The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02451

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"elewish Floridian
Combining THt JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 4
Miami, Florida Friday, January 23, 1976
By Mail SOc. fwn Sections Price 25 <-enia
U.S. to Cut Aid to 'Antr Voters at UN
SEES ISRAEL'S DEMISE IN GERMAN INTERVIEW
'Down on Knees,? Arab Solon Vows
NEW YORK (JTA) Zuhayr Muhsin, "defense
minister" of the Palestine Liberation Organization and
second in command, a leader of the Syrian-supported
terrorist organization, As Saiqa (Thunderbolt), and a
leader of the ruling Ba'ath Party in Syria, was recent
ly interviewed in Damascus by Die Zeit, a widely read
weekly published in West Germany. The interview,
which appeared in the weekly's Dec- 12 issue, indi-
Gen. Gonan
[ Resigns
From Army
TEL AVIV (JTA) Gen.
Shmuel Gonen, whom the
Agranat Committee held re-
sponsible for Israel's mili-
tary defeat at the outset of
the Yom Kippur War, re-
signed from the army last
week.
He refused to accept a
field command offered him
by the Defense Minister on
grounds that it would imply
that he accepted the Agra-
nat panel's conclusion that
he was unfit for a regional
command or to head a de-
partment at General Head-
Continued on Page 2-A
p

Boycott Explained 3-A
Israel Rapped 7-A
Rabin in Warning 8-A
Jewish Refugees 12-A
'Full Understanding' 13-A
ABBA EBAN
Arabs Press Moderation
To Split U.S., Israel Tie
cated the position the PLO is expected to take dur-
ing the Security Council debate. What follows is an
excerpt of this interview as it was released here by
the American Jewish Committee.
DIE ZEIT: What will be the PLO's objectives
when it participates in the Security Council's Middle
East debate?
Continued on Page 3-A
Eban's Return to Top
Gov't. Post Imminent
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) For the first time since Yit-
zhak Rabin set up his Cabinet 18 months ago, leaving Abba
Eban conspicuously out of it, the two men met for a long
friendly chat alone in Tel Aviv Friday. The Premier's aides
said they had reviewed the political situation in advance of
the Security Council debate-
However, they did not
deny rumors that their con-
versation presaged an immi-
nent return of the former
Foreign Minister to the gov-
ernment.
1

i
By YITZHAK RAB1
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Prospects increas-
ed late last week that the
Arabs and their supporters
RABBI WAS 'TAKEN IN'
Jakobovitz Attacked
For Views on Soviet
Defends Trip to Russia 6-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Chief Rabbi Immanuel Jako-
bovits of Britain has come under sharp attack by leaders of
Soviet-Jewish emigre groups here and strong, if muted,
criticism in official circles for his remarks following a nine-
day visit to the Soviet Union last month that there was
reason to be hopeful that
the situation of Jews there
would improve.
Activists, such as Prof.
Alexander Voronel, head of
the Soviet Immigrants Aliya
Committee, claimed the chief
Rabbi had been taken in by
clever Soviet propaganda.
He said a comment attribut-
ed to Jakobovits that there
was no large-scale anti-Sem-
itism in the USSR was a sign
of naivete and he took issue
with the rabbi's statement
in a Jerusalem Post inter-
view that life was better for
Continued on Page 13-A REP- ABZUG
would come up with a rela-
tively moderate draft reso-
lution in the current Secur-
ity Council debate on the
Middle East which the U.S.
would find difficult to veto
on grounds that it impairs
progress toward peace and
which, according to sources
here, is aimed at creating a
rift between Israel and the
U.S.
The anticipated resolution
would ask for recognition of
the "national rights of the
Palestinians" and thereby
open the way for PLO par-
ticipation at a reconvened
Geneva conference, the
sources said.
MEANWHILE, an Israeli of-
ficial confirmed to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Se-
curity Council President Salim
Ahmed Salim of Tanzania was
Continued on Page 2-A
QUALIFIED sources in-
dicated that Eban's return was
Continued on Page 1S-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
has indicated that the United
States will reduce assistance
to those nations which have
opposed the U.S. on issues
at the United Nations
Responding to a report
that Secretary of State Hen-
ry A. Kissinger had formal-
ly initiated such a policy,
the State Department said,
without confirming the re-
port explicitly, that "obvi-
ously our actions toward
other countries are based on
their actions toward us."
SPOKESMAN Robert Funseth
also said that this is a "diplo-
matic practice followed by this
country as well as by other
countries. Obviously, how a
country votes is an action."
He noted, however, that he
was unaware of any changes in
the foreign assistance program
that the State Department had
submitted for the current year,
a $4.4 billion program.
Funseth added that since the
program has not yet been adopt-
ed by the Congress, it was pos-
sible changes may take place in
it. According to published re-
Continued on Page 8-A
Argentine Anti Semite
Gets Envoy Post to Syria
DAIA Criticizes University Rector
By ASHER MIBASHAN
3-A
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
Horacio Calderon, a govern-
ment official who has charged
that Judaism represents inter-
national synarchy which has
infiltrated global institutions,
including the Catholic Church,
is slated to be named Argen-
tine Ambassador to an Arab
country, probably Syria, it was
reported here.
Calderon, a member of the
right-wing Peronist Youth or-
ganization, made his anti-
Semitic allegations in his book
"Argentina Judia" ("Jewish
Argentina") and repeated them
at a press reception here a
week ago at which the book
was formally introduced.
HE WAS confirmed on Jan.
2 as press director of the Bue-
nos Aires National University
by the university's rector,
Eduardo Mangiante.
Calderon's anti-Jewish re-
marks and especially his attack
on the Vatican, brought a
Continued on Page 15-A
ABZUG DEFENDS LIBERATION MOVEMENT
No Bias in Women 9s Unit
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Rep. Bella Abzug
(D., N.Y.) has strongly rejected a claim that
there was an anti-Semitic or anti-Israel trend
in the women's liberation movement. "I know of
no evidence of it and if there were evidence,
it (anti-Semitism) would be crushed," she told
some 100 women attending a day-long confer-
ence on Zionism sponsored by the American
Zionist Federation at the America Israel Friend-
ship House.
Abzug, a leader of the feminist movement,
was challenged on the anti-Semitism issue after
she spoke about the International Women's
Year Conference in Mexico City which she at-
tended as an official Congressional observer.
SHE SAID the clause in the "Declaration of
Mexico" calling for the elimination of Zionism
was not a feminist measure but was adopted
by delegates who represented governments, not
women, at the United Nations-sponsored con-
Continued on Page 8-A



Page 2-A
*>kttWh. fkridliain
Friday, .January 23, i97i
Arabs in 'Moderate* Stand to Split Allies
Continued from Page 1-A
in contact with Israel's UN Am-
bassador Chaim Herzog urginy
him to participate in the Coun-
cil debate which Israel had been
boycotting because of the pres-
ence of the PLO.
It was learned that Hcrzoq
and Salim might meet during
the aebate to discuss the issue.
But Israeli sources here insisted
that Israel was determined not
to attend the sessions.
The Council voted 11-1 at the
outset to seat the PLO delega-
te in. The U.S. cast the only ne-
gative vote. Britain. Fiance am1
Inly abstained. The vote was
procedural and not subject to
V to. The delegates who favored
admitting the PLO to participa-
tion with the rights of a UN
member state, except the right
to vote, explained that their po-
sition was based on what they
regarded as "precedents*' for
such action.
U.S. AMBASSADOR Daniel P.
Moynihan, however, insisted
that the seating of the PLO was
"illegal" because the PLO was
not a state did not recognize
Israel and di I not accent Se-
curity Council Resolutions 24?
and 331 as the basis of peace
negotiations.
Also late in th.' week, twe
bombs w,e discovered at the
Iraqi UN Mission. Police source:
indicated they wee similar to
the three pipe bombs discov-
ered at the entrance to a sub-

Gonen Quits Post;
Won't Accept
Agranat Report
Continued from Page 1-A
quarters.
In his letter of resigna-
tion, Gonen reiterated his
charge that the Agranat
Committee made him a
scapegoat for errors on the
Egyptian front.
A HIGHLY egarded armored
division commander curing the
1967 Six-Day War, Gonen was
commander of the southern re-
gion encompassing Sinai when
t*e Egyptians, in their surprise
attack of October, 1973, crossed
the Suez Canal and overran the
Barlev Line.
The Agranat Committee, ap-
pointed bv th-m Premier Golda
Mej- to investigate the conduct
of the Yom Kiopur War and the
ewerN I |8jdpg up to it. pointed
the. finger at Gonen as the sen-
ior officer most responsible for
Israel's setbacks.
Gonen disputed the commit-
tee's- findings but was unable to
get them reversed. He,was given
a special assignment at General
Headquarters, pending a final
decision on his future military
career.
THE DEFENSE Minister and
Chief of Staff apparently wanted
to retain Gonen in a major
command post.
I Igal counsel indicated that
the Agranat verdict did not pre-
clude his assignment to com-
mand a field unit, but the Gen-
prl chose to resign instead.
;tmw
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way service tunnel under the
UN library building.
The two bombs at the Iraqi
Mission were found after an
anonymous called telephoned
WCBS-TV at 11:08 p.m. that
there were bombs at the Mis-
sion. The caller, a man, identi-
fied himself as a representative
of the "Jewish Underground
Army."
MORE than an hour later.
CBS radio received a call from
a man who said he represented
the "Jewish Armed Resistance
Strike Movement" of the Jewish
Defense League. The caller, ap-
parently unaware that the
bombs had been discovered and
dismantled, said, according to
CBS sources. "We would like to
accept responsibility for the
bombing of the Iraqi Mission."
He also said. "We would alsc
like to say it is quite possible
several mere bombs are placed
around th'.' city. We are not say-
ing this is definite, but the UN
had better watch out."
The bombs at the Iraqi Mis-
sion were found propped
against a door hading to the
Mission's basement entrance.
According to police, they were
wrapped in black plastic sheet-
ing and were concealed in a
shopping bag.
Seven nersons in the building
at the time were evacuated.
Meanwhile, a UN spokesman
announced that three more
bomb threats were telephoned i
to the UN.
INTENSIVE private consulta-
tions continued here as the Se-
curity Council prepared to re-
sume its Middle East debate.
The Council sessions were
expected to be presented short-
Iv with either amendments to
Resolutions 241 and 338 or ad-
ditional provisions which would
call not onlv for the recognition
of Palfs'inian rights but for PLO
participation at Geneva.
The nnv nrcn^sals would also
demand Israel's withdrawal
from all occupied territories
within one year and a return to
its ra*-Jun 1Q67 borders under
penalty of UN sanctions.
STILL another possible reso-
lution wi'l be one calling for
the creation of a Palestinian
St t on the West Bank and Gaza
Strin. sources said. If the U.S.
finds its-lf unable to veto al'
of these possible resolutions. Is-
rael would be more diplo-
matically' isolated than ever be-
fore, which, apparently, is the
Arab aim, the sources said.
The U.S. has said it would
veto anv resolution that it see"
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as impairing progress toward
peace. It may thus block a mea-
ure calling tor Israel's evacua-
tion from all occupied terri-
tories since K-solution 242 do?s
not make such a demand, at
I*ast as it ;s interpreted bv the
U.S. an' otfvsr West ,rn coun-
tries and Israel. It calls onlv for
Israel's eventual withdrawal
from "t nitn ; ;s" wthin 'se
framework of a peace settle-
ment.
THE P^SO'.UTtn.N also d^s
not mention th Pa'astinhns b't
c*ili fir a hut s sttl men! of th i
refugee probl?-" in gme'al. A
provision specifically referring
to Pri! rt'nHn hMs might, how-
ever, h acceptable to the U.5.
since Washington his acvnowl-
(.!<->H --. ...-i^f ^n---> of such
rights although it refuses to rec-
ognise the PLO as represent'!'
live of the Pal stinian people.
Moynihan has declared h"*-e
t'iat "the PLO is nat a state.
docs not administer a (Wind
territory, does nat ha'-e the at-
t-Uvp.- r*f i stnf nd does not
claim to be a state."
He sa'd that while th" U.^.
acknowledges that a settlement
must take into account the
"legitimate interests" of th"
Palestinians, the definition of
thes" interests was a matter for
negotiations.
He said, however, that thn
Council was erodinu its i
fluence by s?ating the !>l0 j5
as ,the General Assembly erode* I
its prestige by its votes last ve
to condemn Zionism us racism
however, delegates Whl
supported s-ating the PI,0 Cjt J
three crecdents. On was that
the General Assembly's Nov in
resolution slated that the pin
be a -varti-inant in all im^
tional foru"e> on peace in the
Middle East sponsored bv th.
UN.
Another Precedent they refer I
red to was the Security CoUn"
cil's Nov. 3^ resolution evterrj.
in? the mandate of the United
Nations Disengagement Ob-
server Force (UNDO:- on the
Colaa Heights. At thai time, the
then Presi lent of the ^-curirjj
Council. Soviet Ambassador yJ
Hov Mali'-, stated that it wasthal
r-nS:>ns-: of thp majority that
the PLO be invited to partici.
pat! in the debate.
The third precedent was the
O ..-. 4 s ssion oi h Security
round! cmvnd to debate the
Dae. 2 Israeli ai>- raids on ter-
corist strongholds in Lebanon
to which the PLO was invited.
MOYNIHAN contended that
thse were ad ho,- s a si ins that
*id not st any precedent for
PLO participation in a formal!
found! debate on the Mideast]
Moynihan also challenged Mai
1'k's statement of the consensa
cf the maiority as having noj
i-ot1 standing.
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1-23-76


'riday, January 23, 1976
*Jewisti flcridtiaffj
Page 3-A
'Down on Knees,9 Envoy Sees Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
MUHSIN: The positions of the PLO in the United
Nations must be strengthened, the legitimate and na-
tional rights of the Palestinians must be firmly ground-
ed, and all UN resolutions concerning Palestine back
to 1947 that is, back to the Partition Plan must
be mobilized against Israel. The Palestinian question
must never again be dealt with in the United Nations
as a mere refugee problem, but must be handled with
a view to a separate Palestinian state.
DIE ZEIT: Would this also create a basis for re-
cognition by the PLO of a separate Israeli state, of
Israel's right to exist?
MUHSIN: I don't like to answer this question.
If Israel remains what it is a racist, Zionist, impe-
rialist state all it will get from our side is bullets
and shells. Not until Israel has become something
different will the Jews see our faces and, indeed, our
outstretched hands not unless they are ready for
peaceful dialogue with us, so as to create with us the
democratic, secular State of Palestine. We want to co-
exist with them, in a unified state or a state with two
cantons. We don't want to throw them into the sea or
drive them into the desert.
DIE ZEIT: But that really amounts to denying
them the right of existence in a state of their own,
doesn't it?
MUHSIN: They will have to accept this eventual-
ly. Our right of existence in all of Palestine comes
first.
DIE ZEIT: And a Palestinian state confined to the
formerly Jordanian West Bank and Gaza would not
satisfy these juristic claims?
MUHSIN: No, never. We want back every piece
of land, every field, every village and every house that
was ever ours. We will not yield on that. Right, nat-
ural right, is on our side.
DIE ZEIT: Can one put it to the Israelis to com-
mit this sort of national suicide?
MUHSIN: They will have to learn to understand,
but they won't understand until they change their
outlook. That will happen when they are down on their
knees before us, when we have smashed them to pieces
by force of arms.
DIE ZEIT: In other words, peace is not in sight?
MUHSIN: For now, neither war nor peace. And
in the future, war again, new wars. It's inevitable.
Herzog Explains Israel'& Boycott of Debate
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA)
Chaim Herzog, Israel's Ara-
ssador to the United Na-
ons, declared here that Is-
rael was not participating in
the Security Council debate
an the Middle East not only
l|ecause of the presence of
e Palestine Liberation Or-
inization but "because of
nirty to the process of de-
roying the mechanism for
iace in the Middle East by
ansferring the issue from
e Geneva Peace Confer-
ice to the Security Council
pursuance of an avowed
rian-PLO purpose to an-
1 all moves toward peace."
But the Israeli envoy
essed that Israel is ready
negotiate with the Arabs
peace. "We are ready
.here and now to negotiate
r-^eace but the operative
word is negotiate," he
stressed. "We are not ready
to be dictated to and we
Will not accept a dictate,
j HERZOG'S remarks were
made in an address to a meet-
ing sponsored by the Conference
of Presidents of Major Amer-
fean Jewish Organizations timed
to coincide with the opening ot
the Security Council.
?About 250 persons attended
meeting held at the Carne-
International Center, includ-
members of the Presidents
ference and other Jewish
tent Christian clergymen.
r and civil rights leaders
noted people from the arts.
ttacking the record of the
ntly-compteted 30th On-
Assembly, Herzog charged
"the United Nations is
gradually being turned by, a
U group of despots led by
Syrians and the PLO in the
- monger ing center of the
world."
HE SAID that "by allowing
small groups of irresponsible
extremists to dictate to the UN,
the tragedy of the Middle East
is being prolonged." He said
that this same process was now
being brought into the Security
Council.
Herzog stressed that in adopt-
ing Resolutions 242 and 338
"the Security Council had
created a mechanism which is
already beginning to show re-
sults in moving our strife-torn
area towards peace and accom-
modation," a reference to the
two disengagement agreements
with Egypt and the one with
Syria.
But, he said, extreme ele-
ments led by the PLO are try-
ing to destroy this mechanism.
"The issue before the United
Nations now is whether or not
it is going to allow the elements
of violence, hate and intran-
sigence to set the tone in the
Middle East, or whether it will
maintain the momentum which
has been achieved on the basis
of resolutions reached in the
Security Council towards nego-
tiations, accommodations and
peace in the Middle East," Her-
zog stated.
REJECTING an anticipated
proposal that -the PLO be in-
vited to attend the Geneva Con-
ference, Herzog noted its ter-
rorist record and its call for the
destruction of the Jewish State.
Ha declared that "despite the
hypocritical lip service paid to
it by the Arab" fovenunent,"
Egypt has curbed the activities
of the- PLO, Jordan does not
allow it- to operate- in its ter-
ritories and even Syria main-
tains tight controls over them."
"The only place in which they
are free to- operate is in Leba-
non," he said. "With what tragic
consequence* we all know."
Herzog also took direct aim
at the PUra call for a dem-
ocratic secular state. "If they
believe so much in democracy
and secularism why has no
democratic state arisen so far in
the Arab world?" he asked. "For
19 years the Jordanians con-
trolled the West Bank and the
Egyptians controlled the Gaza
Strip. Why was no secular state
created there at that time?"
HERZOG also scorned the
claim by some that if Israel
moved back to the pre-1967
borders "all will be solved." He
noted that the present borders
were created as a result of a
"war which the Arabs brought
upon us and upon themselves."
He said that for "19 years we
sat along the 1967 borders until
the Arabs attacked in 1967," but
during that time the Arabs did
not make peace, nor did they
negotiate for peace.
"The issue is not a question
of territory, it is not a question
of Palestinians, although these
are both important," Herzog de-
clared. He said the issue is a
"change of heart" in which the
Arabs agree to accept the exist-
ence of Israel.
"The question is at what point
Arab nationalism, with its pro-
digious glut of advantage,
wealth and opportunity, will
come to terms with the modest
but equal rights of another Mid-
dle Eastern nation to pursue its
life in security and peace," he
said.
RABBI Israel Miller, chair-
man of the Presidents Confer-
ence, in introducing Herzog,
said today was "a dismal day in
the history of the United Na-
tions and in the efforts to reach
a just and enduring peace" be-
cause the UN had surrendered
to "PLO terror."
Miner urged the United States
government to "resist the Arab-
Soviet drive to substitute dicta-
tion at the Security Council for
negotiations at Geneva." He
urged the U.S. to block any
attempts to alter. Resolutions
242 and 338 and to veto any new
resolutions.
At a press conference follow-
ing the address, Herzog said
that even if the U.S. was to go
along with any new resolution
Israel would not accept it if it
was not in its national interest.
But he rejected a suggestion
that Israel might leave the UN,
saying that this is what the
Arabs want. Israelis, he affirm-
ed, do not run away from fights.
He also noted that the UN still
serves as a good place for diplo-
matic contents.
DAIA Raps
Univ. Rector's
Statements
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
DAIA has protested to the Rec-
tor of Buenos Aires National
University, Eduardo Mangian-
te, against the anti-Semitic
statements of Horacio Calde-
ron, the University's newly ap-
pointed press director.
In a telegram to Mangiante,
Dr. Nehemias Resnizky and
Moises Camji, president and
acting secretary of the DAIA,
expressed astonishment that
the Rector did not repudiate
Calderon's statements which,
they said, were incitements to
civil strife.
The DAIA also protested to
the Argentine Interior Minis-
ter, Dr. Angel Federico Koble-
do, who is chairman of the
Justicialist (Peronist) Party,
over the recent proliferation of
anti-Semitic acts.
CALDERON, who is a leader
of the Peronist Youth organ-
ization, alleged that interna-
tional Judaism was a sinister
force behind disorders in Ar-
gentina and the world at large.
He made that charge in his
new book "Argentina Judia,"
(Jewish Argentina) and in a
speech at a press reception
here two weeks ago where the
book w?s formally introduced.
The reception was held at
the Eva Peron House, head-
quarters of the Justicialist
Party. The DAIA leaders said
Calderon was trying to create
the impression that the party
endorsed his views.
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Page 4-A
* Jewish fhridliain
Friday, January 23, 1976
"
A New View of Chutzpah
The high point of United Nations chutzpah occur-
red shortly after the Middle East debate began on Mon-
day of last week.
Farouk Khaddoumi, foreign policy adviser to the
Palestine Liberation Organization and Yasir Arafat, be-
rated Israel with a viciousness of tone perhaps unparal-
leled in previous UN" history.
The tragedy of Palestine, he told the Security Coun-
cil, began with the "iniquitous Balfour Declaration."
Furthermore, declared Khaddoumi, the United Nations
had no right "to partition our country" in the first place,
meaning the world organization's establishment of Israel
in 1947.
Referring to Jews as "usurpers," Khaddoumi charg-
ed them with "a sinister scheme against our people."
After diverting himself of such blatantly venomous
distortions of truth and history, Khaddoumi thereupon
criticized Israel for failing to attend the UN "debate."
THAT is chutzpah.
Self-Destructive Trip
French President Valery Giscard d'Estaing's re-
cent trip to Cairo was a disaster.
The French are going to give Egypt all the things
Egypt does not now have in sufficient quantity
fighter planes, guns, pressure on Europe to see Egypt
in an ever more favorable light as d'Estaing does what
he can to dampen even further the once favorable light
that shone on Israel.
This comes at a particularly bad time bad when
one thinks of the snag in relations between Egypt and
the Soviet Union, particularly Moscow's refusal to make
it easier for Egypt to repay all the money Moscow bank-
rolled and Egypt blew in its attack on Israel in 1973.
One can easily argue that America is doing the
same for the Israelis that America is arming the Is-
raelis and supporting the Israelis in a world increasingly
determined to isolate them.
But the bald fact is that Israel is not attempting
to exterminate anyone whatever the phony Third
World-Communist bloc says. The Arabs are.
Furthermore, any rift between the Soviet Union
and any Arab state is worthwhile for western interests.
For a western nation to fill the breach is tantamount to
knitting the rift and thus to diminishing the benefit of
the rift to the West.
That is what France's President has done.
In this sense, we see d'Estaing's visit to Moscow in
the same meddlesome way that we saw Gen. DeGaulle's
first meddlesome attacks on the American dollar and
American international prestige.
In the end, the French are gouging out a hole in
the hull of the boat they themselves are sailing.
Time to Act-Not Talk
Faye Schenk, president of the American Zionist
Federation, has announced the creation of a Commission
on Zionist Ideology made up of 31 Zionist scholars and
leaders. The commission will perform a needed service
by dealing with such questions as the contemporary
character of Zionism, the differences betwen Zionist and
pro-Israeli activity, and whether Zionist philosophy
needs updating and revision.
It is important that the efforts produced by the
commission not be kept to itself that they reach not
only Zionist and Jewish organizations, but also the gen-
eral public. Despite all that has happened in recent
years, proper information on Zionism still does not
reach a large public.
Most people, including many Jews, really do not
know what Zionism is. They are thus easy targets for
Arab propaganda.
The Israel government, the World Zionist Organi-
zation and the various Zionist and Jewish organizations
in every country should cooperate on a massive and
effective information program.
^Jewish Floridian
OFFICE AND PLANT 120 N.E. 6th STREET TELEPHONE 373-4606
/.O. Box 01-2973, Miami. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET LEO MINDIJN SELMA M. THOMP80N
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor Assistant t PubUr*-
The Jewish Floriotan Doe Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Published every Friday since i27 by The Jewish Floridian
Second-Clas* Postage Paid at Miami. Fla-
me Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewisn Weekly,
MemDer of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndi-
cate, Worldwide News Service, National Editorial Association, American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
Conscience' Worries a 'Friend'
I AST WEEK, I concluded with
the promise to take a clos-
er look in this column at Lau-
rens van der Post's recent book,
"Jung and the Story of Our
Time," with specific reference
to the sections dealing with
Psychiatrist Jung's alleged anti-
Semitism.
But a column the other day
by Garry Wills, of the Univer-
sal Press Syndicate, for the mo-
ment forces me to set my prom-
ise aside because the Wills piece
urgently demands a response.
COINCIDENTALLY, it has to
do, at least partially, with,
guess what?, anti Semitism:
-'-'
Mindlin
li 11mi"1 t
SMHBillOflBDUMA
that ubiouitous rain in the
backside of man which afflicts,
not his conscience (the seat of
*JTA
his conscience is hopefully
elsewhere), but his brutal ani-
mal nature.
The subject of Wills' column
is Israel, and he has written
it with what he would have us
believe is profound regret.
For one thing, he argues,
every time he writes about
Jews or Israel, "the sicky hate
mail" arrhes to congratulate
him "for at last seeing through
the Jewish plot to rule the
world."
COMPLAINS WILLS: "Once
I voiced a mild criticism of
something Leonard Bernstein
did and some people wrote
me fervent letters of embar-
rassing praise for attacking
'that Jew'."
Okay, he's made his point
We are now on notice that Wills
is not an anti-Semite partic-
ularly when he observes with
some sympathy, "One of the
sadder side effects of this dis-
ease (anti-Semitism) is the Is-
raelis' own earned touchiness
about any criticism at all. They
have always seen how each
tiniest criticism was put to use
by the anti-Semites."
Wills thereupon proceeds to
criticize Israel, and in no "tin-
i"st" way either, if not confi-
dent of immunity from charges
of anti-Semitism, then at least
certain that he has set the in-
tellectual ground rules for crit-
icizing Israel without having to
anticipate unreasonable (unin-
tellectual) counterattack.
THAT IS the unfortunate
blight of the liberal intellect-
ual: he assumes the right to say
anything he pleases, no matter
how destructive, even self-de-
structive, so long as he can as-
sure himself it is reasonable.
Behind this "impenetrable"
armor, where he sloughs off the
Continued on Page 12-A
Jewish Education Big Concern
SUBSCRIPTION BATES: (Local Areai One Year$12.00; Two Years$22.00;
Three Years$30.00. Out of Town Upon Request.

Volume 49
Friday, January 23, 1976
Number 4
21 SHEVAT 5736
Deadline and my regular
work schedule dictate that I
write this weekly column on the
weekend, and thus I plan to
violate a basic newspaper ruin:
don't report on an event before
it happens; sometimes it doesn't,
as many a naive beginner has
learned.
Last Monday, I was to attend
a meeting of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, newly
headed by Gwen Weinberger.
The agenda, among other things,
called for a discussion on new
priorities for CAJE and, of
course, I planned to speak up.
MY PRIORITY was not on
the agenda for 1974 and 1975
because it died or was killed
after much debate in 1973.
Some of you will have guessed
already: I urge that Federation
subsidy of synagogue schools
become the No. 1 priority of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation.
On Tuesday, I had lunch at
one of Greater Miami's Ortho-
dox day schools. I am profes-
sionally employed at a Reform
synagogue (if you've come in
late) Aid would not send my
children to a parochial school
for old-fashioned "democratic"
reasons.
My visit was for the purpose
of exploring with those who
conduct this fine school ways
to raise funds desperately need-
ed to maintain its standards.
ACTUALLY, no one concern-
ed with Jewish education needs
the above excuses to raise the
issue of community funds being
allocated in greater volume to
education whether it be the
minimal synagogue version or
the maximum day school enter-
prise.
If one is growing weary of a
debate that seems to lead no-
where, there is some new evid-
ence that perhaps those who
control community funds may
listen too. Past history would
indicate this is remote but, as
I probably once wrote, by de-
finition to be a Jew is to be an
optimist how else have we
survived these cruel millennia?
THE STUDY done by Harold
S. Himmelfarb and published
last September by the Syna-
gogue Council of America re-
veals that "The proportion of
eligible Jewish children receiv-
ing some type of Jewish educa-
tion is declining," and goes on
to state that while some of that
is due to our declining birth
rate, "it seems clear that a sub-
stantial proportion is not."
Using figures from National
Jewish Population Study in Chi-
cago, Himmelfarb estimates that
roughly 30 percent of all eligible
children between the ages of 6
and 18 years will not receive
any Jewish education.
However, less than a decade
ago. studies showed that close
to 90 percent of those children
were receiving some bad as
that mav have been, if one be-
lieves decades of speakers at
Federation general assemblies.
I WISH to make only one
point here, based on my sched-
uled meeting at the dav school
on Tuesday. Himmelfarb at-
tributes the proportionate in-
crease in the '60's partly to the
greater availability of schools
and the increased wealth of the
Jewish population.
From my vantage point as a
synagogue administrator, I can
state unequivocally that hun-
dreds if not thousands of
Jewish children are not getting
any education because their
parents cannot afford the cost
of day school tuition or the
membership dues required at
most synagogues for enrolling
their children in their midweek
and Sunday schools.
The synagogues in this com-
munity and throughout the
country have been in a reces-
sion for several years. They no
longer can afford to expand
their schols, nor can they af-
ford to carry the heavy load of
members who are unable to
meet the inflated costs which
beset the synagogues today.
If there isn't overt rejection
of those who may be "religious
indigents" no synagogue
leadership will ever admit to
turning away a family because
of money there is a sad his-
tory of handling this problem
in such a manner that is even
worse in its denigrating way.
THAT SUCH an attitude may
only reflect the general com-
munity view of the Jewish poor
is something worth commenting
on some other day.
Last week, in a letter pub-
lished in The Jewish Floridian,
Rabbi Victor Zwelling strongly
suggested that the community
begin paying its way for Jew-
ish education. Something like
a year ago, according to a head-
line in the Miami Herald, "Rab-
bi Lehrman to Demand Fund-
ing for Religion, Education."
Lots of other letters and ser-
mons have been delivered but,
as we used to say in those good
old '60's, if you're not part of
the solution, you're part of the
problem.
And as long as the education
and religious leaders of
community do not press the
solution Federation tne
problem will get even worse.
'
.1


Friday, January 23, 1976
*Jet*isi rk rid for?
Page 5-A

4-
I,
Scroll of Infamy
Should be Published
In Black Border
RECOMMEND CIVIL ACTION BE DROPPED
Rosenbaum Case in New Light
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The abominable resolution
adopted in the General Assem-
bly of the United Nations, of-
fering the hypocritical stamp of
legitimacy to anti-Semitism on
a world-wide scale, has natural-
ly aroused the loathing of all
decent people and deep indig-
nation in Jewish ranks the
world over. To be sure, the
Jewish people cannot respond
adequately to this incarnation
of Hitbrism in our day.
But there is something we
can do and immediately.
The Jewish Floridian should
begin publishing each week the
Scroll of Infamy, listing the
states that voted for the Arab-
Communist resolution and the
states that did not have the
courage or the integrity to vote
against it and abstained.
THE LIST might well be en-
closed in a black border in
commemoration of the death of
human decency in the United
Nations.
The publication in each issue
of this Scroll of Infamy would
be a very helpful reminder to
Jewish tourists and travelers,
and all men and women of good
will and intelligence, in plan-
ning their trips abroad.
If Biblical warrant is needed
we have it in the 18th Psalm,
Verse 26: "Toward the faithful
you are faithful, toward the
wholehearted you are whole-
hearted, toward the sincere you
are sincere, but toward the
crooked you are perverse."
ROBERT GORDIS
Professor of Bible
Professor of the Philosophies :
of Religion
Jewish Theological Seminary
New York
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: I
In your issue of Friday, Jan.
16, there appjared an article!
iiiHimmiiiiKiuMta
nmmntnnmii!
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Words Be Brier
Kohtlcth (Ecdesiastes)
^HMMniMMHMWWMBMMH
under "Great Jewish Pevscmli-
tiea" entiiied "The Establish-
ment and Jewish Youtii."
In my om'ni^n. this e-ti>le
really highlighted a situation
exiting in American Jewish so-
ciety today.
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LIFSET
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Legal and financial circles here
are discussing with interest the
possible repercussions of a Tel
Aviv court judgement last week
f*0 the Israel Corporation-Tibor
Rcsenbaum affair.
Judge Shlomo Lowenberg
ruled last Thursday, with the
consent of all the parties, that
civil action taken against Ge-
neva banker Tibor Rosenbaum
by the Israel Corporation, in
Israel, should now be dropped.
THE CORPORATION had
Iat year got the court to block
Rosnba'.im's assets in Israel,
stimated at $15 million, fol-
lowing the collanse of his
Geneva based International
Credit Bank and its allied Va-
ffuz registered Inter Credit
Trust.
Tint collapse 1-ft the Israel
Corporation. Israel's presti.V
finance company, and its as-
sociated companiec, S79 mil-
li'.n out of pocket, because de-
posits they had placed with
Rosenbaum could not be re-
covered.
In subseouent criminal ac-
tion here, the Israel Corpora-
tion director general. Michael
Tzur, was sentenced to 15
years imprisonment on charges
of embezzlement, bribery,
fraud and currency offenses.
TZUR'S APPEAL is due to
be heard by the Israel supreme
court in March, and legal ob-
servers here believe that last
week's judgment by Judge Low-
enberg may affect the appeal.
"What had seemed black at
first," the Judge wrote, "ap-
pears not so on closer examina-
tion."
He was referring to the Is-
rael Corporation's allegation
that Tzur and Rosenbaum to-
gether had conspired to trans-
fer $.5 million of Israel Cor-
poration monies to the Rosen-
baum Trust Company without
the knowledge of the Israel
Corporation Board of Direc-
tors.
"Aft*r matters were exam-
in?d in the Israel Corporation
books." the Judge wrote, "it
has now become clear that
what were previously thought
lo be transactions conducted
through the personal contact
only between Tzur and Rosen-
baum were actually recorded
regularly in the Israel Corp.
books and were open to inspec-
tion."
JUDGE LOWENBERG noted
t^at these transfers were ef-
fected over a period of three
years, in open correspondence
between the two companies,
and they were reported to the
Israeli authorities and were
known to the corporation's
auditors.
Rosenbaum had no reason
to suspect, the Judge contin-
ued, that the transfers had
been made by Tzur acting alone
and without authorization.
The judgment may have re-
percussions too on the private
criminal prosecution which Is-
rael Corporation's chairman,
Baron Edmond de Rothschild
of Paris, has brought against
Rosenbaum in the Swiss courts.
THAT PROSECUTION is also
based on the $3.5 million. Ros-
enbaum's lawyers are certain
to argue that the Tel Aviv-
judgment clears their client of
criminal complicity in a con-
spiracy and to press, therefore,
to have the charges dropped.
ROTHSCHILD'S criminal ac-
tion against Rosenbaum is the
only criminal proceeding that
the ruined financier faces.
Israel on$5 a day
The fighting has stopped in the Mideast.
But not the suffering.
Especially if you're an elderly person in
poor health or a newly arrived immigrant
trying to take care of yourself and your
family in an economy ravaged by wars and
inflation. Where the only aid you can count
on for fdod, housing, clothing and medicine
totals about $5.75 a day. And that's all the
money you have in the world.
We must continue to help the people
of Israel with their human needs and their
commitment to make possible a decent
quality of life for every citizen. We must
house Russian immigrants and bring hope
to their elderly and build faith in the future
for their children.
Because we are one in spirit with the
people of Israel, their problems are indeed
our problems. And if you think all their
problems are solved, think again.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again.
&
We Are One.




Page 6'A
vJewistiFlcridlian
Friday, January 23, 197J
Real Meaning Behind Lebanon War
By LEO MINDLIN
Associate Editor
The Jewish Floridian
The civil war in Lebanon is
not a religious war between
Christian and Moslem, and
those who have been reporting
it that way have done, and con-
tinue to do, a disservice to the
public .understanding.
It is true that Moslems and
Christians are fighting one an-
other, but the reasons are more
demographic and, .ultimately,
political than they are religious.
. FOR A long time, Lebanon
was. a predominantly Christian,
essentially Roman Catholic,
country. In maintaining the re-
ligious balance between Chris-
tian and Moslem, major govern-
mental posts have been care-
fully divided up between the
two.
More recently, there has
. been a shift in majority toward
the Moslems, who are now in
the numerical ascendancy.
While the country's preeminent
financial position in the Middle
East (the Lebanese like to think
of themselves as the Switzer-
land of the Levant) has includ-
ed many Christians and Mos-
lems in its highest echelons,
the predominant faction in Le-
banon's fiscal success is Chris-
tian.
This has necessarily meant a
basic Lebanese identification
with the West. The new Mosr
lem ascendancy spells a politi-
cal shift toward the -East.' It
also spells sympathy with .the
so-called Third World revolu-
tionary movements. In the Mid-
dle East, this means the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization.
THAT IS why, from the out-
set. Lebanon has had such a
difficult time in taming the
PLO, unlike King Hussein's ex-
perience with the PLO in Jor-
dan, where conflicting political
ideologies did not long tear the
country apart.
King Hussein simply flushed
them out.
In Lebanon, there has been
the schizophrenia of having to
tolerate the PLO at the same
time that there was an official
awareness that the PLO is ded-
icated to more than the de-
struction of the Israeli Zionist
enemy. In Lebanon (as earlier
Jakobovits Replies to Criticism
in Jordan), the PLO was, and
remains, dedicated to the de-
struction of westward-leaning
Beirut.
In a choice between his king-
dom and a PLO-designed revo-
lution, Hussein saw only one
choice. Because of the peculiar
nature of Lebanon's population
constituency, the choice has
been a more difficult one.
WHILE THE PLO attracts
both Moslem and Christian,
roughly speaking, it is more
Moslem in makeup,:spirit and
determination than it is Chris-
tian.
There is more indigence
among the Moslems, more flam:
ing Arab feelings and. in the
end, a feeling that Lebanese
Christians are "outsiders," aliens
to the spirit of Mohammed and,
in contemporary terms, Third
World revolutionary ideals. For
many Lebanese Moslems, there
is little to choose betwet*
Christian Lebanese and Israeli
both of whom they lump int
the "oppressor" category.
Against this backdrop, rath*
than a view of the war as a r<
ligious war, it should be easi
to understand the entry of
Palestinian army into Lebanoi
on Tuesday advancing ahead a
the forces of invading Syria
units. Syria, with its predom
nant Ba'ath (leftist) party, j
about as revolutionary a m
litical body in power in thi
Middle East as can be foum
today.
. It is also against this back
drop that the danger of the cur
rent Middle East emergena
can be best understood.
IN ADDITION to destroyin
Lebanon, the PLO is bet
through the open support
Syria, on breaking up the Mi
die East .accoYd "between Egy]
and Israel, as well as on d
minishing even the slenderei
possibility of a "moderate" c
Continued on Page 14-A
LONDON (JTA) Chief
Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits'
office released a statement here
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, responding to allega-
tions by circles in Israel that
he had been duped by Soviet
propaganda during his nine-
day visit to the USSR last
month.
The statement, by Moshe
Davis, director of the Chief
Rabbi's office who accompanied
Jakobovits on his Soviet tour,
said in part:
"THE ALLEGATIONS of
naivete and superficiality are
absurd aud must .be considered
against the background of the
Chief Rabbi's wide experience
over many years in official
meetings and negotiations with
government figures in several
countries of the world.
"Dr. Jakobovits is known as
a person of acute and percep-
tive judgment and is the last
person I would have thought
could be accused of being
duped. Furthermore, many of
the statements attributed by
thoseiWho attack him are fact-
ually, (incorrect, or distorted.
-NWhat disturbs me ;mest
deeply is that the division of
opinion and its expression in
such intemperate terms sorely
damage the very cause we are
all seeking to promote by a,
variety of means."
JAKOBOVITS report that his |
trip to the Soviet Union gave
him cause to hope that the lot
of Jews there would be im-
proved and that the situation
of Soviet Jews "is more com-'
plex and the dimensions more
acute than one imagines" came
under bitter attack from lead-
ers of Soviet Jewish emigre
groups- in Israel.
The Chief Rabbi's assess-
ment of the situation in the
Soviet Union was also criticized
in Israeli official circles as be-
ing superficial" inasmuch as he
met only with middle echelon
Soviet officials.
'Napper Admits Anti-Semitism
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) An Italian
who organized-.>the kidnapping
of French businessman Louis
Hazan told police he acted out
of hatred of the head of the
"Phonogram" record company
because he was Jewish.
Ugo Brunini, 35, who was
arrested with four other men
after 53-year-old Casablanca-
born Hazan was found last
week gagged and bound in a
villa some 60 miles from Paris,
also admitted he was respon-
sible for a bomb attack made
against the offices of the Pho-
nogram company in October,
1975.
BRUNINI, now crippled as a
result of a spinal disease, was
reported to have said that he
disliked Hazan. He told police
that he knew _the head of the
"Phonogram" company was
Jewish.
"I was pleased to learn that
Hazan had been the victim of
a swindle an unidentified
person had managed to cash a
>bad check for almost $1 mil-
lion a .few months ago but
then I, grew,bitter when I.saw
that .-he had surmounted this
setback and that he was still
as wealthy as before. I had
then the, idea of the attack,"
Brunini was .quoted as saying
to police.
He said that he organized
the kidnapping to extort more
than S3 million from "Phono-
gram" and Kazan's family.
BRUNINTS motives appear-
ed somewhat different from
MizruchUHapoel Hamizrachi
of Greater Miami
Cordially invites you to attend
The Annual
Scholarship Dinner
Honoring
Mr. and Mrs, Charles Jacobs
Sunday evening* February Sth9 1976
ttt 6:30 o'clock
Guest Speaker:
Rabbi Louis Bernstein
National President of the Religious Zionists of America
Rubiat Room
Algiers Hotel
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Miami Beach, Florida
R.S.V.P.
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those of his accomplices who
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Year's Eve. said most of the,
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party.
Moschini, who allegedly told
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Friday, January 23, 1976
<
iii
re
is
10
fJewlstincrfcUar
Page 7-A
Prexy Hopefuls Talk on Israel
u :
n

h
yi
d
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i
By JOSEPH POLAKOfI?
WASHINGTON (JTA) Jimmy Carter and Fred
Harris, two of the candidates for the Democratic Party's
Presidential nomination, while expressing support for Is-
rael, differed en how the United States should approach
the Arab-Israeli conflict.
They expresed their views on NBC's "Meet the Press"
program. Two other candidates on the program, Sen. Birch
Bayh of Indiana and Pennsylvania Governor Milton Shapp,
were not questioned about the Middle East.
CARTER, a former governor
of Georgia, said he thought the
> United States shouM continue
with its r-rep-by-sten approach
to negotiations in the hope that
"Jordan, handi A'-nbra, and at
least Lebanon might come for-
ward to a negotiation with Is-
rael that would be fruitful."
But Harris, a former U.S.
Senator from Oklahoma, said
that an 'overall" Geneva con-
ference is now required. "We
have gone about as far as we
can in the step-by-stfep ap-
proach," Harris said.
"I tiiink we have pushed Is-
rael awfully far up to now with
very little in return, and it is
going to make the next steps
very tough."
Carter said that "an integral
part" to the "ultimate solution"
in the Middle East is "recog-
nition of the Palest:nians as an
entity with the right to have
, their own nation, to choose
their own government, to exist
in a territofy," neither on the
West nor East Bank of the Jor-
dan River.
BUT HE said the U.S. should
not recognize the Palestine Li-
beration Organization "until
they recognize the right of Is-
rael to exist in peace in their
present location."
While saying that Israel
might have to withdraw from
some of the territory occupied
since 1967, Carter conceded
that if he were Israel's Pre-
mier, he would not withdraw
from the Golan Heights or the
JtWish and Christian holy
places in Jerusalem.
Harris said that the U.S. can-
not impose a peace on the
Middle East and challenged the
incentives President Ford and
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger are using to get
agreements.
HE SAID the U.S. should be-
come financially involved in
regional development in the
Mideast rather than providing
arms and nuclear plants to the
Arabs.
He said it made no sense to
supply planes and tanks to Is-
rael and then talk about pro-
viding the Arabs with sophis-
ticated arms to knock them
out. He said he was not sug-
gesting that the U.S. should
stop supplying arms to Israel
but he said they should stop
providing them to the Arabs.
Terrorists Killed
In Gun Battle
TEL AVIV (JTA) Four
terrorist infiltrators were kill-
ed in a brief gun battle with
Israeli forces near the Leba-
nese border last week. The in-
cident, which occurred shortly
after 8 p.m., was part of an
upsurge of terrorist activity
that included a Katyusha rock-
et attack on the Safad area.
There were no Israeli casual-
ties in either instance.
The entire border region
was alerted for possible terror-
ist assaults timed to coincide
with the opening of the Se-
curity Councils Middle East
debate. Extra precautionary
measures were also instituted
at Ben Gurion Airport.
THE SLAIN terrorist-?, who
were first spotted -by an Israel
patrol near Margalioth settle-
ment in Upper Galilee, were
carrying papers that identified
them as members of an extre-
mist gang that takes an even
harder line against Israel than
the PLO.
They were described by se-
curity sources as three young
men and one somewhat older.
They were carrying arms, ex-
plosives, ammunition, knives
and axes and their mission ap-
parently was to occupy a house
and seize hostages, the sources
said.
The rocket attack in the Sa-
fad area may have been an at-
tempt to divert attention from
the would be saboteurs, se-
curity officials believe. The
rocket attack knocked out some
electric power linos causing a
one-hour black-out in Safad
and vicinity until the lines ivere
repaired.
Israel Criticized for Shunning Palestinians
AMSTERDAM (JTA) A
Dutch-borrt Israeli and a pro-
Israel member of The Nether-
lands Parliament have both
criticized Israel for its ada-
mant stand against recognition
of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization.
Willem Aantjes, Parliamen-
%
Israeli Forces
In New Pullback
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli forces withdrew
without incident from a desert salient in Sinai at the
northern end of the Gulf of Suez. The area, which
consists of sand dunes and contains no military instal-
lations, is the first that will be handed back to Egyp-
tian military forces under the Israeli-Egyptian interim
accord signed in September.
Egyptian military units are expected to enter the
evacuated zone 48 hours after the Israeli departure.
The Ras Sudar and Abu Rodeis oilfields and the coastal
strip linking them were handed over to Egyptian civil-
ian administration several weeks age. The newt Tsradli
withdrawal under terms of the interim agreement will
be canied-out in 13 days when Israeli forces pull out
of the Balooza area in northern Sinai:
THE ORTHODOX RABBINICAL COUNCIL
OF GREATER MIAMI
RABBI MORDFIAI SHAPIRO, President
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tary chairman of the Dutch
Calvanist Party (ARP), said in
a radio interview here that Is-
rael was "unwise" in saying j
that it would never talk to the
PLO and by unconditionally
refusing to participate in the
Security Council's Middle East
debate.
YAAKOV Arnon, former di- j
rector general of the Israel Fi-!
nance Ministry and a founder
of the recently formed Israel i
Palestine Committee, criticized I
Israel on a television interview
for being unwilling to recog-
nize the PLO because of past
acts of terrorism committed by
it.
Arnon recalled that many
states established during the
past 25 years had started as
terrorist movements and as-
serted that the national aspira-
tions of the Palestinians should
be recognized as well as the
same Jewish aspirations.
Before settling in Israel,
Arnon was chairman of the
Netherlands Zionist Organiza-
tions. The Israel Palestine*Com-
mittee is' composed of Israeli
public figures and others who
maintain that- Israel should
agree to negotiate with any
Arab group that recognizes, it,
including the PLO.
AANTJES, a well-known sup-
porter of Israel, said the Is-
rael government's refusal to
have any dealings with the
PLO "isolates Israel even more
which is the last thing we
would want to happen." He
said Israel should express will-
ingness to negotiate with the
PLO on condition that the lat-
ter recognizes Israel's right to
exist as a state within secure,
recognized borders and that
the PLO officially abandons all
acts of terrorism against Israel
and its official position that the
Jewish State must be elimin-
ated.
The TV program on which
Arnon appeared included an
interview with Mayor Hay Ma-
zuz of Nablus who accused Is-
rael of taking all fertile lands
from the Arabs, leaving "hem
only barren hills.
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i
Page 8-A
fjewistfhridiar
Friday, January 23, 1976
No Bias in Women's Group
Continued from Page 1-A
ference in Mexico City.
Several women told Abzu? that they had
found anti-Semitic and anti-Zionist ideology
expressed at local feminist meetings. They
charged that Judaism was being blamed for
oppressing women.
"I have never seen or heard what you
described." Abzug replied, noting that she has
a strong consciousness both as a woman and
a Jew and would recognize any anti-Semitic
trend.
She said there are probably anti-Semites in
the women's movement just as there is in so-
ciety as a whole, but stressed that the move-
ment's leaders such as Karen DeCrow, presi-
dent of the National Organization of Women,
have strongly condemned the anti-Zionist moves
by the United Nations General Assembly.
FA YE SCHENK, president of the AZF, said
if the women who raised the question found
an anti-Semitic trend in local organizations, it
was up to them to oppose it personally on the
local level. Rachel Jacobs, executive director
of the Americans for Progressive Israel, said
it is her experience that it is usually Jewish
women who, at local feminist groups, reject
their Jewish background.
She urged the women to "examine your-
selves and see why your sister or daughter"
rejects being a Jew.
ILS. to Reduce
Aid to W Voters
We'll Nix Word Changes-Rabin
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin said
here that Israel has a peace
plan, that it recognizes that a
Palestinian problem exists but
that it is not the heart of the
Middle East conflict and that
the interim accord Israel sign-
ed with Egypt last Sept. 1 con-
tains great hopes for peace and
might be the real beginning
of peace.
Addressing the Israel Bond
Organization convention here,
Rabin, who will visit Washing-
ton at the end of the month,
said he hoped the U.S. would
stan:! by its commitment to
Israel to block any attempts to
change Security Council Reso-
luti'-ns 242 and 333 d-uing the
Council's present debate on
the Middle East.
ANY CHANCES, he warned.
would crcntc political cha-s
in the Middle East and in the
entire world and their effects
would bo felt in this region not
in terms of years but within
the next few months.
Rabin said that if Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat was
quoted correctly, his reported
remark in Cairo today that
Egypt would not raise an is-
sue if the Palestine Liberation
Organization is not represented
at the Geneva conference, was
a stand that resulted from
Egypt's interim agreement with
Israel. He said Arab extremists
feared that agreement because
of its implications for a peace-
ful settlement.
Rabin, briefly outlining Is-
raels policy, said Israel clear-
ly rejected the recent testi-
mony before a Congressional
committee by Assistant Secre-
tary of State for Near Eastern
Affairs Harold Saunders that
the Palestinian issue was the
core of the Middle East prob-
lem.
The heart of the conflict is
the lack of readiness on the
Arabs' part to reconcile them-
selves to the existence of the
Ftate of Israel, Rabin said. Un-
til they cross that Rubicon, the
conflict will continue.
HE SAID that the answer to
the question, does Israel have
an overall peace plan, was yes,
but peace had to be preceded
by reconciliation. Israel is
ready for territorial conces-
sions in retain for real peace.
Rabin said.
Another question, the Pre-
mir continued, is what is Is-
rael's solution to the Palestin-
ian problem? Although that is
not at the hea'1 of the conflict
Israel recognizes that it i-; a
p 'oblem that must be solved.
It should be solved in the
content of negotiations with
Jordan and possibly with the
participation of Palestinians on
the West Bank, Rabin said.
HE SAID that what Israel
e pected of Jewish communi-
ties throughout the world was
that they do whatever has to
b-^ done in support of Israel. Ii
they do "we can withstand and
overcome this Arab offensive,"
the Premier said.
The more than 250 Bond
leaders from the U.S. and Ca-
nada arrived here yesterday'
for the convention. On their
arrival, Rabin issued a state-
ment dec.iaiing that the "Is-
rael Bond Organization has
been a source of increasing
importance in every phase of
our economic development dur-
ing the past 26 years."


Jews Cancel 2*000
Reservations in Top
Hotels of Brazil
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) Said Farhart, the
president of the government tourist organization, has
confirmed that some 2,000 American Jews have can-
celled their reservations in the five star hotels here as
a protest against Brazil's vote in the UN General As-
sembly for the resolution equating Zionism with racism.
Thomas Mendelsohn, manager of Rio's Sheraton
Hotel, said three American travel agencies cancelled
more than 600 reservations during the Christmas-New
Year's holiday and some 800 reservations for 1977.
MORE THAN 500 reservations were cancelled at
Rio's Intercontinental Hotel, it was reported.
Sen. Jacob K. Javits (R., NY.), who ended his
three-day visit to Brazil, described the cancellations
as "individuals' reactions" and not an organized boycott.
The anti-Zionist vote by Brazil and the tourist
cancellations were reportedly discussed at meetings
between Javits and Gen. Golbery do Couto e Silva,
chief of President Ernesto Geisel's civil cabinet, and
Foreign Minister Azeredo da Silveira.
He emphasized that the
"seriousness of our economic
problems at the present time"
required an "expansion of its
activities to the greatest pos-
sible degree this year."
Continued from Page 1-A
ports. Kissinger has already de-
cided to defer assistance to Tan-
zania because of its vote in the
UN General Assembly to oppose
the Ford Administration's posi-
tion on Korea and because it
voted for the Anti-Zionist reso-
lution.
ON THE other hand, coun-
tries such as Malawi and the
Ivory Coast, which have backed
U.S. positions in the UN, are
understood to be given addition-
al assistance. Votes in the UN
which went contrary to U.S.
interests concerned Korea, the
call of independence for Puerto
Rico, the demand for removal
of American bases in Guam and
Zionism.
When a reporter asVed Fun-
BSth whether the anti-Zionist
resolution could be considered
?n action aev.nst U.S. interest,
Funseth renlied. "Our attitude
was made clear on this resolu-
tion" and. he added, regarding
very
the vote, "we regret i
much."
In relation to attitudes in Con-
gress, the House International
Relations Committee last month
asked President Ford to provide
a report in 90 days that would
justify assistance to those coun-
tries which favored the anti-
Zionist resolution. Funseth said
he was unaware whether that
report has been completed.
THE RETURN of Congress
last Sunday from its year-end
recess was expected to bring
about a clarification of the Ad-
ministration's position on the
aspects of aiding countries con-
sistently in opposition to the
U.">
The foreign aid programs
have yet to run the gauntlet of
both authorization and appro-
priation legislation. In this pro-
cess, specific policy is expected
to be formulated by the Admin-
istration for Congressional ap-
proval.
Leon Uris To Be Honored
At Sisterhood Soiree
L>on Uris, author of "Battle
Cry," "Exodus," "Mila 18" and
many other best-sellers, will be
the sucst of honor at the Shades
of Tiffany Soiree suppor and
dance on Simdav. Jan. 25. at 8
p.m. in the Mural Room of Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
The event is scheduled for
the end of the first day of the
Temnl Emanu-El Antique Show
and Sale sponsored by the Sis-
frhood of Te-^nle Emanu-El.
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Friday, January 23, 1976
+Jewlsti fhyrkJkiii
Page 9-A
DISPLAY INDIFFERENCE TO THEIR HERITAGE
Jewish Cultural 'Giants' Ignorant of Jewishness

By JACK SIEGEL
WITH MURRAY ZUCKOFF
NEW YORK f.TTA) When
the JTA editor discussed with
me coverage of the Jewish Wel-
fare Board's first night's session
of its Conference on Jewish Cul-
tural Arts, we also discussed
how best to handle the session
since its panelists were not
normally associated with Jew-
ish affairs.
We tried for a separate inter-
view but it didn't work. How-
ever, it being a subject of in-
tense interest and concern to
the Jewish community. I was
sent by the editor to the first
night's panel and found the au-
ditorium of the Ninety-Second
Street "Y" pretty well filled.
DORE SCHARY. who chaired
the evening and helped organize
the conference, does have a rec-
ord of identification with Jew-
ish causes. However, the others,
Prof. Richard Oilman, professor
of Drama at Yale; Alfred Kazin,
author and professor of Eng'ish
at Hunter; Arthur Miller, Pulit-
zer Prize-winning playwright
and author of "Death of a Sales-
man," and Barbara Tuchman.
historian and also Pulitzer Prize-
winner, all do not.
However, what we anticipated
was that the first session would
come a cropper.
To start with. Cilman rrad a
pa^er which seamed like s
s^-ies of op"-'iT'v:~. -mil invoke*
vr.'M reference tn Hadassah
apj Commentary. He said Jew-
ish cultural experience "is
there." I i' Mitt Thorn. I s'_">-
p* and what has to ','
c".i';ibed?
HE REFERRED to the ''.-
t: itv of Jews :.T1 "v!"v '
\ nl arts. ide"tifid the*^ "-
"pnn" art. He als^ s?id the Tew-
i--. artist and intellectual ij
ivntified virh a "bourffeois
st-^'cture but at the sa-^e tf-n
ir;ected a "supernatural" ete-
rr^nt, which Rave his point of
View a pif'md:t" his annroich
iirfortunatel. and with otW-
vvi-e best intentions, did not
have.
Failed to S'prvfv Depth
Kazin, who said he was "proud
of religious rig**." seemed to
identify his Jewishness with his
immigrant parents who came
f>om Russia. It does not signifv
de-th in the conference subject
to know that the Puritan fore- j
fa'hers came armed with an
awareness of Hebrew, or that
th candle-sticks in the Touro |
Svnagogue were made in Paul j
Revere's shop.
KAZIN, who probably receiv-
ed an extra-curricular educa-
tion in the alcoves of the lunch-
room in Citv College in the,
thirties (as did I), should ner- f
bans know that minting Mark
Twain about the Jews, or Emer-1
snn or Thoreau about some re- |
lated con lition. 1 -aves a more |
identified Jew with the feel n |
t^t external auotes do not a |
Jew make. It's like women say-
ir.s men cannot write of their
feelings and problems, or Blacks
sa'ing the same of whites.
Nowhere in t^is oaper lid
Kazin refer to having been Bar
Mitzvah. While thnt rite of a-
sage is not the sum total of
Jewishness, it is a good base
and acquaints a voung Jew with
some of its heritage.
Kazin spoke of the Jewish
artist's capacitv to create
dreams, as in Hollvwood. and it
was difficult to tell whether he j
thought this a creative force..
When he ended his statement
with an expression that there
was a moral confusion among
Jews, he seemed to be project-
ing his own condition.
MILLER made several per-
sonal references about hav-
ing lived in the same neighbor-
hood of the "Y" (Harlem?)
and as a young boy thought,
since everybody in the neigh-
borhood was Jewish, that the
same applied elsewhere. He in-
voked his own theatrical dis-
cipline as to what was Jewish,
but that, too, was anecdotal.
However, touched by the Ger-
man experience, about which h?
wrote in "Incident at Vichy," ha
asked Heinrich Boll. German
Nobel Laureate in Literature,
how the absence of Jews in Ger-
many affects its creativity. Boll
renli"d thnt what was missing
was the "pursuit of the final
truth."
This, of course, is a literary
concept and could be applied to
almost anv oeoole. but Mi'.W
precoursed it with his own feel-
ing that, in Jewish culture. thrp
is "danger" around us and that
"the last days are here." So""-
how. too, he equated this with
a search for power. What power,
Jewish power?
MRS. TUCHMAN was a whoh
lot gentler with the subtect and
as an h'storian could find no
Jewish culture in the United
Ptat"* h-fnro 1<<0.
Although she made reference
to I<5 ael and the Holocaust, she
confessed to an uncertainty
about being able to define Jew-
ish culture and said it had a
definite relation to the general
culture in which it variously or
individually resided.
Schary said written questions
would be entertained after the
intermission and that was when
the cropper came. The question
vv'iich uns^t the g;ntle pursuit
of Jewish culture was: How can
you organize a Conference on
Tswlsh Culture with people who
know so little about it?
SCHARY defined the Question
as rude but had sufficient pres-
ence of minJ to advise the asker
th->t this was the first session
and that the remainder of the
conference includd people
"" closely identified with the
Jewish scene. He said there was
a balance and it was yet to come.
Mrs. Tuchman asked to an-
swer the question, but it didn't
quite come off. She realized it
and asked the questioner to
come forward and explain what
she/he meant by Jewish culture.
P"t the asker remained anonym-
ous.
WHILE my editor and I had
not anticipated this precisely,
we did feel that this distinguish-
ed group might be somewhat
distant from the subject. And
we sought a clue, a key on how
to resolve this, with a view to
having such distinguished think-
ers and creators involved in
Jewish affairs.
We came up with the word,
"Yiddishkeit." While there was
no mention made of Babel, Bu-
ber, Isaac Bashevis Singer or
Achad Haam, there was talk of
Philip Roth from Miller and
Saul Bellow from Kazin.
A young friend of mine, who
is not Jewish but inclines with
interest in its culture, insisted
on attending. Later, I asked,
"Do you know Miller's 'Death
of a Salesman'?" The reply was,
"Know it? I lived it."
WE IN our hearts knew that
the protagonist of the play,
Willy Loman, was a landsman
and everybody else's father or
uncle, because there is in Miller
a kind of "Yiddishkeit" which
found expression in that play,
a compassion for the inhuman
condition of man and sympathy
fo- th wife who sa^s "Atten-
tion .Must Be Paid."
"Yiddishkeit" is in Miller as
accumulated phenomena, in the
same way Einstein (whom they
forgot to mention) could not
have created his equation with-
out Newton; Newton, his gravity
notion without Galileo; and
Galileo without Ptolemy. Jew-
ish culture is historical, it is
religious, it is writtenand like
a pyramid comes to rest in the
present.
Jt has no roots in the Amer-
ican experience but has contrib-
uted to it. It is not a series of
one-l'ners but a whole com-
pendium which has to be exam-
ined and re-examined as the
Jews in the past did because
they wanted to survive and pass
that survival on.
IT IS also a prescient force
which anticipates doom and be-
cause we have been the first
victims in history.
We are veterans of this his-
toric struggle and can give to
the American bicentennial, to
the American civilization which
Kazin teaches, not only its par-
ticularity but its universality.
But first, we have to relearn it
ourselves and begin with .
0nesis.
Miami Beach on$5aday.
'- *
While most people have been complaining
that it now costs a fortune to serve meat
at dinner three times a week, some of our
less fortunate elderly people consider
themselves lucky to eat anything for dinner
three times a week.
That's how bad it's become. Inflation
has destroyed the purchasing power of
people trying to squeeze out enough for
medicine, rent, food and clothing on
Supplemental Social Security Income of
about $5.26 a day.
Trying to live on that amount of money
canbreak your heart. And your spirit. And
even your will to live.
For some of us, it's a matter of inflation.
For others, it's a matter of survival.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If vou think all of our problems are solved, think again*
TV
We Are One.



.....' p. .

I

' .
Federally-Financed Program Averts Delinquency Among Hassidic Kids

A FEDERALLY-FUNDED project to provide coun-
seling and treatment to problem children of
Hasidic and ultra-Orthodox families to prevent them
from becoming juvenile delinquents has been func-
tioning since the start of November in Brooklyn's
Boro Park section, which has New York City's heav-
iest concentration of Orthodox Jews.
The project is part of a program of service to
the Orthodox community carried on by Jewish Par-
ents United, a member agency of the Council of
Jewish Organizations of Boro Park.
IT OPERVTES on a one-year grant of $250,000
f>-n'vi the federal Pafe Streets Act. funnebd to the
JPU through New York State and the Mayor's Crim-
inal Justice Coordinating Council, according to Rabbi
Burton Jaffa. JPU director.
HE SAID JPU has a staff of four part-time psy-
chologists, as well as full-time social workers and
counselors, ail Orthodox Jews.
He said the current caseload of the organization


V- Jttki
vtj
" IB?
A
B^v_': ^;
is 90 children, with a ratio of about seven boys to
three girls. The JUF office is in operation from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, closing early on Fridays,
and is closed on Sundays.
Rabbi Jaffa said that until the project was started
last Nov. 5, parents of such children had nowhere
to go for help because they refused to go to a non-
Orthodox Jewish facility.
HE ADDED that the JPU policy is to work with
children and thus obtain the trust of the parents,
many of whom are initially hostile either because
they fear the problems of their children will be-
come known in the community, or because they re-
fuse to believe there is anything wrong with their
children.
The children are usually referred for treatment
by principals of yeshivas they attend. In situations
where parents, on being called for permission for
JPU professionals to see their children, refuse such
permission, the JPU turns to the rebbe of the sect
to which the parents belong, who orders parental
compliance.
In the Hasidic community, this is sufficient,
Rabbi Jaffa said. Among Orthodox families, the rabbi
of the congregation to which the parents belong is
called in for assistance.
HE SAID the children exhibit the whole range
of problems afflicting American children generally
educational, emotional, and family relations. They
include children with learning disabilities. One proj-
ect is the testing of 100 Boro Park children to locate
such functional disabilities.
...,........... >

Herzl Canal
Problem Solved
Haifa
-pECHNOLOGICALLY feasible. Economically worthwhile. Sub-
ject only to political considerations. Such is a summation
>{ the verdict of a committee of experts which for more than
a year has Studied the rs^ibilit> of channeling water from the
Mediterranean to the Dead Sea, and utilizing the difference in
level to generate electric power.
The committee was appointed by the Government of Israel
in March. 1974, ;>nd for some reason its findings have been
given little publicity.
THE TOPOGRAPHICAL facts are simple. In the 34- miles
mm the Mediterranean to the Dead Sea there is a drop of
j 400 mete'-s some 1.200 feet. Bv way of comparison, the Nia:
Lgara River carries water from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario for
a descent of about 326 feet in 36 miles.
The idea is not new. It was first proposed by Theodor Herzl
f n his book. "Altnculnnd," and if the waterway should ever be
5 Ouilt.it should obviously bear his name. The proposal was treated
.seriously and scientifically 37 ytttrn later by Prof.'Walter C."
owdarmilk, as part ol his plan for a JVA Jordan Valley
minority.
In the four decodes that followed Israel arid AriieHcan en-
:':ineers have further studied the plan, and the report recently
irubibitted goes into the matter thoroughly.
BASIC' FACTS: There is plenty of water in the source, the
, Tvledtterranean. How ea<:ilv can it be moved from th*re to the
Dead Sea? Arid what would happen to the Dead Sea were it to
r receive large amounts of water?- The latter question was not
jkciiffieult to answer. Much of the water would be lost by evapora-
tion.
g- The face of the D?ad Sea is shrinking in any-event. By
^controlled intake, the level of the Dead Sen would be raised
*by onlv about four meters, and this would do little harm to
ffthe fcvistfr* notnsh plant and other facilities along-the shores.
The latest proposal is for a pipe line from a point some-
u'vhere between Ashkelon and Ashdod. The pipe wonld enter -a :
flannel under the Judcan mountains and emerge not far from"'
Lin'Gedcii; Estimated cost of the whole project, including con-
ihtruction of the hydro-electric plant, would be a minimum
Jof S2O0.000.0O0 a figure which does not sound fantastic in :
,-".ie* davs of jstronomical budgets.
I THE ECONOMICS of the plan would be dictated by the
alternatives. Will the world price of oil go up? Indeed, will '
' oil always be available to Israel? Present estimates are for a
3004ne$frW8rt P'*nt going up to a peak capacity of 600 mega-
* watts. Side benefits were considered. Conventional nuclear po-
twer plants require much water to cool their process, and hence
';iicy must be located in areas along the sea. which are thickly
ft-opulated. The ecological dangers are obvious.
The proposed pipe line water could be made available en
| out*, and before their final drop, for use in nuclear plants,
I.-.nd thus enable sitinc of such plants far out in the Wilderness.
a t/ttf from population centers.
, From an engineering point of view there are few problems.
What seemed visionary even in Lowdermilk's day is today per-'
Jtfectlv feasible, with new machinery and methods.
THE MAJOR problem remains political. Under interna-
Iunal law the plan would require approval of Jordan which
borders on the Dead Sea. The final thought of -the committee
centers on that point. Despite all the other favorable consid-
IIi rations if*.Jordan will not approve, and if we will hot bej
Able to withstand international pressures, then perhaps there
a- no point in our even beginning.-
What was imsaid was perhaps obvious- The enormous bene-
*f;t to both Jordan and Israel if we could reach agreement on
liiis undertaking.
Friday, January 23, 1976 vJeiwistifkirMktr Page 10-A
, *
'
<-J~lerbert
JZuft
To Be Or Not To Be'
Stars Brooks, Bancroft
Hollywood
|i-fEL FRANK will co-produce, write and direct
the musical remake of the Ernst Lubitsch
World War II screen comedy, "To Be or Not
to Be," with Mel Brooks and his wife, Anne
Bancroft, recreating the roles of a Polish stage
"Hamlet" and his actress-spouse, originally
portrayed by the late Jack Benny and Carole
Lombard, with Felix Bressart then contribut-
ing the character of an old Jewish performer
caught in Warsaw when the city is overrun by
the German military might.
"When Ernst Lubitsch asked me to play the
Polish Shakespearean actor," Jack once reveal-
ed to Louella Parsons, "I was afraid that he
needed a young, handsome leading man. Ernst
said he had written it with me in mind and
naturally I was flattered to do a picture with
the famed director and Carole Lombard."
THE SHAKESPEAREAN troupe, in the '
original version, becomes involved with the Pol-
ish underground and they wind iip impersonat-
ing Nazi officers, Jack being made a "fake"
colonel.
Irving A. Fein, in his intimate Jack Benny
biography (Putnam's, 1976), relates that Meyer
Kubelsky, Jack's father an Orthodox Jew
from Russia objected to the picture, refusing
to speak to his son because he had seen him
in a Na/i uniform.
It took Benny a great deal of persuasion
to convince his father that he was only play-
acting and actually on the screen fighting
against the Nazis.
"THE H1NDENBURG," now on the theater
screen throughout the country, deals with the
air disaster of the last dirigible a catas-
trophe foreshadowing a much larger tragedy.
Hitler's onslaught on Europe that was to cause
casualties a million times the number of 35
men devoured by nature at Lakehurst, NJ.,
on May 6, 1937.
The book by Michael M. Mooney and the
scenario extend the factual account of the
blow-up into the speculative sphere of sabo-
tage, though there are no records ol a bomb
plot.
Wmm* Strangers,"
Two Otter Important Novels
Vnoff
^A W0RLD Fn!! of Strangers," by Cynthia
Freeman (Arbor House, $8.95), is a go-
thic novel in the meM of "The Pedtocks": the
trials and tribulations of a family "in search
of itself and the American dream." That means
that David Rezinetsky -leaves the Lower East
Side to try and "make it" in the neurotic, de-
pressed and anti-Semitic America of the 1930s.
In order to achieve social and finacial sta-
tus, he changes his name to Reid, abandons '
his family and denies his birthright. Freeman
chronicles 450 pages of David's rise to powei
and his ultimate denouement.
THE NOVEL is long and drawn out, and
I would prefer to recommend this genre to
gothic fans. However, the author presents a
valid and unfortunate consequence of assimi-
lation in America, admirably concluding with
a strong moral commitment to Judaism .
There has been little -publicity about Hans
Herlin'-s novel, "Commemorations" (St. Mar-
tin's Press, $8.95). Perhaps1 this is because the
book is a translation-from the German. Trans-
lations do not generally do wtfl in the United
States. That's too bad.
Herllrt n&s sttfllfu'lly wO'-.'IV the threads of
a spy-thriller, a oOfmplicated love story and -a
classic manhunt into an exciting pattern of
intrigue and psychological drama.
THE NOVEL begins with Hans Pikola,
photographer par excellence, entering a bank
vault to pick up a quarter of a million dollars
and a gun. From this point, the reader is led
back into Pikola's life and mind to the unusual
relationships with his daughter (is she his
daughter?); a multi-millionaire industrialist (is
he a Nazi war criminal?); an infamous S.S.
doctor (is he really dead?), and himself (will
he take the money and become a killer?).
"Commemorations" succeeds precisely be-
cause it approaches the reader on many levels.
It invites us to probe our own feelings, not
just those of characters we read about .
One of my favorite authors is Giorgio
Bassani of "The Garden of the Finzi-Continis"
fame. A recent Bassani novel, "Behind the
Door." is the beautiful story of an Italian Jew-
ish boy encountering and dealing with anti-
Semitism among his peers.
NOW HIS latest collection of stories, "The
Smell of Hay" (Harcourt, $7.95), also takes
place in Bassani's hometown of Ferrara dur-
ing the 1930s and 1940s of Fascist Italy. He
yaniiy evokes memories of days gone by, and
painfully preserves the horror of Jews dis-
owned by their country and their fellowman.
Bassani's style and themes are often com-
pared to those of Thomas Mann, especially in
the revised newly translated novella, "The
Gold-rimmed -Glasses."
THIS IS a tender yet powerful story of a
respected physician humiliated and victimized
for his homosexuality and Jewishness.
The author clearly parallels the impact of
this individual's expulsion from his commu-
nity with the brutality of the Fascist govern-
ment upon Italian Jewry. ,,:.;.- /.-.J-.
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' 41


Friday, January 23, 1976
*Jtwi$ttfk)rktiar)
Page 11-A
DON WRIGHT in Miami News
Report Sheikh Yamani is Jew
TEL AVIVThe highly-pub-
licized Minister for P-troleum
of Saudi Arabia, Ahmed Zaki el
Yamani, has a mother, a broth-
er and a sister living in Israel
in a suburb of Rehovoth. The
family, which comes from Saudi
Arabia, arrived in Israel via
Yemen some 25 years ago.
Yamani's brother explained
that Ahmed Zaki el Yamani's
real name is Yechieh Zecha-
riah. He said that when his
brother was 16 years old, he
caught the eye of the royal
court, and after converting to
the Moslem faith joined King
Faisal's retinue.
i He later became a sheikh
and is. oi course, now the Min-
solidarity of World Jewry with
the Zionist undertaking."
-'At this time when Zionism
has become the target of the
venomous attacks of our ene-
mies, it is good to recall the
work of the JNF which turns
dry plains into flourishing
faims," said the President.
sary year opened festively here
at the Jerusahm Theatre with
the participation of the Presi-
dent of Israel, Bphraim Katzir,
chairman of the Keren Kej e-
meth; Jacob Tsui, president of
istcr for Petroleum with an .tfie~J#F--of--America; -JV.--Mu-
enormous influence in the Arab
world. Yamani was one of the
OPEC bigwigs who were taken
as hostages by Arab terrorists
in Vienna.
ft .ft ft
JNFs 7Sth YEAR
JERUSALEM The Jewish
National Fund's 75th anniver-
ricc Sage. cabin,:t ministers,
members of the Knesset and the
Zionist Executive.
Katzir said in his greeting
that the occasion was a land-
mark in the renascence of 4he
Jewish people in their land and
"a practical expression of the
JOIN OUR GROUPS AND"$AVE!
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escorted by Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Delray Fall Leisure Tour-Kings Point,
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Pines, Inverrary
March 29
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Seven Israelis on Trial
PARIS Seven Israelis, in-
cluding a former commando.
Shimon Rimon, went on trial
in a Frankfurt court last week
on charges of heroin-smuggling
and distribution in West Ger-
many. Only six Israelis are in
C(Ult.
A seventh, g:mg leader Yostf
Amiel, escaped. ThcY_fa.ce ten-
year sentences.
The prosecution charged the
seven smuggled several kilo-
grams of heroin and sold it
mainly to American soldiers,
but also to other Israelis. Four
of the seven, including a wom-
an. Mrs. Jacqueline Hosmy, are
self-confessed drug addicts.
The case hit the front pages
of the German press because
of Rimon's presence among the
defendants. Rimon, known in
Israel as "Kushi," is a former
member of Israel's renowned
Commando Unit 101 and a leg-
endary figure in military cir-
cles. The German press head-
lined some of their reports "Is-
raeli War Hero Charged With
Drug Smuggling."
ft & #
Mizrachi Women Abroad
NEW YORK Three noted
American Mizrachi Women
leaders are in Israel to attend
special dedication ceremonies
of the new AMW Wolf and Julia
Eisenberg Comprehensive High
School in North Tel Aviv.
The three are Mrs. Sarah
Shane, national president of j
AMW, and a resident of Balti-1
more;. Mrs. Ruth Jacobson, hon- i
orary president, of New York |
City; and Mrs. Evelyn Schrei-
ber, honorary president, a resi-
dent of Lawrence, N.Y.
ft ft T>
Jewish Families Have 'Address'
CARLISLE, PA. The 30
.Jewish families of Carlisle,!
home of Dickinson College, now'
have "Jewish address" in this
college town the B'nai B'rith
Hillel facility which has erolv-.
ed as their synagogue, Talmud I
Torah and community center.
In the past. Carlisle Jews had j i
to travel to Harrisburg for the I
nearest Jewish institution. Now! I
they join with Jewish college
students for Sabbath and holi-
day sen-ices, adult study
course, lectures and socials on
the college campus.
Some 20 Jewish students at-
tend Dickinson and Dickinson
law school.
The 390-year-old college town
recently hafl its first Bar Mitz-
vah, the rite being conducted
at a Hillel sen ice, according
to Prof. Stanley Rosenbaum,
the Hillel coumHor.
ft ft ft
Prots React to UN
NEW YORK Sixty-seven
. faculty members of the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in New York.
Cincinnati, and Los Angeles,
have expressed their "revul-
sion" at the UN anti-Zionist
resolution and declared that Is-
rael "cannot be asked to pur-
chase peace at the price of
s licidc."
Professors of Reform Ju-
daism's institution of higher
learning issued the statement
saying:
"Zionism, in its broadest
sense, is ttlff" affiilnation that
the State.' of Israel has a right
to exist and prosper. It asserts
that Israel's population deserv-
es the support of every fair-
minded person against- those
who would destroy it, thereby
exposing the Jewish people to
the prospect of a second holo-
caust within a single genera-
tion.
'.'Zion's-n as we conceive it
looks forward to a peaceful
resolution of the Complex prob-
lems in the Middle East and
the realization of justice for
Jew and Arab alike. Rut Israel
cannot be asked to purchase
peace at the price of suicide."
ft
Astrologers Make Predictions
TEL AVIV One of Israel's
leading astrologers is predicting
that in 1976 President Ford will
have a tough struggle in the
presidential race against DQ"io-
cratic opponent Sargent Shriv-
er and that} Secretary of Stat;
Henry Kissinger will resign in
the middle of the year.
The 37-year-old astrologe
Han Pecker, did not venture t >
predict who will emerge as wii
ner in the U.S. president ii
sweepstakes. Pecker further
predicts that the fighting in An-
gola will destroy Soviet-Ame -
ican detente and that Egypt
will have enormous domestic
problems that could result in
President Sadat's resignation
In December, 1972, Pecker had
predicted that the year 19?.>
would be Israel's most fateful
year since 1948.
A Cairo astrologer predicts
that before the end of 197o.
iKith President Ford and Kis-
singer will have left their post?.
The 72-year-old Egyptian, Hus-
sein el Shaami, has to his crec-
it an accurate forecast of two
key events in recent Egyptia.i
.'history the death of Presi-
dent Nasser and the Octobe r
1973. war with Israel. His "pro-
phecies" are published in thfl
newspaper, Al Gamorhia.
UAHC 'Teach-In'
NEW YORK A massi 2
"teach-in" designed to inform
Jews. Christians and civic lead-
ers on Zionism. Judaism, the
Palestinians and related ques-
tions will be conducted by tl ?
Union of American Hebrc
Congregations in 12 cities be*
ginning Sunday.
The information program, ac-
cording to Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler, president of the 715-
member synagogue body in t i
U.S. and Canada, has been in-
troduced to meet the growing
concern after the UN's air -
Zionist resolution and the fj-
ture prosDects for peace in t
Middle East. I
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reiberI


Page 14-A
fJewist fhridttaun
Friday, January 23, 1976
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lev
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Meaning Behind
Lebanon's War
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL MOTKE
LEGAL MOTKE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-1120
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
Continued from Page 6-A
rection in the current Middle
East debate at the United Na-
tions.
For one thing, Israel has al-
ready declared, despite U.S.
warnings to keep hands off,
that it would take "defensive
measures" if Syrian forces en-
ter Lebanon.
As of midweek, all Tel Aviv
military sources reported was
that "We can confirm that a
limited number of PLO army
men have entered Lebanon
during the last few days, and
that they are not taking part in
the fighting as yet." But a sense
of urgent expectancy was al-
ready in the air.
MEANWHILE, as of midweek.
U.S. Ambassador to the UN
Daniel P. Moynihan spoke in
defense of Res. 242 and 338 as
it now stands. "We can not es-
cape the reality of the situation
that when all parties have
agreed to a framework, all of
them must agree to changes in
that framework," he said.
Moynihan added: "Changes
imposed on the parties and un-
acceptable to any one of them,
however great the goodwill,
will not work." He meant Is-
rael's warning that changes in
the UN resolutions' wording
from references to the Arab re-
fugee "problem" to national
Palestinian "rights" would in-
stitute possible Israeli boycott
of future Geneva negotiations
and further stalemate.
It is to counter the unlikely
eventuality that Moynihan may
have some success in his argu-
ment at the UN that the PLO
and Syria are moving in Leba-
non.
OF MARRIAGE
And if not that, then to coun- ,N- ,,,.-. TI,,.; marriage of
ter the promised U.S. veto of alan*
a Security Council move to
change the wording of the res-
olutions.
Not only do the PLO and
Syria want no more stalemates
on the annihilation of Israel.
They want revolution, and now,
Husband/Pel itioner
and
CAROL Y. WALL,
Wifr/ReHpondent.
TO: Carol Y. Wall
Residence Unknown
YOU ARK HKHKHV NOTIFIED
thai an aelion for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lUU 6eH filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any to It on
Peti-
Incoln
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS "HEREBY Oi\ t,.\ that
the undersigned desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious nan e oj
THE VILLAS at 70l N. KendaB
Drive, -Miami. PIB. **>*%& f
register said name with the <***
the Circuit Court of l>ade < ounty.
*w8uBm INVESTMENTS. X. V
H Netherlands Antilles Corp.
By Jorge Coloma, Prestdeni
Richard Brickman
Attorney for Applicant
1501 Blscayne rsivd.
Miami, Fla. 88137 ,/9.16.23.ao
IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-14681 SP 05
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
M-B LEASING CORPORATION
u Florida corporation)
Plaintiff,
wherever they can get it in tne Howard it. Htraeb, attorney for
Middle East. Today. Lebanon ^^^.^^"bS* Ftor-
seems a more obvious target lda 88t89i !in,i #np the original with
than does Israel as a prospect for national SUlClde. default will he entered ngalnst you
for the relief demanded in the com-
ONE POSSIBILITY to conn- piaim or petition.
toe tho inr-r^avino nrpstiee of Thli notice shall he published once
tei tne increasing piestige vi ^h fc for four ,.nH,.,.utlve wpelt8
the PLO is admittedly a vision- ln the JEWISH ki.oridian*.
ary one. Two times, in 1967 and
1973. King Hussein erred.
In 1967, he should not have
fought. Because he did, he lost
the West Bank, among other
things. In 1973, he hung back
aid court at Miami. Florida on this
13th day of January. 1978.
RICH AMD P. BRINKER
Am Clerk, Circuit Court
Dnde County, Florida
By I* 8NEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court .Seal)
and he should have fought. Howard it. Htrsch Baq.
' :e
39.
With Israel so sorely pressed f^imBmch0^ *"i,''' 7
in Egypt to the South and Syria Tei. No. 532-6444
in the north, he could in all
likelihood have regained the
West Bank.
Attorney for Petitioner
1/16-2:1-^0
2'6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICK IS HEREBY GrVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
4800 N.W.
3054 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
If full-scale war with Syrian
participation erupts in Leba-
non, and if Israel makes good
on her pledge to intervene, a BARCO tx sales at u
parallel, although not necessar-
ily joint, Jordanian interven
tion in behalf of saving Leba- Cmmyrffjfa
nese hegemony would deal a
serious blow to PLO prestige
and the PLO claim on the West
Bank as the "beginning point"
for a Palestinian state.
The road would thus be open
for a federated Israel-Jordanian
tie on the West Bank precisely
in the way that Israel has re-
peatedly stated since the 1973 francisca ortega
war that she is willing to be-
come a partner to.
ItAUCO CHEMICALS DIVISION,
INC.
FRED KATZ, PUESIDF.NT
1/16-23-30 8/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-6895 (Parker)
IX UK: Estate of
r8 Across, 10 Down
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO AI.iL PERSONS HAVING
CI.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND AU.
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE:
YOI* ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai tin- administration of the estate
of francisca ORTEGA, deceased,
File Number 7.">-tJSf.">. is pending in
th- Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which h- Dade County Courthouse,
Miami. Florida. The personal repre-
sentative of this .-.-tale is JOSEPH
ROSENKRANTZ, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 372 Miami
Beach, Florida 33139. The name and
address of the attorney for the per-
sonal representative are set forth be-
low.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATR/N OF THIS NOTICK, to
Nle with -the clerk of the circuit court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
tlv> claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be .stat-
ed. If the Claim is contingent or un-
liquidated, the natuce ot the uncer-
tainty shall be stateeV-If the claim
Is secured, the. security, shall be de-
scribed. The claimant' ahafl deliver
sufficient copies at the' blm to the
cleric to enable the clerk to mull oae
copy to eaeh personal representative.
All persons interested Ht the etteta
Defendant.
TO: STUART B, RRoWX
"SO N.E. 4th Street
Apartment mi
Miami. Florida
TOU ARE HEREHY NOTIFIED tha\
a lawsuit has been filed In the above
styled eause and you are.required to
serve a oopy of your answer to the
lawsuit on the Plaintiffs attorney".
HL1TSTEIN and MOLANS, 1440 X.W.
14th Avenue, Miami, Florida. $8126,
and file the original Answer in the
office of the Clerk of the County
Court on or before the 3rd day of
February, 1076, otherwise a Default
will be entered against you.
DATED at Miami. Florida, this 8BN
dav of December, 1976.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
Clerk of the County Court
Miami, Dade County. Florida
By P. E. OWIN
Deputy Clerk
fCourt Seal)
1/2-9-16-2T!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PR) >BATE NO. 75-791'"
(Dowling)
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHEI, F. KENDALL,
Deceased.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO AM. PERSONS INTERESTER
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID DE-
CEDENT.
You are hereby notified that a
written instrument purporting to be
the lasl will and testament of said
decedent has been admitted to pro-
bate in said Court. You are hereby
commanded within six calendar
months from the date of the first
publication of this notice to appear
in said Court and show cause If
any you can, why the action of said
Court in admitting said will to pro-
bate should not stand unrevoked.
FRANK B. DOWLING
Circuit ('ourt .ludgn
RICHARD P. ISRINKER
Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
By MIRIAM B.
HF.NDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
First publication of this notice 01
the 2 day of January, 1976.
Publish in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
LEONARD V. STOLAR
Attorney
300 "1st Street, Suite 630
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
1//2-9-16-23
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
im THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
'ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 76-207
General Jurisdiction Division
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IVAN FELISBERTO.
Husband/Pet it inner.
honney FEUSBBRTO,
Wife/Respondent.
TO: BONNET FELISBERTO
Apt. No. 12
l2fi Commonwealth Avenue
Brighton. Massachusetts
TOtJ ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has bean filed against >"" and you are
required to serve a copy of yur writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on S1AN-
LEY M. BRODY. attorney for Peti-
tioner whose address is 407 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach, Florida 33139. and
fib the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 11 19T6I otherwise a default will
I.....nter'ed against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
5th dav of January, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRIXKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By L- SXEEDEN
Aa Deputy Clerk
STANLEY If. BRODY
411" Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 88188
Attorney for Petitioner
1/9-16-23-.10
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTKK IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DIXIE BEDDING COMPANY at 4800
N.W. 37th Avenue, Miami, Kin., in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
1JOHTRON C< ilil'ORATlON
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business at 4i7 Lincoln Rwul. Mi-
ami Reach, Suite 11-B. Florida 33139
under the fictitious name of "EM-
FIRE FACTORS COMPANY" Intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LOUIS DICK MAN
ROSALIND DICK MAN
ADOLPH J. CORN
ESTHER C. SCH1FF
Attorney at Law
4ti7 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
, ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-484
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
LN RE:
The marriage of
JOSEPH D. TALLMAN. husband
and
GRACE TALLMAN, a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
TO:- GRACE TALLJIATf a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
Springfield Street
Feeding Hills, Massachusetts
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-318
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IAH1S FEIBUSCH. Petitioner
and
LEAH FEIBUSCH. Respondent
TO: Leah Felbusch
141-19 70th Road
Flushing, New York 11367
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTTPTED
that an action tor dissolution ot Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to it on
Charles Gertler, attorney for Petition-
er whose address is 420 Lincoln. Road,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139 and. fge
the original with the clerk of the
above atyed coant on or before Fegeu-
ary ;th, 1976; otherwise a default will
be catered atraiaat you for th* relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mar hand and the seal of
r^uJd^T^irTH^E^NTS rl^na^.'MaSife*. ". h *&JZS*& Si*.
FROM THEDATE OF^THK-i^? W h"" b !.** ''* *
M I.** P.AV. 1-JF* you are required to serve a copy of
RICHARD P. BRINKER-
nt?gtfc2Ba A^H^v^7anrr ^wBSP
personal represenUtiVe. o,^ the and fU. the original with th. cleriTot Charles' Gutter *
ACROSS
t. Yiddish to goad
or needle
3. group who sings psalms
on Friday night
6. Soup Jewish
penicillin
8. another way 01 spelling
bes or oei
9. Yiddish expression
tsi means it'
10 first head ot
Hebrew priesifiood
11. besides even
12. Yiddish ich oys a/
14. azoy gut Please
16. point m lime or space
17. lo make chaiiab rise
18. Yiddisfi for family
DOWN
1. wed meaning
washing of the hands"
2. Yiddish for OK '
4. Yiddish for So Now?"
5 Yiddish for house'
7. to light as in the
Sabbath candles
13. Negiiah
15. descriptive of
shofar sound
16. OawJhadaood
agairtsi Goliath
the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court
JOSEPH ROHKNKRANTZ
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of Francisoa
Ortega. Deceased
By HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
LAW OFFICES OF
JOSEPH ROSENKRANTZ
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 372
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone (31-1824
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
First published on January 16, 1M4.
1/16-88
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
ln business under the fictitious name
of RAMAJ3A INN OF HOMESTEAD
at 51 North Homestead Boulevard,
Homestead, Florida 83030. intends to
IJ1! above styled court on or before 420 Lincoln Road
*eb. K, 1*74; otherwise a default wIH Mkunl Beach. Florida 33111
'S ,aga'""t you .tor relief Attorney for Petitioner
demanded In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
f*C*JI0elt.,J?.r, 'our cnsecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FtORIDUN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on UiiM
7th day of January, 1876
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. JAFFE
As Deputy Clerk
(Cirault Court Seal)
1/8-16-23-3*
1/8-16^33-80
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TUB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTV
FLORIDA
No. 76-194
General Jurisdiction Division
_, NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
BKRQUIS MENACED.
Wife,
and
LEVY MENACED,
Husband.
YOU, LEVY MENAGBD. 42-88 81
2.treei' Elmhunet, L. I., N.Y., are re-
answer to the pe-
This punle may not be reoraducert without vwittgl
permission of the author
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that quired' to Te"your
register said name with the Clerk of ^^^^ti^ilmSS of ItoaR^^"^^'"
the Clrea.t Court of Dade County. MOBILE AUTO RADIO STEREO ai c^tWeof ^ 1ST *Zl
Puzzle Answers on Page 13-B
Florida.
NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT
OF TAMPA. INC.
By RALPH LAUGHRIDOH
President
MARK BTJCHBINDER,, ESQ.
Attorney for Northslde Development
93O0 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33166
1/9-16-23-30
13000 Southwest
33165, intends
60th
^ copy thereof upon the petitioner's
LAne. Miami, attorney, Herman Cohen. Eboa, 6a
DANILO GUARAZgale Owner
M. LESTER SAAL
Attorney for Applicant
City National Bank Blag.
(6 West Flagler Street
1/8-8-18-8*
petltloa will be confessed
Dated: Jan. 6 1876.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk, Circuit Court
By B. L1PPS
Deputy Clerk
1/9-16-23-M I
1971
in-1
iustl
oded,
'ear
sin.
who
-ited
that
MO
PLO
rna-
the
the
-fer-j
0U3.I
>*-rd-
'nitedJ
%\
\\t\
tail
iriti
Ya.
the
thai I
tici-
the
iritj
the
ter.
inon
ed.
that
that
for
mi
:ast
Mr,
i
V


January 23, 1976
fjewisl) tfruridfibun
Page ISA
V
jEban Due
I To Join I
Kov'l. Again
Continued from Page 1-A
now to be expected. His pre-
cise position is still a matter
of speculation. Some sources
nay Rabin will try to persuade
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
Eerie the Deputy Premicr-
^^ to
ian meanwhile has left for
U.S. on a United Jewish
^al speaking mission, and
Emay meet with Rabin there
when the Premier makes an
official visit to the U.S. later
this month.
ban's return to the Cabinet
been sought for some time
the ex-Mapai wing of the
_r Party which sees him as
Hove who might help swing
Rabin away from Defense Min-
|ei Shimon. Peres' harder line.
.toan is also considered a
thful Mapai man and such
Hn are at a premium among
top office-holders in the
tin Cabinet. Finance Minis-
Yehoshua Rabinnwitz has
rtedly led the campaign
Ebaa's return to office.
fcBAN himself has visibly
de-e Hernment policy. At a Labor
>artv ideological debate two
ks ago, he was assiduously
ect towards Rabin when
i of them appeared on the <
Jbrm.
tome observers link Eban's
?jected return to what they
as a shift towards the
'es' view in Rabin's Pales-'
ian policy.
/hereas only weeks ago
In refused to entertain the
tion of a possible change
PLO ideology, in his recent
r\ iew with "Nouvel Ob-
ateur,'- he cautiously ad-
led that a radical change
he PLO would prompt Is-'
into a re-evaluation, too. I
[e said such a change would
to include abandonment
the "Palestine Covenant"
was therefore "very, very
bthetical."
EVERTHELESS, the doves,
such as Aharon Yariv, saw the
Rabin s! tinnni as a significant
shift \>;r s own "formula,"
which first broached the PaJas-
tinkti' ilchate in Israeli politics,
H conditioned talks with the
upon its abandonment of
le parts of the Covenant
speak of Israel's destruc-
an, in an interview before
; used the "Yarj-v formula"
stressed that he, like Ra-;
fi.mly opposed a third
e between Israel and Jor-
abill argues that the Yariv
liula in fact is predicated
readiness to contemplate a;
Wf:'- ate stale and believes
mh a state would endanger
el's existence.
[ban said the formula
t readiness to talk with
Palestinian representation
h accepts Israel's sover-
:y but that talks could be j
ucted within an overall
^el-Jordan framework.
JCCs Frail Adult Center
Is Celebrating Its Anniversary
Jan. 25 is the second anni-
versary of the JCCs Dav Care
Center fo rthe Frail Adult, an
extension program of the South
1> h Activities Center.
The Day Care Center for the
Frail Adult provides a protec-
tive environment for the older
person who has difficulty in
fending for himself.
Each day 55 participants are
transported to and from the cen-
ter, where they receive speial-
ized attention, two meals, nurs-
ing supervision, and family and
individual counseling. They also
participate in group activities.
Among the many friends at-
tending the 1 p.m. party are
the guest speaker, Mrs. Edith
Robins, deputy director, Divi-
sion of Long-Term Care, Na-
tional Center for Health Serv-
ices Research. She will describe
the Dav Care Center for the
Frail Adult as an alternative to !
institutinnalization.
The South Beach Activities
Centv.r is funded jointly by the I
Greater Miami Jewish Federa- '
tion and the Division on Aging.
OPEN DAILY LUNCHEON 11:30 a.a.-3 p..
.1 DINNER 3:30 tt .n.
^ SHALOM
A. M nBO
EMBASSY RESTAURANT
ZOMPUMENTARX
WINE
WITH DINNER
on
Fridays & Holidays
1417 WASHINGTON AYE. 53*7550
AIR CONDITIONED
HOTEL
ONTHI-OCEAN
DINING ROOM
NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
P NOME ANNE MEN
FOX RESEtVATIONS S31 7311
IMS COLLINS AVE., MIAMI IEACH
01NNEI HOUR S TO 7 P.M.
DISCOVER for yourself
tonight-how Italian tastes
when it's RIGHT!
faRMAMHTS 21
REAL ITALIAN RESTAURANT
ISO Giralda, Coral Gabies MMM
TWO BLOCKS NORTH OF MIRACLE MILEI
M.^r CrrtH Car* Hmmt4
Sumptuous Luncheon Specials Monday thru Friday 11:30-2
ALL DINNERS UNDER $5 SEVEN DAYS A WEEK S-10 P.M.
The
STEAK
NOISE
The Ultimate in Kosher Dining
In An Eleqant, Intimate Atmosphere
WHIM YOU CAN D/Kf AT LtlSUKt
Our Specialty: Broiled Steak Chicken
Fish Shish-Ka-Bab .Salad Bar
Serving Only Glatt Kosher Meats
Open Sunday 4 to 10 P.M.
Mm. Thru Thurs 5 to 10 P.M.
Your Hosti, MINASHE HIRSCH & RABBI NA1HAN GOODMAN
Reiervationi Please: 531-41 1 4 or 538-6631
On The Ocean el 21st St. MIAMI BEACH
Next to the Sea Gull Hotel
rwaBBBaBBBBaBBBBBBBI
:-
cep<
nti-Semite
amed Envoy
Continued from Page 1-A
- protest from Archbishop
Carlos Aramburu of Bue-
-"iinte thereupon asked
n to- retract br reaffirm
tfltements. Cald^ron did
1 ttzr ujid submitted his
nation from his naw post
inr/ersity.
Mangiante refused to ac-
'' resignation on grounds
alderon mad" his re-
nrivatelv without in-
the university.
ENTERTAINMENT
Direct from
SABRA KOSIIER RESTAURANT
IN CHICAGO
SABRA KOSHER
RESTAURANT
STKICTI.Y
KOSHER
Hl-hV lAll V
4 P.M.
* INTERNATIONAL CUISINE *
VALET SERVICE FREE PARKING
Closed Friday Open After Sundown Sat.
601 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEAGH 531-6739 531-6730
ROYAL HUNGARIANiHSRESTAllfiANT
A REAL TREAT FOR JANUARY!
Sharing Plan and A La Carte Also No Frill Dinners
SERVING THE MOST DELICIOUS FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
PLEASE RESERVE FOR YOUR FRIDAY NIGHT MEALS
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
Rising food prices
got you down?
You do have an alternative!,
diFrilit QfdifinC food Coop is an orgenintioi
that is bringing concerned people together to buy the
best quality food at a savings of up to 40%.
We offer alt foods except meat
Mambtrtkip on limlud Uat. Deports now hems i**tn
342SC MAIN HIGHWAY, COCONUT GROVE
or for informatjpn CALL 445 7137

^i*-**
1^ lOefore oLecwing llltanu ^| J
W 2>bu IVnh Us %!
j, FEATURING: |?
^"OUR FAMOUS PRIME RIBS OF BBF'A
^ STEAKS AS YOU LIKE THEM! 5g
^ "STEAK IS OUR SPECIALTY" <*t:\
AND A VARIETY OF ^r)
DINNERS FROM $39$ ft
WITH (ft
UNLIMITED BEER & WINE THROUGHOUT P*
YOUR DINNER / &
COMPLIMENTARY HELPINGS | ^
Ofrom our bountiful salad
bars baked Idaho
potato and sour-dough
rolls.
ALSO: Try Our Famous French Onion Soup.
Children's dinners include un-
limited home-fried potatoes,
sodas and desserts.
i CUISINE
891-4056
|\
13195 Biscayne Blvd. WJ
;-. ^ Wt ,S# ^

WORLD RENOWNED
\J*WW RESTAURANT
67? Washington A v., Miami B*ac h
OPEN YEAR ROUND AT 4 P.M.
JEWSH-ROUMANIAN-
_ AMERICAN CUISL\'E
TUuZn THAT MAKES THE FAMOUS FAMOUS
Thr ZackeiMU BANQUET FACILITIES
* L?"y 537-3987______________________fc
" ~^^teK^eeKaeaMaeKnwewtaee^aKemenweKt


Pag(
1
Page 16-A
+Jmisi> fhrkliari
Friday. January 23
V


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1
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I
1
reel
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tion
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i B F Goodrfc h


"Jewish Floridiaxi
Miami, Florida Friday, January 23, 1976
Section B
Haifa V. Dean Will Be Guest
At Campaign Training Institute
T>e dean of Haifa Univer-
sity's School of Social Sciences,
Professor B. Z. Sobel. will speak
on the Middh East situation at
the second installment of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's camoaign training instit-
it Jan. 29 and 30. More than
200 community leaders partici-
pated in the December CTI pro-
gram.
There will be an afternoon
TI from 3-5 p.m. and an eve-
ning session from 7-10 p.m. on
Thursday, Jan. 29, as well as
one from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
on Friday. Jan. 30. Registration
is being accented by the GMJF
Campaign Department.
CTI offers 90 minutes of in-
formation, followed by work-
ghnns to develop techniques,
skills and personal confidence.
All Jewish community leaders,
especially those involved in the
Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund,
are encouraged to participate.
CTI chairman Fran Levey
joins Professor Sobel on the In-
stitute faculty, along with
GMJF executive vice president
Myron J. Brodie and GMJF as-
sociate secretary Reva Wexler
and a corps of workshop train-
ers.
Further information is avail-
ahle through the Federation
Women's Division.
Synagogue Women Plan
Intraf aith Learning' Series
Th? Synag^gtK Womn of
County, led bv chairman
Mrs. Irving Lehrman, have in-
BELLE LEHAMAN
vited all women affiliated with
Hide's neai-ly 50 synagogues to
take part in a historic learning
experience.
'Our aim is to spotlight each
of the three branches of Juda-
ism," evplained Mrs. Lehrman.
"in order to share the richness
pnd beautv of each of the three
interpretations of our faith with
women of all branches."
Mis. Lehrman, who was ap-
pointed by Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation Women's Divi-
sion presid nt Marilyn Smith,
obsened that the series of
three prog ams, the first high-
lighting Conservative Judaism
a* Beth Torah Congregation on
Jan. 29. at 10 a.m., is the first
sup ii. escalishing a dialogue
f,. ., Ame.ican Jewish com-
munity.
i onservative, Orthodox and
R-form Judaism which arose
at distinct times and places and
have grown independently
wiH benefit with enriched un-
derstanding of one another gain-
ed through this intrafaith learn-
ing experience.
A schedule of "learning ex-
periences" has been created by
a committee formed within the
Synagogue Women of Dade
County organization. Repre-
sentatives of Conservative, Or-
thodox and Reform synagogues
are participating.
A March program on Ortho-
dox Judaism and an April pro-
gram on Reform Judaism are
rlanned. Commentary, with rab-
binical consultations, as well as
audiovisuals, literature and
demonstration, will be included.
'People's Needs' Are Subject
Of Chaplains' Series
Hospital chaolains must con-
front the fact of their own
mortality before they can suc-
ssfully counsel the families of
I and dying children, said s
Dr. Milton S. Grossman in a
sneech to the South Flo-ida
Chaplains Association on Mon-
- ay.
11 \ Grossman, chairman of t! I!
iatiics Department at Mount
II Medical Center, said
Grief is age-related." The fact j
that someone will get old, sicken
and die is within the realm of
probability, but you don't ex-
pect the young to die."
"The isi'e is supporting the
living, not the departed," Dr.
Grossman declared. "The chap- I
lain should contact the hospi-
tal's social service workers to
find out details and special cir-
cumstances about the family of ;
the deceased which might en-
able him to aid that family more
effectively."
The child's physician should
know if the chaplain has strong
feelings against autopsy. "Or-
thodox Jews and some chap-
lains of all faiths look upon
autopsy as desecration and
mutilation." Dr. Grossman ob-
served, "but the doctor needs
an autopsy to know how effec-
tive his diagnosis and treatment
have been."
Dr. Grossman's talk inau-
gurated a series of programs
entitled "From Cradle to Grave:
JWV Auxiliary 174
Plans Coffee
Membership chairman Sylvia
Liebman for the Norman Bruce
Brown Ladies Auxiliary No. 174
of the Jewish War Veterans has
planned an active afternoon for
the membership coffee on
Thursday, Jan. 29, at 1 p.m. in
the Old Cutler Room of the
First Federal Savings on S.W.
22nd St.
Mrs. Belle Swartz, Depart-
ment of Florida membership
chairman, will talk on "The im-
portance of Belonging." Program
will include obligation of new
members, a skit by members
and music and dance by the
team of Dr. Rose Feld and Mrs.
Esther Cohen.
The Norman Bruce Brown
Auxiliary, oldest in Florida, has
won awards for its many proj-
ects in the community and at
the veterans hospital.
Wolf son-Spinoza
Forum Names
February Guests
Dr. Abraham Wolfson-Spinoza
Forum meets every Thursday
at 10 a.m. at Washington Fed-
eral Savings on Washington
Ave.
Feb. 5: Dr. Ruben Efrom,
February guest speakers are:
"The Jackson Amendment to
U.S. Trade";
Feb. 12: Henry Howard:
'"Life of Haym Salomon";
Feb. 19: Mordecai Yar-
deini: "Jewish Music and Song";
Feb. 26: Jack Silverstein:
"The Future Shape of Health
Care Sites in Dade County."
Dr. Abraham Wolfson was
founder, Harold Kleiner is
chairman.
DR. MILTON GROSSMAN
the Needs of People."
The South Florida Chaplains
Association will examine the
needs of people the chaplains
serve. Organizer of the series is
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, chaplain
at Mount Sinai Medical Center
and chairman of the chaplains
furtherance committee.
President of the Association
is chaplain Henry Bailey of the
Dade County Jail.
Moynihan Warns:
We'll Veto Word
Change in Resolves
See Related Stories 1-A
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The United States indicated
this week that it would exer-
cise its veto power in the Se-
curity Council if that body
ends its current Middle East
debate with the adoption of res-
olutions that would attempt to
change Resolutions 242 and
338.
Addressing the Council, U.S.
Ambassador Daniel P. Moyni-
han said the U.S. believed it
would be a set-back for the
chances of a settlement if the
Council adopted resolutions
"which would have the effect
of leaving no commonly accept-
ed basis for further negotia-
tions." He warned that any im-
posed changes unacceptable to
any of the parties "will not
work.-'
MOYNIHAN SAID that "Our
actions both in the Council and
afterwards will be guided by
our best judgement of what is
necessary" to avoid impeding
chances for peace. The U.S.
had stated previously that it
would block any measures it
saw as endangering progress
toward a peace settlement.
Moynihan stressed that the
two Security Council resolu-
tions are the framework for
any progress toward ending
the Arab-Israeli conflict. "We
are aware," he said, "that there
can be no durable solution un-
less we make every effort to
promote a solution of the key
issues of a just and lasting
peace in that area on the basis
of Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338 taking into account
the legitimate interests of all
the people of the area including
the Palestinian people and re-
spect for the rights to inde-
pendent existence of all states
in the area."
MOYNIHAN'S USE of the
words "legitimate interests'' as
applied to the Palestinians was
seen as a rebuff to the Arabs
who are seeking Security Coun-
cil recognition of the "rights"
of the Palestinian people.
The word "rights" signifies
Adath Yeshurun and CAJt
Offering Two Courses
In response to community
demand, Temple Adath Yeshu-
run is offering a practical
course in Yiddish on Tuesdays
at 7:45 p.m.
"The American Jewish Ex-
perience," a historical and so-
ciological approach to the de-
velopment of the American Jew-
ish community, is offered on
the same evening. The course
traces the waves of immigra-
tion and their unique charac-
teristics, the emergence of an
American Jewish community
and an analysis of trends and
developments in contemporary
American Jewish life.
The courses are fully ac-
credited by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, which is
sponsoring them in cooperation
with Adath Yeshurun.
political rights which in turn
implies the right to statehood.
"Legitimate interests" is a much
broader term and does not
have the same political conno-
tation, observers here noted.
Moynihan, however, upheld
"the rights to independent ex-
istence of all states in the area"
which includes Israel.
The U.S. envoy said that the
two Security Council resolutions
"have been the foundation for
the progress that has been
made and they continue to pro-
vide hope for the future." He
said the U.S. is dedicated to
achieve progress in the Middle
East this year.
MOYNIHAN DECLARED that
"We cannot "scape the reality
of the situation that when all
parties have agreed to a frame-
work, all of them must agree to
ciiangjs in that framework.'' He
emphasized that all the prob-
lems of the Middle East should
be dealt with by the negotiat-
ing process and that any
"changes that may be required
in our approach must be work-
ed out in the Geneva process."
He said that matters of pro-
cedures and the questions of
additional participants to the
Mideast talks should be dealt
with at Geneva or at a prep-
aratory conference. This U.S.
position is shared by Israel
whose Ambassador to the UN,
Chaim Herzog. said at a press
conference last week that Is-
rael was prepared to enter the
Gene, a conference without pre-
conditions and to discuss there
the question of additional par-
ticipants.
ine Arabs on the other hand,
are pressing for Security Coun-
cil action that would admit the
PLO in advance to participa-
tion in the Geneva talks.
Moynihan said that "having
succeeded in establishing an
agreed framework of proced-
ures and principles for a set-
tlement and in creating condi-
tions for the establishment of
the Geneva conference as a
forum in which the implemen-
tation of these principles can
be negotiated, the Council
should not now seek to pre-
judge the work of that confer-
ence."
Rabbis Jaffe and Swirsky
To Address B'nai B'rith Forum
The Florida State Association
of B'nai B'rith Lodges is spon-
soring an Adult Jewish Educa-
tion Panel in conjunction with
the Anti-Defamation League.
Florida Regional Office, on
Sunday. Jan. 25, at the Dora!
Hotel at 2 p.m.
ADL's annual board meeting
begins at 8 a.m. that day at the
Doial with a bagcl-an-lo:; break-
fast, followed by seminars and
workshops, dealing with the
serious issues confronting world
Jewry and Israel.
The Adult Jewish Education
Panel follows the noontime
Leonard L. Abess Luncheon at
which Florida Supreme Court
Justice Joseph Hatchett will
speak.
Two local rabbis will give
talks on "Will American Jewry
Disappear?" at the panel. They
are Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, spirit-
ual leader of Temple Beth-El,
Hollywood, and Dr. S. T. Swir-
sky, rabbi at Temple Beth Ja-
cob, Miami Beach.
Dr. Jaffe, who received an
honorary Doctor of Divinity de-
gree from the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion in 1973, is president of the
Southeast Association of Cen-
tral Conference of American
Rabbis, past president of the
Rabbinical Association of Great-
er Miami and three-time presi-
dent of Broward Board of Rab-
bis. He is author of "What is
Judaism?" and other books.
Rabbi Swirsky is professor of
O' iental history and of archeol-
ogy at Miami-Dade North.
After the rabbis' Di :'ions
there will be questions from the
floor.
i -,-"u-.' :.- natior ; B nai
B'rith Adult Jewish Education
i ommissii n -r. and Alfred Gold-
en, national Anti-Defamation
League commissioner, are co-
chairmen of the AJE Panel.
Morris Mehlman and Leo Bal-
kin are state adult education
cochairmen.
Israel's Cultural LHe
Is Subject of Moadon Talk
The Hebrew Cultural Forum,
"The Moadon," will hold its
monthly meeting on Wednesday,
Jan. 28, at 1:30 p.m. at Temple
Emanu-El's Small Hall. The
guest speaker is Dr. Gershon
Weiner, who will speak in He-
brew on "The Cultural Life in
Present-Day Israel." Dr. Joseph
Diamond will preside.


Page 2-B
vJknisti fhrkM&n
Friday, January 23, 197^ ^"ric
I
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11
American Friends of Hebrew IJ.
Plan Two-Day Founders Event
Government Advisor To T^lk On
Orthodox Jewry's Moral Crisis
An Iv'storic
ders Dinner
(onl'L'rence of
FrienJs of tli"
National Foun-
and Academic
the American
Hebrew Univer-
sity will be held at the Fon-
tiinebleau Hotel on Feb. 21
and 22, clim;r-ins the world-
wide celebration of the 50th
ani'ersary of the establish-
ment of Israel's oldest and
latest university.
Announcement of the two-
day session, which will bring
together education. govern-
ment, business, civic and reli-
gion lead"rs from throughout
the United States, ('ana fa and
Israel, was made by Morris
Messing of Palm Beach, Flor-
ida State president of the Amer-
ican Fii-nis of the Hebrew
Univers'tv.
A highlight of the confer-
ence will be the acceptance ';y
American no'elist Saul Bellow
of the S. Y. A^non GA1 Msdal
Award from ths Hebrew Uni-
versity.
Herbert Buchwald of Mia-ni
Beach, president :>t the Great-
er Miami Chapter of the Ame--
ican Friends; Otto Stieber of
HallanJa' >, president of the
Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter,
and Dr. f-'anford F. Kuvin,
president of the Palm Beach
Chapter. ave working closelv
with Messing in planning the
sessions.
Former New York State At-
torney General Nathaniel Gold-
st"'n will nic(>pt a rerwt on
the Hirry S. Tni-i-m Research
[nsit it!, on? rf H sbrew Uni-
1 rsii tnoi: important divi-
sj in anJ the only facility in
I ael authorized by the late
Pi (sident to bear his name.
Dr. Max M. Kanpclman of
Washing! n. D.C., mlbnal
president of the American
Fii?nds, and Seymour Fish-
man, "ciiti- e \ ice president)
were in i.Mimi Bea^h this week
to confer with Messing and
other Hebrew University lead-
ers. 1
Albert A. Darner, Southeast-,
em regional director of the |
American Friends, will coor-
dinate the Feb. 21-22 confer-
ence from the organization's
new of fie-3 in the City Nation-
al Pan'- Bivlding.
Dr. Joshua Bernstein, domes-
tic affairs consultant and ad-
visor to the U.S. Department
of State and the Israeli govern-
ment, will bs guest speaker at
Sky Lake Synagogue on Satur-
day morning at 10:30.
Dr. B irnstein, who la associ-
ated with Baruch Cottage of
the City University of New
York, will i- on "The Moral
Ciisis in Orthodox Jewry."
Abraham Gitteison. associate
director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Ed c iti
will be
guest rea4ef for the Torah por-
tion en th? f>"
at Mt. Sinai.
1 th? giving of the Law
AMW Gall! Chapter
I e Gtilil Charter r.( the
Amei can Mizrachi W mi n ifiii
l:a-e a d assert card party on
Mind) *. 2, at n:>on at the
IVashiagrni Federal Building in
N th Miami Beach. The pro
c-"ds will ben-fit the scholar.
ship f ind in Israel.
tin 1 niisi ui.xi
\JC Seminar To Hear Hertzherg
On 'Zionism vs. Racism'
The Florida Women's Division
of the American Jewish Con-
p>-ess will present a Jewish Af-
fairs seminar and brunch on
Thursday. Feb. S, at 10 a.m. at
the Eden Roc Hotel. Judy (Mrs.
Murray, Tepper is chairperson
of the day.
Sneakers at the seminar in-
clude Rahhi Arthur Hertzberg,
who is serving his second term
?s national president of the
American Jewish Congress.
Dr. Hertzberg is an officer
of the World Jewish Congress
and a lecturer and author. An
associate professor of religion
at Princeton University and a
visiting associate professor of
J-wish Studies at Rutg-rs Uni-
'ersitv he has taught at He-
brew University in Jerusalem.
R^bbi Hert'berg's tonic is
"Zionism Its Meanine to
American Jews in the 1970's."
Sandra Anderson Garcia is a
E-aduate of the University of
Yiddish Culture Wincle
Hbnors Century of Theater
tv Yiddish Culture Wincle
y "I1 "(! ibrate 100 years of Jew-!
ish theater on Tuesday, Jan. 27 1
.> 1f:30 a.n. at Agudath Jsrae!
H"h 'v Institute.
Morderai Yardeini. fcctwar.
writer and singer, wiM Illustrate
th* evolution of the Yiddish
Omtpr From Goldfaden to the
Mordeeni Meis 1 will present
a dramatic scene from I. L. Pe-
ret7.
MlTinm flingold will preside.
no
Wholesale Distributors of
QUEEN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
and
TCOS
rAL\S
H5R POULTRY
Processor* and Exporter*
of th? 'incst l S. Covt. iispm
tattm Mftll ond POUlTRV
1717 H.W. 7th Ave
Miami, Fla.
Rfou 324-1855
leras at El Paso wln-re she was
on the Dean's List. She received
her Ph.D. in psychology from
the Universitv of Southern
California. Professor Garcia has
nublished numerous articles and
is the recipient of the Ford
Foundation Fellowship to con-
duct research in" Israel.
Her topic wiH be "Racism."
Rabbi Sanford Marvin Sha-
pero is a graduate of the Uni-
v<"*s:tv of Dayton in Davton.
Ohio. He received his Bachelor
of Letters degree from tbe He-
b--w Unin College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in Cincinnati.
He served as a chanlain in
the Navv and as special consul-
tant and chanlain for various
law enforcement agencies. He
was appointed by the governor
to th? board of the New York
St-'t" Youth Commission.
Rabbi Shapero lectured in the
D-martm vira College for Women in New
York snd at th Kaoann Reli-
gious Retreat House in Oiso,
Japan. He has also lectured reg-
n'arlv at the state teachers col-
1r"s in New York. Connecticut
and Massachusetts.
A past president of the j
p-idp-'-vt and vicinity Pastors' j
Association, he was secretary |
?nd "ice "resident of the New
England Region of the Central
C< Dfer*nce of A^erif.in Rabbis,
and prior to his election as
S-n'or R^bbi of Teniple Ema-
nuel of Beverly Hills he was
selected to lead this six-state
group .as president.
His tonic will be "New Hope
for the Aged."
New Lower Fat Beef
Products Offer Improved
Nutritional Benefits
CHICAGOThe Best
Kosher Sausage Company
has recently developed a
line of lower fat heel s;uis-
age products that reduce
the fat content by 23%
(I 3), while retaining the
full flavor and texture o(
their regular products.
U.S. Government stan-
dards allow a maximum of
30% fat in frankfurters.
knackwurst, and bologna
products. The lower fat
products made by the Best
Kosher Sausage Co. have
no more than a 20r-' fat con-
tent. This substantial fat
reduction serves to in-
crease protein and lower
the calorie content signific-
antly.
One of the nation's largest
weight reducing organiza-
tions tested and approved
these lower fat products for
their members' reducing
program.
The nutritional content of
each package is promi-
nently displayed on every
package label. The infor-
mation shows the amount
of protein, fat. and car-
bohydrate content in each
serving.
The Best Kosher lower fat
beef products are sold in
the deli case Of super mar-
kets, dclicatessx-ns. and
other fine food stores.
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Friday, January 23, 1976
ttek&hftBrt&un
Page 3-B
ussian Tenor and Labor Zionist Leader
Will Headline Histadrut Conference
A tenor with the Metropolitan
Ooere in New York who emi-
Igi;iied from the Soviet Union
land one of the nation's leading
gates at the inaugural dinner.
Dr. Morton Malvasky, rabbi of
Temple Beth Shalom, Holly-
wood, and chairman of the
South Broward Council of IHF,
is host committee cochairman.
Raitzin, who emigrated to Is-
rael from the Soviet Union in
1972, was a star performer
with the Moscow and Lenin-
grad opera companies as well
as an acclaimed soloist with
the Moscow Philharmonic. He
made his American debut at
Town Hall in New York in Feb-
ruary, 1975. Raitzin will be ac-
companied by Israeli composer-
conductor Shmuel Kershko.
Dr. Shapiro, educator, lec-
turer and author, was elected
the first president of the Labor
Zionist Alliance in 1971. The
editor of the monthly Labor
Zionist publication "Jewish
Frontier." Dr. Shapiro is for-
mer national director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
and past president of the Na-
tional Conference of Jewish
Communal Service.
Admission to all conference
events is free, except for the
awards banquet Feb. 18. For
information, contact the His-
tadrut office.
Shapp Opening
Emanu-El Forum
The first Jew ever to qualify
as a major candidate for the
Presidency of the United States
will speak at Temple Emanu-El
this Sunday morning at 11, fol-
lowing a 10 a.m. breakfast
launching the congregation's
Bi.i ntennial Presidential Fo-
rum Series.
Pennsylvania Gov. Milton J.
Shapp, who will be on the Flor-
ida Democratic primary ballot
March 9 in his bid for his par-
ty's nomination, will hold a
news conference at Temple
Emanu-El following the for..m.
MISIIA RAITZIN
DR. JUDAH SHAPIRO
L.ihor Zionist figures will head-
line the opening session of the
tenth annual Histadrut Eco-
nomic Conference for Israel,
Sunday evening, Feb. 15.
According to Dr. Sol Stein,
Lnational president of the Israel
iMistadrut Foundation (IHF),
I Dr. Judah J. Shapiro, president
lof the National Committee for
| Labor Israel, will deliver the
keynote address at the inaugural
session. Russian tenor Misha
Raitzin will present a musical
salute to Israel.
The four-day conference at
the Fontainebleau Hotel marks
the IHF's S40 million milestone,
the cumulative total of commit-
ments since the organization
was founded 15 years ago.
Highlight of the conclave will
be the awards banquet on Wed-
nesday, Feb. 18, in tribute to
one of Israel's major diplomats.
Participants throughout the eco-
nomic conference will include
Israeli officials, Labor Zionist
| movement leaders and delegates
j from the United States and
W^anada.
tf Moe Levin, a national vice
^president of the Histadrut
foundation and chairman of the
Bouth Florida Advisory Com-
nittee. is host committee chair-
nan for the Feb. 15-18 con-
lave. He will welcome dele-
SABRA
112 FAGE
COOKBOOK
101
Award Winning
Recipes
TOE KST OF 8,000
RECIPES SUBMITTEO IN A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
I" SEND $1.00
(No Stamps please)
Your Name & Address to:
SABRA COOKBOOK
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 11816
Star Lakes, Century Towers
Plan Israel Bond Events
Events on behalf of the 1976
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign are being
planned by Star Lakes and Cen-
tury Towers, according to Mil-
ton M. Parson, executive di-
rector.
On Sunday, Feb. 1, the resi-
dents of Star Lakes will hold
a "Salute to Israel" at 10 a.m.
in the Star Lakes Social Hall.
According to chairman Mau-
rice Mehlman, there will be a
presentation of "Sholem Alei-
chem The Man," starring
Aaron Heyman. The breakfast
meeting, sponsored by the Star
Lakes Israel Bonds Committee,
Ein Kerem Group of Hadassah,
Congregation Agudath Achim
and Maimonides Lodge-B'nai
B'rith, will also include the
presentation of the Israel
Solidarity Award to Harry Ber-
son, president of Congregation
Agudath Achim, and Ida Green-
field, hospitality chairman for
the Ein Kerem Group of Hadas-
sah.
Century Towers Israel Bonds
Committee chairman Ben Isen
has anounced that the Night
in Israel on Tuesday, Feb. 3,
at 8 p.m. in the Century Tow-
ers Card Room will feature Ed-
die Schaffer, American Jewish
folk humorist.
Herman S. east Theresa
(Teas) Stern will receive the
Israel Solidarity Award.
Active in all Jewish com-
munal activities at Century
Towers, Stars- it a cofounder
of the Sunny Isles Lodge B'nai
B'rith and ha* hold various 6f:i
.fleas, serving as a trustee lor
matt' than 40 years. He las
served as the- Century Towers
social club parliamentarian and
is affiliated with Temple Beth
Sholom.
A past vice president of the
Sophie Tocher Group of Haaasv
sah, Mrs. Stern h a former
secretary of the Century Tow-
ers Social Club. She was one
Of the first women to be an,
official free-lance court report- j
er in New York City.
THE ADULT EDUCATION COMMITTEE OF
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
PRESENTS
THE AMERICAN JEW IN THE BICENTENNIAL YEAR
(A special series featuring outstanding guest lecturers
on American Jewish History)
American Jewish Humorists American Jewish Artists
What Kind of Jews Are These? Origins of American Jews
Religious Movements Trends in American Judaism
Jewish Marriage and Divorce Law from The Bible to America
Early American Jewish Contributions
Jews in American Music; American Journalism; American Science;
American Legal System; American Literature; American Politics;
American Finance; American Music; American Theatre and Film
These courses are open to the public at both of our locations:
2625 SW 3rd AVENUE, MIAMI and 7500 SW 120 STREET, MIAMI
FOR TEN CONSECUTIVE WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY EVENINGS.
For further information, call: 854-3911
7
Irving Q. Pullet. says:
What to
look for in
a Kosher
chicken or
turkey.
cooked... frozen...or fresh
rr.m.
NOKtl
ATTACHED
A
M.B. Art Club
Installation
The Miami Beach Art Club
plans its 19th' annual instaHa-
tion dinner for Saturday, Feb.
7, at noon in the Coronado
Room of the Barcelona Hotel.
The program wrH include en-
tertainment by. operatic so-
prano Ruth Raffo, as well as
the installation and dancing.
District 65 Mteting
Retirees of New York Dis-
trict No. 65 will hold a regular
monthly membership meeting
on Tuesday, Jan. 27, at the
American Savings & Loan As-
sociation on Lincoln Road, at
1?:^0 p.m.

I

/
MOST K CUT
tuimx.;.
Times acwoss^
Htativm
' : '*"-

._*
look r cm
VOUffCMFlflf
(KINGCUP
WlTM-fKB
FOR THE
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Of A TRUE
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The Most Trusted
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At Quality Kosher Butcher Shops
Better Food Stores and Deli's.
N. MENDELSON SONS
621 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Ha. 33139
Tel. 305-532-2426
(MR
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KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY


Page 4-B
vJewisti fhrkUan
i
1

m r
I
r
1=
I
Friday, January 23, 1975
B'nai B'ritli Sholem Lodge
To Celebrate 50th Anniversary
Harry S. Schwartz, a postage
machine manufacturer and a
past president of B'nai B'rith
Sholem Lodge, has been named
general chairman of the gala
dinner-dance celebrating the
50th anniversary of Sholem
Lodge's founding.
The announcement was made
by Kenneth Hoffman, president
of Florida's oldest B'nai B'rith
organization.
Dade Physicians
To Hear About
ERISA, Jan. 29
Physicians in the Dade area
have been invited to attend a
seminar and cocktail reception
to hear from a group of lead-
ing tax specialists on "ERISA"
and how they can help Israel in
the process. The meeting,
scheduled for Thursday, Jan.
29, at 6 p.m., will be in the
Board Rooom of Mount Sinai
Hospital.
The first seminar, held last
month in South West Dade,
proved so successful that the
Pension and Profit Sharing and
Fiduciary Committee for the
Economic Growth of Israel has
decided to continue this serv-
ice to the community. Heading
the committee is Gary Gerson,
CPA. Serving with him are at-
torneys Norman Lipoff, Chuck
Ruffner, James Roth, Byron
Sparber, and CPA Morton
Weinberger.
David Pinski
Culture Club
At the Oneg Shabbos of the
David Pinski Culture Club this
evening at 7:30 at the Ida Fish-
er School Cafeteria, there will
be a talk by L. Lasavin, author
and correspondent of the "Jew-
ish Daily Forward," on "Jews
in Colonial America."
Hilda Zucker, folksinger, ac-
companied by Paul Yanovskv.
will present a group of Yiddish
and Hebrew songs, and Israel
Goldberg will read selections
from Sholem Aleichem.
B'nai B'rith Lodge 1591
January Meeting
B'nai B'rith Miami Beach
Lodge No. 1591 will hold a i
business meeting on Monday, (
Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. in the 100
Lincoln Road Club Room.
Mildred Kole, a Juilliard
School graduate, will sing in |
Hebrew and English. She will
be accompanied by pianist Aida
Yaslo.
The meeting is cosponsored
by Anna and Nathan Marmon,
who are celebrating their 60th
wedding anniversary, and Re-
gina and Sidney Rockwell, cele-
brating their 54th.
Israel Economy's Problems
Are Breakfast Talk Topic
Milton M. Hecker, executive
director, Florida-Israel Cham-
ber of Commerce, will be guest
speaker at a breakfast meeting
at Temple Sinai of North Dade
on Sunday, Jan. 25, at 9:30
a.m. He will discuss Israel's
economic problems and how
the American communities can
help solve them.
New York Attorney
To Speak at Beth Sholom
Leo Klauber. a New York at-'
torney who is active in New;
York and Hollywood civic af-'
fairs, will discuss "The Great-
?"Jew,sh CitV 'n the World
nl toc?ate" the Temple
Beth Sholom Brotherhood
breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 25
The meeting is open to the
public.
The dinner will be on Satur-
day evening, Feb. 21, at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel, and will honor
all Sholem Lodge charter mem-
bers, past presidents and of-
ficers for their half-century of
service to the community.
Hoffman also announced that
Max Nadler will serve as chair-
man of the souvenir journal. E.
Albert Pallot, president of Bis-
cayne Federal Savings and
Loan, and Judge Milton A.
Friedman are honorary chair-
men.
Schwartz, who moved to
South Florida from Chicago in
1933, helped organize the Mi-
ami Beach Elks Lodge and is a
past president of Beth Kodesh
Congregation and its Men's
Club.
Other members of the dinner
committee are Mr. and Mrs.
Morey Feld, Mr. and Mrs. An-
der Klein, Mr. and Mrs. Ches-
ter Leiter, Col. and Mrs. Sidney
Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Lewison, Murray Cohen, Al Zis-
man. Mrs. Martha Nadler, Mrs.
Jean Schwartz, Mrs. Linda Hoff-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Andrew
Tibor.
Reservations for the dinner
can be made through any Sho-
lem Lodge member.
Dining Ita(ianj5ty(e is as
easyas^Uef Bais...W!u\
help fron\Chef Boyar-dee
Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee*
to your house when the
youngsters call for pizza!
Just open up the Chef's
Cheese Pizza and you've
practically got it made.
Everything's right there.
Pizza flour mix, the Che's special
savory sauce, real Itali; n cheese
and easy directions.?' ist 20 minute;
in your oven and ye-, II have a
delicious, "home-made"mychel1
A sizzling, tangy pizza to set
before the kids. They'll
just flip for it!
New
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Cookbook
from
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of Israel

Now you, too, can discover the magic of Sabra
the international liqueur from Israelas a
delicious "secret" ingredient for some of the
most unique taste tempters ever created. In
the phenomenal response to the Sabra Inter-
national Recipe contest, over 8000 adventur-
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America sent in recipes for unusual appetiz-
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The very best recipes were selected, after care-
ful study, by Gourmet Magazine experts for
inclusion in this exciting 112 page book. And
here it is! For just $1 you can get a copy to
start you on your way to fame for cuisine ala
Sabra! While you're waiting for your cook-
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Sabra Apple Fritters
\\2 cup milk
I cup flour
IX teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
Confectioners' sugar
6 apples
11-1 cup Sabra
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg. separated
2 teaspoons sugar ^ ^
Pare apples, cut into l/24nch shoes jJfJ^U and marinate for
2L2S and pour ^/^', Drain liquid from
^eral hours. Then, beat J^** flour, baking powder and
apples and stir into egg mixture. Sift tog f To: Sabra Cookbook, Dept. H,
P. O. Box 5263, Hicksville, N.Y. 11816
Enclosed is $ I. < No stamps, please.) Please send the exciting
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NAME___________
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ADDRESS.
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Friday, January 23, 1976
SHELOMO BEN-ISRAEL
DR. SOL STEIN
Histadrut Presenting Two
Yiddish-Language Broadcasts
Two Yiddish-language radio
programs hsa^d weekly on
VVEVD in New York will be
broadcast live from the Fon-
tainebl?au Hotel this Sundry at
nnnn uni^r tb'i auspices of the
Israel Histadrut foundation
(IHF) of South Florida.
The half-hour Yiddish b-nad-
casts "The News of the Wek
in Review" featuring Shelomo
Ben-Israel and "The Voice of
Histadrut" hosted by Dr. Sol
Stein will be preceded bv
brunch at 10 a.m. Doors will
close at 11:30 a.m.
Dr. Leon Kronish, rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom and na-
tional IHF board chairman, will
discuss "Should Israel Take
Risks for Peace?"
Ben-Israel, columnist and UN
corresDondent for "The Jewish
Daily Forward," addresses hun-
dreds of thousands of listeners
in the Greater New York area
in his weekly review of news
events affecting Israel and the
Jewish people.
Dr. Stein, noted economist
and authority on financial phn-
nip'i. is national president of the
Histadrut Foundation. His week-
ly program is devoted to a dis-
cussion of personal financial
problems as well as a review
of the Histadrut programs in
Israel.
Admission is by reservation
only. For information, contact
the Miami Beach Histadrut of-
fice.
Nightclub Evening
At Aha vat Shalom
A nightclub affair will be held
by the Ahavat Shalom Congre-
gation oh Saturday, Jan. 24, at
9:30 p.m. Live music, refresh-
ments.
_
ESCORTED TOUR
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16 NIGHTS IN ISRAEL, 4 NIGHTS IN LONDON
Local transfers to and from Miami Airport, Round trip air via
British Airways, Full siqhtseeing in Israel and London bv air-
conditioned bus. including entrance fees, Breakfast and dinner
in Israel, breakfast in London, All transWs and porterage.
per person, dbl. occupancy,
C103Q plus $3 tax
V W7 Above rate based
on 36 passengers
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2962A Aventura B'vd. North Miami Beach. FL 33180
Telephone: Oade 931-6600 Broward 525-0675
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vJewisfi FhridUaiF
Page 5-B
Zionist District Jewish Familv Structure
Elects Lefkowitz
The Miami Beach Zionist Dis-
trict elected Al Lefkowitz presi-
dent for 1976 at a recent meet-
ing.
Lefkowitz, a Zionist since the
establishment of the State of
Israel in 1948, was chairman of
the Bronx Region of Food for
Israel. He was named the num-
ber-one membership leader and
was honored by District II.
Bronx ZOA, for his work for
Israel Bonds and UJA.
In 1956 he was a delegate to
the World Zionist Congress in
Jerusalem. From 1959-64 he
ws the Miami Beach Zionist
District's vice president and
membership chairman, and in
1970 was dieted to participate
in the leadership tour to Israel.
Lefkowitz urges all Zionists
to attend the group's meetings,
which are held on the first Mon-
diy of each month at 2 p.m. at
the Washington Federal Audi-
torium on Washington Ave. The
next meeting will be on Feb. 2.
At the 2 p.m. membership
rally and enrollment the guest
speaker will b^ Dr. Sigmund
Fogler, educator and lecturer.
Transportation
Is Forte Forum
Is Subject of All-Day Study
"The Jewish Family Struc-
ture: Are We Teaching 'Where
Its At'?" wm the theme of yes-
terday's annual All-Day Institute
of the Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators.
"The major changes in the
structure of family life in gen-
eral, and in the Jewish family in
particular,' said Emily Grun-
wald, president of the JCECE.
"have affected the young child
of nursery-kindergarten age and
have raised issues affecting the
child's development in the class-
room."
Dr. Allen Rutchick, a psv-
chologist, gave the keynote talk
on "The Jewish Family in Tran-
sition." Following his presenta-
tion, more than 125 teachers
were divided into three semi-
nars led I v psvc'^ilogists. a
physician and social workers.
Dr. WT-ron Sr-hl .nger and
Jen Seif Lev!. MSW, led a sea-
ri~ti or, S?v R01.S ;n tile pa,n.
ily." Ms. Arbne Huysman. MA.
conducted a session on "En-
harvinfl Fa^Uv Relationships
t*irmtgh Pswhodrama." Dr. Ann
P"ben led the third groun on
"Family Dynamics through
Transaction^ Analysis."
The afternoon was devoted
to the acquisition of skills for
the ECE program. Mrs. Anita
Sherman conducted a workshop
on "The Green Circle," a tech-
nique facilitating the examina-
tion by students of their own
filings towards similarities and
differences. Ms. Carol MacKen-
zie led a session on rhythms and
singing, 'hile Mrs. Gila Burke
showed how Yoga and exercises
can be used in the early child-
hood program.
The Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators is the pro-
fessional organization of nurs-
ery and kindergarten teachers
in the Jewish schools of the
ronmunjtv and is affiliated with
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education. Officers include
Fmiiv r.ninwald. president; Mol-
lie Scholl. vice president: Phyl-
lis Basttcky. corresponding sec-
retary; PhvlUs Chaney, record-
i"g secretary; Trudy Zaden,
treasurer; Jan Bergman, im-
' di:>.te past president. Audrey
Dillaman was chairperson for
th daw
Jewish Home Women's Auxiliary
Plans Monthly Birthday Party
Topic
A. D. Moore, chief of Com-
munity Involvement in the Of-
fice of the Transportation Co-
ordinator for Dide County,
will address the Forte Forum-
George N. Caylor Forum on
Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 1 p.m. at
the 1200 West Ave. Auditorium.
Moore, a former special as-
sistant to the Dade County
Manager, will discuss "Pros and
Cons of Transportation in Mi-
ami.
Greater Miami Women's Auv-
iliarv of the Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold
a monthly birthday party at
Doughs Gardens on Sunday,
Jan. 25, at 2 p.m.
The party, to which the public
is hwfted, will be hosted by Mr.
and Mrs. Max Greenberg in
honor of the birth of their great-
grandson.
Shari (Mrs. Lawrence) Silver-
man. Auxiliary president, will
welcome the guests. A program
Ins been arraneed bv Mrs.
Louis Makovsky. featuring the
Musical Floridians in a Trip
and directed by Judy Kamin-
sky.
The Auxiliary will hold its
monthly luncheon meeting on
Tuesday. Jan. 27, at noon at the
Delano Hotel.
Guest speaker will be Mrs.
Harry B. Smith, president of the
Women's Division of the Greater
Miami Federation.
Anne Tanenbaum and Henny
Jaffe are in charge of reserva-
tions.
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Page 6-B
*Jmhl> fhridton
In his recent review of the
movie '"Hester- -Street," critic
and columnist Gene Shalit pan-
ned the story of Jewish immi-
grants on New York's Lower
'East-Side with the flippant quip,
"If they (the Jews) could sur-
vive this movie, they could sur-
vive anything."
When, as Shalit did, a Gen-
tile refers to us as "they," we
are almost (but not quite) in-
nured to the collective and
vaguely pejorative pronoun.
BUT WHEN we are "they" to
some of our ownwell, that is
a whole other balL game.
We now get into the arena
discussed in Cynthia Freeman's
new book, "A World Full of
Strangers." -The hero (anti-hero
rsaliy) lives his life fighting an
inner battle with his self-
inflicted shame. Although Free-
man's character carries his own
anti-Semitism to the extreme of
denouncing his faith, there are
more subtle gradations of Jew-
ish self-hate.
In an October column, Points
of View took a look at Orthodox ,
JqdajsmV perception of less
traditional Jews. In an effort to
turn the tables and have less
traditional Jews look at their
alter-egbs, two general areas of
thought were discussed.
CHARACTERISTIC of one
camp, a young North Miami .
woman, who described herself j
as "an independent, a deist be-
Ueving rather strongly in God i
and Judaism on a personal'
level," remains, however, indif- j
ferent and aloof to institutional-'
i/.ed efforts.
When asked how she views
Orthodox Jews, she said, "I see
them as an extension of myself
with th2 same loyalties but
with a stronger need to identify
with" rituals." She does not see
herself as "less of a Jew" but
does have a live-and-let-live at-
titude torwards her Orthodox
brethren.
Several opinions were at the
extreme other end of the spec-
trum. Comments like: "the
thing that bothers me is their
hypocrisy. Pots and pans are
not religion'; "all the Orthodox
I knew were biased"; "they walk
around like they are better than
I" were indicative of the other
camp.
There's a sad old joke about
how a Jew views his co-r-ligion-
ists. He draws a hypothetical
line around his own observ-
ances. Anyone who is more tra-
ditional than he is, is a "fanatic."
Anyone less observant, is a
"goy."
IT IS precisely because of this
party-line friction and lack of
understanding that Belle Lehr-
man's intrafaith experiences will
be a much needed balm for
Synagogue Women of Dade
County. Although the three
branches of Judaism are not in
direct confrontation, there are
differences in interpretation.
Each is proud of ifs own inde-
pendent stand.
For three mornings, however,;
a mixed committee of IS women,
crossing branch barriers, will'
invite every syoagogue-affiliated
woman in Dade County to ai
Jewish learning experience. On!
Jan. 29, Beth Torah Congrega-!
tion in North Miami Beach will i
be host to a happening planned I
entirely by the Conservative!
women on the committee. There;
will be no rabbinic sermonizing'
or proselytizing.
Rather, there will be an ex-
planatory and multi-media pre-
sentation of the Conservative
way of life by the women them-
selves. There 'will be ample
time for questions and answers
and dialogue.
IN MARCH and April, an
Orthodox group at Beth Israel
and a Reform group at Beth
Am will share their respective
religious lifestyles with their
sister Jews.
This unique opportunity to
learn more about what we all
are is long overdue. We are so
concerned with international
detente, with being an American,
"first" and with community
interfaith, that we sometimes
forget where understanding
should begin.
Mrs. Lehrman's goal for the
three intrafaith days "is the
strengthening and sensitizing of
our identities through better
knowledge of all Judaism, in its
many interpretations for liv-
ing."
As important as our worldly
concerns are (and should be),
let them not consume us. Let
us, first, iron away the frustra-
tions and frictions among our-
selves, and let us truly try to be
"fellow" Jews.
Ponevez Yeshiva
Plans Dinner
The Ponevez Yeshiva of Bnai
Berak, Israel, plans a dinner on
Sunday, Jan. 25, at 6 p.m. at
the Crown Hotel. Mrs. Roberta
S. Zaager of Miami Beach will
be honored for her contribu-
tions to Torah institutions in
the U.S. and Israel.
Addresses will be given by
Rabbi Abraham Kahaneman,
president of the yeshiva; Rab-
bi .Mordecii Shapiro, spiritual
leader of Beth Israel Congrega-
tion; -and Rabbi Berel Wein,
kashruth director of the Union
of Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions of America.
The Ponevez Yeshiva, rees-
tablished after the Holocaust
by HaRav Joseph Kahaneman,
has grown from six students in
1943 to a student body of thou-
sands.
Ja.ck M. Bash is dinner chair-
man, Henry Groudan is cochair-
man.
Temple Sinai Presenting
Nagel Revue at Barry
Temple Sinai of North Dade
will present "The First Two
Hundred Years Are the Hard-
est," a revue by Jack Nagel, at
the Barry College auditorium
on Feb. 7 at 8 p.m.
For information, please call
the Temple Sinai office.
________Friday, January 23, i976
ORT Golden Circle Awards Tol I
The Browns and Carlins
Linda (Mrs. Donald) Martin,
president, Dade South Region,
Women's American ORT, pre-
sented Golden Circle Awards
vesterday to Bert and Joanne
Brown and Donald and Hedy
Carlin at the ORT School of En-
gineering luncheon at the Kings
Ray Country Club.
Mrs. Brown is president of
South Dade Chapter; Mrs. Car-
lin, the chapters past president,
is its health chairman.
The women were recognized
for their contributions and their
devotion to ORT's newest school,
which is on the grounds of the
Hebrew University in Jeru9ar
lam.
Kachela (Mrs. Nathan) Rich,
luncheon chairman, stressed the
importance to Israel of a core
of qualified engineers.
The luncheon guests were en-
tertained by a musical featur-
ing Ann Aibel, Bernice Anapol.
Iris Rosen, Sylvia Weinberg,
Phyllis Gershkoff.
Attending the luncheon from
District VI were Joan (Mrs.
Lou) Baron. Bert (Mrs. led)
Zalles and Mrs. Fritzic Leit.
Representing Southeastern Flor-
ida Region were Henny (Mrs.
Morris) Apner, Jean (M .
er). Rose.; Terry (Mrs. n^I
Brown, Maxine (Mrs. Leon-
Faucr.and Joan (Mrs ,' .
Women's Unit
Meet Slated
Spndra -Last, president of
Dade County -Chapter of ,
National Organization for WoS
en. announced that the .hnuJ,
meeting will be "The FeminS
Connection." a Consciousness
raising demonstration to be he!
Thursdav, Jan. 29, 7:30 nm
100 SE 4th St.
e-R leaders Ch-is Drennaij
Doris Denison, Hilary Mjn(Uil
Carole Mangan, Harriet F.rdoi
Bonnie Line, Pugyv McGearl
and Pauline Kramer will ru
separate groups so that intei
ested women may sample tl
C-R experience before joinii
groups, scheduled to begin eai
February.
The demonstration is open.
are all NOW general meeting]
to non-members as .veil as nn
bers.
I
r*
wvvw
Established
1957
Jfalte^oultrp^reg!
TODAY S WEATHER
Perfect for
Chicken Dinners
Published by Falls Poultry Corporation, South FaHsburfl, N.Y. 12779
CONSUMER PRAISE SWAMPS
FALLS KOSHER CHICKEN
Kosher Clean Story
Scores With Consumers
The overwhelming
praise Falls Kosher
Poultry has received
from the public Is proof
that Kashruth quality
and wholesomeness
are of #1 importance to
the consumer.
Falls Kosher Poultry's
double guarantee of
quality and wholesome-
ness has duly impressed
the consumer public.
Few consumer prod-
ucts are put through the
rigorous testing every
Falls Kosher Chicken
must go through In or-
der to reach your mar-
ket. Full-time-Federal
Inspectors are con-
stantly on the premises
making sure that every
chicken meets the high
standards of the United
States Department of
Agriculture.
The highest stand-
ards of Kashruth are
guaranteed under the
exacting supervision of
Rabbi H. Solnica. Every
chicken is individually
examined inside and
out before, during and
after slaughtering, in
accordance with the
strict laws of Kashruth,
by qualified, trained
and observant Shoctim.
BUBBA'S SOUP BACK
BY POPUIAR DEMAND
Bubba is kvelling (yiddish
for very happy) everyone
is raving about t\er chicken
soup recipe.
Mrs. Anne Glickman of
New York writes: "My hus-
band and I just moved here
from California and in all
our travels we have never
tasted a better soup."
Because Bubba feels
that some of you might
have missed her recipe, we
decided to offer it once
more. Bubba's soup made
with a Fails Kosher Chick-
en is not only wholesome
and nutritious, it tastes
good. Keep Bubba kvelling
write now for your free
recipe.
FREE! Send for Bubba's old fash-
ioned Chicken Soup Recipe -
Falls Poultry Corp. So. Fallsbure,
H.Y. 12779 Dept. 45
REPORT
TO THE CONSUMER
Jewish law requires that
continuousjy flowing cold
water be used during -,li
processing, soaking, sail-
ing, draining and the three
rinses.
Health experts consider
it highly iraiseworthy that
every c, ,cken is examined
for any sign of disease or
any other pathological
condition.
The two seals on every
Falls-United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture ap-
proved Kosher chicken
means unsurpassed qual-
ity and wholesoroeness.
*
M"*"****'**,**,.^^^

JL


Friday, January 23, 1976

Page 13-B
Page 7-B
Luncheon and C Oncert tO Ma rk Mori fremon To Address
J
Farband CJA-IEF Day, Feb. S
Joseph P. Zuckerman of
North Miami Beach, chairman
of the Farband Labor Zionist
at noon at the Barcelona Hotel.
Hundreds of Farband mem-
bers are expected to participate
in the event, which Zuckerman
has planned to aid the 1976
campaign effort of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. A
musical program will follow ad-
dresses by several guest speak-
ers.
Honorary chairmen for the
event are Norman Arluck, Jack
Filosof, Maurice Rorer, Bernard
Giugold, and Dr. Bernard Schu-
mer. Honorary vice chairmen
include Abraham Fisch, Philip
Kalui. Herman Kass, Leon Ret-
tig, Harry Sachs, Dr. Isaac Un-
terman and Louis Wolin.
Assisting chairman Zucker-
man are vice chairmen Sam
Berke, Menashe Feldstein, Mor-
ris Fisher. Mayshie Friedberg,
tt
in:
ar
1,1
JOSEPH ZUCKERMAN
Alliance, has announced that the
11th annual Farband luncheon
and conceit for the CombbfU
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund will be on Sunday, Feb. 8,
Milton Lesser Named Head Of
Heart Institute Medical Staff
of
Osmer S. Deming, president
Miami Heart Institute, an-
THE INCOMPARABLE
JAN PEERCE
Sings Your Favorites
WITH AN ALL STAR CAST
THE THEATRE OF PERFORMING ARTS,
MIAMI BEACH
SAT. FEB. 21 76, 8:30 MA.
Doiutian $4.50, $530, $*30, $7JO
Ticket. ivaiisM* It Jordan Mirth B1 HUmi
or 163 rd St. NMB or Ari. Kiduri A0*r*y, tU
Lincoln Boid. Swift 211 (tntranc* fr*m Jmmi Aval
For information, reservations and group
discounts call 861-3981 or 532-1851
PRESENTED BV SOUTH DAOE HEBREW ACADEMY
***

For information and reservations call
(Dade) 887-4341 or (Broward) 921-0169.
Sorry, no one under 18 admitted.
Gates open 11:00 a.m.. post time 1:15.

nounced that Milton E. Lesser.
M.D., has been elected presi-
dent of the medical staff. Je-
rome A. Baim, BID., was elect- !
cd vice president and Burton !
D. Levin, M.D., secretary.
A graduate of the University I
pf Georgia and Yale. Dr. Lesser |
interned at Michael Reese Hos-
pital, Chicago. His residency at,
the VA Hospital in Coral Gables
brought him to Florida in 1951.
A specialist in cardiology, Dr.,
Lesser has been on the medical
staff executi\ e committee at
tlii- Institute since 1962 and is
a former Chief of Medicine. He
has served as Chief of Staff at
Mt. Sinai Hospital and is an
associate clinical professor of
medicine at the University of
Miami School of Medicine.
Dr. Lesser has served as
chairman of the Dade County
Medical Association's Peer Util-
ization Review Committee since
1972 and is a member of the
board of the Professional Stand-
ards Re\ iew Organization. He
is a past president of the Heart
Association of Greater Miami
and is a member of the Miami
Beach Healt'i Commission.
LONGEST PIER
IN SOUTH
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BAIT
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*
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Women's League Chapter
Fanny Gibson, Norman Kemncr,
Isidore Lederman. Sol Rosen-
berg. Oscar Shapiro and Morris
Tamres, along with recording
secretaries I.eon Orenstein and
Norman Painkin.
The Farbnnd's consultant
committee Includes Samuel Gal-
fond, Harry Kaminer, Rev.
Joseph Krantz, Max Rothman,
Joshua Z. Stadlan. David Wohl-
rath and Irving Warshawski.
Serving on the Farband board
of directors this year are Harry
Airman, Leon April. Lester Bi-
gelman, Louis Doblin, Sara
Gertz, Meyer Goldstein, Celia
Gottlieb. Lola Merling, Philip
Nashkin, Sam Neshkin, Morris
Orenstein, Bessie Stadlan, fjfc
mon Tetenbaum and Ann War-
shau.
Guest speaker at the Tuesday
noon meeting of the Lincoln-
Roney Chapter of the Women's
League for Israel is Mori Fre-
mon, editor of the Florida-Israel
Chamber of Commerce News-
letter.
Mrs. Fremon visited Women's
League homes and vocational
training centers in Tel Aviv,
Jerusalem and Natanya, and
plans to visit them again next
summer, especially the new Vo-
cational Training and Rehabili-
tation Center in Natanya, for
which ground1 was broken in
1975.
Mrs. Fremon, public relations
chairman of the Florida-Israel
Chamber of Commerce, was
public relations liaison officer
of the Israeli Consulate-General
fnr the past seven years. Dur-
ing two of her throe trips to
Israel she was a guest of the
government.
She attended the World Con-
gress of the Association of
Women Journalists and Writers
in Israel in 1973, participating
in seminars and attending re-
ceptions given by Golda Meir.
Abba Eban, Chaim Bar-Lev.
Moshe Kol, Teddy Kollek. Yeho-
shuah Rabinowitz and Josef Al-
mogi.
M.B. Community Singers
The Miami Beach Community
Fingers is presenting a program
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium. \7Z\
Washington Ave. Solos by in-
dividual members of the group
will be featured, and the audi-
ence will participate in com-
munity singing. There will also
h" danrins tt live music.
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A MIDWEST FILM PRODUCTION
NOW SHOWING


Page 8-B
fJewistfhrktian
Friday, January 23, 1975
I
1
if
I
1
I
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f.
/
The B'nai B'rith Council of Presidents recently began
plans for its participation in the annual February tele-
phone effort for the 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund. Three cochairmen for this year's
Greater Miami Jewish Federation phone campaign will
be Sid Schwartzback (seated) of Israel Lodge, Sol Kaye
(left) of Sunny Isle Lodge, and Col. Nat Kutcher, presi-
dent of Judea Lodge. Supervising all B'nai B'rith CJA-
IEF participation is the organization's regional presi-
dent, Barry T. Gurland (center), who called upon GMJF
campaign director Mel Schoenfeld to address the Pres-
ident's meeting.
A recent educational event sponsored by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Young Adults Division featur-
ed an examination of contemporary "Jewish Identity"
lor a sense of community among young Jews in Greater
Miami. YAD campaign chairman Ike Goldemberg (right)
and learn-ins chairman Adria Rasken (left) joined the
event's cochairmen, Charles Citrin (standing) and Shar-
on Mirmelli (seated, center), in creating a successful
evening, addressed by Rabbi Solomon Schiff, director
of chaplaincy for the Federation.
Round Town
Leo Martin had a surprise
50tli birthday celebration given
by his wife, Gloria, and their
three children, Sherry, Perry
and Lisa. The party, aboard
the "Miss Florida" in mid-
January, lad a Bicentennial
theme and color scheme. The
Martins all wore red, white and
blue as well.
Martin, president of Pom-
peii Casual Furniture Co., is
active in the Miami commu-
nity. He is also serving his
second year as president of
Florida Furniture Manufactur-
ing Association. He serves on
the board of directors of Beth
David Synagogue, as cochair-
man of the Home Furnishing
Division at the Greater Miami
Federation and on the board
of Jewish Vocational Service.
Gloria Martin
i'- active in Ha-
dassah and Beth
David Sisterhood
Born in Lodz,
Pohnd, Martin
arrived in Mi-
ami 26 years ago
via Toronto.
A donation was
made to iiauas-
sah in his honor.
His name is in-
scribed on the
Pillars of Hope
at the Mt. Scopus Hospital in
Jerusalem.
Among the 2511 triends and
relatives celebrating with Mar-
tin were Ziggy Gorson of Wil-
mington, Del., Carmen Aragon
of McClean. Va., Mrs. A. Britt,
the Sam Britts, and Mrs. Aim
Hartenstein, all of Toronto, the
Lee Hortuns of Lake Park, Fla.,
the Don McVeys of Palm
Beach, the Morris Robbinsons
(i B^ca Raton, the M. Roth-
mans and the Ed Giaglones of
St. Petersburg, Ms. R. Camp-
bell of Puerto Rico and the M.
Kupermans of Australia.
Lively Arts
At Lunch time
The Lunchtime Lively Arts
Series at the Downtown Cam-
pus of Miami-Dade Community
College has entertained more
than 55,000 shoppers, students,
workers and visitors at 76 free
events since 1972.
Ruth W. Greenfield, coordi-
nator of the series, has an-
nounced that the next program,
Jan. 28, at 1 p.m. will feature
the Lucktenbeig Duo a vio-
linist, pianist and a harpsichord-
ist.
Leo Martin
Planning a February Mission to Israel especially geared
to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's Di-
vision are chairman Bunny Adler (right) of Miami
Beach, along with Women's Division president Marilyn
Smith (standing) of Miami Beach and Women's Divi-
sion campaign chairman Goldie Goldstein of Bay Har-
bor. Nearly 40 local women will participate in the mis-
sion, the first composed completely of Miami partici-
pants. Information is available through the GMJF Wom-
en's Division.
The Social Club at Bal Harbour's Harbour House led
by president David Friedman (2nd from right) and en-
tertainment chairman Jerome Hirsch (left), recently
greeted Jewish community leaders Ellison Kossoff (right)
and Mrs. Sol Goldstein (2nd from left) to discuss the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1976 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund. Mrs. Goldstein is
campaign chairman of the GMJF Women's Division
and Kossoff is a longtime coordinator of Federation cam-
paign activities among Harbour House residents
Beth Tov Students
To Conduct Service
The Hebrew School students
will conduct the service this
evening at 8:15 at Temple Beth
Tov.
The students will be intro-
duced by the teacher, Kenneth
Cohen, and will then read their
original essays on "What Is the
Meaning of Judaism?" from the
pulpit.
OiriONf D ^^Jl
raldmaiN
HOTEL
MIAMI BEACH'S
FINEST GLATT KOSHER
CUISINE

a dining wumma rot;
WILL LONG RfMEMBER
Coll Adolph for Reservations
Phone: 538-5731
RESERVE NOW
FOR THE PASSOVER
HOLIDAYS
limited number of rooms
available
OCEAN AT 43rd ST.
iO^^ MIAMI BEACH
and his
Boca Raton Hotel
and Club Orchestra
"Weddings &
Bar Mitzvahs
our Specialty"
65.-2803
the life of your party..
* music
5^
Orchestras 932-7323 Entertainment
Kosher
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Not Just
Another
Kosher Hotel
. but new
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The very
finest in Food
preparation,
presentation and \r<
service That V
Wedding, That Bar-
Mitzvah. That special
party belongs at the Algiers.
It's Glatt to be good.
K^s Jack Gartenberg, Owner-Manager
on p^ri0n Ca" C*,crin9 Director A" *" 531-3391
E CEAN AT 2S* ST. AND COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
'
Glatt
Kosher


Friday, January 23, 1976
*Jewisti fkxrkUan
Page 9-B
Multimedia Service at Bet Breira I hinns Labor Zionist Group To Hear -
r...AA lf.0 V ,....,_____? J_ AUi K....JV r.ir.w.nl Pfnlilpnia
Features Mrs, Youngermari's Art
"Art of Life," illustrated with
a slide presentation featuring
the works of Reyna Younger-
man, will highlight Temple Ret
Brcira's services this evening
at 8:15 at the Killian Pines
United Methodist Church.
"We will explore the contin-
ujty of Jewish lite in varioi -
- and countries." explained
>bi Barry Tabachnikoff. "This
ce will b'e one of the high-
rf the year for us."
''.ncs and live "iiwic will be
integ ated with port of the serv-
which was written by Hv
I Green, Mrs. Younger-
i- m dauRhtc. ___
Following the multimedia
service there will be a discus-
sion of the pictures led by Mrs.
Young^man, whos? works have
appeared at the Maxwell Gal-
lery- in San Francisco and Buy-
wr-s Gallery in Sarasota, an.l ,i
England, South Africa and South
America.
Women's American ORT
lsad'tand Chapter will
Its sec in ann ial carnival n
~arn
Sun 'ay, Jan. 25. at the
in K-~n ialo Lakes, from 11
to 4 p.m.

Dr. Albert Kattus, a cardiol-
ogist and heart exercise expert,
will give two talks to the medi-
cal community today and to-
morrow in St. Francis Hospital's
Wiegand Auditorium.
Professor of medicine and
chief of cardiology at the UCLA
School of Medicine, Dr. Kattus
has been chairman of the Amer-
ican Heart Association's com-
mittee <.n exercise since 1970.
H:s talks will be on '"What
Is Really Best for Your Heart
Exercise or 'Take It Easy'?"
and "The Significance of An
gina Forerunner of the Co-
About Israel's Current Problems
The Labor Zionist Cultural
Forum will be held on Tuesday,
Jan. 27, at 1 p.m. at the Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium, 1234
Washington Ave.
Dr. Reuben Hurvitz, Labor
'Zionist leader from Chicago,
and Moshe Fisher of New York,
a board member of the Nation-
al Workers Alliance, will dis-
cuss "The Present Critical
Problems of Israel." A ques-
tion-and-answer session will
follow. Harry Kaminer will
preside.
Temple Judea Blood Drive
Pabbi MoriXS A. Kipper will
be pulpit guest this evening at
Temple Judea. His topic is the
High School in Israel quinmes-
ter program.
Ine Brotherhood of Temple
> .. -ponsonriB a blood
Dank drive or. Sunday, Jan. 25.
The Mt. Sinai Hospital mobile
blood unit will be at the tem-
ple from 9 a.m. to noon, and
the brotherhood will provide
breakfast for all donors.
Ibur electric bill
is higher largely
because our tuel oil
bill has tripled,
to over a million
dollars a day*
Even though we're
using less niel oil*
Three years ago it cost us $334,000 a day for
the fuel oil we used to generate electricity.
Today, the price per barrel of oil has tripled.
Which means our costs have tripled to over a million
dollars a day. A million dollars a day even though
we're using less fuel oil than we did three years ago.
(35 million barrels in 1972 vs 32 million for the 12
months ending October, 1975) This reduction mod
consumption is due to increased reliance on
nuclear-generated power. __
The skyrocketing cost of fuel oil is a major
factor in the cost of producing electricity. Indeed, fuel
now amounts to 59% of our total operating costs.
The result has been a sharp increase in your
electric bill. For the increase in fuel oil costs is
reflected in your fuel adjustment charge.
All of that charge goes to pay for the
increased cost of fuel. FPL doesn't keep a cent of that
money. ,
We aren't any happier than you are about the
increases which the fuel crisis has caused. But we are
gratified that we have been able to keep them from
going higher. With the use of nuclear-generated
power.
In fact, last year, nuclear-generated power ,
saved our customers over 161 million dollars in fuel
oil costs. And we're building more nuclear power
plants to hold fuel costs down even more. For
nuclear power is the least expensive source of energy
available to us today.
So, next time you get your bill, think about
our bill. We're working to keep both of them down.
.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
Ptopk.,.serving people.


Fan lo-B
*Jewish Floridkian
Friday, January 23, 1976
1
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i
S
I
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SOVIET JEWS NEED CULTURAL MATERIAL
'Right to Identity' Project
At the Hebrew Academy
I

Responding to appeals by
numerous Russian Jews, the
South Y\ nfida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, a committee of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
erations Community Relations
Committee, will launch a com-
munitywlde effort to obtain Jew
isb cultural objects for Jews
living in the Soviet Union.
The project. "Right to Iden-
tity," will b'e'ii on Sunday, Jan.
25; at the Hebrew Academy.
"Right to Identity." a nation*
wide program, is based on the
Helsinki OgPCCmCHl Signed bv
the United States and the USSR
in August. I "75. The Final Act
o! the Helsinki Conference as-
sures all people the right to
receive non-Dolitical cultural
materials.
Mbmians are asked to bring
paperback books and magazines
of Jewish interest, records or
tines of Jewish music, and reli-
gious and cultural articles, in-
cluding Jewish jewelry, to the
Hebrew Academy between 11
a.m. and 3 p.m. on Jan. 25.
Contributions to cover the
cost of postage will also be ac-
cepted. Each item collected.will
be sent to individual Soviet
Jews by registered mail with a
return receipt requested. Care-
fn| r^^nrds will be kept regard-
ing delivery or non-delivery to
assure compliance with the Hel-
s n1 i Declaration and interna-
tional nostal laws.

NMB Attorney Is Chairman of the
1976 CJA4EF Lawyers Division
Antiques Show
Begins Feb. 5
The 35th annual Miami An-;
tiuues Show and Sale will be
held in the Bayfront Park Audi-
torium, Feb. 5-8. Hours daily!
are 1 to 11 p.m., except for Feb. '
8, when the show will end at
9 p.m. All exhibits will be for
sale.
The show is being brought to
Miami by Mis. Ethel Mae Boedy
of Cleveland. More than 65
dealers from all over the U.S.
will show their wares from '
paperweights to Tiffany lamps,
Russian enamels, silver, por-l
celains, jewelry and furniture, i
On Saturday, Feb. 7. the Zon-
ta Club of Greater Miami, part
Of an international sen ice or-1
ganization of executive and pro-'
fessional women, will host a
costumed Colonial tea from 3
to 5 p.m. at the show. Funds |
raised will go to the club's wel-
fare projects, including scholar-
ships, equipment for the Dialy-
sis Center at Jackson Memorial,
and other services.
ft
n
Robert Orseck, a North Miami
Beach attorn-iv. has accepted
the chairmanshio of the 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Lawyers Divi-
sion. Orseck's appointment ras
announced by fin ter [i imi
J.'\ ish Fed* ration ice presi-
dent and campaign chairman L.
Jules A,km.
cl f fi.....i '' I
hurst. On ;'.- and Parks, lives
in H I Lakes. An active
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lews in the Movies
's Tr'.k Subject Tonight
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at ''"; the 'i";t sneaker will
be Thclma Altshuler. associate
professor of humanities at Mi-
ami-Dade Community College.
w*wre she teaches drama and
nhitosophv ns well as film. Pro-
fessor Altshuler will discuss
Jews and Jewish Themes in
the Movies."
A longtime resident of Miami.
Professor Altshuler is a grad-
uate of the University of Miami
and co-""hted graduate work
at the University of California
and Fordham. She is the author
of textbooks on film and English
composition.
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Befh Raphael Sisterhood
Plans Paid-Vp Luncheon
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Ranhaal is holding a paid-up
'enibrshin luncheon on Thurs-
day. Jan. 29. at noon.
There will be entertainment
f-mirine the Melodies Isa-
bel- Hpller. Jan Rosenberg and
Sadv Paddon. Mrs. Rose Gins-
berg membership chairman, fe-
in charge.
Fave Brucker
n'esident.
is Sisterhood
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We act M your personal repre.en.
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Prompt confidential service.
W.thout obligation call
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Or Write:
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Toll-free number (from anywhere
in U.S.) (800) 221.5175
Caiiieiot Hall
Plans CJA-IEF
Breakfast
J. Georg- Knfman. chairman
ol thfl CIA-IF.F campaign at
Camelot Hall in Bal Harbour
has announced that a breakfast
will be held on Sunday Feb 1
at 10 a.m.
Israel's Air Force attache to
its embassies in the United
States and Canada. General
ieshayahu Baraket. will be the
guest speaker.
Assisting Kofman are Leon-
ard Flaum, Leon Goldman. Jack
Kornreich, George J. Laikin,
Jack Millstein, Rubin D. Prus-
sm. Jack Rubin. George Sasine
anu Charles Weicensang.
Young Israel
Sisterhood Party
The Young Israel of Greater
Miami Sisterhood, under the
Presidency of Ray Gruen. will
hold its 18th annual paid-up
membership party on Wednes-
&1^irat8:30pminthe!
The program features games
andanioa cream sundae fiesta.
Membership vice pre^anfs
are Joyce Frand. Dvora GottKeb
and Arlene Leibowita. Publicity
chairwoman is Donna Gottlieb.
Hebrew Home
Auxiliary Meeting
The regular meeting of the
Beach Hebrew Home for the
281'th" n ?" WRdn^day. Jan
rL w C De,ano Hotel at noon.
Bess Horowitz and Lee Green
S TrST "nack ^^^n
Mrs. Sarah Levin, president.
Tifereth Jacob
Sisterhood To Meet
Sisterhood of Temple Tifer-
Sl^aCOb- Hialeah- wi? hold a
meeting on Sunday. Jan. 25. a"
9-30 a.m. at the temple.
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This puzzle contains the names of the world's 12
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tOCATIO U, HOWARD JOHWOW., ^TCH L0D


riday, January 23, 1976
+Jeht> Fk>ridlian
Page 11-B
m(t
^abMmtal ffoge
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Ornand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
Veto Votes
Foster Cool Heads
By RABBI JONAH E. CAPLAN
North Miami Beach
Can thp, Rabbinical Associa-
tion. Qf Greater Miami Speak for
All of Miami's Jewish Commu-
nity?
I say "NO." Because there are
questions that -will not satisfy
some of the constituent bodies,
the Synagogue of America has
a constitutional provision that
gives each constitutent body a
veto vote. Without this vetp vpte
the Synagogue Council of Amer-
ica would not have lasted this
long.
For the same reason the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion cannot speak with one voice
for Miami Jewry.
In the world we live in we
have more disagreements than
agreements. That's why the UN
Security Council gives a veto
vote to the permanent members
of the body. The President of
the U.S.A. has a .veto vote over
Congress.
However, where religious dif-
ferences aiise. it is even more
of a. serious matter.
The Conservative and Reform
rabbis do not acrec wirh the
Orthodox on Halacha. They
don't ven agree among them-
selves.'The chasm, is sometimes
vcv 6-g and unbridgeable.
In order that the readers may
better understand the issues
and answers, let me illustrate
what happened recently at, a
rabbihicial meeting.
The question was: Should the
Rabbinical Association tape a"
TV program .before a major
holiday like. Passover, Succos
and Sheyttois, to be shown on
the holiday?
The more traditional rabbis
said "Definitely NOT.'' To the
credit of the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation. ..cool heads prevailed,
and the vote was not to tape and
no damage was done to the
organization.
If the traditional rabbis had
had a \eto vote, the hot issue
could have been avoided.
The next time, cool heads may
not prevail because each side
feels aggrieved when forced to
yield to the so-called opposition.
The Southern Jewish Experience
Is Theme of JSeiv Novel
For more than a century
Southern novelists have created
some of America's most endur-
RONALD L. BERN
ing literature from the rich
fabric of life in the South. But
one important cultural and so-
cial thread has been largely
overlooked or ignored: Jewish
life in the South.
"The Legacy," a novel by
Ronald L. Bern, captures and
details the Southern Jewish
experience in what one review-
er called "one of the best nov-
els to. come out of the South
in the 70s."
An epic spanning four gen-
erations, "The Legacy" is the
bittersweet story of the life and
times of David Harris. The au-
thor follows David, a six-year-
old boy in 1942, through child-
hood, adolescence and young
manhood as he seeks to under-
stand the meaning of his own
heritage, and at the same time
to find a place for himself in
Southern society.
Growing up in a warm Jew-
ish family, David is confronted
with his first taste of anti-
Semitism as he enters school.
America's entry into the war
and a series of inflammatory
editorials in the local newspaper
blaming all Jews for the coun-
. try's involvement overseas lead
to a daily "fight-to-survive"
existence fur the small boy.
These eaily experiences leave
Da :id troubled. As he grows
older, his compassionate father
introduces him to facets of
Southern -life that help him
bridge the cultural- gap.
But it is Isaac Shulman, his
tough, autocratic immigrant
grandfather, who bequeaths to
his grandson his own powerful
sense of destiny and heritage.
The reader is transported
back and forth between David's
experiences, his parents', and
the family's bitter beginnings
in the "Old Country."
Vivid scenes of Isaac Shul-
man's 19th-century Russia,
which "Publishers' Weekly" call-
ed "the affecting ones," con-
trast with confrontations with
the Ku. KUix Klan in this novel
of timeless significance for
everyone seeking his own sense
of identity and place.
A .Nov. 19 review in "The
Detroit Free Press" summed up
the new novel, published by
Mason/Charter, this way:
"While Bern deals with four
generations of a proud Jewish
family and the struggles of
maintaining their heritage and
legacy, he has writen with great
detail and understanding one
of the most accurate views of
the macho, bigoted South of the
'30s. '40s and '50s I have ever
read.
"The hunting, the fishing, the
sports, the drinking the ethic
and mentality, the mood and
temper of the people and the
times. It's all there."
Ronald Lawrence Bern, au-
thor of "The Legacy," has deep
roots in the South. He grew up
in Anderson, S.C., and was grad-
uated with Bachelor's and Mas-
ter's degrees from the Univer-
sity of South Carolina.
He is president of Ronald L.
Bern Company, a New York con-
sulting firm. He has published
two works Of non-fiction.
1

Q. What is the Biblical at-
titude- toward miracles?
A. Biblical Hebrew has no
word corresponding to the Eng-
lish ."'mwacie-' 3:^fPs,yhp^ etc.);. .but. says
the authoritative Encyclopaedia
Judaica.- the meaning of "won-
der":, is ranch' broader than
.."miracle.'*'A. particular class-of
miracles, however, can be con- ,
. side/ed as. a definite biblical
.concept, since it is designated
bv terms of its own. These are .
; the '"signs," i.e.. extraordinary .
and surprising events which
God brought about in order to ,
demonstrate His power and will
in particular situations, when
men had to he convinced. A
sign can be given. as proof of
prophecy.- Thus the altar of
BethTEl .collapsed as a sign that
the prophecy of its future de-
struction was true (I Kings 13:
1-16). The more important signs
occurred in. Egypt: the staff
turned into a serpent to show
that Moses was indeed sent by
God (Ex. 4:1-7); the ten plagues
coerced Pharaoh to accept the
divine command and let the peo-
ple go.
Some biblical miracles are
more than signs, in that their
purpose goes beyond the mere
proof of divine power. Israel
was saved and Egypt's army
destroyed by the parting of the
Red Sea, the people were given
water and fooo in the desert by
means of miraculous acts, and
so on. Both Samaria (II Kings
6:7-7:20) and Jerusalem (II
Kings 19:35) miraculously es-
caped conquest by besieging
armies. Such miracles can be
viewed as direct divine inter-
vention at critical moments of
human history. Even in these
incidents the element of a
"sign" is never wholly absent.
Dathan and Abiram and their
followers were swallowed by the
earth; it was a just punishment,
whose suddenness was demand-
ed by the situation. Moses'
words (Num. lft:2K-30), how-
ever, designate the event clear-
ly as a sign. It is also stated
that when Israel saw the mighty
deed of Egypt's destruction in
the sea they believed in God
and in Moses (Ex. 14:31). Evi- .j
dently, says the Encyclopaedia
Judaica, the Bible makes no I
distinction between signs pro-
per and miraculous divine inter-
vention in human history.
There is a third type of mir-
acle in. the Bible in which the
sheer admiration of.-.(he.-wonder-
worker seems more important
than both elements discussed
above. One cannot escape this
impression when reading the
stories about Elijah, and, to an
even greater degree, about Eli- jj
sha. Such stories are a regular
feature of popular religion of
all times and in all places in
the Bible they are almost en-
tirely confined to the figures of
these two "nonliterary" pr-oph-
ets.
The problem of whether mir-
acles are "natural" .or "super-
natural," which was of concern
to scholars of later ages, does
not bother Bible writers, hi one
case (Num. 16:30) a miracle is
described as a "creation,"
which indicates an awareness of
what moderns might call the
"suspension of natural laws'
(see also Ev. 34:10). Oh the
other hand, the miracle of the
descent of the quail (Num. 9:18-
23) is quite plainly and clearly
described as a "natural"
though unexpected occurencc
and yet is treated as a full-scale
.miracle. Bible writers simply do
not ouestion God's-ability to do
anything, by any means.
The intellectual's dislike ol.
miracles has- furnished the
mainstream of Bible criticism
with a yardstick: some sources
contain more accounts oi mir-
acles than others, and are there-
fore deemed less "valuable,"
Scholars with apologetic tenden-
cies tend to minimize the im-
portance of Bible miracles in
their endeavor to make biblical
religion less "crude" and more
"pure." This case can be based
on the preponderance of the
"sign" concept in the Bible, but
is nevertheless wrong, says the
Judaica.
The Bible docs not, as a rule,
tell miracle stories for their own
sake but it does regard the
"signs and wonders" of God as
extremelv important. Man has
to know that God can do any-
thing, whenever and wherever
He chooses; that this has been
demonstrated in history manv
times and the sacred historv of
Israel has been shaped often
enough by direct and quite evi-
dent divine intervention. Faith
thtt can do without this notion
of miracles is possible, but un-
thinkable in biblical terms.
Q. What is reconstniction-
ism?
A. Reconstructionism is an
ideology and a movement in
U.S. Jewish life. According to
the authoritative Encyclopaedia
Judaica. both the idea and the
movement owe their inspiration
to Mordecai Menahem Kaplan.
Kaplan argues that with the
breakdown of certain tradition-
al beliefs, Jewish identity had
become attenuated. Jews remain
loyal to their faith despite hard-
ship and suffering because they
believe that adherence to Juda-
..... :
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
21 SHEVAT 5:38
ism assures them of, salvation in
the next world. But in Kaplan's
view, this is no longer credible.
Consequently, Judaism must
transform itself from a civiliza-
tion orientated toward the life
hereafter into one which can
help Jews to attain salvation in
.this--world. Belief in the pos-
sibility of this salvation is cru-
cial to Kaplan's thought. It
mpans the progressive improve-
ment of the human personality
and the establishment of a free,
just, and cooperative social or-
der. Kaplan maintains that there
are adequate resources in the
world and capacities in man to
achieve, such salvation* He de-
clines,.God as the "power that
makes.for salvation.-" The notion
of' God conforms to our experi-
ence, since man senses a power
. which orients him to his life
and elicits from him the best of
which he is able.
Some Reconstructionists, Mil-
ton .--Steinberg probably being
the best example, refused to ac-
cept Kaplan's theology, the Ju-
daica reports. A more popular
notion of Kaplan's was his de-
finition of Judaism as an
evolving religious civilization
whose standards of conduct are
established by the Jewish people
and whose common denominator
is neither beliefs, tenets, nor
practices, but rather the con-
tinuous life of the .lewish peo-
ple. The Jewish religion, said
Kaplan, exists for the Jewish
people, not the Jewish people
for the Jewish religion. Judaism,
like any other civilization, com-
prises a history, a language, a
religion, a social organization,
standards of conduct, and spirit-
ual and social ideals. Under the
influence of the early French
sociologist. Emile Durkheim.
Kaplan staled that whatever is
an object of collective concern
takes on all the traits of a reli-
gion, which in its turn functions
in order to hold up to the in-
dividual the value of the group
and the importance of his com-
plete identification with it. Reli-
gion, therefore, lies at the very
heart of every civilization.
'
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Yitro
The revelation of the Law on Mount Sinai-
"And it came to pass on the third day, when it was
morning, that there were thunders and lightnings and a
thick cloud upon the mount, and the voice of a horn ex-
ceeding loud (Exod. 19.16).
YITRO Word reached Jethro, Moses' father-in-
law, and a priest of Midian, of what God had done for
the Israelites. He went to meet Moses in the desert.
Jethro advised Moses to appoint judges, in order to ease
the burden of his sole leadership; Moses should confine
himself to the most difficult questions.
In the third month, the children of Israel heard the
Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai: God's voice de-
clared: "I am the Lord thy God Thou shalt have
no other gods before Me. Thou shalt not make unto thee
a graven image. Thou shalt not take the name of
the Lord thy God in vain. Remember the sabbath
day, to keep it holy. Honor thy father and thy
mother. Thou shalt not murder. Thou shalt not
commit adultery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou
shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. .
Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's hpuse wife .
j nor any thing that is thy neighbor's (Exodus 20.2-14).


Page 12-B
'Jenisti fkridUan
Friday, January 23, 1976
5
i
I
r
t
r
ir
Bar Mitzvah

Economic Society
Installs 1976 Officers
The Economic Society of
At a reception and dinner in South Fiorjda, Inc., recently in-
Charles's honor on Saturday stalled new officers for 1976.
night at the Seville Hotel, his Tne society's new president is
Major Philosophers Are Subject Of
CAJE Modern Jewish Thinkers Course
grandpa/, nts, Mr. and Mrs.
Freidul Kambcr and Mrs. Ke-
becca Goldberg, will be pre-
sent, along with Miss Raquel
Segal, his aunts Mrs. Rerri
Seigel and Mrs. Anne C. Wolpe
of Washington and Mrs. Sylvia
Richard B. Bermont. Executive
vice president is Ben N. Cris-
well. Vice president of programs
is William S. Marshall.
Membership and economic
education vice presidents, re-
spectively, are David Blumberg
and Dorothy Ashe Dunn. Susan
Segel of Lanewoou, N.J., and
Charles Goldberg David Greenberg his cousins Andrea and Bren- Neuman is secretary and Lyn
da Segel, and Jaime Katz of don C. Conlon, is treasurer.
Puerto Rico.
ir ir ir
KAREW ANN KAPLAN
Dr. and Mrs. Arnold Kap-
lan's daughter, Karen Ann, will
become a Bat Mitzvah this eve-
graCdhe ^T Rilic'r" SLTSK ""* 8 Bel" ^ C"' "' """<*P'"
CHARLES GOLDBERG
Berta and Jaime Goldberg's
son, Charles, will be Bar Mitz-"
van on Saturday at 8:45 at
Temple Or Olom.
The board of directors new
members are O. Leslie Nell and
Morris M. Broad.
The guest speaker was Dimit-
ris Balatsos.
School, where he is on the
varsity soccer team and in the
school band.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
gregation.
Karen, who is in the fourth-
grade class at the Beth Torah
Harold Wolk Religious School
and a member cf the student
council, U in the seventh grade
at John F. Kennedy Junior
High. She plays classical guitar.
Karen, who received the Amer-
ican Legion Award, is presi-
dent of Acorn Service Club
and editor of the school news-
paper.
Guests will include her great-
grandmother, Mrs. Lena Ris-
kin, and her grandparents, Ben
Riskin and Mr. and Mrs. Al
Kaplan. Other guests are Dr.
Hears Dr. Gorfinkel
Dr. Joseph Gorfinkel, rabbi
emeritus of Temple Beth Moshe
of North Miami, spoke on
"Chaim Greenberg: Poet and
Autltor" on Wednesday at a
meeting of Aviva Chapter of
Pioneer Women. ,
Mrs. Dora Cohen, chapter
president, chaired the meeting,
at which tribute was paid to the <
late Beba Idelson, president of
the Pioneer Women world or-
ganization, who died in Israel
last month.
The writings of the major
Jewish philosophers ot the twen-
t^nt of the course "Modern
tent o fthe course "Modern
Jewish Thinkers" to be taught
bv Edith Jacobson at Temple
Sinai of North Dade on Thurs-
days from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
The course, which began on
Thursday, is offered in the In-
stitute for Jewish Studies of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation in cooperation with the
Adult Education Program of
Temple Sinai.
Major philosophers to be con-
sidered include Franz Rosenz-
weig, Martin Buber, Abraham
Isaac Kook, Abraham Joshua
Heschel. Mordecai Kaplan and
Ahad Haam.
The primary concepts and
ideas of each will be described
by Mrs. Jacobson, w**h special
emphasis on the influence of
thir thought on modern Jew-
ish belief and practice.
Mrs. Jacobson has taught in
such programs as the Institute
fo>- Jewish Ftudi -s, the Contin-
uing Education Department of
Miami-Dade Community Col-
lege and for a variety of Jewish
organizations, including Hadas-
sah in which she served as
education chairperson for sev-
eral years. In the summer of
1974 she led a study tour to Is-
rael.
Mrs. Jacobson. who majored
in nhilosophy at the University
of Miami, is also a Registered
Nurse. She has participated in
national educational seminars
and is the author of a mono-
graph on concepts and ideas in
the book of Genesis. She recent-
ly concluded a series of courses
on the relevancy of Biblical
thought for 20th-century Juda-
ism, given under the ausnices
of the Institute for Jewish
Studies.
Beth Moshe Students
and Mrs. Wayne Riskin of San e>
Antonio and Dr. and Mrs. Ger ^rtlCipatmg in Services
aid Kaplan of Chicago.
ir ir ft
DAVID F. GREENBERG
David Franklyn, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Carol Greenberg, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on Sat-
urday at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Emanu-El.
David is a seventh-grade
The following members of the
fifth-year class at Temple Beth
Moshe's Religious School will
participate in services this eve-
ning:
Kelli and Murray Segal
daughter and son of Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Segal; Cathy Rich-
man, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
student in the Lehrman Day Paul Richman; Steve Mitchell,
School. He plays tennis and son of Mr- and ^tn- Rav Mit'
enjoys water-skiing and scuba- cneI1: M,ke Eechter, son of Mr.
diving. and Mrs. Howard Tractenberg;
David's parents will host a Ronald Fisher, son of Mr. and
reception following services at Mrs- Joseph Fisher; and Sheryl
the Doral Hotel, and out-of- Rapee, daughter of Mr. and
town guests will attend.
ir ir ir
RONALD YANKS
Ronald, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Yanks, will be Bar Mitz-
vah at Temple Zamora on Sat-
urday at 9 a.m.
Ronald attends the Deerborn
Mrs. Stuart Rapee.
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Rabbi Fingerer
Leads Talmud Class
Herbert L. Lelchuk, presi-
dent of Congregation Beth
Moshe, has announced that
School, where he is a member Rabbi Daniel J. Fingerer will
of the Junior Key Club and offcr a class in Talmud,
the basketball team. Classes will be held on Mon-
Mr. and Mrs. Yanks will host davs and Thursdays at 2 p.m.
a dinner in Ronald's honor at beginning Jan. 26, and the Trac-
the Sheraton Four Ambassa- tate Ta'anis will be studied.
dors on Saturday evening.
ir it it
MICHAEL PINCUS
Mr. and Mrs. David M. Pin-
DORWIN'S
1572 WASHINGTON AVE.
'532-4061
Asthma Fund Drive
Sunshine Chapter, North
Dade-Broward and Point East
cus son, Michael, was called Chapter of CARIH the Na-
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah tional Asthma Center at Den-
niuru V 3t TemPIe Israel- ver conducted a door-to-door
Michael is a student at John and street drive in the North
P. Kennedy Junior High School, Miami Beach area from last
wnere he is in the school or- Sunday through today,
cnestra s string section and ac- The funds collected are for
tive in scouting and sports. the benefit of children suffer-
inere was a reception in his ing from severe asthma and al-
honor.
lied allereics.
f

I.
HIGH IN THE
BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
CAMP
WOHELO
FOR GIRLS
Director: Morgan Lev)
Wohelo
Comet
Traits
"Dedicated
to
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< C nitdren are the future ^
R. D. 4
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CAMP
COMET
FOR BOYS
Director: Harry Pure
ACCREDITED
CAMP
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Quality 8 Week Camps Completely Separate Facilities
COMET TRAILS For Teenage Boys
Owned and Directed by a Miami Family for 48 Years.
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FLORIDA REUNION SUNDAY, JANUARY 25th, 1 P.M.
Greynolds Park Rock Shelter
Prospective campers and parents welcome.
Call or write for a personal interview in your home.
1976 enrollment closing soon.
Morgan I. Levy, Director
1S31 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami, Fla. 33144 Phone: 2644389
Staff inquiries invited, minimum age 19-


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Services Bar Mitzvah Lessons All Dietary Lam Observed
M.D. & 2 R.N.'s Staff our Modem Infirmary at ALL Times.
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Your Camp Directors:
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Contact Director Louis Weinberg
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Phone 758-9454 or 858-1190
w1NTER o--:^cK._5philadelphia


I January 23, 1976
+Jew1sli ncrkfiari
Page 13-B
5
Religious Services
MIAMI
SHALOM CONGREGA-
995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Iron. 1
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadi
Nahmias. J1
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Groner. 32
EMES CONGREGATION.
SW 19th Ave. Conaervative.
ir Sol Pakowitz. 2
AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Ken-
FOr. Reform. Dr. Herbert M.
iigard. Associate Rabbi Mitchell
Itz. 3
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Yav-
neh. 32-a
BREIRA CONGREGATION.
SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Tabachnikoff. 3-A
DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
irvative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
>r William Lipson. 4-A
ACUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimovits.
32-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. S3
DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
iu. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
|rn Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
Sonservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
8
ISRAEL AND GREATER MI-
YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
Iset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
man. 8-A
LOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th
Conservative. Rabbi David M.
on. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
AtL.SOUTH TEMPLE (former.
Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Re-
Km Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
-------------a-------------
IUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
e.. Suite 306. Conservative. Rabbi
ixwell Berger. 9
RETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6500
Miami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
llomon Benarroch. 14
JN TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
Irvative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
intor Errol Helfman. 16
HIAIEAH
|ERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
bi Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Na-
fcan Zolondek. 13
NORTH MIAMI
TH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
Zi NE 121st St. Conservative. Rab-
Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
ehJda Binyamin. 35
MIAMI BEACH
JOATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
rthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
ITH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
d. Rabbi Alexander Gross. 5
rH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Ibbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
tTH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
frtnodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
virsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19
tTH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1543
fferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
tlliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
ETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
nase Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
Ih. Cantor David Conviser. 21
ETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative,
iabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecai
rardeinl. 21-A
fTH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
35 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
'. Tropper. 22
|TH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox,
labbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
JAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
)rthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
lacobson. 22-B
(BAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
842 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
ibbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
JBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
Congregation. 715 Washington
Ive. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
(elamed. 23-A
iMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conservative. Dr. Irving
iLehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
IEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
5. Gross. 23
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
BETH TORAM CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson. 34
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36-A
I RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
NW 183rd St. Conservative,
bi Victor D. Zwelling. Cantor
ek Lerner. 36
-------------------
EL TEMPLE OF GREATER
Ml. 137 NE 19th St. Reform,
bi Joseph R. Narot. 10
S'NAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick. 38
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
ELITE CENTER. 3175 SW 25th
Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Idenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
s. 11
CORAL GABLES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5650 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
senstat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 51
FORT LAUDERDAIE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park -Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi PhMip A: Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor Je-
rome Klement. 43
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 52
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 62
FOMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. 93
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1361 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosen-
feld. 45
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 46
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
65
IACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
Itor Meyer Engel. 26
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
senfield. 47B
INESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
lOrthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
(Cantor Abraham Self. 27
IENORAH TEMPLE. 620 75th St.
[Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
Ivvitz. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
|ER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Clein. 29
IEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr. Or-
Fhodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
ian. 30
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47-C
-------------------
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nobb Hill Rd. Re-
form. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams. 64
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazin
Cantor Abraham Kester. *
Member of the Rabbinical Association
of Greater ftl.Iaml.
Women's Council
Of Realtors
The Women's Council of Re-
altors installed officers at the
recent convention of the Flor-
ida Association of Realtors in
Orlando. Norma Martin of Sa-
rasota is the new president.
The Miami Dade North Chap-
ter, which received the 1975
Membership Award, was repre-
sented by Adrienne Aron, pres-
ident, and Janet Drake, Doro-
thy Ikenson and Ruth Tarta-
glia.
The Miami Dade North Chap-
ter is planning an educational
roundtable workshop on
Wednesday, Jan. 28, from 2 to
5 p.m. at the Miami Shores
Country Club.
Torah Academy
Family Supper
Tu B'Shevat and Arbor Day
were celebrated at the Torah
Academy of South Florida on
Jan. 16. Thirty-six trees were
planted, symbolizing a Jewish
concept of two times Chai,
which means "life."
The trees, each marked with
the name of the child who
planted it, were donated to the
school by the Florida Division
of Forestry.
Dade School Board Member To Be
Israeli Education Ministry Guest
G. Holmes Braddock, a mem-
ber of the Dade County School
Board, will be a guest of the
Israel Ministry of Education,
Feb. 2-18. He has been a mem-
ber of the school board since
1962 and has served as its
chairman and vice chairman.
Braddock will join other
sponsors from all over the U.S.
of the National Committee for
Middle East Studies in Secon-
dary Education, an affiliate of
the American Professors for
Peace in the Middle East.
The committee's prime con-
cern is the impact of Middle
East problems upon American
youth and their grasp of world
affairs.
The committee develops cur-
ricula and lesson plans, semi-
nars and workshops on the
Middle East and Middle East-
ern Studies for secondary-level
social studies teachers, educa-
tors, and administrators.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 576-4OO0. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4553. Rabbi Sanford
Shapero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1820 NE 163rd St., Nfrth Miami
Beach. Fla. 33162. 947-6094. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
,AfA II, AHTSil A) 0 ^
P(F | A jj C E)Q H

E
TVM
J* X G
ACHSENMlA
K FfO c C 0 R o m)
(s~b utha?hica)b
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
ANSWERS: Israel, Canada, United States, South
Africa, Great Britain, France, Morocco, Argentina, Aus-
tralia, USSR, Iran, Italy.
ZJhefKed Uelve
RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE
Located in the
HOLIDAY INN
1819 79th St. Causeway North Bay Village
/
Bar Mitzvahs
Parties
and other
social functfons
Mon.-Wed. & Fri.
Ladies Nights
50c.
a drink
3:30 to 7 P.M.
95c.
DOUBLES
PRIME RIBS
SHISH KEBAB'S
STEAKS
SEAFOOD
Candlelight Dining and
Live Entertainment.
Happy Hour 5 P.M. to 7 P.M.
*
X *SvUr\-


*>*.* ^.aww
Page 14-B
+Jewlsti fhr/dHan
Friday, January 23, 1976
it
\
I
P
I
t
|
I
I

Right Wrongs in Israel, Allon Urges
UGAL NOTICE
By YITZHAK SHARGIL build front line fortifications, peace.
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yigal Al-
lon has called on Israelis to
make use of the relative
calm resulting from the new
interim accord with Egypt to
remedy the wrongs and in-
equities within Israel's so-
ciety.
As Israeli and Egyptian
teams were working out the
final details of the interim
pact in Geneva, Allon warn-
ed against a return to pre-
Yom Kippur War compla-
cency and urged against a
repetition of easy money-
making and profiteering
such as was done by private
contractors employed to
ADDRESSING AN audience
at Ben Gurion University in
Beersheba that included com-
munity leaders, academicians,
students and youths from de-
veloping communities, Allon
said it might be better to con-
struct Israel's new lines of for-
tifications in Sinai by the army
engineers corps rather than
private contractors.
He said if the engineers lack-
ed all the equipment, laws could
be passed to commandeer
equipment for the task. Allon
said the deficiency of the Is-
raeli-Egyptian interim pact in
Sinai was that it is not a final
peace agreement but only a
stage on the road towards
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
technicians' presence as an es- fldade county
sential condition for the sig- general jurisdiction division
nature of the agreement. I had acon ^ob^IsolutIon
my reasons for and against of marriage
" IN UK: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOYCE .MITCHELL HIRSCHHORN.
American technicians. But I
have decided in favor of the
technicians because the pros
are more than the cons."
ASKED BY Maariv if he
would implement the agree-
ment should Congress fail to
Wife.
mill
8TEPHAN HffiSCHHORN,
Husband.
TO: STKI'H.W HIRSCHHORN
. r. Charles Hlrsehhorn
1SS West HSili SI reft
New York, New York inn?:?
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFir.D
approve the American presence, thai an action for Dissolution or Mar-
Allnn rfmliorl that thprp was an ''''"-' ni,s '"'" fil''' :|Kai"sl you nnd
Alton replied tnat mere was an -j |( l.i.1|llj,.,1 sorve a POpy of
understanding with the Amer- your written defense*, n nny. to it on
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 76-27
'n Ri-: Estate of:
SARAH SHNEYER,
I iiwiised.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO Aid- PERSONS HAY INS CLAIMS
)R DEMANDS AQAINST THE
\i:0\'H ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
YQU AUK HEREBY NOTIFIED
bat the administration of the etdate
if SARAH BHNEYER, deceased, File
Number 76-27 Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for D:icl< County, Florida.
rotate Division, tin- address of which
- fc Weal Flakier Street. Miami.
Florida. The Personal Representative
if the estate Is SEYMOUR SHNEY-
5R Whose address, is 2L'-36 tth Ave-
.iue. Little Neckj NOW York. 11362.
The name and address of the Perso-
nal Representative's attorney arc set
ortl below,
All personi havlu claims or do-
h:i mis asalnsj the estate are requir-
ed, WITHIN THREE .MONTHS
FROM THE HATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
to file With the clerk of the above
"tiit a written statement of any
clairit or demand they may have.
Each claim must be In writing: and
must indicate the basis for the claim,
the name and address of the creditor
rr his agent or attorney, and the
imount claimed. If the claim is not
-ei due, the date when it will become
lue shall be stated. If the claim is
uniiiigent or unliquidated, the nature
>f the uncertainty shall be stated, if
'he claim is secured, the security
shall be described. The claimant shall
leliver sufficient copies of the claim
'<> tlie clerk to enable the clerk to
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 75-7466
Division 35
in Be: Estate of:
HOSE STORCH,
1) leased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ai:o\ i: ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
Vui: ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that lite administration of the estate
of ROSE STOROH, Deceased File
Number 76-7448, It pending in the
Circuit Court for Dave County, Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse. 7."
West Flakier Street, Miami, Florida
The persQiial representative of the
e.-iate is WILLIAM LEVY, whose ad-
dress la 3Q0 Diplomat Parkway, Apart-
ment 811 Hallandale. Florida. The
name and address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are requir-
ed. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
Its advantage, he said, was
that it may possibly provide
the chance for a political set-
tlement instead of a military
one.
IN AN interview published
in Maariv on the eve of Rosh
Hashonah, Allon was reported
as saying that if the United
States was for any reason un-
able to provide American civil-
ian technicians to man an ad-
vanced warning station in Si-
j ,l irani that if thp stationing of JoSEl'H w. MALEK, ESQ1 IRK. at-
nai as proposed in the interim 1CcUls mai Ine sidnonnig oi ( mv for Petu,oner_ wh0M address
accord with Egypt "we shall technicians was not possible, u, sso Lincoln Road, suite soi .Miami
the U.S. would not hold Israel Beach, Florida 33188, and file the
responsible for not reaching an ^cou^on'or ^Mrwft
agreement. If7t; otherwise a default will be en-
tired against you for the relief de-
He said he believed Congress manded in the complaint or petition.
,...,,. I,I innrnvn PrAecfrl nn that This notice shall be published once
would approve. Pressed on tnat r.lrh wi.(l. fo|. f(iul. ,.I1S(.,.utiv(, week9
point, Allon said if there was
no approval, "we shall have to
find a way how to advance to
the agreement under conditions
that will result from the can-
cellation of the American pres-
ence."
find a way to implement the
agreement without them."
According to Maariv, Allon,
who with Premier Yitzhak Ra-
bin and Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres comprised the Is-
raeli negotiating team for the
agreement, said, "I did not pre-
sent the question of American
technicians as a demand and I
did not regard the American
LiGAl NOTKE
(Asked the same question in
in THE JEWISH FI.OR1DIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at .Miami. Florida, on this
Hull day of January, 1978
RCHARD P. HltlNKER,
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By I.. 8NEEDEN
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH \v. STALER
350 Lincoln Road Suite .'"I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.IVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of TEATItO NACIONAi. at 4.14S N.W.
ISSrd Street, Miami, Florida intends
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
TRACY I.O ENTERPRISES. INC
By STEPHEN H. CYPF.N,
Assistant Secretary
CYPEN & NEVfNS
Attorneys for TRACY LO
ENTERPRISES, INC.
831 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Bench. Florida .1:1110
l/SIt-SO 2/8-13
Attorney for Petitioner
1/23-30
2.'-I3
an interview published in the Miami Hca.h, Florida ssisj
Sept. 15 edition of U.S. News &
World Report, the Israeli For-
eign Minister replied: "Now, if
Congress fails to approve the
Administration's undertaking
to dispatch to the area a couple
of hundred technicians, it will
be a great disappointment to
Israel, and I think, also to ,
n. IN RE: The .Marriage of C.AIL B.
i-gypt. Such refusal may par- riciiards. wife and Howard a
alyze the process of implemen- ^^oward c"r,cha
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 76-1920
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
tation of the agreement, and
some new methods would have
to be sought out.")
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE I* HEREBY GIVEN that
to file with the clerk of the above the undersigned, desiring to engage
court a written statement of any in business under the fictitious name
claim or demand they may have, of STEVEN J. KLEIN d/b'/a IN-
Each claim musi be in writing and STRUMENTR FOR STUDIO REN-
must Indicate the basis for the claim, TAL at 1260 N.E, 203rd Street North
the name and address of the creditor Miami Beach, Florida Intends to reg-
pr ins ay. nt or attorney, and the ister said name with the Clerk of the
amount claimed. If the claim is not Circuit Court of Dade Countv, Florida,
yet due, the date when it will become STEVEN J. KLEIN
dui shall be stated. If the claim is MICHAEL P. CHASE
contingent or unliquidated, the nature Attorney for STEVEN J KLEIN
Of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim is secured, the security
shall be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the claim
In the clerk to enable the clerk to
1/9-16-23-30
mail one copy to each personal rep- "!?-.%.PW "' ac" Personal rep-
resentative.
All persons interested In the estate
rcscntativc.
All persons interest,.d in the estate
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 75-4926
In Re: Estate of:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-39843 Div. 25
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TAMPA FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DIANIA SMITH and...............................
her husband, if married
CITIZENS NATIONAL HANK OF
MIAMI, and CARMINE A BRAVO,
residence unknown, if living; un-
known spouses, if remarried, and if
dead, then unknown spouses, if re-
married; all unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees, or otherwise claiming by,
through, under or against the said
DIANIA SMITH and.......................
her husband, if married, CITIZENS
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI, and
CAKMNE A. BRAVO and against all
LABIS other persons having or claiming to
have any right, title or Interest in or
RDS
Mil Cooper l^inding Road
Apt. A-1H3
Cherry Hill. New Jersey. 0SIV34
Yor ARE HEREBY required to
serve a copy of your Answer to the
Petition lor Dissolution of Marriage
herein on the Petitioner's Attorney,
Ml'RRAY Z. KIJSIN, 800 Seyboid
Bulldihg, Miami. Florida and file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
tlio Circuit Court on or before Febru-
ary IT, l!7ti or said cause will be taken
as confessed l.v vou.
DATED this 20th day of January.
197ft
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court
C. P. COPEI.AND
Deputy Clerk
1/2.1-30 2/6-U
ituu OTHER to the Property herein described.
decedent s will, the qualifications of PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE Defendants.
.,.,]l'..J>,-'r50i1.n,,.J.e?Tese"t:,t!ve or ROTATE: TO: DIANIA SMITH and..............
her husband, if married,"CITI-
ZENS NATIONAL BANK OF
decedent's will, the qualifications of
the personal representative or the
venue or Jurisdiction of the court venue or Jurisdiction of the court. yoC ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND ALL QLAIMJ5. DEMANDS. AND ihat the administration of the estate
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL of OSCAR BETANCOURT AGRA-
BE FOREVER BARRED. ( BE FOREVER BARRED. MONTE, deecused. File Number'75-
Date of the first publication of this 'Date of the first publication oY tWs K* Is pending in the Circuit Court
Notico of Administration: Jan. 23. Notice of Administration: Jan. 28. for Dade County. Florida,.Probate D'-
1976.
1!76.
SEYMOUR SHNEYER
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of SARAH SHNEYER;
Deceased.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
11ALBUT AND 02VLBUT
721 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida, 33139
By: HYMAN P. OALBUT
Telephone: 672-31*0
1/23-30
WILLIAM LEVY
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of Rose Storch,
i Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR MRSONAfc,
REPRESENTATIVE:
LAW OFFICES OF A. JAAT ORISTOL
Dade Federal Build,ng
21 Northeast First Avenae
Miami. Florida 33U1'
Telephone 37S-179S
1/2S-S0
vision, the address of which is Dkde
County Courthouse. 73 West Flajler
Street, Miami, Florida. The personal
rpreentative of the estate is MHR-
RAY Z. KLEIN. ESQ. whose addSiss
Is 100 Seyboid Building. Mi:*fni, Flor-
ida. The name and address of -'the
personal representatives attorney "are
set forth beloW:
Ail persons having cjatra'a .or. de-
niands against the" estate, are reqair-
d. WITHIN. TJfREEv: MONTHS
FROM THE DUTX r^THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THT3 NOTICE.
MIAMI and CARMINE A.
BRAVO, residence unknown. If
living; unknown spouses, if
remarried and it dead, then un-
known spouse* if remarried; all
unknown heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, assignees. len.qr, creditors
trustees, or otherwise claiming
the said DIANIA SMITH and
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANO
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 78-1944
,.... NOTICE OF SUIT
FRANCES CRANT.
Petitioner-Wife
and
CLARENCE GRANT.
Res|s>nilent-Husband
TO: CLARENCE OKA NT
400 CHURCH STREET
,, K1S8IMEE. FLORIDA
YOU CLARENCE GRANT, are
hereby notified that a Petition for
Dissolution Of Marriage has been filed '
against you and youSre required to
Z7\t C3?y'3'!r Answer or *<*"*
wffe-, ,,e PeMon on PeUtUmer-
ii w K*.*"a B,"cyn Buiajng-
Jinolhta*,"r .K-,^*', Mlaml- ^>rfda
Ofc* Of
i or
ln*'tlrA'^W-CT^.^^Pft'"*n IB th
ir
rt
t
against.all O^f"^ers0'r5'havln; -. ria^ef
- SM9TH and
r"^^3tI,"?nWtBJfcSK^i*B"h* f'i""*?" lvt*. n yon taa fe
If married. CmglENa NA- Judgment by default will h- W~. -
TIONAL BANK (3f MIAMI, and *nst you for the relief *TmS^!S
>
CARMINE
or-clatming to have any rbAr.
title or Interest or to the
YOU*""^- h.'?*iJ-<'eaCrtb* to tn> wltrrthV, cler* if the above ., WE ARE HBREB-Y NOTIFIED .DONE AND OM>EBEn?!E
court a w-Htten- strfwrhVi'!of^fiy 't to foreclose mortgage "ado County. FTorRhTth.s :
claim or demand thay may have. f*^lns.t..re,"J *" Wa kW -'.__- -______a'* m.r 1 tlaan r I tail n ^ t___ ____. '.________T _
Each cUum must be in writing and. ^*tL^- .affs-'nst ypu. In the aboM
must indicate thebaslB ror the claim. OU^"b,,th pn"''. TAMPA rKI>7
the.nan* and address of the creditor o?V^,?TtVIN09 Amf LOAN A3RO-
or his agent or attorney, and "the 4$?^N'
amount ejaimed. If the clolm is' not .J'il6 J!F^T.rt}r\*aa > Toreclos-
Thts Notice 8hall.'be''publlsliM--itt"f
^*?*S tour con^u^v.
rtrt Jewish^ Fldrldlan; !
MMmf."
XOthr dy. -
yt due.- the date when It will be'een
due shall be auted. If the. claim la
contingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim i* secured, the security
shall, be.described. Tiie claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the chum
e clerk to enable the cler* to
ed Is as follows:
&0A,fLlockJ*' WaaEfWOOD,
YOU ARE REQUIRED 1o gerve a
RICHARD P. BRINKHm
Clerhv Ulrjallt Court
Dade County, Florida,
By: G. FREDERICK -
.._._ Detwlty Clerk
(Circuit Cowt Seal)
__________ *m-M vt.
NOTICE TS HEREBY OfV^I" that
mail one copy" to"'each personal!*- fJs' % *^ *'^* <^other~piead- *\ *ggBBSF. Hn,le'r the^icti
res-entiftive. .* '"?, Plartttfrs Attorney HAL. of PENINsiTi.ar oS
All persons interested in the estate %?* ^ ^^'^DMAN. 800 Douguta WO*
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad! JSfisJ^ G.aW*8' rw**7um. 30S6%E ^w7t LtiXrS.t.
BbilgjraUMLhfE been mailed are. re- !? SJTJ1" ?'?ln^ ln > *ffee of Ma. 3J3S4 Intend 'tc, r.^l^M
to engaxs
.rtMioua- n^me
uuired, WITIffN THREE MONTHS u #^tte? 2i ^he bv Cort. on or nn>e With the Clei* nffhVTi iT
SS2?1, rnK TJATE 0F THE FIRST ft'SM' T\1^ Prt>rrV, 7^ Court of Dade Cointv Florida,
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTfCE. L" -*S,"" of whlc^1th* complaint will J, H G iJ, *
to file any obiectlons thev mv h.,. V6 taken as confessed aa-alnst vn a i "A_2r
-7. --------- vr in,.-, llOTItB, Ka ., t ----------. *^'l'"tmi will
file any objections they may have ? taken as confessed against you
that challenges the validity of the ^HLe,^e"* L-re/,u5?ud in Plaintiffs
., Inc
A Fla. Corp.
dec-edenr, wTJT the" OuanBcatlo"ns Tf ""^FD ^T" "VC........ ^tl&SsY$%$gtt
personal representative or the 1975 15th d-"y of January. Attorneys for applicant EaD
1/8S--30 /-13
venue or jurisdiction of the court,
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: Jan. 23,
11*76.
MURRAY Z. KLEIN, ESQ.
As Personal Representative of tb.6
Estate Of OSCAR BETANCOURT
AGRAMONTE
Deceased.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MURRAY Z. KLEIN, ESQ.
Ml Seyboid Building
Miami, Florida
379-6S51
RICHARD P. BRINKER Clerk
Clerk Of the Circuit Court of
Da*e county Florida
By: C. P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OTVE* f
the undersigned, desiring
that
m.* M. *w^l^r rrcn.foVxs.
of KING'S DElJl at If
. n..jNU s deli at 1580 Washington
NOTICE UNDER^ ^re^ter*'^ BeCh M1M- '"""d
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW of oT ^ "' name with the Clerk
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN that F orida CUrt f D"de Cmnt*'
the undersigned, desiring to enaWe *'<"'.
'" kujnjw under the fictitious name f I?" tVC-
SftSS^:2..P2?Llm 1* By TOM/- A?l-,Cbrp.
Street
ter
Clrc
et Miami 331 9 Int^d. 0 r*Z. HENRt'A^S4Cv5RRB Pre'Mt
said name with the Clerk of the Aitorn.w N
Ult -Srf-ftrf ^2? ^B^ca^Ar"1
JOAN SINGER
l/IS-80
'
2'B-13
Biscayne Bldg.
Miami 33130
be I
>or-
aw
the
nil
on
the]
in
ro-|
ar-
-W
1 '"1 on
- 'P "I


lay, January 23, 1976
*Jewish fhridHam
Page 15-E
1
Bernstein To Speak At '
'reciter Miami Mizrachi Dinner
Mi'.rachi-Hapoel Hnmizrachi,
greater Miami Region, has
fclv.;(Jul';J its annual scholar-
ship banquet for Sunday eve-
King, Feb. 8, at the Algiers Ho-
kel.
Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever, presi-
dent, announced that guests of
honor are Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Jacobs, who are active in the
Mizrachi movement and in
bhilmthropv. The Jacobs^s. who
live in H-'iHndale, came from
)ayton, Ohio.
Gi~t speaker at the dinner is
[Fah'-<~ Louis Bernstein, national
[president of the Rabbinical
council of America. A graduate
of Yeshiva University, he is
editor of the Mizrachi publica-
tion "The Jewish Horizon."
Th? Greater Miami Mizrachi
Chanter is a branch of the Reli-
gion1: Zionists of America, which
is -celebrating its 73rd anniver-
sary this year.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
In THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-825
IENERAL. JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
K in:: THE MARRIAGE OF:
[lAVUKK VAI.DKS ESCOBAR,
Petitioner,
|].i IS FERNANDO BSGOBA-R,
Rrnnr>ntr"Tl*
|T" IMS HCnVAM"! ESCOBAR
Carrera f Number 927 Marsella
lUnnralda, Columbia s.A.
vi-.;- AUK, HEREBY NOTIFIED
n.'i an action for Di.-snlution Of Mar-
lins been filed against you and
\.ii are inquired to swve a copy of
I"- written defenses. If any. to it
..ii svi'l. T. VON ZA.MFT, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address la 1820
Dixie Highway, Suite BSO Coral
Cables, Florida S3146, and file the
orlalnal with tl>' cleric of the above
Kiylcd court on or before '.'"th Kehru-
ary, ''17.1; otherwise a default will he
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the rompTatnt or petition.
This notli'f shall be puhllahed once
each week for four eonveeuUv weeks
in THH JEWISH FIXJRIDIAW.
WITNESS my hand and ih.- sen! of
sn'd court hi Miami, Bwida on this
Itlh day f January, 1978.
ItlCHARD P. HRINKEK
.v.- Clerk, '"ii.uii I'oini
I lade County, Florida
By 8. I'AKKisil
As Deputy Clerk
I (Circuit < "oiin Seal)
SMI. T VON ZA.MFT
i. h ;>'\i. Highway, Suite sr,o
i ("oral Gables Florida ::::i 18
.Mi.M-noy for Petitioner
Ipliune: WT-4878
1/16-13-30 2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
I(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
. OLVIL-ACTION NO. 76-1080
GENEBAU-JUR'SDICT'ON DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN KB: The Marriage of
M kUC Al AN COOPER, Petitioner
and
HONNIK (CATHERINE ROACH
i 'i h >PER, respondent
Tip: RONNIE KATHBRINE
REACH OOOPWR
308 West 18th Street, Apt. 6-f?
New York Now York lMa
YOU ARK HKHKHY NOTTFIBH)
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a cow of
your written defenses, If any. to It
on .IF.URY A. BURNS, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 931 City
National Hank Huilding. Miami. Flor-
id;, Mist and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before Fell. 20, 1976: otherwise n
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.OKIDIAN.
WITNESS roy hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
13th day of January. 1976.
R'CHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade Conntv, K'orlda
By G. FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal)
JBRRT A, BURNS
''iX City National Hank Building
Mi.inc. Ffortfla 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
1/16-23-30 2/
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTCR IS HEREHY GIVEN that
the nnderslgajNf, dettrUuf to engage
In bus'np.* under the fictitious name
Of A. G. OSTEK & ASSOCIATES at
14930 8. Spur Drive, Miami, 33161 In-
tends to register snld name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ALLEN G. OSTER
1/16-23-30 2/6
RABBI LOUIS BERNSTEIN
B'nai B'rith Women Plan
Bicentennial Evening
B'nai B'rith Women. Miami
Council, will present a Bicen-
tennial evening, Monday, Jan.
26, at 8 in the Grenada Room
at the First Federal Batik Build-
in" on 27th Ave. and Coral
Wav.
The film "Jews in America,"
honorinc .Jews in American his-
tory, will he shown. George
p-rnst*in regional chairman of
the Anti-Dcfamtion League, will
be the guest speaker.
LEGAL NOTICf
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
ol NECKS^APFMAI. ftl 8850 S.Wi 68th
Court. Miami. Florida 331S6 im--nils to
n-Kislcr said name with the Clerk of
il>. '"ircuit Court of Dado County,
Florida.
1 !\DA I'.ARON
KOMMEL. ROGERS, IX1RBER
ft SUK.NK.MAN
Attorneys for Linda Baron
I-., | incnln Road, Suite 601
Miami Beach, Florida S8188
1/16-23-30 I 8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business and* r the fictitious "line
of GEORGE OREENE ORCHESTRA
at I960 N.E. 169 Street. North Miami
Reach, l-'la. 38162 intends to register
said name With 'he Clerk of the Cir-
eiiit COuri Of Hade County. Florida.
GEORGE GREENBERG
t/J6-23-80 2/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
NO. 75-8046
IN RE: ESTATE OK
F.MMA JAN'-: I.K.K
I iscenai d
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO til PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
i dt DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE B8TATB AND AI OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
Vi". ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thin the ailministration of the estate
... EMMA JANE LEE, deoeaaed, File
Number 75-8"46, Is peodins in the Clr-
,-uii Court of the Eleventh Judicial
Circuit of Florida In and for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Dlvlalon, the
address of which is 73 West Klngler
Street, Miami, Florida 33 The ner-
wmal Eopresentstive of this .state is
JAMES S I BE, whose addn | :::i
Northeast I86tn Street! Miami. Flor-
ida. The nain-- and address of the
attorney for the personal representa-
ii- ace >( forth below,
,>U nersons ha-\'ing claims or de-
trn id* against the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE tiF THE FIRST I'l'in I-
CATfON OF THIS notice, to file
With the Clerk Of the court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must lie
in writing and must Indicate the ba-
si> for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the rredlto* or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
win n it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim Is
wcot-ed. the security shall be describ-
ed, the claimant shall deliver SUfffclent
copies of the claim In the clerk to
enable the clerk t" m-'l one copy to
,.;,,!. 'M-rsonal representative.
All persons interested In the estate
to wrom a co"y of this Notice of
y ,iTv,;t.i.'f^*1"" I.....1 rn't,,'1', t*e
required. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
pi ti\i *rn i.* rvATF ',r-' mHF i^iv-'T
prii'.hWT'ov nv i-'iic .>>.,.
.. fib any nbjectlons they may have
that challenges 'he validity of the
decedent's will the nullifications of
t> oeVsofial r#*>resenfatlve, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the court.
First published on: January Ifith,
l76.
JAMES S. I.ftB
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of KWMA JANE l.EE,
Deceased
'OSEPH .T G?*" By DAVID OERSTEN
Of Law Offices of
Toseph J. Gersten
IA50 Soring Garden Road
Mlnmi. Florida 33136
ATTORNEYS FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
1/16-23
Beth David Brunch
And Art Exhibit
Ob Sunday, Feb. 1, following
a special ser\ice and member-
ship appreciation brunch at
Beth David Congregation, the
Fine Aits Committee will pre-
sent a mixed-media art exhibit,
including sculpture, ceramics,
macrame, paintings, etc., by
members of Betii David Con-
g.eg TOe special service r.nd
brunch are sponsored by the
Men's Gab and the member-
ship committej.
LEGAL f'OTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7668
in Re: Bstate of:
HARRY ENDEK
Decea: i 'i
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors aud Ail Pereona Hav-
ing t'laims or li'inaiuls Against Said
Kst.it' :
Vou are hereby notified and re-
quiem! to present an> ulaims ami de-
mands which you may have against
the estate oi HARIIV ENDKK deceas-
ed late of Cuyahoga County, Ohio,
to ihf t inuit Judges of Vhile County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733.Hi, Florida
Statutes, in thtir offices in the County
Courthouse In Dade County .Florida.
within tour calendar months from the
tiin,- of the first publication hereof, or
the same will be barred
Hied at Miami. Florida, this 13th
da} Of Junuarv. A.T>. 107l>.
SHAflKN K.VDBK
A- Ancillary Executrix
First publication of this notice on
tlit |8ed day Of January, Wi.
Altornevs loi Ancillar> Executrix
JAMKS A HAHSi;i!
Sioract Hall and Hauser
Mill Itrickcll Avenue
.Miami, Florida
1 23-80
The residents at Southgate Towers are led by Julius A.
Levine (left) in preparing an effort for 100-percent
participation in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund.
Levine is assisted by Irving Traub (center) and Dave
Frank.
/Zionist 'Federation Making
Yom Haatzmant Plans
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME tAW
NOTICE IS HKRETIY tTTVEN that
lie- main.ligncd, ib.Miwin I" ongitge
in business under the fictitious name
ol \\ II.SOVS KOOST in Dade County,
Florida,, intends to n cister said name
With the Clerk of th. Circuit Court ol
Diule County. Florida.
AVAi.H I'OKfOUATION
By: J. 1. Wilson. President
HARRIS & S1KKIN. I'.A.
Attorneys for Applicant
;.lh Floor Dad. I'.derel Hldg.
Miami, Florida 38131
1, 18-38-30 8
Plans for the communitywide
observance of "Yom -Haatzmaut.
Israel Independence Day, will
be launched on Tuesday. Jan.
27, at a meeting of the Amer-
ican Zionist Federation of South
Florida executive board.
Ttie noon luncheon will be ir
the offices of the AZT, accord-
ing to Mrs. Harriet Green, pres-
ident.
Among those participating in
tha ; "'f'-tinc .are S^yroiur B.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Uoc.i Every Da Cfoftd Sobbtrth
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2S63
Liebman. national vice pres.
dent ^bf the AZF. and Geralc
Schwartz, >a member ^of the na
tional board of directors of th-=
American Zionist Federation.
Iorali Acatlemv
Plants % Trees
The Torih Academy of South
Florida plans a family supper
on Sunday Jan. 25, from 4 to r
Israel of- (-rfoater.Miami.
Proceeds wi'l go to the Tora ;
Academy scholarship, fund.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NO'I'UK 16 itrMt.nt i.lvu.s' that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in hu.**iness under the ficptious name
of TUACKItS INCORPORATED at
12550 Biscayne Blvd., suite 6uz. .\ortn
.Mimni, Fin. 884HI iniemls to rei-ister
eald name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court ol bade County Florida.
Fl.OKlIiA TRACKRS
IM-co |'oi.-,Vl ISD
A Fla. Corp.
, l/i6-38-30 2 6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-605
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
: OF MARRIAGE
IN ItK: The Marriage of
KI-AIXK NOIITH,
petitioner,
and
CA8S K NORTH,
Respondent.
Ti i: OAS8 R NORTH
Condominium V'elero, Apt. 702
1070 Costi in Alcman
AcapOlco, .Mexico, N.A.
VOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Diswdutlon of Mai-
n.inc h;is been Wdd against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to It on
MARIAN STREET, I'.A. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is 12700
Blauayne Boulevard, suite no. North
Miami Florida .'WISl and file the
original with the clerk of the ahove
styled eourt on or hefore Feb. 12. Is76;
Otherwise B default will be enter* I
aKainst you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THK .IF.WISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS* my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
Sth day of Jan.. 1876,
RICHARD I' URINKKR
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I inde County, Florida
By c FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARLAN STREJBT, P.A.
13700 iiisc.iyiie Blvd.- Suite 4i0
North Miami. Florida 33181
Attorney for Petitioner
891-5852
l/lfr-28-30 2/6
friendship...
means someone cares
G8R00N FUNERAL NOME
Stivinf the JtfffcrrCommumty shTce 1938
ORlHOtfOX
CONSERVATIVE
REFORM SERVICES
Emr.ufl Cordon H946J IkcCoriSsi
HjnYGon:oi>(l964) Jimei B Gordon
-TcJ*p.h-ne J8S-MM
FICTITIOUS NAM* LAW
Notice is hereby give nthat the un-
dersigned, Ed Gordon Enterprises,
int. desiring to enflraire in misine--
n-itler the fictitious name. THE
FASHION CONSPIRACY intend-
register said name with the Clerk o<
I'.e Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
In/ ED GORDON' ENTERPRISES.
INC.
By: Edwin H. Gordon. Pres.
12^26-1/2-9-16
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift And
understanding service.
Dade County
949-H656
13365 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. levitt, F.D.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. S> 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3596
1921 Pembroke Rd.


Page 16-B
*Jcwisti Ihoridkui
Friday, January 23, 1976
BET THE BEST IN DAIRY!
You'll love the great variety of
products from around the world...
always satisfying, always fresh!
AMERICAN KOSHER
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 36'
ON 2 PACKAGES
FLEISCHMANNS REGULAR CORN OIL
Margarine
Franks or Knocks .Vkgz99*
HEBREW NATIONAL MIDGET
Salami or Bologna
ia.oz.$f 29
chub m
SKANSEN MATJES
5*
LIMIT TWO PKGS.. PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
f LO-SUN FRESHLY SQUEEZED ORANGE OR
Grapefruit Juice 4 ck $1
BORDEN LITE-LINE
Cream Cheese.......... 5K 49*
SWEET MUNCHEE
Cheese Singles AS 59*
DORMAN'S IMPORTED AUSTRIAN SLICED
Swiss Cheese 5:89'
WISCONSIN "HOLLAND STYLE" BABY OOUDA OR
Edam Cheese____.gf:85*
SERVICE APPETIZER DEFT.
AVAILABLE ONIY AT STORES WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
All IUNCH MEAT B CHEESE SLICED TO ORDER.
RICH'S GOURMET DELITE
Turkey Breast Roll
69 -
FRESHLY SMOKED SLICED
Nova Salmon........................3 $ 159
DELICIOUS
Chopped Liver-............3T 99*
WISCONSIN CHEESE WITH CARAWAY SEEDS ONLY
Sweet Munchee___SSf 79*
LEAN COOKED
Corned Beef.......................JS 89*
HEAT SERVE (WHIL.E THEY LAST) SERVES MO PEOPLE
Stuffed Turkey__each$1495
CREAMED
Herring Fillets each 29*
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 42
ON 2 CANS
Grapefruit
Juice
Herring Tidbits g 99*
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 1
ON 2 PACKAGES
American
Singles
BORDEN
COLORED
(CHEESE FOOD)
12-OZ.
PKG.
LIMIT TWO PKGS., PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE,
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
c
Finest Quality
MEATS I POULTRY
Blade Chops
89\
LAMB
SHOULDER
NEW ZEALAND
FROZEN
USDA CHOICE BEEF
Rib Steak
FRESH
Ground Beef Chuck l.
suc(d _Ma
Beef Liver 79*
SMALL END
BONELESS..,
LB.
$239
$109
Fryer
Quarters
FLA. OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM
FRESH
LB.
59
SPECIAL!
ROSOFF
Borscht
32-OZ.
JAR
LIMIT ONE JAR. PLEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MUSSELMANS
P.P.BRAND
UNSWEETENED
46-OZ.
CAN
Apple Sauce 5<^88*
P.P. BRAND YELLOW CLING
Peach Halves.....??..?;..,^NZ-39*
BIRDS EYE
FROZEN
LIMIT TWO CANS, PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE,
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Orange Juice *
5 as 99c
n
1 MADE W
WONDERFUL
FRESH BAKED GOODS
WITH PURE VEGETABLE SHORTENING
n
ITEMING
DELICIOUS NEW YORK
F
RICH'S FROZEN
Coffee Rich____3 8**1
P.P. HAND FROZEN
* 1Z. % |
.....................4bP PROS. JL
Cut Corn.
Onion Bread
OO ioaf
_ MtCK
English Muffins 3'oVGs 87*
PICKWICK
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
IN MIAMI BEACH
ALTON ROAD AT 18th STREET l/A
ALTON ROAD AT 10th STREET a
COLLINS AVE. AT 5th STREET A
COLLINS AVE. AT 74th STREETS/A
NORTH BAY VILLAGE (79th ST. CAUSEWAYJa
ARTHUR GODFREY ROAD AT PRAIRIE AVE. S/A
NORMANDY DRIVE AT RUE VERSAILLE A
HARDING AVE. AT 94th STREET, SURFSIDEs/A
IN MIAMI
DADELAND SHOPPING CENTER A
IN HOLLYWOOD
SO. FEDERAL HWY. (U.S. I) AT MAYO
S FRESH SEAFOOD A SERVICE APPETIZER
MERCHANTS GREEN
STAMPS FOR FINE GIFTS!
WE WELCOME
FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SATURDAY. JANUARY 24th
AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES IN DADE COUNTY,
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
Pick your own fresh
FRUITS & VEGETABLES
YOUNG AND TENDER
Round Beans
29c...
INDIAN RIVER SEEDLESS
Grapefruit 5 Jag.59*
CRISPY FRESH
Romaine Lettuce........head 33*
GARDEN FRESH
Green Cabbage..................lb. 12*
CRISP
Red Radishes 21& 19*
FOR RAKING OR FRENCH FRIES
Idaho Potatoes 5 .*& 79*
FOR THAT TROPICAL FLAVQR
PUERTO RICAN
Pineapples
EACH
SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SEAFOOD
SERVICE COUNTERS
Large Flounder
98c
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONI $OU> TO DEALERS.
FANCY
CAUGHT
FLORIDA CAUGHT
Yellowtail
FRESHLY SLICED
Halibut Steaks.
FANCY SMALL
Pearl Shrimp^
$119
LB. A
$198
.LB. JL
$159
.lb. JL


Friday, January 23, 1976
+JewisiinorkUan
Page 17-B
Jewish Family Life Is Focus
Of Weekend Reform Seminars
Helping young parents deal
with Jewish family living in the
home is the focus of Professor
Vy
GERALD B. BUBIS
Gerald B. Bubis, director of the
School of Jewish Communal
Services of Hebrew Un lege-Jewish Institut of Rel'gion.
He will meet with Reform t:m-
ples in Dade and Broward Coun-
ties during the weekend of Jan.
29-31.
Representatives of five Dade
Reform temrles will attend sem-
inars on Friday, Jan. 30, at 6
p.m. at Temple Is.a 1. an.' Sat-
urday, Jan 31, at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom.
The coi'-dinnto'- is RnbSi
Ralph P. Kingsley cf Temple-
Sinai, and committee represen-
tatives include Nanci Goldstein
of Temple Beth Sholom, Bar-
bara Donshik of Temple Sinai,
Ronni F.ermont of Temple Is-
rael and Marcia Reisman of
Temple Beth Am.
Professor Bubis will also
meet with educators and lay
committee members to discuss
"The Jewish Family" and "The
Changing Life Style for the
American Jew." These meetings
will be 'at Temple Judea on
Thursday, Jan. 29, at 6:30 p.m.
and at Temple Beth El, Holly-
wood, on Saturday, Jan. 31.
Professor Bubis heads the
HUC-JIR school in Los Angeles
which educates communal work-
er; to serve in Jewish commu-
nities here and abioad.
Professor Bubis, who has a
BA and MSW from the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, did post-
graduate work at USC, Berk-
eley, and Hebrew University
ana is pursuing a Doctoral de-
gree.
lie has been a visiting fac-
ulty member at the Hebrew
Unl ersity and a guest lectur-
er at UCLA, Haibor College,
Loyola University and Haifa
University.
He has published many ar-
ticles on subjects related to
contemporary Jewish life. He
coauthored a monograph on
Jewish Identity and edited a
book on the Jewish family
wmch will be published within
the year.
His articles have appeared in
"Recenstructionist," "Journal
if Jewish Communal Service.'
"Jou.nal of Central Conference
of American Rabbis" and "Jew-
ish Spectator."
Committee Formed To Plan
Nadler Memorial Library
Formation of a South Florida
committee to establish an Israeli
school library in memory of
Michael Nadler, a former Great-
er Miami Hebrew Academy
student killed last year in
an Arab fworl' t atack on
a religious kibbutz in the Golan
Heights, was announced this
week.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross,
principal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy, said the grouD will be
known as the Ramat Magshimin
Committee, taking the name of
the Israeli settlement where
19-year-old Nadler and two
yeshiva student-soldiers were
murdered by* hatchet-bearing
terrorists.
Ramat Magshimim consists of
a kibbutz and a yeshiva, Meron
Ha Golan.
Members of the local com-
mittee, in addition to Rabbi
Gross, who returned recently
f>-om a visit to the site of the
slayings in Israel, include Dr.
Matthew Zuckerman, Louis Pol-
lack, Sam Waldman, Rabbi
Phinas Weberman and Rabbi
Mordecai Shapiro.
Michael Nadler moved to Is-
rael with his parents, Dr. and
Mrs. Sam Nadler, four years
ago. Dr. Nadler is professor of
sociology at Ban-llan Univer-
sity.
The first four students in a 30-hour "Homemakers Aid"
course conducted by Pauline Gould (in the background)
at the Jewish Vocational Service of Miami received cer-
tificates of competency from Steven Weisberg of JVS
at Mt. Sinai Hospital. The four are Mary Faust, Bess
Goretsky, Mae Goodman and Laura Isenberg. The stu-
dents learned how to aid people using crutches, wheel-
chairs, walkers and canes, as well as bed services, cook-
ing, cleaning and other homemaking activities, along
with "conversational therapy." The women are consid-
ered qualified to work in private homes wherever aged
srsons need help. _/
Jk
JAN PEERCE
Hebrew Academy
Presents Peerce
The South Dade Hebrew
Academy will present Jan
Pesrc". "Toscanini's favorite
tenor," at tne Miami Beach
Theafe of the Performing Arts
on Saturday, Feb. 21, at 8:30
p.m.
In this program, Peerce
looks lool s back at the high
points of his celebrated roles
and offers selections from
operas less familiar to many
audiences.
Peered w>s hailnH. when he
made his Metropolitan Opera
debut, as "successor to the
greats of opera's almost ex-
tinct Golden Age." Alexander
Fried, of the "San Francisco
Examiner," called him "one
of the most phenomenal sing-
ers of our time."
TV Programs
Sunday, January 25
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Temple Beth Shalom
Hollywood
tt "it tt
"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Guests:
A Panel of College Students
Topic:
"The Bicentennial"
Beth Tor ah Congregation
has announced the continu-
ation of its ninth annual
Cultural Series on Montluv,
Feb. 9, at 8:30 p.m. with
the appearance of Jacob K.
Javits, Senior U.S. Senator
from New York. Sen. Javits
is in his fourth Senate term
and his 28th consecutive
year in elective office. He
is the senior Republican on
the Committee on lAxbor
and Public Welfare, the
Joint Economic Committee
and the Select Committee
on Small Businesses. He
also serves on the commit-
tees on Foreign Relations
and Government Opera-
tions. Laura Siskind is
chairman of the series, Hy
Katz is president of Beth
Torah congregation.
Philip W. Lown (seated), a longtime supporter of Bran-
deis University, was presented with a batik by repre-
sentatives of alumni of the university's Lown Graduate
Center for Contemporary Jewish Studies at a recent
meeting at his Miami Beach home. Shown with Lown
are his wife, Sally; Assistant Professor Bernard Reisman
(right), associate director of the Lown Center, and
Ralph Gottleib (left), a 1972 graduate of the Center and
a staff member of the Greater Washington UJA. Lown,
a trustee emeritus of Brandeis, is also founder of its
Philip W. Lown School for Near Eastern and Judaic
Studies. Students and alumni of the Lown Center were
in Miami for the General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. The group also
named Lown an honorary member of the Alumni Asso-
ciation.


The Costa Brava Condominium on Belle Island will hold
its first State of Israel Bonds "Night in Israel" on Jan.
26, it was announced by Mrs. Rose Heimowitz (center),
president of the condominium and cochairman of the
event. Also shown are Matthew Hartston (right), treas-
urer, and Philip Getz, member of the board of directors.
The event will honor the outgoing officers of the condo-
minium: Sidney J. Burger, president; Arnold Ferber.
vice president; Matthew Hartston, treasurer; Mrs. Louis
Heimowitz, secretary; and Philip Getz and Aaron Kra-
vitz, members of the board of directors.
Aventura in North Miami Beach has organized a series
of training seminars for the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, to culminate in the complex's major 1976 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund evening
at the Aventura Country Club, Feb. 16. Gathered re-
cently for education and training were (from left) Al
Sherman and Max Sussman, vice chairmen of Ensenada
Building; GMJF Women's Dlvrston vice president He-
lene Berger; Aventura Pacesetter vice chairman Trudy
Rose; Coronado Building vice president Bernard Semi-
gran; and Biscay a Building vice chairman Phil Kates.


Page
I
i
i
i


I:
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l
:*,
li
J
Page 18-B
v.JmitfnorMitor
Friday, January 23, 1975
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.'
Louis Golden Is Chairman Of
Seminary Convocation
The Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America will inaugurate
its seventeenth annual convoca-
tion season in Miami Beach
with a brunch in the Empire
Room of the Eden Roc Hotel
ori Wednesday, Jan. 28, at 10:30,
it was announced by Louis B.
Golden of Cleveland, special
chairman of the opening event.
The Seminary's numerous ac-
tivities unfold during the month
of February and culminate in
an academic convocation at
Temple Emanu-El and a convo-
cation dinner in the Diplomat
Hotel, both on Wednesday, Feb.
25.
Golden disclosed that Rabbi
Saul I. Teplitz of the Seminary
Faculty and spiritual leader of
Congregation Sons of Israel in
Woodmere, N.Y., will address
the brunch.
Rabbi Teplitz is vice president
of the Synagogue Council of
America and national treasurer
of the Rabbinical Assembly of
America. *.Jik.
Rabbi Teplitz assumes the
role undertaken for so many.
years in Miami by his late
father-in-law, 'Dr. Max Arzt, vice
chancellor of the Seminary, who
initiated .the Seminary!* winter
activities in Florida more than
20 years ago.
Louis B. Golden was a reci-
pient two years ago of the
Seminary's National Community
Service Award at the annual
convocation dinner. A leading
Cleveland industrialist and phil-
anthropist, he served as presi-
dent of the Jewish National
Fund Council of Cleveland, Tem-
ple en the Heights, and- the
Intercollegiate Zionist Organiza-
tion, i
He is a trustee of the Jewish
Community Federation of Cleve-
land and a governor of the Is-
rael Bond Organization, of
whose Prime Minister's Medal
he was a recipient.
Golden is chairman, .of the
board of the AAV Companies in
Solon, Ohio, which he founded
in 1933.
!The opening Seminary brunch
is the first of approximately a
dozen events scheduled in Mi-
1 ami and Hollywood. The dinner
chairman for the second con-
secutive year is Matthew B. Ro-
haus of Miami Beach and New
York.
Chose Federal Appoints
Proby Director of Advertising
Lucien C. Proby III has been
named advertising director of
Chase Federal. Stephen J. Wa-
ters, Jr., executive vice presi-
dent/savings, made the an-
nouncement of the board of
directors' decision.
Proby assumes responsibility
for all internal and external ad-
vertising and public relations,
including long range project
preparation and implementation,
new office promotion and mar-
ket research.
Proby, a native Miamian with
seven years' experience in jour-
nalism and advertising, received
a Bachelor's degree from the
University of Florida.
He has been editor of a
major Florida boating and out-
door magazine, executive sports
editor for a West Coast daily
newspaper and Southeast re-
gional account executive for a
South Florida advertising firm.
Chase Federal is the fifth
largest savings and loan in Flor-
ida .and forty-first nationally,
with total assets in excess ef
$700 million. The asociation
operates -ahcteen locations serv-
ing Dade and Broward counties.
Louts B. Golden (left) and Dr. Gerson D. Cohen, chan-
cellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
A leading figure in the Jewish community of Cleveland,
Golden will chair the opening event of the Seminary's
scheduled events in Miami.
Histadml Golf Tournament
To Benefit Israeli Students
The third anmint-SlSiOeO His-
tadrut Pro-Am Golf Tourna-
ment benefiting students of- aft
backgrounds in Israel has.bees
scheduled for Monday, March L.
at Sky Lake Country Club in
North Miami. Beech.
Louis Wolfson II, senior vice
president of Wameteo Enter*
prises, will serve as general
chairman, according to an an*
nouneement by Metropolitan
Dade County Mayer Stephen P.
Clank, last year's chairman, and
Miami Beach Councilman Leon-
aid 0. Weinstein, vice chair-
man.
A field of 30 championship
touring pros will be entered
with celebrities, and ISO ama-
teurs, who. will ,pay a tax-
daductible entrance fee of $300
each.
"We ar* extremely, grateful
do Sky Lake Country Club and
Stuart Perlman." Wolfson said,
"for once again providing
greens fees and carts at no ex-
pense to the iJistadrut Scholar-
ship Fund." The fund, which
-has provided more than 50,000
full scholarships in Israel since
1957, will receive some $46,000
from the Pro-Am.
SAM ADLEK
HERBERT SADKIN
Miami Builders Plan
CJA-IEF Dinner, Feb. 14
The Builders & Allied Trades
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, led by Sam-
uel I. Adler and Herbert Sad-
kin, will host its annual dinner
on Saturday, Feb. 14; at the
Konover Hotel.
Adler and Sadkin have an-
nounced that the event, to bene-
fit the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emerg2ncy Fund.
4-----*-----------------_
will begin with cocktails at 8:30
p.m. and dinner at 9.
Dinner chairmen Michael
Adler and S- Martin Sadkin have
announced that Senator Rich-
ard Stone will be guest speaker.
The division's co-chairmen for
Special Gifts include building
industry leaders David B. Flee-
man, Burton F. Goldberg, Harry
A. Levy and Stephen Muss.
Jimmy Carter Is First Speaker
In JCC's Town Hall Series
The Public Affairs Committee
of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida.is sponsor-
ing .a Town Hall Series, featur-
ing the Pfesidenatal Priwan-y
oandMates of .both -partios..
.- -The fiwt participant will be
Jimmy Carter, former Governor
of Georgia.
Carter will speak on Monday,
Jan. 26; at B p.m. at Temple
Israel- of -Greater Miami. The
program -iAJme ?and open to .the
poMlt.-;**-.'
Miss Powell and Mr. Sussman
Are Married in Coral Gables
Catherine Lynn Powell,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eu-
gene F. Powell of Morgantown,
W. Va., and Mart -teven Suss-
man. son of Mr. and Mrs. Irv-
ing H. Sussman of Coral Gables,
were married recently at Tem-
ple Judea in Coral Gables.
The bride's sister Jo Beth
Powell was maid of honor;
bridesmaids were hpr sister
Michelle Powell and sister-in-
law Mrs. William S. Sussman.
The groom's brother, William C.
Sussman, was best man. Ushers
were Michael Abrams and Rob-
ert Donovan. Joe Carbia, a
friend of the groom, sang in
the sanctuary before the cere-
mony.
Mrs. Sussman. who received
a Bachelor's degree in journal-
ism in 1974 from West Virginia
University, is employed by the
"Gainesville Sun." She is former
assistant telegraph editor of the
"Tallahassee Democrat."
Mr. Sussman, a graduate of
Coral Gables Senior High
School, attended Tulane Univer-
sity and the University of Mi-
ami, from which he received a
Bachelor's degree in English.
He is a staff writer for the
"Lake City Reporter."
In addition to their immediate
families,, the couple's many rela-
MRS. MARK SUSSMAN
tives and friends from 11 over
Florida attended their wedding,
as did many from New Jersey,
New York. Ohio, Pennsylvania,
West Virginia and Wisconsin.
Also present were Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Shnier of Toronto;
cousins Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Black of Melbourne, Australia;
and friends Henry and Geoffrey
Cohen.
Following their wedding trip,
the couple will reside in Lake
City, Fla.
Landow Yeshiva Center
Sponsoring Chassidic Fest
)
The Landow Yeshiva Cen-
ter-Lubavitch Education Cen-
ter is planning a Chassidic
Also, appearing in the con-
cert will be Cantor Mothe Te-
leshevsky, who is well knows
for -his. Chassidic. .renditions and
interpretations of Jewish songs.
Dancers are also Chassidim
who have an experienced dance
background. Featured that eve-
ning will oe the "Kazatka"
dance from Russia and also the
"Dance of the Resurrection," a
traditional dance that has been
passed down from generation
to generation for centuries.
Further information is avail-
able from the Landow Yeshiva
Center.
MORDECHAI BEN DAVID
Music, Song and Dance Festi-
val on Feb. 7 at the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts.
Differing from similar music
festivals offered in our area,
this concert will star Chassi-
dim who have had music as
part of their way of life.
Mordechai ben David, the
featured performer, has given
concerts at Carnegie Hall,
Brooklyn College and the Mi-
ami Beach Auditorium, as well
as elsewhere in the U.S. and
Europe. He has also produced
two LP albums.
ESTABLISHED RABBI WISHES
TO MEET REFINED LADY
66 or over, financially secure.
with view to marriage All let-
ter* (confidential) will be ack-
nowledged.
Writa Rabbi E., Box 012973,
Miami 33101
Leon Uris To Be Honored
At Sisterhood Soiree
Leon Uris, author of "Battle,
Cry," "Exodus." "Mila 18" and
many other best-sellers, will' be
the guest of honor at the Shades
of Tiffany Soiree suppor and,
dance on Sunday, Jan. 25, at 8,
p.m. in the Muial Room of Tern-
pie Emanu-El.
The event is scheduled for
the and of the first day of the
Temple Emanu-El Antique Show,
"d -Sate sponsored by the Sis.'
terhood- of TeanjiaEmanu-EL
SILBERMAN'S
FlUE CABINETRY
New eanoapt in Wall Unit*
Desk* for the Professional
1963 N.E. 147th LANE
NORTH MIAMI 531-2474
Open Weekdays
Sundays 10 to 1
LEASE OR PURCHASE!!
76 CADH1AC CONVERTIBLES
"LAST Of THE BREED"
In ottr warehouse for immediate
ale or tease the following '76
Eldorado Convertibles. Drive one
home today.
1 Firemist Red, Firemist
1 Crystal Blue, White
1 Ivory, Ivory
1 Firemist Rod, White
Also, on display In our warehouse
for your inspection the follow-
ing '75 Eldorado Convertibles.
1 Metallic Blue, White
1 Black, Black
1 firemist, White
1 Commodore Blue,White
Priced from S79S7.77 or lease from
S3SS.63 par month. (AIM, '73 and
,*74 Convertibles)
GOLD QAST
AUTO BROKERS
"WHOLESALERS AMD
LfiSSORS 81NCS 1945"
517-S. DIXIE HWY. EAST
Vaetrdays til 5 Sundays
I


1-5


Friday, January 23, 1976
*Jewist fk>ridlaitf
Page 19-B
v

A Visit to a Kosher Candy Factory
By SHLOMO YEHUDA
I was curious about the re-
ports I've been hearing for
ytars about Kosher candy, and
I decided to see first hand
what makes candy kosher and
what precautions are taken to
be sure it is kosher.
For my research on this sub-
ject I chose Barton's, the com-
pany that has been famous for
over 35 years as the leading
kosher candy company in
America, and the company that
originanted kosher for Pass-
over candies and cakes with
fhe biggest selection available
anywhere.
I started the tour on Bar-
ton's fourth floor, which houses
a vast beautiful bakery with
tile floors and walls and a full
wall of windows to allow the
sun to brighten the area and
its modern equipment.
The mixing bowls, deposit-
ors, conveyor belts and ovens
were all spotlessly clean, and
the entire atmosphere was
pleasant and appetizing.
All this was what we saw
even before the (coshering pro-
cess for Passover was started.
We could imagine what we
would see after the live steam,
blowtorches, hot-water hoses
and general scrubdown came
into play.
The tour took us down to the
other three floors, where the
chocolates and candies are
made in the modern candy
kitchens. What we first saw
were all the men and women
in their white outfits, the men
with smart white caps and the
women all outfitted in hairnets
to prevent any foreign matter
from falling into the candy.
In various parts of the build-
ing we saw the sanitation ex-
perts, those employed by Bar-
ton's and those sent in by in-
dependent outside sanitation
consultants-. They are. all ex-
perienced men, well' trained
in their work and strict in their
demands upon'all the workers.
The washrooms were spick-and-
span, and regulations regard-
ing personal cleanliness were
posted everywhere and metic-
ulously followed.
We inspected the chocolate
vats and storage tanks and
found everything up to Our
expectations of cleanliness and
purity. We were particularly
' impressed with the equipment
for cleaning the metal choc-
olate molds where everything
was washed in 340-degree wa-
ter.
In general, we found that
aside from nuking certain that
no non-kosher ingredients are
used in the manufacture of
their products, Barton's car-
ries into practice the policy
that feuhruth means "cleanli-
ness."
76 CADILLAC*
(LEASE OR PUECimi)
On display in our wirtMvK
showroom.
Calais Coupes, Sedan*, Coupe
OeVillea, Sedan DeVitfes,
Eldorado Coupes, Seville*,
Eidonrto Convertible* and
Fleetwood Brougham*
all driven lea* than 100 miles
PRICED FROM
$7997.77
76 SEVILLE
(demonstrator 79 mile*)
$3000 DISCOUNT
Now *13,997.7 less $3,000
you pay only
$10,997.67
12 other Sevilles to choose from.
All driven less than 100 milee.
'75 LEFTOVERS
Discounts to $3000
(ONLY A FEW LEFT)
GOLD COAST
AUTO BROKERS
"WHOLESALERS AND
LESSORS SINCE 1M6"
617 8. DIXIE HWY. EAST
POMPANO BEACH
943-3777
Weekdays 'til 5 Sundays l-B
In addition to the rabbinical
supervisors who check the
suppliers of all materials to
make certain that only kosher
ingredients are used, and in
addition to the rabbis who in-
spect every package of raw
materials that conies into the
plant, there is a full-time rabbi,
who is a member of the Union
of Orthodox Congregations of
America, and a staff of people
who make certain that kosher
indeed means clean.
And what a surprise it was
to see among the Barton em-
ployees several Satmar Ghas-
sidim and some young men
walking about in yarmulkes
and with their tzitzis hanging
out.
I learned that there are over
200 shomrei shabbos working
for Barton's who are happy to
work for a company that is
closed on Shabbos and Yom
Tov. and that makes it pos-
sible for them to be home in
time every Friday and Erev
Yom Tov.
And imagine, every day there
are Mincha and Maariv serv-
ices on the shipping floor. To
top it all, Barton's even pro-
vides a succah for its employ-
ees for the full eight days of
Succot.
Now I know why Barton's
enjoys so high a reputation in
the Jewish community, not only
for delicious candies and cakes
but for the highest standards
of kashruth and cleanliness.
. fatJ**aaft*a>*:atts1ii:iJ'
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^^H* : S^km '\v.'".V iki *

Mym&ymk
/.....jHOiY 7 .. 1
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4 f i
Prof. Liebman To Give
Simonhoff Memorial Lecture
Prof. Seymour B. Liebman
will give the 1976 Harry B.
Simonhoff Memorial Lecture on
"Sephardim and Askenazim in
America" on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m.
at Temple Emanu-El.
The program, in the Beatrice
Blank Memorial Chapel, is open
to members of the Jewish His-
torical Society of South Flor-
ida and Temple Emanu-El and
to invited guests. Reservations
and further information are
available at the temple office.
The lecture, on the tenth an-
niversary of Simonhofrs death,
is under the auspices of the
Jewish Historical Society and
the University of Miami history
department. Simonhoff was a
prominent South Florida author,
historian, lawyer, columnist,
real estate operator and trav-
eler.
LIEBMAN, a national vice
president of the American Zion-
ist Federation, has been Ad-
junct Research Scholar at the
Institute of Inter-American Af-
fairs at the University of Miami
since 1971. He received his ad-
vanced degree in history magna
cum laude at the University of
the Americas, where he also
taught.
Bart Udell, a Miami attorney
and past president of Temple
Beth Am, is chairman of the
event. Dr. Irving Lehrman, rab-
bi of Temple Emanu-El and
honorary national president of
the Synagogue Council of
America, will welcome guests.
Mrs. Lois Dobrin, former sec-
retary of the local office of the
American Friends of the He-
brew University, will speak on
'The Memories of Harry B. Si-
monhoff.
Dr. Bruce A. Lohoff, chair-
man of the University of Miami
history department, will discuss
"In This Bicentennial Year."
Lohoff, who is on the coor-
dinating committee of the Uni-
versity's program in American
Studies, earned his Ph.D. from
Syracuse University.
Three Community Leaders
To Spearhead NCCJ Dinner
The National Conference of
Christians and Jews has an-
nounced that three community
leaders will spearhead the 24th
annual brotherhood dinner.
Chairperson is Frank E.
Mackle, Jr., president and chief
executive officer, Deltona Cor-
poration. A member of the Flor-
ida Council for 100, Mackle is
a trustee of Notre Dame Uni-
versity. He served as vice
president for the Mackle Com-
pany from 19*7 to 1971, was
president of General Develop-
ment Corporation from 1954 to
1961 and was elected chair-
man of the board in 1961.
Mackle is a trustee for
Mercy Hospital and principal
director for Mutual of Omaha,
Southeast First National Bank
of Miami, W. R. Grace & Com-
pany, New York, and Farrand
Corporation.
Mrs. Elfen Whiteside Mc-
Donnell, executive vice presi-
dent, Biscayne Kennel Club,
has been named awards chair-
person for the dinner.
A native Miamian, Mrs. Mc-
Donnell is a member of the
Board of Trustees of the Uni-
versity of Miami and member
of the Council of Advisors to
the President and national
board of Florida State Univer-
sity. She was a founder-mem-
ber of the Mental Health So-
ciety and the Urban League,
and for five years was chair-
man of the Florida Commission
on Children and Youth.
Don Shoemaker, editor, "Mi-
ami Herald," is chairperson
for the Pacesetters committee.
Shoemaker is cnalrman of
the board of governors, Flor-
ida Region, NCCJ, and presi-
dent-elect of the united Way.
He is a trustee and committee
member of the University of
Miami, chairman of Dade Coun-
ty Coordinating Council and
member of the Florida Bicen-
tennial Commission.
Peace Corps
Seeks Recruits
Bruce Cohen, Peace Corps
area manager, served with the
Peace Corps in Tunisia. He has
announced that the Peace
Corps needs qualified volun-
teers singles and couples
With no dependents to help
others to help themselves. Re-
quirements are a college de-
gree or at least four years' ex-
perience in fisheries, civil
engineering, surveying, me-
chanics, construction, city plan-
ning, education, nursinfe, or
health background.
Living allowance, transporta-
tion, medical and dental ex-
penses and readjustment al-
lowance are provided.
For information call 350-
4692 or come to the Action
Recruiting Office, 1150 SW 1st
St., room 106, on Jan. 26 and 27.
Making plans for the Jan. 25-27 Temple Emanu-El An-
tique Show and Sale are (from left) Mrs. Bernard Kaplan,
chairman; Mrs. Richard Sehwarz, president of the Sis-
terhood, which is sponsoring the event; and Mrs. Barton
S. Goldberg, cochairman. The hours on Sunday and Mon-
day are noon to 10 p.m.; on Tuesday noon to 6 p.m.
Furniture, jewelry, silver, paintings and objets d'art
will be offered. The Sisterhod Coffee Shoppe will be
open from noon to 8 p.m. daily. On Monday and Tues>-
day visitors will have an opportunity to win an "an-
tique" door prize.
Hebrew Academy Students j
Presenting Talent Show j
A talent show by Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy stu-
dents will be featured at a
luncheon meeting of the He-
brew Academy Women on
Wednesday, Jan. 28, at noon
in the school's new Merwitzer
Building.
The program is open to the
general public, according to
Irene (Mrs. Leonard) Adler,
president of the Hebrew Aacd-
emy Women.
Hostesses for the luncheon
include Mrs. Jay Dermer, Mrs.
Fannie Gulden, Mrs. Frances
B. Schnur and Mrs. Flatty
Stern. Reservations may ibe
made at the organization's of-
fice in person or by phone.
Among the students partici-
pating in the talent show are
Melisa Simons, Ixslie Rozehc-
waig, Maxine Messer. Miriam
Richter, Joe Richter and Marc
Dunaevsky. at
The New Algiers
4^ 1A ***cever No min'mum
qpXvr Including 2 drinks
Reservations Mr. Adrian 531-6061 <
Group Reservations Mr. Zone 53IS391
e^f/ga
2555 Collins Avenue Miami Beach
APPEARING JAN. 24 THRU 29
JACK
CARTER
FEATURING
GAtt NELSON
i
>

-


Page 20-B
knitii fkridiaun
Friday, January 23, 1976
an extraordinary pre-completion offer
The Garden Mausoleum of
Mount Nebo Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33126
. ".*-*-:b.x+.
Artist's rendering of the mausoleum as completed.
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A GIFT, ABSOLUTELY FREE, OF A COMPLETE SET OF THE NEW ENCYCLOPAEDIA JUDAICA
TO THE FIRST 25 PERSONS
who respond to this advertisement
and who purchase before March 1,
1976 two or more crypts in this
beautiful Mausoleum we will make a
FREE GIFT of a complete set of the
new Encyclopaedia Judaica, retail
price of same being in excess of $600.
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a family af
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PHONE: 261-7612 k
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Friday, January 23, 1976
*Jmist> filcridi&n
Page 21-B
* <
i
Now, the Jewish people
have their own.
The Encyclopaedia Judaica gives
Jewish families a complete and
authoritative single source for every-
thing related to their Jewishness.
The 16 magnificent volumes are filled
with facts about people, places,
events and ideas.
What is a Jewish encyclopaedia?
It is a "Jewish" encyclopaedia in
the sense that each topic covered is
thoroughly researched and written to
emphasize its relationship to Jewish
thought or activities.
The impact of Jewish thought
and traditions on the world around
us is also covered in detail.
The biography of Albert Einstein,
for example, deals less with his scien-
tific contributions (such information
is available from many sources) and
more with his involvement in
Jewish life.
Similiar emphasis can be found in
articles on psychology, sociology, sex
education and other broad general
topics. .
It is this emphasis, this editorial
directionr which makes the
Encyclopaedia Judaica unique ... and
invaluable for every Jewish family.
The Jewish love-of-learning
The love of books, the discipline
of study, the joys of learning-these
have been important ingredients of
Jewish family life for centuries.
The word "Bible" means book,
and it is because of this relationship
to the written word, to the Bible, the
Torah, and other sacred writings that
the Jews have become known as
"The People of the Book".
But the staggering proliferation
of reading matter and the complexities
of modern life have created a
particular problem for Jews. How
does a family gain special insights
into its own Jewish traditions and
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For many Jewish families, the
Encyclopaedia Judaica provides
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The Encyclopaedia provides a
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Twenty-five hundred editors,
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Page 22-B
fJknist fkridfian
Friday, January 23, 197#
8
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Jewish Mysticism Subject Of Herzog Attacks Men's Club President
Talks at Sisterhood Kallah United Nations Is Emanu-EI Guest Tonight
Beth David Congregation is
presenting Dr. Arthur Green,
ordained rabbi and proftssor,

DR. ARTHUR GREEN
whose topic during the annual
Sisterhood Kallah, Jan. 23 and
24, is "Jewish Mysticism."
Dp. Arthur Green, a student
of Jewish mystcism and theol-
ogy, has written a number of
articles on these subjects. In
recent years Dr. Green has
joined with others in the Bos-
ton area to found the Havurot
Shalom community, which has
since had a major impact on
the American Jewish commu-
nity. He has lectured at many
universities, synagogue and
Jewish community centers
throughout the United States
and Canada.
The Kallah, in recent years,
has indicated a gathering or
convocation for the purpose of
an in-depth study or discussion
of a problem and stems from a
unique feature of the activities
of old Babylonian academies
held twice a year during the
month of Elul, the month pre-
ceding the Passover festival.
Thousands of students and
scholars came to the academies
from all parts of the Diaspora
and spent the month in study
and discussion. The talmudic
tractate was analyzed and le-
gal decisions handed down, and
the five-month study prior to
this discussion yielded stimulat-
ing and scholarly pursuits and
thus influenced the spiritual
and intellectual life of Jews In
the remotest communities (Salo
Baron).
Rabbi Bender Is Meeting With
Florida Bar-IIan Committee
Rabbi Karpol Bender, execu-
tive vice chairman of the inter-
national board of overseers of
RABBI BENDER
Bar-IIan University since 1973,
arrived in Miami Beach last
week to meet with leaders
of the Florida Committee for
Bar'-Ilan.
Originally from Cape Town,
South Africa, Rabbi Bender
studied at the University of Cape
Town and at Yeshiva Univer-
sity in New York, where- he
was ordained and from which
he was graduated with a de-
gree in political science.
Before settling in Israel, he
served as a rabbi in New York
City an* Canada, and was di-
rector of the B'nai B'rith Hil-
lel Foundation at Queen's Uni-
versity in Canada. He was na-
tional vice president of the Rab-
binical Council of Canada.
IN 1969 Rabbi Bender settled
with his wife, the former Rena
Zambrowsky, and their two
children in Israel.
Rabbi Bender will help com-
plete plans for the March 21
Bar-IIan dinner at the Fontaine-
blean Hotel which will honor
Congressmen William Lehman,
Claude Pepper and Dante Fas-
cell and pay tribute to Miami
Beach religious leader William
Silverstein.
PALM SPRINGS, Calif.
(JTA) Branding the United
Nations General Assembly as
a "forum' of intransigence ra-
ther than compromise.'' Chaim
Herzog, Israel's Ambassador to
the UN, declared here that
"our enemies are seeking to
legitimize any future actions
that they may want to take
against Israel and the Jewish
people."
Speaking to some 600 dele-
gates to the United Jewish Ap-
peal's Western Regional Lead-
ership Conference, Herzog at-
tacked the enemies of Israel
who are trying to legitimize
the terrorist Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
"Can you imagine such a
murderous group being pro-
posed as a legitimate repre-
sentative?" he asked.
FRANK Lautenberg, UJA's
general chairman, reviewed
the campaign needs for the up-
coming national drive and
noted that Israel's humanitarian
responsibilities are greater than
ever.
"In 1976 we have the op-
portunity and the ability to
dedicate ourselves to perfect-
ing the American spirit of -
idealism the spirit of dem-
ocracy and for the Amer-
ican spirit of Zionism as well,
for Zionism and democracy
are as one in principle and in
practice."
Melvin M. Swig, of San Fran-
cisco, UJA West Coast Region-
al chairman and executive
committee member, who was
also dinner chairman, stated:
"In light of recent events at
the United Nations and in Is-
rael, this year's West Coast
regional conference takes on a
new and urgent meaning.
FOR US, it is the renewal of
a very special process: to share
in the responsibility for the
destiny ef our people. There-
fore, the presence of every per-
son of conscience is extremely
vital. Our collective response
must be an act of support .
a positive expression of our
concern."
The three-day conference
took place to demonstrate
American Jewish unity and
strength on behalf of the world
Jewish community, and to in-
augurate the West Coast's par-
ticipation in the 1976 UJA na-
tionwide fund raising cam-
paign.
Jewish Scholar Will Talk On Miami Beach
'Virginity in the Old Testament9
Dr. Harry M. Orlinsky will
present a- lecture on "The Con-
cept of Virginity in the Old
Testament'' on Monday, Jan. 26,
at 8 p.m. in the Flamingo Ball-
room of the Whitten Student
Union at the University of Mi-
ami.
Sponsored by the university's
reMgien department, the lecture
is open to the public.
Dr. OMinsky, professor of Bi-
ble at the New York School of
Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion, is editor-
in-chief of the New Translation
of the Torah for the Jewish
Publication Society of America.
He was the first Jewish scho-
lar invited to participate in an
authorized Christian translation
of the Bible into English, and
is the sole Jewish member of
the 21-schoiar committee who
produced the Revised Standard
Version of the New Testament
in 1952.
READ THIS!!
vnvin DKArtl/ rfCTV
CADILLAC
(THRU BROKER)
You pay close to dealers cost.
I "Iflff ACCvVrvv. ViVrillCf I9f*v
Sawyer- 943-3777 *- forth**
information.
South oldest Automobile
Brokers since 1945.
HARRY ORLINSKY
Hadassah
Southgate Group will hold a
"Member Bring a New Mem-
ber" Brunch on Wednesday,
Jan. 28, at 1 p:m. in the Terrace
Room of Southgate Towers.
Membership chairperson is Sa-
bina Sheer. Special "get-ac-
quainted" program by Muriel
Kovinov. Shirley L. Rosenberg,
president.
Hannah Senesch Group will
hold a regular meeting on Mon-
day, Feb. 2, at noon at the De-
lano Hotel. Mrs. Sherman Fast
will speak on Youth Aliyah.
Snack luncheon. Mrs. Inez
Townsend, president.
Kadlmah Grotm will hold a
regolar meeting on Feb. 2 at
noon at the Singapore Hotel.
The Mustcar Ftortdians will pre-
sent an international program.
Stephen a Wise Gneap will
meet on Feb. 8 at noon at the
Morttmarrre Hbtfek Mrs. Flor-
ence Barth Will speak.
Halm Yassky Group will meet
on Wednesday, Feb. 4, at noon
at Byron Hall. Social hour be-
tween 12 and 1 p.m.
Abraham A. Silver of Erie.
Pa., president of the National
Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs, will be guest speaker at
Temple Emanu-EI services this
evening at 8:30.
Silver, whose parents are
Temple Emanu-EI members Mr.
and Mrs. Max Silver of Miami
Beach, is past president of Con-
gregation Brith Sholom of Erie
and of its brotherhood. He is
president of the Hebrew Free
Loan Association, chairman of
the trustees of the CBS Ceme-
tery and a director of the Jew-
ish Community Welfare Coun-
cil, all in Erie. He has served
on the leadership cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal.
In Silver's honor a special
Oneg Shabbat will be sponsored
by the Men's Club of Temple
Emanu-EI immediately after the
service. Cochairmen are Joseph
Abelow and Herbert C. Zemel.
Eilat Chapter of Pioneer Women
Celebrating Tu B'Shevat
Eilat Chapter of Pioneer
Women will celebrate Tu B'She-
vat, the Jewish Festival of the
New Year of Trees, during its
monthly meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 27, in the civic auditorium
of the Washington Federal
Building on Washington Ave.
The 7:30 p.m. event will ob-
serve the Jewish Arbor Day,
which is marked by the plant-
ing of trees in Israel and in Jew-
ish communities everywhere.
Mrs. Olga Prince will sell Eilat
Chapter members certificates
that will permit the planting of
/trees in the Pioneer Women
Forest in Israel.
Mr. and Mrs. Isadore Hammer
will report on their recent trip
to Israel. Mrs. Hammer is an
active Pioneer Women leader.
Cantor and Mrs. Louis Feder
of New York City will present
a special entertainment pro-
gram, arranged by a committee
headed by Mrs. Hilda Leifer.
Mrs. Rena Miller, president,
will chair the meeting.
Pioneer Women Golda Meir Chapter
To Hear Jewish Literature
A reading of Jewish literature
and humor in Yiddish will be
presented by Mrs. Frieda Lipp
at the meeting of the Golda
Meir Chapter of Pioneer Wom-
en on Wednesday Jan. 28, at
12:30 p.m. in the Washington
Federal building on Washington
Ave.
Mrs. Katherine Lippman,
president of the chapter, will
chair the session, according te
Mrs. Claire E. Balaban, pub-
licity chairman.
Committee members for the "Americana '76" luncheon
and expo to be given by the Sisterhood of Beth Torah
Congregation on Feb. 11 at the Carillon are (standing,
from left) Mesdames Hugh Unger, Marshall Baltuch,
Malcolm Meister. Seated are Mrs. Lawrence Schorehart
(left) and Mrs. Martin Knobel, chairman.
Beth Torah Sisterhood Plans 1
"Americana '76" Expo and Luncheon
A Bicentennial expo and fash-
ion show luncheon, "Americana
16," lure been planned by the
Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood ef
Beth Torah Congregation for
Wednesday, Feb. 11, at the Car-
illon Hotel.
Cocktails and an Americana
exhibit featuring handmade
quilts, jewelry, African art and
ceramics are at 11 a.m., fol-
lowed by a luncheon and fash-
ion show at noon.
A selection of clothes from
the "24 Collection" will be mod-
eled by Sisterhood members, ac-
companied by the Ted Martin
Orchestra.
Mrs. Stanley Caidin is Sister-
hood president.
(
Conservative Ohio Rabbi Is
Sunday's Greenfield Lecturer
.' : i

Rabbi Jack Riemer ef Bay-
ton, Otrio, will- be- the Greenfield
Institute lecturer on Sunday at
10 a.m. at Temple Israel. Spir-
JtUfll leader of a Conservative
congregation, Rabbi Riemer has
earned a nattortdP reparation for
his original prayers. His talk
will deal with "The Organized
Prayer Book versus Creative
Prayers." A discussion follows
the lecture.
:


January 23, 1976
fJewisti ftwidtiain
Page 23-B
istralicfs New Prime Minister
By SAM LIPSKI
as newly-elected Prime
Malcolm Fraser, has
that his government
Irongly support Israel in
Iddle East conflict.
would want to make
olain our commitment to
rival of Israel," he said
first major foreign policy
ent over the weekend.
T rejected the claims of
feated Labor government
Gough Whitlam that it
inducted "an even-hand-
fclicy on the Middle East,
kcribed it as a pro-Russian
policy.
FRASER spoke on a Radio
Australia interview in which he
attacked the Whitlam govern-
ment for having neglected Aus-
tralia's traditional friends over
the oast three years.
The Fraser government would
try to strengthen relations with
Australia's traditional friends
which have "a clear philosoph-
ical commitment in common
with Australia." he added.
The first signs of a shift in
policy came when Australia
joined Israel, the United States,
Canada and eight West Euro-
pean nations in a walk-out pro-
lada Agrees to Hold Habitat
TORONTO (JTA) Saul F. Rae, Canada's Am-
ador to the United Nations, has signed a formal
ement with the UN for the holding of the Habitat
'erence on Human Development in British Columbia
summer. The agreement includes a proviso that
;gates and observers will be admitted to Canada for
conference according to UN rules, which means that
esentatives of the Palestine Liberation Organization igW^W^^
be allowed to .attend. much will depend on the lead
Nat Bent, director of the Canadian Zionist Federa- given by the U.S.
\'s Pacific Region, and Fred Lapkin, chairman of the While the Dec. 13 landslide
la-Israei Committee for the same -region, said that- win for Eraser's Li bmMNM;*
Jewish groups do not oppose the conference they .^S^SfSSSSS
understanding of Israel's posi-
by. the new government,
test in a UNESCO conference in
Paris.
The walk-out followed the
conference's adoption of a reso-
lution "noting" the UN General
Assembly's recent equation of
Zionism with racism.
Fraser's strong declaration of
support for Israel, which fol-
lows similar commitments made
during the recent election cam-
paign here, has encouraged Jew-
ish communal leaders.
BUT THEY are waiting to see
how the Fraser government will
react when it will have to make
decisions on more specific is-
sues, such as allowing PLO rep-
resentatives to come to Austra-
lia.
ANOTHER aspect which is
being closely watched is the
degree to which the Fraser gov-
ernment's pro-Israel and anti-
PLO position could weaken it
the United States modifies its
own stand against the PLO.
As the new government in
Canberra is anxious to follow a
Washington Une in the United
Nations and move away from
step of calling on all Jewish
voters, regardless of party, to
reject Hartley.
In the new Parliament, which
will commence its session next
February, there will be four
Jewish parliamentarians. For
the Labor Party, Dr. Moss Cass,
the former Minister for the Me-
continue to oppose allowing the PLO to attend it.
THEY SAID ^peaceful but massive demonstrations
be carried out .daring the conference.
Joseph Yaacov, charge d'affaires of the Israel Em-
ny in Ottawa, told reporters that Israel will partici-
m Habitat but this does not signify any change in
[policy toward the PLO.
Last July, the -Canadian government, faced with
^opposition to allowing the PLO to attend a UN
agress- on Crime scheduled for Toronto, asked the
to postpone the meeting.
Instead, the UN moved the conference to Geneva.
yever, the .Canadian government has said from the
[that it intends to go through with the Habitat
t erence.-
70,000 Israelis Emigrate
JERUSALEM (JTA) About 70,000 Israelis
emigrated-daring the past four years, and the "yordim''
.rate is coming perilously close to matching the rate of
[aliya, according to figures prepared b Ephraim Dovrat,
(advisor to the Finance Minister, which were released
here last night.
The figures were appended to the Treasury s pro-
sed IL 84.2 billion austerity budget for fiscal 1976-77
irhich was presented to the Cabinet.
. The iignres-showed that in 1972, 12,000 Israelis left
le country for good and in 1973, the year of the Yom
lppur War, 15,000 departed.
EMIGRATION REACHED a peak of 24,000 last year
twhen most reserve soldiers were demobilized. This year
[it was down somewhat to 19,000.
According to Dovrat, the yordim rate will decline
to 16,000 in 1976 but since next year's aliya is esti-
mated at only 24,000, Israel will have a net gain of
conly 8000 immigrants. Some economists who have exam-
r ined the .proposed budget are disputing Dovrat's esti-
Lmates for next year. The say the increased unemploy-
ment will result in a larger number of yordim and
fewer olkn.
t ion by. the new
Israel lost some of its friends
in the Parliament.
THE ANTW-ABOR swing
ithe Fraser government win
have amiahnum-SS^eat-maJor-
Ry in the 127-#e*t .-ParharaenJ
swept two outstanding j?rtv
Israel, spokesmen.from federal
.politics.
The Minister for Environment
in the WhiUam government, Joe
Berinson. lost his seat as did
the Minister for Housing, Joe
Riordan.
Berinson, a leading member
of Perth's Jewish community,
was a brilliant and articulate
pro-Israel advocate who often
found .himself in conflict with
his own Prime Minister.
Riordan, who is not Jewish,
but represented a heavily Jew-
ish electorate, was a moving
force behind the Parliamentary
Labor Friends of Israel.
ON THE other hand, Austra-
lia's most outspoken supporter
of the PLO and an extreme left-,
winger, Bill Hartley, failed in
an attempt to win a place in
the Senate on the Labor ticket
for the State of Victoria.
A widespread campaign
against Hartley was mounted
within the Jewish community
by both Labor and non-Labor
supporters. The Board of De-
puties took the unprecedented
dia, retained his seat in Mel-
bourne as did Barry Cohen in
New South Wales.
For the Liberal Partv, Senator
Peter Baume retained his seat
in New South Wales while his
cousin, Michael Baume. won a
seat for the first time in the
House of Representatives.
Question Box
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
QWhat is the origin and
meaning of the idea that the
Jews are the "chosen peo-
ple"?
AThis concept is mention-
ed as early as in the Bible
(Amos 3:2, Deuteronomy 7:7,
etc.). It is frequently mention-
ed in Talmudic and Cabbalistic
literature. There are writers
who define this concept in a
qualitative fashion, indicating
that there is something specif-
ically different about the Jew-
ish people. Most, however, in-
dicate that the "chosenness" or
"difference" about Jews is not
a qualitative difference.
It is interesting to note that
in some places in the Bible
where the concept of the chosen
people is mentioned, it is stress-
ed that there is a universaliam
in humanity and that the .Al-
mighty is the father of all hu-
manity (Exodus 1:5). Isaiah
40.-.27) as -wall as the Creator of
all the Universe.
Generally, the idea of being
a chosen people .never was
meant to imply any feeling of
exdusiveness. R is intended to
mean that the Jews were chos-
en to "serve," to be held up as
an example and -bear even
greater .criticism and respon-
sibility, and w carry the burden
of being the barometer of hu-
man cinscience and the victim
of human prejudice.
The fact that anyone can con-
vert to the Jewish faith indi-
cates that Jews are not exclu-
sive in the sense of racial or
genetic features. Also, the fact
that their relationship with the
Almighty is one of a covenantal
nature indicates that the "choos-
ing" was not one-sided.
While they were being chos-
en, they also had to select to
abide by the heavy responsi-
bility of being the noble exam-
ple of what is good and vir-
tuous in life. Generally speak-
ing, history has borne out the
truth of this concept.
Society has always looked
upon the Jews as someone dif-
ferent. The Jews may have, at
times, tried to run away from
this distinativeness only to be
forced back into playing their
role.
The Jew expresses this
"chosenness" when he owns up
to his added responsibilities
such as when making kiddush
on.the Sabbath, which is dis-
tinctively Jewish, or on holi-
. days,- or when reading the Holy
Torah, which is distinctively
Jewish, or when proclaiming
his unswerving faith in the idea
of one and only one God, which
was originally Judaism's great-
est contribution to-.humanity.
Almogi Elected Head Of
WZO Aliya Department
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Jose* Almogi, aewry^elected
World Zionist Organization
chairman, was elected head of
the WZO Aliya Department by
the Zionist Executive.
Meeting immediately after
the Zionist General Council
closed, the Executive elected
Almogi to the aliya post which
had previously been held by
chairmen Louis Pincus and
Pinhas Sapir.
AT THE Executive session,
Almogi's first as WZO chair-
man, he said that being chair-
man of the Zionist organiza-
tion was "the greatest honor
I have had in my public ca-
reer."
Meanwhile, Leon Dulzin has
announced his formal resigna-
tion as acting chairman of the
Jewish Agency.
Officials said an Agency
board of governors .meeting
would be convened in Jerusa-
lem to elect Almogi Agency
governor and would be fallow-
ed by an Agency Executive
meeting which would elect him
Agency chairman.
Leaders
Synagogue Council Meetings
chings Using Mew Techiiique
Display at GMJF Art Gallery
elections from Joseph P-
Men's art are on display at
[Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
lion's Art Gallery at 4200
Kne Blvd.
ne collection, according to
Uey Arkin, chairman of the
sration's art committee, is
iprised of over 50 slate etch-
l featuring a new art form
technique created by Wha-
he show, which will con-
ie to mid-February, is open
kdays rrom 9 a.m. to S p.m.
(tplying layers of black
ricals on state to make the
toe unfadable, .waterproof
[-fireproof, Whalen carves
1 into-the-sBhua clay <*
the slate.
Whalen has a patent pending
on his technical process, which
is only one of twelve etching
media he uses.
Retired from the army, Wha-
len has lived in South America
and Israel. The subjects of his
drawings come from years of
research and observations of
Jewish history, culture and re-
ligion, at home and abroad.
A Miami resident, Whalen
annually tours seven Eastern
states, displaying his works in
major art shows, including the
King's Plaza Art Show in Brook-
lyn, i the ivlanroevUie -Mali Mt
Show in Pittsburgh, and the
Jaorristown MJ0 Art Show.
Several of American Jewry's
foremost .leaders met in Miami
Beach this week to plan a se-
ries of meetings in Dade, Brow
ard and Palm Beach counties
to be held by the Synagogue
Council of America, umbrella
agency of Orthodox, Conserva-
tive and Reform Judaism in the
United States.
Rabbi Henry Siegman of New
York, executive woe president
of the Synagogue Council, is
coordinating the gatherings
with Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein,
Dr. Irving Lehrraan and Moses
Hornstein.
Dr. Lookstein is national
president of the Synagogue
Council .while Dr. Lehrman and
Hornstein serve as .national
chairmen of its Society o; Fel-
lows: -Hornstein is a Hollywood
business and religious leader,-
-.and -J>r. Lehrman, .rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach, is former national pres-
ident of the .Synagogue Council.
The organization is expand-
ing the activities of the first
national Jewish ''think-tank,''
the Institute for Jewish Policy
Planning and Research. A ma-
jor arm .of the Synagogue Coun-
cil, it is headed by Ambassador
Philip M. Klutznick, former
U.S. envoy to the UN and for-
mer national and international
.president of B'md B#ith.
The area of interfaith dia-
logue, m which the SCA has
been a pioneer, also will be dis-
cussed, following a recent ob-
servance in Washington in
which Rabbi Siegman and Dr.
Lookstein participated. The con-
vocation marked the -10th anni-
versary of the revised Vatican
policy toward the Jews, consid-
. esed a milestone -in Gathohc-
. Jewish relations.
RABBI HENRY SIEGMAN




Page 24B
*'Jenisti nurtMaw
Friday, January 23 m^

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The Sisterhood of the Congregation of Temple B'nai
Raphael of North Miami Beach will hold its annual
fund-raising flea market and rummage sale this Sunday,
beginning at 8 a.m., at the North Dade Drive-In Theatre
on N.W. 27 Ave., just off the Palmetto Expressway.
Standing at the site of the fund-raiser are (from left)
Mrs. Irene Bleiweiss, membership vice president; Mrs.
Lila Brown, past president of the Sisterhood; and Mrs.
Debbie Greenberg, Sisterhood president.
At the recent grand opening of the new Biscayne Fed-
eral office in Palm Beach's Royal Poinciana Plaza,
among the first to open new accounts were Palm Beach
Mayor Earl E. T. Smith (left) and U.S. Congressman
Paul Rogers (seated next to him). Ms. Margaret Brown,
the office's manager, gave them her personal attention
as well as their choice of gifts. E. Albert Pallot (right),
president of Biscayne Federal, smiled his appreciation
and said the opening was a gratifying success. This is
the second Biscayne Federal office in Palm Beach, and
the ninth in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.
A tenth will open soon in Coral Gables.
% Young Israel Dedicating
* A Neiv Sefer Torah
AJCongress Women's Division 4
Plans Jewish Affairs Seminar
The American Jewish Con-
gress is sponsoring a full-day
seminar whose main topic is
"Zionism vs. Racism and Its
Meaning to the American Jew
in the 1970's."
The seminar will be at the
Eden Roc Hotel on Feb. 5,
from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
A main speaker at this forum
Youth Beaten
By UN Guards
NEW YORK (JTA) A
17-year-old Brooklyn high
school student told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he
was handcuffed and "slapped
around" by United Nations se-
curity guards in a basement
room at the UN.
Robert Deligdish said the in-
cident occurred after guards
seized him and three other
youth who were demonstrating
against the PLO outside the
UN gates.
UN security authorities were
not immediately available for
comment.
DELIGDISH, who says he is
a member of Betar, a Zionist
youth group, told the JTA that
the guards pulled him and his
companions inside the gates
and "pushed us and slapped us
around."
He said the other youngsters
fled outside the gates while he
ran in the opposite direction
and entered the UN building.
He said he was seized there
and taken by three guards to
a basement room where he was
handcuffed and "slapped
around."
He said he was photograph-
ed, ordered to produce identi-
fication and interrogated for 25
minutes before he was released
with a warning not to show his
face at the UN again.
is Dr. Arthur Hertzberg. who
is serving his second term as
national president of the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress.
He is a graduate of Jo!nis
Hopkins University, where he
was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.
Rabbi Herfberg was ordained
at the Jewish Theological
seminary of America, and re-
ceived his Ph.D. in hkt.
from Columbia University v
also served as an Air fa, '
chaplain during World \\-
ar
Rabbi Hertzberg Waa ,
spiritual leader at VVesl
Synagogue in Nashville, Tenn.
before taking a pulpit in '
wood, N.J.
DALIGDISH said he is a sen-
ior at Mid wood High School in
the Flatbush section of Brook-
lyn.
On Sunday. Feb. 1, at 11 a.m.
i'le Young Israel of Greater
Miami will dedicate a new Se-
ter Torah (Torah scroll of the
e Books ..,,. The
forah is written on parch
i a Sofer (scribe) ni a special
brew script.
A colorful and joyous cere-
' ony accompanies the Torah's
c >mpletion and dedication. A
i .ocession will form at the
iiome of Mr. and Mrs. Murray
"rand and will march, dance
and sing with the Torah to the
Young Israel synagogue on NE
171st St. Refreshments will be
>erved there, and the scribe
will write the final lines of the
Torah.
The Torah was donated by
Mrs. Frand's mother, Mrs. Su-
ie Fliegler, and her late father
Kalman Fliegler.
Those who wish will be able
to dedicate letters of the Torah
to be written in their honor.
The public is invited to attend.
Tifereth Jacob
Sisterhood To Meet
Sisterhood of Temple Tifer-
eth Jacob, Hialeah, will hold a
meeting on Sunday, Jan. 25 at
9:30 a.m. at the temple.
Rabbi Salomon dewiarroch
has been retained by the Sis-
terhood as its new Hebrew
School teacher. He will also
prepare students for Bar and
Bat Mitzvah.
Benjamin I. Shulman (left), chairman of the board of
Intercontinental Bank of Miami Beach, was honored
for his distinguished service to ORT by the Greater Mi-
ami Men's Chapter of the American ORT Federation at
its 15th annual installation luncheon at the Seville Hotel
this month. Leonard Zilbert, president of Riverside Me-
morial Chapels of Florida and member of the national,
board of the American ORT Federation, presented Shul-
man with a painting done in Israel.
Israeli Consul General Astar Addresses
Florida-Israel Chamber of Commerce
"Israel and Its Economy" was
the topic of a talk by Nahum
Astar, Israel's Consul General
m the Southeastern U.S., at the
luncheon meeting Thursday of
the Florida-Israel Chamber of
Commerce.
Serving his final tour of duty
in the Israeli Foreign Service,
Astar was Consul of Israel in
1 |S region in 1956. He served
subsequently in many other
areas including as Ambassador
to Liberia.
Prior to assuming his present
post, he was director of the
Official Guests Division of the
Ministry, handling the visits of
heads of state, senatorial mis-
sions and Henry Kissinger,
among others.
NAHUM ASTAR
The Eternal Light (Chai) luncheon recently at the Caril-
lon Hotel marked the 18th anniversary of Sisterhood of
Temple Ner Tamid. A plaque honoring the past presi-
dents of the Sisterhood was presented to the congrega-
tion by donors Mrs. Helen Glazier and Mrs. Rita Salo-
mon. Shown at the luncheon were (from left) Mrs
Salomon, Mrs. Henrietta Fine, former president; Mrs
Fannie Rest, president; former presidents Goldie' (Mrs.
Louis) Cohen, chairperson of the event; Betty (Mrs
Jack) Greenberg; Mildred (Mrs. Carlton) Blake, event
cochairperson; Lillian (Mrs. Murray) Shaw; Mrs. Gla-
zier; Gussie (Mrs. Paul) Novak, former president.
Deborah Marcuse and Robert Klein \
Plan April Wedding ~

hA wpri' wedd'"g 's planned
RnfiS ,r Ann Marcuse and
Robert Jeffrey Klein.
hJhtrannncenient was made
by Miss Marcuse's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Hans H. Marcuse
of Miami Beach. Mr. Klein is
the son of Mrs. Margaret Klein
of North Miami Beach.
Miss Marcuse is a candidate
for a Bachelor's degree in li-
brary science at Florida State
University.
Mr. Klein, who is completing
work toward his Master's de-
gree in audiology at Florida
State, is interning at the State
School for the Deaf in St. Au-
gustine.


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