The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02472

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"JTewi]|i Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
19 Number 25 Miami, Florida Friday, June 18, 1976 Fred K- shochet wtm,y, June is, w By Man 50 c-enta two Sections Price 25 cents
TIDE IS TURNING
elen Suzrnan:
A New Vision
For S. Africa
By FRED K. SHOCHET
Publisher, The Jewish Floridian
And SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor, Community Papers
JOHANNESBURG, South Afrca After more than a
week of travel and intensive interviews here with South
Africans, both Jewish and non-Jewish, both in and out of
government, it is not at all clear that the bulk of those with
whom we speak are for Apartheid.
Most are, including leading Jews. As members of the
established white minority, they readily concede that
Apartheid is a profound national disorder and that changes
must be made
BUT THEY envision the
changes as part of a gradual
process one into which South
Africans, both white and Black,
must grow. Further, they envi-
sion that Blacks must earn the
changes as a reward for changes
in themselves toward an accom-
modation with western ways
an accommodation that, tragic-
ally, whites are just as gradual
in helping them to make.
In all. it is a vision not in
keening with the explosive
Black revolutionary movements
elsewhere in Africa or, in fact,
elsewhere in the world.
A few. however, see the dan-
ger in South Africa's national
commitment to gradual change.
Principal among these is Mrs.
Helen Suzrnan, who has for
vears demanded major radical
reforms in the country.
MRS. SUZMAN is one of 12
Jewish members of South Af-
rica's Parliament. As leader of
her Progressive Reform Party,
she meets with us for a news
conference as part of our visit
here arranged by Pan American
World Airways and the South
African Tourism Board.
In the beginning, Mrs. Suz-
rnan was regarded as a dan-
gerous agitator, but in the face
of the remarkable capacity
Aoartheid has shown to survive
here at no matter what cost,
her recent climb to political
resDectability is indicative of
the nation's awareness that a
Continued on Page 1S-A
Anti Semitism on Rise
In W. Germany Again

HELEN SUZMAN
jDL'ers
Arrested
By FBI
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA)
ie FBI has announced the
dnight arrest of three
bers of the Jewish De-
nse League on federal
arges of interstate trans-
lation of explosive mate-
s.
A JDL official promptly
Continued on Page 8-A
Likud Seeks Gen. Sharon's
Return to Active Politics
TEL AVIV__(JTA) Likud leader Menachem Beigin,
|io is trying to bring Reserve Gen. Ariel Sharon back into
je opposition group, has paid a visit to Sharon's farm. But
&her man would divulge what was said.
Sharon, who was the founder of Likud, reportedly
3 not want to return to its leadership until the various
ies and factions in Likud unite as one party.
Beigin's effort was seen as a reflection of a fear within
Jcud that Sharon might join Prof. Yigael Yadin, the archae-
Jogist and former Chief of Staff, in forming a new party.
Observers here, however, note that the effort to bring
lin back into politics is destined to failure.
BONN (JTA) There
is still strong anti-Semitism
in West Germany, a univer-
sity study has shown. The
mass communication depart-
ment of the Sociological In-
stitute at Cologne University
has publicized the study,
headed by Prof. Alphons Sil-
bermann, which finds that
between 15 and 20 percent
of West Germans still have
marked anti-Semitic preju-
dices.
Among a further 30 per-
cent, there is latent anti-
Semitism, the study says.
Silbermann puts much of the
blame for this on an "infor-
mation deficit" in the Ger-
man population.
H I S OPINION researchers
were told in reply to the ques-
tion how many Jews live in Ger-
many, for example, an average
of 400,000. In reality their num-
ber in West Germany is just
under 27,000, with another 5,000
in Communist East Germany.
About 20 percent of those
questioned believed that Jews
had particular influence in the
theater, in television, the cin-
ema and in literature, while
17.8 percent took the view that
Continued on Page 3-A
MULTINATIONAL STATE
Israel98 Arabs Pen Sharp
Testament Against Zionism
Second Thoughts 9-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A group of Israeli Arab
leaders that met with Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin two
weeks ago has drafted a
strongly worded memoran-
dum to him challenging the
Zionist definition of Israel as
a Jewish state with an Arab
minority.
The group, consisting of
the heads of Arab town and
village councils, has taken
sharp issue with Rabin for
describing the Arab minor-
ity as a distinctive culture
and religion but omitting
any national significance.
THEY ARE also bitter over
Rabin's refusal to rescind the
Continued on Page 6-A
OPEN TO FORD VETO
Senate OKs 4 Billion
Aid Proviso to Israel
WASHINGTONThe Sen
ate Monday, by a vote o<
62-18, passed a military for
eign aid bill that would au-
thorize an expenditure of
$6.7 billion over the next 27
months.
Israel would be the bene-
ficiary of $4 billion-plus, and
Egypt would receive in ex-
cess of $1 billion in credits
THE HOUSE of Representa-
tives has already authorized its
own measure, authorizing an
expenditure of $7.1 billion. The
two bills must now be coordi-
nated before a final congres-
sional vote.
Observers here are already
predicting a veto by President
Ford because the Senate mea-
sure also gives Congress the
power to cut back on U.S. sales
of weapons abroad.
According to these observers,
such sales exceeded S10 billion
in 1975. The Senate bill author-
ized a congressional veto of any
individual sale abroad in ex-
cess of $25 million.
IN ADDITION, congress would
be empowered to block sale to
nations considered "gross vio-
lators" of human rights or that
discriminate against persons on
the basis oi race, religion, col-
or or national origin.
Continued on Page 12-A
JOSEPH SISCO
Sisco Sees
Hope For
Peace
Schindler's Response 11-A
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA)
Retiring Undersecretary of
State for Political Affairs,
Joseph J. Sisco, said here
that there is hope for peace
in the Middle East because
both the Arabs and the Is-
raelis are "sick and tired of
war."
But he added that he does
not believe anything could
be achieved in the Mideast
this year.
AT A farewell luncheon giv-
en by the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jew-
ish Organizations. Sisco said
that he shares "the deep con-
cern" over the Mideast situa-
tion.
But, he stated, "I continue to
believe that peace would come
to the Mideast" although "it will
Continued on Page 9-A
Job Prospects Bleak for Grads
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA)
For a substantial number o'-
the estimated 90,000 to 100,-
000 Jewish young men and
women now graduating with
bachelors degrees from Amer-
ican and Canadian colleges,
the immediate future offers
only bleak prospects for ful-
fillment of their hopes for
professional careers.
Their plight has been dra-
matized, particularly since
the onset of the 1974 reces-
sion by the painful specta-
cle of the Ph.D. driving a
cab.
NOT VERY many Ph.D.'s
have, in fact, been forced to be-
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A
*Jenistncridiain_
Job Prospects Bleak for Grads
Continued from Page 1-A
come cab drivers but a very
large number of bachelor de-
gree holders, particularly in the
humanities, either have not
found employment since 1974,
or have been compelled to take
low-paying jobs far below their
abilities and skills.
To obtain specifics on the
problem as it has affected the
career fields traditionally at-
tracting Jews and some esti-
mates on whether the problem
is transient or long-range, the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency ask-
ed three New York experts for
their assessments.
They are Dr. Walter Duckat,
director of the guidance divi-
sion of the Federation Employ-
ment and Guidance Service;
Elias Kaean, executive director
of the B'nai B'rith Counseling
Service office in New York; and
Dr. Alan Groveman. supervisinp
counselor in the B'nai B'rith
office.
THE THREE experts agreed
generally that, for the immediate
future at least, many career
fields in which Jews have long
predominated have not only
ceased to offer job opportunities
but also have suffered dismiss-
als which have hit Jewish pro-
fessionals hard.
In the separate interviews,
the three job experts agreed
that, with a few specialized ex-
ceptions, public school teaching
is currently a closed field.
Thousands of Jewish teachers
have been dismissed, notably in
New York, where most of the
career contractions since 1974
have been most damaging to
professionals.
Teaching posts at the college
level, another field with heavy
Jewish representation, are in a
similar squeeze, with few or no
openings in many disciplines
and widespread dismissals of
vounger faculty members.
THAT SITUATION stems part-
ly from the fact that a bachelor's
degree in political science, so-
ciology, psychology, philosophy,
English literature any of the
humanities has proved to be
useless as a career tool.
This has brought a shrinkage
of enrollment in such courses
and a parallel shrinkage in the
need for faculties in those dis-
ciplines. Another factor is the
impact of the steadily rising
costs affecting private colleges
and universities and the effect
of the financial bind of local
and state governments on pub-
licly-supported higher educa-
tion.
Duckat said commitment to
masters and doctoral degrees, in
the hone of appointment to col-
lege staffs, is not being recom-
mended by the FEGS.
HE SAID this did not apply
to some fields of engineering
but he stressed as did Kagan
and Groveman that the pros-
pective student should not make
a decision for advanced studies
until after the most intensive
review of all relevant informa-
tion obtainable.
Kagan said bachelors degrees
in the humanities should be
considered onlv as a base for
advanced studies, with the ad-
Jewish Observers
Needed at Trials
Of Former Nazis
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tuvia Friedman, head of the
Nazi Documentation Center in Haifa, said here that either
the Israeli government or the Jewish Agency should have
an official observer at all Nazi war crimes trials.
He said the absence of such observers is interpreted'
as a lack of interest by the victims of the Nazis and may be
the reason for the light sentences or acquittals in German
and Austrian courts.
FRIEDMAN WAS commenting on the acquittal in Ham-
burg of Karl Streibel, a former death camp commandant,
and five former guards who were accused of being respon-
sible for the death of a million Jews.
He said such acquittals would not be possible if Israeli
government or Jewish Agency officials had been present
at the hearings.
ditional caveat that students
planning such studies should be
aware of the current lack of
openings for college level teach-
ing jobs in those fields.
"He suggested that a Ph.D. in
political science would be es-
sential for an individual want-
ing a position in a research
group, or in a lobbying agency
or on a Congressional commit-
tee. He also said a political sci-
ence BA could be the basis for
study for a law degree.
BUT GROVEMAN and Duckat
both felt this favorite field of
Jews was now overcrowded.
Groveman sajd there appeared
to be iobs for patent and tax
attorneys while opportunities
were Door in criminal, corp-
orate and environmental law.
Civil service, a field to which
Jews have gravitated because
hiring was on merit and job se-
curity was strong though pay
was poor, also has been hard
hit bv governmental budget cut-
backs, bringing a freeze in new
employment and widespread dis-
missals. Social work, another fav-
orite of Jews, has been hard
hit because many such jobs are
in government.
MEDICINE and dentistry,
long-time goals for Jewish ca-
reerists, present more of a
problem of getting the degree
than getting a job or starting a
practice. Competition for ad-
mission into medical schools
has become steadily more severe
partlv because medical school
openings continue to be static
in number.
A large number of Jewish
would-be doctors are studying
overseas, a solution which has
brought its own special prob-
lems. Students unable to get
into medical schools are often
onting for dentistry but in this
field too. competition for entry
was described as having become
intense.
We look to you to make Israel
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CJA and Israel Emergency
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M6-18-76
M6-18-76


Friday, June 18, 1976
* Jewish Ikriciian
Page 3-A
2,000 Russians Prepare to Emigrate to U.S.
NEW YORK Russian
immigration to the United
States is about to be stepped
up as over 2,000 Russian
Jews in transit outside Rome
receive their visas for entry
to the U.S. This is the gist of
a report delivered by Herb-
ert Bernstein, executive di-
rector of New York Associa-
tion for New Americans
(NYANA) at the settlement
agency's 26th annual dinner.
At least 350 Russian im-
migrants per month are ex-
pected in New York alone
over the next few months for
settlement here, said Dr.
Bernstein. This is more than
double the average monthly
migration rate of Russians
to this city in the past. About
one half the Russian immi-
grants coming to the U.S.
settle in New York.
THE INCREASED flow is the
result of the processing out of
a human bottleneck that de-
veloped recently in Ostia, a Ro-
man suburb used as a transit
station for Russians wanting to
settle in countries other than
Israel. The bottleneck was main-
ly due to a sudden rise in the
number of Russians deciding to
settle in the U.S. and other
western countries rather than
Israel.
At present, an average of 50
percent of Russian Jews leaving
the Soviet Union are "noshrim,"
persons who decide to go direct-
ly to the west. Another compo-
nent of the Ostia Russian com-
munity is the "yordim," those
who lived in Israel for a brief
period but decided to settle
elsewhere.
Dr. Bernstein based his re-
port on studies conducted by
the Jewish Agency and HIAS.
A glaring Felix Aronovich poses to show how he is up
against a wall of Soviet exit refusals, according to the
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry. His wife. Alia, was
recently given a visa to join his mother and brother
who have already reached freedom, but the 45-year-old
mechanical engineer wonders if he will ever see his child,
who is expected shortly.
the world-wide Jewish migra-
tion agency, the results of
which were delivered last week
in Geneva at the HIAS Migra-
tion Workshop.
Subsequently, he visited
Rome, where he met with of-
ficials of HIAS. the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee and ORT.
ONE OF the conclusions of
the Jewish Agency study, re-
ported Dr. Bernstein, linked
Russian "yerida," emigration
from Israel, with places of
origin and consequently Jewish
identification. Israeli immi-
grants from the central Russian
republics, in which the more
assimilated, more professional
and less Jewish-conscious Rus-
sians reside, have the highest
dropout rates. Newcomers from
Odessa also have a high drop-
out rate.
On the other hand those from
the Baltic states and Moldavia
and especially the non-Ashken-
zic Jews, who tend to have a
greater Jewish identity and less
opportunity outside Israel, are
less prone to "yerida."
Immigrants from Georgia, for
example, Tashkent and Samar-
kand, have the lowest dropout
rate from Israel, it was found
DR. BERNSTEIN said that the
conclusions reached by the Jew-
ish Agency study parallel the
results of studies at NYANA,
which indicate a direct relation-
shin between Jewish identifica-
tion and successful settlement
in the face of difficulties im-
migrants must overcome.
Reviewing the global Jewish
migration situation, Dr. Bern-
stein pointed to Lebanon, Rho-
desia and South Africa as areas
of concern. Nearly 3,000 Jews
resided in Lebanon at the end
of 1975. he reported, of which
more than half have bolted out,
"migrating to Israel. France,
Brazil and Switzerland.
Thrn are about 450 left in
RHmt and other 300 in the ad-
jacent mountains.
Among those remaining are
families with substantial bank
accounts in Lebanon. They are
unable to withdraw their funds
simnlv because the banks have
been closed in the wake of the
civil war.
Thirty-one of the Lebanese
who have left have applied for
U.S. visas. NYANA recently re-
ceived its first Lebanese family.
TURNING TO Rhodesia, Dr.
Bernstein stated that the 4,000
well-established Jews there
were "sitting on a volcano." As
the shadow of civil war looms
over this African country, a
number of Rhodesian families
have already emigrated to South
Africa and other English-speak-
ing countries.
The main problem for this
community has been how to li-
quidate assets and transfer
monies out of the country, he
said.
As for South Africa with its
large Jewish community of
120.000. there is much concern
about the future, particularly if
the leftist revolt in Angola
spreads across the border. At
the moment, he reported, South
African Jews are, in fact, trying
to recruit "noshrim" and "yor-
dim," mainly professionals, of
whom they are in very short
supply.
IN AN EFFORT to "reduce
the trauma of adjustment for
both client and community"
here and to speed up the settle-
ment process, according to Dr.
Bernstein. HIAS, ORT and the
Joint Distribution Committee
have agreed on a number of
measures to be carried out in
Rome.
HIAS. for example, will be
expanding its orientation pro-
gram to include five sessions on
the American scene. It will also
provide NYANA with additional
records necessary for expedi-
tious settlement.
ORT will be moving its Eng-
lish school from Rome to Ostia
anc provide records to NYANA
on the progress of students.
These are djemed as import-
ant measures in preparation to
the iob-finding process some
weeks thereafter on this side of
the Atlantic Ocean. The JDC
has agreed to provide NYANA
with records of social service
summaries and additional re-
no-ts bv medical specialists.
Anti-Semitism
Seen on Upswing
In West Germany
Continued from Page 1-A
Jews are too influential in pol-
itics.
A particularly clear indica-
tion of what Silbermann called
"traditional and inherent pre-
judices" were the answers to the
following question: the inter-
viewees were asked to imagine
a friend had told them of the
possibility of a particularly ad-
vantangeous business deal with
a Jewish businessman and that
he wanted advice on how to
handle it.
JUST OVER 14 percent ad-
yised not to have any business
dealings at all with a Jew; 38.7
percent thought he ought to do
the deal but keep a close eye
on the partner. Only 35.9 per-
cent thought there was no dif-
ference between a Jew and any
other businessman.
The older those questioned
were, the more marked their
anti-Semitism was (47 percent
of the above-55-year-olds).
Those tending most strongly to-
wards it on a vocational break-
down were farmers (47 per-
cent). Those with the least pre-
judice were white-collar salaries
staff (23 percent).
OF THE farmers. 52 percent
still believe that persecution of
the Jews is punishment for the
crucifixion of Christ. Silber-
mann said only enlightenment
and history teaching which did
not end with Bisn.arck could
eliminate the anti-Semitism.
But so far, the educational
institutions in Germany had not
made any worthwhile contribu-
tion to this. He recalled that an
anti-Semitic climate had once
before been created through
literature, from the theater
stage and by caricatures.
He criticized a modern drama
about real estate speculation in
Frankfurt, "Der Muell, Die
Stadt und Der Tod," by Rainer
Fassbinder, as "swimming on
the same wave again."
MEANWHILE, it was report-
ed by the West German Em-
bassy in London that a grow-
ing number of Jews who fled
Nazi Germany to Britain are
asking for their German citizen-
ship again.
The Embassy spoke of a "re-
latively new trend" which had
been in oroeress for about two
vears and "surprised" the au-
thorities. The Embassy said it
could give no figures on the
number of people involved.
It added that the citizenship
applicants usually did not re-
settle in Germany but stayed in
Britain. This contradicted a re-
cent report in the mass-circula-
tion Daily Mirror in London
which spoke of an "exodus" of
rich families back to Germany.
Press reports here have sug-
gested that by taking German
citizenship back but living in
Britain the applicants could
save taxes.
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Page 4-A
fJewist) flcriJian
Murder is No Answer
Assassination is one of the most contemptible
forms of attack upon the free body politic. No individ-
ual is the victim alone. All of society suffers when
some lunatic somewhere decides to change the course
of current events through murder.
In this context, even the attack on Gen. Idi Amin,
strongman of Uganda, is to be deplored.
We recognize the severe hardships under which
his people are struggling to survive against his own
brutality as a leader. We empathize, particularly, be-
cause of Amin's unyielding anti-Semitism, which is
strange payment for the training and hospitality he
received at the hands of the Israelis.
Mill, we are glad that the assassination attempt
against him failed. That is not the way to get rid of
Amin's tyranny. Until the western world comes to see
Amin's tyranny as its own, and comes to help the
Ugandans bear the burden, Amin will continue to rule
his African roost.
The change needed is of another order entirely.
Assassination can only bring on a new dictator and,
as we say, hurt the cause of freedom everywhere.
Puzzling Lebanese Situation
American Jews have been perplexed about the
civil strife in Lebanon which has been going on for
more than a year. First with a long history of helping
their co-religionists, Jews could not understand how a
Christian community of one-million was being threat-
ened with extinction while the entire Christian world
sits by, seemingly unconcerned.
Then of course there was the fact that the United
Nations has devoted so much time to castigating Israel
it has not even once taken up the situation in Lebanon.
The situation has become even more perplexing as
Israel seems to be watchful but unconcerned as Syria
intervenes more and more in Lebanon.
However, this does not mean the situation is not
grave, and that it does not carry the seeds of a new
Mideast conflict. Israel has warned that it would in-
tervene if Syria crosses the Red Line." No one has
specified what the "Red Line" is, but presumably it
means the presence of Syrian forces in the southern
area near Isral's borders. The conflict in Lebanon is so
fluid that it is potentially dangerous for Israel, and
thus for the world.
Let Us Not Yawn
The issue of Soviet Jewry has been used for pol-
itical benefit, especially by those opposed to detente
with the Soviet Union. At the same time, the press
has recently carried an article called "Let My People
Yawn," which depicts a growing indifference on the
part of a large segment of American Jews to that issue.
Now, however, there seems to be signs of a re-
newed and organized effort to aid Soviet Jews based on
reports from Jewish sources in the USSR of growing
harassment of would-be Jewish emigrants. This, if so,
has not only cut down on emigration but has made
many Jews afraid to apply.
The new effort has taken on an official stamp with
the creation of an American commission by Congress
to monitor the compliance of the Soviet Union with
the Helsinki Declaration, including the right of Jews
and others to emigrate.
Perhaps even more helpful, was the decision by
eight Senators to seek the establishment of another
committee that would keep close tabs on the treatment
of Soviet Jews.
Every Soviet Jew who has come out of the USSR,
as well as the activists still there, have stressed that
the Soviet Union does listen to public opinion from
abroad. It is known increased pressure by individual
Jews and non-Jews, and especially acts by elected offi-
cials, does have a result.
Jewish Floridian
OFFICE and PLANT ISO N.B 6th si.. Miami. Fin. 131S2 Phone 373-46011
I'ii Box 3DT3. Miami Florida 33101 .
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Of The Merchandise Advertiied In Its Columns
I'uhlixht-d .'mtv Friday since I0S7 by The Jewish Floridian
Bernna-Clns* Postage Paid at Miami. Kl.-i
O Fred K. Shochet Friday. June 18. 1976_______
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Aoency. Seven Art. Feature Synch.
oat? Worldwide New. Serv.ee. National Editorial Association. Americani As-
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Three Years$30 00. Out of Town Upon Request. ______
Tough Election Year
Friday, June 18, 1976
Foreseen
fOR THIS American Jewish
r voter, 1976 will be a diffi-
cult election year.
On the Republican side, at
least for the moment, there is
Gerald Ford.
But Ford is the man who
gave a blank check of pardon
to the criminal Richard Nixon.
History will not forgive him
.asily for that.
IN THE year 1976, almost 13
/ears after the assassination of
'resident Kennedy, a restless
lation is reviving the agony of
hat event by moving toward a
renewed investigation of the
facts leading up to it.
Those who recall the subse-
quent Ruby assassination of
Lee Harvey Oswald still feel
angry for having been cheated
out of the opportunity to know
why and how the assassination
was planned and executed.
Unreasonable though it may
be, the national anger extends
toward Ruby himself, who died
of natural causes, but whose
death nevertheless cheated us
a second time.
FOR WE will never know
now whether or not the dou-
ble assassination was part of the
same plot against Kennedy or,
as Ruby insisted, an independ-
ent act of violence against Os
wald born of Ruby's own mis-
guided rage and terrible need
to avenge Kennedy's murder.
It is against this backdrop
that I, at least, find myself forc-
ed to regard Gerald Ford.
Ford's pardon of Nixon was an
assassination equivalent of Os-
wald's act.
In pardoning Nixon, Ford did
away with a would-be murderer
of the American constitutional
process, and now we will never
know just how it all got started
and, what is worse, who else in
and out of government, was
implicated.
Should he be reelected, the
nation will play the Ruby role,
eliminating the culprit (Ford),
from his need to atone and the
hope for some ultimate explan-
ation to us.
FOR THIS unforgivable dis-
service alone, Ford should be
drummed out of the White
House. And yet here he is, still
offering himself to the Amer-
ican electorate in the form of
the pig's kosher foot.
The Nixon agony apart, Ford
Continued on Page 13-A
Legislative Session Not a Bust
Volume 49
Friday, June 18, 1976
Number 25
20 SIVAN 5736
Media coverage of state and
local political events is at best
inadequate, at worst mediocre
if not biased and slanted. The
recenlfly-completed session of
the Florida Legislature provides
a good example of the failure
of the press to inform the pub-
lic of what really took place.
Certainly not at the time it
was happening, although fortu-
nately calmer, more thoughtful
presentations in the weeks fol-
lowing the session have shown
that it wasn't the horror we
thought it was (from reading
the Miami Herald). But that im-
pression still lingers; few peo-
nle, it would seem, have the de-
sire to follow through beyond
the headlines
OTHER THAN Ch. 2's excel-
lently-filmed nightly report di-
rect from the floor or other
sources during the legislative
period, the commercial chan-
nels, like the press, offered lit-
tl insight into what was taking
place in Tallahassee.
The contrast with their night-
ly repetition of the course of
the presidential primaries fur-
ther emphasizes the neglect of
local politics anl makes a state-
ment on the quality of local
jounalism.
Most conscientious readers
must have been shocked by the
Herald's final roundup of the
session. Far from being the dis-
mal, pork-chopper, boss-dictated
thing, we were led to believe
for 60 days it suddenly became,
in the words of Gov. Reubin
Askew, "a productive session."
AND ONE of the Herald's
favorite targets, Sen. Jack Gor-
don, could be said to have been
almost praised in the article,
since he was ultimately respon-
sible for a budget which, ac-
cording to the Herald, sees that
"the old. the poor and the dis-
abled will live a little better"
and was hailed by many as "one
of the best social services bud-
gets we ever had."
EDWARD
COHEN
More hot meals, better nurs-
ing home care and drug assist-
ance for the elderly are among
those items. One could go on
and on, but vou get the idea.
As was usual, the session
finally separated the men from
the boys ladies like Elaine
Bloom and Elaine Gordon who
were among the "men" will par-
den the cliche and it is that
process which determines the
worth of a legislative meeting.
THE CONTENDING forces
that seek to affect legislation
are many and tough. Land-
lords, tenants, teachers, farm-
ers, doctors, lawyers you
name the elements of our so-
ciety and they all have a stake
in the bills and the voting. And
that is why it is so important
that we get straight, unbiased
and insightful information about
how those relations are han-
dled.
Perhaps it isn't possible giv-
en the rule of American jour-
nalism that requires reporters
to rush into print with the
headline-grabbers. Perhaps it
isn't possible or even pro-
per to let the process sim-
mer first (as it always does)
before stating it has boiled.
As it turned out, Jack Gordon
was more the hero of the edu-
cation funding controversy than
the villain he was depicted
(what a distortion of the role
of a man who has been a na-
tional leader in support of the
public schools!).
And Sen. Bob Graham was
less the star than the Herald's
anointed choice for governor
in 1978, if you know the back-
ground.
IF GORDON'S position as one
of the three leading men of the
Senate brought significant ad-
vances in social legislation to
Florida not possible too often
in the past, his was a lonely
fight for civil rights and civil
sense.
Would you believe that he
was the only Senator who voted
against the now-notorious
"Shoot Your Neighbor" bill
(Ken Myers was absent on that
vote; I believe he would have
joined his Dade colleague)?
That he and another Senator
opposed an onerous bail bond
bill, and that he and Ken Myers
again held out alone against the
provisions of a bill dealing with
the restoration of civil rights.
FOR MANY, that may not
seem as important as his finally
getting Gov. Askew's Housing
Finance Agency bill through, or
the revolutionary generic drug
substitution measure, but they
serve as illustrations that prag-
matic politics need not be di-
vorced from the idealism that
people like Jack Gordon. Ken
Myers, Elaine Bloom and others
brought to the legislature this
year.
In addition to the contending
elements mentioned earlier, leg-
islators have to think of the
needs of their districts.
Summing up. under the head-
line. "How Dade Fared in Capi-
tol." the Herald reporter states
"Indeed, despite a near-auster
itv budget and a Legislature
dominated bv Central a no
North Florida conservatives, tne
urban Dad-. Palm Beach ana
Broward areas got most
what was wanted and needed
Remember that the next time
vou read or hear a horror ston
about the 1976 Florida Legist
ture.
-


Friday, June 18, 1976
vJenis/i fhrtcMaui
Page 5-A
The Big Show: Sex
Life of Legislators
anderson
WASHINGTON The Wayne
Hays affair has blown the cork
out of the gossip bottle. Wash-
ington suddenly is buzzing with
rumors about who is sleeping
with whom.
Reporters who specialize in
writing about the great political
issues now have their ears
glued to the keyholes. We made
a count of the members of Con-
gress whom we have reason to
believe are romancing girls in
their offices. We counted 34.
SOME MEMBERS, including
such prominent legislators as
House Ways and Means Chair-
man Al Ullman and Senate La-
bor Chairman Harrison Wil-
liams, have wound up marrying
their secretaries.
But the sudden burst of gos-
sip raises a question. When
should a congressman's private
life become public news? We
think the answer is clear: When
public funds are involved.
We were tipped off, for exam-
ple, that Louisiana's Congress-
man John Breaux had taken a
secretary on a romantic holi-
day in the Far East at the tax-
payers' expense.
WE TRACKED them down to
the Shin-Miyako Hotel in Tokyo.
The congressman is registered
in Room 952, the secretary in
Room 954. Our associate. Bob
Owens, spoke to both of them
bv trans-Pacific telephone. Both
vigorously denied any romance.
They had gone to Japan, they
said, to attend a, conference on
aquaculture.
There is no doubt that sex
plays a role on Capitol Hill.
Some members try to use their
congressional status to attract
bedmates.
But most members of Con-
Israelis Keep Eye on Lebanon
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
security circles are watching
with interest the difficulties be-
ing encountered by the Syrian
army in its operations against
Palestinian terrorists in Leba-
non.
A Syrian force trying to reach
the Lebanese port of Sidon has
been almost completely cut off
by the terrorists and Lebanese
leftists. Syrian attempts to
break through with supplies
and reenforcements have failed
so far.
ACCORDING to Israeli
sources, the Syrian army does
not possess the combat quality
it had before the Yom Kippur
War although it has been fully
rehabilitated quantitatively.
The Syrians, moreover, are
seen to be facing a crucial deci-
sion: whether to increase the
size of their forces in Lebanon
which means thinning out
their army along the sort of
agreement with the other Arab
countries.
A move in the latter direc-
tion would harm the image of
gress are cast in the image of
their constituents. They are no
less moral, no more moral than
the rest of us.
POLITICAL Potpourri: The
last presidential campaign was
marred, as we all know, by
Watergate tactics buggings,
break-ins and other dirty tricks.
We have just completed a can-
vass of the major presidential
campaign staffs. Only one has
taken any precautions to guard
against another Watergate.
Except for locks on the doors,
the various campaign headquar-
ters have made no special se-
curitv arrangements, with one
exception. Ronald Reagan's
headouarters is on the alert for
nolitical mischief.
On Canitol Hill. Democratic
front-runner Jimmy Carter has
been trving to nick up support
from members of Congress. Yet
strangelv. he has declined to
Hisclose the list of endorsements
ho has won.
THE REASON, for his reti-
cence, according to our sources.
is that he has fallen far short
of the 35 congressional endorse-
ments which had been promised
The actual number was closer
to half as many.
House Democratic Leader
Thomas O'Neill is regarded on
Capitol Hill as an astute political
forecaster. For what it's worth,
he has been telling associates
flatly that Gerald Ford will not
get the Republican nomination
for president.
FREE RIDE: The American
ambassador to Cyprus. William
Crawford, has come up with a
unique way of financing his
summer home.
Under State Department reg-
ulations, he is entitled to per
diem nav if he conducts official
business on his trips. Well, he
freouentlv travels from the em-
bassv in Nicosia to his summer
home in Kyrenia.
He savs he engages in offi-
cial business along the way.
Therefore, he has claimed and
collected oer diem amounting
to about $38 a dav
Cabinet Weighs Possible
Cuts in Israel's Budget
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet will meet in special ses-
sion here to consider Finance
Minister Yehoshua Rabinowitz's
call for ministerial budget cuts
in the neighborhood of IL 2 bil-
lion to compensate for the un-
expectedly high rate of inflation.
The matter was taken up at
the Cabinet's regular session on
Sunday at which various minis-
ters objected strongly to the
cuts.
Although a decision was de-
ferred for one week, the govern-
ment apparently decided that it
could not delay action on ur-
gent fiscal measures.
NEVERTHELESS, most ob-
servers doubt that the Cabinet
will take any decisive action
tomorrow. Rabinowitz has been
meeting privately with his min-
isterial colleagues during the
oast two days in an effort to
persuade them to accept the
cuts
But most of them remain
firmly opposed. These include
the ministers of defense, hous-
ing, education and health.
The Finance Minister is pro-
posing, in effect, that each min-
istry absorb inflationary price
increases by cutting their ex-
penditures. Rabinowitz explain-
ed that this is necessary because
inflation is rising as the rate of
more than 30 percent instead
of the anticipated 25 percent.
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President Hafez Assad who put
Syria's prestige on the line in
Lebanon.
ASSAD, in fact, appears to
be losing popularity in Syria as
a result of his Lebanese adven-
ture.
Meanwhile, Israeli circles
could not confirm reports that
Syrian army units had entered
the so-called "Fatahland," the
one-time terrorist stronghold in
southeastern Lebanon adjacent
to the Israeli border.
The circles said that the Syr-
ians may have skirted the
northern perimeter of "Fatah-
land" in an effort to relieve
their forces deployed around
Sidon.
But claims that they entered
the region were dismissed here
as "psychological warfare" by
the PLO in Beirut, possibly aim-
ed at Israeli intervention in the
Lebanese conflict.
ISRAEL'S policy of watchful
non-intervention has not chang-
ed. There has been talk of a
"red line" which, if breached
by the Syrians, would cause Is-
rael to consider an appropriate
response.
Sources here believe the "red
line" may refer less to a geo-
graphical Position than to a cer-
tain set of political conditions
which may or may not mate-
rialize.
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Page 6-A
*Jenisl> Meridian
Friday, June 18, 1976 *
DECISION FOR JEWISH FtDtRAL PRISONERS
Arabs Define
Inmates to Receive Kosher Food of Israel
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) Jew-
ish inmates of federal prisons
throughout the United States
are now entitled to receive full
kosher meals, including meat,
poultry and fish, according to
Sidney Kwestel, president of the
National Jewish Commission on
Law and Public Affairs (COLPA)
which helrjed negotiate the ko-
sher food arrangement with the
Federal Bureau of Prisons.
The statement, setting this as
formal policy is the first in the
46-vear history of the bureau,
Kwestel said, adding that it was
effective as of May 25. Kwestel
said that a series of lawsuits
on the issue in federal courts
had clarified in general terms
the right of Jewish prisoners to
a nutritious kosher diet but had
not resolved the auestion of the
precise comoonents of such a
diet
HE SAID that heretofore the
federal government had con-
sistently refused to provide
such Jewish inmates with ko-
sher meat or poultry.
A draft statement setting forth
the new policy, applicable to
any Jewish inmate who asks for
a kosher diet, was prepared by
COLPA attorneys in coopera-
tion with representatives of the
National Council of Young Is-
rael, an association of Orthodox
synagogues, the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations of
America, which sponsors a ko-
sher certification program, and
the Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica, an association of Orthodox
rabbis.
Kwestel said the new policy
statement spelled out the right
to kosher food and stated that
the inmate's diet must contain
"as great a variety of foods as
possible, including meat and
poultry."
ELIGIBILITY is open to "any
Jewish committed offender who
wishes to observe the dietary
laws" and remains in force for
the inmate "as long as non-
kosher food is not consumed."
Such a breach of kashruth ob-
servance "may" result in loss
of the inmate's "entitlement."
The statement also provides
that removal of the kosher food
privileges may be challenged by
the inmate through the usual
orison grievance procedures.
According to the policy state-
ment, all kosher foods provided
to Jewish inmates "shall be
nrooerlv certified or deemed
acceptable by the kashrush di-
vision" of tho Orthodox Union
"svmbolized bv the OU on the
container or packaging, or by
anv other Orthodox agency
deemed acceptable bv the in-
mate."
THE NEW arrangements rec-
ognize that kosher food mav be-
come non-kosher if brought into
contact with non-kosher food or
utensils used to prepare non-
kosher food.
Jewish inmates are therefore
provided with "access to a hot
"late, or some other means to
heat their food; at least two pots
and oans one for preparation
RELIGIOUS PRECEDENTS CITED
Ten Commandments
'Duplicate" Unveiled
At Agudath Israel
Not only is this the year of the Bicentennial celebrat-
ing America's birthday but in recent observance of the
Shavuoth holiday, which commemorates the giving of the
Law on Mount Sinai over 3,500 years ago, Agudath Israel
Synagogue, 7801 Carlyle Ave., Miami Beach, was fortunate
in obtaining "an exact proportionate duplicate of the orig-
inal Ten Commandments."
Rabbi Sheldon Ever, spiritual leader, explains that "the
Gemara in Baba Bathra 14a states that the Tablets were
six handbreadths in length (one cubit or 18 inches), six
rundbreadths in width and three handbreadths in thick-
ness."
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS at the Synagogue are
made of solid block clear lucite with a mirror effect ena-
bling the lettering to be read from all sides. It was hand-
crafted and engraved under the most careful rabbinical su-
pervision, explains Rabbi Ever.
Contributors were George and Sue Kazdin, of Miami
Beach, and Miami Plastic and Engraving Corporation of
Hialeah, and their staff of Arnold S. C. Johnson, J.E. Mc-
Cabe, Jeff Mell and Kurt Schaal.
f SYSTEMS FOR SECURITY. Inc. ^
BURGLAR & FIRE
of meat dishes and one for pre-
paration of dairy dishes, or at
least two dishes, bowls and cups
one each for meat meals and
one each for dairy meals, and
two sets of eating and serving
utensils."
The preparation and serving
utensils must be new, with the
exception of the hot plate. In-
mates also will be provided with
"a special storage area in which
to place their eating utensils
and cooking equipment, to pre-
clude their accidental use in
connection with non kosher
food."
APPROVAL of the policy
statement followed action by the
Bureau of Prisons, during the
Passover period last spring, to
permit Jewish inmates to re-
ceive greater amounts of Ko-
sher-for-Passover foods, includ-
ing TV dinners, than ever be-
bore, Kwestel said.
Harolds Jacobs, UOJCA presi-
dent, and Herman Rosenbaum,
Young Israel president, hailed
the approval of the statement
as an important development
anci praised the spirit of coop-
eration of the Bureau of Pris-
ons.
Paul Epstein, of the COLPA
Washington Branch, was legal
counsel to the negotiating team
which included Stanley Schles-
sel. director of the Young Israel
University Kosher Dining Divi-
sion; Rabbis David Cohen,
UOJCA director, and Elkanah
Schwartz. UOJCA public affairs
representative, and Robert Ter-
skv a Newark attorney.
THE PASSOVER program was
coordinated by Epstein and
Schlessel. with the meals pro-
vided by the Young Israel Ko-
sher Dining Division. Kwestel
said. It was understood that the
orison bureau would absorb the
additional cost of the kosher
meat, noultrv. and fish in the
program.
A COLPA spokesman said the
kosher food problem was much
less complicated in state and
local orisons, where visitors are
permitted to bring parcels of
food, a practice banned in fed-
eral orisons.
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Continued from Page 1-A
government's plans to expro-
priate land some Arab and
some Jewish-owned in Gali-
lee.
The memorandum, which was
delivered to the Premier late
last week, stresses that the
Arabs regard Israel as a state
for twe nations. The Arabic
word used is ambiguous but can
be interpreted as a bi-national
state.
THE GROUP also warns that
it will oppose the expropriation
of "any cenitimeter" of Arab
land in Galilee, the Negev or
the so-called "triangle" east of
the coastal plain.
Apart from the Galilee proj-
ect, there are no known plans
for expropriations in any of
these areas.
The Arab leaders also criti-
cized a government decision to
create an Arab-Jewish public
council to deal with problems
of the Arab minority.
THE PRESS has leaked the
names of some 35 Arab person-
alities who would participate in
the 73-member council. Many
of them are regarded by the
Arabs as establishment-orient-
ed.
The local leaders insist that
committees will not solve the
problems but only a change in
povernment policy towards Is-
rael's Arab citizens.
Two prominent Arabs whose
names appeared on the unoffi-
cial list have announced that
they would not participate in
the council.
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both to
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AND TO THE PEOPLE OF
ISRAEL
For further particulars, please contact:
llsrael Histadrut FouTda ~, |
1420 Lincoln Road, Suite 389
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I Telephone: 531-8702
This is to inform you that I plan to include in my WILL a
BEQUEST to the Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
i
RamT
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ADDRESS
STATE
-fip-
TEl. No.


Friday, June 18, 1976
'JewistiFhridttan
Page 7-A

friendly, foreign, nearby
and still your best buy
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Citv Puerto Vallarta, newer ones like Cabo San Lucas, Loreto, Mulege, all in Baja and just opened resorts
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Page 8-A
* Jewish fhridiain
Friday, June 18, 1976 >
FBI in Arrest of JDL Members
Continued from Page 1-A
charged that there was a
"strong possibility" the FBI
had planted the explosives
in the car containing two of
the three JDL members.
The FBI said the New
York City Police Depart-
ment and the Port Authority
of New York-New Jersey
took part in the investiga-
tion leading to the arrest.
J. WALLACE Leprade, as-
sistant director of the FBI in
charge of the New York office.
and Michael J. Codd. New York
City Police Commissioner, joint-
ly announced the arrests at a
press conference at FBI head-
quarters here.
They said those arrested were
Steven Isaac EhrBch, 20, of
Brooklyn; Thomas Macintosh
Jr., 36, of Woodbury, N.J.; and
a 17-year-old juvenile, whose
name was withheld because of
his aw;
Leprade said that an exten-
sive joint investigation by the
three agencies led to the arrest
of Ehrlich and the juvenile at
the Goethals Bridge on Staten
Island, shorllv after they cross-
ed over the bildge from New
Jersey.
HE SAID the two suspects
had been foun dto be in posses-
sion of a quantity of black pow-
der commonly used in prepara-
tion of explosive devices. Mac-
intosh, described by the JDL
as a convert to Judaism, was
arrested at his home in Wood-
bury. Leprade said conviction
carried a prison sentence and/
or a $10,000 fine.
Within an hour and a half of
the FBI announcement, the
JDL called a press conference
at its headquarters here at
which Dov Fisch, JDL associate
director, suggested an FBI
plant.
Under insistent questioning
by reporters as to whether the
three members were in fact
carrying explosive material,
Fisch said there was "a pos-
sibility of 30 percent" and that
there was also a 70 percent pos-
sibility that the few pounds of
explosive powder were planted
by the FBI.
FISCH ALSO asserted that
arrests were the result of "an
increasing pressure by the So-
viets on the United States gov-
ernment to arrest Jews" be-
cause of the FBI's inability so
far to find those responsible for
the recurrent attacks on Soviet
diplomats and installations in
the United States. The JDL has
reacted to the attacks by deny-
ing complicity but praising the
attacks.
Fisch also said that the Ford
Administration, in arresting the
three JDL men, wanted to save
detente with the Soviet Union
and that the JDL rejected "cru-
cifixion of the three Jews on
the cross of detente."
He called on established Jew-
ish organizations like the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee and the
American Jewish Congress to
raise bail for the three suspects.
He indicated the three were be-
ing held incommunicado by the
FBI and that the JDL did not
know where they were.
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Friday, June 18, 1976
fJetvistiflcriaUan
Page 9-A
Israeli Arabs
Withdraiv Document
em not ins run
Sisco Foresees Peace in Mideast
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A group of Israeli Arab
leaders appeared to be having second thoughts on a me-
morandum they drafted for Premier Yitzhak Rabin which,
in effect, calls for recognition of a bi-national state in
Israel.
The text of the memorandum, leaked to the press,
engendered an angry public reaction inasmuch as it chal-
lenged the Zionist concept of Israel as a Jewish State with
an Arab minority.
HE INSISTED however, that this did not mean the
text would be altered. "The memo was prepared by three
persons, and we simply wanted to discuss the matter again,"
he said.
Other Arab notables conceded that the original lan-
guage may have been too strong. "But so was Rabin's dis-
regard for our national uistinctiveness," they said.
The group, consisting of Arab mayors and town coun-
cil members, met with the Premier two weeks ago to dis-
cuss the problems of Israel's Arab minority.
THEY VOICED displeasure afterwards with Rabin s
description of the Arabs as a distinctive culture and reli-
gion without mentioning any national significance.
Their memo saw Israel as a state containing two na-
tions. The Hebrew translation of the Arabic phrase used is
a bi-national state.
Continued from Page 1-A
not be easy."
Sisco is leaving his present
post July 1 to assume the presi-
dency of American University
in Washington, D.C. He joined
the State Department in 1951
and has dealt in Mideast affairs
since the mid-1960s.
At the reception, which was
held at the Presidents Confer-
ence's headquarters at 515 Park
Ave., and attended by more
than a hundred Jewish leaders,
Sisco was praised for his
"friendship and understanding"
of Israel and American Jewry.
SIMCHA DINITZ, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States,
said that with Sisco "we knew
we had a friend in the State De-
partment. 1 think," Dlnitz said,
"that nobody in the American
government knows Israel, un-
derstands Israel better than
Sisco."
President Ford and Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger sent
letters for the occasion to the
chairman of the Presidents Con-
ference. Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler. praising Sisco for his
long and devoted service and
his contribution to U.S. efforts
at reaching a Mideast solution.
Ford said:
"FOR OVER a decade, he
(Sisco) has worked tirelessly to
help achieve progress toward
a final peace in the Middle
East. Since October, 1973, he
has Dlayed a particularly sig-
nificant role in the successful
diDlomatic efforts of our gov-
ernment in that area.
"Peace in the Middle East
and the maintenance of Israel's
security and survival have con-
tinued to be the priority foreign
nolicv objectives of my Admin-
istration. They have been well
served and effectively carried
forward by Joe Sisco for
which I am personally grateful
to him."
PRESENTING Sisco and his
wife. Jean, with an illustrated
Hebrew-English book of Psalms.
Schindler declared that Amer-
ican Jews remained pledged to
Israel's survival "with our very
lives."
Also paying tribute to Sisco
were Rabbi Israel Miller, for-
mer chairman of the Presidents
Conference, and Max Fisher,
chairman of the Board of Gov-
ernors of the Jewish Agency.
Terrorists Pepped 'Criminal9
BRUSSELS (JTA) The Ministers of Justice ot
the nine member states of the European Common Market
approved a draft project which would describe terrorist
acts as "criminal" and deprive terrorists of their political
status.
The draft project defines as "common law crimes"
aerial hijackings, threats against civilian planes, attacks
against civilians and diplomats, the taking of hostages and
the use of grendes, bombs and any explosives.
She has a steady,
reasonable income.
She doesn't have a job.
We loaned her $2,000.
Why not? She always wanted to go to Israel but there
just wasn't enough time. Not. with helping Jack in the
business, raising the children and taking care of a house
There just wasn't enough time.
Now there is, and with her Social Security check,
interest from savings accounts and a few dividend
checks, she's making out just fine, Jack made sure
of that, and she just didn't have the $2,000.
She wouldn't ask the children, so she asked us.
She and Jack had borrowed before. (Doesn't
everybody run short now and then?) It was always
paid back on the button. She got her loan.
Job, or no job, she's a first class lady
We gave her credit for that.
We give credit where credit is due.
We give credit to people.
People to people.
We built our reputation on it.
We care.
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Ford Administration Keeps Saying One Thing But Doing Another
|>ACK IN March, when true seekers after peace
in the Middle East were dismayed by President
Ford's clear willingness to sell military equipment
to Egypt, Mr. Ford was quick to assure a B'nai
B'rith audience that the United States, with a long
history of supporting Israel, will defend the secur-
ity and survival of Israel.
In mid-May, after vetoing the $9.4 billion for-
eign aid bill, which embraced promise of nearly
half that huge amount for Israel over a 27-month
period, the President quickly mounted the rostrum
of a Jewish meeting again (this time the American
Jewish Committee) to provide reassurances simi-
lar to those given in March.
WHETHER PAVING the way for Egypt to get
more military aid from the U.S. or darkening the
hopes for Israel to obtain vitally needed economic
assistance, Mr. Ford is obliged, of course, to keep
firmly in mind the election-year whims of Amer-
ican voters.
Certainly, in putting his stamp of disapproval
on the foreign aid bill, on which Congress had la-
Wd
ert
i^eqal
w
bored so consciously (with constant consultation
with Mr. Ford's liteutenants), the President was
motivated in part by asking himself "What will
Kcnald Reagan think and do if I sign the bill?"
FOR THE measure contained a provision for
a six-month suspension of the trade embargo
against Vietnam an item sure to be scooped up
and capitalized upon by the jingoistic Reagan camp.
While Israel and her friends the world over
wait for repair of the damage done by the Presi-
dential veto, it is instructive to look back on the
Administration's actual score card.
Thus we need to recall that ir March a CIA
spokesman told the American Institute of Aero-
nautics and Astronautics that Israel has 10 to 20
nuclear weapons. Would the CIA spokesman have
offered this controversial tidbit without approval
of the Defense Department? and why give the Arabs
a handle for their ax in this bumbling way?
A COUPLE of days later, the President let the
news media people know that he was irked when
Jewish leaders in America protested his projected
;ale of six C-120 military transport planes to Egypt,
jon thereafter, our representative to the UN, Bill
cranton, scolded Israel for promoting Jewish set-
tlements in occupied Arab territory.
This rebuke was administered at the time Scran-
ton as decency dictates cast the U.S. veto in
the Security Council against an Arab-structured
resolution deploring Israeli policies in Jerusalem
and on the West Bank.
Not long after that episode, former Defense
Secretary James R. Schlesinger openly accused the
Administration he had served so energetically of
jndermining American moral support for Israel and
pressuring Israel to make concessions to those foes
who have vowed to decimate the 28-year-old state.
S.
n sun
fanor I
New Books
Of Major
Jewish Interest
"A TEXTB00K of Israeli Hebrew," by Haiim B. Rosen (Uni-
versity of Chicago, $7.95, 404 pp.), aims to enable a stu-
dent to read "moderately difficult" Israeli Hebrew and to
write and converse in current Hebrew. This emphasis on
teaching current Israeli Hebrew is in no uncertain terms. The
author indicates that special care has been taken to present
only authentic types of speech, unquestionably acceptable to
the native speaker of Hebrew.
To accommodate everyone, Rosen has devised his lessons
so as to suit the needs of students of classical Hebrew as well.
Special sections of Biblical text are included, with adequate
discussion of classical Inguage.
EACH OF the 60 sections includes extensive explanation
of the material included. Rosen provides both translation and
transliteration, pronunciation aids, vocabulary lists and in-
creasingly more difficult essays to read and comprehend.
In fact, an Israeli educator to whom I showed the text
commented upon the excellent progression in degrees of dif-
ficulty and how this is a challenge for the competent student
of Hebrew.
LEO KOSTEN'S latest compilation of vignettes, jokes, and
double-entendres is "The 3:10 to Anywhere" (McGraw-Hill.
$8.95, 323pp.). It is directed toward "anyone who loves or
dreams of travel." On the contrary, most of the anecdotes
have less to do with the countries in which they take place
than with poking fun at accents, foreign expressions and com-
mon human foibles.
The first trip which Rosten recalls, however, is an effec-
tive piece. It is his arrival at the age of three at Ellis Island
In four pages he all too briefly describes a meaningful and
touching scene. He captures the flavor of the "magic island":
"The wire-screened wating chambers were packed with
Greeks in funny skirts and leggings, forever fingering their
beads; Swedes with celluloid collars; stolid Dutchmen; Turks
with fierce mustaches; Romany gypsies with blazing eyes, who
gave me candy; and Jews with thick beards and unshorn ear
ringlets ."
LATER, Rosten recounts an episode of his youth in Chi-
cago going to the Yiddish theater and the Cafe Royal. It
is a memorable and well-told glimpse into one of the most
colorful periods of American Jewish history.
While Irving Howe and Abraham Karp have recently
written scholarly works on the Jewish experience in America
for the Bicentennial, Rosten should have entertained us with
his anecdotal first-hand experiences of same.
"Mottele," by Gertrude Samuels (Harper & Row, $8.95,
179pp.), is a new novel about the true story of Mottele Shlayan,
a young boy who joined the partisans of the Soviet Ukraine
during the Holocaust.
MOTTELE IS known to us already through the accounts
of Misha Gildenman (Uncie Misha), the legendary commander
of this detachment of Jewish partisans which numbered in the
hundreds. Yuri Suhl, author of several important books on
resistance during the Holocaust, compiled a number of stories
about Uncle Misha and Mottele in his now famous work, "They
Fought Back."
Samuels became fascinated with the young Jew who. did
fight back. She fictionalizes true episodes which can be found
in Suhl's book, adding a dimension of exploration into the
character's motivations and ideas. This is a worthwhile addi-
tion to the reading lists of all young adults.
Page 10-A legist flcrkliar Friday, June 18, 1976
*4,
mo
erg
The Role of the Jew
In a Lawless World
'INHERE ARE many ominous signs that our
civilization is in the grip of a malaise for
which we do not have a cure. We realized it
quite suddenly. It broke like a wave over our
heads although the danger signals were there.
Now we stand, disoriented and dissatisfied,
helpless and dazed in the face of all problems
that have been opened up by Vietnam and
Watergate. It is as if the walls are crumbling
down. There is nothing to keep them from fall
inn
The spreading lawlessness in all spheres
of society seems to be without limits and
without promise that it will ever recede or
abate in our days. Confidence in the law itself
has been eroded. The great abstractions and
ideas about "the rights of man." the great de-
signs of the law have come to naught when
confronted with the necessity of keeping our
society functioning.
THEY HAVE not brought the millennium.
They have only shown the imperfection of our
aye and the lack of accountability we see all
around us.
The same problem is haunting the family
cil nations. For many years dominant powers
promoted lawlessness, undermined the tiny be-
ginnings of stability wherever they could find
them and clothed it all in a fine and appealing
rhetoric.
It was a simple design to establish an or-
der of ilisordei and to cow the so-called West-
ern World into accepting terror as a legitimate
form of politics. It came to a fitting climax
when a gun-carrying terrorist lectured the rep-
resentatives of more than 100 nations about
nis peaceful designs and the good life he want-
i J to create for everybody, Jew and Arab
ilike.
THESE ARE regrettable developments for
all those wh- thought the United Nations would
bring the realization of a dream. As on the na-
tional level, great ideas have shown their limi-
tations when set into practice. Beyond that
the danger exists that, while we live under the
' nor of national and international lawless-
ness, we are becoming so used to it, that we
are inclined to accept it as a way of life.
The Jew with the knowledge of "his law"
ihould know better. He might have the tend-
ency to "understand" certain acts of lawless-
ness. But he should know that the moment we
try to "understand" lawlessness, we are not
a. from giving it our approval.
There are no excuses for the excuses
r.'ade every day Poverty does not justify law-
1 eaking. Demonstrations do not establish a
:i w order; nor do judicial decisions that have
t ic imprint of reality and provoke lawlessness.
THE END does not justify the means. Big
< orporations should not be ripped off because
ihey rip off the people. The old and the feeble
should not be exploited, even if the profit mo-
live calls for it or even if Jews do it to a
How Jew.
The Man Who Said W
Is Now Clearly Saying Yes'
^41,
'pert
Haifa
CINCE the retirement of the late David Ben
Gurion from active political leadership, the
Israel public has been looking for a personality
whom it could follow with enthusiasm. And
inevitably, for years, the finger has pointed to
ihe soldier-archeologist, Yigal Yadin. For more
than 20 years Yadin rejected all invitations to
go into politics, but the more he demurred,
ihe more appealing he became in the eyes of
the public.
And only a few weeks ago the mystery
man stepped out of the shadows and formally
mnounced that if there were indeed popular
support for him and his ideas, he would con-
rent to offer his candidacy.
YADIN IS a man of great ability. He is
oerhaps best known as the archeologist who
places' names live again in Jewish history. Yet
places names live again in Jewish history. Yet
he also has a brilliant military background. On
him the story is told that in 1948, when he was
Chief of Operations for the Israel army in the
Negev, he was faced with the problem of stop-
ping the Egyptian forces which were invading.
Their flanks were protected by the track-
less wastes of the desert. Yadin recalled from
us knowledge of archeology and ancient his-
tory that there had been an old Roman road,
southwest of Beersheba, now barely covered
by sand. His armored column swept around,
cut the Egyptian supply route to the south,
and halted the advance.
LATER HE became Chief of Staff of the
Israel Defense Forces, but when he shed his
uniform he went back to his first love, ar-
cheology. He has great personal charm. At the
moment he conducts a television series on Is-
rael's antiquities, which is increasing his char-
isma even more.
Whenever the possibility of his assuming
national leadership was suggested, questions
were raised. What are his policies?
Previously he had been known to have
strong opinions on only one major issue: he
firmly believes that Israel must change its cum-
bersome electoral system, which makes a farce
out of democracy, while preserving its external
iorms. Recently he spent over a year as a
member of the Agranat Commission, which in-
vestigated the faults and weaknesses that re-
sulted in the Yom Kippur War surprise.


riday, June 18, 1976
fJenisti fhrk/ian
Page 11-A
JWVets Oppose Brown's Reappointment
WASHINGTON Judge Paul
Aibner, National Commander
pt' the Jewish War Veterans of
jie U.S.A., on behalf of the
Intire organization has vigor-
ously protested the nomination
If Gen. George S. Brown for a
lecond term as chairman of the
loint Chiefs of Staff.
He has called upon President
perald Ford to consider an-
other "more capable and ac-
ceptable nominee" for this
jiigh position.
MONTREAL In connection
vith the Summer Olympics to
be held in Montreal beginning
July 17, 1976, Jewish Commu-
nity Centers throughout the
f.8. and Canada have been urg-
ed by JWB to conduct or par-
ticipate in memorial events in
honor of the 11 Israeli athletes
nassacred in Munich, Germany,
during the Olympic Games held
Ihere in 1972.
In a memorandum to health
Ind physical education direc-
tors of JWB's affiliated Jewish
Community Centers and YM and
AVHAs, Dr. Hillel Ruskin, on
eave from Hebrew University
a JWB's special consultant on
health and physical education
ind camping, and Oliver B.
/inkier, national consultant on
health and physical education,
vrote:
"Almost four years have
oassed since the massacre of
Ihe 11 Israeli athletes during
Ihe Munich Olympic Games in
1972. Eleven sportsmen were
tiade the target of a political
campaign. This murderous act
it the very place that symbol-
izes peace with all nations gave
rise to the question of the very
pssence of these games.
"Israel's request to the In-
ternational Olympic Committee
and the Organizing Committee
pf the Olympic Games in Mont-
real to hold memorial services
or events during the Games
has now been rejected. The in-
ternational community tries to
forget the tragedy, and avoids
any reference to it."
0
NEW YORK More than
300 members and friends of
American Mizrachi Women paid
tribute to famed opera tenor
Jan Peerce and his wife, Alice
Peerce, "for their devotion tc
Israel and the Jewish people"
at a special Golden Jubilee
Family in Israel celebration
here at the New York Hilton
Hotel.
0
NEW YORK More than 300
members and friend sof Amer-
ican Mizrachi Women paid trib-
ute to famed opera tenor Jan
Peerce and his wife, Alice
Peerce, "for their devotion to
Israel and the Jewish people"
at a special Golden Jubilee
Family-in-Israel celebration here
at the New York Hilton Hotel.
The Peerces are serving as
honorary national Mother-and-
Father-in-Israel during this
Golden Jubilee Year of the or-
ganization. The Peerces were
presented with a special poster
made by the children of Beth
Zeiroth Mizrachi. Jerusalem.
NEW YORK A new nation-
al program to provide Orthodox
Jewish travelers with local in-
formation centers for their
unique needs while traveling
has been launched by Agudath
Israel of America, a major na-
tional Orthodox Jewish organ-
ization.
Under the program, traveling
Jewish businessmen and visit-
ors will be able to contact volun-
teer community leaders in 29
cities encompassing 18 states in
the U.S., Canada and Mexico,
to determine where kosher food
can be obtained, location of
synagogues and other pertinent
Criticism of Israel
Not Deplorable
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Alexander M. Schin-
dler, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish Organ-
izations, declared here that
criticism of certain Israeli
governmental policies by
American Jews in no way
implies any diminution of
their commitment to Israel.
"Let no one be mistaken
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and misread our occasional
questioning of this or that
Israeli governmental policy
as disunity or weakness. We
remain committed with our
very lives, all of us to Israel's
survival in security and in
peace," Schindler said.
HE SPOKE at a farewell
luncheon tendered by the Presi-
dents Conference to retiring
Undersecretary of State Joseph
J. Sisco. "Those differences that
do exist among American Jews
about Israel's foreign policy are
nowhere near as serious as they
are portrayed." Schindler stress-
ed.
He took issue with the label-
ling pi Jews as "doves*' or
"hawks" with respect to their
views on Israeli policies.
He said those terms were a
throwback to the Vietnam War
and "applied to the Middle
East, they evoke dangerous and
misleading comparisons."
SCHINDLER observed, "I for
one have never heard a Jewish
hawk' demand that Damascus
be levelled or that the harbor of
Alexandria be mined. Nor have
I heard any 'dove' question Is-
rael's right to be. What divides
the 'doves' and 'hawks' on Is-
rael is not the ultimate goal of
peace but the kind of risks that
should be taken to achieve that
peace." Schindler said.
"The real issue is not 'hawk'
versus 'dove' but rather what
is the 'quo' that Israel has the
right to expect for its 'quid'?
The debate of late has focused
on those territories that Israel
should or should not surrender.
But the essential questions are
these: What kind of peace will
result from Israel's concessions?
Is there to be a mere mouth-
ing of phrases like 'the non-use
of force' which in the final
analvsis means nothing at all?
"Or should that peace include
opening of trade, travel and cul-
tural contacts between Israel
and her Arab neighbors as the
foundation on which a just and
lastine neace can be built?"
Schindler asked.
HE CONCLUDED, "When the
Arab states answer these ques-
tions. Israel and the world will
know whether there will be a
genuine peace in the Middle
East or the kind of 'peace' that
the Muslims and Christians of
Lebanon are enduring as Arab
slaughters Arab."
information of unique import-
ance to the Orthodox Jew.
O
NEW YORK Seven Labor
Zionist leaders will attend the
World Conference in Israel for
Yiddish and Yiddish Culture
which will be held in Israel in
August and which will be the
first international conference of
communal leaders dedicated to
Yiddish and Yiddish culture in
70 years.
The delegation of Labor Zion-
ists attending the conference
will be headed Dr. Judah J.
Shapiro, president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance.
According to Labor Zionist
leaders, this is the first confer-
ence since 1908 when a similar
international conference on Yid-
dish and Yiddish culture was
held in Czernovitz in Roumania.
O
NEW YORK Rabbi Leon-
ard A. Schoolman has been
named new director of program
for the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, national
body of 720 Reform synagogues
and 1.1 million members in the
United States and Canada.
In making the appointment,
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler.
UAHC President, stated that
Rabbi Schoolman will coordinate
the UAHC's activities serving
the member congregations in
such areas as worship, educa-
tion, youth, synagogue adminis-
tration and the creation of new
programs and projects to assist
svnagogue development and
growth.
O
NEW YORK At the 50th
annual meeting of the Syna-
Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein,
spiritual leader of Congregation
Kehilath Jeshurun, New Yqrk
City, was reelected president of
the SCA. the national umbrella
agency for the Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reform branches
of American Judaism, repre-
senting some four million Amer-
ican Jews.
Rabbi Lookstein, who will
serve a one-year term, is foun-
der of the Ramaz School and
chancellor of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity in Ramat-Gan, Israel. He is
a member of the Administration
Committee of the Joint Distri-
bution Committee and Commis-
sioner of the Hillel Foundation.
O
NEW YORK Hadassah. the
largest women's volunteer or-
ganization in the country, will
hold its annual national conven-
tion in Washington, D.C., from
Aug. 15 through 18.
About 2,500 delegates, repre-
senting 350,000 members from
over 1,500 chapters and groups
throughout the United States
and Puerto Rico, will attend the
62nd annual national conven-
tion of Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of America,
at the Washington Hilton Hotel.
Rose E. Matzkin, of Water-
burv, Conn., national president,
of Hadassah, announced that in
addition to hearing reports,
projecting plans, adopting bud-
gets and participating in semi-
nars and workshops, the dele-
gates will honor distinguished
guests and hear addresses by
eovernment leaders and inter-
national authorities in the fields
of Hadassah's activitieshealth,
education, youth, and American
and foreign affairs.
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)f


Page 12-A
fjewisti fhrkUan
Friday, June 18, 1976
i
Trial Balloon for New Geneva
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Trial balloons are up and soar-
ing for a Geneva-type confer-
ence in early autumn to move
towards "settlement" of the
Arab-Israeli conflict. Although
the White House has denied the
reports as untrue, skeptics not-
ed that they were floated by
commentators intimate with
highest Administration author-
ities and they are usually ac-
curate in their disclosures of
Administration ideas.
Actually, the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency saw signs of
balloons being readied for float-
ing some five weeks ago and
noted at the time that some
Administration people were
forecasting a grave crisis in late
summer in the Middle East in
which President Ford would
have to take a hand.
THIS ROLE would conse-
quently enhance his global im-
age as a peacemaker at the
height of the Presidential elec-
tion campaign.
In any event, some analysts
see the groundwork being
readied by the U.S. foreign af-
fairs establishment for move-
ment towards a climax on the
problems of the area.
Of deep concern to observers
is the view taken by Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger that
"world opinion" dictates his
position on Rhodesia. While the
democratic principle of rule by
the majoritv of a country's in-
habitants is naturally regarded
as right by analysts, the diffi-
culty associated with that
"world opinion" as it affects
Israel is that it is easily manu-
factured by the Arab-commu-
nist-Third World Bloc in the
Franco-Israeli
Ties Appear
Cooler Than Ever
PARIS (JTA) A new
source of friction between
France and Israel is developing
here.
Israeli President Ephraim
Katzir called off a visit to Paris
scheduled for this month be-
cause French authorities would
not accord him the kind of wel-
come demanded by diplomatic
protocol.
Official circles here insisted
that Katzir would have been re-
ceived "with all the honors due
his rank." They said the Israeli
Embassy was informed that pro-
tocol would have been "fully
implemented" for Katzir's visit.
THE INTENDED visit was a
private one. Katzir, an inter-
nationally known bio-chemist,
was invited to attend a scien-
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National Hebrew
ISRAELI GIFT CfNTW IMC
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tific symposium here in mem-
ory of his late brother, Aharon
Katzir, who was a victim of the
1971 Lod Airport massacre. He
is also to attend a similar event
in Britain.
Israeli authorities maintained
that even a private visit by a
head of state required a mea-
sure of ceremonial pomp by the
host country. They said that
President Valery Giscard d'Es-
taing was prepared only to re-
ceive Katzir in his office for a
talk and did not plan to tender
a dinner or even a luncheon for
him.
Katzir's office in Jerusalem
issued a brief announcement
that Tn view of the circum-
stances created, the President
has decided, upon the Foreign
Minister's recommendation, to
travel only to Britain."
FRENCH officials said that
protocol does not require a
luncheon invitation for a priv-
ate visit by a head of state.
They recalled that when Queen
Elizabeth paid a private visit
to France last June, she was
not invited to meet with the
President.
Giscard was prepared to meet
Katzir on June 21, but a lunch-
eon or dinner were ruled out
because the French leader is
leaving on an official visit to
Britain the next day, sources
at the Elysee Palace said.
Observers here said that the
Israelis suspect France of try-
ing to insult Israel while heap-
ing honors on visiting Arabs.
French sources accuse Israel of
' attempting to turn Katzir's visit
into an official occasion in or-
der to strain France's relations
with the Arab states.
United Nations and they often
get support from others, too,
which put expediency above
principle.
IN ANOTHER indication of
possibilities towards going to
Geneva, Kissinger has observed
that the U.S. and the Soviet
Union are not widely separated
in outlooks on Geneva-type con-
ferences.
The stumbling bloc is Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
participation. The Soviets want
the PLO to enter into discus-
sions while the U.S. will not al-
low this until the PLO recog-
nizes Israel.
In a mid-May interview here,
Kissinger was asked about the
latest Soviet proposal for a two-
stage Geneva Confersnce, in-
cluding the possibility of the
PLO working in its preparation.
Kissinger noted that the U.S.
had proposed a two-stage ap-
proach and then added that "if
the first stage could be con-
ducted without the PLO, with-
out anv prejudice, to what hap-
pens later, then I think we
would be very close to the So-
viet position.
BUT THE first stage could
include those countries that
were invitee! to the first Geneva
Conference (Israel, Egypt, Syria,
Jordan and the two superpow-
ers) and that those countries
were, after all, the originators
of the Conference decide where
we go from here."
Kissinger disclosed that the
ouestion of whether the PLO
would be able to participate as
a member of one of those dele-
gations in the preparatory par-
lev "has never been raised yet."
This leaves an opening for the
Soviets to reach a compromise
with the U.S. and in turn both
superpowers could put their
weight on the PLO to agree to
recognize Israel by some for-
mula and Washington in turn
could focus on Israel to relent
against the PLO because "world
opinion" dictates at least that
much change in position to
move towards peace.
American Israeli!
q All Religious Articles $
>. Synagogues Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVI.
>t 1-7722 S. Schwarti
RELGO, INC.
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books I Records
PHONE 532-5912
Senate Okays
Aid to Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
In particular, observers here
see this as a means of dealing
with Arab boycott measures
against Israel or American cor-
porations under Arab boycott
pressures
It is for this particular reas-
on that a Ford veto is foreseen
in the event that the Senate
House reconciliation of the two
bill retains this in the final
form.
Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld (right) discusses
worldwide military problems with Judge Paul Ribner.
National Commander, Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A., at
recent special session in Rumsfeld's offices in Washing
ton, D.C.
Levfs Boston Bus
Decision Criticized
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Jewish Rights Council (JERI-
CO), a national organization of
rabbis and laymen, has written
to U.S. Attorney General Ed-
ward H. Levi expressing disap-
pointment over the decision of
the Justice Department not to
enter the Boston school busing
case.
JERICO claims that all mass
busing orders by courts violate
the individual rights and needs
of the pupils being bused.
JERICO SAID that every bus-
ing decree, in order to agree
with the Equal Protection and
Due Process clauses of the Con-
stitution, must be based upon
a detailed examination of the
impact of the busing upon each
individual pupil.
Otherwise, according to JERI-
CO. individual pupils are going
to be punished for the sins of
others. This inherent fault of
busing decrees, and the result
ing adverse impacts upon the
education of the bused pupils.
renders the present-da;- mass
busing being mandated by the
courts unconstitutional, in JF.RI-
CO's opinion.
JERICO. which was founded
in 1971. has previously filed
friend-of-the-court briefs in the
United States Supreme Court
opposing the forced busing of
children in public school case-
in Denver. Richmond and De
troit.
wiT

aff^
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June 18, 1976
fJenisii fhridiari
Page 13-A
MINDLIN
triufttn/sf Foresees Tough Election Year
Continued from Page 4-A
jles over an administration,
largely Nixon-operated by
al Nixon appointees, that
fcnt on destroying legally
it could not destroy il-
ly when the man from
tier was still roaming
lg the fleshpots of Capitol
Lke Frank Zarb, the energy
1. These days, he's the Ford
ynistration hatchetman
jist all congressional al-
lots to break up the multi-
lonal, monopolistic oil com-
ics that operate by govern-
Kt sanction despite every
J-trust law on the books.
roRGET THE illegality of
Br criminal operations and
administration's efforts to
itect them. Zarb argues that
[the Congress is successful,
result will mean higher
. costs to the consumer, a
Eline in the search for new
irces of energy that only
nopolies can make and, that
bogeyman, a blow to the
fcion's security.
rVho will argue against Zarb's
reat to our pocketbook and
national survival? Free en-
prise be damned. Up the
-jiner for restraint of trade.
Zarb is only one Ford zombie
lien there's Earl Butz. another
Jfeshiva bocher," who enjoys
he unique distinction of being
f food conglomerate lobbyist in
dministration's clothing.
BUTZ IT is who in the wake
If the Yom Kippur War glee
Lilly announced that the days
Bf food available at affordable
prices were over. (Why not?
Butz is a former Ralston Pu-
rina executive.)
Butz it is who put the food
conglomerates into a position of
equivalency with the OPEC car-
telists, reasoning that one bad
turn (OPEC's astronomic hike
in the cost of fuel) deserved
another (America's astronomic
hike in the cost of food).
The trouble with the Butz
"solution" is that it hasn't
harmed OPEC food consumers
very much at all in the same
way that OPEC oil exporters
have harmed us.
THE CHIEF victims of the
Butz swindle are the American
people. The chief beneficiaries
so far are the capitalistically
clever Russians, who have made
oodles of money from the swin-
dlers on top of the money that
the food conglomerate swim-
dlers are making from us.
Where is Ford in all of this
as, indeed, in matters of foreign
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at the all new
policy his sudden shift in
the Middle East, for example,
toward a desperate march for
peace that must end success-
fully sometime before election
day, an impossibility if ever 1
saw one, an impossibility that
would leave Israel (and Amer-
ica) victimized and the Soviets
dangerously rewarded?
(The Arabs can expect little
more from this march than the
agony they are currently suf-
fering in Lebanon).
IT IS difficult to give an an-
swer to just where Ford is.
What appears to be true is that
Ford is not his own man
someone or something else is
President; Ford certainly is not.
(I tend to think that it is the
anonymous energy and weap-1
ons cartelists and the food con-
glomerates that occupy the',
thing called the presidency.)
Even before the Reagan blitz,
to knock him out of the run-;
ning, Ford was just a Zarb-type
zombie, speaking for the Zarbs
and the Butzes in the same way
that the Zarbs and the Butzes
speak for the anonymous car-
telists and the conglomerates.
What is worse, these days
Reagan's challenge forces Ford
into extremist statements and
extremist positions not even
he would otherwise take on
tender matters such as busing.
?!
Dutch Deport Terrorists
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Four Palestinians sentenc-'
ed to one-year imprisonment for trying to seize the Warsaw
express train have been released and deported to Syria.
The four were arrested and sentenced last September be-
fore they could carry out their plan. They wanted to force
Dutch authorities to stop allowing Jewish emigrants from
the USSR to pass through Holland.
The
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military needs, foreign policy,
human welfare.
IF FORD does not make it at
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it difficult to adapt myself to
Keagan as alternative. There
has not been a Boy Scout in
the White House since Teddy
Roose\elt. but Roosevelt was a
city slicker, and Reagan's a
hayseed.
That is a dangerous altarna
live but so. presumably, is the
Democratic choice for nominee.
Jimmy Carter, a hayseed, too,
if of a different order.
What would be wrong with a
havseed in the White House?
For that, another time
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"-,


Page 14-A
*knist thridttan
Friday, June 18, 1976
IEGAI NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NO! ICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-16107
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JAMES M. HARRISON. Petitioner.
and
BETTY J. HARRISON. Respondent.
TO: Mm. Betty J. Harrison
1708 Campbell Street
Statesvllle. North Carolina 28677
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a codv of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
DAVID E. STONE, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 101 N.W.
12 Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128. (3051
324-4555. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before July 2. 1976: otherwise a de-
LEGAL NOTICE
IEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17563
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of AMERICAN HEALTH PLAN AS-
SOCIATES at 1701 NE 164 St. N.
Miami Beach. Fl., intends to register
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17280
ArriniJ JxSDX?JoS!4,H'X.,.VON sa,d name wltn ,ne Clerk of the Cir- GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VIRGINIA M. CESTARE
Petitioner-Wife
and
BRUCE M CESTARE
Respondent -Husband
TO: BRUCE M. CESTARE
Respondent-Husband
97 Cedarhurst Avenue
CedarHurst. Long Island,
New York 11516
cult Court of Dade County, Florida.
DANIEL G. HARWITZ. M.D P.A.
SPARBEK, ZEMEL. ROSKIN
HKILHKONNER & KARP. P.A.
1 S.E. 3 Avenue, Miami. Fla.. 33131
Attorneys for Applicant
6/4-11-18-26
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN DAVID.
Husband. Petitioner,
and
SOLANGE VTILE DAVID.
Wife. Respondent.
TO: SOLANGE VTILE DAVID
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that that an action for Dissolution of Mar- wise a default will be entered against
the undersigned, desiring to engage riage has, been filed against you and you for the relief demanded In the
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17060
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: PETITION OF
ROBERT LEE HARRIS
TO: EDDIE BLACK
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Petition for Adoption has been
filed against you and ypu are required
to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, If any. to It on Martin Starr.
Attorney for Petitioner, whose address
is 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
ourt on or before July 7, 1976; other-
tha
rlage
you are requireu to serve a copy _
your written defenses. If any. to it on DELTA INVESTMENTS OF
fault will be entered against vou for HARRIS SPERBER. attorney for Pe- FI/>RIDA GENERAL
the relief demanded In the comnlaint tltloner, whose address is 19370 Col- I'ARTNERSHIP AS TRUSTEE
Street, Miami. Florida, and file said court at Miami. Florida on this
the original with the clerk of the 28th day of May. 1976.
or petition. lins Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida
This notice shall be published once 33160. and file the original with the
each week for four consecutive weeks clerk of the above styled court on or
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN. before July 14. 1976: otherwise n de-
U'lTNESS mv hand and the seal <>f fault will be entered against you for
said court at Miami. Florida on this the relief demanded in the comnlaint
20th day of Mnv. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKF.R.
5/28
6/4-11-18
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
lly c P C( IPBLAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David E. Stone. Esquire
Stone. Sostchln & Koss, P.A.
loi x w 12 Avenue
Miami. FL 33128 (324-45.151
Attorney for Petitioner
5/28 6/4-11-U
>r petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17^79
WITNESS my hand and the seal of GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-16103
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
I.I IS Q, XAVARRO MARTI.
and
XELIDA BENITEZ NAVAKHO.
TC: NeUda Benltei Navarre
Respondent. Iist Known
Residence Pueblo Nuevo
Haire, Orlenle. Cuba
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to It op
GLADYS GERSON. attorney for Pe-
tltloner, whose address Is 101 N.W
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida. .13128.
and file 'he original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July t. I!i7(i: otherwise a default will
be entered against vou for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petl-
sald court at Miami. Florida on this
4lh day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BHIXKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
Bv L. SXEEDEX
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARRIS SPERBER
1M70 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33160
Attorney for Petitioner-Wife
6/11-18-25 7/2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-16644
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
-MARIA BABlUiNiA.
Wife.
RENE BABILoNIA.
Husband
TO: RENE BABIU>NIA
6604 Hudson Avenue
West Xcw York. N.J.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If anv. to it on
Albert I. Carricarte. Bag., attorney '"l East Ptajrler Street
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AI'DENCIE ESCARXE DOMINQUE.
Wife. Petitioner.
HENRY DOMIXQUE.
Husband Respondent.
TO: HENRY DOMIXQUE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Daniel Better, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before July
:>. 1(76; otherwise a default will he en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI/>RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
2nd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. URINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By O. FREDERICK
As Deputy (lerk
(Circuit Court Seall
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Petitioner
801 Dade Federal Building
above styled court on or before July
9. 1976; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAX.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on thli
2nd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Petitioner
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 358-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
6/4-11-18-25
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
6/4-11 18-25
33131
'"thi. ,! t ., >. .... '''''.|,'-i.""",r- whose address" "is" MM Miami. Florida's!
tlce shall he nublished once Ml 7th Street. Miami. Florida, and Phone: U8-60M
Attorney for Petitioner
each week for four consecutive weeks file (he original with the dork of'ih..
"' JS&JS""^ KI;"",[)IAX ''"* ''""''' r be/ore Julv 2
WITNESS my hand and the seal of 19,6; otherwise a default will be en-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Civil Action No. 76-16853
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EARL RAY LEE
and
MARY ELIZABETH MURRAY LEE
TO: MARY ELIZABETH
MURRAY LEE
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy 0f
your written defenses, if any. to it on
ESTHER G. SCHIFF, attorney for
I'etitioner. whose address is 407 IJn-
eoln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before July 7. 1976; otherwise a de-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR DA^E COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-16280
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of
Dora HOROWITZ. Petitioner.
V.-.
ISIDORE HOROWITZ
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ISIDORE HOROWITZ
.".474 New Castle Avenue
Encino. California 91311
Yd ARE NOTIFIED that an ae-
lion for divorce has been filed agalnsi
you and you are required to serve a
cop] Of your written defenses. If anv.
to it on Liw Offices of George J.
Tallanoff. Petitioner's attorneys. 420
Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
S2138, on or before June 30. 1976. and
file the original with the Clerk of"
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys, or immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
mnnded in the Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and ihe seal of
this court on May 21. 1076
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
By: L. SNEEDEN
as Deputy Clerk
Law Offices of George J. Talianoff
Attorneys for Petitioner
By: Terrence 8, Schwartz
5 it
li/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuil Court Seal)
GLADYS GERSON. ESQ.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. FL 33128
(305) 324-4SS5
Attorney for Petitioner
5/28
6/4-11-18
said court at Miami. Florida on this
2*th dav of Mav. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv G. FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Al BERT L. CARRICARTE. ESO.
2491 N.W, 7th Street
ELVv^NT^J^oTc^rcTRCUIT^F '"&' *"*
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR F ,M*"^Vf,#t,t,0"r
Phone No. 649-7917
5/28
. ID FOR
DADE COUNTY
n.uS!yjL ACTION NO 76-16138
*r--rAH,!DICT,0N DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
is- n^ OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JESSE O. ROBINSON
and
ELIZABETH ROBINSON
TO: ELIZABETH ROBINSON
7114 S. Prairie
..^.Chicago. Illinois 60619
ii, l AR.E HEREBY NOTIFIED '^;VK,-S RELLO and UTOPIA
that an action for Dissolution of Mar- "NCORPORATED.
nage has been filed against vou and Defendants.
^!!!?,l!Rd to ,wve a ,oov "f JAMES BELLO. as Individual
K,UL,^U,te5.ae'2!2* nv. to It on
.N-THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
"TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
8fLPA0.P COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-12311
,,.,.,. NOTICE OF ACTION
BARRY GRAY.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ON
-10955 CA-01 (04)
A LI-STATE MORTGAGE
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
Cross-Plaintiff.
CLIFFORD PAUL DAVIS and
LINDA LOUIS DAVIS, his wife.
Cross-Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To: Cliffqrd Paul Davis and Linda
Louise Davis, bis wife
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
mis a "-'ross-complalnt for foreclosure
6/4-11-18 of mortgage has been filed agalnat vou
and against the following described
real property located In Dade Countv
Florida, to wit:
Imi One (1) In Block Four (4) of
MURRAY HOMES according to
the plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book Fifty-Seven (57) at
Page Ninety-Two (92) of the
Public Records of Dade Countv
Florida.
/4-.,8-25 P'^p-c entered agawlstU 5 ELEV fL0r\da^'A^ V^ F
or%eUU.,n '" ,h" "m',la"11 DAM COUNTY"
T& notice shall be published once GENERAL JURISDICT?bN,"B'fvi*.oi1.
WITNESS my hand and the seal IX RE: The Marriage of
tMrVK oV ^r!-97,F,or,da-on ^"yWULi
RICHARD P. BHIXKER.
Clerk, Circuit Court.
Dade County. Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ESTHER G. SCHIFF.
407 Lincoln Road PH N E
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
6/4-11-18-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
ik.USiy.'.L ACTION NO. 76-17095
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
IX RE: F MARR|AGE
and corporate officer of
and you are hereby required to serve
your answer or other pleading to this
< ross-complalnt on Elliot L Miller. HILDA I. ELLIOTT Wife
cross-plaintiffs attorney at 621 N.E. and
1st Street, Miami. Florida 33137. and FRANKLIN D ELLIOTT
file the original answer or pleading
with the Clerk of this Court on or
!';Ui. !;?; D FRIEDMAN, attorney y.J'^'PK'^'i'POKATED.
for Petitioner, whose address is 420 .,'P *"K NOTIFIED that an ac-
j-ncoln Road. Suite 392. Miami Beach ,""" '"r "reach of contract and fraud '""'"re he 28th dav of June. 1976. If
Honda .1313'.. and file the original BK 8SH fM,>d "tainst you and UTO- !"u, ,n,,, t. do ao- iudgment bv de-
wlth the clerk of the above sivled HIA IN( ''RPoRATED and vou are '"H", 5,u 1,e taken against vou for the
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv I. SNEEDEN
,,., A" Deoutv Clerk
<< ircuit Curl Seal)
5/2S 6/4-11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUOICIAL CIRCUITOF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
__,.. DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
iv n PASE NO' 76-16301
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPHINE OOMS. Wife
Petitioner
and
"WEN J OOMS. Husband.
Respondent
TO: Mr. Owen J. Ooms
Federal Jail
__ Chicago. Illinois
,i V r' ASF yOT'FIED lhat an ac-
i!ZL 2 PlR!io|ut'" of Marriage has
been filed against vou and vou are
Hi I itf ...... ".-mil- .'fi i ire tin
MaiTitiffs attorney or immediately
I hereafter; otherwise default will be
rendered against vou for the relief
to complaint or netl-
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
tins ( ourt on Mav 26. 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
or the Circuit Court
Bv: L SNEEDEN
Denutv Clerk
____________________8/28 6/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
Of JE8SKA INVESTMENT GROUP at
'..70 Indian Creek Drive. Miami Beach.
Fla.. 33141 in'
name with tht
Court of Dade County. Florida
KING RICH
RHERYI. RICH
.1/28
6/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
rICTlTIOUS NAME LAW
Husband
TO: FRANKLIN 1). ELLIOTT
339 Grafton Street
Worchester. Mass. 01604
,.'1' ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
(hat an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
>ou are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Stanley E Goodman, attorney for
I iitioner. whose address is 2688 N W
62nd Street. Miami. Florida 33147. and
rile th.. original with the clerk of the
above_ styled court ..... before Julv
6; otherwise a default will be en-
AGNES BAKER. Wife
TO: SAMUEL BAKER
Wate A Bit P.O
Allside District
_ Trelawnev. Jamaica, w I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
(hat an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a conv of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
Donna R. Blausteln. attorney for Pe-
rt v""' ^iT. """r^s is 1753 Alton
V 2?' '?6- Miami Beach. Fla 33139
*?.*. K lt"~ nrigin*' with the clerk
i.. b.v-e. stv,ed rourt on or before
June 30. 1976: otherwise a default will
lemTnrtlrt *t"'n"t vou ,or ,ho re"f
ilor? comnlaint or petl-
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
&n ttfjErMr"1*on ,hi"
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad'- Countv. Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
,,-. *" nM>utv Clerk
(( Ircu't Court Seall
".'28 c/4-11-18
r-!,?JiCE 0F ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
u -r^,. lNO PROPERTY)
FiVilSl'?CUIT COURT OF THE
rfc lNI. JUD,C,AL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
r-.v,.. ADE COUNTY
nuS..l7' ACTION NO 76-15953
ACTA|OMJli5lSDICT,ON D'vTsLON
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
notice is HEREBY given that
(be undersigned, desiring to engage ...-..
In bualneaa under.the fictitious name '" 5,.JKW,SH M-ORIDIAN.
1;1 .,mncent's at 615 71st WITNESS my hand and the at
;.' 7 -M'-'U" Beach. Fla. Intends to faid court at Miami, Florida on
egister sa d name with the Clerk of lj" *ujr of June. 197K.
tered against you" foVThe "reiieT %'- g $: Th^marHage ',AfGE
manded in the complaint or petition PAXp BER8SON.
This notice shall be published once Petitioner,
i-ii.li week for four consecutive week
eeks
seal of
this
and
PHILIP BERSSON
Respondent.
TO: PHILIP BERSSON
l!lori,'lain'U" rUrI of na"d<' Countv,
VmJ88B ANASTASI. SR.. 50%
CYDNE ANA8TA81 :."'-
5/28 6/4-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J. HARTNETT
//-., A" D*uty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Yoi
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
reh Drive. Miami Beach. NOTICE IS HEREBY- ofvPM ,i, i tf,W^ 6?nd strpel
ntend to register said the undersigned desiring To engag, T. Flrldf "i47
he Clerk of the Circuit In business under the fictitious name A""rney for Petitioner
of NUTRITION AND RARIATRIC
ASSOCIATES at 15S NE 164 Street
-North Miami Beach. Fla.. 33162 In.' -
ci!!rt lo. r.*?lB,Ar sni auVFltoIr.ed.C,r0,, CUrt f na(I- NOT|CE
vutr,tVoEn,:an,dDbHaAr,,at*R,c p a VOT^HVff^ "avv
with the Clerk of this Court either_________________________
before service on Petitioners Attorney NOTICE UNDER
or immediately thereafter: otherwise FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
a default will be entered against vou NOTICE ISI HEREBY^ GIVEN that
Hie undersigned, desiring to engage
"1 .uS.'.nfs,s under the fictitious name
'_'' NORMAN BERSSON
Two Fifth Avenue
Apartment l.,\
New York. NY. 10003
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
fellt"" '% D""utlon of Mar-
Petitioner, whose address Is 350
ALAN KIHZWEIL
quired to serve a OOW Sf your"writT uimTiks KUR^WCU
g MB&' Per'i MK 'k'st fSkuSS'
."""..!u.n-de"tned. desiring to engage
-RICKMAN
6/4-,I-,8 AUor'neT^0r,aprn',,aml- F' 11} WS^f^^^'SSZ
6/4-11-18 FEA%/.{ERHK "& PL^TII^ku

for the relief demanded in the Peti
tlon.
6/4-11-IS
" Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
5/28
6/4-11-18
ifh i. i- m '"""'iifu 'Tire
THP ,^.,5',lir consecutive weeka
U-l?vwioW,SH ''I-ORIDIAN.
said Tnu?, S .n,y..nand and ,he se"' f
3rddd0vU0, "j'u^'^s F'0r,da "I
RICHARD P. BRINKER
*"CI*. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By L SNEEDEN
(Circuit Cou-r8,Sea,!)yClerk
STFivn^rT >'"STEIN of
vn I nV fR N'EUSTEIN
\i?.i n Road' Su"e 52"
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Tiirn<7..,or Petitioner
Telephone 538-2344
/11-18-26 7/t



Friday, June 18, 1976
vJenisti norkiian
Page iVa
Helen Suzman-A New Vision for S. Africa
Continued from Page 1-A
reassessment of the "gradual
change" principle is a top
priority.
Also until recently. Mrs. Suz-
man was the only member of
her Progressive Reform Party
in Parliament, but now as one
of many she predicts that her
party will replace the United
Party as the official opposition
to the ruling Nationalist Party
of Prime Minister Vorster
"within a year's time."
"To begin with," she tells us,
"we will continue to oppose the
ban on Black African member-
ship in South Africa's trade
unions."
THIS IS in response to the
oft-repeated and contradictory
notion expressed by South Af-
ricans generally that one of the
ways to bring Blacks toward
gradual integration into western
ways is through technical as-
sistance to them in the form of
education and jobs.
The contradiction, says Mrs.
Suzman, is best demonstrated by
a simple question: How can this
ever occur, even gradually, if
Blacks are barred by Apartheid
from joining trade unions? It
is true that Blacks have their
own union, but only the white
unions are recognized as "of-
ficial" here.
In further opposition by her
party to national Apartheid pol-
icy, Mrs. Suzman predicts a
resounding defeat for the all-
Black State of Transkei slated
for independence next October.
"MORE THAN half of its
population will live in the white
Republic of South Africa," she
observes, which tends to remind
an American observer here that
the separate-but-equal doctrine
failed in our own country as
well.
In terms of the Jewish at-
titude toward Apartheid, Mrs.
Suzman believes that most of
South Africa's Jews "support
the moderate United Party," al-
though "many" also support
her own more radical Progres-
sive Reform Party.
Only a few, she declares,
support Prime Minister Vors-
ter's ruling Nationalists on the
pervasive racial question here,
a statement that doesn't square
well with what we ourselves
observe in other of our inter-
views with South African Jews.
INEVITABLY, however. Jew-
ish political attitudes are fash-
ioned by South Africa's increas-
ingly friendlv policy toward Is-
rael, a policv that has emerged
more out of a common national
agony than genuine philosophi-
cal conviction.
With South Africa and Israel
both branded as "racist" by the
Communist-A r a b-Third World
bloc, it is natural that South
Africa should turn toward Israel
in a "misery loves company"
move; although Israel, happy
for evidence of friendship any-
where, is warv of her new
South African tie because of
deep-rooted Israeli feelings
about racist feelings generally.
Israel's Ambassador to South
Africa Itzhak D. Unna explain!
this strange marriage of cir-
cumstance to us in a special
interview.
"In 1960. after Sharpeville.
he savs. explaining that Sharpe-
ville was tbc unfo'Tiiqte inci-
dent in w'-'"'n a number of Af-
Every once in a while
a Famous Restaurant
is born...We were
born in 1945
Come i|Oy out .ntwnarionalty
famous cuisine
71 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH 531-3967
Six hands, each holding a huge Shofar with an Eternal
Light in the center, is Johannesburg Jewry's memorial
to the six million Jews killed in World War II. It is sit-
uated at the Westpark Cemetery in Johannesburg. The
work was created by one of South Africa's best known
artists, the late Herman Wald.
ricans were killed by police
during a riot, "Israel, together
with several other countries,
withdrew her diplomatic rep-
resentative and left the legation
in the hands of a charges d'af-
faires."
UNNA CONFESSES that when
South Africa left the British
Commonwealth in 1961, South
Africa made overtures to Israel
to establish a mission in Israel,
but that "this was at the time
of the heyday of our honey-
moon with the Black African
nations."
Golda Meir, then Israel's for-
eign secretary, felt strongly
that raising the profile of South
African-Israel relations would
be deterimental to Israel's rela-
tions with the Black African
countries.
And so, says Unna, "we did
not encourage the South Af-
ricans to open a mission in
view of our Black African pol-
icy." In fact, Israel voted with
the Third World powers against
South Africa whenever the
Apartheid question came up.
BUT, HE declares, times have
changed. And so, in 1971, "we
welcomed the establishment of
a consular mission by the South
Africans in Tel Aviv."
Further, after the 1973 war,
during which South Africa was
just about the only country out-
side of the United States to
give Israel moral support, "it
was felt that the time had come
to raise the diplomatic mission
of Israel to an Embassy and, in
June, 1974, that was accom-
blished."
South Africa responded in
November of last year by rais-
ing their consular mission to
embassy status.
"I WOULD say," declares
Unna, that "on the whole the
relationship between us and the
South Africans is a commercial
once," minimizing where he can
idealogical sanction. In 1969, he
explains, "the trade between us
was in the region of $3 million
both ways."
Today, he says, it has grown
to $80 million.
The final Unna rationale for
the new Israeli-South African
tie is fascinating, "are Afrikan-
ers," he observes, "are a devout
Christian Calvinist people, who
know the Bible perhaps even
better than we do. including the
Old Testament, and they make
a comparison between the Great
Trek of the Afrikaners away
from the British to the Trasns-
vaal and the Exodus of the Jews
from Egypt.
"SO THERE is a common Bi-
blical heritage which they re-
spect tremendously in Israel.
Add to this that Afrikaners feel
that South Africa and Israel are
in the same boat a small
community surrounded by a
preponderance of hostile neigh-
bors, and the picture becomes
clear."
Esneciallv here, at the tip of
the African continent, the So-
viet bogevman emerges. First,
there is the drama that occur-
red in Angola, a drama the So-
viets through their Cuban con-
nection are now hoping to stage
in Rhodesia.
Then, South Africans relate
the wav in which Israel deals
with its Arab population and
Arab civil liberties to their own
Black population.
UNNA SAYS he repeatedly
hears the question: What would
you Israelis do if instead of
having an Arab minority of 12
percent you would have an
Arab majority of 18-3? Would
you still give them the right to
vote and the right to sit in Par-
liament as you do now?
Unna admits that this is a
very difficult question to an-
swer, particularly since the
1973 war.
However, most important
about the question, he says, is
not the answer but the feeling
here amone South Africans that
Israel is not so much standing
up to its Arab minority as to the
Soviet Union.
"You hear it frequently said
in Britain." he explains, "that
if Israel falls, the Soviets will
be on the Zambesi the iver
north of Rhodesia. In other
words, if the western position
on the Jordan falls, the Rus-
sians will not only have the
Middle East; they will have
conquered South Africa, all of
Africa, as well."
IN THE face of the complex
political racial considerations,
with Jews somehow squeezed
uncomfortably between them,
what is the impression with
which we leave South Africa?
Well, it overrides all these
considerations. As Miamians.
we recognize our own national
and local problems. But as cit-
izens in a tourist community
we also recognize the distinct
advantages we enjoy at home.
And so it is a pity that in
all of our traveling and talking
to the people here, we have not
had more time to enjoy South
Africa's beauty.
AS CAPITAL of South Africa.
Johannesburg offers a variety
of cultural programs, focusing
around the civic center. Ballet,
ooera and theatre are perform-
ed in season with local talent as
well as artists from abroad.
One of the city's major tour-
ist attractions is the Carlton
Center, a five and a half city
block maze of towering office
buildings and subterranean
shops and restaurants. Promi-
nent on the city's skyline are
two broadcasting towers, the
ITZHAK D. UNNA
Strydom version housing an
observation deck and revolving
restaurant which is a good place
to begin a sightseeing tour of
the city.
The Republic's administrative
capital and one of South Af-
rica's prettiest towns is Pretoria,
located 35 miles from Johannes-
burg. The main attraction here
is the Union building with its
manicured gardens especially
resplendent in he spring. Sep-
tember to November. There aie
a total of some 4,000 acres of
parks in Pretoria and countless
iacaranda trees which bloom in
October and November.
CAPE TOWN is to South Af-
rica what San Francisco is to
Americans. Nice to the French
and Rio to Brazilians: the quin-
tessence of sea and mountains
joining to create beauty. A fav-
orite amongst South Africans.
Cape Town is also fabled with
visitors from abroad, especially
sailors who first gaze upon her
beautv from the sea.
I ocRted at the extreme south-
ern tin of Africa. Cape Town's
geograahv is dominated by
world-famous Table Mountain,
the 3.500 foot flat top which
looks down on the city. Cable
car lifts run to the ton of the
mountain in seven minutes.
ALL ALONG the way. wide
expanses of beaches lie at the
foot of the mountains. Some of
the most picturesque beaches
enroute to Cape Point are Sea
Point. Clifton. Camps Bay and
Hout Bay on the Atlantic side.
This, too. is South Africa. And
to this. too. we should like some-
day to return for a more leisure-
lv stay.
SHALOM
EMBASSY RESTAURANT
7 COURSE DINNER from
1417 WASHINGTON ML 538-7550
RESERVE NOW
loi
PaSSOVlR
StDfRS
$37 50-
? Ilf M'S
tai ttjj ini
MAX BROOKS
CANTOR
Maine Univ. Will Host
Mideast Business Conference

WASHINGTON (JTA)
The University of Maine
with the cooperation of the
U.S. Department of State and
Commerce will sponsor a
joint four-day Middle East-
American business confer-
ence at its Orono campus
Aug. 2 to 6, the university
has disclosed.
Acceptances have been re-
ceived by the university
from nine countries, but Is-
rael is not among them, ac-
cording to the university's
promotional material made
available June 2 to the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency
here.
MORE THAN 200 persons are
expected from Saudi Arabia.
Kuwait. Qatar, Egypt, Iran. Iraq,
United Arab Emirates. Bahrain
and Oman. The United States
does not have diplomatic rela-
tions with Iraq but maintains
an "interests" section in Bagh-
dad and commerce is conduct-
ed between the two countries.
The U.S. Arab Chamber of Com-
merce is co-sponsor of the con-
ference.
A Saudi Arabian. Abdul Wo-
habe. a director of the UBAF
Arab American Bank in New
York will brief American busi-
nessmen on the legal aspects of
doing business in the Arab
world.
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger was quoted as saving
this will be "the first large-
scale conference held in the
United States where Arab and
Iranian businessmen will have
the onoortunitv for face-to-face
discussions with pre-selected
American businessmen regard-
ing specific products for sale
and manufacture."
\\ ill \ YOU'VE MM
FLAUNT IT!
Rvil Snapper Romano
Slltor lllf finest Iri-h fili in
Florida. *aiiti etl Ili< Italian
.i\ uilli frf'ftll Wjf.elab|p*.
Eat, enjoy & Exiterienrel
>
Touch Our Menu
. it Excites *> <>u!
RESTAURANT fti. LOUNGE
*++******
t ***+*+**
At the Sheraton Beach 194th
and Collins, Miami Beach
FREE PARKING Tel: 932-2676
SABRA KOSHER
RESTAURANT
Direct from
SABRA KOSHER RESTAURANT
IN CHICAGO
[
ISRAELI ENTERTAINMENT
WEEKENDS
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH 531-6739 531-6730


Page 16-A
fJewistifhridHan
Friday, June 18, 1976
NORTON TIRE COMPANY
11N THE MARKET
FROM TH DESK OF
cz^icLid DLiJUx
*y ", 1976
#
Why? Because we honestly seek to give each
and every customer the very best product at
the very best price. We strive to give you the
finest service possible, everytime. And if that
isn't enough, we stand behind every new tire
we sell. You've got to be satisfied or you'll
get your money back. This letter, from one of
our customers, only serves to convey our
company's attitude toward all who do business
with us. At Norton Tire Company you are the
important one.
President
Norton Tire Company
Dear Sir:
with your organization. b tSiiSTZ yeeTsC; tSSST!^ ^ **
warranties of the manufacturers JLSt00d.behind the
you offer. But even K iSjS ?D2fM Wh'"Ch
oos,t,ve mnmr by whfch "? **,
"nveys an uZSTlC since" d^- PI,C* but a,s
How fortunate you are o ha" C t0 b* f serv''ce.
unique combination of .ft-.r^T1 "fth that
such as this that will ?. *' ft treatment
b--ness long ?" }?** "~ of "V
WE CARRY
ONLY THE VERY
FINEST PRODUCTS
FOR YOUR CAR
BEGoodrich
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
I.R.I.
ALL STEEL RADIAL
THE 50,000 MILE TIRE
Plus our own line
of specially priced
private label
tires offering you
excellent service
at the lowest price.
In 'Jill! [TTDTBTTl
STEEL BELTED RADIAL WHITEWALLS BUY 3 & Get the 4th Tire FREE
SIZE PRICE PER TIRE PRICE SET OF 3 4th TIRE
BR 78-13 50.99 152.97 FREE
DR 78-14 54.77 164.31 FREE
EFT 78-14 57.33 171.99 FREE
FR" 78-14 60.09 180.27 FREE
, GR 78-14 61.13 183.39 FREE
HR 78-14 67.41 202.23 FREE
GR 78-15 63.89 191.67 FREE
HR 78-15 68.31 204.93 FREE
JR 78-15 70.05 210.15 FREE
| LR 78-15 72.83 218.49 FREE
All Prices Plus F.E. Tax 2.11 to 3.47 per tire.
NORTON TIRE CO's. LIMITED WARRANTY
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
If for any reason you are not completely satisfied with
any new passenger car tire you buy from Norton Tire
Co.. return it. along with your original invoice, within
90 dajs of the date of purchase, and your money will be
refunded in full no questions asked1 Commercial ve-
hicles excluded.
EXPERTLY TRAINED
STAFF OF
MECHANICS
FOR YOUR CAR CARE
WHEEL BALANCE
ALIGNMENT
BRAKES
STEERING
BATTERY
BRAKE SPECIAL
FOR DISC BRAKES
Install new Delco
(not rebuilt) front wheel
disc pads
Check rotors & calipers
Repack outer front wheel
bearings (if needed)
Adjust and bleed brakes
(if needed)
Add brake fluid (if needed)
Check & Adjust rear brakes
COMPACT & INTERMEDIATE CARS
V!
$
29
95
LUXURY CARS
$34.95
NORTON
SINCE 19S4-
TIRE CO.
2^E3
BUDGET TERMS
AVAILABLE
WE HONOR:
MASTER CHARGE
BANKAMERICARD
AMERICAN EXPRESS
DINERS CLUB
SHOPPERS CHARGE
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave 634-1556
CORAL CABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360 N.W. 7th Ave 681-6541
N MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7464
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DAOC
9001 8. Dixie Hwy. 667-7575
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th 81. 822-2900
CUTLER RlDOE
20390 8. DM* Hwy. 233-5241 .
WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Rds 552-6656
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy. 247-1622
W. HOLLYWOOD
497 S. State Rd 7 987-0450
FT. LAUDEROALE
1740 E Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
361 N. State Rd 1 567-2166
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N. Federal Hwy 943-4200
WEST PALM BEACH
SIS South Dixie 832-3044
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N. Lake Blvd. 648-2544
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St. 464-6020
VEP.0 BBACH
755 21st Street 567-1174
ORLANDO
3620 E. Colonial Dr. 896-1141
WINTER PARK
881 S. Orlando Ave 645-5305
DAYTON A BEACH
907 Voluela Ave. 286-7467
NAPLES
2085 E Tamlaml Tr. 774-4443


New Meal Site
Opens in N. Dade
A new site to provide meals and supportive social serv-
es to the elderly in North Dade has opened under the
Ispices of the Jewish Vocational Service Nutritional Proj-
|t, it was announced by JVS president Ronald Albert. The
le is located at the McDonald Senior Center, 17011 NE
Mh Ave., No. Miami Beach.
The facility offers 60 free hot kosher meals, five days
[week, to persons 60 years of age and older who have dif-
Ipulty in obtaining adequate nutrition because of poverty,
Vobility problems, lack of knowledge in shopping and cook-
ig, or social isolation.
THE PROGRAM is funded
ider Title II of the Older
Americans Act through the Of-
of Aging and Adult Serv-
ices of the Florida Department
Health and Rehabilitative
[Services, with matching funds
'by the City of North Miami
Beach.
In addition to the nutritious
meals, the program offers op-
portunities for socialization and
a variety of social services, in-
cluding transportation and es-
cort service to the Center. Meal
recipients will benefit from an
information and referral serv-
ice, professional counseling,
nutrition education, recreation-
al activities, and outreach con-
ducted at the meal site.
The North Miami Beach meal
site is the sixth site adminis-
tered by the JVS Nutritional
Project, a member of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation's
family of local agencies. The
Project, which began in Decem-
ber, 1973, now serves a total of
1,010 free hot meals, five days
a week, to senior citizens in a
social setting convenient to
their homes. Until this most
recent opening in north Dade,
the project has been concen-
trated in the south Miami
Beach area. Provisions are
made for 10 percent of the
meals to be delivered to the
elderly homebound.
"THE NUTRITIONAL Project
gives the senior citizen the op-
portunity to come out of isola-
tion and loneliness, to socialize
with peers and trained social
workers as an integral activity
in connection with the nutriti-
ous meal," Albert declared.
"The steady expansion of the
meals program marks the in-
creased concern we feel for
Dade County's large elderly
population, many of whom are
on a fixed income and separat-
ed by distance from their fami-
lies." stated Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation president Morton
Silberman.
"The opening of this first
meal site in north Dade is an
attempt to bring social services
to our people wherever they
live," Silberman explained.
Assistant BBYO Regional Director
To Keynote Training Conference
Girt Bossak. assistant Florida
Regional director of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, will
deliver the keynote address at
the opening session of the Dis-
trict Five Leadership Training
Conference on Sundav at Geor-
gia Tech in Atlanta. District
Five includes Florida, Georgia,
North and South Carolinas, Vir-
ginia, Maryland and the District
of Columbia.
In keeping with the confer-
ence theme. "Chosen," Mrs.
Bossak will describe a way of
life, a set of beliefs that be-
came a religion, a culture, and
a civilization. Refuting youth's
cry that traditional Judaism is
obsolete, she will relate those
4,000-year-old precepts to the
leaders of the our era's largest
Jewiish youth organization in
the world. And she will share
her views on the "chosen" peo-
ple's impact on America.
Mrs. Bossak, in her 25th year
with the agency, has been re-
sponsible for rebuilding two
problem-ridden BBYO commu-
nities. Atlanta and Miami. Both
are now regarded as high-statui
BBYO areas.
GIRT BOSSAK
Twice nominated for Atlanta
Woman of the Year. Mrs. Bos-
sak worked closely with Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.. for the
acceptance of the first black
teenagers in the city's all-white
schools.
Alan M. Freedman is the
BBYO Florida Regional direc-
tor, with offices in Miami.
'<0Te wish Flor idian
Miami, Florida Friday, June 18, 1976
Section B
Temple Menorah Honors Rabbi
For Quarter-Century of Service
It was more a family affair than a synagogue function
when members of Temple Menorah celebrated the 25th an-
niversary of Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz as the temple's spir-
itual leader. Nearly 600 temple members filled the Carillon
Hotel's banquet hall in a celebration that, in the words of
chairman Gidale Feldenkreis, was "a milestone, not only for
Rabbi's 25 years at Menorah, but a joyous occasion for
every family of the temple since his life and our lives are
intertwined."
Michael Arnon, world presi-
dent of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization, presented to Rabbi
Abramowitz an autographed
copy of David Ben-Gurion's
"The History of the Jews,"
which. Arnon said, symbolizes
the scope of Rabbi Abramowitz's
work on behalf of Israel and
the Jewish people.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
executive vice president of the
Regional Rabbinical Assembly,
announced the appointment of
Rabbi Abramowitz to the board
of overseers of the Jewish
Theological Seminary, Amer-
ica's only Conservative rabbi-
nical seminary.
THE EVENING'S highlight
was a "This Is Your Life" type
of program "Yes, Rabbi, We
Remember It" written by
Barbara Rosenblatt and Rosalie
Berger and featuring 15 con-
gregation members recalling
special moments of Rabbi Abra-
mowitz's quarter century of
service to Menorah and the
Jewish community.
The emotional high point of
the banauet was the tribute by
the rabbi's son, David, speaking
as well for his sisters, Dahlia,
recently married to Dr. Steven
Oopenheimer, and Reena. Rob-
ert L. Siegel, chairman of the
temole board, presented to the
rabbi a olaque and a gift on
behalf of the congregation,
stressing the "humanity and
personal warmth that typify
Rabbi Abramowitz in all his
duties."
The rabbi called upon his
wife, Rachel, to join him in the
traditional prayer. "Sheheche-
JWV Post, Auxiliary 223
Hold Memorial Services
JWV West Miami Post and
Auxiliary No. 223 held Memo-
rial Day Services at Open Space
Park in West Miami. The na-
tional commander participated
in the services along with Rabbi
Charles Rubel of Temple Beth
Tov; Stanley M. Gold, Post 223
commander; Judge Paul Ribner,
national commander; Ainslee R.
Ferdie. nast national comman-
der; Howard Melinson, depart-
ment of Florida commander;
Charlotte Mittler. Auxiliary No.
223 president; and Ceil Zucker,
department of Florida presi-
dent.
The Post and Auxiliary have
held annual Memorial Day serv-
ices since 1950.
yanu." thanking God for having
preserved him in life and en-
abling him to attain this im-
portant occasion.
Paul Kasden. temple presi-
dent, thanked everyone for par-
ticipating, paying special tribute
to Mrs. Dorita Feldenkreis. who
irranged the evening's festive
decor.RW
At Temple Menorah's celebration o/ Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz's 25th year as its spiritual leader were
(from left) board chairman Robert L. Siegel and Mrs.
Siegel, Rabbi and Mrs. Abramowitz, State of Israel Bonds
world chairman Michael Arnon, decorations chairman
Mrs. Dorita Feldenkreis and banquet chairman Gidale
Feldenkreis.
New Rules Govern
Use of Israel Bonds
For Tourism
Gary Gerson, new campaign chairman of the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organization, has made public the follow-
ing official statement on the use of Israel Bonds for tourism
in Israel, as published in the Information Letter of the
Ministry of Tourism, Overseas Offices Division:
PAYMENT BY TOURISTS
TO HOTELS AND OTHER
AUTHORIZED TOURIST
AGENCIES
"As from 1st of May, tourists
who nay in foreign currency for
hotel accommodation will be
exempt from local taxes (wel-
fare, surcharge, rebate on in-
direct taxes and Value Added
Tax (the last-named is due to
come into force in the course
of the next few months)). These
taxes may reach up to 28 per-
cent of the original account. All
guests are still liable to the 15
percent service charge on hotel
bills.
"Tourists paying in foreign
currency also benefit from ex-
emption from local taxes at
shops listed for tourists and at
car hire firms.
"Payment in foreign currency
mav be made in cash or by
means of travelers checks or
credit cards.
"Tourists may also convert
foreign currency or State of Is-
rael Bonds at banks and will
receive, in exchange, bankers
or travelers checks in Israel
lirot. Where payment is made
bv these checks, tourists also
benefit from the exemption
from local taxes.
"If hotel bills are paid in Is-
rael lirot. the tourist is liable
to all local taxes.
"The Ministry of Tourism
will advertise these new regula-
tions in hotels, offices of the
Ministry in Israel and abroad.
and at ports of entry."
VA Hospital Chaplain Leads Services
U.S. Sen. Richard Stone (left) endorsed Bill Gunter,
Democratic candidate for State Treasurer-Insurance
Commissioner, at a party hosted by Miami attorney
Herb Weinsoff for Dade County Democrats.
Pioneer Women
Kadimah Chapter will hold a
welcome fiome luncheon on
Tuesday, June 22, at noon at
Beth Kodesh Congregation.
Guests of honor are Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Sandier, recently re-
r.'-ned from their fifth trip to
Israel. Tillie Sandier is Chap-
ter president. Luncheon spon-
sor is Mrs. Fannie Strauss, who
said that proceeds go to child
welfare institutions in Israel.
For reservations and informa-
tion, call Mrs. Elsa Kreutzer.
Rabbi Allan Mirvis will con-
duct Sabbath services at the
annual convention of the De-
partment of Florida. Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S.A. and
Ladies Auxiliary, at the Amer-
icana Hotel on Friday, June 25,
at 8:30 p.m.
Before coming to Miami to
serve as Jewish chaplain at the
VA Hospital, Rabbi Mirvis was
spiritual trader at B'nai Israel
Synagogue in Hampton, Va., for
32 years.
A native of Baltimore. Rabbi
Mirvis received a B.A. degree
from Yeshiva University and
was ordained at the university's
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theol-
ogical Seminary. He is a mem-
ber of the Rabbinical Council
of America and was cited by
the National Conference of Sy-
nagogue Youth for a quarter-
centurv of service to Jewish
youth in Virginia.
Convention chairman Michael
Schechter announced that Can-
tor Manni Mandel of North Mi-
ami Beach will chant the Sab-
bath evening services at the
joint convention. Cantor Man-
del, a past state JWV com-
mander, has served as national
cantor. David Eisenman will
lead the kiddush.


Page 2-B
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Friday, June 18, l
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NCJW Presenting
Child Abuse Forum
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women and the Mental
Health Association Task Force
on Child Abuse and Family Life
Education will present a Com-
munity Forum on Child Abuse
on Friday, June 25, at 4200 Bis-
cayne Blvd., from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m.
Speakers will be Dr. Irwin
Redlener. director of Pediatric
Intensive Care Unit at Jackson
Memorial Hospital and assistant
professor of Family Medicine
and Pediatrics at the University
of Miami; Lester Langer, chair-
man, Mental Health Association
Task Force on Child Abuse and
Family Education; Steve Za-
ricki, supervisor, Child Abuse
Unit Protective Services for
Children.
"U.S. News and World Re-
port" of May 3, 1976, stated:
"Child abuse is reaching epid-
emic proportions. Incidents of
maltreatment of youngsters re-
portedly reached an estimated
4 million in the United States
during 1975. More than 200,000
American children, most below
the age of 5, died last year as
the result of intentional abuse
by adults."
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women, under the auspices
of the MHA Task Force, is the
coordinating agency for a "com-
munity friend" volunteer proj-
ect in which trained volunteers
will serve in a supportive role
to parents identified as abusive
by the Dade County Depart-
ment of Protective Services.
The Forum has been develop-
ed to educate the community to
the extent of this problem in
Dade County, to involve the
community, and to develop a
corps of trained volunteers.
Documented experience has
shown that concerted commu-
nity effort can provide methods
of rehabilitation for the child
and family.
Nancv Goldstein, vice presi-
dent of Community Services,
National Council of Jewish
Women, is chairwoman of the
Forum.
Former Hillel Direetor Featured
On Chahad Radio Program Today
Geoff Levine, former Hillel
director at Miami-Dade Com-
munity College, will be fea
tured on "The Jewish World"
this morning between 6 and
6:30 on WHRC (1550).
Levine will be interviewed by
Rabbi David Eliezrie, Chabad
ca -'pus activities director and
host of the weekly radio pro-
gram. They will discuss the
problems facing Jewish stu-
dents on the Florida campuses
and develop ideas for dealing
with the situation challenging
the Jewish community and its
youth.
Levine studied at Boston
University and the University
of Massachusetts as well as at
the Shaopel Institute in Jeru-
salem, from which he received
a Master's degree.
This program is the first in
1 series on Jewish Student Life
in Florida. In future broad-
cists students from colleges
and universities around the
state will be interviewed. "The
Jewish World" is a media proj-
ect of the Chabad House-Florida
Lubavitch Headquarters.
JWV Auxiliary 174
Plans Meeting
On June 22 Norman Bruce
Brown JWV Ladies Auxiliary
No. 174 will hold a business
meeting at the First Federal
building. 2750 SW 22nd Ave.
The agenda includes choosing
delegates to the statewide con-
vention at the Americana Hotel,
June 25 to 27.
Two candidates are running
for office: Belle Swartz, de-
partment president, and May
Schreiber, chaplain.
Saturday's telecart at the Vet-
erans Hospital will be covered
bv Mr. and Mrs. Jack Liebovitz.

PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
PAUESJNAMDLAW
ABRAUNSTEINOI
rTKPCFXOSDRLCQ
KTYHNSLHWFGHG
EPGSAYCIREIBR
NQMEMDXPKVTGE
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FIEGENBAUMOPTT
LANZKAWCJMWFE
VHUDCVP0CUZ0S
GRLSEBIPTLREO
HEWIBXJPKYNRR
HCMHILLQUITDa
Listed below and hidden in this puzzle are the
names of 12 Socialist politicians on the New York City
scene in the early 20th century. Their names are plac-
ed horizontally, vertically, diagonally, forward and back-
ward. How many can you find? Answers are on page
6-B.
Jacob PANKEN Benjamin GITLOW
Morris HILLQU1T Samuel ORR
Elmer ROSENBERG Adolf HELD
Louis WALDMAN Abraham BECKERMAN
Wm Morris FEIGENBAUM Barnett WOLF
Abraham SHIPLACOFF Alex BRAUNSTEIN
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
BLANCHE ROSS
NYANA Elects
Blanche Ross
Blanche (Mrs. Chester M.)
Ross was elected president of
New York Association for New
Americans (NYANA) at the 27th
annual meeting of the board of
directors. The daughter of Sam
and Lena Goldstein, founders of
Temple Israel, where she was
confirmed, Mrs. Ross succeeds
Soohie S. Udell, who was NY-
ANA's president for five years.
Mrs. Ross, who was a NYANA
vice president for three years,
said that the organization's mis-
sion "reflects the Jewish ethos
which is to take- care of one
another." A former resident of
West Palm Beach who now lives
in Manhattan, she is chairman
of the Women's Campaign Coun-
cil of the CJA'Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies Joint
Campaign and a member of the
UJA national board. She is also
an honorary national board
member of Brandeis University
Women's Committee.
Also elected at the meeting
were Mrs. Cecil N. Rudnik, Sam-
uel Nass and William M. Lan-
dau, oresident of the Jewish
TelegraDhic Agency, as vice
nresidents: Steven B. Rosenfeld
and Maxwell Passerman, treas-
urer and associate treasurer;
Arthur Chernick. secretary; and
former president Arnold S. As-
kin, honorary president.
Guest sneaker at the dinner
was Jerry Goodman, executive
director of the National Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry, who dis-
cussed the future of the Soviet
Jewry movement.
Since its establishment in
1949 NYANA has helped settle
more than 160.000 Jewish im-
migrants and refugees in and
around New York. The agency
is a beneficiarv of the Joint
Cirnoaign of UJA'Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
Teens to Explore
'Jewish Miami'
What happens at a funeral?
What is kashruth? What is the
Federation of Jewish Agencies?
What happens in an old age
home? Why is there so much
security around El Al flights?
What is a mikveh? Who and
what are Lubavitchers?
These and related topics will
be discussed and explored on
a tour of Jewish Miami spon-
sored by Temple Adath Yeshu-
run for teens ages 12 to 16.
Tour guides for the eight
Tuesday and Thursday sessions,
9:30 a.m. to noon beginning
June 29, will be Rabbi Simcha
Freedman and Cantor Ian Al-
pern.
For additional information,
contact the tempi* offices.
Or Olom Elects New Officers
At a meeting in early June,
Temple Or Olom elected offi-
cers for 1976-77. The executive
board includes Ted Sloan, presi-
dent; Len Steinberg, Abby Sil-
ver, Linda Nornik. Norman
Shwedel. Paul Ginsberg, Isaac
Sklar, Sam Kessler. Michael
Primak, Myrna Fistel, and Dan
Licker, vice presidents; Ralph
Fistel. financial secretary; Bob-
bie Sloan, corresponding secre-
tary; and Jennie Solo, record-
ing secretary.
Minna Katz was named Sit
terhood president, and Sand*
Bochner Brotherhood president
Assistant vice presidents at*
Jean Mandell, Rebecca SkiJ
Muriel Barth, Larry mX
Sam Nevel, Joe Rodrigue? jJi
Fertig. Sol Kaplan, Joe Katz
Berry Clein. Maurice Zuker'
man, Marty Hirsch, An Gross
man, Richard Harris. Bill Louis
Michael Mirell. Dena Parent
and Hilliard Clein.
Bicentennial Study Ends in Tour
The first settlement on Amer-
ican shores, the Western Fron-
tier and the exploration of out-
er space were the highlights of
a Bicentennial Tour through
Florida taken by the students of
the fifth and sixth grades of the
South Dade Hebrew Academy
and the Hillel Community Day
School.
The trip was the final event
in a yearlong project integrat-
ing general and Judaic studies
centering on the Bicentennial.
The 75 students were accom-
panied by their instructors.
Maxine Deutsch, Mali Lipson.
Felice Canner, Aten Mintz. Bert
Parker; special resource in-
structors Marsha Kulman. Bob-
bi Indgin. Ron Rubin and Neil
Rosen; Michael Scheck Dre dent of the Hillel Community
Day School and his wife Dr
Silvia Cohen, and Abraham J
Gittelson, associate director nf
the CAJE
The project will continue dur-
ing the coming year in both
schools with the coordination
of the Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education and the resources
of the American Association for
Jewish Education.
PAINTING
BY ASHKENAZI
Also Plastering & Papering.
1st Class Work
Very Reasonable. 864-9693
*Dii\ing Ita(ianjsty|e is as
easyas^Uef ^BaislWitl^
l\ejp fron\Chef 'Boy-ar-dee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
to cook for you when
you long for a delicious meatless
meal. His Cheese Ravioli
really hits the spot! Perfect for the
children's lunch, for an easy supper
or even a late-night snack. If you
like kreplach. you'll love the Chef s
Cheese Ravioli. Bite-size, chock
full of tangy Italian-style cheese
simmered in rich, hearty tomato sauce
that's seasoned with even more
cheese. And. all you do is heat-and
enjoy. For a thrifty, meatless
mechayeh you couldn't do better!
ANNOUNCING...

a new addition to the
Falls Signature Collection.
Consumers, in our opinion, should be label
conscious, and we at Falls are very proud
of what we call our signature collection of
labels.
First, we have the Falls name, recognized
nationv.-ide as one of the finest all natural,
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Next, we have the signature of the United
States Department of Agriculture, assuring
you of unrivaled wholesomeness.
And now, we have added the signature of
the most respected name in National
Kosher supervision, the (C. granted by the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations
The Falls Signature Collection....
a status symbol for your table
THE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
FALLS KOSHER POULTRY
SOUTH FALLSBURG. MY 12779
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"friday, June 18, 1976
fJewisti Meridian
Page 3-B
Douglas Gardens Elects Shapiro
Edward Shapiro, the newest
officer elected by the board of
directors of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the
Aged, came to South Florida to
retire 12 years ago. Since then,
he has done just about every-
thing but that.
Following a Shapiro family
tradition, he has made a second
career of philanthropic work.
His first involvement here was
with the Mount Sinai Medical
Center, where he remains ac-
tive as a board member, having
completed three terms (the
maximum allowed) as presi-
dent.
As its newest elected vice
president, Shapiro brings to the
Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged considerable
valuable experience acquired in
business (before coming to
South Florida he was executive
vice president of Marvland Cup
Company) and in fund-raising.
SHAPIRO SAYS, "To succeed
in charitable work, you must
treat it like a business in terms
of cost efficiencies and the
abilitv to find dedicated people
EDWARD SHAPIRO
who will actually work at their
lobs, as opposed to merely go-
ing through the motions." He
adds that he believes "most
people are good and therefore
at least willing to listen to a
1 e gi t i m a t e people helping
cause."
JNF Awards Jerusalem Banner,
To So. Dade Hebrew Academy

The Degel Yerushalayim (ban-
ner of Jerusalem) was present-
ed bv the Jewish National Fund
to the South Dade Hebrew Acad-
emy for outstanding achieve-
ment in teaching about Israel
and Jerusalem at Jerusalem
Day Ceremonies at the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy on
May 28.
Dr. Zeev Kogan, president of
the Southeast Region of the
JNF, presented the banner to
Dror Zadok. Hebrew Director of
the South Dade Hebrew Acad-
emy, which had devoted 8
weeks to study on Jerusalem
involving reports, multimedia
artwork, a ceramic depicting
the Lion of Judah before the
Holy Ark, models of the Tem-
ple and the Old City of Jeru-
salem, and coordination of the
entire program in both the gen-
eral studies and Judaic depart-
ments.
More than 600 students from
six dav schools joined in the
festivities, which were cospon-
sored by the JNF through its
educational consultant, Nily Fa-
lic. and the Central Agency for
Jewish Education through its
associate director, Abraham J.
Gittelson.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the host school, wel-
comed the representatives of
the schools, which then present-
ed portions of the program, in-
cluding "The Gates of Jerusa-
lem" bv the Hebrew Academy
led bv Mrs. Helen Benyunes; the
Hillel Community Dav School
Choir directed by Cantor Ian
Aloern: Jerusalem in song and
narration bv Lehrman Day
School students directed by
Rachel Maerovitz; Jerusalem in
dance by South Dade Hebrew
Academy Students led by Mrs.
Kugel: an original poem on
Jerusalem recited by Dalit Ku-
gel from SDHA: and Jerusalem
in history, by the students of
Temple Menorah Day School
led by Yitzchak Marom.
Levi Soshuk and Dr. Sidney
Esterson evaluated each school's
program and the schools that
participated in the program
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami, the Lehrman D Temple Menorah Day School,
ZEV KOGAN
South Dade Hebrew Academy,
Hillel Community Day School
and Temple Beth Shalom of
Hollywood Day School were
awarded certificates of recog-
nition by the Jewish National
Fund.
"While the program of the
Degel Yerushalayim included
only the day schools this year,"
Mrs. Falic said, "in the coming
years we will include all the
Jewish schools of our commu-
nity."
Wholesale Distributors of
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Processors and Exporttri
f the finest US. Covt. InsetCtMl
KOSHEK MEATS art POUITIT
1717 N.W. 7th Am.
Miami, Fie.
Phone 324-1855
The Home and Hospital for
the Aged has just launched a
major fund-raising program for
the Baron and Polly deHirsch
Meyer 120-bed addition. Upon
completion, the new facility will
bring to 360 beds the total in
the growing complex at Dou-
glas Gardens.
Recognized worldwide as a
leading and innovative institu-
tion, the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged is
truly a multifaceted organiza-
tion, providing permanent resi-
dential housing, medical center,
adult day care, out-patient men-
tal health, geriatric training,
mobile support programs, out-
patient medical clinic and a host
of other notable community ac-
tivities. Aaron Kravitz, presi-
dent of the home, said that "the
new 120-bed addition is the first
of several major projects within
our projected ten-vear expan-
sion programs."
Ed Shapiro will probably be
busy for at least anrjther ten
years.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a bene-
ficiarv agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
United Way of Dade County.
Denise Burstyn (left), daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George
Burstyn, accepted The Jewish Floridian Journalism
Award from Norma (Mrs. Michael) Orovitz (right), a
writer for the newspaper, at the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy's junior high graduation. Miss Burstyn was
yearbook editor. The Jewish Floridian has presented
this award for the past 18 years.
r
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
ABIGAIL MINIS 17111807
She provided sorely needed goods for the Continental Army
A bigail Minis was the matriarch of a dis-
/V tinguished family in the early history
/ % of Georgia, and was a Revolutionary
* patriot of classical note. Born in Eng-
land in 1711, Abigail at age 22, left the security
of London to settle in the new colony of Georgia.
She came with her husband, Abraham, two
daughters, Leah and Esther, and a brother
Simeon.
Abraham was a man of means and followed
mercantile pursuits in the new world. His
name is on the first real estate deed recorded
in Georgia, and his son Phillip was the first
European child born in that colony. Abraham
died in 1757 leaving his estate and business to
the capable Abigail who increased the inheri-
tance manifold during her long and fruitful
life of 96 years.
In 1779, the American high command decided
to recapture Savannah from the British. Gen-
eral Lincoln selected Phillip Minis and Levi
Sheftal to help the expedition. After the attack
was launched, supplies were sorely needed and
the commanders applied to Abigail for
provisions.
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Good
lolht
Last Drop y**
The keen old woman knew the Continental
Army to be a poor credit risk, but her beloved
state and Independence came first. She "deliv-
ered the goods" without hesitation. The retak-
ing of Savannah was an American failure,
leaving Abigail in a very precarious position.
The British suspected her loyalty. But before
they acted against her. she managed to leave
for Charleston, S.C. with her five daughters.
Her son, Phillip, early in the Revolution, was
branded a "vile rebel" and blacklisted; he could
never hold office under any Royal governor.
Phillip Minis acted as Pay Master and Com-
missary General of the Continental Army in
1776. He personally advanced S11.000 for sup-
plies to Virginia and North Carolina troops.
He later served as President of Mikvah Israel
and as City Warden of Savannah.

SEND FOR
EXCITING
BOOKLET
Honoring 17/6
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled lo read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send 50c (no stamps) with name
and address to:
JF.WISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, NY. 10017


Page 4-B
+ k*isltk*klleni
Friday, June 18, 1976

'Ms. Douglas Gardens' Crowned
"Ms. Douglas Gardens," queen
of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, was
crowned during the afternoon
of June 8. Mrs. Mattie Neivert,
who said she is "gratified to
grow old gracefully." carried
off the roses acknowledging her
ladies nominated by the
beauty. She won the pink and
gold-sequined crown in a close
competition with three other
winners nominated by the
home's 227. residents, staff and
volunteers.
The ballot asked voters to
choose on the basis of zest for
living, personality, involvement
in the home's activities and at-
titude toward life and their fel-
low man.
The Master of Ceremonies,
executive director Fred Hirt,
announced the background of
each contestant and asked these
final decisive questions for the
judges' panel: "What is your
attitude toward life and vour
fellow man?" and "How is
Douglas Gardens the Home for
Beginning Again for you?"
BEFORE AN enthusiastic
crowd of residents and families,
each contestant replied to the
questions. "This is the number
one home," cheered Mrs. Nei-
vert, who heads the recreation
committee and writes for the
Douglas Gardens newspaper.
"The Home has provided me
with more friends and activ*
ities than I could have if I were
living in my own home in the
community," observed the 87-
year-old widow.
The contestants and their es-
corts eagerly awaited the judges'
decision when Hirt said "En-
velope, Dlease" and called out
Mrs. Neivert's name. She wept
like a young miss, and took her
walk as the new queen, escorted
by Louis Jacobs, while audience
applauded and cameras rolled.
The other three contestants
were Mrs. Lillian Cowen, 81,
Mrs. Rose Lawson. 77, and Mrs.
Augusta Schlesinger, 81.
The judges were board mem-
bers Mrs. Mollie Silverman,
Irving Fieldstone and Mrs.
Marcy Lefton.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a bene-
ficiarv agency of the Greater
Miami Je-./ish Federation and
the United Way of Dade Coun-
ty.
Mrs. Mattie Neivert (center), "Ms. Douglas Gardens,"
is escorted by Louis Jacobs as Marcy Lefton (right)
presents the award to the Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged's new queen on behalf of the judges.
Murray C Berkowitz (2nd from left), of Congregation
Beth Israel, received the UOJCA Presidents Award at
the 78th anniversary national dinner of the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America at the New
York Hilton. With him are Rabbi Fabian Schonfeld (left),
president of the Rabbinical Council of America; Rabbi
Berel Wein, Rabbinical Administrator of the UOJCA
Kashruth Division and former spiritual leader of Con-
gregation Beth Israel; Harold M. Jacobs, president of
the UOJCA; and Yehezkel Fagan, director of the
UOJCA/NCSY Central East Region._________________
G.M. Hebrew Academy Day Camp
Adds Program for Teen-Agers
Torah Academy Kindergarten Graduates
A special Teen-Age Program
has been added to the Hebrew
Academy Summer Day Camp,
according to Joe Ackner, camp
director. Such activities as
horseback riding, go-karting.
overnight hikes, aquatic sports,
bowling, roller-skating and ice-
skating_are planned.
All campers participate in
daily activities athletics, arts
and crafts, field trips, dramatics,
singing and dancing, and a
science program. For ages 8
through 13 an integrated Marine
Science Program has been
added, involving laboratory
work, trips and specimen-col-
lecting.
Other features available to all
campers include hot lunches,
free transportation, a special
program for overweight chil-
dren, religious instruction and
indoor activities in the school's
air-conditioned rooms.
The Torah Academy of South
Florida is graduating its first
kindergarten class this week.
The 15 children who will enter
the first grade this fall are
Vicki Carr. Joyce Dearson,
David Frand, Barry Galitzer,
Michael Gamily, Tammy Gross,
Felicia Hornung, Atara Kane.
Lee Krueger, Ziporah Leff, Ari
Lutz, Adam Schreiber, Michael
Shuman. Michael Umans and
Elana Vana.
Mrs. Shulamith Gittleson, co-
ordinator of the pre-school Mon-
tessori program, will conduct a
post-Shavuot sing-along in the
"Ruach of 76" honoring the
kindergarten graduates. Par-
ents and friends will join in the
celebration.
HOUSEKEEPING I COOKING
Private home with two
adults excellent references
required. Good salary live
in or out.
CALL 66S-6398
Chosen Children
Begin Tour
The Chosen Children, 27 area
teenagers directed by Bud
Breitbart and Howard Neu, will
tour Savannah, Richmond, Wil-
liamsburg, Washington, New
York, Philadelphia and Boston
and present their Bicentennial
program at various Jewish com-
munities.
The group, which has appear-
ed throughout Florida and last
year toured Israel, performs a
cantata describing the Jewish
contribution to the development
of the United States since the
days of Columbus.
Auxiliary 778 Attending Convention
Evelyn Clein. president of the
JWV South Dade Post No. 778
Ladies Auxiliary, has announced
that members of the Auxiliary
attending the Department of
Florida convention at the Amer-
icana Hotel on June 25 are
Edith Novins and Evelyn Co-
hen, vice presidents; Leah Eis-
enman. secretary; Jackie Rose,
patriotic instructor; Sylvia Dub-
i
bin. trustee; Mollie Brown,
donor chairman; and Lillian
Brown, parliamentarian.
The next board meeting is
scheduled for Tuesday. July 6,
at 8 p.m. at Mrs. Clein's home.
Plans are being made for a din-
ner-theater Darty on Saturday
evening. July 3l. at the Ring
Theater. Mrs. Novins is in
charge of arrangements.
54500 Tons Of Fun!
Bates to Do National's Advertising
National Airlines has selected
Ted Bates and Company as its
new advertising agency.
Date of the assignment will
be announced shortly, accord-
ing to J. Dan Brock, vice presi-
dent-marketing for National.
Brock praised F. William Free
and Company, who had handled
Israel South
Eleets Officers
Neil H. Sacks, an Eastern
Airlines executive, has been
elected president of Temple Is-
rael South at the congregation's
annual meeting. To assist him,
as vice president, will be Mar-
tin Grusby, an instructor in the
Drama Department at Miami-
Dade North.
Sacks and Grusby succeed
Lee Schwartz and Lloyd Schei-
ber.
the account since 1969, noting
that it had developed the suc-
cessful "Fly Me" and "No
Frills" campaigns.
"But we felt that a change in
strategy and direction had be-
come necessary at this time,"
he said. "We retain the highest
regard for the Free agency's
creativity and consistent ex-
cellence during its seven-year
association with National."
The "Fun Chips'C\R\I\ VI.I! and
MAKDICKAS. 27.230 gross tons each,
offer you more tlum an\ other 7-da\
Miami-based Caribbean cruise ship, tte
haw more swimming pool* (even in-
door pool.-), more lounge*, more ship-
board activities, more entertainment
i in. Iiidui.: two different -how- each
night), more public deck space and the
largest stateroom*. Hie reason we ha\r
no much space is that each of the "fun
tss CARNIVALE, Departs
Every Saturday From Miami
For San Juan, St Maarten
And St. Thomas
ships"arc ll\ll-\(i\l\ LARGER
dun any other 7-da) cruise -hip out ol
Miami! We also offer the lineal Inter-
national and Vmerican cuisine, full
ganihling casinos, tin- most popular
ports-of-call. and we're the <>nl\ 7-da)
flccl ili.il dork-at even port. t
W hen you think about going on a
cruise, think of "the Fun Ship*". We
offer more bounce to the ounce. More
Inn to tin- Ion!
tss MARDI GRAS, Departs
Every Sunday From Miami
For Nassau, San Juan And
St Thomas
For information or reservations see your Travel Agent
Carnival Tours, 820 Biscaynt Blvd., Miami, Florida 33132
Small family type
Conservative Synagogue
seeks services of both a mod-
ern, traditional, energetic rab-
bi and a cantor. Experienced
in all phases of congregation-
al and educational activities.
PHONE 448-7132
H
Cruise "the Pun Ships"
%, *365-*565
per person double occupancy
rates are for base season sailing dates and
eacn ,.ism gross tons registered in Panama are higher for certain peak season sailing dates
-Lri


Friday, June 18, 1976
fJewisti fhrk/ian
Page 5-B
Diabetes-Major Health Problem
Diabetics, their families and friends are invited to at-
tend a Country and Western party honoring the new Dia-
betes Life Center, a nonprofit counseling and education
facility serving South Florida, on Friday June 25, at the
Arrowhead Golf and Tennis Club in Davie. Dress is West-
ern-style and there will be refreshments, dancing and en-
tertainment.
Diabetes has been recognized
by the State of Florida as a
major health problem. Gov.
Reubin Askew recently signed a
bill creating three diabetes cen-
ters for education, treatment
and research in the state medi-
cal schools at Tampa, Gaines-
ville and Miami. The bill, which
takes effect July 1, will be fund-
ed, not through general rev-
enue funds, but by private
grants and donations.
According to 1971 National
Institute of Health figures,
which the JDRF regards as con-
servative, there are 14,000 ju-
venile diabetics (insulin-depend-
ent) in Florida and at least
150,000 adult diabetics (on oral
medication or diet control).
Medical opinion suegests that
there are at ltast 50 percent
more Floridians with undiag-
nosed or latent (borderline)
diabetes.
Private nhvsicians feel that if
no "Dractical cure" is found,
within the next 25 vtars 50 per-
cent of the population will have
diabetes. University of Florida
statistics on the incidence of
diabetes in the state are at least
double the figures given above.
Diabetes is the third largest
Killer of children and adults in
the United States. It is the lead-
ins cause of blindness; 50 ner-
csnt of persons suffering heart
attacks and 75 percent suffering
strokes are diabetic: 80 percent
of all amputations are diabetes-
related; it is a maor cause of
kidnev failure.
Statistically, 12 years from
'he day of onset, one in two
diabetics will suffer at least one
of these complications.
The average life span of a
diagnosed juvenile diabetic is
2 vears. This is the motivation
for the Juvenile Diabetes Re-
search Foundation, which is
dedicated to accelerating re-
sarch that will vield a cure.
The Foundation founded and
funds the University of Miami's
Diabetes Research Center and
sunnorts the Diabetes Life Cen-
ter in Broward County.
Greyhounds Race, Mummers Strut
At Flagler This Saturday Night
Flagler Dog Track's $100,000
Internationa lClassic. the world's
richest grevhound race, will be
'eld Saturday. June 19, with
$37,000 going to the winner.
The 17th running of the pres-
tigious event, it climaxes a
e-iHine scrips of eight races.
rtn original starting field of 64
qrevhounds has been narrowed
to the eight finalists.
Dotted Line and Pewter, who
led the field in victories, are the
carlv co-favorites to win. Also
in the field is peerless super-
sprinter Bashful Guy.
THE COLORFUL finale is Sat-
urday night's 12th race, with
the ODening race beginning at
a special early time of 7:30 p.m.
Additional attractions include
the music of the Strutting Mum-
mers at 6:30 and a pre-race Bi-
centennial salute. "Happy Birth-
day. America."
There will also be eight qual-
ifying races in the Super Mara-
thon Championship, the finale
of which closes out the Flagler
summer on July 2.
Judy Feder (center) won first prize in a countywide
essay contest sponsored by the Greater Miami Women's
Chapter of Brandeis University. The subject of the con-
test, of which H. Pace Miller (right) was chairperson,
was "The Influence of Louis D. Brandeis on American
Jurisprudence." At left is Sherry Solomon, principal of
the Hebrew Academy Girls High School, where Ms.
Feder is a student.
Cerebral Palsy Association Installs Officers
Chuck Zink was to be M.C. and
installing officer on Thursday
at 6 p.m. at the annual meeting
of the United Cerebral Palsv
Association of Miami.
Officers are Jack Schillinger.
chairman of the board; Fred
Stanton. vice chairman; A. An-
thony Noboa. president; Frank
Demery. president-elect; Mrs.
Janice Pfeiffer, vice president;
Mrs. Flora Mendelson. secre-
tary and Mrs. Elda Diaz, treas-
urer.
Francis P. Kelley, director of
the Retardation Program Of-
fice, State of Florida Health and
Rehabilitative Services, was fea-
tured speaker.
Members of the South Florida Israel Bonds Prime Min-
ister's Club were guests at a dinner hosted by Dr. and
Mrs. Maxwell Dauer where Mr. and Mrs. Gary Gerson
(center) were among those who received awards for
their enrollment in the Prime Minister's Club. With Dr.
Dauer (left) is the Hon. Chaim Even-Zohar (right), who
represented Israel's Prime Minister and joired in pre-
senting the awards. Gerson is the newly named general
campaign chairman of Ike Israel Bond Organization and
Dr. Dauer is president of the Prime Minister's Club.
Attention Organizations!!!
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION NEED $$$...
DOES YOUR ORGANIZATION DO FUND RAISING??
We have a variety of plans that will not only-
raise funds but serve as splendid
MORALE BUILDERS!
Write MHS c/o Jewish Floridion Box 01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101
Give name of organization and number of members,
how long in existence.
"My husband's
a "perked coffee" May vin.
He insists on Maxim."
.!!
Maxim tastes lite fresh
perked coffee because
Maxim starts with fresh
perked coffee. Then it's
freeze-dried into big dark
chunkschunks of real
perked coffee. That's
Maxim. Fantastic flavor
by the cup or the potfuL
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
MAXIM! The May vin's favorite for fine coffee flavor:


Page 6-B
^JmlstOcrkMor
Friday, June 18, 197
4rWf
Standing (from left) are Mrs. Rose Sing-
er; Mrs. Flora Sinisk; Mrs. Sarah Burkin;
Mrs. Giis Mintz; Judge Natalie Baskin,
installing officer; Sidney Siegel, execu-
tive vice president of the Miami Beach
Hebrew Home for the Aged; Mrs. Bess
Horowitz; Mrs. Dorothy Singer; Mrs. Jean
Zapolsky; and Mrs. Lillian Sherman. Seat-
ed (from left) are Mrs. Anne Fine; Mrs.
Nettie Krieger; William Silverstein; Mrs.
Sarah Levin, president of the Auxiliary;
Leonard Zilbert, president of the Miami
Beach Hebrew Home for the Aged; Mrs.
Jennie Cohen, Mrs. Ethel Fiscji and Mrs.
Sylvia Keller.
^
.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Miami Beach Hebrew Home
for the Aged held its annual in-
stallation luncheon at the De-
lano Hotel on May 26. Officers
for 1976-77 are president, Mrs.
Sarah Levin; vice presidents,
Ethel (Mrs. Henry) Fisch, Mrs.
Rae Lieberman; Sylvtia (Mrs.
Leon) Keller. Anne (Mrs. Jay
C.) Fine and Lillian (Mrs. Irvin)
Sherman; financial secretary.
Rose (Mrs. Abraham) Singer;
recording secretary. Mrs. Do-
rothy Singer; corresponding
secretary, Mrs. Sarah Burkin;
treasurer. Mrs. Jean Zapolsky;
parliamentarian, Mrs. Flora Si-
nick; pianist, Mrs. Bess Horo-
witz. The installing officer was
Circuit Court Judge Natalie
Baskin.
The Auxiliary, with a mem-
bership of 575, provides addi-
tional care and comfort to the
residents of the Miami Beach
Hebrew Home for the Aged.
MESWTA
Louis Mtrwilitr Stnior Hioh School
ANNOUNCES
SUMMER
CLASSES IN
JUDAICA
TALMUD I
ADVANCED TALMUD
JEWISH PHILOSOPHY
For Information:
1965 ALTON ROAD
538-5543 or 534-1878
Hebrew Academy
Registration Open
Registration for students from
throughout Dade and South
Broward Counties has begun at
the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy. Enrollment is open
in nursery and kindergarten as
well as in grades 1 to 12.
Rabbi Alexander S, Gross,
principal of the school since its
establishment in 1948. has said
the 1976-77 season will feature
an intensified Jewish Studies
nroeram.
MIAMI BEACH DOCTOR
51. 5'10". 155 lbs.. NON-SMOKER.
PLEASANT PERSONALITY.
SEEKING ATTRACTIVE. INTEL-
LIGENT. NEVER-MARRIED
WOMAN UNDER 40 FOR
FRIENDSHIP AND MARRIAGE
DR. M.B.. BOX 01-2973.
MIAMI 33101
CANTOR, BARITONE,
CONSIDERED ACCOMPLISHED
EXPERIENCED IN REFORM
AND CONSERVATIVE
SERVICES. AVAILABLE FOR
THE HIGH HOLY DAYS.
LEONARD KLIGER. P.O. Box 151
MIAMI BEACH. FLA. 33139
CALL 534-3238
A U E S J(N A M D L A/4
KPCPXO
T Y H
P G S
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G M(H I L I Q U I T)
(ANSWERS: Panken Hillquit, Rosenberg, Waldman,
Feipenbaum, Shiplacoff, Gitlow, Orr, Held, Becker-
Br-ur.stj.:.
Hebrew Home Ladies Auxiliary
Installs 1976-77 Officers
Torah Academy
Elects Hoffman
Sol Arluk, honorary life presi-
dent of the Torah Academy of
South Florida, has announced
that Martin Hoffman, a Fort
Lauderdale attorney, has been
reelected to a second term as
president of the school.
Elected with him were Dr.
Norman Bloom. 1st vice presi- j
dent; Barry Schreiber. vice
nresident-at-large; Dr. Morton
Freiman. vice president of reli-
gious education: Molly Green-
berg, vice president of secular
education: N o r v i n Dearson,
vice president of ways and
means: Irving Seidel. vice presi-
dent liaison; Joshua Galitzer,
financial secretarv and treas-
urer; Ida Arluk, corresponding
secretary; and Marcia Kane,
recording secretary.
The officers will be formally
installed at a dinner on June
27 at the Social Hall of the
Young Israel of Greater Miami.
Torah Academy of South
Florida is beginning its second
vear in September with nursery
through third grades. It plans
to add one grade each year un-
til a full comoliment of ele-
mentary grades is attained.
Registration is or>en for the
coming year.
The Israel Independence Day Dinner of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University brought together these
leaders of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (from
left): Mrs. Leonard Luria; Dr. Irving Lehrman, Honor-
ary Fellow of the Hebrew University; Seymour Fishman,
executive vice president of the American Friends; and
Leonard Luria, recipient of the organization's Torch of
Learning Award.
ENJOY BETTER HEARING
MARRIAGES, JEWISH,
INTER-FAITH, CIVIL, BY
REVEREND CANTOR,
534-4711
AAATURE WIDOW SEEKS
PLEASANT, "BALEBOTISH"
WOMAN
to Share Spotleaaly Clean, Beauti-
ful Apartment at Roney Plaza
Aoartmenti, 23rd and Cotlini, Mi.
ami Beach.
Wante Woman Concerned With
!ru*' J'WJ.'h lnter* and Who
la Highly Motivated.
Willing to (hare Apartment Ex-
pen.ei 50/50. Including Local
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"Two can Live Cheaper Than One"
and Enjoy Pleatant Social Rela-
tionahip. at Thia Magnificent
?*? 10ni *nd P"y-Equipped
Social and Queat Facility.
PHONE 538-7981
JVS NUTRITIONAL PROJECT
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE
Title VII, Older Americans Act
920 ALTON ROAD
MIAMI BEACH, FL. 33139
INVITATION FOR BID
1. Furnish and deliver 60 to
100 hot Kosher meals in
bulk, to McDonald Senior
Center, 17011 N.E. 19
Avenue, North Miami
Beach, 5 days per week.
2. Please call 673-5106 for
specifications for bid
BID DATE: Sealed blda are to be
J iWed. at tne ot,iee ot th Pro].
,V -y .JunJ Z5, 1978 "nd opened on
(hi. date. Any and all bida may be
2&u !di !?" .,he weeeMtol bid
ihall be aubmitted to the Diviaion
of Aging for approval.
NAOMI BENSON
Project Director
'200 OFF with this ID
ON CLEANING or REPAIRING
Veer Hearing Aid.
(llmltad lime ...I,)
20% OFF ..
HEARING AIDS
Guaranteed EVERREADT
batteries
CORAL WAY HEARING AID CENTER
PHONE: 443-6822 .,. &&*,
NURSING &
HOMEMAKER
i SERVICES
We are in !he business of helping people. COMCARE not only
provides skilled nursing care, but also "homemaker" services. A home
maker will shop. cook, do light housekeeping and all those extras that
will make life easier for you.
COMCARE
I INC.
COMprehensive Heal*
CARE Services
Speoatomg m Health Pp'Sir 11
Since 1969
* Registered Nurses Licensed Practical Nurses Nurses Aides dedicated
to caring for the sick or elderly in their own homes, in nursing homes or in
hospitals.
NOW SERVING YOU WITH HOMEMAKERS
24 HOUR SERVICE 751-6280 CALL ANYTIME
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Opening
QUALITY AUTO PAINTING
do,
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Kpi: >' H $17 ?(,
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lignment system
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v
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'none: 751-0911


Friday, June 18, 1976
Page 7-B
Menorah Names
Mrs. Berman
Education Head
Mrs. Bryna Berman has been
named educational director of
IrSie Me"i)rah RelWous
School, according to an an-
nouncement by i>aul Kasden
president.
Mrs Berman. who holds a
Masters degree in education
and is a certified reading spe-
cialist, has been with the school
as supervisor of the Day
School's secular department and
director of the early childhood
education department.
The faculty of Temple Menorah
Religious School Play School,
Nurserv. and Kindergarten
is Mrs. Judith Portman and Mrs.
Mollie Scholl. The afternoon
school, grades 1 to 6. has as its
faculty Mrs. Norma Robinowitz,
Mrs. Miriam Bonwitt. Mrs.
Chava Preminger. Miles Bondar
and Yochi Eisner.
A FULL program of parental
participation in Jewish educa-
tion will be undertaken by the
Parents of Menorah under Mrs.
Berman's guidance, and a Sab-
bath morning Jewish Congrega-
tion with full school activities is
projected for the coming year.
The entire educational reli-
gious department is under the
supervision of Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz. who is the teacher
of t he confirmation class. A
Judaica department, for grades
8 to 11, is sponsored jointly by
Temple Menorah and the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion.
Members of the Temple Emanu-El confirmation class at
the morning service for Shavuot on June 4 were (seated,
from left) Natalie Ann Cohen, Loren Diane Greenberg,
Susan Dana Greene, Rena E. Carmi, Elizabeth Ann Klein,
Lori Faith Rosen, Susan Mona Greifer, Suzanne Allison
and Bonnie Romer. In the second row (from left) are
Stuart Scott Kaplan, Stuart Paul Uffner, Steven Green-
berg, Bradley B. Kovens, Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Can-
tor Zvi Adler, Mark Steven Meland, Mark Lindenberg,
Franklin Lewis Zemel, Robert Harris Salvage. In the
back row (from left) are Molly Ann Sirkin, Wendy Jan
Coleman, Helen Jacobson, Lisa Faeder, Adina B. Adler,
Giselle Leslie Kovac, Pari Sonson and Mallorie Lynn
Mamber. Helen Jacobson, Natalie Ann Cohen and Gisel-
le Kovac tied for top honors in the annual essay con-
test, the subject of which was "What the Temple Means
to Me." Honorable mentions went to Mark Lindenberg,
Elizabeth Klein, Rena Carmi and Molly Ann Sirkin.
Washington Federal
Staging July 4 Fireworks
For the 15th consecutive year
Washington Federal Savings and
Loan Association will stage the
oceanfront fireworks that have
become Miami Beach's tradi-
tional Independence Day cele-
bration.
The aerial pyrotechnics will
be launched from a barge an-
chored off the oceanfront at
10th St., beginning at 9 p.m.
Skyrockets, pinwheels and other
displays will light the Miami
Beach sky for blocks.
Cantors Honor
Colleagues
The Cantors Assembly, South-
east Region, held a meeting and
farewell party honoring those
colleagues leaving the area at
the home of Cantor and Mrs.
Edward Klein.
The party became a concert
in which many cantors partici-
pated, accompanied by Hy
Fried. "Tzeischem L'sholom"
and good wishes were extended
to Cantors Errol Helfman of
Temple Zion, Jacob Mendelson
of Beth Torah Congregation,
and Stanley Rich of Temple Or
Olom who are leaving the area
to assume pulpits in other
cities.
LIGHT... BEAUTIFIES!
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M Canlrat Shopping Pfaie
+



Page 8-B
Je#isl> florid fan
Friday, June 18, 1976
'Poimts of 'Vi
ICW
with NORAAA A. OROVITZ
Abortion on demand.
LVD.
The Pill.
Planned Parenthood.
Rhetoric for the 60's and 70's.
Even more than just black
type and white space, the pre-
ceding expressions describe the
lomstics of personal lives and
li vine-1976.
IN RECENT months, the press
has run periodic articles con-
cerning American lifestyles. Cit-
ing percentage figures. Amer-
ican couples were pegged as to
birth control preferences, abor-
tion experience and family size.
For example, in a nationwide
survey, it was determined that,
presentlv. one pregnancy in five
-.nds in abortion. Despite the
fact thai 20 percent of all con-
ceptions are terminated, an-
other half-million or more wom-
en are carrving unplanned and
unwanted fetuses to term. They
are unable, for a variety of rea-
sons, to obtain the abortion thev
desire
A Gallup poll, run last win-
der, determined that 52 percent
of Roman Catholics in the
United States would favor a Con-
stitutional amendment severely
limiting a woman's right to an
abortion.
A smaller, but still significant
sample (46 percent) of Protest-
ants, would also favor such an
amendent.
THE READERS of The Jew-
ish Floridian are invited to par-
ticipate in a survey to deter-
mine how Jewish couples com-
pare to the larger populace on
these issues.
Please answer the following
questions as completely as pos-
sible. Do not, in any way. mark
your answer column or return
envelope with identification. In-
formation is desired not per-
sonal profiles.
Please mail the survey col-
umn to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 2973. Miami, Florida
33101. marked for my attention.
Results will be tabulated and
nuHishfid after a substantial
sample of survey answers have
been returned
Thank you for your partici-
pation.
William Landa, Mark Ko-
vens, Robert Bookbinder
and Herb Rauch sponsor-
ed a reception on Wednes-
day to honor former State
Representative Ted Cohen,
president of the Temple
EmanU'El Men's Club and
chairman of the Miami
Reach Convention Services
i ommittee.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Age. Husband
Wife
Affiliation.
Reform
Orthodox
Unaffiliated
Conservative
Husband
Wife
Age at birth of first child:
Birth controlIf responsibility is husband's:
Device
Sterilization
Birth controlIf responsibility is wife's:
Device
Sterilization
6. No birth control practiced by either husband or wife:
7. Number of children:
8. Were children planned? 1 2 3 4
9. Has wife ever had an abortion?
10. Do you approve of abortion? Husband Wife
11. Could you decide for an abortion if faced with the
decision? Husband Wife
12. Would you favor a Constitutional amendment severely
limiting abortion to availability only if a woman's life
were in physical danger? Husband Wife
Don Feder, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Emanuel Feder of
Miami Beach, was valedic-
torian of the graduating
class of the Mesivta Louis
Merwitzer Senior High. He
received a $500 scholar-
ship which he will use to
continue his education
a local university and
the Talmudic College
Florida.
in
at
of
Golf Tourney Will Benefit ARMDI
Two more professionals are
among the latest entries in the
American Red Magen David for
Israel's Charity Golf Tourna-
ment slated for this Sunday at
the Bayshore Golf Course. AH
proceeds will go to Israel's of-
ficial Red Cross service.
Jerry Castigliano, who has
qualified for the pro tourna-
ments, and Jim McDonald, a
winner of the Phoenix Open,
have signed up for the Father's
Day tourney, which is cospon-
sored by the Bayshore Men's
and Women's Golf Clubs.
Tournament chairman Mayor
Harold Rosen noted that the
"Magcn David Adorn provides a
vital lifeline to the people of
Israel, maintaining some 600
rescue vehicles throughout the
country and furnishing Israel's
only blood processing service."
ACCORDING to Howard Kauf-
man, president of the ARMDI's
Greater Miami Chapter and
tournev coordinator, entry fees
man.
Other new entries in what is
expected to be a record field
are Judge Gerald Klein. Florida
require a minimum contribution
of $20 to the ARMDI. includ-
ing greens fees. Working with
Rosen and Kaufman are Sol
Drescher, national cochairman
of the $10 million blood bank
drive, David Coleman Florida
state president, and Samuel
Reinhard. Florida state chair-
high school champion Warren
Jurkowitz, former Bayshore
Men's Club champion Dr. Don-
ald Sayet and his father. Dr.
Max Sayet.
Additional information is
available from Felice (Mrs.
Gerald) Schwartz at the ARMDI
Miami Beach offices.
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue-North Miami Beach
NOW ACCEPTING
ENROLLMENT
FOR MEMBERSHIP
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CAU
MEMBERSHIP REGISTRAR
932-4200
June 14 was an important milestone for the Levine farml\.
Andy youngest of four sons of Rosalyn and the late Victor Le
vine, was graduated from Emory University School of Dentistry
in Atlanta. Mother and oldest brother, Paul, attended the cere-
monies. .
The family is also celebrating Roz s retirement from the Dade
County Public School System, in which she has spent 15 yean
teaching government and history at her alma mater, Miami Sen
ior High.
Andy and Phyllis hosted a celebration buffet on Monday
c\ening at their Atlanta home. Phyllis's parents, Gayle and Frank '
La Civita, were there from Sarasota.
Dr. and Mrs. Joel Goldstein of North Miami Beach recently
returned from a ten-day trip to Atlanta and Chicago, where they
attended Homecoming at the National College of Chiropractic,
from which Dr. Goldstein was graduated last year. He is active
in North Miami Rotary and is executive vice president ni the
North Miami Beach Jaycees.
Ronjay Berliner won the Best Actor Award at Coral Gables
High School for this school year and the Rotary Club's "Sen
ior Boy of the Year Award." He was No. 1 player on the Cora!
Gables High badminton team with a 7-0 record. Berliner will
study acting this fall at the Stella Adler Actors Studio in V
York.
The Best Actress award was given to Cecile Liebman and
Isis Bobers. Steve Savitt, Wayne Hosford and Roy Sekoff were
named Best Supporting Actors, while the Best Supporting Ac-
tresses were Celia Singer and Elise Addie.
Debra Bruman, daughter of Norman and Irma Braman of
Coral Gabies, had her confirmation party at the Brickell Bay
Club with some SO guests in attendance on June 6. On the 8th
Irma, Susie and Debra left for the Bramans" villa at Cap D'Ail,
where the family will spend several months.
Myles Gary, youngest son of Hazel and Irving Cypen of Mi-
ami Beach, was graduated from Stanford University with honors
and distinction and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
Rose-Edith Herson Grosswald recently received her M.S. de-
gree from FIU, from which she was graduated with honors. The
wife of Michael I. Grosswald and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William
Gerson, Mrs. Grosswald is a graduate of Miami Norland Senior
High and Florida Atlantic University. She attended the Brandeis
Camp Institute in California and designed and taught the Hebrew
class for children with learning disabilities at Temple Solel in
Hollywood.
Longtime supporters of Nikki Beare author, radio producer
and public relations executive honored her at a party at the
Coconut Grove home of Lita and Jack Green on Tuesday evening
They want to encourage her to run for the Florida legislature. The
party was also the occasion to celebrate Nikki and Dick Beare's
30th wedding anniversary.
Dr. Saul H. and Ada Kaplan of Miami Beach have returned
from Los Angeles, where they attended the Bat Mitzvah of their
daughter, Ellyn (Mrs. Robert) Feinatock, who was confirmed at
Temple Emanu-El here. The Kaplans are the grandparents of Jill, ,
Joele and Jordan Feinatock.
Jacalyn Adler, Samuel Abramson and Abraham Chames of
Miami, and Marian Corndorf, Oralee Gross, Leah Mandelbaum and
Alan Singer of Miami Beach, recently received Bachelor of Arts
degrees from Yeahiva University.
New members of the Kings Bay Yacht and Country Club are
the Abe and Elaine Berkowitz family, the Dr. Danilo and Alison
Doenas family, the Dale and Susan Heckerllng family, the Adam
and Mary Jane Polacek family, the Max and Gail Spiegelman fam-
ily, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Wainger, Robert Thiem and his son Wil-
liam, and the Melvin and Dulce Wine family.
Mrs. Gert Kanzer, doll lady, was saluted by B'nai B'rith Wom-
en of Coral Gables, Helen (Mrs. Sam) Kurland, president, foi her
outstanding work on the Dolls of Democracy presented to various
schools and organizations.
Leon April of North Miami Beach was among the 5,000 per
sons who attended the 13th constitutional convention of the Na-
tional Council of Senior Citizens in Chicago in early June.
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue-North Miami Beach
ANNOUNCES
OPENING OF TENNIS COMPLEX
Monday thru Thursday 9 a.m. to dusk
Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday 2 p.m. to dusk
Sunday 8 a.m. to dusk
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
MEMBERSHIP REGISTRAR
932-4200


SL


Friday, June 18, 1976
> kisl Ikridkm
Page 9-B
Bcm and Howard Miller back
in town after a trip to Los An-
geles and Houston. Their chil-
dren live in California, and they
enjoyed their daughter. Marcy,
and her husband, Brian Lewii.
Their son, Ronald, and his Shei-
la have two boys, and needless
to say the grandparents were
thrilled to watch the little ones
grow up
Iris (Mrs. Herb) Marks run-
ning all over town she's busy
teaching the game of backgam-
mon to many and organizing
tournaments .
Ruth Becker Pollack is back
on the road to recovery after
spending two weeks at Mt. Sinai
Hospital. Irv Simson is over his
recent illness, and he took his
Bernice to California. They cov-
ered the coast from Los Angeles
to San Francisco, touriQg. look
ing and enjoying. Their daugh-
ter. Shelly, has recently moved
to San Francisco, where she's
busy in the fashion coordination
field .
Irene and Bernie Jay had to
go to New York on business,
and while they were in that sec-
tion of the country, they de-
cided to go on into Montreal
after all. it's so close. Irene's
mother lives there, so naturally
they spent several pleasant days
visiting family .
Paris and London were well
covered by Libby Rand and the
Dr. Harry Needlemans. On the
way home, Libby stopped off to
visit friends in Montreal .
Ella Coplin Harris just back
from a visit to Minneapolis,
where she visited her daughter.
Audrey (Mrs. Alvin) Kaufman.
Thev are both waitingAudrey
to become a grandmother and
Ella to become a great-grand-
mother both for the first
time .
Madaline and Dr. Steven
Kaufman, who live in Vermont,
are awaiting the birth of their
first child, but it's hard to tell
who's the most excited .
Ann and Julian Kurlander
catching their breath and get-
Ck
arminglu
Miss Martin and Mr. Apelker
To Marry at Tel Aviv Hilton
yours,
hi
<,Jith Zi
w
ting used to the time change
after a trip to California. It was
a "practice run" for their plan-
ned vacation to Europe later on
this summer .
An extended European jaunt
was taken by Susan and Leo
Gumbiner. They sailed over on
the Queen Elizabeth II, then
flew back. They happened to be
in Italy when the earthquakes
hit, but they were very fortu-
nate. They felt no earth tremors
and said their vacation contin-
ued as though nothing had hap-
pened .
Louise and Gary Brown ex-
pecting their first child in Oc-
tober it will be her parents,
the Bernard Jays', first grand-
child. (Doesn't look as if we're
experiencing a Population Zero).
Terrie and Marvin Tharp hav-
ing a double celebration. She
just completed her course work
for a Ph.D. in psychology at the
University of Miami, and Man-
has iust accepted an offer by
Price Waterhouse as an engi-
neering consultant
Linda and Richard Kahan
busy changing diapersthey've
iust had their first child .
Marcia and Dr. Donald Sayet
back from vacationing in Col-
orado and California. They
drove, went hiking, went horse-
back-riding, looked at all the
magnificent scenery and said
they had a marvelous time.
Florida Women's League
Installs 1976-78 Officers
The Florida Branch of Wom-
en's League for Conservative
Judaism recently installed new
officers. Mrs. Morton Levin was
reelected president. Serving
with her for the 1976-78 term
are Mrs. Jerome Gilbert, Mrs.
Alan Nirenberg, Mrs. Howard
Oser, Mrs. Albert Solo, Mrs.
Norman Sholk and Mrs. Ewald
Ziffer, vice presidents; Mrs. Ed-
ward Hoffman and Mrs. William
Shulevitz, corresponding secre-
taries; Mrs. Hy Schutzer. rec-
ording secretary; and Mrs. Nat
Siesser, financial secretary-
treasurer.
Serving on the Branch board
are Mrs. Richard Bailey, Mrs.
Max Banner, Mrs. Arthur J.
Brown, Mrs. Herbert Cohen.
Mrs. Louis Cohen, Mrs. Max
Cohn, Mrs. Avram Drazin, Mrs.
Irving Firtel. Mrs. Seymour
Goss. Mrs. Meyer Levinson.
Also Mrs. Ted Martin, Mrs.
Philip Medvin, Mrs. Abe Meyer.
Mrs. Irving Pivnick. Mrs. Ron-
ald Pollock, Mrs. Jerome Rifkin,
Mrs. Al Schneider, Mrs. Charles
Shaffer, Mrs. Eliot Stein, Mrs.
Jules Shapiro.
Also Mrs. Arnold Thorner,
Mrs. Melvin Waldorf, Mrs. Mor-
ton Weintraub, Mrs. Jack Wolf-
stein and Mrs. Leah Zatz.
THE BRANCH will hold a
President's Council meeting on
Thursday, June 24, at Temple
Emanuel in Lakeland. The
President's Council consists of
Sisterhood presidents and their
vice presidents, branch officers
and activity chairmen.
The Council will provide an
idea exchange and some "how-
to's" for those attending.
Sheryl Kartzmer to Wed in August
Sheryl Kartzmer, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin L. Kartz-
mer of North Miami Beach, will
marry Salomon Queroub, son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Queroub of
Kiryat Shemona, Israel, on Au-
gust 28 on the "Miss Florida."
Miss Kartzmer, a groduate of
Miami Norland Senior High,
was graduated this year from
the Boston University School
for the Arts where she was a
member of Mu Phi Epsilon and
Phi Kappa Lamda. She is a
musician and her fiance is a
manager of the Singer Co.
m
uniTGD AiRunes
OLAM TRAVEL NETWORK. INC.
GO KOSHER
SIE AMERICA THE (0MB WAT
EXCITING TOURS TO
- jstrsx -safe-
STANLEY GEWIRTZ
Pan Am Forms
New Division
The formation of a Public
Communications Division at Pan
American World Airways, com-
bining federal affairs, public af-
fairs and public relations, has
been announced by William T.
Seawell, chairman and chief
executive officer.
The new division is headed
by attorney Stanley Gewirtz,
vice president-public communi-
cations and former vice presi-
dent-public affairs. He reports
to James 0. Leet, executive vice
president-corporate services.
Seawell said the new division
covers a broad scope of federal
and public affairs and public
relations activity designed to
"influence the image of Pan Am
and its impact on the public."
A GRADUATE of the Harvard
Law School, Gewirtz joined Pan
Am in 1972 as vice president-
public affairs. He was president
of BF Consultants Inc.. a public
relations and management con-
sulting firm. He is a former vice
president-corporate public rela-
tions and government affairs of
the Interpublic Group of Com-
panies, Inc.. vice chairman of
the Presidents Task Force on
National Aviation Goals, con-
sultant to the President's Com-
mittee on International Avia-
tion Policy, vice president-ad-
ministration for Western Air-
lines, vice president-corporate
affairs for National Airlines and
a vice president of the Air
Transoort Association.
He has practiced law in New
York and Utah and was ad-
mitted to nractice before the
United States Supreme Court.
He is a member of the New
York executive board of the
American Jewish Committee
and of the board of overseers
of the Hebrew Union College.
SEAWELL also announced
the appointment of John Krim-
sky. Jr., as vice president-fed-
eral affairs, effective July 1.
Krimsky, formerly staff vice
president-public affairs, will
head Pan Am's Washington of-
fice.
The international services
function of Pan Am's Interna-
tional and Regulatory Services
Division will be headed by Seth
H. Preece, staff vice president-
international services, with of-
fices in New York. Preece is a
former staff vice president-in-
ternational and regulatory af-
fairs based in Washington.
Krimsky joined Pan Am in
1960, serving various marketing
assignments in New York, Min-
neapolis, Okinawa, Osaka and
Tokyo. His last marketing post
was that of director Pacific
marketing-overseas. He was
named staff vice president-
public affairs in 1974.
Sherry Lynn Martin, daugh-
ter of Leo and Gloria Martin of
South Miami, will marry Shaul
Apelker, son of Baruch and Ba-
tia Apelker of Netanya, Israel,
in July at the Tel Aviv Hilton.
Miss Martin, a graduate of
Miami Palmetto High School
and Miami-Dade Community
College, is a physical therapist
at Mercy Hospital.
A graduate of Tel Aviv's
Technical School of Aviation.
Mr. Apelker was recently dis-
charged with honors and the
rank of lieutenant from the Is-
rael Air Force. His father is
manager of the Bank Leumi of
Israel.
Among the 300 guests from
all over the world will be 50
Miami residents, transported to
Israel bv the Martin family via
El Al. President of Pompeii
Casual Furniture, Martin has
arranged VIP treatment for his
guests during their stay.
Following a wedding celebra-
tion that, according to Martin,
is "geared to inspire the young
counle to enioy a happy, mean-
ingful Jewish life together
as well as to attract Miami Jews
and other Americans to visit
and to do business in Israel."
the couple will honevmoon in
Europe.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults
Division recently held its first weekend Retreat, involv-
ing more than 70 young men and women. The Central
Agency for Jewish Education, represented by Vicky
Goodman (left), played a key role in Retreat program-
ming. The event's chairman was Dr. Robert Rasken (2nd
from left) and its vice chairmen were Adria Rasken and
Linda Bogm (right).
We Are Open for Business
After Vacation
H & M STEIN DELI & RESTAURANT
1141 WASHINGTON AVE. 534-2557
Open Evry Day 11 AM to 8:30 P.M. Closed Friday Nito t Sat.
Ftel Good. Dine in a Traditional Strictly
Shabos Atmosphere
Finest Jewish Home Cooked Food
Prtpartd by Helen Stem Shomer Shabos
TOS
MARTY'S GOID FACTORY
164SN.E. 163 ST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
MON.-SAT. 10-6
THURS. 10-9
947-1616

FREE
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OF INY PAIR OF
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WE ACCEPT ALL CHECKS


I '
t>age 10-B
+Jewist>fkirAM*0
Friday, June 18, 1976
Religious Directory
Israel-America Chamber Plans
MIAMI
HHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. 808 W 87th Ave. Ort nodes.
Rabbi Zvi Raphael?. Cantor Aron
Ban Aren. 1
1MIV SHALOM.
thedo*.
man.
VS?T w-S Business, Commerce 'Get-Together9
1NIHI EMES CONGREGATION.
2533 SW 19th Ava. Conaarvativa.
Cantor Sol Pakowitx. 2
'BETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Kan-
Jail Or. Raform. Or. Harbart M.
Baumgard. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Chefitr S
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1*44
Washington Ave. Orthodox, Rabbi
Tavi G. Schur. 32
SET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Libaral. Rabbi
Barry Tabichnikoff. 3-A
BETH DAVID. 22!> SW 3rd Ava.
Coneervative. Rabbi Sol Landav.
Cantor William Lipaon. 4-A
-------------------
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservativa. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipaon. 4-B
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 7Mh St. 0BWS
Coneervative. Cantor Murray Yav-
1Mb. 32-A
--------------8--------------
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SSFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 Sth St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordaeal Chaimovite.
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ava.
Modarn Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Laon Ssgsl Rav. Men-
Jti Guttarman.
--------------O--------------
BETH TOV TEMPLE. MSB SW Sth
St, Conaarvativa. Rabbi Charlaa Ru-
bal. S
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YE8HURUN TEMPLE. 1021
NE Miami Gardana Dr. Conaarva-
tiva. Rabbi Simcha Fraadman. Can-
tor Ian Atparn. SI
--------------------
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ava. Hebre*
Raligioua Community Cantar. 1t2H
NE 3rd Ava. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
aarvativa. Or. Max A. Lipacnita.
34
S'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. tS00
Swneet Driva. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Qlixman. S-A
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
401 NW 183rd St. Conaarvativa.
Rabbi Victor O. Zwelllng Cantor
Jack Larnar. SI
ISRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER VOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml-
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 171
NE 171 at St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
aim Gambach. 34-A
-------------------
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
IS01 NE 22nd Ava. Raform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingalay. Cantor Irving
Shwlkee. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
11th Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick *
MIAMI. 137 NE Itth St. Raform.
Rabbi Jnaaph R. Narot 10
ISRAELITE CENTER. 317S BW 25th
St. Conaarvativa. Rabbi Solomon
Waldanbarg. Cantor Nathan Far
i I1
OF. OLOM TEMPLE. 1755 SW 10th
St. Conaarvativa. Rabbi David M.
Baron. 13
AMI. HO NE 171at St. Orthodox.
Rabbi 7v Laff.
ORAl GABIES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd. Re farm. Rabbi Michaal B. Ei-
arnatat. Cantor Rita Shora. 40
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ava.,
Conaarvativa. Rabbi Maurice Klain.
41
ISRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Beth Tikva). 002B Sunaat Dr. Ra-
form. Rabbi Joaaph R. Narot 13-A
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ava.. Suite 306. Conoaarvativa. I
--------------a--------------
ZION TtMPLE. 8000 Millar Rd. Con-
aarvativa. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Ban Dickaon. 14
--------------a--------------
HIAIIAH
riFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 981 E.
4th Ave. Conaarvativa. 18
----------a--------------
NORTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conaarvativa. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
vehuda Binyamin. SB
--------------a--------------
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7101 Carlyla Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
IT
'BETH EL. 2400 Pina Tree Dr. Orthe.
dox. Rabbi Alexander Gross I
---------a---------
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecal Shapiro. IS
---------a---------
BETH JACOB. 301 Waeh.ngton Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi ShmaryaVra T.
wlraky. Cantor Maurice Mamchee.
11
------------------
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1B49
Jefferson Avr. Conaarvativa. Rabbi
Elliot Wlnograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
M
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER. COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Servicee. Rabbi Richard A.
Davia.
Davia. 48
SUtfSIDC
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac O. Vina. BO
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Coneervative. B1
a----------
FORT IAUDERDAIE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conaarvativa.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 324S W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Raform. Rabbi Joal
S. Ooor. Cantor Jerome Klement.
43
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
NW 57th St. Coneervative. Rabbi
larael Zimmerman. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moahe Bomzer. 82
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chsse Ave. Liberal. Dr. Laon Kron-
en Cantor David Convleer. 21
DIERFIHD BEACN
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village Eaet. Conaervativa. Rabbi
David Barent. 82
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conaarvativa.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordaeal
Yardeinl. 21-A
--------------a--------------
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
936 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 23
POMFANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
aervativa. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ava.
Ccr.iervative. Rabbi Morrla A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Ranzar. 40
IITH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ava. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
---------------a--------------
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jecobao* 22-B
COtAl SPRIN6S
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Raform. Rabbi Max Welt*. 44
MAUANOAU
HALLANOALE JEWISH CENTER.
411 NE 8th Ava. Coneervative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
CHABAO HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph Biston SS
r-UOAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
BaeMOKI FINIS
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1800 Unl-
varsity Drive. Coneervative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin S3
--------------a--------------
HOUYWOOO
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1S81 8. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa,
Aaaletant Rabbi Harvey M Roeen-
...a. 45
-EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Waah- .HrTH m.lbu Teuai a *ani a
Ington Ave. Conaarvativa. Dr. Irving *3J'l!*^.3JM*&i*Sf4*
hrm.n r.ntnr T-i Adiar J*? Conaarvativa. ftabbl Morton
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 716 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Melr Maoiiah
Melamed. 21-A
.ehrman. Canter Zvi Adler. 24
Malavaky. Canter Irving Gold.
-8-
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine -SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnaton St
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross 28
Coneervative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Aaeociate Rabbi Chalm S. Listflsld.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Weahington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel. 24
---------------a---------------
K.NESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Canter Abraham Self. 17
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 82nd
Ave. Conaervativa. Rabbi David Ro-
eenfield. 47. b
---------------a---------------
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazln. 47-c
uUBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Colline Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra.
bam Kerf. 07
--
MENORAH TEMPLE. **
Ceneervatlve. Rabbi Mayer A b rente-
wltz Canter Nice FeMman. 21
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Re-
ena.1 Raform. Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr.
84
RECONBTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7473 N.W. 4th St. 08
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum waterway. Ceaaefnative. Or.
Eugene Labevlta. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER Ml
CeoHne Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Badl
Nehmlae 81
MltAMAt
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 0820 SW 35th St.
Conaarvattve. Rabbi Avrom Orasln.
Centor Abraham Keater. 40
Member of the Rabblnlce! Association
of Greater Miami
Elisha Galon, executive direc-
tor since 1974 of the Israel-
America Chamber of Commerce
and Industry, was in Miami this
week to discuss participation of
area businessmen in a confer-
ence scheduled for February.
1977. in Tel Aviv.
The business "get-together"
for Israeli and American busi-
nessmen will focus on new op-
portunity for mutual trade and
an intensification of business
relations between the two na-
tions. Several hundred Amer-
ican businessmen and women
are expected to participate in
"Opportunity '77 Israel-America
Business Weekend." to review
what Israel offers in terms of
quality, quantity, design and
manufacture of export products.
The general introduction at
at the conference will be fol-
lowed by workshop sessions on
different branches of industry,
as well as visits to manufactur-
ing plants and opportunities for
person-to-person contact and
direct business negotiations,
and a social and tour program
Additional information is avail-
able at Israel-America Chamber
of Commerce offices or Israeli
consular offices
NEW YORK-BORN Galon emi-
grated to Israel in 1951, spent
a year at Kibbutz Urim and then
joined the Israel Air Force in
which he served for two de-
cades, leaving in 1973 as a
lieutenant-colonel.
After a stint at the Israel Air-
craft Industries, where he was
on the marketing staff of the
Westwind executive jet, Galon
was appointed to his present
post. He is married to a Sabra,
Lea, and they have two chil-
dren.
JVW Auxiliary 682
Awards Bond to Student
The Abe Horrowitz Auxiliary
of JWV Post No. 682 partici-
pated in the annual North Mi-
ami Beach Senior High awards
assembly on June 8. President
Belle Horowitz and American-
ism chairperson Mrs. Louise
Moscovlitch presented a U.S.
Savings Bond to Steven Katz-
man. son of Mr. and Mrs. Bur-
ton Katzman, for his essay on
the Constitution.
The Auxiliary's nominees for
the Edith H. Feibleman Memo-
rial Award, the Bertha Lach
Memorial Award and the Wom-
an of the Year Award are Mrs.
Shirley Morton, Mrs. Elsie
Greebel and Mrs. Alice Brun-
ner. Winners' names will be an-
nounced at the annual statewide
convention at Che Americana
on June 25-27.
KENNETH J. SCHWARTZ
Temple Sinai
Elects Schwartz
To Third Term
Kenneth J. Schwartz, presi-
dent of Temple Sinai of North
Dade for the past four years,
has been reelected to a third
term. He is on the board of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa- ;
tion and is active in Jewish '
communal life.
Elected to serve as vice presi- '
dent at the synagogue's annual
meeting on June 9 was Aaron
Podhurst. chairman of the con-
gregation's special fund-raising
Drogram and longtime member
of the board of trustees.
Newly elected trustees are
Lvnn Fromberg. Ira Golber.
Mrs. Marvin Kaleky, Dr. Mel-
vvn Drucker and Murray Blatt-
man. Continuing as trustees are
George Berlin, Michael Edol-
man. Harold Greene, Leonard
Israel, Frank Kromsky. Dr. Jack j
Berne. Norman Klein, Mrs. '
Jack Sands and Mrs. Sidney '
Walker.
Chancellor Gerson D. Cohen (left) presents a plaque to
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Winsten of Surf side in appreciation
of their contribution to the Mathilde Schechter Resi-
dence Hall of the Jewish Theological Seminary of Amer-
ica. The presentation was made at the May 23 dedica-
tion of the building.
SPECIALIZING IN COPY AND RESTORATION
RESTORE YOUR TREASURED PHOTOS
AS LOW AS $3.95 FOR A ftt BY 5 COPY
Also
BAR MITZVAHS WEDDINGS CUSTOM PORTRAITS
RICHARD LEWIS-PHOTOGRAPHER
165 NE 96 STREET MIAMI SHORES
751-6476
Jewish
social agency
seeks half-time executive sec-
retary for women's auxiliary.
Organizational experience arid
knowledge of community es-
sential.
Reply to J.S.
P.O. Box 01-2973
Miami, Fla., 33101
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION Of
GREATEII MIAMI
4200 Biacayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33IS7. 578-4000. Rabbi Soloman
Sehiff, Executive Vlea President.
UNION Of AMHICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
118 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4553. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAOOOUI Of AMERICA
1820 NE 1S3rd St.. North Miami
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
Beach, Fla. 33182. 847-8084. Rabbi
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
Popiel Religious School
2225 N.E. 121 Street 891-5508
REGISTRATION NOW BEING ACCEPTED
TWO-DAY AFTERNOON SCHOOL
SUNDAY SCHOOL (K, I, 2)
BAR/BAT MITZVAH ) mma
CONFIRMATION ) ""
SECONDARY JEWISH EDUCATION
Licensed & Creative Teachers
' Kadima/US.Y. Youth Groups
To Forge: Closer links with our Jewish Heritage!
To Learn: The History of our People!
To Build: A strong, proud Identity!
INSTRUCTION TO INTELLECTUALLY AND
EMOTIONALLY STIMULATE
TEMPLE MEMBERSHIP INVITED
JUlESEINHORN.Diroco^,^,^
OR DANIEL j. FINGERER, Rabbi
a


Friday, June 18, 1976
*hnislIhrUkm
Page 11-B
%\t
coordinated by #*
Greater Miami Rafafainkd Aatocwhw
\ JJ ZJ Dr. Mex A. lipschitz Raebi Robert J. Or-and
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
1
YOUR RABBI SPEAKS
Wealth: Prerequisite
For Jewish Leadership
iRinR n.ivin oimi __-,
By RABBI DR. DAVID RAAB
Temple Beth Solomon
When we study Jewish his-
tory, we discover that in every
age and in every era leaders
arose who guided the Jewish
people. These leaders were men
of vision, learning and spiritual
and moral strength.
Yet today our leadership tc
a great extent is based upon
wealth. Look through a board
of directors list of any Jewish
organization, and you find in-
dividuals who have excelled in
the business and financial
world, but not in the areas of
Jewish education and Jewish
scholarship. Once in a while a
rabbi or two are thrown into
the list for ornament.
Read your newspapers or
study the affairs of the commu-
nity, and you will discover that
the people who are being hon-
ored once, twice and even three
or four times (sometimes by the
same organization) are those
not with the knowledge of the
Book but rather the possessors
of the Docketbook. There is a
song that says "Money, money,
money makes the world go
round," but I believe that
"Money, money, money, makes
the world dizzy, and lose its
sense of values."
Very rarely is a man of scho-
larship honored in the commu-
nity. Rarely is he afforded the
ODDortunitv to be in a position
of leadership. In the Sayins of
the Fathers we read: "Upon
three things the world stands:
uDon Torah. upon worship and
upon the performance of deeds
of loving kindness." In our day,
a more exact description would
be: "Upon three things the
world stands, upon money, upon
money, and upon more money"
WE CLAIM that we are "the
people of the Book," but our
lives do not substantiate this
traditional value. Is it any won-
der that our young people are
alienated and are repelled by
the false values of their elders?
Is it any wonder that when our
youth finds the middle-class
values of their parents indade-
quate and the leadership mate-
rialistic-bent, they become dis-
illusioned and turn to the cult
of the Unification Church, head-
ed by the Rev. Sun Myung
Moon?
Our materialism and material
outlook are anathema to the
young, and some try the medita-
tion cults of India. We should
rather have one golden dream
than all the dreams of gold.
Furthermore, our actions
sneak so low that our young
neoDle cannot hear what we are
saying. We tell our youth that
smoking, drinking and gambling
are wrong, and yet we smoke,
we drink and we gamble. We
speak of honesty and integrity
and vet at every turn, from the
lowest rung in our society to
the highest people in govern-
ment, there is corruption, im-
morality, lack of ethics and lack
of humanity. The mystery of
Watergate may have been laid
bare, but false values and false-
hoods are still with us and per-
meate our everyday life.
If we are to become a "light
unto the nations." we must first
become a light unto ourselves
and our children. They are no
more and no less than the pro-
ducts of their elders. When we
shall restore our sense of val-
ues, then our young people will
retum to their senses.
LEADERSHIP must be based
unon rha.acter and Jewish
learning and not solelv unon
wealth:
blessed is the leader who
knows where he is going, why
he is going and how to get
there.
Blessed is the leader who
knows how to lead without be-
ing dictatorial: true leaders are
humble.
Blessed is the leader who de-
velops leadership while lead-
ing.
Blessed
seeks the
serves.
Blessed is the leader who has
his head in the clouds, but his
feet on the ground.
A leader is best when people
barely know he exists.
Not so good when people obey
and acclaim him.
Fail to honor a people and
they fail to honor you.
But of a good leader who
talks little, when his work is
done, his aims fulfilled.
They will all say, "We did
this ourselves."
is the leader who
best for those he
Question Box ? ?
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why do religious
Jews add the term "K'veyo-
chol" when referring to the
name of the Almighty?
Answer: This expression is
added to the name of the Al-
mighty whenever a Jew speaks
of Him in so-called human
terms. The word means as it
it were possible to say it. The
source for this custom comes
from the Mishnah (Sanhednn
6) in which there is this state-
ment: "When a man suffers
(i e he committed a sin which
causes him great anguish), how
does the Almighty express him-
self as if it were possible to
say'it, 'My head is too heavy,
etc."
Here you have the Almighty
'using the fpn i of human speech
and speaking as if He had a
head. etc. Obviously one cannot
speak of the infinite in finite
terms, and so one guards him-
self to say that in reality one
cannot use finite terms to re-
fer to the infinite God but that
he uses them because he has
no other way of saying it and
therefore procedes his expres-
sion by saying "K'veyochol
meaning that he is making the
statement "as if it were possible
to sav such things about the
Almighty." while in reality it
is not. ^____
m
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
20 SIVAN 7:53
JEWISH HISTORY IN AMERICA
Jewish Chaplaincy
In the years when American
Jewry was striving for recogni-
tion and status, the nation's
Jews faced, in 1861, "the first
instance of outright discrimina-
tion and legal inequity in the
nation's history."* When the
Civil War brought thousands of
Jews into the armies of the
Union and the Confederacy,
those in the Union Army were
faced with the provisions of the
Volunteer Bill, which required
regimental chaplains to be "reg-
ularly ordained ministers of
some Christian dsnomiation."
This was in a nation dedicated
to the equality of all men. a na-
tion whose Constitution had
carefully separated church and
state.
Only July 12, 1861, when the
"Christian denomination" stipu-
lation was being debated in the
House, Cong. Clement L. Val-
landigham of Ohio moved to
substitute the phrase "religious
society." Apparently entirely on
his own initiative he spoke out
in defense of Jewish rights.
"There is a large body of men
in this country, anjd one grow-
ing continually, of the Hebrew
faith." he said, "whose rabbis
and priests are men of great
learning and piety, and whose
adherents are as .good citizens
and as true patriots as any in
this country." He denounced the
bill as entirely unjust and com-
pletely without Constitutional
warrant. Nevertheless, the
amendment was rejected and
the bill passed.
Within one year, by July.
1862. the Congress was forced
to change its position in what
was described as "the first
major victory of a specifically
Jewish nature won by American
Jewry in a matter touching the
Federal Government."*
THE SEQUENCE of events
which led to the eventual Con-
gressional reversal began with
the visit of a YMCA worker to
the military camp in Virginia
where the 5th Pennsylvania
Cavalry was temporarily sta-
tioned. The YMCA worker is
said to have been horrified to
find that a Jew, Mitchell Allen,
of Philadelphia, was serving as
regimental chaplain.
In the resulting public cla-
mor, the assistant adjutant gen-
eral of the army was forced to
issue an official warning that
"anv person mustered into serv-
ice as a chaplain, who is not a
regularly ordained clergyman
of a Christian denomination will
be at once discharged without
pay or allowance."
Rather than face dismissal,
Allen resigned on the excuse of
ill health. Although actually a
layman, Allen was considered
the best possible choice for re-
gimental chaplain. During his
two months as substitute rabbi
and military chaplain, he served
all faiths.
Col. Max Friedman. Allen's
commanding officer, and many
of his officers and men were
Jewish. Determined to be serv-
ed by a Jewish chaplain, they
decided to try again as a test
case. They selected the Rev.
Arnold Fischel of New York
City as the regiment's chaplain-
designate and he applied to the
Secretary of War for a commis-
sion. His application was de-
nied on the basis of the Chris-
tian clause.
THUS IT was clear to Amer-
ican Jewry that discrimination
was to remain the official na-
tional stand. Then followed al-
most a year of Jewish effort,
lobbying, political pressures and
techniques of every kind ("and
which also revealed the alarm-
ing degree to which anarchy
and indifference prevailed with-
in American Jewry"*).
Finally, by July, 1862, Con-
gress had modified the require-
ments so that any "regularly
ordained minister of some reli-
gious denomination" might, with
t h e proper recommendations
and qualifications, seek appoint-
ment as chaplain. Rabbis could
aoplv for commission in either
of two categories, as regimental
chaplains or as members of the
newly organized hospital chap-
laincy. ,
In August. 1862, the Board of
Ministers of the Hebrew Con-
Behaalotekhn
"When thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps
shall give light in front of the candlestick" (Num. 8.2).
BEHAALOTEKHA "And the Lord spoke unto
Moses, saying: 'Speak unto Aaron, and say unto him:
When thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall
give light in front of the candlestick.' And this was
the work of the candlestick, beaten work of gold; unto
the base thereof, and unto the flowers thereof, it was
beaten work; according unto the pattern which the
Lord had shown Moses, so he made the candlestick"
(Numbers 8.1-4). After the Levites had been purified,
they who were between their twenty-fifth (Numbers
8.24) and their fiftieth years, came to the tent of meet-
ing to take the place of the first-born in the holy serv-
ice. In the second year after the Israelites had departed
from Egypt, they observed the Passover festival on the
14th day of the first month, Nissan. Those who having
touched a corpse were deemed impure, were required
to wait a month to observe the festival. On the 20th
day of the second month, the cloud rose from the
tabernacle, and the children of Israel journeyed from
Mount Sinai, each tribe grouped around its standard,
three days' distance behind the Ark. At this time, the
Israelites began burdening Moses with their complaints.
To ease the burden, 70 elders, on whom Moses' spirit
rested, were delegated to serve under him.
gregation of Philadelphia peti-
tioned President Lincoln for the
appointment of a Jewish hospi-
tal chaplain for the Philadel-
phia area. The Board selected
as its nominee 54-year-old Ba-
varian-born Rev. Jacob Frankel.
minister of Rodeph Shalom Con-
gregation of Philadelphia. On
September 18, 1862, Jacob
Frankel became the first Amer-
ican rabbi to be appointed a
militarv chaplain. He served for
almost three years, until July 1,
1865.
Jewish wounded in the Ken-
tucky hospitals stirred the en-
tire Jewish community to move
for the appointment of a Jew-
ish chaplain for that area. Pro-
minent non-Jewish citizens, in-
cluding the editor of the "Louis-
ville Journal," joined with Jews
and urged Robert Mallory, a
Kentucky member of the House
of Representatives, to seek a
commission for the Rev. Bern-
hard Henry Gotthelf, the rabbi
of Adath Israel Congregation of
Louisville.
Rev. Gotthelf received his
appointment on May 6, 1863, al-
though his commission dated his
rank from February 16. He
served 28 months.
THE RECORD of the one rab-
bi who served as regimental
chaplain in the Civil War seems
to have been neglected in stand-
ard American Jewish history
books. On April 10, 1863, the
Rev. Ferdinand Sarner enlisted
in the army at Brooks Station,
Virginia. He was immediately
elected chaplain of the 54th
New York Volunteer Infantry,
although Jews appear to have
been a small minority in the
entire regiment. Sarner, born in
Lissa, Posen, in 1820. was a
graduate of a German univer-
sity.
During World War I, the new-
ly organized National Jewish
Welfare Board had the official-
ly assigned duty of recruiting
and endorsing Jewish military
chaplains. During Wori6 War II
a special committee of the JWB
had a similar responsibility.
By the end of the war,. 311
rabbis had been commissioned
and served in the armed forces.
Seven died in service. In 1948
a U.S. Government postage
stamp memorialized four chap-
lains lost in the World War II
sinking of the military trans-
port, S.S. Dorchester. One of
these chaplains was Rabbi Alex-
ander Goode.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Korn. Rabbi Bertram W.
"Jewish Chaplains During the
Civil War." American Jewish
Archives. Vol. I. No. 1. Cincin-
nati. Ohio. June. 1948.
EncvcloDaedia Judaica. "Mili-
tarv Service. Jewish Chaplain-
cy." Jerusalem, 1971.
TV Programs
"Still, Small Voice"
VCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Guests:
Mrs. Robert Russell
Stanley Gilbert
Donald Reiff
Myron A. Berezin
Topic:
wish Community Centers
of South Florida:
New Directions and
New Programs
Sunday, June 20
"Jewish Worship Hour"
ATLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Temple Bet Breira


Fage 12-B
fJewisti IkiidkM
Friday, June 18, 1976 m

Saul Kravec Jay Muunun
JAY D. MUSSMAN
Rabbi and Mrs. Norman
Mussman's son. Jay David, will
observe his Bar Mitzvah at Beth
Torah Congregation on Satur-
day morning at 8:30.
Jay is a June graduate of the
temple's religious school, which
awarded him the Abe Schorr
Memorial Award for outstand-
ing service to the school and
where he is a member of the
Junior United Synagogue Youth
and of the Youth Choir. He is
an Honor Roll student at John
F. Kennedy Junior High.
Rabbi and Mrs. Mussman will
host the kiddush for the entire
congregation following the serv-
ices. The guests will include
Jay's grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Maurice Z. Mussman of
Buffalo Grove, 111., and Mrs.
Reva Schoichet of Highland
Park, 111. Other guests from the
Chicago area are the Sander J.
Mussman family of Northbrook,
Mr. and Mrs. Morton Berman
of Skokie, the Mrs. Phyllis Har-
ris family of Morton Grove and
the Meyer Shwachman family
of Highland Park.
Jay will celebrate a second
Bar Mitzvah in Israel later this
summer at the Western Wall.
He will be accompanied by his
parents and sister, Maria Beth.
-u a it
SAUL KRAVEC
Mr. and Mrs. Rafael Kravec's
son, Saul, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Sat-
urday morning at Temple Me-
norah.
An eighth-grader at Nautilus
Junior High School. Saul is in-
volved in the learning resource
program and is a member of the
Future Lawyers Club.
There will be a reception in
Saul's honor at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel
6 -Cr it
ADAM G. KURTZ
Adam Gifforri. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Kurtz, will become
a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday
morning at 9:30 at Temple Ti-
fereth Jacob.
r
Avron Smolensky has been
elected music director at
Temple Zion, where he will
coordinate all music ictiv-
ities and be responsible for
Bar and Bat Mitzvah in-
struction, the confirmation
program and the choirs.
Mrs. Otilia Kellerman (left), Mrs. Klara Kovar, Helen
(Mrs. Morris) Lipp and Lillian (Mrs. Hyman) Chabner,
chairman of the day, received special Imma (Mother)
awards for 1976-77 at the Hebrew Academy Women's
annual Imma luncheon hosted by Rabbi and Mrs. Alex-
ander S. Gross. The organization supports the scholar-
ship program of the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy,
the South largest Hebrew day school, of which Rabbi
Gross is principal.
A student in the temple's re-
ligious school and active in
Young Ju^ea. Adam is a sev-
enth-gradel at Palm Springs
Junior High School, where he
won the Presidential athletic
award for the second year. He
enjoys using his Citizen Band
transceiver.
Following services the Kurtzes
will host the kiddush, and there
will be a reception later that
day at the Miami Lakes Country
Club. Special guests include
grandDarents Mr. and Mrs. Har-
rv Gifford and Mrs. Rebecca
Kurtz, all of Great Neck. N.Y.
Hebrew Academy Students
Receive Awards at Graduation
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy, presented
special Honor Awards to 19 stu-
dents the junior high gradua-
tion Wednesday evening.
Kenneth, son of Mr. and Mrs.
E. Peter Goldring, received the
Aaron Lauder Torah Im Derech
Eretz Award; Josh, son of Mr-
and Mrs. Samuel Blau, received
the Talmud Award; Joan, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Mayer Fel-
ler, received the Midot Tovot
Alumni Award; Gary, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stein, re-
ceived the Max Silverberg
Sportsmanship Award; Shelly,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Don-
ald Kass, received the PTA
Science Award.
Bradley, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Towbin, received the
Math Award; Fanny, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. George Felden-
kreis, and Yaakov. son of Rabbi
and Mrs. David Lehrfield, re-
ceived the President's Award;
Ann. daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
David Peters, and Yaakov Lehr-
field received the American Le-
gion Scholarship Awards.
Wayne, son of Mrs. Selma
Bauerj. and Veronica, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Segall,
received the American Legion
Athletics Award; Lisa, daughter
of Mrs. Carol Pestoff, Joel, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Frand,
and Fanny Feldenkreis received
the Louis and Rebecca Mer-
witzer Service Award; Joel, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Murray Frank,
and Marcie, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Lester Engel, received
the Isidore Lauer Fine Arts
Awards; Laurel, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Wilkins,
and Larissa, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Roth, received
the award for the Most Progress
in Hebrew Studies.
WANTED
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Excellent opportunity in
growing temple. Contact
Mr. Conn at 735-4040 or
7100 West Oakland Park
Blvd. Sunrise, Fla., 33313
Sergio E. Varona (left) has
been appointed assistant
vice president and auditor
and George Fischer has
joined the staff as market-
ing officer of the Intercon-
tinental Bank of Miami
Beach. The announcement
was made by Benjamin I.
Shulman, chairman of the
board of the bank._________
RELGO, INC
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books ft Records
1507 Washington Avenue
PHONE 532-5912
Empire: 'Bullish9 on Kosher Poultry
Empire Kosher Poultry is ad-
ding 11 new products this sum-
mer and fall to its line of con-
venience poultiy specialties.
Empire is committed to a
major expansion program for its
main processing plant in Mif-
flintown. Pa., in a move that
broadens its already extensive
list of more than 50 ready-to-
cook and precooked poultry and
non-poultrv products.
Murray L. Katz, second-gen-
eration president of Empire,
says, "More and more people
are recognizing the merits of
Empire Kosher Poultry for qual-
ity, purity and taste. This is be-
cause our special processing re-
moves most of the blood, which,
if left in the flesh, imparts a
"gamy" flavor and aroma, and
is a source of possible contami-
nation.
"Also, our poultry is salted
and washed in cold running wa-
ter three times to insure maxi-
mum cleanliness. Of course, we
start with only the best and
healthiest birds, which, after our
special kosher process, are
bound to be plump, juicy, ten-
der and clean. A bad bird just
can't pass our stringent U.S.
Government and rabbinical in-
soections."
The energetic son of Empire's
founder, Joseph N. Katz, Mur-
ray Katz described the new
items as adding another dimen-
sion of convenience to the basic
oroduct line that has served
four generations of kosher con-
sumers." These innovations are
possible, he explained, because
of the company's use of latest
developments in equipment and
in packaging techniques and
materials.
Katz describes the new Em-
Dire products this way:
"Whole Cooked Chicken in
Broth, a new heat-and-serve
product, is unique in its con-
tent of rich natural chicken
broth which, with the addition
of three to four cups of water,
cooks into a hearty chicken
soup. The product is packaged
in a vacuum film bag and can
be kept refrigerated or frozen.
"An innovation in poultry tech-
nology is Empire's new Skinless
Turkey Franks they look,
cook, smell and taste like the
best beef hot dog, but are more
economical. Ten fully cooked
turkey franks, one pound, are
vacuum-packed i n laminated
film packages. Cocktail Franks
in Blankets are finger-size tur-
key hot dogs in pastry wrap-
pers, packaged frozen in five-
ounce full-color-photograph-
illustrated boxes.
"Consumer convenience is pro-
vided by Turkey Meat Loaf in
Marinara Sauce, a new frozen
product, recipe-formulated and
readv to bake in oven ready
aluminum pans. The net weight
two pounds, is sufficient for an
average-size family serving.
"Empire enters the frozen in-
dividual dinner field with four
new varieties, oven-ready in
aluminum trays to heat-and-
serve: Turkey Meat Cutlet in
Marinara Sauce with Mashed
Potatoes and Peas and Carrots;
Sliced Turkey with Gravy, Mash-
ed Potatoes and Peas and Car-
rots; Spaghetti and Turkey Meat
Balls in Marinara Sauce with
Peas and Carrots and Apple
Sauce; Baked Beans and Turkey
Franks with Sauerkraut and Ap-
ple Sauce."
The 11 ounce dinners are
packaged in full color photo-
graph-illustrated boxes. Empire
savs these items are well suited
for quick home preparation, for
airlines and other transient lo-
cations, hospitals, nursing
homes, schools, and other in-
Tennis
Tourney
Ends Sunday
The final play for Temple
Emanu-El's Tennis Tourney is
scheduled for Father's Day,
Sunday, June 20. at 1 p.m. at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Abel
Holtz, reports cochairman Mar-
tha (Mrs. Lester) Mishcon.
In the father-child category,
Elliott Harris and Scott will
play Abel Holtz and Javier, who
is state seeded and on the var-
sity tennis team at Ransom
School. In the mother-child
category Martha Mishcon and
Adam will play Roberta (Mrs.
Eugene) Weiss and Howard
Rosenblatt.
Herbert Buchwald, tourney
cochairman, announced that
trophies, to be presented im-
mediately after the finals were
contributed by Intercontinental
Bank of Miami Beach, Capital
Bank of North Bay Village and
Jefferson National Bank of Mi-
ami Beach. Burton Belenke's
House of Diamonds is contribut-
ing the engraving.
Life Here and in Israel
Is Bet Breira Focus
Dennis and Alice McDougle
who have lived in the U.S. and
Israel and have long been in-
volved in the Jewish commu-
nity, will lead Temple Bet
Breira's weekly service this eve-
ning at 8:15. Their topic is Par-
ticipating in the Jewish Com-
munity in the U.S. and Israel.
Rabbi Barry Tabachinikoff
and congregation families are
on a studv-retreat at River
Ranch in central Florida
stitutions that must provide
kosher meals but do not have
the proper food and facilities.
"Batter-Dipped Fried Chicken,
frozen, heat and serve, legs,
breasts and wings, will be pack-
aged in full-color-photograph-
illustrated boxes. "Our fried
chicken," Katz says, "will make
one of America's most popular
foods available with the extra
benefit of kosher wholesome-
ness, quality and taste."
Asked about Empire Kosher
Poultry's prospects, Katz is en-
thusiastic: "Our commitment to
new plant and new products is
a further commitment to the
perpetuation of kosher. The
market for kosher poultry is
growing, for more and more
Jewish people are observing
the dietary laws and even non-
Jews appreciate our quality and
taste. And there are other faiths
whose dietary laws are similar
to our Jewish Orthodox laws.
"So the demand for our poul-
try keeps growing. In some
communities the neighborhood
processors are disappearing, but
Empire's ability todqy to ship
iced, refrigerated or frozen pro-
ducts anywhere, even overseas,
enables us to continue to make
our kosher products available
to everyone. After over 40 years
in have the experience in mak-
ing genuine kosher poultry the
way people like it.
"People know this and recog-
nize the integrity of our process
and products. Using the newest
technologies and equipment, we
can satisfv almost everyone and
also provide kosher poultry and
food in ways never before
dreaded possible. And we can
serve more oeoole than ever.
Prosnects? Well, let's say that
we at Empire are "bullish"
about poultry Empire Kosher
Poultry."
?


[Friday, June 18, 1976
+Jewist ftcridNan
Page 13-B
Ex-Condo Commissioner Sipkin
To Campaign for County Office
Talmudic College Honors Torah Patrons
George Sipkin, a former mem-
ber of a United States Atomic
Energy Board, former member
of the Dade County Planning
| Advisory Board, and executive
ssistant to Cong. William Leh-
lan, plans to campaign for the
I office of Dade County Commis-
Isioner for District 1 in North
ade.
A graduate electrical engineer
ind member of the Bar of the
District of Columbia, Sipkin is a
etired Federal employee and
fwas chief patent counsel of a
Wavy research laboratory and
lo! the Naval Ship Systems Com-
mand, the navy's largest bureau.
He also served as a special as-
sistant to the administrator of
fche General Services Adminis-
tration. While with the Navy he
was granted five patents on
pomplex naval equipment, all of
fhich were licensed without
feharge to the United States Gov-
ernment.
After coming to Florida 15
ears ago, Sipkin helped found
je Condominium Executives
Bouncil of Florida and, as a
Midominium Commissioner,
Biped draft and secure the
issage of the present State
Midominium Act. He was also
gtrumental in the preparation
id adoption of the Dade Coun-
Comprehensive Land Use De-
Blonmcnt Plan.
SIPKIN WAS in the forefront
in securing adoption of ordin-
ances relating to the building
moratorium, gun control, the
banning of phosphate deter-
gents, the dating of milk and
dairy products, and the clear
packaging of meats, fish and
poultry. He also fought the In-
terama Stolport and North Dade
Jetport and was a leader in the
establishment of Arch Creek
State Park.
A member of the Council of
Senior Citizens, the Association
of Retired Federal Employees,
the Concerned Citizens of North-
east Dade, B'nai B'rith, and the
Affirmative Action Committee
of the State Democratic Party,
SiDkin said: "If elected, I will
be a full-time commissioner and
will defend the Land Use De-
velopment Plan and the environ-
ment of Dade County. I will
work to develop our tourist in-
dustry by speeding up the beach
nourishment project and by
bringing professional hockey
anl basketball teams to this
area. I will strive to expedite
the building of our rapid transit
svstem, the water and sewerage
plants, the 192nd Street and
Sunny Isles causeway projects,
the building of low-cost housing
and other public works."
Sipkin and his wife, Bert, live
in the Point East Condominium
complex, where he is an
executive vice president.
The Greater Miami Jewish
community was praised for its
support of higher learning and
Torah study at the recent sec-
ond annual Torah Patron dinner
of the Talmudic College of Flor-
ida at the Sea Gull Hotel.
At the banquet, attended by
over 200 persons, 50 South Flor-
idians were proclaimed Torah
Patrons of the college. "The
most eloquent testimony to the
maturing of a Jewish commu-
nity is its establishment of a
school of higher Jewish educa-
tion, a Yeshiva," said Rabbi
Bernard Poupko, chairman of
the Rabbinical Board of Great-
er Pittsburgh and keynote
speaker.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro,
spiritual leader of Beth Israel
Synagogue, praised the commu-
nity and members of Beth Is-
rael Congregation for taking
the initiative in the creation of
the Talmudic College and pro-
\ iding its strongest base of sup-
porters.
Willia_m Silverstein, the guest
of honor, received the Founding
Father award from Rabbi Tibor
H. Stern in recognition of his
commitment to and support of
the college. Silverstein, who
was dinner chairman, read an
original poem written when he
first came to the United States.
The Talmudic College, which
opened less than two years ago,
in August, 1974, today has stu-
dents from Canada. Israel and
the United States in its Yeshiva
and its Kollel, graduate stu-
dents of Talmud.
Murray Berkowitz, chairman,
Choice' Is Confirmation Focus
_, On the eve of Shavuot 12 attending the Synagogue School
[young people who have been of Temple Sinai of North Dade
THE HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER INC.
(CONGREGATION BETH TEFILAH)
(CONSERVATIVE)
is desirous of engaging the services
of a MATURE RABBI
Please Address Correspondence to
MORRIS WOLFSON CHAIRMAN
RITUAL COMMITTEE
All correspondence will be held in
strictest confidence.
through the tenth grade, con-
firmed their faith in a service
combining traditional liturgical
readings with creative prayers
and essays written by the young
people.
The theme of the confirma-
tion service was "choice," this
group of young people having
chosen to be confirmed and hav-
ing contracted at the beginning
of the school year to perform
certain religious obligations, in-
cluding study, worship and tze-
dakah (charity).
The twelve confirmands are
Charles Berlin, Brad Epstein,
Amy Green, Robert Greene,
Heidi Katz, Debra Kromsky,
Judith Miller, Evan Morgan,
Howard Rosen, Sheryl Rosen-
berg, Melinda Ross and Alan
Shuster.
To...
BETH DAVID
SOLOMON SCHECHTER DAY SCHOOL
REGISTRATION IS NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR
SEPTEMBER ENROLLMENT
EARLY CHILDHOOD DIVISION ELEMENTARY DIVISION
AGES 2 5 AGES 6- 11
CONTACT MRS. AUDREY DIUAMAN, DIRECTOR,
ANY WEEKDAY BETWEEN 10:00 A.M. AND 12:00 NOON
7500 S.W. 120 STREET 238-2*01
Happenings
The Academy Players, direct-
ed by Maxine Baumrind, will
present "You're a Good Man,
Charlie Brown" on Monday,
June 21, at 8:15 p.m. in the
Hebrew Academy Auditorium.
to -to -to
Retirees of New York District
65 will hold their regular month-
ly membership meeting on Tues-
day, June 22, at the American
Savings and Loan building at
1200 Lincoln Road at 12:30 p.m.
The proup meets on the fourth
Tuesday of each month.
-to The National Endowment for
the Arts will again support the
free Music in the Park pro-
grams developed by Performing
Arts for Community and Educa-
tion (PACE). Area residents
will be offered about 100 pro-
grams of classical, folk, jazz and
country music.
to -to -to
According to Dewev Knapp,
president of the Greater Miami
Men's Chapter of ORT, Ben-
jamin I. Shulman, chairman of
the board of Intercontinental
Bank of Miami Beach, received
a Certificate of Accomplishment
at their last meetine celebrat-
ing America's Bicentennial and
Israel's 28th anniversary.
said "It was a dream of our
community for many years that
we could establish a center of
higher Jewish learning in Mi-
ami Beach. Now it is a reality."
Many Talmudic College stu-
dents, including several from
Israel, had come to the new
institution to study with its
dean, Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, a
noted rabbinic scholar who is
a graduate of Ner Israel Rabbi-
nical College in Baltimore and
was dean of graduate studies at
Beth Ha Talmud in Jerusalem.
A native of Philadelphia, Rabbi
Zweig taught in Israel for five
years.
The associate dean is Rabbi
Yaakov Poupko, a graduate of
the Ner Israel Rabbinical Col-
lege and Beth Medrash Gevoah
in Lakewood. N.J.
Master oi Ceremonies for the
evening was Rabbi J. Burstyn,
executive director of the Tal-
mudic College, who commented
that "Each Torah Patron has
taken it upon himself to sup-
port one day of learning at the
college, thus making them its
strength and sustenance.
Among the many guests were
Miami attorney Steven Robin-
son and Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Geller, who were celebrating
their 58th wedding anniversary
at the dinner.
William Silverstein (center), guest of honor, received
the Founding Father Award of the Talmudic College of
Florida at the Recent Torah Patron dinner. With him
are Rabbi J. Burstyn, executive director of -the college,
and Murray C. Berkowitz (left), its chairman.
Keynote speaker Rabbi Bernard Poupko (left), chairman
of the Rabbinical Board of Greater Pittsburgh, and
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, who presented the award to Sil-
verstein.
Dr. Walter Fingerer (right) received his Torah Patron
Award from Rabbi Burstyn (left) and Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig, dean of the Talmudic College.


Page 14-B
fJewisti iBurkEaanr.
Friday, June 18, 1976 -
LEGAl NOTICE
* "
rtAtt
V
* 4*"*
r i
Confirmation services were held June 3 at Temple Ju-
dea of Coral Gables. Rabbi Michael E. Eisenstat officiat-
ed and Cantor Rita Shore directed the liturgical portions
of the creative service written by the rabbi and mem-
bers of the class. In the front row (from left) are Bar-
bara Saslow, Susan Myers, Gary lndianer, Jodi Miller,
Kenny Herskowitz, Geoffrey Marks, Bruce Fletcher,
Arthur Colsky, Neal Bennett, Sharon Gutlohn, Stephanie
Zimmerman, Dana Parnes, Deborah Pollak, Lori Kudi-
viz, Debbie Jampolsky, Mrs. Ray Berman and Cantor
Rita Shore. In the center (from left) are Cheryl Ham-
ersmith, Amy Helfman, Roy Paskow, Lisa Palley, Lauren
Keith, Ruth Singer, Carolyn Gorwitz, Ronald Horwich,
Kimberly Davis, Glenn Sommer, Cathy Bearman, Wendy
Ennis, Nancy Jacobs, Lisa Apple, Debbie Silbert, Mar-
cie Greenspan, Meryl Jampolsky, Patti Brickman and
Avery Wellman. In the back row (from left) are Alan
Siegel, Mark Feldman, Dennis Gilman, Jeffrey Price,
Leslie Camens, Michael Landy, Neil Bulbin, Rabbi Eisen-
stat, Roger Snyder, Lori Helfman, Merle Kipper, Brad
Weiss, Hal Kessler, Karin Diamond, Randi Michelson,
Keith Landy and Roger Spitzer.
Israel Consul Bids Farewell Sandier To Speak
To Olim from Miami Area At Temfle lsrae}
LEGAL NOTICE
Nahum Astar, Consul General of Israel in Atlanta, will
officially wish farewell to 35 olim (emigrants) from the Mi-
ami area. The June 20 bon voyage party for olim, who are
leaving for Israel during the summer, culminates the activi-
ties of the local Chug Aliyah, an organization of potential
olim affiliated with the nationwide Association of Americans
and Canadians for Aliyah (AACA).
Eliezer Kroll, the shaliach
(representative) of the Israel
Aliyah Center, whose regional
office is in Miami, foresees an
increase of 50 percent over last
year in Aliyah from the area
and says it is encouraging that
a number of families are in-
cluded.
According to Kroll. a repre-
sentative of Israel's Ministry of
Education recently interviewed
a dozen local teachers and 20
social workers interested in
pursuing their professions in Is-
rael.
Most olim from Miami have
previously left without any no-
tice taken of this important step
and Kroll hopes the farewell
party will give overdue recog-
nition to the emigrants and to
the importance of Aliyah,
Question
Box
LEGAL NOTICE
N_THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
*J3J&9S, COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Cue No. 75-15825
.,. ...NOT,CE OF ACTION
inh**S P,PE SUPPLY CO. INC .
a Honda corporation.
Plaintiff.
ggNTRZL BANK* TRUST
a nankin* corporation:
SUNRISE POINT. INC..
\'.!orida rorDoratlon:
H Km DAN ELECTRIC. INC
a Florida corporation:
BOYS ELECTRIC CORPORATION.
a Florida corporation-
HERYDAN KLECTRIC. INC
Florida corporation;
WEATHERMATIC CORPORATION.
a Florida corporation: and
VALMOR DISTRIBUTORS. INC
a Florida corporation.
Defendants
T" KELIABLE PLUMBING. INC..
Edward J. Flaccavento. Director
Patrick H. Erra. Director.
l-'ilumena Cantone. Director.
Residence of Dlrectora unknown
ou are hereby notified that an ac-
tion ban been commenced to foreclose
a mechanic's lien on the following real
property lying and being and situate
in Dade County. Florida, more par-
'"ularlv described as follows:
The SE v, of the SE V. of the
N \\ '4 of Section 15. Township
.... So. Range 40 E. less the E
13..00 feet excluding the No. 39.30
feet of said E 137.00 feet and less
the So 137.00 feet excluding the
\V 39.60 feet of said So. 137.00 feet:
Lot 9 of the unrecorded plat of
COWAN SUBDIVISION bv E. R.
Urownell Assoc. Inc.. dated Decem-
ber 1971. as more particularly de-
scribed In OR. Book 8385. page
1905. NC 73R-163244; a/k/a Sun-
rise Point, located at 8261 S.W
U'Sth Street. Miami. Florida.
This action has been filed against
you and you are reauired to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any.
to it on HERMAN GRAYSON. ESQ..
at 1000 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the Clerk of the above stvled
Court on or before the 23rd dav of
July. 1976. otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
Of said Court at Miami. Florida, this
Ith dav of June. 1976.
RCHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of said Court
Bv N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
6/18-26 7/2-9
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why is the recita-
tion of the Shema so import-
ant in Jewish religion?
Answer: Judaism, in essence,
has very little dogma. It is a
religion of action, which speaks
louder than words. The one
most basic theme of the Jew-
ish faith is the unity and single-
ness of the Almighty. The be-
lief in the one and only God
was basically a theme intro-
duced by Judaism.
Jews have paid a dear price
for clinging to this tenet, thus
rejecting any dualism or trini-
tarianism. It is basically the
"Shema" which expresses this
principle of faith, especially in
its first verse "Hear 0 Is-
rael the Lord our God. the Lord
is One."
While the Almighty has a
variety of names, each referring
to a different attribute, there
is basically only one God. He
is the God of nature and the
God of transcendence, the God
of judgment and the God of
mercy. The Jew is asked to pro-
claim this faith daily and to ex-
press its relevance in the ac-
tions of his daily life upon this
earth.
Prof. Robert Sandier of the
University of Miami will de-
liver the lecture following serv-
ices this evening at Temple Is-
rael of Greater Miami at 8
o'clock.
Dr. Sandier, who will raise
the question "Do Jews Still Ac-
cept the Teachings of the Pro-
phets?" in the continuing series
of Summer in the Synagogue
programs, has written exten-
sively on Jewish subjects deal-
ing particularly with American
life and literature and has been
a major force in establishing
the Judaic Studies Program at
the University of Miami.
Straus Returns
To Urban League
Clifford Straus has resigned as
the Florida representative of the
Women's League for Israel, ef-
fective June 1, to become co-
ordinator of the Counseling Di-
vision and project director of
the Housing Opportunity Cen-
ter of the Urban League of
Greater Miami.
Straus, who worked with the
Urban League from 1966 to
1969, was with the Women's
League since last summer. The
Women's League office will be
closed until September but ap-
pointment of a new representa-
tive will be announced within
the next few weeks.
LEGAL MeTKI
LE6AI KOIKE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
SWiSS,".HPte ,ne fictitious name of
A8I| APARTMENTS at 407 Lin-
coln Road. Miami Beach. Fla. Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
DELTA INVESTMENTS
a Fla. General Partnership as Trustee
6/18-25 7/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names
of ECONO-OPTICS. ECONO-VISION
and ECONO-EYE GLASSES at 946
East 25th Street. Hlaleah. Florida in-
tends to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
JOHN COSCUELA (100%)
6/18-25 7/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-17691
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA TERESA JEREZ.
Petitioner-Wife.
RUFINO LUIS JEREZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: RUFINO LUIS JEREZ
5521 Est. No. 2
Villanueva. Gllen.
Mendoza. Republica de
Argentina
Vor ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it on
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQUIRE, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address is
2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Suite
420. Coral Gables. Florida 33134 (Phone
(305) 442-8624). and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before July 16. 1976: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
7th day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By W. TYMINSKI
,. As Deou'v Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
I'ARIXJS LIDSKY. ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Attorney for Petitioner
6/11-18-25 7/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DAHF COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3099
IN RE: ESTATE OP
NKcildlK L RAND.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
Id ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of GEORGE L. HAND, deceased. Fil.
Number 76-3099, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
uiurh is t:i West Flagler Street, -Mi-
ami. Florida 38130, The personal rep-
II.,Miaiive of the estate la lihhyf:
HAND, whose address la 5825 Collins
A\.nue. Miami Beach, Florida 83140
The name and address Of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims ur de-
mands against this estate are re-
iiuired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE, to
file With the elerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have Bach claim
must lie in wilting and must Indicate
Hi. basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
'in claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffl-
ient copies of the claim to the elerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the "state
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THRFIE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validitv of the dece-
dent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or lurisdictlon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: June 18.
1976.
LIBBYE RAND
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of George L. Rand
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LLOYD L RUSKIN
107 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 3.1139
Telephone: 673-8118
6/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 76-3397
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
in RE: ESTATE OF
SYLVIA 8HANKMAN,
I leceaaod
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE: ________
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of SYLVIA SHANKMAN. deceased.
File Number 76-3397. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County, For-
Ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami The personal representative of
the .state is MARTIN SHANKMAN.
whose address Is 4750 Alhambra Cir-
cle, Coral Gables. Florida 33146. The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis of the claim, the name and
addreas of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when It will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated if the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
. nut copies of the claim to the clerk
to n.ilili the elerk to mail one copy
to each personal ropreaentatlYe.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
< hail, nires the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS DEMAND8 AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT Si i FILED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication Of this
Notice of Administration: June 18,
l!'7G.
MARTIN SHANKMAN
As Personal Representative of the
Eatate of Sylvia Shankman,
deceased
Sandra Goldstein, Baq,
Goldman. Goldstein A Pacaler
2401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Phone 842-2411
6/18-2S
NOTICE Of- mv..ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-9995
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBBRA CIPALDI,
Petitioner
and
JOSEPH A. CIFAI.DI.
Respondent.
TO: JOSEPH A CIFAI.DI
Quail Roost Trailer Park
17101 Southwest 200 Street.
No. Z-l
Miami, Florida 33187
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If anv. to it
"n Richard G. Dunberg. Esq.. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address is
MM Sunset DriveSuite 180. Miami.
PL 33143. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before July 23. 1976: otherwise a
default will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for fgur consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
11th day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. HEWETT
,. Ab Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Richard G. Dunberg. Esquire
GOODMAN A DUNBERG
N.185 Sunset Drive Suite 180
Miami. Florida 33143
Attorney for Petitioner
6/18-25 7/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of El. MERCADO I'NICO, INC at
10807 s\v 40 St., Miami. Fla. 33155 In-
tend* to register said name with the
Clerk of th, circuit court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
JOSE LORENZO
6/4-11-18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 76-3703
JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUI8 C. PAREDES.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of LOUIS C. PAREDES. deceased. late
of Dade County. Florida. File Num-
ber 76-3703 is pending In the Circuit
Court in and for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 3rd F'loor. Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West F'lagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The personal
representative of this estate is NA-
THAN K. SPECTOR. whose address
is 2001 S.W. 5th Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida. The name and address of the
attorney for the personal representa-
tive are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION i if THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Bach claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
of the above styed court to enable
the cerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
ITBI.ICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
IE' TION8 NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on this
'' day of June. 1976.
NATHAN K SPECTOR.
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of LOUIS C. PAREDES.
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
Ju. j76,,0n n ,he ,8,h day of
"EN"Y NORTON. ESQ.
201 Blscayne Building
19 W Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone 374-3116
Attorney for Personal Representative
6/18-3S


^KJune 18, 1976
vJewisti fkrkfiar
Page 16 h
Obituaries

s. Maun. i Min i-v i. 71. of Mi-
ami Beacli Interment Lakeside.
Riverside.
HOTH. Bathe mi. ..f .Miami Beach,
Interment Ijtkeside. Newman.
STEINBERG. Samuel. 68. of Miami.
Interment Ml Nebn. Gordon.
ROSENFELI' E*. \"i'tli r.:,\
Village Interment Lakeside.
Blaaberg.
STERN. Diane liarnelt. 63. Riverside.
GREENFIELD. Edward. Ml. of Miami
Beach. Intetmeni \u n.-Im,
Riverside.
MHF.NKEB, Edward. 66. of Surfside.
Newman.
NEIMAN. Jerome (Jerri i. ..I North
Miami Beacli Levitt
SPORN. Harry. of Miami Bench
Interment l-al.i m WIDOM. Robert. U. of Miami. Gordon
FOX, Max. 80. of North Miami Beach
Interment I-iK. sidi Riverside
8IEGEL Samuel I M. m Miami
Beach. Entombment l~ikcsi.li
Riverside.
8TERNGASS I'-.uh. I. mi. of M,;,,,,,
Beach. Riverside
WEINTROB. Helen., of North B;,v
Village. Interment Graccland
Memorial Park Klnshcrg.
FINDER. Rosali.-. of Surfside
Riverside.
LIEBERSON. Mrs .la. 77. of Miami
Beach. Interment Star of David.
Riverside.
NEROVE, Diivnl A St. ol Miami
Beach. Interment Mi Sinai
Riverside
ROSENBERG. Jennie. :,. ,,f North
Miami Beach Newman
RUBIN. Samu.l .1 S2. of Miami
Beach. Interment Lakeside
Riverside.
(HBRIDAN, Clarence Edward. M. of
Miami. Int. Tin. in Lakeside.
Hlasberg.
SINTOW, Mrs. Anna It.. M. of Miami
Heach Riverside
JEFFER
>
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
WTOJB
IraMJefler Medwin .letter ai.m Jetler
MKWYOm
188-11 HUSH AVE. HOI US UN*
1283 CONEY ISLAND AVE. BKIYM, N Y
212/776-8100

DUE COUNTY -13385 \rV DIXIE HWY
847-11 85 Ret) by Sonny lew". FO
raftftM) COUNTY 1921 PEMBROKE RO
926-2743 Reo by Sonny le.rn.FD
AIM KACH COUNTY 62S S OLIVE AVE
1-925-2743 Hep b.PWurstein FO
Sefwces available in all com
munilies in New fork and Ihr ourjhoul
Ihe 6eale( Miami area J
LEGAL NOTlL
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3638
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN UK: E8TATE OK
IRENE GOTTLIEB
I >e. eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PER80N8 HAVING CLAIMS
OK DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:
Within three months from the time
of the first Publication Of (his notice
you are required to Hie with the clerk
of Ihe Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida, I'robute Division, the address
of which Is 73 W. Kinder Street. Mi-
ami. Florida, a written statement of
any claim or demand you mav have
against the estate of IRENE GOTT-
LIEB, deceased
Each claim must be In writing and
must Indicate (he basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
or his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when it will become
due shall lie stated. If the claim is
eiinliiiKent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainly shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal representa-
tive
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT BO PILED WILL RK
FOREVER MA It RED.
Hated Mav |1, 1976.
GLORIA LEVITT
As Personal Representative of the
Estate or [RBNB Gottlieb
I t i i id
MICHAEL A. BIENSTOCK
Attorn, -v
SHAPIRO, PRIED, WEIL & BCHBER
4"7 Lincoln RoadSuite 10-B
Miami Heach. Klorlda SJ1J9
Telephone: 538-6381
6/11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dealiing to engage
in business under the fictitious name
Of JOHN" W at 161:: Pennsylvania
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida. 33139
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Klorida.
JOHN WAJCMAN
CALBUT & GALHUT
Attorneys for JOHN \V
7-1 Washington Ave,
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
6/11-18-26 7/2
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Serving the Jewish Community since 1938
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
^^^ REFORM SERVICES
(IMMGordon(19461 Ike Go-Don
HsnfSwdon (19641 IimiB Cordon
^^^Telephone 858-5566_____
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open tvery Day CCoied1 Sobbtrth
UGAl NOTICl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3273
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN UK: E8TATE OF
TILLY It HOSSEIN a/k/a
TILLIK H. R088EIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS III! DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE E8TATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOL ARE HEKEHV NOTIFIED
thai the administration <.t the state
of TILLY It. ROS8EIN a/k/a TILLIE
i: ROSSEIN, deceased, Kile Number
76-3273, is pendin.: in the Circuit Court
foi Made County. Klorida. Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is Dade
County Courthouse. 73 Wes( Flagler
Street, Miami. Klorida. The personal
representative of the estate is HER-
BERT S SHAPIRO, whose address is
"a. Lincoln Itoad. Miami Beach. Klor-
ida 18189. The name and address of
the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons bavins claims or de-
mand* against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the cleric of the above court a
written statement Of any claim or de-
mand (hey may have Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
talnt] shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the Security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
put copies of the claim to the clerk
t.. enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
KRO.M THE DATE OK THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualification! Of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND till-
JECTION8 NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: June 11.
1976.
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of TILLY R. ROSSEIN a/k/a
TILLIE R ROSSEIN. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SAMUEL W. FRIED
SHAPIRO. FRIED. WEIL & SCHEER
4"7 Lincon Road. Suite 1"-H
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) S38-63R1
6/11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-17498
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
in Re The Marriage Of:
SONIA DEI. VALLE. wife
and WILLIAM DEL VALLE,
husband
TO MR. WILLIAM DEL VALLE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
lias been filed against you and you
ire hereby required to servo a copy of
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Wife's Attorney. LES-
TER ROGERS, whose address Is 1454
N \\ 17 Avenue. Miami. Florida 33125.
and file the original with the Clerk
of ihe above styled Court on or before
this Itith day of July. 1976. or a De-
fault xv-ill be entered against you.
DATED this 4th dav of June. 1970.
RICHARD P. BRINKBR
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By O. FREDERICK
6/11-18-25 7/2
When a loss occurs
away from home.
m BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
I
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
New v"'k: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
r^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to entrance in
nusiness under the fictitious name of
HESiiN CROUP. LTD. at 4325 Col-
lins Avenue. Miami Reach. Kla. in-
tends to register Mid name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Klorida.
JUDY WERNER
INTERIORS. INC.
6/18-23 7/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-9552
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: PETITION OF BENISOI
PIERRE.
TO: JEAN ELIE DORISMOND
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has been
filed for a minor child and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer or other pleadlnic to the
Petition for Adoption on the Petition-
er's Attorney. HARVEY D. ROGERS.
Suite 200. 1454 N.W. 17th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida 33125. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 23rd day of
July. 1976. or a Default will be enter-
ed against you.
DATED This 11th day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: N. A. HEWETT
Deputy Clerk
IEGAL NOTICr
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 76-17549
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
SIN MORTGAGE A INVESTMENT
CORP., a Florida eoniorntion.
Plaintiff.
VS.
EDWIN BORISON and JOAN
BORISON. his wife.
Defendants
TO EDWIN BORISON and JOAN
BORISON. his wife.
(Residence unknown)
and
Each and ail unknown person*, parties
and defendants who claim by. through,
undei or agalnsl ihe aforesaid EDWIN
BORISON and Joan BORJSON, his
wife, whether as spouses, heirs, de-
visees, grantees, assignees, lienors.
creditors, trustees or otherwise, as to
each anil all of whom residence Is
unknown.
and
Each and all unknown persons, parties
.mil defendants, as to each and all of
whom resilience is unknown, having or
claiming to have any right, title or in-
terest In or to the following described
property, which Is the subject matter
of the above-styled cause, vis:
UNIT No S06, in that condomini-
um designated as WASHINGTON
CENTER CONDOMINIUM, toge-
ther with an undivided Interest to
all common elements which are
appurtenant to said units ii, ac-
cordance with saiil Declaration of
Condominium filed for Public Rec-
ord in Official Records Rook 5677,
at page 270. of the Public Records
Of Dade County, Florida: which
< ondomimum parcel is located on
Lot .,. Block 48, OCEAN BEACH
ADDITION NO 3, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Bonk 2. at Tage SI. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Klorida.
VOL. AND EACH OP vor are
hereby notified (hat a Complaint has
been filed by the above-named Plain-
tiff against you and each of vou to
foreclose a mortgage on the above-
described property In the above-styled
cause and you and each of you are
hereb) required to file an Answer or
other Pleading responsive thereto with
the Cerk of the above entitled Circuit
Curt and to serve a copy of such
Answer or other responsive Pleadine
upon the Plaintiff's Attorney. DAVID
M OON8HAK. 1497 N\V 7th Street.
Miami. Klorida 33115, on or before the
Hitli day of July. 197(1: otherwise the
allegations of said Complaint will be
taken as confessed by vou.
DONE AND ORDERED at (he Dade
County Courthouse. Miami. Florida,
this Ith day of June. 1976.
Richard P. Brinker
Clerk of Circuit Court
By <~\ p. COPEI.AND
Oeputv Clerk
6/11-18-2.'. 7/2
LEGAL IteTKE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CIRCUITO TKATRAb LATINO
AMERICANO at 612 Alnsley Building.
Miami 33132 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
TRIANON THEATRE. INC.
DANIEL M KEIL
a Fla. Corp.
DANIEL M. KEIL
Attorney for applicant
6/18-25 7/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-17407
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FRANK CURTISPetitioner
and
ROSE M curtis -Respondent
To: ROSE M. CURTIS
RD. 2. Allen Road
Peeksklll New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
nag, lias been filed against you and
yOU are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to il on
MARK II SLAVIN. LAW OFFICES
MELVIN K. KRANKEL. PA. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 420
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Klorida
33139, and file the original with the
clerk of the above Styled COUH on or
before July 14, 1976; otherwise a de-
fault win be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
.r petition,
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH KLoRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
3rd day of June. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By I. BNEEDBN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
I.AW OFFICES MELVIN F
KRANKEL. P.A.
420 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach, Florida 33131'
MARK B. SLAVIN
Attorney for Petitioner
6/11-18-23
6/18-25
7/2-9
7/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-17342
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
JOHN V. AHLFORS.
Husljand.
and
ANNA MAY AHLFORS.
Wife.
YOU. ANNA MAY AHLFORS. c/o
Oppelaar. 14711 148 Avenue N.E..
Wnodlnvllle, Washington. 98072. are
required to file your answer to the
petition for dissolution of marriage
with the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney. Herman Cohen,
Hjaq i",22 S.W. 1st Street. Miami. Flor-
ida. 33130. on or before July 14.
1976. or else petition will be confessed.
Dated Jun 7, 1976
Richard P. Brinker.
Clerk. Circuit Court
By S. PARRISH
Deputy Clerk
______________ 6/11-18-25 7/2
NOTICE UNDER"
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of JEANNETTES at 12559-A Bis-
cayne Boulevard. North Miami, Flor-
ida 33181 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
SUN TRUST. INC.
KURT WELUSCH
Attorney for SUN TRUST. INC.
161 Almerla Avenue. Suite 200-E.
Coral Gables. Florida JJg^ .
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
iii business under the fictitious name
of LA ROSA FLOWERS at 1843 N.W.
ITili Avenue. Miami. Florida 33125 In-
tends I" register Bald name with the
Chrk of Ihe Circuit Court of Dade
('OUntV. Klorida
TROPICAL FlidWER SHIPPERS.
INC d<"i\ i
bj MAX MEEKS. Pri sldenl
HARVEY n ROGERS
wtornev for Tropical Flower Shlpoen
I I I N IV. 17th Avenue
, .- 6/---U-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTV. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3280
Division Judge Joseph Netbltt
IN RE ESTATE OF
1113 iRGE E, NOBLE
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
claims OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai the administration of the estate
of George E. Noble, deceased. File
Number 76-3280, It pending In the
Circuit Court for I lade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, Ihe address of
which is 7:i IV. Flagler St.. Miami.
Florida The personal representative
of (lie estate is Deuward V Noble
whose address Is 2975 N E. 187 Street.
North Miami Beach. Florida The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate arc requir-
ed WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written -tntcmciit of anv
claim 01 demand they mav have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
Indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney. and (be
amount claimed. If the claim is not
vet dUC the date When it Will be-
come due shall be stated, if the claim
is contingent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be stat-
ed. If the claim is secured, (he secur-
ity shall be described The claimant
shall deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the dart
to mail one copy to each personal rep-
resentative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed arc re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
KRo.M THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they mav have
that challenge- the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
ihe personal representative, or the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: June II.
1976.
Deuward V. Noble
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of George E. Noble
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
David M. Gonshak
Attorney at Law
1497 N.W 7th St., Miami. Kla r:i-'".
Telephone: 642-0721
6/11-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76.3317
IN RE: ESTATE OK
CELIA RIEGER
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS or DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE: _______
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Ih. administration of the estate
,,f Cells Rieger, deceased, File Num-
ber 78-3317, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33130. The personal representative
of (he estate Is Percy M. Rieger.
whose address Is 489S N W 29th
Court. Apt. 416. Uiuderdale Lakes.
Klorida 3331.1. The name and address
of the personal representative's attor-
ney arc sat forth below
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of anv claim or de-
mand they mav have. Each claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
iddress of the creditor or his agent
nr attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
Mated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim Is
secured, the securltv shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copt
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a ropy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file anv objections thev may have
that challenges the validltv of the de-
cedent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CI.AIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WnX
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: June 11.
1976.
Percy M. Rieger
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Cells Rieger
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
I 1900 North University Drive
Pembroke Pines. Florida 33024
Telephone: 305-620-0054


P*ge 16-B
*Jei$tfkrkt&r
Friday, June 18, 1971
p*St> HtOE SALUTES
JUNE IS DAIRY MONTH
; C M l -1.' $ C IM t .'. i
* rt C SCI 5 :.: ^ C S ; "t
isfv;..-' -j:t. :-!-'- ::'>- :
we ant you to feel good about
thrs urwoue opportunity to
own a 40-piece set of imported
porcelain china
Friendship
Sour Cream
49c
;:s-a se ^^
*..-.-; P**l ': = : '""- "* "''-" :
.' S" -' '' I I tC.JOC .'-'<:
ALL GRINDS
COFFEE
Pantry Pride
Cream Cheese
39c
+ >.;:,< -:' < ,1 ; I :-
1 k EtcOMS -'." ":':
/ ii..'.
Power 99
Low Fat Milk
SJ59
American Singles ** / ^
Soft Margarine ... ..'< 59
Swiss Cheese '':' / >
Cottage Cheese
Milk Shakes 4
ffli SAVE 43<
Maxwell
House
$106
1
MB
BAG
:$::; veil iic.,>wcon"!i
SAVE 68
Era Liquid
Detergent
64-OZ
BOTTLE
$189
1
+ ,., ., 1 1 M.'i! .-;-1* :. ':-;;.
aU'WQI MOW fCuOWG OCUM
t J
1.1.:.'.

Beef Salami
99
r -HI!' Mil'.- -_
Liverwurst 49"
1 i 1 t BMM MM m
Salami Or Bologna ...v 1"
Sliced Bologna g 73'
Clorox
Bleach
49
<*.*' :: r. '.:i '-
-1 s- m won t':..:
.:-*
;i-Si'OS
"V-
Instant Dry Milk
10 $939
MM
1 1 "t m
Tomatoes
9i *'
3
4
urn- +* wii cmi. r*
Creamed Corn
... mi mma .. m ._
Green Beans -> 1
"" .. -. QQ:
Coffee Creamer V^y
"n;i .
Mayonnaise 8"'
Kosher Dills 59
Preserves ^ "
Cat Food "...... 5 '..: 99
Foamy Liquid
,c
. : ; o :: : 1": "' :-"- :::
Beef Chuck OQc
Blade Steak 07
.$1"
,69
Beef Rib Steak -"-
Btm. Round Roast
Rump Roast
Pot Roast
Beef Liter
1 1 :wo it : :* vi
Beef Brisket --'-' -
.1 : 4.1 Turkeys 2SS 59
>_. CH H*4f**MI "IfkMIIM WOJ -_
Fres-h Fryers 48
Fryer Qtrs. 1 59
Fr>er Parts 99
Eye Round Roast ., sl**
Bottom Round Steak ,sl4f
Lamb Shldr. qqc
Blade Chops 0%l
Southern
Peaches
- : -OUR OWN
3 79
Nectarines
2 $1
:: =
5 i 5 c *
Fla. Oranges 16 :. 1
Potatoes D OV
Artkhokes 5^1
Florida Limes o 5#~
: .:: 1 :1 : .
Round Beans 29
CeieVyHtaeii 2 ^:'49:
kMXMiaia ...rQ:
Salad Dressing O^
Tomatoes
3 $1
as*
XHCRT
39
S-'-'-^-^-i m Snmtee 4*0&an
MMI :>'
: :'. 111
Turkey Rolh 99c
Kippered Salmon 89
:. : r.: :*;:-s
Banquet Dinners
Akc
' I |>. ::
Haddock Fillet ;
ik :_* 1 --. '. :
JiMce
c..*.*"
iv"f *IM la 'CSD VCM
Bologna
COL*TT* WXM ovb *V
-tc:
O ens


Full Text
Friday, June 18, 1976
Bcm and Howard Miller back
in town after a trip to Los An-
geles and Houston. Their chil-
dren live in California, and they
enjoyed their daughter, Marcy.
and her husband, Brian Lewii.
Their son, Ronald, and his Shei-
la have two boys, and needless
io say the grandparents were
thrilled to watch the little ones
urow up
Iris (Mrs. Herb) Marks run-
ning all over town she's busy
teaching the game of backgam-
mon to many and organizing
tournaments .
Ruth Becker Pollack is back
on the road to recovery after
spending two weeks at Mt. Sinai
Hospital. Irv Simson is over his
recent illness, and he took his
Bernice to California. They cov-
ered the coast from Los Angeles
to San Francisco, touring, look-
ing and enjoying. Their daugh-
ter. Shelly, has recently moved
to San Francisco, where she's
busy in the fashion coordination
field
Irene and Bernie Jay had to
go to New York on business,
and while they were in that sec-
tion of the country, they de-
cided to go on into Montreal
after all. it's so close. Irene's
mother lives there, so naturally
they spent several pleasant days
visiting family .
Paris and London were well
covered by Libby Rand and the
Dr. Harry Needlemans. On the
way home, Libby stopped off to
visit friends in Montreal .
Ella Coplin Harris just back
from a visit to Minneapolis,
where she visited her daughter.
Audrey (Mrs. Alvin) Kaufman.
Thev are both waitingAudrey
to become a grandmother and
Ella to become a great-grand-
mother both for the first
time .
MadaHne and Dr. Steven
Kaufman, who live in Vermont,
are awaiting the birth of their
first child, but it's hard to tell
who's the most excited .
Ann and Julian Kurlander
catching their breath and get-
*klsl tkridkw
Page 9-B
=
{^harminglu
yours,
^PF
ting used to the time change
after a trip to California. It was
a "practice run" for their plan-
ned vacation to Europe later on
this summer .
An extended European jaunt
was taken by Susan and Leo
Gumbiner. They sailed over on
the Queen Elizabeth II. then
flew back They happened to be
in Italy when the earthquakes
hit. but they were very fortu-
nate. They felt no earth tremors
and said their vacation contin-
ued as though nothing had hap-
pened .
Louise and Gary Brown ex-
pecting their first child in Oc
tober it will be her parents,
the Bernard Jays', first grand-
child (Doesn't look as if we're
experiencing a Population Zero).
Terrie and Marvin Tharp hav-
ing a double celebration. She
iust completed her course work
for a Ph.D. in psychology at the
University of Miami, and Man-
has iust accepted an offer by
Price Waterhouse as an engi-
neering consultant
Linda and Richard Kahan
busy changing diapersthey've
iust had their first child
Marcia and Dr. Donald Sayet
back from vacationing in Col-
orado and California. They
drove, went hiking, went horse-
back-riding, looked at all the
magnificent scenery and said
they had a marvelous time.
Miss Martin and Mr. Apelker
'*"* To Marry at Tel Aviv Hilton
Florida Women's League
Installs 1976-78 Officers
The Florida Branch of Wom-
en's League for Conservative
Judaism recently installed new
officers. Mrs. Morton Levin was
reelected president. Serving
with her for the 1976-78 term
are Mrs. Jerome Gilbert. Mrs.
Alan Nirenberg, Mrs. Howard
Oser, Mrs. Albert Solo, Mrs.
Norman Sholk and Mrs. Ewald
Ziffer, vice presidents; Mrs. Ed-
ward Hoffman and Mrs. William
Shulevitz, corresponding secre-
taries; Mrs. Hy Schutzer, rec-
ording secretary; and Mrs. Nat
Siesser, financial secretary-
treasurer.
Serving on the Branch board
are Mrs. Richard Bailey. Mrs.
Max Banner. Mrs. Arthur J.
Brown, Mrs. Herbert Cohen.
Mrs. Louis Cohen, Mrs. Max
Cohn, Mrs. Avram Drazin. Mrs.
Irving Firtel. Mrs. Seymour
Goss. Mrs. Meyer Levinson.
Also Mrs. Ted Martin. Mrs.
Philip Medvin. Mrs. Abe Meyer.
Mrs. Irving Pivnick. Mrs. Ron-
ald Pollock. Mrs. Jerome Rifkin,
Mrs. Al Schneider, Mrs. Charles
Shaffer, Mrs. Eliot Stein, Mrs.
Jules Shapiro.
STANLEY GEWIRTZ
Pan Am Forms
New Division
The formation of a Public
Communications Division at Pan
American World Airways, com-
bining federal affairs, public af-
fairs and public relations, has
been announced by William T.
Seawell. chairman and chief
executive officer.
The new division is headed
by attorney Stanley Gewirtz,
vice president-public communi-
cations and former vice presi-
dent-public affairs. He reports
to James 0. Leet, executive vice
president-corporate services.
Seawell said the new division
covers a broad scope of federal
and public affairs and public
relations activity designed to
"influence the image of Pan Am
and its impact on the public."
A GRADUATE of the Harvard
Law School, Gewirtz joined Pan
Am in 1972 as vice president-
public affairs. He was president
of BF Consultants Inc.. a public
relations and management con-
sulting firm. He is a former vice
president-corporate public rela-
tions and government affairs of
the Interpublic Group of Com-
panies. Inc., vice chairman of
the Presidents Task Force on
National Aviation Goals, con-
sultant to the President's Com-
mittee on International Avia-
tion Policy, vice Dresident-ad-
ministration for Western Air-
lines, vice president-corporate
affairs for National Airlines and
a vice president of the Air
TransDOit Association.
Sherry Lynn Martin, daugh-
ter of Leo and Gloria Martin of
South Miami, will marry Shaul
Apelker, son of Baruch and Ba-
tia Apelker of Netanya, Israel,
in July at the Tel Aviv Hilton.
Miss Martin, a graduate of
Miami Palmetto High School
and Miami-Dade Community
College, is a physical therapist
at Mercy Hospital.
A graduate of Tel Aviv's
Technical School of Aviation.
Mr. Apelker was recently dis-
charged with honors and the
rank of lieutenant from the Is-
rael Air Force. His father is
manager of the Bank Leumi of
Israel.
Among the 300 guests from
all over the world will be 50
Miami residents, transported to
Israel bv the Martin family via
El Al. President of Pompeii
Casual Furniture. Martin has
arranged VIP treatment for his
guests during their stay.
Following a wedding celebra-
tion that, according to Martin,
is "geared to inspire the young
counle to enjoy a happy, mean-
ingful Jewish life together .
as well as to attract Miami Jews
and other Americans to visit
and to do business in Israel."
the couple will honeymoon in
Europe.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults
Division recently held its first weekend *"'*:
ing more than 70 young men and women. e Central
Aeencv lor Jewish Education, represented by Vicky
Goodman (left), played a key role in *TT\
ming The event's chairman was Dr. Robert Rasken (2nd
from left) and its vice chairmen were Adria Rasken and
Linda Bogm (right).
We Are Open for Business
After Vacation
H & M STEIN DELI & RESTAURANT
Also Mrs. Arnold Thorner,
Mrs. Melvin Waldorf. Mrs. Mor-
ton Weintraub, Mrs. Jack Wolf-
stein and Mrs. Leah Zatz.
THE BRANCH will hold a
President's Council meeting on
Thursday, June 24. at Temple
Emanuel in Lakeland. The
President's Council consists of
Sisterhood presidents and their
vice presidents, branch officers
and activity chairmen.
The Council will provide an
idea exchange and some "how-
to's" for those attending.
Sheryl Kartzmer to Wed in August
J _, n__:- Ilia
Sheryl Kartzmer. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin L. Kartz-
mer of North Miami Beach, will
marry Salomon Queroub, son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Queroub of
Kiryat Shemona, Israel, on Au-
gust 28 on the "Miss Florida."
Miss Kartzmer, a groduate of
Miami Norland Senior Higjv
was graduated this year from
,he Boston University School
for the Arts where she was a
member of Mu Pta Bk mi
Phi Kappa Lamda. She is a
musician and her fiance is a
manager of the Singer Co.
OLAM TRAVEL NETWORK. INC.
GO KOSHERun"eD *,Runes
$ff MUICA THf MM WAY
EXCITING TOURS TO mMV,
^AUZA BRENNER mm Bgg^
605 LINCOLN BO., MIAMI BEACH P"g__________
He has orccticed law in New
York and Utah and was ad-
mitted to practice before the
United States Supreme Court.
He is a member of the New
York executive board of the
American Jewish Committee
and of the board of overseers
of the Hebrew Union College.
SEAWELL also announced
the appointment of John Krim-
sky. Jr., as vice president-fed-
eral affairs, effective July 1.
Krimsky, formerly staff vice
president-public affairs, will
head Pan Am's Washington of-
fice.
The international services
function of Pan Am's Interna-
tional and Regulatory Services
Division will be headed by Seth
H. Preece, staff vice president- ^
international services, with of-1
fices in New York. Preece is a
former staff vice president-in-
ternational and regulatory af-
fairs based in Washington.
Krimsky joined Pan Am in
1960, serving various marketing
assignments in New York. Min-
neapolis, Okinawa, Osaka and
Tokyo. His last marketing post
was that of director Pacific
marketing-overseas. He was
named staff vice president-
public affairs in 1974.
1141 WASHINGTON AVE. 5342557
Open Ev.ry Day 11 AM to 8:30 P.M. Closed Friday Ntfe S..
Feel Good. Dine in a Traditional
Shabos Atmosphere
Finest jewisfc Howe Cooked Food
Prepared by Helen Stein
to*
MARTY'S GOLD FACTORY
1645 N.E. 163 ST.
N. MIAMI BEACH
MON.-SAT. 10-6
THURS. 10-9
947-1616
FREE
EAR
PIERCING
WITH PURCHASE
OF ANY PAIR OF
14KT GOLD
EARRINGS
95
DP
WE ACCEPT ALL CHECKS


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Page 8-B
*Je*isti tlcrkttan
Friday, June 18, 1976
-
joints of Uiew
with NORMA A. OROVITZ
Abortion on demand.
I.U.D.
The Pill.
Planned Parenthood.
Rhetoric for the 60's and 70's.
Even more than just black
type and white space, the pre-
ceding expressions describe the
logistics of personal lives and
livinc-1976.
IN RECENT months, the press
has run periodic articles con-
cerning American lifestyles. Cit-
ing percentage figures, Amer-
ican couples were pegged as to
birth control preferences, abor-
tion experience and family size.
For example, in a nationwide
survey, it was determined that,
presentlv. one pregnancy in five
?nds in abortion. Despite the
fact that 20 percent of all con-
ceptions are terminated, an-
other half-million or more wom-
en are carrving unplanned and
unwanted fetuses to term. They
are unable, for a variety of rea-
sons, to obtain the abortion thev
desire.
A Gallun noil, run last win-
ter, determined that 52 percent
of Roman Catholics in the
United States would favor a Con-
stitutional amendment severely
limiting a woman's right to an
abortion.
A smaller, but still significant
sample (46 percent) of Protest-
ants, would also favor such an
amendent.
THE READERS of The Jew-
ish Floridian are invited to par-
ticipate in a survey to deter-
mine how Jewish couples com-
pare to the larger populace on
these issues.
Please answer the following
questions as completely as pos-
sible. Do not, in any way. mark
your answer column or return
envelope with identification. In-
formation is desired not per-
sonal profiles.
Please mail the survey col-
umn to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 2973. Miami, Florida
33101, marked for my attention.
Results will be tabulated and
Dutjishfed after a substantial
sample of survey answers have
been returned
Thank vou for your partici-
pation.
William Landa, Mark Ko-
vens, Robert Bookbinder
and Herb Rauch sponsor-
ed a reception on Wednes-
day to honor former State
Representative Ted Cohen,
'resident of the Temple
Emanu-El Men's Club and
chairman of the Miami
Beach Convention Services
i ommittee.
1. Age: Husband
Wife
2. Affiliation:
Reform
Orthodox
Unaffiliated
Conservative
3. Age at birth of first child: Husband Wife
4. Birth controlIf responsibility is husband's:
Device
Sterilization
5. Birth controlIf responsibility is wife's:
Device
Sterilization
6. No birth control practiced by either husband or wife:
7. Number of children:
8. Were children planned? 1 2 3 4
9. Has wife ever had an abortion?
10. Do you approve of abortion? Husband Wife
11. Could you decide for an abortion if faced with the
decision? Husband Wife
12. Would you favor a Constitutional amendment severely
limiting abortion to availability only if a woman's life
were in physical danger? Husband Wife
Don Feder, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Emanuel Feder of
Miami Beach, was valedic-
torian of the graduating
class of the Mesivta Louis
Merwitzer Senior High. He
received a $500 scholar-
ship which he will use to
continue his education in
a local university and at
the Talmudic College of
Florida.
Golf Tourney Will Benefit A KM 1)1
Two more professionals are
among the latest entries in the
American Red Magen David for
Israel's Charity Golf Tourna-
ment slated for this Sunday at
the Bayshore Golf Course. AH
proceeds will go to Israel's of-
ficial Red Cross service.
Jerry Castigliano, who has
qualified for the pro tourna-
ments, and Jim McDonald, a
winner of the Phoenix Open,
have signed up for the Father's
Day tourney, which is cospon-
sored by the Bayshore Men's
and Women's Golf Clubs.
Tournament chairman Mayor
Harold Rosen noted that the
"Magr i David Adorn provides a
viral lifeline to the people of
Israel, maintaining some 600
rescue vehicles throughout the
country and furnishing Israel's
only blood processing service."
ACCORDING to Howard Kauf-
man, president of the ARMDI's
Greater Miami Chapter and
tournev coordinator, entry fees
require a minimum contribution
of $20 to the ARMDI, includ-
ing greens fees. Working with
Rosen and Kaufman are Sol
Drescher, national cochairman
of the $10 million blood bank
drive, David Coleman Florida
state president, and Samuel
Reinhard, Florida state chair-
high school champion Warren
Jurkowitz, former Bayshore
Men's Club champion Dr. Don-
ald Sayet and his father. Dr.
Max Sayet.
Additional information is
available from Felice (Mrs.
Gerald) Schwartz at the ARMDI
Miami Beach offices.
Other new entries in what is
expected to be a record field
are Judge Gerald Klein, Florida
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue-North Miami Beach
NOW ACCEPTING
ENROLLMENT
FOR MEMBERSHIP
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CAU
MEMBERSHIP REGISTRAR
932-4200
June 14 was an important milestone for the Levine family.
Andv voungest of four sons of Rosalyn and the late Victor Le
vine was graduated from Emory University School of Dentistry
in Atlanta. Mother and oldest brother, Paul, attended the cere-
3 The family is also celebrating Roz's retirement from the Daik
County Public School System, in which she has spent 15 year,,
teaching government and history at her alma mater, Miami Sen
Andy and Phyllis hosted a celebration buffet on Monday
exening at their Atlanta home. Phylliss parents, Gayle and Frank
La Civita, were there from Sarasota.
Dr. and Mrs. Joel Goldstein of North Miami Beach recently
returned from a ten-day trip to Atlanta and Chicago, where they
attended Homecoming at the National College of Chiropractic,
from which Dr. Goldstein was graduated last year. He is active
in North Miami Rotary and is executive vice president of the
North Miami Beach Jaycees.
Ronjay Berliner won the Best Actor Award at Coral Gables
High School for this school year and the Rotary Club's "Sen-
ior Boy of the Year Award." He was No. 1 player on the (
Gables High badminton team with a 7-0 record. Berliner will
study acting this fall at the Stella Adler Actors Studio in V
York.
The Best Actress award was given to Cecile Liebman and
Isis Bobers. Steve Savitt, Wayne Hosford and Roy Sekoff were
named Best Supporting Actors, while the Best Supporting Ac-
tresses were Celia Singer and Elise Addie.
Debra Braman, daughter of Norman and Irma Braman of
Coral Gables, had her confirmation party at the Brickell Bay
Club with some 50 guests in attendance on June 6. On the 8th
lima, Susie and Debra left for the Bramans' villa at Cap D'Ail.
where the family will spend several months.
Myles Gary, youngest son of Hazel and Irving Cypen of Mi-
ami Beach, was graduated from Stanford University with honors
and distinction and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
Rose-Edith Bcrion Grosswald recently received her M.S. de-
gree from FIU, from which she was graduated with honors. The
wife of Michael I. Grosswald and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William
Gerson, Mrs. Grosswald is a graduate of Miami Norland Senior
High and Florida Atlantic University. She attended the Brandeis
Camp Institute in California and designed and taught the Hebrew
class for children with learning disabilities at Temple Sole! in
Hollywood.
Longtime supporters of Nikki Beare author, radio producer
and public relations executive honored her at a party at the
Coconut Grove home of Lita and Jack Green on Tuesday evening
They want to encourage her to run for the Florida legislature. The
party was also the occasion to celebrate Nikki and Dick Beare's
30th wedding anniversary.
Dr. Saul H. and Ada Kaplan of Miami Beach have returned
from Los Angeles, where they attended the Bat Mitzvah of their
daughter, Ellyn (Mrs. Robert) Feinstock, who was confirmed at
Temple Emanu-El here. The Kaplans are the grandparents of Jill,
Joele and Jordan Feinstock.
Jacalyn Adler, Samuel Abramson and Abraham Chames of
Miami, and Marian Corndorf, Oralee Gross, Leah Mandelbaum and
Alan Singer of Miami Beach, recently received Bachelor of Arts
degrees from Yeshiva University.
New members of the Kings Bay Yacht and Country Club are
the Abe and Elaine Berkowttz family, the Dr. Danilo and Alison
Dnenas family, the Dale and Susan Heckerling family, the Adam
and Mary Jane Polacek family, the Max and Gail Spiegebnan fam-
ily, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Wainger, Robert Tbiem and his son Wil-
liam, and the Melvin and Dulce Wine family.
Mrs. Gert Kanzer, doll lady, was saluted by B'nai B'rith Wom-
en of Coral Gables, Helen (Mrs. Sam) Kurland, president, foi her
outstanding work on the Dolls of Democracy presented to various
schools and organizations.
Leon April of North Miami Beach was among the 5,000 per
sons who attended the 13th constitutional convention of the Na-
tional Council of Senior Citizens in Chicago in early June.
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue-North Miami Beach
ANNOUNCES
OPENING OF TENNIS COMPLEX
Monday thru Thursday 9 a.m. to duik
Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday 2 p.m. to dusk
Sunday 8 a.m. to dusk
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT
MEMBERSHIP REGISTRAR
932-4200
ik