The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02457

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
~Jewish Floridian
Combining 7Hf JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
>lume 49 Number 10 p"" k shoehet March s. 197 Miami, Florida Friday, March 5, 1976
By Mail 50c. Three Sections Price 25 cents
'You Make the Difference9 Miami Mobilizes
"You Make the Difference" Month
begins Mar. 18.
That day, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation launches an all-out mobiliza-
tion, stretching between Purim and Pass-
over, to achieve the goals of the 1976
Combined-Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fund.
THE CAMPAIGN'S general chairman,
L. Jules Arkin, has called a rally to kick-
off this special effort. It will be held
Thursday, Mar. 18, at the Friedland Ball-
room of Temple Emanu-El, 1700 Washing-
ton Ave., Miami Beach. The 90-minute
rally, to which all campaign leaders and
workers from all parts of Greater Miami
are invited, will commence at 5 p.m.
"You Make the Difference," the
drive's theme, will be seen in banners,
buttons and flyers connected with the mo-
bilization period. The sights and sounds
of the Jewish spirit, music and dancing,
will highlight the afternoon rally. The fla-
Conlinucd on Page 14-A
I


Allon in Mexico to Sign Deal
For Production of Israel Plane
At Iirael Bond Conference
IB
L. JULES ARKIN
U.S. Denies
Jet Sales
To Egypt
Egypt Air Advantage 14-A
"WASHINGTON(JTA) The
lord Administration categorical-
ly denied that it is considering
felling J-79 Phantom jet en-
lines to Egypt.
Egypt wants the engines to
nstall th-m in it.- Soviet-made
jlIG-21 nlwes because the So-
viet government has reportedly
efused to sell Egypt replace-
nent parts for the aircraft.
REPLYING to reports in Is-
rael that such a U.S. sale is
ending. State Department
Continued on Page 7-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Informed sources here con-
firmed as basically accurate
reports published that Is-
rael and Mexico will sien an
agreement to establish a
plant in Mexico to manufac-
ture Israel's commercial jet
aircraft, the Arava. The two
countries will also discuss a
possible joint petro chem-
ical venture to be located
in Mexico.
The report, in Yediot
Achronot, said both ven-
tures would be on the agen-
da of Foreign Minister Yi-
gal Allon's visit to Mexico
City this week. The Foreign
Minister and Mexican offi-
cials are expected to sign or
at least initial the agreement
for Mexico to assemble the
Arava, a transport plane de-
signed and built by Israel
Aii craft Industries.
ANOTHER agenda item is the
n:gotiation of an aviation agree-
Continued on Page 6-A
Rabin Under Fire As
Labor Crisis Mounts
By YITZHAK SHARGIL And TUVIA MENDELSON
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Labor Party leadership
had been meeting urgently over the weekend to try to find
a successor to Meir Zarmi who announced his resignation
as secretary general of the party. So far, no key Labor per-
sonality has shown any interest in taking the post and
Zarmi has refused to reconsider.
BUT U.S. HAS 'NO COM/HEW
(Explore Non Belligerency
Cabinet Approves Move
8-A
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
had no comment on the decision by the Israeli Cabinet
to authorize the United States to begin talks with
Egypt, Syria and Jordan about the possibility of a non-
belligerency agreement with Israel.
Department spokesman John Trattner said the
Continued on Page 12-A
The latest crisis within Is-
rael's governing political
party coincides with a ris-
ing flood of criticism of Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin from La-
bor Alignment and opposi-
tion forces and from many
individuals who were re-
garded as close supporters
of Rabin when he took of-
fice two years ago. Pressure
is also mounting for the es-
tablishment of a national
unity government that would
Continued on Page 15-A
REVEAL TRUE RELATIONSHIP
Lawsuit Filed Against
Arab Information Center
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Department of
Justice said it is pressing in a lawsuit to have the Arab
Information Center in New York City identify its "true
relationship" with the League of Arab States in ad-
vertisements that it has placed frequently in American
publications and that it might place in the future.
The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court here last
week, charged the center and its director, Amin Hilmy
II, with violating a federal registration requirement in
connection with a propaganda campaign for the League
of Arab States.
ROBERT HAVEL, director of public information
for the Justice Department, told the Jewish Telegra-
Continued on Page 12-A
ADMINISTRATION ACKNOWLEDGES DEVELOPMENT
Heavy Saudi Troop Corps
Forming Common Front
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Ford Administration
acknowledged to Congress
that Saudi Arabia has some
5,000 troops in Syria and as
many more in Jordan in sup-
port of "the common Arab
front" aeainst Israel.
But Alfred C. Atherton,
Jr., Assistant Secretary of
State for Near Eastern Af-
fairs, testifying before the
House International Rela-
tions Committee's subcom-
mittee on international po-
litical and military affairs,
denied that Saudi Arabia's
American equipped forces
would make "a substantial
Continued on Page 2-A
Heart of a 'Prisoner of Conscience'
Free Inquiry 3-A
Soviets in Israel 8-A
By JUDITH MATZ
South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry
The cell in Potma Labor
Camp is damp and cold. The
young prisoner hunches
over his writing paper, stop-
ping frequently to warm his
stiff fingers. "All my life is
connected with Israel and
its future," he writes.
Strange words from a Mos-
cow prison cell.
He finishes his letter, folds
it carefully into its envelope,
and addresses it: Rabbi Vic-
tor Zwelling, Miami, Flor-
ida, U.S.A. He wonders if it
will reach his friend, whom
he has never seen, halfway
around the world.
He is taking a great risk in
sending it, hoping it will pass
the censors, for he is allowed
to write only two letters a
month. These are always to his
beloved wife, Pauline, already
in Israel.
THE YOUNG prisoner is Mik-
Continued on Pag* 8-A
MIKHAIL KORNBLIT


Past 2-A
*Jmi*t Herri&r
Friday, March 5, 197,5
)
I

Saudis Forming Common Front
Continued from Page l-A
difference" :n another Arab-
Israeli war.
ATHERTOS Mid he could
n >: r.:le (Ml the poOaibUity of
some engagement' by Saadi
Arabia irt a future Arab-Israel
war "but one cannot say it will
be absolutely the case." he
said.
He admitted that "there is. of
se. no ultimate euarar.tee
military equipment we sell
to one state will not be trans-
ferred to another." But. he te>-;-
"there are serions" poh-
and l^gal restraints tnd
"technical :>ns.*'
Atherton's arpearance before
the subcommittee was intended
to justify the Ford Adrr.inisttB-
tiaaYs ne\ $1-2 billion arws
rtfco program for Sand: AraWa
that will bring US ~:.\:ir.
equipment and services to that
c "-.::% r. the oast six manths
10 atmn 45 billion n contracts.
He daeUrwJ thai the safcj
"caaad not significantly affect"
the "relitive balance of forces
in Saudi .Arabia and its r.eifrh-
bon"
REP. BENJAMIN S. Rosen-
thai D. NY.) filed objections
1 the sever, parts of the latest
arms sales program for Saudi
Arab'* He and Reo. Dante Fss-
D F'.a '. the :
tee chairman who scheduled
the hearing, both blistered the
AdmhdstntioBra policy on
tales.
U elicited testimony rroni
Artw.il anj Lt. Col Catl Grant-
ham of the Defense Departtrer-:
on the effects of the haatfjr
soooisticated vaapoury the U S
has contracted to sell Saudi
Arabia, inrtading the tank-
destroytaf "Dragon" miss-.le that
OB be handled bv a single foot
soliier like a rife.
Congress can block or reduce
the r-rog-am if both, house? BOB-
cur withaa 20 days. Indical
ven. hwevr. that Roeentnal
heated tae e:es lor holding
back the program No Senate
ctioa baa vet been scheduled.
THE SUBCOMMITTEE took
the rroitram under advisement.
Athertnn also rroeeated pro-
grar-j for IPO -r.iaaon ui mUi-
tarr as>:*tar.ce for Morocco and
I151 million for Iran's air force
Atherton. bacJced by State and
Detente Department experts.
-'.: -ue wUuniuiittae that the
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etir
MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT ?
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ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE IKSURANCi

M me'iicu
meuetm
Rossmoor
Vf CIK'OMT CREEK
ilie masicr plami^d
ailtili ewicktminiHin
no kind lease
norecreaiion lease.
;- = ei- Phone :
= -.-- V a- ------E J.: ?-";.
Administration is proceeding
its military programs be-
cause Smdi Arabia "carries
considerable weight both poli-
East and
or. 3 world scale in financial
and energy areas He said it
was m the I".5 interests to
m a. onlin mutually beneficial
relations u:th Saadi Arabia.
The latest program includes
construction of naval head-
ers at Riyadh, naval facili-
ties at Jidda on the Red Sea
and Juba-.l on the Persian Gulf,
and cargo handling facilities
near Jidda and on the Persian
Gul:
THE PROGRAM -slso includes
military equipment and services
to mechanize two Saudian bri-
gades with tanks, anr.oreu per-
9mr.el carrier* "Dragon" mis-
siles and ""Vulcan" guns Saudi
Arabia preaently has five bri-
gades, one 1" them mechanized.
Atherton said.
In his rrenared statement, the
Assistant Secretary said it would
Se "an incomplete perspective"
to new this arms "roeram in
terms of the Arab-Israeli con-
f.ict
He listed three broaier
points" tue vast terrain and
resouroes of Saudi Arabia; its
re'.*t::>Rsr.:r :: the V > that
tceta to Until the exoumon si
a'hi ni:: 1] mfl leoces a
the st." and the fact
- to pro-
- "'. -r S r ~

nose
: Arabia
atherton aed for the
hat jther c :" -
Dragon
l -. V ?
? 1 "'......s
or
.....
rainst
-...... :i- citizens.
A#sttOB Arabia ^a? ref-.ised to admit any
l'; ":"" ii But he
edje-J r-*r ^aadi Arabia
cr nerai l xrisni and eouates
Z -..; -- the Jewish State.
MM OUT
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a' Asuukail Sanrgs on Lincou
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1410
m-i.i.j.


[Friday, March 5, 1976
*Jen isfi fkricfistjn
Page 3-A
Growing Pessimism Attributed to Sinai Withdrawals
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA)
As Israel completed its with-
drawals in the Sinai, there
was a growing pessimism
about the benefits to Israel
of the disengagement agree-
ment signed with Egypt last
September. The feeling
among many Israelis was
that Israel had carried out
its part of the agreement to
the letter, but it had seen
little results from the other
partners to the accord, Egypt
and especially the United
States.
There have been few signs
from Egypt that it wants
peace. In fact, Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat has
said there cannot be any
peace between Israel and
Egypt in this generation.
While Egypt has allowed Is-
raeli cargo to pass through
the Suez Canal, it has not
kept its promise to tone
down anti-Israeli propagan-
da.
BUT WHAT is really concern-
ing Israelis is the United States
and particularly the arms that
were promised to Israel from
the U.S. Israel's consent to the
agreement was based on Amer-
ican assurances that there would
be a steady flow of arms to
replace the military advantages
Israel had in the Sinai positions
it was giving up, according to
one Israeli who is an ardent
supporter of the U.S.
But he noted that now Israel
faces the same delaying tactic
that was used by the United
States during the Ford Admin-
istration's reassessment that
held up arms delivery between
the time the disengagement
talks broke down in March,
1975, and the time the agree-
ment was signed in September.
Promises of almost unlimited
U.S. arms, including the Persh-
ing missiles, have resulted in
cuts in the U.S. supplies and in
delays in shipments.
THIS HAS jeopardized the
planning of the Israel Defense
Force which had expected to
receive tanks, armored cars and
other items at an early date and
now must wait at least two more
vears for them.
Voice Fear for Free Inquiry
NEW YORK (JTA)
Scientists from eight coun-
tries who attended the Sec-
' ond World Conference on
Soviet Jewry have formed
I an International Federation
| of Concerned Scientists, to
I be located in Paris.
The purpose of the Fed-
Veration will be to gather and
I disseminate information and
to coordinate the activities
I of its affiliates in all coun-
3 tries where committees on
behalf of ostracized Soviet
scientists already exists or
are in process of formation.
THE FEDERATION will en-
courage its affiliates to increase
their efforts and activities on
behalf of Soviet scientists who
are denied fundamental scien-
tific and personal rights.
The announcement was made
at a press conference at the
Palais de Congres, Brussels by
Dr. Dennis Ciama, of Oxford
University, England, on behalf
of scientists from England, the
U.S.A., France, Israel, Italy,
Sweden, the Netherlands and
Belgium, following a symposium
devoted to the exploration of
ways to assist Soviet colleagues.
Also present was Nobel lau-
reate Dr. Polykarp Kusch (1955-
physics), University of Texas at
Dallas, who said that in his view
cooperation by U.S. scientists
to exchange programs between
the U.S. and USSR was inter-
preted by the Soviet govern-
ment to mean support of their
repressive measures against dis-
sident Soviet scientists, and he
advised his American colleagues
to think carefully before en-
gaging in such cooperation.
DR. KUSCH had earlier ad-
dressed more than 1.000 dele-
gates at a plenary session of the
conference. In an expression of
solidarity, he declared, "If more
demonstrations such as this one
had been held in the 1930s, I
am convinced that many lives
could have been saved."
As its first official act. the
affiliates of the Federation have
-v. learning experiences in
summer programs for adults
ISRAEL/AMERICA ULPAN: 8 week Intensive Hebrew study
at Ulpan Akiya.
UNIVERSITY SEMINARS: 3 to 6 weeks; credit courses;4ield
trips; lectures.
PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS INSTITUTE: 5 week seminar
(in English) examining cultural development; Israel's social,
economic, political and educational problems.
BIBLE SEMINAR: 3 weeks; field trips, lectures; Biblical
origins of present day settlement and culture problems.
fci jiion on these end other piogitms contact:
WORLD ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
\ A ffl~\ Department of Education & Culture
VVAW 515 Park Avenue, N.Y.C 10022.
(212) 752-0600 ext. 384/385
adopted a motion which sup-
ports the resolution on the free
circulation of scientists adopt-
ed by the 15th General Assem-
bly of the International Coun-
cil of Scientific Unions which
asserts the right of scientists to
participate in international con-
ferences without hindrances of
a political nature.
Each affiliate will urge its
national representatives to ICSU
to ensure that this resolution
be implemented.
AS AN essential element of
the free circulation of scientists,
the Federation will also ask the
executive board of ICSU to af-
firm the right of scientists to
migrate to the country of their
choice, especially when their
country of residence does not
give them the opportunity to
pursue their scientific career.
The U.S. Committee of Con-
cerned Scientists delegation
was headed by its national co-
chairman. Dr. Jack Cohen, Na-
tional Institutes of Health,
Bethesda. Md.. and included Dr.
Kusch; Dr. Edward A. Stern,
University of Washington. Seat-
tle; Dr. N. S. Wall, University
of Maryland; Dr. Leo Diescn- i
druck. Queens College, N.Y.;
and Dr. Robert Gerber, of Los
Angeles, Calif.
The Committee of Concerned
Scientists consists of over 4,000
U.S. scientists. It is an independ-
ent national organization com-
mitted to constructive action on
behalf of colleagues in the
USSR and elsewhere who are
denied fundamental scientific
and human rights.
Also unexplainable, according
to Israelis, is the American de-
cision, seen as adverse to Israel,
not to allow Israel to produce
parts for the American F-16 on
the grounds that it would mean
transferring sophisticated Amer-
ican know-how to Israel.
There is some perplexity over
the real intentions of the U.S.
in its refusal to supply Israel
with infra-red equipment need-
ed to fight the terrorists.
ISRAELIS are also concerned
about what they see as an Amer-
ican attempt to force Israel to
accept agreements with the
Arabs as a means of improving
American influence with the
Arab states at the expense of
the Soviet Union.
They say that the attempt to
cut Soviet influence has failed
and claim that Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger's de-
tente program is a one-way
street in which the USSR con-
tinues to carry out its expan-
sionist plans.
The Israelis note that the So-
viet Union is entrenched in
Syria, having supplied that Arab
state with an unparalleled flow
of sophisticated arms and is now
making an effort to win over
Jordan.
THEY NOTE the visit of a
top Soviet official to Amman
last month, the visits of Syrian
leaders to the Jordanian capital,
the sending of Jordanian troops
to Syria for training, and the
possibility that Jordan will turn
to the Soviet Union for arms.
All indicate that the USSR is
planting roots in Jordan. They
note that the U.S. is not check-
ing this advance which it could
do by helping Israel maintain
the balance of power against
the Arab states.
There is also an increasingly
disquieting feeling among Is-
raelis that, the U.S. is preparing
another phase of pressure on
Israel through delays of sup-
plies and denials of some items
on Israel's purchasing list.
Many Israelis feel that Israel
paid the bill in carrying out the
withdrawals, but has not re-
ceived the promised merchan-
dise, not even peace.
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Miami Lilin: 13875 N.W. 67th Ave. Skylake: 18300 N.E. 19th Ave. Miami Baaon: 16900 Collins Ave. Miramar: 6860 Miramar Parkway (Browara) Oakland Plaza: 4B50W. Oakland Park Blvd. (Laude-daio Lakes)
ADDITIONAL ORLANDO OFFICES SERVE CENTRAL FLORIDA


Page 4-A
fJewisiifhrkUaf}
Friday, March 5, 1976
,
\
You Make the Difference
Mar. 18 will be a date for South Floridians to reckon
with. "You Make the Difference" Month begins on that
The 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund will be launching an all-out drive between
Purim and Passover to meet critical needs m Israel to-
day.
What CJA will be saying is that each one of us can
spell the difference between meeting these needs and
failing to do so. The message is a simple one: Each of
us must participate.
We are not sure that an editorial repetition of Is-
rael's current critical condition will make our readers
any more aware of the problems facing the Jewish State
than they already are.
We all know them education, inflation, medial
care the growing fear of unemployment, a back-break-
ing tax bite on the average wage-earner, one of the pro-
portionally largest military budgets in the world
The point is that all of us can help Israel meet these
problems. And, as L. Jules Arkin, Greater Miami s CJA-
1EF general chairman, declared this week, our contribu-
tions "can mean the difference between wasted time
and years of productivity for local retirees.
Arkin was reminding us that our gifts are used
right here at home, too.
Our gifts, indeed, help deal with a whole range of
human concerns. All of us can "Make the Difference.
That's what Mar. 18 and the month-long drive after it-
are all about.
On Voting Next Tuesday
- If one can talk about Presidential Primaries as be-
ing important, next Tuesday's in Florida certainly qual-
lieSThe New Hampshire Primary clearly generated
major national interest and seemed to narrow down the
field of two in the Republican camp at least it chang-
ed the outlook and political possibilities open to each
of them Ditto for Massachussets and Vermont Tuesday
This is what can be expected here in Florida next
Tuesday for the Democratic Presidential aspirants a
spelling out of future realities in a far more crowded
Understood in these terms, all of us can express our
opinions on just who the front-runners ought to be in
X parties the Republican choice is not yet dectsrve
and, indeed; the Florida primary may have the .ajgoai
honor of making it so.-- ^ $ aAat^it^m *e
Whatever your'persona! political predilections, *e
urge our readers to vote Mar. 9. Griping about the na-
tional political condition is hardly ^ constructive as
doing something about it in the polling booth, even
in a Presidential Primary pomg tooth.
Aid for Guatemala
With all of the problems facing world Jewry, Jew*
in the United States and in Israel can be proud that the>
have taken time out to help the earthquake stricken
people of Guatemala. The Jewish population ofthatCen-
tralAmerican republic is small so the aid is not just for
lews but all of the victims.
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Comm.ttee
with ts long record of aid to needy Jews donated 510.000
To neU?theg disaster victims in Guatemala and offered
to lend its relief workers to aid Guatemala.
ffnaf B'rith has been gathering funds supplies; and
volunteers to help Guatemala. It has also adopted Ch.na-
ut smaU rural town where about 80 percent of the
homes were destroyed, leaving 4.500 W ^J^
In addition many individual American Jews ha%e offered
funds and other services. .
The people of Israel, who are suffering under_
crushing economic burden, have also donated aid for
Guatemala. u ,, ^f um*i
This is a fulfillment of the ancient teaching of Hillel.
who said: "If I am not for myself, who will be; If I am
only for myself, what am I?"
Jewish Floridian
Here, Saul Bellowed Naught
AIY FATHER used to refer to
1 the "unterlekker" with a
bitter irony he reserved for al-
most no one else. "Unterlek-
ker." I took him to mean, was
his Yiddish bilingual pun on
the intellectual.
Literally, an "unterlekker"
would be one who "licks un-
der." It takes little imagination
to recognize what my father had
in mind.
THE FACT is that he wasn't
so much talking about intellec-
tuals as he was about the ex-
tent to which Jews go to fawn
on intellectuals as symbolic of
their own pretense to intellec-
tualism.
In this sense, my father saw
the "unterlekker" as an indis-
criminate camp-follower of an
ideal and with little capacity
Mindlin
to distinguish between the
phony and the real McCoy.
The American novelist. Sa-'l
Belhw. brings this memory of
my father to mind specific-
ally. Bellow's appearance the
other week before a convoca-
tion here of the A,rir ican
Friend's of the Hebrew "Univer-
sity.
THE FRIENDS group had ob-
viously invited Bellow to their
procedings to say something
stirring about Israel the He-
brew University at Jerusalem,
the "People ot the Book" (a
phrase that used to set my fa-
ther's teeth on edge), Jewish
culture and tradition, the
An -; ican Jewish heritage with
himself as one of its most dis-
tinguished examples.
Instead. Bellow gave them a
barrel of bull. The gathering
got exactly what it deserved
For years now, I have been
utginc an unsuccessful war to
get Jewish organizations to
knock off inviting "big stars"
to their functions for big fee
so that the stars, Jewish and
non-Jewish, should say some-
thing nice about them. In short,
I have been attempting to e--ect
a barricade to the Unterlekker"
route.
WHEN YOU think that Ger-
ald Ford not too long ago was
an Israel Bondnik. it really
o ight to put the whole problem
into its proper perspective
And if Ford doesn't, then
Saul Bellow should.
The thing about Bellow is that
the Hebrew University Friends
should have known better, and
if they didn't, they could at
least ha' e asked. There is noth-
ing Jewish in his writings
t.om Augic March" and "Hum-
bcldt's Gift" to "Herzog" and
"Mr. Sammler's Planet."
CRITICS WHO see serious
Jewish concern in Bellow
other than disaffection and
ghetto alienation turned big-
time have been looking for
a needle in a haystack. Or else,
they are exceedingly poor crit-
ics.
And. indeed, that is what Bel-
low himself toM^the Hebrew
University gpthenng about the
Jewish seizing upon him as a
Jewish writer that Jews are
* CbntiBned'on Psjte 13 A
Jewry's Last Political Hurrah?
OFFICE AND PLANT 1 N E th STREET TELEPHONE 3T1-4***
.'O. Box 0!-r7J. Miami. Florida J."-l
FRED K. SHOCHET i-EO MINDl.tN SELMA M THOMPSON
Editor and Publisher Associate Ed-.tor irtant to Publir*-
Tne Jewish Florioian Does Not Guaranty Tne r.tmrjtn
Of The Merchandise Advertised in Its CoIhwm
Published every Friday since it7 by The Jewish Floridiaji
Sw-.nd-C;" Postaare Pal at Miami. Fla-
q Frsd K. Shochet March 5. H7I
rhe Jew.sh Floridian ha* absorbed the Jewish unity and tat* Jswisn Weekly
Meinoar of t.ie Jewish Teleoraohic Aoency. Seven Arta Feature Syndi-
cate. Worldwide News Service. National Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of Enolish-Jew.sh Newsoapert. and the Florida Press Association
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year112.00; Two Years422.00;
Three YearsSJ0 00 Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday. March 5. 1976
Volume 49
2 ADAR 5736
Number 10
Next Tuesday's Presidential
Primary in Florida will be one
of the last samplings of Jewish
voting power we may ever see
in this country. Only the New
York primary a few months
hence will be as historically-
significant for American Jews,
and history may mark it only
as a footno'r- fter all.
Portentous as the opening
sounds, candor would make it
a footnote next week except
ths. like the silly New Hamp-
shire media explosion, the Flor-
ida primary comes early enough
to eliminate the weaker can-
didates. And. because of their
concentration in the 11th, 13th
and 14th Congressional districts,
as well as their good voting ha-
bits, the Jewish voters are a
desirable, not to say important
target for the candidates.
WHILE THERE will be dozen
or so of them for Democrats to
choose from on the Mar. 9 bal-
lot, in reality there are only
three who are serious about
Florida Jimmy Carter. Henry
Jackson and George Wallace
and a fourth. Milton Shanp. who
has literally pulled out his le-
gitimate yarmulke in an effort
to woo the Jewish vote on the
basis of his own Jewishness.
It strikes a sad note, because
Shapp is admittedly a man com-
petent enough to be President,
with views that have won him
admiration from the public and
press, but his chances are so
remote that one wonders if he
is seeking no more than a foot-
note.
What was meant to be a two-
man race, a head-to-head show-
down between Southerners Wal-
lace and Carter, became three
when Jackson took note of his
Jewish strength, the serious-
ness of the Carter threat, and
decided to go up against what
several months ago appeared to
be the Wallace meat-grinder.
UNLESS Shanp's anneal as a
Jew to Jews is greater than
such ethnic appeals have been
in the Dattern of Jewish voting
traced over many decades, Jack-
son's move is a wise one.
In the absence of any cam-
paign by one of the liberal can-
didates. Carter fell heir to many
of the Jewish liberal leaders.
But his credentials in that area
are nowhere nearly as strong as
Jackson's among the small "c"
conservative and big "o" Ortho-
dox Jews.
Milton Shano could be a
significant spoiler for Carter by
diverting some liberal Jewish
votes he might have received.
Jackson, of course, needs no
introduction to Jews. And if he
did, despite, hi* years as a de-
vout supporter of Israel, no
stone is being left unturned,
nor anv svnagogue left unno-
ticed to deliver the message.
SOME LOCAL svnagogues
trotted him out on the bimah
during services, introduced him
from the audience and in all
wavs made it clear he was "our
man."
So confident is he of that
s-.i-rr-rt that appeals for finan-
chl as-istance are not only ad-
dressed to rabbis and lay lead-
ers but to the synagogues, them-
selves, which as corporate en-
tities in most cases might run
afoul of the Federal election
laws not to say of Internal Rev-
nue if they could spare the
funds for such a purpose.
It will be simple to determine
the Jewish vote by analyzing
South Beach and the ghetto-ized
condominiums that jam the
coastline from North Miami to
West Palm Beach. This pheno-
menon of modern Jewish life,
which recreates stylishly the
east side of New York, and
slums of Chicago and Philadel-
phia, has also witnessed the re-
turn of that once-maligned po-
litical figure, the ward-heeler.
HE IS now called the presi-
dent of the condominium, but
acts." and is treated accordingly.
as if he can deliver the preat
blocs of votes the legendary
Tammany and Kelly-Nash Alder-
men once did.
Whatever the merits, in this
year of our Bicentennial one
can hardly fault the Jew if he
votes his one issue. Israel, and
the Catholics theirs: abortion.
while the candidates wti>rl
around in search of votes wher-
ever and however they get
them.
I am convinced that our de-
votion to zero population
and
our dedication to causes im-
material to our survival as Jews
in America make our decline
inevitable, and thus 1976 wiU
be the last year of real Jewisn
political power. South Florida
looks like the scene of our last
hurrah.
Ji ~


Friday, March 5, 1976
*Jewisti fkrMteun
Page 5-A
JAPANESE VIEWERS TO SEE JUDAISM IN ACTION
United Mizrahi Bank
TV to Feature Religion in U.S. To Pen Gotham Branch
NEW YORK (JTA) An
estimated 20 million Japanese
viewers will watch a one-hour
documentary film on religion
in the United States, at the end
of March, which will feature a
segment filmed by a Japanese
TV crew at a Conservative syna-
gogue m Manhattan and a He-
brew Day School in Brooklyn,
the director of the Japanese-
television network NHK office
here reported.
Yosbfo UVhhh. the director
here. Said-a fivenan crew came
from Janan to film material for
the doewmentarv. one of five
on religions throughout the
world"
HE SAID the documentary on
the. United Stat-s would also
co"or Citholics, Protestants and
Mormons and perhio"; some
och*r sects. He explained he
could not be mn soeciflT be-
cause th raw filT> was r"ing
taken hack to Janan for editing.
MIAMI HEAITH INSTITUTE
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The film on the United States,
l'ke the other four, will have
Japanese subtitles. Uchida also
said he could not give a more
exact date for the time of the
t 1 -cast of the American docu-
mentary. NHK is a public serv-
ice network, he said.
Arrangements for the crew to
shoot film at the Magen David
School, described as the Iargt
and oldest of six Sephardic day
schools in the United States,
were made thrrmgh Torah Ume- -
sorah, tha National Society tor
Hebrew Day Schools.
Rabbf Moshe Greenes, princi-
pal of the day .school. Mid the
TV crew filmed a Torah lesson
in grade five, filmed tha chil-
dren in'the school playground
and interviewed the nrincioal.
Filming was done on Jan. 7.
THE SYNAGOGUE visited by
the TV crew was Congregation
Shaare Zedek in nooer Manhat-
tan, on recommendation .of the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
the Conservative institution.
Rabbi Shlomo Baiter, snirit-
ual leader, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the crew,
two members of which were
fluent in English, asked to film
a regular Saturday morning
s *rvice but was told this was
not permitted.
Instead the crew attended a
regular morning service on Jan.
5 in a downstairs room at which
some 60 worshippers were pre-
s;nt. The camera at one point
was angled to shoot over the
reader's shoulder, focusing on
the pointer as it was moved
across the Torah Scroll.
BALTER SAID he had called
to the attention of one of the
cameramen a wall designed by
Sol Nodet, nresident of the con-
a "*T*tion who is- a well-known
artist and miniaturist to conv
metnorate the Holocaust. The
rabbi said that the cameraman :
interrupted his explanation to
say "1 have been in Auschwitz."
Uchida was asked how much
of the one-hour documentary
04*14 be devoted to any one
religion. He said that while this
would be determined by the
technicians m Janan, he ex-
pected that about 12 to 15 min-
utes of tho hour-long documen-
tary would deal with the Jew-
ish material Filmed here.
He said he had been inform-
ed the documentary will not be
shown, in this- country.
NEW YORK(JTA)United
Mizrahi Bank, Ltd., one of Is-
rael's oldest and largest banks,
has announced the opening of
a representative office at Rocke-
feller Center in New York City.
Aharon Meir, the bank's man-
aging director and chief execu-
tive, arrived in New York to
participate in meetings and re-
ceptions which will mark the
opening of the representative
office. <*4
HIGHLIGHTING these events
waa a cocktail party at the Wal-
dorf Astoria Hotel and a lunch-
eon with the American-Israel
Chamber of Commerce.
In announcing the opening,
Amitzur- Shlasky, VS. repre-
sentative, stated that the office
has been established to serve
the needs of international in-
vestors and depositors.
The representative office is
equipped to offer the services
of the bank's international divi-
sion in Tel Aviv to clients and
prospective clients in the United
States, to arrange commercial
transactions through its world-
wide facilities, and to respond
to inquires.
The United Mizrahi Bank Ltd.
operates a nationwide network
of 54 br*iches, as well as hav-
ing affiliates and subsidiaries
throughout Israel.
It provides a complete range
of financial and banking serv-
ices, to retail, commercial trust,
institutional, and -international
clients.
IN RESPONSE to its growing
international activities, the bank
recently opened a new- foreign
business building in Tel Aviv.
. United Mizrahi' Bank Ltd. has
current total assets of over
$500,000,080 with deposits Of
approximately $300,000,000.
Its stock is widely held, and
traded on the Tel Aviv Stock
Exchange. The bank is also a
leading broker on the exchange.
01 m r i M (he mo; crest a cm nP^T '
SJ i LI Idwc'ors !**6 South J-^ [A Call I' :.-:''. mi ^^ Herb SJiaenhcr" 5. .' <.-:<..'7
Miami Beach on$5aday.
While most people have been complaining
that it now costs a fortune to serve meat
at dinner three times a week, some of our
less fortunate elderly people consider
themselves lucky to eat anything for dinner
three times a week:
That's how bad its become. Inflation
has destroyed the purchasing power of
people trying to squeeze out enough (or
medicine, rent, food and clothing on
Supplemental Social Security Income of
about $5.26 a day.
Trying to live on that amount of money
can break your heart. And your spirit. And
even your will to live.
For some of us, it's a matter of inflation.
For others, it's a matter of survival.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
O
We Are One.


Pace 6-A
*Je*1st'ncrkmr_
Friday, March 5, 1976
Tekoah Says He's Still Politically Available
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Yosef
Tekoah, president of the Ben
Gurion University in Beersheba
and former Israel Ambassador
to the United Nations, is re-
ceiving "many offers" to return
to active political life in Israel
but, he says, "I will weigh the
offers when time is right."
In an interview with the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency here
last week at the start of a two-
week speaking tour on behalf of
the United Jewish Appeal and
the Ben Gurion University, Te-
koah noted that in fact he is
very much involved in politics
in Israel.
"I AM ACTIVE in the frame-
work of of Labor Party," he
said.
"I have been elected head of
fund-raising for the party, and
I appear at least four times a
week on behalf of the Labor
Party in public gathering."
Tekoah, who is completing
final arrangements here for the
Presidential Primary Tuesday
South Florida goes to the pells on Tuesday, Mar. 9,
along with the rest of the Sunshine State to vote in the
Presidential preference primary.
Two candidates are running in the Republican Party
field President Ford and former California Gov. Ronald
Reagan.
For Reagan, at least an
even showing is a virtual
necessity in Florida, follow-
ing his razor-thin loss to
President Ford in the New
Hampshire primary, where
Reagan supporters had pre-
dicted a major victory.
IN THE Democratic field,
there are four hopefuls: Sen.
Henry Jackson (D. .Wash.); for-
mer Georgia Gov. Jimmy Car-
ter, who was clear victor in the
crowded Democratic ballot in
New Hampshiie; Alabama Gov.
George Wallace and Pennsyl-
vania Gov. Milton Shapp, the
nation's first Jewish candidate
for the presidency.
The results of the Massachu-
sett sand Vermont primaries on
Tuesday sharpened even fur-
ther the significance of Flor-
ida's primary Mar. 9.
Also on the baHot Tuesday is
a state amendment to the Flor-
ida constitution, authorizing
and limiting local taxes for wa-
ter management purposes to not
more than 1 mil.
There are three Dade County
amendments:
to To permit the cbunty to
license and regulate taxis and
other vehicles for hire through-
out Dade instead of only in the
unincorporated areas;
For staggered terms for
members of the Dade County
Commission so that the mayor
and four county commissioners
will be elected for 4-year terms
beginning in 1976, and another
for a two-year term, also in
1976;
Shall the salaries for
mayor and commissioner be in-
creased?
IN ADDITION, there is the
question governing the paying
of funds for the cost of addition-
al water supply, treatment and
transmission facilities.
For City of Miami voters,
there will be the chance to ap-
prove or disapprove a S25 mil-
lion housing bond issue.
Alion Signs Mexican Plane Deal
Continued from Page 1-A
ment between Israel and Mexico
which will include landing rights
for El Al in Mexico City. The
agreement will be initiated dur-
ing Allon's visit, but the nego-
tiations are Mkely to be pro-
tracted, the Yddiot Achapnf re-
port said.' *
foinsiuEL & LONDON
MAY 27 TO JUNE 14
1179- aS*"
Includmi:
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mini mii'isr i irntf j
GLOBE TRAVEL INC.
1613 N.I. 163 ST.
No. Miami a 1 DADE BKOWARD
1(305) 049-M27 (305) 970-8785
Officials here noted that Is-
rael gives high priority to its
commercial ventures with Mexi-
co and that accounted in part
for the dismay last year over
Mexico's vote in favor of the
anti/tt'rtiist resolution in the
UN Gen*ral Assembly. Thalps*
flhfe has-since been resolved* in
diplomatic contacts between the
two countries.
Allon will visit three Central
American countries Guate-
mala, Nicaragua and Costa Rica
Foreign Ministry sources dis-
closed.
HIS VISITS will be brief, and
his stop-over in Guatemala will
be of only a few hours' dura-
tion and in the form of a con-
dolence call to that country re-
cently ravaged by an earth-
quake.
In Costa Rica, Allon will call
on the President and address
that country's parliament.
Official sources here express-
ed hope that the Foreign Minis-
ter's visit will have favorable
reoercu9sions throughout Cen-
tral and South America where
there has been a disturbing ero-
sion of sSpport for Israel in
recent months.
THE OFFICIALS said that
after studying the results of the
Foreign Minister's visits to Cen-
tral American countries, a deci-
sion would be made on further
visits later this year to several
South American countries.
Allon was to stop at Paris for
one day enroute to Mexico to
lunch with French Foreign Min-
ister Jean Sauvagnargues. One
item on their agenda was to be
France's alleged stalling on a
financial pact between Israel
and the nine European Common
Market nations, sources here
said.
Washington
Federal
Savings and Loan Association of Miami Beaoh
ASir*: rxctED ssoo miuion
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Hollywood:
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Phone: 981-9192
JACK 0. GORDON

Phone: 673-
North Miami Baaeti:
633 NE. 167th Street
Phonr. 673-3333
Boca Raton:
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MTHUR H CmjRSHON
Ctiifmn al I" Bml_.
&
SATISFYING
EXPERIENCE
A recent survey tells us most people
get a big kick out of saving money.
We believe it. We see them every
day as they save for a new home or
car, for a trip, for their children or
grandchildren. We know they're
enjoying it and we enjoy helping
them do it. The survey also says
people like to save at a place that's
warm and friendly. We already
knew that.
Our growth to over 500 million
dollars has come about because
people like to do business with us.
Why? We think it's because we
consider people our most important
asset. Why don't you drop into
any of our convenient offices, open
a savings account, talk about
mortgage, perhaps just talk.
ii
publication of his new book, "In
the Face of the Nations,"
which includes his major
speeches at the UN, was asked,
in view of his experience with
Soviet diplomats at the UN,
what effect, if any, the second
Brussels conference can have
on the Soviet authorities.
"THE CONFERENCE will un-
doubtedly influence the Soviet
authorities," Tekoah contended.
"The Soviet government has
paid attention to international
public opinion in the past on the
question of Soviet Jewry .
The Brussels conference is a
beginning of a chain of events
reflecting (international) inter-
est in Soviet Jewry, and I be-
lieve it will have an effect on
the Soviet position towards
Aliya."
Tekoah also said he believed
the question of restoring diplo-
matic relations between Israel
and Russia "Is secondary to the
question whether there is a
freedom of emigration from the
Soviet Union. The renewal of
diplomatic ties can be no more
than a touch of cosmetic with
no affect on Aliya."
In Tekoah's opinion, Israel
must concentrate all its efforts
on ensuring Aliya from Russia
while leaving aside the ques.
tion of diplomatic relations.
TEKOAH pointed out, how-
fever, that there are no "serious
indications" that the Soviet
Union, which severed its diplo-
matic ties with Israel at the
outbreak of the June, 1967, Mid-
east war, is moving in the di-
rection of restoring the ties with
Israel.
The former Israeli Ambassa-
dor to the UN, who serves pre*,*
sently as special advisor to For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon, said
that Israel's position at the UN
should continue to be that "Is-
rael will be bound only by reso-
lutidns adopted by its agree-
ment."
On the Arab's design to try
to expel Israel from the UN,
Tekoah said that "the only way
to prevent it will be by demon-
strating to them (the Arabs) it
will be detrimental to their own
interests. Should the Arabs
bring this (Israel's expulsion) to
vote, Israel would reconsider
its attitude to all UN activities
regarding the Mideast situation
including the continuation of
the UN peace-keeping fortes
and any role played by the UN
at the Geneval conference."
Sol&Bernice
Frankel wanted
their children's
wedding to
be the
talk of
Miami
So they selected the Konover.
And people are still talking! About the excellent hon cToeuvres.
The courteous, continental service. The gourmet dinner and
the raignificent Konover surroundings.
"VOUre celebrating a happy occasion, ask the Frankels who they
would recommend Then call Norman Blecker, Director of
Catenng 865-1500. Kosher catering prepared under
strict rabbinical supervision also available
Konover Hotel MC
On the Ocean at 54th Street Miami Beach, Florida


Friday, March 5, 1976
*Jenisti thridiar
Page 7-A
RABBI TANENBAUM VOICES PLEA
Bring Sivindlers to Justice
U.S. Denies Jet Engines
Being Sold to Egypt
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Marc Tanenbaum, director of
interreligious affairs for the
American Jewish Committee
commenting on reports that
records of a number of Hebrew
day schools have been sub-
poenaed on suspicion of involve-
ment in nursing home Medicaid
swindles, said that guilty Jews
should "be exposed and punish-
ed regardless of who they are
and what may be their titles or
positions."
He said the AJCommittee "to-
gether with every responsible
Jewish group" condemns "prac-
tices of a few individuals in the
Jewish community who have re-
portedly engaged in ill?gnl and
immoral financial transactions
with nursing homes for private
gains."
ACCORDING to Jewish
sources, the day school records
have been subppoenaed by Char-
les .). Hynes. the special prosecu-
tor for nursing homes, whose ef-
forts have led to indictments of
Rabbi Bernard Bergman and
Eugene Hollander, two leading
Orthodox Jews, on state and
federal charges of misuse of
Medicaid funds in their nursing
home operations.
Hollander has pleaded guilty
and is awaiting sentence.
The sources said the ned de-
velonm-nt went beyond the
earlier disclosures concerning
Bergman and Hollander, who
reportedly had made contribu-
tions to religious organizations
and to leading rabbis under the
giiise of nursing home costs
which were subsequently reim-
bursed with Medicaid funds.
TANENBAUM said that "the
fact that ostensibly religious
Jews or rabbis have allegedly
been involved and that such
exploitation takes place at the
expense of poor and elderly peo-
ple many of whom are Jews
only compounds the scandal.
Such reprehensible behavior
violates every moral and ethical
canon of Judaism and of the
Jewish people.
"If the reports are true," he
continued, "the Jewish commu-
nity surely wants this scandal-
ous business investigated tho-
roughly and completely. We
urge that the guilty be exposed
and punished regardless of who
they are and what may be their
titles or positions."
C ntinued from Page 1-A
'")' esman John Trattner said,
"j categorically deny the pro-
posal exists." He said the pro-
posal "is not even considered
in the Administration." adding
that he had "no idea" on what
the Israeli press reports are
based.
Gen. (res.) Mordechai Hod.
former head of the Israel Air
Force, in an interview with Ye-
diot Achronot yesterday, said
that if Egypt received the Amer-
ican engines it would gain a
distinct advantage in air power.
He was commenting on re-
ports of the sale here that orig-
inated in Washington.
MEANWHILE, Pentagon
sources earlier made similar
comments to that by Trattner
but left open the question whe-
ther Egynt has asked for the
tn'iines. Trattner said he was
"not aware" that Egypt had
asked for the J-79 engines.
Dspite the disclaimers at the
Pentagon and State Department,
informed sources here said that
some Administration sources
a>-e considering selling the en-
gines to Egypt and that it could
be done through a third coun-
try or in some other manner at
an appropriate time.
Human Rights Author Passes, 88
a\
W***'
uASTErS *9*' Hallandole Beoth Blvd.
LARGIST SlllCTION OF
989-4241
*****
PARIS (JTA) Prof. Rene
Cassin, Nobel Prize Laureate,
author of the United Nations
Declaration of Human Rights
and honorary president of the
Alliance Israelite Universelle,
died here last Friday at the age
( of 88.
One of Gen. Charles de Gaul-
le's earliest followers in June,
1940, after the Nazis overran
France, the Jewish French-horn
writer, statesman and attorney
broke with de Gaulle in 1967
over the General's Middle East
policy. Prof. Cassin, comment-
ing on de Gaulle's arms embar-
go on Israel stated: "France is
identifying itself with injustice."
PROF. CASSIN obtained his
doctorates in law, economy and
political science- and was ap-
pointed law professor first at
Abr-en-Provence University and
than at the Sorbonne.
In the 1920s, he was a French
delegate to the League of Na-
tions and served in this capacity
until th" outbreaV of World War
II. In June. 1940. he was the
first ranking French civilian to
join de Gaulle in London and
was subseouently appointed
Minister of Justice in de Gaul-
le's "Free French" government.
At the end the of war, Prof.
Cassin was appointed vice presi-
dent of the Council of State.
France's highest non-political
administrative post, and was
subsecuently appointed as the
Council's honorary president.
HE WAS the first Frencbdele-
gate to the UN Commission on
Human Rights and then its
president. In 1968, he was
awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
and in 1973 the Goethe Prize.
He donated the monies of these
awards to humanitarian activi-
ties.
Prof. Cassin was throughout
his career interested and active
in Jewish and Israeli affairs. In
1974. a French high school was
inaugurated in Jerusalem bear-
ing his name.
Rabbi Goren Meets
With Ford in Capital
By JOSEPH POLAROFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)Rab-
bi Shlomo Goren, the Asbkena-
zic Chief Rabbi of Israel, left
for Israel after a two-week visit
to the United States and an un-
scheduled meeting with Presi-
dent Ford at the White House.
In an address at Shomrai Emu-
nan Synagogue in Silver Spring,
Md., Goren indicated that the
Egyptian-Israeli agreement in
the Sinai was among the topics
he discussed with Ford in their
meeting.
He said the President felt
that Egypt would not go to war
with Israel again because it
Vrould adversely affect the
Egyptian economy and would
result in the immediate closing
of the Suez Canal. Goren also
indicated that Ford believed
What do doctors
recommend
for patients in pain?
There are many medications a
physician or dentist can prescribe
for pain. But there's one pain re-
liever physicians and dentists dis-
pense again and again: Anacm.
Each year, doctors give out over
$0,000,000 Anaein tablets for
everything from toothache and
fceadache pain to the minor pains
of arthritis. And millions take
Anaein without stomach upset.
When you're in pain, take the
tablet a doctoa iht ft*-, ye*on
hia own office. Take Anacm.
that Israelis should not feel con-
cerned about the agreement be-
cause it will be successful.
THE CHIEF Rabbi and Ford
conferred for 20 minutes during
a meeting arranged by the Is-
raeli Embassy. Israeli Ambassa-
dor Simcha Dinitz and Gen.
Brent Scowcroft, the President's
special assistant for security af-
fairs, were also present. Topics
included Jewish questions in-
cluding the plight of Soviet and
Syrian Jews.
Israeli sources described the
meeting as extremely friendly
and warm. The White House
said the meeting was arranged
after Goren asked to meet with
Ford and that the visit was a
courtesy call of a private and
social nature.
In his sermon, Goren stressed
that events affecting Israel can-
not be judged by day-to-day
events but in the perspective of
history. He said he saw the hand
of God in Israel's successes in
war and in the development of
the country.
GOREN, who was the guest
of Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer of
Shomrai Emunah Synagogue,
went after yesterday's service
to the home of Charles and Git-
ta Siegman where he attended a
bris.
He also addressed students of
the Yeshiva High School in Sil-
ver Spring and the Hebrew
Academy in Washington. Dur-
ing his two-week trip. Goren
aln visited New York. Boston
and'Toronto.
Among the many positions he
held. Prof. Cassin was the head
of the Consultative Council of
Jewish Organizations and a for-
mer president of the European
Human Rights Court and the
International Institute of Ad-
ministrative Sciences.
HE WAS a founder of UNESCO
and subseouently a strong critic
of that UN body's politiciza-
tion.
Prof. Cassin took a leading
part in campaigns for the right
of Soviet Jews to emigrate.
lARGtST StLlCTION OF ,
MACRAME PRODUCTS
AT TRULY RIDICULOUS PRICES
12 (-...HUM .__-,
CMHCMI $T 50
Ra|. 5.15 W
421, #24, J0, CM *^-
In tail* Mm S*)50
ll|. 1.11 Mm
it ib. jut. $ I A?S
Mi 21.lt I "f
Mh .ri f*lTNMn, If Urn }-l. il
ti.ii iHtnwii* mm
NilehiM Car MM ftH mi Ut4*
I Ik. Jota Ball.
n.t 2.M
Wilh this i
1 Li. .-7JClo
C.blaCart
Xtl. 4.51 Will. Hm at
Old World Prices thai yau all can afford ... today.
You'll be Pleated.. .Pleat e bring thll ad with you.
mil mm
211 rtSM*4
lUt. 21.M
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
IS THIS NATION BECOMING
A VAST INSANE ASYLUM?
*
*
*
1.1 REFER TO THE NEWEST TRAGEDY ANGOLA!
<>nd rwmrmany Amey>c*n know who** Arwjola Wf\ f .
2. THE PARDON OF RICHARD NIXON and who said what to
whom?
3. THE UNEMPLOYMENT PROBLEM in this country and
what is and what is not being done about it.
4. THE CRIME PROBLEM and if I was one of the people in the *
40% minority group that was unemployed maybe I'd
have to resort to crime too! How about you?
5. AND did you read the series on Howard Hughes in the Miami
Herald? How does this man get away with what he's
doing? Lawton Chiles is a wonderful guy. I love the way
he smiles (and I know he's a good walker). But like 75%
of our government leaders he's a do nothing guy m my
opinion.
6. AND NOW REVEALED- s6,000,000 to Undercut Italy!! What
does Lawton Chiles, our walking Senator, say to all this.
Have You Heard Anything?? Neither Hove I._______
*
I WANT TO BE TOUR NEXT UNITED STATES SENATOR.
I WANT FUll EMPLOYMENT FOR All MINORITY PEOPIE AND EVERT0NE EISE.
NO ONE CAN THINK QEARIY ABOUT OTHER PROBLEMS, IE THE ECONOMY STINKS
AND IF PEOPLE ARE OUT OF WORK. THIS CONDITION ONLY LEADS TO INSANITY.
I AM CAllING FOR THE RESIGNATION OF PRESIDENT FORD and HENRY KISSINGER
AND TO REGAIN LEADERSHIP FOR THE PRESIDENT FOR HUBERT H. HUMPHREY.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
As US Senator I will work for fall omploymoiit even if wo hove to
use the methods and programs of Franklin D. Reotevelt. I don't want
financial contributions from you. I want your support for a Senator
(me) who will do some sereamimj(in moderate weico) in the Ui.
1 taM^'opinion, we ore heading towardi WAR to fat it makes my
head spin.
My. Program: MORE DIPLOMACY AND STATESMANSHIP -IKS CU.
W "DiTTYTIJCIS"
*
*
Sincerely
JERRY CARVER iwm.i^ *>"



^
Page 8-A
^Jmi^flcrkfiar
Friday, March S, 1976
>\
Anxious Heart of a 'Prisoner of Conscience'
i
Continued from Page 1-A
hail Kornblit. He used to be an
oral surgeon. Now he does
heavy labor and waits. Since
the day of the Second Lenin-
grad Trial, May 11. 1970, he
has been waiting.
The sentence was heavy
seven years on strict regime.
Strict regime means one visit
per year after half the sentence
is served. It means one food and
one clothing parcel per year.
And those two letters a month.
The charge? Crimes against
the Soviet people. The accused
had been studying Hebrew.
RABBI ZWELLING can hard-
ly believe it. Every week for
nearly two years he has written
to Mikhail Kornblit. He made
weekly trips to the post office
to send the letters by registered
mail, with a return receipt re-
quested. He wrote to let Korn-
blit know that he was not for-
gotten. He never expected an
answer. But it came.
The Rabbi shares the news
with the members of his con-
gregation, B'nai Raphael in
northern Dade County. They,
too. are astonished and filled
with joy. For Mikhail Kornblit
is part of their lives.
THE PRISONER in Moscow is
a full, complementary member
of their synagogue. Project co-
ordinator. Mrs. Linda Levine.
sees that the school children
and youth-group members write
to him. Each Bar and Bat MU7-
vah wears a medallion bearing
his name around his or her
neAxrt every Shabb.it. Ml'Jwil
Kornblit is called to the Torah.
Because he cannot resaond to
the alivah, a special nrayer is
recited for him, in the hope that
he may soon make the greatest
aliyah of his lite home to Is-
rael.
Non-Belligerency Test Okayed
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet agreed today to assent
to American moves that would
test the readiness of Israel's
Arab neighbors to enter into an
agreement of non-belligerence
with Israel.
Such an agreement would be
less than a formal peace settle-
ment but would amount to a
renunciation of the state of war.
The decision, adopted unanim-
ously after a lengthy debate at
a Cabinet session, was said to
apply to the three confronta-
tion states bordering Israel
Egypt. Jordan and Syria.
THE CABINET took up the
matter apparently in response
to suggestions nut to Rabin by
the U.S. Administration during
the Premier's visit to Washing-
ton last month.
Rabin reportedlv told the
Americans at the time that he
could agree to an American
probe of Egyptian and Syrian
attituc'os on a non-belligerency
nact but needed Cabinet ap-
nroval for similar approaches
toward Jordan.
The Premier stress d
anv settlement with Jordan in-
volving territorial concessions
bv Israel would have to be ap-
proved in advance bv a national
referendum, oossi'oiv in the
form of new elections.
THE CABINET was reported
to have deliberately avoided
discussion of any quid pro quo
Israel would be prepared to of-
fer th Arabs in exchange for
non-belligerency.
Israel's nublic offer last spring
to withdraw from the Mitla and
Gidi passes and the Abu Rodeis
oilfields in Sinai in exchange for
an agreement of non-belliger-
ency with Egypt is acknowl-
edged to have been a political
error.
Israel has withdrawn from
these positions, under the inter-
im accord with Egypt signed at
Geneva last September, but has
gotten nothing approaching non-
belligerency from the Egyptians.
THE AMERICAN feelers will
apparently be made simultane-
ously with efforts to recovene
the G^n^va conference. Secre-
tary of Stat Henry A. Kissinger
is said to believe that the use-
f In ^ss of sten-bv-step diplo-
macy has ended but that a full-
fledged >-">ace settlement is not
a practical expectation at this
time.
Israeli observers do not place
pmch hope on Geneva at this
stage becavse of Svrian insist*
pace on PLO participation in
the conference. Syria is sup-
"vtd in th's by the Soviet
Union, cochairman with the U.S.
of the Geneva conference.
EFFORTS to revive the Ge-
n > a conference are currently
being promoted by UN Secre-
tary General Kurt Waldheim.
Roberto Guyer. UN Undersecre-
tary, is due in the Middle East
tomorrow. He will meet with
Foreign Minister Yigal Allan
Tuesday morning.
After viiiting the various Mid-
dle East parties to the Geneva
conference he will go to Mos-
cow to ascertain the Soviet view
on the possible resumption of
the parley.
100 Soviet Jews
Arrive in Israel
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV(JTA)A group
of 100 Jews from the Sovi I
Union, including several l'-ai-
ictivists who spent years in
their fight for evit visas and
lOl-yep'-old Rabbi Moshe Ep-
stein of Leningrad, arrived at
Ben Gurion Airport last week.
Many of the new arrivals
agreed with some Israeli circl-s
that they were the vanguard of
a new wave of immigration from
USSR that was attributed to the
second World Conference on
Soviet Jewry held in Brussels.
IT REMAINED to be seen,
however, whether the arrivals
spelled an end to the year-long
drought in aliya from the So-
viet Union.
One of the emigres, Prof.
Alexander Lunz, a 52-vear-old
mathematician who first ap-
plied for a visa in 1972, said
experience nroved that the So-
<* viet authorities understand, the,
'; language of pressure.
He said Soviet Jews expect
that Brussels n and the efforts
of world Jewry at large will in-
fluence the Soviets to change
their emigration policies.
THE ARRIVALS included
seven other activist families,
among them Israel Vernibitzki,
47, a shipyard engineer from
Leningrad, who is joining his
son, a student at Haifa Tech-
Mikhail Kornblit is known in
the west as a "Prisoner of Con-
ner nee." He is one of dozens
of Jews now serving time in So-
viet orison camps on trumped-
up charges. Their real crime is
that th :s reouested permission
to emigrate to Israel.
THE SOUTH Florida Confer-
rn-:- on Soviet Jewry, a com-
r-^-tee of f'e Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee, has set up
a Synagogue Prisoner of Con-
science program. The Greater
Miami Rabbinical Association
has parsed a resolution to sup-
port and narticipaf" in the pro-
"-*m. nntW the Chairmanship
of Rabbi Zwelling.
It is honed that eventually,
even- s'n-'gogue in the com-
munity wiP undertake responsi-
bility for one prisoner of con-
scien"*. As .at B'nai Raphael,
tV prison lr will become a liv-
in B*osn'w w:hin the svna-
g -.gut;, which will visibly dem-
r"=* t its concern in a vaii-ty
of ways.
MYRIAM WOLF. overall
chairman for the Prisoner of
fnnscicnee nrog-ams is assist-
ing congregations with setting
up their o oihbi 7""'I:""T has contacted
area rabbis to urge implementa-
tion.
Pauline Kornblit was asked
in a recent interview in Israel
whether protests against the
treatment of Jews, from other
parts of the world, is making it
worse for those remainiiiR in
Russia.
She replied with great ve-
hemence, "No! You must tell
them to remember Hitler. It was
only because of world silence
that Germany carried out its in-
famy against the Jews. If there
is world outcry, Russia will be
concerned. There must be world
outcry to allow Jews in Russia
to be what they want to be and
to leave if they want to."
MEANWHILE, in his Moscow
c*ll, Mikhail Kornblit counts out
his seven-vear sentence and
hopes only that his health holds
up under the severe conditions
of the labor camp. He J reams
of being strong to give the
rest of his life to Israel.
"In most pans of the world,"
he writes to Rabbi Zwelling,
"the Jews are guests. When you
become tired as a guest, vou
have to go home. Bu: when
th^re is no home for a .-van and
the hot g^ts tired of HIM. he
has to fl'e out of the house The
whole h'storv of our MOPl! is
a story "bout guests anJ hosts.
It is sad but true. And 1 never
w-yT to se it happen again."
G1976R J Reynolds JobtcoaCc .
nion; Prof, flya Platetzki, of Mos-
cow; Victor Kog.an. a geologist
f ii M >scow; Smuel Stroginitz,
of Leningrad; and Irma Cher-
ani Mordec'ii Pritzker
who both participated in the '.
B'usseN conference before corn-
in" to Israel.
Most of them expressed the
opinion that they got their visas
only because of Brussels II.
Platt7ki. a mathematician who
will join the faculty of Tel Aviv
University, observed, however,
that "Nobody in Russia knows
why he suddenly gets the exit
visa."
He said he was refused one
for years on grounds that he
was engaed in secret research,
an allegation he denies.
VERNIBITZKI said he waited
five years for his visa and that
while some activists received
permission to emigrate, the ap-
plications of others were re-
peatedly turned down.
Rabbi Epstein's arrival creat-
ed a stir at the airport. The
fragile centenarian had to be
helped off the plane. He ar-
rived with members of his fami-
ly, including a daughter and
grandchildren. He said he want-
ed to live in Jerusalem.
Rabbi Epstein once headed
the Jewish community in Lenin-
grad and at one time was exiled
to Siberia for Zionist activities.
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
M mg. 'tit". 1.0 mg nicotine w. per eiotttm, FTC Report StPT.^J-


Friday, March 5, 1976
* Ir*/f-* n$\m tttimn
Page 9-A
MILTON SHAPP IS BREAKING
THE GROUND.
Here's what ISRAEL TODAY, the respected voice of California's
Jewish community: says about Governor Shapp's candidacy:
"We have waited 200 years for Governor Milton Shapp of
Pennsylvania. It has taken our country some time to accept a
Jewish candidate for President and it has taken someone with
experience and guts to take such a step. Milton Shapp has taken
that step.
"It is befitting that in the Bi-Centennial year there be a
Presidential candidate who is a qualified, respected government
leader, won his gubernatorial re-election by over 300,000 votes,
engineered one of the country's most sound state economies,
settled heated strikes, loves this country and its people and also
is a Jew.
"Milton Shapp is a longshot in 1976 but Milton Shapp deserves
a chance. He is setting a precedent which could allow your son,
daughter, grandson or granddaughter to become President of the
United States of America. Years from now you will be able to tell
your grandchildren and great-grandchildren that you voted for the
first Jewish Presidential candidate... Governor Milton Shapp, or
will that be President Milton Shapp?"
As Pennsylvania's first two-term Governor in over 100 years
-elected by the biggest Democratic majorities in the state's
history-Milton Shapp has demonstrated a capacity for leadership,
a grasp of economic realities, and a concern for human needs
-In 1970, he inherited a state $800 million in debt from the
previous administration. In less than 1 year, using sound business
management, he turned the red ink to black.
-Since then taxes have been cut in Pennsylvania by $360 million
and last month he presented a budget which held next year's
spending to a 3.97% increase-half the national rate of inflation.
-He inaugurated the nation's first statewide system of free public
transportation for Senior Citizens at no cost to taxpayers.
-Haturned his Governors Mansion into a school for brain damaged
children and a Late Start Center for the elderly. In the State
Capitol, he and his wife rent their own home.
-He implemented a program of rent and property tax relief benefits
for the elderly and handicapped.
-As President, his proposal for a National Education Trust Fund
offers the hope of improving the quality of education in this
country from day care through post graduate studies, while
eliminating the need for property taxes and cutting the cost of
college tuition in half.
-His National Investment Policy will trigger private sector invest-
ments to produce millions of new jobs in a growing economy.
Milton Shapp for President. He's got more executive experience
-more government ability-than any other Democratic candidate
for President. And these times cry out for just such a man He s
not fancy He's not famous. But there's not a better man when it
comes to understanding your problem, rolling up his sleeves and
getting the thing solved.
The candidate you vote for in this primary has got to have the
answers. The quality of your life is in question.
Pio for by ShPP or Preeioent Committee copy
ot our repo* hied with the Federal Elections Comm,,on .no tve.lrtle (or purch.se in W.sh.ntfon, D.C.
Shapp has answers for America.
1%



.
oLjavid
*^chsv
artz
Washington's Mideast
Problem Goes Back
has its Middle East
WAfc
problem. Way back let us remember
in these bicentennial days George Washing-
ton had the same problem.
The U.S. in G.W.'s day was a little smaller.
It had only three million people then. We have
almost that many running for President to-
day and thcie were only 13 states. Yet small
as the country was, the entire world was af-
fected by its establishment.
WASHINGTON NOT only had to fight the
British, but the Germans. The British, it will
be recalled, hired an army of 30.000 German
soldiers from the province of Hesse to fight
for them. Russia came into the picture, too.
The Czar took advantage of the British pre-
occupation with America to seize the Cimea.
Tiie United Nations have never asked Russia
to give it *ack.
The American problem as far as the MiJ-
dle liast is concerned" didn't emerge until alter
the winning of independence.
THE SO-CALLED Barbary or Arab States,
Algeria, Tunis. Tripoli, Morocco, practiced
piracy kidnapping the crews of ships going
through the Mediterranean. Now. they say
they own all the land of the Middle East, in-
cluding the land of Israel, but then they went
further and said they owned all the water of
the Mediterranean too.
Up to 1776, this was no problem, as the
British paid the annual tribute, but after the
Revolutionary War, Adams, the first Ambassa-
dor to Englnd, and Jefferson, the first Ambas-
sador to France, were confronted by it.
JEFERSON'S TIME was largely spent ran-
soming captives. He finally proposed to his
fellow envoys the estaolishment of an inter-
national naval force to deal with piracy, but
nothing came of the proposal.
Washington as President saw the United
States humiliated by being forced to pay the
Bey of Algiers almost a million dollars a
huge sum for the release of some captives and
the U.S. also agreed to pay an annual tribute.
But in a short time, the Bey wanted more
and in the next administration. Commander
Preble headed a little fleet of vessels to teach
the Bey a lesson.
IT IS interesting that Commander Preble's
flagship was named The George Washington,
but the piracy was not ended until Commo-
dore Dscatur in 1815-grabbed the Bey by the
neck so to speak, giving him the option of hav-
ing his harbor city and aU of his fleet destroy-
ed unless- he promised to stop his guerrilla
activities. It was a good day for America after
that, although European nations continued to
contribute to the Bey for the use of-the water
until about 1830.
Jewish Immigrant Romp;
Literary Contest Obsession
&
uectn
7>~off
CQABRIEL" by Harry*PWk>ck (McGraw-HM.
$9.95), is a* romp through the lives of
Jewish immigrants in Toronto of the 1930s.
Canadian and American immigrants are a pop-
ular subject for literary and cinematic writers
today.
First, Mordechai Richler's "The Apprentice-
ship of Duddy Kravitz" caught on, then it was
made, into a movie. This year, we have seen
Jan Kadar's film "Lies My Father Told Me"
followed by the spin-off paperback. Now the
film "Hester Street" is showing; and of course
E. L. Doctorow's best-selling novel "Ragtime"
Tits into the immigrant scheme as well.
"GABRIEL" is in the same genre as "Dud-
dy Hravitz" and Salinger's "Catcher in the
Rye." It is the story of the personal and sex-
ual maturation of a young boy thrust into a
new and strange environment abounding in
unusual and colorful characters.
They boy works hard at becoming Amer-
icanised, as do his Irish and Polish immigrant
friends. This is a sprightly and erotic portrayal,
occasionally developing themes of family unity
through faith, and the rituals of marriage and
death in different ethnic groups.
THE BOOK is at times artful, frequently
vulgar and more often than not sophomoric.
No doubt, it will become a movie.
The history of Philip J. Simon's "Cleft
Roots'' (Chicago'. Priam Press, $7.5(1) is un-
usual. The book- was written 25 years ago foe
a contest whose- purpose- was to "focus attenr
[ion upon Jewish survival in the United States."
The book- was selected for publication as a
finalist and a few months later waff-denied its
award and refused publication
With this 1975 publication, Simon offers his
own "contest." He asks readers to write letters
to Priam Press indicating whether or not the
judges 25 years ago were justified in their de-
cision to reject it. The best letters will receive
cash awards.
THIS WORK of fiction appears to be basical-
.y autobiographical, describing a Jewish boy
born into a dual heritage of Puritanism and
Judaism which thoroughly confuses him. He
later marries a non-Jew. The book primarily
deals with the problems which may result from
intermarriage.
The story is fairly interesting. However, its
impact is marred by the author's crusade to
have his book published.
Not only is he supporting the above-men-
tioned "contest," but also he describes his book
as a "refreshing departure from the flood of
pornography being spewed into the reader's
market" not a tasteful or appealing way to
present the merits of one's work.
fK overt
Ocotii
Crossroads

w
ASHINGTON has crawled with the speed of a turtle to res-
cue near-bankrupt New York with a $2.3 billion reprieve
loan, but some lasting good may come from the financial melo-
drama.
Beyond frightening Gotham's politicians and other power
brokers into reforms having to do with pensions, college tui-
tions, and swollen bureaucracies, the Manhattan Scare should
sene to awaken the uninformed to the modem plight of social
service agencies heavily dependent for survival on private phi-
lanthropy and government.
A SECOND gain will be a more compassionate look at the
fiscal plight of America's big cities, increasingly burdened with
providing for the poor now crowding Megalopolis, And a third
possibility is a new burst of speed for tax reform.
Leaders of Jewish federations, preparing for their annual
round of conferences at the height of the New York crisis, led
off with a timely and urgent call for an understanding of dam-
age to human service programs certain to result if New York
dsfaulted.
THE HEAVIEST burden, federation leaders pointed out,
would fall on the poorest and most defenseless people in Man-
hattan. Already the victims of a two-headed monstrosity cre-
ated by the peculiar union of inflation and recession striking
at the same time, elderly and jobless victims of the crisis
would suffer even more.
And if banks were weakened while bonds sank in value,
philanthropic giving would certainly plunge sharply.
SPOKESMAN FOR New York Catholic Charities quickly
telegraphed a similar message of despair. In a comprehensive
appeal published in the New York Times, Msgr. James J. Mur-
ray, executive director of Catholic Charities of New York, de-
clared that each day was bringing cries for help from the poor
the hoogry, the newly jobless.
He counted off vital agencies vulnerable-, is the hour of
municipal financial darkness, neighborhood selfrbarp- projects,
youth, services in high-delinsjuency areas, homemaker programs,
nursine homes, hospitals.
Slowly, those who may. have; been too preoccupied with
their personal problems- to. worry about help- snpptifd by pri-
vate and governmental supphers of human services came to
realize what was happening to minions subsisting on welfare
and unemployment allotments, inflation-riddled pensions, food
stamps, and social security cheeks.
HARSH JUDGMENTS on such remedies for hard times
were softened, at least to a degree, daring the New York crisis.
Meanwhile, Mayor Abraham Beame of New York* end
mayors of many other large American cities- found listeners
at last for the story of urban dilemma so long-neglected. Those
same Congressmen and While House functionaries who had
been damning and downgrading New. York for fiscal misman-
agement (which certainly was a factor in the drama) aU too
easily overlooked the fact that they had helped to mandate a
large portion of the big city financial obligation.
"No urban community can meet its own problems these
days with its own tax base while meeting those responsibilities
which the federal government should 9houlder," Mayor Beame
said with full right to speak as he did.
"IN- EVERY area from social services to the environment
to municipal labor relations, federal policies have imposed new
strains on local resources."
Federalization of our welfare system, reform of our gen-
eral revenue-sharing program, and an intensive educational
effort obliging all residents of the United States- to take a fresh
look at problems created by the unending trek of our people
to our largest cities all merit advocacy and heightened atten-
tion now.
Friday, March 5, 1976 Jmfefi Fhrkfian Page 10-A

, I" .1 -| i:, n',i ||.: '.in.

mmcuuiiini.ri nw
This is Surely the Kind of Intermairiage You Like to Read About
Haifa
'pHE DAILY newspaper, "Hatsofeh," publishes a
list of couples who have registered for marriage
in the various rabbinical offices throughout the
country. At first glance the two columns of fine
print which appear each day look like little more
than a reprint from the telephone directory. Yet a
closer inspection reveals that the dry, formal listing
can be a treasure house of imaginative, dramatic
stories.
Reduced to statistics and digested by compu-
ters, this information can undoubtedly cast much
light on trends in the evolving composition of Is-
rael's society.
THE REGISTRY identifies the couple by place
of birth, as well as by present city of residence^ I
recall, in the early days of the State, when the vast
majority of brides and grooms were born abroad.
More than a quarter century has elapsed since the
days of mass immigration, and those getting married
&4L
'pert
today are for the most part already native bom
Israelis.
YET IT is not difficult to idnttfv N or Suzanne Turgeman or Yaakov Buzaglo as being
undoubtedly members of what is variously called
the Oriental or Sephardi or Eastern Jewish commu-
nities.
And when we read that Israel Berkowitz is tak-
ing as his bride Mimi Shitrit, the exact place of
their birth need not be recorded for us to realize
that this is one of the happy cases of e welcome
"intermarriage."
The number of such matches between the com-
munities is growing. Israel's Bureau of Statistics
reports that in 1952 only 9 percent of all marriages
were between Ashkenazi and Sephardi. By 1955, the
figure had grown to 11.8 percent, and in 1962 it was
15 percent.
I HAVEN'T seen more recent figures, but my
own rough calculation based on the "Hatsofeh" ta-
bles leads me to guess that the figure is already
around 18 percent.
Certain basic premises can be made on the
basis of the daily lists. New immigrants tend to
marry mates from the same country. Almost all of
the Russian-born are choosing Russian-born. And
sure enough the statistics of twenty and more years
ago confirm that in those days the newly arrived
Rumanians or Moroccans were at that time each
marrying for the most part within their community.
fv......... '.:.i :!"!. :>...; mi. ; i.....
| I j1 M ,.:i | MMH :;i mi
i't. lr k I :
HiHHNHI.....I


riday, March 5, 1976
+Jetrtsti ncrrdfkyr
Page 11-A
SUSAN PANOFF: More About Books-'ISew Reissue'
MALCOLM HAY. Thy Brother's Blood: The
Roots of Christian Anti-Semitism. Hart
$8.95; $3.95 paper.
jyjALCOLM HAY, a Catholic historian, origin-
ally wrote this work in 1950. It is being
-eissued now, the editors say, as a result of
dispassionate public opinion toward the de-
struction of the State of Israel. This they at-
tribute to unconcern for the lives of Jews and
ignorance of their calamitous history.
Mdst of the book relates attitudes and ac-
tions of the Church from the 11th through 18th
enturies. One representative of the Church
denounced too much persecution of the Jews,
jecause if they were treated too harshly, it was
felt that it would be difficult to convert them.
ANOTHER churchman protested against the
daughter of Jews with the words: "God does
lot wish to annihilate them.. They must be
made to suffer fearful torments and be pre-
served for greater ignominy, for an existence
more bitter than death."
Hay proceeds to record the history of the
yellow badge which Jews have worn since
medieval times and through the Nazi period,
(t was a device adopted by the Fourth Lateran
Council to drive the Jews out of medieval so-
:ial life and to degrade them in the eyes of
:he Christian world. Others at the time who
vore distinctive badges were lepers and pros-
titutes.
HAY DEVOTES a portion of his book first
to the Crusaders who for several centuries
nassacred Jews in the name of the Church; and
wcond, to the blood libels, with which the
Church accused Jews of ritually murdering
Christian children.
On this issue of blood libels. Hay emphasizes
liow important it is for non-Jews to condemn
he brutality and tortures perpetrated by the
Church during the Middle Ages. He says that
"those who condone such deeds (or do not
:ondemn them) share in the guilt and help to
-vhich made such hatred and cruelty possible
.n the past .. and within recent years."
Concerning recent years, Nazi propaganda
n the early 1930s issued warnings to the Ger-
man people to take special care of their chil-
Iren at Passover time.
THE HISTORY of anti-Semitism in France,
^ng'.and. Germany and Poland in the 17th to
19th centuries is related to the Church and the
nter's influence on the masses and European
!ieads of states.
Hay blames Hitler's death machine upon the
"same old story of ignorance, stupidity and hate
that had been told throughout Christiandom
for a thousand years."
Despite the fact that Hay begins his book
with a somber recollection of the Holocaust
ind refers to it throughout, and concludes with
the inevitability of Nazi genocide and the sub-
iequent establishment of the State of Israel, I
vas surprised not to find a chapter discussing
he role of the Church DURING the Holocaust.
PERHAPS Hay was sticking to his title of
the Christian roots of anti-semitism, hence he
emphasized church history. But surely Rolf
'lochhuth's "The Deputy" and constant turmoil
regarding this issue necessitated some kind of
liscussion of this important and controversial
natter i
This is a significant contribution by a non-
lew to the history of anti-semitism, and the
lotivntional forces which impelled Hay to
ftudy it should inspire others to do the same.
AJCommittee Vows
Information War
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The American Jewish Com-
mittee's Board of Governors
ended its ten-day meeting
herethe first ever held in
Israel with a declaration
that Israel's survival is a
challenge not only to those
who have made their home
here but to evftry Jew every-
where." /
The declaration stated:
"We return to the U.S. with
a determination to do every-
thing possible to help all
Americans understand the
legitimacy of Israel's case,
to help provide the economic
know-how and resources it
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support it requires."
ELMER WINTER, AJCommit-
tee president, proposed a new
scheme to attract American in-
vestments to Israel and increase
Israeli exoorts to the United
States. He called for the estab-
lishment of 20 regional "task
forces" throughout the U.S. to
encourage investment in Israel
on a purely business basis.
Winter said his study of the
problems and his meeting here
with government officials,
manufacturers and businessmen
convinced him that there are
money-making opportunities in
Israel for American business.
He noted that Israeli exports to
the U.S. rarely went further
than the Eastern Sea Board, a
situation that called for imme-
diate remedies.
WINTER SAID he believed
that the AJCommittee could
play a key role in the establish-
ment of the "task forces" be-
cause of the preponderance of
businessmen and professionals
among its membership.
A highlight of the AJCommit-
tee's deliberations was the de-
dication of the "Hanna Hirs-
chorn Baumann Collection of
Americana" at the AJCommit-
tee's Jerusalem office, a gift of
Mrs. Baumann, a member of the
Board of Governors, from Rye,
NY.
The collection consists of over
500 books and periodicals on
American Jewish life which will
be available to scholars and the
general nublic at the AJCom-
mittee Library here.
SPEAKING at the dedication
ceremony U.S. Embassy Offi-
cial Andrew Schlesinger re-
marked that both the U.S. and
Israel maintain the principle
"that an informed citizenry is
the best defense against despot-
ism and that government func-
tions as a reflection of literary
opinion."_____________
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Ptge 12-A
JewHtihriMan
Friday, March 5, 1976

i
Prediction: Writer Will'Depar?
)|[TOR, The Jewish Floridian:
This note is in reference to
an. article by Leo Mindlin in
i s edition of Feb. 6 regarding
his po'tion with respect to
ij ; jnizing college staffs.
Ordinarily, we would not pay
iny attention to such adolescent
outbursts. But an article at-
l i eking the efforts of a union.
,. inted in an impartial, unbiased
i spaper, and especially one
Uiat carries continuously the
massage of Jewish unity, is not
M.uch more short of scandalous.
We hope, in the future, you will
nvoid this kind of nonsense.
BESIDES being president of
Die Reared New York City
I ichers in Florida, I also hap-
pen to be the editor of the B'nai
B'rith bulletin, "Margate Chav-
er "
So 1 am concerned. Our argu-
ment, then, is not with the Min-
dlin character. We predict that
Ut will depart from his medio-
crity into oblivion.
\Ve are more concerned with
y iur newspaper's permitting
BUCh pooling ot ignorance that
ran only serve to offend the
thousands of people who had to
carp their living by the "sweat
.if dheir brows."
rK) YOU know that unions in
u'Ous sections of the U.S. are
in Israeli and U.S. drives, that
tliere are quite a few retired
i toners serving as officers in
OK of our B'nai B'rith lodges in
Mi-award, and that our organiza-
tion consists of members who
t tugnt at all levels of^a-j>ej\ool
..rem? imm
imm*m
OUR
READERS
wrm
"let Thy Wdri-Bfcr
KohdetH (BcTlM*****)
But not a single one of them
v mid display tta* sUMbwness
t'id narrowness of mind of your
i .-ature" writer.
WILLIAM EMMER
MargateTFIa.
Mr; Mindlin Replies: "I am
glad that Reader Einmer
made such a noble excep-
tion to his hard and fa*t
rule. It demonstrates his
high regard for a free press
.i'id suggests that this is pre-
cisely the kind o! freedom,
as a union man. he would
bring to the academics of
free inquiry in colleges and
universities not yet union-
ized."
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
For over 30 years, Sen. Henry
Jackson has been warning about
Russian plans for the domina-
tion of the Middle East and the
oil fields of the Persian Gulf as
a giant step toward world con-
quest. He has also helped alert
America to the fact that Israel
is defending vital US interests
at the same time that. Israel
fights for its own survival.
In addition, of course, there
are the great moral issues in-
volved in helping Israel to arm
itself against the treacherous
onslaughts from its Arab neigh-
bors, heavily armed with Rus-
sian equipment
IN 1971, Sen. Jackson called
our State Department "foolish
and shortsighted" for gambling
with Israel's security in the
Middle East, when the sale of
Phantom jets was being unduly
delayed at that time, in the face
of a massive Russian buildup
in Egypt and Syria. He also
sharply denounced the Soviets
as "determined to keeD tensions
high and to nurture the distinct
hope that Israel will one day
be destroyed."
Jackson's analysis of Russian
treachery was 10 percent cor-
rect. His dire warning became a
tragic reality with the 1973 Yom
Kippur attack on Israel by the
combined treachery of Russia,
Egypt and Syria.
Bayh Cites U.S.
Israel 'Obligation'

MANCHESTER, N.H.
(JTA) Sen. Birch Bayh
(D Ind.) declared here that
the "obligation" of the
i :ed States "is to ensure
Israeli defenses are suffi-
ciently strong to leave ab-
solutely no doubt in the
i ds of her adversaries
r ching an attack upon her."
In that connection, Bayh
( died on President Ford
ROd congress to grant Israel
lull funding" in her re-
quests for military aid to
meet the serious threat to
her security posed by "al-
most a score of hostile
sates."
SPEAKING at Temple Adath
v :.,liurun here...Sen. Bayh, a
ndidate for $ie 1976 Dem-
i itic Presidential nomination,
iiid that "the ttality of the sit-
uation in the Middle East also
means that this, country must
. iii.l alongside Israel to defeat
the hostile resolutions" that
..Jmv3 come out of the UN Gen-
eral AssemWj^ and other UN
bodies.
"These are not harmless reso-
lutions." Bayh said. "They are
racist slanders that abuse his-
torical truth and trivialize the
suffering of the very people in
whom the light of civilized
humanity burns."
Bayh referred to his visit to
Israel and his inspection of that
country's front line position.
He said, "every military con-
flict must be decided in Israel's
favor because the first war that
Israel loses will also be her
last.
"THE UNREMITTING hos-
tility of her neighbors and the
vow bv Yasir Arafat and the
PLO that success for them
means dismantling the State of
Israel gives no latitude.
"What choices are open to
a state whose only alternatives
are victory or political oblivion?
What costs must be borne by
a people for whom failure
means national oblivion?
"What costs must be borne
by a people for whom failure
means national oblivion? The
ranee of choices for Israel are
perilously narrow. The best pro-
spects are for a tense, protract-
ed armed coexistence with her
neighbors.
"The worst is a massive on-
slaught by Israel's enemies if
they perceive her to be weak,"
Bayh said.
Israel, that tiny bastion of
courage and democracy, was
the only obstacle to Russian
domination of the entire Middle
East.
CLEARLY, Scoop Jackson is
the man who can help save
America in these difficult and
troublous times. His perception
and foresight, his understanding
of Russian treachery and ag-
gression, clearly deserves our
recognition and support. We
should vote for these qualities
in the primartes-on Mar. 9.
JOSEPH ABELOW
Miami 1
t
U.S. Refuses to Comment
On Non-Belligerency Try
Continued from Page 1-A
U.S. has not received the "full text" of the Israeli de-
cision, and "we took forward to seeing more of the Is-
raeli Cabinet position."
THE ISRAEL decision was reportedly made on
the request of the Ford Administration to Premier Yit-
zhak Rabin during his visit to Washington last month.
Trattner said that since Rabin's visa, the-U^..has
been in consultation wkh all the governments involv-
ed in the Israeli-Arab conflict on procedures -for the
next ateptoward a Middle Eastpeace.- -
it ft'.* &
EDITOR, 1W Jewiak FTorldUn:
In connection with its 50th
Jubilee, the Yeshiva of Flatbush
is trying to locate its alumni.
AU graduates are requested to
send their current addresses to
the Alumni Office, 919 East 10th
S>t., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11230.
ALLEN BODNER
Jubilee Chairman
Brooklyn
Since the consultations are mwr-- in diplomatic
channels, Trattner said, he was not at liberty ta-dis-
cuss them.
TRATTNER VOLUNTEERED that the U.S. has
begun its official operations of the early warning sys-
tems in the Gidi and Mitla Passes in the Sinai.
He pointed out that the U.S. participation was at
the request of the parties to the Israeli-Egyptian agree-
ment signed last September.
1 ;

Deserters Helped
Arabs Acquire
Transmitter, Guns
TEL AVIV (JTA) Police disclosed here that
a powerful transmitter and other wireless equipment
was found in the home of one of two Israeli Arabs ar-
rested recently for possession of large quantities of
arms stolen from military bases by two Israeli army
deserters.
The transmitter was found in 'the home of Salah
Gazawieh in Kalansuwa, a village southeast of Na-
thanya, along with two submachineguns and ammu-
nition.
GAZAWIEH, 25, and Zuheir Suleian, 27, from a
smaller village near Kalansuwa, have been charged
with collusion with the two soldiers to steal arms from
military camps. According to the charge sheet, they
purchased 33 Uzzi submachineguns at $100 apiece
from the deserters along with ammunition.
Some of the guns were distributed to villagers,
and the rest were concealed in a secret cache. They
were uncovered by security forces during an investi-
gation of subversive activities in Kalansuwa. Both
Arabs have been remanded for trial. The deserters,
Doron Dhouah and Meir Ziv, both 19, face courts-mar*
tial.
Laiv Suit Filed Against
Arab Information Center
Continued from Page 1-A
phic Agency that Hilmy has not registered as a foreign
agent as required by U.S. law and should register to
continue his activities.
In addition, the suit charges the Arab Informa-
tion Center failed to label as propaganda advertise-
ments in various newspapers, including an advertise-
ment in November, 1975, that sought to explain that
the United Nations General Assembly resolution equat-
ing Zionism with racism was not an attack on Judaism
but on Zionism, Havel said.
THE SUIT also alleges, according to Havel, that
the Arab Information Center had refused to produce
certain correspondence that it is required to keep un-
der the U.S. Foreign Agents Registration Act, and it
seeks to obtain that correspondence.
Furthermore, the suit asks the court that the cen-
ter produce the books and records of the Arab Infor-
mation Center in Washington. Havel told the JTA that
the next step is a response from the Arab Information
Center and a court procedure for a hearing.
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Friday, March 5, 1976
Je*lst> lh*,1,u
Page 13-A
ace
LEO MINDLIN

the Ben Gurion strawman knows
no more about Jewish histi y
than Bellow does himself. Ntjt
ther does the headline writ.e
Saul Belloived, but He Knew Naught
up with his BILKk>
Continued from Page 4-A
, rong in their evaluation of his
ork.
1 would have put it that he
,; no more Jewish than, say,
Norman Podhoretz and his
Commentary" crowd. In line
with his own feelings of disaf-
fection, Bellow was less paro-
chial: he does not like to be cut
from the same Hart Schaffner
and Marx bolt of cloth as, say,
Bernard Malamud and Philip
Roth.
AND HERE, one must give
Bellow his due, although he is
wrong along with the other
Jews on these writers if he
thinks they are any more Jew-
ish than he is. But at least he
is far superior to them as a
writer, as a skilled craftsman,
and that was Bellow's message
here in Miami. But that's not
what he'd been paid to say.
The presence of the newly-
aDpointed director general of
Hans H. Marcuseg
Louis Wit kin
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the Israel Ministry of Defense,
Shlomo Avineri, notwithstand-
ing. Bellow told the gathering
that he had been advised that
"Jewry needed "a good press',"
but obviously he did not accept
the Friends' invitation to give
them one.
In fact, he used the occasion
as a public forum to set every-
one straight on just how un-
Jewish he is no matter what
the cost to the cause he neither
espouses nor understands, which
is typieal-of intellectuals: they
arc always more concerned
with principles than with peo-
ple.
AND SO, not only did Bellow
deny he was a Jewish writer.
He also argued that his pref-
erences were Hawthorne, Mel-
\ille, Poe, D. H. Lawrence,
Dreiser and Sherwood Ander-
son "I didn't bring home the
wisdom of Maimonides" his
argument being more of a chal-
lenge than a declaration of
preference.
Not only did Bellow deny
that "only as a Jew in Israel
can I be whole." He also argued
that he is a loyal American who
is loyal to the experience and
culture of America.
In short. Bellow set up straw-
man after strawman, which he
then proceeded to knock down
with the tatterdemalion senti-
mentality of a Don Quixote, but
without the Don's intuitive un-
derstanding that his mission
was after all a mere gesture.
ADDRESSING HIMSELF to
the proposition that "My cul-
ture, my language is Amer-
ican," and "I can't reject 60
years (his age) of life in Amer-
ica," Bellow sent his lance into
the dead side of David Ben
Gurion's dead belief that Jews
living outside of Israel have a
"split personality" that can only
be made whole by living inside
Israel.
Poor man. At least Don Quix-
ote knew his knight's gear was
of a bygone day. The Ben Gur-
ion argument has long since
been shot down. It is not that
Bellow was attempting to re-
surrect anything, but that he
was demonstrating his ignor-
ance of Jews, Jewishness, Ju-
daism, Israel, the diaspora.
If he could use this as the
core of his whole "shtik," then
he was not qualified to speak
in the first place. He was, in
terms of contemporary history,
a quarter of a century behind
the times, a fossil.
AND TO whom was he de-
fending his Americanism as an
ALTERNATIVE to Judaism
as if they were ever at odds?
And to whom was he setting
forth his favorite writers (Haw-
thorne, et al.), like a pig his
kosher foot, as an ALTERNA-
TIVE to Maimonidesas if they
were ever at odds, too? Who
needed this gross insensitivity,
11ns gross display of ignorance,
tins pandering to popular prej-1
udices about the alleged order
of Jewish priorities?
Is there anyone, Jew or Gen-
tile, who would see a Jewish
intrigue in a preference for
Hawthorne, Melville or Poe
from which he would want to
be prrlicly dissociatedother
than ; Bellow fearful of the
anti-Semitic implications upon
himself personally of a ques-
tion long since discussed, dis-
solved and discarded?
Obviously, no one, except
perhaps the morning Tageblatt,
which reported his comments
with such gusto the next day.
In all fairness, I should not
abuse Bellow so mercilessly in
this. He was after all an invited
guest, and so he spoke his
mind although it does seem
that a more understanding soul
than Bellow, who confessed
.here that,Israel "is not essen-
tial to me" and that "I should
have been more sensitive to the
events of this age," might have
refused the invitation no mat-
ter how foolishly his hosts
pressed it upon him.
BUT THE American Friends
can not be excused. Forget the
platform they gave Bellow he
should not have been given. I
am more concerned with the
next morning's headline, "Writ-
er's Defense: He's First an
American."
Which means the rest of us,
who do not share Bellow's ig-
norance, are not. Which means
Zionism is dualism (at least),
even if it isn't, as the so-called
United Nations says, racism.
The reporter who heard Bel-
low's "emotional pla" against
Histadrut Secretary Fe&rs
Rise of Unemployment
JERUSALEM (JTA) Histadrut Secretary
General Yeruham Meshel warned here that unemploy-
ment in Israel could reach 70,000 by the end of 1976
unless the government takes urgent measures to find
jobs and to increase investments that would create
more jobs.
Meshel also warned that Israel faced serious so-
cial unrest if the poorer classes feel the wealthier peo-
ple are not bearing their fair share of the economic
burden.
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Page 14-A
*Jewist> Fh>ric/if3nn
Friday, March 5, 1976
CAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN STRESSES NEEDS AT HOME AND ABROAD
Tom Make the Difference'-Miami Mobilizes
Continued from Page 1-A
vors of Purim, hamantaschen, will be dis-
tributed.
IN COOPERATION with the mobiliza-
tion inspired by Chairman Arkin, all lead-
ers of the Federation have asked for com-
plete CJA-IEF participation during the six
weeks between Mar. 18 and Apr. 28. Hun-
dreds of committee members, Jewish or-
ganization and agency leaders will be con-
tacted for this purpose.
"We have an urgent job to do in this
time period," Arkin explained. "Thou-
sands of local residents must be given the
chance to fulfill their Jewish responsibil-
ity through CJA-IEF. Too. much depends
on this campaign's success to let the work
remain undone.
"In Israel, for instance," he said,
"thousands of men and women who have
served their country with courage and
tightened their belts in a time of dire in-
flation cannot find adequate apartments
in which to live and raise their families.
"ALONG WITH severe housing short-
age, government subsidies to Israeli edu-
cation have had to be cut back so that
education beyond the ninth grade is no
longer free to all children. Needless to
say, government-backed university scho-
larships are more and more scarce as well.
"Basic foods bread, milk, sugar,
meat have gone up in price from 50 to
150 percent in the last year alone. Ima-
gine the strain on an average Israeli fam-
ily simply to keep food on the table.
"Right here in our own community,"
he continued, "we see the problems nearly
every day. The cost of living in Miami
Beach, for example, has risen far beyond
the means of so many residents living on
fixed incomes.
"THOSE PEOPLE must still be pro-
vided with medical care when they need
it. They must be able to find a meal rather
than go hungry. They must have pro-
ductive activities to make their lives mean-
ingful. And professional help when their
problems are too urgent to work out
themselves.
"Our people, the Jewish people, in all
countries and cultures, have survived as
one by maintaining its traditions, its rich
heritage, generation to generation, through
thousands of years. We can't let that proc-
ess stop now, and we can insure Judaism
for coming generations through the edu-
cational programs made possible by CJA-
IEF."
ARKIN ADxMITTED that "our cam-
paign work, however successful it may be,
might not lower rates of inflation or
insure that there will be no war in the
Mideast.
"But it can mean the difference be-
tween a hovel and a decent apartment for
an Israeli family. It can mean the differ-
ence between wasted time and years of
productivity for local retirees. And it can
mean the difference between ignoring a
problem and solving it."
This six-week period of mobilization
is specially geared toward more than 2,500
campaign leaders and workers who can
and do make the difference. In charge
of information is Evelyn Kopelman at Fed-
eration, 4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Egypt May Gain Air Advantage
TEL AVIV (JTA) The former commander of the
Israel Air Force has warned that Egypt will gain a distinct
advantage in air power if the United States goes through
with plan to sell Cairo the new J-79 jet engine.
Gen. (res.) Mordechai
Hod, who headed the Air
Force in the 1967 Six-Day
War, said in a special inter-
view published in Yediot
Achronot, that the Egyptians
could install the* J-79 in
their MIG-21 interceptors,
replacing the original MIG
engines as they wear out.
The Soviet Union has re-
fused to supply Egypt with
replacement engines.
THE J-79, which powers the
American Phantom jet, would
increase the MIG's rate of climb,
give it greater speed and a
longer range for patrolling and
interceptor missions, Israeli ex-
perts have said. Gen. Hod ob-
served that the Egyptian Air
Force would thus be benefit-
ting from two technologies
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the Russian and the American
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This, he said, would be con-
trary to Washington's repeated
statements that it intends to
preserve the balance of power
in the Middle East.
Reports that the U.S. plans
to sell the J-79 engine to Egypt
surfaced in Washington last
week. Gen. Hod said in the in-
terview that the least the U.S.
could do is condition the sales
to a demand that Egypt end its
state of belligerency with Is-
rael.
OTHERWISE the American
statements about the balance of
power are absurd and ridicul-
ous, the former Air Force chief
said.
Israeli experts noted that the
J-79 is heavier than the Rus-
sian-built MIG engine, and the
Egyptians may be required to
make some alterations in the.
MIG bodv before installing it.
Foreign sources have indicat-
ed that it would take between
12 to 18 months to produce a
prototype MIG with a Phantom
engine, and only after that was
tested could the Egyptians pro-
ceed to replace the original en-
gines in their MIG-21 fleet
which consists of about 200 of
the Russian-made aircraft.
HOWEVER, Israeli sources
said th technological problems
are not insurmountable.
They noted that the Chinese
have installed British engines
in their MIGs, and Israel has
transplanted American engines
into its French-built Mirage jets.
Israel's own fighter, aircraft, the
"Fir," is powered by an Amer-
ican engine.
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"


ifiday, March 5, 1976
vJewlst FhridtkHi
Page 15-A
l 1
I
*
thin Under Fire as Labor Crisis Mounts
Continued from Page 1-A
ice Likud.
IT THE same time, the La-
Alignment itself appears in
K. The Mapam political
committee engaged in heated
debate over the weekend as to
' whether it should remain in the
Alignment or strike out on its
own.
The veteran party secretary.
Meir Talmi, continues to favor
the alliance with Labor, but
even he insists on minimum
conditions without which, he
said, Mapam should prepare to
enter a separate list in the next
elections.
Chaika Grossman, on the
Other hand, called for a clean
break with Labor and suggested
that many Laborites would de-
fect to a Mapam list. The dif-
ferences between Mapam and
Labor run deep and involve
such basic issues as an overall
peace plan, the Palestinian ques-
tion and the social and economic
tap in Israel.
ZARMI SAID he was resign-
ing tocause the Labor leader-
ship is allegedly indifferent to
the oarty's serious financial sit-
uation.
But many observers believe
the real reason is the crumbling
Of the party's internal structure,
the public differences between
party leaders over policy and
the leadership's alleged lack of
supoort for the party's elected
bodies.
The Labor Party is viewed by
many Israelis as a rudderless
shio or. the verge of foundering.
This view seems to be borne out
by the refusal of many top men
to take over Zarmi's office
Former Foreign Minister Ab-
ba-Elian fhtly rejected the '-ost
-Mso'refi'ses e"en to talV about
it. Fir> me? Minister Yehoshua
R&bin),,-it/. shunned any sug-
gejtfon that.he become secre-
tary g 'iieral and insisted tha*
he will remain in the Cabinet
as Ions as he is wanted.
HOUSING Minister Avraham
Ofer swiftly denied rumors that
he would consider the secretary
generalship if he could retain
his government portfolio. Other
public figures who have been
mentioned former UN Am-
bassador Josef Tekoah, Uzzi Ba-
ram, head of the Labor Party's
Jerusalem branch, and doveish
Labor MK Yossi Sarid have
not responded.
ly observers say the La-
rarty has been without true
rship since the death of
Pinhas Sapir last year. Sapir,
who was Finance Minister in
the government of former Pre-
mier Golda Meir and later re-
signed to become chairman of
the World Zionist Organization
and Jewish Agency Executives,
was Libor Partv's "strong
man" :.n.l undisputed "boss" for
years.
THE STRENGTH of his oer-or-
ality '.-li together the various
divergmt factions that make up
Labo- and those factions are
now ccning unglued, observers
say.
Rabin, 'he titular head of th?
party. '< b- jng faulted for fail-
ing tn : over the reins of
lead'" ''!". The Premier, in fact. J
has ne under unorece I
politic:!1, and personal critic
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since his return from the U.S.
last month and this has even
spilled over on his wife, who is
alleged in some quarters to be
interfering in affairs of state.
Dissatisfaction with Rabin ap-
parently has been smouldering
for some time. It surfaced dur-
ing his visit to Washington
when a "senior source" in his
entourage criticized Israel's
weapons purchase list as in-
flated, sloppy and a dishonor to
the State.
THE CRITICISM reflected on
Defense Minister Shimon Peres,
regarded as Rabin's principal
rival. The Premier acknowl-
edged when he returned to Is-
rael that he was the "senior
source" and, in effect, apologiz-
ed to Peres. But most observers
believe the episode is far from
over.
Rabin is being faulted for al-
leged drift and indecisiveness.
Yoel Markus, one of his early
supporters, wrote in Haaretz
several days ago that "more and
more people find it difficult to
understand his (Rabin's) mo-
tives and are asking, 'is there
method to his madness?' "
Markus titled his article "Ra-
bin The Last Chapter?" He
claimed that the Premier now
commands only token support
from the Labor Alignment and
asked, "How long can you hold
the man (in office) just be-
cause there is no one else?"
RABIN HAS also been criti-
cized by other former support-
ers, among them former Com-
munications Minister Aharon
Simon Signs U.S.-Israel
Industrial Research Agreement
JERUSALEM William Simon, U.S. Secretary of
the Treasury, assured Israeli leaders here this week
that "The foundation of our policy is a just and lasting
peace in the Middle East."
Simon arrived here for talks with Israeli Finance
Minister Yehoshua Rabinowitz, whom he assured that
"To create an economic environment of prosperi.y in
this region is consistent with this goal."
Israel was Simon's second stop on a Middle East
economic tour. His first stop was Saudi Arabia, where
he told Arab leaders that the U.S. welcomes Arab in-
vestments but is opposed to the Arab boycott against
Israel as an obstacle to peace.
During Simon's stay, he signed an agreement es-
tablishing a U.S.-Israel Foundation for Industrial re-
search and Development.
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Yariv, who said if there is no
improvement soon in the Labor
Party leadership, "i will either
retire from political activity or
find a new framework to fight
for my opinions."
Prof. Yechezkel Dror, of the
Hebrew University, a former
Rabin supporter, has called for
the establishment of a national
unity government. Police Minis
ter Shlomo Hillel acknowledged
that the Labor Party had to
present the public with a good,
"national league team."
The difficulties faced by Ra-
bin and his party have provided
grist for the Likud mill. Gen.
Ariel Sharon, the Yom Kinpur
War hero who founded Likud
as the non-Labor oooosition,
spoke out sharply against the
Rabin government in a radio
interview over the weekend.
IT WAS his first public criti-
cism since Rabin named him a
special advisor to the Premier
last year despite the objections
of many Labor Party leaders.
Sharon said the only way to
cure the "fever" that is sapping
Israel's strength is to form a
small emergency government
before the next elections. He
said if this is not done, early
elections must be held.
Sharon and another Likud
leader, Mayor Shlomo Lehat of
Tel Aviv, participated in a pri-
vate meeting here last week
with several businessmen and
political figures, reportedly to
discuss early elections.
MEANWHILE, Rabin appears
to be getting the message from
both the right-wing opposition
and the leftists and doves with-
in his own party that there is
serious dissatisfaction with his
regime. He seems to be trying
to anpease both sides.
Many observers believe Rabin
will soon invite Eban, a "dove,"
:o join his Cabinet.
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Paf
= Page 16-A
+Jmlsti ncrkMan
Friday, March 5. 1975
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"Jewish Flor idlian
.Miami, Florida Friday, March 5, 1976
Section B
Allon Says Economic Strength
Vital to Mideast Peace Accord
An economically strong Israel
is vital to the attainment of
peace in the Middle East, Yigal
Allon. Deputy Minister and For-
eign Minister of the State of
Israel, declared Saturday night,
as he called for wider economic
aid from Jewish communities in
the United States and Canada.
"We shall be in a much
stronger position at the nego-
tiating table, if our economy, as
well as our defense, is sound
and Impregnable," the Israel
|<*der ii iclared. "An economic-
ally and socially strong Israel
will itinwe its military posture
and political bargaining posi-
tion," he said.
ALLON OFFICIALLY launch-
es the 1976 campaign for State
of Israel Bonds at an inaugural
dinner at the Fontainebbau
Hot 1 attended by more than
1,000 Jewish loaders from e'-ery
section of the North American
continent.
Calling attention to "the spec-
t-ic' wealth in recent vea--s, the Is-
rael Government leader stressed
that "it represented a threat of
the greatest magnitude to the
economic stability of Israel."
Israel's troubled economy may
become "a weak link in our
chain of defense against the
political warfare of the Arab
world," he warned.
In urging wide American Jew-
ish suDport, he said that the Is-
ra"l Bond Organization, which
h channeled more than $3.2
billion into every branch of Is-
raelis ecommy in the last 25
years, "stan 1s today in a posi-
tion of crucial importance to
heli us overcome the economic
trills and hardships of the com-
ing year."
ISRAEL faces "the danger of
a marked rise in unemployment
for the first time in many
years," the Deputy Prime Min-
ister said. But he emphasized
that it was the result of drastic
measures taken bv the Israel
Government to reduce inflation
and increase exports.
In 1975 Israel's balance of
payments deficit amounted to
S3.9 billion, the highest in its
history.
He noted that increased un-
employment would be a "se-
rious threat" to the country's
capacity to provide jobs for new
immigrants.
In this connection, he said,
that while Israel continues to
give its "vigorous support to tha
right of Soviet Jews and Jews in
Syria and other Arab lands to
emigrate, it would be a very
sad state of affairs if we failed
to have economic means to
give jobs to those who might
be permitted to come to Israel
in larger numbers in the near
future."
MORE THAN 100.000 Soviet
Jews entered Israel since 1971.
SOME OF the Arab countries,
especially Egypt, he pointed
out, have begun to realize that
they can solve their serious
economic problems only by
spending more on development
"instead of wasting their re-
sources on futile wars."
He added the hope that this
trend would also be "an incen-
tive to the Arab States to work
for peace, which is the sole sal-
vation for our troubled area."
Allon recalled that from the
earliest days of Israel's inde-
pendence, the Arab States had
used the economic boycott "as
a weapon to reinforce their mili-
tary and political pressure and
warfare against us."
Sam Rethberg, general chair-
man of the Israel Bond Organ-
ization, who presided, decla-ed
that tht recent Brussels World
Conference for Soviet Jewry
"must be supplemented with
concrete action through the Is-
rael Bond campaign to create
jobs in Israel for those .lews
who would be permitted to
leave Sovit l Russia for Is ;..i
in the .T"''ng year."
ROTHBERG for a wid-
er mobilization of American and
Canadian Jews for the sale of
Isra '1 Bonds "i i pro! ide the
lvg st oossibl* s'lare of I=-tTs
Development Budget of SI bil-
lion this vi '
Among other speakers at the
dinner w;re Rabbi Leon K.o-
nish. of Miami Beach, and Leon-
i Goldfrae, of Philadelphia.
paign cochairmen
I Bonds; Julian B. Vcnc-
ricy, national chairman for Re-
gions; Robert L. Siegel, general
rman of the Israel Bond
(i ive in Greater Miami; Mrs.
Noiine Daniels, general chair-
for To.onn; and Rabbis
[r ing Leh man and Mayer
.' a of Greater Miami.
Judith Raskin, leading so-
:.] m; m Opera.
ed a musical program of
'- 5 lection-:.
Women's League President
To Speak at Donor Luncheon
Violet (Mrs. Harry) Wiles,
national president of the Wom-
en's League for Israel, will be
VIOLET WILES
speaker of the day at the donor
luncheon on March 9 at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
Participating in the luncheon
are the members of the League's
Lincoln Roney Miami Beach
Chapter (Mrs. Meyer Resnick,
chairman), Shalom Chapter
(Mrs. Mortimer Nathanson,
chairman), and Aventura Chap-
ter (Mrs. Frank Koch, chair-
man).
.The Women's League for Is-
rael is an organization devoted
to the social, economic and edu-
cational welfare of Israel's
ith El set1 d its president in
Ji-ne. 1975, Mrs. Wiles, of
Scarsdsle, N V.. has served as
associate chairman of the na-
tional executive board and
chili man of the League's Con-
course Chapter. She has made
s*eroI trips to Israel, during
w' ich time she represented
IV im^n's League in meetings
w'th Israeli cabinet ministers
and officials.
Mrs. Wiles has been instru-
mental in the formulation of
plans for a Women's League for
Israel National Rehabilitation
ar.d Vocational Training Center
in Natanva. She played a role
in the decision to expand pro-
's for Russian immigrants
in WLI Homes in Tel Aviv and
Haifa. r,nd to use a part of the
Jerusalem Home for a pilot proj-
ect in vocational training for
minimally brain-damaged teen-
agers.
Mrs. Wiles also supported the
(stablishment of a Women's
League for Israel Scholarship
Endowment Fund at the He-
brew University of Jerusalem
to helo disabled veterans of the
Yom Kippur War to complete
their education.
Mrs. Wiles is the daughter of
a League member, a mother of
three members, and grand-
mother to a four-year-old life
member. One of her daughters
is teaching in a special chil-
dren's program at the Univer-
sity of Miami.
L. Jules Arkin
Marilyn Smith
Michael Adler
Federation Leaders Discuss
1976 CJA-IEF on Television
Throe of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's top leaders
v.i 1 discuss the 1976 Combined
Jewish Apoeal-Isrfl Em gency
Fund on WCKT-TV. Channel 7,
on Sunday, March 7.
The program still, Small
r<\! bv the Rab-
ivnie Asociitinn of Greater
Miami at 10 a.m. Host and mod-
erator will be Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive vice president
of th- Rabbinical Association
and director of chaplaincy for
th-- I I ition.
The film "It Is No Dream"
w'll be featured, hinhlighting
the humanitarian services made
possibh bv CJA-IEF funds in
Is~"l. Other areas of GMJF
involvement will be discussed
hi rvi'sts L. Juls Arkin. Ma-
rilvn S"vth and Michael Adl'r.
ALL THREE participants have
visited Israel recently and will
relate their experiences. Arkin,
i Ff>d ation vice president and
CJA-IEF r in 1 chairman, is a
Miami Bi ach attorney with
n arly IS years of community
leadership exix rience.
A; president of the GMJF
nen's Division and wife of
ration oresident Harry B.
Smith, Mirilvn Smith performs
mtnv functions, in campaign
in -v'ii -'i th" GMJF Women's
1976 effort has already exceed-
ed $1 million and in other
fi -Ids of community concern.
She has recently returned from
the World C viet Jewry held in Brussels.
Adler, chairman of the GMJF'
Young Adults Division, is a
Co-nl Gibl-s builder.
Hebrew Academy Women,PTA
Sponsoring Passover Workshop
A Passover Workshop, fre
and open to the entire Jewish
community of South Florida,
will be held on Wednesday.
March 10, from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. in the new Merwitzer
Building Auditorium of the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy.
Th" event is cosnonsored by
the Hebrew Academy Women
and the Hebrew Academy PTA.
Irens (Mrs. Leonard) Adler.
president of the Hebrew Acad-
emy Women, and Claire (Mrs.
Josh) Renhun. PTA president,
are coordinating the public
service event.
Susan (Mrs. Barry) Eisen-
berg has been named chairper-
son of the Passover Workshop,
which is intended to help Jew-
ish families better understand
the significance of the holiday
and how to observe Passover in
the home.
Mrs. Murray Kirschner and
her high school students will
demonstrate how to bake Pass-
over cakes and rolls.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy. Mrs. Gross, and Rabbi
David Lehrfield, spiritual lead-
er of Kneseth Israel Congrega-
tion and a Hebrew Academy
faculty member, will answer
questions about the holiday.
Mis. Rose Bienenfel! will
prepa e a I a Bover Seder table,
which will be used as the model
for the various discussions.
Morris Waldman, president of
Maxmo Distributors, Inc., rep-
resentatives of Kedem kosher
wine, will provide a winetasting
table in conjunction with the
workshop.
The PTA will have special
Passo! er candies on sale, and
a kit full of Passover recipes,
instructions and special infor-
mation will be given to each
woman attending. There will be
a door prize, a free lunch, and
a Model Seder conducted by
Hebrew Academy students.
Although admission is free,
advance reservations are re-
quested.
GMJF Mideast Update Features
Mrs. Hauser, Schechterman
Miami residents will hear
Rita E. Hauser, one of the na-
tion's foremost a on
Middle East affairs and the Pal-
estinians, on Thursday, March
11, at Temple Israel.
Mrs. Hauser, a New York at-
torney, has served the U.S. gov-
ernment in many capacities.
She was for years a member
of the United Nations Commis-
sion on Human Rights and was
also a member of the United
States Delegation to the 24th
United Nations General Assem-
bly.
Her leadership roles in the
UN have placed her at the
heart of world events and she
has dealt directly with ele-
ments from all nations in the
Middle East.
AIRS. HAUSER will appear
on M Cast UpdateFo-
cus: Paleti] i am
sponsored by th nunity
Relations O ol the
Greater 1 < edera-
;. -.
"W are "- ,0
ha v a wo nan of sach sta
. Farr,
chairman of the event. "She is
a very important public figure.
For example, there has been
speculation in the public i
that she would fill a Supreme
Court vacaney, and she was
prominently discussed as a
successor to former UN Am-
bassador Daniel Patrick Moy-
nihan."
Appearing with Mrs. Hauser
will be Dr. Bernard Schechter-
man, an expert in Palestinian
culture and thinking. Dr.
Schechterman, professor of po-
litical science at the Univer-
sity of Miami, recently return-
ed from a study mission of the
American Professors for Peace
in the Middle East to Israel and
Arab lands, where he talked
with government leaders.
ADMISSION TO the Middle
East Update is limited to a
first-come fivst-served basis.
"Persons interested" in attending
this event are encouraged to
respond promptly to the Com-
munity Relations Committee,
576-4000.
Registration will be at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Israel. Assist-
ing Mrs. Farr will be Diane
Eisenberg, who is in charge of
pre-registration, Reva Wexler,
who will handle registration at
the door, and Nanci Goldstein,
who is hospitality chairperson.
RITA E. HAl
DR. B. SCHECHTERMAN


Ve
Page 2-B
fJenisfi Meridian
Friday, March 5, 1975
-
\
Jackson to jpeak,at Emanu-El Sunday
Moynihan Here to Campaign for Him
Strengthened greatly by the
solid endorsement of outgoing
UN Ambassador Daniel Patrick
Moynihan, U.S. Sen. Henry M.
'Scoop" Jackson moves his cam-
paign for the Democratic Presi-
dential nomination in Florida to
Miami Beach Sunday morning.
S"n. Jackson will soeak at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-El
in the closing event of the syn1)-
gogu's 1976 Sunday Morning
Glickman's Works
At Temple Israel
"Gabriel Glickman, through
his artistic creativity and orig-
inal talent, won great admira-
tion among those freedom-lov-
ing people in Russia who braved
authoritv to see his work. It
takes courage and stamina to
defy the Soviet government
policy of converting an artist
into an ideological errand-boy.
"Glickman has defied official
shackles."
These words were written by
Pavel Litvinov to Rabbi Harry
Bronstein. of New York, who is
coordinating the show of Glick-
man's oils and lithographs be-
ing presented by Temple Israel
from March 5 to March 19.
THE EVENT is cosponsored
by Al Tidom (We Dare Not Be
Silent), an organization that
works for the relief of Soviet
J"wrv. Rabbi Bronstein is na-
tional president.
Oils on canvas and on card-
board will be shown, together
with manv of Glickman's most
popular litviogranhs.
Proceeds from sales mav
somedav free Glickman and
manv fellow Jews from the So-
viet Union.
ACCORDING to dancer Va-
lery Panov. "Glickman has can-
tured th" ~"irit of Jewish life
in Russia ^fore the Communist
Revolution. He is the Solzhe-
nitsyn of art, depicting the
events affecting Jews under Sta-
lm and Khrushchev and until
the present."
An exhibition of his works in
Leningrad was closed by So-
viet authorities 8 few years ago
because "they conveyed a nega-
tive iniDression of Jewish life
in Russia," Panov said in a re-
cant Radio Liberty interview in
New York.
Glickman's works, including
portraits of Anne Frank, Solz-
henitsyn, Einstein and Rasputin,
ware spirited, out of the Soviet
Union by the underground. His
impressionistic works of well-
known ne>sonaliti'>s. as well as
his association with Sakharov,
Solzhenitsvn and oth^r dissid-
ents, led to his troubles with
the authorities.
A decorated Red Army officer
durina World War II. Glickman
was graduated from the Lenin-
grad Academy of Art in 1947.
His monuments and statues are
to be found thoughout the So-
viet Union, Brazil and other
countries.
On Sunday morning, follow-
ing the Greenfield lecture, Rab-
bi Bronst-in will give a short
talk on Glickman's art.
Jackson To Be Honored
At Testimonial Dinner
Sen. Hv-v M ."Scooo" Jack-
son will b.' honored at a testi-
monial dinner Sunday at the
DuPont IT '--.a Hotel, it was an-
nounced this week bv Goldie
(Mrs. SoD Goldstein, chairman
of the event.
The S^.vo-person dinner at 7
p.m. will bs nreceded by a cock-
tail recep*'' n at 6 p.m.. accord-
ing to cochairmen Harry A.
*'Hat",'' Levy and Samuel N.
Fj i'Jland.
Working with the chairmen
are such CJiumunity Leaders as
A; nold Pii'lcer. Vice Mayor Rose
Cordon. North Miami Beach
Council:-' an Milton Littman.
State F /-'smtatives Paul
St tobcrg ^hine Bloom and
Shorman Winn. State Senator
Ge Firs <'nm. Gerald ani
Felice Schwartz. Alfred and
Lilly Ptone. Anne Ackerman,
Max Serchuk. Shep Davis and
Mayors Harold Rosen. Maurice
I-' !-, Jack Block and Steve
Clark.
Jackson, runncrup for the
'97? Democratic nomination.
has campaigned extensively in
coith Florida in W.nt w-^eVs,
where his identification as au-
thor of th" .Ia"Vson n-n-i-
mania, on aid to Israel and So-
vit Jewrv has mad 1 him a
solid favorite in Tuesday's vot-
ing.
Sen. Jackson will sneak at the I
dinner, expected to be one of j
I'M most successful fund-rais- '
ing events in the history of i
Florida Presidential politics.
Presidential Forum Series. He
will be introduced by Samuel
N. Friedland. chairman of the
board of Temple Emanu-El and
one of American Jewry's fore-
most leaders.
Ambassador Moynihan will
arrive in South Florida on Fri-
day to campaign for Sen. Jack-
son, with whom he has worked
closely during the oast 16 years.
Friedland stressed that there is
no admission r-harge for Sun-
day's Tempi Emanu-El forum
program, which will feature a
major nolicv address on the
Middle East by Sen. Jackson.
Jackson will hold a 9:30 a.m.
news conference at the congre-
gation, which he addressed dur-
ing the Yom Kipnur War in be-
half of State of Israel Bonds.
And a auestion-and-answer pe-
riod will follow his 10:30 talk.
Judge Frederick N. Barad,
presid'-nt of Temple Emanu-El,
noted that all Democratic and
Republican Presidential as-
piants have been extended in-
vitations to participate in the
series, and that the nlatform of
the congregation will be open
this fall to the Republican and
Democratic nominees as nart of
the temple's Bicentennial ob-
servance.
Sen. Jackson has received
endorsements recently from
hundreds of governments, busi-
ness, educational, civic and reli-
gious leaders including Miami
Mayor Maurice Ferre, Miami
Beach Mayor Harold Rosen, ,
Dade Mavor Steve Clark, South I
Miami Mavor Jack Block, Mi- |
ami Vice Mayor Rose Gordon,
Miami Beach Councilmen Phil
Sahl and Simon Wikler and
manv others.
During the last several days
of campaigning in Massachu-
setts and Florida. Sen. Jackson
ae-ijn urged American economic,
military and political support
of Israel and renewed his pledge |
of "no negotiations with terror-
ists. The PLO today stands un-
masked as what it is a terror-
ist organization which preaches
and Practices murder and bar- j
barism and calls for war, not
peace."
Sen. Jackson also proposed a
sweeping tax relief program for
the elderly.
"Under this plan," Jackson
said, "a r-Pical widow re- I
c?iving $f,800 a year in Social
Security benefits, $1,000 a year !
in interest on her savings, '
S 4,000 a year from her part-
time job, and paying $750 in
PASSOVER
at the new
(Not just another Kosher Hotel)
Dine with us 9 days
April 14-22. 2 seders-3 meals
pf day. $250 pet person
Stay with us 2 weeks
$560 per person, double
occupancy. 14 days includes
all hotel privileges and all meals
Synagogue services Mashgiach on premises.
Its Glatt to be good.
For information Call 531-6061 or 531-3391
QCEAN.AT a&THST. AMD COLUNS,AV.,MAAlB6ACH
TEACHERS.
ISRAEL NEEDS YOU.
Professionals needed to be
integrated permanently into
Israel's educational system.
Personalized program. Fi-
nancial assistance available.
Interviews by Ministry of
Education official in April.
Contact immeliately:
ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER.
4700 Biscayne Blvd.,
Room 385
Miami, Fla. 33137
(305) 573-2554-7
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
let me quote you rates. Also
locel moving & long distance
moving anywhere in the U.S.
' oversees
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
property taxes op her home
would receive total additional
benefits of $1,776 per year."
The Jackson plan encompass-
es three major elements:
A federal tax credit gua-
ranteeing that older Americans
will pay no more than 5 percent
of their income in property
taxes.
A federal income tax
credit equaling 15 percent of all
their income, up to a maximum
credit of $550.
An increase from the
present $2,760 to $4,800 in the
maximum amount older Amer-
icans can earn without losing
Social Security benefits.
Jackson, who spelled out his
proposals in a "Program for Tax
Relief for the Elderly," de-
clared:
"For the government to con-
tinue to ignore the worsening
e">nomic plight of our senior
citizens can only be classified
as an unforgivable sin.
"No group of Americans i.
suffering more from the rav
ages of inflation.
"Rising property taxes are
forcing thousands upon thou
sands of older Americans from
homes they have worked a life-
time to secure, and many, manv
people who have spent their
productive vears working hard
and paying taxes are faeinB
destitution because their gov-
ernment does not care enough
"The eldirly represent the
largest single group of Amer-
icans living in verty, This is
a mtional disgrace.
"I believe this tax relief pro-
gram represents, in its wav
something almost as meaningful
to older Americans as Social
Security and Medicare were
when they first came into be-
ing.
"All of us have a stake in
providing for an intelligent,
sensible nlan for the elderly
for all of us are growing older."
Jackson campaign headquar-
ters have b^en established at
828 Washington Ave. in Miami
Beach, at 2650 Biscayne Blvd.
in Miami, and at other locations
throughout South Florida.
Transportation,, to th noils is
available from all Jackson head-
Quarters.
Beautiful, Exotic Plants and Flowers
Journey into an enchanted tranquil valley, complete
with waterfalls ond all the rare and tropical plants
your dreams could grow .
SPECIALIZING IN:
Ferns Cactus
Bromeliods Pony tails
Anlhuriums Unusual Arolios
Journey To .
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mechayeh you couldn't do bet:erl


Friday, March 5, 1976
+Jewish fk>r8dfan
BBWomen's Biennial Confab
Opens in Capital This Weekend
Page 3-B
Sight hundred B'nai B'rlth
Women delegates from the
United States, Canada. Israel
Europe and South America will
holu their international biennial
convention at the Shoreham
Americana Hotel in Washington
DC, Mar. 7 to 10.
The convention theme, "So
Proudly We Hail," will be car-
xrted out through workshops,
programs and sneakers explor-
ing the spirit of service, the
spirit of woman and the spirit
of continuity.
THE CONVENTION will open
Sunday evening with a keynote
address by Dore Senary, hon-
orary national chairman of the
B'nni B'rith Anti-Defamation
League. The noted playwright-
producer will speak on "The
Jewish Experience in America."
On Monday, Mar. 8, a lunch-
eon on 'The Spirit of Service"
will feature Dr. Daniel Thursz,
dean of the School of Social
Fork and Community Planning
at the University of Maryland.
BBW delegates will hear
peakers at four workshops on
Operation Independence" (pro-
;rams to serve older adults),
'New Flight Patterns: Opera-
lion Stork" (maternal and in-
ant advocacy), "The Jewish
woman: Here and Now," and
'Adolescent prejudice."
ON TUESDAY, Mar. 9, dele-
tes will attend a reception at
le White House, where they
rill present a custom-made set
f three Bicentennial dolls to
^rst Lady Betty Ford. The Bi-
ntennial Trio was recently
Ided to BBW's unique Dolls
for Democracy collection in
honor of the nation's Bicenten-
nial.
At a banquet Tuesday eve-
ling, Mrs. Louis Kash, of Los
^ngeles, will be installed as
President of B'nai B'rith Wom-
en. Mrs. Kash is recipient of
former Prime Minister Golda
Meirs medal for outstanding
service to the State of Israel.
The banquet will also feature
'Hie Spirit of Woman," an orig-
inal production on the history
of BBW by the internationally
famous National Players of
Catholic University.
At a closing luncheon on "The
Spirit of Continuity," the wom-
en will hear Gerda Weissman
Klein relate her experience as
a victim of the Holocaust. Ye-
cheskiel Cohen, director of the
BBW Children's Home and
Group House in Israel, centers
for the treatment of emotional-
ly disturbed boys, will also ad-
dress the delegates.
Members of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization will take
part in a presentation on the
continuance of the Jewish spirit
BBW DELEGATES, meeting
in plenary sessions, will set po-
licy for the 150,000-member
international Jewish women's
service organization and will
take action on a number of na-
tional and international issues.
Delegates attending the con-
vention from the South Florida I
area include Alma Hofstadter,
South Coastal Region chairman,
Joan Wolfberg, cochairman, and
Roz Ornstein, secretary, who
has been nominated to the na-
tional board of BBW. Harriet
Horwich and Elaine Miller, of
North Miami Beach, past dis-
trict presidents, were also no-
minated to the national execu-
tive board of B'nai B'rith Wom-
en.
The four local B'nai B'rith
Women's Councils will be rep-
resented by their pifesidents:
Muriel Marks. Miami Council;
Blanche Breitbart, Miami Beach
I Paleys Are Honorees At
Hillel Benefit Breakfast
|The Hillel Community Day
fchool has announced a benefit
eakfast hosted by the Hal-
ndale Jewish Center Con-
egation Beth Tefila, which
as pledged itself to aid Hillel
bd plans to donate all funds
iscd by the breakfast to the
Scholarship Fund.
.^Sponsored by the Hallandale
Jewish Center's Sisterhood and
Men's Club, the breakfast will
Riviera
Palm Springs, Calif.
Your Kosher
Holiday Includes
(.l*i Kosher All freshly-
cooked meals prepared under
strict Orthodox rabbinical
supervision. Includes Ml break-
fast, lunch and dinner, ft late1
night snack. Special Fruit
Basket and other Goodies in
each room upon arrival
Maqrtificent traditional Seders
with renowned Rabbi and Can-
tor. Daily synagogue services.
Children's program Friday
night Oneg Shabbal. All
service charges and gratuities
are included. Spectacular
dinner show April 17th.
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
Ann..- *il-Apnl 14. 1476/9 nighlt-
10 d,,,|],w In -Aj.nl t 1976
Kftaenciioat Subiecl To Ava $575 &_ I *425 M
I fDoublf OiXUfan^l
IOa ispMCV #"rw i""1
For reoarvatiorm or information
Macho Travel Service
7970 Beverly Blvd.
I os Anqetes. Calif. 90048
be on Sunday, March 7, at 10
a.m. in the auditorium at 416
NE 8th Ave., Hallandale.
The breakfast is in honor of
George and Dorothy Paley. Pa-
ley has been an active worker
for the South Broward Jewish
Federation and State of Israel
Bonds.
THE PROGRAM will include
entertainment by Cantor Dan-
ziger accompanied by Rebbit-
zen Helen Schwartz, and violin
selections by David Ornstein
accompanied at the piano by
his wife, Sarah Ornstein.
There will also be a book
commentary by Art Canon,
chairman of the Hillel School
committee.
Also on the program is a
slide presentation about Hillel,
narrated by its president, Mi-
chael Scheck, with Rabbi Albert
Mayerfeld, principal* and Mar-
shall Baltuch, executive direc-
tor, coordinating the visual
program.
Dr. Lee Duffner, education
vice president of Hillel, will
speak at the breakfast.
Adatli Yeshurim
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple
Adath Yeshurun will have a
"Remember Jewish Music
Month" and Purira celebration
at the March 16 general meet-
ing at 8 p.m-
The program will feature
guitar soloist Judy Rosenstrauch
and Yosi Yanich with his oranim
d~"" -;-.
Council; Carol Romcr, Twin
County Council, and Martha
Morgan of Inter-Coastal Coun-
cil.
ALSO, from Miami Beach will
be Sara Senderoff, Jean Sher-
maan, Vera Pearl, Ethel Rol-
nick and Dorothy Kay; from
Miami, Helen Kurland, Edith
Bassman. Lillian Sutta and Syl-
via Kermisch; from North Mi-
ami Beach, Ida Friedman. Ann
Sander, Lee Stempa. Tilli Gar-
be r, Esther Goldstein, Ceil
Mansker, Mina Friedman and
Shirley Schiffman.
Other delegates who will at-
tend the B'nai B'rith Women
Biennial Convention in Wash-
ington include Elise Factor,
Hialeah; from Hallandale, Hoda
Bisgyer, Past District president,
and Mollye Ginsberg and Sylvia
Schoen; Surfside, Betty Schaf-
fer; Sunrise, Bertha Sheps and
Ida Kostoff; Hollywood, Minna
Wolff, Betty Homan and Mary
Wolfe; Margate. Mildred Tell;
West Palm Beach, Freda Bom-
pey and Ellen Cohen; Lauder-
hill, Dora Cohen.
FEEL LIKE A KING ... IN **
PUERTO RICO o. FLORIDA!
ENJOY YOUR PASSOVER IN LUXURY
WITH AN "ATLAS" KOSHER TOUR inn ok*
PUERTO RK0 449
EL CONQUISTADOR
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All rales aro per pers dtf. occ.
Special rales for children under 12 in same room
luxurious accommodations 2 tiadilional conducted
Seder Services and 3 Kosher meais daily unoer
strict rabbinic supervision Nightly entertainment
All sports and spa lacililies Fascinating sightseeing
Children's supervision
Over 5000 People Enjoyed Our Previous Passover Tours
Help our children in Israel by booking with us.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI WOMEN
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 402 Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
(305) 531-7996
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
HAYM SALOMON 1740 1785
Financier Banker of the American Revolution Patriot
Haym Salomon was a fervent patriot
whose love of liberty and business
acumen combined to make him the
financial hero in the War of Inde-
pendence. Born in Poland in 1740, he was
forced to flee that country in 1772, due to his
fight for freedom, along with Pulaski and
Kosciusko who became military heroes of the
Revolution.
Salomon prospered from the very start in
America, doing business with wealthy loyalists
while joining the Sons of Liberty, a group of
revolutionary patriots. He was twice arrested
by the British but managed to escape execution
both times; finally fleeing to Philadelphia.
Salomon's reputation for honesty and skill in
trade, especially foreign, attracted Robert
Morris, then Superintendent of Finance, who
called on him for help in raising money to wage
the war, and later to save the emerging nation
from financial collapse. Morris' diary indicates
some 75 transactions were made by the two
men between August 1781 and April 1784.
As President Calvin Coolidge said of Haym
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Salomon: "He negotiated for Robert Morris
all the loans raised in France and Holland,
pledged his personal faith and fortune for enor-
mous amounts, and personally advanced large
sums to such men as James Madison, Thomas
Jefferson, Baron Sleuben, General St. Clair and
many other patriot leaders who testified that
without his aid they could not have carried on
the cause."
Salomon's place in history is memorialized by
a 20-foot high statue standing at Wabash and
Wacker in Chicago. Unveiled in 1941, the
statue depicts three great Revolutionaries,
George Washington in the middle, flanked by
Robert Morris and Haym Salomon. It is a tell-
ing tribute to the Jewish-American patriot
whose life was dedicated to his family, friends
and country.
Good
to the
LastDrofr*
L
./*r
i "i *OX
1 i 1
miN

SEND FOR
ExerriNc
BOOKLET
Honoring 1776
and Famous
kwsiB
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled lo read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewhh heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send 50* (no stamp!.) with name
and address to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017


I'agc 4-n
fJenisijftcrkfiati
Friday, March 5, 1976
\

So. Florida B'nai B'rith Lodges
To Install Officers at Brunch
Drescher Named Cochairnuin
Of Blood Bank Campaigi
The B'nai B'rith Council of
South Florida Lodges "ill hold
its annual Installation of offi-
cer'- brunch on Sunday morn
ln, March ~'H. at the Eden Roc
Hotel, it was announced by
council president Barry T. Gut
land
The South Florida council is
the governing body of tha more
than <> B'nai B'rith lodgea and
",500 members In Dada County.
A ilate of 18 officers and
i-n ;!; will be installed for
Slui|>|> Dismayed At
Dependent Congress
Pennsylvania Gov Milton
Shapp, i unpaigning here on
th eve "t the Florida Prealden
ti.ii Primary next rueaday. ra
RCh .1 t' the news >'i the con
grcssional failure to override
Preaideni Ford's veto of the
Public Works Jobs Hill by da
clartng thai "1 am ahaolutely
dismayed at the inability" of
the CongreM M take an Inde-
pendent move away from White
House proeaurea
"President Kord is respousi
hie for an notion that ertll cost
unemployed Americana 600.000
duvet lohs and main thousand*
of other Jobs in Industry."
Sharp declared
-THE HIGHEST cost to
America la Joblessness It is
sheer lolly to he paying out
billions ol (totter* In onemnloj
meni companaatton and welfare
to keep people unemployed
where there ore so man] on net
needs ol the \ > CM Mtophl
Snapp bbH <" ..'.- sense
"to d.iie out monej
ploymtnt co open* and
welfare and keep our ecu
idle "
She called o i the
I eneraJ
an\ ,
.....' -
SPE \mm; at a meeting of
the Condominium Executi' e
Council of Florida at Sunrise
l akes, Sh ipr said thai "the At-
torney General should act in
situati his where axcaasJve man
agement ig eementa and recre-
ation toane* threaten "tha very
survival Of the condominium
owner "
In a debate with other IV-
mocratic hopefuls on next lues
,!.i\ primary ballot, held at
the Four Ambassadors in Mi-
ami earl] this week. Qov. Shapp
charged that the 0 S. govarn-
ment has "no right" to put a
cap on the amount ol money
retirees earn it they want W
receive their maximum Social
Security benefit
Shapp was rebutting the no-
- thai 'here should be B
reia* i.-nship between
what a retiree receives in So-
- rttj and the amount
he Red m cam after
VKIS DISCOURAGES enter-
declared, "and :t
also i ice to the
ml] economic

Go" tap is the first
the 1U
nor
one-vear terms at the brunch.
They are Louis Hvmson (Me-
\nu). nresident; Sid Schwarz-
i.-'< (Israel), president-ehct;
Robert Felngold (Col. Marcus),
Kenneth Hoffman (Sholem).
Maurlc; Mehlman (Malmoni-
d *), Richard Zimmerman (OoM
Coast), vice presidents; Beth J.
Krebs (T/'dik-.-iM. secretnrv;
an I Maniu Beckerman I Me
,'miv treasurer
Trus* ten -nv Louis Bonchick
(Israel), Irving Cyoers (Sunnv
tsl-s >!', Feiseles i\o-th
D d 'V Eric Glaaer (Hatlltvah).
Col. Nat Kutcher (Judea), Royal
Kwelt (\v-i"'in> Harrv Nissel
(Coral Cables). Sid Ritter (Is-
r:iiV .'.nek Slow (North ^hore>
and Tom Schwartz (Miami
Beach)
Feigelee and Fred Snvder. a
former council president, a-e
K moral chairmen of the brunch,
with Schwarrbach as reserva-
tions chairman.
TicWs are available through
any B'nai B'rith lodge presi-
dent in Dade County or at the
B'nai B'rith Regional Office.
Bright new Package!
BOLOGNA
A-
Oomd B*t.
Psst-aw, Saiami.
v -..vwurst airvd
Far**^->-s
Sul_____
r\
KOSHER ZiON
BM i- COM*4hf Of CMiCAdO
; \v-.-.\>*
f^l^****e>^<^.'^**'*'*'*''*l'^''^
-
,-
Stop the thief!
t^ Kaftan hrwd *. ./
4 fc. rr- WW'
gaaaMB>
Hi '> saasq faa. n *'
m MMaaagVia bsft >>* *** *
fcv -X Hv.n hs> .-*lw
hiti t*t *r "* '* *s v
^^^^^ src- -
. *_ -Si ta .r-?^*
rMki s iiidsaajeaaeaa%
Sao^Ci 4
868-7370
-mm,\JKk
^^>*^^^^^^#*^^->-^-^^
^*-*^r
j
Sol Drescher of Miami Beach,
chairman of the Southeastern
region of the American Ked
,'.. ,n I)t i i for Israel, has been
mm -d national cochalrman of
a c' np i i to build a new $10-
m'illon central blood bank for
th Ptate nf Israel.
ti. MnnH bin'' m matronnli-
t.n Tel Aviv, will be operated
h,. M<\en David Adorn, Israel's
R ''. Cross society.
,>..,,..,,,.. ,., .| recentrv in
,,;... r. .n ', ...ti, Mrs. Nathan
-- ,i ..-r, ,-f New Vo'k. c^-hni'--
......i to *lan a iv'innwid^ ef-
fort "i raise funds for the blood
b ml
Wo-Vin" closol" with Dr%.
ch! in this area will be David
Col "man. Florida state presi-
dent, an I Sam-iel Pelnhard,
s- Bit chairman of the American
R -d Man David. Both men
are from Miami Beach.
TVv will coordinate their ef-
f- -t< w**h Howard Kaufman of
Miami Beaeh. nresident of the
C--itJ- Miami chapter, and
with C.^-ald Schwartz. South-
east regional director. Offices
if th" American Red Magen
D-.' id for Israel, the only agen-
l
cy in the United States author-
ized to solicit or accept funds
for the emergency services or-
ganization, are in the 42(> l.in-
coin Road Building, Suite 446.
Drescher said the new blood
bank the most modern in the
Middle East "will be con-
Btructed largely underground to
(vwide nrotection from pos-
si,,l enemy air attack, and will
f'-.tre the most modern avail,
able equipment.
Ta!mudic College Dean
On 'Judaism Today'
Rabbi Tibor Stern, spiritual
leader of the Jacob C. Cohen
Commun'ty Synagogue, will in-
teniew Rabbi Jacob M. Poupko,
associate dean of Talmudic Col-
lege of Florida, on "Judaism
Today* this morning at 11:30
on Channel 6.
Rabbi Stern said the plans of
the Talmudic College, which is
in i's second year of operation,
will be discussed. "In addition,"
he siid. "there will be special
e-iphasis on the impact of the
Yeshiva on the community."

Now there's a ground coffee
that tastes great without caffein,
So enjoy.
Ground roast
Brim decaffeinated coffee
is rich in Colombian beans.
3r i-rac =" e- : :~ rr^dBrim0 decaffeinated coffee.
Ground Brir* s 97% nMn free. So you don't have to wony
~c "at :~ :-' ::"?? A~c ^^e- t cc -es to ta'amBrim* is
s; c= : :_;.. -."".. _e:..:-' c-^ lUMMttl o\erover and OWl
PE3LL\R 09 DR'P GRIND.
FREEZE-D9IED. OR ELECTRIC PERK
So
you fill your cup
flavor, not caff ein


Friday, March 5, 1976
'Jen/* # fhrkllar
rfage 5-B
The Levins to Be Honored At
temple, and they served for
many years as presidents of tne
Brotherhood and Sisterhood.
In*1968 Woolf became a Flor- t i r-gm -r* if i
[da resident. He is a member LclIMr dLlOlllSt fSOIICtS Lllllt'llCOIl
of the Tallis and Tephlin Club
=-----------^=^-' at Temple Emanu-El.
Voters Incorporated will hold
an orvn-to-the-public meeting
on Tuesday, March 9, at 8 p.m.
in the Washington Federal Audi-
torium at 1234 Washington Ave.
Ted Cohen, Murry Myerson and
Sam Gyson will talk about legal-
ized casino gambling,
ft & &
Free Sons of Israel Greater
Miami Lodge No. 208 will hold
a meeting on Thursday, March
11, at 8 p.m. at the Jefferson
National Bank on 41st St., Mi-
ami Beach. Guest speaker, of-
ficer Jerry Vanderberry of the
Police Department, will discuss
crime prevention.
ft
Elsie Rubin will discuss "Who
and What Is Man?" at the Forte
Forum on Tuesday, March 9, at
1 p.m. at the 1200 West Ave.
auditorium.
Cr ft ft
The Hon. Gwen Margolis is
the guest speaker at the regular
monthly meeting of the Bis-
cayne Democratic Club on Mon-
day, March 8, at 8 p.m. at the
Washington Federal Auditorium,
1234 Washington Ave.
Mrs. Martha Heller will out-
line plans for the Bicentennial
show and party scheduled for
April 26.
ft ft -ft
Nancy Greenberg of South
Miami is having a representa-
tive showing of her paintings
during March at Kings Bay
Yacht and Country Club.
A graduate of Brooklyn Col-
lege, Ms. Greenberg studied at
Pratt Institute and the Brooklyn
Museum Art School. She has
taught in New York City public
schools and lectured at Ken-
wood and Palmetto Elementary
Schools.
ft ft ft
Carl Wool of North Miami
got the surprise of the half-
century this past week when
his wife, Shirley, invited in 75
guests to a surprise 50th birth-
day party. Entertainment high-
light was a roast and toast for
Car! by longtime friends Ber-
nice and Harry Jackson of Mi-
ami Shons.
The Wools, from Chicago,
have been North Miami resi-
dents since 1947. Owner of a
wholesale plumbing suooly busi-
ness in Fort Lauderdale, Wool
was named by a radio station
the Best Boss in Broward Coun-
ty for 1975.
ft
Mount Sinai Medical Cv*ve
has sent 30 cartons of 'i! ll
Buppliea to Guatem 11 '......."i
Aviatecha, the official rcli f
clearing house.
Sid and Iris Poland are home
after a recent trio to Atlantic
City, where th"v vlited the In-
ternational Gift Fair, and At-
Wholes%ie Distributors of

/
QUEEN ESTHER -
KOSHER POULTRY
and
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Processors and Exporters
of the finest b.S. Govt. Inspected
KOSHER MEATS and POOITRY
1717 N.W. 7th Ave.
Miami, Fla.
Phone 324-1855
lanta, where they attended the
annual Gift Show. In Atlantic
City Iris made purchases f.-om
15 countries for her Thing-A-
Dings shop on Arthur Godfrey
Kd.
ft ft
As a five-year-old glimnsed
his first awesome rign of free-
dom the Statue of Libertv
in New York Harbor, he and his
family and friends bowed in
prayer and thanked God for
giving them a second chance,
to life.
Tradition t'ls us that a man's
life is usually three score and
ten. On March 6 at the Israelite
Center Temple Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg will call Jack Woolf
to the Bimah, and at the age of
83 Woolf will chant the runes
of his "second" Bar Mitzvah.
Three generations will be
there to celebrate this very rare
occasion: Woolf's son, Samuel,
of Scarsdale, N.Y., and his
grandson. Lee Cohen, of Miami.
Woolf's first Bar Mitzvah was
at the Congregation Brothers of
Israel Temple. Mt. Vernon. NY..
of which he is now a lifetime
member. He and his wife. Au-
gusta, were married in that
H; is a life member of the
Al"ia Temple in Washington.
DC: life member of the Glazers
Union: life member of Mt. Ma-
sad i Lodge No. 902 Shrine;
member of the Scottish Rite
32nd '.> gree, White Plains. N.Y.:
me-'b^r of Fleetwood Syna-
aogue. N.Y; member of the
.A-npjcan Legion Post No. 3,
Mt. Vernon.
O"t-of-town guests will honor
Wo"\r at a 1-incheon at the tem-
*! following services, and there
"ill be a reception in the eve-
p:*w nt th home of his grand-
children. Mr. and Mrs. Lea
Cohen.
Out-of-town guests include
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Woolf,
D-Land. Fla.: S:imuel Woolf.
<>q-1la, N.Y.; daughter and
ein.|n.liw Mr. rind Mrs. Leon-
ard Wenteles. Milford. Mass.;
D-. and Mrs. Stdnev Hutne',
P-no' lvn. NY.; Mrs. Rose
ffwaMmr, Th B'-nnv. NY.. Mr.
and M-s. Hirolr' WaMumn,
B-onwille. N.Y.; Esther anrl
Helen Woolf and Hy Woolf, Os-
sinins. N.Y.; and Mrs. Jennie
Z"'owit7. Pnrtchester. N.Y.
Jewish communal and ch ic
I ad is M.c and Lea Le\in
have been turned the reciri-
MR. AND MRS. LEVIN
Pitts-elect of the Da\id Btn-
Gaiion Award. The announ:e-
ment wjs made by Dr. Leon
Kronish, chairman of tlie La-
bor Zionist Alliance State of Is-
rael Bonds luncheon.
The presentation will be
^aie at th" Ln'uw -'i~nist Al-
liance Bond-With-Israel Lunch-
eon, en behalf of tV South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion CST,r!,i'",. T
C..nJ,,.
Ma-ch 14. at noon at the Eden
Roc Hotel.
THE PRESIDENT cf Lincoln
Diversified Investments in Mi-
i!-ii Reach lor IS years. Levin
served as president of the 1s-
rael Histadrut Council in South
Florida in 1985 and has been
chaionan of the board since
1953.
He is on the national execu-
ti"e board of the Natin :l Com-
mitt 'e for Labor Israel, and has
distinguished himself as a na-
tional vice president of the His-
tadrut Foundation and a mem-
ber of its Executive Committee.
President of the Farband Chaim
Web.man Branch, which he
helped organize in 1962. he was
among the founders of the Le-
bedicler Branch. For their
years of work on behalf of Is-
rael, the Israel Histadrut Coun-
cil of South Florida presented
the Le'.ins their annual "Heart
of Israel" Award.
Lea Le\in is active in the
Shaloma Group of Hadassah,
Pioneer Women and Histadrut.
Milton M. Parson is the Ex-
ecutive Director for the South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign
Israel on$5 a day.
The fighting has stopped in the Mideast.
But not the suffering.
Especially if you're an elderly person in
poor health or a newly arrived immigrant
trying to take care of yourself and your
family in an economy ravaged by wars and
inflation. Where the only aid you can count
on for food, housing, clothing and medicine
totals about $5.75 a day. And that's all the
money you have in the world.
We must continue to help the people
of Israel with their human needs and their
commitment to make possible a decent
quality of life for every citizen. We must
house Russian immigrants and bring hope
to their elderly and build faith in the future
for their children.
Because we are one in spirit with the
people of Israel, their problems are indeed
our problems. And if you think all their
problems are solved, think again.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again,
O
We Are One.


Page 6-B
+Jewish flcrktiar
Friday, March S, 197* i
\
All smiles at a reception honoring U.S.
Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jackson are
these supporters of his bid for the Demo-
cratic Presidential nomination in Flor-
ida's March 9 primary (from left): Goldic
i Mrs. Sol) Goldstein, South Florida fi-
nance committee chairman for Jackson;
Sen. Jackson; Miami Beach Mayor Har-
old Rosen, a Jackson chairman in Bade
County; and Mrs. Helen Jackson, the
Senator's wife
'Sliolem Aleichem9 Star to Highlight
Fountaimiew Night in Israel, March 18
Aaron Heyman, star of "Sho-
lem Aleichem,' which received
ra'e re\ie\vs at the North Mi-
ami Playhouse, will highlight
the "Night in Israel" on Thurs-
day, March 18, at 8 p.m. in the
Fountainview Social Hall.
Sponsored by the Fountain-
view Israel Bonds Committee,
committee chairman Michael
Genson and cochairman Mn.
Marti Skopit announced that
the Stale of Israel Solidarity
/\ wi'l be nr*emed to the
Fountainview Religious Congre-
gation.
ACCORDING TO the chair-
men, "This meeting in which
Fountaimiew residents will
participate will help, through
the purchase of Israel Bonds,
with the financial aid Israel
needs to reduce her balance-of-
payments deficit and to create
jobs for Russian immigrants."
"Israel's economy is in seri-
ous difficulty because it wound
up 1975 with the biggest deficit
in its balance of payments
close to $4 billion of any
year since it came into exist-
ence 28 years ago," said Milton
M. Parson, executive director,
South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
The lirraci Bond Organization
has been the prime source of
funds for Israel's economic -de-
10
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In 1975 it provided S277.310.000
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projects, bringing to more than
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to date.
Ms. WoH to Describe
Soviet Jewry's Plight
Miriam Wolf will be guest
speaker during services at Tem-
ple Bet Breira this evening at
8:15 at the Killian Pines United
Methodist Church.
Ms. Wolf, organizer and
chairperson of the South Flor-
ida Conference on Soviet Jew-
ry, will describe the problems
faced by So\ict Jews in their
efforts to emigrate to Israel and
the United States.
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Cubai
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vegeti


9? -.Friday, March 5, 19~6
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Page 7-B

IE
IG.
\NOL
I went home.
I went back,
l went i week*
end.
I to New

[ opl La ;.'. over
Idlew > i urse,
I ; iners
and w my
famil] '... W -bron Cemetery.
\N BROTHI \ciisen.
opened i;> an Off-Off Broadway
play, in.'' is a eal designation.
He played Lilian Hcilman's
charactei of the petulant youn^-
<. son in "Another Part of the
Forest." 1 hat play was written
"The Little Foxes," but
the action precedes and explains
the better known "Foj
The plaj sold out its live per-
formances for the Airline Thea-
tre Wing, and several actors and
agents came to see it along with
the company's friends and re-
latives.
I went to sec Issac Bashevis
Singer's "Yentl" on Broadway.
yYentl, the Yeshiva boy. is real-
lalv a girl, and I am anxious to
ask Mr. Singer, a Miami Beach
winter \isitor. about his crea-
tion. More on "Yentl.'*
I STOPPED in for a carton
of milk at a Manhattan market
near my brothers apartment.
In my most polite Publiv Super-
market manner. 1 -isked a lady,
with a large order, if I might
pay for my milk before she
checked her groceries. Assum-
ing, of course, that she would
abide by the Geneva Conven-
tion Shopper's Ojde, I had my
money ready.
The Code, as it applies to
food shopping, reads: "Anyone
with less than three items shall
be permitted to check out be-
fore her (his) turn, providing
the other shopper has a larger
order Green stamps may be
L offered, but not accepted. In ap-
J preciation."
m To my surprise, she said, .{
"'You may not"" And she was
angry, too Sam.- thins with the
well-dressed man behind her.
I LEFT them shontine at each
other about my colosal nerve. |
By New York City standards, T ;
usually fail the "moxie" test.
This lime. I suppose; the Miami
Beach tourist in me outstripped
those two New Yorkers in chutz-
pah. If I ever heir "For a girl
from New York, vou're not bad"
again, I will spit epithets.
I borrowed a white winter
coat to keep me warm. Doing
nothing more taxing than climb-
ing in and out of cabs. I find
that the white coat is now a
lovely shade of soot. How can
you get dirty, just breathing?
I went to the Metropolitan
Museum of Art for a nostalgic
walk through the galleries. It
"mod to be free. Now. there is
La booth with suggested dona-
tions For entrance. The young
woman behind the booth actual-
ly asked "And what would you
like to givff
UPON i Mering the museum,
we were asked to check our um-
brellas. Noting that tlit cloak-
room lines resembled Dade
County Auto Inspection Stations
at mid-day. we decided to smug-
gle the umbrellas in a crevice !
of a column. Later, it poured,
and someone else wan staving
drv under our umbrellas. Why
was I so susprlsed? I reallv ex-
pected the umbrellas to still be
where we left them
I came from Miami to find a
Cuban restaurant in a Puerto
Rican neighborhood. We ate ,
Yucca a white potato-like ]
vegetable that could pass for a
irtft garlic clove.
Mfc ate at "La Urdla''-=="I
with NORM* A. OROV1TZ
kind of a French restaurant in
the Rockefeller Center area on
8th Avenue. Madame Deniel
treat-, regulars with charm and
after-dinner drinks.
SOMEHOW, the graciousness
and warmth, along with uood
food, are all the more appealing
i the temper nine i> 22
. i, and tne wmu-chiil tactor
(we never had wind-chill ratios
when 1 was growing up) made
it even mon oui iae.
I ate real whipped cream
the measure of a truly fine res-
taurant at Serendipity in the
Bast 60's. The rest of the meal
was incidental to the dollops of
heavy, sweetened cream ambro-
sia heaped on whatever you or-
dered dessert-wise. Readers may
write and request my short list
of Miami restaurants which
serve real w.c. Enclose a
stamped, self-addressed en-
velope, please.
I called home (to Miami that
is), and my husband asked,
"Have you been mugged yet?"
My children inquired as to my
purchases. I spent a total of 40
minutes in Bloomingdate's
(Bloomie's is the "in" pseu-
donym now).
My brother took me to a cast
party after his play closed.
Everyone was either a writer
or an actor. Even the director
was a writer. Not one doctor,
lawyer or CPA.
\VF TOOK the Triboro Bridge
out to La Guardia. Would you
believe a 75 cent toll? Both
ways. I will never again be-
grudge the 15 cent toll over
Broad Causeway.
During the plane trip South-
bound, I sat next to a_ mission-
ary for the Mormon" Church.
The "Elder" was a sincere 19-
year-old boy on his way to a 21-
month mission in Caracas. He
explained the basic tenets of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints, and I returned
the compliment by answering
his questions about Judaism, as
best I could.
"I never 1 m w any Jews at
home in Utah," he said.
I never knew anv Mormons
back home in Brooklyn. By the
way bl [amj is a no-no.
I "went" back home to New
York.
I enjoyed it, it felt ,jood it
fell : and K in
I : liar surroui
And :' n I "ca ie home." I
n illy came ho is
Roney Plaza Bonds Dinner
To Honor the Kleinmans
Fwi '. la > en Ic and com-
hi is a >d Julia
ii: receive the Da-
Cantorial
Concert
I | South-
in. v i;l p es nt a con-
cert i n Sunday, March 7, at
Temple Emanu-El at 8 p.m.
Three canto-s are feature.1:
Hassan Louts Danto of Toronto,
Haawn Abraham Mtzrahi of
Cincinnati, and Hazzan Zvi Ad-
ler of Temple Emami-El. assist-
ed by the temple's Junior Chor-
al Group.
Kay K-amer, coloratura so-
prano, will be a soloist, accom-
panied by Shmttel Fershko, Is-
raeli pianist and composer who
is musical director of Temple
Emanu-El.
Liturgical, Israeli, Yiddish
and secular music will be fea-
tured in the program.
Cantor Adler is concert chair-
man for the Cantors Assembly.
Cantor Eleaznr1 Bernstein, also
of Temple Emanu-El, is co-1
chairman. Cantor Saul H. '
Breeh, chairman of the South-
eastern Region of the 'Canton, ]
Assembly, is working with the \
local organization in produc-1
ing the event.
Tickets are available at the
Temple Emanu-El office or
through most of the cantors in
Dade and Broward counties,
according to Cantor Adler.
Proceeds will benefit the
Cantors Assembly cantorial
scholarship and publications
program.
MR. AND MRS. KLEINMAN
vid Ben-Gurion Award, it was
announced by Samuel and Ethel
Rudenberg, honorary chairmen.
Roney Plaza-is. ael Dinner of
i tate.
The presentation will be made
at the dinner, on behalf of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign, on Sun-
day, March 14. at 6:30 p.m. at
the Eden Roc Houl
Born in London. Morris and
Julia Kleinman came to Miami
Beach seven years ago from the
Bronx. A member of the Roney
Pla/a Men's Social Club. B'nai
B'rith, Judea Lodg\ and Ha-
da^sah Associates. Kleinman is
active in the communal aotixi-
ti -s at Temple Solomon.
THE PLACE

Kosher
Catering
Fantasy
.:

Not Just
Another
Kosher Hotel
. but new
and elegant.
The very
finest in Food
preparation,
presentation and
service .. That
Wedding. That Bar
Mitzvah. That special
party belongs at the Algiers.
It's Glatt to be good.
\^_y Jack Gartenberg, Owner-Manager
For information Call Catering Director Allan Zane at 531-3391
ON THE OCEAN AT 25ih ST. AND COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
aaflL Kosher
me
OUNQi
For Dancing
Now Appearing
The Neapolitans
and the
Togetherness Quartet
5:30 P.M. 5 A.M.
A? WtftH's
! THE PLACE FOR STEAK j
1335 79th St. Ciutewiy
Miami, Florida
Reservations
758-5581
Wl Honor A-niMCin Fiprn
and ma|or cr.dlr ci.4i
HE IS a for nt lemb r <>f
Tem| I Is-ael Irand one se,
Knighl I
s nic I i tje i
dozo !. ire I ill in New
Yo Locally I nber
of the i Ge l
of thi Kn lit
Ju
dent of fund
Bah ::
n-
I
"'II:.! !
ire,
i'ii. tif
h sts i -. n,
. ta-
ils iff.
Opti-Mrs. Club
T e Opti-M Club oj ;. .mi
B-ach will h'>ld its regular
monthly luncheon on
Tu isdv March 9, al at
the Embers Restaurar For
reservations call M Martin
Steiner or Mrs. Edwin Henig.
The afternoon's prog a n is a
book review by Isabel Sider of
"A Wonderful Stranger" y Cyn-
thia Freeman. Mrs, James Lev-
enson is program chairman.
On April 3 the Ooti-Ml'9. and
their husbands will go to the
Pom pa no Race Track. Mrs. Wil-
liam Carmel, chairman of the
evening, says transportation will
be bv bus.
nternationally renowned.
Seafood, steaks, choos.
fowl, all perfect and
plentiful in newer than
new elegant decor Open
at 5:30 p.m. daily (pri ie
parties up to 200)
NICK & ARTHUR'S
1801 79th St. Causeway
Miami, Florida
Reservations
864-2 200
We Honor American Express,
and major credit carda
CAROL KANE
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATION
YEAR'S BEST ACTRESS
FRANK'S AUTO GLASS
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CORAL GABLES
WINOSWHOS
WINDOWS
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CAROL KANE IN HESTER STREET -WRITTEN AND DlREC~ED Br
JOAN MICKLIN SILVER' PRODUCED BY RAPHAEL D SILVER


Page P-B
*Jenist> HcridHan
Friday, March 5, 1976
\
Nobody, but nobod
to help Israel than Sen
.
In Praise of
Scoop Jackson
by LEON URIS
Author of "Exodus"
After the Six Day War In 1967 I was
cT.proac'ieJ by ranking Israelis to consider
undertaking a book based on the hypothesis
that the Arabs had won the war. The
prospect, even as fantasy, was so abhorrent
I declined.
I recalled those discussions and my
ivid reaction during the Ycm Kippur War
of 1973. At the onset of that conflict,
with the issue gravely in doubt, the
massacre cf Israel became a vis r. of ter-
rifying reality. It turned into a days-long
Rtghttriare In which my own world had I een
destroyed. I rather douLt thai any Jew
anywhere would have lived a single day
..ain as a whole person beyond an Arab
\ ictory.
Conversely, my most fulfilling moment
es an author came several years back
when my wife and I visited the Schoenau
wansit camp outside Vienna, a way station
spiriting Soviet Jews to Israel. I met and
wept with a woman who risked twenty years
of penal labor to work on an illegal under-
ground translation of EXODUS.
It was at Schoenau that the name of
Senator Henry M. Jackson first captured ray
imagination.
The group in transit was potpourri
from all over the Soviet Union, workers for
the most part, and certainly unsophisticated
regarding knowledge of America. Yet, to
a person, they all knew the name of a
single man.
"Do you know Senator Jackson of
Washington?" I was asked over and over.
I answered that I didn't.
-If you meet him, tell him that his name
is spoken with reverence by our people
and he is blessed in a million prayers. '
LEON URIS
A MATTER OF JUSTICE
Henry Jackson's traumatic involvement
with the holocaust came when he visited
Buchenwald three days after its liberation
as a young Congressman. He never forgot
what he saw.
It would be a disservice to tnis man
to consider his pro-Israel stance as an
isolated quirk. He deplores tyranny. Henry
Jackson deplores tyranny in his own country.
He deplores tyranny in mankind.
The Jackson Amendment to the 1974
Trade Act demanding the Tree choice
"Israel does not have a better
friend than Senator Jackson
from Washington."
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff
Senate Floor
November, 1971
of "eorte to emigrate was highly unpopular
wi h Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Henry
n er and those in the business
establishment who stood to turn a profit.
They branded it as undue interference in
iet internal affairs.
Why was it overwhelmingly carried by .*!
cnatc? If we examine its logic it
11. mes a masterpiece of common sense.
The bottom line of Jackson's foreign
.. is to secure an enduring world peace.
... major instrument for ascertaining
;j m this age is a genuine detente
een iiic Soviet Union and the United
tes.
AN EMBODIMENT OF THE
AMERICAN DREAM
We Jews who are the custodians of the
ashes of our people and for whom the gas
chambers were likewise intended are
obviously the ones most sensitive to the issue
of Israel's survival. This is as it should be.
In no way does it conflit with our allegiance
to our country. Indeed, the Jewish commu-
nity of America has contributed to the e
greatness of this nation far beyond its small
numbers. We have the right and the sacred
duty to fight for the survival of our people.
Despite this understandable preoccu-
pation with Israel's well being, we cannot, in
all conscience, support a man for the
Presidency on this issue alone.
The more one leaves this question and
looks at the entire man, even more thrilling
the prospect becomes of Henry Jackson
leading our nation. In the coming weeks
cue public will have the exciting prospect of
learning what the voters of the State
of Washington have known for over a
generation.
No candidate for the Presidency in this
century is more a product of the common
people and is more dedicated to the cause

of
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HENRY
A
Senator Scoop Jackson with his wife, Helen, and children, Anna Marie, 12, and Peter, 9.
L
PAID FOR BY
JACKSON FOR PRESIDENT
Waiter T. SkaUerv$J*Tre<1


)
Friday, March 5, 1976
*Jewist Fkridiain g------...
Page 9-B
has done more
laf or Henry M. Jackson
ir
y+:
of the common people.
Henry Jackson is of a rare species,
a political purist who has never teen tainted
by scandal and whose overpowering
motivation is to help ordinary human beings.
For two decades he secretly donated
his outside speaking and writing earnings,
half of his income, to help students in
his s.ate. These cnonymous gifts were
revealed only after enactment of a public
disci, jure law.
COMPASSION, COURAGE, AND
COMMON SENSE
Cn the domestic side Henry Jackson's
tenure has been a textbook of liberal
progress for the common man. minorities
Struggling for civil and social equality,
?for women's espiratiens, the poor, the aged,
the I'.f.rm and ih.? student. His ability to
gras" an issue in the making has been
nowhere better demonstrated than in going
to th forefront of two of the most demand-
ing pr Hems of our time, energy and
environment. He understands that there has
to be a median, a way that use of the land
and industrial and economic growth can
live side by side. He is as knowledgeable
about conservation, land use and resources
as anyone in this country. He has developed
programs designed to leave a legacy of
continued natural wealth and beauty
for future generations.
A GREAT LEADER FOR AMERICA
Henry Jaekson is an acknowledged
expert on national defense.
Henry Jackson is an acknowledged lead-
er in civil rights.
Henry Jackson is an acknowledged
leader for social progress.
He served as Chairman of the Demo-
cratic National Committee at the behest of
John F. Kennedy.
He has been named in the leading poll
as one of the ten most admired men in
the world.
He is rated by almost everyone in the
Capitol as the nation's most effective Senator.
He has been overwhelmingly chosen
by a poll of fellow Senators as the Senator
best oualified to be President of the United
States.
i l ffer my hand and my heart to
Senator Henry Jackson of Washington,
for America and the world.
r|kfc time
ejp Senator
, JACKSON
sesiIent committee
fiAtTreasurer DEMOCRAT
la
Senator Henry M. Jackson introduces his wife, Helen, to
former Israel Prime. Minister Golda Meir, a trusted friend.
The Senator enjoys the same warm relationship with
current Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
lorida will be Prou
of Scoop Jackson
as our President
Endorsed in the March 9th Primary by:
SAMUEL N. FRIEDLAND
MRS. SOI (GOLDIE) GOLDSTEIN
MAYOR MAURICE FERRE
V.'CE MAYOR ROSE GORDON
MAYOR JACK BLOCK
COUNCILMAN PHIL SAHL
STATE REP. PAUL STEINBERG
STATE SEN. SHERMAN WINN
WILLIAM SCHNITZER
ROSE RUBAN
MAX SERCHUK, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS
JOSEPH D 'APICE, PRESIDENT, CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION
HARRY A. (HAPPY) LEVY
MAYOR HAROLD ROSEN
MAYOR STEVE CLARK
COUNCILMAN MILT LITTMAN
STATE SEN. GEORGE FIRESTONE
COUNCILMAN DR. SIMON WIKLER
ALFRED AND L'LLY STONE
STATE REP. ELAINE BLOOM
GEORGE SIPKIN
ANNE ACKERMAN


.mMM
'age 10-B
, tpn/*t> flahUKam
Friday, March 5, 1976
\

Irving Lebow Burton Joseph
Alan Kessler
Maxwell Rabb
Harry Denner
Mrs. M. Abram iwoiton Aoram
graduate of the University of
Miami's Law School and holds
a lioctorate in jurisprudence.
He is the eflltor of the Miami
Law Review.
He is a member of the boards
of the Institute for Jewish Life,
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions and Welfare Funds, and
United HIAS.
He is a past president of the
Miami Beach Bar Association,
pan chairman of the Charter
Review Bo-t\1 of Miami Beach.
Dell president of the Civic
League of Miami Beach and
Pal i-Star Hibiscus Island Asso-
ciation, and former chairman of
the Foundation of Jewish Phil-
snthrc; iea at the r iter Mi-
ami Jewish Federation.
Max Orovilz
Mrs. Schwartz
\\ alter Dcutsch Harry B. Smith
K. J. Schwartz
Sol Sehreiber
Arnold Rosen
ii
The Hebrew Union Colk>ge-
Jewish Institute of Religion will
present us Distingutsneo Jew-
ish Sen ice Awards to thirteen
South FloriditnS at a Centennial
Convocation on Sunday, March
7.
Dr. Alfred Cottsehalk, presi-
dent of the College-Institute.
the academic and spiritual cen-
ter of Reform1 Judaism will pre-
sent the awards and deliver the
Convocation address at Temple
Beth Sholom at 2 p.m. on Sun-
day.
In the evening there Will be
a dinner at the Konover,Hotel
at which Chaim Herzdg. Israel's
Ambassador to the United" Na-
tions, will be the speaker and
guest of honor.
The Centennial celebration,
leaded by Max Orovitz, one of
the honorees. for the State of
Florida and David Fleeman for
South Florida, is coordinated by
Chaim Friend, the HUC-JIR's
national director of develop-
ment, and A. Harold Murray,
ihe stati' director.
The honorees are as follows.
Judge Morton L. and Gladys
Abram, leaders of Temple Beth
El. Hollywood, and active in
many Jewish and civic organ-
izations and causes.
Judge Abram. Broward Coun-
y Court Judge, served as Sen-
ior Judge of the Municipal
Court of Pembroke Pines. A na-
tive of Chicago and recipient of
B doctorate in law from DePaul
University Law School, he and
hifl family came to Hollywood
in 1957.
Judge Abram was elected sec-
retary of Temple Beth El only
six months after moving here.
He has served also as the tem-
ple's vice president, executive
vice president and. for four
years, president. A charter
member of the Broward County
Chapter of the American Jew-
ish Committee, he is active in
B'nai B'rith and in the Jewish
Federation of Greater Holly-
wood.
Mrs. Abram is a member of
-lie board of the National Fed-
eration of Temple Sisterhoods
i.nd. in 1973, she and Judge
Abram received the Masada
Lward Oom the Israel Bond
Organization. They have two
*ons, both attorneys, a daughter
,iid two grandchildren.
Harry Denner is past presi-
dent and a trustee of Temple
Bra 1 of Weal Palm Bench.
Born anil raised in New York,
.vhere he was a manufacturer,
Denner Was president of the
Neckwear Foundation of Amer-
ica.
He has been an indefatigable
fund-raiser for manv Jewish
causes, and is an active leader
in the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach Countv and on be-
half of Israel Bonds, as well as
jn other Jewish activities and
South Floriclians To Be Honored
\t HUC-JIR Centennial Convocation
philanthropies.
Walter and Mildred Deutsch.
who ftve in Davit, are affiliated
wifh Temple Sold of Hollywood
where De'it the bofetH of the Men's Club and
an organfzer of the congrega-
tion's Big-Brrtfhers and Big Sis-
ters OrgathVatton.
In Cincinnati. Deutsch's home
town, he was affiliated with his
turner' in the printing business
and was a congeganr and e
board member of the Isaac May-
er Wise Temple.
Deutsch is an ardent worker
for and supporter of the United
Jewish Apneat, and Represented
his district in the UJA's "Op-
eration Israel" pilgrimage to the
Jewish State.
Alan' B. Kessler, an attorney*
and president of Dutch Inns of
America motel-hotel chain, is a
past president of Temple Beth
Am in Miami. Born in Mineola,
N.Y., he has been a resident of
the Greater Miami area since
1936, and is a graduate of the
University of Miami Law School.
Kessler is president of the
Southeast Council of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and a member of its na-
tional board of trustees and
executive committee and past
president of the UAHC's South
Florida Federation. He was the
recipient of Hospitality Maga-
zine's Hall of Fame Award and
of the State of Israel Bonds'
Tower of David Award.
Ha and iiis wile, Esther, have
two daughters and a son.
Irving S. Lebow, affectionate-
ly called "Doc" by everyone, is
a native of Detroit. He is a past
president of Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Fort Lauderdale and
a member of its board. He is
president of the South Florida
Federation of the UAHC.
Lebow has taught compara-
tive religion at Emanu-El. A
member of a long list of organ-
izations, he has been, as a presi-
dent of Oakland Toyota in Fort
Lauderdale, president of the
Fort Lauderdale Auto Dealers'
Association. He and his wife,
the former Rita Rudick of Ak-
ron, have four children, one of
whom is Sally Ames, a singing
and recording artist.
Max Orovitz. When one men-
tions philanthrophv in the
Greater Miami area, he thinks
immediately of Max Orovitz,
whose communal activities and
benefactions fill several single-
spaced typewritten pages. A
business executive and attorney,
he was bom in Camden. N.J.
He was married to Ruth Kaplan
in 1929, and they have three
children, all married and living
in Dade County.
Orovitz is a director of City
National Banks in Miami and
Miami Beach. He was president
of the Dan Hotels in Israel,
which include the King David
in Jerusalem.
A member and past president
of Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami. Orovirz is incorporator.
director and past president of
the 'Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, one of the six original
founders of the United Fund of
Dade County and its past presi-
dent, and an honorary member
of the national cabinet of the
UJA.
The recipient of numerous
awards, he is active in all the '
cultural affairs of his county :
and was named the Outstanding
Civic Leader Of the Year by' the
Miami Beach Civic League "in
I960.
Arnold 'P. "fcoseirfs a member
of the board of nverseers of
the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion. Born
in New York City, he has been
a resident of the Miami area
since 1935, and is a graduate
of the University of Horida.
In 1946 he and an associate
formed F & R Builders, the ;
forerunner of Lennar Corp., of j
which he is the executive vice '
president. The Rosens have'
long been active in religious and
civic circles in Miami. He has
been the president of Temple
Israel and is a member of the
board of the South Miami Hos-
pital. The Rosens have two
Children and three grandchil-
dren.
Sol Sehreiber, a member and
past president of Temple Judea
in Coral Gables, is also a for-
mer president of B'nai B'rith
Of Coral Gables and has served
as an officer and board member
of the B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization, the Hillel Founda-
tion and the Anti-Defamation
League.
He is a recipient of the Jeru- '
salem Peace Award and the
Award of the Prime Minister's
Club of Israel. Active in the
Israel Bond Organization, he is
project leader of the Consult-
ants for Israel program. He and
his wife, Thelma, have three
married daughters and two
grandchildren.
Kenneth J. and Maxine
Schwartz have long been active
in the Jewish community in
Hollywood, and are members of
Temple Sinai of North Dade.
Schwartz is president of the
congregation and for the past
fifteen years has been sneaker
in Florida and Georgia for th;
United Jewish Anneal-Is;-a"l
Emergency Fund. He se-'cs s
well as a member of the Great >r
Miami Jewish Federation's
steering committee and is mis-
sions chairman. His business is
land sales and shopping center
development.
Mrs. Schwartz is the 1976
Campaign Coordinator for North
Dade of the Greater Miami Jew- :
ish Federation's Women's Divi-
sion. They have six children.
Harry B. Smith, of Miami
Beach, an attorney and senior
partner in the law firm of
Smith. Mandier, Smith. Parker
and Werner, is president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion
A member of Temple Beth
Sholom In Miami Beach, Smith
is married to the former Mari-
lyn Krensky and they have three
children.
He is a magna cum laude
The Distinguished Jewish
Service Award will i ie pre-
sented to Maxwell M. Rabb and
Burton M. Joseph.
Maxwell M. Rabb. who serv-
ed two Presidents Dwight D.
Eisenhower and Lyndon B.
Johnson in important White
House positions, is president of
Temple Emanu-El in New York.
He is a partner in the law firm
of Stroock & Stroock & Lavan.
Button M. Joseph is a mem-
b m of the board of governors
of the College-Institute and a
past president of Temple Israel
in Minneapolis. President of the
I. S. Joseph Co.. grain and feed
business, he is a biochemist and
a member of the board of trus-
tees of American Freedom from
Hunger organization.
As chairman of the College-
Institute's Board of Fellows,
Joseph will induct Ambassador
Herzog as a "Fellow" of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion at the din-
ner.
Uwly.
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And Berenaka is the only
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where you'll tmd beautiful
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Friday, March 5, 1976
*Jtwisfi fhrkfiar
Page 11-5
e
Jje
^aftlrimatl flags
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Mm A. lipschitz RaDbi Robert J. Or*and
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT JEWISH TRADITIONS
Benevolent Societies
"And if thy brother be waxen
poor, and his means fail with
thee; then thou shalt uphold
him. ."
Leviticus 25:35
When the founding fathers of
the first Jewish community in
New Amsterdam (New York)
landed on Colonial American
shores in September,"1654, they
were told in no uncertain terms
they would have to take care of
their own poor.
The Dutch West India Com-
pany needn't have bothered to so
enjoin the refugees from Recife,
Brazil. Care of the poor had
been Biblical injunction for
Jews for three thousand years.
In Recife, which the settlers
had been forced to leave, the
congregation had had a well-
organized system of care for the
needy, including dowries for
poor orphan brides.
' THUS IT was natural for Jew-
ish charity in Colonial times to
continue as a congregational
responsibility, which it did, in
the main, until the last half of
the 19th century.
A survey of services rendered
by the congregation includes
'cash, food, wood for fuel,
clothes, linen, transportation to
foreign parts, fitting out to sea.
board for the transient and the
sick, mazzot, rent money, medi-
cine, nursing, the ministrations
of a physician, and free burial."
The constitution of New
York's Congregation Shearith
Israel, adopted in 1706 and ex-
panded and renewed in 1728,
declared that "those poor of
this congregation that shall ap-
ply for Sedaca shall be assisted
with as much as the Parnas and
his assistants shall think fitt."
The congregations, the fore-
runners of the benevolent so-
cieties, found it difficult to keep
their synagogues solvent as a
result of their allocations for
poor relief. Shearith Israel's re-
lief expenditures during the first
half of the 18th centurv ranged
from a tenth to a third of its
annual income.
"ALTHOUGH the Jew saw
charity'deeds of loving kind-
ness' as a virtue important
in itself," Marcus wrote, "he
did not practice it for its own
sake only, for the succor it of-
fered the unfortunate. There
were other considerations. The
pious Jew was not unmindful,
of course, that the practice of
charity brought rewards in
heaven, but if no more than
subconsciously, he was moved
to benevolence by still another
important concern: the typical
Colonial Jew was without ex-
ception native to a land which
imposed disabilities on its Jew-
ish residents; he knew only too
well that a turn of the wheel
of fortune might tomorrow
bankrupt and impoverish him.
"He helped others so that he
and his children might be help-
ed if they should ever need the
support of their fellow Jews.
He accepted without demur the
obligations of kinship.
"It was also a fact not to be
denied, that all Jews every-
where recognized the right of
a petitioner to demand and re-
ceive help from a fellow Jew.
The man at the door was a
claimant, not a suppliant! and
finally this too was a weighty
consideration Jews helped
one another because they fear-
ed for their own status if they
deserted their poor and threw
them on the mercies of the
haiii ir.esscd non-Jewish au-
thorities."
CONGREGATIONS were also
loath to see needy members go
to the public poorhouse, where
they would be deprived of
kosher food and Jewish fellow-
ship. A congregational minute
of 1800 stated:
"To alleviate the distresses
of the unfortunate as far as we
can is our first duty as Men.
To prevent a Yehuda from go-
ing to live among goyim at the
poorhouse should be the
first duty of the Trustees of the
congregation."
In the first half of the 19th
century, the center of respon-
sibility for poor relief was seen
to shift in a measure from the
congregation as such to special-
ized agencies created by the
congregation.
Later in the century, these
specialized congregational or-
ganizations were replaced by
Jewish philanthropic societies
and institutions in large num-
bers. "The simple, spontaneous
help given to the needy in the
small community of old had to
give way to cooperative com-
munal organization if the sen-
sitive poor were not to be over-
looked."*
B'nai B'rith. founded in 1843,
the world's oldest and largest
Jewish service organization, es-
tablished orphanages, homes for
the aged and hosnitals. Among
the accomplishments of Jewish
philanthronv was the develop-
ment of federated fund-raising
which produced greater results
for all participants.
THIS WAS also a distinctive
Jewish contribution to philan-
thrope in America since the
benefits of the federation idea
became generally recognized
and it was adopted by the Com-
munity Chest movement.
Bibliography
"de Sola Pool, David and In
mar. An Old Faith in the New
World. New York. 1955.
Encyclopedia Judaica. Philan-
thropy United States. Jeru-
salem. 1971.
Marcus. Jacob Rader. The
Colonial American Jew, 1492-
1776. Detroit. 1970.
IV Programs
Sunday, March 7
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Temple Menorah

"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
executive vice president of
the Rabbinical Association
and director of chaplaincy
for the Federation
Guests:
L. Jules Arkin
Marilyn Smith
and
Michael Adler
Topic:
1976 CJA-IEF
?QUESTION BOX?
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why is the Sab-
bath before Purim referred to
as "Shabbos Zachor"?
Answer: On this Sabbath it
has been ordaineu by the rab-
bis that all synagogues add a
special portion from the Penta-
teuch to the usual reading for
that Sabbath. This is a portion
where the children of Israel are
commanded to remember the
Iriendish attack of Amalek upon
the wandering tribes of Israel
(Deuteronomy 25:17-19).
This portion begins with the
word "Zachor," which means to
'remember" or to "bear in
mind." What is involved here
is not just the individual hatred
of Amalek for the Jews of that
period. The name "Amalek" has
also become a generic term
which applies to all the sworn
enemies who seek to destroy
the Jewish people, including the
field Hainan of the Persian
period who is related to the
story of Purim.
IT IS designed to remind us
of the evil that lurks in the
hearts of men and which seeks
to destroy us and would destroy
us were it not for the Grace of
the Almighty.
Since the festival of Purim
is one which is dedicated to the
victory over that evil, the por-
tion of the Torah which bids us
to beware of this evil is read
on the Sabbath before Purim.
Since this portion begins with
the word "Zachor." the Sabbath
is named as the Sabbath Zachor
or the Sabbath (on which we
read) Parshath Zachor.
'?
Question: Why is the Pu-
rim feast delayed until the
late afternoon instead of tak-
ing nlace earlier like the feast
of other festivals?
Answer: There arc a num-
ber of reasons advanced for the
timing of the Feast of Purim.
Many claim that this was done
so that the people would see to
it that they distributed gifts to
the poor and exchanged "por-
tions" with their friends during
the earlier part of the day. De-
laying the feast to the late after-
noon gives them the chance to
do this.
In the course of other festi-
vals charity and gifts have to be
dispensed before the holiday
and thus their meals can be
consumed earlier in the day.
ON PURIM it may be done.
and actually should be done on
the holiday. Some claim that
the feast was ordained partially
to commemorate the feast to
which Esther invited the King
and Haman. Her feast took
place in the late afternoon be-
cause all Jews were fasting for
three days and she did not par-
ticipate in the feast until the
last two hours of the day.
Since the feast served to be
the turning point of Jewish
destiny, our current Feast of
Purim is delaved until late in
the day to remind us of the cir-
cumstances of Esther's historic
parties which brought about the
salvation nf her people. (Elijah,
Gaon of Vilna.)
ill CANDIELIGHTIMG TIME 3 2 ADAR 6:05
Ul
Question: What is the ori-
gin and meaning of the Jewish
belief in the Messiah?
Answer: The word "Ma-
shiach" means the "anointed
on?" In the Bible the term
originally was used to apply to
a person whose appointment to
high office is sanctioned by the
Almighty and who thus is
"anointed" according to the Al-
mighty's designation to carry
out the terms of the office as
ordained by the Almighty. This
referred to a High Priest or a
King.
In the prophetic literature of
the Bible the term was also ap-
plied to a person from whom
the Almighty designated a spe-
cial purpose in history. For ex-
ample Cyrus, the Persian king
who granted permission for the
Jews to rebuild the Holy Tem-
ple, whs alM rel Tiv.l to in iUC '
terminology (Isaiah 45:1).
Thus, some of the prophets
spoke of the deliverance of the
people of Israel to come as be-
ing executed through a des-
cendant of the House of David
who was anointed for kingship
Generally speaking, the A
rismatic figures to cany out
mightv "appoints" certain cha-
ins plans in the human world
who are "anointed" as a symbol
of their designation for that
special purpose. The destruc-
tion of the templv seemed t.
have suspended the existent;
of such charismatic figures.
The eschatological era, whsn
the temple is expected to b-=
restored and universal tnitil
and justice will prevail, is tra
ditkmally expected to see tht
reappearance of such a figure.
GREAT JEWISH PERSONALITIES
Solomon Ibn Gabirol
By RABBI SIMON APRIL
One of the greatest of the
philosophers and poets of the
"Golden Age" was Solomon Ibn
Gabirol, born in Moorish Spain
In about 1020. Of his life little
is known. From his poems we
learn that he was left an orphan.
His loss and his consequent
loneliness were probably the
cause of the intense melancholy
that characterizes his poems. It
was only in loving communion
with the Merciful Father that
he could pour out his desolation
and be comforted.
The "Fountain of Life" was
Ibn Gabirol's contribution to the
Jewish philosophical literature.
It shows unmistakable Jewish
feeling for Jewish tradition and
the culture of the age. It was
translated into Latin, 'Tons Vi-
tae," and was diligently studied
by Christian scholars.
IT IS RATHER as a poet than
as a philosopher that Ibn Ga-
birol is best loved by his fe'-
low Jews. His religious poeni
are written in Hebrew.
Solomon Ibn Gabirol was )
teacher of moials as well as
philosopher and poet. He is also
thought to be the author of the
"Choice of Pearls," a collection
of proverbs and moral reflec-
tions, many of them of Arabic
origin.
Solomon Ibn Gabirol died i.:
1070. Legend relates that ac
Arabic poet, jealous of the Jew -
power of song, slew him anc
buried his body beneath the
roots of a fig tree. The tree bore
blossoms of such surpassing
beauty and fruit so unusuall;-
abundant and so extraordinarih
gweet, that the whole city talk-
ed of the marvel.
And so some of the people
dug under the tree and found
the body of the murdered poer.
His slayer expiated his crime
with his life.
\
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Pehude
The cloud covers the completed tabernacle as the
Israelites stand in the distance.
"Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting,
end the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle"
(Exod. 40.34).
PEKUDE "These are the accounts of the Taber-
nacle, even the Tabernacle of the testimony, as they
were rendered according to the commandment of
Moses, through the service of the Levites, by the hand
of Ithamar, the son of Aaron the priest" (Exodus
38.21). "All the gold that was used for the work was
twenty and nine talents, and seven hundred and thirty
shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary. And the sil-
ver of them that were numbered of the congregation
was a hundred talents, and a thousand seven hundred
and three-score and fifteen shekels" (Exodus 38.24-
25). "And of the blue, and of purple, and scarlet, they
made plaited garments, for ministering in the holy
place" (Exodus 39.1).
With the conclusion of the Tabernacle, Moses
blessed the children of Israel.
On the first day of the first month in the second
year since the departure of the children of Israel from
Egypt the Tabernacle was set up. A cloud covered it
and the glory of God filled the Tabernacle. When the
cloud rose, the children of Israel continued on their
journey through the desert toward the Promised Land.
. iwri < ... .'*... -^tm.


Page 12-B
vJewisti ftvridUani
Friday, March 5, 1976
\



F. S. Steinman
FREDERICK S. STEINMAN
Frederick Scott, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Steinman, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at Temple
Emanu-El.
A seventh-grade student at
Lehrman Day School. Frederick
is a member of the Florida Ma-
rine Aquarium Society and loves
all snorts.
Mr. and Mrs. Steinman will
host the kiddush in Sirkin Hall
following the services, and a
reception in Frederick's honor
at the home of his aunt and
uncle that evening.
Special guests include Fred-
erick's grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. David Kugelman and Mrs.
Gertrude Steinman; his sister,
Sandi; and out-of-towners Mr.
anj Mrs. Ralph Scharf, Mr. and
Mrs. Al Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs.
Danny Kaminsky and Mrs. Beat-
rice Steinman.
ft a
JEFFREY COHEN
AND
MARK GLASER
On Saturday at 10:45 a.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom, Jeffrey,
son of Mrs. Joan Cohen and
Bernard Cohen, and Mark, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Glaser,
will be B'nai Mitzvah.
Chabad Student Center Opens
At South Florida U. in Tampa
Rabbi Abraham Korf. Chabad
Lubavitch regional director, has
announced the opening of a new
branch in the network of Cha-
bad centers throughout Florida,
Chabad House Jewish Student
Center at the University of
South Florida at Tampa.
Close to 3,000 Jewish students
attend the university, and until
the opening of House, there vns'Tjo prosj am
serving the jjudtjjtS' Jewish
nueds. An >.trtsioa'^program is
u nd t way of the Univer-
sity of Tampa.
The Chabad House Jewish
Student Center provides varied
services and programs for the
students including weekend ac-
ti'itv. where Chabad House pro-
vides Shabbos meals free of
charge to approximately 60 stu-
dents. |
A Jewish Fre<> University of-
! "- man" different courses.
Kosher kitchen and housing are
*lso available in the Chabad
House facilities.
In additi n. a n iw Innf a-
tive project was initiated in
ia, Yedid. ChabaJ House,
in eoooeratioo with the Univer-
sity of South Florida and
' ici il -'.vice of Ta noa,
his organized a project in n
J wish stu lents worl h the
!; rly in Tampa an 1 rec
for their efforts ui
the auspices of Chabad Hou
Rabbi Lazar Fif! in -:
tor of the center in Tampa, is
a graduate of the Lubavitch
Rabbinical Seminary In N
York.
Rabbi Korf also said th9t the
movement is planning to onen
a Chabad House-Jewish Student
Center at the Universitv of Mi-
. in Ccal Gables. This
will provide much-nsedsd s -
ices for t** over 4,000 Jewish
students at the university and
ether area colleges.
Students Interested in attend-
ing the University of South
Florida and who want housing
or Kosher men's should contact
Rabbi David Eliczrie at the Cha-
bod House in Miami Beach.
Works of Two Israeli Artists On
Exhibit at Temple Emanu-El
Yosef (Joseph) Ijaky, one of
Israel's outstanding painters,
will appear, with his work, at
the annual Israel Art Show at
Tempi-: Emanu-El. sponsored by
the Sisterhood. The program,
open to the general public, be-
gins with a two-hour preview
narty at 4 p.m. Sunday, March
7.
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Schin-
dler are general chairmen of
the show, which is being coor-
dinated by Ruth (Mrs. Bernard)
Kaplan, Sisterhood past presi-
dent, and Kathy (Mrs. Richard)
Schwartz, president.
The Roumanian-born Ijaky
studied at the Academies of Art
in Bucharest and Budapest. In
1958 he emigrated to Israel,
where his style evolved into
figurative impressionist. He
makes brilliant use of the palet-
te knife, and his sense for the
colors that are Israel is unfor-
gettable.
DURING the Six-Day War,
Ijaky was with the first group
of Israeli Army men running
into the old city oi Jerusalem;
it was his sketches done at this
time that have become famous.
He captured the emotions of
the people at the Wailing Wall
and then went on to capture
Miami Beach's 'First Lady'
To Receive Ben-Gurion Award
Civic and community leader
M s. Anna Brenner Meyers,
known as Miami Beach's "First
Lady," will receive the David
Ben-Gurion Award at a "Night
in Israel" sponsored by the
Crystal House Israel Bonds
Committee on Monday, March
15. at 7:30 p.m. at the Crystal
House.
Dr. Arieh L. Plotkin, Israeli
expert on Middle Eastern Af-
fairs, will give the keynote ad-
dress. Chairman is Zelda Thau,
and cochRirmen are Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Botwinick, Ber-
nini Feldman and Harry Roth-
erf.....
LAWYER, social worker.
n'...ae. t.aciior anj public health
e: pei t, Anna Brenner Meyers
in every edition of
1 Who's Who ',f Women" since
its fi st appearance in 1959.
Agudath Achini
Names Nislick
Its Rabbi
Jacob I. Nislick has
i n im ;' permanent rabbi of
C ,<: eg ition igudath Achim.
1 "of the Greater Mi-
Rabbi deal Association and
! member of the Rab-
:al Council of America,
" bbi Ni H :k :, founder and
past m iid nt of the National
' .:> of Hebrew Day
- -jil Adiinitrators. He is
,-,'s. member of the New York
rd of Rabbis.
Officers of the Orthodox con-
g-egation a-e Philio A. Zelevan-
s'y. pres'dmt; William Ehren-
v.o-t i and Julius Gerber, vice
presidents; Jacob Scall. treas-
urer; Sin mnd Hober, financial
s icretary; Julius Peltz, secre-
tary; Sam Plug, William Shockett
an I Meyer Lebovic, gabni: Paul
Seaman, Harry Karp, Sol Ar-
luck and Harry
presidents.
Berson, past
Nationally Known
Manufacturers...
MNI DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER BLFNDS,
DORWIN'S
1572 WASHINGTON A VE.
532-4061
GHmP OCflliBfl
For Boys & G iris 6-16 *\|
A CAMPING PARADISE IN THE HEART M \
OF THE POLLEN FREE, COOL HILLS jU 1
A LAKES OF OCALA NATIONAL FORESTED
LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA "'S?'
All Land and Water Sports Wattrskiingand Riding Daily
Pro Golf and Tennis Arts and Crafts Sailing, Scuba
Trips by Canoe Horseback Riding Special Teen Program
Reading and Math Clinics Traditional Friday & Sabbath
Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Laws Observed
M.D. It 2 R.N.'s Staff our Modern Infirmary at ALL Times.
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors:
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS ft SHEILA WALDMAN
ERY
'MAN |
Miami Beach Phone: 532-3152 or Write:
P.O. Box 402888, Miami Beach, Florida 33140
_____ SIGN UP NOW
9
She initiated and worked for
the FCC license for Educational
Television (WPBT-TV Channel
2> and for the establishment of
Miami-Dade Junior College.
Mrs. Meyers has been presi-
dent of the Jewish Family Serv-
ice, and a board member of the
Dade County Community Chest.
Welfare Planning Council and
Jewish Home for the Aged.
Among her many honors are
the Class-oom Teacher's Asso-
ciation Award for Outstanding
Service for Quality Education
and Outstanding Woman Citi-
zen of Dade County.
Shi was the only woman in
South Florida to receive the
Jerusa'em Liberation Award on
behalf of the State of Israel.
The honorary chairman cf the
iter Miami Israel Bond Or-
ation Women's Division,
she scei' ed the Eleanor Roose-
velt Humanitiss Award.
the extreme beauty he found
throughout the country. During
the Yom Kippur War, Ijaky was
with the troops on the Golan
Heights, once again painting his
beloved Jerusalem.
His works have been exhibit-
ed abibad and alwavs ga'o.'d
glowine, critical notice. Whe-
ther the focus is marketplacs
and bazaars, lofty minarets with
their spires and arches, quiet
fishing or pastoral scenes,
Ijaky's genius and pure realism
are instantly recognized.
Between the early 1950's and
1973 Ijaky's works were exhi-
bited all over the world in
Copenhagen, Milan, Paris, Lon-
don, Geneva, the West Indies,
Ghana, New York. And his
works can be found in collec-
tions in Tel Aviv, Antwerp, New
York City. Svracuse. Milwau-
kee. Philadelphia and Bogota.
IN 1972 Ijaky won the first
prize at the Festival of Religi-
gious Art. So"i of his work is at
present on exhibit in New York,
and he plans to be in South
America later this year. His
work for the theatre has also
b?en highly praised, especially
his s:t designs for "Light, Live-
ly and Yiddish" at the Belasco
Theatre in New York.
* ii *r
"The Prophets," a portfolio of
12 pencil-signed and number"d
lithoeraohs by Reuven Rubin,
generally considered Israel's
foremost artist, will also be on
display during the show.
The portfolio, which won *"_*
PtltS of Israel Prize in 19~3,
w*8 the last work signed by
Rubin before his death. A co*n-
olete Rubin portfolio has never
b:?n exhibited in Florida, BC-
c i I'ng to Larry Finkelstein,
i"ss manager of the Argo
ry, which is supplying the
art for the show.
OVER 70 SPORTS AMD ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by a
well known Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on our own
nul, >q ^ holetclourse! Ridin0 on seven miles of trails spread
ZrJl ^"o^ br^,h,akin9'v beautiful scenery! A chrldrens
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing,
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery
photography and gymnastics are just some of the many fascinating
activities available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance.
OUR 41 ST YEAR!
unaer Weinberg family direction
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Announcing limited openings in the Miami area.
Contact Director Louis Weinberg
Miami Office 2333 Bricked Ave., Suite 1512
Phone 758-9454 or 858-1190
Separate camps of dist
BTCS^rattStfJBfl&SUr*-
A
mmm^,3SsmsBe-' "*-<-.....
j .


iday, March 5, 1976
*Jewisii Thcrid inn
Page 13-B
Religious Services
MIAMI
" SHALOM CONGREGA-
ION, 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
^Bvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron 1
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. M5
Collint Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadl
Nahmias. 31
----------
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. 32
HI EMES CONGREGATION.
533 tW 19th Ave. Conservative.
Cantor Sol Pakowitz. 2
r ----------------------------
ITH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Ken.
I Dr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
Bmgard Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Clefitz. 3
---------
. BREIRA CONGREGATION.
RS SW n?th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3.a
---------------
DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
fJMrvat v>- Rabbi Sol Landau.
Cantor William Lipson. 4.a
I------- ---------
BBM DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
ajidau Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. 32.A
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimovits.
32-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
t*ve. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can.
tor Ian Alpern. 83
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Warn Traditional. Rabbi Max Sh*.
iro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
del GuV'-rm.in. 5
BETH TORAM CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson. 34
TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
B>Cont.i vative. Rabbi Charles Ru.
bel. a
3'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
unset Drrve. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman g.A
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Oambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36-A
'NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rahbi Victor D. Zwelling. Cantor
Jack Lerner. 36
?S'NAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick. 38
IrtAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 ne 19th St. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171at St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
nase. ,,
OR OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 18th
St. C:.iservative. Rabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
IBRAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former-
ly Bath Tikva). 9075 Sunset Or. Re-
farm. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
CORAl GABIES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
senstat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
Planning the Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute of Religion Centennial Con-
vocation dinner scheduled for Sunday,
March 7, at the Konover Hotel are (from
left) Max Orovitz, dinner chairman How-
ard R. Scharlin, Rabbi Joseph R. Narot,
Chaim H. Friend, David Fleeman and
dinner coordinator A. Harold Murray.
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite ?06. Conoservative. 9
TIRERETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6500
I. #4iami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Salomon Benarroch. 14
------------------
ION TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
eervative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Helfman. 16
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA.
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Da via.
HIAIEAH
l*ERFT" jM:oB TEMPLE. 951 E.
HAve Conservative. 15
NORTH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
22 NE l^1st St. Conservative. Rab-
^B>r r.iniel J. Fingerer. Canter
Yehuda Binyamjn. 35
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 60
---------_-------
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. bl
MIAMI BEACH
iQUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
FORT LAUDExDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor Je-
rome Klement. 43
BETH f: 2-IO0 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho.
dox. Ral-.hi Alexander Gross. 9
I----------------------------------
ETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
BETH lACOB 301 Washingto
Orthodox Rabbi Shmary?'
Swlrsky. Cantor Maurice Ma
BKTH RAPHAEL TEMPLE
JeVfers:n Ave. Conservative.
Elliot winograd. Cantor Saul
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE.
Jhaae Ave. Liberal. Dr. '_eon
Is*. Cantor David Conviser.
n Ave.
iu T.
mches.
19
1545
Rabbi
Breeh.
20
4144
Kron-
21
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 52
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 82
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St.
44-B
Simcha Dinltz (2nd from left), Israel's
Ambassador to the United States,'received
the Israel Histadrut Foundation's Forty
Million Dollar Award at its 10th annual
Economic Conference for Israel. Making
the presentation was Sol C. Chaikin of
New York (center), president of the Inter-
national Ladies Garment Workers Union
and a vice president of the National Com-
mittee for Labor Israel. A $50-million goal
was announced by the Histadrut Foun-
dation at the conclusion of the four-day
conference. Also pictured are (from left)
Rabbi Leon Kronish, national campaign
chairman; Dr. Sol Stein, national pres-
ident; and Moe Levin, Florida chairman
of the Israel Histadrut Foundation.
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi Daviu R.i.ib. Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. 21-A
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
ETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
St Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 8-18 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobaon. 22-B
------------------
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 715 Washington
Awe. Orthodox. Rabbi Melr Masliah
Malamed. 23-A
HAILANOALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
-----------------------------------------
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Unl-
veraity Drive. Conaarvative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. 43
HOUYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
Asaiatant Rabbi Harvey M Rosen-
fold. 45
MANUEL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
lagtan Ave. Conservative. Dr. Irving
Lahrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 4*
1
MREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
^rae Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
S. Oro.s. 25
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston 8L
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Asaociate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
95
JWV Auxiliary 778
To Meet Tuesday
The Executive Committee of
the Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish War Veterans, South
Dade Post No. 778, will meet on
Tuesday, March 9, at 8 p.m. at
the home of Lillian Brown.
Plans will be completed for
the installation scheduled for
Tuesday, March 23, at 8 p.m. at
Temple Beth Am. Evelyn Cohen
and Sylvia Dubbin are in charge
of arrangements.
The Auxiliary recently re-
ceived an Aid-to-Israel Award
from the national office in rec-
ognition of their contribution to
the Tel Hashomer Hospital and
the Sheba Medical Center.
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tar Meyer Engel. 26
BETH AHM TEMPLE. S10 SW 92nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
sen field. 47- B
K*ESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MENORAH TEMPLE. 620 75th St.
Conaarvative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo.
Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47-C
wrte.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nobb Hill Rd. Re-
form. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrama. 64
BTAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
lie Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
I
OHEV SHALOM. 7056 Bonita Dr. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
80
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 9020 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 48
Member of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 574-4003. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 3794553. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1820 NE 153rd St., Nprth Miami
Beach. Fla. 33162. 947-6094. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
5KU L L E R)J IBIy
A\E\R L A N G E R)
.
ANSWERS: Metchnikoff, Ehrlich, Barany, Meyer-
hof, Landsteiner, Warburg, Loewi, Erlanger, Chain, Muller, Reichstein.
1------


Page 16-B
*Jci$t. fkridian
Friday, March 5, 19-5
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SAVE 21
Grade 'AA'
PANTRY RllTTOI1 LIGHTLY
PRIDE UlillVl SALTED
, UWiT ONI PG Pi I AM WITH OTHII PURCHASES Of
t7.ee omoi exciuoing ckjaiettes
[Basic
nBartrain
SAVE 50
Downyflake
FROZEN
Waffles
IIMIT ONI PKG !( ASE WIT
S7 00OIMOIE IXCIU
IIMIT ONI PKG 'LEASE WITH OTHEI PUICMASES Of
LUDING CIGAIEHES V
PANTRY PRIDE MIXED VEGETABLES OR
Sliced
Carrots
0 CUT
WHOLE SUCED
SEETS
4.11
[ CANS WM
FANTIr PPIOI I1GULAI Ol FtlNCH
Cut Green Beans 4 'Van? $1
'AN!lr PUDI tVHOlf Ol SllCfO
White Potatoes 4 SS $1
TM| OlO FAVOtlTI j, .
Heinz Kosher Dills 'St.' 59c
PANinr piidi
Tomato Sauce 6 886*1
PANTPT HIM
Stewed Tomatoes 3 SS $1
riKiir PMM
Prune Juice .o?t?.i69*
GOIDIN CIOWN
Lemon Juice 33 59*
PANTIY PIIDI ^_ _
Fruit Cocktail 3 SS $1
CONTABfNA
Tomato Sauce 3 '^199*
PAIAOItl tllAWIIM. **,
Preserves 2 89e
CONIAOINA
f>OZ. $t
CANS a
Tomato Paste...........4
ORCHARD HILLS CHERRY. APPLE, BLUEBERRY
Frozen m $ -
Fruit Pies I: 1
ANTir rim iiozin _
Coffee Lightener 'X23c
SAIA HI IIOZIN ^_ _
Pound Cake______J%SX89<
BORDEN WHITE OR COLORED CHEESE FOOD
American AQ(
Singles V^SJo
Whipping Cream 3 53c
no-suN
Orange Juice..............4 SSS $1
AIL HAVOIS
Les Cal Yogurt 4S%99*
PANTIT PIIDI
Cream Cheese i% 49*
mis. rnuirs coin oil
Margarine -JBC AS .69*
MAKSTOM* STAT H 5 HAP I
Cottage Cheese____^59*
The Pontry Pride Woman is on oware
shopper. She knows you get..
Unbeatable
^Bargains
^very TOay!
... of the store where
high quality and
I low price come together.
'RICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY. MARCH 6
VT ALL PANTRY PRIDES
IN DADE COUNTY.
GET MORE
riTTlillTTeli FOR YOUR
F!tii;.C!it! DOLLAR AT
I S"S J PANTRY PRIDE
Your Basic Bargain Store\
CUSTOfcllt MAT PulCHASt AIL TmI STAItlO ITIMS WITH ONI IT 00 OtOIl Or r
IICtlfOlNG C'CAIITTIS
-
USDA
CHOICE
BEEF LOIN
WHOLE OR
HALF
17 TO 20 LB.
AVERAGE
SLICED TO
ORDER
BEEF LOIN
STRIP
STEAK
LB.*1"
$129
*149
Dm4AM USDA CHO
DOTTum 6lfous
Round Roast LB
USDA CHOICI III' .
Eye Round Roast i. sl
USDA CHOICI 111'
Rump Roast..............................* *139
USOA CMOICI SMALL IND SONIIISS mm
Beef Rib Steak $1"
WW ZIAIAND IIOZIN WMOll
Lamb Shoulder-JSELs* 69*
NIW ZIAIAND IIOZIN SHOUIOII SLAM
Lamb Chops 89*
USOA CHOICI IIII -^ ^
Chuck Blade Roast 89*
USDA CMOICI LAtGI IND _
Beef Rib Roast $179
USDA CHOICI nil
Chuck Blade Steak .. 99*
SlICIO _
Beef Liver

FIOIIOA Ol
SHIPPED
FIESH ICED
WHOll
LB.
Premium
Fryers
GIADI A QUICK IIOZIN
Cornish Hens 79*
HA. SHIPPID PIIMIUM PUSH
Fryer Quarters u 59*
HA, SHIPPID PIIMIUM IIISH
r ryer Parts...ri%. jf 5f
PANTRY PRIDE
All Meat
Franks 'S
LAND O HOST 1LICID a|| ,..,,
Smoked Meats 2 ,?',-. 95'
OSCAI MATH WIINIIS Ol
Beef Franks
PILlSiUIT CHUM Ol PLAIN
III I
.....pG. a
$129
Wiener Wrap.............2 .49*
FLO-SUN
Grapefruit
Juice OUART
** CONT.
AMERICAN KOSHER MIDGET
Salami or c
Bologna
PANTRY PRIDE COUNTRY SQUIRE
White
Bread
20-OZ.
LOAVES
fttosic
tin i
SAVE 30
Pure Cane
Sugar
PANTRY
PRIDE
-LB.
BAG'
LIMIT ONI SAC PHASE WITH OTHII PUICHASES Of
S7.00 Ol MOIE. EXCLUDING CIGAIETTES
SAVE 48
ON TWO CANS
[*Basic
[bargain.
Pantry Pride
ip^ Tomatoes
E9^1DELICIOUS |
[lOMArOESJ FlAVOR
16-OZ.
CAN
LIMIT : CANS PHASE WITH OTHEI PURCHASES
' OF S7 00 Ol MOIt EXCLUDING CIGAIETTES
[^asic
6Barjrain
SAVE
in Fresh
^Asparagus
FIRST OF
THE SEASON! LB.
FRESH AND TENDET
Western
Broccoli
39
BUNCH
U.S. NO.I INOIAN IIVII WHiTI .A|G, a c-
Grapefruit.......asasLV m 1
U.S. NO. I (PICK TOUI OWN)
Yellow Onions .. 19*
HIAlTHPUl AND NUTIITIOUS ZUCCHINI am.
Green Squash______u. 25
TANOT PIAVOI PUIITO IKAN _
Pineapples 49
NUTIITIOUS 4 MllCIOUi (PICK TOUI OWN) _
Carolina Yams.......__4 us. 1
Orange Juice................m!38 89*
I AUTIFUl PHHODINDION AND POTHOS
Live Plants
o*** WMCM
TOTIM POU..............POT
$Q89
Garden Fresh
Florida Carrots
2i 19c
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Black Forest
Liverwurst
Man whiii miai
Chicken Roll___
Old Milwaukee
Ol
CABLING BIACR
12-OZ. i
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BOTTLES
Wl IESSIVE TNI IIGHT TO LIMIT OUANTITIII. NOMi SOLD TO MAIM,


# # # Hadassah National Treasurer
^Jewish Floricban to speak at Gift* b...,.
Miami, Florida Friday, March 5, 1976
Section C
Lehrman to Receive Award At
Bar-llan U. Anniversary Dinner
Over 200 Miami Chapter of
Hadassah members and their
guests will attend a special
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El and one of
American Jewry's foremost
statesmen, will receive the Pin-
chas Churgin Award of Bar-
llan University at the national
dinner celebrating the 20th an-
niversary of the founding of the
only American-chartered uni-
versity in Israel.
Announcement of Rabbi Lehr-
man's selection and acceptance
was made by Dr. Joseph H.
I.ookstein. chancellor of Bar-
llan University and national
president of the Synagogue
Council of America.
Dr. Lehrman, himself a past
president of the Synagogue
Council umbrella agency of
Orthodox. Conservative and Re-
form Judaism in the United
States has been in the fore-
front of the causes of Jewish
education and the State of Is-
rael since assuming the pulpit
of Temple Emanu-El 32 years
ago.
HE WILL share honors March
21 at the Fontainebleau Hotel
at a black-tie dinner with Wil-
liam Silverstein. a Miami Beach
philanthropist and hotel owner,
who will receive the Bar-llan
University Medal of Honor. Sil-
verstein, an officer of Temple
Emanu-El, also is vice president
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy and a director of Bar-
Ilan.
Mayor Harold Rosen of Mi-
ami Beach is chairman and Mrs.
Haniet Green, president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida and of the Pio-
neer Women Council for South
Florida, is cochairman.
Another highlight of the din-
ner will be the presentation by
Dr. Lookstsin of Honorary Fel-
lowships to three veteran Flor-
ida members of the United
States Congress. The three
champions of Israel to be hon-
ored are Representatives Claude
P. Ponner. Dante B. Fascell and
William Lehman.
AMBASSADOR Chaim Her-
zog, Israel's chief envoy to the
United Nations and former head
of Israeli military intelligence,
will be the guest speaker. The
law school at Bar-llan is named
in memory of his late brother,
Yaacov Herzog, who was Is-
ra Is Ambassador to Canada.
All proceeds of the dinner will
"i to the hw school, said Mayor
Rosen, a Miami Beach attorney.
Th Pinchas Churgin Award
is named in memory of the late
founder of Bar-llan, which now
has more than 7,000 students
and provides thousands of
teachers, lawyers, sociologists,
psychologists and businessmen
for Israel. Dr. Churgin, a na-
tional president of the Religious
Zionists of America and dean
of Yeshiva University, worked
closely with Dr. Lookstein to
establish Bar-llan.
Dr. Lehrman is past national
chairman of the Rabbinic Cabi-
net of the United Jewish Ap-
peal and chairman of the board
of governors of the Israel Bonds
Organization for Greater Miami.
HE TWICE served as the gen-
eral chairman of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
bined Jewish Appeal the only
rabbi in Dade County ever to
head the community's central
fund-raising campaign.
A oast president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami, he is national vice presi-
dent of Religion in American
Life and has won the Silver
Medallion for Brotherhood,
highest award of the National
Conference of Christians and
J"WS.
FRIEDA LEWIS
gifts brunch on Sunday, March
7, at the Doral on the Ocean.
According to Mrs. Harold Issen-
berg, fund-raising vice presi-
dent, the special gift contribu-
tors to the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center at
Ein Karem and the Mt. Scopus
Hospital will be honored.
Mrs. Harvey Friedman, presi-
dent of the Miami Chapter, has
announced that the guest speak-
er for the day is Frieda (Mrs.
Edward) Lewis, national treas-
urer of Hadassah. Mrs. Lewis is
a past national vice president
and also served as cochairwom-
an of the 59th and 60th national
Hadassah conventions.
A deputy member of the Zion-
ist General Council of the World
Zionist Organization and a mem-
ber of the national board of the
American Zionist Federation,
Mrs. Lewis is chairwoman of
the management of National
Hadassah.
Throughout the years Mrs.
Lewis has been an activating
force for the welfare of civic,
educational and Zionist endeav-
ors in her home community of
Great Neck, N.Y. A former edu-
cator, guidance counselor and
administrator, she has brought
distinction |to Hadassah platr
forms throughout the United
Statss.
Mrs. Michael Bliss and Mrs.
Frank Ehrenreich are cochair-
ing the special gifts brunch.
Flagler Accepts
Phonebill Payment
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association, in conjunction
with Southern Bell, last October
opened a payment office at
Flagler Federal's Miami Beach
branch. 1050 Alton Road.
Telephone bills can be paid
at any teller's window, and a
receipt is issued immediately.
This service is available to all
telephone customers.
Harry Deitch, manager of
Flagler Federal's Miami Beach
branch, said "We hope event-
ually to have a special window
where all utility bills can be
paid. From the success of this
program, it is evident that the
consumer appreciates the con-
venience of neighborhood pay-
ment locations."
Purim-a feast for freedom
by ESTHER FEJNBEK
At Purtn we celebrate a* freedom horn Hanm MM of this joyous ocwto.Untos<^U*^rteitotoe*te^toti^}&***hW
The makers of HELlMAWrSVBEST FOODS' M MurontuW th^ you to jfou recipe and hope yhwipprVii
SALMON HOPS D'OEUVRES
1 can (7 3/4 oil salmon, drained, cleaned
and naked
1 Cup HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
Oash white peppw
Pinch mace (optional)
2 egg whites, stiffly beaten
16 sices white bread, crusts removed and
toasted
Paprika
In medium bowl stir together salmon, Real
Mayonnaise, pepper and mace. Fold salmon mix-
ture into egg whites. Spread mixture onto bread
slices. Sprinkle with paprika. Broil 4 inches-hem
source ol heat 2 to 3 minutes or until Hghtly
browned Cut each slice into 4 triangles; Mm
immediately Makes 64 hors d oeuvres.
Submitted by:
Mrs Benson R. Sundheim. New York. NY
CHICK PEA SALAD
lean (20 oi) chick peas
I cup chopped celery
1/2 cup chopped green pepper
1/4 cup chopped pimiento
1/2 teaspoon salt
Oash pepper
3/4 cup HELLMANNS/BEST F000S
Real Mayonnaise
3 tablespoons prepared horseradish
Lettuce
In medium size bowl toss together chick peas,
celery, green pepper, pimiento, salt and pepper.
Stir together Real Mayonnaise and horseradish;
add to chick peas mixture and toss lightly Cover
andchiii Serve on lettuce Makes 4 to 6 servings
Submitted by
Mrs Gordon Marcus. Philadelphia, PA
WHOLE WHEAT MUFFINS
2 cups unstYted whole wheat noyr
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 CUP HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 cup buttermilk
Grease 12 (21/2x11/4-inch) muffin cups. Stir
together Hour, baking powder and salt. Add Real
Mayonnaise to Hour mixture and mix well. Stir in
buttermilk until batter is just moistened. (Batter
will be lumpy |Turn into prepared pan. filling each
cup 2/3 lull. Bake in 400F oven 20 minutes.
Makes 12 muffins.
Submitted by:
HuthSchwarti.NewYork.NY
OARLCWtEUD FILLING
1/2 cup margarine, softened
1/3 CUP HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 clove garlic, crushed
Oash paprika
French bread
in small bowl stir together margarine, Real
Mayonnaise, garlic and paprika. Slice bread par
tialiy through, making 12 cuts. Spread approxi-
mately 1 tablespoon lining between each slice.
Bake in 350F oven until bread is heated through.
Submitted by
Sandi Stein. Atlanta, CA
MM-.
6 hard cooked egos
1 cup HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
liar (4 oi) domestic caviar
6 anchovy fillets, finery chopped
2 tablespoons grated onion
2 tablespoons lemon jute
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
1/4 cup cold water
Put eggs through food mill Stir together eggs.
Real Mayonnaise, caviar, anchovies, onion, lemon
juice and Worcestershire sauce. In small sauce-
pan sprinkle gelatin over water, heat over low
beat, stirring constantly, until gelatin dissolves.
Stir into egg mixture. Turn into 4-eup mold. Chili
until firm. Unmoll Garnish as desired. Use as
spread on crackers. Makes 4 cups.
StibmMtedby
MarjerieL. Small.
69 Elmwood Drive. LMngston. NJ
M
"tasl 0* I he Rock** the nann Is HELLMANN S.
Wesl its BEST FOODS By nthei name. HI 1M
same lint Rial Miiotmaut.
CARROT FRUIT SALAD
1 can (8 oz) crushed pineapple, drained
1 cup coarsely shredded carrot
1/4 cup shredded coconut
1 orange, peeled and sectioned
1/3 CUP HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
Lettuce
Chopped nuts
to large bowl gentry toss together pineapple,
carrot, coconut, orange and Real Mayonnaise.
Cover and chill Serve on bed of lettuce, garnish
with nuts. Makes 4 servings.
Submitted by:
Mrs. Louis J. Robinson, University City, MO
PLEASE send us jrow recipes
We'd be delighted il you'd share more ol your
favorite Kosher mayonnaise recipes with us We'll
print your name and send you $10.00 lor any recipe
we use in our advertising Just send your special
uses lor HERMANN'S or BEST FOODS Mayon-
naise to me:
Esther Feinberg, Consumer Service Dept.
Best Foods Oiv. ol CPC Int'l Inc.
Englewood Cliffs. NJ 07632.
Be sure to include your name and address. All
recipes become the property of Best Foods, and
may be adjusted or edited before publication.
"AND AU THE KING'S SERVANTS THAT WEKW THE KING'S GATE
SSre^w^
CHAP
,.-*.'.-.
9mrnmt*im**e*

p.

Page 2-C
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Friday, March 5, 1976

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Inverrary Runner-Up Among
Histadrut Tourney Pros
J. C. Snead, runner-up in this
week's Jackie Gleason Tourna-
ment Players Championship at
Inverrary and winner of last
month's San Diego Open, is
among 30 touring pros sched-
uled to tee off Monday morn-
ing. March 8, in the third an-
nual $15,000 Histadrut Pro-Am
Golf Tournament at Sky Lake
Country Club in North Miami
Beach.
The one-day tourney, which
benefits students of all back-
grounds in Israel through the
Histadrut Scholarship Fund, was
originally scheduled for March
1, the day following the Gleason-
TPC event. Rain delayed action
at Inverrary, forcing a one-
week postponement of the His-
tadrul-Sky Lake pro-am.
OTHER PROS who will play
in Monday's 18-hole tourney are
Mark Hayes and Lee Elder, who
finished fourth and fifth at In-
verrary, Bruce Devlin, Larry
Ziegler, Dave Hill, Tommy
Aaron, Ray Floyd, Bob Dickson,
Gary Groh. Fred Marti, Howard
Twirty., Bob Gilder, Art Wall,
Don Iverson, Ken Still, Jerry
McGee, Bob Eastwood, Bill Ro-
gers, Barry Jaeckel and Wally
Armstrong.
Some 120 amateurs have paid
a tax-deductible entrance fee,
and four amateurs will be pair-
ed with each touring pro, with
teams selected Saturday eve-
ning at a dinner hosted by Sky
Lake Country Club.
Several amateur spots are
now available due to the one-
week postponement. Gallery
tickets are available. For in-
formation, contact the Sky Lake
pro shop or the Histadrut of-
fice.

James Conlon has been ap-
pointed principal guest conduc-
tor for the 1976-77 Greater Mi-
ami Philharmonic concert sea-
son, it was announced by Dale
Heapps, general manager,
ft tf tr
The Small Business Adminis-
tration and SCORE (Service
Corps of Retired Executives)
will conduct their monthly con-
ference for small businessmen
on Tuesday, March 9, 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m., in Room 208 of the
Federal Office Building, 51 SW
1st Ave.
ft ft ft
The annual Miracle Ball held
in South Florida to benefit St.
Jude's Hospital in Memphis,
will star the hospital's founder,
Dannv Thomas, Paul Anka and
The Regeneration March 20 at
the Fontainebleau Hotel. Ball
chairman is Tony Abraham.
ft ft ft
Representative Elaine Gordon
(D.-Miami) has been appointed
bv Speaker Don Tucker to the
Intergovernmental Relations
Committee of the National Con-
ference of State Legislatures.
ft ft ft
ft ft ft
The Dade Association of Dia-
betes Educators will hold free
classes for diabetics and their
families at Diabetes Learning
Centers in Dade County.
Classes begin March 9 and
will be repeated the second and
third weeks of each month from
7 to 9 pjn. at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital, the Fred Archer
Building at Miami-Dade Com-
munity College, Baptist Hospi-
tal and Palmetto General Hos-
pital. Daytime classes will be
held at Veteran's Hospital on
NW 16th St.
ft ft ft
The Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce has elected the fol-
lowing to three-year terms as
governors: Ted Cohen, Ted Co-
hen Associates; Steve Cypen,
attorney; Larry Karel, Karel
Exposition Management; Ed
Noakes, Eastern Airlines, and
Paul Whitebrook, Merrill Lynch.
Frank Payak of National Air-
lines, chairman of the tellers
committee, made the election
report.
ft ft ft
The University of Miami
School of Music will hold audi-
tions on Saturday. March 13, at
9 a.m. for students wishin? to
apply for admission and for
those seeking scholarship as-
sistance for the fall term.
The session will be at the
School of Music complex, main
campus. All interested students
should contact the school at
284-2433 for an appointment.
The audition-interviews will be
conducted by faculty members.
Baumritter is Chairman Of
Einstein College Dinner
Reestablishing a tradition be-
gun when the Albert Einstein
College of Medicine of Yeshiva
throoist who is active in many
humanitarian projects in the
United States and in Israel. A
founder of Einstein College,
where he and his family estab-
lished the Baumritter Kidney
Dialvsis Center, he is also a
founder of Mt. Sinai Hospital
and a leader of the United Jew-
ish Appeal.
The Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, the first medical
school in 'he United States un-
dr Jew'sh ausnices. is open to
all qualified students regardless
of race or religion.
Pioneer Women
Kadimah Chapter will hold a
regular meeting on Tuesday,
March 9, at noon at Beth Ko-
desh Congregation.
Chapter president Tillie (Mrs.
Fred) Sandtei; has said that Mrs.
Dorothy Goldman will review
"My Life" by Golda Meir.
ft ft ft
Pioneer Women Club No., 1
will honor Msyshie Friedberg
of Miami Beach on his 94th
birthday on March 9, at a noon
luncheon in the Sabra Restau-
rant.
The event will be called a
"third Bar Mitzvah," even
though the celebration tradi-
tionally is observed on a man's
96th birthdav.
Mrs. Sophie Kranrz, president
of the chapter, said Friedberg,
a 70-year veteran of the Labor
Zionist Movement, will be hon-
ored for "a lifetime of leader-
ship on behalf of Zionism, the
State of Israel and the Jewish
people."
Friedberg is a member of the
board of directors of the Flor-
ida Committee for Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity, and also is an active
worker on behalf of State of
Israel Bonds, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity and the Labor Zionist
Alliance.
He works daily as a volunteer
in the Israel Bonds office, cov-
ers literally hundreds of cards
for the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund
drive and helped the Pioneer
Women staae their Golden Jubi-
lee Convention in Miami Beach
last October.
ft ft ft
Sharon Chapter will meet in
thi civic room of.the 100 Lin-
coln Road Building. Miami
Beach, at noon on Wednesday,
March 10.
The same chapter will hold a
card oartv and luncheon on
Monday. March 15, at noon in ,
the building's card room. A do- ,
nation to the Pioneer Women
Child Rescue Fund for Israel is ;
required, and the meeting is
open to the public.
ft ft ft
Beba Idelson Chapter will ob-
serve Purim at a meeting on
March 10 at noon in the Wash-
ington Federal building, 1133
Normandy Dr.
Mrs. Esther Weinstein will
read the Megillah, the Scroll of
Esther that describes the his-
torical basis of the holiday. She
will t>ortray Queen Esther in a
Purim mini-Dlav, and Purim re-
freshments will be served.
The entertainment orogram
includes Hilda Zuker, Paul Ya-
nofsky and his mandolin, and
other musicians. Mrs. Fannie
Gibson, president, said the
event is free and open to the
public.
ft ft ft
Leon Siegel lecturer and
Zionist.leader, will sneak on the
Middle East situation at a Pu-
rim nartv of the Kinneret Chap-
ter on Sun-lay, Mirch 14. at 1
d."1. at Washington Federal
auditorium on Normandy Dr.
A Puvim nhv. written and
directed by Tobi Gruber. will
'.ight an entertainment oro*
and refreshments will be
served. The meeting is free and
o^en to the Dublic.
American Mizrachi Women
THEODORE BAUMRITTTER
University opened in 1955, the
Florida Friends of the- Medical
College ara sponsoring a recep-
tion and Buffet dinner on be-
half of the college on Thursday;
March 18, at 5:30 in the Cotil-
lion Room f the Eden .Roc, Hot-
tel.
Chairman of: Bv mu* i
Theodore Baumritter, a phHan-
Miami Beach Chapter presi-
dent Rachel Katz has announced
a regular meeting on Tuesday,
March 9. at Washington Fed-
eral, 1214 Washington Ave.. at
1 p.m.
ft ft ft
Shalom Chapter has called all
members to a meeting on March
9 at 1 pjn. in the club room of
100 Lincoln Rd. Mrs. Krieger is
president. Dora Hecriev has
written a Purim play, which she
will also.produce.
k/ itt, tk/.. ..
0dtMpter president Freda
Oster has scheduled-a meeting
for Wednesday. March 10. at 8
p.m. at Beth Israel Synagogue.
Sunny Taylor will discuss
"Plants and Lawm." Slides and
a film will be shown.
Purim Seudah on Purim dav.
Program chairman Gertrude
EsOerman.
ft ft ft
Aviva-Kinneret Chapter has
invited all members- te~ a pre-
Pttrriw luncheMk, on Monday,
March 15, at 1 p.m. at First
federal'on-SW27M* Aw*v Hoe--
dium, Fanny April and Sophie
Schraeger.
Mrs. Green Is Cochairing
March 21 Bar-Ilan Dinner
of
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
the South Florida Zionist
Federation, has been named co-
chairman of the Bar-Ilan Urri-
versity national 20th anniver-
sary dinner, to be held at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, March 21.
Acceptance by Mrs. Green,
who is president of the Pioneer
Women Council of South Flor-
ida, was announced here this
week by Dr. Joseph H. Look-
stein, chancellor of Bar-Ilan,
just prior to his departure for
Israel.
Mrs. Green will serve with
Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach, dinner chairman and co-
chairman of the Florida com-
mittee for Bar-Ilan University.
Mrs. Green, former national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation and a mem-
ber of the national board of the
Pioneer Women, serves on the
American and Florida boards of
directors of Bar-Ilan. Sh is
too leader of the Labor Zionist
division of State of Israel Bonds
and a former vice president of
the women's division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Miami Beach
Democratic Club
The next ooan-to-thj-aublic
meeting of the Democratic Club
of Miami Beach will be on
Thursdav. March 11, at the Ria
Plaza Hotel at 8:15.
Results to date of the Presi-
dential primaries will be dis-
cussed, and there will be a
question and answer period.
Moderator is club president Col.
Wally Gluck. There will be
guest speakers and entertain-
ment.

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Friday, March 5. 1976
fJenist) fhriaf/air.
Page 3-C
Leaders of the Lehrman Day School Scho-
larship Ball, scheduled for April 3, met
at a planning reception hosted by Mr. and
Mrs. Carol Greenberg. At left are Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph (Jerry) Gold. The foursome at right
includes Mr. and Mrs. William Bard and
Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Oper. Mr. and Mrs.
Lawrence M. Schantz are general chair-
men of the black-tie event, which helps
provide scholarship assistance to more
than half of the students at the South's
largest Conservative Hebrew Day School.
Two Miamians to Participate In
JWB Convention in New Orleans
Merton Gettis and Myron Be-
rezin, both of Miami, will have
prominent roles in workshops
at the JWB 1976 Biennial Con-
vention in New Orleans, March
24 to 28.
JWB is the Association of
Jewish Community Centers, YM
and YWHAs and Camps in the
United States and Canada.
Gettis will be chairman of a
workshop on "Putting It To-
gether Developing a Coor-
dinated Approach to Member-
ship Campaigns."
Berezin will be the resource
->erson at a workshop on "The
Time Is Now Programs to
Meet the Changing Needs of
Older Adults."
Beth Solomon
Sisterhood
Temple Beth Solomon Sister-
hood will hold its regularly
scheduled meeting on Wednes-
day, March 10, at 12:30 p.m. at
the temple.
President Edythe Jiser ad-
vises that Cantor Yardeini will
offer contorial selections in
honor of the Purim festival.

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Page 4-C
vJewtetncrkliari
Friday, March 5, 1976

Molly Picon will appear with Geula Gill at the Theatre
of the Performing Arts on Saturday, March 21, at 8:30
p m The show is sponsored by the South Dade Hebrew
Academy. Molly Picon is well known for her roles m
the American and Yiddish theatres, and has appeared
in films and on television. After World War II she enter-
tained thousmds of homeless Jews in DP camps and
did fund-raising tours to benefit Israel.
NCC J Award-Winners
At Temple Israel
The three men who were
honored recently by the Nation-
al Conference of Christians and
Jews will share the pulpit dur-
ing services \h\< evening at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
Dr. Joseph R. Narot, senior
rabbi of Temple Israel. Garth
Reeves, editor of the Miami
Times, and Manolo Reyes, WTVJ
Latin news editor, will discuss
"Brotherhood As We See It"
The trio received the NCCJ's
annual Brotherhood Award as
representatives of Greater Mi-
ami's Jewish, Protestant and
Catholic communities.
Rabbi Narot will be the Green-
field Lecture Series speaker this
Sunday morning at 10. He will
discuss "Ironies and Paradoxes
in Jewish Teaching and Belief.
A Purim Party At the CAJE
The Community Hebrew Ul-
: pan program has scheduled a
Bicentennial Purim party for
Wednesday, March 10, at 7:30
p.m. at the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, Gwen Wein-
berger, CAJE president an-
nounced.
More than 200 participants
in the Ulpan Centers at Tem-
ples Beth Sholom, Emanu-El, Si-
nai, Beth Am, and Beth David
will attend.
The highlight of the program
will be presentations by a num-
ber of different classes focus-
ing on the Purim holiday and
units of instruction covered in
the classroom.
A HUMOROUS modern Me-
gillah will be read, relating the
events of today to those of the
Purim story of the past. Com-
munity singing will be led by
Israeli entertainer Sholomo
Geva.
A Knowledge of Purim quiz
will be conducted in easy He-
brew with students from the
various centers competing in a
Purim College Bowl. The tra-
ditional holiday hamantashen as
well as felafel will be served.
Greetings will be extended
by Abraham J. Gittelson, asso-
ciate director, CAJE; Levi So-
shuk, educational consultant for
the Ulpan program; Rita Gold.
Ulpan administrator; Shula Ben
David, educational supervisor,
and Nily Falic, educational con-
sultant of the Jewish National
Fund.
COSPONSORING organiza
tions of the Community Hebrew
Ulpan Program, together with
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, are the American
Zionist Federation, headed by
Harriet Greene, the Israel
Aliyah office, Eliezer Kroll, di-
rector, and the department of
education and culture of the
World Zionist Organization, di-
rected by Dr. Abraham Gannes.
The Jewish National Fund is
also joining in the sponsorship
of the Purim party.
The Purim party is a conclu-
sion to the Ulpan winter term.
The spring semester begins
March 29.
Herald Writer
At Beth Raphael
John McDermott, political
writer of the Miami Herald, will
analyze the Primaries and the
outcome on election day, as
the guest speaker at the 8 p.m.
Oneg Shabbat at Temple Beth
Raphael.
South Florida Council of Pioneer Women
held a State of Israel Bond luncheon on
February 23 at the Eden Roc Hotel. More
than 400 women representing South Flor-
ida Council chapters were on hand when
Yaakov Morris (center), spokesman of
Israel's Permanent Mission to the United
Nations, presented the David Ben-Gurion
Award to Clara (Mrs. Sidney) /
Luncheon chairman Mrs. Milton (;
(right), president of the South Florida
Council, was the recipient of the State of
Israel Masada Award at last year's Bond-
With-Israel Brunch.
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I
H
^r-Tr-^V^
.-
Friday, March 5, 1976
vJetvist) fhrMiar
Page 5-C
BB Young Men's Lodge Sponsoring
Free Glaucoma and Vision Tests
Mrs. Sherman Kaplan (2nd from left),
past president of the Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood, is the honoree at their 36th
anniversary luncheon, Wednesday, March
17, at noon in the temple's Friedland Ball-
room. The luncheon will also honor past
presidents, and Mrs. Richard Schwarz,
president, announced that Temple Play-
ers director Trixie Levin has prepared an
original Purim play, "It Happened in
Shushan." Serving on the committee are
the mesdames Harold Kurte (right),
chairman; Bruce Weissman, cochairman;
Irving Cypen (left), honorary patron
chairman; Ted Hollo, honorary luncheon
advisor; Leonard Abramson and Herbert
Shapiro, chairmen of patrons; Albert Da-
vidson (2nd from right), door prizes; Rob-
ert Frank, decorations; Paul Steinberg,
hostesses; Norman Schwarz, door control,
Bernard Kaplan, refreshments; Jerome
Uffner, printing, and Peter F. Heller, pub-
licity.
The young men's B'nai B'rith
lode in formation in the South
Miami-Kendall area will sponsor
its first community service proj-
ect a fr^e glaucoma screen-
ing for adults and vision-acuity
testing for pre-school children
on Sunday, March 7, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Temple
Beth Am.
With the cooperation of the
Florida Society for the Preven-
tion of Blindness and the Tem-
ple Beth Am Brotherhood, the
glaucoma screening and pre-
school vision test is free and
available to the public, accord-
ing to Bob Biederman, the
lodge's vice president for com-
munity and volunteer services.
The young men's lodge, form-
ed last fall, has 75 paid mem-
bers and last month received its
' provisional charter from the
* B'nai B'rith District Five board
of governors.
Glaucoma is a serious eye
disease which strikes an esti-
mated one out of every SO per-
sons over 35 years old. It is a
leading cause of blindness in
^ adults, and more than 72,500
J Floridians are victims of glau-
coma, although half of them are
unaware of it.
The glaucoma test is quick
and painless. Persons found to
have elevated eye tension in
the screening process will be
urged to contact an *ye special-
ist for further evaluation.
Heart Institute
To Honor Staff
The board of directors of Mi-
ami Heart Institute will host the
17th annual dinner dance hon-
oring the professional staff on
Saturday, March 13, at the Doral
Country Club. Invitations and
arrangements are being handled
by Robert S. Summers^adminis-
trator.
The Institute will recognize
four individuals for distinguish-
er service: Warren Jacobs, M.D.,
Robert E. Bauer, M.D., Jonne L.
Hic^s, R.N., and Roz Gambel,
L.P.N.
Special tribute will be paid
bv the board of directors to
Mrs. Claire Mendel who will be
honored as founder and presi-
dent of the Auxiliary from 1960-
75.
COMCARE is Nursing ^re
CALL ANYTIME
751-6280
O-.v si iff of reliable homamakars, com-
panions, nurses aides, R.N.'s and LPN's
are available hourly, daily and weekly.
They are professionally supervised, bond-
ed and screened.
All of Comcare's employees are specially
trained to ease the burden of chronic
illness.
WE OFFER 24 HOUR SERVICE ft ROFESSIONAl'WWtViSIOM
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NIGH I CLUB IN JAFFA
GRATUITIES TO GUIOES
4 DRIVERS
=1 ATLAS TRAVEL BUREAU
Benjamin I. Shulman (right), chairman of the board of
Intercontinental Bank of Miami Beach, received DA-
MAN, Inc.'s Humanitarian Award for his generous sup-
port and continued encouragement of DAMAN's work
in providing Drugs and Medical Aid to the Needy. Mak-
ing the presentation was Miami Beach Councilman Phil-
ip Sahl, president of DAMAN, Inc.
SABBATH and FESTIVALS
NEW MEMBER TOKENS
WEDDINGS. ENGAGEMENTS,
HOUSE GIFTS
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OFFCE: 444-6185
BLOSSOM: 661-9993 LILLIAN: 238-5980
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South Florida Young Leaders met with Yigal Allon (cen-
ter) the Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister
of Israel at a South Florida Israel Bond New Leader-
ship meeting on Feb. 28 at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Re-
ceiving a first-hand off-the-record report on conditions
in Israel from General Allon were Israeli actress Dahlia
Lavi- Ilan Cohen, codirector, New Leadership, State of
Israel Bonds; Ronald Krongold, chairman, New Leader-
ship Division of the Greater Miami Israel Bond Organi-
zation; and Arthur KaiL South Broward board of gov-
ernors, cochairman of Young Leadership.
KIDDUSH
STEMWARE
by NISSAN ENGEL
Beautifully designed Kiddush
glasses in goldleal dishwasher
tested, with a 5 oz capacity, six
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SAVE-Order 6 set carton
3350 (36 glasses) Inclusive
send to
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One Gregory Avenue
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Page 6-C
vJmisti ftcridiar
Friday, March 5, 1975
\
i Israeli Artist's Etchings
At Lowe-Levinson Gallery
The works of Israeli artist
Amram-Egbi will be exhibited
at the Lowe-Levinson Art Gal-
lery of Temple Beth Sholom of
Greater Miami. Judy Drucker,
Beth Sholom's cultural director,
has announced that the 60 co-
lored etchings will be on view
at 9:30, after services this eve-
nmg.
Amram-Egbi studied at Tel
Hai Institute. Avni Institute,
and the School of Advanced
Painting all in Israel and
also at the Brooklyn Museum
School of Art and the Pratt
Graphics Center in New York.
His works have been in group
exhibitions and one-man shows
in Israel, South America and
throughout the United States,
and he is the recipient of sev-
eral awards.
Amram-Egbi says, "There is
no art, only artists, who possess
a talent which enables them to
balance shapes and color in an
harmonious manner."
The exhibition will be held
until March 18, and gallery
hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday; 9:30-10,
Friday evening; and 9 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sun-
day.
Stein I ooks at the Jewish World
This Evening at Temple Eniami-El
Jacob Stein, immediate past
national president of the United
Synagogue of America, will
speak on "A Look at the Jew-
ish World" this evening during
the service which begins at
8:30 at Temple Emanu-El.
Stein assumed the presidency
of the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations in 1972, and played
a decisive role in the relaxa-
tion of some of the restrictions
on the emigration of Soviet
Jews.
Stein and Dr. Irving Lehrman
worked closely together when
the Miami Beach rabbi served
for two years as national pres-
ident of the Synagogue Council,
a major member of the Confer-
ence of Presidents. They have
visited Israel together and
worked closely on behalf of
such causes as the Synagogue
Council, Israel Bonds and the
United Jewish Appeal.
The two men are helping to
coordinate a major effort for
increased tourism to Israel
through the offices of the Is-
rael Government Tourist Office
and El Al Israel Airlines.
Chabad Plans
Purim Banquet
Chabad House will hold a
Purim banquet at the Sea Gull
Hotel on March 16 at 6 p.m.
The evening will include a cos-
tume contest by the children,
and Chassidic song and dance.
At 9- p.m. the Lubavitcher
Rebbe, Rabbi M. M. Schneer-
son, will be heard hve from
New York via the Lubavitch
Communications System. He
will speak about Purim and its
lesson for all of the Jewish na-
tion.
Philharmonic
Fund-liaising
Is Under Way
Larry D. Horner, president-
elect of the Greater Miami Phil-
harmonic Society and campaign
chairman for the 1975-76 sus-
taining-fund drive, has an-
nounced a $400,000 goal for a
six-week campaign which ends
on April 2.
Four fund-raising committees
have been established to
heighten community support.
The business and industry com-
mittee is headed by O. Leslie
Nell, executive vice president
of Southeast Banking Corpora-
tion. Emil J. Gould, president
of the Philharmonic Society and
owner of Housing Engineers.
Inc., heads the board of direc-
tors committee, while Harry
Nathanson, longtime community
leader, heads the snecial gifts
committee. The community com-
mittee is headed by William M.
Klein, vice president of Florida
Power and Light.
According to Horner, season
subscriptions are up and single
ticket sales are increasing with
each concert, bringing the Phil-
harmonic closer to its goal of
deriving 50 percent of all op-
erating funds from ticket sales,
typical of other philharmonic
orchestras in the United States.
rVee
Glaucoma Tests
The Florida Society for the
Prevention of Blindness, in co-
operation with Metropolitan
Dade County, the Lions Clubs
and the Ceta VI program, is
sponsoring free glaucoma tests
at various Miami and Miami
Beach locations during March.
For further information, con-
tact 446-8928 or 448-7787.
Jackson, Ford Score
In Massachusetts
Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jack-
son scored strong triumphs
Tuesday night in the Democrat-
ic Presidential primary in Mass-
achusetts and in the party cau-
cuses in his home state of Wash-
ington to propel him into next
week's Florida primary with all-
important momentum.
Jackson garnered 30 dele-
gates in the Bay State voting,
as against 21 for Rep. Morris
Udall, 20 for Gov. George Wal-
lace and 16 for former Gov.
Jimmy Carter.
A preliminary survey by
NBC News of predominantly
Jewish precincts showed Jack-
son getting more than 40 per-
cent of the vote there, a margin
of better than four to one over
Udall and Carter, his closest
rivals.
President Gerald Ford routed
former Gov. Ronald Reagan in
Massachusetts, 62 to 36 percent,
but the Californian had cam-
paigned little there. In Vermont,
Reagan gained 18 percent
vote against the Presider/
a token write-in effort.
Outstanding JWV Commander
To Be Honored in June
Harold C. Uhr, president of
the Commanders' Club of the
Jewish War Veterans, Depart-
ment of Florida, announces that
an award will be presented to
the outstanding commander of
the Department at the annual
department convention in June.
Samuel Franzblau has been
appointed chairman of the
award committee, and each post
will be asked to submit 1
ter describing their co-
der's work.
A representative of the '
manders' Club will atten.!
installation at all department
posts.
Releases for Publication
TO ALL PUBLIC-RELATIONS OFFICES, PUBLICITY CHAIR-
MEN, AND CORRESPONDENTS:
Copy submitted to The Jewish Floridian for publication
should be typed in npper and lower case (not in all capitals),
double-spaced, on one side only of the paper.
ss
I
I
I
Attention Hi-Rise Dwellers!!
THE GOLD COAST PASSOVER FUND
I Needs Volunteers
We need 1 or 2 persons in each hi-rise building to serve as a committee person to
accept contributions to the Gold Coast Passover Fund which will be placed under their doors
* without any solicitation by the committee.
We DO NOT NEED people to solicit funds!
The Gold Coast Passover Fund will distribute these funds to the thousands of needy
Jews in South Miami Beach so they will be able to purchase traditional Passover foods.
For more information, contact:
MORRIS (MIKE) FOX, PRESIDENT
TEL. 864-5939
GOLD COAST PASSOVER FUND
(TEMPORARY HEADQUARTERS)
LANDOW YESHIVA CENTER
1140 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
TEL. 673-5664, EXT. 16
( This ad paid for by Morris Fox, Pres J
Officers of the Gold Coast Passover prepari nc Passnvor (ma ~,i, i a,
Jews in South Miami Beach. ^ fd packae8 last year for needy



Friday, March 5, 1976
^Jcniif fkridfiar'
Pace 7-C
Wltats
By norma barach
VEGETABLE CASSEROLE
H-';i'- a thought for a one-dish MfMMe meal
either by itselt or with the addition of chunks of meat to make
a a more complete meal.
1 lb. zucchini, thinly sliced mar-orsm to taste
V4 lb. long yellow squash. sal;
thinly sliced pepper
8 to 10 gm. potatoes (whole) 1 9-07. packag? frozen
8 gm. white onions (whole) nixed vegetables
1 Kb. can stewed tomatoes
Grease- a baking pan or casserole. Add all ingredients
except frozen vegetables. Bake covered at 350 degrees for 'i
hour. Add frozen vegetables and bake 20 hHRM more. Dn-
ccver and bake an additional five minutes to brown. Chunks
of beef nay be served on top, making it a complete meal.
CHEESEY RED SNAPPER
I am always loo! inp for new and interesting ways to pre-
pare fish. 1 did a little experimenting and came up with this
recipe, which makes a tasy meal served with spaghetti
and salad.
1 4-oz. car, mushrooms,
drained
],4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. lemon juice
2 lbs. red snanper
(in two slices)
1 cup sour cream
1 oz. cheddar cheese grated
1 large onion sliced
Grease a baking pan. put in fish and top with onions and
mushrooms. Mix the sour cream, cheese, salt and lemon juice
to make a sauce and pour over fish and vegetables. Place in
350-degree preheated oven for 45 minutes. Serves 4-5.
TUNA-TATO CASSEROLE
Food prices remain high although tuna is still one of the
most economical of foods. For those concerned about economy
in the kitchen, here is a fine main dish made with any type
of canned tunafish.
1 12H-QZ. can tuna (drained) 1
1 10%-or. can cream of 1
potato soup
% cup corn flakes crumhs
Mix tuna, soup, egg, corn flakes crumbs and onion flakes.
Put into a greased casserole. Top with grated muenster cheese.
Bake at 350 degrees about 40 minutes or until done.
LEFTOVER TUHKEY'TN GRAVY
Who can serve turkey without having leftovers? IVe never
heard of it being done. As a result, one is always faced with
the prospect of "dressing up" the turkey leftovers to make
them seem like a fresh meal.
tsp. onion flakes
egg
lb. muenster cheese
(grated)
3 cups leftover turkey
cut in chunks
Vi cup diced green pepper
%k cup chopped onion
1 clove minced garlic
lMi tblsps. flour
1 Mb. can stewed tomatoes
2 tsns. Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp. salt
3 tblsps. margarine
Melt margarine in medium saucepan. Add green pepper,
onion and minced garlic and sautee about five minutes or
until tender. Stir in flour and cook for one minute until
smooth. Blend in tomatoes, salt and Worcestershire sauce.
Cook and stir until mixture thickens. Add turkey chunks, mix
gently and simmer covered for 10 minutes, stirring occasion-
ally. Serve over fluffy rice, mashed potatoes or toast.
MARINATED FLANK STEAK
Always on the lookout for a new way to prepare meat. I
tried this method of cooking kosher flank steak, which also
mighl be known to your butcher as "the top of the flanken."
It is a piece of meat connected to the rib steak. I found it to
be tender and flavorful and served it with rice and a tossed
salad.
1 lb. kosher flank steak 1 tblsp. vinegar
it. CUp SOy sauce M cup onion flakes (soaked
1 tblsn. b'-own sugar in cold water until soft)
Mix soy sauce, vinegar, brown sugar and drained onion
flakes. Pour over meat and marinate five hours. Turn meat
several times. Bioil on both sides. Slice in thin slices against
the gram of the meat. Serves three adults or two adults and
two children.
OATMEAL SQUARES
With cooler weather, baking at home becomes more pop-
ular. I have here a suggestion for a nourishing treat for adults
as well as children.
1 stick margarine 1 baking soda
cup white sugar ""* tsP salt
cup brown sugar ^
tsp. vanilla ^
large egg J*
cups flour %
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream margarine, sugar.
eggs and vanilla. Add flour, baking soda, salt and oatmeal. Mix.
Then blend in nuts and chips. Grease a 13x9-inch pan. Spread
dough into pan evenly. Bake for 15 minutes. Cool and cut into
squares.

W
cup oatmeal
cup chopped nuts
cup chocolate chips
cup butterscotch chips
March 9 Is the Second
Intrafaith Learning Day
The second in the Synagogue
en of Hade County's u
of Intrafaith Learning Experi-
ences is set for Tuesdav, March
9. at 9:30 a.m. at Tem"lJ Beth
Am. The announcement of the
event was made by Synagogue
Women chairman Mrs. Irving
Lehrman.
Belle Lehrman. specially ap-
pointed to the post by Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Wom-
en's Division president Marilyn
S:nith. describes the day as "a
survey of Reform Judaism."
This is the second of three "In-
trafaith Expel iences." the first
of which, on January 29 at Beth
Torah Congregation, focused on
Conservative Judaism.
On this Tuesday there will
be a tour of Beth Am's facilities
and musical interludes by Beth
Am student groups. With Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard present as a
resource person, a panel of lay-
women '.'.ill discuss the history.
education styles, re-
iifrfous pi and home ob-
oeiated with Re
.liiii.ii.-i.
ncpiMMMiattoes of other Re-
form synagogues will participate
in the program as well, with
both Sholon Sisterhood presi-
dent Shirley Miller offering an
invocation.
The Intrafaith Experiences
have been created by a com-
mittee of Conservative, Reform
and Orthodox synagogue wom-
en in an effort to further under-
standing among followers of the
three interpretations of Juda-
ism.
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Page 8-C
+Jewist>norXflar
Friday, March 5, 1976
\
Temple Beth Am celebrated
its 20th anniversary as a Tem-
ple and Rabbi Herbert M. Baum-
gard's 25th year in the rabbinate
at a gala weekend. Rabbi Baum-
gard is the founding spiritual
leader of the Temple which now
has over 1,300 families as mem-
bers.
The Sunday night anniversary
program was held in the Sanc-
tuary and Herman Feldman was
the program chairman with Bar-
ton Udell his co-chairman. The
evening was emotionally charg-
ed with a unique slide presenta-
tion program featured and each
of the congregation's past presi-
dents explaining the slides
taken during his tenure in of-
fice.
MANY DIGNITARIES attend-
ed representing the civic, poli-
tical, educational ana leligious
groups of our community Guest
speakers were Rev. Canon Theo-
dore Gibson of the Christ Espi-
copal Church and a member of
the Miami City Commission, and
Rabbi Dr. Paul Steinberg, dean
of the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion of
New York.
A surprise presentation was
made to Rabbi Baumgard by
Dr. Ivan Hoy, chairman of the
Department of Religion at the
University of Miami.
A number of children, joined
together in a group called "The
Troubadours," presented a mu-
sical interlude under the direc-
tion of Harriet Potlock, and
when they completed their
songs they nresentated a plaque
to Rabbi Baumgard "in appre-
ciation of all his efforts on be-
Half of the Temple's youth."
NONE OF the Baumgard fami-
ly was forgotton: wife Selma for
her many years as volunteer
director of the choir, plus un-
counted hours doing many
chores; and children Shira, Da-
niel and Jonathan, for their
many contributions on behalf of
the members and Temple. Sel-
ma's long-sleeved, softly tail-
ored gown was in green and
white checks.
Among the members who at-
tended the program were Evelyn
and Ben Clein, with their daugh-
ter, Patty. Evelyn wore a navy
pants suit with a white and
navy sweater. Anita and Joe
Molien were also among quests,
she in a brown and beige pants
ensemble.
OmOi ed shades of brown were
in the Drint dress worn by Mi-
riam (Mrs. Byron) Chrekas. We
also saw Marilyn and Milton
Rapoort and Barbara and How-
ard Katzen. Temple president,
Bernard Goodman, was tnere
with his Evelyn.
Rhoda (Mrs. David) Welt
wore a stunning light beige silk
gabardine suit tnat she had
made in Hong Kong. Iris (Dr.
Daniel) Franco was in a foliage
green and white print long-
sieeied dress, lua (Mis. Gene)
Dynner chose a peach-colored
pants enemble.
AT THE reception we caught
a glimpse of Reva and Irving
Wexler. She was in a burgundy-
colored, long-sleeved dress.
Joan Schwartzman, who has
worked faithfully at the Temple
for the uost 18 years, and was
thanked by Rabbi Baumgard for
all her efforts, chose a two-
pi^ce silk jersey featuring a
watercolor brush stroke print in
transitional soring colors.
Marilyn (Mrs. Joe) Solomon
topped her beige pants with a
long-sleeved pull-over sweater
of the same color. Gloria (Mrs.
Leonard) Luria wore a beauti-
fully tailored dark brown suit.
Esther (Mrs. Alan) Kessler's
print dress looked like a Liberty
of London with small florals on
a d shall) Feuer chose a yellow,
bUck and white geometric silk
nrint. Pat (Mrs. Joe) Altschul-
ler was in tones and shades of
brown, and Audrey (Mrs. Ray)
Roth selected a green and white
pants ensemble.
Muriel (Mrs. Phil) Revitz top-
ped hr loosely-woven ivory
knit with a coat in a slightly
deenr shade. Adellc (Mrs.
Fred) Stone was in a slate blue
ultra-suede, two-piece ensem-
ble. Irene (Mrs. BUI) Baros
chose a mauve silk jersey, and
Pauline (Mrs. Al) Lewis was in
browns and beige topped with
a suede and leather jacket.
B'nai B'rith Contributing
To Guatemalan Relief
WASHINGTON (JTA)
B'nai B'rith is marshalling
funds, supplies and medical vo-
lunteers for victims of the Gua-
temala earthquakes. Ricardo
Holzer of Panama City, chair-
man of the B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional Council, said that Guate-
mala's small Jewish community
has reported no deaths "but
widespread loss of material pos-
sessions."
Max Trachtenberg, president
of tne B'nai B'rith Lodge in
Guatemala City, advised B'nai
B'rith headquarters here that
the quakes had severely dam-
aged Jewish communal institu-
tions, some of them beyond re-
pair.
TRACHTENBERG appealed
for large canvas tents and other
supplies. Twenty tents, contri-
buted by a Philadelphia sport-
ing goods store, have been air-
shipped, Holzer said.
Holzer, enroute to Guatemala
City, will present government
relief officials with a $1,000 con-
tribution from B'nai B'rith "as
the start of a campaign for re-
lief funds among our members."
A campaign for Spanish-
speaking physicians to volun-
teer their services in Guatemala
has been organized by Perry
Shertz, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.,
chairman of B'nai B'rith's Dis-
aster Relief Committee, and
Irving I. Gerson, of Metairie,
La., who has headed B'nai B'rith
hurricane relief drives in the
past.
GERSON has also organized
a team of ham radio operators
to maintain contacts with Gua-
temala.
Meanwhile, the Central Jew-
ish Committee in Mexico City
is organizing a campaign to col-
lect food and clothing for the
earthquake victims. The Guate-
malan Embassy in Mexico City
has already expressed thanks to
the local Jewish community.
M. B. Hadissah
Renanah Group will have
their annual Youth Aliyah
luncheon, Monday, March 8, at
noon. A champagne (dairy)
meal will be served at the home
of Mrs. Evelyn Zemel in Miami
Beach.
it it it
Halm Yassky Group will spon-
sor a luncheon and card party
on Wednesday, March 10, at
noon at Byron Hall.
. it it
Royal Maccabees Group will
hola a Purim Party and meeting
on Monday. March 15, at 7 p.m.
at the Financial Federal Audi-
torium. 755 Washington Ave.
Entertainment. Clara Landy is
president.
A -tt it
Natanya Group will hold a
regular meeting on Tuesday,
March 16 at 12:30 p.m. at Wins-
ton Towers 300. Jean Temkin
will present "To Hadassah with
Love" and there will be a mu-
sical interlude honoring the
Bicentennial. Presentation of
new slate of officers.
it it -it
Plaza 800 Group will sponsor
a Youth Alivah luncheon on
Wednesday, March 17. at noon
at the Deauville Hotel.
it it it
Forte Towers Group will hold
it annu") Youth Aliyah lunch-
eon on March 17, at noon at the
Doral Hotel Starlight Room.
Chairperson is Claire Berlowitz.
A musical nrogram. "The Me-
lodies," will be siven bv IsabDll
He!l-T, Sadye Padden an 1 Jen
Rosenberg. Geraldine Rice is
president.
i: i? it
Lincoln G^oun will hold its
annuil Youth Aliyah luncheon
on Thu'sdav. March 18. at noon
at the Carillon Hotel. President
is Mrs. Nellie Weisman.
it it it
Plaza 800 Group will have
their regular meeting in their
Social Hall, 800 West Ave. on
Mondav. March 8, at 12:15 p.m. j
A Youth Activities (Hashachar) ,
film, nirrated by Barbara Sny-
der, will be shown.
ft it it
Bav Harbor Group will hold
its regular meeting on March 8,
at 12:30 p.m. at the Washington
Federal Building, 1132 Kane
Concourse, Bay Harbor Island.
Guest sneaker will be Mr. Ros-
enthal. manager of Washington
Federal Savings and Loan.
President is Mrs. Nathan Schei-
ner.
Surfside
Women's League
The Surfside Women's League
will host a Meet the Candidates
program on Monday, March 8,
at 8 p.m. at Town Hall. The
voting public is urged to attend.
In honor of Surfside-Canada
Week, the League is sponsoring
a musical gala featuring Patri-
cia Gayle on Wednesday, March
10, at 2 p.m. at Community
Center Auditorium. The public
is welcome.
The League's monthly card
party is scheduled for Thurs-
day. March 18, at 12:30 p.m. at
Town Hall.
Roberta Slater and Ira Silver
Are Married in Morristoivn
MRS. IRA SILVER
Mr. and Mrs. Max Silver gave
a reception at Kings Bay Yacht
and Country Club on Feb. 22 to
celebrate the marriage of their
son, Ira, to Roberta Slater,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Slater.
The couple were married in
Morristown, N.J., on Feb. 1.
Mrs. Silver is a graduate of
the University of Maryland, and
Mr. Silver is in his senior year
at University of Miami Law
School.
The couple will make their
home in Miami.
Mitfiir
by
and his
Boca Raton Hotel
and Club Orchestra
"Weddings &
Bar Mitzvahs
our Specialty"
651-2303
RONEY PARTY SHOPPE
BOUTIQUES GIFTS STATIONERY
Specializing in Greeting Cards Unusual Large Selection of
Passover Greeting Cards and Holiday Gifts Attractively Priced
' BROWSE AROUND" FOR HUNDREDS OF GIFT HEMS
All REASONABLY PR'CED
2345 Collins Ave. Roney Plaza Arcade 534 3713
Russell Si over Candies
Hallmark Cards Holiday Cookies from Bahlsen
B0NDID ERUIT SHIPPERS
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI
137 N.E. 19th STREET
Proudly Presnts
THE ART OF GABRIEL GLICKMAN
OF LENINGRAD
"The Solzhenhsyn of Russian Artists" Valery Panov
SPIRITED OUT OF THE SOVIET UNION WHERE THIS
BRAVE DISSIDENT JEW IS OPPRESSED
-O-
Original Oils & lithographs tor Sale
Proceeds to Assist Soviet Jewry
-o-
"lt takes courage and stamina to defy Soviet government
policy of converting an artist into an ideological errand-
boy. Gabriel Glickman has defied official shackles" -
PAVEL LITVINOV
EXHIBITION OPEN FRIDAY, MARCH 5
AND MAY BE SEEN DAILY UNTIL MARCH 19
imagine

Weddinjs by L Allen Becker Photographer*
Mj" *1T*00
or Mltzvqhf Even Lex
Portraits From $50-00
175
E. Allen Becker
26 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Hem and tfeita partratta 532-2351
We restore
old ohototraphi.


'Friday, February 27, 1976
+Jcnisti ncrkttan
Page 9-C
; ****
Principals oj the American Friends of
the Hebrew U. conclave included (above,
from left) Morris Messing of Palm Beach,
Florida slate chairman; Mrs. Viola Char-
cowsky, founder of the Hebrew Univer-
sity; Prof. Shlomo Avnieri, new Direc-
tor General of the Israel Foreign Minis-
try and Dean of the Hebrew U. faculty
of social sciences; Mrs. Lillian Kronish,
recipient of the Torch of Learning
Award; and Seymour Fishman, executive
vice president of the American Friends.
Chatting with Prof. Avnieri (below, left),
who was making his first public appear-
ance since his confirmation as Director
General, are Herbert Buchwald, presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Chapter of
the American Friends; Howard Scharlin,
conference chairman; and Dr. Leon
Kronish, rec&ient of the Judah L. Mag-
nes Award at the Miami Beach dinner.
SOUTH DADE HEBREW ACADEMY
PRESENTS
The Incomparable
MOLLY PICON
PLUS
One Night Only
The Exciting Voice of
i
j
GEULAGILL
The MIAMI BEACH
THEATRE OF PERFORMING ARTS
I SAT., MARCH 27th 1976. 8:30 P.M.
DONATION $4.50, $5.50. S6.50. $7.50
Tickets Available at Jordan Marsh
Downtown Store or 163rd St. Store N.M.B.
Also at Arie Kaduri Agency 235 Lincoln Rd.
MB. Suite 211. Entrance on James Ave.
For Group Rates, Information & Reservations
Call, 532-9662 5321851 or 861 3981 '
The presidents of the Dade and Broward
Chapters of the Women's League for Is-
rael met at the home of Betty Dreier na-
tional honorary vice president, to plan a
campaign on behalf of the National Voca-
tional and Rehabilitation Training Center
in Natanya. The Israeli government is
matching funds with the League, which
n ri,,rk received the large copper
Mayor Stephen C. Clark cew hich tne dies
sculptor's models $^SZi Bicentennial
were made for the official Greater M on
medal, the nations first *^**% Courthouse.
Feb. 11 in ceremonies at ^^ J.SA, the Bi-
Sylvan Meyer, chairman "d" yMiami area, and
centennial Commission or ^P^tlented medal num-
Mrs. Norma Hunt president ^^ launcned the
ber one to the Mayor The Prfea" Tticipating banks
sale of the limited edition ^^^Zr of it public
and savings and loan associations as a nonp
will work with the Ministries of labor and
Welfare on this project for the handi-
capped and blind. Above (from left) are
Celia Engelmeycr, Margate; Rose Koch,
Avcntura; Delia Slater, Florida; Shirley
Xathanson, Shalom; Muriel Lunden,
Woodlands; and Fran Resnick, Lincoln
Miami Beach.
SEDER SERVICE
In response to the many
inquiries received
CANTOR
BEN DICKSON
is pleased to announce
he will conduct the
Seder Service Wednesday
Evening, April 14th at
THE CARIUON HOTEL
6801 COLUNS AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH
service.


Pase 10-C
"=*
Jenist fh/rUdft/aun
Friday, March 5, 1976
Meeting with Sen. Henry M. "Scoop" Jack-
son and Mrs. Helen Jackson to help plan
Sunday morning's talk at Temple Emanu-
e Grea'er Miami community leaders
Morris Dread (left), chairman of the
American Savings and Loan As-
sociation, and former Bay Harbor Islands
Mayor Shepard Broad (right). The Broads
have worked closely with Sen. Jackson for
many years in support of Israel and So-
viet Jewry.
I
Mrs. Zucker to Install
JWV Auxiliaries* Officers
CEIL ZUCKER
Ceil Zucker, president of the
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Auxiliaries lor the Department
of Florida, will act as installing
officer for the following groups:
Point East Auxiliary No.
698: Monday, March 8, at 8
p.m.;
Hialeah-Miami Springs No.
fSU: Sunday, March 14, at 8
p.m.
South Dade No. 778: Tues-
day, March 23, at 8 p.m. at Tem-
ple Beth Am;
-Murray Solomon No. 243:
Thursday, March 25, at 8 p.m.
Mrs. Zucker will attend a
Purim party sponsored by the
Department of Florida at the
Miami VA Hospital on Monday,
March 15; at 7:36" .pan. She is
also helping to coordinate the
jjmiBVBi tar the National Con-
vention to be held in Miami
Beach in August.
r8 Across, tO Dowrr-i
y
by Irv Brechner
I ViMish shemevdrk
3 the largest weekly news
pape' m N J is
The News
5 Yiddish vaneti or bod
8 most leverem prayer
9 on St Patrick s day
they make them green Isingi
II Kr No Eh
12 affectionate sultix
13 TmM s choice in Fiddler
15 means the night before'
in Hebrew
18 10 down wrote music
tor tms movie
20 total of numbers in trite
of fhrs Du77le
21 triumphant exclamation
? in Yiddish it's ains
25 producer of 18 across
27 m Yiddish it s chosh
ever mentsh
author of up l he Down
Staircase is his granddaughter
(2wds,
2 Israeli U N Ambassador (2 wds;
4 rt swallowed Joneh
5 one of Tevye s daughters
6 form of to be
7 popular diet sort drink
10 wrote theme for classic
movie about Jews escaping
to Palestine
u Yiddish lot he
16 Yiddish for what
17 Yiddish for to drag or puK"
19 in Yiddish n s aroyf
20 in Vsh it s shmeikei'
22 klainikeit (big deal;
23 m Yiddish it s eiz
24 m Yiddish it's oder
26 in Yiddish Its karten
This puizle may not be reproduced without written permission
of the author

ANSWERS ON PAGE 12-C
Club
The David Pinski Club Oneg
Shabbos at 7:30 this evening at
the Ida Fisher School cafeteria
will feature a talk by "For-
ward" correspondent L. Lasa-
vin on "Jews in the Confed-
erate States."
Hilda Zucker and Paul Ya-
novsky will present a group "f
Yiddish and Hebrew songs, and
Max Brooks will read from
Yiddish classics.
WJC Prexy Sends Greetings
To Soviet Jewy* Conference
Carver Announces
Senate Candidacy
In announcing his candidacy
for United States Senator from
Florida, Jerry Carver indicated
that there was a need to re-
verse the position that the Fed-
eral government has been tak-
ing with respect to the "trickle-
down" concept.
Carver denounced the pro-
posa'. to grant $6.5 billion to the
railroads to make them 'live
while millions of people are
still unemployed, and the grant
of millions of 'dollars to help
Lockheed and other huge cor-
porations Bunrhre-vvhen ser'manF
"social proWems" exist.
These moneys cocfld be' used,
Carver believes, to mutt Ma*.
young people who, he feels.
sense' that this industrial na-
tion has become almost' com-
pteteiy^ money-oncnteo.
A school teacher and social
worker for twenty years, Carver
is now a salesman- for Keyes
Realty Co
Carver was finance coordi-
nator of George McGovern's
campaign for the Presidency,
Robert L. Shevin's campaign for
Florida attorney general, and
Ira Dubitsky's campaign for Cir-
cuit Court judge.
Temple Menorah
Purim Party
On Sunday, March 14, from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Temple Me-
norah will present a Purim car-
nival.
The Parents of Menorah has
engaged more professional
booths, children's rides and
games than ever before. Prizes
and snacks will spice up the
bargain-hunting at the flea mar-
ket bazaar, where a wide var-
iety of locally donated new
merchandise will be sold at un-
believable prices.
David Pinski
FOR SALE
ABOVE GROUND CRYPTS
in Mt. Nebo's Garden
Mausoleum. Information
Mrs. Miller 756-7231
PARTS (JTA) Dr. Na-
tmm C.oldmann, president of
th? World Jewish Congress, sent
a message to Josef Almogi,
chai"ian of the World Zionist
Organization Executive and
chairman of the Second World
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
evpressing his best wishes for
the success of the gathering.
Goldmann stated that although
he personally would not be able
to attend, the WJC would be
represented by a large delega-
tion headed by Philip M. Klutz-
nick, chairman of the WJC gov-
erning board.
"THE CONFERENCE meets
at a crucial period of world his-
sory, when great efforts are be-
ing made everywhere to reduce
tensions between the nations of
the world," Goldmann said in
his message.
"One essential element in
these efforts is the realization
of the need for universal respect
'or human rights and human
dignity. Regrettably, this spirit
has not yet expressed itself in
the treatment of the Jewish
people at larg; and particularly
of the Jewish minority of the
Soviet Union.
"Thev still do not enjoy the
right of free emigration and the
right of free pursuit of their
religious life and national cul-
ture.
"1 am confident that a states-
manlike conduct of the Brussels
conference, under your chair-
manship, will help to drew at-
tention to these problems and
place them high on the agenda
of current world concern."
THE IMPORTANT of the
conftrence, Goldmann contin-
ued, was already apparent from
the campaigns conducted
against it.
"I hooe that nothing will al-
low us to have the unity of the
Jewish people disturbed in our
unceasing endeavors for the
better life of our brethren in the
USSR who represent nearly
one-fourth of the Jewish peo-
ple." he stated.
Israel Sends Aid to Quake Victims
TETERBORO, N.J. (JTA)
Three thousand pounds of
medical supplies were loaded
aboard an Israel-built Arava
Stol aircraft- which left from
here for earthquake stricken
Guatemala.
The material was marked
"From the People of Israel- to
the People of Guatemala" and
"From the People of Israel Ahv-
craft Industries to the People
of Guatemala.
IN ORDER to speed delivery
to the stricken areas of Guate-
mala, the medical sjeear area*
purchased in the United States
by LAI and loaded aboard the
' Arava Stol -which was scheduled
to be delivered to Guatemala
this month.
At a ceremony at the Teter-
boro Airport, Victor Riveria, a
representative of the Guatema-
lan Consul in New York, said
that "Israel and yoar company
(IAI) have clearly demonstrated
the affection for my country."
ANOTHER Arava Stol was
scheduled to arrive in the New
York area this week with 3.000
pounds of powdered milk that
IAI has donated for Guatemala.
Last week, an Israeli Boeing
707 flew to Guatemala from Is-
rael with supplies donated by
Israelis. The three planes will
have carried a total of 46,000
pounds of relief supplies do-
nated by Israel and IAI.
PAN CARD GAME
wciuws dick or :
320 cards and
compute instructions
SPECIAL OUttY $5.00 FOR
$ compute sets
REGULAR $6.0* Pit SIT
Mailed fra* anywhere in
Continental U.S.A.
GREAT GIFTS
Send check for $S.O0 to:
TOLCH PRODUCTS
90 1 Washington Avo. S.
Minneapolis MN 55415
Red Cross
Needs Drivers
March is American Red Cross
Month, and the organization
is seeking volunteers to drive
the Red Cross station wagons
that pick up and deliver needy,
sick senior citizens who have
no other way to get to doctors,
hospitals or clinics.
If vou are interested, and can
give four hours one day a week,
CHl] 576-4600 and ask for Mort
Weinberger or Carole Springer.
ELEGANT 54 UNITS
$800,000 $100,000 DOWN
DAVID Z. S0K0L, Viet Prtt.
Commercial Safes Manager
Keyes Co. Realtors 371*3592
100 N. Biscayne Blvd.
STEAL THIS 19,340 SQ.FT.
Office, showroom, studio, ware-
house hldg. Was priced 1700,000
NOW S475.000$35,000 cash over
S440.000 1st mortgage at B3i\
with S4L. Downtown Hollywood
location. Call
DAVID Z. SOKOL, Vice Pros.
Commercial Sales Manager
THE KEYES CO. Realtors
100 N. BUcayne Blvd. 371-35*2
HEARING TESTS SET FOR
NORTH DADE and
SOUTH BROWARD AREA
Electronic Hearing Tests will
be given free at the MIAMI
GARDENS HEARING CENTER,
1708-A Miami Gardens
Drive, Skylake Mall/West
North Miami Beach
on Monday thru Friday.
TED VURRARO, Licensed Con.
sultant will be in the office to per-
form the test. For anyone who
has trouble hearing or understand-
ing is welcome to have a test us-
ing Hie latest electronic equipment
to determine his or her particular
Iom.
Everyone should have a herring
test at least once a year if there is
any trouble at all hearing clearly.
Even people now wearing a hear-
ing aid or those who have been
told nothing could be done for them
should have a hearing test and find
out about the lateat methods of
hearing corrections.
THE FREE HEARING TE8T
WILL BE GIVEN MONDAY
THRU FRIDAY NEXT WEEK
AT TH OFFICE LISTED
BELOW.
CALL THE NUMBER BELOW
AND ARRANGE FOR AN
APPOINTMENT OR DROP IN
AT YOUR CONVENIENCE.
MIAMI GARDENS
HEARING AID CENTER
1708-A MIAMI
GARDENS DRIVE
SKYLAKE MALL/WEST
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Ph.: 940-7208


riday, March 5, 1976
+Jewist> IThridHnr
Page 11-C
Iban: Hebrew Academy's 'Voice'
Former Israel Foreign Minis-
ter Abba Eban is the narrator
of a new film on the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy which
will be released this spring, it
was announced this week by
Judge Norman Ciment, presi-
dent of the Miami Beach school.
Eban, former Israeli Ambas-
sador to the United States and
the United Nations, first visited
the Hebrew Academy 25 years
ago when he came here to help
launch the State of Israel drive
for South Florida. He and Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross, princi-
pal of the Miami Beach school,
ha< e maintained a close rela-
tionship since.
Judge Ciment said the Tech-
nicolor film will be shown
throughout Florida and the
South to "better acquaint the
communities of our entire re-
gion with this focal point of
Jewish education in the South-
eastern United States."
Interviews with Hebrew
Academy alumni who have as-
sumed leadership roles in the
business, religious and civic
worlds will be featured. Doc-
tors, dentists, lawyers, engi-
neers, businessmen and rabbis
will reflect upon their experi-
ences at the school, a benefi-
ciary agency of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation and its
CJA-IEF campaign.
Former students will discuss
such topics as moving to Israel,
studying at various Israeli uni-
versities and yeshivot, and car-
rying on their heritage in adult
life.
All of the Hebrew Academy's
facilities, from nursery school
and kindergarten through sen-
ior high, are being filmed.
Such activities as music, art,
drama, speech, junior and sen-
ior choirs and athletics will be
shown together with studies in
Hebrew, English and the ma-
jor departments of general and
Jewish studies.
Students visiting old age
homes, Shabbat and holiday
programs for the sick, tours of
facilities in South Miami Beach
will also be included in the
film, the most ambitious under-
taking in the Hebrew Acad-
emy's community-relations and
public-relations programs in its
28-year history.
Chilean Government Aiding
In Search for Silberman
Photographed while looking over the script of a color
film about the Greater Miami Hebrew Academy which
will be narrated by former Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba Eban (center) are Judge Norman Ciment and Rab-
bi Alexander S. Cross (right). Eban, who first visited
the Hebrew Academy 25 years ago, when he was Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S., agreed to become "The Voice
of the Hebrew Academy" for the film, which is being
produced here for use throughout the South.
'Kissinger Lied'-Jackson
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
Chilean Embassy official has
claimed that David Silberman
was abducted by known persons
from a jail in Antofagasta in
northern Chile and that the
Chilean government is cooperat-
ing with the human rights com-
mission of the Organization of
American States (OAS) in an in-
vestigation of his disappearance
18 months ago.
Rafael Otero, Counsellor at
the Embassy, made that state-
ment to the Jewish Telegraphic
Ag"ncy in response to an in-
quiry as to the fate of the 35-
year-okl Chilean-Jewish mining
engineer.
SILBERMAN served in the
regime of th;- late President
Salvador Allende and was sen-
tenced bv the Chilean military
junta to 13 years' imprisonment
for alleged treason after Allende
was deposed in the 1974 coup.
Otero's statement was be-
liever) to have been the first to
mention abduction in the case
in which the Chilean eovern-
ment has provided virtually no
information despite nersistent
inauiries from Silberman's
father and sister who live in
Israel.
HIS WIFE and three children
remained in Chile. The Embas-
sy official told the JTA that "the
government began an investiga-
tion and round no evidence
where he (Silberman) is and
what happened."
He said the human rights
commission of the OAS was con-
ducting its own investigation
"with the cooperation of the
Chilean government" and that
the Chilean Minister of Justice,
Miguel Schweitzer was "making
WASHINGTON(JTA)Sen.
Henry M. Jackson (D.-Wash.)
charged here that Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger "lied to
us" in their exchange of letters
Oct. 18, 1974, in which Kissin-
ger declared he had Soviet as-
surances for relaxation of its
emigration restrictions for Jews
and other Soviet citizens.
On the strength of that letter
and Kissinger's testimony after-
wards before the Senate Fi-
nance Committee, the senate
adopted the Jackson Vamk
Amendment to the Trade Act of
1974 by a vote of 88 to 0 on
Dec. 13 of that year. President
Ford signed it into law.
JACKSON, a candidate for the
Democratic nomination for
President, made his charge on
ABC's "Issues and Answers"
nationally-televised program in
response to a reporter's question
that alleged Jackson's amend-
ment "deprived the U.S. of a
very positive bargainship with
the Soviet Union" and had the
effect of fewer Jews being able
to "get out as a result of it"
"Of course, Henry Kissinger
lied to us," Jackson responded.
"He gave us the letter by say-
ing that the Russians had agreed
to all the provisions relat-
ing to relaxation of the rules
regarding emigration, and he
told the congress that was the
case when he had a letter from
the Russians, from Gromyko in
which he had recanted on all of
it."
"But worse than that" Jack-
son continued, "Gerald Ford,
within three weeks after the
congress had voted 88 to 0 to
support the Jackson amend-
ment, announced he was going
to vote for the repeal of it. Why
should the Russians pay any at-
tention to the amendment when
you have an administration that
wants to do away with it? They
just want to wait"
WHEN the reporter said "the
fact is some 30,000 Jews were
getting out before the amend-
ment, and now many fewer
are," Jackson, having noted that
the law applies to "all human
beings," including Jews, re-
plied that "it will bejhatjvay_
until we get a new administra-
tion because Mr. Ford and Mr.
Kissinger say they are going to
ask congress to repeal it. Con-
gress will not repeal it.
"Why should we subsidize the
Soviet Union, give them credit,
give them Most Favored Nation
treatment when they are violat-
ing international law? The Jack-
son Amendment is based on the
international decision on human
rights adopted in 1969 by over
100 nations, ratified by the So-
viet Union, and it provides that
a person has the right to leave a
country freely and return free-
ly. And finally, it was ratified
again at Helsinki.
"I believe the time has come
when they should live up to
these agreements before we
even talk about granting any
economic concessions or help."
Surf side Garden Club
The Surfside Garden Club
will meet on Tuesday, March
9, at 10 a.m. at Surfside Town
Hall. Rose Kronman -vill con-
duct a terrarium workshop.
Those attending should bring
bowls, plants and soil.
Bw.. ~w.----- ___________----------------_----------------------
Response to Planned Israel Bond Tour
Is 'Overwhelming,' Says Parson
The response to the May 24-
June 3 Florida Israel Bond Dele-
gation Tour has been over-
whelming, according to Milton
M. Parson, executive director,
South Florida Israel Bond or-
ganization.
Parson announced that peorle
from Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach Counties have made res-
ervations to participate in the
first Florida areawide fact-find-
ing mission to Israel.
"Since I led my last delega-
tion in 1970, I have felt it im-
portant for the leadership in our
community to meet with the
high-ranking government otti-
cials. military leaders and the
people," said Parson.
The complete package, which
includes round-trip transporta-
tion costs from New York to Is-
rael, hotels, meals, land costs
and all Israeli transporation on
tour days is $995. Parson stated
that the entire cost can be paid
with State of Israel Bonds.
The tour members will stay
at the Tel Aviv Hilton, the Jeru-
salem Hilton and a special ac-
commodation at Kibbutz Ayelet
a oersonal investigation." Otero
volunteered the information that
Schweitzer is Jewish.
Silberman was denuty minis-
ter for mines in the Allende ad-
ministration and was general
manager of the Cobre Chuque
copper mines in Antofogasta.
The mines, once operated by
the American Anaconda Coo-
per Co.. were nationalized by
the Allende regime.
OTERO SAID he was "guess-
ing" that "some peonle intended
him out of the country"
and thev could be "a terrorist
g-onn from the left or the right.
Reallv. we don't know what hap-
penn-d. He simply disappear-
ed." Otero slid. He claimed that
S'lberir.an wss tried for treason
because he "save secret pro-
-"> engineers in a Soviet
commission that was insnectin?
production at the Cobre Chuque
mines.
Otero also nllesed that Si!-
be'man was "a ton executive"
Of Chilean Communist Party.
Silbernnn's father and sister
ha'-e sought assistance from the
International Red Cross, Amer-
ican legislators and various
world personages to determine
his whereabouts or confirn
whthpr he is dead or alive.
THEY HAVE nointed out that
of the many Chilan political
prisoners who disa-^eared
when the military regime toofc
over that country, Silberman
was the onlv one who vanished
after h& was tried and sen-
tenced. /**'
Chif Ra))bi Angel Kreiman
of Chile. Jwlp ;has Dressed in-
ouiries on Jlna}?- of the Silber-
man fami!Viii8J'*reportedIy or-
dered bv Peesldent Augusto Pi-
nochet last'vaar to stop asking
fistions about Silberman.
Sparkman Urges
'Quiet Diplomacy'
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)Sen.
John Sparkman (D.-Ala.) said
with relation to the Middle East
that "we are now in a period
calling for quiet diplomacy" and
urged sidetracking of all issues
until "a suitable answer is found
to the question of Palestinian
nationalism."
The chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
offered his advice in a review
of American foreign policy in a
senate speech.
HE DECLARED that this is
the time for "patience, to wait
for the right moment for prac-
tical peace initiatives, and to
discourage any state in the re-
gion from peremptorily altering
the delicate balance."
"Perhaps therefore," he ad-
ded, "it is just as well to cir-
cumvent, for the moment, the
intractable issue of the Golan
because it and other issues can
be reduced to manageable pro-
portions" when the Palestinian
question is solved.
"The U.S. cannot, should not,
andI am confidentwill not
acquiesce in a final settlement
which does not require the
Palestinians to recognize Is-
rael's right to exist" within UN
security council resolution 242,
he said."
Sparkman emphasized "final"
in his prepared remarks.
REFERRING to the Soviet-
American trade issue that is
tied to Soviet emigration policy,
sparkman indicated he was mov-
ing away from the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment although he
did not mention it directly.
"When the trade issue is re-
vived at some future date," he
said, "we should not try to con-
nect it to the internal practices
of the Soviet Union, however
greatly we may deplore internal
practices of the Soviet Union,
however greatly we may de-
plore some of these."
He warned against becoming
"dependent" on the Soviet
Union for essential materials
and said he is for "detente but
I think it should have some-
thing for us, as well as for the
Soviets."
Hashacher in the Northern Ga-
lilee. The activities have been
planned to allow considerable
freedom and flexibility so the
participants can see "everyday
Israel" and visit with families
and friends.
Among some of the experi-
ences will be meeting newly ar-
rived Russian immigrants, visit-
ing the oil ports of Ashdod and
Ashkelon, lunching at the Knes-
set and a session with univer-
sity students. Those interested
in making reservations should
call Parson at 531-6731.
Hadassah Menorah Education Day
Menorah Grouy of Hadassah
will hold its annual education
day on. Monday, March 8, at
the Coral Gables Junior Wom-
an's Club. Registration begins
at 10 a.m.
Dr. Seymour B. Liebman, au-
thor, historian, and president of
the Jewish Historical Society of
South Florida, Wi2 open the
program with a talk on "Juda-
ism Yesterday, Today, and To-
morrow." An Israeli-style lunch
will be served.
IN KEEPING with Menorah's
Bicentennial theme, Mr. Born-
stein, cantor of Temple Israel
and adjunct lecturer on Jewish
music at the University of Mi-
ami, will speak on "The Con-
tribution of the Jews to Amer-
ican Music."
Israeli dancing will be per-
formed and taught by Beth Tril-
ling. An exhibit of Bicentennia.
art and Judaica is being coor-
dinated by Natalie Lyons, edu-
cation vice president of Miami
Chaoter of Hadassah. Israeli
products wif. be displayed and
sold by Mrs. Morton Goldman.
Mrs. Simon Weiss is chairman
of the day.


Page 12-C
^Jeuisfi fk>r/fafifir
Friday, March 5, 1976
\

Black and a Jew by Choice, He Shares King's 4Dream'
Debate in the Black community over to Judaism, and went to Israel where he
whether to support Israel or the Arabs not only became part of a kibbutz but
in their conflict in the Mideast has grown also served in the Israel army as a soldier,
increasingly heated and bitter in recent His remarkable story of transition from
years. As Black Muslim influence has the civil rights movement of the '60's to
spread, one Black American who took sides wearing the uniform of the Israel army
with Israel went all the way. A Talladega for six months is told here.
College graduate, Larry Lewis converted
By LARRY LEWIS
People have often asked me,
"Why do you want to live in
Israel?" My standard reply is:
"Because I am an unrecon-
structed idealist by nature, a
Jew by choice and a Zionist by
conviction." Although this ex-
planation usually brings a host
of additional questions, I never
tire of saying it.
My journey to Israel really
liegan the day of my conver-
sion to Judaism
ago in
Temple Israel ..
summer of 1964, I was a young raismS of children. From each
Israel because of the color of spirit, and the people of Kib-
my skin. There are Jews in butz Gat. In February of this
if there h=d bcrn em""H "on Most of the army consists of
on the bus we would have reserve units and men sere
danced. m tne reserves until they are
IN AUGUST of 1973 (two 55. childless women until they
months before the October afe 3, old In time of
War). I received my draft no- r, ,,
tice from the Israel Defense war, the Israel Defense Force,
Forces instructing me to re- can be swiltly transformed
port for induction in October, from a small army of regulars
I'm a dual national and hold and natjonai servicemen into a
both American and Israeli
citizenships. As an Israeli
Israel from all over the world year I applied for membership citizen I'm subject to compul-
and the variation of their skin and was accepted as a can-
coloring ranges from black to didate. There is a mandatory
white. one-year probationary period
IT TOOK several more inter- for candidates so that the mem-
views at the center before all bers can get to know the per-
sory military sen ice, both reg-
ular and reserve duty.
I came to Israel under the
Law of Return under which
Israeli citizenship law is grant-
large army of citizen reservists.
As a private in the reserves,
I'm subject to a call-up for
50 to 70 days of active duty a
year.
An ancient Jewish legend
; day of my conver- Dm7- a collective oy tne KipoutzniKs. wnen tne the Unitad stats and
ludaism ten years community based on equality vote is taken on my member- f ,._..,* aLso b,
September, 1965, at everything: work, housing ship, I don't think there will J \7-nUv
rael in Boston. In the food/ clothing commodities and be a single "no" vote. a **" *er co..m-y
arrangements were completed: son. A favorable vote by two- d automatically ,0 Jew has it that when the Almighty
to Israel ordered through the been here for over three years m,ga ""**h,"" FfifJBft!T"" t0 humanity, He handed the
Israel Aliyah Center. and I'm known and well liked ". al '". "SStJSS? h Book over t08ether with a
^1XL GuL1a L00"*0}*?. by. the kibbutzmks1 When Jhe {jJ^UniJ3 stat^T and a"citken sword and He said: "* you Hve
be a citizen by the book, well and good; if
ntry that al- not you shall be forced to live
lows dual citizenship. by the sword."
according to his ability and to There are about PfPIe When the fourth Arab-Israeli .
h-WMasrvB! IraSSrU &rsj- !HOSpUaL is a dining hall and kitchen *> Enla"d. Brazil to be erroneous thinking on *f^E^i !.;*&
( HAVING read many books (we're building a new one); a the U.S.A. my part. I went to the indue- *a, frflhl. lr ah!
j and attended the services of common laundry and clothes- APART from the weekly film tion center and asked to be *0b D"l STnaTce a*
various religions over the sorting center, where the wash- rsoTnethnesnSol the weekly caUed up ear,y' l was toId come IK S ^
\ years, the precepts and beliefs ing is done by a work team for SSSTSetE MldVsS Ctober 24 (the day of the
of Judaism had the greatest the whole kibbutz and then bat meai on Friday evening fmaI ceasefire) as instructed. it WAS Mohammed who
: appeal for me for they coin- ironed and mended if neces- USUally followed by some cul- MY BASIC training unit con- first defined Jews as "the pec-
i cided with my own outlook on sary. iurai activjty aftcr-Work oc- sisted of other new immigrants P'e of the Book." I believe that
life and toward God. Religion, There are the children's cupations which take place at that were from such diverse if we can learn unashamedly
) believe, is a matter of private quarters, the clubhouse, and of Gat or our regional center in countries as South Africa, Rus- to see ourselves as Mohammed
introspection and personal ex- course, the various branches of Ashkelon are folk-dancing, sia. India, England. Argentina. his day saw us, and if our
)>erience. After much thought work: the fields (cotton, sugar, choir, lectures on almost any- prance and the United States! Arab neighbors would also
nKK Sum*!. 2"lta(ltsd beets- wheat); orchards (or- thing, trips throughout the Since I haH served four years share that vision, together we
Rabbi Fields, who at that time anges. grapefruits, lemons, avo- country (with special emphasis in the U.S. Armed Forces (pe- could find the strength to ban-
was assistant rabbi at Temple cauu,i; wood tactory; dairy; on its history, geography, and riods of regular army service ish the sword and all that it
Israel, and arranged formal chicken hatchery; and chicken archaeology), handicrafts les- actively served in a foreign represents in the Middle East.
conversion studies.
There is a concept in all
Asian religions: "Many moun-
(iins up to God, with many
) oads up each mountain." I be-
came a Jew becajse in Juda-
ism I found the theological
lierspective for me.
as a period ui intcr.be turmoil:
civil rights demonstrations,
."trikes, a new lifestyle, new
values. It was a time when
Members of the Ku Kiux Klan
in my hometown of Tuscaloosa,
Alabama, were proclaiming:
'We don't hate Negroes. We
) we 'em, in their place like
shining shoes, bellhopping,
.^.treetsweeping, picking cotton,
houses for laying hens. sons, pottery classes, and so army is taken into account by I know that in America to-
PROBABLY the most inter- forth. We also have a swim- the Israel Defense Forces when day there is an increasing pro-
esting feature of kibbutz life ming pool, library and a small computing length of national Arab sentiment within the
is the raising of children. Since museum. service), my Israeli military Black community. The reasons
everything is done on collec- TT.,.ii.. : .... ____.___obligation in the regular army for this are well known
sever-
th
can
nations, and the economic sit-
uation brought on by the oil
crisis.
------------------ -----------------K----------- ------------------- ------- ----- -------- -.n-ikwij *'i everything is done on collec- jjsuallv in th .; obligation in the regular army for this are well known -
five lines, children are taken y "' "!..'Tkfh' WaS for three nths. How- Black Muslim influence, sevei
ca-e of and educated in that wnIn '"' no/ ,,JL' ,? eVer' due t0 the 0ctober War. ing of diplomatic links wit
light. The burden of feeding, SSng S? frSf S Z LT ""l"** an additiona! Is'ael by most BIack Africa
cleaning, clothing and training ,!"' menas (n and tnree months.
I REMEMBER the early '60's the small child does not fall ?ff. the kibbutz), go to small
I was one of the best marks-
There are those Blacks who
condemn Zionism as a "tool
on the working mother, but on "formal parties or lounge in
the naunk-s Id matrons as- the clubhouse, where soft "n"V basic traming corn-
signed to the chiiJ. en houses. dnnks: coffee- and 9W After baste temining. 1
The children are divided bv maBaz|nes in a relaxed atmos- ****** es a P" ate with a
age groups, 80 that all children ^ heI", tor fornl "Peasant Ja^ JPPj "nit in the Engi- of the imperialist" without
born in one year go through background for sociahzmg. I "^:th^s *here we issued lowing that the early chain-
baby house, nursery, kinder- "" a,s0 r".f a *"* of ^^ sugar to sub- pians of the African cause were
garton. primary school and ***** and Philosophy ("The machine *uns. als3 influenced by the examp,e
high school together. Each yy(.a. k. .yi?gu a" Ex' Dur'ng my travels around of Zionism and leaders of the
group has its common sleep- ~?fltlst wnicn l nPe to com- Israel in uniform, I was often first Pan-African movements,
ing, eating, learning and re- p e soon' mistaken for an Af ican in Is- such as Marcus Garvey and
digging ditches, eating possum, creation quarters. i HAVE found in Israel a rael for mil'tary training), a w- E. B. DuBois, preached
find serving time." since coming to Gat I've sense of togetherness some- !>la,?k jew *'"m 't"'<'- l*- "BIflck Zionism."
Like so many other college picked oranges and grapefruits, times displayed in strange {?. ancAmedcan- tourist, thj. R. .
rtudents during that turbulent trampled cotton in cotton bins, ways. One day after visiting ?"' most freq"ently a Black ^'J*/nkh Blacks, sho,uld look
era, I was "involved." When weeded sugar beets, washed Tel Aviv, I was on my way Hebrew' EnTinl 'T $lgta^
SJaHlS ^:^=S EffiS^g tfrs SS&SSS
ESva KvH&S SSSaffi SHHS SSSSft*
rights movement. I also joined where we have over 18,000 ever, one man insisted on m- ~ .?- 4._andwas outs,de of tne Jewish commu-
!.en S^dent Zionist Organize- laying hens. tering the bus even when told
Z SS S \WCre: KIBBUTZ GAT is a self-gov- by the bus driver that he
he unity o the Jewul,. peo- erning entit democraticIuy wouldn't drive the bus with
Viti.h L gn ? 8h organized and responsible for him in the door. The man said
SSLTfi! SJ'JSS its own social- cultura' d he was ta a hurry and w"'d
romeland. the Land of Israel economic development. The not ve. The driver cut off
rormUga.l acS[mtriiimm,8r S ge"eral meetin* f mem *! ^^ ^ **" **5
from all countries he bers (which emrM takes a newspaper.
strengthening of Israel, which piace every Saturday night)
is based on the prophetic vi- decides on matters 0f principle ,hI,hWM/1 very hot daV a"d
sion of justice and peace ." in a!1 nhases nf kihh,rt7 ,if^ the bus d.dn t have air condi-
assigned to a reserve init. nity.
i wholeheartedly believe in
i'lose goals.
AS A member of the SZO's
in all phases of kibbutz life. ,;; Tk ~ ------
tioning. The passengers were
.. -2TTL"*^ r^TWM scorning restless. To my
bV LT.? ST?* P."-' a ""olarly looking'
These decisions are executed becoming restless. To r
-Jh .. committees, prise, a scholarly looki,
Aliyah Committee, I promoted S,^,,^","a'iy'f ?,"? S, 3 !" ,he front of the bus org
"aliyah" primarily through in- sa" number f fu"-time "ex- ized a committee among the
;5rmal discussion with Jewish ecutive officers" the secre- passengers to negotiate wiS
.college students. One student, ~nat (secretary, work-coor- the man standing in the door
. ho had recently visited Israel. dinator. treasurer, fram man- Most of the committee mem-
'upon hearing that I planned to ^l*' wh? arer elected for bers were from the front of the
'settle in Israel said to me: Per,ods ran8,n8 from "e to bus since it was the scene of
"Life in Israel is very hard. two years the action.
:Only strong idealists or eco- Almost all kibbutz members The committee offered to
nomic masochists move there." have a permanent job in a buy the man a ticket on the
i "That's Okay," I answered, particular work branch. Perma- next bus. He refused. But when
' Cm a little of both." nent places of work are as- one of the committee mem-
! As a" Zionist, I decided that signed by a special committee, bers, a projectionist at a Tel
1972 would be my year for The day-to-day assignment of Aviv cinema, included a free
sliyah (-emigrating) to Israel, workers as between branches ticket to the movie, "The Exor-
Jn early February. I went to the job of the work coor- dst," along with the first of-
Hhe Israel Aliyah Center in oinator. who plans each day fer, he quickly announced his
'downtown San Francisco to ar- according to special needs and acceptance. The passengers
range the trip. I didn't and- Problems. cheered and we all began sing-
cipate any racial problems in I LIKE the life-style, the ing Israeli folk songs. I think
H "SP*
Y



"riday, March 5, 1976
+ knist> fkrkHcin
Page 13-C
1'' .-, : -v r *
: W
-w* ...
Wore than 1,500 people listened to Yigal Allon (right)
it the 1976 International Inaugural Conference on Feb.
28 at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Among the Jewish com-
munity leaders attending the dinner was Robert L. Sie-
gel, chairman of the Miami host committee and general
chairman of the Greater Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign. General Allon, Deputy Prime Minister
and Foreign Minister of Israel, focused on the need this
year to widen the scope of the Israel Bond drive.
Studying plans for the new S10 million central Blood
Bank of Israel, to be built in the Tel Aviv area by the
Magcn David Adorn, are leaders of the American Red
Magen David for Israel: from left, Irving Firtel, presi-
dent emeritus of the Gi eater Miami Hebrew Academy;
Ben Kutcher, Ronev Plaza cochairmun; David Cole-
man, Florida state president of the Red Magen David;
and Julius Levinc, Forte Towers cochairman and Bnai
B'rith past president. Sol Drescher of Miami Beach is
national cochairman of the blood bank drive.
alh and Lnager of its Alton ^ ^.^^
is William J. Schusel, Intercontinental Bank vicepresr
dent for community and customer relations Schusel
cochairman and treasurer of the Peppy *"!*>**
Meals Fund, which provides food for the needy m Mtamt
Beach, particularly senior citizens.
Temple Israel
Sisterhood Lunch
The cochairwomen of Temple
Israel Sisterhood's annual don-
or luncheon are Mrs. Law-
rence E. Singer and Mrs. David
R. Hochb;>rg. The theme of the
luncheon, "Stage Door Can-
teen," reminiscent of World War
II days, will include fash-
ions by Jordan Marsh.
The event is scheduled for
Wednesday, March 10, at 11:30
a.m. in the Mediterranean Room
of the Dora) Beach Hotel.
JCC-Bet Breira
Purim Carnival
mple Bet Breira has join-
ed with the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida to pro-
duce a Purim carnival this
Sunday, beginning at 11 a.m. at
the Red Barn (opposite the
Kendale Lakes Country Club).
"This is one of the greatest
cooperative efforts we've been
associated with." said Allan
Just, Southwest program super-
visor for the JCC.
Round Town
Works by artist Reyna Young-
erman can be seen in a solo
exhibition at the Hollywood Art
Center, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
through this afternoon.
Cr it T5r
The Philadelphia Club is hav-
ing a Purim party on Sunday,
March 7, at 1 p.m. at 1234 Wash-
ington Ave.
tr & -b
National Airlines flew 453.7
million revenue passenger miles
in February, an increase of 4
percent from the figure of a
year earlier.
J. Dan Brock, vice president-
marketing, attributed the strong
traffic performance to an im-
proving U.S. economy.
6
Mount Sinai Medical Center
needs volunteer service aides
to visit patients and also help
them get ready to go home.
For more information, call
674-2080.
Question: What is "Purim
Katan" (which occurred this
year on Feb. IS)?
Answer: "Purim Katan," the
"miniature Purim," is a day
which is celebrated as a minor
festival in the case of a leap
year in the Hebrew calendar
such as this year happens to
be.
Traditionally, the festival of
Purim is destined to take place
every year on the 14th day of
the Hebrew month Adar. In a
leap year, there happen to be
two consecutive months called
Adar. The question arises as to
which of these two months
should be designated as the
month in which Purim Is to be
celebrated on the 14th day.
Since the event of the original
Purim is claimed to have taken
place on a leap year and in the
second of the two months called
Adar, it has been ordained that
Purim shall always be cele-
brated in the second of the two
Adars.
Still, because the 14th day of
Adar generally became known
as a day of good fortune for the
Jewish people, even the occur-
rence of the 14th day of the
first Adar in a lean year is
marked by some spirit of re-
joicing even though none of the
mitzvoth and practices of Pu-
rim are observed on that day.
We thus eliminate penitential
prayers from the service on that
day.
Leon J. Ell (left) past president of Temple Beth Sholom,
has been named an honorary cochairman of the HUC-
JIR Convocation Dinner scheduled for March 7 at On
Konover Hotel. Otto Stieber (right) of the Rockville
Centre, N.Y., Reform Temple is a cochairmun.
Sara Tucker (left), widow of Richard Tucker, looks on
as the late tenor's friend and colleague Metropolitan
Opera soprano Beverly Sills (right) chats with Mayor
and Mrs. Maurice Ferre. The occasion was a receptior,
at the Ferres' Casa Maria, where civic and community
leaders heard about the South Florida'Chapter support
ing the new Richard Tucker Music Foundation, Inc. A
series of national and local projects, whose goals an
to aid gifted young singers across the 'country, have
been planned. n
Washington Federal Savings and Loan Association re-
cently celebrated the grand opening of their new eight-
story Washington Federal Building at 450 North Park
Road, Hollywood. Arthur H. Courshon (left), chairman
of the board of Washington Federal, accepts congratu-
lations from Hollywood Mayor David Keating, as Sena-
tor Jack Gordon, president of Washington Federal, looks
on during the dedication ceremonies. ______
Kneseth Israel Congregation
mourns the passing of
MILTON KAHN |
Thursday, February 26th. 1976
in Nathanya, Israel
Mr. Kahn was a Past President and
Builder of the Synagogue and will
be remembered for his devotion
to the Congregation.
> -..-



Page 14-C
*Jfwisti fhrkMttn
Friday, March 5, 1976
To Honor the Dead, a ncl Remind the Living
\
By JACK S1EQEL
DACHAU (JTA) -
grey, gloomy
- It
was a grey, gloomy and
somehow very fitting'day. I
and a friend, armed with a
35 mm. camera and driving
the rented Opel, left Munich
for Dachau about 20 miles
away. As we left, I thought
of the story in the Interna-
tional Herald Tribune just
several days earlier about
the people in Dachau, now
a city of 33,000 (13,000 be-
fore World War II), who
were not interested in and
even hostile to the existence
of the memorial camp site,
its history and everpresent
reminder.
I thought, on the contrary,
it should be exposed again
and again and made visible
wherever possible "to honor
the dead and remind the
living."
MUNICH'S grand streets, the
well-built houses and well-fed
and clothed people were traf-
ficking in their clean streets
Munich the birthplace of Ger-
man fascism where in Novem-
ber, 1923, Hitler attempted a
coup d'etat beginning at the
Buergerbraeu and ending at the
Feldhernhalle, and where 11 of
his "genossen" (comrades) were
killed while he fled in ignominy.
Now, however, that was an-
other history as we drove up
Ifland Strasse to Ise Ring, fol-
lowed the Mittlerer Ring and
finally found ourselves on Da-
chauer Strasse heading towards
that medieval town.
But the roads were heavy
with modern traffic, and on
either side was all the evidence
of a citv well-heeled. Farther
out. thp landscape thinned, and
after 25 kilometers, we saw the
KZ (Konzentrationslaagercon-
centration camp)."sign right too
iate and passed it.
WE MADE an illegal U-turn
and stopped to ask a gas at-
tendant where the KZ was. He
muttered an unfriendly direc-
tion in his thick Bavarian ac-
cent, and we took off to the
sign "Gedenkstaette" (memorial
site). A bare road led us to a
parkig area iust outside the
barbed wire of the camp.
Mv -friend and I milled up
almost- simultaneously with an-
other cair driven by a German,
and when we got out together,
I asked him if he. were visiting
the citv, aad he said he was
from Munich. He was about 45.
and 1 asked what he thought for
Dachau and its times. He call-
ed it a "dirty history."
I said as we stood there in the
biting winter cold where likely,
hundreds of "Kazettlings" (in-
mates) must have marched into
the camD and their ultimate
death, that this would never
happen again.
and wide field where.
I *.! by wafch-towers once
machine gun manned, there
were two sections of oblong-
numbered areas where the bar-
racks housing the inmates used
to be.
ON THE right, as we moved
in. was a moat, now a dry ditch
with patches of snow, which
separated the field from the
fence shielded by trees. They
were bare of foliage in the win-
ter and hardly shielded the
camp of whose activities peo-
ple used to say, we didn't know
what was happening.
A plaque, somehow aged and
ageless, said, "Plus Jamais, Nie
Wieder, Never Again," and the
same, I guessed, in Russian
which I couldn't read.
Two young men passed our
way and turned out to be Aus-
tralians on their way to Inns-
bruck for the Olympics. I stop-
ped briefly to talk to them.
Dachau was before their time,
and they were at a loss for
words and one could only mut-
ter, "What a horrible mess."
ONCE AGAIN, I surveyed the
field and invoked from my own
memory and experience in the
time, the rows of barracks, the
guttural German commands, the
frenetic activity for those still
then among the living.
At the opposite end of the
field, were three monuments
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
symbolic of the religion of all
the people who were annihilated
there. Some nuns, who stopped
to pray over one barracks site,
moved in the Catholic memorial
which had a church in the rear.
It was called Heilige Blut
(holy blood). I and my friend,
a non-Jew, stopped before the
Jewish memorial, built in 1965,
for a quick moment, not as
much in prayer as in recall. We
moved on past another moat
and met twoj/oung men coming
our way. dressed in winter
sport clothing.
ovens themselves, standing
there so benignlv as though
they once had baked bread.
OVERHEAD were solid beams
with hanging cord where, I
learned for the first time, some
inmates were hung to death,
perhaps simultaneously with the
burning of others. The clatter
of wooden boots suddenly
sounded echoingly, and for a
frightening moment I thought it
was the SS coming, but it was
just the police guard having a
look around.
There were faint scratchings
on the wall, and I didn't bother
to read them because I knew
what they would say. The cam-
era clicked repeatedly, and I
tried to personalize this, in the
Germany I knew after the war
as a soldier, in the memory of
two of my late wife's sisters,
one of whom was killed in Aus-
chwitz.
I BECAME impatient and
wanted to leave, uncomfortable
and frightened in the square,
bare block buildings, but I had
to wait until the pictures were
taken. The interest superseded
my needs, although I asked for
one special shot.
Outside, there were now two "
German guards, one young, one
older, a Czech. We talked, and
the Czech said he had been a
POW in the Soviet Union during
the war, as though that would
get my sympathy.
"~t"
Vatican Mideast
Position Unchanged
PARIS (JTA) The Vati-
can newspaper, "Osservatore
Romano," said that the Vati-
can's position on the Middle
East and the Palestinian prob-
lem "has not changed in any
way."
The statement, in effect, dis-
avowed Vatican endorsement of
a communique released after the
Decent Moslem-Christian con-
ference in Tripoli, Libya, at-
tended by a Vatican delegation,
which affirmed the rights of the
Palestinian people to return to
their "homeland," meaning the
territory now Israel.
VATICAN sources in Rome,
contacted by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, said the "Os-
servatore Romano" report fully
and completely represents the
position of the Vatican.
The sources appeared highly
embarrassed bv the communi-
que which totally supported the
Arab side in the Middle East
conflict with the implication of
Vatican endorsement of that
position.
They told the JTA that the
Vatican delegation "was not
empowered to reach political
decisions" and should not have
done so.
DON VIGILK) Levi, deputy
director of "Osservatore Ro-
mano," explained the back-
ground of the Tripoli communi-
que in a front page commen-
tary. He said that Cardinal Ser-
gio Pignedoli, who headed the
Vatican delegation to the Tripoli
conference, was shown the com-
munique "at the very last min-
ute," implying that he had no
chance to change it.
Pignedoli explained the cir-
cumstances himself last week.
He said that the document was
prepared in Arabic and that he
did not know, until it was pre-
sented to him. that it contained
an unqualified endorsement of
the Arab position.
He said he repudiated anv al-
leged support of it on the Vati-
can's part.
ZOA President Announces
National Rabbinic Council
The young man was from Da-
chau and said all this had hap-
pned before he was born and
knew nothing of the times. The
older cop said. "We knew no-
thing. Those who did and talk-
ed, ended up here."
HE WANTED to put a happy
note on the proceedings. "Three
of them stayed on in Dachau
and became rich." I thought I
heard a familiar theme. "Jews?"
THE MAN said, shrugging.
"Who knows? The Nazis will
come again because there is so
much 'communismus' in the
country." He cited the Bader-
Meinhof gang, and I said they
were anarchists not commun-
ists, and the man said. no. they
are communists and that the
high schools were full of Reds.
His words had the smell of
Hitler again, and they depress-
ed me. My friend and I walked
past the barbed wire, and I
could almost visualize the
gaunt, sickened faces and claw-
like fingers pressed to and grip-
ping the interstices.
Ahead were some buildings:
one was a museum, and inside
a sfMfW guard in a green uni-
form sat,at the door. We didn't
stay long; the effect of putting
such things together was not
real, and we moved into the
I stopped them, too. and ask-
ed where they were from. Nor-
way, one said, and I asked- what
they thought of the camp. ?'Gro-
tesoae." one said. We talked
very briefly and went our sep-
arate ways, they away from the
crematoria and we towards
them.
BUT THE word "grotafque"
rang in my ears. My friend aad
I passed the "Grave of the:"Ten
Thousand Unknown,** to an area
once used as a shooting range
aad-where executions were per-
formed. In back or the range
was the! blood ditch. Turning
around again and surveying the
area, it was all so difficult to
believe. The surroundings were
now so bland, even Christmasy,
with the snow.
The term, '"moving," which
a woman used about the memo-
rial as she left, hardly began to
reach the enormity of the bes-
tiality. It escaped comprehen-
sion as though momentarily it
would be necessary for "the
jack-booted Nazi janissaries to
come out of that history com-
manding respect for their real-
ity.
Nevertheless, a religious state-
ment stood in defense of the
truth: "But the souls of the
righteous are as the hand of
God and there shall no torment
touch them." Now ahead were
the crematoria and we advanced
towards them, I with some dis-
taste, and my friend with a
kind of professional eagerness
to record Its details as well as
absorb it for the first time as a
phenomenon which had occur-
red before her birthdate.
The "Brausebad" (shower),
which was used as a decoy to
get inmates to enter, ultimately
to be gassed, was just a bare
room. Further in were the
"No." he said. "Communists.
They made business. But one
died recently from too much
drinking." We talked on farther.
The afternoon was drawing to
an end. The camp closed at five,
and it was a quarter to.
I looked for my friend who
was nowhere to be seen. I look-
ed down the long grey field
where the barracks once stood
and became scared all over
again as if the jack-boots would
suddenly appear, and I would
be locked in. to remain and suf-
fer the same fate, with body as
well as mind.
FINALLY, running and cam-
era swinging, my friend appear-
ed, and we left the camp.
I took one last look. It was
cold with unremembered his-
tory, and I said, one must do
this again and again and keep
this death alive.
We walked to the car. and
across the lot was a ball field
where some young Germans
were playing soccer as if no-
thing had ever happened.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
formation of a National Rabbinic
Council designed to serve as an
advisory group within the Zion-
ist Organization of America has
been announced by ZOA Presi-
dent Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein.
In the formal announcement
of the new ZOA group, Dr.
Sternstein named Rabbi Sey-
mour J. Cohen, of Congregation
Anshe Emet in Chicago, as Na-
tional Chairman.
RABBI MORRIS Landes, of
Congregation Adath Jeshrun in
Pittspurgh. Pa., and Rabbi Amiel
Wohl. of Temple Israel in New
Rochelle. N.Y., were named na-
tional cochairman.
Dr. Sternstein indicated ad-
ditional appointments would be
forthcoming.
In a statement announcing
the establishment of the coun-
cil, Dr. Sternstein called on all
American Rabbis to formally af-
filiate with the ZOA and to pub-
licly identify with its objectives.
"thus unmistakably lending
their considerable personal
prestige and the moral force of
their position in American So-
ciety to the Zionist ideal."
"HISTORICALLY," said Dr.
Sternstein, "the clergymen of
the American Jewish communiy
have been in the forefront of
the Zionist movement. In' the
past, they have swayed great
numbers of Americans and
reached out to the leadership
of the Christian community.
"Zionism must become a
topic for Sunday sermons," he
said, "just as it is now a topic
of Friday night and Saturday
sermons. With the help of a
committed body of rabbis such
as those we expect to see sitting
on our National Rabbinic Coun-
cil, we can accomplish this ob-
jective."
Rabbi Cohen is Conservative,
Rabbi Wohl is Reform and Rab-
bi Landes is Orthodox.
Israeli Cabinet Considers
Allowing Charter Flights
A Public Service
Announcement
Mount Sinai Medical Center
is participating in a national
study to determine whether as-
pirin can help prevent heart
attacks.
One hundred- volunteers, ages
30 to 69, are needed. To be
eligible, you must have had a
heart attack within the past five
years.
For more information, call
674-2185.
Bv DAVtt>l LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA> The
cabinet decided by a majority
vote to consider clear and spe-
cific proposals for the introduc-
tion Of charter flights to Israel
on a trial basis. Charter flights
are presehtiy banned except in
the-case of Christian pilgrims
ands Scandinavian tourists
The cabinet requested speci-
fic proposals within two weeks
from a special committee head-
ed'by Meir Heth. a Bank of Is-
rael official, which has been
studying the issue.
THE HETH committee has
already submitted a report re-
commending charter flights on
a selective basis for a trial pe-
riod. Justice Minister Haim Za-
dok found its report too vague,
and the committee was there-
fore asked by the cabinet to
reconvene and come up with
more concrete recommenda-
tions.
Tourism Minister Moshe Knl,
a strong advocate of charter
flights to bolster Israel's sag-
ging tourist Itrade, expressed
satisfaction with the decision.
Transport Minister Gad Yaa-
cobi voted against it but found
himself in a minority.
YAACOBI has supnorted El
Al. Israers national air carrier,
which is vehmehtly opposed'to
charter flights that would cut
into its business.
The Heth committee suggest-
ed that El Al-could, if it wished,
open Its own charter subsidiary.
The committee also recommend-
d that the test of charter
flights should be from countries
or regions not presently served
by El Al.
Family Service At
Temple Israel South
A monthly family service is
being instituted by Temple Is-
rael South, which meets at the
Sunset Congregational Church,
thi6 evening at 7:30.
Following a short service, the
children of Tjmple Israel South
Religious Sollol will lead the
entire congregation in singing
and dancing, along with Dany
Amihud, music specialist, and
Beth Trilling, dance specialist.
\


larch 5, 1976
9Jen1st ftorSdiair
Pa^e 15-C
Pound Devaluation
IECAL NOTICE

Creeps Ahead
iSALEM (JTA)
Big devaluation" crept
icortbly further on Feb. 10
when the Israel Pound was re-
ducort in value by another 1.9
cant. The Pound now stands
at HflU8 to the U.S. dollar.
^comf-red to IL 7.24 before the
jp^ftet devaluation.
?.latest depreciation was
pd at midnight by the
ministerial committee
authorized last June
Hue Israel's currency at
Hup to 2 percent every
Iff if considered necessary.
TtBt PURPOSE is to stem in-
flation and aid Israel's exports.
The prices of basic commodi-
ties, fuel and transit fares are
not expected to rise as an im-
mediate result of the latest
devaluation. Arnon Gafni, di-
rector general of the Finance
Ministry, has disclosed that
"creeping devaluation" will be
reviewed shortly to evaluate its
results to date. It was learned
that two modifications are under
consideration. One would link
the Pound to a variety of for-
eignr.wrencies. It is nresently
.^tJflk#.4o the U.S. dollar.
Tn.Other would permit the
special ministerial committee to
impqae devaluation at less than
30-daf intervals.
MpPDITTON to the devalua-
"evy of sli^htlv less than
2 pAeni will be imposed on
for_fccurrencv held bv com-
LE6AL NOTICE
v
NOTICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
_,-is HB"'''BV r.ivfiv <(
the umfcrii;n'-'l. desiring to engage
In baMarss und.-r the fiititlous name
Of QOMBKA!. EI.KCTItl'NKS SKi<\
ICB8^ti60 S.W. 1 Street. Mi.-.mi.
Fla Intai.J to reirist.r said name with
the Clwjf <>t II'.; Cir.mll Court of Dade
Countjr,gr1ri AXFkEIiO RFANO. SO*
PBBRO 1, HERNANDEZ -""-
3/5-12-19-28
----------_ -----------------------
IN THE Clf
_IRCUIT COURT FOR
; COUNTY. FLORIDA
r..OBATE DIVISION
Flt- NUMBER 76-1051
DiWstan FRANK B. DOWUINO
TTATE OP
SY RESSNER
M
J OF ADMINISTRATION
PERSONS HAV'XG C'-AIMS
WDS AOAINST THE
STATB AND ALL. OTHER
INTERESTED IN THE
IE HEREBY NOTIPIED
dmlnistralion of the estate
IARY RE3KXER. deceased,
'lie Nwfcaer 71-1051. is pemlina in th
ClrcultrfCeurt f..r Dade County. Flor-
ida, PrSate Division, the address of
which -fc I'mirt House. W Flae'.er
Street. (Bisml. Florida. The personal
rpreetat) of the .stale la HAR-
RY U FA-3SETT. whose address Is
SOS Porte Plaza Hid*.. 1401 Brlr.kell
Ave., Miami. Fin.. .131:11. The name
and address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All BV-*"'"-s having claims or da-.
mandaaBhaipst the estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROs^BTHE DATE OF THE
riRS*fc^p!'iii.u:ATiox of this
fOTISlKi to file with the elerk
of the^kov.- court I writt.-n statemen*
of angBBFlaini or mand they may
ave. Man claim must be in writing
and iilil indicate the basis for tho
Hfflf and address of the
1 his .tuenr or attorney, and
claimed. If the claim la
the dnte when it will b*-
shall be stated, if the claim
nt or unliquidated, the na-
rtalntv shall be stal"-t.
giaini scared, the security
escribed The claimant shall
t conies of the claim
plerk to enable the clerk to
IcoDV to each personal ranr
the
ns interested In the estate
copy of this Xolice of A.l-
n line been mailed are rt-
WITH1X THREE MONTHS
HE DATE OF THE FIRST
TWIN OF THIS NOTICE.
objections they may have
nees (he validity of am
I wUi the tua.lifn atioiiN of
Mat representative, or the
sdiction of the court
1MB, DEMANDS. AND
NOT SO FILED. WXL.I--
. BR BAKRJCD.
the.firat publication of tnw
Adiuiiilfdratioa; March 5.
-RAHHY U..BAB8B5TT
Pers'c.al Representative of tho
~of IKMA MAY RESENEK
Deceased
FORNEY FOR
PJSHH' > '"-ENTATIVE'.
HABRT U BASSETT
IM Porte Plain Bldg..
1 Urtpfcell Ave.
----,-*lorIda 33131
I77-*5*1
.a/s-is
mercial banks, though not on
private depositors of foreign
currency.
Gafni noted that since the
last devaluation Jan. 4, the dol-
lar rose slightly on the inter-
national money market in rela-
tion to the major European cur-
rencies.
Asked if the prices ot govern-
ment subsidized commodities
will go up before April when
the government's new austerity
economic program takes effect,
Gafni said that according to
agreements with Histadrut no
such changes will be made.
Ariath Yeshuruii
Sisterhood
The Sisterhood of Temple
Adath Yeshurun will have a
"Remember Jewish Music
Month" and Purim celebration
at the March 16 general meet-
ing at. 8 p.m-
The program will feature
guitar soloist Judy Rosmstrauch
and Yosi Yanich with his oranim
dance group.
PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS
ANNUAL REPORT -
The annual report of the private
foundation
AM AN H APP1 Foti-mx
ForNDATION TRUST
required to be filed under section
6"5ti Internal ({.-venue Code, is avall-
ahl. for public inspection at Its prin-
cipal office. "BOO Red Road. South ..h-
ami. Florida for inspection during reg-
ular business hours by any citizen
upon re.iuest within ISO days after the
date of this publication
KABlil MORRIS KJPPBR .
Managing Director
Date of publication March 5. If7.
3/5/71 ___ ___ ____________
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN' that
the undersigned, desiring to eneatre
in business under the fictitious name
of T. & U INVESTIGATIONS I Ti>
at 133 N E. 117lh Street, Suite 305,
X. Miami Beach 331C2 inlands to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County. Florida
MEL WEISS
___________^__________ 3/5-12-19-J*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the flotltinuji "**.-
of CHAMPION SPORTING GOODS
CENTER at 1174-A Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach. Fla.. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Cnnntv. Florida,
WIOUTOW ENTERPRISES. INC
3/S-U-19-2S
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT
OP FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CASE NO. 78-7041
GENERAL JURISDICTION OIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HAZEI- STERN JOGAN.
GERALD W. JOOAN,
Husband/Respondent.
TO: GERALD W. JOGAN
Residence unknown
TOW re uotlfied that a Putltion for
Pis.-oiution of Marriage has been filed
taalnst you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your Anwwer to W
Petition on Petitioner's Attorney. All-
NER SOIX1MON. 120S Capital RnnK
Building, Miami. Florida anil file the
original Answer with the Clerk of the
ibove-styled Court on or before April
14. 1978, otherwise a default shall be
entered against you.
DATED thl 3rd dnv of March. 19TB.
RICHARD P. DRINKER.
Clerk
Circuit Court Seal!
Bv: R. H. KISSEE
Deputy Clerk
3/6-12-19-26
NOT.CE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN ANB FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7S-8J7T
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF NtABRIAOE
HM RE: THE MARRIAGE OP:
MARTA E8TAMPONI RO*.
Wife,
and
JCLIO CESAR RCHQ.
Husband.
TO: JULIO CESAR ROTO
814 Oceanview Avenue
Brooklyn. New York 1123r.
YOI ARE HKREUY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dlasoiutinn of Mar-
riage has been filed against yon and
you aie required to set are I
vnur written defenses, if any. to U en
Albert I. ('arricarte, Esq., attornatr
for Petitioner, whose adilreaa Itl
N W, Tth Street. Minnn, Floridn, and-
flla the original with the .lerk of the
iboue styled court on or bofan Aww
9, 1"7: otberwlae a default "ill he
entered againet you foi -ef de-
manded In the comt.lanil. or !
Thie t:olice shall DS im'.ii. Jb-.i IDC*
ea.h week for four con.....utlv weeks
In THE JEWISH PLORTBTAN
WITNESS my hand and
saiil court at Mianii. I'lorida on this
16th dav of February, 197*
RICHARD P HRINKElt
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Hade Couniy I'tori.tu.
By t: P COPBLAMB
Aa Deputy cieik
iCIroult '"urt Seal i
\ it BUT L. CARR1CAKTB. ESQ.
i4l N.W.- 7th Street
Miami, Florida |SII
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone No. 649-7917
3/G-12 -::>;
NOTICE UNDER
FIOTITI008 NAMSiLAsV..
NOTICE la HEREBY GrVENtBat
thje uudcrsigncd. desiring, to engaKe
In business under the fictitious- name
of AJiC BtlSLNEME SYSTEM** at 1120
N.W. US Drive. Miami. Fla.. 3316'.'.
Intends to register said naine with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
KEHOJO, INC
A Fla. Corp.
RICHARD E WA1.UOF. President
BRUCE HERMELEE, ATTT.
MIIJ.EDGE, HORN. & HEHMEL.EB
Attoraeytor.ppUc.nt ^^^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE OIVISION
FILE NUMBER 76-1318
Division B< ANTON
IN RE: ESTATE OP
RUTH ROJXJEN
Decensed
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO AM. PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE ANI> AM. OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
TOTJ ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of RUTH RODGEN. deceased, File
Number 71-1318. is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probnte Division, the address nt which
is Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Fla. 33130. The
personal representative of the estate
is SHIRLEY U'KKANT. whose ad-
dress Is 100 West Avenue, Miami
B.-acb. Fla .1.1I3!! The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons havit'i claims or de-
mands against the estate are rejouli
e.l. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE PATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
Ni.TH'E, to file with the rlarl
of the above court a written statement
of any claim or demand they mav
have. Each claim must he In writing
mid must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent n' artornev nn.l
the amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the dnte when it win be-
come due shall be stnted. If the claim
is contingent or unllouidated. the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be stated.
If the claim is secured, the security
shall be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the claim |
to the clerk to enable the clerk to
mail one copy to each personal repre-
sentative.
AM persons interested In the estate
to whom a coov of this Notli-e of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
ouired. WITHIN THREE MOXTHS
PROM THE DATE OF THE F"'ST
PI IMITATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objeoUons they may have
thai challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the personul representative, or the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DRMAXDS. AND
OHJKCT'O.VS NOT so FILED WILL
BE FOREVER RARRED.
Date of the first puuiication of this
of Administration: March f.
1976
SHIRLEY AI'FFANT
As P'Tsonal Btirasootatlve of the
Estate of RUTH RODGEN
Deceased
ATT' I'tNRY FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:
LEON A EPSTEIN
IM Lincoln Road
Miami BeMfc, Fla. 33139
T-iephone: S38-7670
3/5-12
Obituaries
Charles Schwartz Passes at 100
Charles B. Schwartz of Miami Miami: and a sister. Mrs. Bes-
Beach. formerly of Brooklyn,
died on Feb. 6 in his 130th
vear. He was born in Roumania
in 1876 and came to New York
in 1899.
A founder of the First Brook-
lyn Roumanian-American Con-
gregations, which was oraan-
i7Pd in 1894 bv his mother,
Clara Schwartz, he served as its
first president and was a life
msmber..
Schwtrtr is survived bv his
wife, Ida Brecher Schwartz; a
son. Marvin, of Brooklyn; a
daughter. Lucille Blackton, and
a son-in-law. cantonal soloist
Henry Avrum LeClair. of South
SCHENKMAN
FANNIE. 7S. of Miami Beach, fnr-
mrly of Staten
Island. N. Y.
oassed t w a v
Feh. 28. 197S
Survived bv he-
husband. Israel.
i on, Albert
of Coral Gables.
' dauahrer. Mrs
pe'nvi e i, of
Com I Gableo. 1
grandchild. De-
bra, and one
sister. M r s
Rose Sonwarts
of Miami Reach.
She was a I if.
Member of the
Zionist Organi-
zation of Amer-
ica. Also Drma.
I a s Gardens
Auxiliary and a member of the Ja-
cob C Cohen Temnle. Services were
held Sundnv from The Riverside
M'aan1 Reach. Interment Mt. .Woo
Cemetery.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME.'
^lyintthr Jews!) Csmmus.tr anct 11)1
ORIHOOOI
coNSERmnvr
_______^ imMuiwii
EmimjelGomon 115461 lkeesks
Harry Goiden (1964) James I Go.tfon
Telephone aSS-MM___
sie Cooner. of Miami Beach
Services were hekL at The
Riverside in Miami Beftch. with
interment at Mt. Judah Ceme-
tery in Brooklyn.
iii'tFW Evelyn. 7". of Miam
Gordon.
GARF' ICK. Miriam, of North Mi-
ami B'ach. levltt
GOT ngTEIN. KI, 70. of North Miami
Reach Interment Mt. Nebo
Gordon.
stoit. Lillian. 8 Reach Interment S'ar of Davidi
Riverside.
LEVY. Bernard. 8. of Miami Beach.
Interment Lakeside. Riverside.
SOKOI OW. Herman. 7s. of Miami
Bench Interment M' Nebo Gordon.
GOLDSTEIN. Harry R. 79. of Miami.
Interment Mt Nebo. Riverside
HERO. Aaron J.. 6, of Miami Beach.
Interment ML Nebo. Riverside.
SCHE.NICMAN. Fannie, IB, of Miami
Beach. Interment Mt. Nebo. River-
side.
BRANDT. Abraham. 84. of Miami.
Interment Mt. Nebo. Gordon.
BERKOWITZ, Louis. 17, of North
Miami Beach. Interment Mt. Neb*
1-evltt.
JACOBS, Max. 77. of North Miami
Beach. Interment Lakeside. River-
side.
KLACSNER. Solomon, 70. of Nortla
Mem Bench. Riverside.
WACHT, Rose. 89. of Miami Beach
and New York Riverside.
REROER, Rose. AS, of North Miami
Reach. Mt. Sinai. Riverside.
BERNSTEIN Stella. 89. of North
Miinr Reach. Interment Mt. Nebo.
Levitt.
SOI OHON, Fannie, M, of Miami
Reach. Interment Mt. Nebo.
Riverside.
WEIL. Amelia. 5, of Miami Beach.
ItlHliliL
JACOBS. Irvin*. 80. of Miami B-arht
BlaBbarif.
KORSON Anna Shore. 87. of North
Miami lleu.h. Interment Mt Nen.e
Riverside
1.IFSTE1N. Jack. 71. of Miami IT
Interment 1-ikescle. Newman.
STEIN. Nettie. o< Miami Bench
Interment LaJ GELE
(VONUM-S' INC.
IEVITT
memorial chapels
tZ1 Pe*>ret MM. Il W. Dixie Mt
Hollywood, e-la. Mort* sHsmi. Fi
tens/ 4-evilt. F.O. Albert Lsrtee, r.a.
NOTICE l"inro
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEI.'HBV f!IVEN that
i!.. u'llerslKne.l. desiring to etiKSMr
in bMslnesji utwlcr the fUV'r'nu. nani-<
of El HERA] I"> DEI EWLIO Et,
ARTISTA el M60 SV.' "4 Aw*., Miami.
Fla. Intend, '.o reslstar
the I "lerk of the > Iroull Courl o( I lad*
County !"
BS
.MAIIIc BARRBB '
5-12-1M6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
DADE COUNTV FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 76 S0.-8
NOTICE TO DEFEND
In The Matt- r of An Adoption.
JOSEPH loI'.KNZA WILSON. JR..
and.
CORINB LEE STANFORP WIIJJON.
Petitlon.M
VOL. BALDWIN HINXKV. c/o Inea ,
Hinsey, Aliola Town. Biniini. Rahar :
mas, take Notice thai B i'etitlon io-|
adopt your natural, child hsja haan I
filed in this Court by the above mimed ;
petltinnejw, and you ,;.re reouired tn ,
file youn written defense* and tra
verses to, the i.eiitH.n with the Clerk
of this i\iurt, and t" serve a rn>
thereof uoon.Josojih C I mussel. Attor-
ney. 99SS NVe 7th Avenue. Miami.
Florida MHO. not. later than April 9t
1!'7G. Otherwise i Default will be en-
tered aRalnst you. and the 'Allegation
of the Petition will be taken as con-
fessed. DATED: February 27th. 1978.
Miami. Florida.
"RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk, Circuit CourL
By N. A. HEWETT. D.C
l/e-l!-l-2l

When a loss occurs
away from home.
MM Ml WifflftS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
r 949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
13385 West Dixie Highway
Reprwenled by S. Levitt, F.D.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.


P2{
Page 16-C
*Jenisti norMiw
Friday, Mgrg s, i97fi
1976 CJA-IEF MEANS JEWISH SURVIVAL
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Federation Leaden Show That "You Make the Whereat*"
The uual PACESETTER BALL U Saturday e rnig,
March 6, at the Eden Roe. Reserve now through Mr.
Fischer, at 5764000. Finalizing plan* for the elegant
Mack tie event are (left to right) Federation Vice Pre-
ident and Pacesetter Chairman Norman H. Lipoff, na-
tional UJA Chairman Irving S. Worry, and Federation
President Harry B. Smith.
Leader, of the MERCANTILE DIVISION planning a
major meeting and dinner in late March to cnlminate
the Division's campaign include (left to right): Interior
Design Chairman Edith Irma Siegd; Home Furnishings
Chairman David Parker, Furniture Traveler* Chairman
Zelda King; and Interior Deiigu Co-Chairman Gun Jacob-
Federation Women's Division campaign leaden* are observing a milestone in
their 1976 community-wide effort surpassing II million in local women's giving.
Spearheading that effort this year are (left to right): Miami Beach Chairman
Bca Levy; South bade Coordinator Marvi* Srhaectei-, Campaign Vice Presi-
dent Coldie Goldstein; South Dade Coordinator Mikki Futemick; North Dade
Coordinator Maxine Schwartz; and Women's Division President^
Smith.
Dr. M. J. Grosnman (left). Chairman of COASTAL TOWERS residents
for CJA-IEF, and guest speaker Dr. Henry I. Sobel (right) of Brazil,
helped honor Mr. A Mrs. Ted Berman (center) for their years of ded-
ication to the campaign and Jewish survival.
Asher Nairn, Assistant Direc-
tor of Israel's Foreign Minis-
try, will address residents of
SEACOAST TOWERS
NORTH on Sunday, March
7. Leading the 1976 cam-
paign effort for the building
are General Chairman Sam-
uel Kosman, and Co-Chair-
men Ben Essen and Edwin
S. Schweig.
At MAISON GRANDE, Chah>]
man Sidney L Bernbaum
(left) and Honorary Chair-!
man Isadora II. Abrama
(right) gathered residents to
honor Mr. & Mrs. Nathan
Shukovsky. Guest speaker
Ben Easen (second from left)
addressed them about th. ir
campaign support.
North Dade Women's Division "Sponsors" gathered for a most success
ful campaign event hosted by Mrs. J. Allen Siegel (second from left).
CnesU included Mrs. Donald Feldman (left). Mrs. Martin Goodman
(second from right) and Mrs. Norman Klein.
Rabbi Max A. Lipac
Beth Torah Congregation
wiU speak for CJA-IEF o.
Sunday, March 14. lo gather-
ed residents of BUCKLEY
TOWERS, led by Chairmu
Jack Leeb, Co Chairmsi
Elaine Miller, aud Goonlins.
tors Morris M. Kling sad
Coldltt-rs.
At the RONEY PLAZA last week, Chairman Nathauiel
Kutcber (left) and Special Gifts Chairman Louis Colemau
(right) helped gather residents for a special campaign
address by Col. Baruch Levy (center), an Advisor on So-
cial Affairs In Israel's Prim.' Minister.
South Dade Women's Division "Sponsors" gathered last week at the
Mutiny Club. Together with nearly 40guests were (left to right):Soatk
Dade Campnign Coordinator Mrs. David Schaeeter-, Mrs. CernU
Schwartz S. D. Sponsor Chairman Mrs. Alvin Philipsou; and rasa
speaker Howard Stone.
if FORTE TOWERS Co-Chair-
* man Albert Johnson. Chair-
man George Kotiu, and Co-
Chairmen Joseph Zelnet
and Jack llnzi-lkorn rimm-
ed guest iBennaT Rabbi Hen-
ry Sobel last week for the
uilding's major Miami
Beach campaign event.
Consul General of Israel Emanuel Shimoiii (left) spoke to a large eaav
paign gathering last week at WINSTON TOWERS "200." TI*
building's CJA-IEF leadership includes (left to right):Chairman Rob'
ert Hit kin. Max Krieger, and Joseph Kami.
Pacesetters at AVENTURA
gathered at the home of Mr.
A Mrs. Sam Rosenberg (cen-
ter). GMJF Pacesetter Chair-
man Norman II. Lipoff (sec-
ond from left) spoke to lead-
ers including Aventnra Pace-'
setter Vice Chairmen Arnold
Meyer (left) and Trudy Rose
{second fro- right) and
Aveatura General Chairman
Ai BYRON HALL, leaders including (left to right) Chairman Job*
Temple. Honorary Chairman Harry Sacks and Women's Csnunaaa
Ada Weinberg gathered residents to hear a special 1*76 campaign a*
dress by Israel's Consul General Emaanel Skiason* (right).



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