The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02449

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
run away Security Council may mean war
JERUSALEM Should the
Security Council move to take
over Arab-Israeli peace negotia-
tions, the United Nations will
"stalemate" future peace moves.
This was the warning sound-
ed by Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin following a Cabinet meet-
ing on Sunday.
RABIN URGED the United
States to attempt to block any
such move. Rabin also warned
that if the U.S. does not use its
veto to block a security council
takeover of the Middle East
debate beginning on Monday,
war might break out.
Rabin noted that "more seri-
ous developments might result"
from such a debate and addej
that Israel has "sufficient mili-
tary strength to provide us with
room for political maneuvers,
Continued on Page 3-A
"dewish Flojridliian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
'Volume 49 Number 2
Miami, Florida Friday, January 9, 1976
By Mail 50c. Two Sections Price 25 rents
EXPLAINED DEFENSE NEEDS
Yariv Pessimistic
About U.S. Aid
To Israel in '76
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
Report Allon Supports
Jordan Talks
AHARON YARIV
Hausner
Polygraph
JERUSALEM (JTA) Gi-
deon Hausner suggested here
that all cabinet ministers be re-
quired to take lie detector testa
to find out once and for all who
has been leaking classified in-
formation on cabinet proceed-
ings to the press.
Hausner, a minister-without-
portfoho of the Independent
Liberal Party; is-one of Israel's
most prominent jurists, who
prosecuted Adolf Eichmann in
1961.
HE MADE his proposal at a
cabinet meeting. He told news-
men afterwards that he was
quite ready to submit to the
polygraph and would even ac-
cept more stringent surveillance
of cabinet members in the inter-
ests of state security.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin was
unwilling to order his cabinet
colleagues placed under surveil-
lance but urged every minister
to take pains to keep cabinet
Continued on Page 11-A
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Former Communications
Minister Aharon Yariv, who
has returned from a six-
week visit to the United
States, said that Israel stood
a good chance of receiving
all or most of the military
aid it requested from the
U.S. last year but warned
that it could not expect the
same level of assistance to
be forthcoming this year.
Yariv, a former chief of
military intelligence who
held the rank of general be-
fore he retired from the
Army last year, went to
Washington on behalf of
Premier Yitzhak Rabin. His
mission was to explain Is-
rael's defense needs to U.S.
Congressmen in both houses
and especially members of
key Congressional commit-
', Continued oa Pa*e 2-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Foreign Ministry has
refused to comment on a report that Foreign Minister Yigal
Allon has proposed that Israel conduct "informal" negotia-
tions with Jordan for an interim agreement at which West
Bank Arab leaders would be part of the Jordanian dele-
gation.
YIGAL ALLON
Ha.l............I \ .- i
The report, by Ma'ariv's po-
litical correspondent, Yosef Ha-
i
Rabin Due in Capital
WASHINGTON (JTA) The White House has
announced that Israeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin will visit
the United States Jan. 27 to Feb. 4 for in-depth discus-
sions with President Ford on the Middle East.
- .,....
iHnmwm
Protection Rackets
Will be Investigated
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Rabin has
decided to become personal-
ly involved in efforts to elim-
inate the protection racket
Soviet Jewish Woman
Kept in Mental Hospital
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Soviet Jewish woman. Meta Lei-
kina. has been held incommu-
nicado for eight months in a
mental institution in Kazan in
the Soviet Tartar Republic and
is suffering from malnutrition
and severe mental depression,
according to information reach-
ing her daughter, Anna Rosnov-
skaya, who lives in Israel.
Details of the case were re-
ported by Inez Weissman, presi-
dent of the Long Island Com-
mittee for Soviet Jewry.
ACCORDING to Weissman,
the daughter learned of her
mother's condition from her sis-
ter in Moscow who only recent-
ly was allowed to visit Mrs.
Leikina for the first time since
her incarceration.
The daughter reported that
her mother's weight was down
Continued on Page 8-A
that is preying on merchants
in Israel's large cities. Rabin
revealed his intention at a
Cabinet session after Wel-
fare Minister Zevulun Ham-
mer said the phenomenon is
growing and needs increas-
ing police resources to curb
it.
Police Minister Shlomo
Hillel, who last week said
the police could not control
the racket because the vic-
tims were afraid to talk, told
the Cabinet that the police
are trying to eliminate the
racket.
THE PROTECTION racket
has been receiving more public
attention with the increasing
violent incidents that have oc-
Continued on Page 12A
Third World Dictated Rabasa's Ouster
MEXICO CITY (JTA)
The unexpected resignation
of Foreign Minister Emilio
O. Rabasa may have been
triggered by the storm of
criticism in the Mexican
press that he went too far
in trying to mollify Israel
for Mexico's vote in favor of
the General Assembly's anti-
Zionist resolution adopted
Nov. 10.
But some observers here
attribute his sudden depar-
ture to a basic trend in Mex-
ico's foreign policy toward
the Third World and away
from the United States
which, sources say, was re-
sponsible in the first place
for Mexico lining up with
the Arab-Communist Third
World bloc to identify Zion-
ism as a form of racism.
RABASA, a close friend of
U.S. Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger, announced his re-
signation Dec. 29 without giving
a reason but said his decision
was "irrevocable." Government
sources said he had not been
dismissed.
His successor, appointed im
Continued on Page 1S-A
rif, appeared on the eve of Al-
ton's departure for Washington,
where he was to meet Wednes-
day and Thursday with Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kissinger
and possibly with President
Ford.
ACCORDING TO Ma'ariv, Al-
ton's suggestion was the first by
a ranking member of the govern-
ment that included West Bank
leaders in negotiations with
Jordan, an apparent attempt to
neutralize the PLO. A Foreign
Ministry spokesman hinted that
the reported proposal coincided
with Alton's views when he re-
ferred newsmen to the Foreign
Minister's speech at the Labor
Party's ideological forum at Beit
Berl last week.
Alton said at that time that
when the time comes to negoti-
ate with Jordan, "We shall want
to consult both the Jordanians
and the West Bankers on the
way to include West Bank rep-
resentatives in the talks."
The question remained as to
whether Allon was merely re-
peating in political consultations
this week what he had said on
the record last week or was ac-
tively pushing for an Israeli ini-
tiative in that direction.
MA'ARIV OUOTED other po-
litical figures as expressing
doubts as to the feasibility of
Continued on Page 1S-A
EMILIO RABASA


Page 2-A
vJewisli narkJiaiKi
Friday, January 9, 1975

World Congress Moves
Africa, Asia Desks
NEW YORK (JTA) The Executive of the World
Jewish Congress decided at a recent meeting in
Jerusalem to move to New York the African and Asian
Affairs desk which for the past two or three years has
been located in London.
This was announced by Philip M. Klutznick, chair-
man of the Governing Board of the WJCongress. The
transfer, Klutznick said, follows a decision by the
WJCongress to step up its efforts to create friendship
and understanding between the Jewish people and Afri-
can and Asian nations many of which know little or
nothing about the history and aspirations of the Jewish
people.
KLUTZNICK NOTED that in addition to African
and Asian Permanent Missions to the UN and embassies
in Washingon, there were also several important insti-
tutes in this country for American African and Amer-
ican-Asian cooperation.
The person appointed to the desk in New York will
take over an ongoing operation which has already estab-
lished contacts with a substantial number of African
and Asian countries, and has to its credit some signifi-
cant achievements, Klutznick said.
Mandy Rice-Davies Begins
Slage Career in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) A key figure in the 1963
scandal in Britain that led to the resignation of War
Minister John Profumo and rocked the upper echelons
of government has begun a new stage career in Israel.
Mandy Rice-Davies, 30, is receiving plaudits for her
performance in "Who's Afraid of Marriage," a Hebrew
adaptation of the Broadway stage hit, "The Marriage-
Go-Round." Miss Rice-Davies, who came to Israel 10
years ago, married an Israeli and became a successful
restaurant owner, plays the part of a woman who wants
to have the perfect child and goes about finding the per-
fect father.
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BICENTENNIAL D'CG^APH?ES
CoL Solomon Bush: Office
COLONEL SOLOMON BUSH reached the
highest rank of all Jewish officers in the Con-
tinental Army. His first duty in the War of
Independence was -Deputy Adjutant General of
the Pennsylvania State Militia.
Fighting near Brandy wine, Bush received
a near fatal wound. He survived but was cap-
tured when Philadelphia was taken by the Brit-
ish. He was later freed in a prisoner exchange
and applied for rations and pay.
THE SUPREME Executive Committee
studied his record and cited him for a dis-
tinguished and brilliant career, especially dur-
ing the winter of 1776 "when the service was
critical and hazardous."
After the war, unable to connect with a gov-
ernment job, and probably seeking medical aid
for his wound that never quite healed. Bush
journeyed to England where he again was aole
to serve his country. The British were stil!
smartina under defeat, and w*i*e nn<*qnirtv, >
policy which led to the War of 1312 seizing and
- irching Anvsricin boats and conscripting
their sailors into the Royal Navy. At the *;
no U.S. consul or ambassador was present to
intervene, so Col. Bush took it upon himself
to act on b?balf of his fellow Americans.
HE REPORTED his efforts to President
Washington whose answer contained warm com-
mendations for the CoUnel's successful inter-
ventions.
On his return to America, Bush applied for
the office of Postmaster General, recently va-
cated by Timothy Pickering who had been pro-
moted to Secretary of War. He was the first
Jew known to be considered for Cabinet rank.
If he failed to reach this office, his unhealed
wound must have played a role since it did
hasten his death, probably in 1796.
f
Yariv Gloomy About US. Aid
Continued from Page 1-A
tees.
YARIV SAID he spent more
time in Washington than he had
originally intended because he
had to see almost every Senator
and many members of the House
in order to explain fully Israel's
security needs. "I tried to con-
vince the Senators and Repre-
sentatr.es that the balance of
power in the Middle East is such
that the arms aid to Israel m LSI
be appro-, ed in its fullest form,"
Yariv said.
He.added that he could not
say the aid would be approved
because of his efforts, but that
they did no harm. He said there
was a good chance that Israel's
requests would be ajnroved
without any serious cuts.
Bit he cautioned that Israel
would nit be able to make so
!n!.'e an av ns request in 1976.
BUY ISRAEL BONDS
This makes Israel Economically
Strong when you give to
the CJA Israel Emergency
Fund you give to yourself.
Mayshie Friedberg

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Friday, January 9, 1976
pJmlsti flcridfiaun
Page 3-A
Israel: Recognize Us and We'll Negotiate
By YITZHAK RAB1
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Israel has- declar-
ed that it is prepared to en-
ter into negotiations "at any
moment without any pre-
conditions whatsoever" with
its Arab neighbors but that
it would negotiate only on
the basis Of recognition of
Israel's sovereign rights,
would accept no dictates
from any quarter, and "we
will not negotiate our own
suicide."
In a firm, but generally
conciliatory address in the
General Assembly's Middle
East debate, Israel's Ambas-
sador to the UN, Chaim Her-
zog, called on the Arab
states "to rise above the
hate, bitterness and intran-
sigence of their words, to
liberate themselves from the
chains of their slogans and
to join with us in setting out
together along the road to-
ward peace and a better life
in the Middle East."
HERZOG OBSERVED that
the issue in the Middle East is
not the question of territory or
the question of the Palestinians,
"although these are both im-
portant."
It is, he said, "a change of
heart with respect to Israel on
the part of the Arab countries.
Until that change is achieved,
no meaningful advance can
really be attained in the Mid-
dle East.
The Israeli envoy said that
while Israel is ready to nego-
tiate, it will not accept dictates
of any kind. He reiterated Is-
rael's position that progress to-
Rabin Sees War in Middle East
Continued from Page 1-A
but possibly we will have to give
expression to this (war) sooner
than many think."
Rabin's statement came on the
heels of a Cabinet statement to
Washington to block the Se-
curity Council attempts to put
Israel-Arab' negotiations into its
hands.
MEANWHILE, Israel's en-
voys to the United States and
the United Nations charged this
week that the presence of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion at Monday's Security Coun-
cil debate on the Middle East
was designed to destroy the
chances of a negotiated peace
in the Middle East in favor of
an Arab-Soviet imposed settle-
ment.
"Israel will not be a party to
this futile exercise," declared
Simcha Dinitz, Israel's Ambas-
sador to Washington.
"The American reassertion of
two Israeli diplomats
in accepting Stephen
No Basic Differences
Between Israel and U.S.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Jus-
tice Minister Haim Zadok, who
returned from an extended visit
to the U.S., has reported that
there were no basic differences
between Washington and Jeru-
salem on the Palestinian ques-
tion. Although Zadok was pri-
marily on a fund-raising mis-
sion, he met with several high
ranking U.S. officials, including
Under Secretary of State for
Political Affairs Joseph J. Sisco.
He told reporters that Israelis
exaggerated the possibility of a
shift in American policy toward
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization. He said his meeting with
Sisco made it clear that the U.S.
understood Israel's determina-
tion not to have any dealings
with the PLO and its reasons
for refusing to take part in next
week's Security Council debate
on the Middle East to which the
PLO has been invited.
ZADOK, who was absent from
the last few Cabinet meetings,
told reporters that he regarded
leaks of classified material from
Cabinet sessions and from vari-
ous ministries as a crime that
demanded vigorous investiga-
tion.
He said the leaks prevented
a fair discussion of major issues
by the Cabinet. Zadok also
criticized Cabinet members who
publicly expressed their dis-
agreement with certain govern-
ment policies.
itself in the councils of the
United Nation has, I fear, per-
haps come too late^'_said Chaim
Herzog, Israel's Permanent Rep-
resentative to the UN.
The
spoke
Wise Awards "for distinguished
service to Israel" presented by
the American Jewish Congress
at a dinner in the Waldorf-
Astoria.
AMBASSADOR Dinitz said
the Nov. 30 Security Council
resolution inviting the PLO to
take part in Middle East peace
discussions next Monday was "a
prescription for stalemate, not
for progress."
Herzog warned that recent
UN votes reflected "a deter-
mined, avowed effort to destroy
the Geneva Conference, to de-
stroy the process of negotiation
and to replace it by a process
of dictation in which the Se-
curity Council will attempt to
improve a Soviet-Arab solution
on Israel."
He continued: "The decision
of the Security Council to seat
the PLO at the Council table
was a blatant violation of the
Charter of the United Nations.
This Charter specifically allows
for the invitation of states or of
persons to the deliberations of
the Security Council. It does not
allow for the invitation of or-
ganizations."
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PLO Refused Office
In Venezuela
NEW YORK (JTA) Venezuela has refused a
request by the Palestine Liberation Organization to open
an office in Caracas, according to the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The ADL said that the Venezuelan Ministry of For-
eign Relations stated that the refusal was based upon
Venezuela's policy of maintaining relations only with
nations and international organizations.
THE PLO REQUEST was made Nov. 7 during a visit
to Caracas by a PLO delegation. The PLO published an
advertisement in Caracas newspapers on Dec. 18 as a
means of pressuring the Venezuelan government.
The advertisement expressed the PLO's sadness
that the government had not yet responded to the re-
quest for the establishment of an official permanent PLO
delegation in Caracas, the ADL reported.
ward peace can be
the framework laid
made in
down by
Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338.
He said that if the purpose
of the present General Assem-
bly debate is to develop a proc-
ess of negotiations without pre-
conditions, Israel would coop-
erate in every way.
HERZOG WARNED, how-
ever, that if the purpose of the
debate and other UN meetings
is to pass "purposeless, one-
sided resolutions and create a
situation whereby the Security
Council or the General Assem-
bly will attempt to impose a
solution Israel's attitude to-
ward this proposition (is) for-
get it."
Herzog declared, "We will
not be a party to any attempt
to dictate to us."
HE OBSERVED that it would
be "wiser" and "logical" to ask
the representative of the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
whether or not the PLO accepts
the resolutions laid down by
the Security Council as the ba-
sis for negotiations and whether
they are prepared to renounce
their declared policy calling for
the destruction of a member
state of the UN.
He noted that many UN dele-
gates "blithely express them-
selves on the question of the
representation of the PLO at
Geneva or even at meetings of
the Security Council."
But, Herzog asked, how could
Israel be asked to negotiate
"with people whose open, avow-
ed policy is to destroy our
existence?"
Arab
Students
Quit
Campus
J
JERUSALEM (JTA) Eight
Arab students have departed
from the Hebrew University
campus at Ein Karem, choosing
to Teave rather than stand com-
pulsory guard duty with their
Jewish dormitory mates. The
Arab youths said their refusal
was a "principle of conscience"
and noted that Israeli Arabs are
not conscripted for compulsory
duty in the armed forces.
The Ein Karem campus
houses mainly pre-medical stu-
dents. The Arab students had
volunteered to perform non-
security related services on the
campus such as first aid in lieu
of guard duty.
BUT THE University Student
Union, dominated by the mili-
tant Likud and National Religi-
ous Party, rejected the offer.
They insisted that in addition to
first aid duties, the Arabs patrol
the campus.
The University authorities
who would have preferred a
compromise, said they could
only accept one that was agreed
to by the Student Union which
they recognize as the sole of-
ficial representative of the stu-
dent body, including the Arabs.
AMIN RIAD, head of the Arab
Students Committee warned "If
we are forced to leave the cam-
pus the issue will be brought to
the Arab public, and then it will
be hard to stop it from rolling."
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Page 4-A
vJewist fhridUari
Friday, January 9


Rabin's Serious Warning
The long-awaited Security Council debate, with
Israel's on-again, off-possibly threat to boycott it, begins
on Monday.
We must take seriously Prime Minister Rabin's
warning over the weekend that a Council attempt to
take over the Israeli-Arab peace negotiations might
easily lead to war.
This is an acid note on which to begin the new
year. Nevertheless, the world must be put on notice
that it alone will have to bear the responsibility for con-
tinuing recklessness and acquiescence to Arab Third
World Communist bloc blackmail at the United Na-
tions.
So far, it is estimated that the UN has been spend-
ing some 50 percent of its time condemning Israel for
one reason or anothermainly for existing.
What has been occurring there, and in its ancillary
organizations, such as at the regional UNESCO meeting
in Paris recently, where another condemnation of Is-
rael was voted, emerges in the retrospect of the out-
going year as a kind of game for the amusement of the
Arab Third World Communist bloc hangers-on.
Rabin's warning to them over the weekend was
meant to put all this at an end- We hope they take him
at his word.
Mexico: Where to Now?
The Echeverria-Rabasa flap is over. All "explana-
tions" have been duly noted, including President Eche-
verria's vow that he would "rather die" than apologize
for Mexico's aye vote on the recent United Nations
resolution equating Zionism with racism.
What is not noted is where we go from here.
There is no doubt that the American-Jewish boycott
of Mexico as a tourist site has hurt Mexico's economy
beyond anything anyone imagined possible. It began not
as an organized effort but as a spontaneous outpouring
of righteous wrath. Perhaps that is why it has proven
so effective.
But American Jews are not really tuned in on how
to carry on. Is Mexico to continue to be a tourist pariah?
There is no clue from Israel. At the height of the
flap, one Jewish leader associated with Tel Aviv Uni-
versity went to Mexico City to accept an award from
President Echeverria who had, himself, just weeks be-
fore that, received an award from the same university.
Neither do there seem to be any clues from among
the ranks of American leadershipapart from the con-
flicting statements following the Rabasa resignation and
then following the Echeverria vow before the Mexican
Congress.
Boycott, contrary to the Arab zest for it, is not only
a dangerous thing. It is also an immoral thing. It must
be thought about very seriously, especially now that it
is no longer spontaneous but being organized.
Terror Hits Home
During Golda Meir's December tour of the United
States, the former Israeli Premier constantly pointed
out that the Jewish condition provides a barometer for
a country's well-being. She noted that wherever a gov-
ernment begins mistreating Jews this is an indication
of what will soon be in store for the rest of its citizens.
The same is true on a global scale, as indicated by
the recent terrorist attack on the headquarters of tho
Organization of Oil-Producing Countries (OPEC) in
Vienna. When the world closed its eyes to the Arab
terrorist attacks on Israel, the Israeli government re-
peatedly warned that unless this terrorism was stopped
others would suffer from it too.
Now terrorists, who shot up the OPEC offices and
held Arab oil ministers as hostages, used the same
weapons of violence against the very countries that
have applauded their use against Israel.
-to
it
ft
. .. And Home is Israel
Unfortunately, terrorism Is no longer the kind of
problem that involves Jews as objects. Judging from
the growing level of juvenile delinquency and adult
crime m Israel, it appears that Jews are increasingly
becoming the perpetrators of terror and criminality
themselves.
This is what is behind Prime Minister Rabin's state-
ment this week that he will be launching a high-level
attack on Israeli racketeering.
One can only hope that crime in Israel is the tem-
porary consequence of agony in Israelunbearable fi-
nancial burdens, the constant threat of war, the never-
ending Arab terrorist attacks.
Still, whatever the reason, it is a newly-emerging
Jewish sociological pheomenon, and a tragic one to
reckon with.
We're Back in the Mid-30's
IN TERMS of historical paral-
lels, we are living in the mid-
1930's. The world is dividing up
into contending camps involv-
ing spheres of influence geo-
graphic, demographic, access to
raw materials, ideologic.
Ideology is tne last of these
it was no different in the
mid-1930's although from
time to time some pretentious
politician, swollen wfith pride
and power, will insist it is the
first, just as pretentious politi-
Mindlin
I1IIIM"""1
cians insisted it was the Km
then, too. m
Perhaps the most potent Mrt
of the parallel is that, again JJ
are pretending that none of 2
dividing up is occurring.
IN THE tace of one daily in.
ternational disaster after an
other, which piles political im"
passe upon impasse, we try to
live both fiscally and spiritual-
ly as if nothing has changed.
Worst of all, the endless
demonstration is that we have
learned nothing from history
we do business with those who
will eventually be our bloodiest
opponents.
Make no mistake: there is no-
thing in this that shows our hu-
mility, our humanity, our deter-
mination to avoid confrontation
at all costs that fraud, for
example, we call detente.
BY BUSINESS, I mean what
Karl Marx meant when he pre-
dicted the demise of capitalist
society that the bourgeois is
alway delighted to sell the tools
of his own destruction to any-
one who will buy them. All he
wants is to make a profit the
rest be damned, including his
own destruction. He reasons
that he can deal with that
eventuality "later." (This is a
perfect definition of detente.)
Then all that has changed
since the mid-1930's are the
contenders and the eventual
battlegrounds. (Some are no
longer "eventual." Some, we
have already lived upon and lost
upon.)
Mainly, the shift here is from
internecine to multi-racial and
multi civilizational struggle.
What lies ahead for us is not
another showdown for power
Continued on Page 13-A
Sad Recital of People's Decline
A surprisingly large front
page headline in the Los An-
geles Times while I was visiting
there last week called attention
to Israel's internal problems. As
.the loading story of the day, it
was a sad recital of an economy
and a people apparently in a
serious decline because of tlv
tremendous burden imposed by
defense expenditures.
When I wrote "several weeks
.!> that the demand for st
Jewish support of the P<
Ron's budgets on the gro 1
that it was important to 1 sra l
survival could affect adversely
the quality of life in America
I received the usual criticis*".
Without American arms, I ws
informed, Israel could not pos-
siblv defend itself.
THERE IS no disagreement
with that. What is dishearten-
ing to me as a Jew and an
American separating the twe
for the purposes of this column
is the mindless, cynical poli-
cy of the United States in re-
spect to its sales of arms, pri-
marily in the Middle East,
which makes a mockery of any
notion of effective military de-
fense by Israel. The only cer-
tainty appears to be bankruptcy.
By one of those ironies of
American life, the scion of a
family which made its fortune
out of war has conducted an
important study which con-
cludes that the U.S. government
can no longer exercise effective
control over American weapons
once it has sold them to Arab
countries.
Congressman Pierre S. Du-
Pont headed a House Interna-
tional Relations Committee
study mission which made this
basic point, as it relates to the
security of Israel:
BILLIONS in arms being sold
to the Arab nations can easily
be diverted to Syria and Egypt
for use against Israel if the oc-
casion arose even though, theo-
retically, Saudi Arabia and Ku-
wait, the two countries most
involved, are prohibited from
doing so.
Edward
"Should a country decide to
i -an"! American weaponry,
the United States can do little
to prevent it," the study re-
veals. It should not be over-
looked that Saudi Arabia's lead-
ers, fanatically religious en-
emies of Israel, have been the
buyers of close to $5 billion in
arms and Kuwait more than
$5*11 million in recent years.
To meet this newest threat to
its survival, as well as the bil-
lions in military equipment sold
by the Soviet Union, Great Brit-
ain, France and others to Syria,
Libya and Egypt, Israel has im-
posed on its people the high-
est taxes in the world.
THE POSTPONEMENT of so-
cial reforms, the dramatic de-
cline in the GNP, the rise of
crimes of violence, emigration
seeming to outpace aliyah, all
cn b- traced to the understand-
able insecurity of the small na-
tion surrounded by armed
enemies.
What is happening in the
Midcile East is of primary con-
cern to us, of course, but the
picture is no different in the
rest of the world including
tTie poverty stricken <:d
World where the expi ::di-
tures of vast resources arc be-
ing made for military hardware
while the needs of people for
food, medicine and simple shel-
ter are ignored.
THE PACIFIST Jeaneth
kin, the only member of 1 D>
gress to vote against both World
Wars I and II, commented pro-
nhetically one time that All
they that live by the sword shall
perish by taxes," and it would
seem to be as true in the near
future for this country as it is
for those others which have far
less resources.
Too many intelligent people
of all political shades have been
critical of the arms races, of
Pentagon expenditures, of the
obscenity of wasted resources
for the purpose of further des-
truction, for us to take serious-
ly the proposition that the
American people must make a
serious assault on the militar-
ism which has infected our so-
ciety and, yes, threatens our
security and that of Israel.
To provide for the common
defense, as stated in our Con-
Continued on Page 13-A
Jewish Florxdian
FHED K. SHOCHET !!!' "" FIrlda 3MM
Editor and Publisher tEO MINDUN
The Jewish Flo-rim.- !M .? El,i*<>'- Assistant to ]
Of The MkSSSIanSVffi1 G.r"" The Ka.hrwth
Publl.h-d evorv ImSTJ "" Advertied In It. Column.
*ond-Cta k?fe '=27.by The Jewlsn WoridlM
3310J
SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
Assistant to Publir*-"*
ew.p4p9rt
SUBSCRIPTION RATFrTTT------1--------------------------"""" ..... "---------
Three YMr._tWM "f; t-ocal Area) One Year812.00: Two Year.$22.00;
f<_of Town Upon Reque.t. _
Number 2
Volume 49
Friday, January 9, 1976
7 SHEVAT
^


Friday, January 9, 1976
vJkwisti Ftcrtdfiatr?
Page 5-A
KissingeV Rebuffs CIA Study of hraeVs Budget
WASHINGTON (WNS)
A report that the $2.3 billion in
military and economic aid the
Administration has recommend-
ed for Israel will result in a $500
million budget surplus was vig-
orously denied by Secretary oi
State Henry A. Kissinger.
Replying to questions at *
news conference, Kissinger said
he was "not familiar" with an
alleged CIA secret study of the
Israeli economy which reported-
ly said that Israels requests for
U.S. assistance were "greatly
inflated."
Kissinger said that "even at
the level of $2.3 billion" ol
American aid "Israel will have
to engage in an austerity pro-
gram in order to make endjj
meet." The Israeli Cabinet h*JJ
iust adopted an IL 84.2 billion
austerity budget which provide!
for heavy cuts in government;
spending in all departments.
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Page 6-A
* Jen is* ffcriafiann
Friday, Januarv
President Ford Not Lame, but Sitting, Duck
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Sydicate
President Ford was at Vail,
Colo., doing one thing he does
pretty well skiing. Yet it
availeth him not. He is still
caught up in an ordeal by ridi-
cule.
I am scarcely a Ford support-
er, but I have had my fill of
the cheap shots hurled at him
by TV entertainers, profession-
al and amateur comics and
amateur politicians. When he
takes a fall on the snow, it re-
minds his critics of his recent
stumbles.
When he stumbles, they see
him as a stumblebum. When he
misreads a line in a speech,
they pillory him. They openly
assess his intellectual powers as
not much above the mentally
defective.
SINCE America is a dem-
ocracy, there is always open
hunting season on Presidents. I
have hit at him myself when
he deserved it on his energy
policy and especially on his
harsh, unfeeling earlier stand
toward New York financing.
But it is one thing to hit hard
at a policymaker for bad poli-
cies and quite another to ridi-
cule him indiscriminately for
real or fancied personal weak-
nesses, when he is helpless to
answer.
As every President has dis-
covered at some point in his
tenure, American public opin-
ion can be brutal.
GERALD FORD carries an
expert disability because he was
never elected either to the Vice
Presidency or the Presidency.
On both counts he isn't a lame
luck he is a sitting duck.
It began, I suspect, with the
stumbling. A feeling has built
up against President Ford, on
many grounds, but it didn't
have a symbol to clothe itself
in. The stumbling furnished the
symbol.
There have been two other
recent instances where a simi-
lar symbol proved the political
death of a public figure.
ONE WAS Edmund Muskie,.
when he stood in the New
PRESIDENT FORD
openly pilloried
Hampshire snow in early 1972,
with reporters and cameras
around, and wept with rage
over a slur on bis wife. Those
tears in the snow finished him
as a presidential candidate.
The other instance was, of
course, George Romney's re-
mark about having been "brain-
washed" on Vietnam. That, too,
proved a clincher.
Neither Romney nor Muskie
ever became President. Mr.
Ford did.
THE ORDEAL of ridicule
visited on the image of a
"stumbling" President now
creates a credibility crisis for
him, which will affect not only
his personal showing against
Reagan, which isn't so import-
ant for the nation, but also the
Administration conduct of for-
eign and domestic policy, which
is.
It is a characteristic of Amer-
ican democracy that we commit
mayhem on an incumbent Presi-
dent, wound him, lame him, fill
him with buckshot, bloody him,
mug him; and when we present
him to the world thus bat-
tered, bruised and bandaged
we are surprised that our allies
abroad are disheartened and
that our enemies gang up to
finish the job thus begun. <
THIS ISN'T a plea to go easy
on Gerald Ford, wjio seems to
have a thick political skin and
as an old pro can take it. Be-
sides, Mr. Ford has been known,
to play pretty dirty himself, as
Ford, and whose head i,
bloodied but still unbowed
I mean Mayor Abraham
Beame of New York City. At one
point the two political' career-
he did in his effort to impeach Forj.s and Beame.s __ eer>
Supreme Court Justice William sected( to Mr. Fords hapless
damage and Beame's good for'
tune.
IT WAS when Mr. Ford made
his National Press Club attack
on Beame in New York City in
a ruthless, slashing manner.
It gave Beame a chance, at
the same forum the following
week, to answer Mr. Ford in a
forceful speech that carried
weight around the nation.
The exchange marked Mr.
Ford's wqrsi performance and
Beame's finest hour. It was a
turning point for Mr. Ford: Af-
ter that, everything went down-
hill.
IT WAS also a turning point
for Mew York City, when the
crumbling of the anti-New York
sentiment began.
It is a good example of how
political battle in America op-
erates at its best, not its worst.
O. Douglas.
It is a plea rather to do less
hurt to ourselves. The give-and-
take of healthy political com-
bat is a necessity in a dem-
ocracy.
We are witnessing now, in
India, the shabby 6tory of a
political leader who couldn't
take criticism and so ended
Indian democracy in order to
end the criticism.
THIS ISN'T likely to be re-
peated in the United States. But
a nation which has been able
to afford a long history of
rough-and-tumble political strug-
gle can afford also to distin-
guish between hard slugging on
policy decisions and unfair at-
tacks of a personal character.
Curiously there is another
political figure woo has had an
even rougher time than Gerald
Plan Proposed to Leave
Jerusalem as United City
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Vet-
eran Mapam leader Yaacov Ha-
zan has proposed, a. plan fr
Jerusalem that would, leave the
city united under Israeli con-
trol.
He told Mapam's political
committee. that under his pro-
posal there would still be a cen-
tral municipal government that
would have authority over the
entire city bik the city would
be divided into areas or bo-
roughs on the basis of the dem-
ographic distribution of the pop-
ulation.
THE VARIOUS areas would
have authority to handle their
affairs independently. Hazan
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proposed his own Jerusalem j
plan because, he said, it wasi
better for Israel to defend itsj
own proposal than to oppose a {
plan by its opponents.
The fact that some U.S. uni-
versities are working on draft,
proposals for Jerusalem means,
that people are thinking about
the problem and it will come up j
sooner or later.
Hazan said the Old City j
should be governed by a comt
mittee of Jews, Christians and,
Moslems and the holy places
should be regarded as having,
extraterritoriality, although, Is-,
rael should continue to be re-
sponsible for maintaining order
at the sites.
HE SAID the Arabs could.;
hold citizenship in some state
east of Israel (he did not specify,
whether this would be Jordan;
or a Palestinian state) or theyj
could apply for Israeli citizen-
ship.
He said if they retain their,
Arab citizenship they should
still be given all the rights of
Israeli citizens except to vote
for the Knesset.
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Friday, January 9, 1976
vJkmisti Fkridian
Page 7-A
Student Network Sees No Democrary
In American Jewish Life
CLEVELAND (JTA) The
North American Jewish student
network adopted by a narrow
margin a resolution at the close
of its annual convention here
advising Israel to "take the
initiative" in negotiations with
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization for a solution to the
Palestinian problem, provided
that the PLO recognizes Israel's
right to exist "as a legitimate
political entity as presently con-
stituted" and renounces all
forms of terrorism.
The resolution was passed by
a vote of 55-48 after prolonged
debate among the 200 delegates
from university and college
campuses all over the U.S. and
Canada who attended the four-
day convention at Case-Western
Reserve University here.
THERE are aboitt 100 ob-
Pressure Groups
Won H Move Us,
Ford Tells 'Caster
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Ford declared
this week that United States foreign policies will not be
determined by any "highly articulate" or "very tightly
organized pressure group of any kind" that is unrepresenta-
tive of American society as a whole and because they "have
a limited perspective or scope can on occasion, tend to
distort the circumstances and can hamper rather than help
in the solution" of the problems at hand.
The President made those remarks in the course of
an interview on a three-hour NBC television program de-
voted to U.S. foreign policy in 1976. A transcript of the
pre-taped interview was made available to the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
WHILE Ford did not identify
the "pressure groups," he re-
ferred to them in direct re-
sponse to NBC reporter John
Chancellor, who asked for a com-
ment on "some, of the pressure
groups we find both within the
United Nations and as you see
these puessure- groups in for-
eign affairs, thinking, for ex-
ample, *jf the influence of
American Jews, of the growing
influence of Arabs of various
groups."
In the course of the inter-
view, the President also sharp-
ly criticized, what he considered
undue Congressional interfer-
ence in the Presidential foreign
policy-making prerogatives.
IN THAT connection he refer-
red, without mentioning by
name, to. the Jackson-Vanik
Amendment to the U.S. Trade
Reform Act that linked U.S.
trade benefits for the Soviet
Union with that country's emi-
gration practices.
"The action of Congress about
a year ago has harmed the op-
portunity of many to immigrate
from the Soviet Union," Ford
said. "I noticed just the other
day that the immigration from
the Soviet Union is down this
year including many reductions
in the immigration of Soviet
Jews from Russia. I think the
action of Congress was harmful
in that retard"
THE PRESIDENT was sur-
prisingly mild in his response
to a question about V.S. rela-
tions with the UN, where it has
suffered a series of diplomatic
setbacks. "I believe that sub-
stantial progress- was made .
in the UN in the seventh special
lession late in 1975," he said.
"That was a very construc-
tive session of the UN which
ought to bring together de-
veloping as well as the develop-
ed nations."
He conceded that "it is true
that subsequent to that there
were some very vitriolic de-
bates; there- were some very
serious differences tfcnt de-
veloped in the UN from various
pressure groups."
FORD expressed hope that in
the future "some of this conflict
would subside and there would
be a rlre constructive effort
made to solve the problems, and
since I am always an optimist
-^ and I think that is important
and necessary for a President
to be that 1 think that as we
move in the UN in the future
that we can calm some of the
veices and get to some an-
swers."
Ford added that "this coun-
try's foreign policy in the UN
will be armed in that direction,
and if we- follow what we did in
the seventh special session and
what we are trying to do now,
I think these pressure groups
will recognize that words are
not the answer but solutions will
be to the benefit of all parties
concerned," the President said.
When asked if he thought that
"organized pressure groups play
a greater role now in terms of
our foreign affairs or trying to
influence them" than in the
past, Ford replied: "To some
degree, yes. I think highly or-
ganized, very articulate pres-
sure groups can, on occasion,
tend to distort the circum-
stances and can hamper rather
than help in the solution.
"I don't -believe those pres-
sure groups necessarily repre-
sent the American people as a
whole. So a President, myself
included, has to look at the
broader perspective and not
necessarily in every instance
r*nond to th* pressure groups
that are well-intentioned but
who have a limited perspective
or scope.
"And as we move ahead, we
OK going to try and predicate
our foreign policy on the best
interests of all the people in
this country, as well as our al-
lies and our adversaries, rather
than to respond to a highly
articulate, a wry tightly organ-
ized pressure group of any kind.
We cannot-let America's policies
be predicated on a limited part
of our population or our se-
-ciety."
servers. The delegates attend-
ing represented the full political
spectrum, from left to right-
wings, and included delegates
from Zionist and non-Zionist,
religious and secular student
groups.
The overall atmosphere was
one of support and identifica-
tion with Israel as expressed in
resolutions calling for Aliya and
volunteers.
One resolution, however, ex-
pressed serious concern over
the social and economic gap
between Israel's orienta 1 end
western Jewish communities.
With regard to the American
Jewish scene, the network seem-
ed most disturbed by what it
regards as a lack of democracy
in American-Jewish life.
THE RESOLUTION on the
PLO was significant inasmuch as
the Palestinian issue presently
looms as the most crucial one
in Middle East peace negotia-
tions and has created sharp dif-
ferences of opinion in Israel
and within the Israeli govern-
ment.
The draft, adopted here,
though hard fought at the pie-
nan' session and in prior work-
shop debates, generated support
from both left and right.
It stated: "Whereas there can
be no solution to the Middle
East conflict without Palestin-
ian recognition of the Jewish
right to self-determination and
Israel's recognition of the Pales-
tinians' right to self-determina-
tion, we advise Israel to take the
initiative to find a solution to
the Palestine question including
meeting with the PLO when the
following conditions are met:
The PLO publicly an-
nounces its acceptance of the
State of Israel as a legitimate
political entity as presently con-
stituted;
The PLO publicly indicates
its rejection of all acts of viol-
ence and terrorism against civil-
ian populations, and the PLO
publicly promises to refrain
from any actions of this na-
ture."
ANOTHER resolution adopted
applauded the U.S. Ambassador
to the United Nations, Daniel
P. Moynihan, for his "eloquent
defense of democracy in the UN
and vigorous criticism of the
Zionism is racism resolutions,"
and urged him to continue to
speak out against third world
and communist "totalitarian-
ism."
A resolution on the social
gap in Israel stated: "Be it re-
solved that the sense of thi*
body is that we believe that the
unequal status of a part of the
Sephardic community in Israel
creates the most serious threat
to Israel's survival as a unified
Jewish community."
The resolution called on Is-
rael "to work for equalization
of economic and cultural op-
portunities among rich and
poor" and "to reorganize the
educational system to provide
equal educational opportunities"
and to "reflect the cultural div-
ersity of all Israelis."
THE RESOLUTION stated
further the network should
"provide educational programs
about current social problems in
Israel and encourage volunteers
to work for underdeveloped
communities in Israel."
The convention contended
that Jewish communal life in
Africa is "largely undemocrat-
ic" and that the Jewish lay pub-
lic "is largely ill-informed and
misinformed."
It stated that there were "few
public hearings on critical ques-
tions" and "few genuine elec-
tions to communal office."
A RESOLUTION adopted
stated that "The network shall
c^nerate with other individ-
uals, organizations and coali-
tions in attempts to create a
democratically-elected, account-
able body to represent the
younger generation of American
Jewry and eventually the com-
munity as a whole."
The scope of the convention's
interest was reflected in the
numerous workshops and panel
discussions held during the four-
day conclave.
THE SUBJECTS of these in-
cluded Jewish feminism. Jewish
theater, Jewish education and
teaching, the Sephardic com-
munity and poverty in Israel,
Zionism, the Third World and
the UN, building alternative
communities, problems of the
older generation, Kibbutz and
Aliyah.
Fredda Smith, of Madison,
Wis., was elected chairperson
of the network.
SI El u your precious jewels X3|>mVh1 to the most prestigious -"V"v/y" jewelers in the South --^ \A Call Lewis Rustexn Phone: 445-2644
Herb Schoenberg 531-0087]
>vhats
ZIONISM?
go to the source
not the oil tank
>ia

L [ 1
p-1 -V-
| v<
Read what
Herzl, Weizmann,
Mark Twain,
Ben Gurion,
Churchill
and other thinkers
actually wrote
about Zionism
and Palestine in
ZIONISM:
A Basic Reader
$!<)(>

per copy
50c per copy bulk
(25 or more)
HERZL PRESS 515 Park Avenue, N.Y.C. 10022
Please rush
copies of ZIONISM: A Basic
Reader $ $1.00 per copy. Remittance enclosed.
L.
Addr.
:j
No fancy programs.
No fancy deals.
lust good
old fashioned banking.
We'll always be here
when you need us.
We Care.
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South Dade
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Phone: 274-8362
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301 Arthur Godfrey Road
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Miami Beach. Florida 33160
Phone:949-2121


Page 8-A
vjmisti FkrMiar
Friday, January 9, 1976
U.S. Developers Get Unmatched Advantages
NEW YORK (JTA)
American firms seeking to
locate industrial plants
abroad are finding the ad-
vantages offered by Israel
virtually unmatched by any
other country as a result of
an Executive Order by Pres-
Rabbi Sandrow
Passes at Age 68
NEW YORK (JTA) Rab-
bi Edward T. Sandrow of Wood-
mere, N.Y., a leader in Jewish
education, Zionism .ind a variety
of Israeli programs, and a mem-
ber of the board of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, died in
Mount Sinai Hospital here at
the age of 68.
The cause of death was not
indicated, but he had undergone
surgery a member of times in
recent years. Funeral services
were held at Temple Beth El in
Cedarhurst, of which he had
Soviet Woman
In Mental
Institution
Continued from Page 1-A
to 100 pounds, that she was
wracked by despair and wanted
only to die. The medical com-
mittee at the mental institution
which is supposed to consider
her case will not meet for an-
other seven months.
MRS. LEIKINA was given an
indeterminate sentence after
conviction at a secret trial for
allegedly smuggling a violin out:
of the Soviet Union.
The charge was false, the j
court sat in camera and the ac-'
cused was not permitted to at-j
tend her own trial, Wcissman
said.
Let The
KOSHER
STEAK
HOUSE
Arrange your
Functions. Our
Expert Catering
Staff Will Arrange
Your Luncheon,
Functions,
Bar Mitzvah,
Wedding or Anniversary
(50 to 500 people)
Serving only
GLATT KOSHER MEATS
Call MENASHE HIRSCH
lor an appointment
531-4114
been rabbi emeritus after serv-
ing as rabbi since 1937.
RABBI SANDROW had been
a visiting professor of pastoral
psychiatry and professor of
homilotics at the Jewish Theol-
ogical Seminary and had been
a president and member of the
New York Board of Rabbis and
a past president of the Rab-
binical Assembly, the associa-
tion of Conservative rabbis.
He had served as chairman
of the Commission on Chap-
laincy of the National Jewish
Welfare Board and a former
vice president of the Jewish
Chaplains Association.
He had served as a member
of the executive committee and
the executive council of the
Zionist Organization of America
and a member of the rabbinical
advisory council of the United
Jewish Appeal.
1
ident Ford, effective Jan. 1,
the Government of Israel
Investment Authority an-
nounced here.
The Presidential order
makes Israel one of the few
selected countries eligible
for the Generalized System
of Preferences. This means
that more than 2,700 prod-
ucts manufactured in Israel
can now be imported into
the U.S. duty-free, the In-
vestment Authority said.
THE ADVANTAGES that
would accrue to an American
company locating an industrial
site in Israel include, according
to the Investment Authority,
duty-free access to many U.S.
markets; duty-free access to the
European Common Market; a
preferential tax position, includ-
ing higher foreign tax credits;
and protection from double
taxation.
The doty-free status applies
to many metal products, fine
chemicals, elect; ical and elec-
tronic products, computers and
medic A instruments. Textile and
semi-finished goods are exclud-'
ed under the agreement. The
GSP is a reciprocal agreement.

* Israel has agreed to reduce
import tariffs on over 130 U.S.
made items, the Investment Au-
thority said. The Authority
quoted a senior Israeli govern-
ment official as saying that
products manufactured in Israel
by American firms "will be able
to reach Europe and the United
States as if they were manufac-
tured in the domestic markets
duty-free.
"AT THE SAME time, man-
ufacturers will be able to take
ad antage of the U.S. tax breaks
not granted to operations in ei-
ther the U.S. or the EEC. To-
gether with Israel's low costs,
high technical skils and gener-
ous financial incentives, these
Tax Treaty of Nov. 20, 1975,
advanta ;.. iu< from a 'cost of do-
ing business' standpoint to lo-
c.it- in is/ I t'lan in cither the
Ccmm n Ma-kct or the U.S.,"
the official .said.
It could be the perfect affair. And it should
be. After all, we're talking about the most
important moments in your life. Your
daughter's wedding. Your son's
confirmation. The one big party of
the season.
Our catering director, Betty Ann Mass, is
without peer. Please don't hesitate to
call her for advice, for specialized
attention, and for a chance to look over -
the magnificent new Cotillion Room.
Morris Lansburgh's
Eden Roc
HOTEL, YACHT AND CABANA CLUB
OCEAN FROM 45th to 47th STREET -ON MIAMI BEACH
Betty. Ann Mass, 532-2561
Ih.
no I KOSHER
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HEATED SAlT WATER POOL
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NICHHY ENTERTAINMENT
SOCIAl HOST M.C.
TV IN All ROOMS
CARD ROOM HEAITH ClUI
CIRCUMTING ICE WATER
WfVMVRaOM
TEEN-ME CLUB ROOM
CMLOREN'S COUNStUORS
DURING HOUOAV SEASON
SYNAGOGUE ON PREMISES
SERVING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
TENNIS PRIVILEGE*
VOLLEY BALL
HEALTH SPA SAUNA
Vow H.t the BERKOWITZ Associate*
PHONE: 531-5771 \
FULL OCfaNfROST B10CK
40* tointSTs
\ M.AMl etftCM
/">rtv
BUFFET
EXTRAORDINAIRE
Monday evenings in our
MEDITERRANEAN ROOM
6:00 to 9:00 P.M.
$12.50 per person.
tax and gratuity included.
duties on all industrial exports
to EEC countries; the U.S.-Israel
Tax Treaty if Nov. 20, 1975
which, subject to Congressional
approval, will protect American
firms investing in Israel from
double taxation; and the Israel
government's recent raising of
existing grants for research and
development to match, dollar-
for-dollar, the investing compa-
ny's investment in research and
development.
Israel bases this claim on its
admission t > the European Com-
mon Market as an associate
member last J: ly with an initial,
60 percent reduction in customs
OCEANFRONT AT 20TH ST.
KOSHER
Early Bird
DINNER
. Pluo
t*x and tips
FULL 8 COURSES!!

The New
KOSHER
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il#Vtf| V OPEN ALL YEAR
HOTEL POOL TENNIS CLUB / Complelei III CondihonedA Healed
PRIVATE All WEATHER TENNIS COURTS FUUY EQUIPPED HEALTH ClUS
OLYMPIC POOL PRIVATE BEACH DANCING and ENTERTAINMENT TV IN All ROOMS
COFFEE SHOP RUMPUS ROOM FOR TEENAGERS SERVING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
DAILY SYNAGOGUE SERVICES ON PREMISES
Your Hos! The BERKOWITZ Associates
BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED & I For lnformMiM p*o. ,
FULLY EQUIPPED EFFICIENCIES mq tmmm j
Rates on Request 930*001 I
2 FULL OCtANfROHT BLOCKS 32nd lo 34th Sis. MIAMI BEACH
The
KOSHER KITCHfcN
Offers a Complete Assortment of Take-Out
Foods, Party Platters and Home Catering
Such As Barbecued Chicken, Southern fried
Chicken, Egg Rolls, Chow Mein. Tsimis,
Cholent, Breast of Beef and Kugel.
Everything Cooked Daily
GLATT Meats Under Supervision of O.R.C.
Call Early In The Week For Shabbos Orders
MENASHE HIRSCH
Owner
PHONE: 534-5314
101-21st St., Miami Beach (Next to the Sea Gull Hotel)
A&L
An affair with Heart
at Hotel | |
ontainebleau
We truly care
Combined with the elegance and magnificence of
Hotel Fontainebleau, we pride ourselves in the very
special spirit exhibited by the Fontainebfeau family...
at all times there is the realization ol the importance of
a special event; be it a Bar Mitzvah, Wedding, Anni-
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is always on achieving perieuion. You are invited to
visit and experience first-hand the delights of Fontainebleau.
KOSHER CATERING
AVAILABLE
CALL 538-8811
BILL GOLDRING
Executive Vice President,
Catering
I


Friday, January 9, 1976
+Je*l$kn&rkttan
Page 9 A
u-j
i
N you think that all of Israel's problems are solved
because an interim agreement has been signed, may
we painfully remind you of the sudden shock of the War
of Yom Kippur. And that the Mideast was shattered by
the Six Day War in 1967. And that a quiet period in 1955
was followed by violence and destruction in 1956 And
that the same horrible thing happened in the Mideast
in 1948. And before that, many of us can remember
Hitler promising peace for Europe and the world And,
of course, no one needs to be reminded of the recent
U NresolutioncondemmingZionismasaformof racism.
To forget our vows to help Israel now. because a very
fragile and tentative interim agreement has been signed,
would be to forget the horrible lessons that history has
carved into our souls. Again. And again And again.
We must continue to help the people of Israel with
their human needs and their commitment to make
possible a decent quality of life for every citizen. We
must house Russian immigrants and bring hope to
their elderly and build faith in the future for their children.
We must help them keep alive the traditions through
which future generations of Israelis will find hope and
courage and a sense of their place in the world.
We must pray for peace But we must be prepared
tor anything.
Support the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1976
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Give now
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 576-4000.
If you think all of our problems are solved, think again*
w
We Are One*
o
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal
and Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137 Phone: 576-4000



ft
I
I


'"'' '......
;:. si
Weizmann to Truman: Tm President of a Thousand Presidents'
rrHE STORY is told about Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
the first President of Israel.
Following the establishment of the State of Is-
rael, he visited President Truman and presented
him with a Torah scroll in the White House. Tru-
man, in a relaxed mood, told Dr. Weizmann of the
difficulties he had encountered in his determination
to see the Jewish State come into existence through
the United Nations.
"It is not easy to be a President," he said. Dr.
Weizmann, known for his good humor, retorted: "I
know it. ... I am a President of thousands of Presi-
dents. ... In Israel every Jew thinks he is the Presi-
dent."
RABBI ISRAEL Miller, the mild-mannered chair-
man of the Conference of Presidents of Major Amer-
ican Jewish Organizations, can say the same. He- is
now completing his term of office heading a body
composed of Presidents of 32 Jewish organizations.
fiiumi i .

He has to deal with 32 Jewish presidents. And this
is not an easy task. It is even more difficult since
every decision at the Conference must be made by
conten9us.
With his. charm and common sense, Rabbi Mil-
ler managed to avoid- conflicts within the ranks of
the Conference* This, in spite of the differences of
opinion that developed from time to time over some
iaaues and the tactics of dealing with them.
Some of the members of the Conference consider
him- too domineering in his running- of the organiza-
tion. However, events have proven him correct. He
has put the Conference .on the map mare than any
of his predecessors.
SOFT-SPOKEN, scholarly, and-effective in pre-
senting his views. Rabbi Miller won for the Confer-
ence attention and respect in the White House, De-
partment of State and. in other high government
offices, in Washington. Among Jewish masses he is
today the most popular leader.
Tens, of thousands of American Jews who never
knew of the existence of the Conferenceand what
it stands forare now well aware of its function as
an instrument of American Jewry in taking collec-
tive action-, to enhance the security of Israel.
Many of these Jews answered the call of the Con-
ference this year and came from various cities to
participate in. the mass demonstration* in the heart
of New York, whenever a critical situation developed
for Israel in. the- United Nations, in Washington or
elsewhere.
niiiuiwwiiiiaiw iiiumwii'i hi m in' iiwuumuiiiniMUWiiitmkNiiwnimvuimiuiuuii^^
a i m !iwimiiiiu!iit:i.i' I

A Truly
Unique Union
OCAL 24. of the New York State School Administrators and
Supervisors Organization Committee, AFL-CIO, designates a
bona fide union which is unique in two respectsits members
negotiate individual contracts with their employers and they
comprise the onlv 1 nown union of Hebrew school administra-
tors, mostly principals.
The United Hebrew Principals and Administrators Associa-
tion received its AFL-CIO charter in the spring of 1974, ac-
cording to Samuel Deutsch of Elmont. N.Y.. a vice president of
the local, who serves as educational director of Temple Israel
of Merrick, N.Y.
DEUTSCH ESTIMATED the membership of the UHPAA,
most of them principals of congregational schools in the Greater
New York area, at 65. of the union's estimate of 140 to 150
fully licensed and accredited Hebrew school principals in New
York State. The local's charter covers the entire state but the
members are mainly residents of the Greater New York area.
Deutsch told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that Local 24
does not bargain collectively for its members. Each principal
continues to bargain individually with his school, just as each
principal did before the union was organized.
HE EXPLAINED that the Jewish schools differ in terms
of responsibilities of their principals' duties, hours of service
and related functions, and in the number of pupils and teach-
ers which often governs the salary structure of the congregar
tions. He said the membership of Local 24 comprises all Jew-
ish ideologies, "providing the principal meets our membership
qualifications."
A very large number of those serving as Hebrew school
principals are ineligible for membership in Local 24 because
they cannot meet these professional requirements for member-
ship. Deutsch estimated the number of working principals with
the needed qualifications at about 20 percent of the total.
He said that most of the principals are "free-lancers, rab-
bis and part-time housewives, who do not qualify for member-
ship."
LOCAL 24 is an outgrowth of an organization founded
about 60 years ago with the name of Agudat Ha-M'nahalim
Association of Principalsorganized by some of the nation's
leading Jewish educators of the time. When a new generation
of Jewish professional educators, mostly American-born or
American-educated, began to replace the founders, the philoso-
phy of the association changed radically.
The new generation began to react with disgust against
"arbitrary dismissals, and whims of rabbis or school commit-
tees in congregations." Deutsch said the affected principals had
no organization to turn to for help except ad hoc and inef-
fectual groups which were unable to rectify "inadequacies and
inequities in an ongoing situation."
The principals who opted for a radical change in efforts
to deal with such problems by creating a labor unionan idea
resisted bv many principals on grounds it was "not proper"
for professional educatorsdid so in the belief that "we must
help ourselves in gaining the status and safeguards which the
professional Jewish educator lacks and which is a major detri-
ment to the future of Jewish education in America," the educa-
tor said.
DEUTSCH CITED among specific problems which led t the
decision to proceed with formation of a labor union and to
AFL-CIO affiliation, dismissals without cause, absence of sev-
erance, absence of Social Security in many schools, no tenure
and shaky or no job security.
Such conditions, he asserted, "have caused some of our best
educators to leave the field of Jewish education at a time when
their services of Jewish educational leadership are sorely
needed, especially when many if not most Jewish religious
schools often are staffed by untrained teachers."
Friday, January 9, 1976 *Jewisti Fkridliar, Page- 10-A
S.
is an
Vff
A World of Jewish
Fiction, Fantasy
'T'WO NEW paperbacks are available for de-
votees only.
If science fiction is your bag. "Wandering
Stars" is a trip into the world of Jewish sci-
ence fiction and fantasy. The anthology, now
available in paperback (Pocket Books, $1.50).
contains some old favorites like Bernard Ma-
lamud's "The Jewbird," as well as other se-
lections written expressly for this collection.
One of the most delightful stories, "On
Venus, Have We Got a Rabbi," by William
Tenn, probes the question What is a Jew? Can
a creature that looks like a brown pillow grow-
ing a short gray tentacle be a Jew?
AUTHOR ISAAC Asimov writes the intro-
duction to "Wandering Stars" and entitles it
"Why Me?" A good question indeed, for Asi-
mov's essay indicates why he should not have
introduced the collection.
After confessing that he is not an ob-
servant Jew and never underwent "that cu-
rious puberty rite, the Bar Mitzvah," he- re-
signs himself to the fact and fate that there
is nothing he can do about it. He is Jewish
whether he- likes it or not. And it would seem
that he does not like it.
After a defensive explanation of how
working on Rosh. Hashanah is no worse than
changing one's name from Davidowitz to Da-
venport, he concludes that the reason he
wrote the introduction is that "despite all my
infidel ways and beliefs, I am Jewish enough."
Rubbish.
IN RESPONSE to the demand from his
audience, Sam Levenson has put together a
Request Album, as he calls it. It contains fa-
vorite lines and paragraphs which his fans
have read in his books, heard him use on
television and in live appearances. "You Can
Say That- Again, Sam: the Choice Wit and Wis-
dom of Sam Levenson" (Pocket Books, $1.50)
is arranged according to the- subjects which
Levenson has traditionally treated with humor.
There are the family jokes, the jokes
about children's- foibles, the sad' but laughable
problems faced in old age and the memories of
childhood in a traditional home. Some anec-
dotes, are funny and sooo true. Others are
simply bad humor.
THE FORMER: a letter home from t*ie
college student: "Dear Dad: I have come to
the decision that it is time for me to stand
on my own two feet- I- shall call collect Sun-
day night to explain. Frederick." The latter:
child in a supermarket: -"Some jolly green
giant just stepped on my foot." I guess you
had to be there.
Levenson develore several, clever essays
dealing with the prcbb-is which teenagers
face, and he conclnc's with a sensitive piece
addressed to his daughter suggesting time-
tested beauty hints:
Past History is Forgotten
As New York Takes Lumps
i
nQd
crt
*^eaai
pOUR YEARS ago, when Abe Beame was still
functioning as Controller of the City of
New Yorkand not as Mayorhe looked up
towards Albany where the political powers were
heaping mountainous financial burdens on Man-
hattan and made a sage observation.
"The practical answer for correcting (tax-
ing and spending), inequities," he said, "lies in
restructuring all levels of governmentfederal,
state, regional, county, city, community district,
town, and village. Our economic and social
problems have become so complex that each
level of government is interdependent with all
the others."
AT THAT time, some New Yorkers were
advocating the creation of a 51st statenot one
to be sawed off and floated out to sea as one
of Arizona's politicians recom-nendedbut a
modern city-state, free of pressure from Al-
bany. The proposal was chimerical, but those
who recall it favorably now might help their
way to a better understanding if they took a
fresh look at Abe Beame't piece of wisdom.
For New York City, with all its wayward-
ness, extravagances, brashness, and political
mismanagement, hi but the surface manifesta-
tion, of a ranch deeper wound that only a few
have j* behlcH>eneath the surface bleeding.
WE HAVE not made the transition from a
predominantly agrarian nation to an overurban-
ized country with enough allowance for civic
overhaul. Government by county commission-
ers in some parts of the country is. archaic and
costly; and many large cities, especially New
York, are having their financial backs broken
by the time lag in adjustment.
New York itself will be spared complete
financial default. It will long outlive a Presi-
dent's press secretary's sophomoric assertion
that Manhattan is like a wayward daughter
hooked on heroin in naed of a stern father to
take charge and break her of the habit. It will
still be there after the President himself has
moved on to other gaffes, after ridiculing it to
bewildered Yugoslavs.
AND THE catharsis and cure will do the
city heaps of good. People will sift through the
long litany of issues and come to a better
understanding of problems piled up on our
largest metropolis in the years of vast change
in America: why it costs a billion dollars a
year to carrw-ea welfare program, how police
and fire preteetioo-and sanitation service came
to eest so much, why civil service developed
uge imperfections, the reasons for free hospi-
tal service and free education at college level.


January 9, 1976
fJemsti ncridliain
Page 11-A
lloynihan Honored for Stand at UN
JNITED NATIONS In rec-
^ition of his "outspoken and
rageous stand at the United
lions" against the equating
, Zionism with racism, U.S.
ibassadur Daniel Patrick
lynihan has been selected as
recipient of the 1975 An-
il Award medal of the Judaic
ritage Society.
ie annual award, recog-
ig outstanding service to the
ish people, has been a So-
|y tradition since 1972. The
annual award medal, is-
In the year of Israel's 25th
uiversary. honored the late
esident Harry S. Truman for
historic role in the recogni-
of the State of Israel.
In 1973, the award was gtven
Golda Meir for "a lifetime of
rated service to the Jewish
ise.** In 1974, the award was
ssented to Sen. Henry Jack-
CD.-Wash.) in acknowl-
of his "unstinting ef-
on behalf of Jewish emi-
ition from Soviet Russia."
&
Oil from Algae
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
im of Hebrew University sci-
(tists believes that Israel may
able to synthesize a high
le of oil from a certain tyoe
[algae that thrives in sunlight
meet its oil requirements
iugh this process bv 1980 il
project is undertaken im-
liately.
[An announcement by the Uni
brsity said the team, headed
Prof. Ben Zion Ginzburg,
roposed the mass construction
"solar ponds" covering 1,000
Uometers of unarable desert
reas that enjoy virtually year-
jund sunshine.
According to the announce-
iient, Ginzburg and his asso-
ciates have already produced a
^igh grade of oil from the algae
hat grows abundantly in salt
(rater imder strong sunlight.
lie oil is of such quality that
requires little further pro-
Bssing, the announcement said.
The Hebrew University sci-
itists based their experiments
a 40-year-old discovery that
TEDDY KOLLEK.
Mayor of Jerusalem,
Invites you to have your Son's
?ar mitzvAh
in
isRaet
Tlwnk giving your son ttie incrd>ble
opportunity ol chanting his Haftorah at
the Western Wall. Let the entire family
share the experience of a-Bar M'tivah in
Israel, a pilgrimage that fulfills a dream
and brings you closer to the spirit of the
Jewish Peple.
| ASK FOK Ol'H BAR MTZVAH
BliOCHl ItK
BQN VOtAW TRAVJEl, INC.
ri074 Interama Blvd.. N.M.B.Fla.
Your Israel Headquarters
CALL LEE AT 945-6131
the hyper-saline waters of the
Dead Sea contained "salt-hun-
gry" microorganisms, both bac-
teria and algae.
The latter can yield oil in
commercial quantities. The ex-
periments were partially funded
by the Ministry of Commerce
and Industry.
ft ft ir
Belkin Successor Saught
NEW YORK A Presidential
Search Committee, comprising
50 Yeshiva University adminis-
trators, faculty, students, alum-
ni and representatives of higher
education and community life,
has been formed to seek a suc-
cessor to Dr. Samuel Belkin.
Dr. Belkin, president of the
institution for 32 years, retired
last summer and has been ap-
pointed Chancellor.
The Search Committee has
been charged by the Univer-
sity's Board of Trustees with
the responsibility of seeking a
successor "worthy of Dr. Sam-
uel Belkin and Dr. Bernard
Revel (the institution's first
president who served from
1915-1940)."
ft -ir ir
EUat Apartments
EILAT Israel's exotic Red
Sea port and resort center of
Eilat will be the focus of a new
residential development being
offered to overseas families who
wish to enjoy at least part of
their year in the sun.
In order to help persons from
abroad take.advantage of Eilat's
year-round rainless summer
climate and what the National
Geographic magazine has term-
ed the unmatched undersea
life and scenery of the Red Sea,
Isralom, Israel Homes and Real
Estate Ltd., is offering a new
group, of apartments specifically
designed for overseas buyers.
Two seven-story buildings of
56 high-standard apartments are
now being built on a choice
elevated location not far from
the town center.
ft ft ft
College Camous Protests
GROSSINGER, N.Y. Amer-
ican college campuses, other-
wise politically apathetic these
days, have ignited with Jewish
student protests over the UN's
equating Zionism with racism,
a survey by B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations reported here.
Rallies and demonstrations,
petition-gathering and teach-ins
on Zionism have erupted on
scores of campuses, with crowds
of 200 to 1,500 denouncing the
anti-Semitic implications of the
UN resolution.
"The response was a gut re-
action," said Rabbi Samuel Z.
Fishman, Hillel's director of
programs and resources, during
a session at the annual Hillel
Director's conference here,
ft ft ft
Arabs Leave West Bank
JERUSALEM Arab labor-
ers, who have depended heavily
Secret Service Fingers Algeria,
Libya, Iraq in OPEC Snatch
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Is-
raeli secret service implicates
Algeria, Libya and Iraq directly
in last month's attack by Pales-
tinian and Eurooean terrorists
on the headquarters of the Or-
ganization of Petroleum Export-
ing Countries (OPEC) in Vienna
in which three nersons were
killed and 11 oil ministers kid-
napped.
According to the newspaper
France Soir, the Israelis are
convinced that Algeria organ-
ized and supervised the opera-
tion in collaboration with the
other two Arab countries and
extremist Palestinian terrorist
groups.
IF THE Israeli view is as re-
ported, it coincides remarkably
with the charge published in the
semi-official Egyptian newspa-
per, Al Ahram. that the Vienna
assault was mastermineded by
one Dr. Wadi Haddad and fi-
nanced by Libya with the col-
laboration of Algeria.
France Soir, which did not
identify its sources of informa-
tion, said that the Israeli secret
service learned that the attack
on OPEC followed a secret
What do doctors
for patients in pain?
There are many medications a
fihysician or dentist can prescribe
or pain. But there's one pain re-
liever physicians and dentists dis-
pense again and again: Anacin.
Each year, doctor3 give out over
50,000.000 Anncin tablets for
everything from toothache and
headache pain to.the minor pains
of arthritis. And millions take
Anacin without stomach upset.
Wlu>n you're in pain, take the
tablet a doctor might give you in
his own otHrf. Take Anacin.
COL. QADDAFI
meeting in Baghdad attended by
Haddad, by a wanted interna-
tional terrorist known as Carlos
Martinez, an Algerian repre-
sentative and a Libyan delegate.
Haddad is in charge of mili-
tary operations of George Ha-
bash's Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, a Marx-
ist terrorist group that split from
the PLO.
ALI HAMDI Gammal, editor
of Al Ahram, said, however, that
the attack was carried out by
the Libvan-backed Popular Re-
volutionary Front for the Li-
beration of Palestine, a splinter
organizaztion of the PFLP.
"Why did the Algerian au-
thorities allow the guerrillas to
travel to Libya instead of try-
ing them or handing them over
to the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization to try them'?" he
asked.
He also questioned the rea-
sons behind the recent meeting
between Libyan leader Col.
Muammar Qaddafi and Presi-
dent Houari Boumedienne of
Algeria. "AH these indications
and information make us won-,
HausnerFor
Polygraph
Continued from Page 1-A
discussions absolutely confiden-
tial.
HAUSNER acknowledged that
lie detector tests were an ex-
treme form of surveillance but
said it was vital to trace the
source of cabinet leaks.
He said the leak of a note
from President Ford to Premier
Rabin urging Israel not to es-
tablish new settlements on the
Golan Heights had damaged Is-
rael's relations with the U.S.
der whether there was a pre-
meditated agreement on this
operation," Gammal wrote.
The France Soir article said
Israeli intelligence learned that
the four men who attended the
secret Baghdad meeting pre-
pared plans for the Vienna at-
tack which were finalized in
Tripoli, Libya. After a stay in
Libya, Carlos went to West Ger-
many to recruit some members
of the Baader-Meinhof, an an-
archist group.
THE TERRORISTS arrived in
Vienna on Dec. 19 and carried
out the attack according to plan
although the killing of three
people was a blunder that tem-
porarily embarrassed the Al-
gerians, France Soir said.
Carlos Martinez is still at
large and may be hiding out in
Libya. He is wanted in France
for the murder last June of two
French secret service agents
and a Lebanese informer.
on the Israel work market since
the Six-Day War, are moving
East.
An unprecedented economic
boom in Jordan and Arab oil
countries attracts skilled labor
because for the first time in the
economic history of the region
salaries naid in Arab countries
are sometimes ten times as high
as in Israel.
Figures published in the Arab
press mention that 13,000 uni-
versity trained workers and
other skilled laborers have left
the West Bank for Jordan and
other Arab countries.
ft ft ft
Zionists Need Democracy
NEW YORK (JTA) A
member of the World Zionist
Organization Executive urged
the Zionist movement "to mo-
bilize the American Jewish com-
munity to fight to make it more
democratic and truly responsive
to its constituency."
Dr. Alien Pollack, who is also
a member of the Labor Zionist
Alliance executive committee,
spoke of that "great challenge"
to the Zionist movement in the
course of an ideological sympo-
sium at the LZA's 23rd national
convention here.
"Only such a truly represen-
tative American Jewish com-
munity can meet the great of-
fensive which the Arab world
and its Soviet and Third World
allies have launched upon the
Jewish people," Pollack said. He
warned that Israel and Jewry
are facing "the greatest chal-
lenge since the time of the holo-
caust."
ft ft ft
United Synagogue Motion
KIAMESHA LAKE, N.Y.
The Conservative movement of
Judaism, which serves more
than a million and a half Jews
in 830 synagogues throughout
the United States and Canada,
has moved towards formal af-
filiation with the World Zionist
Organization "as a repudiation
of the United Nations resolution
equating Zionism with racism."
This was revealed here at the
bicentennial convention of the
United Synagogue of America
which condemned the General
Assembly resolution and reject-
ed its attempt to create a dis-
tinction between Judaism and
Zionism.
"Zionism is Judaism and Ju-
daism is Zionism," the president
of the United Synagogue, Ar-
thur J. Levine, declared.
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Page 12-A
fJewisii ihrkfiatr?
Friday, January 9, 1976
The Name of the International Game is to Jag Israel
As Enemy of Peace Throughout the World
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
NEW YORK (JTA)
On Sept. 1, Israel and Egypt
initialed the second Sinai in-
terim agreement that was
} eached with the help of Sec-
i 3tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer.
That same day, President
Ford in personal telephone
calls to Kissinger, Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, and
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat congratulated the
three for achieving the ac-
cord, termed it fair and bal-
anced and declared that
"this is a great achievement,
one of the most historic of
tiis decade, perhaps of this
century."
WITHIN THREE weeks, how-
ever, this fair and balanced
^jreement had all but been
iirned against Israel into a
most unfair and unbalanced
portrayal of the Jewish State
?-, lusting after U.S. military
v. capons almost at the expense
cr America's own military needs
mid placing burdensome de-
mands on America's strained fi-
nincial resources as the price
>' ir having consented to the
socord.
The major dailies in New
fork and Washington embark -
;l on a concerted campaign
f.icusing on what they made to
National Hebrew
IflMElf Gin CENTER INC.
Bar Mifzvah Sets
Religious Articles Sifts
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Religious Goods, Gifts,
Books & Records
1S07 Washington Avenue
PHONE 532-5912
American Israeli
$ All Religious Articles $
Far Synagogues Schools Homes
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
JC 1-7722 S. Scawartt
REPHUN'S HEBREW
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HAS EVERYTHING FOR
Synagogues, Hebrew Schools
and Jewish Homes. Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
417 Washington Are. 672-7017
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Rabbi Joseph E. Rockovsky
Phone 672-7306
945 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
[e* me quote you rates. Abe
local moving long distance
moving anywhere in the U.S.
or overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
appear was Israel's insatiable
appetite for U.S. aid, leaking
texts and secret memorandums
and undertakings between Is-
rael and the U.S. and offering
such tantalizing and misleading
headlines as "New Missiles for
Mideast: A Destabilizing Fac-
tor," and "Pentagon Not Con-
sulted on Pershings."
The net result of these re-
ports created the distinct im-
pression that the "most histor-
ic" achievement had not taken
place between Israel and Egypt
but between Israel and the U.S.,
and that Israel was the sole
beneficiary of the accord reach-
ed with American help.
UNQUESTIONABLY, THE
leaks to the press regarding
various U.S.-Israel undertakings
and the ensuing one-sided,
contradictory, half-baked and
innuendo-filled reports reflect-
ed the sentiments of the differ-
ing, even waning factions with-
in the State Department, the
Pentagon, the Administration
and Congress. These sentiments
could be grasped behind the
screaming headlines.
On Sept. 18, Drew Middleton
wrote in the New York Times
that the possibility that Israel
will acquire medium-range and
long-range surface-to-surface
missiles "is regarded by quali-
fied informants in Washington
and Western Europe as a sig-
nificant step toward expanded
warfare in the Middle East."
Furthermore, he noted, "Is-
rael's deployment of the Persh-
ing, military sources noted,
would add a new dimension to
her power and, according to
one critic of the proposal, de-
stabilize the military balance in
the area."
MIDDLETON "balanced" his
report by relating Israel De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres'
statement to the National Press
Club in Washington that Israel
was prepared to offer a guar-
antee not to convert the Persh-
ing missiles with nuclear war-
heads.
But the Times expert imme-
diately redressed this "balance"
by showing that Israel had nu-
clear potential and had con-
verted earlier weapons from
Deny Israel Was
Willing to Quit
GidL Mitla Passes
WASHINGTON (JTA)The State Department
has denied a report by Joseph Alsop that Israeli Pre-
mier Yitzhak Rabin had assured the United States last
March that Israel would be willing to pull back from
the Mitla and Gidi Passes in the Sinai as part of a dis-
engagement agreement with Egypt. The pullback later
was part of the disengagement agreement signed in
September.
DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN John Trattner said
Alsop, in an article in the New York Times magazine,
reported that Rabin assured Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger he could carry the Israeli government with
him on the question of withdrawal.
"NO SUCH assurances were given by the prime
minister to the Secretary," Trattner said.
He refused to comment on Alsop's charge that Is-
rael had participated in an effort to have Kissinger
removed as secretary. When he was asked whether Al-
sop's article as a whole reflected State Department
thinking, Trattner replied he could not answer general
questions.
He said he was not prepared to go into other as-
pects of the article.
Rabin Vows He'll
Fight Racketeers
Continued from Page 1-A
cur red. The existence of an ex-
tensive network of extortionists
in Haifa came to light recently
after an incidence of violence
during which a hand grenade
was tossed into a local vegetable
market.
The protection racket was
also blamed over the weekend
for an enormous fire at Israel's
large daily, Ha'aretz, estimated
to be the largest blaze in the
history of Tel Aviv.
At the same time, police were
investigating the possibility that
the blaze was the work of ar-
sonists.
AVINOAM KAHANE, spokes-
man for Hillel's office, said that
the police had detained four Is-
raeli youths discovered with
empty gas cans shortly after the
blaze broke out.
The fire, in addition to de-
stroying Ha'aretz's newsprint
stock, also spread to a store-
room in the building used by
Magen David Adorn.
The fire followed on the heels
of two other fires in Tel Aviv
last week. Kahane said that a
suspect was being held in one
of those fires which broke out
in a furniture store.
OFFICIALS have categorically
denied claims from Beirut that
PLO guerrillas were responsible
for yet another act of violence
when 14 men tried to shoot and
run following their machine-
gunning of a police hostel in the
heart of the city.
Neither the fires nor the
shooting at the police club were
attributed to the PLO.
the U.S. and Britain to her
needs and that the conversion
of Pershings from a non-nuclear
to a nuclear role "would not
offer insuperable technological
problems."
In addition, Pentagon offi-
cials were quoted in the press
as insisting that the military
establishment had not been
consulted about an "agreement"
for the U.S. to supply Israel
with Pershing missiles and in-
timated that Kissinger, during
his latest shuttle, had slipped
this "agreement" to the Israelis
behind the backs of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff and Defense Sec-
retary James R. Schlesinger,
since replaced by Donald Rums-
feld.
Ii WAS also intimated by
these officials and dutifully
"disclosed" by the press that
the supply of Pershings and F-
16s was a virtual pay-off to Is-
rael for signing the accord.
According to wdl placed
"leaks" funneled through the
Press, the U.S. had not only un-
dertaken a number of secret
military accords with Israel
that included pledges for mili-
tary hardware that could very
well diminish existing U.S. arms
inventories, but also substantial
financial aid that would take
an enormous bite out of Amer-
ican taxpayers' pocketbooks.
Rep. Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.)
alluded to the latter when he
asserted recently that the Si-
nai accord will cost the U.S. $4
billion to implement which, he
asserted, is "mighty expensive
real estate."
J. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT,
who is the former chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, also denounced the
Sinai accord as too costly for
the U.S. and delivered himself
of the opinion that "we have
subjected ourselves to the will
of Israel."
Parenthetically, neither Con-
gressman offered a feasible al-
ternative to the so-called exor-
bitant cost, namely, the removal
of American troops or person-
nel from areas where they are
stationed in non-danger zones
and to reassign the monies
spent on them for the cost of
having personnel in Sinai.
On top of all this, or rather,
throughout all this, Kissinger
reiterated time and again since
his return from his latest shuttle
that Israel would not have,
mieht not have, consented to the
Sinai pact unless the U.S. agreed
to station civilian nersonnel
there and, in fact, had insisted
on this proviso as a orereauisite
for agreeing to the accord.
TO ALL intents and purnoses.
these developments have left
the impression that Israel and
the U.S. are involved in some
international Watergate and that
Israel is bent on "Vietnamiz-
ing" the U.S. by forcing America
into another foreign exploit.
Wittingly or unwittingly,
these "leaks" and reports have
become grist to the mill among
those segments in the State De-
partment, Pentagon, and Con-
gress that would like to turn off
the American public to Israel,
if not turn American public
opinion against Israel.
The Jewish State, thereby, is
being cast as the heavy in the
Mideast scene. The facts do not
warrant this.
Prime Minister Rabin re-
ported recently that the idea
of an American presence in
Sinai was first Droposed by Sa-
dat in his meeting with Ford in
Salzburg in June.
HE SAID the idea had come
up when Sadat rejected the Is-
raeli proposal that the warning
systems would be manned by
the Egyptians and Israelis
alone.
Peres, who together with
Rabin and Foreign Minister
Yigal Allon comprised Israel's
recently. Allon, in an incer-
negotiatine team, reaffirmed this
view published in Maariv,
stated:
"I did not nresent the ques-
tion of American technicians as
a demand, and I did not regard
the American technicians' pres-
ence as an essential conditir:;
for the signature of the agree-
ment."
The so-called impartial press
very partially refrained from r! -
porting these statements or
buried them in reams of copy.
AS TO American commit-
ments to sell Israel new weap-
ons, including Pershings, Kis-
singer recently told report-
ers that these arms are not new
items that h?ve been "submit-
ted to us during the negotia-
tion" and hud been "review j
prior to the reassessment (be-
gun last Mi"ch). bv all : ;
agencies in Washington."
Also recently, Schlesinger c
cded after being asked point*
blank bv reporters on CBS-TV
"Meet die Press" that he had
ben informed about the I
shing missiles in due course.
In addition, he continued,
even if the Pershines were a I
proved for Israelwhich at h i
time they are notproduct i
has been shut down for some
time and could not be resumed
before 1978. Likewise, the sj-
phisticated F-16s will not g)
into production before 1979-30.
Schlesinger noted.
AGAIN, the press failed to
balance its reports regarding
arms sales to Israel by playing
down or entirelv ignoring the
most salient facts: that the
P>rshin"s would barelv offset
the stockpiles of Frog and Scud
missiles the Egyptians now ha 9
thanks to Soviet help and that
t'^e Arab states now have mis-
s;les capable of hitting eve:;'
city in Israel, while Israel now
has no comparable weapons.
Also played down bv the press
was the conclusion of the study
published recently by the
authoritative London-based In-
ternational Institute for Strate-
gic Studies which showed that ,
during the oast 12 months Ira j
increased defense spending fro n
$3.?">4 billion to $10,405 billic:-.;
Saudi Arabia hiked its defense
budget from $1,808 billion eo
$6,343 billion; and Egypt's de-
fns budget went up from
$4,071 billion to $6,103 Milton
During the same period, h-~
ever, the IISS showed that Is-
rael's defense budget decline j
from $3,688 billion to $3 5 3
billion.
AS FOR economic aid to Is-
rael, the $3 billion Israel had
hoped to get is now down to
some $2.3 billion subject t>
Congressional approval of which
$1.5 billicn is for military aid.
Unreported or buried in the
voluminous reports on the US.
aid package is the fact that
Egvnt will receive between $65')
million and $866 million in what
is terr;d in Washington at
"non-military" aid for now.
In addition, Kissinger has .
made it clear that the U.S. has
not committed itself to "sepa-
rate funding" to Israel in co-n-
pensation for the oil she will
no longer obtain from the Sinai,
wells that are being returned :j
Egypt.
There had been reports that
Israel would receive $300 mil-
lion in compensation.
THE PICTURE, therefore, of
Israel as a militarily rapacious
nation, anxious to involve the
U.S. in a Mideast "Vietnam"
and seeking to drain American
financial resources is a portrait
devoid of reality.
The reality is that Israel has
received verbal and written
promises, indications, offerings
and hedged pledges. These are
hardly the substantial weapons
and finances Israel desperately
requires in her continuing
struggle to maintain her na-
tional sovereignty and security. *



January 9, 1976
+Jewisti FhridUan
Page 13-
MINDLIN
*
It's Sad-But We're Back in the Mid-30's
pntinued from Page 4-A
[>ng the nations of the West,
spillings-over into conflict-
spheres of influence in Asia
[Africa.
;ONCEIVABLY what lies
Cad is an Armageddon with
Ba and Africa, in which only
western rjpwer, the Rus-
|ns, are seriously aligned
jinst us.
[Whether or not the Russians
111 be able to maintain them-
flves technologically and civil-
fetionally against us without
kiaranteeing their absolute dis-
-pearance as the cultural en-
|ty for which we know them
c-day is open to great question.
lo long as they can get other
[aces, other civilizations to
ght their battles for them, as
J'iey have done so successfully
[since World War II, they will in
probability be able to main-
Itain themselves.
The Asia-Africa camp is in
fact not new to us. It is in Asia
in Korea and Vietnam
that we have already lived and
done some losing. But that was
just the beginning of our struggle
in Asia, in the same sense that
Angola today is just the begin-
ning of our eventual struggle in
Africa with nations no longer
"newly-emerged," as we con-
tinue naively to see them, but
emerged fully emerged and
with interests long since in di-
rect conflict with our own.
IF ONE can set aside the sud-
den dramatic and symbolic in-
tensity of Angola at this time,
perhaps the most obvious initial
pressure point will be the Mid-
dle East, and this is where the
mid-1930's parallel is at its
clearest. After all, a future Asia-
Africa Armageddon seems so
distant if not altogether unreal
as a possibility that Karl Marx
prophecy again.
For it is in the Middle East
that the West, and Europe par-
ticularly, can maintain the
charade that nothing has
changed. Asia and Africa are
exotic, strange, far away, a fan-
tasy.
BUT THE West, Europe par-
ticularly, has a long tradition
in history of experience with
Arabs and Jews. In the choos-
ing of sides between them, the
Europeans have had no difficul-
ty in giving the palm to the
Arabs. Anti-Semitism is a con-
ditioned reflex in the European
consciousness.
If there is no want of nega-
tive feeling against Jews in the
United States, at least there has
been some modicum of restraint
in judgment of the Israel-Arab
impasse here undoubtedly ex-
plained by our relative oil
hat Ever Happened to Privacy?
ecret Agencies Have Answer
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
In this era of illegal wiretaps,
entries into homes without war-
rants, and the accumulation of
covernmental dossiers cluttered
with gossip about harmless citi-
: ens, it is good to know that one
c! the four copies of England's
Magna Carta, extant, will be
'etched from the Mother Coun-
iry sometime in 1976.
Granted that the Magna
Carta was of help primarily to
the British barons who thought
King John was too cheeky when
.(. reigned in the early 13th
centurv, the venerable docu-
lent remains one of the bright -
sl jewels in the diadem of
eedom. And freedom the
nd helping to release us from
ir of ruthless and arrogant
thoritiesmust be constantly
ipped up and sustained in
America against formidable
IF THIS sounds hysterical, a
I review of what is now sur-
Wilson
Off
To Israel
LONDON (JTA) The
Prime Ministers of Israel
and Britain will be exchang-
ing official visits during the
first half of 1976.
Rritish Premier Harold
Wilson will apparently make
his long awaited official
visit to Israel during the
spring as part of a Middle
East visit which will in-
clude Egypt, Saudi Arabia
and Iran.
WILSON was reportedly
to have gone earlier to Je-
rusalem, but Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin's Washington
visit obliged changing the
schedule. The Israeli Pre-
mier is expected to return
the official visit shortly
thereafter.
Meanwhile, it is under-
stood that the leader of the
Conservative opposition,
Margaret Thatcher, is due
to visit Israel some time in
March.
THIS WILL be the first
time she has been to the
Holy Land since she be-
came leader of her party.
She was in Israel a few
years ago when she held a
junior Cabinet post in the
last Tory government.
facing as congressional hear-
ings of our intelligence-gather-
ing and law enforcement agen-
cies goes forward should re-
move doubts.
The largest snoop fish hook-
ed to date is, of course, the
Central Intelligence Agency.
Sen. Frank Church, heading
the Senate Select Committee on
Intelligence Activities, obvious-
ly believes it is worth risking
his political future to shake
loose every unhidden (and even
some deeply concealed) chap-
ters in the history of this
agency which has so long en-
joyed the luxury of apathetic
governmental oversight.
Leaving aside the question of
w hether th-> CIA did or did not
join in plots to assassinate
heads of governments, habits
and activities alreadv brought
to lifjht have proved strong
rnoii"h to send CIA head Wil-
liam E. Colbv in search of
Mitchell Rogovin. a civil liber-
tarian lawyer, to serve as Mr.
Colby's counsel. Behold what
Watergate has brought us.
OVER IN another wing of
the federal government, the
mild-mannered FBI director,
Clarence M. Kelley, is finding
it rough indeed to follow the
course of public disenchant-
ment with his predecessor, J.
Edgar Hoover.
Kelley is not accountable for
what happened to those missing
Hoover files on the sex lives of
people in high places, but he
remains in the eye of several
other storms.
How is he going to handle
brash agents who want to keep
alive Cointelpro, that Gestapo-
like unit dedicated to the ha-
rassment of people who frown
on some of the hijinks of the
American military, people who
risked their necks to protest
long enough and hard enough
to spring America from Viet-
nam? ,
IN THIS Bicentennial cele-
bration season, scheduled to
come to a fevered patriotic
climax in 1976, it is comforting
to have on the books the Free-
dom of Information Act, passed
in 1974 over one of President
Ford's many vetoes.
This law is one of the few
new reeds on which a troubled
citizenry, jealous of its liber-
ties, may lean these days. It}
gives us protection against a;
federal government more and
more inclined to probe aimless-
ly into our private lives. It may
even serve as a curb against
the spiraling computerization ol
information about individuals
and "thus help to blow the
whistle on the FBI officials who
continue to run the irrelevant
data on our humdrum activities
through monster machines de-;
spite White House and con-
gressional opposition.
SO THERE may be a better
wav to celebrate that national
200th birthday than to drool
over the Magna Cartaa fresh
look at the Fourth Amendment.
Remember? "The right of the
people to be secure in then-
persons, houses, papers, and ef-
fects, against unreasonable
searches and seizures, shall not
be violated, and no warrants
shall issue, but upon probable
cause, supported by oath or af-
firmation, and particularly de-
scribing the place to be search-
ed, and the persons or things to
be seized."
The language may sound a bit
archaic, but the intention and
resolution are as fresh as our:
prayers of today to keep our;
freedom inviolate.
riches. Western Europe has no
such resources with which to
indulge the impulse toward po-
litical disinterest.
Still, despite our own oil
riches, the Arab cartel action
agatinst the West has had a
severe dislocating economic im-
pact upon the United States. It
is against this that the European
cold shoulder of Israel and the
Jewish appeal for the Israeli
cause must be judged. If we find
the going rough, Europe by con-
trast feels like a high speed car
with brakes and steering sud-
denly gone foul.
Europe's choice of Arab over
Jew is thus clearly dictated. But
the truth is that the Jews will
not be the reason for an ulti-
mate European and western
confrontation in the Middle
East any more than the Jews
were the reason for the con-
frontation with Hitler. To be-
lieve they are will be to make
our role there that much more
difficult.
NEVERTHELESS, if I read
the signs right, a conceivable
western confrontation in the
Middle East must find the West
not with the Arabs but with the
Israelis. Despite the critical oil
condition, this will not be so
much an economic choice as a
civilizational one.
And what goads me in anti-
cipation of such a choice is that
there will be the inevitable
hucksters and charlatans of
ideology to say that "we went
in there to save the Jews," in
the same way that the hucksters
and charlatans of ideology said
the same thing of World War II.
Even the Europeans, who
should know better, believed it,
although to avoid confrontation
with Hitler, they were perfect-
ly willing to let the Nazis slaugh-
ter as many Jews as they wait-
ed much in the same wi.y
that we are perfectly willing lo
let the Arabs squeeze the life-
blood out of Israel today.
THE PARADOXES in the his-
tory of the mid-1930's are mir-
rored in the paradoxes of our
African foreign policy and our
foreign policy in the Midd'o
East at this time.
The fact is that the African
struggle and the Middle Et>-A
struggle are precisely the same
Yet in Africa, we are aggres-
sive; in the Middle East, we aio
"moderate." The Ford adminis
tration is straining at the lea; h
for American involvement in
Angola but is attempting .' n
"even handedness" betwet n
Arab and Israeli.
And so we arm the Arabs to
the teeth to the tune of mi I
tiple-digit billions, arms th.t
may someday shoot and kill not
only Israelis but westerners .'
well. We bail the Soviets out of
their continuing agricultui. crises at the expense of high' i
food costs at home and shoic
up their technological ineptitu
with Soyuz stunts when it >s
clear that we are fighting them
via Soviet surrogates in Angela
today and will conceivably bo
fighting them tomorrow in ttic
Middle East. (Shades of Karl
Marx again, who was right
about everything except the
Proletarian Paradise.)
THIS IS, 1 know, a pessimis'io
way in which to launch the new
year. But the signs are all thei c,
and it would be foolhardy lo
pretend they are not. Prime
Minister Rabin's warning en
Sunday that war may be closir
in the Middle East than anyone
thinks cannot be taken lightly.
The fact is that we have a
predilection for deceiving our-
selves. For example, in the mid
1930's, we were selling scrap
iron to Japan that the Japanese
then made into bombs to sink
the U.S. Navy at Pearl Harbcr.
It's all there in the histc /
books for us to read. The pan 1
lei should become clearer tht n.
COMPARE & SAVE
Cohen: Sad Recital
Of People's Decline
Continued from Page 4-A
stitution, would seem to mean
in this nuclear age a search for
a stable peace through effective
arms control and disarmament,
rather than the course we are
presently pursuing.
THE ARTICLE on the DuPont
studv ends by stating that Hen-
ry Kissinger has told Congress
that he would be willing to con-
sider international discussions
about limitations on the flow of
arms into the Middle East "but
the administration has taken no
initiatives."
It would appear a logical step
for us to pressure not for more
military spending by this ad-
ministration but for more initia-
tive in restricting the arms race
in the Middle East, if not else-1
where.
I
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Your Complete -/ M OCH ^ftf^Sft
Office Supplier / Df'OD I O Flonda Since 1933
The following are our NEW LOW NET PRICES
and are GUARANTEED until July 1, 1976
NEW LOW
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LETTER FILE FOLDERS 11 pt. MANILA..........................
LEGAL FILE FOLDERS II pt. MANILA............................
8V2 x 14 CANARY LEGAL.PAOS STITCH AND PERF......
IV. x 14 CANARY LEGAL PADS (PADDED)..................
8Vi x 11 CANARY OR WHITE RULED PADS (PADDED)
3 x 5 SCRATCH PADS....................................................
4 x 6 SCRATCH PADS....................................................
5 x 8 SCRATCH PADS....................................................
PENCILS EAGLE MIRADO OR VENUS VELVET................
PENCILS PREMIUM QUALITY BLACKWRITER.................
STANDARD STAPLES......................................................
STAPLE REMOVER..........................................................
#1 GEM PAPER CLIPS.................................................
JUMBO PAPER CLIPS.....................................................
RUBBER BANDS Vt LB. BOX.........................................
RUBBER BANOS 1 LB. BOX...........................................
3 x 5 WHITE INDEX CARDS RULED OR PLAIN..............
4 x 6 WHITE INDEX CAROS RULED OR PLAIN..............
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STANOARD AOO. MACH. TAPE VA" (100 rolls)..........
STANDARD ADD. MACH. TAPE VA" (12 rolls)............
KO-REC-TYPE or KO-REC COPY.....................................
LIQUID PAPER WHITE....................................................
FINE POINT FELT TIP PENS FLING...............................
BIC PENS MED..............................................................
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UPTOWN UA. ICH. CORAL SAILES
??IN( MttSTim ISM WISWNSTON (
3.40
4.30
4.20
3.85
3.00
......60
......85
1.25
......80
.....40
.....60
......60
1.90
5.60
......50e..
1.60 ib
.....1.95 m
3.40 m
5.30 m
25.00 mm
2.95
......60
......60
1.50
1.00
1.00
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CLIP & SAVE
PAUL BARNETT FRED CHEKANOW SOL SCHR


fJewist thridUajn
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IK HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, deslrinr to engage in
business under the fictitious name o(
ALLDADB TV SERVICE at 2381 W.
Flagier Street, Room No. 200. Miami.
Florida Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County Florida.
HAUL A. VAZQUEZ
12/26-1/2-9-lt
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TW JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-40240
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MABEL SHANLEY. Administratrix
of the Estate of John Hhanley,
Plaintiff
LILLIAN MeDANIEL and
MeDANIEL her
husband, LELA M. HooTEN and
ll'iiiTEN, her
husband, ANDREW SHANI.EY and
SHANLEY. his wife
FRANK G. SHANI.EY. and
SHANI.EY, hie wife,
BLANCHE SLOUGHETEHBECK and
SLOUGHTERRECK.
her husband. WANDER BREITLING
and BREITLING.
her husband. CATHERINE ARTLEY
and ARTI.EY. her
husband". EVA C. SHAN LEY and
SHAXI.EY her
husband, GERALD C. SHANI.EY,
and SHANI.EY. hi*
wife, VIVIAN JAPENGA and
JAPENGA. her
husband, ELVERA ENGLAND and
ENGLAND, her
husband, DONALD A. SHANLEY and
SHANLEY, his
wife, and if any of the aforesaid
named Defendants be dead their
unknown devisees, heirs, personal
representatives, legatees, grantees, or
claimants, otherwise under or against
then and any person or persons
unknown to the Plaintiff having or
claiming to have any right title or
interest in the lands', through, by or
under said Defendants,
Defendants.
TO: LILLIAN MeDANIEL and
MeDANIEL
her husband
7401 S&n Pedro, N.E^Space 52
Albuquerque, New Mexico 8710S
LEI.A M. HOOTEN and
................ HOOTEN,
her husband
1313 Clelo Vista del Norte N.W.,
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 87114
ANDREW SHANLEY and
SHANLEY,
his wife.
2538 Viola Dr.. S.W.
Albuquerque. N..M. 87105
FRANK G. SHANLEY and
SHANLEY
his wife
6324 Foley Court, S.W.
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87105
BLANCHE SLOUGHETER-
BECK and ...................
SLOIGHETBRBECK.
her husband
7401 San Pedro N.E., Space 48
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87109
WANDER BREITLING and
.......................BRB1TLJN0.
her husband
5321 6th Court, N.W.
i Albuquerque, N. Mex. 87107
CATHERINE ARTLEY and
..............ARTLEY,
Her husband
Residence Unknown
EVA C. SHANLEY and
i ............................SHANLEY
Her husband
12886 Blackstone
I Detroit, Michigan 48223
GERALD C. SHANLEY and
[ ......................... SHANLEY.
I his wife
12885 Blackstone
Detroit, Mich. 48223
VIVIAN JAPENGA and
! ...........................JAPENGA,
ker husband
: 17146 Chupel
Detroit, Mich. 48219
I EI.VERA ENGLAND and
..................ENGLAND.
her husband
20840 West Nine Mile Road
Southfield. Micb. 48705
DONAIJD A. SHANLEY and
; ....................................SHANLEY.
his wife
9304 Allen Rd.
Allen Park, Mich. 48101
and if any of the aforesaid named
Defendants be dead, their unknown
devisees, heirs, personal representa-
tives, legatees, grantees, or claim-
ants, otherwise under or against them
and any person or persons unknown
to the Plaintiff having or claiming to
have any right title or interest in the
lands, through by or under said De-
fendants.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on the
property described as:
That portion of the West 46 feet
of Lot lit lying South of County
Road, and the West 46 feet of Lots
20 and 21 of JACKSON PEA-
COCK'S SUBDIVISION, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 4 at Page 71, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has1 been filed and commenced In this
Court and you' are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If any,
to it on SAMUEL E. SMITH. Attor-
ney for Plaintiff, whose address Is
1320 S. Dixie Highway. Suite 850.
Coral Gables, Florida 33146, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above- Court, on or before January
30, 1976; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the Compjalnt.
This* Notice shall be published once
eaci week for four (4) consecutive
week* in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said <*ourt, at Miami, Florida on this
19Ui day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the
Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
By B. LIPPS
As Deputy. Clerk
SAMUEL E. SMITH
Attorney for Plaintiff
1320 S. Dixie Highway, Suite 850
Com! Gables. Florida 33146
Phone: 667-4878
12/26-1/2-9-16
r8 Across, 10 Down-i
LEGAL NOTICE
Friday, January 9, 1976
LEGAL NOTICE
by Irv Brechner
ACROSS
? Olympic swimmer who won
7 medals '2 was;
6 Passover song------Lo No E
7 famous stained glass
arli si
10 recent telethon s name*------
to Survival
11 common Temple name beginning
12 abbreviation tor type ol lox
13 what authors usually required
to submit along with manuscnpt (abort
18 a most depressing person 'Yiddish;
19 masculine pronoun
20 Spanish poet and religious
thinker Judah
23 circumcision
24 author ol Up The Down Stair-
case Ust name/
3 Yiddish for lecherous
oic man labor
4 tamous comedian Don
5 worn during prayer by men
8 Hebrew for garden'-.
9 Abraham could be Hebrew!
name for this common
Enohsh name
14 Potok s artistic character s
name
15 an atlectionate dinunuitive
(Yiddish i
16 tsuioch m Yiddish means'
17 Walk a Day lor
20 NY Politician who started
0TB (initials;
21 mitia.s ol famous NY Phil-
harmonic conductor
22 form of verb be
This puzzle may nol be reproduced vwthout written
permission of the autho-______________________________
See Puzzle Answers on Page 13-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7465
In RE: Estate of
IDA ABRAHAMS,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
of IDA ABRAHAMS, deceased late of
Dade County, Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided
in Section 733.16, Florida Statutes in
their offices in the County Courthouse
In Dade County, Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publicaiton hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 23rd
day of December, A.D. 1975.
SAMUEL ABRAHAMS
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of January, 1976.
MYRON ALBERTMember of
Florida Bar No. 154369
Attorney for Estate of Ida Abrahams
66 Court Street
Brooklyn, New York 11201
V2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7916
(Dowling)
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN RB: ESTATE OF
ETHEL F. KENDALL
Deceased.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSON'S INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID DE-
CEDENT.
You are hereby notified that a
written instrument purporting to be
the last will and testament of said
decedent has been admitted to pro-
bate in said Court. You are hereby
commanded within six calendar
months from the date of the first
publication of this notice to appear
in said Court and show cause if
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-39425
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA JUNE LBSCHALOUPB.
Petitioner,
and
EDWARD GERARD LESCHALOUPE,
Respondent.
TO: Edward Gerard Leschaloupe
R.R. No. 4 Brampton, Ontario,
Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on WOLF and
SOHONINOER. PA., attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is Suite 702
Dadeland Towers. 9300 South Dade-
land Boulevard, Miami, Florida, 33158,
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 23rd 1676; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FI_ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
12th day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL FRANK SCHONINGER
WOLF and SCHONINGER, P.A.
Suite 702Dadeland Towers
9300 South -leland Boulevard
Miami, Fl. 33166
Attorney for Petitioner
12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 78-39804
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EPHRJAN ADKINS. Petitioner.
and
ERMA D. MACK ADKINS.
Respondent
TO: ERMA D. MACK ADKINS
Post Office Box 7
Molino, Florida _
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to it on
HARLAN STREET, FA. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 12700 Bis-
cayne Boulevard, Suite 410. North Mi-
ami, Florida 33181, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of ttte above styled
court on or before January 23rd, 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against yon for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
16th day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HAKLAN STREET. P.A.
12700 Blscayne Blvd.Suite 410
North Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Petitioner
891-5852
12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE CF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-38715
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
WALTER DI8MUKB.
Petitioner
and
CLAUDIA DIBMUKE,
Respondent. ___
TO: CLAUDIA DISMTTKE,
110 Clark Street
Hartford, Connecticut
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to It
on EUGENE J. WEISS, attorney for
Petitioner whose address Is 407 Lin-
coln Road, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Suite PH N/E, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
Court on or before Jan. 16, 1976: other-
wise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida, on this
5th day of Dec, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By H. BERMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE J. WEISS
PH N/B
407 Uncoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
12/19-26 1/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THI
ELEVENTH" JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IS AND FOR
DADE COtlNTY
* PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7650
(Judfje Dowling)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAUL R GOKBON
Deceased. "T|
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED TN
THE ESTATE OK SAID DECEDENT.
You are Hereto? notified' that a writ,
ten instrument purporting to be the
last will and testament of said dece-
dent has been admitted to probate In
said Court. You are hereby oomtnand-
ed within six calendar months from
the date of the first publication of
this notice to appear in said Court
and show cause, if any you can why
the action of said Court In admitting
said will to probate should not stand
unrevoked.
FRANK B. DOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By MIRIAM B. HENDKICKSON
Deputy Clerk
CYPEN & NEVINS
Attorney!
82.1 Arthjir Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
First publication of this notice on
the 19th day of December, 1975.
_____________________12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of
BARGAINVILLE CENTERS
QRUMPY'S
M. FORSTER & ASSOCIATES
FORSTER INTERNATIONAL
POOLCHEM DISTRIBUTORS
Intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DISTRIBUTOR SALES. INC.
DANIEL M. KEIL
Attorney for Applicants
12/19-26 1/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-39734
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHN HERNANDEZ. JR..
Husband/Petitioner,
and
HERM1NIA MILAGHOS RIVERA-
HERNANDEZ.
Wife/Respondent.
TO: HERMINIA MII.AOROS
RIVERA-HERNANDEZ
197 Santiago Igellas Pantin
Fajrado, Puerto Rico 00648
tOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are resuired to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
MARVIN I. MOSS. P.A.. Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address is 12550 Bls-
cayne Boulevard North Miami. Flor-
ida 33181, on or before Jan. 23rd. 1976
and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Petitioner's Attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on Dec. 16. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of said Court
By B. LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
12/19-26 1/2-6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5819
In RE: Estate of
FRANK P. SPIZIO
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
of FRANK P. SPIZIO. deceased late
of Dade County, Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided in
Section 733.16, Florida Statutes, in
their offices in the County Courthouse
in Dade County, Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida this 26th
day of December, A.D. 1975.
HELEN L SPIZIO
As Administratrix
First publication- of this notice on
the 2nd day of January-, 1976.
JOSH REPHUN
Attorney for Administratrix
1370 Washington Ave., M.B.
1/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
any you can, why the action of said the undersigned, desiring to engage In
?. 'Z,,"1""*, "a d S l1 P,r- *_" under <"e fictitious name of
bate should not stand unrevoked. the hidden corner boutique
FRANK B. DOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
By MIRIAM B.
HENDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
First publication of this notice on
the 2 day of January, 1976.
Publish in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
LEONARD U. STOLAR
Attorney
300 71st Street, Suite 630
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
1//2-9-16-23
BOUTIQUE
ut number 7029 S.W. 46th Street in
the City of Miami. Florida Intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
day of December 175.
TODAYS LOOK, INC.,
a Florida Corporation
LAW OFFICES OF
KURT WELLISCH
161 Almeria Avenue Suite 200-E
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(445-7954)
Attorney for Applicant
12/26-1/2-9-19
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Notice is hereby give nthat the un-
dersigned, Ed Gordon Enterprises,
inc. desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name, THE
FASHION CONSPIRACY intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
/s/ ED GORDON ENTERPRISES,
LNC,
By: Edwin H. Gordon. Pres.
_____ 12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-40005
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SELENE WILT.
Petitioner,
and
MARK ALAN WILT.
Respondent.
TO: MARK ALAN WILT
150 South Atlanta Street
Rowell, Georgia-
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it oa
FRIEDMAN AND LIPCON, attorneys
for Petitioner, whose address is 2600
Douglas Road. Suite 1011, Coral Ga-
bles. Florida 33134 (446-6485) and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Jan-
nuary 30, 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWSH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this ISth day of December. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
FRIEDMAN AND LIPCON
2600 Douglas Road. Suite 1011
Coral Gables. Fla. 33134 (446-6485)
Attorneys for Petitioner
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
, FICTITIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of LUCITE ORIGINALS at 2910 S.W.
0 Avenue, Pembroke Park, Fla. In-
er said name with the
Circuit Court of Dade

--_.._, AND ROSBN, CORP.
h .i A i l0. rK'8ter *' name A Fla. Corp.
Mth the Clerk of the Circuit Court of KW1TNEY. KROOP &
Dade County Florida. SCHEINBERG. PA.
SAMUEL SPECTOR Attorneys for Applicant
12/19-26 1/2-8 12/19-26 l'2-
f


January 9, 1976
fJewisMWdten
Page 15-A
hird WorldPutHit on Rabasa
Continued from Page 1-A
mediately after Rabasa's an-
louncement, is Ambassador Al-
fonso Garcia Robles, until Dec.
29 Mexico's Permanent Repre-
sentative to the UN and the
[diplomat who cast Mexico's con-
troversial vote in the General
Assembly.
That vote sparked a general
boycott of Mexico by thousands
of American Jews and Jewish
organizations who usually take
winter vacations in Mexico or
hold conventions there. The
bovcott has taken a hea'-y toll
of Mexico's all-important tour-
dustry with severe reper-
cussions on this country's
economy.
TOURISM officials here re-
pert that tourism, Mexico's sec-
ond largest foreign currency
earner, is off 25 percent this
holiday season, largely as a re-
sult of the American Jewish
bovcott. More than 120,000 can-
celhtions were received for the
Christmas week in Mexico City
ar.d Acapulco. The loss of Jew-
ish convention business alone is
estimated at $750,000.
In addition, non-Jewish groups
h3'.e cancelled conventions here
in deference to the sensibilities
of Jewish participants. It was at
least partially to save the tour-
ist trade that President Luis
Echeverria dispatched Rabasa
tn Jerusalem early in December
to "clear up certain misunder-
standings" with the Israeli gov-
ernment.
Echeverria subsequently met
in Mexico City with 15 Jewish
leaders from the U.S. and Cana-
da to whom he reportedly
pledged that Mexico would no
longer support anti-Zionist mea-
sures at the UN.
BUT SEVERAL days later,
Mexico voted in favor of a de-
coration by thi International
Women's Year Convention held
in Mexico City last summer
which equated Zionism with
colonialism and apartheid as
movements that should be
eliminated The boycott was
continued. Rabnsa, meanwhile,
was nttacked in the Mexican
| p.ess for compromising the na-
tion's honor by apologizing in
o!cm for acts of his gov-
ernment.
Newspapers' here denounced
bis remarks to report?rs in the
Israeli capital that the misun-
d -indings had been "forgot-
ten, pardoned and buried." He
v* is taken to task especially for
hi ise of the vvo'-d "pardon0!."
Observers bore say the entire
affair must be viewed in the
ctive of Mexico's desire
:ome the leader of Third
World forces in Latin America
and Echeverria's personal am-
bition to succeed in the presi-
d of the General Assembly
at its 31st session next year.
MEXICO, along with many
Allon Eyes
Jordan Talks i
Continued from Page 1-A
A'Jon's proposal considering the'
reluctance of West Bank !e*d-1
ers to participate in such nego-
ns. The papp.r named Pre-
mier Yitzhak F.abin as one dff
|t ;-e who "probably" opposed;
Vd >n's ideas.
The Foreign Minister report-
il.- defended his suggestion on
Is that it could neutralize
.0 and present Israel, for
change, as a country with dos-
ideas. Allon was said to,
p. that if tlj West Bankers
iject his prop'osnl, the onus will
|t he t.tV n<5t Israel.
Allon's visit to Washington is
iked to the Security Council
- i .ii the Middlefiastsched-J
led for next Monday at which
ke Palestine Liberation Organi-
ktion is due to participate. Is-
^el is still maintaining that it
11 boycott the session because
the PLO presence.
Third World countries, is not
considered to be basically anti-
Israel or anti-Zionist but in-
creasingly anti-American. By
supporting the Arabs in their
drive to isolate Israel Aipio-
matically, these countries are
striking at the United States
without running the risk of a
direct affront to the U.S. whose
economic assistance they sorely
need.
To make matters even more
acid. Echeverria. in an address
before Mexico's Congress last
week, declared that he would
"rather die" than apologize for
Mexico's vote at the United Na-
tions.
While emphasizing that the
Mexican vote needed to be "un-
derstood" in terms of Third
World pressures on his country,
Echeverria nevertheless made
his statement to slam at Raba-
sa's "forgive-and-forget" diplo-
macy before his sudden resigna-
tion.
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COMPLETE DELICIOUS HOMEMADE DINNER
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got you down?
You do have an alternative^
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m offer all foods except mat
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or for inforroat|pn CALL 44S 7137
OUR FIRST ANNIVERSARY
Thanks to You We Have Grown and
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We Are Mere... MIAMI BEACH'S fIRST
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four Hoiti, MffHSHt HIRKH & RBBi N4H4AN GOODMAN
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Open For Luee. end Dinner TAKE OUT ORDERS
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The Zuckermana
eV Larry Winklei
BANQUET FACILITIES
537-3987


Page 16-A
+JelrfncsH*>r
Friday, janua
*7 9.
, nert 30 doyfc yo*o<^-----
\bu are about to find out
hy a tire you never heard of
the best tire for these times.
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The I.R.I. All-Steel Radial is the world's first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles. It's the
most economical tire you can own. Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires. Because of the exclusive I.R.I. Ail-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles,
out of the tire itself. We believe the result
Is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any'
kind or any brand or tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the t R.I. All-Sted
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably, i
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50,000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boll It all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
I- BIAS 2. BELTED J. RADIAL
\ BIAS TIRES
Two, tour or s ometimes even more plies (or
uyers) of material cross under Ihe tread it m
ngle or bias to the center line of the tire. Generally
the cheapest tire to buy.
2. BCLTrO TIRES
Simfir to the twast.re with the addition of fws
or more beds of material that run around the lire
under the tread. This combines a bias sidewall
with increased tread sUMity and improved
tread life.
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features. Cords of
ulerfal run from sidewall to sidewafl crossing the
tread at 90 degrees Two or more belts of material
Jso run around the tire. Price per tire is higher
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires Is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78s and 7.75's all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
S'NCE 1924
TIRE CO.
The strongest radial is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I. Is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially -
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial tire U ooly a steel-belted radial. This is
Important in understanding the superiority of
m I.R.I. All-Sted Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the l.R.I. radial than in any
other automobile tire. Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I.R.I,
tread stays open for maximum road contact -
in all kinds of weather. This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc) used in the
sidewalls of all other automobile tires. The
result is 100 per cent steel strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
IR.I. All-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and its
stamped on the side of every I.R.I, tire. Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials -
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for all vdudes, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pick-ups.
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, too.
The I.R.I. All-Sted Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us. Each cable is wound of seven strands of
simti
CENTIR
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
NORTH MIAMI11360 N.W 7th aV2-lVAiX
MOM ESTCAD3810* S. Federal HwvftfiiK
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1. The only tire with STEEL
sidewalls for strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort.
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength, 30 steel cables per inch.
Total: Three layers of steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for surefire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire. That's a total of 21 strong
steel filaments in each cable. Yet. with ail this
strength, the cable is as flexible as silk. The
result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configure.
HMi was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I.R.I. All-Sted
Radial. Now. the combination of steel and
tread design provides solid, road-holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat.
The I.R.I. is an all weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't beard about I.R.I.
AH Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry.
I R I. is a relatively small company. We
are growing steadily on a market-by-market
plan now reaching your city. Five years
ago. we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the finest imported tire available
mSZZ? d c?nvCntional *-wl*f
85KLT- WCre free ",0 tr* anything."
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hadtTV ,irC rr than the one
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a MOOO^i. S avai,able here Backed by
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Br C->ii>dru h
I


I
' tFewish Floridiaxi
Miami, Florida Friday, January 9, 1976
Section B
Miami's Jewish Leaders Elected To
JDCs Board and National Council
A number of Miami's Jewish
community leaders were elected
to the board of directors and
national council of the Joint
Distribution Committee at the
61st annual meeting in New
New York, it was announced by
JDC chairman Jack D. Weiler.
Among those elected to the
board were Harry B. Smith,
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and L. Jules
Arkin, chairman of the Federa-
tion's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Re-elected to the board was
former GMJF President Sidney
Lefcourt. Those already serv-
ing in this capacity for the JDC
are Federation leaders Harry A.
Levy, Stanley C. Myers, Robert
Russell and Morton Silberman.
Re-elected to the JDC's na-
tional council were Miamians
Joseph Gittleman, Daniel Neal
Heller, Samuel Kipnis, Sam
Luby, Mr. Anna Brenner Mey-
ers, Max Orovitz, Norton S. Pal-
lot, Arthur S. Rosichan and Mrs.
Sam Simonhoff.
Miami leaders serving on the
JDC national council are Jose
Avayu, Lionel Bosem, Shepard
Broad, Myron J. Brodie, Judge
Irving Cypen, David B. Flee-
man, E. Peter Goldring, Nat
Gumenick, Barry Haiman, Ar-
thur Horowitz, Jerry B. Isan,
Mrs. Jacob Katzman, Donald
Lefton, Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
Mrs. Burton R. Levey, Richard
Levy, Joseph M. Lipton, Saul J.
Morgan, Steven Muss, Rabbi
Joseph Narot, Jacob Rifkin,
Charles H. Rosenberg, .Howard
R. Scharlin, Frank S. Schneider,
George Suber, Mrs. Mike Sum-
berg, Harold Thurman, Louis
Knesset Speaker Pays a Visit
To South Dade Hebrew Academy
When Yisrael Yeshayahu,
Speaker of the Knesset, wanted
to visit an American Hebrew-
English all-day school during a
mid-December visit to the
United States, he chose the
South Dade Hebrew Academy.
Yeshayahu was accompanied
by an interpreter, for he speaks
almost no English, but he list-
ened to questions asked in He-
brew by the school's students,
who speak the language fluent-
ly.
The speaker was sent to the
United States by the Israeli gov-
ernment in response to recent
anti-Zionism at the UN and to
help raise funds and address the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. In Israel he has responsi-
bilities similar to those of the
Speaker of the U.S. House of
Representatives and also acts
as Chief of State in the absence
of Premier Yitzhak Rabin.
Dr. Melvyn Greenstein, presi-
dent of the school, Erwin B.
Marshall, principal, and Dror
Zadok, Hebrew director, all wel-
comed Yeshayahu and held a
special ceremony in his honor.
Dr. Melvyn Greenstein
(left), president of the
South Dade Hebrew Acad-
emy, welcomes Yisrael Ye-
shayahu, Speaker of the
Knesset, while the school's
Hebrew director, Dror Za-
dok, looks on.
Shu I mat i To Be Honored By
ORT Men's Chapter, Jan. 11
The Greater Miami Men's
Chapter of the American ORT
Federation will hold their 15th
annual installation luncheon at
the Seville Hotel on Sunday,
Jan. 11, at noon.
Leonard Zilbert, president of
the Florida Riverside Chapels,
RABBI SCHIFF
Rabbi Schiff Is Guest
At Emanu-El Tonight
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, execu-
tive vice president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami, will be the guest speaker
this evening at the 8:30 service
of Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach. Rabbi Schiff is director
of the chaplaincy service of the
greater Miami Jewish Federa-
on.
active community worker and
religious leader, will be the
master of ceremonies.
Rabbi Dr. David Raab, chap-
Iain of the Greater Miami Men's
Chapter, will offer the invoca-
tion and benediction.
The guest of honor is Benja-
min I. Shulman, chairman of
the board of the Intercontinen-
tal Bank of Miami Beach. Shul-
man, who serves on the board
of directors of the Miami Beach
Symphony Orchestra and on
the board and executive com-
mittee of the Florida Commit-
tee for Bar-Ilan University, is
active in Temple Emanu-El and
its Lehrman Day School.
U.S. Senator Richard Stone is
scheduled to be the guest
speaker. Representing the
world ORT Union Headquarters
in Geneva will be Hyman Wach-
tel, and many other prominent
community leaders will attend.
Presentations to many mem-
bers for their charitable gifts
and recognition of those who
have given their time and en-
ergy to ORT are also part of
the program, which will include
professional entertainment.
Dewey Knapp, who led the
chapter in 1975, has been re-
elected president for 1976.
The Greater Miami Men's
Chapter leads all chapters in
the United States in the amount
of money contributed for ORT's
work.
Winsten, Mitchell Wolfson, Wil-
liam Agranove, Stanley Arkin,
Leo Eisenstein, Mrs. Toby
Friedland, Mrs. Sol Goldstein,
Marshall Harris, Aaron Kanner,
Norma C. Kipnis, Jay Kislak,
Norman H. Lipoff, Stuart Mir-
melli, Edward Rosenthal, Stuart
Rothchild, Mendell M. Selig,
Fred K. Shochet, Eli Timoner,
Robert Traurig, Milton Weiss
and Leonard Wien, Jr.
Newly elected to the JDC na-
tional council are Michael M.
Adler, Samuel Adler, Rep.
Elaine Bloom, Sol Center, M.D.,
Marvin Mike Cooper, Julius
Darsky, Mrs. Aaron Farr, Ar-
thur Flink, Morris Futernick,
Stanley Gilbert, Ignacio Gold-
emberg, Alfred Golden, Moses
Grundwerg, Mel Kartzmer, Ra-
fael Kravec, Mrs. Bernard
Mandler, Mrs. Robert Russell,
David Schaecter, Joan Scheiner,
Mel Schoenfeld, Kenneth J.
Schwartz, Nathan Skolnick, Clif-
ford Suchman, Mrs. Morton L.
Weinberger, Reva Wexler and
A. B. Wiener.
Ralph I. Goldman, former as-
sociate director of JDC in Is-
rael, was elected executive vice
chairman of the JDC. He suc-
ceeds Samuel L. Haber, who was
elected honorary vice chairman.
Temple Beth Am's Art exhibit and sale, scheduled for
Jan. 17 in the temple's social hall, is the subject of dis-
cussion between Sisterhood president Lori Miller (left)
and ways and means committee cochairperson Eva
Rawicz. The art show, combined with a wine and hors
d'oeuvres party, will feature signed and numbered
lithos, jewelry, oils, watercolors, sculpture, photographs,
enamelwork and wall hangings. Original works will
come from the Gloria Lurid Gallery. There will be works
by Rouault, Somers, Miro, Dali, Chagall and Braque as
well as by local artists Meredith Miller, Samuel Vinikofj
and Ryna Youngerman. Prices will be no higher than
regular retail, and all paintings and prints will be framed
and ready to hang.
NCJW To Hear Robert Shevin
At Bicentennial Celebration
The National Council of Jew-
ish Women's annual member-
ship meeting and Bicentennial
celebration will be on Wednes-
day, Jan. 14, at 11:30 a.m. at
the Fontainebleau Hotel.
The council-produced film "In
Pursuit of Privacy" will be
shown. Robert L. Shevin, Flor-
ida's Attorney General, will be
guest soeaker, and Evelyn Co-
han will receive the Hannah G.
Solomon Award.
Judy M. Gilbert is president
of the Greater Miami Section.
NCJW.
Letus
entertain you. tree.
First Federal's Herb Aronson and his
wife Annabel would like to entertain you.
As a service to the community. And for
just plain fun.
What do they do?
They draw plenty of laughter and
applause. Wherever they go.
What a show!
So when your condominium group or
organization is planning its next meeting.
call Herb Aronson. And let Herb and his
wife provide the entertainment. Free.
Just call 577-6462 for more details.
<***
First Federal
OEl'
of Miami
Where people come first
aim fmijm fm a M mm **. r*f*


Page 2-B
*Jewi$t fteridiar
Friday, January 9, 1975
Histadrut Is Sponsoring Steinbergs To Receive Solidarity Award
Yiddish-Language Broadcasts
Two Yiddish language pro-
grams heard weekly on radio
station WEVD in New York City
will be broadcast live from Mi-
ami Beach this month under the
auspices of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation (IHF). The an-
nouncement was made by Dr.
Leon Kronish, rabbi of Temple
Beth Sholom and national IHF
board chairman.
The broadcasts of "The News
of the Week in Review" airl
"The Voice of Histadrut" will
originate from the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 25,
at noon, and will be preceded
by a brunch at 10 a.m. Admis-
sion is bv roservation only.
"The News of the Week in
Review" features Shelomo Ben-
Israel, columnist and UN cor-
respondent for the Yiddish-
language "Jewish Daily For-
Cantor Alpern
To Be Honored
By Men's Club
The Men's Club of Temple
Adath Yeshurun will honor Can-
tor Ian Alpern on Sunday, Jan.
18, at 9:30 a.m. "This award is
given each year to demonstrate
our appreciation for the work
done on behalf of Jewish educa-
tion," said Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man.
The combined choral groups
of the temple and Hillel Com-
munity Day School, and Cantor
Jacob Mendelson of Congrega-
tion Beth Torah, will participate
in the entertainment program.
The leaders of several local
Jewish educational institutions
will describe the purpose and
function of their schools. All
proceeds will be donated to the,
educational institutions partici-
pating in the program.
Israelite Center
Sabbath & Dinner
Honor Sisterhood
Following Sisterhood Sabbath
service at the Israelite Center
Temple on Friday, Jan. 16, there
will be a traditional Sabbath
dinner in the Social Hall. Kid-
dush will be recited by Ronald
Kirsner, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Hyman Kirsner. Zemirot will be
led by Rabbi Solomon Wal-
denbcrg and Cantor Nathan Par-
nass.
Mrs. Pearl Koenigsberg is Sis-
terhood president. Mrs. Chester
Lsiter, chairlady of the evening.
i<5 .?c-.sit?d by Mrs. Pearl Koe-
nigsberg, Mrs. Louis Sonsky and
Mrs. Albort Winston.
Yiddish Culture Wincle
Marking Reisen's Birthday
The Yiddish Culture Wincle
-11 r? I hrate the 100th anniver-
sary of the birth of Abraham
Reisen on Tuesday, Jan. 13, at
10:30 a.m. at Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute.
Morris Becker, lecturer, scho-
lar, and principal of Jewish
schools, Will discuss RVysri'-
works and their impact on Yid-
dish literature.
Jf 00b Gorelick will offer a 1
selection of Reisen's songs ?nj
Israel Goldberg will recite Born, >
R 1 in poetry. Dora Meisel will
preside.
SOL STEIN
ward."
Dr. Sol Stein, economist and
national president of the His-
tadrut Foundation, is host of
"The Voice of Histadrut," which
presents a weekly discussion of
personal financial and estate
planning as well as a review
of the Histadrut programs in
Israel.
"These two programs are
broadcast live from Miami
Beach once a year." Rabbi
Kronish said, "to provide nostal-
gia for many of our local resi-
dents who used to live in the
New York area and were reg-
ular listeners of Shelomo Ben-
Israel and Dr. Stein."
At King Cole
Florida State Representative
and Mrs. Paul B. Steinberg have
been named recipients-elect of
the Israel Solidarity Award, it
was announced by Nate Piliaw-
sky, chairman. King Cole Israel
Bonds Committee.
The presentation will be
made, on behalf of the 1976
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization campaign, at the
Thursday, Jan. 15, at 8 in the
Dr. Rosenbiuth Named
International Editor By
Dental Fraternity
Dr. Morton Rosenbiuth of
North Miami Beach was install-
ed as international editor at the
68th annual convention of the
Alpha Omega International Den-
tal Fraternity on Jan. 1 in Balti-
more.
Dr. Robert Shira, president of
the American Dental Associa-
tion, and Dean of Tufts Univer-
sity School of Dental Medicine,
was the keynote speaker.
Dr. Ronald Goldstein of At-
lanta was installed as interna-
tional president for 1976 and
announced that this year's con-
vention will be held in Van-
couver, B.C.
Other officers installed were
Dr. Jack Lawson of Sterling
Heights, Mich., president; Dr.
Sanford Scheingold of Cincin-
nati, secretary; Dr. M. William
Rose of Cleveland Heights,
treasurer.
"Night in Israel," Jan. 15
King Cole Lounge. Guest speak-
er is comedian Emil Cohen.
Rep. Steinberg, a graduate of
the University of Miami and
Stetson University College of
Law, is a past president of the
Miami Beach Jaycees and B'nai
B'rith Sports Lodge and former
director of Miami Beach Tax
Payers Association.
ELECTED to the House in
1972, he was chairman of the
City of Miami Beach Beautifica-
tion Committee and the reci-
pient of the national awards in
1967, 1968 and 1969 for city
beautification. He also received
of the Golden Apple Award in
1971 from Dade County Educa-
tion Association for outstanding
service to education and "Out-
standing Young Man of Amer-
ica."
Steinberg was appointed by;
Governor Askew to the Florida
Council of International De-
velopment for 1972 and to the
Advisory Council on Waste R
co-cry and Management f"
1974.
Sandy Steinberg, a gradua--
of the University of Mian
taught in the Dade County
school system, is active in B'nVi
B'rith and is vice president of I
the Sunflower Society.
In 1976 Israel Bonds stresses 1
the emphasis on a year in which]
Israel must have financial aid for'
increased oil exploration and an
intensification of the search for,
new sources of energy. Mihon
M. Parson is the executive di-
rector of the Greater Miami
Israel Bond Organization.
HEATH, BRUCE SILVIAN, father of
Scott and Wendy, and former hus-
band of Carole, all of whom ore
now residing in Toronto, Ontario,
Canada, please contact Mrs. louise
Shogilev at (416) 781-1592 collect
on a matter of importance.
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I Friday, January 9, 1976
fJewisti fhrktiam
Page 3-B
Greater Miami Isra el Bonds Campaign
Exceeds $10.5 Million for Third Year
For the third consecutive
year the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization campaign
has collected more than $10.5
million to help advance Israel's
progress and welfare through
urgently needed economic de-
velopment programs.
The announcement was made
by Robert L. Siegel, general cam-
paign chairman, who said that
Miami is once again at the fore-
front in purchasing a record
number of State of Israel Bonds
at this historic time in Israel's
history.
Siegel said: "In 1975. a time
of anti-Zionist resolutions, back-
breaking balance of payment
deficits, and a record high de-
fense budget, it was imperative
that the men and women of our
community respond with total
commitments and outstanding
pledges to continue to keep Is-
rael strong and viable. It is in-
deed heartwarming that our
community answered the chal-
lenge at a time when South
Florida ranked number one in
unemployment and was con-
fronted with rampant inflation."
Rabbi Gross Will Speak at Brunch
Honoring Hebrew Academy Fellows
A dedication brunch honoring
the Fellows of the Greater Mi-
ami Hebrew Academy will be
held on Sunday, Jan. 11, at
10:30 a.m. in the Merwitzer
Building of the Miami Beach
school.
The guest speaker, Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, principal of
the Hebrew Academy, will de-
scribe his 10-day trip to Israel
under the auspices of the Gov-
ernment of Israel and the World
Zionist Organization, from
which he was scheduled to re-
turn today.
Persons who contributed
scholarships to the Hebrew
Academy for 1976 will be in-
ducted as Fellows of the He-
brew Academy by Judge Nor-
man Ciment, president of the
south's largest Hebrew day
school.
I. H. Abrams, chairman of the
executive committee, and Judge
Ciment will outline the results
of last month's 28th annual
Scholarship Dinner of the He-
brew Academy which honored
former Bay Harbor Islands
Mayor Shepard Broad.
Cohosts for the dedication
brunch are the president's coun-
cil of the Hebrew Academy, of
which Councilman Murray Mey-
erson is chairman, and the
board of directors of the school,
of which George Kimmel is
chairman.
SUMMIT-ISRAEL
A therapeutic community in Jerusalem for American
adolescents and young adults experiencing serious life
adjustment problems.
A structured, clinically supervised program geared to the
individual with average or above average intelligence,
offering:
Pre-collegiate, college level, and
vocational programs.
Supportive environment of a
therapeutic community, individual
therapy, group therapy, profes-
sional counseling and guidance.
Individualized tutorial approach.
Socialization, self-confidence, and
cultural awareness.
i An opportunity to begin anew in a
vibrant and dynamic society.
American trained professional staff.
i Moderate tuition, a portion which
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major medical insurers.
Inquiries should be forwarded to:
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Summit Institute in Israel, Ltd., 1750 N.W. 189 Terrace. Miami, Florida 33055
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MILTON M. PARSON, execu-
tive director, offered a special
"thank you" to the rabbis and
congregations of Greater Miami
for their support of and solid-
arity with Israel through their
profound generosity and assis-
tance.
Parson emphasized that the
spiritual support, strength and
inspiration of the congregations'
spiritual leaders were major
reasons for the successful cam-
paign results. The congrega-
tions' officers and directors
were acknowledged too, for
their magnificent cooperation
and hard work for their Din-
ners of State.
Siegel announced that for the
first time in Israel Bonds' 25-
year history a Prime Minister's
Israel Bond Conference will
meet in Europe this month to
plan to increase the participa-
tion of foreign Jewish commu-
nities in the Israel Bond pro-
grams and to set the theme for
the worldwide 1976 Israel Bond
campaign.
Mizrachi Women
Plan Meetings
Hadar Chapter president Lil-
lian Chabner invites everyone
to a "Day at the Races" at Cal-
der on Tuesday. Jan. 13. All
seats are reserved.
On Jan. 28 the chapter will
hold its regular meeting at 1
p.m. at the Washington Federal
Bank Bldg. on Normandy Dr.
fr & -ft
Miami Beach Chapter presi-
dent Rachel Katz has scheduled
a meeting for Tuesday, Jan. 13
at 1 p.m. at the Washington
Federal Auditorium on Washing-
ton Ave.
ti & &
Shalom Chapter president Rea
Krieger has planned a luncheon
meeting for Tuesday. Jan. 13, at
noon at 100 Lincoln Rd. in the
clubroom. '
6 # &
Geula Chapter president
Freda Oster will have Bea
Young, national vice president
of AMW. as guest speaker on
Wednesday, Jan. 14, at 8 p.m.
at Beth Israel Synagogue. Gert-
rude Esterman is program chair-
man of the meeting.
Yivo Forum
S. Dunsky, a noted educator
of the Jewish Seminary and He-
brew schools in Montreal and
author of many books on Mid-
rash Rabbah, will address the
Yivo Forum on "R'b Joseph
Caro, 400 Years After" Wed-
nesday, Jan. 14. at 8 p.m. at
Temple Beth Sholem.
Dunsky received the literary
award of the J. I. Segal Fund
for Jewish Education.
REX
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miami,florida
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305-445-1413
hours:
8:30 til 6:00
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The Prime Minister's Club plaque for exemplary service
to Israel was presented on Dec. 17 at the Fontainebleau
Hotel to Robert L. Siegel, general campaign chairman
of the Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization. The
presentation was made to Siegel, a Bay Harbor Islands
resident and Miami Beach builder, at the "Woman of the
Century" dinner, honoring Golda Meir, of which he was
dinner chairman.
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ON AMERICAS
N0.1 PRUNE.


Page 4-B
vJewisti noridiain
Friday, January 9. 1976
Longwood Towers "Salute to Israel"
To Honor Lillian and Hyman Chabner
Longwood Towers residents
in Bay Harbor Islands will pay
tribute to Hyman and Lillian
Chabner and hear keynote ad-
dresses by Mayor Louis Haas of
Bay Harbor Islands and past
Mayors Stanley Tate and Shep-
ard Broad at a "Salute to Is-
rael" breakfast on Sunday, Jan.
18, at 11 a.m. in the Longwood
Towers Social Hall.
The announcement was made
by Longwood Towers Israel
Bonds Committee chairmen Dr.
and Mrs. Sam Berkowitz, who
said that entertainment will be
provided by Emil Cohen, Amer-
ican Jewish folk humorist.
Hyman and Lillian Chabner,
members of the State of Israel
Bonds Prime Minister's Club,
received the Prime Minister's
Club plaque at the "Woman of
the Century" dinner honoring
Golda Meir in mid-December.
President of Congregation
HYMAN AND LILLIAN CHABNER
Blum Named Advertising Director
By Pantry Pride-Food Fair
Michael I. Blum has been
named director of advertising
and sales promotion for Pantry
Pride and Food Fair Stores in
South Florida, succeeding Theo-
dore Zalles, who has retired.
A graduate of Roosevelt Uni-
versity and Loyola University in
Chicago, Blum moved to Flor-
ida 17 years ago. He has taught
retailing at the Lindsey Hop-
kins and is a member of the
board of directors of the Great-
er Miami Advertising Federa-
tion.
Blum and his family live in
Hollywood Hills and are mem-
bers of Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood. His parents are Mr.
?.nd Mrs. Sam Blum of Miami
Beach.
Kreutzer To Address
Beth Kodesh Congregation
Frank Kreutzer, an attorney
who served the community's in-
digent and provided service to
many organizations for many
years, will be the guest speaker
at late Friday services at Beth
Kodesh Congregation this eve-
ning at 8:15. His topic is "The
Bicentennial and the Jewish
People."
no
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Beth El and the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Association,
Chabner serves on the execu-
tive boards of Hebrew Acad-
emy, Mesivta, Hebrew Free
Loan, B'nai B'rith and numer-
ous yeshivas.
Mrs. Chabner, a recipient of
the State of Israel Bonds "Wom-
an of Valor Award," is presi-
dent of the Hadar Chapter of
American Mizrachi Women and
a member of Brandeis Hadas-
sah, in which she is Miami
Beach chairman and vice presi-
dent of membership. In addition
to being a life member of both,
she is a life member of the
Hebrew Academy, Temple
Emanu-El and numerous yeshi-
vas.
Temple Congregation
To Honor Its Choir
Temple Adath Yeshumn his
planned a traditional Fridn-
night dinner on Jan. 1*. at fcla
p.m., to honor their choir. The
congregation and their families
will sing traditional Sabbath
songs.
There will be no late services
that evening. Kabbalah Shabbat
services will be at 5:15.
Jewish community leader Abraham Udell and Mrs. I dell
(left) received the Israel Solidarity Award from guest
weaker Emil Cohen at the Maison Grande December
"Night in Israel." Residents of the Miami Beach apart-
ment complex paid tribute to the Udells and at the same
time pledged major commitments to purchase Israel
Bonds. ____________
Votes Incorporated Plans Open Meeting
Voters Incorporated plans an erate.
open-to-the-public" meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 8 p.m. in
the Washington Federal Audi-
torium on Washington Ave.
Harry Levy, president, will rriod-
ine gucsl speakers include
former Circuit Court Judge Al-
fonso C. Ser>e: Director of Fior
ida Polls J. B. (Joe) Abram; and
Nat Potamkin, political activist.
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So rich you fill your cup
with flavor, not caffein

I I L


Friday, January 9, 1976
*'Jkwisfr fhrkUan
Page 5-B
'
-
Mayshie Friedbe rg's Retirement
Began His "Most C haUenging" Career
"Hester Street" Premiere
To Benefit B'nai B'rith
*
Many Miami Beach residents
approach retirement with re-
signation, but 94-year-old May-
shie Friedberg refuses to give
up his career ... a career he
started at the usual retirement
age and which he claims is the
most challenging of his life.
Mayshie retired from his job
as an electrician three decides
ago, but he never considered
for a moment actually retiring.
He embarked instead on a full-
time campaign job inspiring
support for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's annual Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund.
One of the most popular and
colorful figures in Miami
Beach's Jewish community,
Mayshie has helped raise hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars
for the life-sustaining programs
of Federation's 50 local, national
and overseas social service
agencies. Twenty-five of these
agencies continue to improve
the quality of life for residents
in Dade County.
MAYSHIE'S spirit and dedica-
tion have earned many awards,
but the greatest award, he says,
is the satisfaction he sets from
practicing "Tzedekah" (the an-
cient Jewish tradition of help-
ing people in need) through the
CJA-IEF. Perhaps that is why,
he adds, "I am now richer than
ever before."
"I have very little patience
with people who say they can't
find the time to help others who
are less fortunate," says May-
shie. "If we are to assure the
Jewish people a better quality
of life one of which all Jews
can be proud we must each
give as though our own life de-
pends on it."
Whether in English, Yiddish
or his native Russian, Mayshie's
message is clearly communi-
cated to Miami Beach residents:
"Jews everywhere face a critical
time in history. The survival of
Jews at home and abroad de-
pends on the support of other
concerned Jews."
AMONG HIS long list of
"spare" time activities, Mayshie
serves on the Federation's board
of governors, is an active par-
Beth Raphael Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Raphael will hold a meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 15. at 7:30 p.m.
at the temple, with Faye Bruck-
er presiding.
Mrs. Mary Gerstman has ar-
ranged a musical program
through the courtesy of the Cas? j
Federal Bank.
WIDOW
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mid-50s young, enjoys WTMI,
Judaica, sunshine, Seaquarium
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AdoSph Lopez
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MAYSHIE FRIEDBERG
ticipant in its CJA-IEF Hotel
Division and was a founder and
past chairman of the Condo-
minium Division. He has been
active with the United Way for
over 10 years.
A former chairman and 1976
vice president of the Farband
Labor Zionist Organization,
Mayshie is on the executive
boards of the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem, Histadrut, the
Jewish National Fund and Paole
Zion LZO.
He is a member of the Zion-
ist Organization of America,
B'nai B'rith and Technion, and
is active in many of Federation's
beneficiary agencies including
the Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, the American Jew-
ish Congress, the American Jew-
ish Committee and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
He is an active campaign work-
er for Israel Bonds.
"Mayshie Friedberg has pro-
vided enormous input and Im-
petus to Federation and its CJA-
IEF," said L. Jules Arkin, gen-
eral chairman of the Federa-
tion's 1976 CJA-IEF. "We are
deeply grateful for his longtime
commitment and service to the
world Jewish community."
B'nai B'rith will present the
film "Hester Street" at a pre-
miere benefit performance at
Wometco's Normandy Theater
in Miami Beach on Thursday,
Jan. 22. Curtain time is 8:30
p.m., with a reception at 7:30
p.m. Tickets are available
through the B'nai B'rith office
in Hollywood.
Announcement of the benefit
was made by Mike Teitelbaum,
M.D., president of the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith,
and Barry T. Gurland, president
of the B'nai B'rith Council of
South Florida Lodges, the or-
ganizations sponsoring the
South Florida premiere of "Hes-
ter Street."
"Hester Street" is the detailed
story of a Russian-Jewish fami-
ly's emigration to the United
States at the turn of the century
and their adjustment to the
American way of life. Hester
Street is in New York's Lower
East Side.
Starring Steven Keats and
Carol Kane, the Midwest Films
Productions feature was written
and directed by Joan Micklin
Silver and produced by Raphael
D. Silver.
Pioneer Eilat Chapter Concert
To Feature Soprano Nina Diamond
Eilat Chapter of Pioneer
Women will present a concert
featuring lyric soDrano Nina
Diamond on Saturday, Jan. 17,
at 8 p.m., in the civic auditor-
ium of Financial Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association on
Washington Ave.
Proceeds from the program
will go to the Child Rescue
Fund of Pioneer Women in Is-
rael, according to Mrs. Sara
Brucker, publicity chairman.
Tickets are available at the Pio-
neer Women office, or from
Mrs. Goldie Rubinstein or Mrs.
Rena Miller.
Ask your son the doctor
about Mazola
Good for taste and good for nutrition.
All four are made with liquid corn oil which may help to lower
your serum cholesterol level when used as a part of a total diet.
MAZOLA CORN OIL. For tastier
baking, crisper frying, livelier salads. Never an oily
after taste. Never burns at normal cooking temper-
atures. And it's low in saturated fats, high in poly-
unsaturates, contains no cholesterol whatsoever!
Kosher-Parve.
CONTAINS
LIQUID
CORN Oil
Mazola
Margarine
MAZOLA SWEET
UNSALTED MARGARINE. Greater
meat and dairy meals, grand for baking and frying. Because it's
Parve and Kosher, unsalted, low in saturated fat, high in poly-
unsaturates, and won't burn at normal frying temperatures.
Kosher-Parve.
,.">
Mazola
Margarine
-
MAZOLA
MARGARINE.
Light delicious flavor
without the disadvantages.
Unlike butter, Mazola
Margarine is low in saturated
fat, high in polyunsaturates.
And contains no cholesterol
at all. Milchige
Kosher.

MAZOLA
DIET MARGARINE, whata
tasty way to cut calories and saturated fats in your
family meals. Because it's lower in calories, but high
in polyunsaturates. Yes, buttery tasting Mazola
Diet Margarine watches out for your familyat the
table and in your baked and fried foods. Milchige
Kosher.
The Mazola Family of Products is good for your family
ALL UNDER SUPERVISION


Page 6-B
fjenit fhrkUaifi
Friday, January 9, 1975
joints of View
with NORMA A. ORQVITZ
Family laws of Purity and
mikveh immersion, as discussed
lb last week's column, are alive
and actively observed at the
community mikveh at 151 Mich-
igan Avenue, Miami Beach.
During the daylight hours the
mikveh is used daily by 50 men.
Before Shabbat the number may
climb by 50 percent. Emmanuel
Edelstein, Men's Group presi-
dent Of the Daughters of Israel,
which is responsible for the
mikveh's mortgage, said that
many more younger men are
taking advantage of mikveh use.
Of the 200 male members half
are under 40. Many of the young
fathers frequently bring their
post-Bar Mitzvah-age sons to
mikveh before Shabbat.
The Ladies' Group of the
Daughters of Israel has as its
duty the maintenance of the
mikveh. There are meetings,
luncheons and educational op-
portunities as well. Later this
month Rabbi Stephen Riskin of
New York's Lincoln Center
Synagogue will be the guest lec-
turer on purity laws for the
Daughters of Israel. (The lec-
ture is open to non-members.)
Ten years ago the Daughters
of Israel had 40 female mem-
bers. Today the number is up-
ward of 150 women, half of
whom are under 35. Member-
ship is $10 a year plus $3 for
each mikveh use. Tourists and
non-members are charged $5
per use and a bride pays $10.
The last step in a conversion is
mikveh immersion and that re-
quires a $30 fee.
Rosa and Donald Diamond of
North Miami Beech recently
adopted 15-month-old Michael
Aaron from a Bogota, Colombia,
orphanage. After having their
new sort circumcised, the Dia-
monds decided upon the im-
1 mersion as well.
The Colombian orphanage re-
quires a religious certificate be-
fore the adoption can be final-
ized. "The birth certificate
might have proved sufficient but
We decided on making the con-
version complete with immer-
sion," explained Diamond, an
engineer- with a local concern.
Mrs. Diamond, a Sabra, things
of mikveh in terms of personal
cleanliness only. While she
wanted mikveh for her son, she
would not consider it for her-
self.
One young woman in her 30's,
who preferred to remain anony-
mous, well known in Miami
Beach's Orthodox community,
related how she went to the
mikveh before her marriage ten
years ago. "I was frightened
and didn't know what to epect.
1 wanted to go because it was
the right thing to do." She did
hot find the experience spirit-
ually uplifting, however, and
has not gone since.
Another woman, who de-
scribed herself as "Orthodox
but quite modern," observes
mikveh and has done so for
nearly seven years. Her mother
artd mother-in-law never en-
couraged her to observe, and
after she had made the deci-
sion on her own, her future
husband had a "lukewarm re-
action." However, he ac-
quiesced.
lit the years since husband
and wife have found "the wait-
ing to be an incentive." This
28-year-old woman has deter-
mined that "it's possible to
achieve significance of mikveh
without adherence to fanatical
details. I can kiss my husband
hello without exciting him."
Hence, this couple does not
limit affectionate gestures dur-
ing the niddah period, as is pre-
scribed by the Torah and inter-
pretive writings. It is the good
feelings, the spiritual elevation,
that bring this young mother of
two back to the mikveh month
after month. "I feel really re-
newed after an immersion," she
said.
A young North Miami Beach
mother of three, who also wish-
ed to remain anonymous, does
not evaluate mikveh in terms Of
spiritual elevation. Rather, this
32 year old woman, whose
mother also observed laws of
purity, thinks of the observance
as an essential religious obliga-
tion that goes "hand in hand
with keeping Shabbat."
One light comment was noted
in a conversation with a 27-
year-old Miami Beach woman.
When there is no alternative,
she explained, the ocean may
be used for immersion. She re*
called one night when a rough
tide got the better of her bath-
ing slippers and nearly of
her! "It was horrendous!"
On a more serious note, how-
ever, the young woman said
that "there are certain times
when you can't come to your
husband. So when you can do
so, it becomes more beautiful."
Acknowledging that there are
stresses and strains inherent in
mikveh observance, she believes
that it dramatically enriches her
marriage.
Perry Ciment, an Orthodox
businessman in his 30's, inter-
prets his wife's observance as
a positive force in their mar-
riage. "Mikveh infuses the
physical with the spiritual. The
period of abstinence with its
discipline and regimen imbues
our marriage with the beauty
of sex."
Many books and pamphlets
have been written on various
aspects of mikveh. "The Purify-
ing Waters" by Ruth Rovner
and "A Hedge of Roses" by Nor-
man Lamm are especially read-
able and recommended. They
touch upon the woman's physi-
cal and psychological well-
being, links with traditional
Judaism and how purity laws
cart work for a marriage.
"Points of View" has tried to
present various opinions on
mikveh and its realistic place
in a contemporary marriage.
Zionist Leader's 90th Birthday
To Be Honored by Pioneer Women
Zionist leader Elie Duberstein
of Miami Beach will be honored
on his 90th birthday at a lunch-
eon of Pioneer Women Club
One, Sunday, Jan. 18, at noon at
the Embassy Restaurant. Du-
berstein has been active in
the Labor Zionist Move-
ment throughout his adult life.
Mrs. Rose Mann and Mrs.
Ruth Budovsky, Pioneer Women
members, will host the lunch-
eon, which will benefit the or-
ganization's Child Rescue Fund
in Israel
Reservations for the luncheon
can be made at the Pioneer
Women office.
Senior Years Should Be Tranquil,
Says Hebrew Home's President
\
Leonard Zilbert, president of
the Miami Beach Hebrew Home
for the Aged, says that the
"period of senior citizenship
should be a time of tranquillity,
a time for examining the past j
with the wisdom of perception
for what may be going on
around us."
The Home "was designed to
permit this repose into tran-
quillity and it is our hope to
add to the needs of the elderly
in this peaceful setting by ad-
ding to our present concrete
establishment a minipark.
"The park will break up the
monotony of the present build-
ing," Zilbert continues, "and our
elderly will have the opportu-
nity to enjoy their surroundings
in the midst of trees, flowers,
green and some vestiges of na-
ture that unfortunately are be-
coming more' scarce for every-
one."
"The most Important ingre-
dient of Judaism is to help
other people, and this is
the heritage that we like to pass
on to our children," says Zil-
bert. "Certainly we must be con-
cerned with ourselves, but we
recognize that an exaggeration
of self-concern is selfishness
and that the productive worth-
while life calls for an examina-
LEONARD ZILBERT
tion of what is happening
around us and concern for
the people around us.
"It is most obvious that Mi-
ami Beach has become a haven
for the elderly, and this haven
and heaven has been a
blessing for those who can no
longer be as productive as they
once were.
"The elderly require help, and
it might be worthwhile for all
of us to stop a few minutes in
this frenetic life and give
give to those who have given,
and who now deserve our con-
sideration and love. What bet-
ter priority than to lend our
humanity to those who have
given in their lives.
Zilbert continues, "It is a
tradition in our way of life to
take care "of the elderly, to
respect their infirmities, to pave".
the way for easement into the
peaceful contemplative life.
"Although I am involved in
any number of civic endeavors,
and I do serve in a leadership
capacity in many of these, I am
delighted that I can share in the
growth of the -Miami Beach He-
brew Home for the Aged, es-
pecially with a dedicated direc-
tor, Sidney Siegel. and Jus de-
voted staff, and understanding
volunteers," Zilbert concludes.
Isaiah Lodge To Hear
ADL Regional Director
Arthur Teitelbaum. regional I
director of the Artti-Defamationl
League of B'nai B'rith, will bel
the featured speaker at a gen-[
era} meeting of isaiah Lodge atl
7:30 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 12,1
at the American Savings audi-
torium oh Artoii Road.
7
Irving Q. Pullet,, says:
What to
look for in
a Kosher
chicken or
turkey.
cooked... frozen ...or fresh
r.M.
NO FEET
"' 0
A
WING MS
MUS* 3E (
EACH NECK
MUST BE CUT
AT LEAST 3
TIMES ACROSS
NECK VEINS
//
/
/
/
/
s
/
1
LOOK FOR
YOUR EMPIRE
WING CLIP
WITH THt .
FOR THE
GUARANTEE
OF A TRUE
KOSHER
CHICKEN
The Most Trusted
fame in Kosher Poultry
At Quality Kosher Butcher Shops
Better Food Stores and Deli's.
N. MENDELSON A SONS
021 Washington Ave.
Miami Beech, FU. 33130
Tel. 305-332-2426
LIVER
MUST BE
WRAPPEO
WITH NO
81 GOO
LEAKAGE
Si"
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
KMBTMfMt V
yuctu ;
MOM.


Friday, January 9, 1976
vJemst fkiridliiam
Page 7-B

Mrs. Elizabeth Virrick
To Receive Abess Award
Mrs. Elizabeth Virrick will
receive the Leonard L. Abess
Human Relations Award, at a
luncheon at the Doral on Jan.
25. The announcement was
nade by George Bernstein,
chairman of the Florida Region-
al Board of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The award is given annually
fn recognition of efforts toward
"furthering the goal Of better
human relations and contribut-
ing substantially to the''well-
being of the citizens of the State
of Florida."
In making the announcement
Bernstein said, "ThrouRh this
award to Elizabeth Virrick we
are recognizing her extraordi-
nary service to the people of
our community which has span-
ned several decades of volun-
teer leadership in a variety of
causes dedicated to the im-
provement of the lives of the
disadvantaged. By personal ex-
ample over the years, through
her tireless work and creativity
in responding to human- needs,
she has enhanced the quality of
MRS. VIRRICK
intergroup relations in our
area."
The Abess Award carries with
it a $1,000 research grant in hu-
man relations, contributed by
Miami philanthropist Leonard
L. Abess.
Last vear's recipient was Col.
Mitchell Wolfson.
Consumer Advocates and Experts
Will Attend AAUW Meeting
The consumer affairs commit-
tee of the Miami Chapter of the
American Association of Uni-
versity Women will hold an
open meeting at 1 p.m. on Sat-
urday, Jan. 17, at Miami Springs
Villas.
Because the members of the
Dade delegation to the Florida
legislature will go t Tallahas-
see in April. Eileen Campion, a
Miami attorney who is the com-
mittee's chairman, is urging the
public to attend the meeting to
make known their feelings, opin-
ions, and questions on consumer
issues.
^, Harry Haighley and Molly
Sinclair, consumer news report-
ers for the "Miami News" and
"Miami Herald," respectively,
will speak. Other guests include
Rep. Paul Steinberg, a member
of the Florida Legislature; Wal-
ter Dartland. Dade County Con-
sumer Advocate: and Bob May-
e" of Ch. 4 and Molly Turner of
Ch. 10.
All members of the Dade dele-
gation to the Florida Legisla-
ture have been invited, as all county and Metro com-
missioners.
Milton Blum, who teaches at
th University of Miami and
F1U, and Prof. William Capit-
man of FIU. active in the con-
sumer affairs field, will address
the meeting.
The consumer affairs commit-
tee includes Mrs. Levitan. Mary
Lou Sherry, Bertha Strawn, Pat
Nord. Frances Leonard and Do-
rothy Novak.
Friends of Lubavitch Names
Meuashe Hirsch Its President
The board of directors of
Friends of Lubavitch, which is
composed of Life Partners of
the Chabad Lubavitch move-
ment, has elected Menashe
Hirsch its president.
Friends of Lubavitch is the
community support organiza-
tion that backs the activities of
Merkos Chabad Lubavitch
throughout Florida. The Life
Partners are those members of
the Jewish communitv who have
donated 10 percent of their in-
come to the work of the world-
wide Chabad movement.
Menashe Hirsch. well known
in Greater Miami Jewish lead-
ership circles and a longtime
resident of Miami Beach, is a
graduate of Yeshiva Chaim Ber-
lin of Brooklyn. He served as
president of the Oholei Torah
Day School (now the Landow
Yeshiva Center) for four years.
A leader in the tourist in-
dustry, Hirtch is the proprietor
of the Sea Gull, which includes
the Kosher Steak House and the
newly opened catering service,
the kosher Kitchen.
Temple Israel Opens Its
Bicentennial Observance
Temple Israel's Bicentennial
observance will spotlight the
Jewish role in the American
"experience. Dr. Samuel Proctor
will speak this evening on "The
Jews in the Colonial South" as
part of a Sabbath Eve of Hope
and Dedication, written by Rab-
bi Joseph R. Narot and Cantor
Jacob Bornstein. There will be
no Sabbath Eve services, so that
congregation members can par-
ticipate in the Bicentennial ob-
servance.
The Cultural Arts Society will
present a film, "The Golden Age
ot Second Avenue," narrated by
Htrschel Bernardi and featur-
ing scenes from the Yiddish
Theatre with Molly Picon, Mau-
rice Schwartz, Paul Muni and
Menasha Skulnik, on Saturday
evening at 8.
Dr. Jacob R. Marcus, director
of the American Jewish Ar-
chives in' Cincinnati and an ex-
pert on tfte history of Jews in
America, will deliver the Green-
field Institute Lecture on Sun-
day morning at 10. His subject
is "The Romance of the Amer-
ican Jew."
An exhibit of Jewish Amer-
icana, much of it on loan from
the American Jewish Archives,
will be on view at the Temple
during the weekend as part of
the Bicentennial observance.
Surf side Garden Club
The Surfside Garden Club
will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 13,
at 10 a.m. at Surfside Town
Hall.
The program includes a lec-
ture and slide presentation on
pesticide treatment for trees
and plants by Dade County
Agricultural Department expert
Louis Daigle.
The public is welcome.
Colonial America's Hebrew Roots
i
Piccntenrrial studies of the
Hebrew roots of Colonial Amer-
ica will be one of the cultural
aspects of the Community Mod-
ern Hebrew Ulpan Program
conducted by the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education from
Jan. 12 to 15.
Rita Gold. Ulpan administra-
tor, saici that classes in the pro-
gram include the study of the
manifestations of Hebrew in
various aspects of early Amer-
ican life.
The Community Hebrew Ul-
pan "classes are held morning
and evening in North Miami
Beach at Temple Sinai of North
Dade and Beth Torah Congrega-
tion- on Miami Beach at Tem-
ple Beth Sholom and Temple
Emanu-El; and in the Southwest
at Beth David Congregation and
Temple Beth Am.
Classes are given on begin-
ner, intermediate and advanced
levels with specially trained and
certified teachers who have
participated in intensive-lan-
guage-teaching seminars.
Information about registra-
tion is available at the CAJE.
Are Aspect of (14JE Program
Cosponsors of the program are
the American Zionist Federa-
tion, and the Israel Aliyah Cen-
ter, and the Department of Ed'i-
c-!t;on and Culture of the World
Zionist Organization.
PRESENTING THE GREAT
AMERICAN SOPRANO
IN AN EXCLUSIVE
MIAMI ENGAGEMENT
ROBERTA PETERS
SUNDAY, JANUARY 18,1976 AT 8:30 P.M.
At Beth David Auditorium, 2625 Southwest 3 Avenue, Miami.
Ticket prices ; all seats reserved Front orchestra $12.50.
Middle orchestra $10.00 ... rear orchestra S7.50 ... mail orders
to Beth David Auditorium, 2625 Southwest 3 Avenue, Miami.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 854-3911
Terry and Jules Bagdan, Chairman
All seats are reserved ... mail your check today to.. .
Beth David Auditorium
2625 Southwest 3 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33129
Enclosed check for ______
Send_____ tickets at_________ each.
Name ________________________________________________
Address _____________________________________________
Telephone ___________________________
JWV Auxiliary 223
Plans Party
West Miami Auxiliary No.
223, Jewish War Veterans, will
hold a post-holiday party for
the patients at the Snapper
Creek Nursing and Convales-
cent Home on Saturday after-
noon.
Senior citizens chairman Ruth
(Mrs. Norman) Burman will be j
accompanied by the Auxiliary
president Charlotte (Mrs. Mur-
ray) Mittler and members of
the Auxiliary, and will give!
presents of live plants, laprobes
and ditty bags with comfort I
items for the patients.
The Auxiliary's regular I
monthly meeting will be oni
Thursday. Jan. 15, at 8 p.m. in |
the Community Room of Uni-i
versity Federal Savings and|
Loan on Ponce de Leon Blvd. '
I
Guest speaker is John Mus-1
son, an officer of the bank, who
will sr^eak on "New concepts in
Marketing Financial Products."
Program chairman is Helen
(Mrs. David) Burrows.
The hostess for the evening
is Eleanor (Mrs. Jack) Pales.
SAME PRODUCERS OF "WE ARE HERE" LAST SEASON'S SMASH HIT
DIRECT FROM MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
NOW APPEARING!
CINEMA THEATER LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
12th Street aaa Wiihii.il.- If MM NO KRFOftNINCES OH FMDiT
Muni leach Matinees at 2:30 P.M. All Seats $3.00
Telephone: 531-6202 Evening Peilermancei at 8:10 P.M.
531-2011 Reserved Seats
SPECTACULAR 2't HOUR LIVE PERFORMANCE ON .TaGE
rO- rURTHE- INrOKMATION AMD CKOUP DISCOUNT CALL CIMCMA THEAT._______
COMMUNITY HEBREW ULPAN CLASSES
BEGINNING:
TIME:
Week of Jan. 12, 1976
2 Days a Week-2 Hours a Day-9 Weeks
Daber
Ivrit
B'Ulpan
TEMPLE SINAI Of NORTH DADE Beg.-lnt.-Adv.
18801 N.E. 22nd Ave., NMB Beg.-lnt.-Adv.
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION Beginners-lnt.
1051 International Blvd., NMB
TEMPLE BETH SHOIOM
4144 Chase Avenue, MB
Beg.-Int.-Adv.
Beg.-lnt.-Adv.
Mon-Wed
Tues-Thurs
Tues-Thurs
Mon-Wed
Mon-Wed
Tues-Thurs
Morns.
Eves.
Eves.
Morns.
Eves.
9:30-11:30 AM
7:30- 9:30 PM
7:30- 9-.30 PM
10:00-12:00 Noon
7:30- 9:30 PM
Morns. 10:00-12:00 Noon
Eves.
7:30- 9:30 PM
Morns. 9:30-11:30 AM
TEMPLE EMANU-EL Beginners
1701 Washington Avenue, MB Beg.-2nd Level
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION Beg.-lnt.-Adv. Tues-Thurs
7500 S.W. 120th Street, Miami
TEMPLE BETH AM Beg.-lnt.-Adv. Tues-Thurs
5950 Kendall Drive, Miami
Experienced-Certified U lp<*n Hebrew Teachers
'PEE: $35 (All Students) for 36 hobrs of instruction.
CO-SPONSORED by AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION ISRAEL ALIYAH CENTER
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE OF THE WZO
THE CENTRAL AGENCY'FOR JEWISH EDUCATION OF GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION.
Partial Scholarships for: Teachers in Jewish Schools and Students majoring in Jewish Studies.
for information and registration call the
CENTRAL AGtHCY FOR JEWISH EDUCA1ION 5764030


Page 8-B
vJewisti ffarXMan
Friday, January 9, 1175
Miss Pallot and Mr. Braverman
Are Married at the Doral
Ann Laurie Pallot, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Norton Pallot
of Coral Cables, was married tc
Stanley Deems Braverman, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Braver-
man of Hollywood, on Jan. 4 at
the Doral Beach Hotel.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard of-
ficiated at the ceremony, which
was followed by a champagne
brunch in the Starlight Roof of
the Doral.
Mrs. Braverman's maid of
honor was Madeline Traurig
and her bridesmaids were her
cousins, Stephanie and Jayne
Pallot and Lynn Katzen, and
Nancy Strawgate and Debbi
Puyanic. Becky Braverman was
honor attendant and Mia Mans-
field the flower girl.
The groom's brother, Howard,
was best man. Ushers were the
bride's brothers. Steven and
John Pallot, and Gary Siegel,
Lewis Freeman and Mark Li-
bow.
The bride wore her mother's
wedding dress of white satin
with a yoke, insert on the full
skirt and cathedral train of
chantilly lace. Her bouquet of
white orchids and stephanotis
was set on the groom's mother's
prayerbook.
Mrs. Braverman was grad-
uated from Coral Gables High
School and cum laude from
Boston University with a Bache-
lor of Science degree in com-
munications. She was active on
the university's radio station and
participated in women's crew.
She is writing a cookbook.
A graduate of Southwest High
MRS. STANLEY BRAVERMAN
SrK"o'. Mr. Braverman received
a Bachelor's in chemistrv cum
laude from the University of
Miami, where he was president
of the Pre-Medical Honor So-
ciety and a member of Omicron
Delta Kappa Honor Society and
Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. He is
a senior at the University of
Miami School of Medicine,
where he is a membe*" of Phi
Delta Epsilon medical fraternity
and the vearbook staff. He plans
to socialize in neuro-ophthal-
mology.
On the return from a weddine
trin to Hawaii the couple will
make ttvir home in Miami.
July Wedding
Meredith Smith
Mrs. Shirley Head of Miami
has announced the engag-unent
of her daughter, Meredith Dee
Smith, to John L. Ray, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ray of Hai-
fa.
Miss Smith, daughter also of
the late Jerome Smith, was grad-
uated from Miami Coral Park
High School and th Unr"rsitv
of Florida, from which she re-
ceived a B.S. in advertising. She
Is Planned By
and John May
serves as Assistant Marketing
Director for the American Sav-
ings and Loan Association.
A graduate of Hicksville
(N.Y.) High School, Mr. Ray
received a Bachelor's in broad-
casting from Queens College.
He is a news reporter for
WPTV-Ch. 5 in West Palm-
Beach.
The July wedding will be at
the Kings Bay Yacht Club.
Sandra Gordon and Marc Einhorn
Will Marry In May
Sandra Gordon, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Gordon of
Miami, will marry Marc Ein-
horn. son of Dr. and Mrs. Gor-
don Einhorn of Miami.
Miss Gordon is a graduate of
Miami Coral Park High School
and received an Associate in
Arts degree from the Univer-
sity of Florida. She studied also
at FIU and plans a career in
dental hygiene.
Mr. Einhorn. a candidate at
the New School for Social Re-
search in New York for a Ph.D.
in clinical psychology, was also
graduated from MtamJ Coral
Park High. He received his
Bachelor's dree in psvciology
from the Universi*y of Florida
and h*s Master's in Dsvchology
from Loyola College in Balti-
more.
The couple will be married at
Temple Emanu-El on May 10.
Organizations Will Learn About
Magen David Adorn at Luncheon
An organizational meeting of tional president of the Amer-
the American Red Magen David
for Israel will be held on Thurs-
day, Jan. 15, in the new offices
of the American Friends of the
Hebrew University. City Na-
tional Bank Building, Miami
Beach.
The noon luncheon will ac-
ouaint leaders of condominium
associations, tenant associations,
synagogues and other organiza-
tions with the programs of Is-
rael's official Red Cross service,
the Magen David Adorn.
Among those participating in
the event are Samuel Reinhard
of Miami Beach. Florida state
chairman; Sol Drescher. South-
eastern regional chairman;
David Coleman of Miami Beach
state president of the Red
Magen David; Howard Kauf-
man, president of the Greater
Miami Chapter; and Gerald
Schwartz, Southeastern regional
director.
A special guest at the session
will be Joseph Handleman, na-
ican Red Magen David for Is-
rael, the only agency in the
United States authorized to
solicit and accept funds for the
Israeli Red Cross.
Cancer League
Plans Luncheon
The Tropical Cancer League
is holding a Bicentennial lunch-
eon and show on Saturday, Jan.
10, at the Starlight Roof of the
Doral Hotel at 11:30 a.m.
Proceeds will benefit cancer
research at the American Medi-
cal Center Hospital.
Chairman of the day is Mrs.
Charlotte Rosenberg. Mrs. Mey-
er White is president, and Mrs.
Morris Goluskin is program and
publicity chairman.
Calder Finale
The $90,000 plus Tropical
Park Derby highlights the final
weekend (Jan. 9-10) of racing
at Calder Race Course. The
Tropical meeting, which began
Nov. 7, ends on Wednesday,
Jan. 14, with older runners go-
ing for the $60,000 Saul Silber-
man Handicap.
With the Jan. 14 finale, Cal-
der closes down until mid-May,
when the summer season be-
gins.
Rabbi Narot Reviewing
Mrs. Mei^s "My life"
"My Life," the autobiography
of Golda Meir, who was honor-
ed as "Woman of the Century"
in Miami in mid-December, will
be reviewed by Rabbi Joseph R.
Narot on Jan. 13 at Temple Is-
rael at 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi Narot's review is part
of the Sound of Books Series,
which is sponsored by the Sis-
terhood of Temple Israel.
Miami Professor To Speak
About Sephardic Jews
The Sephardic Jewish Center
of North Miami Beach will hear
a talk on Thursday, Jan 15, at
8 p.m. by Dr. Seymour Leib-
man, professor of history at the
University of Miami. His topic
will be Sephardic Jews of the
United States.
...... I
Mrs. Zucker
Visits Auxiliary
Mrs. Ceil Zucker, president
of the Department of Florida,
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Auxiliary, was to make her of-
ficial visit to the Murray Solo-
mon Auxiliary No. 243, along
with her staff, on Jan. 8. Mrs.
Daphne Adelman, traveling
gavel chairlady, presented the
gavel to Mrs. Tanya Levine,
Auxiliary No. 243 president.
Yivo Forum Is Celebrating
Jewish Music Month, Jan. 21
To celebrate the month ol
Jewish Music, the Yivo Forum
is presenting a recital and lec-
ture by Cantor Boris Greisdorf
of Boston on Wednesday, Jan.
21, at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom.
Cantor Greisdprfs topic is
"From the Folksong to Classical
Music." He will be accompanied
at the piano by Sally Lazar.
Born in Vilna, Cantor Greis-
dorf received his Bachelor's
degrees in music from the Royal
Conservatory of Toronto and in
sacred music from Hebrew
Union College in New York.
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Susan Waas and Earl Kaplan
Are Married at Beth David
Susan Waas and Earl Kaplan
were married at Beth David
Svnagogue on Jan. 3. with Rabbi
Sol Landau and Cantor William
Linson officiating.
The bride, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Maxwell Waas of Mi-
ami, wore a fitted-bodice long-
sleeved gown of ivory chiffonet
and chantilly lace. The cath-
edral train was bordered with
matching lace, as was the ca-
melot to which her waist-length
veil was attached. She carried
a cascade bouquet of yellow
roses, a white orchid and baby's
breath.
The maid of honor was Nancy
Kaplan, and bridesmaids were
Sharon Olkes, Debbie Olkes,
Marsha Greenberg. Kimberly
Blake, Nincy Blake. Melanie
Blake, Wendy Brandwein and
Shara Cawn.
Mr. Kanlan, son of Mrs. Irv-
ing Mandcll of North Miami
Beach and Leroy Kaplan of Chi-
caeo. had as his best man Bruce
Manne. Ushers were Richard
Waas, Martin Waas. Norman
Waas. Ronnie Kanlan. Alan
Mandell. Steven Blake. Michael
Olkes, Barry Branowein, and
Ronnie Brandwein.
Mrs. Kaplan, a junior at the
University of Miami, is a mem-
ber of the Alpha Epsilon Phi
sorority, U.M. "Band of the
Hour" and Panhellenic Council.
V
MRS. EARL KAPLAN
She was graduated from Miami
Senior High.
Mr. Kaplan is a 1975 graduate
of University of Miami, where
he was the Alpha Epsilon Phi
sweetheart. He was graduated
from Norland Senior High
School.
The reception was in the
synagogue's Spector Hall.
On their return from a wed-
dine triD to Montego Bav, Ja-
maica, the couple will make
their home in Chicago
Pioneer Women Chapter To Pay
Tribute to Beba Idelson
A tribute to Beba Idelson,
world president of Pioneer
Women who died in Israel last
month at the age of 80, will
highlight the meeting of the
Beba Idleson Chapter of Pioneer
Women on Wednesday, Jan. 14,
at noon at the Washington Fed-
eral building on Normandy
Drive.
Mrs. Harriet Green, president
of the Pioneer Women Council
of South Florida and former na-
tional vice president of the
American Zionist Federation,
will join Mrs. Fannie Gibson,
chapter president, in saluting
Mrs. Idelson's accomplishments.
Mrs. Green also will review
"My Life," the autobiography
of Golda Meir, former national
executive secretary of Pioneer
Women and past Prime Minister
of Israel.
The meeting is free and open
to the general public, according
to Mrs. Fannie Darcy, publicity
chairman.
Coin, Stamp Show
Concerned Citizens of Opera-
tion Re-Entry are sponsoring a
professional coin and stamp
show to be held on the second
Sunday of each month, begin-
ning Jan. 11, at Westland Mall
in Hialeah.
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jj


Friday, January 9, 1976
*Mnisii Ik rid kin
Page 9-B
Yeshiva Godolah Is Opening
r North Dade Weekend "Satellite"
The Yeshiva Godolah of
Greater Miami Rabbinical Col-
lega will open a satellite 'v>V-
end Shabbos Yeshiva in North
Miami Beach to acquaint that
Jewish community with a Ye-
Bhiva structured-study session.
The Yeshiva Godolah will be
housed temporarily at the
North Miami Beach Chabad,
17900 NE 10th Ave.
The Yeshiva Godolah the
iirst rabbinical college opened
on the Eastern Seaboard by the
Lubavitcher Rabbi in conjunc-
tion with the Landow Yeshha
Center. Lubavitcher Education-
al Center has grown from 11
rabbinic graduate students in
the living room of a private
home to a 60-member college
that will ordain its first group
this year.
According to the dean, Rab-
ri Sholom D. Lipskar, the stu-
dents who will be living in the
North Dade area from Friday
through Sunday will continue to
provide the service of studying
with students of all ages and
helping them in their religious
training.
The Yeshiva Godolah has
more than 50 local students who
study part time to reinforce
their regular course of study at
different local schools. The stu-
dents have established a Friday
evening adult study group at
which they acquaint young Jew-
ish men and their families with
lorah *nr>wleage.
Rabbi Leib Schapiro, Rosh
Yeshiva of the college, has giv-
en a number of lectures in con-
junction with the program. Ac-
cording to Rabbi Lazar Teitel-
baum, the administrator, stu-
dents follow regular courses of
study during the weekend and
adhere as closely as possible to
the normal Y?shiva schedule.
Women's League for Israel
Lincoln Roney Miami Beach
Chapter will honor Rae Tenen
iit its annual "Woman of the
Year" luncheon on Wednesday,
.'an. 14, at noon at the Mont-
rnartre Hotel. Mrs. Tenen will
receive a plaque acknowledging
her contributions to the Wom-
en's League during the past de-
cade, according to president
Fran Resnick. Mrs. Tenen is
editor of the chapter's monthly
bulletin.
well with the antique jewelry
show on Dec. 28.
to to to
Florida Chapter will meet on
Thursday, Jan. IS, in the Forte
Towers west auditorium at 1
p.m. Sara Helfand will review
"And Perhaps," Ruth Dayan's
story of her life with Moshe
Dayan. President Delia Slater
will preside.
to
to to
to
to to
Aventura Chapter will hold a
program-planning meeting and
minilunch on Jan. 14 at Fi'st
Federal Savings. 183rd St. anrl
Biscayne Blvd. Shirley Shupak,
chairman of the March donor
luncheon, will discuss that
event. Rose Koch, chapter pres-
ident, said that the chapter did
Shalom Chapter (Hallandalc)
will go to Dania Jai Alai on
Saturdav. Jan. 24. Chairpersons
for the event, which includes
luncheon, are Judith Reddock
stH Lillian Halnerin. Chapter
president is Shirley Nathanson.
On Feb. 5 there will be a card
party and luncheon at First
Federal with Irma Deutsch and
Edith Warshaw in charge.
Music
by
"Weddings &
Bar Mitzvahs
our Specialty"
and his
Boca Raton Ho'l
and Club Orchestra
65 -2803
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MARK SCHECTER
Mark Harry Schecter's paint-
ing "The Boy in Red" is on dis-
play in the American Painters
Exhibition in the New Conven-
tion Center in Paris.
Pierre Salinger, press secre-
tary during Kennedy's Adminis-
tration and described as the
best-known American in France,
is president of the Jury that
nominated Schecter's painting
for the show.
Salinger said, "I am delighted
that the human and artistic con-
tacts between the two conti-
nents will be expanded by this
brilliant art exhibition of inter-
national importance."
Schecter's art has previously
been exhibited in Paris in a
one-man show at the Gallery
Vendome and along with four
leading American artists' work
at the Gallery of the Four Move-
ments.
Ten of Schecter's paintings
are being shown around the
world in U.S. Embassies as part
of the State Department's "Art
in Embassies" program.
Schecter's parents are Rosa-
lyn and Louis Schecter of Miami
Beach.
to to to ]
Gail G. Abramson and Rob-
erta Simon have been named to
the 1974-75 Dean's List of Barn- i
ard College in New York.
Miss Abramson, daughter of;
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Abramson ;
of Miami, is a graduate of He-|
brew Academy Girls High
School. Miss Simon, daughter of;
Mrs. Diana Maine and Tobias
Simon of North Miami, was;
graduated from North Miami
Senior High School.
Miami Beach
Hadassah
Royal Maccabees Group will
hold a regular meeting on Mon-;
day, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. at the |
Financial Federal Bank Audi-
torium. Entertainment. Presi-
dent is Clara Landy.
to to to
Natanya Group will hold a
regular meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 20, at 12:30 p.m. at Winston
Towers 100. Entertainment by
Veronica and Peter.
to to to
Sophie Tucker Group will
hold their annual Las Vegas
Night on Sunday, Jan. 18, at 7
in the Coastal Towers Party
Room.
Miami Beach
Democratic Club
The Democratic Club of Mi-
ami Beach will hold an "open-
to-the-public" meeting on Wed-:
nesday, Jan 14, in the Zodiac
Room of the Holiday Inn on
22nd St. and Collins Ave. at 8;
p.m. !
Bernard Baron, executive di-1
rector of social services, will;
speak on the success of Opera- j
tion Re-Entry and "Youth of
Today." A prominent senior;
citizen leader will discuss vari-
ous programs for the aged, and
there will be a question-and-
answer period moderated by
club president Col. Wally Gluck.
The Hon. Richard P. Brinker,
Clerk of the Circuit Court, will
address the meeting on "Mod-
ern Court Procedures and
Crime."
Ellen Abramson of Keystone Point is North Dade Chair-
man for the 1976 "Miami Shalom" programs, sponsored
by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Divi-
sion. Meeting recently to plan a series of events to wel-
come newcomers to the Greater Miami area were (from
left) Carolyn Praver, Mrs. Abramson, Gail Granek and
Mitzi Center.
More than 300 members of the South Florida Home
Furnishings Industry paid tribute to designers Gloria
Muroff (2nd from left) and Bob Rubinstein (2nd from
right) at the Home Furnishings Industry Israel Dinner
of State on Dec. 21 at the Eden Roc Hotel. Making the
presentation of the State of Israel David Ben-Gurion
Award, on behalf of the South Florida Israel Bond Or-
ganisation campaign, are Gus Jacobson (right), general
chairman and Arthur Smith, cochairman.
Kosher
Catering
Fantasy
Not Just
Another
Kosher Hotel
... but new
and elegant.
The very
finest in Food
preparation,
presentation and
service ... That
Wedding, That Bar
Mitzvah. That spec
party belongs at
It's Glatt to be good
:tai&
Om. Kosher
(ED
&4a
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For information Call Catering Director Allan Zane at 531-3391
ON rHE OCEAN AT 25th ST. AND COLLINS AVE.. MIAMI BEACH
you're going
to hove an affair,
make sure people
talk about it.
There you are hosting an affair
al the beautiful Deauville Hotel
(where $2,000,000 has just
been spent on brand-new
luxury and elegance!)
And after it's all over, what you
thought would be just a simple
catered affair has turned out to
be the social event of the year.
Call Al Sicherer.
at 865-8511 and start
having an affair everyone
will talk about.

On the ocean at 67th Street. Miami Beach


Page 1C-B
fJewisfi FhrkUan
Friday, January 9, 1976
American Friends of Hebrew U.
To Hear -Regional Director
Albert A. Dnrner. Southeast
regional director of the Amer-
ican Friends of the Hebrew-
University, will speak on "The
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
in i9"6: Crisis and Progress" at
the opening meeting of the new
, year for the Greater Miami
Women's Division of the Amer-
ican Friends.
The session, which is slated
for Thursday. Jan. 15. at 11:45
a.m. at the Montmartre Hotel,
is open to the general public.
Reservations are required ond
can be made at the Hebrew
University office.
There will also be a review
of Cynthia Freeman's "A World
Full of Strangers" by Mrs. Ar-
thur Pekelner, former president
of the Miami Chapter of Hadas-
sah.
Mrs. Lillian Kronish, presi-
5pnt of the Greater Miami
Women's Division, will chair
the meeting, with Mrs. Celia
Rosenblatt, a benefactor of Is-
rael's oldest and largest univer-
sity, offering the invocation.
Mis. Frank Fierson is program
chairman.
Mrs. Florence D. Feldman,
director of the women's divi-
sion, is coordinating the meet-
ine and handling reservations.
Committee members include
the Mesdames Joseph I. Anton,
Harry Becker, Ira Bernstein,
Joseph Berman, Else Bonem,
Viola Charcowsky, Louis Cohn,
Philip J. Gould, Joseph Gruber,
Myer Harris, Oscar Hecker,
Rose Hochstim, Herman Kauf-
man, Maurice L. Kutz, Morris
Minov, Ida R. Lear, Bernard
Lir.c^n Max Meisel, Anna Bren-
ner Meyers, Meyer Mintz, Jean
Prescott, David Ponve, David
Provus, Jacob Rachlin, Carrie
Rosen. Sam Schiffman, Betty
Schaffer and Max Topol.
Pantry Pride Names Lerner
Southern Region Vice President
Marvin Lerner has been
named Southern Region vice
president for the Pantry Pride
Supermarket Division of Food
Fair Stores, Inc.
Lerner, who had been serving
6s corporate staff vice president
for operating services, assumes
responsibility for Pantry Pride
and Food Fair supermarkets in
southeastern Florida.
A veteran of over 30 years in
food retailing, Lerner grew up
in the food business in Phila-
delphia, where his family owned
and operated stores.
He spent six years with Food
Fair in merchandising and store
management positions before
joining the New York-based Bo-
hack chain, of which he even-
tually became president. He
rejoined Food Fair Stores in
1974.
MARVIN LERNER
Folk Dance Workshop At Temple Beth Sholom
Moshiko (Moshe Itzchak-
Halevy), the Israeli folk-dance
creator, will conduct a two-day
Israel Folk Dance Workshop,
Saturday, Jan. 10, and Sunday,
Jan. 11, in Silverman Hall of
Temple Beth Sholom.
The workshop, sponsored by
the Israel Folk Dance Center in
cooperation with the temple,
will be held each day from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Registration is limited, with
preference given to intermediate
and advanced folk-dancers.
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And now. with its new group nursing plan to overcome
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"Lucy" Comes to the Aid Of
Miami Beach's Elderly
Coloratura soprano Roberta
Peters opens Congregation
Beth David's annual Forum
series on Sunday, Jan. 18,
at 8:30 p.m. at Coral Way.
Miss Peters made her Me-
tropolitan Opera debut in
1956 and has sung in Lon-
don, Vienna, Moscow and
other major opera houses.
She was the first American-
born artist to receive the
Bolshoi Medal.
Media Experts
Address ORT
Richard Archbold, city editor
of the "Miami Herald"; Wilson
Griffith, public service director
or WCKT-TV Ch. 7; Dick Syatt,
public service director and
talkmaster of radio station
WKAT; and Ken Bomar of Hank
Meyer Associates, public rela-
tions, participated in a Publicity
and Public Relations Sympo-
sium sponsored by District VI
of Women's American ORT on
Jan. 6.
About 165 leaders represent-
ing regions and chaoters-at-
large in trie nine Southeastern
states comprising District VI at*
tended the symposium and me
Jan. 7 district board meeting.
Aliyah News
There will be a Chug meet-
ing on Sunday, Jan. 11, at 7:30
p.m. at the Jewish Federation
Building on Biscayne Blvd.
The discussion topic, includ-
ing a slide show is "Develoo-
ment Towns in Israel" present-
ed by Elba and Donald Stein,
who attended the recent Asso-
ciation of Americans and Ca-
nadians for Aliyah (AACA) win-
ter seminar in Israel.
A discussion and question-
and-answer period will follow
the Stein's presentation.
Forte1 Forum
Samuel Pascoe, a member of
the executive committee of the
Anti-Defamation League, hon-
orary life president of the Mi-
ami Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith
and board metfiber of the Jew-
ish National Fund, will address
the Forte Forum-George N. Cay-
lor Forum on Tuesday, Jan. 13,
at 1 p.m. at the 1200 West Ave.
Auditorium. Pascoe's topic is
"The Current Role of the Anti-
Defamation league in Jewish
Affairs."
Surf side Women's League
Mrs. Leah Jaffe will be the.
guest of the Snrfside Women's I
League on Monday. Jan. 12, at|
Town Hall at 8 p.m. She will
present "News and Views from ;
the People's Republic of China."
The Douglas Gardens Outpa-
tient Mental Health Center is
taking a bold step forward in
providing outreach services to
the elderly citizens of Miami
Beach. With the cooperation of
the City of Miami Beach De-
partment of Parks and Recrea-
tion, the first "Lucy" booth has
been opened at the South Shore
Community Center. Dedication
and ribbon-cutting ceremonies
were held on Tuesday.
The "Lucy" booth is the first
of a series of booths inspired by
the Charles Schulz comic-strip
character Lucy, who offers psy-
chiatric help for five cents.
The booth is staffed by a
psychiatric caseworker during
certain hours, and serves as an
information and referral head-
quarters as well as mobile in-
take unit for the Douglas Gar-
dens Outpatient Mental Health
Center.
The Mental Health Center,
established for persons 55 and
over, offers psychological and
psychiatric evaluation and in-
dividual, marital, family and
group therapy.
The "Lucy" booth is trilingual
English, Spanish and Yiddish
which permits it to serve the
needs of the entire South Beach
communitv. Additional "Lucy"
booths will be constructed at
Miami Beach sites where eld-
erly people congregate.
When not manned, the "Lucy"
booth will be stocked with bro-
chures describing a variety of
services offered in Dade Coun-
ty and warning the elderly
about specific problems relating
to preventive mental health.
The first of these educational
brochures is on drug misuse by
the aged.
Staff for the Douglas Gar-
dens City of Miami Beach
"Lucy" booth is provided by a
snecial gerontology grant from
the Florida Department of Men-
tal Health through the Dade
County Mental Health Board
with matching funds provided
by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the United Way.
Space and facility cooperation
is provided by the Miami Beach
Department of Parks and Re-
creation. The Douglas Gardens
Outpatient Mental Health Cen-
ter is a division of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged.
Great-Grandmother's Talent
Is a Gift to the Community
Sophie Rubin is a great-grand-
mother and a concert violinist,
a member of the Senior Sym-
phony and the Hollywood Sym-
nhony who has given more than
!J0 concerts since moving to
Miami a few years ago, a dedic-
ated musician who donates all
proceeds from her concerts to
a fund for sick and elderly fel-
low artists.
Mrs. Rubin, who has received
many commendations for her
generous efforts to entertain the
South Florida community, will
give her next concert at Buck-
lev Towers on Feb. 16 for
B'nai B'rith.
Mrs. Rubin has performed
previously at Buckley Towers,
for Hadassah and the Men's
Club breakfast, as well as at the
Hebrew Home for the Aged and
the Hallandale Jewish Center.
She gave a Purim concert at
Temnie Adath Yeshurun and
has played at the Miami Beach
Auditorium and at Miami-Dade
Community College.
She has given three concerts
for residents of Douglas Gar-
dens, the most recent being in
mid-December.
When Mrs. Rubin H her
husband, Milton, cehb-ated
their wedding anniversary with
a cruise, she entertained their
fellow pass"mers and was pre-
sented with a medal by the
ship's c=irt?in.
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Effective January 1,1976,
a one-year < subscription to
the Miami edition Is $12.
l'l"nu'inn,; riw nnwri
GOOD
NEWS
FOR
MIAMI
AND ENVIRONS!
EXPERT SOFER
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Mezuia, and alto any Hebrew Scripts.
1J


Friday, January 9, 1976
* Jewish fltoricH&jn
Page 11-B
%hi
^abMmtal |Jaas
co-ordir.ated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
What the Second ImmigrationAccomphshed
RABBI SOL LANDAU
Beth David Congregation
Miami
Having been reared in an era
that governs its immigration by
quotas, it is hard to imagine that
the United States, a little more
than one hundred years ago,
placed advertisements in Euro-
pean newspapers "inviting" im-
migrants to the country.
In a message to Congress (on
June 1, 1841) President John
Tyler: 'To the people of other
countries, an invitation to come
and settle among us as members
of our rapidly growing family."
Tyler elaborated on his invita-
tion by further stating: "... for
the blessing which we offer
them, we require of them to
look upon our country as their
country and unite with us in
the great task of preserving our
institutions and thereby per-
petuating our liberties."
Jews from Germany, Bohe-
mia, and Poland were among
those who eagerly followed that
invitation and made up what
has been called in America Jew-
ish History: The Second Immi-
gration Wave. These new immi-
grants were to transform the
simple monolithic structure of
the tiny American Jewish Com-
munity in 1815, consisting of
seven congregations with a
membership of almost all of the
three thousand Jews then liv-
ing there, all predominantly
Sephardic, into a complex multi-
ritual pluralistic community.
The new group of immigrants
mainly originating in Bavaria,
Baden and Wurtenberg, in ad-
dition to, as previously men-
tioned, Bohemia and Poland,
came from a totally different
background than the earliest
Jewish settlers here.
They had been influenced by
the new ideas of enlightenment,
individualism and scientific
progress. They were living un-
der the impact of liberal Pro-
testantism and. the early effects
of emancipation. However the
series of Napoleonic wars in
Central Europe and the new
wave of anti-Jewish manifesta-
tions brought these Ashkenazi
Jews to these shores where they
encountered largely the- good
will of the American people in-
stead of the manipulative mood
of the European 'Princes.
The Jewish settlement in the
United States grew from barely
three thousand to the more than
one-fourth of a million in 1890.
They were newcomers respon-
sible for the major changes in
organizational forms and a long
series of new congregations
which were developed.
In 182? the first nort-Seph-
ardic Congregation was formed
in New Yerk, and by 1855, 110
were already in progress. While
during the first phase of the
American Jewish settlement the
synagogue was able to take care
of all the needs of its people:
religiously, culturally, and so-
cially, now the need for new
institutions and organizations
was keenly felt. As a result, in
1843 the first Jewish fraternal
organizatien B'nai B'rith
was organized. In 1820 the ooen-
ing of the Hebra Shel Bikor
Holiun Ugmilot Hasadtm (So-
ciety for the" Visitation of the
Sick & Mutual Assistant) for all
Jews, which had been organized
earlier in Philadelphia. This
showed that diversity and not
uniformity was its principle
caused by enlargement and de-
centralization of Jewish areas
of settlement. In 1843 there fol-
lowed the Independent Order
Free Sons of Israel, Brith Abra-
ham (1849) and others. In 1859,
the Board of Delegates of Amer-
ican Israelites was organized.
In the field of Jewish educa-
tion where a new phenomenon
had arisen with the advent of
the public school as the pre-
dominant American form of
child education, the Jewish all-
dav school collapsed. New ve-
hicles for Jewish education
came into being, such as the
First Hebrew Sunday School by
Rebecca Gratz founded in 1638
and the first afternoon Talmud
Torah 1845. It seems unbe-
lievable that (or many decades
the state subsidized the Jewish
schools, such as the one of the
Spanish and Portuguese Syna-
gogue in New York, called
Yeshivat Michat Areb, thus the
Religious Sunday and Weekday
Afternoon schools are compar-
able newcomers to the Amer-
ican scene in the perpetuation
of Judaism.
tn the religious area, no
ordained rabbis were present in
America until th middle of the
19th cefttury with the arrival
of three rabbis.
No text books of Jewish edu-
cation existed, not even an En-
glish translation of the prayer
book until such men as Isaac
Leeser produced them under
great handicaps beginning in
the 1840's. This period then is
also the departure point for cur-
riculum material beginning with
a "Catechism for Younger Jew-
ish Children" and the "He-
brew Reader."
The Reform Movement saw
its beginnings also in the 19th
century, triggered by the first
such Congregation in the United
States in 1824 in Charleston. S.C.,
with the forming of the "Re-
formed Society of Israelites,"
and culminating in the founding
of the Union of American He-
brew Congregations in 1873.
Tr.o Hebrew Union College was
founded in 1875 under the lead-
ership of Isaac Mayer Wise, and
thus the founding of the First
Rabbinical School in the United
States (in Cincinnati).
The Historical School, today
known as Conservative Judaism,
came to the fore as a counter
movement to the Reform, with
such men as Sabbato Morais,
then Marcus Jastrow and Ben-
jamin Szold, in turn, to the
founding (in 1877) of the Jew-
ish. Theological Seminary of
America in New York.
The New World now had be-
come a home for the politically
persecuted, religiously op-
pressed, and the economically
uprooted. The Jews who immi-
grated during this period push-
ed as far West as did the
frontier migration of all Amer-
icans. Jews settled as far as
California. An example of such
migration can be illustrated by
a man like Cyrus Adler who was
later to become the third presi-
dent of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America and presi-
dent of Dropsie University, who
was born in Van Buren, Arkan-
sas in 1865. His family lived on
a plantation and carried a trade
post with the Indians. The Ger-
man-Jewish peddlers as a whole,
played a vital role in the frontier .
Western push, but also laid the
foundation, not only for some
of the great department stores
all over the country but began
to introduce the mass manufac-
turing and consumer society
that are so much part of con-
temporary United States.
During the Civil War Jews
fought both in the South and
the North. In fact the Confed-
eracy had a Jewish Secretary of'
State. The union counted sev-
eral thousand Jewish soldiers as
did the South. For instance, in
1872 the first Jewish Chaplain.
Jacob Frankel of Philadelphia,
was appointed to the U.S. forces.
This German-Jewish immigra-
tion of the mid-19th century
then laid the foundation for the
communal structure of Amer-
ican Jewry capable to receive
still another wave of fellow
Jews which were to arrive from
Eastern Europe, and was going
to outnumber them many-fold.
In time they would revolutionize
its iiututions and become the
largest and most influential..
Jewish community in the world.
Question
Box
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
Question: Where is the Bi-
blical source for the Jewish
requirement of visiting the
iick?
Answer: Maimonides (Yad,
Hil. Evel 14:1; see also his Com-
mentary on the Mishnah Pe'ah
i'.t) derives this requirement
from the Biblical commandment
which says "Thou shah love thy
neighbor as thyself (Leviticus
19:18). Evidently, according to
Maimonides, "loving" one's
neighbor was not simply an
empty feeling but an emotion
that led to some action which
showed concern for one's fellow
man. Medieval scholars also
considered this obligation to be
in the category of those duties
which were designed to have
man become the Image of the
Almighty by imitating His graci-
ous deeds. It is thus mentioned
in the Talmudic literature that
the Almighty Himself showed
the example of the need to Visit
the sick by going to visit the
. Patriarch Abraham after his cir-
cumcision. Man, therefore, in
visiting the sick performs an
act of Grace which the Almighty
Himself once demonstrated.
GREAT JEWISH PERSONALITIES
The Establishment and Jewish Youth
There is a prophetic message
in the Book of Joel which tells
us that "the old will dream
dreams and thd young will see
visions." There is no doubt that
the Old look to the past and
reminisce about What was. They
were set in their ways. They
dream dreams based on the
past, while the young see vi-
sions, harbingers of the future.
It is no surprise to learn that
the youth of today is alienated
from the established Jewish
community. The establishment,
which is made up of the old
leadership and the established
financial power structure, with
its old mores and ways, is re-
pugnant to the young people of
today. The young rebel when
they see the hypocrisy and dou-
ble standards of the establish-
ment.
In the Pirke Avot, or "The
Sayings of the Fathers," Rabbi
Simeon indeed taught that the
world rests upon three founda-
tions, namely, "upon Torah or
learning; ur*on hard work or
divine worship; and upon deeds
of loving kindness and righte-
ousness." Yet what the youth
beholds today are three entire-
ly different foundations. It can
best the summarized thus:
"Upon three things the world
rests: Upon money; upon
nionev: THERE IS hardly any place
in the establishment for any
young man with high ideals. Our
organizations and the power
structure in the community are
made up of individuals whose Jri;,
main credentials for Jewish I
leadership is that they can con-
tribute sums in at least five !
figures. A rabbi might be placed I
on a prestigious board of direc- |
tors, to acquire some respecta- j
bility for the organization, be-
cause he is a good fund-raiser,
or because he counts in his con-
gregation members with great
means.
I have yet to see an individual
institution that would place an
individual on its board because
of his learning and scholarship.
I hae yet te see an individual
honored because he is de-
dicated, because he lives up to
the ideals and teachings of the
Prophets of Israel, and because
he is in the vanguard in the
struggle for equality and jus-
tice.
There was a time when Torah
and Jewish knowledge were the
criteria for Jewish nobility.
Nowadays, whatever the rea-
sons and pressures, we find
ourselves peroetuating an es-
tablishment based upon wealth.
As the Yiddish saying goes,
"Ver si hot die meah ot die
deah" that is, "Whoever
gives the pay has the say."
THE JEWISH community or-
ganizations comprise the most
undemocratic phenomenon in
our land. Is it any wonder that
when the youth sees this per-
verted set of values, he throws
up his hands in despair and
says, "This is not for me"?
He then joins the various
campus organizations which ac-
cept him for what he is and not
for what he has. He is able to
work for the ideals which have
been instilled in him, but which
he cannot pursue in the close-
knit establishment, based on
wealth, social standing and the
country club mentality.
To remedy this situation my
theme is clear: If you wish a
healthy Jewish community, if
you desire to improve the rela-
tionship between the establish-
ment and the Jewish youth,
then loosen the bonds of con-
trol.
Let the young people, the
middle-aged and the elderly
leaders work together and con-
sult one another, for it is still
true as Sanders, in his "Citaten-
lexikon," wrote, "There is no-
thing more enviable than to
have an old head and a young
heart."
Moses indeed told Pharaoh:
"With our young and with our
old, we will go together." When
the older and the younger will
mingle together, when the
young will perceive democratic
procedures in electing members
of the community, when the
establishment will cease per-
petuating themselves, then the
prophetic spirit will once agaih
enter our youth for they will
encounter Jewish ideals and
integrity.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
II!
7 SHE VAT 5:27
m

SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Bo
TV Programs
Sunday, Jan. 11
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG-TV Ch. 109:30 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Beth Torah Congregation
North Miami Beach
ft ft ft
"Still. Small Voice"
WCKT-TV Ch. 710 a.m.
Host:
Rabbi Stanley A. Rtngler
Guests:
Brenda Shapiro
American Jewish Congress
Brenda GferVitz
Hillel Director
University of Cincinnati
Topic:
"Women in Jewish Life"
:
Israelites hurriedly partake of paschal lamb.
Egyptian first-born are slain by God.
"And ye shall eat it in haste it is the Lord's
passover" (Exod. 12.11). "The Lord smote all the first-
born in the lahd of Egypt" (12:29).
BO God sent MOses to Pharaoh once more with
the following words: "Go in unto Pharaoh .. and tell...
him: ... If thou refuse to let My people go, behold, to-
morrow will I bring locusts into thy border' (Exodus
10.1-4). Pharaoh would nOt be moved. Then God pun-
ished Egypt with a thick darkness. Yet Pharaoh remain-
ed adamant. Finally, Moses warned the King of Egypt
that God would send the most fearful plague of all, the
death "Of all the first-born in the land, both of men and
beasts. Thfe Israelites were given the ordinance of the
Passover, so named because God passed over the homes
of the Israelites when he killed the first-born of the
Egyptians, on midnight of the fifteenth day of the first
month (Nissan). Pharaoh was shaken, at last. He sent
the children of Israel from the land. They consisted of
"about six hundred thousand men on foot, beside chil-
dren." In their haste to leave Egypt, the Israelites baked
matzoth from dough that was not leavened. Hence the
prohibition against eating leavened bread on Passover.
I
1


Page 12-B
'pJewisli fhridlKari
Friday, January 9, 1976 *,
T
Bar Mitzvah
Roxanne Pundik
Richard Herman
Enrique Abut
ROXANNE PUNDIK
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Pundik's
daughter, Roxanne, will be Bat
Mitzvah this evening at Temple
Menorah.
Roxanne is an eighth-grade
student at Nautilus Junior High.
Following services there will
be an Oneg Shabbat at the Pun-
dik home, and on Sunday, Jan.
11, there will be a reception and
luncheon at the Starlight Roof
of the Doral Hotel.
ft ft ft
ENRIQUE ABUT
Enrique, son of Mr. and Mrs.
lose Abut, will be called to the
.Torah as Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day at S p.m. at Congregation
Beth David.
Enrique is in the seventh grade
at Shenandoah Junior High. He
is a member of the MVP Silver
Community soccer team.
Mr. and Mrs. Abut will host
the reception in Enrique's honor
at the Deauville Hotel on Sat-
urday afternoon
ft ft ft
DEBBIE HALASZ
Mrs. Carol Halsalz's daughter,
Debbie, will be Bat Mitzvah this
evening at 8:15 at Temple Ner
Tamid.
A student at Ner Tamid Reli-
gious School and Nautilus Jun-
ior High, Debbie is active in
: school drama, plays the flute
and enjoys ceramics.
Following services there will
be an Oneg Shabbat in Debbie's
honor, and on Saturday there
will be a reception in the tem-
ple's Sklar Auditorium.
# # ^
RICHARD HERMAN
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Herman's
son, Richard, will be Bar Mitz-
vah at Temple Beth Am on Sat-
urday morning^
Richard attends Palmetto Jun-
ior High and is in an acceler-
ated class in the Beth Am Reli-
gious School. His hobbies are
rock- and stamp-collecting and
comedy movies.
Following the service there
will be a luncheon at the tem-
ple. Richard's grandparents,
Mrs. David Coburn and Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Herman, will at-
tend. Out-of-town visitors in-
clude Mrs. Sylvia Moskowitz,
Jacki Moskowitz and Mrs. Mol-
ly Davis.
Dedication Lodge
Breakfast
A film, "Jews in America,"
will be shown at the regular
breakfast meeting of B'nai B'-
rith Dedication Lodge No. 2743
on Sunday, Jan. 18. Following
the film Congressman William
Lehman will address the group.
Answers: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah,
l .ihum, Habakkuk, Haggai, Zephaniah, Zechariah, Mala-
.c:::.
Key West Is Honoring
Paul Marks With A Day
PAUL MARKS
Paul Marks, pioneer Flor-
idian, chairman of the board of
r lagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association of Miami ryid
former resident of Key West,
will be honored on Saturday,
Jan. 10, at Paul Marks Day in
Key West.
Only three other men have
been honored with a "day" by
Key West Ernest Heming-
way, Mitchpll Wolfson and "Boo-
gie" Powell.
Paul Marks Day has been ar-
ranged by Marks's "conch"
friends to show their apprecia-
tion for his work for the Keys,
which began with the rebuild-
ing of the Overseas Highway in
1935. and the founding in th>
eaily 1930s, together with Tom
Reedy, of the Key West Clu'3
in Miami.
Lou Carbonell, president of
the Lions Club of Key West, in
conjunction with the Key West
City Commission and the Mon-
roe County Commission, made
the arrangements for Paul
Marks Day, which includes a
dinner on Saturday at 8 p.m. at
the Holiday Inn at which Sen.
Lawton Chiles will be guest
speaker.
Former Circuit Court Judee
I.iician Proby and his wife,
Kathryn, are sponsoring an
open house and cocktails at
their Key West home for Marks
and his friends on Saturday
fro"i 3 to 6 p.m.
Jacques Donnet Will Lead
Zimrah Ensemble in February
The Farband Lebidiker Branch
has engaged Jacques Donnet to
conduct the sixth annual Zim-
rah Ensemble on Saturday, Feb.
28, at 8 p.m. in the Theatre of
the Performing Arts in Miami
Beach.
The Zimrah Ensemble in-
cludes 80 participants who will
present a series of cantatas with
well-known opera stars, con-
ducted by Donnet and accom-
panied by nianist Jerry Carreta. |
Joseph P. Zuckerman is chair-
man of the Zimrah Ensemble
event.
Donnet, who has been called
"the crusading musicologist," is
the composer of nearly 40
works. He received an award
from ASCAP for his score for
a documentary on the United
Fund, and provided music for
a Miami Heart Institute docu-
mentary film in 1973. A poly-
phonic piece for electronic in-
struments was nominated for a
Guggenheim Award. He also re-
ceived the Henry Hadley Award
in composrtion and was a Pulitz-
er Prize nominae in 1959 and
1968.
Donnet was instrumental
in
organizing the Miami Philhar-
monic Society at about the time
he was arranging and conduct-
ing the shows at the Carillon
Hotel. He has conducted for
Mischa Elman and Jose Uturbi
and provided arrangements for
Ping Crosby, Kate Smith and
American Savings Names
New Officer
John P. Noonan has been ap-
pointed commercial loan officer
for the 11-office American Sav-
ings and Loan Association of
Florida. The announcement
was made by Thomas R. Bo-
mar, president of American
Savings, and Philip J. Barber,
vice president and director of
mortgage lending.
Prior to joining American
Savings, Noonan worked as an
independent mortgage broker j
and sales consultant through-
out Florida.
CAMP
Indian Orchard,
Pennsylvania
MOSHAVA
Boys and Girls
Grades 3 to 10
SPONSORED BY BNEI AKIVA OF NORTH AMERICA
AND RELIGIOUS ZIONISTS OF AMERICA
The camp director, Rabbi Yitzchak Pessin, will be at the Y. I. of
Greater Miami at 8:00 p.m. Jan. 17th, at the Sovereign Hotel
at 11:00 a.m. Jan. 18th and at the Y. I. of Hollywood at 3:00 p.m.
Jan. 18th to show movies and slides of Camp Moshava and
answer any questions you may have about Camp AAoshava.
Florida Representative:
MR. SHIMSHON FARKASH
941 N.E. 170 Street
N. Miami Bch., Fla. 33162
305-653-0824
New York office:
25 West 26 Street
New York, N.Y. 10010
(212) 683-4484 689-1414
HIGH IN THE
BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
CAMP
IJWOHELO
FOR GIRLS
Director: Morgan Lev)
R. D. 4
Waynesboro, Pa. 17268
CAMP
COMET
FOR BOYS
Director: Harry Pure
5
pal
m
ACCREDITED
CAMP
AMERICAN CAMPING
ASSOCIATION
Quality 8 Week Camps Completely Separate Facilities
COMET TRAILS For Teenage Boys
Owned and Directed by Miami Family for 48 Yean.
Only 4'/2 hours from Miami
FLORIDA REUNION SUNDAY, JANUARY 25th, 1 P.M.
Greynolds Park Rock Shelter
Prospective campers and parents welcome.
Call or write for a personal interview in your home.
1976 enrollment closing soon.
Morgan I. Levy, Director
1531 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami, Fla. 33144 Phone: 264-6389
Staff inquiries invited, minimum age 19,
^~>~,~~~~
M
J
OVER 70 SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by a
'well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on our own
private nine hole cour*! Riding on seven miles of trails spread
over 525 acres of breathtakingly beautiful scenery! A childrens
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery.'
photography and gymnastics are just some of the many fascinating
act.v.t.es available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance
OUR 41ST YEAR!
under Weinberg family direction
Dietary Laws Observed Matinr,,.,M c
<*" <* WWTE FOR A BEAUTiFUL COL^R BROChTre'
Announcing limited ooeninas in the Miami area
Contact Director Louis Weinberg
Miami Office 2333 Bricked Ave., Suite 1512
Phone 758-9454 or 858-1190
iBREtr8&nfij^ssra*ia
SQlQIBittJtffi (g&S)03>


iday, January 9, 1976
*Jewisti fhridHam
Page 13-B
Dulzin States Views on Candidacy
By DAVID LANDAU
1 JERUSALEM (JTA)"I do
Dt see myself as a party candi-
ite. I am not standing on be-
alf of any party. I am fighting
ainst the 'principle' that any
[ingle party can claim a lien on
le position of chairman of the
lewish Agency."
A determined-sounding Leon
Dulzin, treasurer and acting
chairman of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
Executives, made these state-
ments to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency in an exclusive inter-
view here last week as the po-
litical atmosphere seethed with
Consul General of Israel Nachum Astar (2nd from left)
met recently with Greater Miami Jewish Federation
leaders, including several Israelis living in the area.
Among those at the meeting were Haim Bar-Navon
(right) of Miami Beach, Mrs. Hana Walsh (left) and
Sammy Reiser of Miami.
'
Professor Seymour Liebman (right) last week addressed
the residents of Eton Hall on behalf of the 1976 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund- Chairman
Henry Salus (left) and cochairmen Morris Abramowitz
and Emanuel Titlebaum led the response to the needs
of the people of Israel and the Jewish community
through support fontiie GMJF's campaign effort.
At the recent dinner commemorating the 25th anniver-
sary of blood drives for the Mount Sinai Medical Center
Blood Bank by Hibiscus Masonic Lodge No. 275 were
(from left) Dr. Jack Lubin, pathologist in charge of the
Blood Bank; Lodge Blood Bank committee members Eli
Streicher and Sandy Hildebrandt; cochairman Milton
Perlberger; chairman Max Grossman; worshipful master
Murray William Rubin; Marshall Bernard; and Dr. Ar-
kadi Rywlin, Director of Pathology and Laboratory Med-
icine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Lubin presented a certificate
of appreciation to Rubin. Individual commemorative
plaques were presented to Grossman and Perlberger.
Hibiscus Lodge holds four annual blood drives, and
lodge members have also donated blood to be made
available as needed by indigent patients.
rumors and reports concerning
the chairmanship contest.
DULZIN HAD just returned
from an emergency mission to
Argentina, where he managed
to avert a threatened strike by
Jewish school teachers. He
passed briefly through New
York on his way back and is
understood to have met with
or spoken to several prominent
Jewish leaders.
He will reveal nothing of
these conversations beyond
saying that he feels satisfied
with them. As Dulzin spoke to
the JTA, news came that the
Labor Party is moving into high
gear in its efforts to retain the
Agency chairmanship. Premier
Yitzhak Rabin summoned a
meeting of top ministers and
key party workers to discuss
the candidacy of Haifa Mayor
Yosef Almogi, the man Labor
hopes will wrest the chairman-
ship from Dulzin's temporary
grasp.
Sources inside Labor say the
party is determined not to let
the Agency chairmanship slip
from its traditional control. It
is precisely, this attitude, says
Dulzin, which he is determined
to fight.
"I DO not question the right
of other candidates to runbut
the contest should be one of
personalities, fought on the ba-
sis of a candidate's individual
records, and of his fitness for
the job."
His own campaign, Dulzin
said, will be fought on this
basis. His record is seven years
of service as the Agency treas-
urer, including almost a year as
acting chairman between the
death of Louis Pincus in 1973
and the election of Pinhas Sa-
pir in 1974.
During that year. Dulzin said,
he served with the confidence
and cooperation of all sections
of the Agency and in closest
rapport with the government.
Dulzin, a leader of the Lib-
eral Party wing of Likud, said
his political views never im-
pinged upon those relationships
or upon his work as treasurer
or acting chairman.
HE MAINTAINED that po-
litical views have nothing to
do with the chairmanship issue
because the Jewish Agency's
tasks are apoliticalaliya, ab-
sorption, education, youth aliya,
and settlement.
Dulzin noted that after Sa-
pir's death in August he was
unanimously elected acting
chairman again by the Execu-
tive. Dulzin said that he and
several leading figures in
American Jewish affairs have
been disturbed by reports that
the Israel government intends
to exert influence in the elec-
tion contest in the Jewish
Agency.
There have been press re-
ports here for instance, of La-
bor intending to "buy" Mizrachi
support for Almogi by offering
the National Religious Party a
string of municipal posts. Such
reports are detrimental to the
Agency, says Dulzin significant-
ly-
IT WOULD be "to the bene-
fit of all of us" if such actions
ceased. Dulzin said he believes
that if Almogi finally decides to
run, the contest will not be en-
tirely along party lines. He ex-
pressed hope for suonort "from
various groups within the Zi-
onist movement including from
some members of Labor itself."
He declined to elaborate.
It is not yet known when the
contest will take nlace. There
are three possibilities: at the
Zionist General Council meeting
in January, the Jewish Agency
Assembly in July, or the
World Zionist Congress in De-
cember, 1976.
Even if a new chairman is
elected in January or July he
will have to seek reelection in
December at the Congress when
the entire Executive is auto-
matically up for election.
DULZIN, it is understood,
plans to run for the Congress
election, no matter whether he
is elected chairman before that
or whether he fails in a prior
contest with Almogi. Dulzin's
supporters are urging that the
contest be postponed until the
Congress or at least until the
Agency Assembly in the sum-
mer.
Thev point out that if Almogi
is elected chairman of the WZO
at the Zionist General Council
in January, an anomalous situa
tion would arise whereby AJ
mogi would be WZO chairman
and Dulzin Jewish Agency act
ing chairman at least until
July when the Agency assembly
convenes and could elect A)
mogi chairman of the Agency
too.
Dulzin, it is understood
would not voluntarily step
down to allow Almogi to take-
over the Agency chairmanship
At present the timing of thu
contest seems to depend on how
successful Labor is in obtain
ing a broad consensus for Al-
obtained. Labor will push for an
early contest.
Dr. Solomon S. Lichter, principal of Miami Beach Senior
High, will be honored for a decade of service at a dinner
dance given by the PTA on Jan. 31 at the Fontainebleau
Hotel. Committee members who met to plan the event
at the home of Mrs. Hy Siegel (left), PTA president, in-
cluded Mrs. Burton Kovler, secretary, and Mrs. Ronald
Fine (right), president-elect.
Mrs. Pauline Okun of Miami Beach received a plaque
from leaders of the American Red Magen David for
Israel when she dedicated a new ambulance to the
Magen David Adorn during ceremonies at the Greater
Miami Hebrew Academy. Shown with her are Samuel
Reinhard of Miami Beach, Florida state chairman, and
Howard G. Kaufman (right), president of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the American Red Magen David for
Israel. The ambulance was dedicated in memory of
Mrs. Okun's late husband, Sam, and her late parents,
Zalman Levine and Shane Goldie Levine.
Harr-y Schuch (left) receives a plaque from David Cole-
man, Florida state president of the American Red
Magen David for Israel, on behalf of the residents of
Sky Lake Garden Condominium in North Miami Beach.
Residents dedicated an ambulance to the Magen David
Adorn, Israel's official Red Cross service, and contrib-
uted more than $2,300 to the campaign for the MDA's
blood bank. Cong. William Lehman (D.-Fla.) was prin-
cipal speaker at the ceremonies.


rage 14-tJ
fJewisti fhridUan
Friday, January 9, 1976
Rosenfield Marks 15th Year
With Home Life Insurance Company
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Sam L. Rosenfield, C.L.U., of
North Miami, this month marks
his 15th year with the Home
Life Insurance Company of New
York. He is associated with the
Miami agen-
cy, which is
in Coral
Gables.
The reci-
pient of sev-
en National
Quality
Awards for
service t o
clients, Ros-
enfield rank-
ed among the
top 25 in na-
tional sales
organization during 1974. He is
a Qualifying member of the life
insurance industry's Million
Dollar Round Table, and a
member of the President's
Council Summit, Home Life's
highest honor group.
Fame, which gives permanent
recognition to those who have
made a significant contribution
to the company's growth.
Sam Rosenfield
Inside Judaica
Q. What does Judaism say
about slander?
A. In order to invest the
prohibition of defamation with
the greatest possible weight, tal-
mudic jurists interpreted the
biblical injunction. "Thou shalt
surely rebuke thy neighbor
and not bear sin because of
him" (Lev. 19:17), as meaning
that you may reprove your
neighbor so long as you do not
insult him: but if you make him
blush or turn pale from shame
or fury, then you have incurred
guilt because of him. Other
biblical exhortations like "Thou
shalt not go up and down as a
tale bearer" (Lev. 19:16), or
"Thou shalt not utter a false re-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 76-207
General Jurisdiction Division
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK: The Marriage of
IVAN FELISBERTO,
Husband/Petitioner,
a nil
Rosenfield is a 1975 conten- bonnev felisberto.
. .. ... Wife/Respondent.
der for the Home Life Hall of to: bonney feijsberto
Apt. No. 12
1626 Commonwealth Avenue
Brighton, Massachusetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on STAN-
a j c .u n_:.._;. 1-EY M. BRODY, attorney for Petl-
A graduate of the University tioner whoge addrep8 ig 407 Lincoln
n( Tannsccpp Rospnfiplft is a Koad. -Miami Beach. Florida 3313ft, and
ot lennessee, Kosemieia is a fjl< (hp orl(rlnal w|th the c|erk of the
member of the Miami Chapter above styled conn n or before Feb-
. ., .. ruary 11, 1976: otherwise a default will
of Chartered Life Underwriters i. entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
arh week for four consecutive weeks
in Till: JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
5th day of January, 1976.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
STANLEY M. BRODY
(07 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
1/9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOT HE IS HEREBY OIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
M & M I'ROIMCRTIES, UNLIMITED
at 5625 N.W. 79th Ave., Miami, Fla.
33166 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
JAY T. MALINA
MITCHELL TRESS
LEON A. EPSTEIN
Attorney for Applicant
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTIOU3 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage ia
business under the fictitious name of
THE VILLAS at 6701 N. Kendall
I ... Miami, Fla. 33156, intends to
h1 name with the Clerk ot
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
. ,MITK INVESTMENTS, N. T.
a Netherlands Antilles Corp.
By Jorge Coloma, President
Richard Brickman
Attorney for Applicant
860] Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla. 33.37 1/iM6.23.39
and the Estate Planning Council.
your children orphans (Ex. 22:
21-23). This is a typical in-
stance of Divine punishment.
The punishment therefore is ex-
pressly prescribed in the Torah:
"and a covenant was concluded
between them and the Creator
of the World, that whenever
they cry, He hears them and
acts." Slandering the dead is
also regarded as a great sin to
be expiated by fasting and pray-
ers, while a court may punish
it by fine, the Encyclopaedia
Judaica reports.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
port (Ex. 23:1), or "ThOU Shalt in business at 407 Lincoln Road. Ml-
not hatP thv hrothpr in thv aml Beach, Suite 11-B. Florida 33139
v ?" if ioi-rV "So. u i. u,,der the fictitious name of "EM-
heart (Lev. 19:17), "Thou shalt pire factors company- intends
not take vengeance, nor bear "' register the said name with the
any grudge" (ibid., 18), and &tTnty?fF&1aac,rcuU Court of Dade
"Love thy neighbor as thyself" louis dickman
(ibid.) have all been sum- RadoVJ?h ?'cohnN
moned to help invest the prohi- esther g. schiff
bkfon of slander with biblical 40_ ^0?*^?idI*w
authority, says the authoritative Miami Beach, Florida 33139
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
DIXIE BEDDING COMPANY at 4800
N.W. 37th Avenue, Miami, Fla., in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LIGHTRON CORPORATION
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of GUSTA SPORT OF MIAMI at 234
N.E. 25 St., Miami, Fla., intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
GUSTAVO E. CHACON
12/26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-32867
NOTICE OF ACTION
MURRAY FRIEDMAN and
HILDA FRIEDMAN, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
R ALONSO MORALES and
SERtilO ARTURO Dl'RAN OJEDA,
Defendants.
TO: SERGIO ARTURO DURAN
OJEDA
Residence Unknown
J"Ou ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property In Dade County.
Florida:
Lot 7. less the N. 5" thereof. Block
15, South, City of Miami accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book B, Page 41, of the
Public- Records of Dade County,
Florida,
bai been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
LEON A. EPSTEIN, plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose address is 420 Lincoln Rd.
Suite 438, Miami Beach, Florida, 33139,
on or before the 28th day of January,
1978, and file the original with the
his Cou
aintifff
diately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the complaint or
petition.
Witness my hand and the seal of
this Court on the 18th day of Decem-
ber, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
12/26-1/2-9-16
clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on plaintiff's attorney or imme-
Encyclopaedia Judaica.
Disciplinary floggings appear
to have remained in most places
the most common punishment,
at least for graver cases of
slander. In other places, and in
lighter cases, fines were im-
posed.
Instances of punishable slan-
der are insulting a scholar, j^gg FEBU8CH?Pemioner
widows and orphans. "Mistreat- and
ing" widows and orphans "sah *'kibusch. Respondent
... it ., TO: Leah Feibusch
means, literally, causing them
distress. If you cause them dis-
tress by insulting them God will
heed their outcry as soon as
they cry out to Him. His anger
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-318
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
141-19 70th Road
Flushing, New York 11367
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Will blaze forth and He Will put Charles Gertler, attorney for Petltlon-
VOU tO the SWOrd, and VOUr H, whose address is 420 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139 and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styed court on or before Febru-
ary 9th, 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLOR1DIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
6th day of January, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Charles Gertler
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petltionor
1/9-16-23-30
wives shall become widows and
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-434
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
JOSEPH D. TALLMAN, husband
and
gRACE TALLMAN, a/k/a
RACE BOVA
TO: GRACE TALLMAN a/k/a
GRACE BOVA
Springfield Street
Feeding Hills, Massaehusetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to it on
ARTHUR H LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner whose address Is 1980 So.
Ocean Drive, Hallandale, Florida 33009,
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
Feb. 12, 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FfcORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
7th day of January. 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. JAFFE
As D.-putjr Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
1/9-16-23-30
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2616
In RE: Estate of
PAULINE HARRIS
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTON TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that I
have filed a Final Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
charge as Executor of the estate of
PAULINE HARRIS, deceased, and
that on or after the 2nd day of Feb-
ruary, 1976, will apply to the Honor-
able Circuit Judges of Dade County,
Florida for approval of said Final Re-
port and for distribution and final
discharge as Executor of the estate of
the above-named decedent. This 23rd
day of December, 1975.
WILLIAM M. KLEIN, EXECUTOR
A. JAY CRISTOL
Attorney for Executor
21 Northeast First Avenue
Miami. Fla. 33313
379-1792
_________________________12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE S HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of RAMADA INN OF HOMESTEAD
at 51 North Homestead Boulevard.
Homestead, Florida 33030, intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT
OF TAMPA, INC.
By RALPH LAUGHRIDGE
President
MARK BUCHBINDER,. ESQ.
Attorney for Northside Development
9300 South Dadcland Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33156
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-40027
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANSELMA MARIA EUGENIA LEON,
Wife
and
JUAN SIEXTO LEON. Husband
TO: JUAN SIEXTO LEON
Centro Escolar .'7!'. Barrios
Altos Lima, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name*
of HL.M ENTERPRISES and RED
BARON ENTERPRISES at 811 Per-
Ave.. Miami, Fla. 33157 intends f
register said names with the Cleric
( 1 the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Pit n S HARRY I. MOSKOW1TZ
EUGENE LBMLICH, ESQ.
Attorney for Harry L Moskowita
MM V,'. Flagler St.. Miami Fl.
12/19-26 1/2-i
IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-14681 6P 06
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
M-B LEASING CORPORATION
a Fit rlda corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STUART B. BROWN,
Defendant.
TO: STUART B. BROWN
76C N.E. 64 th Street
Apartment 514
Miami, Florida
FOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a lawsuit has been filed in the above
styled cause and yon are required te
serve a copy of your answer to the
lawsuit on the Plaintiff's attorneys,
BLITSTEIN and MOLANS, 1440 N.W.
14th Avenue, Miami, Florida, 33126,
and file the original Answer in the
Office of the Clerk of the County
Court on or before the 3rd day of
February. 1976. otherwise a Default
will be entered against you.
DATED at Miami, Florida, this 23rd
I December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the County Court
Miami. Dade County. Florida
By P. E. GWIN '
Deputy Clerk
fCourt Seal)
1/2-9-16-2J
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OP
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7916 (Dowling)
In RE: Estate of
ETHEL F. KENDALL,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or .Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required]
^ to present any claims and demands
that an action for Dissolution of Mar- '"which you may have against the estate
riage has been filed against you and ETHEL F. KENDALL deceased
you are required to serve a copy of li,,e your written defenses, if any, to It on
DANIEL M. KEIL, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 612 Ainsley
Building, Miami. Florida 33132. and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Janu-
ary 30. 1976; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal ef
said court at Miami, Florida on this
18th day of December 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL M. KEIL
612 Ainsley Building
Miami, Florida 33132
12/26-1/2-9-16
1 Ircuit Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16, Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof, or
the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 30th,
d..y df December, A.D. 1976.
City National Bank of Miami Beach
By: Virginia M. Rawls, Trust Officer
(X) HENRY FOX,
As Executors
First publication of this notice 00
the 2nd day of January, 1976.
LEONARD U. STOLAR
Attorney for Co-Executors
300 71st Street. Miami Beach, Fla.
1/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA
No. 76-194
General Jurisdiction Division
_. _N,OTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of
BERQUIS MENAGED,
Wife,
LEVY MENAGED.
Husband.
YOU. LEVY MENAGED, 42-26 81
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7478
In RE: Estate of
BEN El SEN BERG,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
of BEN EISENBERO. deceased late
of Dade County, Florida, to the Cir-
cuit Judges of Dade County, and file
the same in duplicate and as provided
in Section 733.16. Florida Statutes, in
their offices in the County Courthouse
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-40023
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ELENA ALVAREZ de MANCIA
Petitioner
and
AUGUSTIN MANCIA
Respondent
TO: AUGUSTIN MANCIA
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
GLADYS GERSON, attorney fqr Peti-
tioner, whose address is ISTNorthwest
12th Avenue, Miami, Florida, 33128
and file the original with the' clerk of
the above styled court on or before SHAPIRO, FRIED, WEIL ARCHFRR
January 30 1976; otherwise a default Attorneys for Estate
will be entered against you for the *07 Lincoln Road, Suite 10-B
relief demanded in the complaint or Miami Beach Florida 33139
petition.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 75-7801
In RE: Estate of
HENRY B. ESFORMES
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
AgaimU Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
. J"^?u may nave a8"a'nt the estate
of HENRY B. ESFORMES. deceased
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided In Section 733.16, Florida Stat-
utes, In their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof, or
the same will be qarred.
Filed at Miami, Florida this
day of December, A.D. 1975
MAURICE ESFORMES
HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
_, As Executors
.v. ^"'Publication of this notice on
'"? i"1"1 day of January, 1976.
30th
This notice shall be published once-------
1/2-9
Dated: Jan. 5 1976.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Clerk, Circuit Court
By l: LIPPS
Deputy Clerk
1/9-16-23-8
First publication of this notice o
the 9th day of January, 1976.
HVLAN H. KOUT
Attorney for Executors
420 Lincoln Road
1/9-16
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GLADYS GERSON, ESQUIRE
101 Northwest 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
12 2A-.1
Dade County,' Florida
., ?*"& GUARAZSele Owner
M. IJ3STER SAAL
Attorney for Applicant
City National Bank Bkbr.
5 West Flagler Street
'*
sses
nchj
for'
ian
for J
!ton .
di-
arr.i
of
us-
ire
0,
ise
eel
>

i


riday, January 9, 1976
*Jewisl) fhrkUaun
Page'15-B
Following the recent annual luncheon of the Humane
Society of Greater Miami where more than $8,000 was
raised for the facility, Lillie Rubin's winter fashion col-
lection was modeled by (from left) Mrs. Tibor Hollo,
Mrs. Murry Goodman, Mrs. Hy Siegel and Mrs. Norman
Schindler.
Religious Services
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION W5 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
MENORAH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Raosi Mayer Ab-am-
owitz Cintor Nico Feidman, 28
Ben Aron.
ANSHE EMES. 2S33 SW 1th Av*.
Conitrvative Cantor Sol Pakowiti.
BETH AM (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall
Dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M. iaumgard. Associate Rabbi
Mitchell ChefiFi. _____ 3
CONGREGATIO.M BET BREIRA. 107-
55 SW 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikpff. 3-A
BETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Contervative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lioaon. -A
--------------
BETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sel
Landau. Cantor William Lipeo/i. 4-B
----------a>
BETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor L*on Segal. Rev. Men-
del Gutterman. 8
BETH TOV fTewl--. 6438 SW 8th
St Conaervatlve. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
MER TAMID (Tamrle). 79th fit. and
Carlyle Ave. Co servative. Rabbi
Eugene Labnvitz. Cantor Edward
Klein.
--------------
0HEV 8HAL.CM. 7055 Bonita Or.
Orthodox. Habbi Phineaa A. Weber,
main. 86
I'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YCUTH SYNAGOGUE. WOO
Sunaet Drive. Orthooox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixma" 8-A
ISRAEL (Temple* OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19*^ St. Reform.
Rabbi joaeph R. Narot. HI
ISRAELITE (ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenoera. Cantor Nathan Parnajj
tl
OR OLOM (Tempi*) 8755 SW 16th
St. Conaervatlve Habbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Starter Rieh. It
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 178th St..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham i.
Jacobson. ZZB
CUEAN HEBREW* CONGrlFGATiriN
124V washinqtoo. Ay*. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. >
CUBAN SEPHARO-tC Ht?WCON-
GHEOATION. 715 Washington Ave.
Rabbi M-ir Maslih Melamed. z*-*
MANUEL (Tempiej. 1/01 Washing-
ton Ave. Conse.vatlve. Pabbl 'rvlnq
Lehrman. Cantor Zvi Adler -^
HEBREW ACADEMY 2400 Pine Tree
D- Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Groaa. ____ ______
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tlbor H. Stern.
Oantor Meyer EnaeL
IKNESETH ISRAEL. 1l6 EuclidIAvj.
Orthodox. Rabbi David l_*hr*iai
Cantor Abraham ft'. *
fcEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTRR. f46
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahntias. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAiM 1642
44 Washington Ave. St
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JKWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Vavneh 32-A
SGUOAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 5th St
OrthodvX Rabbi Mordacai Cbaimo-
2nd Semester Begins Jan. 13
At Temple Adath Yeshurun
The second semester of
adult education courses at Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun begins on
Tuesday. Jan. 13.
The first hour, 7:45-8:45 p.m.,
offers four courses taught in
conjunction with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
"Jewish Philosophy" is taught
by Rabbi Simcha Freed'nan,
while "Readings from the Pray-
erbook" has Cantor Ian Alpern
as instructor.
The second hour is a lecture
series on Zionism.
Registration forms are avail-
able at the temple office. For
additional information, call Alan
Renzer, the temple's executive
director.
JWV Auxiliary No. 778
To Meet on Tuesday
Jewish War Veterans Ladies
Auxiliary No. 778 will hold a
regular meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 13, at 8 p.m. at Temple
Beth Am.
Harold C. Uhr, department
service officer, will describe the
benefits, to which deceased vet-
erans' wives are entitled. Evelyn
Clein. president, has said that
t*e metin '|c and that a nuest.ion-and-
answer period will follow the
talk.
UGAl NOTKE
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN (Tempi*). 10j2S
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedmfn. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. S3
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Religious Community Center. 1925*
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. S3-A
BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi Max Lip-
schiti. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson.
M
BNAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd R\
Conaervative. Rabbi Victor O. ZwX-
ing. Cantor Jack Lerner. 98
TEMPLE ISRAEL.SOUTH (FormaHy
Beth Tikva) 9025 Sunset Or. Reforra
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13 A
AMU-EL. (Temple) 8W0.8W 107th
Ave.. Suite 306. Rabb. Maxwell
TIFErtETH ISRAEL (Temple). 8500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. 14
EION (lempie). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman S'lapiro.
Cantor Errol Hel-lman.
HIALtAH
TIFE9ETH JACOB (Temple). WE.
4th Ave. Conservative. R* ,
Nathan ZolondeK. *9
N0K1H MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 N E 121st St. Conservative
Rabbi Dr. Daniel J Fingerer. Can-
tor Yehuda Binyamin. M
MIAMI BACH
4.GUDATH |SAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Otho.lox RamV Sheldon N. Ever. 17
BETH EL. *00 Pine Tree Or.
Orthodox.
BETH ISRAEL, r/0 4Cth ot. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. >
----------a
BETH JACOB. 301 was-ingtcn Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swrrsxy Cantor Mauiio* Mamches.
BETH RAPHAEL (Timplel. 1545 Jef-
fe'son Ave. Conservative. Rabb'
El! ot Winograd Cantor Saul Breeh.
BETH SHO'-OM (Ten.pie). 4144 Chasr
Ave Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
TEMPLE BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Pd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi Oavid Raab. Cantor M0""*
cai Yardeini. Zi-A
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Trooper.
BETH VOSF"H CHAIM CONGP-E
GATiON. 84"* M*eldl*n Ave. 22-A
SEPHAROIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
N.E. 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 88-A
SINAI ,fimpll Of NORTH DADB
1880-1 MB 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabo>
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkea. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGC3UE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Oov
Bidnick 38
fOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St Orthodox
Rabbi Z*v Leff. 81
CORAL GABIES
JUOEA (Templel. o550 Granada Blvd
Reform Rabb' Michael B. Eisen-
stat. Cantor Rita Shore *
-------------
ZAMORA (Tempi*). 44 2amora Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein
sunrsiDt
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave Orthooox. Rabb1
Isaac D Vine. Bf
fORT LAUDlROAll
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 W
Oak'and Park Blvd Pabbi Philio *
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice iMeu. 4?
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Blvd. Reform. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment 43
TAM.,RAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
Nv, 57th Si. Conservative. Rabb'
Milton J. Gross. ***
YO'JNO ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox). 3897 Stirlirg Rd. 52
POMPAN0 BEACH
MARGATF JEWISH CENTER Mf
ww th t. >4.
SHOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Morriv A. Skoo
Cantor Yaarov Renxer. 4
HAILANDAU
HALLANOALE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabb.
Harry E Schwartz. Car tor Jacob
Dflnziger '
Obituaries
Dr. Bernard Ehrenpreis,
Retired Radiologist, Passes
STATE OF FLOR'DA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
f hereby certify Ihdt TRITON I.I-
QI'OKS. FNC. was nn the ISth Hay of
March. IDfi!1. inonrnornted under the
laws of th* State of Florida, with Its
principal place of business at Miami
(Dadu County) Florida.
I further certify that the above cor-
poration filed in this pff'a* on the '""h
day of December. 1975. Notice of In-
tent to Voluntarily Dissolve under
Section fiOS 27. FVrida Statutes.
GIVEN under my hand and the
Great Seal of the State of Flor-
ida, at Tallahassee the Capital,
this the 2th day of December,
19T5.
BR.UCB A. SMATHERS
Secretary of State
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
1/8/76
Dr. Bernard Ehrenpreis, 78.
former director of radiology* of
the Department of Hospitals in
New York, died last Friday.
He began a career in research
of radiation treatment for can-
cer and other diseases.
In 1955, Dr. Ehrenpreis mov-
ed to Miami and retired from
the medical profession. He be-
gan writing poetry, and had
several works published, includ-
ing "Thorny Memories" and the
long poem "Eroica," which he
often recited at poetry festivals.
Dr. Ehrenpreis had more
than 50 medical papers pub-
WALDORF
KA1MK (Sarah) 77 of Miami Beach
passed away Friday. She was a res-
ilient here for 45 years. She is sur-
vived by daughters. Mrs Poor] B
Haw.aii. Mrs. Renee Levy. Miami
Beach, son, Melvin Waldorf, Holly-
wood, Fla. 7 grandchildren. Mrs.
Barbara Coflno, Miami, Mijia Cheryl
I/evy, Miami Heach, Miss Janice
l.'vy, Miami Beach, Master Scott
Levy, Miami Heath, Harold Waldorf.
Edward Waldorf and Miss Jacqueline
Waldorf. Hollywood, brothers Jack
A Barney Barnett of Miami B*ach,
Michael. C.-orge and Hy Barnett,
New York, sisters, Mrs. Anna Cutler,
Mrs. Mae Dlsick, New York. Family
suggests donations to the American
Cancer Society, S.-rvk-e.- ware h*ld
Sunday at Kiversidi Chapel. Inter-
ment Woodlawn Cemetery. Miami.
TRAEGER
SARE E.. 69. of Miami, passed away
Dec. SI. She had been a Miami resi-
HOUrWOOD
BETH El JTerrpl-l. "351 '4t|- Aye
Reform Rabbi Samul Jaf'e. aijt Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfelr' as,
.----- m-----
BETH THALOM (Temple'. 460' Ar-
thur St Conservative. Rabbi Mortoe
Maiavsky C*ntor lrvi.ii? Gold. 41
S I N a I (Temple) 1?l"1 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shaoiro
Assoriot- Rabbi Chalm S Listfijlo
TEMP'-E BETH AHJA. Corservstive.
310 SW 62-d Av., Hollywoad. F David Rosenfield. 47-8
1 EMPLE SOLEL (LfMnafl 5100 Sner-
idan St., Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazie ___ *'c
PIANTATI0N
PLANTA-.ION JEWISH CONGB.B-
, QATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
' tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams.
MIRAMAX
ISRAEL (Templel. 6920 SW- SBJIs-tl
Conservative. Rabbi Avon. Drartn.
Cantor Abraham Keste. <
HOMf STEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWWH CENTBJ.
m NE 8th tt C*n**rvativ*.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME
lished. and a textboo'r* called
"Aorta."
He was a member of the Lu-
bavitcher Yeshi-a and Terr.ole
Beth Israel, where he served
as a rabbi during the summer
months.
He is survived by his wife,
Ge'tmde, a son, Charles, of
Philadelphia, a brother. Ru-
dolph, of West Palm Beach, and
a sister, Dr. Amalia Garir., of
In in. Pa.
Sen ices were held at River-
side Chapel with interment in
Lakeside Memorial Park.
dent for the past SO >vars, originally
coming fmm ChloaCO, 111 Mis- Tl I
ger was Comptroller of Traeger
Bros., Inc., having been in the or-
noration for BO years. She is survived
by her 4 brothers, Joe. Samuel David
from the Miami area and Dr. Milton
Traeger. Honolulu, Hawaii. Services
were held Jan. 2, 11 a m at Gordon
Funeral Home, 710 SW 1Mb. Ave.
Miami, with interment in ML Nebo
Cemetery. The family will be re-
ceiving friends and observing Shiva
at the resilience of David Traeger.
337 Meieioza Coral Gables.
SUCHER
1
GEL6
MONUMENTS !NC.
Open Ever' Do Closed Sabbath
140 SW .7th Avenue
Phone 766-2886
WILLIAM. 59 of Bay Harbor Is.,
formerly of Montreal. CanadA passed
away Jan. -', 1976 Survived by his
wile Phyllis. 3 sons, Michael. Brian
and Howard. 3 daughters Anna,
Khonda and Cindy, 1 brother George
and 8 sisters Eleanor Kirsch. Ruth
Wayne and Jennie Farley. He was a
Masonic member of Surrsldja 1/idge,
Miami (teach, the North Shore Ki-
wanis Club. B'nal It'rith. Shriner
(Malli Temple). BB*f*jCtOr of the
Hope SchooJ, and the Children's
\'ariety HospiUtl. Vice president
Temple Menorah Services were held
Sunday at Riverside Chapel. Inter-
ment Lakeside Memorial Park.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICR IS Hfc*KF,J?Y IHVKX that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of STEVEN J. KLEIN d/b/a JN-
STKUMgNTS Pf* STCDIO BRU-
TAL at 1250 N.E 803rd Street North
Miami Beach, Florida Intends to reg-
ister said name wlU the Clerk, of the
Circuit Court of Da STEVRX J. KI.EI.V
MICHAEL P- CHASE
Attorney for STEVEN J. KLEIN
1/9-16-23-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUpiCIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-7767
r,EN**'"*<\L JUflSQ'CT'ON OIV SION
ACT'ON POP DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
KAREN HDE C S.SAPV, a k a
KAREN SCK 'IKMON.
Petitioner
Mi 'il VMED MEMOX,
Resnoi
TO MOHAMED MSUOSt
11 esldence unknown)
yoi ai:;: iilrkhv \"Tt;i:u
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage i..i- b*en i'icd against you and
..u are required to serve a cops ot
your writieii di If any, to It on
( |E1 i A. AI I. attorney for Pe-
i. Suite 400
Roberts Balding, 'J1- W*s| F'..ig!e"
, Mi..mi. l'"lo:id:i, and file ih^
original with the rlarK of the aho-v*
styled coujjl on or before January 30,
1936' otherwise i di fault will he en-
, nst you for tin- relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
Tin.' nellcM shall b* nuld shed r,nce
each week fi* for conaecwtiv* w
In THE JEWISH Fl.oIilDIAN.
w !*>: i-:s& <>> hai d an.<"
, 'lianii. Florida on
I ......,,!"'- "17.V
P RRJNKER
1 'in u ; r
1 PMnrldn
p.. c P rTTPEl \XD
\ i 1 -omy Clerk
tin Couri 9
ANGEI > A AI '
Suite 001 Bulldlnf
2S We-i Fl ie!ei SI'i
' ..- di
AltflCIll v foi Petitioner
. V'.l
E LAVV .
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
ir\ liusiiuss under the fictitious name
or, QUALITY I-AVNDIC* at 6310 N K.
2nd \e. MiamL FJ. 38JS* intends to
re^lstaa sal*-name with the Clerk
of the Circuit. Court of Xlade Coun'y.
Florida.
R. A. PIIX)TO. INC.
EUGENE LEMIJCH
Attorney for R. A. Piloto, Inc.
2720 W. Flagler St.. Miami. Pi.
12/19-26 1/2-9
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-165&
\l 13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by S. Levitt, F.O.
rVew York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Brow ard County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.


Page 16-B
vJewisti noridiiai)
Friday, January 9, 1974
l
I
a

Pe
Oc
fh",
Fe
be
del
tio
1
eat
in
sal
7th
(Ci
look to Food Fair for the
Best in Dairy Products!
Discover a large variety of exquisite imported
and domestic products always available. .always fresh!
ONUS SPECIAL! SA
ON 2 PACKAGES
BOROEN LITE LINE
Cream Cheese
KING SOLOMON
LIMIT TWO PKGS. PIEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S7 00 OR MORE,
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FLOSUN
c?,r^eJulce ss$i
Life Spread Qtrs. i4.9
P P. BRAND COLORED (CHEESE FOOD)
American Singles pkg$1 1S
All FLAVORS
Borden Yogurt 3 cupzs79
PAUIYS
Sweet Munchees^fs%% 59c
IMPORTED NORWEGIAN SUCED
Swiss Cheese 89*
SERVICE APPETIZER HPT.
AVMAHf ONIV AT STOWS WITH SUtVtCI COUNTHB.
Ml IUNCH Mf AH I CHHW HKK> TO OKH*
RICH'S GOURMET WHITE MEAT
Turkey Breast
ROLL 09C BARTER
FRESHIY SMOKED SLICED LOX OR
Novie Salmon g $1M
BLACK FOREST OLD FASHIONED
Wide Bologna T 79*
WISCONSIN CHEESE WITH CARAWAY SEEDS
Sweet Munchee haifib 79*
DELICIOUS
Chopped Herring 99*
FRESHLY MADE COLE SLAW, MACARONI OR
Potato Salad LB 59*
WISCONSIN FINEST
Muenster Cheese .T89*
ONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 28'
LotsO'Lox 2mrz$1"
KAHN'S MIDGET
Liverwurst o63*
KAHN'S SPICED IUNCHEON MEAT OR ^
Cooked Salami 8p?g79*
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 1"
ON 2 PACKAGE!.
Franks or
Knocks
AMERICAN V#^ 12-OZ.
KOSHER ^S PKG.
LIMIT TWO PKGS.. PIEASE WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORI,
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Finest Quality
MEATS A POULTRY
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Beef Chuck
Blade Steak
99
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
USOA?
^CHOjCfJ
Corned Beef
Brisket
BONELESS
$7 4*
JL LB
49
USDA
.CHOICE
FRESH
Ground Beef Chuck iB$ 109
U.S.D.A. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Under Blade Steak w$l8t
U.S D.A. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS < ea
Shoulder Steak lB $169
ONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 30'
HEINZ TOMATO
DEL MONTE TT' -. |
PruneJuiceM KetShup
A ^-v ,4"0Z-
40-OZ. /IQC BOTT1E
BOTTLE M' Z7 UMIT ONE BTl PLEASE Wl OTHER
LIMIT ONE BTL, PIEASE. WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
RED PAK CALIFORNIA
Tomatoes......,........................3S$1
MANISCHEWITZ
Tarn Tarns 8PKGZ 59
F> P. BRAND WHOLE KERNEL OR ^W
Creamed Corn 3 85*1
STOKEIY SLICED
Green Beans.................3'c*n?1
LIMIT ONE BTl.. PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASE OF $7.00 OR MORE.
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
WONDERFUL
FRESH BAKED GOODS
MADf WITH PURE VEGETABLE SHORTENING
Egg Bread
P.P. BRAND O KB. y^OC
We RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE $010 TO DEALERS.
FOOD
FAIR

SUPERMARKETS
FOR
QUALITY
AND
FRESHNESS
PIUS THE GREATEST
VARIETY
OF PRODUCTS TO HELP PLAN YOUR MEALS
MERCHANTS GREEN 3r3J
"yy| STAMPS FOR FINE GIFTS' lllllllllIII|
Wl WllCOME I jmipc
FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS V
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY, JANUARY 10th
AT All FOOD FAIR STORES IN DADE COUNTY
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
Pick your own fresh
FRUITS A VEGETABLES
A REAL TREAT I
Puerto Rican
Pineapples
49C ,ACH
GARDEN FRESH
Romaine Lettuce head 25c
GARDEN FRESH FIRM
Green Cabbage 12*
SUNSWEET m ........
Pitted Prunes '?49*
EASY TO PEEL-SWEET EATING
80 SIZE
Oranges
1 0j69c
>

TRY OUR DELICIOUS
SUN RIPENED
TEMPLE ORANGES,
THIN SKINNED
AND FULL OF JUICE
SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SEAFOOD
SERVICE COUNTERS
Mackerel
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
55
LB.


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