The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02450

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Uewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 3
Miami, Florida Friday, January 16, 1976
By Mail 50c. fwo Section* Price 25 rent*
PLO in Running Start With 11-1 Vote for Participation
UNITED NATIONS Three pipe bombs in a
subway tunnel beneath the UN Library Building were
found and defused by police at 3 p.m. on Monday,
just one-half hour before the Security Council was
scheduled to convene.
The bombs were active and within a short time
of exploding. They symbolized the explosive atmos-
phere of the Council debate that followed upstairs.
BY A VOTE of 11-1, the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization was admitted into the discussion of the
scheduled Middle Eastern debate. As promised pre-
viously, the Israel delegation boycotted the session,
declaring that it could not be present to negotiate
its "own suicide."
''.....MWiiii:ii, 11 -.,,...
Daniel P. Moynihan, U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations, argued against the move, reminding
the Council that the PLO is not a duly-constituted
nation and could therefore .not be admitted to the
debate. To do that, he declared, would be to violate
the structure, rules and regulations of the United
Continued on Page 6-A
BIO ARAB GAINS IN OFFING?
Fears and Hopes
As Debate Began
Paris Interview: Rabin on PLO 13-A
Uawk Takes Dove Stand .. 14-A
Council resolution broadly sym-
pathetic to the Palestinian cause
a resolution which would
drive a wedge between Jeru-
Continued on Pae 15-A
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Jerusalem Monday awaited
with trepidation the Secur-
ity Council debate on the
Middle East scheduled to
begin that day.
The main fear among top
policy-makers is that the
Arab-initiated debate could
result in even greater isola-
tion of Israel, and even in a
rift opening between Israel
and the United States.
Foreign Minister Yigal Al-
lon, in Washington for talks
with Secretary of State Hen-
ry A. Kissinger, was instruct-
ed by the Cabinet to ascer-
tain as precisely as possible
what can be expected from
the U.S. as the Security
Council drama unfolds.
PARADOXICALLY, the worst
fear was that the Arabs would
not be extremist, but moderate.
Their moderation could tempt
the U.S. into supporting a new
Zionist Ideology Commission
Launched in Schenk Report
NEW YORK (JTA) An American Zionist
Federation Commission on Zionist Ideology has been
launched, and its first conference will be Jan. 21, it was
announced by Faye Schenk, AZF president.
Rabbi David Polish of Chicago, president of the
Chicago Zionist Federation, will be chairman of the
commission to which 31 Zionist scholars and leaders
have been invited as members.
THE COMMISSION, Mrs. Schenk said, will meet
several times during the year for a series of high deli-
Continued on Page 1-A
JOSEF ALMOGI
IN 67-42 VOTE
Almogi Beats Dulzin
For WZO Chairman
By DAVID LANDAU And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Zionist General Council
has elected Haifa Mayor Josef Almogi the new chairman
of the World Zionist Organization Executive by a vote of
67-42.
All 110 members of the Council cast ballots, one of
them a blank. Almogi's victory was by a considerably great-
er margin than expected by his opponent, acting WZO
Chairman Leon Dulzin.
DULZIN, who had predicted
a close vote, has agreed to re-
sign as acting chairman of the
Jewish Agency Executive when
the Agency Assembly convenes
here this summer, and that post
will automatically go to Almogi.
Sources close to Dulzin said
that he still intends to present
himself as candidate for the
WZO and Jewish Agency chair-
manships when the next World
Zionist Congress convenes here
at the end of the year.
Almogi and Dulzin embraced
after the results were an-
nounced and pledged coopera-
tion. Yitzhak Navon, chairman
of the Zionist General Council,
praised the qualities and
Continued on Page 6-A
Israel, Syria
Told: Hands
Off Lebanon
Rumsfeld, Alton Review War 2-A
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States
government warned here against intervention by any
foreign power in the Lebanese situation and specific-
ally mentioned Syria and Israel in that connection.
State Department spokesman Robert Funseth said
the warning was in response to statements by the Syr-
ian Foreign Minister Abdel Halim Khaddam that Syr-
ia would annex Lebanon if that country was partition-
ed and by Israeli Defense Minister Shimon Peres that
Israel would not stand idly by if Syria intervened in
the Lebanese crisis.
"THE U.S. HAS repeatedly expressed its support
for the territorial integrity of Lebanon," Funseth said,
referring to Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger's
Continued on Page 3-A
// Syria Moves to Annex,
Israel Vows to Mobilize
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense Minister Shimon
Peres warned here that Israel would react if Syria in-
tervened in any form in the current fighting between
Moslems and Christians in Lebanon. He made the com-
ment to the newspaper, Maariv, in connection with a
reported statement by the Syrian Foreign Minister,
Abdel Halim Khaddam, that Syria would annex Leba-
non should that country stand in danger of becoming
divided.
Peres said any Syrian intervention would be
tantamount to an invasion of Lebanon with all of its
consequences and that Israel would not remain indif-
ferent but would consider its moves.
POLITICAL CIRCLES in Jerusalem described
Peres' remarks as restrained. Israel would regard any
Continued an Page 2-A
SEGMENT DEAUNG WITH fgjjgjM ggg AMERICAN SEWS
Ford Interview Cut for 'Time Limitations'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
And HELEN SILVER
NEW YORK (JTA)
A spokesman for NBC-TV
said here that a segment of
the interview with President
Ford dealing with pressure
from Ameriean Jews and
others was cut from its
three-hour survey of Amer-
ican foreign policy Jan. 5
because of editorial judge-
ment that there were more
important segments to in-
clude within the time limita-
tion. "There was no other
reason," the spokesman
stressed.
A full transcript of the
President's interview for the
program, "New World-Hard
Choices, American Foreign
Policy 1976," was given to
the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency and other news me-
dia by the White House prior
to the broadcast.
A WHITE House spokesman
said that what Darts of the in-
terview should be used is
"something totally up to NBC"
and the segment "may have
been edited out for whatever
achievements of both candi-
dates. He souaht to console Dul-
zin by noting that he too knew
the taste of defeat once as a
reason they may have had." The
deleted segment was reported
Continued on Page 15-A
PRESIDENT FORD


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Rumsfeld, Allon Review Lebanon
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
Rumsfeld and Israeli Foreign
Minister Yig WASHINGTON (JTA) for 65 minutes at the Pentagon,
Defense Secretary Donald were believed to have included
If Syria Moves,
So Will Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
change in Lebanon resulting from Syrian actions as a
direct threat to its own security. A Kuwaiti newspaper
quoted the Syrian Foreign Minister as saying that Syria
would intervene to prevent the division of Lebanon
even if it meant war with Israel.
Addressing the Golani Brigade on the completion
of its winter maneuvers, Peres indicated that he had
little hope for peace with the Arabs in the immediate
future-
THE ARABS are not ready for peace, and even
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt, who is purported to
be the most moderate Arab leader, has said that peace
with Israel will not come in this generation, Peres said.
But Sadat wants his territories in this genera-
tion, the Defense Minister added, observing that those
who deny Israel peace deny themselves the territories.
Goering's Mercedes
Sold for $160,000
NEW YORK (JTA) Hermann Goering's Mer-
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from San Francisco. The 1944 car, used by the Nazi
leader, was auctioned in Scottsdale, Arizona. The Mer-
cedes weighs five-and-a-half tons and includes a mine-
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in their talks a discussion of the
deteriorating situation in Leba-
non in relation to the general
situation in the Middle East.
Official sources, both U.S. and
Israeli, declined to affirm spe-
cifically that the Lebanon crisis
had been considered by the two
officials. Nevertheless, thei*-
cautiously-worded statement in-
dicated that the meeting wenf
beyond Israel's military require-
ments.
WILLIAM Greener, the new
Assistant Secretary of Defense
for Public Affairs, said that
Rumsfeld and Allon "discussed
a wide range of issues of mut-
ual concern, including the cur-
rent state of defense assistance"
between Israel and the United
States, and "the Middle East
situation in general."
Rumsfeld, Greener said, "felt
the meeting was most wwrth-
while." Greener said it was "in-
aopropriate to discuss the spe-
cifics of the meeting," but, he
said. "I can say they did not
d of hardware."
The latter presumably re-
lated to Israel's desire for F-1S
and F-t6 warplanes and the rat*
of delivery to Israel. Israeli |
sources said that "a very broad
political and strategic discus-
sion" was held "in a very
friendly" atmosphere.
THE ATTENDANCE of high-
ranking State and Defense De-
partment officials at the Rums-
feld-AUon meeting indicated the
imoorUnce attached to it by the
United States.
Present were Joseoh Sisco.
Undersecretary of State for
Political Affairs; William Cle-
ments, Deputy Secretary of De-
fense; Gen. Howard Fish, As-
sistant Secretary of Defense for
Security Assistance Operations;
Amos Jordan, Assistant Defense
Secretarv for International Se-
curity Affairs; James Moyes
Denuty Assistant Secretary of
Defense for Near Eastern Se-
curity Affairs; and Malcolm
Toon, the U.S. Ambassador to
Israel.
WITH ALLON were Israeli
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz; Mai.
Gen. Avraham Adan, Israeli
military attache; Joseoh Ciech-
mover. director of the Israeli
Defense Ministry mission in the
United States; Haim Baron, di-
rector of the Foreign Minister's
office; and Ephraim Evroa, de-
puty director.
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Friday, January 16, 1976
fJewisti FkridHcuri
Page 3-A
i
Gush Ernunim Homes Not Permanent
By DAVID LANDAU And YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Yitzhak Rabin as-
sured Cabinet "doves" here that the mobile homes being
provided to the Gush Emunim settlers adjacent to the Ku-
dum army camp near Nablus in the Samaria district of the
West Bank did not signify a decision by the government to
establish a permanent Jewish settlement there.
The presence of the mobile homes, donated by the Jew-
ish Agency, outside the army camp perimeter and the con-
struction of a road from the camp to the makeshift settle-
ment raised questions at a Cabinet session that the govern-
ment was going beyond the compromise it reached with
the Gush Emunim in November.
DEFENSE Minister Shimon
Peres told the Cabinet that the
land outside the Kudum installa-
tion had in fact been annexed
to the army five years ago and
therefore- no new land annexa-
tion was involved.
The Military Governor of the
Samaria region has, at the same
time, warned increasingly res-
tive Arab villagers at Kudum to
desist from any provocative ac-
tions against the settlers. He
claimed the land occupied by
them belonged to no one and
was under the jurisdiction of
the custodian of abandoned
property.
The government reached a
compromise with the militant
Orthodox Gush Emunim during
Reds Crack Down
On Jewish Activists
LONDON (JTA) Jewish
sources in the Soviet Union re-
port on a crackdown on Jewish
activists there by the author-
ities, with more than 100 homes
raided by KGB men in Moscow
alone in the past month of Jews
linked to the publications, "Jews
in the USSR" and "Tarbut
The Cultural Report."
These sources report that the
homes of four of those most
prominently connected with
these two publications were
raided by the KGB shortly after
the departure from the Soviet
Union of the Chief Rabbi of the
British Commonwealth, Im-
manuel Jakobovits on Dec. 24."'
HE HAD been assured by top
Soviet officials that efforts
would be made to ensure Jew-
ish cultural life in the USSR.
The homes raided belonged to
Vladimir Prestin, Pavel Abra-
movitch, Ilya Essaf and Osip
Beygun. These sources said the
KGB men acted on the explicit
order of Public Prosecutor Tik-
honov, who is in charge of the
file of the Jewish cultural pub-
lications.
These Jewish sources also re-
port that a number of activists
were detained by Soviet police
in Moscow, also on the day of
Jakobovits' departure, after they
held a quiet" demonstration out-
side the Lenin Library in the
Soviet capital.
THEY STOOD in silence for
10 minutes in tribute to those
sentenced to prison five years
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ago in the first Leningrad trial.
They issued a statement to
the western press urging sup-
port against the repression of
Jewish culture in the Soviet
Union and against attempts to
frighten the applicants for visas.
The eight detainees, later re-
leased, included Prof. Mark Az-
bel, Prof. Alexander Lunts, Ilya
Rubin and Vladimir Lazaris.
the ChanukAi holidays to avoid
a confrontation between the
army and several hundred
squatters who had occupied a
site near Sebastia in the Sa-
maria district with the stated
intention of establishing a set-
tlement in defiance of govern-
ment policy.
UNDER the compromise, most
of the squatters agreed to leave
the area voluntarily but about
30 families were permitted to
remain within the confines of
the Kudum army camp though
they were given freedom of
movement.
The compromise was sup-
posed to be in effect pending a
Cabinet debate and decision on
the delicate issue of Jewish
settlements on the West Bank.
Cabinet "doves" and others
obiected vehemently at the time
and riots broke out in Nablus
and other Arab towns which
had to be quelled by force.
The government was accused
of surrendering to the Gush
Emunim who had clearly vio-
lated the law. Those charges
were revived last week when
heavy equipment was brought
into the region to build a road
and the mobile homes were lo-
cated outside the army camp
proper.
ALTHOUGH soldiers station-
ed at Kudum were under strict
orders not to fraternize with
the settlers, there has been con-
siderable mingling. The placing
of the mobile homes outside the
army camp was justified by the
government on grounds that the
settlers should not be forced to
live under military regulations.
The land involved covers 200
dunams, about 50 acres. Accord-
ing to government sources, the
headman *ot nearby Kudum vil-
lage were trying to incite the vil-
lagers and the residents of other
Arab hamlets in the region to
protest.
A delegation that met with
the Militarv Governor to object
to the settlement activity was
given a stern warning to main-
tain law and order. They were
told the authorities would deal
harshly with any attempt by
Arabs to interfere with the set-
tlers.
MEANWHILE, a group of
Jewish and Arab students and
some faculty members of the
Orthodox sponsored Bar Han
University near Tel Aviv have
organized a drive toward co-
existence between the Gush
Emunim settlers and local
Arabs. They suggested the erec-
tion of a large workshop or fac-
tory in the area where Jews and
Arabs would be employed. *
They also laid they intended
to meet with the villagers and
headmen of Kudum to explain
that the presence of the Jewish
settlers posed no threat to Uje
Arab inhabitants of the region.
It was learned meanwhile
that the first settlers have be-
gun to arrive at Har Odem, the
third of the four new Golan
Heights settlements recently au-
thorized by the Cabinet. Har
Odem is sponsored by Haoved
Hatzioni, the settlement move-
ment of the Independent Li-
beral Party.
The new village was formerly
a Syrian outpost. The settlers
are moving into structures left
by the Syrians and into newly
built concrete houses.
Stay Out of Lebanon,
Israel, Syria Warned
Continued from Page 1-A
letter, to that effect to the Prime Minister of Lebanon
last Nov. 5.
Funseth hi a prepared statement read to reporters,
said: "During the course of the difficulties in Leba-
non, we have made clear that the U.S. opposed any
outside interference in Lebanon's affairs. This position
was made known to the governments in the area. Our
view has not changed- No country should intervene in
Lebanon. We are opposed to any outside intervention
in Lebanon by any country, including Syria and Israel."
FUNSETH NOTED that "My response is to the
statements of both the Israeli and Syrian officials,"
meaning Peres and Khaddam.
Asked if there was any foreign intervention now
in Lebanon, Funseth referred the questioner to the
Lebanese authorities.
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Page 4-A
vJewlsti f/cridKaun
Friday, January 16, 1975
Meaning of UN Debate
The debate in the Security Council that began on
Monday is probably the most critical in Israel's current
history. The issue is the legitimacy of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization as more than an observer the
PLO received observer status at the UN last year with
the appearance of pistol-packing Yasir Arafat there.
The issue is also whether the current Israel-Arab
peace talks can be shifted from its Geneva base to the
Security council where, of course, Israel would be rail-
roaded by the Third World-Arab-Communist bloc.
In addition, the issue is whether the wording of
UN Res. 242 and UN Res. 338 can be amended to change
the meaning of these resolutions ex-post facto with re-
spect to (a) reference to Israel's withdrawal from Arab
"territories," suggested reading: "all territories"; and
(b) reference to the status of Arab "refugees," sug-
gested reading: "Palestinian peoples."
In these proposals, the rewording leaves little doubt
that Israel has been deprived of negotiating room of
territories for Arab relinquishment of adversary status
that is to say, the abandonment of all hopes for ulti-
mate Arab recognition of Israeli legitimacy.
Also in these proposals, the reference to "Palestin-
ian peoples" binds the world to Arab demands for the
unlimited return of Arabs to "Palestine," a name so far
without definition, and thus goes a long way toward the
final PLO aim: establishment of a "secular state" in
Palestine (undefined) and, of course, the dissolution of
Israel.
The Price of a Veto
The first of these issues has already been decided.
By an 11-1 vote, the Security Council has granted the
PLO the right to participate in the Israel-Arab debate
In all of this, the U.S. veto plays a critical role
the vote on PLO participation was procedural and there-
fore not subject to veto.
The question is whether the U.S. will exercise its
veto right when the Arabs press for revision of the
critical UN resolutions- Over the weekend, Dr. Kissinger
indicated that the administration may not do that after-
all. Perhaps, he suggested, the Palestinians may be more
negotiable in their demands than can be imagined.
Whatever the outcome, Israel is sure to lose. Even
if the U.S. exercises its veto right, the Kissinger price
may be a high one for Israel to pay: for example, under-
the-table pressure from Washington that Israel nego-
tiate an interim accord with Syria on the Golan Heights.
We Must Not Forget
"Who is richer than the Jew who remembers? Who
is poorer than the Jew who forgets?"
With these words, noted martyrology author Elie
Wiesel accepted the first annual United Jewish Appeal
David Ben Gurion Award-
Wiesel was telling the recent UJA national confer-
ence, where the presentation was made, that things are
more ominous for Israel and world Jewry today than
in a long time.
After all, history does tend to repeat itself. By re-
membering, by not forgetting, we can help history NOT
to repeat itself in this instance, and in a most significant
way through our gifts to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and CJA-Israel Emergency Fund.
This is especially significant in light of the launch-
ing of the CJA-IEF campaign last week with Harry B.
Smith, president of Federation, and L. Jules Arkin,
chairman of the 1976 campaign, at the helm.
Most of us are giving. If we have not already done
so, then do so.
Shift in Population
Statistics compiled by the American Jewish Com-
mittee indicate that the Jewish population of Greater
New York is declining. The statistics conclude that there
is a mass exodus to the suburbs.
For example: In New York City proper, there was
a loss of 608,000 in Jewish population. At the same
time, there was a gain of 191,000 in Nassau-Suffolk and
of 34,000 in Westchester.
It is difficult to estimate what this exodus can mean
to the near-bankrupt economy of the Great Apple, but
we can well imagine what it must mean to Nassau-Sulf-
folk and Westchester.
Judging from parallel experience here, Nassau-Suf-
folk and Westchester must be going through the kind of
population explosion that South Florida enjoyed during
the past decade or so.
This has meant the transferring of complex Jewish
community activities in civic, cultural, religious and
philanthropic programs from one area to another. It has
also meant the transferring of the complex problems
characteristic of any large community from one area
to another.
Dr. Carl Jung and the Jews
FROM NEBUCHADNEZZAR
r to Nero, from Hitler to Rich-
ard Nixon, history has always
dabbled in the emotional lives
of leaders. The absolutist who
succumbs to the corruption of
power remains an endless
source of fascination and hu-
man speculation.
The question is not so much
why one leader or another be-
comes the way he is, but how
it is that people fail to recog-
nize his potential toward tyran-
U1IIIIWIII" 'I
Dili
MMMHNlJ
ny in the first place, and suffer
it until it is often too late to
remedy.
PARTICULARLY in the 20th
century, this is a predominant
issue. The course of Indira
Gandhi's premiership in India
for example, may well be un-
derstood only at some future
time after a study of her emo-
tional fabric has been made.
Here at home, and in the re-
cent past, we have had the
rag ful tears of Edmund Mus-
I ie, the forced resignation from
his \ice presidential candidacy
of Thomas Eagleton because it
was discovered that he had
b-- n a mental patient, the wild
sexual escapades of Rep. Wil-
bur Mills with a nightclub strip-
per allegedly leading to his
near-murder of her, the report-
ed alcoholism of Speaker of the
House Carl Albert.
Not to mention nude women
running down the corridors of
the White House during the
K-.nnedy presidency and Ken-
nedy's confession to friends
that he suffered unbearable
headaches if he did not have
frequent intimate relations.
OR WATERGATE itself -
the corruption beyond any sin-
gle incident in our history of
the powers of the presidency.
Richard Nixon's "secret" psy-
chiatric sessions with Dr. Ar-
nold Hutchnecker, the dazed
Nixon ramblings about his
"saint" of a mother at the mo-
ment that a whole nation, it-
self dazed by his political ex-
cesses, beheld his decline and
fall.
I said before that 20th cen-
tury history is particularly
prone to be psychoanalytical
Continued on Page 12-A
Liberal Dilemma: Many Cooks
It's flattering to hear from
some people that they miss my
comments on American politics.
It seems they are confused, con-
cerned, copped-out (these are
Democrats of course; the three
Jews I know who are Repub-
licans haven't spoken to me for
years. Besides, they're not con-
fused, onlv concerned).
Flattering but frightening.
What makes anyone think I'm
not confused or concerned?
And while I haven't copped-out,
I often wonder what it means
some nights lately when I keep
milling the blanket over my
head.
THE POSSIBILITY of a Ford,
Reagan or Wallace becoming
the President of the Unit -d
States in the very year that we
celebrate our Declaration of
Independence surely must bog-
gle the mind of any reasonable
person.
We, here in Florida, already
have been exposed to the ex-
plorations of presidential can-
didates for two years. It was
first in February of 1974 that
Sen. Walter Mondale of Min-
nesota, trailed by the ever-
nresent television cameras
building their files for "Cam-
paign 76," was greeted by Mi-
ami's liberal establishment.
Mondale was testing the at-
mosphere and. as it turned out,
his own durability, for he de-
cided not long after that he'd
rather not be President than
have to endure the incredible
nonsense of becoming a "viable"
candidate.
IT IS safe now for me to say
that I can think of few better
qualified men for the position
and that the elimination of men
like Walter Mondale is a sad
reflection on the entire svstem.
Now there are 11 or 12 pas-
sing through dailv the num-
ber doesn't really matter for
onlv a few are reallv serious
and none has taken off, either
bv personalitv or the sheer
force of his campaign as did, for
instance, George McGovern,
who had small personality but
great campaign tactics.
This is not to say that the
dozen Democrats are not com-
petent and that their perform-
ance in office would not sur-
pass that of Ford, Reagan or
Wallace. I trust I am not being
biased when I say that almost
any one could.
THE DILEMMA of choosing
among the serious contenders
like Bayh, Carter, Jackson,
Udall, etc.. is not so much the
men but the liberal picture. Li-
berals seem to be in disarray,
to have lost the spirit that has
carried them, since 1932, to na-
tional victory with great con-
sistency because they offered
a program which meant much
to most Americans.
Desnite the ignorant mouth-
ings of saloon ohilosopher Mike
I^Velle or salon sage William
Buckley. American labor would
still be bark in the dark ages
without liberal support and
legislation. Liberals are not re-
volutionists but reformers, and
the ultimate inadequacy of that
was best summed up, it seems
to me, by Walter Lippmann.
"Progress," he wrote, "is mak-
ing the best of a bad bargain."
Given the large warts each
of the Democratic hopefuls car-
pus on his record Jackson
the militarist, Bayh's initial
soonsorshio of S-l and some
other dubious legislation, Car-
ter's questionably successful
nmpaign for Governor of
Georgia I am convinced that
most of them fall into the tradi-
tional Democratic mold in that
they do not believe that com-
passion is obsolete. That even if
government doesn't seem to be
"bv teh people" any longer, it
must continually strive to be
"for the people."
A VAGUE philosophy, indeed,
but surely superior to the rigid
right-wing ideology of Ford and
Reagan which views the unem-
ployment of millions a better
way of life for their side than
any other.
There's another side to the
liberal dilemma and that's the
decision by the corrupt labor
leadership to come back to the
Democratic side because they
have lost faith in Ford and
Continued on Page 11-A
^ewislri Floridian
OFFICE AND PLANT 1M NK 6th STREET TELEPHONE S7J-4
-'O. Box 01-2973, Miami. Florida 3S101
Ed ?ndSpKE.T .LEO MINDUN SELMA M. THOMPSON
Th. .! kr, A""clale Editor Assistant to PublU>"*
mrt FJ.onolan Doe Not Guarantee The Kathrwth
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Publish^ evoryPn.Uy since 1327 by The Jewish FlorldUn
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.ocistion xgn.gari Sfa v^^-zp^:
saggars stuts^zsz*** *-VM^*'
1
Volume 49
Friday, January 16, 1976
Number 3
14 SHEVAT 5736
L


Friday, January 16, 1976
* Jewish fhrkMaun
Page 5-A
JDC Moves Headquarters f rom Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Joint Distribution Committee
has officially moved its Israel
headquarters from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem. A ceremony mirk-
ine the orvnin-r "f the new
headquarters last Thursday was
attended by Robert L. Goldman,
the former associate director of
the JDC's Ma'h"n n-nm-arri in
Israel, who on that day also of-
ficially became the JDC's execu-
tive vice chairman.
Ahn rttnnding were 70 JDC
o~^ho<. w*<" hid bpen dis-
missed because of the move.
MAYOR TEDDY Kollek cited
the transfer of the JDC head-
quarters as a rare examnle of
9 n^n-Zionist organization's sen-
sitivity to the importance of
Jerusalem as the site for major
Jewish organizations. Kollek
to the Zionist General Council
when he noted that the Reform
movement plans to move its in*
ternational headquarters to the
Israeli capital.
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Page 6-A
*Jenist> noridttan
Friday, January 16, 1975
PLO in Running Start With 11-1 Vote for Participation
Continued from Page 1-A
Nations Charter.
The Soviet Union opposed
the U.S. position, stating that
the PLO represents the legiti-
mate rights of the "Palestinian
people."
MOYNIHAN argued that a
"yes" vote would "open a verit-
able Pandora's Box of future
difficulties."
Great Britain, France and
Italy all abstained.
Because the matter was pro-
cedural, that is to say, not one
of substance or policy, the veto
power capable of being exer-
cised by the Security Council's
permanent members was inap-
plicable. They include the So-
viet Union, China, Britain and
France, in addition to the U.S.
Farouk Kaddoumi, foreign
policy advisor to PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat, greeted the vote
with the comment that "We took
up arms and had recourse in
defense of our valid desire to
live in our own land."
He called the PLO struggle a
"just struggle" against Israel by
"all legitimate means."
SAID KADDOUMI: "We strug-
gle for legitimacy and peace
not to seize what does not be-
k a Italic Says Prison Solons are Anti-Semitic
ALLENWOOD, Pa.Rabbi
Meir Kahane, of the Jewish
Defense League, now com-
pleting a federal prison
term at Allenwood Federal
prison camp, has blasted of-
ficials of the prison, as well
as the Bureau of Prisons, for
"a kind of bureaucratic
heartlessness that throws
the prisoners here into bit-
terness and despair."
He also accused officials
here of "blatant anti-Semi-
tism." Kahane condemned
as well the Bureau of Pris-
ons and its director, Norman
Carlson, for "willful viola-
tion of court orders and a
contempt for the law that
shows that Watergates oc-
cur in the country daily."
KAHANE had Allenwood Su-
perintendent E. Jensen brought
into District Court in Lewis-
burg, Pa., where Jensen is re-
ported to have told the court
that he would refuse to pur-
chase a quarter pound butter,
cheese, soups, bread or meat
because of "budgetary limita-
tions" despite court orders by
the Second Circuit Court of Ap-
peals and Judge Jack B. Wein-
stein of the Eastern District of
New York.
Jensen also allegedly refused
to allow national Jewish groups
to donate food and also refused
to entertain the purchase of
kosher meat TV dinners at 10
cents a meal (subsidized by na-
tional Jewish groups). In a
statement Kahane said:
"THIS IS more than a ques-
tion of a dull diet. It is a ques-
tion of a dull, petty tyrant (and
Jensen is only one of so many
in the system) who la incom-
petent and fearful of making his
way in the outside world. Thus,
he chooses the security of a
prison office where he can rule
over a petty fiefdom of fright-
ened and helpless people.
"He not only seeks to defy
the courts on the issue of kosher
food to which he brings a
measure of his own primitive
anti-Semitism but takes plea-
sure in denying maximum priv-
ileges of half-way houses, fur-
loughs and paroles despite
general Bureau policy.
"The result is total failure of
rehabilitation because Jensen
and all the Jensens produce bit-
ter, frustrated and angry pris-
oners. These latter see a system
without a heart and thus they
have no comDunctions against
striking at it later.
"I INTEND" to press for gen-
against Jensen in general and
on the kosher food issue in par-
ticular, all the way through ad-
ministrative and court channels.
"I INTENT to press for gen-
eral reforms on behalf of all the
prisoners here, as well as equal
rights for Judaism, including a
room for a synagogue (there is a
complete church); shelves for
Jewish books and religious sup-
plies; a Torah scroll and phy-
lacteries; nightly study groups
(the Christian Yokefellows have
this) and other basic religious
rights."
long to us. It is the resolve of
our people to continue our
struggle military and politi-
cal.
"Our people will continue ojir
just struggle by all legitimate
means to obtain their legitimate
g3als. We have legitimate ra-
tional rights not 'interests'
&3 some like to put it."
Kaddoumi assured the Se-
curity Council that the PLO
wants "peace Jor us and for the
Jews in Palestine," thus presag-
ing the general position of tha
PLO that Palestine should be-
come a "stcular state" for
Arabs and Jews alike.
r
Almogi New WZO Chairman
I
U.S., Canadian Leaders Plan
To Meet Rabin at Confab
NEW YORK (JTA) Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin invited
more than 250 Jewish leaders
from the United States and Ca-
nada to meet with him and
other government leaders on Is-
rael's economic needs and prob-
lems in 1976 this week.
The Prime Minister's Israel
Bond Conference will nl program of action to increase
the participation of Jewish
communities abroad in alleviat-
ing the severe pressures on Is-
rael's economy resulting from
a record high defense budget
and a staggering balance of
and a staggering balance
more than S3.5 billion, accord-
ing to Sam Rothberg, general
chairman of the Israel Bond
Organization.
FOR THE first time in the
25-year history of the Israel
Bond program, the conference
met in Europe as well as in Is-
rael.
The initial sessions of the
1976 conference were held in
Brussels Sunday and Monday to
focus attention on the new op-
portunities for wider Israel
trade with Europe as a result
of the agreement Israel signed!
early in 1975 with the Common
Market that will lift all tariff
barriers on Israeli goods by the
middle of next year.
Continued from Page 1-A
candidate for the Presidency of
Israel and again when he stood,
for election as Speaker of the
Knesset.
ALMOGPS victory was as-1
sured earlier when the Zionist
Congress Court rejected a mo-
tion by Dulzin's supporters to;
postpone the vote until the Jew-
fan Agency Assembly meeting j
six months from now.
The court, headed by Israeli
Supreme Court Justice Moshe
Landau, said there was no jus-
tification for postponement be-
cause the WZO constitution
states specifically that the elec-
tion of a new chairman must be
held at the session of the Gen-
era! Council "closest to the
date on which the position be-
came vacant.
That date was last August
when WZO chairman Pinhas.
Sapir died suddenly.
The 65-year-old veteran La-!
borite. who resigned from the'
Cabinet in 1974 to become
Mayor of Israel's third largest
city, was strongly backed by the
Labor Party who selected him to
oppose Dulzin, a leader of Li-1
kud.
HE WAS elected by a com-!
bination of Labor, Mapam, In-
dependent Liberal and General
Zionist votes. The Mizrachi re-
ligious faction split.
Prior to the voting. Premier
Yitzhak Rabin engaged in inten-
sive personal lobbying for Al-
mogi among the General Coun-
cil delegates from Israel and
abroad.
HIS EFFORTS were credited
with biinging some Mjzrachi
votes and other waverers into
the Almogi column. Dulzin's
suoDorters for their part had
hoped to corral some Labor
Party dissidents or at least more
blank ballots, bat their efforts
failed.
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For Tourism in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) December, 1975, was the
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cording to figures released by the Tourism Ministry,
60,700 tourists came last month.
The figure was 36 percent higher than in Decem-
ber of 1974 and 16 percent higher than in December,
1971, the previous top December. Of those arriving
here last month, 51,900 came by air and most of the
others by cruise ships.
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*-


Friday, January 16, 1976
vJewisti fkridftar
Page 7-A
i
\

We all hope and pray that peace will come to the Mideast. But
it's a long, long way off.
What exists now is an interim agreement. And an interim
agreement is not peace. It is a very fragile first step in a long
series of steps that one day may result in peace. We can
be hopeful. But, of course, no one needs to be reminded of the
recent U.N. resolution condemning Zionism as a form of racism.
So we had better not fool ourselves for even a moment that
Israel's problems are solved. Or even close to being solved.
For one thing, Israel took great risks to bring the Mideast
situation to its present state. Israel gave something real. It gave
up land. And this land had already been paid for by the blood
of Israelis in previous wars. So far, the other side has not given
up land, it has only given its word. And only history will tell
whether or not that word will be honored.
Now that's where it stands. A fragile interim agreement
exists, but it is a long, hard costly road to peace.
The economic pressures on Israel are enormous, and will
continue to be enormous every single step of the way to peace.
And let us not confuse talk of United States military aid to Israel
with Jewish giving.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
V
We Are One*
U.S. aid is important and vital. But let us remember that
almost all those funds for Israel's defense are being spent in the
United States in United States industry. And let us remember
that the tools of war can only protect. They cannot create.
Because of this, we must work as hard as ever to help the
people of Israel. Because if we let up now, everything that all of
us here and all of those in Israel have worked for so hard for so
long could be lost.
We must continue to help the people of Israel with their
human needs and their commitment to make possible a decent
quality of life for every citizen. We must house Russian
immigrants and bring hope to their elderly and build faith in the
future for their children. We must help them keep alive the
traditions through which future generations of Israelis will find
hope and courage and a sense of their place in the world.
We have not come this far to fail.
If you think all Israel's problems are solved, think again.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Give now.
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
,


Page 8-A
vJewistifhrkJiarin
Friday, January 16, 1976
?

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Artist's rendering of the mausoleum as completed.
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I


Friday, January 16, 1976
fJewist) fkrkfiati
Page 9-A
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M
Page 10-A
^Jenist Fkridliar:
Friday, January 16, 1976

AZF Launches Zionist Ideology Commission
Continued from Pace 1-A
berations designed t develop answers to such ques-
tions as what is the contemporary character of Zionism,
i> the ideology of Zionism of 1976 essentially the same
as the Zionism of 1945-1956. how does one distinguish
between Zionism and pro-Israel activity, and docs Zion-
ist philosophy need updating and revision?
'The recent UN resolution equating Zionism with
racism, and the resulting acceleration of interest in
Zionism has created historic challenges and opportuni-
ties for the Zionist community," Mrs. Schenk stated.
'NEVER BEFORE in recent years have so many
people been interested in hearing about, or discussing,1
Zionism. One important by-product of this phenomenon
is the need to clarify and interpret the meaning of
ZJGirism."
Among those invited to participate in the commis-
sion are Prof. Howard Adelson, Dr. Judith Diesendruck,
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, Charlotte Jacobson, Philip
KJutznick, Rose Matzkin, Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
Dr. Judah J. Shapiro, Dr. Joseph Sternstein, Kalman
Sultanik, Prof. Marie Syrkin, Jacques Torczyner and
Rabbi Mordechai Waxman.
The 31 invitees represent all groupings in the Zion-
ist movement.
AT FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL BEGINNING SUNDAY
Beach to Host N.Y. Federation Gathering
Miami Beach will host the
3Sth annual conference of the
Council of Opnnnations of the
Greattr Mew York United Jew-
ish Appeal Federation of Jew-
ish Philanthropies Joint Cam-
paign which will launch the
Council's 1976 fund raising
.drive among the members of
more than 300 Jewish frater-
nal and folk organizations head-
quartered in that metropolis.
The UJA Federation Joint
Campaigr is responsible for
mobilizing the New York Jew-
ish community's financial sup-
port for humanitarian pro-
grams in Israel and in a score
of oth jr countries. The drive
alsc supports the Israel Emer-
gency Fund and the Federa-
tions network of 120 Jewish
health, welfare and cultural
age, ies >.T'ing New Yorkers
of all fciths and creeds.
IKE CONFERENCE which
wpeoa S'nday evening at the
For.t.'iii-.bleau Hotel, will con-
tkna through Sunday, Jan. 25,
with its closing session being
held at the Barcelona Hotel.
The conference, which will
rcprcs .Ming their respective
organizations, i 'Iso expected
to attract the same number of
winter visitors, many of whom
are arranging their vacations
in Florida to coincide with the
conference's dates.
A major attraction is the ap-
pearance of Dr. Nahum Gold-
mann, on of Jewry's most
prestigicns loaders and states-
men outside of Israel. Dr. Gold-
mann i th~ president of both
the World Zitmist Organization,
and of the Conference on Jew-
ish Matsri-i Claims Against
Germany. the organization
which ,-as instrumental in
reaching an agreement with
the late President Adenauer of
West Germany to indemnify
German Jews for injuries and
material damages they Suffered
in the hands of the Nazis.
I DR. GOLDMANN is also a
former president of the World
Zionist Organization.
Other speakers are Sholom
Rosenfeld, editor-in-chief of
Ma'ariv, daily Israeli newspa-
per; Judge Benjamin Shalleck,
of New York, Council chair-
man; arid Norman 'Gilmovsky,
Council honorary chairman, al-
so of New York.
The conference will alsc be
addressed by officers of the
country's leading Jewish or-
ganizations, as well as Jewish
Cultural figures.
MUM ON BACKERS
Day ah Pill
Edit Paper
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Former Defense Minister Mo-
she Dayan has confirmed that
he accepted a proposal to be the
editor of a n:w morning news-
paper but refused to reveal the
names of the investors, report-
ely a group of Americans and
Israelis.
According to Maariv, the
American investors are being
represented by Ami Brown and
the Israelis by Moshe Wertheim-
er and Chagal Bar-Kochba.
D3yan said he will continue
to serve in the Knesset, divid-
ing his time between the news-
paper and the Parliament. He
said the newspaper, which is to
be a tabloid, will be a Zionist
newspaper and will not be af-
filiated with my political party.
But. he ad-'ed. "It will most
certainly reflect my views."
IN ANOTHER development in
Israel's newspapers, the Jeru-
salem Post announced the
names of its two new editors,
An Rath. 50, and Erwin Fren-
kel. 42. The two replaced Mrs.
L?a Ben Dor who served as
editor since the death of Ted
Lurie in 1974.
Rath, who was born in Vien-
na, ioined the Post in 1958 as
political and diplomatic corres-
pondent, became news editor in
I 1970.
Israel Histadrut Foundation
F PRESENTS
LIVE YIDDISH RADIO BROADCAST
OVER STATION WEVD IN NEW YORK
Shelomo Bai-Israel
Renowned Radio Commentator
Columnist of the -Daily Jewish Forward''
and its U.N. Correspondent
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V>ovy na!?vy vr
National President
Israel Histadrut Foundation
whose uniifiie weAly radio series
has recehrd wide acclaim
Weekly Review:
The Middle East Today
Weekly Program:
'The Voice of Histadrut"
Dr. Leon Kronish
Spiritual leader, temple Beth Sholom
Brilliant National leader of
State of Israel Bonds, U. J. A.
and the Israel Histadrut Foundation
Should Israel
Take Risks for Peace?
SUNDAY, JAN. 25th, K7B FONTAINEBLEAU HQJEL
BRUNCH: 10 AM. BROADCAST: 12 NOON
ADMISSION: $3 PER PERSON
FOR RESERVATIONS, CALL THE ISRAEL HBTADRUT FOUNDATION TEL 531-8702



iy, January 16, 1976
vJewistifhridHain
Page 11-A
lion, Dr. K. Eye Security Council Debate
By HELEN SILVER
TASHINGTON (JTA)
[Israeli Foreign Minister
ill Allon and Secretary of
Henry A. Kissinger jn-
ited to newsmen after a
;-hour meeting at the
Department last week
their talks aimed at
shing a common U-S.-Is-
|i position on the Secur-
Council's Middle East
ite had not reached a
jlusive stage.
("I think we need another
in order to continue and
kybe to analyze our con-
tortions," Allon said. He
[Cohen: Too
iany Cooks
itinued from Page 4-A
agan (a plus for those two
[my opinion).
RVhen the thieving Teamsters
ere chased out of the merged
iL-CIO in the '50's, and the
jkedown Building Trades
lions felt hemmed in by the
Ite incorruptible CIO unions
I by Walter Reuther, they
rned to their natural allies:
Republicans.
[THEY WERE good partners
fccause neither of them be-
fcved in an honest trade union
ovement. Of one thing you can
certain: there will be no ef-
fective coalition, as in the New
Bd Fair Deal Days, between
srals and labor in 1976.
Beginning Jan. 26, the YMHA
>r Jewish Community Center
you're fancy) will launch its
jiadrennial .forum series for
residential candidates with
. iimy Carter's appearance,
lis is serious business and no
_ne to avoid learning some-
jjing about the people upon
horn much of our future de-
fends. You might call this my
imment on American politics.
TEDDY KOLLEK.
Mayor of Jerusalem,
invites you to have your Son's
?ar mitzv&h
in
ISPACt
Think ol giving your son tr* incredible
opportunity ol chanting his Hallorah at
tlM Western Wall. Lei the entire fam.iy
shire the experience ot a Bar Mitzvah in
Israel, a pilgrimage that luthlis a dream
and brings you closer to the spirit ol the
Jewish People.
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added, "Today we didn't
even reach the stage in
which we have to find out
our views and try to learn
facts, procedures and regu-
lations and so forth."
ALLON REITERATED that
Israel would not attend the Se-
curity Council debate which
began Monday because the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
has been invited to participate.
"We will not be there, but this
has nothing to do with our
talks. The Secretary did not try
to convince us to change our
mind," the Israeli Foreign Min-
ister said in reply to a ques-
tion.
Asked if Israel would recog-
nize the PLO, Allon replied
flatly, "We're not going to re-
cognize them." Kissinger, who
was asked about possible Arab
attempts to modify Security
Council Resolutions 242 and
338, said the U.S. would strong-
ly oppose any changes but
stopped short of saying that it
would exercise its veto power
against them.
We have stated that as far
as the U.S. is concerned, peace
negotiations must be made on
Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338 and we consider
them the only relevant UN res-
olutions," Kissinger said.
WITH REGARD to a veto,
however, he said, 'We will have
to see what resolutions emerge
before we can make a final de-
cision. We will not participate
in any of them. We will strong-
ly oppose any changes."
In his prepared statement to
reporters as he and Allon
emerged from their meeting,
Kissinger said: "We have just
concluded our initial talks
which were conducted in a
very cordial anJ friendly at-
mosphere. There are no two
countries more interested in
democracy and peace than the
U.S. and Israel. The U.S has al-1
ways stated its interest in pre-
serving the security and sur-1
vival of Israel. We are talking
primarily about the Security
Council resolution at the UN
Security Council next week
with a view toward achieving
a coordinated .position and tor
maintain common interests."
ALLON SAID in h*< state-
ment, 'Our meeting today gave
us a very good opportunity to
review the situation in the way
we are accustomed ... I think
we need another talk tomor-
row in order to continue and
maybe to analyze our conversa-1
tions. They were very informa-
tive talks and I do hope that we
shall reach an understanding,
because, as the Secretary said'
just now, we have many inter- \
ests in common and foremost
to have progress toward peace
in the Middle East, peace which
will offer a solution to all prob-'
lems in the Arab-Israeli con-
flfct."
Allon agreed with Kissinger
that their talks "were cordial
talks, nice, and I am glad we
bad them."
President Ford, meanwhile,
conferred with five American
envoys to Middle Eastern coun-
tries who were/called home for
consultations on the eve of the
Security Council debate.
Meeting with him at the
White House were Ambassadors
Toon; Robert Murphy, the Am-
bassador to Svna; Thomas
Bickering, Ambassador to Jor-
dan: William Porter, Ambassa-
dor to Saudi Arabia; and Her-
mann Eilts, Ambassador to
Egypt.
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Sachar Reprint,
Other Books Appear
By SUSAN PANOFF
Abram L. Sachar, THE COURSE
OF OUR TIMES. A Delta
Book. N.Y.: DeU, 1975. Re-
print. $4.25.
After teaching a course in
contemporary affairs at Bran-
deis University, Dr. Sachar, now
chancellor of Brandeis, was ap-1
proached by Boston's education-
al television station to put the!
classroom on the air. his volume j
is a revision and expansion of I
those telecasts. Jew and non-!
Jew alike faithfully watched
"The Course of Our Times" on
WGBH. Not only is Dr. Sachar
worth listening to, but also his
book is well-worth,reading and
studying.
GU Carl-AIRoy, THE KISSIN-
GER EXPERIENCE: Amer-
ican Policy in the Middle
East. New York: Horizon
Press, $7.95.
AlRoy, an internationally
known. expert on Middle East-
ern affairs, examines Kissinger's j
role in the Yom Kippur War
before and after. He is partic-
ularly concerned with the oil
issue, Russia's influence in the
Middle East, and the prospect
for peace. Timely.
ft *
Fred M. and Grace Hechinger,
GROWING UP IN AMERICA.
New York: McGraw-Hill, $15.
The authors show the insep-,
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education in America. Schools
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they struggle under many con-
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realistic needs of minority
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Page 12-A
*Jenisti Flcridliairi
Friday, January 16, 1976
IEO MINDLIN
f-

New Book Studies Carl Jung and the Jeivs
Continued from Page 4-A
about its leaders, although it is
clear that other centuries be-
fore our own had similar op-
portunities and, in fact, took
them with gusto if not quite in
the same way.
"Nero fiddled while Rome
burned" may well be the best
of all psychoanalytic encomi-
ums to political schizophrenia,
and that event occurred 2,000
years ago.
AND THE 19th century Rus-
sian novelist. Leo Tolstoy, fill-
ed his masterpiece, "War and
Peace," with speculation about
alternative outcomes to the bat-
tle at Austerlitz if only Napo-
leon didn't have a headache at
one pivotal moment.
Or what might have occurred
at Moscow if Gen. Kutuzov did
not have an emotionally debil-
itating cold at the precise in-
stant that he decided to play
the waiting game with Napo-
leon and thus bring the savage
winter snows of Russia into a
victorious military alliance with
him against the French.
But it is largely in our own
time that these considerations
take on a psychiatric timbre be-
cause our own time is marked
by psychiatric understanding in
a way that past history is not.
THE REASON for this is that
psychiatry the ability to un-
New Book Appearing in Argentina
Touts the Old Anti-Semitic Line
By ASHER MIBASHAN
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
A book titled "Argentina Judia"
(Jewish Argentina) by a gov-
ernment official who accused
/udaism of being the source of
"international synarchy" that
has infiltrated major world in-
stitutions including "the ranks
of the (Catholic) Church" was
introduced with fanfare at a
press conference here several
days ago, attended by church
officials, academicians and rep-
resentatives of the Libyan Em-
bassy.
The author, Horacio Calde-
ron, a member of the right-wing
Peronist Youth, wa? confirmed
list week as press director of
National Hebrew
ISKAEU GlfT CENTER INC.
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Religious Articles 6Hts
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417 Washington An. 672-7017
the Buenos Aires National Uni-
versity.
THAT POSITION was seen in
circles here as a reward for his
bonk. His book is startingly re-
miniscent of the 19th century
work "France Juive" (The
French Jew) by Eduard Dru-
mont, which sparked anti-
Semitism in France when it was
published there.
At the press conference Cal-
deron stated that the "visible
powers of Judaism are known
as international synarchy whose
various prongs are Zionist proj-
ects, diaspora projects, Jewish-
Christian projects divided into
capitalist, Communist, Masonic
and Vatican internationals."
Regarding the alleged Vatican
international, the author de-
clared in his speech that "it par-
ticipates actively in synarchic
activity and has been es-
tablished after a prolonged and
persistent process of Jewish in-
filtration in the ranks of the
Church."
CALDERON espouses the con-
cept of "synarchy" developed
by the late President Juan D.
Peron who viewed all world
events ns the outcome of a sinis-
ter link between capitalism,
Communism, Freemasonry and
the church, all controlled in
some occult manner by "inter-
national Judaism."
The philosophy was strongly
reminiscent of the notorious
19th centurv forgery, "The Pro-
tocols of the Elders of Zion,"
although Peron was not un-
friendly to Argentine Jews, and
his regime maintained diplo-
matic relations with Israel.
Calderon declared in his
speech that his book places Ar-
gentina among the non-aligned
countries. "Thus, we shall stop
being satellites of imperialism
and particularly obedient in-
struments of the Kissinger plan
(U.S. Secretary of State Henry
'*WAr*-'WV

Rabbi Joseph E. Raclcovsky
Phone 672-7306
045 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
PLANNING
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ISRAEL?
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Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
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A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
A. Kissinger) which concen-
trates occult powers of Judaism
and international svnarchy."
LAST NOVEMBER, Calderon
was one of the signers of an
advertisement in local newspa-
pers applauding the United Na-
tions Third Committee draft
resolution that identified Zion-
ism as a form of racism.
Those attending the press
conference introducing his book
included The Rev. Father Raul
Sanchez Abelenda, dean of the
philosophy faculty at Buenos
Aires University, and Rodolfo
Tecera Del Franco, dean of the
sociology department.
Meanwhile, three Arab groups
here published large advertise-
ments in major Buenos Aires
newspapers declaring that "A
Palestine State is the only peace
possibility" in the Middle East.
The ad quotes PLO chieftain
Yassir Arafat and the late Presi-
dent Peron.
THE SPONSORS are Argen- !
tine Cultural Palestine House, I
Argentine Arab Youth for the !
Liberation of Palestine, and
Palestine's Vrice. They ex-
pressed great satisfaction over
the successes achieved by the
PLO at the United Nations last
year and drew a distinction be- !
tween Judaism and Zionism.
In that connection they quot- I
ed views expressed by the
"Ikuf," the left-wing anti-Zion-
ist Federation of Argentine Jew-
ish Cultural Bodies which at-
tacked the official representa-
tive organizations of Argentine
Jewry such as the DAIA, the
Buenos Aires Jewish Commu-
nity Council and the Argentine
Zionist Federation as perpetra-
tors of "international synarchy."
The ad noted with satisfaction
that during 1975 a street in the
citv of Rosario was named
"Palestine Street" and a square
in the resort town of San Cle-
mente Del Tuyu was named
"Palestine State."
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derstand human motivation in
the specialized kind of way that
hopefully leads bizarre or aber-
rant motivation and behavior
to therapy and cure is a
relatively modern phenomenon.
Most of us would agree with
this assertion mainly on the ba-
sis that, of course, it is rela-
tively modern. Didn't Sigmund
Freud, the father of it all, only
die in 1939?
But that would ignore other
modern founders, from the
French neurologist, Charcot
(1825-1893), to Freud's early
colleague, Bleuler. who gave
Freud so many of his signifi-
cant leads in psychopathology.
MAINLY, it would ignore
another titan cl medern psy-
chlatry, Carl Jung who. though
In many ways was as important
as Freud, and in others even
more important, enjoys no
such Freudian equivalence in
the popular mind.
It is for this reason thct
Laurens van d<>r Post has writ-
ten the recen* "Jung and the
Story of Our Time" (New York:
Pantheon Boo!;s, $10).
In it. van der Post, a South
African author of fiction, travel
and personal memoirs, docu-
ments his rather lengthy friend-
ship with Jung. Of particular
interest are the passages relat-
ing to Jung and the Jews.
THERE HAS been much
speculation about and docu-
mentation of Jung's pro-Nazism
and anti-Semitism. Van der
Post attempts to discuss much
if not all of it as allegation and
"unfortunate ill-timing" that
have led to profound "misun-
derstandings' about Juns's
feelings, and beliefs.
But the fact is that Jung and
Freud, the former first a stu-
dent of the latter and then a
colleague, broke up in the end
behind a cloud of not so secret
recrimination, not only over the
course of psychiatry but Jews,
as well.
Freud's own works, both in
the "Psychopathology of Every-
day Life" and "Wit and its Re-
lation to the Unconscious," are
filled with references to Jews,
Judaism, Jewish humor and the
anti-Semitism he suffered as a
Viennese practitioner of a new
and unholy "Jewish occultism."
OF COURSE, psychiatry- is
no more Jewish than anti-Sem-
itism is Jewish. The van der
Post book is, minimally, proof
of that.
There is no doubt that Freud
had his troubles with anti-Sem-
ites. The question is whether
Jung was one of them. This is
a fascinating consideration
bearing upon two giants in
modern psychiatry.
One of the more immed
questions resulting from our
recent political agonies in Wash-
ington i> whether candidates
for "nigh public office should be
required to submit to psychia-
t ie eNamination before ti'.ey
are permitted to run. That
would mean submitting to an
anal" tic process largely forged
by these two giants.
THE VAN der Post book giv-
es Uo an insight into their own
imperfections, thus raising the
question whether emotionally
imperfect beings can offer
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[y, January 16, 1976
vJewisi) ncrkfiar}
Page 13-A
iuit Policy And We'll Talk-Rabin to PLO
By EDWIN EYTAN
[ARIS (JTA) Pre-
lr Yitzhak Rabin indicat-
or) an interview published
>, in reply to a hypo-
tical question, that the
possible development
could lead Israel to re-
sider its present policy
javing no dealing whatso-
lr with the Palestine Lib-
jtion Organization, would
for the PLO to renounce
stated goal of the destruc-
i of Israel.
The Premier also said in
interview, appearing in
weekly "Nouvel Observ-
er," that Israel would
k for a reconvening of the
Ineva conference provid-
that the UN Security
luncil reaffirms the text
Id practical meaning of its
[solutions 242 and 338
[thout alteration as the
femework of the Geneva
Inference.
Hans H. Marcusej
Louis Witkin
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HE SAID Israel favored a re-
turn to Geneva because of the
stalemate in further negotiations
of an interim settlement with
Syria on the Golan Heights.
Rabin did not give a specific
date when Israel would ask for
a resumption of the Geneva
talks but hinted it would be in
the near future.
The Israel leader stressed
that Israel would go to Geneva
only if the conference is limited
to the original participants
those who attended when it con-
vened briefly in December 1973.
He thus ruled out participation
by the PLO. Another condition,
he said, was that the U.S. act
to block in the Security Council
any Arab attempt to cancel or
void any element of Resolutions
242 and 338.
HE SAID that if the Geneva
parley reopened, Israel expected
all the participants "will make
U.S. Failure in Angola
Will Ultimately Hurt Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger was reported to have said that the test
of American strength in Angola, and America's fail-
ure to meet it, could have direct repercussions for
Israel.
According to the Washington correspondent for
Yediot Achronot, Kissinger told him that he feared
U.S. weakness in Angola would harm Israel in the long
run. The Soviets, Kissinger said, would deduce from
America's failure if there was a failure to stand
firm in Angola that they could force concessions else-
where in the world, specifically in the Middle East.
The Yediot Achronot correspondent reported that
Kissinger told him: "The Security Council is a junior
league compared to the dangers for Israel in the An-
gola affair."
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proposals they think fit." As for
Israel, he said, it will ask the
conference to begin by having
each participant define its own
concept of peace and what each
means when it calls for "peace
in the region."
With regard to the PLO, Ra-
bin stated in reply to a "hypo-
thetical" question that his coun-
try would reconsider its position
of non-recognition of the PLO
only if the latter recognizes Is-
rael's right to exist. He em-
phasized that Israel would de-
mand "something more than
mere words words backed by
deeds."
ONE SUCH deed, he said,
would have to be the PLO's com-
plete renunciation of its "Pales-
tinian Covenant" which calls ejir
the replacement of the State of
Israel by a "secular, dem-
ocratic" state of Arabs and
Jews.
"Afterwards, we shall draw
the consequences and make the I
necessary decisions," he said.
Rabin also said that regard- |
less of what happens at the Se- j
curity Council debate, Israel'
would continue to honor tho
disengagement agreement it
reached with Egypt last Septta
ber.
He said that Israel now fav-
ored reconvening the Geneva
conference because "under cm
rent circumstances, with Syria's
refusal to hold any negotiations
over the Golan question, thcie
is nothing else to do but li>
start again the Geneva confer
ence and examine the entire is-
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Catering


rage ii-A
*Jewisi) flcridfi&jn
Friday, January 16, 1976
One of Israel's Leading Hawks Turns
Into Dove on PLO Recognition
JERUSALEM (JTA)
One of the leading "hawks"
of Israel's academic com-
munity has urged Israel to
negotiate with any Palestin-
ian group, including the
PLO, that renounces terror-
ism and accepts the exist-
ence of Israel.
Prof. Yehoshafat Harkabi,
an authority on internation-
al relations and Middle East-
ern affairs, expressed that
view in a telephone radio in-
terview from the United
States where he is presently
on sabbatical leave-
HE ALSO questioned the of-
ficial Israeli view that the es-
tablishment of a Palestinian
state on the West Bank would
pose a mortal peril to Israel and
They Clung to Jewish Heritage
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridiaa:
In these days of an infamous
onslaught on Judaism-Zionism
at the United Nations, equating
it with racism. I wish to share
with your readers a unique ex-
perience concerning a group of
Jews in a faraway island who
clung to their Jewish heritage
and identity, in life and death.
On our trtp from Israel to Mi-
ami, my wife and I happened
to stop over for a few days at
the air terminal of one of nine
Azores Archipelago islands, the
Terceira Island. The Azores lie
in the middle of the Atlantic
between Europe and North
America and are under Portu-
gal's jurisdiction The capital of
Tereceira is Angra do Heroismo,
a stately and picturesque town,
with a population of about
50,000.
ON OUR visit to Angra, the
first thing we inquired about
was whether there were Jews
living there. We established that
there was a small Jewish com-
munity in Angra until about 10
years ago. when the last Jew
left for the mainland.
The only reminder left of the
vanished Jewish community in
Angra is a cemetery, located on
a side street, at the end of the
town, on a small plot of land
between two one-story houses.
A middle-aged woman, whom
we happened to meet nearby,
led us into the cemetery
through a small gate, part of a
greenish old fence between the
two houses.
The woman kept repeating in
broken English pointing to the
graves: "The Jews were our
brothers."
WE FIRST thought that she
was a descendant of Spanish
marranos. But she later clarified
that she and her mother be-
long to a small group of Pro-
testants among the predominant
Catholic population of the Is-
land.
The Jews and the Protestants
maintained jointly a worship
house which they used intermit-
tently on Sundays and the Sab-
bath until the last Jew disap-
peared.
We cotmted 58 graves with
memorial stones of various sizes
and shapes. Amazingly, only a
few of the tombstones were
broken. Most of the inscriptions
on the tombstones, in Hebrew
and Portuguese, were difficult
to decipher. The oldest de-
cipherable date was "1837-
1885," on the tombstone of a
man. The two most recent tomb-
Oil
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Worit Be BHeT
Koheleth (Ecclctiastet)
mmumnnaaiiniiniRnnauii!ia:nDininiiiiiiinaiiinQtiuuiiUiUBwai:)iuiuu
Hemispheres
Hadassah
The next meeting of the
Hemispheres Group of Hadas-
sah will be on Jan. 20 in the
Ocean Terrace Room. Refresh-
ments will be 6erved at noon,
followed by a short business
meeting and a card party.
The Hallandale Chapter and
all its groups are holding the
annual Youth Aliyah luncheon
at the Americana Hotel Ball-
room on Jan. 22 at noon.
stones were on the graves of a
man and a woman.
THE MONUMENT on the
man's grave was inscribed nice-
ly, in professionally-carved let-
ters in Hebrew, as follows: "The
respected man, Shlomo Alvis
Levi, passed to his eternal rest
on the 22 of Nissan in the year
5722, 26 April. 1962."
And the tombstone on the
woman's grave had an inscrip-
tion in Latin letters: "Anna
Elisabeth Ab ohlo-1964, -92
years."
Evidently, this woman was
the last Jewish person who re-
mained on the island, and upon
her request, the neighbors
buried her in the Jewish ceme-
tery and placed the tombstone
on her grave with the crudely
etched inscription, done by
hand.
I SAID a prayer for the re-
pose of the souls of these Jews,
buried in a remote corner of
the world, who doggedly ad-
hered to their Jewishness and
were determined to die as Jews.
We understood that there is
no one at present who takes
care of the cemetery, and it
would, therefore, be important
that some Jewish institution
should assume the task of mak-
ing arrangements to preserve
this monument to a Jewish
community that is no more.
DR. REUBEN EFRON
Miami Beach
-to EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
A proposal reflecting great
insight was made at the recent
Solidarity Conference in Jeru-
salem called in response to the
UN's Zionist resolution. It was
proposed by the working group
on economic resources, headed
by the Israel Finance Minister,
that a $1 billion fund be raised
earmarked for bringing Jewish
youth to Israel and strengthen-
ing Jewish education in the
Diaspora.
Here was a clear recognition
of the importance of Jewish
education for the future of Is-
rael and the survival of the
Jewish people, and its present
inadequacy.
IF, INDEED, Jewish education
is important to the community,
then it is time that the com-
munity primarily, and not the
user, pay for it. We fancy our-
selves as People of the Book
who appreciate education, and
yet we are far behind the gen-
eral American society in its
policy of free universal educa-
tion on the primary and second-
ary levels.
This policy is justified on the
basis that society and not just
the individual is the beneficiary
of education.
Many young parents complain
today that they cannot afford
Jewish education for their chil-
dren as it is presently marketed.
I PERSONALLY feel that if
they prized it more, they would
find it more affordable. But, be
that as it may, if the parent
does not appreciate the value of
Jewish education to his child,
then the community must recog-
nize its importance to the com-
munity, and pay for it.
The synagogue community,
under whose auspices most
education takes place, can no
longer afford the total cost of
Jewish education. Furthermore,
Jewish education only loses
qualitatively being tied in with
synagogue budgets and finances,
as it does by being tied in with
the Bar/Bat Mitzvah.
EITHER subsidies or a vouch*
er system from Federation
funds must be forthcoming for
quality Jewish education given
under all auspices.
Sure, Israel needs every last
penny that we are able to raise,
and yet, out of Israel came the
call for $1 billion to be set aside
for Jweish education in the
Diaspora.
RABBI VICTOR ZWELLING
Congregation B'nai Raphael
ft ft ft
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In a recent speech before a
local chapter of the United Na-
tions Association, a speaker
apologized for the Third World
Nations who voted for the Arab-
backed Anti-Zionism resolution
which was passed by the Gen-
eral Assembly. His point was
that many of those nations have
no concept of what Zionism
means but merely voted that
way to spite the United States
whom they, hate for not doling
out foreign aid to them in the
measure they expect.
If his point is true, it is not
a defense of the United Nations,
but it is rather a most serious
indictment of the structure of
the world body.
THE UNITED States never
had a hand in colonializing the
black nations of Africa or the
States of South America and is
certainly not to blame for their
poor economic status. Instead
of being thankful for what we
have done for them in the past
out of the goodness of our
hearts, they arrogantly ask,
"what have you done for us
lately?"
If they are to be angry at all,
they should pour out their
wrath upon the Arab nations
who now have wealth beyond
their own needs and whose oil
price manipulation wrecked the
United States' economy and
caused us to cut down on for-
eign aid.
IF THESE nations do not
know what Zionism is, it is ob-
vious that they are ignorant of
international political science.
It is a dangerous folly to have
such people decide world af-
fairs that affect the welfare of
all people. They should be sent
back to their native jungles and
be barred from passing judge-
ment on subjects of which they
are ignorant.
RABBI PHINEAS WEBERMAN
Ohev Shalom Congregation
advanoe Soviet penetration* in$o>
the Middle East.
Harkabi, a former chief of
army intelligence and, until re-
cently, an advisor to Defense
Minister Shimon Peres, has al-
ways supported a tough line in
Israel's foreign policy dealings
with the Arabs.
He is now apparently adopt-
ing the position of two of the
leading Labor Party "doves" in
the Knesset, former Communi-
cations Minister Aharon Yariv
and Yitzhak Navon, chairman
of the Knesset's foreign affairs
and security committee.
IN HIS interview, broadcast
over the weekend, Harkabi
maintained that it would be to
Israel's tactical advantage to of-
fer to negotiate with the PLO.
He said such an offer would
face the PLO with the choice
of abandoning its "covenant"
for the dismemberment of Is-
rael or lose the image of "mod-
eration" it has managed to cul-
tivate at international forums.
"The time has come for us to
be more sophisticated in our
tactics," Harkabi said.
He also contended that it was
a mistake for Israel to consis-
tently reject the idea of a Pales-
tinian state between Israel and
Jordan.
According to Harkabi, such a
state weukl eventually become
part of Jordangbecafise that is
where the line* of communica-
tions would have to run. The
main problem of a Palestinian
state would be its own viability,
he said.
HARKABI'S remarks were bit-
terly attacked by Likud in the
column published by that fac-
tion in Haaretz.
Noting that similar views
were recently raised in the
Knesset by Prof. Shlomo Avin-
eri, Likud described Harkabi'g
interview as the "second lecture
within one week on the neces-
sity to tear from the Jewish peo-
ple's sovereignty parts of its
homeland, an act which would
inflict unforeseeable dangers.'
In the past several weeks, a
number of influential "doves"
in the Labor Party and the La-
bor Alignment have urged the
government to change its at-
titude toward the issue of tals>
ing to any Palestinians who re-
nounce terrorism and accept the
soereignty of Israel.
These include Abba Eban,
Victor Shemtov, Avraham Ofer,
Yitzhak Ben Aharon. Others out-
side the government include
Arie Eliav, Res. Gen. Matti Pe-
led and David Shaham.
Minister Vows
Secret Leaks Plug
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Justice Minister Haim Za-
dok promised here to take
tough new action to plug
the rising tide of "leaks"
that has been hampering
the Cabinet's work. Zadok
made his pledge in the Knes-
set as both coalition and
opposition MKs took the ros-
trum to complain about the
leaks.
Zadok said the Premier
would set up a panel of ex-
perts, including secret serv-
ice and military intelligence
personnel, to investigate the
leaks and recommend meas-
ures to stop them.
BUT ZADOK reminded the
MKs of tough laws already on
the statute books that provide
prosecution and punishment for
persons found responsible for
leaking classified material.
One measure to be consid-
ered, he said, was an ordinance
providing that sensitive political
information, such as the recent
message from President Ford to
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, deplor-
ing the new settlements on the
Golan Heights, be classified as
military secrets with a penalty
of up to 15 years in jail for leak-
ing such material.
Zadok said the wave of leaks
from the Cabinet chamber re-
sulted in decision-making being
removed to less formal forums
which was a danger to dem-
ocracy and good government.
THE REASON for it was that
the government feared present-
ing top secret information to ths
Cabinet lest it be disclosed.
But if the Cabinet is to func-
tion properly as the top deci-
sion-making forum of the na-
tion, its members must be given
all the relevant information and
must be able to express them-
selves freely, Zadok observed.
But they were inhibited by the
possibility of leaks, he said.
Zadok's observations were
similar to those of Haim Lan-
dau of Likud and Avraham Me-
lamed of the National Religious
Party who presented agenda
motions decrying the recent
spate of leaks.
"The floor and the ceiling of
the Cabinet room have been
leaking for years," Landati
charged. Government depart-
ments also leaked, he said. He
apportioned the largest slice at
blame to the Foreign Ministry,
but contended that "the Prime
Minister's office is also culpa-
Ford Recognizes
Salomon's Role
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Ford, in a
rS-fV? I ym Salmon LodSe of Brith Shalom in
Philadelphia praised the contributions of Haym Salo-
mon who helped finance the American Revolution.
The lodge and the George Washington Scottish Rite
bodies in association with Philadelphia 76 memorialized.
Salomon on on January 3, the anniversary of his death
in i /oj,
of AmerirlfST "** "As We lay the cerstone
of America s third century, it is most appropriate that
we pay tribute to the very special part played by Havm
Salomon in the success of our initial efforts I am oieas
ed to join with the members of the Haym Salomon
Lodge No. 663, Brith Shalom, in memo'rializfngTs
dedication to America." e
'
!,


January 16, 1976
*Jmisti fhrkMiOHn
Page 15-A
aePs Fears and Hopes as Debate Opens
jntinued from Page 1-A
and Washington.
lne are the days when the
js could be counted on to
idice, with bombast and
;mist rhetoric, their own
interests.
jw, under Soviet coaxing,
JArabs even the Syrians
light well soften their hard-
demands, and propose a
lerate formulation on the
Jstinian question which
lington would be hard put
Jeto.
IEY MIGHT well make use
jrmulations actually used by
JU.S. itself in the past, such
|the "interests of the Pales-
m people" referred to in the
communique issued June,
13 by President Nixon and
Viet Communist Party Secre-
Leonid Brezhnev and re-
nted at the Vladivostok sum-
by Brezhnev and President
last year.
resolution in this vein
ild meant in the present con-
Israeli policymakers say,
fcall to reconvene Geneva with
PLO participating.
^fter all, if the Palestinians
a peopla and have legitimate
jrests, then they have the
it to attend the peace con*
;nce. And their representa-
ts recognized worldwide
Fare none other than the PLO.
Sgypt was already thought to
canvassing a resolution in
is vein. The Soviets would
probably support it, and
ria in the end might come
>und to it too.
[THEN everything would de-
fend on Washington. Israel
ild not accept such a resolu-
tion, too policymakers here ex-
plain, and would not participate
at the Geneva conference if the
PLO were invited.
In effect, what Israel is ask-
ing of Washington is that it pro-
tect a position (Israel's) which
it itself does not support and
that it veto proposals (on the
Palestinian issue) which it
might otherwise be inclined to
accept. For Israel's official
stand on the Palestinian issue,
even following the seeming shift
Ut6t week with Premier Yitzhak
Rabin's "Nouvel Observateur"
interview, is a very far cry in-
deed from' the U.S. position.
Rabin insisted that the PLO
would have to specifically abro-
gate its "Palestine Covenant"
a secular, democratic state
before it could be said to have
meaningfully changed its ideol-
ogy. The interview ws certainly
a tactical snift, undertaken, in
most observers' view, following
intense pressure at home and
from Washington.
FOR THE first time, albeit as
a "very, very hypothetical pos-
sibility," the Premier consid-
ered the prospect of the PLO
changing its ideology.
He was not flatly and totally
and eternally negative, as he
had been in a recent "News-
week" interview which was
widely criticized as needlessly
intransigent. But the U.S. has
never supported the demand
that the PLO abrogate the
covenant.
The most Washington was
Drepared to acceDt and this
was enshrined in the Seotem-
h<>r "memoranda of understand-
ing" between Jerusalem and
Washington was that it would
Interview Cut
or Time, NBC Says
Continued from Page 1-A
the JTA on Jan. 6.
)uring the program, the issue
| Soviet Jewish emigration was
alt with in the context of
tente.
[John Dancey, the NBC cor-
soondent in Moscow, said the
Ickson/Vanik Amendment had
ashed" the Soviet Union's
kres for expanded trade with
U.S. But he noted that "the
^mber of Jews leaving the So-
rt Union has dropped off
arply in the last year."
[FORD ALSO mentioned the
rop in Jewish emigration as
he to Congressional action,
lile not mentioning the J'V
lendment by name, he used
las an exampla of Con^ression-
;nterferenc in the Presidsn-
[l fo-eign policy-making prero-
Jtives.
I On the Middle East, John
lancellor, the NBC special
^gram's anchorman, noted
t Israel may no longer be L
fe to rely on :ts air superior-
| and "that a future war would |
decidd by tanks on thei
ind. There's also the cbaoce
it however strong the Israelis
be in thp 'r. the Arabs
be stronger."
[Chancellor added. "Saudi
fabia, for example, has con-
futed for an air force build-1
costing more than a billion j
|Hars. The contractor the
is helping to build uo I
re and more Arab forces. We
doing it to keep the Rus-
is from doing it, which
esn't make the Israelis
Bathe any easier."
AN interview by Edwin
trnan wife- Daniel P. Moyni
on the usefulness of the
kited Nations, the American
Ibassador to the world organ-
tion said that the U.S. should
ktinguish between the Gen-
Assembly and the Security
sil.-^rhich is .pretty eloee
to indispensable to formulating
foreign policy.
"Just about anywhere you go
in the world you will find its
involvement and not the least
in the Middle East where the
whole structure of our policy is
based upon Security Council
resolutions."
As for the General Assembly.
Moynihan said, "I think the time
has come when we should seek
as much as possible to deal with
as few things as nossible in the
General Assembly."
He said the action by the
Assembly declaring "Zionism a
form of racism is absence, un-
true, a lie and characteristic of
what comes out of the General
Assembly."
not talk with the PLO unless the
PLO recognized Israel and ac-
cepted Resolutions 242 and 338.
THE FORMULATION was
chosen advisedly, and Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger was
not prepared to commit his gov-
ernment to anything more. The
American rationale is that, while
opposing a third state and pre
ferring a "Jordanian aolutiun.
Washing: in sees the chance of
such solution inexorably dim-
ming.
If the PLO were to recognise
Israel and accent the Resolu-
tions 242 and 338 perhaps,
this is not clear, by attending
Geneva and thus doing so by
implication only then, the |
American argument runs, Israel .
would have to take the chance
that political responsibility'
would moderate the terrorist I
movement and result in prac-
tice in its abandoning the ulti-
mate aim of destroying Israel, i
For Israel, say top policymak-;
ers, this is wholly unacceptable.
A third state is seen here as a;
challenge to the very existence j
of the Jewish State.
THE SITUATION is com-1
pounded, according to some ob-
servers here, by the fact that j
Israel's present adamant stand
on the Palestinian issue is not
regarded entirely with credibi-
litv abroad.
Foreign governments and
perhaps the U.S. government,
too 'vight tend to believe,
especially if they follow the Is-
raeli press, that a further shift,
a further softening, is likely as
time goes on and pressures
mount
Foreign Minister Allon's posi-
tion is a mystery. He has not
yet formulated it in Cabinet
deliberations. Perhaps he will
do so this month m the sched~
uled "political debate" before
Rabin's own official visit to
Washington.
Some observers here believe
Allon's views are considerably
different from those of Rabin,
and that the Foreign Minister
has in effect already given up
hope of a purely "Jordanian
solution" to the Palestinian
question.
SOME SAY Allon would be
prepared to countenance even
a third state, linked in some
way to Jordan and ruled by
"moderates."
Kissinger and his aides are
doubtlessly fully aware of these
"differences of nuance." as they
within' the Israeli Cabinet, and
are euphemistically called,
they will be eager to assess
them for themselves in their
meetings this month with Allon
and Rabin.
Their conclusions may to a
large degree dictate their stand
at the Security Council and
their willingness to take a posi-
tion there contrary to Israel's
position on the Palestinians.
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Page 16-A
*'JmisiifhrXMain
Fritey, Janua;
ry 16, i
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No tricks. No hidden charges.
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I. BIAS 2. BELTED 9. RADIAL
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Tw. four or sometimes even more plies (or
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3. RADIAL TIRES
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Buying tires is tough enough.
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^Jewish Floridian
iami, Florida Friday, January 16, 1976
Section B
UN Debate Aiming
At Israel's End
See related stories 1-A
UNITED NATIONS Acting
Monday's 11-1 vote that per-
mitted the Palestine Liberation
rganization to participate in
ke United Nations debate on
eace in the Middle East, the
leurity Council this week
romptly launched into a dis-
jssion essentially aimed at the
sstruction of Israel.
Syria opened with a demand
k.it "the Zionist entity," mean-
kg Israel, must recognize that
\e Palestinians have a right
"self-tl' termination."
' SYRIAN Ambassador Moafak
jllaf did not link this demand
h an equivalent Arab recog-
Iti >n of Israel's rights to the
\iie thing essentially, to
feaceful existence within its
i'ii borders.
Instead, he emphasized the
|ght of Palestinians to return
their home in Israel, which
called a "racist regime." At
lie same time the Syrian Am-
Bssador attacked Israel for
oycotting the Security Coun-
fcl debate.
Israel had stated all along
tiat her delegation would re-
rain from attending if the PLO
;re given more than observer
status.
Allaf declared that Israel
must withdraw from all occu-
pied territories completely as a
precondition for peace, leaving
it unclear whether he meant
withdrawal to the pre-1967 bor-
ders or to the 1948 borders es-
tablished at the time of the
original United Nations parti-
tion of Palestine.
HE REJECTED UN Res. 242,
calling it "inadequate" as the
basis for a peace settlement.
Res. 242 makes reference to
the Arab refugee problem. The
Arab Third World Communist
bloc wants this wording chang-
ed to read "Palestinian people's
rights."
Earlier, Egypt's President
Anwar Sadat had announced in
Cairo that Egypt would be will-
ing to go to Geneva without
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion participation, providing Is-
rael withdrew to the pre-1967
borders. But at the Security
Council debate, Egypt Ambas-
sador Esmat Abdel Meguid call-
ed for "a permanent and just
peace in the Middle East .
based on the achievements of
the Palestinian people of their
national rights."
[Narot To Speak for CJA-IEF
A Crystal House, January 21
Dr. Joseph R. Narot, spiritual
ader of Temple Israel and an
uthor and lecturer, will speak
n behalf of the Greater Miami
ewish Federation on Wednes-
lay, Jan. 21, at the Crystal
ouse Restaurant.
The occasion is the annual
ombined Jewish Appeal-Israel
mergency Fund gathering of
rystal House residents. Led by
ochairmen Benjamin Botwi-
ick, Lillian Brown, Erwin
amp, Samuel A. Gale, Jr.,
harles G. Reskin and Zelda
hau, the residents will convene
3:30 p.m. for cocktails.
The cochairmen anticipate
xcellent attendance at the
vent, during which the Crystal
ouse residents will make their
976 CJA-IEF commitments.
It
DR. JOSEPH R. NAROT
Haber To Be Auctioneer
Of Art at Beth Sholom
The Sisterhood of Temple
Jeth Sholom will conduct its
Annual art auction on Sunday,
fan. 18, at 7:30 p.m. Art dealer
/illiam Haber will conduct the
Auction, which will feature
vorks of Baskin, Braque, Cal-
mer, Chagall, Cocteau, Dali,
Hirer, Gat, Goya, Giacometti,
-eger, Man Ray, Miro, Picasso,
tembrandt, Renoir, Rockwell,
louault, R. Soyer, Utrillo, Va-
barely, Vlaminck and Whistler,
ftmong others.
A cocktail party will precede
ie auction and the works will
on display after services
Friday evening, Saturday morn-
ig, and all day until auction
ime on Sunday.
The committee in charge of
ie auction consists of cochair-
len Mr. and Mrs. Jerrold Good-
ian, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
liller, Dr. and Mrs. Marvin
ackner.
Committee members are Dr.
id Mrs. Michael Albin. Mr. and
William Binder, Dr. and
Mrs. Allan R. Dunn. Dr. and
Mrs. Franklin Fiedelholtz, Mr.
and Mrs. Milton M. Gaynor, Mr.
and Mrs. Gary R. Gerson, Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Goldstein, Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Green, Dr. and
Mrs. Jerry Hagen, Mrs. Flor-
ence Hecht and Mr. and Mrs.
Kenneth Hershey.
Also Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Jaffe, Mr. and Mrs. Irving B.
Kaplan, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald
Klein, Mr. and Mrs. James S.
Knopke, Mrs. Nathan La Tuchie,
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Lavan,
Mrs. David Muskat, Mrs. Ralph
Muskat, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Platt, Mrs. Jean Prescott, Dr.
and Mrs. Morton S. Robinson
and Dr. and Mrs. Fred Rosen-
blooip.
Also Mr. and Mrs. Julius Ser,
Mr. and Mrs. Jon Serbin, Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Stonberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Swedroe, Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Vinik, Mr. and
Mrs. Lewis E. Zorn.
Sisterhood President is Mrs.
Irving E. Miller.
Adult Education.
At Beth David
Registration for the second
semester of Adult Education
Classes at Beth David Congre-
gation (Coral Way) is on
Wednesday, Jan. 21, from 8 to
10 p.m., and at Beth David-
South Dade on Thursday, Jan.
22, from 8 to 10 p.m.
Courses include Prayer Book
Interpretation, Yiddish, Hebrew
and Jewish Music. Guest lec-
tures in the South Dade build-
ing will continue the theme of
"The Role of the Jew in the
Bicentennial Year."
Registration is open to non-
members. Chairmen of the
adult education committee are
Dr. and Mrs. Martin Rothberg.
Senator Jaekson
At Temple Judea
Senator Henry M. Jackson of
Washington will speak on "The
Current Middle East Situation"
at this evening's Services at
Temple Judea of Coral Gables
at 8:15.
Poetry for Pleasure
Poetry for Pleasure class is
now open at the Ida Fisher
School every Tuesday evening,
from 6:30 to 8, in Room 123.
Arnold Kleiner, lecturer, per-
former and writer, is the in-
structor.
A group of founders of the Albert Einstein College of
Medicine recently attended a luncheon, hosted by phil-
anthropist and communal leader Theodore Baumritter,
to form the "Florida Friends of Albert Einstein College
of Medicine" and became charter members of the chap-
ter. The group is planning a cocktail party in early
spring. Seated (from left) are Jack Flower, Ms. Sue
Berkowitz, Baumritter and Abraham Gevirtz. Standing
(from left) are Hyman I. Cohen, Joseph M. Drexler,
Irving J. Volk, development director Leo Hack and
George A. Guild.
At a recent testimonial breakfast at Aventura in honor
of State Representative Elaine Bloom (2nd from right)
were Speaker of the Florida House Donald L. Tucker
(2nd from left) and Attorney General Robert Shevin
(far right). With Rep. Bloom and her special guests in
this picture, taken just after the breakfast which was
attended by over 300 friends and supporters, are Mrs.
Shevin (next to Rep. Tucker) and Philip Bloom (center).
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Page 2-B
JewistMkt&bm
Friday, January 16, i976
Tenth His tad rut Economic Conference4
Is Scheduled for Mid-February
JWYPo$tNo.7?3 Plans Meeting, Social
The Israel Histadrut Founda-
tion (IHF) will stage its major
American event of 1976 in Mi-
ami Beach the tenth annual
Histadrut Economic Conference
for Israel Feb. 15-18 at the
Fontainebleau Hotel.
In making the announcement,
Dr. Sol Stein, national presi-
dent of the IHF, noted that the
four-day conference is signifi-
cant for it marks the achieve-
ment of IHF's $40 million
milestone, the total of commit-
ments since it was founded fif-
teen years ago.
"The importance of the $40
million figure is underscored by
the specific use to which these
commitments are being put,"
Dr. Stein said, "to finance the
vast network of Histadrut's so-
cial, health, education and wel-
fare programs, which serve the
needs of more than 70 percent
of Israel's population."
Participants in the Histadrut
Economic Conference include
representatives of the govern-
ment of Israel and leading fig-
ures of the Labor Zionist move-
Temple Adath Yeshurun's
Men's Club will honor Can-
tor Ian Alpern on Sunday
morning. Jan. 18 at the
breakfast program that will
include the Combined
Youth Choir of the Temple
and Hi 11 el Community
School. Cantor Alpern serv-
ed congregations in Mer-
rick, N.Y., and Baltimore
before assuming his post at
Adath Yeshurun in 1973.
Prof. Leaner at Beth Sholom
Coffee, Culture and Conversa-
tion at Temple Beth Sholom on
Sunday, Jan. 18, at 10:30 a.m.
will feature Prof. Arthur Ler-
mer. He will speak on "Jewish
Identification and Problems ot
Integration (Cultural Pluralism
vg. Assimilation)."
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ment, in addition to delegates
from throughout North Amer-
ica.
The highlight of the meeting
will be the Conference Awards
banquet on Wednesday evening,
Feb. 18, at which a leading Is-
raeli diplomat will receive the
Histadrut Foundation's Forty
Million Dollar Award.
Other scheduled Vtt inHnde
the opening session, the Inau-
gural Assembly, Sunday, Feb.
15; a Yiddish-speaking recep-
tion, Monday; an Economic
Symposium and a reception for
the Canadian delegation on
Tuesday. Admission to all ses-
sions is free.
awards dinner.
except for the
The Harry H. Cohen No. 723
Post and Auxiliary of the Jew-
ish War Veterans will have a
general meeting on Sunday,
Jan. 18. at 10 a.m. at the Surf-
cide Community Center_______
Tnere wilf be a social oh Sun
day. Jan. 25, at 7:30 p.m. at t!L
Washington Federal Building on
Normandy Drive.
The KTOiro's president is w.
Horn, publicity chairperson ji
Mildred Revzin.
According to Rabbi L son
Kronish, national board chair-
man, "IHF's innovative ap-
proach in mobilizing finar.
support for Israel is based on
such methods as deferred giv-
ing, through testamentary be-
quests and trusts, and annuity
programs which pay a generous
life income to the donor
assuring the much needed flow
of capital to Israel."
Information on the Histadrut
Economic Conference for Is-
rael is available from the Miami
Beach Histadrut office.
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^iday, January 16, 1976
fJewisti fhr tetter,
Page 3-B
Ban m rittcr Will Speak At Bay view Terrace and Manhattan Towers
Seacoast Towers Breakfast
Planning January Nights in Israel
Sunday, Jan. 25, will mark
the culmination of the 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
TED BAUMRITTER
Emergency Fund for residents
of Miami Beach's Seacoast Tow-
ers East.
All Seacoast East residents
are invited to hear an address
by philanthropist Ted Baumrit-
ter at a 10 a.m. breakfast.
General chairman William
Einhorn is assisted by initial
gifts cochairmen Herbert J. Al-
theimer and Jack Braverman
and cochairmen Lester Abra-
hamer, Joseph Cohen. Louise
Cohen, Sam T. Rosenberg and
Emanuel Zahler in creating the
Seacoast East event on behalf of
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration's campaign.
Baumritter, an industrialist,
is serving as overall highrise
chairman for the 1976 CJA-IEF.
He is well known for his com-
munity leadership.
Residents of Bayview Terrace
and Manhattan Towers in Miami
Beach plan "Night in Israel"
programs this month on behalf
of the 1976 Greater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization. The an-
nouncement was made by Rob-
ert L. Siegel, general campaign
chairman.
Solomon and Rose-Anne Zu-
bow will receive the Israel
Solidarity Award at the Bay-
view Terrace event on Monday,
Jan. 19. at 8 p.m. in the Social
Hall. Accordng to chairman Al-
bert Nadel and cochairman
Louis Koulias, "It is indeed fit-
ting that the Zubows receive
the coveted award. Sol, a grocer
whose family built a synagogue
in Monticello, New York, has
donated food to many Jewish
charities for the poor and needy
and the people of Israel."
Max Mandel and Ida Raskin
will be the recipients of the Is-
rael Solidarity Award at the
Manhattan Towers "Night in
Israel" orr Wednesday, Jan. 21,
CJA-IEF Night At
Presidential Condominium
Adath Yeshurun Sisterhood Giving
'Love and Marriage' Program
f
The sisterhood of Temple
[Adath Yeshurun is presenting a
program on "Love, Marriage,
ISex and Judaism," on Wednes-
|day. Jan. 21, at 8 p.m.
A panel discussion will be led
Dy Rabbi Simcha Freedman.
fcuests will be Dr. Barry Glass-
man, medical director of the
Center for Psychotherapy;
Marvin Najberg, assistant to the
director of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service; Dr.
Sandy Siegal, psychologist; and
Mrs. Marcy Levin, president of
the Florida branch of Women's
League for Conservative Juda-
ism.
Beth Sholom Sisterhood Meeting
Features Dramatic Program
Sisterhood, of Temple Beth
lolom of Greater Miami will
its first open meeting of
976 on Wednesday, Jan. 21, at
II a.m., at the temple.
Mrs. Irving E. Miller, Sister-
hood president, said that the
neeting "will feature a special
ale of Israel gift merchandise,
raffle, and a program featur-
three members of the Beth
Iholom Thespians Joe Nevel,
Mice Lee and Leon Unger in
dramatization of Tales of
ac L. Peretz." "
iends Unlimited
Bob Lewenthal of the Miami
iers Club will show two films
skiing in Colorado and will
demonstrate skiing skills for
Friends Unlimited, this evening
9.30 at Temple Beth Am's
Wouth Lounge.
SABRA
112 PAGE
COOKBOOK
I
101
Award Winning
Recipes
THE BEST OF 8,000
RECIPES SUBMITTED IN A
NATIONAL CONTEST
AND JUDGED BY
GOURMET MAGAZINE
SEND $1.00
(No Stamps please)
Your Name & Address to:
SABRA COOKBOOK
DEPT. B
P.O. BOX 5263
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 11816
Musician and entertainer
Tony Ross will perform on Mon-
day, Jan. 19, when residents of
the Presidential Condominium
gather for "Israel Solidarity
Night," on behalf of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
Chairman Abraham Potash
has announced that the event
will begin at 7:30 p.m., in the
Presidential recreation room.
There will be an address by
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive
Surf side Women's League
The Surfside Women's League
will hold its monthly card party
on Thursday, Jan. 22, at 12:30
p.m. at Town Hall.
vice president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami
and director of chaplaincy for
the Federation.
at 8 p.m. in the Manhattan Tow-
ers Card Room.
Al Shelnzeit and Helen R.
Weinstein, chairmen, announced
that Manhattan Towers resi-
dents will show their support
and solidarity for Israel and pay
tribute to two of their most de-
voted residents at this event.
Mandel, house chairman and
board trustee of Temple Ner
Tamid, serves on the B'nai B'-
rith Board and was named
"Man of the Year" by the Tem-
ple.
Ida Raskin was named "Wom-
en of the Year" and is a past
president of the Kadimah Ha-
dassah Group and the Jewish
War Veterans Women's Auxi-
liary.
Featured speaker at the two
meetings will be entertainer
Emil Cohen, who will discuss
the 1976 theme for Israel Bonds
which stresses energy.
Temple Menorah Service
Features Parent-Child Dialogue
At late Friday services this
evening at 8:15 at Temple Me-
norah 28 students of the first
grade of the Hebrew School
will be consecrated.
The Consecration Service is
the culmination of a three-
month study program undertak-
Three Things."
The service will include pre-
sentation of a cantata, "Upon
en jointly by the parents and
children, and it features a mu-
sical dialogue between them in-
corporating Biblical texts and
prayer-chanting.
Good Afternoon!

And good tasting. Spread that famous
Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese flavor all over a crispy matzoh for
your tea time snack. One bite will tell you-it's fresh and creamy and smooth.
Satisfaction is guaranteed, or your money back from Kraft.
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
KRAFTj


*1\1
Pajje 4-B
+J Friday, January 16,
BEST RESULTS EVER-EXCEPT MIKING YOM KIPPUR WAR
Israel Bonds Provided Over $277 Million
In 75 for Israel's Economic Development
In 1975 the Israel Bond Or-
ganization produced in excess
of $277 million in cash for the
development of Israel's eco-
nomy. This represents the larg-
est amount obtained in one year
except for 1973, the year of the
Yom Kippur War. The an-
nouncement was made by Mil-
ton M. Parson, executive direc-
tor. South Florida Israel Bond
Organization.
Parson said the results of last
year's Israel Bond campaign
surpassed the figure realized in
1974 in communities in the
EmanU'El Sisterhood Is
Sponsoring Antique Show
The Temple Emanu-El third
annual antique show and sale,
sponsored by the Sisterhood,
will be held at the temple from
Sunday, Jan. 25 through Tues-
day, Jan. 27. The hours are:
Sunday and Monday, noon to 10
p.m.; Tuesday, noon to 6 p.m.
The Sisterhood Coffee Shoppe
will be open from noon to 8
p.m.
Mrs. Bernard Kaplan, chair-
man for the show, announced
that dealers will offer a variety
of furniture, jewelry, silver,
bric-a-brac, antique paintings,
objets d'art, etc.
Cochairman is Mrs. Barton S.
Goldberg; the committee in-
cludes Mesdames Jerome Uff-
ner, Bob Bezark, Albert David-
son. Alexander Kogan. Murray
A. Kern, Irving Karp, Ted Hollo
and Peter F. Heller.
Creative
Custom Cabinets
by J. S. SHMGARY
Designers And Manufacturers
of
Creative Cabinetry
* Built In Furniture Bars
* Wall Units Office Furniture
* Kitchens Closets
' Stereo Shelves
* TV Bookcases
' Mica Products
3421 N.W. 36 STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA
Telephone 6337303
United States, Canada, Western
Europe and elsewhere in the
free world, and is considerably
in excess of the amount realized
in 1967, the year of the Six-Day
War.
THE MOST important single
event contributing to this year'F
successful effort. Parson ex-
plained, was the response by
the Jewish communities in the
countries where Israel Bonds
are sold. He observed that "the
heightened reaction to Israel's
crucial economic needs" by the
Jewish communities was "a con-
crete demonstration of their
determination to stand with
Israel in a critical period in her I
history."
Parson also pointed out that
another key element of the cam-1
paign in 1975 was the "excep-
tional showing" by the institu-!
tional sector, which was respon-
sible for the sale of $70 million
worth of Israel Bonds to banks
pension funds, labor unions,
communal institutions and en-
dowment funds.
Robert L. Siege! is general
campaign chairman. Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion; William Liftman is chair-
man South Broward board of is chairman. North Broward
governors; Robert M. Hermann board of governors.
CHAIM WEIZMAN FARBAND BRANCH
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND TRADITIONAL
INSTALLATION LUNCHEON
Honoring
CHAMPIONS OF ISRAEL
SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 1976-12 NOON
FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL
MOE LEVIN, President
Sonia Horwitz Anna Stone Alick Silverstein
Social Chairmen 534-5138
673-8807 534-0337
For Reservations Call: Jean Lew, Corresponding Sec'y.
672-7396
Join Our Groups and Savel
Unbelievable But Tw
TOP FIRST CLASS HOTELS AT $5 A DAY
COMPLETE TOURS FROM MIAMI from $632 (Winter/Spring)
Special Add-On Fares to New York-$45 Round Trip
Upcoming Our Special Escorted Tours
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March 29 & May 3 Friends of Castle, Lauderhill and
B'nai B'rith, Star Lakes
Passover Tour, 'sraelExtension to London,
Rome, Athens & Greek Island Cruises
Israel and Amsterdam, N. Miami Beach
Delray Hebrew Congregation, Kings
Point, Hawaiian Gardens, Hollybrook,
Pembroke Pinos, Inverrary
April 12
July 25
September 1
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July 25 From $1298
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OVER 150 MONTHLY GROUP DEPARTURES
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1074-1076 INTERAMA BLVD., N. MIAMI BEACH, FLA. 33162
As always we offer the best value for your money
without sacrificing quality.
COMPARE and when YOU go, go with an Oldtimer and
Expert, 33 years in the Tourist Industry Israel, Europe & U.S.A.
Recipients of Shalom Award by the Government of Israel for
Promotion of Tourism
Call LEE ARI R0SENKRANZ AT 945-7491/945-6131


Friday, January 16, 1976
*Jewisii Flcrid/aip
Page 5-B

4
i
Douglasityrdens' Addition Ia Be Ranted
For Baron and Poll y dellirsch Meyer

Aventura apd Sky Lajte Travel Plan
Escorted Tour to Israel, London
Judge Irving Cypen, chair-
man of the board of the Mhmi
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, announced the name
of the new 120-bed addition
under construction in an ad-
dress to the 1,200 persons at
the 29th annual meeting at
Douglas Gardens on Dec. 21.
Judge Cypen indicated that
the new facility would be known
as "The Baron and Polly de
Hirsch Meyer Center Building"
and said that it would increase
Douglas Gardens' capacity to
350 residents.
Judge Cypen said that "Ba-
ron's work and accomplish-
ments, prior to his untimely
death, with Polly always at his
side, established an unexcelled
tradition of visionary concern
and involvement on behalf of
our aged. Baron was one of a
kind a great man who loved
our home. I onlv wish that he
could be with us today an-1 see
his dream com true. Thank
God for Polly, who is commit-
ted, concerned and dedicated to
the well-being of our residents
at Douglas Gardens and who is
carrying out Baron's dream."
The new center will adjoin
the home's NE 5">nd St. facility.
Judge CyDen said that Samuel
J. Heiman, chairman of the
Douglas Gardens Building Con-
struction Committee, will super-
vise the building tasks.
Heiman commented, "We
have a great responsibility to
the manv people on the home's
waiting list. This building will
be completed as rapidly as is
humanly possible."
A leature of the new build-
ing will be a "Pillar of Guard-
ians" at its entrance, inscribed
with the names of the 100
guardians of Douglas Gardens
who will assist in the building
campaign.
Thirteen community leaders
elected at the meeting to the
board of directors are Melvin
H. Baer, Morris N. Broad, Jesse
CassMhoff, Harry Chernin, Sam-
uel Irving Fieldstone, Jules B.
Gordon, Dr. Richard F. Jacobs,
Arthur J. Margolis, Richard A.
Pallet, Edward Shapiro, Fred K.
Fhochet. Jeffrey E. Young and
Richard Zimmerman. |
Albert Ossip, vice president
of the Geriatric Center at Doug-
las Gardens, said, "We are in-
deed fortunate to include in our
board so stellar a group of in-
dividuals whose leadership will
facilitate the continued growth
we envision in the immediate
future."
Attorney General Robert L.
Shevin, the meeting's kevnote -
speaker who was introduced by
Dade County attorney and
Douglas Gardens board mem-
JCC Offering
Israeli Folk Dance Class
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida is offering
an Israeli Folk Dance class on
Monday evenings from 7:30 to
9:30 at the JCC Teen Center,
Dadeland Inn.
Beginners and advanced stu-
dents are welcome to the class, j
which is free and open to senior j
high, college students and
adults. More advanced students!
will be organized into a per- j
forming troupe. For further in-
formation, call the JCC office.
ber Stuart L. Simon, spoke on
the problems of the elderly, so-
ciety's need to cope with the
problems and Douglas Gardens'
role in meeting the need.
There was a memorial serv-
ice at the meeting for Paul R.
Gordon and Jack S. Popick and
a multiscreen audiovisual pre-
sunntion as well as a tribute to
Harry Pearlman and Sam Gert-
ner.
Aventura and Sky Lake Trav-
el have joined torces to program
an escorted tour of Israel and
London, leaving Miami on April
26 and returning from London
on May 17. The trip is under
the leadership of Max Rivkin,
who has led trips to Israel.
The plans include local trans-
fers to and from Miami airport,
round trip by jet, stays at four-
star hotels, sightseeing con-
ducted by qualified English-
speaking guides, all transfers
and porterage, breakfast and
dinner in Israel, and breakfast
in London.
There will be the opportunity
to swim in the Mediterranean,
the Gulf of Aqaba and the Dead
Sea. A copy of the itinerary is
available at Aventura Travel
Boutique or at Sky Lake Travel.
DOMAR KITCHEN CABINETS
Don't Buy On Impulse!
Why go to a showroom when
you can come & deal direct
with the manufacturer &
save money. Complete
kitchen remodeling under*
one contract including
e Plumbing; e Paneling
Electrical e Office Furniture
Built in appliances e lars Serv,r9 Sou,h F!orida tor '5 Years
Ask about our Domar Mica relating guarantee
Phone-685-8747 or 621-0807 For a Free estimate
2335 N.W. 149 St., Opa-locka
Let one of our specialist design a kitchen at no cost
COMPLETE KITCHEN REMODELING
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
ABIGAIL MINIS 17111807
She provided sorely needed goods for the Continental Army
Sol&Bernice
Frankel wanted
their children's
wedding to
be the
talk of
Miami
So they selected the Konover.
And people are still talking! About the excellent hors doeuvres.
The courteous, continental service. The gourmet dinner and
the magnificent Konover surroundings.
If you're celebrating a happy occasion, ask the Frankels who they
would recommend Then call Norman Blecker, Director of
Catering. 865-1500. Kosher catering prepared under
strict rabbinical supervision also available.
Konover Hotel *#C
On the Ocean at 54th Street Miami Beach, Florida
A bigail Minis was the matriarch of a dis-
f\ tinguished family in the early history
f~% of Georgia, and was a Revolutionary
patriot of classical note. Born in Eng-
land in 1711, Abigail at age 22, left the security
of London to settle in the new colony of Georgia.
She came with her husband, Abraham, two
daughters, Leah and Esther, and a brother
Simeon.
Abraham was a man of means and followed
mercantile pursuits in the new world. His
name is on the first real estate deed recorded
in Georgia, and his son Phillip was the first
European child born in that colony. Abraham
died in 1757 leaving his estate and business to
the capable Abigail who increased the inheri-
tance manifold during her long and fruitful
life of 96 years.
In 1779, the American high command decided
to recapture Savannah from the British. Gen-
eral Lincoln selected Phillip Minis and Levi
Sheftal to help the expedition. After the attack
was launched, supplies were sorely needed and
the commanders applied to Abigail for
provisions.
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
The keen old woman knew the Continental
Army to be a poor credit risk, but her beloved
state and Independence came first. She "deliv-
ered the goods" without hesitation. The retak-
ing of Savannah was an American failure,
leaving Abigail in a very precarious position.
The British suspected her loyalty. But before
(hey acted against her, she managed to leave
for Charleston, S.C. with her five daughters.
Her son, Phillip, early in the Revolution, was
branded a "vile rebel" and blacklisted; he could
never hold office under any Royal governor.
Phillip Minis acted as Pay Master and Com-
missary General of the Continental Army in
1776. He personally advanced S11,000 for sup-
plies to Virginia and North Carolina troops.
He later served as President of Mikvah Israel
and as City Warden of Savannah.
Good
10 the
Last Drop
SEND FOR
EXCITINC
BOOKLET
Honoring 1776
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of may "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send 5(K (no si.mips) with name
and address to:
JEWISH AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017
J


Page 6-3
Jewi&nwMi&L
kJVow .
with NORMA A. OROVITZ
Next week, Miamians will
have two fine opportunities to
get to know one another just a
little bit better.
On Jan. 21, Temple Israel
Sisterhood is having a unique
luncheon program. Both mem-
bers and non-members are in-
vited to join in an afternoon or
"Jeanne Wolf With ..." take-
off on Jeanne's nationally-syn-
dicated Public TV interview
show. Jeanne, a member of
Temple Israel who once sat an
its big board, will give the
audience a chance to interview
the interviewer.
AFTER SOME brief remarks,
Jeanne will open the discussion
to the floor. According to
Jeanne, when she does this type
of program, "people like to do
to me, what I do to others.
She too enjoys it.
Most of her time, these past
three years, have been spent
writing, producing and inter-
viewing for taped shows. Next
Wednesday, Jeanne anticipates
just having a good time sharing
inside stories and behind-the-
scenes tidbits without worry-
ing about editing her perform-
ance afterwards.
Jeanne and husband Peter, a
VP with E. F. Hutton, just re-
turned from Jerusalem where
their family celebrated son Mat-
thew's Bar Mitzvah. Jeanne's
other children, Madeline, Mich-
ael and Marshall, fill up all the
hectic hours not devoted to her
blossoming professional life.
THE OLD saw about asking
only a busy person to take on
an extra iob seems impractical
to Mike Wallace's prettier coun-
ter-part. Realistically, she's got
her prioritieshome and work.
"If I were going to pick a
Iriend, it wouldn't be me. I have
so little time." But next week,
Jeanne Wolf will be sharing her
time and anecdotes with .
it ft ft
Saying hello and getting to
know you is what "Miami Sha-
lom" is all about, too. A Jew-
ish welcome wagon is hosted
periodically at the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation, with the
next get-together slated for Sun-
day evening, Jan. 25 at 7:30 p^m.
The idea, nurtured andId
veloped by chairwoman Gabriel-
la (Mrs. Sol) Landau, past chair-
man Gail Andich and areachair-
men Candace Ruskin, Thelma
Casselhof and Ellen Abramson,
has provided a community
starting place for newly-arrived
Jews in Miami.
ALTHOUGH the group's wel-
come is aimed at people new to
Miami in the last two years,
several longtime residents have
come to some of the five open-
houses held since 1974.
Mrs. Landau comments that
"we don't send anybody home.
However, the philosophy for
Miami Shalom was built upon
the rough estimate that 20 per-
cent of all Americans move each
year. "Basically." says Beth
David's rebbetzm. "our society
has become more and more
alienated, so it is important for
the Jewish community to be a
cohesive unit. We don't want
Jews to be lost in a new town
or us lost to them."
THE EVENING, which begins
with an informal social hour fol-
lowed by more formal intro-
ductions to each other and area
activities for future involve-
ment, has absolutely no finan-
cial pitches or solicitations.
Sharon Leblang, Merrily
Todd, Myrna Cohen. Gladys-
Gelb, Carolyn Praver, Terry
Kates. Mitei Center, Helenc
Berger and Brenda Kingsley are
the active committee members
who make Miami Shalom work.
Those of us who might know
a newly-arrived neighbor or|
relative would do both Federa-
tion and the newcomer a favor
by touting these hello groups.
Call Evelyn Kopelman at Fed-
eration, and take your turn at
making a friendly shiddach.
Cancer Unit To Meet
There will be a general meet-
ing of the Bal Surf Unit, Wom-
an's Corps, of the Papanicolaou
Cancer Research Institute on
Tuesday, Jan. 20, at noon at the
Montmartre Hotel. The group
meets on the third Tuesday of
each month. The group's presi-
dent is Florence Matson; vice
president is Sophe Libby.^ _
Miami Beach
Hadassah
Natanya Group will hold an
HMO (Hadassah Medical Organ-
ization) luncheon on Thursday.
Jan 22, at noon at the Starlight
Roof of the Doral Hotel. There
will be a fashion show by *at
Allen, and musical entertain-
ment by Bill DeShara.
ft ft ft ...
Morton Towers Group will
sponsor a luncheon on Sunday
Jan. 25, at noon at the Starlight
Roof to honor "H" Day. Pro-
gram: Miss Kay Kreamer. vocal-
ist, accompanied at the piano
by Shmuel Fershko.
it ft ft
Royal Maccabees Group will
hold an Eye Bank luncheon on
Jan. 25 at noon at the Mont-
martre Hotel. Guest speaker will
be Betty Fast. Entertainment.
President is Clara Landy.
ft ft ft
Ben-Gurion Grouo will hold
a Youth Aliyah luncheon and
card party on Monday. Jan. 26,
at noon at the Galahad Dade
Building.
it ft ft
Lincoln Group will hold an
eye bank luncheon on Monday,
Jan. 26, at noon at the Hotel
Delano.
ft ft ft
Haim Yassky Group will spon-
sor a luncheon and card party
on Wednesday. Jan. 28, at noon
at Byron Hall.
Temple Israel Singles Party
The Singles Scene, sponsored
by Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami, is having a 50's and 60's
party on Saturday, Jan. 17, at 8
p.m. at the temple. 137 NE 19th
St. Everyone is welcome
Friday, January 16, 1976
Saturday, January 24, 1976 and
Sunday, January 25, 1976
at 8:00 P.M.
HEBREW ACADEMY AUDITORIUM
24O0 PINE TREE DRIVE MIAMI BEACH. FLA.
ALL SEATS RESERVED
For Further Information Call 338-5678
THE LABOR ZIONIST ALLIMKE
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fowwiS
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iUIMHIM III w in nMiu mim ut m
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FESTIVAL OF
CANTORIAL, ISRAELI, JEWISH FOLK SONGS
M/4MI BEACH THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS
Washington Avenue & nth Street, Miami Beach
FEATURING
MISHA ALEXANDROVICH
nn iw "iy>t ,ot?>tnN nyoontq-^yn
SHLOMO
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A&yfi lyi )w 5niv> i*
FOR TICkETS: CALL DAYS 864-5226
OR ANYTIME 866-7771, EXT. 1511
MATUS RADZIVILOVER
via nwn pyjiWTioo tin -nay \)Q iyDUp -\\n
AND OTHER ARTISTS AND PERSONALITIES
MUSIC BY THE GREAT COMPOSER
SAMUEL FERSHKO
Ticket*: 1) Agudath Israel Cong.. "7801 Carlyle Ave. M.B.; 2) National Hj^Jfda,
Center 49 Washington Ave., MB.; S) Torah Acaoemy of South MtarWa,
Northeast 171 Street. North Miami; 4) Box Office of the Theatre.
" SPONSORED BY TORAH ACADEMY OF SOUTH FLORIDA & MIFAL HATORAH.
CHAIRMAN-BARRY D. SCHREJBER


Friday, January 16, 1976
vjfew/sft Fkridiajn
Page 7-B
Area Community Leaders Participate
In Conference with Yitzhak Rabin
\
A contingent of Jewish com-
munity leaders from the South
Florida and Caribbean area are
participating in a conference
with Israel's Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin and other Cabi-
net leaders on the country's
economic needs and problems
in 1976. The opening session
was in Prussels on Jan. 11.
About 250 Jewish leaders
from the United States, Canada
and the Caribbean are partici-
pating in the Prime Minister's
Israel Bonds Conference. The
purpose is to plan a program
to increase *j participation of
foreign Jewish communities in
alleviating the pressures on Is-
rael's economy resulting from
a record high defense budget
and a $3.5 billion balance-of-
payments deficit, according tc
Robert L. Sieg?l, general cam-
paign chairman. Greater Miami
Israel Bonj Organization.
The local leaders will meet
with the Prime Minister Rabin.
Deputy Prime Minister and For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon. Fi-
nance Minister Yehoshua Rabi-
nowitz. Defense Minister Shi-
mon Peres and other Israeli
leaders.
For the first time in the 25-
year history of the Israel Bond
program the conference is meet-
ing in Europe, focusing atten-
tion on the opportunities for ex-
panded Israeli trade with Eu-
rope as a result of the 1975
tariff agreement with the Com-
mon Market that will lift all
barriers on Israeli goods by the
middle of 1977.
The principal objectives of the
conference are to demonstrate
Israel's urgent need for exports
and energy and to maintain its
deterrent strength to prevent
any new outbreak of war, said
Siegel.
Pacesetters and Trustees To Receive
4Iion of Judah' Pins at Brunch
The Geater Miami Jewish..
Federation Women's Division
will host the annual "Lion of
Judah'.' brunch on Thursday,
Jan. 22.
The gathering of pacesetters
and trustees of th** Women's
Division will be at the Miami
Beach home of Rose (Mrs. Ju-
lius) Darsky. She has planned
the day with pacesetter-trustee
chairman Davida (Mrs. Harry
A.) Levy.
A highlight of the event is
SOUTH DADE HEBRFW ACADEMY PRESENTS
i
The Thrilling Voice of
JAN PEERCE
Plus An
ALL STAR CAST
The THEATRE OF PERFORMING ARTS
Miami Bf*h
SAT. FEB. 21st 1976 8.30 P.M.
DONATION: '4 '5* V T*
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Night
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The Incomparable
ft MOLLY PICON
Only PLUS
The Exciting Voice of
GEULA GILL
The THEATRE of PERFORMING ARTS
. v ,' Buck
SAT. MARCH 27th. 1976 8.30 P.M.
DONATION: >4 5W 6" ,7
MAIL COUPON TODAY. OR CALL
532-1851 or 861-3981'ci furthei information 01 G'oup rales
ARIE KADURI AGENCY f
'lib LINCOLN RD MIAMI BEACH 33139
Miss/Ms
Mr and Mrs______________________________________________
ADDRESS______________________
CITY_____________________________P"0"*--------------

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT JORDAN MARSH-
DOWNTOWN MIAMI OR 163rd ST., NMB
the presentation of the "Lion of
Judah" pin, an original design
in gold by David Balogh, to
new pacesetters and trustees.
There will be an address by
National United Jewish Appeal
Women's Division chairman
Sylvia Hassenfeld.
Goodbye 0 Lord,
I'm Going To America!
"\
ROSE DARSKY
"Wise, warm, funny and endearing..."
Charles Champlin, LA TIMES
"A beautifully detailed, film of
charm and substance. A page
from the album of our past..."
-Judith MM. SATUHOAY REVIEW
tester treet
-AMIDWEST FILM PRODUCTION
COMING FRIDAY, JAN. 23rd
NdRMANDY I SUNSET HALLJWOALE
I mror SUNSET DR.I I HAll.BEACH BlVD I
SOUTH MIAMI | |>tw..nUS 1 I A1A|
I distinctive
bridal
iphOtOQRAPhy
j
Bose&bsrg
LIVING COLOR j
Albums Start at $95. (
24 Photos
WEDDINGS
BARMITZVAHS j
ANNIVERSERIES j
Call 305-43M471
Mrs. Stern Named Chairman
Of Bar-Ilan I/. Overseers
Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein
chancellor of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity and national president of
Florida winter visitor, as chair-
man of the American Board of
Overseers of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity.
Mrs. Stern is the first wom-
an to occupy an American lead-
ership position for a major Is-
raeli university. Dr. Lookstein
said.
Mrs. atern, who for several
years has been chairman of the
Greater New York Women's Di-
vision for State of Israel Bonds,
is associate national chairman
of the Israel Bonds Women's
Division.
A member of the board of
directors of tne America-Israel
Cultural Foundation, London-
born Mrs. Stern is married to
Jerome L. Stern, president of
Brennand-Paige Industries, Inc.
JANE STERN
the Synagogue Council of Amer-
ica, has announced the election
of Jane Stern of New York, a
Agudath Israel
Sisterhood Luncheon
Agudath Israel Hebrew In-
stitute Sisterhood is sponsoring
a paid-up membership lunch-
eon on Sunday, Jan. 18, at 1
p.m.
gpUMHUMMI
The Hemispheres
WHEN THE TOPIC TURNS TO HAIR....
MORE AND MORE PEOPLE WHO KNOW
SAY.
"THE HAIRSTYLISTS
AT
'THE HEMISPHERES'"
The hairdressing center of the Hallandale area ... where
the finest in haircutting, styling, coloring and condition-
ing of hair is an everyday happening!
Hairstylist at
"The Hemispheres"
1980 SO. OCEAN DRIVE
HALLANDALE
(OCEAN SOUTH BLOC)
"Always An Appointment nj-U7t
Open to You" M42
MON. THRU SAT.

SHMOtABrahimHabaim
Le Costo Rica
ENJOY YOUR OWN GOLF COURSE AWA^
FROM HOME in the grounds of th" '<
CARIARI INTERNATIONAL COUNTRY
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c CARIARI HOTEL offers you:
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la'oet. pr.vair bathroom. T V telephone,
' enrt atf ^ood'lioned 2 Restaurants 3 Bar-..,
Snackbar A Coffee Shop, Ditto"
Pr-vate bus wtvice to and from the city
C'^fy hour.
TENNIS
10 Professional Tennis Courts -^
1 Stadium with lights
Unlimited Tennis
Ball-Boys SO 25 per hour
Lessons $2.50 per 45 mm.
Rental Racquet available
Racquet Repair and Restricting
Pro Shop
One Championship 18 Hole
Go Course
18 Hole Putting Green
Green Fees S6.00 per day
Caddie: 9 holes $1.50
18 holes $3 00
Bag Storage Available
Rental Clubs Available
Pro Shop_____
GENERAL INFORMATION
aicyoM Rental To* Agency Rant A C Gilt Shop G yannasiums Sauna Bath
Whirlpool* Biihard Room Karaw Lclsons. Olympic Swimming Pool* 3 Children*
TariFaS
RATES
(Plan Europeol (European Plan)
SENCILLO: S22.00 SINGLE? S 22 00
DOBlE: 38.00 30UBLE: 28 00
SUITE (1 Personal: 40.00 SUITE (t Person); 40:00
SUITE (2 Personas): 50:00 SUITE: (2 Persons) 50:00
Tarcta Pfriooa; 4:00 Third Person 400
HOTEL
csr
sin
COSTA RICA
C A.S.A. Hotels.Inc
244 Biscaynt Blvd.
Miami. Fla. 33132
Tel.(305) 358 6659
Please send me all information
available on the
CARIARI Hotel.
San Jose.C.Rica.CA.
Name
Add..
up code


Page 8-B
vJewisti fhridiari
Friday, January 16, 1975

Bonnie Nadel and Evan Mittman
Are Married at the Doral
Bonnie Susan Nadel became
the bride of Evan Mark Mitt-
man at the Doral Country Club
MRS. EVAN MARK MITTMAN
on Dec. 27. Rabbi Sol Landau
and Cantor William Lipson of-
ficiated at the ceremony, which
was followed by a reception.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. Nadel
of Miami. H er uncle, Harry
Pearl, and Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Pearl are longtime Miami
residents.
The groom, son of the Max
Mittmans of New York and In-
verrary, is the grandson of Mi-
ami Beach resident Mrs. Bella
Mittman.
The bride wore an ivorv silk
Empire gown with a bodice of
Alencon lace embroidered with
seed pearls and matching lace
on the long sleeves. Her long
mantilla trimmed in th same
Alencon lace and appliques fel'
from a Juliet can.
The bridt s maid f horini
was her sister, Marh. The bride-
groom's sister, Peggy (Mrs.
Steven) Kahn, was matron o'.
honor. Bridesmaids were Gai^
Nedelman, Jann anrl Joan Mos-
so, Cheryl Pasternak. Thereft
Irvin and Arlcen Weintraub.
Steven Kahn, thf groom'r
brother-in-law. was best man.
The bride's brothers. Jeff an-!
Ron Nadei, and Wayne Nor-
wood, Steven Reubel. Mike Mo- !
dell and Gary Sherman were ]
ushers.
The groom's niece, Jaymee
Kahn, was flower eirl and his
nephew, Jan-nd Kahn, w^s ring- J
bearer. Jodi Nedelman kept the
guest book.
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Foundation Meeting
The general meeting of the
Dade-Broward Chapter of the
Retinitis Pigmentosa Founda-
tion will be at 8 p.m. this eve-
ning at the First Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association
18301 Biscayne Blvd.
The guest sneaker is Martin
Neuman. astrologer and psychie
from WKID-TV and radio
WEXY.
MIAMI BEACH'S
FINEST GLATT KOSHER
CUISINE

A DINING IXPlRllHQt YOU
WILL LONG RtMMBER
Call Adoiph for Reservations
Phone.- 538-5731
RESERVE NOW
FOR THE PASSOVER
HOLIDAYS
limited number of roams
available
OCEAN AT 43rd ST.
MIAMI BEACH
Mrs. Mittman was graduated
from Miami Coral Park Senioi
High and attended Miami-Dadt
South. Her husband, a graduate
of Hewlett (N.Y.) High School,
received a Bachelor's degree
from the University of Miami.
He is associated with Checkout
Industries of New York.
Out-of-town guests >vere the
Dr. Harold Baumgarten family
of Jacksonville; Mr. and Tvlrs.
Leopold Sher of New Orleans;
Dr. Marvin Berkowitz and his
daughter, Barbara, Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Ingber, Mr. and Mrs. Sol
Mittman and Mrs. Mildred
Baum, all of Los Angeles; the
Dr. Daniel Berkowitz family, the
Dr. Alfred Berkowitz family,
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Mittman,
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Kahn and
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Kanter,
all of New York; Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Nadel of Allentown, Pa.;
David Nadel of Toronto; and
Mr. and Mrs. Lionel Asen of
Palm Springs, Cal.
The newlywecls took a wed-
ding trip to AruDa and Curacao
and are now at home in Law-
rence N.Y.
Opti-Mrs. Club
Plans Luncheon
The Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami
P*ach annual fund raising
Winged Victory Singers lunch-
eon will be on Wednesday, Feb.
4, at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Mrs. Murray Sonnett is chair-
man and Mrs. Louis Pilzer is
handling tickets and taking res-
ervations. Mrs. Lloyd Ccoper is
president.
For the past 2r- years thj
primary concern of the Opti-
Mrs. Club has been the care and
rehabilitation of emotionally
disturbed children. Over a thou-;
sand children are leading nor- i
mal, useful lives because of the
group's efforts.
The Opti-Mrs. Club maintains
scholarships for ten children at
the Montanari Clinical School in
Hialeah and for eight children
in the Grant Center in South
Miami.
They donate sports equipment
and other necessities to the chil-
dren in Alpha House and Bay
House.
The Opti-Mrs. Club contrib-
utes to many community proj-
ects and sponsors the Opti Miss
Service Club at Miami Beach
High School.
the life of your party..
MUSIC
WHY IS BARTON'S
TORMSSOVER
BECAUSE...
Barton's quality is unsurpassed.
Fund Raisers make more money with Barton's
Over $7,000,000 raised by Organizations in the last few
years
BIG PRIZE AND INCENTIVE PROGRAM WITH
$1,000 CASH FIRST PRIZE -13 MORE BIG AWARDS
Largest assortment of Kosher-For-Passover choco-
lates, candies and cakes ever.
O Kashruth certified by the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
No one manufactures for Barton's. Barton's manufac-
tures for no one. Barton's makes all its own Passover
products.
#If you want Barton's Buy Barton's
Orchestras 932-7323 Entertainment
NtW 0 IUC4NO iWI'H'IMD
Barton's Fund-Ratsing Div. 80 O.Kalb Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201
Phone: (212) 858-5000 Ask tor Doris Kromer.
-The name Barton's is your guarantee of Kashruth and Quality.
"yES. PLEASE SEND ME DETAILS~OF"vOL^^AsioVER PLAN~'
NAME ..........
ORGANIZATION
ADDRESS.......
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All floors models drastically reduced
Over 125 models & styles, Contemporary and Traditional
IMMEDIATE FREE DELIVERY ON ALL FLOOR STOCK
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J*


Friday, January 16, 1976
+Jewist) Fhridttan
Page 9 B
Federation Is Repeating
Campaign Training Institute
There will be three addition-
al sessions of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation's cam-
paign training institute on
Thursday and Friday, Jan. 29
and 30.
The announcement was made
by CTI chairman Fran Levey,
who reported excellent results
from the more than 200 com-
munity leaders who took part
in the free enrichment course
held in December.
Community leaders can regis-
ter now for the January CTI, to
be held at the Federation Audi-
torium, 4200 Biscayne Boule-
vard.
The afternoon session will be
from 3 to 6 on Thursday; the
rvenine from 7 to 10 Thursday. A ses-
sion on Friday will run from
9.30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Along with Mrs. Levey, the
CTI faculty includes GMJF
executive vice president Myron
J. Brodie and GMJF associate
secretary Reva Wexler. A spe-
cialist on the Middle East will
supply additional information.
Trained instructors will offer
discussion and workshop ses-
sions following the information-
al program. The total CTI ses-
sion is geared to increase the
knowledge and 'n'lan'-" the
skills of community leaders.
Additional information on
CTI registration is available
from the Federation Campaign
Department.
Beth Israel Sisterhood
The next meeting of Sister-
hood of Beth Israel will be on
Tuesday, Jan. 20, at 1 p.m. at
the synagogue.
Mrs. Bea Young, national
representative of the Southern
Region and national vice presi-
To Hear Book Reviews
dent of American Mizra< hi
Women, will review two bo*
by Allan Drury: "Come Ninev- h
Come Tyre," and "The Prom-
ise of Joy!"
Regina Schechter and Regina.
Wang are presidium presider '>.
FRAN LEVEY
Royal Atlantic Hosts
Israel Solidarity Night
Thursday, Jan. 15, is "Israel
Solidarity Night" for residents
of the Royal Atlantic Condo-
minium. The event is held on
behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1976 Com-
bined Jewisn Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, direc-
or of chaplaincy for the Fed-
:-ration, is guest speaker, and
ther." will be a preview of an
Israeli Tilm musical.
Hvman Bernstein. Max Ha- j
ber, Sam Kirschenbaum, Harold I
Round Town
Theodore Bikel, folksinger- \
actor, was the surprise highlight
of an evening of entertainment
for residents of the Miami Jew-
ish Home "nd Hospital for.the
Aged at t>.e annual New Year's
Eve Party.
Well over 200 residents and
their families ranging in age
from six to *>7 and volun-
teers attended the party, at
which greetings were extended
by Fred D. Hirt, executive di-
rector of the home, and Leo
Steinman, a member of the
Men's Auxiliary.
Bikel sang several selections .
from "Fiddler on the Roof," ac-
companied by Chosen Children;
pianist Howard Neu. The Chosen
Children and Junior Chosen
Children danced and sang Is-
raeli tunes as well as melodies I
to celebrate the Bicentennial.
Cocktails and a champagne j
buffet supper, prepared by the j
home's food service staff di-
rected by Max Temel, followed
the entertainment.
Hirt commented, "I don't
think there's another home in
the country where young staff,
performers and volunteers can
gather together with residents
and families to usher in the New
Year in so warm a spirit."
The party received active sup-
port from numerous sources,
including David Ben Gurion
Lodge of B'nai B'rith, Holly-
wood.
ft &
The Fishbein family gathered
at home in Miami Beach during
the winter holiday to celebrate
Mrs. Elizabeth Fishbein's Ph.D.
in counseling psychology from
the University of Miami.
Mrs. Fishbein, a professor at
Miami Dade Community Col-
lege, and her husband, Dr. I.
Leo Fishbein, a psychiatrist,
enjoyed the visit of their daugh-
ters, sons-in-law and grandchil-
dren.
Kliman. Robert Kohn. Adoiph
Lepzelter. Morris Rutstein, Mike
Washowsky, Murray Weiss and
Mordecai Yardeini are in charge
of arrangements.
Gershwin lodge Auxiliary
Plans Two Meetings
The Ladies Auxiliary of
Knights of Pythias George
Gershwin Lodge No. 196 will
hold a general meeting on Mon-
day. Jan. 19, at 8 p.m. at the
Surfside Community Center. A
musical program is planned.
On Feb. 16 the group will hold
a Valentine meeting, same time,
same place.
The presidium is Mrs. Francis
Gans and Mrs. Abraham Finger-
man. Mrs. Philip Sahl and Mrs.
Simon Endeweldt are in charge
f miblicitv.
Kosher
Catering
Fantasy
Not Just
Another
Kosher Hotel
... bat new
and elegant.
The very
finest in Food
preparation,
presentation and
service .. That
Wedding, That Bar
Mitzvah. That special
party belongs at the Algiers
It's Glatt to be good
tars
Jack Gartenbcrg. Owner-Manager
For Information Call Catering Director Allan Zane at 531-3391
ON THE OCEAN AT 25th ST. AND COLLINS AVE MIAMI BEACH
w,w
>*fcW*WiV%WWV Established
1957
jTalls(^oultrj)^resi
TODAY'S WEATHER
Perfect (or
Chicken Dinners
Published by Falls Poultry Corporation, South Fallsburg, N.Y. 12779
LOCAL KOSHER BIRD
WINS NATIONAL AWARD
Falls Chicken
is Now Three Ways Better.,
In keeping with its policy ol maintaining highest
standards, the Falls Poultry Corporation requests
examination by the U.S. Department ot Agriculture
and is granted Seal ol Wholesomeness P-4098.
Under the continu-
ous, full-time supervi-
sion of the United States
Government and Rabbi
H. Solnica who pledges
supreme Kashruth,
every chicken is individ-
ually examined before,
during and after slaugh-
tering, inside and out, to
assure purity, quality
and wholesomeness.
A thorough check is
made to guarantee that
there are no harmful
residues of pesticides,
CHICKEN SOUP
CURE-ALL?
For more generations than
one can count, legend has
it that chicken soup Is the
housewife's remedy for
any illness that may befall
her family. There has been
little In the way of scien-
tific data to support these
claims. ,
Research is now being
done in the field of low-
cholesterol poultry... less
calories per lean meat
ounce ... and flavorful
tastes for a once bland
chicken diet
It may once again turn
out that the housewife has
come out ahead of science
with her Intuitive knowl-
edge as a practical
homemaker.____________
FREE! Sed for Bubba's old fash-
ioned NMM Soup mim-
Fails PMltiy Carp. So. FalUborf,
H.Y. 12771 Mat 40
REPORT TO CONSUMERS:
1. The N.Y.
State De-
partment of
Agriculture
has always
maintained
highest poul-
try inspection levels.
2. The U.S. Department of
Agriculture further assures
consumer protection by its
Seal of Wholesomeness.
3. The laws of Kashruth
that once
protected an
ancient civi-i
lization that]
had no re-'
frigeration,
continue to
aid man in his line of de-
fense against modern con-
tamination and disease.
1EO
Fundamental to the laws
of Kashruth are the sepa-
ration of the clean from the
unclean. Every chicken
that is made Kosher must
be in a state of perfect
health. They
must be
clean and
free of para-1
sites and
must not
have them-
selves partaken of unclean
food. The restrictions as to
what constitutes clean or
unclean are far more strin-
gent under the laws of
Kashruth than under the
laws of man. Hence the
importance of the true
meaning in...
... it's KOSHER clean.
hormone injections or
other unwholesome
chemicals.
All processing is done
with continuously flow-
ing cold water... soak-
ing, salting, draining,
three rinses and then
quick-chilling for per-
fect freshness.
A final weight and
packing inspection is
made as the "pride of
the poultry" is carefully
prepared for shipment
to your market.
Raised and Dressed
as Nature's Best.
Ask for your Falls
Kosher Poultry at your
local Kosher Market


Page 10-B
vJewist) Meridian
Friday, January 16, 1976
I
" Roseniarv'fThTme
By ROSEMARY FURMAN
Those Miamians we spoke to
from Aspen didn't lie, it really
was colder in Florida than in
Colorado. Somehow, it was far
mot exciting to wear a coat in
Miami, as I did last week, than
to bundlj up in Aspen. Anyway,
we're all back, and the serious
"season^ is upon us.
Aanual sistsrhood luncheons
are in the works. The first one
I've heard of is Temple Israel's
donor luncheon, chaired bv Har-
. net Stager and Jackie Hoch-
berg. It will be on Mar. 10 at
the Doral Beach Hotel.
. WHILE on the topic of Tem-
ple Israel it's been doing some
. particularly interesting things.
Over the weekend, in celebra-
tion of America's Bicentennial,
Dr. Sam Proctor, of tlie Univer-
sity of Florida, a top historian,
spoke about Jews in the Colonial
' South.
The next evening, a film on
New York's Y.ddish theatre was
\ shown and" Sunday morning. Dr.
Jacab Marcus gave a lecture on
"The Romance of the American
Jew." I don't know about being
the most sanctified Jews, but
" members of Temple Israel
should be the smartest. If thev
do not become intellect^!, they
at least may become integrated
personalties through Temnle Is-
rael's Seminars in Life Experi-
ence.
From 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,
on six consecutive Saturdays,
beginning Jan. 24, vou can take
a course in Yoga, "Your Key to
Self-Awareness and Liberation
from Disharmony" (a'l that and
lose weight tor) or Helen Wal-
lace's fine course in life cycle:
"Discovering Contimiitv Be-
. tween Life's Stages with In-
creasing Awareness of the Po-
tentials." I don't know what that
means, but this course was
given at Miami-Dade Commu-
nity College, and it's a good one.
ON THURSDAY evenings, be-
ginning Jan. 15. for six w?eks
Allen Rutchik, Ph.D. in clinical
rsvchologv, will deal with the
relationship asoect of sexualitv.
"The group will explore energy
that motivates soxualitv and the
impediments that diminish it."
No comment.
Another class. led by Ell
Lew, Ph.D., will explore the
problems of being single and
Will attempt to "enhance" com-
mtm'cations skills.
Even if some 0f tne descrip-
tions are high-flung, the id^a
of providing for the needs of
consregants is exciting.
Davida Lew and Mrs. Julius
Darcky are having a Lion of
Judah Brunch for Pacesetters
and Trustees of Federation on
Jan. 22. You may have to give
a lot of money, but vou'll get
to see Mrs. Darsky's apartment.
It tataa no monev to hear
Carol Wein fMrg. Leonard. J-.)
talk about antioue quilts and dis-
play of her own collection at
the Bisovne Boulevard main
branch of the Miami Public Li-
brary from Feb. 13 to 17. Carol,
who has taught manv ouilt-
PARADISE BOARDING
KENNELS
SAME l/X'ATION SINTR IMS
S.W., CORAL GAMES
HOURS 8:30 6:00
SPtCIM CAM fO* ftMALES
IN SEASON
PAULnCE RrNPTJEE (Owner)
I-arry a Ht-len McKnight (Oprs.)
11324 CORAL WAV 221-1311
RABBI CANTOR
Uniquely Talented. Seeks Lib.
eral Congregation. Presently
Available. Writ* R. C, P.O.B.
012973, Miami 33101.

making classes, will be lecturing
twice, on Feb. 10 and 12, at
12:15, and she says the quilt
show is going to be "one of
Miami's best."
A NEW "private" club has
opened in Dadeland Towers,
and as long as it serves Julienne
salads, which it does, I like it.
Dadeland Towers is a develop-
ment of Hank Green's, but
Novo's has it origins in Miami's
Cuban community.
Some glimpsed faces: Donald
Kahn, Roger and Linda Gor-
wita, Larry Plummer, Jack
Pyms, Sam Schoninger, Al Mor-
rison and Joan and Fred Feicks.
I didn't glimpse them, but some-
body did.
ft It-it
Jpecial "ongratulations to
Kenneth Brickman on his Bar
Mitzvah, and to Shirley Trintz's
parents, Ida and Mort Goldman,
on their 50th wedding anniver-
sary. Rabbi Edward Goldman, of
CincirmaVi a cousin, '"remar-
ried" the Goldmans at a large
party at Shirley and Howard
Trintz's home in South Dade.
Temple Menorah' Chapel
will be dedicated on Sun-
day, Jan. 18, at 11 a.m. in
honor of Dave and Mary
Alper for their generous
pledge to the Temple Me-
norah Completion Cam-
paign. Friends of the Al-
pers, who have been devot-
ed members of Temple
Menorah for 20 years, will
attend a reception in their
honor following the cere-,
mony.
Sisterhood Sabbath
At Temple Beth Tov
At Temple Beth Tov this eve-
ning, in commemoration of Sis-
terhood Sabbath, Mrs. Lillian
Rubel will sneak on "The Im-
portance of the Sabbath in Jew-
ish Life." Other Sisterhood
members will rarticioate in the
program, which begins at 8:15.
THIS AD
COULD
SAVEYOU
$1DOO
WHEN YOU
If you are one of the thousands
of Jews who came to Florida
to live but still own a cemetery
plot up north, your death couid
prove very costly to your
survivors.
Consider the cost of ship-
ping the casket and remains
back. Consider the long
distance phone calls. Consider
that one or more family
members will fly back for the
funeral. The cost of accom-
modations while they-are
there. -
Your inexpensive burial
pJot could become very
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There is a much more
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SAAGrGrRUSAHYLI
GDNLKTVRDQJEC
EOXHMPESnOSC
SPBLMSARZEBBE
The names of the Prophetic Writings are listed be-
low and hidden in this puzzle. They are placed hori-
zontally, vertically, diagonally, frontward and backward.
How many can you find? Answers are on page 13-B.
Psa,ms Ecclesiastes
-Proverbs Esther
Job Daniel
Song of Songs Eaa
futh Nehemiah
Lamentations Chronicles
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
You could buy, outright, a
plot at Lakeside Memorial
Park for a mere $250.00.
This is what you will qet
for that $250.00:
1. A beautifully serene
memorial garden setting with
an eight acre reflecting lake.
Most northern cemeteries
are old and depressingly
unattractive.
2. Perpetual care at no
extra cost. Practically all
northern cemeteries charge
an annual fee for care. In a
few years, the cost of this care
could exceed the price of a new
plot at Lakeside.
3. A place your family,
friends and relatives can visit.
Lakeside Memorial Park is a '
short bus ride from anywhere
in the Miami area.
See Lakeside Memorial
Park for yourself. It's the kind
of decision you should not
put off. Were located at
H.W.25AthSt.atl03rdAve.,
Miami. Phone 305-592-0690.
In Broward:
Itlllll 305-525-9339.
lakeside.
Mgmgna,

-.:. .
'.....-
...
-


iday, January 16, 1976
JcwidhFhr/dtajn
Page 11-B
SUp
Jtahnmtcal Page
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
GRtAT AMERICAN-JEWISH PERSONALITIES
Isaac Mayer
Wise
Words to the Wise
(1819-1900)
More than any of his contem-
poraries, it has been said of
Isaac Mayer Wise (1819-1900)
that he left the impress of his
personality upon the develop-
ment of Judaism in the United
States. The father of American
Reform Judaism was the son of
a poor Bohemian schoolteacher.
After about two years as rabbi
at Radnitz, Bohemia, Wise turn-
ed his back on the Hapsburg
Empire and emigrated to the
United States.
When Wise arrived on Amer-
ican shores he found himself
among Jews most of whom had
been brought up in the tradi-
tion of rabbinic Judaism. Stir-
rings for revision in services
and ritual, however, had come
to the surface as early as 1824
in Charleston, South Carolina.
Amid the relatively greater free-
doms of religious life in Amer-
ica, Wise soon began to display
the organizing talents which
were to result in his lifetime of
achievement in Jewish, civic
and national affairs.
WITHIN THREE months of
his arrival, Wise was appointed
Rabbi of Congregation Beth El
of Albany, New York. It was
not long before he began work-
ing for reforms. He introduced
mixed pews in the synagogue,
a mixed choir, sermons in the
vernacular and confirmation.
Within a year he had conceived
the idea of a single ritual for
the American Jewish commu-
nity. His reform positions led to
a split in the congregation and
the formation of a new congre-
gation by his followers. In 1854
he went to Cincinnati as rabbi
of Congregation B'nai Jeshu-
run, where he officiated for the
remainine 46 years of his life.
Wise's genius, as Sachar*
pointed out, did not lie in orig-
inal theology. He was primarily
an organizer. He never gave up
on a cause. It took him 25 years,
interrupted by the Civil War,
to succeed in his agitation for
a union of congregations the
Union of American Hebrew
in
Congregations, established
Cincinnati in 1873. Another suc-
cessful quarter-century cam-
paign to fill a long-felt need
was the establishment of a sem-
inary for the training of rab-
bis. With Wise as president. He-
brew Union College was estab-
lished in 1875. For the rest of
his life, Wise labored in the in-
terests of the college. He or-
dained more than sixty rabbis.
FROM 1889 until his death
in 1900, Wise served as presi-
dent of the Central Conterence
of American Rabbis. In Cincin-
nati, in addition to serving his
own congregation, Wise was
examiner for public school
teacher applicants. He was a
member of the board of direc-
tors of the University of Cin-
cinnati. At the same time, he
managed to edit his weekly
journal, "The Israelite" (later
the "American Israelite"), in
which he expounded the phi-
losophy of American Reform
Judaism. He authored a num-
ber of religious and historical
works, various novels and even
a couple of plays. His revised
prayer book, "Minhag Amer-
ica," ("American Rite") was
used by Reform congregations
until close io the enc of the
century.
Wise must have been blessed
with robust health, for in addi-
tion to the range of activities
mentioned, he traveled through-
out the country, bringing his
philosophies and messages to
congregations over the land. It
is little wonder that during his
lifetime Isaac Mayer Wise was
regarded as the most prominent
Jew of his time in the United
States.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Sachar, Abram, Leon. "A His-
tory of the Jews," 5th edition.
1964, Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.
New York.
Encyclopaedia Judaica, Jerusa-
lem, 1971, "Wise, Isaac May-
er."
The Jewish Encyclopedia. New
York, 1906. "Wise. Isaac
Mayer."
Beyond the Return to Tradition
By RABBI MITfHELL CHEFITZ
Temple Beth Am
There is no longer anything
unusual about my being asked
to teach about tallis and tefillin.
even in the younger grades of
our religious school. I am asked
with some frequency about mat-
ters of tradition, and this with-
in a Reform Jewish congrega-
tion.
Occasionally, I am asked by
someone who has only recently
become actively involved in con-
gregational life if there is a
movement back to the tradition
within Reform Judaism, and I
respond that the movement in
that direction is already well
established.
Anyone who has witnessed
the activity at UAHC camps of
who has participated with adult
study groups in the rediscovery
of forgotten traditions cannot
deny this. Yet this is not a re-
turn to Orthodoxy: rather, it is
restructuring of Reform prac-
tice.
NOW I sense an additional
trend, perhaps a logical conse-
quence of this experimentation.
These traditional forms produce
an effect, and there is a desire
to understand that effect, sc
much so that there is a rising
demand for instruction in the
basic texts of Judaism.
An increasing number of peo-
ple of all ages are now request-
ing courses in everything from
Humash to the Zohar. Recent
offerings in Rashi, Maimonides
and mystical texts have been
fully subscribed, and these have
not been survey courses but
comprehensive study.
This reflects a concern that
goes beyond the "return to tra-
dition" that has been experi-
enced within Reform Judaism
in the last decade. Perhaps it is
a result of the demise of our
faith in technology, perhaps a
reflection of the involvement of
our youth in mystical specula-
tion.
Whatever the cause, it is an
awakening that must not be
ignored.
By RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAX
TemDle Adath Yeshurun
The uninformed and the de-
liberately malicious sometimes
accuse Judaism of having a
greater concern for what goes
into one's mouth than with what
comes out.
These critics argue that To-
rah presents a steady diet of
laws which concern permissible
and forbidden items and the
proper preparation of food. To
these critics, the Command-
ments seem like a menu of
meaningless rituals which com-
nrises the essence of "The
Law."
This claim is patently false.
It is not my intention, here, to
defend the "dietary laws." In-
deed no defense, apology or ra-
tionale is reauired, for the To-
rah tells us that "Man doth not
live by bread only, but by every-
thing which precedeth out of
the mouth of the L-rd doth man
live" (Deut. 8:3).
It would be meaningful, how-
ever, to analyze the assertion
that our tradition is not very
concerned with what comes
from our mouths, i.e., our
words.
The Torah says, "When a
man voweth a vow unto the
L-rd. or sweareth an oath to
bind his soul with a bond, he
shall not break his word" (Num-
bers 30:3). We are cautioned,
"Keep thee far from a false mat-
ter ." (Ex. 23:7).
The "ten words" includes the
Commandment "Thou shalt not
bear false witness against thy
neighbor" (Exodus 20:14).
The Talmud tells us of Rabbi
Levi, who said, "G-d says, 'If
you bear false witness, I regard
it as if you had declared that 1
had -not created the world' "
(Talmud Yerushalmi Berachos).
The Kol Nidre prayer at the
outset of Yim Kippur asks G-d's
forgiveness for promises made
to Him which one has not ful- '
filled. The Machzor clearly in- f
dicates that those promises be-
tween man and his fellow are
still binding following the reci-
tation of the prayer.
The Torah contains a detailed
description of the Plague of
"Metzora." This word is com-
monly translated as "leprosy"
but literally it means "slander-
er" or "tale-bearer." Miriam,
the sister of Moses, is punished
with this affliction for her ac-
cusations against her brother.
The daily Amida contains a
nineteenth blessing which de-
claims the tale-bearer. It says,
"And for the slenderer let there
be no hope ."
Our tradition goes far beyond
the mere injunction to avoid
false statements and malicious
acts. The emphasis on truthful-
ness is a repeated lesson. Thus
we read in Pirke Avot that the
world exists because of truth.
"Ernef (truth) is one of the
names of G-d. The Torah was
written with truth.
The Baal Ha-Turim demon-
strates again and again that the
three letters ^lef," "Mem" and
"Dalet" are repeated constantly
in the Creation story. This is
part of the significance of the
statement "the beginning of
Thy word is truth ." (Psalms
119:16).
The Sages point out that the
Hebrew word for truth contains
the first, middle and last letters
of the Hebrew Alphabet. The
message is that truth should be
constant throughout.
Our Torah portion adds yet
another dimension to Judaism's
concern that what emanates
from one's mouth be that which
is proper. It says, "And ye shall
not wrong one another; but thou
shalt fear thy G-d; for I am the
L-rd your G-d" (Leviticus 25:
17).
The Sefer Ha-Chiiuich in its
compilation of the 613, explains
this sentence. It says, "This re-
fers ... to speech. In other
words we are not allowed to
cause pain or to wound an-
other's feelings."
RABBI FRIEDMAN
The Midrash, commenting on
this verse, tells the story of
Rabbi Simon who instructed his
servant to purchase good food
in the market. The servant re-
turned with tongue. The Rabbi
then instructed him to buy some
bad food. The servant returned
with more tongue. When ques-
tioned as to why he bought the
same item for two opposite pur-
pose, the servant replied.. "When
the tongue is good, there is no-
thing better, and when it is bad
there is nothing worse."
The Midrash follows this tale
with a story about the brilliant
scholar Rab who gave a sumptu-
ous feast for his students. He
had placed before them tender
tongues and hard tongues. Rab
watched as his disciples all
selected the soft tongues. He
then said to them, "Note what
you are doing! As you select the
tender tongues ard leave the
hard, so let your tongues be
tender to one another!"
Words to the wise.
Leviticus 25:1-26:2.
I CANDLELIGHTING TIME
14 SHEVAT 5:32
4jJ
uiHUNiran ....... ,,maiir*J
I

SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Beshalah
The Amida concludes with the
words "O L-rd. guard my lips
from evil and tongue from
speaking guile." The confession-
al on ihe Day of Atonement asks
G-d's forgiveness for sins com-
mitted "with utterance of lips";
"in speech"; "confession of the
lips"; "by unclean lips'"; by
impure speech," etc.
TV Programs
Sundav, January 18
"Jewish rWorship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Victor D. Zwelling
Congregation B'nai Raphael
C? IS &
"Still, Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 7 10 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Maxwell-Lipshitz
Guests:
Dr. William Greenfield
Dr. Harry Kaufman
Mr. Sonia Cchen
and
Dr. Lawrence Silberglied
Tonic:
"What Is the Future of
the Jewish Family?"
The waters of the Red Sea divide to make a path for
the Israelites.
"And the children of Israel went into the midst of
the sea upon the dry ground; and the waters were a
wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left"
(Exod. 14.22).
BESHALAH Fearful of the hostile tribes the Is-
raelites might encounter on the direct route to Canaan
through the land of the Philistines, God sent the newly-
freed slaves by way of the desert near the Red Sea. As
they journeyed, they were guided by a pillar of cloud
by day and a pillar of fire b night. The Israelites had
left Egypt presumably to worship their God in the de-
sert. When Pharaoh learned that the children of Israel
would not return to Egypt, he pursued them to the banks
of the Red Sea at the head of an army of chosen troops.
But a miracle occurred: the children of Israel were able
to pass between the waves of the Red Sea that divided
before them and stood upright like columns. The Egypt-
ian hosts, plunging into the Red Sea after them, were
all drowned. At this sight, the children of Israel sang a
song of praise to God. On their journey through the
desert, the children of Israel were sustained by manna
from heaven; water issued from a rock for them at the
bidding of God. The Amalekites did battle with the Is-
raelites, but wer-e defeated by Joshua, the son of Nun,
and his men.
Li
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Luncheon Honors
'Tag Day" Workers
Ruth FrankensteiriWUl Preside At
Clinical Social Workers Meeting
The Florida Society for Clini-
cal Social Work will hold an
emergency statewide meeting
mental health professions for
help with individual, marital
and family problems.
' the Florida Society for Clini-
cal Social Work is a.VU'ated
with the National Federation ot
^oci-?ties for Clinical Social
Work.
A group of women were hon-
fred at a luncheon at the Fon-
iinebleau Hotel on Jan. 14 for
Iheir work for the Jewish Na-
tional Fund Tag Day. The an-
nouncement was made by Abra-
ham Grunhut JNF president.
It also served as the kickoff for
(lie 1976 Tag Day, which is Sun-
day, Jan. 18.
, All women who collected $36
pr more were invited. Beulah
,S(Mrs. George) Brodie, who has
been chairman of the event for
nany years, works throughout
4 he year to get volunteers to go
out on Tag Day with the "blue
Laxes" symbolic everywhere of
fftfF.
Mrs. Brodie. an active Zionist
v iio has visited Israel many
(times, has held many offices in
Aha Miami Beach Chapter of
t? idassah and is secretary of
fM Jewish National Fund Coun-
' of Greater Miimi.
- THE SPECIAL honorees were
"iose who collected $100 or
j'^ore last year, and Mrs. Birdie
Pomper, a volunteer at large,
was the grand champion, bring-
ing in $500.
Others honored were Miami
Beach Hadassah members Clark
Hyde and Selma Levine of the
Brandeis group; Velma Soos
and Sylvia Rubel of the I. R.
Goodman group; Gladys Gordon
of Treasure House; Kay Epstein
and Ros-^ Ganz of Emma Lazarus
group; Eva Altman of 100 Lin-
coln Road Group; Esther Lipow
of Plaza 800; and Beatrice
Schlossman of the Hanna Se-
nesch Group.
Honored from the Naomi
Group of the Miami Chapter of
Hadassah were Paula Gold and
Sandy Cohen. From Pioneer
Club 1, Sophie Ritter and Ruth
Budowsky; and Pioneer Group
2, Rose' Marcus. The Miami
Beach Mizrachi Women's group
.included Fannie Weiner and
Shalom Mizrachi Althea Ger-
stein and Fannv Weiner.
Bar-Ilan University
Is Honoring Silverstein
Miami Beach philanthropist
a:id religious leader William
oilverstein will bj honored by
Bar-Han University at its 20th
anniversary dinner, March 21
dt the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Owner of the Sagamore Ho-
tel and a member of the board
of directors of the Florida Com-
mittee for Bar-Ilan University,
Sdverstein is a vice president of
the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy.
Announcement of his accept-
aace was made by Dr. Joseph
H. Lookstein, chancellor of Bar-
ban, the American-chartered
university located at Ramat
Gan, Miami Beach's sister city
in Israel. Dr. Lookstein, who
maintains residences in Miami
Beach, New York and Israel, is
national president of the Syna-
gogue Council of America.
Silverstein, a director of Tem-
ple Emanu-El and a founder of
Mt. Sinai Medical Center, will
be honored at the same dinner
at which Congressmen Dante
Fascell, Claude Pepper and Wil-
liam Lehman receive official
tributes from the Israeli uni-
versity.
A leader of the Zionist Organ-
ization of America and the Jew-
ish National Fund, Silverstein
is a founder of the Hebrew
Home for the Aged of Miami
Beach.
Bar Mitzvah
RUTH FRANKENSTEIN
on Saturday, Jan. 17, at the
Hillsborough Mental Health
Clinic in Tampa.
Ruth Frankenstein, president
of the Florida Society and as-
sociate of Dr. Barry Glassman
at the Center for Psychotherapy,
will preside at the meeting. Mrs.
Frankenstein established the
marriage and family counseling
sen-ices at Temple Beth Sholom
and Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
Other Miami area participants
in the ^ program include Dr.
James Kennedy, vice president j
of the Florida Society, and Vin-
cent Arcamonte, Gerald Kurtz, I
Barbara Fiorella of Jackson I
Memorial Hospital and Edith
Gross of Mt. Sinai Hospital.
High on the meeting's agenda
will be to push for the passage ,
of legislation regulating licen- j
sing of qualified mental health
professionals, psychologists,
clinical social workers, and
marriage and family counselors.
The Florida Psychological
and Allied Services Practice
Act, H.B. 1262, would safeguard j
consumers who turn to the
YIVO FORUM
Concert Recital Lecture
From the Folks-Song to liturgical and Classical Music
with CANTOR BORIS GREISD0RF
BASS BARITONE
With Degrees: Royal Conservatoire of Music, Toronto,
and Sacred Music, Hebrew Union College N.Y.
SALLY LAZAR AT THE PIANO
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21st-8 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM-4144 CHASE AVENUE
LORI BETH SPITZER
Lori Beth, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Norman Spitzer, will
be Bat Mitzvah on Saturday at
11:15 a.m. at Temple Judea. She
i; a Hebrew School graduate,
and will continue her religious
education through confirmation.
Lori is in the eighth grade
mi the gifted program at South
Miami Junior High, where she
is Student Council representa-
tive, a member of the school
orchestra and in the Student
Forum. She is the newspaper
editor of South Dade Councilet-
(.08, a member of Ruach and a
I sacher's aide at Temple Judea's
leligious school.
Lori is the granddaughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Spitzer of
I iami Beach and Mrs. Albert
h'-orrell of Orlando.
Among the out-of-town guests
B ; Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ettinger,
i and Mrs. Jerry Bornstein,
Dr. and Mrs. Morton Levy, Mrs.
Florence Gluckman, Mr. and
hies. Henry Morrell, Dr. and
;. Garry Grotty, Mr. and Mrs.
1/iurence Morrell. all of Or-
1 indo; Mr. and Mrs. Sam Sil-
berstein and Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Spitzer of Jacksonville; and
Kn. Anne Stone of Phoenix.
ft ft &
REMMA ESTY SHAPIRO
Sylvia and Harold Shapiro's
d lughter, Remma Esty, will be
I'.-it Mitzvah on Saturday at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Remma, who is an eighth-
grader at Hebrew Academy, has
been acting since she was two
and a half years old.
ft ft ft
SCOTT DELL
Scott, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Dell, will become a Bar
Remma Shapiro
Mitzvah at Beth Torah Congre-
gation on Saturday at 8:30 a.m.
Scott is in the fourth-grade
class at Beth Torah Harold Wolk j
Religious School. An eighth- J
grader at John F. Kennedy Jun- j
ior High, he is a member of the
orchestra and of the Junior Na-1
tional Honor Society.
In Scott's honor his parents i
will sponsor the Kiddush fol-
lowing services. Guests will in-
clude his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Fasbinder and Mrs.
Frieda Dell, as well as Dr. and
Mrs. Alex Dell of Houston, Jeff
Fasbinder of Los Angeles, Dr.
and Mrs. Ira Mitzner of Miami
Shores, and Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Shone of London.
B'nai B'r'rth Women
Of Point East
Membership Drive Is On
Point East Chapter No. 1303
of B'nai B'rith Women is en-
gaged in an extended member-
ship drive.
Mrs. Eva Sussman, president,
says the group is sponsoring an
afternoon with actor Henry
Howard at the membership'
meeting on Monday, Jan. 19, at
12:30 p.m. in the Large Arts and
Crafts Room of the Point East
Clubhouse.
OVER 70 SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by a
'well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on our own
private nine hole course! Riding on seven miles of trails spread
over 525 acres of breathtakingly beautiful scenery! Axhildrens
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing,
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery,
photography and gymnastics are just some of the many fascinating
activities available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance.
OUR 41ST YEAR!
unaer Weinberg family direction
Dietary Laws Observed Nationwide Enrollment
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Announcing limited openings in the Broword & Miami areas.
For further information contact our
Hollywood Representative-Mrs. S. Kogan
3401 N. 41st Ct., Hollywood Tel. 989-1545 (after 5 P.M.)
Miami Office 758-9454 or 858-1190
DIRECTOR LOUIS P. WEINBERG
Separate camps of distinction for Boys and Girls on beautiful Reflection
Lake in the picturesque Pocono Mountains of N.E. Pennsylvania.
WINTER OFFICE: 6528 Castor Avenue. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19149
Phone: (215) 533-1557
ft ft ft
TYLER CYMET 1
Mr. and Mrs. Seymoui Cy-
met's son, Tyler, will be Bar
Mitzvah at Beth Torah Congre-
gation on Saturday at 8:30 a.m.
Tyler is a student at the
Lehrman Day School. Before be-
coming a Florida resident, he
lived for two years in Israel
with his family.
In Tyler's honor his parents
will sponsor the Kiddush fol-
lowing services.

'jrjrjrjrjrjrjrjrjrjm:
HIGH IN THE
BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
CAMP
WOHELO
FOR GIRLS
Director: Morgan Lev)
rjm
Wohelo
Comet
Trails
"Dedicated
to
Youth
f L-hildren are the ^Suture >
R. D. 4
Waynesboro, Pa. 17268
CAMP
COMET
FOR BOYS
Director: Harry Pure
*
Quality 8 Week Camps Completely Separate Facilities
COMET TRAILS For Teenage Boys
Owned and Directed by a Miami Family tor 48 Year*.
Only 4'/2 hours from Miami
FLORIDA REUNION SUNDAY, JANUARY 25th, 1 P.M.
Greynolds Park Rock Shelter
Prospective campers and parents welcome.
Call or write for a personal interview in your home.
1976 enrollment closing soon.
Morgan I. levy. Director
1331 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami, Fla. 33144 Phone: 2644389
CAMP Staff ,n<1uir,es invited, minimum age 19.
AMERICAN CAMPING
v ASSOCIATION J
X

n


lay, January 16, 1976
Jenisti Hcr/diar)
Page 13 B
Religious Services
MIAMI
kVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
lON, 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Ibbi Zvi Raphaety. Cantor Aron
in Aron. 1
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 645
Collins Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Sadi
Nahmiat. 31
ETZ CHAIM CONGREGATION. 1544
Washington Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Abraham Groner. 32
(HE EMES CONGREGATION.
S3 SW 19th Ave. Conservative,
intor Sol Pakowitz. 2
ETH AM TEMPLE. 5950 N. Ken.
II Or. Reform. Or. Herbert M.
umgard. Asiociate Rabbi Mitchell
Ihefitz. 3
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
Conservative. Cantor Murray Vav-
neh. 3j.A
ET BREIRA CONGREGATION.
D755 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
irry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
ETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
onservative. Rabbi Sol Landau.
ntor William Lipson. 4-A
AGUDAS ACHIM NUBACH SEFARD
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St. Or-
thodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimovits.
32-B
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN TEMPLE. 1025
NE Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can.
tor Ian Alpern. 33
ETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
Dth St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 19255
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33.A
|TH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha
iro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahl. Rev. Mendel Gutterman. 6
-BETH TORAH CONGREGATION.
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. Con-
servative. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson. 34
TH TOV TEMPLE. 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
INAI ISRAEL AND GREATER Ml-
IAMI YOUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9300
[Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
[Glixman. 8-A
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
NE 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
aim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36. a
J-NAI RAPHAEL CONGREGATION.
1401 NW 183rd St. Conservative.
, Rabbi Victor D. Zwelling. Cantor
['Jack Lerner. 36
S'NAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov Bid-
nick. 38
ISRAEL TEMPLE OF GREATER YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
MIAMI. 137 NE 19th St. Reform. AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 10 Rabbi Zev Leff. 39
Israelite center. 3175 sw 25th
[ St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
I Waldenberg. Cantor Nathan Par
I nass. 11
|R OLOM TEMPLE. 8755 SW 16th
Si. Conservative. Rabbi David M.
| Baron. Cantor Stanley Rich. 13
CORAL GABLES
JUDEA TEMPLE. 5550 Granada
Blvd. Reform. Rabbi Michael B. Ei-
senstat. Cantor Rita Shore. 40
Israel-south temple (former.
Ily Beth Tikva). 9025 Sunset Dr. Re-
I form. Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
ZAMORA TEMPLE. 44 Zamora Ave.,
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
fSAMUEL TEMPLE. 8900 SW 107th
Ave., Suite 306. Conservative. Rabbi
Maxwell Berger.
IFERETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Salomon Benarroch. 14
7I0N TEMPLE. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro.
Cantor Errol Helfman. 16
HILLEL JEWISH STUDENT CEN-
TER, COLLEGE STUDENT SYNA-
GOGUE. University of Miami. 1100
Miller Drive. Traditional and Lib-
eral Services. Rabbi Richard A.
Davis.
SURFSIDE
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION.
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D. Vine. 50
HIALEAH
IFERETH JACOB TEMPLE. 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Na-
than Zolondek. IS
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St. Conservative. 51
NORTH MIAMI
|BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 NE 121st St. Conservative. Rab-
bi Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Cantor
Yehuda Binyamln. 35
MIAMI BEACH
lAGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever.
17
FORT LAUDERDALE
BETH ISRAEL TEMPLE. 7100 W.
Oakland Park Blvd. Conservative.
Rabbi Philip A. Labowitz. Cantor
Maurice Neu. 42
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 3243 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Reform. Cantor Je-
rome Klement. 43
BETH EL. 2400 Pine Tree Dr. Ortho-
dox. Rabbi Alexander Gross. 5
BETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
NW 57th St. Conservative. Rabbi
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
BETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
19
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD.
3897 Stirling Rd. Orthodox. Rabbi
Moshe Bomzer. 52
BETH RAPHAEL TEMPLE. 1545
Jefferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
DEERFIELD BEACH
JEWISH CENTER BETH ISRAEL
OF DEERFIELD BEACH. Century
Village East. Conservative. Rabbi
David Berent. 62
BETH SHOLOM TEMPLE. 4144
Chase Ave. Liberal. Dr. Leon Kron-
ish. Cantor David Conviser. 21
POMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER. Con-
servative. 6101 NW 9th St. 44-B
BETH SOLOMON TEMPLE. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mordecai
Yardeini. 21-A
SHOLOM TEMPLE. 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop.
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 49
BETH TFILAH CONGREGATION.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGREGA-
TION. 848 Meridian Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 22-A
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
416 NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rab-
bi Harry E. Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. 12
B'NAI ZION TEMPLE. 200 178th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson. 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION.
1242 Washington Ave., Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW
CONGREGATION. 715 Washington
Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Meir Masliah
Melamed. 23-A
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE IN THE PINES, 1900 Uni-
versity Drive. Conservative. Rabbi
Sidney I. Lubin. 63
-------------a-------------
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL TEMPLE. 1351 S. 14th
Ave. Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosen-
feld.
45
EMANU-EL TEMPLE. 1701 Wash-
ington Ave. Conservative. Dr. Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine
Tree Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross. 25
BETH SHALOM TEMPLE. 4601 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. 46
_----------------
SINAI TEMPLE. 1201 Johnston St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
65
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Dr. Tibor H. Stern. Can-
tor Meyer Engel. 26
BETH AHM TEMPLE. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi David Ro-
senfield.
47-B
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1475 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield,
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MENORAH TEMPLE. 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
SOLEL TEMPLE. 5100 Sheridan St.
Liberal. Rabbi Robert Frazin. 47-C
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nobb Hill Rd. Re-
form. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams. 64
NER TAMID TEMPLE. 80th St. and
Tatum Waterway. Conservative. Dr.
Eugene Labovitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr. Or.
thodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. 30
MIRAMAR
ISRAEL TEMPLE. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avrom Drazirr
Cantor Abraham Kester.
48
Member of the HHbbini.al AxHoriatinn
of Greater Miami.
B'nai B'rith
Sabbath
The B'nai B'rith lodge in for-
mation in the Homestead-Naran-
ja Lakes area will conduct a
B'nai B'rith Sabbath at the
Homestead Jewish Center this
evening at 8.
According to Michael Green,
president pro tern of the new
lodge, "the Sabbath service is
part of a nationwide B'nai B'rith
effort to focus attention on
communitywide relipjious par-
ticipation during the Amercan
Bicentennial."
Green added that a repre-
sentative from Supreme Lodge
headouarters of B'nai B'rith in
Washington would be guest
speaker at the service. An Oneg
Shabbat will follow.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION OF
GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla.
33137. 576-4000. Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Executive Vice President.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
119 E. Flagler St., Miami, Fla.
33131. 379-4553. Rabbi Sanford
Sbtpero, Director.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA
1820 NE 163rd St., Nfrth Miami
Beach, Fla. 33162. 947-6094. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman Executive
Director.
MSB
cs_ lOTTAT'JEMALlC
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p ,o\a c h s e yfc/x H T -
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K H M U R f\e\x z/ah M E Y U E A 0 N A I
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ANSWERS: Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, Chronicles.
.
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r*~-----i r\ n
Page 14-B
vJewist fhrktiati
Friday, January 16, 1976
V
'
*
UGAl NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dealring to engage in
byslness under the fictitious name of
ALLDADB TV SERVICE at 2381 W.
Flagler Street, Room No. 200. Miami.
Florida intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County Florida.
RAUL A. VAZQUEZ
12/26.1/2-8-li
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR OADB COUNTY, FLORIDA
ENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-40240
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MABEL, SHANI.EY, Administratrix
f the Estate of John Shanley.
Plaintiff
1.11 JJAN McDANIEL and
............. MCDANIEL. her
husband, LKI-A M. HOOTEN and
a.......................... HOOTEN. her
Husband, ANDREW SHANLKY and
.......................... SHANLEY. his wife
FRANK G. SBANIjeY. and
....................... SHANT.ET. his wife.
BLANCHE SLOOOHETERBBCH and
....................... 8LOCGHTEHBECK.
her husband, WANDER BRErTUNQ
and............................ BREITLINa.
er husband, CATHERINE ARTIJ3T
and.............................ARTLEY. her
husband. EVA C. SHANLEY and
.......................... SHANLEY her
husband, GERALD C. SHANLEY,
and......................... SHANLEY, hi*
Wife, VIVIAN JAPENGA and
-..................... JAPENGA, her
husband. ELVERA ENGl^AND and
ENGLAND, her
husband, DONALD A. SHANLEY and
-.................................... SHANLEY. hla
wife, and if any of the aforesaid
aamed Defendants be dead their
nknown devlaees, heirs, peraonal
representatives, legatees, grantees, or
claimant!, otherwise under or against
them and any person or persons
unknown to the Plaintiff having or
clalraing'to have any right title or
interest in the lands, through, by or
under said Defendants,
__ Defendants.
TO: LILLIAN McDANIEL and
-.................................. McDANIEL
her husband
7401 San Pedro, N.E,- -Space 52
Albuquerque. New Mexico 8710$
LELA M. HOOTEN and
..................................HOOTEN,
her husband
1313 Cielo Vista del Norte N.W.,
Albuquerque. N: Mex. 87114
ANDREW SHANLEY and
. ....................................SHANLEY.
his wife.
2538 Viola Dr.. S.W.
Albuquerque. N.M. 87105
i FRANK G. SHANLEY and
.....................................SHANLEY
his wife
6324 Foley Court. S.W.
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87106
BLANCHESLOUGHETEH-
BECK and................
SLOUOHETERBECk,
her husband
7401 Saw Pedro N.E.. Space 48
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87109
WANDER BREITLING and
- -.-.....................BRB1TL1N0.
her husband
5321 6th.Court. N.W.
Albuquerque, N Mex. 87107
CATHERINE ARTLEY and
v a..................ARTLEY.
her husband
Residence Unknown
. EVA C. SHANLEY and
. ~-a......................SHANLEY
her husband
12885 Blacks tone
Detroit. Michigan 48223
GERALD C. SHANLEY and
. .........................SHANLEY.
i his wife
12885 Blacks-tone
Detroit, Mich. 48223
VIVIAN JAPENGA and
" .............JAPENGA,
her husband
17146 Chupel
Detroit, Mich. 48219
ELVERA ENGLAND and
. ,/ ENGLAND,
her husband
20840 West Nine Mile Road
Southfleld. Mich. 48705
DONALD A. SHANLEY and
,i ...................... SHANLEY,
his wife
9304 Allen Rd.
Allen Park. Mich. 48101
and if any of the aforesaid named
Defendants be dead, their unknown
devisees, heirs, personal representa-
tives, legatees, grantees, or claim-
ants, otherwise under or against them
and any person or persons unknown
to the Plaintiff having or claiming to
have any right title or interest in the
lands, through by or under said De-
fendants.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on the
property described as:
That portion of the West 46 feet
of Lot 19 lying South of County
Road, and the West 46 feet of Lots
20 and 21 of JACKSON PEA-
COCK'S SUBDIVISION, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 4 at Page 71, of the
Public Records of Dade County
Florida,
has been filed and commenced In this
Court and yog are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, If any
to it on SAMUEL E. SMITH, Attor-
ney for Plaintiff, wnose address Is
1320 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 850
Coral Gables; Florida 33146, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above Court, on or before January
80, 1976; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the Compjalnt.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four (4) consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH FJvORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court, at Miami. Florida on this
19th day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the
Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy. Clerk
SAMUEL E. SMITH
Attorney for Plaintiff
1320 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 850
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Phone: 667-4878
12/26-1/2-9-1S
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVgEN tjiat
the undersigned, -desiring to' engage
In business under the fictitious name
of STEVEN J. KLEIN d/b/a IN-
STRUMENTS FOR STUDIO REN-
TAL at 1250 N.E. ZOSrd Street North
Miami Beach, Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
STEVEN J. KLEIN
MICHAEL P. CHASE
Attorney for STEVEN J. KLEIN
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-40005
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION LET M. BRODY,
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SELENE WILT,
Petitioner,
and
MARK ALAN WILT,
Respondent.
TO: MARK ALAN WILT
150 South Atlanta. Street
RoweU, Georgia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 76-207
General Jurisdiction Division
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IVAN FEIJSBERTO,
Husband'Petitioner,
and
BONNET FELISBERTO,
Wife/Respondent.
TO: BONNEY FELISBERTO
Apt. No. II
1626 Commonwealth Avenue
Brighton, Massachusetts
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dtasolutlon of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on S't'AN-
ttorney for Petl-
NOTICE UNDER NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW FICTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that- NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In the undersigned, desiring to engage 1
baainess under the fictitious name of business under the fictitious name of
M At PROPERTIES, UNLIMITED THE VILLAS at
14 _
at 66X6 N.W. 7th Ave., Miami. Fla.
31166 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JAY T. MAL1NA
MITCHELL TRESS
LEON A. EPSTEIN
Attorney for Applicant
12/26-1/2-9-16
tioner whose address hi 407 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 11, 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNES8 my hand and the seal of
riage has been filed against you and a'd court at Miami, Florida on this
5th
day of January. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By L. SNEEDBN
As Deputy Clerk
STANLEY If. BRODY
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses; if any, to it oa
FRIEDMAN AND LIPCON, attorneys
for Petitioner, whose address Is 2600
Douglas Road. Suite 1011, Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 31134 (446-64|5) and file
the original with the clerk of tha-
above styled court on or before Jan-
nuary 30, 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint or ne- Attorney for Petitioner
tltion.
This notice shall be published onci
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWSH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
FRIEDMAN AND LIPCON
2600 Douglas Road, Suite 1011
Coral Gables. Fla. 38134 (446-6485)
Attorneys for Petitioner
12/26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-32867
NOTICE OF ACTION
MURRAY FRIEDMAN and
HILDA FRIEDMAN, his wife.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
R. ALONSO MORALES and
SERGIO ARTURO DURAN OJBDA.
Defendants.
TO: SERGIO ARTURO DURAN
OJEDA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Dade County,
Florida:
l-.i 7, less the N. 5' thereof. Block
16, South, City of Miami accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book B. Page 41, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a oopy of your
Drive. Miami, Fla. 33156, intends t
register said name with tire Cftrfc of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
DOLOMITE INVESTMENTS, N. V.
a Netherlands Antilles Corp.
By Jorge Coloma, President
Richard Brtckman
Attorney for Applicant
3501 Blarayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla, 33137
1/9-16-23-30
IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-14681 SP 05
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION '
M-B LEASING CORPORATION
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STUART B. BROWN,
Defendant. '
TO: STUART B. BROWN
750 N.E. 64th Street
Apartment 514
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a lawsuit has been filed In the abov*
styled cause and you are^required M
serve a copy of your answer to thg
lawsuit on the Plaintiff's attorneys,
BLITSTEIN and MOLAN8. 1440 N.W.
14th Avenue, Miami. Florida, 33126.
and file the original Answer In the
Office of the Clerk of the County
Court on or before the 3rd day of
February, 1976, otherwise a Default
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DIXIE BEDDING COMPANY at 4800
N.W. 37th Avenue. Miami. Fla.. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
L1GHTRON CORPORATION
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business at 407 Lincoln Road, Mi-
ami Beach, Suite 11 -B, Florida 33139
under the fictitious name of "EM-
PIRE FACTORS COMPANY" intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LOUIS DICKMAN
ROSALIND DICKMAN
ADOLPH J. COHN
ESTHER G. SCHIFF
Attorney at Law
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
1/9-11-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-318
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOUIS FE1BUSCH. Petitioner
and
LEAH FEIBUSCH. Respondent
TO: Leah Felbusch
141-19 70th Road
Flushing, New York 11367
lOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
<-narles Gertler, attorney for Petition-
er whose address is 420 Lincoln Road.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of GUSTA SPORT OF MIAMI at 234
N.E. 25 St., Miami, Fla., intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
GU8TAVO E. CHACON
_____________________ 12/26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 78-2816
In RE: Estate of
PAULINE HARRIS
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTON TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that I
have filed a Final Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executor of the estate of
PAULINE HARRIS, deceased, and
that on or after the 2nd day of Feb-
ruary, 1976, will apply to the Honor-
written defenses, If any, to It on wm be- entered against you.
LEON A. EPSTEIN, plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose address Is 420 Lincoln Rd.
Suite 438. Miami Beach, Florida. 33139,
on or before the 28th day of January,
1976, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either-before serv-
ice on plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a default /Court Seal)
will be entered against you for the """'" ------'
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. ____________
Witness my hand and the sea) of
this Court on the 18th day of Decem-
ber, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
12/26-1/2-9-16
DATED at Miami. Florida, this 23r
day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the County Court
Miami, Dade County, Florid*
By P. E. GWTN '
Deputy Clerk
1/2-9-11-21
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-40027
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANSELMA MARIA EUGENIA LEON,
Wife
and
JUAN S1EXTO LEON, Husband
TO." JUAN SIEXTO LEON
Centre Bscolar 278, Barrios
Altos Lima, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action tor. Dissolution of Mar-
riage- has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
DANIEL M. KE1L. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 612 Ainsley
Building, Miami, Florida 33132. and
file the original with the clerk of the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-791f
(Howling)
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHEL F. KENDALL,
Deceased. *
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID DE-
CEDENT.
You are hereby notified that a
written instrument purporting to bo
the last will and testament of said
decedent has been admitted to pro-
bate In said Court. You are hereby
commanded within six calendar
months from the date of the first
publication of this notice to appear
in said Court and show cause if
any you can, why the action of ea.it
Court In admitting said will to pro-
bate should not stand unrevoked,
FRANK B. BOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
By MIRIAM B.
HENDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
First publication of this notice
the 2 day of January, 1976.
Publish in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
. EXECUTOR
A. JAY CR1STOL
Attorney for Executor
21 Northeast First Avenue
Miami, Fla. 33313
379-1792
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
18th day of December 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPE LAND
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL M KEIL
612 Ainsley Building
n..uBe auiiresK is zu Lincoln Road. "! ""?'""" """er me iictltioua name Miami Florida vuv>
Miami Beach. Florida 33139 and file ot RAMADA INN OF HOMESTEAD -lnnmi' i''orlaa 5313-
tlie original with
the clerk of the
auo\e styed court on or before Febru-
ary 9th, 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded n the complaint or petition.
Ilus notice shall be published once
*am,J\'J!"Lfor four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
tth day of January, 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
.. As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Charles Gertler
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 331S9
Attorney for Petitioner
1/9-16-23-30
at 51 North Homestead Boulevard,
Homestead, Florida 33030, intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT
OF TAMPA, INC.
By RALPH LAUGHRIDGE
President
MARK BUCHBINDER,, ESQ.
Attorney for Northside Development
930(1 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33156
1/9-16-23-30
12_26-l/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA
No. 76-194
General Jurisdiction Diviaion
rx, J^V,CE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
BERQUIS MENAGED.
Wife,
and
LEVY MENAGED.
Husband.
YOU. LEVY MENAGED, 42-26 81
ireet, Elmhurst, E. I., N.Y are re-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7478
In RE: Estate of
BEN EISENBERG,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-40023
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ELENA ALVAREZ de MA NCI A
Petitioner
and
AUGUSTIN MANCIA
Respondent
TO: AUGUSTIN MANCIA
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
rlage"hasCt*--"- -D.'B-S?-U,-lo.n of Mar: P*^-^** ttr f
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THB
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-434
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
JOSEPH D. TALLMAN. husband
and
GRACE TALLMAN, a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
TO: GRACE TALLMAN a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
Springfield Street
Feeding Hills, Massachusetts
lot! ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Arthur H LIPSONi attorney for
Petitioner whose address is 1980 So.
Ocean Drive, Hallandale, Florida 33009,
and file the original with the clerk of
trie above styled court on or before
Jeb. 12, 19T6; otherwise a default will
oe entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
I has been filed against you and THE JEWISH FfcOHIPIAN
are required to serve a copy of WITNESS my hand and the
K-SSJrSiSS.8**' if anv. to it on Ba,a court at Miami. Florida i
seal of
on this
m!,TV" '" J,'u,r answer to the pe-' calendar months'from the time of the
tnecJrLrofin0,U,1'',n "' carriage with flrw publication hereof or the same
the Clerk of the above Court and serve wM be barred.
Filed at .Miami, Florida, this 31st
you are
OTUirrartwSnS""'} "juo court t Miami, Florida
GLADYS GERSON, attorney for Peti- 7h day of January, 1976
You are hereby notified and required tlner. whose address Is 101 Northwest RICHARD P. BRINKER
Present any claims and demands "'" Av?nue' .Miami, Florida, 88128, As Clerk. Circuit Court
which you may have against the estate ?" e orl'inal with the clerk of Dade County Florida
of BEN EISENBERG. deceased late g*-'*oy*. "ft"*1 co"rt on or before By S. JAFFE
of Dade County, Florida, to the Cir- ,,a1n*ry 30. 19'8: otherwise a default __, As Deputy Clerk
Cult Judges of Dade County, and file i en,er,ed against you for the (Circuit Court Seal)
the same in duplicate and as provided [,!,m anrted '" "le ''""P1"*'" or 1/9-16-23-30
in Section 733.16, Florida Statutes in P iw. -------------------------------------------'--------------'
their offices in the County Courthouse *'* "J'? sh,a" be Published one,
each week for four consecutive weki
m THE JEWISH FUIRIDIAN '
\\TNESS my hand and the sea) of
in Dade County, Florida, within four
a copy ther.-of upon the petitioner's
attorney, Herman Cohen, Esq., G22
let Street, Miami, Florida. 33130.
< n or before February 12. 1H76, or else
petition will be confessed
Dated: Jan. r, ]:,,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court
By B LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
., FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
said court at Miami, Florida on this !ne undersigned, desiring to engage IB
day of December, A.D I97fj
SHEPPAHD L EISENBERG
BA1LLE R. MENDELSON
As Executors
First publication of this notice
the !'th day of January, 11.76.
HYLAN H. KOCT
Attorney for Executors
420 Lincoln Road
1/9-16
18th day of December, 1975
RICHARD P "BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
I'-v H. LIPPS
_ ,, Af Deputy Clerk
on (Circuit Court Seal)
GLADYS GBRSON, ESQUIRB
101 Northwest l^th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
12 '^6-1'2-9-16
''u*'T",eS8 under the fictitious name ot
, 'ii c Suuthwcst 50th Lane, Miami,
.13166, intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
D.wii.u oi'ARAZSole Owner
M. LESTER SAAL
Attorney for Applicant
City National Bank Bldg.
West Flagler Street
1 r*..it.*t


January 16, 1976
* Jen 1st ncric&ain
Page 15-B
Original Paintings and Sculpture
'eatured at Beth Am Art Shoiv
iple Beth Am Sisterhood's
hi art exhibit and sale will
p Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at
emple's social hall. A wine
fiors d'oeir*rs nartv is in-
in the plans for the eve-
Iginal oils, watercolors,
graphs and sculpture by
LEGAL NOTICE
fc CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
Judicial circuit in and
jdade county, florida
|al jurisdiction division
CASE NO. 76936
bTICE BY PUBLICATION
Hit- Miirriac' I "
CANNON, wife and
fjoK CANNON, husband
llI.I.Y JOE CANNON
JamM Cannon
]fi-67 South Palm River Road
impa. Florida
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
J Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
inas been filed against you and
Vr-' hereby required to serve a
bf vour answer or other pleading
i ivtition on the wife's Attorney,
|ER ROGERS, whose address is
|Tw. 17 Avenue. Miami, Florida
; and file the original with the
' of the above styled Court on or
* this 20th day of February 1976,
[Default will be entered against
rED this lith day of Jan.. 197S.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By G. FREDERICK
1/16-23-30 2/6
notice of action
jonstructive service
^ (no property)
Ihe circuit court of the
eventh judicial circuit
>f florida in and for
dade county
fCIVIL ACTION NO. 76-825
_ERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IE THE MARRIAGE OF:
fDKE VAUOES ESCOBAR.
Petitioner,
IS FERNANDO ESCOBAR,
Respondent.
l.l'IS FERNANDO ESCOBAR
C.irrera 9 Number 927 Marsella
Hisaralda. Columbia S.A.
|Ol' ARE HEREBY NOTrFIED
|t an action for Dissolution of Mar-
p,. his been filed against you and
i are required to serve a copy of
Ir written defenses, if any. to It
[SAUL T. VON ZAMFT, attorney
I Petitioner, whose address is 1320
Dixie Highway, Suite 850 Coral
1.1 ... Florida, 33146. and file the
_?inal with the, clerk of the above
LI-ci court on or before 20th Febru-
Ar. 1976; otherwise, a default will.be
Itered against you fbr the relief de-
>nded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
.ch week for four consecutive weeks
[THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
SV1TNESS my hand and the seal of
Jd court at Miami. Florida on this
dav of January, 1916.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Da da County. Florida
By S. PARRISH
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
,AULT. VON ZAMFT
320 S. Dixie Highway. Suite 850
oral Gables Florida SSM6
Attorney for Petitioner
Phone: 667-4878
1/16-23-38 2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7.10
(GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I IN RE: The Marriage of
[ MARC-ALAN COOPER, Petitioner
and
BONNIE KATHER1NE BEACH
COOPER, respondent.
TO: BONNIE KATHERINE
I: EACH COOPER
309 West 9!'th Street, Apt. 6-B
N -w York New York lO'i'Ja
"YOT ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. u> it
on JKRRY A. BURNS, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 933 City
National Bank Building. Miami. Flor-
ida 831J8 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before Feb. 20. 1976; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
13th day of January. 1876.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G, FREDERICK
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JERRY A. BURNS
933 City National Bank Building
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney far Petitioner
1/16-28-30 2/6
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAVA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of A. G. OSTER & ASSOCIATES at
14930 S. Spur Drive, Miami, 33161 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ALLEN O. OSTER
1/4.6-23-30 /
Dali, Rouault, Miro and Bou-
langer will be displayed as well
as photos, jewelry, paintings
stainless-steel sculpture and
other pieces by Miami area art-
ists.
0RT Leader Dewey Knapp
To Be Honored in New York
Among the ten ORT leaders
who will be honored at the 1976
National Conference ot the
American ORT Federation is
Mia-nian Dewey Knapp.
The conference is scheduled
to take place "t ri A"-'<"ana
Hotel in New York from Friday,
Jan. 29, through Sunday, Feb.
1, according to Harold Fried-
man of New York, president of
the 140,000-member organiza-
tion^__________________________
lEGAt NOTia
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I "W
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of NECKS APPEAL at 8950 S.W. 69th
Court, Miami. Florida 33156 in'*"rt* to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
LINDA BARON
KOMMEL. ROGERS. LORBER
& SHENKMAN
Attorneys for Linda Baron
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
____________________1/16-23-30 2/8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of GEORGE GREENE ORCHESTRA
at 1950 N.E. 169 Street, North Miami
Beach. Fia. 33162 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Ceurt of Dade County. Florida.
GEORGE GREENBERO
1/16-23-30 1/6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
NO. 75-8048
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EMMA JANE LEE
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONg INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of EMMA JANE LEE, deceased. File
Number 75-8046, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court of the Eleventh Judicial
Circuit of Florida in and for Dade
County. Florida, Probote nivislv 'he
address of which is T3 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of this estate is
JAMES 8. I.EE. whose address is 334)
Northeast 156th Street. Miami. Flor-
ida. The name and address of the
attorney for the personal representa-
tive are set forth below.
AU persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE, te file
with the clerk of the cort a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim muat be
in writing and must indicate the ba-
sis for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the -laim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed, the claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
AH persons interested In the estate
to whom a copy <>f this Nothje. of
Administration has been mailed a>-e
rwiavrad, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE ETRST
PUB1 ICATJON OF THIS N< .TTCE.
to file any objections they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedent's will the oualil'i
the personal renresentative. or the
vru or jurisdiction of thi- court.
Firs! published on: January 16th,
1976.
JAMES 8. I-EE
As Personal Renresentative of the
Estate of EMMA JANE DEE.
Deceased
JOSEPH J. GEROTI--V
By DAVID GERSTEN
Of Law Offices of
Joseph J Oersten
1050 Spring Garden Road
Miami. Florida 33136
ATTORNEYS FOR
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVB
1/16-23
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage m
bmdness under the fictitious name of
THE HIDDEN CORNER BOUTIQUE
at number 7029 S.W. 46th Street In
the City of Miami, Florida intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
of 4he Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this ....
day of December ls'S
TODAYS I/K)K. INC..
a Florida Corporation
LAW OFFICES OF
KURT WELLISCH
161 Almeria Avenue Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
(445-7954)
Attorney for Applican^M_i/j_f_u
Forte Forum
At the Jan. 20 meeting of the
Forte Forum-George N. Caylor
Forum, at 1 p.m. in the 1200
West Ave. Auditorium, John
McDermott will talk on "The
Battle for the White House
1976."
McDermott, political editor
of the "Miami Herald" since
1952, was a war correspondent
and a foreign correspondent.
NOTICE UNDER
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOT HE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring engage
In buaineae under the fictitious name
of WILSON'S ROOST in Dade I'ounty.
Florida, Intends tn register said name
with the Clerk "f the Circuit Court of
Dade Count v. Florida.
WAI.D CORPIIRATU IN
By: J I Wilson. President
HARRIS SIRKIX. PA.
Attorneys for Applicant
"ith Floor Dade Federal Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33131
1/16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of TRACERS INCORPORATED at
12550 Blscayne Blvd.. Suite 302. North
Miami, Fla. 33181 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County Florida.
FLORIDA TRACERS
INCORPOR ATED
A Fla. Corp.
1/16-2S-30 2/6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-605
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELAINE NORTH.
Petitioner,
and
CASS I! NORTH.
Respondent.
TO: CASS R. NORTH
Condominium Velero. Apt. 702
1070 Costera Aleman
Acapulco. Mexico. N.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy ol
vour written defenses. If any. to it on
HARLAN STREET. PA attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 12708
Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 410, North
Miami Florida 33181 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on ox before Feb. 12. 1976:
otherwise a default will be enter/1
against you for the relief demanded
in the complalot or petition.
This notice shall ke published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
W'lTNES* my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
8th day of Jan.. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cleric. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G. FREDERICK
As Depaty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARLAN STREET, PA.
11700 Biscayne Blvd.Suite 410
North Miami. Florida 33161
Attorney for Petitioner
891-5852
1/16-23-30 2/6
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice ia hereby give ntfcat the un-
dersigned, Ed Gordon Enterprises.
Inc. desiring to engage in bualmw
under the fictitious name. THE
FASHION CONSPIRACY intends to
register said name with the Clerk ot
the Circuit Court of Dade Coemty.
Florida.
ial KD GORDON ENTERPRISES.
INC.
By: Edwin H. Gordon. Pres.
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-7747
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIV'SION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
KAREN SEE CASSADY, a/k/a
KAREN SUB MEMON.
Petitioner
and
MOHAMED MEMON.
Respondent
TO: MOHAMED MEMON
(residence unknown)
TOE ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you aad
you are required to aenre a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it on
ANGELO A. AIJ. attorney^ for Pe-
Utioner. whose address is Suit* IN
Roberts Building. 28 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the ahove
styled court en or before JanvMry 30.
1976: otherwise a default will a* en-
tered against you tor the reliof de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI/ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand aad The aeal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this lS'h day ef December. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPBLAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal!
ANGEIvO A. A LI
Suite 400. Roberts Building
28 West Flagler Street
Miami Florida 33130
Attorney for Petltlonar^^^
Mrs. Faye Brucker, who was honored as president of Sis-
terhood of Temple Beth Raphael at the temple's tenth
anniversary celebration at the Deauville, lights the can-
dles while Rabbi Elliot Winograd watches.
Hallandale Jewish Center Installing New Officers
Rabbi Harry E. Schwartz will Dreyfuss, Charles Feit, Joseph
install new officers and direc-
tors this evening at 8 during
services at Hallandale Jewish
Center-Congregation Beth Te-
fila.
Officers to be installed arej
Myer Pritsker, president; Bern-
ard Kramer, Hyman Cohen, Dr.
Sidney Esterton and Nathan
Bolasny, vice presidents; Dr. '
Nathan Sudnow, treasurer; Irv- [
ing Solomon, secretary; Jack i
Stillman. serceant-at-arms.
The new members of the
board of directors are Jad'
Burstein. Henry Derman. Joseph,
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Optn vc" Pa1- C'osc-d fabbrfh
l/0 SW 5?tr. Avenue
Phone 2*6-2S8o
Frank, Leon Mitteldorf, William
Seitles and Edward Zimmerman.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Stf>u)| tke Jtauh Community since 1831
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
____ __^ mfORM stuview
Emjnutl G.Hon (I94S) Hit 6o.*tn
Mjtry6onJon(l9M) limn B Gwdon
Telephone 858-56 ,__
Levitt 0
memorial chaoels
tan i.-ae* "!9;J?'**? *g-
Hliywe. N.rth MUml. Ha.
tft-7209 to 1'>
fenny L.vlH, f.O. At Layt.n, P.O.
PALMER'S
MONUMENT COMPANY/
IN
MIAMI
BEACH l
Coll JEfferson 1-7677
fVNEXAL HOUS
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
Edward T. Newman. F.D.
mSONAJJZlD MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CHATTED
notntwoRRfHor
4444921-4444922
3279 S.W. Sth ST.. MIAMI
f JEFFER
FUNERAL HOMES. INC.
OnKTOTS
IrwiflJtfle' MeAwnJeflei mjew.
IN ft*W YORK
IM-n MUM M H01US II ft*
1283 C8W ISUN0 Wf BKLfft. ft
212/776-8100
m rionoA
(M0C COUNTY I3385 Xlf HW
947-1185 .*"i*" !3
gHOWAflO COUNTY I92I PtM8R0
925-2743 "-.o.-.j *
PA1M KACH COUNTY 62% S 9Ut M
1-925-2743*-
. MUM*
',... o..'ir<> I
,iht if..' 'Ad ) ->
0
When a loss occurs
away from home.
wm Murniis
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt. F.O.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.


Page
Page 16-B
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Our Dairy Department Has It All...
QUALITY.. .VARIETY... FRESHNESS!
Discover our large variety of
imported and domestic products .
always fresh and sensibly priced.
SINAI KOSHIR _
Franks or Knocks ".Sri09
HEBREW NATIONAL SLICED SALAMI OR
Bologna S&75'
BONUS SPECIAL!
BORDEN
Sour Cream
PINT
CONT.
LIMIT TWO PINTS. PLEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FLO-SUN GRAPEFRUIT OR
Orange Juice..............4cm $1
OROf N COLORED OR WHITE (CHEESE FOOD)
American Singles V'z 99*
MRS. FILBERT'S
Margarine Qtrs. 2 & $1
ORDf N NATURAL SLICED
Muenster Cheese *79*
FISHER'S PART SKIM
Longhorn Cheese ISSM0*
ASSORTED FLAVORS BORDEN
Yogurt.........4 cu4 99c
SnVKE APPETIZER DEpY |
AVAIlAtlf ONir AT STOMS VITM KtVId COUNTIM
All IUNCM MIAT t CWBI SUCIO TO 0Dt
FRESHLY
Smoked Sable
(CARP) V^# HALF
LARSBORG IMPORTED OANISH BAI
Swiss Cheese .ST 99*
MEDIUM OR
Rare Roast Beef. ff 99*
AXELROO'S DIIICIOUS
Farmer Cheese....................u.*l
FRESHLY MADE POTATO. COLE SLAW OR
Macaroni Salad..................M.59*
RICH'S CATERING
Turkey Breast St 89'
BOHUS SPECIAL! SAVE 34'
ONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 92
ON 2 PACKAGES
Salami or
na
AMERICAN
KOSHER
MIDGET
12-OZ.
CHUB
LIMIT TWO PKGS PLEASE. WITH OTHER
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EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Finest (Jimlily
MEATS 4 POULTRY
USDA CHOICE
Beef Rib Steak
Small End Bnls.
8D $239lt
SLICED
Beef Liver l 79c
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Quarters lB 59<
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer parts lB 99<
ONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 48'
ON 2 CANS
FRUIT & HONEY
SUNSHINE KRISPY
Crackers
Fruit
Cocktail
16-OZ.
CAN
MIT TWO CANS PLEASE WiTh OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
16-OZ.
PKG.
C SALTED OR
UNSALTED
Orange Juice
5 sss 99c
BIRDS EYE
FROZEN
P.P. BRAND
Frozen Waffles 2 .39*
LIMIT ONE PKG PLEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MUSSELMANS
Apple Sauce______ZS&9*
DELICIOUS
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ALL VARIETIES
Manischewitz Soup ^z 39'
WONDERFUL
FRESH BAKED GOODS
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OH1INIHMI1
WE WELCOME
FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY, JANUARY 17th,
AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES
IN DADE COUNTY, EXCLUDING
FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
520 COLLINS AVI. MIAMI BEACH
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Pick your mm fresh
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27 SIZE O FOR f}^f
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Oranges 10 ro. 49c
P.P. BRAND
Mixed Fruit .oxz89c
Mclntosh Apples3BlABc59c
FOR BAKING AND FRYING
Idaho Potatoes 5 .: 69{
WONOERFUL FLAVOR TOP QUALITY
D'Anjou Pears&l FRESH AND TENDER
Broccoli

BUNCH
SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SEAFOOD
SERVICE COUNTERS
"~1
OOO
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
Mackerel
OO LB.
WE RESERVE THE RtGHT TO l.M.T QUANTITIES. NONE $OLD TO OEALIR$.
FLORIDA CAUGHT
Yellowtail........... *1'
FLORIDA CAUGHT
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** L. R^B
FLORIDA CAUGHT
Pompano
I

->


Friday, January 16, 1976
vJewlst) fkridTfari
Page 17-B
rain Dea th Becomes Acceptable
As a Jewish Criterion of Death
David Waxman To Head GM JF
Commision on the Elderly
By HENRY W. LEVY
NEW YORK Starting off
with the concept that Judaism
has a "bias for life" a group of
over 100 rabbis and scholars in
related fields such as law and
medicine discussed the "Jew-
ish View of Life and Death" at
a seminar at the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America
here.
The meeting was held under
the joint auspices of the Rab-
binical Assembly's Committee
on Bioethics and the Committee
on Jewish Law and Standards.
AT THE seminar, it was gen-
erally agreed that Jewish tradi-
tion would accept "brain death"
as a criterion of death. Since
the cessation of brain activity
also means the cessation of
spontaneous breathing and
heart beat, the newer criteria
are not opposed to those found
in traditional Judaism.
The speakers at the seminar
were Rabbi Seymour Siegel,
.professor of theology at the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
and also chairman of the Rab-
binical Assembly's Committee
on Jewish Law and Standards,
and Rabbi Daniel Goldfarb, a
recently ordained rabbi, who is
a lecturer on law and associate
director of the Legislative Re-
search Fund of Columbia Uni-
versity, Rabbi Stanlev Kessler,
of West Hartford, Conn., chair-
man of the Rabbinical Assem-
bly's Committee on Bioethics,
presided.
THE ESTABLISHMENT of
"brain death" as a criterion,
said Rabbi Siegel, was of par-
ticular significance in the case
of transplants. Patients who are
potential donors who are on
respirators or heart machines,
can be tested for signs of spon-
taneous breathing and heart
beat by removing the ap-
paratuses for a short while.
If there is no spontaneous
respiratory activity, and there
is evidence of brain death, then
the patient can be presumed to
be dead.
The machines can then be
turned on again "in order to
maintain the freshness of the
organs destined for replanting.
In continuing these procedures,
we are not restoring life, but in
truth ventilating and circulating
the blood of an unburied corpse.
The absence of spontaneous
breathing and heart beat to-
gether with the comatose state
is sufficient to determine the
presence of death."
This, Rabbi Siegel observed,
would not apply to the Karen
Quinlan case because by all
criteria she is alive. The prob-
lem in the famous case is
whether it is allowable by
ethical guidelines to allow the
patient to die.
WHILE Judaism is opposed
to euthanasia, there are grounds
to legitimate the withdrawal of
means which prevent the ar-
rival of death. This is a form
of "passive euthanasia" which
Jewish sources leave room for
though they are definitely
opposed to active euthanasia,
that is, directly killing a living
patient even though he may be
in pain.
Rabbi Goldfarb, speaking out
of his legal and rabbinical train-
ing, said "we must keep pace
with scientific development,"
citing laws in various states
which call for determining
death in the light of new medi-
cal knowledge.
As a direct outgrowth of the
conference, Rabbi Goldfarb tes-
tified at a hearing called by the
New York State Assembly to
determine a statmory definition
of death.
HE SAID, "The thrust of
medical developments makes it
increasingly clear that in cer-
tain cases, brain function is the
appropriate measure of life and
death.
"On the basis of my own
study, and consultation with
leading members of the Rab-
binical Assembly, I have con-
cluded that the determination
of death on the basis of a mea-
surement of the cessation of
brain function, in situations
where responsible medical opin-
ion indicated its propriety,
would be consistent with Jew-
ish law."
Yosef Urges
Rabbinate Dissolve
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Josef is calling for the dissolu-
tion of the present Chief Rab-
binate and Chief Rabbinate
Council to be followed by new
elections for both bodies.
He is making the proposal in
radio and television interviews,
apparently in response to a
proposal by the director general
of the Religious Affairs Ministry
to abolish the traditional dual
Chief Rabbinate in Israel and
elect a single Chief Rabbinate
to serve both the Sephardic and
Ashkenazic communities.
YOSEF and his Ashkenazic
counterpart, Chief Rabbi Shlo-
mo Goren, were elected in 1972
for five-year terms. The two
have been feuding constantly
ever since and their public
quarrels have hampered the
functions of the Chief Rab-
binate.
The 10-member Chief Rab-
binate Council has consistently
supported Goren in W.J disputes
with Yosef and the latter has
boycotted Council meetings,
charging that the Council was
packed with Goren's men, Un-
der law, the two Chief Rabbis
serve as cochairmen of the
Council.
Yosef is adamantly opposed
to abolishing the dual Chief
Rabbinate. He said it would
destroy a 400-year tradition and
be a grave historical error.
HE ALSO accused Goren of
creating discord between them.
Goren, who is recovering from
a heart ailment, has made no
comment but sources close to
him said that Yosefs remarks
were "prejudicial to the honor
of the Torah."
Were new elections to be held,
Yosef is fairly certain to win
the Sephardic nomination since
he enjoys the support of virtual-
ly all Sephardic rabbis and reli-
gious lay leaders in the Sephar-
dic community.
Goren's chances are less cer-
tain, observers here say.
THE FORMER Chief Chap-
lain of Israel's armed forces en-
joyed great popularity when he
was elected Ashkenazic Chief
Rabbi in 1972 but his support
has eroded since then.
Hebrew Academy Students
Observing Tu B'Shevat
Students of the Greater Mi-
ami Hebrew Academy will plant
trees at the main entrance to
the Miami Beach school today
at 10 a.m. in observance of Tu
B'Shevat, the Jewish Arbor
Day.
Because the holiday, observed
on the 15th day of Shevat, falls
on the Sabbath this year, the
tree-planting must be done on
Friday, explained Rabbi Alexan-
der S. Gross.
Rabbi Gross, principal of the
Hebrew Academy, recently re-
turned from Israel, where he
conferred with American and
Israeli day school educators and
other educational officials.
The Hebrew Academy stu-
dents will plant trees native to
Israel, Florida and to the United
States in 1776, according to
Judge Norman Ciment, presi-
dent of the school.
' fjnee the establishment of
Jewish agricultural settlements
in Palestine in the late 19th
century, the festival of Tu B'-
Shevat, the New Year of Trees,
has acquired great significance,
symbolizing the revival and re-
demption of the land in Israel
by the conquest of the desert,
Rabbi Gross noted.
Postal Service
To Assist
Alien Residents
The United States Postal Serv-
ice is cooperating with the Im-
migration and Naturalization
Service in assisting all aliens to
comply with the Alien Address
Report requirements.
E. H. Daws, Sectional Center
Manager/Postmaster of Miami,
said that report cards (Form I-
53) are now available at local
post offices, branches and clas-
sified stations throughout South
Florida.
In compliance with the 1952
Immigration and Naturalization
Act, each alien residing in the
United States as of January 1,
1976, must report his or her cur-
rent address not later than Jan-
uary 31, 1976.______________
Mizrachi Women
B & P Chapter president
Sophie Rossman has announced
a chapter luncheon meeting at
the home of Rose Shapiro on
Sunday, Jan. 18, at noon. Bea
Young, national AMW vice
president, will review a current
book.
6 to to
Aviva-Kinneret Chapter presi-
dium, Fanny April and Sophie
Schraeger, have scheduled a
regular meeting and bingo party
for Monday, Jan. 19, at 1 p.m.
at the First Federal Bank on
S.W. 27th Ave. Chairmen are
Tillie Emmer and Freda Apta-
kin; hostesses are Rose Gru-
berg and Tillie Saal.
to to to
Shoshana Chapter president
Rose Shapiro has called all
members to a luncheon meeting
on Thursday, Jan. 22, at noon
in the Rotunda Room of Sea-
coast Towers North.
to to to
Florida Council presidents
and executives of the board will
meet on Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 10
a.m. at headquarters. Announce-
ment was made by Francine
Katz, president.
to to to
Hadar Chapter president Lil-
lian Chabner has announced a
regular meeting at the Wash-
ington Federal Bank Building
on Normandy Dr., on Wednes-
day, Jan. 28, at 12:30 p.m.
David A. Waxman has been
appointed director of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation's
central commission on the eld-
erly, it was announced by My-
ron J. Brodie, GMJF executive
vice president.
"Mr. Waxman brings to the
newly organized commission
diversified experience in the
areas of social planning and
Jewish communal service," said
Brodie. "His appointment in-
dicates a major step which Fed-
eration is taking in its program
to effectively alleviate the prob-
lems of the elderly."
A subcommittee of the GMJF's
planning and budgeting com-
mittee, the central commission
on the elderly reviews, coor-
dinates and consults on all
existing and proposed programs
and allocations for the elderly,
and develops and arranges for
the initiation of new services.
A social planning consultant
for the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies of New York for
the past three years, Waxman
has been a planner for the Hu-
man Resources Administration
in New York City and a super-
visor of the city's Department
of Social Services.
WAXMAN is a member of
the Academy of Certified Social
Workers, the National Confer-
ence on Jewish Communal Serv-
ice and the National Conference
on Social Welfare.
"Federation's agencies al-
DAVID A. WAXMAN
ready serve thousands of elder-
ly in North Dade, South Dade
and Miami Beach," said GMJF
president Harry B. Smith. "But
despite all of our efforts, we
have barely provided the basic
life-sustair'nu services."
Richard D. Levy, chairman of
the central commission on the
elderly, said that "the addition
of Mr. Waxman to our staff of
trained social workers will
prove a tremendous asset to our
efforts in achieving unprece-
dented service goals for the eld-
erly."
Pioneer Women Will Launch
Inaugural Conference At
Bond-With-Israel Brunch
Pioneer Women from through-
out South Florida will attend
the Pioneer Women Bond-with-
Israel brunch on Monday, Feb.
23, at the Eden Roc Hotel.
The event, on behalf of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign, will launch
the 1976 International Israel
Bond Inaugural Conference
scheduled for Feb. 26-28, to be
attended by Ambassador to the
UN Chaim Herzog and Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
Foreign Affairs Yigal Allon.
According to Milton M. Par-
son, executive director, South
Florida Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, "We are grateful that these
women representing South Flor-
ida Pioneer Women's Clubs
have taken this opportunity to
initiate what we hope will be
a record number of Israel Bond
purchases in 1976, when Israel
faces anti-Zionism, a serious
balance-of-payments deficit and
a devaluation of the pound."
Parson offered a special thank
you to Mrs. Milton Green, presi-
dent of the Pioneer Women
Council of South Florida and
national chairman of the Golden
Jubilee National Biennial Con-
vention, which in October mark-
ed the 50th anniversary of Pio-
neer Women, for her work in
organizing and mobilizing the
membership.
Mrs. Green, a national board
member and former national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation, received the
State of Israel Masada Award at
last year's Bond-with-Israel
brunch.
Governor Shapp Will Open |
Emanu-El Bicentennial Forum
Gov. Milton J. Shapp of Pen-
nsylvania, a candidate for the
1976 Democratic Presidential
nomination, will speak at Tem-
ple Emanu-El of Miami Beach
on Sunday, Jan. 25, in the open-
ing session of the congregation's
Bicentennial Forum series.
An industrialist and philan-
thropist, Gov. Shapp will pre-
sent a 30-minute outline of his
national and international pro-
gram proposals, following a 10
a.m. breakfast in the Mural
Room, according to Judge Fred-
erick N. Barad, president of
Temple Emanu-El.
A 20-minute question-and-
answer period will follow Gov.
Shapp's talk, and there will be
a news conference in the tem-
ple's executive board room at
11:45.
Shapp was elected Governor
of Pennsylvania in 1970, the
first Jew to hold that office.
He is also the first Pennsylvania,
governor ever to win reelection
(1974).
In 1966 Shapp won the Dem-
ocratic nomination in a major
upset, but narrowly lost in the
general election. He received
national acclaim in 1974, when
his personal intervention helped
settle a truck drivers' strike
that was crippling much of the
country. His appointment of
Pennsylvania Insurance Com-
missioner Herbert Denenberg in
his first term gained favorable
publicity.
During the Kennedy Admin-
istration Shapp was a consul-
tant to the Peace Corps and to
the U.S. Department of Com-
merce on area development
problems.
Yivo Forum
On Wednesday, Jan. 28, at 8
p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom,
Dr. Saul Goodman, professor at
the Jewish Seminary in New
York, will speak to the Yivo
Forum on Bal Shemtov and
Martin Buber.
On Wednesday, Feb. 4, at 8
p.m. Dr. Goodman's topic will
be "Jewish Creativity in Two
Cultures: Sephardic and Ash-
kenaszi."


Fa
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Friday, January l; 19^
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Hebrew Educators Alliance Mhtmi Observes
'Aet of Worship'
Observing Tu B'Shevat
An address by the former Is-
rieli Ambassador to the Philip-
pines, a film depicting the UN
vote on Zionism and entertain-
ment will highlight the annual
Tu B'Shevat party of the He-
brew Educators Alliance, co-
sponsored by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund and the Central
Agency for .Jewish Education on
Sunday, Jan. 18. at 8 p.m. at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion building.
Yaakov Avnon. on special as-
signment from the Israel For-
eign Ministry to the Jewish
community of the United Stai- S,
will speak to more than 100 He-
brew teachers on the political
situation in the Middle East.
Avnon, who emigrated to Israel
from Poland in 1937, served in
tV British Army during World
War II where he commanded a
company in the Jewish Brigade.
H ioined the Haganah follow-
ing the war, and was assigned to
t : Central Command Staff,
reaching the rank of Sgan Aluf.
Avnon has served in diplo-
matic posts in Stockholm. Los
Angeles and Sierre Leone before
g"ing to the Philippines from
J968 to 1972.
Following Avnon's address.
th? group will see the film "The
ON Proceedings: Anti-Zionist
Resolution," which details the
events of the day of the UN
vote.
The Tu B'Shevat festival will
be marked by Israeli singing
led by Shlomo Geva, and a
renast of the fruits of Israel
associated with Tu B'Shevat.
Today
Jwstice Rateheft Te Keynote
Abess Award Luncheon
YAAKOV AVNON
Zehava Sukenik, president of
the Hebrew Educators Alliance,
will chair the gathering, with
greetings offered by a repre-
sentative of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education. Nily Fa-
iic. educational consultant for
the Jewish National Fund, will
report on current JNF proj-
ect'-, including the forest to be
planted near Jerusalem in ob-
servance of the American Bi-
centennial.
Serving with Mrs. Sukenik on
the executive committee of the
Hebrew Educators Alliance are
vice presidents Dror Zadok and
Gladys Diamond, secretary Shu-
a Ben-David and treasurer
C^ava Porush.
The City of Miami's third
annual City Under One God Act
of Worship will take place at
noon today at the Bayfront Au-
ditorium.
Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre
has said "As our country pre-
pares to observe its 200th anni-
versary, we in the City of Mi-
ami believe this is an appro-
priate moment to pay our res-
pect to those virtues which
have nourished and sustained
us through the years.
"Each of us," the Mayor con-
tinued, "must look within our-
selves for that inner strength
which flows only from a deep
and abiding spiritual faith and
a commitment to a power great-
er than ours."
CHAIRPERSON of the event
is the Rev. Canon Theodore R.
Gibson, a member of the Mi-
ami City Commission. Joining
him are representatives of the
religious community Rabbi Sol
Landau, Father John Edwards,
Rev. H. Wight Kirtley, Rev. Max
Salvador, and Rev. Martin
Anorga.
Vonda Van Dyke, a former
Miss America and a Miami resi-
dent, will sing inspirational
songs she has written.
JOSEPH HATCHETT
Florida Supreme Court jus
. t ,owph Hatchett will be the
ke>r Leonard L. Abess Human Rela
ttMK Award luncheon. .,,
sored ny the Florida Ktj,onal
MR! ol the Anti-Delarrntion
Leftgm -if B'nai B'rith, at the
al Hotel on Jan. 25.
v Elizabeth Virrick will
receive the Abess Award for
ixiraordinary service to
"t ptcple of Miami which has
d several decades of
volunteer leadership in a variety
('. causes dedicated to the im-
< -rent of the lives of the
dfcadvantaged."
T.-.t Award carries with it a
SJ 000 research grant in human
.1 s. contributed bv Miami
philanthropist Leonard L. Abess,
:r -,cnor of the recipient ol the
. ward
Miss Lipschitz and Mr, Schochet
Will Marry in JVew York
Miami Family Has Operated
Slimmer Camps for Years
Camp Wohelo for girls. Camp
Comet for Boys and Comet
Trails for teenage boys are lo-
cated in the Blue Ridge Moun-
tains of Pennsylvania. For the
past 48 years the camps have
been owned and operated by
the Levy family of Miami. Ber-
tha Levy founded Camp Wohelo
in 1929 and tooK many girls
from the Miami area each sum-
mer.
"In those days it was a long
train ride to our camp from
Miami," recalls Morgan Levy,
the director. "Now we are
proud to have over fifty girls
and boys from the Miami area
flying to our camps in just a
short four-hour trip by plane
and bus."
The ca/nps have grown from
1? girls in 19"9 to 175 girls at
Camp Woh-jlo. ISO boys at Camp
tomet art 75 bpys at Comet
Trails. The camps are complete-
ly separate, each having its own
pool, lake, mess hall, and ath-
L-tic facilities.
"Tennis is one of our activi-
ties thai we stress in our eight-
week proa;ajn," continued the
Plorida i; actor. "We have 19
lighted courts with ball ma-
chines, intant-replay TV, prac-
tice wills and nationally' rank-
ed players as instructors. This
is not only a great sport for
young people. They can con-
tinue a all through their adult
lives.
"We offer a challenge to chil-
dren. ag?s 7-J6, to onioy a
camping experience that is not
totally oriented to social life.
Waterf.pnt activities including
water-skiing, boating, canoe
trips, rubber rafting and swim-
ming are taught and supervised
by 9 water-safety instructors at
each camp. Mountaiurchmbing
and backpacking are enjoved by
our older campers."
The boys' camps have a sci-
ence program involving ham
radio, photography, physics and
chemistry, rocketry, aviation
and electronics ... all planned
m a program of "Earning can
bs fun.
"Each camper must succeed
at our camps in some area of
our program. This plus good
supervision and a fun-filled
camping experience are the
keys to our success," says Mr.
A Florida Reunion is being
held at Greynolds Park, Rock
Shelter, on Sunday, Jan. 25, at
1 P.m. AH old campers, new
campers, prospective campers
and staff are invited.
The engagement of Rochelle
Judith Lipschitz to Stuart Scho-
chet has been announced by
her parents, Rabbi and Mrs.
Max A. Lipschitz of North Mi-
ami Beach. Mr. Schochet's par-
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Abraham
Schochet of New York City.
Miss Lipschitz, who is ma-
joring in psychology at Stern
College of Yeshiva University,
will be graduated in June. She
will enter NYU Graduate School
to study educational psychol-
ogy. She also attended the lie-
brew University in Jerusalem.
A magna cum laude gradu-
ate of Baruch College, from
whid he received the Beta
Gamma Sigma Award in market
earch, Mr. Schochet is com-
pleting work toward a Master's
decree in industrial psychol-
ogy at Baruch. He is a gradu-
al of the Manhattan Talmudlc
Academy of Yeshiva Univer-
sit
111 wedding will be held in
\- York in early sunnier.
nnn there will be a champagne
isctption at Beth Torah C'on-
- egation, where Dr. Lipschitz
is rabbi
JNF Sponsors Appreciation Brunch
South Dade Hebrew Acad-
emy is presenting a con-
cert of classical Israeli and
Jewish folklore on Sunday,
Jan. 18, at 8:30 p.m. at the
school's auditorium. Israeli
opera star Nora Feldman,
tenor Nico Feldman, and
Shmuel Fershko will per-
form, along with violinist
Bogdan Chruszez.
Abraham Grunhut, president
of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Rabbi Irv-
ing Lehrman, JNF Foundation,
have announced a JNF appre-
ciation brunch on Tuesday,
Jan. 27, at 11:30 a.m. at the
Fontainebleau Hotel, to honor
Miami Beach Chapter of Hadas-
sah presidents and JNF chair-
man.
Mrs. August Mentz, chair-
man, Women's Division, and
immediate past president of the
Miami Beach Chapter of Ha-
dassah. is chairperson of the
brunch.
Guests include Mrs. Maxwell
UoiHberg, Florida Regional Ha-
dassah president, and Mrs. Jean
Feirberg, president of the Mi-
ar.t) Beach Chapter of Hadas-
Mfl.
A series of such brunches are
being planned for all Zionist
groups who work with the Jew-
ish National Fund.
A Kosher Dining Israeli Folk Dance Classes
?

Jewish Song Festival At
New Performing Arts Theatre
The '.' orah Academy of South
Floriac. an I Mifal Hatorah arc
sponsoring 1 Cantonal and Is-
raeli Jims'; I oik Song Festival
at the \ .< Miami Beach Thea-
tre of the P.--forming Arts on
Mond;i' Jan. 26, at 8 p.m.
* Cantor Misiia Alexandrovich,
a terror who produced many rec-
, ords and gave thousands of
^concerts before fleeing the So-
y viet-ltefoo-waw called hy "The
New York Times" a "singer of
distinction."
Other artists appearing in the
program ana nianist-comoos^r
Shmuel Farshko, Matus Radzi-
vilover, who is known as th
"Last Vohliner Cantor," and
Shlomo Caslebaeh, the folk-
singer-cantor.
Chairman of the event is
Barry p. Sehfeiber. The guest
of honor is Joseph' Margulius of
Miami and Winnipeg.
Expevieuee
Th atrnosr>here is warm, the
)'<*htin s'llvhied, Israeli music
fills the background. And every
item on th menu is Glatt
(st-ictl"^ Kosher.
Th KosHor Steak Hous*. in
"v Sea Gull Hotel in Miami
Bch. nrnvide* a comfortable
and snacious "family dining"
atmosr>he*e.
TH? service is friendly, the
sjaff dtenifled that every
din-"- nn Th" Hir*hs have been in the
business of prenaring and serv-
ing Roshr food for nearly a
renfirv. jn the Old World and
th8 Nw. Before 1966. when
thv bw>nqht their long tradi-
tion to Miami Beach, thev had
oneratod a cat-ring establish-
ment in Brooklyn.
Rabbi NatHan Good-nun. serv-
*'' as a. rabbi in Monfioeflo
N.Y. h<5for~ Joining wjth Mena-
eho Hirsh in operating the Sea
c"'l Htl uni ononing. the
F<*b4F vision <; that fH*. ap-
ci?pt fw4 of food prc.np'-ation
nr>H thpa mo reentry en-
sued hs M^mi Beach ar-
aHHp.r-erl tn,.
The Ko^hr Steak Hoikh nf.
hr* sa|iuj har. and Fpanc*,
n^das fmadr* withqut an
dairy n^odtictel. br-aWs and
hreadsfk** are baked* daily on
the premises.
Beginning at Emami-El
A series of weekly classes in
Israeli Folk Dancing will be
held on Tuesday afternoons at
3:30 in the Mural Room of Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
Sandy Kuttler, yuth director
of the congregation, will con-
duct the two-hour classes.
Israeli folk dancing will be
covered from the pre-20th-cen-
tury Palestinian uance to the
choregraphies of modern dan-
cers.
Kuttler said danees chereo-
graphed by Devotah Lapson
Fred Berk. Moshiko, Moshe Es-
kavo. Shamo Bachar nd athere
will be taught. Many of the
dances are for couples.
Basics of folk dancing, the
Yemenite movements, the Chas-
sidac influences and Dm/ styl-
ing wilt be demonstrated by
Kuttier and his assistants.
There are between 200 and
300 different Israeli folk dances.
Kuttjer said, "and we hope to
be able to teach a representa-
tive number of them. A possible
outgrowth of this program will
be a performing group for those
interested."
Guest instructors will appear
oeceaonally. f he classes, geared
to high" school and college stu-
dents, are open to the public
without charge, according te
Judge Frederick rf. Barad, Tem-
ple Emanu-El president, and
anyone interested should con-
tact the temple office.

Tbc KEOEM Wme Family
Now Prisents
17 of World's Finest
KOSHER WFNES
Available at International Seer t Wine
Mth .fc Bint Road, Mlajni.Fk
.
KffDEI
. -..
- r-i'.
i
11
h
0
0
it
i


tnaay, January 10, iy/o
r '==c=
vjewisti ttortdUQn
fage iy-o

Psychiatrist To Conduct
AMW Florida Co uncil To Present
-
Professional Symposium Bronze Medallion Award to Sen. Chiles

Jevsish Family and Child
Senice today announced ry.v.-
posiuiii for the profesiiiocal
community conducted v- Dr
Jules Masserman.
Dr. Masserman, a psychiat-
rist; will speak on *'Tbi Fttn-
ciple of Uncertainty in Psy-
chiatry" on Monday. Fe*> 9, it
8 p.m. at the DuPont Plaza Ho-
tel.
Dr. Masserman's preservation
is the latest in a series of pro-
fessional symposia presented by
the Center for Family Life ind
Ghild Development of trre tan -
ish Famfiy and Children.'; Sacv-
ice.
Dr. Massiimanwas tri Md .;
musx at the Detroit CotW
ton. in pharmacy at Sand'-
College, in historv. phV.owK>Hv
and nvdicine at Wayne L'nii
sit v. in neurology at S:ar'-)rd.
in psychobiology ;t Johns Hep-
kins '..-. psychiatry at the Uni-
versity of Chicago and in psy-
choanalysis at the Chu '_
: llytic Institute.
He is professor and coc-.air-
man of the department -
chlatry and neurology at North-
western University, and i a
Fellow at the Center for Ad-
vanced Study in the Behavioral
Sciences in Palo Alto.
Dr. Masserman has received
Presidential citations and has
lectured throughout the United
States and in many foreign
countries, including the Soviet
Union and China.
He is the author at Behavior
and Neurosis, Principles of Dy-
namic Psychiatry. Psychiatry
East and West, A Handbook of
Psychiatric Therapies, and other
volumes, including an autobio-
graphy, A Psychiatric Odyssey.
He has published over 400
articles on subjects ranging
from music to neurology.
The initial support for the
establishment of the Center for
Family Life and Child Develop-
ment was provided through the
generosity of the late Emanuel
Pollack, vice president of the
board of directors of Jewish
Family and Children's Service,
to stimulate and offer oppor-
tunities for postgraduate educa-
tion, research and publication
in the helping professions. The
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and United Way of Dado
County support the service.
'.-
Prof. Dawulowicz To Discuss
Labor I uions' Jewishness
Lucy Dau'idowic:. professor
of social history at Vesl Uni-
versity. iii deJiver the Green-
field Institute LtoOWC 9VS Sun-
.'. morning at W a smple
Bel. Her topic is "TRe "eu-
Lshness of the American Labor
ns."
Prof. Dawidowic7. is author of
a new history of "The War
Against the Jews. 193.'.-1945."
many articles and book- with
Jewish themes, including the
recently reprinted "Politics in a
Pluralist Society," and "A Holo-
caust Reader," which is to be
published soon.
LUCY PAWTDOWICZ
Plans for the Pioneer Women's Golden Jubilee mission
to Israel in May are discussed at a reception in the of-
fices of the Pioneer Women Council of 'South Florida
welcoming Dov Kvlani, new director of tile Israel Gov-
ernment Tourist Office for the Southeastern United
States. Principals at the meeting are {fnmrleft) Elhanan
Segal, Southeastern Director of El Al Israel Airlines;
Mrs. Harriet Green, president of the Pioneer Women
Council; Israel Consul Jacob Goren, outgoing director of
the Atlanta-based Israel tourism office; and Kolani.
A
First Baneshares Names Kanter
To Board of Directors
ri~

i Joseph H. Kanter, a Miami
hanker, community developer,
industrialist and philanthropist,
has been elected .to the board
of directors of First Bancshares
Of Ffcrida, Inc. Thomas F Flem-
ing. Jr., chairman and presi-
dent,' made the announcement
and said- that Kanwr was also
**nkjd chairman of the finance
*imitt*.
tional Conference on Citizen-
ship, Washington, D.C0 a non-
profit organization chartered
by Congress, and is also na-
tional chairman of the Nation-
al Jewish Appeal. He is a past
chairman of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Combined
Appeal.'
Jn 19Sff Kanter .was selected
by. <'&awro^4uawine as -one
' Uwumm&i&t tow*
SEN. LAWTON CHILES
Jane tlsrhrr
To Marry
Andy Howard
Mrs. Debbie Uscher of Laud-
erdale Lakes has announced
the engagement of her daugh-
ter. Jane, to Andy Howard, son
of Councilman and Mrs. Sy
Howard, of Surfside.
Miss Uscher, daughter also
of the late Harry Uscher, will
receive a Bachelor of Science
degree in public relations from
the University of Florida in
March.
Mr. Howard is the assist-
ant to the director of market-
ing and advertising at Washing-
ton Federal Savings and Loan
Association.
Women's American
ORT Plans
Coral Gables Chapter will
meet on Wednesday. Jan. 21, at
1 pm. at the First Federal Sav-
ings Batik Building, SW 27th
Ave. and Coral Way.
President Estelle Stein will
preside, and Rabbi David Baron
of Temple Or Olom will speak
on "The Role of Women in Ju-
daism Today." Yetta Rogers is
hospitality chairman.
it- it it
Kendall Chapter plans a paid-
up membership party for- Sat-
urday. Jan. 24. at 8:30 p.m. at
the Imperial Pines Recreation
Room on North Kendall Drive.
The entertainment will be
Oriental dances. Enid Zerlin is
chapter president.
David Pinski
Culture Clnh
The Oneg Shabbos of the Da-
vid Pinski Culture Club at 7:30
this evening at the Ida Fisher
School Cafeteria will feature L.
Lasavin, author and corespond-
ent of the "Jewish Daily For-
ward," who will discuss "Jews
in Colonial America."
Folksinger Regina Bailin and
Paul Yanovsky have prepared
a program of Yiddish and He-
brew songs, and L. Ritterman
will read from Yiddish classics.
JChhur i pShScari; of aejfcu- la >$#$#*, JWitica,- *rta
At the 'Golden Jubilee ban-
quet ol tiic Florida Council of
American Mirrachi Women at
the Fontainehleau Hotel on
Sunday. PeU. 1. at 6:30 p.m.,
U.S. Senator I.ewton Chiles wi!!
receive1 the AMW Bronze Me-
dallion Award.
Senator Chiltfs is being hon-
ored for his service to his :i\-
low man and for his contribu-
tions to American Israeli
Friendship.
The presentation of the award
will be made by Mrs. Alfred
Stone*, member of the national
board of AMW and mother of
IS. Senator Richard Stone.
Francine Katz. president of
the Florida Council, has an-
nounced that Ros'yn Ness is
chairperson of the celebration
and that her committee consists
of members ol Shalvah Chap-
ter Roslyn Paul. Arleno Dlt-
Chek. Lana Goldberg, Nancy
Bldom and Sheila Weiss.
All 16 Florida chapter presi-
dents will be honored at the
event.
Westview Country Club was the scene of a recent
major Combined Jewish Appeal Israel trm en\
Fund event, the annual gathering of club Members idst-
ed for the Greater Miami Jewish Federations I97i
paign effort. Helping generate participation b;
were campaign general chairman L. Jules A\
and Mrs. Arkin, along with Westview CJA-IEF chair-
man Richard Wolf son and Mrs. Woljson.
....... .... .......
The State of Israel David Ben-Gurion Award was pr
sented to Mr. .and Mrs. Norman Sholk (center) at the
Beth David Congregation Israel Dinner of State at the
Konover Hotel by the congregation's spiritual leadt r,
Rabbi Sol Landau (left). Abbie Ben-Ari. representing
the State of Israel, was the keynote speaker.
JB6BPK H. KANTER
.*
Rabbi DoV Bldrtiek (rights spiritual leader of the Sky
Lake Synagogue, presents additional corttriblitwns by
his congregation to the 197b Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. The recent presentation con-
tinued the commitment to the synagogue's annual CJA-
1EV gathering in December: Richard Goldstein (left) of .
tft& Greater Miami Jewish Federation e*epressm me
oBrrmanityfts frwfcuaV for the Sky.-baker congareajBms' *
generosity. ^ JL
'-V


Pat
Page 20-B
vJewisti fhridiar
Friday, January 16, 1975


4



\~-
.' 1
Pictured at a recent planning luncheon for the Aviva
Hadassah Bicentennial Ball are (from left) Mrs. Peter
Millheiser, coordinator; Mrs. Morton Getz, Mrs. Leon-
ard Herman and Mrs. Richard Glatzer, committee
members.
JCC Town Hall Series
Opening With Jimmy Carter
Mr. Conald J. Reiff, president
of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida, has an-
MRS. GERALD P. SOLTZ
nounced that Mrs. Gerald P.
Soltz and Nathan Pritcher will
cochair the public affairs com-
mittee of the Jewish Community
Centers for the coming year.
Also working on the commit-
tee will be Mrs. Lily Stone, Mrs.
Roberta Shevin. Mrs. Rosflyn
Berrin, Mrs. Elaine Pittell, Mrs.
Karen Margulies, Mrs. Gloria
Greenspun, Mrs. Esther Gordon,
Mrs. Elaine Fleisher, Mark
Fried, Herman Goodman, Barry
Holeve, Bernard S. Mandler and
Allan Margolis.
This year first JCC public
affairs committee event will be
the Town Hall Series. When it
was inaugurated four years ago
by the JCC the series had Presi-
dential candidates George Mc-
Govern, Henry Jackson, Hubert
Humphrey, Edmund Muskie,
George Wallace and John Lind-
say participating and speaking
to over 10,000 people in the
Greater Miami area.
This year the committee will
present the Presidential Pri-
mary candidates individually
from the Democratic and Re-
publican Parties.
The candidates will be in-
volved in dialogue with the peo-
ple in the community, and the
public affairs committee sees
the series as an educational ex-
perience designed to help every-
one become more involved with
the key issues of the 1976 cam-
paign as well as with those seek-
ing nomination. In this way the
public will be able to make a
more intelligent decision with
respect to the Primary.
The first Presidential candi-
date scheduled for the Town
Hall Series is Jimmy Carter,
former Covernor of Georgia,
who will speak on Monday, Jan.
26, at 8 p.m. at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami.
Dade County Outstanding Citizens
Will Receive Awards in May
The annual Dade County Out-
standing Citizens Award com-
mittee has set the 29th awards
presentation date for Thursday,
May 6, at the Sheraton Four
Ambassadors.
The awards are made to one
man and one woman whose
civic performance has been
judged the most outstanding of
the preceding year.
The recipient cannot be an
elected or appointed official or
anyone receiving compensation
for his work. Nominations must
come from recognized civic and
service clubs.
Sponsor for the award is Sho-
lem Lodge No. 1024 of the B'nai
B'rith, and award patron is
Joseph M. Lipton, chairman of
the board of Dade Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association of
Miami.
The permanent judges are
George Beebe, associate pub-
lisher of the "Miami Herald,"
Ralph Renick, vice president of
WTVJ, and Fred K. Shochet,
publisher and editor of the
"Jewish Floridian."
All nominations should be
sent to Melvln J. Haber, co-
chairman, Outstanding Citizens
Awards Committee, Dade Fed-
eral Building.
Aviva Hadassah
Bicentennial Ball
An evening of poetry, music
and art will be presented at
Aviva Hadassah's Bicentennial
hall on Saturday, Jan. 24, at
7:30 p.m. at the Doral Country
Club.
Mrs. Peter Millheiser is co-
ordinator, and assisting her are
Mrs. Edw-in Steinberg, chair-
woman, and Mrs. Marvin Fried-
man with Mrs. Morton Getz and
Mrs. Richard Glatzer chairing
the evening's cultural presenta-
tions. Proceeds will benefit the
Hadassah Medical Organization.
Salute to Israel Brunch
Sunday at Mayfair Towers
The officers of the Men's and
Women's Clubs will receive the
State of Israel Solidarity Award
at the Mayfair Towers "Salute
to Israel" brunch on Sunday,
Jan. 18, at 10:30 a.m. in the
Mayfair Towers card room in
Surfside.
Special guest will be Israeli
entertainer Danny Tadmore.
who is also a lieutenant in the
Israel Defense Forces.
According to chairman Nor-
man Chusitt, "We are urging all
residents in Mayfair Towers to
join us for this significant event
and stand up and take part in
our answer to the Third World
nations who declared Zionism as
racism at the General Assembly
meeting by providing over-
whelming Israel Bond commi--
ments as our pledge."
The Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization has been
called upon by Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin to help finance
Israel's search for new sources
of energy through Israel Bonds
These funds will be utilized to
help meet Israel's energy needs
and explore for new energy
sources.
Milton M. Parson, executive
director, has called on Greater
Miami area complexes to hold
special meetings and provide
funds to establish new industries
and nroduce more energy for
Israel's economy.
Aviva Hadassah Bicenten-
nial Ball coordinator Mrs-
Peter Millheiser talks with
Mrs. Marvin Friedman,
commitee member.
Their Slogans
Tell the Story
"Our slogans tell our story,"
said Murray Bresky, president
of the Falls Kosher Chicken Co.
of South Fallsburg, N.Y. "The
words 'kosher clean' and 'raised
and dressed as Nature's Best'
appear in all our advertisements
and say it all as far as we are
concerned."
" 'Kosher clean,' said Bre-
sky, "refers to the way our
chickens are processed. Every
chicken in individually examin-
ed bofore, during, and after
slaughtering, inside and out, to
assure purity, quality, and
wholesomeness. These inspec-
tions are conducted under the
full-time supervision of our
learned rabbis and the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture."
"All processing is done with
continuously flowing cold wa-
ter, soaking, salting, draining,
three rinses and then quick
chilling for perfect freshness."
" 'Raised and dressed as Na-
ture's Best,' Bresky continued;
"refers to the way our chickens
are 'grown.' Most people don't
realize that the yellow coloring
of chickens comes from foods
introduced into a chicken's diet
specially for that purpose.
"Those foods have little or
no nutritional value for the
chicken. Furthermore," Bresky
said, "the government is con-
sidering banning all coloring
agents from meat and poultry
feed.
"On the other hand," said
Bresky, "our chickens, raised
in Amish country in Pennsyl-
vania, are a natural white. They
are raised in the healthiest en-
vironment and are fed only sub-
stances that are of nutritional
value. When we receive the
chickens at our plant, a
thorough check is made to gua-
rantee that there are no harm-
ful residues of pesticides, hor-
mone injections, or other un-
wholesome chemicals."
"We honestly believe," said
Mr. Bresky, "that our strictly
kosher natural white chicken is
a unique product in the kosher
field.
Mothers' March Leaders
Appeal for Money and Workers
With the 26th annual Moth-
ers' March on Birth Defects
coming up Jan. 25, Jewish lead-
ers of the March of Dimes-
sponsored countywide event
appealed for "more worktrs
and generous givers."
Mrs. Clair Weintraub, the
original Mothers' March chair-
person who is working in an
advisory capacity, said, "We
can still use loads of volunteers.
Just call the March of Dimes
office."
"The Mothers' March has a
goal of $64,000 this year," said
Mrs. Marty Cleveland, who is
chairperson for the third con-
secutive year.
Mrs. Cleveland pointed out
that, according to National
Foundation March of Dimes
statistics, 200,000 babies are
born each year with significant
birth defects.
"Funds raised are used for
research, patient care and
health education. Much of the
money raised stays right here
at our own Birth Defects Cen-
ter at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital," said Mrs. Cleveland.
Dr. Orlinsky To Speak At
Beth Am Tonight
Dr. Harry Orlinsky, Bible
scholar, will give his annual
lecture at Temple Beth Am as
part of this evening's service.
His topic is "The Making of the
BibleWhy Were Certain Books
Left Out? Why Were Others In-
cluded?"
Dr. Orlinsky, a past president
of the Society of Biblical Lite-
rature, is chairman of the com-
mittee for the New Translation
of the Torah, Jewish Publica-
tion Society. He is the only Jew
to be invited to serve on the
translation committee of the
"Holy Bible, Revised Standard
Version," the official Protestant
text in America.
Dr. Orlinsky has served as
professor of Bible at the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in New York
for over thirty years, and his
appearance here in Miami is
part of the college's Centennial
observance.
Dr. Orlinsky is author of
many books, including "Under-
standing the Bible Through
History and Archeology" and
"Essays in Biblical Culture and
Bible Translation."
Hillel Day School Students
Celebrate Tu B'Shevat
In preparation for Tu B'She-
vat, the Jewish New Year for
Trees, on Jan. 17, students at
the Hillel Community Day
School have purchased certifi-
cates from the Jewish National
Mind to have trees planted in
the American Bicentennial Na-
tional Park in Israel.
The children have studied
JNF's contributions of foresta-
tion, swamp-draining and road-
building, as well as the organi-
zation's employment of new im-
migrants to Israel.
A horticulturist spoke to the
students at an assembly about
when and how to plant trees
and care for them. As part of
Hillel's school building program
a number of trees and seedling
are being donated to the school,
where they will be planted bv
students in celebration of the
holiday.
Rabbi Albert Mayerfeld.
school principal, said that Tu
B'Shevat "underscores the ed-
ucational philosophy of the Hil-
lel Community Day School be-
cause it integrates an under-
standing and appreciation of
the Jewish heritage, a low of
the land of Israel, with the sci-
entific studies to be a good
American able to enjoy the en-
vironment."
Meeting recently to plan for the Sunday, Jan. 18, annual
art auction of Sisterhood of Temple Beth Sholom are
committee members (seated, from left), Jane Goodman,
Linda Binder, Sue Miller, Shirley Miller, Ruth Sackner;
standing (from left) are Jerrold Goodman, Niety Ger-
son, Arlene Albin, Lillian Zorn, Jane Robinson and Judy
Drucker. A cocktail party at 7:30 precedes the auction.
Gourmet Cookery
At Temple Judea
Temple Judea Sisterhood will
hold a brunch meeting on Jan.
21 at 10 a.m. at the temple.
Carole Kotkin, Food Editor of
Teacher and Student Exhibit
____At Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery
At the Lowe-Levinson Art
Gallery of Temple Beth Sho-
lom on Thursday, Jan. 22, from
7 to 10 p.m., teacher and stu-
dent will share in showing their
works.
The teacher is Gerald Glen
Winter, chairman of the art de-
vT 'nrMKOrot partment of the University of
"Miami Dming Out" magazine, Miami, who has hS one-man
will give a cooking demonstra- exhibitions in MilwauK St
tion and prepare a Souffle
Grand Marnier. Carole has
taught gourmet cooking:at Mi-
ami-Dade and is a partner in
Bobbie and Carole's Cooking
SchooL
Louis, Kansas City, Winter
Haven and at the Lowe Art Gal-
rva 1W^iami^ "?e holder '
BFA, MFA and MSA degrees,
he is the recipient of
awards.
several
Warren Ser, the student, is a
sculptor who is working toward
his MFA at Washington Univer-
sity (St. Louis) Graduate School
of Fine Arts, where he is a
graduate chief assistant in the
sculpture department. Ser, who
was born and raised in Miami
Beach, received a BFA from the
University of Miami in 1974.
A champagne reception will
mark the Jan. 22 opening of
the show, which will continue
through Feb. 15. Gallery hours
are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday; 9 a.m. to noon
on Saturday and Sunday.
.


I


Friday, January 16, 1976
vjewlsli ihrkfian
Page 2IB
Israel, Jewish People Glad to Wrap Up 1975
4%
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
NEW YORK (JTA) For
Israel and the Jewish people,
1975 could not have ended too
soon. It was a year of diplomatic
defeats for Israel and steam-
roller victories for the Arab-
Communist-Third World bloc.
It was a year of economic crisis
and political dissension in Is-
rael which threatened to split
the Alignment and the coalition
government.
It was a year when many
friends of the Jewish State
including the United States,
France, Sweden, Mexico, Chile
ani Brazil left Israel in the
lurch and capitulated to Arab,
Communist and Third World
pressure. It was also a year of
world wide economic crisis in
which many Jewish communities
were caught in an economic
crunch; in which the plight of
Soviet Jewry increased both in
terms of a nrecipitous decline
in emigration and in mounting' go right for Israel. The deep-
harassment and arrests of Jews
seeking to emigrate; and in
which detente veered off course
and threatened to collapse al-
together over the issue of An-
gola.
THE ONLY bright moments
for Israel and the Jewish world
was the second Interim Sinai
accord between Israel and
Egypt and the outpouring of
international solidarity between
Jewish communities and Israel
o^'er the issue of Zionism. Yet,
eve n these positive develop-
ments were darkened by anxiety
and fear regarding their long-
range consequences. The ramifi-
cations of all these develop-
ments will be manifested in full
scoDe in 1976 and confront Is-
rael and world Jewry with some
of the most crucial challenges
and fateful decisions since the
Jewish State came into exist-
ence.
In 1975, nothing seemed to
Led by chairman Jack Bellock (2nd from left), the resi-
dents of Aventura in North Dade have prepared a com-
plete schedule of events for the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund. Throughout January, Aventura leaders in-
cluding Dorothy Sandlofer (left), Mary Brody (2nd from
right) and Dave Fisher have scheduled education and
training meetings for residents. The campaign effort for
1976 will culminate in February with a major event to
be announced.
Julius Werbner (left), chairman of the 1976 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund at Century 21-
Admiral's Port in North Miami Beach, announces that
the complex's campaign will culminate Jan. 18 at the
Century 21 Tower Auditorium. Werbner is assisted in
this Greater Miami Jewish Federation effort by cochair-
person Phoebe Gould and a committee including Dr.
William Douglas (right). North Miami Beach philanthro-
pist Nathan Cutler will be honored for his many years of
devoted effort on behalf of Israel and the Jewish people.
B'nai B'rith president Barry T. Gurland will address the
gathering.
Chairman Sam Horowitz and cochairman Rabbi S^New-
berger (left) are now involving residents of North Mi-
amf Beach's Chancellor Hall in the 1976 Combmed Jew-
ish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund. Their dedication is
inspiZg excellent commitments to the ^"M"
Jewish Federation's campaign effort, making possible
many vital humanitarian programs locally and overseas.
going economic crisis, reminis-
cent of the 1960's, provoked a
series of major strikes. The gov-
ernment was under mounting
even these positive develop-
and outside the government to
change its attitude toward the
Palestinian issue.
The illegal settlement move
in Sebastia by the Gush Emu-
nim and the compromise the
government reached with the
settlers created a furor in the
Labor Party and caused Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin to threaten
to resign.
THE VICTORY of a Commu-
nist Mayor in the Nazareth
election brought a series of
charges that the government
had neglected the problems of
Israeli Arabs and counter-
charges that the Communists
were preparing a base in that
city for terrorist activities.
Throughout all this, terrorist
bombs ripped through down-
town Jerusalem in July, Octo-
ber and November, killing a
total of 21 people and injuring
46, and terrorist activities in
Tel Aviv and along the border
were responsible for the death
of some 24 Israelis and terror-
ists.
The year 1975 was also filled
with a series of ironies and
perversities for Israel and the
Jewish world.
THE ADOPTION by the Gen-
eral Assembly in November of
a resolution equating Zionism
with racism was a perversity
because it was the culmination
of a series of similar resolutions
adopted in Mexico City at the
International Women's Year
Conference; in Lima, Peru at a
pressure from doves within
Conference; in Lima, Peru, at a
meeting of ministers of non-
aligned states; and in Kapala,
Uganda, at a meeting of the Or-
ganization of African Unity, all
of which were convened to deal
with the socially progressive is-
sues involving the elimination
of apartheid, colonialism and
imperialism.
It was ironic that the ground-
swell of voices in Israel calling
for talks with any Palestinian
group that renounced terrorism
and recognized Israel's sover-
eignty was attributed in large
measure to American pressure
for accommodation with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion rather than an ongoing de-
mand over the years by pro-
gressive and radical Israeli and
Jewish political leaders and in-
tellectuals.
IT WAS perverse that im-
mediately after Israel signed
the interim accord with Egypt
in September the Jewish State
was cast as the heavy in the
Middle East by Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger and
by major sections of the Amer-
ican news media. Most ironic
of all, was that the universal
solidarity of the Jewish people
in the diaspora and Israelis was
the result not of any internal
intellectual or ideological de-
velopment and Zionist consci-
ousness-raising, but a reaction
to the Assembly resolution.
The year 1975 also witnessed
a new twist in the old adage
that when America sneezes Eu-
rope catches pneumonia. This
year, when America and Eu-
rope formulated ways to resolve
the Mideast crisis, Israel suf-
fered from migraine headaches
and vertigo.
IT WAS also a year in which
history closed in on Israel and
disclosed that no event any-
where in the world could occur
without impinging on Israel's
interests and future. A case in
point was the situation in An-
gola. A decade ago, before the
U.S. Congress was traumatized
by American involvement in the
Vietnam war and before the il-
legal global activities of the CIA
came to light, a civil war in
Angola and the Involvement
here by the U.S. and the Soviet
Union supporting warring fac-
tions seeking state power might
have been the subject for an
objective and dispassionate
study on superpower politics.
Not so, however, in 1975. The
rift between the U.S. and the
USSR had widespread signifi-
cance for the entire Jewish
world. Former Israeli Premier
Golda Meir alluded to this when
she called attention late in De-
cember in an NBC "Today" pro-
gram to the fact that Congres-
sional refusal to support U.S.
military aid for the anti-Com-
munist factions in Angola raised
a serious question about Amer-
ican security guarantees for
Israel. Earlier, Kissinger told
reporters at a.press conference
in Washington that Congress'
negative attitude toward U.S.
aid in that West African coun-
try would be counter-productive
and imperil American credibility
in the international arena.
HE RECALLED that Congres-
sional action in the form of the
Jackson/Vanik Amendment to
the trade bill caused the Soviet
Union to repudiate its 1972
trade agreement with the U.S.
and resulted in a cutback of
Soviet Jewish emigration, pre-
cisely the opposite effects, he
noted, of what the J/V legis-
lation intended to accomplish.
The conflict between the U.S.
and USSR in Angola brought
into sharp focus not only the
economic rivalry between the
two superpowers but also the
economic rivalries and contra-
dictions within the European
Economic Community (EEC).
It also revealed that the role
of economics, ignored or minim-
ized by many Israeli leaders and
those of diaspora Jewry when
dealing with vital political and
diplomatic issues, was at bot-
tom the motivating force at
work in crystallized and com-
pressed form at the United Na-
tions and UNESCO.
The U.S. has extensive cor-
porate interests in Angola and
seeks to prevent the emergence
of a government antagonistic to
pro-Western regimes in Zaire
and other African states.
THE AREAS which include
South-West Africa and South
Africa are rich in gold, iron,
copper, uranium, diamonds, oil
hnd petroleum and serve as
relatively untapped markets for
American trade and invest-
ments.
In addition, a new radical re-
gime in Angola would also pose
a threat to South Africa and
Rhodesia with which the U.S.
has been friendly. The Soviet
Union, for its part, in addition
to whatever material benefits it
would reap with the emergence
of a radical pro-Soviet regime
in Angola, and whatever diplo-
matic advantages it can gain
among Third World countries
after having been effectively
dislodged and frozen out of the
Mideast by Kissinger's step-by-
step diplomacy and Egypt's shift
toward the U.S., seeks strategic
footing on the South African
continent and possible naval
bases at key Angolan ports.
THE SITUATION in Angola
and the rift between the U.S.
and USSR brought to surface
the economic interests of the
EEC nations in developing trade
and investments in Africa as a
way of solving their own eco-
nomic crises. Britain and
France view the Angolan situa-
tion with nervousness and un-
certainty, while West Germany
agrees with the U.S. Adminis-
tration's view that the war in
Angola is crucial to East-West
relations.
On the whole, however, the
EEC nations are loath to be-
come involved in the Angolan
struggle. They do not want to
lose their credibility with Af-
rican and Asian states as main-
taining a neutral stance regard-
ing the struggles on those two
continents or an independent
position in relation to the U.S.
on matters they feel not bound
up vMith European or NATO
security.
The Europeans, once having
been the colonizers of these
countries, understand better
than the U.S. the seething re-
sentment and hatred these coun-
tries harbor toward their former
colonizers and allies.
BUT THE Europeans also un-
derstand the dire need of the
Afro-Asian nations to develop
their own technologies, which is
impossible without the trade
and know-how the West is able
to provide.
1 This .attitude, in part, ex-
plains why a number of Euro-
pean nations, especially Brit-
ain, were so critical of the at-
tack unleashed against the OAU
by Daniel Moynihan. the U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, and by
his scatter-gun attacks against
African and Asian policies in
the UN.
The EEC nations are also re-
latively unconcerned with the
issue of East-West detente since
Continued on Following Page
Winston Towers residents Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Drex-
ler received State of Israel Prime Minister's Club plaques
at the "Woman of the Century" dinner honoring Golda
Meir at the Fontainebleau Hotel. Chairman of the High
Holidays and Synagogues Division for the Greater Mi-
ami Israel Bond Organization, Drexler is president of
Temple B'nai Zion. .. _.
- TTi
nfmmmmmq0tff\tf1ilQ*m''''p*k--


-r^enisri mwitauctr
rriaay, January it, iy/6

K
Israel, Jewish People G lad to Wrap Up 1975
Continued from Preceding Page
most of them have trade rela-
tions with the USSR.
THESE economic develop-
ments also explain the real
significance of the votes in the
UN and UNESCO during 1975
regarding the anti-Zionist and
anti-Israel resolutions and the
real meaing of the "tyranny of
the automatic majority."
Israeli and diaspora Jewish
leaders focused on voting pat-
terns as if the UN represented
a forum, albeit limited, for par-
liamentary activities. They over-
looked Ihe vital economic inter-
ests at play. The tyranny of the
automatic maioritv did not con-
sist in 'he hot that the Arab-
Communist-Third World bloc
could muster a majority of
votes at will but that in the last
lysis they didn't care about
nor did they need the voting
support of the Western nations.
I he West could play out its
Charade of voting against or
abstamiii'.' on issues crucial to
Israel because the interests of
both the WS 9t and the bloc came
together on the economic level.
WHAT COUNTED, give or
. take a procedural approach or
] an incidental and secondary dif-
ference on short-range goals,
was that the West and the bloc
needed each other on the level
of trade and capital invest-
ments. France, for example,
voted against the anti-Zionist
resolution in the UN Third Com-
mittee on Oct. 17, but two weeks
later authorized the PLO to
open a bureau in Paris.
Similarly, France voted
against the anti-Zionist resolu-
tion in ii (i nasal Assembly
on Nov. 10, but a month later
concluded an economic and
arms deal with Egypt much to
the satisfaction of both coun-
tries. In addition, Egypt's plan
to invest $8 billion in an arma-
ments industry will also aid the
British industry since Egypt
plans to buy helicopters and
naval equipment from Britain.
Another example was Mexi-
co's seemingly paradoxical vote
to the anti-Zionist resolution.
Israeli and Jewish leaders at-
tributed this to Mexico Presi-
dent Luis Echeverria's ambition
to become the next UN Secre-
tary General.
ID FACT, however, Mexico's
VI ti was due less to Echever-
ria's ambition than to that coun-
try s bid to be acknowledged
as the representative of the
Third World in Latin America.
That was the essential reason
for the strenuous campaign em-
barked on by Mexico to hold
the International Women's Year
Conference in Mexico City.
Ihe year 1975 was marked
by five major events that show-
ed, above all. that Israel's fate
was not self-determined but
more than ever dependent on
the U.S.
In March, the failure of Jm
singer's Mideast shuttle led
President Ford to call for a
reassessment of Mideast policy
which, in practice, resulted in
halting economic and military
aid. In September, the Israel-
Egvptian accord effectively
isolated Egvpt from the rest of
'the Arab world and brought
pt closer 1o the U.S.
IN OCTOBER, I'resident An-
war Sadat's trip to the U.S. was
a triumph for American policies
in further cementing relations
with Egypt, while Sadat himself
managed to secure for his coun-
try the certainty of large-scale
economic aid. nuclear reactors
for desalinating sea water and
the possibility of obtaining mili-
tary aid an the future.
Another event was the on-
going Arab boycott of American
and European-firms doing bnsi-
ness with Israel or owned by
Jews.
This provided the Arab
league-fcoycott office witb lev-
erage to yit JeWsh'and"noiF
Jewish "bmiaes* firms against
ea<*-wr .and-adee toed, with
not auroh success, to isolate
Jewish firms from the rest of
the economic structures.
But the crowning event, the
one before which all others
paled into relative insignifi-
cance, was the adoption of the
anti-Zionist resolution. But,
more than that, it marked an
unprecedented move in which
the national liberation move-
ment of an entire -people was
condemned as a form of racism
by an internationally constituted
legal body, the same body that
recognized Israel's right to exist
as a nation in 1947.
THE RESOLUTION was also
unprecedented in that an ideol-
ogy representing the highest
collective political conscious-
ness of a people was condemned
as a form of racism.
The resolution. although
presumed by earlier ones during
the year, stunned Israelis and
Jews around the world. Reacting
in knee-terk fashion to this
calumny. Zionist and Jewish or-
ganisations for the most part
resorted to gimmicky and sen-
tentious arts in newspapers, shop-
worn cliches and the manufac-
ture of thousands of buttons.
Thev failed to seize the op-
portune v to present the histor-.
ical contributions of Zionism as
a movement of national libera-
tion to other, more recently
evolving liberation movements.
THey also failed to present
Zionism as a body of theory
dealing with the condition of
lews in the diaspora, the gen-
eral nature and structure of
dtasnora reality and its role in
developing Israeli society. In-
Stead, the spate of ads was more
calculated to win support for
this or that Zionist organization
than to deal with fundamentals.
THE FAILURE on the part of
Zionist and Jewish leaders to
rise to the occasion was not ac-
cidental. For years they had
operated on the assumption 1hat
Zionism had been vindicated
and absolved by history; their
thinking on this issue had be-
come stultified and cynical. In
Israel for example, they term
"t7ionut" was invariably placed
in quotation marks and used as
a put-down.
The reaction to those coun-
tries that voted for the resolu-
tion, especially those who had
been considered friends of Is-
rael and some of the Third
World countries, was one of un-
restrained and generally -un-
thinking fury.
They were attacked as being
anti-Zionist and anti-Israel with-
out redemption. Yet the Zionist
and Jewish leaders again over-
looked reality. Many of the
Third World and Latin Amer-
ican countries voted : for i the
resolution more in- protest
against the U.S. than against
Zionism and Israel.
BY THE same taken, many
of the countries that voted
against the resolution- did so
not because-they were in-prin-
ciple agreement with Zionism
but to orotest against the Arabs
who had brought them to their
knees during *he nil embargo
Because the Jewish' and Zion-
ist leaders were not prepared
to deal with the issue of Zion-
ism on a fundamental level,
they sought out heroes for ac-
clamation and villains for con-
demnation. The arch-hero be-
came Moynihan and the arch-
villain became Mexico. Despite
the steadfast support by Moy-
nihon for Zionism, many Israelis
noted privately that his method
of defending it gratified Amer-
ican Jews but made it difficult
for Israel to take a more bal-
anced approach with some of
the fence-sitting delegations in
the UN.
The year ended with: an
embarrassing and' disastrous
series of snafus on-the?tft of'
the Israeli government to notify
the Knesset and-Jewish leaders*
abroad that It had reached an
WHAT ARE the prospects for
1976? Again, the state of the
economy in the West will deter-
mine the political and diplo-
matic activities. According to
forecasts by the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and
Development (OECD), prospects
for the industralized nations are
that they will move back to
economic growth in the first
period of 1976 but will falter
later in the year.
The current balance of pay-
ments deficits for the 24 OECD-
member states will nearly triple
to S17.5hillion in 1976 from this
year's S6 billion and overall un-
employment is expected to rise
slightly above the present 15
million level by the end of 1976.
The Economics Group of the
Chase Manhattan Bank de-
scribed the EEC countries as
"recession-gripped" and suffer-
ing from an "economic slump."
As for the economic situation
in the U.S.. the Federal Board
in mid-December reported that
the output of factories, mines
and utilities rose only 0.2 per-
cent in November, providing
further evidence that the eco-
nomic recovery has slowed
dramatically.
THOMAS E. Mullaney, writ-
ing in the Dec. 14 issue of the
New York Times, noted that
forecasts depict a moderately
expanding economy in 1976,
with real growth rising on the
order of 5 to 6 percent and in-
flation declining to the range
of 6 or 7 percent.
"If these prognostications
prams to be accurate, there
would be little cause for con-
cern except for the fact that
the same computer runs are
predicting an abnormally high
unemployment rate of 7 percent
or greater," he stated.
In addition, there are still a
number of uncertainties and un-
knowns that will come into-play
next year: the extent of the
financial crisis of the -cities; the
impact of labor negotiations;
the fPresidential election; the
lagging world economy, and the
mood of Congress regarding
spending on foreign projects.
Undoubtedly, all these de-
velopments will affect a wide
number of issues involving Is-
rael and the Jewish commu-
nities, not the least of which
will be the extent of economic
aid Israel can expeet from the
U;S. or American Jewry.
W FACT, Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Rabin has already cau-
tioned Israelis that economic aid
will be rendered more difficult.
Several days ago he stated that
U.S. aid will not continue
forever at a .rate of 20 percent
of Israel's budget.
"It is not a question of tight-
ening our belts," he said. "They
will be tightened for us."
Some Israeli economists have
noted that the austerity budget
adopted .earlier Jasi month is a
hedge against -predictable hard
times resulting, in part, fxom
the economic slump in the U.S.
and at the-same time an -effort
to make Israel less dependent
on aid either from the U.S. gov-
ernment or American Jews.
In broad outline, the eco-
nomic, political and diplomatic
developments that began to pin-
fold in 1975 will become more
pervasive and relentless in
1976.
THE NEW year will begin
with a major concern as to
whether the Security Council
debate on the Mideast will .con-
clude with an amendment of
Resolution 242 to take into con-
sideration the resolution adopt-
ed last month in the General
Assembly catting for the right
of self-determination and na-
tional independence for the
Palestinians and their right to
"return to the homer; and prop-
erty from which they were up-
rooted."
A decWiva'faWor l for Israel
this country, were under fire
from grass roots Jewish com-
munities for lacking creative
and innovative responses re-
quired bv the world situation.
A great deal of dissatisfaction
was expressed that little was
done, or done haphazardly, to
mobilize communities on vital
issues. Jewish leaders were also
berated for relegating much of
their activities to issuing press
releases and engaging in private
consultations with Administra-
tion officials.
JEWISH and Zionist organ-
izations were also criticized for
being unable to function at full
capacity except under crisis
situations, failing to develop a
corps of future leaders, duplica-
tions and overlapping of serv-
ices, insufficient efforts to in-
volve the membership in deci-
sion-making processes, and a
general parochialism toward
broader social issues.
The major ongoing need in
1976 will be to defend Israel
against American pressure for
more territorial concessions
while demanding of the Arabs
that, at most, they normalize
their relations with Israel.
There will also be the need to
take Zionism out of the stalls
of idolatrv and present it as a
vibrant, viable force for peace
and progress in the Middle East,
and to transform this year's but-
ton Zionists into next year's
ideological and activist Zionists.
There will be the need for
heightened awareness regarding
aliva and less bureaucratic im-
pediments in this country and
in Israel that turn off actual and
potential olim. In 1976 there-
fore, the Jewish and Zionist
leaderships will require a major
overhaul in their approaches to
myriad issues and a basic re-
tooling for the tasks that lie
ahead. The alternative may be
a series of setbacks for Israel
and the Jewish people.
Residents of the Moorings in North Miami Beach are
again organizing for a total commitment to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's 1976 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal Israel Emergency Fund. Chairman Hy Selig (right)
and cochairman Lou A. Bonchick, who are gathering sup-
port from hundreds of the condominium's residents for a
major Jan. 25 event, predict 100-percent participation
in the campaign. Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, spiritual leudcr
of BethTorah Congregation, will be guest speaker at the
event made possible by the B'nai Israel Lodge.
Harry Pshoter PtnmmM 81
Harry Pshoter, 87. formerly
of Dorchester, Mass., died at
the Hebrew Rehabilitation Cen-
ter for the Aged in Roslindale,
Mass.. on Jan. 5. Born in Rus-
sia, but immigrating to this
country at an early age, Psho-
ter was a manufacturer and
salesman of extract syrups.
Pshoter was a founder of
Yeshiva Ohel Torah of Dorches-
ter and was awarded the Jewish
Advocate carnation for his ro-
port of the Jewish community.
He is survived by his wife
Ida (DtelD. two daughters. Mrs.
Yeshaia Miller of Millis, Mass..
and Mrs. Mordecai Kohen of
Dedham, Mass., a sen, Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter of Daytona
Beach, and 9 grandchildren and
7 great-grandchildren.
Services were held in Brook-
line. Rabbi Shoter and Rabbi
Samuel Fox of Lynn officiated
Yiddish Theatre At Helirew Academy
The Workmen's Circle and
the Labor Zionist Alliance are
presenting evenings of Yiddish
theatre on Saturday and Sun-
day, Jan. 24-25, at the Hebrew
Academy Auditorium at 8
o'clock.
In celebration of the 100th
anniversary of Yiddish theatre
in America and of the Bicen-
tennial, "Lebn Zol Columbus!"
will offer sketches, songs and
musical takeoffs by Ben Bonus,
Mina Bern, Bernard Sauer, Ba-
ruch Farber, Israeli singer Jen-
nie Kessler, and Broadway pian-
ist and director Philip Fradkin.
^Family Sabbath At Bet Breira
Temple Bet Breira will hold
a family dinner and Sabbath
celebration this evening at 6:30
at Glades Junior High School
on SW 64 St.
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
has said there will be a family-
oriented ritual before dinner,
tallowed by an abbreviated
service "so that the families
can keep it and take it witf-
them and be able to conduct
their own Sabbath services at
home."
There will also be a discus-
sion of the value of Sabbath,
rituals and tradition.
?&* Sf'SfiSS onA ^-^^5**h>.comrnurl*ies
the rroqhitiaB-Sn-tha Gefterah will be the roh- end nature of
claratloa of Mexico City. JowMt Iwalwt, rgpranaTlT la
City National Bank Annmmces Anoint menu
City- National Bank of Miami
-ha* named- two vice presidents:
Michael Beeraan, who had been
assistant vice president, and
IWehard Kamp, personnel direc-
tor.
repMMntth*. to the- American
Institute of Banking,
Charles Earnest, Kermit Le-
wrn^ John .Phelan and Eleanor -
WHHarns were named assistant .
Gary-Lavner, budget anatest eS^^3*11 aho**e -
-with the ank sine* 1973 h haThJr.F?T aad-'iewin
j
i
V>'.
roe premises.





in 'Next Year m Jerusalem' to Become 'This Year in Jerusalem'
tfGE in the ancient Jewish call. "Next Year
^Jerusalem," will mark the new year just
The new text will be "This Year in Jem-
innovation will be introduced by the United
tppeal. It will be followed by other Jewish
tions. In many Jewish homes the craving
ext Year in Jerusalem" usually recited
mily Seder as part of the Haggadah will
replaced by "This Year in Jerusalem." In
es too the prayer will be "This Year in
m."
1ft result, the UJA will hold its next annual
Hi four-day conference not in New York
it has been holding it all the vears of its
Hce but in Jerusalem. The JDA national con-
B is Msually attended by more than 2,000 par-
Bs from communities in all parts of the United
Th. / will now proceed at their expense
to New York but to Jerusalem.
ft w:X. be the largest American Jewish gather-

iiv in Jerusalem in the history of the State of Is-
rael. Perhaps the 'largest Jewish conference ever
seen anywhere overseas. Its purpose will be three-
fold:
To demonstrate American Jewish solidarity
with Israel against the Arab-Soviet anti-Israel ma-
nipulations in the United Nations;
To uplift the morale of the Jews in Israel
by displaying American Jewish affinity with them
on a large scale;
To bring to Israel a large number of Amer-
ican Jews who will help to relieve partly the de-
pressed economy in the country by spending sev-
eral million dollars during their stay.
ISRAEL NEEDS these three things badly. It
needs a solid demonstration of Jewish solidarity
against its enemies not only in words but also in
iiction.
It needs an impressive show of Jewish unity for
the people in Israel to make them feel that their
concern is the concern of all Jews in the free world
especially oi the Jewish community in the United
States which is today the largest, richest and politic-
ally the most influential Jewish community in the
diaspora.
In taking the initiative to proclaim "This Year in
Jerusalem" as its slogan for 1976, the UJA is not
merely paving the way for other Jewish organiza-
tions to emulate its action. Its ambition is much
higher It wants to make this year a year of "Solid-
arity Pilgrimages" to Israel. It hopes to stimulate
every community group and thousands of Jewish
families to visit Israel this year.



.
&n
Ik) in Salomon Book
For Bicentennial Year ^
Milzvah
For Adults

BtEPARATION for the Bicentennial, the
Bed States Postal Service has issued a
oi stamps commemorating "Contributors
Cause" of the American Revolution.
'contributors who are representatives of
jy groups in America include a Black, a
1 and a Jew.
Jew is Haym Salomon. "Financial
I and the citation on the reverse side of
Amp reads: "Businessman and broker
Salomon-was responsible for raising most
[money needed to finance the American
lion and later to save the new nation
lollapse."
IRLEY MILGRAM'S "Haym Salomon:
's Son" (Jewish Publication Society,
[is ostensibly for juvenile readers. The
(larly and presentation, however, make
ally entertaining and informative for
J Having produced five television dramas,
ftn can skillfully create dialogue to drama-
mificant event6 in Salomon's life. She
Ktroduces forejgn words and interesting
expressions of the time.
oreover, Milgram does not simply retell
M She subtly underscores the important
and ideals of the colonists, particularly
Bong commitments made by Jews in be-
B the Revolution.
THE VALUES and concepts presented here
can easily be compared by parent, teacher, or
young adult himself to the action and commit-
ments of Jews in America today.
For example, Milgram shows us how fund-
raising in 1780 was integral to the establish-
ment of the United States. A reader quickly
draws the comparison to the enthusiastic and
vital fund-raising performed in the United
States today on behalf of the existence of the
State of Israel.
Is not Salomon's dream for the infant
America the same as our dream- for the young
Israeli state: "Do we want this countiy with
its promise of freedom to be truly our coun-
try? We have longed for such a place to live
more than any other people. Let us pledge our
dollars immediately ... to help the Revolution
succeed."
THE BOOK is well-designed. Attractive
drawings by Richard.Fish are interspersed-wtth
the text. Official documents and correspondence
from Salomon to other patriots are set off from
the next in coloniaMype printing.
"Haym Salomon," published in Philadelphia
m the Bicentennial year, is a fitting tribute to
this eminent American hero, and a valuable
Judaic contribution to America's two-hundredth
anniversary.
la Moved Kissinger Deeply
Portrait Gallery Unveiling
Joseph
VoUoff



Washington
|BER ISRAELI Premier Golda Meir facing
lundred distinguished Americans, inolud-
etary of State and .Mrs. Henry A. Kis
.and AFL-CK) President Gauge Meany,
here that "* one thing I wish" is
before "an audience anvwhen* in the
tnd be able to say well, it's ail over;
wars."
one, no one in the world, wants peace
ian Israel," she emphasized in a moving
raneous address Dec. 19 at a luncheon
ational Portrait Gallery where an oil
of her by Raphael Soyer was unveiled.
78-YEAR-OLD stateswoman said that
e was accused of "intransigence and
in the Middle East diplomatic pro-
remembered Auschwitz and Buchen-
. I plead gujjty" to those charges, she
[because "we can't afford another risk."
Irish people, she said, speaking ef their
td, "lived for over two-thoysand years
J onto something we didn't have. We
E because we knew how to pray for it
to our death for it."
t ^ i SINGER said that in his saven years ip
Washington as a U.S. government official, "no
person has moved me more, and no one's as-
sociation has meant more to me than Mrs.
Meir's." He said, "Mrs. Meir has always sym-
bolized that survival of a country is serious
business, and nothing is more important than
the spirit of the people."
Declaring that "the most reliable guarantee
for Israel is not diplomatic agreements nor
reassurances but Israel's spirit," Kissinger
added that "the confidence thot this little state
represents is of the greatest importance to the
spirit of man and the spirit of freedom."
HE HAILED Mrs. Meir as "this great rep-
resentative of a country whose freedom, in-
dependence and security are of vital iraport-
anceance to the United States."
S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithson-
ian Institution of which the gallery is a part,
noted that Mrs. Meir. is the only American
woman ever to become the head of a foreign
government.
He qualified the designation, saying, "not
out of male chauvinism but because she shares
this notable distinction with another former
American, Eamon De Valera," Ireland'^ late
leader.
^^mmmmmmtmm- I M^iiiMMM
^lXTY MEN and women members of a major Manhattan Re-
form synagogue are attending classes which will enable them
to have as adults the Bar Mitzvah and Bas Mitzvah rites they
did not have as children.
The program, unique for Congregation Rodeph Sholom and
probably unique in Reform history for the number of partici-
pants, was initiated by Rabbi Gunter Hirschberg, spiritual lead-
er of the congregation. Rodeph Sholom also is unique for hav-
ing established what is believed to be the first day school under
Reform auspices.
INITIALLY, the two-semester course had been planned on
the basis of one weekly class, to be held Sunday mornings at
the synagogue. However, Rabbi Hirschberg told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, the response was so much greater than had
been expected that two classes had to be organized. The second
class meets on Wednesday evenings. Each session lasts two
and a half hours.
Rabbi Hirschberg said the women outnumber the men
though he declined to give specific figures and that the age
range was from the hue teens-to the 50s. The oldest "student'
is 60, he said.
RABBI HIRSCHBERG was ashed how unique the program
is in Reform Judaism. He said he knew of a similar program in
another Reform congregation but that it had only eight par-
ticipants. He said he did not know of any similar program in
any Reform congregation with as many participants as the one
at his synagogue.
Two semesters are planned. Both have courses in Hebrew,
subdivided into one class for beginners and one for advanced
participants in the language. The first semester began last
October and will continue to- February. The second semester
will run from February to June.
IN ADDITION to instruction in Hebrew, the first semester
has a class in Jewish history, taught by Rabbi Paul Joseph,
the congregation's assistant rabbi. The course in Jewish belief*
and practices in the second semester will be taught by Rabbi
Hirschberg.
In announcing the program in. a memorandum aimed at
interested congregants, Rabbi Hirschberg noted that "early Re-
form Judaism originally abolished Bar Mitzvah because ir felt
that all too often it had become an end to the study of Judaism
rather than a beginning."
He added that "this valid reason was only one among many
which had no validity whatsoever, and so Bar and Bos Mitz-
vah today are again an integral part of Reform Jewish life."
Without "the accompanying learning, however," the rites "are
still meaningless," he said.
INITIALLY, the plan called for Bar Milzvah and Bas Milz-
vah rites in one ceremony during services Friday evening, May
14, with air course members participating. The fact that so
many more adults have enrolled in the program than was anti-
cipated has caused Rabbi Hirschberg to drop that plan and to
ponder means by which each candidate can have an opportuniry
for an individual role in the rites.
Rabbi Hirschberg said he was considering setting aside two
Friday night services for rherttes May T4 and May 21 but
that he wap still working out the problems created by the un-
expectedly high enrollment.
RABBI HIRSCHBERG was asked whether there was an in-
dication of a positive relationship between enrollment in the
program and participation in. synagogue activities and whether
any congregational officers were participating.
He said some trustees were among the candidates but added
that he felt that the motivations of the.-participants were .mainly
a desire for more intensive Jewish education.
Friday, January 16, 1976 fJewisti FhridRain Pae 23-"B


F\
Page 24-B
*Mnidh fhrkHan
Friday, January 16, 197^
Mandate of Heaven
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
Who'd have predicted, five or
ten years ago, that the Commu-
nist giant, the Chinese People's
Republic, would want America
to be stronger, not weaker? That
is the essence of the attitude
of the Chinese leaders in Peking
toward President Ford's visit.
When Mao Tse-tung first
compared America to a "paper
tiger," in 1945, he meant it to
reassure his Red army follow-
ers who feared that American
power would keep them from
completing their revolution.
Now, 30 years later, Mao in-
vokes the phrase again, but this
time he uses it to goad the
Americans into asserting their
strengths against the Soviet
Union.
THE CHINESE leaders inevit-
ably pursue a double policy to-
ward the United States. In the
years immediately ahead they
regard Russia as a more dan-
gerous enemy, and therefore
cherish America.
They fear a Russian-Amer-
ican detente because it will
speed up Russia's industrial de-
velopment and thus strengthen
the weapons with which Russia
may aim to destroy Chinese
power.
In long-range terms the
Chinese hope not only to sur-
vive against Russian "hegemon-
ism" but also to be strong
enough to challenge American
power eventually. They may
even hope to defeat it by sheer
size and population, or under-
cut it by a Maoist revolution in
America itself.
THESE are longtime perspec-
tives, but the Chinese are a
patient and enduring people. In
anv other society the age of
the present leadership (Chou
En-lai at 77 and Mao at 82)
would seem a sign of senility
in the ruling elite and perhaps
' in the civilization itself.
Not so with the Chinese, who
have always honored age, and
have little inclination toward a
cult of youth. Even the adoles-
cent "Red Guards" of the Cul-
tural Revolution in the latter
half of the 1960s carried out the
oversubtle design of Mao, who
tried to use them to get rid of
his opponents and keep the
revolution fresh.
EVEN WITH Chou En-lai
"probably dying," as Secretary
of State Henry Kissinger -has
said, and with Mao surely in his
last phase, the Chinese are not
without a government.
It is truer to say that they
rely less on a particular lead-
ership than the Americans or
even the Russians, because they
rely more on a living arbiter
and model and on a belief sys-
tem.
The model is of course Chair-
man Mao himself his sayings,
his method of "contradictions,"
his swings of policy, his role as
final arbiter of doctrine. There
is scarcely a nation in the world
today whose people and leaders
are as oriented toward a single
man as the Chinese.
THIS IS at once their strength
and their weakness their
strength because it offers a na-
tional cohesiveness to tide them
over blunders and crises of
policy, their weakness because
no one is in sight to replace Mao
as the archetypal figure, the ul-
timate ancestor.
The Chinese belief system is
one of the mysteries of political
behavior in our time. It once
rested on obedience to the em-
perors, then to the regional war-
lords.
TODAY it rests not only on
the cult of Mao but even more
on the belief that he can be the
revealer of "correct" doctrine
because there is in fact a body
of correct Marxist doctrine to
reveal.
All along in the history and
ethos of the Chinese there has
tttelt the sfcnse of being a
chosen people, proud of their
tradition and their cultural ex-
cellence, with a mandate from
heaven to discover the right
way of government and of life
and to lie by it.
This has been the secret of
the Chinese as an enduring,
self-confident people. It is the
secret of the effectiveness with
which dissenters are brought
back into line in Communist
China, less by direct coercions
from the government than by
indirect pressures from the
party vanguard which to some
extent speaks for the mass of
people.
MAO'S blunders have been
massive the farce of the
"hundred flowers," the disaster
of the Great Leap Forward, the
self-destructiveness of the Cul-
tural Revolution.
Yet for those who assume that
he carries the mandate of
heaven, from Marx and Lenin,
he can correct his blunders be-
cause he is himself the fount of
doctrinal correctness.
It would be foolish to under-
estimate the strength of such a
belief system, or the enduring
quality of a society which holds
it.
_........mumWMiimiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiwuwiMnniimiiwri.....
Inside
Judaica

r
New Law Exempts
Jewish Merchants
Sabbath observers have been exempted from a new
Provincial law that forbids most retail stores to re-
main open on Sundays. The new law, believed to bo
the first of its kind enacted in Ontario, went into effect
Jan. 1.
Its primary purpose was to restrain large super-
markets that have remained open on Sundays and na-
tional holidays. Certain small shops employing three
or fewer people are exempted.
AS A RESULT of representations by the Canadian
Jewish Congress in association with the Seventh Day
Adventists, an amendment was added to remove the
Sunday ban from retail businesses that are closed for
"a period of 24 consecutive hours in a period of 32
hours immediately preceding Sunday" which occupy a
relatively small area and employ less than eight per-
sons.
Jewish retail shops operated by Sabbath observers
largely fall into this category.
A PROPOSAL to add the words "for religious reas-
ons" to the amendment was struck out on grounds
that mention of religion in a Provincial law may render
it unconstitutional.
Only the Federal government is entitled to deal
with religious matters in Canada.
Q. Does Israel's southern-
most city, Elath, have a his-
tory?
A. According to the author-
itative Encyclopaedia Judaica,
Elath is first mentioned in the
account of the Israelites' wan-
derings in the desert during the
Exodus. Solomon built a "navy
of ships" at Ezion-Geber beside
Elath. From there it sailed to
Ophir manned by his servants
and those of Hiram, king of
Tyre. Later Uzziah, king of Ju-
dah (785-733 B.C.E.), rebuilt
Elath restoring it as the port of
Judah on the Red Sea but after
his reign Judahite control of
the Negev ceased. In the Hel-
lenistic period it served for a
time as a Ptolemaic port called
Berenice and it is later mention-
ed as a Nabatean port (renamed
Aila) from which an important
commercial highway led to Giza.
Aila continued to be a major
commercial and military port in
Roman and Byzantine times. In
the third century the Tenth Le-
gion, together with its head-
quarters, was transferred there
from Jerusalem and it was
thereafter a key point in the
Byzantine defense system in the
south of the country.
The Jewish population in the
neighborhood of Aila was aug-
mented by Jewish tribes ex-
pelled from Arabia by Muham-
med during whose time the
Muslims gained control of the
town, which was called in
Arabic Akaba. A Jewish com-
munity continued to exist there
until the middle of the tenth
century and possibly until the
Crusader period. In 1116, Bald-
win I, king of Jerusalem, cap-
tured the port: the fleet of Ray-
naud de Chatillon sailed from
there to harass Arab maritime
trade in the Red Sea. Saladin,
who brought the Crusaders'
rule to an end in 1170, erected
a fortress at Akaba. By the 14th
century the town was almost
completely deserted and only
under Turkish rule was an at-
tempt made to develop it. The
ancient site of Elath with re-
mains from the Nabatean, Ro-
man, Byzantine, and medieval
periods has been located north
of Akaba.
Modern Eilat is 3 mi. west of
Akaba along the coast. The site,
a wasteland, was included in
the future Jewish state in the
UN partition plan of 1947.
Eilat's growth was extremely
slow. The turning point came
with the opening of the straits
in the Sinai Campaign (1956).
The Eilat-Mizpeh Ramon-Beer-
sheba road was opened to traffic
in January 1958. In 1967, the
Eilat-Sedom highway was DUt
into use. In 1969, construction
began on the road leading from
Eilat southward to Sharm el
Sheikh, With the sea bottom
sloping steeply from the Eilat
shore, port building there is re-
latively easy. In 1957 the origi-
nal anchorage was repeatedly
enlarged to cope with the
mounting sea cargo traffic, and
an oil port was installed in the
southwest of the city. A new
port was built at an investment
of $54,700,000 and opened in
1964.
The Eilat airfield, situated
just east of the city, was en-
larged, and about a dozen daily
flights today connect Eilat with
Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
The first 16-in. oil pipe-
line connecting Eilat with Haifa
was laid in 1958-59. Work on
the large 42 in. pipeline from
Eilat to Ashkelon began in 1968
and was finished in 1970. A de-
cisive factor in Eilat's economic
life says the Judaica is the Tira-
na Copper Works, which in 1968
employed 1,000 workers, nearly
all residing in Eilat. Tourism
and recreation constitute one of
the major branches in Eilat's
economy.
High-Income Bracket Israelis
Questioned By Tax People
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Income Tax Com.
mission has summoned 2,200 persons in the higher in.
come brackets for questioning to determine whether
they have been paying the proper amount of taxes. The
spot check was the first step taken by the Treasury
since it announced that tax collection procedures would
be tightened to make sure the government gets the in.
come it is entitled to by law.
The persons whose tax returns will be scrutinized
were selected on the basis of their living standards.
THEY INCLUDE owners of large automobiles, pleas-
ure boats and luxury homes valued in excess of 1
750,000 and persons who make frequent trips abroad 1
and are generally "known for their high standard of liv-!
ing." Treasury officials said.
The tax commission believes there are tens of thou- 1
sands of persons who fit that category which is at sharp j
variance with the image of Israelis as a people heavily!
burdened by taxes and struggling to make ends meet
It does, however, confirm the existence of a deep so-
cial and economic gap in the nation.
Jefferson National Names
Branam Vice President
James R. Branam, Jr., has
been elected executive vice
president of Jefferson National
Bank at Kendall, a subsidiary
of Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.
Branam attended the Uni-
versity of Miami and is a grad-
uate of the Banking School of
the South Louisiana State Uni-
versity. He has been active in
Miami since 1958 and is a past
president of the Miami chapter
of the American Institute of
Banking and the Group Eight
Installment Bankers.
Glaucoma Is Talk Subject
At South Shore Meeting f
Dr. Richard Rose, ophthal-
mologist on the staff of South J
Shore Hosnital, is the featured
speaker at the South Shore Hos-,
pital Women's Auxiliary midl
winter meeting. Jan. 22. at 10:3fli
in the hospital's board of gov-
ernors room.
Dr Rose's topic is "Glaucoma
th" Earlv-Warning Signs and
What You Can Do About Them"
President of the auxiliary il
Mrs. Anna H. Singer, program
chairman is Mrs. Claire Du-
Pont Paul.
'Jeanne Wolf With../
Miami resident Jeanne Wolf,
star of the award-winning Pub-
lic TV interview program "Jean-
ne Wolf With .," will speak
at the Temple Israel Sisterhood
luncheon meeting on Wednes-
day. Jan. 21, at 11:30 a.m.
WPBT-TV Ch. 2 lncdlv broad-
casts the show, which has been
syndicated elsewhere. Mrs. Wolf
produces other programs for
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76.1120
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALAN S. WALL
Hushnnd/Petitioner
and
CAROL Y. WALL.
Wife/Respondent.
TO: Carol Y. Wall
Residence I'nknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any to It on
Howard R. Hirsch, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 407 Lincoln
Road. Suite 7-K. Miami Beach, Flor-
ida 391.19. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before February 18, 1976; otherwise
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published on.ce
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
13th day of January. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Howard R. Hirsch Esq.
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 7-K
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139,
Tel. No. 532-5444
Attorney for Petitioner
_____________________1/16-23-30 2/6
NOTICE UNDER
x,^/ICTIT,OUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
^i!1 u."J',t'r lhe "ctltious name of
BARCO TX SALES at 14800 N.W
24th Court, Opa Locka, Fla. 33054 In-
tends to register said name with Uie
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
D/B/A BARCO TX SALES
BARCO CHEMICALS DIVISION.
mc
FRED KATZ. PRESIDENT
1/16-2S-30 2/
Temple Israel Sisterhood
WPRT and 'will give those at-
tending the luncheon a back-
stage glimpse of TV produc-
tion and program problems.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THlif^J
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ^m
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-6895 (Parker)
IN RE: Estate of
FRANCISCA ORTEGA
Dec-eased. __.umi
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CI.AIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND A LI-
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN SAID ESTATE: vr.-rnriHl
YOU ARE HEREBY ,^,Tf!|*
that the administration of the e-J.
..f FRANCISCA ORTEGA, decease*.
Kile Number 75-6*96, is l""d.'n* I
the Circuit Court for Dade Count*
F.orlda. Probate Division, U.< addrea
;t which is Dade County Co"*"*
Miami, Florida. The P*r,na'n285j
tentative of this estate is /8^"
hUSENKRANTZ. whose ,a.d,Ur*"f-,
420 Lincoln Road. SuUe 3.- -"'"J
Beach, Florida 33139. The name
address of the attorney for tnc
sonal representative are set wrin
All persons having claims or d
mands against the estate art rMW I
,d. WITHIN THREE MOTM ,
FROM THE DATE OF iHb, F'SJ
PUBLICATION OF THIS -\0T.1|C^nrt .
file with the clerk of the circuitc-n.
a written statement of a'JJa,;7i I
demand tbey may have. E.w nc
must he in writing and mu.si "n""^"
the basis for Ue ulaim. H"2*-f
address of the creditor or Irs *S* ,
attorney, and the amount i,'a""wS,B ? |
the claim is not yet due. tM ,. I
when it will become due shall Mw
ed. If the claim is contingent or jj
liquidated, the nature of tne
tainty shall be stated. If g
is secured, the security shall a
scribed. The claimant ^"""fai
sufficient copies of the claiin i
clerk to enable the **JJJSS
copy to each personalrepresn
All persons Interested In tne w rf
o whom a copy of ttojgS I
Administration has beeni ma" Tgj
required. WITHIN THREE MO>Rf, j
KHOM THE DATE ^ voTlC* J
PUBLICATION OF THIS >><' WT
to file any objections the> nw wj
that challenges the valid t> ,
decedent's will, the Q''"> or tM J
the personal rPfe8e"f"{,V "court
venue or Jurisdiction oftn.<.
JOSEPH ROSENKRANTf y
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of Francmc*
Ortega. Dece8,e,%
By HARVEY D. FRIED.MA.n
LAW OFFICES OF
JOSEPH ROSENKRANTZ
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 37-
Mlami Beach, Florida 3Ji
Telephone 531-1224 ^^-^^aJj
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONA"
REPRESENTATIVE .. jtfl
First published on January J/J(.f


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