The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02452

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
~<3fewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 5
Miami, Florida Friday, January 30, 1976
By Mail 50c. Two Section?. Price 25 renu
Politico's Wife Can Embarrass Him
SEN. JAVITS
yarmulke and all
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
The Ja' its case differs from
others in olving the private af-
fairs o"f public persons that
ha' e been hittint,' the headlines.
Its difference lies in a plural
as against a singular. For a
welcome change it is not about
politics and sex but about poli-
tics and the sexes.
In that sense it is a more
modern case, as befits a time
when wives are still married to
husbands but at least among
a militant minority want to
be fiercely independent about
their own lives and careers.
THE IMMEDIATE problem
of Sen. Jacob Javits (R., N.Y.)
is nonetheless anguished for be-
ing very modern. Consider the
scenario. He is liberal and Jew-
ish, a senator from a state
which is hea< ily both. He has
worked for civil rights, civil
liberties, democracy, American
independence of the Middle
East oil cartel and a fair chance
for Israel to survive against its
enemies.
Now comes the news that his
wife has been doing public re-
lations work for the government
of Iran, is registered as its agent
and gets more than $60,000 a
year for her efforts.
P.S. The Shah of Iran is none
Continued on Page 3-A
Rabin Arrives Here for Talks;
More Concessions to be Asked
ClOSIkG OF TIMNA MINES A HOW
Ghost Town In
EilaVs Future?
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Fear continued to mount in
Eilat that Israel's southern-
most city and sole outlet to
the Red Sea would become
a ghost town after the Tim-
na copper mines are closed
down and its dismissed em-
ployes are forced to find jobs
elsewhere.
Minister of Commerce and
Industry Haim Barlev, who
flew to Eilat Jan. 5 after a
general strike protesting the
shut down paralyzed the
town, told the Knesset that
there was no hope of getting
the money losing copper
works out of the red for the
next five years.
THE TIMNA mine workers
won a reprieve of uncertain
duration when Barlev promised
that the copper mines would not
be shut down until alternative
jobs are found for its 700 em-
ployes. But he hedged his prom-
ise on further consultation with
his colleagues on the ministerial
economic committee which had
recommended to the govern-
ment that the deficit-ridden in-
dustry be shut down.
New job prospects are also
uncertain. Labor Minister Mo-
Continued on Page S-A
'Leakers9 Due for Prison
In Proposed Legislation
Press Reacts Angrily 3-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Leading Israeli editors re-
acted bitterly against a new regulation approved by the Cab-
inet which would make reporters liable to severe prison
terms for publishing information classified as secret.
The measure, based on
the 1957 Espionage Law, is
intended to plug leaks of
classified information from
Cabinet sessions and other
high level sources that have
plagued Israeli leaders for
many years and recently
caused severe embarrass-
ment to Premier Yitznak
Rabin.
MOSHE ZAK, a senior
editor of Maariv, Israel's
largest daily, called the
measure "most seriaus" and
charged that it marked the
beginning of political cen-
sorship. Zak, who is vice
chairman of the Press Coun-
cil, said he would no longer
be able to claim to friends
abroad that Israel's press
was free of political censor-
ship. Zak's views were shar-
ed by many other prominent
Israeli journalists.
The measure, which must be
approved by the Knesset's For-
eign Affairs and Security Com-
mittee, was endorsed by the full
Cabinet with one abstention.
Continued on Page 13-A
Invitation to Address Congress 2-A
WASHINGTON (JTA)
For the third time since he
took office as Premier of Is-
rael in June, 1974, Yitzhak
Rabin arrived here Tuesday
for talks with President Ford
and other top U.S. officials.
They are regarded by ob-
servers here as the most
crucial in the 28 years of
U.S. Israeli relations.
Rabin, accompanied by his
wife, received a full-dress
welcome on the White House
lawn by President Ford. This
is the Israeli leader's second
State visit to Washington.
His first, as Premier, was
in September, 1974. His
meeting here with Ford last
June was not a State occa-
sion.
THE PREMIER, beginning an
eight-day visit to the U.S., ad-
dressed a joint session of Con-
gress Wednesday after receiv-
ing a formal invitation from
Continued on Page 2-A
ESPECIALLY AMONG CHILDREN
Addiction, Pushers
Rampant in Israel
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
And TUVIA MENDELSON
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Evidence of widespread and
increasing drug use and ad-
diction in Israel, especially
among children and high
school youths, is causing
alarm among parents, teach-
ers and government offi-
cials.
Attorney General Aharon
Barak has just submitted a
report on the drug problem
to the Cabinet with recom-
mendations that the author-
ities adopt a national policy
with respect to both the le-
gal and medical aspects of
drug procurement and us-
age.
The Cabinet is expected
to discuss the matter short-
ly, possibly at its next ses-
sion.
BARAK NOTED that narcot-
ics use increased conspicuously
after the 1967 Six-Day War and
has permeated all segments of
Israeli society. According to
Health Ministry estimates, there
are over 1,600 drug addicts in
Israel and the number of ad-
dicts persons who regularly
use drugs is believed to be
increasing at a rate of 150 a
year.
Continued on Page 2-A
j..... .. .
PRIME MINISTER RABIN
U.S. HOPEFUL
Lebanon:
A Political
Solution
Warning to Syria 8-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The United States looks to "a
political accommodation" in Le-
banon which will "preserve the
security of all the Lebanese
communities."
Under questioning, State De-
partment spokesman John Tratt-
ner said, in reference to the
Syrian government's mediation
with the warring parties, that
"we would, of course, be en-
couraged by a successful out-
come of what appears to be
a serious effort to achieve a
ceasefire that sticks and a po-
litical accommodation in Leba-
non which would be acceptable
to and preserve the security of
all Lebanese communities."
TRATTNER later stressed
that "we are assuming that any
arrangement reached has to be
acceptable to the Lebanese gov-
ernment and leadership and has
to preserve the security of all
the Lebanese communities."
Questioned about the com-
ment by Undersecretary of State
Continued on Page 7-A
Fulbriglit Firm Advises Arabs
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Former Arkansas Sen. J. Wil-
liam Fulbright arranged an
agreement for a Washington
law firm with which he is af-
filiated to give "advice and
guidance" to the United Arab
Emirates, records at the De-
partment of Justice examined
by the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency showed.
Acting for the firm of Hogan
and Hartson, which is register-
ed as a foreign agent at the De-
partment, Fulbright initiated
correspondence last summer
with UAE Ambassador Saeed
Ahmad Ghobash for a proposal
"under which I and my firm
would serve as counsel" to the
Emirates, a group of small
sparsely populated sheikhdoms
with vast petroleum resources
along the Persian Gulf.
COPIES OF the Fulbright
letter, dated Aug. 12, outlining
services and calling for an an-
nual retainer fee of $25,000.
and Ghobash's acceptance of the
proposal dated Nov. 28 are on
file at the Department as re-
quired by law. Fulbright joined
Hogan and Hartson Feb. 1, 1975,
less than a month after he left
the Senate where he had serv-
ed 30 years, half of that time as
chairman of the Foreign Re la-
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 2-A
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Friday, January 30, 1975
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Rabin Arrives Here for Talks
Continued from Page 1-A
House Speaker Carl Albert, and
it was the first time an Israeli
leader has been given this hon-
or.
Rabin was also scheduled to
speak before the National Press
Club on Thursday. Rabin, who
served for five years as Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S.. was
guest of honor at a White Housd
dinner tendered by President
Ford. Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger was also slated to
host a luncheon in his honor.
In return, Rabin will give a
reception for American officials.
Although no agenda has been
announced, it is virtually cer-
tain that Rabin's talks with
Ford, Kissinger and others are
including discussions of the
Lebanese civil war and the im-
pact of its outcome, the prob-
lem of further Israeli negotia-
tions with Syria for a new in-
terim agreement on the Golan
Heights and the composition of
future Middle East peace talks,
including the Geneva confer-
ence.
THE U.S. Administration has
made it clear that it insists on
movement toward a settlement
of the Arab-Israeli conflict this
year for domestic and interna-
tional political reasons.
Mainly, it is sneculated, the
pressure for settlement comes
at this time as a consequence
of the pro-Palestinian resolution
in the United Nations. Should
the Security Council move to
support it, the U.S. has already
vowed to veto it on the basis
that it is essentially aimed at
the destruction of Israel.
Since adrinistration policy is
not to "tol rate stalemate in the
Middle East, the pressure that
w*ll be nut on Rabin during his
visit hi*re for new concessions
is designed to take the Gutting
edge off the U.S. veto at the UN.
BUT PRIOR to his departure
for the U.S. from Jerusatem late
Sunday, Premier Rabin declared
that the Arabs "want to destroy
us by phases," and he express-
ed profound pessimism about
prospects for peace.
Furthermore, while declaring
that Israel is prepared to offer
"far-reaching territorial com-
promises in behalf of peace,"
he flatly asesrted that new in-
terim agreements have already
been ruled out by his govern-
ment.
This was intended to serve
as a warning to the Ford admin-
istration not to press Rabin for
an accord with Syria similar to
the accord reached with Egypt.
Involved in the warning was
the sensitive Golan Heights is-
sue, which is alreadv sorely
rocking the Rabin coalition.
Addiction, Pushers
Rampant in Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
Barak's report said that a
1971 gurvev showed that five
percent of Israeli high school
students used drugs, mainly
hashish.
i
Behind Invitation to Rabin
WASHINGTON (JTA) Speaker Carl Albert
has invited Israeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin to address
a joint session of Congress which was to meet on
Wednesday.
It was understood when Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat was invited to address the joint session of Con-
gress at the urgings of the Ford Administration, that
Congress would accept that request on condition that
Rabin would have the same privilege on his next visit
to Washington.
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He said no data wee available
on the number of student drug
users now.
The Attorney General's re-
port coincided with complaints
of drug use at high schools in
Jerusalem, south Tel Aviv,
Herzliya and Yahud. Three stu-
dents at the Rehavia Gymnas-
sium in Jerusalem, one of Is-
rael's most prestigious high
schools, have been questioned
by police about their alleged use
of "pot". marijuana and
three other students were re-
ported under suspicion.
IT WAS learned, meanwhile,
that police have detained five
youths as alleged drug pushers
at the Rehavia high school.
Tel Aviv district police are in-
vestigating a complaint by
teachers at a south Tel Aviv
school that pushers have been
seen near the school distribut-
ing drug-soaked cigarettes to
young children. According to
the complaints, the pushers try
to make addicts of the young-1
aters by offering them choc-,
olates and then enticing them'
to try hashish cigarettes.
Initially the drugs are given
away, but when the children
become "hooked." they are
forced to pay, the teachers'
complaint said. Similar com-
nlaints have come from Herzliya
north of Tel Aviv and Yahud.
a town east of Tel Aviv.
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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Darnel P. Moyni-
han (right) receives B'nai B'rith President's Medal, the
organization's highest award, for his "vigorous and elo-
quent defiance of diplomatic ambiguity" in scoring the
UN General Assembly resolution equating Zionism with
racism. B'nai B'rith President David M. Blumberg pre-
sented the award during a session of the midwinter meet-
ing of the B'nai B'rith board of governors, who heard
Moynihan call the world "a nastier and more dangerous
place" because of the UN vote.
Deny Report King Hussein,
Rabin Met at Red Sea
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin
and King Hussein of Jordan apparently share one thing
in common they enjoy relaxing on the sunny shores
of the Red Sea. Rabin and his wife vacationed at Eilat
for several days last week while Hussein was taking a
holiday at the adjoining Jordanian town of Aqaba.
Observers here expressed interest in the coinci-
dence, but official sources insisted there was no meet-
ting between the two leaders. Rabin held several meet-
ings in Eilat, which faces a serious economic crisis be-
cause of the impending shut-down of the Timna cop-
per mines.
He played some tennis and he and Mrs. Rabin parti-
ed for two hours at a local night club. It was not known
how Hussein passed his time.
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Javits' Wife an Embarrassment
Continued from Pa ui the tl Javits is.
He doesn t g ant llis people de-
mocratic dghts; his jaiis are
crowded with political prison-
era; he is always out front when
it comes 13 iud ing up oil prices
by the cartel, and he votes in
the United Nations with the
Arab states against Israel.
THE JAVIIS marriage has
long been known to be a strong-
ly independent one, with each
partner agreeing to give the
other considerable freedom.
Marion Javits has steadfastly
refused to move to Washington,
where the senator must neces-
sarily spend most of his time.
She has her own interests, in
theater and the arts, and she
has made it clear that she has
her own politics, too, as a mem-
ber of the Liberal Party rather
than either of the major ones.
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hsil she now d^cjires
' : nt give up* hei
r.'anian job, because ol her
' lence as a
t think it is a
u rationaliza-
tion. I think she means her
woman's autonomy, and has all
along meant to live it. It isn't
news to the senator either that
he is married to a woman with
strong individualist views, who
doesn't intend to let her hus-
band's job keep her from going
her own way.
THE NEWS that this attrac-
tive, high-sipirted woman is an
Iranian business agent ("the
chic of Araby" is the Way it is
being put) has, however, raised
two serious questions. One is
what the episode does to Sen.
Javits and his career. Fortu-
nately for him he doesn't have
to run again until 1980. or hi?
goose would have been cooked.
Even without an impending
election contest he is in trouble.
Every move of his on foreign
policy will now be watched
especially by Liberals to see
whether his wife's pecuniary in-
terests or her pillow talk has in-
fluenced him, or whether he is
leaning backward to show it
hasn't.
ON THE other side there will
be a conservative segment of
opinion which will want to
know whether the cenator is
the man he seems or a
mouse. It is still true, even in
an era of strong movements
for women's equality, that most
i a public figure
(ble n keep his fam-
il he claims
to know p the na-
tion's house in order.
The second question is one
that Marion Javits should in-
evitably have put to herself:
Would she have been worth so
big a public relations fee if her
husband were just a New York
lawyer and not one of the na-
tion's ablest and most influen-
tial senators? With all respect
to her ability the answer seems
pretty clear.
I MAKE both these comments
without any male rancor, but
simpiy to suggest how tangled
the question of women's inde-
pendent lives can be when the
woman is married to a public
figure. I sympathize with Mar-
ion Javits' passion for an au-
tonomous life. But given who
her husband is, her decision
to take and keep the Iranian
account must appear as a hi-
malayan error of judgment.
The time may come in our
views of public figures when
one person's desire for freedom
won't inflict so much hurt'on
another.
Until that time we are all
caught in a web of circum-
stance and must balance what
we want against what we in-
flict. It applies to both sexes
and to public and private life
together.
Gen. Allon Keynotes
Bdsld Meet Feb. 26
Gen. Yigal Allon, Deputy Prime Minister of the
State of Israel and Minister for Foreign Affairs, will
be guest of honor and the keynote spokesman when he
launches the 1976 campaign for the State of Israel
Bonds at the International Israel Bonds Inaugural Con-
ference here Feb. 26 to 28 at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
.More than 1,000 Jewish community leaders from
throughout the Western Hemisphere will pay tribute
to Allon and learn of the Bond role and the theme
of the 1976 campaign to meet the urgently needed eco-
nomic development programs.
GEN. ALLON, who began his military career with
the Haganah, was a member of the Military Advisory
Committee to the Prime Minister during the Six-Day
War in June, 1967, which formulated the strategic and
political policies.
He was also Commander-in-Chief of the Palmach,
the shock troop division of the Jewish Defense Forces
in Palestine, which played a major role in Israel's War
of Liberation.
After entering public life in 1954 as a member
of the Knesset, he served as Minister of Labor and was
responsible for public works and other development
projects, many of which were financed with the pro-
ceeds from the sale of Israel Bonds. He was appointed
Deputy Prime Minister in 1968 and is a member of the
Cabinet's Defense and Economic Affairs Committees.
He formerly served as Minister of Absorption and Min-
ister of Education and Culture.
Press Hits Back
At Repressive Move
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The representative bodies of
the press in Israel have
continued to vigorously pro-
test against the Cabinet de-
cision to extend censorship
regulations to areas of diplo
matic activity.
They pledged to fight the
proposed new measure when
it comes up for approval be
fore the Knesset Foreign Af
fairs and Security Commit-
tee. The committee of edi-
tors of daily newspapers said
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in a statement it would ask
for a meeting with Yitzhak
Navon, the chairman of the
Knesset committee.
MOST OF the criticism cen-
ters on the fact that this move
by the government is the first
ever into the realm of political
censorship. The critics argue
that it will tarnish Israel's dem-
ocratic reputation and will not
secure the secrecy of state com-
munications as the government
intends.
The only way to do that, the;
critics argue, is to plug leaks at
source. Otherwise they, will con-
tinue to dribble out if not
through the local press, then
through foreign media publish-
ing stories with overseas date-
lines to skirt Israeli censorship.
The Cabinet's draft regula-
tions provide that information
on secret communications be-
tween Israel and foreign gov-
ernments and secret meetings
between officials of Israel and
of countries which have no
diplomatic relations with Israel
is now to be censorable.
Transmission of such infor-
mation can incur a jail term of
up to 15 years and publication
of it up to seven years.
THE EDITORS' committee
said they would ask to appear
before the Knesset committee to
argue their case. This incipient
political censorship, their state-
ment said, would have grave
repercussions for Israel at home
and abroad. The Journalists As-
sociation (the professional un-
ion) also condemned the mea-
sures in strong terms and
pledged to fight against them.
Eric Silver, of "The Guard-
ian," chairman of the Foreign
Press Association, also protest-
ed "in the strongest possible
terms."
He warned, "This violation of
the freedom of the press is a
serious threat to Israel's dem-
ocratic reputation."
The chairman of the Press
Council, Prof. Nathan Roten-
streich, also attacked the pro-
posed legislation saying it would
do more harm than any con-
ceivable advantage it might
achieve.
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Southeast Region Women's Division Jewish Affairs
SEMINAR-EDEN ROC HOTEL
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5
MORNING: 9:30 A.M. DR. SANFORD SHAPERO
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Rabbi Shapero is the National Director of the Institute for
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--------O--------
BRUNCH: 11:30 A.M. DR. ARTHUR HERTZBERG, Pres.
"ZIONISM"
Rabbi Hertzberg is National President of American Jewish
Congress
CHAIRPERSON: JUDITH TEPPER
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Page 4-A
vJemsti Fhrktiari
Friday, January 30, 1975
j
1
i
1
1
High Level Schizophrenia
There seems to be a profound schizophrenia in U.S.
foreign policy, particularly as it relates to the United
Nations.
On the one hand, there is Ambassador Daniel P.
Moynihan, whose acid tongue is a welcome refresher to
the otherwise groveling stance we took at the UN before
his appointment.
Into the bargain, there is the recent statement by
President Ford affirming the administration's total sup-
port of the substance and method of Moynihan's debate
as if he would be empowered to say anything there
with which the White House were not in total agree-
ment in the first place.
On the other hand, there is our foreign policy as
enunciated by Henry Kissinger or at least as it was
enunciated by Henry Kissinger up until the recent past
and his several demotions in rapid order.
And that policy is to continue to grovel at the
United Nations before the Soviet Union, the Arab bloc
and the Third World as if Ambassador Moynihan were
not there representing us at all, using that tongue of
his like a rapier to expose the hypocrisy and crass ex-
pediency not only of our opponents, but also of our
allies.
We note with satisfaction the presentation to Moy-
nihan of a high B'nai B'rith Award for his service at the
United Nations. Certainly, the Ambassador deserves it,
but increasingly, we are not quite sure for whom he
speaks in those jaundiced halls along the East River.
The Mania for Secrecy
Israel's sharp response to information leaks and
those who leak information is to be deplored.
The government has moved to make "offenders"
subject to prosecution and imprisonment. Abrogation of
the right of free speech and a free press is a step toward
totalitarianism and would seem alien to a Jewish State.
Somehow, the move comes uncomfortably close upon
the heels of an allegedly angry communication from
President Ford to Prime Minister Rabin about the "leak-
ing" of "top-secret" information to the press.
The angry communication has since been denied
both in Washington and in Jerusalem, but the Rabin
government's proposed legislation to deal with "offend-
ers" speaks for itself.
It seems like a century ago by now, but it was only
on August 9, 1974, that President Ford took office un-
der the most unusual circumstances in American his-
tory. On that occasion, addressing himself to the cause
of the changeover in mid-administration of the Nixon
presidency, Mr. Ford vowed to keep an open door and
to run an open government.
It did not take long for the American people to re-
cognize that they were being hoodwinked once again.
But what does seem strange is that Prime Minister Rabin
should permit President Ford to extend the growing
White House mania for secrecy from Washington to Je-
rusalem.
Who is governing whom?
Demand for Quid Pro Quo
Despite these and other tensions, Prime Minister
Rabin's visit to Washington this week suggests that all's
well on the surface at least.
The invitation to Rabin to address a joint session
of Congress magnified that impression.
There is no doubt that top on the list of priority
subjects discussed between Israel and the U.S. was Is-
rael's boycott of the United Nations debate on the Mid-
dle East.
That can mean little more than a Ford demand for
quid pro quo what Israel would be expected to "pay"
in return for the privilege of American assent to the
boycott.
In turn, that can mean essentially one thing- the
first step toward an Israel-Syrian interim accord and
just what concessions Israel would have to pay for that
too, especially considering the U.S. veto of a separate
Palestine State Monday.
He Opposes Teachers9 IJnion
...... .. ,-.^.- -____I I-. J Ml I TTIl ll I III ""H~lW ('fit! IIVI' KK (if I nH 11 ct i-i .. 1 .
Jewish Floridian
opk.ck A.xD -L^-jg toffJBgf^ 3; T.KPHONE ,:,,,,
Sffi MSSgg 2JEt%Z *** M THOMPSON
Puhiiih J Merchandise Advertised In Its Column..
Published every Frhiay since tg7 by The JewishVorKI'w,
Second-Class Postage Paid at Miami. Pla.
The Jew.sh Floridian has absorbed the Jewish unltv >nri <.. i.
Jewisn Weekly.
Feature Synd4-
Volume 49
Friday, January 30, 1976
rpHE FACULTY of Miami-Dade
Community College is vot-
ing this week on whether or
not they want a collective bar-
gaining agent to represent their
interests in contractual and
other business matters with
the college's administration
and board of trustees.
If the majority of the facul-
ty approves, then a teachers'
union will be coming to tht col-
lege's three campuses.
I DREAD that possibility.
Every instinct tells me I should
be for a union. My earliest
childhood memories are imbu-
ed with the spiiit of the work-
er's struggle against entrench-
ed big business interests.
Mindlin
ttumnatttflUMUiBtftd
my lif\ mostly I heard of Da-
vid Du!>insky. And beyond him,
on a Parnassus all their own,
were William Green and John
L. Lewis, before the American
In those formative years of Federation of Labor and the
Congress of Industrial Organ}.
zations merged, who were the
truly divine heroes of the op-
pressed proletariat.
Although it had nothing jn
the literal sense to do with
unions, the veterans' march on
Washington became the flam-
ing symbol of the indifference
of the privileged classes to the
suffering of the "masses," when
unemployed and hungry World
War I servicemen came to the
ca' ital to ask for their veteran's
b nefit before it was due, and
President Hoover ordered the
army to fire on them,
WE WORE that ag->oy like a
badge in the same way that
-^ome of us wear a bieeding Star
of Da\id today with the He-
brew word. "Z'kor""Remem-
ber" on it.
In my own house, there was
a schizophrenia about unions
because my father was neither
oppressed nor a proletarian,
and he would surely have been
incensed to be considered one
of the "masses"
Still, as a Russian emigre,
he coulu hardly conceive of
voicing opposition to the con-
c.jt <.f union union against
religious persecution, union
against political oppression,
onion against racial discrimi-
nation and, yes why not?, union
against economic exploitation.
BUT THAT was all theoret-
ical, especially because in his
expeiicnce (and therefore in
my own) most of these things
did not exist for him in any
meaningful way in this coun-
try.
And so, I heard about things
like the Farband, Workmen's
Circle, Sholem Aleichem schools
and Ikuf only years later when
they could no longer have,
meaning for me at least not
in the same way that they were
organizations embodying flam-
ing Yiddish and proletarian
Continued on Page 12-A
Some Columnists are Dinosaurs
Number 5
28 SHEVAT 5736
Unlike the dinosaur, which
disappeared because it could
not adapt to the en'ironTint,
some of our newspaner column-
ists continue to be published
desoite their obvious irrelev-
ance. And they are incompetent
and immaterial as well.
It's bad enough that they
write as if the Cold War is an
imnortant nart of our livs to-
day; a few, like Victor Riesel
haven't got past World War II
vet. Take a recent niece by him
in defense of the CIA's involve-
ment in Italian politics:
"SEN. FRANK Church's in-
telligence con.mittee mvestim-
tors didn't bother to look, for
example, into the assassination
of Carlo Tresca, one of the
purest of anti-Communist cru-
saders right in the heart of Man-
hattan. That was a GPU killing
albeit years ago. It was handled
for the Italian Communists by
a Mafia hit man."
Do you know when Tresca
was killed? In 1943. Do you know
that this sainted radical (to me,
at least) was an anarchist-
syndicalist who was the target
for Mussolini's Fascists for de-
cades? That in 1943, Italian
Communists were underground,
hunted nartisans fighting with
our OSS? That no respectable
journalist or historian has come
up with a GPU-Mafia theory of
the murder? That in his book,
"The Ouest for the Dream."
John Roche (another cold
warrior), writes off the "fatried
syndicalist Carlo Tresca (later
to be murdered in New York bv
either a Communist or Fascist
gunman, or perhans a non-
political member of both pay-
rolls)"?
THE POINT isn't who killed
Carlo Tresca, of course. It's the
irrelevance of such ancient his-
tory which Riesel conveniently
doss not date in order to carry
on the only crusade he has
known for almost four decades
and in defense of the CIA.
If so hapnenod that ex-CIA
spook William Buckley had a
similar column that day. What
interested me more, however,
was the morning that Buckley
and Mike LaVelle ran side-by-
side.
It confirmed my belief that
the sophisticatedly-simple-mind-
ed Buckley (who, on the side,
runs with the radical liberal
chic) and the neighborhood-
saloon-simpleton are really the
same people. Don't let the tie
on one and the open-neck shirt
on the other fool you.
BOTH REDUCE the problems
of American life to two common
denominators: liberalism and
communism. (Their premise is
that their readers don't know
enough to distinguish between
the two. Thev deal in unreality
as if it were sacred scripture.)
Buckl-v-LaVelle, for instance,
writes,of welfare as a purely
st^te problem as if the great
migration from rural to urban
America hadn't taken place
these past 30 veirs. The noor
wore dumped into New York,
Chicago Detroit, etc., from Ala-
bama, Mississippi, Puerto Rico,
etc creating a monumental
welfare problem that belongs to
all of America and not just the
besieged cities.
On the other hand, LaVelle-
Buckley dishes out his saloon
dreams about "wealthy commie
broads" easily bedded by macho
teamsters (ignoring the manv
"gnv" teamsters who make pick-
uns in those neighborhood sa-
loons LaVelle frequents).
ONE MIGHT have written like
this with some authenticity 40
years ago, but today? When hall
the members of Marxist -
oriented splinters are FBI, CIA
and Army intelligence agents?
These particular columnists
have a view of American free-
dom, national and foreign policy
that can be politely described
only as reactionary based on
myths, not values, that were
long discarded by the great
majority of American, people.
With those views it is no sur-
prise that Buckley is an open
propagandist for Ronald Rea-
gan, LaVelle picks up George
Wallace, and Riesel follows Jay
Lovestone's line.
Know who Jay Lovestone
was? He was the leader of the
American Communist Party. He
was kicked out in 1929 and has
been advising George Meany
since then, or thereabouts.
THIS OBSESSION with Com-
munist evils inevitably seems to
lead these men into the trap, as
Ruck ley once wrote, that sees
life under a Fascist dictator as
"qualitatively huge" in its dif-
ference from Communist dicta-
tors when in real life it is their
similarities which are "qualita-
tively huge."
The real tragedy is not thai
life has passed the columni<
by but that editors with no h:-
torical background and, ap
parently, no access to rese->
material continue to lend th
newspapers' prestige to th
awful and dated drivel.


Friday, January 30, 1976
*Jewisti FIcrldKari
Page 5-A
JDL Charges it Was Barred Denied by NCSJ
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Jerry
Goodman, executive director of
the National Conference on So-
viet Jewry, denied a charge by
the Jewish Defense League that
he had barred the group's par-
ticipation in the World Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry scheduled
for Brussels in February.
The JDL charged that Good-
man said that neither Rabbi
Meir Kahane nor any other rep-
resentative of the JDL would be
admitted to the conference.
The group said it "would not
stand for such a violation of
basic democracy and the right
of freedom of speech." A JDL
spokesman declared, "We prom-
ise that further action will be
taken to guarantee that Rabbi
Kahane will be allowed to speak
at Brussels."
GOODMAN siid whit he had
told two JDL leaders, Dov Fisch
and Russel Kelner, was that the
setup of the conference does
not permit the JDL's nart'doq-
tion but that he had said that
when he goes to Bruss?ls to
meet with the international
steering committee he woulJ
raise the question of the attend-
ance of the JDL and other or-
ganizations.
Goodman ernbinH that th=
Brussels meeting is not an elect-
ed conference. He siid the
American participation is *wvn coordinated by the National
Conference and include do-
gates from the National Con-
ference, the Conferee? *'
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations and offi-
cials of the fund-raising apoara-
tus of the communities that be-
long to the Council of Jewish
iderations and Welfare Funds.
"The JDL is not part of that,"
he said.
The JDL said it is gathering
signed affidavits from officials
of various Jewish organizations
protesting the barring ol the
JDL.
IT SAID one of the first signa-
tures was that of Alexander
Tiemkin, who is in the United
States to seek help in getting
his daughter. Marina permis*-
sion to emigrate from the Soviet
Onion to Israel.
In 1971, Kahane was barred
trom the first international con-
ference on Soviet Jewry7 which
was also held in Brussels. He
was seized by Belgian author-
ities and deported from the
country.
Kahane, who is now serving a
jail sentence for parole viola-
tion at the Allenwood (Pa.) Fed-
eral Prison, is expected to be
released from prison at the end
of this month.
REPORT SEMI OFFICIAL ONIY
Israel, Spain Slate New Accord
Candy View Of
Kashruth 'Peculiar'
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
My first reaction to your arti-
cle on Jan. 23 that appeared
about a visit to the Kosher
candy factory was that it was
a spoof, but I am afraid it was
for real. How ridiculous and
misleading to equate clean with
Kosher.
I would hope that every Kosher
facility is clean. Likewise, I
would expect all candy factories
to be clean. The uniqueness of
a Kosher factory is not its spot-
less bathrooms. It is like saying
at the Seder table, "Why is this
night different from all other
nights, because the house is
clean."
Neither does a minyan on the
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Spain and Israel have indi-
cated semi officially that
they intend to set up diplo-
matic relations shortly. Spain
is the only Western Euro-
pean country which has
never had diplomatic ties
with Israel.
Spanish Foreirn Minister
Jose Maria de Areilza told a
television interviewer in
Spain Friday that he envi-
saged diplomatic ties with
Israel "in the not distant fu-
ture."
HIS ISRAELI counterpart,
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon.
responded in a statement wel-
coming the Spanish statement.
De Areilza said he would not
discuss the reasons why Spain
had never had ties with Israel
before, but noted that "all West-
ern nations have ties with Is-
rael."
He said that "Spain remains
faithful to the UN recommenda-
tions and resolutions on the
evacuation of all occupied ter-
ritories (by Israel^, the defense
of human rights of the inhabi-
tants of those territories, and
the right of the Palestinian peo-
ple to defend their aspiration to
possess their own country."
ASKED to comment on this,
Allon said: "All sovereign states
are perfectly entitled to their
views on any world problem.
When full contacts are estab-
lished it will be possible to have
fruitful exchanges and consulta-
tions on these problems."
Allon was recently reported
to have met in secret with Span-
ish officials somewhere in Eu-
rope to discuss future ties.
The Foreign Ministry here,
however, has never confirmed
these reports and still refuses
to do so. Meanwhile, in Cario,
Egyptian Foreign Minister Is-
mail Fahmy assured Parlia-
ment, on the basis of recent
high level contacts, that Spain
would not change its present
policy towards Israel."
I gave 200 years ago.
r"':"Vl
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Wvris Be Brief
Koheleth (Ecdaiastes)
........... ".......'........ri::;::.i_.L..:: -' ........''->* '
premises nor having a Ch"
as a worker say anything about
kashruth.
To constantly ma'e the p'Mntj
that Kosher is clcn is to bit-
tie windmills and to be overly-
concerned with ol.( wives' tabs.
Furthermore, by s'ich overem-
phasis, previously unthought of
doubts might sjjJ..ru> bi con-
sidered.
FOR SURE, thare was one
paragraph with r inwl to what
Kosher supr* isicn :i all about,
but so mu".h ws o-nitted (the
separation of dairy and parve,
checking out sources and pro-
ducts), dm to the stressing of
the cleanliness of the factory.
Such articles do a double dis-
t service. First, they mislead the
: public factually as to what kash-
ruth actually is, second, it is a
disservice to companies such as
Barton's, for if Kosher is sy-
nonymous with cleanliness, then
i any product produced under
hygienic conditions becomes
"Kosher."
It is no longer necessary to
seek products such as Barton's
that are under rabbinical super-
vision guaranteeing their true
Kosher character.
VICTOR D. ZWELUNG
B'nai Raphael Congregation
Haym Solomon loans his personal fortune to Robert Morns Courtesy Bettman Archives
200 years ago, many people did whatever
they could to help a young nation survive
against enormous odds.
The nation was the United States of
America. And some of those people were
Jews.
Some gave money to help. And others
fought and died for America in the
Revolutionary War. Because they believed
her moral principles and dedication to
human dignity and freedom were in
harmony with their own religious and
personal convictions.
200 years later, another country, another
young democracy carries on that priceless
heritage of dedication to human dignity and
freedom.
Her name is Israel.
This year, the United States of America
will celebrate its Bicentennial.
In less than 172 years, it will be Israel's
turn.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
O
We Are One*


Page 6-A
^Jenisf1 Fhridfiann
Friday, January 30, 1975
J
\
Boris Tsitlonak (left) huddles up for
warmth on a crude wooden bench in the
hamlet of Yeniseisk, while Dr. llya Glezer
(right) gazes at his paintings on Jewish
themes in the town of Bugatchny, in
photos obtained by the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry. Both are Moscow ac-
tivists exiled to remote Siberia for seek-
ing exit to Israel. Tsitlonak's "crime" was
to join a 15-second demonstration near
the Kremlin. Glezer, Russia's foremost
brain morphologist, was sent into exile
after serving three years in a harsh labor
camp.
TV Spoof a Welcome Relief
By UZI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Every second Thursday
night most Israelis stay home
glued to their televisions,
eagerly awaiting "N i k u i
Rosh" (Cleaning the Head),
the now-notorious satirical
"magazine" that pulls no-
punches in its pointed com-
ments on current events. On
Mondays, three days after
the show, the Knesset pre-
sidium is almost always
flooded with urgent motions,
submitted mainly by right-
wing members, in reaction
to this or that irreverent skit.
The Likud and the reli-
gious parties, as well as sev-
eral right-wing MKs of the
Labor Alignment, often feel
themselves or their tenets
attacked or insulted by the
charades enacted on "Nikui
Rosh." The gravity with
which the Knesset discusses
the TV show often supplies
new ideas for "Nikui Rosh"
script-writers.
FOR THE Likud and the reli-
gious parties, the authors and
editors of "Nikui Rosh" are-
enemies of the country. They
accuse them of sapping the
morale of the nation.
Among the skits these groups
have found particularly offen-
sive was one recently which
hinted that the government
might contemplate inducing a
war with Syria in order to di-
vert public attention from some
of the pressing domestic prob-
lems.
Another skit DOrtrayed Presi-
dent Ephraim Katzir as a chat-
terbox who talks freely and un-
wisely about Israel's alleged
nuclear potential. Other scenes
which expressed the script-writ-
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at 6:30 o'clock
Guest Speaker:
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ers' opposition to the govern-
ment's official policy on the
Palestinian problem have raised
vociferous protests, too.
Admittedly, "Nikui Rosh"
tries to balance its attacks by
savaging to the left too, but
somehow these efforts are re-1
garded more benignly by their!
victims.
THE PRODUCER and senior
editot of "Nikui Rosh" is Mor- j
dechai Kirschenbaum, a 36-
year-old University of California l
graduate. Kirschenbaum is re-1
yarded as one of the few quality j
TV professionals working in l
Israel.
In recent interviews, Kirs-j
chenbaum praised his superiors I
in the Broadcasting Authority
for their tolerance and liberal-1
ity. He says they have shown
remarkable readiness to let the
"Nikui Rosh" staff run the show
guided purely by professional
considerations.
In recent weeks, however,
Boardcasdng Authority direc-
tor general Yitzhak Livni twice
banned a particular skit, caus-
ing Kirschenbaum and his co-
workers to cancel the whole
show.
BOTH TIMES Livni interven-
ed to Drevent the screening of
scenes pointing up police in-
competence in coping with the |
extortion and "protection" rack-
ets run by certain strong-arm i
"families" in neglected rural i
settlements and urban areas.
Livni explained that he had
pledged to the State Attorney
that no reference would be
made on "Nikui Rosh" to a cer-
tain family whose case is now
sub judice.
Livni's ban raised the ire of
"Nikui Rosh's" staff, which
claimed that there was no legal
justification for his interven-
tion because the skit in ques-
tion hit at the nolice rather than
at the alleged criminals-
But they conceded that this
instance was the exception
rather than the rule.
All the other 600-odd sk**
have been broadcast as scripted
as a result of close coordination
between the program's editorial
staff and their administrative
superiors.
THE'DIRECTOR of televisionr
Arnon Zuckerman and Livni,
give the- "Nikui Rosh" writers
and editors full backing in the
face- of- outside criticism.
The theme-song that acconv
panies the show each week says:
"In the present difficult situa-
tion what one needs is to keep
one's head (brain) clean."
The 120 people who take part *
in producing "Nikui Rosh" are1
proud that Israelis can still
laugh at themselves. But there'
are a good many Doliticians who
would Drefer "Nikui Rosh" to
poke fun at somebodv eLse
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V' v 1
I


Friday, January 30, 1976
vJewisti Ffur idiotr
Page 7-A

U.S. Votes 'No' to Independent
Palestine Resolution at UNations
UNITED NATIONS The
United States cast its 13th
veto in the Security .Council
Monday night, voting ''no"
to the establishment of
an independent Palestinian
state.
The resolution, proposed
by Pakistan, Benin, Guyana,
Panama, Rumania and Tan-
zania, would also have de-
manded the withdrawal by
Israel from all occupied Arab
territory taken in the 1967
war.
That would have included
the Old City of Jerusalem
and the Golan Heights.
THE RESOLUTION also went
on record as recognizing the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion as the legitimate "repre-
sentatives of the Palestinian
people" and the "inalienable
right" of Palestinians to an in-
dependent state in Palestine.
Palestine was not d:fined by
the resolution, bat it is pre-
sumed that what was meant was
the establishment of an inde-
pendent state on the West Bank,
of Jordan and in the Gaza Strip.
In addition, the resolution
caiL-Q fjr the right of those
Arabs who left their homes in
the 194c war in Is.-ael to re-
turn there.
THE IS. "n;" vot?, cast by
Amba.- adur Laniel P. Moyni-
hcn, :oil-.w?d on the heels of
U.S. Hoping
For Political
Settlement
In Lebanon
Continued from Page 1-A
Joseph J. Sisco th national set'bment is needed in
Lebnmn. T>attnr said that
"while efforts are underway to
resolve the c-isis we have to
wait and see" the results of the
discussions between the Syrians,
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and the Lebanese Chris-
tians and Moslem groups.
While the impression has been
Jiat the U.S. has been in contact
with the PLO on the Lebanese
civil strife. Trattner indicated
that Wshington has not been in-
communication with the organ-
ization.
ASKED by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency whether the
PLO was among the "parties" to
which the U.S. had addressed it-
self on the preservation of Le-~
banon's integrity, Trattner said
the U.S. had been in touch with
the "governments" concerned,
the Arabs, Israel and European
countries.
He said he did not have '"spe-
cifics" on what had been agreed
upon in Lebanon so far nor what
Lebanese leaders have consent-
ed to the Syrian proposals.
Earlier this week, Syria as-
sured all parties to the conflict
in Lebanon that it would respect
Lebanese sovereignty. This was
tantamount to a Syrian promise
that it would withdraw all
troops of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization as soon as
"security allows."
Inglish-Jewish Frit Nffe
Jewish journalism will be the
theme of Friday night services
at Beth David Congregation this
week. At his 8:15 p.m. service,
Rabbi Sol Landau will gear the
spirit of the evening to the
theme, "English-Jewish Press
Night."
the Dec. 0 watt by the U.S. of
a "niinrai Arab condemnation
of Israel.
In casting the lone veto.
Moynihan declared that the
U.S. -ote "is not based on an-
tipathy to the aspirations of
Palestinians." He also declared
that "we are not closing the
door to introduction in the ne-
gotiating process of considera-
tions net yet in the process."
British Ambassador Ivor Rich-
ard earlier offered an amend-
ment to the resolution, which
had been worked out by Syria,
Egypt, Libya, Jordan and the
PLO, that "balance" was need-
ed in the resolution.
IN EFFECT, Richard wanted
it on record that the resolution
would not wipe out Security
Council Resolutions 242 and
333, the basis for the present
Middle East peace negotiations.
Richard's amendment failed.
Voting for the resolution were
the Soviet Union. France, Ja-
pan, Pakistan, Benin, Guyana,
Panama Rumania and Tanzania.
There were nine abstentions,
including Britain, Italy and
Sweden.
THIS LEFT the U.S. essen-
tially wolatad and in the posi-
tion of appearing pro-Israel and
anti-Arab, an illusion at best.
The Ford administration he
made it clear in no uncertain
terms that the President wants
to -see the continuation of move-
ment toward peace in the "Mid-
dle East, with Israel apparently
expected to make major con-
cession after major concession
to the Arabs.
The Ford administration's
lopping off last week of $500
million in Israel's expected $1.5
billion m military sales credit
for fiscal 1977 was a clear in-
dication that the pressure is
already building on Israel not
to construe the U.S. veto as ac-
quiescence to the current sta-
tus quo. (See story, Page 11-A.)
In addition, the visit in
Washington this week by Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin emerged as
a stage for confrontation on the
peace issue between Israel and
the U.S. It had originally been
billed as no more than a formal
state visit. (See story, Page 1-
A.)
ISRAELIS HELP THEM MOVE IN
38 Americans
Take Up Posts ]
In Sinai Desert
TEL AVIV (JTA) An advance party of 38
Americans connected with the U.S. early warning sur-
veillance station to be installed between Israel and
Egyptian lines in Sinai has arrived here. A chartered
plane with the first consignment of equipment for the
listening post landed at Ben Gurion Airport at about
the same time.
The Americans include nine State Department of-
ficials headed by Nicholas G. W. Thorne, field director
of the Sinai mission, and 21 technicians who will install
and help operate the advance warning post.
THE TECHNICIANS are employed by the Systems,
Inc., of Dallas, Tex., the private contractor selected by
the State Department to install, operate and maintain
the electronic station. About 200 Americans, all civil-
ians, will man the surveillance post once it is installed.
The equipment landed here included tractors, genera-
tors and mobile homes.
It was loaded on trucks that drove off immediately
for Sinai. The Israeli army is assisting in setting up
the American listening post that was provided for in
the Israeli-Egyptian Sinai accord signed last September.
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. V (


Page 8-A
fJewidh Fhrtdlian
Friday, January 30, 1976
ds Ghost Town
In the Future ?
For Port of Eilat?
J
Continued from Page 1-A
she Raram promised that the
dismissed mine workers would
be employed building a new air-
port seven miles north of Eilat,
a project already approved by
the Cabinet but not scheduled
to start for three months.
Israel Aircraft Industries was
reported planning to locate a
new metal plant in Eilat. but
that will not be ready for at
least three years. Baram con-
ceded that even those projects
would not provide jobs for all
of the taM-i#f mine workers.
JVIOREOVER, those projects
are in the construction field and
Eilat residents were wondering
what would become of the sci-
entists, engineers, lab techni-
cians and copper specialists em-
ployed in office jobs at Timna.
They cannot become tractor
tor operators or construction
workers overnight, it was re-
marked; and what of the wives
of these white collar emrioyes,
many of whom teach at Eilat's
schools? Thev would leave if
their husbands have to find jobs
elsewhere and the local school
system would suffer from a
shortage of teachers.
BARLEV told the Knss"t that
the government had no choice
but to shut down th mines in
view of the continuing depres-
sion in cooner prices on the
world market. He observed that
in other countries, better mines
than Timm had b? down for the same reason.
He estimated that if the works
were kept going thev would lose
IL 67 million in 1976 on top of
an IL 60 million deficit last vear
an-! thnt the outlook for f77
and 197S was even worse.
Meanwhile, a special commit-
tee has boen set up in Eilat with
the participation of Histadrut's
Trade Union Department and
various government agencies to
pvnlore the job problems with
Eilat authorities.
THE HOPE is to find em-
ployment in the Eilat area for
as manv of the laid-off workers
as possible. But the outlook was
not good. Apart from the cop-
per mines. Eilat's chief sources
of jobs are the port, the oil pipe-
line to Ashkelon and tourism.
The town has already suffered
a declin" in ocan-bome com-
merce since the Suez Canal was
reopened last June and, as the
Egyptians are allowing Israel-
bound cargoes though not Is-
rael-flag ships to use the
waterway, the importance of the
pipeline may diminish.
Although it en'ovs an excel-
lent climate Eilat was sunny
with temperatures in the 70s
while the rest of Israel was near
freezing the town cannot de-
pend soHv on tourism because
of its isolation from central Is-
rael.
^h" highway trip is long and
tedious, and Israel's internal
aMine, Arkia, has limited ca-
rncity. Transport Minister Gad
Yrwobi is nhnning a Beershe-
ba-Eilat railroad but that proj-
ect, not vet begun, will not be
completed for several years.
1
The beach at Eilat on the Red Sea is pop-
ular with tourists and natives alike. Many
of the 20,000 citizens of the city are em-
ployed in the tourist industry or work in
the port. Others used to find employment
in the nearby copper mines at Timna
which date from the time of King Solo-
mon. Now the future is Eilat is in doubt-
(Photo courtesy of Israel Ministry of
Tourism.)
Warning for Syria, Not Israel
Talks With Canadian
Were Friendly,
But Also Stern
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Official sources have indi-
cated here that the political
talks between Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allon and visit-
ing Canadian Foreign Min-
ister Allan McEachen were
friendly, although Mac-
Eachen was not entirely in
agreement with the Israeli
government's position on the
Palestinian question.
The sources said that Al-
lon explained to the Cana-
dian diplomat that Israel was
boycotting the current Mid-
dle East debate of the UN
Security Council as a sym-
bol and warning of its pos-
sible reaction to any chang-
es in the terms of reference
of the Geneva conference.
BUT ALLON said Israel did
not boycott every international
forum or conference at which
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization was present. He noted in
that connection that Israel
would be participating in this
year's Habitat Conference at
Vancouver despite the likely
presence of the PLO there.
MacEachen. who arrived, in
1 Israel on the final leg of a Mid-
dle East tour that took him to
Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and
Iraq, reportedly briefed Allon
on his impressions from the
Arab capitals.
He and the Israeli Foreign
Minister held a lengthy work-
ing session attended bv their
respective aides and were said
to have spent considerable time
dicus*ina bilateral relations be-
tween Israel and Canada.
ALLON reportedly pointH
o"t that several Western coun-
tries have taken legislative ac-
tion against the Arab boycott
of Israel and seemed to hint
that Israel would welcome
similar stens by Canada.
MacEachen was said to have
ben n-m-committal on that mat-
ter. Allon expressed warm
nrise for Canada's role in the
United Nations Emergency
Po^ce (UNEF) in .cinai and the
United Nations Disen-",oment
Observer Force (UNDOF) on
the Goten Heights.
Canadian units have partici-
pated in everv peace-keepin?
for^ sine* the inception of th
world organization.
THE TWO ministers agreed
to st"dv ways to close the trade
gap between Israel and Ca.na^
which is presently in Israel's
disfavor.
MacEachen said he would
study wavs to encourage Cana-
dian investments in Israel.
The Canadian visitor had a
busy schedule. He called on
President Eohraim Katzir and
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, visited
Jerusatem Mavor Teddy Kollek
at the Citv Hall, placed a wreath
on the Yad Vashem Holocaust
Memorial, visited Herzl's tomb
and hosted a dinner in Allon's
honor.
BEFORE leaving Jerusalem
for a tour of Galilee. MacEachen
visited Christian holy places in
East Jerusalem.
His tour was billed as a "priv-
ate visit" according to the pro-
tocol followed bv visiting for-
eign ministers who do not of-
ficially recognize Israel's sov-
ereignty in East Jerusalem.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Of-
ficials here said that Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger'"
reiteration in Copenhagen of
the U.S. warning against outeidc
intervention in the L-b^es-
conflict was aimed primarily at
Syria.
Noting that the Secretary.
who wa em'onte to Moscow
at the time, spoke against "any
unPter,l "tjon." sources hr
said that Kissinger knows th-"
no such action need be feared
from Israel.
THEY ADDED that Israel
mipht react onlv in face of ?
Syrian invasion of Lebanon b-it
di'i "ot intimate that the U.S. ;
would approve or condone an'
Israeli reaction under those cir- i
cumstances.
Meanwhile, officials deniec' j
reports that Premier ififitzhak j
Rabin considered postponing his
trip to Washington last wek be- i
casue of the worsening situation
in Lebanon.
State Department spokesman
John Trattner said in Washing- i
ton that the U.S. was "looking '
forward" to welcoming Premier
Rabin there this week.
H-* made the statement when
asked about reports that Rabin
might postpone his visit be-
caus" of tV L"bin->s'> situation.
U.S. officials said in Washing-
ton th3t t'^" had information
that so~e Palestinian units hiH
ente^c "^iion f*o~i Svrh b-tt
would n^t s^y whether thesr
units were actually fighting.
Spokesman it th' White
House and the State D'oarfn^n*
reiterated that t1** U.S. has
warned all outside parties
against intervening in Lebanon
but did not say what position
the U.S. would take if. in fact.
sMch intervention occurred.
A White House official said
the'-e wm "no evidence" that
Syrian military forces have en-
tered Lebanon but was unable
to replv when asked how he
pttiM d'etiiSMish between Syr-
ians and Palestinians.
WHEN rn in 10s' n-ei '"nt F/s^nhower
ordered U.S. marines landei in
I,"h?non \<-l>~n rh T."bans*
government appeared threaten-
ed, spokesmen emphasized that
th U. -. vroaM not intervene.
Trattner said, '"I would like
to make it clear that we are not
giving anv consideration to U.S.
intervention in Lebanon."
He added, "We are deeply
concerned about the deteriorat-
ing situation and everybody
concerned is aware of our
views."
'
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1


Friday, January 30, 1976
fJewisi) fkridicoi
Page 9-A
Israelis in Mexico City for Cultural Talks
MEXICO CITY A special
Israeli delegation headed by
Abba Geffen has arrived here
to negotiate implementation of
an agreement to broaden Israeli-
Mexican cultural and scientific
lies that was signed in Jerusa-
lem during President Luis Eche-
vcrria's visit there last year.
On the occasion of the dele-
gation's arrival, Sergio Nuelste-
jcr, secretary general of the
Central Jewish Committee, and
Leon Davidoff, president of the
Mexican-Israel Cultural Instit-
ute, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that they were "very
pleased'' and satisfied with the
pood and cordial relations exist-
ing now between Mexico and Is-
rael and between the Mexican
government and the local Jew-
is* community.
They added that it was im-
portant for American and Ca-
nadian Jewish leaders to know
this.
a a
Preferential Trade Accord
BRUSSELS The European
Economic Community is due to
sign next month preferential
trade agreements with three
North African countries Al-
geria. Morocco and Tunisia. The
EEC Council of Ministers an-
proved the agreement with Al-
geria Jan. 20.
Agreements with the other
two states were approved last
year. These agreements iner5"'*
industrial and pgneultural EE^
concessions, as well as protocols
on foreign workers H-,lngin to
the three fts in Western Eu-
rone and an accord on financial
co-r'pra,i'"\
The EEC has also e^nt'H
Algeria financial assistance
amounting to $140 million. S0S
:"i'lion of 'Hi<:h is an outright
. ft. Tfc" EEC i1? due to onen
L-ntiations with Egvnt nn J*n.
28 and with Jordan and Syria
a few davs later.
ft ft
Rostow Scors U.S. Pol'rv
NEW York Eugene V.
stow, who vis Un^s"C'v-
fry of cte for Political Af-
fn'rs during the Johnson Ad-
ministration. charged here f*1
nca ,V>Q 1Q73 Yom Kinpur Wir
the United ?tats. in its efforts
;o wjtn '',0 A-ab stat-s frnm
the Soviet Union, has abandoned
its reliance on United Nations
S""uritv Council Resolutions
242 and 338.
Noting that the resolutions
provide that "the Israelis nee''
not withdraw one inch from the
ceasefire lines until there is a
firm and binding agreement of
peace," Rostow declared that
"in negotiating the military dis-
engagement agreement between
Egypt and Israel, our govern-
ment give ud its strongest and
most important negotiating po-
sition, and a fundamental orh-
cinle as wll." Rostow, who is
now Sterling Professor of Law
and Public Affairs at Yale Uni-
versity, offered these opinions
in a naner prepared for delivery
:o the opening session of the
National Committee on Amer-
ican Foreign Policy's second
symposium at the Waldorf-
Astoria.
ft ft ft
Syrian Situation Not Improved
JERUSALEM A Foreign
Ministry official has denied that
he had reported a substantial
improvement in the condition of
Jews in Syria. Max Waron told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that he had been misquoted and
misinterpreted bv certain news
media which recently carried
reports to that effect.
He said that, in fact, no mean-
ingful improvements had taken
place with respect to Syrian
Jews except for an occasional
relaxation of the harsh restric-
tions in a few individual cases
which the Syrian authorities are
using in their worldwide pro-
paganda campaign.
Apart from these "cosmetic"
instances, Syrian Jews are still
an oppressed, unfree, perse-
cuted minority, Waron said.
Ehan Speaks in Dalhs
DALLAS (JTA) Former
Israeli Foreign Minister Aboi
Eban called on American Jewry
to intensifv its su~nort of Is- '
and "continue to share the
burden of 27 years of common
experience." Speaking to 500
volunteer camraign leaders of
the United Jewish Appeal's
Southwest Region Conference at
the Fairmount Hotel, Fban de-
clared: "The burdens are many,
and we look to you from across
the lives we have saved, the C"'-
ture we have created, the graves
we have dug, the tears we have
shed, the passions we ha,T?
aroused and the inexpressible
hopes we have kindled."
Eb?n stressed that "there has
not been and never will be a
Middle East without a sovereign
Israel at the center of its life."
He said the Arab-Israel conflict
is different from every other
territorial dispute in the world
since one side, the Arabs, does
not recognize the sovereignty
of the other, Israel.
ft ft ft
Settlement Claims Collapse
LONDON According to in-
formation reaching London from
West German Finance Ministry
~u c~s. negotiations by Dr. Na-
hum Goldmann, president of the
Wo. 1J Jewish Congress, for a
f;n I D*< 600 million settlement
of J?wish drums have fallen
th-ough. The claims were on
r--h->'f of J'w'sh Nazi victims
in Eastern Europe who were
onlv able to reach the West
after 1965, the final date of
previous reparations.
Israel W1S to receive a major
slice of the money to pay for
', !"ttlement of new immi-
grants from the Soviet Union
u other East European coun-
tries.
According to JTA informa-
tion, the Germans have finally
rejected the claims, saying they
will pay no more reparations.
The>v was no official statement
on the subject, and the West
German press counsellor in Lon-
don said he had no comment to
make.
ft ft ft
French Arms to Arabs
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) French of-
ficial sources have confirmed
here that France has been sell-
ing a "limited amount of mili-
tary equipment" to Egypt, as
well as to other Arab countries.
The French sources were not
prepared to specify the type or
the quantity of material export-
ed to these states. Official
spokesmen stressed, however,
that France would "respect the
area's balance of power."
It is known that France has
sold Egypt electronic equip-
ment, radar installations, as well
as a small quantity of "Crotale"
missiles. The French also hone
to sell Egypt the new French
combat plane "Delta 2000"
which will roll off production
lines only in 1980, at the earl-
iest.
* 6
Cardinal Shehan Honored
BALTIMORE Lawrence
Cardinal Shehan, former Arch-
bishop of Baltimore, was hon-
ored here by the American Jew-
ish Committee for the focal role
he played in encouraging Vati-
can Council II ten years ago to
adopt the Declaration on Non-
Christian Religions that repu-
diated anti-Semitism and ab-
solved the Jewish people of the
charge of deicide.
Dr. Morton K. Blaustein, well
known Baltimore industrialist
who is a national vice presideni
of the American Jewish Com
mittee and a former chairman
of its Baltimore chapter, pre-
sented the Cardinal with the
organization's National Interre-
ligious Award an origin? I
lithograph by the noted artist
Chaim Gross, bearing the He-
brew words "shalom," meaning
"peace." and "emmet," mean
ing "truth."
ft ft ft
Hadassah Moves
NEW YORK Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization of
America, moved into its new
headquarters at 50 West 58th
Street here on Monday.
The present area at 65 Eas.t
52nd Street becomes part of a
package of several buildings on
Fifty-Second and Fifty-Third
Streets put together by Fisher
Brothers for development.
"Through an arrangement
with Fisher Brothers," Rose E.
Matzkin, national president of
Hadassah says, "we will ex-
change our present five-story
building, which is 38,000 square
feet, for an eight-story building
providing 55,000 square feet."
I gave 50 years ago.
50 years ago, being a Jew in America meant
:hat a lot of doors open to other people were
closed to you. Your chances of getting to the
school you wanted or the job you wanted
were very slight.
Fortunately, in those years, there were a
number of young Jews who worked and
fought and gave everything they had to help
make life better for future generations of Jews
They helped open schools. And jobs.
And hotels. And restaurants. And
neighborhoods. And opportunities.
Now, many of those who gave so much
to make possible a better life for Jews in
America today, need our help in their old
age. They need decent food. And housing.
And medical attention. And companionship.
They need to know that they are cared for.
That they are valued.
A lot of what you are and have today,
you owe to them.
Don't ever forget it.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-40( 0,
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
O
We Are One.


s
usan
V~ff
Books M<
Fine Gifts
q^HREE CURRENT publications of excellent quality are writ-
ten for the layperson and make lovely, meaningful gifts.
The list of contributors to "The Bar Mitzvah Book" (Praeger
$19.95) is quite impressive: Isaac Babel, Jakov Lind, Bernard
Malamud and Bernard Reisman to name a few.
Editor Moira Paterson. with the aid of Eugene Borowitz,
has put together a patchwork of articles dealing with impor-
tant events and concepts in the history and faith of the Jew.
IT IS their hope that as a gift at the time of Bar Mitzvah,
this volume will provide inspiration for the young adult to
return to it (and hence Judaism) in the future.
Knowing that an unfortunately large number of teens do
not continue with Jewish education beyond Bar Mitzvah, the
editors believe that if the ceremony is reinforced by a positive
family attitude toward Judaism and education, the young adult
will find a sense of community and living tradition within his
religion.
The essays in "The Bar Mitzvah Book" are first-rate.
They are set off by color plates of paintings, sculpture and
contemporary photographs. For example, Malamud's story,
"The Angel Levine," is well-illustrated with stills from the
film.
AND THERE is a valuable selection entitled "The Mar-
tyrs," by Henry Wasserman, which begins with the sacrifice
of Isaac, continues with Masada and Christian Spain, ending
in the Holocaust. This selection is accompanied by drawings,
woodcuts and photographs of Jewish martyrdom throughout
world history.
It is an admirable goal to provide such a compilation for
the Bar Mitzvah boy, but he is not the only one who needs it.
HOW CAN you ghe a thirteen-year-old feminist "The Bar
Mitzvah Book"? Certainly a simple title to indicate the book's
wide appeal should have been used.
At the very least, it should have been called "The Bar/Bat
Mitzvah, Confirmation, Graduation, Wedding, Anniversary
Book" .
A fascinating work which will serve as a very useful tool
in the Jewish schools is Joan Comay's "The Temple of Jeru-
salem" (Holt, $15). Gomay describes the First and Second
Temples in great detail from the sites, materials and other
specifics to the political and religious turmoil accompanying
both periods.
The author identifies the importance of both the city df
Jerusalem and the Temple Mount to Jews, Christians and Mus-
lims. Jerusalem is a hot subject today.
CGMAY IS particularly concerned with the emotional and
spiritual meaning of the Temple for Jews throughout our his-
tory, and the Temple's significance for Jews today.
The text is understood by teen as well as adults. The var-
iety of illustrations; diagrams and pictures which attend the
prose, enhance the production, and aid in conceptualizing the
holiness of the Temple.
COMAY IS amply qualified to present such a Biblical/
historical book. Not only was she a staff editor of the "En-
cyclopaedia Judaica," but also she has written books on Israel,
the Old Testament and Jewish history.
Moshe Pearlman's latest book. "In the Footsteps of the
Prophets" (Thomas Y. Crowell, $19.95), traces the lives of the
prophets pointing out their different backgrounds personalities
and styles of speaking the qualities which made each an
individual with his own idiosyncrasies,
of ethics.
PEARLMAN HAS already shown how he can combine
popular history with attractive photography in a polished vol-
ume entitled "The Maccabees." In the "Prophets" he presents
some unusual photography.
One plate in particular is an enlargement of ancient
weights (shekels) from the Israelite period inscribed with He-
brew terms marking their various denominations.
It looks like an entry in a modern art exhibit. Other
photographs of the flora and fauna of Israel capture a mood
as well as the subject itself. This is indeed a fresh exciting
approach to Biblical commentary.
Friday, January 30, 1976 *Jewist) fhrMOari Page 10-A
2^hi' Community Challenges
Ahead in New Year
t^eqal
1
i DAGGER pointed at the heart of the New
York Jewish Community's philanthropic
activities, Gotham's fiscal crisis has been
blunted for a little while at least. The Presi-
dent has changed his mind, mountainous taxes
have been decreed, and the stranglehold on
education, health, and welfare has been brok-
en temporarily.
Alarm over the potential danger to Jewish
charitable activities was sharply sounded by
Sanford Solender, executive vice president of
the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of
New York. Prudent, farsighted Jews in cities
throughout the nation shared Solender's an-
xiety, acutely aware of the threat to all the
country inherent in a possible New York col-
lapse.
SAVED AT the 11th hour, Jewish leaders
of New York and their counterparts elsewhere
might want now to give serious thought to a
few other issues with which the American
Jewish community will have to grapple during
our Bicentennial Year.
Not that the challenges are all outside
the zone of non-Jewish interest and concern;
but before we _enter a year of American na-
tional celebration ,it should prove helpful if
each person chancing to read one man's inven-
tory would engage in soul searching and list
his own bill of 1976 particulars.
LOOKING BACK on more than a.quarter
of a century of professional activity in the
Jewish communal field and peering ahead to
try to spot new problems, this observer offers
i he following packet of concern:
Mindful of the persistence of terrorism,
the collapse of governments, shortage of food,
intensity of racist thought and action, and
widespread moral collapse, Jews need as never
before to give thoughtful leadership to the
battle to keep instruments of physical destruc-
tion subordinate to the force of humane and
ethical values.
The State of Israel's days of sharpest
agony must continue as our unending concern
and challenge.
Closely linked to that issue is the need to
be active on behalf of disenfranchised and op-
pressed Jews in the Soviet Union and in Arab
lands behind the Petroleum Country.
Intensification of Jewish education for
our children as well as for those no longer
young is mandatory.
We must increase our determination to
apply the traditional Jewish practice of justice
and mercy to the manifold problems of human
relationships in a society losed from old moor-
ings.
We need to resolve to look upon Amer-
ica's Bicentennial observance with its stress
on religious freedom as a grand opportunity
to refresh our intelligence and souls concern-
ing the enduring and precious truths about
Judaism as we proclaim those verities proud-
ly, firmly, and convincingly to our American
countrymen and the world.
The Story of Young Marina:
A Serious Clash o( Cultures
'i) Haifa
\VfE FIRST met Marina when she was 13
years old. Only a few months earlier, she
had come to Israel with her family from Rus-
sian Georgia. My wife waS' a member of a
group of volunteers who taught Hebrew to
new immigrants at their homes, and the viva-
cious, eager young Marina at once attached
herself to Nechama.
Even after the lessons were no longer
continued on a systematic basis, Marina would
often come to visit with us at our home. It
was interesting to watch the process of ad-
justment. At first she had been negative to
almost everything in Israel.
LIFE IN Georgia had been happier, more
comfortable. But as she learned the language
and observed the relative freedom of Israeli
youth, she changed. Though she dropped out
of high school, she went to evening classes,
studied bookkeeping and got a job.
This was already a radical departure from
the usual sheltered life of a Georgian teen-age
girl. She told us something of the restrictive
life imposed by the Georgian code and the
demands made by the family dan.
ALREADY THERE was talk of finding a
match for her and contracting an engagement
to be concluded with marriage at the age of
18, the legal age in Israel. Marina resisted
ONE DAY word came to us that Marina
was "in trouble." She quit her job without
notice. A letter came from her, and we learn-
ed that she had been "keeping company" with
a boy not unusual for a normal giit, n.w
16. But suddenly she discovered hi wjs an
Arab. The family found out.
She was confined to her home, and the
family decided that she must be "contracted"
at once before she got in trouble and disgraced
them also.
I CAME home from tiie ofiice one day to
find a weeping Marine and a \e.y much con-
cerned Nechama. Marina had ran away from
home. She would not go back. The big engage-
ment party was to be tomorrow.
A quick check with knowledgeable people
revealed that we would be committing a legal
offense if we kept the girl, a minor, away from
her parents. We learned that a trained social
worker, experienced in such matters, is on
call 24 hours a day, and he was summoned.
THE SESSIONS went on for some hours.
The family insisted that Marina must go I
through -with the engagement party. i
Broken in spirit, with downcast eyes,
Marina left with her family. Did we imagine
that she was reproaching us for having let r
her down? The family promised us faithfully
they would not beat her.
That was last month. We wonder how the
engagement party went. We have not yet heard
from Marina.
Gotham Ifatenwal Celebration Reflects Jewish Cultural Contribution
1\EW YORK Jewry has started the Bicentennial
celebrations of the American Revolution with
an imposing three-day program reflecting the Jew-
ish cultural contributions to America and the Amer-
ican contribution to Jewish life.
The program, in which leading American Jew-
ish personalities from the world of culture took
part some of them Pulitzer Prize winners and
Academy Award winners was the first expression
"* pf the participation of the American Jewish com-
munity in the Bicentennial.
IT WAS arranged by the National Jewish Wel-
fare Board on behalf of its constituent Jewish cen-
ters. Other national Jewish organizations will simi-
larly conduct Bicentennial programs to bring out
Jewish contributions in various fields of -American
life.

ons
^^ntou
molar
Jewish community centers, now affiliated with
the JWB, have their roots in literary and cultural
societies which existed "more than 100 years ago.
Reading rooms were their first facilities.
They expanded later when the Young Men's
and Young Women's Hebrew Association movement
and the Settlement House movement started pro-
grams for the Americanization of immigrants.
THE JWB as a national service agency, defined
It has stated that one of the primary functions of
Jewish centers is to serve as agencies of Jewish
identification. These objectives were reinforced by
a survey of the JWB and the community centers
conducted by Prof. Oscar Janowsky some 30 years
ago.
Many persons prominent in the field of Amer-
ican culture got their start in the Jewish community
centers which now serve more than 1,000,000 peo-
ple. -
-PERHAPS THE most famous Jewish center is
the Educational Alliance on New York's Lower East
Broadway. It was founded in the early years of Jew-
ish mass immigration and is still functioning today,
its objectives in terms of "Jewish cultural survival."
However, because of the change of population in
the neighborhood it serves now less Jews


lay, January 30, 1976
+Jewlst> mhridfiiair
Page 11-A
JAILED BLACK ACTIVIST SPEAKS OUT
UN Resolution Hypocritical
By ELDRIDGE CLEAVER
I'O ASPECTS of the recent UN resolution
1,'beling Zionism as racist both shocked
i-surprised me. Shocked because, of all the
fie in the world, the Jews have not only
^red particularly from racist persecution,
have done more than any other people in
|bry to expose and condemn racism.
Generations of Jewish social scientists and
jlars have labored long and hard in every
of knowledge, from anthropology to psy-
plogy, to lay bare and refute all claims of
ial inferiority and superiority. To condemn
Jewish survival doctrine of Zionism as
feism is a travesty upon the truth.
SECONDLY, I am surprised that the Arabs
lid choose to establish a precedent con-
ining racism because it can so easily and
jhteously be turned against them. Having
bed intimately for several years among the
rabs, I know them to be among the most racist
pople on earth. No one knows this better than
jck Africans living along the edges of the
khara.
Once while traveling through Bamoko, Mali,
;ab driver flew into a rage when we asked
to take U6 to the Algerian embassy. When
learned that we actually lived in Angeria,
concluded that we were crazy.
"Man," he said irritatedly, "don't you know
st the Arabs still have Black slaves?"
HE WAS right, although I didn't find'out
|til later. Many Arab families, that I can af-
rd to, keep one- or two Black- slaves to do
keir menial labor. Sometimes they-own an en-
Ire family. I have seen such slaves with my
vn eyes. Once I pressed an Algerian official
kr an explanation of the status of these peo-
lle, and he ended up describing a complicated
!>rm of indentured servitude. The conversation
roke up when I told him that it was nothing
it a hypocritical form of slavery.
I have the deepest sympathy for the Pales-
Inian people in their search for justice, but
[see no net gain fpr freedom and human dignity
the world if power blocs, because of their
jility to underwrite sagging economics for a
sason, are able to ram through the UN reso-
Itions repugnant to human reason and his-
meal fact.
THE COMBINATION of Communist dictator-
lips, theocratic Arab dictatorships, and eco-
nomically dependent Black African dictator-
lips are basically united in their opposition
the democratic forces inside their own bor-
|ers. This gives them a lot in common and lots
room and motivation to wheel and deal
long themselves.
But it is not a combination deserving of
aspect by people from countries enjoying
lemocratic liberties and traditions of freedom.
it is a combination that must be struggled
[gainst.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Eldridge Cleaver is the
Black American activist who fled the
United States to avoid prosecution and
for years lived in Algeria. Late in
1975, Cleaver returned voluntarily to
face the charges against him. The col-
umn published here was written by
Cleaver from his prison cell in Cali-
fornia and originally appeared in the
Boston Herald-American.
But it seems to me that the Western dem-
ocracies, the United States above all, are so
guilt-ridden because of their past history as
colonizers that they now swallow, hook, line,
and sinker, every half-baked argument emanat-
ing from the wise men of the General As-
sembly.
I believe that the time has come to re-
examine the credentials of all the members of
th General Assembly. Why should all these
little so-called countries with minuscule pop-
ulations have a vote equal in weight to that
of the United States? When such votes are cast
in the reckless manner of the anti-Zionist reso-
lution, it is time to sit up and take notice.
THE SO-CALLED hardline adopted at the
UN by Ambassador Moynihan seems too soft
to me, and the support which he is getting in
certain political circles is softer still. But the
stakes in the struggle in the international arena
are- high.
The General Assembly is no longer filled
with Maharma Gandhis pleading .the case of the
downtrodden, colonized masses. It is now a
forum for crude, hired killers like Idi Amin
Dada, the hatchet man of Uganda.
But it is not enough to criticize the negative
aspects of the UN in print and fiery speeches,
and then lose the crucial votes when the chips
are down.
Concrete steps must be taken to render the
UN structurally incapable of cynical manipula-
tion by hypocritical power blocs that devour
freedom in the name of a just cause and under-
mine democratic principles with a reckless
distortion of the right to vote.
IT MAY seem paradoxical that I write these
words from a prison cell in California. I am
certainly not a stranger to racism. I have per-
sonally experienced it in the ghettos and pris-
on yards of America.
But I have also personally shared the ex-
perience of thousands of men and women now
languishing in the prisons of Communist and
Third World countries.
The cause of democracy and freedom can
best be served when men and women speak out
against the forces that seek to nullify them,
even if this means speaking out from a prison
cell.
unds Allocated to Launch War on Extortionists
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
jbinet has agreed to allocate
ptra funds to the police and
stice ministries to pay for ad-
tional manpower and other
sources needed to apprehend
prosecute alleged criminals
jaged in the protection-extor-
&n rackets.
[It was the third session in
which the Cabinet took up the
problem of organized crime
which is reportedly flourishing
in Israel's major cities and in
smaller urban centers.
POLICE Minister Shlomo Hil-
lel said the pohce were giving
priority to investigations of the
protection-extortion racket that
victimizes businesses large and
small.
He said the public prosecu-
tors were speeding up the pre-
paration of cases and the courts
were placing them high on their
calendars.
The Cabinet also adopted a
resolution urging the public to
report all cases of extortion to
the Dolice.
Ford Cuts Funds
For Israel Military
J
WASHINGTON CJTA) President Ford has
earmarked $1 billion for military sales credits to Israel
for the U.S. fiscal year 1977 starting Oct. 1 according
to his budget made public Jan. 20. He stipulated that
he wishes Congress to provide him with authority to
grant Israel up to half of that amount as a gift at his
discretion.
The new budget request to Congress represents a
reduction of $500 million in the military credit sales
of $1.5 billion recommended to Congress by the Presi-
dent for Israel for the current fiscal year which ends
Sept. 30.
IN THIS recommendation, he also asked for au-
thority to forgive Israel up to half of his requested
amount, or $750 million. In the new Economic Security
Assistance Program, the President asked to authorize
$1,802 billion for all countries, a reduction of $70 mil-
lion from the 1976 program.
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Page 12-A
fJenisti norkKMn
Friday, January 30, 1976
LEO MINDLIN
College Teachers'' Union Slap at Freedom
Continued from Page 4-A
ideals for those who so pas-
sionately belonged to them.
Theoretically then, my father
was a union-sympathizer. It
was a part of his Jewish na-
ture and the Jewish search for
justice.
BUT AS a businessman, he
hated unions. He did not want
/eople telling him what to do
and what not to do in his own
business affairs. That to him
was tyranny and oppression,
too.
I suppose that's where my
own schizophrenia with respect
lo unions comes from. I am as
lassionate about justice as I am
against people telling me what
to do.
in this context, I can never
..hake from my consciousness
Jefferson's insight that "man-
Kind are more disposed to suf-
fer, while evils are sufferable,
than to right themselves by
abolishing the forms to which
they are accustomed."
APPARENTLY, not so the
union-bent at Miami-Dade. For
.several years now, they have
been telling me and everybody
else, by memo, all about the
evils I suffer at the hands of
the college administration and
board of trustees, although I
have never really been aware
of these evils.
My opinions, they tell me,
are not solicited with respect
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to wages, hours, promotion,,
fringe benefits, retirement
plans. While that is not alto-
gether true, I suppose some of
it is true.
But a more important truth
is that I do not solicit the opin-
ions of rhe administration or
board with respect to what or
how I teach, nor do they voice
any. This is of far greater sig-
nificance to me than any of the
other considerations, and it is
a separation of powers I must
enjoy, or I could not teach at
all.
I AM more interested in
teaching than in the business
of teaching. In fact, I am not in-
terested in the business of
teaching at all. I am content to
let those whose business is the
business of teaching engage in
that business.
If 1 were interested in busi-
ness, I would not be a teacher
and a journalist. As a teacher,'
If I do not like the business
methods of those responsible
for the business of teaching,
then I am free to leave.
In the spirit of Jefferson on
man's capacity to endure and
prevail, if I dislike a room in a
house, I need not burn tin
house down. I can try to redt
the room to my liking or I
can move.
For this freedom of choice, I
pay some price, which is to say
that I am not an equal negotia-
tor in contractual matters.
BUT IT is, in my opinion, far
smaller than the price I will
have to pay if the union-bent
win.
Then, I will have pretender-
teachers over me in the busi-
ness of teaching, whose skills
neither in teaching nor in the
business of teaching I will be
able to trust. And I say "over
me" advisedly, since I have no
one "over me" now.
I will be required, for exam-
ple, to pay a fee (dues) for
services rendered to me which
I do not want. I pay nothing
now.
I WILL have even less to say
in my contractual matters than
I have now I am already be-
ing told by the union-bent, even
before they have won, that it
would be "advisable" for their
representatives to have both
the right and the power to be
present at every slightest oc-
casion that I may want to dis-
cuss with some chairman or ad-
ministrator the business of my
teaching. This is not true now
either.
In fact, I am informed, it
would not be "ad\isable" to
seek out such an occasion in
my own behalf without first
contacting them so they can de-
cide whether the meeting is ne-
ITV at,al1, or whether or
not they should be present if
they approve the meeting.
In the end. I will not be able
to speak for myself, which I
find hateful. I have already
been told, even before they
have won, that this will be nec-
essary to the preservation of
the integrity of the union whose
primary interest is, after all,
my own best interest.
I CAN not help divorcing this
sense of "obiter dicta" from
Marx's view in the Manifesto
that totalitarian proletarianism
is prerequisite to all revolu-
tions if they are to be success-
ful but that, ultimately, the to-
talitarianism wanes in the same
proportion as revanchism
wanes.
I have yet to see the waning
of totalitarianism in the guise
of proletarianism anywhere on
earth not in Moscow, not in
Peking, not in Havana, not in
Kampala. Nor do I see it in a
single union yet. American or
British, where the pride, and
the responsibility, of individual-
ism are dead.
The truth is that I don't even
know who is issuing these
union memoranda to me. And I
already feel a sense of pro-
found oppression by these
anonymous, selfless souls so de-
termined to speak for me.-
THIS IS not a matter of the-
ory, ror poasibly e\en a matter
of fact. It is a matter of feeling:
The union be damjed.
Totalitarianism revulses me,
especially when it waves the
flag of humanity. In this, I sup-
pose, I am truly my father's
son.
Fulbright Firm Advises Arabs
Continued from Page 1-A
tions Committee.
Fulbright lost his Senate seat
when he was defeated in the
1974 Democratic primaries by
Arkansas Gov. Dale Bumpers
who was subsequently elected.
As chairman of the powerful
Foreign Relations Committee,
Fulbright was a frequent critic
of Israel's policies and leader
of the minority of Senators who
opposed U.S. aid programs for
Israel proposed by successive
administrations.
In his letter to the UAE. Ful-
bright said he contemplated
that his firm's services "would
include counsel with respect to
United States legislative mat-
ters of executive policies which
might affect the interests of
the Emirates as well as coun-
sel with respect to commercial
or other ventures with United
States or foreign business un-
der consideration by your gov-
ernment."
THE LETTER noted that the
UAE Ambassador had "suggest-
ed" the proposal. Fulbright is
reported to have visited the
United Arab Emirates recently.
He is not personally registered
as a foreign agent in the pa-
pers submitted Dec. 18 to the
Justice Department bearing the
signature of Edward A. McDer-
mott. a member of the law firm
with which Fulbright is affi-
liated. Neither man respond-
ed to a phone call placed to
their office by the JTA.
In his reports to the Depart-
ment. McDermott said the pur-
pose of the agreement is to pro-
vide "usual legal representa-
tion and advice." He also re-
ported "political activities"
were not included.
Justin O'Shea, chief of the
registration of the Justice De-
partment's Criminal Division,
told the JTA that Fulbright
"may have to register" as i
foreign agent "but I am not
sure yet."
HE NOTED that there are
"certain exemptions for law-
yers" regarding registratioa
The Hogan and Hartson sta-
tionery lists the names of 6')
lawyers associated with it.
Among them is former Vir-
ginia Gov. Linwood Holton.
who served for a time as Assist-
ant Secretary of State for Con-
gressional Relations under Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kii
singer.
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Round 41; Cl. Solitaire Diamond
Fioe Cul Color
X7
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Emerald Cul Sobtaare Diamond
Free of hnperfKtteiu 2 Baguette.
rtatimm Set tit*
203
Carvad Malachite
Worn by CoUaiesa Avcrsperg of
Viemu -Antique Brooke-

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Ruby-Diamond Bracelet
3 Oval Rabies-Total Weight
I WO. 4 Oval Solitaire
Diraondt- 20 Rouad Diamonds
a*J~**1.....-..-.a-..._ t. ., ........
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A'E'g~ "CENSED APPRAISERS ESTABLISHED OVER 50 YEARS
patek phillip 356<* N- OCEAN BLVD., FT. I.AUDKRDALK. El A 33308
SSS SSSSSU JSftEEraui BANK building
ROYAL DAULTON FHONE: S6SSS08 ALL LINES.JOHN A. JAMES. PRESIDENT
CROWN DERBY TRAD UNWANTED JEWELS FQR Nf,w,


luary 30, 1976
*Jewist noridVar?
Page 13-A
!nfo 'Leakers' May Faee Prison Terms
publication.
The Premier or Foreign Min-
ister or persons acting in their .
behalf would be allowed to au I
Bed frm Page 1-A
t^ti/tiv KAbiN
It bars publication, without
prior government approval, of
two types of information: com-
munications between the Is-
raeli government and other gov-
ernments that are classify "top
secret," and secret meetings be-
tween Israeli officials and offi-
cials of countries with which
Israpl does not have formal
diplomatic relations.
That cateporv. at oresent, em-
braces more than half the na-
tions of the world.
ALTHOUGH official concern
over Cabinet leaks to the press
has been mounting since the ad-
ministration of former Premier
Golda Meir, the problem seemed
insoluble.
Minister Gideon Hausner re-
cently suggested that all minis-
ters and others privy to Cabinet
deliberations be required to take
lie-detector tests to uncover the
source of the leaks. Rabin re-
jected the idea, but he has been
seriously disturbed by recent
leaks.
One was the Maariv report
that President Ford had sent
Rabin an angry personal mes-
sage deploring the government's
decision to establish four new
settlements on the Golan
Heights.
Another was a report in Ye-
uiot Achronot of a secret meet-
lias Firm at Warning Helm
SEPH POLAKOFF
fcNGTON (JTA)
HS. government has grant-
Hhtract for S16.S million
Hems, Inc.. of Dallas,
M, to install, operate and
gain the early warning sta-
Htween the Egyptian and
Ines in the Sinai desert.
M>g to the State Depart-
fcnnarv is to be rcspon-
150 cf the up to 200
ivilian American volunteers al-
ed toy Congress to take part
project which was de-
fid as part of the Israeli-
n second interim accord
ptember under the aegis
retary of State Henry A.
E
DRDING to thf State De-
nt, an advance team from
lias company is to be in
Hnai Tuesday to begin es-
ing a base camp and to
e surveillance capability
20 the agreed date
e withdrawal of Israeli
from the Gidi and Mitla
and for Egyptians to en-
passes.
Let The
WOSHER
STEAK
not si
Arrange your
Functions. Our
Expert Catering
[Staff Will Arrange
Your Luncheon,
Functions,
Bar Mitzvah,
idding or Anniversary
(50 to 500 people)
Serving only
.ATT KOSHER MEATS
no I KOSHER
HOTEL
ftoum
plenty Aii Conditioned ft Heated
EATE0SA1! WATER POOL
IAST PRIVATE BEACH
KIGHTIY ENTERTAINMENT
pOCIAl HOST ft MX.
IN AU ROOMS
CARD ROOM HEALTH CLUB
CIRCULATING ICE WATER
I EVERY ROOM
TEEN AGE CLUB ROOM
CHILDREN'S COUNSELLORS
DURING HOLIDAY SEASON
SYNAGOGUE ON PREMISES >
[SERVING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
TENNIS PRIVILEGES
VOLLEY BALL
HEALTH SPA SAUNA
ui Host the BERKOWITZ Associates
'WOW: 531-5771 .
On-the-snot policv guidance
and direction to the Systems
personnel will come from a gov-
ernment team of 28 persons led
by the Sinai field mission direc-
tor, Nicholas O. W. Thome.
In turn, Thorne will report to
C. William Kintos, of the State
Department's policy planning
staff who holds the roles of spe-
cial representative of President
Ford for this purpose and as
chairman of the Sinai support
mission and the Inter-Agency
Management Board.
THE BOARD consists of rep-
resentatives of nine U.S. depart-
ments and agencies and is lo-
cated in the State Department.
Systems, Inc., was one of
six bidders for the project, the
Department said.
The company, which does an
annual business ot about $250
million, produces electronic sys-
tems for aircraft and other
equipment.
Its Greenville. Texas, aircraft
division will manage of the pro-
gram while the H. B. Zachary
Co. of San Antonio, Tex., a con-
tractor, will perform the prin-
cipal construction of the sta-
tions.
If you're going
to hove an affair,
make sure people
talk about it.
There yoti are hosting an affair
at the beautiful Deauville Hotel
(where $2,000,000 has just
been spent on brand-new
luxury and elegance!)
And after it's all over, what you
thought would be just a simple
catered affair has turned out to
be the social event of the year.
Call Al Sicherer.
at 865-8511 and start *
having an affair evervone
will talk about.
I .I. #
On the ocean at 67th Street. Miami Beach
Ijffiyftiva ami ajfcjjy
It could be the perfect affair. And it should
be. After all, we're talking about the most
important moments in your life. Your
daughter's wedding. Your son's
confirmation. The one big party of
the season.
Our catering director, Betty Ann Mass, is
without peer. Please don't hesitate to
call Hi for advice, for specialized
attention, and for a chance to look over
the magnificent new Cotillion Room.
Morris Lansburgh's
Eden Roc
HOTEL YACHT AND CABANA CLUB
OCEAN FROM 45th to 47th STREET -ON MIAMI BEACH
Betty Ann Mass, 532-2561____________________
ing in Europe between Foreign
Minister Yigal Allon and an
African diplomat, believed to
have been either the President
or Foreign Minister of Zaire.
ISRAELI political correspon-
dents reportedly proposed to
Rabin recently that they volun-
tarily refrain from publishing
such reports. Newspaper edi-
tors, however, refused to accept
such curbs, even if voluntary.
Rabin then invoked the 1957
Espionage Act which permits
the government to expand the
list of secret information, the
publication of which is a crim-
inal offense.
If the measure is approved by
the Knesset committee, a min-
ister or government official who
leaks secret information would
face a sentence of up to 15
years' imprisonment.
A REPORTER Dublishing the |
information would be subject to j
imprisonment for up to seven
years. In practical terms, the
measure means that newspapers '
will have to submit classified
information to the government j
ensor for approval prior to
thorize publication on an in-
dividual basis.
Newspaper circles criticized1
the Premier tonight for alleged-
ly reneging on a promise not to
draft censorship measures with-
out consulting the editors' com
mittee. "He pulled a fast one
on the press," one journalist
remarked.
jrpayrmott?y&
V Ho Seta*'*
OCEANFRONT AT 20TH ST.
KOSHER
Early Bird
DINNER
J Plu
**tnx and tips
FULL 8 COURSES!!
From 5:30 PM
Reservations
^k\ Julius Katz //Wi
saxony
Hotel of Ihe Year (Q\
OPEN ALL YEAR
HOTEL POOL TENNIS ClUB V Complelel* Air Conditioned I Healed
PRIVATE AIL WEATHER TENNIS COURTS FULLY EOUIPPEO HEALTH ClUI
OLYMPIC POOL PRIVATE BEACH DANCING irid [NilRIAINM(N) TV IH AU ROOMS
COFFEE SHOP RUMPUS ROOM FOR TEENAGERS SERVING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
OAIIT SYNAGOGUE SERVICES ON PREMISES
Your Moil Th IERKOWIT2 Associate*
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED i I For MurMm ...
FULLY EQUIPPED EFFICIENCIES r0Q tail
Rates on Request 330~DO I I
2 FULL QCLAHFROHT BLOCKS 32nd lo 34lh Sn MIAMI BEACH
The
KOSHER KITCHEN
Offers a Complete Assortment
of Take-Out Foods
DAILY SPECIALS
SUNDAY FREE 1 lb of Cole Slaw With a S5 Purchase
MONDAY $1.59 a lb. for Bar-B-Oue Chicken instead
of Regular Price ot S1.79 a lb.
TUESDAY FREE midget Bologna With a S10 Purchase
WEDNESDAY FREE 1 Qt. of Soup With a S4 Purchase
THURS. FKEE a Small Kugel With a S5 Purchase
Everything Cooked Daily
GLATT Meats Under Supervision of O.R.C.
Call Early In The Week for Shabbos Orders
MENASHE HIRSCH Owner
PHONE: 534-5314
101-21sl St., Miami Beach (Next lo the Sea Gull Hotel)
An affair with Heart
at Hotel t i
ontainebleau
We truly care
Combined with ihe elegance and magnificence of
Hotel Fontainebleau, we pride ourselves in Ihe very
special spirit exhibited by the Fontainebleau family ...
at all limes there is the realization of the importance of
a special event; be il a Bar Mitzvah, Wedding, Anni-
versary Party, or a Presidential Dinner, Ihe emphasis
is always on achieving perleUion. You are invited lo
visit and expenence first-hand Ihe delights of Fontainebleau.
KOSHER CATERING
AVAILABLE
CALL 538-8811
BILLGOLDRINC
Executive Vice President.
Catering


fii^C il-.l
" X W//*#//11'/'// IILHHaiH!
, jdiiuuiy ju, J7;u
L5GAI NOTICE
LEGAL MOTKI
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
tNO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUfcKfAL CIRCUIT
CPrLOR'lDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTON NO. 76-825
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION!
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAi IE < >Fl
HAYDEE values B8COBAR,
I', titloner,
ami
LUIS FERNANDO ESCOBAR,
Respondent.
TO: LUIS FERNANDO ESCOBAR
Carrara B Number B27 Marsella
Rlsaralda, Columbia B.A
TOU AliK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been tiled against you and
jrou are required ti) serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on SAT-!, T. VON RAMFT, attorney
for Petitioner, \vhi>se address la 1320
B. Dixie Highway, Suit.- R.'.n Coral
Gables, Florida 33Mi'>, and file the
original with the clerk of the atx ve
styled court on or before 20th Febru-
ary, 1976; otherwise a default will.be
entered, against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in TUB JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida op this
8th day of January, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Hy S l'AKHISH
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAM. T VON ZAMFT
1320 6 Dixie Highway, Suite 850
Coral Gables Florida 33146
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone: 667-4878
__________________ 1/16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
- HEREBY GIVEN
that
- a. d< Ig j t
u 4r r t lie |fActtlfcui
. Ifl 'ST Ml "'! County,
ster said name
' < 'Ircuil Ci urt of
i i untj. Florida,,
kVALD CORPORATION
i:..: .1 i, Wllsoi Piesident
S & silk in. P a
for Applicant
i lade Federal lildg.
Florida 33131
1/16-23-80 2/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTH E is hhkeisy QIVBN that
tin undei signed, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
Of TRACERS INCORPORATED at
12660 Blscayna Blvd., Suite 302, North
Miami, Fla. 33181 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County Florida.
Fi-ORIDA TRACERS
INCORPORATED
A Fla. Corp.
1/16-23-30 2/6
2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-1080
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
JN RE: The Marriage of
MARC-ALAN COOPER, Petitioner
and
BONNIE KATHERINE BEACH
COOPER, respondent.
TO: BONNIE KATHARINE
BEACH COOPER
309 West 9!
New York New York 10025
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on JERRY A. BURNS, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 933 City
National Bank Building. Miami. Flor-
ida 3313* and file the original with
the olerk of the above styled court on
cr before Feb. 20, 1976; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FIjORIDIAN
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-605
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELAINE NORTH,
Petitioner,
and
CASS R. NORTH.
Respondent.
TO: CASS R NORTH
Condominium Vi-lero, Apt. 702
1P70 Costera Aleman
Acapulco, Mexico, N.A.
YOC AHE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an aciion for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to it on
HARLAN STREET, P.A. attorney
tor Petitioner, whose address is 12700
Bisoayne Boulevard, Suite 410, North
Miami Florida 33181 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb. 12, 1976-
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
"' NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCLUT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND-TOR''
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Civil Action No. 76-1794
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE < >F
JoYCE MITCHELL HIRSCHHORN,
Wife,
STEPHAN HIRSCHHORN,
Husband
TO: STEPHAN HIRSCHHORN
c/o Charles Hlrechhorn
116 West 68th Street
New York. New York 10023
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against yuu and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to It on
JOSEPH W. MALEK. ESQUIRE, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose address
is 350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501 Miami
Beach, Florida 33139. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before February 2R.
1976; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on this
19th day of January. 1976.
RCHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L SNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK
350 Lincoln Road Suite 501
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
1/23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTIOUS NAME LAW
HEREBY GIVEN that
i siring to engage in
oils ; Bie of
THE VI t> 8701 N. KjUidjUl
B nti nds to
I nai i with the Cl< rh f
., Courl "i Dade County,
F rida. .. ,.
I H LOMITE INVESTMENTS, N. V.
: n. ihi rlande Antilles Corp.
By Jorge I oloma, Preside nt
- Attorney for Applicant
351 i Bis. ayn Blvd.
Miami, Fla, 881 SI
1/9-16-23-30
2/6-IJ
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-1920
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
IN RE: The Marriage of GAIL B.
RICHARDS, wife and HOWARD G
RICHARDS, husband.
TO: HOWARD U. RICHARDS
801 Cooper Landing Road
Apt. A-103
Cherry Hill, New Jersey, 08034
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer
witmwu ,~, "i------j';*"" S?"V a coPv f your Answer to the
u^1.?.SS-.m.y.ha_n,d a.?d.the al f Petition lor Dissolution of Marriage
this herein on the Petitioner's Attorney
MURRAY Z. KLEIN, 800 Seybold
Building, Miami, Florida and file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before Febru-
ary 27, 1976 or said cause will be taken
as confessed by you
DATED this 20lh day of January,
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
said court at Miami, Florida on
Mh day of Jan., 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By O. FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARLAN STREET. P A
12700 Biscayne Blvd.Suite 410
North Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Petitioner
891-5852
1/16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-1120
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALAN S. WALL.
Husband/Petitioner
and
CAROL Y. WALL.
Wife/Respondent.
TO: Carol Y. Wall
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to It on
Howard R. Hirsch. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 407 Lincoln
Road, Suite 7-K, Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before February 18, 1976; otherwise
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
13th day of January, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Howard R. Hirsch Esq.
407 Lincoln Road, Suite 7-K
Miami Beach, Fla. 83139,
Tel. No. 532-6444
Attorney for Petitioner
1/16.-23-30 2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE '
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEMENT!* JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 76-207 .
General Jurisdiction Division
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IVAN FELISBERTI,
Husband Petitioner,
. nd
BONNBY FEL1SBERTO.
wif. Respondent
TO: BONNET FEI.ISBERTO
Apt No. 12
1626 Commonwealth Avenue
Brighton, Massachusetts
TOI' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
I .,- been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on STAN-
LEY M. BRODY, attorney for Peti-
tioner whose address Is 407 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach. Florida 33139, and.,-
filt the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 11, 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
d< manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS ray hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5th day of January. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
STANLEY If. BRODY
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
1/9-16-23-80
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DIXIE BEDDING COMPANY at 4800
N.W. 37th Avenue, Miami, Fla.. In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LlGHTRON CORPORATION
1/9-16-23-30
2/6
C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
1/23-30
2/6-13
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice is hereby give nthat the un-
dersigned, Ed Gordon Enterprises,
WITNESS my hand and the seal of ,nc; desiring to engage in business
said court at Miami, Florida on this ""der tbe fictitious name. THE
13th day of January, 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G. FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JERRY A. BURNS
933 City National Bank Building
Miami..Florida 38130
Attorney for Petitioner
_____________ 1/16-23-30 2/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF~THE~
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7668
In Re: Estate of:
HARRY ENDER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
i AAl Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and
mands wl
the estate
ed late
to the
and file
provided in Section 733.16,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
TFNPR?, D,E.oCOUNTY' FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 76-1944
NOTICE OF SUIT
FRANCES GRANT,
Petltioner-Wife
and
CLARENCE GRANT.
Respondent-Husband
TO: CLARENCE GRANT
400 CHURCH STHEET
NOTICE UNDER _, KISSIMEE, FLORIDA
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW u Tti.U CLARENCE GRANT, are
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that hereby notified that a Petition for
the undersigned, desiring to engage """!., "... Marriage has been filed
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
BARCO TX SALES at 14800 N.W.
24th Court. Opa Locka. Fla. 33064 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
D/B/A BARCO TX SALES
BARCO CHEMICALS DIVISION,
INC.
FRED KATZ. PRESIDENT
1/18-23-30 2/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business at 407 Lincoln Road, Mi-
ami Beach. Suite 11-B. Florida 33139
under the fictitious name of "EM-
PIRE FACTORS COMPANY" intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LOUIS DICKMAN
ROSALIND DICKMAN
ADOLPH J. COHN
ESTHER G. SCHIFF
Attorney at Law
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
1/9-16-23-30
FASHION CONSPIRACY intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
/s/ ED GORDON ENTERPRISES,
INC.
By: Edwin H. Gordon, Pres.
12/26-1/2-8-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
. (NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
rewcC'y,IL ACTION NO. 76-434
GENERAL JURISDICTION'DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
IN RE: F MARRIA"
The marriage of
County, Florida.
ALLEN G. OSTER
1/16-23-30
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
orit-~fh}"'e: >7-*1. ""d le the
2/6 JTK Answer or Pleading In the
2? of the. Clerk f 'he Circuit
Court
before the 27th day of
GRACE TALLMAN a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
Springfield Street
Feeding Hills, Massachusetts
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-318
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOUIS FEIBUSCH. Petitioner
and
LEAH FEIBUSCH, Respondent
TO: Leah Feibusch
341-19 70th Road
Flushing. New York 11367
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution- of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy, of
NOTICE UNDER --------- ~ Ui
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW {'.,1^' ?*". V *u <" to do so.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ag-f.^".^ *ekMlt W"i be taken
iring to engage ^I^Ve'tiUon^or'^sSon^Mar'
Florida.
Statutes, in their offVeesTnThe Cou^y" 'TsTip^vTr'v8^0-
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 13th a* INC.
day of January. A.D. 1976.
SHAKEN ENDER
As Ancillary Executrix
..Flrst l,ub"eatlon of this notice on
the 23rd day of January, 1976.
Attorneys for Ancillary Executrix
JAMES A. HAUSER
Stprace, Hall and Mauser
1401 Brlckell Avenue
Miami, Florida
____________________________1/23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of NECKS APPEAL at 8950 S.W. 69th
Court, Miami, Florida 33156 intends to
l!*lr Bald name ^th the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
LINDA BARON
KOMMEL, ROGERS, LORBER
A SHENKMAN
Attorneys for Linda Baron
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
,__________ _________1/16-23-30____2/fi
NOTICE UNDER
k,^)CT,T,OU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
business under the fictitious name
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
1/23-30
2/6-13
- ORDERED
Dade County, Florid
of Jan., 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By. G. FREDERICK
._, Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
1/23-30 2/6-1*
NOTICE UNDER
^'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN
tlonMlnded '" ,he comDlint "or "peti:
ealh we^'fo Sha" be Pubshed one.
, i^-eek for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FliSSslM '
WITNESS my hand an? the seal of
?fhd/Url, a,1 M,ami- Florid" on this
7th day of January, 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. JAFFE
As Deputy Clerk
NOTICE UNDER
---------.., that ., FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
?n h.I"? erwgneJd' de8lr'nK to engage .NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
in husoes under the fictitious name he undersigned, desirin- to engage (Circuit Court Seal)
J, ^M^^ IN.N OF HOMESTEAD '" b"'nf* under the ficTltlous name
at 51 North Homestead Boulevard. ,f., PENINSULAR A R M A T U R E
Homestead. Florida 33030. Intends to W,,8KS INTERNATIONAL INC at '
register said name with the Clerk of ?,56 N-E. 12 Terrace, Ft. Lauderd-
Circuit Court of Dade County. ?~r 33?3.4 Intends to
1/9-16-28-3*
TNBHS my hand and the seal of
SI Joourt at M'aml, Florida on this
6th day of January. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
//-, As DeP"ty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Charles Gertler
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
1/9-H-23-80
Florida.
NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT
OF TAMPA. INC.
By RALPH LAUGHRIDGE
.... President
MARK BUCHBINDER,. ESQ
o'n0rJley.vfor> Nofthelde Development
8300 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33156
. 1/9-16-23-30
Lauderdale,
name with the Clerk" of'fhe^Clrcu'it
Court of Dade County. Florida.
J- H. G., Inc.
A Fla. Corp.
',JlUrev,.S; Greene. President
LEVINE, RECKSON & REED
Attorneys for applicant
1/23-30
_,. *7'CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEReE? GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to ei
' c,TcHvE.5lRCU,T COURT OF THI
., y^Dt JUDICIAL CIBCUIT
IN AND FOR riAnp cniiMTv
13000
33165,
Southwest
Intends to
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIOA
_ No. 76-194
Sol'r*' Ju'"'etien Division
IN RnCE BY PUBLICATION
iic.r The marriage of
NOTICE UNDER
x.F.iCJITIUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERJ2BY GIVEN that
the underai2iw.fi rio.i-i.... .- ____:
o
STR
TA
MICAEI%EVc^kKLEIN
Attorney for STEVEN J. KLEIN
50th Lane, Miami,
with the Clerk of thTc^ulTco."^, MRnis'MENAGED.
'/' Dade County, Florida Wife,
NOTICE UNDER ?" GUARAZ~S|e Owner
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW M- LESTER SAAL
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that eJ/T' for APP''c*nt
the undersigned, desiring to engage S'L^V-S,"*1.Bank Bld*-
in business under the fictitious nam VVest F'agler Street
and
LEVY MENACED,
Husband.
J J^F' Ji^T* MENAGE. 42-26 |1
Street, Elmhurst, L. I.. N.Y., are re-
?5 /" i'le your answer the pe-
the cwiT ""'""on f marriage with
1 e5lerk.,f the boTe Court and serve
_______________1/2-9-16-21
NOTICE UNDER
NOTICE w'HERBBY"oiVEN that tiSSZJ^Sfi
tS^SA^ts^mS 9STSz*-?*s- m*
ter said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida
JOAN SINGER
1/23-30 2/6-13
1/9-16-23-30
A Fla. Corp.
h=e^AnSor't-o'nRRE JR Prefl,dnl
Attorney for Applicant
1201 Biscayne Bldg.
Miami 33130
1/23-30 2/6-13
n business under the fictitious ,; k < M'aml. Florldf
f GEORGE GREENE ORCHESTRA Setliw ^m **"*? 12. 16,
t 1V50 N.E. 169 Street North vLv^ r\ *.'" be confessed,
leach. Fla naifi- J^Lr0?h Maml -Pated: Jan. 5 1976.
o
cult Court of Dade County Florida 2?r' &9L* Court
GEORGE GREENBERG
1/16-23-80 2/6
reel, Miami, Florida, 33130,
or else
By B. LJPPS
Deputy Clerk
a

l/-16-28-S0
i



January 30, 1976
+Jewish Her idicur
Page 15-A
STEPS TAKEN AGAINST 'UNSCRUPULOUS BUSINESSMEN'
Deny Rumor U.S. Officials,
Anti-Semitism in Argentina PLO Leaders Met Secretly
EDNA AIZENBERG
example of what concered
may achieve was the
Etion by Norma Kennedy,
ronist leader in Buenos
of a statement threaten-
take steps against the
rupulous" businessmen of
rtad Street" and the
|" neighborhood where
Jewish-owned stores and
ior synagogue are located
for allegedly increasing
s, illegally stocking con-
products, and sabotag-
\he people.
the DAIA (Delegacion
Vsosiaciones Israelitas Ar-
enas) protested these insin-
pns, Mrs. Kennedy met with
president. Dr. Nehemias
fiizky, and issued a declara-
with him denying she had
[Jewish community in mind
, attributing the matter to a
ries of mistakes and mis-
Tstandings."
^ATHER than causing the
pent economic crunch, as
enemies would have it,
are caught in it together
their fellow non-Jewish
entities. Business is at a
al standstill. No one buys
icept tourists or sells.
Iryone waits to see what cost
eases and shifts in economic
Icy the morrow will bring,
foping inflation is the order
day, with prices often
(ibling overnight and goods
appearing off supermarket
lives as housewives hoard
Jrything from sugar to toilet
er in fear of shortages and
inking purchasing power.
Strikes of all kinds are ramp-
and in June an attempt by
regime to limit wage in-
cases promised to the power-
General Labor Confedera-
(CGT) in the hope of rein-
inflation, brought about a
>-day general strike that
alyzed the country, causing
wit to remark that even the
\d will have to dig their own
PLETHORA of politico*
|es with which Argentines
to alleviate their multiple
idaches (Yiddish speaking
iiences had an additional
Ince to laugh for a while at
performances of "Stem-
ivu," a musical comedy by
olem Aleichem being staged
the Buenos Aires kehila
tiding) does not hide the
fcvity of what is happing. Jew-
institutions also stand to suf-
Cnrollment in Jewish schools
down as budget-conscious
rents look for ways to cut
enses. Jewish teachers, like
salaried employes, are hard
It to make ends meet.
(Argentina is apparently wait-
Ig for a strong hand to steo in
|d fill the vacuum left when
en. Peron died and the divi-
DAVID PLEASING
PEOPLE
IS HIS
BUSINESS
H. could malt
your n.xt party
your best one.
I cater private partial ef all siies at (Mf
"' '"'" CImcm in < Mir PUTTER
ICTMM ar create yew .am mm a**1
II Fieere it la rnr otitt.
CALL 856-6950
GLORIFIED CATERERS
1U3 Coral Way, Miami, Fla.
THE
PLACE
FOft
STEAK
JED BEEF OPEN HEARTH
HARBOR LOUNM
Always t grtry with
of two great jazz combos
I Street Couseway, Miami Beach
MCA** EXPRESS ONNRS CLUB
751-5511
sions in his Justicialist move-
ment broke down. Jews, too,
fear the vacuum.
Peron was a powerful figure
who could maintain internal
ordf r by listening to each g*-oun
as the occasion demanded. A
pamphlet issued by the DAIA
under the title, "Peron el Pue-
blo Judio" (Peron and the Jew-
ish People), contains quotes
from a number of the General's
speeches in which he evrn^se 1
his friendship for Israel and ad-
miration for the Argentine Jew-
ish communitv.
SHORTLY after he reassumed
the Presidency in 1973, endine
18 years of exile in Spain. Peron
had a meeting with a delegation
of Jewish leaders in which he
assured them that his movement
was opposed to anv form of dis-
crimination and that his doors
were open should any problem
arise that might concern the
community.
At the same meeting, in an-
swer to a point raised bv the
Jewish representative, Peron
said it was absurd to apply the
term "Sinarqua" to Argen-
tina's Jews as had been hap-
pening in a number of publica-
tions.
Yet this term was used by the
General himself at various
points in his career to describe
an alleged international power
clique seeking world domina-
tion directed from United Na-
tions headquarters in which are
included Communism, Capital-
ism, the Catholic Church, the
Freemasons and Judaism (or
Zionism).
THE DIVERSE currents with-
in Peronism were further dem-
onstrated when the Argentine
leader chose a Jewish Minister
of Economy, Jose Ber Gelbart,
who resigned after a power
struggle with Jose Lopez Rega,
former private secretary to Pe-
ron and Minister of Social Wel-
fare.
Lopez Rega courted Libya
and the Third World and was
accuspd in some quarters of eiv-
ing aid and comfort to the ultra-
rightist, anti-Semitic "Triple A!"
Argentine Anti-Imperialist
Alliance.
Since becoming President,
Mrs. P-Ton has on occasion alo
Mrs. Peron has an occasion also
once again denounced "anv at-
tempts to divide the Argentine
family." Still, with the Gen
gon^. there is worry in Jewish
circles how elements unfriendly
to the community might take
advantage of the current un-
rest.
There is an episode in "Los
Gauchos Judios" one of the
few reflecting anti-Semitism
in which a Jewish settler, Rabbi
Abraham, is falsely accused of
stealing a Gentile neighbor's
horse. No amount of valid evi-
dence or argumentation can
convince the local authorities
that the settler is innocent,
since as someone put it, "those
Jews are thieves."
COMMENTS Gerchunoff:
"Rabbi Abraham has witnessed
perhaps without foreseeing
the consequences the begin-
ning of a new period, which
transplants to Argentine soil the
eternal opinion about the Jews.
I want to believe, however, that
it doesn't always have to be
this way. ."
At Argentine's hour of trial.
Gerchunoffs words seem to
have a particularly timely ring
and the recreation of "Los Gau-
chos Judios" at this juncture
of Argentine history is perhaps
of more than passing signifi-
cance.
Israel Can Produce
Big Uranium Crop
NEW YORKIsrael could produce 100 to 150 tons
of uranium annually, enough to fuel four power sta-
tions, Prof. Shimon Yiftah, of the Department of Nuclear
Engineering at the Technion, told the Israel Industry
and Commerce News recently.
PROF. YIFTAH, who is also president of the Israel
Nuclear Sciences Society, explained that every ton of
phosphates from the Negev phosphate deposits con-
tains 100 to 200 grams (V* to % lb.) of uranium, which
could be extracted as a by-product of phosphoric acid.
The Technion professor said that the cost of produc-
ing one kilogram (2.2 lbs.) would amount to between $20
and $30. Since the price of uranium had jumped recent-
ly to $50 a kilogram, production was now profitable.
The Nuclear Engineering Department at the Tech-
nion is Israel's only source of locally-trained nuclear
engineers. With the government's decision to introduce
nuclear power stations to Israel, the Technion will be
responsible for making the needed manpower available.
KOSHER
CUISINE
AIR CONDITIONED
Rovhl nu
HOTEL
aMaMaaa.^
ONTHf OCfAN
DINING ROOM
NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
MONfANM MIN
FOR RfSHVATIONSSJ.-7311
1S45 COLLINS AVI., MIAMI MAC*
DINNER HOUR $ TO 7 P.M.
WASHINGTON (JTA) A leading London
daily's front page report of secret meetings recently
between American officials and Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization leaders has brought a sharp denial from the
State Department.
The Financial Times said that the purpose of the
meetings it reported to have taken place appears to be
to draw the PLO into direct discussions with the United
States.
BUT THE newspaper added: "It seems inconceiv-
able that the United States would recognize the PLO
without parallel guarantees that the PLO would recog-
nize Israel." The BBC earned the report in its overseas
service.
Several hours after the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
inquired at the State Department regarding the Finan-
cial Times report, a spokesman took the unusual step of
reading a prepared statement to the JTA. The state-
ment said:
"THIS STORY is incorrect. While individuals come
to us from time to time purporting to carry messages
from the PLO, I can state categorically and without qual-
ification that the reports in this story about either the
existence or the substance of a purported dialogue
between the U.S. government and the PLO are totally
incorrect. As the story itself says, the U.S. has never
authorized anyone to act formally or informally as an
emissary on its behalf to the PLO. We have no contacts
with the PLO."
ROYAL HUNGARIANS RESTAURANT
A REAL TREAT FOR JANUARY!
Sharing Plan and A La Carte Also No Frill Dinners
SERVING THE MOST DELICIOUS FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
PLEASE RESERVE FOR YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT MEALS
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
OPEN DART LVNCHfON II-.Xm.rn. 3 p.m
* DINNifflilljRf
.4^2? IB
[embassy restaurant
1417 washington ave. 538-7550
COMPLIMENT AH}
WINE
WITH DINNER
on
Fnooyi A Ho4M**yi
The KOSHER STEAK
HOUSE
The Ultimate in Kosher Dining
In An Elegant, Intimate Atmosphere
wmu rev can mm at wsuh
Our Specialty: Broiled Steak Chicken
Fish Shish-Ka Bab Salad Bar
Serving Only Clott Kosher Meats
Opt* Sunday 4 re 10 PJA.
MM. Thru Ttos S to 10 fJt.
Your Hosts. MCNASHf HIRSCH t RABBI NATHAN GOODMAN
Reservations NMMI 531-41 14 m 538-6631
On The Ocean al 21*1 St. MIAMI BEACH
Neil to ihe Soa Gull Hotel
ENTERTAINMENT
litrect frttna
SABRA KOSHER RESTAURANT
DM CHICAGO
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strictly
roburr
WfclN DAILY
4 P.M.
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH 531-6739 531-6730
world renowned
^arnou*
W BESTAUtAMT
Washington A v., Atiomi Baeh
OPEN YEAR ROUND AT 4 P.M.
JEWiSH _ AMERICAN CUISINE
ffS THAT MAKES THE FAMOUS FAMOUS
The Zuckerm.na BANQUET FACILITIES
Larry W..k>.


l n u \ a ii mi .11 hi imtm i
I lUdV. .JdllUdl V
Page 16- A
*Jenii> fkrkftsr
Friday, January
30.
%
If
?he next
ext 30 days, youshouwr^-----_
\bu are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radial is the worlds first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles. It's the
most economical tire you can own. Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires. Because of the exclusive I.R.I. All-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself. We believe the result
Is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the I.R.I. All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50.000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
re not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
1. 8IAS 2. BELTED J. RADIAL
t. BIAS TIRES
Two. four or tometimes even more plies (or
dyers) of material cross under the tread at an
angle or bias to the center line of the tire. Generalr*
the cheapest tire to buy.
2. BELTED TIRES
Similar to the bras tire with the addition of two
or more belts of material that run around the tirt
under the tread This combines a bias sidewall
with increased tread stability and improved
tread life.
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features. Cords of
material run from sidewall to sidewall crossing the
tread at 90 degrees. Two or more belts ot material
also run around the tire. Price per tire is higher,
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires Is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78's and 7.75's all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on piies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
S'NCE 1924
TIRE CO.
The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I, is the only all-steel radial
automobile lire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials, put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially -
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial tire is only a steel-belted radial. This is
important in understanding the superiority of
an I.R.I. All-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the I.R.I, radial than in any
other automobile tire. Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I .R.I.
tread stays open for maximum road contact -
in all kinds of weather. This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc.) used in the
sidewalls of all other automobile tires The
result is I00 per cent steel strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
I.R.I. All-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and its
stamped on the side of every I.R.I. ,ire Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials -
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
tor all vehicles, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pick-ups.
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I.R.I. All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us. Each cable is wound of seven strands of
SFRVICf
Will*
BUDGET URNS AVAILABLE
NORTH Ml AM 1-13360 N W 7th A52-Ml Al
# *# mm umm *m ctu out*
1. The only tire with STEEL
sidewalls for strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort.
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength, 30 steel cables per inch.
Total: Three layers o.' steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for sure-fire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire. That's a total of 21 strong
steel filaments in each cable. Yet. with all this
strength, the cable is as flexible as silk. The
result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-'round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configura-
tion was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I.R.I. All-Sted
Radial. Now. the combination of steel and
tread design provides solid, road-holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat.
The I.R.I, is an all-weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't heard about I.R.I.
All-Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry.
I K.I. is a relatively small company. We
are growing steadily on a market-by-market
plan now reaching your city. Five years
ago we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the finest imported tire available.
Because we had no conventional tire-making
SLU!??e?t,Jwe WCre free "to ,fy anything."
we did. And came up with a totally new idea
tha, produced a tire even better than the one
we had Set out to make. The I.R.I. All-Steel
m li, ,?S *T ,es,ed and r*-'ted. Subjected
to literally millions of miles of road-handling
aTS.0" J,'S aVai'able here- Backed b"
bv'^ JgUaran,ee S^ and serviced only
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INTIRNATKMWl RUBBER INDUSTRIES, IMC
Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles.
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?
BFOiiotinch


"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, January 30, 1976
Section B
Rabbinical Association Names
February CJA-IEF Monti
i
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami has issued a
proclamation designating Feb-
ruary as "Combined Jewish Ap-
peal Is.ael Emergency Fund
Month" on behalf of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's an-
nual campaign.
The proclamation was issued
in the name of the Association
by its president, Rabbi Ralph
P. Kingsley of Temple Sinai of
North Dade, and its executive
vice president, Rabbi Solomon
Schiff.
CJA-IEF Month was pro-
claimed to dramatize the prior-
ity of the 1976 fund-raising
d'fve. The Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
is t!i. f >cal point of humanitar-
ian concern for th? vital social
s......ire needs of"Jews in Mi-
ami, in Israel and throughout
the world. Contributions to the
campaign provide funds for
more t'mn 50 local, national and
overseas agencies for Jews who
lack the resources to help them-
RABBI R\LPH P. KINGSI.EY
*
MICHAEL ADLER
S. MARTIN SADKIN
Adler and Sadkin Chairing
Annual Builders Dinner
Michael Adler of Coral
Cables and S. Martin Sadkin of
Miami Beach are joint chair-
men of the annual dinner of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Builders and Allied Trades
Division.
The event, traditionally at-
tended by hundreds of leaders
in the local construction and
housing industries, will take
place Saturday. Feb. 14. at the
Konover Hotel. A cocktail re-
ception begins at 8:30 p.m., din-
ner is at 9.
Adler and Sadkin are rep-
resentatives of the young busi-
ness leaders takin; major roles
in the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Chairmen of the Builders and
Allied Trades Division are Sam-
uel I. Adler and Herbert Sadkin
of Miami Beach.
Senator Richard Stone is to
be guest speaker at the gather-
ing. Industry leaders David B.
Fleeman, Burton F. Goldberg,
Harry A. Levy and Stephen
Muss all serving as special
gifts cochairmen have ex-
tended invitations to represent-
atives of local home and apart-
ment builders, general contrac-
tors, property management,
land developers and allied
trades.
Corinthians CJA-IEF Event
Is Scheduled for February 8
Residents of the Corinthian
will gather on Sunday, Feb. 8,
for the building's annual Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund breakfast.
1976 campaign chairman for
the Corinthian is I. Ely Gold-
stein, who announced that there
will be a nationally known
guest speaker and that his co-
chairmen for the event are Wil-
liam B. Chersky, Alex Hanson,
Harry Harrison and Leon Srago.
Dr. Rowen to Speak At Beth Moshe Nursery School
Temple Beth Moshe Popiel
Nursery School has announced
that Dr. Betty Rowen will bo
the guest speaker on Tuesday,
Feb. 3, at 7:30 p.m. Her topic
is "Parent Awareness Train-
*" ______
Dr. Rowen, professor of edu-
cation at the University of Mi-
ami, consultant to children's
TV programs, author and lec-
turer, is listed in "Who's Who
of American Women, 1973-76,"
selves
In issuing the statement.
Rabbi Kingsley said that "in
light of the critical needs of
this year's campaign, due to
spiraling inflation here and
abroad and the ever-increasing
economic burdens of the people
of Israel, the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation is calling upon all syna-
gogues and temples to devote
th^ir services and prayers dur-
ing February to support this
central fund-raising program.
"The Synagogues, which have
alwavs set the precedent for
moral responsibility, must ex-
pntr>}|fy the age-old Jewish tra-
dition and resnect for Tzeda-
kah. which makes chanty not
an ontion but a religious re-
cuire*n#nt. We cannot falter in
our efforts to heln meet the
poil of the 1976 Combined Jew-
ish Aopeal Israel Emergency
rund."
Ariath Yeshiirnn
Yiddish Classes
Y:ddish is becoming a pres-
tige language. An .increasing
tin her of scholars study it,
not only as a language but as a
i in'ce of Jewish culture as
well.
"It is because of this increas-
ed interest that we have started
to offer a class in Yiddish,"
says Alan Renzer, executive di-
rector of Temple Adath Yeshu-
run.
Classes are held on Tuesday
evenings in cooperation witb
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and are fully ac-
credited. For further informa-
tion, call the temple office.
Schwartz Will Describe
The Arab Myth
Gerald Schwartz, director of
a Miami-based public relations
firm, will be guest speaker this
evening at late services at Beth
Kodesh Congregation. His topic
will be '"The Arab Myth of
Palestine."
This Sabbath is known as the
"Sabbath of Laws" the basis
for the laws is the Ten Com-
mandments.
Harmon to Speak at
Luncheon Honoring Him
i
Avraham Harman, president
of the Hebrew University ot
Jerusalem, will speak at a
luncheon in his honor on
Wednesday, Feb. 4, at noon at
the Westview Country Club.
Sponsors of the event are Her-
bert Buchwald of Miami Beach,
president of the Greater Mi-
ami Chapter of the American
Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity, and Howard Scharlin,
chairman of the National
Founders Dinner and Academic
Conference scheduled for Feb.
21 and 22 at the Fontainebleau
Hotel.
Harman, who served as Is-
rael's Ambassador to the United
States from 1959 until he as-
sumed the presidency of He-
brew University in i968. will
meet with national and local
leaders to plan the two-day
conference. He will also report
on Hebrew University's prob-
lems and plans, Buchwald said.
Morris Messing of Palm
Beach, state president of the
American Friends, is coordinat-
ing Tlarida activities in prep-
AVKAHAM HARMAN
arati'w for the conference.
Settling in Palestine in 1940,
Harman was in charge of the
English section of the informa-
tion office of the Jewish Agency
for Palestine until Israel be-
came a state. He earned his
law degree from Oxford Uni-
versity.
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
JONATHAN LIVNY
Lehrman, Livny to Be Guests
At Farband Luncheon, Feb. 8
Joseph P. Zuckerman, chair-
man of the Farband Labor Zion-
ist Alliance, has announced that
Jonathan Livny and Dr. Irving
Lehrman will be guest speakers
at the annual Farband Lunch-
eon and Concert Sunday, Feb.
8, at the Barcelona Hotel.
Livny is a leading Israeli
spokesman and Member of the
Knesset. Dr. Lehrman. spiritual
leader of Miami Beach's Tem-
ple Emanu-El, has served as
general chairman of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal, as well as
associate chairman of CJA-IEF
campaigns for the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation during
his three decades of community
leadership.
The Hth annual event, held
on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1976 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, will begin at
noon.
Mt. Sinai Prexy Is Bay Harbor
CJA-IEE Campaign Chairman
Edward Shapiro, president of
Mount Sinai Medical Center, is
leading a major effort for the
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund in the
Bay Harbor area.
Shapiro, well known for his
years of leadership in Miami's
Jewish community, is chairman
for the first joint CJA-IEF cam-
paign in the Belmont and Rex-
leigh residences.
Mount Sinai is a member of
the Federation's family of local
agencies that benefit directly
through CJA-IEF. The cam-
paign helOS M nmt Sinai to pro-
vide medic.il care to ind g 1
Jewish patients.
Shapiro has announced that
the Belmont and Rexleigh cam-
paigns will culminate with a
joint narlor meeting on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 11, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Belmont Social Hall.
Rabbi Kingsley to Speak
At Jacksonville University
& fc- **- -
EDWARD SHAPIRO
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley of
Temple Sinai of North Dade is
scheduled to speak at Jackson-
ville University on Feb. 3-4. He
will address several classes and
luncheon meetings.
Rabbi Kingsley's appearance
is sponsored by the Jewish
Chautauqua Society, the educa-
tional project of the National
Federation of Temple Brother-
hoods. The organization is ded-
icated to creating a better un-
derstanding of Jews and Ju-
daism.


1'llUdV. .JdUUcllV OV
Page 2-B
vJewisti noridlian
Friday, January 30, 197|
Aventura Will Honor
Dorothy Sandlofer
Aventura chairman .lack Bel-
lock, a key leader in the 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, has an-
DOROTHY F. SANDLOFER
nounced a special event honor-
ing Dorothy Feinberg Sandbfer
on Mondav, Feb. 16, at Aven-
tura Country Club.
A former resident of Detroit.
Mrs. Sandlofer devoted vears of
effort to that citv's Jewish Wel-
fare Fedeption as well as to
the work of the American Jewish
Congress. Slit: has been a prin-
cipal leader nf Miami's Jewish
Vo'">ti'->'V>! agency's inception in 1957. JVS
is a nv'iber of Federation's
fa^ilv of local agencies.
A chartering member of JVS,
M,-s. Sandlofer served as i's
vice president and was presi-
('nt b?tw?en 19^3 and 1966.
Through lie- involvement the
Charles P. Feinberg Memorial
Fund endowing s^holarshin
1ins wns established in
1972, administered through JVS
and ^idint; 25 college studen's.
Belloc'; is assisted by a large
A'vntura committee in plan-
ning the evening to hon'v M"s.
Saadlofer. Avsntura golf pro
Juli-'s Roros is among the
event's supporters.
Kaufmans To Be Honored
By Friends of Herzliah
Ma: :. I Sa>ah Kaufman of
New York and Miami will be
gjests of honor at the annual
banquet of the Frirnds of Herz-
liah-Jewish Teachers Seminary
on Sunday, Feb. 1, at the Al-
giers Hotel. Dr. Gershon Winer,
former dean of the institution
and for several years a resi-
dent of Israel, is scheduled to
attend.
Ida Kaufman, who served as
treasurer of the Jewish Teach-
ers Seminary some 30 years
pgo, Iras labored for the His-
tadmt and for the Stats of Is-
rael and is chairman of the
protected Yiddish-language li-
b'arv in Miami Beach. Sarah
Kaufman is active in the busi-
ness world, in Hadassah, and in
welfare agencies.
Th Miami Friends of Herz-
liah-Jewish Teachers Seminary
uncludtjs Joseph Berman and
' K ''igsberg. chairmen;
Morris Fisher, secretary: Dr.
Joseph Diamond and Israel
Meinbaum, honorary chairman;
Morris and Sarah Friedman,
Norman Arluck, David and Mi-
riam Gingold, Harry Gale, Isi-
dore Walk. Irving Warshawsky,
Chaim N. Weingarten, Benjamin
Weiner, Leon Segal, Joseph
Zuckerman. Max Rothman and
Mollie Rubinstein.
Herzliah Jewish Teachers
Seminary, on Bank Street in
New York's Greenwich Village,
has five departments. The two
undergraduate departments of-
fp programs leading to dinlo-
mas for Hebrew and Yiddish
teachers and the degree of
Bachelor of Jewish Literature.
Studies include Bible, Hebrew
'nnguage and literature, Yiddish
\ nww and ttoratunt, Tal-
mud, Jewish education, Jewish
history, Jewish philosophy and
Jewish sociology.
Susan Panoff to Address
Books Discussion Group
Susan R. Panoff, director of
the Educational Resource Cen-
t jr it t*9 Central Agencv for
Jewish Educition and book -e-
vj v f0- "The Jewish Flor-
idfon." will address the Great
J wish Books Discussion Groin
ZTO
Wholesale Distributors of
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
FALLS
KOSHER POULTRY
Processors and Exporter*
of th* rfaast U.S. Govt. Inspvigd
KOSHER MEATS and POUITST
W17 N.W. 7th Ave
Miami, Fhk.
Phone 3)4-1859
on Thursday. Feb. 5, at 1:30
p.m. at the Miami Beach Public
Library.
Her subject will be "The
T?nts of Jacob" by Raphael
Patai, a study of Jews in the
Diaspora.
The Great Jewish Books Dis-
cussion Group is an independent
organization whose objective is
to bring classical Jewish writ-
ings and ideas to the Jewish
community.
Under the guidance of Sam-
uel Reiser, the group encour-
ages individuals of every reli-
gious and communal persuasion
to create their own discussion
grouns and stimulate interest in
our Jewish literary heritage.
Torah Academy
Plans Dhmer
Mavine SUlMPM cliairladv of
the dinner committee, has an-
nnunoad tbi first annual scho-
larsnirr dinner for the Torah
Academy of South Florida, the
only Torah IXm*soYah-afftliatedi
school in rhe North- D&fe area.
Thar dtrnw, honoiriiiif ita
fowtfws. will Hb w Stmday,
Feb. 15, at the Crimson Retom.
Gnest srjeatmr is" fcaUoT Beref
Wein, fttr^rf srrhHfrtat'leadfct of
Congregation Beth Israel.-----+*
Baltimore Rabbi
At Temple Israel
Dr. Abraham Shusterman,
rabbi emeritus of Har Sinai
Congregation in Baltimore, will
deliver the guest sermon dur-
ing Sabbath Eve services at
Te rmle Israel of Greater Mi-
ami beginning at N o'clock.
In anticipation of the intro-
duction of the now Reform Jew-
ish p: aye book the following
week at Temple Israel, Rabbi
Shusterman will reveal "What
Pra..... M "i-- 11 We."
H'*!le) Dcy School Auction
To Pe at Beth Torah
Hill 1 ommunity Day School
v ill hold its annual auction at
7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. l, at
Beth '',i Cong eg ition in
North : 1 li Beach.
Mrs. irman Winn, chair-
nan of the e ening lor the
t:u';-.i ir, has announced that
Harold Col>b will be the auc-
tioneer and that a tremendous
amount of merchandise has
be n received for auctioning,
including a seven-day Carib-
bean cruise.
Cnchairman for the auction
is Mrs. Harvey Ehrlich. Mi-
chael Scheck is president of the I
school.
Proceeds from the auction
will benefit Hillel's scholarship
fund. For firther information,
call the school office.
ADTs Coleman to Address
Brotherhood Meeting
B'nai B'ritl V'oniel and
Men of Coral Gables has an-
nounced that their annual
Brotherhood meeting will be on
Tuesdav, Feb. 3, at 8:30 p.m.
at the First Federal Bank Com-,
munitv Roorns, SW 27th Ave.
Odd Coral Way.
The speaker will be David
Coleman, a member of the Anti-
Defamation League Speaker's
Bureau.
JWV Auxiliary No. 330
To Induct New Members
The Jewish War Veterans
Post and Auxiliary No. 330 will
hold a regular business meeting
on Thursday, Feb. 5, at 8 n.m.
at the American Legion Hall,
l*th St and Alton Rd., Miami :
Beach.
The Ladies Auxiliary No. 330
will induct new members and :
hold a social meeting. Pauline
Lazarus is Auxiliary president.
Freda Liebcrman is publicity
chairman.
Jewish Home's Auxiliary
Plans luncheon
The Junior Auxiliary of Mi-
ami Jewish Home & Hospital for
the Aged has scheduled a lunch-!
eon meeting for Tuesday, Feb.
17. at noon at the Singapore
Hotel.
The featured speaker will be !
Judge Aaron Harkaway, and j
there will be a musical pro-1
gram. For reservations, contact j
the president, Mrs. Morris Rat-
ner.
ISRAEL
STAMPS
OUR SPKIALTY
FREE
CURRENT
PRICE-LIST
ON
REQUEST
GA*a co.
P.O. BOX 374
HEWLETT. NEW YORK
VMST
(51*) 374-2909
" ii n
Adath Yeshuran Students
Present Consecration Service
The first-grade students of
Temple Adath Yeshurun He-
brew School will present a spe-
cial Consecration Service this
evening at 8:15, led by their
teacher Mrs. Jack Diamond and
Cantor Ian Alpern.
After being blessed by Rabbi
Simcha Freedman. each child
will be presented with a siddur
(prayerbook). The students be-
ing consecrated are:
Monday Wednesday class:
Lee Blumberg, Richard Borah,
Alfred Chernov, Robin Davis,
Shari Feldman, Harvey Gins-
bur", Robert Goldman. Maria
Greenspan.
And Kim Hagan. Hedy Klo-
da, Hagai Lerer, Brian Polo-
niecki, Stcy Rosenthal, Andy
Sand, Jeffe' Seltzer, Jay Sha-
ri'-o. Laura Siskind, Jesse Tep-
licki and Ellen Tucker.
Students in the Tuesday-
Thursday class are Rnk
Chance, Heidei Cohen ffi
Curtis. Sharon Feldman S,
Harke. Melissa Hart. u$
Horowitz. '"
And Pattyi Jacobskina na
Kaufman. Seth Lapfdu l,
Lowenthal, David Milman Evan
Piper, Roger Piper. PamRosa
And Felisa Schwadron. Gerald
Seidler Marie Stein, Marc Tes
cher, Michael Toner, Steven
V-.lm.kv. Keith Wein, oscar
Wemberg and Tracy Wexler.
Garage Sale
North Miami Charter of Won.
en's American OUT h:is an-
nounced a garai sale featur-
ing household itetis, baby
things, and many mjscellaneom
items. The sal will be on Sat-
urday, Jan. 31, an-.l Sunday
Feb. 1. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.'
':,
The KEDEM Wine Family
Now Presents
Home Style Kosher Gefilte Fish
Grape and other
Delicious Fruit Juices
e
Available at Thirty Supermarket
& Shopper's Paradise
Washington Ave., Miami Beach
ETRIC
SUPERIOR QUALITY HOTEL TOURS
TO U.S. A.* MEXICO* HAWAII
EUROPE'ISRAEL
H
U
o
m
Deluxe and 1st class hotels
Experienced leadership
Registered nurses
All day and evening activities included ^l>'
Free brochure Home visits Fab. & March
Personally supervised by owners-directors
Mr. and Mrs. Jack J. Metselaar
Mr. and Mrs. Allen N. Rich
-- METRICS CAMPING TOURS
SHOUT THE RAPIDS
HORSEBACK HIDE
BICYCLE RIDE
1 SV. IMVING
EXP10RE GLACIERS
WATER SKIING
HIKING
CANOEING
METRICS BICYCLE TOURS
HIKE B::(E AND CAMP THROUGH THE WEST
EXCITING 4-6-7 WEEK PROGRAMS
TOLL FREE NUMBER 1-800-431-1130
OR CALL COLLECT 0-914-725-4800
METRIC TEEN TOURS
2 Overhill Rd., Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583
3
n
H
7)
O
S
n
H
a
o
HH ERTISEMENT
New Lower Fat Beef
Products Offer Improved
Nutritional Benefits
CHICAGOThe Best
Kosher Sausage Company
has recently developed a
line of lower fat beef saus-
;ige products thai reduce
the fat content by 33%
(1/3). while retaining the
HHf flavor and texture of
their regular products-.
US. Government stan-
dards allow a maximum of
30% fat in frankfurters,
knackwurst. and bologna
products. The lower fat
products made by the Best
Kosher Sausage Co. have
no more than a 20^; fat con-
tent. This substantial fat
reduction serves to in-
crease protein and lower
the ealoriecontent signific-
antly.
One ol the nation's largest
weight reducing organiza-
tions tested and approved
these lower fat products for
their members' reducing
program.
The nutritional content of
each package is promi-
nently displayed on every
package label. The infor-
mation shows the amount
of protein, fat. and car-
bohydrate content in each
serving.
The Best Kosher lower fat
beef products are sold in
the deli case of super mar-
kets, delicatessens, and
other fine foed stores.


1976
+Jen iHi fk rkUam
I
General Goren, Israel's Chief Rabbi,
1 Bonds Rally on Me
i
5 Of] Is 01
in
i
-

''' chann'j
mem b le ol
. -am
Histodrut Honoring Dinitz
U Final Conference Session
icha Dinitz, Israel's Am-
|l a .- -
ai ticipant in Mid-

AK'HA DINITZ
ions, will
fecei' i rKatadrut
lltan Uol-
. n > Inesday, Feb.
1 ion oi the
I rence
lor Isra at t.ie FoataineWeau
in making the armauacement,
. i| president
H rul Foundation,
... Dii was
N bis brilliant
ienice to the State of Israel
nd his c; l- icourage-
pport ol the Israel
ndation."
The. iarks the achieve-
ent of the LHF's $40 million
lilestone, the cumulative to-
SABRA
112 PAGE
COOKBOOK
101
Award Winning
Recipes
THE BEST OF 8,000
RECtPES SUBMITTED IN A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
SEN #1.00
(No Stamps please)
Your Name & Address to:
lABRA COOKBOOK
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
IHICKSVIILE, N.Y. 11816
ince the
loi|! a i lized IS
i |
e
; P i n il Is Poj
teui
The First ret
was former
justice Vr
na-
e Hi
ii until his ap-
poin Secretary of La-
the 1 medj Adminis-
tratii n Go] ed the
rwenty Million Dollar Award
in 1971.
Other eci] ients h ive been
Rabbi Leon Ktonish of Miami
Beach, IHr board,
chairman (Twenty-Five Million
Doll ii Award in I 73), and the
late Pinhas Sap:., former Is-
raeli finance rniri md chair-
1 of the Jewish Agency
(Thirty Six Million Dollar
Award in February, 1975).
Beth Torah
Flea Market
Beth Torch's first annual
open-air flea market will be on
Sunday, Feb. IS, from 9 a.m.
h) S ivm. at 105* No.th Miami
Beach Blvd. Selling space is
limited and can be reserved by
calling 947-7528. Merchandise
donations will be picked up.
Anyone with information con-
cerning the whereabouts of
the following persons, please
call:
THS NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
576-4747
Children of
CHAIM & LEIB LERNER
born in TomashpoT, Russia
Relatives are trying to locate
them.
PAUL or MARK POLIAKOFF
(POLICOFF) formerly of Phila-
delphia, born in late 20/s in
United States.
Cousins in Israel are trying to
locate them.
BOCA RATON
Condos For Sale
On golf course appr. mile
to Beach. 2 BR + den / 2
full Baths. Walking distance
to Club restaurant for din-
ing and dancing, lighted
tennis, 36 holes of golf, bil-
liards, sauna, whirlpool.
Easy access to 1-95. Financ-
ing available.
For Sale Same Location
1 BR + den / 2 Baths and
others. Prices range from 31
thousand.
HOGELAND B. BARCALOW
REALTOR
4799 N. Federal Hwy.
Boca Raton -391-9963
cf
I
the d

Gen i i one Of the
SHLOMO GOREN

yari us 1
I in-
i
' i ci il
'books ;
ny and, as a result ol
:h, a compli te ( ide of
Religious L ;r jr.
ote his .
comments v on the of
T*! timoni I
id a
and bool with .'.
ish religio and cus-
toms.
T!ie COl
i ien to all men
h Florida <]
munity and will highlight
197 S Flori la Israel B< nd
Organi :ation cam,Mien drivi
for life-gi co-
nomic .' it program]
Group
o
-

Ave.
"
asl
ces in p
RICHTER
JEWELRY CO.
OVEi) SO Tf MS IN MIAMI
PURCHASERS OF
DIAMONDS 1 FtNE
A|vin-Rhte- ond ArnQld'Tr,
*~ experienced opprojjefi con ,
of Q>5isfance"1c indivfdi/dlu^jHl
tameys aru^.banks tor hig
.price and ouicUesJ way to d.spow
of your iewels onsujf
ALVIN C. RICHTER
DIAMOND MOr*
PH tltM2
3745*3?.
1
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
HAYM SALOMON 1740 1785
Financier Banker of the American Revolution Patriot
H
"aym Salomon was a fervent patriot
whose love of liberty and business
acumen combined to make him the
financial hero in the War of Inde-
pendence. Born in Poland in 1740, he was
forced to flee that country in 1772, due to his
fight for freedom, along wiih Pulaski and
Koseiusko who became military heroes of the
Revolution.
Salomon prospered from the very start in
America, doing business with wealthy loyalists
while joining the Sons of Liberty, a group of
revolutionary patriots. He was twice arrested
by the British but managed to escape execution
both times; finally fleeing to Philadelphia.
Salomon's reputation for honesty and skill in
trade, especially foreign, attracted Robert
Morris, then Superintendent of Finance, who
called on him for help in raising money to wage
the war, and later to save the emerging nation
from financial collapse. Morris' diary indicates
Some 75 transactions were made by die two
men between August 1781 and April 1784.
As President Calvin Coolidge said of Haym
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Salomon: "He negotiated for Robert Morris
ail the loans raised in France and Holl
pledged his personal faith and fortune fei i
minis amounts, and personally advanced I
sums to such men as James Madison. Thomas
Jefferson, Baron Steiihen, General Si. Clair and
ruany other patriot leaders who testified
without his aid they could not have carri
the cause."
Salomon's place in history is memorialized by
a 20-fool high statue standing at Wabas i
Wacker in Chicago. Unveiled in 1941, the
statue depicts three grc.it Revolutionaries,
(ieorge Washington in the middle, flanked \
Robert Morris and Haym Salomon. It is a tell-
ing tribute to the Jewish-American patriot
whose life was dedicated to his family, friend*
and country.

Gond
lo ihi
V'F
G(MAl IOOD.
k
^mT^I
.PS i Jy "fills]
^BB^tl^U
SEND FOR
EXCITING
BOOKLET
Honoring 177c
aad h.imous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will he.ihriii..
tUo I stories in this boi
your Ji hisli In ritugt In Americalb
of many "historic" Jews who mu<:
contributions in the creation and building of
our nadon, Send 50* (no stumps) with m
and addresi to:
JEWISH-AMI RICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4-188. Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017
u


^
^mmmm
ll.UJl. JJIIUJUwp^
Page 4-B
*Jewisti florid fan
Friday, January 30, 1976
t .
Reform Rabbis and Laymen
Plan HUC-JIR Centennial
Dade and Broward County Reform rabbis
are planning the centennial celebration
of the Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. Seated (from left) are
Rabbis Herbert M. Baumgard, Temple
Beth Am; Samuel Z. Jaffe, Temple Beth
El; Joseph R. Narot, chairman, Temple Is-
rael; Ralph P. Kingsley, Temple Sinai.
Standing (from left) are A. Harold Mur-
ray, South Florida director of develop-
ment, HUC-JIR; Rabbis Robert P. Frazin,
Temple Solel; Robert J. Orkand, Temple
Israel; Michael B. Eisenstat, Temple Ju-
dea; and Chaim H. Friend, national direc-
tor of development, HUC-JIR.
Southgate Towers Plans
Israel Solidarity Night
Julius A. Levine, chairman
of the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
effort among residents of Mi-
ami Beach's Southgate Towers,
has announced a gala "Israel
Solidarity Night" on Thursday.
Feb. 5, at 7:30 p.m. in South-
gate's Terrace Room.
Guest speaker will be Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, spiritual
leader of Miami Beach's Temple
Menorah. Appearing in a
musical program will be Tony
Ross.
RABBI M. ABRAMOWITZ
Hadassah Florida Region
Will Meet in Orlando
The Florida Region of Hadas-
sah will hold, its mid-winter
board meeting in Orlando on
Feb. 4. Helen (Mrs. Maxwell)
Weisberg, president of the Flor-
ida Region of Hadassah. will
call the meeting to order at
10:30 a.m. at the Kahler Plaza
Inn.
There will be three workshops
that evening: a nominating com-
mittee meeting, chaired bv Char-
lotte (Mrs. Leonard) Wolpe; a
conference workshop, chaired by
Selda (Mrs. Sherman) Milton;
and a youth activities worshops.
chaired by Devora (Mrs. Sey-
mour) Friedman and Roz (Mrs.
Joseph) Solrz.
A Bicentennial education in-
stitute, "Jewish Involvement in
the American Community." will
be held on Feb. 5. Chairperson
Edith (Mrs. Charles) Schulman
announced that the program in-
cludes a presentation on "Jews
in the History of Florida" and
'How Jewish Authors Affected
History."
Guest speakers will be Pro-
fessor Barry Mesch, "Jewish
Contribution from Colonial
Times," and Professor Sheldon
Isenberg. "How History Will
Record American Jews From
1976 Forward." Both are in the
department of religion at the
University of Florida in Gaines-
ville.
There will be an exchange of
ideas on how Hadassah chap-
ters in Florida are participating
in Bicentennial celebrations.
The winning artwork of the Mi-
ami Chapter's Bicentennial art
contest will be on display.
Arrangement, chairperson for
that day is Ellen (Mrs. Lau-
rence) Morrell of Orlandto.
Marlene (Mrs. Norman) Ross-
man is president of the Orlando
Chapter of Hadassah.
JWV Post 778 Sponsoring Auction
Jewish War Veterans, South
Dade Post No. 778, and the
Auxiliary will sponsor an auc-
tion at Temple Beth Am on
Sunday. Feb. 8. at 7:30 D.m.
Jackie Rose and Sylvia Dubbin,
cochairmen for the Auxiliary,
and Al Rose and Arnold Novins.
cochairmen for the Post, an-
nounce that among the guest
auctioneers will be Metro Ma-
yor Steve Clark, Sooth Miami
Mayor Jack Block, Miami City
Commissioner Rose Gordon,
and Daryl Pollack of WTVJ-TV
Ch. 4. TV personality Al Lei-
bert will be the auctioneer.
Merchandise to be auctioned
includes a seven-day cruise,
two three-day cruises, week-
ends, dinners, gift certificates,
rugs, clothing, and other arti-
cles. No bids will be refused.
JF & CS Offering Parenthood Course
A course on "How To Parent
More Effectively" will be of-
fered by Jewish Family and
Children's Service at two loca-
tions. Beginning Feb. 2. fro-.
3:30 to 5 p.m., at Place North
386 NE 167th St., and begin-
ning Feb. 3. from 3:30 to 5 p.m..
at the Main office, 1790 SW
2~th Ave.
The course runs for six weeks.
For registration information.
Sally Kolitz at the Jewish
Family and Children's Sen-ice.
We look to you to make Israel
Economically Strong by Buy-
ing Israel Bonds. Give to the
CJA and Israel Emergency
Fund. Mayshie Friedberg.
Southern Florida Reform
Rabbis and laymen met recent-
ly to compl ste liturgical, educa-
tional and social programs com-
memorating the centennial here
of Hebrew Union College-Jew-
ish Institute ot Religion.
Rabbi Joseph R. Na'-ot of
Temple Israel, who heads the
rabbinic co-afimitt^e, announced
that Sunday. March 7, would
be devoted to an academic con-
vocation at T-mrle B-th lh -
loin an 1 a dinn-r at the Kon-
over Hotel with a guest of
hon-v- to be onn'Mnisd.
Rabbi Narot. chairman of the
HUC-JIR rabbinical board of
overseers, stressed that "sun-
port for Jewish academic in-
stitutions represents a vital nec-
essity for the members of the
American Jewish community."
He noted that rabbis, cantors,
educators, communal workers
and Jewish and Christian scho-
lars who have earned their de-
e-ees at HUC-JIR serve in Jew-
ish communities all over the
worH, ince its founding in
Cincinnati in 1875 by Rabbi
Isaac Mayer Wise, the Colleee-
Institute has ordained 1,562
rabbis, including the first wom-
en in 1972.
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk is the
HUC-JIR president of the
scheol's campuses in Cincinnati,
New York, Los Angeles and
Jerusalem.
In addition to Ihe dii
the convocation, a numb of
HUC-JIR faculty member!
be in Miami during the winter
and a Jewish music concert will
be given in April.
Reform rabris on the
mittee, in addition to
Narot, include Rabbis Herbert
M. Baumgard and Mitchell
fitz, Temple Beth Am; Michael
B. Eisenstat, Temple Judea-
Robert P. Frazin, Temple Solel'
Samuel Z. Jaffe and Han
Rosenfeld, Temple Beth El
Ralph P. Kingsley, Temple Si-
nai of North Dade; Leon Kro-
nish, Temple Beth Sholom; Rob-
ert J. Orkand, Temple Israel;
and Sanford M. Shapero, re-
gional director UAHC.
i
Catholic To Give
Greenfield Talk
On Sunday morning Father
John T. Pawlikowski will be the
Greenfield Lecture Series guest
speaker at 10 a.m. at Temple
Israel. President of the Catholic
Theological Union of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, Father Paw-
likowski hat been a national
leader in Catholic-Jewish dia-
logue and will give his impres-
sions of "Jewish-Christian Rela-
tionships."
i


Friday, January 30, 1976
fJenisti FhridBOnn
Page 5-B
Schapiros Honored At D&er Welcomes
Port Roy ale Night in Israel
The residents of Port Rovab
Condominium in Miami Beach
pledged substantial purchases
of State of Israel Bonds at a
"Night in Israel" held recently
in the Social Hall.
Honors were accordsd Solo-
mon and Cla-a Schapiro, who
received the Israel Solidarity
Award for their exception^
leadership. Among the guests
were Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man of Ohev Shalom Congrega-
tion and Israeli entertainer Dan-
ny Tadmore.
Sponsored bv the Port Royal:
Israel Bonds Committee und?r
the chairmanship of David Pret-
ner and cochairman Julia Asoh
the guests learned that the 197,'
thpmo strass4 the need for de-
velopment funds with wVrh to
establish n?\v industries and pro-
due more energy for Israel's
economy.
Solo' ion Schapiro. a board
'",'" P Ohev halom Con-
gregation, is a forra-r board
_; '" '-' Of Young Israel of
'" ecrrst in1 B=vswiter and
West Side Institutional Syn-
'" gj : in New York.
C'ra s.r-hy j-0 a )jf. member
of Mizrachi Wn^ien, is -t mem-
ber of Haim Yassky c-roun of
Hadassih and of the Ohev Shi-
lom C-,nT'eg>thn fisterlmd.
The Schapiros are active ;n the
Social and Sunshin? C!ib -it
Port Rovale and have received
the Golden Boo'< Certificat" on
their Gol !en Anniversarv from
tV Bessi> Gotsf'ld CMMron's
Village and Far~i School Mizra-
chi Women's Organization of
America.
Milton M. Parson is th
executive director nf tv Gmt-
p- Miami Isra?l Bond Organiza-
tion.
Hirsh Eleeted President
Of Friends of Lubavitch
At a recent meeting of the
board of directors of the
Friends of Lubavitch, which is
composed of the Life Partners
of the Chabad Lubavitch move-
ment, Menashe Hirsh was elect-
ed president. The announce-
ment was made by Rabbi Abra-
ham Korf, executive vice presi-
dent and Regional Director of
Merkos Chabad Lubavitch.
Menashe Hirsch, well, known
in Greater Miami's Jewish lead-
ership circles, is a graduate of
Yeshiva Chaim Berlin in Brook-
lyn. He served as president of
Oholei Torah Day School, now
the Landow Yeshiva Center, for
four years.
Hirsh is also a leader in the
tourist industry. He is the pro-
prietor of the Glatt Kosher Sea
Gull Hotel, which includes the
Kosher Steak House and the
newlv opened catering service,
the Kosher Kitchen.
Judy Drucker Named to Board Of
Richard Tucker Music Foundation
Judy Drucker, chairman of
the Temple Beth Sholom Great
Artists Series, has been named
a member of the board of the
new Richard Tucker Music
Foundation.
Plans have been made for a
kickoff cocktail party on Feb.
17 at the home of Mayor Mau-
rice and Mercedes Ferre. The
guest of honor will be Beverly
Sills of the Metropolitan Opera.
John V. Lindsay, former
Mayor of New York, is chair-
man of the board of directors
of the foundation, which was
formed to perpetuate the mem-
ory of the late tenor through
projects to aid gifted young
singers.
Surf side Women's League
Surfside Women's League
will meet at Town Hall, Mon-
dav, Feb. 9. at 12:30 p.m. Miss
Sylvia Stein will review Ar-
thur Hailey5s novel "The
Moneychangers."
The League's monthly card
r-arty is scheduled for Thurs-
day, Feb. 19, at 12:30 p.m. at
Town Hall.
Weisgal
To Miami
D \ Ma [well Dauer, presi-
!!o i !a Committee
f r the Weizmann Institute of
bcirnci, recently welcomed to
ij M y.r W. W isgal, jour-
nalist, editor, theatrical impre-
M'io, chanc llor and principal
a.chitect of the Wiizmann In-
stitute in Kchovot, Israel.
At a recent event in New
Yj k in his hon >r, Weisgal was
introduced by Elie Wiesel, not-
ed author and distinguished
proijssor of Judaic stuuies at
ill: City Uni eisity of New
York, as "one of the most cre-
ati e personalities of our time
w.H) has dedicated his own life
to the iife, present and future.
.1 toe Jewish people. '
While in Miami. Weisgal will
continje his work on b.'hah of
the Weizmann Institute of Sci-
ence, he i-a.i oe contacted
Lj.uugh Mrs. Lee Rockstiin,
a L.Cau\e ui ector of the Flo
Ua Committed for the Wdz-
cnann In.titute on Lincoln Rd.
Segal to Speak At
Erandeis District Meeting
Leon-Segal, noted Zionist and
lecturer, will be the guest speak-
er at the meeting of the Bran-
deis District, Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, on Monday.
Feb. 2, at 8 p.m. in the Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium, 1133
Normandy Drive.
Jewish Music Month will be
celebrated with a sing-along of
Jewish and Hebrew folksongs, j
Louis Hoberman. president of
the Brandeis District, will act
as master of ceremonies.
Leon Segal has contributed
greately to the cultural life of
Greater Miami and is a frequent
visitor to Israel. He is a member
Of the Jewish Council for Jew-'
ish Education, of the national
executive council, and presi-
dent of the Hebrew Forum of
Greater Miami. He has con-
tributed articles to many maga-
zines and periodicals.
Segal will discuss the Kfar
Silver Agricultural College and I
Mollie Goodman High School'
in Israel, both of which are j
sponsored by the Zionist Or-
ganization of America.
Rose Shaniro and Thelma I
Sheckter will be the hostesses
at the social hour following
Segal's talk and the sine-along.
Morris to Be Keynoter At
Pioneer Women Bond Lunch
Yaakov Morris, the spokes-
man of Israel's Permanent Mis
sion to the United Nations, will
keynote the South Florida Coun-
cil of Pioneer Women Bond-
With-Isracl Luncheon on Mon-
day. Feb. 23, at 11:30 a.m. at
the Eden Roc Hotel, it was an-
nounced by Mrs. Milton Green,
president and luncheon chair-
man.
A member of Israel's Foreign
Ministry for the past two de-
cades. Morris served as deputy
director of the Information Di-
vision in Jerusalem and has
represented Israel as the head
of the missions in Indi. as
counselor in Sto^hclm and as
counsel in New York.
The Irish-born diplomat is
author of th" best-selling "Mas-
ters of the Desert." which has
?n introduction by David Ben-
Gurion. Morris was activ in
the Pioneer Zionist Youth Move-
ment and served in the Haga-
nah.
Mrs. Green announce.) that
Clara (Mrs. Sidney) Leff will
receive the State of Israel David
Bcn-Gurion Award at the lunch-
eon. Mrs. Leff, former national
president, is national building
fund and national Israel Bond
chairman for the Pioneer Wom-
en. She was a delegate to the
World Zionist Congress in Jeru-
salem and to the 25th anniver-
sarv conference of Youth Aliyah
in Israel.
Sandier to Speak
At Samu-El
Robert Sandier, professor of
English and head of the He-
hrpW Studies Department at the
University of Miami, will dis-
cuss "Do Jews Still Accept the
Teachings of the Prophets?"
during services this evening at
8 at Temple Samu-EI.
Following the services the
Sisterhood of the temple will
host the Oneg Shabbat.
OPENS SATURDAY
SATURDAY, MAN. 31st
l* JANUARY 31st thru FEB. 5th
D. S. CLARKE PRESENTS:
MIAMI BEACH
ANTIQUES SHOW
OVER TEN MILLION DOLLARS
WORTH OF ANTIQUES FOR SALE
CLIP THIS COUPON
MIAMI BEACH
ANTIQUES SHOW
CONVENTION HALL
1700 WASHINGTON AVE.
JANUARY 31st thru FEB. 5th
12 NOON TO 10KK) P.M. LAST NITE TIL 6 P.M.
ADMISSION $2.00
WITH THIS COUPON $1.50
..
~-* .


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a "perked coffee" May vin.
He insists on Maxim."
Maxim tastes like fresh
perked coffee because
Maxim starts with fresh
perked coffee. Then it's
freeze-dried into big dark
chunkschunks of real
perked coffee. That's
Maxim. Fantastic flavor
by the cup or the potful.
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Tape f>-B
JK B-hnHl ITkiriicfliictin
Friday, January 30, [97^
Mi>. Tanenhaum to Receive
Solomon Schechter Medal
Faye CMts. Joseph) Tanen-
baum of Toronto and North Mi-
Beaeh will receive the
ami
FAYE TANENBAUM
Solomon Schechter Medal from
the Jewish Theological Semi-
nuy of America at a brunch at
the Konover Hotel on Tuesday
morning, Feb. 10, under the
auspices of the Seminary's Na-
tional Women's Patron Society,
it was announced by Mrs. Louis
E. Goldstein, chairman of the
society.
Mrs. Tanenhaum will be the
twenty-second (ano the fifth
woman) recipient of the award
in the Seminary's 90-year his-
tory. Dr. Solomor Schechter, a
world-renowned British scholar
and theologian, was the first
president of the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America.
Dr. Saul I. TeoJitz. a member
of the Seminary's faculty and
rabbi of Congregation Sons of
Israel of Woodmere, N.Y., will
be the guest speaker at the trib- |
ute to Mrs. Tanenhaum.
A longtime friend and patron
of the Seminary, Mrs. Tanen-
haum received the Seminary's
National Community Leader-
ship Award in 1962 in New
York. A native of Toronto, she
has been active in the religious
and philanthropic life of On-
tario Province. She was for
many years a member of the
board of the Jewish Home foi
the Aged, which was founded
by her mother.
She served also on the board
of the Ontario Section of the
Council of Jewish Women and
was chairman of its Braille
training and affiliations commit-
tees. She was a vice chairman
of the UJA of Toronto and a
member of the board of trus-
tees of the Mount Sinai Hospi-
tal.
Some years ago the Tanen-
baunis established the Faye and
Joseph Tanenbaum Chair in
Talmud in the Seminary's Rab-
binical School.
The National Women's Patron
Society is headed by Mrs. Louis
E. Goldstein of New York City
and Bal Harbour, a former
president of the Women's
League for Conservative Juda-
ism and a past chairman of its
Torah Fund-Residence Hall
Campaign. Last year the League
raised over 51 million for the
Seminary. In May it will dedi-
cate the Seminary's newly ac-
quired Mathilde Schechter Resi-
dence Hall to house the Semi-
nary's female students. The hall
was totally funded by the Wom-
en's League Torah Fund Cam-
paign.
Weiner Among Top Ten In
Home Life's National Sales
Herbert L. Weiner, CLU,
ranked among the top ten in the
national sales organization of
the Home Life Insurance Com- I
pany, New York, during 1975,
with sales of more than $4.5
million.
Weiner, who is associated
with the company's Miami
agency in Coral Gables, is a
consistent winner of the Na-
tional Quality Award for serv-
ice to clients, and a Life and
Qualifying Member of the in-
dustry's Million Dollar Round
Table. He has been inducted
into the Home Life Hall of
Fame, founded to give perma- <
nent recognition to those who
have made a significant con-
tribution to the company's
growth.
HERBERT L. WEINER
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Individual Therapy Assertivetess Training Groups
Group Therapy "Sudtorty Single" Groups
Marital Therapy Uolteelack Therapy
Family Therapy lay Treatneot Programs
Treatment of Sexial Oysfnctiees
Psychological and Vtcatietal Testing
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Friday, January 30, 1976
* lew Ssib fhrUKku)
\
Page 7-B
/Yc
4^/ Vow .
~i
with NORMM A. OROVITZ
When distaff members of our
"Now" community join the work
force, t\\l> contradictory ele-
ments become apparent. The
J.A.P. (Jewish American Prin-
cess) image begins to fade,
much as facetious husbands re-
fuse to admit it. And paradox-
ically, because their husbands
are still the boui ca of the family
income, needs other than finan-
cial arc the wants being satis-
fied.
Tobv Smrtler, a kindergarten
teacher at Coral Gables Elemn-
tary School, nut it succinctly.
"I had to <\ ) something to make
me ME." What Tobv did was to
stait college h i ter two chil-
dren were grown and on their
own.
AFTER four years spent be-
twee i Mi imi Da South and
Uni entity M imi, Toby be-
gin! i -:'> teaching
Career. '-" dtan so :-' he be-
gar : ?pee,
"I'm "" ltd f me and I'm not
finished eithi
Thai el ait of new-found
me-ness is simi : cliclous
sen i f II ,' ni dene CM! i>
worn ';:' b, if von It is
really
Ir:s Chaisn and EdU S i iu
an tw t brand n m a as-
i rig-
ger "Hi '>' as il b md
a hi If vei fit-
n a al oth o the
Jorth Miam fri s en-
rolled in .-j .; i ass.
TWO COURSES '
exam tat frii lie: ar<
a desk al Sans Souci's Ac sal-
ty. The'' v; lii
timi. i fie snac an riis-
sions. Bbth gi "is oroughly
en i' ;m-:';' ? hey
sec themselves as nerformlng a
positive s-.'>-\ ice j le i iak-
ing the ourchase of a lifetime
a horn..
The challenge of negotiating
a sale and bringing it to fruition
is very satisfying. They are
also getting i;" nmercial
property and foaming even
more a*net b nuch to
their huabaada sliqht. Iris
comments that it is lit to
find a niche for oi iftei
the childr n are gri a nd that
a concerted effort musl be made
in that di :tion
Edie Agrees. "My interests
have changed, and life is more
Interesting now."
An inter* Bt that led to a ca-
reer is thi reason Judv Aron
is ni'.'.' b travel udy,
never really coi in
women's organisations, was
looking f->r to oc-
cim\ he rtime. She considered
goin:; back to school or work-
ing as a medical technician as
she had before her marriage.
Instead. Judy prevailed unon
the travel agency that booked
her familv's tours and now finds
herself sitting on the other side
of the desk. "I've researched and
planned my own trips and
thought it would be fun to plan
other niennle's trips," she said.
TIIF. FUN factor, not hedon-
istic Dlcasure but satisfying ful-
'iis to be an over-
riding clement in these new
vocations.
Joan Brooks' career began
when her son ">s about to be-
come Bar Mitzvah. Instead of
havin the invitation? address-
ed nrofeaeionallv. Joan's hus-
band suggested she do them
herself and donate the calligia-
pher's fees to Federation.
"And that is exactly what we
did." She learned the art of
fancy Palace script on her own
but consulted with other
citigraphers for advice on pens
anci ink. From her North Miami
Beach home, not two years
later, Joan's business is mush-
rooming.
"I don't turn anything away,"
she said. She now addresses
others' invitations (card shops
promote nor samples), creates
TV ads and completes diplomas,
awards and commendations.
DORIS SUTT1N, commended
in "Who's Who of American
Women." has been working "for-
ever." With a background in
advertising and sales, she com-
bines her business talents while
wholesaling fabrics and paint-
ings to the decorator trade for
her family's business, Saul S.
Siegal Company.
She sees no problem in jug-
gling her time but aoes sec a
problem being a woman in a
man's business. "Men think a
pretty woman is frivolous. You
have to be more talented than
a man to make it in business
and it takes twice as long."
Tired of being referred to as
the boss' daughter. Doris once
thought of chartering a chapter
of S.O.B. (Son of the Boss), a
club conceived by a group of
Philadelphia businessmen. Iron-
ically, she was too busy work-
ing, volunteering for her son's
PTA and taking a creative writ-
ing course with James Jones at
FIU to worry about being the
boss' daughter, for long.
RUTH SCHAFKER loves work-
ins! In what was once a man's
world. Discounting any double
business standards, Ruth revels
in her 10th year as a decorator.
He'- career has been a series of
evolutions from anparel de-
signs to commercial artist to
decorator.
Presently, her expensive anti-
que hobby is expanding her
decorator) line. She calls anti-
quing her "weekend job." Ruth's
husband shares the responsibi-
lities for their three children so
the hassles are halved.
Juggling time and errands,
making the time until the kids
come home count and discover-
ing avocations that become va-
cations is what many of "Now's"
readers are doing. We'll catch
up with more of you in subse-
quent columns.
David Pinski
Culture Club
The Oneg Shabbos of the Da-
vid Pinski Culture Club this,
evening at 7:30 at the Ida Fish-j
er School Cafeteria will com-j
memorate the hundredth anni-
versary of the birth of the Yid- j
dish poet Abraham Rei/.in.
L. Lasavin, author and cor-
respondent of "The Jewish
Daily Forward," will speak
about the poet's life and work.
Jacob Gorclick will sing a group
of songs to which Reizin's
poems were set. Fishel Nesh-
kin will read from the poet's
work.
Liebman to Discuss
Mideast at Adath Yeshurun
Temple Adath Yeshurun's
guest speaker on Tuesday, Feb.
3, at 9 p.m., will be Professor
Seymour Liebman, a member of
the American Professors for
Peace in the Middle East and a
national vice president of the
American Zienist Federation.
His book, "The Middle East:
A Return to Facts," is used on
three college campuses, and he
is a member of the national
board of the National Commit-
tee on American Foreign Policy.
His topic will be "A Solution to
the Middle East."
The lecture series is given in
cooperation with the central
agency for Jewish education.
Clara Leff Will Be Honored At
Pioneer Women Bond-with-Isracl Luncheon
Clara (Mrs. Sidney) Leff,
former national president of
Pioneer Women and the current
23, at 11:30 a.m. at the Eden
Roc Hotel. The announcement
was made by Mrs. Milton Green,
luncheon chairman and presi-
dent of the South Florida Coun-
cil of Pioneer Women.
The luncheon, onening the
1976 Inaugural Conference lor
the State of Israel Bonds, will
hear an address by Yaakov Mor-
ris, spokesman of Israel's Per-
manent Mission to the United
Nations.
An internationally known
Jewish leader and lifeling Labor
Zionist, Mrs. Leff. a member of
Pioneer Women for over a quar-
ter of a century, serves on the
board of the American Zionist
Federation and the board of
directors of the National Com-
mittee for Labor Israel, and is
honorary national vice chair-
man of the Jewish National
Fund.
She has represented Pioneer
Women at international gather-
ings and on trips throughout the
world, serving >. ix times as a
delegate to tli: World Zionist
Congress in Jfcrusalsm and to
the 75th anniversary conference
of Youth Aliyah in Israel.
After joining Pioneer W<
in 1934, she served as pre! d< .it
of the Greater New York in-
cil and has held many posit! ns
on the national level.
CLARA tJflFF
national building fund and na-
tional Israel Bonds chairman,
has been named the recipient-
elect of the David Ben-Gurion
Award.
Presentation will be made at
the Pioneer Women Bond-With-1
Israel luncheon on Monday, Feb.:
Chiles Campaign
Begins Today
U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles (D-:
Fla.) will kick off his Dade
County reelection drive in Mi-
ami this morning at a Dutch
treat breakfast at Miami Springs
Villas at 8 o'clock. The meet-
ing is open to the public.
Chiles said plans for the Dade
County One Equal Share Ral-
ly, set for Feb. 28. will be fi-
nalized at the meeting.
Sen. Chiles has set a $10-
per-contributor limit for his re-
election campaign. thereby
guaranteeing each person one
equal share in his Senator.
FashioriSpree '76
The Greater Miami Section
of the Nation Council of Jewish
Women concludes its three-dav j
FashionSpree 76 today at Bay-
front Park Auditorium from 10
a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Judy M. Gilbert, president of
the Greater Miami Section .said
"The funds we raise at Fashion
Spree are used to support our
programs in education, here |
and in Israel, and our services
to youth, the elderly, the immi-
grant and the disadvantaged.
Cash in on our now
or-never daffy deals'
78 CORDOBA
Automatic, factory air. power
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radio, tinted glass, radial lues.
other extras.
Stock No. 6105 $6,781
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mmnrwH!im
* J y "Uiuidl \ \J\J~
Page 8-B
vJewistTier Mian
Rosemary's Thvmt
BV ROSEMARY FURMAN
I spent last Tnursday morn-
ing in the home of Mrs. Julius
Daryky in Miami Beach. The
occasion was the annual Lion
of Judah brunch for the Pace-
setters and Trustees of the
Women's Division of Federa-
tion.
The Lion of Judah, that at-
tractive gold pin you may have
seen on someone and wondered
about, is Riven to *hcse women
who are in the highest category
of women's giving. Over 60
women attended the brunch.
THERE ARE. in all, over 200
women in the Miami area who
give, in their own names, very
substantial gifts to Federation.
Testimony to Federation's ef-
fectiveness is the fact that not
very many years ago there were
only eight women who received
the Lion of Judah.
Before Mrs. Darsky wel-
comed the gathering, the wom-
en, led by Mr. Darsky, ad-
mired every nook and cranny
of the Darsky apartment. They
could not have had a better
guide. Muriel Rudolph was the
decorator, anc. Mr. and Mrs.
Darsky have every reason to be
proud.
Chairwomen of the day wre
Mrs. Harry Levy and Mrs.
Stephen Sonson, both of Miami
Beach.
AFTER D^-ida Le\ v explain-
ed the significance of th dav.
Mrs. Sonson introduced David
Tooaz. an Israeli "o^t and a~-
tor. Besides being uniauely
handsome, his Doetrv. narticu-
larly his poem about living near
a volcano (as all Israelis do),
was very effective. Lots of wa-
tery eyes.
Then Mm. Merrill ffas&en-
feld, national United Jewish Ap-
peal Women's Division chair-
man, addressed the group.
Mrs. Hassenfeld (who remind-
ed me in looks an 1 style of
Miami Women's Division pres-
ident Mi-ilyn Smith (which
is not at all bad), noted the
serenity of the day and that
in Israel "there is no quiet sea-
son."
She talked of the situation in
London where English Jewry
are "scared."
THEY SEE the streets of
London filled with Arabs and
realize that there are more
newspapers written in Arabic
than in English sold on the
streets of London. Indeed, the
Jewish conferences that she has
attended there were not de-
signated as such for fear of
reprisals.
As English property is being
grabbed up by the Arabs, she
wondered about England's al-
legiance to Israel. Quoting Elie
Wiesel, she said: "Countries
don't have fi.ends they have
interests."
After Mrs. Hassenfeld's re-
marks. '* Miai T "tees an-
nounced their gifts. While some
of them do not like to think of
themselves as "elite" with
all the snobbish connotations
that word may engender
there is no doubt that in terms
of their concern for the Jewish
community, thev are elite in
the best sonse of the word.
Mrs. Darskv provided a beau-
tiful luncheon for all her guests.
anJ, a small thing, but it im-
pressed me: she prepaid the
parting attendants. They would
not even accent a tip.
tr rt-
Correction: The Miami Pub-
lic Library's ouilt show will be-
gin on Feb. 3 at the Biscayne
branch of the library. And Carol
Wein will eive only one lecture
on her quilts, at 12:15 on Feb.
10.
Mr. Rosichan and Miss Hutner
Are Married in Miami
Arthur S. Rosichan and Flo-
rence Hutner of Toronto were
married on Jan. 18, Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff and Rabbi
William Saiovitz of Pittsburgh,
the eroom's cousin, officiated
at the ceremony, which was
held at Rosichan's home.
Rosichan, who was executive
vice president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation from
1960 to 1972, is executive di-
rector of the Federation's Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies
and a lecturer at the Barry Col-
lege School of Social Work.
Mrs. Rosichan, director of
the Toronto Jewish Welfare
Fund for 20 years, is an officer
of the Ontario Council of Aging
and a consultant to Community
Care Service, Inc., in Toronto.
She is also treasurer general
for North America of the Inter-
national Council of Social Work.
The bride's sister. Mrs. Oscar
Pol>ock ,of Toronto, w s the
matron of honor. Richard Rosi-
chan was his lather's best man.
The Rosichans will make
their home in Miami.
Barton's Sponsoring Essay Contest

About 3 million Americans
are expected to participate in
a nationwide essay contest spon-
sored by Barton's Candy Cor-
poration cf Brooklyn, accord-
ing to Stephen Klein, chairman
of the Board. The company has
long been involved in public
ser ice and education thro'igh
its many institutional advertise-
ments and informative pam-
phlets.
The essay contest features
two themes, "What Would Mo-
ses say to the United Nations
Today?" and "What Would
Thomas Jefferson say to the
United Nations Today?"
In addition to cash prizes,
the winning essay will be fea-
tured in full-page ads in ma-
jor newspapers in April and
June. The contest clases March
15.
The first pri;'es will be di-
ided equally between the win-
ner and the organization he or
she represents. In^ itations to
participate have gone out to all
major organizations, religious
institutions, schools and clubs.
"Perhaps we can fin j the key
to world peace and the settle-
ment of some of the world's
major problems through the es-,
saw submitted in the contest,"
said Klein. "Certainl> *he peo-
ple of the United States are j
much concerned by the animo-
sities among the world's nations.
They should have an opportu-1
nity to exoress their views and
their proposals for solution:
within the framework of the
two provocative subjects of the
contest."
National chairman of the United Jewish Appeal Women's
Division Mrs. Merrill Hassenfeld (seated) addressed
the annual "Lion of Judah- brunch sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division
pacesetters and trustees at the home of Mrs. Julius Dar-
sky. Together for the event were (standing, from left)
pacesetter-trustee coc'nairman Mrs. Stephen Sonson,
hostess Mrs. Julius Darsky, and pacesetters-trustee
chairman Mrs. Harry A. Levy.
Miami Beach leaders of the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration Women's Division taking part in the recent
"Lion of Judah" brunch at the home of Mrs. Julius
Darsky included (from left) Mrs. Israel D. Shapiro,
Women's Division campaign vice president Mrs. Scl
Goldstein, Miami Beach area chairman Mrs. Richard D.
Levy^jmd Mrs. Norman Robbins.
Carol Sokolow and Michael Rosin
Will Be Married in May
Carol Lynn Sokolow and
Michael Aurel Rosin became
engaged on New Year's Day
and plan to marry in May at
Beth David Connregation.
I
Miss Sokolow, the daughter of i
Mrs. Benjamin Amdurer and j
Jerry Sokolow of Miami, re-
ceived a Bachelor of Science'
degree in business administta-!
tion from the University of
Florida in Gainesville. She i employee as a bank credit
analyst.
Mr. Rosin, the sen of Mrs.
Elsie P. Rosin anJ the late Mar-
cus Aurel Rosin of Sarasota,
will be graduated this spring
from the University of Florida
Medical School at Gainesville.
Friday, January 30, 1976
Radiology Expert
Gives Talk
D\ Melville Jacobs, head of
Radiology at City of Hope and
an authority on the radiological
treatment cf tumors, was sched-
uled t.i address the South Flor-
ida Council of Auxiliaries and
its friends at a communitywide
meeting on Thursday. His sub-
ject was a report on the new
linear accelerator installed at
City of Hope in 1975, one of six
in the nation, and the work be-
ing done on bone-marrow trans-
plants in the treatment of leu-
kemia.
Dr. Jacobs headed the team
that developed the first low-
cost cobalt radiation "bomb."
an instrument that is a part of
the permanent exhibit at the
Smithsonian Institution in
Washington.
President of the South Flor-
ida Council of Auxiliaries,
which has over 3,500 members,
is Mrs. Cy Plasky, a member of
the Medical Center national
board cf directors.
Temple Zamora
Sisterhood Dinner
Florence Boss, president of
Temple Zamora Sisterhood, has
announced a gala testimonial
dinn:r in tribute to the ladies,
who ha'-e freely gi'en of their
sendees for many years on be-
half cf Temple Zamora.
Rabbi Maurice Klein, spirit-
ual leader, will present the
plaques to the honorees, whose
names will be disclosed at the
time of presentation.
The dinner will be on Sun-
day, Feb. 1, at 6 p.m. The chair-
lady of the occasion is Rose
Da iJow.
'Outreach' At
Oliver House
Continuing the "Outreaci1."
prcg.am inaugurated list year,
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot will con-
duct services for Temple Is-
rael's members and friends at
the Oliver House this evening
at 8.
the life of your party..
MUSIC
Orchestras 932-7323 Entertainment
MIAMI BEACH'S
FINEST GLATT KOSHER
CUISINE
-
A DINING EXPERIENCE YOU
WILL LONG MMtMBUt
Coll Adolph for Reservations
I Phone: 538-5731
*<
RESERVE NOW
FOR THE PASSOVER
HOLIDAYS
Limited number of rooms
available
OCEAN AT 43rd ST.
MIAMI BEACH
Kosher
Catering
Fantasy
Not Just
Another
Kosher Hotel
. but new
and elegant.
The very
finest in Food
preparation,
presentation and .
service ... That \
Wedding. That Bar-V
Mitzvah. That special
party belongs at the Algiers.
It's Glatt to be good.
/Mi tCT)s (<0r3P'Glatt
"<*l/f/ %$ /UL Kosher
\^7 Jack Gartenberg. Ouinr-Manager
For information Call Catering Director Allan Zane at 531-3391
ON THE OCEAN AT 25th ST. AND COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH


Friday, January 30, 1976
*Jewlsti noridiam
Page 9-B
The Physicians Division of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, led by Dr. Alan
Craubert (seated) of Miami Lakes, met
recently to discuss activities in its 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fund effort. Leaders taking part in-
cluded (from left) Dr. Dale Davis and
Dr. Neil Koreman of South Miami, GMJF
camoaign director Mel Schoenfeld, and
guest speaker Howard Stone. Stone, Unit-
ed Jewish Appeal's overseas programs di-
rector, discussed the Physicians' Mission
to Israel, planned for later this year.
Harry B. Smith, president of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and Myron J. Brodie, executive vice presi-
dent of the GMJF, inspired members of Federation's
Leadership Development Committee at a well-attended
planning meeting. The program is designed to select
and educate individuals for roles of maximum service to
the community through the Federation and its agencies.
Among those spearheading this year's effort are (from
left) Robert Traurig, chairman of the leadership devel-
opment committee, Stanley Rosenblatt, Aaron Podhurst
and Samuel Rabin.
The first Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division Mission to Israel
will be led by chairman Mrs. San Adler
(center, left). Mrs. Adler will be joined in
the ten-day study tour by her mother,
Mrs. Sam Shinensky (center, right), along
with nearly 40 other community leaders
including Women's Division South Dade
area chairman Mrs. Herbert Praver (2nd
from right) and her mother, Mrs. Minnie
Feuer (right), and Mrs. Alan Gardner
(left) of North Miami, along with her
mother, Mrs. Estelle Luckman (2nd from
left).
Lou Hymson (center) of North Miami Beach is presi-
dent-elect of the South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
Lodges. Together with Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion campaign director Mel Schoenfeld (left) and B'nai
B'rith Council president Barry T. Gurland (right), Hym-
son is planning a widespread February telephone effort
by B'nai B'rith members to assist the Federation's 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund effort.
The llth annual Farband ^orZonSt
Luncheon and Concert will be held for
the Greater Miami Jewish Federations
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Lra*
Emergency Fund at the Barcelona Hotel
on Sunday, Feb. 8. Together to plan he
program of musical artists ana guest
speakers were (seated, from left) Jack
Filosof, president of Bialik Branch, Far-
band LZA, and Joseph P. ^kerman
president of Lebediker Branch, Farband
IZA and conference chairman; along
with (standing, from left) honorary chair-
man Bernard Gingold, secretary Norman
Mnkin vice chairman Morris Tamres,
and honorary vice chairman Leon Rettig.
Mrs. Leonard Miller (left) of Bal Harbour joined Mis-
sion chairman Mrs. Samuel Adler (right) of Miami \
Beach for a preliminary briefing on the first Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division Mission to '
Israel, scheduled for later this month. A group of 40 lo- \
cal women will participate in a ten-day study tour on \
behalf of the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel 1
Emergency Fund, led by Mrs. Adler, along with Worn- I
en's Division president Mrs. Harry B. Smith and cam- j
paign chairman Mrs. Sol Goldstein. _J


Page 10-B
fJenisti /rJoridliain
Friday, January 30, 1976

This year's Pap Award dinner
will have a Bicentennial musical
note. The Joyful Noisemakers
ill present "Ballad for Amer-
cans" on Monday, Feb. 9, at
the Sheraton Four Ambassadors
Hotel. The announcement was
mde by Dr. Julius Schultz,
resident of the Paranicnl-iu
Cancer Research Institute at Mi-
i mi.
Presenting "Ballad" will be
i l.vmember orchestra and 20-
oice chorus under the direc-
on of Charise Amidon. The
iodern cantata is based on four
highlights in the nation^ his-
ioi f the Union, the War Between
I ie States and the .Machine Age.
it & a
Dr. Manolo Reyes, TV news-
>an, had been named honorary
Heart Sunday chairman of the
rreater Miami Heart Fund
>rive, to be conducted in Dade
tv) Monroe Ciuntlts in Feb-
iary.
In ma! ing the announce-
lent, nusl V: imonte, M.D.,
eci ta of tl fearl Associa-
tion, said thai l!ii? will be t;i
sixth consecutive year in which
Dr. Roves is honorary Heart
.vunday chairman.
Dr. Reyei aid that 10.000
olunteera are needed to k
door-to-door ^n Heart Sunday,
Feb. 22. -it will only take a few
lours," sai 1 Dr. R u it
is a very important job. Volun-
teers will call on their r."ih-
rors for donations and distribute
literatur? about many of the
free public service pn
that are put on in the commu-
nity.
"The Heart Sunday goal this
year is S160.000," Dr. K
aid, "and this -oes into re-
>earch. education and commu-
nity service. The Heart As^a-
iiation is a non-profit health
<4>ency. sunnorteu entirely by
public contributions. This means
'hat it is up to all of us vou
and me to help the Heart
Fund so that these important
.Tograms can continue."
Forty I o are lined up
>r the Fob. 8 Rolf tournament
t Aventurn Country Club. It
wHl be a shotgun start at 11
i.m. and will benefit the Shaare
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem.
Tournament sponsor is Jimmy
De Nicola with Julius Boros as
tournament chairman. Groups
censist of three amateurs and
a pro.
In addition to local and na-
tional celebrities, a list of the
pros so far are: George Bayer.
Rich Bassett. Ernie, Jav and Ju-
lius Boros, Bill Co1Hp-_ Manuel
de la Torre, Chris Carson (John-
ny Carson's son), Roger Ken-
ivvly, Tom Toski (Bob's brother).
Johnny I.a Ponzina, Dale Wel-
ker, Joe Diego and John Okley.
\Y ft
Fireball District of the Boy
<>o. ts of America will hold its
fourth annual Pinewood Derby
on Saturday, Jan. 31, at Im-
maculate (.'oiT-ention School in
Hialeah. Kegistration is from 8
t i '' a.m. All participants should
bring lunch.
ft
Henry MenJelson, local rep-
tive of Common Cause,
:i | -ess the Forte Forum-
1 o N. Caylor Forum on
. Feb. 3, at 1 p.m. at the
1?P0 Wesl Ave. Auditorium. He
will I ibe the group, which
is with maintaining
Bnd horesty in American
polil
: : Me M. Fuchs was re-
in tied the new execu-
or of Senior Centers
of Dade County, Inc. She has
ith the United Way of
I"1 I ;v as a director of
the Volunteer Action Center, as
a ui tor for the United
Way's fund-raising campaign,
and matt recently as director
of the Retired Senior Volunteer
am.
A- RSVP director, Mrs.
Fuchs headed a communityvvide
effort to help the retired senior
citizen become an active par-
ticipant >h volunteer activities
throughout the Miami area,
ft ft
Dr. Steven Rievman, family
counselor, will describe "How
To Lead a More Stressless Life"
at the general meeting of the
Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation on Tuesday, Feb. 3,
at 8 p.m. at the Mailman Cen-
ter's 8th floor auditorium.
Round Town
Albert E. Quinton, Jr., chair-
man of the Board of the Heart
Association of Greater Miami,
has announced that Mrs. Mat-
thew H. Bradley is the chair-
man of the 1976 Miami Beach
letter-writing campaign for the
Heart Fund.
Mrs. Bradley, the wife of Mi-
ami Beach cardiologist Matthew
H. Bradley, M.D., said that the
Beach Heart Fund Campaign is
handled on a letter-writing basis
"Because in the high-rises and
condominiums on the Beach it
just isn't practical to have Heart
Volunteers go door-to-door on
Heart Sunday, Feb. 22."
ft ft ft
PUZZLED! by Norina A. Orovitz
C 0 M P A N
h n p o
A K I 0 H ff
L U U Y I U
I Z S N S T
5T I S 0 E H
Z V I T M G
A Y M J E V
H L P T ff' A
E D M X K P
HZSHAD
E Q 0 N I H
T T a K E T
U R 7 Y
W F A E
irsG
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VKHL
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A H B B
Jennie and Dave Shorr, who
wore married in Brooklyn on
Jan. 10, 1926, celebrated their
Golden Anniversary at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel on Satuiday,
Jan. 10. The Shorts have three
children Morton, Pat Rosen,
and Melvin and six grand-
children Clifton, Robert, Eliz-
abeth and Erica Shorr, Mrs.
Susan Karafoil and Nina Rosen.;
Present at the celebration
were Melvin Shorr; a sister, j
Mrs. Sylvia Burd of Brooklyn;
brother and sister-in-law Harry
and Lillian Lerner of North Mi-!
ami; Rochelle and Dr. Alan R. ,
Lewis of South Miami; Joann :
Lerner and Dr. Mel R. Krohn;
Yetta and Jack Nyman of Fort j
Lauderdale: and Sadie Ingber of |
Miami Beach.
This puzzle contains 12 words and phrases having
to do with Jewish marriage. How many of the words list-
ed below can you find? They are placed horizontally,
vertically, diagnoally, frontward and backward. An-
swers are on Page 13-B.
KETTUBBAH PROCREATION
HUPPA KIDDUSHIN
SHADCHAN NJSSU'IN
GET SHEVA BERAKHOT
CHALITZAH OYTRUFN
COMPANIONSHIP BREAKING GLASS
HELD OVER 2.1.WEEK!
SUNSET
aw SUNSCT M I
SOUTH MIAMI
NcMANDY
HUNS AVI el 7*
MIAMI IIACM
HALLANOALE
A COMPREHENSIVE TOUR OF ISRAEL
& AMSTERDAM SPONSORED BY THE
ISRAELITE CENTER TEMPLE & LED
BY RABB! SOLOMON ri WALDEHBERG
A ?m/l number of reservations still available.
LEAVING MAY 10th RETURNING MAY 31
hr further information call 445-1529
"Once in a while you come across
a jewel of a film that makes movie
going worthwhile. HESTER
STREET is one such film."
Mary McGechy. NBC Radio
^Hester Street
J> J) fh w
i
ANTIQUES SHOW
FEBRUARY 5-6-7-8
BAYFR0NT Al'D'TORIUM, 5th ST. at BISCAYNE BLVD.
AIL EXHIBITS FOR SALE
Admission $2.00
Hours 1:00 to 11:00 P.M. Last Day 1:00 to 9:00 P.M.
All Merchandise Shown For The First Time
Hayim Fershko Sarah Fershko
Fershko Duo
In Bicentennial
Recital
To commemorate the Bicen-
tennial, lyric soprano Sarah
Fershko and pianist-composer
Hayim Fershko, will appear in
recital on Tuesday, Feb. 10, at
8 p.m. at the Miami Beach High
School Auditorium.
Both artists have been ac-
claimed in Europe. Israel, Mex-
ico, South America. Canada and
the United States for their per-
formances of Jewish, Hebrew,
and Russian folk music as well
as of classical music.
Sarah Fershko will sing "The
House I Live In," accompanied
at the piano by Hayim Fershko.
who will also play his transcrip-
tion of works of Franz Liszt
SILBERMAN'S
FINE CABINETRY
New concept in Wall Units
Desks for the Professional
1963 N.E. 147fhlANE,
NORTH MIAMI 531-2474
Open Weekdays
Sundays 10 to 1
THE INCOMPARABLE
:


JAN PEERCE
Sings Your Favorites
WITH AN ALL STAR CAST
THE THEATRE OF PERFORMING ARTS,
MIAMI BEACH
SAT. FEB. 31 76, 8:30 P.M.
% 0*mM $4.50, $5 M, |*.50, $7 5C
Tkk.h tv.ft.bU i Jordw, M.rth Oawmew* *W
9 or tUrf $,. NMft ., Arf, K#AM A#WMr ,
f lieatfc- to.d, $,,, si] <*,*. f,^ tmmt Avfc)
For information, reservations and group
*unti call 8614901 or 532-1851
-ftfSENTiD BY SOUTH DADE HEBREW ACADEMY
****
;.


r
Friday, January 30, 1976
fcw#.# fknWinir
Page 11-B
Jje
^abbutical !$&%t
o-ordiri3ied by the
Greater M.ami Rabbinical Associalion
co-edilors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GREAT AMERICAN-JEWISH PERSONALITIES
Ruhb'i Isaac Leeser
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Russia's Historic Haired of the Jew Continues
BAB!'.! OK. DAVID RAAB
^femple Beth Solomon
bi Isaac Leeser was born
^estphalh, Germany, on
Xe. 1 isod. He had attended
BCymnasium of Muenster,
Be he received a Rood foun-
B> hi : Latin, German and
ew. In 1824, at 'the invita-
of his uncle, Zalman
|le, he came to Richmond,
ie worked there at the
jless of his uncle, who was a
jierchant. On Saturday and
_ay, however, he assisted
piazzan'tn the Synagogue
each religion and Jewish
MT-
was while answering an
Jewish article in the "Rich-
H) Whig," which had ap-
^d in the "London Quar-
T' that brought him to the
HBtion of the congregation in
Kdelphia. In 1829 he was
Before invited to become the
n at the prestigious Con-
tion Mickve Israel of
delphia. His articles of de-
of the Jews (a prelude
|he Anti-Defamation League
'nai B'rith) were published
33 as "Jews and the Mosaic
' and "The Claims of the
s to an Equality of Rights.'1
jeser was referred to as
thodox" by proponents of
rm and looked upon as a
mer by his congregation.
as definitely in favor of
ige and modernization, but
;e within the framework
adition and Mosaic prac-
One of his great changes
to introduce into the
rdic Synagogue preaching
English language.
THE BOOK "The Jews of
. telphia" by Henry Samuel
ais, we read that "in the
I 1829 a man who became
most distinguished of He-
Spiritual Guides in this
imunity; a man who in fact
the pioneer, levelling the
and arranging the system
organization among the
. in the United States, was
Ited to become the Pastor
Congregation Mickve Israel.
man was Rev. Isaac Lee-
(From 1830 till the end of the
il War in 1865, American
ish history was really
iwn as the "Age of Leeser."
contributed a great deal to
fcaism and to the religious
W cultural life of the com-
ttiity, and th eentire Amer
Epi Jewish populace. Materials
3 books on Judaism in Amer-
K were limited, and Leeser
Applied most of these needs,
leed, he was the greatest pio-
x in the progress of Judaism
id Jewish knowledge in the
sw land of opportunity.
[Truly, he was an all-around
prsonality and scholar. He
rote textbooks for children,
^ayerbooks for the synagogues
Jld translated the Bible into
bodern English. Known as
The Leeser Bible" and com-
peted in 1854, it was the stand-
Ird English translation until
|917, when the new Jewish Pub-
lication Society translation of
Bible was published.
r--:ESER was also the one
fo published the first nation-
Jewish magazine in the
Ited States. "The Occident"
_I "The American Jewish Ad-
Hate." Concerning the maga
zine, Dr. Bertram Korn in his
book "The Early Jews of New
Orleans" wrote that "The Occi-
dent" publication "was perhaps
the greatest contribution which
Leeser made to American Jew-
ish life. He edited it single-
handedly and always lost
money on its publication. If he
had married, and needed to
support a family he could never
had carried it off."
What is most important about
Leeser's work was his great
dedication to Jewish education.
With the famous Rebecca Gratz,
he founded the first congrega-
tion religious sunday school,
which has served as the proto-
tvne of our oresent religious
schools.
He was also successful, to-
gether with Solomon Solis, in
founding a secular school, the
Hebrew Education Society. To
serve a great need in America,
he founded the Maimonides
College, to train rabbis for the
American rabbinate.
One of his most lasting and
influential contributions was
the Jewish Publication Society.
which has published more
books on Judaica than any
other publishing firm and con-
tinues to publish and distribute
books of Jewish interest
throughout the country.
After setting the foundation
for the basic institutions of
Jewish life in America, Leeser
died on Feb. 1, 1868, at age 62.
He will continue to occupy an
important position in the his-
tory of the American Jewish
community, especially as we ob-
serve the Bicentennial of Amei-
ica.
The American Jewish com-
munity is richer for having had
the great pioneer of Judaism in
its midst. Orthodox, Conserva-
tive and Reform Judaism have
been enriched by this giant of
the Jewish spirit.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
28 SHEVAT 5:43
10
i
As America
Begins
\vi' Bicentennial
RABBI NATHAN H. ZWITMAN
Congregation B'nai Zion
When Malik walked out on
Moynihan's speech on behalf of
Israel in the UN General As-
sembly's closing session, I saw
the present inherit the past.
Back in 1563 Yuden-rein Rus-
sia lost its distinction as Ivan
the Terrible conquered Poland
and its Jewish population be-
came a part of Russia.
"What will be do with the
.lews?"' asked the Czar. Quickly
replied the "religious" Ivan,
"Baptize them or drown them
in the river." They were drown-
ed.
Thus began the history of the
Jews in Russia. New Jews came
an i continued to be eradicated
and to reappear. For over 400
years they were forced to seek
shelter in a land where pogroms
and terrible Ivans waited for
them.
Today over 2 million are
st ran Jed there and not allowed
to leave. The new Ivan may no
longer attack the Jew, but oh!
how he strikes at Judaism. The
blood accusations of old are
reflected in such distortions of
fact as "Zionism is racism," and
in spreading such venomous
falsehoods into the bloodstream
of Jew-hating nations of the
world.
Not only do I seek 'o show
that Malik the Russian i heir
to his past, but also that Moyni-
han the American is heir to his.
America was founded on He-
braic Biblical principles. The
Psalms of David filled the pages
TV Programs
Sunday, Feb. 1
"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Ralph Kingsley
Guests:
Rbbig Solomon Schiff
and Tibor Stern
Topic:
"Orthodoxy Today"
SYNOPSIS OF THK WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
i Mishpatim
Moses instructs the Israelites in the divine Law.
"And he took the book of the covenant, and read
in the hearing of the people; and they said: 'All
tliat the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey'"
(Exod. 24.7).
MISHPATIM The laws that Moses submitted to
the children of Israel after they had heard the Ten
Commandments dealt with the following subjects:
The Hebrew servant; murder, filial aggression and
blasphemy; kidnapping, criminal assault; maiming of a
servant; the butting bull; accidents and damages; theft;
property damage; watchmen; seduction; proselytes, the
orphaned and the widowed; lending and borrowing; the
sanctiiication of God and man; relations with the enemy;
the Sabbatical year; the Sabbath; the three pilgrim fes-
tivals; idolatry.
This portion concludes with the renewal of the
covenant with God. The children of Israel accepted the
covenant with the words: "All that the Lord hath spoken
will we do, and obey" (Exodus 24.7). Moses then as-
cended Mount Sinai to receive the tablets of the Law.
of the first book printed in this
country.
John Elliot, Isaac Addington,
Ethan Allen, Increase and Cot-
ton Mather spoke Hebrew. Wil-
liam Bradford published the
first Hebrew grammar in Amer-
ica. The Seal of the newly foun-
ed United States, drawn up by
Franklin and Jefferson, sho
Pharaoh and his men in pur-
suit of the fleeing Israelites,
who reach the dry shores of the
divided waters which close upon
Pharaoh and his warriors, and
on the bottom appear the words
from the Bible, "Resistance to
tyrants is obedience to God."
At the beginning of our 200-
year history every sophomore,
junior and senior at Harvard
University had to recite a verse
from the Hebrew original of the
Old Testament at morning pray-
er.
In 1781 Ezra Stiles delivered
the Commencement Address at
Yale in Hebrew. As far back as
1660 the study of Hebrew was
required in the Public Schools
of New Haven.
Great has been our role in
every area of American life. We
constructed skyscrapers and
subways in New York. We built
bridges across the ('.olden Gal
in San Francisco. We raise stoi
In the blue grass country
Kentucky. We operate mines in
Colorado. We grow wheat in
Kansas.
There is no sector of the
commercial, industrial or arti itic
life of America which Jew. ha'
not benefited. We take pride in
these accomplishments, but w -
lose the true purpose of 01
Bicentenni il when we fail t i
recognize our spiritual contribu-
tion as our greatest {jift to this
country.
In the truest sense America
is a spiritual rather than a
material entity. Russia is large
in extent of territory, popul; -
lion and natural resources. But
it is not, and never will be. as
great as America unless free-
dom to earn a livelihood, re-
ceive an education and vote
freely are given to all citizens.
Remove these freedoms and
America is no longer America.
May this never happen. May
this land always be heir to its
past.
Inside Judaica
',
,i' ;. .'-.:. I -...' .I'-
Q. How does Judaism feel
about hospitality?
A. In ancient Israel, says the
authoritative Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica, hospitality was not mere-
ly a question of good manners,
but a moral institution which
grew out of the harsh desert and
nomauic existence led by the
people of Israel. The biblical
customs of welcoming the weary
traveler and of receiving the
stranger in one's midst was the
matrix out of which hospitality
and all its tributary aspects de-
veloped into a highly esteemed
virtue in Jewish tradition. Bib-
lical law specifically sanctified
hospitality toward the stranger
who was to be made particular-
ly welcome "for you were
strangers in a strange land"
(Lev. 19:34 and Ex. 12:49)
The Bible is replete with ex-
amples of pious hospitality. The
extreme to which hospitality
was taken is shown by the
stories of Lot and the old man
of Gibeah who were prepared
to sacrifice the honor of their
daughters in order to protect
their guests, who were to them
complete strangers (Gen. 19:4-8
and Judg. 19:23-24).
Rabbinic literature widened
the scope of the virtue of hos-
pitality, which it called "bring-
in of guests." One of the virtues
for which one enjoys the fruits
in this world and obtains the
principal reward in the world to
come, hospitality is. according
to R. Johanan, even more im-
portant than prayer or, accord-
ing to R. Judah, than receiving
the divine presence. The Mid-
rash relates that even at the
height of Nebuchadnezzar's
siege of Jerusalem, mothers
would deprive their children of
the last crust in order to grant
hospitality to a mourner. Chil-
dren were taught to be hospi-
table by instructing them to in-
vite guests to dine when they
answered the door.
On the other hand, the E J
reports, the rabbis denounced
the parasitical guest, especially
if he were a scholar. Two extre-
mes were avoided through a
clear definition of the duties of
host and of guest. The host was
forbidden to make his guest un-
comfortable either by appear-
ing miserable or by watching
his guest too attentively, or by
neglecting to serve his guest
himself. The guest was instruct-
ed to show gratitude to rcci'e
a special blessing for his host,
to leave some food on the plate,
and to comply with his host's
wishes. Some six centuries
earlier, Ben Sira (1st century
C.E.) had already defined the
table manners which were to be
practiced by the guest, and had
condemned the parasite, who
took advantage of hospitality.
The tradition of hospitality
was particularly apparent amor.?
Jewish communities in the Mid-
dle Ages and a separate chari-
table association called Hevra
Hakhnasat Orehim was estab-
lished for that purpose. Me-
dieval European Jewish com-
munities instituted a system of
pletten or "meal tickets" for
travelers and itinerant scholars,
and in the 15th century, estab-
lished student hostels. Nor was
individual hospitality neglected:
among Polish communities, it
was also the custom to billet
students with members of the
community for their daily
meals. This custom, known as
cssen-teg, later spread to Ger-
many. In modern times, chari-
table institutions have assumei
most of tne responsibility < c
communal hospitality.


age 10-B
*.kmst Mnriciinr
Friday. January 30. 1976
*
Page 12-B
f'Jewisli fk>ridfiajn
Friday, January 30, 1976

i
i
*
t *
I
I
\l
f
Bar Mitzvah
KENNETH L. FEIGELES
Kennrth Lawrence, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Feigeles,
will be Bar Mitzvah at Temple
Ner Tamid at 8:45 a.m. on Sat-
urday.
Kenneth is a student at Nau-
tilus Junior High School and
Ner Tamid Religious School.
While attending oiscayne Ele-
mentary School, he won three
distinguished sports awards and
two Presidential Best Athlete
Awards given by the school and
Best Athlete Award given by
Park group. He also plays the
clarinet.
A kiddush will follow the
service.
At a reception in Kenneth's
honor at the Barcelona Hotel,
out-of-town guests will in-
clude his aunt and uncle Renee
and Haiola Hrand and grand-
mother, Lydia Schaeffer, of
North Bergen, N.J.
-Cr tJr
DEBRA LYNN KOGAN
I
Debra Lvnn, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Kogan, will be
called to ths Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday at 11:45
a.m. at Temple Judea of Coral
Gables.
Debra, a Hebrew School grad-
uate, will continue with her re-
ligious education.
ft & MICHAEL B. GORELICK
Michael Brian, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerard Gorelick, will ob-
serve his Bar Mitzvah at the
Beth Torah Congregation on
Saturday morning at 8:30.
Michael, a student in the
fifth-grade class of the Beth
Torah Harold Wolk Religious
School, is ah eighth-grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Jun-
ior High. His hobbies are swim-
ming, playing drums and tropical
fish.
In Michael's honor his par-
ents will sponsor the kiddush
following services.
Guests will include his great-
grandmother, Mrs. Sonia Gore-
lick; his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Horowitz and Mr.
and Mrs. Irving Gorelick; as
well as the R. Horowitz family,
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Gorenstein,
the J. Beitel family of New
York, the Jack Shurack family,
and the Martin Gorelick family
of Skokie, 111.
# Q #
Scott M. Zahler Steven Frumkes
at Beth David Congregation.
Scott is a student in the Daled
class of the Beth David Religi-
ous School and in the seventh
grade at Gulliver Academy. He
plays baseball in the Howard
Palmetto Khoury League, and
was South Dade champion in
the pass-punt-kick competition
in tb? 12-year-old division.
Dr. and Mrs. Zahler will host
the kiddush following services
and a reception on Saturday
night at the Kings Bay Yacht
ami Country Club.
Special guests include Scott's
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed-
wa d Zahler and Mrs. Joseph
Schwadron, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Schwadron of New York and
Miami, and Dr. and Mrs. Reu-
ben Efron of Jerusalem and Mi-
ami.
ft ft ft
STEVEN S. FRUMKES
Steven, son of Melvyn B.
Frumkes, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami.
A seventh-grade student at
Carver Junior High School,
Steven is a first class Scout,
member of Troop 64, and is in
the Scouts' Order of the Arrow.
He is also a student in the sev-
enth grade at the Temple Israel
Religious School. His hobbies
are playing the drums and
stamp collecting.
Steven's father will host a
luncheon reception in his honor
at the Kings Bay Yacht and
Country Club.
USYers Hold
Walk-A-Thon
On Jan. ^5 o\cr 400 Jewish
toenagers of United Synagogue
Youth were on the streets of
Miami Beach for their sixth
Annual Tiknn Olam Walk-A-
Thon for World Jewry.
The opening ceremonies were
at Temple Ner Tamid, where
Mayor Harold Rosen presented
a proclamation declaring Jan.
25 United Synagogue Youth
Day in Miami Beach.
The USYers, representing the
15 Conservative synagogues in
South Florida, have been soli-
citing sponsors for the past two
months for their ten-mile walk. I
Similar Walk A Thons were J
held in every city in the eight
states of the Southeast Region.
Michael Levine of Temple
Menoran, chairman of the
Walk-A-Thon, exptUs to reach
the $25,000 goal this year.
Funds collected are allocated to
the Israel Emergency Fund,
Student Struggle for Soviet Jew-
ry, Magen Da\id Blood Bank,
Seminary in Argentina, and Tik-
vah. a program for retarded
children.
Harry Silverman. regional
youth director, reported that 40 I
aduits participated as supervis-
ors, checkpoint signers, and
general coordinators. The group
is under the direction of Ed
Hoffman and Judge Arthur
Winton, chairman of the Re-
gional Youth Commission.
Tempi* Israel
Reverend Charles Mory of
the Sunset Congregational
Church will preach at Temple
Israel South this evening at 8
at the church.
Seacoast Towers West residents Dr. and Mrs. Philip W.
Lown received the State of Israel David Ben-Gurion
Award at a recent State of Israel Bonds meeting. Dr.
Lown, one of the founders of the Israel Bonds drive in
Maine, is a member of the National Campaign Cabinet
of theUJA, a trustee of Brandeis University, and hon-
orary president of the American Association for Jewish
Education. Mrs. Lown, big gifts chairman for Israel
Bonds, is a life member of the New England Hebrew
College. The Lowns are members of Temple Beth Sholom.
Parson to Lead Ten-Day
Mission to Israel in May
SCOTT M. ZAHLER
Dr. and Mrs. Sanford F. Zah-
ler's son, Scott Mitchell, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 9 a.m.
Tifereth Jacob
Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Tifer-
eth Jacob, Hialeah, plans a
meeting on Sunday, Feb. 8, at
Gelvan Hall at the temple at
9:30 a.m. The subject will be
Passover and a film on Purim
in Israel will be shown. A kaf-
feeklatsch follows the meeting.
Miami area residents will
have the opportunity to observe
how Israel Bond investment
dollars are utilized when they
participate in the Greater Mi-
ami Israel Bond Delegation ten-
day fact-finding mission to Is-
rael, May 24 through June 3.
The first community wide
tour under the direction of
Milton M. Parson, executive
director of the Greater Miami
Israel Bond Organization, which
will leave New York on Mon-
day, May 24. is available tc
purchasers of $1,000 or more
worth of Israel Bonds.
Thcs? mt^r'sted in makinp
reservations should contact Par-
son at the Is-ael Bond office.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN

KNESETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION
1415 EUCLID AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
TELEPHONE 538-2741
J Proudly
Presents
By Popular
\ Demand
The World
Renoivned
CANTOR
JOSEPH
MALOVANY
Of the Fifth
Ave. Synagogue
SABBATH SERVICES FEBRUARY 13, 14, 1976
6:00 P.M. & 8:30 A.M. ...............____ $4.00
GRAND CONCERT ACCOMPANIED BY
COMPOSER/CONDUCTOR SHMUEL FERSHK0
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1976 8:00 P.M. $3.00
SABBATH SERVICES & CONCERT $6.00
TICKETS AVAILABLE IN SYNAGOGUE OFFICE
V
9
Miami Beach Mayor Harold Rosen (right) renamed 74th
St. at Collins Avenue Hester Street to honor the film's
South Florida premiere benefit showing last week on be-
half of the B'nai B'rith Council of South Florida Lodges.
"Hester Street" is showing at Wometco's Normandy, Hal-
landale and Sunset Theatres. Also pictured is Barry T.
Gurland, president of the B'nai B'rith group.
/
Nationally Known
Manufacturers...
rlNI DOUBLE KNITS.
POLYESTER BLFMOS.
Plus Accessories
DORWIN'S
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"r:Jay,
January 30, 1976
* Jewish IfleridHan
Page 13-B
Religious Services
MIAMI
it VAT SHALOM CONOFftA.
105 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
ron. 1
-----------------
;hE EMES CONGREGATION.
SW 19th Ave. Conservative.
'inor Sol Pakowitz. 2
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadi
Nahmias. 31
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Groner. 32
kc--. AM TEMPLE. 5050 N. Ken.
c" Or Reform. Dr. Herbert V
nrd. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
fitx. 3
BREIRA CONGREGATION.
; SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
y Tabachnikoff.
3-A
l-NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
AMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE 9300
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. 8-A
PBNAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1411 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
Rahbi Victor D. Zwelling. Cantor
Jack Lerner. 36
ISRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10
>R OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative. Rabbi David M.
Bi'in. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
flSPAEL-SOUTH TEMPLE (former.
I/ 9eth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Re-
form. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
SAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conservative. Rabbi
Maxwell Berger. 9
l-ERETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6500
N Miami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Salomon Benarroch. 14
2 ON TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Helfman. 16
HIALEAH
rERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
ch Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Na-
t in Zolondek. 15
NORTH MIAMI
|BS"H MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rab-
b
Or. DianJel.J, Fingeaar. Cantor
-uda BWJ**in. **** 35
V
' MIAMI BEACH
GUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
fB"H EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho.
dOX. Rabbi Alexander Gross. 5
IETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
fBETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Sa rsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19
fBcTH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1543
J -rerson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
fBETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chase Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
ish. Cantor David Conviser. 21
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mprdecai
Yardeini. 21-A
IETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
IETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TiON. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
INAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson. 22-B
IUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
IUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 715 Washington
We. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Melamed. 23-A
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conservative. Dp. Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross. 25
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel. 26
[KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MENORAH TEMPLE. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
?NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
T.itum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovltz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
>HEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. 30
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murr.iv Yav-
neh. 32. A
-H DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
mservatlv*. Rabbi Sol Landau.
(antor William Lipson. 4-A
IETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
> St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
, iu. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
rfH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
llYoJern Traditional. Rabbi Max Mu-
[p.ro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
IStahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
------------------
kETH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
| St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
ACUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chjimovits.
32-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
'ADATH YESHURL'N TEMPLE 1025
i t.vr Rahhi Simeha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. 33
AGl'DATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TORAK CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson. 34
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36-A
S'NAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shuikes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick. 38
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
ISRAELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
nail. 11
CORAL GABIES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
senstat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein. \
41
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 51
FORT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor Je-
rome Klement. 43
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 52
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 62
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
HALLANDAIE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. 63
HOUYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 8. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Roe";
feld. n
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 46
------------------
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
65
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
senfield. ^^^_ 47"B
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47-C
------------------
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION, 400 S. Nobb Hill Rd. Re-
form. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams. 64
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester.
48
1
Member of the Rabbinli
of. Great" r .Miami.
The Bialik Branch of the Farband Labor
Zionist Alliance will meet on Feb. 2 for a
program dedicated to the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1976 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund. Bia-
lik leaders planning the event, which will
feature a guest speaker and singer Bracha
Skulnick, were (seated, from left) 1st vice
president Harry Kaminer, president Jack
Filosof, and 3rd vice president Mayshie
Friedbcrg; along with (standing, from
left) executive member Mrs. Norman
Painkin, financial secretary Norman Pain-
kin, executive members Herman Kass,
Charles L. Fox and Mrs. Harry Kaminer,
and honorary executive chairman Ber-
nard Gingold.
Gotham Jews Quit for Suburbs
NEW YORK The Jewish
population of the Greater New
York area declined by 383.000
between 1962 and 1970-71, and
the same period saw a substan-
tial exodus of Jews from the city
to the suburbs. In addition, the
proportion of young children
under five years of age in the
overall total of 1,998,000 Jews
who currently live in Greater
New York also declined.
This is disclosed in an article
on "The Basic Characteristics
of the Greater New York Jew-
ish Population" in the 1976 edi-
tion (Volume 76) of the Amer-
ican Jewish Year Book, which
has just appeared.
THE YEAR Book is published
by the American Jewish Com-
mittee and the Jewish Publica-
tion Society of America. Its edi-
tors are Morris Fine and Milton
Himmelfarb. Martha Jelenko is
t^e executive editor.
In the article, based on the
National Jewish Population
Study conducted under the
auspices of,the Council of Jew-
ish Federations and Welfare
Funds, Fred Massarik points out
that the movement to the sub-
urbs has resulted in the Nassau-
Suffolk area having a Jewish
population of 605,000, which is
larger than that of any borough
in the city proper.
Brooklyn's Jewish population
is now estimated at 514,000;
Queens 379,000; Manhattan 171,-
000; Bronx 143.000; and Staten
Island 21,000. The Jewish pop-
ulation of Westchester is listed
at 165,000.
IN NEW York City proper,
there was a loss of 608,000 in
Jewish population, while there
was a gain of 191,000 in Nassau-
Suffolk and of 34,000 in West-
chester.
The total number of Jewish
households in the Greater New
York area is 720,000, whose
average size is just below 2.8.
The size of Jewish households
is highest in Nassau-Suffolk
(3.64 persons per household),
followed by Westchester (3.28).
Both these figures are higher
than that of any of the live
boroughs.
Turning to distribution by
age, the writer declares that
"young children under five
years of age and children be-
tween 5 and 14 constitute par-
ticularly large components of
the total Jewish populations in
the suburban areas, notably
Westchester. In Nassau-Suffolk,
where the proportion of the
very young is not exceptionally
high, children in the 5 to 14 age
Tribble's Wire Flight Vehicles
On Display at Washington Federal
Washington Federal Savings
and Loan Association, 1701
Meridian Ave., is sponsoring an
art exhibit by Edward J. Trib-
ble through Feb. 26.
The exhibit is the first pub-
lic display of the Tribble Me-
chanical and Gaseous Flying
Device Company. Tribble said,
"the object of my art is to
weave wire into vehicles of
flight. They have no function
despite their seeming complex-
ity and a few moving parts.
They are, indeed, of no practi-
cal use whatsoever. If my art
brings me little else, it might
well be said, it qualifies me for
a life in politics."
category are a major segment
of the total population.
At the other extreme, the
presence of Jewish aged pri-
marily in the Bronx, but also in
Manhattan, clearly exceeds that
in all other boroughs/counties."
SIMILARLY, the proportion
of gainfully employed Jewish
men and women is highest in
Nassau-Suffolk and Westchester,
the article declares, followed by
Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the
Bronx. As to the percentage of
women in the labor force, the
highest figure is again found in
Nassau-Suffolk.
Thus the findings suggest that
Nassau-Suffolk has proportion-
ately the highest percentage of
wage earners of both sexes, and
that "the conventional pattern,
with the male wage earner as
the sole contributor to the fami-
lv income, is most prevalent in
Westchester. The Bronx shows
the lowest proportion of gain-
fully, employed, if both men and
women are considered."
The proportion of male stu-
dents 16 to 22 is highest in
Nassau-Suffolk (17 per cent),
followed by Westchester (11 per
cent) and Queens (10 per cent).
Female student percentages are
highest in Westchester (14 per
cent), Nassau-Suffolk (11 per
cent) and the Bronx (10 per
cent).
The number of retired men is
low in the suburban counties
(4 per cent) but relatively high
in the Bronx (close to 30 per
cent). In all counties, the pro-
portion of women who are
housewives is between 40 and
50 per cent.
Beth Moshe
Art Auction
Temple Beth Moshe plans a
benefit art auction of oils, wa-
'tercolors, drawings, etchings
and lithos by Dali, Picasso, Cha-
gall, Miro, and Rockwell, among
others, at the temple on Sun-
day, Feb. 8, at 8 p.m. The pre-
view showing is at 7, and re-
freshments will be available all
evening.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 576-4000. Rabbi Solomon
Schlff, Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4553. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1820 NE 163rd St., North Miami
Beach. Fla. 33162. 947-6094. Rahbi
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
s-\ 9 0MPAU'0!iSHIP) 1
ii
E< \ VP (NPURPY 01 PL
A K s0\H G W F A E-yE/i A
L U U Y\r\n iis aAA H I
I Z S TT s\t\n X d/a/w n A G
T I s 0 E H\a\jJ/B/6 0 E P G
Z V I T M/0 OXEW R U S P N
A Y Is jVe/v/r/zntNy q h U I
H E L D m x/yp j x m a\o\a 3 c K A E
H Z\ rS/H/A DOHA N)B\rT
l yoy HIHSUDDIK) B R B
T-(j/X (KETTUBBAH)
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. VARIATIONS IN TRANSLITERATIONS AND SPELLING MAY OCCUR. ANSWERS: Kettubbah, Huppah, Shadchan, Get, Chalitzah, Companionship, Procreation, Kiddushin, Nis-su'in, Sheva Berakhot, Oyfrufn, Breaking Glass.


Pa
oo m.R
e 14-13
fJenisl! >
Friday. January 30. 1976
Jam
30, 1976
*

Rabin Hails Role
Of Soviet Jewry
l GAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE

:>ER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW

TEL
i
tg to I
to Isr
th
A Id

o
vention of tire A n of
Russian b:
'. I
'
Jewish
Zion i iany
I
i
: l< iic thai the i
Soviet '. ms ito Israeli so
s
chairman of the
I!
vet'
isorption
ACCO lir R( 'V, more
.hurt 110,00
to Israel from
from lhat
on a c
HE SAID th 1 v
iot prepared I the ti ne to ab-
ort such numb ip ly, 95
percent of the newc< found
mployment within three ye irs
of their arrival.
Rosen re'"' thai '0 p.-r-
cent were absorbed in industry,
6,000 work as scientists and en
ineers. 2.000 are physici
jnd 42 percent of the Russian
li::t were academicians.
This type of alfya is not a
mrden but an as lei to '.:,.e coun-
try, he said.
LEGAL NOfiCE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTV)
IN THI CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-2594
CENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
RE Till': MARRIAGE OP:
I'TIIA FARAC1
\\ Ife,
and
GUIS8EPPE F.\l: U
Husband.
TO: (3UISSEPPE FARAC1
Amfindola 41
Cefata B
l'iilorino, Sii ily. ri.(>\-
VOli AHH HEREBY M.TIFIED
H an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been riled against you an.I
you are required to serve a copy of
ymr written defenses,, If any, in it
en Albert I.. Ciirricarle; Emu,, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 x.vv. 7Ui sin-i. .\ii.,ini Florida,
ami file Hi. original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or before
March 5, 1976; otherwise a default
will In- entered Against you for the re-
lief! demanded ,1, ,1,, ..'n.ii.uiii or po>
tiiir.n
This notice shall be published o
. i d week for four ponsecutivi woelu
I'HK JEW isil FLORIDIAN.
witvkss my hand and the seal ol
I court at Miami. Florida mi Lhis
day of Jan..
RICH \i:i. p, BRTNKEft
As i Hark, Circuit lourl
I >a Bj B LIPPS
1 i' mi; y Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT I. CARRrCARTE, ESG
2491 N.W. 7ih Street
Miami. Florida 231 26
Attorney for Petltli
Phdne No. M9-t17
1/S0 2/6-13-20
iitJplllC
VI,
'
" A
OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
U PROPERTY)
IN THE ClrlCUiT COURT OF THE
Eutv'liNTH JUDICIAL CIKCUiT
( WDA IN AND FOR
DftUE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76.1831
- JOHI4UMCTION DIVISION
i'Vi I'M > > I
I
I ,Ct FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I i
. i \
i urt am you are n qu
.u \. niiiii de-
,\ ..I' .i.


I
,'llh the i

on-
. I i Inn
,.
week lor four cons* i e< k *
\\ I .. n ,i hi

-
I
. ... i -i .. I ...
A ii inii I Lleik
I
i'.11WARD J.
I
.- .
!
CIRCUM COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. CADE COUNTY. Fi.CKIDA
CC-IEnAL JURlbDICTION DIVISION
NO. 76-J235
NOTICE BY PUOL'CATION
. I'HK MAHItl '.i.'M
' I VI, Hi. i'i I.
I lusband,
1 s,
SADIE D HAITI,

.i'Ii: ii haw I. itEslDENi -i:
1 '.....: I ) |
|iy of you
'in"" "i Marriagi filed against
j .. upon hu ". i 'i p. y
MCH( iL.1 S, ESQ Gl N A
l-i ivci ue, Miami,
i iginul iin ii. rk 1.1 i ..ui i
on "i before Murch .'.. 1976; othei
' '"I Itlon v. in be confi ieil bl j nu
Dated thl 22nd .i. \ ol Jan :
Kit HARD P. Bill ERK
By: s JAI' FK
A I teput] lerfc
IN THI URT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
PROBATE L'.v.'SION
NOTICE NISTRATION


VOI \::|- HER] .: NOTlFf
1
..l ,'lin-l;
U anil lll'TB u
lumi H
i .
requlr
r
i
lit of ans
.

i n
. it i id thi
mei If tl

i
111 ill lll.li. :
' i ted. II
uanl
the clerk | u.....|, :,. ,.
. opj ,..
i ma Inten I d In the
10
ha
1 rHREE Mt)N
'Al THE DA'I i: i I'HK I
I) l I '- Ol' THIS a"'i
... .
1 i ly of thi
' Uie ..... ,,i
1
u iurl "i. tli ..in i
DE.HANDS, AND
"i:-l! i "' SO PILED H
EVER BARRED
t publ '.ii ni thla
i: Januarj
' \si'i:i; J MARKS
rH M. Bl-VNKaTEIN
A- Personal H of ||;,
tl i i". in p, ii i .
SHAi'lHO, PRIED WEII RK
i..... Suite III:
IS9
l :." :/,,
JNDER
FIC *W


I
I.EH IAODAN
BIN
. i
' I '
ERfl
,:i:
PI
3-2(1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
... that
g to I
undei *
.' 28th
H '' endi
nmi Clerk
L'oui .' Con
i la,

33013
.. EI.1.ISCH
1 E, INC.
to, itulti 0-E
i
i 3(1 : '
LEGAL NOTICE
'OR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA

I M- -'
I
t.CTICE UNDER
TITIOU8 NAIVE LAW
1 (ilVEN thai
li .
OUI
.
th the i
'loridn
. CORP,
milch
Corp.
M ml, PI.
I!
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
IS H 1.1 i EN thai
he uml i i
ctltloua n .
K ' MR Kl 'i'i.
SPECI \ I 1ST il 10202
" >'' Hlal nh Oard ns, PI.
t i mi with
1 the 'il Hi! I "OUI I f.|
. Plorlda.
MR KOt il OP WEST DADE, IXG
......wner
I'' .i: : : I.. JONES VI. Pn
l 30 2/ti-i:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-27
In Ri Bi la In of:
SARAH sll>
I leceaaed.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
'I I Al.l. PERSONS li iVINQ CI-AIMS
OR DEMANDS AQA1 v'8'1 'I
AMOVE ESTATE AND \l I. OTHER
1 ERSONS INTERES1 ED l.\ THE
ESTATE:
vot: auk iiki:i:i:v x, .tikiki.
that the administration of the .
of SAkAH 8HKETBK. deceaaed Pile
Numbon 7-27 li pendiag m it..- cir-
cult Court for Dade County, PI
Probate Division, the addresa of which
,'', '-, V\Ft Plagler Street, Miami,
i-i'iiiia. The Personal Representative
"i the estate is SEYMOUR SHNEY-
EH whose addreaa I B 16 80th An-
' ui Uttle Neck, \.-u Vork 11362
1 ii" name and addreaa of the Penm
nal Reuri aentatlva'a attornes
lnriii betow;
AH persona havlnx claims or de-
mands ai:ain-i thi e late ai, i. ouir-
Pd, Ul'i'liix THiUfiH MONTHS
PROM THE DATE OP THE P1RS1
PITH I [CATION OF THIS VOT'f'E
lo Hie with the clerk of the above
'"'""' > wrllt.'i, ai. m-nl ,,: anv
claim or demand they may have
claim must be in wiUtlne,
musi iniiii-iii,. ii,,- baxla for the claim
Hi.' name and address of the creditor
or ins agent or attotni y, and the
amount claimed !a (
yn due, the date when It will become
hall be stated. If the claim is
gi ni or unliquidated, the nature
unc. rtalnhj ahull bi slated. If
'!" ';1'""1 "ur.M, the security
-';,u .....lojcrlbed The clatronnl
felrvej- sufficient cogies of the i
to the slerk to enabU the clerl
mail one copy io e-.uh personal ron-
re.senliitivc
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION .
File Number 75-7466
Division 35
:' R of:
-i s iR( II.
c, -. |
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
' >i.!. PERSONS HAVIXQ CLAIMS
' i: DEMANDS AUAINST THE
.'' ;'' E l-i TE AND Al.l. OTHER
PKRESTEI) IN THE
'. PH:
V"i" ARE HEREBY MOTIF
m ni-it-i'iinn in i
':( !'"^'-: STOI CM i'......: f..
MiiiiImm 7 7 1' ,, itB9 ,, ,ll(,
11 oun foi Dad i ountj pior
''".' Division,, il.. .,.. '
'. i- I lade < uunu i 'i.tiniiou-
Plagler Street. Miami, Florida
tiie i'"-i si.ii.-ii reprewNHallve or the
la W I LI J AX i m, whose ad-
''''-s I "' Diplomat ParJcwai \nart-
m. n. si] Hallandale, blorlda The
name and address of the personal rop-
a.....nuj ace Bet forth
ah persons ha vine claims or de-
'"; "''\,'':";-' 1'"' -'"<;.,,. requlr-
THiiEK MONTHS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
v"'' HERKliY GIVEN that
,i .
the fictltloui n
Kl M :.: MR. KOOL A TO
AIR '' 'NO riO> ING; MR. KOOL
;|' l > 'I \I.IST at l1 N W
St., Ulan PI. Intend! to ri -
s'"'1 i ith the Clerk of the
i I >a.i. Count) Floi
MR. Kim: op NORTH DAD1
Pla lorn. Owner
B: < L .!' i.NJ s- VU Pn
l 30 2 6-1;

ORATION
'
I
I
' |RA-
' 7.".-
11 i nurt
f, Fiol I' D
:
I .'..' I .
Thi in i sonal
tl te is M UR -
:
, f
nddi

or di -
equfr-
. i N
' VTE OP THI
OF THIS NOTICE,
to '. wltl the li r:< in th,
court ii i any
maj hi
i in n
musl ihe ba i- ra,
dltor
.
n not
i
I I I ...i Is
iincei taint,
I I 1
.i sufflcli
clerk to
mail to i .nu |n i Boual i
e led in thi eal
: re-
/ :
i i i
|'" THIS NOTICE
1
y ol
......! ni'- will, the ui, ilii atloi
I ersonal reprcsentu

1 CLAIMS. DEM \.\'D
I '! IONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BR I i A111 {I i
Date of the firsl thin
Adm nistrnl a Ja u 23
Ml'RRAY /. KLE
' Pel ni Re| r......Ml ivi ol the
Esl ISCAU RKTANCi H'RT

11 ised
iRNEY FOR PERSON \'
I EPKESENTATIVE:
/. KLEIN, ESO,
' Si J'bold liulii
I Florida
idol
I 38-30
. if
M-THE DATE OFTHE FIRST
PI Bi.ICATlON OF THIS NOTICE
' with Hit clerk of the above
court a written statement of any
'"," V' ''''",:"....."' '"' have
mist indicate thj baaia tor the claim
the name and address of the creditor
""
' ''" thi .'i.-.ini not
Ye due tB-tatej***. .,',,,
due shall be sta ed If the claim Is
.01 urn,.,..,. ,. | thB .,,.,,.
" the unsertd
secured, ;:., secuiits
deifv
S Ji '" "" claim
li Ik to
: rep-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME'LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underslgaed, desiring to
in business under tl" fictitious
of GCSTA EXPORT OF .MlWIl at
2:14 N.E. 25 Si, .Miami, Kin. Intends In
' ter said name with the Clc rk
of the Circuit Court ,,f Dade County
Florida.
GUSTAVO E. CHACON
1/30 2/6-13-20
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring l inpaBe
in business under the floUUous name
of MR. BELVEDERE -- AI.VI-.'KTIS-
ING AND PROMOTIONS ut Dade
County, Fia. Intends in register said
name with the Clerk of tlie Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
M. J. LEZEI.L
SAKETTA MOSHBR
1/30 2/6-13-20
AUMraeas lnlerest.il i (he .
I "in a <">> of this Notice of \d-
)iiinl.-iraii..n has been maHed are re-
ninr.d, U'lTlll.v THREE -MnVTlIS
I THTE DATE OF
' [CATION OF THIS NOTICE
I" fil'- any "bjectlons tier m iy
that challenges the validity of the
deoedenfs will, the nualiflcatlons ni
the personal repiasentntlve or the
l ti; "i Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO PI1 ED Wll 1.
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date or the first publication of this
Ani.ee of Aiiini ni -i r.-ilinn : Jan. 2.t.
1.' 11.
SEYMOUR BHNEYEH
Personal Representative of the
Bstate of SARAH 9HNEYER,
I l. ICI
ATTORNEY FOR I'EHSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
GALBUT AND GA1
7:i Washington Avenue
.Miami Beach, Florida, S313S
By: HYMAN P. GALBUT
Telephone: 672-3100
1/23-30
All peoMins Interest, | i tin estate
". "J ly ol ti.,.-. .-.. Hoe "i Ad.
WITHIN MONTHS
IMF I..V
.T.i.ia 0
Macttons th y may have
tnal challenges the validity of the
will, M..... nu t
tie nersonal representative or the
venae or Jurisdiction of the court.
A' I IS. DEM WOS, AND
V' BSD WILL
The fir-; lAhllcatlOO of this
i Admlnistrationi Jan 23
WILLIAM IKVV
As Personal Representative of
the mate of Rose Btoreh,
11.,-.
w?'.T(?rX,:V ''"!: ERSONAL
REPRESENTATIV '
LAW OPPIl BS OP A. JAY CltlSTOL
Had, lederal Build.ns;
-1 .Northeast First Avenue
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: 378-17H2
1/23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-6610
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
l.\ HE: Estati
LEROY U > \\.
I le, eased.
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING Cl UMS
',H DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE f..- ATI-: AND ALL OTHER
tSONS INTERESTED IN THE
>"i ABB HEREBY NOTIFIED
: the In tration of the
"! ':': WYNN, deceased, File
.Num.'.., ,0-66io, la pending li
Lircuit i ouri for Dade County, Plor
Jta, i robate Division, the a<
"hicli i pade County Courthou i .
Wea i, der Street, Miami, Florida.
i tie ni-i-nn .i representative ... the
Is -\.al Wynr, |-,u, II, whose ad-
j 1 S.W. 103rd Place Ml-
nm{ M' I The nan,, and add,, -
'/' he personal represcntalives attor-
ni nri -et forth bekvw
, A" '" : tOng claims or da.
'muds ngalnst the ... .,.,. !
PCBLI. -ti,,, ,, THIS VOticp
thTlbove
men I ol
',.""," I thei. ms* have
'" must be In writini
must Indicate the basis for the cl
or h lh" "'"
' atti Tiey and the
amoui
en'lt "iT become
; -""d. if the claim is-
" i :l'v;
to each
,, -';!: M,'> the estate
' ." this NotUM ni Ad-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-39S43 Div. 25
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
'A V1NGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
re.
DIAMA .-.WITH and
1 I und, ii in.,.
-/..:...- NAIIONAL ::.,.\iv OP
MIAMI, a.,d C UOUNE a. BRAVO
1' 'dew e unkmn u, II lh Ing; Un-
1 '" Al; bui.:, ii remarried, and if
in .a. then unknown pousi If re-
in, irri, d; all uuknown heirs, devisees
gnees, linens, creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claiming by,
;'';:"-' """'" or agahisj thi said
I I.O, A SMITH and.
.. 'N A I HAM, id' MIAMI, and
A.\E A BRAVO audagainst all
P rsons having ... claiming to
have am right, title oUnterest In or
to the pn ,, rty lu-ren. duscrlbed,
l' :- ndanis.
i i '.
Y'i
that
"'V, ,^de. '
'ATE OP THE FIRS!
' ""' maj
1 vaHdh> of the
tallflcktlone of
ial re>;resentatlre or the
en?" "'. '": il',. court.
c
Bl
AW' -. DEMANDS, AND
' PH i-'l Will
;l- f'OREVEI- BARRED'
en of. this
day of ..'an., 197"
NEAT WYNN POWELL
1 "al Representative of the
>, I ed
,V;V'
8881 8 W. H171I1 Avenue '
Suite 219
Miami, Florida 33176
Telephone: 6S5-0550
1 '.'0 n H
plANIA SMITH and
hex. hu&bjuad, if married, cm i'.
/. 1.N.S -NATi.i.NAI.KA.MvUi.-
-Mlv-MI and ( ARM1NE A.
kVO, residence unknown, if
iivuus; uuknowu sinutses, if
remarried, and || dt.,d, i)lt;M Un-
anown spouses .1 remarried; nil
lown heirs, devl e, gTant-
''-;,' "l ''.. orMUtors
i.siees, or otherwise claiming
by, through, und or against
d ''.am V SMM .1 and
!fwrried, r, ,/::xs V^'"a"U"
'.''V.M l;..,K "I' .MIAMI, and
1 VRMLNE A BRAVO and
'U othei persona hawing
prclalmlng to have anv rlgbt
"'.....'' interest |n or in (he
propertj her,-,,, ,1. -. ribed
*':'' HEREBY NOTIFIED
will to foreclose mortgage
'"^-"'.1 Personal propertyhas
1 iA-;vi,,!l'llm' TAMPA KED-
""- AN* LOAM ASSO-
j I 9 MUaM to he foreclos-
eu 1.- blS 1OUOW0 i
i''\'im' .v'::'"'k ''''':i-:twood,
1 rii i.\ one ao-
agto .!. ri; ,,., ,.,.;,,,,.
, '," P,al l:""' 7 of
";,.!;;; is of Hade tfu,?.'
YCM ARE liH.jriKKi, to serve a
answer or other ulnad-
'"-' '" '' Intlffs Attornav lEK
'."I'-'1 2*bhw, Florida, 3:1134.
.'.'' I'.- origin.'.! in ,|. ,fk.e ot
1. > leik of the above Count, n or
!" "": the 27th day of February 197?
"'!< Of u-hiel, the '-.niiidabit wi i
for I1"6" a? '""" '' agatoit you
roi the rellel requested In Plaintiff's
<' mplainl and pleadings 1,"",l'"'
'1' ttti i..h 9, of January.
MCHARD P. ItlMN'KKK, clerk
Clerk of the Clrcull Court of
pade County Florida
By: C. P. COPEIiAND
Deputy Clerk
fCWTTRTSEAU ''"'" ***"
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I


today, January 30, 1976
+J&vtet>fk>rMlaHn
Page 15*
New Party in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel has a new party, the
[Labor-State Movement (La-am). The new party, which
[hjis eight Knesset seats, is made up of three groups
within the Likud opposition the State List, a splinter
from Rafi; the Independent Center, which split from the
Free Center; and the Labor Movement for a Greater
| Israel, made up of former Labor and Mapam members.
THE DIVERSE background of its members was
[shown at the party's inauguration ceremony last week
Lit Beit Sokolow when MK Yigal Horowitz quoted from
Jfoavid 15cn-Gurion and MK Eliezer Shostak read state-
ments from Ze'ev Jabotinzky, both of whom were vio-
lent antagonists during their lifetime.
The party's main ideology is the right of Israel to
all the land it now holds.
IT DECLARED that there shall be no sovereign state
between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean except
Israel and Israel has the legitimate national right to
hold onto the Sinai in order to frustrate any future
ene ny attack.
The Neiv Vegetarian Cigarette
JERUSALEM (JTA) A cigarette that can be
smoked or eaten with or without dressing will be
introduced on the Israeli market within three months,
it was reported here. It is made of dry lettuce leaves by
a process developed over the past five years by Dr.
Gregorio Rubinstein, an Argentinian Jew. The tentative
brand name is Long Life," and it could, in the long
run, spell the end of the salad days of the tobacco in-
dustry.
DR. RUBINSTEIN says that any one of a variety of
vegetables could be used to manufacture the cigarette,
but he selected lettuce because it can be dried in the
field. Moreover, Israel's climate yields three lettuce
erops a year. Dr. Rubinstein's 10-stage biomechanical
process neutralizes the lettuce taste and a negligible
quantity of tobacco is added to give the smoke a familiar
flavor.
Lettuce cigarettes can be manufactured by the same
process as the conventional kind and requires no re-
tooling by factories. It contains no nicotine and at least
50 percent less tar than any other cigarette on the mar-
ket. Presumably, as one wag commented jokingly, it
can be had with a mayonnaise filter.
PLO Has Lease In Park Ave. Bldg.
NEW YORK (JTA) The chairman of the
Chase Manhattan Mortgage and Realty Trust, Joshua
Muss, has explained that the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization "has a valid enforceable lease" in a Park
Avenue building in Manhattan which was recently ex-
tended for four years by the Trust's leasing agent. Muss
made his comment in response io-a letter from the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress to David Rockefeller, chairman
of the Chase Manhattan Bank, protesting the lease to
the PLO.
A SPOKESMAN for the bank said that the Trust
has no corporate ties with the bank and that the letter
accordingly was forwarded to the Trust. The PLO open-
ed an office at the Park Avenue office in September,
1970, and moved into a separate but connected build-
ing providing it with more office space. The office is
used by the PLO's two official observers to the United
Nations and three staff members.
The two buildings were taken over on a foreclos-
ure by the Trust, and the leasing agent renewed the
PLO lease soon after the Trust took over the mortgage
for the two buildings.
Sabbath Observers Fight Laiv
NEW YORK (JTA) A group of 20 merchants
in East Meadow, L.I., who keep their stores closed on
Saturdays, trare -obtained a Temporary restraining or-
der to stop Nassau County Police from charging them
with the violation of Sunday closing laws.
THE GROUP, known as Shop-A-Rama II, argued in
Brooklyn Federal Court that they were closed on Satur-
day to observe the Jewish Sabbath and to force them
to close on Sunday violates their constitutional guaran-
tees of religious freedom. They claimed they were con-
stantly harassed by police who issued summonses and
L.seied their merchandise.
PfMIAS LA VON
H.llywo**. Nort* Mljmi. Fl.
fenny LtvNVr.K A** -*". FO-
Pinkos La von
Dead at Age 72
Rahhi Unterman
Dies in Jerusalem
Rabbi Isser Yehuda Unter-
man, Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi of
Israel from 19..4 to 1972, died
in Jerusalem on Jan. 26 at age
90 of complications following
pneumonia.
Rabbi Unterman was regard-
ed as a rabbi of "the old school,"
but was esteem id and consid-
ered a moderate until the end
of his tenuKS, when he sided
with local rabbis who banned
the marriages of an Israeli bro-
ther and sister, the Langers. to
their fiances on the g.-ounds
that they were illegitimate.
When Unterman was defeat-
ed by Shlomo Goren in the 1972
elections lor a new Chief Rabbi,
Goren arranged to have the
Langer deci.ion reversed. Rab-
bi Unterman retired at this
point from public life, but con-
tinued to teach at the rabbin-
ical seminary he headed.
Yivo Forum
Dr. Saul Goodman will ad-
dress the Yivo Forum on "Jew-
ish Creativity in Two Cultures
Sephardic and Ashkenazi" on
Wednesday, Feb. 4, at 8 p.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom.
On Wednesday, Feb. 11, at
8 p.m. at the temple Dr. Heszel
Klepfisz, director of the Aloeit
Einstein Institute of Panama,
will .speak on "From Father
Abraham to Einstein." Dr. Klep-
fisz. recji ed -the honorary de-
gree of Vasco Nuene8 de Bal-
boa for his cultural achieve-
ment.-, in his wjriv in Panama.
Adult Ed
At Temple Zion
On Monday, Feb. 2, Temple
Zion's sfcmd siv-\vc?k Mini-
Mester in the Adult Educatior
series begins. At 7:30 p.m. on
Mondays there will be the
choice of a class conducted by
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
"Rapping with the Rabbi," or
W> n a tftam T-i.B a Jawor
an alternate class conducted by
Cantor H lf>nan, "Music of Our
People," which will nnauaint the
student with the melodies sung
in the synagogue on the Sab-
bath and Festivals.
The 8:30 class is a continua-
tion nf Beginning Hebrew.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open 'very Drc Closed Sahbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 2o6-288S
TEL AVIV (JTA) Fu-
neral services were held Sun-
day at Hulda for Pinhas Lavon.
a veteran Labor Party and His-
tadrut leader who, as Defense
Minister in 1954, became the
central figure in this country's
most prolonged and bitter po-
litical dispute that led to the
resignation of Premier David
Ben Gurion.
Mr. Lavon, who was 72, died
at the Gedera Hospital for the
disabled where he had been
confined lor several years, par-
alyzed and in a coma.
HIS CAREER followed the
pattern of many of Israel's
leaders who came from Eastern
Europe, identified with the kib-
butz movement and rose to
leadership positions in the La-
bor Parly and government.
Born Pinhas Lubianiker in
Poland, Lavon attended Lvov
University and immigrated to
Palestine in 1929 at the age of
25.
He founded the Gordonia La-
bor Zionist youth movement
while still in Poland and after
coming to Palestine was one ol
the founders of Kibbutz Hulda
near Ramla.
He also founded the [child
Hak\utzot Vehakbutzim, the
united Mapai-sponsored kibbutz
movement.
MR. LAVON'S leadership
abilities and talent as a speak-
er helped him rise rapidly in
Labor ranks. He became secre-
tarv of Mapai and secretary of
Histadrut.
After the State of Israel was
founded, he entered the Cabi-
net as Minister of Aerieulture.
He also served for a time as a
Minister-without-Portfoho.
When Ben Gurion retired
temporarily in 1953 to his Sde
Boker home, Mr. Lavon took
over the Defense portfolio pre-
viously held by the-Premier.
The famous "Lavon Affair"
of the 1950s centered over
whether Lavon, as Minister of
PALMER'S
fcUAMl MONUMENT COMPANY/
Defense, had issued the orders
for an abortive attempt by Is-
rael] agents in Cairo to tuin the
U.S. and British governments
against Egypt by trying to hoir >
U.h. libraries in Cairo and
Alexandria and Egyptian the-
aters that showed brMsh ai
American films.
THE PLAN was to have the
terrorist acts attiibuted to Egj
tians. But it misfired. The pe
petrators were caught and e
posed. One committed suicide
two were executed and five
sent .meed t long prison tern:
rhe incident rocked Israel
and seriously compromised i -
relations with the U.S. and Brit-
ain. The government of the then
Premier Moshe Sharett had not
been consulted about the oper-
ation, and Mr. Lavon said I .
had no knowledge of it.
But Col. Binyamin Gibli. chiel
of military intelligence, insisted
that Lavon had given the orders
to proceed with the plan. A
committee of inquiry reach'. 1
no conclusions.
LAVON RESIGNED from the
government but was subse-
quently elected secretary gen-
eral of Histadrut. In 1961, e\i-
dence emerged that appeared to
clear Lavon of complicity in
the Cairo incident.
The government issued
statement absolving him of re-
sponsibility against the protests
oi uen Gurion, who was once
more Premier.
Ben Gunon contended thai
the exoneration of Lavon wa
a miscarriage of Justice an:
resigned, bringing down h -
government.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
ScttfMgthe Jewish Community since T93P
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_ ____ REFORM SEWVrCtS
einTroelCortoflOMS) I'lGim-
HffYG.0' Tlphon H68.6j______
flllSONAUTED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
444-0*21 -444-0922
3279 SW.tth ST MIAMI
*=i
IN
MIAMI
BEACH
Coll JEfferson 1-7677
PUNERAL HOMB
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
Edword T. Nwvmoa F.D.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. levitt, F.D.
New York: (212J-263-76G0 Queens Blvd. & 76th RU, Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
C

. *- ,-
^^^____


Pa" *'
<%. a~..s~*, n^sjixc
Frirtav .Taniiarv 30 1Q7*
Page 16-B
* Jewish Meridian i
Friday, January 30, 197$
a
1
!
i
i
1
1
*
i
'
QUALITY...VARIETY.FRESHNESS
YOU CAN DEPEND ON FOOD FAIR
EVERY DAY...EYERY TIME!
FOOD
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 22'
ON 2 PACKAGES
KRAFT PARKAY
Margarine
QUARTERS
LIMIT TWO PKCS., PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FIO-SUN
Orange Juice 4 SSS $1
FLO-SUN
Grapefruit Juice ffiK1 19*
BREAK STONE'S CREAMED
Cottage Cheese Vft 75'
ALL FLAVORS
Les Cal Yogurt 3IS79*
BORDEN
Sour Cream e8SJ. 59
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT.
AVAtlARlt ONIY AT STOl5 WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
All IUNCM MEAT 1 CMIISI SUCEO TO OROER.
FRESHLY SMOKED
Large Whitefish
$199
JL LB.
WISCONSIN FINEST
Muenster Cheese SSf 89'
AMERICAN KOSHER
Salami or Bologna ?ff 79'
69'
RICH'S GOURMET OELITE ALL WHITE MEAT
Turkey Roll................quarter LB.
WISCONSIN FINEST SWEET (W/CARAWAY SEEDS ONLY)
* half TrQ'
Munchee Cheese.
DELICIOUS
Chopped Herring L. 99'
BLACK FOREST COOKED SALAMI OR
Wide Bologna KK 69'
BONUS SPECIALI SAVE 30*
WHITNEY'S
Pink Salmon
7V4-OZ.
CAN
LIMIT ONE CAN, PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MRS. ADLERS REGULAR OLD JERUSALEM .
Gefilte Fish Jiff* 1
ij.oz.$l 19
HEBREW NATIONAL KOSHER
Franks or Knocks.......
REUBEN SLICED PASTRAMI OR
Corned Beef S 79'
VITA PARTY SNACK OR
Creamed Herring '^99'
COPELAND SLICED
Meat Bologna !4& 99'
LAND O FROST SLICED All VARIETIES _
Smoked Meats 2^95'
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
v |
P ii B
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 20*
ON 2 PACKAGES
Cheese
BORDEN
LITE-LINE
BOZ
PKG
LIMIT TWO PKGS., PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Finest Quality
MEATS & POULTRY
Sirloin Steak
$189
USDA CHOICE
BEEF LOIN
LB.
USDA;
CHOICE,
WHOLE OR POINT HALF
Beef Brisket fi> $179
PICKLED
Beef Tongue.............................. $129
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Quarters..................... 59'
BONUS SPECIAL!
RICH'S
Coffee Rich
FROZEN
16-OZ.
CONT
LIMIT ONE CTN.. PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASES QF $7.00 OR MORE,
G CIGARETTES
1 MADE
WONDERFU
FRESH BAKED GOODS
MADE WITH PURE VEGETABLE SHORTENING
29
MANISCHEWITZ
Tarn Tarns..........._...............tfi 59'
AU VARIETIES
DELICIOUS NEW YORK
Challah
59c
MB.
LOAF
AU VARIETIES
Manischewitz Soup JSff 39'
^ __ P*. BRAND 100%
$139 Whole Wheat Breads 45*
un
CHERRY BLACKBERRY CONCORD
Kosher Wme%ffiff
PLANTATION PRIDE BABY
Kosher Dills
TJT. HAND
^.769C Onion Rolls
SI 55'
IN MIAMI BEACH
ALTON ROAD AT 18'h STREET s a
MtnmJ 'ALTON ROAD AT 10th STREET A
COLLINS AVE. AT 5th STREET A
COLLINS AVE. AT 74th STREETS a
NORTH BAY VILLAGE (79th ST. CAUSEWAYJa
ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD AT PRAIRIE AVE. S/A
NORMANDY DRIVE AT RUE VERSAILLE A
HARDING AVE. AT 94th STREET. SURFSIDEs a
IN MIAMI
DADELAND SHOPPING CENTER A
IN HOLLYWOOD
SO. FEDERAL HWY. (U.S. I) AT MAYO
S FRESH SEAFOOD A SERVICE APPETIZER
'lOIII.';.
sunn
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. JANUARY 31 If
AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES IN DADE COUNTY,
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
Pick your own fresh
FRUITS I VEGETABLES
INDIAN RIVER SEEDLESS
White Grapefruit
5 a 59c
DELICIOUS
Nutritious Yams...............u. 25c
GOOD AND CRUNCHY
Calif. Carrots .19'
GARDEN FRESH CRISP
Red Radishes 3 i*%29<
SUNSWEET
Pitted Prunes.....................!Sff49*
Romaine Lettuce
29e
CRISP
FRESH
HEAD
SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SEAFOOD
SERVICE COUNTERS
/V
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
v ----------- wMiMinii....................ri ^m^m
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLO TO DEALERS.
Mackerel
55.
A



Friday, January 30, 1976
+Jewish tlcrldiain
~m m
Page 17-B
Anniversary Weekend to Honor
Rabbi Baumgard and Beth Am
An Anniversary Weekend,
combining the celebration of
the twentieth year of Temple
Beth Am with its Senior Rabbi
RABBI BAUMGARD
Dr. Herbert M. Baumgard's
twenty-fifth year in the rab-
binate, will be held Feb. 20-22
al the temple.
At the 8:30 p.m. Friday serv-
ices the guest speaker will be
Rabbi Dr. Roland B. Gittelsohn
of Temple Israel, Boston, one of
the foremost spokesman for Ju-
daism in America and a long-
time friend and associate of
Rabbi Baumgard.
A past president of the Cen-
tral Conference of American
Rabbis. Rabbi Gittelsohn is the
author of many books and is
known for his dedicatory ser-
mon at Iwo Jima Cemetery dur-
ing World War II.
The 8 p.m. Sunday anniver-
sary celebration will include a
pictorial history of the temple's
two decays narrated by the
past presidents.
REPRESENTATIVES f "
community and national agen-
cies Rabbi Baumgard has serv-
ed will attend.
Rabbi Dr. Paul M. Steinberg,
dean of th" New York School of
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion and direc-
tor of the Jerusalem School.
will discuss the contributions
of Rabbi Baumgard and Temple
Beth Am to Judaism and the
community.
Rabbi Baumgard is the found-
ing rabbi of Temple Beth Am.
Under his guidance a small
nucleus of members has ex-
panded to include over 1,300
families.
The temple itself, which orig-
inally held classes and services
in area churches and schools,
is housed in five buildings on
an 11-acre site in Southwest
Miami. A two-story teen-age
building erected in 1975 was
named The Herbert M. Baum-
gard Building by the congrega-
tion to honor their beloved and
dedicateJ spiritual leader in his
lifetime.
RABBI BAUMGARD is pro-
minent in national as well as
local organizations. He is a
member of the executive board
of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis and a regional
vice president of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith.
He is a board member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and the executive commit-
tee of the South Florida Coun-
cil of UAHC. He is a past presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Rab-
binical Association and of the
South Florida Interfaith Agency
for Social Justice.
Rabbi Baumgard has long
been a member of the Com-
munity Relations Board of Dad.'
County, and he has served in
the Economic Opportunities
Program, the City of Miami
Youth Advisory Committee and
the Citizens Advisory Commit-
tee.
The author of a book and
numerous pamphlets. Rabbi
Baumgard appears iegularly on
WCICJTV Channel 7's "Still,
Small Voice."
Congregation president Bern-
ard Goodmnn has named Alan
K"S' ler Chairman of the Anni-
versary Weekend. Herman Feld-
man and Barton Udell are the
program cochairmen.
/. Ely Goldstein (seated, center) is chair-
man of Miami Beach's Corinthian, a group
creating its most successful Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
effort ever. Assisting Goldstein in gather-
ing support for the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 campaign from Corin-
thian residents are (standing, from left)
cochairmen William Srago and Harry
Harrison; Corinthian Women's Division
Chairman Ruth Charin; and cochairmen
William B. Chersky and Alex Hanson;
seated (at left) are Mrs. William Fritz
and (right) Mrs. Alex Hanson.
Histadrut Chapter to See
Conference Pictures
Marsha Wolfstein Chapter of
Histadrut Women's Council will
hold a luncheon at noon on
Wednesday, Feb. 4, at the Mont-
martre Hotel.
Mrs. Philip Sahl, publicity
chairman, will show pictures of
thp November. 1975, Histadrut
Solidarity Conference in Israel
to which she was a delegate.
The project for the day is
scholarships for indigent stu-
dens in Israel.

ADL Honors Mrs. Virrick
For Years of Slum-Fighting
For nearly three decades
Elizabeth Virrick has labored
to improved the lives of disad-
vantaged blacks in the Coco-
nut Grove area.
On Sunday the Florida Re-
gional Board of the Anti-Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith
presented her with the Leonard
L. Abess Human Relations
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Robin of Winston Towers were-
honored by more than 2,000 members of South Flor-
ida's Jewish community when they became members
of the State of Israel Bonds Prime Minister's Club. .
Presentation of the award to the former Chicago resi- \
dents was made at the "Woman of the Century" dinner
honoring Golda Meir at the Fontainebleau Hotel on .;
the occasion of the 25th anniversary, o[ Israel Bonds, j
Award in recognition of her
extraordinary service to the
people of Miami, which has
spanned several decades of
volunteer leadership in a var-
iety of causes dedicated to the
improvement of the lives of the
disadvantaged.
In her acceptance speech
Mrs. Virrick, who says she has
"never done anything single-
handed," reminded her audience
including legislators, com-
munity leaders and elected of-
ficials as well as friends
that the honor also goes to
"the many hundreds who have
worked with me for 28 years."
She went on to describe "the
day that changed my life,"
when Father Theodore Gib-
son, who had just been ap-
pointed to the Miami City
Commission, told the all-white
Civic Club in the Grove about
the wretchedness of the blacks'
housing in the area "Col-
ored Town," as it was called.
After an inspection trip Mrs.
Virrick called 24 people to her
home and together they form-
ed the Grove Citizens Commit-
tee for Slum Clearance. That
committee in time became
Coconut Grove Cares.
Florida Supreme Court Jus-
tice Justice Joseph Hatchett,
the keynote speaker at the
luncheon, said, "The slums of
Coconut Grove are being
eliminated, the health prob-
lems of Coconut Grove are be-
ing solved because our hon-
oree led a fight to rid that
area of its problems.
"Good human relations re-
quires that we follow her ex-
ample." in imkd i
>>"
Pictured above are Archie Stone and Don Shula, head
coach of the Miami Dolphins. Stone will be honored
at the sixth annual Archie Stone Foundation birthday
dinner on Feb. 12 at Miami Springs Villas Playhouse,
funds raised by the foundation, 50 percent go to Var-
iety Children's Hospital and the balance are granted
Stone, who was Dade County's Man of the Year in 1975,
is celebrating his 75th birthday at this dinner. Of the
to sports-oriented youth organizations, such as the
Archie Stone Youth LaCrosse League.
f yM Ritjfxirft i$K t
1 fete. k ^ wpTTiyjin^ 'a*** A J^Di
1 ^^_ ^^^^^m ^bjjBjiijAfisfti*,-.' 3 31
Dr. Sol Stein (standing), national president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation (1HF), presented his regular week-
ly Yiddish-language WEVD (New York) radio program
live on Sunday from the Fontainebleau Hotel. Also pic-
tured are Rabbi Leon Kronish, 1HF national board chair-
man, and Shelomo Ben-Israel (right), columnist for "The
Jewish Daily Forward," who also broadcast his regular
weekly Yiddish-language program live from Miami
Beach. The broadcasts concluded a brunch on behalf of
the Histadrut Foundation, which raised $157,500 in com-
mitments representing 31.5 mortgage units for new hous-
ing in Israel. Moe Levin, a national vice president and
Florida chairman of IHF, was chairman of the event.


t-ai
n..; j------
** *\^ s
Page 18-B
fJmisti fhrkfiam
Friday, January 30, 1976
1
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i
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i
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if
^4 Zest for Life
By NORMA A. OROVTTZ
Whatever Nat Roth has ac-
complished has been completed
in a big way, or he has not
called it quits.
At 79, Roth, a longtime Mi-
NAT ROTH
amian, retired as a "peddler"
ot lauies' ready-to-wear. But in
his retirement, Roth can still be
found representing Serbin of
Miami and Graff of California
in his showroom at the Miami
Merchandise Mart. "I asked my
firms not to put me out to pas-
ture. So, now I help the friend
who took over my line."
WHILE reminiscing in that
mini-world of merchandise,
Roth recalled how he came to
Miami in 1912 when he was
only 16, and Miami was paved
in cobblestones. His father
boened a small ladies' shoo in
Daytona, and the younger Roth
became a traveling salesman.
1 Working hotels and red light
districts (the latter being more
lucrative!), he developed a
varied clientele for the goods
.shipped from New York via
> Daytona.
..' '. World War I found him back
In New York patrolling the har-
bor for. German submarines.
' After the war, Roth, now mar*
iied, made his way to Miami
and landed- a iob as the buyer
'Tor the New York Department
Store (where Richard's now
" stands).
HE ALSO opened his own re-
tail outlet, simultaneously, on
the present site of downtown
Burdines'. After a short stint as
"an entrepreneur, Roth began a
career as a manufacturers' rep-
resentative that was to span 40!
years.
It was back in early 1920's,
i while Miami was still in its
neonatal stage, that Roth be-
came involved in the small but
intense Jewish community.
With men like Harrv Simons,
Morris Plant. Phillip Ullendorf,
Louis Wolfson, Morris Cowen,
Louis Zeientz, Jules Pearlman
and Dr. M. O. Katz. Roth broke
with the original Beth David
Congregation to form Temple
Israel.
THE GROUP bounced around,
like any new congregation,
meeting at *^ Flagler Street
Women's Club, the Seybold
Building and the Sears prop-
erty, until finally settling at
the present 19th Street location.
Nat Roth remembers how
even the budding Jewish com-
munity made its presence felt
in what was considered, by
northern standards, uncharter-
ed hinterlands. Noting that he
was familiar with many Ku
Klux Klanners, even peeking in
on their initiations, Roth never
experienced anti-Semitism at
their white-robed hands.
He recalls, however, some
real problems when a grouD
known as "The White Front"
came to Miami. Its leader, Wil-
liam Btanchard, Jr., and a
henchman. William Lyman,
fomented bitter anti-Semitism
with their slogan "Drive the
Jews from Biscayne Bay into
the Ocean."
ONE NIGHT, with tacit un-
derstanding if not approval
from the authorities. Roth and
about 100 Jewish War Veterans,
American Legionnaires and Gen-
tile confederates schemed to
break up a White Front meet-
ing. Armed with 18-inch pipes
from the Markowitz Plumbing
Company, marked for identifi-
cation with grommets from the
Kraft Awning Company, and
protected by three Jewish boun-
cers from a local gambling
casino, Ruth and his cronies
not only broke up the meeting
but caused the zealots to scat-
ter, battle-scarred.
Blanchard ended up in Jack-
son Memorial HosrJtal, iron-
ically being stitched up by a
young Jewish intern. That night
marked the end of Blanchard's
presence in Miami and the dis-
bandment of the White Front.
If Roth held fast to his prin-
ciples alongside the Jewish
community, he also held fast
when some Miamians tried to
take advantage of his loyalty.
AS THE only Jewish Flor-
idian to be aonointed to the
Selective Service Board during
World War II, Roth made a few
enemies. On several occasions,
he was approached by wealthy
and concerned fathers to give
certain considerations to their
draft-eligible sons.
He not only resisted the
blatant bribes but was com-
mended by the FBI.
The one area where Roth
never refused to make a dona-
tion was f nr the National Associa-
tion of Women's and Children's
Salesmen of the U.S.A. and Ca-
nada (NAWCAS) Foundation.
The foundation, of which Roth
is president, raises aad di$~
tributes funds to disabled and
indigent salesmen or their
MORRIS GROSS
widows.
"What we are doing is as-
sisting them so they don't have
to go to welfare," he explained.
The foundation's original
plans for a retirement home
have been abandoned so that
the applicants may receive
more benefits while remaining
in their own familiar milieu.
NAT ROTH'S milieu, until
two years ago, was graced by
his wife of 53 years. Pearl. For
their 50th wedding anniversary,
the Roths were remarried by
Dr. Joseph Narot. with the
same best man and maid of
honor in attendance. One dif-
ference was that their grand-
son played the wedding march.
If Nat Roth at 79 is so full
of exuberant zest for what he
is doing now and has done in
the past, it is no wonder that
Miami boomed courtesy of him
and others that shared his
sp*tit
Rabbi Gelb Here! to Discuss
Israel and Zionism's Future
The- fourth annual "Scholar-
In-Residence" program span-*
sored by the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida in
conjunction with the American-
Zionist Youth Federation opens
on Sunday With the, attiva! in.
Mittm Beach of Rabbi Saadu
Rabbi Gelb, one of the world's
foremost Labor Ziontat leaders,
will meet w*flr numerous
groups of Jewish and non-Jew-
ish leaders to discuss the cur-
rent problems and future pros*
p*etevof both the State of Israel
and the- Zionist .Movement.
Gr. Miami Hebrew Academy
Presenting a Melaveh Malkali
Miami Beach
Hadassah
Plaza 800 Group will have its
regular meeting on Monday,
Feb. 9. at 12:15 p.m. in the So-
cial Hall at 800 West Ave. Mrs.
Fay Berkley will speak on
"Youth Aliyah." President is
Mrs. Rose Miller.
tr tr tr
Lincoln Group will hold a
regular meeting on Feb. 9, at
12:30 p.m. in the Clubroom of
100 Lincoln Rd. President is
Mrs. Nellie Weissman.
tr tr tr
Morton Towers Group will
meet on Feb. 9. at 11:30 a.m. at
the American Savings Bank, Al-
ton and Lincoln Rds. Ann (Mrs.
Sol) Gelfand, chairperson of
American and Zionist Affairs,
will sneak. President is Mrs.
Dora Krimsky.
-to tr tr
Emma Lazarus Group will
hold a regular meeting on Feb.
9, at noon at the Holiday Inn,
Collins Ave. and 87th St. Mrs.
Manny Temkin will speak. A
Film, "With These Children,"
will be shown.-
tr tr tr
Southgate Group will hold a
regular meeting on Feb. 9, at 7
p.m. in the Terrace Room. Spe-
cial program will highlight
Youth1 Aliyah. President is Shir-
ley L. Rosenberg.
tr tr tr
Stephen S. Wise Group will
hold a card party on Feb. 9, at
1 p.m. at the Octagon Building,
1881 Washington Ave.
tr -tr tf
Herzl Group has scheduled
its regular meeting for Feb. 9,
at noon at the Montmartre Ho-
tel. Sara Helfand will review
"Harrv S. TrumanPlain Speak-
ing." President is Syd Spear.
tr tr &
Shaloma Group will meet on
Tuesday, Feb. 10, at noon at
the Shore Club Hotel. Lee (Mrs.
Louis) Goldman will present
her cantata. President is Edith
Shapiro.
tr tr tr
Natanya Group will hold an
Eye Bank luncheon and card
party on Thursday, Feb. 12, at
Winston Towers 100 at noon.
VIP Sabbath
At Emanu-El
Saturday will be observed as
VIP (Very Interested Parents)
Sabbath at Tertipie Emanu-El of
Miami Beach.;
Students of the Lehrman Day
School and the congregation's
afternoon and weekend- religi-
ous schools wlfl be honored by
Dr.' Irving Lehrman, according
to Lorraine (Mrs. Carol) Green-
bet, chairman of the event.
Arluncheon-for'stttdstitt and'
parents- wift- be held in the
Friedland Ballroom immediate-
ly after the Saturday rooming
service. Mrs. Greenbera juosL
Dr. Morris B. Gross, profes-
sor- of educational psychology
at Lehman College of the City
University of New York, will
speak on "Parents of 176
Does Your Child Know Who You
Are?" on Saturday, Jan. 31, at
8:30 p.m. in the new Merwitzer
Building of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy.
Special entertainment in the
form of an Israeli musical pre-
sentation by the Kol Simcha
Trip will be furnished by Efron
Gross, Jeffrey Schiff and Sam
Poller. The entire evening will
be in the form of a Melaveh
Malkah, a Hebrew term mean-
ing "escorting the queen," used
to describe the meal and festi-
vities at the end of the Sabbath.
Sponsored by the Hebrew
Academy PTA, the event, in-
cluding supper, is open to the
public. There is an admission
charge.
Claire (Mrs. Josh) Rephun
named Mrs. Linda Pinstein
chairman of the event. Other
committee members include
Sheri (Mrs. Henri) Solomon,
Hadassah (Mrs. Herbert) Ler-
ner, Eleanor (Mrs. Henry)
Stern, Irma (Mrs. Milton)
Ehrenreich, Lori (Mrs. Irwin)
Miller. Miriam (Mrs. David)
Lehrfield and Shirley (Mrs.
Alexander) Gross.
Dr. Gross, the brother of
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, prin-
cipal of the Hebrew Academy,
earned his doctorate at Teach-
ers College of Columbia Univer-
sity. He was on the faculty of
Hofstra University before join-
ing the Lehman College faculty.
A visiting professor at Bar-
Ilan University, Dr. Gross has
served as supervisor of psy-
chology at the Hadassah-He-
brew University Hospital in
Jerusalem.
Co-author of "Psychologists'
Casebook," and author of many
research articles and mono-
graphs, he is a psychologist in
the Methadone maintenance
program at Long Beach (N.Y.)
Hospital.
Health and Fitness Expo
At Convention Center, Feb. 6-8
Over 50 nationally known
speakers have been scheduled
to appear at the International
Health, Diet and Physical Fit-
ness Exposition at the Miami
Beach Convention Center, Feb.
6. 7 and 8.
The exposition program will
include authorities in nutrition
and food, health supplements,
phvsical fitness and exercise,
ecology and pollution, physical
appearance, sex rejuvenation,
and protection as a means of
survivals:
"It's an exciting format," said
Jerry Levine. coproducer of the
exposition. "The show covers
so many facets-for healthier liv-
ing that a person could spend
an entire day at the show and
never hear the same speaker
twice!"
Levine added that the health
exposition will make full use of
the five meeting rooms in the
convention hall so visitors can
choose the speaker/subject they
wish to see and hear with no
competition from the exhibition
of health-related products show
on the convention hall's main
floor.
V" "
"One general daily admission
price for the exposition will al-
low a person to attend the in-
formative and educational meet-
ings and the exhibition on the
main floor," Levine says.7*
-----------------------------------------------------:.ir. .:*[
Zena Harman to Be Honoredt
At Reception in Miami Beach
Zena (Mrs. Avraham) Har-
man, wife of the president of
the Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem, will be guest of honor
and principal speaker at a re-
ception on Wednesday, Feb. 4,
at 11 a.m. in the Miami Beach
home of Rabbi and Mrs. Leon
Kronish.
Mrs. Harman. former world
chairman of the United Nations
Children's Fund (UNICEF), was
elected to the Knesset in 1969.
She is an active member of the
Labor Partv headed by Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and
former Premier Golda Meir.
Mrs. Kronish is chaulnfijrof
the Greater Miami women's di-
vision of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University- Res-
ervations are required for "the
event and can be made'-at the
American Friends office, City
National Bank Building. -Mrs.
Florence Feldman, director, of
f*"> women's division, -.isrcoor-
dinating the reception-.- .~.\
The women's division of fil i
American Friends supports* "th~
sehotoriWri fund nrogram Of the
Hebrew University.
The first four students in a 30-hour "Homemakers Aid"
course conducted by Pauline Gould (in the background)
and the Jewish Vocational Service of Miami received
rWtottes'of'competency from Steven Weisberg of JVS
at MtSinar Hospital: The four are Mary Faust, Bess
Goretsfcy, Mae Goodman and Laura Isenberg. The stu-
dents learned how to aid people using crutches, wheel-
cnairs walkers and canes, as well as bed services, cook-
ing cleaning- and other hotnetnaking. activities, along
mm conversational therapy," The women are consid-
ered qvattfuid'tcrvmrh in private homes- wherever aged
persons need help.
m


Friday, January 30, 1976
* Jewish fhrk/ian
Page 19-B

Cuban
Jewry
Revisited
Cuba's Jewish leaders,
fearful regarding the future
of tkeir community, decided
to place in one central room
all of the. files, minutes and
other materials which each
organisation had accumulat-
ed since its earliest days,
some of them in the first
decade of this century. Then-
own scholars gone, they feel
that this material should be
put into the hands of schol-
ars in other countries.
Because of their close as-
sociation with the World
Jewish Congress, they invit-
ed my interest and asked for
my help. I responded by
making contact in July, 1973
with Dr. Ricardo Subirana
y Lobo, Cuban Ambassador
to Israel.
BORN RICHARD Wolf in Ger-
many, he came to Cuba in 1914
as a young chemist and made
his fortunte there. He was a
generous supporter of Fidel
Castro, who, himself a descen-
dant of a Maranno family, re-
warded Subirana with the ap-
pointment as Ambassador to
Israel.
Subirana's commitments as
Jew never waned and he was
especially helpful when his .co-
religionists needed intervention
with the government. He was
most sympathetic *o my re-
quests on behalf of his Cuban
Jewish community" and agreed
to-intervene with Castro.-.
Unfortunately, only six weeks
later, Castro broke relations
with Israel. I then turned to the
Cuban Embassy in Canada and
laid the samerequests befere
Ambassador Jose Fernandez de
Casein and his First Counsellor
Alfonso Hererra.
NEGOTIATIONS
protracted so that I found it nec-
essary to go to Havana to deal
directly with their Ministry of
Foreign Relations which has the
final word on such materials
leaving the country. The Ca-
nadian Embassy was most help-
ful in arranging an appointment
for me with Mrs. Isabel Her-
nandez, Deputy Minister in
charge of the North American
desk. She showed understand-
ing, expressed Sympathy and
agreed to intercede with her
Minister whose final word we
are awaiting.
The other two requests are
also awaiting his consideration.
They relate to the need to e-
plenish the library in die Patro-
nato Synagogue with new books,
pamphlets and magazines; and
to a license to import a mini-bus
for communal needs.
WITH SUCH a vehicle they
could pick up their children in
all parts of the city, to bring
them to the synagogue Shabbat
mornings, to transport their sick
aged to the hospital clinics and
for pickup of various kinds for
the operation of the community.
Such desires loom larger in a
controlled country, especially
since each requires special gov-
ernment sanction.
The condition of life for Jews
in Cuba in 1975 is, happily, hard-
ly changed from what it was in
1973.
NMaMMMMN
EDITOR'S NOTE: Lavy M.
Becker, honorary consult-
ant jo the World Jewish
Congress on intercommu-
nity affairs since 1969, and
recently appointed to the
chairmanship of the Stand-
ing Commission on Small
Communities, visited Cu-
ba in 1971, 1973 and
again in June, 1975. .In
addition to the normal
need to revisit isolated
communities, this hast vis-
it to Cuba was for the pur-
pose of intervening per-
sonally with government
authorities to achieve
some special requests of
the Jewish community-
+mnmmm*mm
There is still no emigration
from Cuba -far ^anybody. Some
older people were permitted to
make visits to relatives in other
countries. A few were finally
permitted.to emigrate to Israel
These were among those whose
applications .came before'May
30, 1976, and were finally pro-
cessed. There ill remains the
feeling of being "boxed in."
ALL FIVE synagogues in
- Havana-still function with -reg-
ular services and the social
interaction before and after
services. It is still mostly the
older Jews who make up the
rather smatt- attendance at such
services.
-On a normal Shabbat, there
maybe no more than a total of
100 people in all of die syna-
gogues, few -younger than 70.
The synagogues are supported
by the monthly dues of their
rjnernbers, meager in most cases;
by the rental monies received
t from the government for use of
> their auditorial and from the
ononies from the sale of Pass-
over products.
The five -.day -a week after-
noon Hebrew-school, one and a
half hours per day, now has an
enrollment of 37, less than 40
percent of their 95 children in
Havana between ages 5 and 17.
Of the balance, some are not
being brought uo as Jews, some
do not attend this"Escuela Al-
bert Einstein, where the He-
brew classes are held, and some
are simply not interested. These
37 children are picked up daily
at their homes by one of two
buses assigned for this purpose
by the government, are fed
lunch in school and returned
home by the same buses. These
are snecial concessions.
THE LEARNING process is
much improved.over.what I ob-
served two years ago. Miss Mer-
cedes Villapol, Spanish born,
Spanish citizen, nominally Cath-
olic, is still their teacher. It may
-be recalled that, -through the
interest of Moishe Baldas, she
was encouraged to join the
youth choral group, then to at-
tend the adult Hebrew classes
and finally persuaded to teach
the children when the old teach-
ers could no longer do so.
Her whole life, these last four
or five years, is related to Jews
and Judaism. Small wonder,
then, that she has expressed the
desire to formally become Jew-
ish.
Moises Baldas and Mercedes
Villapol spend two evenings
each week with adults who come
for classes in Hebrew, history
and current Jewish events, par-
ticularly regarding Israel. She
takes the beginners and he the
i others.. In a community where
there are no learned profession-
al Jews it is remarkable that
volunteers are so devoted.
UNDER THIS same heading, a
rather meager one, one should
report the importance to them
of- their choral group. The level
of their music may be low, the
repertoire limited. But their joy
is unbounded. This is a. pro-
gram without which these more
than 20 young people would
have hardly any contact with
anything Jewish.
.It is a program of joy and
learning for the participants,
and a contribution to the com-
munity since they perform at
all festive.occasions as well as
at Holocaust commemorations.
To add to this picture of their
cultural life I report on the con-
tinuing function of the library,
housed in the Patronato, their
large synagogue center. It has
some 10,000 volumes, largely
Spanish, also multi-lingual, its
content mostly Jewish. It has a
small circulating membership
but is more importance as a
reference library.
INTERESTING is the story of
the Cuban who came to borrow
a copy of the Protocols of the
Elders of Zion. He was court-
eously treated and came back
for additional anti-Semitic lit-
erature. He eventually turned to
other material and is now a
pbilo-Semite.
The librarian, Marcus Mat-
tarlin, and his assistant, Adete
worm, .are loyal and intelli-
gent. Unfortunately, they cannot
keep wp with new intrials,
nor are they budgeted for pur-
chases even if they bad the per-
mission to import them. Should
the government allow them
- seme freedom -in this matter.
the world Jewish community
wilt have a responsibility to
fund them.
THE TWO young native-born
Cuban Jews,'Morses Behar and
-Abraham Berezniack, who-were
trained for 18 months and 12
months, respectively, by the
late schochet, Pinches Czuch,
continue to be the official shoch-
tim of. the community. On three
Tuesdays of each month, they
ritually slaughter five bulls, nine
of whose forequarters are then
taken by the two kosher butch -
- ers who are -authorized by the
government (theirs may be the
only two private enterprises in
the country) to process them
into multiples of three-quarter
pounds, the-ration of meat al-
lowed each i person each nine
days. | The schochtim are privil-
eged, in the abbatoir, to reject
any animal whose health stand-
ards they question. -Because
they really do not know the
laws of Shechita and its kash-
rut, they make no judgments.
If they have any doubt they
reject the animal and are per-
mitted to slaughter another.
This secures the religious
principles of the few families
whose strict observance made
them question the authority of
the shochtim.
BOTH THE schochtim and
the chairman of their commit-
tee insisted on my "examining"
their chalofim (knives). I ac-
ceded only because, in my
youth, I was aware ef my
father's care in "shteHmg" his
chalofim and the method of
examination to be certain there
were no "pegjmot." ,
The sajne process took place
in regard to millah. Baldas
persuaded the old mohel, Berl
Srebrenick, while he was still
able, to teach millah to young
Jacobo Epelbaum Newman,
who has now had the experi-
ence of 10 circumcisions, al-
ways in the presence of a
qualified Jewish physician.
It is interesting to note that
the shochtim and the mohel
complained to me that the
community was not showing
them adequate "respect."
THE LEADERS of the com-
munity, on the other hand,
complained that these young
functionaries did not attend
synagogue, did not study He-
brew or try to increase their
knowledge of Jewish laws and
practices. It is recognized by
all parties, however, that there
is a good quid pro quo. The
young men have achieved a
form of profession and extra
earning power and the com-
munity is grateful that these
services are provided.
It will be remembered that
Cuba continued its diplomatic
relations with Israel after the
Six-Day War, despite the fact
that the USSR and other Com-
munist countries, except Ru-
mania, severed them. Although
Cuba has always voted with the
Arabs in the United Nations,
its relations with Israel were
not unfriendly.
It was in August, 1973 that
Castro, without warning, an-
nounced his break with Israel.
Nevertheless, the Zionist Fed-
eration in Cuba continued to
function. Its headquarters and
its outdoor sign are still there.
Its program remains the same.
Furthermore, they received
permission both in 1974 and
1975 to have large public func-
tions to celebrate Israel's 26th
and 27th Yam Haatmaot ad-
versaries.
THEIR Maimonides Lodge,
originally organized by Amer-
ican residents in Cuba, serves
as a means of identity for those
who may not. identify with any
of the synagogues. Their cur-
rent president is a young 37-
year-old accountant, Louis
Saklarz, native born, speaking
an-acceptable English and Yid-
dish. Such evidence of young
leadership in almost all areas
is encouraging.
The Jnventud Hebree de
Cuba, using the Zionist head-
quarters for their meetings,
provides the medium for some
30 young marrieds and singles
to meet on their own level for
basically social purposes. Their
president, Elias Barfocas,
represents them on the coor-
dinating commission.
Remembering that this is a
generation that grew up -with-
out benefit of rabbinic or other
professional guidance, their
very participation in this
. group, even if with little pro-
gramming, signifies their strong
desire to be Jewishly identified.
MOST OF the questions they
put to me were regarding the
degree to which Judaism is
lived in other Communist coun-
tries. It is all the more inter-
esting -when one leams that
they identify closely with the
revolution and the regime.
Had they been old enough they
would have joined their elders
who joined Castro Min the
hills." To have been among
those who fought with Castro
"in the hills" is to be in Cuba's
highest category.
Not only did he have the
support of many Jews, but
some of them sit on the central
committee of the party, while
others hold other high posi-
tions. Although some of these
do not identify with the Jew-
ish community, these young
people see no conflict. They
6upport the philosophy and the
regime. They .want to remain
Jews.
BY the uja mission
how they could help,
First^jubliathed on
Jn. 30. WT6.
1/39 2/
Deputy Clerk
1/30
Phonr: 531-8727
2/6-13-20
1/30
January, iv.
*/

1/30
/


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Page 20-B
fJewistflcridlian '
Friday, January 30, 1976
r.
f MM
P i
i
i
\ H 'i
I 1
t: an ex
traordinary prc-completion offer

The Garden Mausoleum of
Mount Nebo Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33126
Artist's rendering of the mausoleum as completed.
A GIFT, ABSOLUTELY FREE, OF A COMPLETE SET OF THE NEW ENCYCLOPAEDIA JUDAICA
TO THE FIRST 25 PERSONS
who respond to this advertisement
and who purchase before March 1,
1976 two or more crypts in this
beautiful Mausoleum we will make a
FREE GIFT of a complete set of the
new Encyclopaedia Judaica, retail
price of same being in excess of $600.
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a family af-
fair. Although you may not like to
think about it, the time to arrange
for it is long before the need, when
your mind is unclouded, and you can
consider the alternatives.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
BURIAL. Entombment in this mag-
nificent mausoleum is comparable to
ground burial, yet how much more
reverential. And there is never a
maintenance charge; crypts will be
maintained beautifully forever, with
sympathetic concern and profession-
al care as part of the total purchase.
DO NOT WAIT PURCHASE
NOW, with a small initial payment
and three year terms.
SEE OPPOSITE PAGE
FOR DETAILS
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY A GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
POST Off ICE BOX 440-367/MIAMI, FLORIDA 33144
Sir:
? Please have your sales representative call me Jo
arrange an appointment at Mount Nebo. I under-
stand that if I purchase two or more crypts bfefore
March 1, 1976, I will receive FREE as a .jjifr a
complete set of the new Encyclopaedia Judaica.
PHONE: 241-7*12
ON TODAY NAME
street
-CITV ~ t' V -
21*

' -
r. -

\
-
I
nd the- Zionist Movement.
iy after the Saturday rrtornmg
service. Mrs. Greenbere .said.

persons need hely.
fi m/ iwiiiw wiwi&rci *W^**
I
I


Friday, January 30, 1976
* Jewish fkrkttari
Page 21-B
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a

Are your children
Jewish? % f
letter "Ahnnf N^Hi# A> ^'dk: ^^

Do they know about Masada? Abraham Lincoln's letter "About
ews"? Do they know about black Jews and Mountain Jews? About the
|art Jews played in the discovery of America?
Do they know? And incidentally, do you?
The Encyclopaedia Judaica belongs in the home of every Jewish
tirent who cares. There are 16 magnificent volumes filled with facts about
ople, places, events and ideas. Every page, every paragraph, every
ford has been painstakingly researched by world-renowned scholars.
A key to Jewish identity
What emerges is a priceless key to Jewish identity for every Jewish
irmly. There is no better way of discovering for oneself what it
Scans to be a Jew.
The facts are presented objectively, without exaggeration or
pology. Facts speak for themselves. It staggers the imagination to
[alize that a small people, fighting an unending battle against
rejudice, bigotry and hatred, have contributed so much to world
istory, culture, science and the arts. (More than 60 Nobel Prize
[inners have been Jewish or of Jewish descent.)
Written for an American audience
Happily, the Encyclopaedia is not a dry-as-dust work of
Itroverted scholarship. It is written in English specifically for an
[merican audience, dedicating special articles to the part Jews
jayed in the history and development of each American state,
: hundreds of. cities and counties.
You can read about Einstein and Salk, about Justice Cardozo
.id Arthur Miller. But there is room, too, for Sandy Koufax and
[ank Greenberg, for Barbra Streisand and the Marx brothers.
For this generation and the next
After carefully examining the Encyclopaedia Judaica, David
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I ITS tne XtJtk mission pirnt-iuibXiuhed on: Jan. 30. 1976.
how they could help. 1/3
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1/10 1/8-13-20
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Phone: 531-0727
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First published on thia 30th day 6f
January. 1976.
t/% 1/30 1/1


fJewisti tier Mian
Friday, January 30, 197
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Zealots, Leftists Clash At Samarian Camp
Treasure Isle Oli)
By YITZHAK SHARC1L
And TUV1A MENDELSOX
JSL AVIV (JTA)
Several hundred members of
Mapam and Moked set up a
campsite in the Samarian
hills near the Kudun army
camp and announced they
would not leave until the au-
thorities evacuated the 30-
odd Gush Emunim families
who were permitted to set-
tle there .during the Chanu-
kah holidays last November
under army protection.
About 50 Mapam and Moked
youths remained on the barren
hillside overnight. Food sup-
plies and shelter were brought
to them on foot after vehicles
carrying supplies and equip-
ment were turned back at army
checkpoints on the West Bank.
THE SURPRISE move by
members of the extreme "dove-
ish" camp in Israel politics was
acknowledged by their spokes-
men to be a protest against the
government's apparent acquies-
cence to illegal settlement at-
tempts on the West Bank by
the militantly Orthodox and
nationalistic Gush Emunim.
By copying the Gush Emumim
method, they, hope to. nut a stop
to it. The. government cannot,
without political embarrass-
ment, force the Mapam and Mo-
ked campers to leave the; West
Bank while permitting the Gush
to remain.
Dov Zakin, a Mapam MK,
meanwhile charged that the
government was spending funds
without authorization.to provide
jobs for the Gush campers at
Kudun and to set up the frame-
work of a permanent settlement
for them. Zakin claimed that
vast sums of money were in*
volved and urged the Speaker
of the Knesset to bring up the
matter before the Chamber.
DEFENSE Minister Shimon
Peres said that no decision had
been taken yet to evacuate the
Moked and Mapam campers
near Kudun. He said a decision
would be made at a later stage
accordin" to developments on
the scene. Moked has threaten'
Construction Begins for New
Intercontinental Bank of Miami
ed to stage protest demonstra-
tions all over Israel until the
Gush campers are removed from
the West Bank.
Moked leader Meir Payil said
it was inconceivable that a po-
litical group that acted in defi-
ance of government policy
should be given the protection
and support of the army. He
also assailed the government's
vacillation and indecision with
regard to settlements in the ad-
ministered territories.
THE MOKED and Mapam
campers distributed leaflets to
local Arab villagers explaining
the- nature of their protest.
Some Arabs reportedly wanted
to join but were advised against
doing so.
The campers set up huge ban-
ners on the hillside reading
"Gush Emunim Go Home," "Ku-
dun Settlers Undermine Peace,"
and "Gush Emunim Endanger
Democracy."
. The demonstration is essen-
tially a confrontation between
two extremes in Israeli society.
The Gush are religious zealots
who contend that the West Bank
belongs* to Israel by divine right
and should therefore be open
to unrestricted Jewish settle-
. ment.
Women's American OR"
Treasure Isle, plans a_._gener
j i. j v meeting on Tuesday,- Feb. 10,.
They are backed by hard-line noon flt the Washington Feder
nationalists of the right-wing,, Bank at Normandy-Isle.
and Orthodox political factions
MAPAM AND Moked are left-
ist oriented, vigorously secular
and regard the administered
territories as temporary hold-
ings that must eventually be
returned to the Arabs in ex-
change for, peace. According to
their view, the establishment of
permanent ,Jewish settlements
in those territories only make
the prospects for peace more
ermote.
Official government policy en-
visages a return of some of the
administered territories pos-
sibly the greater part of such
areas as Sinai but only in
exchange for a formal peace
pact with the Arabs that, in-
cludes their recognition of Is-
rael's right to exist.
The government has said,
however, that for security rea-
sons Israel will never return, to
its pre-June, 1967, boundaries.
The government of Premier
Yitzhak Rabin has also pledged
to hold a national referendum
before agreeing to the return of
any part of the West Bank to
Arab sovereignty.
Ground was broken on Jan. 9
for the new permanent home of
Intercontinental Bank of Miami
at NW 7th St. and 39th Ave.
According to Jaime E. Pino,
chairman of the board of Inter-
continental Bank of Miami, the
two-story structure will be
ready for occupancy on Oct. 1.
Intercontinental Bank of Mi-
ami, which changed its name
from The Flagler Bank on Nov.
17, 1975, is located in the Cen-
tral Shopping Plaza, about a
block from its future home. The
financial institution joined with
Bank of Miami Beach, now In-
tercontinental Bank of Miami
Beach, early last year to pro-
vide customers with a greater
network of banking services.
Pino is president of both In-
tercontinental Banks, while Ben-
jamin I. Shulman is board chair-
man of Intercontinental Bank of
Miami Beach and vice chairman
of the Miami facility. Felipe
Solarana is executive vice presi-
dent of the Miami bank and Jose
A. Maruri is executive vice
president of the Miami Beaeh
bank.
Yariv Warns Israel
Beth Sholom Artists Series
Presenting Stem on Monday
I
The first artist in Beth Sho-
lom's Great Artists Series to
appear in the new Miami Beach
Theatre of the Performing Arts
is violinist Isaac Stern, whose
. concert will be on Monday, Feb.
2. at 8:30 p.m.
Stern's accomplishments as a
musician, .cultural and civic
feeder, and friend of young art-
ists have been varied and re-
markable, .as. has his influence
on America's fine arts history.
In the 1974-75 season he ap-
peared in concerts around the
world in recital with his long-
time partner, Alexander Zakin,
who will appear with him at the
Feb. 2 concert, and as soloist
with orchestras in New York,
Chicago, Beaton, Los Angeles,
Toronto and Houston, among
many others.
Without Stern's persistence.
Carnegie Hall would, have- bean
demolished in 1960, but he was
able to persuade New York City
to buy the- hall and lease it to
a nonprofit organization of
which ha is- president.
Parkinson Foundation Plans
Annual Bob Hope Dinner in Miami
The National Parkinson Foun-
dation, Inc., has announced that
its annual "Bob Hope Dinner"
will be on Saturday, Feb. 14, at
8 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom
of the Fontainebleau Hotel.

A pre-dinner hot hors d'oeu-
vres table will be served at 7
p;m. As m the past,-Bob Hope
Mill emcee the show and present
seme of the great personalities
of the theatre,. TV, Hun and the
sports worlds.
Mrs. Jeanne Levey, chairman
of the National Board of Direc-
tor and founder of NPF, is anti-
cipating a fine evening. Mildred
(Mrs. Claude) Pepper, national
chairman of the Women's Divi-
sion, is the dinner chairman.
Reservations can he-made, by
writing to the 'National Parkin-
son Institute in Miami.
TEL AVIV _(JTA) Aharon
Yariv, a former Cabinet minis-
ter, has warned that Israel must
be prepared for a shift in Amer-
ican policy toward recognition
of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization and the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state be-
tween Israel and Jordan within
the framework of an overall
Middle East peace settlement.
Yariv, who just returned from
a six-week visit to Washington
to .explain Israel's needs for
U.S. military assistance, said he
detected the .new direction of
American- policy. But this does
not mean that Israel has. to>>ac-
cept it. and not fight.-*, r.heaie-
clared in an interview on the
army broadcasting service.
YARIV, a former chief of
military intelligence who nag*
J the.original separation.of
agreement with the
in Sinai after the Yom
HBar,,erved briefly- as
Minister of Communications. in
Premier Yitzhak Rabin's Cabi-
net.
He quit the Cabinet post a
year ago, charging that the
Communications Ministry as it
was set upMw-uaneceeeary-aad
He- has since undertaken sev-
eral missions for the govern-
ment abroad. Regarded as .-,a
"dove" in farad's.politics, be
said that if the government had
accepted his formula of express-
ing willingness to negotiate with
the PLO if the latter recognized
Israel's right to exist, Israel's
information campaign overseas
would have been easier and
more successful.
ISRAEL'S former Ambassador
to the United Nations, Yoeef
Tekcah, spake on the same sub-
ject in an address, in Ashkelon.
Tekoah, who is president of Ben
Gurion University m Beersheba,
said the. government needed a
much broader political-base be-
fore it could consider dealing
with the PLO in any circum-
stances.
He suggested that the general
elections scheduled, for 2977, be
advanced so that the govern-
ment can command the widest
possible, support in dealing with
the Palestinian question.
Former Defense Minister Mo-
, she Oayan, who met -with-Sa
members Of the Cleveland
United Jewish Appeal delega-
tion, said Israel is 4n a better
position now than previously to
secure some kind of settlement
with the Arabs. He observed
that although Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat has ruled* out
peace with Israel in this
The program -indludes.musit
entertainment and a safety ta
by the police.
On Thursday, Feb. 12^aJt:riw
there will be a white elephai
sale in the card room at 75i
E. Treasure Dr Clothing, Dot
tique items, homemade cake an
other items will be for sale.
Beth TefHals
Honoring Mrs. Schwartz
Congregation Beth Tefila-Ha
landale Jewish Center will *
a breakfast at 10 a.m. on St.
day, Feb. 1, for the benefit c
the United Jewish Appeal an
Israel Emergency Fund.
The guest of honor is Hele
Schwartz, the wife of Habl
Harry E. Schwartz. She will b
honored for her many contribi
tions to Jewish life, to Israe
and to the Hallandale Jewis
Center-Congregation Beth Te
fila.
The guest speaker wttll. b
Avraham Avi-Hai, author c
"Ben-Gurion: State Builder."
Pioneer Women Chapter
To Hear About Stone Book
Murray Lubell will reyiei
Irving Stone's "Clarence Dar
row: Attorney for the Defense
at a meeting of the Hi-Rise Tik
vah Chapter of Pioneer Wo^
on Tuesday, Feb. 3, at nooi; ^
the card room at Forte Tower
North.
Mrs. Pauline Finkelstein w>l
preside at the meeting, whicl
will also hear reports on lates
developments concerning Israe
. and the United Nations.
Pharmaceutical Fraternity
Plans Seminar
The South Florida Aluir.n.
Chapter of the Rho Pi Phi In
ternational Pharmaceutical Fra-
ternity will hold a two-hour ao
credited seminar on Wednes
.day, Feb. 4, at 8 p.m. in th
second-floor meeting room ft
the Home-Federal Savings :anc
Loan on Hallandale Beach Brvd
Dr. Michael Rush, podiatrist
will discuss "Foot Health in I
Tropical Climate, and Tree*
went" and i Richard S. Lehman
;attorney,,w^4escribe "fislati
Planning for the Pharmacist."
The seminar is free to. aD
South Florida practicing ^aw
visiting pharmacists and tfctii
arivs*. -- ::-
Night of Stars
M^NerTmmd
Louis Suchman, chairman of
3** EanUJNfc.t of Stan
ncy with Egypt, Syria and Jor-
dan.
ABL Hails Anti-Trust Action
Kneseth Israel Presenting
Concerts by Cantor Malovany
Cantor Joseph Malovany,
principal cantor of the Fifth
Avenue Synagogue in New York
City, will appear at Kneseth Is-
rael Congregation Sabbath serv-
ices on Friday, Feb. 13, at 6
p.im. and Saturday, Feb. 14, at
8:30 a.m.
Kneseth Israel will also pre-
sent Cantor Malovany in con-
cert, accompanied by composer-
conductor Shmuel Fershko, on
Sunday, Feb. 22, at'8'p.m.
Born in Israel, where he serv-
ed as cantor to the Israeli
Army, Cantor Malovany began
his singing career at age seven
in the choir of the Bilu Syna-
gogue in Tel Aviv, becoming its
conductor at age twelve.
Cantor Malovany won the
bursary of the American Israel
Cultural Foundation, and con-
cluded his musical studies at
the Tel Aviv Music Academy
and the Royal Academy and
Trinity College of London,
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has-hailed the anti-trust
action instituted last week by
the U.S. Department of Justice
against -Bechtel, Inc., a major
construction firm of San Fran-
cisco, for alleged participation
in the Arab boycott of Israel, as
"a major step forward in. the
struggle to impede Arab boycott
operations, in the United States
against American companies
and individuals."
The ADL last July sent docu-
mentation of Bechtel's com-
pliance with the Arab boycott
to Assistant Attorney General
Thomas Ei Kauper, head of the
Justice Department's anti-trust
division.
ARNOLD FORSTER, ADL's
general counsel and associate
director, said that at stake is
more than $1 billion worth of
American, merchandise and
know-how, but that, the. com-
modities are desperately needed
by the Arabs and that, there-
fore, Bechtel is in a position to
refuse to submit to Arab black-
mail.
Forster said Bechtel's failure
to support American public
policy which opposes participa-
tion in boycotts against nation-
als friendly to the U.S. involve
the company in an alleged un-
lawful conspiracy in restraint
of trade. t
The Bechtel Company issued
a statement.calling the suit "to-
tally unwarranted" and grid
that the Bechtel group of com-
panies did not discriminate in
any way in personal matters or
cantatas.
BUT THE statement said that
federal regulations "have ex-
pressly stated that compliance"
with the law of foreign govern-
ments "is. not illegal under
American law."
:
president of Temple Re? TatnKi
has announced that actress uad
comedienne Charlotte Coepei
will be "one of the featartd
artists on'Saturday, Feb.'21, a!
8il5 p.m., in the Main Sane
tuary of the Temple.
Cantor Edward Klein and the
Serelle Sisters Adrians and
Anita r accompanied by pian-
ist Sally. Lazar and her orches-
tra, will participate.
Round Town
Two longtime members ef
Temple Tifereth Jacob_Hialeah,
were honored by a special One!
Shabbat on Jan. 23 to celebrate
their birthdays.
Ted Mohel, who has been a
member for 25 years, and JaJ!
Browde, a member for moro
than 20 years, were honored
for their outstanding service!
to the congregation.
Among the visitors were
Diane and Ron Barch, Mohel'f
daughter, and son-jn-law; Barry
and Cookie Wright, daughter
and son-in-law of Mrs, Claire
Mohel, and their children Va-
lerie and Sean; and Mrs. Arleae
Greenberg, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Jay Browde,.and hex sons
Steve and Howard. u
v
Mi
muu rne- uoiih Movement.
service. Mrs. Greenbere said.
persons need help.


juary 30, 1976
+Jmist)Fk>rktian
Page 23-B
B'ritb Asks U.S. to Reduce
>rt to UNations Agencies
JGTON (JTA)
i's board of govern-
rged that the United
other Western na-
tctively reduce their
it in and financial
UN volunteer agen-
ieans of opposing the
Communist blocs'
roughshod over the
11. S _
B'rith-ruling body.
Fits -midwinter meet-
i-cited the continued
>n Of UNESCO in
ttt ^sueh"- sanctions
\a\agency. It asked
'ellectrral and artistic
" continue to boy-
ICO activities.
' B'RITH'S -disenchant-
i the!. United Nations
DeanTaBandoning sup-
iTun'damental purposes
t its_ credulity and
tOVftV'frr wofid affairs
stored,." said-David M.
\, "B'nai B/rith's presi-
strohgly endorse the
M* Congress to reassess
relationships to the
jr actions, the B'nai
irerftors appealed for
Congressional approval of the
Administration's request for
$2.3 billion in aid to Israel, call-
ed on Western nations to opDose
efforts to alter UN Resolutions
242 and 333. called the "tragedy
in Lebanon" an object lesson on
the validity of the PLO as a
legitimate body capable of pro-
viding "a reasonable and sincere
answer to the Palestinian prob-
lem," and denounced the con-
tinuing harassment of the "rem-
nant Jewish communities" in
Syria and Iraq, demanding "in-
tensified efforts" to effect dip-
lomatic interventions in their
behalf.
THE BOARD adopted a $23.7
million budget a 5.3 percent
increase over last vear to fi-
nance B'nai B'rith's wide rant*e
of orograms and projects in
1976.
Almost half of the amount
$11.1 million was allocated
for the organization's sponsor-
ship of Hillel Foundations on
350 college campuses, the 40,-
000-member B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization and a professional-
ly-staffed career counseling pro-
gram conducted in 20 metropo-
litan areas.
ivan: No Money
..
stDevelopment
_.vlia difectqp general
fewiphn Agency, -told a
pwish: Appeal-delega-
rominjnt New Jersey
en here, that "For the
i.' in'.'ifcrraers hfcttory
O.jnowwfor develop-
t'f Israfif9, economic
v he"ats6'~tota* them that
Irwdfif ri get the
;-werr expecting from
~thc Bonds-
ISITORS heard a simi-
riag-report on Israel's
j_ag-; acqnon}y- from
For Corrrrrrerce 'and In-
.Eterlev and Haim
presudeftf (of Tel
aJty-aBfi one of Is-
iing^ economists.
ahar,. "whose special
p'Tast'Vear drafted Is-
: feiofm. ^fll, said the
joW_'Jad one of the
fciai periods ,in its eco-
Rstorv."
that fwr-the-ftrst time,
lent was forced to
kcuts in defense spend-
|hough.*^ev- meant the
ces would have to do
ital equipment.
snent as much as. we
. defense > it would
"^noTny," Prof. Ben-
lid,
SAn) that Israel
.us's" unemnloyment as
against inflation be-
would deter aliya and
ig*rous social unrest
jntrv. The basic prob-
\t Israel, with its extra-
defense needs, con-
nercnt more than it
the Minister said.
t
^sajd the government
to narrow the con-
Jroduetion gap by in-
C'deet-eastntr
3n. and mobilizing
5m abroad.
: by ihe end of this
irrtpttohY airead? re-
percent, would- be
it; percent from the
ppp'tir War level.
!Y the UJA mission
_how they could help.
Barlev said that, over and above
UJA donations, thev could as-
sist Israel the most bv stimulat-
ing its exports, meaning the pur-
chase of Israel goods.
He cited the example of the
Jewish-owned British depart
ment store chain, Marks and
Spencer, which, he said, bought
Israeli foods and textiles On a
strictly business basis. ^^_^
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUTT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA
FILE NUMBER 75-4092
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
IONACIO D. RETNOSO.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID
^OU^ARE HEREBY NOTrFIED
that the administration of the estate
of raNACTO D. REINOSO. deceased.
File Number 75-4092 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse.
Miami. Florida 33130. The personal
representative of this estate is OR-
I ANDO HERNANDEZ, whose address
is JTffT N.W. 'J4lh Street. Miami. Flor-
ida, 33147. The name and address of
tne attorney for the personal repre-
sentative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands .-.gainst the estate are rewir-
ed W~HIN THREE MONTHS
PROM THE DATE >F THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each Claim
must fie In writing and must Indicate
the basis for th- cliim. the name and
a : Ire-is <>f the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed, if
the claim Is not sat due, the date
when it will become 9ue shall (" stat-
.(I If the claim la contingent or un-
linuidated the nature of the unoer-
t ilnty shall be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cieni '-oples of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mail one copy
to each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has" been mailed are re-
quired.- WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may hav
I hat challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal "representative, or'the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ORLANDO HEKN'ANDBZ
As Personal Renresentallve of the
EUaate-of lONACTO D. REINOSO.
Deceased.
FRANKLIN X>.. KRET7TEER. ESQ.
3041 N.W. 7th StreetSuite 100
Miami, rforlda 33K5
541-2505_____
PERSIwaIL REPRESENTATIVRT
Firmt published on: Jan. 30. 1976.
1/30 2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-2905
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RK: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUIS E. VARELA,
Petltloner/Haabai d,
and
-MARIA I VARELA,
Respondent Wife,
TO: MARIA I VARELA
Pedro Valdlvia No. 1828
Apto 201
Santiago, Chile, s.A.
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed agalnal you and
you en required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, n' any: to it on
EDUARDO ANTON, attorney for Pe-
tltloner whose address la AOUDO,
ANTON ,v PINKIRO, 1647 B.W. 27th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 3314k and file
the original with the clerli of the
above styled court on or before March
5, 1976: othi n Ise a default will he
enteri d ugnli you foi the relief <\-
manded in ihi complaint or petition.
This noi li ball be published oni
...... foui nsecul Ivi w< eka
in THE JEWISH FI/JRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
Bald court al Miami. Florida on this
28th da] of Janu irj. i : t;
RICHARD P BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
i lade 'ounty, Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Eduardo Anton. Esq.
AGL'DO ANTON \- PINEIRO
lt;47 S.W. 27th Avenue
.Miami, Florida 33145 Ph. No. 8.54-2643
Attorneys for Petitioner
1/30 2/6-13-20
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-2909
IX RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALFONSO RAMON.
Petitioner,
and
AXA LUCIA RAMON,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
You ANA LUCIA RAMON, Calle
105, No 22AOS, Bogota, Colombia, are
hereby notified to file your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage with the Clerk of the Court and
mail a copy to the Petitioner's Attor-
ney HENRY M. WAITZKIN, 740 -
"1st Street. Miami Beach, Florida
33141. on or before the 2nd dav of
March, 1!>76; or this Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage filed against you
will be taken as confessed
DATED this 28th day of January
1976.
RICHARD P. RRINKER.
Clerk of Circuit Court
..by: L. SNEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
J 1/30 2/6-13-20
uiN TWE OtRCUiT COURT>Oft"
DADE OOUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-2910
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE'OF
" ELDA B< >('A Vi:< '.RA.
(Petitioner,
and
JULIO BOCANEGRA.
'Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
You, JULIO BOCANEGRA. Carrera
41D No.' 78B-87, Barranquilla. Colom-
bia, are hereby notified to file your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage with the Clerk of
the Court and mail a copy to the Pe-
titioner's Attorney HENRY' M.
WAITZKIN, 740 71st Street, Miami
Beach. Florida 33141 on or before
2nd day of March, 1976: or this Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage filed
against you will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 28th day of January,
1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk of Circuit Court
by: I. SNEEDEN
' Deputy Clerk
''Sit 2/6-13-20
legal Nona
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICtAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DAOE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-38695 (Division 12)
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
RENOTICE OF ACTION
\V T QUEEN & SONS, INC.,
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff.
CLYDE MADDUX and WILI.ENE
MADDUX his wife, and
UNITED STATES STEEL
( OR I'i'RATION, a corporation
authorized to do bulncss in the
State of Florida.
Defendants.
TO: CLYDE MADDUX AND
WILLKNE MADDUX, his wife
Residence: Cookevllle H.ghway
Cumberland Countv
i !ro8svlUe, Tennessee
Mailing Addreas: Post Office Boat 59
Cros-vUie. Tennessee 28Sba
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on 'he
fn 'owing property in Dade County.
Florida:
Lot 13, Block !". INI.1KITA SEC-
TION "A," according to the Plat
thereof, aa recorded in Plat Book
BO al Page 15, of the Publii Rec-
ords of Dade County. Florida: to-
gether with all furniture, furnish-
ings, appliances and fixtures cur-
rently on the premises located at
lSir.l" S.W 174th Street. Miami.
'Florida SVlCT.
h^s been filed against you and you
are rexiuired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on V.
ROBERT CARLISLE. Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is 299 Alhambra
Circle. Coral Gables. Florida 33134,
on or before March 5," 1976. and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on plain-
tiff's attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded In the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this COurt on January 27. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER as Clerk
of the Circuit Coort .
By N. A. HEWETT"
as Deputy Cleric
1/S0 2/6-13-20
IN THE CIRCUIT COU*T OF THE
11TH JUDfCtAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
CASE NO. 76-2639
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
In Re The Marriage of
PEDRO LUIS ESTRADA and
FREDESW'INDA GONZALEZ
ESTRADA.
NOTICE TO DEFEND TO:
Fredeswlnda Gontalei Estrada, 418 -
49th Street. Brooklyn. New York 1122").
You are hereby notified that a suit
seeking a Final Judgment of Marriage
Dissolution, has lie.-n filled against
you. in this Co/rt, by your husband.
Pedro Luis Estrada, and that you are
required to file your Answer, and or
any paper thereto with the Clerk of
tins Court, and to lerre a copy there-
of on Joseph c. Lausse] Attornes Al
Law, 9959 XIV 7th Avenue, Miami,
Florid:, ::::,". your husband's counsel,
not lat.r than March 10th 1976, other-
wise a Default will be entered against
you
DATED: January 28th, 1|>76, Miami,
Florida
RICHARD P. BRINKE
Clerk i 'I uii l 'oui
By X. A HKW ETT, C
l. : 2 6-13-20
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTON NO. 76-2705
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IX RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
VIRGINIA FREYRE.
Petitioner,
and
RAUL FREYRE.
Respondent
TO: RAUL FREYRE
51 Green Street
Jamaica Plains. Massachussetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to It on
ABE K'OSS. attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 101 N.W, 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 5th, 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
27th day of January, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By S JAFFE
As I'eoMty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ABE KOSS
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida*
Attorney for Petitioner
1/30 2'G-13-20
NOTICE UNDft
FICTITIOUS NAMI LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
Of VISTA OPTICS. VISTA EYE CLI-
NIC, VISTA OPTICAL VISTA TEST
CENTER and VISTA MEDICAL CLI-
NIC at :i4 E. 25th Street. Hialeah in-
tends to register -aid names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
jdHN COSCUBLA
1/30 2/6-13-20
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 76-219
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
SAUL ELGART
Deceased
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
oit DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE: __
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of SAUL E1.GAHT, deceased. File
Number 7K-219, pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
Is 7.! West Klagler Street, Miami.
Florida.
The personal representatives of the
estate are EDMUND I ELGART and
JEFFERSON NATIONAL BANK OF
.MIAMI BEACH, whose address is 180
Birch ltdi, Long Meadow. Mass. and
.'("1 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. Miami Beach.
The name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the cl.-rk of the above
court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have.
Bach aim must !>, In writing and
mu.-i Indicate the basis for the claim
the name and address of the creditor
or h s agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is not
yet due. the date when it Will become
due shall be stated. If the claim is
Becured, the security shall be describ-
ed The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall <>ne copy
to each persona! representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
dUir.d. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE HATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE!
to file any objections they may have
thai challenges the validity of the
dec-dents win, the Qualifications of
the iicrsoiial representative or the
venue or jurisdiction of the e ur:
Al I. CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL.
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Jan. 30.
1976
EDMUND I. EI.GART
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of SAUL ELGART
JEFFERSON NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI BEACH
By STUART J. MILLER
Trust Officer
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
TRAGER AND SCHWARTZ"
3Q1 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach Florida 33140
Phone: 531-6727
1/30 2/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
JOHN R. BLANTON
CASE NO. 76-300
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FLORENCE LOMBARD" '.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION .
TO VLL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
IMANDS AGAINST THE
a >:. ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
EST V '
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED

,,i p|(,i ombardo, rle ased, .
Numb if ending I
11 id I 'ounty, Flor i .
e addre -
..
jda, T i] ipresentatlve of the
\\ Mayo, wlv.se ad-
I botl Avenue, Surttflde.
The name end ad.lies- of the personal
trney are set forth
All persons having claims or de-
mandg against the estate are requir-
, i w [THIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed If
the claim is not yet due, the data
when it will become due shall be stat-
ed. If the claim la contingent or un-
liquidated the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated If the claim 13
secured, the aecurltS shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk
to enable the clerk to mall one copy
to e:ch personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to wiioni a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE HATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION of THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
thai challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CIAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Jan. 30.
1976. I
COHN N MAYO
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Florence Lombardo
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
M ilcolm H. Friedman
Sno Douglas Road
Coral Gables. Florida
444-5701
1 '30 2/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-8010
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN BERGLASS.
NOTICE"OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAflMS
OK DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
S \il> ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of HELEN IIERGI.ASS deceased. File
Number 75-8010 is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is Dade County Courthouse, Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal represen-
tative of this estate is Milton Ber-
glasa WhOM address is ;ir. West 29th
Street Miami Beach. Florida 83140.
The name and address of the attorney
for the personal representative are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requlr-
I WITHIN THREE MONTHS
'.] THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file with the clerk of the court
, ii itetneni of any claim or
demand hi may have Each la:m
must tie In writing and must Indicate
' claim, the name and
address of the redMor or his agent or
attorney, imounl claimed >f
- not yet due, the date
*>me due shall be stat-
ed. If the ilaln iogent or un-
llquldated the nature of the uncer-
tainty ahall be stated If 'ho claim is
secured (he security shall he describ-
ed. The lalmanl shall deliver suffl-
iOplea of the claim to the clerk
11. i rhe clerk to mall one copy
to i h personal representative.
All persons Interested in the estate
to whom a cony of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PirBLICATION OF THIS' NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
thai challenges the validity of the de-
cedent's will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the venue
or turlsdictlon of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
M JAY BENNETT. ESQUIRE
1100 Kane Concourse. Suite 201
Bay Harbor Island*. Flortdn 33154
TeVenno-ne 865-9881
ATTORNEY FUK PERSONAL
R EP RESENT A TIT E
MILTON BJ2RGLASS
As Ptfeen&T Representative of the
Estate of Helen Berglass, deceased
First published on this 30th day Of
January. 1976.
1/30 2/6


Vage 24-B
-
Jewish fkiridlickr
Friday, January a, J
\
K

s
'Midrises' Under Construction
At Rossmoor Coconut Creek
Rossmoor .Coconut Creek,
file adult community being de-
veloped in the Pompano Beach-
Margate area, continues steady
construction and sales pre-
press, and is now one of Brew-
ard county's most popular de-
veloping communities.
The 304 units of Bahama
village, Rossmoor's first con-
struction phase, are almost sold
out. Construction of Nassau
Village, the second phase, is
complete and residents have
I'een moving in since early
December.
Development of Nassau Vil-
lage West is under way. A pre-
construction sales offering has
been made for units in Martini-
que Village, and, according to
Larry Uchin, vice president of
marketing and sales, response
has been good. Martinique Vil-
lage will consist of midrise
apartments in five basic floor
plans, from studios to two-bed-
room, two-bath apartments.
Martinique Village villas, the
first "midrise" apartments, will
be in the area of the 16th, 17th
and 18th holes of the 13-hole
Rossmoor golf course.
Uchin said, "We hare had
many requests for multistory
units with elevators. Residents
want higher elevations with
imposing views and they do
NOT want to climb stairs
not at all."
Representative and Mrs. Paul B. Steinberg (center)
received the Israel Solidarity Award at a reception in
their honor to help the sale of Israel Bonds at the King
Cole Condominium Apartments recently. Judge Charles
Neustein (left), an associate of Representative Stein-
berg, presented the award along with Nate Piliawsky
(right), chairman of the event.
p'-'r^ -- ......
North Miami Beach's Century 21-Admiral's Port resi-
dents have pledged their commitments to the 1976 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund, meeting
last week at the Tower Auditorium. Guest speaker for
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation was Barry T. Gur-
land (2nd from left), who is regional president of B'nai
B'rith. Julius Werbner (2nd from right) is the com-
plex's chairman, assisted by cochairman Phoebe Gould
(left). The January meeting honored Nathan Cutler
(right) for his years of dedication to Israel and the
Jewish people. -
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Why are three
people called up to the Torah
when it is read on Monday
and Thursday mornings and
Saturday afternoon?
Answer: The rabbis in the
Talmud tell us that the three
people represent the three clas-
sifications of Jews, i.e.. Cohen.
Levi and Israelite. These are
the shortest readings of the
week. The idea is that actually
all Jews should be reading the
Torah. These three are the re-
presentatives of all the Jews.
The impression, then, is that the
Jewish community as a whole
is reading the Torah. Another
opinion in the Talmud tells us
that the three represent the
three divisions of Jewish Bib-
lical literature, i.e., the Penta-
teuch, the Prophets, and the Ha-
giographa. The principle is that
a Jew and a Jewish community
should be reading all of the
scriptures. The three portions
that are read are representative
of al lscriptures and thus a
token of the entire Bible
Question: Why is it neces-
sary to read at least ten verses
from the Bible during these
times?
Answer: One version in the
Talmud tells us that the ten
verses represent the basic ten
men who are required to make
up the quorum for reading the
Torah in public. They represent
the community at large, and the
ten verses, therefore, remind us
that Torah-reading in public re-
quires a minimum quota of at-
tendance. Another version in
the Talmud tells us that the ten
verses represent the Ten Com-
mandments. This reminds us
that reading the Torah is done
to help us observe the com-
mandments of the Almighty. A
third version of the Talmud tells
us that the ten verses represent
the ten orders by which the Al-
mighty created the world. This
reminds us that reading the To-
rah is to guide us into accepting
God's wish as developed through
nature. It teaches us the su-
preme faith that is necessary in
believing that whatever happens
in nature is the Almighty's will
and should be accepted by man
as such.
Farband Branch
To Hear Kaplan
The Bialik-Ben-Gurion Branch
No. 290. Farband, will meet on
Monday, Feb. 2, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Washington Federal Audi-
torium at 1234 Washington Ave.
Sender Kaplan, former editor
i I a Jewish newspaper in Ha-
vana who works for the Jewish
Federation, will analyze the si-
tuation in Israel. Norman Ar-
luck and Harry Kaminer, mem-
bers of the branch, will partici-
pate in the program.
Jack Filosof is president of
the branch.
Rabbi Baron To Address
JWV Auxiliary 223 Meeii,,*
West Miami Auxiliary No.
223. Jewish War Veterans, will
hold its monthly meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 5, at 8 p.m. at
the Miami home of Thelma Pot-
lock.
Guest speaker is Rabbi David
Baron, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Or Olom, whose topic will
be "Women's Role in Judaism."
Also on the agenda for the
meeting will be first nomina-
tions of officers for 197a.77
Proeram chairman is ul.
Burrows and Auxiliary ,
dent is Charlotte Mittlef,
The Auxiliary and piJ.
host a rec hall party at th
Hospital on Wedn-.-sdav a*
at 7:15 p.m. Hospital chal
tlame Youngentob will att>
along with other members
the Auxiliary hr^ital cord
North Miami Beach's Helene Berger, vice president ot
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Divisip
is assisting Aventura residents in a number of educa-
tional evenings, leading up to the complex's major 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund event
on Feb. 16. Joining Mrs. Berger for a recent training
seminar were (from left) Aventura general chairman.
Jack Bellock; Mary Brody of the Aventura Publicity
committee; Pacesetter vice chairman Arnold Meyer]
and El Dorado Building vice chairman Israel Poley.
Longwood Towers "Salute to Israel" paid tribute to
residents Hyman and Lillian Chabner (center) on be-
half of the 1976 Greater Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion campaign. After hearing from special guest Mayor
Louis Haas of Bay Harbor Islands, the Chabners were
presented with the Israel Solidarity Award by (from
left) former Mayor Stanley Tate, Mrs. Tate, Dr. Sam
Berkowitz, chairman, and former Mayor Shepard Broad.
The Chabners, members of the State of Israel Bonds
Prime Minister's Club, are members of Temple Emanu-
El.

Greater Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults Divi-
sion chairman Michael Adler (left) and campaign chair-
man Ike Goldemberg (right) led the nearly 40 YAD
members participating in the division's recent annual
leadership parlor meeting. Helping out at the event,
which spearheaded the 1916 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund, were parlor meeting cochairman
Karen Gould (2nd from left), immediate past chairman
Stewart Mirmelli (center), who welcomed the leaders
at his home, and guest speaker Howard Stone (2nd from
right), United Jewish Appeal's director of overseas serv-
**-------------- >*
Annual Girl Scout
Cookie Sale Opens
From now through Feb. 16
over 8,000 Girl Scouts will
knock on doors during the an-
nual Girl Scout Cookie Sale.
The sale is an important
source of income for local
troops, enabling them to take
part in special projects and
trips that would not otherwise
be possible.
Scouts will offer five varieties
of cookies mint, peanut-but-
ter sandwich, sandwich cremes,
shortbread, and peanut-butter
patties all supplied by South-
ern Biscuit Co.
Discussing expansion plans of the American Red
t gen David for Israel in South Florida at a recent meet-
ing at the offices of the American Friends of the He-
brew University are leaders of Israel's official Red
Cross Society. From left are David Coleman of Miami
Beach, Florida state president of the American Red
Magen David for Israel, and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Miller of Point East. Sol Drescher, Southwestern re-
gional chairman, presided at the session, which was
addressed by Joseph Handleman, national president of
the only organization in the United States authorized
to solicit and accept funds for the Magen David Adorn,
Israeli's only nationwide ambulance, blood bank and
emergency services organization.


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