The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02448

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
~ Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 49 Number 53
Miami, Florida Friday, January 2, 1976
By Mail 50c. rwo Section?. Price 25 rzasa
COMMUNITY WIDE EFFORT THIS WEEK
CJA-IEF Launches 1976 Campaign
Jules Arkin Named 1976
General Campaign Chairman
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration President Harry B.
Smith has announced that the
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund will be
launched this week throughout
Dade County.
"The urgent need for each
Jew to stand committed to the
very survival of the Jewish peo-
ple is more pressing than ever
in 1976," said the campaign's
General Chairman L. Jules Ark-
in, a Miami Beach attorney who
will be serving for the second
year in CJA-IEF's top leader-
ship position.
"Israel's very existence is
challenged this month
throughout the world, as the
United Nations Security Coun-
cil debates agreements on Mid-
dle East peace arrangements,"
Arkin said. "The whole Jewish
people has struggled for justice
through centuries of oppression.
Culminating that struggle was
the rebirth of the Jewish home-
land 28 years ago.
'"Now." he added, "the UN
General Assembly has openly
condemned Zionism as a form
of racism, defaming the very
action which the Assembly
made a reality in 1948. This
infamous act is a challenge to
all of us, as Jews. And we must
meet that challenge with
strength."
CJA-IEF is the annual cam-
paign through which Greater
Miami's Jewish community re-
sponds to the tremendous social
needs of Israel's people, as well
as those of Jews in need here
in Miami and in communities
throughout the world.
"Governments must deal with
the political and the military
situations that face nations,"
Arkin continued. "As a Federa
tion, we conduct a campaign
for humanitarian purposes
Jewish people coming to the aid
of other Jewish people. We are
Continued on Page 9-A
RABIN'S 1976 GOAL
L. JULES ARKIN
'76 Chairman
Thwart Syria-Soviet
In UN, Press For
Geneva Talks
HARRY B. SMITH
President
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV JTA Premier
Yitzhak Rabin's Dec. 27 declara-
tion that Israel's immediate tar-
get for 1976 must be to thwart
Syrian-Soviet diplomatic offen-
sive at the UN and press toward
a reconvened Geneva confer-
ence in the hope of reaching a
general peace settlement with
all of Israel's neighbors 'ob-
viously anticipated his trip to
Washington on Jan. 7 and 8.
He will meet with Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger and
possibly with President Ford.
Rabin's visit to the U.S. is
expected to be crucial to the
next round of Middle East peace
negotiations, especially the Jan
12 Security Council debate on
the Middle East which Israel
has announced it would boycott
because the PLO has been in-
vited.
The Premier stressed in his
remarks that, as of this moment,
no Arab state is ready to nego-
tiate with Israel, least of all
Syria, and to pretend that there
might be a change of heart
could only undermine Israel's
position.
Rabin addressed a Labor
Party forum at Beit Berl near
Continued on Page 1S-A
.... i
Votes for Cash at the UN i
TORONTO (JTA) Votes on resolutions at the
UN Genera! Assembly are being bought and sold like
rugs in a Baghdad bazaar, the 'Toronto Star" has i
charged.
In a story by foreign correspondent Mark Gayn, the
"Star" said the votes are being bought by oil-rich Arab
states from impoverished delegates from Third World
countries who have difficulties maintaining themselves
and their missions in New York City.
The going price is $6,000 $8,000 for votes on im- {
portant issues, according to Gayn. He said recently one
ambassador sold his delegation's vote for $500, while
another's price was $4,000.
Gayn said that trading votes for cash has grown
with the increase in the UN's membership. He said the
home government usually shuts its eyes to the practice
as long as it doesn't run contrary to its own national in-
terests.
The purpose of the vote-bwyiag is to increase a
majority, Gayn said. One diplomat conceded that the
practice was common and an accepted fact of life at
the UN, Gayn added. However, he noted, neither the
United States, nor the Soviet Union is involved in the
vote-baying.
WITH REGARD TO THE PALESTINIAN PROBLEM
Cohesive Policy Sought
By GIL SEDAN and YITZHAK SHARGIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli leaders in and out
of the government are trying to develop a cohesive national
policy with regard to the Palestinian problem, now looming
as the major issue in Middle East peace negotiations, and
how to deal with the increasingly politicized Arab minority
inside Israel
The Cabinet's formula of June, 1974, stating that the
Palestinian question can be dealt with only within the
framework of peace negotiations with Jordan is generally
accepted and there seems to be a growing consensus that
Israel must recognize some form of national identity for
the Palestinians.

..... '""-^'"';
But the framework of Pales-
tinian national expression and
how far Israel can safely go in
accepting it remains a matter
of serious debate. Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Alton stated Israel's
dilemma concisely, at a Labor
Party meeting at Beit Berl on
Dec. 28, when he said, "If we
return all territories, we'll be
left without defensible borders;
if we keep them all, the result
will be a bi-national state."
Alton, however, ruled out a
Palestinian state between Is-
rael and Jordan which, he said,
could turn out to be a PLO
state. He reiterated that the
Palestinian problem must be
solved in the Jordanian con-
text and said Israel would nev-
f ontinued on Page 5-A
Rabin: "Quit Criticizing or Resign"
JERUSALEM (WNS) Premier Yitzhak Rabin has
told his Cabinet ministers either to stop publicly criticizing
government policy or to resign. The statement made at a
Cabinet meeting, which was revealed in the press, was seen
as primarily addressed to Foreign Minister Yigal Allon, who
has recently criticized the government's Palestinian policy.
Allon seems to be leaning to-
ward the proposal by former
Communications Minister Aha-
ron Yariv and Health Minister
Victor Shemtov of Mapam that
Israel should talk to any Pales-
tinian group that recognizes the
Jewish State and desists from
terror. Rabin firmly opposes
this formula, although private-
ly he has said that he could
envision a Palestinian state on
the West Bank under moderate
Palestinian leadership. Later the
Prime Minister's Office denied
Rabin's warning was aimed pri-
marily at Allon.
Meanwhile, Prof. Yehoshafat
Harkabi, one of the leading
"hawks" in the Israeli academic
community, has urged Israel to
negotiate with any Palestinian
group, including the Palestine
Liberation Organization, that re-
nounces terrorism and accepts
the existence of Israel.
HARKABI, an authority on
international relations, a former
chief of army intelligence and
until recently an advisor to De-
fense Minister Shimon Peres, in
a telephone radio interview
from the United States, ques-
tioned the official Israeli view
that the establishment of a West
Bank Palestinian state would
threaten Israel and advance So-
viet penetration in the Middle
East.
Harkabi said if Israel offered
to negotiate with the PLO, the
PLO would be faced with the
choice of abandoning its "co-
Continued on Page 12 A
Cubans
Out of
Syria
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Cuban armored brigade that had
been stationed in Syria since th
end of the 1973 Yom Kippur
War returned to Cuba a few
weeks ago, it was revealed he*e.
The only foreign troops now
in Syria are members of an in-
fantry brigade from Saudi
Arabia.
The Cuban brigade was sent
to Syria to man the new Rus-
sian T-62 tanks that the Syriaaa
were getting from the Soviet
Union after the war. Syria did
not have any crews for the
tanks because of the loss of
hundreds of tank crews during
the war.
In addition to helping the
Syrians, the Cuban government
wanted its soldiers to gain some
combat experience. The Cubans
took part in clashes against the
Israelis on the Golan Heights
during the war of attrition that
Syria wiged from January to
June, 1974.
Cuban troops have been re-
ported fighting recently with
the Soviet-backed Popular Move-
ment for the Liberation of An-
gola.


Page 2-A
+Jeistnor*fon
Friday, January 2, 1975
8,000 Soviet Jews Emigrated
To Israel This Year
;
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON(JTA)
Soviet Jewish immigration
to Israel via Vienna is ex-
pected to total slightly more
than 8,000 this year, accord-
ing to statistics from Amer-
ican sources made available
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency The figure does not
include Jews emigrating
from the Soviet Union whose
destinations are countries
other than Israel, notably
Western Europe and North
America.
According to the fieures re-
ceived by the JTA. Jewish emi-
grants from the USSR via Vien-
na who are going to Israel to-
talled 7.460 in the first 11
months of 1975. Based on the
monthly average of 6"8 persons.
the overall total for the year
should be about 8.138 The rela-
tively small number of Soviet
Jews who pass through Rome
en route to Israel were not in-
cluded in the statistics.
No figures have been made
available on the number of Jews
'leaving the USSR for countries
other than Israel. This number
has been growing steadily since
the 1973 Yom Kippur War and a
estimated to amount to about
40 percent of all Jews leaving
the USSR via Vienna, according
to American sources At that
rate, the total number of Jews
eimeretuig from the Soviet
Union this year would be in the
neighborhood of 11.300.
EMIGRATION statistics for
19"5 showed that the greatest
numbers of Jews leave the
USSR in the cold weather
months. Last January and Feb-
ruary the exit totals were 8~0
and 809. respectively. In No-
vember. 1975. the last month for
which figures are available, the
total was 8~0. The lowest month-
ly departure figures were last
Slay and July, when emigrants
numbered 4~0 and 490 respec-
tively. But last June the depar-
tures totaled 710.
Jewish immigration to Israel
via Vienna was 14.000 in 1971
and 31.500 m 1972. In the latter
year, only 500 Soviet Jews went
to countries other than Israel.
Emigration from the USSR
reached a peak in 19"3. when
33.500 Soviet Jews arrived in
I.-ael and about 2'00 went
elsewhere. In 19^4. 24300 So-
viet Jews passed through Vien-
na, of whom about l'.OOO went
to Israel.
Rabbi Kahane
In Yew Trial

By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK JTA Rab-
bi Meir Kahane was transfer-
red on Nov. 2" to the federal
minimum security prison at
Allen wood. Pa.. aft?r a Federal
Circuit Court of Appeals ruling
that he was entitud to kosher
food as a federal prison in-
mate.
Barry Slotnick. attorney for
the founder of the Jewish De-
fense League, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that it was
his understanding that, under
the agreement by the US. gov-
eenment to comply with the
ruling, all Jewish prisoners un-
der federal detention request-
ing kosher food would here-
after be provided such a diet
which will include rabbinically-
cerufied kosher meat and fowl.
FEDERAL JUDGE Jack Wein-

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stein, who sentenced Kahane
iast March to a year in prison
for parole violation, ordered
Kahane to serve his term at
the Allenwood facility and to
receive kosher food there U S.
government attorneys challeng-
ed the kosher food order, which
was upheld by a lower court.
While the appeals court or-
der said only that Kahane was
entitled to nutritionally-ftalanc-
ed kosher meals, which he is
getting by restricting his diet
at the Allenwood facility to
vegetables, fruits and such fish
as tuna. Slotnick said Kahant
would stan getting kosher meat
meals probably next week.
SLOTNICK SAID he had been
informed that federal officials
were discussing with local ko-'
s'her caterers provision of ko-
sher meat meals to Kahane.
When the government rejected;
Weinstem's order that Kahane
be provided kosher food at the
Allenwood facility, the judge
allowed Kahane to stay at a
half-way detention house in
Manhattan, pending outcome of
the court battle.
Kahane was given permission
to leave the facility daily to go
to kosher restaurants and to
synagogue for worship. Slotnick
said that, with time off for
good behavior. Kahane would
probably complete his sentence,
by the end of Januarv.
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fJtnisHkurKti&jn
Page 3-A
Kissinger Speech Still
Studied for Implications
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF and interests of all parties in
WASHINGTON -(JTA) -Seemly of State Henry ^ZS^^S^t
Kissingers proposal in his United Nations speech for live in peace and security and
"informal, multi-lateral meeting to assess conditions and
discuss the future" of Middle East peace negotiations
is immediately seen by observers here as a diplomatic
kvice to placate Arab anger toward Egypt for signing the
hai accord with Israel and which eventually may open
fe door to participation by the Palestine Liberation Or-
Inization in the Geneva conference sponsored by the UN.
TJ.S. officials went to extra-
sessing the current situation in
Maintain Pressure,
Shapp Urges
r
the legitimate interests of the
Palestinians.
iinary lengths to explain that
5. consultations with "Middle
stern states" was only one of
ee options that Kissinger
in mind.
rHEY POINTED out that he
spoke of Syrian-Israel
jotiations and a formal Ge-
/a meeting.
tfoting that consultations on
informal meeting had just
in and would continue over
coming weeks, officials said
informal discussions would
be under UN auspices.
len questioned closely on
isible participation by the
a top official noted that
Secretary spoke very ex-
pitly and deliberately of "na-
ksked if the Arabs would sit
m with Israel even at infor-
sessions, the official said
|t the consultation forms
fe yet to be arranged.
FACT that Kissinger an-
inced the proposal at this
so soon after its apparent
eption, indicated to inform-
observers that its purpose
|to mollify Arabs, especially
Syrian and Palestinian
lers who are expressing an-
over their view that Egypt
re too much to Israel even
bugh the Sinai agreements
Iw Egypt clearly stands to
|p military and economic
is with U.S. support.
Lt the UN, Kissinger said
tie United States seeks no
fccial benefits. We do not at-
i pi to exclude any country,
will cooperate with any na-
that is willing to make a
ktribution. We have no pref-
ace for any particular pro-
lure. We will support what-
fer process seems most prom-
)g. Our approach will con-
.ie to be both flexible and
kermined.
le said the U.S. had already
in discussions with the So-
Union with a view to as-
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the Middle East and weighing
possible diplomatic approaches
to bring about a durable peace
in accordance with Security
Council Resolutions 242 and
338.
HE ALSO stressed that "The
role of the world organization
remains essential. If this or-
ganization has no other accom-
plishment than its effective
peace-keeping role in this trou-
bled area it would have well
justified itself."
Kissinger said that UN troops
had become indispensable to
the two disengagement agree-
ments in the Mideast, as well
as the new Sinai accord. The
General Assembly's delibera-
tions on the Middle East have
also played a central role and
could encourage progress or
exacerbate tensions, Kissinger
said.
KISSINGER SAID that the
Middle East would continue to
be an area of anguish, turmoil
and danger until a just and dur-
able peace is achieved. He
stressed that such a peace must
meet the principal concerns
"The United States promises
its full dedication to further
progress toward peace," Kissin-
ger said.
Israel's UN Ambassador
Chaim Herzog said he was
pleased with the "strong meas-
ure of American leadership"
demonstrated in Kissinger's
speech.
He hoped this "new look"
would be maintained by Amer-
ican representatives throughout
the session.
Calder Turf
Championship
The turf championship of the
1975-76 Tropical at Calder sea-
son is on the line during the
New Year's weekend. On the
New Year Calder will present
the $35,000 added La revoyante
Handicap matching the leading
fillies and mares at 1 1/16 miles |
on the grass. On Saturday, Jin. ]
3, the richest race ever fea-1
tured at Calder pits the leading
male turf contestants at nine
furlongs on the grass m the
$75,000 added W.L. McKnight
Handicap.
Racing at Calder, Monday
through Saturday, continues
through Jan. 14.
LOS ANGELES (JTA)
Pennsylvania Gov. Milton J.
Shapp has urged the American
Jewish community "to main-
tain and increase the pressures
on our own government lead-
ers to make certain that Israel
has the right to exist and flour-
ish as a free nation."
Speaking at a Hadassah din-
ner in the Hollywood Palladium,
Shapp said that "no other nation
in the world today is so be-
sieged, so maligned and so
needed."
SHAPP, who is seeking the
Democratic Party's Presidential
nomination, also made reference
to last month's United Nations
resolution which calls Zionism a
form of racism, saying, "I am
disturbed, as I know all of you
are, at recent indications that
our national leaders may be
weakening in their resolve to
maintain the safety and integrity
of Israel. We must to let this
happen.
"We must never permit the
oil barons of this world to
snuff out the candles of free-j
dom and human dignity that
burn so brightly in the Mid-
east."
The Governor noted that "the
job and duty for American Jews
is relatively easy and safe. Wa
are asked to supply money and
credit. Certainly, contributing
funds is the very least we can
do to help our brethren to de-
velop and maintain safer lives
for themselves and their chil-
dren.
"BUT IT is also our respon-
sibility to maintain and increase
the pressure on our own govern-
ment leaders to make certain
that Israel has the right to exist
and flourish as a free nation.
Shapp told the gathering that
his mother was a leader in
Hadassah for many years in the
late 1950's and early 1960's in
Miami Beach, "and I know from
personal experience what won-
derful work vou do."
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-'- LWjaa ian* *n*r vser i/.t'. '.- :.;
Jmt timer*'**', '".u.^r La TKr- -.j k'ja
2UT '^^fjK. utyaii '-.; -jit: ' UfK/C* t .; < -. '^f '' -. -.
JO*. 'JiKT'U'X.it V- ./'. jC_--^ Vj* >i.-- '-J:'JX.
/. tithem t jr*.ir^r : v*r\*_'.;- '.-:..-.-
".'-if v.i ->. >; -i*?; ;. v^",* tJrrju. v.>.'--T -. --.t:.'
ravx. Ivr -X-X4 -i I**vr / -^t MR- Zrf/i-tr r**v
'.\->jK. \tmmtti starve *ys fe-'^ijfcC ti^r v.* i*-.a'.r
M .'t.'irti .t -.* -v* t-.^. '/ tz. trr^vr 'jc ^* Weal
i*- -':' >' >'. 1^^-; > tfCBfcntiC v.'.*
<; .'/Crtr* i >..f <-.c --it r**r~s*r. hod k ^ -t -.'.'.
J.' 1/V; --.' ; 'j?xyx.*r. zy/r'jv.: < .-,*
*iaevar*ri ". vt ,v
fM li it*.' *.". ':.*:.: 'K>.. y!'Ss*z:-\
.'/? 'r: '.'^'..-.' '.'-. s.'jC >:
A Niee Place to Visit
"If the fc$rv;*a*a MMflflf '/ Toamc rtac/xc-
v* the hy picet u I*rarf, I wijj rewraneo:
^y.'i.'.'.^-lt 7"ft*w: MBMltl '.7 Iiradi Touruai Mimiter
'.:v;-.t /-.. i' i r'^rr" prCH v."'-.-'.: ve MfN Bttdf
only half in /a4 Tat ltr<*eJj official bebe-.-et that if
dkcra wrr; !;% isdhiayt ofi toorfati throafhout the
.--i:- /',- r. y, fa briTupiij! peace
Arttht from every Arab plate vffl have vit/ted li.'i';
thi year The taracfl pavcrMMM iMUcvei thai the "open
bridge*" policy u impt/rtjint becaa*e it tJlpwi Ai
t/> *ee the re^J farugl '/fter trn the country depicted
by Arab hate pr'ypaganda.
Kol wxjld <>Iv> like 10 IM Arab tOOflftl come not
onJy acrot the Jordan Rhrar bridges but blvj acrtjit,
thf '.;'.--/ ^.ar,ai UntjJ then, luraeJ u intent on encour-
a^jf.f/ toorfati from outside the Middle East and has
et a pad f/f one milli'/n for 1V76 The record high so
far is 726,000 tourists in 1972.
liut Ko! ha* streued that the million figure vnil
not r*; reached unless American tourism, which reached
200,000 this year is doubled. Tourism from the L' S was
the only one to decline in 1975
Tourinm Proves Solidarity
Y will vt*it Urael next year to show their solidarity with
the Jewinh State in the wake of the anti-Zionist and
other anti Israeli resolutions adopted by the United
Nations General Assembly. The recent Jerusalem Con-
ference of Jewish Solidarity urged increased tourism
u, Israel and was immediately answered with the arf
nouncement that several American Jewish organizations
will hold their meetings next year in Jerusalem.
The Israel Ministry of Tourism is also making a con-
earttd effort to have more American Christians visit
Israel to see their holy places. The more of all kinds,
the better.
Columnist as a Candidate
frvrilM
inn zhL*:: rat >ritr t
vrortT*i raapw-ioT. Turn art
n iuuii andtfBis xra* iv tw
Imwcratii mmnanjtn iu* ws-
wxr tvn **:* 1in ns -jol.
tiar r iniErr n iaei itr
uanm ".tr nitr~"fir ve: ".rtt T'
hi rir : irr v-- 'iif-tr-nar

en Ak cmsa tfafficri
cffiFW
. :
tnnt far -wrrtnn* I 3gn*.
ir tut r.iri rf ta rf 4ar4
Timi^iii i-1 fadtvv atun
trt. ai Hunt^" f ut'tuar? **rr
nnr mr *ct oa: t ousaiaar
las wscant* uur ciok: mipwucr
hbbAQ I frmr 'ju mM
nit avjir c nar aI*! L*iie.
T7au i ^J^mjm. vcc. J.
.r-pjmnir '.r.ne- -j&xAt i taut
" wax ^-?t: '. -; Hb
.a; >-_:>-: *::ri nun
....
*r: :
: btzv.ii:
:.-,-,-;-_,- h; 11-
^.-.-^ ~
- eco.
fjsc J jnr t ir i
tin* a;lit throu^E an p*^ a|
fmm hcaalH. law- ^
Sr teosai ic ::
i-ve are Stk ;- e5
and 3j T tic: e^ -^jl
' --* o?^. ?r-h r-rt eacen m.1
df ami hnv fraO t ree; :
:-i-
am.
nie
Ten
'^\
in.
for
"ar
for
an |
it.
di-l
;d
and I
pl
It is I
; hel
>\
- -- .,-.- -
the wwsBf. Ir .-;*
-->*. y* r.-t
- ." wcraM :t lh( treariesl
- : 'A world ^ we sire only
-.he
not
be
has!
r "j7<-wKchm aad
poetry aad d-*e&::::~'~ _
tiwre-
just when r~ hrtbe
pded ? I do tbe da-ar.dest
t*^nE I tore oe a CW::: or
.-.tn I wacb a fiat I write in
zzzry: I to for a safe or a
tncvck rider I pir a p
soaiaore: I cribbic name notes
:o :yteJf abase :- issfbk
t-uaiss I hope to do before my
t;me ha* ran oat.
fsvcboioji*t frier.i= tell
-is rneans I am oy:rs the
tf Triaapie, escaping from
the hard things of hfe Maybe.
H I tell them to loof a: dia-
jrsaM rf that woodrouf :'rgan-
^alied the brain.
THE LEFT brain d.r-e;:< my
strong right arm. which ;? for
action and precision. Rut the
brain is for the in
nmeasurabJe It directs my
;f- hand, and the left hand is
the dreamer.
Brain and hands together, in
Continued on Page 13-A
Do-Gocders: Strange Bedfellows
ft -ixti are properly *ar\
'f. -. ; Leapse of
V.'orr*B V<*e.-s .- aoo
Cause sys oeuiu^e the}'
ac-^..;. dVo .; 2'rxl thus
thwar.ir.i t^ .; -.
- t-ecaaM ^".:;: have a v=n-
thus upet the stability of the
s}-stni), not to say do actual
ban
A case in po;nt. I am now
convinced, is the 1974 Federal
Ekct.on Campaign Act (FECA;
for which Common Ca'jse takes
-..sd.it and responsibility
Ft* FECA. which M hailed as
the American response to Wa-
tergate, is now labeled 'The
Great Post-Watergate Reform
Han" according to Nat Hen-
"/.'.. "the most dangerous as-
sault on the democratic political
process in the history of the
republic." Strong words indeed.
when it is considered that so
many liberal politicians and the
liberal press are enthusiastic
about it. Fred Harris, the pop-
ulist spokesman among the
dozen or so Democratic presi-
dential hopefuls, calls FECA "a
revolution in American politics
. Ordinary people finally have
a fighting chance against the
ITTs and the Gulf Oil com-
panies. This thing cuts the rich
and the friends of the rich down
to size"
Strange words, too, in light
of the enthusiasm of the Nation-
al Association of Manufacturers
for the "reform." It has in-
formed its members that cor-
porations are permitted under
the law to set up segregated
funds based on "voluntary" con-
tributions which can be con-
tributed both to candidates and
to political committees. Just as
strange bedfellows are in oppo-
sition:
Conservative Sen. James
Buckley, liberal former Sen.
Eugene McCarthy, the Missis-
sippi Republican Party. Stewart
Mott. the wealthy funder of
liberal candidates and causes,
the American Conservative
Union, the New York Civil
Liberties Union, and several
others of diverse interests and
ideology who brought the suit
which the Supreme Court re-
cently passed on for decision at
a later date. My suspicion is
that the law will be allowed to
function for the 1976 election
on the grounds it is too late t
do anything about it and that;
will be all from a court afraid i
to decide.
The issues at stake are many,
not only the mistaken (if notI
fraudulent) notion that the rich
are cut down to size. It is pos-1
sible. the American Civil Liber
ties Union points out in a new
pamphlet, for 10 executives at
an oil company to each con-
tribute $25,000 to the "volun-
tary" political fund. The fund
can then distribute $5,000
apiece to the re-election cam-
paign of 50 favorite congress-
men. Multiply that by 10 oil
companies and the industry has
poured a total of $2.5 million at
S50.000 each to their favorites.
On the other hand, the pamphlet
states. "If one well-to-do backer
of a minority party wanted to
give $1,500 to its congressional,
candidate, the law makes that a
crime." So much for money.
More important it seems to
me is the attack on the First
Continued on Page 13-A
"eJewish Floridian
OFFICE AND PLANT -120 N.E. 6th STREET TELEPHONE S73-4*
.'.O. Box OI-l'973. Miami. Florida JSlOt
eS /S2S5! LBO M1NDUN SELMA U. THOMPSON
and Publisher Associate Editor Altant to PubU.*-
o*t F'oria?an P Not Guaranty Tlr Kaartrvtk
P,.Mi^h J Me~Jndiae Advertiaatf In Ita Column.
PMbllh^d,v*o-Friday sine. 1S7 by The Jewish FlorMlMl
_________________fc^cond-Claw Postage Paid at Miami. Fla.
^.molT'of MTfjSLtai" bor>a JMM Unity and MM JcwiM ***
Smt8mSL& mSH e. Te'OrPh.*c Agency. Seven Art. Faatura Syn*-
Volume 49
Friday, January 2, 1976
Number 531
29 TEVENTH 5736
M-44-7*
M..l--?
M-1-J-7S


=s II Friday, January 2, 1976
+Jewlst)fhrkn&n
Page 5-A
Continued from Page 1-A
er sign a peace agreement with
Jordan unless it contained a
solution of the Palestinian
question.
Solution Steps Outlined
Former Foreign Minister
Abba Eban, who addressed the
American Protessors for Peace
in the Middle East Thursday
night, agreed that a Palestinian
solution should be sought in
negotiations with Jordan or
Lebanon or both. But he advo-
cated Israel's withdrawal from
most of the Arab territories it
occupied in the Six-Day War
with only slight changes in the
pie-June, 1967, map which
would take into account human
and population considerations
rather than stretches of land.
Khan said that in exchange
for a genuine peace pact, Israel
should be ready to give up most
of the Golan Heights, part of
the West Bank, excluding East
Jerusalem, part of the Jordan
Valley and most of Sinai up to
the Kaffah salient. According
to Eban, the "one-sided" ap-
proach of Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger has "run
out of gas." He said the time
has come for a mutual Israeli-
American position opposed to
the Syrian-Soviet attitude.
Eban warned that Israel must
embark on a diplomatic offen-
sive aimed at the Geneva
conference, where an overall
settlement with the Arabs would
have to be worked out. Kissin-
ger's present piecemeal ap-
proach only weakens Israel, he
said.
ILP's Views Stated
The Independent Liberal Par-
ty, a partner in Premier Yitz-
hak Kabin's coalition govern-1
ment, approved a resolution at
a party executive meeting in'
Tel Aviv, calling on the govern-
ment to recognue the rights of
Palestinians on the West Bank
to national self-determination.
1I.P leader Moshe Kol, Minister
of Tourism in Rabin's Cabinet, J
proposed round-table talks be-
tween Israel, Jordan and the!
Palestinians of the West Bank.
The resolution made it clear
that the objective of such talks
should be a solution involving
territory on both banks of the
Jordan and that the negotiat-
ing partners, in addition to Jor-
dan, should be any recognized
Palestinian leadership that ac-
cepts the existence of Israel.
Another section of tlu resolu-
tion urged some type of con-
federation between Israel and
I Jordan.
Rules Out Talks With PLO
Defense Minister Shinon Pe-
[ res has also been speaking of
j late of offering extensive au-
tonomy to West Bank Arabs.
But in an interview published
in the Paris newspaper France-
Soir, Peres oil ;d out Israeli ne-
gotiations with the PLO under
any circumstances.
He maintained that even if
PLO recognized Israel and agreed to
negotiate wua it directly, Ara-
fat was in no position to speak
>n the name of. the PLO, which,
according tq Pares, embraces
extremist terrorist groups "head-
ed by George Habash, aif Ha-
watme and Ahmed Jibril whe
demand nothing less than the
dismemberment of Israel. "We
cannot enter into relations with
an organization whose aim is
still the liquidation of the Jew-
ish State," Peres said.
Peres reiterated his earlier
proposals to place local govern-
ment administration on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip in
the lianus ot local Arao lead-
ers elected by the population
of those areas. He even envis-
aged a "European formula"
embracing a "common market"
and open frontiers between Is-
rael and a semi-autonomous
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
But he adamantly ruled out
a Palestinian national state be-
tween Israel and Jordan which,
he claimed, would be open to
Soviet influence close to the
vital centers of Israel.
Review Israeli Arabs' Situatiaon
Labor Party Secretary Gen-
eral Meir Zarmi announced that
he would shortly convene a
meeting of the Labor Party bu-
reau for an in-depth review of
policy toward Israel's Arab
population. Zarmi took a very
serious view of the Dec. 9 mu-
nicipal elections in Nazareth,
the largest Arab city in Israel,
where a Communist backed
slate headed by Tewfik Zaid
won a landslide victory over
the Labor Party candidate
Labor Party experts on Arab
affairs view the Nazareth re-
sults as having serious national
tducator To Address
Booh Group
Dr. Levi Soshuk, Jewish edu-
cator and former head of all
Hebrew programs in the New
aI City sch001 system, will
address the Great Jewish Books
Y'scussion Group on Thursday,
Jan- 15, at 1:30 p.m. at the Mi-
am; Beach Public Library. He
will discuss "Gates of Bronze"
by Haim Hazaz.
ought
implications. The Communist
slate clearly benefited from
burgeoning nationalistic senti-
ments among the Israeli Arab
population which had been do-
cile and more or less apolitical
until the Yom Kippur War.
Labor's main concern is the
effect the Nazareth elections
will have on Israel's national
elections in 1977. Israeli Arabs
comprise 9 percent of the elec-
torate and if they vote en bloc,
could elect 11 MKs out of 120
making them a potential power
greater than that of the Na-
tional Religious Party.
Attitudes Unlikely To Change
Shmuel Toledano, Rabin's ad-
visor on Arab affairs, did not
think it likely that Israelis
would change their attitude to-
ward the Arab minority under
the present political circum-
stances. He said the attitude of
the Jewish population was be-
yond the gi"ernment's control
and was affected by Palestinian
nauwiuiiS'ii across the borders
which most Israelis see as the
greatest threat confronting the
State.
The newly elected Nazareth
City Council held its first meet-
ing Friday under the chairman-
ship of Mayor Zaid. He report-
edly invited the six minority
Labor and NRP council mem-
bers tojoinhimin an aii-t'action
coalition, but local observers
doubted that his invitation
would be accepted.
Anti-Semitism
Seen Growing
In Argentina

NEW YORK(JTA) The
kidnapping last month and the
reports in Buenos Aires news-
papers of the torturing of Mrs.
Mirta Judewicz, a teacher at the
I. L. Peretz School in Buenos
Aires, is part of a continuing
high level of anti-Semitism in
Argentina, according to Rabbi
Morton M. Rosenthal, director
of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith's department of
Latin American affairs.
"Guardia Restauradora Na-
cionalista Antisemita," the
group which reportedly com-
mitted the atrocity, told Mrs.
Judewicz they plan to take
similar action against other
members of the Argentine Jew-
ish community.
RABBI ROSENTHAL said
that after members of the ICUF,
the federation of Jewish cul-
tural entities, denounced the at-
tack to a group of national
tlenuties. all members of the
Union Civica Radical, the cen-
trists, condemned the assault
and called for creation of a bi-
cameral federal commission to
investigate acts of violence
which are plaguing Argentina.
The attack on the school
teacher coincided with the re-
surgence of anti-Semitic propa-
ganda sold on Buenos Aires
newspaper stands, Rabbi Rosen-
thai reported. He said that one
magazine, "El Guardian de la
Soberania Nacional" (The
Guardian of National Sovereign-
ty), for example, has sought to
revive the discredited "Andinia
Plan," an alleged plot to create
a Jewish state in southern Ar-
gentina.
THE MAGAZINE falsely
claims that Jewish leaders have
recruited military personnel to
launch an insurrection.
An article in another typical
publication, "Milicia," a maga-
zine linked to Argentine Nazis,'
charged that "Judaism and
Marxism constitute the liberal-
bourgeois vanguard of interna-
tional Zionism," Rabbi Rosen-
thai said.
Adath Yeshurun
Welcoming Collegians
Temple Adath Yeshurun will
welcome its college students at
late services this evening. Sev-
eral students will participate by
delivering short addresses on
the theme "The Future of Amer-
ican Jewry As We See It."
"Show me how I can
automatically receive an
interest check every month!'
And we will.
Because, after all, your savings and the interest it earns are yours!
Which is why at Financial Federal, we compound that interest
on a daily basis (so even your interest earns interest). And pay it every
month. By mail, directly to you, if you so desire.
So look for our smile. We'll be looking for yours.


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/


Page 6-A
+Jeniii for id for
Friday, January 2, 1975!
British Chief Rabbi Is
'Hopeful9 About Soviet Jewry
By MARK SIEGAL
LONDON (JTA) Chief Rabbi of the British Com-
monwealth Immanuel Jakobovits said on Dec. 25 that his
nine-day visit to the Soviet Union, from which he has just
returned, gave him "reason to be hopeful" about the situa-
tion of Soviet Jewry and taught him that "the circumstances
of Soviet Jewry ... are much more complex than the sim-
plistic view taken by so many here."
In an exclusive interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency the Chief Rabbi said,
"There is a need for thorough
and careful reappraisal of attit-
udes and priorities."
He spoke of his meetings with
Soviet officials and various
ministries and of his visits to the
rhree largest Jewish commu-
nities in the USSR Moscow,
Leningrad and Kiev. "I was
tremendously uplifted by their
struggle to preserve Yiddishkeit
which is an inspiration to the
world," he said.
Jakobovits was invited to the
Soviet Union by the leader of
the Jewish congregation in Mos-
cow. He was accompanied by
Moshe Davis, director of the
Chief Rabbi's Office in London.
JAKOBOVITS was the first
spiritual leader of a Western
Jewish community to visit the
USSR in an official capacity. He
described his experience as
"both exhilarating and harrow-
ing."
He told the JTA that at the
outset of his tour he spent sev-
eral hours at the Soviet Minis-
try of Cults in Moscow with
Viktor Titov, deputy chairman
of the religious affairs depart-
ment.
At Titov's suggestion he met
with Col. Ovchinikov, deputy
director of the Interior Minis-
try's visa and registration de-
partment.
The Chief Rabbi said their
1 talk focused on the question of
reunification of families. He
said the official explained the
procedure and criteria for is-
suing visas. Jakobovits said,
"They gave us reason to be
hopeful ... We tried to bring
home to them that if they re-
move the cause of complaints,
they will find the Jewish world
responsive."
Jakobovits said, "I am not an
expert after nine davs, and I
only met 1,000 out of millions of
Jews, but the situation is more
complex and the dimensions
more acute than Qne imagines."
THE HARROWING aspects of
his tour were on his visits to
Babi Yar, site of the Nazi mas-
sacre of Kiev Jewry in World
War II, and to the monument
in Leningrad to the 680,000 per-
sons who died of starvation in
that city during the German
siege. "One realizes the mas-
sive role played by the Russians
in defeating Nazism, one per-
ceives anew that the Russians
and the Jews suffered more
than any other peoples from
the Nazis," Jakobovits said.
He described his Sabbath at
the Moscow Synagogue, where
the worshipers included promi-
nent Jewish activists, including
Prof. Alexander Lerner. The
Chief Rabbi also addressed a
scientific seminar for dismissed
Jewish scientists at the home
of Prof. Mark Azbel in Moscow.'
He said they told him, "We are
being scientifically killed. This
is death for us. All contacts
with the outside world are life- j
giving."
Jakobovits said he gained the
impression that his visit was ai
momentous occasion for the'
Jewish scientists who were*
stripped of their professional
posts after applying for exit
visas.
Israel Disturbed by Egypt's
Move to Make Arms
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Of-
ficials in Jerusalem have ex-
pressed deep concern at reports
of Egypt's plans to establish a
massive armaments industry.
These reports have been lent
new currency by the Valery Gis-
card D'Estaing visit to Egypt in
which the French President con-
fered with Sadat on French
technical help to set up the
projected arms industry.
According to western sources,
the Egyptian plans call for an
$8 billion investment, most of
it to come from Arab oil states.
BY THE 1980's. Egypt hopes
to have an indigenous industry
that will be able to manufacture
or assemble the most up-to-date
weaponry.
In the interim, Egypt pro-
poses to buy from the west the
present generation of weapons
to complement its existing So-
viet equipment.
Israeli experts outline three
distinct phases in Egypt's weap-
on planning:
In the short range. Egypt
must look to Russia and the So-
viet bloc countries for senicins
and spares to maintain the
quality of its existing equip-
ment, nearly all of Eastern
Origin. At the same time,
though, Egypt is buying from
the west electronics equipment
and other items which can in-
tegrate into its Soviet-based sys-
tems;
In the intermediate range,
Egypt plans to purchase present-
generation western equipment
for instance Mirage 3's and
Mirage F-1S. from France and
Sea-King and Gazelle helicop-
ters from Britain, as well as
naval equipment;
In the long range, with the
help of Arab oil money and
western known-how and tech-
nology, Egypt plans to set up
its own armaments industry
able to supply it with the weap-
ons of the 1980's.
THERE ARE reportedly plans
for French technicians to be
stationed in Egypt shortly in
order to prepare the ground for 1
arms factories there.
The Israeli officials said the j
Major French contribution to'
these Egyptian plans could hard-1
ly be seen as a contribution to'
the peace option.
President Sadat had recently
said that he had by no means
abandoned the war option
and the French support he is
apparently to receive would help
him maintain that option, the
officials said.
Ral>!)i Wallenberg
To Lead
Pilgrimage
Rabbi Solomon H. Walden
Ix tual leader of the Is-I
rael t< temple, will lead I
a pilgrimage in mid-May to Is>
rael and Amsterdam, where the
group will visit the home of!
Anne Frank to pay homage to
her heroism and memory.
There will be a meeting at
the Temple on Thursday, Jan. 8,
at 8 p.m. A film giving the high-
lights of the trip will be shown,
and a representative of El-Al
Airlines will answer questions.
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Dispute Settled

TEL AVIV JTA A dis-
pute over the location of an
Egyptian advance-warning sur-
veillance post in Sinai was set-
tled today at a meeting between
Israeli and Egyptian officers
held in the UN buffer zone un-
der the chairmanship of Gen.
Ensio Silvasio, commander of
UN peacekeeping forces in th.l
area. "I
The dispute, which arose over I
discrepancies between the fa '
raeli and Egyptian maps re
suited in the postponement of
the arrival of 200 Egyptian tech.
nicians and workers at the site
to build the listening post in th*
Gidi Pass region.
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%& Why can't
FPL absorb the
fuel adjustment
costs?
A The price of fuel oil has
skyrocketed to a point
where it now costs FPL
three times what it did in 1972. The
average cost per day has risen from
$334,000 to over $1,000,000. The
cost of fuel now comprises 59% of
our total operating costs.
To give you a clearer idea of
what these figures mean, the price we
fk
Vi
paid tor fuel oil last year was 3
times greater than our payroll
expense and more than three times
our total net income for the same
year. That's why there's the fuel
ud/iUumenr charge on Vur electric
bill. However, we don't keep one cent
or that money, it all goes to help pay
the fuel bill. We don't like paying
that much money for fuel any more
than you do.
We're doing all we can to keep
the cost of your electric bill down.
L hat s one reason we're building
more nuclear poWer plantS; Nuclear
fuel is the least expensive source of
energy available to us today.
Uing you know is a part of our responsibility.
*
FLOR.DA POWER & LIGHTCcSSny
reople...serving people.


[Friday, January 2, 176
+JewHtifk)ridRar
Page 7-A
9
"We can't blame
you for thinking that
the people of Israel
can do the impossible.
After all, look at the record.
They've made water flow in the desert,
they've raised crops from barren rock
The Ve held off armies 10 times their size.
And, amidst all their problems, managed to
find the time and space to welcome nearly
two million immigrants.
But in 1976 these miracles are taking a
terrible toll
Every working man and woman in Israel is
now being taxed 60% of their salary.
Large families are crowded into tiny
apartments.
Our job is to make children strong,
care for new immigrants, enable the aged
to live in dignity.
from the people of Israel we ask the
impossible
from you we ask the possible.
o
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal
and Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard,.Miami-, Florida 33137
Phone: 576-4000


Page
r
8-A
*3ei$lhfk)rktian
Friday, January 2, 1976
Israel Still Hedging on Jan. 12 Debate
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has said that it will
continue to respect the presence of the United Nations Dis-
engagement Observer Force (UNDOF) on the Golan Heights
but would not cooperate with the Security Council's Middle
East debate scheduled to begin next Jan. 12.
The government's position was stated in a communique
issued following an extraordinary six-and-a-half-hour Cab-
inet session.
IT WAS convened to consider
the vote by the Security Coun-
cil to extend the UNDOF man-
date for six months while at
the same time acquiescing to
Syria's demand for a debate
on the Palestinian issue in
which the Palestine Liberation
Organization would be invited
to participate.
The communique said the
government negated the linkage
between the renewal of the UN-
DOF mandate and "foreign ele-
ments" incorporated into that
decision.
The Cabinet s statement was,
in effect, a reiteration of Israel's
position that the UNDOF man-
date is an integral part of the
1974 Israeli-Syrian disengage-
ment accord and is completely
separata from any other mat-
teis including debate on the
Palestinian issue.
THE COMMUNIQUE said Is-
rael would continue to honor
the existence of UNDOF on the
basis of the 1974 separation of
forces agreement which was
still valid.
It stressed that the latter
agreement included the com-
mitment to avoid terrorist ac-
tions across the disengagement
lines and declared that Israel
held Syria responsible for im-
plementation of the agreement
in all of its parts.
The communique served no-
tice that Israel would take nec-
essary security measures along
its northern border and, in that
confjxt, the ministerial settle-
ments committee was authoriz-
At the observance of Human Rights Day chairman Ellen
Mandler (2nd from left) explained the plight of the "Or-
phans of the Aliyah" Soviet Jews trapped inside Rus-
sia to Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Di-
vision leaders Sandy Lcfkowitz (left), Bobbie Lift (2nd
from right) and Nancy Goldstein (right). The women
participated in the Dec. 10 program, "Women's Plea for
Human Rights," focusing attention on the Orphans. On
December 10, 1948, the UN adopted its Declaration of
Human Rights, to which the Soviet Union was a signator.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Luck met with Israel's former
Prime Minister Golda Meir (center) at a private event
on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The Lucks, who live in Miami Beach, recently returned
from the World Leadership Conference in London,
where they represented Miami's Jewish community.
Hans H. Marcuse
Louis Witkin
To assure you of a I
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531-4114
ed to decide on the establish-
ment of additional settlements
on the Golan Heights.
ISRAEL WARNED the Se-
curity Council that the resolu-
tion which contained an impli-
cit invitation to the PLO to
participate in the Jan. 12 de-
bate could jeopardize peace ef-
forts in the Middle East. Israel
stated that it continues to base
its policy on Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338, nei-
ther of which makes any refer-
ence to the Palestinian issue.
The communique quoted the
Better Attend
Debate Kissinger
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer has confirmed that he
had "indicated" to the Israeli
government that "it would be
better served" if it participated
in the Security Council's Mid-
dle East debate on Jan. 12 which
Israel has announced it would
boycott because the Palestine
Liberation Organization was in-
vited.
Kissinger said, at the same
time, it was "of course clear"
that Israel's repressntative
"would not wish to be in the
room while the PLO delegate is
actually spe^kin-j."
HE MADE his comments in;
the course of a 70-minute press i
conference it the State Depart-1
ment whicl was devoted almost
exclusively to issues involved
in the second SALT agreement
with the Soviet Union and
brought only one question about
the Middle East.
The Secretary used that ques-
tion to reaffirm in strong terms
that there has been absolutely"
no shift in U.S. policy toward
the PL ) despit! its admitt id
pressure on [31*9?] to reconsider
its boycott of the upcoming Se-
curity Council debate.
"We will not deal not ne- i
gotiate with the PLO as Ions
as the PLO does not ncc:r>t UN'
Security Council Resolutions
24' and 33S," Kissinger said.
"That will be our attitude dur-
ing the Security Council debate.
1 would like to stress again that
the U.S. considers relevant for!
debate only Resolutions 242 and
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338 and we will not accept any
resolution that tries to intro-
duce any element that goes be-
yond 242 and 338," he declared.
THE QUESTION on the Mid-
dle East at the news conference
was in two parts. The first asked
Kissinger to confirm reports
that he had asked Israel to re-
consider its Security Council
boycott, which the Secretary did.
campus. While we make every
The second part asked if
there was anv indication that
the PLO is -shifting away from
its position of non-recognition
of Israel's right to exist. Kissin-
ger did not respond to that part
of the question.
recent Knesset decision that Is-
rael would not have any deal-
ings whatsoever with the PLO
and would not participate in
the Geneva conference if the
PLO was invited there. The
Cabinet's communique was ap-
proved unanimously.
IT WAS learned, however,
that differences of opinion
were expressed by various
ministers during the lengthy
debate. Five dove-ish ministers
two from Mapam, two from
the Independent Liberal Party
and Labor's Avraham Offer
are known to have suggested
that Israel modify its position
with regard to the Palestinians
by stating its readiness to nego-
tiate with any Palestinian group
that recognized Israel's sover-
eignty and renounced terror-
ism. A decision on that propo-
sal was postponed.
At the same time, hawk-ish
Cabinet ministers pressed for
an intensive new settlement
program on the Golan as Is-
rael's answer to the Security
Council vote and they ap-
pear to have won out.
With only Mapam and Offer
opposing, the Cabinet authoriz-
ed its settlement committee to
decide on new settlements on
the Golan and this in ef-
fect means thr green light for
four nsw settlements which
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*


Friday, January 2, 1976
VJewlsti rkridficin
Page 9-A
GJA-IEF Launches 1976 Campaign

,* continued from Page 1-A
a community of 250,000 Jews
with the responsibility of as-
suring a decent quality of life
ior Israel's people, and for all
Jews whose welfare and dignity
is challenged.'
Arkin pointed out that CJA-
1SF is not a charitv, but rather
a responsibility which Jewish
people have accepted for thou-
gands of years as a part of being
Jewish. It is "Tzedakah" the
r-inciple of social justice for
?.ll Jews guaranteed by all Jews
__ that has been a key factor
in binding Jews together as one
reople since the time of Abra-
ham.
"Todav, some American Jew?
feel that United States aid to
Israel decreases the need for
c-mpaigns like CJA-IEF," said
Arkin. "To that I have to say
that we can't confuse military
aid with support to humanitar-
ian programs.
US aid is vital to Israel's
ability to defend itself. Yet the
vast majority of that aid is for
military hardware and it's
~pent right here in American
ndustry. CJA-IEF funds must
-M-ovide humanitarian services
.iirectly to the people of Israel.'
Along with programs of i-nmi-
.ration and absorption, which
-.able Israel's pooulition tc
crow and prosper, the resource*
vided bv CJA-IEF support
urgent social welfare, health.
ication and training pro-
. "IS.
Here in Dade Countv."
Arkin said, "our goal is to make
community a belt"- nine?
all of us by providing
,ie score of more than 25 local
mcies and ser-iccs that are
itally needed. The 1975 Cnm-
ralgn c:nrated $13 m:lhon
and, with this Jewish commu-
nity's support, w are able f>
--ovid" hot m~als to eHerlv
Jews who might otherwise ro
hungry. We make possible medi-
cal care for the indigent. Jew-
ish education for youth, from
pre-school through college. And
there are professional count-
ing programs for the troubled
of all ages, spiritual comfort,
recreation and cultural pro-
grams, and a wide range of
Cher services.
"This is the life-savine tpm*
ro-t m^" possible bv CJA-IEF
collars. Yet while the same dol-
lars buv less service in 1976, the
neds for which we must pro-
vide are greater!
"We can't cut back," he said.
' \nd so CJA-IEF must be even
r*"*e effective than it has been
before. The goal this year will
not be set in dollars, because
the needs are unlimited. The
slogan we are using to stat
that thi" vear is 'IF YOU
THINK ALL OUR PROW JEMS
ARE SOLVED, THINK AGAIN!'
'Our objective will be to get
the message of Jewish respon-
5 bilitv and the meaning of
r.'surine the aualitv and dign'tv
of Jewish life through CJA-IEF
through to every Jewish
household in Greater Miami.
"If that is accomnlished," he
concluded, "and if each Jew
understands what we mean
when we say that 'We Are One,'
ihen our campaign cannot heln
but succeed in t'Vs Bicentennial
year."
Advisors to the Chairman for
1976 will be Miami industrialist
Robert Russell, a GMJF Past
President currently serving as
?. National United Jewish Ap-
peal Chairman, and Miami
Beach builder Harry A. Levy,
a Federation Vice President
who himself served as CJA-IEF
Chairman in 1972 and 1973.
Members of the Campaign
Steering Committee are Levy
and Russell along with GMJF
immediate Past President David
B. Fleeman, Women's Division
Campaign Chairman Mrs. Sol
Goldstein, Arthur Horowitz,
Pacesetter Chairman Norman
H. Lipoff, Stephen Muss, How-
ard R. Scharlin, Missions Chair-
man Kenneth J. Schwartz, Presi-
dent Harry B. Smith and Eli
Timoner.
Levy will also superise the
work of the campaign's Advance
Gifts Division, led by a Manage-
ment Team of Morris N. Broad,
Dr. Sol Center. Mclvin L. Kartz-
mer, Gerald Ross, Kenneth
Schwartz, Jerry Sussman and
Leonard A. Wein, Jr.
Top leaders in other major
campaign divisions are Samuel
I. Adler and Herbert Sadkin
(heading the Builders and Al-
lied Trades), Richard S. Wolf
son (Campaign Chairman for
Westview Country Club), Mor
ris Futernick (Campaign Chair
man for the South Dade area)
and Federation Executive Vice
President Myron J. Brodie.
Harry A. Levy
Robert Russell
David B. Fleeman
Norman H. Lipoff
Mrs. Sol Goldstein Arthur Horowitz
Mel Kartzmer
Gerald Ross Jerry Sussman Leonard A. Wien, Jr. Samuel I. Adler
Herbert Sadkin
Sabotage Courses in Prison
Richard S. Wolfson
Morris Futernick
Myron J. Brodie
TEL AVIV (JTA) Po-
lice Commissioner Aryeh Nir
nas admitted that terrorist in-
mates in the Ramleh Central
Prison have been conducting
courses on sabotage and terror-
ists acts for fellow-inmates in-
side the prison walls.
The courses, which involved
about 20 prisoners, some of
whom were forced to partici-
pate, according to Nir, included
written instructions on how to
prepare explosive charges, how
to make home-made bombs,
how to plant explosives on
roads, and lists of chemicals
that could be purchased and
used to produce explosives.
THE COURSES were con-
ducted with two improvised,
handwritten "textbooks" which
contained detailed diagrams
and illustrations. They were
prepared by inmates who were
accomplished sappers, the pris-
on commissioner said.
The clandestine classes in le-
thal devices were uncovered
after one prisoner was stabbed
and seriously wounded during
a movie show at the prison.
The incident led to a search
of the cells which uncovered 10
improvised knives made from
ground-down strips, including a
spoon handle, three improvised
brass knuckles, one of them
made from a bent fork, two in-
struction books and $90 in trav-
elers checks, Nir said.
SECURITY SOURCES noted
that increased terrorist activi-
ties in the administered terri-
tories was reflected in a num-
ber of cases now before mili-
tary tribunals.
Forty-four young Arabs from
Nablus are facing charges of
organizing terorist cells in the
Samaria district of the West
Bank. The accused, members of
four different cells, were ap-
prehended before they could
carry out any acts of sabotage.
In Gaza, six terrorists and
the night watchman at a citrus
packaging plant owned by an
Israeli, Joseph Kami, have been
charged by a military tribunal
with setting fire to the plant
which employed local Arabs.
The watchman was an accom-
plice, possibly under duress,
because it was he who called the
lire brigade after the terrorists
fled the scene.
ANOTHER SIX terrorists,
four of them brothers, are fac-
ing a military tribunal in con-
nection with an elaborate plan
to take over an Israeli textile
plant where three of the broth-
ers were employed.
According to the charges,
they planned to murder fellow
employees, take hostages and
threaten to blow up the plant
unless certain demands were
met.
The ring leader was identi-
fied as Mouhammed El Alouni,
22, who left Gaza to study in
Lebanon last year and was re-
cruited by the Popular Fr< il
for the Liberation of Palestine
and trained in terrorist tech-
arrested before they were able
to put their plan into effect.
DURING THE trial of the si*,
the prosecutor noticed a fan-i-
liar face in the courtroom.
Referring to a police identifi-
cation kit prepared on the ba-
sis of testimony by one of t i
brothers, the suspect was idt n
tified as the gang's contact m <
in the Judaea region and was
arrested before he could leave
the court.
New Officers At
Temple Adath Yeshurun
Temple Adath Yeshurun In*
elected its new board of dirtc
tors. The chairman of the boa d
is Gary Holtzman and coehalr
man of the board is Hows id
Marks.
The officers and directors a.t
elected for one year. The char
man of the board for the II St
four years is Morris Katz, w'i;
four years was Morris Katz, wlio
the congregation.
------------------------------- ,
Berkowitz At Emanu-EI
Rabbi William Berkowitz, im-
mediate past president of t !.c
New York Board of Rabbis, w tl
be guest speaker during the lrle
Fridav evening service at Tem-
ple Emanu-EI. His subject is
"Frankly Speaking, Comment
and Opinion."


M
9

Program
For Moms
A YOUNG Jewish mother who complained to a Jewish com-
A mumty center official that she suffered from "the peanut
butter blue." sparked a program in Los Angelas which provides
baby-sitters so that the mothers can participate in cultural and
intellectual programs.
The development of the Young Mothers Morning Program
at the Westside JCC of Los Angeles was described by Jane Post,
the centers adult social-educstion coordinator, in the current
issue of -Program Aids." a quarterly publication of the Na-
tional Jewish Welfare Board.
MS. POST said the young woman who sought her out two
years ago had quit the professional world to become a wife,
mother and housekeeper and that she had indicated she felt
keenly the need and the difficulty of maintaining her personal
identity, finding happiness in a new life role and in develop-
ing new inter-personal relationships outside of her family.
Out of that discussion. Ms. Post reported; came the real-
feation among center officials that many Jewish young women
had such problems and would probably respond to a program
designed to meet those needs.
THEY AGREED that the first major problem for the young
mother was: "what do. I do with my infant since reliable sib
tars are hard to find?" One of the first elements/ of the new
center program was arrangements to make baby-sitting services
available at the center for toddlers10 months to three years
of age. Children over three years could be enrolled at the cen-
ter's nursery school.
On the premise that the young mothers needed outlets for
physical as well as intellectual expression, the daily program
provides for an hour foe body-ego movement, yoga and folk
dance. For the second hour, the participants join in intellectual
aad cultural programs which they help develop, including book
reviews, child development discussions, Jewish holiday work-
shops, craft activities and rap sessions on growth and'identity;
BABY-SITTERS in the program, who receive training, are
supervised by volunteers from the center's women's service
league. The sitters must have a che6t X-ray and a note from
their doctors that they are physically fit Each participating
other is asked t bring toys, bottles and cookies if she wants
her child to have them. The toys are left at the center and
(He different groups of children share them.
Two important elements of the program, turned out to- be
ftees and Jewish content Determination of fees involved recog-
nition of the fact that young families often have financial prob-
lems. Initially, a registration fees of $3 was charged women
who were not center members. Each participant paid $1.23
weekly for baby sitting for each child and 50 cents a week for
trie dance program. Fees were collected monthly.
AS COSTS rose, the matter was discussed with the par-
ticipants. Currently, Ms. Post reported, the fees for the 13-ses-
sion programs are $10 for a center member and $20 tor a non-
member, without baby-sitting; and $28 for a member and $40
for a non-member with baby-sitting.
Ms. Post reported 12 women registered for the first semes-
ter of the opening program. When a second semester- wa6 of-
fered, 30 women registered immediately, the maximum number
planned for. A waiting list was started. Currently, three groups
function each week plu6 a group at another facility.
IT DEVELOPED that almost all of the women had little or
o Jewish experience m their homes "and initially there was
resistance in moving in that direction." Despite the fact that
priorities at the center are "very high" around Jewish identity
and Jewish survival, no pressure was used, Ms. Post reported.
But the discussions during the sessions often turned to
Jewish matters and, in response, Ms. Post offered the women
an opportunity to meet with a resource person.
For example, the women questioned the relevance of Ju-
daism and its rituals and indicated they wanted to talk out their
feelings with someone.
MS. Post reported that verbal evaluations are held reg-
ularly to "keep the program viable and relevant"
Friday, January 2, 1976 kmsi Ihrilnr "age 10-A


j "'"'*'!
I

I
ay Since When is W
Sri A Four Letter Word?
"VOW THAT longevity is being mass-produced
m America by medical science, om in every
10 of our countrymen and countrywomen is
65 and over. And of these gray heads, at least
one in every four lives below the government-
drawn line of poverty.
As the centurv grows nearer to a close, the
percentage of. elders will be even higher. And
all us deeply concerned about the manifold
problems of aging surely hope that the num-
ber, of gerontological centers in our major uni-
versities (there are 20 now) will increase.
FOR THE Jewish community, nurtured, by
grand Biblical passages dealing with beloved
people attaining great age and traditionally
committed to caring tenderly for the infirm and
lonely among its. ancients, added insights about
aging are always welcome. Such revelations
abound in a remarkable new book, "Old is Not
a Four-Letter Word!", written by Jean Beaven
Abernethy and published by the Abington Press.
Reading and rereading Mrs. Abernethy's
reflections on the dilemmas, fears, hopes, and
opportunities of contemporary elders, one is
convinced she has gleaned the best of most-
modern works in the field.
SHE IS factual, yet touchingty inspiration-
al; unafraid of jolting truths about neglect of
older people, yet respectful of all efforts made
.
t0 .ift through the deprivations and shocks
by the aging. She brings a harvest of wis-
and advice for those who want to live
fruitfully and in dignity to the end and pro-
1S bravelv and sensibly that while the aging
process has its own stern timetable, there is
much we can do about how we accept this cold
inevitability. .....___
Mrs Abernethv assigns herself the challenge
to answer two basic questions: 1-How does a
person maintain a sense of one's own worth
considering society's negative attitude toward
aging? 2What does an individual need to
learn which will be appropriate for the later
vears?
IN RESPONSE to the first challenge, the
author points out that growing old in this era
of four-generation families can mean growing
new: that elders can opt for the positive ex-
pectation; that the 22 million who are 65 and
over can refuse to withdraw, can fight such
harsh societal fates as mandatory retirement
and discrimination in such areas as credit
rights. That old monster, Society, i* not invin-
cible; Gray Power is a new and influential army
in America.
So much, then, that modern*' who frown
upon categorization as Senior Citizens and
cringe a little when labeled as Golden Agers,
can do on die plus side.
Lives of the Generations
In the Kibbutzim of Israel
'Si- ^^^m .
f^m t>-
Vf '**!
Hr rfJWwP-t-a ?fl
1
jiFW

^
&
MSUH
n~ff
Lionel Tiger and- Joseph Shepher. WOMEN IN
THE KIBBUTZ. Harcourt $1.95.
4 NTHROPOLOGISTS Tiger and Shepher ex-
plore the lives of several generations of
women in kibbutzim in Israel They maintain
that "the study of the kibbutz is promising
ground for understanding sex differences every-
where and their impact on the division of la-
bor."
This in-depth survey involves interviews,
questionnaires, and the creation of a mathe-
matical formula for determining sex ratio dif-
ferences between populations.
THE AUTHORS present us with a candid
picture of aU aspects of the kibbutz. Its eco-
nomics, agriculture, politics, education, military
services and family life, as well as a historical
survey.
From the early years of kibbutzim, women
have been taught to believe that boys and girls
are equal. Equal rights means equal work. How-
ever, under the demand for expanded services
for a growing kibbutz-movement population,
women began te move from agricultural
branches to service work.
By the late 1940s, a wider variety of foods
were available, clothing was improving, and
there were children. Kibbutzniks might be able
to treat food and clothing casually, but not the
children who were to be their dream of/.the
future.
THE EFFECT of these new demands; caused
a long, gradual process of sexual polarization
of work. Tiger finds that many women begin
in male work, but move to a sexrtyped job as
their longest or last job. This is more true with
the kibbutz-bred generation, than with those
who came to the kibbutz as adults.
The authors' data about education and
careers confirm what psychological studies
have told them all alcagr "women arc ^ore-
interested than men in interpersonal transac-
tions ... and men prefer impersonal and very
broad activities, which rarely involve small chil-
dren."
THE DISCREPANCY between tV attitude
toward equality and actual behavior causes
soul- searching within tbr kibbutz movement?
today.
An unpopular conclusion of this study is
that it shows what may be a deeply rooted pat-
tern of human behavior. However, this review-
er suggests that what- is equality for one might
be view as inequality by another. The authors
make a related judgment: "people's (read won>
en's) actions are not necessarily the unhappy
performances of the duped and confused," a9
Kate Millett and other feminists insist.
FEW OTHER women enjoy the supportive
facilities available in. the kibbutz. Women in
the kibbutz can be confident that their children
are taken care of and educated; that they, are-
given jobs and economic security*, and that they
are surrounded by a loving extended family.
Can those of us outside the kibbutz be as-
sured of such a future for ourselves and our
children?
f,WIW*JIIKIIWm.ilIMlIWNIl4W,('ltWllHIUI Ui...
rMMMeaMM : "-'' wiMMuai Prime Time on TV in Israel Means a Whole Mock of Arab Beauties

Haifa
ORIME TIME on Israel's single television channel
each evening, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., is devoted
to the Arabic program. It is directed primarily at the
450,000 Arabs and Druzes who live in Israel, and at
the dose to a million who resides in Golan, the West
Bank and Gaza.
The quality of the programs has been so high and
the content so interesting that more and more non-
Arab Israelis have fallen into the habit of tuning in,
and the- Israel Broadcasting Service now runs He-
brew subtitles on many of the Arabic programs.
THESE ARE no crude propaganda, broadcasts. In-
deed, it would appear there are no immediate ob-
jectives beyond the desire to provide this large group
of local residents with entertainment and informa-
tion similar to what the Hebrew speaking population
Carl
a4k
'pert
receives. In the long run. if tljey have confidence in
Israel's TV, and look upon it as their TV, so much
the better.
There is no attempt to argue politics, or to brain-
wash the public. On the other hand, there is no avoid-
ing controversial, subjects, and both. the.good and
negative sides of Israel are shewn.
OUR ARABS can also receive the Lebanese,
Syrian, Jordanian and Egyptian TV broadcasts, de-
pending on what part of Israel they live in, and we
seek to counter their exaggerated criticism with a
balanced picture.
Typical programs: Know Israela. weekly docu-
mentary on life, especially in areas of human inter-
est where there is joint Arab-Jewish interaction.
There is a periodic feature on life in an Arab village,
and the camera, puts the chosen village of the week
on the little screen.
THERE IS a weekly feature on life and culture in
the Islamic world, and an Arab literary program.
They are directed to the intelligent, literate, think-
ing Arabs.
I can add a further observation on, one. aspect of
our Arabic TV: Many of the female announcers are
gorgeous beauties, and fatv outshine their Jewish col-
leagues on the.. Hebrew programs.
'


'
rj
luary 2, 1976
* Jewish fhrktiain
Page 1I-A
ten is W
et(er Word?
he derivations and shocks
g. She brings a harvest of wis-
for those who want to live
dignitv to the end and pro-
d sensibly that while the aging
wn stern timetable, there is
ibout how we accept this cold
y assigns herself the challenge
sic questions: 1How does a
a sense of one's own worth.
y's negative attitude toward
does an individual need to
be appropriate for the later
to the first challenge, the
that growing old in this era
families can mean growing
can opt for the positive ex-
e 22 million who are 65 and
to withdraw, can fight such
es as mandatory retirement
n in such areas as credit
onster, Society; is not invin-
a new and influential army
i, that moderns who frown
on as. Senior Citizens and
en labeled as Golden Agers,
s side.
&
I
usan
fJgnoff
ds that many women begin
move to a sex-typed job as
It job. This is more true with
generation, than with those
kibCmtz as adults,
data about education and
what psychological studifs
I ai<\ig: "women are more-
n in interpersonal transac-
prefer impersonal and very
lich rarely involve small chil-
*NCY between the, attitude
nd acfusl behavior causes
thin the fcibbutz movement-
conclusion of this study is
may be a deeply rooted pat-
avior. However, this review-
af is equality for one might
ty by another. The authors
pnent: "people's (read wom-
ot necessarily the unhappy
e duped and confused," as
her feminists insist,
omen enjoy the supportive
in. the kibbute. Women in
wmfident that their children
ad educated; that they. are-
erne s-curity, and that they
a roving extended1, family,
outside the kibbutz be aa-
ture- for ourselves and our
rs fourth Prime Minister, Mrs. Golda Meir, re-
a bouquet of red roses on her arrival in South
Dec. 16 from Robert L. Siegel (left), general
lign chairman, Greater Miami Israel Bonds Or-
ition, and Moses Hornstein (right) of Hollywood,
lan, Prime Minister's Club and Trustees of Israel
\uth Broward County for the South Florida Israel
Organization.
Hornstein (right) presented the inscribed sterl-
Iver Twelve Tribes of Israel award to Mrs. Meir,
nder of the State of Israel Bonds programs. Mrs.
was honored as "Woman of the Century" at a din-
ttended by 2,2000 men and women representing
Florida's Jewish community on Dec. 17 at the
inebleau Hotel. Over $3 million in Israel Bonds
purchased at the event, which commemorated 25
of State of Israel Bonds.

SANE PRODUCERS Of "WE ARE HERE" LAST SEASON'S SMASH HIT
DIRECT
FROM
NEW YORK'S
MADISON
SQUARE
GARDEN
J0EBRNS4 ELIAS OlSH
PA0UDIVPRESENT
THE AMERICAN
DEBUT OF
H
b Beauties
Fgyptian TV broadcasts, de-
Israel they Uvo in, and we
taggerated criticism with a
low Israela. weekly docu
ly in areas of human inter-
t Arab-Jewish interaction,
e on life in an Arab village,
chosen village of the wee*
*hire on life and culture in
aa Arab literary program.
? intelligent, literate, tbink-
worvanon on one. aspect of
the female announcers are
R outshine their Jewish col-
TQgrams.

:/
\
R(C0WVE THE KSISHOWIWft
TOCOWf fnOMISfUtl If
ISRAEL S MINIS'".' 0' TOURISM
THE MINISTRY 0'
(0UOTI0N A CULTURE
THEMUNKI'AllTf Of
U. AVIV r*fo
m

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1ECT FROM MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
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PECTACULAR 2'i HOUR LIVE PERFORMANCE ON STAGE
I rURTHCR INTO* M ATIOK AND CROUP OISCOUMT CAll CINEMA THCATIW
Former Soviet Hero Speaks
At N.Y. Jewish Rally
NEW YORK (JTA) Naum
Alshansky, a Soviet Jew who
earned one of the USSR's high-
est awards for service in World
War II, was guest speaker at
a luncheon that was a high-
light of a major "Leadership
Conference" sponsored by the
Greater New York Conference
on Soviet Jewry recently at
the Park Avenue Synagogue.
The conference chairman,
Kings County District Attorney
Eugene Gold, said the parley
took a hard, close look at the I
directions and goals of the So-|
viet Jewry movement against I
the backdrop on the UN Gen-|
eral Assembly anti-Zionist reso-;
lution and the stepped up per-
secution of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
GOLD SAID that the "Lead-1
ership Conference" was partic- i
ularly timely in view of the-i
widespread belief that the USSR
will use the infamous UN reso-
lution to justify its anti-Jewish
policies and to create more dif- j
ficult obstacles in the path of ]
emigration.
Alshansky, who attained the!
rank of colonel in 26 years of
military service, was awarded
the Order of the Red Banner'
in World War II. In April, 1971,
he and his wife, Klara, and their I
two children applied to emi- j
grate to Israel. He was stripped;
of his rank and deprived of his i
ftffficer's pension immediately ;
following his application.
AUTHORITIES began a con-
certed campaign of harassment
aimed at Alshansky and his
colleagues Capt. Genadoy Kip-
nis and Col. Efim Davidovich,
all of Minsk. This campaign cul-
minated in threats of a major
trial in May 1973.
More than TOO Jewish activ-
ists were allegedly implicated
in the trial, which was sus- j
Massachusetts
Supports
pended only after publicity in
the West drew loud protests
against the planned persecution.
Kipnis was permitted to emi-
grate after eight months in
prison. Awaiting trial, Alshan-
sky and Davidovich were de-
tained and kept under constant
surveillance.
IN MARCH, 1974, in a dra-
matic gesture, Alshansky form-
ally renounced his Soviet citi-
zenship and handed back his
medals, expressing his protest
at official refusals to allow him
to emigrate to Israel.
The gesture was made at the
reception rooms of the Supreme
Soviet Presidium in Moscow.
This year, the Alshansky family
was finally permitted to emi-
grate to Israel, where they now
reside. He is touring the United
States under the sponsorslrp of
the National Conference on So-
viet Jewry.
Israel
"VISIT OUR pristict
STUDIO. f/kMOUS AIL
ovum world
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one of the
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3BB
BOSTON(JTA)The Mas-
sachusetts Senate has unani-
mously adopted a resolution
supporting the State of Israel,
the Jewish people and Zionism.
The resolution, authored by
Sen. Jack H. Backman (D.-
Brookline, Newton), was offered
in the senate by Sen. Backman
and Sen. Alan D. Sisitsky (D.-
Springfield).
THE RESOLUTION, which
was adopted last Friday, also
condemned the UN Third Com-
mittee for equating Zionism
with racism.
The resolution declared that
"through the hostile political
efforts of surrounding Arab
nations," the UN committee
"has sadly declared the dream
of Zionism to be a form of
'racism and discrimination'
which is an affront to the Jew-
ish people who have for 2,000
years been among the chief vic-
tims of such uncivilized conduct
and which action is an affront
to the verv basic concents of
humanity for which the United
Nations stands."
The resolution added that
"the Massachusetts Senate af-
firms and aonlauds the action
of the delegations of- the United
States and other freedom-loving i
nations who vigorously sup-1
ported the State of Israel and
the Jewish oeonle in opposition
to the- -United Nations commit-
tee action "
IT URGED that "the United
Nations take nositive steos to
Insure-the cessation of hostile
military, economic and oolitiral
action against the State of Is-
rael."
Now thru January 4
A Hilarioa* Evening with
Milton
Berle

in
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HAPPENED ON THE VW^TORRUM
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Holrl. THE HASTA. MONTY TRAINER S BAYSHORE RESTAURANT. SCAMP'S ot THE TAURUS
(eeeree. ..lad. deeeert. end choice .1 h..T.,,) PLUS food Orch.elra S.ctio. aeal for .
Show. Oa Ml* non the Boa Office only I uncheon Theatre Package S9.0 (Wedaeeday Marlaeea oaly) Coaaplete Laachaoa al
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Ihf
fjof wm i^mw: ipiayhci m


Page 12-A
+Jewlsti Fforidrfori
Friday, January 2, 1976 '\\

)

Rabin: "Quit Criticizing or Resi
g11
m i
Continued from Page 1-A
venant" for the dismemberment
of Israel or lose the image of
"moderation" it has managed to
> cultivate at international fo-
, rums.
Harkabi was bitterly attacked
by Likud, which noted that
simiar remarks were made re-
cently in the Knesset by Prof.
Shlomo Abineri of the Hebrew
University. Likud described
Harkabi's interview as the "sec-
ond lecture within a week on
the necessity to tear from the
Jewish people's sovereignty
parts of its homeland, an act
which would inflict unforesee-
able dangers."
ALLON meanwhile told the
Knesset that if Israel were to
ignore the question of the Pales-
tinian identity, it would
strengthen, not weaken, the
PLO. He said if Israel ignored
this problem, friendly countries
that agree with Israel that the
PLO is not a suitable partner
for negotiations would have
adopted a more negative at-
titude. He said that "If the PLO
is reaping demonstrative suc-
cesses in international organiza-
tions, this is not because our
counterarguments are wrong or
the line we have adopted is mis-
taken; it is the result of a com-
bination of negative factors
which, to our regret, character-
ize today the entire internation-
al arena capitulation to Arab
terror and oil blackmail, trem-
bling knees and even sometimes
naivete, genuine or pretended."
Dr. K. Supports
Moynihan at UN
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Ford and Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger "ex-
pressed strong support for the
effective job" Ambassador
Daniel P. Moynihan has been
doing representing the United
States at the United Nations"
and have "encouraged" him "to
continue to speak out candidly
and forcefully on major issues
coming before the UN," the
White House has said.
The statement was read to
reporters by White House Press
Secretary Ron Nessen following
a meeting between Moynihan
and President Ford who were
joined for about ten minutes by
Secretary Kissinger.
THE STRONG endorsement of
Moynihan by the President and
Secretary, of State put to rest
rumors that the administration
was unhappy with American
UN envoy's outspokeness in the
General Assembly, especially on
Middle East issues and that
Moynihan intended to resign.
Those rumors came to a head
last week when the British UN
representative, Ivor Richard,
sharply criticized the American
delegate, without mentioning
him by name, for allegedly us-
ing the UN as a "confrontation-
al area" to assail countries
whose political systems or
ideologies he disliked.
Moynihan was one of the
most vociferous critics of the
Third World countries that
voted for or abstained on the
anti-Zionist resolution adopted
bv the General Assembly Nov.
10.
Can't Go Back
To '67 Borders,
Gur Declares
National Hebrew
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HAS EVERYTHING FOR
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and Jewish Homes. Free Gift
with Every Bar Mitzvah Outfit
417 Washington Ave. 672-7017
EARLIER, Moynihan called
President Idi Amin of Uganda
a "racist murderer" on the UN
i floor after Amin, who is cur-
| rent chairman of the organiza-
tion for African Unity (OAU),
urged the extinction of Israel.
Richard's attack on Moynihan
was believed in some quarters
to have been approved, if not
inspired, by State Department
elements believed anxious to
hive Movnihan resign after less
than five months in office.
THERE WERE reports that
the 48-year-old former Ambas-
sador to India and former Harv-
ard professor was about to sub-
mit his resignation.
Nessen would not say what
prompted the president's meet-
ing with Moynihan except that
it was by mutual agreement. He
did say there was "no commu-
nication" from Moynihan to the
President. The UN envoy was
not accompanied by the other
members of the U.S.
members of the U.S. UN mis-
sion when he visited the White
House.
The White House statement
said "a range of matters in-
volving the UN" was discussed
and that "the President wants
it clearly understood that Am-
bassador Moynihan has rys com-
plete confidence."
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV(JTA)Chief of
Staff Gen. Mordechai Gur said
here that the changed character
of warfare resulting from the
introducing of highly sophisti-
cated weapons systems and elec-
tric detecting devices in the
Middle East made a return bv
Israel to its pre-June. 1967
borders totally impossible.
He said the changes following
the Yom Kippur War included a
greater use of air Dower bv both
sides and the supply of Soviet-
made Scud missiles to the Arab
arsenal that threaten civilian
targets behind the lines.
GUR SAID that sophisticated
anti-aircraft defense systems
based on missiles cannot be al-
lowed too close to Israel's
borders because they would
neutralize the maneuverability
of Israel's Air Force. Similarly,
he said, the existence of early
warning systems and the varie-
ty of electronic warfare equip-
ment ruled out a return to the
1967 lines.
The Chief of Staff spoke at an
international symposium on the
military aspects of the Yom Kip-
pur War currently being held
in Jerusalem with the partici-
pation of about 200 military of-
ficers, experts and analysts from
abroad, and a like number of
Israeli military officers and
commentators.
GUR SAID that in the event
of a new war, Israel would re-
tain its qualitative superiority.
While the Egyptians seek a
sophisticated eauipment that
C2.n be operated by simple
soldiers, Israel is trained to
operate sophisticated weapons
by the most sophisticated per-
sonnel, he said.
W vat* yi ira.
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
, Phono 672-7306
945 MICHIGAN AVE., MIAMI BEACH
PLANNING
ON MOVING TO
ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554 and
let me quote you rates. Also
focal moving & long distance
moving anywhere in Hie U.S.
or overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
Lectures At
Talnmdic College
The Talmudic College of Flor-
ida has announced Torah Lec-
tures, in English, to be present-
ed each week by Harav Ha-
t0ao Y,c,h,anan Zweig, Shlita,
the Rosh Yeshiva of Vais Med-
rash Hagodal. The lectures will
be given in Room 220 of the Tal-
mudic College in Miami Beach.
On Sundays at 5 p.m. Rabbi
it-hE itCt^res on the Tractate
Ketuboth. On Mondays at 8 p m
a lecture is given for laymen
on Jewish philosophy based on
tne Bible; no previous back-
ground is necessary. Some
topics in the series have been
2?i& uree WiH and Reward
and Punishment. On Thursdays
at p.m. the topic is Advanced
Bible, featuring the portion of
the week.
Although it might appear that
the existence of long-range mis-
siles and earlv warning devices
would make the location of Is-
rael's future borders less rele-
vant to its defense than in the
past, as has been argued by
some circles who believe Israel
could safely return to an ap-
proximation of the 1967 lines
sources here said Gur's thesis
is based on the fact that modern
techniques of warfare make
geography more important than
ever.
THEY POINTED out that even
with improved advance warning
devices, the time lapse between
the warning and the attack has
been greatly reduced. Israeli
defenses based on the 1967
borders would not provide the
essential extra minutes neces-
sary to counter a surprise at-
tack.
Similarly, the sources pointed
out, if the Arabs passed anti-
aircraft defense systems at Tul-
karem, Qalqilya or Jenin on the
West Bank, the airspace around
Tel Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem
would be within range and ac-
tivity by the Israel Air Force
would be prevented.
The sources also noted that
the same sophisticated weapons,
even if capable of being operat-
ed by unsophisticated person-
nel, are far more effective in
the hands of sophisticated sol-
diers. They said this has been
proven in the use of nlanes,
tanks and other weapons by both
sides.
GUR SAID Israel would not
have a Qualitative or quantita-
tive problem in the next five to
ten years. Israel's problem, he
said, would be to win the next
war with fewer casualties and
with as little damage as possible
to the nation's economy and in-
dustry.
In the long range, however,
he said, the future poses the
question not of army against
army but Israel against the
Arabs and how they can live
together in the region. He said
that should there be another
war, Israel would seek condi-
tions that would enable it to
win a decisive victory before or
in spite of intervention--by the
superpowers.
Asked about the danger of nu-
clear warheads on Scud mis-
siles, the Chief of Staff said Is-
rael did not contemplate their
use by the Arabs. The Scuds
with conventional warheads are
a threat to the civilian copula-
tion but are not a decisive fac-
tor in war, he said.
AT AN earlier session of the
symposium. Brig. Kenneth
Hunt, deputy director of the In-
stitute for Strategic Studies in
London, said that the sale of
American arms to Arab coun-
tries which might use th*r-
against Israel was "probablv to
Israel's interest" in the lon
range because "it undercuts the
Soviets. It is part of the price
for protection" of Israel by the
U.S. he said.
Hunt said "American policy is
clearly aimed at being on better
terms than before with the
Arabs, particularly the con-
servative Arab regimes "
Arabist
He said the recent political
changes in the Middle East cre-
ated problems for Israel for
which military strength was no
th0aUtntethPHeHt0,d the SymPsiur"
a^ JTV g^ned3
srssr- soviet -SES
Slip*
>er Marathon
At Flagler
The world's longest-distance
will be decided Saturday night,
Jan 3, as a field of eight goes
to the post in the $25,000 Tom
BennerpSuper Marathon Chan,
The super marathon course
covers more than a half mile
and it takes the greyhounds
more than a full minute ?o cove
VW? laDS around the track
jaFTagler will be open through
Lectures
In Canada
TORONTO (JTA) The
Canadian government has is-
!i!ed, a ministerial permit to
Shaf.k Al Hour, vice chairman
of the PLO delegation to the
UN. to come to Canada for a
series of lectures on the topic
How Can Zionism be a Form
of Racism?"
The government policy is that
UO members are admitted t"
Canada if they have no tec-
ist record.
PROTESTS wtffftfft
Parliament bv/ U
Gray, of Wj^dcasts, de-
Progressive-C* in, and we
Claude Lagnefcism with a
the.
URBAN affairs M^ docu-
Danson has told Prm}|rlter*
Trudeau that he is relutyi.
head the UN Habitat Conk
on Human Settlements in '
couver next year in light of A
a,Wrist resoI Danson a Jewish member of
f, Canadian Cabinet, sched-
V
SocceF Player
Killed I
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
riot by spectators at a soc-
cer match in Rehovot result-
ed in one soccer player be-
ing stabbed to death and his
twin brother being badly
beaten when he tried to pur-
sue the murderer. A 17-
year-old suspect is being
held by police.
The tragedy, which has
stunned all of Israel, came
in the second half of the
league game between Mac-
cabi Rehovot and Maccabi
Kfar Gvirol. With the score
1-0 in favor of Maccabi Re-
hovot, the referee stopped
the game, charging the Mac-
cabi Kfar Gvirol players
with illegally pushing the
home team goaltender.
KFAR GVIROL fans then
jumped over the fence and at-
tacked the members of the Re-
hovot team.
One of them stabbed to death
Mordechai Kind, a member of
the Rehovot team. His twin
brother, Aharon, who is also 3
member of the Rehovot team,
tried to catch the assailant but
was attacked and beaten by
other fans of the visiting team.
Education Minister Aharon
Yadlin, who is in charge of
sports in Israel, hinted that the
playing of league soccer game*
may be suspended for a while.
Last year, there was an out-
cry to ban the games for a year
because of the rough behavior
of the fans. In many cases ref-
erees were threatened or even
injured, and there were reports
of players being bribed to lose
games.
THE SITUATION grew worsa
when hajid grenades and deto-
nators were used by spectators
to frighten players and referee?
Bottles and stones were thrown
as a matter of course.
A public commission had
various recommendations las:
year. But suspending the league
game was ruled out because of
the popularity of the sport
which draws thousands of fans
to stadiums throughout thd
country on Saturday afternoons.
A
t
n
t

i


anuary 2, 1976
+Jenisti fkridFian
Page 13-A
Columnist as a Candidate
Adalh Yeshurun Honor Roll
Hnued from Page 4-A
factual and symbolic ways,
ise what Rollo May has
the "courage to create."
fact that I keep losing or drop-
ping or breaking any watch I
may have possessed and must
always borrow one in an emer-
gency.
FOR THE watch keeps re-
minding us of the dark angel of
)r. Max A. Lipschitz (second from left), spiritual lead-
of Beth Torah Congregation, received the Eleanor
loosevelt Humanities Award from the State of Israel at
\c Beth Torah Congregation-Israel Dinner of State on
6 at the Eden Roc Hotel. Presentation was made
dinner chairman Burton Young (second from right).
fhown with them are President Hyman Katz (left) and
\uest speaker Rabbi Yisroel Kelemer, president of the
labbinical Council of California and nephew of Rabbi
lipschitz.
At a recent cocktail party in the new offices of the
Southern Region of the American Technion Society,
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Tikton presented their gift of
$15,000 in Israel Bonds to the Technion. Shown with
the Tiktons are Ronald G. Stark (left), regional direc-
tor, ATS, and Abraham A. Grunhut (2nd from left),
vice president, Greater Miami Chapter.
The Bialick Ben Gurion Branch No. 290,
FARBAND LABOR ZIONIST ORDER,
will celebrate the Golden Wedding (50th) Anniversary
ef their President,
JACK FILOSOF and MRS. FILOSOF,
en Monday, January 5th, at 7:30 P.M.
ie Wi-
le summit the Washington Federal Bank Auditorium,
at the <
ie 100 Ji
Id will
leado. w w w
ing ?ANTOR MORDECHAI YARDEINI, Composer and Singer
ition
1234 Washington Avenue.
HERSKEL GENDEL, Well Known Humorist, and
HELEN HELFMAN, Well Known Soprano
will participate fn the program.
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED.
Harry Kaminar, Vice President, Will preside.
death. "Watchman, what of the
night?" And so we work or
drift or dream "while it is
day. For the night cometh when
no man can work." Or drift. Or
dream.
In an age of clock-watching
the ultimate revolt is the revolt
against time, which is a revolt
against death. I am bound to be
told that it is a childish revolt,
because time makes everything
meaningful, and non-time would I
be chaos, and death gives a
frame to life.
But I shall remain a rebel
against time; even then I have'
to meet my deadlines, including
the last.
On Dec. 17 Temple Adath
Yeshurun presented the Rabbi's
Honor Roll for November to the
following students:
Aleph Class: Heather Thomp-
son, Mark Tescher; Bet Class:
Richard Nirenberg, Marjorie
Thompson; Gimmel Class: Den-
nis Gaeta, Michael Skaika; Daled
Class: Hillary Rossman; Hey
Class: Jeff Greenstein.
The December winners of the
Rabbi's Honor Roll are: Aleph
Class: Stacy Rosenthal, Roger
and Evan Piper; Bet Class: Stev
en Steckler, Robert LowenthaJ;
Gimmel Class: Lisa Levine, Nor-
man Richman; Daled Class:
Phyllis Gothelf; Hey Class: Marc
Kopelman.
This award, which is for ex-
cellence in Hebrew School and
is signed by Rabbi Simch a
Freedman and Izhak Pachter,
the Hebrew School principal, ia
based on the combination of
scholastic achievement, behav
ior, attitude and attendance.
COHEN:
Continued from Page 4-A
Amendment that FECA repre-
tents in several areas. Like it
or not, campaign contributions
are so intertwined with direct
political communications as to
be an integral part of free'
speech. Thus, as one Appeals
Court Judge stated, "The fun-
damental spirit of the First j
Amendment prohibits the reg- j
ulation of any individual's con- j
tribution to the political dia-
logue and the electoral process." i
And do you remember the bat-
tle over disclosure of the Flor-
Ida NAACP membership list?
The Supreme Court ruled that j
when the state compels dis-
closure of anyone's affiliation it
has a "chilling effect" on both
freedom of association and the
right to privacy.
Well, the 1974 FECA requires
that a public record be kept of j
everyone who contributed more
than $10 to a candidate for fed- \
eral office, and if it's more than
$100, the home address, occu-
nation and business address as
well. As the ACLU observes, i
such disclosure provides a
readvmade list for employers to j
check on the political activities j
of their employees. Talk about
"chilling effect"!
If Common Cause and its
naive supporters are not too j
heady about their "victory" over >
the politicians, they might take |
a good look at what those po-
liticians have wrought with the j
help of the do-gooders. All done j
by applying a simple political
axiom: If you can't lick 'em, join
'em. Some more strange bedfel- j
lows that Watergate brought to-!
gether.

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rage il-A
*Jmtlsti fhridHan
Friday, January 2, 1976
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
ALLDADE TV SERVICE at 2391 W.
Flagler Street, Room No. 200, Miami,
Florida nit-nil.- to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court Of
Dade County .'Florida.
HAUL A. VAZQUEZ
12/26-1/2-9-H
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-40240
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
MAHBL SHANLEY. Administratrix
of the "Entitle of John Shan ley.
Plaintiff
LILLIAN McDANIEL and
.............................. McDANIEL. her
husband, LELA M. HOOTEN and
IKiOTEX, her
husband, ANDREW SHANLEY and
SHANLEY. his wife
FRANK G. SHANLKV, and
.................SHANLEY, his wife,
BLANCHE 8LOUGHETERBECK and
SLOUGHTEHBECK.
her hasbaird, WANDER BREITL1NG
and BREITLING,
her husband, CATHERINE ARTLBY
and ..................ARTLEY. her
husband', EVA C. SHANLEY and
..............................SHANLEY her
husband, GERALD C. SHANLEY,
and SHANLEY, his
wife, VIVIAN JAPENOA and
...............JAPENGA. her
husband, ELVERA ENGLAND and
.............................ENGI.AND. her
husband, DONALD A. SHANLEY and
SHANLEY, his
wile,jBnd if any of the aforesaid
ii;tmod Defendants be dead their
unknown devisees, heirs, personal
representatives, legatees, grantees, or
claimants, otherwise under or against
I hem ami any person or persons
unkaown to the Plaintiff having or
claiming to have any right title or
interest in the lands, through, by or
under said Defendants,
Defendants.
TO: LILLIAN NcDANIEL and
..............................McDANIEL
iher husband
'7401 San/Pedro. N.E.Space 52
AUmajueroae,. New Mexico 87101
LELA M. HOOTEN and
................. HOOTEN,
l her husband
1313'Cleio Vista del Norte N.W.,
Alhuquerque. N. Max, 87114
ANDREW SHANLEY and
..............................SHANLEY,
his wife,
:2588 Viola Dr., S.W.
Albuq.uerq.ae, N.M. 87105
FRANK G. SHANLEY and
.............................SHANLEY
>his wife
6324 Boley Court, S.W.
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87105
BLANCHE SLOUGHETER-
' BECK and..............
SImQUGHETERBECK.
her husband
7401 San Pedro N.E., 8paoe 48
Albuquerque. N. Mex. 87109
WANDER BREITLING and
...................................BREITLINO,
her husband
: 6321. 6th Court, N.W.
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 87107
CATHERINE AKTLEY and
............................... ARTLEY,
bur husband
Residence Unknown
EVA C. SHANLEY and
. -".................. SHANLEY
her husband
1288S JJIaekstone
Detroit, Michigan 48223
GBRaia> C. SHANLEY and
:--".........................SHANLEY,
his wife
12885.Blackstone
Detroit,'Mich. 48223
.VAVJAN JAPENGA. and
her husband
17148 .Chapel
'Detroit, Mich. 48219
ELVERA ENGLAND and
...................................ENGLAND,
her husband
20840 West Nine Mile Road
Southfield. Mich. 48705
DONALD A. SHANLEY and
S3.......,v.........................SHANLEY,
his wife
9304 Allen Rd.
Allen Park, Mich, 48101
J and if any of the aforesaid named
Defendants be dead, their unknown
devisees, heirs, personal representa-
tives, legatees, grantees, or claim-
ants, otherwise under or against them
and any person or persons unknown
to the Plaintiff having or claiming to
have any right title or interest in the
lands, through by or under said De-
fendants.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to quiet title on the
property described as:
That portion of the West 46 feet
of Lot 19 lying South of County
Road, and the West 46 feet of Lots
20 and 21 of JACKSON PEA-
- COCKS SUBDIVISION, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded in
1tt,.Bo.ok 4 at PaKe of th
Public Records of Dade Countv
. Florida.
M been filed and commenced in this
Court and you are required to serve a
Copy of your written defenses, if any
fc it on SAMUEL E. SMITH, Attor-
?,e.?n f2r ,al.nl,,f- wnose address Is
SW20 S Dixie Highway, Suite 850,
oral Gables, Florida 33146, and file
'e original with the Clerk of the
X",ToCou.ru' on or before January
30, 1976; otherwise, a default will ba
entered against you for the relief
rayed for in the Compjaint
. This Notice shall be published once
flacb week for four (4) consecutive
*x,n,,IHE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
ISlh day of December, 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the
Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
By B. LIPPS
I..... As Deputy Clerk
SAMUEL E. SMITH
Attorney for Plaintiff
1320 s. Dixie Highway, suite 85*
Cora! Gables. Florida 33146
Phone: 667-4878
12/26-1/2-9-16
8 Across, 10 Down n
LEGAL NOTKE
IE6AL MOTKE
ACROSS
1 L'Chiyim. ----------life!
3 A Cfiortwm is a '
7 'thflious leader ol
congteojlon
9 Thous shan not--------
10 i*va means '
13 ------------Komokna (songj
14 it's counted nound
Passover time
15 Passover service and
meal
16 moO meaning unity m
UJA slogans
17 favonte mm bawls
18 stale where oWtst Jewish
congtegehon is kxatefl ltK /
22 lood inspector
24 I m Hebrew
25 Main Si m Tel Aviv.
-------------------Rd
26 body ol water in Israel (abbrj
DOWN
2 strong religious Minis.
ptayn
4 location of prison break
in' exodus
5. Ut my peoale '
6 rwjM before
6 former heavyweight
boner Max
11. 'ore-warning evenl
12 Detente Minister
Shimon-----------
15. public 'offerings
of goods
19 common Jewish name,
one cf the tnbts
20 prayer ending
21 NV Met opera star
23 levy* s writ
This puzzle may not be reproduced without >"irlen
permission ol the author
See Puizk Answers on Page 13-B
LfcCAl NOTICE
IKAl NOTKE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
TOWER SUITE at Tower 41. 4101
Pine Tree Drive. Miami Beach, Fla.
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
CATERING MAGIC, TNC.
HANS H. MARCUSE. President
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for applicant
,____________________12/12-19-26: 1/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business urtder the fictitious name of
SOLA BIBLE SOCIETY PRINTING.
SOCIEDAD BIBLICA SOLA IM-
PKENTA at 1180 S.W. 6th Street. Mi-
ami, Florida 33130 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
ANTONIO SOLA
1180 SW 6th St. Miami. Fla. 33130
12/12-19-26; 1/2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
NORTH DADE PEDIATRICS at 2040
N.E. 163 St.. North Miami Beach.
Fla 33182 intend to register said
name with the Oierk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
EFF & BONG. P.A.
KWITNEY, KROOP A.
SCHEINBERG PA.
Attorneys /or applicant
12/12-19-26;
1/2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-38616
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FRANCISCO BARBA,
Husband,
and
ALEYDA BARBA,
Wife:
TO: FRANCISCO BARBA
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has-been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
yotar written defenses. If any, to it
cm TED E. TSOUPRAKE. attorney
for Petitioner, whoee address Is 220
Miracle MileSuite 22*. Coral Gables
Flor.da 33184 TeL: 443-1657. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Janu-
ary 16, 1971.; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published .once
,.,^'r for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDUN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
5th day of December, 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
./-.. ,. As DePUty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
TED D TSfU'PRAKE
220 Miracle MileSuite 222
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Tel: (305) 443-1657
Attorney for Petitioner
12/12-19-26; 1/2
N THE CIRCUIT COU4T OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-StM5
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
W. T. QUEEN & SONS. INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs
CLYDE MADDUX and WILLENE
MADDUX, his wife, and
UNITED STATES STEEL
CORPORATION, a corporation
authorized to do business
in the State of Florida.
Defendants.
TO: CLYDE MADDUX and
WILLENE MADDUX his wife
Post Office Box 59
Crossville, Tennessee 38556
and
UNITED STATES STEEL COR-
PORATION, a corporation
authorized to do business In the
State of Florida, and all persons
or firms claiming by, through
or under them and to all others
to whom it may concern:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Dade County.
?'" Block 10. INLIKITA SEC.
TION "A." according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book
50 at Page 45 of the Public Rec-
ords of Dade County. Florida; to-
gether with all furniture, furnish-
ings, appliances and fixtures cur-
rently on the premises located at
I, 5! S,W,c,:74lh Street- Miami.
Florida 33157.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any to it on V
ROBERT CARLISLE. Plaintiffs at>
torney, whose address is 299 Alhambra
Circle Coral Gables, Florida 33134 on
or before January 16, 1976, and file
fW? f I! fii* the Clerk f this
Court either before service on plain-
tiff s attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
m?rt,.Hg,'n?L >'?? fr ,ne de-
manded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
Of this Court on December B 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER as Clerk'
of the Circuit Court
By C. P. COPE LAND
as Deputy Clerk
12/12-19-26; 1/2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-39804
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EPHRIAN ADK1NS. Petitioner,
and
ERMA D. MACK ADK1NS.
Respondent
TO: ERMA D. MACK ADKINS
Post Office Box 7
Molino, Florida ___
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to it on
HARLAN STREET, PA. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 12700 Bis-
cay ne Boulevard, Suite 410, North Mi-
ami, Florida 33181, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 23rd. 1976;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
hi the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
16th day of December. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARLAN STREET, P.A.
12700 Biscayne Blvd.Suite 410
North Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Petitioner
891-5852
12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE.OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUrT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-38715
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
WALTER DISMUKE,
Petitioner
and
CLAUDIA DISMUKE.
Respondent.
TO: CLAUDIA DISMUKE.
110 Clark Street
Hartford, Connecticut
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to It
on EUGENE J. WEISS, attorney for
Petitioner whose address is 407 Lin-
coln Road, Miami Beach, Florida 3313S
Suite PH N/E, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Jan. 15, 1976; other-
wise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published onoe
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida, on this
5th day of Dec, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By H. HERMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE J. WEISS
PH N/E
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
12/19-J6 1/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
XONSTRUCTVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-39150
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
FRANK ROSADO
Husband,
and
MINERVA ROSADO,
Wife.
TO: MINERVA ROSADO
222 East 8th Street
.Brooklyn, New York
11218
.wTOU AIUE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a cony of
your..wr*"n d'enes. If any. doit
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN A>1D. POR
DADE COUNTkY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7650
(Judge Dowling)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAUL R GORDON
Deceased. 1
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:____
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE OF SAID DECEDENT.
You are hereby notified that.a writ-
ten instrument purporting to be the
last will and testament of said decer
dent has been admitted to probate in
said Court. You are hereby command-
ed witiiin six calendar months from
the date of the first publication of
this notice to appear in said Court
and show uauae, if any you can why
the action of said Court in admitting
said will to probate should not stand
unrevoked.
FRANK B. DOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By MIRIAM B. HENDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
CYPEN & NEVINS
Attorneys
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beuch, Florida 33140
First publication of this notice on
the 19th day of December. 1975.
______________________12/19-86 1/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
of
BARGAINVILLE CENTERS
GRUMPY 'fi
M. FORSTER & ASSOCIATES
FORSTER INTERNATIONAL
POOLCHEM DISTRIBUTORS
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
DISTRIBUTOR SALES. INC.
DANIEL M. KEIL
Attorney for Applicants
______________________11/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-38401
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
N RE: The Marriage of
mary l McDonald,
Petitioner/Wife
and
TERRY E. MCDONALD i
Responden t / Husband
TO: TERRY E. MCDONALD
USS AGERHOLM (DD 826)
Fleet Post Office
San Francisco California 96601
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
DAVID M. GONSHAK, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1497 N.W.
7th Street, Miami. Florida 33126. and
file the original wit*, the clerk of the
above styled court n or before Jan.
16, 1976: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded, in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
3rd day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. JAFFE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) I
DAVID M. GONSHAK
1497 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
12/12-19-26; 1/2
-'
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL.CIRCUIT" W
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTON NO. 75-39033
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
... m OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LINDA GUBALA, Wife
LEON GUBALA. Husband
TO: LEON GUBALA
c/o LEON GUBALA SR
35 ZOJ2RB AVENUE
vni?VTS1'.-.lVICW YORK. 14226
fhT, y ^ HEREBY NOTIFIHD
ri, 2 aCl'n fr isolation of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
vou are reuuired in .,. ..__ .
are required to serve ii oonv f
^i^not^e'snairbe'TublM^o. 22Crtj? ''^ ^ ^ '"^
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FIX)RIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of iZ^rnmS^JSL "lUr consecutive weeks
/Sir?H0Urt.art Mi*ml' Florida Mtb wrrvn-i^1811 pLORIDIAN
10th day of December. 1975. mv iio^rt o..h .u- 1.
^^^^^>e above.K
Sf*|2* yu 'or 'he relief demanded
in the complaint or petition. eraanae<1
T? now* 8,na" be Published once
'LweK. for four consecutive w..h!
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By G. FREDERICK
irn ,. ^ Ab r^Puty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
iftM^rw1. CAKR'CARTE. ESQ.
1491 N.w. 7th Street
Miami Florida 33126
c Atto,rney for Petitioner
Phone No. 649-9917
.____________^_^^ 12/12-19-26:
NOTICE UNDER
J:!CJIT|OUS NAME LAW
JESS my hand and the seal of
^'d,tourl Miami. Florida onth'g
9th day of Deoernber, 1976
R,CH.ARD p BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
JJade County, Florid
By L. SNEEDEN
ifHr u ^ As DeP"ty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12/12-19-!
\Jl
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME I au
NOTICE IS HEREBY OIVTB
EN
[he ^ndecsigned, desiring t'o en.
NOTICE IS HERBBrGrVE" that rf^feSSgSS
neh.,U?dersigne,d' desirine to engage i^K' J*'a,nl' *>*. "134 Intend
raws?**! ES* -^
!31,79S,inte^sU,toMr,egTsterBeIa1<;d' n^rne F ANTONIO ULMETE
tVlth the Clerk of tnf'ci'rcuU CourH? 'WSSB8P9S5> CBUCM
Dade County, Florida. n .,^^-',UQUE CARIX)S GIUSTI
SAMUEL SPECTOR "^."-I'ERMO SOSTCIIIN
12/19-26 1/2-9
t
n
I

\
Attorney for Applicants
12/12-19-26;
VI


inary 2, 1976
it
+Jenisfncrkfia,n
Page 15-A
frart Syria-Soviet in UN,
hrem for Geneva Talks
Eilberg Charges State Department
With Pressuring Trip Cancelers
r

iued from Page 1-A
bba which filled the main
the party's ideological
[while hundreds watched
ceedings on closed-circuit
on in the anterooms.
ts included some of La-
Feading personalities in-
mmd out of the government,
[ them former Foreign
~ r Abba Eban, who chair-
forum, and former De-
linister Moshe Dayan.
Absence of Peace Plan
un vigorously denied
Is that his government
overall peace plan and
tded to outline what Israel
accept -as defensible bor-
[A true peace must be on
round, not on paper, he
le declared that Israel will
relinquish the Golan
kts, but that this did not
sarily mean that the pres-
ses would remain. He said
kovertment was prepared
per Egypt far-reaching ter-
al concessions in Sinai but
retain Sharm el-Sheikh at
juthern tip of the penin-
^in said Israel was also
xed lor territorial conces-
[in negotiations with Jor-
jit that there was no point
Swing maps at this stage
bflfte any Israeli pullbacks
fr** [the Judaea and Samaria
regifcs would have to be ap-
proved by a national plebiscite
which the government has
pnBsed '.before signing any
agnBnent with Jordan.
H Premier reiterated that
I Almogi
Certain
Hell Win
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Cain#fcgn aides to Josef Almogi,
the Hoifa Mayor and labor lead-
er running for the post of Jew-
ish Agency and WZO chairman,
say he is sure to get at least
70 Of the 110 votes on the Zion-
ist General Council when the
vote is held in the new year.
If he wins the Zionist 'Gen-
era! Council vote. Almogi will
me WZO chairman and
.will automatically be
A Jewish agency chair-
B the Jewish agency as-
in the summer.
B>RDING .to the aides. Al-
mo| m assured of the 39 votes
b Labor Alignment bloc.
fvotes of the "Coirfeaera-
| General Zionists (which
s Haddassah) and at
o-thirfls of the Mizra-
8 votes.
lso hopes to pick up the
ttes and some others,
ces close f> the n**>-
te, Leon Duhan, reject'
hand this assessment as ,
of the war of attrition j
wag^d" against thflzm.
I Dulzin people TTtatntarrt
the Bnfederation vote is by nr,;
IBS in th" bag for AlmBgi.
all the Labor alignment
assured for him in the;
balloting.
7HIIJS, ^independent (
jrs feel Dulzin will gain j
^ Jthe planned world Jewish :
Knit to -be held m Jerusalem |
the end of this month. Rabin
|d he will be the joint hosts
the summit, and wall each
ak at the-opening session.
[Some 100 Jewish leaders -from
Jroad will join Cabinet and
sO leaders from Israel in
inning a massive Zionist in-
lation and identification,
ipaign to combat the UN!
ti-Zionist vote.
The observers Say the sum-'
if it goes well, "will help
sin prove his contention
though he is an (opposi-
l) Likud politician, he can
rate closely on Zionist
with the Labor-led gov-
Israel would never accept a
third state between itself aiid
Jordan. He said that if PLO
chief Yassir Arafat ruled such
a state, it would bring another
intransigent foe close to Israel's
vital centers and reduce the
prospects of an overall settle-
ment with Israel's other neigh-
bors.
He also repeated Israel's de-
termination not to negotiate
with the PLO and insisted that
the only real solution of the
Palestinian problem would be
contained in a settlement with
Jordan.
Rabin said Israel recognized
the existence of a Palestinian
problem and that without its
solution the Arab-Israel conflict
could not be resolved. Bat he
did not believe the Palestinian
issue was the crux of the Mid-
dle East problem or the key to
peace.
Neither War Nor Peace in 1976
Eban and Dayan, though
ideologically far apart, support-
ed the government's position
against a third state between
Israel and Jordan and against
negotiations with the PLO.
Dayan said he did not believe
1976 would bring either war or
peace to the Middle East be-
cause Egypt, Syria, the Soviet
Union and, according to the
former Defense Minister, the
U.S., were seeking the political
route of Israel and would not
resort to the war option.
But Dayan saw a chance of
gaining a renunciation of bel-
ligerency from Egypt if the U.S.
cooperated in view of its rap-
prochement "with Cairo and
Egypt's need for massive eco-
nomic aid. He called for Jewish
settlement'on the West Bank in
accordance with defense needs
and warned that an Israeli with-
drawal from the Judaea and
Samaria regions would be an
historic error. Eban proposed
an interim settlement approach
to the West Bank.
Eban called for a new defini-
tion of Israel's position on the
Palestinian issue, and while he
agreed with the government's
decision to boycott the Jan. 12 \
Security Council debate warned
that Israel's absence from UN i
peace forums should not be-
come a permanent phenomenon.
WASHINGTON(JTA)Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D.-Pa.)
accused the State Department on Dec. 24 of deliberately
trying to discourage American citizens -from canceling trips
to countries that voted for the anti-Zionist resolutions
adopted at the recently ended 30rh session of the United
Nations General Assembly.
In a letter to Secretary of
State Henry A. Kissinger, Eil-
berg charged that the State De-
partment was "advising the
Civil Aeronautics Board not to
permit persons who had previ-
ously paid for trips to countries
which had supported the reso-
lutions to cancel "their reserva-
tions."
Eilberg referred specifically
Brandeis District To Hear Essen
Attorney Ben Essen will be
the guest speaker at the meeting
of the Brandeis District, Zion-
ist Organization of America,
Monday, Jan. S, at 8 p.m. in the
Washington Federal Auditorium,
Miami Beach.
Essen will discuss the writ-
ings of Sholem Aleichem. Louis
Hoberman, president of Bran-
deis Zionist District, will review
the latest news affecting Israel.
Essen has served as a director
of the National Children's
Cardiac Hospital, trustee -of
Hillel Foundation, president of
B'nai B'rith Sports Lodge
Membership Dinner
Sports Lodge No. 2834 of
B'nai B'rith will hold a mem-
bership dinner on Thursday,
Jan. 8, at 7 p.m. at the Rocky
Graziani Restaurant in North
Miami.
Featured speaker is Chuck
Dowdle, sports director of Chan-
nel 10, who will discuss the Mi-
ami Dolphins and the upcoming
Super Bowl.
Bob Cox, director of commu-
nity affairs at Pompano Harness
Track, will show a film on har
ness Taciag.______________
Greater Miami YMHA, presi-
dent of Temple Judea of Coral
Gables, worshipful master of
Hibiscus Masonic Lodge, chair-
man of Hi-Rise Division of Jew-
ish Federation of Miami and
member of executive boards of
Florida Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith.
Rose Shapiro and Thelma
Sheckter will serve as hostesses.
to a trip to Brazil sponsored by
the Jewish Y of Greater Phila-
delphia, scheduled to depart
Dec. 27. The triD was canceled,
but the State Department has
urged the CAB to reject re-
quests for a refund of the air
fares paid in advance, Eilberg
said. "This action would force
the people to go to countries
where they would feel uncom-
fortable and be unhappy at the
very least, or they would have
to forfeit the cost of the vaca-
tion which they had paid in ad-
vance," the Congressman wrote.
He said that the "Obviously,
the State Department is more
concerned about the feelings of
a government of a foreign na-
tion than those of the citizens
of the United States in whose
interest the department is sup-
posed to be working."
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MR.


Page 16-A
*Jen1st Fhrkfkin
Friday, January 2
> nexi^Moysjfou*o|^!l-------
\fou are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radial is the world's first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles. It's the
most economical tire you can own. Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires. Because of the exclusive I.R.I. All-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself. We believe the result
Is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the I.R.I. All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50,000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil It all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
2. BELTED 1. RADIAL
1 BIAS TIRES
Two. four or tometimes even more plies (or
layers) of materiel cross under the tread at an
neje or bias to the center line of the tire. General
the cheapest tire to buy.
a. BELTFD TIRES
Similar to the bias fire with the addition of twa
er more belts of material that run around the tin
binder the to*. Tnij combines a bias sidewtN
with increased tread stability and improve!
IfoadWe.
y RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features. Cords of
material run from sidewall to sidewall crossing the
tread at 90dtf rees. Two or more belts of material
Iso run around the tire. Price per tire is higher,
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78's and 7.75's all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO.
The strongest radial Is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I. is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial Hrc is only a steel-belted radial. This Is
Important in understanding the superiority of
an I.R.I. All-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the I.R.I. radial than in any
other automobile tire. Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I.R.I,
tread stays open for maximum road contact
in all kinds of weather. This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of sted cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc.) used in the
sidewaMs of all ether automobile tires. The
result is HX) percent sted strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range D.
I.R.I. All-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and it's
stamped on the side of every I.R.I, tire. Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials -
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
lor all vehicles, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pick-ups.
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, loo.
The I.R.I. Afl-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed sted cable engineered exclusivdy for
us. Each cable is wound of seven strands of
SA/ETY
SERVICE
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1. The only lire with STEEL
sidewalls for strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort.
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength, 30 steel cables per inch.
Total: Three layers of steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for surefire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire. That's a total of 21 strong
sted filaments in each cable. Yet. with all this
strength, the cable is as flexible as sill. The
result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configure* .
tion was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I.R.I. AU-Sted
Radial. Now. the combination of sted and
tread design provides solid, road-holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat.
The I.R.I. is an all-weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't heard about I.R.I.
AU-Sted Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry.
I.R.I, is a relatively small company. We
are growing steadily on a market-bymarket .
plan now reaching your city. Five years
ago. we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the Ron* imported tire available.
Because we had no conventiond tire-making
wST '^we wcre free "to tfy "ything."
We did. And came up with a totally new idea
Le hJi^ t,rC I"'" better than ,he >
we had set out to make. The I.R.I. AU-Sted
Radl has been tested and re-tested. Subjected
to literally millions of miles of road-handlin/
TB5E22T ,%savaUablehere Baekedby
n_ M^
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Extra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles.
SSSSL !i?,you huy- ** ""
AJI-Steel Radial.
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?
V
B r GiMidru h


Miamians Sign Proclamation
Addressed to Rabin
Leaders of Greater Miami's
Jewish Community signed a
proclamation to Israel's Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin pledging
to achieve the highest stand-
ards of excellence in Jewish
life.
At a recent luncheon meet-
ing at the Harmonie Club in
New York, Samuel !. Adler and
Harry A. Levy ol Miami Beach
and Robert RuswU of Miami
represented the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation at the sign-
ing.
Adler and Levy, prominent
local builders, have accepted
key leadership D09itions within
Miami's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
GMJF treasurer Adler is
Harry A. Levy, a vice
president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
and advisor to the chair-
man of the 1976 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund, was
among the American Jew-
ish community leaders
who signed a proclama-
tion addressed to Israel's
Prime Minister Rabin at a
luncheon in New York.
The Proclamation pledges
total American Jewish
support for "the highest
standard of excellence in
Jewish life in th'.s coun-
try, in Israel, and in Jew-
ish communities through-
out the world."
Two former dinner chairmen were among the partici-
pants at the 28th annual Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy dinner at the Deauvile Hotel which benefited the
school and honored former Bay Harbor Islands Mayor
Shepard Broad. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Kanter of Mi-
ami Beach (above, left) talk with Mr. and Mrs. George
Feldenkreis of Keystone Point. Dorita Feldenkreis was
cochairman of the hostess committee of which Nancy
Kanter was a member. Below, from left, are George
Kimmel, chairman of the Hebrew Academy board of
directors; Mrs. Kimmel; Leonard Adler, auditor of the
school; and Mrs. Irene Adler, president of Hebrew Acad-
emy Women.
"Jewish Floridian
chairman of the Builders and
Allied Trades Division. Levy, a
Federation vice president, is an
advisor to the CJA-IEF chair-
man and supervisor of the Ad-
vance Gifts Division Manage-
ment Team. Russell, a past presi-
dent of Federation, serves as
a national United Jewish Appeal
chairman and as advisor to the
local CJA-IEF chairman.
With a group of American
Jewish leaders the three Miami
representatives authorized the
Proclamation, which states:
"To the Prime Minister of the
State of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin,
and the People of Israel ... In
a time of great travail for Jews
everywhere we are mindful that
the past is our heritage, the
present our responsibility and
the future our challenge as
Jews. In a world unconcerned
with decency and respect for
humanity our solidarity with the
people of Israel bears witness to
the eternity of the Jewish peo-
ple. We, the Jewish leadership
of the United States, therefore
pledge ourselves to achieve the
highest standard of excellence
in Jewish life in this country, in
Israel and in Jewish commu-
nities throughout the world."
Beth Solomon
Sisterhood
Temple Beth Solomon Sister-
hood will have a board meeting
on Jan. 7 at the temple at noon.
The Sisterhood's regular meet-
ing is scheduled for Jan. 14 at
12:30 at the temple. Edith Geiz-
er will preside at both meetings.
Spoken Yiddish
Temple Adath Yeshurun is
offering a course in Yiddish
during the second semester of
the Adult Education program,
beginning Jan. 13.
The course is given in coop-
eration with the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Midwood H.S. Reunion
Midwocd High School in
Brooklyn will celebrate its 35th
anniversary on May 26 with a
reunion dinner. Midwood alum-
ni interested in attending should
contact Mrs. Pearl Roberts at
the school.
Miami, Florida Friday, January 2, 1976
Section B
Israel, Sweden Ties are Strained
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fo-
reign Minister Yigal Allon has
recalled Israel's Ambassador to
Sweden. Avner Idan, "for urgent
consultations," it was officially
announced.
The recall was clearly a
diplomatic expression of Israel's
anger over Sweden's vote in the
Security Council last week to
invite the Palestine Liberation
Organization to participate in
the Council's deliberations over
Israel's air raids on terrorist
bases in Lebanon Dec. 2.
SWEDEN WAS the only West-
ern European country to vote
with the Arab-communist bloc
and Third World states to ex-
tend the unprecadented privi-
lege to the PLO.
It provided the crucial ninth
vote. Under security council
rules, the assent of nine of the
15 members is required to
invite outside parties to attend
its sessions.
Allon told a cabinet meeting
that there was no change in
Israel's firm resolve to boycott
the current Security Council
meetings on the Lebanon raid
and the Council's Middle East
debate, set to open Jan. 12, to
which the PLO was also invited.
ALLON indicated that there
has been American pressure on
Israel is resisting this pressure,
attend at least some of the Se-
curity Council meet:/;s. But
Israel is resisting this puressure,
the Foreign Minister said.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin de-
nied at the cabinet meeting
press reports of differences be-
tween himself and the Foreign
Ministry on this issue.
RABIN, who was acting Fo-
reign Minister last week while
Allon was abroad, reportedly
rejected a proposal that Israel
attend those sessions of the Se-
curity Council from which the
PLO representatives would be
absent.
The proposal, which would
have permitted Israel to par-
ticipate in the debate and de-
fend its actions over Lebanon
while avoiding proximity with
the PLO. was said to have been
suggested by Israel's UN Am-
bassador Chaim Herzog.
Rabin said that the proposal
was one of several options pre-
sented to him bv Foreign Minis-
try officials while he was acting
Foreign Minister.
"Lost Vohliner Cantor" At Agudath Israel
"The Last Vohliner Cantor,"
Matus Radzivilover, well-known
interpreter of Hebrew liturgy,
will perform the service on Sat-
urday, Jan. 10, at 8:30 a.m. at
Agudath Israel Hebrew Instit-
ute.
Cantor Radzivilover, who was
born in Poland and was soloist
with the synagogue choir at age
six, has appeared as a guest
cantor in Canada, Mexico and
Israel. He is famous as a master
interpreter of the original rite
and version of "Vohlin."
Crackdown on Jewish Activities
TORONTO JTA Jewish
sources in the Soviet Union re-
port on a crackdown on Jewish
activists there by the author-
ities. KGB men in Moscow alone
in the past month have raided
over 100 homes of Jews linked
to the publications "Jew in the
USSR" and "Tarbut" the cul-
tural report.
The sources report that the
homes of four of those most
prominently connected with
these two publications were
raided by the KGB shortly after
the departure from the Soviet
Union on Dec. 24 of the Chief
Rabbi of the British Common-
wealth, Dr. Immanuel Jakobo-
vits. He had been assured by
top Soviet officials that efforts
would be made to ensure Jewish
cultural life in Russia.
The homes raided belonged
to Vladimir Prestin, Pavel Abro-
movitch, Ilya Essaf and Yosip
Beygun. The sources said the
KGB men acted on the explicit
order of Public Prosecutor Tik-
honov, who is in charge of the
file of the Jewish cultural pub-
lication.
The Jewish sources reported
that a number of activists were
detained by police in Moscow
after they held a demonstration
outside the Lenin Library,
standing in silence for ten min-
utes in tribute to those sen-
tenced to prison five years ago
in the first Leningrad trial.
They issued a statement to
the Western press, urging sup-
port against the repression of
Jewish culture in the Soviet
Union and against attempts to
frighten applicants for visas.
B'nai B'rith Women
No. Dade Chapter No. 809
The North Dade Chapter No.
809 of B'nai B'rith Women will
hold its regular meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 8:15 p.m.
at the Washington Federal Say-
ings and Loan Association in
North Miami Beach.
The program for the evening
will be a talk by Molly Turner
of Channel 10 News.
Sisterhood Auction
The Mollie Kahaner Sister-
hood of Beth Torah Congrega-
tion is holding its annual new
merchandise auction at 7:30
p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 11, in the
social hall of the synagogue.
South Beach residents rallied for the State of Israel and
paid tribute to banker Abraham Grunhut (center) on
Dec. 15 at the South Beach Auditorium in Miami Beach.
Among the key leaders at the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization "Night in Israel" were (from left) Mayshie
Friedberg, last year's recipient; Mrs. Emanuel Mentz,
past president of Miami Beach Hadassah; Mrs. Zelda
Thau, chairman, and Judah Kurtzbard of Bank Leumi in
Miami Beach.
Seacoast North
CJA-IEF Chairman Named
Albert M. Shulman of Miami
Beach has been named chair-
man of the 1976 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund for Seacoast Towers
North. The announcement was
made by CJA-IEF general chair-
man L. Jules Arkin.
"Mr. Shulman has already
demonstrated years of devoted
service to Jewish community ef-
forts, especially those which
benefit the people of Israel,"
said Arkin. "His enthusiasm and
the urgent need for CJA-IEF's
success in 1976 will be the driv-
ing forces in rallying support
from all the residents of Sea-
coast North this year."
Shulman is assembling the
building's leadership in antici-
pation of a major campaign
function early in 1976.
Bar-Ilan Will Honor
South Florida
Three United States Congress-
men representing South Floria
will be honored by Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity of Israel on March 21 at
a testimonial dinner in the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel.
Announcement of the accept-
ances by Representatives Dante
B. Fascell, William Lehman and
Claude D. Pepper was made in
Congressmen
Miami Beach by Dr. Joseph H.
Lookstein, chancellor of Bar-
Ilan University and national
president of the Synagogue
Council of America.
Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach, cochairman of the Flor-
ida Committee for Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity, will serve as chairman
of the dinner.


Page 2-B
+Jenist thridiar
Friday, January 2, 1975

ChiJes's Re-Election Campaign
Draws Manv New Contributors
Sen. Lawton Chiles (D.-Fla.J
will hold organizational meet-
ings for his re-election cam-
paign in 21 Florida counties
during the first two weeks of
1976. There are now 40 counties
where Chiles re-election cam-
paign organizations have been
established since he announced
his candidacy in late June.
Senator Chiles will make his
second report on fund-raising
activities to the Federal Elec-
tion Commission in early Jan-
uary. The first quarterly reoort
showed campaign contributions
of $40,863 representing more
than 4,000 contributors.
All contributions are within
the $10 ner contributor limit
imposed by Senator Chiles. "The
one equal share concept, under
which no ont can give more
than S10 to this campaign has
captured the public's interest
and has already resulted in
thousands of individual contri-
butors." Senator Chiles said, ad-
ding that "We have set out to
interest and involve those who
have never before been inter-
ested or involved."
Women's League Chapter
To Honor Rae Tenen
Beethoven and Gershwin
Featured in Series Opener
The opening program of the
1976 subscription series spon-
sored by the Miami Beach Mu-
sic ant Arts League will be at
the new Theater for the Per-
forming Arts on Jan. 22.
Three works, performed by
the Atlanta Symphony, are fea-
tured: Beethoven's Symphony
No. 3 ("Eroica"), a Bennett ar-
rangement of "Porgy and Bess,"
and "Rhapsody in Blue," with
pianist Edith Kraft, former
faculty member of the Juilliard
School. The two Gershwin
nieces were programmed by
Robert Shaw, conductor of the
Atlanta Symphony, to eclebrate
the Bicentennial.
The Jan. 22 concert is the
first in a series of seven.
Stone Nominates Area Students
For Admission To Academies
Thirty Florida high school
seniors have been nominated by
Sen. Richard Stone for admis-
sion in 1976 to one of the na-
tion's service academies.
An eight-member academy
selection board, named by Stone
to choose the best possible
nominees, chose from among
more than 800 applicants and
interviewed more than 200 lead-
ing contenders in Tallahassee in
mid-December.
Among those nominated for
admission to the Air Force
Academy is Thomas J. Green-
baum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ron-
ald Greenbaum of North Miami
Beach.
Michael Kosnitzky, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Konsitzky of
North Miami Beach, and Paul
M. Plescow, son of Mr. and Mns.
Elmer Plescow of Miami, are
among the nominees to the
Military Academy at West Point.
MR. AND MRS. FILOSOF
Farband Branch
To Celebrate
President's Anniversary
The Golden Wedding Anniver-
sary of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Filo-
sof will be celebrated by the
Bialick-Ben Gurion Branch No.
290 of the Farband Labor Zion-
ist Order, on Moniav. Jan. 5. at
7:30 p.m. at the Washington Fed-
eral Auditorium, Miami Beach.
Filosof is president of the
branch.
Cantor Mordechai Yardeini
humorist Hershel Gend'*l and
soprano Helan He'.fman will Dar-
tipicate in the program at which
Harry Kaminer, vice president,
will oreside.
Isaiah Lodge To Hear
ADL Regional Di ector
Arthur Teitelbaum. regional
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, will be
the featured sneaker at a gen-
eral meeting of Isaiah Lodge at
7:30 n.m. on Monday, Jan. 5.
The meeting will be at the
American Savings auditorium
on Lincoln Road.
Rae Ten^n has been named
"Woman of the Year" bv the
Lincoln Roney Miami Beach
Chapter of th: Women's League
for Israel, for "her tireless de-
dication to furthering the wel-
fare and ti!rvi"al of Israel," said
Frances Resnick. chanter presi
dent. Mrs. Resnick will present
Mrs. Tenen with a plaque at a
luncheon on Wednesday, Jan.
14, at noon at the Montmartre
Hotel.
A life member an'! longtime
officer of the board of the chap-
ter, Mrs. Tenen is an officer of
and active worker in many
charitable and community or-
ganizations. She works in the
Israel Bond office and has her-
self purchased a substantial
amount of Israel Bonds.
TH speaker of the day, life
member Mrs. Yaffa Dermer.
wife of former Mayor Jay De-.
mer, is a Sabra who re'centlv
rfturn'-d from a visit to Israel
She will give an eyewitness re-
port on economic conditions in
Israel and the mood of the pen-
pie.
The musical part of the pro-
gram will feature Italian tenor
Tony Simone, accompanied by
concert pianist Aida Yaslow
Simone, a protege of the Miami
Society of Young Performers,
has been acclaimed in Europe
and South America, as well 33
in Miami Beach. He has sun
with a group of the Miami
Opera Guild.
Rose Dellerson, luncheon
chairperson, is past president
of the chanter and in charge
of reservations, along with Tyl
Weisman.
BEEF BOLOGNA
"'a

Siegel Named Ameriean Savings
Vice President
Barry D. Siegel, director of
marketing, advertising, and pub-
lic relations, has been named a
vice president of American Sav-
ings and Loan Association of
Florida. The announcement was
made by Thomas R. Bomar,
president ef American Savings.
Siegel joined the American
Savings staff in April, 1973, ani
was name assistant vice presi-
dent in January, 1974. As mar-
keting director he is resnonsi'n
fr support programs, advertising
jin., public relations for Amer-
ican Savings. The Association
has branches in Miami Beach,
Bay Harbor Islands, Plantation,
Lauderhill, Hallandale, Pompano
Beach, Deerfield Beach and Ft.
Lauderdale.
Siegel is also vice president-
elect of the Civic League of Mi-
ami Beach. He is vice president
and treasurer of the South Flor-
ida Marketing Society, and has
been active on the board of the
Institute of Financial Education.
He serves, on the boards of direc-
tors of the Florida Chapter of
the American Jewish Committee
anJ South Florida Society for
the Prevention of Blindness.
Heart Association To Get "Anne"
The Heart Association ol
Greater Miami will be able to
purchase a badlv needed "Anne"
for their cardiopulmonaiy :e-
BUScfitbMon (CP1 ) classes be-
cause uf a S50C contribution
presentee' in memory of Pauline
Zimmerman
"Anne" is a life-si/e man-
nequin used '05- volunteer Heart
Association instnetors to dem-
onstrate the technique of reviv-
GORDON ROOFING
AND SHEET METAl
WORKS, INC.
1450 N.W. 21st STREET
Phone 633-4990
Have Your roof repaired now;
you will save on a new roof later
"Sattsfai tory Work by
Kxpfrir>nci' ing heart attack victims. The
free one-rime three-hour classes,
conducted .ai most a-i.0 h'
tal8, have been taken by more
than 10:000 Dade Cuun'ans
since they began a year and a
half ago.
In accenting the check from
Mrs. Irving Glazman on behai'
of the Roosevelt Temple No. 33
Pythian Sisters, James B. Hall,
executive director of the Heart
Association, said, "One of our
great needs is to purchase ad-
ditional training equipment and
to replace equipment whic't
wears out quickly because of
the many GPR classes conduct-
ed in this area. Roosevelt Tem-
ple No. 33 Pythian Sisters ha.',
been of z-eat help in satisfvinf
this need"
Corned Beef,
Pastrami, Salami,
Bologna, Tongue,
Knockwurst and
Frankfurters.
KOSHER ZiON
SAUSAGE COMPANY OF CHICAGO
5511 North Kitilt Avenue Chrajj. Illinois 60625 Phone: (312) 738-2208
E^A TRADITIONAI??
JEWISH LIFE
AWAITS YOU IN
SOUTH FLORIDA
of Ml
ouno LUiae
t

Mrs. Irving G'.azman p?
sewed a $500 check to
James B. Hull, executive
director of the Heart As-
sociation of Greater Miami,
from Roosevelt Temple No.
33 Pythian Sisters in
mory of Pauline Zimmer-
man.
LULVOOl
WILL WELCOME YOU
AND WILL HELP YOU SETTLE
SYNAGOGUE RABBI IN RESIDENCE
CDYLETE RECREATION FACILITIES
EO NATIONAL & SOCIAL ACTIVITIES
KOSHER PROVISIONS NEARBY
AGR N ~. JEWISH COMMUNITY
IN T-= : L\TER OF SOUTH FLORIDA
THE OAKS
condominium
sent no-ne of
&W of Mfyu-OoJ
Moshe Bomzer Rabbi
A er of modestly priced
& 3 bedroom
00 .ijartments are available.
For a- appo.nt-rientor further mformatior
w 'e o' onone
THEOA'S
4111 Stm.ng Road
Fort Lauderdale Florida 3314
Browa'O 791-1870 Dade 944-0416
Complete
Window Service
IMPAIRS
REPLACING REGLAZING
tMl Jervfce tret f rf imofei
PHONE 666-3339
All WINDOW REPAIR
IBlf IMMM
Technion Women's Luncheon
The Miami Beach Branch of
the Women's Division of the
American Society for Technion
will hold a luncheon on Thurs-
day, Jan. 8, at noon at the
Montmartre Hotel.
Pearl Bernette is the featured'
entertainer. Mrs. Belle Stein i9,'9
president. Rom Steinberg
publicity chairman.
Escorted Tour
Israel & London Apr. 26-May 17 Superior Four Star Hotels
16 NIGHTS IN ISRAEi, 4 r:CHTS IN LONDON
Local transfers to and from Miami A'rno-'- Rmtn,i t,.;~
,Fu ageing* brae, and Londpn &2-SgSLg.? .*- *"*
Breads, and dinner in laraa,. ** ,. L^ m%?%'.
^venture Travel Boutique, Inc.
2962A Aventura Blvd.
N. Miami Beach, FL 33180
TELEPHONE
Dade 931-6600
Broward 535-0675
$1339
per person
dbl.
occupancy
plus $3 tax
*bove rate baaed on
36
u:
Sky Luke Travel, Inc.
750 N.E. 195th St.
N. Miami Beech, FL 33179
TELEPHONE
-Dade 653-1010
Broward 525-3163
I


Friday, January 2, 1976
-Jcwist fhrldttan
Page 3-B
CAJE Ulpan Program
Beginning Winter Term
"Shalom uv-racha" (A most
hearty welcome!) will be ex-
tended to those attending the
opening of the winter term of
the Community Hebrew Ulpan
Program being conducted
throughout Dade County by the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, Abraham J. Gittelson,
associate director of the agency
announced.
An expanded program of
morning and evening classes in
six locations and utilization of
the latest texts and methods of
teaching Hebrew will highlight
the winter term, which begins
the week of Jan. 12.
Beginner, intermediate and
advanced classes will be held
at Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach, Mondays and Wednes-
days from 10 a.m. to noon and
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Classes for
beginners and advanced stu-
dents will be held at Temple
Emanu-El on Tuesday and
Thursday mornings from 10 to
noon.
Morning and evening classes
will be held at Temple Sinai of
North Dade on Mondays and
Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to
noon and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. for
beginners, intermediates and
advanced students. Classes for
beginners and intermediates
will be held at Betb Torah Con-
gregation on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from 7:30 to
9:30.
In the Southwest area, morn-
ing classes will be held at Tem-
ple Beth Am on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. Evening classes will be at
Beth David Congregation, Tues-
days and Thursdays, from 7:30
to 9:30 p.m. Both locations have
classes for beginners, inter-
mediate and advanced students.
The Ulpan classes are spon-
sored by CAJE, the American
Zionist Federation, the Israel
Aliyah Center and the Depart-
ment of Education and Culture
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, American Section, under
the direction of Dr. Abraham
Gannes.
The Ulpan approach to lan-
guage study utilizes the audio-
lingual method of foreign-lan-
guage study, immersing stu-
dents immediately in a concen-
trated program of speaking and
listening to the language as
spoken by native instructors.
Ulpan programs in Israel
have taught Hebrew in a short
time to immigrants from more
than 70 countries.
Ulpan instructors are special-
ly trained teachers and concen-
trate on spoken Hebrew with an
Israeli accent.
Israeli cuture is also intro-
duced in Ulpan classes, where
recent happenings in Israel are
discussed and Hebrew songs
and dances learned. There are
also parties and meals, with the
entire menus and ordering in
Hebrew.
Hebrew Academy Plant Sale
Will Commemorate Arbor Day
A plant sale commemorating
the holiday of Tu B'Shevat, the
Jewish Arbor Day, will be held
by the Hebrew Academy Wom-
en in conjunction with the PTA
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy on Sunday, Jan. 11, at
the school from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m.
Tu B'Shevat, the 15th day of
the Hebrew month of Shevat,
falls this year on Jan. 17, a Sat-
urday, and will be observed with
the planting of new trees by
Hebrew Academy students on
Jan. 11, according to Mrs. Leon-
ard Adler, president of the He-
brew Academy Women.
There wiU also be a talent
show by the students of the day
school from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.,
and the Hebrew Academy Choir
will perform at 12:30 p.m. There
will be a band playing for dan-
cing during the day.
Alice (Mrs. Abraham) Pay-
cher is serving as coordinator
of the talent show. Miriam (Mrs.
David) Lehrfeld is food coor-
inator, with Ben Margolis as co-
chairman. Jewish and Israeli
food breakfast, lunch, dinner
and snacks will be available
during the plant sale, which will
feature subtropical and tropical
plants, pots and macrame con-
tributed by parents, nurseries
and supporters of the Hebrew
Academy. Israeli art from Argo
Gallery, Ft. Lauderdale, will be
for sale.
Claire (Mrs. Josh) Rephun is
president of the Hebrew Acad-
emy PTA, and Mrs. Inda Pin-
stein is publicity chairman. Pro-
ceeds from the talent show and
plant sale, which are free an
open to the public, will go to
the Hebrew Academy Scholar-
ship Fund.
"Priorities of An American Jew"
Is Temple Menorah Panel Topic
Late Friday services at Tem-
ple Menorah this evening will
be dedicated to, the college
youth, three of whom will form
a panel to discuss "Priorities of
An American Jew."
Ira Levine, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Oscar Levine, will stress
the need for a better Jewish
educational system: "Today's
Needs Reeducating the Jew."
Ira is a student at Emory Uni-
versity.
Paul Warshauer, a senior at
Northwestern University, will
address himself to "Jewish Iso-
lationism" and will call for a
sharing of communal respon-
sibilities in order to gain greater
involvement on the part of the
average college student.
Frances Glushakow, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Glusha-
kow, and a senior at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, will stress
the cause of Israel as a top
priority for American Jews in
,"An Elusive Peacfe." Frances
will propose a firm link between
American Jewry and Israel
based on religious and cultural
ties.
Rabbi Abramowitz will sum
up the discussants' papers and
stress the need to hearken to
the voice of the college stu-
dents.
Art Forum
The Monthly Art Forum, an
activity of the Miami Beach Art
Club, has announced two Jan-
uary meetings.
On Saturday, Jan. 3. a 3 p.m.,
and Fraud Strange Bedfel-
lows."
On Saturday, Jan. 18, at 2
p.m., at the Washington Fed-
eral Auditorium, Dr. Louis and
Mrs. Dorothy Alpert will talk

Dov Kolani, legal advisor
since 1968 to the Ministry
of Tourism in Jerusalem,
has been named director
of the Southern U.S-, re-
placing Jacob Goren, who
is returning to Jerusalem.
According to tourism com-
missioner Israel Zuriel,
Kolani, a member of the
Israel Bar Association who
was born and educated in
Jerusalem, is considered
Israel's top expert in tour-
ism law. <"*
Over 300 Forte Towers residents honored Israel and
Rose Schwartz and Irving H. Greene at the Jewish Na-
tional Fund Banquet in the Fontainebleau Hotel. The
residents have established two groves in the American
Bicentennial Jerusalem Park. Pictured (from left) are
banquet chairman George Kotin and Mrs. Kotin, Irving
H. Greene, Mrs. Mimi Chandeze, Hon. Zev W. Kogan,
president, JNF Southern Region, Cantor Saul H. Breeh,
chairman, Hi-Rise Apartments.
At the Forte Towers banquet were (above, from left)
Mr. and Mrs. Kotin, Mr. and Mrs. Israel Schwartz, the
honorees, Mr. Kogan and Cantor Breeh.
* Maxwell House Coffee ^
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
FRANCIS SALVADOR 1747 1776
The First Jewish Patriot Killed in the American Revolution
On August 1, 1776, in one of the earliest
k battles after the signing of the
f Declaration of Independence on July
4th, Francis Salvador was killedthe
first Jewish patriot to die in the Revolution.
With a small group of 330 men, he fell near
his plantation on the Keowee River in South
Carolina, while defending the settlers against
a British-incited attack by Cherokee Indians.
Francis Salvador was born in London. The
nephew of a wealthy English financier, he
arrived in Charleston in 1773 and became a
planter and landowner with an estate of over
6000 acres. Salvador soon became an ardent
patriot, an outspoken defender of American lib-
erties and in 1775, a representative to the First
Provincial Congress. Later, he served in the
Second Provincial Congress of South Carolina.
Salvador was the first Jew to serve in a provin-
cial or in an "American" legislative body.
While in Charleston, Salvador earned the
respect and friendship of many noted colonial
leaders. Among them, Edward Rutledge, Pat-
rick Calhoun and Edward Pinkney.
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Among Salvador's achievements were: finan-
cial advisor to the Assembly; participation in
reorganization of the courts and system of
selecting magistrates; his active role in the
drafting of the Constitution of South Carolina;
and bis commission to sign and stamp the
State's new currency.
Although he died at the young age of 29,
Francis Salvador's contributions to his adopted
state and country were exceptional. The plaque
dedicated to his memory in City Hall Park in
Charleston bears these words...
Born an aristocrat, he became a democrat,
An Englishman, he cast his lot with America;
True to his ancient faith, he gave his life
for new hopes of human liberty and
understanding.
Good
lothe
Lost Drop
SEND FOR
EXCIT1NC
BOOKLET
Honoring 1776
and Famous
Jews in
American
History
You and your children will be thrilled to read
the fascinating stories in this booklet about
your Jewish heritage in Americathe profiles
of many "historic" Jews who made notable
contributions in the creation and building of
our nation. Send 50* (no stamps) with name
and address to:
JEWISH-AMERICAN PATRIOTS
Box 4488, Grand Central Station
New York, N.Y. 10017


Page 4-B
+3mlst)IUrktten
Friday, January 2, 197$
Imprisonment is Price for Emigration
To Israel from Russia
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK(JTA) "Im-
prisonment if the price for im-
migration to Israel." This is the
way Shimon Grilius. a 30-year-
old Vilna-born electronics engi-
n*"-r. summed up his five years
cf hard labor in Soviet prisons.
Grilius, the first Orthodox
Jewish "Prisoner of Con-
science" to emigrate to Israel,
received especially harsh treat-
ment when he tried to observe
Miami Mayor Maurice A. Ferre (right) received the
National Humanitarian Award from B'rai B'rith Youth
Services at a dinner and ball in his honor on Dec. 14
in Miami Beach. Making the presentation was Moses
L. Kove, an international vice president of B'nai B'rith
and chairman of the New York City Taxi and Limousine
Commission. The testimonial, attended by 300 guests,
benefited B'nai B'rith's national youth programs, in-
cluding the Hillel Foundations, B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) and Career and Counseling Serv-
ices.
W^y.M
^P^ ifl we$?%- .'W-A
^bk ^1 ^r^"^^^ Bk.
1 w j Ml
Mrs. Stella Topol received the "Woman of the Year"
plaque of the Florida Women's Division of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University at a luncheon at the
Fontainebleau Hotel. From left, Maurice A. Berman; Eli-
yahu Honig, director of the department of information
and public affairs of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem;
Mrs. Topol; her husband, Morris Topol; and Sanford Ber-
man. The Bermans are Mrs. Tcpol's brothers with whom
she contributed the Berman Cafeteria on Hebrew Uni-
versity's Mt. Scopus campus. Honig was the principal
speaker at the luncheon, which benefited the university's
scholarship fund.
President Rose Banner (left) discusses plans for the
silver anniversary "Stairway to the Stars Luncheon"
with Menorah Sisterhood's first president, Shirley Sol-
loway (center), and Elsie Belsky, charter member and
past president. All past presidents and charter members
will be honored in a special ceremony by Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, spiritual leader of Temple Menorah, at the
Jan. 21 luncheon at the Carillon Hotel.
kashrut, the Shabbat and other
religious laws in prison.
HE IS now in New York to
spend a month as the first
"Hero-in-Residence" under a
program sponsored by the
Greater New York Conference
on Soviet Jewry and the Board
of Jewish Education. During the
month, he will speak at Jewish
schools in the daytime and be-
fore adult groups in the eve-
ning.
Speaking in Hebrew, Grilius
was interviewed before he and
another former "Prisoner of
Conscience," Sylva Zalmanson,
participated in a Simchat Torah
"Festival of Freedom" in front
of the New York Public Library
sponsored by the GNYCSJ.
Nearly 1,000 people braved
the rainy weather to attend the
demonstration. Many of them
marched to the Isaiah Wall op-
posite the United Nations where
Zalmanson began a hunger
strike in support of her hus-
band, Eduard Kuznetsov, and
the other "Prisoners of Con-
science."
INDIVIDUALS and organiza-
tions were expected to join her
as she appears before the Isaiah
Wall from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily.
Kuznetsov, who was sentenced
in December, 1970, in the first
Leningrad trial, is still serving
a 15-year sentence.
Grilius stressed that the
cause of nrisoners and the Jew-
ish activists and emigration are
all part of the same issue. He
said Jews should seek the free-
dom not only of the "POCs"
but of all Jews in the Soviet
Union.
He said the fact that he, Zal-
manson and others are in Israel
and are able to come to the
United States to seek heto for
other Jews is "a miracle of God
but God also expects us to help
in his miracles."
HE SAID he has learned that
Jews are not peonle of separate
nations but are all one, and that
when one Jew suffers all Jews
must come to his defense.
The young engineer was ar-
rested on July 21, 1969, in Rai-
zan in central Russia along with
several other voung Jews at the
University of Raizan. an engi-
neering school, because they
had been seeking to emigrate
since 1966.
Grilius noted that he and
others had gone to Raizan be-
cause quotas for Jews made it
impossible to go to universities
near their homes. The charge
was anti-Soviet activities.
Grillius said the only evidence
presented by the authorities
was that he had a record called
"The Diary of the Six-Day War."
HE SAID another piece of
evidence was an article written
by Yuri Vudka, the only one
of the students who was Ortho-
dox before imprisonment, argu-
ing that Jews had a right to
emigrate to Israel on the basis
of a return to their national
homeland.
This was written in 1966, a
year before the major drive for
aliya, which was spurred by the
Six-Day War, began.
Grilius, who said he was
raised as a traditional not a re-
ligious Jew, noted that both his
grandfather and father had
been imprisoned under Stalin
for wanting to remain Jews.
His grandfather was subse-
quently killed by the Nazis in
Lithuania.
GRILIUS SPENT two years in
the Potma Labor camp and
three years in Perm, all of them
under strict regime. He suffer-
ed the same harsh treatment
that other Jewish nrisoners did,
including the indignity of shar-
ing ouarters with former Nazis.
But for the religious prisoners
it was even harsher, he said.
He related that they trted to
keep kosher and therefore re-
fused rnurh of the food He was
always hungry.
It was worse on Passover be-
cause thev ?av? up eating bread
which was their main staple, he
recalled. Grilius and his fri nds
also worked longer hours so
that they would not have to
work on Shabbat.
Grilius. who now has a long,
thick red beard, said the So-
viet prison guards forcibly re-
moved bis kipot and shaved his
beard and pavot. In addition, he
and his friends were nut into
solitirv confinement afte1- each
attempt at wearing a kipot and
beard.
GRILltfS SAID that one can
survive a five-year term but he
was afraid for those like Vudka
and the defendants in the first
Leningrad trial who have to
serve up to 15 years.
He said the camps are in an
area where it is 10 degrees be-
low zero for eight months and
prisoners are not provided
with warm shoes or clothes.
Grilius arrived in Israel in
December, 1974, and studied
Hebrew at the Ulpan at the
Beit B-odetsky Absorption Cen-
ter in Kamat Aviv. He will start
wo-k soon as an electronic? n-
pm"?r at the Sony plant in Tel
Aviv.
NOTING THAT he frnew of
conditions in Israel while still
;n tho USSR. Grilius slid that
the things he expected to be
goo^ there are even better and
some of what h thought would
Pe bad are even worse.
"But I feel that I am at
ho^ie," he said.
He added that Israel is the
rnlv countrv where he could
|f* a full Jewish life and af-
fi -"led that be wants to help
bifH tv Jewish State.
St. Francis Hospital
Plans 50th Anniversary Gala
St. Francis Hospital. Miami
Beach's first hospital, will begin
celebration of its 50th year with
a Golden Anniversary Ball on
Jan. 3 at the Doral on the
Ocean.
Members of the community
and the hospital's loyal support-
ters will be present at the
"golden event." whose M.C. is
newscaster Ralph Renick. Music
for dancing will be provided by
the Don and Mary Burns Or-
chestra.
The annual event was moved
from the Surf Club, where it had
previously been held, to the
Doral to provide space for larg-
er attendance.
The generosity of patroness
Blanche (Mrs. Nelson Swift)
Morris and patron emeritus
Fred Snite, who has sponsored
23 previous St. Francis balls,
will permit proceeds from the
dinner to go to the $18 million
Golden Anniversary Expansion
Program, which will provide for
modernization of hospital facil-
ities.
Forty-Niners To Hear About
"Israel's Outlook for 1976"
Gerald Schwartz, Southeast
regional director of the Amer-
ican Red Magen David for Is-
rael, will sneak on "Israel's
Outlook for J.976" on Jan. 13
at a 7:30 p.m. meeting of the
Temple Emanu-El Forty-Niners
in the temple's Sirkin Hall.
Irving Schatzman, Forty-Nin-
ers president, said that the pro-
gram is open to the public, but
reservations are required and
can be made at the Teple of-
fice.
President of a Miami Beach-
based public relations and ad-,
vertising agency, Schwatrz is a;
member of the national board of
directors of the American Zion-
ist Federation, past president of
the Miaim Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith and former president of
the South Florida Zionist Coun-
cil.
no
Wholesale Distributors of
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I
Friday, January 2, 1976
+Jewisti rtcrirffon
Page 5-B

Majorca Towers* and* Point East '
Plan Mid-January "Nights in Israel"
Siegel Stresses '76 As *
"Year of Energy" For Israel
Meivin S. Landow, chairman of the board of Kennedy
& Cohen appliance dealers, was honored recently by
the National Appliance and Radio-TV Dealers Associa-
tion, the City of Miami Beach and the Landow Yeshiva
Center of Miami Beach at an awards luncheon at the
Sheraton Four Ambassadors. Landow received a plaque
and was cited by Jules Steinberg, executive vice presi-
dent, National Appliance and Radio-TV Dealers Asso-
ciation, for "... his help to the small appliance dealers
in difficult economic times." Lenny Weinstein, Miami
Beach City Councilman, presented Landow with the
key to the City of Miami Beach. Rabbi Sholem Lipskar,
Landow Yeshiva Center, presented Landow with a pla-
que from the cultural center that he endowed.
Over 800 women and men attended the Miami Chapter
of Hadassah's Annual Youth Ally ah luncheon at the
Fontainbleau Hotel on Dec. 8. Josie Burson, America's
Mother of the Year and a member of the National
Hadassah Board, spoke on Youth Aliyah. A fashion
show featuring Israeli creations by students of the
Alice L. Seligsberg Vocational High School was pre-
sented by Jordan Marsh. Pictured here are (front row,
from left) Gloria Friedman, president of the Miami
Chapter; Mrs. Burson: Helen Weisberg, president, Flor-
ida Region of Hadassai. In the back row (from left)
are Linda Minke~. a i: n'strative vice president of the
Miami Chapter; Ellen Mqndler, immediate past presi-
dent; Rose Schwartz, Diane Issenberg and Doris Axxin,
coordinators of the day.
Mrs. Rachel Laufer Katz (second from left} riceived
the Stale of Israel David Ben-Gurion Award at the
American Mizrachi VJomen Bond-With-Israel Luncheon
on Dec. 7 at the Konover Hotel. Makin'g the presenta-
tion were (from left) Mrs. Aaron Katz, president. South
Florida Council, and guest speaker Ambassador Amos
Ganor, Deputy Consul General of Israel in New York
and a ranking member of Israel's diplomatic corps.
Mrs. Hyman Chabner (right), luncheon chairman, an-
nounced that the chapters pledged overwhelming Is-
rael Bond commitments.
Humorist, raconteur and vo-
calist Emil Cohen will headline
the Majorca Towers "Night in
Israel," Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 8
p.m. in the social hall.
According to general chair-
man Louis Stark, the meeting,
sponsored by the Majorca Tow-
ers Israel Bonds Committee, will
stress the 1976 theme for State
of Israel Bonds "The Year of
Energy for Israel."
"Israel today faces a period
of stern austerity and economic
hardship at a time when its
defense budget is the greatest
in its history, and that is why
Israel Bond investments count
so heavily today," Stark said. "It
is up to us to see that Israel
receives a continued and in-
creased flow of Israel Bond dol-
lars to help it overcome its
many problems."
ON THURSDAY, Jan. 13,
Point East residents will hold a
"Night in Israel" rally. Chair-
man Morris L. Tobman has an-
nounced that the rally will be-
gin at 7:30 p.m. in the Point
East Auditorium and will fea-
ture author Max I. Dimont, an
expert on Jewish history who
has lectured at the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem, University
of Haifa and the Weizmann In-
stitute.
Tobman cited 1976 as "a deci-
sive year in which Israel must
have the resources for increased
oil exploration and an intensifi-
cation of the search for new
sources of energy."
The Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization is placing the
emphasis in 1976 on energy, oil
exploration, electrical power
and expansion programs. This
was announced by Robert L.
Siegel, general campaign chair-
man.
One of the most important
aspects of this year's campaign,
he declared, will be to finance
Israel's search for new sources
of energy. "Israel Bond funds
will be utilized to help meet Is-
rael's essential energy needs to
replace the oil from the Abu
Rudeis oil fields, which have
been returned to Egypt as a re-
sult of the interim Sinai disen-
gagement agreement," Siegel
said.
ONE OF the new energy proj-
ects is an 800-megawatt nuclear
energy installation south of
Ashdod which will be a four-
year oil-exploration program re-
quiring an investment of S200
million. Other projects include
the construction of an electric
power station, the development
of large-scale solar energy units
for commercial use and the es-
tablishment of a hydroelectric
power project.
Siegel underscored the neces-
sity for increasing Israel's in-
dustrial output for export to en-
able the country to realize the
opportunities for increased
trade with Europe as a result
of its 1975 agreement with the
Common Market. Under the
terms of the new agreement, he
said, Israel will be allowed to
sell its products to Common
Market nations duty-free, begin-
ning in 1977.
Because Israel's shortage of
funds for economic develop-
ment will not be remedied by
large-scale U.S. financial aid
earmarked largely for defense,
Israel is increasingly dependent
on State of Israel Bonds.
Pioneer Women
Plan Luncheon
Kadimah Chaper of Pioneer
Wo"in plan a luncheon for
Tuesday, Jan. 13, at noon at
Beth Kodesh Congregation.
Guest of honor is Helen Miller,
a chapter member now living
in Israel.
Hostesses for the afternoon
are Pauline Levick, Rose Soko-
lof and Elsa Kreutzer. Proceeds
go to social services for wom-
en, children and youth in over
1,000 child care and immigrant
rehabilitation centers in Israel.
"Biblical Zionism" on TV
P.nbbi Tibor H. Stern spirit-
ual leader of the Jacob C. Cohen
Community Synagogue, will de-
liver a message on Biblical Zion-
ism this morning at 11:30 on
Ch. 6. Rabbi Stern i. preparing
a bookht about biblical and
Prophetic Zionism.
One of the world's oldest
kosher wines is now being
distributed in Florida, it
was announced by Morris
Waldman. Kedem wines,
made by the Herzog fam-
ily since 1948 in Europe
and the U.S., has awarded
Waldman and Max Stitch
exclusive distributorship
of the product line in the
state. Waldman, who own-
ed and operated Waid-
man's Hotel in Miami
Beach for years, was also
vice president of Argento
Importers, wine brokers.
Stitch, of Miami Beach, is
well known in the kosher
wine field.
J.F.
Jewish
Civilization
It's all there in the
Encyclopaedia
Judaiea.
For free color
brochure,
call (305) 534-8251
or write: E. J., Sun* 505,
120 Lincoln Rd., M.B. 33139
PAYMENT ACCEPTED
IN ISRAEL BONDS
OVER 70 SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES
Imagine! Tennis on 13 lighted professional courts, staffed by a
'well known' Tennis 'Pro' and 10 instructors! Golf, on our own
private nine hole course! Riding on seven miles of trails spread
over 525 acres of breathtakingly beautiful scenery! A childrens
paradise ... 25 sailboats, 3 motorboats, 4 indoor Brunswick
bowling lanes, canoe trips, baseball, basketball, waterskiing,
drama and dance, karate, fencing, rocketry, ham radio, archery,
photography and gymnastics are just some of the many fascinating
activities available! Ages 5 to 16. Fee includes air fare allowance.
OUR 41 ST YEAR!
unaer Weinberg family direction
Dietary Laws Observed Nationwide Enrollment
CALL OR WRITE FOR A BEAUTIFUL COLOR BROCHURE
Announcing limited openinos in the Miami area.
Contact Director Lowis Weinberg
Miami Of ice 2333 B'ickpll Ave.. Suite 1512
Phone 758-9454 or 858-1190
Separate camps of distinction for Boys and Gi.-ls on beautiful Reflection
Lake in the picturesque Pocono Mountains of N.E. Pennsylvania.
WINTER OFFICE: 6528 Castor Avenue. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19149
Phone: (215) 533-1557


Page 6-B
-Jenisti fforkfiar
Friday, January 2, 1975
oint
, of tew
with NOR/VW A. OROVITZ
SPECIAL TO 1HI WISH fLORIDIAN
Shalev: "Where Is the World's Outcry?"
At a Salute to Israel Veterans
Day at the Fontainebleau Hotel,
sponsored by the Israel Histad-
rut Foundation, Mordechai Sha-
lev, Israel's Ambassador to Ca-
nada, addressed some 1,000 per-
sons and raised the question oi
The Lubavitch Chabad House
bus advertisements enjoin Jew-
ish women and girls to bring
peace and happiness into their
homes by lighting Shabbat can-
dles. For want of space, the
Hasidic group might also sug-
gest the taking off a Shabbat
challah and observance of "ta-
harat hamishpahah" family
laws of purity.
Of those three positive,
obligatory mitzvot for Jewish
women, the use of mikveh im-
mersion (for family purity) is
probably the most deliberated
and meaningful.
Simply put, purity laws, as
written in Leviticus IS: 19-33
and rabbinic interpretations
which followed, forbid marital
relations for approximately two
weeks out of every month. The
time is divided into a minimum
of five "unclean" days succeed-
ed by seven "clean" days. In
anticipation of the menstrual
period, one additional day of
abstinence is required. On the
eighth "clean" night and before
the first marital union of the
cycle, a woman is obligated to
immerse and purify herself in
a ritual mipveh, saying a spe-
cific blessing.
THE LAWS of "Niddah"
(when a woman is in her im-
purity) create a behavioral
structure and home situation
that is markedly different from
today's overworked image of a
sexually revolutionized society.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro of
Beth Israel Congregation fre-
quently speaks with young cou-
ples on the importance and
significance of mikvah.
Likewise, Rabbi Dov Bidnick
of the Sky Lake Synagogue
thinks that the stereotypes of
the past concerning what a mik-
veh is all about are not true in
1975. "The old-fashioned, un-
clean, unattended mikveh is
gone. Today, most mikvohot
are planned for aesthetic beauty
as well as for spiritual fulfill-
ment," he explained.
Spiritual elevation, not physi-
cal cleanliness, is really the es-
sence of mikveh.
BEFORE a woman may even
go to a "ritualarium," she must
scrupulously bathe herself,
shampoo her hair, pare h**r
nails, remove nail polish and all
cosmetics and bandages. At the
community mikveh, located at
151 Michigan Avenue, the at-
tendant will direct the woman
to one of four dressing and
bathrooms. After bathing once
again, she will be guided to one
of the two mikvohot.
Each is a small tiled room
with a short stairway leading
into a sunken tiled tub. After
one complete immersion (hair
and all), the attendant will join
in saying the blessing. Another
one or two immersions are us-
ually observed.
A "kallah" (bride-to-be) will
immerse herself three times,
often with her mother present.
After the purification, the
dressing room is available for
private use, conplete with a
hairdryer and makeup table. A
woman may complete the entire
ritual in a half-hour.
According to the caretaker, a
mature Orthodox matron who
regrets that Americas Jewish
education ignores traditional
mikveh observance, the ritual-
arium is used by 4 to 10 women
each evening.
THE MIKVEH is open to men
for ritual purification during
the day only and to women
after dark. The water is changed
between day and evening and
circulated constantly, much like
in a swimming pool.
The newly built mikveh,
which replaced a 30-year-old
structure at the same address,
carries the modern stone facade
to the interior, where rainwater
pipes are enclosed in a stone
chimney of sorts at the center
of the building.
There is also a mikveh at
Beth Israel Congregation in the
mid-Beach area. However, ac-
cording to Rabbi Shapiro, that
mikveh is "basically an accom-
modation for men before Shab-
bat. We don't want to interfere
with the community mikveh."
Therefore, the 40th Street
ritualarium would only be used
by women when the time for
immersion (which should not be
unnecessarily postponed) came
on erev shabbat or yomtov.
The whole rational for use of
mikveh is not just arbitrary and
forced separation in the mar-
riage bed. Spiritual elevation,
self-control, links with tradition-
al Judaism and an instant re-
play of the honeymoon each
month are some of the areas
that come into focus in this dis-
cussion.
Next week "Points of View"
will present a contemporary
evaluation of family purity laws
by observers and non-observers.
Miami Beach
Hadassah
Southgate Group will hold a
regular meeting on Monday,
Jan. 12, at 1 p.m. in the Terrace
Room of Southgate Towers.
Shirley Rosenberg, president.
Forte ToWers Group will meet
on Jan. 12, at 12:30 p.m. in the
1200 West Ave. Auditorium. Bi-
centennial Program, "Jewish
Roots in America," bjt Elfreda
Solis-Cohen. Songs in English
and Hebrew by Dorothy Mon-
dres with Rose Glick, accom-
panist.
Morion Towers Group will
meet at the American Savings
Bank. Alton and Lincoln Rds.,
on Jan. 12, at 11:38 a.m. Free
dessert to all paid-up members.
Sophie Primak will review
"Herzl."
Emma Lazarus Group will
hold a regular meeting on Jan.
12, at noon at the Holiday Inn,
Collins Ave. and 87th St. Leona
Meisel will review "The Life of
Marc Chagall."
Bay Harbor Group will hold
a regular meeting on Jan. 12, at
12:30 p.m. at the Bay Harbor
Town Hall. A skit will be per-
formed by members. Mrs. Na-
than Scheiner, president.
Lincoln Group wlill hold a
meeting on Jan. 12, at 12:30
p.m. at the Clubroom of 100 Lin-
coln Rd. Mrs. Nellie Weisman,
president.
Sophie Tucker Group will
hold a regular meeting at the
Coastal Towers Party Room on
Jan. 12 at noon. Bicentennial
program with the choral group
of Coastal Towers.
Herzl Group will hold a lunch-
eon meeting on Jan. 12, at noon
at the Montmartre Hotel. A film
will be shown by Samuel Strik-
off. President Syd Spear.
Shaloma Group will hold a
regular, meeting on Tuesday,
Jan. 13, at noon at the Shore
Club Hotel. Guest speaker is
Mrs. Augusta Mentz. Edith Sha-
piro, president.
Ben-Gurion Group will hold a
regular meeting on Jan. 12 at
noon in the Galahad Dade Build-
ing. Entertainment and celebra-
tion of Golden Anniversaries of
Mr. and Airs. Nathan Haut and
Mr. and Mrs. James Wolchock.
civil war in Lebanon.
"Lebanon at one time was the
shining example of democracy
at work in the Middle East, the
one nation which was not 100
percent Moslem, where Chris-
tians were allowed to coexist in
peace," Shalev said.
"By keeping silent about con-
tinued attacks on Israel, and al-
lowing Beirut to become the
capital of Arab terrorism they
managed to keep themselves
alive. Now they are the paying
the price."
Shalev asked, "Where is the
outcry of the Western world,
essentially a Christian world?"
He pointed out that this is not
the first time the Moslems have
tried to stamp out Christians in
Lebanon, citing the events of
1958, when terrorism was
rampant in Beirut.
The Israeli diplomat also ad-
dressed himself to the question
of the Jan. 12 Middle East de-
bate in the UN Security Coun-
cil which Israel has said it will
boycott because a PLO delegate
has been invited to attend.
"How can sensible people, de-
cent people, expect Israel to sit
down with the PLO to settle the
Palestian problem?" Shalev ask-
ed.
His statement that "Israel will
not accept a UN-imposed solu-
tion of peace in the Middle
East" drew applause from the
audience.
"Israel is once again being
attacked by the evil forces of
the world," Shalev said, "and
the center of that attack is the
United Nations. But there are
many sideshows, such as the
International Women's Year
meeting, the UNESCO meeting ^J
in Parto, etc. There is hardly a
meeting today that is not used
as an opportunity to make a
strike at Israel, even when the
subject matter has nothing to
do witn the Middle East con-
flict."
Commitments of $375,000,
representing 75" mortgage units,
were nude to benefit the His-
tadrut Mortgage Fund in Israel,
which grants home loans to
young couples, especially vet-
erans of the Israel Defense
Forces.
1
Evelyn Cohan To Receive
Hannah G. Solomon Award
At NCJW Meeting
V
Forte Forum
The Forte Forum-George N.
Caylor Forum will present a
talk by Mendell M. Selig,
"What's Ahead for Israel?" on
Jan. 6 at 1 p.m. at the 1200
West Ave. Auditorium.
Described as "a key layman
among Miami Jews," Selig has
been chairman of the Council
for Economic Development of
Israel and board member of the
GMJF and American Associa-
tion of Jewish Education.
At the kickoff breakfast for ORT's Israeli Award Cam-
paign were (from left) Celia (Mrs. Leonard) Kaufman,
vice president, Coral Park Chapter; Arlyne (Mrs. Ron-
ald) Levy, Dade South Region financial secretary; Enid
(Mrs. Herbert) Zerlin, president, Kendall Chapter; Lois
(Mrs. S. Melvin) Apotheker, vice president, Dade South
Region, and chairman, membership department; Barbara
(Mrs. Thomas) Ratner, Dade South Region expansion
chairman; Iris (Mrs. Jerome) Price, vice president, Dade-
land Chapter; Rachela (Mrs. Nathan) Rich, Dade South
Region executive committee member.
Pharmaceutical
Seminar
The South Florida Alumni
Chapter of Rho Pi Phi interna-
tional pharmaceutical fraternity
will hold a free one-hour ac-
credited seminar on Wednes-
day, Jan. 7, at 8 p.m. in the
second-floor meeting room of
the Home Federal Savings and
Loan on E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd. Mildred Padow, M.D., will
speak on "The Radiologist, The
Patient and The Pharmacist."
The seminar is open to all
South Florida practicing and
visiting pharmacists and their
wives.
A short business meeting foi
the chapter members will fol-
low the lecture.
'Jewish Themes''
David Goodman will speak on
"Jewish Themes in Opera arid
Music" this evening at 8 at
Temple Israel South. Worship
services are conducted at Sun-
set Congregational Church.
The Greater Miami Section,
National Council of Jewish
Women, annual membership
meeting and Bicentennial pro-
gram will be held at 11:30 a.m.
on Wednesday, Jan. 14, at the
Fontainebleau Hotel. Judy M.
Gilbert, president, made the an-
nouncement.
Robert L. Shevin, Florida At-
torney General, will be guest
speaker. Evelyn Cohan, commu-
nity leader and past president
of Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Wom-
en, will receive the 1976 Han-
nah G. Solomon Award.
The Hannah G. Solomon
Award, named for the founder
of the National Council of Jew-
ish Women, is given to a person
who has changed the lives of
others through her leadership
efforts and services in the com-
munity and who has motivated
others to fight for change which
has resulted in progress and en-
lightenment in the community.
MRS. COHAN'S service to
this community includes mem-
bership on the board of direc-
tors of American Jewish Com-
mittee, Governor's Commission
on Criminal Justice Standards
and Goals, Advisory Council for
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, board of directors of Girl
Scouts of Dade County, NCJW
national committees on field
service and national affairs,
NOW Task Force on Abortion,
and the Hemispheric Confer-
ence for Women. She is a volun-
teer coordinator for the Florida
State Division of Youth Serv-
ices.
EVELYN COHAN
The Bicentennial program
highlights Council's top priority
on Constitutional rights. The
NCJW believes that individual
freedom, dignity and security
are basic to American dem-
ocracy, that individual liberty
and rights guaranteed by the
U.S. Constitution are keystone*
of a free society and that any
erosion of these liberties or dis-
crimination against any person
undermines that society.
To commemorate the Bicen-
tennial, the NCJW will present
the multimedia "In ursuit of Pri-
vacy" on Jan. 14. The comma-
nity is invited. Judy M. Gilbert
will preside. Betsy Singer, vice
president of public affairs, is
chairwoman of the day.
s
Schwartz and a Jesuit
To Discuss the Mideast
The continuing Middle East
crisis will be discussed at the
oan' J8Jneetin* the Mi<
Beach Elks at 8 p.m. M the Elfcs
clubhouse.
Allen Goldberg, program
chairman and past exalted ruler
of the Elks, said, "This will not
be a debate, but a presentation
of opposing viewpoints concern-
ing an area of vital interest to
our community and our nation "
Father Joseph L. Ryan, S.J.,
who has spent most of the past
27 years in the Middle East, will
speak on "Prospects for a Just
Peace Today."
Father Ryan, who taught in
Iraqi colleges and universities
from 194S-48 and 1956-68 serv-
ed for two years as vice presi-
dent of Al Hikma University in
Baghdad. Since 1971 he has
been a resident member of the
Center for the Study of the
Modern Arab World at St.
Joseph's University in Beirut
Gerald Schwartz, a member
of the national board of direc-
tors of the American Zionist
Federation, will describe how
"Terrorism Threatens the
World."
Schwartz, who is past presi-
dent of the South Florida Zion-
ist Council and a former execu-
tive of many Israeli organiza-
tions, is president of a Miami
Beaeh-based public relations
and advertising agency.


Friday, January 2, 1976
* &H#4#l fti-rnrfinr
Page 7-B
Rebbetzin Scores "Jewish Amnesia"
By NORMA A. OROVITZ
Th.-re are sever-1! ways to
iuate what a religious re-
vival meeting might do for the
religion in ouaation i'ie loaal
religion in question, the local
people who pay to attend.
When Rebbetzin Esther Jun-
greis came to Miami Beach for
her one-night Hineni appear-
ance last week, she came to en-
courage closet Jews to find their
destiny and "come home to
Judaism."
Some local rabbis helped to
sell ant or distribute tickets.
Other clergymen refused to
participate or encourage their
high school students to attend
the Hineni happening. But of
the 4,000 people who did attend,
some may just have walked
away a bit more conscious of
their Jewishness. And if that is
in fact the case, then Esther
Jungreis' theatrical presentation
will have been worth her ef-
fort.
The excitement began with
the publicity press releases, the
posters about town and the gen-
eral talk in the Jewish commu-
nity. Although the advance
advance ticket sales of $3-$7
called for an 8 p.m. starting
time crowds assembled at the
Convention Center well before-
hand.
Display and sales tables, with
items ranging from "Buy Israel,
Inc." to Hineni records and
booklets and needlepoint kits,
were scattered throughout the
lobby. Groups of people sur-
rounded the combo playing pop-
ular Israeli and Yiddish tunes.
Several Hassidic men and boys
joined in a Mayim dance. The
Chabad House distributed free
Shabbat candles and holders as
well as class schedules.
Rabbi Biston, Lubavitch Di-
rector of Activities, explained
plans for an additional Chabad
House on the University of Mi-
ami campus. Hannan Sher, Fed-
eration^ Director of Israel
Youth Programs, was on hand
to encourage aliyah and semes-
ter study options.
Retirees, youngsters, collet
students and vacationing snow-
birds thronged about.
Merle Lubisch, who lost three
daughters to the Jews for Jesus
movement, came with her son,
Murray, who has remained with-
in the Jewish tradition. Samuel
Abrahams, a New York attor-
ney and free-lance journalist,
anxiously brought his wife to
hear the rebbetzin. Joe Weiner,
who had seen Hineni two years
ago and found the experience
"too depressing," attended only
in order to hear his son play in
the Mark Three Rock Group.
Mrs. Alan Cohen brought her
nine- and ten-year-old sons,
Hebrew Academy students, be-
cause she anticipated a "good
experience."
On the other hand, 22-year-
old David Suffrin from Mon-
treal came because he was
curious. A Judaic Studies stu-
dent at McGill University, Suf-
frin did not expect a turn-on,
just an added atf>ction to his
vacation.
An Orthodox North Miami
Beach woman in her 60*s, blind
since her teens, heard Rebbetzin
Jungreis on the radio and found
her remarks meaningful. En-
couraged by her rabbi, she ar-
rived with Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Sobel and Mr. and Mrs. Alolshes
Levine, also of... North Miami
Beach.
Visiting from Paris. George
Gersene, a theatrical producer,
arranged for a front-row seat.
He would like to see Hineni in
Paris with the rebbetzin speak-
ing in Yiddish.
The Clei Zemer Orchestra
that travels with Hineni provid-
ed the musical backdrop for Es-
ther Jungreis' performance. The
ESTHER JUNGREIS
rebbetzin appeared after an in-
troductory movie and stood on
a stage runway for a continuous
two-hour talk.
Her message for a return to
Torah living was interwoven
with the story of a hypothetical
second generation American
Jew named "Kevin." The gist of
the all-too-familiar tale was that
grandfather "Morris." a shtetl
Jew, came to the U.S.A. at the
turn of the century. His son,
"Miltie," was all too anxious to
become a completely assimil-
ated American (i.e., not "too"
Jewish, like Morris). Miltie then
produced "Kevin," who is con-
sidering intermarriage. With
Kevin goes 4,000 years of tradi-
tion. Will Kevin bring a "Chris-
topher" or a "Moshe" into the
world?
That really is the rebbetzin's
question. The answers she pro-
vides and insists upon are sim-
-- -)-.-> tt .nn^tne*" < million
die in "spiritual gas chambers."
I i ve .lewish memory, ob-
i and
Elevate Judaism from
. :i of a i li rail-
on worthy of daily
mce. Do one raitz-
vah :> .J another tomor-
row.
OK! Miami Jews g;t '.hi- mes-
sage! If and after Hinnni does
reawaken the "pintele yid"
(flicker of light) within sleep-
ing Jewish souls. Hineni goes
back to its New York headquar-
ters.
Then what? That is what
bothers Hineni's detractors. A
religious spectacular, be it Billy
Graham or Esther Jungreis,
does not follow up on the inter-
est generated. Is the spectacle,
then, worthwhile?
According to the rebbetzin,
the answer is affirmative. She
estimates that 90 percertt of
those turned on to Judaism by
Hineni "will be channeled into
established activist organiza-
tions." For those not satisfied
with the establishment, there
are Hineni correspondence
courses and Miami Beach and
Palm Beach chapters in the
planning stage. "We do not want
to polarize the community. We
want the local community to
benefit," the rebbetzin empha-
sized.
Any activity that might raise
Jewish consciousness and en-
hance Yiddishkeit cannot be
completely negative. Criticisms
of dramatics and theatrics aside.
Esther Jungreis may just have
prevented another case of Jew-
ish amnesia.
>M& S^X*
The Cuban-Hebrew Community paid tribute to George
Feldenkreis and his wife, Dorita (right), when the State
of Israel David Ben-Gurion Award was presented to
them at the Cuban-Hebrew-lsrael Dinner of State on
Dec 6 at the Konovet Hotel. Guest speaker Dr. Roberto
Aron, Israel's delegate to the UN General Assembly
and president of the World General Zionist Organiza-
tion, made the presentation while Mrs. Aron look-
ed on President of the Cuban-Hebrew Israel Dinner
of State was Dr. Isidoro Lerman, and representatives
of the Cuban-Hebrew Congregation of Greater Miami,
Cuban-Sephardic Hebrew Congregation, B'nai B'rith
Latin Lodge and Inter American Group of Hadassah
attended the dinner.
The first Campaign Training Institute, sponsored re-
cently by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, featured
free informational and workshop courses for individual
enrichment led by (from left): Federation executive
vice president Myron J. Brodie; Institute chairman
Fran Levey of South Miami; Dr. Mervin Verbit, profes-
sor of sociology at the City University at the City Urn-
sor of sociology at the City University of New York; and
Reva Wexler of Miami, a management training specialist.
Dr. Marvin Isaacson presented the Humanitarian Award
to Mrs. Rose Kogan.
Mrs. Kogan Receives
Hospital's First Annual
Humanitarian Award
In a Venetian Island patio
garden filled with pink blos-
soms, Rose (Mrs. Alexander)
Kogan on Dec. 21 received the
first annual 1 lumanitarian .Award
from P. L. Dodge Memorial Hos-
pital, Florida's largest non-state-
owned psychiatric hospital.
Mrs. Kogan has been known
in South Florida since 1941 for
her presidencies and leadership
of many philanthropic and cha-
ritable organizations.
The award was presented by
Dr. Marvin G. Isaacson, medical
director of the P. L. Dodge
Memorial HosDital Foundation.
Miami Beach Mayor Harold Ros-
en addressed the 100 members
of the group, enumerating some
of Mrs. Kogan's accomplish-
ments.
Among the guests in the re-
ception line were Mrs. Phoebe
Morse; Mr. and Mrs. Ted Hollo:
Dr. Martin Rosenthal, chief of
psychiatry at the Mercy Hos-
pital, and Mrs. Rosenthal; Barry
Kutun and Paul Steinberg, Flor-
ido state legislators, and their
wives; Dr. Joseph Lucinian, a
founder of the Coral Gables Hos-
pital, and Mrs. Lucinian; Dr.
and Mrs. Irving Lehrman; Dr.
and Mrs. Michael Gilbert; Dr.
and Mrs. Morton Hammond;
Clare Massey; Mrs. Lillian
Brown; Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Grove; Dr. Ed Williams; Dr. and
Mrs. Hoffman Grosskloss; Dr.
and Mrs. John Dix; Dr. Solomon
Lichter, principal of Miami
Beach Senior High School, Dr.
E. Valdes-Castillo a local psy-
chiatrist, and Mrs. Valdes-Cas-
tillo; and impresarios Jay Jen-
sen and Trixie Levin.
The annual award will be
presented to individuals who
have demonc'rated their hu-t
manitarian efforts to the com-
munity.
Fontaiiiebleau Appoints Resnick
Bernard Resnick has been
named executive vice president
of the Fcntainebleau Hotil. ac-
BERNAKD RESNICK
cording to Ben Novack, chair-
man of the board. Resnick has
long been associated with re-
soits in Miami Beach, North
Carolina and the Bahamas. At
the Fontainebleau he will con-
centrate on guest accommoda-
tions, stimulation of travel
agent activity and staff indoc-
trination.
Novak also announced that
Charles Bass, executive vice
president of convention sales,
Ms. Lenore Toby, manager, and
Leonard Frankel, reservation
manager, will continue in those
positions
Resnick, who devotes his
leisure time to working for the
benefit of underprivileged chil-
dren in the community, recent-
ly received a Certificate of Ap-
preciation from Mayor Steve
Clark.
H<; has served in the hotel
division of the advisory com-
mittees of Miami Dade and
Broward Community Colleges,
and holds an honorary profes-
sorship from FIU.
Hemispheres Group of Hadassah
The Hemispheres Group of
Haddassah held its monthly
meeting in the Ocean Terrace
Ballroom on Dec. 16. President
Gertrude Dank paid tribute to
Henrietta Szold, founder of
Hadassah, who started the
Youth Aliyah movement in
1934.
A Youth Aliyah luncheon is
planned for Jan. 22 at the Amer-
icana Hotel-
Hassie Lichtenstein, educa-
Casting for Temple Emanu-
port on current world events.
Program vice president Frances
Littman narrated a musical pro-
gram directed by Hilda Glazer,
who was presented with a Medi-
cal Center plaque. Performers
were Isabel Abel-on, Freda
Alexander, Eva Brautman, Pau-
line Buchner, Dorothy Green,
Margot Lax, Ruth Lefkowitz,
Rae Massell. Mary Lipschutz
and Ethel Gould.
The group's next meeting will
be on Jan. ^0 at noon in the
Ocean Terrace Room.


Page 8-B
+Jmisi>nar*B3P
Friday, January 2, 1976
Ilene Anne Kulbersh Wed to Warren Jay Rechtman
Ilene Anne KtHberfch and
Warren Jay Rechtman were
married on Dec. 20 at Temple
MRS. WARREN RECHTMAN
MRS. GEORGE MAGRILL
MRS. SANDY RAY
MRS. JOHN W. SALMON
Tife erii Jacob Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Tifereth
Jacob, Hialeah, has planned a
neting for Sunday, Jan. 11, at
9:30 a.m. at the temple.
The Sisterhood's community
;>ioject is the Hialeah Convales-
cent Home, and there are var-
ious other projects for juniors
'.o senior citizens.
Emanu-El by Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz and Rabbi Irving
Lehrman.
The bride, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Irwin Kulbersh of Bay
Harbor, wore a gown of white
satin and Alencon lace with a
matching lace mantilla. She
carried her Bat Mitzvah Bible
covered with white roses.
Mrs. Susan Shiland, a cousin
of the bride, was matron of hon-
or. The bridesmaids were Lori
Levite, Ann Goldman, Paula
S^rsos. R^erta Garlikov and
Sharon Ziskin.
The best min was Marshall
Faye. and ushers were the
groom's brothers Mark. Paul
and Neal Rechtman and the
bride's r^usins Alan and Ste-
phen Goldman.
The bride, a graduate of the
Uni"ersitv of Florida, attended
Georgia State in Atlanta. She is
a member of Phi Sigma Sigma
sorority.
Mr. Rechtman, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Edwin Rechtman of
Atlanta, attended Emory Uni-
versity and was graduated from
Georgia State.
Mrs. Rechtman is the grand-
daughter of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Goldman of Miami
Beach and the late Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Kulbersh of Atlanta.
Among the out-of-town guests
at the dinner at Temple Emanu-
El following the ceremony were
relatives and friends from New
York, New Jersey, California,
Michigan, Georgia, Tennessee,
Alabama and South Africa.
The couple will make their
home in Atlanta on their return
from a wedding trip to Gatlin-
burg, Tenn.
Dianne Roberts and Toby Katzker
Are Married in North Bade
Abbe Pepper Weds George Ma grill
Abbe Carol Pepper and
George Max Magrill were mar-
ried on Dec. 28 at Temple Beth
Moshe by Rabbi Daniel Finger-
er.
Mrs. Magnll, daughter of Mr.
?"d Mrs. Milton J. Pepper of
Miami, attends the University
of South Florida at Tampa.
Her husband, son of Mrs. May
Magrill and the late Herman
Magrill. was graduated from the
University of South Florida at
Tampa.
The bride wore an organza
g">... i leu witn Alencon
lace and carried a white Bible
covered with white orchids and
apricot roses. Her sister, Linda
Susan Goldwasser, was matron
of honor.
The groom's brother, Ben-
jamin Magrill, was best man.
The ushers were Jeffrey Gold-
wasser, Jerry Funk, Edward
Witten, Marx Shapiro, John
Barwick, Richard Tyson and
Robert Cintia.
The flower girls were Amy
Funk and Dory Witten.
On their return from a wed-
ding trip to Jamaica. W.I., the
couple will reside in Tampa.
Miss Augenslein Marries Mr. Ray
Linda Rose Augenstein,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abra-
ham Augcnstein of North Miami
Beach, was married on Dec. 28
to Sandy Ray in the Versailles
Gallery of the Fontainebleau
Hotel. Rabbi Max Lipschitz of-
ficiated.
The bride wore a gown of
ivory peau de soie and a man-
tilla veil, both reembroidered
with English lace and pearls.
Mrs. Ray's attendants were
Susan Weiner, maid of honor,
and Judy Slovin, Yvonne Kas-
par, Avra Frank and Sherry
Rakusin, bridesmaids.
Harris Hoffman was best man.
and Ira Lewis, Dr. Jeff Aueen-
stein, Jay Augenstein and Mich-
ael Darrow were ushers.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray are 1974
graduates of the University of
Florida, where they were active
in Hillel.
Following a honeymoon
cruise to Nassau and Freeport,
the couple will make their home
in North Miami.
Bonnie Wank Marries John Salmon
Bonnie Ellen Wank and John
W. Salmon were married at the
Dauville Hotel on Dec. 21. Of-
ficiating at the ceremony were
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz and
Hazzan Jacob Mendelson of
Beth Torah Congregation, and
the bride's uncle, Rabbi Max J.
Weitz, of Coral Springs Hebrew
Congregation.
Mrs. Salmon, whose parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Wank of
North Miami Beach, was grad-
uated from North Miami Beach
Senior High School and attend-
ed the University of Georgia,
where she was a member of
Delta Phi Epsilon sorority. She
is a student in the University of
Florida School of Education.
Mr. Salmon's parents are
Michael Salmon of Miami and
Mrs. Arthur Cohen of North
Miami Beach. He was graduated
from North Miami High School
and is an honor graduate of
Penn State, where he belonged
to Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity.
H will enter the University of
Florida Law School in March,
1976.
The bride's white organza
dress with chapel train had ac-
cordian pleats around the
bodice, hem and cuffs, with ap-
pliqued Venice lace and pearl
headings. Her full-length man-
tilla was attached to a head-
piece of Venice lace and she
carried a cascade of white and
yellow roses.
The bride and groom, who
met while in the USY program
at Beth Torah, were attended
by Myra Furman, maid of hon-
or, Marilyn Hoder Salmon,
matron of honor, and Randye
Hoder, Amy Tarsches and Pam
Press, bridesmaids; Harold Gold-
berg, best man, and Richard
Shalmon, Marc Wank, Larry
Bookman, and Larry Grant, us'i-
ers.
Nirah Shapo, a cousin of th"
groom, wis flower girl, and
Barton Miller, a cousin of the
bride, was ring-bearer.
Following a reception at the
Deauville, the couple left for a
wedding trip to Jamaica, W.I.
They will make their home in
Gainesville.
Round Town
George H. Finn, an attorney,
is the new Temple Beth Raphael
Men's Club president. Born in
Brooklvn, he was graduated
from City College and Brooklyn
Law School. He worked for the
Federal government and for the
Veterans Administration, where
he was chairman and legal
member of a Disability Evalua-
tion Rating Board. He later .
worked for the State of New
York as State Veterans Coun-
selor in the U.S. Naval Hospi-
tal at St. Albans. George, now a
Miami Beach resident, is the
father of twins Arthur, who
received his Master's degree
from the University of Miami,
and Jacalyn, who is married
and lives in Long Island.
& ft -a
Bart Kleinman and Lou Step-
enoff, senior members of the
National Society of Fee Apprais-
ers, were appointed by the Dade
County Commissioners to serve
on the Dade County Minimum
Standards Housing Appeals
Board under the chairmanship
of senior member Al SiegeL
Dianne Lee Roberts and Tobv
Martin Katzker were married
on Dec. 28 by Rabbi Ralph P.
Kingsley at Temple Sinai of
North Dade.
Mrs. Katzker, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. William Roberts
of North Miami Beach, is a *
graduate of Miami Norland Sen-
ior High and Miami-Dade Junior
College. She is a secretary for
Gold Triangle Stores.
The groom, a graduate of Mi-
ami Coral Park Senior High and
Miami-Dade. is a systems ana-
lyst for the Southeast Regional
Data Cen'er at Florida Interna-
tional Unive^itv. His parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Katz-
ker of Miami.
The bride wore a Victorian-
sleeved gown of cindlelight
peau de oi with a c^nel train
and Alen^n Hc applimies and
reembioiderei Abncon lace on
the bodice. Her l'mg r-thedral
mantra wis trimmed with
matchine lsce.
The miid of hono-- was LjiW
Morgenst^m. and bricl^smqiJ-.
were Allyn BernsHn. B^M
Hirschhorn and Laura Silver*
man.
Aub"r Av-nutb Wl b"t m-n
and ushops we- lo^n i^-r^ti.
Ira fflrshhn-f) and lack R*tvjr*r,
Leslie Jacobson was flower
MRS. TOBY KATZKER
girl and David Katzker was
ring-bearer.
Out-of-town guests included
the bride's grandmother, Mrs.
Rose Heller of New Jersey, and
Theodore Heller, Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Katzker and Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Gryzick.
A luncheon and reception was
held in the temple social hall
following the ceremony.
On their return from a wed-
ing t'ip to Colombia. South
America, the couole will make
t>,-i ho-"t in Mianv.
Marcia Satin and Farid Lavipour
Are Married in Philadelphia
Marcia Row Satin. diug'itT
of Anne and George Shusterman
of Miami Beach, was married
MRS. FARID LAVIPOUR
on n-c. '" M Fr-i-i Lavipour, son
of Bern an. Go.gi Lavipour of
Tehran. Iran.
The ceremony was performed
by RabS: I,nia Bogage in the
Philadelphia b^e of the bride's
sister. Mrs. Robert H. Schwab.
The briic's attendants were hei
sisters, Wendy Citrin and Mary
Ellen Schwab. The g-o-vv*
brother, Ehsan Lavipour, was
best man.
Mrs. Lavipour, a native of
Miami Beach and a graduate of
Mhmi Beach High School, pub-
lished an article on Jews in the
Soviet Union in th 1975 Rosh
Hashanah edition of the Jewish
Floridian.
A** "ssisfnt nrof'S'or of Rus-
si'n literature it Stoclton State
Cell g., s*h- i- a candidate for
,>------,,1 -j j-p<. in Russian at
the University of Pennsylvania.
She sturiK. Russian at the Uni-
versity d? P-iris and in 1974
spent five months in Leningrad
as an international research fel-
low.
Her mother is chairwoman of
the math department at Nau-
tilus Junior High School, and
her stepfather is a Miami phar-
macist.
Mr. Lavipottr, an alumnus of
Lafayette College, received a
Master's decree in business ad-
ministration from the Wharton
School of Finance. A statement
analyst in tne global credit de-
partment of Chase Manhattan
Bank, he is the witbnr of two
books on multinational corpora-
tions. His father is in real estate
in Iran.
Adena Skop Weds Bruce Konigsburg
Adena Skop, youngest daugh-
ter of Temple Sholom's rabbi
Morris A. Skop. and Mrs. Skoo'
was married at the temple on
Dec. 28 to Bruce Konigsburg.
son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Konigsburg of Pompano Beach.
Mrs. Konigsburg. a graduate
of the University of Miami
tea"hei> ;r Imntd County. Her
husband, an engineer, was grad-
ptei fron the University of
Florida.
The couple will make their
home in Coconut Creek.
ORT Meeting
The Miami Business and Pro-
fessional Chapter of Women'-
American ORT will hold a reg-
ular meeting on Thursday, Jan
8, at the American Savings Bank
on Lincoln Rd. at 7:45 p.m. A
Chinese auction will follow the
meeting.
AMW Galil Chapter
Galil Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will have a
regular meeting on Monday
Jan. 5. at noon at the Washing-
ton Federal Building in North
Miami Beach. Mrs. Tina Frei-
man will present slides and an
eyewitness report on Soviet
Jewry.
I
*
I
MRS. BRUCE KONIGSBURG
A


Friday, January 2, 1976
+Je*ist>fhr3dUar?
Page 9-B
I
Rosemary's Thymt
By ROSEMARY FUR.MAN
The sun is shining brightly in
Aspen, Colorado. Tourists are
wearing their fur coats and
sheepskin parkas but it's really
jar too warm for coats and par-
kas and word is that it's cooler
in Miami. So far, ski conditions
are good but everyone is hop-
ing for snow. The mountains are
getting bare and Miamians are
racking up their share of in-
juries. Four days into her vaca-
tion Judy Weiser tore ligaments
in her right knee (two years
ago it was her left knee) and
she's in a cast from ankle to
thigh. Result: five weeks out of
commission and her Corvette
the cast won't fit in.
Jimmy Siegel, Lois and Jay's
son. spent a day at Aspen hos-
pital, but he just strained some-
thing and will be skiing in a few
davs. Kate Furman hit her head
with her own ski not an easy
feat and she has a lump to
show for it. That's it so far.
Most Aspen regulars are here
this holiday season: Alan and
Leila Marcus and kids; Davida
and Hap Levy, who have their
sons here and will soon be join-
ed by their newly married
daughter; Arlen? and Herb
Ruchwald. Jack Courshon, Glo-
ria and Howard Scharlin, Pat
and Martin Fines and sons
Ricky and Randy, the Ernie Hal-
pryn family, and the Weisers,
Woody and Judy.
There are also some newcom-
r-s. Ron and Ellie Ager have
ecently bought a condominium
here; Gloria and Irwin Gold-
berg are over at the Plum Tree
Inn; Sue and Chuck Cobb are
here with Andy and Sandy Gar-
<*r and the David Egozis are
here.
If it sounds as if everyone is
falling over each other as well
as the mountains, not so. Each
family goes its own way, skiing
the mountains and trails most
suited to the ability of the skiers
in the family. At night there are
get-togethers that usually in-
clude the children, but by 9:30
most of us are in bed.
Aspen is not the only Dlace that
is entertaining Miamians. Jill
and Stanley, Norman and Rosa-
lie Arkin and children are at
Steamboat Springs, Colorado.
At Vail, along with President
Ford, are Cliff and Betty Such-
man. Rona Gelbert, Joan Bloom
and family and a whole Ski Club
contingent.
At Keystone, Colorado, there's
a Madahorn Ski Club group that
many doctors have taken ad-
vantage of. Some we know arc
Br-bbie and Len Haimes, Man-
lvn and Alan Robinson, Mimi
and Bob Cohen and Bud and
Audrey Jaffee.
Nancy Click and Robert Ma-
;oon are in Sun Valley, Idaho.
If Colorado were a little near-
er Miami, we'd all be happier
the plane ride is grueling but
once here, it's heaven, and a
good place to start the winter
season. Happy winter to you all.
Members of the Florida Committee for the Weizmann
Institute of Science stand with Dr. David Danon, hema-
tologist and professor of biological ultrastructure at
'he Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.
Dr. Danon spoke informally with community leaders
during brunch at the Carriage House, sponsored by Dr.
Aaxwell Dauer, president of the Florida Committee.
From left, Mrs. Dauer, Dr. Danon, Dr. Dauer and Dr.
Morris Rockstein.
Alumni and leaders of Yeshiva University met recently
at the North Miami Beach home of Barry ***"**
to plan a series of lectures and meetings of friends
alumni, parents and students which wil lmim%*"d
annual Heritage Award dinner in early spring. Pictured
heTare (standing, from left) Peter GoMring gener*
chairman; Joseph M. Drexler, a master lldfr>%ng*
Goldring Dr. Maurice Strahlber, Dr. Samuel Feldman
Dr Norman Bloom. Seated (from left) are **
Lipschitz, Schreiber, Leo Hack, development director
Dr. Joseph A. Singer, Harold Miller, and Rabbi Jonah
Caplan. Rabbi Simcha Friedman and Dr. Daniel Rich
also attended.
Brandeis Women
Sponsoring
Symposium
A symposium, "Controversy
Over the Presidency, Three
Views of the 76 Election," will
be held in the Playhouse Audi-
torium of the Seacoast Ea&t on
Thursday, Jan. 22, from 10 a.m"
to 3 p.m.
Sponsored by the Greater Mi-
ami Chapter of the Brandeis
University Women's Committee,
the symposium will feature the
views of three Brandeis profes-
sors of political science: Robert
Art. Bruce Oppenheimer and
Stephen Whitfield.
An onen nanel discussion will
follow the lectures.
Mrs. H. Pace Miller is chair-
man of the Brandeis University
Women's Committee, which is
dedicated to the support of the
University Library.
JWV Ladies Auxiliary No. 778
Plans Meeting Picnic, Auction
At a recent meeting of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewisl
War Veterans, South Dade Post
No. 778, the following nominat-
ing committee was elected: Leah
Eisenman, Sylvia Dubbin, Edith
Novins, Jackie Rose and Pearl
Blumenthal. Appointed to the
committee were Terry Bernfeld,
Evelyn Cohen and Molly Brown.
The slate will be presented at
a meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 13,
at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth Am.
Jackie Rose and Sylvia Dub-
bin, cochairmen of an auction
planned for Sunday, Feb. 8, at M
p.m. at Temple Beth Am, have
announced that honorary auc
tioneers will be Metro Mayer
Steve Clerk and. South Miami
Mayor Jack Block.
Plans are being completed for
an all-day family picnic jit
Matheson Hammock on Sunday
Feb. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m
J r^ ^ssfl ^^f | \ 1
Sr'~ fl ^* t Jk E''
^1
Ik** o: B 1 f .4 J
s.
a .-**" VI i 1
St' j Jf I
2 f'<.' j
|*:s m Bf** tfl A i; nSSB t'
Vice Mayor Harvey Ruvin presents the key to Dade
County to Mrs. Elaine Mass, national president of the
Jewish War Veterans Women's Auxiliary. Mrs. Rose
Shorr (left) and Mrs. Ceil Zucker, officials of state and
local chapters, look on. Ruvin, who was cited for his
interest in veterans' and handicapped persons' affairs,
said, "It was an honor to be visited by the highest rep-
resentatives of the JWV's Women's Auxiliary because
of the outstanding work they have done for so many
years."
John Rogers, executive
manager of the Miami In-
ternational Boat Show,
was elected president of
the National Association
of Exposition Managers at
the association's annual
convention in Phoenix. A
member of the board of
directors of NAEM and
immediate past vice pres-
ident, Rogers will also
serve as national program
chairman and educational
seminars coordinator.
Hebrew Ulpan
At Emanu-El
As part of Temple Emanu-El's
adult education program a Mod-
ern Hebrew Ulpan (concentrated
language course) will begin on
Jan. 13 under the sponsorship
of Temple Emanu-El and the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation, cooperating with the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida.
Advanced beginners classes
will be held on Tuesday and
Thursday mornings from 10 to
noon at the temple.
Instructors are specially train-
ed and certified Ulpan teachers
who provide the opportunity for
reading, writing and speaking
Hebrew and learning about Jew-
ish culture holidays and Israeli
life.
Temple Beth Raphael
mourns the loss of its first president
ABYSCH PERL
Founder Of Our Temple
A memorial service (Shloshim) will be held or
SUNDAY, JANUARY 25th, 1976 AT 2 p.m.
at our Temple, 1545 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach.
"May His Soul Be Bound Up in the Bond of Life"
The Talmudic College
of Florida
DOES NOT
Provide Rabbinical Supervision nor does it endem
the Kashruth of any Establishment or Product who*
soever. We have neither done this in the past nor c:.
we intend doing it in the future.
imagine
Weddings by E. Allen Becker Photographers
00 lor Mltzvqhs Evan L
Portraits From $50.00
AS LOW
AS
*175(
E. Allen Becker
426 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Hem* and Garden portraits S32-2SSI
We restore
old photographs.


Page 10-B
rjewltti nuirSddaHn
Friday, Januarv 2, 1976
Mount Sinai, VA Hospital Seek Volunteers-
To Test Aspirin as Heart Attack Deterrent
Can aspirin help prevent
heart attao! s?
Some 360 volunteers to test
this possibility are being sought
in the Greater Miaiii area by
Mount cinai Medical Center and
the Miami Vetarans Administra-
tion Hospital.
THE TWO local institutions
are among 30 major American
clinical centers cooperating in
the Aspirin Myocardial Infarc-
tion Study (AMIS) a federally-
sponsored $16 million project
involving close observation of
4.200 volunteers nationwide dur-
ing a three-year period.
The National Heart and Lung
Institute organized AMIS to find
out whether people who have
already suffered heart attacks
can decrease their risk of re-
currences by taking small doses
of aspirin on a regular basis.
Dr. William H. Bernstein, a
Mount Sinai cardiologist and a
principal investigator for AMIS,
explained that aspirin interferes
with blood clotting.
"WE THINK it niav be able
to keep clots from forming in
the coronary arteries the ves-
sels that supply blood to the
heart muscle," he said. "Such
clots can block the coronary
arteries completely, triggering
a heart attack."
Volunteers needed for AMIS
are men and women between
the ages of 30 and 69 who have
had at least one heart attck
within the pst five years but are
free of other major disease.
Dr. Bernstein said all volun-
teers accepted into the study
will receive medication in cap-
sules, identified only by code
numbers, to take twice a day.
The capsules may contain the
daily equivalent of three aspirin
tablets, or a placebo a harm-
less inert substance.
THE IDENTITY of the mate-
rial each participant receives
will be determined entirely by
chance, using a computer for
random selection. Each partici-
pant will have a 50 percent
chance of receiving either type
of capsule. Until AMIS ends,
neither the participants nor the
phvsicians supervising the stund
will know which individuals are
taking which capsules.
AD participants will be given
aspirin-free medications for
headaches, colds and other
minor ailments which would be
treated ordinarily with aspirin.
A! "s participants also re-
ceive free medical e "animations
and laboratory tests three times
a year, and reports will b? sent
to each individual's nhysician.
THESE checkups are intend-
ed primarily to detect any side
effects which may result from
taking aspirin regularly.
"It's well known that in few
individuals prolonged use of
aspirin may cause stomach up-
set or gastrointestinal bleeding,"
Bernstein notes. "If any of our
volunteers encounter such prob-
lems, we will treat them and
change their medication."
At Mount Sinai, Dr. Bern-
stein already Ins close to 80
AMIS volunteers and needs 120
more. Dr. Hugh Gilmore. who is
conducting the study at the Vet-
erans Administration Hospital,
has recruited 60 participants so
far and needs an additional 100.
Adults who meet the basic
requirements and would like to
volunteer may phone Dr. Bern-
stein at 674-2185 or Dr. Gilmore
at 348-2433. Both numbers will
be answered 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. Collect calls
from Broward and Monroe
Counties will be accepted.
"My Life'9 Will Be Reviewed
Golda Meir's autobiography,
"My Life," will be reviewed by
Mrs. Harriet Green on Jan. 11
at a meeting of Kinneret Chap-
ter of Pioneer Women. The 1
p.m. meeting, at Washington
Federal's Normandy Isle Audi-
torium, is free and open to the
public.
Mrs. Green, president of the
South Florida Zionist Federa-
tion and the Pioneer Women
Council of South Florida and
former national vice president
of the American Zionist Federa-
tion, has worked with Mrs. Meir
on numerous p^o-Israel proj-
ects.
Refreshments will be served
at the meeting, and there will
be a boutique, according to Mrs.
Rita Adoff, chapter president.
Mrs. Tobi Gruber is publicity
chairman.
Casting "The Liberty BelP
Casting for Temple Emanu-
El of Miami Beach's original
Bicentennial pageant, "The Li-
berty Bell," will be held on
Monday, Jan. 5, at 8 p.m. in the
temple's Friedland Ballroom.
Mrs. Trixie Levin, who is
writing and directing the play
depicting the participation of
Jews in America's first 200
years, said men, women, teens
and children are invited to try
out for roles in the program,
which will be presented Feb.
29 in the Temple Emanu-El
sanctuary.
Dr. Mana-Zucca and Shmuel
Fershko, Israeli composer and
music director of Temple
Emanu-El, are composing an
original score for "The Liberty
Bell."
Judge Frederick N. Barad,
president of Temple Emanu-El,
said the play has been granted
recognition as an official Bicen-
tennial event by Third Century,
U.S.A., and national Bicenten-
nial agencies.
Nursery School At Adath Yeshurun
Dr. Edward Tescher educa-
tional vice president of Temple
Adath Yeshurun, has announced
the opening on Jan. 5 of the sec-
ond semester of the nursery
school.
The school has an active PTA,
a music program ,vith Cantor
Ian Alnern, and a strong read-
ing and number readiness pro-
gram to prepare the children
for grade school.
The school's hours are 9 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. and bus service is
available. Inquiries should be
directed to Mrs. Sheila Weiner,
the nursery school director.
Prospects for Aspirin to Take
On Tricky Anti-Clotting Job
First marketed in 1899, as-
pirin has long been used to re-
duce fever, pain and inflamma-
tion. "During World War II,
scientists seeking a way to
"stretch" scarce supplies of
blood plasma with gelatin found
that the gelatin induced clot-
ting, but that aspirin prevented
this reaetion.
It's not known precisely how
aspirin inhibits clotting. It may
interfere with the ability of
platelets to cling to each other
and to the walls of blood ves-
sels.
ASPIRIN'S anti-clotting pro-
perties may also have something
to do with the drug's ability to
block production of prostaglan-
dins, a class of fatty acids which
serve as chemical messengers
in the body.
One researcher recently sug-
gested that the chemical which
induces clotting may be a "la-
bile aggregation-stimulating sub-
stance" ( LASS) manufactured
during the series of chemical
reactions which creates pros-
taglandins, and that by blocking
pirin may also block formation
of LASS.
In any case, the first clue that
aspirin might be useful in heart
attack prevention came during
the 1950's when a physician
noted that patients taking the
drug regularly to relieve the
pain and swelling of arthritis
seemed to have a relatively low
incidence of heart attacks.
MORE recently, reports pub-
lished in the British Medical
Journal last year by the Boston
Collaborative Drug Surveillance
Group and by members of Brit-
ain's Medical Research Council
Epidemiology Group in Cardiff
suggest but do not prove as-
pirin's value in combatting
heart attacks.
In Boston, 325 heart attack
patients and 3,807 persons ad-
mitted to hospitals for other
reasons were questioned about
their drug usage. Regular use of
aspirin was reported by 0.9 per-
cent of the heart attack patients
and 4.9 percent of the other
patients.
A follow-up study involving
[ prostaglandin production as-pin? sjuaijed jjobw jjeaq jgj,
10,091 others yielded similar
results: 3.5 percent of the heart
attack patients and 7.0 percent
of the other patients gave a his-
tory of regular aspirin use.
IN THE British study, 615
men who had recently suffered
myocardial infarctions were
given a daily dose of aspirin
and another 624 received a
placebo. The survival rate of
the aspirin group was 12 per-
cent higher after six months and
25 percent higher after a year.
The results of these studies
were not statistically significant,
but they showed a trend which
led officials of the National
Heart and Lung Institute to or-
ganize the massive nvtSJMPHe
Aspirin Myocardial Infarction
Study (AMIS).
It is hoped that AMIS will
prove whether regular use of
small doses of aspirin is effec-
tive in preventing recurrent
heart attacks, and, if so,
whether the benefits of consum-
ing aspirin in this fashion out-
weigh the risks. These can in-
clude such side effects as heart-
burn, stomach pain and gas-
trointestinal bleeding.
Can aspirin help prevent heart attacks? Dr. William H.
Bernstein hopes to answer this question with the aid
of 360 volunteers from the Greater Miami area. Dr.
Bernstein is a cardiologist at Mount Sinai Medical Cen-
ter and a principal investigator for the Aspirin Myo-
cardial Infarction Study (AMIS).
Education Day Scheduled
By Florida Women's League
The Florida Branch of Wom-
en's League for. Conservative
Judaism is having an education
day on Jan. 8 at Ohev Shalom
in Orlando. Mrs. Howard Oser
of Orlando, Florida Branch vice
president, is chairman of the
day.
Branch president Mrs. Mor-
ton Levin, Mrs. Jack Wolfstein,
Mrs. Marshall Baltuch, Mrs.
Aaron Applefield, Mrs. Albert
Solo, Mrs. Charles Perry, and
Mrs. Norman Sholk will par-
ticipate.
A panel of rabbis includes
Gary Perres of Temple Israel,
Orlando, David Gaffney, Jack-
sonville Jewish Center, and Rud-
olph Adler of Ohev Shalom in
Orlando.
The annual education day in
central or north Florida is a
service of Florida Branch of
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism.
mm
4
A Sunday champagne brunch at the Lakeview Drive
home of Marcia and Lawrence Schantz (above, leH)
launched plans for the April 3 Scholarship Ball of Tem-
ple Emanu-EVs Lehrman Day School. Talking over the
event with the Schantzes, who will serve as chairmen
are Dr. and Mrs. Irving Lehrman. Another foursome at
the brunch were (below-, from left) Dr. and Mrs. Maxwell
Dauer, Martha (Mrs. Lester) Mishcon and Judge Fred-
erick N. Barad. Judge Barad is president of Temple
Emanu-El, and the Mishcons and Dauers are scholar-
ship patrons of the Lehrman Day School and members
of the chairman's cabinet for the Scholarship Ball.
....
i
1


ly, January 2, 1976
+Jewisli Mo radian
Page 11-B
%fy
^aMriwcai flage
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz Raobi Robert J. Orkand
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
The Real Challenge To
Synagogue Leadership
By RABBI S. FRIEDMAN
Executive Director
Southeast Region
Jnited Synagogue of America
South Florida probably repre-
tnts the greatest challenge to
^nagogue leadership in many
decade. Whereas other areas
kf our country are witnessing a
liminutiort of the Jewish pop-
llation and synagogue affilia-
ioft, the very reverse is true of
lis area in which we reside,
ret the religious leadership,
ath rabbinic and lay, is not
leeting the challenge of this
rrowth and perhaos in some
trays is hostile to it.
What is called for, it seems
to me, are new mooes of think-
ing and new approaches toward
caching the multitudes of un-
t'filiated that are moving into
juth Florida.
In the less than two years
lhat I have been in this com-
Imunity, the area of greatest
[controversy has been the con-
jdbminium services which occur
I during the High Holidays. In my
opinion, dubbing these services
as "mushroom synagogues" and
making pronouncements and
resolutions negating their exist-
ence has-been a disservice to
the total Jewish community, to
the synagogues, and to the rab-
bis themselves.
First, let me define the
"mushroom aynagogue" <>s it
was known up north. Often an
itinerant "raobi" and/or small
group of "promoters" would
rent a theater or a hall and ad-
vertise in the newspaper and
through posters and signs dis-
tributed in stores and billboards
that High Holiday services were
being held, with a world-
renowned cantor.
Inexpensive tickets were sold
to anyone interested. Eaually
negative aspersions were cast at
those who frequented hotels in
the "borscht belt" on the High
Holidays. The participants and
hotel owners were similarly
chastised, although these places
were not labeled "mushroom"
because they were of a more
permanent structure.
THE PHENOMENON of con-
dominium services in South
Florida is that they are not
"mushroom" and certainlv not
"borscht belt" hotel services. It
is an iniustice to these groups
to label them as pariahs and to
exclude them from the religious
community. Our ostracizing
them has not stemmed their
growth and may even have re-
sulted in their low standards in
the use of religious personnel
and a minimal financial struc-
ture.
TV Programs
Sunday, Jan. 4"
"Jewish Worship Hour"
WPLG, Ch. 10 *> 9:30 am.
Host: Rabbi David Shapiro
Temple Shuki, Hollywood
"Stffl, SmaH Voice"
Ch. 7 10 a.m.
Hosfc Rabbi Ralph Kingsley
Guests:
Rabbis Sanford Shapero
and Seymour Friedman
Topic: The Guests' Roles
as Regional Directors of
the UAHA and USA
I am not certain that my
proposals or answers are of the
best, but I am convinced that the
present procedure of repudia-
tion urying our heads in the
sands of the beach and kicking
our heels, no matter how voci-
ferously has not been a pro-
ductive approach. It has been of
no assistance to the established
congregations, and in one sense
the condominium synagogues
have been "mushrooming" in
terms of growth .rom year to
year.
To better deal with this sub-
ject, I divide it into two areas.
One, the condominiums which
have weekly and daily minyans
through most of the year in ad-
dition to the High Hoidays
(often without benefit of cler-
gy). These are increasing i
number and may be found in
Century Village. Deerfield
Beach; Hawaiian Gardens, Fort
Lauderdale; Kings Point, Delray
Beach and many in Miami
Beach.
For the most part they meet
in the community rooms within
their complexes and often in the
large recreation hall for the
High Holidays. These are viable
groups with a dues structure,
an organization, legally char-
tered, and are meeting the
needs of their particular group.
The" often compete with the
mu'tifaceted condominium so-
cial and cultural programs of-
foreH to th> r^ci^oTits. but man-
age to hold their own.
THE PARTICIPANTS are al-
most always retirees who have
had some peripheral involve-
ment in synagogue life in their
previous communities. Very few
were heavily involved with pre-
vious synagogue leadership
roles. To a great extent those
who were "shul-goers" joined
synagogues when they settled
here and are not, as a rule, in-
volved in th condominium
group. Thev still prefer the at-
mosphere of a svnagogue sanc-
tuarv. the chanting of a melodi-
ous chazzan, and the Torah of
a rabbinic sermon.
It is my contention that we
should "reach out" to these all-
year-round condominium syna-
gogues with the totality of our
synagogue staff and program.
There is not a set formula of
establishing this relationship,
but I might suggest the follow-
ing:
Satellite: Develop a legal
and Ongoing relationship with
the condominium synagogue.
The individuals would nay a
specially designated member-
ship fee similar to those offered
to "snowbirds" (call them
"satellites"). These members
would have certain limited
privileges within the congrega-
tion which might include the
services of the rabbi, syna-
gogue facilities and programs,
i.e., hospital visits, weddings,
funerals, adult education, ritual
materials and similar items. The
expertise of the congregation
would be offered to the satellite
grOup' and, more importantly,
give it an identity beyond itself.
Regional Affiliation: Con-
sider the condominium syna-
gogue as an independent entity
which would affiliate with one'-
of the national bodies and be
served as ah affiliate. However,
appropriate kinds of program
services should be devised for
this specialized group. Among
those to be considered might
be lecture series, classes, but
trips to areas of Jewish inter-
est.
By far. the most controversial
and debatable area is the con-
dominiums that conduct High
Holiday services only. These
were alluded to earlier as being
dubbed "mushroom" syna-
gogues. In almost all cases these
services are held within a par-
ticular complex and are used,
basically, for the residents of
that complex. The need to serv-
ice these groups has been vehe-
mently opposed by the estab-
lished congregations; they
"would have deleterious effects
upon an existing congregation"
was the reaction of one syna-
gogue.
Others insist that their exist-
ence should not be acknowl-
edged. Under any circum1-
stances, they must not be given
any help. Rabbis are forbidden
to assist them in any way. In
reality, this approach has not
stemmed the tide of these
groups but, as stated earlier,
they increase each year. Some
of the results of this approach
have been the use of "charla-
tan" rabbis, of a non-religious
experience, of minimal charge
for seais, of a scramble for
Sifrei Torah and other practices
which do not enhance the spirit-
uality of the High Holiday ob-
servance.
My experience in dealing with
these people is that they are not
"cheap chiselers" or "hippo-
crites," but to a great extent are
sincerely interested in having a
religious service that will meet
their needs. Many of them are
retirees who never were in-
volved in synagogue life other
than attending a High Holiday
service. Thev feel comfortable
in having a more intimate serv-
ice within the environs of their
"home" with their friends and
neighbors.
They are sincere in their ef-
forts and feel that they are con-
tributing to the spiritual needs
of their own community. Some
have been conducting services
for as much as ten consecutive
years, but they need direction
and guidance from the estab-
lished synagogue community. I
firmly believe that we must
change direction and work posi-
tively with these groups for the
benefit of both the congrega-
tions and the condominiums.
Again, there are many different
avenues of dealing with this
challenge. Permit me to share
with you some ideas on this
matter.
Satellite Services: Congre-
gations "reach out" to condo-
miniums in their geographic
vicinity and agree to promote,
conduct and be totally respon-
sible for High Holiday services.
A minimal charge for seats
should be established which
would be equitable to the resi-
dents and be of financial bene-
fit to the congregation. This
relationship should be sustained
by the synagogue through pe-
riodic programming for the
condominium during the year.
In addition, residents should be
encouraged to become members
by advising them that the costs
of the High Holiday seats could
be credited at any time toward
the membership fee, should
they choose to become members
at a later date.
Independent Services: In
areas where there is more than
one established congregation or
no congregation in the "imme-
diate vicihity," the regional of-
fice should service the condo-
minium High Holiday group.
They should advise them as to
the'manner of conducting such
a service, the sources for the
purchase and/or rental of Mah-
zorim, Talleisim, Sifrei Torah
and other ritual items. They
should recommend religious
personnel, i.e., rabbi, cantor,
etc., who are qualified and bona
fide and able to provide a mean-
ingful religious experience.
An established minimal cost
for holiday seats should be set
which would meet the general
standards of the community.
Criteria for the distribution of
surplus funds (condominiums
are forbidden to make any pro-
fit) should be determined be-
forehand, assuring the contribu-
tions to Israel and for the en-
hancement of the Jewish religi-
ous community. The latter could
be in the form of donations to
area synagogues and to the Re-
gional coffers for use of the
local Jewish religious commu-
nity.
In conclusion, may I urge thi
rabbinic and lay leadership in
our congregations to seriously
consider the above remarks and
not peremptorily dismiss them.
Many of us are harboring the
streotyped myths about the na-
ture of the South Florida Jew-
ish community in general and
the condominium Jewish resi-
dents in particular. What is call-
ed for are innovative and crea-
tie ideas to meet a pressing and
imperative situation. The chal-
lenge to synagogue leadership is
to create an atmosphere which
will vitalize religious life in
South Florida for all its Jewish
members.
Judah P. Benjamin
By RABBI S. USTFIELD
Temple Sinai, Hollywood
Rothschild spoke of Judah P.
Benjamin as "perhaps the great-
est mind" on the American con-
tinent. Indeed, the boy who
came to the United States as a
poor immigrant used his bril-
liance and charm to become a
wealthy attorney and an in-
fluential and articulate political
leader.
Judah Philip Benjamin was
born a British subject in St.
Croix, Virgin Islands, in 1811.
Benjamin's family moved to
South Carolina, and in 1828 the
young Judah set out for the
booming port of New Orleans to
study law.
While in New Orleans. Ben-
jamin entered into an unsuc-
cessful marriage with a Cath-
olic girl. After a few years his
wife left him to live in Paris,
while Benjamin devoted himself
to law and politics.
HE BECAME known as an
extremely capable lawyer, and
before long he was admitted to
practice before the Supreme
Court. In fact, he turned down
a nomination to the Court in
1853 in order to continue his
very successful law practice.
Benjamin was elected to the
United States Senate from
Louisiana, the second Jew ever
to become a Senator. When
Louisiana seceded from the
Union, President Jefferson Davis
immediately called Benjamin to
the Confederate cabinet as at-
torney general, followed by ap-
pointment as Secretary of War,
and a year later as Secre-
tary of State.
In the latter capacity Ben-
jamin served as an eloquent
exponent of the Confederate
cause, and he almost succeeded
in winning political recognition
and financial aid for the Con-
federacy from France and Eng-
land. He is still remembered as
tv> guiding intellect of the Con-
federacy.
When Lee surrendered to
Grant in 1865, Benjamin fled to
England as a hunted refugee
with a price on his head. In
England he took up again the
practice of law, and soon dis-
tinguished himself as an out-
standing jurist. "The Times" of
London called him "almost the
leader of the English Bar in all
heavy appeal cases."
THROUGH his 73 years Ben-
jamin took no part in Jewish
affairs. The most that can be
said for his Jewishness was that
he never denied his origin nor
did he convert to his wife's
Catholic faith.
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
114
29 TEVETH 5:22
W
!
i'i
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
Vaera
Moses and Aaron exhort Pharaoh to release the
Israelites.
"And Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh"
(Exod. 7.10).
"The Lord, the God of the Hebrews, hath sent me
unto thee, saying: Let My People go" (7.16).
VA-ERA God told Moses that He had first ap-
peared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as El Shaddai, and
had made a covenant with the patriarchs to give them
the land of Canaan. Now, hearing the unhappy cry of
the children of Israel, the Almighty was reminded of
his covenant.
Pharaoh refused to let the children of Israel de-
part from the land of Egypt. God brought seven plagues
oft the Egyptians, in an attempt to force Pharaoh's
hand: blood, frogs, gnats, flies, murrain, boils, and hail.
At first Pharaoh conceded to Moses, "I and my people
are wicked. Entreat the Lord, and let there be enough
of these mighty thunderings and hail; and I will let
you go" (Exodus 9.27-28). But, when the plagues
stopped, Pharaoh's heart was hardened again, and he re-
fused to let the Israelites go.
tiiiiiUMtrumM'iut*i!itiii
t


Page 12-B
+Jew 1st Her Mian
Friday, January 2, 1976
Bar Mitzvah U.. Envoy Here for Briefing
Natalie A. Cohen Ben Reizner
NATALIE COHEN
Sheila and Morris Cohen's
daughter, Natalie Ann, will be
called to the Torah as Bat Mitz-
vah on Saturday morning at
10:30 at Temple Emanu-El.
Natalie, a ninth-grader at
Lehrman Day School, plays the
piano and the violin, is Crea-
tive Writing Editor of the Ninth
Grade Yearbook and a member
of the "Chosen Children" sing-
ing group.
Following services Mr. and
Mrs. Cohen will host a recep-
tion in Natalie's honor at the
Friedland Ballroom.
ft ft
PHILIP KORN
Philip, son of Dr. and Mrs
Morton Korn, will become a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
Temple Menorah.
Philip is in the seventh grade
at Nautilus Junior High.
Following services there will
be a Kiddush. Family and
friends have been invited to a
luncheon at the Korn home,
where these will aso be an eve-
ning reception in Philip's honor.
ft ft ft
BENJAMIN REIZNER
Mr. and Mrs. Max Reizner's
son, Benjamin, will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at 9 a.m. at Beth David
Congregation.
Benjamin is a student in the
Dalet class of Beth David Reli-
gious School and in the eighth
de at South Miami Junior
High.
. allowing services, Mr. and
Mrs. Reizner will host the Kid-
dush in Benjamin's honor.
ft ft *
DANIEL SZUSTER
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Szuster's
son, Daniel, will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at 8:45 at Temple Or
Olom.
Daniel is in th eB class at
Temple Or Olom and a seventh-
grader at Rockway Junior High.
Mr. and Mrs. Szuster will
host the Kiddush at the temple
following services. Special
guests include Luis Szuster,
Samuel Szuster and Greiza Szus-
ter of Cost Rica; Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Pinchansky and Alberto
and Victoria Motola of Mexico;
issim and Sara Motola, Lean and
Bianca Motola, Alberta and Hi-
loa Motola. and Blanch Egozi.
Philip Korn
Leon Dulzin (2nd from right), acting chairman of the
Jewish Agency, met in Miami Beach recently with lead-
ers of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Cuban-
Hebrew Division. Cuban-Hebrew campaign director Ra-
fael Kravec (left) greeted the guests, along with dinner
chairman Jack Chester (2nd from left), Cuban-Hebrew
general chairman Dr. George Feldenkreis (center), and
secretary Dr. Bernardo Benes.
The women of Bay Harbor Islands, led by (from left)
Mrs. Benjamin Lemkin, Mrs. Sol Zallea and Mrs. Ru-
dolph Hennick, took a bus tour recently of the Jewish
community to see the work of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's local agencies.
By-DAVID. LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
U.S. Ambassador Malcolm
Toon flew to Washington
for a general Middle East
policy conference that Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer has been conducting
with several U.S. ambassa-
dors to Middle East coun-
tries during the past few
days.
Israeli officials refer to
the series of conferences on
the ambassadorial level as a
reassessment but say that
this time it appears to be a
genuine reassessment of pol-
icy rather than a "policy of
reassessment" such as Pres-
ident Ford ordered after the
collapse of interim talks
between Israel and Egypt
last March and which Is-
raelis regarded as a direct
pressure tactic to extract
additional concessions from
Jerusalem.
THE CURRENT talks at the
State Department are viewed
here as the prelude to a new
American diplomatic initiative,
possibly a revival of Kissinger's
proposal, which he made in his
address before the UN General
Assembly last September, for
an "informal" conference in-
volving all parties to the Middle
East dispute.
Kissinger got non-committal
responses from Israel, the Arabs
and the Soviet Union at the
time. But in view of recent ac-
tions at the UN, notably the
General Assembly's resolution
inviting the PLO to participate
in all UN-sponsored peace-mak-
ing forums on the Middle East,
the informal conference idea
appears to be an attemnt to
skirt the dangerous Palestinian
issue at this time.
Observers here pointed out
that any move to reconvene the
Geneva conference, as is being
urged by the Soviet Union and
Egypt, would lead to a head-on
clash over the PLO. On one
hand, there is the UN resolu-
tion, and r>n the other Israel's
determination, presumably
shared by the U.S., to have m
contacts whatever with tha
PLO.
ACCORDING to tentative re-
ports out of Washington, the
informal conference would to
held in New York on the UN
ambassadorial level. That would
seem to exclude the PLO which,
though it has observer status in
the General Assembly, repre-
sents no government and has
no UN ambassador.
These speculations could ba
confirmed here. Israel officials
are reluctant to make any pre-
dictions until they have a gen-
eral outline of Kissinger's plans,
presumably from Toon when he
returns from Washington.
As Toon departed for Wash-
ington, it was learned that the
U.S. Ambassador to Syria, Rich-
ard Murphy, has returned to
his Damascus post following
meetings with Kissinger over
the weekend. The U.S. Ambas-
sador to Jordan, Thomas Pick-
ering, was belived to have flown
to Washington also. The Amer-
ican envoy to Saudi Arabia is
also belio,rpd tn h,a "a-timpatin;?
in the policy conferences.
Fear Growing U.S. Isolationism
NEW YORK The president
of the American Jewish Con-
gress warned here of a "grow-
ing isolationism in U.S. foreign
and domestic affairs that threat-
ens to divide America from its
allies abroad and alienate New
York City from the rest of the
country."
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg of
Englewood, N.J., spoke at a
luncheon at Stephen Wise Con-
gress House for Josef Almogi,
Mayor of Haifa, who arrived in
the U.S. recently.
"WASHINGTON'S refusal to
help New York City resolve its
financial troubles," Rabbi Hertz-
berg said, "is as harmful to the
strength of our society as the
ostrich-like attitude among
many Americans toward foreign
aid is to the peace and security
of America and the internation-
al community." He continued:
"Foreign policy isolationism
stems from the misguided be-
lief that a nation as strong as
the United States can survive
without friends and allies.
Domestic isolationism argues
that this nation can remain
strong and secure even if its
cities face economic and social
disaster."
The American Jewish Con-
gress leader expressed the view
that "each form of isolation
feeds on the other.
"MANY Americans," he said,
"are asking: 'If the Federal gov-
ernment won't bail out New
York City, why should America
spend vast sums on economic
and military aid to Israel?' "
"It is a question that chal-
lenges American Jewish leader-
ship above all others to answer.
For unless we can answer it
satisfactorily to our fellow
Americans, Israel may prove to
be the first victim of this new
and pernicious isolationism in
the United States.
"We must make clear that
our own country is a particular
beneficiary of the Israeli with-
drawal, that U.S. political and
economic influence in the Mid-
dle East are growing thus
protecting and assuring the flow
of Arab oil to the West.
"WE MUST make clear that
U.S. aid to Israel helps deter
Arah, attack, thus reducing the
peril of a U.S.rSoviet confronta- '?i
tioh. With the threat of such a ':
clash reduced, it may now be \
possible to slow down the arms
race with the USSR and save
Washington ir|iy more billions
than the cost of helping Israel.
"We must make clear that
America is a global power, with
global responsibilities as well as
domestic ones and which re-
uire that America act vigorous-
quire that America act vigorous-
interests, as we do in the Mid-
dle East.
"Finally, we should point out
that the largest amount of
American assistance to Israel
will be spent in the U.S. for
planes, tanks, guns, electron-c
equipment produced bv Ameri-
can working men in American
factories. No one is suggesting
this is th w" to s^lve our coun-
try's economic problems: but the
fact -omains that niost of the aid
Israel is requesting will stay in
this country.
"When the American peonls
understand these facts. I be-
lieve their good sense will pre-
vail."
RABBI HertzTbe continued:
"The coming months will re-
quire the most intensive effort
h-f 'V-i>riomi Jnvs since tha
Sinai campaign in 1956 to help
our fellow-Americpns under-
stand why U.S. aid to Israel
serves the best interests of our
country and of the cause of
peace.
"Because Jews. ara urban
dwellers, we must at the same
time plav our rightful role in
the struggle to save our cities.
I beli?ve the allies we make in
this struggle particularly in
t^e Black community can be
of invaluable help and support
in the great effort to win sup-
port for Israel's cause."
Several leaders of Miami's Jewish community attended
the United Jewish Appeal's annual December conference
in New York. During the cash presentation were (from
left) Leon Dulzin, acting chairman of the Jewish Agency
Gerald Colburn, UJA national cash chairman; L. Jules
Arkin, general chairman of the Federation's 1976 United
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund; and Samuel I
Adler, cochairman of the Builders and Allied Trades Di-
vision of the Miami campaign. Arkin and Adler are Fed-
eration officers.
The Keystone Point home of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Feig
(right) was the scene of a recent "educational coffee-
hosted for the GMJF Women's Division. Mrs. Feigwel-
nZedfTu nd nei8hbors' including Edith Newman
nld irnmlZent' f.""***"** weaker Reva Wexler
(2nd from left) explained the services supported by the
Jewish community through the CJA-IEF


January 2, 1976
vJewlsl) nwHkui
Page 13-B
Rabbinic Panel Debates Orthodox Unity
3W YORK (JTA) A
el of four rabbis and one
nan debated the pros and
j of Orthodox unity at a ses-
of the first National Ortho-
Leadership Conference on
hlic Affairs.
the conference session, chair-
by Rabbi Joseph Karasick.
airman of the board of the
Bon of Orthodox Jewish Con-
tgations of America, was held
fe recently.
HE KEYNOTE of the ses-
[in. on "Articulating a Unified
.thodox Position.' was de-
lered by Rabbi Steven Riskin,
ritual leader of the Lincoln
luare Synagogue of Manhat-
|n, who pleaded for coopera-
Tjn on common issues relating
to Orthodox survival, while
respecting the honest differ-
ences of opinion among/the var-
ious sectors of the orthodox
community.
Quoting classifical differences
of opinion in Talmudic and
Halachic literature, Rabbi Ris-
kin insisted that the various
segments of the Orthodox com-
munity agreed sufficiently on
the fundamentals of Judaism to
be able to work together on
such issues as Jewish educa-
tion, aid to Soviet Jewrv, and
issues related to the continued
survival and grown of the Jew-
ish people.
RABBI RALPH Pelcovitz,
past president of the Rabbinial
Alliance of America, warned of
the practical problems in ef-
fecting a unified Orthodox posi-
tion, relating to the very real
political considerations of each
Orthodox group in the com-
munity.
Nevertheless, he appealed for
an earnest effort to rise above
those political considerations,
In order to utilize most effec-
tively the enormous human re-
sources in the Yeshiva and
Chassidic segments of the
Orthodox community.
:*w
i
[Pictured (from left) are Professors Robert Art, Bruce
\Oppenheimer and Stephen Whitfield who will participate
\in a symposium sponsored by the Greater Miami Chap-
iter of the Brandeis University Women's Committee.
? ? ? ? ? 4
? ?????
? ? ? ? ? 4
>!?*?

Samuel Kosman received the State of Israel David Ben-
Gurion Award on December 14 at Seacoast Towers East.
Taking part in this special tribute to the philanthropist
were his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Schwartz, who flew in from Connecticut for the occasion.
Representing the layman's
point of view, Herman Rosen-
baum, president of the National
Council of Young Israel, outline
the practical obseltacles effec-
tively precluding the possibility
or even the desirability of physi-
cally merging the several Ortho-
dox organizations active in the
community.
He did, however, advocate
joint actions in areas of agree-
ment, such as the common
Aliyah department shared by
young Israel and the UOJCA
and other areas of cooperation
between Orthodox groups.
IN VIGOROUS opposition to
the previously expressed posi-
tions, Rabbi Bernard Weinber-
ger, spiritual leader of the
Young Israel of Brooklyn, ar-
ticulated the point of view of
the "right wing" of the Ortho-
dox community.
World Bank Assurances
Welcomed by AJCommittee
NEW YORKThe American
Jewish Committee has welcomed
the assurances of World Bank
President Robert S. McNamara
that the Bank did not adhere
to the Arab boycott and that it
strictly maintained a non-dis-
criminatory policy in its per-
sonnel practices.
The Committee expressed its
satisfaction in a letter from its
president, Elmer L. Winter, to
McNamara which was made
public here.
THE WORLD Bank's position
on these questions, issued in
reply to an inquiry previously
addressed to it by the American
Jewish Committee, was contain-
ed in a letter dated Sept. 17.
In it, the Bank made clear
that any qualified supplier could
bid on any of its contracts re-
gardless of whether or not it did
business with Israel or was lo-
cated in a country that traded
with Israel.
Detailing this policy as it re-
lated to the Arab boycott, the
Bank explained that "it adhered
to a policy of international com-
petitive bidding in financing
goods from Bank loans.
"THIS APPLIES to all mem-
bers without exception. In re-
gard to trade restrictions, such
as tbe so-called Arab boycott,
the Bank's role has been posi-
tive in terms of ensuring both
equity and opportunity. The
Bank does not permit in a re-
quest for tenders of bids for
contracts any condition that
precludes participation by qual-
ified suppliers because they do
business with Israel, or are lo-
cated in a country that trades
with Israel."
Turning to its personnel policy,
the Bank declared that "it is
the firm policy of this organiza-
tion to treat its personnel in a
manner completely free from
discrimination on grounds of re-
ligion, race, national origin or
social condition."
ON ANOTHER question rais-
ed by the American Jewish
Committee concerning restric-
tions on travel by Jewish em-
ployees of the Bank to Saudi
Arabia, the Bank explained that
it had been assured by the
Saudi Arabian government that
"when the Bank wishes to send
a staff member in behalf of the
Bank to Saudi Arabia, no bar
will be posted to issuance of
visa on grounds of religion."
Winter, welcoming these as-
surances, expressed his appre-
ciation for McNamara's "sen-
sitivity to these issues."
He added that "you can un-
derstand our concern with these
questions and the overriding
necessity for a great interna-
tional institution like the World
Mrs. Chinsky
To Review
Short Stories
Masada Chapter of Pioneer
Women will meet on Wednes-
day, Jan. 7, at the Pioneer Wom-
en Council offices at 1 p.m. Mrs.
Ida Chinsky, secretary-treasurer
of the chapter, will review
"Great Jewish Short Stories"
edited by Saul Bellow.
Mrs. Bertha Liebmann is
chapter president, Mrs. Irene
Raczkowski is vice president.
Tour to Israel
Temple Adath Yeshurun's
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
Mrs. Freedman are planning to
lead a tour to Israel in the lat-
ter part of July.
Bank to avoid any semblance oi
discrimination or of any partici-
pation in arrangements for boy
cotts."
He also exoressed the
American Jewish Committee';'
"trust that the policies that you
have enunciated will be con
sistently followed in the BankY
day-to-day operations."
THE WORLD Bank, a special
ized agency of the United
Nations, has 125 subscribing
member countries. The United
States contributes 22 per cenr
of its capital.
Last year, the Bank mad<
loans of approximately $5,500.-
000,000.
Howard A. Mesh (left) of South Miami and Michael B.
Goldstein (right) of Miami are cochairmen of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation Accountants Division. Con-
sul General of Israel Nachum Astar (2nd from left) ad-
dressed the accountants' first meeting on behalf of the
1976 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund,
along with guest Mrs. Morton Weinberger of South Mi-
ami, representing the Federation.
Dr. Sol Stein, national president of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation, welcomes Mordechai Shalev (center), Is-
rael's Ambassador to Canada, to Miami Beach for a
Salute to Israel Veterans Day celebration sponsored by
the Histadrut Foundation. From left are Rabbi Leon
Kronish, national Histadrut board chairman; Dr. Stein;
Shalev; Judge Paul Ribner of Philadelphia, national
commander of the Jewish War Veterans; and Sidney
Bolotin of Chicago, IHF national board member.
Dr. David Russin (center) and Dr. Donald Glucksman,
both of Miami Beach, joined Dr. Eugene Bloom (right)
in planning the work of the 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Physicians Division.
Activities scheduled for the year include a mission to
Israel.


Page 14-B
vJewist fhrktt&n
f'Yiday, January 2, 1976 .

LEGAL NOTKE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-7930
In RE: Estate of
HENRY BERMAN
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and all Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate :
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate <>f HENRY BERMAN deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade County, and
file 'In- same in duplicate And as pro-
vided in Section 733.1 Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices In the County
Courthouse In Dade County. Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 19th
day of December, A.D. 1975.
SEYMOUR J. SIMON
LOUIS BERMAN
As Executors
First publication of this notice on
the 26th day of December, 1878.
SIMON, HAYS & GRITNDWERG
Attorneys for Executors
608 Ainsley Bldg.. Miami. Fla.
12/26
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
,n business under the fictitious names
of HUM ENTERPRISES and RED
BARON ENTERPRISES at 811 Per-
rine Ave.. Miami, Fla. 3315.7 intends to
register said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
/S/ HARRY U MOSKOWITZ
EUGENE 1J5.M1.ICH, ESQ.
Attorney for Harry L. MoskowlU
2'i.t) U. Flagler St.. Miami El.
12/19-26 1/2-i
1/2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-39734
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHN HERNANDEZ. JR.,
Husband/Petitioner,
and
HERM1N1A M1LAGROS RIVERA-
HERNANDEZ. A
Wife/Respondent.
TO: HERMINIA MILAGROS
RIVERA-HERNANDEZ
11'T Santiago Igelias Pantin
Fajrado. Puerto Rico 00648
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for dissolution of mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are resulred to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
MARVIN I. Moss. P.A., Petitioner's
Attorney, whose address is 12550 Bis-
cayne Boulevard North Miami. Flor-
Rla 38181. on or before Jan. 23rd. 1976
and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Petitioner's Attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on Dec. 16, 1875.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of said Court
By B. L1PPS
Deputy Clerk
12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-40006
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN'RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SELENE WILT,
Petitioner,
Md
MARK ALAN WILT. '***
Respondent.
TO: MARK ALAN WILT
150 South Atlanta Street
Rowell, Georgia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of .Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
FRIEDMAN AND L1PCON. attorneys
for Petitioner, whose address is 2600
Douglas Road. Suite 1011, Coral Ga-
bles, Florida 33134 (446-6485) and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Jan-
nuary 30, 1976; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWSH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this IS th. day of December, 1976.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
FRIEDMAN AND LIPCON
2600 Douglas Road, Suite 1011
Coral Gables. Fla 33134 (446-6485)
Attorneys for Petitioner
12^26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 76-2616
In RE: Estate of
PAULINE HARRIS
Deceased.
NOTICE OF INTENTON TO MAKE
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby given that I
have filed a Final Report and Peti-
tion for Distribution and Final Dis-
clarge as Executor of the estate of
PAULINE HARRIS, deceased, and
tljat on or after the 2nd day of Feb-
ruary, 1976, will apply to the Honor-
able Circuit Judges of Dade County,
Florida for approval of said Final Re-
port and for distribution and final
discharge as Executor of the estate of
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-39425
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA JUNE LESCHALOUPE.
Petitioner,
and
EDWARD GERARD I.J3SCHAIXIUPE.
Respondent.
TO: Edward Gerard Leschaloupe
R.R. No. 4 Brampton, Ontario,
Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed In this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any. to it on WOLF and
SCHONINGER, PA., attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is Suite 702
Dadeland Towers, 9300 South Dade-
land Boulevard, Miami, Florida, 33156,
and file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 23rd 1976; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
12th day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL FRANK SCHONINGER
WOLF and SCHONINGER. P.A.
Suite 702Dadeland Towers
9300 South 't deland Boulevard
Miami, Fl. 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
12/19-26 1/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of LUCITE ORKHNALS at 2910 S.W.
30 Avenue. Pembroke Park. Fla. in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
HERMAN AND ROSEN. CORP.
A Fla, Corp.
KWITNEY, KROOP &
SCHEINBBHO. P.A.
Attorneys for Applicant
19/19-36 1/2-9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME L-AYV
Notice is hereby give nthat the un-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
M & M PROPERTIES. UNLIMITED
at 56^5 N.W. 79th Ave., Miami. Fla.
33166 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
JAY T. MALINA
MITCHELL TRESS
LEON A. EPSTEIN
Attorney for Applicant
12/26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the underpinned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious nuM
of DOMINION FOOD STORES at
14759 N.E. 6 Avenue, North -Miami.
Fla 33161 intend tc register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MOE FARROW'35%
LILA FARROW 35%
STEPHEN FARROW 10%
ROBERT FARROW 10%
RANDY DIANNE FARROW 10%
MORTON M. BEIGBL
Attorney for applicants
12/12-19-26; 1/f
dersigned, Ed Gordon Enterprises, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 76-7288
In RE: Estate of
HARRY HUSNEY.
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the estate of HARRY HUSNEY. de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade County, Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 22nd
day of December. A.D. 1975.
MURRAY M. HUSNEY
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 36th day of December, 1975.
DAVID S. KUMBLE
Attorney for Executor
350 Lincoln Road Suite 212
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
18/26 1/2
Inc. desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name, THE
FASHION CONSPIRACY intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
thv Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
/s/ ED GORDON ENTERPRISES.
INC
By: Edwin H. Gordon, Pres.
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTIOE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTK;E IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
THE HIDDEN CORNER BOUTIQUE
at number 7029 S.W. 46th Street In
the City of Miami, Florida intends to
register the said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Couit of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this ....
day of December ls76.
TODAY'S LOOK, INC..
a Florida Corporation
LAW OFFICES OF
KURT WELLISCH
161 Almeria Avenue Suite 200-E
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(445-7954)
Attorney for Applicant
12/26-1/2-9-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 76-6819
In RE: Estate of
FRANK P. SPIZIO
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
of FRANK P. SPIZIO, deceased laje
of Dade County, Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided in
Section 733.16, Florida Statutes, in
their offices in the County Courthouse
in Dade County, Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida this 26th
day of December, A.D. 1975.
HELE^I L. SPIZIO
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of January, 1976.
JOSH REPHUN
Attorney for Administratrix
1370 Washington Ave., M.B.
1/2-9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-74*6
In RE: Estate of
IDA ABRAHAMS,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
CASE NO. 75-32867
NOTICE OF ACTION
MURRAY FRIEDMAN and
HILDA FRIEDMAN, his wife.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
R. AIXiNSO MORALES and
SERGIO ARTURO DURAN OJEDA.
Defendants.
TO: SERGIO ARTURO DURAN
OJEDA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Dade County,
Florida:
Lot 7. less the N. 5' thereof, Block
15, South, City of Miami accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, recorded
in Plat Book B, Page 41. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
LEON A. EPSTEIN, plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address is 420 Lincoln Rd.
Suite 438. Miami Beach, Florida, 33139,
on or before the 28th day of January.
1!)76, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on plaintiff's attorney or imme-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names or
El Solar Condomlnio En El S.W.
S W. Story Se Exllia Valdes His-
toria Del S.W. Condomlnio en Hia-
leah at 2145 S.W. 24 Street, Miami,
Fla. 33145 intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Salvador Torroella
12/12-19-26; 1/*
IN THE COUNTY COURT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 76-14681 SP 05
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
M-B LEASING CORPORATION
a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
STUART B. BROWN,
Defendant.
TO. STUART B. BROWN
750 N.E. 64th Street '
Apartment 514
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
.. lawsuit has been filed in the above
diately thereafter; otherwise a default styled cause and you are required to
will be entered against you for the v. a copy af your answer to the
relief demanded In the complaint or iawsuit on the Plaintiff's attorneys,
petition. BLITSTEIN and MOI^ANS, 1440 N.W.
Witness my hand and the seal of ]4)h Avenue. Miami. Florida. 33125,
is Court on the 18th day of Decem- nn,] fne the original Answer in the
th
ber, 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By 1. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
12/26-1/2-9-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NCy-75-40027
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANSELMA MARIA EUGENIA LEON.
Wife
and
JUAN SIEXTO LEON, Husband
TO: JUAN SIEXTO LEON
Centro Escolar 279, Barrios
Altos Lima, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
DANIEL M. KE1L, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 612 Ainsley
Building, Miami, Florida 33132, and
file the original with the clerk of the
Office of the Clerk of the County
Court on or before the 3rd day ot
February. I!i76, otherwise a Default
will be entered against you.
DATED at Miami Florida, this 23r*
day of December, 1975.
RICHARD P BR'NKER
Clerk of the County Court
Miami. Dade Conntv. Florida
By P E. OWIN
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
1/2-9-16-2J
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT Or*
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-7916 (Dowling)
In RE: Estate of
ETHEL F. KENDALL. !
decea Bed.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any claims and demand*
which you may have against the estate
of ETHEL F. KENDALL deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16, Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the County
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
You are hereby notified and required sid court at Miami, Florida on this
above styled court on or before Janu- r'":,h" ," rV i V ",T
arv 30 1976 otherwise a default will Lou-house in Dade County, Florida.
be^ntered against you for' ne reTie KME ^^If"??" J,th*
demanded in the complaint or petition. '?' '*% W^10" ^^ '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-7846
In RE: Estate of
JENNIE BISHOP
deceased.
NOTICE TO OREDITORS
To All Creditors and all Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said tf^Jif' S^*f}
to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the estate
of IDA ABRAHAMS, deceased late of
Dade County, Florida, to the Circuit
Judges of Dade County, and file the
same in duplicate and as provided
in Section 733.16. Florida Statutes in
their offices In the County Courthouse
in Dade County, Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publicaiton hereof, or the same
will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 23rd
day of December, A.D. 1975.
SAMUEL ABRAHAMS
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 2nd day of January, 1976
MYRON ALBERTMember of
Florida Bar No. 154369
Attorney for Estate of Ida Abrahams
18th day of December 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL M. KEIL
612 Ainsley Building
Miami, Florida 33132
12/26-1/2-9-16
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of JENNIE BISHOP deceased
late of Dade County. Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.16 Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
Brooklyn, New York 11201
V2-9
IN
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 76-40028
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-425*
(J. ftWYNN PARKER)
within four calendar months from the In BE: Esate of
time of the first publication hereof. SAMUEL HI.AIR
E^VEEnVRHCUJUTD.CC?AUCTC,^uTtHE ^.ione^ ""*<**
OF FLORIDA IN aSd FOR
the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 30t"
day of December. A.D. 1975.
City National Bank of Miami Beach
By: Virginia M. Rawls, Trust Officer
(X) HENRY FOX,
As Executors
First publication of this notice o
the 2nd day of January, 1976.
LEONARD U. STOLAR
Attorney for Co-Executors
300 71st Street, Miami Beach, Fla.
___________________________1/2-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 76-7801
In RE: Estate of
HENRY B. ESFORMES
deceased.
NOTIOE TO CREDITORS
To AH Creditors and, All Btraons
Having claims or Demands
Against Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and required
to present any chtiroa and demand*
which you may have against the estate
of HENRY II. ESFORMES, deceased
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
C rcuit Judges of Dade County, and
file the same in duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 7*M6. Florida Stat-
utes, In their offtoes in the County
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from the
llMB Af *... #l.-___-LI, .. 9
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 17th
day of December. A.D. 1975.
ELSIE PROPPER
EDWARD BISHOP
HELEN BISHOP
As Executors
First publication of this notice on
the 26th day of December, 1975.
SHAPIRO, FRIED, WEIL
SCHEER, Esqs.
Attorneys for Estate
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
12/26 1/2
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the above-named decedent. This 23rd the undersigned, desiring to engage
dfiT,,J ^.Tw^'?,; ,_______ fn J?H?J!1?" nder the fictitious name
WILLIAM M. KLEIN, EXECUTOR
A. JAY CRISTOL
Attorney for Executor
21 Northeast First Avenue
Miami. Fla, 33318
37P-17I-2
of OUST A SPORT OF MIAMI at 234
N.E. 25 St., Miami, Fla., intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
GUSTAVO .i' <.-. :
-r
and
AUGU6TIN MANCIA
Respondent
TO: AUGUSTIN MANCIA
(residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED V* of th* ,lr8t Publication hereof, or
that an action for Dissolution of Mar- ,ne s*rn will be barred,
riage has been filed against you and ., p^ed M Miami, Florida this 30tK
you axe required to serve a copy of *ay of December, A.D. 1975.
your written defences, if any, to it on MAURICE ESFORMES
GLADYS GERSON, attorn** toi P.ti- HERBERT S. SHAPIRO
v.. -- t"._ i, .... "oner, whose address Is 101 Northwest As Executors
,/ll notified and requir- 12th Avenue, Miami, Florida, 33128 F'mt publication of this notice oi
ed to present any claims and demands and file the original with the clerk of ,h ?Fd <">' of January 1976
Ute or^ffiELVeBI*AaiR,t '." Iht' a*V?a'^,,ed "V" ""or before SHAPIRO. FR.I*D WBHX\ I SCHEER
provided in Section 783.16 Florida This notice shall be published once ------------
Statutes, In their offices in the County each week for four consecutive weks
Courthouse in Dade County, Florida. In THE JEWISH FI/)RTDTAN '
n'm. /rhr/a,ent ar mn"'hfi frvm th.e WT-105SS my hand and thVeeal of
time of the first publication hereof, said court at Miami jrirM= IJZ.
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 19th
day of December. A.D. 1975.
/S/ BEATRICE SASLAV
As Administratrix
1/2-9
First publication of this notice on
the 26th day of December, 1975.
GALBUT AND GALBUT
Attorney for Personal Representative
71'T Washington Avenue.
court at Miami. Florida on this
18th dpy of December, 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B. L1PPS
,. As Del>uty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GLADYS GERSON, ESQUIRE
101 Northwest 12th Avenue
i ,' j
NOTICE UNDER
,^J!,CT,T,OU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name ot
^5 1LE AUTO RADIO STBREO at
1JO00 Southwest 50th Lane, Miami,
165, intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court ot
Dade County, Florida
u ?4?ir. QUARAZ-Sole Owner
M, LESTER SAAL
Attorney for Annllcint


iay, January 2, 1976
* If** is l> ncrMian
Page 15-B
loral Gables was the scene of the latest "Miami Shalom"
tvent, part of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
I omen's Division's program to welcome newcomers to
\he area. Hostess Candace Ruskin (left) greeted Gables
irea guests Penny Kaye (second from left) and Meide
Vagner (second from right), along with "Shalom" chair-
in Gabriela Landau, at a brunch in the Ruskin home.
Religious Services
MIAMI
tAVAT SHALOM CONQREGA-
.riON 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
IRabbi Zvi Rupheely. Cantor Aron
MENORAH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Rich Mayer Abram-
owitx C'tntor Nico Felaman 21
iBen Aron.
iNSriE EMES. 2o33 SW 19th Ave.
|Conrvative Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
Ieth am (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall
[Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M. Baumgard. Associate Rabbi
| Mitchell Chefiti. 3
JNGRBOATIO.^ BET BREIRA. i07c
I55 SW. 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
|B.ir-y Tabachnikoff. S-A
*
_TH DAVID 2625 SW Srd Awe.
[conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
lantor William Ltoson. *-A
---------m
|TH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 W
|20th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William l.ipso/i. 4 B
JETH KODESH. 1101 SW 12th Ave.
I Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Men-
del Gutterman.
IETH TOV ,-Ta^H.f 6438 SW Sth
St. Conservative. Pabbi Charles Ru-
bel. _^ _____
J'NAI ISRAEL AND GREATER
MIAMI YCUTH SYNAGOGUE 9600
Sunset Drive. Orthooox. Rabbi Ralph
Glima" S-A
IRAEL iTemple> OF GREATER
MUMI 137 NE 19V. St. Reform.
Rabbi Joaeoh R. Narot. 0
ISRAELITE ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenperg. Cantor Nathan Parnaaa
i
OR OLOM (Temple) 8755 SW 16th
St. Conservative Kabbi David M.
Baron. Cantor Stariey Rich. I*
TEMPLE ISRAEL-bOUTH (FormeHv
Be'h Tikva) 90/-5 St-nset Or. Reform
Raooi Joaeph R. Nsirot. 13-A
AMU PL. (Temple) 8900 SW 107th
Ave Suite 306. Rabbi Maxwell
Beroer
IFEilETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. 14
ZlON (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative Rabbi Norman Shapiro.
Cantor Krrol HeMman.
1IALIAH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Consei vative. Rabtv
Nit'ir, ZolondeK. IB
NORlH MIAMI
BET^ MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2223 ti E 121st St. Conservative
Ra':!) Dr. Daniel J. Finoerer. Can
tor Yehuda Binvamin. 35
MIAMI REACH
\Gl OATH ISRAEL 7801 Carlvle Ave.
O'tno.lox rtabb' Sheldon N. Ever. 17
BETH EL.
Ort'-odox.
cO0
pi->e Tree Or.
BETn ISRAEL. 7'J 40th ot. Orthodo*
RjbSi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
BE'H RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHO'.OM (Temple). 4144 Chaee
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi i_eon Kronish.
Cantor David Convieer. m
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 1T8th St..
Miam, Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham 1
Jacobson. Z2"8
CUBAN HEBREW CONGH pr.ATiON
124? Washington Av*. Ortnndox
Pabbi Dow Rozencwalg.
CUBAN SEPHAROIC HtCREWCON-
GRFGAT-ON. 715 Washington Ave.
Raboi M'eir Maslish Melamed. 23-
iER TAMID (Temrie). 79tn St. and
Carlyle Ave. Co servative. Rabbi
Eugene Labnvitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. IS
JHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Haboi Phineas A. Weber,
main. SS
>*PHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. fAVJ
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sedi Nahmiaa. 31
JONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM 1542
44 Washington Ave. St
sORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th SL Causeway.
Nortn Bay Village. Conservative
Cantor Murrey Vavneh S2-A
Happenings
Steven M. Berner has been
appointed Fund Raising Direc-
tor of the Heart Association of
Greater Miami. A graduate of
Queens Collage, New York,
Berner's evnerienc0 includes
fund-raising for the United Jew-
ish Appeal, the United Negro
College Fund and the Girl
Scouts of America.
to ft ft
Rabbi Arthur I. Baseman of
Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater,
will sneak on "Zionism: Fact
and Myth" at Polk Community
College in Winter Haven on Jan.
21. He will also address several
classes am' an assembly of nurs-
ing students on "To Show Con-
cern: A Jewish View." Rabbi
Baseman's apoearance is spon-
sored by the Jewish Chautauqua
Society._________________
Treister
ANITA, a resident of Miami for 46
years, coming from Utlca NY., died
Sundav. Dec 28. She had been ac-
tive in the PTA at several achools,
IncMKlitiK Miami Beach HiKh School,
and was a number of the Miami
Beach Elks Auxiliary and Its home
for crlonled children in I'matlHa.
Fla Survivors include two sons, Ken-
neth and Leonard K.. six itrandrhil-
dren and a sister. Mrs. Sophie Fried-
lander Services were held Tuesrtny
at Temple Israel with Gordon Funer-
al Home In charge._________________
LtGAL NOTICE
tOODAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEPARO
CONGREGATION. 707 8th St
Orthodox Rabbi Mordecai Chah-no-
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
ADATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1029
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha FreedmSn. Can-
tor Ian Alpern. St
AGODATH ACHIM. Srd Ave. Hebrew.
Religious Community Center. 19256
NE Srd Ave. Orthodox. SS -A
BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conservative Rhbi Max Lip-
chitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendeleon
34
BNAI RAPHAEL 1401 NW 183rd K\
Conservative Rabbi Victor D. Zwel-
ing. Cantor Jack Larger. SS
-------------
SEPHAROIC JEWISH CENTER. 971
N.E. 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
s''m Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36-A
SINAI lemolei Or NORTH DAD!
I880- NE 2?nd Ave. Reform. Rabtr
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. S7
BETH JACOB. 301 War-ingtOii Ave.
Ortrodox. Rabbi Sh-.iaryahu T.
Sw'rsky Cantor Mauiioe Mamches.
19
TEMPLE BETH SOLOMON 1031
Lincolr Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Mo-de
cai YarPVini. 21-A
CONGREOATION BETH TFILAH.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I
M. Trooper.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGPE
GATIQN. 843 Martian Ave 22-A
SKY LAKE SYNAGC3UE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Ortho-ox. Rabbi Dov
B'dmck 38
fOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER Ml.
AMI 990 NE 171st St Orthodox
Rabbi Zev Leff. Si
CORAL GABIES
JUOEA (Temple*. 5550 Granada Blvd.
Reform Rabtv Michael B. Eisen.
atat. Can'or Rita Shore **
ZAMORA iTempiei. 44 iamora Ave.
Conserv.tive. Kabbi Maurice Klein
HMfSHM
MOGAN DWID CONGREGATION
93-18 Hardinq Ave Ortt-nnox. Rabh'
Isaac D Vine SC
rOPT LAUDfROALt
BETH ISRAEL (Templ-1. 7'00 W
Oak'and Park BWd. Pino- Pnilip A
Labowitz Cantor Maurice Neu. 4f
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oak'and P.irk
Bi^d Reform. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment. 63
TAM..RAC JEWISH CENTER. 9104
Nv 57th %<.. Conservative. Rabb;
Milton J. Gross. -A
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
(Orihadoxi.. 3897 Stirling Rd. 52
PfTMPAVO BtACH
MAPQATF JEWISH CENTER W
M"/ gth St. *4-l
3HOLOM (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ava
Conservative. Rabbi Morrip A. Skop
Cantor Yaacov Henzer. 49
HAILANDAU
HALLANOAt.C JEWISH CENTER
Conservative. 416 NE 8tn Ave. Rabb.
Harry E Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Canziger '
a---------------
HOLLYWOOD
UJTH Cl fTempl'l 1351 I4th .v
Reform Rabbi Samuel Ja'fe. Assist-
at Raboi Harvey M. Rosenfelf 4
? --
BETH fHALOM (Temple). 46C Ar-
thur St Conservative. Rabbi Mortos
Ma'avsky Cantor Irvine Gold. 41
i
EMANU-EL (Temple). 1701 Waihmg-
ton Ave. Conae. vdtive. Rahbi lrv!nq
Lehrman. Cantor Svl Adle^ S4
HEBREW ACADEMY 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander i
Gross
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tlpor H. ttprti.
Oantor Meyer Enel. **
KNESETH ISRAEL 1419 Euclid Ave.
rthotfasc. 4MM OsmM JjahcllPl*
Canter AbraHam Set *>
6 I \ I (Temple) 12T1 Johnson St
Conservative. Rahbi David Shaoiro
Aeeor.iote Rabbi Chaim S. Listfielo
TEMPLE BETH AHM Corservstive.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywojd. F.abbi
David Rosenfield. 47-B
1 EMPLE SOLEL iL'tjenal) 5100 Sher-
idar. St., Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazi- 47-c
FlAnTTATJON
RLAN-TA*. ION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rubbi Arthur S. Abrarnia.
MIRAMAK
l*WrEL (Temple) 6920 SW 39th St
Conaervative. Rabbi A4fit. njaln.
Cantor Abraham Ke*te. 41
H0MEJTEAD
HOMESTEAD ^stWM CNTR
188 NE Stt B4- Cenaervative. S4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 76-7918
(DowlinK)
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN RE. BSTATE OF
ETHEL F. KENDALL,
Decea^eil.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID DE-
CEDENT. ,_ ..
You are hereby notified that a
written instrument purporting to be
the last will ami testament of said
decedent has been admitted to pro-
bate in said Court. You are hereby
commanded within six calemlar
months from the date ot the first
publication of this notice to appeal-
in said Court and show cause ir
any you can, why the action of said
Court in admitting- said will to pro-
bate should not stand urn-evoked.
FRANK B. DOWLING
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
By MIRIAM B.
HENDRICKSON
Deputy Clerk
First publication of this notice on
the 2 day of January. 1376.
Publish in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
LEONARD V STOI.AH
Attorney
300 -71st Street. Suite fi.3"
MlaiDi Beach, Florida WM1
1//2-9-16-23
Mrs. Sadye G. Rose, 86
Former Welfare Executive
Sadye G. Rose, 86, former
executive director of the Jew-
ish Family Service of Greater
Miami, died Sunday in Victoria
Hospital.
Mrs. Rose was born ".n New
York City and came to Miami
50 years ago. She was active in
Jewish community affairs, and
worked with the Jewish Family
Service for many years.
Until recently, she worked as
a receptionist and senior aide
at the Myers Senior Citizens
Center in Miami. She was em-
ployed there until becoming ill
several weeks ago.
She was a former member of
the Beth David Sisterhood and
a member of the Beth Kodesh
Congregation.
Mrs. Rose is survived by a
cousin. Sylvia Spanner.
Services were held at Gordon
Chapel.
Hohauser
I.KO. died Monday. Dec. 2!>. In Mer-
cy Hosoital. A plumbing contractor
In Dailc County for -in vnn ha
came here 41 years ago from New
York City and was a member ot
Temple Israel and the Coral Gables
Chapter of B'nal I'.'rith. Survivors
iii. luil- his wife, Ruth: a daughter.
.Mrs Alble Flakes: a brother, Sam-
uel, and two sisters. Mrs Hilda
Hnuser and Mrs. Lillian Kraft. The
s.-rvi tea \v."in..s.iay were held at
Gordon Funeral Home.
Singer
EDWABD HAPOI D. >. of 1^9' Mi-
ami Qardena Dr.. No. Miami Beach,
nnasnrl away Friday. Dec. 2'">. Sur-
vive*! by his Wife, Sue. two (laugh-
ters. Mnrci;. Tyson and Joan Julian,
imiii of Miami, two grandchildren,
and a sister, \ilriam Schlossberg of
New York Mr. Singer was a retired
fund raiser for the United Jewish
Appeal and State of Israel Bonds.
Bervlcea were held at the Johnson
Foster Funeral Home. Burial was in
li.-th El Memorial Gardens.
Young
SADYE G. ROSE
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Zvery Day Closed Sabbolh
140 SW 57th A/cnue
Phone 266-2888
MORRIS. *3. of ir>K0 N.E. 125th St.,
North Miami, died Saturday. Dec 27
at St Fnmcis Hospital. He came
h.re |n 1939 from Philadelphia. Pa.,
and was an officer of Henderson
Portion C ntrol. Survivors include
three son>, Burton Young. No Miami
Beach. Jack Young. Coral Gables,
and Herbert Y,>ung, Chicago. III.;
one daughter. Mrs, Shirley /Caret.
Miami; three brothers. Daniel. No.
Miami Beach. Albert and Jack. Phil-
adelphia: 11 grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren. Services were
held iii Hollywood with Kabbi Max
A. I.ipschitz of Temple Beth Torah
officiating. Interment was in Lake-
side Memorial Gardens
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 74-7767
GENERAL JURISDICTION D'VSION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
KAREN -ri'' '' v': ',v :l
KAREN BOB MEMON.
Petitioner
MOHAMBD MEMON.
Respondent
TO: MOMAMED MEMON
(residence unknown)
TOO ARE HERBB? NOTIFIED
' II in action for Dissolution of Mar-
been filed Mains) Via and
you are required to serve a cony of
your written defenses, it" any. to it on
(TNGELO A. Al I. attorney for Pe-
titioner. Whose a.hire's is Suite <"'
Roberts Building. 28 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the ni.ove
d court on or before January SO,
17: otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
nrin.iecl In the omnlaint or petition.
This notice -hall be published one"
each week :' r four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH F'/iridiaN.
WTTNESS my hand and the seal
of -eiid conn at Miami. Florida on
tli 18th day o' December, 1975.
RICHARD P BOUNCER
\ clerk, circuit Court
I ia.I. County Feoftd*
By C P POPEI \ND
A- Iiouiv ('lerk
uil Court Seal'
ANOE! O A All
Suite MO, RobesU Building
| w.-sr Flagler Street
Miami Florida SS1S0
Attorney for Petitioner
LI M-1 '2-9-16
IEVITT
memorial Chapels
1121 P.mbf*. nd. 1M8S W. Dixie H-ry
Hollywood. Fta. North. "."JI?;-
921.7200 949(315
onny Lsvitl. F.D. Albsrt Layton. F.D
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Strving the Jewish Community since 1933
0RTH000I
CONSERVATIVE
_______^_ REFORM SERVICES
(manual Gstaon (1946) IktCorPen
Harry Gordon (1964) James B Gordon
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY \ I
ELK IN |*I:8:
1
RRSONAUZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUK WORKSHOP
444-092!-444-0922
3279 SW. 8th ST.. MIAMI
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEBBBY GIVEN that
the unilvruiKtteil. desiring to eneaee
in busiiees under the fletltious name
of QUALITY LAUNDRY at 6310 N E.
,2nd Ave. Miami. PL 33138 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of 'the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
*. A. -PIJ^rTO. tttC
EtKTENE LEMl.rCH
Attorney for R. A. Plloto. Inc.
BTM W. Pls*ier St.. Mlatasi. FJ.
12/19-K 1/J-*
^93
When a loss occurs
away from home.
mm BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Ketxesentakti by S. Levitt, F.O.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.


Pi
Page 16-B
-JmlstiFhrklkuj
Friday, January 2,
m
II
DAIRY& DELICATESSEN DEPTS.
You'll find treats both domestic and imported in our
Dairy & Deli Departments. Kept fresh by constant refrigeration
and priced for bigger savings!
VITA PARTY SNACKS OR ft
Creamed Herring mr 89
LAND O FROST SLICED ah vaiTies ^ 3 qz m> *
Smoked Meats Z pkgs.SJ D
AMERICAN KOSHER SKINLESS 07 -^ -^ .
Cocktail Franks 1%. 99'
P.P. BRAND FLA. FRESH
Large Eggs
GRADE
DOZEN
LIMIT TWO DOZ.. PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF 17.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
FLOSUN FRESHLY SQUEEZED
Orange Juice 3 S89'
SEALTEST DELICIOUS
Buttermilk Sm 79*
KRAFT COLORED (CHEESE FOOD)
American Singles Sg*Ils
BREAKSTONE (ALL VARIETIES)
Sour Cream Dips a39#
Finest Quality
MEATS A POULTRY
AMERICAN KOSHER MIDGET
Salami or
Bologna
1202.
CHUB
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT
AVAIlASlt ONIT AT SIOHIS WITH lift VIC I COUNHUS
All IUNCH Wl ATS < CHIIil JUCID TO O0i
Sturgeon
69c
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
Under Blade
Pot Roast
$139
JL LB.
FRESHLY
SMOKED
BONELESS
USDAi
CHOICE,
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
Blade Steak
991
USDAl
CHOICE
USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS
Shoulder Steak LB $169
FRESH
Ground Beef Chuck LB$109
DELICIOUS
Borden Egg Nog 0cur99
MAYFAIR IMPORTED FINLAND
Gruyere Cheese 53*
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH FRYER __
Roasting Chickens lb 59'
ONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 40'
QUARTER
LB.
LEAN COOKED
Corned Beef QlBR 89*
LARSBORG IMPORTED CHEESE
Danish Swiss T 99'
LEAN
Cooked Ham ;BR; 69'
FRENCH STYLE ASSORTED
Butter Cookies ^ *1
DELICIOUS
Chopped Liver Slf 89'
MEDIUM OR
Rare Roast Beef g 99'
ONUS SPEC1ALI SAVE 36-
ON 3 ROTTIES
REFRESHING
Canada Dry
28-OZ. Tf ^*(* 'WINK
NO-RETURN M /"^ ^ CLUB SODA
BOTTLE J_ %J 'GINGERALE
LIMIT THREE BOTTLES, PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF % 7.00 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
MOGEN DAVID
BLACKBERRY
CONCORD CHERRY
Kraft #
32-OZ.
JAR
LIMIT ONE JAR. PLEASE, WITH OTHER
PURCHASES OF S 7.00 OR MOKE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
O BLACKBERRY
Kosher Wines Ze $139
BAG #9
P.P. BRAND
Potato Chips
P.P. BRAND
Pretzels..................
HOLIDAY
Mixed Nuts 1^89'
MB.
BAG
75
SEAF000 DEPARTMENT
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SEAFOOD SERVICE
COUNTERS
FROZEN RED
Hawaiian Punch tJiX*!
FANCY CAUGHTLARGE
Flounder
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
(?)
FOR
QUALITY
AND
FRESHNESS
PLUS THE GREATEST
VARIETY
OF PRODUCTS TO HELP PLAN YOUR MEALS
1 ? 1
Merchants
aniNintiril
MERCHANTS GREEN
STAMPS FOR FINE GIFTS!
WE WELCOME
FOOD STAMP SHOPPERS
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU
SATURDAY, JANUARY 3rd.
AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES IN DADE COUNTY
EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS.
Hick your own fresh
FRUITS I VE0ETABLES
3
INDIAN
RIVER
Seedless
Grapefruit
5.a'c 49c
GARDEN FRESH
Snow White
Cauliflower
HEAD
U.S. NO. 1 (PICK YOUR OWN)
Yellow Onions lb 19'
DELICIOUS TOP QUALITY
Bosc Pears lB 35'
FIRM SAIAD SIZE
Ripe Tomatoes 3 okfg6s $1
CRISP GARDEN FRESH
Red Radishes 2 19*
NEW YORK
Jewish
Challah
l-LB.
LOAF
98<
BURNY BROS. PASTRY
Cheese Danish
STOUFFER'S FROZEN FRENCH
Crumb Cake pkgz89'
SALUTO FROZEN m^tCO*,* FLORIDA CAUGHT "M A E
Party Pizza SSW Mackerel lB 55' 91 45
Wl RCSCRVI THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOW TO DEALERS.


Full Text
Page 16-A
+Jewlst)Fk>rXfbf>
Friday, Januar
y*.*
If
?he next
yo intend to *****
ext 30 doys. you^hould^reu------
\bu are about to find out
why a tire you never heard of
is the best tire for these times
Radically new. Radically different.
The only radial with steel sidewalls.
The I.R I. All-Steel Radial is the worlds first
all-steel radial tire for automobiles. It's the
most economical tire you can own. Because of
the radial design, you get more miles per gallon
of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires. Because of the exclusive I.R.I. Ail-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself. We believe the result
Is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
kind or any brand of tire on the market today.
Our engineers believe the i.R.I. All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50,000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
I you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
2. BELTED S. RADIAL
t. BIAS TIRES
Two, four or ometimes even more plies (or
hyersl of material cross under the tread at an
naje or bias to the center line of the tire. General
the cheapest tire to buy.
2. BELTFD TIRES
Safcr to the bias ttre wit* tke addition of fen
ar more belts of material that run around the tin
under the tread. Tfcis combines a bias sidewaU
with increased tread stability and improved
tread life.
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offer the most desirable features. Cords of
material run from sidewall to sidewati crossing the
tread at 90 degrees. Two or more belts of material
also run around the tin. Price per tin is higher
but cost per mile is lower.
Buying tires is tough enough.
Vou almost need an engineer's education to
understand MM advertising these days. There
are bias and belted and radial types. F-78's
and FR-78's and 7.75s all of which fit the
same car. And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
NORTON
SlNCS 1924
TIRE CO.

The strongest radial Is an all-steel radial.
The I.R.I, is the only all-steel radial
automobile tire.
Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
to work beneath the tread only. One or two
belts of steel run the circumference of the tire
and fabric or fiber cords are used radially
sidewall to sidewall. The conventional steel
radial tire is only a steel-belted radial. This is
Important in undemanding the superiority of
an IJLI. All-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
put more steel in the I.R.I. radial than in any
other automobile tire. Two layers or belts of
steel cables (30 per inch) make sure the I.R.I,
tread stays open for maximum road contact
in all kinds of weather. This also reduces
friction, which is the biggest single cause of
tire wear.
A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
fabric (polyester, fiberglass, etc.) used in the
sidewaHs of all ether automobile tires. The
result is 100 per cent steel strength and
protection.
Rated Load Range O.
I.R.I. All-Steel Radials meet government stand-
ards equivalent to an eight-ply rating and it's
stamped on the side of every I.R.I. tire. Most
passenger tires even steel-belted radials -
earn only a B or four-ply rating. Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
for all vehicles, even the heaviest of luxury
automobiles, station wagons or pickups.
Improved steel cable design means extra
comfort, taa).
The I.R.I. All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us. Each cable is wound of seven strands of
SffRVICI
CENTER
BUDGET TERMS AVAILABLE
BBTMhrMMHhSHFJ&n > Ave.-34-155
C25t.P^i-F.*-"Blrd DowrtM Road-446-8101
K0K,T?J?'AMI-13360 N.W. 7th Ave.-l-Yi
HmJfl AMI BEACH1454 Alton RoadOTJ-6S63
n. -^9U $At-^HOl S. DUU Hw^-#*f-757S
WlALtAH/PALM SPRINGS MILS-1S75U8L-2|.uaa
WEST MIAMIBird a Gatlaway Rda &&Z.CMX
HOMCaTBAO-SOlte 8 PvErJj Hwr-t^^R
W. HOLLYWOOD-.*? alsUU ECt-JHW
Hr At Start Neurtst Yt* CH 633-IM5
1. The only tire with STEEL
sidewalls for strength and
flexibility, more protection,
more comfort.
2. Two belts of special filament
steel cable for maximum tread
strength, 30 steel cables per inch.
Total: Three layers of steel
beneath the tread.
3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for sure-fire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire. That's a total of 21 strong
steel filaments in each cable. Yet, with all this
strength, the cable is as flexible as sill. The
result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-round tread.
A special computer-designed tread configura-
tion was developed to make maximum use
of the strength built into the I.R.I. All-Steel
Radial. Now. the combination of steel and
tread design provides solid, road-holding
performance under all kinds of driving
conditions wet or dry. snow or summer heat.
The I.R.I. is an all-weather, all-year tire.
Why you haven't beard about IJLI.
All-Steel Radials till now.
Compared with the giants of the tire industry.
i.R.I. is a relatively small company. We
are growing steadily on a raarket-by-market. .
plan now reaching your city. Five years
ago. we set out to produce a tire that was as
good as the finest imported tire available.
Because we had no conventional tire-making
equipment, we were free "to try anything."
we did. And came up with a totally new idea
tt; produced a tire even better than the one
J P"!t0 mke The I.R.I. All-Steel
mi Sf8*? tes,edand wted. Subjected
to literally milhons of miles of road-handling
TSrXCei,NoW S,SaVaUable here *<*5r
bv nlTi,leiuarfn,ee- So'd and servicedonly
by proven leaders in the business.
iM*M am
J^TIWUl WMtt rum* ML
txtra safety. Extra comfort. Extra miles.
All-Steel Radial.
AWHO*izeo oisrinBUTots ro*
E
ftoaodeoooaooc-c-o'
WatnOIBMIM|[io|
iBmiratTByinl

i*i
**<>*** <
>*.
B F Gno(Jri

4
i
Miamians Sign Proclamation # #
Addressed to Rabin llfeWJlSll FlONCliail
Leaders of Greater Miami's
Jewish Community signed a
proclamation to Israel's Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin pledging
to achieve the highest stand-
ards of excellence in Jewish
life.
At a recenr luncheon meet-
ing at the Harmonie Club in
New York, Samuel !. Adler and
Harry A. Levy ot Miami Beach
and Robert ussell of Miami
represented the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation at the sign-
ing.
Adler and Levy, prominent
local builders, have accepted
key leadership positions within
Miami's 1976 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
GMJF treasurer Adler is
Harry A. Levy, a vice
president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
and advisor to the chair-
man of the 1976 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund, was
among the American Jew-
ish community leaders
who signed a proclama-
tion addressed to Israel's
Prime Minister Rabin at a
luncheon in New York.
The Proclamation pledges
total American Jewish
support for "the highest
standard of excellence in
Jewish life in this coun-
try, in Israel, and in Jew-
ish communities through-
out the world."
chairman of the Builders and
Allied Trades Division. Levy, a
Federation vice president, is an
advisor to the CJA-IEF chair-
man and supervisor of the Ad-
vance Gifts Division Manage-
ment Team. Russell, a past presi-
dent of Federation, serves as
a national United Jewish Appeal
chairman and as advisor to the
local CJA-IEF chairman.
With a group of American
Jewish leaders the three Miami
representatives authorized the
Proclamation, which states:
"To the Prime Minister of the
State of Israel, Yitzhak Rabin,
and the People of Israel ... In
a time of great travail for Jews
everywhere we are mindful that
the past is our heritage, the
present our responsibility and
the future our challenge as
Jews. In a world unconcerned
with decency and respect for
humanity our solidarity with the
people of Israel bears witness to
the eternity of the Jewish peo-
ple. We, the Jewish leadership
of the United States, therefore
pledge ourselves to achieve the
highest standard of excellence
in Jewish life in this country, in
Israel and in Jewish commu-
nities throughout the world."
Beth Solomon
Sisterhood
Temple Beth Solomon Sister-
hood will have a board meeting
on Jan. 7 at the temple at noon.
The Sisterhood's regular meet-
ing is scheduled for Jan. 14 at
12:30 at the temple. Edith Geiz-
er will preside at both meetings.
Spoken Yiddish
Temple Adath Yeshurun is
offering a course in Yiddish
during the second semester of
the Adult Education program,
beginning Jan. 13.
The course is given in coop-
eration with the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
Midwood H.S. Reunion
Midwood High School in
Brooklyn will celebrate its 35th
anniversary on May 26 with a
reunion dinner. Midwood alum-
ni interested in attending should
contact Mrs. Pearl Roberts at
the school.
Miami, Florida Friday, January 2, 1976
Section B
Israel, Sweden Ties are Strained
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fo-
reign Minister Yigal Allon has
recalled Israel's Ambassador to
Sweden, Avner Idan, "for urgent
consultations," it was officially
announced.
The recall was clearly a
diplomatic expression of Israel's
anger over Sweden's vote in the
Security Council last week to
invite the Palestine Liberation
Organization to participate in
the Council's deliberations over
Israel's air raids on terrorist
bases in Lebanon Dec. 2.
SWEDEN WAS the only West-
ern European country to vote
with the Arab-communist bloc
and Third World states to ex-
tend the unprecedented privi-
lege to the PLO.
It provided the crucial ninth
vote. Under security council
rules, the assent of nine of the
15 members is required to
invite outside parties to attend
its sessions.
Allon told a cabinet meeting
that there was no change in
Israel's firm resolve to boycott
the current Security Council
meetings on the Lebanon raid
and the Council's Middle East
debate, set to open Jan. 12, to
which the PLO was also invited.
ALLON indicated that there
has been American pressure on
Israel is resisting this pressure,
attend at least some of the Se-
curity Council meet:/;s. But
Israel is resisting this puressure,
the Foreign Minister said.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin de-
nied at the cabinet meeting
press reports of differences be-
tween himself and the Foreign
Ministry on this issue.
RABIN, who was acting Fo-
reign Minister last week while
Allon was abroad, reportedly
rejected a proposal that Israel
attend those sessions of the Se-
curity Council from which the
PLO representatives would be
absent.
The proposal, which would
have permitted Israel to par-
ticipate in the debate and de-
fend its actions over Lebanon
while avoiding proximity with
the PLO, was said to have been
suggested by Israel's UN Am-
bassador Chaim Herzog.
Rabin said that the proposal
was one of several options pre-
sented to him bv Foreign Minis-
try officials while he was acting
Foreign Minister.
"Last Vohliner Cantor" At Agudath Israel
"The Last Vohliner Cantor,"
Matus Radzivilover, well-known
interpreter of Hebrew liturgy,
will perform the service on Sat-
urday, Jan. 10, at 8:30 a.m. at
Agudath Israel Hebrew Instit-
ute.
Cantor Radzivilover, who was
born in Poland and was soloist
with the synagogue choir at age
six, has appeared as a guest
cantor in Canada, Mexico and
Israel. He is famous as a master
interpreter of the original rite
and version of "Vohlin."
Crackdown on Jewish Activities
Two former dinner chairmen were among the partici-
pants at the 28th annual Greater Miami Hebrew Acad-
emy dinner at the Deauvile Hotel which benefited the
school and honored former Bay Harbor Islands Mayor
Shepard Broad. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Kanter of Mi-
ami Beach (above, left) talk with Mr. and Mrs. George
Feldenkreis of Keystone Point. Dorita Feldenkreis was
cochairman of the hostess committee of which Nancy
Kanter was a member. Below, from left, are George
Kimmel, chairman of the Hebrew Academy board of
directors; Mrs. Kimmel; Leonard Adler, auditor of the
school; and Mrs. Irene Adler, president of Hebrew Acad-
emy Women.
TORONTO JTA Jewish
sources in the Soviet Union re-
port on a crackdown on Jewish
activists there by the author-
ities. KGB men in Moscow alone
in the past month have raided
over 100 homes of Jews linked
to the publications "Jew in the
USSR" and "Tarbut" the cul-
tural report.
The sources report that the
homes of four of those most
prominently connected with
these two publications were
raided by the KGB shortly after
the departure from the Soviet
Union on Dec. 24 of the Chief
Rabbi of the British Common-
wealth, Dr. Immanuel Jakobo-
vits. He had been assured by
top Soviet officials that efforts
would be made to ensure Jewish
cultural life in Russia.
The homes raided belonged
to Vladimir Prestin, Pavel Abro-
movitch, Ilya Essaf and Yosip
Beygun. The sources said the
KGB men acted on the explicit
order of Public Prosecutor Tik-
honov, who is in charge of the
file of the Jewish cultural pub-
lication.
The Jewish sources reported
that a number of activists were
detained by police in Moscow
after they held a demonstration
outside the Lenin Library,
standing in silence for ten min-
utes in tribute to those sen-
tenced to prison five years ago
in the first Leningrad trial.
They issued a statement to
the Western press, urging sup-
port against the repression of
Jewish culture in the Soviet
Union and against attempts to
frighten applicants for visas.
B'nai B'rith Women
No. Dade Chapter No. 609
The North Dade Chapter No.
809 of B'nai B'rith Women will
hold its regular meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 8:15 p.m.
at the Washington Federal Say-
ings and Loan Association in
North Miami Beach.
The program for the evening
will be a talk by Molly Turner
of Channel 10 News.
Sisterhood Auction
The Mollie Kahaner Sister-
hood of Beth Torah Congrega-
tion is holding its annual new
merchandise auction at 7:30
p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 11, in the
social hall of the synagogue.
South Beach residents rallied for the State of Israel and
paid tribute to banker Abraham Grunhut (center) on
Dec. 15 at the South Beach Auditorium in Miami Beach.
Among the key leaders at the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization "Night in Israel" were (from left) Mayshie
Friedberg, last year's recipient; Mrs. Emanuel Mentz,
past president of Miami Beach Hadassah; Mrs. Zelda
Thau, chairman, and Judah Kurtzbard of Bank Leumi in
Miami Beach.
Seacoast North
CJA-IEF Chairman Named
Albert M. Shulman of Miami
Beach has been named chair-
man of the 1976 Combined Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund for Seacoast Towers
North. The announcement was
made by CJA-IEF general chair-
man L. Jules Arkin.
"Mr. Shulman has already
demonstrated years of devoted
service to Jewish community ef-
forts, especially those which
benefit the people of Israel,"
said Arkin. "His enthusiasm and
the urgent need for CJA-IEF's
success in 1976 will be the driv-
ing forces in rallying support
from all the residents of Sea-
coast North this year."
Shulman is assembling the
building's leadership in antici-
pation of a major campaign
function early in 1976.
Bar-Han Will Honor
South Florida Congressmen
Three United States Congress-
men representing South Floria
will be honored by Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity of Israel on March 21 at
a testimonial dinner in the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel.
Announcement of the accept-
ances by Representatives Dante
B. Fascell, William Lehman and
Claude D. Pepper was made in
Miami Beach by Dr. Joseph H.
Lookstein, chancellor of Bar-
Ilan University and national
president of the Synagogue
Council of America.
Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach, cochairman of the Flor-
ida Committee for Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity, will serve as chairman
of the dinner.


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