Bars. 3 Elevators. Swimming Pool.
Duty-Free Shops. Gymnasium, and.
Casino Facilities! Entertainment. Shows.
Revues and world-renowned Cruise
Director and Staff
f mi
SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT mm
milllHMH MUISE LllltS
nirwxiwii
1421 Bricked Avenue. Miami Florida 33131
Intone [305)374-6611
MONARCH CRUISE LINES INC
1438BRICKELL AVENUE
MIAMI FLORIDA 33131
Please tend me brochures and information
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
Mr TRAVEL AGENT IS
it
ZIP


Page 12-A
*Jewisi>ncrXfiat7
Friday, July 2, 1976
Bicentennial Vow:
Let Aged Have
Their Rights Again
By WILLIAM PEIRCE RANDEL
Professor Emeritus
University of Maine
|F CERTAIN human rights are
unalienable, as the Declara-
tion of Independence affirms,
they must, by simple logic, have
existed as far back in time as
the earliest social structure.
Life, liberty, and the pursuit of
hapiness, the examples offered
by the Declaration, are general
enough to meet this logical con-
dition.
But most of the rights that
individuals and groups have
fought for are much more spe-
cific, rising out of changing cir-
cumstance. Until they surface
into awareness, they could just
as well never have existed. Any
given group, however, may hope
that its rights will in time be
recognized as inalienable.
WHAT OF America's older
citizens, a group just beginning
its campaign for rights? For
three centuries its occurred to
nobody that they were being
deprived of their rights, or even
that they had any special rights
to be deprived of.
Few in number and low in
visibility, they accepted life as
it was for them, and were not
considered a distinctive group
with distinctive problems. Only
since 1900. as a result of their
nhenomenal increase in num-
bers and changes produced by
the great social revolution still
in progress, has thai been pos-
sible.
In 1900, only 3 million Amer-
icans, or about 4 percent of the
population, were 65 or older.
Bv 1975 thev numbered a solid
22 million, 10.3 percent of the
total.
THE FORECAST is for this
percentage to increase. Statis-
tically, they have become a
major category in the popula-
PEPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
HAS EVERYTHING FO*
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
*nd Jewish Homes Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
4T7 WMfcteffM Am. 472-7017

7*" w
'(
labbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone 672-730*
4i MICHIGAN AVC, MIAMI BEACH
National Hebrew
isiaeii em corns mc
Bar Mif7v ah Stfl
Keligious Articles Gifts
449 Washington Ave. 532-2210
American Israeli
q All Religious Articlts Q
Kt Synagogues Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
il 1-7722 S. Sthwortx
RELG0, INC.
Religious Goods, Grits,
Books Records
'507 Wash in,tor. A ...
HONE 532-S913
tion and are certain to remain
so.
A category, however, is not
necessarily a group. It becomes
one only when its members are
conscious of common interests
and, more particularly, of dis-
advantages general enough and
pressing enough to need correc-
tive joint action.
One handicap to the consoli-
dation of a genuine old-age
group is that every American
who passes his or her 65th birth-
day, the generally accepted
threshold to old age. is already
a member of several other
erouns and is unlikely to lose
interest in them suddenly just
bv coming a year older. On the
other hand, news reports of
flagrant discrimination against
the elderly, and improving dis-
tribution of information about
aeing encourage active partici-
pation.
THERE IS firm evidence that
the category of older Amer-
icans is well on its way to be-
coming a better organized major
grouD and each year increas-
ingly capable of campaigning
for its rights.
Sooner or later, virtually
every older person, strong or
weak, rich or poor, is a victim
of discrimination. If and when
the 65-and-older group should
decide to draw up a Bill of
Rights, relief from discrimina-
tion and from those mortifying
stereotypes will be conspicuous
among its articles.
Inalienable rights, as suggest-
ed earlier, have practical mean-
ing only as they can be stated
in words. If given the form of
a Bill of Rights, each section
should clearly., and as concisely
as possible, express the right
demanded. For maximum im-
pact, moreover, the rights
should be exclusively the con-
cern of the elderly. To include
rights sought also by other
groups would invite the Ques-
tion of whether older citizens
are a genuine groun with soe-
cial needs all its own.
OUR HYPOTHETICAL Bill of
Rights, again for maximum ef-
fect, should concentrate on
major demands. Scattered
through the ranks of our elderly
are pathetic clusters with parti-
cular handicaps. However, list-
ing the needs of every identi-
fiable sub-group, in co-equal
articles, would distract atten-
tion from what concerns all the
older people.
The 1971 White House Con-
ference on Aging, as summariz-
ed, revealed this fragmenting
tendency: separate deas were
made for Rural Older People.
Asian-American Elderlv. Span-
ish-Sneaking Elderlv. the Aged
in the Marianas Islands, and
several others in demonstrable
need of heln. The inevitable re-
sult was that the audience
couldn't see the forest for the
trees.
The whole is greater than the
sum of its parts, and for a Bill of
Rights intended to swav a Con-
gress, fifty state legislatures,
and the majority of voters pil-
ing fraction on fraction can
onlv invite defeat.
WITH DUE regard to the
danger of diluting emphasis.
and bv firmlv limiting demands
to those matters exclusively the
concrn of older citizens, we
might begin our hypothetical
Bill of Rights bv echoing the
Declaration in a plea for the
right to relief from forms of
discrimination based on age
that diminish the enjoyment of
life, libertv. and the pursuit of
happiness.
A Bond Between America
And the Helpful Gtizen
With Philadelphia's ceremonial moving of
the Liberty Bell to its new quarters a block
from Independence Hall, shortly after midnight
New Year's Day, America embarked on its
year-long Bicentennial celebration.
As this symbol of freedom entered its new
home, the thoughts of Americans everywhere
turned to that July day, 200 years ago, when
a small group of men representing the 13
Fnglish colonies made the momentous decision
to sever the ties that bound them to the mother
country, and declare independence.
THE MILITARY struggle that followed was
long and hard. Patriots fought British regulars
and Hessians with the limited resources at
hand. Other patriots provided money and goods
to the Continental Army, helping to keep it
in the field until victory was won. Thus began
the tradition of voluntary citizen participation
in the affairs of government.
In the two centuries that followed, Amer-
icans time and again came to their nation's
rid, providing money to purchase new terri-
tories and manpower to keep America free.
Today, millions of Americans are helping their
government, and themselves, through the pur-
chase of U.S. Savings Bonds.
Since the introduction of the Series E
Bond in 1941 to help with America's de-
fense and, later, war effort some $170 bil-
lion worth have been sold, most since the end
of the Second World War. Today E Bonds
worth more than $59 billion are outstanding
When H Bonds, introduced in 1952, are in
eluded, the amount of Savings Bonds held by
citizens now exceeds $67 billion.
WHAT DO Savings Bonds do for America
and its citizens? The nation gets a security
that adds stability to debt financing and helps
to reduce inflationary pressures.
Purchasers find Bonds an easy, conve-
nient way to build a savings nest egg, increas-
ing their financial security. And the six per-
cent interest rate, combined with a number of
tax advantages and guaranteed safety for both
principal and interest, make Bonds very at-
tractive in today's market.
54,500 Tons Of Rin!
Tin "Kim >h.p>'< .\K\I\ Vl.l ami
\1\KDI (iKXS. 27.250 gnu* Ions earn,
offer wiu mnrr than ant iilher 7-tla\
Miami-based Caribbean iTuinr ship, we
have more evtinimin|( pool- (e\en in
ili><>r pool,*), inorr louilgrx. inorr -hip-
1.....til activities inorr entertainment
(ilK'luding lo different -lion- each
lliglll). inorr puhln dri k -parr ami the
largest -latrn>om>. The reason we haw1
mi niUl'll .-parr i> lli.il rarh ol llir "fun
tss CARNIVALE, Departs
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St Maarten
And St Thomas
hi| an MM 1 \(. \l\ I.XKl.KK
than an\ other 7 ila* (TIMM* >hip out ol
Miami! W.- aUi iiffrr thr- fin->t Inter-
national anil Vim-man cuiMiie. lull
liamblinfc casinos, tin- muwl popular
|Hiri--ol-i all. ami we re the unlj 7-ilax
fleet ili.ii docks al rverj port
W In n miii think a In nil p>in|! on a
iTuim-, think ol "thr run Ship>". r
oiler inorr liolllirr to thr ounce. More
Inn to thr ton!
tss MARDI GRAS, Departs
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
For information or reservations see your Travel Agent
Carnival Tours, 820 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132
H
Cruise "the Fun Ships"
ks Cain (vale
Ks'MarijGins
each 27.250 gross tons* registered in Panama
$365-$565
per person double occupancy
rates are for base season sailing dates and
arc higher tor certain peak season sailing dates
rrg~B~innnnri^^
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
1735 N.E. 163rd STREET
945-0835


V"
.. ''
Friday, July 2, 1976
* kwist flcrXHan
Page 13-A
Haym Salomon was twice arrested by the British and twice escaped
execution.
Haym Salomon and the Fabric
Of Our Mosaic Tapestry
By RABBI SAMUEL SILVER
AS WE observe the 200th
birthday of our nation, we
recall with pride that Jews and
Judaism played important roles
in the exciting events marking
the birth of our beloved coun-
try. We are proud that Jewish
people and Jewish ideas are still
deeply involved in the continu-
Hans H. Man-use;
Louis Witkin
To assure you of a j
erb social event ;
tar Mitzvah. Wedding
Anniversary Party.
MAMAuMdtocook
forttwhoUdaysr'
Great Kosher-style food
Come to Twelve Tnbes
NE 123rd Street
lust East of Btscayne Brvd
North Miami i
OPEN
NIGHTLY
430 PM
(EXCEPT MONOAYI
893 5600
SCHECHTER'S glatt
CffiBBEM
STRICTLY KOSHER HOTEL
"YOUR HOME
AWAY FROM HOME"
Theraeeetk Whirl reel
Otyaapic Ml* l>i*M
Peel
Privet* Seaey leech Patio
TV I Rod!, la All Imm
Free EatcrtainmcKt A
Porfcis*
Oteonfront Synogeajve
Sugar, Salt A Fa? Free Diets
Fen, Games. lastrectiea
In Oer New Gem* mmi
Crafts Area Far Children
4*1 Week Sessions
_____*WiaMe_
Entire oceanfront block
2 7th to 38th St MIAMI REACH
Phone i30'jib31 0061
. v4.
ous spiritual growth of the
United States.
Although the Jewish popula-
tion was small in Colonial days,
there is no doubt that the pre-
cepts of Judaism were vital
factors in the shaping of our
land.
The Pilgrims deemed them-
selves the successors of the an-
cient Israelites. The ancient Is-
raelites broke away from Egypt-
ian bondage; they broke away
from British bondage. The an-
cient Israelites crossed an un-
known terrain, the desert, to
reach their destination. The Pil-
grims traversed an unknown
expanse, the ocean, to reach
theirs.
The ancient Israelites looked
unon their goal as the Promised
Land. The Pilgrims deemed the
new continent their Promised
Land, their new Canaan.
INTO THE Promised Land
the ancient Israelites planted
the ideals of Moses.
Moses and his ideals were
also the ethical guidelines
adonted bv the Pilgrims here.
As a result, into the very
fabric of America the precepts
of eoualitv and compassion and
ntstic* were stitched. This Mo-
saic tanestrv has become the
stuff of American morality. It
is true that our people, even our
leaders, do not always live up to
the lofty moral mandates upon
which this country rests. But
when deviations do take place,
we recognize that there has
been a shortfall, and we all
know as a people what we
should do and to what stand-
ards we should return.
It has been pointed out that
North America was settled by
people looking for God; South
America was settled by people
primarily looking for gold. The
word. God, and the word, gold,
are almost alike. But there's an
"1" of a difference, and that
vital distinction ?'counts for the
fact that our form of govern-
ment has remained fixed
throughout the 200 years of our
existence, whereas to the South
nations which lacked these
moral underpinnings have ex-
hibited a lamentable degree of
instability.
A NUMBER of patriots sur-
rounded George Washington
when this country staged its
ereat struggle for independence.
The number of Jews in the arm-
<*d services was then, as it has
alwavs been, in a higher ratio
than th<* Jews in the general
nnnulation. And no wonder. The
Jws in the colonies were treat-
ed as eouals. Thev were not

CnUinl Ribiimcil
Seser* isiaa MicitUel.
a Prtstisis
RESERVE NOW
CALL
866-8831
On tit* Ocein
t 67th Street
MiMi Inch,
Fltridi 3)141
TOO WtU FJUOT A KTTsaT
VACATION M MIAMI MACM
MNHI SHUT DATS
M. 23 OCT. S
OAViss teosssBira
2 SUPERLATIVE MEALS DAILY
FREE LUNCHEON SNACK
SUPERVISED DAY CAMP
$18 Per Person Dbl. Occ. to Aug. 31st
given every prerogative, but in
the main they were looked upon
as residents entitled to the
rights of citizenship, without
those disabilities and dertials
which typified the lot of Jews
in the Old Country.
The best-known Colonial hero
of the Jewish faith was Haym
Salomon. Although the early
immigration of Jews to these
shores is often described as a
Senhardic "wave," there were
many Ashkenazic Jews here in
the early days. Salomon was in-
deed an immigrant from Poland
and one of the languages that
he was familiar with was Yid-
dish.
Indeed, Salomon was a lin-
guist, as is often the case with
Jews. In this regard he typified
the stress on cultural attain-
ments which has been part of
the Jewish heritage.
HIS PROWESS as a linguist
served Salomon in good stead
in one episode of his exciting
life. When he was a prisoner
of the British, he was given spe-
cial liberties because he served
as translator.
Salomon was astatute as a fi-
nancier. This skill reflected the
fact that many European Jews,
denied the riaht to own land
Continued on Page 14-A
I ThP ^k^IR CONDITIONED
k sherCrouih
OCfANFRONT
40th to
HOTEL 41sl Streets

RESERVE NOW for the HIGH HOLY DAYS
17*
SUMMER SPECIAL
daily per person double occ
to Sepl 6 132 ol 250 rooms
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
Tennis Facilities Hand Ball Volleyball
Olympic Swimming Pool Entertainment
Full Block ol Private Beach TV in Rooms
Daily Synagogue Services
For Reservations Phone: 53l"5771
Services
Conducted
By Cantor
LEIB RASKIN
Konover Hotel
proudly presents Miami Beach's
Dining & Entertainment Center.
LARISSA
Dancing-S"ig!ng-CoTed
Stw H'reci '">m 'uOa
US " Pmners Irom 7PM y>
Show 9PM
Gourmet Dining & Fdbulous Show
DAVID
IFRAH
ajnta
Show and
dance music
oy
UNIVERSAL
ii mal
|i
First time in
Miami Beach
SWMr
)lncmg &
lanainmani
30 lo I 30
Reservations:
865-1500
Konover Hotel
On the Ocean at 54th Street Miami Beach Florida 33140
Miami s 'avoMe group
The^irst
Impression
No Minimu
No )-
VISIT Om MtfSTXX
smm. famous m
ovt* rm motto-
1ST. 1935
(P^
one of the
largest and
most beautiful
selections at
moderate prices.
only one
studio for
your personal
attention
CLOSED
MONDAYS
UNIQUE FRE FORM 14
AND 18 KARAT FLOWING
GOLD JEWELRY TO PLEASE
YOUR PERSONALITY
Osdit Cards
11630 HE 2 AVE.
NORTH MIAMI
7S7-3145
rCS


Page 14-A
* Jewish flcrkMan
Friday, July 2, 1976
Haym Salomon Recalled
Continued from Page 13-A
and denied the right to join
various occupational guilds in
Europe, took to commerce as a
course of livelihood.
Salomon embodies also the
longtime propensity of the ideal-
istic Jew to give his heart to
his adopted land when that na-
tion needs him. In the Bible we
read about Joseph saving the
country of Egypt. Mordecai
saved the life of the king in
ancient Persia. A cluster of
Spanish Jewish diplomats and
statesmen enriched the life of
Spain before it went inquisitor-
ial. Disraeli put England on a
larger man.
SALOMON naturally gravitat-
ed towards the support of the
colonies yearning to breathe
free. He fought bravely on the
side of the freedom-seekers. He
also gave this nation, in its
critical accouchement, the art of
financing. He was able to secure
loans for the infant nation in a
manner emulated by few others.
He was praised by Secretary
of the Treasury Robert Morris
as a man who refused to profit
from his skill as a fiscal magic-
ian. Love of country was great-
er in him than love of lucre.
It is for these reasons that
Haym Salomon is the perfect
prototype of the Jew who senses
the synchronization of a dem-
ocratic land and Hebrew ideal-
ism. He risked his life for his
country. He scorned the tempta-
tion of profiteering. He aided the
good cause over and beyond the
call of elementary duty. He was
a model to all of us of selfless
devotion to glistening causes.
Much has been written about
the question of whether this na-
tion displayed adequate gratit-
ude to the man who helped
underwrite the costs of our Re-
volution, whether his heirs have
been DroDerly recompensed.
THERE IS little doubt, how-
ever, that we cannot adequately
reDav Haym Salomon or his
memory for what he did to as-
su.re the preservation of the life
of our land when it was frail
and ready to topple into the out-
srretched hands of predatory
imperialisms which were ready
to abort it.
The two names of our great
patriot are of immense signi-
ficance. His first name has vir-
tually become an English word.
Haym means life. If our nation
was able to take on life after its
precarious birth it is as much
due to Haym. the man whose
name means life, as to virtually
everyone else. And if we are to
add life to the luster of Haym
Salomon we are called upon to
build him monuments of mitz-
vot. sacrificial deeds which will
testify to his enduring imprint
unon us.
And, incidentally we now
learn that the grave of this man
of life has no marker on it
there in the Philadelphia place
if interment. It would be well
that Jews, as part of the Bicen-
tennial observance, would as-
sure the placing of a tombstone
over the grave of this shining
exemplar of dedication to noble
purposes.
And it would be a fine idea
if every community in the U.S.
were to erect a statue to Haym
Salomon. The Haym Salomon
Foundations, 1855 W. Main St.,
Alhambra. Calif. 91801. will be
pleased to support such an en-
terprise and provide us with
additional data about the "little
banker on Market Street.'*
THE OTHER name of the man
we glorify is Salomon, which is
a variant of the Hebrew word.
Shalom. If there is anything
Haym Salomon yearned for it
was peace. Valorous in warfare,
as was his leader, George Wash-
ington, what he really dreamed
of was a world which would
bring to fruition the vision of
the prophet Isaiah. We know
that we are a long way from
peace. It is true that in 1976,
we have no international wars
rWWVVWWMMVVWVWVVVMM
DISCOVER ftr
tMifkt-b-M ItaKai taste
whti it's RIGHT.'
REAL ITALIAN RESTAUI
lit GiraMa. Cerel GaMeaeMMM
TWO BLOCKS NORTH OF MIRACLE MILEI
N4Cn*Cf*Mn
SmptfrM* LmHmm Specials Maaeay Uara PrMey U:S0-2
ALL DINNERS UNDER It SEVEN DAYS A WEES fr-M P.M.
ROYAL HUNGARIAN HBRESTAURANT
Re-Opening For The Summer Season
JULY 2nd AT 4 P.M.
ATTRACTIVE SUMMER RATES
SHARE PLAN AND NO-FRILL DINNERS
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
in a wnil*
Restaurant
,
rASHINOTON AVIMilB
MIAMI MACH J1-3t*7
The New Land Gardens
THE GARDENS YOU CALL HOME
1 Bedroom 1 V, Berth From l29,000
2 Bedroom 2 Bom From '36,500
AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
The Gardens Have
Everything Plus
N'^AYtUN16750 N.E. 10th Av.nu.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
TELEPHONE (303) 652-B4Q3
raging, but civil wars abound.
We must also strive to do
tions taken by the United Na-
tions that the valiant freedom
fighters of Israel are still not
adequately appreciated, and
that we are a long way from
peace in the land whose ideals
inspired both our nation and its
founders. But we must not des-
pair. As Haym Salomon kept his
morale high even when he was
a prisoner of the enemy, so we
must keep our morale high
while peace is a prisoner of
international misunderstanding.
We must also striving to do
what Salomon did: make our na-
tion the instrument of benefi-
cence and democracy and their
supporter in the family of na-
tions.
HERE IS a piquancy which
we might dwell on Although
we are celebrating the 200th
bithday of our country, we are
not celebrating the 200th birth-
day of our present form of gov-
ernment. 1776 marked the year
when we broke away from
England and decided, like the
Maccabees of old, that we would
rather die on our feet than live
on our knees. Then there inter-
vened a period known as the
time of the Confederac\
foundered a bit. staged ;i con
stitutional convention, adopted
a Constitution and then ir
George Washington was ii
ed as our first president
our Present form of governi
mu formally instituted.
Now. my friends, if you
tract 1776 from 1789, you
realize that our country didn't
reallv get started until ii
bar mit/vahed.
May it continue to mat
Protest Soviet Restrictions
On Packages from Abroad
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Greater New York Conference
on Soviet Jewry has mailed 30
packages to the Soviet Union
for families of Jewish Prison
ers of Conscience." The act
came as a group of Congress-
men and other public officials
held a press conference on the
steps of New York City's Main
Post Office to protest new So
viet restrictions going into ef-
fect in the Soviet Union on the
size and value of parcels being
sent Into the I'SSR.
Eugene Gold, chairman of the
GNYCSJ, said the new restric-
tions are designed to further
harass Soviet Jews and others
who have been denied
after applying for exit vi
REP. JAMES Scheuer D
N Y ) said that the action
violation of the Helsinki
ment
He and other Congressmen
slid thev would seek legii
action. Richard Ro
Republican State Chairman
the New York Republican Com-
mittee has asked Sec I
State Henrv A. Kissing*
n i-urv Secretary Williari
mon to intrevene.
The new regulation will in-
crease the duties on some
- bv 'in to 200 perc.
lHE.\ YOU'VE GOT IT
FLAI'KT IT!
Red Snapper Romano
Saor ilu- finest fresh fi-li in f%.
Florida, ouutoed the Ituliun / v^ .
w.i\ uith fn-li \i^il.d>l>- V^ y^
tut. enjoy X- Exiterieneel 1J/
Gr&tMtf
M
y
Touch Our Menu
it Exritea ^ on !
At iht Sheraton Btach i4in
RFSTAURANT ft LOUNGE tn0 Co"'n. Ml""
f Pit PARKING Tl: S32-2S7S
***#
Off* DAHY LUNCHEON UiMm.-J -
DfNNfffliMtafaJB.
SHALOM
IB
|EMIASSY RESTAURANT
1417 WASHINGTON AVf. 5317550
:a*iPiJMi**TAffi
WINl
WITH OINNIK
on
ftlOMTft m PMNOTryi
ABRA KOSHER
RESTAURANT
Dir*t from
SABRA KOSHER RESTAURANT
IN CHICAGO
UNDER SUPERVISION "oV '
I AABBI ABRAHAMJACOBSON.
I___ 'NAI ZION SYNAGOQUE
KlttHtR
OKN DALY
I P.M.
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH 531-6739 531-6730
H & M STEIN DELI & RESTAURANT
1141 WASHINGTON AVI 534-2557
OPEN EVERY DAY 11 AM to 8:30 P.M.
CLOSED 1 HOUP BEFORE SUNDOWN FRIDAY
CLOSED All DAY SATURDAY
Feel Good. Dine in a Traditional Strictly
Shabos Atmosphere
Finest Jewish Home Cooked food
Prepared by No/on Stern
1tt?3


JFriday, July 2, 1976
+ k*ist fJkxkMnn
Page. 15-A
LEO MINDLIN
In COSGRESS. )vly 4. //*
Xi?fie imam mcuJ^cf fa ration **** ,*L5tate$ of^Xnwrtta.
u.
_^-7/..*./.-4^.aaa-'*-*/*- -*-+ -2*
/A --
j_ ..-,*/..,!.-.* / ,./* ~- ,*. .. *. .w. ._,.**.. ./. i_b_-4W .* .. 'T* yT T- "
/i_y^ 4b H+m&mf. -.-***,4. --------------- /A ~/4fc,4*<4*i|.U.4W/-~~.~->V~ ***/'-S'f*"
..~4.. ...-.;-*. 4U44. 4W,_r 4V-.. 4>' /-..* --A^-_,^^^t_ Jt1 4> U. 4W I^A f. J- ,mM4S.~yM- *"1
. ..-,*-,------/- C ~^^^| V-^,4v-V ..-*.*-b-U^ ..-> 4 .'-
-'At*?-
........

*_b- 4 ,.'X4^/4b i'~
__ ^" 11 1 f'U ,*^4
4,44. -4< V*' .4W -t/..- ". V /./* y 4* --4**. -4* V ^- ^J. J .4 4 / *4^ *- /- JU+M 4^- '- ^
Once we give up our self-governance by ignorant default, anyone with the power to
answer the question will be able to answer it any way he wishes.
The Statue of Religious Liberty in Philadelphia's Fair-
mount Park, sculpted by the celebrated Moses Ezekiel
and presented 100 years ago by B'nai B'rith as a gift
to the American people during the Nation's Centennial,
was dedicated May 16 in a public Bicentennial observ-
ance when B'nai B'rith leaders assembled in Philadel-
phia for a meeting of the organization's Administrative
Committee.
W.Bank
Terrorism
Seen Over
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Police Minister Shlomo Hillel
said that he believes the wave
of unrest on the West Bank and
East Jerusalem is over. Security
forces have the situation well in
hand and are prepared for any
new attempts to incite to riot.
Hillel said on a radio interview.
He rejected proposals that se-
curity forces simply stay out of
Arab population centers and
ignore strikes and school clos-
ings in order to avoid clashes.
"If we adopt such a policy we
shall lose control of the situa-
tion," the Police Minister said,
adding that.Israel was not Le-
banon where law and order has
broken down.
THE WEST Bank and East
Jerusalem were quiet over the
weekend except for scattered
incidents that were promptly
dealt with by police The Mili-
tary Government lifted the
week-long curfews in most
towns where local officials
promised to maintain public or-
der.
The mayors of Ramallah and
Nablus met with Military Gov-
ernment officials over the week-
end. About 200 Arab youths
demonstrated in Nablus, a day
after the curfew was lifted in
the Casba (market) area. They
were dispersed by security
forces. A oolice ieep was stoned
and one Arab policeman was
sliehtlv iniured.
Groups of vouths attempted
to organize demonstrations in
Ramallah and El Bireh imme-
diately after the curfew was
lifted.
THEY ERECTED road blocks
and burned tires but eventual-
ly dispersed. A truck owned bv
Abd A-Nur Janho. a former
mqvorql candidate in Ramallah
who is being held on suspicion
of murder, was set on fire ves-
terdav. No incidents were re-
ported in East Jerusalem.
Defense Minister Shimon Pe-
res told an audirnce of army
officers over the weekend that
Israeli forces dealina with dis-
turbances on the wqt Bank
had demonstrated *"gh level
of self-discipline in fam of gross
provocation.
July 4 Riddle:
Will Indifferent
America Survive?
Continued from Page 4-A
seauistic basis in their behalf
should representatives for one
reason of another (selfishness,
greed, arrogant pursuit of per-
sonal power) be inclined to do
otherwise.
On this Bicentennial occa-
sion, it seems to me that the
Jefferson-Hamilton struggle is
far from being resolved, al-
though it is a tribute to Thomas
Jefferson that we have surviv-
ed as a nation for so long.
Still, there are signs that
Hamilton may yet have his day.
I am not talking about the ob-
vious corruption that has seized
the soul of our self-governance.
I AM talking about ignor-
ance the populist ignorance
that made Socrates and Plato
and Aristotle conclude that
democracy is the worst form of
government, only one step
away from anarchy.
I am talking about the fact
that, as a nation, we may be
better informed than our fore-
fathers and those who, more re-
cently, came before us. But we
are far more ignorant. More
illiterate. And, what is worse,
indifferent to this ignorance,
this illiteracy.
I am obsessed, for example,
by the recent story out of Clear-
water that of 15 Pinellas Coun-
ty applicants for teaching posts,
four failed to do better in their
qualifying examinations than
three-fourths of the eighth-
grade students they would be
instructing if they were hired.
I AM obsessed by the reac-
tion to this of Dr. Thomas
Tocco, assistant county super-
intendent for research, evalua-
tion and planning, who declar-
ed somewhat agonizingly, "Col-
leges of education are turning
out candidates who basically
n od to be retrained when they
reach the school system .
The colleges of education do
not screen out people who are
almost functionally illiterate.
They need to clamp down and
become more stringent."
What Tocco was saying was
that the national process for
training school teachers, with
its absurd emphasis on educa-
tion courses (how to teach)
rather than on content 'arts
and science what to teach)
has given us a pool of ignorant
instructors trained to "manage"
classrooms and students with
mumbo-jumbo "strategies," but
not to enlighten them.
EVEN ON the basis of Toc-
co's own standards for Pinel-
las county eighth grade, where
"On the reading test (for job
applicants) we set the standard
at the 75 percentile level, mean-
ing incoming teachers would
have to score better than three-
fourths of the eighth graders,"
what an abysmal future we
must look forward to a fu-
ture of eighth grade teachers
three-fourths of whom are
themselves little better than
eighth graders.
If the relationship between
self-governance and enlighten-
ment is not instantly apparent
here, then consider the ques-
tion of political ignorance, in-
deed bigotry, in a recent issue
of "The Florida Professional
Educator" in which a blatantly
anti-Semitic column touts the
concept of "aryanism" as a fun-
damental requirement for a
candidate in Florida's upcom-
ing gubernatorial campaign.
WHAT BETTER can one ex-
pect from educators whose
standards are reflected in Dr.
Tocco's dismay? And, incident-
ally, in his own shockingly low-
requirements for teaching ap
plicants.
Yes. Hamilton may yet have
his day And then the question
will be what he meant by eli-
tist government. Once we give
up our self-governance by ig-
norant default, anyone with the
power to answer the question
will be able to answer it any
way he wishes.
Rabin Meets With
Supporters of New
Palestinian State
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin met
for two hours with a group of Israelis advocating recogni-
tion of a Palestinian state provided that such an entity recog-
nized Israel.
The group, known as the "Public Council for an Is-
rael-Palestine Peace," was founded several months ago and
includes a number of leading personalities with left-leaning
or "doveish" views. No details of the meeting were dis-
closed.
VIEWS WERE said to have been exchanged on the
situation in Lebanon, in the administered territories and
on Israel's Arab population and options for peace. Little
agreement was reported between Rabin and his visitors.
The latter included Eliyahu Elyashar, former chair-
man of the Sephardi Federation in Israel; Uri Avneri, edi-
tor of the weekly "Haolam Hazeh" and a former Knesset
member; MKs Arye Eliav and Meir Payil; Res. Gen. Matit-
yahu Peled; writer David Shaham; and Yaacov Arnon,
former director general of the Finance Ministry and pres-
ently chairman of the board of the National Electric Co.


Page 16-A
+Je*ist> rkrkMar
Friday, July 2, 1975
NORTON TIRE COMPANY
*1 IN THE MARKET
Why? Because we honestly seek to give each
and every customer the very best product at
the very best price. We strive to give you the
finest service possible, everytime. And if that
isn't enough, we stand behind every new tire
we sell. You've got to be satisfied or you'll
get your money back. This letter, from one of
our customers, only serves to convey our
company's attitude toward all who do business
with us. At Norton Tire Company you are the
important one.
r*om tmi or.K or Hay f f o,76
President
Norton Tire Company
Dear Sir;
Having done business with U ~
M my memory prevail I th,." .""' fr as 'nq
'ft I expressed a houaht or '' S.'n9 *
"' your organization.9 tW about V dealings
thriug'hilt'th1: y^V, tLSZS*""*' "-e
warranties of the manuScJu St00d beh'"nd the
you offer. But even I 6rs and rvlcm Xvh

WE CARRY
ONLY THE VERY
FINEST PRODUCTS
FOR YOUR CAR
BEGoodrich
1
I
r
1
STEEL BELTED RADIAL WHITEWALLS
BUY 3 & Get the 4th Tire FREE
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
I.R.I.
ALL STEEL RADIAL
THE 50,000 MILE TIRE
Plus our own line
of specially priced
private label
tires offering you
excellent service
at the lowest price.
SIZE PRICE PER TIRE PRICE SET OF 3 4th TIRE
BR 78-13 50.99 152.97 FREE
DR 78-14 54.77 164.31 FREE
ER 78-14 57.33 171.99 FREE
FR 78-14 60.09 180.27 FREE
GR 78-14 61.13 183.39 FREE
HR 78-14 67.41 202.23 FREE
GR 78-15 63.89 191.67 FREE
HR 78-15 68.31 204.93 FREE
JR 78-15 70.05 210.15 FREE
LR 78-15 72.83 218.49 FREE
All Prices Plus F.E. Tax 2.11 to 3.47 per tire.
NORTON TIRE CO's. LIMITED WARRANTY
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
If for any reason you are not completely satisfied with
any new passenger car tire you buy from Norton Tire
Co.. return it. along with your original invoice, within
90 dajrs of the date of purchase, and your money will be
refunded in full no questions asked' Commercial ve-
hicles excluded
>
EXPERTLY TRAINED
STAFF OF
MECHANICS
FOR YOUR CAR CARE
WHEEL BALANCE
ALIGNMENT
BRAKES
STEERING
BATTERY
BRAKE SPECIAL
FOR DISC BRAKES
Install new Delco
(not rebuilt) front wheel
disc pads
Check rotors & calipers
Repack outer front wheel
bearings (if needed)
Adjust and bleed brakes
(if needed)
Add brake fluid (if needed)
Check & Adjust rear brakes
COMPACT 4 INTERMEDIATE CARS
29
95
LUXURY CARS
$34.95
BUDGET TERMS
AVAILABLE
WE HONOR:
MASTER CHARGE
BANKAMERICARD
AMERICAN EXPRESS
OINERS CLUB
SHOPPERS CHARGE
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W 27th Ava. 634-1556
CORAL QABLEI
Bird A Douglas Road 446-6101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N W. 7th Ava 681-6541
N MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 045-7464
MIA** BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
BOOTH DAOC
9001 8. Otab) Hwy. 667-7575
HULEAH/FALM SRRINQB MILE
1275 49th St. 622-250C
CUTLER RtOOE
2O3B0 8 OtataHwy 233-6241
WEST MIAMI
Bird 6 Galloway Rd 552-6656
HOMEBTEAD
30100 S Fadaral Hwy. 247-1622
W.HOLLYWOOD
497 S Stata Rd 7 967-0450
FT LAUDCROALE
1740 E Sunriaa Blvd 463-7566
PLANTATION
381 N. State Rd. 1 567-2166
OMTAMO BEACH
3151 N Fadaral Hwy. 943-4200
WEBT PALM BEACH
515 Sooth Dixla 632-3044
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Laka Blvd. 648-2544
FT. FIERCE
2604 South 4th SI 464-6020
VERO BEACH
755 21M8trMt 567-1174
3620 E Colonial Or. SS6-1141
WINTER PARK
861 S. Orlando Ava. 646-5308
DA YTONA BEACH
907 Votuala Ava 296-7467
2065 E Tamlaml Tr 774-4443


TEMPLE BETH AM BICENTENNIAL TIME LINE MURAL. MADE BY HARDWORKING CHILDREN
Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, July 2, 1976
Section B
ockeying for Power Around
\Rabin Makes New Problems
By TUVIA MENDELSON
and YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
obviously well-intentioned at-
tempt by a group of Labor Party
MKs to encourage Premier Yitz-
lak Rabin at a time when he
las come under severe criticism
from within the Labor Align-
ment appeared to have created
new source of friction in La-
bor ranks.
Rabin may have been grati-
fied by expressions of support
ind well wishes from the 14
MKs who visited his Tel Aviv
affice last week.
BUT HE cannot be pleased
sy the repercussions of that vis-
lit. which, according to many ob-
Iservers, only served to under-
line the precarious position of
|the Premier in his own party.
The visit was initiated by Ms.
)rah Namir who said she felt it
vas necessary for Laborites to
express confidence in the Pre-
lier even though many of them
disagree with some of the gov-
ernment's Dolicies.
The delegation she recruited
lor the purpose was hardly a
band of unswerving loyalists
IT INCLUDED veteran Labor
[leader Yitzhak Ben Aharon, who
fas a thorn in the side of both
|former Premier Golda Meir and
*abin. It also included the new-
est "enfant terrible" of Labor's
Knesset faction, Yossi Sarid, who
lonly last week submitted a mo-
|tion to the Knesset criticizing
the government for deporting
two West Bank Arab leaders on
[the eve of registration for the
]West Bank municipal elections.
Ben Aharon, for his part, has
demanded an explanation from
[Rabin for the violence that
[erupted in Arab towns and vil-
lages in Israel last Tuesday
an event for which no Israelis
Iseem to have a satisfactory ex-
planation.
Nevertheless, both Sarid and
[Ben Aharon reportedly assured
Rabin that their desire to bring
I these issues into the open did
[not imply lack of support.
THEY WISHED him well in
continuing to carry out his pol-
icies. Ben Aharon was quoted
as telling the Premier, "We
came here to tell you to be
strong. I am convinced that the
party has no better people than
vou to lead the nation. I am
sure that the decision to ap-
point you two years ago was the
right one then and is right to
this day,"
However, some top level La-
bor Party leaders expressed
criticism of the "support initia-
tive." They wanted to know, for
one thing, who decided who
would be invited Israel Karg-
man, a veteran of Labor's Ma-
pai faction, suggested that "peo-
Dle will think" that the party
members who did not visit Ra-
bin do not support him.
Mordechai Ben Porat, of La-
bor's Rafi wing, said he was not
sorry to be among the uninvited
because the meeting was "un-
important."
HE SAID he could understand
that Labor MKs would support
their party's leader but won-
dered why it was necessary for
a delegation to visit the Pre-
mier simply to express their
support
Other party figures were also
skeptical of the need for a pub-
lic demonstration of support for
Rabin. Some claimed the par-
ticipants in the meeting were
"very carefully chosen."
Ms. Namir's response to the
critics was not calculated to en-
hance Rabin's prestige as a
leader. She was quoted as say-
ing that the Premier was "un-
justly" attacked on issues
"which everybody knew he was
not conversant with when he
was elected."
SHE ALSO observed that when
Rabin was elevated to the Pre-
miership "he had little or no"
party background" and "prac-
tically" no parliamentary ex-
perience.
"But we did vote for him and
we believe he is doing pretty
well under the circumstances,"
she said. One wag observed that
with such compliments Rabin's
critics could afford to remain
silent.
New Harassments
By Soviets Told
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Hard-
ships, harassment and delay
continue to be the lot of Soviet
Jews applying for emigration
visas according to the latest in-
formation reaching here from
the Soviet Union.
In Kishinev, where newspa-
pers have carried anti-Zionist
and anti-Semitic articles in re-
cent weeks, applicants who were
granted visas have been forced
to evacuate their apartments
one month before their sched-
uled departure for Israel.
FOR THE past six months, the
family reunion invitations from
Israel which the Soviet author-
ities require before they will
even consider a visa applica-
tion, have not been getting
through to Jews in Kishinev.
The same situation prevails
in Kiev. In the latter city, a
scientific seminar run by "re-
fusniks" was harassed by pol-
ice. The last one was held in a
park after two Jewish scientists
who oame from Moscow to lec-
ture were physically ejected
from the city.
In Moscow, the 100th session
of a seminar on "mathematical
application to medicine" was
held, however, at the apartment
of Prof. Alexander Lerner.
JEWISH sources reported that
Boris Shtern, a member of the
Continued on Page 12-B
Bicentennial Events
Sparked by Youth
At Beth Am
Suzy's grandfather was tailor to the Czar; in 1754
Danny's family migrated to Philadelphia, where one mem-
ber became an original member of the Daughters of the
American Revolution; Jon's grandfather traveled the Phila-
delphia area in a horse and buggy, selling merchandise;
Shelly's ancestor was a suffragette leader; Susan's Grand-
pa Nathan was a casketmaker.
These were .some of the fascinating bits of family his-
tory the fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade students of Temple
Beth Am Day School discovered in researching the emi-
gration of their ancestors to the United States.
The children spent many hours sitting at their grand-
parents' knees or listening on the telephone to the tales
of life in the Old Country and of the early years in Amer-
ica. The information they gathered was compiled to form
a minihistory of Jewish immigration.
Most of their ancestors came from Russia, Poland
and Austria, but there were a few from Spain, Latvia and
Ireland, and one had stopped en route in Japan. The
majority arrived between 1885 and 1910, the earliest com-
ing in 1754 and few after 1915. Emigration was influenced
by war and famine and by the spread of anti-Semitism,
which lessened after the early 1900's.
Using this information the students have fashioned
a 30-foot Bicentennial Time Line mural on the walls of
the Temple Beth Am library, commemorating the history
of their Jewish ancestors' arrival here. Each child is repre-
sented on the mural's ocean by a ship bearing the name,
date of arrival, port of entry and country of his relative
who came the greatest distance.
Maps, copies of documents, illustrations, photos and
books pertinent to the immigration period appear in a
companion display provided by librarian Margot Berman.
The mural will be on display at the Beth Am library
throughout the summer.
ft ft ft
A highlight of the Bicentennial observance by South
Florida's Jewish community is scheduled for the 200th
anniversary of the adoption (not reading) of the Declara-
tion of Independence.
Jewish Patriot's Day will be celebrated at the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy this morning at 10 at an observ-
ance honoring Jewish patriots of the Revolution, the War
of 1812, the Civil War and America's first two centuries.
Hebrew Academy students attending summer day
camp plan a song-and-dance program depicting the peo-
ple who have helped make this country great. All of the
school's art, music and drama teachers are involved in
this production, and former Miami Beach Mayor Harold
Shapiro and his daughter, Remma, an Academy student,
will present a skit spotlighting the role of Haym Salomon
in financing the Revolution.
Maurice Weinman, national executive committeeman
Continued on Page 12-B


m
Page 2-B
*Jenisl>flcri(iSa/n
Friday, July 2, 1976 ?
MORTON SILBERMAN
RICHARD LEVY
Federation Gets Housing Fund O.K.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's application
for construction of 100 units of housing and accompanying
supportive services to Greater Miami's elderly through a
$2.3 million loan made available under Section 202 of the
Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 has
been approved, it was announced by Federation president
Morton Silberman.
Federation was one of 132 ap-
plicants approved nationally
from among some 1.500 re-
quests. Under this federal Hous-
ing and Urban Development
(HUD) program, Federation
and its family of local agencies
will provide a blend of housing,
social, health and recreational
services, meal services, house-
keeping assistance, educational
and cultural programming, tele-
phone reassurance, escorts,
shopping and transportation
services, sheltered employment,
and personal counseling to resi-
dents of the apartment house.
The sen-ices, except housing,
are already available.
"The availability of Federa-
tion-sponsored housing for the
elderlv will be of great benefit
to those seniors who are on a
fixed income and are isolated
and lonely." said Richard Levy.
chairman of Federation's Cen-
tral Commission on the Elderly.
Beth David School Holds Graduation
Beth David Solomon Schech-
ter Day Schools Early Child-
hood Division graduated 12
kindergarten children on June
11. They are Ahron Berney, Hi-
larie Brown, Kevin Fine. Jill
Heim>witz. MerrtB-David Hi-
ger. Jay Jacobs, Pamela Min-
kes, Adam Perets. Caren Ridge,
Eric Schwarz, David Shtrax and
Tiffany Vileno. Seven of the
children will enter the primary
section in the fall.
At the Elementary Division
graduation on June 9 Rabbi Sol
Landau presented diplomas to
Theodore Davis and Robert
Minkes. The entire school par-
ticipated in a musicale illustrat-
ing the scope of the 1975-76
music curriculum. Special rec-
ognition was given to students
and teachers for achievement
throughout the year.
A plaque presented to the
school by Mrs. Audrey Dilla-
man. director, to honor each
graduating class will be placed
in the new expanded facilities
at Beth David-South.
Registrations are being ac-
cented for the Early Childhood,
ages 2 to 5. and the Elementary
Divisions, grades 1 to 6.
K Q E
I E T
E A H
T R A
R J N
I H A
Q Z N
PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
MITEPOHSVBHAV
CAKKCSJPIERGA
LTBCVUITJB
NELCMITBBSA
EDSWHKNLLS
SMWAPDEAOV
HXSXMQBEU A
GDNABTDETN
AEOYAEORPE
RNYKEMZTMGTPP
EVKORAHQTHGZCP
EUWaZPPrGAPYE
HDMPDEVARIMEW
Listed below and hidden in this puzzle are the 10
weekly Torah portions from July 3 through September
4. They are placed horizontally, vertically, diagonally,
forward and backward. How many can you find?
KORAH VAETHANAN
HUKKAT-BALIK EKEV
PINHAS RE'EH
MATTOT-MASE SHOFETIM
DEVARIM KEE TETZE
All rights reserved.
Miller to Aid Bank Purchase
^vohk-^L Of Israel Bonds
NEW YORK Edith J. Mil-
ler has been named assistant to
the president. Rabbi Alexander
M. Schindler, of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, the representative body
of 720 Reform synagogues in
the United States and Canada,
serving 1.1 million people.
In her post. Miss Miller will
continue to administer the of-
fice of the president, serve as
liaison between it and such
groups as UAHC lay leaders,
staff, and Reform rabbis. Jew-
ish organizations, and other re-
ligious, civic and government
acencies dealing with the
UAHC.
In addition, she will partici-
pate in the decision making
nrocess affecting the shaping of
nrograms and policies of the
UAHC
Montessori At
Torah Academy
The Torah Academy of South
Florida has established the
Southeast's first nursery-kinder-
garten to incorporate a Montes-
sori program into a Hebrew
day school curriculum.
The pilot project will be in-
augurated this September with
a planned enrollment of 25 chil-
dren. Early childhood exposure
to Jewish religious and tradi-
tion will be stressed and special
attention will be given to mu-
sical and artistic creativity.
Integrated into the curricu-
lum will be a project of reading
preparedness in modern He-
brew, utilizing classic Montes-
sori methods and materials. A
newlv renovated and redesigned
open classroom is being pre-
pared to accommodate the pro-
gram.
The Torah Academy of South
Florida, nurserv through sec-
ond grade, is the onlv North
Oade day school certified by
Torah Umesorah. the National
Societv for Hebrew Day Schools
Registration for the nursery-
kindergarten and grades 1 and
2 is open. For details, call the
school office.
Friedman of USA
Is Emanu-EI Guest
Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Southeast regional director of
the United Synagogue of Amer-
ica, will be guest speaker on
Splurdav morning nt Temple
Emanu-EI. His topic is "The
Price of Jealousy."
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
TEACHERS
for 3rd, 7th A 9th Grade*.
We also need a Music Teacher
Temple Beth El (of Hollywood)
Call 944-7773
A wider area for the sale of
Israel Bonds in Florida was
opened up this week when Gov.
Reubin Askew signed a bill per-
mitting state commercial and
savings banks to purchase State
of Israel Bonds. Up to now, only
national banks in Florida could
invest in Israel Bonds.
The new law was enacted
only a week after Gov. Hugh
Carev of New York had signed
a similar bill allowing savings
banks, savings and loan asso-
ciations, and credit unions in
his state to add Israel Bonds to
their investment portfolios.
Nineteen other states and the
District of Columbia have also
passed legislation enabling sav-
ings banks to buy Israel Bonds.
STATE SEN. Jack Gordon of
Miami Beach played a decisive
role in the successful handling
of the new Florida law. Other
officials whose cooperation was
helpful were Paul Steinberg of
the Florida House of Repre-
sentatives and State Comptroll-
er Gerald A. Lewis.
Shepard Broad. Florida State
chairman for Banking Institu-
tions of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization and honorarv chairman
of the board of the American
Savings and Loan Association
in South Florida, and Rabbi
Leon Kronish. of Miami Beach
chairman of the Israel Bond
National Rabbinic Cabinet, wel-
comed the new law as a dem-
onstration of popular support
for Israel in Florida and hailed
it as an opportunity to enlist
wider economic aid at a time
of serious financial difficult!
for the Jewish State.
JCC Featuns
Teen INights
A special Saturday Night
Summer Teen Program is under
way at the new Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Cen-
ter.
According to dentist Arnold
Sheir. Teen Advisory chairman.
each Saturday night features
a different coffee house pro-
gram with dances, entertain-
ment and various activities The
programs will begin at 8:45 p.m.
Saturday, July 3. will be
"Games Night." For tickets and
additional information, call Lar-
ry Herring at the JCC Teen
Department.
lei
bl
Ti
.01
Bright Item Package!
BOLOGNA

Corned Beef,
Pastrami, Salami
Bologna, Tongue
Knockwurst and
Frankfurters.
KZ
KOSHER ZiON
SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
S51I North Ked/e Avenue Chicago. Illinois 60625
Pnore (312) 738-220S
^Dir^ing Ita|iai\jsty|e is as
easyas^Uef l\e[p fron| Chef fety
y
BoMFdegj
Macaroni
Shells
J" TOMATO SAUCt
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee*
to cook for you when
you want to serve a real
treat! For lunch, a light bite or as a
side dish with dinner. Anytime at all.
the Chef's Shells in Tomato Sauce are
truly a macaroni mechayeh! They're
bite-sized, made of firm, tender
macaroni and come in the Chef's own
savory tomato sauce. All you do,
is heat and eat'Nice and easy
Nutritious and economical Next time
you want to dine Italian-style,
try Shells in Tomato Sauce from
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee!
fr.
ni
at
Attention Organizations!!!
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION NEED $$$. .
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DO FUND RAISING??
We have a variety of plans that will not only
raise funds but serve as splendid
MORALE BUILDERS!
Write MHS c/o Jewish Floridian Box 01 2973, Miami, Florida 33101
One name of organization and number of members,
how long in existence.


v. July 2, 1976
* Jewish BlXiMMt
Page 3-B
FEDERATION INMATIVt PAYS Off
[illel Foundations Will Serve Campuses
So. Dade Hebrew Academy Students
Are Recognized for Excellence
. Greater Miami Jewish
-ration's initiative in gath-
L together representatives
Florida's nine federated Jew-
[communities culminated re-
llv with the formation of a
Ehanism for providing Jew-
programmirig for college
Bents on all major Florida
pPuses- ._ ,11
fhe body is known as the Hii-
I Foundations of Florida. Its
Ird of directors includes rep-
entatives from the Miami
Icration as well as the Jew-
I Federations of Greater Fort
Jerdale. South Broward.
ni Beach (Y; bgkqj vbgkqn
County, and the Jewish Com-
mty Councils of Jacksonville,
itral Florida. Sarasota and
npa.
,uident and faculty repre-
tatives for all sections of
rida also will play an active
in the new board, along
representatives of the Flor-
B'nai B'rith Organization.
[We called these Florida
lups together," said Greater
ami Jewish Federation presi-
kt Morton Silberman. "to co-
nnate our resources state-
so that we could provide
ush educational, cultural and
Icious programming on a
lie equitable scale throughout
Inda's campuses.
h'HE NATIONAL Hillel or-
kization is a br inch of B'nai
fith." Silberman noted. "In
lie County the Greater Mi-
Jewish Federation has long
- cooperating with them for
banded ami enriched Hillel
mining .it the University
[Miami, Florida International
liversity and Miami-Dade
Inmunity Colleges. This co-
mmon has been extremal]
:cessful, and has increased
tnmunitv support for the Hil-
Jewish Student Centers here
km 52.000 in 1967 to S160.000
11976.
' rhese resources have
engthened Hillel's presence
nendously. and made the
liters an integral factor in the
jnpus lives of more than
looo Jewish college students
[the Miami area."
3MJF executive vice presi-
jit Myron J. Brodie com-
knted on the need for Miami
[work toward similar success
[other Florida campuses:
f'There are sizable Jewish stu-
nt DODulations on at least
Fee other Florida campuses,
tably the University of Flor-
at Gainesville, where there
3.500. the University of
ith Florida at Tampa, where
ere are 3,000, and Florida
ate University at Tallahassee,
here there are 1,200.
["These schools serve stadents
pm large and small commu-
tes all over Florida, and from
her states as well. However,
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
nd
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Proctsiori and Exporters
* thf in.it MS. Govf. Imaacttd
KOSHER MEATS ami P0UIT1Y
1717 N.W. 7th Am,
Miami, Fli.
Hmmi* 324-1855
MYRON J. BRODIE
unlike Miami's schools, they are
located in cities whose Jewish
populations are too small to of-
fer them meaningful support
and service. Therefore the
state's federated communities
have jointly accepted the re-
sponsibility to see that Jewish
activities are made available to
them."
TWO MEMBERS of the GMJF
board of directors. Mrs. Nor-
man Robbins and Stanley R.
Gilbert, have been selected to
represent Greater Miami on the
board of the Hillel Foundations
of Florida. Rabbi Stanley Ring-
ler. director of Miami's Hillel
Jewish Student Centers (a mem-
ber of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's family of local
agencies i, was appointed re-
gional director for the statewide
program as well.
"There are a number of key
reasons for Hillel-type program-
mi n on a college campus." said
Ringler. '"The first is that when
a student leaves home to attend
college, his traditional spheres
of Jewish influence home,
synagogue, school, summer
camn are removed. In addi-
tion .he is exposed to a number
of new influences which may
have an important impact on
the decisions he makes affect-
ing the rest of his life. There-
fore, Jewish religious and cul-
ture should be available to him
if he chooses to seek it in his
new college environment.
"Also, there is ajtreat deal of
Hillel. making meaningful
socialization offered through
contacts with other Jews avail-
able to the student who seeks
them. This is obviously helpful
to the college student, who may
be away from his old friends
for the first time."
Through its continuing "part-
nership" with the national B'
nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion has been able to provide
support for an excellent variety
of Judaic programs on Dade
campuses. Now the Hillel Foun-
dations of Florida will develop
that same type of relationship
with the national organization
in order to bring about increas-
ed programming on Florida
camnuses outside Dade County.
For its first year, which be-
gins the fall, the Hillel Founda-
tions of Florida will receive
funding from the nine federated
communities. This will augment
the existing Hillel operations at
Gainesville and Tallahassee and
enable them to create a new
full-time program in Tampa. As
the Foundation develops, it will
begin to consider additional
services to other Florida cam-
nuses as well
Additional information is
available through Rabbi Ring-
ler.
1
SABRA
COOKBOOK
112 PAGE
101
Award Winning
Recipes
THE BEST OF 8,000
RECIPES SUBMITTED !N A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
(No Stamps please)
Your Name A Address to:
SABRA COOKBOOK
SEND SI.00
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
H'CKSVIUE. NY. 11816
Erwin Marshall, principal of
the South Dade Hebrew Acad-
emy, has announced that the
school's Hebrew Department
has received national recogni-
tion for its excellence in educa-
tion. Three students represent-
ed Florida in the National Bible
Contest in New York on May
23. Dalit Kugel placed ninth in
the nation in the grade 6-8
category, receiving a certificate
of honor. Mona Offenback and
Aaron Goldberg also partici-
pated.
The annual contest, conduct-
ed in Hebrew, is sponsored by
the American Association of
Jewish Education.
Marshall also noted that Dror
Zadok's Hebrew Department
gained other honors, including
the Jerusalem flag, awarded bv
the Jewish National Fund and
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, for the best Jeru-
salem studies project.
Jonathan Rachline. Mark
Fisch and Elaine Needleman
won national gold medals of
honor eiven in the AMI (Knowl-
edge of Israel) test, sponsored
by the AAJE and JNF.
Academv students also excel
in English language studies.
Marshall points out. consistent-
ly scoring at least two years
above grade level in Stanford
Achievement Tests.
Mt. Sinai Needs
Young Volunteers
Teenagers interested in help-
ing others while learning about
careers in health should con-
sider becoming Teen-Age Volun-
teers at Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
According to Adele Freund.
director of Volunteer Services,
applicants should be at least 15
or entering tenth grade and
must be willing to work at least
one four-hour day each week.
Volunteers are interviewed
and, if possible, placed in the
area of their interestwhether
secretarial or working with pa-
tients.
Ms. Freund notes that last
vear's summer volunteers put
in a total of 4.604 service hours,
published a monthly newsletter
and enjoyed a biweekly group
luncheon.
The Volunteers must ioin the
Auxiliary and wear a uniform,
but different styles are avail-
able.
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
REBECCA GRATZ 1781 1869
From the birth to the rebirth of the Nation.
One of the most beautiful and gracious
, women of her time, Rebecca Gratz
' was born to wealth in Philadelphia
and devoted her life to charitable
causes. As a little girl she heard talk of the new
Constitution, saw the drafters entering Inde-
pendence Hall and giving birth to the Nation.
She lived to sec its rebirth after Lee's surrender
at Appomatox.
Among her Iriends was Washington Irving,
who. on a \isit with Sir Walter Scott in Eng-
land, told the great author how Rebecca, at
peril to her own life, had nursed Irving's
fiancee. 18 year old Matilda Hoffman, dying
from tuberculosis. Scott, never knowing Jews
and indulging in the prejudices of the day, was
struck with the compassionate Rebecca and
the high esteem in which Philadelphia held the
GratZ family. Scott immortalized her as the
lovely and faithful Rebecca in his celebrated
novel. "Ivanhoe."
Rebecca Gratz fell in love with a man not of
her faith. Instead of marriage she wedded her
A trtdttion in American-Jewish homes
for half century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
life to the service of fellow Jews less fortunate
than she. Among her charities and the Jewish
organizations which she helped to found and
worked in were: the Philadelphia Orphans'
Home; the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society:
the Jewish Foster Home and also the Hebrew
Sunday School Society of Philadelphia. For
many years she was concerned with the relig-
ious training of all Jewish children including
those of her own synagogue. Under her direc-
tion, the first Jewish Sunday School in the U.S.
opened in 1838.
Rebecca Gratz was acclaimed .is one ol the
noblest women in the world, when laid to rest
in Mikvah Israel Cemetery in Philadelphia in
I8h>> at the age of 88.
Honor,ngJ776Jnd
rJmous |( u j
AiBcricaarfaton
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 177b
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
\our Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic-' Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
oui nation. Send six (no stamps) ith name
nd address toi
JHWISHAMKRICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Cencral Station
New York, N.Y. I00f


Page 4-B
lewistncrMtrn
Friday, July 2, 1976
MELTZER
ROSENTHAL
KEFTH
Flagler Federal Promotes Officials
The board of directors of Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association has announced the promotions of its three
top management officials who have been with Flagler for
20 years. Nathan Meltzer assumes the duties of chairman
of the board, Seymour D. Keith is chairman of the execu-
tive committee and Herschel Rosenthal becomes president.
Meltzer and Keith are founding members.
The promotions follow the moted to treasurer. In 1965 he
retirement of board chairman
Paul H. Marks, who will con-
tinue to serve as a director,
holding the honorary title of
chairman emeritus
Meltzer, who was senior vice
president until 1965. when he
became president, is also a di-
rector of the Barnett Bank of
Miami Beach.
Keith is a member of the
Dade, Florida, and American
Bar Associations and the Amer-
ican College of Mortgage Attor-
neys. He has also been a mem-
ber of the board of directors
since its founding.
Rosenthal joined Flagler Fed-
eral as controller and was pro-
was named executive vice presi-
dent. A Certified Public
Accountant, he founded the ac-
counting firm of Rosenthal,
Groden and Levinson. He is also
active in the Florida and United
States Savings and Loan
Leagues. He is past president of
the Greater Miami YM-YWHA
and Beth David Congregation,
and active in the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation.
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association has 11 offices
in Dade and Broward Counties.
The main office is located in
downtown Miami, and two addi-
tional offices are scheduled to
open later this year.
ASK
(YOUR AGENCY NAME) M Mm con*
ABOUT SITMAR'S EXCITING
CARIBBEAN CRUISES.
WE KNOW.
SMnur.Tht test value* to the Caribbean and South America!
Sail in incomparable luxury, aboard
Sitmar's Liberian-registered T. S.S.
Fairwind, one of the largest and most
spacious ships cruising. You'll visit the
Caribbean's most vivid and exotic ports,
be spoiled by Italian service, served
lavish continental cuisine and stretch
out and relax in Sitmar's roomier cabins.
Ask us about Sitmar's 7, 10 and 11-day
Caribbean cruises (the 11-day reaches
South America!) and their money-
saving Air/Sea Program. It will be the
most luxurious, most memorable vaca-
tion of your life!

OPEN SATURDAY
1799 N.I. 163rd St., North Miami Bach M. 945-0835
32 Miracle Mil*, Coral Oablos T.I 446-3331
Talmudic College
Registration Open
Registration for students has
begun at the Talmudic College
of Florida, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Thursday.
The Talmudic College of Flor-
ida is an accredited rabbinical
college, offering programs in
Jewish law and philosophy and
a remedial program of Judaic
studies for students without a
veshiva high school background.
The college provides full dormi-
tory and boarding facilities, and
offers courses to the general
public.
The staff is headed by Rabbis
Yochanan Zweig. dean, and Ja-
cob Poupko, associate dean,
who stresses the impact of the
Talmudic College upon the re-
gion's laity: "The Talmudic Col-
lege, with its transcultural per-
spective, has been able to re-
late tht Torah's philosophv and
values to the here and now,
giving order and meaning to
life in these anarchic and
chaotic times."
HUDSON
ALLEN
DUNWODY
United Way Appoints Chairmen
Attorney Marshall H. Harris,
1976 United Way general cam-
paign chairman, has announced
the appointments of Steve Hud-
son, William H. Allen, Jr., and
Atwood Dunwody as committee
chairmen.
Hudson, Flagship Banks' vice
chairman of the board, will head
the sponsorship committee.
Long active in United Way
campaigns, he is a member of
the board of trustees.
This is Allen's first year of
United Way campaign leader-
ship He has been involved with
United Way's Little Havana
Activities Center as a volunteer
and this year becomes Special
Gifts chairman. He is a South-
east First National Bank of Mi-
ami executive vice president
Vice president of United
Way's board of directors and
trustees. Dunwody will chair
the individual gifts and founda-
tions committee as he did last
wear. He is a member of the
1975 Pillars Club, comprised of
jommunitv leaders who make
substantial personal contribu-
tions to United Way
SUPER MOTT'S
GIVES YOU MORE
OF WHAT YOU BUY
PRUNE JUICE FOR.
Certihed Kosher and Parva
by Rabbi Or J H Ratbag
Mott's put something
extra into their prune
juice.
More prune.
Ten percent more prune
solids than required by
U.S. Government
regulations.
To improve the texture.
To improve the taste.
Then they added
Vitamin C.
Mott's didn't just name
their prune juice super.
They made it super.
Taste it.
You'll love it.
AND 10< OFF TO TRY IT.
SAVEKX
On any size bottle of Super Mott's Prune Juice
To Ootfx If you oMom> o -r*nJ
cwKnx* rh* face votu* of ihri
coupon toward ** puxhaw pr*
of product ipcifwcJ h*r*an
land upon our '*av**t aubmrt *v,
dfnc* rh***o* toftttadory to vt)
**> ttr* HOHT'i *h coupon for it*
toe* tfOtj* ptui S for bonding
0*y an* coupon p*r purctxH*
C uttomr "tutt pay any toatn ton
Vord uniM acqu>rd dar*cf*y from
O 1*od Cu**om*r or vwnr* pro-
n-brl*d *ir#d or r*tfrl*d Good
onfy rt U SA Co* volu* 1 20
To r*d*m marl to Du*fy*to*T
Campony Inc P O Bo* 3114
Ch*to* Pa rflOlo
STOtC COUPON EXflttS AUGUST 31,1976
Cr976 0jWA<)ncCM,*iVr MC 370 LRNGTON AVf NT N' KOI'


nday, July 2, 1976
* Jew 1st fhrMtom
Page 5-B
Pioneer Women Chapter Installs Officers
Hannah (Mrs. Harold) Levine
,as installed as president of the
egev Chapter at a luncheon at
Gallagher's Restaurant in Pom-
ano Beach. She succeeds Betty
Mrs. Nathan) Waea.
Harriet (Mrs. Milton) Green,
resident of the Greater Miami
ouncil. was installing officer.
Martha (Mrs. Michael) Rosen-
eldt gave the welcome message
and Lilyan (Mrs. Charles) Solo-
mon awarded sponsor pins.
Entertainment was by the
Choraleers, and Mrs. Beatrice
Scheer and Helen (Mrs. Harry)
Fish were hostesses.
ALSO INSTALLED were Flo-
rence (Mrs. Jack) Sherman,
executive vice president; vice
presidents Betty Waga, Moetzet
Hapoalot; Martha Rosenfeldt,
Segal Heads Florida Delegation
[To World Jewish Cultural Congress
The Florida delegation to the
World Jewish Cultural Congress,
scheduled to convene in Jeru-
salem from Aug. 23 :o 26, will
be headed by Leon Z. Segal of
Miami Beach. Other members
Df the delegation are Mrs. Dorah
Meisel. Mrs. Gitel Khan. J. Yu-
doff and L. Lasavin.
Segal commented that "It is
the first time in almost a cen-
was held about 80 years ago."
tun that such a congress will
take Place. The last one, known
JCC Lectures
Focus on Health
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida/South
Beach Activities Center is pre-
senting a weekly lecture series.
"You and Your Health." Each
Fridav'at 1:30 p.m. at the Wash-
ington Ave. center another
asnect of health will be discuss-
ed bv a professional from a
I local health agency.
This afternoon's topic is Nu-
trition, with a speaker from the
Health Department. Future Fri-
day toDics include General
Heart Disease. Cancer Aware-
ness (with a film). Arthritis and
Asnects of Aging.
The series is free and the
public is invited.
JCC Camp Welcomes
Russian Children
Seven children, ages 3 to 13,
ire attending the Jewish Com-
munity Center camp, after hav-
ing studied for a few weeks at
the Hebrew Academy. Many of
them have trouble with English
but most have mastered He-
brew.
Thev are members of Russian
immigrant families who have
been in the United States for
about a month and live in Mi-
ami Beach, after having spent
ten months in Israel and six in
Germanv since leaving the So-
viet Union.
Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Outpatient Department adoles-
cent clinic was able to provide
free nhv the children, thanks to the sup-
port of the Jewish Federation
on Greater Miami, in prepara-
tion for their camp experience.
MARRIAGES, JEWISH,
INTER-FAITH, CIVIL, BY
REVEREND CANTOR,
5344711
BEAT IT!
RAISED PRINTING
Imagine 1,000 Butinei* Cards
HIGH QUALITY
Red, Blue or
Black from $B95
Any Two
Colors Abovo from $10.70
FREE PICK UP A DELIVERY
PERPETUAL REBATE
PROGRAM
651 1467
SEVEN DAYS
cultural; Lilyan Solomon, mem-
bership; Ann (Mrs. Louis) Fish-
er. Israel Bonds; Mildred (Mrs.
Morris) Latman. recording sec-
retary; Mrs. Stella Safeer, treas-
urer; Mrs. Lillian Itskowitz, fi-
nancial secretary; Mrs. Heien
Finkelstein, dues chairman;
Sylvia (Mrs. Jack) Yamen. cor-
responding secretary.
Also Ida (Mrs. Hyman) Fial-
kin, cultural cochairman; Mrs.
Samuel Greenwald. publicity;
Bea Scheer, spiritual adoption;
Mrs. Rona Schimel and Mrs.
Sally Kaufman, bulletin cochair-
men; Helen Fish, telephone
squad chairman; Mrs. Estelle
Cohen, donor chairman; Mrs.
Eva Ginsberg, sunshine commit-
tee: Betty Waga. council dele-
gate; and hostesses Lillian (Mrs.
Morris) Greenberg, Mrs. Gert-
rude Reiter. Rose (Mrs. Irving)
Victor and Svlvia (Mrs Max)
Yudin.
LEON Z. SEGAL
as the 'Czernowich Conference,'
He added that "in view of the
Holocaust, which destroyed Eu-
ropean Jewish cultural centers,
this congress takes on great
significance and places great
responsibilities on Israel and
the American Jewish commu-
nity."
The opening session, at the
Jerusalem Grand Theater, will
feature a keynote address by
Israel's President Ephraim Kat-
zir. Discussion sessions will fo-
cus on world Jewish literature,
press, theater, education and
research.
m&
MIAMI CENTRAL
I-95,Exitat79St.
Featuring a
LUNCHEON
BUFFET
Monday Friday 11:30 to 2:30
Enjoy a Taste Tempting
Chef's Special
Every eveninq
Chicken Cordon Brtu
Baby Beef Ribs
Beef Stroganoff
IVM SUNDAY
CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
MIAMI CENTRAL
79th Street & 7th Avenue
1-95, Exit at 79 St.
759-1561
Plenty of Parking Space
t.vv.v..'
Pleased with quota checks turned over to Harriet (Mrs.
Milton) Green (2nd from left), president of the South
Florida Council of Pioneer Women, at the recent in-
stallation luncheon are (from left) Mrs. Sue Cooper
president of Miramar Chapter, Mrs. Anna Zuckerman.
president of Dimona Bet Chapter of Hollywood, and
Betty (Mrs. Nathan) Waga, outgoing president and in-
coming first vice president of Negev Chapter in Deer-
field Beach who will also serve as delegate to the South
Florida Council.
Honored for an outstanding Israel Bonds
campaign were leaders of the Cuban He-
brew community who received citations
of merit at a recent breakfast meeting at
the Konover Hotel. Seated (from left)
are Mrs. Zoila Levin, Mrs. Rachel Ger-
son, Mrs. Lui.su Lerman, Mrs. Eva Bais-
man, Mrs. Guta Huppert, Mrs. Bertha
Pundik and Mrs. Sofia Schwartzbaum;
standing (from left) are Boruch Shames,
Sender Kaplan, Israel Lusky, Moises
Levin, Jacobo Biniakonsky, lsidoro Ler-
man, Oscar Minski, Samuel Schwartz-
baum, Jaime Wenguer and Israel Bi-
chachi. Not in the picture are Mrs. Vic-
toria Adouth, Jaime Mitruni, Mrs. Sofia
Kress, Isaac Yagodnik, Moreno Habif,
Jacobo Mucasey, Mrs. Dorita Felden-
kreis, Moris Rosenfeld, Gerson Kriger,
Eugenia Huppert and Rela Schnaidoski
For over 125
tasty suggestions,
st-nd for our new cook-
book," Beyond Chicken Soup".
In it. you'll find everything from
traditional favorites to delicioua " ideas. There's even a special section on major
Jewish holidays, with appropriate menu sug-
gestions for their i-eleln-.it inn
To get your copy, send 75* plus the label from a
32 or. far of Hellmann's*or Best Foods'Real
Mayonnaise (or91.00 without the label I, along
with your name and address to: "Beyond
Chicken Soup", Depl BCS M.Bos 807,Coventry,
CT 06288, or use this convenient coupon.
f__________ E5S J ^m a
EUMANNS Joiii5i IJC2
1 /
1 Adrtr
- City State
| 't\y



Page 6-B
-Jewish ncrMton
Friday, July 2, 197J
Principals of South Florida day schools at
the ceremony awarding the Degel Yeru-
shalyim of the Jewish National Fund at
the Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami
were (from left) Abraham J. Gittelson,
associate director of Central Agency for
Jewish Education; Nily Falic, educational
consultant, JNF! Dr. Zev Kogan, presi-
dent, Southeast Region JNF; Moshe Ezry,
principal. Temple Beth Shalom Day
School, Hollywood; Mira Fraenkel, prin-
cipal, Solomon Schechter Day School;
Dror Zadok, director, Hebrew Depart-
ment South Dade Hebrew Academy; Ruth
Segal, instructor, Lehrman Day School;
Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld, principal, Hillel
Community Day School; Rabbi Alexander
Gross, principal, Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy. The Jerusalem banner was
won by the South Dade Hebrew Academy.
Miami Beach resident Joseph H. Kanter, a member of
B'nai B'rith District Two, received the B'nai B'rith Na-
tional Humanitarian Award from Mrs. Louis Perlman
(center), chairman of the national B'nai B'rith Youth
Commission and founder of B'nai B'rith Girls. With them
is Mrs. Lewis Kash, international president of B'nai
B'rith Women. Kanter was honored at a recent District
Two Convention luncheon.
Sam Topf, president of Mi-
ami's Jordan Industries and
the Florida-Israel Chamber
of Commerce's "Industrial-
ist of the Year." has been
named president of Newell
Bulldog Co. of Ogdensburg.
N.Y. Topf is also a co-found
er of the Consultants of Is-
raeli Industries, Inc.
LIGHT ... BEAUTIFIES!
NEW EPA LIGHTING .1 CHANDELIERS LAMPS TABLES MIRRORS DESKS CURIO CABINETS ORIENTAL LAMPS TEA CARTS TRAC LIGHTING SPECIALISTS PADDLE PANS 3740 NE 2nd Ave. Miami 576-0934 Ft. iMderdale 3558 N. Ocean Blvd. Boca Raton 2880 N fed Hn,
l^t^p~ cI^b^^f

MIAMI BEACH DOCTOR
SI, 5'1C". 155 Ibi.. NON-SMOKER.
PLEASANT PERSONALITY.
SEEKING ATTRACTIVE. INTEL-
LIGENT. NEVER-MARRIED
WOMAN UNDER 40 FOR
FRIENDSHIP AND MARRIAGE.
DR. M.B.. BOX 01-2973.
MIAMI 33101
Puzzled! Answers
ANSWERS: Korah, Hukkat-Balak, Pinhas, Mattot-
Mase, Oevjrim, Vaethanan, Ekev, Re'eh, Shofetim and
Kee Tetze.

r
OAK ROOM LOUNGE
Featuring TV'i DUANE THOMAS
on Guitar. S. Piano
Tuesday to Saturday 9 to 2 a.m.
COCKTAIL HOUR 5-7
HOT HORS DOEUVRES
LADIES DRINK, ', PRICE
(Bar Liquor,
Sing along every night
with the friendly folks ot
The OAK ROOM
LOUNGE
MIAMI CENTRAL
79th STREET & 7th AVENUE
I-95, Exit at 79 St.
759-1561
Henry of Parking Snar
Mondale Backs
Breaking Boycott
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA)
"The boycott by Arab na-
tions of firms that do busi-
ness with Israel is reprehen-
sible," Sen. Walter Mondale
(D., Minn.) told an Israel
Bond drive dinner here.
The Senator announced
his strong support of twc
measures aimed at break-
ing the boycott in the Unitec
States.
MONDALE noted that "the
boycott has the destructive
side-effect of poisoninR rela-
tions among American firms,
and striking at the principle of
non-discrimination upon which
our social and legal system is
based."
The boycott affects not only
companies that do business with
Israel but also companies whose
officers or major stockholders
have been identified not only as
pro-Israeli, but also of the Jew-
ish faith, he said.
Such Minnesota firms as Re-
serve Mining Company and
Scherr-Tumica of St. James are
on the Arab blacklist as are
such major national corpora-
tions as Coca-Cola, CBS. Ford
Motor Company and Korvette
"THERE ARE two ways of
dealing with this danger and I
strongly support both of them."
Mondale pointed out.
"I am co-sponsoring Sen.
I Abraham) Ribicoffs (D.. Conn.)
bill to deny U.S. tax advantages
including the foreign tax
credit, deferral and Domestic
International Sales Corporation
benefitson any foreign sourcJ
income earned as a result
participation in the boycott
This would eliminate the tax
benefits that have led mam
firms to choose economic self
interest over moral and lew;
principles of the United States
The second way of combattint
this problem is dealt with in \
bill offered by Sen Adlai Stev
enson (D.. 111.) that soon should,
be before the Senate for a vote
Mondale said.
HE SAID it would provide fo
mandatory reporting of all del
mands. and an accounting o
whether a U.S. firm plans ti
comply, with full public dis-
closure of all such requests and
plans.
"In other words," he said
"the bill is designed to make
sure companies are forced ti
consider not onlv the desires ai
their OPEC clients, but also thi
reaction of the American people
to such policies."
Happening ...
At the North Miami Beach
Bicentennial Commission's "Da\
in Central Park" on July 4
Mayor Walter Pesetsk\ will of-
ficiate at the burying of a tine
capsule outside City Hall, whict
stands where Central Part
to be.
The monthly coin and stamp
show sponsored bv Concerned
Citizens of Operation Ke-Entr
will be held on Sunday, Julv 11
at the Westland Mall. 103rd Sffl
exit of the Palmetto Exp
way in Hialeah.
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
WITH THIS AD ONLY, AT
RALPH'S
AUTO ELECTRIC & SOI \D
:t:,o-;U2 vi:. h.tui si.
EXPERT MECHANIC FOB ALL GENERAL KIT MILS
FREE BRAKE CHECK UP ON: _
1. MASTER CYLINDER 2. BRAKE SHOES 3. WHEEL CTLINDERC 4. BRAKE DRUMS
ALL AMERICAN CARS: reline brakes $2995 discs eitii
$5"
*0?
OIL CHANCE I FILTER *0" RABIATBR I EN6INE FLUSH *9'
F0REI6N CAR TUNE BPS $25)95 *""'"* Mi S18'S
SPECIAL LICENSE FOR MODIFYING EMISSION CONTROL AND
REMOVAL OF CATALYTIC CONVERTERS INCREASE YOUR
HORSEPOWER AND GAS MILEAGE Phonf?
$7995
lEfi. '110.00 SPECIAL
945-7641
Ask for special prices on C.B.'s and Stereo*

<< NURSING &
. HOMEMAKER
A SERVICES
t -
We are in the business of helping people COMCARE not
provides skilled nursing care but also homemakpr seiv.
maker will shop cook, do light housekeeping and all tffcM
ike Me easier for you
CQMCARE
llNL.. s*>
* Registered Nurses licensed Practical Nurses Nurses Aides ded cated
to caring for the sick or elderly in then own homes in nursing homes, w'
hospitals.
NOW SERVING YOU WITH HOMEMAKERS
24 HOUR SERVICE 751-6280 CALL ANYTIME J


riday, July 2, 1976
*Je*ist> ncridfSar
Page 7-B
Bill Outlawing Arab Boycott Stalled
BOSTON A bill to outlaw
^he Arab boycott in Massachu-
setts remained stalled in the
State Senate where serious op-
position developed last week
after the measure passed the
state House of Representatives.
Sen. Jack Backman (D.,
Jrookline-Newton), one of the
sponsors of the legislation, tern
porarily postponed action to
provide additional time to
:larify its language.
Backman said he agreed to
the postponement "at the re-
quest of the Jewish Community
Touncil of Metropolitan Boston"
to allow its attorneys '"addition-
al time to work out some tech-
nical amendments to the bill
i'hich will eliminate any pos-
sible legal questions that have
been raised by certain interna-
tional corporations."
0
TEL AVIV Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin delivered a stinging
lattack on civil servants in Is-
Irael. specifically teachers who,
[he charged, are not pulling their
[weight.
Addressing the convention of
[Hakibbutz Hameuchad, the Kib-
[butz movement of the Labor
party's Achdut Avoda wing,
[Rabin contended that teachers
I any ling ijard enough. Israeli teach-
lers snend fewer hours a dav in
[the classroom than American
It'.-achers, he said.
Rabin declared that Israel
|has attained enormous achieve-
Iments in agriculture and se-
Icuritv. but when it comes to
[education, "it turns out, to my
regret, that the Israeli teacher
of todav has not proven him-
[s.'lf as he should."
0
PARIS Syrian President
Hafez Assad attended a special
ballet performance here in his
honor at the Elysee Palace. If
lv knew what he and his group
snw. it must have a strange
(experience. *
The show was the ballet "Gi-
Isele." based on a ballad by a
German Jew. Heinrich Heine;
with music bv a French Jew.
[Adolnhe Auam; the choreogra-
phy bv Jean Sinelli. an Italian
Jew. and danced in the main
role bv Paris Opera star dancer
poniinioue Khalfouni. an Alger-
|i;m-born Jew.
0
TORONTu The Zionist Or-
ganization of Canada has re-
lleased an evaluation bv Canada-
[ian "olim" in Israel of the work
[done bv a three-man committee
Ith- ZOC sent to Jerusalem last
lAnri] to conduct hearings on
[the problems of Canadians in
Israel and the reason why some
|of them return to ranada.
The nanel created a contro-
verav when the Jewish Agency
lenticized it as unrepresentative
|of Canada's Jewish community
land refused an invitation to
[narticinate in the hearings or
|to send obsen'ers.
But the Association of Amer-
icans and Canadians in Israel
paid in its publication "Jerusa-
lem Voice" that it "salutes the
initiative of ZOC and wishes
them success in their sincere
dsire to increase aliya. improve
r'ita (absorption) and make a
vital contribution to the
strengthening of Israel."
YOUTHFUL, EXPERIENCED
ACCURATE TYPIST
knowledge of Yiddish & Jew-
ish organizations helpful. 5
I days. Many extras.
PHONE 534-6518
YOUNG CANTOR
Lyric tenor, nice personality,
seeking position for High
| Holy Days. Excellent referenc-
es from previous Temples.
Call 538-9045
The AACI publication, copies
of which were released by the
ZOC, fount that the testimony
by some M, people selected
from hund.ms invited to sub-
mit written oriefs, was "given
in a serious courtroom atmos-
phere" and "was ;t nalanced pic-
ture of the current situation."
0
NEW YORK-Philip M. Kiut/
nick, an American .iewish lead-
er and a former member of the
U.S. delegation to the United
Nations with the rank of Am-
bassador, believes that despite
its "failure in peace- keeping
and miserably unbalanced reso-
lutions of the General Assembly
and even the Security Council."
mankind is better off with the
world organization than if it did
not exist.
Klutznick made his state
ments, both commendatoi v ano
critical of the UN. in an add-ess
delivered at the Conference on
United States Objectives in the
United Nations System h
the Ralph Bunche Institute of
the United Nations. City Univer-
sity of New York Graduate
School.
"When some fine and able
people go so far as to suuuo-.-
that we can find other ways of
doing good rather than to tol-
erate the bad that the UN does,
they have permitted their jus-
tified nique over a reprehen-
sible act to outweigh their prac-
tical sense and understanding
of the world in which we live."
Klutznick said.
O
VIENNAA right-wing group
called "Action New Right" dis-
tributed a booklet a. the Uni-
versity of Vienna June 23 al-
leging that six-million Jews did
not die at Nazi hands, that the
Jews were "exploiting anti-
Nazi genocide propaganda" and
that the Nuremberg war crimes
trials were illegal because the
defendants were sentenced for
alleged acts that were made
criminal onlv retroactively after
World War II
Austrian authorities have tak-
en no steps so far to confiscate
the 40-page booklets or stop
their distribution although it is
against the law to spiead racist
or neo-Nazi material.
The booklet claims that
"There exists irrefutable evi-
dence that the claims of the
murder of six-million Jews dur-
ing World War II are without
the slightest foundation how-
ever, nobodv succeeded to ex-
ploit war sufferings as much as
the Jews. The anti-Nazi geno-
cide propaganda was spread
mostly by Jews."
Onlv several thousand Jews
were killed during the war. it
said.
O
NEW YORK Harold M.
Jacobs, president of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions of America, and Fred Ehr-
man, UOJCA Israel Commission
chairman, have released ex-
cerpts of their recent letter to
Sen. Jacob Javits (R., N.Y) in
which thev express their dis-
may at his recent statements
on the Middle East in hearings
before a Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Subcommittee.
The letter asserted that Sen
Javits "appeared to have taken
too seriouslv recent statements
bv President Anwar Sadat of
Egvnt and other so-called Arab
moderates that do not include
the concomitant mvitation to
serious neace negotiations that
would make Israel's right to
exist more than iust an empty
phrase. In the absence of hard
agreements the Arabs must be
udged on the basis of their
nst performance rather than
their statements a record
that does not inspire confidence
in their desire for a peaceful
solution of their dispute with
Israel."
Ehrman and Jacobs also took
exejption to the Senator's cri-
ticism of Israeli settlements in
the administered terri-
tories, in which he stated
that "with regard to the
administered territories Israel is
completely on its own." Clear-
y, on the basis of prior experi-
ence and the lesson of recent
events in Lebanon, Israel must
.Maintain such settlement for
i.-curity purposes
o
MONTREAL (JTA) Res.
Gen. Rehavam Ze'evi, Premier
Yitzhak Rabin's advisor on
counter-terrorism, has just re-
turned from Montreal where he
inspected security arrangements
for th2 Israeli team participat-
ing in thj Olympic Games.
Gen. Ze'evi submitted a list
of recommendations to the Pre-
mier, it was learned, June 24
but no details were disclosed.
The first group of Israeli ath-
l?tcs the soccer team left
for England June 23 where they
.vill train for two weeks before
going to Montreal. Gen. Ze'evi
visited the Olympic Village
where the Israeli and other
t ;ams will be housed.
He also met persons respon-
sible for security on behalf
of the International Olympics
Committee and with Canadian
security authorities. Canada has
prohibited private security ar-
rangements for any of the par-
ticipating teams and will rely
on its own force of 13,000 po-
lice and soldiers for the protec-
tion of the sportsmen and spec-
tators.
An Israeli request for inde-
pendent security arrangements
in light of the 1972 Munich
Olympic massacre was rejected.
But the Canadians are alert to
the possibility that mercenaries
either Japanese or Euro-
peans might attempt attacks
on behalf of Arab terrorist
groups.
O
JERUSALEM The Knesset
once more defeated a bill that
would have instituted civil mar-
riage in Israel for persons dis-
qualified to marry under religi-
ous law. The 51-18 vote against
the measure drafted by Minis-
tcr-Without-Portfolio Gideon
Hausner of the Independent
Liberal Party was, in fact, a
vote to preserve the status quo
under which Israel's Orthodox
religious establishment is given
blanket authority over marri-
age, divorce and other personal
matters.
Justice Minister Haim Zadok
told the Knesset as much when
he declared that the present
government, like its predeces-
sors, had no intention of alter-
ing the understandings on
which the coalition with the Na-
tional Religious Party is based.
"Coalition agreements must
be preserved. This is part of
public life." Zadok said. ILP MK
Yehuda Shaari. who introduced
the Hausner bill, said it did not
reoresent a break with the sta-
tus quo but rather a solution of
serious personal problems "for
those people who under the
o.esent situation were disquali-
fied to marry."
O
WASHINGTON The For-
eign Military Assistance bill on
which Israel. Egypt, Syria and
Jordan along with close to 50
other countries look to bolster
their economies, has continued
to run a course of complexities
that makes its ultimate result
till uncertain.
Both President Ford and Sec-
retary of Defense Donald Rums-
feld, however, have indicated,
according to Sen. Clifford Case
i,K., N.J.), mo.enentse m the
direction of legislation that
would assist Israel to meet its
defense requirements.
Case said that at a meeting
at the White House, the Presi-
dent showed signs of willing-
ness to compromise on the fund-
ing fo- the transitional quar-
ter between the current fiscal
year ending June 30 and the
new fiscal year beginning Oct.
1.
0
JERUSALEM Sephardic
Chief Rabbi Ovadia Yosef re-
turned here from a nine-day
visit to the Jewish community
cf Iran. He reported success in
stimulating greater contribu-
tions to Israel from wealthy
Iranian Jews an I in resolving a
feud between Iran's three rab-
bis. But reports that the Shah
would receive Rabbi Yosef
proved erroneous. It is believed
here that the Shah did not want
to tmbarrass another important
visitor to Teheran. King Khaled
of Saudi Arabia, bv granting an
audimce to the Israeli Chief
Rabbi.
Yosef said he visited the Jew-
Shiraz where he spoke in pack-
ed synagogues on halachic prob-
lems and urged greater religi-
ous observance.
0
AMSTERDAM The Coun-
cil of th European branch of
the Worl 1 Jewish Congress met
in closed session at The Hague
for two days last week to dis-
cuss a wide range of topics of
int rn-'tional and Jewish con-
cern. Jewish communities from
17 West European and Central
European countries were repre-
sented.
East Germany's tiny Jewish
community sent observers for
the first time in the persons of
Hernnnn Aris and Dr. Peter
Ki"-hrv-. Dr. Bendrich Bass.
nr. sm' m of the Jewish Com-
munities of Czechoslovakia, also
attenJed as an observer.
Dr. Nahum Goldmann, presi-
dent of the WJC and Dr. Ger-
hard Riegner, its secretary gen-
eral, told a press conference
after the sessions that the sub-
ject of East-West detente had
been on the agenda.
JERUSALEM The Gush
Emunim squatters at Kadum in
Samaria were offered alterna-
tive sites within the govern-
ment-approved areas. The set-
tlers, who have been asked by
the government to vacate Ka-
uum, where they have been en-
camped illegally since last No-
vember, promised to have an
answer by the weekend.
The sites were proposed by
Yehiel Admoni, head of the
World Zionist Organization's
settlement department, who was
a-.ing for the government.
Minister-Without-Portfolio. Is-
rael Galili, who is chairman of
the ministerial settlement com-
mittee, told the Cabinet last
week that the Gush Emunim set-
tlers will be asked to accept
one of the sites and vacate
Kadum.
The sites offered are Kochav
Hashahar. which is presently a
Nahal outpost, northeast of Ra-
mallah on the eastern edge of
the S.tmarian hills, or a choice
of places on the western edge
of Samaria, close to the pre-
1967 line.
0
PHILADELPHIA The grow-
ing rapprochement between Is-
rael and South Africa is based
nurelv on pragmatic considera-
tion on both sides. Helen Suz-
man, leader of the struggle
against South Africa's apartheid
policies, said here.
The new relationship, how-
ever, does not necessarily mean
that the two nations condone
each other's policies, she added,
according to a report bv Frank
Wundohl and David Gross of
the Philadelphia Jewish Expo-
nent
Mrs. Suzman. who is Jewish,
was here to receive a special
Civil Liberties Medallion at the
annual onen board meeting of
the Philadelphia chapter of the
American Iewish Committee.
A leader of the opposition
Progressive Reform Party in
th: South Africa Parliament.
Mrs. Suzman maintained that
mnst South African Jews, espe-
cially the vounger Jews, do not
- inport Apartheid However.
sv f<"tion"d. Jews do not vote
as a bloc and the South African
vote is not analyzed bv ethnic
groups, as it is here in the
I'nited States
0
WASHINGTON The State
I) -nartment has denied that it
had received a protest from Is-
i :i -1 over President Ford's ex-
nr,.sion of thanks to the Pales-
tin- Liberation Organization for
hn]nin8 in th" evacuation of
Americans fro-' Lebanon
KOSHER
MEAT CENTER
953 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MAM! BEACH PHONE 532-6586
FORMERLY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ERWIN ROSENBERG, Proprietor
FEATURING
Lundy's u GLATT Meats
999 GLATT Delicatessen & Portion Control
Meats
AN Impire Poultry Kosher
ALSO FRESH MEAT UNDER
RABBINICAL SUPERVISION


Page 8-B
fJenist Fhrldiari
Friday, July 2, 19?6
Mrs. Middle America goes to
Tupperware parties.
Fernwood, Ohioans Mary
Hartman and Loretta Hagars go
to Belcherware parties.
And Miamians go to plant
parties.
Plastic ivy and larger than
life birds of paradise from Wool-
worth's have gone the way of
daily milk deliveries and cloth
diapers.
If there is anything more "In"
today than growing plants, it
could only be selling plants.
GREEN THUMB hobbyists
fina themselves sharing their
talent and know-how with black
thumb friends. One step leads
to another and a hobby evolves
into a business.
That is exactly what happen-
ed to three young Miami wom-
en who computed pots plus
plants to equal profits.
Barbara Rosenberg's "So
Grows It" was a one woman
enterprise that now involves
distributors and installation
teams. Plants were "just a hob-
by" when, three years ago, Bar-
bara was asked to select plants
for a friend's home. With that
request. Barbara made the leap
into the business world.
She caters to the patio crowd
and her work involves whole
horticultural schemes for inter-
iors, lanais. a turned front yard
and exnosed beams that scream
for driftwood hangings.
Her gift creations include
glazed sea shells and coral set
with Dlants. Her work is so pro-
fessional that Nessa Gaulois car-
ries her collections.
BARBARA'S BUSINESS has
blossomed since she started cat-
ering plant parties. Two young
women arrange for coffee-
klatsch get-togethers for any-
where from 15 to 30 people. The
individual hostess invites the
guests, serves the danish. gets
a free gift for her trouble and
Barbara sunplies the plants.
"Deco Plants" supplies Barby
Carrier with her greenery. Bar-
by. a full time staffer at the Uni-
versity of Miami's Registration
Office, does plant parties "in
her spare time."
Although Barby pushes the
Luwasa plant system (an attrac-
tive and easy way to grow
plants with futuristic contain-
ers, ceramic rocks and liquid
food), she injects Dlant psychol-
ogy into her presentations. "A
plant is like a person. It has
different needs." While diagnos-
ine under or over-watering in
a professional manner, she will
turn Jewish grandmother and
warn against greasing plants
with mayonnaise which pre-
vents them from breathing.
ALLOWING that she cannot
drink water straieht from the
tan. Barby analogizes that plants
cannot either Letting water sit
out for 24 hours permits gase-
ous chlorine to evaporate and
mikes for a sweeter irrigating
agent.
Luwasa items are now to Mi-
ami but for Barby Carrier, who
plant sits and always "sends
neople home with cuttings." this
business is a pleasure.
Living things were Susie
Schermer's pleasure and are
now her business called, appro-
priately. "Living Things." Susie
became interested in plants
when thev were still an out-
door item. Her avocation turned
to vocation purely by chance.
THIS BEACH High and UM
graduate went back to school
for a Masters in counseling.
After completing her degree
work. Susie found that the jobs
offered took her "too far from
home too often." She did not
want to curtail her homelife so
drastically.
Another aspect of the profes-
sional versus housewife quan-
dary was that the openings
available were not as interest-
ing as Susie had anticipated.
Casually looking for a busi-
ness close to home, instead, led
Susie and husband Mickey to
an old Spanish style building on
Arthur Godfrey Road. It was
such a perfect set-up for a plant
shop. Susie recalls. The back-
yard would serve as a holding
area under cover and would be
suitable for experimental grow-
ing as well as keeping the plant
inventory. So began another
horticultural haven.
SUSIE AND Mickey cater to
the terrace trade and specialize
in interior and patio contract-
ing. Always on the prowl for
new and unusual plants, the
Schermers offer their clientele
a host of potted gift items.
Susie Schermer likes plants
because, like life, they change.
Barbara Rosenberg loves hav-
ing her hands in the soil. Barby
Carrier talks about plants as if
thev were people.
There is an illustrator in New
York who sketches both plants
and people. On one small water-
color, the following words are
written alongside the drawings:
"Plants are like people. If you
sing, nourish and caress them,
thev will never stop growing."
Beware the
Sloganmakers
KIAMESHA LAKE. N.Y.
(JTA) "The battle for Is-
rael's survival is being fought
in the United States over Amer-
ican public opinion and foreign
policy." a B'nai B'rith regional
convention was told here.
Jerome Bakst. national direc-
tor for research and evaluation
of B'nai B'rith's Anti-Defama-
tion League, told leaders from
the organization's Middle Atlan-
tic Region at the Concord Ho-
tel for their 124th annual meet-
ing that Jews "are facing a
threat we cannot ignore and a
danger we cannot accept."
BAKST SAID that the Arabs
have established a five-year
world master plan, with a 1980
target date, for isolating Israel
diplomatically and economical-
ly.
The Arabs, he added, have a
$30 million budget for local pro-
paganda efforts that include
television, films, books, period-
icals and sneakers.
"Once moribund groups like
the Organization of Arab Stu-
dents have been revived after
years of inactivity," he said.
BAKST contended that there
has been a major shift in the
climate surrounding Israel and
the worldwide Jewish commu-
nity since the Yom Kippur War
and especially since the suspen-
sion of Secretary of State Hen-
ry Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy
in 1975.
"It is called even-handedness.
but let us not be fooled by the
slogan-makers in Washington,"
he said.
Camp ShelanU ^ws Epstein Marries Mr. Feldser
In Progress
The first session of the sum-
mer camping programs spon-
sored by the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida began
last week, with more than 1.000
youngsters from Dade and
South Broward participating.
The camp's two four-week
sessions are based at the JCC's
new Michael-Ann Russell Cen-
ter in North Miami Beach and
at the South County branch.
The JCCs are a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's family of local agencies.
"Camp Shelanu"Hebrew for
"our own camp"' offers daily
swimming instruction, arts and
crafts. Judaic culture, sports,
music and drama, as well as
periodic field trips and special
events.
Some of the unusual features
for 1976 include a Teen Travel
Camp, in two sessions, for ages
12 through 16; JCC's Leader-
ship Apprentice Program for
ages 14 and 15 runs through
both sessions. June 21 through
August 13, and involves 70 mem-
bers; a one-month "Bicenten-
nial Tour" starting July 12 will
bus 15-to-17-year-olds to his-
toric locations along the East
Coast from Florida to Washing-
ton. Philadelphia. New York and
Boston.
CAMP SHELANU youngsters
are divided into four age groups,
each of which enjoys program-
ming geared to its own learning
level. "Nitzanim" are the pre-
school-age campers, who take
part in weekly Oneg Shabbat
programs as well as swimming
instruction twice daily. Jewish
music and dancing, reading and
storytelling, and field trips. The
Nitzanim Camp show is sched-
uled for Julv 29.
"Unit Aleph" at the JCC
camp includes first- and second-
graders. These groups add na-
ture study and hiking to their
summer fun with drama and
music, swimming and field trips.
Unit Aleph will present its
summer camp show on July 22.
A special attraction for "Unit
Bet" campers, grades three and
four, is conversational Hebrew
learning in Ulpan sessions.
These campers learn the im-
portance of ecology through na-
ture study, and they enjoy in-
struction in sports and fitness
including tennis at the Mich-
ael-Ann Russell Center's new
courts Their annual camp show
is scheduled for July 6.
Canoeing instruction on the
Oleta River (bordering the
Michael-Ann Russell Center) is
an attraction for "Unit Gimmel"
campers, fifth-to-eighth-graders
These groups are busy planning
Independence Day programs,
beginning their more advanced
Hebrew training at the Ulpan.
tennis, creative arts, and plans
for the JCC's annual Maccabiah
Games, set for July 7. Their an-
nual camp show will be held
August .
HIGHLIGHTS of the summer
for Camp Shelanu include the
Maccabiad. involving 1.500
youngsters in sports competi-
tion. The "Chugim" groups
camners with special interest in
dramatics will present a
show on August 10 And the
JCC's second "Jewish World's
Fair" is scheduled for August
12 at the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center.
Songf est at Israel South
Israeli folksinger Dany Ami-
hud will lead a songfest as part
of the monthly family services
at Temple Israel South this eve-
ning at 7:30.
Amihud will share in leading
the liturgical music of the serv-
ice with Ed Lasoff. a member
of the congregation.
Ellen Ruth Epstein, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Epstein
of Miami Beach, was married
on Sunday to Brad Sidney Feld-
ser, son of Mrs. Hannah J%ies
of Stuart. Dr. Irving Lehrman
officiated.
The couple, who are grad-
uates of the University of Flor-
ida in Gainesville, plan to make
their home in Atlanta.
The bride's attendants were
Mrs. Barbara Ehrlich of Long
Island as matron of honor and
Susan Epstein of New Orleans
as maid of honor.
Tom Barb of Albany, Georgia,
was best man. and the ushers
were Richard Jones of Stuart.
David Epstein of North Miami
Beach. Jim Fulton of Chamblee,
Georgia, and James Moss of
Doraville. Georgia.
Guests and relatives from
New York. Pennsylvania. Vir-
ginia, Austin, Texas and New
MRS. BRAD S. FELDSER
Orleans attended the ceremony
and reception at Temple Kmanu-
EL
Michele August Marries Pakistani
Michele August, daughter of
Elaine Schiller August and
member of a pioneer Miami
family, was married on June 26
to Rehan Habib. son of Mrs.
Banu Husein of Karachi who
traveled to Miami to attend the
wedding in traditional Pakistani
dress.
Judge Dominic L. Koo offi-
ciated at the afternoon cere-
mony at which the bride was
given in marriage bv her broth-
er. Samuel Joseph August, a stu-
dent at Lehigh University.
Mrs Habib wore a white sa-
tin Southern Belle-stvle gown
with Chantillv lace and a full-
length veil edged with matching
hce She carried a bouauet of
Hnrine flowers and daisies.
HER ATTENDANTS were her
grandmother. Florence Schiller
Cavaliere. as matron of honor,
ind her sisters Allison as maid
of honor and Deborah as brides-
maid.
Rnz Fazalbhov was best man
and the usher was Shezad A.
Contractor.
Mrs. Habib is a graduate of
North Miami Senior High,
where she was a member of Sub
Debs. Her husband studied at
MRS. REHAN HAHIB
Florida International University
Following the ceremony there
was a reception at the home of
the bride's family. On their re-
turn from a wedding trip to St
Augustine and along the Florida
coast, the couple will live in
North Miami
Canadian Leader Says Israel
Is Foreign-Policy Cornerstone
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
OTTAWA (JTA) Allan
MacEachen. Canada's Minister
for External Affairs, declared
here that "the continuous exist-
ence of Israel is a cornerstone
of Canada's foreign policy." and
"we refuse to become part of a
plot to undermine the legiti-
macy of the State of Israel."
The Canadian diplomat, ad-
dressing the annual conference
of the Canada-Israel Committee,
also pledged that "Canada will
not push around Israel forcing
her to adopt policies contrary
to her interests."
HE CITED Canada's stance at
the United Nations where "Our
decisions are taken in the sense
of our principles and on these
principles we have rejected the
linking of Zionism with racism
in the General Assembly last
fall."
He recalled that the Canadian
Senate and House of Commons
"are the only legislative body
in the world which has unan-
imously condemned that resolu-
tion."
MacEachen noted that "Israel
has not failed to respond to the
call for help of the Third World
countries." He said that during
his visit to Israel in January
"we have examined whether we
can complement one another in
third countries, thus expressing
our common values by such
cooperation "
REFERRING to the upcoming
Habitat Conference in Vancou-
ver to which the Palestine Li-
beration Organization has been
invited. MacEachen promised
that "Canada will do its K
keep the conference or. the
rails. If extraneous questions
are going to be introduced the
Canadian government will take
its responsibilities l >ame
as we did" at the UN
OWN YOUR
OWN BUSINESS
IN FLORIDA
AN OPPORTUNITY TO
SHARE IN FLORIDA'S
LARGEST INDUSTRY
POTENTIAL GROSS
EARNINGS $50,000
YEARLY AND UP
SUBSTANTIAL FLORIDA
COMPANY
NO. 1 D ft B RATING
Roply to: O. Y.
P.O. BOX 01-2973
e/o JEWISH FIORIDIAN
MIAMI 33101


riday, July 2, 1976
fjewisli HcridHain
Hage 9-B
/V 0 14 C* o w n
Sid and Iris Poland, who own the Things-A-Dings gtfi and
accessory shop on Arthur Godfrey Rd.. have just returned from
Visiting San Francisco, Carmcl and Monterey. They're off again
Eo the National Gift Show in Dallas, the International Candy Ex-
hibition in New York and to check on Sid's TV interests in Alex-
andria. Va.
Among the recent graduates of the Forsyth School for Den
|tal Hygienists at Northeastern University in Boston is Leslie
IFaye, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Robbins of Miami Beach.
Ian honors graduate, going to Guatemala to aid earthquake victims.
The St. Francis Hospital board of directors has two new
members: Kenneth B. George, Jr., and Charles Schwarz, M.D.
Ic.eorge, president of Flagship First National Bank of Miami, is
[president of the Lincoln Road Association. Dr. Schwarz has been
Ion the hospital staff since 1948 and has served as chairman of
[the Department of Medicine and as a member of the executive
committee. At the June 24 awards dinner 77 employees were hon-
|ored by the hospital for a total of 660 years of service.
Capt. Frank L. Goldstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Goldstein
|t Homestead, has graduated from the Air University's academic
instructor course. A graduate of South Dade High who received
I a Bachelor's degree from the U. of South Florida and a Master's
from U. of Chicago, he has been assigned to Scott AFB in Illinois
as a social worker.
Gerald Schwartz, feeling fine and out of the hospital, is con-
ducting business from home. Holding the fort at the office are
Felice P. Schwartz, senior vice president, and Carol Jacobs, ac-
count executive.
Intercontinental Bank of Miami Beach will complete
construction of a five-story tower adjoining its main
building on Washington Ave. by the end of the year,
according to Benjamin 1. Shulman, chairman of the
board. Similar in design to Intercontinental Bank's Alton
Rd. office, it will have full access to the existing build-
ing and increase present facilities by about 40 percent.
The building will house the international department
and executive and administrative offices.
OLAM TRAVEL NETWORK. INC
GO KOSHER
Wl
uniTGD AiRLines
SEE AMERICA THE KOSHER WAY
EXCITING TOURS TO
CALIFORNIA LAS VEGAS GRAND CANYON-
LAKE TAHOE-SIERRAS-CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ROCKIES
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS
AUZA BRENNER TRAVEL SERVICE INC.
605 LINCOLN RD MIAMI BEACH PHONE 531-5865
Joseph Stefan (seated, left), chairman
and president of the Miami National
Bank, signs a check for $250,000 that the
bank is lending to Temple Sinai of North
Dade for the congregation's purchase of
State of Israel Bonds. Receiving the check
on behalf of the temple is secretary Nor-
man S. Klein (seated, right). With them
are (standing, from left) temple trustee
Ira Gelber; treasurer George J. Berlin;
and Garv Gerson, general campaign
chairman oi the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization. Milton M. Parson,
Israel Bonds executive director, noted
that Temple Sinai is among the many
congregations and institutions that sup-
port Israel's economy hy purchasing spe-
cial five and a half percent interest-bear-
ing Israel Bonds. Klein lauded the Miami
National Bank loan as "a solid demon-
stru'ion of commuriily-rnindedness and
concern for the welfare of the little
democracy of Israel."
EXPERIENCED
YOUNG
ORTHODOX
RABBI
WANTING TO RELOCATE
IN THE SOUTH
BAL KRIAH
BAL T'FIIAH BAL T'KIAH
Write RABBI E.Y.O.,
Ocean View Post Office
Box 40-2583
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140
___ Temple Israel's Assistant Rabbi
I Leading Services This Evening
Brett S. Goldstein, new as-
sistant rabbi at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, will lead the
services this evening at 8. His
sermon, "In the Beginning."
will review Chaini Potok's novel
of the same name.
Ordained recently at the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in Cincinnati.
Rabbi Goldstein will be installed
formally as a member of Tem-
ole Israel's rabbinic staff later
this war.

BarMitzvahs
are better at
the Konover.
( ot ml. ''
Director Crf I
865-1500
Mia. Beachs <" i
hotel is the ideal pMc> to
irate your special occasion
rabbinical supervision also available
Konover Hotel
On the Ocf
54th Street Miami B-


Page 10-B
-Jenisfi fhrkMarj
Friday, July 2, 19?6
Religious Directory
MIAMI
AMAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. 995 SW 67th Ave. OrthodOB.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Btn Aron 1
AN8HE EMES CONGREGATION.
23S3 SW 19th Ave. Conservative.
Cantor Sol Pakowitz. 2
BETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Ken.
Jail Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Chefitz. 3
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonlta Dr. Or
thodox. Rabbi Phlnaar A. .Veber
man. ag
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1B64
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Tavi G. Schur. 32
Chabad Opens U. of Miami Student Center
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. 32.A
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tab ichnikoff. 3.A
---------a>- ---------
BETH DAVID 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservat.ve. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipaon. 4.A

BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipaon. 4-B
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men.
Jal Gutterman. 6

BETH fOV TEMPLE 6438 SW 8th
t. Conaervative Rabbi Charles Rv.
bel 8
-
J-NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER Ml-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9600
Sunset Drive Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Olixman 8 A
a
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
^401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D Zwelllng. Cantor
Jack Lerner. M

ISRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
4IAMI. 137 NE 19th S Reform.
Rabbi Jnsep.i R Narot. 10
a
ISRAELITE CENTER 3175 SW 25th
t Conservative Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberp Cantor Nathan Par
nasr n
O* OLOM TEMPLE 8755 SW 16th
St. Cc.iservative Rabbi David M.
Baron. 13
ISRAEL SOUTH TEMPLE (former,
ly Beth T;kva) go.-1? Sunjet Dr. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseoh R. Narot. 1S-A
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306 Conservative. Rab-
bi Edwin P. Farbrr 9
ZION TEMPLE R000 Miner Rd. Con-
ervative Rabbi Norman N Shapiro.
Cantor Ben Dickso" 16
--- -
HiAltAH
TIFERETH jCOb TEMPI.E 951 E.
4tn Ave Conservative 15
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimovita.
S2-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1026
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive Rabbi Simcha Fraadman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. is
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ava. HebrevJ
Religious Community Center. 19251
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. JJ.A
BETH TCRAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipachitz.
34
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 871
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. 36-A
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
-3801 NE 22nd Ave Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid.
n.ck ]
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI 990 NE 171at St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. M
------------------
ORAL GABLES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd Reform. Rabbi Michael B. li-
senatat. Cantor Rita Shore 40
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave..
Conservative. 41
41
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER. COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE Univereity of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
Davis. 13
NORIH MIAMI
BETH MObHE CONGREGATION
2225 NE 121s. S. Conservative Rab-
Bi Dr Dame1 Fingerer. Cantor
Yehuda Bmyamin 33
a
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL 7801 Cariyle Ave
Ortho-1-< Rabbi Sheloon N Ever
17
a
'BETH EL 2400 Pin Tree Or Ortho.
dox. Rabbi Alexandrr Gross. S

sJETH ISRAEL 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Sh.ipiro. 18

'BETH JACOB 301 Washington Ave
Orthodox Rabbi Shmary?:.u T.
Swiraky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19

BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE 1545
Jeffersor Avr. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Wmogi-ad. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE 4144
Chase Ave Liberal. Dr. '.eon Kron-
ish. Canto. David Conviser. 21

BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE 1031
Lincoln Rd Modern Conservative.
Rbbi Davic. Raab Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. 21.A

BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euchd Ave Orthodox Rabbi I.
M. Tropper 23
a
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow RozencwMig. 22-A
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Avr. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D Vine 54
------- -----
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER
183 NE 8th St. Conservative ai
-a---------------
FORT IAUOFIDAIE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE 7100 W
Oakland Park Blvd Conservative
Rabbi Philip Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Ne>) 43
EMANU-EL TEMPLE 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd Reform. Rabbi Joel
S Goor Cantor Jerome Klement
43
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
4171 Stirling Rd. Orthodox Rabbi
Moshe Bomzcr. 59
-----
DEtRFIElD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
?, DE"FIELD BEACH Century
Village East Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. jj
ROMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER Con-
servative 610' NW 9th St 44. B
SHOLOM TEMPLE 132 SE 11th Ava.
Conservative Rabbi Morn. A Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
Rabbi Abraham Korf, region-
al director of the Chabad-Luba-
vitch movement, has announced
the newest phase in the Chabad
in Florida expansion project,
the opening of the Chabad
House-Jewish Student Center at
the University of Miami in
Coral Gables.
The Jewish Student Center
will provide much needed serv-
ices to the nearly 5.000 Jewish
students at the University of
Miami, FIU and Miami-Dade
South. The center will also co-
ordinate and direct Chabad ac-
tivities throughout South Dade.
The Chabad House Jewish
Student Center, in the midst of
the university's "Fraternity
Row." was acquired through the
generosity of Mr. and Mrs. H.
Hoffman.
CHABAD HAS been active at
area universities through the
Chabad Student Union, which
has sponsored various projects,
most recently a statewide Jew-
ish Student Conclave at the Uni-
versity of South Florida in Tam-
pa.
The Jewish Student Center
will provide a multifaceted ex-
perience, including educational
and Shabbos Drograms, a 24-
hour "hotline." social and pol-
itical events, a kosher meal
service and a nizza and relafel
shop Moshies Munchies Ko-
sher Pizza.
Chabad Extension Senice
programs at FIU and Dade
South will be coordinated with
UM activities.
The Chabad Student Union
and Rabbi David Eliezrie, cam-
nus activities director, have
been planning the different ac-
tivities, and students at Cha-
bad House participate at all
levels of programing and ad-
ministration.
Rabbi Korf observes that "this
new Chabad Center will provide
South Florida students with a
fresh new alternative to Juda-
ism; it will act as a catalyst for
developing a sense of Jewish
community at the University of
Miami."
SINCE a decade ago. when
the first Chabad House-Jewish
Student Center was opened at
UCLA, its unique approach has
attracted thousands of Jewish
students everywhere to Juda-
ism. A national and worldwide
network of Jewish Student Cen-
ters operated bv Chabad-I.uba-
vitch has developed, including
those at Tampa. Wisconsin. Ro-
chester. CaM Town (South Af-
rica) and Melbourne (Austra-
lia)
In this are* Chabad onerates
headquarters in Miami Beach,
North Dade-North Miami Beach,
and the Mobile Center Mitzvah
Tank.
Rabbis Korf and Eliezrie will
present the Lubavitcher Rebbe,
Rabbi Menachem Mendel
Schneerson, world leader of the
Chassidic movement, with a
key to new Chabad Center a
ceremonies in New York attend
ed by more than 5,000 ChahaH
followers. The even, will*
broadcast live to over so ChV
bad Centers worldwide, includ"
mg Miami. u
I Community^
S Corner:
The Spanish influence
abounds in South Florida. And
to everyone's benefit, too. The
Spanish Monastery, in an inter-
faith move, has donated three
antique refectory chairs to the
Sephardic Jewish Center in
North Miami Beach. The pres-
entation was made by Rev.
Frank Atlee, Jr., and was ar-
ranged by Hy and Irene Hapiel.
Felicidades! .
Rabbi Sheldon Harr is new to
Plantation as he assumes the
pulpit of the Plantation Jewish
Congregation. Sheldon Harr's
vocation may be the rabbinate
but. according to the TV and
radio listings, his avocation is
the media. Rabbi Harr used to
be seen and heard over the air
waves as co-host of Palm
Beach's "Mosaic" on Channel 5
and as host of West Palm Beach
Jewish Federation's weekly ra-
dio show. With this new ap-
pointment, the Plantation Jew-
ish Congregation celebrates its
Ural anniversary .
In the "Mv Son" department
Sgt. Richard Jaffe, whose moth-
er Ruth, resides in North Mi-
ami Beach, has been assigned to
Florida's Patrick Air Force Base
as an air traffic control special-
ist Ricky Deutch will be a
second-generation Ivy Leaguer
as he registers for the fall sem-
ester at Brown University in
Providence, R.I. Rickv s dad
Dr. Richard E. Deutch, Rrad
uated from Brown in his home-
town, eventually settled m Mi-
ami only to have his eldest son
return to hometown and gown
Ricky and Robin Popkin
just graduated from Ransom-
Everglades Alan S. KapUn
graduated from the University
of Florida Dental School, and
Eric J. Kaplan graduated from
the U of F Law School
In the "My Daughter' depart-
ment: Rachelle Nelson, daugh-
ter of Mayor and Mrs. Ted NsJ.
son of Bay Harbor Islands, re-
cently returned from a -our of
Poland and Rumania with the
UM Chamber Singers The Mi-
ami group was only one of two
minstrel groups to be invited
by the United States State De-
partment .
Community Corner Salutes:
Donald Farbcr on winning the
annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Alumni
Golf Tournament Norman
Braman on being named to th<
board of directors of the Miami
Heart Institute
Would You Believe ? De-
terment A university co-ed
changed her name from Susan
Zimbleman to Susan Zimhle-
woman!
Fire Hurt in Tel Aviv Riotinp
TEL AVIV (JTA) Five
persons, including three police-
men, were injured by a hand
grenade thrown during a riot
here in a sjum quarter of south-
eastern Tel Aviv
The rioting by slum-dwellers
was aimed against the demoli-
tion of buildings erected with-
out a municipal license.
CORAL SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N W 100th Ave
Re-form Rabbi Max Weitz 44
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobaon 22-8
CHABAD HOUSE 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox Rabbi Josnph Biston 66
HAllANDALE
HALLANOALE JEWISH CENTER
16 NE 8th Ave Conservative Rab-
Ji Harry E Schwartz Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 1?
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ava.. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig 23
a
'CUBAN SEPHM^DIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION 715 Waahington
Ava Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Maaliah
Vtelamtd 23-A
-EMANU-EL TEMPLE 1701 Waah-
ington Ave. Conservati/e. Dr. Irving
-chrman Cantor Zvi A.ller 24
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 1900 Un,.
versity Dnve Conaervative Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. M
HOurwooo
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1SS1 8. 14th
Ave Reform Rabbi Samuel Jaffe
Asaiatant Rabbi Harvey M Rosen -
46
GOLD COAST SYNAGOGUE 544S Col-
line Ave. Conservative.
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Tree Or. Orthodox Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross 33
'B,h.TH.SH/L0M T*"PLE. 1 Ar-
!? ,r ?. Con,ervative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsfcy Cantor Irving Gold. 46
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St
Conservative Rabbi David Shapiro
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Liatfield
JACOB C COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE 1582 Waahington Ave.
Orthodox Dr. T bor H Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel 26
4)---------------
KNESETH SRAEL 1475 Euclid Ave
Orthodox Rabb- David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. zt
-----------------
t-UBAVITCH CONGREGATION 1120
Collms Ave Orthodox. Rabbi Abra.
Ham Korf. 17
MENORAH TEMPLE. 620 75th t.
Conservator Rabbi Mayor Abramo.
wltz Cantor N:c Feldman. 28
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatwm Wat*rway. Conaervative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitr Cantor Edward
Klein. 28
SEPHARDIC lEWISH CENTER 648
Collms Ave. Orthodox Rabbi Sadl
Nahmiae. II
'BETH AHM TEMPLE 310 SW 62nd
*ve Conservative Rabbi David Re-
senfield. 47.B
*S,kE1-. T0Er'pLE* "00 Sheridan St
Liberal Rabbi Robert Fraiir 47.c
----------
PLANTATION
p>ANTATION JEWISH CONORE-
fri,TR? *0S Nob Hill Rd IU.
eral Reform Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
" 74C7?NNSTVR^hTI?,N'8T 8*<">
-----------------.
MIRAMAR
''rRA.!L TEMPLE 6820 SW 35th St.
Conaervative Rabb. Avrom Orain.
Cantor Abraham Keeter. 4a
JW\ \ames Sherrv
State Commander
At the concluding business
s-ssion of the Jewish War Vet-
erans' 30th annual convention
on June 2" Arthur Sherrv was
elected commander of the De-
partment of Florida.
Others elected include Nor-
ton Leff. senior vice comman-
der: Sidn-v Potlock and Alvin
Kcse. junior vice commander;
and Leonard Davis, ludge advo-
cate.
Outgoing state commander
Howard Melinson and state Aux-
iliary president Ceil Zucker
were honored at a banquet dur-
ing the three-day convention
which was held at the Amer-
icana Hotel.
RABBINICAl ASSOCIATION OF
CREATER MIAMI
S?L'*;yf>a aWyC. Miami. r,.
E2L i7*-4000- "bbi Solomon
Sch.ff. Executive Vice President
About 300 helmeted police-
men, reinforced by border pol-
ice units and fire brigades with
water hoses, surrounded the
area after local residents block-
ed demolition equipment with
piles of burning tires and wa-
ter-filled trenches.
THE POLICE, wielding
truncheons and protecting them-
selves with plastic shields, clos-
ed in on the rioters and were
pelted with rocks and molotov
cocktails.
A bull dozer attempting to
knock down a locksmith s work-
shop, allegedly built without li-
censes on a public lot. became
stuck in a water-filled ditch
Police who surrounded the
vehicle to protect it were at-
tacked with a grenadi
treated After the injured vtn
removed, police closed off the
demolition site, pennittini; muni-
cipal workers to gear down the
building bv h?r.d
THE LOCAL resident-
that demolition orders issued
some time ago by Mayor Shlo-
mo Lehat. were beinc carried
out onlv in poor neighborhoods
while illegally built houses n
the wealthy northern districts
of Tel Aviv were allowed to
stand Lehat said that illegal
sructures would be demolished
no matter were thev are locat-
ed
UNION Of AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
lh.B. 37lk*iu "i nford
Shapero. Director.
Member of the Rabbinic*' Aaxoclatloa
'I tirraler
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OP AMERICA
'820 NE 163rd St.. North Miami
oXtT Fri--" *"""
Beach, ria. SS182. 847.6084. Rabbi
in a
pickle
about
where
to
m
&.
WE LOVE CHILDREN ... THe KIDS LOVE US
BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY TO BERTRAMS.
Reasonace p.-.ces. good ceo. arj* sencfon i-om
h*na*hesiocom( -k uoes-a.i you
caned' |
Cockti '-, O'jme tic and | ceer


Friday, July 2, 1976
> knisl fUridktr
Page 11-B
b>
^abhmwal l$n%t
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
crxditors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT JEWISH INSTITUTIONS
The Making of a Sef er Torah
By Rabbi Seymour Friedman
Executive Director
United Synagogue of America
In South Miami Beach Rabbi
Y. S. Halpern is continuing the
traditional role of the Sofer.
Although his talents and skills
are used in many ways, such as
the writing of Ketuboth (mar-
riage contracts), Gitin (divorce
papers) and other similar legal
religious documents, his pri-
mary concern is in the writing
of Sifrei Torahs.
Rabbi Halpern studied this
craft in Jerusalem under the
direction of Rav Nahman Klein,
a descendent of the Hasam So-
fer, one of the most renowned
men in this field. Rabbi Hal-
pern. who wrote a Sefer Torah
for the late Rabbi Unterman.
the Chief Ashkenazi Rabbi of
Israel, has been involved in this
work for 22 vears.
It is hard to know how to
describe the work of a Sofer.
The beautiful workmanship of
his manuscript makes me want
to describe it as artistic but
an artist calls on his own ideas
and inspiration. The Sofer is
forced to exercjse his artistry
within very strictly defined
limits: every aspect of his work
is controlled by rules laid down
over a thousand years ago.
THE RULES and regulations
are contained in a special trea-
tise called Masechet Soferim.
compile-l about 1,400 vears ago.
Its 21 chapters set out in me-
ticulous detail every conceiv-
able aspect of the work of writ-
ing a Sefer Torah. There are
regulations about the size of
columns, the number of col-
umns to a leaf of parchment,
the number of lines to the col-
umn, and the amount of space
to be left between words and
around letters, as well as the
appearance of the letters them-
selves If the Sofer deviates in
even the tiniest detail from any
of these regulations, his work
is nosul (unfit for use).
Even the material with which
a Sofer works is controlled by
tradition. The parchment on
which he writes has to be made
from the skin of a kosher
animal. Rabbi Halpern told me
that he normally prefers to use
parchment made from calfskin,
for this is soft and supple. He
prepares the parchment himself
soaking the skins first in
water and then, over a period
of weeks, in a lime solution.
This procedure softens the skin
so that all the hair and fibers
can be removed with a knife.
This soaking, incidentally, is
done at an ordinary tannery,
where the lime baths on other
occasions are used to soak hides
that will eventually be put to
more secular uses, such as
drumheads! This does not mat-
ter, but it is important that a
special prayer is pronounced at
the outset to dedicate the skin
for the making of a Sefer To-
rah. If this prayer is omitted,
the oarchment cannot be used.
The skin la soaked initially foi
three weeks and then, after th :
hair has been carefully scrape I
off with a knife, it is put into
another lime solution for a fort
night.
The skin is then pinned with
strings to a frame for drying.
The strings are attached to
small screws on the frame
which are tightened during the
drying process in order to
sr-'-h the skin (0 tr.
size. This has to be done with
care so that the skin does not
crack an expensive mistake,
as it can take up to 62 calfskins
to make sufficient parchment
for one scroll.
NOT ONLY does the scribe
prepare his own parchment; he
also has to make all his own
writing materials: he cuts his
own pens and mixes his own
ink. The ink is made by boiling
un a mixture of gallnuts, cop-
per sulphate crystals and gum
arabic. Rabbi Halpern does this
in a small saucepan on his
kitchen stove, and the resulting
ink is a shinv black. It is inter-
esting that this mixture, incor-
porating cooper sulphate cry-
stals, was known even in Tal-
mudic times. 15 centuries ago.
The Sefer Torah must be writ-
ten with a quill oen. which Rab-
bi Halnern cuts from goose or
turkey feathers.
Before any writing is done
on the parchment the Sofer
must rule his lines: it is for-
bidden to write a Sefer Torah
on unlined oarchment. Rabbi
Halnern draws his lines by mak-
ing tinv holes at each end of
his roll, using a metal ruler as
a guide and indenting a line
with a small awl. This gives him
a clear guideline to work on but
is auite invisible once the man-
uscript is completed.
An average calfskin Produces
a niece of oarchment wide
enough to write four or. at the
most, five columns. Each col-
umn bv tradition must be wide
enough to write three times the
longest word that occurs in the
Torah that is. in practice
about S inches wide. Another
reason is that each column
should be no wider than a man
can comfortablv read without
moving his head from side to
side. The size of the margin be-
tween the columns is also care-
fully regulated.
Maimonides. the Medieval
Jewish codifier and philosopher,
wrote that the ideal height for
a column should be the width
of V fingers as 17 is consid-
ered to be a good number, being
the numerical value of the word
tow good Maimonides also pre-
scribed that the margin at the
too of the scroll should be three
fingerbreadths. that at the bot-
tom four fingerbreadths and the
margin between the columns
two fingerbreadths. These mea-
surements are retained today.
BEFORE a Sofer can sit down
to write anv part of a scroll he
must be rituallv clean and he
therefore goes to a ritual bath
(mikvah) each day before he
commences work. He also pro-
nounces a special prayer. "I am
writing this for the sake of the
holiness of a Sefer Torah." be-
fore he starts work. The idea of
this nraver is to concentrate
the scribe's mind on his task.
He must be free of all distrac-
tions.
A scribe must not write a
Sefer Torah from memory, how-
! he knows the words
f|e .. word from
an authorized text. Rabbi Hal-
pern uses as his guide a book-
written by a Polish Sofer at
the end of the 19th century.
This has the complete text of
the five books of Moses. It
shows exactly how much space
to allow between words so that
both margins are kept straight
Anart from the obvious aesthe-
tic virtue of straight columns
margin and to add to the
complexity of the scribe's tasks,
there are only certain letters
which can be elongated to make
the lines of even lengths.
There are also certain letters
which have to be written either
larger or smaller than the rest.
Throughout the scroll there are
about 20 such letters, and for
each of the deviations the rab-
bis have an explanation. The
Sofer must remember each of
these minute details, as well as
the sections, such as the Hymn
of the Red Sea crossing, which
have to be set out in a special
way. If he fails in even the
smallest detail the scroll is con-
sidered unfit for use. unless the
mistake can be corrected.
I asked Rabbi Halpern what
happens if he makes a mistake
when working on a scroll He
explained that it could be cor-
rected the ink can be erased
with a knife and pumice stone.
But should a mistake be made
in the writing of any of the
names of God this cannot be
corrected and the parchment
cannot be used. Special atten-
tion has to be given to the writ-
ing of the names of God. It must
be done without anv interrup-
tion. According to the Book of
Soferim, "Even if the King of
Israel should then greet him,
he is forbidden to reply."
Question
Box
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why is the me-
zuzah affixed in a slanting
position instead of either a
horizontal or vertical posi-
tion?
Answer: There seem to be
two conflicting opinions in Ta!
mudic literature, one contend-
ing that the mezuzah must be
affixed in a horizontal position,
while the other asserted that
the mezuzah be affixed in a
vertical position.
The rabbis of later years com-
promised in ordering the me-
zuzah to be affixed in a slant-
ing position so that both posi-
tions can be nartiallv accented.
Some claim that this decision is
a model of ideal life both out-
side and inside the home. i.e..
on both sid>s of the doorpost
to which the mezuzah is af-
fixed
Th" n-t of compromise pre-
rvps the neace of the house-
hold within, iust as it also pre-
a trves the Deace of the outer
world in the affairs of people
;ind nation-
TV Programs
Sunday, July 4
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Temple Emanu-El
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Should Jeivish Children
Enter the Professions?
By RABBI M. B. EISENSTAT
Temple Judea
Along with the Enfamil, we
Jews manage to force-feed our
children with generous doses
of propaganda. By the time
Jewish children have given up
the bottle, they know that it is
their bounden duty to go to col-
lege and to enter one of the
"professions." By the time they
are juniors or seniors in high
school, they have a morbid
dread of not going to college.
Their parents do not even
consider the possibility of their
children's not going to college
It is not a question of "whether
college." only of "which col-
lege." It is only the child who
is so without intellect that
college is not even a remote
oossibilitv who escapes the
pressure of peer and family.
Needless to say, the college
education for which parents
generally sacrifice so much is
aimed either directlv or indi-
rectly at preparing the student
for a particular kind of job
upon graduation: perhaps the
education is to prepare the child
for a graduate education which
will culminate in a job.
THERE IS nothing wrong with
helping our children to obtain
all that education. Not if the
children really want it. But to
pressure them into accepting it
so that they may prepare for a
career of which thev are not
desirous or. worse vet. one
which thev do not want or even
find hateful, is to do them a
eret disservice.
Our era of higher education
and reliance upon technology
has taught us that there is no-
thins dishonorable or disgrace-
ful about working with one's
hands. It is not a disgrace not
to be a "professional." Anyone
who has had recourse to the
services of anv one of the per-
sons who service or repair anv
of the various technical devices
noon which we depend can only
recognize the value of vocation-
al training. John W. Gardner
said it very well when he ob-
served that an excellent plumb-
er is of infinitely more worth
than an incompetent philoi-o-
pher.
We Jewish parents who would
help our children might do well
to recognize that there is a vast
vocational field that does not
demand a college degree. We
would do well to recognize that
a vocation that brings satisfac-
tion as well as remuneration is
of vital importance to the well-
being of our children.
Inside Judaica
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Q. Can the Bar Mitzvah
be celebrated on a day other
than the Sabbath?
A. The calling up to the
reading of the Torah is a sym-
bol of a boy's attaining maturity
Among observant Jews in East-
ern Europe, the Encyclopaedia
Judaica states, the boy was us-
ually called to the Torah on the
Monday or the Thursday fol-
lowing his birthday.
In Western Europe the occa-
sion took on a more ceremonial
importance, and it was custom-
arv for the Bar Mitzvah boy to
be called up to the Torah to
read the "maftir" portions and
the "haftorah" on the first Sab-
bath after his birthday when
morning service assumes a more
festive atmosphere. After the
service, a festive "kiddush" is
often held, with a banquet on
the ;amc or the following day.
& & -it
Q. What is fhe Bat Mitz
vah?
A. "Bat Mitzvah" ("daugh-
ter of the commandments") is a
term denoting the attainment of
religious and legal maturity o)
a girl at the age of 12 plus one
dav, It was officially introduced
in France and Italy and widely
adooted in other countries.
*p
Korah
"And the earth opened her mouth, and swal-
lowed them up and all the men that appertain-
ed unto Korah" (Num. 16:32).
KORAH Korah, son of Izhar, and Dathan and
Abiram, sons of Eliab, led a rebellion of 250 men who
refused to accept the leadership of Moses and Aaron.
Moses tried in vain to persuade them that all was being
done according to God's will. Finally, God Himself acted
"And it came to pass that the ground did cleave as-
under that was under them. And the earth opened her
mouth, and swallowed them up, and their households,
and all men that appertained unto Korah, and all then
goods. So they went down alive into the pit; and the
earth closed upon them, and they perished from among
the assembly And fire came forth from the Lord,
and devoured the two hundred and fifty men" (Num-
bers 16:31-35). To prove that Aaron had indeed been
chosen by God for his priestly function, Moses instruct-
ed every tribe to place its rod near the Ark of the Cove-
nant; miraculously, Aaron's rod sprouted. Thus ended
the controversy over the priesthood. The portion pro-
ceeds to describe the various emoluments that the priests
and Levites received.
.


Page 12-B
* Mnisii-fhrMtor)
Friday, July 2, 1976
Catholic Good Friday Prayer
Under Rabbinic Scrutiny
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA)
An American rabbinical ex-
pert on Catholic-Jewish re-
lations has renewed a long
dormant effort to obtain re-
moval from the Catholic
Good Friday liturgy- of a
hymn which has strong anti-
Jewish elements. Called the
"improperia," or "Reproach-
es," the ancient hymn is
sung during the "Veneration
of the Cross."
While the term "Jews"
does not appear in the
hvmn. the reference is un-
mistakable The opening
verse, as given in English
translation in a 1961 study
made under American Jew-
i s h Committee auspices,
"Anti-Jewish Elements in
Catholic liturgy," reads: "0
Mv People, what have I done
unto thee? Or in what have
I offended thee? Answer Me.
Because I led thee out of
the land of Egypt thou hast
prepared a cross for thy
Savior."
THE SECOND verse reads,
according to the 1961 study,
showed that portions of the
text of the hymn were efforts
to take the Passover "dayenu"
of thanks and turn its message
against the Jews.
Tanenbaum last week sent
letters on the problem to Bi-
shop James Rausch. general
secretary of the United States
Catholic Conference, and to the
Rev. John Sheerin. associate
director of the Bishops Secre-
tariat for Catholic-Jewish Rela-
tions.
He also wrote to the Rev.
Frederick McManus. dean of
the graduate school at Catholic
University in Washington and
a specialist in Catholic liturgy
and a former president of the
National Catholic Liturgical
Association
THE NATIONAL Conference
of Catholic Bishops has a litur-
gical commission which report-
edly has discussed modifica-
tions or elimination of the hymn
but has not taken official ac-
tion on making such a recom-
mendation to the full American
Catholic hierarchy.
Tanenbaum told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
AJCommittee is asking the
Catholic officials to put the
matter on their agendas for at-
tention and possible action. He
said Archbishop John R. Quinn.
of Oklahoma City, is chairman
of the Bishops Liturgical Com-
mission and that Rausch could
formally bring the issue tt ihe
Archbishop's attention fo> offi-
cial action.
TANENBAUM SAID his of-
fice arranged for the 19ol study
at the request of the late Au-
gustin Cardinal Bea. then Pres-
ident of the Secretariat for
Christian Unity. The study, one
of three on possible sources of
anti-Jewish hostility in Catho-
lic teachings, was maae at Bea's
request after he was assigned
by Pope John the responsibil-
ity of preparing the schema on
Catholic-Jewish Relations for
Vatican Council II.
The rabbi said the Cardinal
asked that the study on liturgy
be kept confidential because he
was then under tremendous
pressure against any changes
in the liturgy from Arab-Catho-
lic clergy and from ultra-Or-
thodox Catholic theologians
who firmly believed that the
Jews had crucified Jesus and
deserved punishment for their
"sins "
TANENBAUM SAID that the
initial cooperative efforts at im-
proving Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions, growing out of Vatican
Council II decisions, had been
aimed at eliminating anti-Jew-
ish references from Catholic
.textbooks so that future gene
rations of Catholics would nor
be exposed to such anti-Jew-
ish teachings.
He told the JTA that there
were no such references in any
Catholic textbooks published
last year, marking the success
of a 10-year effort.
In his letter to Rausch. Ta-
runbaum noted the elimination
of anti-Jewish content from
Catholic teaching materials and
added that "for some inexpli-
cable reasons, much less atten-
tion has been paid to similar
problems in liturgy." He re-
called that Pope John had re-
moved the "perfidious Jew"
prayer from the Good Friday
service but that "little systema-
tic work has been done in lit-
urgy on that problem.
Until 1970. when the English
translation of their hyman be-
came available, the "impro-
peria" had been sung in Latin
and its implications reportedly
were not understood. The issue
surfaced this year when Ken-
neth A. Briggs. religious edi-
tor of the New York Times, who
is a Catholic, became aware of
the anti-Jewish elements of the
hymn and discussed it with a
number of Catholic clerical
leaders, including Rausch, Mc-
Manus. Sheerin end others.
BRIGGS REPORTED, in an
article in the Times which ap-
peared the day after Good Fri-
day, that some of the Catholic
dignitaries felt that the hymn
failed to conform to a set of
guidelines on Catholic-Jewish
relations issued in January 1975
which requires that the Catho-
lic church evaluate its liturgy
for possible anti-Jewish refer-
ences.
In his letter to Rausch, Ta-
nenbaum said he had sent some
of the findings of the 1961
study to Briggs in the belief
that enough time had elapsed
since 1961 to permit such re-
lease and that he was also
making the findings available
to Rausch and the other catho-
lic leaders.
Tanenbaum also wrote Rausch
that "we would authorize you
to make this available to the
appropriate commissions or
persons who would be respon-
sible for undertaking any pro-
gram of revision of negative or
injurious references to Jews or
Judaism in present-day liturgi-
cal materials."
TANENBAUM ADDED that,
after those commissions or per-
sons made a study of the 1961
findings, "perhaps it would be
in order to consider issuing a
set of guidelines dealing spe-
cifically with the removal of
negative references and the in-
corporation of more affirma-
tive liturgical expressions that
would advance the cause of
Catholic-Jewish understanding
Tanenbaum said that to
make such changes, the nation's
bishops would have to request
permission from the Vatican.
This is understood to be a time-
consuming process
New Harassments
By Soviets Told
Continued from Page 1-B
journalists' union in Kalinin-
grad, has been refused an exit
visa and his son. Maurice, has
been threatened with conscrip-
tion into the army.
In Moscow, Joseph Elkind. a
lawyer who once headed a col-
ony for the rehabilitation of
juvenile delinquents, has ap-
plied for an emigration visa but
has received no reply. He fears
he may be turned down because
his former employer was the
Ministry of Interior.
A group of Jewish army vet-
erans in Moscow who were re-
fused ^sas because of their
military service, took their case
directly, to the Soviet Defense
Ministry last month. They were
interviewed separately and told
their cases would be reviewed.
THIRTY-FOUR Jewish activ-
ists in Minsk, among them for-
mer Red Army Col. Lev. Ovi-
scher. have signed a petition to
the Soviet government urging it
to resume diplomatic relations
with Israel in the interests of
Middle East peace.
Ovischer had applied for a
visa to go to Israel but was re-
fused It was reported, mean-
while, that the widow of the
late Col. Yefim Davidovich, the
Red Army hero who died in
Minsk last April, has applied
for an emigration visa for her-
self, her daughter adn grand-
son
Her husband had been re-
neatedlv refused a visa on
grounds of security.
Soviet Jews' Rights
Sought by Petitions
LOS ANGELES (JTA)
A petition campaign, seeking
human rights for Soviet Jews,
was launched by the Commu-
nity Relations Committee's Com-
mission on Soviet Jewry when
Dr Alexander Luntz. one of the
activists who initiated the peti-
tion in Moscow, visited Los An-
geles last month
The campaign is part of a
worldwide movement to stop
Soviet violations of the Helsinki
accord.
CRC chairman is Maxwell E
Greenberg. Commission chair-
man is Rohert M Shafton
The petition campaign,
launched at a special meeting
of the commission, was signed
by Sen. John Tunney. Mayor
Tom Bradley and members of
the Los Angeles City Council,
led bv Councilmen John Fer-
raro and Z*"- Viroslavsky.
meichels
by MIMA IAKACB
MEAT LOAF
Meat loaf is a favored dish in our house. The children
especially like the catsup sauce topping. It gives the meat
loaf a pretty color and keeps the top moist and juicy.
2 lbs. hamburger meat mushrooms, drained
2 extra large eggs 1 clove garlic, crushed
1 green pepper, diced salt, pepper to taste
1 stalk celery, diced % cup corn flake crumbs
1 4-oz. can sliced 1 bottle (14 oz.) catsup
Mix all ingredients together except the catsup. Press into
a large loaf pan. Bake at 350 degrees for half-hour. Pour catsup
over the meat and bake 30 minutes more. Serves 5-6.
BEEF STEW
Warmer days are upon us, and even with air-conditioning
one looks for dishes that avoid "heating up" the kitchen 1
recommend this top-of-the-stove dish for the hot days ahead.
It is delicious served over noodles or rice.
2 lbs. chuck meat whole
cut into 2-inch chunks 4 carrots, cut in rings
3 medium onions, sliced '. cup Malaga wine
'2 lb. fresh mushrooms, 1 tblsp. oil
Brown meat in oil and then add vegetables to pot and
brown. Add wine and cook ovei low heat for about two hours,
or until meat and carrots are tender. If necessary, add a few
tablespoons of water.
CURRIED LAMB
The kosher housewife is always looking for new ways to
prepare meat for her family. I'd like to share with you an ex-
periment I tried in a curried lamb dish. It is delicious served
over rice.
3h cups beef consomme
1 bay leaf
1 large can peach halves,
drained
3-4 lbs. lamb stew
1 medium onion, diced
2 tblsps. oil
1 tblsp. curry powder
3 cloves
Brown lamb and onion in oil. Mix remaining ingredients
and pour over lamb and onions. Simmer covered for 14 to
2 hours. Serves 6.
Bicentennial Events
Sparked by Youth
At Beth Am
Continued from Page 1-B
of the Jewish War Veterans, has arranged for colors to
be posted by Miami Beach Post No. 330 color guard.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principal of the Hebrew
Academy, said, "We planned this day to acquaint our chil-
dren and the community with the contribution these
patriots have made as Jews and as Americans. The great-
ness of individuals like Salomon is still largely unknown
to the general public," which is invited to attend the
celebration.
& a a
Florida's flag flew over Mt. Rushmore National Me-
morial in South Dakota's Black Hills June 16 and 17 and
ceremonies recognized the state during the 1976 Days of
Honor commemoration developed by the National Park
Service.
That flag was presented to Harvey Cotton of Gov.
Reubin Askew's office during evening lighting ceremonies
on June 17, and another state flag will be displayed
through through Sept. 8 in an Avenue of Flags established
for the Bicentennial.
Each U.S. state and territory is receiving homage at
the Shrine of Democracy, carved by Gutzon Borglum.
depicting Presidents Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and
Theodore Roosevelt and symbolizing the growth of the
United States.
LUNTZ. a distinguished sci- }
entist and a key spokesman for
activists when he was in the
Soviet Union, was released last
February and is currently tour-
ing key cities in the U.S. to
mobilize support for the "refuse-
niks "
ii^^iw^oxtoMyto'yi^
^^^^^^^*****^^i^ WMWliMWMMWWVW* HI 0
NEIL S. GOTTFRIED
On Saturday morning at 8:45
Neil Scott, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Martin Carl Gottfried, will be
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Ner Ta-
mid.
Neil is a student at Ner Ta-
mid Religious School and John
F. Kennedy Jr. High School.
He enjoys shirt painting, cera-
mics and stamp-collecting
A kiddush will follow the
services and a reception in
Neil's honor will be held at the
Kosher Steak House.
Out-of-town guests include
Neil's grandmother, Fanny Gott
fried, his uncle. Herbert Garfin-
kel. and Frank Zappulla. all of
New York
S


Friday, July 2, 1976
Jewisti Horkflan
Page 13-B
IEGAL NCTKI
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
\i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4018
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
v, |;k KSTATE OF
:.\D1E SCHWARTZ.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
M.I. PERSONS HAVING
l xiMS "It DEMANDS AOAINST
UK \HoVE ESTATE AND AI.I.
V'Tlll'i: PERSONS INTERESTED
ix THE ESTATE:
., ,r ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
he administration "f the estate
Bailie Schwartz, deceased. File
1 \umb.r 76-4018. Is pending in the
ji ircuit Court for Daile County. Flor-
liln probate Division, the address of
H-nlch is t;i West Flagler street. Ml-
uni Florida The personal r.presen-
i.iiiv.s .if the estate are Michael R.
gchwart! and Flagship First National
tmk '>f Miami Reach whose address
,i Flagship First National Bank
Miami Beach. Illl IJnenln Road
I ili. Miami Beach. Florida 33139 The
me and address of the personal ren-
nentatlvea' attorney are set forth
All persons having elalms or de-
uralnst this estate pre reojulr-
i WITHIN THREK MONVH8 PROM
HE DATE OF THE FIRST PITKLI-
ATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
nli th. clerk Of the above court a
ritten statement of any claim or
mand they mas have Each claim
u- In iii writing and must indicate
hi baali for the claim, the name and
IdreM of the creditor or his acrni
attorney, and the amounl claimed
i the claim is not vet due. the date
hen ii "ill become due shall be etat-
,1 If the claim It contingent or un-
Uldated, the nature of the uncer-
unty shall I"- stated If the dpim is
v.., ured, tin' s.-curltv shall be descrlb-
I Th. claimant shall deliver suffl-
.iii coplea of the claim to the clerk
tn .liable the clerk to mail one copy
i each personal representative.
Ml persona interested In the estate
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
i nlstration has been mailed are re-
Uired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
ROM THE DATE oF THE FIRST
I'HLICATION OF THS NOTICE, to
any objection! they may have that
lllenges the validity of th.- dece-
nriil the Qualification! of the
representative, or the venue
turlsdlctlon of the court.
I AIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
\S SOT BO FILED WILL BE
iREVER MARRED.
f the first publication of this
if Administration: .lulv 8. 1976
MICHAEL R SCHWARTZ
II AOSHIP FIRST NATIONAL
HANK i IF MIAMI BEACH
B) KEI.IN .1 MARTINEZ
\ Personal Representative of the
Estate "f Sadie Schwartl
11., :i sed
i:\EY Fl >R PBR8I >NA1.
REPRESENTATIVE
/.. mel, Roskln,
liner and Karo. P A
s E : Avenue
Miami. Klorlda 33131
Telephone: (805) 158-7990
7/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3412
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN UK ESTATE OF
\ IKON BERG
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
To Ml. PERSONS HAVING
I..M.MS oK DEMANDS AC.AINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
irTHEH PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOX' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
tARON BERG, deceased. File
Number 76-3412. Il pending In the
circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
id, i I'r.ihate Division, the address of
which Is 73 W Flagler St Miami.
il.iida 331!'.). The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is Fay Bent.
whose address Is K770 Indian Creek
Drive. Apt. 15 A. Miami Reach. Flor-
ida The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
s.-t forth beovj
All persona having claims or de-
inainls against this .-slat.- are re.iuir
.1 WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST I'l'BLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or
lemand they mav have Each i laim
must be in writing and must indicate
thi basis for the claim, the name and
iddreai of the creditor or his agent
r attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim Is not vet due. the date
When it will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty -.hall be stated If the claim is
ured the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver sufft-
ient coplea of the claim t" the i lerll
to enable ihe clerk to mail one copy
oh personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
mind WITHIN THREE MONTIS
PROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
I'llll.lCATION OF THS NOTICE, to
file any oblectlons thev mav have that
hallengea the validity of the dere-
dent'l will, the Qualifications Of the
ners.inal representative, or the venue
"r in .diction of the court.
AI.I. CLAIMS DEMANDS AND 'ECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL HE
FOREVER ItARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration .Tulv -'. 19.R
FAY HERO
Al Personal Representative of tbe
Estate of Aaron Rerg
Deceased
ATTORNEY. FoR PERSONAL
I'EI'RESENTATIVE
PAUNCB. FINK & FORM AN
...... Blscayne Blvd.. suite Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: 371-5471
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
I VT,v TEEN at 1274" SW r,(t Terr..
Miami. Fla 311(8 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dad.- County, Florida.
FRANK M CORDOVE8
RODOLFO M PRIETO
7 t-9-16-88
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice is hereby given that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
SEAL ENTERPRISES at 19" NE 91st
Street, Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Oeorge A. Seljo
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DAI iE BILLING SERVICE at 77.",
Dade Blvd., Miami Beach. Fla. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ROBERT SHORE
STATE BUILDERS, INC.
Bv: FRED R PBRLMAN. Pres.
MICHAEL P. CHASE
Attorney for State Builders. Inc.
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to eiUTSjre in
business under the fictitious name of
BEACHCOMBER RESORT MOTEL
a/k/a BEACHCOMBER MOTEL at
18925 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach.
Florida 881M intends to register Bald
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
BEACHCOMBER REVISITED. INC.
SHIRLEY WHOLE. ESQ.
Attorney for Beachcomber
Revisited. Inc.
Suite 111, 42" Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida Mitt
Phone 3".-.-:.31-6427
7 .' V-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19519
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLIVER SOLOMON NEALON
PETERS, Husband
I.YNETTE YVONNE PETERS.
Wife
To: Oliver Solomon Nealon Peters
Calle San Cristobal
131 l-a i'astora
Caracas, Venesuela
yOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been file daaralnat you and
you an required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sol Alexander, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 19 W. Flak-
ier Street, Suite 317. Miami. Florida
3313". and file the original with the
clerk "f the above styled court on or
b.for.- July 30, 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the r.li.f demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each .ek for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.oRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on this
22nd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P DRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By WILLIE HRADSHAW JR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19616
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
HUGO ANDKADE
Husband
and
JOSEPHINE ANDRADE
w Ife
TO: Josephine Andrade
74-08 DIUnari Blvd.
Queens, New York
yOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai in action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
STANLEY B. GOODMAN, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 2688
N.W 62nd Street. Miami. Florida
33147, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before July 30th. 1976,otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI/1HIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
23rd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BR1NKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Daile County. Florida
By 8. PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
H 'ircuit Court Seal)
Stanley E Goodman
1611 N W 62nd Street
Miami. Florida 33147
Attorney for Petitioner
6/25 7/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-1507
Division 35
IN RE ESTATE OF
PETER PHILLIPS.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS |R DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VIM' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of PETER PHILLIPS, deceased. File
Number 76-1507. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami Florida The personal representa-
tive of the estate Is MOI.LIE PHIL-
LIPS. Whose address is 4019 Utah
Btreet. Apartment 2". San Diego. Ca-
lifornia 11104. The name and address
>f the personal representative's attor-
neyi are set forth below
All person! having claims or de-
mands nfralnm the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PPBI.I-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount Claimed.
If the claim Is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tain shall b. state.! If the claim is
secured the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver surri-
. lent copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has be.n mailed arc re-
i.Ulred WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OK THIS NOTIt B. to
file anv objections they may have that
challencei the validity of the deca-
dent's will, the qualification! of the
personal representative, or the venue
..r jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
ll'CTIO.NS NOT BO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
D.t. ,,f the first publication of this
Notice Of Administration: June 26.
'*"' // MOLLIE PHILLIPS
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Peter Phillips. Deceased
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
GAIJM'T AND OALBI'T
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. J31S9
Telephone: 672-3100 ^^ ?/J
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-20306
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
o Mil.ha OABELL.
Pi tltloner,
JEROME HOWARD OABELL.
Respondent.
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU JEROME HOWARD OABELL
residence unknown ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED TO FILE your written
response to this action for dissolution
of manage, with the Clerk of the
above Court, and serve a coov upon
Petitioner's Attorneys. SAUL T. VON
/.AMET, Suite U0, 132" South Dixie
Highway, dual liable- Florida 33146.
on or before the tith day Of August.
1976, els. the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage will be taken as con-
fessed.
DATED June 29. 1976
RICHARD P, DRINKER
By; P ii IPEI.AND
Deputv Clerk
H 'ircuit Court Seal)
Published four conaecutlve weeks in
THE JEWISH FIXtRIDIAN.
7/2-9-16-23
Question
Box
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19547
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
YDORE VALDE8.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JOSE VALUES.
Respondent-Husband.
TO; JOSE VALDES
751 West 178th Street.
Apt. *2-A
New York. New York 10033
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
Hi.u an action fur Dissolution of Mar-
11.in,, ha! been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy Of
vnur written defenses, if any. to it on
CARLOS I.IDSKY, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2121 Pon-
ce de Leon Boulevard Suite 420. Co-
ral Gables. Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
stvl.d curt on or before July 30. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in tbe complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23rd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKEK
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESUIIRE
2121 Ponce de l,eon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Cables, Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 442-S624
Attorney for Petitioner
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SNAPPER CREEK DAY CAMP at
6509 S.W. 113th Ave.. Miami. Fla.. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
H'.'NTER ASSOCIATES. INC.
6651 SW. 117th Ave.. Miami. Fla
STEPHEN H. ROSEN
Attorney for Hunter Associates. Inc.
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of THE CHINA EXPRESS RESTAU-
RANT at 9601 Collins Avenue. Miami
Beach, Florida intends to register said
name with Ihe Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade Countv. Florida
HAM LEE INCORPORATED.
a Florida corporation
HARol.D CEASE
Attorney for HAM LEE
I Nil iRI'i iRATED
L'72'1 West Flagler Street
Miami Florida 88186
''h...... M*-'m 81 7/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-9552
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: PETITION OF BENISOl
PIERRE. ., .^
To JEAN E1.1KDOK1SMOVD
(Residence Cnknown) _____
VOL ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has been
filed for a minor child and vou are
hereby required to nerve a copy or
your Answer or other pleading to Uif
Petition for Adoption on 'he Petition
.r'l Attorney. HARVEY D ROGERS
Suite 200. 1454 N.W. 17th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida J3125. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 23rd day of
July. 1976. or a Default will be enter-
ed against you.
DATED This 11th day of June. 1976.
Richard P. brisker
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: N a. hewett
Deputv Clerk
1/18-85 7/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-20287
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
in RE: The Marriage of
UEI.MIRA M VILAS.
Wife/Petitioner
JOAQUIM VILAS,
Husband I Respondent
TO: JOAQUIM VILAS
RCA DOS in IMBEIROS, No 13
Bo.MBARRAl. PORTUGAL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has be.-n filed against vou and
you are required to serve a cony of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
WILLIAM BRODY attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 407 LIN-
' OLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, FLOR-
IDA S3139, and file the original with
the ci.rk of (he ai.ov. styled court on
or before August 4. 1976; otherwise
d.fauii will be .nt.r.d against vou
for the relief demanded In the com-
plain! or petition.
This notice shall be published onci
. acti week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the Mai
of said curt al Miami. Florida on
tins l'!' day of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKBR
Al i 'l.rk i 'ircuit Court
Dade Countv, Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
As Deputv Clerk
(Circuit COUH Seal i
WILLIAM BRODY
4i'7 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 83189
Attorney for Petitioner
7 8-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
WET PAINT at 18610 North Kendall
Drive. Miami. Florida intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
MAUREEN JORDAN mo'T-
HARVEY D ROGERS
Attorney for Wet Paint
1454 N.W, 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33125
Phone: 325-1561
7 2-9-16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CENTREX trade SERVICES. INC
at P.O. Box 011337, Miami SI101 In-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
JOSE PELLEYA
ED1AKDO BKRTOT
HARRY HURLEY
7/2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-19159
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA MERCEDES GUTIERREZ.
I. ZAPATA
Wife. Petitioner,
and
DIEGO ZAPATA.
Husband. Respondent.
TO. DIEGO ZAPATA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reojulred to serve a copy f
lour written del.nses if anv to it on
DANIEL RETTER. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is S01 Dade
Federal Building i"' East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 13131, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before .lulv
30, I97C: otherwise a default will lie
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the .-omplaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH F1.0RIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
aid court at Miami. Florida on this
isth dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv C. P. COPELAND
As Deoutv Cleric
(Circuit Court Seal)_____
DANIEL RETTER. ESOtTIRB
Attorney for Petitioner
101 Dade Federal Bulldlnr
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 35R-6l>9n
Attorney for Petitioner
/!R T/l-9-16
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why is it neces-
sary for a Jew tc affix a me-
zuzah on every door in his
home?
Answer: A variety of rea-
sons are offered for this mitz-
vah. Basically, it is so com-
manded in the Bible (Deuteron-
omy, Ch. 6). Some claim that it
is required so that the Jew re-
members that the Almighty is
omnipresent and that his pres-
ence should be sensed every-
where. This consciousness of
the Almighty"s presence can
serve to prevent a Jew from
wrong-doing, even in his pri-
vacy.
The Kabbalists (e.g., Reca-
nati) consider the mezuzah as
a means of protecting the home
and its inhabitants from evil.
In this respect the Jew fids
faith in the symbol of the me-
zuzah and a feeling of security.
It might also be that the me-
zuzah is a means of keening the
Jew constantly associated with
the word of the Almighty.
Since the mezuzah contains a
parchment scroll upon which
are written some paragraphs
from the Scriptures, the word
of the Almighty is thus con-
stantly found in the presence
of the Jew. Since the mezuzah
is affixed to the doorpost and
is thus in a place throueh which
neonle move, the Jew is thus
reminded of the need for con-
sistency in his faith.
The love of 'he Almighty
whi'-h a Jew has in his home
must travel with him as he
moves across the threshold from
his private domain to the public
thoroughfare. The concern and
politn-ss a Jew mav have in
public life must travel with him
as he cosses back into his
i.rivate domain from the public
arena.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-15342
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of:
DEUtRME I.ATOI'R.
Petitioner,
and
QITYL1NE GARDINER LATOCR.
Respondent
To: QUTLINE GARDINER
LATOUR
Residence I'nknown
VOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a coov of
your written defenses. If anv. to it on
EDWARD .1 NAURISON, attorney
for Pet it inner, whose address Is 561*
N E 71 Street, Miami. Florida M138.
and fib- the orialnal with the clerk
of the abov. stvled ...urt on or be-
fore August 8, I97 fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive week'
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
-ml court at Miami. Florida on this
mth day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P HRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Made County, Florida
By A CRCTCHER
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Beall
EDWARD .1 NAI'RISON. ESQ
568 N E 71 Street
\iiann. Florida 88188
Attorney for Petitioner
7/8-9-16-88
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OrVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
KINO'8 DELI at 1580 Washington
Avenue, Miami Reach. Fla. intend to
register said name with the Clerk Of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Luis Fernando Yaztiuez A
Ana Vaznuex. his wife
6/25 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
SAGITTARIUS SALES at 777 NW 72
Ave. Miami. Fla.. Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the Clr-
CUlt Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
LARRY ZARSKY
NAT WEI NICER
RICHARD IAN RR1CKMAN
Attorney for applicant
7/2-9-16-2X


Page 14-B
Jmistn&rkMan
Friday, July 2, 1976
LEGAL NOTICI
LfCAl NOTKI
IEGAL NOTKI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Filt NumNr 76-5S5
IN UK. ESTATE OF
MAl'DK J HARPER.
1 'iriMS.J
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
PO ALL PKKSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AQAIN8T
THE ABO\ 1: ESTATE and all
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOl' auk HEREBY NOTIFIED
lhal the administration of the state
of MAI'lu: J HARPER, deceased.
1'iU' Number 71;-:..'.;.. Il pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which II 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami Florida .1313" The personal rep-
renontalivi of the ..-Lite is Donna S.
Hell. whose address is 1377 N\V 34th
Street, Miami. Florida The name and
address of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands aA*alnsl tins estate are re-
luirnl. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM I'lIK DATE OF THK FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
tile iii iii. clerk of the above court
a wi -:..toment of any claim or
demand the* ma* havi Bach claim
inu-i ;. writing and must indicate
the l.i-i- for the claim, the name and
addn u >: the creditor or his act
attorney and the amount claimed If
thi i lain is not vet du. th. date
when it will bejoonae due shall be
stated K thi ntli Bent or
un] the I tun of tin uncer-
tain:* -' ill t stated If tl..
secured the scum* ahall be describ-
ed Thi lellvet raffl-
es of thi
i,. rk I ma I n*
i.....I reo resen tatIn
\ : -
lo whoi tl \ Ad-
m mailed an re-
quli UN THREE MONTHS
PROM THE P ATE OF THK FIRST
\ OF THIS NOTICE ti
fiU anv the* may have that
o thi
will, thi .i thi
tatlve or the venui
. U't
.'I.AIMS. DEMANDS AND
'IONS \i 'T si i FILED wil 1
UK I
D. .....M publication of this
Administration: July I, 1976
\\ S BELL
\- Pi I the
AUDE .1 HAUrEI!
ATTORNEY !" R
!Si SAI KEPRESENTA riVE
\ -sos
IkU
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THK
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17563
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK THE MARRIAGE OF
VIRGINIA M CE8TARE
Pi titioni r- wife
and
BRUCE M CESTARE
K. -p..ml. nt-Husband
TO BRUCF M CESTARE
Respondent Husband
M O.darhurst Avenue
lYdnrllurst. l,ong Island.
New York 11
Apartment No IC
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed against you and
VOU are required to serve a copy Of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
HARRIS 8PERBER, attornej foi Pe-
titioner, wh -i address li ISJTO Col-
lins Avenu Miami Beach. Florida
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
befon Jui* :4 ::'?>:. otherwise a de-
fault will 1'. entered against you for
th. relief di manded In the complaint
or petition
This none, shall hi published once
week for four consecutive u
in THK JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
Miami Florida on this
4th day of Jun. ItTI
RICHARD P BR1NKER
\- Clerk, dr. uit Court
Dade County Florida
By 1. SNEEDKN
a- Deput) Clerh
C un Seal!
II ARRIS SPERBER
Ulna Avenue
Bl ai h. Florida
\: rnej for Petitioner-Wife
: :
INC

iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNT*.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Cute No '6-16406
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Mai re Ol
.
VIRGINIA ID if.
To \ IR43INI V CtD
I:. -..I. n I'nknown
TOP ARE HEREBY ..1 that
. Petition for Dl
ha- been filed against voU and rou
are h.rdi r. ,iuir, I \, .,
' C ti
the Petition ... th. Hu- i Attor-
l.ESTER ROGERS whose ad-
dr, s- M 4 N \A II Avenue Mi-
am; PI -i,I.. I1JS and fil. the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styl-
ed Court or. or before this 3i'th da*
of Ju.v '.: or a IVfault will he en-
tered against VOU
DATED this ISth da* of June. ItTI
RICHARD P HK1NKEK
-k of the Circuit Court
Pv N A HEWETT
___ 7 ;--i
IN THE "CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No 7S.1S82S
NOTICE OF ACTION
COPLAN PIPE SUPPLY CO
a Florida coruorai
Plaintiff
VS
CENTRAL BANK TRUST
COMPANY
a banking corooratfcNi:
SUNRISE POINT INC
a Florida corporation.
DAN ELECTRIC INC
Floi .I
- ELECTRIC CORPORATION
E ration.
HBRTDAN ELECTRIC INC
ATIC Cl RPi 'RATION
ration: and
DISTRIBUTORS INC
1* corporation
.:-.ts
RLE PLUMBING. INC
.->i j Fia
Pain. M Errs Director
-- unknown
. hereh* notified that an ac-
m me need to foreclose
lb* following real
f and being and situate
in Dad. C u:.:* Florida more oar-
. descnb*-d as follow s
the BE >. at the
N \\ -i f gectioa 15 Township
.-.e. i the E
feet excluding the No IS
feet :J7 feet and less
the 9 feet excluding the
M feet of said S.' 117 <*' fee:
1- I : plat of
COWAN SUBDIVISION b* E R
Br aat*d Decem-
ber l7l as saore particular!* de-
larlbtd OR KM twrr
Ifavj. NO T3H-163:44 a k a Sur.-
rta* Polr S W
Street Miami FWrida
This action ha beer filed ag>
vow and rou are reouired to serve a
.-op* of tout srritten defense, if anv
061 HERMAN GRATSON ESO
** Lincoln Road Miami Beach
Florida i. and fUe the orUnnal
ith the Clerk of the above strled
Court o or before the 3rd da* of
Jutv ;*7< otherwise a default wtD
W entered ininst vou for the relief
li aaastj hi the comolalnt
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
ef said Court at Miaaai FVnda this
Kth (tar Ot JTuasr. l*7i
rchard f brinker
U Clerk of said CoUr!
Rv N A HEWETT
As IVuutT Clerk
iCourt Sea.
6 i$- : :-
T
I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4124
IN KE ESTATE I >F
NAT NELSON,
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSl NS HAVING
: DEMANDS AGAINST
rilK ABi '\ i PE AND ALL
i I'HKl; PKRS INS N rEKI STEP
VOl" ARE HEREin NOTIFIED
......
NAT NE1 Si S File
Nun the
..
AVest Fla
'. \ NKi.S
North Miami
1(9
- f 11 :i t a -
. t forth ^
All persons 1
i. .iuir. .1
WITHIN IIIKIK MONTHS FROM
THK PATE OF THK FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE to fill
>\ ith tl cl. rk f tl
rttl ,.m or de-
the) ma) h..%. Bach claim
musl in writing and must indicate
th. the i lain th. name and
address of thi litOI or his agent
lII .in ant :.iimed
If (he claim is not : iu. the date
when it will bucofjM due shall be
t If th. claim is ontingent or
unliquidated, the nature f the uncer-
tainty shall he stated If the claim Is
secured, th. securlt] shall be desorib-
.il The .l.umart shall deliver suffi-
cient copies, .f th. Uim to the clerk
to enable the clerk mail or.,
to each personal representative
All persons interested in the estate
: whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are r. -
.iuire.1. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE t
file any objevt may have that
- th. validity of the dece-
- Uill thi qualifications of the
entatlvi r the venue
' ;w urt
AI.I. CLAIMS DEMANDS AND OS-
riONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Votlci vdministration Julv : 1J7
REVa NELSON
v- Personal Representative of the
Estate of NAT NEI-Si N
Deceased
I .- R PERS SAL
REPRESENTATIVE
ROTH EN BERG KOGAN
KORNBLUM A BENJAMIN
11 I din*
'"4
- ;.*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-4025
IN RE ESTATE OF
LEOPOLD STERN.
I easel
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
in ALL PERSONS HAVING
OI.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSON8 INTERESTED
IN SAID STATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of LEOPOLD STERN deceased, late
of Dade Countv. Florida. File Number
T6-40U is pending In the Circuit Court
In and for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, th. of which
la 3rd Floor. Dade County Courthouse.
73 West Plaster Street. Miami. Flor-
ida S3130 The personal representative
of this estate is MARIA MAGDA-
LEN.* STERN, whose address is 1500
Hay Road. Apartment Mt, Miami
Reach. Florida The name and addr.s-
of th. attorney for the personal rep-
ilivo is set forth below
All persons havinc claims or de-
mands against this estate are reiiuir-
,1 WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with th. clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or
demand the* may have Each claim
he m writing and must I idicate
all for the claim th. name and
Idreai of the. creditor or his agent
r attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not v.t due the datl
when it will become due shall he stat-
ed If th. claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the un. r
taint* shall be stated It th. claim Is
secured, the S.CUritV shall be lies. Till-
ed The claimant shall deliver lUffl-
copies of the claim to the clerk
of th. abovi styled ...urt t.. enable the
. lerk to mall om I OP] to each personal
II ntative
All persons interested In th. estate
I horn a op] I thll Ad-
ministration has been malted ire re-
i WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
IMPLICATION OF THS NOTICE, to
mav have that
the validity of the di
. e/ill th. Qualifications of the
hi venue
..r jurisdiction ol thi ourt
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS AND I H-
' s NOT SO FILED WILL BE
c:KED
iTED at Mian on thi-
: ii
MARIA MAGDAI KN
As Pi
Estate I LEOPOLD ST
First pul

HENRY NOR"1' '
i' aa -
Miam
'
LE6AL NOTKI
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-9054
(Div. 31 WEAVER)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR PETITION
FOR ADOPTION
IN HE:
The Matter of the Adoption hy
J. HARRY M.CALLEY and
VIVIEN M.CALLEY
TO: Ronald Nixon
Residence I'nknown
Address I'nknown
roU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Petition of Adop-
tion has been filed In the above can-
noned case wherein vou have been
named as the punitive Father of a
baby girl horn on the 2ath dav 01
February. 1976. at Mt Sinai Hospi-
tal. Miami Reach. Dade County. Flor-
ida to KATHRYN REWJUK a/k/a
KATHY REWJUK. out of wedlock
and *"U have been named as the
punitive Father of said infant child
and this cause shaU come on to be
heard for Final Hearing and. If vou
have any objections thereto, vou are
reQulred lo nerve copy of said ob-
Jectlona, if any. on Robert H Burns.
Esij Attorney for Petitioner w!
address ,s |M Lincoln Road. Suite
ISO, Miami Reach. Florida 33139. and
file the original with the Clerk of the
V \. stvled court on or before Au-
gu-t I ItTI; oth.rwisj. a Default will
Be entered against you for the relief
I. minded in the Complaint or Peti-
tion and anv rights that vou mav
have had. shall be terminal..I
This ii.ti-e shall be published once
' week for four consecutive weeki
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and th.- -..,1
ed court at Miami. Florida on
tlrd da* of .lun. "."
RICHARD P BRINKER
\- iTerk iin un Court
1 ..ol, i 'ountv El.-ri.la
BY I. SNEEDKN
A- I '.-nut* Clerk
iClRCPIT CuIRT BEAD
ROBERT H BURN8 I
4:'" Llni
Miam. Beach Florida
Telephone No ;....-44_",
ner
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY QrVRV v
the underslaned. desiring to --- thit
business under the fletltlou/n^?e ,n
CIRCIITO TEATRAI. ,"a.5f 0'
KEIL
a Fla Corn
DANIEL M KEIL
Attorney for applicant
/i*-::
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
File Number 76-3792
Division
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ui
'I.IAN TILES GALI.ERY il
'
.
lit Court
IT MIAN TII.ES SOUTH IN''
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
TICE IS HERERY OIVBN
- ring to engage
-- ess under :.-.iotas name
I WASHING! N PHARMACY at
n Avenue in
Miami Beach Florida ir.-
tbe said name with
jrt of Dade
FVr-.da
Dated at Miami Beach FVnda this
lane '.:*
AYA8HINOTON DRF-; CcMPANY
R LI*.-si L Ru-
1: :- skin
* cobcant
4*J Linoolr. Road
Beach FV>n : :---.-a
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that
understated desiring to essnurr
business nndii the ftctiuoas nasa*
A w TRICK PARTS AND
EWFIPMENT CO it .'.** NW South
- Dnr Medie* Florida intends
-ttf.tr said name with the CVrk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County
FAorida.
Was*, a Vmceute il IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3826
Division JOHN R BLANTON
IN RE ESTATE OF
ETTA D SCHULZ.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
ro ALL PERSON8 HAVING
CLAIMS nR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
.'THER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE
rOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of ETTA D SCHULZ. deceased. File
Number 76-381*. is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade ("ountv Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
\>h:,h is T3 W Plaster Street. Miami.
Florida The personal representative
of the estate is WILLIAM BARNETT
whose address is :! ISInd Drive. Mi-
ami Beach. Florida TTie name and
address of the personal representa-
tives attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are reauir-
V 1THIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUHL1-
CATION OF THIS N"TICE. to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv clam
demand the* ma* ha*e Each claim
Bust be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim th. name and
f the creditor or his agent
. d :*.. amoui : claimed
If the laim is not vel date
when it will become due shall be stat-
II the claim is contingent or un-
'.ated. the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim Is
ired the secuntv shall N
.he claimant shall deli*er suffi-
;.;e of the claim to the clerk
enable the clerk mail one
-.-rsonal represents'
All persons interested in the estate
whom a .-or* : < Notice of Ad-
oration has been mailed are n
aired WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION "F THS NOTICE
file any objections the* ma* have that
'\*et the validitv of the dece-
the Qualifications of the
-.a! -eprsentative or the venue
- -u-.sd tten of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS AND >>B-
NS NOT S<1 FILED WILL BE
F"REVER BARRED
Dat. this
' Administration Julv ;
WILLIAM BARNETT
\- Perwonal Representative of the
Estate of Etta D S
ATTORNET Fy^R PERS--NAL
KEPRESENTATIVE
KUNE MOORE KLEIN A
HERROS PA
by JOSEPH PERI-STEIN
4*T Uncota Road
Miami Beach. Fla 33139
Teieu*oue i3-4-"
______________________________ 1 :-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNO PROPERTYi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 76-159S3
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
in RE Thi marrlaci of
FAYE IIERSS) IN,
Petll
and
PHILIP BERS80N,
1:. -[H.ndent
To PHILIP BERSSON
. o Ni |RM AN BER88) X
Two Fifth Avenue
Apartment ISA
N. w Y..rk N Y 1".',1
YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a By ol
your written defenses. If anv. to it on
STEINBERG A neisteln attorney
Petitioner, whose addr. -
Lincoln Road, Bulti SI* Miami Beach
Fla 33139. and file the original with
th. rk of the above styled court on
or before July 14. 19,<:. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against ou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published once
ach week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
court at Miami Florida on thll
na .i.,* of June I'.-Ti.
RICHARD P BHINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I '.ol. c iuntv Florid.i
R* 1. SNEEDKN
A- Deput* Clerk
It ircuit Court Seal I
'HAKI.KS L NEUSTEIN of
NRERG a NEUSTEIN
Llm In R.....1 suit.
Miami Beat h Florida .
All rnej for Pi titioner
M ii
: :
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
'TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-17498
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
In He The Married of
SONIA DEL VALLE wife
i il Li AM DEL V \Li.r
husband
MR WILLIAM DEL VALLE
Ri -..!: I'nknown
ARE HERERY notified that
Dissolution ,.f Marriaice
been filed ,,.u .,,(
r< quired l servi
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATinu
IN RE ESTATE OF "*TI0N
BENJAMIN G01J)BERC.
Deceased
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
Cl AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND AI.I
''HER PERSONS INTERESTru
IN THE ESTATE '
YOU ARE HERERY NOTIFIED
that the administration of th..
..f BENJAMIN GOLDBERG
ed, File Number 7K.3T:..
the Circuit Court for Dad. j-.L
Florid.! Probali Division tl
' which Is the Dad.- Cout
house. Miami. Florida Th. ,.-
representative* of thi .'
LENA GOLDBERG and 1
PERSON NATIONAL RANK OF Ml
ami reach whose addn
II Mm Trei Di
ami Beach, Florida at : |
Street Miami Beach, El
ami ai
representative* attornles ar.
All persons ha* mg la I mi I. .
I the i
WITHIN THREE MONTH
THE DATE OF THE FIRST I !U.'|.
CATION of THIS NOTICE
w ith the lerk ..f th.
ile-
rnu-t be In writing and mu I
the basis for thi the nai
Irea* of thi
... I the amouni
ed if th.- laim i- |
I ir f thi
. .
-. ured the s. urll
' man! shall
. ...
/
' '
'
'
! WITHIN THREE
'HE DATE
PUBLICATION IF
'
lent'* w ill. the .u.. I
U. '
CLAIMS DEMAND."
' 'H.l Ki Tl. iN8 NI 'T S' I FILEI
HE FOREVER BARRED
of the fir-i pul
Vol of Adm li
1 E.NA Ol il.M'i
THK JEFFERSON NATION
HANK i IF MIAMI BEACH
B] STUART J MILL!
Trust Off
A- Personal Representati* e- f the
Estat. f BENJAMIN GUI.I i
I .. -ased
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES
ENGLANDER A BURNETT
Attorneys for Lena Goldberg
Person*! Representative
One Lincoln Road Building Su li
Mlalm Beach. Florida 3313"
Phone ^1-1443
Bj MALVIN ENOLANDER
TRAGER A SCHWARTZ
Attorneys for The Jefferson National
Hank of Miami Beach Personal
Representative
Ml -41st Street
Miami Beach Florida 3314"
Phone yi:r:
By 8 GEORGETRAGER
.
\ u
; | -
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNO PROPERTYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCl.IT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-1W
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE Thi Marrfaure of
M ARIA TERESA JEREZ
Petll re -w
u d
RUF1NO His JEREZ
|< Hu-band
To RIFINO LUIS JEREZ
Bal N
Villanueva Gllen
M.ndoaa Repu
Argentina _,,.,..n
YOI- ARE HEREIN
that an action for Dlaaoluti i ;:
'
an a -tion
naite has been file.'.
VOU are required 10 serve a
) ur written defenses If at*
mswer or ol :h; CARLOS LIDSKY ESOUIRK
ietitioii on the \\ ;f, Attorney I p< r Petitioner wl
ERS nhos.
ter k..,;kks ,;-., ;:Mv,:; >.;s,
;_J Wl Miami Florida S3 US
s with the Clerk
1 Court on or I
IMh da* of Jul* -.sTs or a re-
will b, entered against vou
DATED this 4th da* of JU1 ,
HARD P RRINKER
i lerk of the Circuit Court
R* 0 FREDERICK
11
-
..uit
19T6
I I
NOTICE UNDER
1S1 p, net Leon B mil
IN. Cral Gable. FL rida M1M
u. -MsM). and '
with th. clerk of the ab.^*.
...urt on or before Julv 1*. '"
erw.se a default will be
against ,u for the relief demi.
mplalnt or petition
This notice shall be pul
ach week for four oonaecuti*' "
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS mv hand and th.
aid ...urt at Miami Florida "

.


Friday, July 2, 1976
*Jenisti /hi i in/
Page 15-b
Obituaries
LIGAl NOTKI
IEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
/ININGER
M r Ml \M U. 66 of Miami. Passed
.' Thursday. June 24 He had
,,!. his home here for the oast 28
I,mh eomlWX from Cleveland, oho
nd was the owner of the Ace Jal-
,.. Awning. Window & Door Co
Mr Winlnger was I.member of
TVmole <>r (Horn, the Flagl.T-tlables
X' No 197 K. Of P. and the
liencvole.it He was Past Pres. of the
Benevolent ami former ( Iwncellor
Commander of the Gables Loan. He
a >> a 12nd Degree Mason. B m.m-
,',', ,f the Miracle Lodiie No. 321
IV \.M member of the Bcotlah Kite
,nd The Mahi Shrine Mr Wlninger
as a Board Member and Past Coun-
elor of the 1" CT and alao niem-
i ',., the Miami Outboard Club He
, BUrvlved by his wife. Lillian.
laughter, Marilyn & son-in-law. Dr.
llorton N Schwartzman ..f Miami
two aranddauKhtera. Ithonda
.ci.l Paula Schwartzman Service*
held Sundav at GORDON
II NEKAI. HOME. 710 B.W, 11
Ive Miami with Interment in Mt
Sinai Cemetery. Donations in mom-
orv may be made t" tbc Miami
ii. hi Aaan or tin- Retarded citizens
Fund of the 1'nlt Commercial Trav-
elers. 170 NE 174 St NMH
LlPSON, Jennie. 100, "f Miami Beach.
_ r.i.i-i" rg
REINER. Herbert. 73. of North Mi-
ami Beach. Interment Lakeside.
' -"''' .. ...
Ii W.MANN Harry. 87. of Miami.
I interment Mt. Nebo. Rlveralde
I'ASTEN, Earl. M, of North Miami
Beai ii Interment Mt, sinal.
Rlveralde.
IKAITHAISK. Phil. 72. of Tamarac.
I iniiiin.nl Beth El Rlveralde.
1-1 MM Kit Mori.-. 01, ..f Miami Beach.
1 interment Lakeside. Riverside.
| N'STEIN. Louie, 01 of Miami.
Interment Star of David I ionic.n
i iWEN. I" acar .1 Rlveralde
. iI.DHERG, Celia, M of North
Miami Beach Levitt
I.ITVlN. Nettle. 58. of Port l^uder-
dale Interment Beth ei Levitt
RAlSN'r-R. Sarah P.. 76. of Miami
Bead1 Interment Lakeside. River-
side_____________________________
LEGAL NOTKI
NOTICE UNDER
FACTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the nnderaimied, desiring to engage in
i.UMin-' under 'he flctltloUl name of
OASIS APARTMENTS al 662" Indian
Creek Drive, Miami Beach. Fla In-
lends to register aald name with the
Clerk "' the Circuit Court .>f Dade
CountV; Florida.
DELTA investments
,i ki., General Partnership as Trustee
' 2 7/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE Is HEREBY GIVEN that
Hi, undersigned, dealrlna to enaajre in
i.UMin'" under the fictitious names
of ECGNO-OPTICS, ECONO-VI8ION
ami BJCONO-EYE GLASSES at 946
East -''"> Street. Hialeah. Florida In-
tenda '" reftlater aald names with the
Clerk "' the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida,
JOHN COSCUELA (l.....I I
6/18-2:. 7/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dealrlna to engage
Hi l.us>n,ss under Hie fictitious name
of CAH-24 at 9.3" Washington Ave-
nue. >Haml Beach, Florida intend to
i.ulster aald name with the Clerk of
ii,,. circuit Court of Dade Countv.
i'l.,ii.la
IN'1 ERCONTINENTAL HANK
ok mia.MI BEACH
By Jaime Pino, president
INTERCONTINENTAL HANK
OP MIA.MI
Itv: j,,s>. a .Marun president
CYPEN NEVIN8
Attorneys fur Applicant
::. Arthur Godfrev Road
Mlam* ech, Plorlda 3314"
0/25 7/2-'J-l
memorial chapels
1M1 Ptmbr. nt lI5 W O..* M*
Hollywood, fla. North Miami, Fla.
ri.nou .JO-**'1
SONNY LEVITT. F.D.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3693
Division Blanton
IN RE: ESTATE OP
MARIAN P. JOHNSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL persons HAVING
i aims nit DBMAND8 AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
HEM PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOV ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration <>f th,- estate
..f MARIAN P JOHNSON deceased.
Pile Number 76-3693, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, 'he iddreas of
which i- ::: \v Plaitler si Room 807,
Miami. Florida 2313(1 Th,- personal
representative of the estate is San-
ford S Faunci. whose address is soon
Blscayne Blvd., Suite 102. Mlam, Fla
23137 The name and address ,>f the
I ersonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All persona having i lalmn or de-
mands against the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS PROM
THE DATE OP Tin: FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OP Tills NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement <>f any claim or de-
mand they mas have Each claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the baaia for the claim, the name and
arldress ,.f the creditor ..I Ins agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed if
the .laim is not vet due. the date
when a will become .iu.- shall be stat-
, ,i if the .laim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated it the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffl-
, lent copies ..f the claim t" the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail on.....PS
to ,ach personal representative
All persons Inti rested In the estate
to whom a copy ,.f this Notice Of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OP THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE, to
file an) objections the) nay have
that challenges the validity of the
decedent'! will, the qualifications "f
in, personal representative, ,,r the ve-
nue "i jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO PILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
D.n. of the first publication ,.f this
Notice of Administration: June 25.
l ::>:.
BANFORDS FAUNCE
As Personal Representative "f the
Estate ..f MARIAN F JOHNSON
i >. eased
ATTORNEY FOR
PER8" i.NAI. REPRESENTATIVE
FAl'NCE. FINK & PORMAN
:i""" Blacayna Blvd., Room 402
Miami. Fla. 33137
Telephone: 171-5471
6 25 7/2
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME/
Sf rung the Jewish Community since 1136
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_________REfORM SERVICES
Emjnurl Cotton II9M) IktC.'Son
MjrrjCoriJonllJMI limfi B Cotdon
_______Telephone 51-S64_____
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open firry Doy Closed Soefcotr)
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
fntsoelAUZED MEMORIAL!
CTjrrOM CRAFTED
W 0*>W WORKJHOT
4444)921 -4444JM2
327* S.W. SA ST MIAMI
ROTHAUS MONUMENT CO., INC.
. BRONZE & GRANITE
PLAQUES
.MONUMENTS
MEMORIALS
ALL MIAMI AND
NY CEMETERIES
Ron & Barbara Rolhdus
When a loss occurs
away from home.
nmm wm&
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. levitt, F.D.
New v^rk; (212) 263-7600 Queerjs Blvd & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3211
Division 33
IN HK K8TATE OF
AUTIITK MAY Kit.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO Al.l. PBR8ON8 HAVING
I'l AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
HE ABOVE ESTATE AND Al.l.
>>THER PERSON8 INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOll ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Hi.- admlnlatratlon of th.- estate
,.f AllTlirn MAYER, deceased, File
Number 76-3211, In pending In the
i 'ir. tin Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Dlvlalon, the addreaa which Is 71 West Fbtajler Street, Mi-
ami, Florida. The personal repreaen-
tative ..f the estate HYMAN r
iiAl.lil'T. whose addreaa is Tl'1 W'ash-
itiL-t 139 The name and address ..I
ih* "."~.....' rnventative'a attorney
.. --t forth below.
All persons havina claims ..i de-
mands asalnat the estate are retiulred.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Klti >.M
THE DATE OF THK FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, i" file
with the rlerk of thr above .nurt a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Bach claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
addreaa ..f ll"' creditor or his aK'nt or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall he stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
I,, enable the clerk to mail one COP*
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THK PATE OF THK FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any obJecUoiut titey may have
that challena-ea the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the personal representative, or the ve-
nue or jurisdiction of the court.
Al.l. CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS not go FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
\otlce ..i administration: June 2r.,
HYMAN P OALBUT
\^ Personal Representative of the
Batata "f aiitiiik MATER
11.1 eased
ATTORNEY Kolt PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ABRAHAM A. OALBUT
711 Washington Avenue
Miami Beat h, Florida. 13189
Telephone <;T^-:tl on
6/25 7/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
notice 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of JOHN W at 1K12 Pennsylvania
Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida. 33139
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv, Florida.
JOHN WAJCMAN
OALBUT & c.Al.ltl-T
Attorneys for JOHN w
T.'l Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla M13H
6/11 -18-r- l/l
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 76-17549
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
sin MORTGAGE ,\ INVESTMENT
CORP., a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
\ a
EDWIN BORISON and JOAN
BORISON. his wife.
1 lefendanti
TO Kl'WlN BORISON and JOAN
BORISON, his wife.
i Residence unknown)
and
Bach and all unknown persona, partial
ami defendant* who claim by, through,
un.l.-r or again-.! the aforesaid BDWIN
BORISON and JOAN BORISON his
wife, whether j- Bpouaes, heir di
grantees, assignees, llenors,
creditors, trustees <>i otherwise, ai to
each and all of whom residence is
unknown,
anil
Bach and all unknown persona, parties
.iii.i defendants, as to each and all of
whom resident is unknown, having or
claiming to have any right, title or in-
terest in .r to (he following described
property, which is the subject matter
of the above-atyled cause, viz:
I'NIT No S06, in that condomini-
um designate.1 as WASHINGTON
CENTER CONDOMINIUM, toge-
ther With an undivided interest to
all common elements which are
appurtenant to said units in ac-
cordance with said Declaration of
Condominium filed for I'ubin
ord in Official Records Book 5677,
.1 page -?". of the Public Records
..t Hade Countv Florida, which
ondomlnlum panel l located on
l.ot -.. Block 4s OCEAN REACH
ADDITION No :: according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Hook 2. at Page 81, of the Public
Record* ..f Dade County, Florida
YOU, AND EACH OF YOU are
h. r. t.> notified that < Complaint has
been filed by the above -name.! Plain-
tiff nffalnst v.'U and each of vou to
foreclose mortgage on the above-
deal iii.. .1 properrj In the above-styled
cause and you and each of vou are
hereby required t.> rile an Answer ..t
other I'l.a.imt responsive thereto with
th. Cerk ..f the above entitled Circuit
Court and to serve a opy of such
Answer or other responslvi Pleading
upon the Plaintiffs Attorney, DAVID
M OON8HAK, 14)97 NW Tth Street,
Miami. Florida 13135, on .r before the
16th day ,.f July, 1976 otherwise the
allegations of said Complaint will be
taken as confessed by you
DONE AND ORDERED at the Dade
County Courthouse, Miami, Florida,
this 4th day of June. 1976.
III. hard P, Hrinker
Clerk of Circuit Court
Itv p COPELAND
JVputv Clerk
'. 11-18-25 7/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name Of
SNAPPER VILLAGE EARLY DEV-
KI/H'MKNT AND PAY CARE CEN-
TER at 6651 S.W. 117th Ave. Miami.
Fla.. intends to register -said name
with the Cerk of the Circuit Court of
Hade County. Florida
HUNTER ASSOCIATES. INC
6651 S.W 117th Ave Miami. Fla
STEPHEN N ROSEN
Attorney for Hunter Associates. Inc
6/25 7/2-:--1'.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underalffned, de8lrins to engage
in business undei the fictitious name
of BEACHCOMBEH REVISITED.
INC at Ins Avenue. M
i i< it h, Fl irlda 331 Si Intends
i.-ter said name with the Cerk ol th"
Circuit Court mntv. Florida
h nii r Revisited, Inc .1 b a
i:, .i.li, r.mber Resort Motel a k a
Beachcombi r Motel
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQUIRE
Attoi ii" for Beachcomber
Revisited, Inc.
.. 25 7/2-9-1'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 76-18855
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
in Re The Marriage >f
t'ARIDAD FERNANDEZ
Wif. .
I A/.ARi'i R FERNANDEZ.
To I.A/.AIto R FERNANDEZ
Addi.ss L'nknown
YOl' ARE HEREBY notified that
, Petition f"i Dissolution of Marriage
... n filed against vou and vou
arc hi reby required to serve a copv
.,f your answer ..r other idea.In .
the Petition on the Wife's attorney.
now.\kii .I ROSEN, whose address
i- |imi N W :7'b Avenu) 12nd Floor)
Miami, Florida 13123. and til- the
original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court, on or befori tl !3rd dav
. t ,iui\ 1976 nr a I lefaull will be en-
i. i. .1 against vou
I, vTED Mn- 16th dav of .lun. '
RICHARD P HRINKER
. |. rk of the Cln uit c,,Urt
H\ \| HERRERA
- 2.-.-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPFRTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17407
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
FRANK CUHTI8- Petitioner
and
ROSE M CURTIS- -Respondent
Tl': If ISE M CURTIS
I: D -. Allen Road
Peeksklll New York
Yin ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage Mas been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if an* to ii on
MARK M si.WIN. LAW OFFICES
MEI.VIN F FRANKEl., PA attorney
for Petitioner, whose address i~ 420
Lincoln V.,.f\. Miami Reach, Florida
13119, and file the original with the
i, of the above styled rourl un "r
befor. July 14. 1976; otherwise a de-
fault "ill be entered against vou for
the relief demanded In the complaint
i petition
Tin.- notice shall he published once
each week for four conaecutlvi weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl.oltil.iAN
WITNESS mi hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
3rd das of June. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
As cietk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv Florida
Itv l. BNEEDEN
As Deputy cietk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES MEI.VIN F
FRANKEL, P A
ISO Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach, Florida Mm
MARK It SLAVIN
Attorney for Petitioner
' 11-18-2.'. 7/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-17842
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN HK: The marriage of
I. IHN F AHLFOR8.
Husband.
ANNA MAY AHLFORS,
Wife,
YOU, ANNA MAY AHLFORS. c/o
i ippelaar, 14711 I4R Avenue S E
Woodinville. Washington. 98071. are
required to file your answer to the
petition for dissolution of marriage
with the Clerk of the above Court
ami Berve a copy thereof upon the
Petitioners attorney, Herman Cohen.
Ksi| 611 S \V 1st Street. Miami. Flor-
ida, into, on or before July 14.
1976, or els.- petition will be confessed
Dated Jun 7. 1976
Richard P. Brinker.
clerk, circuit Court
By S. PARR1SII
Deputy Clerk
6/U-I8-:::, 7/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of JEANNETTE'S at 11659-A Bls-
cayne Boulevard. North Miami. Flor-
ida 33181 Intends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
BUN TRUST. INC.
KURT WELLISCH
Attorney for SUN TRUST. INC.
161 Almerla Avenue. Suite 200-E,
Coral Cables Flo ida .131.14
6/11-11-25 7/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 76-18842
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The tn.111 lag" "I
l.\K. INTANT JEAN
Husband.
and
\I.MA JEAN.
Wif<
YOl' alma JEAN, residence un-
known are required to file vour an-
swer to the petition foi dissolution ol
marriage with the Clerk .d (he above
Court ..nd servi a cops thereof upon
th, petltoner's attorney. Herman '
hen Bsn 622 .- W 1st Street Miami
Florida 33130, on ir before Ju\ -5.
1976 or elae petition will be confessed
Dated June 16, 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit c,,uri
II, p ri.pi:i.\NH
I leputs Clerk _
. 2-9 ''
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-19470
General Jurisdiction Division
IN RE The Marring'
CHRISTINE T BRl >Vt S
W il.
ami
w ALTER 1: BR< W S
Husband
TO w ALTER K RR< W s
I."i3,*i di|< Court
Kvcrgl ceil, Col
VOU ARK m:i:i:i N NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution ol Mai -
, ia| hat i" en filed against you and
\..u an required to servt a opy of
vour written d< fei ses ii any, "
rHEOn.Xl D H BNJ1ELHARDT, JR .
.,it.., nej foi Pi lltloni 1. whose address
j.1 Sunset Drlvt Suite -'"" South
Miami Florida, and file the original
with th. clerk of the above styled
, Hurt on or before -luh in, 1976 othei
wise a Judgment hj default will be
entered against \..u
DATED this 22 dav ..f June 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk
Itv 11 LIPPS
I.. nun Clei k
(Circuit Court 8e.ll ^ j/j^m
NOTICE Or ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-18056 110)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RK THK MARRIAGE OF
SAMUEL JOHN. Petitioner.
BARBARA SANDER8 JOHN.
Respondent.
TO Mrs Barbara Banders John
Residence Unknown.
YU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action lor involution of Mai
rlare has been filed against \..u and
you are rcnuired to serve a eopv of
vour written defenses, if any. to It
on GLADYS 0ER8ON, attorn, v for
Petitioner, whose addles- is 1"1 N W
13 Avenu.v Miami. Florida 11118. (3051
324-45SS, and file the original with the
clerk of the above stvled court on
..r before Julv 3nth. 1976: otherwise ..
default will l>e entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published once
.ach week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
18th dav of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Pade Countv. Florida
Bv A. CRUTCHER
As Denutv Clerk
tin. uit Court Seal)
Olndvs C.erson. Esaulre
Stone. Sostchln A Koss. PA.
101 N W. 12 Avenue
Miami. FI. 11128 (H4-4WS)
6/25 7/2-9-141


Page 16-B
+JewlsiinorkMan
Friday, July 2| 19?6

[
_ + A t FOR YOUR SHOPPING CONVENIENCE ALL PANTRY PRIDE STORES WILL BE
^^g^^/*^*-'OPEN SUNDAYAULLlp4!a.CL0SF-----------.......
SAVE
PANTRY PRIDC
WITH THESE
''Basic bargains
AMERICAN KOSHER
Meat Franks
Franks Knocks
* LIMIT TWO PKGS. EITHER MANO. PIEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S' 00 Q MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES _
fT A "The second time oroond" of tfiii unkjue offerl
\\$V*^'for you to odd to your service, we ore repeating
the cycle of weekly features of this beautiful
IMPORTED PORCELAIN CHINA
i;
SCULPTURED
this weeks Bread and
FEATURED """"
piece Butter Plate each
49
CH>
WITH
C H
^PURCHASE
J pci orilh $10
3 pri M SI&
t^", SAVE 30
Refreshing
Pepsi Cola
... u7
* UMIT OHI SIX PACK PlIASI WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF 17 00 C* MORE EXCIUCXNG CIGARETTES
MSAVE33
Pantry Pride
Margarine
(QTRS.)
* UMIT FOUR PKCS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
,, OF $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. JULY 3rd.
AT ALL
PANTRY PRIDE STORES
IN DADE COUNTY.
HOLLYWOOD AND
HALLANDALE
CjStOMII MA< PURCHASE ONI
+ OR All S'AMIO'MMS w'Ih
ONI %' 00 PURCHASE OR MORI
MCLUOiN&ClCARITTIS
t55SAVE 33
Pantry Pride
Coffee
$106
REGULAR
OR
ELECTRIC
PERK
I LB
BAG
LIMIT ONE SAC PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
^^^F^^O^R^ORJiEXClUDINC^ICARETTES^^
BORDEN LITE LINE OR
Les Cal Yogurt
14 99*
Q
$*SK
UKUH
ALL
LAVORS
PIG
Cream Cheese
DOtMAN $ IMPORTID AUSTRIAN SllCID
Swiss Cheese
emi oici&mi
Cheese Spread
MAIOARINI QTIl
Blue Bonnet 2
KRAFT CHII SI I OOO
American Singles
49*
59*
>.. $499
o
l-tt
01
f AMI r PIIM ... ,
Drinks :-"-"
' ANII I IIIDI
Pretzels or Stix
CAN J +J
\\v 59'
Pretzel Gems S 59*
PANTRT r.,D.
Peanuts ~.3ff"9*
Fruit Cocktail 3 SS $1
Kosher Dills SS 59*
AM C.IAA.T OR CMUNIT
Peanut Butter SffM4
NARIKO
FigNewtons $'79*
All I1AVOH '' --
Libby's Nectar6,i.S$l*
ClIAI PIASTK FOI IOOO STOIAOI
Glad Wrap XT79*
Ol AD JO OAllON
Trash Bags.................
XKT $019
..PRO M
All MEATS SIKID IO ORDER AT STORES WitH SIRViCI COUNTERS
KAHN'S
Braunschweiger L. 79c
AMERICAN KOSHER ^,
Salami or Bologna HA.lF 89c
Peppered Beef SS 59*
["Basic
["Bargain
U b \j A [ Our / Cull or* oH U S G I Iniptt'tdand
p II r| I A r \ q-oded Our U.S.D.A Chofc* *' cw'l ort '*# '.ni'
U M U I v C / P ll'o'e 'o obtain and art guoronlttd 'o be
* jr'^^m*/ naturally 'tnde' /uttj and drtn>ov\ty Hatoi'vl'
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Rib
Steak
SMALL END
BONELESS
GRADE A QUICK FROZEN
$J99
Turkey
Breasts
WITH
RIBS
99c
SAVE 40
Pantry Pride
Potato Chips
29c
REGULAR
OR
DIP N
802
BAG
* LIMIT ONE SAC PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF j; 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
U.S.D.A. CHOKI WIST CORN f 10 lilt
Round Rump Roast
USD* CHOICE WIST CORN H0 RIM LOIN
Sirloin Steaks
USOA CHOKI WISI COIN HO
Beef Brisket vr..:....
usoa Choice wist corn fid iiif round
Btm. Round Roast
$149
$| 79
$| 29
$| 29
$| 39
USOA CHOtCI til* CHUCk UNOIRttADI
Pot Roast Bnls 5~5
USOA CHOKI WISI CORN MO til'
Chuck Blade Steak
hum
Ground Beef
'LA SHIRRIO RRIMIUM WMOll
Fresh Fryers
IIA SHIPPID PIIMIUM IIISM
Fryer Quarters
'LA } Hit* RID PIIMIII- IRISH
Fryer Parts-' =B
US.O.A CMOKI WIST CORN MD Mil ROUNO -
Eye Round Roast l. *1
.89*
.89*
.48*
.59*
. 99*
MM SAVE 24
Hudson
Flair Napkins
29c
U.S.D.A CHOKI Mil IOUNO
Btm. Round Steak
$1 49
, 1
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
PKG OF
140
LIMIT ONE PRO PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
TOP QUALITY SWEET EATING
Red Plums
39c
LB.
TOP QUALITY WESTERN
PICK
YOUR
OWN
Beef Chuck -jq
Blade Roast / ?
FAMILY
TREAT
LARGE
36 SIZE
PANTRY PRIDE
MB.
PKG.
Bologna
99c
SLICED
DAM IMPORTIO DANISH
Smoked Salami 2 99*
Ntl< RRIOI MIO&I I
Liverwurst 49*
HIIIIV. NATIONAL 01M|I
Franks or Knocks Sff $ 129
Beef Franks ;.c$l"
MY5.AM J |AU >AI> MIAIOI .11'
Franks or Knocks 8Jt$Ilf
MIIIOS MIDC.II a .ic.
Pizza SET V.c'89*
Cantaloupes
59c
^R^ ^Rr each
Red Bliss Potatoes S3 69*
Fresh Limes 8 59*
RID <-... .. .
Watermelons ,^%V9
Florida Mangoes mm 49*
GAIMN IRISH WltllRN
Romaine Lettuce H..o 29*
UIOMT1T TA.T WITH A Cull TASII ORANNT rfcJTj,
Smith Apples- -v. 39*
IO*> QUALITI PUtRIO RKAN
Pineapples 59*
GARDEN FRESH
Green Round Beans
29*
PICK
YOUR OWN
Sauerkraut 43'
MINUTE MAID FROZEN
Orange A
Juice *?
SAIA HI IIOIIN
Pound Cake
6 OZ
CANS
10'. .i
PRO
$1
89*
IN OUR
SEA STAR ICEIANCMC FRIIO
Fish Sticks
yraj&t Seafood case
89c
\t\-a tOX|
I 11 OX
FRESHLY SMOKED
Large
Whiiefish l.
OSCAR MAYER
... MEAT OR
Sliced <"
Bologna }$t
PANTRY PRIDE BROWN N SERVE
Dinner ^
Rolls Sz
3^1
%RFOF I? rfk
CARMNGBIACK IABEI OlD Mil WAUKEE OR
Schaefer
Beer
WI RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EQM5R4XZ8_I91Z90 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-14T01:13:07Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02474
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES