The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02462

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Miami MD 's in Israel see how CJA funds work
By L. JULES ARKIN
General Campaign Chairman
Dr. Harold Berger is chief of
Ophthalmology at Safed Hospi-
tal. He is also a former Miam-
ian, and it was his good fortune
to greet seven active Miami
psychiatrists. All seven had
Safed last week when the first
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Physicians Mission to Is-
rael arrived to view medical
services there.
The Mission, led by Dr. Alan
S. Graubert and his wife. Sue,
included seven medical men
three of whom were Miami area
psychiatrists. All even had
medical background in the U.S.
armed forces.
SO THEIR interests lay not
only in the humanitarian pro-
grams provided by their 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund support, but
also in comparing Israeli army
doctors' practices with their
own.
Dr. Graubert and his group
Continued on Page 1S-A
1eJewish Flaridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 14
c Fr.d k. shochtt Apni 9, ur Miami, Florida Friday, April 9, 1976
By Mail 50c. Three Sections mce 25 cents
TIME Mag's Florid View of Israel's Atom Arsenal
NEW YORK Israel "hastily" put
together 13 Atom Bombs in an under-
together 13 atom bombs in an under
Yom Kippur War in early October, 1973,
and was preparing to deliver them in one
final, flaming Armageddon, according to
the current edition of Time Magazine.
According to Time, this was when the
battle was going badly, and then-Premier
Golda Meir allegedly gave Israel Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan orders to deliver
|he bombs on Oct. 9.
MRS. MEIR acted after Dayan told
her that Israel's armed forces were being
routed by Syria on the Golan Heights and
pushed back by advancing Egyptians at
the Suez Canal.
When, according to Time, Dayan re-
marked to Mrs. Meir that "This is the
end of the Third Temple," the Premier
Continued on Page 9-A
IN ANGRY ATTACK
Rabin Says Reds
Fomented Strike
Syria M ove on Beirut
Only Way Hussein
Gush Emunim
Bitter Debate
Continuing
Rift With Peres 14-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
short but sharp exchange at
cabinet meetings here over the
Gush Emunim settlers at Ka-
dum appeared to observers to
foreshadow bitter debate with-
in the government when the
cabinet takes up the controver-
Continued on Page 14-A
Deportations at Issue ... S-A
Back to Normal ... 9-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin an-
grily accused Israel's pro-
Moscow Rakah Communist
Party of fomenting Arab
general strike and violence
Mar. 30 in an attempt "to
tear up the fabric of coop-
eration between Jews and
Arabs built up over the past
28 years."
He promised, however,
that there would be a full
investigation by the govern-
ment into the events, the
Continued on Page 7-A
Waldheim Appeals to UN 8-A
Hussein in Tribute to Ford 12-A
U.S. Opposes Unilateral Intervention 13-A
Envoy Doesn't Contact PLO 14-A
State Department Display 1S-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) King Hussein of Jordan
declared Apr. 1 that Syrian intervention in Lebanon was
the only "feasible" means to "restore law and order" in
that country and accused Israel of blocking such a move.
He warned that "If Israel
official visit to Washington.
Hussein is known to have
made the same points with
Bi-Racial Anti-Semitism
Threatens Rhodesia Jews
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Chief Rabbi Isaac Zwebner,
of Rhodesia, said here that
the 4,000 Jews in that Cen-
tral African country face
potential disaster at the
hands of anti-Semitic whites
and rebellious Blacks, but
are too complacent or fear-
ful to heed his warnings that
they pull up stakes and emi-
grate to Israel.
Rabbi Zwebner, and his
wife, Aurelia, recently arriv-
ed in Israel to join their four
children who have settled
here. They said they intend-
ed to remain. In an inter-
view with the Jerusalem
Post, Zwebner described
Rhodesia as a powder keg
that will inevitably blow up
and claimed the Jews there
will be the principal victims
because the are caught be-
tween two opposing forces.
HE SAID the white minority
that rules the country includes
anti-Semites who blame Jews
for the "Communist menace"
with which they are obsessed,
particularly since the left-wing
victories in neighboring Angola
and Mozambique, two former
Portuguese colonies.
Continued on Page 7-A
moves forces into Lebanon
to counter Syrian interven-
tion, it will lead to an erup-
tion in the entire area and
perhaps cause a general
war" which "would be di-
sastrous for all concerned."
THE JORDANIAN ruler re-
jected a proposal by Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat several
days ago that a multi-national
force of Arab countries inter-
vene to end Lebanon's civil
strife and insisted that the
Syrians are the ones best able
to help halt the disaster that has
beset Lebanon because of their
objectives and the trust they
have in Lebanon."
Hussein made his remarks to
a group of leading American
newspaper columnists and com-
mentators and other media rep-
resentatives invited to a special
breakfast press conference at
Blair House where the King and
Queen Alia stayed during their
NO REASON WHY NOT...
Continued on Page 2-A
KING HUSSEIN
Ford Tells Opposition
To Foreign Aid Hike
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford has cautioned
Congress that he will "regard as
unacceptable" the nearly $800
million increase in the foreign
aid program to take into ac-
count the transitional quarter
between the current and new
fiscal years. But he did not say
that he would veto the legisla-
tion should it be adopted.
In a letter to the Senate and
House managers of the appro-
priations legislation, made pub-
lic at the White House, the
President said he "must oppose
both the significant reductions
and additions" in the legislation
before Congress and described
his original budget proposals as
"adequate to meet the minimum
needs of the recipients without
Continued on Page 8-A
Carter Supports Settlements
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) For-
mer Georgia Gov. Jimmy Car-
ter said here that Israel's settle-
ments in the occupied terri-
tories were proper and that he
supported the sale of the C-130
transport planes to Egypt, but
not pre-emptive weapons.
Carter, who was campaigning
for the Democratic Presidential
nomination, made his remarks
in answer to questions during
a 30-minute meeting with an
invited group of about 100 Jew-
ish leaders.
ANSWERING a question
which noted that the Ford Ad-
ministration has called the Jew-
ish settlements in the territories
illegal, Carter said Israel has
never said the settlements are
permanent, and there is no rea-
son why the land itself should
not be settled. Earlier, in his
prepared remarks, Carter re-
peated his statement made sev-
Continued on Page 11-A
GOV. CARTER


Page 2-A
* JenlstncrkMan
Friday, Aprfl 9, 1976
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Syrian March Only Way to Peace-Hussein
Continued from Pajte 1-A
respect to Lebanon in his talks
here with President Ford and
Secretary Henry A. Kissinger
and with leaders of both houses
of Congress.
HE INTIMATED as much
when he told the gathering at
Blair House that "We have
brought the facts to the atten-
tion of Washington and I be-
lieve Washington has sent able
people to verifv the facts."
This was apparently a refer-
ence to President Ford's dis-
patch of former Ambassador G.
Dean Brown to Lebanon Mar.
30 as a special envoy to examine
the situation there. Brown is
presently director of the Middle
East Institute of Washington
The Jordanian ruler's open
call for Syrian intervention in
Lebanon indicated to many ob-
servers here that he was serv-
ing as Syria's spokesman on his
visit to Washington, a role in
keeping with the new Syrian-
Jordanian rapprochement.
SOME NOTED that Hussein
seemed favorably disposed to-
ward reported Syrian ambitions
to incorporate the Lebanese
state into a "Greater Syria." He
said he supported "to the full-
est Syria's attempts to bring an
end to the madness in Lebanon"
and contended that "Many Le-
banese at all levels have asked
Syria to intervene because
normal forces for law and order
have distintegrated."
He did not identify the "many
Lebanese" and he dodged a
question as to whether the U.S.
was seeking to persuade Israel
not to intervene in Lebanon
even if Syrian forces entered
that country. However, Hussein
charged that 'Israel is threaten-
ing to intervene, but I don't see
why or to what end. A country
is threatened with destruction
and the re-establishment of law
and order in Lebanon should be
in everybody's interest."
IN BRUSHING aside Sadat's
suggestion to Arab League lead-
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ers on Mar. 29 that Arab coun-
tries supply a security force to
restore order in Lebanon Hus-
sein told the media representa-
tives that "a multi-Arab force
is neither feasible nor possible"
and that an international force
"is not feasible."
He said that "Syria would not
venture into Lebanon unless it
was necessary to separate the
warring factions to give Leba-
non time to reorganize."
Israeli sources here, inform-
ed of Hussein's statements, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that Ambassador Simcha Dinitz
is in daily contact with U.S.
authorities on the Lebanese sit-
uation. The sources reiterated
Israel's position that it would
not interfere in Lebanon.
But should Syrian military |
forces intervene, a new situa-
ican opposition to "unilateral"
northern border and Israel
would have to weigh the course
of action if a security threat
developed on the border as a
result of unilateral Syrian inter-
vention the sources said.
THE U.S. position was re-
iterated in a prepared statement
tion would be created on Israel's
ican opposition to unilateral"
intervention in Lebanon. A
State Department spokesman
said, as on previous occasions,
that this warning applied to both
Syria and Israel.
Hussein's claim that Syrian
intervention was necessary to
end Lebanon's civil war drew
an emphatic response from the
State Department. Department
spokesman Robert Funseth told
newsmen that the U.S. continues
to oppose military intervention
by any outside party in Leba-
non.
"We believe it is very dan-
gerous and "that position is well
understood" by King Hussein,
he said.
OBSERVERS here, pondering
Hussein's remarks in light of
repeated U.S. warnings against
"unilateral" or "outside" Inter-
vention in Lebanon, suggested
that while the U.S. has not giv-
en Svria a green b'ght to move
into Lebanon, it may yet do so
if certain conditions are ob-
tained.
According to these observers,
the conditions could include a
Svrian pledge to renew the man-
date of the United Nations Dis-
engagement Observer Force
(UNDOF) on the Golan Heights
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At the same time, the U.S
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to offset the added danger to
its security, the observer said
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Friday, April 9, 1976
*Jmlsfi fhrA&ui
Page 3-A
3-A i
AT RABBINICAL ASSEMBLY GATHERING
More Representation Urged
GROSSINGERS, N.Y. (JTA)
Urging the creation of a cen-
tral, democratic, deliberative
national Jewish organization
that can make definitive policy
for all of American Jewry, Rab-
bi Mordecai Waxman said that
while there are three organiza-
tionsthe Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jew-
ish Organizations, the Syna-
' % gogue Council, and the Council
of Jewish Federations and Wel-
fare Funds no one of them is
completely representative of
American Jewry.
Making his presidential ad-
dress at the 76th annual con-
vention of the Rabbinical As-
sembly which opened here,
Rabbi Waxman said:
"IN NONE of these bodies is
a considered, coherent, dem-
ocratic policy worked out for
the American Jewish commu-
nity. We need a broadbased or-
ganization which represents the
organized community and can
make policy and speak with
authority. I feel that the syna-
gogue community should initi-
ate the process of creating such
a body and make sure that the
religious bodies which are con-
cerned with the tone, the qual-
ity and the character of Jew-
ish life take their part in deter-
mining the future of American
Jewish life."
Stating that "fortunately, we
seem to bumble along," the rab-
bi from Great Neck, N.Y., said
that "the American Jewish com-
munity needs something better."
Discussing the three central
organizations that now perform
some aspect of policy making,
Rabbi Waxman said:
"The Presidents Conference
presumably represents the Jew-
ish community to the American
government, the United Nations
and to the non-Jewish world on
matters relating to Israel and
some issues of international
concern.
"NEVERTHELESS, it almost
never discusses policy, is almost
always reactive and rarely ini-
tiative, and is a body whose ac-
tions and timing are largely de-
termined by the generally able
man who is its president. Since
it is an umbrella organization,
it must operate by a sort of con-
sensus and avoid division. But
like most umbrellas, this um-
brella, functions best when the
sun is shining."
Calling the Synagogue Coun-
cil "another umbrella organiza-
tion," Rabbi Waxman said that
it is "a reasonable representa-
tive of the Jewish religious
community in ecumenical rela-
tions and is doing a fine job in
its policy institute of raising
issues and processing data."
Admitting that it provides a
setting for rabbinic and lay
religious bodies to get together,
he lamented that "the price of
that association is undefined but
recognized limits of policy and
action."
"THE VETO is as potent a
weapon in the Synagogue Coun-
cil as it is the United Nations
and so broader issues of policy
escape us." He urged that its
role "where the rabbinic and
synagogue community can de-
velop" be expanded.
Stanley Rabinowitz. rabbi of
the Adas Israel Congregation in
Washington, was elected presid
dent of the Rabbinical Assem-
bly.
U.S. Denunciation
Of Settlements
No Policy Change
WASHINGTON (JTA) The White House has in-
sisted that the United States statement at the Security
Council condemning settlements by Israel in occupied ter-
ritories does not represent a change in the American policy.
Presidential news secretary Ron Nessen said that U.S.
Ambassador William Scranton's remarks regarding the set-
tlements were "a restatement of policy" made by former
U.S. Ambassadors to the UN Arthur Goldberg in 1968,
Charles Yost in 1969 and George Bush in 1971.
Nessen said they were "among others" who have said
the settlements are "not helpful to a peace settlement."
Asked why Scranton made his statement after apparently
five years of silence by Administration leaders, Nessen
said it was because Scranton is taking part in the Security
Council debate.
Asked whether Scranton's statements that the settle-
ments are "illegal" have always been official American
policy, Nessen said that he would have to check the record
before answering that.
He said that Scranton's "language was somewhat more
restrained than those on other public occasions."
.
Why would a man with $450,000
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want to borrow $25,000?
The*why"is his business.
The $25,000 is ours.
Maybe his son-in-law needs it, or Uncle Sam wants it.
Or, he wants to take his wife to Europe for their
40th anniversary or, he wants to set up a trust fund for
his new granddaughter. Whatever It's his business.
While he pays it back the interest is deductible from his
taxes, he hasn't disturbed his investments and he has all
that beautiful money in one package. He's just
another one of the people who deserves a loan.
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We give credit to people.
People to people.
We built our reputation on it.
We care.
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Phone: 949 2121


r
Page 4-A
vJewlslifhrkilati
Friday, April 9, 1976
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A Delayed Decision
It is now some seven months that Miami Attorney
Sidney Aronovitz was recommended to fill a vacancy
ton the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida.
As is traditional in these matters, the recommenda-
tion came from the state's senators in Washington, in
this case Senators Lawton Chiles and Richard Stone.
As is also traditional in these matters, the President
was expected to respond to the recommendation within
a reasonable time in order to assure the fact that the
vacancy does not hamper the ongoing juridical respon-
sibilities of the court.
The fact is that nothing has happened thus far. The
President has not acted on the recommendation, and we
wonder why. Can it be that the appointment is hung up
in a net of politics seeking to ignore the Chiles-Stone
recommendation in favor of a "party appointment" in
this presidential election year?
Mr. Aronovitz is a distinguished member of the
bar, in practice for the past 30 years. He is a former vice
mayor of the City of Miami and a former City Com-
missioner.
His longtime civic and philanthropic activities in
Florida are so numerous that they can hardly be cata-
logued here. Suffice it to say, they are, in themselves,
a splendid recommendation for his appointment to the
judgeship in question.
Isn't it about time that the President acted favor-
ably in this matter?
Need for Public Relations
Public relations has never been Israel's long suit.
Up until the 1973 war, this didn't seem to matter too
much.
Up until then, the tide was going all her way. World
sympathies, rooted in the bestiality of the Nazi war
machine, still recalled the tragic indifference to Jewish
suffering.
In Israel, the world seemed to want to atone.
The Yom Kippur War has changed all of that. It is
not our intention here to explain why. Countless thou-
sands of words in these editorial columns since October,
1973, have documented the causes behind the change.
The fact is, there has been a change.
Time Magazine's 'Report
The consequence of the change is that the world is
no longer willing to respond positively to Israel in tra-
ditional knee-jerk fashion.
Automatic sympathy in the past is just that a
thing of the past. Now it is incumbent upon Israel to
become more skillful in her public utterances in order
to combat a parallel advice in the skillful use of public
utterances by the Arabs to argue their own cause.
We have here in mind the current Time Magazine
report of Israel's Atom Bomb arsenal which she was
allegedly preparing to deliver when the Yom Kippur
War was going against her.
We have never doubted Israel's capacity to build
nuclear weapons. As early as the mid-1950's, Abba Eban
repeatedly remarked that "Who do you think built the
Atom Bomb in the first place?"
What strikes us as dangerous, however, is the cava-
lier manner in which Time "reports" the allegedly
scheduled Israeli strike in early October, 1973. Its tone
suggests that Israel was ready to see the whole world
go up in flames in one final Armageddon act before go-
ing down herself.
A Response is Necessary
Whatever the truth or falsehood in the magazine's
report, it is the tone that counts. It represents one of
the most vicious propaganda attacks against Israel to
date, and that includes the worst that the Arab-Commu-
nist-Third World bloc has been able to hurl at Israel
since the Yom Kippur War.
If Israel does not take care and respond to this
viciousness artfully and professionally, things will not
get better, but only worse.
Jewish Flor idian
OFFICE AND PLANT 120 N.K. th STREET TELEPHONE Hl-IW,
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' O Fred K. Shoch.t April 9, 1976
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Seven Beauties' a Great Film
A SPECIAL preview served
up by Wometco Theatres
the other night unfurled a new
Lina Wertmuller film that ob-
solutely must not be missed.
"Seven Beauties" was espe-
cially electric compared to the
Marxist flat tire, Costa-Gavras'
"Special Section," with which
it was shown. If you've seen
"Z," then you well know what
"Special Section" is about.
The Costa-Gavras production
proposes the agonizing pragma-
tism of a Muscovite decision
once again to deal with the
capitalist pigs as allies in the
never-ending war against fas-
cism.
WHAT CAN one do? If one
Mindlin
1 i
is fighting the same enemy as
are the capitalists at this par-
ticular moment (in "Special
Section," it is Hitler in Vichy
France during World War II),
then one may as well enjoy the
benefits of an alliance with
them.
But never forget, fellow-Boy
Scouts: after the death of the
fascists must come the death
of the capitalists since, really
they are one and the same
thing.
As in "Z," what you miss in
"Special Section" is a sense of
humor, which is necessary in
art to the creation of life itself.
And that is the hallmark of
Costa-Gavras' work: it is with-
out humor, and therefore it is
without life.
"SPECIAL SECTION" is not
about people. It is about poli-
tics as an abstraction, and so
one can only regard it as a
corpsea special kind of Marx-
ist corpse which subordinates
people and life to ideology.
Never does Costa-Gavras take
the long view and poke fun at
the lifelessness of his cause
which repeatedly fails to see its'
own profoundest flaw, but of-
fers itself instead as a paean of
praise to life and liberty.
"Cause" people never do take
the long view; they never do
see the possibility of humor in
their humorlessness, and that
is their greatest sin.
That is what kills their cause
before it is born. They do not
conceive that they can be
wrong, or that their dedication
to their errors can be humor-
ous. In an artist, this substitu-
tion of ideology for life is a
fatal flaw.
BY CONTRAST, "Seven
Beauties" is exquisite. Even on
its own terms, it is no less so.
Lina Wertmuller focuses her
genius on pre-World War II Na-
ples. Pasquale, a swaggering
lower middle class son of a
mattress-maker, tries to work
his way up into the hierarchy
of the Neapolitan underworld.
He sports a pistol as the sym-
Continued on Page 13-A
Letter Got a Lot of Space
Volume 49
Ft-ida, April 9, 1976
Number 16
9 NISAN 5736
It was most encouraging to
read a letter critical of a col-
umn I wrote in last week's edi-
tion. There haven't been any
lately and, for one as polemical
as I tend to be, a matter of
some concern:
Are my columns too bland?
Have my "way out" views
become "in"?
Does nobody care?
Just because the first class
postage has gone up to 13 cents,
am I not worth it?
WELL, David Giesser broke
the ice last week and got about
equal space. And, after reading
his letter carefully, I've come
to the conclusion that he
really was after space. His
opus bore out a previous one of
mine in which I pointed out
that what made columnists
omnscient was a typewriter, pa-
per and the willingness of some-
one to print the stuff.
I don't want to come to any
hasty conclusion, but it may be
that in every fund-raiser's heart
(heart?) there lurks the soul of
a writer.
Add another category to my
concern (although ij is one I
have always suspected) and that
is the misunderstood column.
Giesser, who obviously was out
to defend fund-raising and its
ilk against a fancied slight of
mine, just as obviously devoted
most of his column to a demojr-
stration of Jewish erudition that
was impressive.
AND I further suspect that
was the real reason for his
"response" to me. Okay, I'm
impressed.
Looking over the Mar. 12 col-
umn again, it was clear to me
what I was trying to say: that a
man named Simon Wiesenthal
came to Miami to tell of an im-
portant event in Jewish history
without tying it to a fund-rais-
ing projept; that there was a
response from the audience
which was unique in that in the
love and respect for the man,
which became manifest, there
also was a spontaneous outpour-
ing of contributions, which had
not been requested.
I tried to spell out a lesson
in this minor Sunday morning
incident. That lesson was not
intended to downgrade fund-
raising but to try to uplift it.
WHEN I wrote that "I have
been discouraged with the lack
of response to the needs of the
community from most, except
the wealthy, who carry a great-
er share of the financial burden
than is healthy for a viable Jew-
ish future." the intent was not
to be critical of those generous
rich, as Giesser seems to be-
lieve, but quite the opposite.
I am appalled by the com-
paratively small number of Jews
of considerable or moderate
means who support any Jewish
cause, and it is tjiis which gives
me concern for the future of
Jewish bfe unless we find a
!!. ..Way t0 reach more Jew"
than at present.
1 suggested that we need
Jewish heroes as well as
martyrs" and that the response
to Simon Wiesenthal mZTt
dence of that.
W THIS connection. I ex-
pressed my disappointment with
the failure of rabbis and educa-
tors to take advantage of the
presence of this outstanding
personage in our community by
coming to hear him. I was kind
by not mentioning the fund-
raisers and Jewish agency pro-
fessionals on that occasion.
They are too busy, I imagine,
to attend anything that bears
the taint of Jewish knowledge,
for their presence is not con-
spicuous at the many lecture
and other cultural opportuni-
ties offered Jews in Greater
Miami throughout the year.
That lack of interest was reveal-
ed by a Federation professional
who called me on the Friday
before Wiesenthal's Sunday
morning appearance to inquire
whether he could be used for a
condominium fund-raiser that
evening.
He admitted that he was not
aware that Wiesenthal's pres-
ence in Miami had been an-
nounced the previous July and
in later publicity concerning the
lecture series which brought
him here.
AS FOR Giesser's
comments on Jewish
tuals who are outside
of the American Jewish com-
munity and who, for him, would
"desecrate the memory of my
old-fashioned shtetl parents,"
they would have greater impact
if I could have counted him and
his colleagues in the local au-
dience which came to hear Irv-
ing Howe, another kind of Jew-
ish intellectual.
Anyhow, I hope he reads his
book, "The World of Our Fath-
ers," which is only one of many
important positive works by
modern Jews and which might
give our fund-raisers some new
ideas in reaching those Jews
who now are unreachable.
satirical
intellec-
the pale


Friday, April 9, 1976
*Je*lst\fk>rMk*n
f
Page 5-A
Deportations Sparked Violence
By TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
summary deportation of two
prominent West Bankers to Le-
banon has not only created new
political trouble for Premier
Yitzhak Rabin's government,
but re-escalated disturbances on
the West Bank where the de-
portees have become the focus
of further Arab displeasure with
the Israeli administration.
The ouster of Dr. Ahmed
Hamzi Natshi, a Hebron sur-
geon, and Dr. Abdul Azzis Hag
Ahmed, a dentist, from El-Bireh
as alleged troublemakers, may
also cause a backlash against
the moderate candidates Israel
hopes to see elected in the West
Bank municipal elections Apr.
12.
THE REGISTRATION of can-
didates has been noticeably
slow. In Hebron, the candidacy,
of Mayor Mahammed Ali El-
Jabaari, an influential moderate
supported by the Israeli author
ities, appears to have been se-
riously compromised.
Meanwhile, Defense Minister
Shimon Peres' explanation of
the deportations at a cabinet
meeting was greeted with skep-
ticism by many of his cabinet
colleagues and by a large sec-
tion of the Israeli press.
Peres reportedly said the
soldiers detailing the hostile ac-
tivities of the two deportees
had been compiled over a long
period.
THEY WERE accused of fo-
menting some of the recent dis-
turbances on the West Bank and
of association with the PLO and
the communists.
But critics of the deportation
demanded to know why it was
carried out just IS minutes be-
fore the Supreme Court was to
have held a hearing that could
have resulted in a staying of
Attorney General Aharon Ba-
rak's deportation order and
whether Natshi and Ahmed
were deliberately removed from
the West Bank to prevent them
from filing their candidacy for
the mayoral offices in their
respective towns.
The government's reply to the
Supreme Court need not have de-
Supreme Court need not have
delayed its hearing until 4 p.m.
Saturday.
THE TWO men were already
in Lebanon by the time the
court assembled. It was also
contended that neither Premier
Rabin nor Justice Minister Haim
Zadok were aware that the de-
portations were imminent.
But both of them participated
in a special ministerial commit-
tee meeting, along with Peres
and Foreign Minister Yigal Al-
ton, at which it was decided to
put the deportation machinery
into motion against Natshi and
Ahmed.
The two men were arrested
earlier and appeared before a
military-judicial committee con-
sisting of a court martial judge
RICHTER
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and two officers which imple-
mented the deportation proceed-
ings.
RABIN TOLD the cabinet that
the legal aspects of the deporta-
tion were under the "exclusive"
jurisdiction of Attorney General
Barak whose instructions were
followed by the military govern-
ment on the West Bank.
According to some observers,
Jabaari, who threatened to re-
sign a week ago and later re-
considered, is suspected by
many of his Hebron constitu-
ents of having collaborated with
the Israeli authorities to get rid
of Nashti who was regarded as
a serious rival in the upcoming
elections. Jabaari himself has
deplored the deportations and
said he would not run for re-
election.
Public reaction was summed
in a Jerusalem post editorial
which warned that the deporta-
tions may have seriously com-
promised the position of the
traditional and more moderate
West Bank leadership which
now has to prove itself at least
as nationalistic as the opposi-
tion.
The Post charged that "the
Minister of Defense must have
realized that he was inviting
local extremists to openly com-
pete for public office."
Fascell Sponsors
'Holocaust Day9
Remembrance
WASHINGTON Congressman Dante Fascell (D,
Fla.) has joined in sponsoring a resolution in the U.S.
House of Representatives which would establish Apr. 15
of each year as "Holocaust Remembrance Day."
Apr. 15 is the anniversary of the beginning of the
uprising of the Warsaw Ghetto.
FASCELL NOTED that the day should be set aside
so that all Americans could "contemplate the conse-
quences of racial, religious or ethnical hatred.
"Even though the infamous days of the Holocaust
are 30 years behind us," Fascell said, "we should not
forget the horrors that it brought to all mankind.
"This day would also serve to teach those who are
too young to remember that period of the inhumanity
that men and women are capable of inflicting on each
other in the false name of patriotism or some other high-
sounding virtue."
MI
your precious jewels
to the most prestigious
jewelers in the South
Call Lewis Rustem I'twne: 445 u*4
Herb Schocnberg Ml (./
WI was born 28 years ago."
Because Israel is such a young country,
we tend to think of all her people as being
young and strong. And fully able to take
care of themselves.
Not quite so.
Many of Israel's people are older than
Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Many of them
died emotionally and spiritually as they
personally suffered through the most
horrible years in all the history of man.
And yet, with the birth of Israel, many
of them were born again.
But now they face new dangers. The
dangers of poverty and hunger and neglect.
Because of debts from past wars and
the enormous costs of current defense
responsibilities, the people of Israel are the
most heavily taxed in the world. And so they
must look to us in America to provide the
economic assistance and social services so
many of her aged require. And deserve.
If we don't give everything we can to
help these elderly people in Israel, they will
surely suffer greatly.
But then, many of them already know
more about human suffering than any of us
can even imagine.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federations 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give no**.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If vou think all of our problems are solved, think again*
O
We Are One.


r
Page 6-a
Jfewfef.fkrkUM*
Friday, April 9, 1976
JJPB Deplores Arms to Egypt
It's All Over But the Shouting
11-A
/NEW ORLEANS (JTA)
The National Jewish Welfare
Board has deplored the proj-
ected sale of U.S. military equip-
ment to Egypt and declared that
"it would be wiser to develop
relations with Egypt through
economic rather than military
means."
In a resolution adopted at the
closing session of the JWB's
five-day biennial convention at
the Fairmount Hotel, the organ-
ization, which serves Jewish
Community Centers and Y*s all
over the country and Jewish
servicemen and women here
and abroad, urged congress "to
D*'A KOSHER "*"
PASSOVER RESERVE NOW!
FREE SNACK YEARLY tATES AVAIL
1 DINING ROOM OPEN TO PUBUC WHY NOT
CANTOR ABRAHAM St If CALL NOW
538-5711
AND CHOIR
10 CONDUCT SfRVlClS
-B /fM~ Op.n .h V.or Aroui^ HOTEL
Marseilles
C" T --._ _-_. 1741 COLLINS AVENUE
Ion the ocean miam. beach, fl0>.da1
FIRST SEDER
WED, APRIL 14th- 7 P.M.
$29K
SECOND SEDER
THUR. APRIL 15th 7 P.M.
$24oo;,p,nd.
eSe^aT tax inrl.
Children under 8 $15 lor each Seder
DIETARY LAWS STRICTLY OBSERVED
Under ihe supervision of Rabbi Tiboi H. Stern
Call 865 8511, Catering Dept
ON THE OCCAM AT 7lh STREET, MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
PASSOVER
at the new
(Not just another Kosher Hotel)
Stay with us 9 days Dine with us 9 days
$395 per person double AP"' 14-22. 2 seders-3 meals|
occupancy. 9 days includes Per day *250 Per Person
|all hotel privileges and all mealsl or ? seders-$35 per parson
Synagogue services Mashgiach on premises
It's Glatt to be good.
For information Call 531-6061 or 531-3391
OCEAN AT 26TH ST AND COLLINS AVE MIAMI BEACH I
HOTEL
u
fontainebJeai?
h ON THE OCEAN AT 44M ITUIT
TRADITIONAL
(KOSHER)
seOeR
SERVICES
conducted by
RAbl3i MAyeR AfeRAMOWiCZ
and
CANTOR NiCO FGLDMAN
with the Temple Choir under the auspices of
CCMpLe MCNORAh
GRAND BALLROOM
MOTCL FONTAINEBLEAU
APRIL 14-15
tOP RESERVATIONS CALL:
CATERING OFFICE
538-8811
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STEAK HOI SI
and the
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3 Meals Daily
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MAS <9 meals>
'"* P" person plu la. i tips
Sedurlm conducted by
Prominent Cantor & Choir
For Reservations
Phone: 538-6631
On The Ocean at 21st St.
Miami Beach
EMINENT CANTOR
CHARLES SHELDON K00NER
April 14 and April 15, 197S
$Qf| Firtt Seder, per person
^1 Includes tax and tip
(Spatial orlee ol $35 for hoth Seders)
Ash About Our Kosher Meal Plan
For reservations, call Mr. Rubin
531-1271
SHELBORNE
object strongly and to legisla-
tively block the sale of military
supplies to countries in con-
frontation with Israel or to those
whose forces or weapons could,
in case of war, be turned
against Israel."
THE RESOLUTION warned
that U.S. arms sales to Egypt
would strengthen militarism
rather than the forces of mod-
eration in that country.
In another resolution, the
convention delegates urged the
U.S. not to "retreat from the
provisions of the Jackson-Vanik
Amendment which was design-
ed to increase emigration by
Soviet Jews."
It called on Jewish Commu-
nity Centers "to increase their
efforts to keep the plight of
Soviet Jewry before their con-
stituencies."
ISRAEL'S Minister of Educa-
tion and Culture Aharon Yadlin
addressed an earlier session of
the convention on his country's
efforts to grapple with "the so-
cial problems presented by the
social, economic and education-
al differences between Oriental
and Western Jews."
He declared that "our.nation-
al unity is the basic assumption
of our approach to these prob-
lems we are one people."
Yadlin said that the biggest
challenge facing the present
generation of Jews is the im-
provement of communications
and cooperation between Jews
in the diaspora and in Israel
The educational and unifying
ties between centers of Jewry
throughout the world must be
strengthened, he said.
DORE SCHARY, author, play-
wright and former film execu-
tive,, challenged charges of pa-
rochialism leveled at Jewish
artists who create out of their
own ethnic background.
"Why not parochialism?" he
asked.
DANIEL ROSE, of New York,
who was reelected to a second
term as president of the JWB,
reported that centers affiliated
with the JWB are located in
more than 200 communities in
North America and operate out
of almost 500 separate facilities.
He said new center facilities
ranging in cost from $600,000
to more than $12 million have
been opened in the last few
years. In aggregate, center bud-
gets totaled $100 million a year,
he said.
Miami Beach's King Cole Apartments hosted a recent
gathering for the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund. General chairman of King Cole resi-
dents, Tommie Wolf (left), joined with special gifts co-
ordinator Manuel Joseloff (center) and Mrs. Joseloff to
create a successful evening for the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation campaign.
IPASSOVER SPECIAL-
SAVE 5
CALL SAM WALDMAN
8-10-12 NIGHT _.
PACKAGES Cu;
Glatt Kosher
Ph: "t5731 Waldman
NOW
FOR RESERVATIONS
Will
ON THE OCEAN AT 43rd ST.
MIAMI BEACH_______
Whether You Celebrate
PASSOVCR
Let Master Host Deliver '
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We Cater Small Parties to Elegant Afisiral
Cantor ErnanueJ Mandell
will conduct traditional
(kosher) Seder Services
in the Beaux Arts Ballroom
of The Diplomat Hotel.
HoHywood-by-the-Sea,
Wednesday, April 14th.
Doors open 7:00 p.m.
For reservations phone
the Catering Office.
From Miami 949-2442,
Hollywood 923-8111.'
DIPLOMAT


j. Friday, April 9, 1976
Page 7-A
f
Newsmen Report Dr. Kissinger Believed
Nixon Was Anti-Semitic
NEW YORK (JTA)
Former President Nixon's
obsession that there was a
"Jewish cabal" out to "get
him" most distressed Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer, who was convinced
that the President was "anti-
Semitic," according to "The
Final Days," the new book
by Bob Woodward and Carl
Bernstein excerpted in the
current issue of Newsweek
Magazine.
According to the writers,
"as the son of German Jews
who had fled the Nazis, he
(Kissinger) was particularly
sensitive to what he regard-
ed in Nixon as a dangerous
brand of anti-Jewish preju-
dice born of ignorance.
HE SAW in the President an
antagonistic, gut reaction which
stereotyped Jews and convinced
Nixon that they were his ene-
mies.
The remark by Nixon which
most often unsettled Kissinger
was well-known to the Presi-
Rabin Accuses Communists
Of Fomenting W.B. Violence
Continued from Page 1-A
most serious disturbances
by Israeli Arabs since the
State was founded.
THE PREMIER spoke in re-
ply to a non-confidence motion
filed by the Rakah faction,
headed by Meir Wilner. The
motion was presented to a
virtually empty Knesset. The
coalition parties and the oppo-
sition Likud absented them-
selves in protest against what
they decried as Communist
hypocrisy in inciting the gen-
eral strike and then demanding
a no-confidence vote against the
government because of the
violence their incitement en-
gendered.
Apart from the four Rakah
MKs and Meir Payil of the left-
ist Moked faction, no one was
present to hear the motion In-
troduced by Wilner. Addressing
empty seats, he railed against
the government from the ros-
trum, shouting, "Murderers, do
you now flee, cowards?"
LATER, all parties voted
against the Rakah motion ex-
cept for Marcia Freedman of
the Social Democrats, a recent-
ly formed splinter group, and
Moked. The latter abstained,
denouncing extremism on both
sides.
Rabin expressed regrets for
the "oointless deaths" caused
by the violence and wished
speedy recovery to the injured,
police and soldiers and Arab
civilians alike. He praised the
manner in which the law en-
forcement authorities handled
Rhodesia's
Jews Seen
In Danger
Condoned from Page 1-A
He said that in his farewell
address to his congregation in
Bulaway, he held up a letter
addressed to the entire Jewish
community bearing the official
stamp of the White People's
Party and swastikas. The let-
ter contained quotes from
"Mein Kampf" and threats that
"Hitler hasn't yet finished his
job."
ZWEBNER SAID that swas-
tikas have also appeared lately
on Jewish shop windows and
cars. "I'm afraid the Jews are
not aware of the danger or
don't want to think about it,'
he said.
Mrs. Zwebner made it clear
that the Jews, like the rest of
the white minority, lead the
good life in Rhodesia and are
loath to give it up.
"They are spoiled by luxury
and comfort," she said. The
Rabbi said the Jews "say they
can help Israel best by staying
in Rhodesia and giving money,
but we told them that is no
longer true."
the situation, declaring that no
country could permit such dis-
orders. '
He said he was "happy to
learn" that most Israeli Arabs
did not heed those who tried to
incite them and continued their
normal way of life.
dent's close associates: "the
Jewish cabal is out to get me,"
Woodward and Bernstein wrote.
The authors stated that "late
in 1971, Nixon had summoned
the White House personnel
chief, Fred Malek, to his office
to discuss a Jewish cabal In the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The
cabal, Nixon said, was tilting
economic figures to make his
administration look bad. How
many Jews were there in the
Bureau? he wanted to know.
Malek reported back on the
number and told the President
that the Bureau's methods of
weighting statics were normal
procedure that had been used
for years. Later, there was an-
other suspected Jewish cabal
in another department," Wood-
ward and Bernstein wrote.
THEY SAID that Nixon also
expressed obsessive hatred to-
ward "academics" and "God-
dam Ivy Leaguers" although he
did, in fact, continue to approve
appointments of academics,
"even Ivy Leaguers and Jews,"
they wrote.
They said that Federal Re-
serve Board Chairman Arthur
Burns, himself a Jew, was con-
vinced that Nixon was not truly
anti-Semitic. There were, how-
ever, ugly strands of prejudice
in the man, Burns had conclud-
ed. The President really didn't
have much love for humanity,
Burns believed. Why should
Nixon love Jews any more than
Japanese or Italians or Catho-
lics? Nixon regularly employed
epithets for whole sections of
mankind, he knew."
BUT WOODWARD and Bern-
stein said Burns was disturbed
that "if the President perceived
that Jews or Israel or anyone
else, for that matter, got in his
way, he was prepared to stomp
on them."
According to the authors,
Burns "vivdly recalled" a Nixon
"tantrum" in 1973 over the
Jackson amendment to the
trade act whiich would have
linked Soviet emigration policies
toward Jews with U.S. trade
benefits for the USSR.
"Burns watched Nixon very
close on that occasion, and he
was impressed by the Presi-
dent's fury. Burns felt that
Nixon was saying that Jews
might suffer for thwarting his
will," Woodward and Bernstein
wrote.
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Its easier to remember where we don't go.
Our apologies to the Antarctica
Tourist Board.
For despite the fact we have the
world's largest fleet of 747s.
And despite the fact we have
28.(M)() people who've made a
profession out of taking Americans
to foreign lands.
And despite the fact we have a
route structure that takes in 91 cities
in 61 countries.
There's still one continent we
don't fly to.
Of course, tastes may change
radically.
In which case, we'll open
Antarctica to air travel.
Even as we opened every other
continent.
And take the apolog) back and
start taking tourists.

America's airline to the world.
See your travel a#ent.


Page 8-A
*JenisliHorkUar
Friday, April 9, 1976
Jack Anderson
Column Due
In Jewish Floridian
Jack Anderson, whose relent-
less digging has made him one
of America's top investigative
reporters, will begin a regular
Washington Merry-Go-Round
column in The Jewish Floridian
starting Apr. 16.
Anderson has been at the bot-
tom of some of the biggest ex-
poses that have come out of
Washington. He was the first to
report that the CIA, FBI, Secret
Service and other law enforce-
ment agencies were spying on
law abiding Americans. He be-
gan four years ago quoting from
some of the files that these
agencies kept on prominent
citizens
HE WAS the first to report
that the CIA had attempted to
assassinate foreign leaders. In a
series of columns in January,
1971, he gave names, dates and
details of six assassination at-
tempts against Cuba's Fidel
Castro. He reported that the
CIA had recruited two Mafia
men, Sam Giancana and John
Roselli, to direct the assassina-
tion plot.
Jack Anderson was also the
first to report in February, 1975,
that the U.S. was contemplat-
ing military intervention in the
Middle East, a story which Sec-
retary of State Kissinger con-
firmed several months later.
DURING the Watergate era,
Anderson broke many, of the
Need Change
Or Emigres
Won't Come
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV(JTA)A group
of prominent Soviet Jewish sci-
entists who have immigrated to
Israel, warned that unless Is-
rael's social structure is dras-
tically changed, the number of
immigrants from the USSR
would continue to drop and the
rate of departure from Israel
may further increase.
Although the foremost im-
pediment Ho emigration from
the USSR continues to be the
restrictions imposed by Soviet
authorities, anxiety among po-
tential olim as to what con-
fronts them in Israel is now a
real deterrent, Dr. Victor Pol-
sky said at a press conference
at Beth Sokolow here.
HIS REMARKS were concur-
red by other Soviet scientists
who have been successfully ab-
sorbed in the Israeli scientific
community. They included Vi-
taly Ryevsky, a chemist teach-
ing at the Haifa Technion, and
Dr. Yuli Nudelman, a surgeon
at Rambam Hospital.
They said that some 100,000
Soviet Jews have received noti-
fication that they are wanted in
Israel. But because of Soviet
restrictions and because of so-
cial conditions in Israel, many
hesitate to come.
THE SCIENTISTS noted that
many of the Soviet immigrants
are highly professional people,
by no means refugees fleeing
the danger of physical annihila-
tion.
Manv of them are appalled
by the lack of patriotism, Zion-
ist feelings and concern for the
country's future manifested by
the settled population in Israel.
This is responsible for much of
the emigration which can be
halted only by a change of at-
naapbere, the scientists said.
major stories. He was the first
to implicate John Mitchell and
H. R. Haldeman in the scandal.
Anderson was also the
first to report that hush money
had been offered to the Water-
gate defendants. He was called
on to testify himself after the
Watergate investigators learned
that he had been present in an
adjoining room during the dis-
cussions over the hush money
and that a participant had left
the meeting to give him pro-
gress reports.
ANDERSON created a sensa-
tion by publishing the grand
jury transcripts which gave the
first solid testimony of the Wa-
tergate crimes. He was the first
to report that President Nixon
had no advance knowledge of
the Waterwate breakin, but had
participated in the Watergate
cover-up.
Long before the Watergate
scandal broke, Anderson dug
out the story about Howard
Hughes' $100,000 cash payoff
which was delivered by a
Hughes emissary to Bebe Re-
bozo at Key Biscayne and San
Clemente.
It was also Anderson's stories
that led to the celebrated Senate
hearings on the International
Telephone and Telegraph Com-
pany.
HE PUBLISHED the famous
Dita Beard memo telling of a
$400,000 ITT offer to help stage
the Republican convention in
San Diego.
In 1972, Anderson received
the Pulitzer Prize for proving
that President Nixon and Henry
Kissinger had lied to the Con-
gress and the public about the
U.S. tilt toward Pakistan in the
India-Pakistan conflict.
Anderson has been credited
with driving a number of mis-
creants out of public office, in-
cluding former Senators Tom
Dodd (D.-Conn.), George Mur-
phy (R.-Calif.), and Miarlow
Cook (R.-Ky.).
The latest was a series of
columns which led to the re-
signation of Postmaster General
Ted Klassen in the middle of
his term.
Waldheim Urges
UN Study Lebanon
JACK ANDERSON
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim for the first
time made a direct appeal to the
Security Council on the situa-
tion in Lebanon. He sent a let-
ter to Council President Thomas
S. Boya of Benin calling the
Council's attention to the con-
flict in that Arab country-
Waldheim did not directly ask
for a Council meeting, but it
President Ford
Opposes Boost
In Foreign Aid
Continued from Page 1-A
placing unacceptable strains on
our budget."
WHILE MEDIA reports of the
transitional quarter funding
tended to point out that Israel
is a beneficiary, neither Ford's
letter nor responses by White
House Press Secretary Ron Nes-
sen, when questioned by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
supported such reports.
The President's letter made
no mention of Israel but did
deplore the reduction in pend-
ing legislation for military as-
sistance to Jordan and some
other countries. Actually, Israel
would gain about $550 million
in military and economic aid if
a transitional quarter allowance
utimately becomes law.
Egypt would gain $175 mil-
lion in economic, assistance and
Jordan and Syria and more than
a score of other countries would
receive comparable increases in
their allocations.
Ford made his views known
to Sen. Daniel Inouye (D.-Haw-
aii), chairman, and Sen. Edward
Brooke (R.-Mass.), the ranking
minority member of the Senate
Appropriations Subcommittee
on Foreign Aid, and to Reps.
Otto Passman (D.-La.), chair-
man, and Garner Shriver (R.-
Kan.), ranking minority mem-
ber of the corresponding House
subcommittee.
IN THE legislative process
thus far, the Senate adopted a
ceiling of 25 percent of the ap-
propriated funds for the three
months following fiscal year
1976 which ends June 30 and
preceding fiscal 1977 which be-
gins Oct. 1. The House, how-
ever, had not included such
funding in its appropriations
bill.
The House-Senate Conference
Committee will meet for the
first time to negotiate on this
and other differences in the two
bills. Since the Senate has ap-
proved increased funding, the
JTA was informed that whether
the bill will ultimately be adopt-
ed by Congress depends largely
on the House conferees.
The House managers had in-
dicated, prior to Ford's letter,
that they did not include the
transitional quarter funding in
their bill because the White
House did not ask for it. But
they indicated they would go
along with the Senate should
that chamber approve the ad-
ditional funding in this election
year.
was understood here that he
hoped the Council would act on
behalf of the Christians in Le-
banon.
WALDHEIM said that he is
convinced that a cease-fire in
Lebanon has now become even
more urgent. Given the mag-
nitude of the tragedy and the
implication it carries for en-
dangering the wider peace in
the Middle East, he said, he
feels compelled to draw the
Council's attention to the situa-
tion.
A UN spokesman said that
Waldheim's letter was in ac-
cordance with Article 99 of the
UN Charter by which the Secre-
tary General may bring to the
attention of die Condi any
matter which may threaten in-
ternational peace and security.
IN ANOTHER development,
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, Chaim Herzog,
met with Waldheim and handed
him a letter of protest against a
Libyan call for Israel's destruc-
tion during the Security Coun-
cil meeting last week. The rep-
resentative of Libya, a member
of the Security Council, had
stated: "This racist entity in the
Middle East must be destroyed,
and it will be destroyed one
day."
Herzog charged that "this call
for the destruction of a member
state at a public meeting of the
Security Council is in flagrant
violation of the UN Charter."
He also said that this statement
"only serves to emphasize the
serious decline in the moral
standing of this important organ
of the UN."
Herzog and Waldheim also
discussed the situation in the
West Bank and according to a
UN spokesman, Waldheim ex-
pressed "concern and hope that
the situation will be normal-
ized."
MEANWHILE, at a press con-
ference here, the Palestine Li-
beration Organization deputy
permanent observer at the UN.
Zehdi Labib Terzi, said that a
letter was sent to the president
of the Security Council, urging
him "to assume its responsibi-
lity" to resume discussion on
Arab demonstrations in Israel
and the West Bank.
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eeHav^ April 9, 1976
*JewlstncrHlnr
Page 9-A
f
TIME
Continued from Page 1-A
"thereupon gave Dayan permission to ac-
tivate Israel's Doomsday weapons."
Said Time, "As each bomb was as-
sembled, it was rushed off to waiting air
force units. Before any triggers were set,
however, the battle on both fronts turned
in Israel's favor."
ACCORDING TO the florid report,
the bombs were then put away for storage
in desert arsenals "where they remain to-
day, still ready for use."
Time states that the bombs have a 20-
kiloton capability, making them roughly
equivalent in potency to those dropped on
Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World
War II.
Time speculates that the Soviet Union
learned through a spy satellite that Israel
had assembled and was preparing to de-
liver the bombs and so shipped nuclear
warheads of her own "to be fitted on
Scud missiles already in Egypt."
IT WAS for this reason, declares
Time, that the U.S. issued a worldwide
alert on Oct. 15. The U.S., says the mag-
azine, "detected the Soviet warheads as
the ship (was) carrying them
through the Bosporous."
The magazine also revealed that Day-
an ordered the construction of a plant
capable of producing fissionable material
for nuclear weapons following the 1967
Six-Day War.
AMONG THE MOST decorative de-
tails of the Time report was the magazine's
statement that Israeli warplanes had
been ordered to shoot down an American
reconnaissance plane that flew over the
underground tunnel where the A-bombs
were being assembled.
But the U.S. spy plane outsped the
Israeli Phantoms "and returned to its base
with significant (nuclear) readings.''
Jews, Arabs Demand Sterner Control of Terrorism
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Life
returned to normal in Israel's
Arab towns and villages Mar.
31. Bat in the aftermath of the
violence many Israelis Jew-
ish and Arab were seriously
questioning the long cherished
values of democracy and un-
limited freedom of speech.
The wisdom of extending the
protections of democracy to
agitators and inciters to vio-
lence was challenged in many
newspaper commentaries on
the events which claimed the
lives of six Arabs and caused
injuries to 31 Arabs and 38 Is-
raeli soldiers, policemen and
border policemen.
SOME EDITORIAL writers
wondered why no action was
taken against the pro-Moscow
Rakah Communists and other
radical elements who were
known for weeks to be agitat-
ing for a general strike. But
many editorials called for a re-
valuation of Israel's policy to-
ward the Arab minority.
The Jerusalem Post said that
the Arab strike "was violent
enough to bear out some of the
worst fears about the growing
estrangement of the country's
largest minority group from
the Jewish majority." It added
that more imaginative steps
have been taken to help make
Israel's Arabs feel fully-fledged
Israeli citizens."
Davar, the Histadrut daily,
contended: "It is an over-sim-
plification to maintain either
that the incitement by Rakah
was the cause of the unrest, or
that the requisitioning of land
was their main motive. These
were catalysts in a situation of
unrest that has built up over
the years."
AL HAMISHMAR, organ of
Mapam which is a member of
the Labor Alignment, stated:
"There should be a reappraisal
of policy towards the Arab mi-
nority in order to deal with
the roots of the discontent and
bitterness exploited by the Is-
raeli Communist Party."
An Arab leader, Tarek Abdul
Hai, chairman of the Kalansu-
wa town council, charged blunt-
ly that Israel's democracy was
at fault for protecting incitors
and other negative elements. He
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contended that the "silent ma-
jority" of Israeli Arabs oppos-
ed the strike and demonstra-
tions but was compelled to co-
operate with the strike organ-
izers because Israel failed to
protect the loyal majority.
THE LACK of protection un-
dermined those Arab elements
who wanted to maintain law
and order and strengthened
the radicals who are hostile to
the State, Hai said.
Large police forces remain-
ed concentrated in Galilee. But
they maintained a discreet dis-
la^es where the local authori-
ties have apparently succeeded
in 'cstoring order.
Curfews were lifted at Sakh-
nin, Araba and Dier-Hana, the
scenes of some of the worst
lialuice, anJ no new incidents
vi&tt lepoitod. There was a mi-
ll v .stone-ilircwing molee in
Nazareth but it was promptly
CHi lied. Na/areth seemed nor-
id. Tourists were arriving and
ths local market was bustling
.3 usual.
0 FURTHER trouble was
reported in the so-called "little
triangle," a group of Arab vil-
lages on the Sharon plain
no.theast of Tel Aviv. Local
L-adcrs were making efforts to
rjduce th tensions arising
frjm the disturbances.
< hey see ned to be making
headway. But most Israelis
ag. aed that while life is return-
ins> to normal among Israel's
A ab population, wounds were
opened that will take a long
tim~ to heal.
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ay, April 9, 1976
-knlst IhrMmr
Page 11-a
Jets to Egypt Flap Jmt About Over
JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
ense Secretary Donald
isfeld and democratic
ate Majority Leader Mike
isfield both spoke here
on nationally televised pro-
grams in favor of ending the
20-year American embargo
on weapons to Egypt and
contended that the move
would help Israel.
Both backed the adminis-
tration's sale of six C-130
troop transport aircraft to
Egypt. The proposal is be-
fore Congress for its con-
sideration.
RUMSFELD, on ABC's "Is-
ieds Mount Anti-Sadat Drive
Jonn Cools Plea 14-A
jy Maurice Samuelson
.ONDON (JTA) The
net Union is mounting
| major propaganda offen-
e against Egypt's Presi-
nt, Anwar Sadat, follow-
his abrogation of the 15-
ar treaty of friendship and
peration between the two
untries.
Soviet and East bloc news-
per articles and radio
mmentaries monitored
pre have been growing in
|tensity since Sadat tore
the Soviet-Egyptian pact
Cairo Mar. 14. After suf-
Iring Sadat's taunts in re-
vive silence for the past
fax years, the Kremlin has
[early decided to have an
pen confrontation with him.
I a NUMBER of distinct themes
re emerging in the Soviet pro-
Uganda drive. First, Moscow is
Resenting itself not merely as
he only effective supporter of
he Arabs but as their leader in
tie struggle against Israel.
Secondly, Sadat is depicted as
bie betrayer of his predecessor,
the late Gamal Abdel Nasser,
vho in turn is described as the
(rchitect of the treaty which
Sadat tore up.
Thirdly, Moscow claims that
Sadat's policies are weakening
Sgypt both internally and ex-
ternally and that the United
States will not provide the sup-
port Sadat is seeking.
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IMS MICHIGAN AVI., MIAMI BEACH
LISTENERS in the Arab
world to Moscow radio were
told on Mar. 18 that, following
the Sinai disengagement, Israel
and the United States were ig-
noring the Palestine question
and that Israel was able to re-
create a no-war no-peace situa-
tion while continuing to annex
"occupied Arab territories."
Moscow radio added: "Nat-
urally, this line of the Egyptian
leadership is giving all the
patriotic forces in the Arab
world much anxiety."
The day before, Arab listen-
ers to Moscow's radio were told
that "Arab-Soviet cooperation,
specifically military cooperation,
remains the most important fac-
tor in the success of the Arab
nation in the struggle against
Zionist aggression." Such argu-
ments, beamed especially at
Egypt* are being backed up with
copious quotations from anti-
Sadat newspapers and maga-
zines in various parts of the
Arab world particularly Sy-
ria, Iraq and the Sudan.
MEMORIES of Nasser were
whipped up in another Moscow
Arabic broadcast on Mar. 20
which contrasted the former
Egyptian leader favorably with
his successor. For Nasser, col-
lectivization and socialism on
the home front had gone hand-
in-hand with close relations with
the Soviet bloc in the fight
against Western imperialism,
the radio said.
The CIA had frequently tried
to assassinate Nasser "under
whose leadership Egypt march-
ed on in determination and faith
towards progressive changes."
Sadat, however, had taken
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steps to undermine and freeze
Nasser's policies, the radio
charged. Businesses had been
handed back to private owners
who could now be seen "living
in splendor and extravagance in
luxurious hotels and restau-
rants, spending in a short while
what would take a simple work-
er or peasant a year to earn."
THE KREMLIN'S desire to
see the end of the Sadat regime
was visible in a passage in the
Mar. 17 broadcast. Dealing with
the proposed sale of C-130
American transport aircraft to
Egypt, the commentary said that
Israel's anxiety over the deal
could only be justified if Israel
remembered that "the corrupt
policy pursued by Egyptian re-
action" did not enjoy the sup-
port of the Egyptian people.
Soviet bloc propagandists
have also been trying to em-
barrass Sadat by quoting critic-
isms of him by leading Egypt-
ians. Among them is Hassanein
Heikal, editor of the Cairo daily,
Al-Ahram, until dismissed from
his post by Sadat. Others in-
clude the pro-Communist, Kha-
led Mohieddin, an original mem-
ber of the 1952 Nasser junta,
and Lufti Al-Khouli, editor of
the Cairo magazine, Al-Tahiyah,
ideological organ of Arab social-
ism.
At present, there is no sign
of the anti-Sadat campaign abat-
ing, and despite its annoyance
with Cairo, the Soviet Union is
not revising its over-all posture
in the Middle East. Judging
from the outpourings of the
Kremlin propagandists, there-
fore, any hope that the USSR
will modify her bitter hostility
towards Israel is an illusion.
Gov. Carter Says He
Supports New Settlements...
Continued from Page 1-A
eral times previously that if he
were iTemier oi Israel he would
not give up control of the Golan
Heights or of East Jerusalem,
including the holy places.
He said as President he
would not press Israel to relin-
quish those areas.
In explaining his support for
the Administration's proposal to
sell Egypt the C-130s, the Dem-
ocratic candidate said he be-
lieves that the Egyptian-Israeli
agreement on the Sinai was
beneficial to Israel and that It
was equally beneficial to Israel
for the United States to con-
tinue having whatever influence
it now has on Egypt.
HE SAID the C-130s did not
constitute a military threat to
Israel and he "would not sell
pre-emptive weapons" to Egypt.
Carter opened his talk to the
Jewish leaders with a statement
that I have an absolute total
commitment as a human being,
as an American, as a religious
person, to Israel Israel is
the fulfillment of Biblical prr>
phecy."
He declared that the corner-
stone of American foreign pol-
icy is a commitment to the sur-
vival of Israel and he bellves
that this position Is shared by
the majority of all Americans.
At the same time, he said, the
Palestinians as a political en-
tity must be recognized, prefer-
ably within the context of Jor-
dan, but not before Palestinians
recognize the right of Israel to
exist.
IN RESPONSE to a question,
Carter declared that the Jack-
son-Vanik Amendment had been
"ounter productive" to the
struggle for Jewish emigration
from the Soviet Union.
He said Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger had told
him and other governors in 1974
that the Soviet Union had
agreed to liberalize its emigra-
tion policy.
The amendment and a bill
limiting loans from the Export-
Import Bank had, however,
caused the Soviet Union to feel
it was not getting any benefits
for the limited U.S. trade It
would be receiving, Carter said.
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sues and Answers," said "it is
good for the United States and
indeed for Israel that the peo-
ple of Egypt have decided to
disconnect themselves from the
Soviet Union in terms of a pre-
vious relationship and are inter-
ested in looking to the United
States."
However, Rumsfeld appeared
to oppose "security guarantees"
for Egypt against attacks "by an
outside power" and "begin reas-
suring Egypt by asking Israel
to renounce the use of nuclear
weapons, which the CIA recent-
ly confirmed Israel has."
The suggestions were posed
in questions by ABC's military
affairs correspondent, Barrie
Dunsmorc.
RUMSFELD responded that
security guarantees "suggest a
potential commitment of troops,
and that is of a very different
nature" from providing military
equipment.
On the CIA question, Rums-
feld said "I was not there when
those reports were written
about what the CIA said about
the Israelis' capabilities, and my
inclination is f" """ *^at tr
the CIA to extricate them-
selves."
Appearing on CBS "Face the
Nation," Mansfield, of Montana,
said he was in favor of selling
the C-130s to Egypt and "fur-
ther sales if need be to maintain
a reasonable equilibrium in that
area."
Mansfield, who is retiring
from the senate next January,
added: "After all, if we can
create divisions among the
Arab states, I think it is in our
interest, and I think it is in the
interest of Israel as well."
He said Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat "ought to be given
whatever assistance he can."
ASKED ABOUT "expanding
this foothold for America among
tl" Arabs, for example Syria
and Jordan," Mansfield replied,
"Syria will be difficult though
(President Hafiz) Assad, I un-
derstand, is not an unreasonable
man. King Hussein has been in
a most difficult position, but
you've got to give him some
encouragement too, and I think
that Saudi Arabia would come
along, so if we can maintain this
break and give these people
some hone, I think it would be
for the benefit of Israel in the
long run."
Mansfield has a record of op-
posing broad U.S. support for
Israel and backed former Sen.
J. William Fulbright's proposals
on MirHl? East measures.
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Page 12-A
vjewisiiHcrkMan
Friday, April 9, 1976
Hussein Proposes Tribute to Ford and U.S.
WASHINGTON(JTA)
King Hussein of Jordan said
in a tribute to both Presi-
dent Ford and the United
States in its bicentennial
year that Middle East peace
mainly depends upon them
and American principles of
justice.
Neither leader gave any
inkling of practical steps
they discussed during their
exchange of greetings in the
formal welcoming ceremo-
nies for the Monarch and
Queen Alia at the White
House that began their
three-day state visit to
Washington.
FORD, warmly welcoming the
King as "a sincere and loyal
friend" of America and hailing
"the special relationship" that
has existed between the two
countries during five presiden-
cies, told the throng gathered
for the ceremony that their dis-
cussions will be about bilateral
and regional concerns "and how
to advance the cause of peace
in the Middle East."
After the ceremony, the King
and President met
friendly, foreign, nearby
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ly, April 9, 1976
JmistncrkMon
Page 13-A
MINDIJN
ertmuller's 'Seven Beauties9 a Great Film
Continued from Page 4-A
of his virility. His impulses
selfish and human. One of
sisters turn whore, and he
Dts her pimp for refusing to
rry her. It is a question of
lor, not of politics or hu-
nitarianism, as he later ex-
ins.
LOCAL Don, an ugly
Ln, and therefore a more
Ithful-to-life characterization
the Godfather than Brando
Pacino ever could be, tells
squale that he must show
Its and creativity in dispos-
of the body. He must not
away from it like a "com-
on criminal," leaving it to de-
^y in bed and as, in fact, Pas-
ale has done.
I The result is a hatchet mur-
er, a dismembering of the
up, which Pasquale performs
lith revulsion and terror, not
fith American TV panache.
The audience laughs, it is not
orrified, because Wertmuller's
amera is always on Pasquale
lie man as a mildly absurd
eroic figure, not on his murder
the details of the murder,
^hich one is not really meant
take seriously.
AS A RESULT, Pasquale is
aught and merely swaggers
ome more, for now the papers
ball him the "Beast of Naples."
At worst, he is more of an anti-
hero than before.
He is tried, pleads insanity
nd is sent to a mental institu-
tion, from which he is released
oy promising to join the Mus-
solini forces in their alliance
vith the Germans, for by now
Vorld War II has broken out.
The film begins with docu-
mentary footage of Hitler and
iMussolini strutting their stuff
las orators before their teeming
[millions. One hears cowboy
tunes and country western mu-
|sic in polyglot jibberish intend-
ed as commentary on the po-
litical insanity of their aspira-
tions the slaughter of teem-
nng millions to the greater glory
of teeming millions.
If Pasquale has joined them,
lit is not because he, too, is one
[of the teeming millions, but be-
cause he, too, is "insane."
AGAINST ALL of this as a
Ibackdrop, Pasquale is now re-
pealed to us as a deserter in
[the process of running away
I from the war with a companion.
I Not only do they hate their
German allies who hold Italians
in contempt, but they see no
I sense in the war. What is in it
I for them?
As a selfish individual, he
seeks to flee the polyglot ideal-
ism about Italy as warrior and
artist, which is meaningless to
I him.
When Pasquale and his pal
come upon a mass shooting of
naked prisoners in a woods, in-
stead of heroically attempting
to halt it, he runs even faster
than before.
PASQUALE reasons with
some sympathy that it must be
Jews who are being murdered,
but after all he is not a Jew,
and so wouldn't it be foolish to
try to interfere?
Still, it suddenly dawns on
him that not to have said "No"
to the German murder of the
Jews was to have said "Yes" to
it. By refusing to be involved,
he has become a murderer him-
self a real murderer.
The pimp had been a matter
of honor in his Neapolitan
struggle for survival and ad-
vancement. In fact, he had kill-
ed the pimp to prove himself a
worthy citizen of the under-
world in the eyes of the Don,
and so perhaps it had not been
his sister's honor at stake at
all, but his own. The murder of
the Jews, on the other hand,
was something altogether dif-
ferent not a matter of self-
aggrandizement but of moral
principle.
THIS IS pure Jean-Paul Sar-
tre, and it is here that the film
adopts its philosophical polar-
ities Sartre and involvement
vs. Albert Camus and the Ca-
mus notion that the world is
absurd.
The world is absurd because,
unlike the Germans who do
everything in an orderly way,
U.S. Opposes
Unilateral Move
On Lebanon War
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)The
United States said here it op-
posed military intervention in
Lebanon by any one nation, but
it refrained from giving a posi-
tion on how it would look upon
a coalition of Arab nations send-
ing a force into that country to
take control. The State Depart-
ment declared its opposition to
"outside" intervention in Leba-
non.
However, it asserted opposi-
tion to "unilateral" action, but
emphasized it has "no com-
ment" on Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat's proposal to Arab
League leaders to organize a
multi-national Arab contingent
to enter that war-ravaged coun-
try. Department spokesman Rob-
ert Funseth emphasized "our
statement was directed against
any unilateral intervention in
Lebanon."
BUT WHEN he was asked
whether the U.S. would object
to a multi-national Arab force,
he replied "that would depend
on the Lebanese authorities."
He said he was "not really ad-
dressing" himself to the Sadat
"idea" and the U.S. has not had
time to study it.
A pan-Arab intervention, he
said, is "not an immediate prob-
lem."
Pressing for a U.S. position
that it has been seeking since
January, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency asked again whether the
if you're
to hove
going
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On the mean al 67lh Street. Miami Hoash
State Department considered as
"outside" forces the Palestine
Liberation Army whose troops
moved from Syria into Lebanon
and the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization whose militia en-
camped inside Lebanon and are
fighting against the Lebanese
Christian Falangists.
FUNSETH replied, "I am not
in a position to make that kind
of a judgemen ttoday." He point-
ed out, "We are having a de-
licate situation" in Lebanon and
that "I just don't think it would
be helpful for me" to set forth
a U.S. view on the Palestinian
groups.
Meanwhile, Secretary of State
Henry A Kissinger said that the
United States is trying for a
cease-fire in Lebanon and that
the U.S. is in "close touch" with
Syria and other Arab countries
and "some of the parties in
Lebanon."
Reiterating that "we are op-
posed to outside intervention,"
Kissinger said he would not
"speculate" on the effect on the
Middle East should the attempt
fail.
"AT THIS moment the pri-
mary objective is a cease-fire,"
he told newsmen after having
lunch with King Hussein of Jor-
dan.
Kissinger said most of the dis-
cussion with the King concern-
ed the situation in Lebanon.
Asked directly by the JTA
whether he approved of the pro-
posal by Sadat for a multi-
national Arab force to enter Le-
banon, he avoided the reply
with a chuckle.
s
3
I
Hans H. Marcuse
Louis WitJkin
To assure you of a
tuperb social event
Bar Mitzvah. Wedding
Anniversary Party.
at the all new
there really is no order except
disorder, and to behave as if
there were order is to believe
in something that doesn't exist.
It is to be a victim of absurdity
much as the Germans were.
OF COURSE, Pasquale and
his companion are captured and
themselves incarcerated in the
concentration camp on whose
shooting grounds in the woods
they had accidentally stumbled.
There, in true Sartre fash-
ion, Pasquale goes through the
agonizing torture of self-con-
frontation a process by which
he learns at the peril of his life
just who and what he is.
In prison, he learns that he
must not only become involved
with the Other (humanity), he
must take responsibility for the
Other, too. In a terrifying scene
evoking the sadistic Bitch of
Buchenwald, he makes love to
a Brunnhilde-type woman Gaul-
eiter of the camp to the music
of "Die Walkure" in order to
save himself from being shot.
HE RECALLS the narrow,
selfish days of his Neapolitan
past, but another fellow-prison-
er, an anarchist, who commits
suicide by drowning himself in
the bowels of a latrine, argues
that Pasquale's life in Naples
may not have been so wrong
after all.
The anarchist is pure Camus.
The only value in life, he de-
clares, is to struggle against its
valuelessness. The Germans
murder inferior non-Aryan peo-
ples (Italians, Jews) to create
a higher order.
The way to beat them at
their crazy game, he says, is
to have overwhelming numbers
of (inferior) children, who will
affirm the disorder of the uni-
verse in the profusion of their
inferiority as its only order, and
thus to bring the triumph of I
absurdity (disorder).
IN PASQUALE'S act of love,
with the Bitch, she marvels at
his stamina that he can be
sexually viable in the face of
his physical weakness and
starvation just to save his
miserable "spaghetti" skin.
In his act of love, she antici-
pates the anarchist's belief and
Utterly foresees the German
downfall. Since Pasquale's love,
has the capacity of profusion,,
even if of profuse inferior j
progeny, it is nevertheless a
profusion of individuals who
will overwhelm a sterile intel-
lectual ideal (Hitler's Nazism, j
Costa-Gavra's Marxism) that is
anti individual and therefore
anti-human.
And so Pasquale does just
that. He survives and returns
to Naples to have, as he puts it,
25 or 30 children with a young
girl he once knew who, like his
sister, has grown up to be a
whore.
WHY NOT a whore, whose
profession guarantees fertility
of effort? Honor in matters of
marriage as in everything else
is an irrelevancy in an absurd
world.
Neither his murder of the
pimp nor his "murder" of the
Jews (for failing to try to stop
their mass execution and there-
fore saying "Yes" to it) can
possibly matter. What does mat-
ter is that Pasquale has learn-
ed something from his prison
agony.
As Camus argued in his "Let-
ters to a German Friend," what
counts is the struggle against
a meaningless universe; other-
wise, men are meaningless, too.
IT IS in the end not mean-
ing in the universe we must
find, as the Bitch reasons the
Nazis were doing through the
establishment of a master race,
but meaning in ourselves.
Through all of this, Wertmul-
ler uses her cameras like a
Breugel imbued with the cyni-
cism of Lautrec, the prophetic
decadence of Grosz. There is
abundant humor, even if we
are forced to laugh with tears
in our eyes. We see the ugli-
ness and smell the stink of life,
and that is the triumph of the
film.
We are not forced, as in
Costa-Gavras, to submit to the
reduction of life to arid intel-
lectual ideas, thus conforming
to the Marxist principle that
art that dots not advance the
cause of revolution is not art
at all.
"Seven Beauties" IS art. It is
a film not to be missed, wher-
ever it will appear in South
Florida.
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Page 14-A
+Je*lstincrMinir
Friday, April 9, 1976 ^
Bitter Gush Emunim Debate Continues
Continued from Page 1-A
sial issue of Jewish settlement
on the West Bank next month.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, who
promised that the matter would
be debated late in April after
the Apr. 12 municipal elections
on the West Bank responded
acidly when he was asked by
Housing Minister Avraham Of-
ter why the government had
permitted a "political meeting"
at Kadum last week.
OFTER, a Labor Party "dove,"
was referring to a tree-planting
ceremony and other festivities
at the makeshift village outside
the Kadum army camp in the
Samaria region which was at-
tended by 600 Gush Emunim
supporters, among them religi-
ous and right-wing politicians.
Military police barred the
press, although a few reporters
and cameramen got through the
military cordon.
Rabin refused to answer the
question on grounds that he had
not seen it in advance. But he
said, however, that the Kadum
settlements status was a tem-
porary situation that remained
unchanged.
Health Minister Victor Shem-
tov, of Mapam, remarked that
Kadum was treated as an army
camp when it was convenient to
keep out newsmen, but when it
came to letting in politicians,
"different rules seem to apply"
THE KADUM settlers, mem-
bers of the militant Orthodox
Gush Emunim, were permitted
to remain at the Kadum army
camp last November after an
unauthorized attempt by a much
larger group to set up a settle-
ment at Sebastia, the Biblical
capital of Samaria.
Government ministers, re-
sponding to charges that they
had surrendered to a group that
openly defied government pol-
icy, said at the time that the
status of the Kadum settlers was
only temporary until the gen-
eral issue of Jewish settlement
on the West Bank was thorough-
ly debated by the cabinet and
a decision was reached.
The Kadum settlers are a
major issue in the wave of Arab
disturbances on the West Bank
and East Jerusalem. The cabinet
itself seems seriously divided.
NATIONAL Religious Party
ministers strongly back the set-
tlement movement, and Defense
Minister Shimon Peres has made
public statements sympathetic
to the Gush Emunim, who claim
the Jewish right to free settle-
ment throughout the West Bank,
Concern Mounts Over Rift Between Rabin and Peres
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVTV (JTA)
Members of Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin's cabinet are be-
coming concerned about the
growing deterioration in the
relationship between Rabin
and Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres. The differences,
which were confined to cab-
inet meetings, are being ex-
pressed more and more
openly.
The first major public dis-
play was the remarks to Is-
raeli reporters by Rabin
during his visit to Washing-
ton that the shopping list
prepared by the Ministry of
Defense was poorly pre-
pared and did not reflect
"honor" on Israel. This was
seen as a direct criticism of
Peres, and Rabin on his re-
turn had to make a public
apology in the Knesset.
THE DIFFERENCES between
the two officials broke out again
publicly over the weekend when
Peres in an interview in Maariv
said Israel's policies toward Is-
raeli-Arabs had been mistaken.
He said the problem of Israeli
Arabs is a cause of greater con-
cern than of maintaining good
relations with the Arabs on the
West Bank. Specifically, Peres
said that Arabs should have
been encouraged to form their
own political parties rather than
having been brought into the
Envoy in Lebanon
Ordered Not To
Contact PLO
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
said Apr. 1 that President Ford's instructions to special Am-
bassador G. Dean Brown on his mission to Lebanon "do
not include authorization to have contact with the PLO."
But the Department would not rule out the possibility
of such contacts. Brown was sent to Lebanon Mar. 30 to
examine the situation in that war-torn country.
STATE DEPARTMENT spokesman Robert Funseth said
that he had not yet made a report. Asked if Brown was
specifically instructed to avoid the PLO, Funseth reiterated
that contact with that group was not included in his in-
structions.
When a reporter raised the possibility of "indirect con-
tacts" with the PLO, Funseth replied that the U.S. "never
precluded ourselves from the benefit of PLO views."
Asked again if Brown's instructions precluded contact
with the PLO under any circumstances, Funseth said, "We
must see what the circumstances are" and added "we do
not rule it out."
Uganda Embassy
Praises 'Protocols'
TORONTO (JTA) The Embassy of Uganda in
Canada has distributed to Canadian newspapers a press
release extolling the "Protocols of the Elders of Zion."
The purported excuse for the Embassy's 850-word text
is said to be a criticism by Canadian Jewish groups of,
among others, President Idi Amin for his espousal of last
year's anti-Zionist resolution at the United Nations.
The release states: "You cannot understand Zionism
without reading the Protocols of Zion. This book has been
called the greatest lie in history. It has also been called
the greatest truth in history. It is both."
The release adds that to ensure Israel's survival the
Zionists are plotting "to gain decisive influence over Amer-
ican economic, social, political and military affairs."
The Ottawa Journal rebuked the embassy for circulat-
ing "racist hate literature" and noted that the Department
of External Affairs "should have a few rough words" for
the embassy representatives for abusing diplomatic mail
privileges.
Jewish-dominated parties, and
that they should have been
given more opportunity to re-
flect their ethnic heritage.
Rabin immediately replied
that while Israel has made some
mistakes, its basic policy on Is-
raeli-Arabs was sound.
DURING THE recent dis-
turbances on the West Bank,
Peres had disagreed with Ra-
bin's policy of showing force in
the administered territories and
had instead urged that Israeli
troops keep a low profile.
Shlomo Nakdimon, Yediot
Achronot's veteran political re-
porter, wrote last week that
cabinet ministers said that Ra-
bin demonstrated his impatience
during a report by Peres on
the administered territories and
interrupted several times, belit-
ting Peres.
Nakdimon said these remarks
were made in the presence of
Defense Ministry officials and
officers who are subordinates
to Peres.
THE YEDIOT Achronot arti-
cle attributes the source of the
tension to the small majority by
which Rabin defeated Peres for
the premiership and Peres* am-
bition to be Premier.
At the same time, there is no
secret that Peres is more pop-
ular with the public than Rabin.
He has made a much better im-
pression in his television ap-
pearances.
Rabin, meanwhile, as a for-
mer Chief of Staff, as well as
a former field commander, does
not agree with Peres on many
security problems. Rabin's con-
cept of the security network is
different than the one Peres is
carrying out.
RABIN IS believed to feel that
he can hold both the premier-
ship and the Defense Ministry
portfolio, as did the late David
Ben-Gurion. Labor Party lead-
ers have suggested that if Ra-
bin wants both jobs, he should
bring it up openly so that it can
be discussed by the proper
party bodies.
The feeling among the minis-
ters, according to Nakdimon, is
that the situation cannot con-
tinue indefinitely since it threat-
ens the defense and security of
the country.
International Harvester Vows
Not to Bow to Arab Boycott
SAN FRANCISCO(JTA)
In the first vote of a na-
tionwide campaign, share-
holders of International Har-
vester last week cast 1,200,-
000 votes (or 5.2 percent of
the total) in favor of a reso-
lution submitted by the
American Jewish Congress
that would require the com-
pany to prepare a detailed
report on its policy toward
compliance with Arab boy-
cott demands.
An AJCongress spokesman
noting that the Congress
owned only five shares of
stock in the companyhail-
ed the result as "a remark-
able demonstration of public
support of our campaign to
expose pressures on Amer-
ican industry to surrender
to the Arab boycott."
EDWIN M. Epstein, associate
dean of the school of business
at the University of California
and a leader of the AJCongress
in San Francisco, presented the
resolution at the meeting.
In a statement following the
vote, Epstein noted that the
number of votes in favor of the
AJCongress resolution "comfort-
ably exceeded the three percent
required to place the resolution
on next year's agenda automa-
tically."
At the meeting, Epstein said
he was aware that International
Harvester officials had pledged
not to comply with the boycott
but that what the AJCongress
wanted was a statement on ac-
tual practices as well as prin-
ciple.
Brooks McCormick, president
and chief executive officer, re-
sponded: "The Arab boycott is
a barrier to trade and we are
opposed to it as we are to any
other trade barrier but if we are
to perform responsibily for our
shareholders we must cope with
it."
THE IH president described
the AJCongress' resolution as
"broad and burdensome" and
added that it would be costly '
and might be harmful to the
company given the uncertainty
of laws and regulations which
are now being developed to deal
with the situation.
He added: "We sell to both
Israel and the Arabs and have
no intention of changing our
policies to make a sale."
Bonn Cools Sadat Arms Plea
By JON FEDLER
BONN (JTA) President Anwar Sadat of Egypt de-
livered a strong appeal for West German support for the
national aspirations of the Palestinian people at a dinner
given in his honor here by President Walter Scheel of the
West German Federal Republic.
Sadat, whose visit to

Bonn, the first by an Egypt-
ian chief of state, was the
first leg of a five-nation
European tour, declared that
"It is time the Palestinian
people were given back their
legitimate rights after hav-
ing suffered the bitterness
of exile for 28 years."
HE SAID he could "hardly
imagine that the German people
does not have sympathy with
the just cause of the Palestin-
ians and is aware that the PLO
is the personification and voice
of this people which is fighting
for its rights."
Sadat also called for Euro-
pean participation in peace
guarantees that would accom-
pany a Middle East peace set-
tlement within the framework
of the Geneva conference.
The Egyptian leader's views
on the Palestinians were echoed
by West Germany's Foreign
Minister, Hans-Dietrich Gens-
cher, who addressed a separate
dinner given for Egyptian For-
eign Minister Ismail Fahmy.
GENSCHER said, "For far too
long the world has regarded the
Palestinian question merely as
a refugee problem. It has not
adequately realized that it is a
question of how to realize the
right of the Palestinian people
to live under its own state au-
thority. This," said Genscher
"would require that both sides'
recognize each other's right to
self-determination and existence
as a state."
However, West German
spokesmen later rejected a call
by the Arab League for recogni-
tion of the PLO and also made
it clear that Bonn will not sup-
ply arms to Egypt. Klaus Boel-
mg, a government spokesman,
said instead that the task of ful-
filling Egypt's arms needs after
Cairo s break with the Soviet
Union was "a task which the
West must tackle together."
HE ADDED that Bonn was
"in principle not prepared to
deviate from our restrictive
arms export policy."
Hans Juergen Wischnewski,
Secretary of State in the For-
eign Ministry and chairman of
tiie ruling Social Democratic
Party s Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, reiterated that position
when he called on "our Egypt-
lan friends to have understand-
ing for the fact that our policies
don t allow deviation from the
principle of no arms deliveries
to areas of tension."
Boeling said that West Ger-
many would "not refuse" talks
with PLO representatives if
they accepted unconditionally
Israel's right to exist. Regard-
ing Sadat's appeal for European
participation in peace guaran-
tees, the Bonn spokesman said
Germany, together with its Eu-
ropean partners, would support
a constructive solution of the
Middle East conflict.
SADAT, in an interview in
Der Spiegel, said he believed
that Israel was "in a position to
manufacture (atomic) bombs at
any time," but does not believe
"that it already has any.


April 9, 1976
fJewisli Ik* Miai)
Page 15-A
ii phyisicans and their wives visit Beit Kay
valescent Center in northern Israel during last
:'s Greater Miami Jewish Federation mission.
jhoto at left is Elaine Zane (right) of Miami
\ch, wife of Dr. Sheldon Zane, speaking to an
\eli soldier about his rehabilitation progress.
In photo second from left, Miami psychiatrist Dr.
Harry W. Graff (center) examines ongoing ther-
apy administered to an Israeli soldier wounded
in the Kom Kippur War. In photo third from left,
chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Physicians, Dr. Alan S. Graubert (right), of Mi-
ami Lakes, joins an armed volunteer guard on
duty at the embattled schoolhouse of Ma'alot. In
photo at right, South Miami's Dr. Edward Feller
(right) shake hands with a Soviet Jewish physi-
cian at a Jewish Agency absorption center for new
immigrants, supported by CJA-IEF funds.
iamiMD'sinhraelSee Haw CJA-IEF Funds Work
Continued from Page 1-A
tre impressed with the Israeli
ont-line medical teams, travel-
with equipment on their
Ecks to save soldiers' lives in
Jttle. They were equally mov-
however, by the spirit of
le brave Israeli people, living
fcaceful and productive lives
hile surrounded by constant
Insions and grave economic
essures.
I The hand-to-hand, heart-to-
Mrt meeting of Miami doctors
pth Israelis was a learning ex-
erience as well as an emotion-
one.
THE MIAMIANS learned the
tahie of front-linfc medical
eadiness in saving lives and
boosting military morale. Yet
Ihey saw its danger, too, in
counting the toll of brave Is-
raeli doctors' lives lost on the
front lines of the Yom Kippur
Var.
Rehabilitation specialists were
gratified with a visit to Beit
Kay Convalescent Center for
wounded war veterans.
At the same time, psychiat-
rists Dr. Harry Graff, Dr. Mor-
ton Notarius and Dr. Ted Wolff
were enlightened by their
chance to study Israeli handling
of the psychological problems
caused by war.
DR. GRAUBERT noted that
"We're all quite impressed with
Israel's medicine. It compares
well with our own, and Hadas-
sah Hospital in Jerusalem is
equivalent to any fine medical
facility in the United States."
The group was disturbed,
however, by Safed's lack of
facilities. "They have the mak-
ings of a fine medical institu-
tion," Dr. Graubert said, "but
they lack equipment and sup-
plies. This is a tragic situation,
especially in a major hospital
so near the Lebanese border."
Of the group, only the Grau-
Display Shows Jerusalem's
Holy Places in Jordan
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Diplomatic correspondents at
lie State Department were tak-
en aback on Mar. 30 over the
pictorial display of Jordan in
[the Department's lobby in honor
of King Hussein's visit that in-
Icluded an entire panel of holy
places in Jerusalem and Bethle-
Ihem.
The State Department prom-
lised under questioning that it
would supply a response as to
Ihow this took place. But, mean-
I while, considerable questioning
I indicated a feeling among some
1 of the reporters that the dis-
Iplay reflected a change in Amer-
ican policy away from Israel
land in favor of Jordan.
When the question was
I raised whether the display im-
I plied that the Department con-
sidered East Jerusalem a part
lof Jordan, spokesman Robert
[Funseth said that "the exhibit
[does not imply anything except
[that it is an exhibit for the
I King-
When a reporter pressed why
the holy places were shown as
part of Jordan, Funseth said he
did not know but that he would
not attach political significance
to the neople who put pictures
on panels.
HOWEVER, a reporter point-
ed out that the Department's
Jordan desk officer said that
the inclusion of the holy places
in Jerusalem in the display on
Jordan was not a mistake but
deliberate policy and an indica-
tion that the U.S. recognizes th
holy places as part of Jordan.
berts had been to Israel before,
as part of a Federation Mission
in October, 1974. "The fact
that we're here again," he said,
"is evidence enough of the thrill
and excitement we feel about
Israel and the oneness we feel
with Israel's people.
"AND THIS Mission is even
better than the last one. We feel
that every visit especially
with a Federation Mission
will be more exciting than the
last because Israel changes so
quickly. We get a different per-
spective each time, even visit-
ing some of the same places.
And we plan to come again
soon."
Graubert's greatest thrill
came from watching his col-
leagues becoming "turned-on"
by their exposure to the land
and its people. "It was as if
they were enchanted," he said.
Having served in Vietnam, he
also appreciated the contrast of
soldiers who served on the
harsh Golan Heights out of
patriotism and fierce national
pride. Yet Israel's social prob-
lems as well as her history and
scenic beauty were apparent to
the Mission members.
"ALL OF us wanted to stay
even longer," Graubert conclud-
ed. "We all felt at home in Is-
rael, and we all plan to return
hopefully with another group
of Drofessional colleagues from
Miami. After this experience,
the Federation is almost certain
to sponsor more Missions like it
in the future.
"Of course our first commit-
ment is a financial one. Now
we've not only heard, but seen
and felt our responsibility to
CJA-IEF. We must keep our
Jewish community strong to
keep the people of Israel strong.
And as one individual, that's
just what I plan to do through
my involvement."
Dr. Graubert and his col-
leagues, including Drs. Notarius,
Graff and Wolfe Dr. Sheldon
Zane (whose wife, Elaine, cele-
brated her Bat Mitzvah at the
Western Wall during the Mis-
sion), Dr. Edward Feller and
Dr. Theodore Klein, are all lead-
ers in the GMJF Physicians
Division.
THEY ARE now working to-
ward adding an additional $2
million to the 1976 CJA-IEF by
April 2, through the "You
Make the Difference" commu-
nitywide mobilization.
The work of Dr. Graubert and
his colleagues in the Physicians
Division is just one example of
the campaign division efforts
now in progress throughout the
community in order to provide
the humanitarian services here
in Miami and in Israel which
the Jewish people must main-
tain to remain strong.
This effort involves all
physicians, as well as all other
men and women of our Jewish
community. CJA-IEF involves
vou and it involves me be-
cause WE make the difference
Ivary one* in a whlla
Famous Raataurant
la born ...Wo wars
kom In 1*49
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p.
Page 16-A
*Jewlsl)ncrkKon
Friday, April 9, l^l
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"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, April 9, 1976
Section B
Siegel Stresses Israel's Need
For Economic Independence
With the approach of Yom
Haatzmaut, Robert L. Siegel,
general campaign chairman of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization campaign, has
stressed that Israel must strive
for total economic independ-
ence.
At a meeting of key Israel
Bond campaign leaders from
Dade and Broward Counties
Siegel said, "Israel is fighting
for survival on two fronts, and
victory on the first front,, pol-
itics, will be empty without vic-
tory on the second front, eco-
nomics."
Siegel observed that "In 1976
Israel Bonds fo~ economic de-
velopment will be bonds of Jew-
ish solidarity to meet the Arab
political and economic offensive
against Israel. Through the Is-
rael Bond Organization Israel
receives the tools to establish
an infrastructure that provides
a very sound foundation for her
security.
'It is the total support by
American Jewry every man,
woman and child who is a pur-
chaser or involved in the pur-
chase of State of Israel Bonds
that keeps Israel going and
maintains the vital economic
development and agricultural
programs."
"The importance of funds
mobilized through the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organization
campaign is great. Because of
the severe shortage of foreign L
currency Israel has been forced I
to curtail her economic de-
velopment activities. This year
the entire development budget
will total $1 billion, and the
largest possible share of this
must come from Israel Bonds.
"Because of Israel's total de-
pendence on imported fuel,"
Siegel concluded, "increased
funds have been allocated for
developing Israel's own sources
of energy but have had to be
curtailed. This search for new
sources of energy must come
from Israel Bondsl"
ADL National Commissioner Will Be M.C.
At B'nai B'rith Passover Breakfasts
Alfred Golden, a national
commissioner of the Anti-Defa-
mation League, will be master
of ceremonies at two Passover
breakfasts sponsored by the
B'nai B'rith Foundation of the
United States Sunday, April 18,
at 11:30 a.m. at the Konover
Hotel in Miami Beach, and at
9:30 a.m. at the Diplomat Ho-
tel in Hollywood, it was an-
nounced by general chairman
Malcolm H. Fromberg.
Guest speaker at the break-
fasts, which will be traditional
kosher Passover meals, will be
Dr. William Korey, director of
the B'nai B'rith International
Council and B'nai B'rith's for-
mer representative at the
United Nations.
Golden, a former national
Hillel commissioner, is a mem-
ber of the board of governors
of B'nai B'rith District Five,
an area encompassing seven
Southeastern states.
A PROGRAM featuring some
of the area's B'nai B'rith youth
is also planned as part of the
Passover breakfasts, which will
benefit the National Youth Serv-
ices Appeal. Droviding for the
maintenance and growth of the
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Jack H.
Levin, E. Albert Pallot and
Burnett Roth.
Reservations for both events
are still available. For more in-
formation, contact the B'nai
B'rith Foundation office in Mi-
ami Beach.
ALFRED GOLDEN
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations,
support of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization (BBYO) and
Career and Counseling Services.
Louis Hymson and Fred Sny-
der are chairmen of the Miami
Beach breakfast, and Alan J.
Blaustein is chairman in Holly-
wood. Honorary chairmen are
Hebrew U. Friends
Honoring Luria
South Florida civic and busi-
ness leader Leonard Luria will
receive the Torch of Learning
Award at the annual Israel In-
dependence Day dinner spon-
sored by the American Friends
of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, May 6 at the Eden
Roc HoteL
Announcement of Luria's se-
lection was made by Herbert
Buchwald, president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Friends, and Dr. Max
M. Kampelman of Washington,
D.C., national friend of the or-
ganization.
The banquet will climax the
observance of Israel's 28th an-
niversary of independence and
mark the celebration of the 51st
birthday of the Hebrew Univer-
sity, Israel's oldest and largest
institution of higher learning.
A LEADER of Temple Beth
Am, Luria is chairman of the
advisory committee of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds Or-
ganization and a leader of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
He and his wife, Gloria, and
his mother, Lea, are all Foun-
ders of the Hebrew University.
They contributed a park at the
Jerusalem campus in memory
of the late Joseph Luria, Leon-
ard's father, a lifelong Zionist
leader.
Leonard Luria is president
of L. Luria and Son, Inc.,, a
jewelry and gift wear firm, and
has earned a national reputation
for merchandising and market-
ing.
Active in the Israel Bonds
and Israel Emergency Fund
campaigns during and after the
1967 Six-Day War, Luria head-
ed a mission to Israel for Israel
Bonds only hours after the con-
clusion of the Yom Kippur War.
He was one of the first Amer-
icans to cross the Suez Canal,
inspecting the territory called
"Africa" by Israeli army forces.
He has been a leader of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
and the American Friends of
the Hebrew University.
Fascell Would
Increase Funds
For Housing
Rep. Dante Fascell (D.-Fla.)
hopes to increase the amount
of Federal funds available to
non-profit organizations to build
low-cost housing for the elderly
and the handicapped.
Legislation cosponsored by
Fascell would increase the ag-
gregate funding authority for
the loan program to $3.3 billion
from its present $800 million
level.
The program provides loans
to non-profit organizations at
Treasury Department-establish-
ed interest rates for the con-
struction of low-cost housing
units for the elderly and the
handicapped.
"THE DEMAND for these
units far exceeds the funds
available to build them," Fas-
cell said. "Only 3.4 percent of
the total number of housing
units which were sought
throughout the country in Fis-
cal Year 1976 can be financed.
"In Florida, during this pe-
riod, there were 63 applications
to build 12,013 units. Of these
3.4 percent is hardly a drop in
the bucket compared with the
great need for additional hous-
ing for the elderly and handi-
capped in our state.
"This has been a highly suc-
cessful program in the past and
one that is desperately needed.
Not only will it provide the re-
quired housing units for the
elderly and handicapped, but it
will also provide employment
in the construction industry,"
Fascell concluded.
Mr. & Mrs. Club
Mystery Night
The Mr. and Mrs. Club of
Beth Torah Congregation will
hold a "Mystery Night," Satur-
day, April 10. at 8 p.m.
The cochairmen for this
month's mystery evening are
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Genad and
Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Weinberg.
Harry and Ginrty Ross (right) received the Israel Soli-
darity Award at the 5660 Collins Avenue cocktail party
on Feb. 29. Making the presentation was Robert L.
Siegel, general campaign chairman. Greater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization.
Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein, chancellor of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sit, presents a special Founder's Award to Mrs. Ruth
Yablick Schaffzin of Miami Beach at the Fontainebleau
Hotel function marking the university's 20th anniver-
sary. Mrs. Schaffzin and her son and daughter-in-law,
Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold F. Goodman, were installed as
Founders by Dr. Lookstein at the dinner honoring Wil-
liam Silverstein, Dr. Irving Lehrman and Congressmen
Claude Pepper, William Lehman and Dante Fascell.
Bea Young (left), national vice president, and Pearl
Schwartz, Florida Council scholarship fund chairper-
son, presented the Rambam Award to Rabbi S. T. Swir-
sky on behalf of American Mizrachi Women.


Page 2-B
I
Israel Bonds Tributes Planned
Friday, April 9, 76
Rabbi Lehrfield Conducting
A Course at Beth Torah
SALUTE TO ISRAEL
AT SKY LAKE
Israel Ambassador Plenipoten-
tiary to the Permanent Mission
of the United Nations. Dr Dov
B. Schmorak. will be keynote
speaker at a "Salute to Israel"
breakfast on Sunday. April 11,
at 10 am at the Sky Lake Coun-
try Club.
Dr. Schmorak is the son of
Dr. Eleazar Schmorak, a Zion-
ist leader who died in the Holo-
caust.
At the meeting, held on be-
half of the Greater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization cam-
paign, the State of Israel Soli-
darity Award will be presented
to Abraham Kramer, president
of Azure Lake Condominium;
Cy Rhodes, president of Can-
nongate Condominium; Sidney
J. Rosenblum, president of Lake
Park Condominium; and George
Wapnick. president of Royal
Oaks Condominium.
Cr NIGHT IN ISRAEL
AT NEW HORIZONS
The co-owners of New Hori-
zons will sponsor a "Night in
Israel" on Tuesday. April 20, at
8 p.m. in the condo's auditori-
um.
According to chairman Joseph
Butler and cochairmen Carl
Beck, Rose Belinsky and Arthur
Schloss. New Horizons residents
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Great and
Mr. and Mrs. William Schkuno-
witz will receive the State of
Israel David Ben-Gurion Award.
Special guest will be Aaron
Heyman. who will perform from
Ruth Foreman's "Sholem Alei-
chem The Man"
Nathan and Annette Greif
have visited Israel and seen the
work accomplished through Is-
rael Bonds. Mrs. Greif is a mem-
ber of the Rebekah ORT and
United Order of True Sisters,
and was president of Ramah
Hadassah
William Schlamowitz, presi-
dent of the B'nai B'rith Sinai
Lodge, is rice president of the
New Horizons Men's Club, co-
chairman of its entertainment
committee and chairman of its
1975-76 Oxnbined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaign
Working on the event are
Frank Ehrenreich, Men's Chib
president; Claire Frank, Wom-
en's Chib president; Gertrude
Liasauer, president, Ramah
Chapter of Hadassah; and Lou
Green, president. New Horizons
Community Center.
6 -to 6
LABOR-MANAGEMENT
TRIBUTE DINNER
Miami attorney Joseph H.
Kaplan, of the firm of Kaplan,
Dorsey. SickinR A Hessen. has
been named dinner chairman of
the Labor-Management State of
Israel tribute dinner honoring
Gerald Greenfield, president of
the Meat Cutters. Packing
House Workers, and Food Han-
dlers District Union No. 657.
AFL-CIO. The announcement
was made by Milton M Parson,
executive director. South Flor-
ida Israel Bond Organization
campaign
Kaplan heads a bst of dis-
tinguished honorary, associate
and management chairmen. The
dinner is scheduled for Sunday
evening. May 2. at the Eden Roc
Hotel.
Honorary chairmen include
Joseoh Belsky. international
president, and Patrick Gorman,
international secretary treas-
urer. Amalgamated Meat Cutters
and Butcher Workmen of North
America. AFL-CIO. Also Con-
gressmen Dante Fascell. Wil-
liam L?hman and Gaude Pep-
Associate honorary- chairmen
are Joseph Cohen. Federa
Packing Company; Charles Har-
ris, president. Florida State
AFL-CIO Labor Council; Samuel
Friedland. founder of Food Fair
Stores; Dr. Irving Lehrman,
spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El; Joe Morgan, interna-
tional vice president, director
of Southern Conference, Inter-
national Brotherhood of Team-
sters: and Roy Scheurich, in-
ternational vice president, Amal-
gamated Meat Cutters and
Butcher Workmen of North
America.
Dinner cochairman is John
Montalto, business representa-
tive of the Amalgamated Meat
Cutters and Butcher Workmen
of North America. AFL-CIO
District Union No. 657.
Beth Torah Congregation in
conjunction with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
has announced the opening for
registration for the spring ses-
sion of the Adult Evening Edu-
cational Program.
The two-credit course offered
by Florida Atlantic University
will begin on April 29 and will
be held each Thursday evening
from 8:30 to 10 p.m., until June
Rabbi David Lehrfield will
conduct the course, which is
open to the public Anyone wish-
ing to attend may register on
Thursday evenings or call the
synagogue office for further in.
formation.
Gables BB Women
Honor Mrs. Katz
Vivienne (Mrs. Bernard) Katz
has been named Woman of the
Year by the Coral Gables Chap-
ter of B'nai B'rith Women.
Chairman of the day at the
group's recent annual donor
luncheon at the Doral Beach
Hotel Mrs. Katz is celebrating
her tenth year as a member of
this chapter.
Mrs. Katz. who has held of-
fice in the chapter since joining
it. is program vice president
and corresponding secretary.
She is a board member of the
Coral Gables Civic Club, a life
member of the Coral Gables
Chapter of the American Medi-
cal Center in Denver, treasurer
of the Crippled Children's
Charities and past chaplain of
the Ray Renuart VFW Auxliary.
HJeru asBovtr
orange blossom products inc.
Ask For It At Your Favorite Storo
P.O. Box 37009, Buena Vista Station
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 576-3111


Friday, April 9, 1976
-Jans* IhrMBMi
Page 3-B
Principals in the "Tribute to Life Members" luncheon
of the Women's Division of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University, at the Montmartre Hotel last week,
include these leaders of the Hebrew University. From
left, Zelda (Mrs. Philip F.) Thau, a former president of
the Greater Miami Women's Division; Lillian (Mrs.
Leon) Kronish, president of the Women's Division; Al-
lison Levy, a third-generation Life Member; and Bea
(Mrs. Richard) Levy, guest speaker at the luncheon and
vice president of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division.
The KEDEM Wine Family
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Cal B. Rosenbaum, vice
president, risk management
and insurance, for Womet-
co Enterprises, recently re-
ceived the Distinguished
Service Award from the
Total Employment Commit-
tee of the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce. Ros-
enbaum has long been ac-
tive on behalf of the handi-
capped.
Round Town
Joseph and Dorothy Levine
have just returned from Rye,
N.Y., where they celebrated the
Bat Mitzvah of their daughter,
Bonnie Leibowits, who was con-
firmed at Beth David in 1960
and undertook Bat Mitzvah
training at this stage in her life
as "a symbol of reaffirmation of
her belief in God and her iden-
tity as a Jew."
Her son, Alan, who is to be
Bar Mitzvah next year, was in
the audience. There was a re-
ception for friends and family
at the Harrison, N.Y, home of
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Leibowits.
Sweeten
your
Passover
with
Sun-Maid
America's favorite raisin for 3 generations,
Sun-Maid Seedless Raisins are a natural to include
in your Passover festivities. They're perfect for
noshing, cooking, and baking. Bursting with natural
fruit sugar energy. Because they're i
still dried in the sun the natural way.
And have no oils or preservatives
added. Have a sweet Passover... with
Sun-Maid.
Kosher for Passover
rtath -n3
Kosher TPesach
Certified by Rabbi Dr. J. H. Ratbag____
Canada Dry
a better tonic water.
rtfWfr


Pi
Page 4-B
Friday, April 9, lift
S'
u
p
b
tl
n
a
ti
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a
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Early Nominations Are In
For Outstanding Citizens
Early nominations for the
29th annual Dade County Out-
standing Citizens Awards, to be
presented May 6, at the Shera-
ton Four Ambassadors are:
Judge Irving Cypen, nomi-
nated by the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the
Aged, for his "devotion and
commitment to the Douglas
Gardens geriatric care network
and the betterment of the lives
of our senior adults."
Dr. Jordan Davidson, nomi-
nated by the National Parkin-
son Foundation, WPBT, Public
Television, who "receives no
remuneration, only the reward-
ing feeling that he's helping
others."
Dr. Mercedes Sandoval, nomi-
nated by Little Havana Activi-
ties Center, Inc., who "has work-
ed extremely hard to get funds
and for various worthwhile pro-
grams in this community."
Barbara Anne Weintraub,
nominated by the American
Cancer Society, who has "been
a 'sparkplug' that has made the
Cancer Control Program within
Dade County one of the most
outstanding in the nation."
COCHAIRMEN of the event
are Kenneth S. Hoffman and
Melvin J. Haber. Ronald A.
Shapo is vice chairman. The
awards are sponsored by B'nai
B'rith Sholem Lodge No. 1024
and the patron is Joseph M.
Lipton, chairman of the board,
Wholesale Distributors of
Dade Federal Savings and Loan
Association. The award is made
to the man and woman who, in
the eyes of the judges, have per-
formed outstanding single func-
tion for the good and welfare
of the entire Dade County com-
munity during the preceding
year.
Recipients of the award can-
not be elected or appointed of-
ficials who receive pay for the
work done. Efforts of nominees
must be the result of civic moti-
vation for which no compensa-
tion is received.
Permanent judges are George
Beebe, associate publisher, the
Miami Herald; Ralph Renick,
vice president, WTVJ; and Fred
Shochet, publisher and editor,
The Jewish Floridian.
Candidates' names should be
submitted on civic club station-
ery, signed by a club official,
and mailed to: Melvin J. Haber,
cochairman, Dade County Out-
standing Citizens Awards Com-
mittee, Dade Federal Building,
119 East Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131, Suite 239.
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
ProcttMr* m4 IxptrUn
f Ik* ffMtt U.S. vt. lastttctea'
KOSHEK mATS mU POWlTlT
1717 N.W. 7A Av.
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
Chabad House
Sponsoring An
Israeli Songfest
Chabad House-Florida Luba-
vitch Headquarters will sponsor
an Israeli festival of Chassidic
song, Monday, April 19, at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
The festival will feature the
Jerusalem School of Jewish Mu-
sic, Pirchai Yerushaliyim, which
is on its first visit in the United
States. The Pirchai Yerushaliyim
is directed by "the father of
modern Jewish music," Yigdal
Calek.
The Neginah Orchestra and
Jerry Markowitz are included
in the program.
For reservations and ticket
information contact Chabad
House.
Free Admission
To Flagler Practice
Greyhound racing will be
open to the public, including
children, at Flagler Dog Track
beginning Wednesday night,
April 21, at 6:30. Admission,
parking and programs are free
during four nights April 21,
23, 24 and 27 of official
schooling, or practice races, for
the season that opens May 1.
The
healthiest
sweet
your family
can eat
for Passover
Tree-ripened
Blue Ribbon
California
Figs
Figs are the most all-around nutritious
of all dried fruits, and Blue Ribbon
are (igs at their (inestcarefully packed
and sent to you at the peak of their
natural flavor and goodness. From Bibli-
cal times to today, plump luscious figs
have been the ideal fruit to serve your family. Stewed or eaten
right from the package, there's no better treat to eat! Look for
Blue Ribbon Figs-Kosher for Passover-at your supermarket.
BLUE RIBBON FIGS
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
DOS7 TUJ3
Certified by Rabbi Of. J. H. Ralbag_________________
ft
iiHn
The
considerate'
Seder hostess
now brews
New Ground
Sanka
BRAND DECAFFEINATED COFFE
Now it tastes
better than ever.
.....

ThCM aren't just any beans. We've got mellow South American
beans fur smoothness and robust African beans for strength. The
result is a great new taste. The kind of taste you probably never
thought you could find in a ground decaffeinated coffee. And it's
still 97".. caffein free, so if cafleill bothers your guests, this can be
.1 lot better for them. Richer, smoother New ('.round SANKA"
Brand It s the first decaffeinated coffee vour family is going to love
no^Ttra
InMxnl. Krt/r Dried and N>* (Iround
SANKA* llrand DernrTrinnKd (*offr an- cortihcd
KothH (or PaMOVtf 1V IteMu Bernard l*vy
fMNKA" < a 'rgutrrrd tndrmarh of G#*r**J foods Torpor*lion lor fT\
- m kx>;is
At holiday time...
warming hearts in Jewish homes
for 100 years!
-
At holiday time and
all year 'round-Tetley's
the tea you can count
on for rich, hearty "tiny
tea leaf flavor" that never
fades. Perfect for both meat and
dairy meals, at snack time, tea time,
or anytime you long for a satisfying
pick- me-up, make your tea Tetley.
The favorite in Jewish homes since 1875.
TETLEY TEA -gat
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION H5S2
Pueover
v "ab*l J*oo<> Cohen


Friday, April 9, 19?6
*Jfwistih^kMai)
Page 5-B
f
Kolitz to Speak At
Temple Sinai Dinner
Zvi Kolit?., Israeli author,
journalist, and film and theatri-
cal producer, will be guest
ZVI KOLITZ
speaker at the April 11 dinner
for members of Temple Sinai of
North Dade.
The event, held on behalf of
the 1976 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emegency Fund, will
honor Mr. and Mrs. Maurice N.
Swift of Sky Lake. Dinner will
begin at 7:30 p.m., after a 6:30
p.m. cocktail reception, at the
temple. Leading arrangements
for the evening are cochairmen
Dr. and Mrs. Alan S. Graubert
Kosher for Passover
rich flavor
7 varlitm cherry, ifrowbarry, Ihimi,
hi*., block ro.pb.rry, oipb.iry, .,<,.
Chicago
60432
Distributed by:
HI-GRADE FOOD CO., INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
THE
PREMIUM
PASSOVER
WINE
To your health,
to happiness,
and, to peace.
The premium kosher wine you can
"almost cut with a knife."
Classic concords, hill bodied and
rich In flavor, and a wide variety ot
fruit and honey wines. All
Kosher, and. all so very delicious^
and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Edel-
man.
Kolitz is author and executive
producer of Israel's first major
film, "Hill 24 Doesn't Answer,"
which was honored at the Can-
nes Film Festival. He has pro-
duced plays on and off Broad-
way in New York and in Israel,
and a film based on the Solzhe-
nitsyn novel "The First Circle."
After World War II, Kolitz
settled in Palestine, after living
in Lithuania and Italy, and is
the author of plays, stories and
non-fiction in Hebrew and Eng-
lish. Additional information on
the April 11 dinner is available
through the Temple office or
through Mr. Kalman at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Rabbi Friedman
Is Emanu-El Guest
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, ex-
ecutive director of the South-
eastern Region of the United
Synagogue of America, will dis-
cuss "The Conservative Move-
ment in the Bicentennial Year"
this evening during 8:30 serv-
ices at Temple Emanu-El.
Joining special guest Gen. Moshe Dayan
and Mrs. Dayan (right) at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's "You Make
The Difference" campaign dinner last
week were GMJF vice president Norman
H. Lipoff (2nd from left), chairman of
Pacesetters of the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, and Mrs.
Lipoff, a vice president of the GMJF
Women's Division.
Meeker Prints on Exhibit At
Washington Federal's Main Office
Washington Federal Savings
and Loan Association is present-
ing an exhibit of Drints by Dean
Meeker at its Main Office, 1701
Meridian Ave.
Meeker, whose works are in-
cluded in many museum and
institution permanent collec-
tions, describes his art as "a
nrocPM of intrusion."
In 20 years of platemaking he
has been involved with color
and the combining of silk screen
and intaglio. He has designed
and develoDed his own press to
laminate the two elements to
create a quality of texture com-
mon to no other form of print-
making.
I gave two years ago.
His family still lives in Israel. His wife. His
daughter. His two sons.
Four days after he left them to help
defend his country in the Yom Kippur War,
he became one of those statistics you
read about in the newspapers or heard
about on the nightly newscasts.
Two years have passed since then.
Two long years.
And still the people of Israel must look to
Jews in America to meet the staggering
costs of their human needs. The costs of
providing a life of dignity for the elderly.
Decent housing for immigrants. Educational
assistance and even living facilities for
youngsters without fathers.
He can no longer help the people of
Israel build a society where there is
compassion and care for the aged and hope
and opportunity for the young.
But you can.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federations 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
We Are One.



Page 6-B
*Jewlstitk*kHrri
Friday, April 9, 1976
i
*
National Airlines Ads Boost
Neighborhood Travel Agents
Travelers in the market for
a vacation plan should visit
"The Vacation Store" in their
neighborhoods
That's the thrust of National
Airlines' new spring summer
advertising campaign, featuring
8,000 U.S. travel agents.
"For the past few years, Na-
tional has given the travel agent
equal billing in our vacation
tour package advertising. The
line 'Call Your Travel Agent,'
has been printed as prominently
as our own name," said J. Dan
Brock, vice president-marketing.
"Now we're taking the agent
out of the signature and putting
him in the headline. It repre-
sents our total dedication and
commitment to the travel agent
as the principal salesman of the
quality tour packages available
under the 'National Holidays'
banner."
Initial advertising featuring
the trademarked theme. "The
Vacation Store," has been ap-
pearing in travel trade publica
tions since March 22. The cam-
paign was introduced to kev
travel agents at a series of
luncheons in principal cities,
starting in New York on March
23. Advertising in newspapers
and on radio began on March
29.
Vacationers will be urged to
call or visit a convenient "Vaca-
tion Store" to obtain details of
the advertised specials one
or more of the "National Holi-
days" tour packages, ranging
from three-day sprees in Las
Vegas to monthlong European
excursions to Caribbean cruises
to family outings at Walt Dis-
ney World.
Travel agents across the Na-
tional system will have ban-
ners, signs, window displays and
other supplementary material
proclaiming their agency as
"The Vacation Store."
Rotating billboards in major
cities and 2,000 subway car
cards in New York also will fea-
ture "The Vacation Store" logo
and promote "National Holi-
days" package tours.
"We're putting our money
where our heart is strictly on
the side of the travel agents,"
according to Armand Arel, staff
vice president-advertising and
sales promotion.
"We believe that every pros-
pective traveler on the Nation-
al system will get the message
within 30 days. And that mes-
sage is simply that their con-
venient neighborhood travel
ag"nt 'The Vacation Store'
is the olace to go when they're
in the -narket for any type of
holiday travel plan."
Roney Plaza Men
To Hear Dr. Stein
Dr. Sol Stein, national presi-
dent of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation (IHF), will address
the Roney Plaza Men's Club at
its regular monthly meeting
Monday, April 12, at 8 p.m.
Dr. Stein, who returned last
month from one of his frequent
trips to Israel, will discuss Is-
rael's economic situation and
its relationship to American
Jewry. He is recognized as an
authority in personal financial
planning and deferred giving.
Paul Murray is chairing the
meeting. President of the Roney
Plaza Men's Club is John Berg-
er.
Hirsch To Be Honored At
Shaare Zedek Hospital Dinnei
The American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital of Jeru-
salem will present the Maimo-
nides Award to Louis Hirsch,
veteran Miami Beach resident
and philanthropist, at a gala din-
ner on Sunday, April 25, at the
Konover Hotel.
The event will feature an eve-
ning of stars under the banner
"The Middle East Revue." Head-
lining the attractions for the
evening is Israel's ambassador
of song and recordings, Ron Eli-
ran. The other highlights of the
evening are the Five Russkys,
troubadours from Russia via Is-
rael, and, for the first time,
Cheri, a noted Middle Eastern
exotic dancer.
Chairmen of the event are
Mark Denburg, Sidney Olson
and Dr. Matthew M. Zucker-
man. Cochairmen are Jerome
Bienenfeld, Milton Bornstein
and Jimmy DeNicola.
Executive members of the
committee are Mr. and Mrs.
King Rich, Mrs. Rose V. Rosen
baum, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Aron-
son, Mrs. Jerome Bienenfeld,
Judge and Mrs. Sheldon Lel-
chuk, Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel
Nahmias, Rabbi and Mrs. Abra-
ham Dubin, Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Schachter, Rabbi and Mrs.
Sadi Is. Nahmias and Mr. and
Mrs. Ed Schuman.
Small Business
One-Day Conference
The Small Business Adminis-
tration and SCORE (Service
Corps of Retired Executives)
will conduct a free monthly
conference for small business-
men on Tuesday, April 13, 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m., in Room 208 of
the Federal office building on
SW 1st Ave.
Tonics include how to finance
a business, taxes, financial rec-
ords, break-even point, organ-
ization and business plan, and
insurance. Reservations are nec-
resarv and can be made by
filing 350-5833.
Brim: Great Flavor
Without Caffein
This Passover you can get the
great flavor of quality Colom-
bian coffee without 97 percent
of the caffein (which can inter-
rupt a night's sleep) by serving
Brim Decaffeinated Coffee.
For brewing a perfect pot of
coffee every time, choose Brim
Regular Grind or Brim Electric
Perk. Or, if you prefer instant
coffee, make it Brim Freeze-
Dried. All are certified kosher
for Passover by Rabbi Bernard
Levy.
No matter which Brim you
choose, you're sure of great
ground flavor every time!
Do vour friends and family
a favor bv filling their holiday
cups with Brim ... the coffee
mcchayeh without caffein.ST

I^A^A^A^Aw/Ax/Aw/Ap^A^A^Aj^A^
FLORIDA
SCHOOL OF
ELECTROLYSIS
COMMENCING CLASSES-
TAUGHT AT HOME
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
Call today for information
652-9606
JM'S PASSOVER CANDY
BY BARTON
FOR A SWEET ACCENT TO YOUR HOLIDAY
Delicious. JM offers a tempting array of Barton's chocolates and
baked specialities to enhance the festive mood of your
holiday entertaining. A sweet idea for gift-giving.
The enticing selection includes:
Bartonettes, 1 pound box, 4.25
Passover Assortment, % pound box, 3.45
Chocolate Matzos, 13 ounce box, 2.98
Chocolate Seder Mints, 9 ounce box, 2.45
Passover Truffles, 2.45
Chocolate and Vanilla Macaroons, 2.50
Passover Surprise Bag, 6 ounce bag, 1.75
Layer Cake, 3.50
Fine Foods, at all jm stores
except lauderhill and pompano
It's a pleasure to shop with ajm credit card
lordani
-rnansn
A unit ot Allied Stores Corpo'eton


m
i Friday, April 9, 1976
vJewisti itcrkiiar)
Page 7-B'
Southern Bell Annual Report
Calls 1975 Most Challenging
Southern Bell's annual re-
port on the telephone's centen-
nial anniversary characterizes
1975 as "one of the most chal-
lenging periods ever experi-
enced" by the company and its
employees.
Company president L. E. Rast
cited inflation as the biggest
problem the company faced
during the year because it
added significantly to the cost
of nearly everything used to
provide telephone service.
Rast said another problem
the economic recessiondamp-
ened the rate of growth for
Southern Bell in the early
months of 1975, but that by the
end of the year company growth
was improving with the im-
proved economy. He credited
"stringent expense controls"
and "our never-ending search
for ways to increase the effi-
ciency of our operations" with
helping the company finish the
year on the upbeat.
Southern Bell ended 1975 with
9.8 million telephones in serv-
ice, up 3 percent from 1974.
The company handled a record
average of 41 million conversa-
tions daily, including 2.3 mil-
lion long-distance messages.
Revenues in the four states
served by the company were
approximately $2.3 billion, up
15 percent, but expenses rose
to nearly $1.5 billion, up 14 per-
cent over 1974.
As a result of the recession
and slackened demand for serv-
ice, the company cut $209 mil-
lion from its projected construc-
tion program for the year.
"Nevertheless, by year's end,"
Rast said, "we had spent near-
ly $874 million to expand and
modernize equipment and facili-
ties and for necessary plant re-
placement and customer move-
ment." The 1975 construction
program was the third largest in
company history and brought
its net plant investment to $6
billion.
Rast said the construction ex-
penditures helped insure that
residence and business custom-
ers had the broadest selection
of equipment ever and service
of the highest quality in the
company's experience. Contin-
ued technological improvements
from the company's Bell System
partners Bell Laboratories
and Western Electric were
incorporated into Southern
Bell's operations in 1975.
The company added 24 new
electronic switching system cen-
tral offices which handled calls
at computerlike speeds. It also
installed additional electronic
traffic service position systems
to speed handling of long-dis-
tance calls and added automatic
intercept systems for faster
number-change information.
Touch-Tone pushbutton call-
ing became available to 80 per-
cent of the company's custom-
ers.
Rast discussed the potential
effects of competition in tele-
communications. He said long-
distance "private line competi-
tors are permitted to seek out
the most profitable routes, and
equipment suppliers are not
subject to regulation in their
Complete Commercial and
Residential
LAWN SERVICE
Free Estimates.,
Call anytime.
Howard Goldberg-261-6415
STAR OF DAVID
MEMORIAL PARK
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SITES FOR SALE
949-3859
pricing. However, we must
serve all routes and all of our
rates are subject to regulation.
"If these circumstances per-
sist," he continued, "we be-
lieve the ultimate effect will be
increased cost of service to resi-
dence customers and small busi-
nesses." Rast also indicated that
divided responsibility for serv-
ice "is certain to impair its
quality."
Southern Bell's return on
average total capital in 1975
was 8.28 percent, short of the
10.2 percent Rast said is needed
in current economic conditions.
Locally, Southern Bell Man-
ager Charles Watford reports
"we connected or moved 31,064
telephones, resulting in a net
total of 106,701 at year's end.
Our construction program for
the year was $2.1 million, large
by any standard," he said. "We
believe we've started the tele-
phone's second century in great
shape to provide better service
than ever."
Intercontinental Bank of M.B. Names Wheeler Vice President Donald E. Wheeler has been A member of the American appointed senior vice president Management Association, Flor-of the Intercontinental Bank of ida Bankers Association, Amer-Miami Beach, it was announced ican Bankers Association, Bank by Benjamin I. Shulman, chair- Administration Institute and man of the board. Bank Marketing Association, he Educated at the Graduate nas served for nearly 15 years School of Banking of Columbia a' Sterling National Bank and University, New York Univer- Tr"st Company of New York, sity and Pace College, Wheeler Shulman said Wheeler will received advanced training at play a major role in the expan-the American Institute of Bank- sion program of Intercontinental ing. Bank of Miami Beach.
jH||aMpfl 'iSl Lakh -*,___y aVtssssssssr
bb ^eaaaae^
DONALD E. WHEELER ISRAELI ARTISTS AND SCULPTORS NEED AN ART GALLERY FOR DISPLAY AND WORKING FACILITIES HERE. Financing is needed as a loan or collateral or cosigner. A Miami area location is planned. This project will help Israeli Exports to the U.S., provide employment, and help advance the Cultural Development of Israel. About $5,000 is estimated. CALL 531-5381 (AFTER 4 P.M. ONLY)

LARGE LAUDERHILL TOWNHOUSE. Jewish Community, 3 Bedrooms, 2' 2 Baths, Separate Living Rm. and Den, Pool, Tennis, and Club House. By owner. $375.00 Mo. 485-2431 Near Inverrary.
All Reynolds Wrap is
Kosher for Passover.
And for all your holiday cooking and entertaining,
we have all the wraps you'll need.
25-ft. Reynolds Wrap?
Wraps, molds and seals
tightly. Protects food
best in the refrigerator.
Our Economy size-
your economy buy. 75 feet
of tear-resistant foil for
all your household
needs.
200-ft. Giant A big
bargain. 8 regular rolls
for about the price of 6.
Almost like getting 2
rolls free.
Broiling Foil. The only 14*
wide heavy duty foil on the
market. Just the nght size for
your broiler pan.
Heavy Duty Reynolds
Wrap. Nothing's better for
freezing food, for indoor
and outdoor cooking.
100-sq. ft. Giant Heavy
Dut ya lot of foil for
the money. And you won't
run out in a hurry.
Extra Heavy Reynolds Wrap.
50% thicker, stronger than
any other heavy duty foil.
Ideal for extra tough ]obs.
Reynolds Wrap.The BestWraps Around.


Page 8-B
+Jewist> fktrktkui
Friday, April 9, 197
I
Voters Incorporated is devot-
ing its Tuesday, April 13, meet-
ing to judges. Guest speakers at
8 p.m. at the Washington Fed-
eral bldg., 1234 Washington
Ave., will be Judges Thomas E.
Lee, Meed Robinette and Nelan
Sweet. Harry Levy is Voters
Inc. president.
tr tr tr
The Florida League for Non-
ing was to convene its annual
conference on Thursday at the
Cedars of Lebanon Seminar
Center. Experts will speak on
"Management for Better Pa-
tient Care."
tr tr tr
Rae Dowdy, painter, and
Rosalind Levin, poet, will share
the platform at the Saturday
meeting of the Monthly Art Fo-
rum at the Miami Beach Art
Clnb. The meeting will be at 2:30
at the Washington Federal audi-
torium, 1234 Washington Ave.
tr tr tr
Snrfside Women's League will
meet at Town Hall, Monday,
ADril 12, at 12:30 p.m. Dade
County Consumer Advocate
Walter Dartland will speak on
water quality, utilities, and con-
sumer rights.
tr tr tr
The Heart Association of
Greater Miami in cooperation
with the Dade County Medical
Association, Florida District of
Kiwanis and Key Clubs Inter-
national and other medical and
community agencies, need vo-
lunteers to helD out during
blood pressure alert, Saturday,
May 1. and Sundav May 2.
tr tr tr
The Miami Beach Music and
Artt Leame will present Verdi's
"La Traviata" on Sunday. April
11, at 8:15 p.m. at the Miami
Beach Theatre for the Perform-
ing Arts.
tr tr tr
The Snrfside Garden Clnb will
meet Tuesday, April 13, at 10
a.m. at Surfside Town Hall.
Milton Piedro will speak on
soils and fertilizers.
Dr. EU Levy, a psychologist,
will discuss "Coping in To-
day's Irrational Society" at the
next meeting of the Blacayne
Democratic Crab, Monday, April
12, at 8 p.m. in the Washington
Federal auditorium, 1234 Wash-
ington Ave.
A tr tr
Carol Sutton, managing editor
of the Louisville "Courier-Jour-
nal," was named Woman of the
Year at the 25th anniversary
brunch of the Miami chapter of
Women In Communication*.
Maxwell House
Th Traditional Coffee
Your old friend Maxwell
House has long been the
traditional coffee served in Jew-
ish homes at holiday times and
throughout the year. And this
year should be no exception.
Maxwell House is the delici-
ous mellow-tasting coffee, as
perfect with your special Pas-
sover dinner as with your late-
afternoon coffee break. And it
goes without saying, there's no
better coffee to wake up to than
Maxwell House.
If you also use instant coffee
at your home, you'll be delight-
ed to know that new Instant
Maxwell House has a new fresh
aroma and fresher flavor! The
moment vou open a jar you
smell fresh coffee. And the
moment you stir up a cup you
discover a fresher flavor. That's
whv everv cun of new Instant
Maxwell House tastes just as
fresh as your first cup.
New Instant Maxwell House
is also certified kosher for Pas-
sover. So pick up a jar soon.
And, don't forget Regular
Ground Maxwell House for your
brewed coffee.ST
tr tr tr
Metropolitan Museum and
Art Center, North Miami branch,
is presenting "Contemporary
Graphics" by major U.S. artists
from the Miami collection of
Ruth and Richard Shack, Fri-
days, Saturdays and Sundays
through June 1, free, 1 to 5 p.m.
tr tr tr
JWV Abe Horrowitz Auxiliary
No. 682 was to hold a supper
meeting honoring outgoing
president, Shirley Morton, on
Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Post
home, NE 160th St. and 19th PI.
tr tr tr
It was ten days of delightful
weather for the Caribbean trip
of Norman and Irma Braman of
Coral Gables and Norman's
brother-in-law, Ed Lelbowitt, of
Tampa and his wife, Blossom.
Both men are Cadillac dealers.
Dade Co. Fellows
Elect Rosenhaus
As Chairman
Matthew B. Rosenhaus of Mi-
ami Beach has been elected
chairman of the Dade County
Society of Fellows of the Syna-
gogue Council of America.
An officer of Temple Emanu-
El and a national leader of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, Rosenhaus will work
closely with Dr. Irving Lehr-
man of Temple Emanu-El and
Moses Hornsteln of Hollywood,
national cochairmen of the So-
ciety of Fellows.
Rosenhaus was one of the
first founders of the Albert Ein-
stein College of Medicine of
Yeshiva University and is a
leader of the Lehrman Day
School.
Miami Beach Hadassah
Bay Harbor Group will hold
a regular meeting on Monday,
April 12, at 12:30 p.m. at the
Washington Federal building on
Kane Concourse. The program
will honor Passover with Jew-
ish education and humor. Presi-
dent is Mrs. Nathan Scheiner.
tr tr tr
Louis D. Brandeis Group will
install officers at luncheon on
April 12 at noon at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Installing of-
ficer is Mrs. I. D. Shapiro; presi-
dent is Mrs. William Saffir. Pro-
gram by Lee Sohn.
H. & M. STEIN
In reference to the Sun Reporter Ad of April 1st,
1976 H. & AA. Stein, Strictly Kosher Restaurant
and Delicatessen, has never claimed to be under
the Supervision of The Union of Orthodox Jew-
ish Congregations. We only claim that we carry
products.
H. & M. STEIN HAS BEEN KNOWN FOR
YEARS FOR ITS STRICTNESS IN
KASHRUTH OBSERVANCE
WE TRUST WE WILL MERIT
YOUR CONTINUED PATRONAGE.
H.AM.STHN
(Strictly Kosher)
Shomer Shabos
(S) Marcel Stein
Here's 15t
to discover what real
homemade chopped liver
is supposed to taste like!
Kosher for Passover
Mrs.Weinberg makes it like it ought to be!
Remember the smooth, rich taste of old-fashioned
Kosher chopped liver? Mrs. Weinberg never for-
got! She still uses her same recipe to make the
chopped liver you buy at the store. Clip this
HI-off coupon and re-discover what real Kosher
chopped liver tastes like. Mrs. Weinberg s!
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
15C
Mr Grocer This coupon will redeemed for 15C plus 5C
handling provided coupon is received from customer on
purchase of Mrs Weinbergs Chopped Liver Proof of pur
chase of sufficient stock to cover coupons presented for
redemption must be shown on request Redemptions not
honored through brokers or other outside agencies. The
consumer must pay any sales tax Offer good only in the
US and void where prohibited, licensed, taxed or restricted
PyJ?w t-ash value 1/26*. For payment mail coupons to
MRS. WEINBERG'S, 1790 Eastchester Road. Bronx. N Y
SAVE 150
rmmm
15C
Save 15 on 7 oz. or 16 oz. size
of Mrs. Weinberg's Chopped Liver.
SPMAD
Lml Onr Cnxm flri Packer
Offer ripen Drcnntin Jl, 1976
STORE COUPON


priday, April 9, 1976
Jewlsi> HorUkui
Page 9-B
Miss Whitman and Mr. Gordon Betsy Cutler Is Guest of Honor At Engagement Brunch
Are Married at Temple Emanu-El
Ruth-EUen Whitman, daugh-
ter of Fay and Irv Whitman,
and Ira Russell Gordon, son of
Rosette and Murray Gordon,
were married on April 4 in a
double ring ceremony at Tem-
ple Emanu-El. Both families
live in Miami.
The bride's matrons of honor
were her sisters, Dianne (Mrs.
Lenny) Glick and Justine (Mrs.
Mel) Wolfe. Bridesmaids were
Sandra Gordon and Lori Wolfe,
and maid of honor was Lisa
Wolfe. The bride's nieces, Ad-
riane and Stacy Glick, were
flower eirls.
Michael Keil was best man,
and the ushers were Alan Ra-
mer and Jefferey Keil. Candles
were lighted by Tony Salzman
and Robert Zipper.
SPECIAL guests at the wed-
ding included the bride's grand-
mother, Bessie Whitman, who
was escorted by her son, Her-
bert, and the groom's grand-
parents, Katie Gordon, escorted
by her son. Seymour, and Henry
and Fay Fox.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon, who
met as teenagers at a BBG-
AZA meeting, were graduated
from Miami Coral Park Senior
High, where both were Out-
standing Seniors. Mrs. Gordon
was South Florida Council BBG
president. TAGS BBG president,
state youth coordinator for the
Leukemia Association, and a
member of Anchor Service Club.
National Forensic League. Pen
and Sable and the Social Studies
Club.
Mr. Gordon, an active mem-
ber in Interact Service Club.
Thespians. National Forensic
League. Toastmasters Interna-
tional, the JV football team
and Aloha Phi Pi, was on the
chamoion state debate team in
1969.
THEY ATTENDED the Uni-
versity of Florida, where Mr.
Gordon was a dean's list student
and honors Graduate. He was
a member of the Blue Key
Mcmischewiti Means
More Than Matxos!
Everyone knows that Manis-
chewitz is famous for matzos.
But how manv people know the
wonderful variety of other deli-
cious Manischewitz food pro-
ducts available especially for
Passover?
In addition to matzo meal,
cereal and farfel, you'll find the
Manischewitz name on a variety
of taste tempting cake and
cookie mixes, jams and jellies,
soups and canned fish.
Every product is made under
strict rabbinical supervision and
backed by the trusted Manis-
chewitz name famous for
quality Jewish foods since 5649
Be sure also to pick up your
Manischewitz holiday matzo in
the convenient five-pound stay-
fresh ooly-wrap package, and
you'll be certain to have crisp
good-tasting matzos all through
the holiday.
And this year, try some other
Manischewitz holiday foods, too
... for traditional goodness you
can count on!ST
MRS. GORDON
Speakers Bureau and of Pi Lam-
da Phi. He is a news reporter
in Broward county for WCKT-
TV Channel 7 and was previous-
ly anchor and newsman with
WPTV-TV Channel 5 in West
Palm Beach.
Mrs. Gordon, also a member
of the Blue Key Speakers Bu-
reau, earned a Master's degree
in Diagnostic and Prescriptive
Teaching from the University
of Maryland in 1973 and is an
employability skills teacher for
the handicapped in the Dade
County School System.
On their return from a wed-
ding trip to Nassau, the couple
will make their home in Holly-
wood.
Rabbi Feted
NEW YORK More than
1,000 people were expected as
the New York Board of Rabbis
pays tribute to Rabbi Harold H.
Gordon for his 30 years of serv-
ice as its executive vice presi-
dent, at a testimonial dinner on
Thursday, at the New York Hil-
ton Hotel.
Betsy Cutler, daughter of Iris
and A. Budd Cutler, was guest
of honor at a recent brunch at
the Sheraton Four Ambassadors.
The event, attended by 45 peo-
ple, was a celebration of Miss
Cutler's engagement to Carl S.
Schreiber, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Arnold W. Schreiber of Glen
Head, N.Y., and West Palm
Beach.
Miss Cutler will receive her
Master's degree in June from
Emory University, where she is
an honor student and was tap-
ped for Mortarboard. Her fiance
is a medical student in Georgia.
WELCOMING the many
friends were the six hostesses
who planned and coordinated
the party: Annette (Mrs. Aaron)
Foosaner, Rosalyn (Mrs. Arnold)
Kane, Germaine (Mrs. Stan)
Perlman, Helen (Mrs. Sy) Som-
erstein, Mickey (Mrs. Harris)
Cohen and Lois (Mrs. Ted)
Goldstein.
Mr. Schreiber's mother, Shir-
ley, and his aunt, Helen (Mrs.
David) Fels, were among the
special guests.
A double-horseshoe of pink-
draped tables provided back-
ground for the centerpieces of
spring flower bouquets in yel-
low, white, mauve and pink
trimmed with pink satin rib-
bons, designed by Mrs. Gold-
stein to resemble inverted pa-
rasols.
Mrs. Foosaner presided over
the entertainment, which in-
cluded skits, songs and poetry.
All six hostesses participated,
and solos were provided by
Helen Somerstein and Roz
Kane.
; entertainment, which in- Kane.
Happy and Joyous Passover to the
Entire Jewish Community
Kings Creek
West
One And Two Bedroom
Condominiums
COMPANION FOR
H.DERLYLADY
Live in beautiful new, terraced
apartment overlooking large lake.
Cooking, ahopplng and houaa-
keeplng. Room, board and email
ealary. 1-449-1140 If no anawer,
1-272-7087 Dalray Beach.
NEXT TO
EVERYTHING
FOR NEXT TO NOTHING
From $30,950.
Walking distance to
Kings Creek Village Shopping Plaza
and Dadeland.
Models open daily 10 am to 6 pm.
Sundays 1 to 6 pm.
S.W. 79th Ave. and 86th St.
Telephone 279-0404 ..
, The Babcock ***
Company a
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Perfect
for Passover.
Passover.. .what a perfect time to introduce your
family to Ocean Spray's refreshingly different fruit
juice drink- Low Calorie Cranapple. A sparkling
blend of cranberries and apples. Perfect tor dinner,
breakfast, snacks. Perfect for Passover.
Ocean Spray Low Calorie Cranapple
Certified Kosher farve for Fbssover by Rabbi Dr. J.H. Ralbag.
CRANAPPIE is the registered trademark of Ocean Spray Cranberries. Inc., tor its cranberry apple drink


Page lfcB
*Jewlsii IktrkUan
Friday, April 9.6*76
I
fob*, cf Ik
tew
No one can accuse Billy Gra-
ham of losing his touch. The
man simply does not know what
soft sell means.
"The Hiding Place," a Gra-
ham production, is a movie that
slipped into ten local theatres
under the guise of an unusual-
ly finely made Hollywood film
on the Holocaust. To add to its
commercial credibility, actors
the likes of Julie Harris, Eileen
Heckart and Arthur O'Connell
are billed as the stars.
IN ACTUALITY, "The Hiding
Place" is a paid commercial
message that cannot be charged
with reverting to subliminal
sneak-ins. And the real star is
Jesus Christ.
World Wide Pictures, a film-
making arm of the Graham
evangelical conglomerate, has
produced a poignant and deli-
cate, if not lengthy film. The
story line centers on the remem-
brances of Corrie Ten Boom,
the daughter of a gentle Dutch
watchmaker.
The Hollander, who is Gen-
tile, is a "mensch" and raises
his daughters in like manner.
The year 1940 finds the devout-
ly Christian family in a state of
genteel disbelief as their world
is no longer a reasonable fac-
simile of what once was.
THE UNCHRISTIAN attitude
ing a yellow "Jude" star, turns
Papa for sympathetically wear-
ing a vellow "Judeo" star, turns
Gentile gentility into humane
humanity. The first "mitzvot"
the family observes are the sav-
ing and smuggling out of a Jew-
ish baby a latter day Moses.
The infant is nestled in a wick-
er basket.
The movie's name comes
from the hiding place behind a
closet that secrets transient
Jews within the Ten Boom
household. The family's activi-
ties are discovered and the Ges-
tapo incarerates the group.
It is at this point that the
film takes its evangelical turn.
No superfluous postscript is
really necessary to explain that
God, by whatever name, lived
in the Ten Boom home. But
once Corrie and her sister Betsy
(Julie Harris) are removed to
a work camp (Ravensbruck),
the film changes gears.
GRAHAM accelerates into
with NORM* A. OROVITZ
overkill. Every scene has an
overtly Christian nuance. Al-
though the work camp is not
romanticized, the viewer is
spared the raunchy and real de-
tails of Hitlerdom. Death, chim-
ney smoke and soap are only al-
luded to. The shower spigots
release water, not gas.
Against an emotional charcoal
grey backdrop, the film makes
its proselytizing plug. What is
mystifying is the choice of a
modulated version of the Holo-
caust for Graham's mission.
Jesus Christ, as savior in that
hell, is nowhere apparent ex-
cept in the touchingly naive
approach of Julie Harris.
Shades of Viktor Frankl aside,
the viewer does not add up the
premises to reach the foregone
conclusion that Christ saves, as
do Graham, et al.
HAD THE film ended with-
out the blatant advertisement
for Christian evangelism, had
the theatre lobby not been
stocked with Jewj for Jesus
flyers and like literature, had
Jesus Christ's love been lived
instead of spoken of through-
out the film, then this movie
would have been a truly fine
tribute to a family that lived
of law of love.
But instead, the Jewish view-
er walks away, after two hours
and twenty minutes, feeling just
a little bit taken.
Ovadia Sof f er to Speak At
Histadrut's Third Seder
FOR RENT
JUNE THROUGH SEPTEMBER
ELEGANT STUDIO N. MIAMI
AREA, REASONABLE.
891-2138
RESPONSIBLE LADY wishes
bedroom with kitchen privi-
leges around May 1st for a
few months in the Roney Plaza
Hotel.
Call anytime (421) 521-5074
WANTED: CANTOR
TO CONDUCT HIGH HOLY
DAY SERVICES
in a North Dade Condomi-
nium. Must Blow Shofar.
CALL 652-1630
OVADIA SOFFER
Israel Is Topic Of
Trfereth Jacob Guest
The guest speaker this eve-
ning at 8:15 services at Temple
Tifereth Jacob is Dr. Nathan
Friedman, whose subject is "Is-
rael Yesterday and Today."
Services will be conducted by
Ted Mohel, assisted by Mrs.
Renee Levite.
Ambassador Ovadia Soffer, a
member of Israel's permanent
mission to the United Nations,
will address the annual Third
Seder of the Israel Histadrut
Council of South Florida at the
Fontainebleau Hotel Sunday
evening, April 18, it was an-
nounced by Dr. Leon Kronish,
honorary chairman of the local
Council, and board chairman
Moe Levin.
Morris Newmark, president of
the Histadrut Council, and his
wife. Anna, will be honored at
the traditional Third Seder,
which has been conducted by
the Council for more than 20
years.
A GRADUATE of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, Sof-
fer holds degrees from Tel Aviv
and New York Universities.
Ambassador Soffer joined the
Israeli Foreign office in 1963
and has served in the Central
African Republic, as ambassador
to the Republic of Chad and as
a member of the Israeli dele-
gation to the UN General As-
sembly.
The Israel Histadrut Cam-
paign, which is sponsoring the
third Seder, has raised more
than $100 million since 1924 for
the support of Histadrut in the
development of numerous in-
stitutions which today are con-
sidered essential elements in Is-
rael.
Reservations for the Third
S?der must be made prior to
April 12. For more information,
call the Histadrut Campaign of-
fice in Miami Beach.

CONSERVATIVE RABBI. Edu-
cator Baal Korah available
now full time or part time.
CALL 621-0850 MIAMI
or Write RABBI PLONI,
Box 012973, Miami 33101

CtmWcarv Lxururulle& Uw

LaiaAiciIul, uv&ileA vloav to/ attafuil
SUNDAY, APRIL 25th at 5:30pm
KONOVER HOTEL, Collins Ave.f Miami Beach
HONORED GUEST LOUIS HIRSCH
1976 Recipient Elect of the Maimonides Award.
Couterl 150 pe person
Reception Cocktails -Encore Room 5:30.m. 1.6:30p.i.
Showtime -He.iri'i 6:45 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Featuring THE MIDDLE EAST REVUE
Dinner (Dietary Laws) Henri's 8 p.m.
?
^T THE FIVE RUSSKYS
I'lMiluilniirs nl Song
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vi.i Im.ii-1 IVIiKhliriK
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fr CHERI
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Isnpl's Ambiiudor
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Ri-uuding Afliil
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; April 9, 1976
'JewIsli fkirldaotri
Page 11-B
I
Hp
^abbttutal Page
co-ofdirated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
creditors
Dr. Max A. lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
1
i
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
great American JEWISH institutions Inside [udaica
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
B'nai B'rith
evening of October 13,
12 Jews gathered in the
Ker Cafe on Essex Street
in New York City. Their prime
purpose was to establish a mut-
aid, sick and death benefit
odge to provide for the needs
humble immigrants, a prob-
which was growing in in-
insfty but with which the Jew-
I community had thus far fail-
u to cope.
The American Jewish com-
munity at that time consisted of
10,000 men, women and
children Waves of European
Brants, mostly poor, were
^Bng the American scene,
was ill-prepared to re-
I them. Organized Jewish
entered around the syna-
the Jewish community
Boo weak and too divided
Ber effective material as-
Hce and cultural guidance
Ae Jews arriving in great
HJbers from abroad.
12 men in the Essex
tt cafe that night had met
something about it. In the
glow of the dining cm-
jm, a synagogue leader,
Jones, proposed the for-
ion of a society which, while
ed on the teachings of Juda-
would be free in its deli-
ations from everything dog-
ic and doctrinal, and would
able to unite in a common
Dse all Jews.
JCH A society, he was con-
ced, would not only develop
iial understanding and re-
st among the various sec-
of American Jewry and
! harmony in Jewish life,
would also contribute mate-
lv tlo the intellectual and
ral advancement of the Jew-
community.
ius was born what is now
world's oldest and largest
vish service organization
B'rith (Sons of the Cove-
it). Henry Jones is consid-
the principal founder.
iThe beginning of the worn-
I's movement in B'nai B'rith
tes from 1909, when a group
San Francisco women organ-
ed Auxiliary No. 1. Over the
^ars, with a Women's Supreme
Duncil, they have developed
namic programs of their own
addition to their primary
tsponsibilitv as auxiliary work-
rs for B'nai B'rith.
In 1913 the Anti-Defamation
eague of B'nai B'rith was or-
anized. dedicated to the de-
Inse of the Jewish name against
Blumny and caricature.
In 1920, without abandoning
tie important areas of philan-
lropy and fraternity, B'nai
'rith's emphasis shifted to ren-
lering the widest possible serv-
ce for its people by aiding in
*ie construction of a more posi-
tive, vital and creative Jewish
fcommunity.
THIS WAS approached pri-
narily by the B'nai B'rith youth
fiovements. The Hlllel Founda-
ions. established in 1923, carry
Dn the work of teaching, coun-
seling and providing for the re-
[ligious needs of Jewish students
I on college campuses.
They have undertaken the
[ task of making Jewish religious
and cultural values vital and
relevant to the college genera-
tion. The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization was also founded
in 1923 and the Vocational Serv-
ice Bureau In 1938.
Since 1865, B'nai B'rith has
taken a keen interest in the
I. land of Israel and played an im-
portant part in support of the
struggle for a free Israel.
By 1972 B'nai B'rith mem-
bprship had reached approxi-
mately half a million men,
women and youth. There were
1,750 men's lodges and 1,150
women's lodges, 1,300 chapters
in the youth movement, boys
and girls, and the Hillel Foun-
dations were on 285 college
campuses.
B'nai B'rith's program, dedi-
cated to the continunity of
Jewish life, encompasses the
totality of Jewish concerns and
includes many programs in the
interests of the wider commu-
nity.
ITS INVOLVEMENT in world
affairs is conducted through
the B'nai B'rith International
Council, established in 1959,
with offices in several coun-
tries. It is represented in the
governing councils of key world
Jewish organizations. It pub-
lishes the National Jewish
Monthly.
The influence of B'nai B'rith
in Jewish life and throughout
the world is far too vast to be
summed up in a few paragraphs.
But looking back to its 19th-
century beginnings, its growth
and achievements are a revela-
tion of the tremendous power
of an idea given root and
nurtured by forward-looking
men.
B'nai B'rith is a living monu-
ment to the humanity and en-
terprise of American Jews.
Bibliography
Encyclopedia Judaica, Jeru-
salem, 1971. "B'nai B'rith,"
"This Is B'nai B'rith."
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Q. Does exorcism exist In
Judaism?
A. You don't have to be a
Catholic to be exorcised despite
the impression left by the pop-
ular film. "Exorcism" means the
expulsion of evil spirits by
spells, the authoritative En-
cyclopaedia Judaica states.
The melancholia of King Saul
was from an evil spirit which
David's harp playing drove
away. In the "Testament of
Solomon," a pseudoepigraphic
work of uncertain date, the nar-
rator states that during the con-
struction of the Temple, King
Solomon's overseer was plagued
by a demon; the angel Michael
gave Solomon a ring with which
he exorcised the demon.
The belief in evil spirits enter-
ing into living persons, causing
mental illness, talking through
the possessed's mouth and rep-
resenting a separate and alien
personality, has existed up to
the present time.
WHILE originally evil spirits
were considered devils or de-
mons which entered the body of
a sick person, at a later period
they are thought to be the
spirits of dead persons who have
become demons. Since the 17th
century the term "dibbuk" for
these spirits was introduced into
literature from the spoken lan-
guage of German and Polish
Jews.
The literature of the disciples
of the famous 16th-century kab-
balist Isaac ben Solomon Luria
contains many stories and "pro-
tocols" about the exorcism of
dibbukim. Numerous manu-
scripts present detailed instruc-
tions on how to exorcise them.
ililiHHiilfiitiiiiiiimii "linn**! irmiii';
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Metzora
''And the priest shall look, and, behold, if the
plague of leprosy be healed in the leper" (Lev. 13.3).
METZORA This portion describes the laws for j
the purification of the leper after he is healed. "Then j
shall the priest command to take for him that is to be
cleansed two living clean birds, and cedar-wood, and
scarlet, and hyssop. And the priest shall command to
kill one of the birds in an earthen vessel over running
water. As for the living bird, he shall take it, and the
cedar-wood, and the scarlet, and the hyssop, and shall
dip them and the living bird in the blood of the bird
that was killed over the running water. And he shall
sprinkle upon him that is to be cleansed from the lep-
rosy seven times, and shall pronounce him clean, and j
shall dwell outside his tent seven days. And it shall be '\
that is to be cleansed shall wash his clothes, and shave j
off all his hair, and bathe himself in water, and he shall
be clean; and after that he may come into the camp, but
shall dwell outside his tent seven days. And if shall be
00 the seventh day, that he shall shave all his hair off
his head and his beard and his eyebrows and he j
shall bathe his flesh in water, and he shall be clean"
(Leviticus 14.4-9). Finally, after bringing an offering to j
the priest on the eighth day, the former leper shall be
formally clean.
Leprosy was understood to affect objects as well as
people. The portion describes the various cases of lep-
rosy and prescribes their treatment: "This is the law
for all manner of plague of leprosy, and for a scall;
and for the leprosy of a garment, and for a house; and
for a rising, and for a scab, and for a bright spot; to
teach when it is unclean, and when it is clean; this is
the law of leprosy" (Leviticus 14.54-57).
Interreligious Dialogue:
Is There Any Sense in It?
By RABBI SOL LANDAU
Beth David Congregation
During the last few years,
many negative comments have
been expressed in some Jew-
ish quarters about the effective-
ness of the Christian-Jewish
dialogue. The decisions of the
Vatican in 1965 had brought
Ecumenism to the fore and had
been welcomed as a major
breakthrough in interreligious
relationships and especially in
Catholic-Jewish understanding.
Many conferences were call-
ed under joint auspices nation-
ally and regionally. Fellowships
of synagogues and churches be-
gan to meet and interfaith serv-
ices became quite popular.
But with the advent of the
Six-Day War the dialogue al-
most came to a stop, as very
little coperative action was
taken by Christian institutions,
although there were statements
from some outstanding Chris-
tian leaders, such as this one in
May, 1967, calling on ". Our
fellow Americans of all persua-
sions and groupings and on the
Administration to support the
independence, integrity and
freedom of Israel."
RABBI BALFOUR Brick-
ner, director of the Commission
of Interfaith Activities of Amer-
ican Reform Judaism, speaking
before the Central Conference
of American Rabbis in Los An-
geles in 1967, said that the "or-
ganized church seemed unable
to take a strong stand on what
it considered to be a political
issue."
But, he added, "the survival
of the Jewish people is not a
political issue." He charged that
the church "by its silence, by
peaceful calls for peace, sug-
gesting that the matter be
placed in the lap of a then par-
ticularly paralyzed United Na-
tions also failed the cause of
world peace." And, finally, he
said that the American Jewish
Committee's early estimate of
Christian support was "an ex-
aggerated oversimplification."
While a more positive re-
sponse was given by church
leaders in the wake of the Yom
Kippur War and subsequent
guerrilla atrocities, the Chris-
tian-Jewish dialogue remained
fairly dormant. Nevertheless,
there are sporadic activities re-
ported from Brotherhood
Week, which falls between
Washington's and Lincolns'
birthdays, to joint projects un-
dertaken by various interreligi-
ous commissions. But the con-
sensus seems to be that they
are of very little avail and so
people rarely participate in
them.
I feel that the Christian-Jew-
ish dialogue must not only con-
tinue but must be renewed, for
only through dialogue can we
hope to improve relations and
deepen understanding between
the groups. Certainly, isolation
of each faith from the others
can only strengthen or recon-
firm myths and intensify areas
of misunderstanding and hostil-
ity.
THERE ARE those difficult
or complex areas that are in-
herent in the very theory of
Christianity, which posits an ex-
clusive place for salvation. The
New Testament contains a num-
ber of books with strong pol-
emical anti-Jewish descriptions
the much-repeated designa-
tion of the Jew as the "God-
killer," for example. These are
part of the blocks in the dial-
ogue. There are, however, nego-
tiations between the faith groups
that for a number of years have
worked on the elimination of
anti-Jewish references, at least
in the textbooks.
Natural difficulties that de-
velop as a result of social and
economic competitive activities
add to the problems of inter-
group relations. If one were to
take for granted the argument
that ecumenism has not accom-
plished much, the question
"What is the alternative?" then
arises. The answer must be "No
communication and subsequent
isolation. Which has a greater
chance of success?"
In the confrontation of rela-
tionships within a complex so-
cietal picture where the moral
climate has become weak and
shallow, assertive ecumenism
may become an instrument to
undergird the societal founda-
tion.
NOT ONLY can it bring Jew
and Christian closer, teach each
other mutual rest>ect, more of
each other's theology, philoso-
phy and customs, but it will
also bring people closer as hu-
mans, through regular intel-
lectual exchange and social
interplay.
In the Miami area there are
some, although weak, contin-
uing efforts in the Christian-
Jewish dialogue that are con-
ducted by the ADL and the
NCCJ. There are the annual
brotherhood events and the in-
terfaith women's meetings. How-
ever, they need strength, co-
ordination and direction so that
the maximum understanding in
respect and dignity of each are
achieved.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biacayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 67B-40O0. Rabbi Solomon
Schlff, Executive Vice Preeldent.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St.. Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4553. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1820 NE 163rd St., North Miami
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
Beach, Fla. 83162. 947-SOM. Rabkl
UJ
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
9 NISAN 6:18
U)
TV Programs
Sunday, April 11
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a-m.
Boat!
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Temple Beth Shalom
Hollywood


Page 12-B
+Jelstincr***n
Friday, April 9, 1976
^1_|->-I*Ijj**'-*Iii|-*H'ii-^ -* ** tk l> ** ^^-*-*-
#>^%^X^^
I
jSg4 Miifuak
BRUCE DOYLE
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Doyle's
son, Bruce, will become a Bar
Mitzvah at Beth Torah Congre-
gation on Saturday evening at 7.
A seventh-grader at John F.
Kennedy Junior High, Bruce is
a sports enthusiast and reci-
pient of the American Legion
Award.
Special guests will include
his great-grandmother, Mrs.
Lena Fishman, and his grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Stein and Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Doyle.
it -tt -it
YALE ALEXANDER
Yale, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Gerald Alexander, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday at Temple Emanu-
El.
A student in the eighth-grade
ISRAEL
STAMPS
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CURRENT
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Memrfectvrers...
UNI DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER BLINDS.
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DORWIN'S
1572 WASHINGTON AVE.
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WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
at Nautilus Junior High, Yale is
active in its Social Studies Club
as well as in USY at Temple
Emanu-El. He enjoys sketching,
swimming and water-skiing-
Yale's parents will host the
kiddush following services and
a reception Sunday at the Eden
Roc Hotel, where special guests
include his grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Sklarsky and Mrs.
Anna Alexander; his brothers.
Brad and Jack, and his sister,
Loren. Out-of-town guests in-
clude Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Ep-
stein of Rochester and Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Zipem of New
York City.
h -Cr &
GEURCS GPTMAN
Mr. and Mrs. Salomon Gut-
man's son, George, will become
a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
Temple Emanu-El.
A member of the Dalet Class
at Temple Emanu-El Religious
School, George is on the Rabbi's
Honor Roll for Hebrew Studies
and in a special program for
gifted children at Ida M. Fisher
Junior High, where he is in the
seventh-grade.
Mr. and Mrs.' Gutman will
host the kiddush following serv-
ices and a reception later in the
day at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Special guests will include
George's grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Joel Gutman and Jamie
Judelevski, and his brothers,
Jose and Albert. Out-of-town
guests include Sergio Gutman
and Jack Kloss of California,
and Joe Goodman and Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Goodman of Chi-
cago.
Israel Army's Chief Cantor
To Do One-Man Show Here
Yale Alexander George Gutman
KENNETH MERKER
Kenneth, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Manuel Merker, will be a Bar
Mitzvah at Temple Zamora on
Mturuay at 9 a.m.
Kenneth attends Rockway
Junior High School and is inter-
ested in sports, especially bowl-
ling and swimming.
An evening reception will be
held at the Hampshire Inn, host-
ed by his parents.
Out-of-town guests include
Gene Merker and Naomi and
Ilene Tobisman.
it &
DAVID C SIEGEL
David Charles, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Siegel, will cele-
brate his Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day at 11:15 a.m. at Temple Ju-
dea of Coral Gables.
Moshe Krause, known for his
original one man program,
"Dash Me Anash," will appear
for the first time in Florida at
the Hebrew Academy Auditori-
um under the sponsorship of the
Talmudic College of Florida,
Sunday, April 18, at 8:30 p.m.
After being liberated from
Bergen-Belsen, Kraus, who was
bom into a Hassidic family in
Russia, emigrated to Israel,
where he became Chief Cantor
of the Israel Arniy (Res.).
Tickets for his concert or
further information are avail-
able at the Talmudic College.
Tickets are also available "at the
Paramount Bakery and the
American-Israeli Religious Store
in Miami Beach.
^OscoLJCMS,
BB Sholem Udga
To Install Off ken
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge No.
1024 will install officers on Sun-
day, April 11, at the Sheraton
Four Ambassadors.
They are: Andrew Tibor,
president; William G. Thomp-
son, Robert J. Lewison and Nor-
man Lieberman, vice presi-
dents; Albert Zisman, treasurer;
Morey Feld, financial secretary;
Andre Klein, recording and cor-
responding secretary; Chester
Leiter, guardian; Kenneth Hoff-
man, chaplain; William G.
Thompson, historian.
A JEWISH CAMP ... FOR JEWISH YOUTH
CAMP JUDAEA
Ml will K M[iCN CMPlN0SSOCIHON
A truly unique experience in living
Judaism is the goal of Camp Judaea
which is located in the foothills of
the Smoky Mountains of Hender-
sonville. North Carolina. The 100
acre campus offers an Olympic-
sized swimming pool and lake for
boating and fishing, all sports, with
special attention to the emotional
and physical well-being of the indi-
vidual camper.
Arts & Crafts Horseback Riding
Overnights
Sports Music Swimming
Hiking Drama Canoeing Day Trips
Dates are: First Session June 23-July 19
Second Session July 21-August 16
Fees are: $470.00 tuition 1 session
$450.00 second child in family
$925.00 season
Further information can be obtained by callina947Jg^
Owned & sponsored by HADASSAH
Wouldn't You Like Your Chil
To Attend the ONLY Camp
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TOTAL @ INDORSEMENT
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For Miami
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Call
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l SHBUIY AfTUAUM.
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ENTERTAINMENT 'INFORMAL
Write for Brochure or Phone MIAMI OFFICE (3051 534 8356
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t
camp hiGhUndeR
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A Residential Camp for Boys and GMs Ages 7-1S
offers you a wide selection of activities
and times to fit every vacation plan
with 2-4-5-9 week sessions beginning Juno 19
and one week of popular Family Camping Aug. 23-29
PROGRAM OFFERINGS:
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Rock Climbing
Nature Study
Hiking
Gymnastics Dance
Tennis
Land Sports
Wrestling
Horseback Riding
Archery
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Swimming
Rrflery
OPEN ADMISSIONS POLICY
For further information contact Mr. Tim T. Harris,
PINE CREST SCHOOL
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INQUIRIES INVITED
P.O. BOX 41-4450, NORMANDY BJL
MIAMI BEACH, HA. 33141
LIMITED OPENINGS -CALL NOW
1-305-866-3045


a, April 9, 1976
+Je*istifhr*f/ani
Page 13-B
Religious Services
MIAMI
-VAT SHALOM CONGREQA-
I. MB 8W 7th Ave. Orthodox.
Zvi Raphaely. Canter Aron
flAron 1
a-----------
EMES CONGREGATION.
19th Ave. Coneervative.
Sol Pakowltz. 8
M TEMPLE. 6950 N. Ken-
Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
rd. Aaaoclata Rabbi Mitchell
a
BREIRA CONGREGATION.
W 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Tabachnikoff. S-A
DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
atlve. Rabbi Sol Landau.
William Lipaon. 4.A
I DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
St. Conaervatlve. Rabbi Sol
Tau. Cantor William Lipaon. 4-B
KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Traditional. Rabbi Max 8ha-
Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
utterman. e
TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW th
naarvatlve. Rabbi Charlee Ru-
ISRAEL AND GREATER Ml'
YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
at Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
nan. S-A
----------------
RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
NW 183rd St. Conaervatlve.
bbl Victor D. Zwelllng. Cantor
Ik Lerner. M
AMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ive., Suite 308. Conoaervatlve. 8
ION TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
faervative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
I Cantor Errol Helfman. 16
HIALEAH
HFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 981 E.
4th Ave. Conaervative. 16
----------------
NORTH MIAMI
[BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121 at St. Conaervatlve. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Flngarer. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamln. S8
a--------------
MIAMI BEACH
AOUOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Or. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Qroaa. 8
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1545
Jeffereon Ave. Conaervatlve. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breoh.
20
--------------a
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chaae Ava. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
iah. Cantor David Convlaer. 21
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conaarvatlve.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardelnl. 21-A
ETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbl Or. Abraham I.
Jacob ion. 22-B
-------------a
CHABAD HOUSE. 1401 Alton Rd.
Orthodox. Rabbi Joaeph Biiton. (6
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Waahington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbl Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN 8EPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 718 Waahington
- Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Melr Maellah
-Melemed. ________ a'A
EMANU.EL TEMPLE. 1701 Waeh-
Ington Ave. Conaervatlve. Dr. Irving
Lehrman. Canter Zvi Adler. 24
8EPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. (MS
Colllne Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmlaa. 31
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1644
Waahington Ave. Orthodox. 32
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Cauaeway.
Conaervatlve. Cantor Murray Yav.
neh. 82-A
--------------a
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH 8EFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbl Mordecai Chalmovlte.
32-B
--------------a---------------
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1026
NE Miami Gardena Or. Conaerva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Fraedman. Can-
tor Ian Alparn. St
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Rellgioue Community Center. 19261
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. S3-A
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1061 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
aervative. Dr. Max A. Llpachltz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mandelaon. 84
SEPHARDIC JEWI8H CENTER. 671
NE 171et St Orthodox. Rabbl Ne-
aim Qambach. Cantor Joaaph Na-
houm. Sfl-A
kEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
|AM I. 187 NE 19th St. Reform.
bbl Joaeph R. Narot. 10
--------------a--------------
lAELITE CENTER. 3176 SW 25th
Conaervatlve. Rabbl Solomon
Idenbarg. Cantor Nathan Par
a. 11
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbl
Ralph P. Klngaley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 87
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18161 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick. 38
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171at St. Orthodox.
Rabbl Zev Leff. 39
-----------a-----------
CORAl GABIES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 8650 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. El-
eenetat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
OLOM TEMPLE. 8766 SW 16th
Conaervatlve. Rabbl David M.
iron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Coneervative. Rabbl Maurice Klein.
41
4.AEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former.
Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunaet Or. Re-
arm. Rebbi Joeeph R. Narot. 13-A
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. Unlvereity of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Servicea. Rabbi Richard A.
Davla.
Davia. 68
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
laaac D. Vine. 60
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Coneervative.
51
FORT LAUDEIDAiE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conaervatlve.
Rabbi Philip A. LabowlU. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Rabbl Joel
S. Goor. Cantor Jerome Klement.
43
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th 8t. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
--------------a--------------
BETH JACOB. 301 Waahington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbl Shmary:iu T.
> Swlraky. Cantor Maurice Mamcheo.
19
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 67th St. Coneervative. Rabbi
lerael Zimmerman. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moehe Bomzer. 62
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH I8RAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Villege Eaet. Coneervative. Rabbi
David Berent. 62
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
eervative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
----------a-----------
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 182 SE 11th Ave.
Conaervatlve. Rabbl Morria A. Skop.
Cantor Yaaeov Renzer. 49
_--------a
CORAl SPRINGS
CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
GREGATION. 3721 N.W. 100th Ave.
Re-form. Rabbl Max Waltz. 44
HAUANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Coneervative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
PEMBROKE PINK
TEMPLE IN THE PINE8, 1900 Unl-
vereity Drive. Coneervative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubln. 63
----------a-----------
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1361 8. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Aaeiatant Rabbi Harvey M Roeen-
fold. 48
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur St. Coneervative. Rabbl Morton
Malavaky. Cantor Irving Gold. 46
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbl Alexander
8. Qroae.
28
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnaton St.
Conaervative. Rabbl David Shapiro.
Aaaoclata Rabbl Chalm 8. Llatfleld.
86
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
YNAGOGUE. 1532 Waahington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tlbor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel.________
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1476 EuclidlAve.
Orthodox. Rabbl David Lehrfleld.
Cantor Abraham 8elf. 8?
LUBAVITCH CONGREGATION 1120
Colline Ave. Orthodox. Rabbl Abra-
ham Korf.
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Coneervative. Rabbi David Ro-
aenfield. 47-B
---------a---------
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbl Robert Frazln. 47-C
J .
MENORAH TEMPLE. 820 78th St
Coneervative. Rabbl Mayer Abramo-
wltt Cantor Nloo Feldman. a
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St and
Tetum Waterway. Conaaivatlyj^Dr.
Eugene Labovlta. Cantor Edward
Klein. ^_ __ _
OHEV SHALOM. 7086 Benl* Or-Or-
thodex. Rabbl Phlnaaa A. Weber-
men.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWI8H CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nobb Hill Rd. Re-
form. Rabbl Arthur 8. Abrama. 84
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNAGOGUE
7478 N.W. 4th St
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 8820 SW 86th St.
Conaervatlve. Rabbl Avrom Draaln.
Cantor Abraham Keetor.
Member of the Rabbinical Aaaoclailon
of Greater aOaaaL
The Miami Beach Community Singers
have made a generous contribution to the
Israel Histadrut Campaign with the funds
earmarked for Kuvat Holim, Histadrut's
health services in Israel. At the presenta-
tion of the check were (from left) Deb-
orah Raichlen, 1st vice president of the
singing group; Samuel Freed, president;
Irving Gordon, executive director of the
Israel Histadrut Campaign of South Flor-
ida; Philip Katzen, treasurer of the Com-
munity Singers; and Louis T. Levin, fi-
nancial secretary. Official presentation of
the contribution will be made at the Third
Seder on behalf of the Histadrut Cam-
paign Sunday, April 18, at the Fontaine-
ble.au Hotel, and honoring Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Newmark.
Members of Beth Torah Congregation's
PEP (Parent Education Program) will
take a trip to "Jewish New York" this
week, on the occasion of graduation from
Hebrew School. Sites to be visited include
the Spanish Portuguese Synagogue, the
United Synagogue of America, the Lower
East Side, and the Jewish Museum. Rabbi
Norman Mussman, educational director
of the congregation, initiated the program
four years ago. Shown above are (stand-
ing, from left) Mrs. Marshall Batpuch,
PEP teacher who will accompany the
group, Douglas Zidel and Bernard Singer;
seated, from left, are David SeMaya,
Maxine Aiken and Jonathan Reick.
The chairman of the advisory committee
for the Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign, Leonard Luria
(left), extended a warm greeting to Gert.
Yigal Allon, Israel's Deputy Prime Min-
ister and Minister for Foreign Affairs
(center), as Mrs. Allon and Sam Roth-
berg, general chairman, State of
Bonds, look on. The meeting was
late February International b
Conference for American and Cc
leaders held at the Fontainebleau
launch the 1976 State of Israel
campaign.



aaavBBaBB
Page 14 B
+Jm1si> ncrkMan
Friday, April 9, 1976
I
Mizrachi Women Laud Swirsky
At Scholarship Luncheon
A gala 50th Jubilee scholar-
ship fund and special gifts
luncheon was held recently at
the Fontainebleau Hotel under
the auspices of the Florida
Council of the American Mizra-
chi Women. The Rambam
Award was presented to dis-
tinguished rabbi and educator
UCA1 NOTKt
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP TMI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OP FLORIDA. IN AND POR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-10126
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAOB
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BALDEMAR ALBORNOZ.
Petitioner.
and
CARMEN LUBNQO AI.BORNOZ
Respondent
TO: CARMEN LUENOO
ALBORNOZ
Mac Irer 665
Santiago. Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for DiaaoluUon of Mar-
riage haa been filed agalnat you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It on
O. FRANK QUESADA. attorney for
Petitioner, Whose address Is 811
Pnce Da Lean Wvo Suite 100. Coral
Cables, Florida SS184. and file tha
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 7, 1(71;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the complaint or petition.
This noUce shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FIORIDIAN
witness my hand and the aeal of
aald court at Miami, Florida on this
29th day of March. 197s
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida,
By M. J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
O. FRANK QUESADA. ESQ.
111 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Suite 100
Coral Cables. Florida SUM
Telephone: 441-2617
Attorney for Petitioner
4/1-9-11-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
POR DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
J. OWYNN PARKER
CASE NO. 74-2021
IN RE: The Estate of
DOROTHY MINTZ. formerly
known as DOROTHY 8MOLEV.
Deceased
NOTICE OP ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE E8TATE AND ALL
OTHER PER80N8 INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of DOROTHY MINTZ, formerly known
as DOROTHY 8MOLEV. Deceased.
File No. 71-2026 la pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse, 78 Weat
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida. The
personal representative of tha estate
Is IRIS EIDELBERO. whose address
Is 27 Adalphl Drive. Jackson, New
Jersey. The name and address of tha
attorney for the persona] representa-
tive Is set forth below.
AH persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim muat be
In writing and must Indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and address
of the creditor or his agent or attor-
ney, and the amount claimed. If tha
claim Is not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be stated. If
the claim la contingent or unliqui-
dated the nature of the uncertainty
shall be atated. If the claim la aecur-
ed. the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to tha clerk to
enable the clerk to mall one copy to
** Personal representative.
An persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notloa of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
woJfd ^ITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICEVto
file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's wlU, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venae
or jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS ANTJ
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FTLBD Wtt
f*J2S8& BARRED.
LAW OFFICES OF
AIN8LEE R. FERDIB
Attorneys for
Personal Representative
Suite 116
717 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables. Florida Mill
(306) 446-2667
By: A IN 8 LEE R FERDDZ
IRIS EIDELBERO, As Personal
Representative of the Batata of
**"& It"""' SMrB""fas
Dorothy Smolev, deceased
4/1-9
Dr. S. T. Swirsky of Miami
Beach before an audience of
200.
The sum of $40,000 was rais-
ed to support the American
Mizrachi Women's three-prong-
ed program in Israel. Proceeds
were allocated to educational
projects, which include compre-
hensive high schools through-
out Israel.
One of the highlights of the
afternoon was a candle-lighting
ceremony honoring those who
had contributed $500 toward the
purchase of a Golden Jubilee
medallion.
Chairperson of the afternoon
was Pearl Schwartz, Florida
Council scholarship fund and
special gifts chairperson. Co-
chairpersons were Bea Young,
national vice president, and
Jeanne Finklestein, past presi-
dent of the Florida Council.
Uai NOTKi
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OP FLORIDA, IN AND POR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Civil Action No. 7S-10O4E
ACTION POR D48SOLUTION
OP MARRIAOB
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HELENE F. WOOD.
Wife,
and
LOREN T. WOOD.
Husband.
TO: LOREN T. WOOD
(residence unknown)
YOU ARB HBRBBT NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to It on
JOSEPH W. MALEK. attorney for
PeUtloner, whose address Is 160 Lin-
coln Road, 8ulte 601, Miami Beach.
Florida 2211*. and file the original
with the dark of the above styled
court on or before May 6, 1976: other-
wise a default will be entered agalnat
yon for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In the Jewish Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and tha seal of
said court at Miami, Florida, on this
29th day of March, 1271.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk. Circuit Court.
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNBBDEN
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK
250 Lincoln Road, Suite 601
Miami Beach, Florida 22129
Attorney for Petitioner
_____________________________4/1-9-14-12
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT POR
DADB COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-1422
Division Neebltt
IN RB: ESTATE OF
LILLIAN KARASEK
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of LILLIAN KARASEK, deceased.
File Number 70-1422, Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is 72 W. Flagler Street. Miami,
Dade County, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate Is MARI-
LYN K. GOLDBERG, whose address
Is 2611 Fort Roberdeau Avenue, Al-
toona, PA 16602. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
AH persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE*
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have Each
claim must be In writing and most
Indicate the basis for the claim, tha
name and addreaa of tha creditor or
h'a agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim la not yet dua.
the date when It wlU become due shall
Saw!!1 'i *5? cUlm contingent 0r
unllQuidated. the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be atated. If tha claim Is
WB* tha security shall be deacrfb-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to tha clerk
Second-time Godmothers who attended
the luncheon on March 24 at Westview
Country Club are (from left) Marion
(Mrs. Stanley) Frehling, an MSMC foun-
der; Ruth (Mrs. Max) Orovitz, a founder
and wife of Mount Sinai's chairman of
the board; Toby (Mrs. Leonard) Fried-
land, a founder; Hattie (Mrs. Samuel)
Friedland, founder, honorary chairman
of Godmothers '76 and wife of the vice
chairman of the board; Marge (Mrs. Irv-
ing) Cowan, a founder and chairman of
Godmothers '71; Mrs. E. E. Bloom, a
Mount Sinai supporter; and Mrs. Lydia
Barham, an Auxiliary member and 23,000-
hour hospital volunteer. At right, Samuel
Gertner, executive vice president of
Mount Sinai, presented a gift to Helene
(Mrs. Murry) Koretzky, chairman of God-
mothers '76, for her work on behalf of
the Medical Center.
UGAl NOTKI
LMAl NOTKt
IECAI NOTKI
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SUN COLLECTION BUREAU at 1896
S.W. Third Avenue, Miami. Florida
33129 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
BISCAYNE BUREAU
OF COLLECTIONS. CORP.
A Fla. Corp.
4/2-9-14-22
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OP THB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OP FLORIDA, IN AND POR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-10127
OBNERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAOB
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JOSE M GARCIA.
Petitioner.
and
LILIAN HERNANDEZ GARCIA.
Respondent.
TO: LILIAN HERNANDEZ
GARCIA
Last known address
Oranja Hotembo
Corrallllo, Las Villas. Cuba
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for DiaaoluUon of Mar-
riage haa been filed against yog and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to It
on GLADYS GBRSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is Stone.
Sostchln A Koss, PA. 101 Northwest
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida 11128,
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 7. 1976; otherwise a default wlU
be entered against you tor the relief
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
Thla notice shall be published one*
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORTDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the aeal of
said court at Miami. Florida on thla
30th day of March. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
._, As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Gladys Geraon
Stone, Sostchln at Koaa, P A
101 nw. llth Avenue
Miami, Florida 12122
Attorney for Petitioner
4/24-14-21
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OP THB
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
POR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 7S-SS7S
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARK PfTTMAN.
Husband,
and
LINDA SUSAN PITTMAN.
Wife.
TO: LINDA 8U8AN PITTMAN
Rancho Santa Crui
Calsado de los Arcos No. 1
Puebla, Puebla, Mexico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage haa been filed against you in
the above styled cause, and you are
required to serve a copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage on the Petitioner's attor-
neys BLITSTEIN A- MOLANS. 1440
N.W. 14th Avenue. Miami. Florida
33126, and Hie the original Answer In
the Offl.ce of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court. General Jurisdiction Division.
73 W. Flagler Street Miami. Florida
on or before the 7th day of May. 1976:
otherwise a default will be entered
agalnat you.
DATED at Miami. Dade County.
Florida this 26th day of March, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, CLERK
Clerk of Circuit Court
T2 W. Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County, Florida
By B. UPPS
(aa Deputy Clerk)
(COURT SEAL)
4/2-9-16-22
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVB SERVICE
l2.T.HJlCL"CU,T COURT OP THB
BLBVBNTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OP FLORIDA. IN AND POR
._.,. DADB COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Civil Action No. 76.10042
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAOB
IN RB: THB MARRIAOB OF
WALTER H. TOMASHUNAS
Husband,
and
BONNIE TOMASHUNAS.
Wife.
TO: BONNIE TOMASHUNAS
____(residence unknown)
YOU ARB HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar.
warn- ga^g^l
to each persons! representative.
All persons interested la tha estate
ttZSeaVS i Notice of Ad-
mliUatratloa haa been mailed are re-
23JI& J5THIN THREE MONTHS
ROM THB DATE OF THB FIRST
POTUCATrON OF THIS N s, ..; ~ n irs/n. attorney lor
PeUtloner. whoae addreaa la 260 Lin-
coln Road, Suits 601. Miami Beach
Florida U12. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May t. 1974: other-
decadent's WUL tb. ewSKefiJS !_{?' ** "*#. i------. # ui*j nnfTj OX in
decedent's win, the qualifications *
the personal representative, or the Te-
nna or Jurisdiction of tha court
ALL CLAIMS DBMJLNDfl AND I^Th" -,' t2XLSlnm
BJBCTIONS NOT wVr?2S t?? ^JSlJlZ!* Indian
NOTICE UNDER
M PICT'TIOUa NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business MderUi, fictitious name of
8. a L IMPORTS at 9166 S.W. 77
Avenue, Apt No. 1001. Miami. Fla.
SS^J'S^' -aid name wit* tha
gy. ***"* Court of Dade
Ooanty, Florida.
JEFF REISMAN
4/1-9-11-11
OBJECTIONS NOT SOILED WILL
BE FOREVER BlBBSlr. "m
, aU .f .*? nnt MpNtattaa of this
^LXn'iar^r^ir'
,_^ ATTORNEY FOR
PKRS2N.A^ R^RBeBNTATIVB:
* WJ?"*1~'J?" ""to "
Miami. FL 11116
277-14(2
4/I-S
complaint or petition.
Thla notloa shall be pubHahed once
aach weekfoT four consecutive weeks
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
3,2 S0"* .*\.1Um'' Fk"*1- tS
29th day of March. 1974.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk .Circuit Coart.
By L. BNEEDEN
... Depeto Clerk
(Circuit Court Baal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK
360 Lincoln Road. Sid t. Ml
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
4/2-9-14-22
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT POR
DADB COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Number 76-1(70
Division JOHN R. BLANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK LIPSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICB OP ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIM8 OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THB ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARB HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of JACK LIPSTEIN, deceased File
Number 76-1670. Pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Courthouse. 71
West Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of tha
estate la MARTHA LIPSTEIN, whoae
?/. ""J* ,.Ia!*n Miami Beach. Florida. The name and
addreaa of the personal representa-
tive a attorney are set forth below
AD persons having claims or de-
IBSMl aSalAai tha estate are requir-
ed^ WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICB
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have. Each
5hEI*7& bK* S writing and must
Indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and addreaa of the creditor or
ciaiwSf t?r.5ttor,n?r- and tn "mount
claimed If the claim la not yet due.
iSIni -wn5.-u wU1 <:om due
shall be atated If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If {he
a^il/^H^ ,^* Morlty shall b.
fgfflg* Tnf claimant shall deUver
u"lc,nt eopfM of the claim to the
22? ff n,?U <='"* toTnali on!
to .iS"**1 Interested In the estate
Ja THB DATE OF THE nnn
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTlCIl
tS.?'* ",? options thsy maThave
that challenges the valldltybf th!
me personal representative aa v.
Batata of JACK UPSTBIN
ATTORNEY FOR***^
4/2-9
NOTICE UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, Jeslrlng to engage la
business under the fictitious name of
THB INSTITUTE OF RATIONAL
LIVING at 826 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, Florida Intends to reg-
ister aald name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Flor-
ida.
INSTITUTE OF HUMAN
RELATIONS. INC.
By: STEPHEN H. CYPEN.
Assistant Secretary
CYPEN aV NEVTNS
Attorneys for Applicant
826 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
1/19-26 4/1-9
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OP THB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND POR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 79-92S1
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAOB
IN RE:
The marriage of:
cynthia Mclaughlin.
Wife,
and
edward l. Mclaughlin.
Husband.
TO: EDWARD L. McLAUOHLIN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage haa been filed and com-
menced In this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-,
ten defenses, if any, to it on LYONS
AND SMITH. P.A.. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose addreea Is 1220 N.W.
7th Street, Miami, Florida 22126, and
rile the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before April
30, 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or peti-
tion
Thla notice shall be published onoa
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNES8 my hand and and tha
seal of said court at Miami. Florida
on thla 23rd day of March, 1974
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B. LIPPS
.. .. A* Dl>uty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LYONS AND SMITH. P.A
By: RICHARD W. LYONS
1230 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Attorney for Petitioner
/26 4/2-9-14
NOTICE UNDER
____FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the flcUUous name of
LAC CUTTINO SERVICE atelll
&Z- ,1M 5 Pl- V in-
tend to register said name with the
Counkty,FlohriedaC,rCUlt CUrt 3 "*
. JOSE LOPEZ (0%
8ANTIAQO CABRERA 60%
8/19-26 4/2-1
NOTICE UNDBR
NOT^'ls'^REBY^EN tha,
SS"^8 ,?n>ANC CENTER S
tolLS AS*' M1an"- "B, mtend
\, Hf%* *"ld nam with the Clerk
SstSL*-1 Court D'de *35
WOMENS GUIDANCE CENTER. INC
_ a Fla. Corp. ~" v'
EUNICE M. TIMM
_ STEVEN LORDE
EDWARD LBB ROBBINS
________________________1/16 4/1-9-H
..NOTICE UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAMB law
^gWCla HEREBY GIVBN that
the undersigned, desiring to engagala
ftr**""**. the ttoUkmfnSE of
22?wP2E5 HA*R STYLISTS at
"star said name with tha Clark of tk.
Ctrcul, court of Dad. tSsSlfi!
atavSSSi RODRIOUia H
MADELEINE DOMINOOT 60%
1/iS-Sa 4/S-t


April 9, 1976
-JewlstiHcrkMan
Page 15-B
LfSAL NOTKI
UGAl NOTta
UEtAl NOTKI
UGAl NOTKI
ISTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
j CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
LORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
IL ACTION NO. 76-917B
VL JURISDICTION DIVISION
riON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
[THE MARRIAOE OP:
, JAIME CABFEJO.
band,
CABRBJO,
ANA CABRBJO
ira T1A No. 7017
. U, Colombia
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
action for Dissolution of Mar-
been filed acalnat you and
required to serve a copy of
tten defenses. It any. to It
Lv Canicarte. Esq., attor-
Petltloner. whose address Is
W. 7lh Street. Miami, Flor-
~ file the original with the clerk
h above styled court on or be-
rtl 30th, 1976; otherwise a de-
ll be entered agalne.t you for
iMIef demanded In the complaint
ptltlon.
notice shall be published once
reek for four oonsecutlve weeks
BE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
^NBSS my hand and the seal
court at Miami, Florida on this
'day of March. 1976.
[ RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. Herrera
Aa Deputy Clerk
it Court Seal)
T L CARRICARTB. ESQ.
N.W. 7th Street
I, Florida 31125
ttorney for Petitioner
m No. 649-7917
1/21 4/2-9-16
THI CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
rH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
DR DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 74-SSM
URAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
D: The marriage, of
lES MAREE.
Husband.
and
UJNE MAREE.
Wife.
TOU. EARLINE MAREE. resi-
les unknown, are lequlred to file
answer to the petition for dlaso-
on of marriage and other relief con-
ning the following; property In Dads
inty, Florida:
ot 1. Block 12. THIRD ADDI-
TION TO STARLIGHT, accord-
ng to the Plat thereof, aa record-
In Plat Book 94, Pace 62. of
lie Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
/k/a Ittl N.W. 107 Drive.
Miami. Florida.
tlth the Clerk of the above Court and
ve a copy thereof upon the petl-
oner's attorney. Herman Cohen.
Q... Ml S.W. 1st Street. Miami,
or I da, 11110, on or before April 10.
71, or else petition will be confessed,
kted: Mar. 16. 1976
Richard P. Blinker,
Clerk, Circuit Court
By M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
1/11-11 4/1-1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-1544
Division FRANK B. DOWLINO
RE: ESTATE OF
3KAHAM ZIMBER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HAVINO
VIMS OK DEMANDS AOAINST
IE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
THER PERSONS INTERESTED
THE ESTATE:
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
bat the administration of ths estate
1 ABRAHAM ZIMBER. deceased. File
lumber 76-1564, Is pending; in the Cir-
ult Court for Dade County. Florida,
robate Division, the address of which
71 West Flagler, Miami, Florida
1110. The personal representative of
be estate Is SHIRLEY SCHARF
rhose adress Is 11111 BIscayne Blvd.,
flami, Fla. The name and address of
be personal representative's attorney
re set forth below.
All persons having; claims or de-
Hands against the estate are requlr-
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
KOM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
file with the clerk ot the above
Durt a written statement of any
Kim or demand they may have. Each
aim must be in writing; and must
kdlcale the basis for the claim, the
ime and address of the creditor or
[Is agent or attorney, and the amount
Uaimed. If the claim in not yet due,
be date when it will become due shall
stated. If the claim Is contingent or
^liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
ainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
ecured, the security shall be descrlb-
1. The claimant shall deliver suffl-
aent copies of the claim to the clerk
enable the clerk to mall one copy
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
iilred, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
TIOM THE DATE OF THE FIR8T
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
file any objections they may have
bat challenges the validity of the
Decedent's will, the qualifications of
"he personal representative, or the ve-
bue or jurisdiction of the court.
A"LL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
REJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
[BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of tbe first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 9.
1971.
SHIRLEY SCHARF
As Personal Representative of the
Estate ot ABRAHAM ZIMBER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
[HARRY ZUKBRNICK
[420 Lincoln Rd.
flami Beach. Fl. Mill
lephone: 6M-7M7
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
in the Circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit of
florida, in and for
dade county
civil action no. 7-10177
action for dissolution
of marriaoe
general jurisdiction division
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHNNIE WALKER, Husband
and
ALMA JEWELL WALKER, Wife.
TO: ALMA JEWELL WALKER.
Wife
C/O ALMA J. ROGERS
1604 HUNT8VILLE ROAD
BIRMINOHAM. ALABAMA
36214
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to It
on BERNARD A. WIEDER. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 407
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Florida
3H39, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before May 5, 1976; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWI8H FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
ot said court at Miami, Florida on this
10th day of March, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By R. M. KISSEE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BERNARD A WIEDER
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 31131
Attorney for Petitioner
4/2-1-11-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
STUDIO CENTER, LTD. at 14176
NE. 10 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI.
FLA. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
STEVEN CUIFFO
4/1-t-ll-H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to encage la
business under the fictitious name of
ANIMAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE at
8010 N.E. Second Avenue, Miami, Floi
Ida Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dad*
County, Florida.
PETFECTION, INC.
Jeffrey Kwasnek, Proprietor
8TEPHEN_J. AVRACH
Attorney for Petfectlon. Inc.
410 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida Milt
t/M 4/1-t-i*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-8341
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
MARIA C. DIXON,
Petitioner,
and
WILLIAM DDCON.
Respondent.
TO: William Dizon
6024 Parkland Court, No. 101
District Heights. Maryland
20028 _____
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on LAW OFFICES OF BURNS *
ARNOVITZ, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 450, Miami Peach. Florida, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before April
21, 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
15th day of March, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEBDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF BURNS A
ARNOVITZ
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 450
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
1/11-16 4/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-t42
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
IN RE: The marriage of
CHERISNA PIERRE wife, and
THEODORE PIERRE, husband.
TO: THEODORE PIERRE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
herein on the Petitioner's Attorney.
MURRAY Z. KLEIN. Suite 800. Sey-
bold Building. 16 N.E. 1st St.. Miami
Florida, and file the original in the
office ot the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or beiore April 10, 1978, or said
cause will be taken as confessed by
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
D'ANGELO'S FA8HION8 OF MIAMI
at 1096 N.W. 11 St.. Miami. Fla. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ABIDIO SUAKEZ
4/26 4/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO.TS-SUZ
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE:
AMELIA IGLESIA DE CIJE8TA.
Wife,
and
JOSE MANUEL CUE8TA.
Husband.
TO: JOSE MANUEL CUE8TA
Preveaos. Castro de Rey
Lugo, Spain
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been tiled against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to it en
O. FRANK QUB8ADA. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 816 Ponce
De Leon Blvd., Suite 100, Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 11114. and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 21, 1971; oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my band and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
16th day of March, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By R M. KISSEE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
G. FRANK QUE8ADA, ESQ.
136 Ponce De Leon Blvd.
Suite 100
Coral Gables. Florida 11114
(Telephone446-2517)
Attorney for Petitioner
1/11-26 4/1-1
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 74-8414
GENERAL JURISDICTION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ANNE HART.
Petitioner,
vs.
HENRY HART,
Respondent.
You, HENRY HART. RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN, are hereby notified to
serve a copy ot your Answer to the
Dissolution of Marriage filed against
you, upon petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida Mill, and
file original with Clerk of Court oa
or before April M. 1976; otherwise the
Petition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 16th day of March.
1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
1/19-26 4/2-9
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 768418
GENERAL JURISDICTION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
TERM1DIEU ANDRE.
Petitioner.
MARY M. ANDRE.
Respondent.
You, MARY M. ANDRE Residence
Unknown, are hereby notified to serve
a copy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed against you,
upon husband's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQ., 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 23136, and
file original with Clerk of cv art on
or before April 23, 1976; other-rise the
Petition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 16th day of March. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clark
1/19-21 4/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 76-tM1
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
DeNormandle. Frank,
Husband,
and
DeNormandle, Amanda.
Wife.
YOU, AMANDA DeNormandle. 14
Lincoln Street. Glenview, Illinois
60025. are required to file your an-
swer to the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the above
Court and serve a copy thereof upon
petitioner's attorney, Herman Cohen,
Esq., 622 S.W. 1st Street. Miami.
Florida, 33130, on or before April 10,
1976, or else petition will be confessed.
Dated: Mar. 19. 1976
Richard P. Blinker.
Clerk, Circuit Court
By M. S. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
1/21 4/2-9-11
you.
DATED this 24th day of March. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
l/M 4/2-9-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious names of
REEF
AND
REEF EAST
at 7180 N.W. 66 St.. Miami. Fla. In-
tends to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
,'ounty, Florida.
RESEARCH ECOLOGICAL
ENTERPRISES OF FLORIDA, INC.
a Fla. Corp.
STEPHEN A. MICHELBON. Pre*.
LEVINE. RECKSON A REED
Attorneys for applicant
1/24 4/1-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-S67M
(Judge John V. Ferguson)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
Z-MAR CORP.,
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
WILLIAM NECKMAN. el al..
Defendants.
TO: WILLIAM NECKMAN
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
MAILING ADDRESS:
111 N.E. Second Avenue
Congress Building, Suite No. 1711
Miami, Florida Mill.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to Foreclose a Mort-
gage on the following described prop-
erty in Dade County, Florida,
"The S V* of the N H ot the
NW M of the NW % of the NB hi
of Section 19, Township 62, South,
Range 41 East, leas the West M
feet and less the East 413.90 feet,
lying and being In Dade County,
Florida, together with the building
and Improvements thereon erected,"
has been filed against you and you
are hereby required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If any, to
It on ARTHUR D. FRISHMAN, Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address Is 410
Lincoln Road, Suite No. 210, Miami
Beach, Florida, and file the original
with the Clerk of the above styled
Court, on or before APRIL 21, 1976.
otherwise a Judgment may be entered
against you for the relief demanded In
the complaint.
witness my hand and the seal of
said Court on March 16. 1976.
Richard P. Brlnker
as Clerk of said Court
BY: L SNEEDEN
as Deputy Clerk
_______________________6/19-16 4/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-8685
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
KAY BURNS
Wife
and
ROY JENNINGS BURNS
Husband
TO: Roy Jennings Burns
Rt. 4 Box 41
c/o Lakeview Trailer Park
Grand Rapids. Minnesota 66744
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on Stanley E. Goodman, attorney tor
Petitioner, whose address Is 2688 N.W.
62nd Street, Miami. Florida, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before April
M, 1976; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court at Miami, Florida on this
16th day of March. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY B GOODMAN
2688 N.W. 62nd Street
Miami, Florida 31147
Attorney for Petitioner
3/19-26 4/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
SOLVIRO TECHNIQUES at 1655 N.E
115 Street, Apt. 6-B, North Miami,
Fla. Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
SOL-BRGY OF FLORIDA. INC.
A Fla. Corp.
BY: MORRIS TAITE, PRESIDENT
KENNETH N. ReKANT
Attorney for applicant
________________________3/19-26 4/1-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE PLACE FOR STEAK at 1335
79th Street Causeway. Miami, Dade
County, Florida Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
SOUTHERN CATERERS OF
NORTH BAY VILLAGE, INC.
SHIRLEY WOOLF. ESQ.
Attorney for Southern Caterers of
North Bay Village. Inc.
Suite 211. 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
3/26 4/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE CON-
SULTANTS at 11601 S.W. 64 Avenue,
Miami, Fla. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
PEGGY BIEIJJY
Sole Owner
(Registered Real Estate Broker)
________________________3/26 4/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
INLAND INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES
at 1440 N.B 131 St., North Miami.
Fla. Intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
OAYLA SUE LEVIN
ADA FRIEDKTN
IRENE ABEL
Nelson, Feldman ft Davidson
Attorneys for Applicants
1/16 4/1-9-14
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of JERRY AND YVONNE'S DINER
at number 13900 BIscayne Blvd.. In
the City of North Miami Beach. Flor-
ida, Intends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at North Miami Beach, Flor-
ida, this 1st day of April. 1976
CRQSSMAN BROTHERS, INC.
By: Philip J. Grossman. President
Attorney for Applicant
Mortimer 8. Cohen
Suite 800 Alnsley Bldg.
14 N.E. 1st Ave.
Miami. Florida 33132
4/9-16-21-10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of VI8ION EYE GLASSES and VI-
SION OPTICS at 946 East 25th Street.
Hialeah, Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
JOHN COSCUELA 100%
4/2-9-16-11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-9SSS
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE PETBR80N. Wife.
and
TIMOTHY JOSEPH PETER80N.
Husband.
TO:
MR TIMOTHY JOSEPH
PETERSON
Residence Unknown _______
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy ot
your written defenses, If any. to it
on Kwltney, Kroop ft ScheinbertT.
P. A., attorneys for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512.
Miami Beach. Florida, and file tns
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 6. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
W1TNES8 my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
26th day of March. 1978.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court.
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
KWITNEY, KROOP ft
SCHEINBERO, PA.
420 Lincoln RoadSuite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorneys for Petitioner
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-1836
Division Blsnton
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROIJ3 ALLEN
Deceased .._...
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
,NYOUEARlATHEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of HAROLD ALLEN, deceased. File
Number 76-1835, Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is Circuit Court of Dade County. Pro-
bate Division. Dade County Court-
house, Miami. Florida 33101. The per-
sonal representative of the estate Is
JULIA ALLEN, whose address Is 2301
Collins Ave.. Apt. 1218A, Miami
Beach, Fla. 33139 The name and ad-
dress of the personal representatives
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim or de-
mand they may have. Each claim
must be In writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. II
the claim Is not yet due, the date
when It will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the.
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of thli
Notice of Administration: April S.
1976.
JULIA ALLEN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of HAROLD ALLEN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
CHARLES OERTLER
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 614-4611
- -


Page 16-B
+Jml&nt****n
FMdy. April 9. I97j

*eS}>
rcBasic
"Bargain j
*-***>**
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. APRIL 10th
AT ALL PANTRY PRIDES
INDADC.
HOLLYWOOD AND
HALLANDAIE
Salad Size
Tomatoes
6 piTc 39c
INDIAN IIVII WHIII MIOIISS lH 1*101 M sin
Grapefruit""0-0- 6 -o. 1
TMINSKIN AND IUL1 Of JUICI LAIOI M SIU
Fla. Oranges raSS. 16 .o. 1
u.i. no. i tn ruwoii -**,.
Maine Potatoes 5 & 79c
Cucumbers.................... 2 >. 33c
TOP OUAIIIT WASHINGTON JIAT1 ,_ _
Fresh Rhubarb 39
ASIOITIOCOIOII SSS9
Mums....-.............................................ot 1
WAIMN MM IOW CAl <>*
Salad Dressing ".' 69c
Cll*r MSMCM MM IUAM* ClARK ITALIAN Chun.
Ymt NSk wrwia Srara
CUTOAU IAAT PIKtCHAII All IW STAMIO ITIMI WITH ONI 7 00 OtOII 01 MOM
IXCIUOINO CIGAMTTIS ______________________
-
SAVE 33
Joy Liquid
Dish Detergent
59c
FOR
SPARKLING
DISHES
22-OZ.
BOTTLE
LIMIT ONI IOII1I PUAU. WITH OTHIR PURCHASES
OF J7 00 Of MOM. EXCLUDING CICAIIf TIES
SAVE 24
Pantry Pride
Laundry Bleach
25c
FOR A
WHITER
WASH
GALLON
IUG
LIMIT ONI JOG. PLEASE, WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 0 MOM. IXCIUOINO CICAMTTIS
D' Anjou Pears
3*1
FOR LOW
CALORIE
DESSER1
MOOEN OAVIO CONCORD MACKMRRY CHEMY
Kosher Wines il39
FLO-SUN GRAPEFRUIT JUICE OR
Orange m $1
Juice 4 coqnts 1
IIAKSTONI CMAMI0 All VAIIITIIS ^ .
Cottage Cheese 2 $ sl29
P ANTIT PIIDI _
Biscuits...........nSUL.3 23.39c
HIS. 'HUH 1
Soft Margarine & 59'
AH (CHIIII FOOOI COIOIID _
American Singles .'Kt$llf
AII1IOO I
Fresh Buttermilk 3SS! 49c
Farmer Cheese ,.I49*
Top Loin Strip
FORMERLY
NEW YORK STRIP jf ^fl 9 A US DA. CHOICE
iJISSIm / WH0LE 0" HALf
LI- !_-/ loriljW I7TO20H.AVC.
LB. CUT TO ORDER
USDA CHOICE
Beef Chuck ?QC
Blade Roast 0%J
U.S.O.A. CHOICI till CHUCK UN0II __
Blade Pot Roast I29
U.S.O.A. CHOICI Sill IOIN ^ __
Porterhouse Steak......* 1
U.S.O.A. CHOICI till CHUCK SHOU10II AIM *>#>,.
Pot Roast...................."99*
U.S.O.A. CHOICI III! CHUCK IONUISS _
Shoulder Steak $149
U.I.D.A. CHOICI __
Beef for Stew u $129
USDA CHOICI IONUISS Mil CHUCK c __
Shldr. Pot Roast u $139
U.S.O.A. CMOICl IAIO! IND _
Beef Rib Roast $1*9
U.S.O.A. CHOICI SMAll IND IONUISS aa
Beef Rib Steak %\m
U.S.O.A. CHOICI Mil IOIN _
Sirloin Steak $169
Bottom "{SAgg?" $4 29
Round Roast .1
FlA. CM SHIPPI0 PMMIUM FllIM
Fryer Quarters..................i. 59c
Fryer Livers..............................u. 9'
HA. Ol SHIPPIO PIIMIUM PUSH
Fryer Parts 89'
w-OH Mi* 111 W 1*1 TpMOMft ND.tlidl
Premium 0r jac
_ SHIPPED M\ fc
Fryers S ltO
HEBREW NATIONAL KOSHER
Franks or > i q
Knocks $1W
PANT1Y HIM MIOOf I
Beef Salami g 99*
ANN'S 51ICI0 SPICI0
Luncheon Meat \,l 79'
PANTRY PRIDE HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog
Rolls
t RESERVE THE RIOMT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS
SAVE 30
Baronet
Cut Peaches
DELICIOUS
DESSERT
9
29-OZ.
CAN
LIMIT ONE CAN. PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7 00 OR MORE. EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MUSSELMAN'S
Apple
Sauce
50-OZ.
. JAR
88
3
3
PANTIT PIHM
Fruit Cocktail
r ANin PIIM
Tomatoes-------
PANTIT PIMM MOUUM CHI IMHCH STYll
Cut Green Beans.. 5
"NilT PIKM 11ICID WHIII
Whole Potatoes
PANT1Y PIKM
Coffee
IA-OJ. 9 \
CANS m
PANTRY PIKM
Prune Juice.
$
$
$
4I4 0Z. S
CANS
..61
14-OZ. *l
CAN* m
ll'.-OI.S 1
CAMS A
lOX. >S
CANS A
MIL1I
AO A
Real Lemon Juice .'om!o9
PANTRTPIKN
Sliced Carrots.
Ilt-OZ. Sf
CAN* A
PUSHING llll IJ-OZ. .
Old Milwaukee 6 N.n\"$l29
PEPPERIDGE FARMS FROZEN ALL VARIETIES
Layer $t|09
bakes A
NO. I
Great Lakes pjqC
All MIA IS | CMIISI WCIO TO OROIR AT STOMS HAVING COUNTMS
FRESHLY MADE COLESLAW. MACARONI OR
Potato
Salad
59
HACK PORISI OLO PASHIONID OIIMAN STYU
Bologna.........m*mm............^'79*
LB.
Scope Mouthwash
18 OZ
BOTTLE


Friday, April 9, 1976
+Jewlsii fh>rldar)
Page 1-C
Candidates Join to Sponsor
Soviet Jewry 'Solidarity Day'
Tamir Warns to Expect
More V.S. Pressure Ahead
NEW YORK (JTA) Presi-
dential candidates Sen. Henry
M. Jackson (D.-Wash.) and Rep.
Morris K. Udall (D.-Ariz.) ate a
breakfast of stale bread and
sardine scraps in a symbolic
ceremony to launch "Solidarity
Sunday for Soviet Jewry" Mas
1
New York State Republican
Chairman Richard Roaenbaum
delivered a message from Presi-
dent Ford. Messages from Vice
President Nelson A. Rockefeller,
Gov. Hugh Carey, Lieut. Gov.
Mary Ann Krupsak, former
Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter, Sen.
Frank Church (D.-Idaho) and
Alabama Gov. George Wallace
were also read at the breakfast.
They all expressed support
for Soviet Jewry in their efforts
to emigrate.
THE TWO candidates, De-
puty Mayor Stanley Friedman,
representing Mayor Beame, and
Borough Presidents Robert
Abrams of the Bronx, Donald
Manes of Queens and Percy
Sutton of Manhattan were join-
ed at the breakfast by 100 pro-
minent Jewish community lead-
ers to express an all-out sup-
port of efforts to achieve hu-
man rights for Soviet Jews,
freer emigration policies on the
part of the USSR and freedom
for Soviet Jewish "prisoners of
conscience."
The ceremonies, held at the
New York Hilton Hotel, were
under the auspices of the Great-
Hebron Mayor Changes Mind
And Joins in Election Effort
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA)Sheikh
Mohammed All el-Jabaari, the
Mayor of Hebron, announced
last week that he was withdraw-
ing his resignation. He also
pledged, at a meeting with De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres, to
use his influence to restore
order in Hebron.
Peres promised, for his part,
that Israeli police and security
forces would keep a low profile
in Hebron, the largest city in
the Judaea region of the West
Bank.
JABAARI'S decision was wel-
comed in Israeli circles as a
possible turning point in the
recent wave of violence and
demonstrations on the West
Bank. His announcement fol-
lowed a Supreme Court ruling
upholding the government's ban
on Jewish prayer services on
the Temple Mount, the site of
two Islamic shrines.
Jabaari is regarded as one
of the most moderate West
Bank leaders. He is close to
King Hussein of Jordan and has
had cordial relations with Is-
raeli authorities.
His decision to stand for re-
election in the West Bank
municipal elections last Monday,
raised hopes here that mod-
erates might prevail over pro-
PLO militants inasmuch as Ja-
baari enjoys considerable in-
fluence outside the precincts of
his own town.
HOWEVER, the Hebron May-
or coupled his announcement
that he would not resign with
demands that Israeli authorities
restrain the Jewish settlers of
Kiryat Arba, adjacent to He-
bron, and that no further Jew-
ish settlement be permitted in
the area. He also asked for the
release of Arab demonstrators
arrested in the recent disturb-
ances.
Peres met with a group of
Kiryat Arba residents who pro-
tested the restraining order im-
posed by the Military Govern-
ment on their leader, Rabbi Mo-
she Levinger, which prevents
him from entering the Machpela
Cave, the Patriarchs* Tomb in
Hebron.
Levinger faces possible pro-
secution for incitement to viol-
ence because he exhorted Kiryat
Arba residents on a television
interview last week to "shoot
to kill" if they were menaced
by Arabs.
er New York Conference on So-
viet Jewry.
Kings County District Attor-
ney Eugene Gold, NYCSJ chair-
man, said the "tremendous out-
pouring expected on Solidarity
Sunday will be a revaluation
of our commitment to Soviet
Jewry. It will also represent a
response to the unprecedented
campaign being waged by the
USSR to discredit the Soviet
movement."
A SPECIAL guest at the
breakfast was Vladimir Mark-
man, a 38-year-old engineer for
whom the bread and sardines
comprised a regular "meal"
during the three years he re-
cently spent in a Soviet prison
camp. Markman, who arrived
here from Israel last Wednes-
day, displayed a typical pris-
oner's uniform, one that has
never before been seen in the
West.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK(JTA)Shmuel
Tamir, a member of Israel's
Knesset and chairman of the
Free Center Party, a faction of
Likud, said here that "Israel's
arm is going to be twisted," by
the United States and predicted
that American pressure on Is-
rael will increase in months to
come.
Tamir made this assessment
following a week-long meeting
in Washington with top U.S. of-
ficials, at a luncheon sponsored
by the New York Regional
Board of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. Accord-
ing to Tamir, the mood in Con-
gress is running against Israel,
though he said, "Capitol Hill is
still friendly to Israel."
HE SAID that Israel has to
"pursue and convince" Con-
gress now for things that were
taken for granted in the past.
This change in Congress, Tamir
noted, is due to the new gen-
eration of young Congressmen
who do not have "the Holocaust
guilt feeling" and who take a
"rational attitude" toward is-
sues such as the "oil crisis."
Tamir warned that the new
American initiative to end the
state of belligerency between
Israel and the Arabs re-
placing the aim of full peace
as the next step for a Mideast
solution will result in "a
unilateral Israeli withdrawal in
a short time" with no Arab con-
cessions.
THE ISRAELI MK, who is
scheduled to return to Israel in
two days, said that no official
in Washington could explain to
him what non-belligerency
means.
"This is a vague, meaningless
term," Tamir said, adding that
giving up the aim of full peace
in the Mideast "is the greatest
mistake in the last 28 years."
To achieve peace in the Mid-
east, Tamir said, Israel will have
to make territorial concessions.
He added, however, that Israelis
are as far from peace today as
they ever were.
Low Calorie Sauerkraut
SEASHORE
Food Products, Inc.
Kosher for
Passover
Phone Ml 1-3541
n093 1103
Under supervision
of Rabbi
Tiber H. Stem
tf


Page 2-C
+Je*lsiinor***>
Friday, April 9. 1976
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Hebrew Academy International Showcase
Will Benefit Scholarship Fund
Youth Builders Seminars
Are Scheduled for May 3
International Showcase 1976
the most ambitious presenta-
tion in the 28-year history of
the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy will be presented
at the Miami Beach school from
11 a.m. until 11 p.m. Sunday,
May 9.
The one-day exposition will
feature arts, crafts, jewelry,
condominiums, women's, men's
and children's wear and scores
more of items of every size, ac-
cording to Norman Ciment,
president of the Hebrew Acad-
emy.
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Goldring,
leaders of the school and of the
Greater Miami Jewish commu-
nity, have accepted appointment
as general chairman of Interna-
tional Showcase.
THE NEARLY 100 exhibitors
will be housed on the grounds
and in the corridors of the
school's main campus and new
Merwitzer Building.
Israeli-made items will be fea-
tured, but articles manufactured
in the United States, Europe,
Latin America and other parts
of the globe also will be for sale,
Goldring said.
Ciment said additional exhi-
bitors are invited to participate
in the showing, which is expect-
ed to attract nearly 5,000 per-
sons with admission free for
adults and children.
Magicians and cartoons
for the children, all day and in
the early evening in the He-
brew Academy auditorium, will
enable parents to view the dis-
plays. Student and adult coun-
selors, Goldring said, will mind
the youngsters.
DISPLAYS of rental apart-
ments and condominiums will
vie for attention with more tra-
ditional exhibits of Israeli and
Jewish art, with all proceeds
going to the scholarship fund
of the South's largest Hebrew
day school.
Tourism to Israel, Aliyah to
the Jewish state, Israeli coins,
medals and stamps all will be
promoted by International Show-
case, but the scope of the one-
day fair has been widened be-
yond an Israel Expo "to provide
maximum exposure for specta-
tors and exhibitors," Goldring
said.
The 800 students of the He-
brew Academy also will parti-
cipate in International Show-
case, with many of their best
class and individual projects on
display.
The first educational seminar
for the Israel Bond Youth Build-
ers Club will be held for Dade
County synagogue spiritual lead-
ers, educators and administra-
tors at a breakfast on Monday,
May 3, at 9:30 a.m. at the Eden
Roc Hotel.
The announcement was made
by Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
spiritual leader of Temple Me-
norah, chairman of special
events, and acting chairman of
Sunday Gty of Hope Banquet
Honoring Joseph Kosow
PUZZLED! byNormaA. Orovitz
TAWYRAHC A Z IT Q C
E0SNESHC A 0 E IT A
PTBGDCPR E 0 B A L
HBPIXU0M L If P T E
ILULAIIE B T K H B
NEHYDSUV M Z Q A P
EIMGPMWI A L R N D
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REUBENMZ AIN E A
Twelve boys' names of Hebrew derivation are listed below and hidden in this puzzle. The names are placed horizontally, diagonally, vertically, frontward and backward. How many can you find? Answers are on page 13-B ZACHARY LEMUEL TOBIAS JARED SIMEON GABRIEL REUBEN ABNER PHINEAS CALEB NATHANIEL EPHRAIM ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Historian and scholar Dr.
Abram L. Sachar, chancellor of
Brandeis University, will be
guest speaker at the April 11
City of Hope banquet honoring
Joseph Kosow at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel.
Dr. Sachar was a founder of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion, and the first president of
Brandeis University .which, dur-
ing his twenty-five-year tenure,
has become a leader among
American institutions of higher
learning. A holder of 24 honor-
ary degrees, he conducts a
weekly national television
series.
DELIVERING a personal trib-
ute to Kosow for his varied
philanthropic interests will be
Father Michael G. Pierce, S.J.,
director of the Jesuit Center in
Boston. Metro Mayor Steve
Clark, Miami Mayor Maurice
Ferre and Miami Beach Mayor
Harold Rosen will participate,
as will Dr. Irving Lehrman,
spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El, and Theodore Pap-
pas, chairman of the board of
the Keyes Company. Over 1,200
people are expected to attend.
Because of his participation
in American and overseas phi-
Mr. & Mrs. Club
Mystery Night
The Mr. and Mrs. Club of
Beth Torah Congregation will
hold a "Mystery Night," Satur-
day, April 10, at 8 p.m.
The cochairmen for this
month's mystery evening are
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Genad and
Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Weinberg.
lanthropy, Kosow is receiving
the National Humanitarian
Torch of Hope Award from the
Pilot Medical Center.
City of Hope treats, on a free
and nonsectarian basis, victims
of cancer, cardiac and chest
disease, neurological metabolic
and genetic malfunction, and
conducts research in these and
other diseases. There are 514
volunteer auxiliaries in 30
states, of which 15 are in South
Florida.
THE PLACE
\ "HARBOR
OUNQK
Per Dancing
Now Appearing
The George Anaya Trio
lM, from N.Y. A LA.
The Magic Blox
5:30 P.M. 5 A.M.
My ffrtfeft
rHE PLACE FOR STEAK |
1335 Nth 81. Ciuitwir
Miami. Florida
Reservations
758-55B1
W.Hmw
I llUM,
the Israel Bond Youth Builders
Club. Rabbi Abramowitz report-
ed that the Greater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization cam-
paign will launch the Youth
Builders Club program on Yom
Haatzmaut, Wednesday, May 5
in Dade and Broward Counties.
The Broward County meeting
will be held in the afternoon of
May 3 at a luncheon at Temple
Beth Shalom in Hollywood.
The program has been estab.
lished to allow Jewish young
people to purchase State of Is-
rael Bonds from gifts received
at the time of Bar or Bat Mitz-
van.
A special address will be
made by Mrs. Judith Beilin, a
member of the Ministry for
Foreign Affairs of the State of
Israel, who is serving her third
term as Consul of Israel in New
York. Mrs. Beilin represented
Israel as an observer at the
Commission on the Status of
Women at the United Nations.
Rabbi Abramowitz said this
program will illustrate to our
youth the meaning of "Am
Echad" that Jews are one
people thus teaching of the
centrality of Israel to Jews all
over the world.
I r,|.. cr.t cif*!
Internationally renowned
Seafood, steaks, chops,
fowl, all perfect and
plentiful in newer than
new elegant decor. Open
at 5:30 p.m. daily (private
parties up to 200)
jty PMtUl's
NICK ft ARTHURS
1601 79tri St. Causeway
Miami, Florida
Reservation*
864-2200
W. Honor American EicpraM,
and major oradrt card.
3 easy ways to have
a happy and Kosher Passover.
1. Passover Seder. 2. Passover Holiday. 3. Kosher Dining.
Join the Konover Hotel family in a
Traditional Kosher Seder in the
luxurious American Ballroom. 111 k
Services conducted by
MISHA RAITZIN
Leading Tenor from
the Metropolitan Opera
1st Night: 522.50 per person,
lax ft tip included
2nd Night: 517.50 per person,
tax ft tip included
Children under 8- SIBeach,
tax 4 tip included
II
5 Days/4 Nights.
April 14 to April 18
'249
parpanondW.occ.
Pim 15% iii and lip.
Hun ol nous. KconvnooMtoni.
Rsssrvsuoris a tickets:
Banquet Department
865-1500
IncludeaGlatt Kosher full American Plan. Break-
last, Lunch and Dinner with 2 Passover Seders
BSSjUSnT8 Me,f0po,i,an Op*8 tecr.
Reservations: 865-1500
World-famous for fine gourmet
food. Henri's will serve strictly
Kosher meals during the ffcssover
holiday April 14 through April 22.
Come enjoy traditional ftissover
repasts for breakfast, lunch and
tahle d'hote dinners at Miami
Beach's newest, most elegant
hotel' restaurant.
Konover Hotel
On the Ocean at 54th Street, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
wn%
H4-S.TS
M-4.a.7|
H-4-t.
Liy^t,


Friday, April 9, 1976
+Jewlstirkrld*Mi
Page 3*C
Many Miamians Played a Dramatic Role
At Brussels Conference on Soviet Jews
Will there be a need for
Brussels in?
It is a natural question
for participants and observ-
ers of the Second World Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry
held in February. Brussels
II, called to focus interna-
tional attention on the de-
teriorating condition of the
Soviet Union's three million
Jews, drew some 1,500 Jew-
ish and non-Jewish leaders,
including leaders of Miami's
Jewish community, from 32
nations throughout the
world.
The world's attention was
on Brussels' Palais des Con-
gres as a massive demon-
stration of worldwide soli-
darity with Jews trapped in
the USSR unTolded.
BRUSSELS I, which touched
off the great Soviet Jewry move-
ment, had been held five years
earlier. It was now time to re-
view strategies, share experi-
ences and renew commitments.
"The Brussels Conference,"
observed Greater Miami Jewish
Federation President and Brus-
sels delegate Harry B. Smith,
'was one more hour in the his-
lory of the Jewish people, an
hour in which we, the Jews of
the free world, take our stand
with the unbelievable struggle
of Soviet Jews."
Added Miami delegate Dr.
Morton Freiman:
"The struggle is decisive for
the life of every Jew in the
world. If we do not take up this
struggle, we ourselves will no
longer be free."
THE MIAMI delegation was
composed of Smith; Marilyn
Smith, president of the Federa-
tion Women's Division; Dr. Frei-
man and his wife, Tina; Dr. Joel
and Adele Sandberg; Joseph and
Lorraine Yanich, of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, a committee of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation's
Community Relations Commit-
tee, and Edward Rosenthal, di-
rector of the CRC.
There was much to do in
three short days. The confer-
ence goals were to highlight the
increasing injustices inflicted
by the Soviet Union upon its
Jewish citizens, particularly
those wishing to emigrate; to
bring together Jewish and non-
Jewish leaders from throughout
the world to gain deeper under-
standing of the problem to-
gether with a cross-fertilization
of experiences and ideas; and
to fortify morale, both of those
who are trapped in Russia and
those on the outside who have
been carrying^ on the struggle.
THE CONFERENCE met at a
time when there is a drastic
decline in the number of exit
visas being granted to Soviet
Jews. Recent emigration fig-
ures are alarming: more than
14,000 Jews were granted visas
during 1971.
In 1972, the figure was 31,000
and in 1973 it was 35,000. But,
in 1974 only 20,000 were per-
mitted to leave. In 1975, the
total was 13,000, and the future,
appears bleak. The decrease in
emigration has been coupled
with increased anti-Semitic at-
tacks, harassment and discrima-
tion in an effort to dissuade
others from applying for visas.
Miami's delegates participated
in plenary sessions and in num-
erous workshops and special
meetings, and supplied major
input in two new and important
areas of programming.
"Orphans of the Exodus," a
publication created in Miami by
members of the South Florida
Conference, and published in
cooperation with the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
was ir. oduced by Harry Smith
at a Workshop on Prisoners of
Conscience and Refusniks, and
by Dr. Sandberg at a Workshop
House Committee Approves
Additional Foreign Aid
would cut off military aid for
any country that aids or har-
bors terrorists. A similar amend-
ment was adopted by the Senate
by a voice Feb. 17.
Sen. James Abourezk (D.,
S.D.) opposed the measure say-
ing that the Israel Air Force
should be included among the
terrorist groups.
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The House International Rela-
tions Committee by a voice vote
Feb. 18 approved a provision In
its foreign aid authorization bill
to provide Israel and some 50
other countries with an addi-
tional 25 percent of their 1976
foreign aid allocation to cover
the "transitional quarter" this
summer.
The provision was offered by
Rep. William S. Broomfleld (R.,
Mich.), the ranking Republican
on the committee, which in-
dicates Administration support
for the measure.
THE HOUSE committee's vote
was taken as the Senate was
considering a bill which con-
tains a similar provision for the
transitional quarter which runs
July 1-Sept. 30 to take into ac-
count the changeover this year
from the fiscal year to Oct. 1
instead of July 1.
The House committee had
previously voted to provide Is-
rael with $2,255 billion in mili-
tary and economic aid. This
vote means Israel will get an
additional SS63 million. The al-
location for Egypt which was
$740 million in economic aid;
Jordan $77.5 million in eco-
nomic assistance and $75 mil-
lion in military credits; and
Syria which was $90 million in
economic assistance will also
increase 25 percent.
THE HOUSE committee also
adopted an amendment by Rep.
Lester L. Wolff (D., NT.) that
Gables BB Women
Honor Mrs. Katz
Vivienne (Mr*. Bernard) Katz
has been named Woman of the
Year by the Coral Gables Chap-
ter of B'nai B'rith Women.
Chairman of the day at the
group's recent annual donor
luncheon at the Doral Beach
Hotel, Mrs. Katz is celebrating
her tenth year as a member of
this chapter.
Mrs. Katz, who has held of-
fice in the chapter since joining
it, is program vice president
and corresponding secretary.
She is a board member of the
Coral Gables Civic Club, a life
member of the Coral Gables
Chapter of the American Medi-
cal Center in Denver, treasurer
of the Crippled Children's
Charities and past chaplain of
the Ray Renuart VTW Auxliary.
on Helsinki and other Interna-
tional Understandings, and was
the subject of extended discus-
sion at plenary sessions.
"ORPHANS" is a study which
highlights the desperate plight
of scores of separated Russian
Jewish families parents hav-
ing been allowed to emigrate to
Israel while their children have
been kept behind in Russia.
These separations are in clear
violation of numerous interna-
tional conventions and, most
specifically, the Helsinki Agree-
ment signed last August by the
U.S. and U.S.S.R. and other na-
tions.
In his indictment, Smith
charged the Soviets with violat-
ing the Agreement which states
in part that "participating States
will deal in a positive and hu-
manitarian spirit with the ap-
plications of persons who wish
to be reunited with members of
their families."
Inspired by "Orphans of the
Exodus," Congressman Joshua
Eilberg, chairman of the House
Subcommittee on Immigration,
and Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman, a
committee member, have begun
a four-month vigil of speeches
in Congress to highlight the
problem.
THE SECOND area of import-
ant Miami input was the repre-
sentation to the world of the
Soviet Jewry Freedom Flag,
adopted as a symbol of the free-
dom movement by Jewish ac-
tivists in Russia. The flag was
introduced by Dr. Freiman at
a plenary session of the Con-
ference when, in a dramatic
move, he rushed to the stage
on which the Conference's Hon-
arary President Golda Meir was
sitting and presented it to the
former Prime Minister of Israel.
The flag a white Star of
David on a field of blue was
distributed in miniature to all
the delegates at Brussels II, and
a large model was hung in a
place of honor above the heads
of the speakers and performers
at the gala public event at the
end of .the Conference.
Will there be a Brussels HI?
"Yes," we are told by Chair-
man Yosef Almogi. Brussels in
will be held, he said, when the
cause for which so many have
struggled has been won.
"Brussels III will be a cele-
bration of freedom," Almogi
predicted.
"Let us hope he is right,"
commented Dr. Freiman on his
return to Miami. "We can only
hope that the goal of freedom
for all Soviet Jews will be reach-
ed and soon."
LIKE OTHER Jewish commu-
nities throughout the world,
Jews in Miami have renewed
their efforts on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. Through the Community
Relations Committee's South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, Miamians have commit-
ted themselves to a policy of
advocacy and political action.
Miamians are in constant con-
tact with Congressmen, the Ad-
ministration, and Soviet offi-
cials, as well as in personal
contact with Soviet Jews
through the adpot-a-family pro-
gram.
Those interested in becoming
involved in the struggle for So-
viet Jewry may call the Com-
munity Relations Department at
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami.
.Seltzer,
Kosher
for Passover
Syfo Seltzer is better
than Club Soda.
andthatsthePureTruth.
There's nothing very pure about club soda, be-
cause there's nothing very pure about city water.
And that's where club soda comes from. Not only
that, club soda has salt added to it. Syfo Seltzer is
made from the moat absolutely purified water to
be found. It's 100% mineral free*, so if s the per-
fect thirst quencher for those on restricted diets.
Syfo Seltzer uses a unique slow carbooating proc-
ess that packs in doubte-the-bubbles. There are
no taste spoiling additives. The result: A salt-free
super mixer, beverage and thirst quencher that
anyone can enjoy.
Syfo Seltzer. If I better than club soda because
it's purely delicious.
, The difference between
Syfo and club aoda l MS..
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North Miami. P. 33161
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th FAsresr dank
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If youre tired of standing in line to do your
banking, do something about it right now.
The Intercontinental Bank of Miami Beach
has an office at Alton Road and 10th Street
with convenient walk-up and drive-in tellers
that make waiting a thing of the past.
Open an account with us, and we promise
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jb^= Main Office: 930 Washington Avenue. Alton Road Office:
I Alton Road & 10th Street. Miami Beach, Florida 33139.
^^ Phone 534-1577. Member FDIC.


Friday, April 9, 1976
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Boycott of Mexico is 'Wholly JustiHed
J ________.u-^JW anti-Zionist remarks by the JJJx ^
EDITOR, The Jewish Florldian:
In re "Mexican Jews," by
David Kaye, in the Mar. 26 edi-
tion of The Jewish Flondian
the article points out the lack
of sensitivity of that reporter
to the implications of the Mex-
ican endorsement of the UN
resolution equating Zionism
with with racism.
His discussion of the pros-
pects of the Jewish community
"south of the border" reflects
the total lack of understanding
of the problem to which he ad-
dress himself.
MEXICO'S unique position as
neighbor and friend of the U.S.
as compared to the other pro-
resolution advocates increases
the significance of its anti-Zion-
ist stand.
To use the argument that the
Jewish hotel owners would suf-
fer economic losses because of
the Mexican tourist boycott
anti-Zionist renuu -* -", if
ican government could mstity
S resumption of tourist ac-
tivityinDRatlS'ER EPSTEIN
Miami
.limply cannot withstand careful EDTT0Ri The JewishMgg
have just completed a legal
"Let Thy WoWIi Be BHeT
KoheUth (Ecclcfisrtci)
scrutiny.
The economics of the situa-
tion certainly play a minor role
in the overall significance.
Israel, the symbolic home-
land of all Jews, must never
allow any disquieting events to
go unanswered. Since all Jews
should speak for Israel, the
American and Canadian tour-
ist boycott is wholly justified,
and only a renunciation of the
House OKays Omnibus Foreign
Aid to Bolster '77 Budget Cuts
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The House voted 229-139 for a
$5.3 billion omnibus foreign aid
appropriations bill which rep-
resents a substantial reduction
from its earlier authorization
measure.
The House bill also elimin-
ated funding for the transition-
al quarter between the end of
fiscal 1976 on June 30 and the
beginning of fiscal 1977 Oct. 1,
thereby complying with the
wishes of the Ford Administra-
tion.
THE HOUSE action was ex-
pected. Whether the transition-
al quarter funding authorized
by both the House and Senate
earlier at a level of 25 percent
of this vear's foreign aid totals
is revived depends largely
on the action of the Senate Ap-
propriations Subcommittee on
Foreign Aid headed by Sen.
Daniel Inouye (D.-Hawaii).
Under the authorization meas-
ure, Israel was ear-marked for
an additional $556 million. The
House appropriations bill as-
signs Israel $1.5 billion in mili-
tary credits, up to half of which
may be forgiven by the Presi-
dent, and $700 million in eco-
nomic support assistance, $55
million less than the House had
authorized.
The House unexpectedly ap-
proved, by a vote of 229-139, an
amendment by Rep. Bill Alexan-
der (D.-Ark.) that would ter-
minate aid to countries that are
one year in arrears in payment
Mrs. Jennie Seitlin (center), founder 40 years ago of
Pioneer Women in Florida, received a special Golden Ju-
bilee Award from Pioneer Women at the South Florida
Council donor luncheon held Sunday *tttoon**e
Deauville Hotel. With her are Margot (Mrs. Nathan)
Bergthal, luncheon coordinator, and Mrs. Harriet Green
(right), chairman.
of an undisputed debt to the
United States, Alexander told
the House that Israel is 'current
and not among the 71 countries
that would be affected by his
amendment.
HOWEVER, on the basis of
information received from the
House committee leadership,
Israel is on the list of debtor
countries prepared by the US.
Agency for International De-
velopment as of June, 1975. The
information, passed to Alexan-
der, was taken to mean that
Israel owes nothing in military
purchase credits but may be
indebted on other obligations.
A high Congressional author-
rity told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that the Alexander
Amendment would be killed in
a Senate-House conference.
A move by Rep. David Obey
(D.-Wisc.) to cut $200 million
from the $2.2 billion finally
adopted for Israel was defeated
by a vote of 342-33. Obey claim-
ed the bill as it stood would
"not in any way increase the
likelihood of peace in the Mid-
dle East and will in fact diminish
it." He was supported by Rep.
Clement Zablocki (D.-Wisc.)
who may be chairman of the
House International Relations
Committee in the next Con-
gress.
REP. OTTO Passman (D.-La.)
who presented the appropria-
tions bill to the House, noted
that it contains $15 million to
assist Israel to resettle refugees
from the Soviet Union. Last
year Congress allocated $50 mil-
lion for the purpose. Passman
said "We hope in the very near
future to see the Soviet refu-
gees start pouring out of Russia
and we want to have the funds
available in the event the pro-
gram starts back."
Israel was not the only coun-
try affected by the House ap-
propriations measure. Alloca-
tions to Egypt were cut by $55
million, bringing its aid ticket
to $695 million. Syria was as-
signed $80 million, $10 million
less than the Administration
had requested.
I have just WWW*-*"
paper on the issue of medical
and other professional malprac-
tice considerations presented in
he Jewish sources based upon
biblical and that are Talmudlc
I will publish this research
paper both in Hebrew and In
English and will be available
upon appointment to lecture to
professional and civic groups
on the subject.
IN SUMMARY of the paper,
I conclude that properly li-
censed physicians, practicing
under current legal guidance,
have all the protection against
malpractice suits both in the
criminal and in the civil laws
of the Jewish Codes.
Jewish law does differentiate
between the surgeon and the
general medical practitioner.
Also new medicaments and new
practices of surgery must have
rabbinic or legal sanction in
order to exempt the physician
from responsibility.
No malpractice suit can be
leveled against the physician
when cosmetic medicine or sur-
gery is involved. Some rabbis
opine that cosmetic surgery is
totally prohibited.__________
MAIMONIDES, codifier of
the law, completely ignores
the discussion of medical mal-
practice. This omission from
his writings on the subect ii
one of the mysteries of our le-
gal literature.
Aside from medical malprac-
tice, Talmudic law covers mal-
practice of the judge, the attor-
ney, the rabbi and the mohel
or the shochet.
I will recommend a national
malpractice commission similar
to a consumer protection agen-
cy, composed by the members
of the profession, the judiciary,
the clergy and the public.
RABBI TTBOR STERN
Miami Beach
fr 4 EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
It is my opinion that organ-
ized religion and Jewish educa-
tion in general, and the rabbis
and Jewish educators in parti-
cular, are the scapegoats for the
failure of the Jewish home,
which is no longer Jewish, nor
is it home.
Unless and until the rabbinate
and Jewish educators admit
their failings, expose this major
reason therefor, and focus
their efforts on Jewish plus
home, this failure will increase,
and the tribe will decrease.
Hopefully there will be the
saving remnant. But this is an-
other subject for another day.
A. B. WIENER
Miami
CHABAD HOU5 presents;
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Other principals at the Pioneer Women luncheon, which
was attended by 1,500 persons, included (from left)
Bertha (Mrs. George) Liebmann, Ida (Mrs. Sam) Koval-
sky, Rena (Mrs. Joseph) Miller and Tillie (Mrs. Fred)
Sandier. The four women are presidents of South Florida
Council of Pioneer Women chapters.
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I


Friday, April 9, 1976
+Je*istifk>rl(0ari
Page 5-C

1
CECILY and (Dr.) Hal Silber-
had a real family style
party at their home Sunday
afternoon. They were celebrat-
ing the seventh birthday of
their twins, Eliaa and Julie.
Over 150 guests attended the
bicentennial-theme barbecue set
under masses of pine trees.
A puppet show kept the chil-
dren amused while the adults
had their cocktails. Tables were
set with red, white and blue,
and the centerpieces were filled
with popcorn and candy. After
eating corn on the cob, chicken
and ribs, toothpicks were in or-
der, and they were also in the
centerpieces, topped with small
paper flags. There was hardly
room to eat the birthday cake.
AMONG THE guests were
Marilyn and Bert Sager, Len
and Marty Hachman, Edna and
Paul Tupoino and Lee and Jack
Emmer. Jack was the "official
photograDher" of the day, and
he seemed to be enjoying his
duties.
Lisa and EU Timoner were
there with their two little girls.
Lisa's mother, Mona Doane,
made the pretty pink floral
print garden dresses worn by
the girls with a matching dress
for Lisa.
Cecily's parents, Ruth and
Harry Oberset, came over from
the Beach for the festivies. Hal's
mother, Anna Silberman, was
also there for the Darty. Also
saw Evelyn and Armer E. White,
Jana and Hal White, Ardis and
Gene Heiman and Rickie and
(Dr.) Dave Sommers.
JEANNE SOCKET was there
with her four children, but Ira
was playing chauffeur for some
out-of-town relatives who were
in Hollywood. Too bad he miss-
ed such a fun party. Enjoying
themselves were Marilyn and
(Dr.) Alan Robinson and Reva
and (Dr.) Max Daner. The
Dauer's son Eddie was there
with a classmate. The two
young men have just completed
med school.
ft a
ABBIE and Jody Perhnntter
looking forward to their annual
drive up the east coast to Ma-
maroneck, N.Y., where they
will visit her family. Her sister,
Mrs. Fran Greenberg, and her
brother, Steven, and his wife
are busy planning with their
parents, the Sidney Prakins, for
all kinds of activities. Driving
is a way of life for the Prakin
family. They Uve in Florida dur-
ing the winter and anticipate
the drive almost as much as
they do our beautiful weather.
it -ir -tr
Monnie and I joined Dotty
and Sy Keith and Peggy and
Mac Mermell for dinner last
Saturday night at Kings Bay
Communal leaders Israel D. and Louella Shapiro (right)
were hosts at a cocktail party on behalf of the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organization campaign at the 5660
Collins Ave. building. Extending thanks to the Shapiros
with the presentation of the State of Israel Bonds Honor
Award was Robert L. Siegel, general campaign chair-
man and national campaign cabinet leader.
Members of the committee planning the annual Spring
luncheon of the South Shore Hospital Women's Auxiliary
are (from left) Anna Singer, luncheon chairman and
Jeanne Todd, Molla Sherman and Rose Sverdik. Other
committee members are Olive Delahunt and Claxr Du-
vont Paul, cochairmen, and Henrietta Fine, Ingrid Fine,
Lotte Glover, Sara Rutstein and Hortense Schwartz.
There will be a fashion show by Lory's and entertain-
ment by Bunny Lynn and Bob Estelle. For tickets, con-
tact Mrs. Stephanie Cooper, ticket chairman.
Country Club. The dining room
was packed. Saw Ruth and Jay
Slelnhardt, Sherry and Sy Flal-
koff, Lola and Stu Winston,
Mickie and Phil Kaplan, Phyllis
and Sam Rosen, Gloria and Len
Luria, to mention just a few
who were enjoying dining and
dancing.
ft ft ft
Irene (Bill) Bare* and Naomi
(Marty) Feldman cohosting a
"coffee and inspiration" set for
this Friday. It's for the benefit
of Federation. Joyce Sumberg
is scheduled t o be the guest
speaker, and the guests will
meet in Naomi's home. Lots of
people working hard to help
Israel "We are One."
The United Jewish Appeal
has published "The Fifth
Cup," a special text de-
signed to complement the
Haggadah. At a traditional
Seder four cups of wine
are consumed, but the fifth
the cup of Elijah, a sym-
bol of hoperemains un-
touched.
BB Shoiem Lodge
To Install Officers
B'nai B'rith Shoiem Lodge No.
1024 w"l install officers on Sun-
day, i 'ril 11, at the Sheraton
Four Ambassadors.
They are: Andrew Tibor,
president; William G. Thomp-
son, Robert J. Lewison and Nor-
man Lieberman, vice presi-
dents; Albert Zisman, treasurer;
Moray Feld, financial secretary;
Andre Klein, recording and cor-
responding secretary; Chester
Leiter, guardian; Kenneth Hoff-
man, chaplain; William G.
Thompson, historian. ________
TEA LOVERS
are switching to
SWEE-TOUCH-NEE
.^^.Recaiise Swee-Touch-Nee
1PP"Te toll quality, it is more
fragrant, more satisfying.
Make Swee-Touch-Nee
your cup of tea .. it is so
refreshing, so delightful, so
niuch hctter. yet it costs no
more. Try it! Buy it...at all
good food stores.
DISTRIBUTED BY:
HI-GRADE FOOD CO. S05-73S451*
M
1 ^ 5
Km < 1 1
1 1 ^7M r*v m Jl
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fi, *V ?< *' k ::'::,
....?. $$& ^^m
Harold Gardner, public relations counselor, and Ms.
Ruth Forman, of Hyatt Hotels International, were mar-
ried recently in an intimate family ceremony at Hotel
Fontainebleau. The Gardners live in Miami Beach.
North Miami Beach's Jade Winds complex hosted a ma-
jor 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund breakfast recently, at which chairman Sol Vogel
(center) welcomed guest speaker Theodore Feder
(2nd from left), associate director of the American
Joint Distribution Committee. Other residents partici-
pating in leading the Jade Winds Campaign effort are
vice chairman Sam Schwartz (left), and cochairmen
Hermione Spahn and Robert Singer (right).
Women's Division Of The
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
NOMINATING COMMITTEE
PRESENTS THE FOLLOWING SLATE
OF OFFICERS FOR 1976-1977
PRESIDENT
VKE PRESIDENTS:
CAMPAGN:
COMMUNITY EOOCATtQNi
LEADERSHIP DfYHOfMUtT:
corresponding
recording secretaay:
nominating committee
chairman:
parliamentarian
immediate past president:
Mrs. Leonard Eriedland (Toby)
Mr*. Kenneth Schworti (Moxiiw)
Mn. Bernard Mandler (Ellen)
Mrs. Adolph Berger (Helene)
Mrs. Richard Levy (l*a)
Mr*. Norman LipoH (Nancy)
Mrs. Morton Weinberger (Gwm)
Mrs. Harry I. Smith (Marilyn)
Presented by the Nominating CommirJee in accordance with the Bylaws
f the Women's Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Foderotion, Article
a, Sections 5 and 7.
SICTKHI5
Additional nominations may be made only by petition carrying fiftoen
(IS) or more signatures of voting members, provided consent of 1w
nominee has been obtained la advance. These petitions must reach tw*
Chairman of the Nominating Committee not later than fourteen (14) days
after the slat* has been published.
SECTION 7
N there are no frth*r nominations, the slat* as published shall ha
considered elected and the new slat* shall take office May 1.
WOMEN'S DIVISION NOMINATING COMMITTEE
CHAIRMAN: MRS. LEONARD rVJEMANO
MRS IRVING CYPEN
MRS.. CHARLES HBO
MRS. BURTON LEVEY
MRS. MORTON MARCUS
MRS. MALCOLM MEISTER
MRS. ROBERT RUSSEU
MMVMVS CMAfMMNt MRS MERTON GETTTS


Page 6-C
gJgtogilMrtfiB
Friday, April 9, 1976

Burleigh House residents Alfred and
Pauline Kaplan (right) received the State
of Israel Solidarity Award at the Burleigh
House "Night in Israel," March 6. Among
the committee leadership were (from left)
Abraham Savelle, cochairman, and Mrs.
Savelle, and Yetta Pyser, chairman of
host committee.
Harry Kleinman, newly elect-
ed Exalted Ruler of the Miami
Beach Elks Lodge No. 1601, do-
nated 7,500 cans of food to the
Harry Anna Crippled Children's
Hospital. Delivery was made by
Kleinman, Aaron Bookspan,
PER, and Ernsest Bernstin,
treasurer.
ft ft ft
Sid Poland of Miami Beach
has been named chief fund-
raiser for the UM's new Depart-
ment of Judaic Studies. He was
on the national board of the
Israel Bond committee and in
1973 received Israel's Silver
Anniversary Award.
ft ft ft
Retired businessman and con-
..
cert impersario Jay F. Fine and
his wife, Ann, celebrated their
birthdays with a dinner party
at the Delano Hotel.
Present were Paul M. and
Josephine Bruun, owners and
publishers of the Sun Reporter;
brother and sister-in-law Jack
and Rae Fein; daughter Rose
Krimsky; Joseph and Sarah
Shusterman; Martin Rom; Can-
tor Nico and Nora Feldman;
Henry and Minnie Silver;
George and Esther Ginsberg;
Inez Townsend, president of
Hannah Senesch Group of Ha-
dassah; Perry and Freda Beu-
bis; Morris and Pearl Beubis;
and Jimmy Griffith, general
manager of local Brandt Thea-
Community Service Award of the Year of the Advertis-
ing Federation of Greater Miami was presented to Lew
Price (right), director of the Miami-Metro Department
of Publicity and Tourism. Making the presentation to
Price, "for intensive efforts in furthering the economy
of the area through his promotion of tourism and for
many civic contributions," was Metropolitan Dade Coun-
ty Commissioner Sid Levin (center). Metro Mayor
Stephen P. Clark assisted Levin.
Discussing plans for the third annual American Red
Magen David for Israel Golf Tournament, scheduled for
Father's Day, June 20, at Bay shore Golf Course in Mi-
ami Beach are leaders of the Greater Miami Chapter of
the ARMDI (from left): Samuel Reinhard, Florida state
c'nairman of the Red Magen David; Howard Kaufman,
president of the Greater Miami Chapter; Mrs. Jack
Folk, a vice president of the chapter; and Sol Drescher,
Southeastern regional chairman.
tres.
Charlie Buckman, accordion-
ist and pianist, provided enter-
tainment along with Jean Lane,
ft ft ft
Concerned Citizens of Opera-
tion Re-Entry sponsor a coin
and stamp show on the second
Sundav of each month at West-
land Mall, 103 St. exit of the
Palmetto Expressway. The next
show is scheduled for April 11.
V V #
The South Florida Alumni
Chapter of Rho Pi Phi Interna-
tional Pharmaceutical Fraternity
will hold a two-hour accredited
seminar on Wednesday, April
7, at 8 p.m. in the second-floor
meeting room of the Home Fed-
eral Savings and Loan, 2100
E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
ft ft ft
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern of Mi-
ami Beach recently returned
from a lecture tour in Central
America, where he participated
in the formation of commissions
for strengthening Yiddishkeit
and preserving tradition,
ft ft ft
SCORE the Service Corps
of Retired Executives offers
help from its 83 members to re-
tailers, wholesalers, manufac-
turers or service agencies in
the Miami area. SCORE is spon-
sored by the Small Business
Administration.
ft ft ft
Jack Greenberg, outgoing
president of the Men's Club of
Temple Ner Tamid, will be hon-
ored at the Oneg Shabbat this
evening. The committee in-
cludes Louis Suchman. temple
president; D. Dale Regent, board
chairman; David M. Caplan,
treasurer; Meyer Spitzer, colla-
tion chairman; Herman Esgar,
financial secretary.
Three exercises in awareness and sensitivity were the
focus of the recent Council of Presidents' "Experiential
Workshop." Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division leaders Helene Berger (2nd from left) and
Dorothy Oppenheim (right) joined with B'nai B'rith
women Harriet Horwitz (left) and Alma Hofstadter to
create the informative day. The Council, composed of
presidents of all major Jewish women's organizations,
is chaired by Mrs. Oppenheim.
* iB^^^^B

mm ">**gks&ra
W-tfj !9 Rnagdmio>isiki I Btotftiad "I
,"***
n
Another ambulance for the Magen David Adorn, Is-
rael's Red Cross service, was dedicated recently
through the American Red Magen David for Israel at
ceremonies at the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy.
Shown with the 86th ambulance to be donated by South
Florida Jewry since the Six-Day War are (from left)
Samuel Reinhard, Florida state chairman; Mrs. Frieda
Kaufman, who contributed the ambulance; and Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, principal of the Hebrew Academy
and honorary chairman of the Greater Miami Chapter.
Mrs. Kaufman donated the $10,800 vehicle in memory
of her late husband, Max.
f^^ HOUSt OF BIAUTY
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Friday,
April 9, 1976
+ k*lsMk*kti',r
Page 7-C
Lehrman Day School Scholarship Ball
Attainment of the goal of 200
scholarships for the Lehrman
Day School was announced by
Dr. Irving Lehrman at the an-
nual Scholarship Ball held on
behalf of the school sponsored
by Temple Emanu-El.
The Chai Anniversary of the
Lehrman Day School, which has
350 students enrolled from nur-
sery through junior high, was
celebrated at the event.
Students of the school pre-
sented a musical production
staged by Mrs. Trjjcie Levin,
musical director of Temple
Emanu-El. Mrs. Louis Brandt,
Dany Amihud and Jerry Mar-
shall and his orchestra provided
entertainment.
More than half of the students
at the Lehrman Day School re-
ceive partial or full scholar-
ships, with proceeds of the
Scholarship Ball meeting the
operating deficit.
Evaluating the evening are more leaders of the Scholar-
ship Ball (from left): Mr. and Mrs. Murry Koretzky, past
chairmen; Lawrence M. Schantz, chairman of the school
board of Temple Emanu-El; Kathy (Mrs. Richard)
Schwarz, president of the Temple Sisterhood; and Dr.
Schwarz.
Brandeis Camp Institute
Is Accepting Applications
College-age men and women
seeking a unique Jewish living-
learning experience this sum-
mer will be interested in the
Brandeis Camp Institute, which
has served Jewish youth since
1940. The month-long summer
institutes, held in Santa Susana,
Calif., are accepting applica-
tions for 1976.
College students in the South
Florida area may apply to BCI
through the Hillel Jewish Stu-
dent Center at the University of
Miami, a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's fam-
ily of local agencies. Funds for
summer camp institute scholar-
ships are made available to
qualified applicants by the Fed-
eration. BCI sessions are sched-
uled for July and August, each
accommodating 400 500 stu-
dents (from college campuses
throughout North America.
BCI offers cultural, educa-
tional and religious experiences
in a country setting, patterned
after the lifestyle of the Israeli
kibbutz. Students attend ses-
sions with noted Jewish scho-
lars and artists-in-residence,
and participate in the institute's
operation, encounter programs
and cultural happenings.
BCI is not affiliated with a
particular branch of Judaism.
Its programs are geared to in-
volve and to interest young men
and women through participa-
tion in living art forms and cur-
rent thought trends, along with
the rich traditions of Jewish
culture and the Jewish people.
All applicants to BCI must be
undergraduate or graduate col-
lege students. Additional infor-
mation on application and scho-
larship availability is obtainable
from Rabbi Stanley A. Ringler,
Hillel Jewish Student Center,
1100 Miller Dr., Coral Gables.
Rabbi Feted
NEW YORK More than
1,000 people were expected as
the New York Board of Rabbis
pays tribute to Rabbi Harold H.
Gordon for his 30 years of serv-
ice as its executive vice presi-
dent, at a testimonial dinner on
Thursday, at the New York Hil-
ton Hotel.
(ft g TT B B jj)M Z AL If
ANSWERS: Zachary, Tobias, Simeon, Reuben, Phi-
neas, Nathaniel, Lemuel, Jared, Gabriel, Abner, Caleb,
Ephraim.
Happy about the success of the Lehrman
Day School Scholarship Ball are leaders of
the gala sponsored by Temple Emanu-El
(from left): Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehr-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence M.
Schantz. The Schantzes were general
chairmen of the black-tie dinner and
dance held in the Friedland Ballroom. At
right are some of the multiple scholar-
ship patrons, officers of the Lehrman Day
School (from left): Mr. and Mrs. John
Shapiro and Mr. and Mrs. Carol Green-
berg. The Greenbergs, this year's honor-
ary chairmen, were general chairmen of
the 1975 Scholarship Ball.
BERNSTEIN AND KOSULANM TO CONDUCT
Beth Sholom Bicentennial Observance
Will Feature the New York Philharmonic
The New York Philharmonic
Orchestra, conducted by Leon-
ard Bernstein and Andre Koste-
lanetz, will appear in concert at
the Theatre of the Performing
Arts on Tuesday, May 25, and
Wednesday, May, 26. Featuring
programs of American music,
the concerts will be presented
by Temple Beth Sholom as part
of its Bicentennial observance.
Bernstein will also be fea-
tured as piano soloist in George
Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue."
William Warfield will narrate
Aaron Copland's "A Lincoln
Portrait." Appearing with Kos-
telanetz are soprano Eileen Far-
rell and pianist Jerome Lowen-
thal.
The Bicentennial Tour of
America marks the first time
that Bernstein, the orchestra's
Laureate Conductor, has led the
Philharmonic on tour since it
visited Australia, New Zealand
and Japan in 1974. Andre Kos-
telanetz. who has conducted the
orches. a annually since 1952,
is artistic director of its popular
Promenade Concerts in New
York.
FOUNDED in 1842, the New
York Philharmonic is America's
oldest symphonic organization
and one of the oldest in the
world. In its uninterrupted his-
tory, the orchestra has perform-
ed in 320 cities in 42 countries
under the batons of the world's
most distinguished conductors.
During the summer of 1976
LEONARD BERNSTEIN
the Philharmonic is undertak-
ing an American Bicentennial
Tour of Europe, conducted by
Leonard Bernstein and present-
ing programs of American mu-
sic.
Tickets and information are
ANDRE KOSTELANETZ
available at the Temple Beth
Sholom box office.
Tickets are also available for
Benefactors of the two evenings
who will attend a dinner recep-
tion with the orchestra and con-
ductors.
Round Town
The Kosher Steak House was
the scene of the recent 40th
birthday party of Judge Norman
Ciment, attorney and former
Miami Beach Councilman. Skits
and songs were performed by
Norman's wife, Joan, and Claire
Majors. Constantine the Decora-
tor recreated the motif of New
York's Lower East Side, lending
a touch of nostalgia to the af-
fair. Among the many friends
gathered to help celebrate the
occasion were Ted and Sheila
Hollo, Judge Robert Grover,
Judge Jason Berkman, TDA
member Ben Grenald and Mi-
ami Beach Vice Mayor Leonard
Hater.
THEM'S SOMETHING NEW UHDOt THE Ml AM SUN
AND IT'S Ail ABOUT WATERl
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Page 8-C
* Jen 1st HorkMor
Friday, April 9, 1976
9*

U
a
A-
s
Abraham Grunhut (above, left), presi-
dent of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Mrs. Fannie Barad,
who, with her sons, has contributed
greatly to the JNF. At the Coronation Ball
at the Fontainebleau Hotel, Grunhut
out the importance of Russian
Jewry's immigration to Israel and the
JNF's role in supplying resettlement land
there. He called upon world Jewry to con-
tinue in the struggle for the right of Rus-
sian Jews to emigrate. David Klein (above,
right) has long given moral and financial
support to the Jewish state.
At the Coronation Ball were (seated) Ge-
nendle Schuster, Princess 1976; Rose
Schwartz, Queen Esther 1976; Anna Ma-
gid, Princess 1976. Standing are Abraham
Grunhut, JNF president; Mrs. Celia Ro-
senblatt, 197S's Queen Esther; Leon
Schuster; Israel Schwartz; lev W. Kogan,
president of JNF Southern Region; Can-
tor Saul H. Breeh, chairman, Hi-Rise and
Congregational Activities; Harry L. Magid.
JNF Role in Aiding Russian Emigrants
Is Stressed at Coronation Ball
Over 600 people attended the
Coronation Ball of the Jewish
National Fund on Shushun Pu-
rim at the Fontainebleau Hotel,
I and witnessed the coronation of
Rose (Mrs. Israel) Schwartz as
Queen Esther for 1976 and Anna
(Mrs. Harry L.) Magid and
Genendle (Mrs. Leon) Schuster
as princesses of her court.
They sang along with Cantor
Saul H. Breeh, chairman, JNF
Hi-Rise and Congregational Ac-
tivities, and Lois Yavnieli, Is-
raeli opera star. Shmuel Fersh-
ko accompanied them. Rabb|
Irving Lehrman, JNF Founda-
tion chairman, spoke about Pu-
rim and its interrelationship
with JNF and its role in Israel.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
chairman, executive board,
stressed the role of Purim in
Jewish survival, the readiness
and importance of Queen Esther
and Mordecai to give their all
for Jewish survival, and called
upon world Jewry to follow
their example.
THE HAMOTZJ was given by
Lou Aronsonk, cochairman,
Morton Towers, and the Toast
to Israel was made by commu-
nity leader and veteran Zionist
William Silverstein, whom Zev
W. Kogan. president, JNF South-
ern Region, said exemplified
Mordecai by his greatness of
heart and soul and generosity.
The coronation was conduct-
ed by Abraham Grunhut, presi-
dent. Greater Miami JNF, and
Mr. Kogan.
Mrs. Celia Rosenblatt, out-
going Queen Esther, described
how much this recognition had
meant to hear. Rose Schwartz,
the new Queen, thanked the
JNF for this honor, and pledged
that she and her husband will
continue to serve the JNF cause.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro ex-
tolled the generosity of Mr. and
Mrs. Harrv L. Magid, who had
donated $50,000 to the JNF.
Kogan called Leon Schuster a
one-man embassy to the Cuban
Jewish community who, with
his wife, has adopted the JNF
as a way of life.
Miss Brodzki and Dr. hsenberg
To Marry in Fort Lauderdale
The engagement of Bella
Brodzki, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ludwik Brodzki of Fort
Lauderdale, to Dr. Henry J. Is-
senberg, son of Mr. and Mrs.
David Issenberg of Coral Gables,
has been announced.
The couple will be married
in Fort Lauderdale on May 23
by the groom's uncle, Rabbi
Leo Heim. A reception at the
Inverrary Country Club will fol-
low the ceremony.
Miss Brodzki, a graduate of
Nova High School and Sarah
Lawrence College in Bronxville,
N.Y., studied also at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, the
Universite d'Aix-en-Provence,
France, and the Universite de
Geneve in Switzerland. She is
continuing her studies at Brown
University in Providence, RJ.
Dr. Issenberg is a graduate of
Coral Gables High School and
Emory Medical School in At-
lanta, from which he received
his M.D. degree. He works in
the Pediatrics Department of
Albert Einstein College of Medi-
cine at Jacobi Hospital in the
Bronx, N.Y.
Temple Judea Honors Sisterhood,
Plans Congregational Seder
Temple Judea of Coral Gables
will honor its Sisterhood at the
services this evening at 8:15.
Participating in the original
service, "Come, Let Us Cap-
ture Freedom," by Ernestine
Richman, will be Rabbi Michael
B .Eisenstat, Cantor Rita Shore,
Mrs. Richman and other mem-
bers of Sisterhood.
Creative music was written
for the service by Mrs. Ray
Berman, principal of the Reli-
gious School.
There will be a Congrega-
tional Seder on the second night
of Passover, Thursday, April IS,
in the temple social hall.
The Seder will be conducted
by Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
and the musical portions will
be rendered by Cantor Rita
Shore.
Meeker Prints on Exhibit At
Washington Federal's Main Office
Washington Federal Savings
and Loan Association is present-
ing an exhibit of prints by Dean
Meeker at its Main Office, 1701
Meridian Ave.
Meeker, whose works are in-
cluded in many museum and
institution permanent collec-
tions, describes his art as "a
process of intrusion."
Mrs. Rose Cohen Named To
Prime Minister's Club
Mrs. Rose Cohen, of Miami
Beach, has been named as a
member of the Israel Bonds
Prime Minister's Club, it was
announced by Dr. Maxwell
Dauer, chairman.
Mrs. Cohen has been active
in the Jewish Federation, Jew-
ish National Fund and Hadas-
sah, and was one of the earliest
recipients of the State of Israel
Woman of Valor Award.
Rose Cohen and her late hus-
band, Max, were leaders in
Jewish life in Chicago. In 1954
they enabled 430 Yemenite fam-
ilies to become established on
a communal farm, the Nahlet
Max and Rose Cohen in Yishi,
between Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv.
They also established the
Max and Rose Cohen campus at
the Hebrew Theological Col-
lege, the Rose Cohen College for
Women in Skokie, 111., and a
center at the Talmud Torah
High School in Chicago.
In Miami they helped estab-
lish the Hebrew Academy in
1957, built the Max and Rose
MRS. COHEN
Cohen Building for the religious
school of Young Israel of Great-
er Miami, and helped to create
the Louis Merwitzer Mesivta
High School of Greater Miami.
They supported Mt. Sinai Hospi-
tal.
Osceola Lake Inn Opens
With New Additions June 4
Rubin's Osceola Lake Inn, in
the scenic Blue Ridge Moun-
tains on Lake Osceola in Hen-
dersonville, N.C., is reopening
June 4 for its 36th season.
There are some new addi-
tions, including guest rooms,
card room, TV room and recrea-
tional facilities.
Popular with lovers of the
outdoors as well as with those
who simply want to relax, the
inn features a host of activities.
Horseback-riding, pool, boating,
fishing, tennis, a putting green,
shuffleboard, horseshoes, ping-
pong, volleyball and badminton.
Specially supervised programs
are available for children, and
two 18-hole championship golf
courses are nearby.
The Osceola Lake Inn loca-
tion boasts some of the finest
scenery in the Eastern United
States. Situated at a height of
2,500 feet, the resort has accom-
modations for up to 125 guests.
Attire is always informal at all
times, and the American Plan
cuisine is Jewish American
style. Fresh-baked breads and
pastries have become synonym-
ous with Osceola Lake Inn, and
are prepared by Arthur Rubin,
a eraduate of the Culinary In-
stitute of America.
Owner manager host Stuart
Rubin is beginning his 17th
year of operation, taking over
its management from the late
Joe Rubin,,who founded the Inn
in 1941.
A color brochure and rates
are available from Rubin's Os-
ceola Lake Inn, Hendersonville,
N.C. 28739 or by phoning Stuart
Rubin at the inn's Miami office.
JWV Post and Auxiliary 223
To Install New Officers
Jewish War Veterans West
Miami Post No. 223 and Aux-
iliary recently presented a Bi-
centennial flag to the Coral
Park Senior High at an adult
education assembly.
The Post and Auxiliary win
install officers for 1976-77 on
Sunday, April 11, at 11:30 at
the DAV Hall, 51 E. 9th St.
(N.W. 62nd St.), Hialeah.
Post officers to be installed
are: Stanley M. Gold, comman-
der; Martin Levine and Herman
Levine, junior vice comman-
ders; Norman Burman, quarter-
master; Sheldon Goldenblank
adjutant; Sidney Potlock (out-
going commander), judge ad-
vocate.
Trustees are Joe Witten (three
years), Lestern Rosenberg (two
years), Nat Margo (one year).
Sam Grossman is officer of the
day.
AUXILIARY officers to be
installed are: Charlotte Mittler,
president; Theuna Potlock and
Ruth Herman, vice presidents;
Helen Burrows, treasurer; Do-
rothy Noretsky, chaplain; Shir-
ley Wiezenthal, conductress;
Florence Grossman, patriotic
instructor.
Also Carol Gold, historian;
Eva Koch, guard; Shirley Acht-
man, Jerri Bartlett and Gladys
Isgar, trustees; Lucie Viola,
corresponding secretary; Jen"1
Bartlett, recording secretary.
Shirley and Joseph Achtman
are cochairmen for the day.
Post master of ceremonies is
past department commander
Henry Norton, and Department
of Florida commander Howard
Melinson is installing officer.
Auxiliary mistress of cere-
monies is past department presi-
dent Lee Rubin, installing of-
ficer is Department of Florida
Auxiliary president Mrs. Ceil
Zucker.
Banks Honor Jefferson's Birthday
On Tuesday, April 13, there
will be special celebrations hon-
oring the birthday of Thomas
Jefferson at the Jefferson Na-
tional Banks in Miami Beach
Sunny Isles and Kendall.
Huge decorated birthday
cakes and punch will be served
throughout the day. On display
at each bank will be exact re-
plicas of the Liberty Bell which,
in the past several years, have
been made available to schools
and community charitable func-
tions.
This is another in a series of
events sponsored by the Jeffer-
son National Banks to generate
public enthusiasm for the Bi-
centennial.


Friday. April 9, 1976
^JmlstifhrkUan
Page 9-C
Dade and Broward Jewish Croups
Will Participate in Yom Haatzmaut
All Jewish organizations in
Dade and Broward Counties are
being invited to participate in
the official communitywide ob-
servance of Yom Haatzmaut in
the Miami Beach Convention
Center, Saturday night, May 1.
Gerald Schwartz, chairman,
and Mrs. Harriet Green, coordi-
nator of the mass rally, which
is expected to draw more than
10,000 persons for the celebra-
tion of the State of Israel's 28th
anniversary, said both Zionist
and non-Zionist groups have
been invited to participate.
"Israel Independence Day,
Yom Haatzmaut, now is a holi-
day not only in Israel but for
the Jewish people the world
over. Every Jew should observe
the event by demonstrating soli-
darity with the Israelis in their
hours of greatest need,"
Schwartz said.
SIMCHA DINITZ, Israels Am-
bassador to the United States,
will be the keynote speaker for
Yom Haatzmaut, which begins
at 8:30 p.m. Saturday with what
will be the largest observance
in the United States of Israel's
Koach (strength or 28th) birth-
day.
"A complete program of mu-
sic and entertainment also is
being nlanned," Mrs. Green
said, "but the serious side of
Yom Haatzmaut will not be
neglected."
Committees are preparing
resolutions on aid to Israel, to
Soviet Jewry, to Syrian and Ira-
qi Jewry, on Aliyah, Israel tour-
ism, etc.
Tickets for the community
rally, sponsored by the Amer-
ican Zionist Federation and its
constituent bodies, are available
at the AZF office, 60S Lincoln
Road Building.
Mrs. Green, president of the
South Florida Zionist Federa-
tion and of the Pioneer Women
Council of South Florida, said
Jewish youth groups particu-
larly are being urged to. join in
the observance of Yom Haatz-
maut.
Zilbert Re-Elected
Hebrew Home Head
Leonard Zilbert has been
elected president for a tenth
term of the Miami Beach He-
brew Home for the Aged. At a
recent meeting of the board of
directors, he was elected by ac-
clamation.
Zilbert will work closely with
a board of directors of 14 pro-
minent Dade citizens in the
home's everyday operation.
Elected to the board were She-
pard Broad, Moses Hornstein,
William Silverstein, Jack Stein,
Bernard Weinberg, Hyman Krie-
ger, Joseph Shulman, Edward
Weiner, Sarah Levin, Mrs. Rose
Singer, Harry Stone, William
Mechanic, A. C. Fine, Mrs. Mar-
garet Fine and Herbert S. Karol.
Zilbert has been active in the
home since 1963, and is striving
to make it the best in the state.
Zilbert, who is president of
the Riverside Memorial Chap-
els, Inc., and of the Men's Club
of Temple Emanu-El, is a foun-
der of Mt. Sinai Hospital, on the
advisory board of South Shore
Hospital, and president of Bu-
reau of Jewish Education.
Zilbert is a member of the
board of directors of Civic
League Voters Inc., and the
Hebrew Academy, and on the
executive board of Variety Chil-
dren's Hospital.
An honorary life member of
Post No. 85. American Legion,
\\<: is n member of Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, Miami
LEONARD ZILBERT
Beach Tourist Authority, Amer-
ican Legion Post No. 35, Bran-
deis University Club, Greater
Miami ORT, Jewish War Vet-
erans, Kiwanis Club, Lions Club,
and the Workmen's Circle.
Zilbert has received awards
from the Democratic Club of
Miami Beach, American Legion,
Temple Emanu El, and the
Voters Inc. Humanitarian
Award. He was the Civic League
Man of the Year in 1973 and
Mizrachi Man of the Year.
Frank De Varona (left), principal of the adult educa-
tion department, received the Bicentennial flag from
Mrs. Charlotte Mittler, Auxiliary president; Mrs. Thel-
ma Potlock, Americanism chairman; and Sidney Potlock,
post commander.
Rabbi Lehrfield Conducting
A Course at Beth Torah
Beth Torah Congregation in
conjunction with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
has announced the opening for
registration for the spring ses-
sion of the Adult Evening Edu-
cational Program.
The two-credit course offered
by Florida Atlantic University
will begin on April 29 and will
be held each Thursday evening
from 8:30 to 10 p.m., until June
1.
Rabbi David Lehrfield will
conduct the course, which is
open to the public. Anyone wish-
ing to attend may register on
Thursday evenings or call the
synagogue office for further in-
formation.
Round Town
Mrs. Louis Flshman will be
installed as president of the
Tropical Cancer League at a
luncheon meeting on Eriday,
April 9, at the Montmartre Ho-
tel at noon. Mrs. Murray Lev-
nant, national vice president of
the American Medical Center,
will install new officers for
1976-77. Sophie Prunak will give
a book review and awards will
be presented to members for
outstanding service.
The Perfect Matzo Spread:
Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese
When it comes to topping a crisp holiday matzo, there's no
better-tasting spread than Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese.
Philly's known as the cream of cream cheeses the one most
families prefer.
And, of course, it's guaranteed fresh when you buy it or
Kraft will give you your money back. Good-tasting Philadelphia
Brand Cream Cheese in specially marked packages is kosher
for Passover, too. It's a delicious spread to use for appetizers and
dips when guests come to call.
Try these tasty combinations this year!
CUCUMBER CHEESE SPREAD
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia 1 tbsp chopped parsley
Brand Cream Cheese % tsp salt
% cup shredded cucumber, Dash of pepper
% cup finely chopped onion Matzo
Combine softened cream cheese and remaining ingredients,
mixing until well blended. Spread on matzo. Garnish with stuffed
green olive slices, if desired. Yield 1% cups.ST
ft -fr it
Smoked salmon for canapes should be sliced across the grain.
If you prefer a less salty flavor, choose Nova Scotia salmon. For
a taste of salt, "belly lox" should be your choice.
SMOKED SALMON MATZO MYCHELS
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Dash of pepper
Brand Cream Cheese Matzo
% cup dairy sour cream Smoked salmon
14 cup finely chopped onion
Combine softened cream cheese and sour cream, mixing until
well blended, stir in onion and pepper. Spread on matzo, top with
smoked salmon. Garnish with ripe olive slice or chopped parsley,
if desired. Yield 1% cups.ST
iw mat
FLORIDA'S FINEST INSPECTED KOSHER PLANT
Wholesalers, Processors, Distributors and
Saving Ths Industry
Exporters of fhe finest US. G*ft. Inspected
KOSHER MATS and POULTRY
WISH YOV AND
YOUR FAMILIES
A HAPPY PASSOVER
U.S.
INSPECTED
AND PASSED BY
DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE
EST.7338
QUEEN ESTHER KOSHER POULTRY
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us for your requirements
U.S.D.A.
INSP.
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733S
PHONE 324-1S55
1717 N.W. 7* Avenue, Miami, Florida


Page 10-C
+Jewish Ikx+Man
Friday, April 9, 1976
Florida-Israel Chamber of Commerce Honors Topf
Metro Mayor Steve Clark (2nd from right)
presented a Commendation and a Key to
Hade County to Sam Topf (2nd from left)
at the Florida-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce dinner held Saturday at the Eden
Roc Hotel at which Topf was honored as
Industrialist of the Year. In his name the
Kibbutz Association set up a two-year
scholarship, and Milton M. Hecker, ex-
ecutive director of the Florida-Israel
Chamber of Commerce, presented an
award to him from the Jewish Agency
for Rural Development. Sen. Jack Gordon
(left), vice chairman of the chamber's
board, described the value to Israel of its
"Aid Through Trade" programs. At right
is Herbert Gruber, president of the Heller
Co. Cong. William Lehman talked about
the necessity of strengthening trade pro-
grams with Israel.
Shown at the dinner are (seated, from
left) Arthur Rosichan; Roger McCauley
of the U.S. Department of Commerce,
who discussed Israel's economic viability
and business opportunities for foreign
investors; Eytan Bentsur, Israel's eco-
nomic affairs consul in Washington, who
described the political situation in the
Mideast. Standing are Mr. and Mrs. J.
Arthur Goldberghe was toastmaster
and dinner chairman Rhoda Shainberg.
A-'WWW
**KtG0&040^0*0&0^0*l0***K^0*B*tj^0^l0*0*0i

LAWRENCE B. GREENSTEIN
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Green-
stein's son, Lawrence Bruce, be-
came a Bar Mitzvah on April 3
at Beth David Congregation.
A student in the Beth David
Hebrew School, Lawrence is ac-
tive in Cotillion. He is a seventh-
grader at Glades Junior High
and has won several tennis tro-
phies. He has also been a mem-
ber of the Bov Scouts.
Following services, Lawrence's
parents hosted the kiddush and
a reception later in the day at
the Doral Beach. Special guests
included the Barry Sinoff fami-
ly, Mr. and Mrs. Barney Sinoff,
L. Greenstein
and Mr. and Mrs. Martin Wein-
er of Jacksonville; Mr. and Mrs.
Danny Moret of Atlanta; Mrs.
Bertha Miller and Mr. and Mrs.
Dave Rosen of Los Angeles; Mr.
and Mrs. Murphy Isaacson and
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Star of
Chicago.
Chabad House
Sponsoring An
Israeli Songfest
Chabad House-Florida Luba-
vitch Headquarters will sponsor
an Israeli festival of Chassidic
song, Monday, April 19, at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
The festival will feature the
Jerusalem School of Jewish Mu-
sic, Pirchai Yerushaliyim, which
is on its first visit in the United
States. The Pirchai Yerushaliyim
is directed by "the father of
modern Jewish music," Yiedal
Calek. *
The Neginah Orchestra and
Jerry Markowitz are included
in the program.
For reservations and ticket
information contact Chabad
House.
Levy Elad (left), Israel's economic affairs consul for the
Southeast U.S., chatted with Shmuel Erner, manager of
the new Florida branch of Ampal and Bank Hapoalim.
HIS CLOSE TIES CITED
Wilson Invited
To Head Labor
Friends of Israel
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Prime Minister Harold Wil-
son, who announced his resignation on Mar. 16, will
be invited to become the president of the Labor Friends
of Israel organization, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned.
Martin Cohen, general secretary of the group to
which more than 100 Labor members of Parliament
belong, said the invitation would be made in view of
the Prime Minister's record of friendship for the Jew-
ish State. The presidency has been vacant since the
death two years ago of Richard H. S. Crossman, the
former Labor Minister.
Although none of the main contenders for the
Labor leadership has been as closely associated with
Israel as Wilson, most of them are regarded as friend-
James Callaghan, the Foreign Secretary, believes
the Palestinian Arabs should have national self-expres-
sion, but only in the context of peace with Israel.
Denis Healey, Chancellor of the Exchequer, was
first nominated as a Parliamentary candidate in 1952
by the Leeds branch of the Poale Zion, with whom he
has retained cordial links ever since.
Anthony Wedgwood Benn, Energy Secretary, has
long been associated with Mapam in Israel and is a
devotee of the late Prof. Martin Buber, Roy Jenkins,
Home Secretary, and Anthony Crossland, Secretary of
the Environment, have visited Israel in recent years.
Michael Foot, Secretary for Employment, who is
a brother of Lord Caradon, Britain's former UN Am-
bassador, makes a point of not committing himself on
Middle East matters.
ABE C. FINE
mi mmmmtmT* d"r dauh,w *nd ***
Leonard Zilbert, Pre.id.nt
Sarah Levin, President, Ladies Auxiliary
Sidney Siegel, Executive Viee-Presldent




April 9, 1976
* A nisi tkiHni
Page 11-C
Moshe Dayan, Israel's former De-
Be Minister, and Mrs. Dayan (center)
\e greeted by Greater Miami Jewish
teration treasurer Samuel I. Adler
ft) and Mrs. Adler, and GMJF vice
sident Morton Silberman (right) and
Mrs. Silberman last week at the 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund's Carillon Hotel dinner. Near-
ly 500 guests helped demonstrate that
"You Make The Difference" in the CJA-
IEF Mobilization.
?^0?1


/<*
[Tie Social Action Committee of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults
hvision is involving a number of South
liami men and women in vital commu-
tity issues. Meeting recently to discuss
the recent World Conference on Soviet
Jewry were (from left) Gary and Sandy
Dix, Arlene Solnet, Jeff Young and Vivi
Brownstein.
K v'
m*
', ..^ k'. m m**
S' '^M m'
r ** I t f
^m > t*
-#;

19
Zharles and Wendy Citrin (left) of Miami
2nd Arvin and Suzanne Peltz (right) of
South Miami, representing the Greater
tiami Jewish Federation Young Adults
division, welcomed South Miami's Nor-
in and Nancy Lipoff (center) to their
home for a special 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund gather-
ing. Lipoff is a Federation vice president,
Mrs. Lipoff is a vice president of the Fed-
eration Women's Division.
Adding to the success of Superwalk 76 is Michael Kes-
selman (right), a teacher at Nautilus Junior High School
and sponsor of the Social Studies Club. He presented
Superwalk 76 coordinator Dee Tally with a check for
$2,5C:>, representing pledges collected by Nautilus walk-
ers. The March of Dimes event beginning and ending at
the Orange Bowl found over 7,000 walkers raising about
$140,000, $10,000 more than last year, to help fight
birth defects.
Shula Ben David, secretary of the Hebrew Educators
Alliance, presents a plaque to Herbert Zvi Berger, out-
going executive director of the Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education, for 25 years of service to the welfare of
the Jewish teachers in the Greater Miami community.
Dr. Maxwell Dauer (left) received the National Com-
munity Service Award from Dr. Gerson D. Cohen, chan-
cellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America,
at the Seminary's 17th annual convocation dinner at the
Diplomat. Dr. Dauer was one of six prominent leaders
in the Miami area to be honored by the institution.


Page 12-C
+Jewls* HcrkMan
Friday, April 9, 197<
Dr. Irving Lehrman (left) was among the
guest speakers at a recent luncheon and
concert for the Chaim Weizman Branch
Farband at the Fontainebleau, held on
behalf of the 1976 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal Israel Emergency Fund. With Dr.
Lehrman were (from left) honorary chair-
man Jacob L. Kram and Mrs. Kram, Weiz-
man Branch Farband chairman Moe Le-
vin, and Israeli guest speaker Zvi Rafiah.
Some of the participants at the Albert
Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva
University dinner, held on March 18 at
the Eden Roc Hotel, were (from left) Mrs.
Theodore Baumritter, Dr. and Mrs. Max-
well Dauer, Charles Bassine, honorary
chairman of the board of governors who
described the school's needs and aims,
Sue Berkowitz and Theodore Baumritter,
dinner chairman, who pointed out that
the school ranks among the ten leading
medical schools in the U.S. Senior associ-
ate dean Dr. Ernst R. Jaffe described the
new Chanin Cancer Research Institute
and the Reno-Dialysis Center for Kidney
Diseases, established by the Baumritters.
Among the guests were more than 20
Founders.
Passover Begins at Sundown Wednesday
Jews all over the world will celebrate Passover, great-
est and most ancient of all Jewish festivals, beginning at
Sundown Wednesday. The holiday is observed by Reform
Jews for seven days and by Conservative and Orthodox
Jews for eight.
Passover (Pesach), the festival of redemption, has
been considered by Jews for 2,000 years to be the great
holiday, the one richest in symbolism and abounding with
so many ancient and meaningful ritualistic objects, foods
and ceremonies.
Passover services at Agudath
Israel Hebrew Institute begin at
6:30 on Wednesday evening. On
Thursday morning, April 15, at
9 Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever and
Cantor Rabbi Gimpel Orimland
will conduct services and speak
on "The Spiritual Leaven in
Our Souls." Evening services
begin at 6:30.
Rabbi Ever will discuss "The
Symbol of the Paschal Lamb"
on Friday morning at 9.
it -tr ir
Temple Emanu-El will begin
its Passover observance on Wed-
nesday with a 7 p.m. service at
which Dr. Irving Lehrman will
officiate, assisted by Cantor Zvi
Adler.
The two men then will take
part in a congregational Seder
in the Friedland Ballroom, be-
ginning at 7:30 p.m. The 7 p.m.
Thursday service will be fol-
lowed by the second Seder at
7:30.
Dr. Lehrman also will offi-
ciate at Siyum Ha B'Chor, the
Service for the First Born Son,
Wednesday at 8 a.m. in the
Beatrice Blank Chapel at Tem-
ple Emanu-EL He will lead a
Passover study session imme-
diately after the special service,
on the Temple patio.
Dr. Lehrman will preach on
the relevance of Passover today
during Thursday and Friday
morning services, both ot which
begin at 9 o'clock.
Sandy Kuttler, youth director,
will lead Junior Congregation
services on Thursday and Fri-
day at 10:30 a.m. in the Mural
Room.
Cr & -to
The Israelite Center Temple
has scheduled its Wednesday
evening Mincha service for 6
and its Passover service for
6:30. At 8:45 a.m. service on
Thursday, Rabbi Solomon K.
Waldenberg will discuss "Going
Out of Exile"; the evening serv-
ices are again at 6 and 6:30.
On Friday at 8:45 a.m. the
rabbi's sermon topic is "Israel
Stands Alone." Evening serv-
ices are at 6 and 6:45.
s=r -Cr
At Beth David Congregation
on Wednesday evening the serv-
ice is at 6 in the chapel, with
Rabbi Sol Landau and Cantor
William W. Lipson officiating.
The rabbi's topic, in the main
sanctuary, on Thursday at 9 a.m.
is "Seder Teaches Four Ap-
proaches to Life." The evening
service, at 6 in the chapel, will
be followed by a congregational
Seder at 6:30 in Spector Hall.
ir -tr 6
Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami will hold Passover services
at 11 a.m. Thursday, with Rabbi
Joseph R. Narot officiating.
Seder Services at St. Francis
St. Francis Hospital will host
its fifth consecutive symbolic
pre-Passover Seder service at
1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 13,
in the Wiegand Auditorium for
its Jewish patients, family mem-
bers and staff. The announce-
ment was made by Father Pat-
rick Brown, O.F.M, the hospi-
tal's chaplain.
The community hospital, op-
erated by the Roman Catholic
order of the Sisters of St. Fran-
cis, offers major religious holy
day services to its Jewish pa-
tients as a service in conjunc-
tion with the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Of the hos-
pital's patients, 70 percent are
Jewish. Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
director of chaplaincy services
for the Federation, will conduct
Tuesday's service.
"We believe in treating the
total patient," said Sister Mar-
garet McManus, 6.S.F., admin-
istrator of the hospital. "The
spiritual well-being of the pa-
tient is of equal importance to
his physical well-being.''
COFFEE-FLAVORED CHIFFON JTE
Baking at home tends to become more popular as the
prices of flour and sugar come down. This pie is good for
people watching their cholesterol level as no egg yolks are
used.
Mi cup sugar
1 tsp. almond extract *
3 egg whites
V cup sugar
Vi cop cold water
1 envelope kosher gelatin
Vt cup boiling water
2 tblsps. instant coffee
(do not use freeze-dried) 1 10-inch baked pie crust
9 tblsps. fresh egg substitute
Soften gelatin in cold water. Dissolve coffee in the boiling
water. Add gelatin and stir until everything is dissolved. Beat
egg substitute until thick, then gradually add the % cup sugar.
Add almond extract and mix well. Add egg mixture to gelatin
mixture. Chill about 30 minutes. Stir until smooth. Beat egg
whites and gradually add the tt cup of sugar, beating until
stiff. Fold into the coffee mixture. Spoon into the cooled baked
ie crust. Chill for several hours.
BEEF CHUNKS *N* WINE
A meal in one dish seems to be today's busy housewife's
dream. Here is a nourishing, flavorful stew. Serve with a
fresh green salad and your meal is complete.
3 lbs beef, cut in chucks
2 medium onions, chopped
1 tblsp. oil
1 cup sweet red wine
1 cup water
1 tblsp. tomato paste
1 tblsp. oregano
2 allspice berries
M tsp. pepper
2tt lbs. potatoes,
cut in quarters
lb. carrots, cut in thirds
Saute onions in oil. Add meat and brown for 45 minutes.
Add wine, tomato paste, allspice, oregano and pepper. Bring
to a boil. Continue to simmer for % hour. Add potatoes and
carrots and simmer for an additional hour. Serves 6.
PINEAPPLE-FLAVORED SWEET POTATOES
Sweet potatoes are in season. They are expecially good
with turkey or chicken. Here are two variations to try.
6 medium-size sweet potatoes 3 tblsps. pineapple juice
% cup margarine concentrate
% cup dark corn syrup ^ cup brown sugar
Cook unpeeled potatoes in boiling water 15 minutes. Peel
and cut in half lengthwise. Melt margarine in a casserole.
Place potatoes in casserole. Mix corn syrup, juice and sugar.
Pour over the potatoes. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes,
basting often.
SHERRIED SWEET POTATOES
8 medium-size sweet potatoes % cup non-dairy coffee
V4 cup margarine creamer (liquid)
3 tblsps. brown sugar 2 tblsps. sherry
Boil potatoes until tender. Peel and mash. Whip potatoes
with remaining ingredients and bake in a 350-degree oven 25
minutes or until top is brown. Serves 8.
WIENER SCHNITZEL
I am pleased to bring to your attention this week a new
cookbook published by the Hebrew Academy of Greater Kan-
sas City. The book, entitled "BTayavon," offers a wide range
of good recipes. It also has helpful photographs to aid in pre-
paring some items, as well as information relating to the
various religious holidays. To order your copy, send $5 plus
40 cents for postage and packing to the Hebrew Academy of
Greater Kansas City, 5311 W. 75th St., Shawnee-Mission,
Kansas 66208. Now for one of the recipes, a prize-winning one
from a contest held in preparation for the cookbook.
2 lbs. veal, cut into 2 tblsps. water
slices %-inch thick tt cup flour
1 cup fresh lemon juice 1 cup fine bread crumbs
alt l% cups cooking oil or
freshly ground pepper margarine
2 eggs
In a glass dish, marinate cutlets in lemon juice for one
hour. Pat cutlets dry with paper towels; sprinkle with salt
and pepper; dip in eggs beaten with water, then dip in flour
and shake off the excess, and finally dip in bread crumbs.
Refrigerate fop 20 minutes. Heat oil in a heavy 12-inch skillet
until a light haze forms. Add cutlets; cook at medium heat
three to four minutes on each side. Turn with tongs. Serve
over lemon garlic vermicelli (see following instructions).
Lemon Garlic Vermicelli
rrw^Utu^2 larg! nions' sliced in rin8' w <>e stick mar-
S3SJ?2^rtare 80,den-add J ***sUced wh
XL S i,ijn dVoeS ?rU8hed or "**<* sarlic and
5 J 5? lemn- Cook ad<"nal 2 minutes. In large pot
Add nSS aCCrd!ng t0 Packae Blanch and draufwdl:
may addST* SjS?- !* t0M- Additional margarine
may be added. Toss until hot. Serve with slices of veal on top.
BRUSSELS SPROUTS
HereTTSfiSJlSSP ,"* "" Ways t0 co* vegetables.
is mSZERJSS!*preparing Bru8SeU **" =
proutonTonnakesn,^n^th, JSS Add BrUMel-
ing Four lemon juice over the vegetable just before serv-
whl


Wd
ert
eqral
zg<
Abortion: A
Candidate's
Dilemma
)RTION, Busing, and Crime are as much if not more
[the ABCs of the 1976 Presidential election campaign than
[issues of such magnitude as the SALT talks, unemploy-
t, inflation, and the crying need for peace.
[Abortion especially has been seized upon as a matter of
importance that Presidential aspirants may find the suc-
or failure of their campaigns depending upon their views
iis_one issue only, and how they express those views.
FORDS husband and wife are having difficulty
their conflicting public statements about abortion. Ottho-
[ Jewry has so underlined its significance as to touch off
Dversy within the Jewish community. And Catholics have
Med a campaign of considerable election-year proportion
lie subject.
)ver in their own corner, adherents of the American Party
[the Birch Society must certainly be rejoicing over media
Btion given to the abortion debate because the hard feel-
stirred up by the issue may yet breathe new life into
krica's right wing organizations.
'Early in the year, the Knight-Ridder newspapers reported
Da survey indicating that 81 percent of those questioned
eve that abortion is none of the government's business.
I THE QUERY was put thus: "If a woman wants to have
ibortion, that is a matter for her and her doctor to decide
I the government should have nothing to do with h\"
Only 15 percent of those interviewed disagreed; three in
n four Catholics held that this was a matter the govern-
^t should stay out of; so did 82 percent of the Protestants
tioned.
[HOW DID Jews respond? Only 2 percent saw a role for
eminent in the problem. But strongly backing that minority
resolution issuing from a recent convocation of the Rab-
Council of America putting Orthodox leaders firmly on
rd as being shocked "by the blindness of those Jewish
ers who join coalition groups in their advocacy of permis-
abortion."
Even so, Jewish organizations continue a vital part of the
Igious Coalition For Abortion Rights, holding that prospec-
Iction of civil law.
Meanwhile, a spirited debate has been reported in the Knes-
on efforts to liberalize Israel's current abortion laws. There
proposed amendment to the abortion law would permit abor-
ns within the first three months of pregnancy and only in
proved medical institutions.
fre mothers have religious rights on the issue, outside the jur-
IN THE United States Presidential sweepstakes, the quarrel
LM- abortion has been sharply dramatized by a Long Island
jsewife, Mrs. Ellen McCormack, who is running for President
the candidate of the Pro-Life Action Committee.
Ample financial backing has found its way to her cam-
ign. If a political quirk puts Candidate McCormack into the
Bte House, she may be able to do something about abortion.
is not easy to know just what inasmuch as the Supreme
Durt has ruled that states cannot prohibit abortions in the
st three months of pregnancy.
MORE TO the point, one wonders what Candidate McCor-
ick, if elected, would be able to do about the energy crisis,
eign policy, the crying need to create jobs, and a host of
tier pressing, issues requiring a President's studied judgment
nd firm action.
Psychologists should be far better equipped than politicians
explain why the topic of abortion has moved so close to the
eart of all questioning of candidates in 1976.
The controversy gave Ronald Reagan a better chance in
campaign, hurt Birch Bayh and Sargent Shriver, and threw
jrious obstacles in the paths of other candidates. One person
riio has a heavy stake in the outcome of the election may have
nbarrassed her favorite aspirant Gerald Ford by ex-
ercising a wife's prerogative to differ with her husband.
"I AM glad to see that abortion has been taken out of the
backwoods and put in the hospitals where it belongs," Mrs.
Ford declared with spirit while the President was waffling on
the issue.
[Page 13-C *J^/sf>/fcririfo/7 Friday, April 9, 1976
S,
usan
rnff
The Boys from Brazil'
Is Not Really a Novel
f RA LEVIN of "Rosemary's Baby" fame has
written a new novel, "The Boys from Brazil"
[Random House, $8.95). But it is not really a
novel. It is a series of exciting adventures with
10 literary merit. In other words, a screenplay
for a movie.
I am not averse to the book because Levin
nas chosen to fictionalize as serious and sen-
sitive an event as the Holocaust with a fan-
tastic plot surrounding the infamous Dr. Men-
gele of Auschwitz. No, a novelist has the license
to fictionalize any historical event even the
Holocaust. It is simply that the book is poorly
written.
LEVIN DOES present a few thought-pro-
voking issues for his Jewish readers. He does
lot want us to forget the Holocaust, but he
s not sure how Jews should defend themselves
:oday. The main character, Yaakov Lieverman,
modeled after Simon Wiesenthal, presents the
ideal Jewish ethical position.
He is humane and follows the golden rule.
On the other hand, Levin gives a JDL-type
organization a significant amount of credence
in the book. In fact, considering the sequence
of events in the book, the "JDL"'s extreme
and untenable position is quite inviting. There,
I've gone and piqued your interest. But wait
for the movie .
"THE BIRNBAUM Haggadah" (Hebrew Pub-
lishing Company, $4.95, hard; $2.95, paper) has
been reissued in time for Passover. The hard-
bound copy is well worth the price as it is
sturdily bound, has washable covers and hence
is somewhat safe at the table.
This is a scholarly Haggadah: it is for those
who make the Seder a learning experience,
not just a gastronomical one. The Hebrew and
English texts are traditional and Birnbaum's
commentary runs along the bottom of every
page.
Attractive reproductions of illuminated Hag-
gadot, woodcuts and Passover ceremonial ob-
jects grace the text, though none are in color.
FOR LOVELY color plates of old Haggadot,
Bezalel Narkiss, in cooperation with the "En-
cyclopedia Judaica," has produced "Hebrew
Illuminated Manuscripts" (Leon Amiel, $20).
This large volume contains 60 color plates
with in-depth historical surveys of illuminated
Bibles, Haggadot, Siddurim and Kettubot of
Oriental, Spanish, French, German and Italian
origin. It is a significant contribution to Jew-
ish art history.
The text accompanying the plates delves into
he Jewish attitude toward art, and the in-
fluence of Christian illuminators upon that art.
Narkiss discusses the materials and techniques
used in the creation of illuminated manuscripts.
The author also differentiates among the
styles of the Orientals, Sephardim and Ashken-
azim.
IT IS no wonder that those who can afford
to, collect these Hebrew manuscripts. Some of
the illuminations are vibrant reds and purples
with streams of gold throughout.
Others are softly touched with subtle shades
of blue, lavender and primrose, delicately sur-
rounded with golden filaments. Their beauty is
exceeded only by their historical value.
Cart
*4I,
'pert
As Many Israelis See It,
A Job Ought to be Forever
Haifa
AGAIN AND again, Israeli economists, both
in and out of the government, have warn-
ed that there must be an acceleration of ex-
ports if the country is to obtain the hard cur-
rency required to assure national financial
stability. Yet in many parts of Israel plants
producing for export complain that they are
unable to obtain the skilled help they require.
Everybody has a job, and nobody wants to
:hange.
The immobility of labor has been spotlight-
ed in recent weeks at the Friedman plant in
Jerusalem. The factory, which produces refrig-
erators, washing machines and heating stoves
for the local market, has been finding it in-
creasingly difficult to stay in the black. Its
sales dropped off sharply,
AFTER SEVERAL desperate attempts to
stave off the inevitable, the Friedman manage-
ment notified 108 of its 300 workers that there
was no choice but to dismiss them and they
would receive full severance compensation,
dependent on the number of years they had
been with the firm, this in accordance with
the labor agreement.
It has been some years since Israel has had
an economic recession, and Jerusalem's labor
council refused to accept the dismissals. The
men must stay on the job, they insisted. They
all have "kvivut," and in labor parlance that
means permanent rights for life.
THERE WERE demonstrations and pro-
rests reaching as far as the Knesset. Friedman,
backed up by the Manufacturers' Association,
was perfectly willing to continue operating, but
wanted to know who was going to pay his bills.
The Labor Council? Shift to other lines of pro-
duction? Would the Labor Council finance the
etooling, and guarantee sales?
Labor declared that was Friedman's prob-
lem. In the meantime, he could not ignore his
responsibility to these men, more than half of
whom had worked for the plant for over ten
years and some of them over twentv.
BESIDES, he had not made the slightest
gesture to increase the severance compensation
voluntarily, over and above that required by
the contract. Observers recalled that the dis-
missed copper miners at Timna had staged
riotous demonstrations to demand severance
four times that due to them.
It remained for a writer in Davar, official
irgan of the Histadrut, to point out that the
:ountry needed an industrial revolution a
shift of labor from non-profitable or non-pro-
ductive plants, to those whose production help-
ed the national defense efforts or the export
arogram.
Perhaps Israel's labor leadership should
ake a new, long thoughtful look at itself and
ts responsibility for the national welfare.
m.HMi'i ii.k. iiMi.H'ii'-MJiii'i'in
___mi.........---------*~ '"'J
It's Bard to Believe That a Bar Mitzvah Boy Could Have Said llus
HAVE YOU ever met a Jewish scholar who has
virtually committed the Talmud to memory?
It is an amaginz feat, and quite a number of
leople can do it.
One of them is the rabbi of Congregation Bnai
Torah, Highland Park, 111. His name is (Dr.) Sholom
Singer. He and his wife were recently honored on
heir Chai (18th) anniversary with the congrega-
DR. SINGER writes learned tomes, but I men-
tion him today because he inspired one of thes fin-
est Bar Mitzvah talks I've ever read. It s hard to
believe that 13-year-old Steven Klauber could have
written the talk which goes, in part, Uke this.
"One of the most apparent concepts in the Jew-
ish faith is that He is a personal God, not in the
I "I'n'i!"''"'
Samuel Silver
sense that He has a body, but that He deals wiUi
man at will, through justice, anger and love. He
is a God of hope, for the world which he created
with a purpose is not an illusion, and history is not
an endless cycle .
"WHEN YOU reach the Bar Mitzvah age it be-
comes time to reflect upon your life: the meaning
Pf being Jewish ... A Jew believes that God is one.
so as God is one. so is life. Every part of it must be
sanctified. There is no division between the evil
represented by body and the good represented ov
soul, for both must served God.
"These concepts to me mean that I should be
faithful to my religion, family and country. I wouldn't
lie, steal or cheat. I would follow the commandments
and obey my parents. I would help keep Israel alive
and well.
I WOULD Uke to thank our rabbi, my teacher,
uid my parents for the 13 years they've put up with
me, my relatives for happy times I've had with them
and my friends for being friends."
What "nachas" those parents must have had.
\


Pate 14-c
+Jewistincrk*an
Friday, April 9, 1*76
i r::
Calder P-R Head Julian Cole Dies
I
Julian Cole, public relation*
director for Calder Race Course
since 1971, died on Saturday.
He was 50.
Cole, who coined the phrase
"At Calder, We Love You,"
which became the track's slo-
gan, was born in New Haven. A
Miami resident since 1930, he
was a graduate of Miami Beach
High School and the University
of Miami, where he later helped
establish a scholarship for
Indians.
Cole began his career in pub-
licity as a press agent for Sally
Rand, later becoming a public
relations consultant for stock
car races, sports figures, poli-
ticians, and basketball and foot-
ball teams. He was the Miami
Dolphins' first public relations
director and was public rela-
tions director of Biscayne Dog
Track before beginning his as-
sociation with horse racing, at
Tropical Park, in 1961.
AMONG COLE's non-sports
clients were local, county and
state candidates for election, in-
cluding Farris Bryant, Richard
Gerstein, and the Industrial
Commission Safety Advisory
Committee.
Cole was recipient of the Big
Mike Award for advertising ex-
cellence and the Atlanta Festi-
val Award for outstanding TV
commercials. The University of
Miami honored him in 1975 as
the school's first graduate in
the radio and TV department.
He was a member of the Touch-
down Club and Florida Turf
Writers Association and secre-
tary of Turf Publicists of Amer-
ica and the UMs Iron Arrow
Honor Society.
Cole is survived by his daugh-
ters, Caron and Lisa, and his
mother, Mrs. Eva Cohen, all of
Miami. Services were held Mon-
day at Riverside.
Leon Lowenstein Dead at 93;
Was Noted Philanthropist
Leon Lowenstein, who had
donated more than $1 million
to Mt. Sinai Hospital, died there
on Monday at age 93.
A founder and life trustee of
the Miami Beach hospital, to
which he gave $350,000 for the
Gloria and Leon Lowenstein
Nurses Residence, he was also
a benefactor of Fordham Uni-
versity, St. Francis Hospital in
Miami Beach, the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Community Center,
the Jewish Home for the Aged,
Variety Children's Hospital, the
GELB
MONUMFNI^ INC.
Open tvery 0o-. Cloud Sabbntn
140 SW 5/t.. Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Dade County Crippled Chil-
dren's Society and Barry Col-
lege.
Born in New York, Lowen-
stein began work as an errand
boy for his father at M. Lowen-
stein and Son, which became
one of the world's largest textile
manufacturers. Lowenstein was
chairman of the board of the
company.
Lowenstein attended City Col-
lege and held an honorary de-
gree from Clemson College in
South Carolina.
Services for Lowenstein, who
is survived by nieces and ne-
phews in New York, were held
at the Beth El Chapel of Tem-
ple Emanu-El in New York on
Wednesday.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME, I
Sirirv| itu JtwisD Community sinci KM I
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
____________ REFORM SERVICES
ImiaiMl CtrMn (IM) IU cn I
Hf, *( 19(41 Jim.,.G|
T...ph.n. RM-saaf
Ida Schwartz
Passes at 84
Ida Brecher Schwartz, who
came to the United States from
Austria 70 years ago, died here
on March 27. She was 84 The
widow of Charles Schwartz, who
died here in early February,
she was buried near him in Mt.
Judah Cemetery in Brooklyn,
following services here con-
ducted by Rabbi Abraham Neu-
stein.
A voice student of Frank
Damrosch, founder of the In-
stitute of Musical Art, which be-
came the Juilliard School of
Music, Mrs. Schwartz sang with
the Zavel Zilverts Choral So-
ciety and was admitted to the
Metropolitan Opera Chorus, an
invitation she refused in order
to continue solo training.
Mrs. Schwartz is survived by
her daughter, Lucille Blackton
LeClair; a son, Marvin; a sister,
Renee Rose Brecher of Holly-
wood, Calif.; and her son-in-law,
Henry Avrum LeClair, cantonal
soloist of Temple Beth Am.
BARC0
JACK. 77. of Miami Beach, passed
away April 2. A resident of. Miami
for E0 years, he is survived by his
wife, Fannie; daughter, Mrs. Rosalyn
Zltelman: grandchildren Jeffrey. Jo-
dee, and Randee Levlne. He was an
early settler of Miami. In the men's
wear business for over 45 years, and
a Mason. Private graveside services
were held Sunday at Mt. Nebo Cem-
etery. Arrangements by Riverside.
BASS
DAVID. 73. of Miami Beach, passed
away April 2. Came to Florida In
1923 from Baltimore. He Is survived
by his wife. Miriam; son. Dr. Robert
T. Bass: daughter. Susan (Mrs. Ron-
ald) Albert: grandchildren Ronnie
Jr.. Judy, Bobby Jr.. Jeffy and Cin-
dy; brother, Harry, of Chicago: sla-
ters Rae Hurwltz and Sarah Cohen
of Baltimore. He was a member of
Temple Israel, active In Federation
and a Shriner. Funeral services were
held Sunday at the Riverside with
Interment at Temple Israel Ceme-
tery.
FINE
444-421 44*eW2
3279 S.W. a* ST.. MIAMI
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-33%
1921 Pembroke Rd.
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by 5. levin, F.D.
Nw York: (212) 263-7600 Queen* Blvd. 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
ABB C, of. Miami Beach, passed
away April 2. Formerly of Providen-
ce, R.I., he came to Miami Beach In
1947. He was a life trustee and
founder of Mt. Sinai Medical Center,
honorary life president and a bene-
factor of the Hebrew Home for the
Aged, member of the board of Tem-
ples Beth Sholom and Israel. He la
survived by his wife. Margaret;
daughter and son-in-law, Leslie and
Paul Cohn; grandchildren David and
Amy. Services were held Sunday at
Temple Beth Sholom. with entomb-
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery. Ar-
rangements were by Riverside.
QARBBR. Rose, 66, of North Miami.
Levitt
LEVY, Isaac A.. 77, of North Miami.
Interment Mt. Sinai. Riverside.
RAUCH, Sol. of Hallandale. Levitt.
GOLD. Irwln B., 66. of Miami Beach.
Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
POSNER, Albert, SS. of South Miami.
Gordon.
ROSENTHAL. Herman, 74. of Miami
Beach. Interment Mt. Sinai. New-
man.
DANERHIRSH. Hattle. 101. Interment
Lakeside. Riverside.
SHIRES. Alma 8.. 64, of N. Bay Vil-
lage Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
STERN. Joseph P.. 69, of Miami.
Interment Miami Memorial Park.
Llthgow-Wllhelm.
DAVIS, Max. 77. of Hollywood.
Interment Mt. Sinai. Levitt.
FEIN, Jack Irving, 77, of North
Miami Beach. Interment Mt. Nebo
Riverside.
KRASNOFF. Faye. 70,
of North Miami Beach. Levitt.
WECHSLER, Frank, 72,
of Miami Beach. Gordon.
YOUNG, Isadore. 76,
of North Miami Beach.
Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
BADELMAN. Saul, 76,
of Miami Beach. Interment Lakeside
Riverside.
ABELSON, Lucille. 66. of North
Miami. Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
BBNRUBI, Solomon, 79, of Plantation.
Interment 8tar of David, Menorah.
WBILL, Edward, of Hallandale.
Interment Mt. Nebo. Levitt.
KAPLAN, Jack, 72. of Miami Beach,
Interment Mt. Nebo. Rlyerslde.
KATZ, Isidore (Charlie), of North
Miami. Interment Mt. Nebo. Levitt
LANDE, Louis. 64. of North Miami
Beach. Interment Lakeside. Riverside,
CAPLAN, Marcus A., 61,
of North Miami Beach.
Interment Mt Nebo. Gordon.
KAOAN, Samuel A., of Miami Beach
Interment Mt Nebo. Riverside.
OTCHTN, Joseph L, 69. of Miami
Beach. Interment Lakeside. Rlveralda.
FRANKBL. WlUlam. of Surf.lde
JKSnS*nt kaklde. Riverside.
OOHBN. Albert A.. 72.
HOWARDS. Roth. 67, of North
Miami. Levitt
GOODMAN, Charles. 71, of West
Miami. Interment Star of David.
Gordon.
Rachel Abramowitz Passes;
Mother of Miami Beach Rabbi
Mrs. Rachel Leah Abramo-
witz, mother of Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz of Temple Menorah,
passed away in Jerusalem. She
was 82.
Mrs. Abramowitz, member of
a prominent Jerusalem family,
had been an active participant
in the development of the State
of Israel.
She is survived also by an-
other son, Jacob, of Peekskill
N.Y.; three daughters, Mrs!
Louis Katzoff, Mrs. Abraham
Goldberg and Mrs. Tzvi Kantor,
all of Jerusalem; 14 grandchil-
dren and 17 great-grandchil-
Israeli Cabinet Opposes
U.S. Arms Sale to Egypt
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet has expressed firm and
unanimous opposition to Amer-
ican arms sales to Egypt. Re-
ports of such intended sales
have been filtering through
from the U.S. over recent days
and were the subject of con-
cerned questions by several
Ministers.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin said
he had instructed Israel's Am-
bassador Simcha Dinitz to con-
vey to Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger Israel's "utter op-
position" to the "trend of Amer-
ican arms supplies to Egypt
which is in a state of war with
Israel." Rabin firmly denied
"reports from some quarters in
Washington" claiming that Is-
rael in fact agreed to or ac-
quiesced in such arms supplies.
THE PREMIER said he had
made Israel's position clear dur-
ing his recent visit to the U.S.,
when he was first told by Kis-
singer of American plans to sell
Egypt six large transport planes.
He had warned then, Rabin told
the Cabinet, that this was a
dangerous precedent.
Israel's opnosition to the arms
sale is well known to the U.S.,
the Cabinet statement said. Is-
rael's spokesmen had stressed
that "instead of continuing as a
balancing factor in the Mideast,
the US would become a factor
accelerating the arms race and
upsetting the military balance."
This was especially the case
since the Arab states "continue
to receive arms from the Soviet
Union and from other sources."
Well-placed sources here ex-
plained that Israel had been
taken aback by the pace and
intensity of the development of
an arms supply relationship be-
tween the U.S. and Egypt.
SPEAKING frankly, these
sources conceded that Israel
had expected, following last
year's interim agreement, that
Egypt would begin getting some
military supplies from the U.S.,
but this process was expected
to develop gradually and not to
incorporate weapons of a sophis-
ticated nature in its early stages.
In response to other questions
from ministers concerning trou-
blesome news reports from the
U.S. over the weekend and by
Edward Sheehan in "Foreign
Policy," Rabin reported that
Dinitz had queried Kissinger on
these and received soothing re-
sponses.
According ,to news reports
the U.S. had promised Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat to make
every effort to insure Palestin-
ian participation in a Mideast
settlement.
KISSINGER told Dinitz that
the U.S. position on the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
was well-known and remained
unchanged: no participation un-
less the PLO accepted Resolu-
tions 242 and 338 and recog-
nized Israel's right to exist
Regarding Sheehan's asser-
tion that Presidents Nixon and
Ford had secretly promised Sa-
dat to support Israel's return to
the 1967 lines, Kissinger had
referred Dinitz to the State De-
partment's public statement
reiterating U.S. support for Re-
solutions 242 and 338 and af-
firmed: 'It is not for the U.S. to
present a blueprint for a final
settlement or to draw final
boundaries. It is for the
parties themselves. ."
There is concern among some
Cabinet sources that these press
accounts and other reports from
Washington of late may be in-
spired by Administration circles
to put pressure on Israel or at
least test its resilience.
RABIN TOLD the Ministers
there would be a full-scale de-
bate on the "end-of-war" initia-
tive if Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon returns in time from his
visit to Central America and his
scheduled meeting with Kissin-
ger in Washington last Friday.
Attorney General Aharon Ba-
rak and other legal aides have
now completed, it is reliably
learned, their paper on the "end-
of-war" and it will shortly be
submitted to the Premier. It is on the basis of that
paper that Israel hopes to reach
a consensus with Washington on
the meaning and components of
"end of the state of war" and
then proceed (if the Arab states
agree) to substantive negotia-
tions on this basis.
Presently in Jerusalem there
is not a great deal of optimism
that this initiative will indeed
elicit a positive Arab response
or even tentative sign of Arab
interest. But almost all the min-
isters back Rabin in believing
that Israel must give the move
every chance to succeed.
Pro-Boycotters
Will Lose
Tax Benefits J
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
bi-partisan coalition of 11 Sen-
ators led by Sen. Abraham Ribi-
coff (D.-Conn.) has drafted leg-
islation that would deny major
tax benefits to any American
company that cooperates with
the Arab boycott of Israel by
discriminating against American
concerns blacklisted by the
Arabs.
The legislation, introduced by
Ribicoff as part of the U.S. Inter-
nal Revenue Code, is described
by its sponsors as complement-
ing other anti-boycott measures
already being considered by the
Senate as well as President
Ford's own directive last year
barring discrimination against
Americans by U.S. government
agencies.
THE RIBICOFF measure
would deprive any company
that complies with the boycott
of its eligibility for foreign tax
credits, tax deferral on its for-,
eign sources of income and
Domestic International Sales
Corporation (DISC) benefits for
one tax year on its dealings with
any country sponsoring the
boycott.
Ribicoff estimated that 3,000
American firms are boycotting
2,000 blacklisted companies,
many of which are American.
He said that U.S. government
policy is to discourage Amer-
ican firms from participating in
the boycott while not directly
prohibiting it
The widespread discrimina-
tion that has resulted from
American participation in the
boycott is not based on moral
prejudice but on economic self-
interest, Ribicoff said.
He said his proposal "pro-
vides strong disincentives to co-
operation and clear guidelines
to determine compliance."


iday, April 9. 1976
-Jenlsti thrkMan
Page 15rC
Allon Hopes For
No More Arms
For Egypt
JERUSALEM (JTA) For-
leign Minister Yigal Allon said
[that there were grounds for
I hope the U.S. will sell no addi-
tional arms to Egypt in the
["foreseeable future" beyond the
C-130 Hercules transport
planes announced by the Ford
Administration.
Allon expressed that view to
eporters at Ben Gurion Airport
rhen he returned from his of-
Icial visits to Mexico and Cen-
America and a one-day
top-over in Washington Friday
there he conferred with Secre-
ary of State Henry A. Kissin-
er.
ALLON STRONGLY denied,
lowever, that Israel had in any
ray agreed or acquiesced to
the sale of the C-130s to Cairo,
said they established a dan-
srous precedent for Israel,
emier Yitzhak Rabin told the
I Knesset that his government
I would do its utmost to convince
Washington to reconsider the
M30 deal.
The Premier said, however,
hat Israel was less concerned
1th the specific item than with
precedent it established for
future arms relationship be-
reen the U.S. and Egypt.
ALLON ALSO referred to the
nerican initiative to explore
[Arab attitudes toward end-of-
jwar or non-belligerence talks
las the next step in Middle East
(diplomacy.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TH4
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 78-11177
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
RE: The marriage of
llNSTON GEORGE LEE. husband.
Id VELMA NICHOLSON LEE.
wife.
: VELMA NICHOLSON LEE
38 Lagoon Avenue
Harbour View. Kingston 17
Jamaica, West Indies
fOU ARE HEREBY required to
|ve a copy of your Answer to the
kltlon for Dissolution of Marriage
eln on the Petitioner's Attorney.
~*RAY Z. KLEIN. Suit.- 800. Sey-
Bulldlng. 36 N.E. 1st Street. Mt-
Florlda, and file the original In
[office of the Clerk of said Circuit
n on or before May 14. 1976. or
cause will be taken as confessed
rou.
kted this 7th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
B. LTPPS
Deputy Clerk
____________________4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
JONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
(TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
HVIL ACTION NO. 76-11158
IRAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
THE MARRIAGE OF
LOPEZ,
band. Petitioner
and
[LOPEZ.
He. Respondent
kOSA LOPEZ
ARE HEREBY NOTrFIBD
action for Dissolution of Mar-
fkas been filed against you and
^p required to serve a copy of
Hien defenses. If any. to It on
RETTER. attorney for Pe-
whose address is 801 Dade
Building. 101 East Flagler
Mnl. Florida 33131. and file the
J with the clerk of the above
Hpurt on or before May 14. 1*76:
be a default will be entered
I you for the relief demanded In
complaint or petition
Ida notice shall be published once
^^Hpk for four consecutive weeks
I_JEWISH FLORIDIAN
{ESS my hand and the seal of
|rt at Miami. Florida on this
_Tpf April. 1976.
BCHARD P. BRINKER
(As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
lU Court 8eal)
^ft RETTER, ESQI'IHIO
Federal Building
I East Flagler Street
Bl. Florida 3313'
he: 168-6090
ettnsy for Petitioner
LEGAL MOTKE
U6AL NOTICE
'ECAl NOTICE
LE0AL NOTKE
4/9-16-2S-I0
t NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
40TK3JB IS HEREBY GIVEN that
EjKralgned, desiring to engage
tlnees under the fictitious name
WJIN AIRCONDITIONING at
M.W 7 th Avenue. North Miami.
Do register said name with
of the Circuit Court of Dade
Oouaty, FIoHda. _
NCKJIN AIR CONDITIONING
CORP.
[BOTH
Mor Corporation
Building
rlda 11112
4/9-16-11-10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
TEXICOLOR 8UPPLY COMPANY at
1620 N.E. 108 8treet. Miami, Fla..
33161 Intends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
LIMA H, BERTOT
____________________________4/9-16-23-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-10663
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: the marriage of
ROBERT G. NOVAK.
Husband,
and
ELAINE NOVAK.
Wife.
TO: ELAINE NOVAK
residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to it on
A. NORMAN DRUCKER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 420 Lin-
coln Road, Suite 601. Miami Beach.
Florida, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before May 12, 1976: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L. 8NEEDBN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Heal)
A. NORMAN DRUCKER
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
4/9-16-23-30
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-10074
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
LAP80N DORSONNE.
Husband,
vs.
LEOLA K. DORSONNE.
Wife.
You, Leola K. Dorsonne. residence
unknown, are hereby notified to serve
a copy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed against you.
upon husband's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida 311J6. and file
original with Clerk of Court on or be-
fore May 14, 1976; otherwise the Pe-
tition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: M. HERRERA
Deputy Clerk
_________________________4/9-16-23-30
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 76-11066
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JOSE ZUNIGA.
Husband,
vs.
GEORGINA ZUNIGA.
Wife.
You, Oeorglna Zuniga. residence
unknown, are hereby notified to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Dissolution of Marriage filed against
you, upon husband's attorney,
GEORGE NICHOLAS, ESQ.. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida 31136.
and file original with Clerk of the
Court on or before May 14. 1974:
otherwise the PeUtlon will be confess-
ed by you.
Dated this 6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: R. M. KISSEE
Deputy Clerk
4/9-14-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-11187
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI6ION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DIEGO HORTA.
Petitioner/Husband.
and
ELIZABETH HORTA.
Respondent/Wife,
TO: EMZABETH HORTA
Star HIBox 686A
Tonopan, Arizona 86364
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Marcelo M. Agudo. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is AGUDO,
ANTON A PINEIRO. 1647 S.W. 27th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33146. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 14. 1976: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in /THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
6th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B. LTPPS
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Marcelo M. Agudo ____
AGUDO. ANTON PINEIRO
1647 S.W. 27th Avenue
Miami. Florida 13146
(306) 864-2643
Attorney for Petitioner
4/4-14-33-10
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLINQ
NO. 76-1990
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NORMA TARMIN.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AOATNST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of NORMA TARMIN. deceased. File
Number 76-1990, Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Courthouse. Mi-
ami, Florida. The personal represen-
tative of this estate Is ANTHONY
TARMIN. whose address Is 826 West
Marshall Street, Norristown, Pennsyl-
vania. The name and address of the
attorney for the personal representa-
tive are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBMCATION OF THIS NOTICE.
to file with the clerk of the
Court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet due,
the date when It will become due shall
be stated. If the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the jtersonal representative, or the ve-
nue or jurisdiction of the court.
ANTHONY TARMIN
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Norma Tarmln. Deceased
LOUIS GLAZER
Law Offices
GLAZER & GLAZER
11711 Biscayne Boulevard
North Miami. Florida 33181
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
First Published on: April 9. 1976.
4/9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-2182
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEROME HAUSER
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE: _
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of JEROME HAU8ER. deceased. File
Number 76-2182. Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Courthouse. 78
West Flagler Street. Miami. Fla. The
personal representative of the estate
Is BARRY C. FLEI8HER. whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road. Suite 460.
Miami Beach. Fla. 13139. The name
and address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due shall
be stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the personal representative, or the ve-
nue or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: April 9.
1976.
BARRY C. FLBISHER
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of JEROME HAUSER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
LAW OFFICE OF
BARRY C. FLEISHER
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 450
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: S38-4421
4/9-1*1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OTVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BIKINI BOUTIUE at 1780 Sans Souol
Blvd.,, North Miami, Fla. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
EUROPEAN BEACH AND
SPORTSWEAR INC.
A Fla. Corp.
4/9-14-23-M
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 78-10881
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
BERTRAND J. JACQUE8.
Husband,
vs.
BOBBIE J. JACQUES,
Wife.
You, Bobbie J. Jacques, residence
unknown, are hereby notified to serve
a copy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed against you,
upon husband's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLA8. ESQ.. 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida 33136, and file
original with Clerk of Court on or be-
fore May 14, 1976: otherwise the Pe-
tition will be confessed by you.
Dated this 5th day of April, 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By: M. HERRERA
Deputy Clerk
___________________________4/9-16-23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 78-2117
Division FRANK B. DOWLINQ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULINE RUSH
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:
Within three months from the time
of the first publication of this notice
you are required to file with the clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida, a written statement
of any claim or demand you may have
against the estate of PAUMNE
RUSH, deceased.
Each claim must be In writing and
must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
or his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is not
yet due, the date when it will become
due shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal representa-
tive.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Dated March 30. 1976.
DANIEL M. GNIEWKOWSKT
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of PAULINE RUSH
Deceased
Michael A. Blenatock Attorney
SHAPIRO. FRIED, WEIL A
SCHEER
407 Lincoln RoadSuite 10-B
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-6361
4/9-16
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 78-10487
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
KLEBERT LUCIEN
DESRUISSEAUX. Husband,
vs.
AGNES DESRUISSEAUX.
Wife
YOU. AGNE8 DESRUISSEAIFX.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN, are hereby
notified to serve a copy of your An-
swer to the Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you, upon husband's at-
torney, GEOROE NICHOLAS. ESQ..
612 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
83136. and file original with Clerk of
Court on or before May 14. 1976:
otherwise the Petition will be confess-
ed by you.
Dated this 1st day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. CLERK
By M. J. HARTNETT
Deputy Clerk
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of INTERNATIONAL PRINTING
EQUIPMENT ft SUPPLY. INC. at
6910 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Fla.
33138 Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
MR. LESLIE EISENBERO
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of GLOBE CHEM at 7124 N.W. 1
Court No. A, Miami, Fla., 33150 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
BENJAMIN DOUADI
4/9-16-28-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of OFFSHORE SALVAGE SERVICES
at 178 Mac Arthur Causeway, Miami
Beach. Florida 33139 Intend to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Flor-
ida.
OFFSHORE SCIENTIFIC
SERVICES. INC.
BY: JACK L KLUENER
Secretary-Treas.
BY: JACK L. KLUEVER
President
ARTHUR 8. DAVIS
Attorney for OFFSHORE SCIENTI-
FIC SERVICES. INC.
4/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of MAONIFIQUE SANDWICHES A
RESTAURANT at 4412 FontaJnebleau
Blvd., Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
BATS. INC.
By: JAIMIE F. GOUDIE
BLITSTEIN AND MOLAN8
Attorneys for BATS. TNC.
1440 N.W. 14th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33126
/*-1-23-S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 78-7780
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERT CRAWFORD KIRK.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMAND AGAIN8T
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the es-
tate of ROBERT CRAWFORD KIRK,
deceased, File Number 75-7760. is
pending In the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade County
Courthouse, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of this estate
Is JOSEPH McMULLEN. whose ad-
dress is 6870 Coral Way. Miami. Flor-
ida. The name and address of the at-
torney for the estate Is set forth be-
low.
Within three months from the time
of the first publication of this notice
you are required to file with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is Dade County Courthouse.
73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33130, a written statement of any
claim or demand you may have
against the estate of ROBERT CRAW-
FORD KIRK, deceased.
Each claim must be in writing and
must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
or his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when it will become
due shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall de-
liver sufficient copies of the claim to
the clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal represen-
tative.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS not
so filed will be forever barred.
Dated: April 9. 1976.
JOSEPH McMULLEN
As Personal Representative of
Estate of ROBERT CRAWFORD
KIRK. Deceased.
JOSEPH McMULLEN
Attorney
6870 Coral Way
Miami. Florida 33155
Telephone: 665-6916
4/4-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-109*9
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
DAVID FRANK IVY
Petitioner
BARBRO INGER YVONNE IVY.
Respondent
TO: BARBRO INGER YVONNE
IVY (Lorgvlst)
Sufflorgat. 7
21482 Malmo
Sweden
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Mariage has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If any. to it
on ELLIS S. S1MRING. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address
Is 820 Arthur Godfrey Road. Miami
Beach. Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 14. 1976: oth-
erwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
!th day of April. 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By R. M. KISSEE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ELLIS S. SIMRING. ESQ
GROVER CIMENT WEINSTE1N
ft STAUBER. PA.
320 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 13140
Attorney for Petitioner
4/9-14-23-SO
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-108*7
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SHIRELY WATSON FRYE
Petitioner. Wife
AND
GEORGE ROBERT FRYE
Respondent -Husband
TO: GEORGE ROBERT FRYE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
rou are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any to It on
l-ouls R. Beller. attornev for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 238, Miami Beach. Fla..
*nd file the original with the clerk of
he above styled court on or before
May 12. 1976: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FIjORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5th Say of April. 1976 __
EUCHARD P. BRINICER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L SNEBDEN
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
4/6-14.11-10


mdaj, Aprfl 9, ii7|
Page 16-C
Tto Strict 4 Cm*m*l**
I NkW Tfctr H. Start
FOOD
FAIR
KISHER MARKETS
COMPARE OUR PtKB ANO OUAJJTY .
SHOP AND SAVf AT FOOO FA KOSHO MABCin
t MIAMI KACH. 1 Ml ALTON ROAD
jiIASURE AU FOOO FAI* KOSHER MtAT
ARE NOW KOSHBt U PtSACH.
IflrW Sfrwf Sfepptof CMftr
OWy PH Sfp Sfcoppii* fir 1am
Complete Grocery mWi for
Possover fron sop ft Mrrsf
15th DAY
APRIL
15th DAY
NISAN
'
/A
/Z
lV\V
i?
r/w management and employs
extend to you and yew
families bast wishes for
A
JOYOUS
AND
FESTIVE
PESACH
DISCOUNT KOSHEI MEAT I POWTIY MM
163rd St. Shopping Cprtpf
ALL OUR KOSHER MARKETS
WILL BE CLOSED THURS., FRL, SAT.
APRIL 13th, 16th and 17th
IN OBSERVANCE OF PASSOVER
CASHtUTH SUKXVKWN
EV 1 C. KLBN EV WILLIAM SHULMAN
no
WHOUSALE KOSHER MEAT AND POULTRY WAREHOUSE
Sale* Manager: JACK DIAMOND
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
HARVEY MEYERS IKE MAYBRUK
Marfc.t Supervisor: PHILIP KAT2



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