The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02465

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
CJA-IEF mobilization tops $12 million
The 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund, conducted by the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation, has topped $12 million.
The campaign's General Chairman, L. Jules Ar-
kin, attributes this achievement to the success of
the Mar. 18 Apr. 28 total campaign mobilization.
The campaign set aside six weeks to prove
that "You Make the Difference."
"At our opening rally Mar. 18, I announced
that the campaign had reached $10 million, and
would seek an additional $2 million by Apr. 28.
This has been surpassed, and I'm proud to note
that as of Apr. 28, the 1976 CJA-IEF has raised
$12,027,125," Arkin declared.
ARKIN SAID that the "You Make the Differ-
ence" campaign mobilization resulted in an over-
all increase of 26 percent over 1975 commit-
Continued on Page 2-A
"Jewish IHLoridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 18
Fred k. shoehet April so, i7 Miami, Florida Friday, April 30, 1976 By Mail SOc. 2 Sections Price 25 cents
DAYAN INDIFFERENT TO REVELATIONS
'Dado' Document Blames
Dayan for '73
War Setbacks
Government Mum on Revelations
6-A
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Gen. David ("Dado") Ela-
zar's posthumously publish-
ed challenge to the Agranat
Committee's findings on the
Yom Kippur War, continued
to arouse comment in the
press and among the public.
But members of the defunct
I Agranat panel are remain-
ling silent on the issue.
Former Defense Minister
iMoshe Dayan, who Elazar
contended should have shar-
ed the blame for Israel's un-
preparedness in October,
1973, said he had no objec-
tions to publication at this
time of his full testimony
before the Agranat Commit-
tee.
MUCH OF what Dayan said
was classified by the commit-
Continued on Page 11-A
GEN. ELAZAR
Catholics Hit
AJCong. For
'Genocide'
'Obscene' Charge Cited 8-A
MILWAUKEE (JTA) An official of the Catholic
League for Religious and Civil Rights has accused the
American Jewish Congress of "adopting the posture of legal
positivism, the very ideology that enabled Hitler to pursue
his genocidal policies," by its support for legalized abor-
tion.
His Heart Refused
Burden Alone-Rabin
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA)David
"Dado" Elazar was laid to rest
with full military honors at the
Mount Herzl Military Cemetery
IN TALKS WITH ADMINISTRATION
Javits Says Hell Present
\IsraeVs Interim Aid View
Met Sadat 15-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) Sen.
Jacob K. Javits (R.-N.Y.) after
meeting with Premier Yitzhak
Rabin, said that when he re-
turns to Washington he will
"honestly and eloquently" pre-
sent Rabin's views on the $550
million in transitional quarter
aid Israel is seeking from the
United States.
Javits, who arrived here Apr.
21 from Jordan across the Al-
lenby Bridge, disappointed some
Israelis who had anticipated he
was bringing a message from
President Ford on the aid issue.
AMBASSADOR DINTTZ Continued on Page 6-A
here. President Ephraim Katzir,
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, minis-
ters, army generals and thou-
sands of ordinary Israelis were
among the mourners who paid
their last respects to the Yom
Kippur War Chief of Staff.
At the open graveside, Rabin
praised Elazar's "unparalleled
courage" in facing the post-
Yom Kippur War reality a
reality in which he alone had
been made to carry the full
brunt of blame for the army's
Continued on Page 12-A
Dr. Lowell A. Dunlop, the
League's assistant executive
director, made that charge
in a study titled "Neo-Nazism
in America?"
SPECIFICALLY, he took issue
with arguments presented by
Pfeffer, counsel to the AJCon-
gress, in a brief filed by the
AJCongress and seven other
groups before the Massachu-
setts Supreme Court seeking re-
versal of the manslighter con-
viction of Dr. Kenneth Edelin,
who was charged with causing
the death of a fetus.
Dunlop defines "legal positiv-
ism" as objections to the basic
premise that natural rights due
all men are fundamental values
which law must serve.
By relying "heavily on the
law and public policy," the
Continued on Page 6-A
IN PROTEST
Workers
Staging
Slowdown
TEL AVIV Civil servants
here began a work slowdown
this week involving some two-
thirds of the nation's 60,000
civil servant work corps.
The slowdown affected train
service, as well as visa and pass-
port activities, automobile li-
censing and land registration.
THE SLOWDOWN was called
Continued on Page 5-A
Assassination Attempts Predicted
Against King Hussein and Sadat
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) New
attempts may soon be made
to assassinate President Sa-
dat and King Hussein by
units of the Arab Black Sep-
tember organization, the
London Times reports.
The forecast is made in
an article which attributes
the latest wave of Arab ter-
rorism to Libyan leader Col.
Qaddhafi. According to its
unnamed author, the Black
September support appara-
tus has been bwilt up in
Europe and the Mediterra-
Torn Haatzmaut' Rally Due Saturday
Military Sacrifices 15-A
Ambassador Simcha Din-
itz will fly into South Flor-
ida Friday to take part in
Saturday night's mass rally
at the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center marking Yom
Haatzmaut, Israel Indepen-
dence Day. The event is
scheduled for 8:30 p.m.,
with activities beginning
after the end of the Sab-
bath.
Israel's chief envoy to
the United States, who suc-
ceeded Prime Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin to the Washing-
ton embassy, will deliver
the keynote address at the
community-wide salute to
the State of Israel's 28th
anniversary of independ-
ence.
HE WILL hold a news con-
ference Friday afternoon. This
is the first time that a current
Israel ambassador to the United
Continued on Page 1S-A
nean with the 50 million
pounds sterling given to it
by Qaddhafi since the 1972
Munich massacre, which he
inspired.
QADDHAFI is also said to have
financed the recent kidnapping
of OPEC ministers in Vienna
and to have ordered his terror
squads to try to capture a sup-
ply of nuclear bombs.
In Lebanon, Qaddhafi is said
to have contributed more than
25 million pounds sterling to
the lefist forces.
The Times article bases it-
self on information which has
come to light since the arrest
of a Libyan terrorist team in
Tunis last month, where it was
trying to murder or kidnap Maj.
Omar Meheishi, a defector from
Continued on Page 13-A


Page 2-A
+Je*isbfhrkJkwi
Friday, April 30, 1976
i
28th Anniversary: The Search for Peace
challenge "the closing of the
social gap" in Israel.
He noted that after 28 years
of independence, "we are still
CJA-IEF
Campaign Tops
$12 Million Mark
JERUSALEM (JTA) "The search for peace" was
described by Premier Yitzhak Rabin as "the supreme pri-
ority" among the "five major challenges" which "together
hold the key" to the "collective welfare" of Israel and
world Jewry, on the 28th anniversary of independence of
the State of Israel.
The anniversary will be cele-
brated May 9.
IN A message to fellow Is-
raelis and Jews all over the
world, Rabin elucidated on the
meaning of Israel's Independ-
ence Day. He said, "it draws a
line between past survival by
chance and future existence by
will, of being helplessly con-
trolled by events and of con-
trolling events by our own
choice, means and purpose."
It is, Rabin's message said,
"a celebration of the victory of
the Jewish spirit over every
suppressor and despot, past and
present. It is a Jewish festival
of freedom as lasting and as in-
destructible as the values, the
faith and the heritage which
inspired it."
AS THE second "major chal-
lenge" after the search for
peace, Rabin listed "the
strengthening of our defensive
capacity" because "so long as
the basic attitude of our neigh-
bors remains one of hostility,
we have no choice but to con-
tinue to invest heavily in our
self-defense."
The third challenge, Rabin
said, was "the further consoli-
dation of our economic infras-
tructure.
"An essential component of
Israel's strength is its economic
development which must con-
tinue to expand. This requires
of us to work even harder, ex-
port more and consume less. It
requires of the free Jewish
world to invest in Israel in an
unprecendented fashion and
share, thereby, in its upbuild-
ing."
RABIN listed as the fourth
engaged in the great human ef-
fort to give all our citizens
equality of opportunity through
better education, better skills,
better housing and a better
quality of life. Here too," his
message said, "Israel continues
to look to the generosity of the
free Jewish world to give of its
self in helping to create with
us the instruments to meet the
human needs of our society."
Continued from Page I -A
ments. "Judging our efforts at
the Federation," said Arkin, "is
rewarding and it is difficult.
"We have achieved the ob-
j?cti"e set for the campaign
mobilization, yet there is still a
tremendous amount of work to
be done right here in Miami
this year. Thousands of Jews
here in Greater Miami have not
vet been reached with CJA-
IEF's message, and have not
yet made their 1976 commit-
ments.
"Yet the people of Israel con-
tinue to show their courage
each day," he said, "in stand-
ing up to incredible pressures
and affirming their faith in the
Jewish homeland. Despite the
strain of another 25 percent in-
flation in 1976 and daily hos-
tilities which we read in the
newspaper headlines, our peo-
ple remain brave.
"0 U R RESPONSIBILITIES
toward their survival and
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their ability to grow with
strength and dignity can be
no less. That's one of the reas-
ons why I am directing the con-
tinuation of the 1976 CJA-IEF
on a community-wide basis."
Arkin further outlined the
remaining activities of the cam-
paign, including the contacting
of thousands of Greater Miami
Jewish households by mail, by
telephone and in person.
"After this successful mobil-
ization, the next step is up
to you," he added. "When you
receive a letter or a phone call
on behalf of the 1976 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund, respond generous-
ly.
"AND RESPOND as if a life
depended on it. Because, in
fact, so many lives do depend
on CJA IEF. Just looking
around Greater Miami and not-
ing the vital work done by the
Federation's family of agencies,
any Jewish man or woman will
sense the importance of the
services provided.
"Nutrition for 1,000 elderly
Jewish people each day, those
who might otherwise go hun-
gry. And just as important for
our senior citizens, the chance
to get out of their rooms and
away from their hot plates, back
into a social setting. Thousands
more in our city could use this
kind of help, and CJA-IEF
would like to make it possible.
"But the next step is up to
you. That goes for extending
medical care, settlement assist-
ance to immigrants, and job
rehabilitation, recreation and
Jewish education, as well. All
these things and more are our
responsibility."
We look to you to make Israel
Economically Strong by Buy-
ing lereol Bond*. Give to the
CJA end lerael Emergency
Fund. Mayshie Frledberg.
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The premier said that the
fifth challenge was to further
strengthen the ties that bind
the Jewish people."
"Herein lies the real strength
of Israel and of our people
everywhere," he said. "Our fu-
ture, like our Dast, is one. It
must be forged ever stronger
and ever deeper through a new
priority for Jewish education.
"IT HAS to express itself
through a new commitment to
Aliya. And it must be reflected
in closer ties of intimacy
through volunteer efforts in
Israel, visits to Israel in un-
precedented numbers, the shar-
ing of material means, public^
solidarity and an ever meaning,
ful dialogue of thinking."
Rabin said that these Jewish
priorities "relate to the welfare
of all of us and not least to our
brethren in countries where
freedom is denied them the
remnants of communities in
Arab countries where they are
held hostages and the great
Jewish community of the Soviet
Union."
The Premier's message also
paid tribute to Israel's "sons
and daughters who sacrificed
all so that we might celebrate
this day those who fell in
the struggle for our freedom
and in the subsequent battles
to protect it. Their legacy is
precious, and it imposes upon
us the common obligation to
build a better, more beautiful
-nd a stronger Israel."
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Friday, April 30, 1976
-Jmlsii ihrldkan
Page J-A
Gush Emunim Stirs N Y. Youths9 Feelings
By YITZHAK RAM
NEW YORK (JTA) Jew-
ish youths demonstrated for and
against the Gush Emunim and
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank at two separate rallies
near the United Nations. About
200 youngsters, mostly yeshiva
students, gathered in Dag Ham-
marskjold Plaza to shout and
chant support for the militant
Orthdox nationalist group in Is-
rael which insists that the Ju-
daea and Samaria regions be-
long to the Jewish State.
Four blocks away, about 75
young members of the recently
formed Socialist Zionist Union,
assembled at the Isaiah Wall,
denounced the Gush Emunim as
an obstacle to peace in the Mid-
dle East.
THE TWO rallies were occa-
mannma
fflo;i'ni:n:nimuKi!i .i Mj
FILLING IN
BACKGROUND
sioned by a march through the
West Bank by about 20,000
Gush Emunim followers and
their supporters.
At the larger rally. Rabbi
Fabian Schonfeld, president of
the Rabbinical Council of Amer-
ica, declared that Arab refusal
to come to terms with the exist-
ence of a Jewish State, not Jew-
ish settlement on the West
Bank, was the obstacle to peace.
Schonfeld told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that he did not
come to the rally as a repre-
sentative of the Rabbinical
Council but that 90 percent of
the members of that Orthodox
rabbinical body identified with
the Gush Emunim and their pol-
icies.
He and other speakers, who
included Rabbi Avraham Weiss
of the Hebrew Institute of Riv-
erdale, and Hebrew University
Prof. Benjamin Fraenkel, cur-
rently a visiting lecturer at
Princeton, denounced the U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, William
Scranton, for his recent criti-
cism at the Security Council of
Jewish settlement in the occu-
pied torritories.
THE PRO-GUSH Emunim ral-
ly was organized by Noam Ha-
mishmeret Hatzeira, the religi-
ous Zionist youth movement af-
filiated with the young leader-
ship faction of Israel's National
Religious Party, and Yavneh,
the national Jewish religious
students association.
The youngsters carried signs
reading "The West Bank is Is-
rael's, No More Retreats" and
"Samaria and Judaea Are Jew-
ish."
The protest rally, in which
members of Habonim and Ha-
shomer Hatzair participated,
took the view that the Gush
Emunim are a "small minority
of right-wing extremists, who
represent a dangerous obstacle
to peace."
ED FREEDMAN, a member
of the SZU, told the JTA that
the demonstration was held "to
show our opposition to the set-
tlement and march by the Gush
Emunim."
He said the Gush policies con-
stitute "a moral and political
obstacle" to a just solution of
the Israeli-Arab conflict. Parti-
cipants carried placards read-
ing "Israel Yes, Territories No"
and "Aliya. Not Territories."
Reinforced police units were
present at both rallies, the larg-
er number of them at Dag Ham-
marskjold Plaza. No incidents
were reported at either rally.
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-
Page 4-A
Friday, April 30, 1976
1976
Yom Haatzmaut
Jews the world over will celebrate the 28th anni-
versary of the establishment of the modern State of
Israel next week with the observance of Yom Haatz-
maut, Israel Independence Day.
Significance of this year's 28th (Koach) birthday
has been overshadowed by the continuing develop-
ments on the West Bank and in Lebanon, but Israel's
accomplishments in weathering economic, political and
military problems for more than a quarter of a cen-
tury merit public attention.
It is appropriate that one of the largest gatherings
in the United States marking Yom Haatzmaut will be
held here, in he Miami Beach Convention Center, Sat-
urday night. South Florida's Jewish community has
been in the forefront of aid to Israel since its birth
pains, and its identification with Israeli causes is known
everywhere.
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz recognizes the solidar-
ity of this area with Israel in the form of his personal
appearance as keynoter for Saturday night's program.
The plight of Soviet Jewry will not be forgotten
in the observance of Yom Haatzmaut, and the selec-
tion of a Russian refugee, Misha Raitzin, the Metro-
politan Opera star, to headline the entertainment pro-
gram is in keeping with that relationship.
Our presence at the celebration Saturday night
will be a vote for Israel's future.
Vorster Visit Unwise
Israel's friends may rightly wonder why the Is-
raeli government allowed South African Prime Minister
John Vorster to come to Israel for four days, conclud-
ing with joint economic ventures. Any economic ben-
efits achieved by the visit will be far outweighed by
the propaganda loss.
Israel has long taken what it called a "correct"
attitude to South Africa and this wise policy should
have continued.
Most people will not question the need for Israel
to carry out trade with South Africa. No one will argue
against the importance of Israel continuing its close
ties with the large South African Jewish community.
But to go beyond this is certainly unwise at a time
when the Israeli government, Jewish organizations and
Zionist groups are conducting vast campaigns through-
out the world to win friends for the Jewish State.
Racism Link Renewed
The Arab states and their supporters have long
tried to link Israel with South Africa as "racist co-
lonial states." The Israeli government and most Is-
raelis abhor apartheid. But why should Israel have
given the Arab states a chance to further distort Israel's
position?
Those who worked against the United Nations
General Assembly resolution equating Zionism with ra-
cism sought to stress that Israel should not be included
in a resolution aimed against apartheid and colonial-
ism. Now their efforts have been undercut.
The visit may also hurt Israel's attempts to win
friends among liberals, socialists, Blacks and labor
unions. Perhaps even more unfortunate, it may alien-
ate many young Jews, the group that is most impor-
tant to Israel's future.
Yet, despite the diplomatic break, many Black
Africans have remained friendly to Israel. And Israeli
officials have themselves pointed out that Black African
countries are having second thoughts about the break,
made under the pressure of the Arabs.
This development which has begun to show some
results at the UN may now be seriously set back as a
result of the Vorster visit.
(Jewish Floridlitan
OFFICE AND PLANT 120 N.E. 6th STHEKT TELEPHONE S7!-4tnt>
j.O. Box 01-2973, Miami, Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET utJO M1NDUN SEL..MA M. THOMP80'
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor AKintant to Publl**-
Tne Jewish Floriaian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published every Friday slnre 1927 by The Jewish Florlrt-an
Scmml-O" PosIok< Pnid at Miami. Fla.
Fred K. Shochet April 30, 197S
rite Jewish Florldian has absorbed the Jewish unity and the Jewisn Weekly
Mtmoer of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndl
ate, Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As
ssciation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) Ona Year'2.0O; Two YearsS22.00;
Three Years$30.00. Out of Town Upon Request.
Meaning of Meaning of Words
WILLIAM Empson, the phi-
losopher and linguist, rais-
ed the question of the mean-
ing of meaning. What does it
mean for something to have
meaning?
Lest this seem a bit precious,
consider the query of another
philosopher, W. T. Stace. He
as!.s: Is my red your red? We
boili agree that something is
red in color anJ i se red as a
word to describe it.
Hut how can we oe sure we
are both in fact perceiving the
same thing despite the fact that
we are using the same word
for it?
EVEN THE ancient Greeks,
Mindlin
Socrates in particular, knew
that our senses are imperfect
and in different ways. So, to
use Stace's example, what does
*fm
it mean to say that something
is red or even for two or more
people to agree that something
they see is red?
What Empson was suggest-
ing is that we must be careful
in our use of words to under-
stand that we may not be com-
municating at all.
THE FLAP between Gerald
Ford and Henry Kissinger the
other day raises the whole spec-
tre of the meaning of meaning
the treachery of words, par-
ticularly as it relates to politi-
cians, who are chronic linguis-
tic drunkards anyway.
On Mar. 26, Kissinger, in one
of his traditional imperial pro-
nouncements, declared that the
United States had contacted
North Vietnam in order to in-
form the Communists that we
are prepared in principle "to
normalize relations with Ha-
noi."
But on Apr. 23, President
Ford denied it all. "I never
said we seek to normalize re-
lations or recognize North Viet-
nam," he explained at a news
conference in Indianapolis.
THEN WHAT did Kissinger
mean when, speaking for Ford
on Mar. 26, he said 'that the
U.S. was prepared in princi-
ple "to normalize relations with
Hanoi?"
Hanoi and North Vietnam,
simply as words, ought to strike
terror in the Kissingerian lion
heart.
After all, there were all of
those years, all of those mil-
lions of words spoken and writ-
ten between him and Le Due
Tho in Paris guaranteeing in
B >0d olJ star spangled style
the future of South Vietnam.
YET ONE month later, there
was Hanoi ensconced in Saigon.
Apparently, Le Due Tho hadn't
taken the meaning of Henry's
words to mean anything other
Continued on Page 13-A
Miami Rabbi Misses the Point
Volume 49
Friday, April 30, 1976
Number 18
30 NISAN 5736
Interesting how events flow
to make a picture whole. A Mi-
ami Beach rabbi prepared a
sermon last week objecting to
the recent State Appeals Court
decision that oermits the Bis-
cayne Yachting Club to continue
to bar Jews and other unde-
sirables from membership. One
would imagine that every Jew
would agree with his indigna-
tion that "we still have preju-
dice and bigotry in our land."
In theory, yes. In practice,
one would have to question the
meaning of Rabbi Phineas We-
berman's "blast at the Anti-
Defamation League" in his pre-
pared sermon the week before.
(It should be noted that I nei-
ther heard nor read these ser-
mons and only take the word
of the Miami Herald that they
were, in fact, given.)
FOR TO this rabbi, "There
should be nothing wrong in a
group of people choosing their
cultural, religious or ethnic sur-
roundings."
Agreed. But as has been Rab-
bi Weberman's policy over the
years, his position on this not
only runs contrary to that
of the overwhelming majority
of the nation's Jewish commu-
nity but to well-established
American law and dangerously
smacks of the prejudice and
bigotry Rabbi David Raab plan-
ned to preach about.
Rabbi Weberman makes it
appear that ADL's complaint
against those who advertised a
place called "Shomer Shabbat
Village" was directed against
people who wish to live with
others of like religious and cul-
tural preference.
THE TRUTH is that ADL
in this case uniquely against
EDWARD
Jewish interests was only fol-
lowing its historic role of fight-
ing the property restrictions,
advertising and other tactics
aimed at depriving minorities
(and particularly Jews) of their
right to live and play where
they wished.
It was ADL and the Jewish
community which fought for the
laws which forbid advertising a
religious preference in housing
and recreations. It is sad, in-
deed, that an educated Jew
could be so narrow-minded as
not see that the risk of reinfect-
ing the housing market with
religious appeals is a direct
threat to Jewish interest.
IT WOULD be strange if
Rabbi Weberman is not now
aware that the Jewishly-con-
trolled Viking Corp. made its
"shomer shabbas" appeal as a
gimmick to attract business in
a distressed market.
In other words, there was no
business like shul business. Just
as in its now-discontinued ad-
vertisements for Miller's Pond,
the same company showed a
map of the area with important
and convenient shopping cen-
ters, places of interest,
churches. But not Temple Zion,
which is handiest of all. Or, no
business like church business.
Rabbi Weberman is not alone.
"Viewpoint," the publication of
the Young Israel movement, Is
loaded with advertisements that
stress synagogues, yeshivos,
"modern mikvahs," etc.
IF THERE is any excuse for
that, it is that except for strays
like myself, "Viewpoint" is read
by the Orthodox members of
Young Israel and is not intend-
ed for the general public.
It still contains the seeds of
justified discrimination against
those Jews who do not want to
live in a ghetto that is either
self-imposed or forced on them
by law.
The justification for this, that
appeals are made to "golf play-
ers, tennis players and swim-
mers," will remind some of that
old sick joke. When told that
Hitler was killing Jews and bi-
cyclfc riders, the anti-Semite
asked: "What does ht have
against bicycle riders?"
IN HIS obtuseness, his failure
to understand the principle in-
volved in ADL's proper concern
for ANY religious appeals in
housing advertisements. Rabbi
Weberman continues his role of
giving aid and comfort to the
hostile non-Jew by his persist-
ence in building a wall of sep-
aration.
There is in the Talmud, for
me, a beautiful statement on the
problem of the universal and
the Darticular in Jewish life.
"The falling of the rain is great-
er than the giving of the Law,
for the giving of the Law was
a iov only to Israel, while the
falling of the rain is a rejoicing
for all the world."
SO TOO, I see the unrestrict-
ed housing of all people, of lim-
ited income and limited mobi-
lity, and the desire to live where
they wish, to be more important
certainly than the interests of
a developer and even more than
that of those who feel they can
follow Torah only in isolation.


i
Friday, April 30, 1976
>Jelstncrknnn
Page 5-A
r
That's Why Dr. K.
Is Racing Around Africa
anderson
WASHINGTON Sixteen
months ago, we reported that
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer had established a secret
relationship with South Africa.
This policy led eventually to
undercover cooperation with
South Africa in Angola.
The truth has since leaked
out, causing double embarrass-
ment for the United States. We
not only wound up on the losing
side but were caught in a secret
alliance with the hated South
Africans.
QUITE understandably, the
blacks, not only in Africa, but
in America, have been antagon-
ized by Kissinger's policy. They
have reacted by embracing the
victorious MPLA, the faction
which the Soviets and Cubans
supported in Angola.
Several U.S. organizations,
most of them black, were in-
vited to send representatives
to Cuba recentlv to get better
acquainted with the MPLA.
Some of the most prominent
blacks in America, including
Congressmen and newsmen, re-
ceived invitations.
Perhaps it's a good idea for
the Unifd States belatedly to
establish good relations with the
MPLA. But those who went to
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Cuba are entitled to know who
is behind the invitations.
INTELLIGENCE sources told
us that the key organizer is
Julian Torres Rizo, who is ac-
credited as the first secretary
of the Cuban mission at the
United Nations.
But our sources have identi-
fied him as a secret Cuban Intel-
ligence agent. He has been un-
der observation by U.S. intel-
ligence both in this country and
inside Cuba.
Rizo's secret mission at the
United Nations is to develop
contacts with radicals in this
country. He is not a diplomat as
he pretends to be, but is an
intelligence agent. And Cuban
intelligence works closely with
Soviet intelligence.
RAMBLING RUG: We've
solved the mystery of Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger's miss-
ing rug.
The House Intelligence Com-
mittee revealed that the Kur-
dish rebel leader. General Mus-
tafa Barzani, delivered two val-
uable gifts to Kissinger. One
was a gold necklace, the other
an oriental rug.
Kissinger, quite properly,
turned the gifts into the proto-
col office at the State Depart-
ment. We learned that the neck-
lace was locked up in a safe.
But somehow the rug vanished.
Our sources tipped us off that
it had turned up mysteriously in
the White House.
It took two days to track the
rug down. The beautiful, four-
by-six, red and blue rug can
now be found in the outer of-
fice of General Brent Scowcroft.
President Ford's national se-
curity adviser.
BUREAUCRATIC Smoke: A
secret Pentagon report de-
scribes an experimental missile
which couldn't be brought down
by the most fearsome weapons
but got snarled by government
red tape.
Our Air Force, in cooperation
with the West Germans, con-
ducted a series of top-secret
tests in Germany of the Mav-
erick air-to-ground missile. The
Air Force wanted to determine
whether the Maverick could
penetrate simulated enemy de-
fenses.
The Maverick performed im-
presively until the Air Force
tried to test it against a haze
of smoke. There was a "Catch-
22": West German aircraft reg-
ulations prohibit the use of
smoke on the ground over
which airplanes fly. The Air
Force couldn't convince the
West Germans to waive the
rules.
So, notes the secret report
sheepishly, the smoke tests of
the Maverick were "severely
limited."
Warsaw Ghetto
Memorial in N.Y.
NEW YORK (JTA) Mayor
Abraham Beame and Gov. Hugh
Carey proclaimed Sunday, Apr.
25, as "Warsaw Ghetto Com-
memoration Day" in New York
City and State. In his proclama-
tion, Beame declared that "it is
urgent that the world continues
to remember the heinous crimes
committeed during the Holo-
caust and honors the heroes
who fought at Warsaw."
Carey said that "permitting
society to forget this inhumane
episode (the Holocaust) would
be an even greater crime. By
remembering and paying tribute
to the memory of the six million
martyrs, we hopefully will pre-
vent history from repeating
such a truculent act."
MEANWHILE, thousands
gathered inside and outside
Temple Emanu-El on Manhat-
tan's Fifth Avenue for a memo-
rial service Apr. 25 commem-
orating the 33rd anniversary of
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.
The principal speakers were
Chain] Herzog, Israel's Ambas-
sador to the United Nations;
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations; and
Beame.
The ceremony, starting at
1:30 p.m., was held under the
auspices of the Warsaw Ghetto
Resistance Organization
(WAGRO) in conjunction with
other major Jewish organiza-
tions.
Hundreds of memorial can-
dles were lit in Temple Emanu-
El by survivors of the Warsaw
Ghetto.
Sculptor Is Sisterhood's April Guest Artist
Sculptor Lois Goldstein will
be Temple Beth Am Sisterhood's
guest artist for April this eve-
ning following services. Her
work is on exhibit at Yester-
day's Child Gallery in South
Miami.
Ms. Goldstein, who studied at
the Chicago Art Institute and
the University of Illinois, has
shown her work at the Ocala
" .ne Arts Festival, the Museum
of Science Fine Arts Exhibit
and in several local galleries.
A member of the Florida Sculp-
tors League and the Ceramic
League of Miami, in 1974 she
was commissed to create the
Jimmy Durante Award. A terra
cotta bas relief is on permanent
exhibit at Temple Beth Am.
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Civil Servants
Stage Slowdown
Continued from Page 1-A
to protest the inequity in the
special allowances situation in
Israel. Workers were demand-
ing faster implementation of an
austerity plan to take away spe-
cial allowances from the other
one-third of the Israel govern-
ment's work force.
Members of the Knesset have
been criticizing special allow-
ances as a means of avoiding
the government-imposed wage
freeze.
Included are "foot incre-
ments" given to postmen and
"embarrassment increments" for
tax collectors who must bear
the brunt of public anger
against them.
WORKERS who stayed away
from offices that simply closed
their doors do not enjoy these*
allowances, and they were pro-
testing the government's foot-
dragging in equalizing all sa-
laries for civil servants
While Jerusalem had an-
nounced plans to phase out the
special increments, workers
finally called the slowdown be-
cause nothing had as yet been
done to alleviate the three-year-
old, hotly-debated issue.
Meanwhile, the 20.000 civil
servants who will be affected by
the phasing out of special in-
crements, have announced that
thev are planning a strike of
their own to protest plans for
phasing out their special status
Temple Ner Tamid to Install
Officers, Trustees at Brunch
Rabbi Labovitz Mrs. F. Rest Harry Miller Louis Sachman
Officers and trustees elected
by Temple Ner Tamid congre-
gants will be installed Sunday
morning, May 2, at the congre-
gation's annual brunch in the
temple's Sklar Auditorium.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spirit-
ual leader of the temple, wilL.be
assisted by Cantor Edward Klein
in the ceremony, during which
Louis Suchman will be installed
as president of the congrega-
tion for a second term.
Prior to coming to Miami
Beach 30 years ago, Suchman
was a buyer of men's and boys'
for Bloomingdale's. He has been
a president of the Mes'n Club of
Temple Ner Tamid and is a for-
mer treasurer and financial sec-
retary of the B'nai B'rith North
Shore Lodge.
He has also chaired the Ner
Tamid annual concert for many
years, and vice president of the
Freedom Lodge of B'nai B'rith
and past president of the Men's
and Boys' Apparel Club of Flor-
ida and vice president of the
National Association of Men's
and Boys' Apparel Club for the
Southern District. He is a mem-
ber of the George Gershwin
Lodge Knights of Pythias. Elks
and the Southern Apparel Exhi-
bitors.
Also being installed are the
officers and board members of
the Men's Club and Sisterhood.
Harry Miller has been elected
president of the Men's Club and
Mrs. Fannie Rest has been re-
elected president of the Sister-
hood.
Forband Branch
Commemorates Holocaust
The Bialick Ben Gurion
Branch of Farband has planned
a Holocaust commemoration for
Monday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Washington Federation Au-
ditorium, 1234 Washington Ave.
Moshe Fisher, a member of
the Zionist Workers Alliance
Executive, will speak, and there
will be a candle-lighting and a
reading of six Holocaust poems
to honor the 6 million Jews who
died.
Cantor Mordecai Yardeini will
chant the Heil Mielei Rachmim
and Kaddish. Jack Filosof,
branch president, says everyone
is invited and there will be no
solicitation.
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Page e-A '
i
Javits/ Vows to Air Israel's Aid Needs
Continued from Page 1-A
The Ford Administration has
opposed providing Israel and
other countries receiving Amer-
ican foreign aid with funds to
cover the period between the
end of the current fiscal year
on June 30 and the Start of the
new one Oct. 1.
JAVITS said Rabin had made
a statesmanlike presentation of
Israel's case and had not blamed
anyone for the American-Israeli
dispute over the aid. Javits, who
was in Cairo earlier last week,
reportedly told Rabin that it
was his impression that Syria
and especially Egypt want a
peaceful solution of the Mid-
east conflict based on a full
Israeli pullback to the pre-June
1967 boundaries and a Palestin-
ian state on the West Bank.
Rabin also met with another
Republican, Sen. Charles Ma-
thias of Maryland, a member of
the Senate Appropriations Com-
mittee. Mathias said he discuss-
ed Israel's needs for 1977 and
only touched on the transitional
aid.
However, he said, he person-
ally favored providing Israel
with the funds and expected
"some action of this."
IN WASHINGTON, Mathias
was reported to have met with
PLO leader Yasir Arafat some-
where in Lebanon and credited
the PLO with preserving order
in those parts of Lebanon it con-
trols, including the area near
the U.S. Embassy in Beirut.
According to the Washington
Star, which reported this, Ma-
thias, who met with Arafat be-
fore coming to Israel, was quot-
ed as saying that the PLO is
"providing a secure area for U.S.
Embassy personnel" and that
"the PLO or Fatah are really
the only ones providing law and
order, if you can so describe it,
Israel Mum on 6Dado* Document
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
document which the late
Gen. David "Dado" Elazar
prepared two years ago
challenging the findings of
the Agranat Committee that
as Chief of Staff he was re-
sponsible for Israel's lack of
military preparedness when
the Yom Kippur War broke
out, was made public here
- one day after Elazar was
buried with full military
honors on Mt Herzl in Jeru-
salem. The retired former
Chief of Staff died of a heart
attack in Tel Aviv at the age
of 51.
He submitted the document,
at the time of his resignation
in April, 1974, to Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin, members of the Ca-
linet and to the members of
the Agranat Committee appoint-
ed by Premier Golda Meir in
1973 to investigate events lead-
ing up to the Yom Kippur War
and Israel's conduct of the bat-
tle.
IN IT, Elazar took issue with
two charges leveled against
him by the Agranat panel
that he did not warn of the im-
minence of war in October, 1973,
and that he, rather than the
then Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, was responsible for Is-
rael's failure to mobilize in
time.
Comments on the so-called
"Dado document" indicated that
persons in senior positions
found "loop holes" in the Agra-
nat report and that some Cabi-
net ministers did not whole-
heartedly back the findings but
were reluctant to say so at the
time.
Some ministers, in fact, re-
portedlv proposed the appoint-
ment of Elazar to be Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S., indicat-
ing their trust and high regard
for the general after reading
the Agranat report.
ELAZAR claimed in the do-
cument that Dayan failed to
exercise his legal authority to
call up the reserves on the eve
of the Yom Kippur War because
he was waiting for formal ap-
proval from Mrs. Meir.
Even on the day the war
broke out he delayed calling up
two reserve divisions until ap-
proval was forthcoming from
the Premier, which cost preci-
ous time, Elazar stated.
Therefore, he contended, the
Agranat panel was remiss in not
placing any responsibility on
Dayan. He also claimed that
some 400 intelligence reports.
some of them warning of the im-
minence of war, were not shown
to him by the intelligence
branch. Had he received them,
he might have alerted the gov-
ernment and the army, he
wrote.
ELAZAR noted that every
piece of intelligence he receiv-
ed was also received by the De-
fense Minister and that while
the Chief of Staff had only one
source of information army
intelligence Dayan had ac-
cess to many other sources.
The Defense Minister thus
bears the same responsibility as
the Chief of Staff, but the Agra-
nat Committee did not mention
that and placed sole responsi-
bility on his shoulders, Elazar
claimed in his document.
Catholics Accuse AJCong.
Of Adopting 'Genocide9 Tactic
Continued from Page 1-A
ethical values have no place in
nositivistic view that moral and
AJCongress and other groups
that favor legalized abortion
are using "the ideological basis
for the rise of Nazism" under
Hitler, Dunlop contended.
"IT IS only a culture's con-
viction that law must be judged
in the light of moral and eth-
nical values that prevents any
society from succumbing to Nazi
madness," and therefore the
AJCongress position "is surely
a dangerous precedent for the
Jewish community," the writer
claimed.
"Simply, the only cogent ob-
jection to the Holocaust is that
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it as an egregious assault on
the natural rights of man. With-
out appealing to these funda-
mental moral and ethical
values, there can be no com-
pelling judgment that Hitler
was wrong or that the Nazis
who perpetrated the Holocaust
should be punished." Dunlop
wrote.
HE ADDED that "the Jewish
community cannot demand that
tho leaders of religious groups
use their moral prestige to con-
demn recurring manifestations
of Nazism while at the same
time the American Jewish Con-
gress rejects moral predilections
as having no place in law and
public policy."
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in that part of Lebanon where
they are in control."
A State Department spokes-
man told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, after being asked to
comment on Mathias' reported
remarks, that the U.S. Embassy
in Beirut "has been fairly well
protected by various forces, in-
cluding a neighborhood militia,"
during the year-old disturbances
in Lebanon.
THE SPOKESMAN added,
"Our interest is, of course, the
Friday, April 3; 1976
security of the Embassy, not the
source of protection in a con-
fused situation." The Star re-
ported that, on Apr. 16, Mathias
received a call from the Syrian
Foreign Ministry inviting him
to meet with Arafat.
The Senator was quoted as
reporting later that he "broke
no new ground" with Arafat,
but "it was useful from my
point of view for getting a bet-
ter understanding of exactly
what possibilities for a settle-
ment might exist." Mathias, the
Star noted, did not explain why
the Syrians selected him to meet
Arafat.
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YOUR WILL?
Circumstances change.
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make sure that you have not
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IMPORTANT RELATIVES ...
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL!
One paragraph
IN YOUR WILL
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r Friday, April 30, 1976
7-A
THIS IS THE DAY
WHICH THE LORD HAS MADE;
LET US BE GLAD AND REJOICE
-Psalms 118:24
o nnarai rha n hew nrn nt
Can you celebrate a cliche?
You hear (and read) the same
words over and over.
Israel. The Holy Land.
Making the desert bloom.
Familiar?
Yes.
Cliches?
That depends upon you.
Many familiar words can be just
phrases if you allow them to be.
Consider these words:
Husband, wife, children, parents.
Do you take your family for granted?
Or do you remember what they mean?
So much depends upon you,
and what you choose to remember.
Familiarity can breed apathy:
But apathy cannot be your goal,
not in your life with your family,
not in your relationship with Israel.
The land of Israel was never humdrum
in the lives of those Jews throughout
the world, throughout the centuries,
who yearned for a land they could never
see. Ever since Abraham we have main-
tained an indestructible bond with the
land. Ever since the Temple Jews have
always lived in the land.
We have always been surrounded by
the land, even when removed from its
soil.
The land participates in our joys.
At weddings we have always sung
Jeremiah's words:
"May there be heard in the
cities of Judah
and in the streets of Jerusalem
the sound of joy and gladness,
the sound of bride and groom."
The land participates in our sorrows.
At funerals we have always said:
"May the Lord comfort you
among the mourners of Zion and
Jerusalem."
And "Next year in Jerusalem" is
no mere slogan.
We use those words while cele-
brating liberation on Passover.
We use those words while cohi-
memorating forgiveness on Yom
Kippur.
Furthermore, on this day,
embraced by the promise of Israel,
we avow with a sense of destiny
"This Year in Jerusalem."
In prayer we have always faced
Jerusalem.
Throughout life, in misery and in
ecstasy,
we have always prayed for the land and
its welfare.
On Israel's Independence Day...
We celebrate a prayer answered
after centuries.
We celebrate a biblical promise
fulfilled.
We celebrate the millions who
held on to their faith, to their
dream, though dispersed and
despised.
We celebrate an extraordinary
reality.
We celebrate Israel's independ-
ence
because we have no past without
that land.
Without that land our present is
inconceivable.
Without that land our future is
unbearable.
We have often felt abandoned
but we have never abandoned the land.
For the land of Israel is part of our
definition,
part of who we were, part of who we. are.
Its promise has never abandoned us.
We Are One
The place where independence flour-
ishes again after two thousand years is
no commonplace. The birthplace of the
Bible is no commonplace.
The promise of the prophet prevails,
envisioning an end to violence. The vi-
sion of that faith is peace not only for
Jews but for all humanity. We celebrate
that too when we celebrate Israel.
"For Torah shall come from Zion,
the word of the Lord from
Jerusalem.
He shall judge among many
peoples
and shall arbitrate for mighty
nations from afar.
They shall beat their swords into
plowshares,
their spears into pruning hooks.
Nation shall not lift sword against
nation,
neither shall they learn war any-
more."
That too could be a cliche
if you succumb to cynicism,
if you mutter the words mechanically,
if you forget that promises can be
fulfilled.
Affirming Isaiah's words we cele-
brate hope-hatikvah-
which is an uncommon heritage.
Embracing Isaiah's vision, we are
captivated by hope,
our lives are illumined by hope
despite the disasters which have
overwhelmed us.
The uncommon promise of Israel gives
us further reason to hope
and gives us reason to celebrate this
most unusual day
"For this is the day in which the
Lord has made;
Let us be glad and rejoice."
The Rabbinical Advisory Council of the United Jewish Appeal
We suggest you tear out this page for use in your personal or communal Israel Independence Day celebration.
o
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal
and Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137 Phone: 576-4000


ar
Jewish Agony
In Soviet
Union Today
N
O AUTHOR writing a book on condition, of life to.the Soviet
" J Union can omit describing the portion of the fcwlg
Hedrick Smith, who spent three years in Moscow as lMpon*
ent of the New York Times, deals JMtojJJ*^
treatment of Jews in the USSR and with their moods tn
his exceUent book "The Russians," JP~.,
The author devotes many pages to the **""-" 5*
mistreated Jews are called by some to the Soviet Union. *
brings out the anti-Jewish discriminations practiced in the gov
eminent JJJg^ the feeling8 of antj.Semitism prevailing
within the population, especially in the Ukraine^ He tells of
the growing interest among completely assimilated Soviet-born
Jews to know more about Jewishness. He deals, of course, with
the movement among the Jews to emigrate. ____
He also presents reasons given by Jews who are not in-
clined to leave the country. He estimates that a million
more Jews have already opted for assimilation in Soviet Me
and left themselves no way out.
SOME OF his observations are not new. but some or tne
facts which he brings out are new. During the three years or
his residence in Moscow and in the short visits he> made
to other cities in various parts of the Soviet Union he had
opportunities to meet all kinds of Jews. He was also in close
contact with dissident Jews, despite the isolation tn which ror-
eign correspondents are held in Moscow.
The general picture of the situation of the Jews in the
USSR emerging from his well-written book is that they are
the most mistreated national minority in the USSR.
THEY ARE derisively called "the pyaty punkty tne
fifth pointers" a reference to the point No. 5 in their identity
documents which stamps them specifically as Jews, thus pre-
venting them from holding certain positions, restricting their
opportunities to higher education, and making their lives dif-
ficult in many other wavs.
The remarkable phenomenon in Soviet life today is the
fact that although Jews are treated worse than any other na-
tionality in the USSR, many Russians, Ukrainians. Latvians,
Georgians and other Soviet non-Jews seek intermarriage with
Jews, Smith established.
THEY BELIEVE that intermarriage with Jews will be help-
ful to them to emigrate from the Soviet Union as members of
a Jewish family.
The author illustrates this point by telling one of the many
jokes going around in Moscow:
Abramovich was summoned for questioning to OVTR, the
Soviet office which decides on applications for exit visas. "Abra-
movich," says the OVIR colonel, "You have a good position as
a professor. Why do you want to leave for Israel?" To which
Abramovich replies defensively: "It's not me who wants to
go; it's the wife and the children."
"BUT ABRAMOVICH," insists the colonel, "you have a
nice apartment and a summer home. Why should you want to
leave your socialist motherland?" To which Abramovich, shrug-
ging, answers: "It's net me who wants to go; it's the mother-
in-law."
"Tell me, Abramovich, what is it?" the colonel implores.
"You have even bought yourself a car. Why should you want
to give up this good life?" Abramovich responds: "I told you.
It's not me who wants to go. It's the aunt and the cousins."
"Well, if you don't want to go, why did you apply?" the
colonel asks "Don't you see?" Abramovich explains. "I am
the only Jew in the family ."
SMITH SAYS that originally, the Kremlin was startled by
the brazenness with which the Soviet Jews started their move-
ment for emigration. The Kremlin could have finished the move-
ment in a trice, he asserts, but the powerful organized support
which this movement received abroad made Brezhnev think
twice.
Friday, April 30, 1976 Mewls* norkHnr Page 10-A
Do We Really Need
More Horror Stories?
AS NEW booke on concentration camp *
A perienoM make their appearance..I near
some individuate question the noed for more
horror stories. These books, however are
more than horror fantasies. They are real and
they are true. The need to remind ourselves,
our children and our non-Jewish friends is
still pressing.
An inmate of the Lwow Concentration
Camp, Leon Richman, has written 'Why?
Extermination Camp Lwow (Lemberg), in
Janowska Street, Poland" (Vantage, $5.95).
This is the infamous camp recorded in Leon
W. Wells's well-known account "The Janow-
ska Road."
RICHMAN'S prose is more documentary
in style than Well's. He divides his chapters
according to particular episodes listing the
names of the Nazis, their criminal activities,
and their victims.
He speaks deliberately and graphically.
His account needs no elaboration or historical
explanation. It stands alone.
A different and unusual collection of con-
centration camp memoirs is "This Way for
the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen" (Penguin,
$2.95). The author, Tadeusz Morowski, was a
non-Jewish Polish Communist who was an
"Aryan" prisoner in Auschwitz.
HE IS the narrator of three of the twelve
stories. Borowski is both an executioner and
a victim. He willingly accepts responsibility
and guilt for his participation in Auschwitz.
He dOM not write to exooerau himself of
that guilt, but rather to crystallxe it for him-
self and his readers.
This young man was looked to as the great-
est hope of both Polish literature and the
Polish Communist Party after the war. It came
as a shock when he committed suicide in 1951.
BOROWSKI is an accomplished writer. In
this slim volume he speaks from his extra-
ordinary vantage point with mixed emotions:
hate, pity, helplessness for the Jews and
for himself. .
Susan Fromberg Schaeffer, author of
"Anya," a beautiful story of a girl who lives
through the Holocaust, presents us with a
series of poems about froga. "The Rhymes
and Ruines of the Toad" (MacmiUan, $6.95)
is overdone in its silver mylar jacket; and it
is overpriced for its 71 pages. The stones are
strange. They can be translated to the world
of people, but for what purpose.
THE MESSAGE is dark and dreary. A father
toad tells his children about the beginning of
the world and ends by throwing himself down
on his rock crying.
Another poem depicts a little boy swallow-
ing his "cold, ugly" toad for fear his parents
would not like his companion. Very peculiar.
The illustrations by Sebastian Fleuret add
to the eeriness of the book. Detailed, realistic
drawings of fierce, bug-eyed toads are fright-
ening to the point of being offensive. I would
not recommend this book for children, and
there is little for adults as well.
John Adams Left Money For
School to Teach Hebrew
Sck
wartz
T,HERE WAS a bit of a streak of vanity in
John Adams to which he himself confessed
and if he were to arise today he might briefly
expand his chest and say "My, my. Look at all
the attention I am getting."
Of all the founding fathers, none is being
recalled more in this year of celebration. The
reason is that he played a dominant role in
1776. On that hot July day in Philadelphia, it
*as Adams who led the fight for independence.
3ut there are other reasons.
HE WAS an unusually interesting person,
a scholar as well as a man of great courage.
He was interesting even for his faults. He was
of a passionate nature and sometimes could
swear as well as Andrew Jackson and that is
saying a good deal. But with all of his faults,
as Jefferson wrote, if you got to know him. you
would be sure to like him.
Jews have an added reason for liking him.
He was their friend and he didn't express his
Friendship to get the Jewish vote.
Adams and Jefferson were of opposing
parties, but for some years they carried on a
correspondence. In a letter to Jefferson, he
wrote:
"IN SPITE of Bolingbroke and Voltaire, I
will insist that the Hebrews have done more
to civilize man than any other nations.
"If I were an atheist and believed in blind
eternal fate, I would have to hold that fate
had ordained the Jews to be the most essential
instrument for civilization. I cannot say that
I love the Jews very much nor the French, nor
the English, nor the Romans, nor the Greeks.
We must love all nations as well as we can but
it is very hard to love most of them."
In another letter to Judge Adrian van der
Kent, he expressed his bafflement at Voltaire's
anti-Semitism. "How is it possible," he wrote,
"that he should view the Hebrews in this light.
They are the most glorious people ever to in-
labit the earth.
"THE ROMANS and their empire were but
i bauble in comparison to the Jews. They have
jiven religion to three quarters of the globe
ind have influenced the affairs of mankind
more hopefully than any other nation, ancient
)r modern."
Adams did more than talk. One might say
that John Adams was a pioneer in the field of
Hebrew education and even that he helped
found one of the first Hebrew schools in Amer-
ica. Anyway, he did something like that for
which he deserves to be remembered by all
lews. Four years before his death, in a codicil
to his will, he bequeathed funds for the estab-
lishment of a school in which Hebrew was to
be taught along with the classical languages.

Unleashing Mad Dogs of Wan The Horrifying Statistics of Overkill
WITH PRESIDENT. FordSfid his national security
advisors appa/flTOy'-aeterrnined to sell six C-130
mi lit an'' transport- planes to Egypt and with Daniel
P. Moynihan asserting that Cuban brigades are now
established on the Golan Heights border region be-
tween Israel and Syria, all of us who worry ojrer the
survival of Israel are having an uneasy Spring.
Should Egypt actually obtain from Washington
the war-making potential now projected, aggressive
mischief by Cairo would have to be expected, judging
by past history.
TOO MANY forget that the Soviet Union did not
resupply the Arabs in the 1967 crisis until that con-
flict was over. Six years later, resupply by Moscow
came early and in huge doses. Now, only two and a
half years after the Yom Kippur War, President
Sadat has accumulated not only best wishes but also
abundant military equipment from France and Eng-
land as well as from the Soviet Union.
iKoo
ert
What more does he need to squeeze Israel to the
breaking point? Indeed, he allows himself the luxury
of ditching further reliance on the USSR.
CAN ANYTHING good come of such apprehen-
sion? A long shot answer is 'Yes." Why? Because if
all of the world Israel certainly included is
to be saved from destruction, sanity must be ap-
plied to the boundless escalation of weapons before
'.he breaking point.
WE ARE told to button up our lips, to cease in-
quiring out loud into the possibility of universal
incineration, to raise no questions about the wisdom
>f Pentagon thinking and Pentagon economics.
If a Sen. Proxmire and a Rep. Aspin question the
validity of CIA estimates on comparative Russian
and American dollar costs on defense and we con-
clude these lawmakers may have a point, we are
told not to go public on that because brains superior
to the minds of Proxmire and Aspin know better.
Dare we look at the facts again on overkill? Are
we free to repeat the truth that for some time now
the Soviet Union and the United States have nuclear
striking power that measures 15 tons of TNT for
avery inhabitant of the earth? Have we forgotten
that all of the Soviet Union's and America's major
:ities of 100,000 and over can be reduced to pulp
if nuclear warfare bursts open?


ay, April 30, 1976
+3ewlstnvrkHan
Page 11-A
PRESS PUBLISHES STATEMENT IN FUIL
Dado? Document Points Finger
At Culpability of Gen. Dayan
Continued from Pane 1-A
lee, to be released only after
30 years. Elazar's letter of
Vpril, 1974, to Premier Yitzhak
labin, claimed that the De-
fense Minister delayed calling
tp the reserves as the 1973
:risis escalated even though he
vas privy to far more intell-
igence information than the
[Chief of Staff, the office held
I by Elazar at the time.
The letter or document
[portions of which were pub-
lished on the second anniver-
sary of the war last fall, was
released in full yesterday by
Elazar's family.
The former Chief of Staff
died Apr. 15 of a heart atttack
and was buried with full mili-
tary honors Apr. 18.
HIS DOCUMENT was pub-
lished in full in all Israeli news-
papers.
Elazar's letter was submitted
to Rabin, Cabinet ministers and
the Agranat Committee along
with his resignation. He
charged that the investigative
panel was remiss in apportion-
ing blame for Israel's failure
to mobilize in time to meet the
Egyptian-Syrian attack.
He said that while he accept-
ed the responsibility that fell
on the Chief of Staff, the Agra-
nat Committee failed to take
adequate note of the decisive
roles of the Defense Minister
and the then Premier Golda
Meir.
MEANWHILE, a public com-
mittee has been established to
plan projects honoring the late
General. A memorial rally will
be held on the "shloshim," the
30-day anniversary of his
death.
Another project is publica
tion of a book on the history
of Israel's security forces which
Elazar was researching at the
time of his death but had not
started to write. The be* will
be compiled from his collected
material.
B ^JW*r H^H
f& si U > 1 p^I^B

fc^^ WTO
Valerie Harper, known to millions of Americans as
Rhoda Morgenstern in the successful TV comedy series,
"Rhoda," participated in a UJA mission to Israel with
the Jewish community of Norfolk, Va. Pictured with
her is United Jewish Appeal National Chairman Joseph
H. Strelitz of Norfolk. After seeing the country she re-
marked, "I am a Gentile Zionist."
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SUMMER 1976
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(212) OR 9-7171
In MIAMI BEACH
CALL: Rabbi Avi Lazorus
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WRITE: 848 80th St., M.B. 33141
<5
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>3 <
:-*



Page 12-A
+Je*isiinor*man
Friday, April 30, 1976
h.
Ford Praises Syria in Lebanon
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)
President Ford praised with
Syria and Israel for having
"acted very responsibly" in
the Lebanon crisis. He said
that if the crisis is resolved
and a central government is
again functioning in Leba-
non, "then the restraint Syr-
ria has had and the restraint
Israel has had will have got-
ten the Middle East off one
of the most potential volatile
situations in recent months
there."
The President also disclos-
ed that the U.S. is "working
wilh the parties" in the Mid-
east for an extension of the
mandate of the United Na-
tions Disengagement Observ-
er Force (UNDOF) on the
Golan Heights which expires
at the end of May.
FORD MADE his remarks in
response to questions at a meet-
ing with newspaper editors of
Texas where he is engaged in
a tight race with Ronald Rea-
gan in that state's Presidential
primaries.
Ford also predicted "addition-
al headway" in the Middle East
if Israel and the Palestine Li-
beration Organization are able
to resolve their differences. He
stressed that "those two parties
will have to make that deci-
sion." according to a transcript
of his remarks.
While the President was
speaking here, his press secre-
ttary, Ron Nessen, briefing
newsmen at the White House,
indicated the expansion of U.S.
tolerance of Syrian intervention
in Lebanon. He said "the United
States opposes outside military
intervention that could lead to
a military confrontation or to a
Middle East war."
THAT WAS a departure from
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's statement last Decem-
ber that the U.S. opposed mili-
tary intervention in Lebanon
from "any quarter" without the
qualifying reference to con-
frontation or war.
Later, however, when the
Syrian-sponsored Palestine Li-
beration Army and Syrian reg-
ulars entered Lebanon, Admin-
istration officials, including Kis-
singer, praised Syria's "con-
structive role."
Nessen said, according to the
White House transcript, "Even
though we are opposed to out-
side military intervention that
will lead to a confrontation, if
you look at Syria's intent and
nature of what they have done,
I think overall you would have
to say they have played a con-
structive role." He did not deny
that U.S. tolerance of Syrian
activities in Lebanon had ex-
panded.
Kissinger, testifying before a
Senate foreign aid subcommit-
tee last week, spoke of a wor-
risome situation regarding Syr-
ian military intervention in Le-
banon and of Israel's difficult
position.
REPORTS reaching here from
Lebanon since then have indi-
cated that the U.S. put great
pressure on Israel not to move
against Lebanon in any way re-
gardless of possible provoca-
tions stemming from the prox-
imity of Syrian forces to the
Israeli border.
Ford's remarks here also
seemed to indicate an edging
away from the often stated U.S.
position that it would have no
contacts with the PLO unless
that group recognizes Israel's
existence as a sovereign state.
Asked, "Will Israel have to sit
down with the PLO?" Ford re-
plied:
"That is a decision they have
to make and it is, of course, in-
volved, because Israel says as
long as the PLO does not recog-
nize the existence of Israel, they
are not going to negotiate with
the PLO. But that is a decision
they have to make. Somehow I
feel that we can make addition-
al headway there but those two
parties will have to make that
decision."
With respect to the Lebanese
situation, the President said that
the special envoy he sent to that
country last month, Ambassador
L. Dean Brown, has been "ne-
gotiating and working with all
parties."
HE ADDED "and it has been
tough, but I think that we have
made some headway." Nessen
told reporters that when he
made his last check, Brown had
made no contacts with the PLO
in Lebanon. "There have been
exchanges between the United
States and all the parties in-
volved (in Lebanon) with the
exception of the PLO," Nessen
stated.
Kissinger had informed the
JTA two weeks ago that Brown
would be in violation of his in-
structions if he contacted the
PLO during his mission in Le-
banon. The State Department
indicated, when Brown depart-
ed, that his instructions did not
include contacts with the PLO
but the Department did not
seem to rule out the possibility
of such contacts.
All That Jewish Money
-And No Studies Program
Four
1 READERS
WRITE
Israeli Pilots Have Low
Regard for Soviet Fighters
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
REPHUN'S HEBREW
BOOK STORE
HAS EVERYTHING FOR
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
and Jewish Humes Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
4T7 W.shlnglon Avo. 472-/017
dflbbi Joseph L Rackovsky
Phone 672-7306
MS MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BUCK
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
fighter pilots gained a low op-
inion of the professional com-
petence of their Soviet counter-
parts, at least as of six years
ago, when outnumbered Israeli
jets downed five Soviets MIG-12s
jn a dogfight over the Gulf of
Suez during the height of the
war of attrition with Egypt.
They found the Russians poor-
ly trained and clumsy in com-
bat.
The first report of the en-
counter, by one of the Israeli
pilots who participated in it,
was published today in the Air
Force magazine. The pilot was
not identified by name. His
opinions were shared by other
(Israeli pilots and senior Air
Force officers.
THE CLASH between Israeli
Phantoms and Mirages and So-
viet MIGs occurred on July 30,
1970, when the Soviet piloted
jets, then part of Egypt's air
defenses, chased Israeli recon-
naissance planes returning from
a mission over Egypt.
The Soviets had 10 or more
planes in the air against six Is-
raeli fighters, the pilot recalled.
Within minutes, three of the
MIGs were shot down.
The pilot, who shot down the
fourth one, said in his story that
although his Soviet adversary
was in a superior combat posi-
tion at the outset, he did not
know how to utilize his advant-
age.
"I DO not know what the Rus-
sian guy thought. What became
apparent to me is that he was
inexperienced and was not
aware of the basic moves in
such circumstances," the pilot
wrote.
After the Russian "did two
things that are simply not
done," the Israeli brought him
down with an air-to-air missile.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
There appeared in the local
press, several days ago, a news
item to the effect that Presi-
dent Stanford, of the University
of Miami, intended to urge the
University of Miami Board of
Trustees to provide land, a
building, and financial support
for a Cuban Studies Center at
the university in recognition of
the needs of Cuban students
and also in recognition of the
contributions which Cubans
have made to the University of
Miami.
That's all very nice. I wish
the Cubans well.
I AM an older Jewish student
from Coral Gables who has tak-
en many courses, off and on,
at the University of Miami over
the years. I know that there are
more Jewish students at the
University of Miami than there
are Cuban students, yet I do not
recall ever seeing or hearing of
such top-level support for a
Jewish Studies Program.
As for contributions by Jews,
well, I guess I was mistaken, I
thought Rosenstiel (marine sci-
ence). deHirsch Meyer (law
school), Mailman (center for re-
tarded children), Light (base-
ball field), Richter (library),
among others, were Jewish. Per-
haps they are really Cuban. I do
not know them personally.
From another point of view,
iust among us Jews ourselves,
isn't it interesting that wealthy
Miami area Jews, in the distri-
bution of their philanthropy, do
not give money for Jewish edu-
cation (Jewish history, litera-
ture, philosophy, Hebrew)?
I REMEMBER clearly that
Louis D. Brandeis, before he
died, once pointed out that no
Jew can ever speak of himself
as a self-made man. Behind
every successful Jew, he point-
ed out. there is a long, vast
heritage of Jewish qualities and
characteristics which nurtured
and nourished and motivated
him to achieve whatever he
achieved.
"Let Thy Words Be Brief
KoheUth (Eceletiastet)
"'..... ; .
run from the room to regurgit-
ate.
The thing that strikes me
about the reports is that the
Harvard historian apparently
knows nothing about history.
HE IGNORES the fact that a
nation cannot change within a
matter of days, and that Arab
hostility against the Jews, no,
not Zionism, but Jews, is deep-
seated, and will not disappear
overnight.
He ignores the blandishments
of the Arabs themselves that
they will not keep any agree-
ment they make with Israel,
He ignores the instability ol
Arab governments, for exam-
ple, Lebanon, and the short life
expectancies of their leaders
HE IGNORES his own per-
sonal past experiences, and re-
fuses even to give an ear to
Israeli fears when confronted
by the Arab threats of continued
hostility, even if agreements are
reached, on paper.
In short, American interests
cannot be served in any area of
the world by such a Secretary
of State.
ARTHUR ROTH
Miami
& ft iJ
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian.
National Hebrew
isnuu Gin ami iwc
far Mrrrvoft Sttt
(religious Articles Clffi
?49 Washington Ave. 532-2210
Dado's Heart Couldn't Bear
Heavy Burden Alone-Rabin
American Israeli
All Religious Articles
Poy Synagogues Schools Homes
13S7 WASHINGTON AVE.
H 1-7772 S. Schwarti
REIG0, INC
Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books t Records
'507 Washington AvoMe
HONE 532-5912
Continued from Page 1-A
state of unpreparedness at the
onset of the war.
"HE BORE this burden silent-
ly and courageously but his
heart could eventually bear it
no longer, and he fell," Rabin
said.
"When the full story of the
Yom Kippur War is toldDado
will no longer be amongst us,"
the Premier added.
According to halacha, there
are no eulogies during the
month of Nissan, and Rabin
therefore confined himself to a
brief appreciation at the grave-
side.
He recalled Elazar's earliest
days as a fighter and comman-
der in the crack Palmach bri-
gade during the War of Inde-
pendence. The young Elazar
played a vital role in wresting
south Jerusalem from the Arab
Legion, the Premier said. (Ra-
bin was himself a senior Pal-
mach officer under Gen. Yigal
Allon.)
ELAZAR'S LIFE, said Rabin,
symbolized total devotion to the
cause of the Jewish national
revival and the upbuilding of
Israel's defensive strength
"Dado was one of our most
excellent warriors. He reflect-
ed all the best qualities of the
Jewish fighter: courage, com-
radeship in arms, heroism, mag-
nanimity in victory, a deep at-
tachment to the land and to the
people."
It was Elazar, said Rabin, who
had led Zahal from the disas-
trous start of the Yom Kippur
War whose significance he
clearly understood to final
victory. He had always accepted
his responsibility as Chief of
Staff for the opening situation
but objected to having to
shoulder the blame alone.
And yet, when it comes to
giving their money, after they
have made their fortunes, they
avoid the area of Jewish learn-
ing, of Jewish education, like
the plague.
It is absolutely disgraceful.
MRS. E. M. GOTLIEB
Miami
* a &
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In a recent article in The
Jewish Floridian four Conserva-
tive rabbis announced the for-
mation of a new North Dade
Vaad Hakashruth organization.
In the article, it is stated that
"A corporate supervision, such
as that of the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations or
the North Dade Vaad Ha-Kash-
rut, is a nonprofit organization."
Even though it is correct that
we are a non-profit organiza-
tion, I think that the use of our
name as an example and a sup-
posed colleague of the North
Dade Vaad Ha-Kashrut is un-
fortunate and misleading.
The use of our name to sub-
stantiate the credibility of these
four rabbis is unwarranted, and
I am certain that vour readers
will be aware of this.
RABBI BEREL WETN
Rabbinic Administrator
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America
New York
fr -ir -fr
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Anybody who has been fol-
lowing the reports of Secretary
Kissinger's conversations in re-
cent publications has to follow
the example of one high Israeli
official, who reportedly had to
The Southern Sociological So-
ciety sponsored a session on
"The Sociology of American
Jewry" at its recent annual con-
vention at the Deauville Hotel.
There was no local rabbi, lay-
man or Jewish educator pres-
ent, although the discussant
was Jerome A. Wolfe of the
Sociology Department of thfc
University of Miami. For my-
self, an attendant, the most
interesting paper was that by
Walda Katz Fishman of Howard
University, "Jewish Youth: The
Reality Beyond the Myth." Wal-
da is the wife of Fishman, the
Jewish educator, and he was
co-author of her paper.
MANY OF her statements con-
firmed what A. B. Wiener stated
in his recent letter which you
published. Money for synagogue
schools, further increases for
Jewish teachers, and the incor-
poration of courses in ballet
dancing and photography will
not prevent the loss of our chil-
dren to Judaism.
Judaism, Prof. Fishman,
stressed, must be an integral
part of the home. It must be
practiced in every facet of the
lives of parents so that children
will not be faced with the dich-
otomy of hearing one thing in
Talmud Torah classes and see-
ing their parents completely
ignoring the lessons to which
the children are exposed.
An apt illustration of this
dichotomy may be seen at some
of our schools where classes are
held on Saturday mornings.
CHILDREN are driven to tem-
ple and then the parent, usually
the mother, drives off and re-
turns to nick up the child after
school.
It appears that there is the
thought in the minds of the
parents that they are forbidden
mend Saturday morning
to
services.
SEYMOUR
Miami
B. LIEBMAN


I April 30, 1976
+JewUHhrMkM)
Page 13*A
il> MINDLIN
\eaning of Meaning of Words a Problem
Continued from Page 4-A
in what Le Due Tho under-
them to mean, or better
^t, meant them to mean.
rYou would think, as I say,
^at the nightmare of linguis-
cs would keep our Secretary
. State away from any further
itile debate on that subject.
If on Mar. 26 he said one
ling, and on Apr. 23 President
Ford said another, how could
possibly matter? Didn't he
know by then that it is absurd
\o expect something to mean
anything?
No.
THERE WAS Dr. Kissinger,
[on the first leg of his trip to
I Africa, once more defining the
[meaning of what he meant.
There was no disagreement
| between him and Ford. With
respect to U.S. recognition of
I Hanoi, it only SEEMED that he
had said yes and Ford no.
Explained Kissinger, "It was
the President's assessment that
since we had not been given a
satisfactory answer with re-
: spect to the missing in action,
he saw no prospect for nor-
malizing relations."
THE KEY here is not the
MIA issue. It is the President's
Le Due Tho's. We simply failed
to fight hard enough over that
issue.
In all of the recent unfor-
tunate talk about Dr. Kissin-
ger's future, no one has recom-
mended that he read Empson
or Stace. Perhaps someone
should.
Understanding the meaning
of meaning would not only help
him in foreign affairs. Take the
Woodward-Bernstein book, "The
Final Days," a massive cata-
logue of words.
Kissinger's initial reaction to
the book, like former Presi-
dent Nixon's, was resentment
and even rage.
TO COMPOUND the problem
that meaning of meaning pre-
Israelis are in Anxiety Situation
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Alexander M. Schin-
dler, who recently made his
first official visit to Israel as
chairman of the Conference
of Presidents of Major
American Organizations, said
he found a feeling of
anxiety and unhappiness
throughout Israeli society
"from right to left, from top
to bottom."
But, "beneath this outer
shell," Schindler stressed,
he found that the Israelis,
"as always," were united as
a people and ready to make
sacrifices and determined to
pursue national goals once
assessment" the President's they are fully articulated,
inferred meaning of the implied
meaning of the Mar. 26 Kissin-
ger pronouncement which is at
variance with Kissinger's own
assessment" of his meaning.
After all, it is such a personal
thing, meaning.
I am here reminded of the
struggle over the peace talks
table in Paris when that saddest
of sad pages in American his-
tory began.
What shape shall the table
be oblong, square, oval, cir-
cular? What shall its dimen-
sions be?
IF THERE had been no strug-
gle over the meaning of such
matters of substance at the very
beginning, Hanoi might not be
in Saigon today. If, for exam-
ple, a table in the form of an
.ellipse rather than a circle or
la square had been used, the
war might well have ended in
a "victory" for our side, not
HE MADE his remarks in an
interview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency at the offices
of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations of which
they believe is strong and has
made the needed changes in
response to the Yom Kippur
War.
THE PRESIDENT'S Confer-
ence leader stressed that pes-
simism may have been especial-
ly high during his visit because
it came at a time of unrest on
the West Bank, demonstrations
by Israeli Arabs in the Galilee,
the controversy in Washington
over the sale of C-130 trans-
port planes to Egypt and the
$550 million in transitional
quarter aid sought by Israel,
and Ambassador William Scran-
ton's attack in the United Na-
tions Security Council on Is-
rael's policies in East Jerusa-
lem and the West Bank.
At the same time, Schindler
said, the constant self-criticism
he heard may also be due to
the "Jewish penchant for self-
flagellation and exaggerating
the problem as worse than it
really is."
He noted that Israeli news-
he is president. Schindler said papers, especially, tend to exag-
that unlike previous visits of gerate the problems that Israel
the Presidents Conference to
Israel where contact was limit-
ed to government officials, he
sought to meet with Israelis of
all views and from all segments
of the society.
'I met with 40 to 50 people
in four days and held talks
starting at 6 a.m. and ending at
)0 p.m. to midnight," he said.
Schindler said Israel's prob-
lem is not only the lack of arti-
culation of goals but also the
present form of elections which
makes reforms difficult be-
cause of the effectiveness ot
pressure groups.
However, he
noted that Israelis have com-
plete faith in the army which
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has with the United States.
HOWEVER, Israelis are deep-
ly concerned about the Amer-
ican attitude, Schindler said.
"The one question by everyone
was 'has American decided to
abandon Israe?'" Schindler
said.
He said there is a "desperate
reliance" by Israelis on the
American Jewish community.
Israelis realize "America is Is-
rael's only friend" and they
look to the American Jewish
community to influence Amer-
ican foreign policy, Schindler
stressed.
"We, the American Jewish
community, are essentially a
self-confident community,"
Schindler said. "We speak up
for Israel when it is popular
and pray for the strength to do
so when it is not."
Schindler said the Israeli
view the Presidents Conference
as the voice of the American
Jewish Community. He said
they accept his view that the
Presidents Conference should
take stands on issues that con-
cern it without necessarily con-
sulting with the Israelis.
THE REFORM Judaism lead-
er said the major problem for
American Jewry is to turn the
Presidents Conference into a
deliberative body where deci-
sions can be made on a dem-
ocratic basis. He said this is
what he is trying to do and has
alieady taken steps by having
leaders of the United Jewish
Appeal, United Israel Appeal
and the Jewish Federations sit
in on meetings. Schindler said
Assassinations
Are Predicted
Continued from Page 1-A
the Libyan ruling Junta.
In addition to the use of for-
eign terrorists, Qaddhafi is also
said to be using small teams of
newly-trained Libyans, so far
without success.
THE TIMES adds that Qad-
dhafi's new terror campaign
should be seen against the back-
ground of closer Libyan rela-
tions with the Soviet Union in
the wake of Egypt's decision to
break diplomatic relations with
the Soviet Union.
he hopes to institutionalize
these changes so they will be
carried on when he leaves the
chairmanship.
Asked about the criticism by
Rabbi Mordechai Waxman in
his valedictory address as
president of the Rabbinical As-
sembly in which he criticized
the Presidents Conference as
being reactive rather than de-
liberative, Schindler said he
later received a note from the
Consenative leader. He said
Waxman said he would not
have made the charges if he
had been aware of the changes
Schindler was making.
SCHINDLER said this year
the Presidents Conference has
an added responsibility be-
cause of the Presidential elec-
tions. He stressed the group is
non-partisan but it must deal
with the Presidential candidates
as well as the President.
He said the Presidents Con-
ference will be concerned with
the platforms worked out by
the parties at the national con-
ventions and with the foreign
policy advisors that the can-
didates choose.
The Israelis look at the up-
coming election with fear,
Schindler noted, because they
know the policies of the Ford
Administration and they do not
know what a new Administra-
tion will do.
sents to us, it should be remem-
bered that Nixon had hardly
any interest in what the words
meant at all, that is to say, the
moral aspersions the words
cast on his presidency.
All he wanted to know, and
from continuing accounts still
wants to know, is who spilled
the beans to Woodward and
Bernstein. The meaning of that
long catalogue of words to
Nixon, apparently, is not moral
but a call to arms to "get" the
traitor who ratted.
Not so with Dr. Kissinger,
who is an infinitely more com-
plex man. To Dr. Kissinger, the
Woodward-Bernstein book is an
abomination because the words
are "inaccurate" and therefore
unfair (a moral judgment Nixon
wouldn't even make).
WHERE IS it inaccurate and
unfair?, he has twice been ask-
ed by legislators on Capitol Hill
anxious to prevent the former
President from being further
tyrannized by the meaning of
meaning (for example, the fa-
mous April, 1974 television ap-
pearance in which Nixon, flank-
ed by stacks of Watergate tran-
scripts, and by a bust of Abra-
ham Lincoln, told us the mean-
ing of those transcripts when
he declared that in the words
of those transcripts was the
whole story, so help him).
Well, replied Dr. Kissinger,
it really isn't so much the in-
accuracy of the words in the
book as the "tone" of the words
he resents (a second moral
judgment).
Where?, the legislators press-
ed him further, is the tone de-
plorable.
HOW COULD he be expect-
ed to know?, Dr. Kissinger an-
swered, since the fact was that
he hadn't even read the Wood-
ward-Bernstein book
Reading the Hook could have
nothing to do with anything,
could it?, least of all its tone.
In the end, I suppose, re-
commending Empson and Stace
to our Secretary of State would
be a redundant act anyway,
since he apparently can see
meaning in no words at all.
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Page
14-A
+Jewtslifhr*MLW
Friday, April 30, 1976
h
*
LEGAL NOTKI
NOTICE UNDID
FICTITIOUS NAHI LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVW
the undersigned, desiring to rntut 1b
business under the fictitious unit of
TEXICOLOR SUPPLY COMPANY at
1620 N.E. 108 Street. Miami. Fla..
SS1C1 Intenda to register gald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Da.de County. Florida.
LIMA H. BERTOT
4/9-18-11-30
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP YHB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-10863
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: the marriage of
ROBERT O. NOVAK.
Husband,
and
ELAINE NOVAK.
Wife
TO: ELAINE NOVAK
residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed HKalnst yoa and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
A. NORMAN DRUCKER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 420 Mn-
eoln Road, Suite 601, Miami Beach,
Florida, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before May 12, 1976; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI-ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
Sth day of April, 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
llv I. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A NORMAN DRUCKER
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
4/9-16-28-30
r8 Across, 10 Down-i
IMA4 MOTKI
by Irv Brechner
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-10974
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
I^APSON DORSONNE.
Husband,
vs.
LEO LA K DORSONNE.
Wife.
You, Leola K. Dorsonne. residence
unknown, are hereby notified to .serve
a copy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed against you,
upon husband's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida 33136. and file
original with Clerk of Court on or be-
fore May 14, 1976; otherwise the Pe-
tition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: M. HERRERA
Deputy Clerk
4/9-18-21-30
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 76-11066
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JOSE ZUNIGA.
Husband.
OBORGINA ZUNIGA.
Wife.
You. Georglna Zunlga. residence
unknown, are hereby notified to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Dissolution of Marriage filed against
you. upon husband's attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 611 N.W.
11th Avenue, Miami, Florida 3318*.
and file original with Clerk of the
Court on or before May 14. 1979;
otherwise the Petition will be confess-
ed by you.
Dated this 6th day of April. 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, CLERK
By: R M. KISSEE
Deputy Clerk
4/9-1(13-80
I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OP
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-11137
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
\ RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
'IEGO HORTA.
'etttioner/Husband.
and
KMZABETH HORTA.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ELIZABETH HORTA
Star Ht.Box 685A
Tonopan, Arizona 85364
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on Marcelo M. Agudo, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is AGUDO,
ANTON A PINEIRO. 1(47 8.W. 27th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 18145. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 14. 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
6th day of April, 1978
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B. MPPS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Marcelo M. Agudo
AGUDO. ANTON A PINEIRO
16(7 8.W. 27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145
(806) 854-2(43
Attorney for Petitioner
4/8-16-18-10
2 in Yiddish
us Mitel
5 the Father ol
Jewish Emancipation
8 Potok s book lype
ol people Jews are
I? discoverer ol
polio vaccine
14 m Yiddish ii s eiit /ich'
'5 in Yiddish its rnir
16 whal one repents lor
17 in Yiddish its lislinqer
19 ol Israel
21 Israeli town southwest ol
Hebron
25 very low level Body ol water
Sea
26 desert tood
21 in Yiddish it s krenk
28 Yiddish lor I
Yiddish tor cheaply
made arlirle
good as gold
Yidrtisn lor bothering
or trouble
6 in Yiddish it s ess
1 Israeli unit ol land
9 in Yiddish it s jun
10 lorm ol Yiddish word
essen
It New Hampshire laoor
13 in Yiddish it s salat
16 Spanish Jews
18 And we were
bondage in Egypt
20 ol Galilee
22 Southeast (aDbr i
23 OK to be worn m place
ol yarmulke
24 in Yiddish it s alls
Irom
This puzzle may not be reproduced without written
permission ol the author
Puzzle Answerg on Page 13-It
LMAl NOTKI
ECAl NOTICi
RE NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-6117
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERT WAYNE GOODALE
Petitioner
and
SANDRA JEAN GOODALE
Respondent
TO: SANDRA JEAN GOODALE
Ottawa. Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
yon are required to serve a coot of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
PHILIP AUERBACH. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 6599 Bls-
cayne Boulevard. Miami. Florida
33137, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before May 14th. 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
er petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
14th day of April. 197(.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
4/M-10 6/7-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring; to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of MAONIFIQUE SANDWICHES A
RESTAURANT at 9812 Fontalnebleau
Blvd., Miami. Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
EATS, INC.
By: JAIMIE F OOUDIB
BMTSTEIN AND MOLANS
Attorneys for EATS. INC.
1440 N.W. 14th Avenue
Miami, Florida 31128
____________________________4/9-19-13-39
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 76-10681
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BEhTRAND J. JACQUES.
Husband,
?a.
BOBBIE J. JACQUE8.
Wife.
You. Bobbie J. Jacques, residence
unknown, are hereby notified to serve
a copy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed against you.
upon husband's attorney. GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida 83138. and file
original with Clerk of Court on or be-
fore May 14, 1976; otherwise the Pe-
tition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 6th day of April. 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER CLERK
By: M. HERRERA
Deputy Clerk
4/9-18-13-8*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNYY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-106M
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
DAVID FRANK IVY
Petitioner
and
BARBRO INGER YVONNE IYY.
Respondent
TO: BARBRO INGER YVONNE
IVY (Lorgvlst)
Sufflorgat. 7
11481 Malmo
Sweden
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marlage has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If any. to it
on ELMS S. SIMRINO. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address
Is 810 Arthur Godfrey Road. Miami
Beach. Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 14. 1876; oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published ones
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
(th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida,
By R. M. KISSEE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ELLIS 8. SIMRINO. ESQ.
JROVER CIMENT WEINSTBIN
A STAUBER. P.A.
(10 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 11140
Attorney for Petitioner
4/1-18-13-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of PENGUIN AIRCONDITIONING at
12914 N.W. 7th Avenue. North Miami.
Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
PENGUIN AIR CONDITIONING
CORP.
MARTIN ROTH
Attorney for Corporation
1111 Alnsley Building
Miami. Florida 33132
4/9-18-18-10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
Of INTERNATIONAL PRINTING
EQUIPMENT A SUPPLY. INC. at
8910 Blscayne Blvd.. Miami. Fla.
33138 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
MR. LESLIE BI8ENBBRO
4/9-K-28-8*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of JERRY AND YVONNE'S DINER
at number 13900 Blscayne Blvd.. In
LfGAL NOTICI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 78-11177
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
at numoer taww dibckjiic oi?h JiT .".------.
the City of North Miami Beach. Flor- B*g*'Jgg&lgXf&m w k a
Ida. Intends to register the said name WINSTON GEORGE LEE husband,
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of and VELMA NICHOLSON LEE.
Dade County. Florida. ___w'f_.......________________
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at North Miami Beach, Flor-
ida, this 1st day of April, 1976.
CRQS8MAN BROTHERS. INC.
By: Philip J. Crossman. President
Attorney for Applicant
Mortimer 8. Cohen
Suite 800 Alnsley Bldg
14 N.E. 1st Ave.
Miami. Florida 38132
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PLANT FARE at 14979 South Dixie
Hwy., Miami, Fla.. 33158 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
JEANNE E. ZIMMERMAN
4/23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
RE-LUCKI FASHIONS at 440 SW. 8
St.. Miami. Fla.. 33130 Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Flor-
ida.
LUCRECIA FERRER 50%
REINA E. PENA 50%
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in tmsiness under the fictitious name
of OFFSHORE SALVAGE SERVICES
at 178 Mac Arthur Causeway, Miami
Beach, Florida 331.19 Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the [^"r RwhoJa,le8rd
Circuit Court of Dade County. Flor- r^,, Su|(e ^g M|am| Beacn jjj-
and file (he original with the clerk of
TO: VELMA NICHOLSON LEE
38 Lagoon Avenue
Harbour View. Kingston 17
Jamaica. West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
herein on the Petitioner's Attorney.
MURRAY Z. KLEIN. Suite 800. Sey-
bold Building, 36 N.E. 1st Street. Mi-
ami. Florida, and file the original in
the office of the Clerk of said Circuit
Court on or before May 14. 1976. or
said cause will be taken as confessed
by you.
Dated this 7th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
B. LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
4/9-16-28-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-10887
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SHIRELY WATSON FRYE
Petitioner. Wife
AND
GEORGE ROBERT FRYE
Respondent-Husband
TO: OEORGE ROBERT FRYE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any to It on
I/iiiis R. Heller, attorney for Petl-
ddress Is 420 Uneoln
Ida.
OFFSHORE SCIENTIFIC
SERVICES. INC.
BY: JACK L. KLUENER
Secretary-Treas.
BY: JACK L. KLUEVER
President
ARTHUR S. DAVIS
Attorney for OFFSHORE SCIENTI-
FIC SERVICES. INC.
4/9-16-28-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-11466
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI8ION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JEANNETTE GIBBONS.
Wife. Petitioner
and
ALVIN BERNARD GIBBONS.
Husband. Respondent.
TO: ALVIN BERNARD GIRFDNS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution oi Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to it on
DANIEL RETTER. ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 801
Dade Federal Building. 101 East Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before May
15. 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
18th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
,. As Deboty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 83131
Phone: 368-8090
Attorney for Petitioner
4/14-23-30 i/T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE,
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 76-11912
IN RE: The Marriage of
FERNANDO M. VIERA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MAYRA TUMAS VIERA.
Respondent/Wife
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
TO: MAYRA TUMAS VIERA
(Residence and Address
Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to It on
G Alexander Nobll. Esq.. Attorney for
the above styled court on or before.
May 12, 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
4/9-16-21-80
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of GLOBE CHEM at 7124 N.W.
Court No. A, Miami. Fla.. 33150 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
BENJAMIN DOUADI
4/9-16-11-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2276
,, J?'vi,,on jO*KPH NESBITT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSE WLADAWSKY
Deceased
N7!C OF ADMINISTRATION
JO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
S Ef TATE8 'NTE**TED
thY,H. ARB, HEREBY NOTIFIED
. t the administration of the estate
of JOSE WLADAWSKY. deceased!
File Number 76-2276. I, pending Intte
Circuit Court for Dade County. Plor-
'.??i fr<.ba,e. Dlvln. the address of
",P .,8Dde County Courthouse.
fi West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
. .Tne,Personal representative of the
-*" i8. JULIUS WLADAWSKYl
1709, Miami Beach. Florida 33160 The
2S2M22 "ddre the personal reo-
below ttorney sxe set forth
All persons having claims or de-
SSBSryJSSi ,ne e8,a, B required.
W'THIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBM
with'?" I8 NOTICE.^,
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mn, k hfy m/*y have- ^ch claim
8K"i be ,n writing and must indicate
irtVbl""8 'or the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due. the date
when i, will become due shall beiaUU
Hi*-, the claim Is contingent or unll--
nu.dated, the nature of the uncertainty "
'Sfdn b.'. 8,a,e cured, the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
C0Pk,8 L ,ne clalm to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy \%
each personal representative
,n .i,v.plrson8 '"terested In the estate
I-nW .0m..a C0J,y of ,hl8 Ntlce of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
Petitioner, whose address is 32 NB FROM TBn'naTaT^Ffi.lf0!^"
26 Street, Miami. Florida 33137. and I'm I tc.vAr^?0TAE FIRST
f,.e_,he.origina. with th. clerk of th. SS^B^SfSSffSSi
above styled court on or before May
21, 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the petition.
This notice shall be published once
each~)i'S,ek .our consecutive weeks
,n,THE.,.JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on this
14th day of April. 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M J. HARTNETT
, Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
G. Alexander Nobll. Esa
Attorney for Petitioner
321 N.E. 26 Street
Miami. Florida 33137
Tel: 379-1437
4/K-23-30 5/7
ebaiiengei- the validity' of" the de<
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court
TFrTini^'M,S^DE,^ANDS AND OB-
,,V.CT.i,NS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 28*
JULIUS WLADAWSKY
^s^^Tj&Tw^a-wIk?'
Rep^N|^vnal
SJPSgRT SHAPIRO
SHfiSS: "^"P' WEIL SCHEER
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 518-63(1
4/21-M
.""*


ay, April 30, 1976
^JewlsHhrkttMi
Page 15-A
TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS TO BE CELEBRATED MAY 5
\For Israel, it Has Been Siege of Military Sacrifice
By SHIMON PERES
\srael Minister of Defense
The people of Israel have
lever had what other people
ossessextensive areas, plen-
bful water resources, rich nat-
iral resources and prolonged
eriods of peace and tranquil-
ly. But our people possesses
komething that most other peo-
ples cannot boast of a deep
nd implicit faith, historical
bontinuity and a wonderful
youth. We are a people that has
faith in man. By nature the
|jew is a believer.
Now who was it that gave us
[this land? What was it that be-
I stowed this sovereignty upon
I the Jewish people? It was the
Bible in which the spirit of the
Jewish people inheres, and it
was its militant youth which,
by its courage and ability,
transformed the Jewish spirit
of old into a new reality.
Defense Minister Peres talks with Arabs in Hebron.
NO, IT was not hardware but
the men behind the guns who
gained victory for Israel in its
wars for survival. It was not
luck that played such a promi-
nent role in Israel's successes,
but wisdom and resourceful-
ness. Not numbers tipped the
balance in Israel's favor, but
the quality and standard of the
Jewish combatant, the young
Jew who faced danger unflinch-
ingly and overcame it.
The Israeli soldier is differ-
ent from the accepted norm in
other armies. The Israeli pri-
vate has the intelligence of a
senior commander. In time of
need he can appraise the situa-
tion for himself, plan his
moves, size up the surrounding
terrain, establish human con-
tacts with his comrades in arms,
gain full command of the weap-
ons at his disposal and make
decisions.
HE IS capable of being his
own General Staff. Even when
alone in the field, he knows
how to storm the enemy, ex-
ploit successes, avoid impedi-
ments and, even at the cost of
his own life, give his people
the maximum which arouses
the wonder and admiration of
the whole world.
The Israeli commander also
differs from his counterparts in
other armies. He is imbued
with a readiness and willing-
ness to fulfill the functions not
only of an officer but also of a
soldier in the ranks. He aspires
to be among the storming forc-
es and, with weapon in hand,
fifilits face to face with the
enemy at the head of his com-
rades in arms.
First and foremost, he feels
as one of a group, not cut off
from his men in the scale of
danger. The Israeli command-
er is also his own soldier.
THROUGH THEIR fighting
and their death, our sons be-
stowed upon their people a
homeland and a hope, and
through their heroism they en-
riched our people with a new
example that will illumine fu-
ture generations with a light
and lustre that will never dim
Dinitz to Address 'Yom Haatzmaut' Rally Saturday
Continued from Page 1-A
I States has taken part in a Yom
| Haatzmaut event in Florida, al-
though the combined Dade-
Broward observance has been
the largest observance of Israel
Independence Day in this coun-
try for the past several years.
Tickets for the event, at
which there will be no fund-
raising, may be secured at the
offices of Hadassah, Pioneer
Women, American Mizrachi
Women, Labor Zionist Alliance,
B'nai Zion and the Zionist Or-
ganization of America. Head-
quarters for the rally are at the
American Zionist Federation of-
fice in the 60S Lincoln Road
Building. The meeting is spon-
sored by the AZF, with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion serving as co-sponsors.
Mrs. Harriet Green, presi-
dent of the South Florida Zion-
ist Federation, in coordinator of
the rally, which is expected to
attract some 10,000 persons to
the Miami Beach Convention
Center, 1700 Washington Ave.
She is former national vice
president of the American Zion-
ist Federation and president of
the South Florida Council of
Pioneer Women.
GERALD SCHWARTZ, South-
east regional director of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel, is chairman of the rally.
He is past president of the
South Florida Zionist Federa-
tion and a member of the AZF
national board.
Misha Rait, in, a leading tenor
of the New York Metropolitan
Opera, headlines the entertain-
ment program. He will be ac-
companied by noted Israeli com-
poser and conductor Shmuel
Fershko.
Javits in Pow-Wow With Sadat
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
en. Jacob Javits (R.-N.Y.),
irho is Jewish, flew in here last
eek on a tour of the Mideast.
He had spent the previous
.ekend in Egypt where he
eld lengthy talks with Presi-
ent Anwar Sadat.
ISRAELI interest focused es-
cially on these talks, and also
. a private meeting the Sen-
or reportedly had before he
ft the U.S. with President
Drd, where the "transitional
i" issue was understood to
ave been discussed.
| In a news conference in
,.pt, Javits stated for the
cond time during his visit
ere how impressed he had
en by Sadat's sincere desire
achieve a peaceful settle-
nt.
[He noted, though, that he and
iat had agreed to disagree
Br PLO's role in a possible
tiement.
lAVITS' MEETING with Ford
interpreted by some Israeli
Espondents in the U.S. as a
first sign that the President
^Ejtion to the transitional aid
er which Israel was to have
eived $550 million for the
Ivsry one* in while
' Famous Restaurant
is born.. .We were
bom in 194*
July to October period this year
during which U.S. government
will shift the dates of its bud-
getary year.
There have been reports,
some linked with the Javits-
Ford meeting, that Ford has in-
dicated he would be amenable
to a compromise in which the
U.S. would hand over half of
the original aid request.
Javits was due to report first
hand to Premier Rabin on his
meetings with Ford and with
Sadat. He also met with Defense
Minister Shimon Peres, For-
eign Minister Allon, Golda Meir,
Gen. Dayan, Abba Eban and
Menahem Begin.
At his request, a meeting was
also arranged with the new in-
formation director general, Prof.
Sholomo Avineri.
MEANWHILE, the Prime Min-
ister's top aide, Amos Eran,
publicity reiterated that Israel
was taken by surprise by the
administration's decision, dur-
ing march, to oppose the tran-
sitional aid.
Interviewed in Haaretz, Eran
said, Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger had informed Prime
Minister Rabin, and had later
also informed leading Senators,
that the administration would
not opnose the aid provided the
Congress itself initiated the
legislation.
A letter to this effect, signed
by top State Department Aide,
Robert McKloskey, had been
sent to Congress in mid-March,
and the administration's rever-
sal had occurred soon after this.
ERAN MADE the comments
in response to a Haaretz article
by columnist Joel Marcus who
pointed out that U.S. Ambassa-
dor Malcolm Toon claimed Is-
rael "ought not to have been
surprised" by the administra-
tion's decision.
Either Toon or Rabin was
telling an untruth, Marcus wrote
Sunday, and he challenged the
Premier's office to issue a pub-
lic statement rebirtting the en-
voy's 'fusion. Eran's comments
were intended to do just that.
Com* moy ow HMMBMNf
kimuu* cuiikk
MIAMI BEACH 331-3M7
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El and former
national president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America, will
extend greetings in behalf of
the rabbinate. He is national
vice president of the Zionist
Organization of America.
KEN TAYLOR, news director
of radio station WGBS and tele-
vision commentator, will read
Israel's proclamation of inde-
pendence, which was read by
David Ben Gurion on the
fifth of Iyar, May 14, 1948.^
Israel Independence Day,
Yom Haatzmaut, takes place
Wednesday night, but the local
observance was shifted to Sat-
urday night so that Ambassador
Dinitz could participate, Mrs.
Green said.
Resolutions on American sup-
port for Israel, the plight of
Syrian, Iraqi and Soviet Jewry
and on the upbuilding of the
Zionist movement will be pre-
sented to the mass audience,
Schwartz said.
Song and dance groups will
offer Israeli music to the crowd
representing more than 32,000
paid members of the American
Zionist Federation in South
Florida.
RAITZIN, who was one of the
Soviet Union's foremost opera
stars before fleeing to Israel,
sang with the opera companies
of both Moscow and Leningrad
before emigrating to the Jew-
ish state. He studied at the
Moscow Conservatory.
Joseph P. Zuckerman, South-
eastern regional representative
of the Labor Zionist Alliance, is
arr"",rr>',i- chairman Sey-
mour B. Liebman of Miami, na-
tional vice president of the
American Zionist Federation, is
working with Mrs. Green and
I ,.i hnning the dem-
onstration of solidarity with the
neonle of Israel.
ROYAL HUNGARIAN IBB RESTAURANT
Celebrates the American Bicentennial with Daily Specials!
Sharing Plan and A La Carte Also No Frill Dinners
No Chartie for Sharing if Ordered with Skeleton
PLEASE RESERVE FOR YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT MEAIS
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
KOSHER
CUISINE
AIR conditioned
ROYAL PHI
HOTEL
M>MX
ONTHE-OCEAN
DINING ROOM
NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
PMONfANNIDUN
FOR RESERVATIONS 531-7111
1S45 COLLINS AVI., MIAMI IEACH
DINNER HOUR S TO 7 P.M.
SABRA KOSHER
RESTAURANT
Direct from
SABRA KOSHER RESTAURANT
INCHICAGO
nSR^ELTENTERTAT?3MeVT
WEEKENDS
]
TH ICILY
KOSHtK
OPEN DAILY
4 P.M.
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH 531-6739 531-6730


Page 16-A
-jewistnuAMam
Friday, April 30, 1976
NORTON TIRE CO-
WHEKE Y3U ARE THE IMPORTANT ONE!
Back in 1924 my father, Louis E. Pallot, started Norton
Tire Company on a simple business philosophy.
Treat the customer right and he'll be back. We are still
a family business... now with 22 stores throughout Florida
...still following that advice. We strive to give you the
best product, the best price and the best service every
time. We appreciate your business. At Norton Tire
Company you are the important one. Ron, Howard and
I guarantee it.
NORTON S. PALLOT
President
WE CARRY
ONLY THE VERY
FINEST PRODUCTS
FOR YOUR CAR
B.EGoodrich
CHELIN
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
I.R.I.
ALL STEEL RADIAL
THE 50,000 MILE TIRE
Plus our own line
of specially priced
private label
tires offering you
excellent service
at the lowest price.
B.EGoodrich
SILVERTOWN
BELTED
WHITEWALLS
PHYBTHICOn,HBBICUSSnTS
OWflNJUEUTOPMBfTTW
A7B-1:
, Plus 1 75
I F.E. Tax
i-Trada
SIZE PRICE F.E. TAX
C78-14 31.96 2.05
D78-14 33.16 2.12
E78-14 34.51 2.27
F78-14 35.61 2.43
Q78-14 37.07 2.60
H78-14 39.32 2.83
F78-15 37.70 2.54
Q78-15 38.86 2.65
H78-15 40.22 2.87
J78-15 41.12 3.03
1.78-15 43.41 3.14
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
PREMIUM, 4 PLY
POLYESTER
WHITEWALLS
E78-14.
Plus 2 25
F.E. Ta
& Trade
SIZE
IF78-14
Q78-14 27.01
Q78-15 27.06
H78-15
L78-15
PRICE
25.42
_28i5_1_
30.50
F.E. TAX
IMPORTED RADIALS
_____FOR FOI ___SIZE_____ 1S5SR-IJ IEIQN S SPORT! '..'. PRICE. 25.95 CARS F.E. TAX 1.M
MSSR-13 22.95 1.33
_1MSB-1}____ I65SR-11 26.95 27.95~" ______1 6 1.60
IUSR-14 26.95 1.69
17SSR-M 29.95 187
I85SH-I4 31.95 LSI
I55SR-I}_ 29.95 163
--'MSR-.l*___ 31.95 ''
NORTON TIRE CO'b. LIMITED WARRANTY
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
If for any reason you are not completely satisfied with
any new passenger car tire you buy from Norton Tire
Co., return it, along with your original invoice, within
90 dajfs of the date of purchase, and your money will be
refunded in full no questions asked! Commercial ve-
hicles excluded.
EXPERTLY TRAINED
STAFF OF
MECHANICS
FOR YOUR CAR CARE
WHEEL BALANCE
ALIGNMENT
BRAKES
STEERING
BATTERY
BRAKE SPECIAL
FOR DISC BRAKES
Install new Delco
(not rebuilt) front wheel
disc pads
Check rotors & calipers
Repack outer front wheel
bearings (if needed)
Adjust and bleed brakes
(if needed)
Add brake fluid (if needed)
Check & Adjust rear brakes
COMPACT & INTERMEDIATE CARS
$
29
96
LUXURY CARS
$34.95
BUDGETTERMS
AVAILABLE
WE HONOR:
MASTER CHARGE
BANKAMERICARD
AMERICAN EXPRESS
DINERS CLUB
SHOPPERS CHARGE
CENTRAL MIAMI
5300 N.W. 27th Ave. 634-1556
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13300 N.W. 7th Ava. 681-8541
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 163 St. 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
. B001 8. Dixla Hwy. 687-7575
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINQS UH.C
1275 49th St. 822-2800
CUTLER MDOK
S. Dixie Hwy. 233-8241
o, ..WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Rds. 552-8658
,. HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy. 247-1622
WHOUYWdOD
97 S. Slate Rd. 7 987-0450
,,.. Jl- LAUDBJDALE
1740 E. Sunriaa Blvd. 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N. Stata Rd. 1 587-2188
POMPANO BEACH
3151 NJFederal Hwy. 943-4200
*E8T PALM BEACH *^
515 South Dlxla 832-3044
LAME PARK, N. PALM BEACH
532 N. Lake Blvd. 846-2544
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St. 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21itSlreat 567-1174
ORLANDO
3820 E. Colonial Dr. 888-1141
_ WINTER PARR
881 8. Orlando Ave. 648-5808
___OATTOMA BEACH
90T Voluala Ava. 255-7487
HAPIBB
2086 E. Tamlaml Tr. 774-4448
i


'Jewish Flor idian
Miami, Florida Friday, April 30, 1976
Section B
Professional Enrichment' Here
Model for Other Federations
During 1975, the Greater Mi-
ii Jewish Federation and its
amily of local agencies helped
nitiate a "Jewish experience"
jr its professional employees.
The 120 professional men and
lomen in Jewish communal
lervice began to take part in
in innovative series of "Pro-
essional Enrichment Pro-
grams." A form of continuing
Education, these are a renewal
If Jewish consciousness and
jentity. And they promote bet-
|er acquaintance between coun-
;rparts and colleagues at vari-
ous agencies.
MOST important, "PEP" has
Llicked. At present, Miami is
Ine of 14 major American Jew-
ish communities instituting pro-
rams of this type. PEP's great
jccess in Miami was document-
in a report to the National
onference of Jewish Commu-
al Service, submitted by Fed-
ation executive vice presi-
ent, Myron J. Brodie; Jewish
ammunity Centers executive
^rector, Myron A. Berezin; and
entral Agency for Jewish for
iucation director of youth
rograms, Eugene Greenzweig.
"We set our goals three
ays," explained Brodie in dis-
using PEP's methodology.
First, we intended to program
vard increasing knowledge
|jd understanding of the 'Jew-
experience'. Second, we
inted professionals to examine
Irrent social issues and how
ey affect the Jewish commu-
|1 agencies. And third, we felt
was important to create a
eling of 'chavurah' among the
cal professionals."
[PEP sessions begin with con-
ntrated day-and-a-half study
grams, followed by three
narate evening sessions. Four
oups of 30 professionals each
pre enrolled in consecutive
-rams, ultimately reaching
the community's profession-
FACULTY was assembled
Qugh the Central Agency's
aica High School, and
lgh the Hillel Jewish Stu-
nt Centers, with PEP parti-
nts leading discussions,
opics covered included "The
fewish experience and how it
Hates to the Jewish profession-
l" 'Traditional and other Jew-
viewpoints on the right to
," "Intermarriage," "Tzeda-
l." and "Who is a Jew"
nong Bible and Talmud topics.
fFocusing on "Tzelim Elokim,"
concept of man being creat-
tother's Day At
Douglas Gardens
|The Greater Miami Women's
uxiliary, Jewish Home and
spital for the Aged, will hold
i annual Mother's Day party at
jglas Gardens, on Sunday,
9, at 2 p.m.
?or many years this party
hosted by Mrs. Jennie Gros-
ser, philanthropist and hu-
mitarian. This year Mrs.
ances Makovsky, program
airman, and her husband,
jis. will host the party, which
11 feature Morton Reed and
musicians (a grant from the
lisic Performance Trust Fund
ier agreement with the Amer-
Federation of Musicians).
Lawrence Silverman,
iliary president, will wel-
ne residents and guests. The
bile is invited. Refreshments
b* served.
ed in the divine image was a
discussion opener, and its im-
plications for the Jewish pro-
MYRON J. BRODIE
fessional were examined. Crea-
tive Shacharit morning worship
experiences were a part of the
PEP as well.
"AS OF April, 1976, three full
groups of 30 each have been
through the first session of
PEP," Brodie commented, "with
surprising results. The over-
whelming feeling is that these
experiences are greatly needed.
and serve several important pur-
poses.
"A fourth group will convene
next month," he said, "and the
first has already reconvened for
another evening study session.
Through this wise use of our
professional time, we're refin-
ing our own views on the issues
we deal with every day as Jew-
ish community professionals.
'"It's vital that we have a
well-rounded comprehension of
Jewish traditional viewpoints as
well as current thought and
trends," he said, "to do the best
job possible for the members of
our community. And in addi-
tion, we are getting to know
each other better simply by
spending PEP time together and
airing our feelings on the is-
sues.
"THE CAMARADERIE that
we are creating among profes-
sionals, even if taken by itself,"
he concluded, "is a tremendous
asset in the long run, since our
collective goal is to provide ef-
ficient and effective service to
our Jewish community."
The 14 American Jewish com-
munities with similar programs
in various stages of operation
are Baltimore, Boston. Buffalo-
Rochester, Cleveland, Hartford,
Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapo-
lis-St. Paul, New Jersey Metro-
politan Region, Pittsburgh, St.
Louis and Wilmington.
Pepper To Be Honored At
B'nai B'rith Patriotic Rally
Rep. Claude Pepper will be
honored at the B'nai B'rith
Lodge No. 1591 Memorial Day
Weekend Patriotic Rally. Spon-
sored by the Chase Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association, the
Rally will be at the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts on May 27 at 7:30 p.m.
Sharing in the entertainment
is the U.S. Marines Drum and
Bugle Corps, and there will be
a Presentation of the Colors by
the Marine Corps and the
Homestead Air Force Base Co-
lor Guard.
Participating in the program
are Congressmen Dante Fascell
and William Lehman, Miami
Beach Mayor Harold Rosen,
Rev. Garth Thompson, Rabbi
Dr. David Raab and Malcolm
Fromberg, president-elect of
B'nai B'rith District Five.
Also on the dais will be Barry
Gurland, president of the Flor-
ida State Association of B'nai
B'rith Lodges; Col. Philip Co-
hen, Southern Regional direc-
tor of Florida B'nai B'rith
Lodges; Neal Rosen, Florida
Lodge Services director; and
REP. PEPPER
Lou Hymson, president of South
Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
laxities.
The committee, headed by
Sam Pascoe, includes Thomas
Schwartz, president of Miami
Beach Lodje: Robert Skidell,
Lodge president-elect; Larry
Shuman and Moe Reiffen, past
Lodge presidents.
Mesivta Honoring the Chabners
The Mesivta of Greater Mi-
ami, Louis Merwtizer Senior
High School, will hold its dedi-
cation dinner Sunday, May 2, at
6 p.m. at the Algiers Hotel.
Charles Merwitzer, dinner chair-
man, and Melvin Feit, dinner
coordinator, announced that Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Chabner and
the Beth El Congregation, of
which Chabner is president, will
be honored.
The Chabners, played a major
role in the refurbishing of the
Mesivta building on Alton Rd.
Joseph Bistritz, president of the
Mesivta, explained that as well
as directing the expansion pro-
gram, which modernized the
learning facilities. Chabner per-
sonally supervised all of the
construction. The renovated
facilities will permit the school
to provide dormitory services
for many students. A science
laboratory, library and a student
lounge are among the projects
yet to be completed.
In the name of the faculty and
the student body Rabbi M. Blu-
menfeld, principal of the Mesiv-
ta, presented the Chabners with
a plaque, which is in the Mesiv-
ta building.
Watch for These
Future Events
WASHINGTON Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R., N.Y.),
back from a tour of the Middle East and meetings with
both Arab and Israeli leaders, will recommend to Pres-
ident Ford that the President visit the Middle East
and see for himself that the West Bank "in the wrong
hands" would be a dagger at the heart of Israel."
0
TEL AVIVThe West
Bank situation will con-
tinue to fester with spor-
adic outbreaks of vio-
lence particularly when
Herut leader Menachem
Beigin begins to press
his party's position that
an eviction of the Gush
Emunim settlers from
Kadum and Samaria
must lead to a govern-
ment crisis.
0
NEW YORK Col. Yevim Davidovich was killed
by the Soviet's KGB. That is what Prof. Alexander
Luntz, the noted Soviet Jewish mathematician now
living in Israel, will be charging. Luntz will warn against
taking at face value that Col. Davidovich died of a
heart attack in Minsk the story the Soviets have
thus far been telling the world.
0
MELBOURNE Australia will reject an applica-
tion for the entry Down Under of Eddie Zananiri, a
leading student spokesman for the Palestine Liberation
Liberation Organization. His request for admittance
will be denied on the grounds that the Aussies consider
Zananiri a security risk.
0
WASHINGTON Watch for a possible meeting
between President Ford and President Hafez Assad of
Syria in the near future but not in the Middle East.
0
LONDON Greville Janner, MP, vice president
of the British Board of Deputies, is worried about the
resurgence of Nazism in West Germany. He may be
expected to sound the alarm in the days ahead.
JERUSALEM Watch for Prime Minister Rabin
to decline debate over the David Elazar memorandum.
Gen. Elazar ("Dado"), now speaking from the grave,
is embarrassing many top echelon Israeli military lead-
ers. Despite Rabin's warm eulogy for Elazar last week,
he will continue to fend off demands to reopen discus-
sion of just who was responsible for Israeli reverses in
the 1973 War.
South Florida to Demonstrate
Solidarity with Soviet Jews
Major Jewish organizations
throughout Dade and Broward
Counties will mark Solidarity
Day with Soviet Jewry on Sun-
day, May 23, at 2:30 p.m. Large
numbers of concerned South
Floridians will gather at Lin-
coln Rd. and Washington Ave.
to begin a brief march down the
Mall to Euclid Ave., where they
will be addressed by Alexander
Luntz. a leading Russian-Jewish
activist who recently emigrated
to Israel.
The demonstration is coor-
dinated by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, a
committee of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee.
Sharing the platform with
Luntz will be number of poli-
tical leaders representing area
municipalities, as well as reli-
Rious leaders of several faiths.
Organizations participating in
the march include the local
chapters of Hadassah. National
Council of Jewish Women. Wom-
en's American ORT, B'nai B'rith,
Young Israel of Greater Miami,
United Synagogue of America,
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, Jewish Commu-
nity Centers of South Florida,
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
It is expected that every
group in the area, as well as all
individuals concerned with the
plight of Soviet Jews, will par-
ticipate in Solidarity Day. Inter-
ested residents are urged to call
the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
Israeli Rabbi Is
Emanu-El Guest
Rabbi Robert Liberles, spirit-
ual leader of Kehilat Etz Chaim
synagogue in Ashdod, Israel,
will be the guest speaker at
Temple Emanu-El at 8:30 serv-
ices this evening He will talk
on the State of Israel's 28th
anniversary of independence,
which will be observed on May
4 and 5.
Rabbi Liberles "was ordained
at the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America, from which he
received a Master's in Hebrew
literature in 1970. He was vice
principal of the Hebrew High
School (Prozdor) of the Semi-
nary in 1971 and 1972 after
serving as educational director
of Camp Ramah in the Berk-
shires in 1970-71. He was a Fel-
low of the German academic
exchange in 1974-75 and is in
the United States completing
studies at the Seminary for a
Ph.D. in modern Jewish history.


4
2-B
*Je*isHkr**M>
Friday, April 30, 1974
Women's League Chapter
Plans Installation Luncheon
The Women's League for Is-
rael, Lincoln Roney Miami
Beach Chapter, will have its
boy. Fannie Saifer will be in-
stalled as vice president. Mrs.
Fran Resnick, outgoing presi-
dent, will be corresponding sec-
retary for the 1976-77 season.
The guest speaker will be
Mori Fremon, public relations
liaison officer of the Consulate
General of Israel, editor of the
Florida-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce newsletter and the Cham-
ber's public relations chairman.
Singer Katherine Russel, ac-
companied by pianist Aida Yas-
lo, will present a repertoire of
popular and classical music in
Yiddish and other languages.
For reservations, call Rose
Hochstim or Viola Minkoff,
chairman of the day.
MORI FREMON
11th annual installation lunch-
eon on May 6 at noon at the
Delano Hotel.
Installing officer is Mrs. Mi-
riam Sirkin, president of South-
ern Florida Region Women's
Division of the American Tech-
nion Society.
Presidium presidents to be
installed are Mrs. Rose Hoch-
stim, Mae Fried and Lillian Du-
Miami Beach ZOA Plans
Yom Haatzmaut Event
The Miami Beach District of
the Zionist Organization of
America will hold a Yom Haatz-
mautIsrael Independence Day
celebration at its next meet-
ing, Monday, May 3, at 2 p.m.
at the Washington Federal build-
ing, 1234 Washington Ave.
The guest speaker will be
Councilman Hal W. Spaet. Presi-
dent Al Lefkowitz has said re-
freshments will be served and
there will be no solicitation.
Hebrew Academy Showcase
To Have New 'ShtetV Pieces
Ten newly created sculptures
by Jacob Sheiniuk on "The
Shtetl" theme will be displayed
for the first time and offered
for sale at the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy's one-day In-
ternational Showcase 1976, ac-
cording to Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Goldring, general chairmen of
the May 9 exposition.
Last winter Sheiniuk assem-
bled a traveling display of "The
Shtetl" and, sponsored by B'nai
B'rith, presented it at Temple
Emanu-El. The 42 pieces are on
permanent display at the B'nai
B'rith National Museum in
Washington.
The new pieces include a
grandfather teaching his grand-
son the prayer for the etrog,
two Chasidim dancing, a push-
cart peddler waiting on a cus-
tomer, three young boys going
to heder, rescuing of a Sefer
Torah and the blowing of a sho-
far. The sculptures are of weld-
ed metal, plastic wood, oak, lig-
num vitae, rosewood, fired clay,
Durastone, and copper.
SHEINIUK was born in Vilna
in 1902 and studied at the
famed yeshiva there before emi-
grating to Palestine in 1920. He
came to the United States in
1923 and during World War H
was a specialist in welding tech-
niques used in minesweeper
construction.
Following the war and art
school studies, Sheiniuk began
a complete survey of the de-
struction of about 25,000 Shtet-
lach in Central and Eastern
Europe. His sculpture is a trib-
ute to that vanished way of life.
BB Lodge 1591
To Initiate
New Members
At a candlelight ceremony on
Monday, May 3, at 7:30 j>.m.
Miami Beach B'nai B'rith Lodge
No. 1591 will initiate the follow-
ing new members:
Samuel Aker, Sidney Cohen,
Herman Barchenko, Morris Co-
hen, L ou999iFsvbgk vbgkqj nn
hen, Louis Firtell, Nat Halper,
Irving Halpern, Arnold Kleiner,
Jack Koenigsberg, Morris Light-
man, Joseph Melincoff and
and Isadore Perils.
Also Albert Portugal, Anton
Rosenfeld, Murray Schwartz,
Harry E. Simon, Dr. George A.
Small, Joseph Soreff, Benjamin
Tupler, Alfred Weitzner, Sam-
uel Wrubel, Morris Zaritsky,
Leon Zuckerkandel and William
Segal.
Singer Tony Simone will pro-
vide entertainment.
The Lodge plans its 22nd an-
nual Memorial Day patriotic
rally for May 27 at 7:30 p.m. at
the Miami Beach Theatre of the
Performing Arts. Congressman
Claude Pepper will be honored
and Congressmen Dante Fascell
and William Lehman will at-
tend.
Kanter to Receive
B'nai B'rith Award
Real estate developer Joseph
H. Kanter, of Miami and Cin-
cinnati, will be honored by B'nai
B'rith at a Humanitarian Award
Testimonial, Sunday, June 20, at
the American Hotel during the&
B'nai B'rith District 2 conven-
tion.
The tribute was announced
by David M. Blumberg, interna-
tional president, who said:
"Throughout his distinguished
career, Mr. Kanter has demon-
strated his dedication to Im-
munity and his deep concern
for the dignity and brotherhood
of man. B'nai B'rith is proud to
honor an outstanding Amer-
ican."
THE DINNER is Ranter's
honor will help support B'nai
B'rith Youth Services.
A longtime member of B'nai
B'rith, Kanter is past national
chairman of the Young Leader-
ship Cabinet of the United Jew-
ish Appeal, chairman of the
State of Israel Bonds Drive in
Cincinnati, national chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal and
chairman of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the UJA
Campaign.
He is a member of the execu-
tive committee of the United
Jewish Appeal, honorary presi-
dent of American Friends of
Tel Aviv University, and an as-
sociate of Brandeis University.
Kanter is also a member of
the World Business Council
past director of the Ohio Coun-
cil on Economic Education, and
was appointed good will ambas
sador bv the State of Ohio on
behalf of the Ohio Economic
Development Commission.
Kanter is the recipient of
numerous awards, including the
Governor Herbert Lehman
Award and the State of Israel
Award for Leadership in the
United Jewish Appeal.
WANTED
GOOD MALE SINGER
TO PARTICIPATE AND LEAD
TEMPLE LITURGICAL
QUARTET
Experience and background help.
fOl Call for Interview
Miami 949-0501
Hollywood 981-6113
I- I
PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
AAAMMIHUDIQAA
KCBJBZHZYAGMB
AHSELRYASXPAO
LSASLCBSBLALM
I40ID1T3TB0EI
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1181 IQItZIIII
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ABSJCniPSIHD
The names of twelve Biblical people, places and things beginning with A are listed below and bidden in this puzzle. They are placed horizontally, vertically, diagonally, frontward and backward. How many can you find? Answers are on page 6-B.
AMMJHUD ABEL AMEN ABBA ASP ACHSAH ASSYRIA ABOMINATION ATONEMENT AHASUERUS AARON AMALEK ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. .---------------------------------------------------------
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
ABIGAIL MINIS 17111807
She provided sorely needed goods for the Continental Army
A bigail Minis was the matriarch of a dis-
/\ tinguished family in the early history
/ \ of Georgia, and was a Revolutionary
patriot of classical note. Born in Eng-
land in 1711, Abigail at age 22, left the security
of London to settle in the new colony of Georgia.
She came with her husband, Abraham, two
daughters, Leah and Esther, and a brother
Simeon.
Abraham was a man of means and followed
mercantile pursuits in the new world. His
name is on the first real estate deed recorded
in Georgia, and his son Phillip was the first
European child born in that colony. Abraham
died in 1757 leaving his estate and business to
the capable Abigail who increased the inheri-
tance manifold during her long and fruitful
life of 96 years.
In 1779, the American high command decided
to recapture Savannah from the British. Gen-
eral Lincoln selected Phillip Minis and Levi
Sbeftal to help the expedition. After the attack
was launched, supplies were sorely needed and
the commanders applied to Abigail for
provisions.
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for hall > century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
The keen old woman knew the Continental
Army to be a poor credit risk, but her beloved
state and Independence came first. She "deliv-
ered the goods" without hesitation. The retak-
ing of Savannah was an American failure,
leaving Abigail in a very precarious position.
The British suspected her loyalty. But before
they acted against her, she managed to leave
for Charleston, S.C. with her five daughters.
Her son, Phillip, early in the Revolution, was
branded a "vile rebel" and blacklisted; he could
never hold office under any Royal governor.
Phillip Minis acted as Pay Master and Com-
missary General of the Continental Army in
1776. He personally advanced $ 11,000 for sup-
plies to Virginia and North Carolina troops.
He later served as President of Mikvah Israel
and as City Warden of Savannah.
4 Good loiht Last Drop Haxweu
Sf H0USi
?---- COiVU
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Hoaoriog 1776
and Famous
Jewsia
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage In Americafat profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send MX (no stamps) with name
and address to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017
r
.


Friday, April 30, 1976
^Jewlsiifhrknar
Page 3-B
Jewish Community Leaders
Invited to Become Trustees
Members of South Florida s
Jvish community have been
nvi ed to join the Ambassador s
Sty of Trustees of the State
f srael Bonds by purchasing
fmin!rnum of $10,000 in Israel
Bonds, it was announced by
Son M. Parson, executive di-
rect!!? South Florida Israel
Bond Organization campaign.
B Parson said, "Israel's serious
economic difficulties are a mat-
ter of great concern, since a
Jrong economy is vital to her
Scijyjojefend herself and
Flagler Season
Opens May 1
Flagler Dog Track's summer
season begins Saturday with an
opening doubleheader at 1 and
8 p m. and the return of grey-
hound racing's superstar, Bash-
ful Guy, who has seven conse-
cutive victories.
Racing is scheduled nightly
at 8 (except Sundays) with
matinees each Tuesday, Thurs-
day and Saturday at 1. Senior
citizens will be admitted free to
the grandstand at Tuesday and
Thursday matinees.
The Hecht Marathon Cham-
pionship will begin the cham-
pionship racing schedule with
qualifying starting Wednesday,
May 5. The Classic finale will
be Saturday, June 19, with the
$25,000 Super Marathon Cham-
pionship closing out the meeting
on Friday, July 2.
to achieve peace. At no time in
its 25-year history has Israel
Bonds been called upon to meet
needs of this magnitude. Only
through participation in the Is-
rael Bond drive in an extra-
ordinary measure can we hope
to accomplish what Israel ex-
pects from us in 1976.
"ACCORDINGLY, we urge all
people who have bought Israel
Bonds in lesser amounts in for-
mer years to consider the pur-
chase of a minimum of $10,000
in 1976."
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States, Simcha Dinitz,
has extended his patronage and
sponsorship to the Society of
Trustees so that special recog-
nition may be given to purchas-
ers in that category in 1976.
Purchasers of a minimum of
$10,000 in Israel Bonds will be
honored by becoming the first
members of the Ambassador's
Society of Trustees.
Temple Israel Honoring
Presidents, Communal Leaders
Tribute to the past presidents
of Temple Israel will be
featured at the 54th annual
meeting of the pioneer Reform
congregation on Sunday eve-
ning, May 2. A reception and
dinner will precede the meet-
ing.
In addition to the past presi-
dents, one of whom served the
congregation in that capacity
more than 50 years ago, Out-
standing Achievement Awards
will be given to Claire (Mrs.
Sydney) Weintraub and to Rob-
ert Russell for their contribu-
tions to the community as well
as to the temple.
Mrs. Weintraub, the first Jew-
ish child born in Miami, has
been a "first lady" in her lead-
Wholesale Distributor* of
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Processors and) Exporters
of Mi fln.it u.J. ovt. hipittii
KOSNR MATS ma1 POULTIY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Flo.
Phono 324-1833
ADL Intercedes
On Behalf Of
Observant Jews
NEW YORKObservant Jews
will be able to take the exami-
nation of the National Board of
Chiropractic Examiners this
week as a result of schedule
modifications obtained by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Scheduled for April 23-25 in
ten cities, the intensive exami-
nations were planned for April
22 and 23, until the League in-
tervened on behalf of candidates
who complained that April 22
is the last day of the eight-day
Passover holiday.
BECAUSE Sabbath observers
would be precluded from taking
those portions of the test given
on Saturday, the board agreed
to administer a portion of the
examination after sundown Sat-
urday and on Sunday, April 25.
Another option was opened to
observant Jews with the addi-
tion of alternate test dates, on
September 10-12. Candidates
could thus complete all portions
of the examination by taking
them on Fridays and Sundays
in April and September.
According to Bernard A. Kutt-
ner, cochairman of ADL's dis-
criminations committee, the
examination change marked the
third time in the past 12 months
that ADL successfully interced-
ed on behalf of observant Jews
subjected to discriminatory
practices in the national test-
ing Drograms of major profes-
sions.
NOSH ,
ON AMERICAS
N0.1 PRUNE.
ership of the March of Dimes
campaigns, the Museum of Sci-
ence development, as a national
vice president of Crippled Chil-
dren's Society and in many other
civic endeavors.
Russell, who serves on the
World Jewish Agency, led the
Greater Miami Jewish -Federa-
tion to peak performance in the
critical years, and was active in
United Way and the Jewish
Community Centers.
Of Temple Israel's 29 presi-
dents, 13 will be on hand to
receive scrolls of tribute, in-
cluding Sie Mendelson, who was
the fourth president in 1925 and
was elected again in 1927. At
83 he is still an active partici-
pant in the affairs of the con-
Young Performers Benefit
For the benefit of Israeli mu-
sic students, the Society of
Young Performers will present
a concert on Wednesday, May
5, at 8 p.m. at the Eden Roc
Hotel,
The performers include Ruth
Raffo, twice winner of Metropo-
litan Opera auditions; Italian
tenor Tony Simone; the Taran-
tella Group, directed by Ann
Bennett and accompanied by
the Serenaders Group; Univer-
sity of Miami music majors in a
string quartet written by the
late Theodore Newman; violin-
ist Arthur Zadinsky, assistant
director of the Youth Sym-
phony; guitarist Jose M. Lez-
cano; pianist Danniel Lessner;
cellist Gail Freedlander; and an
Italian folk dance group accom-
panied by the Raimondo Se-
renaders.
Patrons include Consul of
Italy Louis Sabatino, the Mor-
ris Lansburghs, Mana Zucca,
Rabbi and Mrs. Leon Kronish,
the Leonard Kellers, Milton
Gordon, the Alexander Kogans,
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Lang, Mrs.
Gertrude Ehrenpreis, Roberta
Strugger Zaager and Sen. and
Mrs. Jack Gordon.
Abo Dr. and Mrs. Howard
Lessner, the Shepard Broads,
the Harry Simones, the George
Stearns, the Harold Shapiros,
the Jay Dermers, the David
Druckers, Mrs. Fannie Silver-
man, Dr. Karl Haas, Liza Fein-
man, the Harry Schellhammers,
Dr. Shirley Jacobs, Hannah Po-
lansky, the Joseph Shawmuts,
Florence Pick, Dr. Joseph S.
Breuer, Matilde Whitehill and
Valerie Spitz.
For additional information or
tickets, contact Ruth Brotman,
founder-president of the Society,
at their offices.
gregation. The others are J.
Gerald Lewis, 1939; Max Oro-
vitz, 1944; William D. Singer,
1953; Henry E. Wolff, 1955;
A. J. Harris, 1959; Harold Thur-
man, 1963; Sam Luby, Sr., 1965;
Elliott D. Blumenthal, 1968; Jo-
seph A. Garfield, 1969; Martin
Fine, 1971; Arnold P. Rosen,
1973; David Fleeman, 1975.
Tribute will be paid to the
following past presidents:
Harry V. Simons, 1922; Dr. M.D.
Katz, 1923; Morris Plant, 1924;
Louis Zeientz, 1926; Day J. Apte,
1928-34; H. U. Feibelman, 1935-
36; Isaac Levin, 1937-38; J. Ge-
rald Lewis, 1939-40; Dr. Frank
Coret, 1941-42; Leonard Epstein,
1943; Herman Wall, 1943; Max
Orovitz, 1944-45; Judge Harold
B. Spaet, 1946-47; Jules Pearl-
man, 1948-49; Max Meisel, 1950-
51; B. W. Slote, 1952; Wm. D.
Singer, 1953-54; Henry E. Wolff,
1955-57; Sam C. Levenson, 1957-
59; A. J. Harris, 1959-61; Sam A.
Goldstein, 1961-63; Harold Thur-
man, 1963-65; Sam Luby, Sr.,
1965-67; Elliott D. Blumenthal,
1968-69; Joseph A. Garfield,
1969-71; Martin Fine, 1971-72;
Arnold P. Rosen. 1973-75; David
B. Fleeman, 1975.
SHALOM
ISRAEL
PERSONALLY ESCORTED BY
MR. EDWARD TUMAR0FF
C 1 1 0 Q PER PERSON
31177 DOUBLE OCCUPANCY
JULY 7 TO MY 21
INCLUDES:
Round trip air transportation, Miami to Tel Aviv
Tranifers-Roond trip, betwen airport ami hotels in Israel, assistance 00)
arrival and deportare, also assistance on departure from Kennedy
Airport, N.Y.
ACCOMMODATIONS M 5 STAB HOTELS (with fall facilities based on_____
double occupancy.)
- Foil Israeli breakfast in Israel.
Foil sightseeing program in Israel air conditioned born, English tpeokiafl
glide.
Plans ore made for a roeoptioo at B'nai B'rHfc Headqoorters in Tol Aohr;
alto reception of the Israel Government Tourist Office, Jerusalem
o Taxes A fees service charge as imposed by notob
SELECT TOURS
6443 BISCAYNE BLVD., MIAMI PHONE 754-7201
On Its
Twenty-Eighth
Anniversary
ISRAEL. .
It has special significance for
us. The Chairman Emeritus
and Founder of American
Savings, Shepard Broad, was
present at the meeting where,
according to David
Ben-Gunon, the State of
Israel was born. Step into any
of our offices and pick up
your complimentary reprint
of the Miami Pictorial cover
story. It features the role
which Shepard Broad
played in making the State of
Israel a reality.
ERICAN SAVINGS
& Loan Association of Florida
Convenient locations throughout South Flondo
FSLK


Page 4-B
*Jewtst>rhr*0V7
\
4
Challenges on Independence Eve
____' m *t.. *_ l.^iiJll Tilt If
By JOSEPH ALMOGI
Chairman, Executive World
Zionist Organization
As Israel is about to enter
Ihu 29th year of its exist-
ence, both the State and
world Jewry face difficult
challenges and urgent tasks
which we must make all-out
effort to meet.
The first and foremost
challenge is that of preserv-
ing the existence of the Jew-
ish people. It is particularly
in societies where the Jews
enjoy social freedom and
economic affluence that the
danger of assimilation looms
large. Day by day, the Jew-
ish people keeps on ?osing
many of its sons either
through intermarriage or
gradual estrangement from
Jewish and Zionist conscii
ousness and attachment.
WE MUST counteract this
situation, placing the greatest
stress on the preservation of the
Jewish and Zionist identity of
the young generation. This can
JOSEPH ALMOGI
best be done through a strength-
ening of Jewish education which
must be accorded prime of
place in the scale of priorities.
The status of the Jewish teacher
must be enhanced and Jewish
education must be placed on
the firm foundations of Jewish
JWV Auxiliary 778 Plans Meetings
JWV Ladies Auxiliary South
Dade Post No. 778 will hold its
monthly board meeting at the
home of the president, Evelyn
Clein, on Tuesday, May 4, at 8
p.m.
Mollie Brown, donor chair-
man, will outline the plans for
the coming donor affair.
Plans will be completed for
the monthly meeting scheduled
for Tuesday, May 11. at 8
p.m. at Temple Beth Am, at
which time the past national
president, Rose Schorr, nation-
al chairman of the insurance
program, will be guest speaker.
The Auxiliary and the Post
will cohost a recreation hall
partv at the Miami VA Hospi-
tal on Wednesday. May 5, at
7:30 p.m.
historical continuity and the
centrality of the State of Israel
in Jewish life.
The second challenge is that
of stepping up aliyah which has
recently lost some of its momen-
tum. Little wonder that the Arab
states continue to demand the
limitation or even the complete
stoppage of immigration to Is-
rael
THEY KNOW only too well
that without this vital factor the
State would become atrophied,
lacking vitality and hope. The
increase of aliyah is a vital re-
quisite of the State.
While in Israel itself, every
effort must be made to improve
the conditions of absorption of
the New arrivals, in the Dias-
pora we must try to open up
Jewish hearts and imbue them
with the ideology that will bring
aliyah to the forefront of Zion-
ist precepts.
The third challenge is that of
continuing the struggle for Jew-
ry in the Soviet Union and in
the Arab lands. Recently a con-
ference met at Brussels for the
purpose of arousing public op-
inion throughout the world to
this problem, and in order to
protest to the Russian author-
ities over its stiffening of at-
Retirees' Conclave to Hear Chiles
Sen. Lawton Chiles will be
principal speaker at the state
convention of the National As-
sociation of Retired Federal Em-
ployees (NA8FE), May 3 to 6,
at the Deauville Hotel.
His topic at the main banquet.
May 5, will be "The Problems
of the Elderly." National NARFE
president John F. McClelland,
of Washington, D.C.. will also
speak.
Miami Chapter president Is
Hyman Hochberg and commu-
nity relations committee chair-
man is Milton Gordon.
Actor to Doscribo Israel Philharmoonlc
The presentation was ar-
ranged by Arthur Sheppard,
president of B'nal B'rith North
Character actor Henry How-
ard will present the Ufe and
growth of the Israel Philhar-
monic Orchestra on Tuesday,
May 4, at 8 p.m. at the Surfside
Community Center.
Shore Lodge No. 1744. to cele-
brate Israel's 28th anniversary.
- i':

We Congratulate the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
LIMECO INC
PACKERS & SHIPPERS
OF LIMES & AVOCADOS
25251 S.W. 139th AVENUE
PRINCETON 33030
PHONE 248-1611
titude towards Jews seeking exit
permits.
IT WAS made clear that our
struggle is by no means directed
against the Russian regime, but
that it is purely a humane and
Jewish struggle. The Conference
was an impressive manifesta-
tion of Jewish unity. It can only
be hoped that our efforts will
bear fruit.
At the same time, our strug-
gle for the defense of the Jew-
ish communities in the Arab
states where they are suffering
oppression continues unabated.
We continue to press the de-
mand for the right of Jews to
leave these countries.
THE FOURTH challenge is
Friday, April 30, 1976
that of consolidating the State
of Israel both politically and so-
cially, and of endeavoring to
thwart the attempts to vilify, the
ideological foundation of the
State the Zionist idea.
The 28th year of Israel's in-
dependence was another year in
which the State continued its
endeavors to attain a peace,
though it was faced with inces-
sant threats of attack on the
part of its Arab neighbors.
It was an additional year of
unprecendented social effort
within the State for economic
consolidation and for a reduc-
tion of the social gap.
In all these spheres the State
of Israel today stands in great-
er need than ever before of the
active partnership of Diaspora
Jewry and of its material and
spiritual support. __________
Greetings to the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
zellner electric inc.
RESIDENTIAL ... COMMERCIAL ...
FREE ESTIMATES
226 WEST PALM DRIVE
FLORIDA CITY 33030
(greetings to the ^H>tate of Israel
on its 28 th &Arnn^
iversar
y
GROWERS
PACKING COMPANY
INCORPORATED
P.O. BOX 3012
FLORIDA CITY 33030


Friday, April 30, 1976
-Jewlst flcrkftar
Page 5-B
ARMDI Schedules
Golf Tournament
The third annual Father's
Day Golf Tournament, spon-
sored by the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Red
Magen David for Israel, will be
held Sunday, June 20, at Bay-
shore Golf Course.
Announcement of the event,
which is cosponsored by the
Bayshore Men's and Wom-
en's Golf Clubs, was made by
Howard G. Kaufman, president
of the local unit that supports
Israel's Red Cross service.
Kaufman said Mayor Harold
Rosen, honorary chairman of
the Greater Miami chapter, will
serve as chairman of the one-
day charity tourney.
ENTRIES for the meet, which
may be made by donations to
the American Red Magen David
for Israel, are tagged at a mini-
mum of $20, including green
fees, Kaufman said, adding, that
entry fees also include partici-
pation in a drawing for a TV
set.
Working with Kaufman are
Bernard Milstein, president of
Bayshore Men's Golf Club, and
Mrs. Gladys Gundy and Mrs.
Lorraine Penael, copresidents of
Bayshore Women's Golf Club.
Samuel Reinhard, Florida
state chairman of the American
Red Magen David for Israel,
and David Coleman, state presi-
dent, also are working with
Mayor Rosen and Kaufman.
Assisting in the event are
Joseph Handleman of Miami
Beach, national president of the
ARMDI, and Sol Drescher,
Southeastern regional chairman.
Headquarters for the golf
tournament have been opened
in the Red Magen David office,
suite 446, 420 Lincoln Road
Building. Gerald Schwartz is re-
gional director of the ARMDI.
Gold Coast Passover Fund
Surpasses Last Year's Effort
" How Sweet It Is' to report
that the second Gold Coast Pas-
sover Fund campaign surpassed
last year's results by more than
100 percent," said Marris
ce" Fox, founder and presi-
dent.
Asked for the formula for
such fine results, Fox said.
"First, you need a good and do-
ing cause; second, a de-
ommittee who will echo
ssage of need to their
concerned neighbors. And there
you have the ingredients for a
successful campaign."
The Gold Coast Passover Fund
placarded all public places on
South Beach, inviting the needy
to apply for Passover assistance
at five application centers staff-
ed by volunteers and located
where the poor congregate for
meals. Among them was the
Landow Yeshiva Center, which
provided temporary headquar-
ters as well.
Visiting nurses obtained ap-
plications from among more
than 250 homebound poor.
The Gold Coast Passover
Fund provided: cash for 800
MORRIS "MIKE" FOX
people, from S18 to $54; five
hot and two packaged meals for
140 homebound shut-ins who
are not on regular hot meals
programs, for a total of 980
meals delivered by volunteers;
1,100 packaged meals for regis-
tered shut-ins and non-shut-ins.
The recipients ranged in age
from 22 to 101.
Fifty-one high-rise buildings
participated, including some in
Hallandale. "We owe our sh-
eerest thanks for the success of
this campaign to these commit-
tees," said Fox.
We Congratulate the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
OUT ISLAND
SEAFOOD CORP.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL...
WE SHIP NATIONWIDE
P.O. BOX 868
KEY WEST 33040
TELEPHONE 294-1533
HOWARD G. KAUFMAN
Retired Rabbi
Passes at 87
Joseph H. Margolies, 87, a
retired rabbi and former chap-
lain at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital and Mount Sinai Medical
Center, died on April 20.
A native of Romania who
came to Miami from Massachu-
setts 20 years ago, lie is survived
by his wife, Diana; a son, Mar-
vin H.; a daughter, Mrs. Cyrene
Aksman; and four grandchil-
dren.
Services were held on April
23 at Riverside's North Miami
Beach chapel.
Greetings to the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
RODRIGUEZ
VILLARREAL
SCHOOL
4286 PALM AVENUE
HIALEAH 33012
PHONE 823-2791
We Extend to the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary Best Wishes
for a Continued History of
Democratic Progress
PASCO'S
SEAFOODS
INCORPORATED
1030 WEST 23rd STREET
HIALEAH 33010
TELEPHONE 885-7344


i
t__,
Page 6-B
+Je*lstfk*Mkui
Friday, April 30, 1976
4
Pan Am 747SP Flight To Set
Round-tile-World Record
Pan American World Airways
has announced that it will fly
a 747SP (special performance)
Jumbo Jet on -a 40-hour record-
setting round-the-world flight on
May 1 with 130 'passengers
aboard.
The 22,864-mile flight, the
"Clipper 200 Liberty Bell Ex-
press," is designed to show the
long-range and technical super-
iority of the Boeing 747SP and
will be monitored by the Na-
tional Aeronautic Association,
the United States representative
of the Federation Aeronautique
Internationale, which governs
world aviation speed and dis-
tance records.
The flight will depart John F.
Kennedy International Airport
and make only two stops, at
Delhi and Tokyo, before touch-
ing down again in New York.
Clipper 200 will attempt world
speed and distance records for
commercial aircraft in two cate-
gories: around-the-world and
between each flight sector.
COMMENTING on the one-
time flight, William T. Seawell,
chairman and chief executive
officer, said, "This isn't a trip
for everybody ifs for those
with a spirit of adventure .
of pioneering ... the very spirit
we celebrate in this Bicenten-
nial year. We are out to break
individual segment and round-
the-world recorls, and every
passenger aboard will be doing
it with us."
The first to order and receive
the 747SP, Pan Am will inau-
gurate schedule passenger serv-
ice with the new airline on April
25 and 26, with the first nonstop
commercial flights between Los
Angeles and Tokyo and New
York and Tokyo. The regular
scheduled New York Tokyo
flight, covering 6,754 miles, will
be flown in 13 hours, 40 min-
utes cutting three hours, 45
minutes off Pan Am's current
time and two hours off any
other airline's fastest time.
Clipper 200 will carry two
types of passengers: those fly-
ing the entire globe-girdling
route and those flying one or
more of the long-haul sectors.
Reservations are available to
the general public on a first-
come, first-served basis through
Pan Am offices or travel agents.
A supervisory flight crew of
senior 747 pilots and flight en-
gineers, headed by Capt. Wal-
ter H. Mullikin, vice president
and chief pilot, will handle the
flying assignments.
Each passenger will receive
a special Pan Am commemora-
tive certificate and an official
"Passenger Observer" card is-
sued op the spot by the National
Aeronautic Association.
THE FLIGHT will be operated
as a revenue extra section of
Pan Am's daily eastbound
round-the-world Flight 2. Na-
tional Aeronautic Association
records show that no previous
attempt has been made for such
a flight in commercial revenue
service.
Clipper 200's estimated air
time is 39 hours, 25 minutes.
With a two-hour transit in Delhi
and a two-hour-and-five-minute
stop in Tokyo, the total New
York to New York time is plan-
ned for 43 hours, 30 minutes.
Pan Am's daily Flight 2 logs
an average air time of 41 hours,
51 minutes, and with nine stops
in its round-the-world journey,
including an overnight transit
in Hong Kong, completes the
circuit in 70 hours. 51 minutes.
The longest sector on Clipper
200 will be 8,100 miles between
New York and Delhi with a
planned flying time of 14 hours.
The 7,354 mile Delhi-Tokyo leg
is planned for 12 hours. 55 min-
utes and the 7,410 mile Tokyo-
New York segment is program-
med for 12 hours. 30 minutes.
The flight will follow a direct
North Atlanti-Central Europe
route between New York and
Delhi. The second sector will
take the 747SP from Delhi to
overhead the Indian Ocean,
overhead Singapore, overhead
Djakarta and directly to Tokyo.
The homeward leg will be di-
rect to New York via a route
slightly north of Seattle.
CLIPPER 200 is scheduled to
depart New York at 5:30 p.m.
Eastern Daylight Time on May
1 and land back in New York
at 1 p.m. on May 3.
Passengers will be treated to
a wide range of flight services,
including full meals and snacks
on each sector, bar and refresh-
ment service, three selections
of movies and an array of
games, contests and prizes pro-
vided by three separate inflight
service crews.
Pan Am will have five 747SPs
in service by June 1, and to-
gether with 32 standard-size
747*s, has the largest Jumbo Jet
fleet in the world, having flown
over 22 million passengers since
inaugurating service with the
plane in 1970. By early summer
Pan Am's North Atlantic and
Pacific routes will be flown ex-
clusively with 747's.
Developed from the proven
technologies and venerable fly-
ing record of the standard 747,
the SP has a top cruising al-
titude of 45,100 feet and a maxi-
mum speed in excess of 600
miles per hour. Similar in ap-
pearance to the standard 747,
it is 47 feet shorter. The SP's
fuel capacity of 48,730 gallons
is about the same as its larger
sister ship, but advanced design
characteristics and improve-
ments to the Pratt & Whitney
JT90 engines give the SP some
25 percent greater range-
Pan Am's 747SP has a maxi-
mum seating capacity of 44 first-
class and 222 economy passen-
gers, compared to the standard
747's 30/343 configuration.
Pan Am inaugurated the first
round-the-world service on June
17, 1947, with a four-engine
Lockheed Constellation in a 12-
city globe-circling trip that took
291 hours.
JCC Teens to Travel This Summer
M.B. Hadassah
Sonthgate Group will hold a
regular meeting on Monday,
May 10, at 1 p.m. in the Terrace
Room. Program will be a pres-
entation by Muriel C. Kovinow
on "Jewish Women in American
History." President is Anne W.
Levine.
6 & &
Shaloma Group will hold its
installation meeting on Tues-
day, May 11, at noon at the
Shore Club Hotel. Installation
by Mrs. Milton Sirkin. Presi-
dent is Edith Shapiro.
9
A K CA M M I H U D)I Q A M A B
jKj B Z H Z Y/Dq
A H ^\ESE R yGJjC/X P A 0
E S A aQ\U)C y>^E A C M\D\E/Y/B Y\B\Q E E M I
N E H If H T 5>Op M P E/A/U M rMl\G D I J T
E R N V W/w)d E\S\y/OH I
N t q o/yw p c \abq m 0
0 T 0 Hi B VM/F Q E K/4/a\HS (/fj, P E yVH G E\ A) 3 G
s j c KCj^itf K) H D
ANSWERS: Ammihud, Amen, Asp, Assyria, Atonement, Aaron, Abel, Abba, Achsah, Abomination, Ahasue-rus, Amalek.
CLUB 116
i BERNIE GOODMAN
< ENTERTAINING
WED. THRU SUNDAY
8 P.M. TIL 1 A.M.
DINING and DANCING
ITALIAN-AMERICAN MENU
Crime Ribs & Steaks 10 Italian Style Veal Eleven En-
trees), Scungilli & Calomo'i to Baked Corns
Oreganato, Plus Fourt^ five other choices Com-
plimentary Wine with every Italian dinner
ALL PASTA HOMEMADE ON PREMISES
We Cater to Anniversaries,
Weddings, Private Parties,
meetings From 35 to 100 at
One Time.
AVERAGE MEAL COST $5
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING
Open ll II .M. (Sun. 5P.M.I
rmiNS ".00M OPEN DAILY FROM 5 P.M. mm HCMtl
Ci'jB He 11648 NW 1 AY! WUMI TEi b& > 938
Door Surprises at 9 P.M. on Friday & Saturday
Bring this Ad with you
Plans are being made by the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida for a Teen Travel
'76 Summer Camp. The season
will be eight weeks long with
two four-week sessions. The
camp will meet at the JCC Teen
Center, 6601 So. Dixie Highway.
In addition to activities around
Miami including ice skating, bi-
cycling and boating, there will
be two overnight and two week-
long trips.
During the first session the
Teen Travel Camp will go to
Walt Disney World overnight
and on to Atlanta for a week.
During the second session there
will be an overnight trip to Key
West and a visit to Washington
for a Bicentennial celebration.
Registration is open for teens
ages 12 to 14. If you register
before May 1, there is a dis-
count. For further information,
contact Shelley Natkow at the
JCC Teen Center.
MR. AND MRS. SOL FRANKEL
and FAMILY
EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS TO THE STATE OF ISRAEL
ATTENTION
Businessmen,
Millionaires,
Philanthropists
'7 Urgently Need
Your Help"
Married man in mid-forties lost life savings
through bad investments in the stock market. Am
a results and profit oriented, seasoned, shirt
sleeved, take charge type executive with exten-
sive business experience seeking position in ad-
ministrative management offering opportunities
to utilize my ability in order to earn a living or
alternatively I can use a non-collateraIized per-
sonal loan of 40-50,000 to enable me to purchase
a small business whereby I can make a decent
living. In return I pledge to repay you or your
heirs as soon as possible.
I further pledge to give the same opportunity to
another deserving individual at some future date.
PLEASE WRITE B.M.P.
BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLA. 33101


Friday, April 30, 1976
*-ht*ftk,*MHi
Page 7rB
Phone (Companies Anticipate
Communications Reform Talks
Dropsie Will Induct Two
The nation's telephone com-
panies hope Congress soon will
begin debate on the proposed
Consumer Communications Re-
form Act of 1976 legislation
the industry says is necessary
to "bring order out of the cur-
rent confusion surrounding na-
tional telecommunications poli-
cy."
Industry spokesmen add that
this legislation may be the only
way to avoid a 60 to 70 percent
jump in basic telephone rates
due to actions being taken by
the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC).
JAMES M. Brown, Southern
Bell vice president for Florida,
said the primary concern of the
industry is "a trend in federal
regulatory policies toward mar-
ket allocation in the guise of
competition."
He says the FCCs policies are
benefiting a few business cus-
tomers at the expense of home
telephone users and smaller
businesses.
"We don't believe federal reg-
ulatory decisions have been in
^the overall public interest,"
Brown said.
"We think Congress with
its responsibility to the people
will have a keener interest
in maintaining high-quality, rea-
sonably priced telephone serv-
ice for the average telephone
customer "
THE TELEPHONE industry
believes the recently introduced
Consumer Communications Re-
form Act will reaffirm national
policy which "has been com-
promised by the present trend
in federal regulation and make
sure future FCC actions benefit
all telephone customers rather
than a favored few," Brown
said.
Sen. Vance Hartke (D.-Ind),
who introduced the bill in the
U.S. Senate, said, "I believe that
telephone service at a reason-
able cost should be available to
all Americans, whether they
live in the cities or in rural
areas. If we allow full competi-
tion, a few large corporations
will receive low-cost telephone
service, but the general public
will suffer increased costs that
will prohibit many of them from
enjoying the use of the tele-
phone."
PHILADELPHIA Former
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ar-
thur J. Goldberg and Chief of
the Israel Delegation to the
United Nations Chaim Herzog
will join a list of notables in
the American Jewish commu-
nity's "Hall of Fame" when they
are inducted as Fellows in-the
Jewish Academy of Arts and
Sciences.
The two statesmen will be-
come Fellows when they ad-
dress a special convocation on
Sunday afternoon, May 2, at the
50th anniversary of the found-
ing of the Jewish Academy of
Arts and Sciences and the na-
tion's Bicentennial.
THE CONVOCATION will be
held at the Dropsie University.
Since its founding a half cen-
tury ago by the late Prof. Mor-
ris Raphael Cohen, noted philo-
sopher at the City College of
New York, the Jewish Academy
has inducted many world-fam-
ous authors, scholars, musicians,
scientists, educators and states-
men as Fellows.
Justice Goldberg joins an-
other member of the U.S. Su-
preme Court in the Jewish
Academy's "Hall of Fame," the
honor bestowed earlier upon the
late Justice Felix Frankfurter.
Morrie Ryskind, stage and
screen playwright and lyricist
who won a Pulitzer Prize for
writing Gershwin's "Of Thee I
Sing," and concert violinist
Isaac Stern are also among
those who have been inducted
as Fellows in the Jewish Acad-
emy of Arts and Sciences.
Justice Goldberg and Ambas-
sador Herzog, who will be in-
ducted as Fellows in recogni-
tion of their contributions and
accomplishments in world af-
fairs, will deliver major ad-
dresses at the convocation
which will bring to Philadelphia
an assembly of noted Jewish au-
thors, scholars, scientists and
statesmen from all parts of the
country.
President of the Academy is.
Dr. Leo Jung, scholar and ra%-
binic leader. Dr. Hirsch L. Sil-
verman, of Seton Hall Univer-
sity, is secretary-treasurer, Dr.
Abraham I. Katsh, president of
the university hosting die con-
vocation, is chairman of the
board. The Jewish Academy has
been quartered at Dropsie Uni-
versity since 1968, when Dr.
Katsh came to the institution
as president.
MARGATE KOSHER MARKET
FULL LINE OF GLATT KOSHER MEAT,
POULTRY, EGGS, AND DELICATESSEN
Free Refrigerated Delivery on orders of
$25 or more
167 S. State Rd. 7 (441) Margate, Florida
PHONE: 972-7230
DADE: 652-8754
Under Supervision of the Florida O.R.C.
Mashgiach on premises.
Florida's only Glatt Kosher Fresh Meat
K~jreetings to the t^tate of Israel
on its 28th tzAlnniversary
LUMS OF MARATHON
11050 OVERSEAS HIGHWAY
MARATHON 33050
TELEPHONE 743-3312


Page 8-B
+JewtstncrkJlan
Friday, April 30, 1976
\


I
John F. Kennedy was right.
One person can make a differ-
ence. And when one is multi-
plied by nearly 200, as in the
Coalition for Full Funding of
Public Schools Through Tax Re-
form, the difference is mightier.
Two chartered planeloads of
Dade Countians spilled into Tal-
lahassee last week for the ex-
press purpose of lobbying for
increased state support of pub-
lic schools. The blend of school
personnel (Alan Olkes, principal
of Coral Gables High School;
Ray Turner, principal of Palm-
etto Senior High; Joe Teker-
man, principal of the new South-
ridge High School; Harold Knott,
principal of West Miami Junior
High School; school board mem-
bers Phyllis Miller and Ben
Sheppard; County Council and
Advisory Committee representa-
tives Caren Jaffe and Betty
Kleinfeld; and local PTA offi-
cers Rowena Koyler, Linda
Ferre, Elaine Weisburd, Bobbie
Loughachi, Sarah Stein, Dorothy
Cohen, Luba Kirsch, Linda Sie-
gel and Laurel Glickstein, all
under the able direction of Mag-
gie Black and Janet McAiley)
made up a widely diversified
group that had but one goal.
BY DAY'S end, at least part
of that goal had been reached.
The House of Representatives
voted to keeD the required local
effort at 6.3 mils. In lay, non-
legislative language, that means
that Dade County will not have
to fork over more property tax
assessment money into the
state's educational pool.
Dade County already assesses
nronertv at the legal limit8
mils. Manv of the 67 counties
do not. The Droposed equaliza-
tion of a 7 mils donation to the
state from each county would
have meant Dade giving more
and getting less.
As it is. the tax money over
and above the 6.3 mils that
Dade donates is Dut to use in
local educational programs that
the state mandates but some-
how neglects to fund!
SO. THE first hurdle of not
siohoning off additional Dade
rnnmv has b<"n iumoed in the
House. The Senate should fol-
low suit and not allow a "per-
version of enualization." accord-
ine to .Sen. Jack Gordon.
During the 'Target: Tallahas-
see^" dav. intimations were made
that jt is big. bad, urban Dade
rin the rural, down home
counties. Pork choppers still
abound in Florida, and a bill
mav be voted unon. not for its
inherent good or bad qualities,
but rath"*- for whom it does or
do*s not benefit.
But even among the Dade
delegation, there are members
who would not vote for an in-
cremental or supplemental tax
bill to aid education. Of the sev-
eral ideas bouncing off the
Canitol stens (increased sales
tax. non-medical and non-dental
nrnfessional services tax, reduc-
tion of the 3 percent sales tax
rebat" to businesses}, there is
one that has a 50-50 chance of
passage, according to Rep. Char-
les Paoy. Jr.
AN INCREASED unit or per-
centage tax on alcoholic bever-
ages could net the state nearly
$100 million a year, some of
which could go to education.
Jack Gordon "would not be In-
clined to vote for it." but Sher-
man Winn would. Bof Graham
thinks the percentage tax would
be more eouitable. and Raloh
Turlington would like the whis-
kev fax readjusted any which
wav (it hasn't been touched in
seven years, while the inflation
rate for that period is 54 per-
cent) before a sales tax increase
is even considered.
In a taxes-are-taboo election
year, the best bets are alcohol
and tobacco taxes, which would
not unnecessarily punish the
poor.
THE GOVERNOR'S budget
cuts in education which caused
panic in academia may not
come to pass after all. Dick
Clark and Charles Papy see a
proviso possible $37 million
may be scrounged up from gen-
eral revenues and redirected to
education. But that would only
be stop-gap, a foot in the door
until some supplemental tax
gives hope for a long term solu-
tion to public school problems.
The Dade County Coalition
had the time and the ear of
many of its local legislators who
made themselves accessible for
private conversations and pub-
lic meetings as well as group
dialogues.
Familiar faces made Tallahas-
see seem like a Miami suburb:
Barry Richard, Alan Becker,
Barry Kutun. Paul Steinberg,
Joe Gersten, Dick Renick, Ralph
Poston, Vernon Holloway and
Ken Myers.
BUT BY far the best friends
Dade's school children have up
in the Panhandle are Elaine
Bloom and Bob Graham. If
Elaine Bloom does not cap her
political career as First Lady
Governor of Florida (at least),
this writer will be much surpris-
ed. Elaine commands attention
and admiration. She is a fighter
but a lady all the way.
There were some in the Coali-
tion who had their doubts about
the efficacy of a few hundred
touristy faces clogging up the
CapitoL No one had any doubts
on the trip home.
THANKS for the fresh rein-
forcements came from senators,
representatives and Commis-
sioner Turlington. It was pro-
pitious that the Coalition came
on the day of the big millage
vote. The reinforcement and
results it brought might be
likened to the last argument be-
fore the jurv is sequestered.
The next step is to tax lux-
uries (tobacco and alcohol) for
necessities educating all of
Florida's children.
ORT Singles
Reorganizing
Miami Beach Business and
Professional Singles and Mates
of ORT is reorganizing for 1976-
77. Their motto is "Fun, Friend-
ship, Fulfillment, and Fund-
Raising" the Big 4-Fs.
The public is invited to at-
tend the group's meeting on
Sunday, May 2, at 1:30 p.m., at
Sambo's Restaurant, 2701 Col-
lins Ave.
Murray Tubelle, who has
reviewed books for eight years
in Greater Miami, will review
Sam Levinson's "In One Era and
Out the Other."
At a future meeting question-
naires will be distributed to
members and prospective mem-
bers to determine their tastes
in programing.
I
WANTED
QUALIFIED HEBREW AND
SECULAR TEACHERS
for an Innovative beautiful .
Day School In Hollywood.
Moat hava axparlanoo Good
rafarancaa Lovo of education
and etudente Call for interview
Miami 949-0501
Hollywood 9814119
Bar Association American Mizrachi Women Meet
Marks Law Day
May 1 is Law Day, and the
Miami Beach Bar Association
will mark the event on Tuesday,
May 4, with a luncheon at the
LiDido Hotel, according to Leon
M. Firtel, chairman of the Law
Day Committee, which includes
Elliot Abbot, Wayne Cypen and
Terrence Schwartz.
Guest speaker at the lunch-
eon will be Phil Hubbard of the
Public Defender's Office.
As part of the Law Day ob-
servance, the Bar Association is
sponsoring an essay contest at
Miami Beach High School and
providing speakers who will be
guests at other junior and sen-
ior high schools.. _____
Aviva-Kinneret Chapter will
hold its donor luncheon and in-
stallation of officers at the Al-
giers Hotel on Sunday, May 2,
at noon. The presidium of this
newly merged chapter is Fanny
April of Aviva and Sophie Schra-
ger of Khmeret. Installing of-
ficer will be Bea Young, nation-
al vice president of American
Mizrachi Women.
4 ir it
Galil Chapter will meet Mon-
day, May 3. at the Washington
Federal building on NE 167th
St. Shulamith Cohen will review
Chaim Potok's In the Begin-
ning." Anne Stern is program
chairman.
Shalom Chapter president has
called a regular meeting for
Tuesday, May 4, at 1 p.m. in the
100 Lincoln Rd. club room
On Sunday, May 9, the chap-
ter will celebrate Mother's Day
at a luncheon at the Tarleton
Hotel. Mother of the Year is
Gizella (Mrs. Joseph) Lowen-
heim, who ia being honored for
her service to children in Israel
who come under the aegis of
American Mizrachi Women.
* *Y -ti
Hadar Chapter will hold its
regular meeting on Thursday
May 6, 12:30 at the Washington'
Federal building recreation
room, 1133 Normandy Dr. Chap-
ter president is Lillian Chabner.'
The chapter plans a brunch-
eon and card party on May 20
at 11:0 a.m. at Byron Hall.
Tifereth Jacob Sisterhood Elects Officers
At a general meeting on April
22 the following were elected
officers of Sisterhood of Temple
Tifereth Jacob:
Mrs. Ida Eisenman, president;
Mrs. Molly Gashun, Mrs. Bea
Mescon and Mrs. Sydel Levitch,
vice presidents; Mrs. Renee Le-
vite, financial secretary; Mrs.
Claire Goldberg, treasurer; Mrs.
Evelyn Silverman, correspond-
ing secretary; and Miss Fay
Stein, recording secretary.
Installation is scheduled for
Friday, May 21, at which time
temple officers will also be in-
stalled.
NOTICE!
There's now a place that
swings nightly til 5 a.m.
Now appearing
EDDIE ELMER &
THE GOLDEN TOUCH
And the BOBBY OLIVER TRIO
THE PLACE FOR STEAK
groat tood and avo antanainmoni H S am
133879th St Cauaaneay
Forrooarvaaonaca* 7M-IM1
We tww Mmercen I BOOM e ewer mejer anal ceres
Elegance in
Dining at a price
you can afford
A Miami landmark lor
seafood, steaks, and chops
now served in our newly
decorated waterfront
residence For the aftair lhai
calls for something extra. we
handle patties to 200 people
1601 79th St Causeway
^nrtnilw t nbtftr CIMllt I '
.-, tittouii
Ruei.ations 864 .'.'00
what weighs 65 lbs.
and can accelerate
from0to40mphin
5 seconds?
See it unveiled Sat., May 1st at Flagler
Grand Opening Doubleheader 1 & 8 p.m.
2UHT"" "* """" "*" -tarn,-**! bO VMM
ssaBaesasssaagSBSxsr'^^'
Matinees every Hies., -mure. & Sat. 1 P.M. Nightly 8 P.M.
'Senior cauene tree grenostano ednuson
every Tuee.e. Thixi meuiee
BogTeVek^Dade: 649-3000
NW37thAve & 7th SI Miami Broward: 527-4071
Sony nooncax*'^


Friday, April 30, 1976
*.Jenisli /ttrtUtt
Pnpe 9-B
Fifty Years of Law Practice
Feted at a Surprise
For Stanley Myers
Women Voters Elect Officers
STANLEY C MYERS
Fifty years of the practice of law was the anni-
versary occasion that led to a recent surprise party
for Stanley C. Myers.
The party was hosted by Myers' law firm, Myers,
Kaplan, Levinson & Kenin, at Miami's Standard Club.
The reception, followed by dinner, was attended
by members of the firms and their wives, together with
members of the immediate Myers family. A presenta-
tion concluded the evening's festivities.
MYERS IS a pioneer Miamian, attorney and bank-
er. He was active in the Bar Association here and
spearheaded construction of the Bar Association Build-
ing in downtown Miami.
One of the founders and first president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, he is a past presi-
dent of the National Council of Jewish Federations and
Welfare Funds and served as chairman of the Dade
County United Way Campaign.
The League of Women Voters
of Metropolitan Dade County
has announced the election of
its officers for 1976-77. They
are Wilma Felder, president;
Orrie Strubinger, Abbey Chase
and Sunny Yahr, vice presi-
dents; Judy Seidner, secretary;
and Mary Jones, treasurer.
Serving on the board of direc-
tors are Marguerite Probst,
Elaine Yonover, Mary Wright,
Gladys Corey, Rosalie Pincus,
Angela Ehrlich, Ruth Rackear,
Gert Kartzmer, Ann Powers,
Merle Frank, Kitty Suarez, Joan
Einhorn, Elaine Rosen, Mary
Jean Risi, Deedra Slachter, Au-
drey Rice, Jane Hosking, Ar-
lene Leone, Kathy Cole, Barbara
Barnett, Virginia Molins, Donna
True, Eunice Dermer, Sophie
Englander, Rcnee Robb, Betty
Neff, Vivian Hill Nesbitt and
Dorrit Marks.
BUY DIRECT
FINE HAND-MADE
CIGARS
ENCANTADA
707 HE. lit AVBMJE
MIAMI, FLORIDA
miKl MVCRMAN, **.
371-3264
.
Social Democrats
Plan May Day
Celebration
JUDAH H. KURTZBARD
REPRESENTATIVE Of
BANK LEUMI LE ISRAEL
B.M.
ISRAEL'S FIRST AND LARGEST BANKING 6WUP
We Salute the State of Israel
on its Great Achievements
During its 28 Years of Statehood
407 LINCOLN ROAD
531-3378 MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
The Greater Miami Branch of
Social Democrats, U.S.A., will
have a May Day celebration at
the South Beach Activities Cen-
ter at 1 p.m. on May 1 under
the auspices of the Workmen's
Circle Coordinating Jewish La-
bor Comm.ttee. Socialist Far-
band, Social Democrats and
Friends of the Bund.
Morris L. Polin, executive
secretary of the Workmen's Cir-
cle No. 692 and the Jewish Far-
band, and Mayer Finkel, direc-
tor of the ILGWU Southern Dis-
trict and manager of Locals 415,
and 475, will be guest speakers.
Soprano Brozha Skolnick, ac-
comDanied by pianist Sonya
Gross, will entertain. Chairman
is Max Glaberman, director of
the Southern District of the
Workmen's Circle.
STUDY LAW IN
3erusolem
Temple Un,ve.s,.y School ol Law in cooperation with the ^Jgj
Faculty of Law (Mount Scopus. Jerusaleml sponsors the Second Annual Summer
Session in Jerusalem Courses are m Enghsh and will he conducted at the
Hebrew Un.eers.ty o. Jerusalem Campus by Un.ted States acu v-membe s.
bymembersol,heLawFacul.yolJe.usalemandoherleadmgls 'M^"*1"-
Cou.ses are tully acc.ed.ted and open to qualified law school and graduate
students
Oetes: July 15 through August 23.1976
Course Offerings: IntroducUon To The Compintm Lew f'^e'^rhe
uSSsX 13 qtr hrs cr72 sem ,s c, I Inter^^[t%t
Co*ftt (3qtr.hr. c/2sem hrs a). Compsrat.veConsnwnonallawQ W
hrs. cr/2sem hrs cr >
Tuition And Fees: ($750.00) S400 lor up to s semester hours o,-ninequarter
hours credit including all course materials and casebooJs S350 "eludes
payment lor lodging, a 3 1 /2 day Israeli tour and law-oriented travel, etc
lod,inB: Students may reside at the excellent bre Un.vers.ty Oorm.tor.es
onMount Scopus wh.ch prov.de fac.l.t.es for cook.ng and refr.ge.at.on
a -j n.k., R.i.tad Visitetions- T.iree and one half day orienta
o^r^^^
such as v,s..s to religious courts and prisons have been scheduled
TSKSSSSSS
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
A Commonwealth University
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for pouring over any kind of lukshen
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page 10-B
jEW*sft/lor**itf7
Friday, April 30, 1976
__
4
Religious Services
ANAVAT SHALOM CONORBOA-
TION. BSS SW 87th Ave. Orttieeex.
Nakkl zvl Raphaely. Cantor Aren
Baa Aran.__________________1
ANIHI EMBS CONGREGATION.
Ott w Itth Ava. Canaarvatlva.
Canter Sol PakOWltS. I
BETH AM TEMPLE. 8660 N. Kan.
dall Or. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Baamgard. Aaaaelata Rabb) Mitchell
Chant*. S
err bRBIRa conorcoation.
107M sw 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Berry Tabachnlkoff. S-A
--------------a
MTH DAVID. 2628 SW 3rd Ava.
Canaarvatlva. Rabbi Sol Landae.
Cantor William Llpaon. 4-A
TH DAVID SOUTH. 7(00 SW
120th St. Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Llpaon. -B
BTZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1S44
whlngton Ava. Orthodox.
--------
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 76th St. Caueewey.
Conaarvptlva. Canter Murray Yav-
neh. S2>A
AOUOAS ACHIM NUBACH SEPARD
CONGREGATION. 707 6th 8L Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordacal Chalmovlta.
Bt-B
------------------
MOUTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1088
ne Miami Qardena Dr. Conaarva-
tlva. Rabbi Slmeha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alparn. SI
---------------a
AQUDATH ACHIM. Srd Ava. Hebrew
Raligloua Community Cantor. 16261
Ml trd Ava. Orthodox. St-A
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ava.
Medarn Traditional. Rabbi Max Sh-
plro. Cantor Loon SagaL Rav. Men-
del Oatterman. S
BETH TOV TEMPLE. S4SS SW 6th
St. Canaarvatlva. Rabbi Charlaa Rw-
baL S
Colllna Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Nahmiaa. 61
TH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1061 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
aarvatlva. Dr. Max A. Llpachlt*.
Cantor Jacob B. Mandolaon. M
B'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER ML
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 6300
Semeet Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Ollxmsn. S-A
--------
B'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW ISSrd St Conaarvatlva.
Rabbi Vlotor D. Zwelllng. Cantor
Jack Lerner. SS
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 671
ne 171at St. Orthodox. Rabbi No-
alm Oambach. Cantar Joaaph Na-
hoom. SS-A
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
16801 NE 22nd Ava. Reform. Rebel
Ralph P. Klngiley. Cantor Irving
Shulkoa. 67
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 16181 NE
1tth Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nlek. SS
' 'SRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
MIAMI. 187 NE 1tth St. Reform.
Rabbi Joeoph R. Nerot. 10
--------------a--------------
ISRAELITE CENTER. 8176 SW 28th
St.. Conaervatlve. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Far
naee. 11
YOUNO ISRAEL OF OREATER MI-
AMI. 890 NE 171at 8L Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Left*. S>
--------
CORAL OAS1ES
JUDEA TEMFLE. 8880 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. El.
eenetaL Cantor Rita Shore. 40
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8768 SW 16th
St. Canaarvatlva. Rabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. II
ISRAEL.SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Both Tlkva). 6028 Sanaa! Or. Re-
form. Rabbi Joaaph R. Nerot. 11-A
ZAMORA TEMFLE. 44 Zamora Ava.,
Canaarvatlva. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8800 SW 107th
Ava., Suite SOI. Conoeervatlve. I
ZION TEMPLE. 8000 Millar Rd. Con-
oervotlve. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Canter Erroi Helfman. II
HIALEAH
TIFERBTH JACOB TEMFLE. HI B.
4th Ava. Conaarvatlva. IB
NOtTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2228 NE 121at St. Conaarvatlva. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Flngerer. Canter
Yehude Blnyamln. 66
----------a
MIAMI BIACN
AQUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyla Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CBN-
TER,COLLEGE STUDENT 8YNA-
QOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Servleee. Rabbi Richard A.
Davle.
Devli. M
---------a
SURPSIDf
MOQAN DAVID CONOREOATION.
8848 Harding Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi
iiaac D. Vina. so
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
168 NE 8th SL Conaarvatlva.
FORT LAUOftDAU
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conaarvatlva.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowlta. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 41
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho.
don. Rabbi Alexander Oroee. I
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3248 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Raform. Rabbi Joel
8. Qoor. Cantor Jerome Kiement.
41
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th SL Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordacal Shapiro. IS
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 8106
NW 67th SL Conaervatlve. Rabbi
laraal Zimmerman. 44-A
BETH JACOB. 801 Waahlngton Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmarya.Ml T.
Swlraky. Cantor Maurice Mamche*.
II
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1B4B
Jeffereon Ave. Conaarvatlva. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saal Breeh.
20
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLB. 4144
Chaae Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
leh. Cantor David Cenvleer. 21
YOUNO ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
8807 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moaha Bomzor. 82
---------------------- ii
DIERHELO BIACN
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELO BEACH. Century
Village EaaL Conaarvatlva. Rabbi
David BarenL SS
BETH SOLOMON TBMPLE. 1081
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conaervatlve.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecal
Yardeinl. 21-A
--------------a
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
036 Euclid Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Troppir. 28
FOMFANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
aervatlve. 6101 NW 8th SL 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 182 SB 11th Ava.
Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Morrle A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Ranzar. 48
BETH YOSSPH CHAIM CONOREOA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ava. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg. 22-A
a
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th SL
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobeon 22-B
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joeoph Blaton. 61
CUBAN HEBREW CONOREOATION.
1242 Waahlngton Ava., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dew Roiencwalg. 23
CORAL SFRIHCS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
OREOATION. 8721 N.W. 100th Ava.
Raform. Rabbi Max Walts. 44
a
HAUANDAII
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 ne ith Ave. Conaarvatlva. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jaoob
Danzlgar. It
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 718 Waahlngton
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Malr Mullah
Metamod. 28-A
PEMBROKE FINIS
TEMPLE IN THE FINKS, 1808 Unl-
viralty Drive. Coneervatlve. Rabbi
Sidney I. Labln. SB
HOUYWOOO
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1861 8. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M Reeen-
falcf. 4B
TO!io6-^Xl ^WESX'l&fiML
Lohrm.n. Cantor Zvl A-Ma-. "1 t&S^ZSmT^S&^t
---------------a-------------- a
HEBREW ACADEMY. 8400 Fine 'SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johniton 8L
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander Canaarvatlva. Rabbi David Shapiro.
88 Aaaaelata Rabbi Chalnt 8. LlettW
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. IBM Waehlngten Ava.
Orthodox. Dr. Tiber H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engal. 86
BETH AHM TEMPLB. SIS SW Send
Ava. Canaarvatlva. Rabbi David Re-
eenflelJ. 47.8)
KNIIETH I8RABL. 1478 Euclid Ava.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfleld.
Cantar Abraham Self. 87
80LBL TEMPLE. 8100 Sheridan 8L
Liberal. Rabbi Rebert Frazln. 47-C
1 UBAVITCH CONOREOATION. 1120
. Colllna Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf. 87
MENORAH TEMPLB. CM 76th St
Conaarvatlva. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
v/ftE. Cantor Nlco Fildman. 26
FtANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Lib-
eral Raform. Rabbi Arthur 8.
Abramo. 84
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7478 N.W. 4th St a*
NCR TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St and MIRAMAR
Tatum waterway. Cefiaervatlve. Dr. i6Rael temple. 6620 sw 86th St
Eugene Labovlt*. Cantor Edward Coneervatlve. Rabbi Avrom Dra*ln.
Klein. SS Cantor Abraham Kilter 01
OMSTV SHALOM. TBSS Bentea Or. Or- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
thedex. Rabbi Phlneaa A. Weber Member of the Rabbinical Aeaoctatloa
Nominations
For Award
Now Accepted
NEW YORK Nominations
for the 1976 William J. Shroder
Awards, the highest service
honor bestowed by the Council
of Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds (CJF) upon Jewish
communal agencies, are now be-
ing accepted, it was announced
here by Mrs. William H. Green,
chairman of the Awards Com-
mittee.
The Schroder Awards, estab-
lished in 1953 by the CJF as a
continuing tribute to William J.
Shroder, its founder and first
president, are given annually in
recognition of outstanding con-
tributions by Jewish voluntary
communal health and welfare
organizations in the United
States and Canada to local, re-
gional, national or international
progress.
IN ANNOUNCING the open-
ing of the 1976 competition,
Mrs. Green, Jewish communal
leader of San Francisco, and
president of its Federation,
noted that "we anticipate an
outstanding field of entries this
vear, heightened by the fact that
the Deriod of common concern
and crisis such as we have been
living through invariably serves
as a stmr to communities and
is a significant stimulus to crea-
tive thinking and planning in
the field of social welfare."
Since its inception, Shroder
honors for creative and sustain-
ed achievement "in the social
welfare field have been accord-
ed to 72 communities, organiza-
tions and institutions.
Among them have been pilot
oroiects and exemplary pro-
Brarrts in such diverse fields as
care for the aged, research and
frinine. new forms of service
delivery. Jewish education, and
other kev communal and social
endeavors.
"It is at a time such as this,"
Mrs. Green noted, "that the
measure of communal know-
how and service is tested. Over
the years we have seen how the
crises of each decade and pe-
riod have only served to under-
score the response of Federa-
tions and agencies by way of
increased and innovative serv-
ices reaching out continually
to newer segments of the com-
munity in need of attention and
care. It is such sensitivity and
ability to act planfully that the
Shroder Awards throughout its
history has looked to recognize.
I am sure that again this year
our committee will have many
projects of relevance and fore-
sight to consider."
The Shroder Awards each
year give consideration and may
be presented to project and serv.
ice entries in several categories:
communities with a Jewish
population of 40.000 or more;
those with a population of
5-40,000; communities under
5,000; as well u to internation-
al, national or regional groups.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
ORIATSR MIAMI
4800 Blaeayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
88187. 878-4008. Rabbi Solomon
Schlff, Executive Vice PreeldenL
union of mmtum
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
116 E. Flagler SL, Miami, Fla.
83181. 878-4868. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYMAOOOUI OF AMERICA
1620 NE 163rd St. North Miami
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
Beaoh, Fla. 36162. 847-8084. Rabbi
Far band Branch to Observe
Remembrance and Independence
The Chaim Weizman Branch,
Farband-Labor Zionist Alliance,
in Miami Beach will observe
Remembrance Day (Tom Ha-
shes Vehagvurah) and celebrate
the 28th anniversary of the
founding of the State of Israel
at a special meeting Thursday,
April 29, at 7:30 p.m., at the
Washington Federal Auditorium,
1234 Washington Ave.
Moe Levin, president of the
Chaim Weizman Branch, said
Shmuel Erner, representative
and managing director of Bank
Hapoalim and Ampal in Florida,
will discuss "From the Concen-
tration Camps to the State of
Israel."
A pageant of the historical
events of Yam Hashoa Vehag-
vurah and Yom Haatzmaut (In-
dependence Day), prepared by
the Chaim Weizman Branch ex-
ecutive board, also will be pre-
sented, Levin said.
Cantor Saul H. Breeh of Tem-
ple Beth Raphael will assist in
the performance of the tradi-
tional portion of the ceremony.
Regina Bailin will entertain with
Hebrew sones.
We Salute the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
THE GATEWAY
INN
35800 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY
HOMESTEAD 33030
TELEPHONE 248-4935
We Congratulate the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
FRIENDLY FORD
2198 NE. 163rd STREET
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 33162
TELEPHONE 949-1311
We Salute the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
TAHITIAN
GROVES INC,
P.O. BOX 4282
PRINCETON 33030
TELEPHONE 248-0742


Friday, April 30, 1976
+Jewlsti IhxkUati
Page 11-B
Mje
^abbtmcal l$*%t
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical AsjocUtion
*dttoci
Dr. Max A. liptchitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT AMERICAN JEWISH INSTITUTIONS
Board of Delegates
Of American Israelites
In the saga of Jewish life in
what is now the United States
of America, 200 years went by
before Jews felt forced to form
their first functional organiza-
tion representing American Jew-
ry. The year was 1859; the or-
ganization was the Board of
Delegates of American Israel-
ites.
The board has been credited
with performing a valuable
function in the process of or-
ganizing the American Jewish
Community. In view of the con-
fusion and the division in Amer-
ican Jewish life at the time, its
formation can be considered a
landmark in American Jewish
history.
Among the obstacles to a
functional organization for
American Jewry was the nature
of the American Jewish com-
munity, fiercely divided as it
was. into Sephardic, German,
North German, South German,
Russian, Polish, Dutch French
and other Jewish groups.
According to an issue of "The
Occident" in 1852, a bitter dis-
pute could develop in a congre-
gation as to whether the prayers
"Adon Olam" or "Kigdal" should
take precedence.
BEFORE the formation of the
board, powerful voices such as
Isaac Leeser, Isaac Mayer Wise,
Samuel Mayer Isaacs and many
others urged some kind of
united action on the needs and
problems of the burgeoning
American Jewish community,
such as improvement of Jewish
education, standards for rabbis
and other religious function-
aries, greater efficiency in
charity, more aid for the sick
and the immigrant, elimination
of religious chaos and anarchy,
defense of Jewish rights in the
United States and abroad.
Attempts at united action in
the American Jewish commu-
nity had already been made.
The Damascus Affair of 1840
led the Jews of several commu-
nities to meet in protest. In
1841 and 1848 attempts were
made to organize a national reli-
gious union.
In 1843 B'nai B'rith, dedicated
to mutual assistance and char-
ity, was the first successful na-
tional organization to be found-
ed. In 1845 Isaac Leeser organ-
ized the first Jewish Publication
Society. There were many other
attempts at united action.
IT IS generally agreed that
the disabilities of the Jews in
Switzerland and the Mortara
Affair of 1858 motivated the
formation of the board. It took
the plight of fellow Jews abroad
to forge the bonds of unity
among Jews of America. On
November 27, 1859, 46 delegates
representing 25 congregations
in 13 cities met hi New York for
the historic accomplishment.
The board was "successful in
many of its undertakings, tardy
in some, uncertain in others,
but it grew from year to year."*
According to its 1868 Proceed-
ings, the year of Isaac Leeser's
death, almost one third of the
nation's 180 congregations had
joined.
Events abroad were carefully
watched by the board. In I860,
at the suggestion of the Board
of Deputies of British Jews, it
raised some $20,000 for the re-
lief of refugees from Morocco,
one third of the total raised
throughout the world.
The board aided Jews in
distress in Persia, Tunis, Gali-
cia, East Russia and elsewhere.
The Jews in Russia occupied
the board's attention for many
years but the board failed to
achieve effective U.S. govern-
ment intervention. On the other
hand, in 1860, the board stirred
the U.S. government to action
in the Swiss Question, the mat-
ter of equal rights for Jews in
the cantons in Switzerland.
SUCCESS was achieved in
1866. At the behest of the Board
of Deputies of British Jews, the
board was also able to secure
American government aid for
the Danubian Principalities.
As the career of the board
continued, Allan Tarshish wrote,
"it became obvious that it en-
joyed some success in keeping
a watchful eye on events at
home and abroad in the area of
civil and religious rights, but
was able to make very little
progress in strengthening Jew-
ish education and. religious life.
This very weakness, in a sense,
began to redound to its strength.
Groups which had originally
suspected that it might seek to
control religious matters, now
gradually joined its fold."**
The Union of American He-
brew Congregations was organ-
ized in 1873. Some of the same
men were active on the board
and in the UAHC. Hopes for the
unification of all American Jew-
ry began to develop but were
met by cleavage between the
Jews of the Eastern seaboard
and the Middle West. However,
a merger of the board and the
UAHC was completed in 1878
and the board passed out of
existence as a separate body but
became a standing committee of
the UAHC.
By 1881 the UAHC, as a re-
sult of the merger, numbered
123 of the 200 sizable congrega-
tions of the country. As an ad-
junct of the UAHC the board
continued to concern itself with
civil rights and has been con-
sidered the direct precursor of
the American Jewish Committee
organized in 1906 as a guardian
of. civil and religious rights of
Jewry.
The leaders in 19th-century
Jewish life whose persistent ef-
forts brought the board into be-
ing created "a dignified voice
for American Jewry," an organ-
ization which brought "relief to
many and established a number
of important precedents in the
field of civil and political
rights."**
Bibliography
Whiteman, Maxwell. "Isaac
Leeser and the Jews of Philadel-
phia." Publications of the Amer-
ican Jewish Historical Society.
Vol. 48, 1959.
Tarshish, Allen. "The Board
of Delegates of American Israel-
ites (1857-1878)." Publications
of the American Jewish Histor-
ical Societv. Vol. 49, 1959.
'-!!
CANDLEUGHT1NG TIME
30 NISAN 6:32
w
He boasted about his connec-
tion with King David and had a
penchant for Jewish and Mar-
rano society. If he was really
born in Genoa, it may be as-
sumed that his parents were
Jewish or ex-Jewish refugees
from Spain. His strange signa-
ture, which he charged his son
always to use, is susceptible to
a Hebraic interpretation.
It is remarkable, moreover,
that Columbus began his ac-
count of his voyage with a re-
ference to the expulsion of the
Jews from Spain; that in one
document he refers to the Sec-
ond Temple by the Hebraic
term "Second House"; that he
sets the year of its destruction
as 68, in accordance with Jew-
ish tradition; and that he seems
to have deliberately postponed
the day of sailing until August
3, though all was ready on the
previous day, but that was the
unpropitious fast day of the
Ninth of Av, commemorating
the destruction of the Temple.
Though a document was re-
cently discovered which makes
it almost certain that Columbus
belonged to a Marrano family
of Majorcan origin, the authen-
ticity "of this document has still
to be proved. Until it is, the
hypothesis that he was descend-
ed from a Jewish or formerly
Jewish family cannot be con-
firmed. Neither, however, can it
be denied.
Q. What are and what hap-
pened to the Ten Lost Tribes?
A. The legend of the Ten
Lost Tribes is one of the most
fascinating and persistent in Ju-
daism, according to the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica. The Kingdom of
Israel consisted of ten tribes
(actually 12 tribes but exclud-
ing Judah and Benjamin who
constituted the southern King-
dom of Judah) and fell in 722
BCE.
Its inhabitants were exiled
and disappeared from the stage
of history. However the passage
in I Chronciles 5:26 to the effect
that the Ten Tribes were in
exile "unto this day," and the
prophecies of Isaiah (11:11),
Jeremiah (31:8), and especially
Ezekiel (37:19-24) kept alive the
belief that the Ten Tribes had
maintained a separate existence
ind that the time would come
when they would be reioined
with their brethren and des-
cendants of the Exile of Judah
to Babylon.
The belief in the continued
existence of the Ten Tribes was
regarded as an incontrovertible
fact during the period of the
Second Temole and of the Tal-
mud. There were, of course,
some who opposed the general
belief. Rabbi Ak;va expressed
his emphatic view that "the Ten
Tribes shall not return again."
Throughout the Middle Ages
and until comparatively recent
times there were claims of the
existence of the Ten Lost Tribes
as well as attempts by traveler*
and explorers, Jewish and non-
Jewish, and by many naive
scholars to discover the Ten
Lost Tribes or to identify dif-
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Q. Was Columbus a Jew?
A. Christopher Columbus is
thought by more and more scho-
lars to have been of Marrano
extraction, reports the Encyclo-
paedia Judaica. He was mysteri-
ous when speaking of his origin,
apparently having something in
his background which he wished
to conceal.
Inside Judaica
ferent peoples with them. Vari-
ous theories, one more farfetch-
ed than the other, have been
adduced for this purpose on the
flimsiest of evidence.
Special interest is attached to
the traveler Aaron (Antonio)
Levi de Montezinos, who, on his
return to Amsterdam from
South America in 1644, told a
story of having found Indians
beyond the mountain passes of
the Cordilleras who greeted him
by reciting the "Shema."
As long as this situation exist-
ed, the fulfillment of the pro-
phecy that the coming (or sec-
ond coming) of the Messiah
would take place only when the
Jews were scattered in the four
quarters of the world mean-
ing: in all countries of the world
without exception was impos-
sible. This argument played a
significant role in creating the
atmosphere which eventually
brought about the return of the
Jews to England.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Marriage Has Become
An Experiment
By Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
Jews have always permitted
divorce but until recent decades
Jews seldom got divorced. Why
was this so? There were many
factors contributing to the seri-
ous Jewish view of marriage.
We have space to consider just
one of them.
The family used to be the ve-
hicle through which a person
related to the broader Jewish
group and to God. What was
life without a helpmate with
whom to share experiences, la-
bors, joys, and sorrows? What
was life without children and
grandchildren, for these were
considered to be extensions of
one's very being, as well as
links to the past and future.
Jewish experience was a con-
stant training in family orienta-
tion. The Jew was trained to
take his pleasure in warm fami-
ly celebrations (the Sabbath and
holidays) and accomplishments.
He was trained to contribute to
the family coffers, to uphold its
honor by righteous deeds.
In America today our chil-
dren are trained to feel that the
individual is the center of the
universe. They are trained to
experience pleasure in terms of
personal gratification. When
they do get married, they re-
gard it not as a life commit-
ment, but as an experiment and
as a means of achieving person-
al hapniness.
The well-being of the family
unit is no longer the goal of the
bride and groom. Personal plea-
sure is the goal. The thought is
not "What can we build to-
gether?" but "What can you do
for me?"
In brief, our children are not
trained to work on a family
team. Thev are not trained to
do their part, to make sacrifices
for the sake of the whole.
We do our children a disserv-
ice by giving them too much
without requiring them to con-
tribute their share to the fami-
ly's needs.
If we train them from their
youngest days to understand
that each member of the family
is a co-worker toward a com-
mon goal and give them the op-
nntunitv to help determine
goals and means of reaching
those goals, above all if we give
them the responsibility and op-
portunity to contribute their
share, we will help them de-
velop the ability to participate
in a nositive family experience
as thev get older.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Kedoshim
"Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment, in
meteyard, in weight, or in measure. Just balances,
just weights shall ye have" (Lev. 19.35-36).
KEDOSHIM "Ye shall be holy; for I the Lord
your God am holy. Ye shall fear every man his mother,
and his father, and ye shall keep My sabbaths Turn
ye not unto the idols And when ye reap the harvest
of your land, thou shalt not wholly reap the corner of
thy field neither shalt thou gather the fallen fruit
of thy vineyard; thou shalt leave them for the poor and
the stranger. ... Ye shall not steal; neither shall ye
deal falsely, nor lie one to another. And ye shall not
swear by My name falsely. Thou shalt not oppress
thy neighbor, nor rob him; the wages of a hired servant
shall not abide with thee all night until morning. Thou
shalt not curse the deaf, nor put a stumblingblock before
the blind. ... Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judg-
ment. Thou shalt not go up and down as a talebearer
. neither shalt thou stand idly by the blood of thy
neighbor. Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself
(Leviticus 19.2-18). "Ye shall be holy unto Me; for I
the Lord am holy, and have set you apart from the
peoples, that ye should be Mine" (Leviticus 20.26).


Page 12-B
-Jewlsti fkrAmv)
Friday, April 30, 1976


^^^%^^^^^^<%^^><%^%^M%%^*^*%^^^i^<^*^i^<%*1^*
BRADLEY SHERMAN
Bradley, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Sherman, will celebrate
his Bar Mitzyah on Saturday at
Temple Beth Moshe. He is a
student in Beth Moshe's religi-
ous school.
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman will
host the Oneg Shabbat on Fri-
day night and the Kiddush Sat-
urday morning.
b is a
MITCHELL SORKJN
Mrs. Bernlce Sorkin's son,
Mitchell, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday afternoon
at Temple Beth Moshe. He is a
student in Beth Moshe's religi-
ous school and a member of its
Kadlma youth group.
MAXINE H. AIKEN
Maxine Hope, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Aiken,
will observe her Bat Mitzvah at
Beth Torah Congregation this
evening.
An Honor Roll student in the
fifth-grade PEP class at the
Harold Wolk Religious School,
Maxine is a seventh-grade Hon-
or Roll student at John F. Ken-
nedy Junior High. She has at-
tended Camp Ramah for several
years.
In Maxine's honor her parents
will sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following the service. Special
guests include her grandpar-
ents, Mrs. C-ertnide Newman of
Providence and Mrs. Lee Aiken
of North Miami
'- TRA LEVIN
Mr. and Mrs. Sidnev Levin's
son, Ira, will become a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning at
Beth Torah Congregation
A seventh-grade student at
John F. Kennedy Junior High,
Ira has won an acting award
and his hobbies include dram-
atics and science. He is a stu-
dent in the fifth grade at the
Harold Wolk Religious School
Ira's parents will sponsor the
Kiddush following services and
special guests include his grand-
mother, Mrs. Ida Levin.
h -0 -to
STANLEY ANDERS
Stanley, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Julio Anders, will become a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at Beth
Torah Congregation.
A student at the Harold Wolk
Religious School, Stanley is in
the seventh grade at John F.
Kennedy Junior High.
In Stanley's honor his par-
ents will sponsor the Kiddush
following services. Special
guests include Mr. and Mrs.
Leon Andursky and Mrs. Sonia
Flaumenbaum.
b iJ STUART B. SASLOW
Stuart Bernard, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Melvyn Saslow, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning at
Temole Judea of Coral Gables.
STEPHEN CRISTOL
Mr. and Mrs. A. Jay Cristol's
son, Stephen, will be called to
the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Temple Beth Sho-
lom.
A student in the eighth-grade,
Stephen is active in the Social
Studies Club and is a member
of STS. He enoys sailing and
fishing.
Stephen's parents will host
the Kiddush following services,
and there will be a reception
and dinner that evening in his
honor. Special guests include
his grandparents. Mr. and Mrs.
Donald Rubin, of Miami Beach.
Teniple Zamora
Celebrating
25th Anniversary
Temple Zamora. Coral Gab-
les' only Conservative temole,
will hold a dinner dance on May
2 at 6 p.m. at the Algiers Hotel
to celebrate the temple's 25th
anniversary. At the event, the
following newly elected officers
will be installed:
Herman Douglas, president;
Jack Rubin and Florence Boss,
vice presidents; Miriam Mill-
man, treasurer; Selma Davi-
dow financial secretary; Jerry
Lieberman, corresponding sec-
retary.
Two-year members of the
board of directors are Jack Kap-
ner, Irving Klein, Isadore
Frankel, Harrv Pines. Jack Sap-
nhire, Jerome Freedman, Jack
Yanks, Lou Chartor. M. Mandel-
kern, Allen Greenfeld. Toby
Cohen. Jack Scheer and Al Ja-
cobson.
One-vear board members are
Rose Davidow, Harry Nissel,
Nat Walberg, Ainslee Ferdie,
Doris Scheer. Rose Galton. Ha-
rold Rustin. Andrew Tibor, Flo-
r*nc Gordon. Nat Goldv. Mort
Bernstein and Sidnev Gross.
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All Land and Water Sports Wttmkiimj end Riding Daily
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Trips by Canoe Horseback Riding Special Teen Program
Reading and Math Clinics Traditions! Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Lam Observed
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8IQN UP NOW
Fusion News
The board of directors of Fu-
sion, Miami's modern dance
Company and a member of the
National Endowment for the
Arts Dance Touring Program,
has named Toby (Mrs. Edmund)
Ansin to represent it on the
nominating committee for the
Dade County Council of Arts
and Sciences.
The artistic director, William
P. Lord, has been elected to the
Cultural Executive Council of
Miami.
The next meeting of the Fu-
sion Women's Committee is
scheduled for May 11 at 10 a.m.
at the Academia Cubana de Bal-
let in Coral Gables. The half-
hour meeting will be followed
by a dance class given by Fu-
sion's ballet master, Kerry Ro-
land. The committee's last meet-
ing was in mid-March at Mrs.
Ansin's Coral Gables home.
'Same Time, Next Year9
Breaks Florida Records
Producer Zev Bufman has an-
nounced that "Same Time, Next
Year," starring Cloris Leach-
man and Richard Schaal, which
has already broken every box-
office record for a South Flor-
ida comedy hit, will return for
an unprecedented second-week
run, Tuesday, May 4, through
Sunday, May 9, at the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts.
The special performance
schedule for the additional
week in Miami Beach includes
Tuesday through Friday eve-
nings at 8:30, Saturday at 6 and
9:30 p.m., and matinees Wed-
nesday and Sunday at 2 p.m.
" 'Same Time, Next Year' was
a born record-breaker," said
Bufman. "Even before we sign-
ed Miss Leachman and Schaal,
our audience seemed to sense
\*L2wX3**ZL P..Y Advene*
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a major hit. They reacted with
enormous power at our box of-
fices."
The appearance of Miss
Leachman and Schaal in this
Broadway hit has focused na-
tional attention on the South
Florida theatrical scene. In ad-
dition to the stars' appearances
on the Johnny Carson and Di-
nah Shore Shows, articles have
appeared in Time and Women's
Wear Daily, and People maga-
zine has scheduled a second
feature article. Miss Leachman
also made a trip to New York
to appear as a presenter at the
Tony Awards.
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May, April 30, 1976
-Jewlsti fkrldUnri
Page 13-B
Metric Features Summers
At Home and Abroad for Teens
Flanked by Ken Kaye (left) and Arthur
Grossberg of Riverside Memorial Chapels,
Riverside vice president Alfred Golden,
Hollywood Mayor David Keating and
Broward County Commissioner Jack Moss
broke ground recently for Riverside's se-
venth Florida facility. Located at 2230
Hollywood Blvd., it will be the state's larg-
est and most modern funeral chapel upon
its completion in the fall.
BBYO Fight to Unionize Continues
Their ages spanned 40 years.
In Jewish history 40 years has
a special significance. To the
BBYO staff the occasion had its
own poignant significance.
The oldest one was 63, the
youngest 23. They came from
Canada, the West, the deep
South, the East.
The entire professional staff
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organ-
ization tidied up their desks,
rescheduled their professional
commitments, and converged on
Washington, national B'nai
B'rith headquarters, prepared to
demonstrate, if necessary, for
the right to join a union.
It was necessary: they lost
by one vote.
THAT WAS in January. Mem-
bers .of the professional staff
who work in Florida report that
another attempt to gain union
recognition will be made when
the board of governors meets in
September.
The decision came in Jan-
uary, 1975, to affiliate with the
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Em-
ployees District Council of 1707,
Community and Social Agency
Employees Union. The national
BBYO staff association's desire
to unionize met with repeated
failure. The board of governors
found other agenda items more
pressing and essential.
When the board of governors
at its January, 1976, meeting
again refused to recognize the
union. BBYO staff personnel of
the United States and Canada
nicketed the National B'nai
B'rith headquarters and the
Mayflower Hotel, where the
board was convening.
Jerry Wurf. international
AFSCME president, expressed
disappointment at the board's
vote to David Blumberg, inter-
national president of the 500,000
member B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization.
"The right of employees in
this country to band together
into unions and to negotiate
with their employers as equals
on such basic issues as wages,
hours and conditions of employ-
ment is fundamental. It is pro-
tected by federal law, and it is
a policy that has served both
American workers and their
employers well," Wurf said.
"As a union, we have high
regard for the service which
B'nai B'rith renders through-
out this country. I find it shock-
ing that an organization like
yours, founded on principles of
brotherhood and human dignity,
would be even the least bit hesi-
tant to grant its employees that
which is their basic right the
right to join a union and be
represented by it."
AMONG THE members of the
board of governors who have
made it clear that they are
strongly in support of union af- \
filiation are Mrs. Louis L. Perl-
man, chairman of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Commission; David
M. Blumberg; Rabbi Benjamin
M. Kahn, executive vice presi-
dent; and Lawrence Peirez,
chairman of the personnel pol-
icy committee.
Joseph T. Murray, national
youth commissioner of Miami,
has given his unequivocal sup-
port.
The staff association presi-
dent, Alan M. Freeman, Florida
Region director of BBYO, re-
ported, "There is nothing vin-
dictive in our objective to gain
union recognition from B'nai
B'rith. We lose far too many of
our staff members each year.
"The negotiating process has
changed in our agency, and dur-
ing the last five years has prov-
en to be inadeqquate. The exist-
ing staff association finds itself
further and further removed
from the negotiating process.
We need a whole nesv approach.
That approach is a union."
Girt Bossak, a 25-year veteran
of the agency, for most of that
period sole staff In two high-
status BBYO cities, Atlanta and
Miami, who marched in the
picket line in freezing Washing-
ton, said, "At this stage in my
career unionization will not
benefit me. I simply support the
young, dedicated, committed
worker, who comes to us hoping
for a career in BBYO and all
too soon becomes disenchanted,
whether he leaves or remains.
"We are social workers; our
job is to help young people de-
velop themselves. We lack the
expertise to do the job that a
union can do. We are ourselves
all members of B'nai B'rith and
our first concern is for the
youth and adults we serve. The
'climate' in which we work be-
comes essential."
The three members of the
Florida staff who went to Wash-
ington are Roy Herzbach, Alan
Freedman and Girt Bossak.
Metric Teen Tours of Scars-
dale is offering two adventure-
filled summer programs Bi-
centennial trips and European
travel.
Teens whp want to relive
American history can partici-
pate in one of seven camping
tours on which travelers will
see America's natural wonders,
following in the footsteps of
pioneers.
Highlighting this season's tour
program is "Bike 'n' Camp," a
six-week cross-country camping,
biking and hiking adventure to
major national parks, monu-
ments and historic cities.
The motorcoach tour, follow-
ing a trail of Sacajewea the
Indian guide who led the Lewis
and Clark expedition departs
from New York and alternate
cities and continues on to Amish
Country. Zanesville, Indianapo-
lis, Columbia, Abilene, Des Moi-
nes, Colorado Springs, Denver,
Mesa Verde, Grand, Zion and
Bryce Canyons, Las Vegas, San
Diego. Los Angeles, Monterey,
San Francisco, Yosemite, Lake
Tahoe, Tijuana, Carson City,
Salt Lake City, Moab, Mt. Rush-
more, Cody, Chicago, Lake Erie
and Pittsburgh.
"Camp 'n' Dorm" is a 40-day
coast-to-coast trip that provides
camping out in national park
areas and living in college
dorms in major cities.
A 50-day program includes a
cross-country camping trip and
a week in the Canadian Rockies
region and Vancouver.
Educational and recreational
activities include shooting the
ranicis, horseback riding, water-
skiing, cookouts, wildlife lec-
tures and nature walks, and vis-
its to rock concerts and dis-
cotheques.
ROME, PARIS, London, Mad-
rid. Tel Aviv and more are in-
cluded in Metric's Teen Tours
Abroad, which feature a wide
range of educational and re-
creational activities. __
The 38-day "Grand Euro-
pean" tour includes visits to
London, Amsterdam, Paris, Ge-
neva, Venice, Florence, Rome,
Pisa, Nice, Madrid, Granada,
Seville, Torremolinos and Tan-
giers.
The five-week "Continental"
is a leisurely tour of England,
Holland, Switzerland, Italy and
France, while the "Classic" tour
includes visits to the same coun-
tries but features 22 days of
travel. The "Maxi Classic" adds
five-days in Spain to the same
itinerary.
A six-week tour of Israel in-
cludes working side by side
Israeli teens while spending two
full weeks on two different k
butzim. Travel to Tel Aviv,
Arad-Beersheba, Eilat, Tiberias,
Haifa, Natanya, Herzlia, Ash-
dod-Ashkelon and Jerusalem is
included. Two modified Israeli
tours include a week on a kib-
butz combined with extensive
travel within Israel. Israei-
F.urope combination tours are
also available.
USY Members
Convening Here
Thirty-three members of the
United Synagogue Youth of
Beth Torah Congregation will
attend the 25th annual Souih-
east Region USY Convent; i
April 30 to Mi 2, at the Calib-
an Hotel.
The theme the convent' l
The Holoc; tFrom D
ness to Light.'" '>mmittee mem-
bers from Beth Torah include
Melissa Siessei, president of the
Stars of Israel USY chapter;
Marcia Bebchuck, vice prr-i-
dent; Shira Kirschenbaum; and
Rhonda Parker, secretary of the
Southeast Region.
Harold Friedman, youth di-
rector of Beth Torah. announ d
that the following USY'ers will
attend the convention: Suze:te
Adouth, Marcia Bebchuck, Ellen
Davis, Lisa Edelson, Scott Fcld-
man, Terri Fried, Sharon Fis-
cher, Laurie Gluck, Paul Gold-
stein, Janet Greenhut, Michelle
Greenhut, Lori Gross, Ilene Had-
dad.
Also Shari Howard, Susan Isi-
coff, Marshall Kahn, Shira Kir-
chenbaum, Allen Kopelman, Mit-
chell Kopelman, Frances Lapp.
Fayanne Lipschitz, Marion Park-
er, Rhonda Parker, Andrea Phil-
lips, Aileen Schecter, Bruce
Shappe, Sheila Shuster. Melissa
Siesser. Mark Weinberg, Janis
Weingarten, Donna Winton, Lisa
Winton and Mitch Zidel.
PHARMACY
1605 Washington Avenue Just South of Lincoln Road
NATIONAL BRANDS EVERYDAY PRICES 531-5583
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i me i4-a
+Jt>wlsi>ncrMlnn
UCAl NOTKi
UGAl NOTKI
LEGAL NOTKI
IIGAL NOTKI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
- PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 70-2680
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBECCA CENDER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO Af.L PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE\BOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
ihiii the administration 'of the estate
of Rebecca Cender. deceased. File
Number 76-2550. 1b pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 73 W. Flagler St.. Miami. Florida.
The personal representatives of the
estate are Milton Coren. 18061 BIs-
cayne Blvd.. Miami. Fla.. Zev. W.
Koran. 420 Lincoln ltd.. Miami Beach.
Florida. The name and address of the
personal representatives' attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Bach claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient conies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one codv
to each personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has beeo mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection thev mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dents will, the qualifications of the
personal representatives or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 30.
1976.
MILTON COREN
ZEV W. KOGAN
As Personal Representatives of the
Estate of Rebecca Cender Deceased
ATTOHNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
ROTH EN BERG. KOGAN.
KORNBLUM & BENJAMIN
by: ZEV W. KOGAN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach. Fla.
Telephone: 534-4586
4/30
5/7
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12483
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
IRMA TANIA GOMEZ.
Petitioner /Wife.
and
1.UT8 R. GOMEZ.
Respondent /Husband
TO: LUIS R. GOMEZ.
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
yo are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Antonio J. Pineiro. Jr.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is AGU-
D0. ANTON ft PINEIRO. 1M7 S.W.
27th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33145.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
May 28. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
aid court at Miami. Florida on this
19th dat of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P COPELAND
_ As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Antonio J Pineiro. Jr.
AOUDO. ANTON & PINEIRO
1647 S.W.27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
4/21-10 6/7-14
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-10467
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF-
KLEBERT LUCIEN
DESRUISSEAUX. Husband,
vs.
AGNES DESRUISSEAUX.
Wife.
TOII. AGNES DESRUISSEAUX
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby
notified to serve a copy of your An-
swer to the Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you. upon husband's at-
torney. GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ..
611 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
31186, and file original with Clerk of
Court on or before May 14. 176:
otherwise the Petition will be confess-
ed by you.
Dated this 1st day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
Deputy Clerk
By M. J. HARTNETT
4/6-16-11-10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
PLANT FARE at 14979 South Dixie
Hwy.. Miami, Fla.. 33158 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
JEANNE E. ZIMMERMAN. 514
RUBIN ZIMMERMAN. 49%
4/23-10 5/7-14
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-11667
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERT S. TWITTY. JR.
Husband
and
GERALDINE ELIZABETH TWITTY,
Wife
TO: GERALDINE ELIZABETH
TWITTY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action tor Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 1681
N.W. 62nd Street. Miami, Florida.
.13147. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before May 21, 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
12th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By G. FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
2688 N.W. 62nd Street
Miami. Florida 33147
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone 691-593'
4/16-21-10 5/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 71-11499
NOTICE OF ACTION
Constructive Service
Property
JACK DURANT.
Plaintiff,
ISRA INVESTMENT. INC.. a
dissolved Florida corporation:
MOUNT SINAI MEDICAL CENTER
OF GREATER MIAMI. STATE OF
FI/JRIDA. MAX CITRON and
NATHAN REIBER. as Trustees. A.
LOUIS MAVILYA. a/k/a Anthony L.
Mavllya. MOSHE ZUR and HAIA
ZUR. his wife.
Defendants.
TO: MAX CITRON and
NATHAN RIEBER
RESIDENCE: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property In Dade County.
Florida:
_&- Block 11-A. of I8LAND
VIEW. Block 11 amended, accord-
ing to the plat thereof, recorded
In Plat Book 4. at Page 121. of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, a/k/a Lot 2. Block
11-A. ISLAND VIEW ADDITION
according to the plat thereof as
recorded In Plat Book 9. at Page
144 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your wrlt-
if.lJ^S??5f,> *ny- t0 ll on HARVEY
RICHMAN, plaintiffs attorney, whose
St"?*" i! im Lincoln Road. Miami
S"^* rj?rid* M1|t on >' oo'ore
May 19. 1976. and file the original with
the clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
witness my hand and the seal
of this Court on April 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of said Court
By: L. SNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
_________________4/16-M-lO S/T
NOTICE UNDER
. FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
SJJK?8* under the fictitious name of
RESTAURANT EL BODEGON at
18327 N.W. 42 Ave.. Opa-Locka. Fla..
Intends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
ALBERTO MAGGI
_^_^__ 4/16-21-10 S/J
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY
***'* 1\- ACT'N NO. 76-12772
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
_, __ OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RAMIRO HERNANDEZ
and
VICTORIA HERNANDEZ
TO: Victoria Hernandez
c/o Garcia
2140 Seward Avenue
Bronx, New York 10471
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTTFD5D
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Louis R. Beller. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road Miami Beach. Fla. 83139. and
file the original with the clerk of the
?bove,s,yled COUI"t on or before June
4, 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21 day of April 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
_ As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Louis R. Beller. Beo.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 211
Miami Beach. Fla. 11119
Attorney for Petitioner
4/10 677-14-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2668
Slvlslon FRANK B. DOWLINO
E: ESTATE OF
ELLA COHEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OH DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IX THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of ELLA COHEN, deceased. File
Number 76-2665. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Courthouse.
Probate Division. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida The personal
representatives of the estate are
RAYMOND A VIDOR whose address
Is 11 Charcoal Ridge East. New Fair-
field, Conn. 06810 and BARBARA
WAINER. whose address is 2158 N.E.
180th Street. N. Miami Beach. Fla.
31162. The name and address of the
personal representatives' attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTH8
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due, the date
when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection they mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 20.
1976.
RAYMOND A. VIDOR
BARBARA WAINER
As Personal Representatives of the
Estate of ELLA COHEN Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
BAXTER. FRIEDMAN, ROBBINS
ft FISCHER
1875 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach. Florida
By Mrs. Jane L. Robblns
Telephone: 946-7696
4/10 5/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-12611
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
In Re The Marriage of
William Haygood. Husband,
vs. Carrie Haygood. Wife.
NOTICE OF ACTION
YOU. CARRIE HAYGOOD. General
Delivery. Allendale. South Carolina,
also known as Carrie Bradley, take
Notice, that William Haygood has
filed a suit for Divorce against you.
In this Court, and you must tile your
Answer thereto, with the office of the
undersigned Clerk, and send a carbon
copy thereof.to JOSEPH C. LAUS-
SEL. LAWYER. 12583(a) NW 7th
Avenue. North Miami. Florida, not
later than June 4. 1976. otherwise, a
legal Default will be entered against
you.
DATED: April 22. 1976.
R. P. BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court
By N. A. HEWETT .
Deputy Clerk
Joseph C. Laussel
Attorney At Law
12583(a) NW 7th Avenue
North Miami. Florida 31161
688-0011
4/10 1/7-14-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-12807
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MAUREEN ROBERSON BOOKER.
Petitioner
and
JOSEPH TERRY BOOKER.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Joseph Tejry Booker. QM-1
USS CANNOLE FF 1056
F.P.O. New York. NY. 09501
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
LEON G. NICHOLS. Petitioner's At-
torney, whose address Is 65 S.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida. 33130. on or
before June 4. 1976. and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Petitioner's
Attorney or immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on April 21, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By B. LIPPS
as Deputy Clerk
4/10 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of COIN VENDINO, INC. at 2073
Northwest 141st Street. Opa Lock*.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
LEE-JAC VENDING. INC.
____ A Florida Corporation
SHIRLEY WOOLF, ESQ.
Attorney for Lee-Jac Vending. Inc..
Applicant
Suite 211. 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone 631-6417
4/10 1/7-14-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR 11TH
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2333
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PEDRO M. LLOPIZ. a/k/a
TONY LLOPIZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
TIIK ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of PEDRO M. LLOPIZ. a/k/a TONY
LLOPIZ. deceased. File Number 76-
1333. Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Third Floor. Dade County Courthouse.
73 West Flagler Street Miami. Flor-
ida. The personal representative of
the estate Is MIRTA D. LLOPIZ.
whose address is 2974 N.W. 102nd
Street. Miami. Florida 33147. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTH8
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection thev mav have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CI.AIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 30.
1976.
MIRTA D. LLOPIZ
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of PEDRO M. LIX5PIZ.
a/k/a TONY LLOPIZ Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
THEODORE M. TRUSH1N LAW
OFFICES. PA.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 600
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 532-4801
4/30 5/7
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-3216 (40)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DESPINA WILLIAMS.
Petitioner,
and
HOMER WILLIAMS.
Respondent.
TO: HOMER WILLIAMS
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on GLADYS GERSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is Stone.
Sostchln ft Koss. P.A.. 101 Northwest
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 4. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on this
23rd day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GLADYS GERSON. ESQUIRE
Stone. Sostchln & Koss. P.A.
101 Northwest 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
4/30 6/7-14-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CA8E NO. 76-12804
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDMOND F. CLERSAINT. husband.
CHERYL L CLER8AINT. wife.
TO: CHERYL L CLERSAINT
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
,.e,r.e,l?, ..n 'he Petitioner's Attorney;
k'mRSA,L.Z Koi-FilN Sul,e 80- Sey:
bold Building. 36 N E. 1st St.. Miami.
Florida, and file the original in the
office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before June 4 i976 or w
cause will be taken as confessed by
DAT5B,Jhl" 2l8t dav of April. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Countv Court
B. LIPPS
Deoutv Clerk
___________________ ----- 26th
USA! NOTKI
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-11162
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JESUS LOPEZ.
Husband. Petitioner
and
ROSA LOPEZ.
Wife, Respondent
TO: ROSA LOPEZ
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East Flagler
St, Miami, Florida 33111. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 14. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
7th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 358-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
4/9-16-11-10
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
by virtue of Chapter 678. Florida Stat-
utes Annotated (1941) Warehouseman
and Warehouse Receipts Wherein AB-
BOTT MOVING ft STORAGE CO..
a Florida corporation by virtue of Its
warehouse Hens has in its possession
the following described property.
Used Household Goods as the property
of MRS. C. MILLETT. whose last
known address was 849 NE 63 Road..
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla.. and that on the
14th day of May. 1976 during the legal
hours of sale mainly between 11:00
forenoon and 2:00 In the afternoon at
2136 N.W. 24th Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida the undersigned shall offer for
sale to the highest bidder for cash In
hand the above described property of
MRS. C. MILLETT.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 14th
day of April. 1976.
__________________________________4/23-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND POR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-12773
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SHAUKAT H. ALI KHAN
NUZHAT KHAN
TO: NUZHAT KHAN
49 B Model Town
Lahare. Pakistan
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Louis R. Beller. Esq.. attorney for.
Petitioner, whose address Is 420 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 228. Miami Beach.
Fla. 33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styed court
on or before June 4. 1976: otherwise
a default will be entered against yon
for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21st day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Louis R. Beller. Esq.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 238
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
_______________________4/30 6/7-14-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-11174
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
NELIDA RAMOS.
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
CARLOS OMAR RAMOS.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: CARLOS OMAR RAMOS
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a coov of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on CARLOS UDSKY. ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 2121
Ponce de Leon Boulevard. Suite 420.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before June
4. 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. 120
N.E. 6th Street. Miami. Florida 33132
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
As Deoutv Clerk
NOTICE UNDER
___FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
thT,,?B .'S "^EHY OIVEN that
in KuVdeP8,*ned- d<""rlnR to engage
kf vnwirUS&L tte fictitious, name
Clerk of the Circuit Court 3 nSl V21 T^l". de ljeon Blvd Suite 420
County, Florida *de S?1 a*l>te- Florida 33134
SOUTH FLORIDA MOTELS INC pn"e; <205> 442-8624
4/10 6/7-l:n attorney for Petitioner
4/30
6/7-14-11


Friday, April 30, 1976
"Jewlsti tkrkmnn
Page 15-B
Abraham Pepper Passes;
Was Longtime Area Resident
Abraham Pepper, a 56-year
resident of Miami, passed away
April 18 at Cedars of Lebanon
Hospital. "Pop" Pepper, as he
was affectionately known to
his many friends and relatives,
celebrated his 96th birthday last
December.
At the turn of the century
Pepper emigrated from Austria
to Providence, R.I., where he
married Annie Ehrenkrantz. He
moved his family to Jackson-
ville in 1905 and later became
a permanent resident of Gaines-
ville, where he was active in
establishing the Jewish com-
munity in that city and provid-
ed a Jewish home atmosphere
for the Jewish students attend-
ing the University of Florida.
In 1913 Pepper, who was in
the scrap business, wrote to the
Chamber of Commerce in Mi-
ami, inquiring about opportuni-
ties for his business, and came
to Miami in response to their
reply that Miami was a grow-
ing city. He established his
business in Miami in 1920.
INTERESTED in community
matters, he immediately became
a member of Beth David Con-
gregation, and served as an of-
ficer and director until 1930.
In 1930, realizing the need for
an Orthodox Synagogue in the
southwest area of Miami, he and
other residents established the
Miami Hebrew School and Con-
gregation, which later became
known as Congregation Beth El.
Pepper and his wife dedicated
the cornerstone of the congre-
gation's first permanent syna-
gogue.
Pepper was instrumental in
establishing the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Association,
of which he was president for
many years. Among his other
philanthropic and fraternal ac-
tivities he was an officer in the
Hebrew Free Loan Society,
Chesed Shel Emmes and the
Miami Elks Lodge.
Furman, Emanu-El
Trustee, Passes
Maurice Gordon Furman, who
founded the M. G. Furman ac-
counting firm of Miami Beach
50 years ago, died April 21 at
73.
LEGAL MOTICE
LICAl NOTKi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Can No. 78-3875 (21)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
WILLIE J. THOMAS, husband
and LULA HAS THOMAS, wife
TO: I All. A MAE THOMAS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Born in Massachusetts, Fur- Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
man was a vashsma nf Wo-m na* Deen fllod SaWlBSt you and you
lir n l eteran Ot World are hereby required to serve a coDy
War H who rose to the rank of yur answer or other pleading- to
(- captain in the African cam- ney. lester Rogers, whose ad-
paign. He was a member of dre"8 14M Nw- 17 Avenue. Miami.
R'nai R'rith ..*. Florida 33126. and file the original
i i trustee Of Tem- with the Clerk of, the above styled ,
Pie Emanu-El and a member of SUrt,?7n 0r befr? f.'8 ?,1th. d"v. ot parties having or claiming to have
the American Institute of CPAs. ed'agJfn.t De'aU'1 """ be "*"' *ny < -m,e or! erpst-,n *
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-11871
DAVID R BALOGH and
SALIJE BALOQH. his wife.
Plaintiffs.
vs.
JOSEPH L WAWRZYNIAK and
CAROL. ANN WAWRZTNIAK. hla
wife, and LUI8 PASTRANA and
JANE' PASTRANA, his wife, first
name being unknown. In her Individual
capacity, and aa Personal
Representative of the Estate of
LUIS PASTRANA. Deceased, and all
parties claiming interests by. through,
under or against LUIS PASTRANA.
If living, or the Estate of LUIS
PASTRANA. If deceased, and all
He is survived by his wife,
Sari; three brothers, Albert,
Harold and Irving; and three
sisters, Mrs. Peggy Aronovitz,
Mrs. Charlotte Serkin and Min-
nie Furman.
Services were held on April
23 at the Riverside Alton Rd.
chapel.
you.
DATED this 14th day of April. 1876.
RICHARD P BRINKEH
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By N. A. Hewett
4/23-30 6/7-14
UML MOTKI
Pepper is survived by his
sons, Sidney of Miami and Ben
of West Palm Beach; two broth-
ers, Harry of Daytona Beach
and Sam of Providence; a sister, Luz MiJklA ^^
Jennie Solinger of Miami Beach;
nine grandchildren and 22 great-
grandchildren.
iN-T.HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 79-12294
,, r.N.I'9E BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GUILLERMO COLON. Husband.
The Family of the Late
RUTH CUTLER
wish to thank all their friends
for the sympathy extended
during their recent bereavement.
BEN CUTLER
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME,
Streini tlit lewnh Community iinct 1131
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_ REfORM SERVICES J
EmuclG*tn(lW) 1st Consul
HlltyCoidsn 11944) llffltl B. CwOtn
ui t Telephone 858-8644
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open tvery Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
PALMER'S
MONUMENT COMPANY/
fSatSONAUZZD MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IR OUR WORMHOf
44344921.4444922
327* SW. S* ST. MIAMI
Wife.
TO: LUZ MARIA COLON
Urbanisation del Carmen
Calle 6. Casa E-104
Camuv. Puerto Rico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of your and '"* tne ortartnal with the clerk of
Marriage has been filed, and you are tn" above styled court on or before
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-10341
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DI88OLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARGARET L WHITTAKER
and
ROBERT O. WHITTAKER
TO: ROBERT O. WHITTAKER
c/0 SERTE3A
3A Avenlda NorteEntre 27 y
29 C.P.
San Salvador. El Salvador. C.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on WOLFSON, DIAMOND. LOGAN 4t
EDGE. PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 407 Lincoln Road.
Suite 9G. Miami Beach. Florida 33139.
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer to the Husband's Attor-
ney. DONALD F. FROST. ESQ. 21
S-W Sth Street. Miami. Florida
33110. and file the original with the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 28th dav of
May. 1976. or the allegations will be
taken as confessed against you. and
a Default will be entered.
DATED AT MIAMI. Dade County.
Florida this 16th day of April. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
By B. LIPP8
As Deputy Clerk
4/23-30 6/7-14
properties herein described.
Defendants.
TO: LUIS PASTRANA, if living, or
"JANE" PASTRANA, his wife.
Individually and as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
LUIS PASTRANA. Deceased.
Defendants
Residence Unknown
Mailing Address c/o J. H.
Duhlg
1133 City National Bank
Building
26 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130; and all
parties claiming Interests by.
through, under or against LTJIS
PASTRANA, if living, or the
Estate of LUIS PASTRANA. If
deceased, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or Interest In the proper-
ties herein described
Residences Unknown _______
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Complaint for Foreclosure of
Mortgages has been filed against you.
against the following described real
property, situate In Dade County.
Florida, to-wlt:
Lots 10. 11. IS: and Lots 14 and 16.
In Block 4. STJNKIST ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof, aa
recorded In Plat Book 40. at Page
96. of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
and you are hereby required to '
copy of your Answer or other nlean-
May 24. 1976: otherwise a default will -, -- ----- ...
be entered against you for the relief In* to the Complaint o^n the PlaJnaris
demanded In the complaint or petition.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
I w. OUI. Hwy-
Heayweee. Pla, N.*h mi.mi. ru.
Ml-Tat* MSU1S .
SONNY UBVITT.'F.O.
IN
MIAMI
BEACH
Call JEfferson 1-7677
NEWMANS
rVNRRAL HOiCI ^
333 DADE BOULEVARD X
Edward T.
FJ>.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
S0IW4RTZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2367
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER A. BERK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
i'l AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the-estate
of ESTHER A. BERK, deceased. File
Number 76-2357. Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade Countv. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is IRVING BERK,
whose address Is 2529 Flteh Avenue.
Chicago. Illinois. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
qulred. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
rlalm or demand thev mav have. Each
claim must be in writing and must
Indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the amount
-lalmed. If the claim Is not yet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient cooles of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal representa-
tive.
All parsons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has bean mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FTR8T
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Amil 30.
1974.
IRVING BERK
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of ESTHER A. BERK
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE: '
JACK ANKUS
5540 I*Oorce Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: 844-7045
4/30 i/7
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
7th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Mark A. Leibowlts
WOLFSON. DIAMOND. LOGAN
A EDGE. PA.
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 9G
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
4/16-23-30 6/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-1902
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM O. DWYER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of WILLIAM O. DWYER deceased.
File Number 76-1902. is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probale Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal represen-
tatives of the estate are Julian Gon-
zalez and Elsie Gonzalez whose ad-
dress Is 3035 S.W. 16th Street. Miami.
Florida 33145. The name and address
of the personal representatives' at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for tbe claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim Is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim Is contingent or unli-
quidated, the nature of the uncertainty
shall be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the dark to mall one cony to
each personal representative.
attorney. George J. Tallanoff. of the
Law Offices of George J. Tallanoff.
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. Flor
Ida 33139. and file the original An-
swer or pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or be-
fore the 26th day of May. MM. If
you fall to do so. Judgment by de-
fault will be taken against you for the
relief demanded In the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In the JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on this 13th day of April.
1476
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
GEORGE J. TALIANOFF. ESQ.
I.aw Offices of George J. Tallanoff
Attorneys for Plaintiffs
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 331S9
Telephone: 533-7337 __ ,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 74-4157 Nesbitt
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AUGUSTINE YERO.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVTNO
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE: _________
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of AUGUSTINE YERO. deceased. File
Number 74-4157. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade Countv. Flor-
ida Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 W Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33128. The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is JUAN A.
YERO. whose address Is 579 N.W.
119th Street. North Miami. Florida.
The name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. .
All persons having claims or oe-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to flla
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Bach claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim Is not yet due. the data
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shill be stated If the ctolmla
All persons Interested In the estate secured, the security shall be deecrib-
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad.
8
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.D.
New Vorfc: (212) 263-7600 Queen* Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-33%
1921 Pembroke Rd.
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 7S-12SM
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
R T. STANLEY. Husband
MAMIE R STANLEY.
Wife
You. MAMIE R. 8TANLEY. RESI-
DENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby no-
tified to serve a copy of your Answer
to the Dissolution of Marriage filed
against you, upon husband's attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ.. Ill N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136.
and file original with Clerk of Court
on or before May 38. 1976: otherwise
the Petition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 20th day of April. 1971.
RICHARD P. BRINKER CLERK
By: M. HERRERA
Deputy Clark
4/13-80 6/7-14
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE PTRBT
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challengea the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OB-
JBCTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Data of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 23.
JULIAN GONZALEZ
ELSIE GONZALEZ
As Personal Representatives of the
Estate of William O. Dwyer
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES:
MARTIN KALB. ESQUIRE
Myers. Kaplan. Levlnson & Kenln
Suite 700. 1428 Brickell Avenue
Miami. Florida 13131
Telephone: 305/371-9041
4/18-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage m
business under the fictitious name of
RE-LUCKT FASHION at 440 SW. I
St. Miami. Fla. 83130 Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dads County. Flor-
ida.
LUCRBCIA FERRER 60%
REINA E. PENA 60%
4/28-30 6/7-14
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one cony
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the ****
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
minlstratlon has been mailedI arere-
qulred. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
to file any objections they JTfc*v*
that challengea the validity of the de-
cedent's win. the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of thecowjL
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 33.
1176
JUAN A YERO
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of AUGUSTINE YERO
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR ________
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
MARTIN ROTH
1111 Ainalev Building
Miami. Florida 831 S3
Telephone: 371-6664 4/M.10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business Under the fictitious nasne of
PAINTS 'N PAILS at 12668 Biacayne
Boulevard. North Miami. Florida. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
Courity. Florida.
DRON. INC.
4/14-23-M ill


Friday, April 30, 1976

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Creamed
Cottage Cheese
PANTRY M ~M 24-OZ.
PRIDE M %^ CUP
? lIMIT ONE CUP PLEASE WITH OIHIR PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
gas**
%Xl* Price reductions on basic foods
CUSTOMER MAV PURCHASE ONE OR At, STARRED ITEMS WITH ONE S7 00 ORDER OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM (WHOLE) LIMIT 2. PLEASE
Fresh Fryers
6H SAVE 20'
Pantry Pride
Sour Cream
PINT
CONT.
39
* LIMIT ONE PINT PLEASE WITH OIMIR PURCHASES
OF S7 00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES J
TOP QUALITY, SWEET EATING
California
Strawberries
PINTS
99
ILA OB SMIPP1D PHIMIUM IBISM
Fryer Quarters .. 55
It* OH SHIPRIO PRIMIUM IRISH ft_
Fryer Parts
C.AA0I A QJIC IROIIN
Cornish Hens
79
Legs 0' Lamb
Li LB.
NEW
ZEALAND
FROZEN
HH SAVE 39'
Musselman's
Applesauce
+ LIMIT ONE JAR PLEASE WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FOR BAKING OR FRENCH FRIES
TASTY THAT
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Idaho
Potatoes
10s*!29
Fresh Pineapple 89*
IAICI SWII1 0^ ^l- -fc .
Sandwich Onions 2 Z9
Red Radishes 3 29c
INDIAN IVI SIID1ISS (IXTRA IAICI 11 SI7I ^ ^
White Grapefruit 6 o/l
THIN SHIN JUICT (LARCI 10 SIZI) + f* $ A
Florida Oranges lb ... 1
SUNSWIII Af ,
Pitted Prunes Sff 49*
Firm Ripe Tomatoes
3PKGS $*|
OF 6 -fj
USDA CHOICI ill' CMUCR RONI1ISS
Shoulder Steak
USOA CMOCCI WISIIRN CORN M0
Beef for Stew
FOR DELICIOUS
SALADS

TRY ME. I'M NEW! PANTRY PRIDE
NIW Zl ALAND FROZIN IAMB ^_
Shld'r. Blade Chops 89
$1 59
$1 39
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Rump Roast ,. 1
USOA CHOICI WISTIRN CORN MDilll ROUND
Eye Round Roast >. 1
GROUND f\\t
Beef Chuck 99
PANTRTPRIOI rfftt
Great Ground '- n o9
USOA CHOICI WISIIIN CORN 110
Beef Brisket .. $149
SLICID AT?*AC
Beef Liver u 9
MI1ISHIRI SMOmOOR
Polish Sausage > 1
USOA CHOICI WIST. CORN 110 Mil LOIN
Porterhouse Steak .. 2
FARMLAND ^ A*V #\ '
Frozen Dinners 2 .'.-. 99
I MI.1 Ml S.lll, -,..( I
OZ CUP
Whipped
Cream Cheese
59
Beef Chuck
Blade Steak
Underblade
Pot Roast
U.S.D.A.
CHOICE
89'
U.S.D.A.
CHOICE'
BEEF CHUCK"
BONELESS
$129
1
LB.
SAVE 26
Pantry Pride
Bath Tissue
19c
2_ ,^ WHITE
-rollJ ~W or
PKG. %? ASSORTED
* LIMIT ONE J-ROll PKG.. PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7 OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
d
PANTRY PRIDE
Mixed Vegetables
OR SLICED b^L 16-OZ* j
CARROTS ^W CANS M
SIOKIII IRINCH STUI SIIWID _
Green Beans tSt 33*
Creamed Corn tSt 25c
QUAKIR ICO'. A% .
Natural Cereal v..,-' 89c
29c
49*
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JOAN OF ABC
Garbanzos
JOAN OF ARC
3 Bean Salad
IADS MATONNAISI
Potato Salad
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Salami or Bologna 3Brfl"
OSCAB MAYIR
Variety Pak !tS:$149
Midget Liverwurst..SSS 49*
AMIRICAN KOSHIi
Franks or KnocksJffl $109
Stviptatd ut Scxoicc Aftftetcj&ii
AH >l A von LISCALOR ATVAfVf
Borden Yogurt 4 SS 99*
PANIRT PRIOI COIOIIOICMIISI lOOOl ftttC
American Singles .m. "9
SARC4NTO CRUMRIID AffAC
Blue Cheese IBs 69*
OROIN llll UNI COIORID A AC
American Singles....."?.?: 99
PANTRY PRIOI SWIII OR SALIID f+ I
Whipped Butter \Zl 61*
IIOSUNPURI -_
Grapefruit Juice %S8. 19*
PBICES EFFECTIVE THBU SATUBDAY, MAY 1 *t, AT ALL PANTRY PRIDE STORES IN DADE ft MONROE COUNTIES. ALSO HOLLYWOOD ft HALLANDALE
>E 100*.
Whole Wheat Brtad :, 45*
VELVET CREME
Chocolate Donuts......."'69*
PANTRY PBIDl 100*
au Ml. M a.,0 (*! tM(io TO OtDliAl I'Orit"
FRESHLY SMOKED
Sable
QTR.
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59
RICH SCATIRINC All WHIM MIAI
Turkey Breast all 99*
CLAIROl ^ LOTION SHAMPOO ^ FAST
Final Net $ -i 99 j Head & $ 4 291 Bayer
Hair Spray 1"" [Shoulders A w |Aspirin
FAST PAIN RELIEF
Pepto
Bismol
FOR UPSET STOMACHS
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS.
-L


Friday, April 30, 1976
* Jew 1st HcrkHan
Page 1-C
State B'nai B'rith Group
Albert Elected
,

%

To Convene in Miami Beach Mt. Sinai Prexy
Stanley Gertzman Mike Teltelbaum
Barry Gurland
Delegates representing over 80 lodges and some 14,000
members throughout the state will convene this weekend
(April 30-May 2) at the Deauville Hotel for the 40th annual
convention of the Florida State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges.
Barry T. Gurland of North
Miami Beach will be installed
as president of the body. Mike
Teitelbaum, M.D., of North Mi-
ami, is outgoing president.
Other officers will be elected at
the conclave.
Stanley A. Gertzman of Char-
lotte, N.C., president of B'nai
B'rith District Five, an area en-
compassing seven Southeastern
states, will be the guest speaker
at the awards luncheon.
The opening session, Friday
at 7:15 p.m., will be a special
Shabbat dinner and service to
be conducted by Rabbi Stanley
Ringler, Florida regional direc-
tor of the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations, with students from
the Hillel Foundation at the
University of Miami. Miami
Beach Mayor Harold Rosen will
welcome the delegates, present
keys to the city and offer a spe-
cial proclamation.
Jay Markowitz of Tampa, past
president of the Florida State
Association and of District Five,
is convention chairman. Louis
Hymson of North Miami Beach,
president of the B'nai B'rith
Council of South Florida Lodges,
is convention coordinator.
CONVENTION delegates will
deal with a program calling for
the expansion of B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations at colleges
and universities in Florida
which do not yet have a Hillel
presence, increased activities
for the B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
Dade United Way Campaign Film
To Be Released Nationally
The United Way of Dade
County's 1976 campaign film
"You're the Hero," featuring
Robert Shaw, produced in con-
junction with Paramount Pic-
tures and directed by John
Frankenheimer, has been se-
lected by the United Way of
America for national distribu-
tion. This is the first time that a
film produced by a local United
Way has been chosen for use on
a national scale by the 2,500
United Way organizations in the
country-
Proceeds from the sale of this
film to other United Ways
through the United Way of
America, will be used to defray
United Way of Dade County
administrative costs.
Bring-a-Friend
To Temple Israel
This evening is Bring-a-Friend
Shabbat at Temple Israel South,
whose services are held at the
Sunset Congregational Church
beginning at 8 o'clock.
ganization (BBYO), particularly
in North Florida, and greater
support for the Jewish Federa-
tions in the state.
Registration for delegates will
be held Friday from 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. All state association com-
mittees will meet prior to the
Shabbat dinner.
Saturday morning religious
services at 8:30 will be conduct-
ed by George Kotin, president
of B'nai B'rith Maccabee Lodge,
Miami Beach.
An awards luncheon Saturday
is scheduled for noon, with pre-
sentation of state B'nai B'rith
awards to be made by Bert S.
Brown of South Miami, third
vice president and treasurer of
B'nai B'rith District Five.
Gertzman, who presides over
some 23,000 members in more
than 150 lodges in Florida,
Georgia, North and South Ca-
rolina, Virginia, Maryland and
the District of Columbia, will
deliver the keynote address at
the awards luncheon.
A LEADERSHIP seminar for
lodge presidents and vice presi-
dents from 2:45 to 4 p.m. Sat-
urday will be led by Ira H. Catz
of Hollywood, past president of
the Florida State Association.
Arnold D. Ellison of Atlanta,
executive vice president of Dis-
trict Five, will conduct a semi-
nar for financial secretaries and
treasurers at the same time.
A lengthy business session,
beginning Saturday evening at
7 o'clock, will feature addresses
by Ellison and Dr. Teitelbaum
and convention reports from the
credentials, budget and constitu-
tion committees.
The B'nai B'rith Foundation
of the United States will hold a
breakfast Sunday at 8 a.m., fea-
turing a special presentation of
its Heritage program.
The final business session will
begin Sunday at 9:30 a.m., with
additional committee reports,
election of state officers and an
installation luncheon beginning
at 1:30 p.m.
Louis Ossinsky, Jr., of Day-
tona Beach, past state and dis-
trict president, will serve as
master of ceremonies. Installing
officer is Malcolm H. Fromberg
of North Miami, first vice presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District
Five.

The South Florida Fund-Raising Cabinet
of B'nai B'rith, established in 1975, will
formulate policy and conduct fund-rais-
ing functions on behalf of the B'nai B'rith
Foundation Youth Services Appeal.
Seated (from left) are Eric Glaser, past
president, Hatikvah Lodge; William G.
Rabins, past president, HMcrest Lodge
and regional fund-raising coordinator;
Malcolm H. Fromberg, chairman, South
Florida fund-raising Cabinet, first vice
president, District Five; Jack H. Levin,
trustee, B'nai B'rith Foundation, cochair-
man of deferred giving program; Hiram
Goldstein, past president, Sunny Isles
Lodge; Bert S. Brown, past president,
Florida State Association, third vice pres-
ident and treasurer, District Five. Stand-
ing (from left) are Neil C. Rosen, Florida
Lodge Services director; Edward Tuma-
roff, regional director, B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation; Mel Feigeles, Century Club chair-
man, Florida Region; Alfred E. Golden,
Hillel and ADL commissioner; Adrienne
M. Weston, administrative assistant,
B'nai B'rith Foundation; Louis C. Sobrin,
president, Hawaiian Gardens Lodge,
President's Club chairman, Florida Re-
gion; Sidney Ritter, past president, Is-
rael Lodge; Dr. Mike Teitelbaum, presi-
dent, Florida State Association; Louis
Hymson, president-elect, South Florida
Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges, past
president, BBYO Board.
James M. Albert was elected
president of Mount Sinai Medi-
cal Center at the annual mem-
bership meeting of the board of
trustees. He succeeds Edward
Shapiro, who served Mount Si-
nai for three successive terms,
since 1973.
Albert has been a member of
the board of trustees since 1963,
and has served on its joint ad-
visory, development fund and
nominating and executive com-
mittees. During the years of
planning and construction of the
Blum Building, Albert was
chairman of the buildings and
grounds committee and recent-
ly was chairman of the nursing
and patient care committee.
A Miami resident since 1925,
Albert is a retired building and
construction executive. He is a
past president of the Home
Builders Association of South
Florida and of the Florida
Homebuilders Association.
He is an honorary life mem-
ber of the board of the Florida
Chamber of Commerce, vice
chairman of the Miami-Dade
Water and Sewer Authority,
past president of the Civic
League of Miami Beach and of
the Paoanicolaou Cancer Re-
search Institute.
He is on the executive board
of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations, the North,
American board of the World
Union for Progressive Judaism,,
and was chairman in 1971 of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization. He is a past board
member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Albert and his wife. Leona,
live in Miami Beach. Their three
sons. Ronald, LawTence, and
Gerald, and their families live
in Miami. Dr. Gerald Albert is
an executive board member of
Mount Sinai's sustaining board
of Fellows.
IN OTHER elections to the
board of trustees of Mount Si-
nai, Max Orovitz was reelected
chairman of the board for the
sixteenth consecutive year. Oro-
vitz, a Miami Beach business
executive, is a founder and life
trustee of Mount Sinai. Imme-
diate past president Edward
Shaoiro was elected as vice
chairman of the board, along
with two other past presidents,
Leonard L. Abess and Samuel
Friedland.
Vice Dresidents are L. Jules
Arkin. Jerry Blank, Julius Dar-
sky. Lila G. Heatter, Samuel J.
H"iman. Mil.thn Reiner, Ben-
jamin G. Kline, Bing Kosoff,
and Sydney Levison. Other of-
ficers elected include Lewis E.
Zorn, secretary; Aletha Gifford
and Dan B. RusWn. assistant
secretaries: W. James Orovitz.
treasurer; and Leonard A. Wien.
assistant treasurer. Continuing
as evecutive vice president is
Samuel Gertner. while Samuel
F^ner remains executive treas-
urer.
New trustees of Mount Sinai
named to the board for one-vear
terms include Louis Harris. Jo-
seph Kosow. Alex Manson. Polly
deHirsch Meyer and Robert Re-
vitz.
Roolortud to srve are Judge
Irvins Onen. Josenh Davidson,
M.B. Hadassah
Sontheate Groan will hold a
regular meeting on Monday,
May 10. at 1 p.m. In the Terrace
Room. Program will be a pres-
entation by Muriel C. Kovinow
on "Jewish Women In American
History President is Anne W.
Levine.
* tr -tr
Shaloma Groan will hold its
installation meeting on Tues-
day, Mav 11. at noon at the
Shore Club Hotel. Installation
by Mrs. Milton SlrHn. Presi-
dent is Edith Shapiro.
JAMES M. ALBERT
Richard Deutch, Robert Feld-
man, Gary R. Gerson, Milton
Kelner, Leonard Liebowitz, Ar-
thur Mark, Leonard Miller,
Marshal Rosenberg, Arthur
Sheppard and Michael Wein-
traub.
For outstanding service and
loyalty to Mount Sinai Medical
Center, James M. Albert, Anna
Brenner Meyers and Lewis E.
Zorn were named life trustees.
SHIRLIE KESSELMAN
High Fashion
At Mt. Sinai
Family fashions will flower
at the Fontainebleau when
Mount Sinai Medical Center
holds its annual Auxiliary in-
stallation luncheon on Friday,
May 7 at noon.
"It's a Family Affair How
Sweet It is" will feature high-
fashion modeling by six promi-
nent families, including the par-
ents, siblings, and children of
Mount Sinai Auxiliary members.
Fashions will be from Saks Fifth
Avenue, thanks to the talents
of fashion coordinator Bette
Mann. Music will be provided
by the Ray Gordon trio.
Shirlie (Mrs. Max) Kessel-
man will take the gavel as in-
coming Auxiliary president, as
Rosalie (Mrs. Theodore) Fincus
steos down from office. Samuel
Gertner. executive vice presi-
dent, will install new Auxiliary
officers.
- James Albert, Mount Sinai's
newlv elected president, and Al-
vin Goldberg, executive direcr
tor. will extend greetings to
luncheon guests on behalf of the
board of trustees and the ad-
ministration of the medical cen*
ter.
Working on luncheon plant
are Sallv Soaet (Mrs. Samuel)
Goldman, luncheon chairman;
Cookie (Mrs. Larry) Wynne",
vice president of membership:
Pattv (Mrs. Alan) Welnsteini,
door Prizes; and Rona (Mrs,
Alan) Braun, publicity chatr*
man.
Centerpieces for the luncheon
tables are beln Mount Sinai Garden Club.
For further information and
ticket purchase reauests. cal
Mount Sinai Auxiliary's office.



PageiC
*JmlstifkrkteHy
Friday, April 30, 1976
Israel Bonds Campaign Events
ROLLING GREEN E
AND BELLE PLAZA
'NIGHTS l.N ISRAEL"
Condominium owners at Roll-
ing Green E pay tribute to fel-
low residents.-lack and Florence
Pereira at a "Night in Israel,"
Sunday, May 2,.at 8, p.m. in the
fourth-floor auditorium. Fea-
tured guest will be Eddie Schaf-
fer, American Jewish folk hu-
morist. According to chairman
Mrs. Frances Studen, cham-
pagne cocktails and refresh-
ments will be served. Commit-
tee cochairmen are Phil Studen,
Morris Abarbanel and Sol Kri-
bal.
Jack Pereira, former secre-
tary of the Rolling Green Build-
ing E Men's Club and the board
of directors, has been active on
behalf of the Israel Bond, Com-
bined Jewish Appeal and Israel
Emergency Fund campaigns.
Florence Pereira, a member of
Hadassah at Rolling Green, is
the chairwoman of the Hadas-
sah Medical Organiation.
On Monday, May 3, at 7:30
p.m. the residents of Belle Plaza
will hold a "Night in Israel" in
the recreation room. Special
guest will be Mrs. Judith Beilin,
a Consul of Israel in New York.
According to Dr. Bernard W.
Smith, committee chairman,
Clarence and Edna Freedman
will receive the State of Israel
Solidarity Award.
The Freedmans, members of
Temple Emanu-El, were active
in the Israel Bond and United
Jewish Appeal programs in their
home town of Waterbury, Conn.
One of the Founders of Temple
Beth El in Waterbury, Mrs.
Freedman is a past president of
the Deborah and Mt. Scopus
Groups of Hadassah.
-b -it -tr
LANCELOT HALL
'SALUTE TO ISRAEL'
The residents of Bay Harbor
Islands' Lancelot Hall will at-
tend a "Salute to Israel" break-
fast on Sunday, May 2, at 10
a.m. in the recreation room. The
announcement was made by
chairman Jack Rasdan and co-
chairmen David Fried, Henry
Roth, Ed Sabath and Eric Zwer-
ling. Other chairmen include
Ben Asher, chairman. Bay Har-
bor Continental; Hy R. Butter-
man, chairman, Town and Coun-
try; Rita Holtzman (Mrs.
Arnold) Schwartz, chairperson.
Bay Harbor Club; and Joseph H.
Epstein, chairman, Coral Sea
Towers.
Special guest will be Israeli
entertainer Danny Tadmore,
whose repertoire includes songs
in Hebrew, Yiddish, English,
Spanish and Italian. He is a
lieutenant in the Israel Defense
Forces Reserves and was called
to active duty during the Yom
Kippur War.
At the breakfast meeting the
State of Israel Solidarity Award
will be presented to the Lance-
lot Hall residents for their lead-
ership on behalf of the people
of Israel.
to tr it
Luncheon Guests to Hear
Rabin Phone Message
OWEN S. FREED
FREED CHAIRING
TEMPLE JUDEA DINNER
Coral Gables attorney Owen
S. Freed, partner of Pettigrew
* Bailey, has been named chair-
man of the Temple Judea-Israel
Bond Dinner of State planned
for Sunday, May 16, at 7 pjn.
at the temple social hall. The
announcement was made by
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat,
spiritual leader, and Milton M.
Parson, executive director of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization campaign.
A vice president of Temple
Judea, Freed is active in the
High School in Israel Committee
of the Jewish Federation. For-
mer president of the Rotary
Harbour House resident
and community leader Eli
A. Cohen has been named
chairman of the Cash Mo-
bilization for the South
Florida Israel Bond Organ-
ization campaign. Cohen
will chair the first "Report
to Israel" luncheon of key
campaign leaders on Tues-
day, May 4, at noon at the
Lincoln Road campaign
headquarters.
Club of Coral Gables, in 1956
he established a Rotary Founda-
tion Fellowship at the Univer-
sity of Uruguay and was an
Honorary Consul of the Repub-
lic of Honduras. He is a mem-
ber of the Dade County Bar
Association and of the Bankers
Club.
Key campaign officials and
Jewish community leaders will
attend a "Report to Israel"
luncheon and hear an address
by phone from Israel's Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin on Tues-
day, May 4, at noon at the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign headquar-
ters. The announcement was
made by Robert L. Siegel, gen-
eral campaign chairman, and
William Littman, South Brow-
ard County, and Robert M. Her-
mann, North Broward County,
board of governors chairmen.
According to a message re-
ceived from Michael Arnon,
president and chief executive
officer of State of Israel Bonds,
"In view of Israel's urgent eco-
nomic situation, His Excellency
Yigal Allon, who will be in
Washington next month, has
asked to address the Greater
Miami Israel Bond campaign
leaders via telephone. At that
time the campaign leaders will
have the opportunity to respond
to Minister Allon with reports
to be taped for transmission to
the government of Israel."
There will also be progress
reports from the Prime Minis-
ter's Club and Ambassador's So-
ciety of Trustees. Enrollments
and a discussion of the next
phase of the Israel Bond cam-
paign in the spring for Shom-
rei Israel (Guardians of Israel
program).
Weiner Is Guest
At Beth Solomon
Ed Weiner, author of "The
Damon Runyon Story" and
"Let's Go to Press" (a biography
of Walter Winchell), will be the
guest speaker at services this
evening at 8 at Temple Beth
Solomon. A veteran public rela-
tions counsel, Weiner's topic is
"Walter Winchell, the Jew"
JWV Auxiliary 681
Breakfast Meeting
JWV Ladies Auxiliary No. 661
of Hialeah-Miami Springs will
hold their monthly breakfast
meeting on Sunday, May 2, at
9:15 at Temple Tifereth Jacob.
Several new projects will be
proposed by the new president,
Mrs. Anna McCullers.
On the agenda are plans for
the monthly birthday party at
Sunland Training Center, par-
ticipation in Memorial Day serv-
ices and election of delegates to
the June JWV statewide con-
vention.
\
FLORIDA'S MOST LUXURIOUS SALON
MAIRSTYIING. TIN'S PIRMANFNTS MANICURES PFClfURFS
BFAuTY TREATMfNTS (AOAlS.COSMITlCS SPEOAl DEPARTMENT FOR BRlDES
HAIR STYLING ALSO FOR WEN
HOUSE OF BEAUTY
451 ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD. MIAMI BEACH
t APPOlNtUINI
MOIIS
AISO SUNDAY
V^
*


6
Friday, April 30, 1976
+je*istinu-*m*j
Page 3-C
Federation Women to Install Officers
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
will host a special luncheon,
. J
a.m. at the Royal Biscayne Ho-
tel, Key Biscayne.
Mrs. Lipoff has announced
that the luncheon-installation is
open to the public, but reserva-
tions are required. There is an
advance charge for the meal.
AMONG those addressing the
group will be Women's Division
president Mrs. Harry B. Smith,
who will deliver a report on her
two-year administration. Special
guest Dr. Bernard Reich will
discuss current affairs. Dr.
Reich is an associate professor
of political science and interna-
tional affairs at the George
Washington University in Wash-
ington.
The incoming president is
Mrs. Leonard Friedland. Vice
presidents for 1967-77 are Mrs.
Adolph Berger, leadership de-
velopment; Mrs. Bernard Man-
dler, community education; and
Mrs. Kenneth J. Schwartz, cam-
paign.
Additional information and
reservations are available
through Mrs. Mesnekoff at the
Federation Women's Division
office.
'Wall of Eternitf Artist
To Have One-Man Show
FOR LADIES ONLY
If you are looking for additional income and escape
from the daily routine here is your opportunity to par-
ticipate in an exciting new program with a well estab-
lished firm: showing, modeling and taking orders for
jewelry at small private shows.
Socially active, good dressers betwen 25 and 50 with
an interesting and attractive personality and an aver-
age education can earn a minimum of $120,00 per
week for as little as 2 afternoons or evenings of excit-
ing work.
Our very flexible program can be increased or decreas-
ed to fit own time availability.
Application for an appointment, including short back-
ground resume, from financially responsible candi-
dates with a minimum 2 years residence in area should
be made in own handwriting and mailed to: Rene I.
Fontaine, P.O. Box 38-1282, Miami, Fla. 33138.
NANCY LIPOFF
Tuesday, May 11, to install its
new officers for 1976-77. Chair-
man of the event will be Nancy
(Mrs Norman H.) Lipoff of
South Miami, the Division's vice
president for leadership de-
velopment.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El and
a past chairman of the Federa-
tion's Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign, will install the of-
ficers and offer the invocation.
The program begins at 11:30
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely, the Is-
raeli artist who executed the
"Wall of Eternity" on the Mer-
witzer Building of the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy, will
present a one-man show during
the Hebrew Academy's May 9
International Showcase 1976.
Taking an active role in plan-
ning the event are Esther (Mrs.
William) Belfer, Joan (Mrs. Nor-
man) Ciment, Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing Firtel, Yaffa (Mrs. Jay) Der-
mer, Dr. Morton Lieberman,
Morton J. Perlman, Claire (Mrs.
Josh) Rephun.
Also Julius Sand. Irene (Mrs.
Leonard) Adler, Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Bistritz, Milton Ehren-
reich, Sherman Baumrind, Bar-
ry Eisenberg, George Gold-
bloom, Dr. Elias Herschman,
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin Stein, Dr.
and Mrs. Frank Stein, Dr. and
Mrs. Steven Gurland, Morris
Waldman, Leon Beylus and Alex
Paul.
A highlight of the program
will be the presentation of a
Bicentennial arts and crafts
project by each Hebrew Acad-
emy student, according to Rabbi
Alexander Gross, the, principal.
]_' CHAYIM
a toast
to
ISRAEL
The Dade County Legisla-
tive Delegation has estab-
lished a toll-free incoming
WATS line so that citizens
of Dade County can easily
contact their senators, and
'epresentatives.
The toll-free WATS line
number is 1-800-342-9276.
<
b^daddys
liquors & Vouoges
Wkem<)owt> n&m alone,!
TV Programs
"StilL Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Guests:
Rabbis Mayer Abramowitz
and Morton Malavsky
Topic:
"Conservative Judaism"
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
BIKURIM CELEBRATION
Honoring
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
HONOREES FOR 1975-76
GUEST SPEAKER
HON. JOSEPH TAMIR
Member of the Defense and Foreign Affairs
Member of the Knesset Delegation to the US. Congress
SUNDAY, MAY 16th, 1976-7:00 P.M.
FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
BEAUTIFUL MUSICAL PROGRAM
STRENGTHEN
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
JNF Foundation Chairman
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
President
FOR RtStRVATIONS CALL 538-6464
We Congratulate
The Leaders and People
of Israel on Their
28th Anniversary
SUPER MARKET
527 WASHINGTON AVE
M B PIORIDA


Page 4*C
* Jem 1st fUrkman
Friday, April 30, 1976
Peretz of 'New Republic' to Speak At
American Friends of Hebrew U. Dinner
Dr. Martin Peretz, chairman
of the editorial board of The
New Republic, will be the prin-
cipal speakei* at the May 5 Is-
rael Independence Day dinner
of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University.
The Wednesday banquet,
scheduled for 7:30 and preceded
by a 6:30 p.m. cocktail recep-
tion, will honor Leonard Luria,
South Florida civic, business
and religious leader with the
Torch of Learning Award of the
American Friends in recogni-
tion of his leadership for the
Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem, the State of Israel and
higher education.
Judge Herbert S. Shapiro,
past president of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the American
Friends and dinner chairman,
is working with Herbert Buch-
wald, president; Harry A.
"Happy" Levy, chairman of the
board; and Marshall S. Harris,
vice president of the chapter.
CHAIRMAN of Capital for Is-
rael for South Florida and of the
advisory committee of Israel
Bonds, Luria is an active mem-
ber of Temple Beth Am and,
with his family, contributed a
park to the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem.
Dr. Peretz, a lecturer in so-
cial studies at Harvard Univer-
sity, is a member of the inter-
national board of governors of
the Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem. Under his direction, The
New Republic has attained in-
creased status as a magazine of
American liberalism.
Reservations for the dinner
may be made at the Miami
Beach offices of the American
Friends. The dinner is being
coordinated by Albert A. Dorn-
er. Florida regional director for
Hebrew University.
Participating in the program
will be Dr. Herbert Baumgard,
rabbi of Temple Beth Am; Dr.
Leon Kronish, rabbi of Temple
Beth Sholom; and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, rabbi of Temple
Emanu-El. Rabbis Lehrman and
Kronish are Honorary Fellows
of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman N. Glick-
stein of Hollywood will receive
a plaque designating them as
Founders of the Hebrew Uni-
versity.
Planning session for the Israel Independence Day din-
ner honoring Leonard Luria brought together leaders of
the American Friends of the Hebrew University at the
Westview Country Club (from left): Howard R. Scharlin,
Col. Jacob Arvey, Ambassador Avraham Harman, presi-
dent of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Her-
bert Buchwald, president of the Greater Miami Chap-
ter of the American Friends.
Ner Tamid Dedicates Ambulance
4
Dedication of a new ambul-
ance to the people of Israel by
members of Temple Ner Tamid
will be held Sunday, May 9, at
10 a.m. at the Miami Beach con-
gregation. Admission is free and
open to the general public and
refreshments will be served.
A new 1976 General Motors
emergency rescue vehicle, built
to the specifications of the Ma-
gm David Adorn, Israel's Red
Cms, will be on display at
Temple Ner Tamid for the cere-
monies.
D. Dale Regent is chairman
of the ambulance committee of
the congregation, which also is
raising funds for the new cen-
tral blood bank in Israel being
constructed in the Tel Aviv area
by,the MDA through the aid of
the American Red Magen David
for Israel.
Dr. Eugene Labovitz, rabbi of
Temple Ner Tamid, will officiate
at the dedication of the ambul-
ance, Regent said. He noted also
that the congregation is the first
in South Florida to undertake a
campaign for the $10 million
blood bank.
DAVID COLEMAN of Miami
Beach, Florida state president
of the ARMDI, will present a
plaque to Ner Tamid members
and describe the blood bank.
Also representing the ARMDI
will be Samuel Reinhard, state
chairman. Louis Suchman, presi-
dent of the congregation, and
Jack Greenberg, president of
the Men's CTub, also will par-
i ticipate.
The names of Louis and Gol-
die Cohen will be inscribed on
the ambulance, together with
that of Temple Ner Tamid, in
recognition of their major con-
tributions. Cohen is cochairman
of the ambulance committee.
Other leading members of the
committee include Herman Es-
gar, David Caplan, Harry Mil-
ler, Jack Greenberg, Max Ras-
kin. Louis Suchman and Jack
Richman.
The congregation is present-
ing a Saturday night, May 1,
Israel Opera Concert at the sy-
nagogue. The 8:45 program by
Opus III will benefit the blood
bank campaign, Regent said.
Gerald Schwartz, ARMDI re-
gional director and past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Lodge
of B'nai B'rith, will serve as
master of ceremonies for the
May 9 dedication.
MR. AND MRS. LOUIS COHEN
Knight to Replace Goode
The Metropolitan Dade Coun-
ty Commission will turn to As-
sistant County Manager Dewey
Knight to fill an interim posi-
tion when County Manager Ray
Goode steps aside in June, ac-
cording to an announcement by
Metro Mayor Stephen P. Clark,
Knight, who came to county
government in 1960 as a social
caseworker, became the high-
est-ranking black in county gov-
ernment in 1970. Knight is now
Goode's only aide with the title
of assistant county manager,
and sits at the manager's right
hand during the semi-monthly
daylong commission meetings.
DEWEY KNIGHT
.....
Happy Anniversary Israel On 28 Years Of Statehood
yitxt*a*al
eoMnm titu m*d ajuwact anvref
MOftTOAQfS -&0MNMCML H* -
Miss Robert Weds Mr. Gurland
In Double-Ring Ceremony
Monica Robert and Barry T.
Gurland were married April 24
at Temple Beth Moshe. Rabbis
MRS. BARRY T. GURLAND
Daniel Fingerer and Alexander
S. Gross officiated at the dou-
ble-ring ceremony, which was
followed by a reception at the
congregation.
Mrs. Gurland, daughter of
Mrs. Eva Robert of South Mi-
ami, formerly of Kansas City,
Mo., is a graduate of Center
Senior High School in Kansas
City and studied fashion mer-
chandising at the University of
Missouri. She is an executive
secretary with W. A. Taylor and
Company, Miami spirits import-
ing firm.
A certified public accountant
with Laventhol and Horwath,
Coral Gables, the bridegroom is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Gurland of North Miami Beach,
formerly Philadelphia. He was
graduated from Villanova Uni-
versity, from which he received
a B.S. degree in Economics.
Gurland will be installed this
weekend as president of the
Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith Lodges.
THE BRIDE, escorted by her
mother and her cousin, Sidney
Weiss of New York, wore a gown
of ivory satin and Venise and
Alencon lace, and carried a bou-
quet of white roses and baby's
breath on a white Bible.
The bridegroom's sister-in-
law, Mrs. Steven V. Gurland, was
matron of honor; bridesmaid
was Ann Marie Klapper. Flower
girls were Brooke Gurland and
Beth Klein.
Steven V. Gurland, M.D.,
brother of the bridegroom, was
best man. Ushers were Will
Klein, the bridegroom's cousin.
Richard Farber, Sy Jack and
Harvey Schneider, all of Penn-
sylvania. Michael Klein was a
junior usher and Andrew Gur-
land was the ring bearer.
Following a wedding trip to
Jamaica, Mr. and Mrs. Gurland
will make their home in North
Miami Beach.
Judah H. Kurtzbard (left), representative of Bank Leumi
Le-Israel, chatted with Professor Shlomo Avineri, new
Director General of the Israel Foreign Ministry, at the
Academic Conference of American Friends of the He-
brew University.
m
*mrfliliilm'Hli>jfiiMli
to*

A Salute to
the State of
Israel on its
28th Year
BON VOYAGE TRAVEL
Your Israel Travel Headquarters
By Sending close to a
Thousand Tourists on our
Bon Voyage-Sharon Tours
During 1976
SAM R0SENKRANZ, President
LEE ARI R0SENKRANZ, Manager bitfjllpt.
1074-76 INTERAMA BLVD.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 33162
PHONE: 945-7491
945-5276


Friday, April 30, lS/o
~k-1tftkjkMryr
Page 5-C



Mayor Clark to Install
Histadrut Women Officers
Mildred (Mrs. Philip) Sahl
will be installed for a sixth con-
secutive term as president of
the Marsha Wolfstein Chapter
of the Israel Histadrut Women's
Council at its annual installa-
tion luncheon Wednesday, May
5, at noon at the Barcelona
Hotel.
Metropolitan Dade County
Mayor Steve Clark will be the
installing officer. Entertainment
will be provided by the Musical
Floridians with Judy Kaminsky.
Other officers to be installed
are Ruth Glasco and Lillian Le-
vine, vice presidents; Betty
Oberstein, treasurer; Ros Vorob,
recording secretary; Estelle
Seidman, corresponding secre-
tary; and Fay Feinberg, financial
secretary.
The Marsha Wolfstein Chap-
ter supports the Histadrut Scho-
MRS. RAPAPORT
Women's League
Plans Conference
The Florida Branch of the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism will hold its spring
conference May 10 to 12 at the
Carillon Hotel. The theme is
"Sheheheyanu We've Come a
Long Way."
Mrs. Norman Sholk is con-
ference chairman, Mrs. Mar-
shall Baltuch is vice chairman.
Mrs. Morton Levin is Florida
Branch president.
Mrs. Henry Rapaport, the
immediate past president of
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism, will be the con-
sultant speaker. Mrs. Rapaport
received the National Benefac-
tors Award for Community
Leadership of the Jewish Theol-
ogical Seminary of America and
is on the boards of the United
Synagogue of America and the
World Council of Synagogues.
The Florida Branch of the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism comprises 33 Sis-
terhoods and Women's League
for Conservative Judaism in-
cludes over 700 Conservative
Sisterhoods throughout the U.S.
and f>n^d"
Israel Birthday
At Beth Sholom
Cantor David Conviser and the
Adult and Children's Choirs of
Temple Beth Sholom will sing
old and new songs of Israel at
the observance of Israel's 28th
birthday this evening at 8:15.
On Wednesday, May 5, the
students in fleth Sholom's
School for living Judaism will
participate in a traditional Mac-
cabiahan athletics and games
contestand a dinner featuring
Israeli foods. Beverly Stein is
chairman of the mothers' dinner
committee, which includes
Nanci Goldstein, Joan Ayman
and Ann Cohen.
larship Fund, which provides
scholarships for the children of
underprivileged families in Is-
rael. The fund has granted more
than 50,000 academic and voca-
tional scholarships since 1957.
Reservations for the lunch-
eon are available through the
Histadrut office.
Bernard B. Jacobson (2nd from left), ex-
ecutive vice president of the National
Committee for Labor Israel, presents the
Histadrut Couple of the Year Award to
Morris and Anna Newmark at the annual
third seder of the Israel Histadrut Coun-
cil of South Florida. Rabbi Leon Kronisn
(left) is honorary chairman of the local
Histadrut Council. At right are Ambas-
sador Ovadia Soffer, a member of Israel's
delegation to the United Nations, and
Moe Levin, chairman of the board of di-
rectors of the Council. Newmark, who is
Council president, was also celebrating
his 85th birthday.
MILDRED SAHL
With Pan Am's non-stop 747s
to Tokyo from these cities,
you're only one stop
tolbkyo from these cities.
#l"nrtland
Burlington
Boston
Providence
Hartford
Baltimore
Washington
Orlando
Pan Am's the only airline that can get you to Tokyo from New York and Los Angeles without stopping.
We also fly non-stop from San Francisco. So from just about any place (there are cities listed above) in the
country, you can hop a flight to those gateway cities on a domestic airline and get to the Orient with only one
stop.From Seattle, you can grab a Pan Am flight that makes only one stop. In a very nice place to stop: Hawaii.
( Pan Am's non stop 7-17 service loTokyo begins April 25 from Los Angeles, and April 26 from New York.)
See your travel agent.
America's airline to the world.


Page 6-C
+Jelstitk*km*i
Friday, April 30, 1976
Douglas Gardens
Elects Officers
The Miami'Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Douglas
Gardens, held a board of direc-
tors meeting to elect officers on
April 18. Aaron Kravitz was re-
elected president; Judge Irving
Cypen was relected chairman of
the board and honorary presi-
dent. Reelected as vice presi-
dents were Sam J. Heiman, Al-
bert E. Ossip, Marshall Wise
and Harry A. Levy. Newly elect-
ed as vice presidents were board
members Arthur Pearlman, Ha-
rold Beck and Edward Shapiro.
A new honorary vice presi-
dent, M. J. Kopelowitz, was also
elected. Other officers reelected
include Stephen Cypen, treas-
urer; Mollie Silverman, finan-
cial secretary; Lilyan Becker-
man, corresponding secretary;
Lawrence Silverman, recording
secretary; and Gladys Israel,
associate recording secretary.
In his acceptance speech Aaron
Kravitz stated, "It gives me
great pleasure to accept the of-
fice of Dresidency." After con-
gratulating the other officers,
he said, "I know we have a win-
ding team tad it is a real source
of strength for me to know that
we have such an outstanding
group of officers and a board
dedicated to providing the fin-
est service* and programs for
the elderly."
Judge Irving Cypen, in con-
gratulating the new officers,
aid, "You represent the dyna-
mic leadership which has been
4

MRS. MARX
ORT Women
Plan Luncheon
Women's American ORT,
Dade South Region, will hold
their first annual Honor Roll
luncheon at Kings Bay Yacht
and Country Club, Tuesday,
May 4, at 11:30 a.m. Mrs. Ve-
ronica Marx, regional Honor
Roll chairman is chairlady of
the day, with Marda (Mrs.
Alan) Stone and Denise (Mrs.
Alan) Benjamin in charge of
seating arrangements. Ann
(Mrs. Thomas) Logan is the
fashion show coordinator.
More than 200 members and
their guests will be entertained
by a fashion show created espe-
cially for the luncheon by Bar-
bara Katz. The people of Bar-
bara Katz, who are new to the
southwest area of Dade County,
have created a blend of Euro-
pean designs and denim sports-
wear styles. Many of the models
will be ORT members.
ORT (Organization for Reha-
bilitation through Training) is
the vocational training program
of the Jewish people. For more
than nine decades ORT has pro-
vided the environment condu-
cive to the development of hu-
manity. Honor Roll is the means
by which every member of
Women's American ORT can
express her commitment to the
ORT program.
instrumental in helping Douglas
Gardens to achieve its national
reputation as to outstanding
gerontological center."
In other business, Marcy Lef-
ton, in reporting for the mental
health committee, noted that the
Douglas Gardens Mental Health
Programs were to become a
major part of a book being writ-
ten for the American Psychia-
tric Association.
Mrs. Lefton said, "The review
committee was overwhelmed by
the depth and breadth of the
mental health services being of-
fered at Douglas Gardens. In
visiting 92 nursing homes and
eight European countries, they
never saw the extensiveness ob-
served at the home."
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a bene-
ficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
the United Wav.
Happenings
The Monthly Art Forum will
meet on Saturday at 2 p.m. at
the Rotunda Room of the Mi-
ami Beach Public Library.
Paintings by Harry Rossman,
president of the Miami Beach
Art Club, will be on view.
Concerned Citizens of Opera-
tion Re-Entry's monthly coin
and stamp show will be held on
Sunday, May 9, at Westland
Mall, 103rd St. exit of the Palm-
etto Expressway.
& ir -to
The Miami Business and Pro-
fessional Chapter of ORT will
hold its regular meeting on
Thursday, May 13, in the Hos-
pitality Room of the American
Savings building, Lincoln and
Alton Rds., at 7:45 p.m.
ft -d -ir
Temple Beth Am's Friends
Unlimited will meet this evening
at 9:30 in the temple's Youth
Lounge. Dr. Mort Notarius, a
psychiatrist, will speak,
ft -it -Cr
The Surfslde Women's League
will hold its annual installation
luncheon Saturday, May 8, at
12:15 p.m. at the Holiday Inn,
87th Street and Collins Ave.
Guest speaker will be Rep.
Gwen MargoHa.
May Hartman Y Honoree in N.Y.
May (Mrs. Gustave) Hart-
man, author of the autobio-
graphy "I Gave My Heart" and
recipient of the Humanitarian
and Woman of Altruism Awards
from the City of Hope Miami
Beach Chapter, will be guest of
honor in New York at a recep-
tion and cocktail party on Sun-
day, May 2, celebrating the
tenth anniversary of the Gus-
tave Hartman YM-YWHA in Far
Rockaway.
Mrs. Hartman was president,
for a quarter-century, of the
Gustave Hartman Home for
Children, which was founded by
her late husband, Judge Gus-
tave Hartman. Her achieve-
ments in child care were na-
tionally acclaimed, and the an-
nual productions for the home's
benefit played to a capacity au-
dience at the old Madison
Square Garden.
Judge Hartman originated the
benefits at the Garden in the
1920s, and through the years
many stars and name bands
participated. When Mrs. Hart-
man ended the shows, Eleanor
Roosevelt wrote to her that "a
tradition in New York life has
ended."
CONGRATULATIONS ISRAEL
on your 28th Anniversary
May Peace ever reign among
all Mankind ... In this our Prayer
on the wonderful occasion of your
Glorious 28th Anniversary Celebration
GUIFEL,INC.
7495 N.W. 48th STREET
MIAMI
MR. and MRS.
GEORGE FELDENKREIS
Sociological View of Judaism
Is Subject of Sklare Talk
Professor Marshall Sklare of
Brandeis University will speak
at Temple Beth Sholom on Sun-
PROFESSOR SKLARE
day, May 2, at 8:30 p.m.
Professor Sklare, who special-
izes in the study of racial, eth-
nic and religious groups, with
narticular emphasis on the so-
ciology of the American Jew,
will discuss "Judaism at the Bi-
centennial: a Sociological Ap-
proach."
Dr. Sklare, formerly profes-
sor of sociology at Yeshiva Uni-
versity, has been visiting pro-
fessor at Hebrew University, the
Princeton Theological Seminary
and at Clark University, and
was awarded a senior fellow-
ship by the National Endowment
for the Humanities. He has also
been president of the Associa-
tion for the Sociological Study
of Jewry.
Dr. Sklare's most recent books
are "The Jew in American So-
ciety" and "The Jewish Com-
munity in America." His "Amer-
ica's Jews" is an examination
of what America has meant to
the Jew and the Jew to Amer-
ica. He is the author of "Con-
servative Judaism: An Amer-
ican Religious Movement" and
the senior author of "Jewish
Identitv on the Suburban Fron-
tier: A Study of Group Survival
in the Open Society."
A auestion-and-answer period
will follow Dr. Sklare's presents-
Tickets are available at the
temple office.
We Congratulate the State of Israel
on its 28th Anniversary
SOUTHERN GULF
UTILITIES INC.
P.O. BOX 69-J
MIAMI 33169
TELEPHONE 652-1100


Friday, April 30, 1976
+Jmlstifhr*mr)
Page 7-C
a
arming l\j
Ferdie Will Address BB Lodge
yours,
,Jiil Zif>p
BITS AND PIECES
Glad to report that Sylvia
/Mrs. Morris) Herman is home
from the hospital, where she
.tayed the entire week of Pas-
sover She's feeling better and
we hope she stays that way...
Larry Lewi, is graduating
from the University of Miami
Medical School, and he's taking
his wife, Mariene, to St. Louis.
They'll be there for three years
while he does his internship in
internal medicine. These days,
when the doctors graduate from
med school, information about
their specialty is fed into a spe-
cial computer, and then the doc-
tor is assigned to the hospital In
the country with which they are
matched ...
Bea and Lester Seal are plan-
ning for their granddaughter's
jecond birthday party. In the
1 meanwhile, they're hoping that
their second grandchild, which
i, soon due, will be a boy. What
a bris he'll have! ...
* Frances and Ben TrupUn are
entertaining their cousins from
London. Here as houseguests
are Ruby and Bertha Lawson.
They all recently went out to
dinner with Pauline and Al
Lewis.
ft 6 fc
We have just returned from
an exciting one-week trip to
Honolulu, Hawaii. It wasn't at
all like Miami Beach, what with
its mountains. It was an al-
most 6,000 mile trip that
brought us to another culture,
but still in the United States.
The resemblence to the Beach
may be found in the many new
high rises on Waikiki Beach.
but the beach at Waikiki is no-
thing like the beaches we have.
Our portion of the Atlantic is a
quiet ocean and warm. We've
never seen a quiet section of
the Pacific. And it's cold.
OUR HOTEL was on Waikiki
Beach, but we were so busy that
we only had time for a few
hours on the beach.
Almost everything in Hawaii
is bright the clothing, the
water, the sky and many of the
buildings. It rains quite often,
but the sun usually shines dur-
ing the mostly short, light show-
ers.
In Honolulu we did the tour-
ist bit. Started off with a city
tour and ended up at the huge
Ala Moana Shopping Center.
Had lunch at La Ronde, the re-
volving restaurant at the top of
the shopping center. The view
of the city was spectular, and
the local fish luncheon was
good.
The cruise to Pearl Harbor
was where we got our sunburns
long with our history lessons.
It gives one a strange feeling to
be drifting alongside sunken
ships with over a thousand
men entombed in them. The
only noise on board was from
the clicking of cameras.
OUR TRIP was aH too short.
On the way over, we had a two-
hour layover in San Francisco.
Our daughter. Swale, met us at
the airport for hutch.
Norms and Harold Abbott
were visiting out there, and
Norma got away to join us. We
do recommend a least a one
niRht stopover each way. Ifs
lot of hours In the air plus a
five-hour time change.
Lois and. Larry Greco flew
out from Kings Bay Travel with
us- They especially liked the
mountains and the people. The
Grecoe found the Hawaiians to
be very nice, cordial and pa-
tient
The Palmetto Senior High
School band also went along.
Ainslee R. Ferdie, the imme-
diate past national commander
of the Jewish War Veterans, will
address the Haym Solomon
Lodge of B'nai B'rith on Thurs-
day eveninR, May 6, on "Jewish
Contributions to the independ-
ence of the American Colonies,"
r'erdie will discuss the role of
individual Jews in the American
Revolution, including such fig-
ures as Rabbi Seixas. Benjamin
Nones, Francis Salvador and
Haym Solomon.
Diabetes Center
Holding Luncheon
The Diabetes Life Center, a
new medical support facility
located in Hollywood, plans a
free buffet luncheon for people
involved in civic and social ac-
tivities in the South Florida
area. The luncheon will be held
May 1 in the dining room of
the Hollywood Medical Center.
The buffet will consist of low-
calorie food prepared by the
members of the Home Life De-
partment of the Hollywood Jun-
ior Women's Gub, who organ-
ized this luncheon to help the
development of the Diabetes
Life Center.
Guests will preview a new
short film about juvenile dia-
betes, and meet the producer,
Robert Schultz, M.D. Also speak-
ing at the luncheon will be
Steven Rievman, director of the
center, and representatives from
the Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation, a sponsoring agen-
cy of the Diabetes Life Center.
The Diabetes Life Center fea-
tures counseling and education
for diabetics and their families.
They work in cooperation with
the family physician to assist in
the total care of the diabetic.
Control of diabetes involves
medical, educational and psy-
chological factors which must
all be integrated. The Diabetes
Life Center is the first such
facility in this area to attempt
such control.
Round Town
Irma Braman of Coral Gables
and daughters, Debra and Susie,
will spend the summer in the
south of France, where the fami-
ly has a villa at Cap D'Ail, near
Monte Carlo. Irma's husband,
Norman, says that if you fall
off the balcony, you faU in to
the Mediterranean. Norman will
make several trips there, leav-
ing Lee Irwin, company vice
president, watching the Braman
Cadillac store.
* *
At the annual stockholders
meeting Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.,
declared a 5-percent stock divi-
dend, to be issued May 14 to
stockholders of record April 30.
The announcement was made by
Arthur H. Courshon, chairman
of the board.
Marvin Sheldon, secretary-
treasurer and general contrac-
tor and partner of SAC Con-
struction Co., has been elected
to the board of directors of Jef-
ferson National Bank at Ken-
daU, a subsidiary of Jefferson
Bancorp.
& it ir
Tlrso A. Gonxalei has been
named a vice president of the
Intercontinental Bank. His ap-
pointment was announced by
Beniamin I. Shubnan, chairman
of the board.
Actor to Describe
Israel Philharmoonic
Character actor Henry How-
ard will present the life and
growth of the Israel Philhar-
monic Orchestra on Tuesday,
May 4, at 8 p.m. at the Surfside
Community Center.
The presentation was ar-
ranged by Arthur Sheppard,
pSent of B'nai B'rith North
Shore Lodge No. 1744, to cele-
brate Israel's 28th anniversary.
Motion Picture Pioneers
Honor Levin at Luncheon
Jack H. Levin, long recog-
nized as Mr. Law and Order oi
the Motion Picture Industry,
was honored as retiring presi-
dent of the Motion Picture Pio-
neers of Florida at the Allison
Hotel on Wednesday.
A highlight was an all-star
show produced by Ben Schrei-
ber and Sam Yeliin, owners of
the Beach Theatre of Miami
Beach. Hosts for the reception
were Ben and Ann Levin of
Pompano Beach.
Levin founded National Con-
fidential Reports, which moni-
tored 14,000 movie theatres. He
was responsible for protecting
$300 million in theater receipts
due annually to major com-
panies as their share of film
rentals.
Levin also founded and di-
rected the Copyright Protection
Bureau, guarding the industry
against flim bootlegging and il-
legal duplication.
Levin has been a trustee of
B'nai B'rith Foundation of the
United States and a member of
the national civil rights commit-
tee of the Anti-Defamation
League and of the board of gov-
ernors of Florida's Variety
Clubs International.
AINSLEE R. FERDIE
As national commander, Fer-
die led the first Jewish Bicen-
tennial ceremonies at Independ-
ence Hall in Philadelphia in
August of 1974 which included
memorial graveside services at
the cemetery where Haym Solo-
mon, Benjamin Nones and other
Jewish patriots are buried.
Ferdie is a past president of
Gilbert Balkin B'nai B'rith
Lodge and three times past
president of Temple Zamora.
Pharmacists Meet in Hallandale
The South Florida Alumni
Chapter of Rho Pi Phi Interna-
tional Pharmaceutical Frater-
nity will hold a two-hour ap-
proved and accredited seminar
on Wednesday, May 5, at 8 p.m.
in the second-floor meeting
room of the Home Federal Sav-
ings Building, 2100 East Hallan-
dale Beach Blvd.
Dr. Ben A. VanderWerf, De-
partment of Surgery. Miami
School of Medicine, chief of the
kidney transplant team, win
speak on "Renal Transplant and
Immuno Suppressive Treat-
ment." Dr. Ferdinand Manlio,
nuclear medicine consultant,
will speak on "Radiopharmaceu-
ticals Used in Modern Day Prac-
tice of Nuclear Medicine."
The event is free to all South
Florida practicing and visiting
pharmacists and their guests.
We Extend to the State of Israel
on Us 28th Anniversary Best Wishes
for a Continued History of
Democratic Progress
JEMACO
DISTRIBUTORS
INCORPORATED
584 N.E. 20th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE 33305
TELEPHONE 525-3624


-:w*,#-: |


Page fc>C
-Jewlsiinorkaan
Friday, April 30, 197*
Israel's Population Quadruples Since Independence
By HAIM SHACHTER
In the 28-year period of Is-
rael's existence, the country's
population has more than quad-
rupled. At the time of declara-
tion of independence, there
were about 640,000 Jews in the
country, or roughly about 6 per-
cent of the Jewish population
in the world. At the end of 1974,
the Jewish population numbered
close to 2.9 million, or almost
20 percent of the world Jewish
population. In the same period,
the non-Jewish population of
Israel grew from 160,000 to al-
most 500,000. The growth in the
Arab population is to be as-
cribed mainly to natural in-
crease, while that of the Jewish
population, mainly to immigra-
tion.
The first wave of immigra-
tion brought over ths Jewish
survivors of the European Holo-
caust. These were followed by
mass aliyot from other parts of
the world, bringing to Israel
about half a million Jews from
Arab lands. It was then that the
State of Israel allocated the
overwhelming; part of its re-
sources to the absorption of the
new arrivals.
IN THE course of this pro-
cess, homes were built for the
immigrants, possibilities of em-
ployment were developed, an
educational network was estab-
lished as well as possibilities
for professional and vocational
training.
In the process of absorption
efforts were exerted for the im-
provement of social welfare in
the country, the reduction of
the disparity between the new
arrivals and the veteran section
of the population as well as that
existing between immigrants
from different backgrounds and
countries of origin, with a view
to cementing social solidarity
and a consciousness of national
partnership and unity.
The waves of immigration
from countries of stress brought
to Israel many people lacking
education or vocational know-
how, invalids and people of a
low potential for adaptation and
integration into a society of
higher standards than those
they had been accustomed to.
THE MOST pressing problem
facing the Government of Israel
was that of feeding the rapidly
growing numbers of mouths. In
1948-49, Jewish fanners culti-
vated some 1,300,000 dunams
(a dunam is a quarter of an
acre). By the end of 1974, the
area under cultivation had ris-
en to 4,270,000 dunams.
Of this area, 1,755,000 du-
nams were under irrigation
(300,000 in 1948-49); 2,779,000
dunams under field crops (1,-
100,000 in 1948); 376,000 under
vegetables (106,000); 420,000
under citrus (125,000); 450,000
bearing other fruit (230,000);
56,000 under fish ponds (15,-
000); 189,000 under flowers,
nurseries and the like (80,000).
At present, the country may
be said to be almost self-suffi-
cient insofar as its basic food
commodities are concerned and
its agriculture now supplies over
80 percent of its total food con-
sumption.
THE FOLLOWING figures
show the spiralling rise in ag-
ricultural production from the
inception of the State until 1974:
Fish: from 3,500 tons22,70$
cow's milk: 78,8001,488,700;
cattle meat: 2,00038,900; avo-
cado, first introduced in 1959,
200 tons15,000 tons; olives:
10,700 tons 30,200 tons; ba-
nanas: 3,500 tons33,700 tons;
stone fruit. 5,200 tons 51,800
tons: nome fruits: 5,200 tons
113,400 tons; citrus fruit: 272,-
7001,698,000 tons; melons and
pumpkins: 272,700tons1,698,-
000 tons: potatoes: 26,000 tons
124,000 tons; vegetables: 80,-
000 tons496,200 tons; green
fodder and silage: 400,000 tons
1,400.000 tons; hay: 40,600 tons
138,000 tons; sunflowers: 400
tons6,900 tons; groundnuts:
200 tons18,000 tons, cotton fi-
bre (first introduced in 1958):
500 tons116,700 tons: wheat
and barley: 4,400 tons504,200
tons.
In 1947-48, there were 33,500
head of cattle in the country.
By 1973-74, the number had
risen to 299,950. The number of
laying hens rose from 1,426,000
to 7,750,000, while the number
of geese, ducks and turkey rose
from 21,000 to 4,000,000.
NO LESS astounding is the
growth in Israel's agricultural
exports: avocado (first exported
in 1970-71) rose from 3,400 tons
to 10,600 tons; pome and stone
fruits (first exported in 1959-60)
100 tons3,500 tons; melons
(first exported in 1953-54) from
100 tons to 42,100 tons; potatoes

Reconstructed homes in the Jewish Quarter of the Old
City of Jerusalem.
(first exported in 1952-53) from
200 tons to 11,200 tons; vege-
tables (first exported in 1951-
52) from 200 tons to 51,700 tons;
groundnuts (first exported in
1951-52) from 100 tons to 10,700
tons; cotton (first exported in
1957-58) from 200 tons to 26,600
tons.
Incidentally the number of
people employed in agriculture
has dropped from 102,000 in
1954 to 84,000 in 1974. This is
due, of course, to the introduc-
tion of mechanized cultivation.
The number of tractors in use
in Israel's agriculture rose in
the period of the State's exist-
ence from 680 to 20,275.
NOR HAS the face of the
country remained unchanged in
the period of the State's exist-
ence. Its barren and denuded
hillsides have been covered by
belts of greenery, and forests
meet the eye everywhere.
In 1948-49, the area under
forests was only 53,000 dunams.
By 1973-74, it had expanded to
534,000 dunams of which 108,-
000 were in government owner-
ship; 462,000 were in the owner-
ship of the Jewish National
Fund and 14,000 in the owner-
ship of other bodies.
The afforested area consisted
of 363,000 dunams of coniferous
trees, 125 dunams of eucalyptus
and 96,000 dunams of other
trees (tamarisk, acacia and*
others). In addition to the af-
forested area there are 350,000
dunams of natural forest and
250,000 dunams of potential area
for afforestation.
The production and supply of
electricity serve as a reliable
guage for any country's indus-
trial development. In 1948 Is-
rael's power stations generated
a total of 260 million KWH. By
1974, the figure had risen to
7,749 million KWH, of which
2,685 million were directed to
industry; 1,393 million for wa-
ter pumping and 3,671 million
for other purposes.
THE MOST significant de-
velopment of all, however, has
been registered in the field of
transport and communication.
No figures are available for the
years 1948-49, but by March,
1950, there were 27,124 motor-
ized vehicles in the country;
7,697 were private cars, 1,103
were taxis; 1,111 were omni-
buses; 1,153 were commercial
vehicles and 6,060 were motor-
cycles.
By the end of 1974, the num-
ber of motorized vehicles had
risen to 408,000, which of 267,-
400 were private cars; 94,000
were trucks and commercial
vehicles, and 9,578 were public
buses traveling 346.8 million
kilometers a year. The number
of licensed drivers in the coun-
try at the end of 1973 was
592,600.
IN SHIPPING, Israel has made
one of its greatest strides. In
1956, the Israel merchant fleet
consisted of 30 vessels (four
passenger ships, 22 freighters
and four tankers). It had no
refrigerating ships at all. By the
end of 1974, its cargo fleet had
grown to 72 vessels.
Israel boasted of 26 tankers
and refrigerating ships. It had
done away with its passenger
ships because in the present
day and age, these are no longer
profitable. The gross tonnage of
its merchant fleet had grown
from 135,731 tons to 2,304,253
tons.
In air transportation, the num-
ber of single flights grew from
475 in 1950 to 6,907 in 1974. Its
revenue freight increased from
278 tons in 1950 to 33,697 tons
in 1974. The mail carried by
Israeli aircraft increased from
50 tons in 1950 to 764 tons in
1974.
STARTLING advances have
been made in the field of educa-
tion. In 1948-49, there were
1,342 educational institutions of
all types (from kindergarten to
General view of the workshops at Neve Ilan, the first
industrial village to rise in the Jerusalem Hills.
university) in the country, with
a total number of 6,469 teach-
ing posts and 140,817 pupils.
(The Hebrew sector accounted
for 1,286 educational institutions
with 6,283 teaching posts and
129,688 pupils; the Arab sector
accounted for 56 educational
institutions of all grades, with
186 teaching posts and 11,129
pupils.)
By 1974-75, the number of
educational institutions in the
Hebrew sector had grown to
6,265, of which 4,279 were kin-
dergartens; 1,457 were primary
educational institutions; 606
were post-primary educational
institutions (including second-
ary schools, secondary evening
classes, continuation classes, vo-
cational schools, agricultural
schools).
The number of teacher train-
ing colleges in the same period
had risen from 12 to 49.
IN THE Arab sector, the ad-
vancement has been much more
astounding, in that the number
of educational institutions, has
risen from 56 to almost 400. In
1948, there were 45 primary
schools; in 1974-75 their num-
ber had increased to 287.
There was one Arab second-
ary school in Israel in 1948;
the number now is 77. There
were no Arab vocational and
agricultural schools in the coun-
try at the time of the emergence
of the State; at present there are
244 Arab vocational schools, two
agricultural schools and two
teacher training colleges.
The number of pupils in the
country's educational institu-
tions shows a spiralling increase
from 140,817 in 1948-49, to
1,014,414 in 1974. In the Hebrew
sector, the number rose from
129,688 to 868,037; while in the
Arab sector from 11,129 to 146,-
377.
In the Hebrew sector, 139,625
pupils (25,406 in 1948) attended
kindergartens; 390,027 pupils
(91,133) attended primary
schools 54,878 (6,411) attend-
ed secondary schools; 64,505
(2,002) attended vocational
schools and 10,356 (713) at-
tended teacher training col-
leges.
In the Arab sector, the num-
ber of children in kindergarten
has risen from 1,124 in 1948-49
to 15,934 in 1974; the number
of pupils in primary schools
from 9,991 to 105,672 and the
number of pupils in secondary
Continued on Page 11-C
The Rabfii Yohanan ben Zakkai Synagogue in the Old
ury of Jerusalem as it appeared after the liberation of
Old Jerusalem in 1967 following 19 years under Jor-
aanian rule.


ly, April 30, 1976
Jfewfeft#)br**iJ7
Page 9-C

M

zlhove C/rom "e/t.) are Abraham Grunhut,
president, Jewish National Fund of Great-
er Miami, Dr. Irving Lehrman, founda-
tion chairman, Gus (Mrs. Emanuel)
Mcntz, chairman of Women for JNF, Mor-
dcchi Lador, Minister to the United Na-
tions, Dr. Aron Weinberger, national di-
rector for the Foundation of the Jewish
National Fund of America, Meir Shohan,
assistant director of the Israel Ministry
of Interior, and Zev W. Kogan, president,
Jewish National Fund Southern Region.
West Bank Marches Assailed
#*
.
Joseph Cohen (left) accepted the State of Israel Bonds
I David Ben-Gurion Award from Dr. Irving Lehrman,
I spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El and chairman,
\board of governors, Greater Miami Israel Bond Organi-
\zation. The presentation was made on April 25 at the
\Seacoast Towers East dinner at the Palace Playhouse.
^r

J
A. Ziskind, executive director, Cedars of Lebanon
lealth Care Center, received a $50,000 check from Mrs.
bne Brodsky, president of the Cedars Auxiliary on
mil 23. The check was the first part of a two-part
Pledge for $100,000, to be paid over the next two years,
fiat the Auxiliary has established for the health care
enter.
NEW YORK (JTA) Four
prominent American Jews con-
demned the march of some
20,000 Israelis through the West
Bank and called on "Jews who
support a militarily and morally
strong Israel" to reject the no-
tion "that territories are more
important than peace," and call-
ed on Israel to "prohibit further
Jewish settlement in the occu-
pied territories."
Rabbi Joachim Prinz, chair-
man of the World Conference of
Jewish Organizations, David Tu-
lin, chairman of the Philadel-
phia Zionist Federation, Rabbi
Max Ticktin, assistant national
director of B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations, and Rabbi Balfour
Brickner, director of the depart-
ment of interreligious affairs of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, issued the con-
demnation and appeal in a state-
ment on behalf of Breira, a na-
tional Jewish educational organ-
ization. The four signed the
statement as individuals, not as
representatives of their resjjec-
time organizations.
BREIRA, which means "alter-
native" in Hebrew, claims it is
"promoting an overall peace
settlement in the Middle East
as the foundation for Israeli
security and hopes to revitalize
and democratize American Jew-
ish life."
In condemning the two-day
West Bank march by more than
20,000 followers and sympath-
izers of the Gush Emunim, the
four Jewish spokesmen de-
clared:
"Coupled with recent viola-
tions of civil rights and loss of
life on the West Bank, this
march serves only to strengthen
Arab nationalism and to weaken
faith in Israeli and Jewish com-
mitment to the human and na-
tional rights on which Israeli
society was founded and main-
tained."
THE STATEMENT added that
"we who believe fervently in
the right of national self-deter-
mination for the Jewish people
in Israel must offer an alterna-
tive to Israeli occupation of ter-
ritories inhabited by over one
million Palestinian Arabs and
recognize the parallel right of
the Palestinian Arab people to
national self-determination in a
state of their own alongside Is-
rael."
Breira said it proposes to
"challenge all elements In the
Arab world to make peace with
Israel on the basis of Israel's
pre-June 1967 borders, with spe-
cial provision for open access
for all to a United Jerusalem."
Ambassadors Will Attend
JNF Inaugural Luncheon
Abraham Grunhut, president
of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, foundation chairman,
have lauded Gus (Mrs. Eman-
uel) Mentz, chairman of Wom-
en for JNF, for her efforts in
promoting the JNF Bicentennial
inaugural luncheon planned for
June at the Fontainebleau Ho-
tel.
During their recent visit for
the Jewish National Fund in
Greater Miami, Mordechi La-
dor, Minister to the United Na-
tions, and Meir Shoham, former
Ambassador to Uruguay and
assistant director of the Israel
Ministry of Interior, emphasized
the importance of the Jewish
National Fund Bicentennial Park
Forest in Jerusalem as extend-
ing and strengtheninp Jerusa-
lem's viability, opening new
roads, establishing four settle-
ments, planting millions of trees
and constructing watchtowers
and picnic areas;
Mrs. Mentz is immediate past
president of the Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah, \ ice presi-
dent of the Region and member
of the national board She is
active in many communal and
civic events and has been a fre-
quent traveler to Israel on be-
half of Hadassah. "She is a great
and unparalleled asset for the
leadership of Jewish National
Funds," said Grunhut
Israeli to Speak at JNF
Bikurim Celebration, May 16
Joseph Tamir, a member of
Israel's defense and foreign af-
fairs committee, will be guest
speaker for JNF's Bikurim cele-
bration on Sunday, May 16, at
7 p.m. at the Fontainebleau Ho-
tel.
"It is only appropriate," said
Dr. Irving Lehrman, "that a
man of such achievements as
Joseph Tamir should be the
guest speaker for the event in-
tended to pay tribute to all the
honorees of the Jev/ish National
Fund during the past year."
The arrangements committee
consists of: Rabbi Mayer Abra-
mowitz, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Aron-
son, Mrs. Florence Behrens,
Simon Berstein, Prof. Andre S.
Bialolenki, Lester Bigelman.
Cantor Saul H. Breeh. Mr. and
Mrs. George Brodie, Mrs. Celia
Broff, Leon Buda, Mrs. Lillian
Dubowy, Harry Feldman,
Shmuel Fershko, Jack A. Filo-
sof, Mavshie Friedberg.
Also* Abraham Grossman,
Abraham Grunhut, Sophie Has-
pel, Meyer Helfinstein, Mr. and
Mrs. Peter F. Heller, Joseph
Hill, Isaac Jacobowit. Merman
Kass, Bernard Katz, Zt W. Ko-
gan, Celia Kolb, George N. Ko-
tin, Sam Kusnetz, l >avid
Lehrfield, Rabbi I >.ehr-
man, Moe Levin.
Also Frieda Lifchu Iz, Rose
(Mrs. Louis) Lustie. Kx and
Mrs. Emanuel Mentz. Mrs Flo-
rence Minov, Samik! Miren-
berg. Sam Pascoe, Mrs. Pearl
Pincus, Birdie (Mrs. Albert)
Pomper, Mrs. Miriam Press, Mr.
and Mrs. Moe Reiffen. Isidore
Riffkin, Martha Rosen, Celia
Rosenblatt, Morris Rossein,
Ernest Samuels, Abe Savelle.
Also Toby Schachter. Oscar
Schapiro, Igor Schultz, Leon
Schuster, Kathy (Mrs. Richard)
Schwarz. Malka Shklair, Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Sichel, Meyer
Siegel, Bernard Silver, Mr. and
Mrs. Joshua Stadlan. Ben Ta-
lewsky, Simon Tetenbaum, Mr.
and Mrs. Abraham Tiktin, Mrs.
Frieda Tobey, Mrs. Ida U'essel,
Sid Wladaver and Leonard Zil-
bert.
Tobacco Distributors Meet
Members of the Half-Century
Club, each with a career en-
compassing 50 or more years in
the tobacco and kindred pro-
ducts world, attended the Na-
tional Association of Tobacco
Distributors weeklong annual
convention at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
The contingent of NATD Half-
Century Club members are hon-
ored several times during the
week.
Half-Century Club members
from South Florida include
Samuel Aptekar, North Miami
Beach; Charles Baron, Miami
Beach; Julius J. Blum, North
Miami Beach; Jesse J. Brown,
Fort Lauderdale; Al Cohen, Fort
Lauderdale; Albert Freeman,
Hollywood; Nat Freedland, Mi-
ami Shores; Richard Ganz,
North Miami Beach; Irving
Goldrich, North Miami Beach;
Harry A. Greenberg, Bal Har-
bour; Abe Harris, Hollywood.
Also Michael Kohen, Miami
Beach; Manuel I. Pearl, Miami
Beach; Eugene J. Rich, Pom-
pano Beach; Philip Shorin. Bal
Harbour; George I. Stolpin, Hal-
landale; and Charles Tusa, Hol-
lywood.
Planning the 21st annual Memorial Day Patriotic Rally
are (seated, from left) Samuel Pascoe, chairman, and
Harry Schellhammer, vice president of Chase Federal
Savings and director of special events. Standing are
Thomas Schwartz (left), president of Miami Beach
Lodge, and Robert Skidell, president-elect.




'
sssr
Page 10-C
rjewlsti Ihxkttar,
Friday, April 30, 197*6"
meichels
by Nf IMA BAKACB
BANANA PINEAPPLE CAKE
By NORMA BARACH
I tried a. "fruity" cake the other day that really has a
very delightful, different kind of taste. Try it and I think
you'll like it, particularly if you're tired of the same old
chocolate, vanilla or marble cakes. It comes from "B'Taya-
von," the fine gourmet cookbook published by the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Kansas City. Persons desiring to order
the book should send $5 plus 40 cents for postage and handling
to the school, 5311 W. 75th St., Shawnee-Mission, Kan. 66208.
3 cups sifted flour 1 8 oz. crushed pineapple
1 tsp. baking soda with juice
1 tsp. cinnamon !'- tsps. vanilla
2 cups sugar 2 eggs
1 tsp. salt 2 cups diced bananas
\.Vi cups cooking oil
Measure and sift together all dry ingredients. Dice ba-
nanas, measure and add to dry ingredients along with oil,
vanilla, eggs, pineapple and juice. Stir mixture well by hand.
Pour into greased tube or bundt pan. Bake at 350 degrees for
approximately 1 to lv4 hours.
CHUCK-IN-WINE
By NORMA BARACH .
What does one do with plain old chuck meat? Add wine
to tenderize it and give it flavor and you'll see.
3 lbs. chuck meat, Vs lb. fresh mushrooms
cut into chucks 2 cups dry red wine
2 medium onions, cut in rings oil
Brown in a Dutch oven the meat, onions and mushrooms
in a little oil. Add wine and simmer covered for \Vi hours
or until tender. Most of the liquid will cook out. If necessary,
you might have to add a little more wine to prevent the meat
from drying out. Serve over rice or noodles.
CHICKEN BREASTS WITH ORANGE SAUCE
By NORMA BARACH
A new cookbook with the catchy title of "The Happy
Cooker" has just been published by the Women's Committee
of Temple Sinai in Atlanta, Ga. The book has recipes that are
all home-tested and has many helpful hints pertaining not
only to cooking but to canning and freezing and gardening.
If you're interested in ordering a copy, send $5.50 plus $1 for
postage (check made out to Temple Sinai or "The Happy
Cooker") to Mrs. Ronald Feinman, 5310 London Dr. NW, At-
lanta, Ga. 30327. (The cookbook is not a kosher one but has
some traditional recipes.)
Now for a recipe from the book, an excellent dish for a
traditional Friday night dinner. You'll find that the chicken
will have a terrific flavor.
3 large chicken breats,
split
1 tsp. salt
y*. cup margarine
2 tbsps. enriched
all-purpose flour
2 tblsps. sugar
V4 tsp. dry mustard
M tsp. ground cinnamon
% tsp. ground ginger
l*a cups orange juice
3 cups hot cooked rice
orange slices and parsley
for garnish
Sprinkle chicken with "4 tsp. of salt. Saute in margarine
in large skillet over medium heat, turning to brown both
sides. Remove chicken from skillet and set aside. Reserve
one-half to three-quarters of drippings in pan and discard
remainder of drippings. Add flour sugar, spices and remain-
ing Vi tsp. salt to drippings in skillet; stir to smooth paste.
Gradually stir in orange juice.
Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mix-
ture thickens and tomes to boil. Add chicken breasts. Cover
skillets; simmer over low heat about 30 minutes, until chicken
is tender. Serve chicken on bed of hot cooked rice, spooning
sauce over. Garnish with orange slices and parsley sprigs.
Serves 6.
LOW-CAL ZUCCHINI
By NORMA BARACH
Many people are weight-conscious in the foods they select,
yet they don't like to give up good taste just for the sake of
saving calories. Td like to recommend a low-calorie vegetable
dish that is also quite easy to prepare.
1 large zucchini squash (cut in eighths)
(peeled or unpeelcd) 1 4-oz. can mushrooms,
2 medium onions drained
(cut in rings) 1 tblsp. soy sauce
1 large tomato Vi tso. garlic powder
Cut zucchini and onions in thin slices. Put in a hot teflon
fry pan. Cook on a low heat about 5 minutes, stirring occa-
sionally. Add tomato and mushrooms. Cook on low heat about
10 minutes, while stirring. Add soy sauce and garlic power
and simmer about five minutes. Serves 4.
i: ; .
FRESH FRUIT SALAD
By NORMA BARACH
As anyone who has ever been to Israel knows, fresh fruits
and vegetables there are fresh and abundant. This week's
column is recommended to me by my sister, a kibbutznik
It is tasty as either as appetizer or dessert. For an added
Israel "ta'am," use Jaffa oranges if you can get them in your
community.
3 bananas M- cup raisins
5 oranges % cud sugar
4 apples % cup red wine or
1 small canteloupe cherry brandy
Dice fruit. Mix wine and sugar. Pour over fruit and re-
frigerate several hours before serving.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
GOTHAM HOTEL, & APARTMENTS
at 702 13 Street. Miami. Beach. Fla.
intends to register said name with the
Cleric ot the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida. _____
WENQERS REALTY CORP.
a Fla. ('urn
BY: SELIG WENGER. PRESIDENT
_______ 4/30 5/7-14-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
Hi,- undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
ECOS at 1401 S.W. 1st Street. Mi-
ami 33135 Intend to register said name
With ihe Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAUL, OLIVA
J. LAZAGA
_________ 4/30 6/7-11-21
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FLORIDA GIFTS CENTER at 1401
S.W. 1 Street. Room 207. Miami. Fla.
Intend! to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
RAUL R. OLIVA
____________________4/30 5/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2334
Division No. 33 (Blanton)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAUL A. MARKS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
nf SAUL A MARKS, deceased. File
Number 76-2334. Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.-Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street. Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse. Third Floor. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal represen-
tatives of the estate are: DORA
.MARKS, LEONARD S. MARKS.
.MORTON I. MARKS, whose addresses
are: 7135 Collins Ave.. Unit 814. Mi-
ami Beach. Fla. 33141; 14 G Knight's
Bridge. Poughkeepsie. N.Y.. 12603: 1
Whitehall Rd.. Poughkeepsie. N.Y..
respectively. The name and address
of the personal representatives' at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL,
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of 'his
Notice of Administration: April 30.
1976. In JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
DORA MARKS:
LEONARD S. MARKS:
MORTON I. MARKS
As Personal Representatives of the
EsfETe of SAUL A. MARKS. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
KURT WELLISCH. Attorney at Law
161 Almerla Avenue. Suite 800-B
Coral Gables. Florida 83134
Telephone: 445-7954
________________________4/10 8/7
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to enrage
In business under the fictitious name
of LUCITE ORIGINALS at 2910 S.W.
30 Avenue. Hallandale. Fla. 88009 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida. ._.
HERMAN AND ROSEN. CORP.
a Fla. Com
____________________4/80 8/7-14-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of ART IN AMERICA at 786 Arthur
Godfrey Road. Miami Beach. Fla. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
OLD A MODERN MASTERS. INC.
a Fla. Corp.
ERWIN STERN. PRESIDENT
NORMAN CIMENT
Attorney for applicant^ ^ ^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of CHEF'S CHOICE at 455 E Okee-
chobee Road. Hialeah. Florida Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Food Service Consultants. Inc.
By WILLIAM J. GOLDWORN.
Secretary
William J. Goldworn. Esquire
Attorney for Food Service
Consultants. Inc.
____________________4/30 5/7-14-81
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
1 iii iness under the fictitious name of
SEXITO at 1401 S.W. 1st Street. Mi-
ami 33135 Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAUL OLIVA
3. I.AZAOA
4/30 8/7-V-21
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of CHEF'S PRIDE at 455 E. Okee-
chobee Road. Hialeah. Florida Intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida. ,
Food Service Consultants. Inc.
By: WILLIAM J. GOLDWORN
Secretary
William J. Goldworn. Esuuire
Attornev for Food Service
Consultants. Inc. ^ |/fJ4J|
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2102
IN RE: ESTATE I IF
celia BRAND
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE AUOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
Of CELIA BRAND, deceased. File
Number 76-210;;, Is pending in the
( Ircult t.'ouri for Dade County, Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 w. Flagler St.. .Miami.
Fla. Tin- personal representative of
tin .state is Abraham W. Brand,
whose address Is 44 Star Island. Mi-
ami Beach. Florida. The name and
address of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of anv
claim or demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attornev. and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not vet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim fo
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal representa-
tive.
All persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice pt Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL C1AIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
HE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 30.
1976.
ABRAHAM W. BRAND
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Cella Brand Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
DAVID M. GONSHAK
1497 N.W. 7th St.. Miami. Fla.
Telephone: 642-0722
4/30 8/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 76-2397
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX SOMBERG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of MAX SOMBERG. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida. File Number
76-2397 is pending In the Circuit Court
In and for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
Is 3rd Floor. Dade County Courthouse.
73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33130. The personal representative
of this estate Is HERMAN SOMBERG.
whose address is 7(85 Abbott Ave-
nue, Miami Beach. Florida 33141.
The name and address of the attor-
ney for the personal representative
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due
the date when It will become due
shaU be stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk of the above styled court to
enable the clerk to mall one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICEto
file any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
''"JgCTSONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
RATED ?' .Miaml' Florida, oji this
30th day of April. 1976
HERMAN SOMBERG
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of MAX SOMBERG.
_ Deceased
First publication of this notice of
April" im. ,he 30lh day of
ESTHER G SCHIFF
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 534-4721
Attorney for Personal Representative
4/30 1/7
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of PALM PATIO BAR A PACKAGE
STORE at 1516 N.W. 27th Ave.. Miami.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
RICHARD KULLA
SANFORD H. KRAMER. PA.
Attorney for Richard Kulla
^_________4/80 6/7-14-21
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2576
Division FRANK B. DOWLINQ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ISIDORE NEWMAN
I i", cased ~
NOTICE OFmDMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED ,
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of ISIDORE NEW.MAN. deceased. File
Number 76-2576. Is pending In the
CiScult Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address ot
which is Dade County Courthouse. 73
West Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of the
estate Is ELAINE NEWMAN HEL-
LER, whose address is 1 Strawberry
Hill Court. Stamford. Connecticut.
The name and address of the personal
representative's attornev are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the esfkl.<
to wjiom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 30.
1976.
ELAINE NEWMAN HELLER
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of ISIDORE NEWMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
SHAPIRO. FRIED. WEIL & SCHEER
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 638-6361
4/30 5/7
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 76-962
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PEARL M. POND.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of PEARL M. POND deceased, late
of Dade County. Florida. File Num-
ber 76-982 la pending In the Circuit
Court In and for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 3rd Floor. Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 83130. The personal
representative of this estate la DON-
ALD IL BLISS, whose address Is 1101
S.E. 12th Way. Ft Lauderdale. Flor-
ida 33316. The name and address of
the attorney for the personal repre-
sentative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THI8 NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any elalm or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due. the date
when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim tef.
secured, the security shall be descfJkx '
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
of the above styled court to enable
the clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FPOM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection they mav have that
challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the Qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
ORJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
DATFD at Miami. Florida on this
14th dav of AnHI. 1976.
DONALD H. BLIS8
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of PEARL M POND.
First publication of this notice of
Deceased
administration on the 30th dav of
April. 1976
M. JAY BENNETT
f.LV** 0lf'ce of M. Jay Bennett
lino Kane Concourse
Suite 201
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida 33154
Telephone 865-9831
Attorney for Personal Representative
4/80 5/7


Friday, April 30, 1976
+Jewish fhrkMaui
Page 11-C
Breeze of Redemption Caresses Jewish Quarter
By JOSEF GOLDSCHM1DT
Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem
Many people who knew the Jewish Quarter of
Jerusalem in the past walk as in a dream when they
see the beautiful new houses with their clean lines
and dignified character rising on the foundation of the
ruins left bjehind them when the Jordanian Legion was
driven out by Israel in 1967. The sound of Torah study
comes from Yeshiva Hakotel. The four Sephardi syna-
gogues destroyed by the Arabs and rebulit in their
original style appear now to be more beautiful. The
Jewish Quarter is now a center of activity for the He-
brew Writers Association, boasts of a research center
set up by Bar-Ilan University, has living quarters for
university and yeshiva students from abroad, and a
youth center where secondary school pupils from all
over the country can study Jerusalem's glorious past.
As one enters the wide plaza facing the Western Wall
which holds tens of thousands of visitors, one feels the
fresh breeze of Israel's redemption caressing him.
'The glory of the world
is Eretz Israel. The glory
of Eretz Israel is Jeru-
salem." (Rambam)
It is often tempting to ask
what a person of the past would
say if he were to visit the scene
of his activities as it was trans-
formed over the centuries to
the present state. Regarding
the Jewish Quarter in the Old
' ity of Jerusalem, our position
is more fortunate.
Many are the people alive
today who knew the synagogues
and dwelling places, built over
and under one another, its al-
leys and gateways with the gor-
geous views over the Temple
Mount, the Mount of Olives and
down into the Judaean desert
and the Dead Sea.
MANY ARE those, too, who
witnessed the utter destruction
and desolation of this unique
historical scenery that the Jor-
danian soldiers left behind
when they were driven out by
Israel in 1967.
If any of those who knew
the past went to visit the Jew-
ish Quarter today, he would be
walking as in a dream. Can this
be the same place where the
old Quarter stood? Can it be
that these beautiful new houses
with their clean lines and their

-"XV"*""^ i S ^^Btk 4M 2 I ) ^M L
k %^* wm
tmtk W i f

|U^W"'""~ -A.

Completing plans for the first State of Israel Bond Labor-
Management Tribute dinner in Florida are South Flor-
ida Israel Bond Organization campaign leaders: Milton
M. Parson (left), executive director, and Jules Love
(right) regional corporate professional for Israel Bonds,
and honoree Gerald Greenfield, president of the Meat
Cutters, Packing House Workers and Food Handlers Dis-
trict Union No. 657, AFL-CIO. The dinner, to be held
i Sunday, May 2, at the Eden Roc Hotel, will feature the
{presentation of the Israel Labor Award to Greenfield
[by Israel Consul General Shimshon Inbal.
t*^
<*
'I
\
\M
\idge Norman Ciment, his mother, Regina (left), and
is wife, Joan, recently enjoyed a dinner at the Kosher
feak House, scene of Ciment's surprise 40th birthday
irty. A former Miami Beach Councilman and a current
smber of the Tourist Development Authority, Ciment
scribes the Steak House menu as "a gourmet's delight
. a favorite on everyone's fine-dining list."
special, dignified character
were erected on the founda-
tions of the ruins of 1967? In-
deed, this is so.
What used to be the central
plaza known then as the
"Deutsche Platz" is here again,
spacious, surrounded by some
of the old buildings, salvaged,
and restored, and by some new
cottage-like houses.
THE SOUND of Torah study
comes from the old "Batei
Machse," in which families used
to live in two-room flats. The
Yeshivat Hakotel of Bnei Akiva
has sprung up in those quar-
ters. Here are the four Sephardi
synagogues which for hundreds
of years had graced the old
Jewish Quarter, destroyed by
the Arabs and built up again,
true to their original style, but
more beautiful.
Moreover, the Jewish Quar-
ter is now a centre of activity
for the Hebrew Writers Asso-
ciation (Beit Hasofer) and
boasts of a research institute
under the aegis of Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity, living quarters for
Bnei Akiva University and Ye-
shiva students from abroad,
and a youth center where sec-
ondary school pupils from all
over the country get a few
days of study of Jerusalem's
glorious past enlivened by
walks and excursions.
REBUILDING THE Jewish
Quarter is no easy task. Wher-
ever you dig in the ruins, you
uncover still older structures,
here an old subterranean pas-
sageway, tliere the pavement
of an ancient road, a Byzantine
church or a private residence!
still showing the black marks
of a fire that destroyed it when
the Romans conquered Jerusa-
lem.
One must preserve, restore,
and build again. Hence, you
also have a shopping center for
the new residents, and the nu-
cleus of a community center,
one or two kindergartens. Soon
there will be a school.
But the heart of the Old City
is the Temple Mount and the
IsraeVs Population
Quadruples Since
Independence
Continued from Page 4-C
schools from 14 to 15,119.
WHEN THE State was estab-
lished, there were only two in-
stitutions of higher learning in
the country the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem and the Is-
rael Institute of Technology
(Technion) in Haifa. These two
had a student roll of 1,635. The
intervening period has witness-
ed the establishment of another
five full-fledged universities and
a number of colleges which will
soon be authorized to grant first
degrees.
The new universities are the
Tel Aviv University, the Bar-
Ilan University, the Haifa Uni-
versity, the Ben-Gurion Univer-
sity of the Negev in Beersheba
and the Weizmann Institute of
Science at Rehovot.
If the number of computers
employed in the country may
be taken as a criterion for in-
dustrial development and great-
er efficiency in all fields of
endeavor, it is of interest to note
that whereas in 1964 there were
only 20 computers at work in
the country, bv 1973 their num-
ber had grown to 359. In the
same period the number of in-
stitutions in possession of com-
puters rose from 15 to 215.
Western Wall that King Herod
erected in his grandiose man-
ner. How cramped and hem-
med in by worthless, old, tum-
bledown houses the Kotel Ha-
ma'aravi was.
THAT'S HOW we remember
it from pre-state days. But now
you approach it over a wide,
slightly sloping plaza that holds
tens of thousands of visitors'on
Jerusalem Liberation Day, cel-
ebrating, praying, and rejoic-
ing..
As you lift your eyes to the
Old Wall from which, accord-
ing to Jewish tradition, the di-
vine presence never departed,
you feel the fresh breeze of Is-
rael's redemption softly caress-
ing you.
Mrs. Freida Tobey (2nd from left) and Mrs. Celia Rosen-
blatt received the David Ben-Gurion Award at the re-
cent Morton Towers State of Israel Bond Luncheon at
the Eden Roc Hotel. The presentation was made by Dr.
Irving Lehrman (left), spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El and chairman of the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization campaign board of governors, while
luncheon chairman Emanuel Mentz looked on.
Miami Beach Mayor Harold Rosen cut the money rib-
bon opening Flagler Federal's Collins Beach Branch on
April 19. The $20 bills were distributed to organizations
in the South Beach area. Also at the ribbon-cutting were
(from left) C. Guthrie Babcock, director; Herschel Ro-
senthal, executive vice president; Nathan Meltzer, pres-
ident; Seymour Keith, senior vice president and secre-
tary; and Samuel Seitlin, director.
In Loving Remembrance
of
Our Parent Founders
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rabinowitz
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rabinowitz
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Goldstein
MIAMI DIAMOND CENTER
Salutes Israel on the 28th Anniversary
of a great nation
and courageous people ...





Page 12-c
JmlsliHorkmMi
Friday, April 30, 19}
<
Mr. Jesse Perez
Personally Extends his
Sincerest Best Wishes
to the State of Israel
for Continued Progress
in the Years to Come
ELI-JESS FASHION
232 WEST 21 tt STREET
HI ALE AH 33010
TELEPHONE 885-3291


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