The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02467

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
leJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 20 Frd K- shoent- May 14. 1976 Miami, Florida Friday, May 14, 1976 By Mail SOc.
Two Sections Price 25 cents
Carter Aide Raps Anti-Jewish Charge
LEADERS AWARDS SLATED
38th Annual
Federation Meet
Set Wednesday
Greater Miami Jewish Federation President Harry
B. Smith and Vice President L. Jules Arkin, chairman
of the 1975 and 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, will be honored next Wednesday
evening, May 19, at Federation's 38th annual meeting
and dinner.
The event, whose chairman is Federation Found-
ing President Stanley C. Myers, will be held at the Car-
rillon Hotel, with a cocktail reception beginning at
6:30 p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. The cost of the eve-
Continued on Page 6-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Two of former Gov. Jim-
my Carter's closest aides
have vigorously denounced
accusations levelled against
him by former speech writ-
er, Robert Shrum, about the
Jewish vote in the Georgi-
an's primary campaign for
the Democratic Presidential
nomination.
Carter's chief media
spokesman, Jody Powell, said
that Carter "has expressed
concern at the lack of sup-
port from Jewish voters but
"in a completely different
context" from that stated by
Shrum.
CARTER'S national issues co-
ordinator, Stuart Eizenstat, a
leader of Atlanta's Jewish com-
munity, described the accusa-
tion as a "total fabrication."
Powell and Eizenstat made their
statements from Carter cam-
paign headquarters in Atlanta
in separate telephone conversa-
tions with the Jewish Telegraph-
ic Agency's Washington bureau
which initiated the calls.
The JTA asked the headquar-
ters for its views after the
charges by ex-speech writer
Shrum appeared in interviews
published in the Washington
Post and the Washington Star.
In accusing Carter of a "de-
gree of manipulation and de-
Continued on Page 12-A
REPEATS HIS VERSION Of YOM KIPPUR NIGHTMARE
Schlesinger Charges Ford Policies
Place Unfair Burden on Israel
IF NOT, THERE OUGHT TO BE
Is There a Jewish Study
Program at Miami U. ?
By NORM A A. OROV1TZ
When Shepard Broad,
Mayor Emeritus of Bay Har-
bor Islands, was approached
about purchasing a Judaica
library collection for the
University of Florida's Jew-
ish Studies Program (JSP),
he thought the request to be
"too humble."
His philanthropic nature
and business acumen came
to the fore as he was made
an offer he could not refuse.
The State Board of Regents
had authorized a JSP to be
develoned at the Gainesville
campus. (FIU's fledgling
program is hurting because
of that unilateral decision.
WITH THE assurance that
the state would perpetually
fund the JSP at Gainesville,
Bread was able to ensure the
establishment of the Shepard
Broad was able to ensure the
Studies with one initial invest-
ment. What made the proposal
most fiscally attractive was that
Continued on Page 1S-A
Peace Alone? 8-A
Ties Eroded ... 12-A
Creative Initiative 15-A
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Ford-Kissinger poli-
cies toward Israel have been
sharply attacked by former
Defense Secretary James R.
Schlesinger here. He said,
"It is improper pernicious
to blame the failure to
achieve a settlement (in the
Middle East) on the one na-
tion prepared to accept a
settlement," an obvious al-
lusion to the Ford Adminis-
tration's open criticism of
Israel's alleged failure to of-
fer initiatives for peace.
Schlesinger made his re-
marks in an address at the
seventh annual policy con-
ference of the American-Is-
raei Public Affairs Commit-
tee at the Shoreham Hotel.
IN REPLY to questions, he
offered an account of the 1973
Yom Kippur War airlift to Is-
rael in which he alleged that
President Nixon and Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger
procrastinated in resupplying
Israel with urgently needed
arms until the war was in its
seventh day.
Schlesinger was Secretary of
Defense at the time and served
in the same capacity in the
Ford Administration until late
last year. In his address, he
referred to two themes of the
Ford Administration's Middle
East policy momentum and
even-handedness.
He said the tendency is to
blame the slow progress in ne-
gotiations on Israel and to assert
"the failure to achieve momen-
tum is a direct responsibility
of Israel."
"MOMENTUM is fine." Schle-
singer said. "The question is
Continued on Page 3-A
t
^^^ ^5^
JAMES SCHLESINGEF
Next President, Whoever, Will
Force Return to Pre '67 Borders
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, president
of the World Jewish Con-
gress, predicted here that no
matter who is elected Presi-
dent of the United States
this year, Israel will come
under increasing pressure
soon after the elections to
withdraw to its pre-June,
1967 borders with only mi-
nor modifications.
Goldmann, who arrived
here from a series of meet-
ings with statesmen and
other leading personalities
in several countries, based
his forecast on his belief
that the U.S. is fed up with
the Middle East problem and
wants a final settlement.
HE TOLD a crowded press
conference here that he was
optimistic over the chances of
a final settlement in the Middle
East because of several factors,
including the American desire
to end the status quo which may
lead to another war and a cor-
Continued on Page 9-A
How Did
Kadum
Flap Start?
Coalition Crisis 2-A
By UZI BENZIMA?!
and DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's political community
is expectantly awaiting; *he
Cabinet debate on West Bank
settlement in general and
the fate of the Gush Enninim
settlement at Kadum in Sa-
maria, in particular.
No one can ruie out e full-
blown coalition crisis, ace
opinions around the Cab' et
table seem irreconc !1 ">My
Continued on Page S-A
Scoop, HHH Withdrawals: Two Lost Friends
NAHUM GOLDMANN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Henry Jackson's withdrawal
Henry Jacson's withdrawal
from the Democratic Party's
presidential primaries fol-
lowing hard on Hubert H.
Humphrey's refusal to enter
them, virtually removes from
consideration for the Presi-
dency two of the Senate's
foremost champions of Is-
rael and Soviet Jewry. All
of the dozen candidates orig-
inally in the field strongly
support Israel and the aspira-
tions of Soviet citizens who
wish to emigrate.
But Jackson unquestionably
was the most outspoken among
them. The Washington Senator
was the principal author of the
Jackson-Vanik provisions of the
Trade Act of 1974 that bars U.S.
trade benefits to the E /Id
Union until it relaxes itf
gration policy.
HE ALSO introduced :u-:. le-
gislation giving the govern;- nX
authority to provide up : B500
Continued on Page 9-A



Page 2-A
>Jew 1stttor Mian
Friday, May 14, 1976
-
Gush Settlers May Topple Rabin Coalition
JERUSALEM-Israel's co-
ali'irtti government headed
j, xlrahak Rabin is in deep
Sunday, the cabinet
HO gainst allowing Jews
in the main centers
oi : .ccupied West Bank
du' offered to relocate set-
ticr elsewhere in the zone.
And the government in-
sisted :hat Gush Emunim
settlers in and near Nablus
evacuuM their settlements.
The Rabin led compro-
mise, v/hlch would have per-
mitted the Gush Emunim
group to resettle elsewhere
in the Samaria region, is
now, however, also in doubt.
On Monday, Premier Rabin,
in an address to his Labor align-
ment, declared that Jewish set-
tlements should concentrate in
the sparsely-populated Jordan
Valley, not in Samaria.
The result of all this confu-
sion was a march of some 15,000
persons through central Tel
Aviv against illegal settlements
on the West Bank.
Led by Mapam and Modek
in cooperation with the Move-
French Leader Will
View Arab Jewry
PARIS (JTA) French Senate President Alain
Poker left for the United States for a nine-day tour during
which le will discuss the plight of Jews in Arab countries
and publicize the International Conference for the Rescue
of Jews in Arab lands.
Porter who has been president of the Conference since
it was formed in 1970, will visit New York where he will
confer with members of the organization and will attend a
parry in his honor given by the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Organizations.
HE WILL also see New York Mayor Abraham Beame
and visit Washington where he will meet with Congress-
men ?nher will also travel to San Francisco and Los An-
gele
Throughout his tour he will explain to officials and
audiences "that the plight of Jews in Arab lands and the
situation of Arabs in the occupied territories are not in the
least comparable.
During his tour, Poher will be guest of Gen. Lucius
Clay, head of the American section of the Conference and
former U.S. Commander in Berlin.
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ment for a Sane Policy, the
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and Premier Rabin's weak coali-
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ft ft ft
WASHINGTON Look for
the Senate to sustain President
Ford's veto of the foreign aid
authorization bill.
Ford vetoed the bill last Fri-
day just seven weeks before the
end of the current fiscal year
to which the measure applied.
In his veto, the President did
not mention the bill's provisions
for transitional quarter funding
for the three months between
the end of fiscal 1976 and the
start of fiscal 1977 under which
Israel would have received an
extra $550 million in military
assistance.
Look for Sen. Hubert Hum-
phrey (D., Minn.), chairman of
the Senate Foreign Aid Subcom-
mittee, to recommend that the
basic provisions of the legisla-
tion rejected by the President
be incorporated into new legis-
lation applicable to both fiscal
years between 1976 and 1977.
ft ft *
BALTIMORE Expect more
pressure from itinerant Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger
now that he is back from Africa.
In an address here, Kissinger
declared that "any successful
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negotiation (with the Arabs)
will require Israel to exchange
territory in return for political
and therefore much less con-
crete concessions."
Kissinger spoke before the
1,500-member Congregation Chi-
zuk Amuno here, one of Balti-
more's oldest Conservative con-
gregations, which presented him
with its Distinguished Leader-
ship Award.
ft ft ft
TEL AVIV Expect upcom-
ing kidnap attempts against So-
viet diplomats serving in the
United States.
This is the word from Rabbi
Meir Kahane, of the Jewish De-
fense League.
At a press conference here
Kahane warned this would hap^
pen unless the Americans and
Russians get together to solve
the problems of Soviet Jews
ft ft ft
BALTIMORE A Utter of
apology will be published short-
ly bv the Rumanian tennis star
Hie Nastase for the anti-Semitic
remarks he made during the
Baltimore International Indoor
tennis championship in Catons-
ville, Md., last January.
"There are too many Jews
here," Nastase said at the time,
referring to the vocal support
for his opponent, Harold Solo-
mon, of Silver Spring, Md., when
a ruling went against Nastase.
The letter will state that "It
was certainly not my intention
to offend Mr. Solomon, whom I
consider a good personal
friend."
British Airways Gets Protest
On Lists' Omission of Israel
Bv MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) British
Airways on May 5 disclosed
some of the steps it takes
to avoid offending the Arab
world by omitting Israel from
much of its publicity. A press
officer for the state-owned avia-
tion company told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that it
prints two editions of its 24-
page worldwide timetable.
One of them, which includes
the services to Israel, is for
general distribution. The other,
omitting Israel, goes to British
Airways offices in the Arab
world. The spokesman also dis-
closed that BA draws up special
lists of its offices which omit
mention of its thre; offices in
Israel.
THIS HAS come to light be-
cause one of these lists was in-
advertently sent to a company
in Israel in connection with an
international conference on fire,
security and safety held in Lon-
don last week. British Airways
had supplied the list to the or-
ganizers of the conference who
distributed it exactly as it was
received.
These admissions were made
following protests to BA over
the absence of Israel from an
otherwise comprehensive list of
nationality marks on civil air-
craft published in the com-
pany's 1976 diary.
Previously, BA has claimed
that this was "an unfortunate
oversight," pointing out that
the diary does give the ad-
dresses of its offices in Israel.
BUT PAUL Maurice, one of
the BA's press officers, told the
JTA that whoever drew up the
list "must hav'e dropped the
Israeli marking for obvious pol-
itical reasons." Had Israel been
included, it would have appear-
ed between the names of Ye-
men and Libya.
Meanwhile, the matter has
bsen taken up with BA by the
newly-formed Anti-Boycott Com-
mittee. It is understood, too,
that the British government has
been made aware of Israeli
views about it.
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M5-7-76


Friday, May 14, 1976
+ 3elsllk*kMai)
Page 3-A
SCHLESINGER SAYS POLICIES ARE ONE-SIDED
Unfair Burden Charge Voiced
Continued from Page 1-A
momentum toward what? To a
just and comprehensive settle-
ment? To a reduction or the
end of terrorism? To the recog-
nition of state entites? It is
improper pernicious to
blame the failure to achieve a
settlement on the one nation
prepared to accept a settlement.
That is an improper judge-
ment."
Schlesinger added that if the
U.S. "is to be the guarantor of
freedom it must be prepared to
support democracies" because
"if we are not prepared to sup-
port democracies, we must ask
who will we support?"
With respect to even-handed-
ness, Schlesinger, who is cur-
rently a Visiting Scholar at
Johns Hopkins University, ob-
served that "even-handedness is
different from forcing either
side into concessions. If the
United States is to be the leader
of the diverse nations it must
be responsible for all nations
and it cannot be in a position
of forcing one side."
He said that the military bal-
ance in the Middle East today
is interlocked with a global
military balance and support of
Israel by the U.S. is "a baro-
meter of American intentions
. The strategic significance of
Israel is of growing importance
in the worldwide military bal-
ance" because it is "an indica-
tor of American steadfastness"
after the difficulties of the U.S.
in Southeast Asia and Africa,
Schlesinger said.
HE NOTED that Israel is
"highly dependent" on the U.S.
Activists In
Hunger Strike
NEW YORK (JTA) So-
viet Jewish activists in Kishi-
nev, in the southern Soviet
Republic of Moldavia, declared
a hunger strike May 1 and 2 in
orotest of a new Soviet harass-
ment technique which forces
applicants to give up their
apartments before they can fill
out an application for a visa to
Israel, it was reported by the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
"If a visa is denied," the let-
ter addressed to United Nations
Secretary General Kurt Wald-
heim pointed out, "which is the
usual procedure of the Soviet
government, the applying fami-
ly is left not only homeless, but
without a shelter from the ele-
ments."
THE 15 signers, who set
aside two days to stage a pro-
test against the "continuing
discrimination of Jews by the
USSR government," said in
their letter, "We hope this pro-
test will reach the people of the
world and they will sympathize
with our plight."
"far more than the Israelis ex-
pected after the 1967 war."
This, he said, put the U.S. in
a position to extract conces-
sions from Israel but he was
"concerned" by the undermin-
ing of America's moral support
for Israel and the "parallel tac-
tics" employed by the U.S. in
Southeast Asia.
Schlesinger's version of the
genesis of the American airlift
to Israel in October, 1973, cor-
responded with what he told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency in
an exclusive interview two
years age.
He said the Nixon-Kissinger
policy when the war broke out
on Oct. 6 was that Israel could
receive whatever American
military equipment it was able
to pay cash for and to transport
in its own or chartered aircraft.
Subsequently, a decision was
made that the U.S. would trans-
port military equipment to the
Azores where it would be pick'
ed up by Israeli planes, but that
did not work out, Schlesinger
said.
HE SAID the idea then was
to transport the equipment in
un-marked American aircraft to
maintain a low profile for the
U.S. According to Schlesinger,
the decision to send Israel mili-
tary supplies directly by U.S.
Air Force transport planes was
not taken until 1 a.m., Satur-
day, Oct. 13.
Schlesinger's version has been
disputed \>y the State Depart-
ment which has implied that the
delay in sending military sup-
plies to Israel was due to foot-
dragging by the Pentagon.
Schlesinger declared that "This
should be out of contention."
However, he said, "We have
the latest authorized leaks" in
an article in Foreign Policy
magazine by Edward R. F. Shee-
han on Kissinger's diplomacy.
Schlesinger observed that this
was "a clever strategem to
neutralize Israel's supporters in
the United States."
HE SAID that Sheehan's ver-
sion of events is in conflict with
his known knowledge and
added, "I must allow others to
sort out the conflict."
Asked whether the U.S.
should be a "major" arms sup-
plier to Egypt and Saudi Arabia,
Schlesinger said that "some
modicum" of related arms is ap-
propriate for Egypt but that
was distinct from being a ma-
jor supplier.
He said that others could
supply Saudi Arabia along with
the U.S. "All aryfis to the Mid-
dle East should be carefully
balanced on the basis of the
regional basis. The United
States should take a long-term
view rather than a short-term
one based on diplomatic views,"
he said.
SCHLESINGER claimed that
"we recognize" that in the last
three or four years, the Amer-
ican military position has de-
clined, notably in naval strength
and "it is essential" that both
the Middle East and the world
military balance be in "appro-
priate equilibrium" because
without that, "ultimately" there
will be no survival for Israel
and the Middle East will be sub-
ject to "Soviet fiat."
A militarily weakened Amer-
ica "will be unable to hold the
rings in the Middle East," Schle-
singer said.
Royal Couple's
Visit Purely Private
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The Dutch government has
emphasized the strictly "private character" of Crown Prin-
cess Beatrix's visit to Israel. The government has forbid-
den the Princess and her husband, Prince Klaus, to visit
the occupied territories and even the holy places in East
Jerusalem.
The Dutch government's restrictions are such that
the couple, who were due to visit Masada during their one-
week stay in Israel, will have to fly in a roundabout way
so as not to fly over occupied Judaea.
THE GOVERNMENT'S orders also prevent the Prin-
cess from making any public statement or attending any
official ceremony apart from the inauguration of the
"Princess Beatrix Floor" at the Tel Aviv Medical School,
which is the official reason for the visit.
The government, apparently in order to avoid un-
favorable repercussions in the Arab countries, has asked
the Dutch press to play down the visit and Dutch newsmen
in Israel are not kept informed of the detailed program
of the visit.
7 Injured in Private
Plane Crash on Road
TEL AVIV (JTA) Seven persons were injured,
one seriously, when a small passenger plane crash land-
ed on a road north of Tiberias. There were eight persons
aboard the aircraft, operated by Arkia, Israel's domestic
airline. One apparently was unhurt, four sustained mod-
erate injuries, and two were discharged from the hospital
after treatment for minor bruises. The plane, an executive
type aircraft known as the "Chieftain," was on a flight
from Rosh Pina in Galilee to Tel Aviv when it developed
engine trouble. The pilot attempted to land on a road but
the piane struck an object which sheered off one wing and
part of one motor.
v You Are Cordially Invited to Attend The
WOMEN FOR JEWISH NATIONAL FUND BICENTENNIAL LUNCHEON
Honoring
PRESIDENTS OF AFFILIATED ZIONIST ORGANIZATIONS
MRS. JEAN FEINBERG
Prei. M.B. Chapter,
Hadassah
MRS. HARVEY FRIEDMAN
Pros., Miami Chapter
of Hadassah
MRS. MILTON GREEN
Pros., Pioneer Women
Council of So. Fla.
Mrs. AARON KATZ
Pros.. Council American
Mizrachi Woman
MRS. M. L. WEISSBERG
Pros., Florida Reqion
of Hadassah
Wednesday, June 2, 1976 12 noon
Fontainebleau Hotel
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
JNF Foundation Chairman
MRS. 6US (EMANUEL) MENTZ
Chairman, Women for JNF
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
Pres., Greater Miami
For Reservations Call: 672-5525 538-6464
\bur savings at Dade Federal
does make a difference
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AMapaMah: 1400 N.W. 36th St. Edison Center: 5800 N.W. 7th Ave North Miami: 12600 N W 7th Av.
: 6860 Miramar Parkway (Broward) Oakland Plaza: 4850 W. Oakland Park Blvd. (Lauderdale Lakes*


Page 4-A
*Jew/sii ********
Friday, May 14, 1976
<-
The Finger of Blame
With his speech before the policy conference of
the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, former
Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger has rekindled
the fire that blazed into an uncontrollable conflagra-
tion involving the Vu.S. role in the Yom Kippur War,
when in October, 1973, Israel's back was to the wall
and needed military resupply from us as quickly as
possible or suffer possible defeat.
In that conflagration, Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer pointed the finger of blame at Schlesinger. In
urn, Schlesinger pointed the finger at Kissinger and,
5y inference, President Nixon.
The passage of time seems to have borne Schle-
singer out: In effect, Kissinger and Nixon dragged
their feet until the last possible moment, when it be-
came apparent, not that an Israeli defeat was in the
offing, but that an Israeli defeat would mean a terrible
strategic blow to American prestige in the Middle East.
There is no need to relive the debate except within
Dr. Schlesinger's own frame of reference at the Public
Affairs Committee annual policy conference the other
day in Washington.
And that is once again to point the finger of blame:
this time squarely at the Ford-Kissinger pro-Arab
stance, which blames Israel for the failure to achieve
peace in the Middle East, but which says nothing about
Arab refusal to recognize the reality of Israeli exist-
ence.
So what else is new?
Make Your Gift NOW
Preparations for the 38th annual meeting and din-
ner of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation May 19
underscores the remarkable achievement of the Corn-
bind Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign,
which two weeks ago announced that it topped its $12
million goal for this year, and is still going full steam
ahead.
We cannot overemphasize the need for every South
Floridian to contribute his fair share to the campaign.
Services here at home dedicated to the best edu-
cational, cultural, health and philanthropic needs of
the Jewish community are served by the campaign.
Needless to say, so too is Israel served by the cam-
paign.
It would be repetitive to recount these needs here
and now. It is no exaggeration merely to say that Is-
rael's very survival depends upon the success of the
CJA-IEF campaign and other such campaigns in Jew-
ish communities across the land.
If you have not yet made your gift, how do you
possibly explain it to yourself?
The answer to that question apart, make your gift
NOW.
Bicentennial Convocation
The Rabbinical Association has come up with a
unique format for its Bicentennial Convocation on
Sunday.
The convocation will recognize the pioneer Ortho-
dox, Conservative and Reform congregations in the
Greater Miami area.
We believe this is a splendid idea. At the same
time that the Rabbis will be paying homage to the his-
tory of American Jewry on the occasion of the nation's
200th anniversary, they will also be paying homage to
synagogues and temples here that did yeoman spir-
itual service in filling the needs of the community
when the community was still fledgling and in need of
leadership.
Historian Max Dimont's scheduled presentation on
"American Judaism: Wasteland or Renaissance" will
certainly tie the two themes of the convocation to-
gether. The occasion should not only prove historical,
but educational, as well.
Jewish Floridian
'IFFICK AND PLANT 120 NX. 6th STREET TELEPHONE 37J-4***
.'.O. Box 01-2973. Miami. Florida IS101
FRED K. SHOCHET uEP MINDLIN SEI.MA M THOMPSON
Bdlto- and Publisher Associate Editor Assistant to Puoll'*
The Jewish Floridian Doe Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
Publlshpd every Friday since 1S27 by The Jewish Floridian
8e<'ond-C! Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
Fred K. Shochat May 14, 1976
Are Jem Politically Naive?
INURING the second Nixon
campaign for the presiden-
cy, writing for another news-
paper, I deplored the appear-
ance of a number of Jewish
leaders on William F. Buckley's
"Firing Line" in support of
Nixon's candidacy.
Their argument was that
Nixon had "changed." This was
a "new" Nixon we were dealing
with in 1972, whom we were
implored to regard as a bastion
of strength in behalf of Israel's
survival, a friend to Jewish
causes generally.
ONE OF the leaders, a for-
mer Miamian, a loud-mouthed
hully with all the ethical prin-
Mindlin
the Jawiah Floridian ha* absorbed the Jewish Unity and Mm Jewien Weekly.
Mtmoer of the Jawiah Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndl.
aat* Worldwide Newa Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapars. and the Florida Prsaa Aaaoclattott
SUB8CRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) Ona Yaar12.00; Two Yeara-22.0;
Three YearsS30.00. Out of Town Upon Request._____________________
14 IYAR 5736
Number 20
ciples of a gutter street-fight-
er, addressed an ad hominem
attack on me to the paper from
New York, which promptly pub-
lished it with much prominence
and enthusiasm.
Taking their cue from Edwin
Albee's "Who's Afraid of Vir-
ginia Woolf?," in which the
drunken history professor or-
ganizes a game called "Get the
Guest," the editors of the paper
had long since organized a
game for me called "Get the
Jew."
Obviously, argued the edi-
tors, if one of the "leaders"
doubted the intelligence of my
criticism of their Nixon sup-
port, then I was wrong and my
credibility as a columnist open
to question.
THE THEORY must have
been that all Jews think alike.
I am a Jew. I do not think like
other Jews do the purpose
of the Buckley program and
the leaders who appeared on it
was to give the impression that
all Jews had swung into the
Nixon camp. Ergo, I am either
wrong or incompetent, or even
both.
I am reminded of this inci-
dent because of an editorial in
the May issue of "Reform Ju-
daism," published by the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions.
The editorial warns Jews
against politicians who exploit
Jewish emotions, particularly
those emotions about Israel and
Soviet Jewry.
NIXON, declares the editor-
ial, "was not only a secretive,
duplicitous and fearful man,
but he had mixed feelings, to
say the least, about Jews."
In obvious reference to the
Woodward Bernstein "Final
Days" study, the editorial re-
calls Nixon's ranting about a
"Jewish cabal" and the com-
mand to his "underlings to
steer his daughters away from
museums because they are all
Continued on Page 13-A
Wanted: Piety and Patriotism
Friday, May 14, 1976
Volume 49
Old-fashioned politics are out,
we're being told by the profes-
sional pundits. That that has been
true for the past 20 years or so,
as some few of us have writ-
ten, doesn't make any less inter-
esting the discovery and the
publication as if it were a new
American cultural phenomenon.
There were, of course, many
facets to old-fashioned politics.
One was what the hostile press
used to rant about during the
New Deal, Fair Deal Dem-
ocratic deals, as it were the
policy of spend, spend, tax and
tax. All of that toj?et the votes
of the poor and lower middle
class, who were most of us in
bygone days.
THE OFT-MALIGNED "boss-
es" of "machines" bought their
votes by passing out Christmas
baskets, welcoming newcomers
to the ward with a half-ton of
coal if needed, fixing traffic
tickets, helping to bring in im-
migrant families, giving out
janitor jobs at City Hall and on
the garbage trucks and doing
other people-oriented things
all for votes.
They also took money for fa-
vors and did other bad things.
So now we have a new kind
of politics and politicians. There
are also many facets to this but
what interests me at this point
in time is what, for want of a
better description, I shall label
"The Politics of Rottenness."
The people breaking new
ground, although the theory has
been with us for a long time,
are Gerald Ford and Ronald
Reagan. We have often seen
one candidate in a race take the
"Rotten" position but this is the
first time in my memory that
both are seeking to outdo the
other in their positions on mat-
ters of social concern which I,
EDWARD
COHEN
in my admitted bias, can label
only "Rotten."
WHERE THE old bosses used
to deliver food baskets to the
poor and near-poor, Jerry
Ford's policy on food stamps
will literally take the food out
of the mouths of young and old.
And it is as deliberate a pol-
itical act to counteract Reagan's
fraudulent attacks on welfare
fraud as was his recent decision
to spend additional billions on
unneeded ships in order to
counteract Reagan's charges
that we are militarily second to
the Soviet Union.
The WPA and loading the
payroll at City Hall with ward
heelers was a traditional way of
keeping the economy strong by
creating jobs. Public housing
not only moved the poor from
one slum to what ultimately be-
came another, but also provided
jobs for the construction indus-
try.
UNDER JERRY Ford, creat-
ing unemployment has been a
deliberate policy, aimed to fight
inflation at the expense of mil-
lions least able to exist even on
minimal standard. Thus among
the many vetoes of the present
administration was that of a
bill designed to re-train unem-
ployed workers and to provide
jobs, rather than welfare.
Welfare, according to the code
of the rottenness politicians, is
only for the military, for the
arms industry. Jerry Ford's lat-
est veto of the foreign military
aid bill, made while Reagan was.
breathing in his face, is a prime
example of what and who counts
most:
He objected to a $9 billion
ceiling on military sales, pre-
ferring that this nation serve
up death at a great profit rather
than food at a lesser profit. He
took issue with a proviso that
we stop giving aid to countries
which consistently violate "in-
ternationally recognized hu-
man rights."
THE VETO also had the ef-
fect of cutting off $1.5 billion
in aid to Israel this year, and
I maintain that he is paying his
dues to the oil bosses and the
Jew-haters because he has writ-
ten off the possibility of getting
a substantial Jewish vote if he
survives Q>e primary tests of
ultimate selfishness with Rea-
gan. And rjte bribery, graft, etc.,
are greater here than any old
boss ever dreamed of.
There is more, much more,
on the sorry record of these
two men. jjn all fairness, they
reflect thdrattitudes of an ever-
growing Amber of Americans
if one canjbelieve the polls and
what one .'hears on local talk
shows.
tPIETY
be- what
for in
tennial.
well-doc
JD patriotism may
ericans are looking
fcyear of our Bicen-
some strange, but
anted, reason many
Americanitdo not relate piety
to the prophets or Jesus or pat-
riotism to- Thomas Jefferson.
They stressed, if I may, the
Politics of*Hope, of compassion
and a brotherly concern for all
people. The Politics of Rotten-
ness is the story of Cain up-
dated. And it is selling.


Friday, May 14, 1976
+Jewlsl.fhr*ttar-
Page 5-A
Nixon Preparing
His Own Version
anderson
WASHINGTON Washing-
ton Post reporters Bob Wood-
ward and Carl Bernstein have
caused a controversy with their
publication of "The Final Days,"
chxonicling Richard Nixon's last
days in the White House.
But we have been keeping
up with Nixon since he left
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.
It was a defeated, distraught
Richard Nixon who went into
seclusion at San Clemente. One
source with access to him de-
scribed him as "totally weary,
terribly depressed and com-
pletely despondent."
ANOTHER source was struck
by Nixon's "stark loneliness."
The former president was "ab-
solutely alone within himself,"
the source said. These were his
worst days. His nerves were
frayed:, his conversation some-
times wandered, and he had to
take Seconal to sleep.
Nixon's psyche was so "deli-
cate," according to our sources,
that loyal aides would take vis-
itors aside and caution them
not to mention Watergate. Nix-
on even developed a strange
inability to repeat the name of
the special Watergate prosecu-
tor, Leon Jaworski.
Yet all our sources agree that
Nixon always had complete
control of his faculties. Slowly,
he began to come out of his
shell.
IT HELPED him to talk
things out with his wife, Pat.
Sources who overheard some of
their conversations tell me Nix-
on began to pour out his feel-
ings to his wife.
When he came close to death
in the hospital, she was con-
stantly at his side. But once
she was away for two hours.
Nixon plaintively asked for her.
Let me quote one source di-
rectlv on this. "If it hadn't been
for Pat." this source said, "Dick
SOME SEE IT AS TEST CASE
would not have survived. Her
presence pulled him through."
THE FORMER President is
now engrossed in his memoirs.
Like Woodward and Bernstein,
he had tried to reconstruct his
final days. He has questioned
former aides to help him recall
the agonizing details.
Nixon has indicated, of
course, that his account will be
quite different than the Wood-
ward-Bernstein version.
But he hasn't yet committed
it to writing, because he hasn't
reached this point in his manu-
script.
INCIDENTALLY, his research-
ers furnish him with detailed
memos, but he is writing his
own book in longhand on
legal-size yellow pads.
Sources who have had access
to the unfurnished manuscript
say it is painfully frank in some
places. He blames himself for
mishandling Watergate. But
most of all. he blames his for-
mer chief of staff, H. R. Halde-
man.
Today, Richard Nixon's leg
pains him when he is on his
feet more than an hour.
HE TAKES anticoagulants
three times a day. And he still
requires Seconal to sleep at
nights.
But he talks confidently of
the future. He believes history
will treat him kindly because of
his efforts as a peacemaker.
How Kadum Controversy Began
Continued from Pa*e 1-A
disparate.
COLUMNIST Joel Marcus,
writing in Haaretz, says of the
Kadum affair that it exempli-
fies the Israeli political trait of
turning molehills into moun-
tains (the Hebrew idiom is "a
fly into an elsphant").
After all, Marcus notes, all
save the extremists on either
side must realize that the fate
of the ISO-odd Kadum settlers
is not, ultimately, going to de-
termine the course of the Mid-
east conflict.
Other observers disagree.
They see Kadum as a test-case:
a single instance embodying in
itself the essence of the "great
debate" that has raged in Is-
rael ever since the Six-Day War
a debate whose repercus-
sions do indeed directly affect
peace prospects in the area.
How did the Kadum episode
begin?
IN EARLY December, 1975,
a group of 30 young Jewish
families, most of them members
of the Gush Emunim nationalist
movement, circumvented army
road blocks and pitched camp
at an old Turkish railway sta-
tion at Sebastia, near Nablus.
The group, soon joined by
thousands of Gush Emunim
supporters, declared that they
were ready to resist violently
any Israel Defense Force at-
tempts to remove them. After
two days of negotiations with
the Gush Emunim leaders, the
Cabinet was summoned on Dec.
7 in order to decide how to deal
with this illegal settlement at-
tempt.
At the Cabinet meeting, De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres re-
ported on the stormy reception
he had received when visiting
the Sebastia camp. Peres told
the Cabinet that he was person-
ally insulted by Gush Emunim
leader Rabbi Moshe Levinger.
THE DEFENSE Minister,pre-
dicted that should the Cabinet
decide to remove the group, a
clash between the settlers and
their suooorters and the sold-
iers could not be avoided.
Peres mentioned that the
poet, Haim Guri, a well-known
former Palmach figure, whom
he had run i-to in Sf' tia, had
suggested a compromise where-
by the settlers would be moved
to a military camp in Samaria.
Asked by some of the Cabinet
members whether he was in
fact seconding Guri's sugges-
tion Peres said that he was
merely reporting it. Premier
Yitzhak Rabin, with the assist-
ance of Minister-Without-Port-
folio Israel Galili, proposed a
deliberately vague formula to
conclude the Cabinet meeting.
ACCORDINGLY, the Cabinet
decision declared that no settle-
ment in the administered ter-
ritories would be permitted
without Cabinet authorization;
the government is ready to or-
der the IDF to take measures
to impose its decisions with re-
gard to settlement policy, and
the government will do its ut-
most to avoid the unfortunate
consequences that might be
caused by a confrontation be-
tween the settlers and the sold-
iers in Sebastia.
The Cabinet's decision thus
contained obviously contradic-
tory clauses: while one para-
graph stated the government's
readiness to bring tne IDF into
action in order to enforce its
policy, another paragraph re-
flected the Cabinet's reluctance
to bring about a confrontation
between the army and the set-
tlers who were in fact challeng-
ing its policy.
This contradiction explains
the different impressions which
each of the ministers took with
him when the meeting ended.
SOME OF the participants
were convinced that the Pre-
mier would order the army to
remove the Emunim group I
from Sebastia, while the others ,
believed that the real meaning
Of the decision was a recom- j
mendation to renew the efforts
to come to a compromise with
the settlers.
On Dec. 8, one day after the ,
Cabinet meeting, Peres reached
an agreement with the Emunim
group which in effect imple- I
mented Guri's compromise pro-
posal.
The settlers were transferred
to the Kadum military camp
nearby, where they were to re-
main pending a Cabinet deci-
sion on overall West Bank set-
tlement policv. Rabin informed
the Cabinet of the compromise.
arguing that it accorded fully
with the earlier decision.
Several Cabinet ministers
frankly expressed their aston-
ishment, claiming that the
agreement contradicted the Ca-
binet's expressed wishes.
THERE WAS a good deal of
subsequent criticism, too, in the
Labor Alignment Knesset fac-
tion and Rabin threatened to
resign, during a stormy faction
debate, should the majority vote
against the "Kadum comprom-
ise-
He assured the doves that the
arrangement with the settlers
was a temporary measure only
pendint? a full-scale Cabinet
debate, to be held within two
or three months.
Now, five months later and
after many delays, that debate
is finally about to be held. The
settlers, in the interim, have
been provided with caravans by
the government authorities, and
have settled into a regular life-
pattern in the Kadum camp.
West Bank Violence
Flares Up Again
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV(JTA)An Arab
youth was killed by Israeli sol-
diers in Nablus as a new wave
of unrest erupted on the West
Bank. Curfews were imposed in
Nablus and in Tulkarem where
rioters hurled rocks and set up
roadblocks of burning tires.
Demonstrators in Jenin were
dispersed by security forces be-
fore any disturbances occurred.
The trouble in Nablus began
with a boycott of classes by
high school students who block-
ed streets with piles of burning
tires.
AN ISRAELI army patrol,
surrounded by rioting youths in
an alley, fired into the air and
then into the crowd. Samir Fam-
ha, 18, was fatally wounded.
Thousands of Nablus residents
attended his funeral. Heavy
cordons of Israeli police were
on hand but no incidents de-
veloped.
Meanwhile, some 4,000 Is-
raeli Arabs from all over Gali-
lee gathered in Nazareth for a
Communist-led May Day rally
against the government.
Arriving by the busload from
towns and villages throughout
the region, they assembled in
the main square to hear both
Israeli Communists and Arab
leaders denounce the Rabin ad-
ministration, the Knesset and
the militant nationalist Gush
Emunim. The demonstration
was orderly but the speeches
and slogans were provocative.
AMONG THE latter were
signs reading "Galilee is Arab
Jews Get Out" and "Rabin
Get Out." Speakers included
Meir Wilner, leader of the pro-
Moscow Rakah Communist
Party, and Ziad Tewfik, the
Marxist Mayor of Nazareth.
Tewfik declared that Israeli
Arabs are part of the Palestin-
ian nation and demanded that
they be given 18 seats in the
Knesset and at least three seats
in the Cabinet.
Samih el-Kasem, editor of the
Arab Communist publication Al
Itihad, read a poem claiming
that all Israelis were murder-
ers. He urged Arabs to use
rocks and bottles against the
armored vehicles of the "con-
quering army."
JEWISH ARAB amity was
demonstrated in a woodland
near Mishmar HaEmek where
about 20,000 persons, including
some 2.000 Arabs, assembled
under the auspices of Mapam.
Health Minister Victor Shemtov
outlined Mapam policies calling
for the evacuation of the Gusfv
Emunim squatters from Kadum
in Samaria and an expression of
willingness by Israel to return
to its pre- June, 1967, borders in
exchange for peace with its
neighbors.
A May Day rally by the leftist
Moked faction drew 200 people
in Tel Aviv, and another by
Rakah and Matzpen was attend-
ed by about 400. The groups
marched in orderly fashion
down Dizengoff St.
MINOR incidents occurred
when rationalist Betar youths
tried to pull down red flags fly-
ing over local Hashomer Hat-
zair clubs.
In Jerusalem police removed
a bomb planted by terrorists in
the main square, and detonated
it safely in an unpopulated asea.
The bomb spotted by a passer-
by, contained explosives United,
to a batterv and detonator.
Who Needs That Kind
Of Arab-Jewish Tie?
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Jews and two Arabs joined
forces in a cooperative venture
and were arrested and sen-
tenced to jail terms of five to
11 vears for their effort.
The venture was doomed even
before it started. According to
police, the quartet two Arabs
from the village of Baqa el
Gharbiya and two Jews from Or
Akiva decided to rob an en-
tire village.
Pretending to be Israeli sol-
diers and wearing Israeli army
uniforms replete with stolen
badges and rank stripes, the
four entered the village of Nad-
lah-Sharika on the West Bank
and claimed to have instruc-
tions to carry out a house-to-
house search.
In the process, they looted
valuables and money.
Washington
Federal
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
ASSETS EXCEED $550 MILLION
NOW IN
CORAL GABLES
ESLE
AT 520 BILTMORE WAY PHONE: 444-5071
CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU IN
MIAMI BEACH CORAL GABLES BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
NORTH MIAMI BEACH HOLLYWOOD BOCA RATON
Jack D. Gordon Arthur H. Courthon
PiesKttnt Chairman of the Board
OA



J
.'. '.v.-.
rage o-A
. Jewlsti fkflctttsy
../ .
Friday, May 14, 1976
4T FtmATIdN DINNER HBU MAY 19
Gurland, Mrs. Schwartz Will
Receive Leadership Awards
Cash Need Clear ... IB
Barry T. Gurland and Mrs.
Kenneth J. Schwartz, Miami
Jewish community leaders, will
be honored by the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation on Wed-
nesday, May 19, at Federation's
28th annual meeting and din-
ner.
Gurland and Mrs. Schwartz
will be the recipients of the
Stanley C. Myers Presidents'
Leadership Award for 1976. The
honor, recognizing outstanding
young community leaders each
year since 1957, was renamed
this year for Myers the
GMJF's founding president. The
award recognizes not only serv-
ice, but leadership potential.
THE ANNUAL meeting and
dinner will be held at the Caril-
lon Hotel, with cocktail recep-
tion beginning at 6:30 p.m., and
dinner at 7:30 p.m.
Gurland, who lives in North
Miami Beach, was recently in-
stalled as president of the Flor-
ida State Association of B'nai
B'rith Lodges. Through the Fed-
eration, he has been instrument-
al in coordinating B'nai B'rith
participation in the Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Ftmd.
He has also served as a CJA-
IEF speaker, a member of the
national United Jewish Appeal
Young Leadership Cabinet, a
member of the Federation's
Group Services Committee, and
active in the newly formed
GMJF Central Commission on
the Elderly.
Mrs. Schwartz, wife of the
president of Temple Sinai of
BARRY T. GURLAND
North Dade, has recently been
named campaign vice president
of the GMJF Women's Division.
For the 1975 and 1976 CJA-IEF
efforts, she served as Women's
Division campaign coordinator
for the entire North Dade area.
SHE IS a trustee of the Tem-
ple Sinai Sisterhood and a
board member of Miami's Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, a member of the Federa-
tion family of local agencies.
Previous recipients of the
Presidents' Leadership Awards
are Martin Fine, Sue Stevens,
Marshall S. Harris. Daniel Neal
Heller. Norton S. Pallot. Sam
Luby Jr.. Mrs. Howard Trinz,
Harrv B. Smith. Mrs. Milton
Green. L. Jules Arkin. Robert
H. Traurtg.
Also Mrs. Richard Brickman,
Mrs. Harrv B. Smith, Mrs. Bur-
ton R. Levey. Mrs. Robert Sha-
piro, Richard J. Horwich, Harry

Muhammed Ali
Tells it All:
'Look for Peace''
WASHINGTON (JTA)
World heavyweight boxing
champion Muhammed Ali, when
asked about the Arab-Israeli
'conflict, said he is "looking for
peace one day with all people."
Ali, a devout convert to the
Muslim faith who has contrib-
uted financially towards a Jew-
ish charity in New York, made
hte comment in the CBS televi-
sion program, "Face the Na-
tion."
FOLLOWING is the question,
posed by CBS news commenta-
tor George Herman, and Ali's
resnonse as shown in the tran-
script of the telecast provided
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency:
"Herman: let me ask you one
question which I don't know
whether it's out of left field or
right field, about Muslims in
America. One of the things that
people think about is the con-
flict in the Arabic world be-
tween Moslems and Jews. Some
people who are Jewish in this
country get worried about Black
, Muslims, and yet you show very
little in the way of signs of
anti-Semitism. Doesn't seem to
be any parallel there."
"ALI: No, well I like you to
look at me as a true one as far
as true beliefs are concerned.
We don't have Black Muslims
that a press word. We have
white brothers, we have brown,
red, and yellow, all colors can
be Muslims.
"And as far as the conflicts
is concened, in these countries,
I don't know too much about
it, and I'm look for peace one
day with all people."
SYSTEMS FOR SECURITY. Inc. A
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JACK SCHENKMAN. President
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BROWARD: 522-7776
MRS. KENNETH SCHWARTZ
A. Levy, David S. Kenin, Gerald
R. Falick, Norman H. Lipoff,
Mrs. Philip Bloom, Mrs. Donald
Lefton, Melvin C. Morgenstern,
Morris Futernick, Mrs. Merton
Gettis, Howard F. Scott, Mrs.
Norman H. Lipoff and Leonard
A. Wien, Jr.
Annual Federation
Affair Slated
On Miami Beach
Cont&inued from Page 1-A
ning is $20 per person.
HUNDREDS OF leaders from GMJF and its fam-
ily of agencies are expected to take part in a theme of
"We Are One Family."
All members of the Federation are invited to take
part. Membership includes all those who have contrib-
uted $25 or more to the 1976 CJA-IEF. The annual
meeting is the most important business function of the
year for the Federation.
The evening's agenda will include election of GM-
JF officers and Board of Directors for 1977, and pres-
entation of the Stanley C. Myers Presidents' Leader-
ship Awards.
THIS IS the first year in which the traditional
award, honoring young men and women for their out-
standing community service and leadership potential,
will be presented in honor of Myers.
Reservations and additional information on the
38th annual meeting can be obtained through Mrs.
Shirley Coff at the Federation, 576-4000.
(

M mg "tif. i.o mg.nicotine per cigartue. FTC Report SEPT 75.


I
Friday, May 14, 1976
fJmistiflorkMary
7-A
Portrait of a Family
(Russia)
f
Sister Sarah
Granted exit visa
to Israel,
1972.
Sister Natasha
Emigrated
to United States,
1924.
Cousin Shmuelik
Captured fighting
with partisans
in Poland.
Executed in field,
1943.
Sister Fanya
Killed in
Treblinka,
Date Unknown.
:
I
l

Brother Abrasha
Decorated at Stalingrad.
Applied for exit visa to
Israel. Refused.
Imprisoned: three years.
Rebecca Lev
Murdered at Babi- Yar,
1942.
Moshe Le>
Murdered at Babi- Yar,
1942.
Brother Benjamin
Died at Auschwitz,
Date Unknown.
Sister Esther
Killed in Majdanek,
Date Unknown.
The next time your family gets together for dinner remember that not all Jews take "family" for granted.
Right now the Federation's Campaign needs CASH
to ensure that Jewish families do not become an endangered sperie*.
If you plan to pay your pledge later, please pay it in fnJJ or oart BOW.
If vou have not made your 1976 contribution, please send us your "h^Hi now.
ISRAEL CANNOT LIVE ON PROMISE* AMjONE!
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
4200 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD MIAMI. FLORIDA 331S7 576-4000
l7l I OMIIIM; JEWISH APPEAL-ISRAEL EMERGENCY El'Mil


Page 8-A
*Jc*isti ncrkUan
Friday, May 14, 1976
* f
Support for Israel 'Prerequisite'
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Former UN Ambassador Arthur
J. Goldberg, contending that
American economic and mili-
tary support for Israel was a
"prerequisite" to Middle East
peace, has proposed here that
the U.S. "make it explicitly
clear" that its national interest
"will not permit Israel's se-
curity or integrity to be threat-
ened or jeopardized."
The goal of American policy
should be "a just peace here
and now," not in the indefinite
future, and attained in "the tra-
ditional way" of negotiations
between the parties in conflict,
Goldberg told the annual meet-
ing of B'nai B'rith's Commis-
sion on Community Volunteer
Services.
THE FORMER Supreme Court
justice and cabinet member was
honored by the B'nai B'rith
Commission with its annual
Chai Award, citing him for "dis-
tinguished volunteers activities
that have demonstrated a life-
time of commitment to the
community." The award was
presented by B'nai B'rith Presi-
dent David M. Blumberg.
Goldberg, a principal achitect
of Security Council Resolution
242 adopted in 1967, said that
the resolution persists as the
basis for peace negotiations.
Efforts by the UN General
Assembly to circumvent 242
with conflicting resolutions are
"unconstitutional under the UN
charter" and "injurious to the
cause of peace," he declared.
GOLDBERG defended Israel
against charges of "inflexibi-
lity," saying "Israel cannot
make peace aloe. The key
question still unresolved
is whether the Arab nations are
read to conclude a consensual
agreement," he said.
Goldberg identified himself
as a "long-standing Zionist,"
equating it as an expression of
loyalty to his Jewish heritage.
"Judaism and Zionism are
genetically the same," he said.
Morocco Zionist Passes Away
In Baltimore at Age 81
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Jonathan Thursz, a leader of
Zionism is Morocco prior to
World War II and afterwards
a specialist in foreign affairs
for the U.S. government, died
Sunday in Sinai Hospital in
Baltimore at the age of 81. A
funeral service was conducted
by Rabbi Levy Smolar, presi-
dent of Baltimore Hebrew Col-
lege.
Thursz, born in Poland in
189S, spent in his youth in Bel-
gium and England and settled
in 1927 in Casablanca, Morocco,
where he started publishing a
Jewish magazine that same year.
In 1940 the Vichy government
then in control of Morocco
closed it.
HE WAS a leader in Moroc-
co's Zionist organization and
represented it at World Zionist
Congresses. While in Morocco
he translated a number of Theo-
dor Herat's works from German
into French.
In July, 1941, he left Morocco
after being warned of his im-
minent arrest by the Vichy re-
gime because he was serving
as head of the refugee commit-
tee of the Casablanca Jewish
community. The Vichy regime
was the puppet organization of
French collaborators with the
Nazi regime.
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* Friday, May 14, 1976
vJewlstifBcrkmam
Page 9-A
-

Rabbis to Cite Temples Here
One highlight of the Rab-
binical Association of Great-
er Miami's Sunday, May 16,
Bicentennial Convocation
will be award presentations
to historical landmark Jew-
ish institutions here. The
event is the Jewish commu-
nity's celebration of Amer-
ica's 200th birthday.
Bicentennial plaques will
be presented to Beth David
Congregation, founded in
1912 as the pioneer congre-
gation in South Florida and
the first Conservative con-
gregation in the area; Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami,
founded in 1922 as the pio-
neering Reform congrega-
tion in the area; and Beth
Jacob Congregation, found-
ed in 1927 as the pioneering
Orthodox congregation in
South Florida.
THE RABBINICAL Associa-
tion will also honor the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation with
an award "for its years of ex-
emplifying the tradition of Tze-
dakah through its humanitarian
services to the Jewish people
in Dade County, the United
States, Israel and throughout
the world."
Also on the program will be
an address by author and lec-
turer Max I. Dimont, who will
discuss "American Judaism:
Wasteland or Renaissance," in
addition to an historical per-
spective of the Jewish contri-
bution to America with prayers,
a musical program, and read-
ings.
The Bicentennial Convocation
will be held at 8 p.m., at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, 137 NE
19th St.
The event is free, open to the
public and refreshments will be
served. In charge of informa-
tion and reservations is Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, executive vice
president of the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami.
Scoop, HHH Exit
Means Loss Of
Pre-'67 Borders a Certainty
Continued from Page 1-A
responding desire by the Soviet
Union.
He said the Americans have
reached the conclusion that a
and that the Soviets will have
to share in the peace-making
progress.
Another factor, Goldmann
said, was the Arabs' realization
that they cannot win a military
victory over Israel and their
desire to concentrate on build-
ing up their own countries while
they still control much of the
world's oil wealth with almost
no competitors.
GOLDMANN said that Arab
terms for a settlement with Is-
rael are admittedly tough but
not insuperable. They want
withdrawal from the occupied
territories, demilitarization and
quarantees. The most difficult
problem would be the status of
Jerusalem, but a solution may
be found without dividing the
city again, he said.
According to Goldmann, the
American solution for the Pales-
tinian problem envisions a ple-
biscite on the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip to decide whe-
ther there should be a Pales-
tinian state federated with Jor-
dan or an independent state
and whether there should be
an economic confederation with
Israel or with both Israel and
Jordan.
There are Arabs who will ac-
cept such a settlement guaran-
teed by both the U.S. and Rus-
sia, Goldmann said.
THE WJC leader said that no
progress has been made toward
solving the problem of Jews in
the Soviet Union. He said the
Soviet attitude has become
tougher because the Soviet bloc
is constantly being strengthen-
ed while the Western bloc has
become correspondingly weak-
er.
Housing Loan to Israel
Washington Federal Savings and Loan Association
will be a participant with the Federal Home Loan Bank
of New York in making a $25,000,000 Housing Guar-
anty Loan to the Government of Israel. The 30-year
loan, which is secured by the U.S. Government, will be
used to expand the availability of housing and home
finance in Israel.
In announcing Washington Federal's decision to
participate in the Israel housing loan, Arthur H. Cour-
shon, chairman of the board, noted that the Associa-
tion had previously participated in making similar
loans and welcomed the opportunity of doing so again.
The result is that the num-
ber of Jews seeking to emigrate
from the USSR has declined,
Goldmann said. He said he had
information that a number of
the visa offices that were open-
ed in the Soviet Union to deal
with exit permits for Jews have
been closed down because of a
lack of applicants.
Goldmann confirmed a re-
port, referred to yesterday by
Yosef Almogi, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, that
60 percent of the Jews who left
the USSR last month did not
continue to Israel after reach-
ing Vienna. Goldmann also said
that the Soviet authorities were
issuing exit visas to many non-
Jews to go to Israel because
they were dissenters unwanted
in Soviet society.
GOLDMANN referred to an-
other recent phenomenon
Arab efforts to demonstrate
friendship toward Jews as sep-
arate from Zionists. He noted
that the King of Morocco an-
nounced he would welcome the
return of Moroccan Jews who
emigrated, even if they held Is-
raeli passports.
In Lebanon, both sides in the
civil war tried to protect the
Jewish community in Beirut,
Goldmann said. He also reveal-
ed that "quite amazingly, a pro-
minent Jew from the 500-strong
Jewish community in Egypt
asked if his community would
be accepted in the WJC."
Summing up his views, Gold-
mann predicted a very difficult
year for Israel in 1977 when
vital decisions will have to be
made.
Friends for Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
million annually to Israel as an
assured basis for the flow of
credit should foreign aid bills
become bogged down in the
legislative process.
Humphrey has for years been
a staunch supporter of Israel.
The Minnesota Senator's most
recent visible advocacy of Is-
rael's security is his leadership
as chairman of the Senate For-
eign Relations subcommittee on
foreign aid.
Although out of the Presi-
dential race, both Humphrey
and Jackson will have strong
influence in the Democratic
Party platform that is to be
written at the Democratic con-
vention in New York in July.
Both will now concentrate on
their reelection to the Senate.
FROM THE beginning of his
campaign, Jackson was assured
of the sympathy of a majority
of Jewish voters, and he receiv-
ed their support wherever he
campaigned. Polls conducted by
CBS and the New York Times
indicated approximately two-
thirds of Jews voting in the
primaries supported him.
Nevertheless, the so-called
Jewish vote was not unanimous-
ly in favor of Jackson. Rep.
Morris Udall (D., Ariz.) receiv-
ed many votes from younger
and more liberal Jews.
In reporting on the Massachu-
setts primary, which Jackson
won, the Associated Press said
that Udall did particularly well
in some Jewish suburban areas
and got more of the Jewish vote
than Jackson, who has made a
continuing appeal to Jews.
THE CONTINUED reference
in press reports to his "Jewish
support" brought a rejoinder
from Jackson when he was
questioned about it following
the New York Primary.
He said he won well in all
sectors of the electorate. Udall,
incidentally, captured a large
segment of the Jewish vote in
New York.
Holocaust Must Not
Be Forgotten,
Austrian Declares
MAUTHAUSEN Austria
(JTA) Austrian Science Min-
ister Hertha Fuernberg said
Sunday it was the duty of every-
body to do his utmost to pre-
vent a repetition of the Nazi
Holocaust.
In a ceremony marking the
31st anniversary of the libera-
tion of Mauthausen Concentra-
tion Camp by U.S. troops in
World War II, the Minister said
the concentration camp was a
"symbol of inhumanism and the
passion of Austria."
"WHO FAILED to learn out
of this experience has no right
to teach the young,"' the Minis-
ter said. "It is the duty of the
old generation to influence the
young to prevent a repetition of
the Nazi Holocaust."
Some 4,000 persons, many of
them former inmates of the
camp, attended the memorial
service.
Bulgaria Ambassador to Au-
stria, Vladimir Ganovsky, un-
veiled a plaque for the Bul-
garian victims who died at the
Mauthausen camp.
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-
Chronicle of American Lawyers to Free Russian Jewish Prisoners
Telford Taylor with Alan Dershowitz and others.
"Conrta of Terror." (Random House/Vintage,
$1.95, 187 pp.)
'THIS IS the chronicle of a group of American law-
yers working through the Soviet judicial system
to free Jewish prisoners convicted while trying to
emigrate to Israel. The Miami Jewish community
is familiar with this struggle, but the 19 cases rep-
resented by famous law school professors and attor-
neys have not received national press coverage.
The names of Silva Zalmanson, the Kornenblit
brothers and the other Soviet prisoners at rallies
for Soviet Jewry are familiar to most American Jews.
But how often have we seen these names on tele-
vision?
THEIR ATTORNEYS indicate that the main prob-
S.
usan
V*ff
lem is, these are not Panovs or Sohhenitsyns
thev are relatively obscure individuals whose deep
devotion to Judaism and courage to emigrate from
the Soviet Union have exacted a terrible price.
Taylor is a well-known authority on international
law. As head of the American Legal Defense Project
for the Soviet defendants, he describes how Amer-
ican attorneys, including Dershowitz, George Flet-
cher, Leon Lipson and Melvin Stein, became in-
volved. He informs us of the prisoners' status as
late as January, 1976, and provides the text of So-
viet legal codes pertaining to these cases.
TO FURTHER present before the public all of
the machinations of the cases, the attorneys have
included the text of petitions, legal memoranda,
affidavits and correspondence.
Taylor points out that "it would be unfortunate
if public attention remains focused exclusively on
the number of Jews allowed to emigrate annually,
or on personalities of international repute. The
shocking injustices to which (the prisoners) have
been subjected certainly call for denunciation just
as forceful as those which have been uttered where
the victims were better known."
The struggle for Soviet Jewry must emanate from
each and every one of us.
About a Bent Cross
And a Muddied Flag
7&f
ert
<^eyal
T'HE DAY after Gerald L. K. Smith. America's
most persistent anti-Semite, died in Cal-
ifornia, Gov Meldrim Thomson ordered the
Concord, New Hampshire, statehouse flag low-
ered to half staff.
This is not to suggest in any way that the
unpredictable Gov. Thomson was memorial-
izing Smith, the tireless editor of a venemous
periodical, "The doss and the Flag." For all
W< know, the New Hampshire governor may
never have heard of Smith. He had the flag
lowered to mark Good Friday, not the passing
"I a self-proclaimed rabble rouser.
I!ii! it is to suggest that we still have miles
to go before we disentangle great symbols
ftom inappropriate settings. By his act. the
Governor was thrusting his piety on to ter-
rain precious to non-heliever, non-Christian,
and Christian alike.
AND THE New Hampshire Civil Liberties
Union has good reason to complain with this
observation: "Those who hold their faith dear
would shudder when the symbols of their reli-
gion are manipulated with the paraphernalia
Of the state. This is an utterly inappropriate
usurpation of power."
Smith's choice of "The Cross and the Flag"
as the name of the periodical in which he at-
tacked .lews, blacks, and immigrants other than
his own immigrant ancestors was a shrewd
propaganda device. He obviously hoped to re-
shape this nation into a church-state amalgam
lonfi prevalent in Europe, thus closing the
American democratic experience to millions
who cherish that section of the Bill of Rights
assuring us we shall have no government-
established religion.
And the flag this was to be his alone to
wave passionately while preaching a gospel
contrary to much that great emblem stands
for.
THIS HELL-and-brimstone politician's life
was shot through with inconsistencies and con-
tradictions. In his early days of the great ride
on Huey Long's coattails, he labored as a union
organizer; in his Detroit years, when he work-
ed hand-in-glove with Father Coughlin. he tried
to crush the old CIO out of existence.
His huddling with the anti-Semitic priest of
Roya' Dak, Mich., in a sense belied his ac-
ceptance of and dedication to a brand of Pro-
testantism ordinarily quite suspicious of Ro-
man Catholicism. Most irreconcilable of all was
his claim to be a true follower of Jesus with
bis obvious use ol his private religious press
to squeeze hundreds of thousands of dollars
from the naive souls who regarded him as
one with the touch of messiah.
HIS CLUMSY effort in 1952 to prove that
''residential Aspirant Dwight Eisenhower was
a "Swedish lew" and therefore not acceptable
to the electorate was an insult to the clerical
c'oth lie wore, just as was his contemptible
reference to another honored President as
"Franklin d. Jewsevelt."
IF THERE are. in fact, as claimed. 5.000,000
people on the Smith mailing list, may the time
be near when these shall find release from the
weird spell cast over them by a modern who,
opently professing his bigotry, raised a cross
to which he had no legitimate claim and draped
himself in a flag he besmirched.

Elderly Jews Will be Less
Poor and Better Educated

^HE JEWISH elderly as a group in this coun-
try will change soon from a largely immi-
grant, poorly educated, low-income group to a
larger group with more income, more educa-
tion and higher levels of occupational back-
grounds, a New York social expert has pre-
dicted.
That prospect, according to Dr. Celia B.
Weisman, means that the communal agencies
which serve elderly Jews must be ready to deal
with such changes. Dr. Weisman, who is as-
sociate professor of social work at the Wurz-
vveiler School of Social Work at Yeshiva Uni-
versity, reported the prospective changes in
"The Future Is Now: A Manual for Older Adult
Programs in Jewish Communal Agencies," a
joint project of the Brookdale Foundation and
the National Jewish Welfare Board.
DECLARING that this shift "has already
made itself evident," Dr. Weisman cited statis-
tics from the National Jewish Population Study,
completed in 1971 by the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds. She said the
data showed that as the number of elderly
Jews increases, so will the proportion of the
elderly to the total Jewish population. The
proportion, projected at 12.4 percent in 1976,
will be more than 15 percent by 1991.
The prospect that future retired Jews will
be better educated was inferred, she reported,
from the current contrasts of 22.6 percent of
Jews over 65 with more than a high school
education, to 45.9 percent of the 50 to 64 year
age group, and to 77.7 percent of the 25 to 29
year group.
SHE REPORTED the data indicated there
would be more retirees from administrative
and professional positions almost half of the
present generation of 50 to 65 year-old Jews
are in such positions, with 20 percent of them
irofcssionals.
In the current 65 to 75 year groups, only
one-third had held such posts. The number of
professional and technical workers increases
si every younger age group of Jews, making
up 40 percent of the 25 to 29 year group.
The data indicated that increasing numbers
of Jews will retire before they become 65.
They also showed that the severe poverty of
the elderly Jews of the present 44 percent
of Jews of 65 presently have annual incomes
of $4,000 or less will probably lessen as
lews with more education from higher level
jobs, with better pension plans, and increased
social security move into retirement.
American
And Israeli
Independence
tJDavid
Sck
wartz
^S WE celebrate again Israel's birthday, it may be interesting
to compare it with America's Fourth of July. It is said that
back in 1948, some Israelis also proposed to hold off declaring
their independence to July 4, but Ben Gurion felt that on that
day a lot of Jews would be at Grossinger's, so May 15 was
chosen instead.
One great advantage Americans had in 1776 as against
Israel in 1948 was that then: was no shortage of parchment
paper to write the Declaration of Independence on.
"MR. JEFFERSON," they said, "here are four big sheets
of parchment paper for vou to write the Declaration of Inde-
pendence. If you want more, just say the word and we
give vou two more sheets."
"Oh, thank vou," said Jefferson. "This sure takes a
off my head. I was worrying if I would have enough pap-, to
say all that I want about the British king and all the evil
things he had done and of course 1 also want to talk about th<
pursuit of happiness. And all the other things to which i i
are entitled."
In Israel, in 1948. alas, the situation was very diffen
Read the book about the day Israel was born by Bernard P< si!
and Henry Levy and you see what trouble they had get!
the parchment to write Israels Declaration of Independent
It almost appears as though they would have to give in U .
Arabs on account of the paper shortage.
THERE WERE other shortages, of course. The Jews nt
bered only 600.000 and they were fighting nations with mai
millions. But -his did not really worry the Israelis too much.
Jews have a great invention. It is called a minyan. With .
minyan vou can always start action. Yon don't need an\ m<
The nations fighting them also had more arms. This IOC
didn't worry the Israelis too much .lews know that Rashi -. d
that when the Israelites of old in their military encour.:-. -
came upon a nation too heavily fortified, they concluded
the people of the country were cowardly There is an
security which transcends all missiles. A brave man ('-
go around with n hundred turns.
THERE WERE other shortages. Food was scarce. Wher lh
Israelis waved their first flags, crying "Long Live Israel.- s ,
To cope with the food shortage, wisecrackers proposed that
rom Kippur be lengthened to two days. Israel's troubles Jhe
wisecrackers said, were due to a surplus of letters in the He-
brew alphabet. The second letter, "Beth." was superfluous as
there was no "Rasar" (meat). "Bayit" (house) or "Beped"
(clothes).
There was no shortage of wisecracks. There is a Yiddish
expression "Tatti du lachst" about the laughter at grim
moments. Never was there so much laughter as this time when
many believed Israel faced the tragedy of being totallv wiped
out. In this respect, there is also some similarity to America's
Fourth, The gags flowed freely at the signing of the Declara-
tion of Independence. "Now we must all hang together." said
one American signer. "Yes," chimed in Franklin, "or we shall
hang separately."
THE WISECRACKERS in Israel said that when a bill was
presented,to the newly-created Ministry of the Treasurv. the
Minister covered his head. It was the only thing the Treasury
could cover.
To cope with the money shortage. Ben Gurion prorced
to fly to America.
"No," said Golda, "Ben Gurion, you are needed here. I v^T
go. She would have liked to go home and change her dretf.
hSlV^'VI"? ,ime BW She took her P**etbook with ten
oouars. bhe had relatives in America with whom she could
won y" nCed 8 fCW d0"arS fr 8 Cab' f0r tipping Bnd
She came to America with ten dollars. She came back not
many days later with fifty million dollars. No wonder she is
Golda.
Friday, May 14, 1976
+ tmlilfkrkMcui Page 10-A


fiday, May 14, 1976
VJmtlstl Ihriditi
Page ii-A
Ford, Kissinger to Speak at AJCommittee Meeting
WASHINGTON Both Presi-
dent Ford and Secretary of
state Kissinger are expected to
Lddress the 70th annual meet-
ing of the American Jewish
Committee at the Washington
lilton Hotel Mav 13 to 16.
AMONG the major speakers,
Dn topics ranging from Amer-
ica's economic crisis to Israel's
security, will be Chaim Herzog,
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations; Sen. Hubert H.
Humphrey, Dr. Alice Rivlin.
director of the Congressional
Budget Office; Norman Podho-
retz. editor of Commentary; Dr.
Konald S. Berman, chairman of
the National Endowment for the
Humanities; Dr. Gerson D. Co-
hen, chancellor of Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary; Irving Howe,
Distinguished Professor of Eng-
lish at Hunter College and City
University of New York, and
author of the best-selling book,
"The World of Our Fathers";
Elmer L. '.Vinter, AJC's National
Vivsident; and Bertram H. Gold,
AJC's Executive Vice President.
THE AJC American Liberties
Medallion will be presented to
Dr. John Slawson, the organiza-
tion's executive vice president
emeritus, who retired in 1967
after heading its professional
staff for 24 years.
Lawrence Spivak, originator
of the NBC-TV program "Meet
The Press," who served as its
producer and moderator for 30
years until his retirement last
November, will receive the
AJC's Institute of Human Rela-
tions' Mass Media Award.
The program was planned by
a committee under the cochair-
m.mship of Alfred H. Moses,
Marcus Cohn and Judge Theo-
dore Tannenwald, Jr.. all of
Washington.
He Says He Was Offered $250,000 to Kill Arafat
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
IcBS-TV's "60 Minutes" pro-
[gram carried an interview
I with a soldier of fortune who
said he was offered $250,000
by a Jewish Defense League
[official to kill PLO leader
Yasir Arafat. The program
[also had a profile of Mrs.
Leah Fabin, wife of Israeli
Premi r Yitzhak Rabin.
The soldier of fortune was
identified by reporter Dan
Rather as John Dane, a Brit-
ish native, who fought for
the U.S. in Vietnam and is
now in Rhodesia.
RATHER interviewed Dane
in Mexico where he said that
the JDL's west coast coordina-
tor, identified as Herb Reuben,
had offered him S250.000 to kill
Arafct.
Rather piayed a tape-record-
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ing taken by Dane of the meet-
ing with Reuben in which a man
said to be the JDL official said
to Dane "the State of Israel
would love to see this man
dead. Every Jew would love to
see this man dead."
Interviewed by rather, Reu-
ben said, "we were fantasizing."
He said theie was no way the
JDL could get the S250.000.
RATHER SAID the negotia-
tions ended when Dane was ar-
rested in the U.S. for smuggling
guns to Mexico and was sen-
tenced to a short Kail term.
Rather said the two men had
not done anything illegal since
it is not against the law in the
U.S. to .)lot to murder anyone
outside the country.
In the segment on Mrs. Ra-
bin leio.t.T Morlsy Safer point-
Poets Receive Bialik Prize
TEL AVIV (JTA) The poet, Yehuda Amichai,
and the author, Yeshurun Keshet, were the joint recipients
of the Bialik Prize for literature. The prize for Jewish wis-
dom Chochmat Yisrael went to Benjamin Kosovski
for his monumental masterpiece of publishing the treasures
of Talmudic literature and his annotations to the Bamidbar
and Devarim (Numbers and Deuteronomy). The IL 3000
prize, given annually by the Tel Aviv municipality, was
presented at Beth Sokalow by Mayor Shlomo Lahat.
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GIVE A GIFT
TO CHERISH FOR ALL TIME.
Stnd your IS and 14 yar oMi on Bat and Bar
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Bar Mltxvah Raoaptlon In tht Old City of Jarutaltm
... an avant that your ohNd W rumambar and
tarsthtorafiflma.
Mr aator mux*****
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ed out that the only time she
receives special treatment is
\yhen she is accompanying her
husband outside the country,
since Israel treats its leaders as
'Mr. and Mrs. Citizen" more
than any other country.
Mrs. Rabin described her
life, her birth in Germany, her
service in the Haganah and
her 28-year marriage to Rabin.
It showed her speech at the
international Women's Year con-
ference in Mexico City, her ac-
tivities in Israel and her talks
to American Jewish women.
THE PROGRAM also carried
criticism of Mrs. Rabin, includ-
ing that she was living too high
a type of life for an Israeli.
Uri Avineri, editor of Haolem
Hazah, said the main criticism
of her was that she was inter-
fering in political life and in-
fluenced her husband's actions.
Mrs. Rabin called those who
criticized her in newspapers her
enemies.
She also criticized Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger,
saying he bfclieved he knew
what was best for Israel, and
only he was right. At the same
time she praised Kissinger and
said she was his strongest de-
fender in Israel, although she
noted' Kisainger did not be-
lieve it.
When
did you
last see,
your attorneyP
How long has it been
since you re-examined
YOUR WILL?
Circumstances change.
Maybe your Will
requires some changes too?
And while you are at it,
make sure that you have not
forgotten one of your most
IMPORTANT RELATIVES...
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL!
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
"I give and bequeath $
to the
ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
Will help maintain the flow of
financial support to Israel for tht
constructive programs of Histadrut.
For further particulars, please contact:
I Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 389
| Miami Beach, Florida 33139
I Telephone: 531-8702
This is to inform you that I plan to include in my WILL a
BEQUEST to the Israel Histadrut Foundation, Inc.
' RaSTC
I ADOftESS----------------------------------------------------------------
CPfT
STATE
liK
TEL. N.


Page 12-A
*JeisHh*kUnui
Friday, May 14, 1976
-
More Prudence Needed in Mideast-HHH
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) Sen. Hubert H. Humph-
rey (D., Minn.) has urged President Ford and Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger "to act more prudently in the
execution of American policy toward Israel."
He charged that the Ford
Administration has taken
steps which in effect are
eroding the historical bonds
between the U.S. and Israel.
Addressing some 1,000 per-
sons attending the seventh
annual policy conference of
the American-Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC),
at the Shoreham Hotel,
Humphrey, reviewing the
record of Administration
pressures since the Yom Kip-
pur War, declared:
"THE FORD Administration
simply does not understand that
actions which are perceived to
weaken the American commit-
ment to Israel will not bring
peace to the Middle East. They
can only bring confusion and
postponement of peace. A final
Carter Aide Denies
Anti-Jewish Charge
Continued from Page 1-A
ception," Shrum quoted the
candidate as saying: "We have
to be cautious. We don't want
to offend anybody ... I don't
want any more statements on
the Middle East or Lebanon.
(Sen. Henry M.) Jackson has
all the Jews anyway. It doesn't
matter how far I go. I won't get
over four percent of the Jewish
vote anyway, so forget it. We
got the Christians."
SHRUM SAID he did not be-
lieve Carter intended that re-
mark as anti-Semitic but rather
as a concept of political prag-
matism.
According to the Post, Shrum,
a former speech writer for Sen.
George McCJpvern (D., S.D.),
Sen. Edmund S. Muskie (D.,
Me.) and former New York
Mayor John V. Lindsay, joined
Carter's speech writing team
only two weeks before he quit
following Carter's victory in the
Pennsylvania primary.
Eizenstat responded tersely
to Shrum's comments about
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Carter's remarks. "I was pre-
sent at many of the meetings
involving the discussions re-
ferred to by Mr. Shrum and
they (his comments) are total
fabrications," Eizenstat said.
POWELL observed that
Shrum's "statement that Car-
ter did not need Jewish votes is
totally ridiculous and contra-
dictory to the concern Carter
has felt and expressed himself
about it."
Noting that Carter comment-
ed on the Jewish vote at a staff
meeting on issues in Atlanta
at which Eizenstat was chair-
man Powell pointed out that
had Carter spoken as Shrum
had said he did, Eizenstat
"would have walked out of it."
Powell observed that Shrum's
assertions "appear to combine
several different comments" of
which "only a part is valid."
He added that Carter, in
Shrum's presence and on sev-
eral other occasions, expressed
concern at the lack of support
from Jewish voters but his con-
cern "was more of dismay and
bewilderment."
POWELL SAID that "Of
course, the idea he would not
continue to make statements on
the Middle East is completely
ludicrous. He has made repeat-
ed statements on the Middle
East and he will continue to
do so."
The Carter aide recalled that
the Governor's "statement of
support from Israel" was part
of Carter's announcement
speech 18 months ago at the
National Press Club here, which
the JTA reported at the time.
Powell added that Carter has
"continued to voice that sup-
port all over the country.
"That's an indication that, al-
though dismayed and discour-
aged in that he has not receiv-
ed much of the Jewish vote, he
has done it not only in New
York. Massachusetts and Flor-
ida but also in states where
Jewish voters are not consid-
ered a large segment of the
electorate."
POWELL AND Eizenstat are
desbribed as among the eight
members of Carter's "official
family" behind the "Carter
phenomenon" that seeks to make
him the Democratic President-
ial nominee and put him in the
White House.
Two others among the eight
are active in Atlanta's Jewish
community Robert J. Lip-
shutz. the campaign treasurer,
and Gerald Rafhsoon, the ad-
vertising director. Recent press
reports describe the three as
men Carter trusts, whose ad-
vice he respects and who would
almost certainly have the ear
of the White House if Carter
becomes President.
peace is all that Israel seeks
a peace that will end the hatred
and a peace that will provide
security."
(In his first major address
since announcing that he will
not seek the Democratic Party
nomination for President, Hum-
phrey asserted that "whoever
will be President next year
should assure all nations that
we are ready to have construc-
tive and positive relations with
them but we will not do so if
the price is ending our special
relationship with Israel."
THE ARAB world, he stated,
"must understand that if it de-
sires better relations with the
United States it must accept
good relations with Israel. No
administration should ever mis-
lead any Arab leader to be-
lieve otherwise."
Saying that it is imperative
for the U.S. to secure the trust
and friendship of the Arab
World, Humphrey added that
"We must declare without em-
barrassment and without apol-
ogy that Israel has earned a
sDecial relationship with Amer-
ica."
The Senator said he opposed
"a full-fledged commitment to
Egypt" because "that can only
increased the risk of war and
pose a threat to peace."
Israel, he added, must remain
"economically viable and mili-
tarily strong" because no Arab
nation has recognized Israel,
abandoned the boycott and di-
Scholars
Eye Karen
Quintan Case
NEW YORK In the Karen
Quinlan case again making news,
in the light of recent judicial
rulings on the euthanasia ques-
tion, the opinions of clergymen
have played an important part
in shaping both mc nl attitude?
and public opinion.
However, it has been auto-
matically, but erroneously, as-
sumed that all long-established
religions would routinely de-
mand the prolonging of life at
any price.
Among Jewish leaders, how-
ever. Orthodox scholars are be-
ginning to suggest that there
might be a way out.
IN AN article in "Perspective"
Magazine, the scholarly journal
just published by the Manhat-
tan-based Rabbinical Alliance of
America, the large Orthodox
group's chief judge of its rab-
binical court, Rabbi Isaac Lie-
bes, takes a qualified view of
the "prolonging life" argument.
While admitting that "hasten-
ing death out of 'mercy' accord-
ing to our Torah is murder,"
and "removing the contact of
the breathing machines is tan-
tamount to murder," Rabbi
Liebes draws a distinction in
noting that "the physician is not
obligated to prolong the life of
a man who is in agony and suf-
fers, and possibly he is permit-
ted to stop his medical treat-
ment."
The article, "Pulling the Plug,
the Torah View of Questions
Raised bv the Quinlan Case," is
one of two articles in the maga-
zine in Hebrew, but it is accom-
panied bv an English summary.
ALSO IN publication, its edi-
tor, Rabbi Chaim .U. Lipschitz,
vice president of Yeshiva Torah
Vodaas and Mesivta, has a
major piece on "The Interna-
tional Dateline in Jewish Life.'-
Other articles include, "Torah
and Worldly Pursuit," by Rabbi
Samuel A. Turk; "The Story of
Rabbi Elazar Rokeach's Appoint-
ment as Amsterdam Chief Rabbi
(in 1735)," by Rabbi Eliezer
Katzman in Hebrew:
plomatic pressure on Israel or
"accepted Israel's invitation to
come forward and negotiate di-
rectly."
HUMPHREY said he does not
believe the Ford Administration
"deliberately seeks to call into
question the basic American
commitment to Israel at the
most difficult time in its his-
tory" but that "through inat-
tention, inadvertance and in-
sensitivity, this Administration
has taken steps which have the
effect of eroding the historical
bonds of trust and confidence
between the United States and
Israel."
Reviewing the Administra-
tion's record "which causes me
such great concern," Humphrey
noted that the "resupply ef-
forts" to Israel during the Yom
Kippur War came "only after
incredible pressure was exert-
ed by members of Congress on
the Administration, using all of
their muscle with President
Nixon and Secretary Kissinger."
OTHER ACTS cited by the
Senator included the reassess-
ment of U.S. policy prior to Is-
rael's signing of the second
interim Sinai agreement with
Egypt last September; the "too
many occasions" at the UN
when the U.S. remained quiet
while nations tried to hu-
miliate Israel; and the counten-
ance by the Administration of
"an unjust and odious boycott
of Israel by powerful corpora-
tions and Arab nations."
Praising the work done by-
AIPAC, Humphrey scored "col-
umnists and editorial writers"
who "warn us about ethnic lob-
bying" and "careless and even
reckless" remarks about the
"powerful 'Jewish lobby'."
He noted that AIPAC has as
much right to urge Congress
and the Administration to pur-
sue policies it deems correct
and essential as various other
lobbies in Washington spending
millions of dollars on behalf of
special interests.
Most Emigrating Soviets Don't
Go to Israel, Almogi Charges
JERUSALEM (JTA) Yosef Almogi, chairman of
the World Zionist Organization and Jewish Agency Execu-
tives, reported that 60 percent of the Jews currently emi-
grating from the Soviet Union do not continue on to Israel
after reaching Vienna.
He also disclosed that immigration during the first
quarter of 1976 was off one percent from the same period
last year.
THE 60 PERCENT "drop-out" rate is regarded as seri-
ous. Last year the number of Soviet Jewish emigres who
chose to go to countries other than Israel was about 40
percent.
The late Pinhas Sapir, Almogi's predecessor, had
warned that if it topped 50 percent it could endanger the
whole Soviet emigration movement because the Russian
authorities would then find it difficult to justify the de-
parture of Jews to other minorities in the USSR who want
to leave.
The Soviet rationale for permitting Jews to emigrate
has been re-unification with families in Israel.
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\, May 14, 1976
+Je*lsbnt*k*Mi
Page 13-A
10 M1NDLIN
Are Jeivs So Politically Naive?
Continued from Pae 4-A
linated by 'Jews and left-
gers'."
he thrust of the UAHC edi-
ul is obviously not to dwell
.. the past, but to avoid the
|>r in 1976 of submitting to
Lr "leaders" and other can-
Ctes who "can turn a Jewish
fence into salivating, pavlo-
voters."
J)R ONE thing, it may be a
k-cherished fiction that there
lo such thing as a "Jewish
E," but it ought to be made
siicntly clear to those who
art that vote that Jews are
single-issue voters.
As the editorial points out,
vs are centrally concerned
out economic issues, gun
ntrol, crime, civil rights, the
|e of the CIA and FBI in the
vasion of individual liberties
fcd, say, abortion no less than
ey are about Israel or Soviet
Iwry.
ITo deny this is to give sup-
port to the growing military-
industrial, pro-Arab propagan-
da about a singular, unique,
powerful, exclusive Jewish lob-
by in America in alleged con-
trol of Congress as if the
Arabs do not have a far more
singular, unique, powerful, ex-
clusive lobby; as if the petro-
billionaires do not, or the ener-
gy moguls, or the jetcraft and
military industrialists in cahoots
with the Pentagon, or the just
plain good old American Med-
ical Association.
AS JEWS, once and for all
we must let those who want our
votes understand that we are
singular, unique, powerful and
exclusive as individual Amer-
ican voters, who will not fall for
the pablum of any candidate
be it a Nixon or Gerald Ford.
Gerald Ford, incidentally, is
an excellent case in point. In
a memo from the White House
dated Apr. 19, Ford acknowl-
edges the significance of "Sol-
idarity Sunday for Soviet Jew-
ry to reaffirm this commitment
to human dignity and funda-
mental rights."
Declares Ford in a ringing
non sequitur: "Our nation was
founded on the principle that
certain rights are inalienable
... It is particularly appropri-
ate, therefore, that in this Bi-
centennial year, Americans ev-
erywhere rededicate themselv-
es to the principles of human
rights on which the nation was
founded."
WHAT THIS has to do, ex-
cept by the wildest stretch of a
politician's imagination, with
the agony of Soviet Jewry, I
hardly know.
But, in his memo, Ford con-
tinues bravely: "As I said four
and a half years ago in New
York at a similar meeting: Let
our American values demon-
strate to the peoples of the
world that we Americans have
not changed in our devotion to
the freedom and brotherhood
5,000 March for Soviet Jewry
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
| NEW YORK (JTA) More
|jan 150,000 persons Jews
nd non-Jews, young and old
barched down Fifth Avenue to
xpress their support for the
fforts of Soviet Jews to emi-
rate to Israel.
Thousands of others lined the
barade route from 72nd St. to
|7th St., where the marchers
jrned east for a massive rally
k! Dag Hammarskjold Plaza
Scross from the United Nations.
The annual "Solidarity Sun-
flay for Soviet Jewry" is spon-
sored here by the Greater New
fork Conference on Soviet Jew-
ry. Other events were held
icross the country under the
auspices of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
KINGS COUNTY District At-
orney Eugene Gold, chairman
If the GNYCSJ, said the dem-
onstration was a "tremendous
lathering of Jews and non-
lews. Blacks and whites" in op-
position to the oppression of
Soviet Jews.
Mavor Abraham Beame, who
|was the principal speaker, last
veek received a replica of the
oviet Jewry "Freedom Flag"
fchat was recently smuggled out
Elegance in
Dining at a price
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1601 79th St Causeway

of the USSR. The flag was dis-
played at the demonstration.
A large blue banner urging
"Freedom Now" led off the
parade followed by three youths
representing the "Spirit of '76"
and carrying the flag of the
American Revolution.
They were followed by an-
other banner pledging "Soli-
darity With Soviet Jewry" and
vouths dressed in Soviet "Pris-
oner of Conscience" uniforms.
Many marchers carried pictures
of Soviet Jewish POCs.
THE MARCHERS represent-
ed synagogues, Jewish organ-
izations and themselves. There
were also many Christians in
the march. Some of the partici-
pants carried such signs as "Let
My People Go," "We Shall Not
Be Silenced," and "Let My Fel-
low Jews Emigrate." One youth
carried a sign saying "Mother
Russia I'd Rather be an Or-
phan."
Many families marched to-
gether holding young children
by the hand or pushing baby
carriages.
Most marchers were silent,
but some sang Hebrew songs or
shouted slogans including one
that has been the anthem of
these marches "One, two,
three, four, open up the iron
door; five, six, seven, eight, let
our people emigrate."
A MESSAGE of support from
President Ford was read to the
rally by Richard Rosenbaum,
New York State Republican
Party chairman. Messages were
also sent by Cardinal Cooke,
AFL-CIO president George
Meany and other prominent fig-
ures.
Last week, the House of Rep-
resentatives unanimously ap-
proved a resolution urging the
Soviet Union to "remove all ob-
stacles to free emigration of So-
viet Jews and others who wish
to live in other countries."
The resolution, introduced by
Rep. Bella Abzug (D-L, N.Y.)
and co-sponsored by 26 other
members of the New York dele-
gation in the House, was in con-
junction with "Solidarity Sun-
day."
THE PLIGHT of Soviet Jew-
ry was also discussed Friday by
Israeli Ambassador Chaim Her-
zog at the United Nations Eco-
nomic and Social Council.
Noting that last year the So-
viet Union attended the Hel-
sinki conference and signed an
agreement undertaking to be
forthcoming in dealing with the
problem of the reunification of
families, the envoy declared:
"I am sorry to report that since
the signing of that agreement
there has been a marked deter-
ioration in the situation of So-
viet Jews and the campaign of
harassment of those who have
applied for permission to em-1
igrate to Israel has been in-
tensified."
Several hours before the pa-
rade began, five bombs went
off in Manhattan. A telephone
call to the news media said the
pipe bombs were planted by
the Jewish Armed Resistance
Strike Unit "as a protest against
the treatment of Soviet Jews."
ONE BOMB went off in the
rear of the UN library, another
at the Four Continents Book
Shop which sells Soviet pub-
lications, another at the Com-
munist Party headquarters, and
two others at bank branches.
There were no injuries and
damages were confined to brok-
en glass.
Gold stressed that the march-
ers wanted to achieve their ob-
jectives by peaceful means.
NOTICE!
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Now appearing
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il^wtMaV"*
of man under the fatherhood of
God."
Non sequitur again except
perhaps to prove Ford's "con-
tinuing concern" for the plight
of Soviet Jewry. The truth is
that he was offering non sequi-
turs on the suoject four and a
half years ago, and he is offer-
ing them again today.
FOR FORD it is who bottled
up trade agreements abroad,
and especially the Most Favor-
ed Nation trade agreement with
the Soviet Union, because of
his opposition to the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment that would
deny MFN status to the So-
viets unless they promised a
liberalized emigration policy for
Jews and other minorities wish-
ing to leave the country.
Ford it is who, mimicking the
Muscovites in this regard, de-
clared the Jackson Vanick
Amendment to be an intolerable
interference into the internal
affairs of the Soviet Union and
a flagrant tampering with U.S. i
foreign policy to the detriment |
of detente.
This is the very same Ford
who wrote all those pretty sen-
timents about Solidarity Sun-
day in his Apr. 27 memo. It is
the very same Ford who wound
up his Apr. 27 memo with one
final, thunderous non sequitur: j
"THE AMERICAN people
have long sought to promote
respect for fundamental human
rights, including the right of
emigration. I assure you today
that the United States Govern-
ment will continue to promote
the principles contained in the
Universal Declaration of Hu-
man Rights."
How? By attacks on the Jack-
son-Vanik amendment? Is this
how to "promote the princi-
ples" of human rights? Is this
the way to show solidarity with
the Soviet Jewish agony?
Or was the Apr. 27 memo
just an exercise in ethnic po-
liticking for the ethnically in-
trepid who hear and under-
stand only what they want to
hear and understand?
THIS IS also the very same
Ford who last week vetoed the
$4 billion foreign military aid
bill, which was tantamount to
slashing $1.5 billion in aid to
beleaguered Israel.
Even if we WERE a one-issue
people, isn't it eminently clear
that politicians consider that
Jewish emotions are so incan-
descent that we fail to see their
inconsistencies, the rank op-
portunism of their words, their
fakery, the frankness of their
deceptions?
The union of American He-
brew Congregations editorial
may make us fee: uncomforta-
ble because it underscores our
political naivete. But we would
be even more naive not to pay
heed to it.
\\j^~^mM*\
iRST~^fc
R
'SE 1
sher 1
lant.
MIAMI BEACH'S FIRST
The kosni;
STEAK HOI'
The Ultimate in Kosher
Dining In An Elegant,
Intimate Atmosphere
Serving
ONLY GLATT KOSHER MEATS
Opan Sunday through Thuraday 5 lo 10 PH
Catering Facilities Available
YaarNaib. MENASHE HIRSCH A
RABBI NATHAN GOODMAN
Phone: 531-4114
On Th Ocn al ?UI SI MIAMI BEACH
Wll IP lti S Gull Hoi.I ,
SOMETHING NEW!
SPECIAL Attractive YEARLY RATES!
Hotel Rooms I Kitchenettes With or
Without Fine Kosher Meals!
FREE TV ENTERTAINMENT .BEACH .POOL
LINCOLN MALI NEARBY 538-57 11
J\lUl*K3illC*
k*7. ...- ta>*a.i ,7> COltlNS AVENUE
ON THE OCEAN miami beach, elquida
I
one of the
largest and
most beautiful
selections at
moderate prices
only one
studio for
your personal
attention
UNIQUE FREE FORM 14
AND It KARAT FLOWING
GOLD JEWELRY TO PLEASE
YOUt PERSON AUTT
MOCf MbtfOT
Credit Cards
Honored
IH30N.E.2AVL
NOaTTWAMAJM
757-3145



Page 14-A
+Jewiti th>rk*ntr
"
-
ugai notki
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
GOTHAM HOTEL & APAUTMENTS
il Tin; 1.1 Street. Miami. Beach. Fla.
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
WKXOER'S REALTY CORP.
a Kla. Corn.
BY: SELIG WKNGER. PRESIDENT
4/30 T./7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2349
Division Neebitt
IN HE: ESTATE OF
AUGUST SARMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO A LI, PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
TOD ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of AUGUST SARMAN. deceased. File
Number 74-2349. is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida The personal representative
of the estate Is ALEX KAELEP.
whose address Is 13825 N.E. 16th
Court, North Miami. Florida. The
name and address of the personal re-
presentative's attorney are set forth
below.
AH persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
qulred, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
I'DHI.ICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file iwilb the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
in.nut they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indl-
i Hi* thfl basis for tin- claim, the name
and address of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the amount
I.limed. If the claim Is not vet due.
I lie date when it will become due.
shall In- stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the nature of
rfr uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall be
described The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail one
copy to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
qaired, WITHIN three months
niui.m the hate op the first
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have
thai challenges the validity of the de-
i client's u.ill. the qualifications of the
per tonal representative, or the venue
'm jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT BO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of tin first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 7. 1976.
ALEX KAELEP
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of AUGUST BARMAN
Deceased
.TToRNEY FOR PERSONAL
itEPHESENTATlVE:
MARTIN ROTH
llll Alnsley Building
.Miami. Florida 33132
Telephone: 37i-.r>664
_________________________5/7-14
On Saturday May 22 1976 at the hour
of 2 o'clock In the afternoon at 621
N E Slat Street the undersigned will
sell tlie following vehicles to the hlch-
est and best bidder for cash. This sale
Is on an as-ls, where-ls basis and
there are no warranties, guarantees
or representation made in connection
with this sale as to the condition,
availability, description or usability of
these vehicles and no guarantee can
lie given with respect to liens or en-
ctuAbrance* thereon. Dodge ID.50-
.1*0597* Charles Chew: Oldsmoblle
IB 35469KD121230 George Allen: Olds-
mobile ID.358396E140379 Marie Taylor:
Chevrolet ID.41839C1372O0 Clarence
Cannon: Dolsmoblle ID.384677M339546
A. S. Decesare: Chevrolet ID.155698U-
149903 David Ward: Oldsmoblle ID.S8-
6399M437901 Frank Spleglc: Dodge.
ID.0342129282 Unknown: Chevrolet 1D.-
1243771.109753 William Villalobos: Tri-
umph ID.GB11374I.CV Vivian Suprovi-
cli Chevrolet ID.164398U174695 Roy D.
Woods: Chevrolet ID.153115D194856
Fred Thompson: Chevrolet ID.163396-
D1C9717 Charles Gilgore: Ford. ID.-
r.T.XEK59552650 l.'nknown: Ford ID.7D-
5OC107989 Edward Smith: Ford ID.6T-
07T285591 Rudolph Hensley: Pontlac
ID.566995P'06130 Unknown: Oldsmoblle
ID338375M14K208 Jerry Pugllese: Ford
ID.6K01U135875 Simon Figueroa: Ford
ID.4G5HC121049 Unknown: Dodge ID.
CI23212910 David Blanchard: Ford in -
2N63X118577 Gladys Bates: Chevrolet
ID 456K9B166.ri4a Irm.i June Edwards:
Ford ID.4A72C128731 Herbert Cuttrlss:
Chevrolet ID. 1663961.199391 Gary Suit:
Dodge ID.LP27D62591491 Barry Star-
key: Plymouth ID.PM1F9F207582 Imo-
gene Stone: Ford ID.4A32H147274 Jo-
seph Slrico: Spartan ID.2956: Ply-
mouth ID.RH23G4R158269: Pontlac
ID.252379R105784: Mercury ID.GAEC-
MC64733: Bulck ID 4336910114665: Ford
ID F10ALN95601: Ford ID.ST12X1740-
06: Chevrolet ID.166470D125633: Ford
ID.F50BCA35982: Toyota ID.TE285216-
17. Elliot L Miller
B/7-J4
8 Across, 10 Down-i
UCAL NOTKI
by Irv Brechner
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of MAGGIE'S SHOES at 2601 N.W. 5
Ave.. Miami. Fla. .13127 Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the --.- 7 iu.'pTHliMAS wife
Circuit Courtofd.cCgunty. Florida, and I^MAmVm^g^lU
' a' Fla. Corp.
5/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 76-3975 (21)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
WILLIE J. THOMAS, husband
2 Thou shall not
heat-------
8 falsehood
9 prayer The
Sabbath Queen [2 wds
12 Yiddish lor
please keep quiel
13 not arop
14 slang lor yes
16 popular British
car labor)
17 in Hebrew if s
ahnachnu
18 in Yiddish it s irenen
19 Sleam Ship (abbr)
21 ol Bosses
International
23 abbr tor Yiddish
word lor dirty old man
25 feel digits
27 musical note
28 earliest written code
ol oral Jewish law
29 worn lor prayer
30 in Yiddish it s aroysgang
31 Yiddish word
lor nat
significance of
one of the Pesach
matwhs
3 becomes sick
4 alltime NBA
scoring champ
Adolph
5 famous Jewish
author (2 wds)
6 silicon (abbr)
J in Yiddish
its men
10 in Yiddish
its shmues
11 Yiddish lor
slipshod
15 in Yiddish its
mizracn direction
20 ancient king
ol Tyre
22 negative reply
24 a well mannered
person (Yiddish)
26 Yiddish word
for lettuce
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2793
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH STERN
I ItTlilSI'll
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OH DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of JOSEPH STERN, deceased. File
Number 76-2793. is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade Countv. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida. The personal representative of the
estate Is GROVER SHEFFIELD,
whose address is 10504 S.W. 77th
Court. Miami. Florida. 33156. The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
AH persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
qulred, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
I'l'lil.[CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and vou
are hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other pleading to
the Petition on the Husband's Attor-
ney. LESTER ROGERS, whose ad-
dress is 1454 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33125. and file the original
with the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before this 24th day of
May. 197C. or a Default will be enter-
ed against vou.
DATED this 14th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By N A. Hewett
4/23-30 5/7-14
RE NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-6117
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN' HE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERT WAYNE GOODAI.E
Petitioner
a written statement of any claim or SANDRA JEAN OOODALH
This puzzle may not be reproduced without written
permission of the author an' "'
demand they may have. Each claim
must he in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not vet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliuuidated. the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall he describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient conies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copv
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
to file any objections thev mav have
thai challenges the validity Of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or iurisiliction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS N<'T BO PILED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED
Dale of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Mnv 7. 1970.
GROVER SHEFFIELD
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of JOSEPH STERN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
RICHARD A. GROSSMAN
<07 Lincoln Road. Suite 9G
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 534-4646
5/7-14
Rei pond* nt
TO: SANDRA JEAN GOODAUP
Ottawa. Cmaila
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
ilial in bi lion for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if an v. to it on
PHILIP AUERBACH. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 5599 Bis-
cayne Boulevard, Miami. Florida
33137, and file (he original with the
clerk of Hie above styled court on or
before .May 24th. 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou for
tin rellel demanded in the complaint
T I" lili'HI
Tin. notlci ball hi published nnc.
each week for lour consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH I'll iRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand anil the seal of
said court nt Miami. Florida on this
Mih day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. DRINKER
A- i I. rk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N A HEWETT
As Demit v Clerk
(Clrr-Ull Court Seal!
4/23-30 5/7-14
PUZZLE ANSWERS ON PAGE 13-6
UMi worm
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT .
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76.1848
Division 32
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY MUENZER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAIN8T
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
"V^S CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADS. COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 7S-2MI
., Dlvl,'on NESBITT. J.
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM STALLMAN.
Deceased
JP ALL PERSONS HAVING
I'AJMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
7SSJ&22E ESTATE AND ALL
?J55 PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2840
Division FRANK B. DOWLING
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BARBARA A. STONE
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of BARBARA A. STONE, deceased.
File Number 76-2840. is minimi; In
the Circuit Court for Dade Countv.
Florida. Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street.
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-12580
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
It. T. STANLEY. Husband
MAMIE R STANLEY
Wife
You. MAMIE It. STANLEY, RESI-
DENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby no-
tified to serve a copy of your Answer
to the Dissolution of Marriage filed
against you. upon husband's attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136.
am' file original with Clerk of Court
on or before May 28. 1976: otherwise
the Petition will be confessed bv vou.
Dated this 20th dav of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: M HERRERA
Deputv Clerk
1/23-30 5/7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
, In business under the fictitious name
Miami. Florida. The personal reore- of PALM PATIO BAR & PACKAGE
sentatlve of the estate Is MYRA STORE at 1516 N.W. 27th Ave.. Miami.
HOME, whose address is 51 Middle- Florida Intends to register said name
brook Road. West Hartford. Connec- with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
ticut. The name and address of the of Dade County. Florida.
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Courthouse. Mi-
ami. Florida. The personal represcn
tatlve of ihe" estate Is PloTen^iEen. sillnmn7VhoViddr.il:?. llcM a
ser. whose address is 1200 West Ave- cavne Rom.v?rH .?."IHffl Sl8"
Jurt for Dade County. Flor-
al iTr,0ba,,,e D|vl8lon- the address of
!2. J* ,L3 West *>**'" Street. Mi-
ami Florida 33128. The personal rep.
ntatlve of the estate i n.rtK.
n, whose i
cayne Boulevard. Apt. No. 602. No.
nue. Miami Beach. Florida. The mm Miami Beach iUC"iiA. ""l
and address of the personal represen- address of the ni^TT' name and
i.tiv'. !..._......-T__. .__.v %..,___ "a ,ne Personal represents.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of ART IN AMERICA at 736 Arthur
Godfrey Road. Miami Beach. Fla. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
OLD A MODERN MASTERS. INC.
a Fla. Corp.
ERWIN STERN. PRESIDENT
NORMAN CIMENT
Attorney for applicant
4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
RE-LL'CKI FASHION at 440 S.W. 8
St.. Miami. Fla.. 33130 intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Flor-
ida.
LUCRECIA FERRER 50%
REINA E. PENA 60%
4/23-30 5/7-14
tatlve's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de"'
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attonioy. and the amount claimed,
the claim Is not yet due. the da.,
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed. If Jhe claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall b, stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative,
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
ORJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Ma/ 14.
1076.
FLORENCE MUBNZB*
As Personal Representative iUm
Estate of Henry Muenier. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL '*
REPRESENTATIVE:
STEINBERG NEU8TEIN
By: Paul B. Steinberg
350 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Telephone: 618-2344
1/14-21
- personal representa-
tives attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
EBfc&&EF\ 2? THI8 NOTICE to
file with the clerk of the above court
5.mT'ni*n.h"atemenL f any *>'" Or
demand they may have. Bach claim
or 1&%Z ,11 tne c.lalm' tn name <<>
B ",5 3? creditor or his agent or
U ?h. TV al!d the "<> claimed. If
- Uk. !*'m.,.,V not yet du- dte
1h ?, LW'",b.ecome due ^a" be stat-
flnmd.iia .S m Si con,ln*"t or un-
iquldatea, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
2M&& nW,,THIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
t.. KafJy ob-ltions ">ev may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent a will, the qualifications of the
personal representative or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court
_4Jl CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
25,%SS2S3 NoT SO EILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
in?* Administration: May 14.
BERTHA STALLMAN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of William Stallman
. __ Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY M. WAITZK1N
740 71st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: 866-0352
714-11
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court t
RICHARD KUl.LA
SANFORD H. KRAMER. PA.
Attorney for Richard Kulla
__________________4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
demand thev may have. Each claim { chff'S I Hinp .t SJ T n?"1*
writing and -us. Indicate ^G^BLStwSSi&
or or hfs aaent l1 rZ*isXer 8aid name w,th ,he c'erk
amount clafmed* hf Clreu" c of Dade County.
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the credit
or attorney, and the amount ciaimea. i.'i,.riHo
If the claim Is not vet due. the date L-^.t
when It will become due shall be B^wnT&tfiTm nw!ai
stated. Tf the claim is contingent or By' "'LLIAM J. GOLDWORN
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer- nriiii. i r- i?ecre 17
talntv shall be stated. If the claim Is "'"'J*,J; Go'dworIl- Esquire
secured, the security shall be describ- i"0" ,or Fd Service
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one coov
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
Consultants. Inc.
4/30 5/7-14-21
RAUL OLTVA
J. LAZAGA
4/80 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ministration has been mailed are re- undersigned, desiring to engage In
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS business under the fictitious name of
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIR8T ECOS at 1401 S.W. 1st Street. MI-
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ml 33135 Intend to register said name
to file any objections they may have with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
that challenge the validity of the de- Dade County. Florida,
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Mav 7, 1976
MYRA ROME
As Personal Renresentative of the
Estate of BARBARA A. STONE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH J. OERSTHN
1050 Soring Garden Road
Miami. Florida 33136
Telephone: 324-1930
6/T-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FLORIDA GIFTS CENTER at 1401
S.W. 1 Street. Room 207. Miami Fla
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
RAUL R. OLTVA
________m_________4/0_ 5/7-14-31
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
,.NOT'fE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
. ,,u.sl.ne8B under >e fictitious name
of CHEF'S CHOICE at 455 E. Okee-
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that hi.w r'hu? u aL45LE' kee"
the undersigned, desiring to engage [IJ"b',f,KRad'S'alean' F'r'da Intends
In business under the two following ,", fhf o,r ^'d name with the Clerk
fictitious names: (1) OVATIONS. (2) Kb'uf. Ult CUrt f Dade c"ntv.
COMPLIMENTS at 5364 N W. 35 ''"twt^i^e............_
Court. Miami. Fla Intends to register
said names with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida
ACCOLADES FASHIONS. INC.
a Fla. Corp.
R/7-14-21-28
Food Service Consultants, Inc
By WILLIAM J. GOLDWORN
....... Secretary
\\ illiam J. Goldworn. Esquire
Attorney for Food Service
Consultants. Inc.
4/30 5/7-14-21
Ski
Uh-



Ly. May 14, 1976
rJewisti ihrAMafi
Page 1S-A
There a UN Jewish Studies Program?
Continued from Pane 1-A
would be "no crisis, year
knd year out."
Ind so, Broad donated sev-
buildings to U of F valued
51.5 million. Once the pro-
ties are sold, the Center will
(established to house the al-
ly flourishing JSP at the
versity of Florida.
should only happen at the
rersity of Miami.
IECAUSE the U of M is in
need of unrestricted funds to
feviate current fiscal bud-
ary problems, there are
ktraints in soliciting donations
ecifically directed at JSP.
here are, however, persons
lo have specific interests
hat is Judaica), and the JSP
(iild be a most willing reci-
ent should such persons in-
kt on earmarking their dona-
kns appropriately.
[Considering that fiscal situa-
)>n, understandable ire was
oked when it was locally re-
nted that the UM was about
establish a Cuban Center on
mpus to house a proposed
kban Studies Program.
[in a telephone interview con-
rning the alleged expenditure,
i. Henry King Stanford said,
("he University is providing no
nds for this project. You can
iote me."
WHAT THE University may
rovide is the land for such a
enter. "If they (the Cuban stu-
ents) raise the money, the
knd will be made available. The
University will have first refus-
on the improvements (should
he proposed Center ever be of-
Broad
Dr. Stanford
fered for sale)," Dr. Stanford
flatly declared.
The central issue was the im-
plied preference for a pro-
posed Cuban program and cen-
ter while the JSP has received
no preferential treatment.
The UM prexy assured The
Jewish Floridian that there is
"no way by which any one
group will get special privileges
over another group."
AT PRESENT, a proposal is
under consideration by greater
Miami Jewish Federation to
help UM fund JSP. At the sug-
gestion of Rabbis Stanley Ring-
ler and Richard Davis, follow-
ing precedents set in other com-
munities, the JSP submitted the
proposal to Federation through
the Hillel Foundation for com-
plementary funding.
The UM has budgeted $15,000
annually for JSP but the money
has not been used and has re-
verted back to the general
fund's operational budget.
Simultaneously, the JSP is
in search of a director. In the
past five years, the head of the
program has been an "acting
coordinator."
Current acting coordinator is
Dr. Bernard Schecterman, who
teaches politics of the Middle
East. Dr. Schecterman explain-
ed the importance of hiring a
director for the program. "Stu-
dents would like further struc-
ture. They don't want a second
hand attitude."
Dr. Sidney Besvinick, pre-
sently very much involved with
the selection of a permanent
director, has promised that
"whether or not more money
comes in, we are going ahead
with the director."
ONCE THE JSP budget is
supplemented by Federation,
plans are in the hoping stage
to augment a Judaica library,
hire additional faculty and to
institute a lecture series.
Without waiting, however, for
additional funds, an adjunct
program has been developed in
the School of Education. Dr.
Samuel Ersoff, chairman of Ad-
ministration, Curriculum and
Instruction, described a Bache-
lor of Education program with
an emphasis in Judaic Studies.
As there is no legal state cer-
tification in JS, a student in
this program would take his
certification in Social Studies
or elementary education. His
electives and general education
classes would be taken in the
JSP.
"There has been a great need
for properly schooled Jewish
day school, after school and
Sunday school teachers," ex-
plained Dr. Ersoff.
THE VALUE of this program,
worked out cooperatively with
ARABS JUST HAVEN'T RESPONDED
4No Initiative' Charge Flayed
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
ncha DinitZ, Israel's Ambas-
|dor to the U.S., declared here
at "there is no greater lie
an that Israel is sitting by
Jithout creating initiatives" for
peace settlement in the Mid-
|e East.
Addressing 400 American
Bwish leaders at a luncheon
jring the 17th annual confer-
ice of the American-Israel
jblic Affairs Committee
UPAC), the Israeli envoy said
liat "all is now in the Arab
ourt."
He asserted that Israel has
ivanced two initiatives but the
Lrabs have not responded to
Ither so far.
ISRAEL'S first proposal, Di-
kitz said, was to reconvene the
eneva conference on the basis
its initial terms agreed to by
United States, the Soviet
piion and the Secretary Gen-
of the United Nations.
But now, he said, "some
nt" the Palestine Liberation
tion invited, an ap-
tit allusion to the Soviet
i/ernment's statement last
ek calling for resumption of
Geneva parley with PLO
hrticipation at both its in-
hrmal and formal stages.
Dinitz stressed that Israel's
refusal to permit the PLO to
attend the Geneva conference
is not a matter of protocol, but
arises from the PLO's charter
which calls for the destruction
of the State of Israel. "No pow-
er in the world can counsel us
to do this," Dinitz said, adding
that the U.S. was not trying to
change Israel's position on the
PLO.
HE SAID the second initia-
tive was to end the state of war
in the Middle East and wait and
see if normalization and lack of
suspicion could materialize in
time and lead to a "full and
positive peace." Dinitz pointed
out "a basic difference" be-
tween "peace and movement."
The Middle East, he said,
needs progress toward peace,
not "movement for the sake of
movement" because "that
creates conditions where a
country can consider itself pres-
sured to make movement and
not to make peace."
He said that movement should
not be made "a matter of public
relations." Israel won't move
just to "have favorable editor-
ials" in the New York Times
and Washington Post, Dinitz
declared.
THE TASK in the Middle
East, he said, is "more com-
plicated, sophisticated and more
difficult than in the past.'- Di-
nitz said the Arab states would
recognize Israel only when they
recognized that it was indes-
tructible. "The State of Israel
and Israel's greatest friend
the U.S. must coordinate
strategic aims if not tactical
aims," he said.
Dinitz called on Americans
to translate Israel's vital needs
into basic strategic terms, "not
by this or that administration
but by the majority of the
American people as the people
have done up to this day."
In that connection he noted
that in the three years since
the Yom Kippur War, the U.S.
has given Israel one-and-a-half
times more aid than in the 25
preceding years. "Keeping Is-
rael strong is vital to American
interests in the region of the
Middle East and for the cause
of democracy everywhere," Di-
nitz said.
>aiMao*i
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, is that its offers a
double indemnity, educational,
insurance policy. The graduate
will have the expertise to
qualify for a parochial teach-
ing job and, as day schools have
an integrated curriculum, these
BEd graduates will also be able
to teach secular subjects.
Dr. Ersoff said this program,
because of its double nature, is
unique and should attract more
students next year. It was only
approved after UM started its
September, 1975, semester.
Florida International Univer-
sity, rather than expanding its
JSP, is contracting its efforts.
Along with its Cuban and Black
Studies programs, is fusing Ju-
daic Studies classes into an
Ethnic Studies curriculum. Be-
ginning with the next academic
year, FIU will offer a core of
Reneral ethnic classes and then
four or more classes with con-
centration in JS.
ACCORDING to Dr. Howard
Rock, the coordinator, FIU's
"certificate" (not certification)
program is very iffy, "if we get
faculty and if the department
is budgeted."
Because each of the ethnic
programs was not drawing
enough student interest, the
move to consolidate was made.
FIU had even scheduled an
"academic quarter in Israel"
which had to be cancelled.
In an overview, then, of three
Judaic Studies Programs, we
find one that is blossoming and
had the good fortune of bene-
fiting from a private endow-
ment as well as official public
funding (U of F); we find one
taxiing.but not quite making it
off the runway (FIU); and we
find the UM's JSP making
strides despite the overall uni-
versity problems sketched in
red ink.
GREATER Miami Jewish Fed-
eration has the opportunity to
establish a real town and gown
relationship with the University
of Miami.
What a blessing it would be
if Federation had some help
from benefactors like Shepard
Broad.
Salute to 200 Years
Of Jews in Gotham
NEW YORK (JTA) Mayor Abraham Beame pro-
claimed the month of May as a "salute" to 200 years of
Jewish life in New York City. The proclamation was read
by the Mayor at a breakfast in his official residence, Gracie
Mansion, which launched a program of tours of Jewish New
York sponsored by the American Jewish Congress.
The breakfast, attended by 80 persons, was hosted by
the Mayor, the AJCongress and the city's Bicentennial
Corporation. Beame's proclamation noted that no other
city has as large a Jewish population as New York and
no other city has had its character so defined and its
growth so enhanced by the presence of a large and energe-
tic Jewish community."
Beame said the city's Jewish contribution goes back
to 1654, when 23 Sephardic Jews settled here and founded
the city's and country's oldest synagogue, Sheanth Israel,
also known as the Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue.
ROYAL HUNGARIAN iHBRESTAURAMT
To Accommodate Our Many Friends And Patrons
We Are Now Open With Our Low Summer Prices
Serving Delicious Dinners Fridays and Sundays
731 Washington Ave.r Miami Beach 538-5401
KOSHER
CUISINE
All C0N0ITKNH0
ROYAL PHI
MOTH
ON-TM-OCiAN
DINING ROOM
NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
mHmfioiissi!-nsi
iss tmum aw.. u **
MNNtl HOOT S TO 7 f M.
SABRA KOSHER
RESTAURANT
Direct from
SABRA KOSHER RESTAURANT
_______INfjHI^ACO
TS^A^UEi^ERTAINMENT
WEEKENDS
1
hotly
KOSHER
OPEN DAILY
4 P.M.
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH 531-6739 531-6730


Pan* 14-A
Page 16-A
-Jewlst ikrHtkW
Friday, May 14, 1976 ~ *
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1
*
Jewish Flor idian
Novelist Dr. Potok
At Women's Lunch
Federation Launches Cash Drive **or J*4 ^ Here
Miami, Florida Friday, May 14, 1976
Section B
The need is clear. The
priorities are set. The time
is now.
With these words the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration has launched a Cash
Drive to accelerate payment
of pledges to the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund with Sidney Lef-
court chairing the effort.
Greater Miami's Cash
Drive,"which aims to raise
$2 million, is part of a na-
tional effort to raise $100
million in cash by July 1.
THE PURPOSE is to ensure
that the people who are most af-
fected by cuts in the Jewish
Agency's budget will still be
provided with at least minimurr
in humanitarian aid this year.
The Jewish Agency is the Is-
raeli agency that allocates dol-
lars contributed to such cam-
paigns as the Federation's CJA-
IEF for immigration, absorp-
tion, social welfare services,
education, housing and other
vital services. Most dramatic-
ally reduced from the 1976
budget are the supportive serv-
ices for immigration and ab-
sorption, and housing. The fall-
off in these services is partic-
ularly devastating to Russian
immigrants who come to Israel
seeking a new life.
"At this moment," said Lef-
court, "the Israeli people look
to American Jewry for a moral
and financial commitment. Is-
raelis are taxed to their limit
. mentally, physically and
emotionally and need from
us an even fuller partnership
SIDNEY LEFCOURT
in the building of our Jewish
homeland.
"Those people who contrib-
ute to the campaign have al-
ways paid their pledges," Lef-
court continued. "But we are
hoping that in light of the cuts
in the Jewish Agency's budget,
which are now coupled with a
spiraling economic burden, Mi-
amians will consider accelerat-
ing payment so that the people
of Israel can put that money to
use immediately."
WHAT HAS caused these eco-
nomic problems? A decade ago
defense expenditures for Is-
raelis were only 12 percent of
their Gross National Product.
Since the 1973 Yom Kippur
War, they have not fallen be-
low 30 percent of the GNP. In
1976-77 they stand at 40 per-
cent. An anticipated 60 percent
of the deficit comes from the
cost of defense imports alone.
The balance-of-payments gap
is now S3.9 billion. More than
17 percent of the budget in
excess of $1 billion annually
goes toward servicing the debt.
And still this is not enough.
While Israel once had a three-
month currency reserve, this
has been cut to six weeks.
Translated into human terms,
these figures mean abbreviated
services to people in need.
There is little left, after defense
costs, to educate tomorrow's
leaders, to feed, house and in-
tegrate the refugees from So-
viet oppression and immigrants
from any lands.
"These people are Israel's
greatest resource and this is
where our priorities must lie,"
Lefcourt said.
"We must carry this respon-
sibility," he went on, "for we
have survived as a people only
by responding in times of need.
As it is needed now. We have
learned our strongest ally is
each other," he said.
SERVING on Lefcourt's Cash
Committee are cochairmen Har-
ry A. Levy, Julius Darsky, Da-
vid B. Fleeman, Morris Futer-
nick, Carl Susskind and com-
mittee members Leo A. Chai-
kin, Myra Farr, Stanley R. Gil-
bert, Al Golden, Michael Gold-
stein, Goldie Goldstein, Me'
Kartzmer Donald E. Lefton
Norman H. Lipoff, Morton Mar-
cus. Allan Margolis, Harvey
Miller, Stewart Mirmelli, Joe
Peiken, Dr. Alvin Philipson.
Sam Rabin, Muriel Russell, Dr.
Lester Russin, Kenneth J.
Schwartz, Edward Shapiro, Val
Silberman, Morton Weinberger
and Irving Wexler.
Novelist Rabbi Chaim Potok
will be guest speaker at a Wom-
en's Committee luncheon of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service.
The renowned author of "The
Chosen," among other best-sell-
ers, will speak at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel at 11:30 on Thurs-
day, May 21.
ELAINE (Mrs. Max) Dinis-
man is luncheon chairman.
Ruth (Mrs. Mortimer) Schaf-
fer w*i'l preside as outgoing
president of the JFCS Women's
Committee. Incoming president
is Mrs. Leonard Beldner.
The function is open to the
public, and information and
reservations are available at
the JFCS offices in Miami.
Dr. Potok, a prolific writer
and lecturer, is among the best
known Jewish authors. In addi-
tion to "The Chosen," he has
also written "The Promise" and
"My Name is Asher Lev," which
have established his literary re-
putation everywhere.
Dr. Potok, who has been writ-
ing fiction since the age of 15,
is in addition the author of "In
the Beginning," his newest
novel, which promises to be
another best-seller.
POTOK'S address at the lunch-
eon will be on "Authority and
Chaim Potok, rabbi and au-
thor of "The Chosen," "My
Name Is Asher Lev," and
'In the Beginning," will de-
scribe "The Jew and Mod-
ern Literature" at a lunch-
eon sponsored by the Wom-
en's Committee of the Jew-
ish Family and Children's
Service on Thursday, May
20, at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Rebellion: The lew and Modern
Literature,'' a personal account
of the tensions and conflicts of
the modern novel and the tradi-
tionalism of religious beliefs.
The address will be followed
by a question-and-answer ses-
sion.
PTA Installing Of ficers
At Hebrew Academy Monday
Stephanie (Mrs. Stephen)
Gurland will be installed as
president of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy Parent-Teach-
er Association on Monday, May
17, at 8 p.m. in the school's
Merwitzer Building. Mrs. Gur-
land, who was vice president,
succeeds Claire (Mrs. Josh)
Rejmun.
Other officers who will be in-
stalled by Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross, the school's principal.
are Alyce Paycher, Gail Gordon,
Evelyn Goldbloom and Leona
Stein, vice presidents; Sue Stein,
recording secretary; Edna Ze-
mel, corresponding secretary;
Yaffa Dermer, treasurer; and
liana Friedman, financial secre-
tary.
The meeting is also the
school's annual celebration of
Yom Hamoreh (Day of Honor-
ing Teachers), and will honor
two faculty members for 18
years of dedicated service: Rab-
bi Shimon Azulay and Joseph
Ackner. Rabbi Azulay serves in
executive positions at the He-
brew Academy and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
while Ackner has been director
of the Hebrew Academy Sum-
mer Camp for several years and
heads the school's science de-
partment.
Rabbi Gross for the school;
Sara Resnick, president of the
student body of the Olga and
Margaret Weishaus High School
for Girls; Dr. Larry Ciment for
the alumni; and I. H. Abrams,
chairman of the school's execu-
tive committee, for the officers
and directors, will speak at the
meeting, which is open to the
Dublic.
MRS. GURLAND
Temple Emanu-El's first tennis tournament will be held
May 23 at the courts of members Richard Levy, Jack
Cooper, Abel Holtz and Sam Luby, Jr., among others.
Warnnng up for the one-day meet are (from left) Judge
Frederick N. Barad, president of Temple Emanu-El;
Roberta (Mrs. Eugene J.) Weiss; Martha (Mrs. Lester)
Mishcon; and Saul Feltzin. Mrs. Mishcon and Herbert
Buchwald are cochairmen of the event, which has three
categories: mixed doubles, father-child doubles and
mother-child doubles. The Lubys will host a post-play
dinner at their home.
Pioneer Women Achievements
Are Focus of Awards Luncheon
At the Haroour House Israel Bonds "Salute to Israel"
breakfast founder and former Mayor of Bay Harbor
Islands Shepard Broad (left) presented the State of Is-
rael David Ben-Gurion Award to Eugene and Hilda Le-
bowitz (center) while cochairman Dr. Philip H. Simon
looked on.
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
of the American Zionist Fed-
eration of South Florida, will
be the principal speaker at the
annual awards luncheon of the
Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida at noon Tuesday,
May 18, at the Eden Roc Ho-
tel.
Mrs. Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council, which
includes 19 chapters in Dade
and Broward Counties, will re-
view the accomplishments of
the organization's Golden Jubi-
lee celebration. She was nation-
al chairman of the Pioneer
Women's 50th anniversary con-
vention, which was held in Mi-
ami Beach last fall and attract-
ed more than 2,200 persons.
The Tuesday luncheon is
open to the public and reserva-
tions may be made at the Pio-
neer Women Miami Beach of-
fice.
More than 60 awards will be
presented, including one to the
Pioneer Women's Man of the
Year. Other citations will go to
outstanding volunteers from
each chapter and the South
Florida Council.
Bertha (Mrs. George) Lieb-
man. president of Masada Chap-
ter, is luncheon chairman. Fe-
lice (Mrs. Gerald) Schwartz is
publicity chairman.
Pioneer Women, the world's
largest Jewish women's organ-
ization with 860,000 members.
Is known also in the United
States as the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of Amer-
ica, and once was headed by
Golda Meir.
ft ft ft
Pioneer Women Club No. 2 is
holding its Mother's Day lunch-
eon a week late, on May 16, at
the Montmaitre Hotel. Proceeds
will go to the Child Rescue Fund
in Israel. Vocalist Regina Balin
will entertain and Ida Chinsky
is guest speaker. Reservations
for the luncheon may be made
at the Pioneer Women office.
Aviva Chapter will meet on
Wednesday. May 19, at noon in
the Washington Federal audi-
torium on NE 167th St. A dona-
tion is required for admission
to the luncheon program. Ms*.
Dora Cohen, president, will
chair the session at which new
officers will be installed. Ber-
tha (Mrs. George) Liebmann,
vice president of the South
Florida Council, will be the in-
stalling officer.


Page 2-B
+JmMnurM**n
-
News from Israel Bonds
Friday, May 14, 1976
m,
RABIN CALLS ISRAEL
BONDS CRUCIAL TO
ISRAEL'S STRENGTH
Leaders of South Florida's
Jewish community heard a spe-
cial Independence Day tele-
phone message from Israel's
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
on May 4 at the South Florida
Israel Bond Organization cam-
paign headquarters. Representa-
tives from Broward County at-
tended a similar meeting at the
Hallandale Jewish Center.
Prime Minister Rabin observ-
ed that the unique quality of the
Israel Bond program is that it
enables "fellow Jews of Amer-
ica to join with us in the prac-
tical work of building, develop-
ing and strengthening Israel."
He emphasized his gratitude
and indicated that through the
partnership of Israel Bonds "we
expand our economy, and the
expansion of our economy has
become a crucial factor of our
future strength."
Hundreds of top-echelon com-
munity leaders in 65 American
and Canadian cities heard Ra-
bin say, "We believe that with
you by our sides in full part-
nership we can achieve our
economic goals, and in achiev-
ing them we will be bringing
closer the day of peace, which
is our deepest aspiration."
Rabin added that "as Jews we
measure strength not only in
terms of tanks and planes but
first of all in terms of spirit.
This above all has been the
weapon that has enabled us to
do great things together to
overcome every obstacle in our
Dath as we rebuild the Jewish
State."
Sam Rothberg, general chair-
man of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization, said the cross-country
telephone hookup marked the
opening of the peak phase of
the spring drive to meet Is-
rael's pressing financial needs.
tr ft &
TEMPLE JUDEA
DINNER OF STATE
Moses Schonfeld, United Na-
tions and foreign correspondent,
will be keynote speaker at the
Temple Judea-Israel Dinner of
State, on behalf of the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign, on Sunday, May
16, at 7 p.m. at the temple's so-
cial hall.
The dinner meeting will fea-
ture the presentation of the
State of Israel David Ben-Gurion
Award to the past president of
Temple Judea, Victor Reiter.
Dinner chairman is Owen Freed,
MOSES SCHONFELD
and spiritual leader of Temple
Judea is Rabbi Michael B. Eis-
enstat.
Host of the popular radio
series "Inside the United Na-
tions," Schonfeld has interview-
ed many of the world's leading
political figures, including the
leaders of Israel, Egypt, Syria,
Lebanon, Jordan and the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization.
A native of London, son of
the presiding rabbi of the Brit-
ish Union of Orthodox Congre-
gations, he lived for a time in
Palestine, where he served as
a special police officer during
the Arab uprisings. His over-
seas assignments include cov-
erage of the Six-Day War, the
Berlin Treaty, the SALT Talks
and reports on Russian emi-
gration to Israel.
Milton M. Parson is the ex-
ecutive director and Robert L.
Siegel is general campaign
chairman of the Greater Miami
Israel Bond Organization cam-
paign.
Study Sessions Featured
In CAJE Multimedia Exhibit
A comprehensive seminar
program for all professional
groups in Jewish education in
the Greater Miami Community
is scheduled for Sunday and
Monday, May 16 and 17, by the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, Gwen Weinberger, agen-
cy president, announced.
The study sessions are an
integral part of the Book and
Multimedia Exhibit and Display
at the CAJE for South Florida's
Jewish educators.
On Sunday at 12:30 p.m. there
will be a bruncheon meeting for
librarians of area synagogue
and day schools and the Dade
County school system. Jonathan
Yardley, book review editor of
the Miami Herald will be the
guest. Rose Sobol, chairman of
the Association of Jewish Li-
brarians, will welcome the
group with Susan Panoff, direc-
tor of the Educational Resource
Center, and Lillian Ross, CAJE
community services director.
ON SUNDAY at 4 p.m. Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross will address
afternoon and day school teach-
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ers on "What Happened at Si-
nai," with special attention to
Shavuot, and a number of new
films will be shown.
On Monday at 9 a.m. there
will be a breakfast meeting and
seminar on the "Jewish Excep-
tional Child." Mira Fraenkel,
president of the Jewish Educa-
tors Council of South Florida,
is chairman.
At 4:30 on Monday the Asso-
ciation of Jewish Youth Direc-
tors will meet under the lead-
ership of Gene Greenzweig, di-
rector of youth programming of
the CAJE, while that evening
at 7 the Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators will gather
for a seminar, "Humanizing the
Early Childhood Program," di-
rected by Dr. Ann Puben. Of-
ficers for the coming year will
be elected; Emily Grunwald,
president, has been nominated
for a second term.
Educators and interested in-
dividuals are welcome to visit
the exhibit, Sunday from 11:30
a.m. to 6 p.m., and Monday,
from 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
wi.
Happening
Members of the legal com-
munity and media were to hear
a debate on the death penalty
by Attorney General Robert
Shevin, moderated by Laurence
J. Hyde, dean of Nova U. Law
School, on Thursday at 8 a.m.
at the Tower Club in Fort Laud-
erdale.
ft ft a
Junior Achievement of Great-
er Miami has scheduled its 19th
annual Future Unlimited ban-
quet for Thursday in the Ever-
glades Hotel at 7:30 p.m. Guest
speaker was to be James W.
McLamore, chairman of Burger
King Corp.
ft ft ft
State Attorney Richard E.
Gerstein will address the Grand
Jury Association of Florida at
its 29th anniversary dinner,
Wednesday, May 19, 7 p.m. at
the Marriott. His subject is "The
Grand Jury Reject It? Re-
model It? Or Rely on It?"
ft ft ft
The Dade-Broward Chapter
of the Retinitis Pigmentosa
Foundation will meet at 8 p.m.
on Friday, May 21, at the First
Federal Savings building, 18301
Biscayne Blvd.
ft ft ft
The National Conference of
Christians and Jews is conduct-
ing a national conference on the
juvenile justice process, June 6-
9. at the Royal Biscayne Hotel,
Key Biscayne.
Rabbis Urge Miami
To Mourn Colonel
Members of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami
are urging their congregations
to observe Sh'loshim, the 30-
day mourning period observed
by Jews, for Col. Efim Davido-
vich, a Soviet Jew who died
while waiting for permission to
emigrate to Israel.
A much decorated Red Army
hero in World War H, Davido-
vich died of a heart attack on
April 24 at Minsk at the age
of 54. Since 1970 he had been
a leader of the freedom strug-
gle for Soviet Jews and an out-
spoken critic of Soviet anti-
Semitism. His fight for human
rights within the USSR made
him the target of repeated
harassment and repression, and
led 57 Soviet Jewish activists
to issue a statement holding
their government responsible
for literally hounding this al-
ready sick man to death.
In saying Kaddish for Davido-
vich, Miamians add their voices
to the worldwide outcry at his
death. Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley,
president of the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami
urges that efforts be doubled to
win freedom for those Soviet
Jews still waiting to leave the
Soviet Union, as a memorial to
this hero who did not live to
see Israel himself.
For further information on
maintaining the "lifeline" for
Soviet Jews, contact the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
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Friday, May 14, 1976
fJewisti ihrktkxn
Page 3-B
Outstanding Citizens Named
Dade County's outstanding
citizens were named on May 6
by Joseph M. Lipton, awards
patron and chairman of Dade
Federal Savings and Loan As-
sociation, at the 29th annual
Dade County Outstanding Citi-
zens Awards luncheon at the
Sheraton Four Ambassadors
Hotel.
The awards gave recognition
to the one man and one wom-
an, of the 26 nominated by local
civic groups, who had perform-
ed the most outstanding single
function for the good and wel-
t j fare of the Dade County com-
munity.
Betty-Ann (Mrs. G. Morton)
Good, nominated by the Crime
Commission of Greater Mi-
ami, was proclaimed Woman
of the Year. A wife and mother
of three, she is a native Mi-
amian. Mrs. Good is the foun-
der of the Court Aid Program,
comprising 85 volunteers who
operate in 12 criminal courts
and the Juvenile Division of the
Circuit Court.
The Dade County Citizens
Crime Watch is another project
she created in which a network
of 15,000 citizens watch for
criminal activities which are re-
ported to the police. She is a
member of the Crime Commis-
sion Junior League, responsible
for financing of the Advocate
Program, which treats with per-
sons on probation and is an of-
ficial agency of Dade County.
In conjunction with the Safe-
ty Department, Dade County's
outstanding citizen is involved
with the new Witness-Victim
Project, speeding up prosecu-
tions, thereby effecting import-
ant savings for tax-payers.
Judge Irving Cvpen, former
Circuit Court judge, nominated
by the nonsectarian Miami Jew-
ish Home and Hospital for the
Aged, Douglas Gardens, was
declared Man of the Year.
Judge Cypen is past president
and current chairman of the
board of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the
Aged. His efforts have brought
Douglas Gardens to national
prominence as an outstanding
geriatric-care facility.
Cochairmen of the event were
Kenneth S. Hoffman and Melvin
J. Haber. Ronald A. Shapo was
vice chairman. Permanent
judges are George Beebe, as-
sociate publisher. Miami He-
rald; Ralph Renick, vice presi-
dent. WTVJ; and Fred Shochet,
publisher and editor, The Jew-
ish Floridian.
Mabel M. (Mrs. J. Riley)
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JUDGE CYPEN
Staats, chairman of the Out-
standing Young Citizens Awards
Committee, presented the 24
high school youngsters who
were nominees for the Dade
County Outstanding Young Citi-
zens for 1975. The two winners,
who will receive $100 scholar-
ships, are Beth Ellen Levey and
Steven Leifman.
Ms. Levey, a senior at Mi-
ami Palmetto Senior High
School. She has been active in
an intensive educational and
enrichment program for Dade
County's underprivileged youth
from the first to sixth grades.
Ms. Levey has been an officer
in more than 27 school organ-
izations and an active member
in 29 volunteer groups.
Leifman, a senior at North
Miami Beach Senior High
School, is engaged in health,
education, welfare and commu-
nity programs. He participated
in Save-a-Life Project in which
100,000 blood pressure tests
were given in the Greater Mi-
ami area. He is president of
his service club, the Key Club
of North Miami Beach, and has
initiated programs to enrich
the quality of life of the inmates
of the Dade County Stockade.
He is active in at least a dozen
charitable and community-wide
projects.
Judges for the Dade County
Outstanding Young Citizens
were Mrs. Charles H. Finkel-
stein, J. Alan Cross, Mrs. Wil-
liam O. Mehrtens, Edward F.
Swenson, Jr.. and Mrs. Mar-
garet Cann. All are former re-
cipients of the Dade County
Outstanding Citizens Awards.
BB Women No. 809
Plan Israel Program
North Dade Chapter No. 809
of B'nai B'rith Women will hold
its regular meeting on Tuesday,
May 25, at 8 p.m. at the Wash-
ington Federal Savings and Loan
Association on 167th St.
The program will be on Is-
rael, featuring the Junior
Choosen Children directed by
Howard Klein. Refreshments
will be served and the public is
invited.
Luncheon Honoring
Mesivta Graduates
A luncheon sponsored by the
parents of the Mesivta Senior
High School graduates in their
honor will be held at the Miami
Beach home of Mrs. David Lehr-
field, Monday, May 24, at 12:30
p.m.
Entertainment will be provid-
ed bv Mesivta High School stu-
dents. All present and past par-
ents and friends of the students
are invited.
Complete
Window Service
REPAIRS
REPLACING REGIAZING
fast Service frM Eifimtfei
PHONE 666-3339
AIL WINDOW REPAIR
7813 BIRD ROAD
Knights of Pythias
Elect Miamians as Officers
At the recent Grand Lodge
Convention in Ocala of Knights
of Pythias, officers were elected
for the coming year. They are:
Irwin Weinberg^. grand chan-
cellor; Samuel C. Levine, grand
vice chancellor; Abe Michael-
son, grand prelate; Milton Her-
mann, grand secretary; Jesse
Lee Bernie, grand treasurer;
Jack Polinsky, grand inner
guards and Irving Waltzer,
grand outer guard. All are from
the Miami area.
The 15 local lodges are en-
gaged in a membership drive.
For information call Irwin Wein-
berg.
NBC Correspondent to Speak
At Miami 11 at lassah Luncheon
Beth Kodesh Officers
To Be Installed Sunday
The officers and board mem-
bers of Beth Kodesh Congrega-
tion, Sisterhood and Men's Club
will be installed on Sunday, May
16, at 7:30 p.m. in the syna-
gogue
Joseph Krissel and Mrs. Elsa
Kreutzer, who were reelected,
and Joseph Sussman will be in-
stalled as presidents.
Sam Schulwolf is chairman
and Rabbi Max Shapiro is in-
stalling officer. A reception for
the officers and board members
will follow.
NBC's national security af-
fairs correspondent, Marilyn
Berger, will be the guest speak-
er at the Miami Chapter of Ha-
dassah's annual thank you
luncheon, Sunday, May 16. Ac-
cording to Gloria Friedman,
chapter president, over 1,500
members are expected to attend
the luncheon at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel at 11:30 a.m.
Ms. Berger, who received de-
grees from Cornell University
and the Columbia School of Jour-
nalism, was part of the Perma-
nent Mission of Afghanistan to
the United Nations. A diploma-
tic correspondent for "News-
day," she covered the Vietnam
peace talks in Paris and the
Middle East, starting with the
Six-Day War in 1967.
She has been a diplomatic
correspondent for the "Wash-
ington Post," specializing in the
Middle East, and she partici-
pated in Henry Kissinger's
shuttles and traveled extensive-
ly in Israel.
Chairpersons of the day are
Renee Steinberg and Edie Ba-
rish, who have announced that
Harriet Snyder Shapiro and
Geri Berney will provide enter-
MARILYN BERGER
tainment. Sunny Hershbein, co-
ordinator, said that chapter of-
ficers will be installed and the
26 newly elected group presi-
dents recognized.
r
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
SOLOMON BUSH c.l745-c.l7%
Colonel in the Continental Army
Colonel Solomon Bush reached the
highest rank of all Jewish officers in
the Continental Army. His first duty
in the War of Independence was
Deputy Adjutant General of the Pennsylvania
Stale Militia. Fighting near Brandywine, Bush
received a near fatal wound. He survived but
was captured when Philadelphia was taken by
the British. He was later freed in a prisoner
exchange and applied for rations and pay. The
Supreme Executive Committee studied his rec-
ord and cited him for a distinguished and bril-
liant career, especially during the w inter of 1776
"when the service was critical and hazardous."
After the war, unable to connect with a govern-
ment job, and probably seeking medical aid for
his wound that never quite healed. Bush jour-
neyed to England where he again was able to
serve his country. The British were still smart-
ing under defeat, and were pursuing a policy
which led to the War of IK 12, seizing and
searching American boats and conscripting
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
their sailors into the Royal Navy. At the time,
no U.S. consul or ambassador was present to
intervene, so Col. Bush took it upon himself to
act on behalf of his fellow Americans. He
reported his efforts to President Washington
whose answer contained warm commendations
for the Colonel's successful interventions.
On his return to America, Bush applied for the
office of Postmaster General, recently vacated
by Timothy Pickering who h.id been promoted
to Secretary of War. He was the first Jew
known to be considered lor Cabinet rank. It he
failed to reach this office, his unhealed wound
must have played a role since it did hasten his
death, probably in 1796.
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 177b
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You ;iml youi children will he iluillu.l lo rc.irf
the fascinating storic in Ibis booklet about
\tiitr Jewish heritage m America ihe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who m;i comribulions in the creation and building of
OUI nation. Send SOf I no ^l imps) with name
Ulkl address lo:
Jl WISH AMKR1CAN PATRIOTS
Box If88, drand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10OI7
Jt


Page 4-B
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Beth Torah Sisterhood Party
Honors Building Fund Donors Speed Record
Pan Am Sets
Round-the-World
Miami Beach BB Lodge Rally
To Honor Rep. Claude Pepper
The Mollie Kahaner Sister-
hood of Beth Torah Congrega-
tion planned a Simchat Torah
dessert party for Thursday at
7:30 p_.m. in the social hall. The
party is honoring Sisterhood
members for their contributions
to the annual Torah Fund Resi-
dent Hall campaign. The Sister-
hood has pledged $5,736, the
highest in the country, to coin-
cide with the current Hebrew
calendar year.
The Sisterhood, as part of the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism, will celebrate
their participation in making
the Mathilde Schecter Resi-
dence Hall a reality. It will
open this month and house stu-
dents at Barnard College and
the Teachers Institute of the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
which is supported solely by
the Women's League.
Cella (Mrs, Norman) Muss-
man, chairman of the party, is
realizing a long-held dream with
the opening of the residence
hall, for when she was accepted
by the Barnard-Teachers In-
stitute program in 1955, she was
unable to attend because resi-
dence facilities were poor and
instead completed her studies
at the College of Jewish Studies
in Chicago.
MRS. MUSSMAN announced
that the following have con-
tributed to the Residence Hall
campaign: Mrs. Louis Winsten,
patron; Mrs. Oscar Bay, Mrs.
Irving Newman, Mrs. Leonard
Schreiber. Mrs. Ewald Ziffer,
and Mrs. Mussman, guardians.
Benefactors are Mrs. Murray
Zidel, Mrs. Barry Segal, Mrs.
Ted Martin, Mrs. Marshall Bal-
tuch. Mrs. Jack Wolfstein, Mrs.
Nat Siesser, Mrs. Frank Kauff,
Mrs. Ceil Basch, Mrs. Eric Gut-
man, Mrs. Arthur Winton, Mrs.
Rhoda Stein. Mrs. Alvin Elias,
Mrs. Harry Mandel, Mrs. Ina
Zymet, Mrs. Saul Schreiber,
Mrs. Hy Kajz, Mrs. rferbert
Aiken, Mrs. Irving Kuttler, Mrs.
Stanley Caidin, Mrs. Sylvia
Glazer, Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz,
Mrs. Pearl Edelsen, Mrs. Mau-
rice Wax, Mrs. Alan Mintz, Mrs.
Edward Wolis, Mrs. Mildred
Snyder, Mrs. Herbert Parker,
Mrs. Arthur Snyder.
And Mrs. Harvey Yurman,
Mrs. Burton Young, Mrs. Alan
Cole, Mrs. Ben Kirschenbaum,
Mrs. Joel Dennis, Mrs. Norman
Kunken, Mrs. David Misonz-
nick. Mrs. Harold Monuse, Mrs.
David Zinn, Cantor Jack Men-
delson, Mrs. Sidney Libow, Mrs.
Sidney Asher, Mrs. Arnold
Sheir. Mrs. Arthur Lipson, Mrs.
Leonard Vova, Mrs. Dorothy
Gimprich, Mrs. Abraham Satz,
Mrs. Lou Iglarsh, Mrs. Char-
lotte Wheeler, Mrs. Israel Le-
vine, Mrs. Harvey Baxter and
Mrs. Irving Krugel.
Three Generations Modeling At
Beth Sholom Sisterhood Luncheon
Three grandmothers, eleven
mothers and seven children will
model fashions from Saks Fifth
Avenue at Temple Beth Sholom
Sisterhood's annual Spring
luncheon, scheduled for Wed-
nesday, May 19, in the temple's
Sisterhood Lounge at 11:30 a.m.
Mrs. Jon Serbin, luncheon
chairman, has said that the
models, all Beth Sholom mem-
bers, are grandmothers Merryle
Young, Mickey Granoff and
Georgian Serbin; mothers Isa-
bel Amdur, Jill Arkin, Evelyn
Esformes, Barbara Hagen, Anita
LifteV, Caroline Lister, Judy
Platt, Janyce Robins, Lois Rob-
ins, Hilda Zaiac and Mrs. Ser-
bin; children Mark Amdur, Sta-
cev Granoff, Tracey Hagen, Hi-
lary Lifter, R. Jon Robins, Bess
Serbin and Lisa Stein.
Reservations for the lunch-
eon, held for the benefit of the
Beth Sholom Anglo-Jewish Li-
brary, the largest in the South,
may be made at the temple of-
fice.
Zomora President
Is Guest Tonight
Services this evening at Tem-
pi; Zamora at 8 p.m. will be
dedicated to the new president,
Herman L. Douglass, who will
be honored with an Oneg Shab-
bat by the congregation.
Douglass will address the con-
e -gation on Nw Beginnings.'
As passengers and crew con-
tinued to unwind and swap
stories about the record-setting
nound-tfcte-world flight of the
Pan American World Airways
747SP (Special Performance),
May 1 to 3, official record-keep-
ers were well into the task of
verifying the facts and figures
on the historic flight.
Preliminary official statistics
released by the National Aero-
nautics Association in Washing-
ton, D.C., show that Clipper Lib-
erty Bell covered the New York-
to-New York route in an elapsed
time of 46 hours, 50 seconds and
flew a distance of 23,230,331
statute miles.
The previous record shown
by NAA is 62 hours, 27 minutes,
35 seconds, flown Nov. 15-17,
1965, by a Boeing 707 320C. The
NAA is the United States repre-
sentative of the Federation
Aeronautique Internationale, the
agency that monitors and main-
tains official world aviation per-
formance records.
Capt. Walter H. Mullikin, Pan
Am's vice president and chief
pilot and head of the 15-man
cockpit team for the globe-cir-
cling journey, praised the pas-
sengers for their spirit, en-
thusiasm and durability in mak-
ing the flight, which required
only two refueling stops in
Delhi and Tokyo.
"I have never seen such a
team-spirited group of passen-
gers who were so keenly inter-
ested in aviation and in the
flight of the Liberty Bell. They
were wonderful," Captain Mul-
likin said. Many of the 98 pas-
sengers told him, he said, they
would be ready to do it again
if Pan Am were to plan another
such record flight.
Miami Beach B'nai B'rith
Lodge is presenting a patriotic
rally, sponsored by the Chase
Federal Savings and Loan As-
sociation as a community serv-
ice, on Thursday, May 27, at
the Theatre of the Performing
Arts at 7:30 p.m.
The 23-member Fleet Marine
Forces Atlantic Drum and
Bugle Corps, of Norfolk, Va.,
will appear for the first time in
this area. The group is directed
by M/Sgt. Allan Emerman, a
former resident of North Miami
Beach.
Claude Pepper, U.S. Con-
gressman and former Senator,
will be honored at the rally. A
member of the House Select
Committee on Aging and chair-
man of the Health and Long-
Term Care Committee, Pepper
will be introduced by Dr. Irving
Lehrman, spiritual leader pf
Temple Emanu-El.
Hanf Schellhammer is vice
president and in charge of spe-
cial .projects for Chase Federal,
while Samuel Pascoe is rally
chairman assisted by Robert
Skidell, Tom Schwartz, Larry
Shuman and Moe Reiffen.
JWV Post and Auxiliary No. 723
Plan an Event-Filled Month
JWV Harry H. Cohen Post
and Auxiliary No. 723 will hold
a general meeting on Sunday,
May 16, at 10 a.m. at the Surf-
side Community Center.
A social is planned for Sun-
day, May 23, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Washington Federal Savings
building on Normandy Dr. Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Belle's 50th
wedding anniversary will be
honored.
On May 30 the Post and Aux-
iliary plan a Memorial Day
Service at 10 a.m. at the park in
Surfsttde at Collins Ave. and
88th St. There will be an honor
guard and bugler from Home-
stead Air Force Base and re-
freshments will be served. In
case of rain, the event will be
at the Surfside Community Cen-
ter.
Art Is Theme For
Beth Israel Sisterhood
The spring art festival is the
subject of the Beth Israel Sis-
terhood May meeting scheduled
for Tuesday. May 18, at 1 p.m.
at the synagogue.
Sandra Mirmelli will be il-
lustrator and Vivian Kirshner
will display numerous handi-
crafts. Members are asked to
bring their own handicrafts for
display. Election of officers is
also scheduled, according to
Regina Wang and Regina
Schechter, cochairmen.
COOL IT WITH KEDEM
"lite Flavor That You Favor"
Wines and Natural Fruit Juices
KEDEM On Ice Tastes Very Nice '*E O E
At Grocery, Supermarkets mLK jj
A Package Stores W-Ht
Maxmo Distributors, Inc.
534-6504
FALLS KOSHER
POULTRY PRODUCTS
available at your
^LOCAL KOSHER BUTCHER
or contact
Arthur Horowitz
Poultry Sales Manager
Zion Corporation
1717 N.W. Seventh Avenue
Miami. Fla. 33136
Tel: 324-1855
THE WHITE NATURAL KOSHER CLEAN CHICKEN
My husband's
a "perked coffee" May vin.
He insists on Maxim."
Maxim tastes like fresh
perked coffee because
Maxim starts with fresh
perked coffee. Then ift
freeze-dried into big dark
chunkschunks of real
perked coffee. That's
Maxim. Fantastic flavor
by the cup or the potfuL
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
...
J
MAXIM. The May vin's favorite for fine coffee Havoc


v
Friday, May 14, 1976
* Jewish ffard/ann
Page 5-B

/
1
Women of JNF June Luncheon
To Honor Affiliated Zionists
Dr. and Mrs. Richard L.
Schwarz have been thanked by
Abraham Grunhut, president of
the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, Foundation chairman,
for hosting the leadership plan-
ning luncheon at their home in
preparation for the Women for
Jewish National Fund Bicen-
tennial luncheon.
Gus (Mrs. Emanuel) Mentz,
chairman of Women for JNF,
has announced that the speak-
er at the Wednesday, June 2,
noon luncheon at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel will be Zeidan Ata-
shi, Consul of Israel in New
York.
Presidents of affiliated Zion-
ist organizations to be honored
are Mrs. Jean Feinberg, Mrs.
Harvey Friedman, Mrs. Milton
Green, Mrs. Aaron Katz and
Mrs. Maxwell L. Weissberg.
Mrs. Feinberg, president of
the Miami Beach Chapter of
Hadassah, comes from Bayonne,
N.J., where she received a
Scroll of Honor from Eleanor
Roosevelt and the Israel Bond
Plaque Award from Dublin's
Lord Mayor Briscoe. She is a
member of the National Hadas-
sah membership committee.
PRESIDENT of the Miami
Chapter of Hadassah, Mrs.
Friedman was on the Sisterhood
board of Beth David Congrega-
tion and is a life member and
trustee of the Miami Chapter of
Women's Society for Technion.
She is also active in the Adopt-
a-Family project of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Mrs. Green, president of the
Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida and of the South
Florida American Zionist Fed-
eration, is past national vice
president of the American Zion-
ist Federation national board,
a member of the American Zion-
ist Federation and recipient of
the State of Israel Bonds Wom-
an of Valor Award and other
honors.
President of the council of
American Mizrachi Women,
Mrs. Katz is active in Hadas-
sah, the Hebrew Academy, Me-
sivta and Yeshiva Gedolah of
Miami Beach and other Jewish
causes.
Mrs. Weissberg is president
of the Florida Region of Hadas-
sah, a member of the Hadassah
national board and active in the
South Florida conference on So-
viet Jewry. She was active in
Young Judaea of Laurelton,
NY., where she grew up.
Temple Judea Elects Officers
The congregation of Temple
Judea of Coral Gables has
elected attorney Donald J. Mur-
ray to a second term as presi-
dent.
Officers elected to serve for
the year 1976-77 are Mrs. Julius
Bearman, Mrs. Stanley Bulbin,
Barry Hesser and Sheldon Pal-
ley, vice presidents; Eugene
Greenspan, secretary; Marvin
Pearlman, treasurer; Harvey
Miller, financial secretary; and
Dr. Clifford Marks, immediate
past president.
ELECTED to the Board of
Trustees are Mrs. Ernest An- .
d?ch, Dr. Bernard A. Apple- V
baum, Dr. Al Coonin, Moil Gold- I
man, Paul Indianer, Harold Jaf- I
fer, Mrs. Martin Kasper, Ben
Klein, Gerald Kogan, Jack Lan-
ger, Miss Elsie Levin, Col. Jack
Norton, Dr. SorreH Resnik,
Morris Richman, Sidney Rich-
man, Ernst Rosenkrantz, Sol
Schreiber, Ralph Sheldon, Mrs.
Michael Spritzer, Ellis Tarschcs,
DONALD MURRAY
Dr. Harold Taylor, Sam Topf
and Marshall Waldman.
The officers and trustees will
be consecrated during services
on Friday. Mav 21.
An affair with Heart
at Hotel t |
ontainebleau
We truly care
Combined with the elegance and magnificence of
Hotel Fontainebleau, we pride ourselves in the very
special spirit exhibited by the fontainebleau family ...
at all times there is the realization of the importance of
a special event; be il a Bar Mn/vah, Wedding, Anni-
versary Party, or a Presidential Dinner, the emphasis
is always on achieving perfection. You are invited to
visit and experience first-hand the delights of Fontainebleau.
KOSHER CATERING
AVAILABLE
CALL 538-8811
BILLCOLDRINC
Executive Vice President,
Catering
MORTON MARCUS
Foundation Plans
Tax Seminar
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's legacy and bequest
program, the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies, will hold
its fourth annual tax seminar
for attorneys, accountants and
trust officers on Thursday. May
27, at the Dimont Plaza Hotel's
Standard Club, it was announced
by Foundation chairman Nor-
man H. I.inoff. The seminar will
be from 4:45-6:30 p.m., with
cocktails and dinner to follow.
Alfred J. Kat/in is dinner chair-
man.
Chaired by tax committee
chairman Morton Marcus, the
program will feature keynote
speaker Jacquin D. Bierman
discussing "Current Issues in
the Charitable Contributions
Areas." A graduate of New
York University and Yale Uni-
versity Law School. Bierman
nractices law in New York and
is author of "Tax Shelter in
Business" and "Your Excess
Profits Tax" among many other
works.
THE PRE-DINNER seminar,
chaired by J. Arthur Goldberg,
will focus on "Tax Wise Philan-
thropy the How When and
Why," with panelists Jack L.
Orkin and Barry Koss.
The primary purpose of the
Foundation's annual seminar is
to inform professionals about
the latest tax techniques in
trusts, bequests and foundations
so that they can advise donors,
charitable organizations and
particularly the Federation.
For further information and
reservations, call Foundation
director Arthur S. Rosichan.
County Osteopaths
Elect Officers
The Daae County Osteopathic
Medical Association has elected
the following officers for 1976-
77: Dr. Robert Oiler, president;
Dr. Perry Dworkin, president-
elect; Dr. Jules Minkes, vice
president; Dr. Arthur Lodato,
treasurer; Dr. Richard Limond,
secretary; Drs. Benjamin Kohl
and Melvyn Rech, trustees-at-
large; Drs. Robert Collins (out-
going president), Dworkin, Ian
Hassin. Minkes and Morton
Morris, board of trustees to
state.
Installation will be bv Flor-
ida Osteopathic Medical Asso-
ciation president Dr. Howard
Neer, at a banquet at Miami
Springs Villas tomorrow.
"Proclaim Liberty" is the
theme of the 26th biennial
convention of the National
Federation of Temple Broth-
erhoods, Nov. 10-14 at the
Diplomat Hotel. Speaken in-
clude Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, Sen. Richard
Stone, Shepard Broad and
others. Al Roth Is general
chairman.
FRED STONE
WILLIAM RAFKIND MEL KARTZMER
New Life Insurance Program
Adds to Foundation Bequests
Top life insurance agents in Miami's Jewish commu-
nity have initiated a program to increase the resources of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's legacy and bequest
program, the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies. William
Rafkind, chairman of the Foundation's development com-
mittee, has announced that the insurance committee will
be headed by Melvin Kartzmer. The idea was developed
by committee member Fred Stone.
The Foundation has designed shrinkage due to taxes, fees.
a program in which life insur-
ance policies will be issued in
the amount of $10,000, with no
medical examination required,
to anyone under age 65, with
the Foundation of Jewish Phi-
lanthropies as beneficiary and
owner of the policy.
The annual premium, tax-
deductible as a charitable gift,
will in no way decrease or af-
fect the donor's pledge to the
Federation's annual Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emerg-
ency Fund campaign.
Each policy has a provision
for retention of an incident of
ownership allowing the donor,
with the owner's consent, to
change the beneficiary to an-
other charitable organization.
This is done in order to in-
crease the marital deduction in
the estate of the insured to
reduce estate taxes.
THE GOAL is to raise $5 mil-
lion (by writing 500 policies)
in life insurance bequests by
August 1.
Life insurance is a popular
and convenient vehicle for
charitable contributions. Any
individual can leave to his fav-
orite charity an amount of
money which would not have
been economically feasible dur-
ing his lifetime. It is also a
simple method of providing a
large amount of capital for a
comnaratively small outlay dur-
ing the donor's lifetime.
The nroceeds are paid in
cash and the bequest can never
be contested. There is no
probate costs or administration.
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, established in
1971. is a self-perpetuating fund
involved in deferred giving. In-
stead of allocating money as
received, the Foundation invests
it and ust-; the income for vari-
ous purooses. In a Foundation
Endowment Fund resources are
continually recycled to produce
new dollars for research, scho-
larships, innovative programs,
seed money for new projects,
and unexpected emergencies.
A BEQUEST to the Founda-
tion is a protective policy* for
the future. Not only does it
strengthen .Miami's Jewish com-
munity, it also insures the con-
tinued existence and develop-
ment of Jewish communities in
Israel and all over the world.
The initial participants on the
insurance committee, which is
in formation, are, in addition to
Kartzmer. Rafkind and Stone:
Ronald Albert, George Bern-
stein, Barry B. Diamond, Harold
F. Essig. Arthur Faber. Arthur
A. FinkeJ, Joseph J. Gardner,
Jr., Julian Goldstein, Edward F.
Harris. Howard J. Hirschfield,
Leonard C. Hallander, Stuart K.
Jacobs. Arnold Kotick, Steven
M. Pawliger. Samuel J. Rabin.
Norman Schwedel, Henry Weiss
and Marshall I. Wolper.
Fo: more information on the
Federation's legacy and bequest
program, contact Foundation
chairman Norman H. Lipoff or
executive director Arthur S.
Rosichan.
Helen (Mrs. Maxwell L.) Weisberg passed the gavel of
the Florida Region of Hadassah to the newly installed
president for 1976-77, Marilyn (Mrs. Morris) LeVine of
St. Petersburg, at the recent Florida Region Conference
at the Deauville Hotel.
SUPER SAVER DELUXE TOURS 11 DAYS
"British Airways"
5 2 DAYS ^Ha^NaDAYS
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Transportation TWATW TICKET
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till COCKTAIL f AIt
$1370
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for Informotio
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GUARANTEED DEPARTURE
From Miami July 7lh Return 29th
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*SSr Shores Travel Cenier, Inc.
Ill II ?.< ItIM
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MMH flM l*|i TMiTII


Page 6-B
"Jenisli noridi, r,
Friday, May 14, 1976
-
u
in
a
i
N
Ai
th
b.
ni
st
a
a
M
ORT Southeast Region Officers
To Re Installed at Luncheon
Mrs. Charlotte Horn will be
installed as president of South-
eastern Florida Region of Wom-
castern Florida Region. The
13th president, she was preced-
ed by Mrs. Irene Sussman, Es-
telle T. Cooper, Ruth Wilks, Lil
Rosenblatt, Joan Baron, Flo-
rence Kupperman (deceased).
Nelson Elected
In Bay Harbor
The seven-member City Coun-
cil of Bay Harbor Islands un-
animously elected Theodore
Nelson mayor on Monday night.
Nelson, former vice mayor,
replaces Dr. Louis Haas, who
was unanimously elected vice
mayor. Bloth men will serve
one-vear terms.
CHARLOTTE HORN
en's American ORT at a lunch-
eon following the region board
meeting on Tuesday^ May 18,
at the Doral Hotel Starlight
Roof at noon. Mrs. Terry Brown
and Mrs. Jean Rose are cochair-
man of the day, with Mrs. Frit-
zie Leit in charge of seating
arrangements. Mrs. Joan Baron,
vice president of District VI and
chairman of promotions and
past president of Southeastern
Florida Region, is the installing
officer.
Mrs. Horn's installation marks
the 25th year of ORT in Miami
and the Silver Jubilee of South-
THEODORE NELSON
A1 R l(g A: M E g I P)
Answers: FIELD, GOLD, HALPER, KUNITZ,
ROLFE, SCHNEIDER, FINEMAN, SCHULBERG, FER-
BER, REZNIKOFF, FUCHS, FRANK.
TEACHING POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Temple Beth Am Religious and Hebrew Schools
are now accepting applications for teaching positions
beginning in the Fall of 1976. Many excellent oppor-
tunities are available, both on the weekend and mid-
week, for classroom teachers from Kindergarten
through 10th grade, as well as for Specialists in many
areas.
Temple Beth Am, located in South Miami, is affi-
liated with the Reform Movement of Judaism and has
a reputation for having one of the finest Educational
Programs in the Southeast. It is also the largest and
has facilities for many Creative Programs.
Interested parties are encouraged to come into
our Office to fill out applications, or to call 666-2536.
We are particularly interested in individuals with a
background in education and/or youth work, as well
as areas of specialty in Jewish subjects, and with a
love of children and a desire to make a creative con-
tribution for the future of Judaism.
Chabad Conducts
Summer Camp
Chabad House-Florida Luba-
vitch Headquarters will conduct
a summer camp program for
South Florida children at Camp
Gan Israel in Detroit. The chil-
dren will travel to the camp in
the Chabad House Mobile Cen-
ter and en route will visit vari-
ous points of interest, includ-
ing Kings Island and Six Flags
over Georgia.
Camp Gan Israel, an affiliate
of the worldwide network of
Chabad overnight and day
camps, is accredited by the
American Camping Association.
Chabad-Lubavitch regional of-
fices nationwide are developing
summer oroRrams for Jewish
children in response to the Lu-
bavitcher Rebbe's new cam-
paign for Jewish education.
Rabbi Menachem Schneerson
said that "Many times an over-
night camp can have a great
impact on a child because he
is in a 24-hour environment
of Torah and recreation."
For further information, con-
tact Rabbi Biston at Chabad
House.
TO SUBLET: Beautiful, full-
service, furnished, Kosher
apartment in Oak Park, Mich-
igan. July 1-August 15. Phone
(313) 968-0332 after 6 p.m.
CANTOR/BAl TEFILO ...
for Traditional Conservative
Congregation, for Rosh Ha-
shana and Yom Kippur. Re-
plies must contain experiences
and pertinent data. Bernard
Dorman, Pros. Cong. Beth
Sholom, 1844 54th St. So. St.
Petersburg, Ha. 33707.
KIDDUSHIN MATRIMONIAL
BUREAU
"And the L.rd G-d ,i,a "It ii not
good that the man ahould be
alone ..." Gen. 2:18
For those who wish to meet
Baalabatisha individuals with
marriage as the goal, contact
Rebbetxin. Call 947-6615 or
write to L.C., P.O.B. 01-2973
for an appointment. No calls
Shabbat or Yom Tov.
South Coastal BB Women
Schedule Regional Conference
Bert Zalles, Beverly Pechenik.
Elaine Stark, Felice Traktman.
Cynthia Kronish, all of whom
will be honored at the lunch-
eon.
Mrs. Horn has held several
ORT chairmanships and nation-
al field service positions for the
District. She is the past presi-
dent and founder of Cloverleaf
Chapter and was chairman of
the executive committee, vice
president of sections, expansion
and re-enrollment.
The other officers to be in-
stalled are Mrs. Ann Speroni,
chairman, executive commit-
tee; Mrs. Joan Rafalove, Bar-
bara Dundee, Mimi Wiener, sec-
tion vice presidents; Esther Bel-
fer, Terry Brown, Dale Flaum,
Serita Greenblatt, Edythe Gur-
land, Sylvia Lorber, Ruth Naf-
tel, Jean Rose, vice presidents;
Fritzie Leit, financial secretary;
Maxine Siegel, recording secre-
tary; Natalie Kaye, correspond-
ing secretary; Henny Apner,
treasurer; and Cynthia Kronish,
parliamentarian.
Over 150 delegates of B'nai
B'rith Women, South Coastfcl
Region, will meet for their first
regional conference, May 15-17,
at Daytona Beach. In keeping
with America's Bicentennial
year the theme of the confer-
ence is "Spirit of 76."
The opening session, Satur-
day night, "Pilgrim's Progress,"
will feature an original dramatic
presentation titled "Birth of a
Region." On Sunday morning
there will be an "American Is-
sues" workshop, Shirley Schiff-
man, region bulletin chairman,
co-ordinating, with a keynote
address by Alma Hofstadter,
chairman of the regional board.
This will be followed by a mem-
bership and life membership
luncheon arranged by Joan
Wolfberg, South Coastal Region
membership chairman, and Har-
riet Horwitz, B'nai B'rith Wom-
en life membership chairman.
THE AFTERNOON session on
Sunday, "Funds for the Future,"
will be conducted by Evelyn
Wasserstrom, president-elect of
B'nai B'rith Women. Delegates
will attend the closing Bicen-
tennial Tea Party, arranged by
Elaine Miller, Cavalcade of Giv-
ing chairman.
"Our Unalienable Rights"
dinner, with guest Evelyn Was-
serstrom speaking on the Anti-
Defamation League, is sched-
uled for Sunday evening.
This first regional confer-
ence, bringing together repre-
sentatives of chapters from
Savannah to Miami, closes on
Monday with an awards brunch,
"The Fruits of Our Labor a
Thanksgiving Festival." coor-
dinated by Zelda Wolff, South
Coastal Region awards chair-
man.
The three-day conference is
to followed by a meeting of the
South Coastal Region board,
chaired by Alma Hofstadter. at
which elections will be held and
the new board installed. The
South Coastal Region is con-
cluding its first year in exist-
ence since the restructuring of
B'nai B'rith Women districts
into regions.
ATTENTION!
ART LOVERS 4 COLLECTORS
If YOU ARE AN ART LOVER, COLLECTOR,
OR SEEKER OF UNUSUAL GIFTS AT VERY
REASONABLE PRICES, YOU ARE CORDIALLY
INVITED TO VISIT MIAMI BEACH'S NEWEST
GALLERY AND GIFT SH0F.
ORIGINAL PAINTINGS SCULPTURES PORCELAINS
CERAMICS MACRAMES, BATIKS ETC.
HOURS: MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.
FORMS AMD IMAGES
764 ARTHUR GODFREY RD.(M.B.
____________PH. 672-4541
"1
#1 is back at The Roc!
Charlotte Horn is back again at The Roc. because
the I hotel on Miami Beach deserves the
I Catering Director!
That means her expertise is here to satisfy ail
your catering needs. From intimate weddings
to spectacular Bar Mit/vahs.
Call Ms. Horn at 532-2561 when you're
readv to turn dreams into realit\.
Eden Roc
On the Ocean from 45th to 47th Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Hotel. Yacht
and Cabana Club
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS
OF SOUTH FLORIDA
8500 S.W. 8th STREET
SUMMER OF 76
CAMPING FOR ALL AGES
JUNE 21-JULY 16
JULY 19-AUGUST 13
-
SESSION I
SESSION II
SOUTH DADE CAMPS
REGULAR DAY CAMP, AGES 3 THRU 14
CREATIVE ARTS CENTER, AGES 9 THRU 14
SPORTS CENTER, AGES 9 THRU 14
TEEN TRAVEL, AGES 12 THRU 14
BICENTENNIAL TOUR, AGES 15 THRU 17
SENIOR ADULT CAMPING, 55 YEARS AND OVER
fully accredited programs, under skilled, professional
supervision. Transportation available, for a detailed
brochure call the Day Camp Office
264-1000
&*&


F
Friday, May 14, 1976
*Jewisl> Meridian
Page 7-B
"
Heschel Legacy Is Subject
Of One-Day CAJE Seminar
The "Legacy of Rabbi Abra-
ham Joshua Heschel for Con-
temporary Jewish Life" is the
theme of a one-day study in-
stitute directed by Edith Jacob-
son and sponsored by the In-
stitute of Jewish Studies of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, on May 26 at Temple
Israel.
The program includes an
introductory presentation by
Mrs. Jacobson on "The Promise
and Legacy of Abraham Joshua
Heschel," highlighting Dr. Hes-
chel's contributions to religious,
universal and social philosophy,
with a response from a panel
of community figures including
Toby Garbler, Ruth Seltzer,
Blanche Nevel, Saydelle Fish-
man, Minerva Davis and Ra-
quel Wax, and a final narration
by Dorothy Angerman.
The scion of a major Has-
sidic dynasty, Dr. Heschel was
a seminal figure in American
Jewish life for more than three
decades following his emigra-
tion from Europe shortly before
the outbreak of World War II.
He was a foremost religious
thinker and a leading activist
in Jewish causes in the United
States and Israel and on behalf
of Soviet Jewry.
AS A theologian Heschel em-
Dhasized the necessity of deep-
ening man's sensitivity to the
presence of God as a living
entity in his life. Through a
series of books, including "God
in Search of Man," "The Inse-
curity of Freedom," "The Pro-
phets" and "Man's Quest for
God." and through the power of
his own towering personality,
Heschel became a major figure
in American Jewish Life.
Following the morning pres-
entation and the luncheon ses-
sion, a film, "A Conversation
with Dr. Abraham Joshua Hes-
EDITH JACOBSON
chel," will be shown and dis-
cussed by Mrs. Jacobson.
Mrs. Jacobson, a University
of Miami graduate, has partici-
pated in local and national
seminars and workshops in the
study of Bible and Hebrew lan-
guage. She is an author of a
pamphlet on the book of Gene-
sis and is completing a mono-
graph on modern Jewish
thought.
SHE HAS been education
chairman of the Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah, for whom
she has conducted educational
seminars that have attracted
hundreds of participant^ and
have featured some of the lead-
ing Jewish thinkers in Amer-
ican life. In the summer of 1974
she led a study tour of Miami
residents to Israel.
The one-day Institute is open
to the public. The registration
fee includes Danish and coffee,
and participants are asked to
bring a sandwich.
Executive of Douglas Gardens
Will Install Auxiliary Officers
Mark Glickman, associate
executive director of the Mi-
ami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged (Douglas Gar-
dens), will install officers on
Tuesday, May 18, at 1 p.m. in
the Playhouse Room of Seacoast
Towers East. Mrs. Jay Recht-
schaffer is chairman of the day.
According to Margaret Green-
berg, publicity chairman, the
event is open to the public, but
there will be a nominal charge
for refreshments. Reservations
should be made with Rena
Stein.
Officers to be installed are
Mrs. Morris Ratner, president;
Mrs. George Israel, honorary
president; Mrs. Max Banner and
Mrs. Sally Schwartz, executive
vice presidents; Mrs. Sigmund
Rostler and Mrs. Leopold Szer-
lip, vice presidents; Mrs. Mil-
ton Cowan, recording secretary;
Mrs. Abraham Simel, Miss Au-
drey Edrick and Mrs. Saul So-
lovei, corresponding secretaries;
Mrs. Philip Brody, financial
secretary; Mrs. Herman Abra-
mowitz, treasurer; Miss Rena
Stein, parliamentarian; Mrs.
Elizabeth Jaffee. chairman of
the nominating committee.
Hillel Elects New PTA Officers
*
The recently elected officers
of the PTA of the Hillel Com-
munity Day School are: presi-
dent, Marsha (Dr. Walter) Fin-
gerer; vice president of ways
and means, Carole (Mrs. Den-
nis) Lentin; vice president of
programming, Lorelei (Dr.
Robert) Ennis; vice president
of special events, Irene (Dr.
Joel) Spalter; treasurer, Miriam
(Dr. Ira) Ginsberg; secretary
to treasurer, Alvina (Dr. Lee)
Duffner; secretary, Maxine
(Mrs. Gary) Dubin; publicity,
Sandra (Mrs. Robert) Goldberg;
hospitality, Shirley (Mrs. Ben)
Genad; children's birthday
cards, Toby (Dr. George) Lip-
ton; Kol Hillel, Judy (Mrs.
Paul) Camel; commemoration
cards, Bonnie (Mrs. Ronald)
Forman; and advisors, Raquel
(Mrs. Michael) Scheck and
Rochelle (Mrs. Marshall) Bal-
tuch.
Members of the board elected
are Sally (Mrs. Alan) Bostom,
Florence (Dr. Leon) Roth, He-
dia (Mrs. Jerald) Cantor, Joyce
(Mrs. Michael) Yarmuth, Lisa
(Mrs. Arnold) Feiner, Bunny
(Mrs. Harvey) Sampson, Maddy
(Mrs. Jerome) Appel and Susan
(Mrs. Wallace) Kleinberg.
The new executive board was
installed by Rabbi Albert May-
erfeld, principal of Hillel, at a
program that included a Yom
Ha'atzmaut celebration present-
ed by the junior high school
students.
Hillel School
Plans Picnic
Over 300 persons are expect-
ed to participate in the Hillel
Community Day School's annual
Lab B'Omer Day Picnic on
Sunday, May 16, at 11 a.m. at
T-Y Park in Hollywood.
A fun-filled day for the en-
tire family is planned, with or-
ganized games for children and
athletic events for adults. There
will be a barbecue as well as
deli sandwiches and snacks.
The picnic will be held on
campsites 10 and 11. There is
an admission charge and res-
ervations are being taken in the
school office.
Hillel Kicks Off Building Fund Campaign
The Hillel Community! Day
School has officially launched
its Sl.S million building fund
campaign for the new school
under construction at 19000 NE
25th Ave., North Miami Beach.
The four building complex
will house classrooms, offices,
cafetorium, science labs, mu-
sic room, library learning cen-
ter, audiovisual room, art room,
teachers' lounge, gift shop and
physical education office.
"Construction, which began
several months ago, will soon be
complete on the first of the
buildings and the new Hillel
will be ready for the opening
of school in September," said
principal Rabbi Albert Mayer-
feld.
Dr. Joel B. Dennis, president
emeritus and general chairman
of the building fund campaign,
announced that a campaign
heaquarters has been set up at
1799 NE 164th St., staffed by
full-time volunteer personnel.
SOLICITATIONS are under
way and parents and board
members are participating to
raise the necessary funds.
"Hillel Builds for the Future
and the Future Is Now" is the
slogan adopted for the cam-
paign, according to Irving Can-
ner and Arthur Winton, asso-
ciate chairmen.
Cochairmen working with Dr.
Dennis are Dr. Ron Levitats
and Raquel (Mrs. Michael)
Scheck. In charge of special
gifts are Jack Friedman and
Moses Hornstein.
Michael Sheck. president of
Hillel, is the chairman of gen-
eral solicitations. Members of
his committee are Ben Genad,
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Dubin, Dr.
and Mrs. Lee Duffner, Dr. and
Mrs. Walter Fingerer, Rabbi
Max Lipschitz, Mrs. Ron Levi-
tats. Mr. and Mrs. Irving Kut-
tler and Mr. and Mrs. Dennis
Lentin. Campaign advisors are
Rabbis Jacob Nislick and Aaron
Shapiro.
The executive director of Hil-
lel. Marshall Baltuch, said that
"registration for next year is
coming in at such a rate that
a waiting list will have to be
in effect for certain grades."
Tony Saletan, folksinger
and guitarist who created
a TV series for children,
will appear at Temple Beth
Am on Sunday, May 16, at
3 p.m. The concert is the
fourth of the National The-
ater Company Shows spon-
sored by the temple's day
and religious schools. Tick-
ets are available at the
temple office or at the door.
Father's Day Golf Tournament
Will Benefit Red Magen David
Aliyah News
Yaakov Zev, the executive
director of the Association of
Americans and Canadians for
Aliyah (AACA), will speak at
the next Chug meeting, Sunday,
May 16, at 8 p.m. at the home
of Shaliach Eliezer Kroll. Also
at the meeting will be Mr. Blum-
berg, director of Anglo-Saxon
Realty of Israel, to discass
rental and purchase of apart-
ments.
On June 20, at the final meet-
ing before summer, Consul Gen-
eral Nahum Astar will be guest
speaker........
Three former Bayshore Men's
Golf Club champions Haul-
over Pier-owner Ben Karn, Dr.
Don Sayet and Martin Horback
are among the early entries
in the third annual American
Red Magen David for Israel
charity golf tournament, sched-
uled for Sunday, June 20.
Howard G. Kaufman, presi-
dent of the Greater Miami
Chapter of the ARMDI and
tournament coordinator, said
that Mayor Harold Rosen,
ARMDI honorary chairman for
South Florida, has accepted the
tournament chairmanship.
DR. MAXWELL Sayet is an-
other early entry in the meet,
which is cosponsored by the
Bayshore Men's and Women's
Golf Clubs. Mrs. Lorraine Pen-
zell is Women's Club president,
and Bernie Milstein is acting
president of the Men's Club.
Other committee members in-
clude Mrs. Gladys Gundy, Flor-
ida State ARMDI chairman Sam
Reinhard, state president David
Coleman, national president Jo-
seph Handleman, and South-
eastern regional chairman Sol
Drescher.
The entry charge is a mini-
mum contribution of $20, which
includes green fees. Headquar-
ters for the event are in the
offices of the ARMDI on Lin-
coln Rd. Gerald Schwartz is
ARMDI regional director.
Intercontinental Liberalizing
Home Improvement Loan Terms
South Florida's rebounding
economy has permitted the In-
tercontinental Banks to liberal-
ize conditions for home im-
provement loans.
Loans of up to five years and
$7,000 are available to home
and condominium owners
throughout Dade County, ac-
cording to Benjamin I. Shul-
man, chairman of the board of
the Intercontinental Bank of
Miami Beach and vice chairman
of the Intercontinental Bank of
Miami.
"With the improvement of
economic conditions in Greater
Miami and our steady increase
in deposits, our twin banks are
able to offer highly competitive
loans for a great variety of
home improvements." Shulman
said.
ROBERT ELLIOT, head of the
nstallment loan department at
intercontinental Bank of Miami
Beach, said applications for
loans to finance major items
such as new swimming pools
"have shown a dramatic upturn
this spring."
Emilio Lacal, vice president
of the Intercontinental Bank of
Miami, reported an accelerated
placing of loans for kitchen and
bath remodelings as well as for
additions of bedrooms and Flor-
ida rooms.
"With the price of new homes
skyrocketing out of the reach
of many Dade residents, the
determination to remodel seems
to be an increasingly popular
option." Shulman said.
He noted that such items as
new roofs and new central-air-
conditioning systems well up
on the list of home improve-
ments '"strongly indicate that
homeowners are deciding to
stay Dut for vears to come."
SHULMAN said, "many in-
dividuals still think that banks
are interested only in business
loans or automobile financing.
We are most receptive to home
improvement loans as we ex-
pand our service area."
Intercontinental Bank of Mi-
ami Beach is at 930 Washington
Ave.. Intercontinental Bank of
Miami is at 3737 NW 7th St.
American Mizrachi Women Meet
Simcha Chapter has invited
all members and friends to the
charter installation luncheon of
this newly organized chapter on
Wednesday, May 19, at noon in
the Winston Towers 200 audi-
torium.
Officers to be installed are
Pearl Rappin, Olga Jaffee, Mi-
riam Price, presidium; Eleanor
Goodman, vice president; Flo-
rence Goodman, treasurer; Rose
Appel, financial secretary; May
Prenner and Mary Skolnik, hos-
pitality committee; Anna Steb,
membership chairman. Install-
ing officer is Lily Stone of the
AMW national board.
Shulamith Cohen will review
Golda Meir's "My Life."
fc it 6
Hadar Chapter president
Pearl Schwartz has invited all
to join in the celebration of
Yom Haatzmaut, Israel's 28th
anniversary of independence.
on Thursday, May 20, at noon
at Kneseth Israel social hall.
Program chairman is Sylvia
Dweir. Admission.
ft -ft -ft
Hadar Chapter president
Lillian Chabner has announced
two festive functions. On Tues-
day, May 18, at noon at the
Eden Roc Hotel there will be
a gala Mother-in-Israel lunch-
eon sponsored by hostesses
Mollie Horn and Helen Zales.
Tax deductible admission. On
Thursday, May 20, there will be
a brunch and card party at 11
a.m. at Byron Hall.
iV
ft
TJ
ilNIMVtlMiy Vft
v-.--.-
Dvorah Chapter's Mother-in-
Israel celebration, honoring Rose
Ehrenreich as Mother of the
Year, is scheduled for Monday,
zanine card room of the Roney
Plaza. Beatrice Fuchs is presi-
dent. |


Page 8-B
+Jenisl fhorkilcnn
Friday, May 14, 1976
Financial Writer Participating
In Histadrut Women's Seminar
Carol Rutgers Mathews, busi-
ness and financial analyst and
columnist of The New York
Post, will be among the panel-
ists in the seminar "Women's
Economics 1976" scheduled by
the Israel Histadrut Foundation
(IHF) of South Florida for next
month as part of a Day of Soli-
darity with the Women of Is-
rael.
Announcement of Ms. Ma-
thews' acceptance was made by
Lillian (Mrs. Leon) Kronish,
general chairman of the IHF
Women's Day event, which will
be on Tuesday, June 8, at the
Fontainebleau Hotel. The 10:30
a.m. seminar will be followed
by a luncheon.
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
of the Pioneer Women Council
of South Florida, will moderate
the "Women's Economics 1976"
panel, according to IHF execu-
tive director"1 Ben Zion Stein-
MS. MATHEWS
berg, who said the Day of Soli-
darity is being presented in asi
sociation with the Pioneer Wom-
en.
MS. MATHEWS. who has lec-
tured extensively nationwide,
has written for such respected
periodicals as Barron's, Dun's
Review, The Nation and the
New York Stock Exchange
Magazine. Her articles cover a
wide range of economic sub-
jects, including inflation, stocks
and bonds, taxes and the na-
tional economy.
Sharing the platform with Ms.
Mathews will be Dr. Sol Stein,
economist, authority on person-
al financial planning and na-
tional IHF president.
"Searching for Financial Se-
curity" and "The Lure of Wall
Street" are among some of the
provocative topics to be fea-
tured at the. seminar.
Tickets for the IHF Day of
Solidarity are available through
the Miami Beach Histadrut of-
fice.
Women Friends of the Hebrew U.
To Hear About Summer Program
Details of the greatly expand-
ed Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem Summer Program for
Overseas Students will be de-
scribed on Thursday. May 20,
at the final meeting of the sea-
son of the Women's Division of
the American Friends of the
Hebrew Dniversity, Greater Mi-
ami Chanter.
The 11:45 a.m. luncheon at
the Montmartre Hotel is open
to the public and reservations
may be made at the American
Friends Miami Beach office.
Mrs. Isabel Sider, a member
of the speakers bureau of the
United Jewish Appeal, will re-
view "The Champagne Spy" by
Wolfgang Lotz.
Mrs. Lillian Kronish is presi-
dent of the Women's Division,
which supports the scholarship
program of the Hebrew Univer-
sity. Mrs. Florence D. Feldman,
Women's Division director, is
coordinating the luncheon.
Undergraduate and graduate
courses are open to American
students, including some courses
open to high school seniors, ac-
cording to Herbert Buchwald,
chapter president. Nearly 4,000
students2,000 from the United.
States attend classes at the
Hebrew University, Buchwald
said. Year-round and summer
courses are available.
Rabbi David M. Baron of
Temple Or Olom will lead
a congregational tour to Is-
rael beginning July 5. For
information, contact Leo-
nore Ravin or Judy Primak.
Cancer Chairman, PCRI President Landow Yeshiva
Guests at Founders Society Party',
Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell Dauer
will be hosts at a party for the
inauguration of the Society of
Founders of the Papanicolaou
Cancer Research Institute at
their home in Tower House II
on Thursday, May 27.
Special guests will be Dr.
onathan E. Rhoads, chairman
of the National Cancer Board,
who is coming from Philadel-
phia especially for the event,
ini Dr. Julius Schultz, presi-
dent of PCRI. Dr. Rhoads is
orofessor and chairman of the
Department of Surgery at the
University of Pennsylvania
School of Medicine, president
of the American Philadelphia
Society and a past president of
the American Cancer Society
and of the American Society of
University Surgeons.
Organization of the Society of
Founders is expected to be a
major factor in the acceleration
of the Institute's program to
raise funds for cancer research,
including $3 million for build-
ing expansion, said Dr. Dauer,
who is chairman of the commit-
tee.
Temple Israel and Miami-Dade
Are Launching a Poetry Series
The Cultural Arts Society of
Temple Israel of Greater Miami,
in cooperation with the Lively
Arts Series of Miami-Dade Com-
munity College (Downtown),
will present British poet Ste-
phen Spender on Monday eve-
ning, May 17, at Temple Israel
in the first of a free series of
poetry programs.
Spender, who with W. H.
Auden is considered to have in-
fluenced the course of litera-
ture in the 1930's and '40's as
did Joyce and Eliot earlier, will
combine readings and discus-
sion.
On June 16 the Cultural Arts
Society will present Prof. Larry
Rubin of Georgia Tech, a Miami
Beach High alumnus, whose
poems have been published in
three books. Karl Shapiro, who
is at Berkeley, will appear in
November.
Temple Emanu-El to Elect Officers
At 'Family Night' Dinner Dance
Allen Goldberg, past presi-
dent of the Temple Emanu-El
Men's Club, has been named
chairman of the nominating
committee that will present a
slate for election of the congre-
gation's officers at the May 16
semi-annual dinner and dance
meeting slated for 6 p.m.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Davidson
are chairmen of the evening,
which is planned as a family
night, according to temple
president Judge Frederick N.
Barad.
Reports on the congregation's
activities of the past six months
will be made by Judge Barad
and Samuel N. Friedland, chair-
man of the board. Dr. Irving
Lehrman will install the new
officers, directors and trustees.
Opening An
Overnight Camp
Rabbi Menachem M. Schneer-
son, the Lubavitcher Rebbe, has
called for intensified efforts in
this "Year of Education" at the
Landow Yeshiva/Lubavitch Edu-
cation Center "to give every
Jewish child a Jewish educa-
tion."
Projected is an overnight
camp for boys between the ages
8 and IS and for girls from ages
8 and 15, to live in a Torah en-
vironment for a 24-hour period.
THE CAMP, called Camp
JETT (Jewish Environment
Through Torah), is located at
Temple Israel's retreat and has
been given to the Landow Ye-
shiva Center "at a nominal fee,"
Yeshiva officials declared.
"The purpose of the camp is
to get children from all back-
grounds and ages, regardless of
their Jewish commitment and
previous background, to give
them the opportunity not only
to study about their religion and
learn more about their heritage,
but also to live and experience
a full-time Jewish existence."
The first four weeks of the
camp season, starting June 22,
will be the boys' session, fol-
lowed by a four-week session
for the girls.
The boys will be under the
direction of the Yeshiva Gedo-
lah students, who will act as
head counselor, counselors and
learning director.
THE GIRLS' sessions will be
under qualified head counselors
and staff members from teach-
ers seminaries in New York,
who have had extensive camp-
ing experience.
Included in the camping pro-
gram will be baseball, tennis,
ping-pong, arts and crafts, and
swimming under fully-licensed
instructors.
Torah Convention Emissaries
Share Spirit of Learning
Some 200 persons including
a host of rabbis from the local
Jewish community and commu-
nity leaders, participated in a
Torah Convention and recep-
tion sponsored by the Landow
Yeshiva/Lubavitch Educational
Center and its rabbinical col-
lege, the Yeshiva Gedolah of
Greater Miami Rabbinical Col-
lege/Joseph Margulius School
of Higher Learning, last week
at the Landow Yeshiva Center.
Sessions included the fifth
biennial Torah Convention,
when Yeshiva students from all
over the country came together
to share their areas of learning
with the students from other
places of learning.
ACCORDING to Rabbi Sho-
lom D. Lipskar, dean of the
Landow Yeshiva/Lubavitch Edu-
eational Center, Torah conven-
tions were started by the Ye-
shiva Gedolah two and a half
years ago.
The Torah Convention pro-
gram, which was chaired by
Yehoshua Binyomin Rosenfeld,
a student of the Yeshiva Gedo-
lah, included presentations of
Talmud treatises by Chaim Braf-
man, of the high school of the
Oholei Torah School for Boys
Moshe Lehrfield, Mesivta of
Greater Miami; Yosef Yitzchok
Spolter, Rabbinical College of
Morristown, N.J.; and Dovid
Leib Grossbaum, Yeshiva Gedo-
lah of Grpater Miami.
Th.2 convention featured a
reception for emissaries sent by
the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi
Menachem M. Schneerson, and
who had just arrived in Miami.
Addressing the students were
Rabbi David Lehrfield, who
thanked them "for the diligence
you have shown in you work,
and the spirit of learning you
have brought to those with
whom you have come into con-
tact."
Also, Rabbi Tibor Stern, who
lauded "the excellent scholar-
ship that the students had at-
tained."
Rabbi Phineas Weberman, of
Ohev Sholom Congregation, who
stated that "with the expansion
of the High School, the Landow
Yeshiva Center has now seen
the full cycle of learning from
nursery school through Rabbi-
nical College."
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar,
who opened the reception, with
brief introductory remarks;
Rabbi Mordechai Shapiro, of
Beth Israel Congregation, who
offered the "sanctification of
God's name";
Rabbi Yehuda Leib Schapiro,
Rosh Yeshiva of the Yeshiva
Gedolah;
Rabbi Abraham Korf, direc-
tor of the Merkos LTnyonei
Chinuch, addressed the recep-
tion with a Torah thought.
A SPECIAL tribute was paid
to Bernard Herskowitz, who
prior to his death opened his
doors to the Yeshiva Gedolah
of Greater Miami when it first
arrived here and had no perma-
nent place to stay.
Thousands Marching on Lag B'Omer
Thousands of children from
local day schools and yeshivas
will march in the Lag B'Omer
Parade on Tuesday, May 18.
Children from public schools
will also participate since it is
a national Jewish holiday.
Floats, bands and banners ex-
pressing the parade theme,
"Salute to Torah Education,"
will be carried and thousands
of spectators are expected to
observe the parade.
There will be special broad-
cast from New York by the Lu-
bavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Mena-
chem Schneerson, who will ad-
dress a parade there, where
mo.e than 50,000 children will
march.
After the parade there will
be an outing in Flamingo Park,
including lunch, games and
prizes.
Parade route: Begins at the
corner of Lincoln Rd. and 17th
St., continues to Lincoln Mall,
moves down the Mall to Meri-
dian Ave. and along Meridian to
Flamingo Park. The public is
invited.
YOUTH ADVISOR POSITIONS OPEN
Temple Beth Am (South Miami, Reform) is seeking mature
individuals to direct the activities of its Youth Groups for Jun-
ior High and High School teenagers. While the exact terms of
employment are flexible and subject to negotiation, it is ex-
pected that each position would require approximately 5 hours
weekly. The Youth Groups provide programs that are of so-
cial, religious, cultural and educational in nature. Duties of the
advisor would include attending all meetings and events pro-
viding guidance in planning and implementation of programs,
and working closely with individual members.
ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE URGED TO
DIRECT INQUIRIES TO RABBI COOK 666-2536
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTERS OF SOUTH FLORIDA
SOUTH DADE NURSERY SCHOOL
IS MOVING TO A NEW LOCATION
SEPTEMBER 1976
AT
DADELAND INN
6601 SO. DIXIE HIGHWAY
f^^^sM| B^ (Just 2 minutes away from
m ^^^^^^k Dadeland Shopping Center)
I
QUALITY FUIL DAY AND
HALF PROGRAMS
for
2 Certified Teachers Individual Learning
Transportation Available
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
REGISTER BEFORE JUNE 30, 1976
FOR EARLY INCENTIVE DISCOUNT
Registration Now Being Taken for Fall Program Call 264-8000
4.


Friday, May 14, 1976
/v0 m d J
*Je*istFk>ridi&n
Page 9-B
The Dade Association of Dia-
betes Educators is holding free
classes for diabetics and their
families on the second and third
Tuesday of each month, from 7
to 9 p.m., at Jackson Memorial,
Baptist and Palmetto General
Hospitals and the Fred Archer
building at Mt. Sinai. Daytime
classes are given at the VA Hos-
-pital on NW 16th St.
S <"r ft
SCHWARTZMAN
As one of a series of com-
munity projects sponsored by
the Intercontinental Bank of
Miami Beach, the Cystic Fibro-
sis Foundation is presenting an
all-star vaudeville benefit show
on Tuesday, May 18, at the Surf-
side Community Center. Morris
Schwartzman, general chairman
of the George Gershwin Lodge
Knights of Pythias, is coordinat-
ing the show with the assist-
ance of Intercontinental vice
president William J. Schusel.
ft ft ft
Thomas R. Bomar, president
of American Savings and Loan
Association, has announced that
American has opened two new
offices, in North Miami Beach
and in Hollywood, bringing its
total number of branches to 14.
ft ft ft
Edythe (Mrs. Harold) Lichter
of North Miami Beach will as-
sume the presidency of the
Women's Corps of the Pap Can-
cer Research Institute at Mi-
ami. She will be installed on
May 15 at noon at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel. Chairman of the
day is Bobby (Mrs. Lester)
Perle.
ft ft ft
Lawrence Wiener, C.L.U.,
president of Endowment Serv-
W#l
ices and Pension Investors Corp,
received the Kemper Insurance
Companies' President's Cup
Award at the annual banquet at
the Marco Polo Hotel. About
2,000 agents were in competition
for the award.
ft ft ft
The American Red Cross,
Dade County Chapter, elected
the following officers at a re-
cent meeting: William R. How-
ard, chapter chairman; Milton
N. Fisher and J. W. Alfred, vice
chairmen; Edward A. Kelly,
executive vice presidents; and
Mrs. John B. Turner, secretary.
ft ft ft
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El, returned to
Miami Beach this week from
New York and Washington,
where he attended various meet-
ings, including the annual na-
tional dinner of the Anti-Defa-
mation League and the national
meeting of the Hillel Commis-
sion.
ft ft ft
Mayors Steve Clark and Mau-
rice Ferre, civic leaders and
Mrs. Helen Holt of the HUD
will attend dedication cere-
monies at Ward Tower on NW
54th Terrace on Friday, May
28, at 11 a.m. The 16-story pub-
lic housing development and
community building for the eld-
erly is named in honor of Dr.
Elmer Ward, a lifelong advocate
of decent housing.
ft ft ft
The vearly tenants and guests
of the Allison Hotel enjoyed a
Mother's Day dinner, complete
with carnations. Catering was
by Nat Cohen.
ft _ft_ft. ______
Three area residents have
been named to the Dean's List
for the 1974-75 academic year
at Yeshiva College: Samuel
Abramson and Louis Solomon
of Miami and Marvin Dennis of
North Miami Beach.
ft ft ft
Sponsored by Beaux Arts of
Temple Judea, in honor of their
tenth anniversary, "South Beach
Photographs" by Nesie Sum-
mers are being featured with a
dramatic improvisation they in-
spired, directed by Robbie
Aruii. The exhibill continues
through Oneg Shabbat this eve-
ning at the temple, according
to Ellen Baum, Beaux Arts
chairperson.
ANNOUNCING THE GRAND
LAG B'OMER PARADE AND OUTING
COME AND MARCH WITH THOUSANDS
OF JEWISH CHILDREN IN THEIR
SALUTE TO TORAH EDUCATION
TUESDAY, MAY 18, 10 A.M.
PARADE ROUTE: Starting at the corner of Washington and
17th, going towards Lincoln Mall, then down the mall till
Meridian and south to Flamingo Park.
PRIZES, BANDS, FLOATS, REFRESHMENTS, RAFFLE
If your child or school is not participating
call Parade Headquarters at
672-8947, 673-5755. 672-4166
Individuals who would like to volunteer their services
are also invited to call.
A PROJECT OF CHABAD HOUSE
FLORIDA LUBAVITCH HEADQUARTERS
1401 Alton Road, Miami Beach
Sports Lodge Elects Officers
STAN LERNER
Stan Lerner of Miami Beach
has been elected president of
B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge No.
2834. Director of customer re-
lations at the Pepsi-Cola Bot-
tling Company of Miami, Lerner
has been a member of Sports
Lodge for eight years.
Other officers elected are
Herb Aronson, Robert S. Cohen,
Stuart Katz and Murray B.
Weil, vice presidents; Maurice
A. Feld, financial secretary;
Jerome Baum, treasurer; Joe
Sokoloff, chaplain; and Lou
Wollman. warden.
The Sports Lodge board of
directors consists of Abe Fein-
bloom, Jordan Davidson, Sy
Howard, Stuart '. Miller, Max
Meyers, Ron Morris, Murray
Samels and Wollmnn.
Col, Phil Cohen is honorary
president of the lodge, which
has been a catalyst in Florida
for the United States Commit-
tee Sports for Israel. Leo Stein-
man is honorary vice president.
Young Israel
Elects Officers
Young Israel of Greater Mi-
ami recently elected new of-
ficers. Barry D. Schreiber,
president, was reelected to a
third term following a brief
hiatus devoted to other com-
munity activities.
Continuing as first vice presi-
dent and treasurer are Irving
Seidel and Ernest Field, respec-
tively. Other new officers are
Martin Brody, M.D., second vice
president; Murray Frand, fi-
nancial secretary; and Naomi
Bloom, recording secretary.
Gaboyim: Ernest Field, Tho-
mas Marcus and Jacob Rosen-
baum.
Outgoing 'officers are Nor- |
man Bloom, M.D., Mirriam j
Alexander. Martin Hoffman and
David Nemtzov.
Dr. Kline Guest At Temple Zion
The guest speaker at services
this evening at 8:15 at Temple
Zion is Dr. Jacob Kline, who
will discuss "Artificial Methods
of Sustaining Life."
Dr. Kline, a professor and
director of Diomedical Engi-
neering at the Uni\tersity of
Miami and a director of medical
instrumentation at the UM Lab-
oratory School of Medicine, was
chairman of the 25th annual
conference on engineering in
medicine and biology in 1972.
He was chairman of the sym-
posium on biomedical engineer-
ing under the joint auspices of
Technion and the University of
Miami in 1972.
Music
by
and his
Boca Raton Hotel
and Club Orchestra
"Weddings &
Bar Mitzvahs
our Specialty"
651-2803
We've Arrived!
CAMP JETT
(Jewish Environment Through Torah)
Under The Auspices of
LANDOW YESHIVA -
LUBAVITCH EDUCATIONAL CENTER
FOR THE 1976 SUMMER SEASON
FOR BOYS 8 15 FOR GIRLS 8-15
JUNE 22 JULY 20 JULY 21 AUG. 18
* Modern Air Conditioned Cabins
* All Athletic Facilities
* Olympic Size Pool
* Experienced Counselors
Exciting and inspirational trips
With Transportation Provided
By Our Very Own Camp Bus
FOUR WEEK SESSION $400
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE
For Information & Registration, Call
CAMP JETT
TELEPHONE 673-5664
or WRITE TO CAMP JETT
1140 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33139


1
/ ,
I
f-Jewisti tlcrkUan
Friday, May 14, 1976
Religious Services
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION. MS SW 87th Av.. Orthodox.
Rabbi Ban Aron. 1
ANSHE EMES CONGREGATION.
2533 SW 19th Avo. Conservative.
Cantor Sol Pakowitx. 2
BETH AM TEMPLE. 5960 N. Ken-
Jail Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baumgard. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Chefitz. s
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1844
Washington Ava. Orthodox. St
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th 8t Cauteway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. 2-A
AGUDAS ACHIM NUDACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 Bth St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Cheiimovite.
S2-B
BET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
10755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
------------------
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Llpaon. 4-A
------------------
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Llpaon. 4-B
/ ----------------
ETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th AV6.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Man-
del Gutterman. 8
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1021
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Slmcha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. 88
------------------
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrevl
Religious Community Center. 1925S
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel.
------------------
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Gllxman. 8-A
------------------
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelllng. Cantor
Jack Lamer. 88
ISRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
MM 11
Collins Avs. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 648
Nahmias. 31
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Llpschitx.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson. S4
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 671
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houcn. S6-A
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. >7
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick 38
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
CORAL GABLES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 6650 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. El-
rnstot. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative. Rabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 18
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
ISRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former.
ly Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conoservative. t
------------a------------
ZION TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Helfman. M
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
Davis. 8
HIALEAH
TIFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. to
15
NORTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121 at St. Conservative. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Fir.gerer. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamin. M
---------.---------
MIAMI BEACH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 81
- a---------
FORT 1AUDE3DAIE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Nau. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Joel
S. Qoor. Cantor Jerome Klement.
43
'BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. 9
stth irhael 770 40th St Orthodox TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9108
" R^bbi Mor!eLcarshTp?roS 0rth0*^ NW 57th St. Conservative R.bb.
------------------
BETH JACOB. 301 Waehington Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmarysliu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
Israel Zimmerman.
44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Mosho Bomzer. 62
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1549
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chase Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
Ish. Cantor David Convieer. 21
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 62
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi Daviti Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. 21.A
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
------------------
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ava.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwlg. 22-A
CORAL SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson 22-B
HAUANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joseph Biston. 68
-CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ava., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg. 28
CUBAN SEPHAftDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 715 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Ribbi Melr Masllah
Melamed. 23-A
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conservative. Dr. Irving
Lchrrnan. Cantor Zvl Adlar. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Trae Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
$. Gross. 28
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ava.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel. 28
-------------a------------
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
a-----------
.OBAVITCH CONGREGATION. 1120
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. 87
----- ---------
MENORAH TEMPLE. 820 78th Bt
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. Cantor Nice Feldman. 28
Officers To Be Sworn, Gordon Honored
At M.B. Chamber of Commerce Dinner
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of the Jefferson National Bank
of Miami Beach, will be install-
ed as president of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce
on Monday, May 17, during the
organization's annual installa-
tion dinner at the Doral Beach
Hotel.
State Sen. Jack D. Gordon
will be honored at the 7:30 p.m.
banquet and dance, which is
preceded by a cocktail recep-
tion at 6:30. New officers, gov-
ernors and trustees of the Mi-
ami Beach Chamber will be
sworn in at the testimonial to
Gordon, a Miami Beach Dem-
ocrat who represents State Sen-
ate District 35 in Dade County.
Gordon, president of Wash-
ington Federal Savings and Loan
Association since its founding
in 1952, is chairman of the
Ways and Means Committee of
the Florida (Senate. He is a
former member of the Dade
County School Board and was
chairman of the Miami Beach
Housing Authority and the
Beach Tourist Development Au-
thority.
OTHER OFFICERS to be in-
stalled included Leon Manne,
vice president for tourism; Paul
Whitebrook, vice president for
organizational development; Jo-
seph Nevel, vice president for
governmental affairs; and Larry
Aberman, vice president for
public affairs.
Tony Noboa will take office
as. treasurer, and Doc Baker is
scheduled to be installed as ex-
ecutive vice president and sec-
retary. Elaine Arrow was elect-
ed general manager
Aberman is general chairman
for the dinner, of which Gerald
Schwartz, Intercontinental Bank
of Miami Beach public relations
director, is publicity chairman.
Other members of the dinner
committee, all directors of the
Beach Chamber, are Steve Cy-
pen. Bill Gale, Joel Gray, Alan
Master, Jim McDonnel, Harry
Milsen, Richard Schlacter, Ste-
phen Muss, Ed Noakes and Bill
Kelly.
Proceeds of the dinner will
help equip the Chamber's new
office building, Aberman said.
Greater Miami NCJW
Installing Officers
JCC Seminar
To Probe A
Generation Gap
"What do I do with Mom and
Pop now that they are older?"
Sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Flor-
ida, in conjunction with the
Jewish Family and Children's
Services, a six-week seminar of
small-group sessions will ex-
amine this question and others
in the relationships between
adult children and their par-
ents.
The seminar will be held in
the Aztec Room of the Dade-
land Inn, beginning Tuesday,
May 18, at 8 p.m. Reservations
are required and enrollment is
limited. For information, call
Arlene MHVr at the JCC.
The Greater Miami Section,
National Council of Jewish
Women's 58th installation will
be held today at the Eden Roc
Hotel. Judy M. Gilbert will be
installed as president of the
section for a third term.
She has just been elected vice
president of Southern District,
National Council of Jewish
Wcmen, and also is on the board
of directors of Jewish Voca-
tional Service and American
Jewish Committee, and the ad-
visory council of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
ORGANIZED in 1918, Greater
Miami Section has had a dis-
tinguished history in the com-
munity and is a vital force in
education, community service
and social action.
Florence Lewis, past presi-
dent of Greater Miami Section,
will be the installing officer!
Anna Mae Ross, vice president
of membership, is chairwoman
of the day. Section officers to
be installed with Mrs. Gilbert
are: Nanci Goldstein, Mimi
Klein, Anna Mae Ross, Betty
Schloss and Louise Stubins, vice
presidents; Joyce Julien, Bee
Kazan and Sophie Thaw, secre-
taries; and Edith Feldman,
treasurer.
NURSES
CARE FOR THE
SICK or ELDERLY
I
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. 83
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1881 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M Rosen-
fold. 48
------------------
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4801 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 48
-----------------
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Llatfleld.
In their own homes, in Nursing
homes, or in the Hospital 24 hr
service 7 days a week
Call anytime
751-6280
3BI
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 82nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
senfield. 47-B
------------a------------
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47.c
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Lib-
eral Reform. Rabbi Arthur S.
Abrams. 84
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNAGOGUE
7478 N.W. 4th St e
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovltc Cantor Edward
Klein. 28
OHEV SHALOM. 706S Bonita Or. Or
thodox. Rabbi Phlntae A- aVaber
nan.
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8920 SW 88th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazln.
Cantor Abraham Kastar. 48
Member of the RabblnlcaJ Association
of Greater Mla.aU
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION Of
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
88137. 878-4000. Rabbi Solomon
Schlff, Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St, Miami, Fla.
83181. 379-4883. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE Of AMERICA
1820 NE 163rd St, North Miami
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
Beach, Fla. 33182. 847-8084. Rabbi

JUDY GILBERT
Division presidents to be in-
stalled include Kate Bickman.
Jane Dolkart, Sylvia Krasnow.
Frieda Levine, Sylvia Oberstein
and Glenda Rose.
Mrs. Gilbert's topic is "A Per-
sonal Declaration of Independ-
ence." A special program will
feature the Shores Division's
"Scenes from Shores 76."
Beth Am Installing Officers
During Services this Evening
As part of the religious serv-
ice this evening, at 8:30 at Tem-
ple Beth Am, incoming offi-
cers will be installed. Taking
the vows of dedication are:
Bernard Goodman, president;
Samuel Steen, executive vice
president; Dr. Samuel Berko-
witz, Stephen Carner, Iris Fran-
co, Alfred Liebert and Barbara
Weiner, vice presidents; Herb
Neuman, financial secretary;
Barry Golstein, treasurer; Es-
ther Kessler, corresponding sec-
retary; and Jackie Rose, record-
ing secretary.
New members of the board
are: Leslie Freedman, Florence
Birchansky; Shepard King, Lo-
retta Miller, Sheldon Weiss,
Stanley Gilbert, Jack Newmark,
Irving Bolotin and Marcia Reis-
man.
Brotherhood officers include:
Donald Klein, president: Mich-
ael Weisberg, executive vice
president; Leo Gelber and Ar-
nold Gordon, vice presidents;
Ben Friedman, recording secre-
tary; Mel Hellinger, correspond-
ing secretary; Al Pobby, treas-
urer; and Les Freedman. par-
liamentarian.
Sisterhood officers are: Peggy
Bieley, president; Norma Lie-
berman, executive vice presi-
dent; Rene Brilliant, president;
Carol Clein, Ann Fernandez,
Betty Gold, Sandi Goldstein,
Lori Miller, Linda Morgan, Eva
Rawicz, Ruth Reuben and Fran
Schreiber, vice presidents; Edie
Spiegel, treasurer; Rhoda Bern-
heimer, recording secretary;
Robbi Weiss and Bobbi Emar,
nual, corresponding secretaries;'
Jeanne Stapleton, financial sec-
retary; and Gerri Legow, par-
liamentarian.
DR. MARK J. GOLDSTEIN D.O.
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING
OF HIS OFFICE AT
16500 N.E. 6th AYE.
NO. MIAMI BEACH
HOURS BY APPOINTMENT
PHONE: 944-4100
HOUSE CALLS
940-6829
TT


(Friday, May 14, 1976
*Jenisti Ffcricffan
Page 11-B
Jp
Jlablmttcai |Ia.ge
ec-ordina*ed by ttw
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
axditors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz RaDbi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT JEWISH TRADITIONS
Hear O Israel
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Mushroom Cloud Controversy
mi
?'
What intellectual appeal and
persuasion could not do to unify
Jewish forces in mid-19th-cen-
tury America was accomplished
by Jewish suffering abroad.
Anti-Semitism and persecution
spurred American Je.ws to iden-
tify themselves and act together
with European Jews.
"For the first time in Jewish
history since the fall of Jeru-
salem." wrote Joseph Jacobs.
"Israelites of different nations
took counsel and action to-
gether for general defense
against a common peril. The
latent national consciousness
sprang into overt existence and
the New Israel of modern times
was born."
It was the Damascus Affair
of 1840 which stirred the Jews
I of America, for the first time
in their history, to join Euro-
pean Jewry in a matter affect-
ing the honor and well-being of
all Jewry. On the disappearance
of a monk named Father Tho-
mas, a number of Damascus
Jews were seized, tortured and
threatened with execution for
allegedly murdering the monk
in order to use his blood for
ritual purposes.
On August 17 a meeting was
held in New York which passed
resolutions expressing horror at
the treatment of the Damascus
Jews and calling on the Presi-
dent of the United States to
intervene on their behalf. Ten
days later the Jews of Philadel-
phia met in the vestry of Mikve
Israel Synagogue and were join-
ed by several representative
Christian clergymen.
The preamble and resolutions
of the Philadelphia meeting in-
cluded these words:
". the Israelites of Phila-
delphia cannot rest while
so foul a blot is cast upon their
ancient and sacred faith, a faith
on which both the Christian and
the Mohammedan religions are
founded, and which is essential-
ly a law of justice, of mercy
and benevolence; and they
would deem themselves traitors
to brotherly love and the rights
of outraged humanity, were
they to withhold their expres-
sion of sympathy for their suf-
fering brethren, who writhe
under unmerited tortures, and
languish in loathsome dungeons,
and to offer their aid, if prac-
ticable, to have impartial jus-
tice administered to them under
the present and any future oc-
casion.
*
"Resolved, That this meeting
highly appreciates the prompt
and energetic measures adopted
by our brethren in Europe, and
elsewhere, for the promotion of
the object of this meeting, and
the noble undertaking of Mon-
sieur Cremieux and Sir Moses
Montefiore, in coming forward
not only as the champions of
the oppressed, but also as the
defenders of the Jewish nation;
and this meeting expresses the
hope that the God of Israel will
shield and protect them, and
restore them to their families
in the enjoyment of unimpaired
health ."
Following this meeting a let-
ter was addressed to the Presi-
dent of the United States, "in
conjunction with our brethren
of other cities." It was suggested
to the President that the moral
influence of the Chief Magis-
trate of the United States
"would be, under Heaven, the
best aid we could invoke for the
protection ht our persecuted
brethren under the Mohamme-
dan dominion."
Although the successful inter-
vention of Adolph Cremieux
and Sir Moses Montefiore oc-
curred before the American ac-
tion could take effect, the
united effort of American Jews
was a significant point in the
history of the Jews of America.
Not only did it signify the
ability of American Jews to
unite in a matter affecting the
honor of all Jewry, but it was
the beginning of the "diplomatic
or international phase" in the
history of the Jews of America.
In 1858 another affair arous-
ed American Jewry and is con-
sidered to have played a major
part in motivating the forma-
tion of the Board of Delegates
of American Israelites in 1859.
This was the Mortara Affair in
which a six-year-old child
named Edgar Mortara was for-
cibly taken from his parents by
Papal authorities.
The outrage caused a sensa-
tion in Europe and America.
The child was educated in a
convent, entered the Augustine
order and subsequently preach-
ed before Italian congregations
in Catholic churches of New
York.
The abduction in 1858 led to
what has been considered the
first major step in the direction
of the organization of Amer-
ican Jewish congregations. The
resolutions of the Philadelphia
Mortara committee recommend-
ed that:
". the different congrega-
tions throughout the Union take
into consideration the propriety
of electing delegates to repre-
sent them in the future, so as
to form a body similar to the
Board of Deputies of British
Jews in London. For united we
can accomplish almost every-
thing, otherwise nothing."
On November 27, 1859, dele-
gates representing 25 congre-
gations in 13 cities met in New
York to from the first function-
al organization representing
American Jewry the Board
of Delegates of American Is-
raelites.
Thus it was as if the age-old
cry "Shema Yisrael" (Hear 0
Israel), uttered by martyred
Jews abroad, inspired Jews of
early America to take common
counsel and act together in
defense of their brethren over-
seas.
By RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
No one who has seen it can
ever forget the billowing mush-
room cloud which rises fore-
bodingly following an A-bomb
explosion. Causing almost as
much of a spectacle is the fall-
out over the endless debate on
the legitimacy and value of
"mushroom" synagogues.
It is probably true that the
appellation "mushroom" was as-
signed to the phenomenon of
"instant" synagogue because of
the nature of the fungus, which
grows almost out of thin air and
then collapses and recedes even
as do the High Holiday disserv-
ices, which are equally ephem-
eral.
Despite this obvious analogy
it may be more appropriate to
compare the so-called syna-
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Jacobs, Joseph. "The Damas-
cus Affair of 1840 and the Jews
of America." Publications of the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety. Vol. 10, 1902.
Whiteman. Maxwell. "Isaac
Leeser and the Jews of Phila-
delphia." Publications of the
American Jewish Historical So-
ciety. Vol. 48, 1959.
TV Programs
Sunday, May 16
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Charles M. Rubel
Temple Beth Tov
"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Guests:
Rabbis Joseph R. Narot
and
David Lehrfield
Topic:
"Intermarriage"
gogues to the mushroom cloud
in recognition of the flighty
operation involved. In either
case, it is important to recog-
nize that the mushroom may be
poisonous.
THERE ARE those who claim
that the purpose of such serv-
ices is to avoid traveling on the
Holy Days. At first blush this
seems like a legitimate argu-
ment, even if inconsistent. Do
these same individuals travel to
shul on Shabbat and Yom Tov?
Are they Sabbath-observant? If
so, why do they reside in loca-
tions which are not within walk-
ing distance of a synagogue?
Nevertheless, if the reason for
conducting services on the pre-
mises of a condominium, for
example, is because of religi-
ous sensitivities, it merits sym-
pathetic understanding. What
YOUR RABBI SPEAKS
Aliyah: A Viable Choice
By RABBI JAY N. MILLER
Director
Hiilel at FTU
and Member
National AUyah Council
It is time that American Jew-
ry recognize Aliyah as a viable
alternative for individual Jews
from within our own commu-
nity. For decades we have en-
couraged and financed Aliyah
for Jews from almost every-
where in the world except from
the United States. Since most
Americans are not planning to
make Aliyah, the entire com-
munity has turned its back on
fellow American Jews who do
seek to live and work within a
Jewish state.
The time has come for an
honest look at Aliyah from
America by the entire American
Jewish community. We have al-
ways been anxious to face the
realities of Israel's financial
needs and have recognized the
role we can play in assisting
fellow Jews from around the
world in their efforts to build
Jewish lives within a Jewish
state.
The change of culture for an
American is no less a shock
than for any other oleh. Every
oleh faces inflation, bureau-
cracy, separation from friends,
loss of status, and much more.
These are realities of Aliyah;
they cannot be eliminated, yet
they can be softened.
THE OLEH can be strength-
ened both spiritually and finan-
cially with support from his or
her community. Within the
synagogue and the Federation
we must be as committed to
the needs of American olim as
we are to any other group of
Jews who can be aided by our
resources and our compassion.
There is no reason we should
not support Jews who are mem-
bers of our own families, per-
sonal friends, and members of
our communities in their ef-
forts to enhance the quality of
their lives as Jews and the life
of the Jewish state and the
Jewish people.
From a distance we may see
all Soviet olim in a noble strug-
gle against the oppressions of
the Communist state, while all
American olim appear to be
misfits, zealots, etc.
In reality, we find that every
oleh makes his or her decision
for a variety of personal rea-
sons. Regardless of their rea-
sons, they make a commitment
to a struggle which we all hope
will lead to the fulfillment of
aspirations, personal and na-
tional.
happens to those who attend
such services on the other 362
days during the year?
The truth is that our congre-
gations still have plenty of room
for those who may wish to at-
tend daily services. There are
still many empty seats on any
given Shabbat. Adult education
courses are crying out for ad-
ditional students. Functions and
programs sponsored by our
temples are not oversubscribed.
Are the High Holy Day pray-
ers satisfying themselves with
the minimal effort such attend-
ance implies, to deny continu-
ous involvement and support of
those Jewish activllBes spon-
sored by our synagogues?
WE ARE living during a pe-
riod when it is increasingly
obvious that we cannot afford
to waste funds, talents or ener-
gies. The synagogues offer serv-
ices to the entire community
on a continuous basis. Issues
such as support of Israel, of
Soviet and Svrian Jewry need
constant contact which syna-
gogues provide. Petitions, dem-
onstrations, education, religious
fulfillment, social relations, etc.,
are the essence and core of our
synagogues. The rabbi stands
ready to counsel, console, visit
the sick, advise and, most im-
portant, educate. The school is
involved in providing instruc-
tion to our future generation.
The committees are involved in
a multitude of meaningful ac-
tivities.
Why should the synagogues,
which are desperately in need
of support, fall victim to the
poisonous mushroom?
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
BEHAR
in
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
14 IYAR 7:39
m
"The seventh year shall be a sabbath nei-
ther sow thy field ." (Lev. 25.4). ". hallow
the fiftieth year and proclaim liberty throughout the
land" (25.10).
BEHAR "And the Lord spoke unto Moses m
mount Sinai, saying When ye come into the land
which I give you, then shall the land keep a sabbath
unto the Lord ... in the seventh year shall be a sab-
bath of solemn rest for the land thou shall neither
sow thy field, nor prune thy vineyard And the
sabbath-produce of the land shall be for food for you:
for thee, and for thy servant and for thy maid, and
for thy hired servant and for the settler by thy side
that sojourn with thee; and for thy cattle, and for the
beasts that are in thy land" (Leviticus 25.1-7). Follow-
ing seven sabbatical years, the 50th year is to be ob-
served as a jubilee. "That which groweth of itself of
thy harvest thou shalt not reap" (Leviticus 25.5).
Scripture then states "And ye shall hallow the fiftieth
year, and proclaim liberty throughout the land unto
all the inhabitants thereof; it shall be a jubilee unto
you. ... Ye shall return every man unto his posses-
sion" (Leviticus 25.10-11).
The same laws pertaining to the sabbatical year
hold true of the jubilee. In addition, all fields return
to their original owners; every Hebrew slave is free
to return to his home. A Hebrew slave can always be
redeemed; if he is not redeemed, he goes free in the
jubilee year.
"And if thy brother be waxen poor, and his means
fail with thee; then thou shalt uphold him: as a strang-
er and a settler shall he live with thee. Take thou no
interest of him or increase; but fear thy God; that thy
brother may live with thee. Thou shalt not give him thy
money upon interest, nor give him thy victuals for in-
crease" (Leviticus 25.35-37).


Page 12-B
*Jemsti Ik till ir
Friday, May 14, 1976
rf^*^*^^'WA#^^^A**>"^^*,-'W^*'*W^-*A-/'A^V^V^
Boa, Md&uaU
WWW*~*WWWW\_r TERRY A. ADIRIM
Mr. and Mrs. Mervyn Adi-
rim's daughter, Terry Alayne,
will become a Bat Mitzvah this
evening at Temple Or Olom.
Terry, a seventh-grader at
West Miami Junior High, is a
member of Future Teachers of
America and USY-Kadima, and
plays flute in the band.
Special guests at the celebra-
tion will be Terry's grandpar-
ents, Shirley and Michael For-
man: her aunt and uncle, Shir-
ley and Ira Rosenfeld, and her
cousins, Perry, Harlan, Randee
and Dawn.
MINDY S. LOFF
Mindy S., daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Sanford A. Loff, will
celebrate her Bat Mitzvah this
evening at 8 at Beth Torah Con-
gregation.
Mindv is a seventh-grade
Honor Roll student at John F.
Kennedy Junior HJigh, where
she is on the Dean's List, and
a member of the fourth-grade
class at Harold Wolk Religious
School.
In Mindy's honor her parents
will sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following the services, and
guests will include her grand-
Darents. Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lip-
son and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Loff.
DAVID M. RUBINI
David Maxwell, son of Dr.
and Mrs. JoseDh Rubini. will be
called to the Torah on the oc-
casion of his Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at 11:15 a.m. at Tem-
Dle Judea of Coral Gables.
EXCELLENT
MUSICAL CANTOR
Cultured tenor voice, 20 years
exp., readi the Torah. blows Sho-
far, looking for High Holiday po-
sition. Reasonable. Can train and
conduct choir if desired.
P.O. Box 39-0128, Miami
Beach, Fla. 33139 or phone,
after 8 P.M. 5344)719
David Sirull
DAVID B. SIRULL
David Benjamin, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Sirull, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning
at 9 at Beth David Congrega-
tion.
David was a student in the
Beth David religious school,
and a member of the junior
choir and junior congregation.
A seventh-grader at South Dade
Hebrew Academy, he is in the
Bowling and Stamp Collectors
Cubs.
Mr and Mrs. Robert Sirull
will bo** a luncheon in David's
honor, and special guests will
include his brothers, Mark and
Arnold of Atlanta; his grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elia Sha-
lachman of Boston; and his
aunts and uncles, Mr and Mrs.
Eric Goodman of Salisbury,
N.C., Mrs. Florence Saunders of
Boston; Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Kaufman of Pittsburgh.
& &
DANIEL F. FINK
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Fink's
son, Daniel F., will become a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
Beth David Congregation.
An eighth-grade student at
Gables Academy, he is an all-
around athlete who received
the President's Physical Fitness
Award and had his Intermediate
Swimmer certificate at age 9.
Mr. and Mrs. Fink will host
the kiddush following services,
and guests will include Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Fink of Sebrinj? as
well as other out of town
friends.
atn
OUR 52nd SEASON
ATOP LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN NEAR
CHATTANOOGA, TENN.
VALLEY VIEW RANCH
FOR GIRIS 6-17 1ST. 1954
1000 ACMS Of HAI15. HUNT HIIOS, SMINGS l>Ot>OIS<*
CNOOSI TOU* OWN HOISI TO CAM 'OR
INSTRUCTION IN WIMUN. INGUSH A JUMPINO
ft ACTIVITY 4 CHAtTS PtOGIAM
/ j -^Mfc** NI W"* WACON I,AIN 3 0t Wl(* 5*"'ONS
^ CLOUDMONT FOR BOYS
AGES 6-16 EST. 1Q24
ADVlNIUtl CAMP I WIIM
Ciill TUP HUH HUM .. HftMUll CLIMIlM CIUU
ftHAOT OROVI CANP *'"'*_,.
!* -Mil C!"..'.B-"LB.6
IICULAI CAMP 5 WIIK$
LM',..UMM. SMI I! Sll* SIIIR6 llSSW
iniMiiii& ciims rrc
WRITE JACK E. OR NANCY C. JONES
3115 S.W. 10S AVE., MIAMI, FLA., 33165
CALL: 552-7112 or 264-3400
Chatting at the reception preceding last
week's Israel's Independence Day din-
ner sponsored by the American Friends
of the Hebrew University at the Eden
Roc Hotel are leaders of the Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem (from left): Dr. Mar-
tin Peretz, owner and editorial board
chairman of The New Republic; Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Luria; and Seymour Fish-
man, executive vice president of the
American Friends. Luria received the
Torch of Learning Award at the banquet.
Dr. Peretz, a member of the Hebrew U.
board of governors, was principal speak-
er. At right, another foursome at the din-
ner, which raised about $250,000 for Is-
raels oldest and largest institution of;
higher learning, included leaders of the
American Friends (from left): Harry A.
Levy, chairman of the board of the Great-
er Miami Chapter; Herbert Buchwald,
chapter president; Peter Goldring, chair-
man of the Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy's International Showcase; and Sol
Drescher, Southeastern regional chair-
man of the American Red Magen David
for Israel.
Bay Harbor Islands residents paid trib-
ute to Jordan Davidson (center) by pre-
senting him with the David Ben-Gurion
Award. Among the community leaders
attending were (from left) Max Feldman,
Jerome Lelchuck, Mayor Louis Haas, Is-
rael's Ambassador Extraordinary to the
UN Dov Schmorak, Vice Mayor Ted Nel-
son, Israel Bond general campaign chair-
man Robert L. Siegel and Lewis Schaffer.
Nashville Rabbi to Address
Jewish Education Meeting
Rabbi Zalman Posner, spirit-
ual leader of Congregation Shea-
rith Israel of Nashville, Tenn.,
will be guest speaker at the
Town Hall Meeting on Jewish
Education, Monday evening,
May 17, at the Jefferson Na-
tional Bank on Arthur Godfrey
Rd.
The meeting will focus on the
problems of Jewish education
in South Florida and seek to
develop greater educational op-
portunities for area children
and involve them in Jewish ed-
ucation.
Rabbi Posner is the transla-
tor of many works of Jewifji
mysticism and an expert on
Chassidic philosophy. He is the
founder and principal of the
Akiva Day School, which pro-
vides Jewish education through-
out the Nashville area
W. M. KLEIN
For Boys & Girls 6-16
A CAMPING PARADISE IN THE HEART
OF THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS
k LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FOREST
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA
All Lind and Water Sports Waterskiing and Riding Daily
Pro Golf and Tennis Arts and Crafts Sailing. Scuba
Trips by Canoe Horseback Riding Special Teen Program
Reading and Math Clinics Traditional Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Laws Observed
M.D. A 2 RN.'s Staff our Modern Infirmary at ALL Times.
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS A SHEILA WALDMAN
Miami Beach Phone: 532-3152 or Write:
P.O. Box 402888, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
SIGN UP NOW
>
FPL Names New
Vice President
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany has announced the ap-
pointment of W. M. Klein to the
newly created position of vice
president of economic develop-
ment.
Klein, who is Miami Division
vice president, will be in charge
of FPL's new department for
economic planning and develop-
ment. He joined FPL in 1952.
"This activity requires the
leadership of a company officer
with knowledge of Florida and
the territory we serve, as well
as the technical knowledge to
work with businesses and in-
dustry," said FPL executive
vice president Gene Autrey in
announcing Klein's appoint-
ment.
Southeast Division general
manager L. H. Adams will suc-
ceed Klein as Miami Division
general manager. Since joining
the company in 1949, he has
been involved in operations,
customer service and sales and
was commercial manager of
FPL's Coral Gables and Miami
Beach Districts.
Buckley Towers "Night in Israel" featured the presen-
tation of the Israel Solidarity Award to Harry C. and
Miriam Caplan (center) as chairman Jack Leeb (right)
and vice chairman Irving Stone (left) looked on.
12riyS*-*-""^ P. Advance
I w oot*' TJl-rtt, mf,-r00TSid Ml
:\*
ifSSKM
^'Teene (co-*
BMaapnBfjejjBaj


Jfriday, May 14, 1976
-JewlstittorkOan
Page 13-B

I Bay Harbor Islands residents recently honored Rose and
Ben Fox (center) for their devotion to the Jewish com-
munity through the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Stanley G. Tate (left), general chairman of the 1976
Bay Harbor Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergen-
1 cy Fund effort, and CJA-IEF guest speaker Stewart Mir-
melli made the presentation.
\"his evening, in conjunction with late services, Temple
ier Tamid will officially dedicate the religious school
honor of Isidor and Sarah Deemar, longtime support-
ers of the temple. Deemar was chairman of the mortgage
\edemption committee and is honorary vice president
of the temple. The school has rceived an endowment
\rom the Deemars, who have actively supported the Ner
Tamid building program.
tapping plans for the May 23 Bicentennial Jubilee of
fie Synagogue Council of America, which will honor
Matthew B. Rosenhaus of Miami Beach as Synagogue
\tatesman of the Year, are leaders of the SCA, coordi-
ating organization of Orthodox, Conservative and Re-
jrm Judaism in the United States (from left): Rabbi
fenry Siegman, executive vice president; Rabbi Irwin
f. Blank, honorary president; and Dr. Irving Lehrman,
itional cochairman of the Society of Fellows. Dr. Lehr-
an will present the award at ceremonies at the Touro
.ynagogue in Newport, R.I., at which Moses Hornstein
of Hollywood, also a cochairman of the Society of Fel-
ows, will participate. President Ford is tc be a speaker,
fis will Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein, part-time Miami Beach
Resident who is SCA president and chancellor of Bar-
\lan University. A member of Temple Emanu-El of Mi-
ami Beach, Rosenhaus is chairman of the Dade County
Society of Fellows.
Jewish
question
BOX
Question: Why is it for-
bidden to give the body of a
Jewish corpse to medical
practitioners for experimenta-
tion and study?
Answer: If the person in
question has not ordered this
during his lifetime, it is un-
questionably prohibited. Even
if the person willed his body
during his lifetime, many au-
thorities prohibit it.
There are a number of rea-
sons for this reluctance. First,
it is a general principle in Jew-
ish law that not only the soul
but also the body is to be treat-
ed as a holy object because
man, in his entirety, is the "im-
age of the Almighty," i.e., both
body and soul. This means, gen-
erally speaking, that man, both
his body and soul, are not to
be treated as an object but as
a subject.
Simply to reduce the body to
an object of study and experi-
mentation indeed depreciates
the spiritual value of a human
being.
Second, the ownership of the
human body is not the province
of man to do with as he pleases.
The Almighty is said to be both
the owner and authority of life.
Thus a person has no right to
mutilate his body during his
lifetime and also does not have
the authority to subject it to
mutilation after his demise.
While certain organs may at
times be given after death to
another human being so that
these organs continue their vital
function and benefit human life
directly, all else in the body
must be bu.ied properly.
& Question: Why is it that
only sons of the deceased re-
cite Kaddish and not the
daughters?
Answer: The functions of
women in the home take priority
over many religious require-
ments, especially those require-
ments that are related to spe-
cific time periods. Since Kad-
dish recital requires the person
to be in attendance in the syna-
gogue at specific times, daugh-
ters are relieved of this obliga-
tion.
There are two other matters
that should be clearly under-
stood in this regard. First, the
recitation of Kaddish is only
one of the many ways in which
children bring honor to their
deceased parents. Daughters
have other ways that may be
as good or better in honoring
parents who have died.
Second, the recitation of the
Kaddish is a function perform-
ed by the cantor in a public
worship service or a rabbi after
a learned discourse. It is only
given to the mourners to say
because they may not be able
to conduct the service or to
render the discourse. It is there-
fore not the top honor paid to
a deceased parent although it
is indeed a worthy act.
Since women do not act as
cantors or rabbis, the substitu-
tion of the Kaddish has no
place for daughters. Further-
more, daughters are not put in
the position of performing a
secondary act, i.e., reciting Kad-
dish, to indicate that they can-
not perform the primary act,
i.e., conducting the service or
rendering the public rabbinic
discourse, since they have no
need to do the latter, being able
to bring honor to their de-
ceased parents by other worthy
means.
Sky Lake Synagogue
Installing Officers
Sky Lake Synagogue will in-
stall officers and board mem-
bers for the coming year on
Tuesday, May 18, L'ag B'Omer,
at 8 p.m. Max Heimowitz and
Mrs. Anita Brender will be in-
stalled as president of the syna-
gogue and Sisterhood, respec-
tively.
Over 100 Dade County women participated in the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation's recent "Dollars & Sense"
seminar for women at the Eden Roc Hotel. Sponsored
by the Federation's Women's Division and the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies, the seminar emphasized
the changing role of women in estate planning, money
management, taxes and philanthropy. Experts on these
subjects were (seated, right) Philip Heckerling, profes-
sor of law at the University of Miami School of Law;
standing are Norman H. Lipoff (left), a tax attorney and
chairman of the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies,
and Arnold Ganz, a Miami-based economist and invest-
ment counselor. "Dollars & Sense" chairmen are Val
Silberman (seated, left) and GMJF Women's Division
president Marilyn Smith (standing, center).
& L t
v 1 m .% h A 1

Mr. and Mrs. Gidale Feldenkreis (left) and Isidore Wol-
lowick (center) met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert L. Siegel (right) to plan the 25th anniversary ban-
quet honoring Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual lead-
er of Temple Menorah. A special program written by
Rosalie Berger, Belle Jurkowitz and Barbara Rosenblatt
will highlight the rabbi's varied civic and religious ac-
tivities.
lettep to the e6itoa
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
We were upset to read the
letter from Rabbi Berel Wein
of the Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations of America
against the use of the Union's
name in the same sentence with
the North Dade Vaad Ha-Kash-
ruth.
The rabbis who organized the
Vaad are products of Yeshivot
and have the finest reputations
for their religious observance,
honesty, and sincerity.
Since their intentison is only
to assure the Kashruth in our
community, which they have
done by their personal super-
vision, as well as by a Mash-
giach who is in the premises
almost every day, they, should
be commended for their efforts
on behalf of those Jews inter-
ested in Kashruth, rather than
being condemned because they
organized a
the Union.
group similar to
BERTTE KUTTLBR
North Miami Beach


Page 14-B
*Jenisti fhridhbir
Friday, May 14, 1976
LEGAL NOTICE
_
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2867
Division FRANK B. DOWLINQ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTHONY DOBRANSKY. a/k/a
TONY DOBRANSKY.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HA VINO
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
Within three months from the time
of the first publication of this notice
you are required to file with the clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida, a written statement
of any claim or demand you may have
against the estate of ANTHONY DO-
BRANSKY a/k/a TONY DOBRANS-
KY. deceased.
Each claim must be In writing and
must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
or his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when It will become
due shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal representa-
tive.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Dated April 19. 1976.
MARY PULCINI
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of ANTHONY DOBRANSKY.
a/k/a TONY DOBRANSKY Deceased
Michael A. Bienstock
Attorney
SHAPIRO. FRIED. WEIL 4 SCHEER
407 Lincoln Road Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-6361
5/14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of ELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES at
2091 N.W. 139th Street. Opa Icka.
Florida 33054 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
JIT-MY-DA CORP.
2091 N.W. 139th Street
Opa Locka. Florida 33054
KURT WELLISCH. ATTORNEY
AT LAW
Attorney for JU-MY-DA Corp.
Ifil Almrrla Avenue. Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
(445-7954)
5/14-21-28
LEGAL nuiiLt
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of DAVID APTS. at 13810 Highland
Drive, North Miami Beach. Dade
County. Florida Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
SEYMOUR SAFFRKN
MICHAEL P. CHASE
Attorney for Seymour Saffren
111924 N H. 19th Ave.. N.M.B. Fla.
5/14-21-28
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 76-11670
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re: The Marriage Of:
DOM ACOSTA.
Husband.
EMPERATRIZ ACOSTA.
Wife.
TO: EMPERATRIZ ACOSTA
9016 180th Street
Jamaica. New York 11432
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you. and you
are hereby required to serve a copy of
your answer or other pleading to the
Petition oh the Husband's attorney.
HOWARD J. ROSEN, whose address
Is 100 N.W. 37th Avenue (2nd Floor).
Miami. Florida 33125. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above styl-
ed Court, on or before the 18th day
of June. 1976, or a Default will be en-
tered against you.
DATED this 5th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. DRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By N. A. HEWETT
5/14-21-28
6/4
6/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12483
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
iRMA TANIA GOMEZ.
Petitioner/Wife.
and
LUIS R. GOMBZ.
Respondent /Husband
TO: LUIS R. GOMEZ.
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Antonio J. Pineiro. Jr.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is AGU-
DO. ANTON PINEIRO. 1647 S.W.
27th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33145.
and file the original with the clerk
if the above styled court on or before
May 28. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
oald court at Miami. Florida, on this
19th day of April. 1S7.
RICHARD P. BR1NKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Antonio J. Pineiro. Jr.
AGUDO. ANTON A PINEIRO
1647 S.W.27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
/23-30 5/7-14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-14469
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
ARIS E. MAKRIS.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUCY KARABOTS.
Defendant.
TO: LUCY KARABOTS
243 Dale Road
Weathersfleld. Connecticut
yOU ABE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to set aside a warranty deed, to
enioin sale of real property, for dam-
ages and other relief, concerning the
following real property in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida:
Ixit 9. Block 4. ESCOTTONIA
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4.
Page 161. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
MARTIN" ROTH. Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address Is: 1111 Ainsley Build-
ing. .Miami. Florida 33132. on or be-
fore June 18. 1976. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the Petition or complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on May 6. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
5/14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-12001
IN- RE: The Adoption Petition Of:
FRANCIS MICHAEL PIERSON.
NOTICE OF PETITION FOR
ADOPTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: DALE MOTT
Address and Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has been
filed and commenced In this Court
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If any, to It
on HIRSCHHORN AND FREEMAN.
P.A.. Attorneys for Petitioner, whose
address Is 742 Northwest 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, and file an original
with the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before June 11, 1976: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed for
In the petition.
Tills notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In the JEWISH FLORIDIAN news-
paper.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, on this 4th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: N. A. HEWETT
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal
HIRSCHHORN AND FREEMAN.
P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
742 Northwest 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33136
_______________________5/7-14-11-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PERRINE SHOPPING CENTER
at 1 through 650 Perrlne Avenue. Per-
rine, Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ARTHUR FASTENBKRG. as Trustee
(s) ARTHUR FASTENBERG
HORWICH & ZAGER, P.A.
Attorneys for Arthur Fastenberg.
as Trustee
Suit.- 302 2222 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of LUCITE ORIGINALS at 2910 S.W.
30 Avenue. Hallandale. Fla. 33009 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
HERMAN AND ROSEN. CORP.
a Fla. Corp.
4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PIER HOUSE at 3409 N.E. 169
Street. North Miami Beach. Fla. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
SOUTH FLORIDA MOTELS. INC.
4/30 5/7-14-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-14372
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDGAR M. INNISS
and
LYNETTE INNISS
TO: LYNETTE INNISS
1963 Ryer Avenue
Apt. 2D
Bronx, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY- NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to It on
RAYMOND J. WOLF, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 1497 N.W.
Till Street, Miami, Florida 33125. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
llth, 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAYMOND J. WOLF
1497 N.W. 7th Street
.Miami. Florida 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
5/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of DESIGN WORKSHOP at 808 NE
125 St.. North Miami. Fla. 33161 in-
tend to register said name
Clark Of the Circuit Court
County. Florida.
ELLEN WEST
RHONDA EDMISTON
5/14-21-28 fi/4
with the
of Dade
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of OAKRIDGfB FARM at 6100 SW 125
Avenue. Miami. Fla. Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
PATRICIA S. KARTER
3/14-21-28 6/4
6/4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-12(11
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
In Re The Marriage of
William Haygood. Husband,
vs. Carrie Haveood. Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
YOU. CARRIE HAYGOOD. General
Delivery. Allendale. South Carolina,
also known as Carrie Bradley, take
Notice, that William Haygood has
filed a suit for Divorce against you.
In this Court, and you must tile your
Answer thereto, with the office of the
undersigned Clerk, and send a carbon
copy thereof.to JOSEPH C. LAUS-
SEL. LAWYER. 12583(a) MW 7th
Avenue. North Miami. Florida, not
later than June 4. 1976. otherwise, a
legal Default will be entered against
vou.
DATED: April 22. 1976.
R. P. BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court
By N. A. HEWETT .
Deputv Clerk
4/SO 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PLANT FARE at 14979 South Dixie
Hwy.. Miami. Fla.. 33158 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
JEANNE E. ZIMMERMAN. 51%
RUBIN ZIMMERMAN. 49%
4/23-30 5/7-14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 76-13677
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
.AHFUZ AHMED.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ANTOINETTE PETERS AHMED.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ANTOINETTE PETERS AHMED
1569 Hills Street
Des Plaines. Illinois 60016
YOU. ANTOINETTE PETERS AH-
MED, are hereby notified to file vour
defensive pleadings to this suit for
dissolution of marriage with the Clerk
of the Court, and serve a cony on the
Petitioner's Attorney. DAVID P.
DITTMAR. of the law firm of MILL-
ER AND RUSSELL. 1408 Ainslev
Building. Miami. Florida 33132. on or
before the llth day of June. 1976. or
a default will be entered against vou.
DATED: April 29. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
By M. J. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
iCIrcult Court Seal)
?/7-14-21-2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12772
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RAMIRO HERNANDEZ
and
VICTORIA HERNANDEZ
TO: Victoria Hernandez
c/o Garcia
2140 Seward Avenue
Bronx. New York 10473
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a cony of
your written defenses, if any. to It
on Louis R. Beller. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach. Fla. 35139. and
rile the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
4, 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
oach week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21 day of April. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Louis R. Beller. Esq.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 238
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of PERSONALIZED PAPETRIES at
808 NE 125 St.. North Miami. Fla.
33161 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
RITA H. BUCKSTEL
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
EDGEWOOD STABLES at 6100 8.W.
25 Ave.. Miami. Fla.. intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida
PATRICIA S. KARTER
5/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-12807
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of-
MAUREEN ROBERSON BOOKER.
Petitioner
and
JOSEPH TERRY BOOKER.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Joseph Terry Booker. QM-1
USS CANNOLE FF 1056
F.P.O. New York. NY. 09501
YOU ARE HERESY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
LEON G. NICHOLS. Petitioner's At-
torney, whose address is 55 8.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida. 33130. on or
before June 4. 1976. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Petitioner's
Attorney or Immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on April 21. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By B. LIPPS
as l>imil % Clerk
4/30 6/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2796
Division JOSEPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE W, TOUNQBLUTH,
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OB DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of Rose W. Youngbluth, deceased. File
Number 76-2796. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street. Mi
ami Florida. The personal representa-
tive of the estate is Pauline W. Hlrsch
whose address Is 504 Navarre Avenue.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. The name
and address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
'he claim is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTION'S NOT So PILED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 14.
1976.
PAULINE W. HIRSCH
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Rose W. Youngbluth
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MALCOLM H. FRIEDMAN
S00 Douglas Road
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: 444-5701
5/14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-12804
GENERAL JURISDICTI
NOTICE TO AP _
,, Dr. n(?Y PUBLICATION)
IN HE: The Marriage of
EDMOND F. CLERSAINT. husband.
and
CHERYL L. CLERSAINT. wife.
TO: CHERYL L CLERSAINT
Residence Unknown
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of COIN VENDING. INC. at 2071
Northwest 141st Street. Opa Locka.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
LEE-JAC VENDING. INC.
a Florida Corporation .
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQ. i '
Attorney for Lee-Jac Vending. Inc.. ..
Applicant
Suite 211. 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone 531-6417
4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-3216 (40)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DESPINA WILLIAMS.
Petitioner,
and
HOMER WILLIAMS.
Respondent.
TO: HOMER WILLIAMS
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on GLADYS GERSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is Stone.
Sostchln & Koss. P.A.. 101 Northwest
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
ind file the original with the clerk of
he above styled court on or berrV-'
June 4. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
lemanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
if Mid court at Miami. Florida on this
.'3rd day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ill.ADYS GERSON. ESQUIRE
Stone. Sostchln & Koss. P.A.
101 Northwest 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 5/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-12294
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GUILLERMO COLON. Husband.
Y.
LUZ MARIA COLON,
Wife. ..
TO: LUZ MARIA COLON
Urbanizacion del Carmen
Calle 6. Casa E-104
Camuy. Puerto Rico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer to the Husband's Attor-
ney. DONALD F. FROST. ESQ.. 26
S.W. 6th Street. Miami. Florlds
33130. and file the original with the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 28th day of
May. 1976. or the allegations will be
taken as confessed against you. and
a Default will be entered.
DATED AT MIAMI. Dade Countv.
Florida, this Hth day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
By B, LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
___________________4/U-0 5/7-14
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
__C"VIL ACTION NO. 76-13174
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
., ~_ 0F MARRIAGE
IN RBj The Marriage of
NEIJDA RAMOS.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
CARIX)S OMAR RAMOS.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: CARLOS OMAR RAMOS
(residence unknown)
lOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It
A
ON DIVISION ?" CrA?.^OS "I>SKY. ESQ.. attorney
PEAR n'r PellHoner. whose address is 2121
mwi J.on<'.e de. r-eon Boulevard. Suite 420.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134. and file
the original with the clerk of the
? ,ne,.*ly,'d court on or before June
4. 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
maJ."' In 'he complaint or petition
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersignedL desiring toEngagein cHu*e"" willThe fX"., t 1978V r/ald
business under the fictitious name of yu "" ron,e,,Bed >v
As Clerk. Circuit Court
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
- or before
SEXITO at 1401 S.W. 1st Street. Ml
ami 33135 Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAUL OLIVA
J. I.AZAOA
4/30 5/7-14-21
DATED this 21st day of April 197S
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Countv Court
11 LIPPS
Deputv Clerk
4/30 6/7-14-21
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv If. J. HARTNETT
,^, As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
CARLOS LIDSKY. ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 420
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 442-8624
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 5/7-14-2!
I


m, May 14, 1976
rJewisUkxicHan
Page 15-B
Obituaries
U6AL NOTKI
IE, 77. passed away May $. He
L to Miami In 1919. engaged In
kurant business and was found -
If Park Ave. Restaurant. Miami
fch, In 1933. Survived by a daugh-
Jshlrley. grandson. William, and
Iddaughter. Jane. Graveside serv-
and Interment were on Sunday
It. Nebo Cemetery.
JtMAN. 75. of Coral Gables. Pass-
.ii May 6. Of Traverse City.
"h he came to Miami In 1925.
here until 1929. when he moved
Jhlcago. He returned to Miami
140 to make his permanent home,
radioing attorney and member of
[Florida Bar. he was a member
Tau Epsllon Phi fraternity, the
Founders Club and Friends of
Isles. He is survived by sons.
irnn S. and Dennis, both of Mi-
ll three brothers. Israel of Miami,
rid of Coral Gables. Joseph of
Ifornia; two sisters. Ann Gold-
and Flo Wepman. both of Mi-
two grandchildren. Services
r. .held Sunday with Interment at
Nebo Cemetery.
IMAN. Jacob (Jack), of North
mm Beach. Riverside.
HBERG. Benjamin. 78. of Miami
Itch. Interment Mt. Slnal. River-
ss.
GER, Charles, 78. of Miami Beach.
Ttriment Lakeside. Riverside.
El.V. Bessie. 85. Riverside.
|ER. George. 94. Riverside.
BKLER. Ethel. 86 of Miami Beach.
hverside.
ID. Shlrlee P.. 54. of Miami. Inter
nt Mt. Nebo. Riverside.
lYKIN. Elsie. 53. of Miami. Inter-
int Mt. Nebo. Gordon.
JtAHI. Louis. 77 of Miramar.
lerment Beth El. Levitt.
|TH. Max E.. 63. of Southwest Mi-
El. Interment Star of David,
rdon.
PER, Anna. 73. of Miami Beach.
wman.
|MAN". Leo. 72 of Hallandale.
fyltt.
IEL. Jacob H.. 94. of Southwest
Jami. Interment Mt. Sinai,
ardon.
INSTEIN. Rose. 83. of Miami.
(lerment Lakeside. Gordon.
JkSSANOFF. Morris. 67. of Hallan-
lle. Interment Beth El. Levitt.
foils. Sander. Interment Lakeside.
LZHERG. Miriam M.. 79. of Miami
bach. Interment Lakeside. River-
Id.-.
EDENN. Alyce R.. 65. of North
liiimi Bench. Interment Lakeside.
Riverside.
KELLNER, Jack, of Margate. Inter-
ment Star of David. Blasberg.
DASCAL. Anton. 72. of Miami Beach.
Interment Mt. Slnal. Riverside.
KKSTOFK. Emanuel. 67. of North Bay
Village. Interment Star of David.____
Levitt. ^"V
KAZDIN. Sadie. 73. of North Miami
Beach. Interment Lakeside. River-
side. V
USAl NOTKI
NOTICE UNDER ~
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of COCHI INVESTMENTS at 410 I*
Street. Miami Beach. Fla.. intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Countv.
Florida.
TOM AS DATORRE
T/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of COLEGIO NACIONAL DE CIEN-
CIAS SOCIALES DERECHO PUBI.I-
CO at 3731 S.W. 27th Terrace. Miami.
Florida 33134 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MIREYA ALDEREGl'IA
3731 S.W. 27th Terrace. Miami. Fla.
5/14-21-28 C/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of METAL MAN at 3545 NW North
River Drive. Miami. Florida intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Surplus Sales. Inc.
By Irving Islcoff President
GERALD SILVERMAN
Attorney for applicant
300 Roberts Building
Miami. Florida 33130
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of Stowe & Company. Ltd. and Trans-
Atlantic Underwriters. Ltd. at 5730
S.W. 74 Street, South Miami. Florida
33143 Intend to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
STOWE ENTERPRISES. INC.
By: Larry B. Stowe. President
5/14-21-28 6/4
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Serving the Jewish Community since 1931
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_^^ REFORM SERVICES
Eminuel Gordon (1946) Ikt Gordon
Hairy Gordon (1964) James B Gordon
Telephone 858-5506
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
pen Every Doy Closed Sobbufh
140 SW 57th Avenue
PALMER'S
MONUMENT COMPANY/1 k
NAUZED MEMORIAL!
CUtTOM CRAFTED
INOUlt WORKSHOP
4444921 '4444m
3279 S.W. Sth ST.. MIAMI
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to .assure swift and
understanding service.
[Dade County
1949-1656
113385 West Dixie Highway
{Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
Jew Votki (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2972
IN RE: ESTATE OP
EMMA E. PEMOLLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of EMMA E. PEMOLLER. deceased.
File Number 76-2972. is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is Court House. West Flagler
St.. Miami. Fla. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate Is VALERIA
SMITH, whose address Is 9510 Lake
Point Ave., Detroit. Michigan. The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
liI'li'U .
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand thev mav have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attornev. and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not vet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal represen-
tative.
All persons interested In the estate
lo whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction, of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration Mav 14.
1976.
VALERIA SMITH
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of EMMA E. PEMOLLER
Deceased
VTTORNBY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HARRY L. BASSETT
1401 Brickell Avenue. Suite 806
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: 377-3561
5/14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 76-15115
IN RE: The Marriage of
DAVID m ISBNFELD,
Petit loner/Husband.
and
MARCIA ROSENFELD.
Respondent/Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
TO: MARCIA ROSENFELD
(Address Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that
an action for Dissolution "f Marriage
lias been filed against you and you
are required to serve a cods "i" your
written defenses, if any, to it mi <;
Alexander Nobll, Esq.. Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 321 N K
26 Street. Miami. Florida 33137. and
file the original with the Clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
18. 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this 12th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
G. ALEXANDER NOBIL. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband
321 N.E. 26 Street
Miami. Florida 33137
Tel: 379-1437
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-15108
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ETHELDER SAMUELS,
Petitioner,
and
' HARI.ES RICH VRD SAMUELS,
Resnondenl
TO: CHARLES RICHARI >
S Wll'KI.S
r. nldence unknou n
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed igalnsl yon and
ypu are required to *erve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it <>n
Stone, Sostchln .- (Com, P.A.. attor-
nes for Petitioner, whose address is
101 N W. 12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
J3128 i 1051 "I ISS5, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above stvled
court on or before June is. in7fi: oth-
erwise a default Will be entered
against vim for the relief demanded in
the complain! or petition.
This notice shall !" published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on tbj.8
11th day "f Mav. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN A KOSS. P.A.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attornev for Petitioner
5/14-21-28 74
LEGAL NOTKI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-14983
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The marriage of.
ALBA ESTHER VASQUEZ TORRES.
Petitioner/ Wife,
and
DAVID TORRES
Respondent/Husband.
TO: DAVIT) TORRES.
Respondent/Husband
27 Manchester Way
Pine Brook. New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to the
Law Office of DAVID A. WOLFSON.
P.A.. Attornev for Petitioner. 8881
S.W. 107th Avenue. Suite 219. Miami.
Florida. 33176. on or before the 18th
'lay of June. 1976 and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Petitioner's At-
torney or immediately thereafter: oth-
er ise. a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on this 11th (lay of Mav.
1976.
Kit HARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk of the Court
liv B. LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
:./l 4-21-28 6/4
LEGAL NOTKI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN ANU
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-14145
X RE: The Marriage Of
< OLLEEN SYMANKO.
Petitioner.
LAWRENCE ALAN SYMANKO.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LAWRENCE ALAN SYMANKO
14 Tree Ton Court
Stamford. Connecticut H6902
VOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for divorce lias been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If any.
to it on I-aw Offices of George J.
Talianoff. Petitioner's attorneys. 420
Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. on or before June 9. 1976. and
file the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneys, or Immediately there-
after: otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded In the Complaint or Petition.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this Court on Mav 4. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
Bv: L. SNEEDEN
as Denutv Clerk
Law Offices of George J. Talianoff
Attornevs for Petitioner
By: Terrence S. Schwartz
5/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-14878
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION
FOR
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTER OF
.Mm IPTII IN IF
RODOLFO BALE.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: LEONARDO BODDEN LOPEZ
I.' IS I ILIVOS 4
SANTI i 1" IMINGII
REPUBLICA DOMINICANA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Petition for Adop-
tion lias been filed aarainsl you and
you are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Petitioner's Attornev. Marcelo M.
Aftudo. 1647 S.W. 27th Avenue. Miami.
Florida JS145, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above stvled Court
on or before June 18. 1976; otherwise
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in Uie.'.com-
plnint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court at Miami. Dade County.
Florida on this 10th day of May. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida ,
BY: C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
Marcelo M Agudo
AGUDO, ANTON A PINEIRO
Attorneys for Petitioner
11147 S W. 27ttl Avenue
Miami. Florida 23146
5/14-21-28 6/4
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-13931
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
i i.sii: WATBRHOUSE.
JAMBS A WATBRHOUSE
TO: JAMBS A. WATBRHOUSE
Conway, New Hampshire 03818
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai a petition for Dissolution of vour
.Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this court and you are reouired
to serve a copy of vour written de-
li rises, if anv. to It on PHILIP J.
MANDINA, ESQ. attornev for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 1710 South
I lay shore Drive. Miami. Florida 33133.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above stvled court on or before
June I lth. 1976: otherwise a default
will be entered against vou for the re-
n. f prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI-ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the si al of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
3nth dav of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv M. HERRERA
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
PHILIP J. MANDINA. ESQ.
1710 South Bavshore Drive
Miami. Florida 33133
Attornev for Petitioner
5/7-14-21-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2522
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDA DRESNER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
TOO ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of Freda Dresner, deceased. File Num-
ber 76-2522. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade Countv. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which Is
73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida. The personal representative of the
estate is Florence D. Marantz. whose
address Is 1800 S.W. 86 Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim must
be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of tin* creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due. the date
when it Will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
10 whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
qurr-il. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OP THIS NOTICE, to
file any I bjectlona they may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will. Ho qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT So FILED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 14.
is) FLORENCE D MARANTZ
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Freda Dresner Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MAX A. GOLDFARB
11 West Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
Room 818
Telephone: 371-2538 5/14-21
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-13936
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
BERT A LIDIA BARILLAS.
Petitioner-Wife
CESAR BARILLAS.
Respondent-Husband _____
You CESAR BARILLAS. RESI-
DENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby no-
tified to serve n conv of vour An-
swer to the Dissolution of Marriage
filed against vou. upon Wife'si attor-
...v GEORGE NICHOLAS. BSQ.-JU
\ \\ 12th Avenue Miami. Florida.
32126 and file original with Clerk of
curt on or before June 11th 1976:
otherwise the Petition will be ennfess-
" Dated this 20th dav of April. 1J7J.
ItiCHAItn P BRINKER. CLERK
Bv: M HERRERA
Depute Cli rk
5/7-14-21-28
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name or
GENERAL OFFICE EQUIPMENT at
696 N.E. 125 Street. North Miami Fla
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida. ___
TASHA CORP.
a Fla. Corp.
Victor H. Palhica. Prf,,,de1nlt.2i.jg
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the'underslgned. desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
PRIF.TO-SOLIS PHOTOGRAPHY at
9243 S.W. 38 Street. Miami. Fla..
33165 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida ____
NORMA PRTETO-SOLIS4-2i_M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12773
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN" RE: The Marriage of
SHAUKAT II AL1 KHAN
and
MZIIAT KHAN
TO NUZHAT KHAN
49 H Model Town
Lahare. Pakistan
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It
on Louis It Beller. Esq., nttornev foT
Petitioner, whose address Is 420 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 222 Miami Reach.
Fla. 33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above stved court
on or before June 4. 1976; otherwise
a default will be entered against VOU
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FliOHTDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21st dav of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
I .ouls R. Beller. Esa.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 238
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 S/T-U-H


Page 16-B
+ Mnist ncridHam
Friday, May 14, l97,l
t^5SAYE21
Pantry Pride
Biscuits
HOMESTYLE ^t
OR
BUTTERMILK
7
8-OZ.
CAN
LIMIT 4 CANS PIEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OR MOII EXCLUDING CIGARETTES J
*e*an}ft
e^SAVE24c
Breakstone
Sour Cream
49
16-OZ.
CUP
LIMIT ONE CUP PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OR MORE. EXCLUDINC CICA
RFITF.S J

PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY MAY 15th
INDADE AND
MONROE COUNTIES
ALSO IN HOLLYWOOD
AND H All AND ALE
GIT MORI FOR TOUR
FOOD DOLLAR
AT PANTRY PRIDI
Pride
Your Basic Bargain Stort xj
CUt'OMI* MA' PURCHAll AIL iHl STAIIID ITIMS WITH ONI
M 00 OROIR OR MO*I I ICtUDiNG OGAITITTIS
Pantry Pride
Orange Juice
ioc
100*.
FLORIDA
FROZEN
6-OZ.
CAN
1 LIMIT 5 CANS PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
yf OF S/ 00 OR MORE EXCLUDINC CIGARETTES
mm save 40-
Pantry Pride
Ice Cream
ALL
FLAVORS
49
HALF
GALLON
, LIMIT ONE ON PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
L^W OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES _J
OSalad Size
p > Tomatoes
GARDEN FRESH
WESTERN
ceberg
Lettuce
u
USDA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED BEEF CHUCK
Blade
Roast
3 89
79
FIRM RIPE
%K
) 3 -;,$1
INDIAN IIVII WMIII SICDUSS !* Wl
R>lCK YOUR OWN
Grapefruit ..'."TOU":OWN 6,0? 1
1 MINSK IN iUICT (IAIGI 10 Sill) _
Fla. Oranges lo .0. 1
GARDIN IRISH CRUP
Red Radishes 3:^29*
GARDIN IRISH HRM
Green Cucumbers 5 <.39
U.S. NO. I All PURPOSI (PICK TOUR OWN)
Yellow Onions.........................i. 19
FOR AHINC OR IITINO -"
Idaho Potatoes 5 & 89
IRI1HII hand PURI UNtWIITINID *%**r
Grapefruit Juice .'89'
GARDEN FRESH
Broccoli
WESTERN
NUTRITIOUS BUNCH
39
PANTRY PRIDE CREAMED
Cottage
Cheese

24 OZ
CUP
99
II AKSIONI SIAT N SMAPI
Cottage Cheese
RIDI WMiPPIO
M.01S 1 09
.....cup A
Cream Cheese !p99
HltSCHMANN S _^
Diet Margarine .;'. 00
KRAFT CHIISI SPRI*0 .-
Velveeta ..^l09
SARGINTO CIACKII SNACK __ _
Cheese Slices t3 75*
Lli CAi Ol tOROIN
Yogurt
" cu 7*F
USDA CHOICE WESTERN CORN FED
Bottom round $ 4| 29
Round Roast JL ,
US 0 A CHOICE WESTERN CORN FEO
Beef Rib Steak
Small End Bnls.
USDA CHOICI wISURN CORN MO til'
1
$J99
USDA CHOICI WISMKN CORN MD til'
Chuck Blade Steak ,. 89
USDA CHOICI WESTERN COIN MD III' IOUND
Rump Roast ..
USD* CHOICI WISIIIN CORN IIO AOil Ot PON
Beef Brisket ......"..
USD* CHOICI till lit IAIGI IND
Rib Roast "M?NC0""" ..
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$149
$| 59
$|69
UtOA CHOICI WltllRN COIN MO III' CMUC
,nis Jl 49
Underblade Steak
USDA CHOICI WISIIIN CORN MD Ufl ROUND _
Eye Round Roast ,. 1
,"C' A(
Beef Liver m D?
MOUND AA,
Beef Chuck .. 99c
IIAOISHIPMO PRIMIUM IBI'.H
Fryer Parts --........... .. %f zf
MA OR SHIPPIO PRIMIUM FMSH
Fryer Quarters u 59c
PANIRT PRIDI p AM,
Great Ground """ D3
l|(l-l.'O.0IIIMuL AI I
l|"H.-lf lO'RiO'l.F.
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM WHOLE
Fresh
Fryers
IB
48
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Era Liquid
Detergent
99c
FOR HEAVY
WASH LOADS
32-OZ.
JUG
LIMIT ONE JUG PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
(MIX OR MATCH) PANTRY PRIDE
Vegetables
"K.im AS OR IRINCM S'MI
(U< CRIINIIANS
MIIIOVICHAI4IS
SllCfD CAIRO'S
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516-OZ.^j
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PANIR* PRIDI SlldilSV I.MUIIK ^ c
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reserves ..<> minimi *** 1
PANTRY PRIDI .
Fruit Cocktail 3 $*
MNUl PRIDI -
Calif. Tomatoes 3 cmh
PANIRt PR10I CRIAM Wll OR
Whole Kernel Corn 4 25*1
16-OZ > \
CANS A
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ASSORIID MAYORS -^ *
Royal Gelatin 2,.oV37c
GRIAt'ORLUNCHIl
1102 $115
CAN
Hormel Spam.........
DINTT VOORI
Beef Stew ^94*
PANTRY PRIDE SLICED
Meat
Bologna
I IB
PKG
89
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Sandwich Spread Si 39c
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Wieners or Franks VSiV*!**
ClAUSSINS
Sauerkraut 89
HIIKIW NATIONAL KOSHia -
Franks or Knocks J.o'$l29
Chili W Beans '1X63*
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LeSueur Peas
CAN
46
MIX OR MATCH PANTRY PRIDE
Frozen Vegetables
llOl IACS SWIIIPIAS IIIOWCO
}0OZ lC\ RIGUIAR OR'RINCh ST'
CUTCKflNttANS ItOCCOUCUTS
2 POLY $1
BAGS *
AANTRT AUDI FtOTIN
Coffee Creamer

5I.OI $1
cins A
-----'pi&jeH Sea^uuC-----
HIGHLINER SKINLESS* BONELESS
Haddock e*ioQ
Fillet $129
12-OZ.
PKG.
f
tscnyainj ck Service Apfietczen.
All MIAI> ( CMIISI iLICIO 10 OtDIt AI SIORIi HAVING COUNIlIi
RICH S GOURMET DELITE
Turkey
Roll
All WHITE HALF
MEAT LB.
*109
1
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KRAFT (QTRS.
HYGRADE BALL PARK MEAT OR BEEF
Franks or
Knocks
NO CHOIESTEROI-LOW IN FAT. NUTRITIOUS OLD MILWAUKEE CARUNG BLACK LABEl
$119 F'bre Brand q#vc Schaefer
^i |BreadH,?oHor 89 Beer 6
12-OZ. ,
NO-tl'UtN
BTLS
Wl RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOIO TO DEALERS
*


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