The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02468

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"^Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 21
r>
Fred k. shochet May 21, 1976 Miami, Florida Friday, May 21, 1976 d> Mail soc.
Two Sections Price 25 cents
MATERIALLY PROSPEROUS BUT S PIRITUALLY POVERTY-STRICKEN
Half- Mooners
Are Jewish New
Figures Show
By IRA PEARLSTEIN
The Rev. Sun Myung Moon
is a middle-aged South Korean
businessman evangelist who
claims to have experienced a
vision in 1936 calling upon him
to help "unify" the world, com-
pleting the task Jesus Christ
had begun. God has special re-
gard, Moon learned, for the
United States materially pros-
perous but spiritually blighted
and sent him here in the
early seventies to bring the
message of redemption and
"unification."
The "Unification Church," as
Moon's evangelical movement is
called, has attracted nearly
10.000 devotees in the United
States; a total of half, according
to reliable estimates, are of Jew-
ish origin. Nearly 3,500 converts
in the 18-30 age group, accord-
ing to Rabbi Bernard Spielman
of Temple Beth El, Allentown,
Pa., who has taken a special
interest in the Moon phenome-
non, are Jewish.
WHAT DOES Moon espouse
and why are his teachings so
Continued on Page 1S-A
REV. SUN MYUNG MOON
Top Leaders
Blast Agnew
On 'Cabal'
U.S. JEWS SHOULD STAY OUT OF IT
i
Dinitz in Defense Of
Occupied Settlements
Anti-Gush Demonstration in Tel Aviv
12-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Sim-
cha Dinitz, Israel's Ambassador
to the United States, has re-
jected charges that Israeli set-
tlements in the occupied ter-
ritories are a hindrance to
... But K. Warns Israel
Will Have to Quit Lands
EDITOR CHARGES
-
/Making World
Safe For
Communism
WASHINGTON Nortnan
Podhoretz, editor of Commen-
tary magazine, today accused
both the liberal and conserva-
tive elites in this country of
lapsing into isolationism and
warned that such a policy is
tantamount to "making the
world safe for Communism."
However, he added, there is
no assurance that the masses
of Americans have adopted this
attitude and there are now in-
Continued on Page 12-A
U.S. Confrontation
6-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
BALTIMORE (JTA)
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger pledged here that
the United States would al-
ways recognize its obliga-
tions to Israel "as the prin-
cipal supporter" of its secur-
ity, and would "be under-
standing of Israel's special
circumstances in the process
of negotiations."
He also maintained that
"the Middle East today, with
all its uncertainties, is at a
moment of unprecedented
opportunity" to make pro-
gress toward peace. But the
Secretary also asserted that
any "successful negotiation
will require Israel to ex-
Continued on Page 2-A
peace and denounced American
Jews who use the media to
criticize Israel's policies. "
"I am for an exchange of
views between American Jews
and Israel ." but "the New
York Times and the Washington
Post do not have to be the first
channel of dispute between
American Jews and Israel," he
said.
DINITZ MADE these remarks
in answer to questions at a
"special dialogue" with Rabbi
William Berkowitz of B'nai Je-
shurun. Some 2,000 persons at-
tended the "dialogue" which
celebrated Israel's Independ-
ence Day and the 150th anni-
versary of the Conservative
congregation.
i |n saying that the Jcupsh
settlements did not prevent a
peace settlement, Dinitz noted
Continued on Page 15-A
More Agnewsticisms 6-A
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican Jewish leaders have re-
acted sharply to former vice
president Spiro Agnew's attack
on "Zionist influences in the
U.S." and the American media
and his charges of "Israeli im-
perialism" and "aggression."^
Agnew made his allegations
during an interview on the na-
tionally televised NBC "Today"
show.
MRS. CHARLOTTE Jacobson.
chairman of the American Sec-
tion of the World Zionist Organ-
ization, noted that "a good deal
oF' Agnew's business activities
since his resignation from the
Vice Presidency in 1973 has
been "on behalf of those same
Saudi Arabians he claimed have
been our very staunch friends
over a period of 60 years!"
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
Continued on Page 3-A
BY HUMPHREY
Vetoed
Provisions
Pushed
Compromise
9-A
WASHINGTON (JTA )
The Senate is expected to sus-
tain President Ford's veto of
the foreign aid authorization
bill. But Sen. Hubert H. Hum-
phrey (D.. Minn.), chairman of
the Senate foreign aid subcom-
mittee, said he would recom-
mend that the basic provisions
of the legislation rejected by
Continued on Page 3-A
HIE NASTASE WRITES LETTER
Tennis Star 'Apologizes'
For Anti Jewish Words
BALTIMORE (JTA)
The Baltimore Jewish Coun-
cil has received a letter of
apology from Rumanian ten-
nis star Hie Nastase for anti-
NO MORE DISCRIMINATION
British Quit Blacklist
LONDON (JTA) Britain has assured Israel that
there will be no more anti-Israeli discrimination by British
Airways, the state-controlled aviation company. Gad Yaa-
cobi, Israeli Transport Minister, said he had received the
assurance from Stanley Clinton Davis, British Parliamen-
tary Undersecretary in charge of transport matters.
Davis had been shown about six examples of Israel's
Continued on Page 3-A
Semitic remarks he made
during the Baltimore Inter-
national Indoor Tennis
Championship in Catons-
ville, Md., last January.
The Council has also been
notified by Forrest A. Hain-
line, Jr., chairman of the
grievance committee of the
United States Tennis Asso-
ciation, that the committee
considers the apology "satis-
factory and accordingly any
disciplinary proceedings con-
templated by us have been
discontinued."
THE JEWISH group asked
Continued on Page 9-A
Silberman Assumes Helm of Federation
Morton Silberman has
been elected president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration for 1976-1977. The
election took place Wednes-
day at the Carillon Hotel
during Federation's 38th an-
nual meeting.
More than 350 Federation
I leaders took part in the
event, which saw the elec-
tion of Silberman and a new
slate of officers, Board of
Directors and an Advisory
Council for the coming year.
OUTGOING President Harry
B. Smith, along with 1975-76
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Chairman L.
Jules Arkin, were honored at
the annual meeting.
Chairman of the meeting was
Federation's founding president,
Stanley C. Myers. The evening's
theme.. "We Are One Family,"
was used by Myers in his com-
ments on the growth of the or-
ganization since its inception in
1938.
Myers paid tribute to GMJF
past presidents, including the
late Ben Bronston, Leon Kap-
lan, Monty Selig and Jacob
Sher, whose families and friends
were among the leaders gath-
ered for the 1976 annual meet-
ing.
MYERS himself was the sub-
ject of tribute, as the Federa-
tion's Presidents' Leadership
Award given annually to
young men and women of out-
standing promise and ability in
Jewish community leadership
Continued on Page 5-A
MORTON SILBERMAN


Page 2-A
+ k*ls*nt*knrui
Friday, May 21, 1976
Lands Must be Given Up-K.
Continued from Page 1-A
change territory in return
for political and therefore
much less concrete conces-
sions."
KISSINGER made his re-
Minks to an audience of about
1.500 members of Congregation
Chizuk Amuno, one of Balti-
more's oldest Conservative con-
futations which presented him
with its Distinguished Leader-
ship Award.
It was his first appearance,
since becoming Secretary of
State, before a Jewish body in
a synagogue sanctuary and his
second before a Jewish organ-
ization. The Secretary addressed
an American Jewish Congress
luncheon in Washington five
weeks ago. On May 16, he was
scheduled to address an Amer-
ican Jewish Committee meeting
in the capital.
SPEAKING partly from a pre-
pared text and part extempora-
neously, Kissinger's address was
punctuated by 14 bursts of ap-
plause. The most enthusiastic
ovations came when he de-
scribed Israel as "a reality" that
will eventually achieve peace
and when he declared that a
solution of the Middle East con-
flict will not be "imposed."
He said "there should be ne-
gotiations between the parties
that will eventually have to live
in r>eace with each other."
Kissinger also called for an
end of Arab economic warfare
against Israel as a step towards
military and political peace. He
said that "the U.S. is committed
to ending restrictions on Israel's
right to trade and on the right
of others to trade with Israel."
KISSINGER'S appearance be-
fore the congregation and its
award to him sharply divided
Baltimore's closely knit Jewish
community of about 100,000.
The Jewish Times, a weekly
serving the community, publish-
ed two editorials Friday, one
favoring and the other opposing
Kissinger's visit.
The official car taking the
Secretary and his wife, Nancy,
to the synagogue ran a gauntlet
of more than 100 students and
adults carrying placards attack-
ing Kissinger and his policies.
Flyers were passed out by
"concerned Jewish citizens"
protesting "the granting of any
honor or award" to Kissinger.
Two demonstrators reportedly
were arrested. The Jewish De-
fense League claimed a role in
the demonstrations.
EXTRAORDINARY security
precautions were evident at the
synagogue where secret serv-
ice men guarded the approaches
to the broad synagogue grounds,
scrutinized all who entered the
huge building and mingled with
the guests. Everyone had an
invitation in advance. But spe-
cial tickets were issued during
the dinner before the award was
presented to permit guests to
enter the sanctuary to hear the
Secretary's address.
Kissinger's speech was ap-
parently intended as a reply to
rpcnt attacks on the Ford Ad-
ministration's Middle East pol-
icy some of them emanating
from former members of the
Administration such as former
Defense Secretary James Schle-
s'nger and as an expression
of reassurance to Israel.
He observed that "There is
no greater example of the pow-
er of faith than the creation of
Israel." Israel, he declared, is
"a reality and a reality it shall
remain." Its "survivors" who
built the nation and now "dream
of neace" will "achieve" that
too, Kissinger said.
BUT HE went on to say, "The
road ahead is almost certainly
more difficult than the steps we
have taken so far. The negotia-
tions ahead in the Middle East
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will present difficult obstacles
and difficult decisions.
"We understand the com-
plexity of Israel's position. Any
successful negotiation will re-
quire Israel to exchange terri-
tory in return for political and
therefore much less concrete
concessions. Even Israel's ulti-
mate goals a peace treaty
and recognition from its neigh-
bors are inherently intan-
gible," Kissinger stated.
He assured his audience that
"We do not underestimate the
dilemmas and risks that Israel
faces in a negotiation, but they
are dwarfed by a continuation
of the status quo and we shall
always evcognize our obliga-
tions, as the principal supporter
for Israel's security, to be un- J
derstanding of Israel's special I
circumstances in the process of
negotiations."
KISSINGER said that "Some
of the Arab countries are now
at last speaking openly and
wisely of making neace and
bringing an end to generations
of conflict." He did not identify
the countries.
Calling for an end to "po-
litical wrangling," between Is- i
rael and the U.S., Kissinger \
chided "those who opportunis- '
tically question our dedication
to the security of Israel" and
asked that they "examine" the !
record of American aid to that
country.
He noted that Israel now re-
ceives about a third of Amer-
ica's total foreign assistance
and that "we have proposed
$4.1 billion for the next two
vears." In his prepared text,
Kissinger said that since its
founding. Israel received $6 bil-
lion in U.S. aid.
KISSINGER shared the dais
with Maryland's two Republican
Senators, Charles Mathias and
J. Glenn Beall, and Maryland's
Governor, Marvin Mandel, a
Democrat.
We look to you to make Israel
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'


Friday, May 21, 1976
+Je*lslilk*S Page 3-A

HHH Pushes Vetoed Aid Proposals
Bones
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Continued from Page l A
the President should be incor-
porated into new legislation ap-
plicable to both fiscal years
1976 and 1977.
Ford vetoed the bill last week,
just seven weeks before the end
of the current fiscal year to
which the measure applied. In
his veto message he alleged
that the bill, as it stood, would
seriously compromise th"e Presi-
dent's ability to conduct foreign
affairs.
HE REFERRED specifically
to what he characterized as "an
arbitrary arms ceiling ban" that
would limit his ability to re-
spond to "the legitimate defense
needs of our friends" and ob-
struct "U.S. industry from com-
peting fairly with foreign (arms)
suppliers."
The reference was to provi-
sions that would have given
Congress veto power over arms
deals by private American com-
panies in excess of $25 million
and would put a $9 billion ceil-
ing on U.S. arms sales abroad
in any given year.
The President did not men-
tion the bill's proMtisions for
transitional quarter funding for
the three months between the
end of fiscal 1976 and the start
of fiscal 1977 under which Is-
rael would have received an
extra $550 million in military
assistance. Nor did he refer to
another provision, opposed by
the Administration, that would
cut off aid to countries that
harbor international terrorists.
BUT FORD assailed the mea-
sure's insistence on "compliance
by recipient countries with visa
practices or human rights stand-
ards set by our Congress as a
condition for continued U.S. as-
sistance."
He claimed that provision
"ignores the many other com-
plex factors which should gov-
ern our relationships with those
countries." The provision was
aimed against countries, such
as Saudi Arabia, which dis-
jfpminate against Americans on
grounds of race, religion or sex.
Humphrey charged the Presi-
dent with seeking to "under-
mine" the work of Congress.
He said the veto "seriously
complicates the operation of
manv important programs, in-
cluding his (Ford's) own Middle
East initiatives."
Meanwhile, the Senate-House
conference bill on appropria-
tions to fund the foreign aid
programs established by the
vetoed authorization legislation
is being held up by the House
foreign aid subcommittee pend-
ing possible compromises on
means to provide the funds un-
der existing authorization mea-
sures.
British Air Quits Blacklist
Continued from Page 1-A
name being omitted from British Airways publicity mate-
rial. He gave explanations for each one but assured Yaa-
cobi that such cases would not happen again.
However, the list of complaints did not include British
Airways' practice, revealed last week by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, of publishing a second "Arab" edition of
its worldwide timetable excluding the services to Israel.
I'mirl* .'/ Thr .Icru.-.-il' Ml l'i.\l

Jewish Leaders
Hit Agnew Slur
Continued from Page 1-A
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, said:
"Spiro Agnew has disgraced
himself once again with his des-
picable statement, so redolent
of the venom and slander we
have come to expect from the
anti-Semitic lunatic fringe .
But if most Americans will dis-
regard Mr. Agnew's statement,
considering its content and its
source, there is now encourage-
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ment and hope for those hate
mongers for whom 'Zionist' is
a code word for 'Jew' and who
must todav be dancing with de-
light over the latest and most
notorious recruit to their ranks."
BENJAMIN R. Epstein, na-
tional director of the B'nai
B'rith Anti-Defamation League,
characterized Agnew's remarks
as "irresponsible anti-Semitic
statements maligning American
Jews and the American press"
which "are shocking and deplor-
able and further discredit him."
Epstein charged that Agnew
was "parroting the Arab propa-
ganda line" and observed that
"this comes as no surprise in
light of his activities in behalf
of Arab petrodollar countries
seeking to invest in the United
States."
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WOMEN FOR JEWISH NATIONAL FUND BICENTENNIAL LUNCHEON
Honoring
PRESIDENTS OF AFFILIATED ZIONIST ORGANIZATIONS
MRS. JEAN FEINBERG
Prei. MB. Chapter,
Hadaaeah
^v
MRS. HARVEY FRIEDMAN
Prea., Miami Chapter
of Hadaaeah
MRS. MILTON GREEN
Prea., Pioneer Women
Council of So. Fta.
Mr*. AARON KATZ
Prea.. Council American
Mitrachi Women
MRS. M. L. WEISBERG
Prea.. Florida Region
of Hadaaaah
Wednesday, June 2, 1976 12 noon
Fontainebleau Hotel
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
JNF Foundation Chairman
MRS. GUS (EMANUEL) MENTZ
Chairman, Women for JNF
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
Pre*., Greater Miami
For Reservations Call: 672-5525 538-6464


Page 4-A
Jewlstncrkflar
i f m
Friday, May 21, T976
Integrity at NBC
Former Vice President Agnew's statements about
Jews and Zionism during an NBC "Today" show last
week gave added exposure to that old canard about the
"Jewish cabal."
Forget Mr. Agnew the nation would certainly
like to. His appearance on the "Today" show is perhaps
best' explained by the fact that he has just published
what the literary trade laughingly calls' "a novel," and
Mr. Agnew was simply trying to publicize it.
The important thing is not this pathetic man, but
what this pathetic man says in his novel about the
"Jewish cabal" and what he said about it over NBC.
Now we understand more fully Richard Nixon's
fear of the "Jewish cabal."
The truth is that the only cabal around the White
House in the Nixon-Agnew heyday involved Nixon and
Agnew their secret intrigue to undermine a nation
and its laws.
While Mr. Nixon's activities these days are not
quite clearly understood, Mr. Agnew's are. He is con-
tinuing the cabal, right here in the U.S., as a paid
agent for Arab clients.
Seemingly, the NBC show's purpose, understood
in these terms, ought to be clear a case of oppor-
tunism all around: Mr. Agnew in behalf of his "novel"
and NBC in behalf of what?
Obviously, to cash in on the appearance of a
"big name" personality, but oh, the price. What does it
say of NBC's integrity to have lent its cameras to a
discredited former Vice President so that he could dis-
seminate anti-Semitic propaganda to publicize his de-
but as a "writer"?
A Long Way to Go
Morton Silberman is the new president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. He was installed at
Federation's 38th annual meeting Wednesday, which
also honored outgoing President Harry B. Smith.
The Silberman administration begins at a time
when the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund proceeds are nearing the $13 million mark
the entire total achieved during the 1975 CJA-IEF.
Wednesday night's campaign report indicated that
there is still a long way to go toward completing the
1976 CJA-IEF campaign.
No dollar goal for the campaign was set. Instead,
'its achievement may be measured by people men
and women whose commitment and involvement caus-
ed CJA IEF's message to reach each and every house-
hold in Dade County," declared Campaign Chairman
L. Jules Arkin in the report.
CJA-IEF's message is the vital Jewish responsi-
bility to "Tzedakah." Fulfill your share in that respon-
sibility. If you haven't given yet, then give now.
Anniversary Celebrations
Although Yom Haatzmaut was officially celebrated
on May 5, Israel and Jewish communities throughout
the world are continuing the 28th anniversary event
with special functions marking the occasion to the very
end of the month.
Both joys and fears are shared by Jewish com-
munities throughout the world.
While there has been no war, this last year has
shown that the chances for a permanent Middle East
peace are still a long way off. Israel, Zionism and the
Jewish people came under an unprecedented attack in
the United Nations and other international forums.
Israel's relations with the United States, the only
country it can rely on, have come under some severe
strain.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin may have best explained
it in his Independence Day message when he said
Israel's independence "draws a line between past sur-
vival by chance and future existence by self-will; or
being helplessly controlled by events and of controlling
events by our own choice, means and purpose."
' JfewisJh Florid Jan
OFFICE and PI^ANT 120 N.E 6th St.. Miami, Fla. J3132 Phone 373-4605
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Published every Friday since 1927 by The Jewish Floridian
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
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Number 21
21 IYAR 5736
Fidel at His Tricks Again
By JACK ANDERSON
WASHINGTON Fidel Cas-
tro is at it again.
Secret intelligence' reports
claim th*at Cuban advisers are
training African guerrillas in
Mozambique for operations
against white-ruled Rhodesia.
Intelligence sources say, how-
ever, there is no evidence that
Cuban troops are crossing into
Rhodesia to take part in the
actual combat.
Castro, of course, caused an
Jack Anderson
-%jm
international stir by sending
combat troops to Angola. The
intelligence reports estimate
that between 13,000 and 14,000
crack Cuban troops are still sta-
tioned there.
SOME ARE helping the new
rulers root out rival guerrillas
from the rugged southeastern
section of the country. But their
main purpose, apparently, is to
deter any counter-offensive un-
til the country is stabilized.
American intelligence agen-
cies have also detected the
movement of Cuban troops from
Angola back to Cuba. One re-
port interprets this as an indi-
cation that Castro is withdraw-
ing some of his men. But other
intelligence sources suggest the
Cuban troop movements are
merely rotations, not withdraw-
als.
KGB CALL?: The Soviet Union
often harasses Jewish-Amer-
icans who visit Russia. But now,
the campaign f intimidation
has apparently reached into the
United States.
For example, Greg and Nancy
Leisch traveled to the Soviet
Union in March. They were
picked up and questioned by
the KGB secret police after they
left the home of scientist Alex-
ander Lernec When they re-
turned to their hotel, they found
that their room had been ran-
sacked.
The Leisches thought they
had left all this behind after
they returned home. But Greg
Leisch received a phone call
from a man who introduced
himself as Mr. Schneider and
idenrtfted himself as a State
Department official.
HE EXPLAINED that the So-
Continued on Page 13-A
Man Turned into a Machine
Volume 49
Friday, Mav 21, 1976
In winding up my column last
week, I wrote that piety and
patriotism seem to bp what;
Americans are looking for today.
One easily recognizes the scoun-
drels for whom patriotism is the
last refuge. But piety? Quite a
few people challenged my use of
the word and its meaningfulness
to the 1976 American in the con-
text of the presidential cam-
paign.
I write this before the Mary-
land Primary results are in but
it doesn't matter. Either the
guru Governor of California,
Jerry Brown, or the Baptist
fundamentalist ex-Governor of
Georgia, Jimmy Carter, will
have been the winner. And if
anything describes them, for me
at least, it is the Politics of
Piety.
GEORGE ORWELL, in an es-
say on "Politics and the Eng-
lish Language," describes the
speaker who "has gone some
distance towards turning him-
self into a machine. The appro-
priate noises are coming out of
his larynx, but his brain is not
involved as it would be if were
choosing his words for him-
self.
"If the speech he is making
is one that he is accustomed to
make over and over again, he
may be almost unconscious of
what he is saying, as one is
when one utters the responses
in church. And this reduced
state of consciousness, if not
indispensable, is at any rate fav-
orable to political conformity."
Which is how I feel as I fol-
low the verbal meanderings of
the languages of Brown and
Carter, political language which
Orwell says "has to consist of
euphemism, question begging
and sheer cloudv vagueness."
IT IS no wonder they spend
much of their time trying to
explain to nuzzled reporters that
"I never said it like that," "It
wasn't meant the way it sound-
ed," and so forth.
EDWARD
COHEN
Nor is it any wonder that
Brown, with his. Jesuit training
and Zen inclination, appears to
be promising pie in the sky in
reflecting the Far Eastern
detached contemplation and ac-
ceptance of corrupt reality here
on earth, especially in Califor-
nia and Washington.
He appeals, one writer has
said, to those white middle-
class people who in recent
years have substituted personal
consciousness-raising for more
traditional political attitudes.
They, who have traveled from
Esalen to est in their search
for salvation, appear to have
found a new leader.
JIMMY CARTER'S evangel-
ical Christian approach is some-
what more puzzling. According
to James Reston in the New
York Times, Carter is said to be
a great admirer of Reinhold
Niebuhr and thus cannot be
labeled a "religious fanatic."
For this great liberal theo-
logian was, if anything, a so-
cial activist who dug into the
real issues of the day and was
a founder of Americans for
Democratic Action. Arthur
Schlesinger Jr. was a close as-
sociate of Niebuhr in ADA, and
he wonders if Carter can really
have understood Niebuhr whose
whole "argument was directed
against the notion that the prob-
lems of secular society would
respond to simple moral preach-
ments.
"American Christianity,"
wrote Niebuhr. "tends to be ir-
relevant to the problems of jus-
tice because it persists in pre-
senting the law of love as a
simple solution to every com-
munal problem Religion
is more frequently a source of
confusion than of light in the
political realm. The tendency to
equate our political with our
Christian convictions causes pol-
itics to generate idolatry."
I CANNOT help but recall,
in this connection, the lead to
the Christmas column Billy Gra-
ham wrote in The Miami Herald
in 1972: "The need of the world
is Christian compassion and
concern."
To which The Man in the
White House, to whom he was
spiritual advrisor, undoubtedly
said "amen" as he ordered the
planes out to carpet-bomb
North Vietnam for a final time.
This is not to question the
sincerity of either Brown or
Carter, or to equate them with
the likes of Nixon, although col-
umnists Cockburn and Ridge-
way in the Village Voice don't
hesitate to state that the cam-
paign of 76 has been waged on
religious innuendo, masking pro-
grams of political reaction.
"THE STRATEGIES (of Brown
and Carter)," they wrote,
?'amount to 1>ie same thfng:
transfer of hopes for social
amelioration from the opera-
tions of government to the
realm of religious meditation
and aspiration. In this type of
fatalism, words have little or no
connection with reality. The
candidate promises everything
in nothing. In the end run it is
a form of propaganda for mak-
ing people "accept the inequities
of the current political eco-
nomy: Nixonism under a new
hat."
My Orwell collection dates
his essay exactly 30 years ago.
What concerns me now is how
the language of politics seems
not only more debased but to
have corrupted thought as well.
The Politics of Piety, indeed.


Friday, May 21, 1976
-JmlstifMflbr
Page 5-A
UNESCO is Practically Broke

By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS JTA UNESCO is practically broke and
may have to cut down on its activities before next year,
according to UNESCO sources here who said that this
"financial crisis" is a consequence of America's refusal to
pay its contributions as a protest against the organization's
anti-Israeli stand.
The sources said the U.S.
owes nearly $2 million on
its 1973-74 contribution and
has not paid its share of
$19.7 million for 1975, nor
has Congress been asked to
appropriate an equivalent
sum for 1976. Altogether,
these sources say the U.S.
will owe UNESCO over $41
million by the end of the
year, or a quarter of the
organization's budget.
CONGRESS voted in Novem-
ber, 1974. to stop participating
in UNESCO's budget following
the organization's general con-
ference adoption of a number
of anti-Israel resolutions.
UNESCO officials believed at
that time that the Arab states
as well as the Soviet Union
would make available the miss-
ing funds. These officials now
say these funds have not been
provided and that UNESCO's
financial situation is "highly
critical."
The organization's director
general and other top officials
have tried to negotiate both
with the Arabs and the United
States for a modus vivendi: a
more "moderate" approach to
Israel and an American prom-
ise to resume its payments.
UNESCO officials say that
"both sides have proven them-
selves adamant: the Arabs have
refused to budge from their
anti-Israeli stand and the
Americans have demanded that
UNESCO drop its politiciza-
tion."
The officials hope, however,
that some solution will be found
before the next meeting of the
Executive Council due to take
place next fall in Nairobi.
Should a compromise not be
found, UNESCO will have to
cut back on its projects and
dismiss part of its staff.
ON THE other hand, the
Arabs and the Soviet Union will
probably demand the imple-
mentation of UNESCO's charter
depriving members who do not
meet their financial obligations
of the right to vote.
Israel, which has scrupulous-
ly paid its UNESCO dues, will
thus risk finding itself practic-
ally alone within the organiza-
tion.
Silberman Assumes
Federation Helm
Continued from Page 1-A
was rededicated in his name
during this year. The first reci-
pients of the Stanley C. Myers
Presidents' Leadership Award,
recognized Wednesday night,
were Barry T. Gurland and
Maxine E. Schwartz.
Assisting Silberman as Fed-
eration officers will be vice
presidents Samuel I. Adler, L.
Jules Arkin, Harry A. Levy,
Norman H. Lipoff and Eli Ti-
moner.
GMJF secretary is Mrs. Sol
Goldstein; associate secretary is
is Richard D. Levy. Treasurer is
Arthur Horowitz and associate
treasurer is Mrs. Leonard Fried-
land.
ELECTED to the GMJF
Board of Directors were Michael
M. Adler. Stanley H. Arkin,
Theodore Baumritter, Mrs.
Adolph D. Berger, the Honor-
able Elaine Bloom, Dr. Sol Cen-
ter, Julius Darsky, Mrs. Aaron
Farr, Dr. George Feldenkreis,
Stanley Gilbert, Alfred Golden,
Marshall Harris, Melvin Kartz-
mer, Norma C. Kipnis, Rabbi
Sol Landau, Donald E. Lefton,
Mrs. Burton R. Levey, Mrs.
Norman H. Lipoff, Morton Mar-
cus, Irving Norry, Mrs. Norman
Robbins, Mrs. Robert Russell
and David Schaecter.
Also elected were Kenneth J.
Schwartz. Edward Shapiro, Fred
K. Shochet, Mrs. Morton Silber-
man. Mrs. Harry B. Smith, Arn-
old J. Stern, Mrs. Morton L.
Weinberger and Irving Wexler
OTHER past presidents of
Federation are Sam Blank,
David B. Fleeman, A. J. Harris,
Sam H. Heiman, Howard Kane,
Aaron M. Kanner, Sidney Lef-
court, Joseph M. Lipton, Mr.
Myers Max Orovitz. Dan B.
Ruskin, Robert Russell. William
D. Sing.er. Carl Weinkle and Mil-
ton Weiss.
* A
" J .
TT^WwwwwuiHHtTHlllflll
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THURSDAY, MAY 27. 1976 "00 Washington Avenue
Honoring
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R A L_


Page 6-A
*Jewisli fkf&lan
Friday, May 21, 1976
Rabin Warns of Confrontation with U.S.
But Jackson's Presidential
primary campaign collapsed
after his defeat by Jimmy Car-
tter in Pennsylvania, and Hum-
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin
warned the Labor Party
Knesset faction that Israel
faces ,a decisive confronta-
tion with the United States
at the end of this election
year no matter who the next
American President is.
The gloomy prognostica-
tion was made in the course
of the Premier's explanation
to the Labor MKs of the Cab-
inet's decision Sunday re-
garding the Gush Emunim
squatters in Samaria and
West Bank settlement pol-
icy.
THE WARNING of a serious
divergence between Jerusalem
and Washington was the sec-
ond made publicly by Rabin
in less than a week. In an In-
dependence Day eve television
interview last week, the Pre-
mier predicted a clash of views
with the U.S. soon over recog-
nition of tfje Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
Rabin told 1iis party col-
leagues that history has shown
that Israel and the U.S. are
generally in agreement over
interim settlement proposals
but in disagreement on the na-
ture of an overall Middle East
peace settlement.
He cited the 1970 ceasefire
which ended the war of attri-
tion with Egypt as an ex-
ample of an interim step on
which Israel and the U.S. were
in concert.
The "Rogers Plan," enunciat-
ed in 1969 by then U.S. Secre-
tary of State William P. Rogers,
was an example of American-
Israeli disagreement over long-
term measures, Rabin said.
HE INDICATED that the U.S.
itself believes that step-by-step
displomacy has run its course
and intends to move vigorous-
ly toward an overall peace set-
tlement after the Presidential
elections are held, one based
on the Rogers formula calling
for Israel's retreat to its pre-
June 1967 borders with only
minor boundary modifications.
Knowledgeable Israeli observ-
ers appear to agree with the
Premier's assessment. They be-
lieve that if the next "crisis"
date is passed renewal by
Syria of the mandate of the
United Nations Disengagement
Observer Force (UNDOF) which
Agnew's Latest Agnewsticisms
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Spiro Agnew, who resign-
ed as Vice President of the
United States in disgrace in
October, 1973, attacked
"Zionist influences in the
U.S." on the nationally tele-
vised NBC "Today" program
and charged that "Israeli
imperialism is taking place
in the world."
He also alleged that the
American media are influ-
enced by Zionism and that
the media do not distinguish
between Arab radicals and
Arabs, such as the Saudi
Arabians who uphold the
"free enterprise" system.
AGNEW, who tendered his
resignation nearly three years
ago after pleading no contest
to Federal charges of income
tax evasion was interviewed by
Barbara Walters. Ms. Walters
pointed out on the program
that Agnew was a disbarred
lawyer who currently makes his
living in international trade
working with American com-
panies involved in business
with Saudi Arabia and Singa-
pore.
A tap<-d transcript of the
interview was made available
to the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy.
His remarks on Zionism were
made when Ms. Walters ques-
tioned Agnew about his novel,
"The Canfield Decision," whose
protagonist is a Vice President
of the U.S. in 1983. Noting that
"you have characters in the
book talking repeatedly about
the Jewish cabal, the Jewish
Zionist lobby having too much
influence in Congress," Ms.
Walters asked, "Is this how you
see it?"
AGNEW replied, according to
the transcript: "I am not going
to challenge you what is in the
book. I do feel that the Zionist
influences in the U.S. are drag-
ging the U.S. into a rather dis-
organized approach to the Mid-
dle East problem. I feel for
example, we don't have an
even-handed policy in the Mid-
dle East.
"There is no doubt that there
has been a certain amount of
Israeli imperialism taking place
in the world. There has been
an invasion of the West Bank.
The Israeli parliament is talk-
ing about settling on the Golan
Heights, on the Gaza Strip.
Even this morning's New York
Times ."
Agnew, who was interrupted
at that point by a question from
his interviewer, was apparently
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-------------tE>
Extension
255
LT.TO
referring to a story on the
front page of today's Times on
Israeli settlement plans in the
occupied Arab territories, ac-
companied by a map.
HE CONTINUED: "I feel that
because of the Zionist in-
fluences in the U.S., these mat-
ters of aggression are routine-
ly considered to be permis-
sible." Asked by Ms. Walters
where these influences are,
Agnew replied, "influences cer-
tainly in the media. I think the
media are sympathetic to the
Zionist cause, put it that way.
I call it the nationwide impact
media.
"We have a tendency not to
separate the Arabs into what
we might call militant, Com-
munist oriented Arabs and
Arabs that support a free enter-
prise system," Agnew said.
He added: "I think that the
Saudi Arabians, for example,
have been our very staunch i
friends for 60 years, and yet*
we regard them and Mr. Sadat
in Egypt who has been trying
to fight the battle of balance
between the Palestinian Com-
munists ." Agnew did not
complete his sentence, accord-
ing to the transcript.
ASKED IF he didn't think
that Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat received equal treatment
of his views when he visited
the U.S.. Agnew replied. "Yes, i
I think he was covered. I don't'
think Mr. Sadat and the late
King Faisal (of Saudi Arabia) |
are nut in a different position."
He did not explain the last re-
mark.
Stuart Schulberg, executive
producer of the "Today" show,
could not be reached for com-
ment when the JTA called his
office in New York to find out
if time would be provided on
the program to anyone request-
ing it to answer Agnew's state-
ments.
CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION
Require qualified Capable
Rabbi to Conduct High
Holiday Services.
Telephone 864-1740
SAL KORAH
WANTED
Write B.K.W., Box
012973, Miami 33101
WANTED
GOOD MALE SINGER
TO SftSSftTfVES AND LKAD
TEMPLE LITURGICAL
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ftl Call for interview
Miami 949-0501
Hollywood 981-61 IS
expires May 30 the U.S. will,
in effect, allow the Middle East
situation to lie fallow for the
duration of the Presidential
campaign. Afterwards, how-
ever, the Rogers Plan could
reappear in one guise or an-
other as the driving force of
U.S. diplomacy in the region.
THIS VIEW this been given
credence by press reports at-
tributed to State Department
sources that middle echelon
American officials have been
instructed to draw up position
papers on all aspects of the
Middle East conflict.
Although such scenarios have
been anticipated here for some
time, no great concern was ex-
pressed as long as it appeared
that Sen. Henry M. Jackson of
Washington or Sen. Hubert H.
Humphrey of Minnesota stood
a fair chance of gaining the
Democratic Presidential nomi-
nation.
Many Israelis felt that if
either of these two longtime
friends of Israel reached the
White House they could be
relied upon not to push Israel
too hard, although even with
them there would be some
tough bargaining and tough
decisions for Israel.
phrey has announced that he
would not actively seek the
nomination.
CARTER, the current Dem-
ocratic front-runner, is an un-
known quantity to Israelis with
respect to his possible Middle
East policies if elected in Nov-
ember.
The feeling now is that whe-
ther a Democrat or a Republi-
can occupies the White House
next year, Israeli policy-makers
are likely to face a renewal of
diplomatic activism by the U.S.
within the next eight to nine
months.
They are convinced that the
Rogers Plan, presumably shelv-
ed for seven years, has never
been discarded.
DURING his television inter-
view, Rabin offered a three-
point program to gird Israel for
an imminent confrontation with
the U.S.: Israel should reduce
its dependence on America by
producing more and consuming
less; public order must be main-
tained on the West Bank in the
face of pro-Palestinian and ter-
rorist activities; and Israel must
fight to win world opinion to
its cause, first and foremost in
the U.S. and to make clear why
terrorist organizations cannot
be negotiating partners.
.Have you Forgotten,
YOUR MOST IMPORTANT
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give and bequeath $
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Friday, May 21, 1976
+Jmlsti Meridian
Page 7-A
Gush Hits Cabinet for Kadum Decision
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Gush Emunim blasted
the Cabinet's decision to
block their attempt to es-
tablish a permanent settle-
ment at Kadum in Samaria.
At a press conference
here, the group's leader,
Hanan Porat, declared that
they "cannot accept" and
"will not agree to" any move
to evacuate the squatters
from the site where they
have been living since Nov-
ember under army protec-
tion.
He declared that the en-
campment outside the Ka-
dum military base would
continue to be built up and
developed into a permanent
settlement.
THAT WAS in direct defiance
of the Cabinet's four-point de-
cision issued which specifically
enjoined the squatters from es-
tablishing a permanent settle-
ment at Kadum.
Some sources believed, how-
ever, that Porat left the door
open for bargaining over an al-
ternative site. In reply to a
question, he said the Gush
would "seriously consider" a
"serious offer" by the govern-
ment of an alternative site
"elsewhere in the heart of Sa-
maria."
The "heart of Samaria" thus
appears to have become the
rallying cry of the Orthodox na-
tionalist militants. Porat warn-
ed that "there must be no ploy,"
meaning that if the government
excluded that "heart of Samaria"
to Jewish settlement, its offer
would be rejected.
PORAT FLAYED the govern-
ment for not consulting with
the Gush before taking its deci-
sion and urged the ministers to
reconsider the whole question
of Jewish settlement on the
West Bank.
The Cabinet stated in its de-
cision that Jewish settlement
would continue "on both sides
of Green Line," the demarca-
tion line between Israel and the
administered territories.
But it stressed that the loca-
tion of settlements would be
decided solely by the Ministerial
Settlement Committee, subject
to approval by the full Cabinet.
THE COMMITTEE, headed
by Minister Without Portfolio
Israel Galili. is scheduled to
meet this week to draft alterna-
tive proposals for the Kadam
squatters.
According to informed
sources, they may be offered a
site near the Nahal (para-mili-
tary) post of Kochav Hashahar,
northeast of Jerusalem on
slopes overlooking the Jordan
Valley. Some political observ-
ers were optimistic that the
term "heart of Samaria" would
prove sufficiently flexible for
an amicable solution to be work-
ed out.
A good deal will depend, of
course, on the public mood
during the weeks ahead, and on
how the Gush Emunim perceive
their support in the public.
Breakfast Forums End Sunday
The speaker at the season's
final Temple Beth Am Brother-
hood Sunday morning breakfast
forum, May 23, at 9:30 a.m., will
be Rabbi Julian Cook. The tem-
ple's associate rabbi for educa-
tion, he will discuss "Some
Notes of Education and Other
Matters of 111 Repute."
Awards will be made to those
members of who have contri-
buted the most to the Brother-
hood this past year, and the
raffle winner will be announced.
I *
J
THG BIG't'NOW
HAS SATURDAY
BANKING IN MIAMI.
AND MONDAY
NIGHT BANKING
ON TH BACH.
The Intercontinental Bank ol Miami
is now open on Saturdays from
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lion to our regular hours. And that's
not just a single window, but both our
lobby and drive-in Facility. Open and
ready with complete, full service
banking, livery Saturday.
Monday night on the Beach.
Monday. May 3rd. From that day on.
the/Mom Road office of the Inter-
continental Bank of Miami Beach
will be open every Monday night.
That makes us thcon/y bank on Miami
Beach to stay open on Monday nights.
In addition to our regular hours,
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7 P.M. Our drive-in windows will open
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open till 7 P.M.
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Miami. Florida 33126
Phone 541-0911
-=- Members FDIC.


Page 8-A
*Jeisli nartd**]
Friday, May 21, 1976
Youth Returning to Judaism-Moscow Rabbi
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Chief Rabbi of Moscow said here
that young Jews in the Soviet
Union afc "drawing closer to
religious life" without being
pressed to do so.
Rabbi Jacob Fishman, who
officiates at Moscow's Central
Synagogue, arrived in the U.S.
as part of a delegation of nine
Soviet clergymen, headjed by
Metropolitan Jubenaly, one of
the highest ranking prelates in
the Russian Orthodox Church.
THE DELEGATION, which is
in the U.S. for a 10-day visit
under the auspices of the Ap-
peal of Conscience Foundation,
includes another Jew, Adolf
Shayovich, a student at the
Rabbinical Seminary in Buda-
pest, Hungary.
Answering questions in Yid-
dish at a news conference for
the delegation, Fishman was
somewhat vague when asked
about freedom of religion for
Soviet Jews.
He only said: "We have three
synagogues in Moscow and peo-
ple pray there from six in the
morning to two in the after-
noon. Then we hold services in
the evenings." He said that
there are "prayer rooms" in dif-
ferent parts of Moscow where
Jews can attend services.
SHAYOVICH, a former engi-
neer who became a rabbinical
student, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that there is
an "intensified" interest in Ju-
daism among the young Jewish
generation.
He said that about 10 Jews
are studying in the Moscow
Jewish Seminary and seven in
Budapest. Fishman said that
during his visit here he hopes
to observe Jewish religious life
and "to strengthen ties with our
Jewish brothers."
Rabbi Arthur Schneier, presi-
dent of the Appeal of Consci-
ence Foundation and rabbi of
the Park East Synagogue, and
the Foundation's two vice presi-
dents, Dr. David H. C. Read,
minister of the Madison Avenue
Presbyterian Church, and Rev.
Thurston N. Davis, S.J., of the
Department of Communication,
United States Catholic Confer-
ence, declared in a joint state-
ment that the religious delega-
tion will be introduced to the
leaders, practices and institu-
tions of their faiths in America
"to introduce them to a cross
section of the religious life of
our people."
IN A statement issued here,
Stanley Lowell, chairman of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, said that Fishman and
the other clergymen were
"functionaries" of the Soviet
government which denies reli-
gious and cultural freedom to
Jews.
He noted that Fishman has
attacked the desire of Soviet
Jews to emigrate and has been
silent about Soviet anti-Semit-
ism and the harassment of Jews
the quota system for Jews in
the universities and the denial
of their cultural and religious
rights.
In addition, Lowell stated,
Fishman is the rabbi "for the
only functioning synagogue in
Moscow and regrettably is the
only rabbi among 60 synagogues
remaining in the Soviet Union
to serve a Jewish population in
excess of three million. This is
stark evidence of the minimal
nature of Jewish religious life
in the Soviet Union. Sadly, Rab-
bi Fishman cannot and will not
do anything to improve this
deplorable situation."
GongiStulatioqs
cBetty*<&igiQoodaqd
on being acclaimed Woman and Man of the Year at the
29th Annual Dade County Outstanding Citizens Awards Luncheon.
Outstanding
Young Citizens Award
winners
.------ BETH ELLEN LEVEY STEVEN LEIFMAN
Joseph M. Upton, (L) Chairman of the Board of Dade Federal Savinqs M Se'?r Senior
and Loan Association, presents Outstanding Citizens award. sTZTh^ITsTooI "So?
I!rla.T!han Tr eaCh. year t0 ne "" and ne WOman in rec9nion of their outstanding
servce to the Dade County community. They must have served without compensation and have
been nom.nated by a recognized local civic group. Judges of the event are members of the media
while Young Gtsens selections were made by former award recipients. It has become one of
lie h m i^ T prestigious fents ** de recognition throughout the city, county and state
Joseph M. Upton has served as the event's sole patron since its inception more than 29 yTrs aga
#f^ DADE FEDERAL SAVINGS
''i^ Servina and Gmminn nM n__u_ Serving and Growing with Florida Since 1934


Friday, May 21, 1976
Page 9-A
What's Ahead?-
More Trouble
On West Bank
TEL AVIV Look for continued eruptions of dis-
tances on the West Bank.
Over last weekend, a
strike by Arab mer-
chants in East Jerusa-
lem was thwarted by Is-
raeli security forceas.
And a 17 year old
Arab girl, Lina Nabulsi,
was fatally wounded
during a clash between
Israeli soldiers and riot-
ing students in Nablus,
with two Arab youths
wounded during a sub-
sequent demonstration
over the girl's death.
Mayor Bassam Al-Shaqa of Nablus and the local
town council have sent a cable to United Nations Sec-
retary General Kurt Waldheim urging him to send a
committee of inquiry to the West Bank to investigate
the Israeli occupation.
0
WASHINGTON President Ford may be expect-
ed increasingly to voice the sentiments expressed by
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in his address at
the Chizuk Amuno Congregation in Baltimore.
At the annual meeting of the American Jewish
Committee here, President Ford declared that "My ded-
ication to Israel's future goes beyond its military needs
to a far, far higher priority the need for peace. We
appreciate Israel's dilemma in moving toward peace.
Israel is asked to relinquish territory a concrete and
essentially irreversible step in return for basically
intangible political measures. But it is only in willing-
ness to dare to exchange the tangible for the intangi-
ble that hostility can be ended and peace attained."
This was the thrust of the sentiments voiced by
Secretary Kissinger in Baltimore (see story, Page 1-A).
It serves as a harbinger of future American foreign
policy in the Middle East.
0
JERUSALEM The ideological struggle between
Premier Yitzhak Rabin and Defense Minister Shimon
Peres is reaching boiling proportions.
The feud between the two erupted at a Labor
Alignment leadership meeting in Tel Aviv, when Peres
accused Rabin of trying to set himself up as a quasi-
autocratic ruler without regard to the views of other
ministers or of important sections of his own Labor
Party.
In response, Rabin is reported to have expressed
the wish that the Premier be empowered to fire a Cabi-
net minister.
Peres replied that Rabin could fire his ministers
by resigning himself, thereby dissolving the govern-
ment.
Under Israeli law, the Prime Minister is not em-
powered to fire members of the Cabinet.
Tennis Star 'Apologizes'
For Anti-Jewisli Words
Continued from Page 1-A
the USTA to take "disciplinary
addon" against Nastase after
the Rumanian player was ac-
cused of saying "there are too
many Jews here" when he be-
came upset by the strong vocal
support from the audience for
his opponent, Harold Solomon
of Silver Spring, Md., a Jew.
Nastase at the time reported-
ly said he was surprised at the
complaint since he made it to
mvself, no one else." In his let-
ter to Mark Coplin, president
of the Baltimore Jewish Coun-
cil, Nastase said:
It was certainly not my in-
tention to offend Mr. Solomon,
whom I consider a good per-
sonal friend, nor to affront any
other person viewing that
match.
"BECAUSE negative comments
based on differences in nation-
ality or ethnicity are inimical
to my own beliefs, I wish to
apologize for any unfortunate
impression which I may have
unintentionally created during
what was a hard-fought tennis
match with Mr. Solomon, I par-
ticularly wish to apologize to
any Jewish citizens of Baltimore
who may have had occasion to
view that match and may have
felt insulted as a result."
Dr. Henry Kissinger said
Monday he will not be Sec-
retary of State after No-
vember no matter who wins
the presidential election.
NBC Crew
Detained
In Jenin
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Several cameramen and a
correspondent working for
NBC-TV News were detained
in Jenin for several hours
after Israeli military author-
ities there ascertained that
their presence sparked a
large gathering of townspeo-
ple and the beginning of a
"staged demonstration."
The TV crew was instruct-
ed to leave, and when they
refused, arthorities detained
them for three hours and
then released them.
ISRAELI authorities have
charged that the appearance of
TV crews on the West Bank has
encouraged local residents to
stage demonstrations, sometimes
in exchange for payments from
foreign newsmen.
Israeli Ambassador Chaim
Herzog told the UN Security
Council last week, during its
debate on Israeli practices on
the West Bank, that an investi-
gation is underway concerning
the proposal by a West Bank
resident to a foreign TV crew
to organize incidents such as
the burning of tires or setting
up road blocks for a payment
of $300.
Avram Zaritsky, NBC bureau
chief, one of those detained,
said that no one had offered
him or his crew any deal last
Thursday to stage a demonstra-
tion.
Senate Examines
Israel Interim
Aid Compromise
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee, acting without dissent, adopted a compro-
mise foreign aid authorization bill which goes a long way
toward meeting the objections voiced by President Ford
when he vetoed an earlier authorization measure.
The new bill, covering aid
programs for fiscal 1976 and that set a $9 billion ceiling on
fiscal 1977, includes, as did the amount of arms the U.S.
the earlier one, the Senate's can sell abroad in any given
formula providing funding year
for the transitional quarter However, it retained the
between the two fiscal years provision that permits Congress
in the amount of up to 25 to ban arms deals by the gov-
percent of what each recipi- ernment or private American
ent country would receive companies with foreign coun-
cui vwu j t excess of $25 million.
for fiscal 1976.
IF THIS measure is adopted Tha Provision is subject to
I a Z i.u> lernpl a concurrent resolution of Con-
and signed into taw. brad meflns ,hat both
SSfe **"% S-SulSX houses forbid such deals, they
S for the three months be- are automatical y ^ref w.th-
tween the end of fiscal 1976 on out Presidential authority.
June 30 and the start of fiscal
1977 on Oct. 1.
This would be in addition to
the approximately $4.1 billion
FOUR OTHER provisions of
the vetoed measure are also
contained in the new bill. These
include a ban on foreign aid
So-SSl^.r-Tto l^h to any. country that harbors
fiscal years. Some SO other international terrorists, dis-
countrieT including Egypt, criminates against Americans
Syria and Jordan, would bene- on grounds of race, color
fit proportionately. Egypt is creed or sex or violates human
slated to receive $1.8 billion rights that are recognized un-
for the two fiscal years plus der mternationa. covenants.
$175 million in transitional Tne new measure retains the
quarter funding. provision empowering Congress
IN DEFERENCE to Ford's to prohibit the delivery of
opposition, the Foreign Rela- American weapons to any coun-
tions Committee dropped from try that transfers *emJ?if
the new measure a provision third nation without specific
contained in the earlier one permission from the U.b.
Fascell Leads in Drive
To Monitor Helsinki Accord
WASHINGTON The House
of Representatives has passed
legislation, 240-95, to establish
a Commission to monitor the
Helsinki agreement with re-
spect to human rights in the
Communist nations, Congress-
man Dante Fascell (D., Fla.) an-
nounced here.
Fascell is chairman of the
Subcommittee on International
Political and Military Affairs,
which held hearings on the bill
last week.
THE ESTABLISHMENT of
the Commission is particularly
significant to the cause of So-
viet Jewry. The Helsinki ac-
cords provide for specific ac-
tions on the part of the signa-
tories of which the Soviet
Union is one with respect to
cooperation in the humanitari-
an fields, particularly in the
area of separation of families.
The purpose of the Commis-
sion would be to monitor and
report to the Congress the im-
plementation of the agreement
with the hope that continued
public scrutiny will encourage
greater compliance.
Washington
Federal
*? ?
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
ASSETS EXCEED $550 MILLION
NOW IN
CORAL GABLES
AT 520 BILTMORE WAY PHONE: 444-5071
CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU IN
MIAMI BEACH CORAL GABLES BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
NORTH MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD BOCA RATON
Arthur H. Counhon
Chtirmtn ot ihe Bolt) ______^^^^^
Jack O. Gordon
tail


Jewish
Characters
On Television

SEVERAL ATTEMPTS have been made to create television
series focusing on Jewish characters but they have gen-
2rally not reached even the **age of test runs, according to
sn expert on American commercial mass entertainment.
Dr. Howard Suber, president of the Society for Cinema
Studies, said the "considerable success" of the Goldbergs in
early television did not disprove his point since that series had
originated in radio and, like many other successful radio series,
had been transferred to television.
DR. SUBER, a member of the motion picture/television
faculty of the University of California at Los Angeles, offered
his analysis in an issue of Davka, the quarterly journal pub-
lished by the Los Angeles Hillel Council.
Dr. Suber contrasted the relative scarcity of Jewish char-
acters on commercial TV "With the clearly-established pop-
ularity of virtually every other ethnic group on television"
and suggested it was probably due to fears of Jewish execu-
tives in the mass entertainment field about becoming "too
visible" as Jews.
He declared that until the appearance of The Law, which
featured a Jewish lawyer, Judd Hirsch, and Bridget Loves
Bernie, Jewish characters had not been given starring roles
in American television series "and Bridget Loves Bernie was
only half Jewish." That program had been sharply criticized
by Jewish groups-
HE ASSERTED that Rung Fu had originally been created
is a Hasidic creature "who walked around spouting pseudo-
I'almudic aphorisms. When he was brought to life in the tele-
vision series starring David Carradine, however, he was changed
to a character who walks around spouting pseudo-Chinese
aphorisms."
Dr. Suber commented that the purported aphorisms "still
sounded Talmudic but evidently the producers were convinced
that Americans would identify more easily with a bald Oriental
than they would with a hairy Jew."
HE REPORTED that, more recently, Lee Rich, who pro-
duced The Waltons "and therefore might be expected to know
something about what would appeal to the mass American
audience, tried to put together a series entitled Enter Horowitz,
but was unsuccessful." He reported there had been other at-
tempts to feature Jewish characters in a television series, such
as Grandpa Max, "but they have so far failed."
He said Rhoda was "nominally Jewish," as played by Va-
lerie Harper, a gentile actress who "assures us that 'in my
heart, I'm Jewish'." Dr. Suber suggested that the fact that Miss
Harper is not Jewish "is seen by many in Hollywood as be-
ing a positive point, just as Gregory Peck's playing a Jew in
Gentlemen's Agreement was seen" by nervous Jewish producers
"as preferable to a Jewish actor portraying a Jew."
Dr. Suber stressed that while Jews "do indeed dominate
in many occupational categories in Hollywood, most notably
among executives, producers and writers," they are "virtually
absent" as Jewish characters in television.
HE CITED as evidence for his belief that the two situa-
tions were related the "metamorphosis" in the Jewishness of
Rhoda in the transition from supporting character to central
character.
He declared that when Rhoda Morgenstern was a support-
ing member on the Mary Tyler Moore Show, "her Jewishness
was clearly established, perhaps to balance the otherwise
WASPish cast of characters." But when she started her own
show, he Jewish aspect was diluted.
"While Rhoda's mother is still a first-class 'nudge', and
her sister is as good a 'yenta' as we're likely to get on televi-
sion, Rhoda's own Jewishness has been deliberately down-
played. She wasn't even permitted to have a nice Jewish wed-
ding."
HE NOTED that "there are a few other supporting Jewish
characters on television currently," listing "Fish" on Barney
Miller and "Juan Epstein" on Welcome Back Kotter, remark-
ing wryly about the latter that "half a Jew is better than none."
And that, he added, with a few minor exceptions, "pretty
nuch ends the list of Jewish chearacters on television."
Friday, May 21, 1976 +Jewlst> fkwkMaf) Page 10-A
?
One Central Body ?
No Way in Our Time
fkfob
ert
QUIXOTIC is the idea, but Rabbi Mordecai
* Waxman of Great Neck, N.Y., deserves a
high mark for still another effort. In his re-
cent Presidential address before the Rabbinical
Assembly, the rabbi called for "the creation of
a central, democratic, deliberative national
Jewish organization that can make definitive
policy for all of American Jewry."
In proposing his idea, Rabbi Waxman paid
passing tribute to the three organizations
which, in his judgment, have been making a
stab at his objective. The Big 3, in his book,
are the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations, the Syna-
gogue Council, and the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds.
MORE THAN 100 yea s ago, 17 Jewish lead-
ers of Paris had the same idea Rabbi Waxman
now tries to float anew. In creating the Al-
liance Israelite Univeraelle,. the determined
French Jews stirred into action by such out-
rages as the Damascus Affair and the Mor-
tara incident felt certain they were setting
up a representative Jewish body "which could
authoritatively speak in behalf of the Jewish
communities of all lands."
This was long before Hitler, long before
the emergence of Israel, and even earlier than
the murder of Czar Alexander II and the Drey-
fus Affair. The Alliance has been a factor for
considerable good, but who dares say now it
could or does speak for Jews everywhere?
HISTORY HAS favored us with a variety
of leaders desiring to bring all Jewish aspira-
tions, philosophical yearnings, dreams, plans,
md activities under one great tabernacle roof.
But always something went awry.
Maybe the trouble was that each Moses
iiad a different concept of leadership. And oh,
what despair over the idea of uniting. Louis
Marshall, American Jewish Committee pioneer,
is recorded, for example, as having once ut-
:ered this anxiety: "The very thought of the
nass of Jews in America having a voice in
the matter of deciding the welfare of the Jews
in the world makes me shrink in horror."
WELL, IT really hasn't been that much of
a nightmare
So we find our way back to Rabbi Wax-
man's new appeal; and it is instructive to
reexamine the purposes of the three national
organizations he cites:
1The Conference of Presidents of Major
\merican Jewish Organizations: With emphasis
abroad, this 21-year-old Conference aims "to
coordinate the activities of 32 major organ-
izations on the American scene as they relate
to American-Israeli affairs and problems af-
fecting Jews in other lands."
2Synagogue Council of America: This um-
brella group serves as spokesman for, and co-
ordinates, policies of national rabbinical and
lay synagogal organizations of Conservative,
Drthodox and Reform branches of American
Judaism. Again, valuable, but Jews beyond the
boundaries of synagogues are scarcely affected.
3Council of Jewish Federations and Wei-
Fare Funds: By now definitely looked upon as
the American Jewish Establishment, this ap-
paratus helps in fund raising, community or-
ganization, health and welfare planning, per-
sonnel recruitment, and public relations. It
brings into its ample fold 235 associated Jew-
ell Community organizations.
s,
HSCM
Vff
A Potpourri of Books
For Good Reading This Week
WtfE HAVE a potpourri this week. Raymond
A. Zwerin's "For One Another: Jewish
Drganizations That Help Us All" (Union of
American Hebrew Congregations and American
Association of Jewish Education, 175 pp.) is an
axcellent text for junior high schoolers to learn
about the important community agencies which
serve American Jewry.
The illustrated, sturdily-bound paperback
is full of charts and diagrams identifying many
tranches of each organization. For example,
Zwerin lists the 12 major national Jewish edu-
cational agencies with their services, publica-
tions and sponsorship.
ORGANIZATIONS such as Jewish Family
Service, Jewish Vocational Service and the JCC
are dealt with in individual chapters. The his-
tory of each, how it operates, and a sample
"case" study are offered. The author has pro-
'ided the reader with passages from Jewish
writings in both English and Hebrew which
relate to the work of each agency.
At the conclusion of each chapter are sug-
gestions for students of "things to think about
and do." In addition to its value as a classroom
text, this is a handy ready-reference tool for
all ages to familiarize themselves with the
structure and function of Jewish communal
service.
"SO WHAT Is a Mensch?" and "Family
Mystique" by Vivian T. Johnson (Vantage,
$3.95, 61 pp.) are two trite, corny stories about
Jewish families struggling to make it in Amer-
ica in the early part of this century. The
stories, boring with stilted dialogue, are un-
believably simplistic, a waste of time for chil-
dren as well as adults. The blurb on the back
cover in which Ms. Johnson describes herself
is pathetic and embarrassing. A poor sample of
'vanity press" publishing.
Elaine Larsen's "Israel" (Hastings House,
$4.95, 176 pp.) is a historical perspective of the
mportant cities and geographical areas of the
country. The orientation is basic.
In fact, it assumes so little knowledge of
Judaism and Jewish history, and includes such
a large number of passages from the New
Testament, that I would characterize this book
as a Christian presentation.
Historical landmarks of all religions are
mentioned. Larsen offers her historical infor-
mation clearly and accurately. She includes a
chapter on the economic importance of the
kibbutz, as well as its significance as a so-
ciological experiment. This is a well-written,
brief and informative introduction to the land
and people of Israel for our non-Jewish neigh-
bors.
New American Jewish History Was Recently Made at Valley Forge
AMERICAN-JEWISH history was made recently
near Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.
For the first time, a Jew was elected president
of the Military Chaplains Association.
AT ITS 51st annual gathering, the association,
comprising clergymen who serve or who have served
in uniform elevated Rabbi Simeon Kobrinetz to its
So. 1 spot.
A graduate of the Jewish Theological Seminary,
the rabbi is also the youngest man ever to head
the organization.
The association is truly ecumenical, comprising
ministers of all faiths also from all over the world
who have served in the U.S. as military ministers.
SEVERAL HUNDRED of the clergymen gave
Rabbi Kobrinetz a standing ovation at their convoca-
tion. The night he was installed was also the same
iKabbi
ver
night the association conferred its annual citizen-
ship Award on President Ford.
In his inaugural address, the new president called
for clergymen truly to proclaim freedom by speak-
ing out boldly on the moral issues of our day.
From 9 to 5, Rabbi Kobrinetz is on Uncle Sam's
payroll in a most important and lofty post: deputy
national chaplain of the Veterans Administration.
THE ELECTION of the first rabbi as head of
the Military Chaplains Association is like a Bicen-
tennial gift by the U.S. to the American Jewish
community.
Mazel tov, MCA. Mazel tov, Rabbi Kobrinetz.
* ti <&
Hurrah for Donald McGannon!
President of Westinghouse Broadcasting, the
largest cluster of non-network radio and TV outlets,
McGannon has surrendered about five million dol-
lars a year because he doesn't want to overcommer-
cialize his stations. He objects to 30-second com-
mercials.
More than that McGannon reduces to a mini-
mum programs that glorify vileness, viciousness and
vulgarity.
He blacks out smut. To him this is not censor-
ship but an act of obligation to serve the needs of
the community.


riday, May 21, 1976
* Jewish fhrktian
Page 11-A
,ets Stare Soviet Emigration in the Eye
JDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The Jewish Floridian of May
carries two news items, one
the large mass march down
fcth Avenue in New York City
to express their support for
he efforts of the Soviet Jews
emigrate to Israel," and
nother news item that "60 per-
ent of the Jews currently emi-
rating from the Soviet Union
not continue on to Israel
ter reaching Vienna."
To these 60 percent should
added the large number of
Russian Jews who leave Israel
ter reaching there. Eventual-
ly, most of them, supposedly
Btriving to emigrate to Israel,
[settle in the United States,
[much to the chagrin and em-
Ibarrassment of Israel, the Amer-
ican Jewish organizations and
[individuals, and non-Jewish
[Americans engaged in support
Jof Soviet Jews to emigrate to
[Israel.
ISN'T IT about time to re-
|view and reassess whether we
re justified in expending so
riuch of our energy, time, mon-
ey, and imposition on American
political leaders in behalf of a
lisappomting and embarrassing
venture?
As for th* Russian Jews sup-
osedly striving to emigrate to
Israel, their ancient homeland
as they profess publicly, but
[settling in the United States in-
stead, we must cease pampering
land glorifying them.
RICHTER
JEWELRY CO.
OVtil SO T(BS IN MIAMI
PURCHASERS OF
DIAMONDS FINE JEWELRY
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Oil
READERS
WRITE
"Let Tfcy Words Be Brief
Kohcleth (Ecclceieitet)
We should, within our great
tradition and heritage from the
time of Stuyvesant and New
Amsterdam, help the Russian
Jews who emigrate to the
United States, on the same lev-
el as we help other Jewish im-
migrants from other countries,
but no more.
WE SHOULD also remove
from the pedestal and degla-
morize the tens of thousands ot
Israelis in this country who,
lacking in loyalty and pioneer
spirit, have abandoned Israel
in its time of hardship and trou-
ble.
Wz must vigorously oppose
the self-appointed "friends" and
"saviors" of Soviet Jews who
engage in terrorism and vio-
lence against Soviet personnel,
these terrorists without a cause,
who bring so much harm to the
Jewish people, and even to the
Soviet Jews whom they profess
to want to help, and cause so
much embarrassment to our
government.
HARRY A. SIMON
Miami Beach
it it it
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Leo Mindlin's vicious attack
on lawyers in Congress, and the
legal profession in general, was
not only out of context with
anything he was trying to say
about Jimmy Carter's candi-
dacy, but he seemed to go way
out of his way to make the at-
tack.
I'd like to ask Mr. Mindlin tc
specify the laws that were writ-
ten by the lawyers in Congress
and the sections he finds of-
fensive. I would also request
that he name the lawyers who
wrote those sections.
AS TO his attack generally
on all lawyers in Congress, I
would name those whom I be-
lieve Mr. Mindlin voted for at
one time or other during his
career as a voting citizen, and
ask for a bill of particulars of
their offenses: Sen. Lawton
Chiles, Sen. Richard Stone, Con-
gressman Dante Fascell and
Congressman Claude Pepper.
Those four are lawyers, suc-
cessful lawyers before entering
Congress, and I would like to
have information (the duty of
the free press) on which to base
my judgment for future elec-
tions, and not onusupported
charges.
Until I hear, or read, a better
substantiation of charges against
them, my support for the four
lawyers in their political cam-
paigns will continue unabated.
ARTHUR ROTH
Miami
MR. MINDLIN REPLIES:
I don't know how in the
world Reader Roth knows
for whom have voted in
the past.
it it it
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In reference to Leo Mindlin's
article on why Jimmy Carter
seems to be way ahead (May 7
issue), I am not quite sure
where Mindlin stands on the
Carter candidacy.
Certainly, Mindlin makes a
good case for American nostal-
gia. The horror of the present
is too unbearable to contem-
plate, and these horrors are the
legacy to the American people
of all the Presidents from Fran-
klin Roosevelt onward.
I AM especially glad that
Mindlin did not flinch from in-
cluding John F. Kennedy in that
category.
The point is, yes of course,
the "good old days" are better
than what we've got to look
forward to in the future, unless
there is profound change in the
American political experience.
My question is whether Car-
ter can be trusted to effect that
change, for change is what we
need I cannot subscribe to
the belief that going back to the
"good old days" is the answer.
AND SO, just what does Min-
dlin believe about that? I'd like
to know, not to argue, but to be
enlightened.
In the end, someone has to
cast some light on Carter
certainly more than the light
that comes from his very win-
ning smile.
FREDERICK AXELROD
Miami-Dade Community
College South
it it *
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Mrs. E. M. Gotlieb's letter
in the Apr. 30 issue of The
Jewish Floridian requires a re-
sponse.
The item as quoted was in
error. President Standford is
error. President Stanford is
Trustees of the University of
Miami to provide either land
or financial support for a Cuban
Studies Center. When the state-
ment appeared in the press, the
local newspaper (The Miami
News) was apprised of this mis-
take in reporting.
MY MAIN comment, how-
ever, concerns her apparent un-
awareness of the development
of our program in Judaic
Studies. The University of Mi-
ami does have an academic pro-
gram in the College of Arts and
Sciences which leads to a paral-
lel major in Judaic Studies. This
program, officially approved by
the Board of Trustees, has been
in operation for over four years.
Courses are offered regularly,
and they are well-received. We
are also currently conducting
a thorough search for a perma-
nent director for the program,
and one should be appointed
shortly. I believe this is evi-
dence of "top level support"
for Judaic Studies at our insti-
tution.
MRS. GOTLIEB also listed
many well-known members of
the Jewish community who
have made gifts to the Univer-
sity of Miami. We are grateful
for these many contributions
without which the University
would never have become the
center of learning to which we
can all point with pride-
Now we have a specific "pro-
gram which deserves the sup-
port of Jewish philanthropists
within the South Florida area.
With comparable assistance, Ju-
daic Studies at the University
of Miami can attain national
recognition.
SIDNEY L. BESVTNICK
Acting Vice President
for Academic Affairs
University of Miami
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Page 12-A
+JewisklkxMk*n
Friday, May 21, 1976".
We're Making World Safe for Communism
Continued from Page 1-A
creasing signs that they respond
enthusiastically to the calls of
people like Daniel P. Moynihan
to proclaim the superiority of
our political values as the tradi-
tional defender of liberty
against the political culture of
Marxism.
THE COMMENTARY editor,
addressing a session of the
American Jewish Committee's
,0th anniversary annual meet-
ing being held at the Washing-
ton Hilton Hotel here, explain-
ed that in reaction to American
failure in the Vietnam War, the
liberal elite in this country de-
veloped doubts about the entire
role of the U.S. in world af-
fairs.
Thus, the liberals, who had
been the most vigorous expo-
nents of an interventionist anti-
Communist policy in the post-
World War II era and who led
the country into the Vietnam
War, became the exponents of
a foreign policy based not on
American opposition to Com-
munist power but on the idea
of a new world order of inter-
dependence and cooperation.
According to Podhoretz, this
idea is a wishful illusion, and
is belied by the Soviet military
build-up and by Soviet policy
in Africa and the Middle East.
THE CONSERVATIVE elite,
too, including Nixon, Ford, and
Kissinger, has opted, in the
aftermath of Vietnam, for a
phased American withdrawal,
in reality if not in rhetoric,
fr-n activist anti-fommu-
nist policy, and for a willing-
n.s to "do business with
Brezhnev."
The conservative view, as
expressed often in private by
Secretary Kissinger, is that the
United States no longer pos-
sesses the will to check Soviet
expansionism, and that we must
15,000 Marchers Protest Gush
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA)
More than 15,000 persons
marched through central Tel
Aviv in a vigorous but order-
ly demonstration against il-
legal settlements on the
West Bank by the Gush
Emunim.
The rally was organized
by Mapam and Moked in co-
operation with the Move-
ment for a Sane Policy.
THE DEMONSTRATION was
held on the eve of today's cru-
cial Cabinet meeting at which
the government debated the is-
sue of West Bank settlement
policy and the specific issue of
the Gush Emunim squatters who
have been encamped near the
Kadum army base in Samaria
since last November.
Truckloads of Mapam young-
sters began arriving in Tel Aviv
yesterday afternoon from kib-
butzim all over the country to
attend the rally. They brought
banners and placards denoun-
cing the Gush Emunim and
their leader, Rabbi Moshe Le-
vinger of Kiryat Arba near He-
bron.
The long list of speakers at
the rally was headed by the
two Mapam Cabinet members,
Health Minister Victor Shemtov
and Absorption Minister Shlo-
mo Rosen. Mapam Secretary
General Meir Talmi declared
"We are here to say no to Ka-
dum."
ARYE ELIAV, an independ-
ent Knesset member and for-
mer Labor Party Secretary Gen-
eral, scored the Gush for "hid-
ing behind the skirts of the
army" at Kadum and described
Levinger as a "high noon gun-
man" who was polarizing the
nation.
Levinger went on trial last
month for insulting Israel army
officers and interfering with the
performance of their duties on
the West Bank.
Prof. Yehoshua Arieli, an-
other prominent "dove," scored
last month's march by the Gush
Emunim and their followers
through the West Bank as de-
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JERUSALEM (JTA) An
Israel television program on the
country's nuclear potential was
cancelled only hours before it
was scheduled to appear. Yitz-
hak Livne, director general of
the Israel Broadcast Authority,
who ordered the cancellation,
denied that he did so on orders
"from above."
Livne said that television is
a powerful medium and he fear-
ed the program would trigger
a national debate on the issue.
BUT DAN Shilon, head of
the TV news department, said
there was nothing in the pro-
gram that had not been printed
earlier in the press.
The nuclear issue was to have
been part of a new documentary
series called '"A Second Look"
which deals with current Israeli
topics. Shimon Tesler, the pro-
gram's editor, said the subject
was chosen after former De-
fense Minister Moshe Dayan
urged Israel to adopt the nu-
clear option and the recent
articles in the world press
claiming Israel has atomic
bombs.
hberately provocative. "They
march when they know the
army is protecting them and
will come to the rescue if they
get in trouble. It is unthinkable
that this group should dictate
policy to the government,"
Arieli said. Shulamit Aloni, head
of the Civil Rights faction in
the Knesset, described the Gush
as "hooligans and fanatical
chauvinists."
The demonstrators marched
a short distance through streets
adjoining the municipal square.
The only incident was a brief
scuffle between some of the
marchers and nationalist Betar
youths who waved pro-Gush
slogans.
Overshadowing the Kadum is-
sue is the possibility of a crisis
that could bring down the Ra-
bin coalition whatever the Ca-
binet's decision is and possibly
destroy the Labor Party's align-
ment with Mapam.
Leaders of the National Reli-
gious Party which ardently sup-
ports the Gush met with Rabin
late last week and urged him
not to evacuate the Kadum
squatters against their will.
THEY WERE reportedly re-
minded by the Premier that the
government had never promised
that the Kadum settlement was
permanent and, in fact, always
stressed its temporary nature.
The NRP Executive met later
and adopted a resolution to use
all of its means to oppose the
evacuation of Kadum. This was
interpreted in political circles
as an ultimatum that the NRP
would quit the coalition govern-
ment if the Cabinet decision
went against the Gush.
At a subsequent meeting with
Rabin. Religious Affairs Minis-
ter Yitzhak Raphael denied that
the NRP Executive intended an
ultimatum. He said the resolu-
tion was only a guideline for
NRP ministers.
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therefore get out of the way
as gracefully as possible. The
logical implication of this view,
Podhoretz declared, is the
abandonment of the American
commitment to defend Western
Europe and Japan from Russian
power and a corresponding un-
willingness to confront Russian
advances in the Middle East.
Podhoretz said that the So-
viet Union would be the only
beneficiary of American with-
drawal from an anti-Communist
policy, for unlike the United
States, the USSR is in a pe-
riod of "active imperialist ex-
pansionism."
He cited the Soviets' con-
tinued pursuit both of military
superiority in strategic nuclear
weapons and in conventional
forces, including ships and
planes designed for offensive
purposes, and he also pointed
to their dispatch of Cuban
proxies to Angola.
THE RUSSIANS, he said,
"can be expected to go as far
as their own ideological and
imperial ambitions, and the ab-
sence of effective resistance,
will carry them and that
could well be to the ends of
the earth."
The Commentary editor
added that even the relative
independence of Communist
parties in countries like Italy
and France from Russian con-
trol, as well as the autonomy
of other Communist countries
like Yugoslavia and China,
would be threatened by an
American withdrawal.
He asserted that these nation-
al Communist movements them-
selves now acknowledge that
their ability to escape Soviet
domination has "all along been
a byproduct of the success of
American power in containing
the Soviet Union."
HOWEVER, Podhoretz took
issue with their proposal that
American power be used "to
save Communism from the Rus-
sians." For, he said, Commun-
ism has been a "curse" and has
destroyed the civil and political
liberty "of every people which
had had the misfortune to be
forced to live under it."
Nor, he said, has the record
of Communism been any bet-
ter in improving the material
condition of the countries it has
ruled or in wiping out inequal-
ities of condition. He expressed
skepticism that the Italian or
French Communists would do
any better if they ever came to
power.
Moreover, Podhoretz denied
that the United States itself
could survive as a democracy
in a world dominated by Com-
munism.
"A COMMUNIST culture
global in its dimensions
whether or not it was under the
control of Moscow would be
impossible to shut out entire-
ly. The Communist temptation
to subvert and undermine the
last remaining democratic so-
ciety would be irresistible, and
to combat such subversion
would require a degree of re-
pression which would itself en-
danger democratic freedoms."
Podhoretz asserted that the
United States still possessed
sufficient power to defend the
free world against the spread
of Communism if the will were
there. He suggested that the
isolationist attitude of the li-
beral and conservative elites
might not reflect the view of
most Americans; but until this
is determined in the national
political arena, the question of
"whether the new isolationism
is as pervasive among the
masses of Americans as it is
among the elites will have to
remain moot.
"If it should turn out that the
new isolationism has indeed
triumphed among the people,"
he concluded, "then the United
States will celebrate its two
hundredth birthday by betray-
ing the heritage of liberty which
has earned it the wonder and
envy of the world from the
moment of its founding to this,
and by helping to make that
world safe for the most deter-
mined and ferocious and bar-
barous enemies of liberty ever
to have appeared on the earth."
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V


I May 21, 1976
Jewisl)tkrkmcun
Page 13-A
Fidel at His Tricks Again Allon Blasts Kahane
Inued from Page 4-A
lion had lodged a com-
Kbout their activities. He
^mpathetic. But he said
0lld have to ask a few
questions: what organ-
or individuals were they
messages for? Who
lese messages intended
lat did the messages
Ch said he carried no
,es. But the conversation
him as a bit odd. The
as, for example, were
1 the same as those ask-
ftfie secret police in Rus-
je did some checking. He
the State Department. He
jrered that they had no Mr.
ider and that the Soviets
had lodged no complaint.
Apparently, the mysterious
Mr. Schneider was a KGB agent
here in the United States, as-
signed to gather information on
Soviet Jews. The FBI is now
investigating.
BRAZILIAN Torture: Grim
documents from Brazil, at the
risk of death, tell a gruesome
story of inhuman torture.
It happened on Apr. 1, the
12th anniversary of the coup
that brought the military dicta-
torship to power. To celebrate,
the Air Force brass in Recife
dragged four political prisoners
from their cells. Hoods were
tied over their heads. They
were thrown into a military ve-
hicle and delivered to the Air
Force police barracks.
There, they were put through
the most hideous torture. These
men were no threat to the gov-
ernment, just helpless prison-
ers who had already been lock-
ed up. Yet they were tortured
anyway, just for the amusement
of the brass.
WE HAVE reported repeat-
edly on the torture tactics in
Brazil. So what is the United
States doing about it? Not much.
Last February, Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger went to
Brazil and signed an agreement
with the military rulers.
It read, in part, that "No two
peoples in the world hold hu-
man dignity in higher regard
than the American and Brazil-
ian peoples."
But it seems that the Brazil-
ian regime has little regard for
human dignity.

[srael Pleads for EEC Role
[ MAURICE SAMUELSON
iNDON (JTA) A call
lithe European Commission
Ruman Rights to examine
Situation in Israel was made
by the chairman of the
lli branch of Amnesty Inter-
bal.
if. Yoram Dinstein, of Tel
University, said that the
^est contribution that the
PJ&pean community could
|e to peace in the Middle
would be to permit Israel's
Kssion to the European Con-
Htion on Human Rights.
KlNSTEIIS, an authority on
Irnational law, said the Euro-
Kn body was virtually the
r international institution
jse findings on allegations of
ure of political prisoners in
lei would be respected.
Addressing a luncheon sev-
tl days ago, attended by rep
entatives of Amnesty Inter-
ponal and other human rights
fanizations, Dinstein said that
_ had been hundreds of al-
tions of torture of prisoners
Israel but almost every case
I been proved to be unfound-
any of the cases involved
orist suspects who were de-
Jded by Mrs. Felicia Langer,
Ekember of the Control Com-
Btee of the pro-Moscow Ra-
ft Communist Party.
n DINSTEIN'S view, Mrs.
lander's constant readiness to
Dege torture of terrorist sus-
EKcts had become counter-pro-
Bctive. By crying "wolf," she
Hked being disregarded should
a genuine case occur, he said.
The Israeli branch of Am-
nesty International is not a
typical one because, unjike other
branches, it takes an interest
in alleged cases in its own coun-
try. Dinstein said that his
branch functioned partly as a
"conduit" for the international
secretariat of Amnesty, which
is based in London.
In the past, relations have not
always been smooth between
the organization and the Israel
government.
THE ISRAELI authorities had
been especially critical of Am-
nesty's publication of a com-
bined report on allegations of
torture by Israel and Syria after
the Yom Kippur War.
A senior Amnesty official at
the luncheon told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
organization had been wrong to
publish the report. Instead, it
should have simply submitted
its findings privately to the gov-
ernments of both countries.
The official also praised the
prompt and careful replies
which the organization receives
when it sends inquiries to the
Israeli Attorney General. Like
other branches of Amnesty, the
Israeli section has adopted
"Prisoners of Conscience" in
other countries. They include
people in South Africa, Bolivia,
Indonesia, East Germany and
Rumania.
IN A discussion about ter-
rorism, Dinstein said that the
perpetrators of the massacres
at Maalot and Kiryat Shemona
in 1974 should be tried under
a law based on the 1948 con-
vention on genocide.
Although he was not prepared
to give the Israel government
a "blank check" over allegations
of maltreatment of prisoners,
he stressed the sensitivity of
Israeli society to human rights.
In the United States, it had
taken two years for details of
the My Lai massacre in Viet-
nam to leak out. Then, only one
man was tried and was later
amnestied by the President,
Dinstein noted.
But when Israeli border
guards executed Arabs in the
border village of Kfar Kassem
in 1956, every person in the
unit responsible was apprehend-
ed, tried and sentenced within
weeks. The Major in charge was
sentenced to IS years.
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Threat of Soviets
JERUSALEM (JTA) Foreign Minister Yigal Al-
lon has sharply condemned Jewish Defense League leader
Meir Kahane's threats of violence against Soviet diplomats
in the U.S. and Europe. Kahane made the threats at a Tel
Aviv press conference when he spoke of "kidnapping and
possibly worse" against Soviet diplomats if the U.S. did not
take a tougher line on behalf of Soviet Jews. Kahane ap-
peared with Soviet immigrant activists Silva Zalmanson
and Alexander Tiemkin, who endorsed his threats.
IN HIS statement, Allon said such threats and action
were inadmissible in themselves and severely harmful for
the cause of Soviet Jewry.
"Israel and the Jewish people have campaigned and
will continue to campaign consistently for the release of
'Prisoners of Zion' in the USSR, for the cessation of harass-
ment of Zionist activists and for the free right of emigra-
tion for any Jews seeking it," Allon declared.
He warned that Kahane's threats would both preju-
dice that campaign and alienate from it the various non-
Jewish bodies that had become involved in the struggles
of Soviet Jewry.
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i


Page 14-A
vjewisii tkj* Friday, May 21, 1976
UGAl NOTICE
UM1N0TICI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-15549
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION
FOR
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RK: THE MATTER OF
ADOPTION BY:
FRANK GONZALEZ
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: LAZARO RICARDO HERRERA
OLIVA
AVBNIDA LAS I'M,MAS 11401
entre BELLAVISTA y PRINCI-
PAL
REPARTO DIEZMERO
QUANABACOA 10
HABANA. CUBA
UGAL IfWIICl
Uf Al MOTKI
ECAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2602
Divieion 33
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX BRODIE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3082
Divieion JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IK ZACK. a/k/a
ISAAC ZACK
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CI^AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOuf NAME"tAW
NOTFICB ,0HERBHYEGIVBN that NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring to enrue ,ne undersigned, desiring to engage
nebuUs?nosrs"nndder Ihc'ffcUtloUnaEe gl gj-Uje-s under he "ctitiousname
AveMAM"Snfl'SF,SaH?3^7?nfnd1s^Te^ iHP^ ^lJ^A^jH
SLr' M^n 1 w k. n,k !fZ Florida Intends to register said name
18ZJ&L"a,T, Si?. ft^9r*-Lar w'th the Clerk of the. Circuit Court
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
LASIRA. CORP.
a Fla. Corp.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED IN THE ESTATE
,ha' 'he administration of the estate yOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
v..J ?.. dec,ased- *B 'hat 'he administration of the estate
Number 76-2602. Is pending In the of IK ZACK. a/k/a ISAAC ZACK.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
of Dade County. Florida.
RICHARD KULLA
. ,. SANFOBD H. KRAMER. PA.
5/7-14-21-28 Attorney for Richard Kulla
______________4/30 5/7-14-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage the undersigned, desiring to engage In
s of pending in the Circuit Court "for Dade '", toStpmm fmnSmSi "ftS? business under the fictitious name of
e. 73 County. Florida. Probate Division, the S?-HSafflftSL^SHS HF ^P?.,?' 1401.SW \Bt Street' Ml"
>rida address of which Is 73 West Flagler ?!,,. i1 Terrace. Miami. Fla.. ami 33135 Intend to register said name
on Petitioner's Attorney. Marcelo M.
Agudo. 1647 8.W. 27th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida 33146. and file the orig-
in, il with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before June 25.
1976. otherwise a default will be en-
GLORIA M. GARCIA
6/21-28
6/4-11
J. LAZAGA
4/30
6/7-14-11
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor- deceased, File Number 76-3082.
Ida, Probate Division, the address
which Is Dade County Courthouse. ..
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED West Flagler Street. Miami. Florida address of which is 73 West Flagler S2.1V.
that an action for Petition for Adop- 33130. The personal representatives of St.. Miami Florida The personal ren. .I4 ,'ntends ,0 register said name with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
tion has been fled against you and the estate are Gertrude Samuels and resentatlve of the estate Is hvmin 5'l,h ,ne CIerk tne Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida,
you are required to serve a copy of Hen Samuels, whose address Is 4634 VOOEL whose address Is 4141 Nau- Dade cunty. Florida. RAUL OLIVA
your written defenses. If any. to it Alton Road. Miami Beach. Florida, tllus Drive Miami Reach Florida """"' "
The name and address of the personal 33140. Th, na^td .dd^Tfh,
representative s attorney are set forth personal representative's attorney are
be'1w- set forth below.
All persons having claims or de- All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re- mands arnlnst the ,.^t., t,. Qr
lefault will be en- quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS quired. WITHIN '
tered against you for the relief de- FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST FROM THP n'
manded In the complaint or petition. PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to PUBLICATION
This notice shall be published once file with the clerk of the above court file with the aim
fnCTHB'jfwmh" Pm,llNWMh! Ur',r.K8,a,emenL f nJf ci.alm or written statement of tnV7lalmUor Sl'/T'^'^h Al^r ld n.me with the"Stork of 7h"e ClrcuU CourtTf D^de
demand they may have. Each claim demand they may have. Each claim J,ne C, ?' .,he Clrcult Court f Dade County. Florida.
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
WITNESS my hand and the seal of must be In writing and miTtIndlea e must be n wrUIng and must indicate
^/^".kV ,5?.l""!i' Da,dS. Coli^' thA basl8 ,or ,he clalm- FlorldH on M.J. 14th Dany of May. 1976. address of the creditor or hi. agent or address of the cJedlloT oFhl ".?"?
attorney and the amount claimed. If attorney, and the amount claimed. If
whn i. m,n "k y'} due. ,, date lhe cla,m ls not vet due. the date
aben'twlll become due shall be stat- when It will become due shall be stat-
i'in.,irt.rrt C.h contln*e.nt or un- ed. If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer- liquidated, the nature of it... ..,.,_
RICHARD P BRINKER'
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
BY: B. LIPP8
as Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Marcelo M. Agudo
AC I DO. ANTON & PINEIRO
Attorneys for Petitioner
1647 SW. 27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145
5/21-28
5/21-28 6/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that MAHFUZ AHMED.
Petitioner/Husband.
RAUL R. OLTVA
_________________4/30 5/7-14-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 76-13677
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
_ uncer- liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
i .?.,V,i ."J1 8,aIed' J'.."e cJa,m '' ,ain,y 8ha" be atated- 'he claim Is
secured, the security shall be descrlb- secured, the security shall be descrlb- .
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffl- ed. The claimant shall deliver suffl- .. undersigned, desiring to engage
clent copies of the claim to the clerk dent copies o
to enable the clerk to mail one copy to enable the
to each personal representative. to each persona.
6/4-11 All persons Interested in the estate All persons Interested in the estate lo reS's'er 8a'd name with the Clerk TO: AeNTP,I.NEJTK pETERS AHMED
- lo whom a copy of this Notice of Ad- to whom a copy of tMs .Clce of Ad! 'the Circuit Court of Dade County. 569 Hi! -Street
of"the claim to the clerk '" buln" """" the fictitious name
,e cferk to maM one copy C',. OP'CAI' lNJ,ER!S? at 4340
lonal representative. J" W V'.Aven"f- Miami. Fla.. Intends
and
ANTOINETTE PETERS AHMED.
Respondent / Wife.
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
CAPITOL FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
UIAN ASSOCIATIN OF DENVER,
a Colorado Hanking Institution.
Plaintiff.
vs.
JUAN A CHAVEZ and VBRA C.
CHAVEZ, and HANK OK MIAMI, a
Florida Hanking Corporation.
i lefendanta.
TO: JUAN A. CHAVEZ anil
VERA C, CHAVEZ
Republic of Panama
1TOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to for., |oae I Mortgage on the follow- CYPEN & NEVTNS
nig real property, lying, being and 816 Arthur Godfrey Road
situate in Dade Countv. Florida, and
more particularly described as follows:
"Lot 13, Block 1. MONIQUE SUB-
DIVISION, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 98.
at Page 43. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Fla."
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
nt's wHl ^h.VB "m ,f, ,h de.CKe" challenges the validity of the dacS-
!?i,n^ rL.Ua."flca,lonu of ,nc den,'s will, the qualifications of the
oTThx luXn f.n,?hLVe'?r. ,he Venue P-rsona" representative, or the venue
A^ff/M tStfBSfe> AND VL.r'8",Ct'0n f 'he CUrt
Florida.
MARSH INDUSTRIES. INC.
a Fla. Corp.
DAVID R. WEISSMAN
Attorney for applicant
5/21-28
Des Plalnes. Illinois 60016
YOU. ANTOINETTE PETERS AH-
MED, are hereby notified to file vour
defensive pleadings to this suit for
dissolution of marriage with the Clerk
fi/4 11 "' *he Court, and serve a coov on the
_' _* Petitioner's Attorney. DAVID P.
DITTMAR. of the law firm of MILL-
ER AND RUSSELL. 1408 Alnslev
GBRTRCDESAMUELS
HKN. SAMUELS
As Personal Representatives of the
Estate of Max Brodie
l leceaaed
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
HKURESENTATIVES:
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICT: IS HEREBY GIVEN that "u'l'Ung. Miami. Florida 33132. on or
gage ,,ef"re the 11th day of June. 1976. or
ame H default will be entered against vou.'
Ok7 DATED: April 29. 1976.
ntends RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk As Clerk of 'he Circuit Court
Miami Reach. Florida 3.1140
Telephone: 532-4721
5/21-28
HYMAN VOOEL
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of IK ZACK. a/k/a
ISAAC ZACK. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HOWARD N. GALBUT. ESQUIRE
GAI.IIUT & GALBUT
"-1 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida Mill
Telephone: 672-3100
5/21-28
'.'!. thf Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida.
Food Service Consultants, Inc.
By WILLIAM J. GOLDWORN.
Secretary
William J. Goldworn. Esquire
Attorney for Food Service
Consultants. Inc.
4/30 5/7-14-21
Bv M. J. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
"/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2667
Division FRANK B. DOWLING
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTHONY DOBRANSKY. a/k/a
NOTICE UNDER
, FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TONY DOBRANSKY.
the undersigned, desiring to engage Deceased
In business under the fictitious name __ .NOTICE TO CREDITORS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
copy of your written defenses. If any, the undersigned, desiring
to it on CARLOS MUSKY. ESQUIRE, business under the flctit._
whose address is 2121 Ponce de Leon "OTHAM HOTEL A APARTMENTS -..-"- =-
Blvd.. Suite 420. Coral Gables, Flor- at 702 13 Street. Miami. Beach Fla. ',no,,ee, Rad. Hlaleah. Florida intends
Ida 33134 (Phone number:305-442-8624). intends to register said name with the ,' $ff?r """L name with the Clerk
on or before the 25th day of June clerl ot the Circuit Court of Dade ,S clrcu" Court of Dade County.
1976. and file the original with the County. Florida.
of PRUDENTIAL INVESTMENT TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLUB at 6039 Collins Ave., No 1203 OLA IMS OR DEMANDS AGA IN
MB Fla. intend to register said name THE ABOVE ESTATE:
Iring io engage ?n 'hK undersigned, desiring to engage w,1,b 'he Clerk of 'he Circuit Court ,w''h'n three months f.
fictitious name of "1 b"8'ness under the fictitious name "' Dad ^""nty. Florida. of the first publication o
ft APARTMENT^ "i SHBTS PRIDE at 455 E Okie- CHRISTINE B. STONE Vu are required to file w
Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 14th day of May. 1976.
at Miami. Dade County. Florida.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 442-8624
5/21-28
WENGERS REALTY CORP.
_ a Fla. Corn.
BY: SELIG WBNGER. PRESIDENT
4/SO 5/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2*43
Division NESBITT. J.
IN RE: E8TATE OF
WILLIAM 8TALLMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
JO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
6/4-11 IS.K ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
. OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE
Florida.
Food Service Consultants. Inc.
By: WILLIAM J. GOLDWORN
....... Secretary
V\ llllam J. Goldworn. Esquire
Attorney for Food Service
Consultants. Inc.
4/30 6/1-14-21
IDA MILLER
WILLIAM R. STEINBERG
ROBERT A. BOLEN
HARRY BERKLEY
5/21-28 6/4-11
from the time
f this notice
with the clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida. Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida, a written statement
of any claim or demand vou mav have
against the estate of ANTHONY DO-
BRANSKY a/k/a TONY DOBRANS-
KY. deceased.
Each claim must be in writing and
,NItt5 CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 71-1S4S
Division 32
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY MUENZER
Deceased
a^WgWSjBC ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage must Indicate the basis for the claim
r wcwftJBft?iJhe ,lc""oa name 'he name and address of the creditor
of AMS COMPANY at 2490 N.W. 7th or his agent or attorney, and the
Avenue, Miami. Fl. 33127 intend to a">ount claimed. If the claim Is not
register said name with the Clerk of vet due. the date when it will become
the Circuit Court of Dade County. due shall be stated. If the claim la
Florida. .w^D contingent or unliquidated, the nature
MrRpiMAM/?R. MOKRJS K I.ASS the claim Is secured, the security shall
________________ S/21-28 6/4-11 be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copie* of the claim to
*RE HEREBY NOTIFIED ^fj^S^iJK
5 e. adm'nltratlon of the estate OTHER^PERSONSlINmMTOn
m. ^,;LLLAM^SLAIjUMAN- deceased. IN THE ESTATE- INTERESTED
BBS*** imE&P^- ?P5S ""iSSS
^r.2?JjLCE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
LEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76.155*1
DISSOLUTION
KTiLHJ: a^LS**** &?SS**rwiS!'. %Z*i*k"A?TA2of
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH
FLOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-15148
yffumtih s^s^iM-t sisss *=
aV Pern.y CM^^SbVT^. ""S' Hlffi Be.BC.h' ?I^M TO; S*" DI SJMONE
jfit ^iC^RFE'VJNTE *^S&'a*R
TOMAS D. CEDRE
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ADA B. CEDRE.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ADA B. CEDRE
919 Casino Center Boulevard
Las Vegas. Nevada
ikT. ASE "BREBY NOTIFIED "..., i,
that an action for Dissolution of Mar- 'he undersigned d
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal representa-
tive.
cAhV,*^*11*8 AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Dated April 19. 1976
MARY PULCINI
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of ANTHONY DOBRANSKY
a/k/a TONY DOBRANSKY Deceased
Michael A. Bienstock
Attorney
?nHAP,RO/ y0HI*;D- WE"- SCHEER
407 Lincoln Road Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-6361
5/14-21
r, NOTICE UNDBR
x. vJiLCTIT|OUS NAME LAW
2JJ58L!" HEREBY GIVEN that
gage
name
IOUES at
Locka.
said
Circuit
BE FOREVER BARRED
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
5/21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Notice of Administration: May 14
the undersigned, desiring to engage I76.
"1 H"ineM under the fictitious name BERTHA STALLMAN
5" ART IN AMERICA at 736 Arthur As Personal Representative of the
Godfrey Road. Miami Beach. Fla. In- Estate of William Stallman
tends to register said name with the Deceased
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
Countv. Florida. REPRESENTATIVE:
OLD A MODERN MASTERS. INC.
SrMt'^^ '"'en*, to
th? Cir,r.a ,name "iln 'he Clerk of
Florida CUr' of Dade County,
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND Telephone: 358-1515
Sate ofThe^rs^ub^atlon of this ^SKRt
a Fla. Corp. .
ERWIN STERN. PRESIDENT
NORMAN CIMENT
Attorney for applicant
4/30 5/7-14-21
HENRY M. WATTZKIN
740 71st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: 865-0358
f./14-ll
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
|?r Administration: May 14.
FLORENCE MUENZER
As Personal Representative of the
SJi?.,^.?iJePry Muenaer. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
R EPRESENTATIVE:
STEINBERG A NEUSTEIN
By: Paul B. Stelnber*
350 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33181
Telephone: 618-2144
6/14-21
Attorney for Petitioner
5/21-28
TOMAS DATORRE. JR
TOMAS DATORRE. SR
f/14-21-28
6/4
6/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OfvJK
,.'M'rlys,IS HEREBY GIVEN ths. D. MElA1' MAN at 3545 NW
he undersigned, desiring to enai"i ,Rlver Drive. Miami. Florida I
In business under the two foltowtS ll r*laAer **id name wth the
MSSIUM 'ii ^rT 1 ZA"" Cour, of DadC
^>S!ri.tP-,-h.BffiS o1? *8? r*f >'5S?Wft & Iden,
cult Court of Dade Countv Florid "ERALD SILVERMAN Fr*"lden
ACCOLADES PABHIONS INc"" ^0%^ tfo'1PMfnt
a Fla. Corp. Hj R?bf,r'" Building
B/7-14-2I-28 ""' Florlda HIM
5/14-21-28
-..NOTICE UNDER
v.,.Ji,CT,T,ous NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
he undersigned, desiring; to enaaa^
m business under the flctitloii. ^5iP
of METAL MAN a. ZuTnT No'rth
Intends
t Clerk
County.
Surplus Sales. Inc.
6/4


I May 21, 1976
9-Jenisii HcrkMan)
Page 15-A
Study Shows Half-Mooners Are Jewish
Co
inued from Page 1-A
ingly persuasive?
,'s theology, "The Divine
le," is a Manichcan pic-
good and evil, God and
n conflict over the fate
| world. He dates Satan's
iction of sin into the
toom the time of Eve's
[sexual intercourse with
ni Moon teaches that
led in his mission be-
e was crucified before
g children. The indirect
on is that Moon, who
ried and has children,
that successful unifier,
iah for our times.
m and his followers see
movement as especially
riate to our modern age
s communication and jet
avel. Moon is the global
h of the 747 and the post-
vice. His followers told me
^fce has succeeded in updat-
Christian teachings to ah
the technical advance of
nankind since the time of
Jhrist; the Unification Church
regularlv sponsors scientific
jperciices and supports its
scientific organizations.
Church seems to appeal
to young people who
Alienated and isolated from
social environment.
BE CHURCH offers them a
community where they get
shelter, a 24-hour-a-day
ion in W?e, and perhaps
importantly, uncritical
Hjnth and positive reinforce-
ment as long as they uncritical-
ly follow the rules of the move-
ment.
The "Moonchildren" I met
were a microcosm of modern
American middle class youth in
psychic disarray. Included
among them were ex-college
radicals, occasional drug users,
self-taught students of philos-
ophy and literature, direction-
less "perpetual students," and
even a few veterans of Jewish
youth groups. Receptive to the
lure of an all-engrossing pana-
cea, they are willing fodder for
the Church of the Rev. Moon.
The Unification Church has
met its share of criticism. It is
accused of manipulating and
abusing the fragile egos of its
followers. Moon's links to the
right-wing government of his
native South Korea have been
reported in the press, as has
the baronial splendor in which
he lives in Tarrytown, N.Y.
NOR HAVE his critics ignor-
ed the fact that the financial
success of the Church in Amer-
ica is based largely on its tax
exempt real estate and business
holdings, and on the surplus
value extracted from unpaid (if
cheerfully given) Moonie labor.
To simply indict Moon, how-
ever, is n him as an oriental Elmer Gan-
try ignores the central issue of
his attractior to young people,
and in particular, young Jews.
Groups like CERF (Citizens En-
gaged in Reuniting Families)
appear to spend more energy
Dinitz in Defense
Of Settlements
settk
east
Continued from Page 1-A
from 1948 to 1967 there
no Israeli settlements on
[West Bank and the Golan
its, but the Arabs refused
jke peace. He said the only
laments that hampered Mid-
peace were those in the
minds of Arabs who continue to
refuse to accept the legitimacy
' of the State of Israel.
Dinitz said he could also not
accept the argument that even
. if these territories were return-
ed to Syria and Jordan in a
peace settlement Jews could not
live there as Arabs live in Is-
rael.
FINALLY, he pointed out
that Israel in 1947 agreed to the
partition of Palestine and was
ban willing to give up even a
I such as Nahariya in re-
tarn for what it thought would
be peace.
Hpnitz's remarks regarding
fafa critics of Israeli policies
when Berkowitx, noting
100 proeainent American
NPOtU
in Tel Aviv
settlements on the
Bank, asked whether
American Jews should criticize
_sl publicly or be silent as
a price for not living there.
The Israeli envoy said that in
his first meetings with an Amer-
Btfery once in a while
Famous Restaurant
f is born...We were
born in 1945
Com* rnoy our MSMSfSSSSJ
lamoui cumnt
71 WASHINGTON AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH 531-3947
ican Jewish organization after
taking up his post three years
ago, he told the group, the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
that "I am for an open dialogue"
between American Jews and Is-
rael.
HE SAID there are numerous
channels that are used but said
the public media should not be
since it provides ammunition to
Israel's enemies. Dinitz said
that he looked over the list of
100 signers and every one has
a channel to voice his criticism
to Israelis, including Premier
Yitzhak Rabin.
However, Dinitz said, while
Israel will continue to have a
free exchange of views with
American Jews, "when it comes
to decisions that affect the life
and security of Israel" such as
the final borders, "only the peo-
ple of Israel can make the final
decision" because St is their
lives that are at stake.
"We are entitled to our own
big decisions and our own small
mistakes." he said. He invited
those who want to publicly crit-
icise Israel to make aUya and .
then argue for their policies
through die Israeli political
process.
ASKED ABOUT Spiro Ag-
new's attack on "Zionist influ-
ences in the U.S." and Amer-
ican media Dinitz replied that
"I will not open a dialogue with
a former vice president of the
United States." However, he
said remarks such as Agnew
made are typical of anti-Semites
going back to the "Protocols of
the Elders of Zion."
Dinitz added, "1 don't think
we should he over-sensitive" to
such bigoted remarks. "The rec-
ord of Israel and of American
Jews is so splendid that we can
walk with our heads high and
look down at these things."
He also stressed that he did
not believe that Agnew's views
were shared by the majority of
the American people.
documenting the South Korean's
chicanery and deceit, than in
seriously analyzing the short-
comings of the environment
Jewish, or otherwise in which
the Moon children grew up.
The Moonies with whom I
spokx were anxious to convince
me that they had not turned
their backs on the; Judaism of
their families and still had high
regard for its tenets. One de-
scribed a very warm, rich, satis-
fying observant Reform Jewish
upbringing, but said she event-
ually joined the Unification
Church because her family's
Judaism had supplied only in-
tellectual stimulation.
THE EMOTIONAL underpin-
nings were missing, she claimed,
as was the intimate connection
of historical events, and every-
day life, to God's will. Another
lamented that the religious in-
tensity of Jewish life is restrict-
ed to the synagogue and special
family-oriented occasions; it
doesn't inspirit all of one's daily
life; they find this 24-hour-a-
day involvement in the Unifica-
tion Church.
The Jewish Moonies also re-
ject what they see as a paro-
chialism, a narrow self-preoccu-
pation in the Jewish commu-
nity. "Jews are for Jews only,"
said one.
"We must solve the world's
problems in a coordinate way.
We are internationalists. If you
have a fire on a ship, you don't
put out the blaze in your own
berth first. You get to the source
of the fire itself, or the whole
ship will burn."
THE MOONIES were exuber-
ant in their efforts to link their
new faith to Old Testament pre-
cedents. One Israeli-born be-
liever called the Rev. Moon "a
successor to the early Prophets
of Israel," an attractive analogy
considering how the Prophets
of Old were often scorned in
their own times.
The Jewish Moonies maintain
that within their newly adopted
internationalist belief, they re-
main good Jews. Thev claim to
be faithful to the principles of
their families, and strongly con-
vinced that the basic truths of
the universe were present in the
Judaism they previously prac-
ticed. The Unification Church,
however, in sharp contrast to
Judaism, according to the
Moonies, is a religion of "ac-
tion" as opposed to a "contem-
plathve" faith. While modern
Judaism only speculates, they
claim, the Unification Church
achieves; they fight for social
justice by peddling flowers and
candy, and sponsoring confer-
ences on scientific progress.
When the Church eventually
succeeds in bringing all peoples
together under the "Divine Prin-
ciple," says one Moonie, "Ju-
daism will not be lost. It has
given us values that are eternal
I don't fear they'll be lost
They're implanted deep within
my heart"
recruits to forget any doubts or
reservations about the "Divine
Principle" they still had. An-
other ex-Moonie, Peter, who
had studied psychology and
group dynamics as an under-
graduate, described how effec-
tively the Church's conversion
process worked: Initiates at the
Mendocino, California, farm for
their first weekend were told to
come equipped with only a
sleeping bag.
FORBIDDEN to bring money,
they became immediately de-
pendent on the Church, at least
for two days. If newcomers ar-
rived in groups or pairs, they
were separated and immediate-
ly surrounded by veteran
Moonies for the rest of the
weekend. Peter, raised in an af-
fluent Jewish community on
Long Island, found himself sur-
rounded by empathetic and en-
thusiastic Jewish Moonies from
the east, during his first week-
end at Mendocino.
Never had love been lavish-
ed so wholeheartedly on him
as on that weekend. Peter re-
members being somewhat dis-
turbed that his questions and
reservations were consistently
brushed aside but initially he
was able to rationalize them
away. Ultimately he became a
gifted "witness," or streetcorn-
er proselyte, and trained in psy-
chology, he was proficient in
spotting the disaffected revolu-
tionary, the bored student, the
broken home victim, the East-
ern Religions freak.
He promised each that the
Unification Church had just
what he or she needed. Scores
of young people he successfully
brought into the Church, many
of them Jewish, remain in it to
this day, six months after Peter
himself abandoned it.
HIS QUESTIONS and doubts
about the movement slowly mul-
tiplied. The lack of tolerance
for dissent troubled him, as did
Moon's right-wing political line.
(Peter, previously involved in
leftist activities, was amazed at
the number of ex-radicals he
encountered in the super-
patriotic Church.)
In several instances Peter
witnessed newcomers breaking
down under the emotional stress
of the initial conversion process.
The leaders were rarely sym-
pathetic. On at least two occa-
sions initiates who "freaked out"
during a weekend in Mendocino
were forced to leave the camp
in the middle of the night and
left to hitchhike home.
Karen, another Moon drop-
out, expressed her concern for
the fate of the thousands of
thoroughly programmed follow-
ers of Moon after the Church
folds, as she predicts it will in
the near future.
SHE ANTICIPATES severe
psychological strain for thou-
sands of obedient Moon follow-
ers who will no longer have his
24-hour-a-day prescription for
living. "I was living in a dream
world," she says. "It was hard
enough for me to come out of
it OK with all the support I've
had.
"Imagine the shock for so
many thousands of others after
the bubble finally bursts."
A number of community and
religious groups established to
fight the influence of religious
cults have emphasized the role
of a "de-programmer" to break
the magical, hypnotic grip of
the cult leaders. Several such
de-programmers have emerged
and achieved a degree of noto-
riety. Karen is skeptical of their
efforts: "I just can't go along
with those violent de-program-
ming methods," she says. It's
like doing the same thing. First
Moon steals your mind, and
brainwashes you, and then your
parents hire someone to brain-
wash you back :o their own
values."
AND KAREN still finds her
parents' middle class values, and
Judaism included, inadequate.
Unlike the enthusiasts led as-
tray by the promises of Sab-
batai Sevi and other charismatic
charlatans, Karen and her fel-
low ex-Moonies do not feel they
have much to come home to.
"I'm Jewish," says Peter,
quoting Woody Allen, "but with
an explanation." Judaism still
implies to many of them an
overly cushioned nouveau riche
existence. We cannot blame this
on Rev. Moon. It is our own
doing and our responsibility to
repair.
Claude Levy Dead at 48
GENEVA (JTA) Claude Levy, director of organ-
ization at the Secretariat-General of the World Jewish Con-
gress in Geneva, died of a heart attack on Saturday. Levy,
who was 48 years old, served as special assistant to the
WJC Secretary General and last year was named director
of organization and member of the WJC General Council.
Levy represented the WJC at the United Nations in.
Geneva and at numerous international conferences.
ducted with Jewish Moonies
were arranged through the pub-
licity office of the Unification
Church. I found most of these
selected interviewees articulate,
speaking their convictions in
very personal and undogmatic
terms. I was therefore not a
little bemused when I heard
random Moonies proselytizing
in front of New York City's
42nd Street Library telling the
same stories often in the very
I i ipoke
na^d interviews.
in com
credulous per..pecti\e of the
Moonies was the more jaundiced
point ol view of the Jewish ex-
Moonies. One described her
experience in these terms: |
"From the time I got in until
the time I got out they kept me,
busy every waking moment. I
never had a second to myself."
The ceaseless activity was
orchestrated to allow the new
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j
Page 16-A
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Friday, May 21, 1976
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At


Jewish Floridian
SCA Honoring Rosenhaus
At Celebration in Newport
Miami, Florida Friday, May 21, 1976
!
s
B'nai B'rith Lodge No. 1591
Presenting Patriotic Rally
Presented by the Miami
Beach B'nai B'rith Lodge No.
1591 and sponsored by Chase
Federal Savings, the 21st an-
nual Patriotic Rally will be held
at the Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts on Thursday, May 27,
at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free
to the event, at which Congress-
man and former Senator Claude
Pepper will be honored and en-
tertainment will be provided by
the 23 members U.S. Marine
Drum and Bugle Corps directed
by Allan Emerman, a former
North Miami Beach resident.
Peter Fuchs will present a
selection from "Hooray for
U S A." and the Homestead Air
Force Base and U.S. Marine
color guards, directed by Col.
Maurice Weinman, JWV nation-
al executive committeeman, will
present the colors.
The national anthem will be
sung by Judge Milton A. Fried-
man, and Col. Philip Cohen,
B'nai B'rith Southern Regional
director, will lead the pledge of
allegiance. The Rev. Garth R.
Thompson will offer the invo-
cation. Rabbi Dr. David Raab
the benediction at the program's
close.
INCLUDED in the program are
Miami Beach Mayor Harold
Rosen, Congressmen William
Lehman and Dante Fascell,
Lodge president Tom Schwartz
and Chase Federal president
Harry Schellhammer. Cantor
Eleazer Bernstein will narrate
the Gettysburg address to mu-
JTS Honoring
The Winstens
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Winsten
of Surfside will be among those
honored in New York at the
dedication of the Mathilde
Schechter Residence Hall of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America at 2:30 p.m., Sunday,
May 23.
They will receive a plaque
from seminary chancellor Ger-
son D. Cohen in appreciation of
the furnishings they have de-
dicated to the residence hall,
the seminary's first residence
for non-rabbinical students. The
hall was made possible by the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism.
U.S. Congressman Bella Ab-
zug, a former JTS student, will
address the guests, as will Chan-
cellor Cohen.
sic and a talk on B'nai B'rith
will be given by Malcolm From-
berg.
Samuel Pascoe is rally com-
mittee chairman, assisted by
Tom Schwartz, Robert Skidell,
Lawrence Shuman, Moe Reiffen,
Gershon Miller and Kewe Kes-
ler. Usherettes, from Chai Chap-
ter of B'nai B'rith Women, are
under the supervision of Flora
Sinick.
Barry Gurland, president,
Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith Lodges; Lou Hym-
son, president of the South Flor-
ida Council; Fred Snyder, presi-
dent-elect, Florida State Asso-
ciation; George Kotin, ADL
Council chairman; and Leonard
A. Baker, executive vice presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce, all will attend.
More than 60 Lodges and 37
Women's chapters are cooperat-
ing with the Miami Beach Lodge
in planning the rally.
Sisterhood
Honors Mothers
Sisterhood Temple Beth Ra-
phael was to honor all mothers
at their meeting Thursday eve-
ning at the temple, with presi-
dent Faye Brucker presiding.
Mrs. Mary Gerstman and Mrs.
Helen Schwanenfeld were to be
specially honored as Mothers of
the Year.
Melodies Three, featuring
Sadye Padden, Isabelle Heller
and Jan Rosenberg furnished
the entertainment.
Rabbi Landau Officiating
At JWV Services
Rabbi Sol Landau of Beth
David Congregation will offi-
ciate at Memorial Day services
in Kendall Park on Monday,
May 31, at 11 a.m. sponsored
by JWV South Dade Post and
Auxiliary No. 778.
According to Post Comman-
der Arnold I. Novins and Aux-
iliary president Evelyn Clein,
the services will be held at a
memorial stone honoring those
who have served in the nation s
armed forces.
Section B
Veterans Plan
Memorial Day
Services in Dade
Jewish War Veterans South
Dade Post and Auxiliary No. 778
will hold a Memorial Day serv-
ice on Monday, May 31, at 11
a.m. at Kendall Park, where
they have erected a monument
to the memory and in honor of
those who served in the armed
forces. The first such monu-
ment to be built in a Dade Coun-
ty park, it will be offically de-
dicated later this year. Evelyn
Clein, Auxiliary president, and
Alvin Novins, post commapder,
are in charge of arrangements.
The Department of Florida
plans services for Sunday, May
30, at Mt. Nebo Cemetery at
11 a.m. Abe Eiserman, depart-
ment chaplain, is in charge of
arrangements, and department
commander Howard Melinson is
coordinating the services.
Matthew B. Rosenhaus, Mi-
ami Beach industrialist and phi-
lanthropist, will receive the
Synagogue Council of America's
50th anniversary Synagogue
Statesman Award this Sunday
during the organization's Bi-
centennial observance at New-
port, R.I., which will be attend-
ed by America's foremost Jew-
ish leaders.
Temple Emanu-El and past na-
tional president of the SCA,
will present the award to Ro-
senhaus, a vice president of the
temple and chairman of the
Dade County Society of Fellows
of the Synagogue Council of
America.
Moses Hornstein of Holly-
wood, national cochairman of
the Society of Fellows, will pre-
sent a special award to Dr.
Lehrman, the first national hon-
orary president of the SCA and
Hornstein's cochairman.
Joseph H. Lookstein of Miami
Beach and New York, chancel-
lor of Bar-Ilan University, is
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, the coor-
dinating agency of Orthodox,
Conservative and Reform Juda-
ism in the United States.
Dr. Lookstein and Rabbi Hen-
ry Siegman, executive vice
president of the SCA, will share
speaking honors with Vice Presi-
dent Nelson D. Rockefeller.
Newport is the site of the
Touro Synagogue, America's
oldest Jewish congregation and
addressee of President George
Washington's letter saying the
United States would not sanc-
tion begotry.
Temple Beth Sholom Confirmands
Participating in Services Tonight
At Shabbat Siyum services
this evening at Temple Beth
Sholom 42 students in the con-
Sisterhood of Temple Israel
Plans Installation Luncheon
Looking over the plans for the new building of the Ke-
hilat Etz Chaim Congregation of Ashdod are (from left)
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, executive director of the
Southeast Region, United Synagogue of America; Rabbi
Robert Liberles, spiritual leader of the Kehilat Etz Chaim
Congregation; and Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual lead-
er of Temple Emanu-El.
United Synagogue SE Region
Adopts Ashdod Congregation
Temple Israel Sisterhood will
install officers at a luncheon,
Wednesday, May 26, at 11:30
a.m. in the temple's Wolf son
Auditorium.
A musicale by the Harp Trio,
featuring Margarita Montero In-
clan, Trudy Frank Faust and
Charjene Conner, along with
Cantor Jacob Bornstein, is part
of the days program.
Officers being installed by
Mrs. Clifford Newmark are
president, Mrs. William Lee;
vice presidents, Mrs. George
Gilbert, Mrs. Lawrence Singer,
Mrs. Lloyd Ruskin, Mrs. Harry
Levinson; treasurer, Mrs. EI-
med Levie; assistant treasurer,
Mrs. Lewis Gorfine; recording
secretary, Mrs. Michael Orovitz;
corresponding secretary, Mrs.
Robert Pritikin; assistant cor-
responding secretary, Mrs.
James Hauser; financial secre-
tary, Mrs. Arnold Scher; assist-
ant financial secretary, Mrs.
Saul Mark; chairman of nomi-
nating committee, Mrs. Henry
Nelson; immediate past presi-
dents, Mrs. Jack Schillinger.
Call Tenrple Israel for reser-
vations.
firmation class will receive Bi-
bles and diplomas. The entire
confirmation class will partici-
pate along with congregation
nresident James S. Knopke,
Brotherhood president Harold
B. Vinik, Sisterhood president
Mrs. Irving Miller, and School
Board chairmen Mrs. David Mil-
ler and Dr. Solomon Lichter.
On Thursday, June 3, at 7:30
p.m., the 42 boys and girls will
be confirmed at a service whose
theme is "Will Our Grandchil-
dren Be Jewish?" Rabbi Leon
Kronish, spiritual leader of
Beth Sholom, in his introduc-
tory remarks, will say "Our
grandparents brought a very
significant spiritual baggage
with them when they came to
these shores. We have inherited
their determination to preserve
a vision until the end of time!
And when we ask ourselves
whether our grandchildren will
be Jewish, the answer of our
tradition is clear: If we will
it ."
Joseph Golden of Beth Torah
Congregation, president of the
Southeast Region, United Syna-
gogue of America, has an-
nounced that at a recent board
meeting the Region adopted the
Kehilat Etz Chaim Congrega-
tion in Ashdod as its sister con-
gregation in Israel. Recently
established, it is the only Con-
servative congregation in the
seaport city and the 15th Con-
servative congregation in Israel.
The spiritual leaders, Rabbi
Robert Liberles, originally of
Boston, who was ordained at the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America in New York, said that
"the congregation is presenting
to the Israelis a viable alterna-
tive between secularism and or-
thodoxy.
Jules Haberman of Congrega-
tion Ohev Shalom in Orlando
and Israel affairs chairman for
the Southeast Region, visited
the congregation and described
the enthusiasm and interest of
Ohev Shalom's membership.
THEY MET the president,
Barry Page of Australia, and
other leaders from Anglo-Saxon
countries and South America as
well as Israel. Haberman and
his wife, Barbara, were guests
at the congregation and partici-
pated in their services as well
as the weekly Oneg Shabbat.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
executive director of the USA
Southeast Region and also a re-
cent visitor, noted that the con-
gregation, which has no facili-
ties, meets in the hallway of a
local school. The services are
similar to the prayer service
held in our local Conservative
congregations. Their prayers
are recited in Hebrew, but the
sermon is in Hebrew and Eng-
lish. Some of the membership
have still not mastered Hebrew
well enough to participate in an
all Hebrew "drasha."
Haberman said sponsorship is
a three-fold program. Congrega-
tions affiliated with the United
Synagogue, Southeast Region,
are asked to become annual
members to help support the
congregation, and individual
membership is sought from
members of Conservative con-
gregations.
A building program is under
way for a chapel and youth
center on a block of land to
be donated by the Ashdod
Municipal Council. The Mayor
of Ashdod issued a statement
declaring full support of the
project and his hope of seeing
a center full of interest and
activity. The stonelaying cere-
monv is planned for midsum-
mer and congregants from par-
ent communities in the U.S.,
England and Australia will be
invited to attend.
Inquiries should be directed
to Rabbi Seymour Friedman at
the United Synagogue Office in
North Miami Beach.
CAJE Sponsoring
July Ulpan Tour
Israeli living and Hebrew
learning will highlight the Com-
munity Hebrew Ulpan Study
Tour to Israel conducted by the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation from July 7 to Aug. 4.
The tour will feature the
learning and speaking of He-
brew in natural settings on
tours throughout the country,
as well as regular study ses-
sions under the direction of
Shula Ben David, Ulpan teacher
and educational supervisor.
The group's major home base
will be Jerusalem, and visits to
Bethlehem, Hebron, Jericho,
Masada, the Dead Sea, Safed,
the Golan Heights, Acre, Haifa.
Tel Aviv, Eilat and other sites
are included. Before each trip
the appropriate vocabulary will
be studied, songs will be taught
and the historical background
discussed.
Meetings with Israeli families,
lectures by leaflng speakers,
attendance at Israeli cultural
programs and visits to Ulpan
centers in Israel are planned as
well.
The tour, in cooperation with
the Department of Education
and Culture of the World Zion-
ist Organization, will be led by
Rita Gold.
MRS. BALTUCH
Beth Torah Sisterhood
Installing New Officers
The officers of the Sisterhood
of Beth Torah Congregation will
be installed by Rabbi Max A.
Lipschitz and Mrs. Nat Siesser.
Rabbi Lipschitz will install Ro-
chelle (Mrs. Marshall) Baltuch
as president, while Mrs. Siesser
will install the other officers:
Mrs. George Edelson, CEAC vice
president; Mrs. Ted Martin,
ways and means vice president;
Mrs. Ina Symet, membership,
vice president; Mrs. Melvin
Keil, youth vice president; Mr?.
Alan Mintz, vice president-at-
large.
Also, Mrs. Eric Gutman,
treasurer; Mrs. Irving Kuttler,
financial secretary; Mrs. Frank
Kauff, corresponding secretary;
Mrs. Louis Foster, recording
secretary; Mrs. Harold Monuse.
social secretary.
The installation ceremony
will demonstrate the putting to-
gether of the Torah as each
officer is called up to be in-
stalled, another part will be
added until the Torah is com-
plete. A reception in the social
hill will follow.


Page 2-B
+Je*istinorMkui
Friday, May 21, 1976
t
c
c
MRS. BARON
MRS. BILLER
MRS. PECHENIK
MRS. ROTHFARB
MRS. MINKOFF
MR. GOULD
ORT District VI Convention
Is Scheduled for May 24-26
Wore than 500 delegates, rep-
resenting nine Southern states
and 16,000 members from five
regions, four coordinating com-
mittees and 25 chapters-at-
large, will attend the Women's
American ORT District VI sec-
ond biennial convention at the
Deaubille Hotel Monday, May
Deauville Hotel, Monday, May
The convention theme is
"ORTThe Voice Heard 'Round
the World." Convention cochair-
men are Mrs. Joan Baron of
Miami Beach and Mrs. Selma
Biller of Clearwater. Southeast-
ern Florida Region is the hos-
tess region, with Mrs. Ann Spe-
roni and Mrs. Jean Rose co-
chairmen of local arrangements.
The delegates will participate
in discussions and deliberations
intended to propel District VI
for the next two years, and will
explore issues unique to the
South and establish directions
for dealing with problems
unique to the Southern Jewish
community.
THE ESTABLISHMENT of an
ORT school in the United States
the world's most powerful
and largest Jewish community
is of prime importance. "To-
day, when over 80 percent of
the employment opportunities
require vocational and techni-
cal training, the program of
Women's American ORT is at
the apex of the needs of our
education system," said Mrs.
Beverly Pechenik, president,
District VI. "Comprehensive
career education is the van-
guard for the continuation of
the democratic form of govern-
ment as we approach the third
century of the establishment of
the United States of America."
Mrs. Baron observed that
"with the world in constant fear
of terrorist attacks, bombings
and hatred, we look to this con-
vention not only to plan and
motivate our district for the
next two years but to strengthen
Jewish identity. The rise of
anti-Semitism and the assimila-
tion of our youth are eating at
the very core of our existence,
and we come together to join
forces to help the less fortunate
and to rededicate ourselves, the
fortunate, to the State of Israel
and the belief that it is every
man's just due to live a life
filled with opportunity and
dignity."
The second biennial conven-
tion will have special confer-
ences for Major Community
Education and Organization.
Thev are designed so that the
disadvantaged and the un-
skilled can be assisted to
sufficient. Workshops will fol-
low the conferences and try to
turn the perspectives into spe-
cial techniques.
MRS. RUTH Eisenberg, na-
tional president of Women's
American ORT, will deliver a
major address on Monday eve-
ning at the opening plenary
session. She recently returned
from a tour of the ORT installa-
tions in Latin America. Also
addressing the assembly will be
Nathan Gould, national execu-
tive vice president and national
executive director of Women's
American ORT.
The keynote address, by Dis-
PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovite
ZAPOXSEIIASU
T M I P 0 Y N E W TVS!
A P 0 Z N M A B R M D A U
BGiS L P J A N S L S V
G N C P E 0 H E 0 K U P K
B (TH D B S N S M N W 0 D
6HSE H G C I P A L R C
Q O'E E G A T K D R X T K
ZLNA A J Z Q P P T A IT
A A H S P R U E T j y s o
H S I Q B S I R P B V H M
C I R A I S G J S 0 E D r
JOSE P H S O N C L E S
Listed below and hidden in this puzzle are the names
of twelve Jews who played a part in the American Rev-
olution. The names are placed horizontally, vertically,
diagonally, forward and backward. How many can you
find? Answers are on page 6-B.
Michael GRATZ Abraham SASPORTAS
Joseph SIMON Isaac MOSES
Manuel JOSEPHSON Moses LEVY
Jacob ISAACS Jacob HART
Aaron LOPEZ Haym SALOMON
Benjamin SEIXAS David S. FRANKS
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
trict VI president Mrs. Beverly
Pechenik, will be delivered Mon-
day evening. Mrs. Ruth Roth-
farb, chairman, executive com-
mittee, District VI, will present
a progress report.
Manfried Shapiro, lecturer
and authority on the Jewish
community, will be the guest
speaker at the opening lunch-
eon.
Mrs. Beverly Minkoff, na-
tional executive committee
chairman, will install the new
officers of District VI at Wed-
nesday's luncheon.
"Crossroads," a dialogue on
the problems facing Jewish life
today, will be presented at
various times during the con-
vention.
Ann Speroni (left) and
Jean Rose, local arrange-
ments chairmen for District
VI second biennial conven-
tion.
Fine Arts School
Season Ends
Closing exercises of the
School of Fine Arts of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom are sched-
uled for Sunday, May 23, at
3:30 p.m. at the temple.
Seventy five children will
participate in a program fea-
turing music, dancing, dramatic
presentations, art and ceramics.
The school, which meets four
afternoons a week, is directed
by Judith Drucker, cultural di-
rector of Beth Sholom. Faculty
members are Andree Juliette
Brun, piano; Jay Jensen, drama;
Sandi Hirsch, ballet; Anita Kop-
ple, music for tots; Roberta Sil-
bert, art; and Henry Small, ce-
ramics.
"The closing exercises afford
an opportunity for parents,
friends and relatives, as well as
the general public, to see the
results of these children's ef-
forts throughout the year to
express themselves Jewishly,
creatively and artistically," said
Mrs. Drucker in her announce-
ment.
The program is open to chil-
dren between the ages of 3 and
13, and inquiries regarding next
season may be made at the tem-
ple office. I
SE Florida Region Knows That
Miami's Heart Is Sunshine-Warm
Southeastern Florida Region,
Women's American ORT, is the
hostess for District VI second
biennial convention at the Deau-
ville Hotel. Local arrangements
cochairmen, Mrs. Ann Speroni
and Mrs. Jean Rose, working
in conjunction with District VI
convention cochairmen Mrs.
Joan Baron and Selma Biller,
have planned two luncheons, a
hospitality room, a musical
comedy and a boutique.
Chairmen for the convention,
Mrs. Dale Flam, Mrs. Florence
Kanter and Mrs. Edythe Gur-
land, will demonstrate that the
warmth of Miami's heart equals
that of its sunshine. Beginning
with an initial glimpse of South-
ern hospitality at the registra-
tion desk, where Bicentennial
Welcome Baskets will be pro-
vided for every delegation, cor-
dial attention will be the key-
note. Home-baked cake and cof-
fee will be served in the hos-
pitality suite.
In the lower lobby of the
Deauville and open to the public
will be the Portpourrie a bouti-
que presenting a unique selec-
tion of items for sale. Mrs. Ter-
ry Brown and Mrs. Joan Rafa-
love are cochairmen, assisted
by Mrs. Sarah Greenberg.
Needlework, coloring books, Is-
raeli artifacts, T-shirts, aprons,
jewelry and the Women's Amer-
ican ORT District VI cookbook,
"Do It in the Kitchen," will be
available. ORT volunteers from
Southeastern Florida chapter
will staff the boutique, which
will be open during entire con-
vention, Monday and Tuesday
from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and
Wednesday from 10 a.m. to
5:30 p.m.
TUESDAY'S luncheon will be
presided over by Southeastern
Florida Region president Mrs.
Cynthia Kronish, who will in-
troduce the guest speakers as
well at the entertainment for
the day, "The Discovery of
Carry ORTway," a musical
comedy depicting ORT in ac-
tion, written, directed and
choreographed by Trixie Le-
vin, assisted by Selma Kanov
and produced by Southeastern
Florida Region.
Mrs. Jean Rose, convention
cochairman and drama group
coordinator, describes the story
as a Bicentennial celebration on
the moon in 2176. The cast in-
cludes members of Southeast-
ern Florida Region's drama
group: Mrs. Mary Gilbert, Mrs.
Norma Gilbert, Mrs. Renee
Levy, Mrs. Dee Meyer, Mrs.
Terry Osterer, Mrs. Joan Rafa-
love, Mrs. Joyce Reed, Mrs.
Jean Rose, Mrs. Susan Rosen-
stein, Mrs. Sheila Slewett, Mrs.
Dottie Speroni and Mrs. Felice
Traktman.
The Bicentennial theme will
be continued and reflected at
luncheons and during the con-
vention by Mrs. Fela Flemen-
baum's table centerpieces and
decorations. Luncheon seating
arrangements are under the
direction of Mrs. Fritzie Leit.
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.


Friday, May 21, 1976
* Jewish fhrkMan
Page s-a
'
Twelve Area Hebrew Schools
Observe Jerusalem Liberation
Israel Bonds Are Third
Behind Government, AT&T
Israel Bonds, gaining in pop- "We cannot match the sacrifices
Yom Yerushalayim, Jerusa-
lem Day, will be celebrated Fri-
day, May 28, by students of 12
South Florida Hebrew day
schools with a special meeting
at the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy at 9:30 a.m.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy, largest Hebrew day school
in the United States outside of
Metropolitan New York, is gen-
eral chairman of the observance
of the ninth anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem dur-
ing the Six-Day War. The Israel
Army liberated the Old City on
June 7, 1967, the 28th day of
Iyar in the Hebrew calendar,
which is used to determine all
Jewish holidays.
A highlight of the event, co-
sponsored by the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will be the presentation of
Degel Yerushalayim, the Jeru-
salem Flag, by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund to the Hebrew day
school that has done the most
in the past year for the people
and land of Israel.
CLASSROOM and extracurri-
cular activities will help deter-
mine the prize, which gives spe-
cial credit for projects relating
directly to Jerusalem.
The dozen day schools par-
ticipating in the competition are
the Lehrman Day School of
Temnle Emanu-El, the Temple
Menorah Day School, the Great-
er Miami Hebrew Academy,
Oholei Torah School, Beth David
Solomon Schechter School, the
South Dade Hebrew Academy,
Temple Beth Am Day School,
Hillel Community Day School,
the Torah Academy of South
Florida, the Temple Beth Sha-
lom Day School of Hollywood,
the Jewish Day School of Fort
Lauderdale and the Jewish Com-
munity Day School of West
Palm Beach.
Mrs. Nily Salic, educational
consultant to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of Greater Miami,
and Abraham Gittelson, asso-
ciate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
are working with Rabbi Gross
on the program.
A cantata, "The Seven Gates
of Jerusalem," will be presented
by Hebrew Academy students.
There will be Israeli songs and
dances, and greetings by Mrs.
Morton Weinberger, chairman
of the CAJE.
Hebrew Academy Students Named
By National High School Honor Group
The Society of Distinguished
American High School Students
has announced its list of 1975-76
members from the Greater Mi-
ami Hebrew Academy, accord-
ing to Rabbi Shimon Azulay,
associate principal of the Acad-
emy's Olga and Margaret
Weishaus High School for Girls.
Among the new members are
seniors Wendy Dreer, Deborah
Goldring, Sara Esquinozi and
Jeanette Himmelstein, juniors
Masha Stein, Anne Rosner and
Shira Seidel, and Judy Feder,
a sophomore.
Nominated because of their
academic an civic excellence,
they are participating in the So-
ciety's annual awards program,
which offers merit awards and
renewable college scholarships
to various American colleges
and universities.
News from Israel Bonds
CHAIM EVEN-ZOHAR
PRIME MINISTER'S CLUB
HONORS NEW MEMBERS
Chaim Even-Zohar, of the Is-
rael Embassy in Washington,
will present the 1976 Israel
Prime Minister's Awards at the
home of Dr. Maxwell and Reva
Dauer, Wednesday evening,
June 2.
The Prime Minister's Club,
established to honor people who
purchase a minimum of $25,000
in Israel Bonds each year, was
officially inaugurated by Prime
Minister Golda Meir at the Feb-
ruary, 1974, International Israel
Bond Conference in Israel. Mrs.
Meir and the late David Ben-
Gurion founded the Israel Bond
Organization twenty-five years
ago.
"The members of this club
represent an honorary society
of the most distinguished Jew-
ish communal and business lead-
ers," said Dr. Dauer. "The pur-
chase of Israel Bonds is evi-
dence of the understanding of
the difficult economic situation
facing the people of Israel this
year."
Even-Zohar, Assistant Eco-
nomic Counselor at the Israel
Embassy, will carry the words
of Prime Minister Rabin as he
presents the awards. Rabin re-
cently said, in a message on
Israel's Independence Day, "Is-
rael Bonds enable you, our fel-
low Jews of America, to join
with us in the practical work
of building, developing and
strengthening Israel. Through
this partnership we expand our
economy, and the expansion of
our economy has become a cru-
cial factor of our future
strength. We do not have the
fantastic oil wealth of our Arab
neighbors. Nor do we have their
rich natural resources. But we
do have you, and it is your
commitment that enables us to
build the factories, the plans,
the roads and the railways that
enable us to produce more, ex-
port more and offer jobs to
more immigrants as they come."
The awards are presented
under the auspices of the South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion.
& -h NEW LEADERSHIP
DINNER DANCE
JUNE 5
The first South Florida Israel
Bond New Leadership inau-
gural dinner dance is planned
for Saturday, June 5, at 7:45
p.m. in the Voltaire Suites at
the Fontainebleau Hotel, it was
announced by Ronald Krongold,
regional chairman, Southeast
United States.
The event, which will be at-
tended by couples from through-
out Dade and Broward Coun-
ties, will feature a keynote ad-
dress by Avi Primor, Chief of
Information of Israel's Foreign
Ministry.
Dinner cochairmen include
Charles and Wendy Citrin, Ste-
phen and Arlyn Cypen, Gary
and Sandy Dix, Steven and Mar-
lene Josias, Arthur and Betty
Kail, Richard and Michelle
Krinzman, Arnold and Suzanne
Laskv, Michel and Connie Nah-
mad, Steven and Ruth Shere
and Elliot and Enyd Sokolow.
Tony St. Thomas will enter-
tain, along with Stu Granger
and his orchestra.
Israel Bonds' campaign theme
in 1976 is "the year of energy"
energy to build the oil pipe-
lines from Eilat, to finance in-
creased electric power, to build
an oil refinery at Ashdod. to
stimulate oil exploration and aid
in the construction of new power
Dlants.
Complete
Window Service
Iff AIIS
REPLACING REGLAZING
Faff Service Free Estimates
PHONE 666-3339
ALL WINDOW REPAIR
7113 BUD MAO
ularity as an investment each
year, are third among the
most commonly held securities
in the country, behind United
States Government Treasury
Notes and AT&T stocks and
bonds, according to Robert L.
Siegel. general campaign chair-
man of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization.
"An important way to in-
crease Israel Bonds is to find
new people to make purchases,
and this is what we've been
able to do in this campaign,"
Siegel told over 50 volunteers
from congregations and hi-rises
who had gathered to hear a live
worldwide telephone talk by Is-
rael's Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin.
"Our people have been work-
ing very hard in the trade and
industrial field, in addition to
congregation dinners and hi-
rise efforts, and the extra work
has paid off in Bonds." said
Siegel "Over 200 functions have
been held over the last eight
months."
The Miami Jewish community
is more concerned than ever
with helping the State of Israel.
of the people of Israel. How-
ever, we can provide the invest-
ment capital to help ease their
financial burdens," said Milton
M. Parson, executive director of
the South Florida Israel Bonds
office. "The wheels of Israel's
economy will not be able to
turn without these Israel Bond
dollars."
Miamians have been invest-
ing in bonds for 25 years. Siegel
and Parson expect the trend of
attracting more bond buyers to
continue, and that's certainly
much needed good news for Is-
rael.
Kiwonions Plan
Benefit Barbecue
The Miami Beach Kiwanis
Club will hold its 12th annual
barbecue on Sunday, May 23
from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Miami
Beach Kennel Club, marking
the launching of the 1976 Com-
munity Benefit Fund.
Proceeds will be used for
scholarships for local high
school students. Donation is
tax-deductible.
Maxwell House Coffee ^
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
REBECCA GRATZ 1781 1869
From the birth to the rebirth of the Nation.
One of the most beautiful and gracious
| women of her time, Rebecca Gratz
' was born to wealth in Philadelphia
and devoted her life to charitable
causes. As a little girl she heard talk of the new
Constitution, saw the drafters entering Inde-
pendence Hall and giving birth to the Nation.
She lived to see its rebirth after Lee's surrender
at Appomatox.
Among her friends was Washington Irving,
who, on a visit with Sir Walter Scott in Eng-
land, told the great author how Rebecca, at
peril to her own life, had nursed Irving's
fiancee, 18 year old Matilda Hoffman, dying
from tuberculosis. Scott, never knowing Jews
and indulging in the prejudices of the day, was
struck with the compassionate Rebecca and
the high esteem in which Philadelphia held the
Gratz family. Scott immortalized her as the
lovely and faithful Rebecca in his celebrated
novel, "Ivanhoe."
Rebecca Gratz fell in love with a man not of
her faith. Instead of marriage she wedded her
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
life to the service of fellow Jews less fortunate
than she. Among her charities and the Jewish
organizations which she helped to found and
worked in were: the Philadelphia Orphans'
Home; the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society;
the Jewish Foster Home and also the Hebrew
Sunday School Society of Philadelphia. For
many years she was concerned with the relig-
ious training of all Jewish children including
those of her own synagogue. Under her direc-
tion, the first Jewish Sunday School in the U.S.
opened in 1838.
Rebecca Gratz was acclaimed as one of the
noblest women in the world, when laid to rest
in Mikvah Israel Cemetery in Philadelphia in
1869 at the age of 88.
SEND FOR
EXCITING
BOOKLET
Honoring \776
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send 50* (no stamps) with name
and address to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017


Page 4-B
*Jew/stifk>rk**n
Friday, May 21, 1976
MEHTA
SUTHERLAND
PERLMAN
FIEDLER
Beth Sholom Again Presenting
Great Artists in Concert
Maintaining its tradition of
bringing the world's greatest
artists to the Miami area, the
Great Artists Series of Temple
Beth Sholom has announced its
1976-77 subscription season.
Opening the season will be
Zubin Mehta and the Israel Phil-
harmonic Orchestra, on Mon-
day. Sept. 20. Mehta has just
been named musical advisor
and conductor of the New York
Philharmonic, and this is his
first appearance in the area.
On Thursday, Feb. 3, 197, so-
prano Joan Sutherland will
make her debut in the Miami
area, followed by Israeli violin-
ist Itzhak Perlman and the Mi-
ami Philharmonic Orchestra
conducted by the young and
dvnamic James Conlon on Feb.
17.
A COUP of the season is the
unprecedented appearance of
the Boston Pops Orchestra un-
der the direction of its founder,
Arthur Fiedler, with pianist
David Bar-Illan on Wednesday,
March 2.
Pianist Andre Watts, who has
earned a secure place among
today's keyboard giants and
won the accolades of the inter-
national press and public, will
appear on Thursday. March 10.
Robert Merrill, leading bari-
tone of the Metropolitan Opera,
will present arias with the
Greater Miami Philharmonic
under the baton of Maurice
Abravanel, and will then take
the cantorial part of the Ernst
Bloch's Sacred Service with the
orchestra and the University of
Miami Civic Chorale under the
direction of Lee Kjelson, in the
final concert of the series,
March 29.
All performances will be given
at the Miami Beach Theatre of
the Performing Arts. Subscrip-
tions are available at the temple
office. The price categories are
$120 for an Angel, $60 for a
Sponsor, and $50 for general
subscriptions. Individual tickets
will not be on sale until July
1, 1976. For further informa-
tion, call 532-3491.
Chairman of the Great Artists
Series is Judy Drucker; James
S. Knopke is cochairman and
Millie Ser is subscription chair-
man.
WATTS
MERRILL
COOL IT WITH KEDEM
"The Flavor That You Favor"
Wines and Natural Fruit Juices
KEDEM On Ice Tastes Very Nice KEDE5J
f
At Grocery, Supermarkets
& Package Stores
Maxmo Distributors, Inc.
534-6504
W
f u/ion i/...
More than just dance-
Comedy. Fantasy. Mind-bending images.
Pure entertainment!
MIAMI BEACH SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
May 22 -8:15 pm Information: 442-1363
\
i non-ptofil, tax-exempt corporation
i
pt corpor;
SliuciiU.il feasti iic on the foods f the harvest
BY ESTHER FEINBERG
Everybody enjoys eating good food to celebrate the |oyous holiday of Shavuoth To bring out the best in
whatever you cook, make sure you have plenty of Hellmann'sVBest Foods* Real Mayonnaise" on hand. As usual,
we're happy you've shared your delicious recipes with us. and hope that all of you have a very happy holiday1
EASY QUICHE
112 CUP HELLMANN S/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 egg
1 can (13 oz) evaporated milk
Dash hot pepper sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup shredded Swiss cheese
1 can (3 oz) real French fried onions
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 frozen 9-inch pastry shell, thawed
Stir together first 5 ingredients. Add
cheese, onions and nutmeg: stir until
blended Pour into pastry shell Bake in
325 F oven 25 to 30 minutes or until
golden brown on top and knile inserted
in center comes out clean Serve im-
mediately Makes 6 servings.
Submitted by
Linda Lips. Philadelphia. PA
SWEET FRUIT DRESSING
1/4 cup walnu
2 tablespoons golden raisins
112 cup HELLMANN S/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1/2 cup whole milk
2 tablespoons lemon iuico
2 tablespoons karo-
Light Corn Syrup
Place walnuts and raisins in blender
container Cover and blend on medium
speed Stir together remaining ingredi-
ents; add to walnut mixture Cover;
chill. Makes 1 cup
Submitted by:
Mrs Joseph Bailel. Milford, MA
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
GELATIN SALAD
1 package (3 oz) lemon flavored
gelatin
1 cup boiling water
112 CUP HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 can (29 oz) peaches, drained and
finely diced
112 cup linely diced green pepper
112 cup finely diced cucumber
112 cup finely diced celery
1 tablespoon minced onion
Dissolve gelatin in water Stir in next 4
ingredients until well mixed Chill until
slightly thickened. Fold in remaining
ingredients Turn into 5-cup mold Chill
until lirm Makes 5 cups or 6 to 8
servings
Submitted by
Mrs. P. S Hosell. Chicago. IL
VEGETARIAN LOAF
1 cup Imely chopped onion
2 tablespoons margarine, melted
1 cup linely chopped celery
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup fine dry whole wheat bread
crumbs
1 cup finely chopped walnuts
1 teaspoon salt
112 CUP HELLMANN S. BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
2 eggs, slightly beaten
Grease an 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2-inch
loaf pan Cook onion in margarine until
Iransparcnt Add next 5 ingredients;
cook 1 to 2 minutes Remove trom heat;
stir in remaining ingredients; mix well.
Turn into prepared loaf pan Bake in
350 F oven 40 to 45 minutes or unlil
lightly browned Serve immediately
Makes about 4 servings
Submitted by:
Ruby Kaplan. New York. NY
wPHr*B
NEUMANNS
JtoONNAlS'
Easi oi ihe Rockies the name is HELLMANN S
West it's BEST FOODS
'ic name, it's the same line Real Mayonnaise
GARDEN SALAD
1 can (16 oz) kidney beans drained
and rinsed
1 can (8 oz) green beans, drained
1 can (8 oz) wax beans drained
1 medium cucumber, ihmly sliced
1 can (8 oz) water chestnuts, sliced
2 cups raw cauliflower, cut in
llowerettes
A cups torn lettuce
1 cup HELLMANN S/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 teaspoon lemon pepper
Toss together all ingredients, mix well.
Cover, chill Makes about 8 to 10
servings
Submitted by.
Mrs Rose Marcus, Chicago, IL
PLEASEsend us your recipes
We'd be delighted if you d share more
of your favorite Kosher mayonnaise
recipes with us Well send you S10 00
for any recipe we select lor use If your
recipe appears in our ad. we will also
pnni your name Just send your special
uses for HELLMANN'S or BEST FOODS
Mayonnaise to me
EstherFemberg ConsumerServiceDepl
Best Foods Div ol CPC Int'l Inc
Englewood Cliffs. NJ 07632
Be sure to include your name and ad-
dress All recipes become the property
of Best Foods, and may be adiusted o'
edited before publication
IN HONOR OF THE GIVING OF THE T0RAH ON
SHAVUOTH. IT IS A TRADITION TO DEVOTE THE
FIRST NIGHT OF THIS HOLIDAY TO STUDYING
THE T0RAH OR ITS RELATED LITERATURE
Bll food! a Divuon ol CPC International Inc *Pe '
I


Friday, May 21, 1976
*Jewist noridian
Page 5-B
I
>
>
Solidarity With Soviet Jews
Is Theme of Sunday Rally
The South Florida Jewish community will show its
solidarity with Soviet Jews in a demonstration on Sunday,
May 23, at 2:30 p.m. on Lincoln Road Mall at Washington
Ave. Members of major Jewish organizations and syna-
gogues in Dade and South Broward will be joined by other
religious groups concerned with human rights in the Soviet
Union. The program is sponsored by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, a committee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Community Relations Commit-
tee.
Sharing the platform will be
mathematician Alexander Luntz,
a recent Soviet emigrant to Is-
rael, Congressman Dante Fas-
cell, Miami Mayor Maurice Fer-
re, Hollywood Mayor David F.
Keating, Georgg Dunn of the
Inter-faith Council of Hollywood,
and the Rev. Conrad R. Braaton.
codirector of the Center for
Dialog.
They will be welcomed by
Morton Silberman, president of
the GMJF, Dr. Joel Sandberg of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward who are coordinating
the Solidarity Day events.
Marchers will carry replicas of
the Soviet Jewry Freedom Flag
a white Star of David on a
blue background which was
adopted at the recent Brussels
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Organizations participating
include the local chapters of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, American Jewish Con-
gress, American Mizrachi Wom-
en, B'nai B'rith, Hadassah, Jew-
ish Community Centers of South
Florida, Jewish War Veterans,
National Council of Jewish
Women, Union of American He-
brew Congregations, United
Synagogues of America, Young
Judea and Women's American
OUT.
The public has been urged by
49 area rabbis to attend the
Solidarity Day Rally to show
their concern for Soviet Jews,
who are allowed neither to
practice their faith within the
USSR nor to emigrate to Israel.
The rally will point up the seri-
ous plight of these Jews who
suffer harassment, imprison-
ment and beatings.
Suggestions for actions which
may be taken by individuals and
organizations to aid Soviet Jews
will be given to all rally partici-
pants. For further information,
call the South Florida Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry.
JCC Presents Officer Slate
Stanley R. Gilbert, honorary
president and chairman of the
nominating committee of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, has announced
the slate of officers and board
of Directors for 1976-77:
Donald J. Reiff, president;
Stanley R. Gilbert, honorary
president; Merton Gettis, Herb-
ert D. Katz, Fran Levey, Evan
Olster, Mrs. Robert Russell,
vice presidents; Mel C. Morgen-
stern, treasurer; Edward Lustig,
associate treasurer; Vice Mayor
Rose Gordon, recording secre-
tary; Esther Gordon, financial
secretary; Dr. Samuel Meline,
corresponding secretary.
Board of Directors: Albert
Aronson, Dr. Norman Atkin,
Adolph J. Berger, Roslyn K.
Benin, Lionel Bosem, Shirley
Cohen. Lewis E. Cohn, Richard
B. Collins, Matthew Ettinger.
Also, Morton Fellman, Stan-
ley Fisher, Rabbi Robert P.
Frazin, Solomon Garazi, Barbara
Gelles, Merton Gettis, Stanley
R. Gilbert, Bobbi Gilbert, Elias
Goldberg, Herman Goodman,
Esther Gordon, Vice Mayor
Rose Gordon.
Also Leonard Helfand, Milton
Hornstein, Moses Hornstein,
Arthur D. Horwitz, Dr. Bruce
Julian, Stuart Kallman, Herbert
D. Katz, Jacob Katzman, Paul
Koenig, Evaline Leckart, Mrs.
Donald Lefton, Fran Levey,
Jack Lubin, Edward Lustig.
Also, Allan B. Margolis, Mrs.
Stanley Margulies, Dr. Malcolm
Meister, Dr. Samuel Meline,
Jack Meyerhoff, Mel C. Morgen-
stern, Evan Olster, Naomi Ol-
ster. Robert Orseck, Phyllis Or-
seck, Nathan Pritcher.
Also, Donald J. Reiff, Norma
Reiff, Dr. Stanley Rosenthal,
Dr. Peter Rubelman, Robert
Russell, Mrs. Robert Russell,
Commissioner Harvey Ruvin,
Pat E. Segall, Laurel Shapiro,
Roberta Shevin, Mrs. Gerald P.
Soltz, Clifford Suchman, Barton
Udell and Henry Weiss.
The annual meeting and in-
stallation is set for Sunday at
the Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center. Chair-
persons Mrs. Barbara Gelles and
Dr. Samuel Mehne havte an-
nounced that the program will
include entertainment, dancing,
cocktails and a buffet.
"Diqing Ita^ai\sty(e is as
easyas JUef ^ais" .Witi\
l\e\g fromJChef 'Boy-ar-dee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee"
to cook for you when
you long for a delicious meatless
meal. His Cheese Ravioli
really hits the spot! Perfect for the
children's lunch, for an easy supper
or even a late-night snack. If you
like kreplach, you'll love the Chef's
Cheese Ravioli. Bite-size, chock
full of tangy Italian-style cheese,
simmered in rich, hearty tomato sauce
that's seasoned with even more
cheese. And. all you do is heat-and
enjoy. For a thrifty, meatless
mechayeh you couldn't do better!
ALEXANDER LUNTZ
Luntz Is Guest
At Area Temples
This Weekend
Dr. Alexander Luntz will be
the guest speaker at services
this evening at Temple Emanu-
El and tomorrow morning at
Congregation B'nai Raphael.
The appearance of Dr. Luntz
a Russian Jewish activist
among those jailed during Presi-
dent's 1972 visit to Moscowis
a highlight of the observance by
the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity of Solidarity Day with
Soviet Jewry, at which he is
keynote speaker.
Dr. Luntz, with his wife, Lud-
milla, and their son, 18-year-old
Valery, was permitted to leave
the Soviet Union in February
along with 100 other emigrants,
one of the largest groups allow-
ed to leave in many months.
The release of the Luntzes fol-
lowed by a few days the world-
wide Conference on Soviet Jew-
ry in Brussels.
Dr. Luntz, former head of a
department at the Institute for
Electronic Control Computers in
Moscow, was denied permission
to emigrate because he alleged-
ly knew many state secrets. As
an aliyah activist, however, he
ultimately became too trouble-
some fo the Soviets, who chang-
ed his secrecy classification and
permitted him to leave.
Beth Kodesh
Plans Spring Banquet
Beth Kodesh Congregation
will hold its annual spring fes-
tival banquet at the Forte Tow-
er on May 30, at 6:30 p.m.
Music will be provided by
Bob Novack and an eight-course
kosher dinner will be served.
EVERY DAY IS A
BEAUTIFUL DAY
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Phone I305I531OO61
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Among the South Florida leaders helping to plan the
Solidarity Day demonstration for Soviet Jews, Sunday at
2:30 p.m. at Lincoln Road Mall and Washington Avenue,
are (from left) Mrs. Harry B. Smith, immediate past
president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Wom-
en's Division; and Dr. Morton Freiman and Mrs. Rob-
ert Wolf, members of the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry's steering committee.
JWV Post and Auxiliary 174
Are Honoring the Greenwalds
The Norman Bruce Brown
Post and Auxiliary No. 174 will
hold a dinner and dance to
honor past post commander Alex
Greenwald and former Aux-
iliary president Clair Green-
wald, according to chairpersons
Edward Feibelman and Belle
Swartz, assisted by Ralph Rosof-
sky and Mae Schreiber. The
event will be held on Saturday
at the Shelborne Hotel.
Newly elected post comman-
der Fernand Canter and Auxil-
iary president Sylvia Liebman
will welcome their guests,
among whom will be department
president Ceil Zucker and her
husband, Alty, and department
commander Howard F. Melin-
son and his wife, Beverly.
CHILD CARE
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IOITA LMt


Page 6-B
*Jmlstfhridlan
Friday, May 21, 1976
0
C
I
*
Ambassador's Wife, Financial Expert
Pioneer Women Conference
Will Speak at Histadrut Women's Day Is a 'See and Learn' Event
Vivian (Mrs. Simcha) Dinitz, wife of Israel's Ambassa-
dor to the United States, will be the guest speaker at a Day
of Solidarity with the Women of Israel presented by the Is-
rael Histadrut Foundation (IHF) of South Florida on Tues-
day, June 8, at the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach.
Dr. Leon Kronish, IHF na-
tional board chairman and rabbi
of Temple Beth Sholom, made
the announcement of Mrs. Di-
nitz's acceptance, adding that
the Day of-Solidarity will have
two segments a 10:30 a.m.
seminar on "Women's Eco-
nomics 1976" followed by a
12:30 p.m. luncheon featuring
an address by Mrs. Dinitz.
"It is particularly appropriate
that this Day of Solidarity has
been scheduled for June 8,"
Rabbi Kronish said, "not only
because this is the year of soli-
darity for world Jewry with the
people of Israel, but since June
8 marks the anniversary of the
reunification of the city of Jeru-
salem, the day that Israel won
its victory in the Six-Day War."
RABBI KRONISH continued,
"The women of South Florida
have an opportunity to make
this day just as significant as
the date was nine years ago."
The Day of Solidarity with
the Women of Israel, which is
being presented in association
with the Pioneer Women Coun-
cil of South Florida, will begin
with an informative seminar
providing guidance for women
in understanding today's com-
plex financial problems.
Carol Rutgers Mathews, fi-
nancial analyst and columnist
of The New York Post, will be
among the economic specialists
participating in the seminar,
according to Lillian (Mrs. Leon)
Kronish, Women's Day general
chairman.
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
of the Pioneer Women Council
and of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida, will
moderate the seminar panel.
The American-born Mrs. Di-
nitz met her husband while she
was attending the University of
Cincinnati. They were married
in 1954 and lived for several
years in Washington, where she
worked as a research analyst
and later at the Department of
Health. Education and Welfare.
WHEN THEY were called
back to Israel, Mrs. Dinitz work-
ed in the public relations office
of a major philanthropic organ-
ization. In Israel she is a mem-
ber of the University Women's
Association and of Imahot Ov-
dot (Working Mothers).
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion provides financial support
for the vast network of Histad-
rut social service institutions
At a recent bruncheon committee were Women's Day
general chairman Lillian (Mrs. Leon) Kronish (right)
and Mildred (Mrs. Philip) Sahl, president of the Hista-
drut Women's Council. The women have begun prep-
arations for the Day of Solidarity with the Women of
Israel set by the IHF for June 8 at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
iC\
A P CT X(S E I T A S) N E
A.
ANSWERS: Gratz, Simon, Josephson, Isaacs, Lopez,
Seixas, Sasportas, Moses, Levy, Hart, Salomon, Franks.
in Israel, and is currently di-
recting its major efforts toward
providing tow-cost housing for
Israeli veterans through the
Histadrut Annuity Trust Fund.
Tickets for the June 8 Day of
Solidarity with the Women of
Israel are available through the
Histadrut Foundation Miami
Beach office.
MS. MATHEWS
MRS. DINITZ
not
be
KIDDUSHIN MATRIMONIAL
BUREAU
"And the L-rd G-d said "It ii
good that the man should
alone ..." Oen. 2:18
For those who wish to meet
Baalabatisha individuals with
marriage as the goal. Call
947-6615 or write to L.C.,
P.O.B. 01-2973 for an appoint-
ment. No calls Shabbat or Yom
Tov.
It
T
W
URNS
RAVEL
ORLD. INC.
The youngest member of Pio-
neer Women, which is convened
its 50th Jubilee Conference in
Israel this month, participated
in a ceremony on Independence
Day Eve on Mount Herzl in Je-
rusalem. Mimi Dryce, the lone
non-Israeli among the young
people who lighted candles, is
an 18-year-old third-generation
Pioneer Woman and grand-
daughter of the organization's
national president.
The conference is a "see and
learn" event, according to the
conference chairman, national
vice president Lillian Hantman.
The participants can familiar-
ize themselves with Israel's so-
cial and cultural problems, visit
such Pioneer Women installa-
tions as nurseries, day-care cen-
ters, vocational and agricultural
schools, and attend seminars
with heads of local agencies
and facilities to discuss and
reassess the social services Is-
rael's difficult economic situa-
tion now demands.
Four Pioneer Women projects
were to be dedicated: the Beba
Idelson World Center in Tel
Aviv, Ben-Gurion University's
Status of Women Research Cen-
ter in Beersheba, an addition to
the Kanot Agricultural High
School in Ashkelon and the JNF
American Bicentennial National
Park near Jerusalem.
IN OTHER Pioneer Women
news, a 49-year-old Arab widow
supporting nine children be-
came Israel's first Arab Woman
of the Year. Mrs. Hamda Sa-
walha of Kfar Kara in the west-
ern Galilee received a medal-
lion from Mrs. Tamar Eshel,
general secretary of Moetzet
Hapoalot, which with Pioneer
Women is responsible for train-
ing programs for thousands of
Arab women in 33 Israeli towns
and villages.
At the 25th annual conven-
tion of the Association of Amer-
icans and Canadians in Israel
held at Beersheba, the Henriet-
ta Szold Award was presented
to three former Pioneer Women
presidents Dr. Sara Feder-
Keyfitz. Rose Kaufman and Es-
ther Zackler.
Israeli Guest at Hadassah Dinner
Mrs. Jean Feinberg, presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Chap-
ter of Hadassah, has announced
that Dr. Shamay Cotev of the
Hadassah Hebrew University
Medical Center will be the guest
speaker at the annual donor
dinner dance this Sunday eve-
ning at the Deauville Hotel.
Dr. Cotev, a Sabra, was grad-
uated in medicine from the Uni-
versity of Chicago and returned
to Israel to specialize in anes-
thesia and critical care at the
Hadassah Medical Center. He
was responsible for the estab-
lishment of the Intensive Re-
spiratory Care Unit within the
Department of Anesthesia,
which he now directs.
Entertainment at the dinner
will be supplied by the Mara-
kesh Express. Donor chairman
is Mrs. Sylvia Kurland. and Mrs
Millie Mintus is cochairman.
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in IBCATNf. FLA. 1314*
(305)361-9111


Friday, May 21, 1976
*Jenisti fhridRan
Page 7-B
*
/*
>
Florida Friends of Yeshiva
Plan Tribute to Dr. Belkin
A memorial service for the
late Dr. Samuel Belkin will be
held on Tuesday. June 1, at 8
p.m. at the Greater Miami He-
brew Academy, 2400 Pine Tree
Dr., Miami Beach.
Dr. Belkin, who passed away
April 19, was named chancellor
of Yeshiva University, retiring
after 32 years as its president,
a term believed to be the long-
est in office among the nation's
major university presidents.
During his term of office, to
which he was elected when he
was not quite 32 years old, Dr.
Belkin transformed a small col-
lege into a major university,
America's first under Jewish
auspices. His pioneering admin-
istration also saw the establish-
ment of the only liberal arts
college for women under Jew-
ish sponsorship and of graduate
schools of social work, social
science, science, the humanities
and law, and the Albert Ein-
stein College of Medicine.
ENROLLMENT under his
leadership grew from 850 to
7,000, the full-time faculty from
94 to 1,500, the annual operat-
ing budget from $444,000 to
$100 million, research grants
totaling $25 million and physi-
cal facilities from one building
to four maor campuses valued
in excess of $100 million.
Dr. Belkin, who was born in
Poland and studied at the Ye-
shivas of Mir and Radun, was
ordained by the latter when he
was 17. Coming to the United
States when he was 18, he mas-
tered English and studied at
Harvard and Brown Universi-
ties, from which he received
his Ph.D.
He became an instructor in
Greek at Yeshiva College in
1935 and in the Talmud at Rab-
bi Isaac Elchanan Theological
DR. SAMUEL BELKIN
Seminary in the following year.
Rising on the academic ladder,
he became a full professor at
Yeshiva College in 1940 and
dean of the seminary upon the
death of Dr. Bernard Revel. In
May of 1943 Dr. Belkin was
elected president and imme-
diately began an expansion of
the college which led to its be-
ing granted university status by
the New York State Board of
Regents.
Dr. Belkin was a prolific writ-
er, whose works include "Philo
and Oral Law." "Essays in Tra-
ditional Jewish Thought," and
"Questions and Answers in
Genesis and Exodus." among
many other works.
The Florida Friends of Ye-
shiva University, committee
chairmen Theodore Baumritter
and Peter Goldring and honor-
ary chairmen Paul Benjamin
and Joseph M. Drexler, have
invited the entire community to
join in the June 1 tribute to the
memory of this beloved and
revered leader and scholar.
Conference Will Probe
Religion, Ethnic Studies
The place of religion and eth-
nic studies in public education
is subject of a two-day confer-
ence for educators and concern-
ed citizens, co-sponsored by the
Florida Regional Office of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'-
nai B'rith and the American In-
stitute of Polish Culture. The
conference will be held on Mon-
day and Tuesday, May 24-25,
at Temple Israel, .137 NE 19th
St., Miami.
Supported by a grant from
the Florida Endowment for the
Humanities, the statewide con-
ference will examine whether
the public school system, from
elementary grades through the
universities, should and can
adequatelv provide sound guide-
lines for dealing with problems
of ethnic and religious identity.
Project director for the con-
ference, Dr. Edward Wynot, a
professor at Florida State Uni-
versity, said, "In our pluralistic
society the Question of whether
public education should and is
able to deal leffectively with
religious and ethnic themes is
one of crucial importance to all
Americans."
Dr. Michael Novak, regarded
as one of America's outstanding
sociologists, will speak at the
conference. He is the author of
"The Unmeltable Ethnics," and
is a former director of the
Rockefeller Foundation in New
York.
Registration information is
available from the Anti-Defama-
tion League's Miami office. Or
by phone, 373-6306.
Or Olom Installs Officers
On Sunday, May 23, at 8 p.m.
the following officers will be in-
stalled at Temple Or Olom: Ted
Sloan, temple president; San-
ford Bochner. Brotherhood
president; Minna (Mrs. Joseph)
Katz. Sisterhood president.
11% RETURN
WITH SAFETY
C.lt.t.r.1 mmi r.n.l raaHas
BFOCD MMTMM COMANY
MTS ASX-MM IW WM74*
HOLLYWOOD & MIAMI
Henry A. Klein has joined
the funeral directing staff
of Levitt Memorial Chapel
in Hollywood and North Mi-
ami. The announcement
was made by Cantor Man-
uel Mandel and Sonny Le-
vitt, who said that Klein
has been affiliated exclu-
sively with Jewish funeral
homes in South Florida
since 196S.
Honorees at the Women for Jewish Na-
tional Fund luncheon at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel on June 2 are (from left) Gus
(Mrs. Emanuel) Mentz, Mrs. Jean Fein-
berg, Mrs. Harriet Green, Mrs. Aaron
Katz, Mrs. Maxwell Weissberg, Mrs. Har-
vey Friedman and Kathy (Mrs. Richard)
Schwarz.
Pioneer Women
A new film on Israel, present-
ed by El Al Israel Airlines, will
be premiered on Wednesday,
May 26, at a meeting of the
Golda Meir Chapter. The 12:30
p.m. meeting at the Washington
Federal civic auditorium is open
to the general public without
charge.
Katherine (Mrs. David) Lipp-
man will chair the meeting, with
Claire (Mrs. William) Balaban
as publicity chairman. Refresh-
ments will be served.
a & it
Eilat Chapter will hold a be-
lated Mother's Day program on
Tuesday, May 25, at 7:30 p.m.,
also at Washington Federal.
Frieda Levitan and Faye
Brucker are cochairmen of the
program committee. Rena Mil-
ler will preside, and Sara Bruck-
er is publicity chairman. Ad-
mission is free and the public
is invited.
Honorees at the program will
be Silvia Callis and Eva Kauf-
man, who will be recognized
for "outstanding leadership for
the Jewish people, the State of
Israel, the Zionist Movement
and the Pioneer Women."
Rabbi Leading
Israel Tour
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
of Temple Judea will lead a
tour to Israel this summer.
In an effort to get more Jews
to visit Israel, Rabbi Eisenstat
is opening the trip to the Jew-
ish community and is repeating
last year's itinerary, which in-
cludes such highlights as a
flight to Sharm el-Sheikh, a trip
to the Strait of Tiran, a visit
with a Foreign Office official, a
night at the Dead Sea and spe-
cial services at the Western
Wall.
Wholesale Distributors o*
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Israel Consul to Speak At
Women for JNF Luncheon
Abraham Grunhut, president
of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, Foundation chairman,
have announced that Zeidan
Atashi, Consul of Israel at the
UN Mission in New York, will
be the guest speaker at the
Women for Jewish National
Fund Luncheon on June at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
Honorees arc Mrs. Jean Fein-
berg, president, Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah; Mrs.
Harvey Friedman, president,
Miami Chapter of Hadassah;
Mrs. Harriet Green, president.
Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida; Mrs. Aaron Katz.
president, Council of American
Mizrachi Women; Mrs. Maxwell
L. Weisberg, president, Florida
Region of Hadassah.
Atashi, who was born in Osi-
fiya, a Druze village on Mount
Carmel in Israel, was educated
in Nazareth and joined the Is-
rael Delense Force in 1961.
When the Histadrut inaugurated
its program of courses for train-
ing Arab youth, he worked with
the youth of the Druze commu-
nity and was appointed deputy
director general of the Arab and
Druze Workers Youth Move-
ment.
After a stint in the Arabic
Department of Israel television,
he taught at Haifa University
and from 1972-75 was Consul
for Information in New York.
Sisterhood Gives Emanu-El
Youth Activities Building;
Groundbreaking and dedication ceremonies for a new
Youth Activities building, to be constructed by the Sister-
hood of Temple Emanu-EI as a gift to the congregation, will
be held on Sunday, June 6, at 11 a.m. The Sisterhood's gift
was applauded by Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of Temple
Emanu-EI, Samuel N. Friedland, board chairman, and Judge
Frederick N. Barad, congregation president.
The two-story building, which
will be built at the rear of the
temple's main sanctuary, will
pel "tit 11 'expansion of the tem-
ple's youth programs and will
include a kitchen, boys' and
fiirls' showers, and rooms for
gymnastics, arts and crafts,
meetings and lectures.
Announcement of the con-
struction was made by Judy
(Mrs. Jerome) Uffner, Sister-
hood president, and Mel (Mrs.
Benjamin) Beloff, building com-
mittee chairman. Ruth (Mrs.
Bernard D.) Kaplan is cochair-
man of the committee. Mrs. Be-
loff announced that builders
Jack Taylor and Ronald Ager,
members of the temple, have
been named chairmen of the
building advisory committee.
Dr. Lehrman will officiate at
the dedication ceremonies fol-
lowing traditional groundbreak-
ing activities, which are open to
the entire community. Federal,
state, county and city officials
have been invited to participate.
Temple Israel Honoring Graduates
Eighteen young men and
women. 16 of whom began their
religious education in the pri-
mary grades at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, will be grad-
uated from the senior high
school at services this evening.
A tribute will be paid to Rabbi
Robert Orkand, who has com-
pleted a four-year internship as
assistant to Dr. Joseph R. Narot
and will assume a pulpit of his
own in Rockford, 111., in July.
The ceremonies mark the 20th
year of a senior high school pro-
gram at the pioneer Reform
Jewish congregation.
The following awards also
will be made: the Michael-Ann
Russell and Jonathan Adam
Award for Youth Group Leader-
ship, Lara Wolin; the Lillian K.
Lewis Memorial Award for
Youth Group Leadership, Bev-
erly Engel; the David Bornstein
Memorial Award. NFTY Nation-
al Academy, Isaac Serotta; the
Irving Fdnberg Memorial
Award, SEFTY Institute, Patti
Rackoff; Brotherhood Award for
achievement in Hebrew studies,
Andrew Fisher; the Alan Rack-
off Memorial President's Award.
Temple Israel Youth Group.
Isaac Serotta.
Sisterhood Awards to Confir-
mation students, SEFTY Instit-
ute, Bryan Daves, Ellen Kan-
ner, Pamela Kohn, Keith Krieg-
ler. Jill RaDperport, Daniel Sha-
piro, Diane Sokoloff and Michael
Wulfe.
The graduates of the class of
1976 are Ross Burger, Kathie
Goldman. Jeffrey Gross, Leslie
Gusky, Jack Kline, Jay Korn-
gold, Michele Krjegler, Ilene
Litvak, Jason Meyer, Sandra
Robbins. A 1 a n a Rosenberg,
Charles Ruzow. Robin Schil-
linger, Shelley Seder. Albert
Swartz, Jodi White, Bruce Wil-
pon and Michael Wohlgemuth.
Michele Kriegler and Jason
Meyer an the valedictorian*.


.Page 8-B
* Jew is* HoridUar
Friday, May 21, 1976
1:
Ol
I
N
A
'^Points of 'Viev;
with NORM* A. OROVITZ
In an epilogue to his recently-
published book. "The Rabbi's
Message--Modern Thoughts on
Ancient Philosophy," Phineas
Weberman explains his modus
operandi. As rabbi of Miami
Beach's Northshore Orthodox
congregation, Ohev Shalom
(Love of Peace). Rabbi Weber-
man links himself in spirit and
deeds with his rabbinic for-
bears. He writos that his an-
tecedents fled Reform in-
fluenced Germany for the "more
religious atmosphere of Chasi-
dic Galicia.'
In a surface contradiction,
however, Rabbi Weberman
came to Miami Beach 16 years
ago and established his presence
where there was no apparent
need or request. Then, he once
again linked up with his past,
gathering to his rabbinic breast
those who would follow him in
striving towards Orthodoxy.
Note that Orthodoxy is not a
place or plateau. Rather, it is a
verb of becoming.
IN AN effort to explain the
maintainance of the Judaic unity
that links Jews of today with
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and
to the future, Ohev Shalom was
the host congregation for an-
other of the learning sessions
sponsored by Synagogue Wom-
en of Dade County.
In an earlier learning session
at 'Beth Torah, Rabbi Max Lip-
schitz spoke of the importance
of another Jewish unity"K'lal
Yisrael" the community of
Israel. A "catholic" Israel would
provide for the unity of all Jew-
ish peoples.
Rabbi Weberman, in hosting
the morning that attracted wom-
en of varied synagogue affilia-
tions, strove to introduce the
group to an historical unity. He
assumed the responsibility for
exposing Jewish women "to in-
formation to which they are
entitled" how to unify them-
selves with their collective past
through an Orthodox lifestyle
for the preservation of that past.
CONSCIOUSLY proselytizing
to fellow Jews may have been
the purpose but the group did
not seem to mind being a cap-
tive audience. The women had
come to learn some unabash-
edly curious.
Susan Rachleff, president of
Temple Sinai Sisterhood, said
she had never been inside an
Orthodox shul and felt the need
for mutual understanding. Beth
Sholom's Shirley Miller, whose
grandparents were Orthodox,
was herself reared in a Con-
servative and then Reform at-
mosphere.
She came to Ohev Shalom to
see if Orthodox Jews had be-
come "more modern." (To point
up the importance of sharing
Jewish lifestyles, Shirley noted
the sometime lack of under-
standing among co-religionists.
"We less traditional Jews
command as much respect as
they traditional Jews de-
mand.")
Rita Ullman, of Temple Is-
rael, though Reform, felt it in-
cumbent upon herself to have
at least a cursory acquaintance
with Orthodoxy.
THE PRESENTATION was
divided up into categories:
home observances, marriage,
family purity (mikveh observ-
ance), tefillin, zemirot (shabbat
hymns), and a general over-
view of an Orthodox lifestyle by
Lydia Goldring.
Lydia delightfully mimed the
Geritol commercial to analogize
Orthodoxy "I eat right. I take
care of myself."
Joan Ciment explained how
observant Jews do not consider
their lives ones of self-denial
but of self-restraint. The out-
look makes the difference, much
like the hypothetical cup being
either half empty or half full.
While Barbara Eisenberg dis-
cussed marriage, and Rabbi We-
berman described the beauty of
the shul's physical plant, the
most interest was generated by
Roz Paul's talk on mikveh.
Roz, a lovely young woman
who still looks dewy and bride-
like in her late twenties, told of
the renewed spiritual awaken-
ing she experiences each month.
She spoke of the mutual anti-
cipation she and her husband
share as the time for Roz's im-
mersion approaches followed by
the first intimacy of the month.
THERESE STISS from Tem-
ple Zion said afterwards that
her "shtetl" preconceptions of
Orthodoxy dissolved that morn-
ing and that "mikveh sounds in-
viting. I just might go!" Miriam
Cannon, also from Temple Zion,
commented on how much her
traditions (she is Conservative)
are a part of Orthodoxy.
Carole Green (Temple Israel)
thought the aspects of family
unity were "great." She was
much impressed with Rabbi
Weberman's bantering good hu-
mor during the question and
answer period though his de-
scription of the Orthodox treat-
ment of women had "a long way
to come."
It seems, according to the
Rabbi, that modesty is the cen-
tral issue in a woman's place
and non-participatory nature
within an Orthodox shul. It
would be immodest for a wom-
an to make a public declaration
(i.e. reading from the Torah).
Whether the women agreed
with the rationale or bought the
premise is immaterial. At least,
they heard the reasoning for
many of Orthodoxy's behavioral
prescriptions. And that is
healthy.
ANOTHER cleric, speaking to
another issue, analogized the
challenges inherent in a learn-
ing experience. "To listen is not
necessarily to approve, to re-
port is not necessarily to en-
dorse, to study is not neces-
sarily to change but not to con-
sult is to fail."
Ohev Shalom was not the
original host for the third ex-
periential learning session plan-
ned by Synagogue Women of
Dade County.
But, in welcoming the wom-
en to his religious home, Rabbi
Weberman laid the groundwork
for the expansion of under-
standing of common Judaic
links. He talked with fellow
Jews about their shared heritage
and unity and that may make
for Rabbi Lipschitz's "K'lal Yis-
rael."
Douglas Gardens
Participates In
APA Convention
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged was pro-
minent in activities at the re-
cent 129th annual meeting of
the American Psychiatric Asso-
ciation in Miami Beach attend-
ed by 9,000 psychiatrists.
Psychiatrists toured the fa-
cility on May 11, observing the
patient care concept implement-
ed at Douglas Gardens and vis-
iting the Outpatient Mental
Health Clinic and the Douglas
Gardens-City of Miami Senior
Adult Day Center.
"Geropsychiatric Management
in a Long-Term Facility" was
the subject of a seven-credit
course given at the home on
May 12, with material present-
ed by Dr. Jack Skigen, director
of neuropsychiatry; Dr. Charles
Beber, medical director; Fred
D. Hirt, executive director;
Marc Litchtman, associate di-
rector; Dr. Jeffrey R. Solomon,
director of community services;
and Jan Maizler, caseworker.
The course offered participants
a multidimensional view of psy-
chiatric care for geriatric pa-
tients in nursing facilities.
ON MAY 13, at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel, Douglas Gardens
presented a panel, "Outpatient
Geriatric Mental Health: a Pro-
gram Review." Hirt, Drs. Ski-
gen and Solomon, and Waldo
Ellison described approaches to
outpatient treatment of the eld-
erly.
Judge Murray Goodman,
chairman of the mental health
committee, said, "It is with great
pride that we accept the na-
tional recognition of the quality
and innovations of our pro-
grams, and the APA's interest
in services to the elderly fur-
ther ensures our commitment to
being in the forefront of this
developing field."
Brandeis Honors
Area Students
Brandeis University has an-
nounced that three area stu-
dents have been awarded fel-
lowships and scholarships for
foreign study.
Edward Ramos of Miami, one
of four juniors named recipients
of Sachar International Fellow-
ships, will study history and
Latin American affairs in Paris
during the 1976-77 academic
year.
Larry Backer and Mark Berg-
er of Miami Beach were among
eight juniors who received
Saval-Sachar Summer Research
Scholarships. Backer will study
poverty in 18th-century Spain,
using archives in Salamanca
province, while Berger will
study with artists at the Paris
Studio School.
Orthodox Union
Honors Berkowitz
Murray Berkowitz, of Miami
Beach's Beth Israel Congrega-
tion, will be among leaders from
the Orthodox community to be
honored at the national dinner
of the Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America
this Sunday at the New York
Hilton.
The guest of honor and reci-
pient of the UOJCA Kether
Shem Tov Award is Marcus
Rosenberg, of Dallas. Elie
Wiesel, author and lecturer, will
be guest speaker, according to
an announcement by UOJCA
president Harold M. Jacobs and
dinner committee chairman So-
lomon T. Scharf.
The UOJCA is central spokes-
man for Orthodox synagogue in
North America.
Temple Emanu-El
Hailing Parents
This Saturday is observed as
VIP (Very Interested Parents)
Sabbath and Parents Day at
Temple Emanu-El. Students of
the religious school and the
Lehrman Day School will pre-
set a cantata, "Hail to Parents,"
directed by Trixie Levin.
Following the services there
will be a luncheon at the tem-
ple to honor parents. Lorraine
(Mrs. Carol) Greenberg is VIP
Sabbath chairman.
CoL Nathaniel H. Kutcher, president of B'nai B'rith Judea
Lodge No. 2855, was elected third vice president of the Florida
Federation of B'nai B'rith at the recent convention.
Ben Kutcher, the Lodge's program chairman for the past five
years, received a plaque for providing the best programs of any
lodge in the state.
Abe Swirsky, chairman of the community and veterans ac-
tivities committee, received the Leo Steinman Award for provid-
ing services to veterans and needy seniors in Miami Beach.
ft ft ft
JWV Ladies Auxiliary No. 330 has announced that its new
officers for the coming year are Bessie Gibber, president; Millie
Moser and Jean Katzman, vice presidents; Freda Liebman, record-
ing secretary; Minnie Hopen, treasurer.
ft ft ft
Morris N. Broad, chairman of the board of American Savings
and Loan, presided at a recent press conference conducted by the
Dade Safety Council. He is chairman of the council's current fund-
ing program. Metro Mayor Steve Clark attended the conference
and presented a proclamation to council president Martin Yelen.
ft ft ft
Mrs. M. S. Farrar, of the Coral Gables Garden Club, has de-
signed the State of Florida arrangement for the Miami Beach
International Flower Show at the Convention Center through May
24.
ft ft ft
In honor of the 50th wedding anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Max
Spiegel will host the Oneg Shabbat this evening at Temple Beth
Tov.
ft ft ft
Norman Braman, president, has announced that Braman Ca-
dillac has acquired Rolls Royce and BMW franchises. Both will
be housed on Biscayne Blvd., just north of the Cadillac facility.
ft ft ft
Judy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Feder, received an
award from the Greater Miami Chapter of the National Women's
Committee of Brandeis University for her prize-winning essay,
"The Influence of Louis Brandeis on American Jurisprudence."
She is a student at the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy.
ft ft ft
Ms. Louise Klein, who received her Master's degree from FIU,
has opened a family counseling office and educational diagnosis
service in Miami Beach. She is certified by the State of Florida
as a school psychologist and guidance counselor.
ft ft ft
Mrs. Carol Jacobs' son Richard has been named to the Dean's
List, the class Honor Roll and Phi Lamda Upsilon, the national
chemistry honor society, at Duke University, where he has just
completed his third year as a pre-med student.
ft ft ft
More than 50 members of the Women's Auxiliary of the Tal-
mudic College of Florida attended a luncheon on May 16 at the
home of Mrs. Phyllis Bastacky, member of the board of direc-
tors. Among the guests were Mrs. Yochanan Zweig, wife of the
dean of the college, and Mrs. Jacob Poupko, wife of the assistant
dean.
Mrs. Gabriel Deutsch led the program, which included a talk
by Alfred Union, Mesivta graduate and yeshiva student.
ft ft ft
University of Miami art school graduate Charles Bernstein
will exhibit oils of South Florida landscapes beginning June 1 at
the Kings Bay Yacht and Tennis Club. He teaches art at Coral
Gables High.
ft ft ft
Joe Donate and Friends plan a jazz performance to raise
funds for the University of Miami Jazz Band's trip to the July
World Jazz Festival in Switzerland. The benefit will be at the
university's Gusman Concert Hall at 8 p.m. on Sunday.
Open House at Hebrew Academy
Annual open house of the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy will be held Monday, May
24, through Friday, May 28.
Guided tours will depart from
the administration office daily
at 10 and 11 a.m., noon, 1 and
2 p.m., according to Norman
Ciment. the school's president.
Parents of students and pros-
pective students will be able to
see classes in session, audito-
riums, libraries, the dining room
and kitchens, athletic fields, lec-
ture halls and other facilities.
Yaffa (Mrs. Jay) Dermer,
chairman of Open House Week[
is working with Rabbi Alexan-
der S. Gross, principal; Mrs.
Stephanie Gurland, president of
the PTA; and Mrs. Irene Adler,
president of the Hebrew Acad-
emy Women, in arranging the
week's activities.
Founded 28 years ago, the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy is a beneficiary agency of
the Greater Miami Federation
and an affiliate of Torah Ume-
sorah, the National Society of
Hebrew Day Schools.
Registration for kindergarten,
nursery school, elementary
school, junior high school and
senior high school classes has
begun, according to Mrs. Sarah
Rodnon, registrar.
Week Acknowledges
Big Brothers, Big Sisters
The week of May 16 to 21
was designated Big Brother-Big
Sister Week in Dade County.
Festivities included a picnic at
Crandon Park and the annual
banquet at the Dupont Plaza
Hotel.
Each of the more than 450
Big Brothers and Big Sisters in
Dade County spends a few hours
weekly with a child from a
single-parent home
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO VIEW THE EXHIBIT OF
OILS AD ACRYLICS
BY VENEZUELAN ARTIST
LALA HERRERA S.
May 24-June 11, 1976
WEEKDAYS 9 A.M. TO 7:30 P.M.
BACARDI ART GALLERY
i>
1100 Biteaynt Blvd.. Mitml. Florid*.


.- Friday, May 21, 1976
>Je*isti ftvrkUnn
f
Page 9-B
Israel Bond Worldwide Head to Speak
At Menorah Banquet Honoring Abramowitz
BB Women Install Officers
Michael Arnon, head of the
Israel Bond Organization, will
join members of Temple Me-
M1CHAEL ARNON
norah and community leaders
in honoring Rabbi Mayer Abra-
mowitz on his 25th anniversary
as spiritual leader of his con-
gregation at a Silver Anniver-
sary banquet, Saturday, June 5,
Confirmation At
Temple Zion
At services this evening at
Temple Zion 12 students who
have completed the tenth grade
of the religious school will con-
firm their devotion to Judaism.
The confirmands have been
part of the Judaica High School,
a joint program of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
ard Temple Zion, for the past
three years.
The Post and Auxiliary will
cosponsor the Oneg Shabbat on
May 28 at 8 p.m. at Temple
Beth Am in memory of mem-
bers of the armed forces. M. Jay
Berliner, past department com-
mander.i s guest speaker that
weekend-
The members of the class will
participate in the service and
present a cantata directed by
Cantor Errol Helfman. Rabbi
Norman N. Shapiro will officiate
and bless the confirmands,
who are: Sharon Berenfeld, Jef-
frey H. Cannon, Rena Lee Col-
skv Regina Ann Driesen, Marc
H. Farber, Jordan S. Garber,
llene Beth Greenbaum, Steven
L. Greenstein, Rochelle J. Gross,
Lissa H. Horenstein, Laura R.
Newman and Stacy M. Weiner.
at 8:30 p.m. at the Carillon Ho-
tel.
The announcement that Ar-
non, secretary of the Govern-
ment and Cabinet of Israel for
six years, will be the speaker
was made by Gidale Feldenkreis
and Isidore Wollowick, cochair-
men of the celebration.
Rabbi Abramowitz, who came
to the Miami Beach congrega-
tion as spiritual leader in 1951,
had distinguished himself as a
Bricha leader as a chaplain in
the U.S. Armed Forces during
World War II, aiding many im-
migrants to escape to Palestine
via the underground pipeline
from Russia, Poland, Germany-
Austria and Italy following the
Holocaust. From 1948 to 1951
he served the Joint Distribution
Committee in Italy and helped
liquidate the displaced persons
camps there.
DURING his 25 years as rabbi
of Temple Menorah, Rabbi
Abramowitz has spearheaded
many communal causes and has
given leadership to the needs of
Israel.
Robert L. Siegel, chairman of
the board of Temple Menorah
and Greater Miami Israel Bonds
campaign chairman, noted that
"Rabbi Abramowitz has wedded
his rabbinate at Temple Me-
norah to the cause of Israel.
Those of us who are associated
with him on behalf of the religi-
ous needs of our community, as
well as in the cause of Israel,
arc deeply grateful to hav^Jiis
constant inspiration."
Siegel expressed gratification
that Michael Arnon, president
and chief executive officer of
the Israel Bond Organization,
will join in the tribute to Rabbi
Abramowitz. Arnon has held
important positions in the gov-
ernment's information and di-
plomatic branches and has serv-
ed as Israel's Consul General in
New York and as her Ambas-
sador to Ghana.
Arnon, who began his career
on the editorial staff of the
Jerusalem Post, also was direc-
tor of the Information Division
of Israel's Ministry for Foreign
Affairs, counsel in charge of
press and information at the
Embassy in Washington and
director of the Israel Govern-
ment Press Office in Jerusalem.
His first appointment abroad
was at the Embassy in London,
where he was press attache for
three years.
Carl Rosenberg, president of
Temple Menorah, noted that the
Silver Anniversary banquet will
be a gala event with dancing
and entertainment and said
there will be no solicitation of
funds.
B'nai B'rith Women Council
of Miami Beach held their an-
nual installation of officers on
Wednesday. Mrs. Alma Hof-
stadter installed the following:
Mrs. Blanche Breitbart, presi-
dent; Mrs. Lillian Kevoe, Mrs.
Sara Senderoff, Mrs. Sadie Reif-
fen, Mrs. Frances Goldberg and
Mrs. Flora H. Sinick, vice presi-
dents: Miss Paula Tepman and
Mrs. Helen Chaimes, secre-
taries; Mrs. Betty Schaefer,
treasurer; and Mrs. Rose Litt,
parliamentarian.
Mrs. Lillian Sands was chair-
person and Alfred Goldman was
guest speaker. The invocation
was offered by Mrs. Litt, the
benediction by Mrs. Sinick.
Pearl Barnett presented musical
entertainment and brunch was
served.
YOUTH ADVISOR
Wanted by
Temple Menorah
Contact
Rabbi Abramowitz a.
866-0221 for appointment
UIPAN STUDY TOUR
TO ISRAEL
$1495 for 29 days
JULY 7-AUGUST 4, 1976
First class hotels
Round Trip Air Fare from
Miami
Breakfast and Dinner
ULPAN HEBREW STUDY
AND SIGHTSEEING
CENTRAL AGENCY FOR
JEWISH EDUCATION
Call: 576-4030
Tennis: Part of Total Jewish Life
BETH TORAH RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
IS SEEKING
QUALIFIED TEACHERS
TO ADD TO THEIR PRESENT STAFF.
If WU ARE TRULY MOTIVATED CONTACT:
RABBI NORMAN MUSSMAN at 947-7528
State-ranked players will vol-
ley with beginners, and broth-
ers with sisters at Temple
Emanu-El's first tennis tourna-
ment this Sunday at the courts
of temple members Mr. and
Mrs. Abel Holtz, Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. Rich-
ard Levy and Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Luby, Jr.
There will be trophies for
winners and runners-up in
father-child and mother-child
doubles, presented by the Capi-
tal Bank of North Bay Village,
Intercontinental Bank of Miami
Beach and Jefferson National
Bank of Miami Beach. Burton
Belenke's House of Diamonds is
contributing the engraving.
Herbert Bachwald and Mar-
tha (Mrs. Lester) Mishcon, co-
chairmen of the event, said a
dinner at the Luby home will
conclude the day's action.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi,
observed that "a tennis tour-
nament further emphasizes the
synagogue as the central ad-
dress of the Jewish community.
Family competition, in particu-
lar, enables our young people
to see that being Jewish is a
total way of life."
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry Sales Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Seventh Avenue
Miami. Fla 33136
Tel 324-1855
THE WHITE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
"Remember the way
MAMA used to cook
for the holidays?"
Great Kosher-style food.
Come to Twelve Tribes.
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just East of Biscayne Blvd.
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4:30 PM
893-5600
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8563 CORAL WAY (WESTCHESTER shoppinglaza) PHONE 264-7722


rage 10-B
vJewisti noridUan
Friday, May 21, 1976
Religions Services

Emanu-El Elects, Installs Officers
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION, 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron. 1
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. 32
>\NSHE EMES CONGREGATION.
2533 SW 19th Ave. Conservative.
Cantor Sol Pakowitz. 2
BETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Ken.
Jail Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Aatoclate Rabbi Mitchell
Chefitz. 3
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. 32-A
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chiaimovita.
32-B
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. 4-A
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. S3
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipaon. 4-B
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
IETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
del Gutterman. 6
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
81 Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bal. 8
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Nahmias. SI
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Llpachltz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelaon. S4
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 671
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. 36-A
9'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Gllxman. 8-A
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick SI
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelllng. Cantor
Jack Lerner. 36
ISRAEL 7FmTlV~o7 "GREATER VOUNO ISRAEL OF OREATER Ml-
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. Mtt. 5" N5 S* Orthodox
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10 Rabbl Zev Leff" ,________ s9
CORAl GABIES
TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
srnstm. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon 'JUDEA
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
nass. 11
--------------a-------------- --------a--------------
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th -ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
St. Conservative. Rabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
-----------a----------'
ISRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conoservative. 9
ZION TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con.
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Helfman. 16
HIALEAH
TIFERETH JCOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. 15
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
COGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
Davis. 68
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
NORTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. 38
------------------
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. 9
------------------
ETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
--------------a--------------
'BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryrl.u T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 61
FORT LAUDEHDAIE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip t. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neij 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
S. Goor. Cantor Jerome Klement.
43
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Israel Zimmerman. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 82
?BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
------------------
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chase Ave. Liberal. Dr. Ueon Kron-
Ish. Cantor David Conviaer. 21
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 2
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi Davio Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. 21-A
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
--------------
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
CORAl SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Re-form. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbl Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobaon 22-B
HAUANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conaervativa. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danzigar. 12
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph Biston. 68
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbl Dow Rozencwalg. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 716 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbl Melr Masliah
Melamed. 23-A
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservatlva. Rabbl
Sidney I. Lubin. 83
-----------a-----------
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 8. 14th
Ava. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Aaaiatant Rabbi Harvey M Roaen-
...a. 4(
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Waeh-
ington Ave. Conaervativa. Dr. Irving
ehrman. Cantor Zvl Adlar. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Plna
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
8. Groaa. 23
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
8YNAQOGUE. 1532 Waahington Ava.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tar Meyer Engal. 28
------------------
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
-Orthodox. Rabbl David Lehrfiald.
Cantor Abraham Self. 17
---------
4-UBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. 87
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4801 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 48
------------------
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conaervativa. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim 8. Liatfield.
88
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 82nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
senfield. 47-B
SOLEL TEMPLE. 6100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Fnazin. 47-c
ME NOR AH TEMPLE. 820 78th St.
Conaervativa. Rabbi Mayar Abramo-
wltx. Cantor Nice Feldman. 28
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Or.
Eugene Labovlt*. Cantor Edward
Klein. 89
OH(V SHALOM. 7088 Banlta Or. Or
thedex. Rabbl Phlneae A. PIANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 8. Nob Hill Rd. Re-
oral Reform. Rabbi Arthur S.
Abrams. 44
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7473 N.W. 4th 8t 89
MI8AMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8920 SW 88th St
Conaervativa. Rabbi Avrom Drasin.
Cantor Abraham Kutir 4a
Member of the Rabbinical Aaaoclatloa
of Greater Mlaaat
Dade County Judge Frederick
N. Barad has been reelected
president ;ind Food Fair execu-
tive Samuel N. Friedland has
been reelected chairman of the
board of Temple Emanu-El. To-
gether with other officers, di-
rectors and trustees they were
installed by Dr. Irving Lehr-
man at the congregation's semi-
annual meeting and dinner
dance in the Friedland Ball-
room last Sunday.
Friedland was temple presi-
dent when Rabbi Lehrman was
selected for the pulpit 32 years
ago, and Judge Barad worked
his way through the University
of Miami Law School by serving
as director of education and
youth activities at the syna-
gogue.
Czechoslovak-born Judge Ba-
rad is past president of the
American Jewish Congress,
Dade Chapter, and of the South
Florida Chapter of the Amer-
ican Technion Society.
OTHER officers elected and
installed include Herbert S. Sha-
piro, vice chairman of the
board, and vice presidents Sam
Adler, Irving Cowan, Dr. Max-
well Dauer, Abel Holtz, Dr.
Sherman R. Kaplan, Harry A.
Levy, Stephen Muss, Milton
Sirkin, Michael Taines and
Leonard Zilbert.
Honorary vice presidents are
Col. Jacob M. Arvey, Sam Blank,
Irving Cypen, Dr. Stanley Freh-
ling, Charles Fruchtman, Abe
Green, Samuel J. Halperin, Sam-
uel Lipton, Harry Millman, A. J.
Molasky, Emil Morton, Matthew
B. Rosenhaus, Harry Rott, Herb-
ert Sadkin, Jack Silverman,
William Silverstein and George
J. Talianoff.
Other officers include Barton
S. Goldberg and Murry Koret-
zky, secretaries; Jules P. Chan-
ning, Dr. Jack J. Falk and Carol
Greenberg, associate secre-
taries; Jack Taylor, treasurer;
Leonard Friedland, Samuel
Katz, Larry Paskow and Law-
rence M. Schantz, associate
treasurers; Herbert Buchwald,
financial secretary; Myron H.
Cohen and Allen Goldberg, as-
sociate financial secretaries; Dr.
Herman R. Mechlowitz and Al-
bert Ossip, recording secre-
taries; and Jack Cooper, Leon
A. Epstein, David Neal Heller
and Oscar Mamber, associate
recording secretaries.
Iff
FRIEDLAND
m
m
JUDGE BARAD
South Florida Pioneer Women
Install Officers at Luncheon
Harriet (Mrs. Milton) Green
has been reelected president of
the Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida, which represents
19 Pioneer Women chapters and
clubs in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach Counties.
She was installed at a recent
luncheon at which awards were
presented to more than 60 wom-
en for outstanding efforts as
volunteers during the organiza-
tion's Golden Jubilee year.
Mrs. Green is president of the
South Florida Zionist Federa-
tion, past national vice presi-
dent of the American Zionist
Federation and a member of the
national board of directors of
Bar-Ilan University.
She has been a leader for
State of Israel Bonds, the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation,
United Jewish Appeal and num-
erous other organizations, and
coordinator of the South Florida
celebration of Yom Haatzmaut,
Israel Independence Day, for
the past several years.
ELECTED as vice presidents
of the South Florida Council
were Gisela (Mrs. Siegfried)
Gutter,, Bertha (Mrs. George)
Liebmann and Felice (Mrs. Ge-
rald) Schwartz. Other officers
are Margot (Mrs. Nathan) Berg-
thal, treasurer; Lillian (Mrs.
Sam) Davis, financial secretary;
Mrs. Sarah Kaufman, recording
secretary; and Mrs. Dora Hal-
pern, corresponding secretary.
Pioneer Women, the world's
largest Jewish organization with
more than 860,000 members in
the United States, Israel and 12
other countries, supports the
women's and youth educational,
health and welfare programs in
Israel of its sister organization,
Moetzet Hapoalot. Mrs. Golda
Meir is the former national
head of the Pioneer Women in
the United States; Leah (Mrs.
Yitzhak) Rabin, wife of Israel's
Prime Minister, is an active
leader of Pioneer Women.
Pioneer Women is an official
agency of Youth Aliyah, the
worldwide network that helps
to rescue Jewish children from
lands in which they are per-
secuted or unable to practice
their faith.
Mirmelli Named Chairman Of
Annual Landow Yeshiva Dinner
;qmcare|
INC.g
NURSES
CARE FOR THE
SICK or ELDERLY
In their own homes, in Nursing
homes, or in the Hospital 24 hr
service 7 days a week
Call anytime, 751 -6280
RABBINICAl ASSOCIATION Of
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Blscayna Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 579-4000. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Executive Vlca President.
UNION Or AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4S63. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SVNAOOOUf Of AMIRICA
18JO NE 143rd St, North Miami
Saymotrr Friedman Executive
Director.
each. Fla. 89192. 47.eo4. Rabbi
According to Jack Burstein,
president of the Landow Yeshi-
va/Lubavitch Educational Cen-
ter, Miami attorney Stewart
Mirmelli has been named din-
ner chairman of the annual
Founders' banquet, scheduled
for June 6 in the Main Ball-
room of the Konover Hotft-l.
Guest of honor is entertainer
Theo Bikel.
The Founders, each of whom
has given at least $25,000 to
the yeshiva, will receive the
Ner Award a sculpture of
Hassidim whose dance develops
into the light of the Shabbos
candles on one side and an in-
scription from a Psalm of David
on the other.
The Ner Award, created by
sculptor Kenneth Treister and
cast especially for this occasion,
reflects the spirit of the recent
campaign of the Lubavitcher
Rebbe. Rabbi Menachem M.
Schneerson, urging all women
and girls to light Shabbos can-
dles. The candelabrum was
carved in Honduras with the
Hebrew words "Neros Shabbos
Kodesh" (the holy candles of
Sabbath).
The Founders will receive
their awards from Treister and
Melvin S. Landow. president of
the Founders' Club. They will
also receive medallions describ-
ing them as Founders of the
Landow Yeshiva/Lubavitch Edu-
cational Center.
HONOREES are Mrs. Regina
Brandes, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Burns. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bur-
stein. Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Cohen. Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell
Dauer. Mr. and Mrs. S. Hallock
HF-A: Mland Mre David
BE* ** FarreU, Mr. and
Mrs. Melvin Feh. Dr. and Mrs.
M. S. Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest
Gerstein, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon
Garazi, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald
Gordon. Dr. and Mrs. Abel
Holtz, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Hutner, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin
S. Landow, Mr. and Mrs. Levitz,
Mr. and Mrs. William Liss, Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Margulius, Mr.
and Mrs. Morton Ma^berg, Mr.
and Mrs. William Mechanic,
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Moses,
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Retter, Mr.
and Mrs. C. W. Robbins, Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Rubin, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Russell, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Schechter, Mrs. Etta
Schiff, Mrs. Rose Ansel, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Schmuckler, Dr.
and Mrs. Marvin Shuster, Mr.
and Mrs. Irvin Siegel, William
Silverstein, Mr. and Mrs. Boris
Stulman and Mr. and Mrs. Leon-
ard Zilbert.
More than 700 people are ex-
pected to participate in the ban-
quet, at which other guests will
be honored with the Shofar
Award, created by Miami artist
King Rich.
Serving with Mirmelli as
honorary chairman are Dr. and
Mrs. Maxwell Dauer, longtime
supporters of the Landow Ye-
shiva / Lubavitch Educational
Center.
Cochairmen of the event are
Dr. Marvin Shuster and William
Mechanic. Committee chairmen
are Dr. Lee Goldberg. Dr. Nor-
man Ditchek, Barry Bogin, Phl-
lio Brafman, Dr. Michael Gold-
stein, Mrs. Sharon Mirmelli,
Barry Ross, Mrs. Linda Bogin,
Charles Citrin. Morton Mayberg,
Jack Roafenthal nd Kenneth
Treister.


Kday, May 21, 1976
* Jewish IhrHkiri
Page 11-B
Weft
^abbtwcal ^%t
coordinated by !?
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
cmdltBft
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Rabbi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT AMERICAN JEWISH PERSONALITIES
August Bondi
(1833-1907)
)n the third floor of the Tem-
House in Vienna there was
jrn on July 21, 1833, a Jew-
fth boy who was destined to
earn a place in American Jew-
ish history as a "fighter for
freedom."
One year after his Bar Mitz-
vah, August (Anshel) Bondi
f (Bondy), 1833-1907, became the
youngest member of the mili-
| tant and revolutionary Vienna
L Academic Legion. At 14 he took
jpart in the student uprising
igainst Metternich which, start-
fig as a student prank, ended
)n a full-blown revolution and
blood bath.
At 15 he became a member
the Austrian National Guard
ind Legion, helped build bar-
ricades and fought the emper-
or's soldiers with paving blocks.
I'Many Jewish youths of Vienna
[were among those who perish-
[ed.
BOTH SIDES of Anshel's fami-
ly were prosperous and stood
high in Prague society, but the
political upheavals in Europe
resulted in bankruptcy of the
Bondi textile and export busi-
ness in 1846. Yet the children
continued with their studies and
Anshel entered the university
early in 1848.
After the Austrian revolution
had been suppressed by the
military, the restless Anshel
announced he was going to Hun-
gary to join the revolutionary
legions under Louis Kossuth.
When the boy's parents sug-
gested they all emigrate to free
America instead, he immediately
fell in with the idea. The family
left Vienna on September 6,
11848. and reached New Orleans
on November 10.
The Bondis arrived in St.
Louis by riverboat but the wan-
derlusting Anshel took off and
spent the years 1848-1855 trav-
eling up and down the Missis-
sipDi, clerking, roustabouting on
the levees and doing a turn as
a bartender on a river packet.
HE TRIED to ioin a group
going to Cuba to fight the Span-
ards, but the venture failed. He
tried to join Commodore Perry's
first expedition to Japan, but
missed by one day. From time
to time he returned to St. Louis,
to Leavenworth and to Louis-
ville, Kentucky, where the fami-
ly settled on the advice of a
friend named Dembitz, who be-
came Justice Brandeis' grand-
father.
The country and Congress at
this time were seething over the
Kansas Nebraska controversy,
whether these new territories
were to be free or slave states.
In 1855 Bondi and two friends.
Joseph Benjamin and Theodore
Wiener, struck out for the lush
Osawatomie lands in Kansas to
stake out claims to farmlands
and open a warehouse and store.
The settlement which grew up
around the warehouse was call-
ed Wienerville.
From the adjoining slave-state
of Missouri pro-slavery forces
raided and harassed the Free-
State settlements. The Free-
Staters under John Brown re-
taliated in kind. Bondi, Wiener
and Benjamin had become mem-
bers of John Brown's band.
Under John Brown. Bondi
and Wiener, the little band of
fighters grew to almost a hun-
dred men. After a number of
battles with thf nro-slavery
fn-ro<; th lare raids ended
m^T rre?*"re of th< U.S. mili-
tary forces. Night raids were
made both ways across the bor-
der. Bondi was one of the or-
ganizers of the famous Kansas
"Jayhawkers." When peace
finally came, Kansas remained
a non-slave state.
FROM 18S6 until the Civil
War broke out, Bondi tried mer-
chandising, farming and trading
with the Indians, without much
success. Bondi, Wiener and
Benjamin founded the city of
Greeley, Kansas. In 1860 Bondi
married Henrietta Einstein, who
was born in Buttenwiesen, Ba-
varia, and who came to America
about the same time as the
Bondi family.
When the guns boomed on
Fort Sumter on April 12 and
13, 1861, it wasn't long before
the humble Bondi cabin on the
Greeley farm became the scene
of a family debate as to whether
the restless Anshel should re-
main with his wife and infant
son or enlist in the Union Army.
His mother, Malka. made the
decision: "As a Jew I had the
duty to defend the institutions
which gave equal rights to all
beliefs." On November 26, 1861,
Bondi saddled his half-breed
mare and with his neighbors
rode off to Fort Lincoln.
With the 5th Kansas Cavalry.
Bondi took part in the Battle of
the Black River, the Battle of
Pine Bluff, Arkansas, and in
hundreds of skirmishes. In the
retreat of the Union forces fol-
lowing the Battle of Monticcllo
Cross Roads, Arkansas, he was
badly wounded and left for dead
on the field. During the night
he was found and cared for by
and old man and his son. who
was a Rebel lieutenant on sick
leave.
Later in the day a Union de-
tail, with a surgeon and under
a flag of truce, removed him to
the Post Hospital. This was in
September, 1864. By November
he was able to travel to Leaven-
worth and final discharge. From
there he returned to Greeley
and his family after an absence
of three years.
BONDI fathered 11 children.
He again tried merchandising
and farming but had a hard
time supporting his family. Sub-
sequently he began to dabble in
politics. He became Register's
clerk in the U.S. Land Office.
In 1881 he was elected police
judge. It is said he could have
risen higher in politics had he
been willing to compromise his
principles with those of the po-
liticians of his time.
On September 30, 1907, after
a round of visits to the families
of his sons and daughters, he
dropped dead on a St. Louis
street. At Salina, Kansas, the
Jewish burial rites were follow-
ed by the Masonic rites. The
courts closed for the day in his
honor. The hearse was follow-
ed by a large contingent of
Masons, Elks, Odd Fellows and
veterans of the Grand Army of
the Republic. At the cemetery
Kaddish was recited by his sons
and grandsons.
Bondi's instructions to his
family were that his funeral
should be plain. "During my
funeral I wish that mention be
made of having all my life been
a fighter for freedom."
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Blumenson. S. L. "Fighter For
Freedom." The National Jewish
Monthly, June. 1952.
Jewish
question
BOX
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why do some
people put on two pairs of
Tefillin each morning instead
of the customary one pair?
Answer: The scrolls (there
are four of them) which are
contained in the phylactery that
is placed on the head are ar-
ranged in accordance with a
certain order as mentioned in
the Talmud (Babli, Menachoth
34b).
Two of the most famous of
the Medieval commentators of
the Talmud differ in their as-
sessment of this order and its
interpretation. The one whose
opinion is widely accepted is
the French commentary known
as Rashi. The one who differs
with him is his own grandson,
who came to be known and re-
ferred to as Rabbenu Tarn.
Some Jews try to fulfill the
commandments in the most per-
fect manner. These Jews, when
confronted with such a conflict
of authoritative opinions, try to
make sure that they would be
considered as having fulfilled
the commandment of putting on
the Tefillin according to all
opinions.
They therefore put on Tefil-
lin whose headpiece has been
lirranged according o Rashi
first. Toward the end of the
service they take these off and
put on the other Tefillin. which
have been written and arranged
according to Rabbenau Tarn.
The second pair of Tefillin is
thus referred to as the Tefillin
of Rabbenu Tarn.
& a
Question: Why is it that
in the Tefillin placed on the
arm there is only one scroll,
while in the Tefillin placed
on the head there are four
scrolls?
Answer: The Bible, when
speaking of the Tefillin which
is placed on the arm speaks of
a singular noun, "And thou
shalt bind them for a 'sign'."
Thus the scroll is an all-inclu-
sive one.
When speaking of the Tefil-
lin which is put on the head,
the Torah, in the same verse
says: "And they shall be for
'frontlets' between thine eyes."
The Talmud interprets the He-
brew word for frontlets, i.e.,
"Totafoth," to indicate that
"toth" indicates two and "foth"
also indicates two.
Thus the word Totafoth is
made up of two plural stems
thus totaling four. This differ-
ence between the headpiece
and the armpiece is interpreted
by the rabbis as indicating that
while the mind of man is given
permission to speculate among
various ideas and opinions, the
act of man, represented by his
arm, should be consistent and
uniform rather than contradic-
tory and confusing.
One may have a variety of
ideas but he should have a
unitv of action.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
On Picking New Leaders
For Country, Congregations
By RABBI MORRIS A. SKOP
Temple Sholom, Pompano Beach
America, during our Bicen-
tennial Year 1976, is beginning
to wrestle with choices for our
next President of the United
States. Some will insist on se-
lecting a leader on issues and
stands the candidate may take.
Others vote on the image
young, old, liberal, conserva-
tive.
When the month of April
rolls around in American Jew-
ish communities, there is also
a restlessness and turmoil
who will be the next temple
president? Shall we select a
man of age and experience .
retired one who will give
the time to the daily operation
of expanding and busy congre-
gations? Or shall we select a
"young man" with young ideas
who will bring the younger set
into active leadership in the
Temple and Congregation?
In my experience of many
years as rabbi, I have noticed
that there is no guarantee that
an old man will be better be-
cause of his experience nor
will a younger man or woman
necessarily bring in new ideas
or vounger leadership. There
are older men with voung ideas
and many young men who are
obstinate and reactionary and
often keep a congregation from
making progress because thev
are insistent on their points of
view. Ultimately the best choice
is not in age or experience, but
rather in attitude and dedica-
tion toward Jewish identity and
survival.
Any person young, old,
man or woman who is com-
mitted to a temple and all it
represents in history, meaning
and influence in the commu-
nity can become a successful
leader. The person must love be-
ing Jewish, enjoy Jewish asso-
ciation and worship and holiday
celebrations. He must have a
deep empathy foi others; be
ready to share his time and en-
joy the cooperation of an un-
derstanding spouse, to be a good
leader of a congregation.
It is always a ioy to see a new
leader step into the responsi-
bilities and, by giving some
time and labor to work with
others, mature into a fine force
for good in a congregation. What
congregations have to learn,
however, is how to show some
aDoreciation for the efforts of
these leaders. Criticism is usual-
lv constant, but praise seems so
seldom expressed.
Giving leaders a plaque or
gift at the end of a term in a
routine fashion is not enough.
Congregations should learn to
recognize their leaders publicly,
in temple and Sisterhood, Men's
Club and youth leadership, so
that the labors of dedicated peo-
ple may find worthy praise of
grateful congregants.
Blessed are the leaders and
more blessed are the people
who properly select Rood ones.
TV Programs
Sunday, May 23
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Morris Skop
Temple Sholom
Pompano Beach
w
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
21 IYAR 7:42
ill
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Behukkotai
"But if ye will not hearken unto Me I will
bring the land into desolation And you will 1
scatter among the nations" (Lev. 20.14, 32-33).
BEHUKKOTAI "If ye walk in My statutes, and
keep My commandments, and do them; then I will give
you rains in their season, and the land shall yield her
produce, and the trees of the field shall yield their
fruit. ... Ye shall eat your bread until ye have enough,
and dwell in your land safely. And I will have re-
spect unto you, and make you fruitful, and multiply
you; and will establish My covenant with you. But
if ... ye shall reject My statutes, and if your soul
abhor Mine ordinances, so that ye shall not do all My
commandments, but break My covenant ... I will
chastise you seven times more for your sins. And
you will I scatter among the nations, and I will draw
out the sword after you; and your land shall be a deso-
lation. When they are in the land of their enemies,
I will not reject them ... to break My covenant with
them; for I am the Lord their God. These are the
statutes and ordinances and laws, which the Lord
mnde between Him and the children of Israel in Mount
>inai by the hand of Moses" (Leviticus 26.3-46).


Page 12-B
vJewlsti Her Mian
Friday, May 21, 1976
i

-.
Bat MitauaU
Bank Workers
Lecture Series Is a Tribute To
Aid Hodges Fund Late Cardiologist Harold Rand
ROBERT L. PUSHKIN
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Push-
kin's son, Robert Louis, will be
come a Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day morning at 8:45 at Temple
Ner Tamid.
A student at Nautilus Junior
High and the Ner Tamid religi-
ous school, Robert received the
Presidential Award in athletics
in the fifth, sixth and seventh
grades. He enoys sports and
motorcycle-riding^ and is a CB
operator.
A kiddush will follow services
and there will be a reception in
Robert's honor on Saturday eve-
ning.
a 4 a
MARC ROSENBERG
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Rosen-
berg's son, Marc, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday morning at 9 at
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
congregation B'nai Raphael.
Kiddush following services
will be hosted by the Rosenberg
family in Marc's honor.
ft ft ft
SUSAN SLAVIN
Susan, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Slavin, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday morning at
Temple Sinai.
ft ft ft
SUSAN HABER
AND
PETER D. RUSSIN
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Haber's
daughter, Susan, and Dr. and
Mrs. David Russin's son, Peter
Dumas, will become B'nai Mitz-
vah on Saturday at 10:45 a.m.
at Temple Beth Sholom.
ft ft ft
MARK A. GOLDBERG
Dr. and Mrs. Leonard Gold-
berg's son, Mark Alan, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 9 a.m.
at Temple Beth David.
A student in the seventh
grade at South Dade Hebrew
Academy, Mark studies music,
is interested in art and science,
and has played Khoury League
ball.
In honor of the occasion,
Mark's parents will host the kid-
dush following services and a
reception at the temple, and that
evening a party at home for his
friends. In July Mark and his
family will travel to Israel,
where he will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah at the Western Wall,
ft ft ft
KENNETH W. DEUTSCH
Marcia and Elliot Deutsch's
son, Kenneth Warren, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day at Temple B'nai Israel and
Greater Miami Youth Syna-
gogue.
An eighth-grader at Glades
Junior High, Kenneth enjoys
bowling, fishing and leather-
craft.
A reception will be held that
evening in his honor at the
home of Don Carter.
ft ft ft
HERRICK J. KOHL
Herrick Jay, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Kohl, will ob-
serve his Bar Mitzvah at Beth
Torah Congregation on Satur-
day morning at 8:30.
A student in the fourth-grade
class at the Harold Wolk Religi-
ous School, Herrick is in the
seventh grade at Thomas Jef-
ferson Junior High. His hobbies
are sports and gardening.
Herrick's parents will sponsor
the kiddush following services,
where special guests will in-
clude his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Kohl of Atlantic
City, N.J., and Mrs. Jennie
Spiegel of Miami Beach.
Intercontinental Bank of Mi-
ami Beach employees have turn-
ed over, a check for m6ney they
collected among themselves to
the memorial trust fund estab-
lished to ensure the education
of the three children of slain
Metro Detective Thomas A.
Hodges, Jr.
Benjamin I. Shulman, chair-
man of the board, said addition-
al contributions can be sent to
the Hodges Education Fund,
care of the Barnett Bank on
Lincoln Rd.
IN OTHER news. Intercon-
tinental Bank of Miami Beach
finished fourth in the 18-team
American Institute of Banking
league in play at the Congress
Bowl. The Credits posted the
high game handicap, a 903, and
the second highest series handi-
cap score, a 2,466.
In a continuing tribute to the
late Miami cardiologist Harold
R. Rand, and to his abiding in-
light on this subject of major
concern in the treatment of pa-
tients with lung and heart dis-
eases, resulting from recent re-
search in the field.
Dr. Millard, who returned to
his native England in 1972, was
associate professor of pathology
at the University of Miami
School of Medicine and was di-
rector of anatomic pathology at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Beth Torah
Celebrates Lag B'Omer
Beth Torah Congregation will
celebrate Lag B'Omer with a
family picnic Sunday, May 23,
at Greynolds Park East at 11
a.m.
The cochairmen for the event
are Sandee and Alan Cole, Shel-
ly and Arthur Lipson and Ro-
chelle and Marshall Baltuch.
The donation admission for
adults and children includes
food, games, sports and fun.
Make reservations with the
synagogue office.
Musical Nostalgia
At Beth Torah
This Sunday at 7:30 p.m. at
the Youth Building, the Beth
Torah Youth Department will
present "Nostalgia '76," musical
highlights of the 20th century. I
Thirty young people, under |
the dSreotion of Mrs. Myrna j
Loman, will perform a script
with narration written by USY
member Janet Greenhut.
Tickets are available at the
door.
Chabad Sponsors
Students Weekend
The Chabad House Student
Activities Division is sponsor-
ing a Shabbaton this weekend
for students from Miami-Dade,
FIU and Florida State, Miami,
South Florida and Florida State
Universities at the Chabad
House-Jewish Student Center at
the USF in Tampa.
The theme of the weekend is
"Explore" a look at the mil-
lennia of Jewish Heritage. Semi-
nars and workshops on Worn- j
en's Liberation and Judaism, |
Death in Judaism, Torah and
Contemporary Society, among
others, are featured and there
will be a midnight campfire.
Students at the Chabad Student
Union at the USF are preparing |
a reception for the fellow Flor-
ida Students.
DR. MAX MILLARD
terest in continuing education
for physicians, the Miami Heart
Institute is presenting the Har-
old Rand Memorial Lecture
Series.
To inaugurate the series, Dr.
Max Millard, a British patholog-
ist, on Tuesday addressed mem-
bers of the Dade and Broward
medical communities on "The
Pathology of Pulmonary Hyper-
tension." Dr. Millard shed new
Adath Yeshurun
Celebrating
Chai Anniversary
Temple Adath Yeshurun,
which has just completed a
merger with Temple Tifereth
Israel, will celebrate its 18th
(Chai) anniversary at the an-
nual dedication dinner dance
on Sunday, May 23.
Max Waltzman, president of
the temple for five years, will
be honored at the event, which
will be catered by Mike Kuper
of K & K Catering of Palm
Beach and Fort Lauderdale.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman is
the temple's spiritual leader,
and Morris Katz is president.
For further information on the
dinner, contact the temple'^,
Men's Club.
our
OUR 52nd SEASON
ATOP LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN NEAR
CHATTANOOGA, TENN.
VALLEY VIEW RANCH
FOR GIRLS 6-17 1ST. 19S4
lOOO MRS! Of THAU*. HUNT MHOS SMINGS. !>0!iOtS CH005I YOUR OWN HOI1I TO CAM 'OR
INSTRUCTION IN WISTIHN, INGUSH A JUMPING
> ACTIVITY A CIAH1 HOCHM
ONI WIIK WAGON TIAIN 1 < 01 I WIIH SISSION1
U^ CLOUDMONT FOR BOYS
AGES 6-16 EST. 1924
AOVINIUtl CAMP JWIIKS
CUM TUP HUH tMAOT GOOVI CAMP < W..J.
,., > mini ttmsft.VBB
IIGUIAI CAMP J WIIKt
uu... linn. smiis. ut* suite ussm .. summit
WRITE JACK E. OR NANCY C. JONES
3115 S.W. 106 AVE., MIAMI, FIX, 331CS
CALL: 552-7782 or 264-3400
For Boys & Girls 6-16
A CAMPING PARADISE IN THE HEART
OF THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
* LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
All Land and Water Sports Waterskiing and Riding Daily
Pro Golf and Tennis Arts and Crafts Sailing, Scuba
Trips by Canoe Horseback Riding Special Teen Program
Reading and Math Clinics Traditional Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Laws Observed
M.D. & 2 R.N.'s Staff our Modern Infirmary at ALL Timts.
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WALDMAN
Miami Beach Phone: 532-3152 or Write:
j,. P.O. Box 402888, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
[Q_____________SIGN UP NOW Q

*
Fun vi"n0*.w You become ?
be,, wmnv or*"
lftllMPTeens(co-*i>
(I
*. *


ly, May 21, 1976
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C* Confirmation

Work Begins On
Rossmoor Courts
Rossmoor Coconut Creek resi-
dents will be playing tennis on
their own courts by July 4, ac-
cording to Orion 1 Smith, con-
struction director Construction
has already begun on the first
lour of the Pompano Beach com-
munity's ten-court complex,
which will include night-lighting
and a pro shop.
According to Larry Uchin,
vice president of Rossmoor's
marketing and sales, the com-
munity's third phase, Nassau
Village West, will be completed
ahead of schedule by mid-
August. Uchin said that "clos-
ings are now being set for early
September" and he added that
"the completion of our tennis
courts will be definite boost to
our sales efforts."
, -, ~.
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Rabbi Sol Landau, Cantor William V. Lipson, Rabbi
Marvin Rose, educational director, and the 1976 Beth
Hebrew Home Women's Auxiliary
To Install Officers Wednesday-
David confirmands. Confirmation is scheduled for Sun-
day, May 23, at 8 p.m. in the Main Sanctuary.
JWV Auxiliary 778
Plans Dinner
Evelyn Clein, president of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the JWV
South Dade Post No. 778, pre-
sented an altar cloth to the
newly organized Homestead-
Naranja Auxiliary at their in-
stallation on May 13.
The South Dade Auxiliary is
planning a Father's Day Eve
dinner, a naid-up membership
party, on Saturday, June 19. at
7:30 at the home of Leah Eiscn-
man. Dinner will be served un-
der the direction of Edith No-
vins, chairman. Terry Stafford,
Terry Bernfeld and Mrs. Eisen-
man.
The 575 member Women's
Auxiliary of the Hebrew Home
for the Aged will install offi-
cers on Wednesday, May 26, at
noon at the Delano Hotel.
Circuit Court Judge Natalie
Baskin will be installing officer,
and Gus (Mrs. Emanuel) Mentz
it chairman of the day. Mrs.
Sarah Levin will be installed as
sident for tha third consecu-
term. Others officers are
del (Mrs. Henry) Fisch, Mrs.
Rae Lieberman, Sylvia (Mrs.
Leon) Keller, Anne (Mrs. Jay
C.) Fine, Lillian (Mrs. Irvin)
Sherman, vice presidents.
Also, Rose (Mrs. Abraham)
Singer, financial secretary, Mrs.
Dorothy Singer, recording sec-
retary; Mrs. Sarah Burkin, cor-
responding secretary; Mrs. Jean
Zapolsku, treasurer; Mrs. Flora
Sirtiok, parliamentarian; and
Mrs. Bess Horowitz, pianist.
\usic Under the Summer-Night Stars
The Marine Stadium on Key
Biscayne will be the scene of
five summer-Saturday-evening
pops concerts by the Greater
Miami Philharmonic.
June 26 features "Two Gen-
erations of Brubeck" the mu-
sic of jazz immortal Dave Bru-
beck and his sons, Darius and
Dan, in a program including
"Take Five," the first jazz sin-
gle to sell a million copies.
Yiddish Culture At
Aiath Yeshurun Service
Temple Adath Yeshurun's late
service this evening will be a
Yiddish cultural service. Leon
Yudoff, president of Jade Winds
f Yiddish Society, will discuss the
^Ineaning of Yiddish culture.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman says,
"This is an innovative concept
the temple, an attempt to
>ress our feeling for Yiddish.
[is a pilot project, and if there
a demand, it will be eon
lied."
"Cinema and Stage" on July
10 presents Academy Award-
winner John Green on the po-
dium, as does the closing con-
cert, Aug. 28. Mitch Miller is
scheduled for Aug. 7, and the
Philharmonic's principal guest
conductor, James Conlon, will
offer a program of light classics
on Aug. 21 with pianist David
Golub.
For further information, call
the Philharmonic office.
Malcolm H. Fromberg of North Miami
(at left in both photos), first vice presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District Five and
chairman of the South Florida Fund-Rais-
ing Cabinet, presented B'nai B'rith Presi-
-.--VS
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dential Citations, honoring generous be-
quests to the National Youth Services Ap-
peal, to Robert Feingold of North Miami
Beach (photo at left) and Joseph Albert
of Miami Beach (photo at right).
All Gl tln ccrtltlW f nvln* ntf
[ fWr "!* b? hand lr wp $2M.00O
I GOLD A SILVII OUOTIS*
i Of 5-1T-78, Silver 4.42 Gold 127.70
ur mi
MM........................1111 till
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10 no........................... *
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! TMNHON:
I All 1UTIIS Of lIO ooto MOUXNOI*
CONMDINTIAUY ASSUaiO ...*
JUDWIDI. '
1% -.!,,( Ivrln* illl"t
[ *OvIM ar* If wnlu. Mill, rdmr 'A
unll Sin,I. Cini llhjhlly hl|h.r
Mimlll IIIIH (USINISS IUIIAU
FEDERAL PRECIOUS METAL
DEPOSITORY CORPORATION
Ml liinrni llioyn. lank
irwrn
An appeal for three blood-
mobiles has been made by
the Magen David Adorn, Is-
rael's Red Cross service, to
South Florida Jewry.
Samuel Reinhard, state
chairman of the American
Red Magen David for Is-
rael, only agency in the
United States authorized to
solicit funds for the MDA,
saiid the vehicles can be
contributed by individuals,
congregations, high-rise as-
sociations or businesses.
Headquarters for the cam-
paign have been established
in the Red Magen David
Miami Beach offices. David
Coleman is state president
and Howard Kaufman is
president of the Greater Mi-
ami Chapter.
MIAMI BEACH
HOUSE FOR SALE
3-Bdrms. Modern with many
evtrpe. p"iiiced fc- quick sale
imving out of town. Upper
CO's. Own;r 531-5327.
1'he Congress of Senior Cit-
izens will celebrate Senior Cit-
izens Month with a dance on
Sunday, 1:30 to 5 p.m., at the
Everglades Hotel. Music by
Paul Herbert and his orchestra.
ft ft ft
The Mental Health Associa-
tion of Dade County is joining
other chapters for a nationwide
membership drive this weekend,
according to an announcement
by Peter L. Bermont.
ft ft ft
The Palmetto Handicap, for
three-year-olds, will be run at
Calder this Saturday. First race
is 1:15.
ft ft ft
Temple B'nai Raphael USY is
hosting an interchapter week-
end, which will be attended by
over 100 area teenagers who
will participate in study groups
and various festivities.
ft ft ft
During worship services this
evening at 8:15 at Temple Judea
the new officers and board of
trustees for 1976-77 will be con-
secrated.
ft ft ft
Retirees of New York District
65 will hold their regular month-
ly membership meeting on Tues-
day, May 25^ at 12:30 p.m. at
the American Savings building
on Lincoln Rd.
ft ft ft
Young Israel of Greater Mi-
ami will hold its third annual
dinner and raffle at 7 p.m. in
the social hall on Sunday, May
23.
ft ft ft
Peppy Fields, radio and tele-
vision personality, will present
a fund-raising "Evening with
the Stars" to benefit the Sunrise
School for the Retarded at the
Surfside Community Center on
Sunday, May 23, at 8 p.m.
Entertainment will be by Dan
Schilling and his orchestra and
leading nightclub entertainers.
ft ft ft
The Elections Department of
Metropolitan Dade County has
opened two additional Hialeah
voter registration locations:
Lovell Homes, W. 84th St., 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, and
Lovell Home, 3rd Ave^ 10:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 to
5 p.m. weekdays.
USAL KOTK.
IEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
tha undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
F. C & ASSOCIATES at P.O. Box
KO0679. North Miami Beach. Fin. 33160
intend! to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad*
County. Florida.
FLORENCE C. COTIJCR
T./21-28 fi/4-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
tho undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PIER HOUSE at 3409 N.E. 169
Street. North Miami Beach. Fla in-
tends i" register said nami- with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of Dade
Count v. Florida.
WITH FI.ORIDA MOTEUS. INC.
4/30 5/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
HI H JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-15950
GENERAL JURISDITION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RK: The marriage of
ANTOINETTE SWEBTINQ,
Wife,
and
WILLIAM SWEETING.
Husband.
VOU, WILLIAM SWEETING, rcs-
nl. in unknown, an required to TTIe
your answer to the petition for dis-
solution of marriage with the Clerk of
the above Court and serve a cony
thereof upon the petitioner's attorney.
Herman Cohen. Esq.. 622 B.W. 1st
Street, Miami. Florida. 33130. on or
before June 25. 1976. or else petition
Will be confessed.
Dated: MAY 19. I97fi
itli'llAHU P BRTNKBR,
( lerk, Circuit Court
By O. FREDERICK
Deputy Clerk
5/21-28 6/4-11


Page 14-B
*Jewisl> fhrSdUtim
Friday, May 21, 1976
LEGAL NOTICE
s
i.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring: to engage
In business under the fictitious names
of FA UK TRAVEL. FARR TRAVEL
SERVICE, TRAVEL FARR. at -6705
Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Fla.. 33141.
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida. ________
FARR TOURS ft TRAVEL SERVICE.
INC.
A Fla. Corn.
5/21-28 6/4-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-3003
Division DOWLINQ
IN RE: ESTAITE OF
CORINNE K. KRACKOW.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of CORINNE K. KRACKOW. deceas-
ed. File Number 76-3003. Is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which Is Dade County Courthouse.
W. Flagler SL. Miami. Florida 33130
Circuit Court. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate Is IRVING
BLY. whose address 1b 1600 Bay Road.
Miami Beach. Fla. Apt. 1679. The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.-
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the cleric of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the cleric
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file anv objections thev may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court,
challenges the validity of the dece-
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 21.
1976.
IRVING BLY
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of CORINNE K. KRACKOW
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
FAUNCE. FINK A FORMAN
3000 Blscayne Boulevard. Suite 402
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: 371-6471
5/21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2911
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERALD I. WERNICK
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of Gerald I. Wernick. deceased. File
Number 76-2911. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse. Miami.
Florida. The personal representative of
the estate Is Violet K. Wernick. whose
address Is 9375 Balada Street. Coral
Gables. Florida 33156. The name and
address of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
muBt be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections thev may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 21.
1976.
VIOLET K. WERNICK
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Gerald I. Wernick
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
James S. Roth. Fromberg, Fromberg
ft Roth. P. A.
M-102 Blscayne Eldg., 19 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33110
Telephone: 358-1484
5/21-28
LEGAL piuint
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of DAVID APTS. at 13810 Highland
Drive, North Miami Beach. Dade
County, Florida Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
SEYMOUR SAFFREN
MICHAEL P. CHASE
Attorney for Seymour Saffren
15924 N.E. 19th Ave.. N.M.B. Fla.
5/14-21-28 6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 76-11670
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re: The Marriage Of:
DOM ACOSTA.
Husband,
and
EMPERATRIZ ACOSTA.
Wife.
TO: EMPERATRIZ ACOSTA
9016 180th Street
Jamaica. New York 11432
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you. and you
are hereby required to serve a copy of
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition oh the Husband's attorney.
HOWARD J. ROSEN, whose address
Is 100 N.W. 87th Avenue (2nd Floor).
Miami, Florida 33125. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styl-
ed Court, on or before the 18th day
of June. 1976. or a Default will be en-
tered against you.
DATED this 5th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By N. A. HEWETT
5/14-21-28 6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-14469
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
ARIS E. MAKRIS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUCY KARABOTS.
Defendant.
TO: LUCY KARABOTS
243 Dale Road
Weathersfield, Connecticut
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to set aside a warranty deed, to
enjoin sale of real property, for dam-
ages and other relief, concerning the
following real property In Dade Coun-
ty. Florida:
Lot 9. Block 4. ESCOTTONIA
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4.
Page 161. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
MARTIN ROTH. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address Is: 1111 Alnsley Build-
ing. Miami. Florida 33132. on or be-
fore June 18. 1976. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or Immediately thereafter: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the Petition or complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on May 6. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
5/14-21-28 6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-12611
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
In Re The Marriage of
William Haygood. Husband,
vs. Carrie Haygood. Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
YOU. CARRIE HAYGOOD. General
Delivery. Allendale. South Carolina,
also known as Carrie Bradley, take
Notice, that William Haygood has
filed a suit for Divorce against you.
In this Court, and you must file your
Answer thereto, with the office of the
undersigned Clerk, and send a carbon
copy thereof.to JOSEPH C. LAUS-
SEL. LAWYER. 12583(a) NW 7th
Avenue. North Miami. Florida, not
later than June 4. 1976. otherwise, a
legal Default will be entered against
vou
DATED: April 22. 1976.
R. P. BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court
By N. A. HEWETT
Deputv Clerk
4/30 5/7-14-21
LEGAL NOTRE
LEGAL NOTKE
LEGAL NOTKE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12772
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RAMIRO .HERNANDEZ
and
VICTORIA HERNANDEZ
TO: Victoria Hernandex
c/o Garcia
2140 Seward Avenue
Bronx. New York 10473 ___
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If anv. to It
on Louis R Beller. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach. Fla. 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
4. 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal ol
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21 day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By I. SNEEDEN
As Demity Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Louis R Beller. Esq.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 238
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner ^^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-12001
IN RE: The Adoption Petition Of:
FRANCIS MICHAEL PIERSON.
NOTICE OF PETITION FOR
ADOPTION *
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: DALE MOTT
Address and Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has been
filed and commenced in this Court
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any. to it
on HIRSCHHORN AND FREEMAN.
P.A., Attorneys for Petitioner, whose
address Is 742 Northwest 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, and file an original
with the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before June 11. 1976: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed for
In the petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in the JEWISH FLORIDIAN news-
paper.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, on this 4th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: N. A. HEWETT
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal
HIRSCHHORN AND FREEMAN.
P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
742 Northwest 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33136
5/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PERRINE SHOPPING CENTER
at 1 through 650 Perrlne Avenue. Per-
rine. Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ARTHUR FASTENBERG. as Trustee
(s) ARTHUR FASTENBERG
HORWICH ft ZAGER P.A.
Attorneys for Arthur Fastenberg.
as Trustee
Suite 3022222 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of DESIGN WORKSHOP at 808 NE
125 St.. North Miami. Fla. 33161 In-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida.
ELLEN WEST
RHONDA EDMISTON
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of OAKR1DGE FARM at 6100 SW 125
Avenue, Miami. Fla. intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
PATRICIA S. KARTER
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PERSONALIZED PAPETRIES at
808 NE 125 St.. North Miami. Fla.
33161 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
RITA H. BUKSTEL
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
EDGEWOOD STABLES at 6100 S.W.
<25 Ave.. Miami. Fla. Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
PATRICIA S KARTER
6/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-12807
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of'
MAUREEN ROBERSON BOOKER.
Petitioner
and
JOSEPH TERRY BOOKER.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Joseph Terry Booker. QM-1
USS CANNOLE FF 1056
F.P.O. New York. N.Y. 09501
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
I.EON G. NICHOLS. Petitioner's At-
torney, whose address Is 55 S.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida, 33130. on or
before June 4. 1976. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk, of this Court
either before service on Petitioner's
Attorney or immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on April 21. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By B. LIPPS
as Deputv Clerk
4/30 R/7-14-21

'.
. '


NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SEXITO at 1401 S.W. 1st Street. Mi-
ami 33135 Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RAUL OLTVA
J. T.AZAOA
4/30 fi/T-M-il

"NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
uV%u"ness under the fictitious, name
of LUCITE ORIGINALS at 2910 S.W.
30 Avenue. Hallandale. Fla. 33009 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
CUHEyRMANAaND ROSEN. CORP.
' ^ ^b 5/7-14-21
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-14372
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDGAR M. INNISS
and
LYNETTE INNISS
TO: LYNETTE INNISS
1963 Ryer Avenue
Apt. 2D
Bronx, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it on
RAYMOND J. WOLF, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1497 N.W.
7th Street. Miami. Florida 33125. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
11th. 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAYMOND J. WOLF
1497 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Attorney for Petitioner^ ^ ^ ^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2796
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE W. YOUNGBLUTH.
11,'icasrd
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE: _______,._
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of Rose W. Youngbluth. deceased. File
Number 76-2796. is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi-
ami Florida. The personal representa-
tive of the estate Is Pauline W. Hlrsch
whose address Is 504 Navarre Avenue.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134. The name
and address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 14.
1976.
PAULINE W. HIRSCH
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Rose W. Youngbluth
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MALCOLM H. FRIEDMAN
800 Douglas Road
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: 444-5701
5/14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-12804
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDMOND F. CLERSAINT. husband.
and
CHERYL L. CLERSAINT. wife.
TO: CHERYL L CLER8AINT
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
herein on the Petitioner's Attorney:
MURRAY Z. KLEIN. Suite 800. Sey-
bold Building. 36 N.E 1st St.. Miami.
Florida, and file the original in the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before June 4. 1976. or said
cause will be taken as confessed by
you.
DATED this 21st day of April 1976
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Countv Court
B. LIPPS
Deputv Clerk
*l$t 6/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
ARTISANS GUILD at 3814 N.E. Mi-
ami Court. Miami. Florida 33137 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
C0UnByLEEMEdR ft LEVINE. INC.
CYPEN ft NEVINS
Attorneys for Bleemer & Levlne. Inc.
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida MHO g ^^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Ihe undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of COIN VENDING. INC. at 2073
Northwest 141st Street. Ona IOOEsV
Florida Intends to register said name"
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
LEE-JAC VENDING. INC.
a Florida Corporation
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQ.
Attorney for Lee-Jac Vending. Inc..
Applicant
Suite 211. 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone 531-64.7 ^^
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-3216 (40)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DESPINA WILLIAMS.
Petitioner,
and
HOMER WILLIAMS.
Respondent.
TO: HOMER WILLIAMS
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to ft
on GLADYS GERSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is Stone.
Sostchin ft Koss. P.A.. 101 Northwest
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
nnd file the original with the clerk of
:he above styled court on or before
June 4. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against vou for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four conseoutlve weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on this
23rd day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. HEWETT
As Deputv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GLADYS GERSON. ESQUIRE
Stone. Sostchin ft Koss. P.A.
101 Northwest 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of Stowe ft Company, Ltd. and Trans-
Atlantic Underwriters. Ltd at 6TJ'
S.W. 74 Street. South Miami. Florida
33143 intend to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
STOWE ENTERPRISES. INC.
By: Larry B. Stowe, President
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of COLEOIO NACIONAL DE CIEN-
CIAS SOCIALES Y DERECHO PU-
BLICO at 3731 S.W. 27th Terr.. Miami.
Florida 33134 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MIREYA ALDEREGUIA
3731 S.W. 27th Terrace. Miami. Fla.
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-13174
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
N ELI DA RAMOS.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
<"ARLOS OMAR RAMOS.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: CARLOS OMAR RAMOS
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 2121
Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Suite 420.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
4. 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. 120
N.E. 6th Street. Miami. Florida 33132
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
26th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARIX)S LID8KY. ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Cables. Florida 33134
Phone: (106) 442-8624
Attorney for Petitioner
4/10 5/7-14-Jl
*3tff '
11
It
1-
1-
d
e


lay, May 21, 1976
fJenist Meridian
Page 15-B
lea Sisterhood
ItctSis Officers
temple Judea Sisterhood of-
jrs installed on Wednesday
la luncheon by Rabbi Michael
[Eisenstat, spiritual leader of
l congregation, were Mrs.
jiest Andish, president; Mrs.
run Kasper, executive vice
esident; Mrs, Michael Sprit-
Mrs. Owen Freed, Mrs. Lee
hpiro and Mrs. Benjamin
pwartz, vice presidents; Mrs.
kid Lazar, recording secre-
Mrs. Harold Jaffer, cor-
onding secretary; Mrs.
Jiard Goodman, treasurer;
fs. lack Morton, financial sec-
tary; Mrs. Stanley Balbin.
rliamentarian; Mrs. Sheldon
ushach, chaplain; and Mrs.
jrry Hesser, historian.
JWV Auxiliary 681 Plans
Memorial Services
Anna McCullers, president of
Hialeah-Miami Springs JWV
Auxiliary No. 681, Rae Ehrlich,
Gert Beck, and Sadye and Abe
Gross will attend a ward party
at the VA Hospital on Saturday.
On Friday, May 28, the Aux-
iliary will hold a special memo-
rial service at Temple Tifereth
Jacob, and on Sunday, May 30,
the group will join in Memorial
Day observances with groups
from the American Legion, VFW
and DAV at Triangle Park at
11 a.m.
LEGAL NOTICE
Obituaries
rii.MAN. Rao. 66, of Romont Cnr-
gi'ns Interment Star of David.
EC IK I Benlamln A. 75 of Miami
leach. Interment -Ml. Sinai. Rlvcr-
LBAUM. M<>lli<'. "" of Miami Beach.
Interment I-akeslde. Riverside.
DI.I'SMITH. Paul. 94. of Miami.
Intermeni Ml Sinai. Cordon.
j-oRCH. Max. 77. of Miami Beach.
JeINBERQER, Isaac. 84. of Went
Miami. I.lthgow. .....
JI.KR Sophie C. of Miami. Inter-
on ni Star of David. Riverside.
LICK. Charlotte Berman. 69. of
V\ i si Palm Beach. Levitt.
nJKIN Bessie. 85. of Miami. Inter-
Imi'in Mi. Nebo. Riverside
IYEKS. I.ee. 66. Riverside.
HASSY, Samuel. 70. Oordon.
Ijl'ER George. 94. of Miami Beach.
i Interment Ml N'ebo. Riverside.
PALTER, Anne, of Dania. Riverside.
fpi'EI. Jacol>. 84. of Miami Beach.
Intermeni Slur of David. Riverside.
DREYER. Hen-man s -7 interment
mi Nebo
PINE, Albert Services anil interment
In Baltimore.
MARGOI.1S. Joseph I! 77. of Holly-
wood. Riverside.
LEVIN, Irma. 72. of Miami Beach.
Rlvi rslde
NAYHOUSE, II IrvlnK. 68, of Coral
Gables. Intermeni MI. Nebo.
Oordon,
PORTER, Edna, 47. of Miami. Inter-
ment Lakeside. Riverside
ROSENSTEIN, Harold. 72. of Miami.
Riverside.
CAPLANE, Police H. 78. of Miami
Rench. Interment Star of David.
Riverside.
DOCTOR, Harry. 91. of Hallandale.
Entombment Hollywood Memorial
Oardens. Levitt.
ENGEL. 'ius. 79. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
KAPLAN, Sadie. 78. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Optn Every Doy Closed" Sabbtrth
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
IEVITT
memorial chapels
,f?i P.mbr.k. AS. IfWO;* Hg*
Hollywood, PI*. North "';,'?,!
SONNY LEVITT, F.D.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME.
Strum the Juh Community since 1131
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
REFORM SERVICES
EmaniKlGoiiondSWI Ike Cortfsn
Hetty Gordon (1964) limes B.Cw'en
Telephone 888-586e_____
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2972
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EMMA K PEMOLLER
11.. eased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
I I.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOl' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai Hi, administration of the
i EMMA E PEMOLLER. deceased.
Fill Numbi Jii !72, '- pending in the
Circuit Courl for Dade ounty, Plor-
i.i Probate Division, the addn
n in, ii i- rout i Housi w esl Flagler
SI Miami, l-'Li The personal repre-
sentative ol the estate is VALERIA
smith, whose address is 6510 Lake
Point Avi Detroit, Michigan. The
name and address of the personal rep-
i, nental h i attoi ney are eel forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mand.- against this estate are re-
qulred, within three months
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE.
to file with the clerk of the above
courl a written statement of .mv
claim or demand they mav have Each
claim must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his ay,-ni or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not vet due.
the date when il will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is con-
tintent or unlleiuldated. the nature of
the uncertainly shall be stated. If
tin- claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk .....nahle the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal renrcsen-
lalive
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
ITBLIfATTON OF THIS NOTICE, to
file anv obiectlons they mav have that
Challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Pate of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration Mav 14.
VALERIA SMITH
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of EMMA E. PEMOLLER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HARRY L. BASSETT
1401 Brickell Avenue. Suite 896
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: 377-3561 ...
5/14-iI
JEFFER.
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
DIRECTORS
ItwnJenet MedwinJetlei
IN NEW YORK
188-11 HUSK AVf.. HOWS. 11. NY
1283 CONEY ISIANO AVE, BKIYH. N Y.
212/776-8100
IN FLORIDA:
OADE COUNTY -13385 W DIXIE HWY
947-1185 Rep by Sonny lewri FO
BROWARO COUNTY 1921 PEMBROKE RO
925-2743 Ren bv Sonny levin. FO
PAIM BEACH COUNTY-626 S OHVE AW.
1-925-2743 Rep byPVMeroiein. FO
Services available mall com-
munities in New folk and ihtoughoul
the dealer Ma mi area /
PALMERS
MONUMENT COM PANY/
ffaMONAUZED MEMORIAL"
custom CHAPTBD
IN OUR WORKSHOP
4M44MI-4M44T22
32WS.W.8A ST.. MIAMI

When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to .assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-14983
NOTICE OF ACTION
i.\ UK. The mai rlage of.
ALBA KSTIIKK VA8QUEZ TORRES,
Petltlonei Wife,
antl
DAVID Tc HIKES
Respondem Huaband.
TO: DAVID TORRES,
Respondent Husband
27 Mum In -i. i Was
Pine I :i nok, New Ji
Vlll" ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai .in action foi I H nlul Ion "i Mar-
riage has been filed ugalnal you and
\ .hi are ri null eel lo itvi .....>S ol
your written defenses. If any. lo the
Law Office ol DAVID A, WOLF
P.A., aiii.i in \ for Petitioner, B881
8.W, l"7th Avenue. Suite 219, Miami,
Florida, 33176, on m befdre the 18th
day of .linn. 1976 nnd file 'he orig-
inal with Ihe Clerk ol iliis Courl ei-
ther before servlci..... Petitioner's At-
torney or immedlateh thereafter; oth-
erwlae, a default "ill be entered
asalnal you for the relief demanded In
the petition
witness my hand and the teal "i
this Courl "n this uih day of Mav.
RICHARD P. BRINKBR,
i'iiik "f the Courl
By I! LIPPH
1 > i>ut \ Clerk
5/14-21-28 'i/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
1ITH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND*
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-14145
i.v RE: The Marriage of
COLLEEN SYMANKO.
Petitioner,
LAWRENCE ALAN BYMANKO.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LAWRENCE ALAN SYMANKO
14 Tree Tun Court
Stamfnnl. Connecticut 06902
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for divorce has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of vour written defense*, if anv.
to it on I*aw Offices of George J.
Tallanoff. Petitioner's attorneys. 420
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach. Florida
33189, on or before June 9. 1976. and
file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorneys, or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the Comnlaint or Petition.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this Court on Mav 4. 1976.
RICHARD P DRINKER.
As Clerk of the Courl
By: L. SNEEDEN
as Deoutv Clerk
Ijjw Offices of George J. Tallanoff
Attorneys for Petitioner
Bv: Terrence S. Schwartz ^^
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 76-15115
IN RE: The Marriage of
DAVID ROSENFELD.
Petitioner /Husband,
and
MARCIA ROSENFELD,
Resnondent/Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
TO: MARCIA ROSENFELD
(Address Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of vour
written defenses, if any. to it on G.
Alexander Nobil. Esq.. Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 321 N.E.
26 Street. Miami. Florida 33137. and
file the original with the Clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
18. 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH F1/1RIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this Court at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, Iliis 12th ilav of Mav. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
I)v M. J. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
c; ALEXANDER NOBIL. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband
321 N.E, 26 Street
Miami. Florida 33137
: 379-1437 S/14-2,-28 6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-14878
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION
FOR
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTER OF
ADOPTION OF:
RODOLFO BALE.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: LEONARDO BODDBN 1-OPEZ
LOS OLIVOS 4
SANTO DOMINGO
REPUBI.1CA DOMINICAN A
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that an action for Petition for Adop-
tion has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenaea, if any. to it on
Petitioners Attorney. Mnrcelo M.
Agudo. 1641 8.W, 27th Avenue. Miami.
Florida 32145, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before June IX. 1!'7: Otherwise
a default Will be entered against you
fur the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
i ach week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH El/IRIDIAN.
witness mv hand and the seal of
said Court at Miami. Dade County,
Florida on this loth day of Mav. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: C. P. COPE1.AND
As Deputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
Marc,!,. M Agudo
AGUDO. ANTON A PINEIRO
Attorneys for Petitioner
1647 S.W. 27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145 ^^ s/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2522
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDA DRESNER
I. i eaaed
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABI IVE KSTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai ihe .ni.......Htration the state
of l-'n .l.i in i in r ileeei i d File Num-
522, Ii pending. In (hi i rcuil
Court for I) el 'ount> Florida Pi
hale |l|\ I loi Hi. .ul'li.- "' I
a. i Flaglei Street. Miami. Floi
Ida The personal representative of the
, tati i Flon in ii Marantz, ho i
|H 18011 H W AVI nil' Ml
ami Florida Thi name and addn
o( the personal renresentatlvi
lornei are sel forth below
ah person* having i lalmi or ae-
mandi analnsl the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRS1 PI BLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with Ihe rlerk of the above court -
written Btatemenl "f anv claim oi a<
mnnd they may hav. Bach claim muai
l in writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his awnl or
attorney, and the amouni claimed, ii
Hi. claim is not yel 'lue. the date
when ii will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim is contingent or un-
llOUldated, the nature "f the uncer-
tainty shall be stated "the ctolm Is
secured, the seeutltv shall he clescrib-
,.,i Tin- claimant shall deliver sorn-
clent copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
i" each personal representative.
Ml persona interested m the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice "f Ad-
minlatratlon has been "BJSj'^ijSKpHS
quired, WITHIN THREE} MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE 1IRST
PGSj!,CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
in, an] ejections they may have thai
challemtes the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the \>-nu<-
or hirisdlctlon of the court.
all claims. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS not so FILED wll.i.
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May i.
'""(s, FLOKENCK Ii MAHANT/.
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Freda Dresner Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
MAX A. OOI.DFARB .
5 West Klagler Street. Miami. Florida
Telephone: 371-2538 5/14-21
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUD'CIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLO" M
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-13936
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BERTA LIDIA BARILLAS.
Petitioner-Wife
CESARVBARILLAS.
Respondent-Husband .
You CESAR BARILLAS. RESI-
DENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby no-
tiifled to serve a coov of vour An-
swer to the Dissolution ot Marriage
filed against vou. upon Wife s attor-
ney. GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ.. tU
N w 12th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
33136. and file original with Clerk of
Court on or before June 11th 1976.
otherwise the Petition will be confess-
ed bv vou. ., ,>
Dated this 30th dav of April 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
Bv: M HERRERA
Denutv Clerk
5/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name or
GENERAL OFFICE EQUIPMENT at
i, ii. \ i: 126 Street. North Miami. Fla.
intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida. ____
TASHA CORP.
a Fla. Corn.
Victor H Paliuca. Frf}^{\\2i_if.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76.15108
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ETHELDBR SAMUELS.
Petitioner.
CHARLES RICHARD SAMUELS.
Respondent.
TO: CHARLES RICHARD
SAMUELS
residence unknown ________
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if anv. to It on
Stone Sostchln & Kosa, pa., attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose- address Is
in] \ w I2ih Avenue. Miami. Florida
JS128 (805) 324-45r,r,. and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above sty led
court on or before June 1R. 1976: oth-
erwiae a default will be entered
agalnsl you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
| -nil'. JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
s,iil COUri at Miami. Florida on this
ilth day of May. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN A KOSS. PA.
ioi N.w. 12th Arena
Miami. Florida ttlM
Attorney for Ptlttonj^^ ,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-13931
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELSIE WATERHOUSE.
JAMES a". WATERHOUSE
TO: JAMES A. WATERHOUSE
Conway. New Hampshire 03818
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of vour
Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this court and you are required
to serve a copv of vour written de-
fenses, if any. to it on PHILIP J.
MAND1NA. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1710 South
llavshore Drive. Miami. Florida 33133.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above stvlcd court on or before
June Ilth. 1976: otherwise a default
will be entered against vou for the re-
llef prayed for in the complaint or
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
30th dav of April. 1976 ,
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv M. HERRERA
As DeDUtv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
PHIIJP J. MANDINA. ESQ.
1710 South Baysbore Drive
Miami. Florida 33133
Attorney for Pe,lt,M,er|/7.14.n.M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
thc'underslgned. desiring to engage 1p
business under the fictitious name of
PRIETO-SOIJS PHOTOGRAPHY at
'i" S W. 38 Street. Miami. Fla..
33165 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
NORMA PRIF.TO-SOLIS
5 /'7-14-ZI-ZR
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12778
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SHAIKAT H. ALI KHAN
and
NITZHAT KHAN
TO: NUZHAT KHAN
49 B Model Town
Lahare. Pakistan ...
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a codv 01
your written defenses. If anv. to it
on l-ouls R. Beller. Esq. attorney for
Petitioner, whose nddress Is 420 Un-
rein Road. Suite 238. Miami Hcach.
Fla 33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above stved court
on or before June 4. 1976: otherwise
a default will be entered against vou
for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition. .....
This notire shall be published once
ach week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI.ORID1AN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21st day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
luls R. Beller. Esq.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 288
Miami Beach. Fla Slit*
Attorney for Pstitty tn.u.


Friday, May 21, 1976
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(^H SAVE 31'
Grade 'AA'
Butter
PANTRY PRIDE
LIGHTLY SALTED
QUARTERS
79
1 LB
PKG.
LIMIT ONE PKG.. PLEAS! WITH OTHER PURCHASES
Or 17 00 OH MOHl EXCLUDING CIGARETTES J
mm SAVE 34<
Cheer
Detergent
FOR HEAVY
DUTY WASH
LOADS
89
49-OZ.
PKG.
1 LIMIT ONE PKG PLEASE WITH OTME PUCMASES
V ** Of 7 00 OR MORE EXCLUOING CIGARETTES J
[ Pantry Pride brings you a
unique opportunity to own
a complete set of fine
imported porcelain china
BY CROWN VICTORIA
Every week collect featured piece* for only
THIS WEEKS
FEATURED
PIECE. THE
HANDSOME
DINNER
49
EACH ^^
PLATE
it's so easy
to own and a
source of
constant pride
one with each s5 purchase
two with'10. three with'15.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. MAY 22nd,
AT ALL PANTRY PRIDE STORES IN DADE COUNTY
ALSO IN HOLLYWOOD AND HALLANDALE
IC 1*11
KI WMCI
D -".. II SO
II l
ir CUSTOMER MAY PURCHASE ONE O. ALL .Hi STARRED !TEMS WITH ONE V 00 PUCHAS. Q. MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FIRST OF THE SEASON
Sweet
Watermelon
U.S.D.A. CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Rib $499
Steak
SMALL END
. BONELESS
U.S.D.A CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
1
Beef Chuck
Blade Roast
79?
USD CMOiCl til' ROUND
SERVE HOT OR COLD
Artichokes
4
LARGE
30 SIZE
FOR
$
1
IP! LAMM SIZI fOt SLICING
IPI lAHOI SIZIOI SLICING
Firm Tomatoes 4 KS 49c
IMINIKIN JUKI ILAIOI 10 till) ^
Fla. Oranges.."- lo.oi 1
U S NO 1 All PUtPOM _, _
Maine Potatoes 5 & 79c
Red Radishes 3 .. 29c
CAIIIORNIA TOP OUAIIIT SUNRISI ^ Q,
Lemons 11 o 9
69*
89c
DIUCIOUI TIO*lCAl IIUII
Mangoes MB..........
IRIIMRURI
Orange Juice
HALF
GALLON
Cauliflower
v
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SNO-WHITE
GARDEN FRESH
59
HEAD
Eye Round Roast ,.$189
UIDA CMOICI Mir IOUN0 IOIIOM
Round Roast SSm
USD* CHOICI WIST COIN II D til* LOIN
$1 29
L.$l
USOA CHOICI WIST COtN IID lllf LOIN ^
Sirftfln Steak u. 1
Sf 49
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$1 69
QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's^ AC
Margarine
MB
PKG.
39
...o$|39
hain 1'ii'D""'
CheezWhiz
RIAMTONI (All VARIITIISl CII l I) _
Cottage Cheese W
5A1&INIO C-ICSl ___ Chunk Mozzarella 9*lm
IRIIHOSHIP CAIORI1 Mllll (RIG. 01 LOW UII
Cottage Cheese SSiW
OROINSLICIOCOIORID AMIRICAN -Q,
Process Cheese o 33
ILIiiCMMANN I-1WO I o: CUPS! UNSAltIO _
Soft Margarine Hi 75
UIDA CHOICI till ROUND
Rump Roast SKSL
UIDA CHOICI WIIT COIN '10 III' !
Rib Roast u
UIDA CHOICI Wll. COIN 110 Mil CHUCH INIS .
Under Blade Steak .. *1
UIDA CHOICI Will CORNHORII' ROUN0 ^g
Btm. Round Steak .. 1
HICI0 CQc
Bed Liver *W
N|W ZIAIAN0 'ROZIN IAMR O O C
Shldr. Blade Chops 89
UI0A CHOICI Ml' CHUCH RONIIISS
Shoulder Steak 1
ILA.JHIPPID PRIMIUM WHOLI (
Fresh Fryers .48*
Fryer Quarters i. t>9
ILA. SHIPPID PRIMIUM IRISH A A*
Fryer PurltlXSSZSXTS, l.99*
IRISH A Ac
Ground Beef Chuck .. 99
Great Ground ^- 69*
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USDA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Beef Chuck
Blade Steak
89
LB
HYGRADE S BALL PARK MEAT OR BEEF
l-LB.
PKG.
$119
1
Franks or
Knocks
OSCAI MATH MI0CIT ^
Braunschweiger c'h. 69 c
KAHNSSllCIO p
Beef Bologna 38 75C
Sauerkraut ll/2.'.'c43c
Beer Salami 8S-,1"
Pantry Pride
Tomatoes
RED
RIPE
10
16-OZ.
CAN
A. LIMIT J CANS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES Of
^W S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUOING CIGARETTES
fepffl SAVE 34'
Kraft
Mayonnaise
ADDS THE
FLAVOR TO
YOUR
SALADS
79
32-OZ.
JAR
LIMIT ONE JAR PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES Of
% AT $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUOING CIGARETTES
PANTRY PRIDE WHOLE OR SLICED
White Potatoes
4 o2$l
CANS
l2*/| 16-OZ.
CANS
oil At on oissttm
Dream Whip
LtrtON onion maki a ( mi
Burger Mix..........
ASSORTIOIIAVORS
Royal Gelatin
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MIX OR MATCH PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN
Mixed Vegetables
.PEAS AND CARROTS f*i*4 24-OZ
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SIA STAR ICHANOIC fRIED
Fish Sticks?
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RICHS All WHITE MEAT
Chicken
Roll
HAIF
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DOIMANS AUSTRIAN
Swiss Cheese
98
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NO CHOlESTEROl-lOW IN FAT. NUTRITIOUS I OLD MILWAUKEE
Fibre Brand Q\c I Schaefer
Bread^ZZ Oif Beer
CARLING BLACK LABEL
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO OEALERS.



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