The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02439

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
imt 48 Number 44
Miami, Florida Friday, October 31, 1975
50c by Mail jwo Sections
Price 25 <-ena
me of My Best Friends Didn Jt Sell Me a Radio
W .SIIINGTON Egypt's President An-
Jar Sadat started his historic visit to the United
tate^ on Monday by losing his cool.
In a heated exchange with guests at the
Ifationa) Press Club where he met reporters for
discussion of what he described as his "good-
rill mission" here, President Sadat denounced
Zionism, while at the same time insisting that
'We are not against the Jews."
EARLIER, HE had met with President
Ford at the White House, ostensibly bringing
with him a "shopping list" for military equip-
ment he hopes to acquire and which he insists
Secretary of State Henry Kissinger promised
him during Kissinger's Cairo-Jerusalem shuttle
talks leading up to the interim Sinai accord
now in effect.
Sadat began his presentation at the Press
Club here in a warm and measured way. Still,
he was aware that large contingents of Arabs
Continued on Page 11-A
RESISTS STATE DEPT PRESSURE
Beame Refuses
N.Y. Welcome
NEW YORK Mayor Abraham Beame this week
Steadfastly refused to permit an official city welcome to
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat who was scheduled to
isit here on Wednesday and Thursday.
Despite heavy State Department pressure, Beame
[declared it would be "an act of hypocrisy" to welcome
f"any chief of state" who backs with so much enthusiasm
as Cairo does "the United Nations resolution which seeks
[to revive a new form of racism."
The resolution equates Zionism with racism.
"AS A MAYOR of the City of New York, I must
recognize that most of the citizens of this City have
Continued on Page 9-A
Ford, Sadat Hail Ties
__*
Of 'New Friendship
WASHINGTON President Ford met Egypt's Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat in a 68-minute meeting, the first in a
series that launched Sadat's historic 10-day visit to the
United States beginning Monday.
Preceding the two chief of
K atican Meet in Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) Members of the Vatican's
Secretariat on Jewish Affairs will come to Jerusalem
next February, it has been reliably learned, to hold dis-
cussions here with Jewish theologians and representa-
tives of international Jewish organizations.
This is the first time such talks will be held in Jeru-
salem. Previous meetings aimed at improving Jewish-
Catholic relations and understandinghave taken place
in France, Belgium and Rome.
THE SECRETARIAT was set up some years ago to
restudv Catholicism's attitude to Judaism.
Early this year, it published a guideline document
Continued on Page 9-A
:New Weapon Takes Bow
TEL AVIV (JTA) A new self-propelled artil-
lery piece that can fire 4 to 5 shells a minute and revolve
360 degrees, has been developed by Sultam Industries,
a subsidiary of the Histadrut-owned Koor Industries,
with the participation of private investors.
The weapon, designed and constructed entirely by
the Sultan Staff, is regarded by local and foreign ex-
Continued on Page 9-A
states'- review of an Honor
Guard, Sadat acknowledged
that "I shall be asking the
U.S. to sell me arms." He
was not specific about a
"shopping list" he was re-
ported to have brought with
him.
SADAT DID say, however,
that if the United States com-
plied with Egypt's request, the
arms "will be used only in ac-
cordance with the United Na-
tions charter, which permits
self-defense."
The President refused to af-
firm that they would not be
used against Israel.
He declared that Egypt had
not been able to replace the
arms it lost in the October, 1973
war. The Soviet Union, he said,
refused to sell Egypt arms.
The- implication was that, be-
cause of his disaffiliation from
Moscow in .recent years, Sadat
expected the U.S. to fill in the
gap.
SADAT ALSO declared that
he would be seeking economic
assistance for his "red-tape"-
ridden enonomy suffering under
a staggering load, including the
promise of education and work
to all Egyptians.
Later, at the National Press
Club. Sadat declared that the
interim Sinai accord would not
bind Egypt to inaction if Israel
refused to come to terms with
Syria over the Golan Heights.
"The United States," he de-
clared, "holds in its hands more
than 99 per cent of the cards
in this game."
IT WAS clear Sadat expected
the administration to begin ap-
plying pressure on Jerusalem
to reach an accord with Syria.
In greeting President Sadat,
President Ford noted that the
Egyptian leader's visit "is a
symbol of the new dimensions
of our- friendship," and prom-
ised that the U.S. would not be
satisfied with a stalemate in the
advance toward a lasting peace
in the Middle East.
PRESIDENT SADAT
loses his cool
Senate, House Rap UN
Anti Zionist Resolution
Knesset Denounces Draft .
Days of Infamy 7-A
6-A
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Senate and House
have prepared a joint resolution informing the 142 member
states of the United Nations of their condemnation of the
anti-Zionist resolution adopted by the General Assembly's
Third Committee (Social, Cultural and Humanitarian Com:
mittee) and urging the General Assembly "to disapprove the
said resolution if and when it is presented for a vote before
that body."
The joint resolution de-
clares that the UN draft
"wrongfully associates and
equates Zionism with racism
and racial discrimination"
and that the purposes and
principles of the United Na-
tions thereby "are threaten-
ed with being nullified and
subverted."
Continued on Page 12-A
SCHLESINGER: VIEWED WITH 'SOME SYMPATHY'
Door to Pershings Still Open
SECRETARY SCHLESINGER
joint study in offing
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Defense Secretary James
R. Schlesinger said here that
the U.S. government would
look "with some sympathy"
on Israel's request for long-
range Pershine missiles.
He said that was Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer's meaning when he
included in the 16 point
U.S. Israeli memorandum
that became part of the re-
cent Israeli-Egyptian accord,
the pledge of a "positive re-
sponse" to Israel's request
for Pershings.
Schlesinger stated that a
joint U.S.-Israel study would
be made regarding the
Pershings "but it is unlikely,
given all of the factors in-
volved, a near term decision
to provide Pershings to Is-
rael is likely to be forthcom-
ing."
HE SAID "I have noticed
that Prime Minister (Yitzhak)
Rabin has indicated the Persh-
ing ground-to-ground missile
was not an indispensable ele-
ment of Israel's defense pos-
Continued on Page 1S-A
Predict
Hate Drive
Will End
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Amadou Mahtar
M'Bow, director general of
the United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific and Cultur-
al Organization (UNESCO),
said here that he believes
that UNESCO in its next
general conference, sched-
uled to meet late next year,
will heed the recommenda-
tion of UNESCO's executive
board earlier this month to
end the anti-Israel measures
adopted by the organization
last year.
Last November, after UN-
ESCO adopted two Arab-in-
Continued on Page 8-A


Page 2-A
*Jenisti fhrkfian
I. M I '" "
Friday October 31
2,500 Plan to Attend CJF Assembly Here
More than 2,500 representatives from the organized
Jewish communities of the United States and Canada will
attend the 44th General Assembly of the Council of .'ewish
Federations and Welfare Funds iCJF) to be held :n Miami
Bgacb Nov. 15 to 23, it was announce- iond Eps:c:n
of Ch!c;>eo. president of ihe CJF. I: v .-: -v.s-
sembly in CJF history.
Meeting at bolh the Ci
Ion and Deauville H.c.
the leaders of the Jewish
lederaucns and Well ire
Funds serving 800 J?w.sh
communities will consider
the wide range of human
needs at home, in Israel, and
o;her countries overseas.
The community leaders will
plan how best to carry out
Federation's crucial role
and responsibilities in max-
imizing aid and services.
ACCORDING TO Epst.in.
who will complete his three-
year ttrm of office as CJF
; --..:.....he del?gates w ill
an :n-
tena i :rit-
..> a:: j
confronting the Ar-
iel :: -. :-:. 0 i:M:::'.:nuy as
they are bnog shaped by infla-
ti n and recession here, by oil.
dftente and the latest Middle
East iioves towards disengage-
ment.'"
The Assembly will include
seven plenary sessions, four
iraor fmms, and a neai-hun-
dred workshops.
"The ever-expanding role of
coanu'nity Federationswhich
recognizes that the meeting of
Israel Aircraft To Fire
More T/iau 4,000 Workers
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel Aircraft Industries
and other military industries will dismiss close to 4.000
workers shortly ia an effort to cut expenses by Israel's
military establishment. The dismissals were seen as the
Defense Ministry's response to criticism that it was not
doing enough to prune its costs in view of Israel's severe
economic situation.
A spokesman for Israel Aircraft Industries, one of
the country's largest weapons producers, said dismissal
notices were being prepared for about 3,000 of its em-
ployes. Close to 1,000 more will lose their jobs in other
military industries in what is expected to be the largest
wave of dismissals since the economic downtown in
1966.
Military sources have warned that the dismissal
may reduce "the potential production" of the mditary
industries.

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the Caoeral Assembly in Miami
a -e;
American support for a
just peace in the Middle East;
The impact of the infla-
tionary spiral and recession on
Jewish needs and the steps
ndcessary to meet them;
Consideration of a propo-
sal for a new merged national
agency for leadership and serv-
ice in Jewish education and
culture;
The 1976 campaigns view-
ed against the lessons of the
1975 experience in an effort to
meet the massive needs in the
year ahead;
Bicentennial perspectives:
American Jewry's participation
in this 200th anniversary year;
The tamt and limitations
of government funding of vol-
untary agencies in the United
&tajte&
The current plight of So-
viet Jews and the actions re-
quired to meet their needs in
Russia. Israel and the United
States;
The effect of women's
v. satar leadership iu American
Jewish communities;
The establishment of fur-
ther guidelines for Federation-
ayaagogue relations;
The development of Fed-
eration endowments, particu-
larly through the new National
Pooled incm; Fund establish-
ed by the CJF;
A reexamination of Fed-
eration's role in community re-
lations.
THE CONVENTION will
opjn on Wednesday evening
with a keynote address by Ep-
stein. Preceding it in the after-
noon, a reception for delegates
at the Vizcaya Museum will be
sponsored bv the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation.
Highlighting the annual ban-
uuet an Saturday evening and
th installation of new Council
officers will be a major ad-
dress on "The Jewish Experi-
ence in America: A Perspecti' e
the Ei-sntsnnial
op the E e of
Uosin anee.
Two anv '
MnWOI vv.i: .: BUttl 3- *i
G.n a! Ass '. ." Li' -'
j. ih-oi- riaua
. inti .-. : initi-
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the C uneJLI '' -
at the ':...... : itorday
MRS. WILLIAM H. GR*T\
of San Francisco, w->
the Award C :'
ma'-e th.se preaanti*ins.
The Bo ii .molar Awards,
honoring the nofd columnist
ani Eiito;-in-Ciu.'f Emeritus of
the Jewish Tel graphi: Ag ncy,
ann )unc 'd by La' y M. Cecker,
cf Montreal, chairman of the
Awards Commitee. on Thurs-
day mornim wT hrno- distin-
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M10-31-75


Friday, October 31, 1975
*Jewish fk rid kin
Page 3-A
Rabbinate Studies Meaning of Quinlan Case
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK(JTA) Three
rabbinical experts, one Ortho-
dox, one Conservative and one
Reform, have expressed sepa-
rpte conflicting opinions on
whether Jewish law would
sancron the Dlea of the parents
of a 21-year-old New Jersey
woman for removal of a res-
pirator which has sustained her
;iie processes for more than
five months.
Karon Ann Ouinlan has suf-
fered irreversible brain damage,
sccordine to doctors at St.
I are's Hospital in Denville,
N.J.. where she is in a coma.
HER FOSTER parents. Mr.
,-nd Mrs. Joseph Quinlan. of
i -ising. N.J-. filed a petition.
asking a superior court to au-
thorize removal of the respirator
BO that their daughter can die
"with grace and dignity."
The three rabbis, asked by
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
for comment on the issues in
he situation from the stand-
l .in! of Jewish law and ethics,
i re Rabbi Norman Lamm, spir-
itual leader of the Jewish
nter in Manhattan and pro-
f-ssor of Jewish philosophy at
Mva Uni-ersity; Rabbi
Seymour Siegel. chairman of
the Committee on Jewish Law
and Standards of the Rabbin-
ical Assembly, the association
c f Conservative rabbis; and
obi Joserh Perman, spiritual
leader of the Free Synagogue
oi Westchester in Mount Ver-
non .and chairman of the Sub-
committee on Bio-Ethics of the
Central Conference of Amer-
ican Rabbis, the association of
Reform rabbis.
RABBI LAMM said that the
parents "simply are not a oartv
to the case from the point of
view of Jewish law" and that "to
bestow upon them the legal right
to determine the life or death
DJ their daughter would be a
reversion to ancient Roman
times when parents had the ab-
solute authority over the life
and death of their orogeny."
He declared that "the gen-
eral principle of the Halacha
with regard to the case itself
is that we are not required to
utilize heroic measures to pro-
long the life of hooelesslv sick
patients, but We are forbidden
to terminate the use of such
measures once they have been
begun."
In other words. Rabbi Lamm
added, "If we are asked whether
or not to use such extraordinary
measures to prolong biologically
the life of a patient who has
suffered irreversible brain dam-
age, then rhere are grounds, de-
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pending on the individual case,
for responding negatively."
BUT HE asserted. "I cannot
see how Jewish law can sanc-
tion pulling the plug, which is
tantamount to severing a vital
organ of the patient, which is
forbidden."
Rabbi Siegel stressed, in his
comment, that he was giving his
personal opinion because the
Committee on Jewish Law and
Standards "has as yet not con-
sidered this matter, but will do
so soon."
The basic question, he said,
is whether the woman is to be
considered dead or still alive,
though in a Coma, in traditional
Judaism, he said, the criteria,
for determining death have been ,
"the cessation of respiratory
functions and the cessation of
heart beat."
These criteria represented
"the best scientific knowledge
of the day." and once those
functions stopped, the person
was judged to be dead, he said.
RABBI SIEGEL added that, in |
the judgment of Orthodox "de-
cisions," these criteria "should
not be changed since they have
been enhrined in the tradition-
al texts."
But "in the judgment of more j
liberal decisors. such as those
affiliated with Conservative and [
Reform Judaism, the criteria for i
death should reflect the best
scientific knowledge of the time,
not dogmatic principles."
At the present time, he said,
"there is near concensus in the I
scientific community that brain I
death does indeed indicate the |
cessation of human life" and i
that therefore, "the basis for!
decision in this vital area has
been established."
ON THE assumption that Miss |
Quinlan is not dead by current'
medical standards, the next I
Question. Rabbi Siegel said, is
the issue of euthanasia. He said
there was a distinction between :
active and passive euthanasia. I
"Active euthanasia is action
to stop Hfe Or permitting a per-
son to die."
Removing the respirator
would be a situation of passive I
euthanasia, which, he said I
would be permitted if medical j
opinion is that the woman is
dead. Since active euthanasis is'
forbidden, the respirator may'
not be removed if the person is j
held to be alive.
He stressed also that when
dealing with such "an infinitely j
precious thing as human life,
the most stringent precautions
be taJten to protect the patient."
RABBI PERMAN agreed that
traditional Jewish law does not
speak of brain death because
this was beyond the limits of
medical knowledge at the time i
it was written.
In any event, he added, "We
do not need to go beyond the
law. We need to get behind it
and try to understand the eth-
nical sensitivity and human
compassion that has determined
all Jewish bio-ethical deci-;
sions."
Rabbi Perman said it was his!
understanding that there was no
present hope for a cure for Miss ;
Quinlan nor any possibility of
returning her to a normal rela-
tively healthy life. The question,
he said, was "whether artifi-
cally to prolong her condition
or not to prolong it. We ought
not to do it."
HE SAID it could not be
"ethnically justifiable to extend
a vegetable state for weeks, let-
alone months" and that "no pa-
tient should have to suffer such
indignity, regardless of state of
consciousness."
Rabbi Perman also contend-
ed that "no parents, whether na-
tural or adoptive, should ever
have to beg that their child's
life be taken. To my mind, there
is no possible good to outweigh
the anguish or these circum-
stances."
He quoted Ecclesiastes that
"There is also a time to let live
and, in this case, to let die."
He noted that there is not at
present any structure to make
an effective decision in the
Quinlan case. He said the Na-
tional Institute of health has a
requirement in respect to bio-
medical and behavioral research
establishing review committees
to examine all research involv-
ing human subjects, made up of
physicians, non-medical scien-
tists "and respected medical1
laymen."
RABBI PERMAN, a member
of the Human Subjects Review
Committee of the Mount Sinai'
School of Medicine, said that
ideally, every hospital "should
have a formalized review pro-
cedure with appropriate means
of appeal" for dealing with
ethnic questions in general hos-
pital practice or physician-pa-
tient relations.
He said the decisions of such
a review committee should be
final, unless restrained by some
legal body. The only procedures
for such situations "in present
use are those established by
peer scrutiny," he stated.

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Page 4-A
^Jewistfhrid^n
Frid?. Octobe
r 31.
Clarifying the Issue
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith has
performed an important public service in reminding us
that Jack Eckerd, President Ford's nominee for adminis-
trator of the federal government's General Services Ad-
ministration, continues to deny that his 1974 campaign
ad against Sen. Richard Stone was an appeal to religious
prejudice.
We have no desire to continue fencing with Eckerd
over this issue. Had the President not tapped him for
the GSA post, we would not have opened it again. We
think the debate is detrimental to the welfare of the total
community. We are sure the ADL would agree.
Unfortunately, the issue was reopened by the Pres-
ident's nomination.
And so now, all Eckerd has to do is to say that he
repudiates the purpose of the ad. Up until this time, he
has flatly refused to do so. This means that all the talk,
printed and otherwise, about Eckerd's alleged apologies
to Stone is beside the point.
Eckerd can do all of us a favor and bury this di-
visive issue once and for all. He can say, publicly, that
calling attention to Stone's being Jewish and his being
Protestant was an appeal to religious prejudice, which
has no place on the American political scene.
The Ties Among Enemies
It's hard to determine the truth of the story that
Capitol Hill has warned Israel against "invading" Leba-
non if the legally-constituted government there falls
and the Syrians move to take the Lebanese over.
But what must be understood is why Israel would
feel bound to do so not really to "invade," but mili-
tarily to assist the presiding forces in power.
The present struggle in Lebanon is not simply be-
tween Christians and Moslems. It is not a religious war.
The present struggle is over whether Lebanon will
survive as a modern nation turned toward the west or
whether it will be taken over by Palestinian radicals
with an eye toward the east.
There is more similarity between Israel and the
presently-constituted Lebanese government than any
Arab would care publicly to admit. But those Lebanese,
Christian and Moslem, who are fighting against the cur-
rent insurgency inspired by the Palestinians feel that
similarity nonetheless.
It Was Doubly Refreshing
Ambassador Moynihan's repudiation of the United
Nations resolution on Zionism, and President Ford's
urging of some of our Latin American neighbors that
they change their minds and vote against the resolution,
were courageous stands in themselves.
Coming as they did on the eve of President Sadat's
visit to the United States this week showed a double
dose of courage.
For one thing, here is the Egyptian chief with a
-shopping list for a monumental amount of military hard-
ware he says Secretary of State Kissinger promised him,
and which the administration says Sadat had better not
expect to have filled.
For another, here is the Egyptian chief already
threatening that he'll sic the Syrians on Israel if we
don't fill his shopping list and that if we don't, Rus-
sia will.
It's refreshing these days to see any kind of cour-
age expressed in our national convictions. To see it
coming from the administration is doubly refreshing.
Protest Not Censorship
A sponsor of a cinema festival in Atlanta, Ga., at
which two Nazi propaganda films will be shown, has
charged the southern office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith with exerting undue pressure to
ban them. "We will not be subjected to any form of
censorship," declared Gudmond Vigtel, director of the
High Museum of Art.
The films in question were made by Leni Riefen-
stahl, a close friend of Hitler. One is "Triumph of the
Will," about a Nazi mass rally in Nuremberg in 1934.
The other is "Olympiad," about the 1936 Olympics in
Berlin. There are those who claim that both films broke
new grounds in cinematic technique, and for that reason
alone deserve to be presented at a film festival.
At issue is whether the ADL's protest against these
films, shown at a festival meant to honor "humanistic"
achievement, constitute censorship. The argument that
these two films broke new grounds are specious. If Na-
zism was fought as a modern form of barbarism, why
should its "art" be considered a contribution to the
advancement of humanity?
Let the Apology Be Heard
THERE IS a certain Saturnal-
ian splendor in the Miami
Heralds editorial support Oct.
23 for the nomination of Jack
Eckerd as head of the General
Services Administration.
The editorial wallows in the
sanctimonious aroma of deca-
dent Rome when the then-rul-
ers of the world said one thing
in an outpouring of philosoph-
ical philandering while doing
another in the trifling flirta-
tions that cost them their des-
tiny. .
ONE SHOULD expect noth-
ing more from a newspaper
that condemned Richard Nixon
Mindlin
r irorr.being behind u'^l
he ahead of us onZ '4
f ir his criminality while urging
,i ction to the presidency
and chewing up and consigning
THE IATKT 6ALAWMQ ACT
to hell anyone who *.
meekest manner sub. *'
there was insanity S^ I
torial judgments **'
I mention this W.
Eckerd Hap J ],^ji
spirit of the Nixon veil1
far from being "
us on the
just over the hill, i,hthf,
ent political moment b f.'i
tus intended to iU|| ,..''-,
false sense of sec^JJ
have successfully coniJJ
a mtional crisis l
THAT is a lie. and U? s 'hem an ,58
are cleans,,! of the vJ.M
'' ,: whoaSfl
to se,z< ojrtoH
our sacred lonor.
Confirmal n of ^
Ford's
m our'
"llr person,
struction : would undenl
another triumph of the
dential com
It woul: serve
proof, if further proof bet
cd. that what lies ahead l
on the horizon just over tig J
is even clo*i r than we thai
"ECKERD IS the
would also c infirm our SI
dedication | i our rv-aJTI
f opines the fel
aid's Oct 23 editorial ia|
time time that it recalls Ei|
erd's 1974 campaign
Richard Stone lor the (\
U.S. Senator from Florida.
In that campaign, on theetl
of Election Day, Eckerd forth his (.nullifications ;r, |
parison with Stone's in k|
paper advertising calling
voter attention that Eckerd i
Protestant, and Stone is Jet
The Herald's Oct. 23
dorsement of Eckerd as hen
the General Services
tration concedes that this i
"a scurrilous advertisemen'i
Continued on Page 13-A
Utilities Should be the Public's
You will have to believe that
my first visit to Disney World
recently further strengthened
my belief that public utilities
should be owned by the public.
I enjoyed everything there but
the WEDway People Mover
which, even if it were free as
blatant propaganda for your
"investor-owned" electrical util-
ities, would have been a waste
of time.
Paid for with the most expen-
sive ticket in the book, an E.
it was an absolute rip-off as
entertainment or information.
It was only what we have come
to expect from our private
utilitv companies these davs.
SOME OF the headlines in the
local press barely scratch the
surface: "Power Users Overpav
$1 Billion"; "Fuel Adjustment
by Utilities Abused."
The stories of corruption seem
endless: Southern Bell has ad-
mitted payoffs to public offi-
cials in North Carolina, South
Carolina and Georgia for favor-
able rate decisions, and is list-
ed among 36 firms which paid
out bribes to foreign officials
(Southern Bell?).
Demands that the nrivatelv-
owned electric utilities, as well
as the telephone company, be-
come owned instead by state,
county and municipal govern*
ments are not new, but the con-
tinued rise in cost to the con-
sumer has accelerated those de-
mands.
IT IS no surprise if some-
what late in the davthat Rep
Alan Becker, another one of
Dade's bright young men in the
Florida Legislature, has now in-
troduced a bill providing for the
acquisition and operation of the
FtoridaUtiIitieS by the S,ate of
Since most of our access to
information of that nature is de-
pendent on the Miami Herald.
Edward
Cohfn
the most one could know about
this bill was a single paragraph
news item and a five-inch edi-
torial called the proposal "half-
baked ... an exercise in fu-
tilityand publicity." And adds
that Rep. Becker knows that his
bill has no chance of passing the
Florida Legislature.
Which perhaps tells a lot
about the Florida Legislature
and the Miami Herald, but not
about the bill or government
ownership of public utilities in
the United States and. yes, in
Florida.
OF THE 2.800 public power
systems in the United States,
1.775 are owned by municipali-
ties. 26 by Federal agencies (in-
cluding TVA), 112 by state,
county or district aeenaai
932 by rural cooperatives
In Florida, 34 munici
cities supply electrical |
their citizens and even 1
their corporate borders.!
isn't such a radical or
baked" idea at all.
The economics of puM
sus private power are
and clear: public powers
yield cheaper rates.'
the difference is as mucli
per cent, and an FPCI
shows that, exclusive on
ed earnings, municipal I
have an average of 301
lower costs per kilowatt
than private utilities.
BECKER DOESN'T a
my own files on a subjo
has intrigued me
shows the reason for a'
tial oercentaee of that I
is that public systems
less on public relations. 1
lobbying, less for execuWJ
aries and. believe it or *
for internal bureauca*
In more direct words."
Continued on P,>4
~*fe wish Flor idiafl
O" ICE AND PLANT 13* N.E. th STREET TKI.KPHOS*'
.'.O. Box 01-2971. Miami, Flwida M'"1
Editor and Publisher
LEO MINDIJN
Associate Editer
A.MSuni tr
^1
Tn* .^:h "* Ooee Not Guarantee The,*'*'*
Of The Merchandise Adv.rti.ed In Its Column.
Published every Friday since 1917 bv The J'wlsh FloH*
-------.________ Second-Cla Postage Paid at Miami. FTa:______
te. WorWwi'd! v:*",h. T'*0'>"fe Aoency. Seven ^JjS
ociatXr> ft KMiiiST! 8'7i- National Editorial Astoc-tlon. -S
.------^^T_nQhsh-Jewiah Newspapers, and the Florida^Pr,
INSCRIPTION RATisTTUoI., Ar> V..r>0.00 TW '
Out of Town Upon Reavest
Ye*'
Volume 48
Friday, October 31, 1975
26
heshvaN1
M10-31-75
M10-11-75
BBBBBBBBBBBBBBSBl
M-----1U-.1I-'*


lay, October 31, 1975
+JmisHh>rkMan
Page 5-A
*

~ %
*A. -
Struggle for Soviet Jewry is Reaffirmed
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
vly elected officers of the
tional Conference on Soviet
irry reaffirmed their commit-
nt to the struggle of Soviet
pry, in a statement issued
at Independence Hall.
lie statement read by Stan-
H. Lowell, reelected chair-
in of the NCSJ, in a ceremony
nessed by hundreds of Jew
community leaders from
bss the United States, point-
out. "Today in our Bicen-
inial Year, our brothers and
ers in the Soviet Union are
Ditinually denied their rights;
tir lives subject to constant
rassment, surveillance and
crimination from the- Soviet
biorities."
NOTING THAT these actions
violations of numerous in-
national agreements the So-
Union has signed, most re-
Btly the Helsinki Agreement,
veil continued: "As long as
Soviet Jews are denied their
rights to emigrate, to enjoy full
religious and cultural facilities
and .are subject to severe re-
pression by the Soviet authori-
ties, we pledge ourselves to sup-
port their struggle, to demand
their human rights and to raise
our united voice against in-;
justice."
The ceremony followed the:
NCSJ's Board of Governors
meeting at the Federation of
Jewish Agencies of Greater!
Philadelphia.
EVEN AS the ceremony was I
taking place, reports from Mos-
cow stated that Ernest Neizves-
ty, one of the Soviet Union's
best-known graphic artists and
sculptors, appealed to President
Nikolai Podgorny for permis-
sion to emigrate to Israel.
The artist, who won world-
wide attention in 1962 when he
publicly quarreled with Nikita
Khrushchev over modern art,
asked for Kremlin intervention
to halt harassment directed
against him and to end what he
termed his "enforced detention"
in the USSR.
Neizvesty, who has been in
official disfavor for many years.
Israel's Superiority to Last
At Least Two Decades
jrO "I do not see the pos-
Hlity of any decisive Arab mil-
Cy success over the Israelis
[the next 10 to 20 years," a
5. expert told the Interna-
mal Symposium on the Oct.
P3 war meeting here Monday.
261. T. N. Dupuy, a U.S. Army
Jitary analyst, told the Egyp-
_ that "I am certain that Is-
f[\ quality, combined with an
pressive marshaling of quan-
by a small nation, will re-
the ascendancy militarily
manv vears to come."
PRAISING the "high qtial-
of the Israelis militarily,
puy at the same time warned
Israel had better achieve
stable Deace in the Middle
st "while their military qual-
| is still supreme. If they wait
long, it may be too late."
Dupuy said the vulnerability
of Israel's superiority reminded
him of the Soviet Union's abil-
ity to defeat a superior German
army during World War II.
Egyptian War Minister Mo-
hamed Gamassy told the 52 na-
tions' delegations at the Sym-
posium that "The October War
strategy was purely Egyptian
and not imported from the East
or West.
"Our forces compiled it with
sweat and blood and in the bit-
ter reality .that Egypt had to
live through after the 1967
war."
Declared Gamassy. "One of
our main aims was to show Is-
rael that its protective shield
of occurred land could be de-
stroyed."
llazar Recommended
Preemptive Strike
Jerusalem lei's retired former Chief
Staff Gen. David Elazar
.here that he had recrrn-
nded a preemptive if ike
inst Egypt and Syria en
eve of the Yom Kippur
but was overruled by
.. Premier Golda Meir be-
(se of political consideia-
is.
le maintained that had
Bel struck first en the ba-
[of intellipence indicating
its neighbors were pre-
Ing for war, the events of
ober, 1973 would have
differfnt and many
Kb mirht have i-een saved.
IlaZAR. who was forced to
jn alter the first prelimi-
i-.port of the Agranat
ottee ciiticued his con-
_ during the early stages of
|Yom Kippur War, spoke at
ffinaJ session Friday of a
lay symposium on the mili-
faspects of the Yom Kippur
'which drew some 200 mih-
officers and experts from
ad and a like number of
officers and military
1Mb.
Bst of the foreign partici-
art going to Cairo for a
ar symposium this month.
, Elazar asked them to con-
fto the Egyptians the mes-
rthat Israel too learned les-
from the last war and
win another should it
r, but that Israel does not
seek military victories because
wars have not brought peace
to the Middle East, and peace is
what is essential for all par-
ties.
Elazar said the difference
between a preemptive war and
a preemptive strike was that
the former was a calculated
political decision while the lat-
ter was a tactical military move
intended to reduce casualties.
HE SAID he did not under-
estimate the improvement of
the Arab armies in the Yom
Kippur War but stressed Is-
rael's qualitative superiority.
He noted that the ratio ot
tanks was 2-1 in the Arab's fa-
vor, but their losses were 4-1
in Israel's favor. Similarly, the
Arabs enjoyed a 2-1 numerical
superiority in aircraft but their
losses were 5-1 in Israel's favor
Minister of Commerce and
Industry, Haim Barlev, also a
retired general and former
Chief of Staff, told the sympo-
sium that it was impossible to
eliminate entirely the element
of surprise in war. He quoted
the Chinese proverb, "Caution
is the mother of wisdom.'
He said several false alarms
were preferable to one surprise
attack.
GEN. (RES.) Ariel Sharon,
the Yom Kippur war hero
whose public criticism of his
superior's actions initiated the
so-called "War of the Generals
after the Yom Kippur War, ab-
sented himself from the sympo-
sium where he had been sched-
uled to speak.
said he sent his appeal after a
second refusal this year for
permission to emigrate.
EARLIER THIS vear, he said
he was told by officials he
could not leave because he had
not divorced his wife. Now, he
told Western reporters, officials
had told him he could not leave
because he had two aged
parents.
When he appealed to emi-
grate last March, he was expell-
ed from the artists' union and
from his official workshop.
He told reporters that his
wife and his mother and father
had approved his request to
emigrate.
Washington
- _
Federal
Saving* and Loan Association of Miami Beach
ASSETS EXCEED $500 MUL10N
7 CONVENIENT OFFICES TO SERVE YOU IN
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Phone:981-9192
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North Miami Beach:
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Phone: 673-3333
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Phone: 391-8903
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Chuman ol till Bond.
ta
SATISFYING
EXPERIENCE
A recent survey tells us most people
get a big kick out of saving money.
We believe it. We see them every
day as they save for a new home or
car, for a trip, for their children or
grandchildren. We know they're
enjoying it and we enjoy helping
them do it. The survey also says
people like to save at a place that's
warm and friendly. We already
knew that.
Our growth to over 500 million
dollars has come about because
people like to do business with us.
Why? We think it's because we
consider people our most important
asset. Why don't you drop into
any of our convenient offices, open
a savings account, talk about a
mortgage, perhaps just talk.
S
He's YOUR kind of Mayor...
and that's why Mayor Rosen is endorsed by:
Condominium Owners Association, Inc.
Unanimously endorsed by the Executive Board
Dade County Council of Senior Citizens
Max Serchuk, President
Voters Incorporated
Harry Levy. President
Senior Citizens of Miami Beach, Inc.
Dr. Jerome Jacobs, Chairman of .he Board Max D. Goldhagen. President
Dade Better Government League
Larry Taylor, President
Tenants Association of Florida. Inc.
Shepard W. Davis. Chairman o( .he Board Murray S. Klein. Presidenl
United Teachers of Dade
Murray Sisselman, President
Voters and Taxpayers League of Miami and Dade County
Erny Fannotto, President
The Democratic dub of Miami Beach
Wally Gluck, President
On Tuesday. November 4, make sure you vote to elect
MAYOR HAROLD ROSEN
Lever 4-A
Free rides to the polls: 532-9097
Pd Pol Adv Hany Mfarwr. Trs.


Page 6-A
* 3eist Hcridfor
% i
i a 1
Friday, October 31, iWs|
Peres Recommends
VOTE Of VIRTBAi UNANIMITY
West B,k Self-Rufe KnessetR(tPs UN **
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Sbiflion
Peres has suggested for the first time publicly that Ar,abs
should assume self-administration on the West Bank
under the local Arab leadership.
lie made that proposal during a visit to the city
coued of Beit Jalla, an Arab town south of Jerusalem.
"There are sufficient decent and sensible men in
Judaea and Samaria who can administer their own mat-
ters," Peres declared.
HE SAID that the Arab summit conference at Rabat -
which eliminated Jordan as the spokesman for West
3ank Arabs and the unacceptability of the terrorist or-
ganizations had created a vacuum which should be filled
by self-administration.
Peres' ideas are apparently shared by Foreign Min-
ister Yigal AUon who was reported to be preparing to
make a formal proposal to the Cabinet soon for the im-
mediate transfer of the civil administration on the West
Bank and the Gaza strip to the hands of the local resi-
dents.
PERES INITIATED the concept of administrative
autonomy about six months ago in private talks with
West Bank leaders. None of them was prepared to as-
sume the responsibility at the time.
One Arab notable in Jerusalem told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency recently that "In the past we thought
pome form of co-existence with the Jews was possible,
but now we don't believe so any more."
The spokesman, who was one of the Arab leaders
approached by Peres, accused Israel of responsibility
{or deteriorating relations with West Bankers by ex-
propriating land for Jewish settlement.
Echeverria Told to Return
Degree to Tel Aviv University
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tel Aviv University stu-
dents are demanding here that President Luis Eche-
verria return the Honorary Doctorate awarded him by
the university on his recent visit to Israel because of
Mexico's vote for the anti-Zionist resolution in the UN
General Assembly's Third Committee.
The demand was contained in a cable sent to the
Mexican President by the University Students Associa-
tion with copies to UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim
and to the Mexican Embassy here. The cable declared
that Echeverria was not worthy of the honor conferred
on him.
PROF. SHLOMO SIMONSON, rector of Tel Aviv
University, has also cabled Echeverria expressing shock
over the Mexican vote and asking for an explanation
inasmuch as Echeverria had expressed friendship for
Israel when he visited here.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Knesset, with virtual
unanimity, angrily condemned the anti-Zionist resolution
adopted by the General Assembly's Third Committee, urged
its defeat in the Assembly's plenary and expressed appre-
ciation to the 29 nations which voted against the draft in
the Humanitarian, Social and Cultural Committee.
A Knesset resolution adopted after a debate on the UN
action reaffirmed that Zionism is the movement for the
reconstruction and liberation of the Jewish people.
ONLY THE four-member pro-
Moscow Rakah Communist fac-
tion voted against the Knesset
resolution. The five member
Aguda bloc was absent.
President Ephraim Katzir and
Leon Dulzin, acting chairman
of the Jewish Agency and
World Zionist Organization Ex-
ecutives, attended the Knesset
meeting which was the first of
iN winter session.
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon,
opening the session on behalf
of the government, said that
i!-spite the fact that the passage
of the anti-Zionist draft in the
Third Committee was "not with
an impressive majority," there
were difficult campaigns ahead.
ALLON DID not rule aut the
possibility that the General
Assembly plenary might adopt
the resolution "perhaps even at
a worse balance of votes/'
He observed, # however, that
"if the General Assembly adopts
the committee's resolution, it
will be backing a negative res-
olution and the day will come
when many of its supporters
will regret backing it and just
like other distorted resolutions
of the General Assembly, this
too will end up the garbage
heap of history."
Allon added that Israel and
the Jewish people should not
underestimate the infntions
behind the besmirching of Zion-
ism. "Joining an anti-Zionist
resolution moans join^nc n
SemuAsm." ^ ""
UKUD MEMBER M?nach
Be^ui claimed that Em^Z
among the initiators of the ami
Zionist drait (the original sum"
sor* weie Cuba and nine Ar,h
states not including Egypt) *,
declared: u
"Ws should not apology
b\< rather accuse those *bn
raised their hands for this di-
graceful resolution."
Beigin said the resolute
reoresented anti-Judaism rathe-
than anti-Semitism because the
Arabs too are Semites.
He also assailed Egypt;
President Anwar Sadat for al
leg-dry sayins? he retained (-.
"-i'itR-y option" onlv weeki
after he had committed himself
n^t to resort to fore: underthe '
Sinai inteiim accord
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Mt of Greater Miami
Show Your Solidarity With Israel
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Friday, October 3*, 1975
+Jmist thrkUann
Page 7-A
C9MMUNIST-7KIRD WOULD BARBARITY
Day of Infamy at United Nations
fly MURRAY ZVCKOFF
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Oct. 17 will be re-
called as a day of infamy at
the United Nations. It was a
cay when a eatal of Arab,
Crmmunist and Third World
states succeeded in formal-
j2:'n their hatred cl Zionism
and Israel by adopting a
draft resolution in which
Zionism was equated with
racism.
It was a day of infamy be-
cause the 70 countries
which voted for the resolu-
tion in the Third Committee
were aided and abetted, in-
tentionally or unintentional-
ly, by the 27 states that ab-
stained in the wre-fiuf by
the 16 states Thar were ab-
sent.
IT WAS a & cause the draft now trrwWe*
rronv of t**se stafs with a legal
and etb1""! wn*"*r and rationale
)n- MMiqo(| -*Jir? a?ain-t Is-
rael and, possibly, for actions
ajj-iT)ct 7jfip>* <"y* Ziorrtet or-
ganizations within those coun-
tris wh"'^ Ti'mist group may
now be functioning.
T^to /*->' T-9"l->Sor> ""W n"0
vides, in the eui00 of ffehtln?
racism, an onil^'g^t asaiirt th-
international lihratnn move-
r-r-nf "f *u_ 'w the embodiment of rUi" ce-
ment in the State of Israel.
Tt wa; a c-" of infa-ov be-
cause the d-aft lB*''''t*Vft9-
Nazi tecr.rlipu,*~f-t^*' oig lie.
"IT WAS also a d?v of Per-
versity in that in J draft resolu-
tion and '-o'- '*oV <" H ?- >
Social, Humanitarian and Cul-
- .-,-,; C The 'r- -ml
the draft are evid'm.e that this
commifT i nejMter toM*>. nor
l-.imanitarian nor cjltu-al.
The vote came a litt-i" "o-e
than a week after Uganda Pres-
ident Hi A*ti s"-trd his
hatred n ths Gen-id Ass^bjv
by calling on t> American
reor)o "nvH '< o-i"tv "f
Zionists." called for the ex-
pulsion Of Iwl from th
United Nation's *ni "the xtinc-
tion of Israel as a stat -."
The Arab sponsored* d'aft
resolution eouatine Zionism
with racism was denounced bv
Israeli Ambassador Chaim Her-
zog who told the Third Com-
mittee that the draft has "de-
graded" the United Nations "bv
ntroducina this anti Semitic
element into the worli todav.
and in so doing you will destroy
it ultimately."
LEONARD GARMENT. a
methbe-- of the'U.S. delegation
to the UN. sPeaHng before the
vote, called- the- draft resolution
"obscene," a "supreme act of
deceit." and "one of the most
grievous errors." in the 30-year
existence of the world body.
The vote for the draft resolu-
tion70 in favor. 28 oDPOsed.
27 abstaining and ^6 absent
WANT! D *
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Center needs your "antique"
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161 GREiNBAY ROAD
W LMETTE, ML. 60091
ticularlv siflc
putt
came after heated and prolong-
ed discussion in the Third Com-
mittee, and after the U.S. and
the nine members of the Euro-
pean Common Market warned
thv would vote against it.
The vote also came after the
committee had overridden a re-
quest by two black African
cn.'t^-ies Sierra Leone and
Zambiaf nosp-'one until next
year consideration of the reso-
lution.
The vote was 68-45 with 16
abstentions. Th" onerative sec-
tion of the draft proposed that
the General Assembly deter-
mine that "Zionism is a form of
racism and racial discrimina-
tion."
HERZOG, IN his statement,
declared". "We have listened to
the most unbelievable nonsense
on the issue of Zionism and
from whom? From countries
who are the arehtypes of rac-
ism."
Qb4*-vers said that the Am-
bassedot's denunciation of the
countries supporting the draft
rerI-tion had a marked impact
e^d that thfre was a shocked
silence at the conclusion of his
$t""-Ut.
Daniel M o v n i h a n the
American Ambassador, walked
from his seat in the committee
to where MHMR was sitting and
embraced him just after the
vote took place. But many dele-
gate* a^Hauded tb vote.
JEWISH SOURCES in New
To-k criticized th New York-
Times for its totcl omission
* -. oar : its.' inrV on the ses-
sion anifihi vnt? to anv refer-
tti- \-ian d:?-
wa miW :d at length. (The
mes. ppweve*. in Us Sunda*
deigned to devote *U of
on* **nt;nce to Heraog's state-
ment.)
Garment tr'd tlfr c--":,te-
that, under the rw^twt of fight-
diHvsi rh> !'X was "at Ihe
point of official.v endocsiafl an-
ti-Semitism, one of tV .v. Jest
and most virulmt fon^s of rac-
Dowh in human h;st--."
He added. "w.> MOet slso is^ue
a warningthis resolution plac-
es the ".-or!; of the United Na-
tions ;n iermardv." H^ d"sc-;hed
7:^ni--, a? 3 ovem-nt seeking
to Preserve "the small remnant
pf th Jewish oor>io t^ot sur-
vived the horrors of raciai holo-
caust."
GARMENT S\ID the draft
would eTCPIFBg? anti-S^e-iitism
and gTCUP hosrilitv and "-ould
f*A+if(f*m prevent the United
cts^-c -*! exonerating wtith
pisr rj^J ""mb3r yea' pro^-am to co-^hat racism.
He said the decision would
Rave far-'^aemfle rons"oueflCes
bcaus th d-af' involved the
"moral au'^o-itv" that h said
was the UN's "only ultimate
claim" for support
Movnihan evor^ssed "pro-
found gratification" for the sup-
port Israel received from the
nations ooooition tb draft
resolution and indicated t*jt
the African program for a T9W
conference and "action plan'
acainst 'icial discrimmatioti
would suffer, at least as far as
the U.S. and Western Participa-
tion and nossihl fundina is con-
cerned. Some Western dinlomlts
mats expressed concern afr
the vote was taken that the ac-
tion wcnrH damage U.S. support
for the UN.
AT THE same time, officials
were sharplv c^rical of **
American countries that p-#l
up with the Arab and Coitioia-
WORLD WIDE DATING *
MATRfMONIAL AGBNCY. A1K
Ags FREE BROCHURE. Call
Tel. (305) 735-7660. 721-8257.|
Write- Lew Dick Enterprise*!
2350 W. Oakland Park Blvd,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. i
nist powers to vote in tvmr of
a draft resolution linking Zion-
ism with racism.
One unnamed high official of
the U.S. Mission flatly accused
Chile of selling its vote to the
Arabs in exchange for'Arab sup-
port when the issue of alleged
torture and political repression
in Chile comes up before the
General Assembly. The Chilean
Mission declined immediate
comment on the charge.
U.S. officials expressed dis-
appointment that many Latin
American countries "deserted
us" by supporting the anti-Is-
rael draft resolution or abstain-
ing. At the same time, thev
pointed out that some black
African countries that usually
supported the Arabs on Middle
East issues, either abstained or
voted against the resolution.
American analysts of the vote
who noted the split in the black
African bloc, castigated the at-
titude of Latin American na-
tions. One U.S. official was quot-
ed as saying "The Fascists in
Chile and some like-minded mil-
itary regimes are lining up with
the anti-Semites."
THE AMERICAN official's
charge that Chile sold its vote
was based on the fact that a
five-member UN working group
had submitted a report last
week denouncing the existence
of "torture cells" and other
forms of Political repression in
Body Not Believed
Missing Chilean Jew
NEW YORK (JTA) The family of a missing
Chilean Jew has finally convinced Chilean authorities
that the body of a man found near El Pillar, Argentina,
last summer and identified as Juan Carlos Perelman,
was in fact not the remains of their relative who dis-
appeared.
Argentine police have established that the docu-
ments found near the body were forgeries, it was dis-
closed here by Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal, director of
the B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation League's Lathi Amer-
ican affairs department.
SIMILAR FORGERIES led to the erroneous identi-
fication of another body found at El Pillar as that of Luis
Alberto- Guendelman Wisniak, a member of the Chilean
Jewish community who is also missing.
The discovery of the bodies led some government-
controlled newspapers in Chile to claim that the missing
men were Marxists who faxed their disappearances to
embarrass the Chilean government and were later as-
sassinated by guerrilla groups they joined, Rabbi Rosen-
thai reported.
Chile, ruled by a right-wing
military junta.
The report on the human
rights situation in Chile is due
to be discussed by the Third
Committee and later bv the Gen-
eral Assembly, though no dates
have been set.
According to informed sourc-
es at the UN. the Chilean dele-
gation has been canvassing
mpmbers for support on the hu-
man rights issue and found Arab
diplomats responsive. The Chil-
ean delegate rejected the report
of the UN working group as
"without foundation" and ob-
tained mainly from hostile
Chilean exiles.
But Chile, which had promised
to cooperate with the UN in-
vestigation, barred the world
organization's human rights
Mm from that country.
DR.LEONARD "
.**!
A sensible man
who cares
ENDORSED BY:
TENANTS ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA, INC.
SHEPARD W. DAVIS ^TsilerT"
Chairman of the Beard
CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
ENDORSED UNANIMOUSLY BY
THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
THE DEMOCRATIC CLUB OF MIAMI BEACH
WALIY GLUCK
Executive Vice President
DADE COUNTY COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS
AAAX SERCHUK
President
VOTERS INCORPORATED
HARRY LEVY
Chairman of Voters Inc. Campaign Committee
SENIOR CITIZENS ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI BEACH INC.
dTjeSe .. Jacobs mm Chairman of the Board Pres.dent
COPE0 TIGER
(UNITED TEACHERS OF DADE)
VOTERS & TAXPAYERS LEAGUE OF DADE COUNTY
VOTERS & HOMESTEAD TAX
EXEMPTION LEAGUE OF DADE COUNTY
Lever
MIAMI BEACH CITY COUNCIL
.-......


Page 8 A
Jbrff*J3fer*4b#7
**>~t
"Anwar...."
DON WRIGHT in Miami News
UNESCO Chief SeesEndtoHate
Continued from Page 1-A
spired resolutions cutting
Israel off from the agency's
international cultural aid
program and barring her
from its European regional
grouping, Congress decided
to halt all funds for UNES-
CO until the agency takes
"concrete steps to correct
its recent decision of a polit-
ical character."
WASHINGTON withheld this
year $19.8 million from UNES-
CO, its share of the agency's
budget.
Addressing a press luncheon
here, M'Bow said that the
United States must pay its 25
percent share of UNESCO's
budget, indicating that non-pay-
ment of American dues is ille-
8J.
"We are in a world where
problems cannot be solved by a
show of force," he said, "nei-
ther by force of weapons nor
by force of money."
Late last week M'Bow met
with officials in Washington,
where he discussed UNESCO's
attempt to correct its position
regarding Israel. According to
M'Bow. his agency is in contact
with Israel, though not in for-
mal negotiations. He added
that he is trying his best to nor-
malize Israel's position within
UNESCO.
MEANWHILE, the Commit-
tee For An Effective UNESCO
has urged M'Bow to take ac-
tion to ameliorate the harm
done by the agency last Novem-
ber. The committee made the
appeal in a letter to the direct-
or general.
UN Seen Changing
Bible These Days
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) "Nothing surprises
me any more after listening to the barrage of falsehood
and consistent distortion of history particularly Jew-
ish history at the United Nations."
This was Israel Ambassador Chaim Herzog's reac-
tion to the report that a verse from the 21st Psalm, in
which Israel is mentioned, was omitted from a cantata
which had premiered on Friday, United Nations day.
THE OMITTED verse, the fourth, says: "Behold, he
that keepeth Israel shall neither slumber nor sleep."
The Austrian composer, Gottfried von Einem, said
the omission was inadvertent. He said he worked from
a 1781 German Bible and had not realized until now
that it was an abridged version.
The omission came to the attention of the Israeli
delegation when a program for the cantata showed that
only six of the seven verses of the Psalm were used.
Some noted that if the verses had not been numbered
in the program not many people other than Biblical
scholars might have noted the omission.
Herzog, however, maintained that it was not sur-
prising that an effort would be made "to amend the
Bible."
The New
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FUUY EQUIPPED EFFICIENCIES I
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2 FULL OCEAJtfRONT BLOCKS 32rt lo Mr* Sis MIAMI KACH
Phone
538-6811
The letter was signed by
Joshua Lederberg, Nobel Lau-
reate and professor of biologi-
cal sciences and genetics, and
by Carl Djerassi, a noted chem-
ist and colleague at Stanford
University.
The letter, which was endors-
ed by many leading American ,
scholars and academicians, urg-
ed action to restore UNESCO;
to its primary role as the chief
organization for international
scientific and cultural ex-
change.
"We do not believe that the;
politicization of UNESCO will
play a signifcant part in the
outcome of the national con-
flict in the Mideast," the schol-
ars said in the letter.
"Our concern, rather, is the
impending destruction of UN-
ESCO as a voice for trans-na-
tional intellectual life of man-
kind."
THE COMMITTEE said 40!
distinguished scholars, who re-1
fleet a substantial cross-section,
of the American Scientific and I
academic community, had back-
ed the letter.
Afiong them the committee |
listed 17 Nobel Laureates, in-
cluding ChiHtian Aniinsen of
the National Institutes of
Health, Hans Bethe of Cornell,!
Paul Sa-nuelson of Harvard.;
Charles T wnes of the Univer-'
sity of California at Berkeley, j
and Gerhard Herzberg of the |
National Resjarch Council of
Canada.
The committee was organiz-
ed "to serve as a central forum
through which the American |
intellectual community has been
able to voice concern about
the politicization of UNESCO
and act to bring about the re-
storation of the agency to the
universality of the principles
on which it was founded," the
committee's letter said.
Where is a
Business Banquet
(or Meeting)
always an Asset?
Call the
Catering Manager
377-1966 "
SiK'iiuon-
l-(MirAmlia*MackM'H
October M, t7S
US. Firm Awards Contract
To Israel Metal Industry
TEL AVIV (JTA) The American company con-
structing power stations in Israel has awarded contracts
worth $70 million to Israel's metal industry for struc-
tural parts and other equipment, it was disclosed by
Z. Harway, vice president of Babcock & Wilcox.
Harway visited the Beersheba works of Negev
Metals Ltd., which has received a $14 million order from
Babcock & Wilcox. Eight hundred tons of steel has ar-
rived at the Beersheba plant and another 1,600 tons are
expected shortly to complete the steel skeleton of the
power station the American firm is building near Ha-
dera.
'*
An affair with Heart
at Hotel | |
ontainebleau
We truly care
Combined with the elegante and magnificence of
Hotel Fontainebleau. we pride ourselves m the verv
special spirit exhibited by the Fonlainetoleau family ...
al all limes there is the realizafion of the importance cf
a special evenl; be it a Bar Milzvah, Wedding, Annl-
wrsary Party, of a Presidential Dinner, the emphas>>
is always on achieving perfection. You are invited tc
\ isit and experience first-hand the delights of Fontainebleau
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pWfMVM
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Check $ Ne. 30 iucujois
STRICTLY KOSHER TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING OINNtR (g)
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PIUS FULL HOTEL FACILITIES Mid ACTIVITIES
TRADITIONAL THANKSGIVING DfNNER (only)
STRICTLY KOSHER DINNER
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PLUS 1 DRINK
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eait In mm) tiei
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MAKE RESERVATIONS EARIY
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e Free Parking on Premises
e Oceanfront Synagogue
TV ft Radio in All Rooms
e Dancing ft Entertainment
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Phone: 531-0061
Celebrate CHANUKAH
with us Nov. 29 to Dec. 6
Sam Schechter Owner Manager
J^ihtim ocuNr.oN. hock if* i. itth $, MIAMI BEACH


... Fria^Octttef 31, 1975
*3ewistfk*kikvi
Page 9-A

Beame: No Welcome
Continued from Page 1-A
come here because they or their forebears were victims
of racial and religious oppression," Beame said in re-
jecting State Department pressure that he change his
mind.
Mayor" Beame was also clearly aware that, in an
.Jdress before the National Press Club in Washington
on Monday, President Sadat paralleled his own prob-
.cms with those of New York City's, suggesting that New
York was also tied by bureaucratic "red-tape which
"r.as discouraged foreign investment."
New Weapon Takes Bow
Continued from Page 1-A
T-erts as one of the best of its type in the world, accord-
ing to Koor's internal publication.
The gun, designated as the Sultam-155, is mounted
en a turret constructed of steel sheets that can be her-
metically sealed, affording better protection for its crew
than previous types of self-propelled guns. Its range,
?.aid to exceed that of other 155 mm. artillery, was re-
ported to be 21 kilometers.
Vatican Jerusalem Confab Set
Continued from Page 1-A
condemning anti-Semitism. The Jewish organizations to
re represented at the parley includes the World Jewish
Congress, the American Jewish Committee, B'nai B'rith,
i.nd the Synagogue Council of America.
Later in February the same Jewish groups will hold
talks also in Jerusalem for the first time with mem-
tcrs of the (Protestant) World Council of Churches Com-
mission en Judaism.
El Al Cuts Back in Face
Of Ongoing Wildcat Strikes
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Al
has taken drastic measures to
reduce it? expenditures in the
face of a wildcat strike bv
workshop employes that ground-
ed the airline.
The cenpanv said thr Treas-
ures would remain in effect as
long as conditions prevent the
uninterrupted, smooth opera-
tion of El Al's services.
THEY INCLUDED letters of'
dismissal sent to 100 temporal
f-mnloyes. the furloughing of,
1.000 other employes, the re-
r?ll of all air crews now abroad
and sustvnsion of the compa-
ny's subsidy to its local canteen.
The measures were announc-
ed following a midnight meet-n"
between transport Minister Gad
Yaacobi and El Al Managing
Director Mordechai Ben An at
which the possibility was raised
of closing down the airline al-
together.
The company is reportedlv
considerine charte-me its
grounded fleet of 13 jets to
ether carriers.
THE STRIKE, which rv>can
'n5t we** with ndvanc- warn-
ing, has r*"m H-nn"Wrt bv the
rovemment. Histad^-t issue/1 *
stronglv-worded call to W
strikers to return to their iods.
Mamt-nanc- workers who
ioined the workshon emnloyes
in their strike decided to re-,
turn to work, but as lonn as the
workshops are closed, the air-
line remains grounded.
Several back-to-work orcWs;
were issued in the hope that
limited service could be re-
stored. The emnloves who re-
sponded showed up at Ben
Hurion Airport wearing signs
that said "I am a forced labor-
er Other strikers lav down on
the tarmac to block planes from
taking off.
THE LATEST strike involving
Israel's national air line, which
has been plagued by labor
troubles for more than ai year,
is over wage scales and charges
by the workers that manage
ment violated contract provi-
sions on promotions.
El Al denied the charges and
produced signed contracts to
support its denial.- Since the
strike began. El Al passengers
have been shifted to foreign
carriers.
RETURN
J. L.
PLUMMER
to the
MIAMI
CITY
COMMISSION
Four years ago Commissioner J. L. Plummer outlined a program for the City of Miami
which he pledged to accomplish. Let's look at the record from official city action:
1. J. L. Plummer said he would institute "Operation Impact" to take police officers
out of the station and into the streets of the high crime areas of Miami.
J. L. Plummer kept his promise.
2. J. L. Plummer said he would propose aid, hopefully pass a new zoning code for
Brickell Avenue to preserve and protect this "Park Avenue" of Miami for the ben-
efit of present and future citizens.
J. L. Plummer kept his promise.
3. J. L. Plummer said he wanted to see expanded recreational programs at city parks
and pools at no charge for the yojng people of Miami.
J. L. Plummer kept his pwmise.
4. J. L. Plummer said he wanted to devel >p the old Port of Miami property into a
vibrant park, the front door of Miami f jr the use of all citizens. It took almost four
years and legal fights but what may be the most beautiful park in America will
open in 1976.
J. L. Plummer kept his promise.
VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4th PULL LEVER U
fromdti p-id it by the Commrti- to te-fleef 1.1. MMMMfc J*. Cmrol Hummer, Trtt.
!
have money available for:
business loans
construction loans
auto loans
boat loans
home improvement lo
and
"we care" loans
What's a"V\fe care" loan?
Maybe you wani io .
buy something for your wife?
JEFFERSON
{J NATIONAL BANKS
* Serving all of Dade County
South Dade
9600 North Kendall Drive
Miami. Florida 33156
Phone: 274-8382 >
Miami Beach
301 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Phone: 532-6451
Subiidimrie* of Jeffmrson Bancorp. Inc. Mtmbars: FDIC
North Dade
290 Sunny Isles Boulevard
Miami Beach. Florida 33160
Phone: 949-2121


First Jewish Candidatefor Presffleirin 200 YearTof Our History
TCTIEN PENNSYLVANIA GOVERNOR Milton Jer-
rold Shapp formally announced Sept. 25 his
candidacy for the Democratic nomination for Pres-
ident he became the first Jew in 200 years of
American history to enter a Presidential campaign in
a major political party.,
Shapp bcame Pennsylvania's first Jewish Gov-
ernor in 1970 and was reelected with a majority of
300(000 votes last year for a second four-year term.
In 1966, after he had sold his business holdings, he
ran for public office for the first time as a candidate
for Governor and defeated the Democratic organiza-
tion's candidate in the primary, but lost in the gen-
eral election.
BORN IN Cleveland, June" 25; 1912, Shapp is the
son of Aaron Shapiro, a hardware wholesaler id
Cleveland who is a Republican, and Eva Smelsey
Shapiro, a Democraf and a leader in that city's
women's rights movement.
Shapp's wife, the former Muriel Matzkin, is a
certified' marriage counsellor who holds part-time
jobs as an instructor in two hospitals in Harrisburg,
^Joseph
VolaLoff
Pennsylvania's capital, and is devoted to helping the
handicapped.
Shapp's first job was to drive a coal truck in
the depths of the great depression after he gradu-
ated in 1933 with a degree in electrical engineering
from- wfaat is now Case Western Reserve University
in Cleveland.
DURING WORLD War II. he rose to the rank
of captain in> the Army Signal Corps and saw service
in North Africa and Europe. In 1946. he founded
the Jerrold Electronic Corporation with $500 and
two employes.
Pioneering in cable television, his company had
annual sales of $50 million and 2,100 employes when
he sold it in 1966 and devoted himself to public
service.
Shapp has participated in three gubernatorial
campaigns for a more businesslike approach in the
operation of eevernment. He was the first Governor
to bring about an across-the-board tax decrease in a
generation for Penns-ylvanians.
HE HAS led in consumer advocate policies, pro-
grams to help the elderly and handicapped and in
welfare reform. In 1947, he gained wide attention
for being instrumental in ending the national truck-
ers' strike and in bringing about settlements in other
major labor disputes. The AFL-CIO" in 1963 vofed
him its "Man of the Year," the first businessman
to receive that honor.
Besides pioneering in the cable TV industry,
Shapp also served as a college instructor, teaching
problem analysis and decision-making and outlining
innovations concerning human resources and indus-
trial operations.
K^allob
I *l*iM '
;.t
Vlenlallv 1II
In Spotlight
A PHILADELPHIA Orthodox rabbi, who serves as Jewish
chaplain for the Norristown State Hospital for mental pa-
tients in Pennsylvania, has developed and directs a major year-
round program of religious services and holiday festivals for
the hospital's 140 Jewish patients, tailored to their differing
capacities to participate.
Rabbi Sherman Novoseller, spiritual leader of Congrega-
tion Beth Tovim. not only leads weekly services on Tuesday
mornings at the hospital but he and his wife have been hosts
for Passover Seders at his home, which houses his synagogue,
during each of the two years he has served as chaplain, he
reported.
HE ALSO led Rash HaFhonah services last Sept. 4. the day
before Rosh Hashonah eve. in the main hosnitil chanel.
Shavuot was observed with a special kosher dinner for
the patients, which included gefilte fish, pudding and other
foods chosen to make the festival "a kosher feast time." He
reported similar meals were served on Rosh Hashonah. Chanu-
kah and Purim. During the summer, a kosher picnic is held
at the hospital.
RABBI NOVOSELLER reported that he came to the hos-
pital in June, 1973. as a volunteer chaplain to fill out the sick
leave of Rabbi Henry Harbater, who had served as chaplain
for 10 years before settlir.2 in Israel. In December, the post
was declared vacant and Rabbi Novoseller was named Chaplain-
He said that when he came to the huge hospital, services
were held for Jewish patients in a central building which haa
a 200-seat chapel, where the longest services are held, which
he has continued.
Jewish patients who have "ground" privileges come from
six buildings, on their own or accompanied by volunteers. Ad-
ditional services are held in four other buildings.
HE DESCRIBES the 10 to 15-minute weekly service as
neither Reform, Conservative nor Orthodox. He said the oc-
casion was "a gathering of mental patients of the Jewish faith
with theirf Orthodox rabbi to hear and repeat some of the prayers
of the synagogue and to sing some of the songs and to partake
of grape juice and cake at a Kiddush."
Rabbi Novoseller stresaed that because his "congregants"
were mental patients, his attitude is that his presence is- simi-
lar to a \4sit to a sick person, to bring a message of cheer and
"not to preach to them a sermon of repentance."
He reported that services are in Hebrew and English, and
that a prayerbook is not used. He said a few of the patients
speak Helrew, and a few have been in Israel, but that most do
not know Hebrew, but they do know they are Jews, "in what-
ever way we can gauge what a mental patient knows."
HE 9AID some of the hospital patients have been there for
decades, while others come for a brief stay of a few days: to
a few months.
He said the most important point to understand in bring'
ing a message to mental patients is to rememb-r they cannot
move about freely but only at the direction of nurses and aides
and directors and superintendents. Accordingly, "holding a ten-
minute service reouires the full cooperation of many people
on the hospital staff."
Describing the Passover celebrations, he reported that this
year, as in 1974, there were two busloads of 65 to 75 patients,
plus six Co eight accompanying hospital aides, arriving at the
Novoseller home which, he said,
A STAINLESS steel kitchen is fully equipped to prepare
and serve food. A male cook does the cooking and Rabbi Novo-
seller's mtther and wife supervise preparation. For Passover,
Rabbi Novoseller said, his son and his daughter-in-law came
from California, "and all of us serve the meal to patients and
hospital aides."
Page 10-A +3eistrkrk9*rr?T\^ October 31, 197?
md* Coors May be Good..
As Beer or Politics?
<^eaal
'T'HERE is a new thunder on the right in
America, and it is accompanied by the
heady smell of beer.
Joseph Coors. 58. president of the Colo-
rado breweries producing a luxury bottle of
booze now tickling the taste buds of beer
lovers, has a hot spotlight playing on him for
at least three reasons: 1 his beer is the de-
light of liquor conoisseurs; 2 he is eager
to move on to the board of the powerful Cor-
poration for Public Broadcasting; 3 Senate
hearings concerned with his nomination to that
post have' disclosed Coor's climb to the heights
where perch financial angels of extreme right
wing movements.
APPARENTLY mild-mannered, something
of an innocent in politics. Joseph Coors his
heer bank spiling over with money appears
to be trying on the mantle worn by the late
oil baron. H. L. Hunt, who poured thousands
ipon thousands into the checking accounts of
American far right undertakings.
A power- in the operation of Television
News. Inc., which uses Coors beer largesse to
supply independent television stations with
rightist tidbits and musings, Joseph Coors
didn't duck thorny questions raised by trou-
bled senators who have a tender regard for
the Corporation of Public Broadcasting.
ONCE SEATED on that board, would not
Coors provide the nation with a classic exam-
ple of eonflter of interest?
Loathing the "Eastern Establishment" as
he readily acknowledged during Senate hear-
ings, would* he not contribute to the possible
defeat of the basic educational and cultural
purposes of the government's Public Broad-
casting mechanism?
Questions of this nature threw a cloud
of doubt over the interrogation of the power-
ful brewmaster. "No nomination which has
come before this (Senate Communications)
subcommittee has bothered me more than
yoTMfc!' said Sen. John Pastore, chairman of
:he inquiry ""gvPup. "There is something here
which raises in my~flttaiLjLred flas"
PART OF Coors" discomfort ""sf&mas^
from a disquieting series on the beermaker's
political activities written by Stephen I-
lor The Washington Post. Further d:
were raised by Charles R. Baker, exgputi i -
lector of the Institute for American D m j-
racy, a public service agency dedis i
probing and reporting on the scheme. .
right and far left units in the nation.
When Richard Nixon was President, he
tried to boost Coors on to the s n i ire r ...1
ol the Corporation for Pi li: li.>a.i::
After Gerald Ford moved int > t'i i President's
office, he renewed the effort And how would
Coors operate as a director of CPS which is
so certain to play a vital role in the 1976 Presi-
dential elections?
HI HAS clearly indicated he would work
to impose his 19th century views on the opera-
tions of public broadcasting bodies. When
he tried to kill a non-commercial station broad-
cast of "The American Way of Death," an ex-
pose of questionable practices in the funeral
industry, he acted on behalf of a key figure
in that industry and asserted that he would
make such efforts at censorship if put on the
CPS bdard.
| ew Sam Spiegel Film Puts
' Hie Spotlight on Hollywood
i
!
Hollywood
*$*** SWEGEL, who has not made a picture
since "Nicholas and Alexandra" was shot
in England and Spain-throughout 1970 and 1971,
has returned to Hollywood for the production
of "The Last Tycoon," filmization of the F.
Scott Fitzgerald novel of the 1930s dealing with
the movie industry at that time. The screen
play for Spiegel's enic h*j ben written by
Harold Pinter. Elia Kin makes his comeback
as the director of the film.
Robert do Niro, of "Godfather Part II," is
set to portray tile Central character of Monroe
Stahr, a fictitious produetion head with some
traits of the late Irving Thalberg. Robert
Mitchom is the powerful studio executive, Pat
Brady.
JACK NICHOLSON is a young screen writ-
er who- fights for the rights of hia craft, and
I '::-J
Donald Pleasance is an English novelist im;
ported to Hollywood. Others in the cast are
Angelica Huston (daughter of John), Tony
Curtis and Jeanne Moreau, the latter making
her Hollywood debut.
"The Last Tycoon." a Paramount picture,
is scheduled to go before the cameras late in
October at the smdhu and on actual locations
in Hollvwood. .
SYDNEY POLLACK who guided the suc-
cessful Barbra Streisand film. "The Way We
Were," now presents to us "Three Davs of the
Condor," with Robert Redford (Barbra's co-
star in the earlier picture) as the central char-
acter, die epitome of the naive young American,
an inept idealist who has served the Central
Intelligence Agency in a minor position until
hell broke loose around him with the unex-
piainaWe murder of almost a dozen people
wmmmiimiiiimmMiMn
H 'w
trni1


31, 1975
+Jmisii fhrkfian
Page 11-A
of My Best Friends Didn't Sell Me a Radio
Continued from Page 1-A
ting outside of the Ciub and the
ise charging that he had sold out the
and was a U.S. "puppet."
TING THAT he was anti-Semitic,
that Egyptians are Semites, too.
avily on the atmosphere created in
States and abroad as a consequence
sed UN resolution backed by Egypt
lird World contingent equating Zion-
.racism, Sadat in an angry exchange
n of the Press Club recalled that
Jewish merchant in Cairo refused
a radio because Sadat had fought in
the 1948 War of Liberation against Israel.
To a burst of laughter, one member of the
club offered to buy Sadat another radio if he
still felt he needed one.
SADAT arrived here this week on the
heels of an open statement by President Ford
that he "deplored" the UN resolution against
Zionism "in the strongest terms."
Sadat was also aware that both White
House and Pentagon spokesmen had already
declared that his shopping list" would be dis-
counted far more heavily than he expected.
In his address here, Sadat told the press
that a key to peace in the Middle East would
be formal recognition of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization. Both Israel and the U.S. have
refused such recognition.
THE PALESTINE issue, he said, is the
largest "problem in the conthct" in the Middle
East.
Still, he charged, Israel and the U.S. fail
to reckon with "the reality that the Palestinians
as a people have not been fully recognized .
the reality that the Palestinian people have suf-
fered unjustly for more than a quarter of a
century for no sin of their own."
Despite the bitterness of his attack, which
stood in marked contrast to his measured be-
ginning, President Sadat wanted it made clear
that Egypt is ready to accept Israel's political,
social and economic existence "as a fact."
Increased Military Power Since Yom Kippur War
-Israel has substan-
eased its military
according to the
Institute in London,
ts that the Israelis
12,700 tanks as com-
] 1,900 a year ago
includes 450 tanks
manufacture, 900
tenturians" and 615
Viet design that were
Cid refitted in the las'
fit with the Arabs.
Force, according
Brt, includes 461 U.S.
and Skyhawks, as
Km large number of
bfysteres and Super-
^HBres.
.a a
^pe Get Awardi
BDRKSen. Hubert H.
of Minnesota, and
executive director
Association for
nent of Colored
be the recipients
ati-Defamation League
B'rith's first annual
Prize lor Human
HM>e presented at
unNov 9 at the Waldorf-
iffctel during ADL's
Anal meeting.
pother highlights of
.will be an address
lor Chaim Herzog
esentative to the
Itions.
* $.
Bnmors Create Panic
JVRumors of a new
arion of the Israel
Pound created panic on the un-
official exchanges trading in
dollars and gold. The spate of
rumors stemmed from an analy-
sis by economists that the gov-
ernment will never succeed in
covering its deficit unless there
is a radical devaluation of the
currency to the level of approx-
imately 10 Pounds to the dollar.
These reports drove the price
of the Pound down to a point
where it was trading on the
black market at IL. 9:50 to U.S.
$1.00.
ft ft Renew Condo Probe
WASHINGTON President
Ford has signed legislation
which directs the Federal
Trade Commission to get on
with its action against 99-year
condominium lease abuses. FTC
funding is contained in the new
Public Law 94-121.
"The condomimum owners in
South Florida should not have
to put up with anv more un-
necessary delays. I'll be watch-
ing to see that the FTC stays on
the track in pursuing unfair and
deceptive practices in condo-
minium sales," said Congress-
man William Lehman this week.
In a letter to FTC Chairman
Engman on Oct. 22, Congress-
man Lehman requested a regu-
lar monthly report on the prog-
Worldwide Protest Forces
Chile to Release Educator
NEW YORK(JTA)World-
wide protest has led Chilean au-
thorities to free Prof. Enrique
Kirberg. a prominent educator
jailed for more than two years,
and allow him to come to the
United States to take on a teach-
ing post at Columbia University,
of
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y
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norm MIAMI
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v^'
the Anti-Defamation League
B'nai B'rith reported here.
According to Rabbi Morton M.
Rosenthal, director of ADL's
Latin American affairst depart-
ment, Kirberg, who was arrest-
ed on the morning of the over-
throw of President Salvadore
Allende's admistration in Sep-
tember, 1973, is due to arrive
in the U.S. this week.
HE IS the former Rector of
the State Technical Uniwrsif
in Chile. Kirberg's continued
detention was the subject of
worldwide protest by the presi-
dents and faculty of numerous
universities, including Brandeis.
Harvard and M.I.T. and Colum-
bia.
Appeals for Ms release by
Amnesty International, the
United Nations Commission on
Human Rights, and interven-
tions by a number of individuals
and other organizations, were
also believed to have been a
factor leading the Chilean gov-
ernment to permit Kirberg's
emigration.
Previously, the government
had contended that the 60-vear-
old educator was serving a
sentence for tax evasion, rather
than for a political crime.
THE POLITICAL charges
against him had been drooped
after he spent nearly two vears
without trial on Dawson Island,
but at the same time he was
fined $4,000 and sentenced to
508 davs in the Santiago peni-
tentiary for reportedly evading
$2,000 in income taxes.
ADL also reported that
another educator who is Jewish,
Juan Rivano, is still in custody
after his arrest by Chilean au-
thorities last summer. The
philosophy instructor was
among 44 persons arrested at
the University of Chile in San-
tiago in connection with a pro-
test against faculty cutbacks
and in support of political pris-
oners.
ress of the aeency's action
against condominium abuses.
J-> A *r
Reform Rabbinical Assembly
NEW YORK Meaningful
worship services, which have
become increasingly important
to Reform congregations, will
be offered on Saturday mornnig.
Nov. 8, to the 3,000 delegates
to the 53rd Biennial General As-
sembly of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and the
3?nd Assembly of the National
Federation of Temple Sister-
hoods.
Using the "Gates of Prayer"
prayerbook just published bv
the. Central Conference of
American Rabbis, the rabbinical
arm of the Reform movement,
the representatives will have a
chance to participate in several
different sen-ices.
Leading the worship portion
will be Rabbi Joseph R. Narot,
of Temple Israel of Greater Mi-
ami.
The Assembly will also in-
clude a session on the develop-
ment of Reform Jewish Day
Schools. Participants will in-
clude Mrs. Sima Lesser, of
Temple Beth Am Day School of
Miami.
Ford in Congratulations
WASHINGTON President
Ford, in a message to American
Mizrachi Women at the group's
50th anniversary convention
here, said that "civic responsi-
bility and devotion to the pub-
lic trust" of three Jewish sen-
ators "are svmbolic of the con-
structive influence of Judaism
on American life."
The President sent his mes-
sage as he noted that the three
U.S. Senators, Jacob K. Javits,
of New York; Abraham Ribi-
coff. ot Connecticut: and
Richard Stone of Florida, on
Monday night, Oct. 20, received
American Mizrachi Women's
Bicentennial Public Service
Award at the Statler Hilton
Hotel.
PAUL M. BRUUN
SUN REPORTER

Tenants Assoc. of Florida. Inc.
Democratic Club of Miami Beach
Senior Citizens Assoc. of Miami Beach Inc.
Condominium Owner's Assoc. Inc.
Voters Inc.
' Voters & Taxpayers league of Miami and
Dade County
COPE TIGER United Teachers of Dade
Biscayne Democratic Club
Dade Better Government League
Voters & Homestead Exemption league of
COUNCILMAN
LEONARD
DEMOCRAT
Lever10A
paic 'or I f
EONARC WEINSTEIN CAMPAI6N TREASURER


Page 12-A
*JenislWorMiar-
Friday, October 31, 1975
'Unmairiagables'List OK-Needs Changing
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Attorney General Aharon
Barak has reported to the Cabinet that the controversial
list of persons ineligible to marry according to Jewish law
was in principle a legal and necessary means for applying
marriage and divorce laws.
He found, however, certain flaws in the way the list
was compiled and distributed and recommended that chang-
es be made in those aspects of it.
Explosives
Found At
Gurion Airport
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
discovery of about a half kilo
of explosives and two electric
detonators in the false bottom
of a suitcase left behind by an
unknown traveler put Ben Gu-
rion Airport on the alert and
set off an intensive investiga-
tion by police and security of-
ficials to trace the owner of the
suitcase.
The discovery coincided with
a security drill at the airport
which closed down the termi-
nal for several hours .
THE SUITCASE, which con-
tained no identification or
markings, was noticed by por-
ters on one of the terminal*s
conveyor belts after all the
other luggage had been picked
up.
It was removed to a safe
place where police discovered
] the explosives and detonators
; in a cardboard double bottom.
Police officials speculated that
the carrier abandoned the suit-
case after noting the thorough
inspection given by customs
and security officials to the bag-
gage of incoming passengers.
Another assumption was that
the suitcase was intended for
delivery to an unknown hostile
group in Israel.
THE POLICE have lists of all
passengers who landed at Ben
Gurion Airport and are trying
to locate them for questioning.
But the owner of the suitcase is
believed to have entered the
country on a false passport,
and the chances of tracing that
person are slim.
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HIS REPORT was unani-
mously endorsed by the cabi-
net and welcomed by Religious
Affairs Minister Yitzhak Rafael
who pledged to cooperate in
correcting the flaws.
The list is compiled by the
Religious Affairs Ministry and
is distributed to marriage re-
gistrars throughout the country.
It contains the names of per-
sons not eligble to marry ac-
cording to the Orthodox inter-
pretation of Halacha, including
persons whose credentials as
Jews are not acceptable to the
religous authorities.
Its disclosure by several
Knesset members, including
former Cabinet Minister Shu-
lamit Aloni of the Yaad faction
a month ago. triggered a con-
troversy in Israel.
THE RELIGIOUS Affairs Min-
istry denied the existence of
such a list but later acknowl-
edged that it did indeed exist.
Prof. Barak, who was asked
by the cabinet to determine
whether the list violated Israeli
law, said in his report that since
the law stated that marriage
between Jews was to be con-
tracted according to Jewish re-
ligous laws, the marriage re-
gistrars had the right and duty
to check the eligibility of pro-
spective marriage applicants
and whether they conformed to
the Orthodox criteria of Jew-
ishness.
However, Barak said the list
should be limited to persons
who actually apply for marri-
age permits or to those whose
divorce proceedings have been
heard before a religious court.
There is no civil marriage or
divorce in Israel.
THE ATTORNEY General
said he found that the list con-
tained information on persons
who have not applied for mar-
riage permits and of co-re-
spondants in divorce cases
which, he said, should be delet-
ed from the list.
He also said that persons on
the list should be informed of
the fact and given an oppor-
tunity to state their case whiclr
has not always been done in
the past.
He recommended further-
more that the list should ba
kept only at the Religious Af-
fairs Ministry in Jerusalem
where it would be accessible to
the 200-odd marriage registrars
tor reference.
Hitherto, the Ministry has
circulated the lists to each re-
gistrar which has resulted is
some cases in leaks of infor-
mation supposed to be confi-
dential .
THE ATTORNEY General did
not address himself to the fun-
damental question of civil mar-
riage and divorce which many
Israelis are demanding because,
he observed, that subject was
not within his terms of refer-
ence.
Senate, House Rap UN
Anti-Zionist Resolution
Continued from Page 1-A
THE JOINT resolution, back-
ed by the leadership of both
major parties in both chambers
of Congress, is to be presented
to the U.S. Ambassador to the
UN, Daniel Moynihan, with the
request that he distribute co-
pies to all UN delegates prior
to the General Assembly's plen-
ary session which is expected
to act on the Third Committee's
draft.
The five co-sponsors in the
House are Reps. Thomas O'-
Neill (D., Mass.) and John Mc-
Fall (D., Calif.), Majority Lead-
er and Deputy Majority Leader,
respectively; Reps. John Rhodes
(R., Ariz.) and Robert H. Michel
(R., 111.), the Minority and Dep-
uty Minority Leaders; and Rep.
John Anderson (R., 111.), chair-
man of the Republican House
Conference.
Other prime movers behind
the resolution in the House in-
cluded Reps. Sidney Yates (D.,
111.), Jonathan Bingham (D.,
N.Y.) and Don Fraser (D.,
Minn.).
IN THE Senate, the immedi-
ate co-sponsors were Republic-
an Minority Leader Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania, Jacob K. Ja-
vits (R., N.Y.), William Brock
(R., Tenn.), and Richard Stone
(D., Fla.).
The prime movers of the
Senate resolution, which is
identical to that of the House,
included Lloyd Bentsen (D.,
Tex.), Harrison Williams, (D.,
N.J.), Richard Schweiker (R., >
Pa.), and Abraham Ribicoff (D.,,
Conn.).
The joint resolution points
out that the "United States, as
a founder of the United Na-
tions, has a fundamental inter-1
est in promoting the purposes
and principles for which that
organization was created."
It states that the UN Charter
specifies that the purposes of
the world organization are "to
develop friendly relations
among nations based on respect
for the principle of equal rights
of self determination of peo-
ples" and to "achieve interna-
tional cooperation in solving
international problems of an
economic, social, cultural or
humanitarian character and in
promoting and encouraging re-
spect for human rights and
fundamental freedom for all
without discrimnation as to
race, sex, language or religon."
THE JOINT resolution charg-
es that "such purposes are
threatened with being nullified
and subverted" by the draft
adopted in the Third Committee
which "wrongfully associates
and equates Zionism with rac-
ism and racial discrimnation."
In that connection, the reso-
lution noted that the U.S. rep-
resentative to the Third Com-
mittee declared that is action,
"under the guise of a program
to eliminate racism," was ac-
tually "officially endorsing anti-
Semitism one of the oldest
and most virulent forms of rac-
ism known to human history."
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sr 31, 1975
"JmitftlcrMKun
INDLIN
Voice of Apology be Heard in Land
td from Page 4-A
intally, that did not
Herald from ac-
running the ad-
in its own pages.
ELESS, it urges in
editorial schizophre-
erd should be con-
use he "is a forth-
Ic-spirited man who
pis country well. It
Ske."
in the head,
erd advertisement
t anti-Semitism. A
religious conviction
ay be construed as
{qualification un-
tender for office
ggest that his Jew-
t is sui generis un-
pNT of ex-post facto
jnd on the chess-
Dolitical expediency
as able to change
per he may say now
(ary, Eckerd's cam-
was a base appeal
^prejudice.
B," the Herald's
Ichachomim" them-
Still, in their
a forthright, public
who will serve his
II"
s what the Water-
doing. They were
in country well
it.
how we must see it
as the Herald sees it because,
after all, Eckerd has "apologiz-
ed." And because the Herald is
"apologizing" in its Oct. 23 edi-
torial, too:
"It (the Eckerd ad) prompted
this newspaper in part to en-
dorse his successful opponent,
Sen. Dick Stone," meaning that
the main reason we (the Her-
ald) supported Stone was Eck-
erd's dirty pool, and so now
you (the Jewish community)
must reward us for the greater
glory of our flaming social con-
sciousness by knocking off
rocking the boat and support-
ing our confirmation plea.
Furthermore, "the apology
was accepted in good faith and.
significantly, Sen. Stone says he
will accompany him (Eckerd)
to the confirmation hearings
and support his nomination."
Djus 'iixit. Deus miseratur.
MY OWN sources inform me
that this is a gilding of the
lily that Stone and Eckerd
met quite by accident on a
flight back from Washington
sometime after the campaign.
Allegedly, Eckerd offered
Stone a handshake and "apol-
ogized" for the "incident,"
which Stone, flustered, accept-
ed because he did not know
what else to do under such
awkward social circumstances.
But Stone, unfortunately, did
not ask what Eckerd was apol-
ogizng for. His acceptance of a
generalized statement of air-
borne camaraderie was an inex-
perienced, politically unwise
thing to do, for which Stone
has what appears to be a
unique knack even now after
so many months on Capitol
Hill.
THE FACTS, as they are now
emerging, and as the Herald
editorial in question would not
have its readers understand,
clearly indicate that Eckerd to
this very moment refuses to
apologize for the content of his
advertisement.
People, Eckerd declares
"you people" is the popular
phrase, meaning "you Jews"
are just too damned sensitive.
And so, if he has hurt anyone's
feelings, he apologizes for
THAT.
But Eckerd does not apolo-
gize for anything else because,
after all, he is Protestant, and
Stone is Jewish, and anyone
with any sense at all can take
it from there.
SWEET TALK in private over
the roar of jet engines is not
the same thing as a public con-
fession of error and apology.
Meanwhile, it will be inter-
esting to see if Stone does in
fact support the Eckerd nomi-
nation, as the Herald antici-
pates.
How he will be able to do
that in the face of the grilling
Jacob K. Javits (R., N.Y.) and
iogi Stomps for Agency Post
Abraham Ribicoff (D., Conn.)
are likely to give it shapes up
as a fascinating Senate fantasy
in my mind with three Jewish
senators in a dogfight as a rank
panderer to religious bigotry
sits by buffing his executive's
polished fingernails.
I FIND u Inconceivable. But
stranger things have happened.
Take the Herald editorial itself,
which in urging Eckerd's ap-
pointment, quotes from Otto
von Bismarck's "fine phrase"
about "the right people in the
right jobs."
Opines the Herald: It was
just 100 years ago that Bis-
marck came up with that one,
and wouldn't it be a nice anni-
versary present (for whom
Bismarck or Eckerd?) if the
Senate voted to confirm?
That's all very interesting
and the most outrageous mis-
application of an historical me-
taphor I can conceive of, unless
I were called upon to write a
script for Abbott and Costello.
Bismarck, known throughout
his life for his diplomacy based
on blood, oil and iron, was a
frank reactionary who openly
voiced his contempt for parlia-
mentary rule.
BISMARCK'S CONSTANT fo-
menting of war in Europe with
an eye toward centralizing the
power of Prussia became so in-
tolerable even to a belligerent
William I, who stood to gain
from these totalitarian policies,
that William nevertheless "put
him on ice," as he called it in
a momentary burst of honest
self-satire, by sending Bis-
Page 13-A
marck off to St. Petersburg as
ambassador to Russia.
Not even Europe's greatest:
thief could tolerate his own
arch-henchman.
Furthermore, hardly three-
quarters of a century later, tht
Bismarckian "right people in
the right jobs" graced as a mot-
to of their murderous intent tht
entranceway to many a Nazi
concentration camp.
THE BITTER irony here i.s
that the history of the motto
fits the nominee to a "t" if ont
is to judge by the campaign
tactics he embraced against
Stone.
Clearly, however, that's not
how the Herald editorialists
seated behind the veneer of
their "scholarship," intended it.
But that's the danger of scho)
arly veneer. It is almost always
ignorant.
If we are asked to support
the Eckerd nomination, let us
at least be spared reference to
the brutal spirit of Bismarck
and what that spirit did to dt-
mocracy in Europe in our own
time.
The Ford nominee's own ac-
tions need no metaphoric assist
from the father of modern fas-
cism.
If this is too stern a state-
ment and a misrepresentation oJ
the man, then let Eckerd say
so. Let him REALLY apologize
so all of us can hear.
Complete
Window Service
KtPAIKS
REPLACING REGLAZING
fast Service Free Estimates
PHONE 666-3339
ALL WINDOW REPAIR
7S13 BIRO ROAD
(JTA) Haifa
it Almogi, who was
linated last week
Party leadership
of chairman of the
cy and World Zion-
told Anglo-Jew-
rliat he believed are
demanded by the
tks.
rho later delivered
[speech at the 74th
trence of the Zion-
n of Britain and
clared, "You need
| is both practical,
stands firmly with
H the ground, and
name time, has vi-
ilD he was grat-
nomination, con-
elected he would
Knesset seat, and
that the citizens
elected him their
understand his
reasons for not completing his
full four-year term.
He said he had been asked to
run for a position that present-
ed one of the greatest challeng-
es. He said he believed aliya
was the. main task ahead and
observed that Israelis should al-
ways keeo in mind the demo-
graphic issue without arguing
over geography.
In an impassioned speech. Is-
rael's Ambassador to Britain.
Gideon Rafeal. decladed that "It
is not the fulfillment of the
Palestinian aspirations" that
moves the enemies of Israel
"but the extinction of Israel's
right to national existence
which motivates their struggle."
HE ASSERTED that Zionism
and Judaism were today synony-
mous and the attack on Zionism
was meant to strike at the very
existence of Jews. He protested
the distortion of the Jewish na-
which reached "its height of ob-
scenity" in Uganda President
Idi Amin's recent attack at the
UN General Assembly.
A political session of the Zion-
ist conference was suspended |
for a time after a fight broke
out between Herut and left-wing
delegates over a Mapam resolu-
tion urging "an overall peace
plan based upon territorial ad-
justments" and readiness by Is-
rael to negotiate with "repre-
sentative Palestinian Arabs."
The resolution also called on
the Israeli government to give
full recognition to the Pales-
tinians' right to self-determina-
tion. Stewards were forced to
eject two Herut youths in the
melee.
Later, Herut leader Malvyn
Benjamin, defeated in his can-
didacy for the chairmanship of
the British Zionist Federation,
expressed deep regret over the
tional independence movement incident.
LANDOW LUBAVITCH
YESHIVA THRIFT STORE
OHOLEI TORAH BOYS
BETH CHAN A GIRLS
YESHIVA GEDOLA GRADUATES
Needs Your Good, Used Furniture,
Clothing, Appliances
Dishes, Pots and Pans, Bric-A-Brac
and What Have You!
FOR FREE PICK UP CALL
653-2270 -:- 653-2271
All Donations Tax Deductible
\EN: Public's Utilities
>m Page 4-A
, tng more because
tncy and politick
i been aptly label-
(investor-owned
[fact that govern-
jtilities are as
he fabled apple
eats against the
as synthetic as
| most pies these
SR, he has point-
other private
Hn that they have
. etition, they are
evel of profit by
monoplies they
attention to the
; and demand or
in the purchase
fuel.
ive missed a re-
unal report which
[the fuel adjust-
hich are automa-
on to us are
. and should be
documented the
klifornia to New
York, estimating the over-
charges to the public in the bil-
lions.
The Environmental Action
Foundation reveals that
American consumers are being
charged with more taxes than
the utilities actually paidabout
SI billion worthand the claim
that they contribute to govern-
ment through taxes is belied by
the fact that, in 1974, almost
one-fourth the private compa-
nies paid no Federal taxes at
all.
IT IS very likely, as the
Herald puts if, that the Becker
bill has no chance to pass a
conservative Florida Legislature
at this time.
But it seems to me that a pub-
lic outaged by the unconscion-
able rise in utility costs and
not to coincidentally, either
by a continued rise in utility
profits, is not going to wait too
much longer before it awakens
to the fact that it is not private
enterprise which is at stake
here but private greed, guaran-
teed.
NOW OPEN TOR REGISTRATION
CWLD,
">.

Q
O
"ti
'in si>*
3/toa/essar/ Cifcfren 's Jfouse
of JKiatni c\WW
10390IX Stconl Amv Ttlefbwf 751-1613
AGES 2-6 YEARS
TRANSPORTATION AVAIlAilE
VICTORIA T. PIACH, Dkettreu
t. A. Cartifiad Montaworl Ta "Free the child's potential, and you will
transform him and the world."
DR. MARIA MONTESSORI


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_


,r, October 31, 1975
-JmlstifhrkUan
Page 15-A
ron Lopez owned one of America's larg est merchant fleets, a major factor in the
n:\e-i' ability to rebel.
BICENTENNIAL BIOGRAPHIES
Aaron Lopez: Neivport Poiver
Jay Berliner Guset Speaker At Community Center
M. Jay Berliner of Coral
Gables, a past state command-
er of the Jewish War Veterans,
will be the guest sneaker dur-
ing Friday evening services at
the Homestead Jewish Co-v
muntty Center (Oct. 31). His
topic will be "The Growing
Menace of the Ku Klux Klan."
South Dade Post 778 of the
Jewish War Veterans will spon-
sor the Oneg Shabat. Post Com-
mander Alvin Rose will intro-
duce the soeaker.
fa AROX LOPEZ was a power in Newport in
the years just preceding the Revolution,
when that port cirv was drscrtbed as a shin-
ping center that "New York can never hone
i rival"
One of the core reasons for this was Rhode
I-'and's great religious liberalism which at-
tracted a substantial community of well edu-
c ;J and able Jews, the most affluent in the
colonies.
Aaron Lopez was outstanding among them.
F was born in Portugal in 1731, and died in
He was described bv Erra Stvles. Chris-
ten pastor and president of Yale, as "a mer-
cU|ant of first eminence: for honor and extent
of c mmerce probably surpassed by no mer-
chant in America."
NFAVPORT'S SHIPPING industry was most
i-^nortant to vounc America's growing strength
ani power that finallv enabled it to revolt;
and Aaron Lopez was in the vortex
He is said to have owned, in whole or in
part, 30 transoceanic ships and over 100 coastal
vessels.
LOPEZ WAS also recognized as a promoter
of friendly relations betwen the faiths. He
was respected by Christians and Jews alike
and no ship ever left his dock on either'*
Sabbath, Sunday or Saturday.
Lopez personally laid the cornerstone of
Newport Synagogue, also known as Touro, now
a Federal Shrine.
In strong svmnathy with Revolutionary
patriots, he fled Newport when the British at-
tacked. Although Newport was ruined in the
war. he did attempt to return when peace was
won, but was lulled in an accident on the way.
Newport locals can still point out to you the
Dlace called Lopez dock.
v.*. olvd ii> re-"rtui*i'i f-->m "HnnorinK 1T7*i
ind Fanwux Jew.- in American History,-' sponsored
.* hu [oaeph Jaoobt I injuniza'.ion. inc.. 1975.
READERS INTERESTED in receiving a ropy.
"<>thr wi-h the Illustrations BWWHUmy'ng '** ">!-
inde. mi) send th^ir name and addr.-ss with 50 onts
n c-nin 'n Ju'rlcan Patriot*. Box 4488. Irand
'entrnj Station, New York. NY., 10017.
Door to Pershings Still Open
Rising food prices
got Jim down?
You do have an alternative!,
dFFhlit OfdFVinC Food Coop is en orgeniationj
th* is brining concerned people together to buy the
best qualky foodite sevings of up to 40%.
m offer ell hods except moot
Mtmbtr+ipo* limited t*ut. Dtpmiis mow bent liken
3425C MAIN HIGHWAY. COCONUT GROVE
or Continued from Page 1-A
. adding that "I think that
'.. of course be included by
sides in any study."
rhe Defense Secretary made
> remarks at a press confer-
ee when he was asked wheth-
the supply ershings which have a 400-
lilj range and axe capable of
hering nuclear warheads
as "now a dead is9ue."
Ha said the II.*. examination,
the matter would include
thsr ebments of the prob-
n" such as "the inventory
jation and the like consist-
it with the supply of Persh-
i$ to Israel."
slHLESINGER REITERATED
v the U.S. would not send
tings to Israel from its
9
ed about a report that the
is withdrawing 36 Persh-
.4- from its inventory in the
h Atlantic Treaty Organi^a-
. !ich would suggest their ;
[a!lability for Israel, Sohlesin-
siid he regarded the Persh-;
. as "an important part of |
alliance defense posture in
kirope."
I He declined to disousti a re-,
otid request by EgypX for j
re.ican weapons, saying he
buld have nothing to say |
Pa tly out of delicacy and.
krtly out of dearth of infor-
mation" on the subject. He re-
ferred reporters to the State
Diparfaient on that matter.
Egyptian President Anwar Sa-
dat iias publicly opposed the
supply of Pershings to Israel,
saying that if Israel received
large stocks of American weap-
ons. Egypt would increase its
own arsenal.
CIRCLES HERE believe Sa-
dat was preparing the way to
get more weapons from the
V.S. than he had previously
indicated or else was seeking to
cut the U.S. supply of military
hardware to Israel in a bargain-
ing process.
The Pentagon has confirm-
ed, meanwhile, that it has in-
creased its orders for Lance
missiles by slightly more than
66 million to sell them to Is-
rael. That sum is understood to
be the cost of about 100 Lance
missiles.
A WINNER EVERYTIME,
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ITewish Floridian
i. Florida Friday, October 31, 1975
Section B
Federation Urges Support
Of
f.H
Programs Here
fhe Community Relations
Immittee of the Greater Mi-
ish Federation has for-
[r(ed ;i statement to Jewish
fnmunity leaders "heartily en-
tsing support for UNICEF
tinted Nations Children's
hid), a humanitarian agency
lich has been confused with
controversial agency,
kF.SCO."
|The confusion, stemming
am the similarity of the let-
designations, has created
lich concern within the Miami
Jwish community.
IT IS important that Miami
msh community members ap-
eciate the tremendous con-
ditions made bv UNICEF on
fehalf of Israel's survival."
|id Donald E. Lefton. chair-
an of the CRC, "and that no
infusion exist between the
arthwhile effort-* of UNICEF
id the disgraceful acts of
v'KSCO. an agencv which has
[irked to tear anart the very
Ibric of Israel's socio-economic
fistence."
|?tatPmPnt issued b" the Is-
I National Committee for
OTCEF in December, 1974,
telares:
lep. Pepper
truest Speaker
U.S. Ren. Cla>ul la.) will be guest sneaker dur-
hy the annual installation ban-
kiot of the Citv of Miami Com-
[ittee on Ecology and Beatifi-
cation at 6:30 n.m Nov. 7, at
Columbus Hotel.
Also sneaking during the an-
i.il dinner will be Citv of Mi-
mi Mavor Maurice A. Ferre.
Judge Henrv Balaban will in-
fill officers for 1975-76, with
Albert Pallot. attorney-
anker, taking his 13th term as
hairman of the committee, and
rchitect Alfred Brownine P-"-''-
returning as first vice chair-
Ian.
I N'ew vice chairmen to be to-
talled include .fames L. Davis
id Mrs. Robert A. Burton, Jr.
ther vice chairmen to be re-
called are Edward Q. Adams,
trie Enfrline, Edward J. Ger-
s. Melvin Jacobs. Sally Mill-
Ige, Mrs. Claude Pepper, Raloh
nick. Mrs. Simeon Spear.
I">. Irvin J. Stenhpns a"d
lullie Turner.
JWV Memorial
Services Nov. 7
Norman Bruce Tirown Post
Jo, 174. Jewish War Veterans
I the USA and Ladies Auxiliary
" hold their annual Veterans
irial Services on Friday
rening. Nov. 7, at 8:15 p.m.
Services will be conducted by
l-ibbi Max Shaoiro. Guest
jv.-aker will be Ainslee R. Fer-
of Coral Gables. Past Na-
Innal Commander of the Jewish
I'ar Veterans of the USA.
Participating in the services
fill be Post Commander Alexan-
er Greenwald of Miami, Post
thaplain George Graham of
liami Beach, Auxiliary Presi-
ent Claire Greenwald of Mi-
ni and Auxiliary Chaplain
Karl Weinstein of Miami.
Imong the other guests will be
Irs. Cell Zucker of North Mi-
ni Beach, President Dept. of
lorida Ladies Auxiliary of the
"The Israel National Commit-
tee for UNICEF gives its sup-
port to the vigorous protests ex-
pressed in Israel and in the
world against the shameful anti-
Israel resolutions adopted at
the last General Assembly of
the UN and the General Con-
ference of UNESCO in Paris.
"It is regretted that nerhans
through some misunderstanding
UNICEF is being confused, be-
cause of its initials, with
UNESCO.
"UNITED NATIONS Chil-
dren's Fund.(UNICEF) was set
up after the Second World War
in order to help children and
mothers who may be in need
because of hunger natural dis-
asters or wars. UNICEF eave
valuable aid to the State of Is-
rael in the first vears of its
existence when it faced the
challenge of absorbing mass im-
migration from the refugee
camps in Eurooe and from
countries where they had lived
in distress.
"After the Yom Kippur war
UNICEF allocated some modest
aid for children and mothers to
the countries involved in the
confli'V. including Israel. Re-
cently. UNICEF has decided to
allocate $30,000for a project
being carried out bv the Com-
munity Centres Corporation to-
gether with the Israel National
Committee for UNICEF. This
project aims to train profes-
sional nersonnel for work with
ore-schor>l children and will
benefit Israel and other coun-
tries.
"It has always been the Jew-
ish tradition to give humani-
tarian support to those jn need,
especially to children."
Sadat Getting
What He Wants
See Related Stories Page 1-A
WASHINGTON Whatever Egypt's president An-
war Sadat, may or may not be getting during his historic
10-day visit in the United States, one thing is sure.
He is successfully dealing with the anger that con-
servative and even radical Arab leaders have been feel-
ing about him for concluding his interim Sinai accord
with Israel.
Mainly he keeps insisting that the accord is only
Phase One in a general withdrawal he is expecting
Israel to make in addition to other concessions, particu-
larly on the Golan Heights.
In press interviews here Tuesday and Wednesday
President Sadat said he has been "urging" President
Gerald Ford to apply pressure on Israel to withdraw
from the Golan Heights.
"If there is a reasonable proposal I think he will
agree," Sadat said of Syria's president Hafez Assad, who
has been Sadat's strongest and most belligerent critic.
Also, Sadat has let it be known that the U.S. ought
to press for a resumption of the Geneva talks with "full
participation" of Yasir Arafat's Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization as an equal partner.
In terms of his own needs by mid-week President
Sadat also:
Signed agreements with the U.S. providing for a
$98 million sale of American wheat, flour and tobacco;
Learned that the administration will ask Con-
gress for $750 million in economic aid for his country;
Press for military commitments amounting to $5
billion over the next 10 years. u_#_.ta
On Sunday Sadat will be meting President Ford m
Jacksonville, Fla., where Sadat is scheduled to stay as
a guest at the home of Raymond Mason, president of
Charter Co., which controls vast oil interests m the Mid-
dle East.
Local JNF Leadership Support
$6-Million Bicentennial Park
Alfred Golden, former National Hillel Commissioner and
member of the South Florida Fund Raising Cabinet is
shown receiving a President's Club plaque. This was
awarded in honor of a continuing commitment to B'nai
B'rith Youth Services. Left to right are Malcolm H. From-
berg, vice president. District 5, and chairman of the
South Florida Fund Raising Cabinet; Golden, and Louis
Sobrin, District President's Club chairman for Florida.
Abraham Grunhut, president
of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, foundation chairman,
have pledged the support of the
local leadership in the drive for
an American Bicentennial Na-
tional Park in Israel.
The pledge was made to
Meyer Pesin, national JNF
president, and Abram Salomon,
executive vice president, who
were honored at a recent lunch-
eon at the Kontainebleau Hotel.
The national park is a $6 mil-
lion project linking a large re-
gion southwest of Jerusalem
Robert Shapiro Elected Chairman
Of Miami Chapter AJCommittee
Robert I. Shapiro, attorney
and civic leader, was elected
chairman of the Greater Miami
chapter, American Jewish Com-
mittee, at its annual meeting
last week.
"History has been writing
the agenda of the American
Jewish Committee for the past
seven decades," said Mr. Sha-
piro in accepting the Miami
chapter chairmanship. "The
mid-seventies calls for a real
effort to build new coalitions
Sen. Harry Cain Presented
V
1976 Honor Award By NJH
among racial and religious
groups to overcome the aliena-
tion, hostility and tensions
which still polarize our commu-
nity."
A native of Miami, he grad-
uated Miami Sr. High School.
Continued on Page 13-B
Distinguished citizens of the
area were present Wednesday
evening for a gala benefit din-
ner at which Senator Harry
Cain, Dade County Commission-
er, was presented the 1976 Hon-
or Award at Miami's 76th
anniversary dinner for the
National Jewish Hospital and
Research Center in Denver.
Don Shoemaker, recipient of
the award last year, welcomed
the guests and introduced Ray
Goode, master of ceremonies
who hosted the evenings festi-
vities.
Stephen Hudson, senior
executive vice president of
Flagship Banks and treasurer
for the affair presented a check
for the hospital, Mrs. Ben K.
Miller, trustee and secretary.
Dr. E. M. Papper. dean of
the school of medicine at the
University of Miami presented
the award to Cain.
The National Jewish Hospital
and Research Center is a medi-
cal complex specializing in
treatment, education and re-
search of chronic respiratory
diseases and immunological dis-
orders. Now in its 76th year.
NJH has provided more than
40,000 days of care to citizens
of Miami.
ROBERT L SHAPIRO
with 200 years of American in-
dependence. The project also
marks the 75th anniversary of
the Jewish National Fund's cre-
ation.
Moe Levin, vice nresident of
the Miami JNF. offered greet-
ings at the luncheon in honor
of Pesin and Salomon. Also ex-
tending greetings were Leonard
Zilbert, vice president; Eman-
uel Mentz. chairman. Morton
Towers, and Grunhut. The
luncheon was chaired by Judge
Zev W. Kogan, nresident of the
JNF Southern region.
A musical program was pre-
sented featuring Cantor Saul H.
Breeh, chairman of the JNF hi-
rise department; Mrs. Lois Yav-
nieli. coloratura soorano, and
Israeli composer Shmuel Fersh-
ko.
The. bicentennial park proj-
ect will conclude the opening of
arterial roads with the improve-
ment of access between the
area and Jerusalem, a system
of recreational services, nicnic
areas, hiking routes, creation of
snecial tourist sites and the
planting of over one million
trees.
The JNF national nark has
br-en endorsed bv the American
Revolution Ricnfmnial Admin-
istration in Washington.
Alloi
,\|. nnd -i I ou I roneon. Mrs.
piorei !:.; 'i-. P mi Ben teln,
Professm \ mli B l Ha loli nakl, I
i,.. i. I.,,.,.i. mi- .ii"i Mr* George
p. idle, m : i Vila Broft, Mr and
Mr i Burta Mr* i llllai l'u-
hnwy, Mr .'"'I Mra Harry PaM-
Tuiti. Mr- Samuel Perahko, Jack
Filosof, Mr and Mi- Bira Plnegold,
Mxypnii Friedbei-. Carl Froot, Mra.
Abraham Grunhut, Mrs. Sophie Haa-
pel, Mi and Mrs. Petei Halter, Jo-
eph Hill. Mr. Bnd Mrs laaac Ja-
robowlti, Mr. and Mn Herman
Kaaa, Mi and Mrs <; 011 KoUn
and Mr and lira Bam KManatB,
Also. Mrs Frieda Lifchuda, Mr.
and Mrs. Louie Lutia, Israel New-
man, Ufa Sam Paacoe, Mrs. Albert
Pomper, Mra Miriam Prase, Mr. and
Mrs. Mm' Reiffen. Mr. and Mrs. Isi-
dore Rlffkin. Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Rossein, Mr and Mrs. Abe Savelle,
Mrs. Toby Soharhter, Mrs. Thelma
Schechier, Igor Schultz, Mrs. Malka
Schklair, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Shaub,
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Slegel, Mr. and
Mrs. Joshua Stadlan, Ben Talewsky.
Mrs. Ida Wessel. Mra. Sid Wladver
and Ana Zuckerman.


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41 ffi'AUFiED WOmA* TO
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October 31, 1975
+Jelsl> FhrkJiar
Page 3-B
vandMrs. Baclanes Named to
iair Beth David Dinner of State
Weizman Lodge B'nai B'rith to Honor Fund Raising Chairman
pUthwest. Dade conrmvmity
kers Sam and Clarice Ba-
ts have been named as
Brmen of the B?th David
Apepation-Israel DJnn"- of
k on behalf of the W5-76
Lter Miami Israel Bond Or-
ation camnaiRn. to be held
Irdav evening. November
[at '?:30 n.m. at the K^nover
E formerly th- Hvatt Ho-
I 54th and Collins Avenue.
tmi Beach. The announce-
ht was made this week bv
kbi Sol Lndai. spiritual
per of Beth David Conprega-
Lmi Badanes. a native-born
fernian. whose narents Morris
I Jennie Badades were among
founders of Beth David
flgi-egation. is currentlv a
fprle vice nresident. and was
B^-nan of the Foods Division,
eater Miami Jewish Federa-
ls He also served as iwesl-
lit of the Jr. Division of the
ung Men"s Hebrew Associa-
riarice. who has served as
president and secretary of
. Beth David Congregation
kterhood, is also a member of
Menorah Group of Hadas-
Milton M. Parson, executive
director of the South Florida
Israel Bond Organization point-
ed out that since the beginning
of the Israel Bond drive in 1951,
more than S3 billion in Israel
Bond proceeds have been pro-
vided for the development of Is-
raelis industries, agricultural
production and the expansion of
the country's export trade.
SAM AND CLARICE BADANES
Dr. Newman To Lecture
Dr. Ronald Newman was to
present a lecture on "Jews in
American Literature" at Beth
David South Thursday evening.
Oct. 30, at 9 p.m.
This was the fourth in a series
of lectures entitled "The Amer-
ican Jew in the Bicentennial
Year."
iasden Named Chairman Of
[enorah Bonds Dinner Nov. 22
Miami Beach hotel entrenre-
pur Paul Kasden has ben
Bmed Chairman of the Temple
PAUL KASDEN
Menorah Israel Dinner of State
on behalf of the 1975-76 Great-
er Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion camnaign. Sunday. Nov.
23, at 7 p.m. at the Fontanebleau
Hotel. Miami Beach, according
to Temple Menorah spiritual
leader Dr. Mayer Abramowitz.
Kasden, who attended the
University of Miami, owner and
operator of the Delano Hotel at
17th and the Ocean, is current-
ly the vice dresident of Temple
Menorah ahd chairman of the
building fund. He is also the
fOuntier of the Talmudic Yeshi-
va College, and is a member of
the Fraternal Order of Elks, the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce, Miami Beach Resort As-
sociation, Southern Florida
Hotel and Motel Association and
the B'nai B'rith.
PUZZLED! by Norma A. Orovitz
flAOSHARETTHCA
JIIIHI JKABSEW
EHBPD .Try O D E R N_)
slrazrwrazahs
hjsptqrehnj
uqibshapi
OnlGTADDBT
LAOtTlRBBANZ
GTBNNCKSPTN
PAIVZEREPPE
BDPCBTPWCJB
EZRABINMJBL
KCBPJBH0L1AQ
The names of 12 modem Israeli leaders ^HMde.
in this puzzle. Their names, M*nch are listed Wow, are
placed vertically, horizontally, *j^*J^
and backward*. How marty can you find? Answers are
OTuS" Abb. EBAN Yitzhak RABIN
ZalmarSHAZAR Levi ESHKOL K'^&rr
Moshe DAYAN Golda MEIR Moshe SHAM;1
Simcha DINITZ Shimon PEREZ Itzhak BEN ZV1
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.__________
Pi j
s K
R If
A S
E R
L I
I E
la M
The Wetemartn Lodge of
B'nai B'rith "will hold a dinner
Tuesday Nov. 4, at 6:30 p.m. at
the Galley in Ft. Lauderdlale.
To be honored is the lodge's
fund-raising chairman. Morris
"Big Mo" ScWneiderman. who
consistently has sparked fund-
raising efforts for B'nai B'rith,
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and Israel Bonds.
Guest .speaker Will be Stan-
ley Gertzman of Charlotte, N.C.,
president of B'nai B'rith Dis-
trict Five. Col. Phi\ Cohen, re-
gional director, will present
awards. Also attending will be
district lodge deputy Lou Karz-
man and lodge past president
Sam Neiberg.
Accordionist Patricia Gayle
will entertain.
Life Of Paul Muni At Ahavat Shalom Nov. 8
Joseph Katof of Deerfield Muni Saturdav evening. Nov
Beach will present a biographic at 8 p.m. at Ahavat Shalom Con-
performance on the life of Paul gregotion.___________________J
8.
Beth Am To
Feature Artist
In its second monthly fine
arts exhibit of the vear. Temple
Beth Am is featuring the work
of Larrv Donovan, Miami artist,
following services Friday eve-
ning.
Donovan, associate professor
of English at the University of
Miami, is a well-known poet and
illustrator. .He has been pub-
lished in the Quarterly Review
of Literature, Accent. Enoch,
Florida Quarterly, and Spirit.
Donovan has been on the
faculty at the University since
1954. where he teaches creative
writing, poetry, contemporarv
literature, science fiction and
detectiye story.
If you
want to
a house,
let us rent
_
money.
Call 673-3333 for fast,
efficient service on
mortgage loans.
Washington
Federal
ASSETS EXCEED $500,000,000
1701 Meridian Avenue. Miami Beach
7 CONVENIENT
OFFICES TO SERVE YOO IN
Miami Beach Bay Harbor islands ..^
North Miami Beach Hollywood J J
Boca Raton
JACK O. GORDON
Pnaldtnt Vlfl
ARTHUR H. C0URSHON "
Cnairman of lie Board
Don't be fooled...
Is it the
genuine
or just a substitute?
Take a close look at the next fresh Kosher
chicken you buy and look for this red, white
and blue metal identification wing tag to certify
you are getting a genuine Empire Kosher product.
Look for Irving Q. Pullet, your
sign of Kosher quality in fresh,
frozen or prepared poultry...
The Most Trusted Name In Kosher Poultry
"sslHr^r
At Better Quatitv Ko^er Butcher Sho^od Stores and Oellys.
KOSHER MIAT MARKIT
621 Washington Av*, M.*. 5*2-2426
1354 NX 163rd St., N.NLB.
945-6451
^-*
I ^'.bVrt-r* gatfR^J


1


kdav, October 31, 1975
*Jkwi$t fhrUttan
Page 5-B
Taube
Mizrachi
Goorlfiiend
Mendzlson
Cantorial Concert At
>eth Tor ah Sunday, Nov. 23
A cantorial concert will be
eld at Beth Torah Congrena-
m on Sunday, Nov. 23. spon-
ired icintly bv the North Mi-
mi Beach svnieosue anl the
antors Assemblv of the United
iynagogue of America.
Four nf the l-'adina cantors in
lie United States will nartici-
at'.' in th* cant'>rial Yirtdish-
raeli renertoi-e. Proceeds
rom the concert will go to-
wards the Canto-s Asse^blv of
[merica scholars^ f--n1 to
ain young mm who wnt to
jive as cantors in svnagogues
iroughout North America.
Participating in the concert
rill be Cantors Jacob-B. Men-
sn. Moshe Taube. Isaac
oodfriend and Abraham M.
lizrachi.
Mendelson, cantor of Beth
|rah Congregation, has per-
jrmed in many concerts in the
and has been a leading
snor in ODeras performed at
tie Miami Beach Auditorium.
Taube. of Congregation Beth
frhalom in Pittsburgh. ca"^ to
lie United States from Israel
1957. He has record ^Original Cantorial Master-
pieces" of RCA.
Goodfriend, who is cantor of
pongregation Ahavat Achim in
Atlanta, was imprisoned in a
Concentration can in Germany
Women98 Classes
\t Chabad House
Machon Chana Women's In-
stitute for Judaism .announces
cgistration for its second vcar
operation. Courses will be
kid in Hebrew, the Praver
iook, Bible, and other subjects.
Classes meet on Mondav and
Thursday nights it the Chabad
louse in Miami Beach.
Studies at the institute are
Reared to women who are int-r-
sted in furthering their .I-*"-" 'll
iucation, and can onW *?--
vening classes. '"We **-* *-
nake our heritage *"ailaKI' ,r>
veryo.ne," said Mrs. Rivka
Corf, Dean ot Women.
For more information, con-
act Chabad House.
ttauer Public Relations
Represent Jiffy Maid Inc.
Neil D. Littauer Public Rela-
lons / Advertisi^q his been
med advertisip? and public
lations B**ncw of record for
ffy Maid. Inv i domestic
rvice fir~i in Dade County.
Gary r. 7H|V. nresident of
liffy Mai i nlso announced that
(ittauet will St '_' advertising
jld Dublic relations for its sub-
lidiary. Jiffy Maintenance,
fhich provides ianitorial serv-
pes for com-^nrcial and resi-
ential properties.
IRMA'S
BLOUSE HOUSE
819 N.E. 125 ST., N. MIAMI
i-wnm*s.**v*i
at the age of 16. His most recent
rcordins is called "Isaac Good-
friend Sings Sholom Secunda,"
on the Golden Crest label.
Canto*" Mizra-N Ms bem a
tenor si'oist "'it'i Zamir Cho-
rahs nf New Y^-k and Boston
and has tou^d m concert with
th""m through E'irooe-and Is-
rael. H is cantor f Adith Is-
rael Synagogue in Cincinnati.
Tickets for the cantorial con-
cert are a"ailable at Beth Torah
Convention.
A viva Group of Hadassah
General Auction Mon. Nov. 8
Cruises, dinners, furniture.
appliances, original art work
and gift certificates are only
some of the items that will be
un for bids at the Aviva group
of Hadassah's general auction
on Mondav. November 10, at
Beth David South.
The doors onon nromntlv at
Q:31 for browsing and brunch.
The auction will begin at 10
a.m. acco'xliii" to professional
nuct'oner Leonard Stern. The
public is invited.
Chairwoman Dorothv Kobritz
announced that proceeds from
toe auction will benefit the
Hadassah Medical Organization.
Sky Lake Sisterhood
The sisterhood of Skv Lake
Svnagogue will hold a rummage
sale on the lawn of 1860 NE
183rd St., North Miami Beach,
on Sunday, November 2, from
12 noon to 5 p.m., and on Mon-
day, November 3 from 1 to 4
p.m.
Aviva Chapter Pioneer Women
Celebrates 13 Birthday Saturday
It will be a B.-'t Mitzvah Party
for the Aviva Chanter of Pi >
neer Women Saturday night as
the North Dade unit c
Its 13th birthday at the Wash-
ington Federal Auditorium
N E 1 S7th St., North Miami
Beach.
Food and entertainment will
be nro'ided. according to Mrs.
Dora Cohen, president of Aviva.
Mrs. Gisela Gutter, publicity
chairman of the Aviva Chao-
ter, served as local cochairmn
of the Pioneer Women Golden
Jubilee Convention held in
Miami Beach. She will report
on the conclave which attracted
more than 2.000 delegates.
Mrs. Miriam (Bernard) Gin-
gold, a national advisor to Pio-
neer Women, will renort on the
contention at a meeting of the
Hi Rise Tikvah Chanter Tues
dav at noon at Fort" Towers.
Refreshments will be served,
and the meeting is open to the
public, according to Mrs.
Pauline Finkelstein. president.
The newlv-chartered Masada
Chanter of Pioneer Women will
m"t Tuesdav in the Pioneer
Worn :
Lincoln Ro id E

11 tun

acting Dres
( bins',"' is publicity chairman
M"- .]'. will report or.
convention.
RICHTER
JEWELRY CO.
OVEii SO YEARS IN MIAMI
PURCHASERS OF
DIAMONDS A FINE JEWELRY
Alvin Richler ond Arncjld Teichler
experienced approiseis can be
o( assistance to individuals, oi
totneys and bonks for highest
price and auickest woy to dispose
of your |ewels. consult.
ALVIN C. RICHTER
DIAMOND BROKER
ln i.l. hi Ml., Slin IU-I1I mini, ft.
HI! C0UIIS ML, M. 371-1)10
PN. Ill-tOi? HUM
;<
New
Sensational
Cookbook
from Jj
The Liqueur
of Israel
Now you, too. can discover the magic of Sabra
the international liqueur from Israelas
a delicious "secret" ingredient for some of the
most unique taste tempters ever created. In
the phenomenal response to the Sabra Inter-
national Recipe contest, over 8000 adventur-
ous and enthusiastic cooks throughout
America sent in their own original recipes for
unusual appetizers, entrees, snacks and des-
serts using Sabra.
The very best recipes were selected, after care-
ful study, by Gourmet Magazine experts for
inclusion in this exciting book. And here it is!
For just $ 1 you can get a copy to start you on
your way to fame for cuisine ala Sabra! While
you're waiting for your cookbook to arrive,
try this superb recipe as a preview of what
appetizing delights are in store!
Sabra Orange
Glaze for Duckling
2 tablespoons patea
orange rind
^4 cup Sabra kie
Itabkspoon orange ma
2 teaspoons bron sugar
I teaspoon cornsiarch
WaMespoon lemon,mce
2 tablespoon* 8-
ln w^_^2&**gSlZm to *-"-:
^A Stbn, m^" \!Tirch until smooth, TTT_ Cook and
Mk 4 servings
_____________-M(>ss Miami Ba-h- to

"To: Sabra Cookbook, Dept. F
P. O. Box 5263, HicksviHe, N.Y. 118 W
Enclosed is $1. (No stamps, please.) Please send the imaginative,
new Sabra Cookbook to:
NAME.
ADDRESS-
CITY------_
STATE.
-ZIP.
So proof of purchase necessary. Void "here prohibited.
Sabra...theexotic liqueur from Israel.
With the distinctive flavor of ripe Jaffa
oranges, laced with rich chocolate.
IM*0TIDNOBOTJlBDY '_.!?!


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October 31, 1975
+Jenist fkred/iann
Pape 7-B
Pied Piper
o Soviet Jewry
\eaks on Sunday
i Intrator, one of the
DDle in the world to have
ious contact with Jew-
pvists in the Soviet Union,
eak on Sunday, at 8 p. .Ti-
lth Torah Congregation,
jiterama Blvd., North Mi-
tach.
educational evening is
tred bv the South Florida
ence on Soviet Jewrv, a
|n>e of the Greater Mia"ii
Federation's Community
pns Committee.
IN Moscow and raised
el- Mrs. Intrator fulfills
ral role in the Soviet Jew-
eedom struggle. A mem-
the Haganah." the Is-
underground movement,
In officer in the Israeli
[dnririK the War of Libera-
s. Intrator now plays a
kuous game of cat and
with the Russian secret
imposinc woman, she
the KGB in circles as
rrv to sever what slv? calls
pifeline"-her nhone calls
ends and famil**" of Jew-
fctivists in the USSR.
Intrator feels a deep
of solidarity with -aeh of
I victiwis of harrassment
many of whom are arrested
and convicted for alleged anti-
Soviet activities (a disguise to
persecute those who have ap-
plied to emigrate to Israel).
THE CALLS provide moral
suDrort to the relatives and a
rare opportunity to exchange
information about the prisoners,
according to Mrs. Intrator.
A familiar voice to overseas
operators. Mrs. Intrator has
many witnTses to tv# clicks,
the jams, the cut-offs of the
KGB tapping on their phones
and the half-hour delays by
Moscow operators who are re-
laving the calls.
After a visit to Leningrad in
1973, where she met the family
of 8 Jewish activist. Mrs. Intra-
tor began the telephone con-
tacts. The sources for the ohone
numbers are kert secret. The
calls are paid for mostly by
private donations.
MRS. INTRATOR'S local ac-
tivities in the community in-
clude national vie* chairman of
the Canadian Committee for
Soviet Jewry (she presently
lives in Canada), immediate
past chairman of Women for So-
viet Jewry, and studvine for an
MA deeree in So"W Studies at
the University of Toronto.
[omen Map Honor Luncheon,
hedule ORT Sabbath Here
atheast Florida Region of
.5 American ORT will
t its fourth annual Early
fevers Honor Roll Lunch-
|o cite over 700 members
leir "generosity and con-
efforts"' on Wednesdav.
|l at the Konover Hotel.
ferlv the Hyatt House.
s. Sarita GreenKatt. as-
hy Mrs. Jean Rose, will
!V luncheon. A fashion
bv Jordan Marsh will
I Affair, with Mrs.
|o- Morris as fashion co-
at^r.
SUNDOWN Fridav. Nov.
ne 5.000 members of the
^east Region will attend
tes ushering in ORT Sab-
|Daa> temoles and svnago-
ORT members will spon-
Ihe Oneg Shabbat or make
Ttions to librarv funds. Rab-
ermons will be devoted to
ork of Women's American
anter members will be at
i>le Bth Solomon. Biscavne
[Flamingo; Ocean Pavillion
lew Studv Group. Collins
It- Temole Sinai. Interama
[Woodlands; Temple Beth
North Miami and
Harbor; Romont Gardens
[io"s Club. Romont Gar-
Temnle Emanu-El. Royal
Palm: Beth Moslie. Sans Key;
Temple Adath Yeshurun. Sky
Lake; North Bay Village Jew-
ish Center. Treasure Isle: and
T>mrle B'nai Zion, Winston
Towers.
In chance of information is
Mrs. Leslie Rie?enberg. vice
president of Southeast Florida
P "ioji ol Women's American
ORT.
JWV Post 174
To Sponsor
Poster Contest
Norman Bruce Brown Post
No. 174. Jewish War Veterans
cl the USA, is sponsoring its
eighth annual brotherhood pos-
ter contest in Dade Countv sen-
ior high schools, Edwin L.
Feibelman. contest chairman,
announced.
The contest runs from Oct. 1
to Dec. 16, with winners an-
nounced in Januarv. Competing
a-e students from art classes at
Coral Gables. Coral Park, Mi-
ami Edison. Miami Jackson. Mi-
ami Senior, and South Miami
high schools.
Individual prizes will be
awarded to the four winners in
each school and winning posters
placed in competition for the
Edwin L. Feibelman poster con-
test trophv presented to the
winning school.
Norman Bruce Brown Post
No. 174 recently was awarded
the 1974-75 Brotherhood Award
as outstanding post in the na-
tion in fostering the concent of
brotherhood at the 80th nation-
al convention held in Las Vegas.
JWV Auxiliary 223 To
Hold Regular Meeting Nov. 6
West. Miami Auxiliary No.
223, Jewish War Veterans, will
hold its regular monthlv meet-
ing Thursday. November 6. at
P:15 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Shirlev Wiezenthal.
Program chairman Mrs.
David (Helen) Burrows an-
nounced that Southern Bell
Telephone will present women's
fashions from "Eve" to the
present time with color slide
illustrations of pvervthine from
the Egvnti^n palm leaf wigs to
moi!-> "licro'mni skirts. Ac-
comn^nrina changes in cotv
mnnicarions styles will also be
pictured.
Members and friends are in-
vited to attend. Auxiliary presi-
dent is Mrs. Murray (Charlotte)
Mittler.
B'nai B'rith District 5 To
Honor Bert Brown Saturday
Several hundred persons will
attend "the Unmaking of a
Third Vice President, or Bert
Brow; Ur> In Smoke" Saturday
evenine at 7 p.m. at the Kon-
over Hot"! in Miami Beach.
former.lv the Hvatt Hotel.
The occasion is a dinner in
honor of Bert S. Brown, third
vice president and treasurer of
B'nai B'rith District Five, an
area encomwassine seven states
with a membership in excess of
20.000.
The dinn-r-roast also will
mark th* 50th birthday of the
Miami CPA who is senior part-
ner in the firm of Canlan. Mor-
rison. Brown and Company.
TAMARA R.COHEN, Ph.D.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF MEW OFFICE
TO
Emerald Hilla Mediae! Square
4440 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 38021
(305) 966-0990
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
MYCHOIOGY
ADULT CHILD FAMILY
CAJE and Encyclopaedia Judaica
To Sponsor Essay Contesfln So. Fla.
The Central Agencv for Jew-
ish Education (CAJE). in con-
junction with the Florida Com-
mittee for the Encyclopaedia
Judaica. will sponsor an essay
contest during November on
American-Jewish history for
students attending Jewish
schools in South Florida.
Announcement was made by
Zvi Berger, executive director
of CAJE. and Michael E. S.
Becher, executive vice chairman
of the local Encyclopaedia Ju-
daica agency.
The contest has been sepa-
rated into two groupsa junior
division for students in grades
4 to 8 and a senior division for
grades 9 to 12, and will be co-
ordinated by Abraham J. Ghtel-
son, associate director of CAJE.
Seven prizes will be offered
in each division with the winner
of the senior division receiving
the 16 volume Encyclopaedia
Judaica while the hinjor divi-
sion first Drue will be a set of
the six-volume "My Jewish
World," the junior edition of
the encyclopedia, the Israeli-
printed and published authority
an Jewish life and history.
Becher said
A set of "Mv Jewish World"
will be presented to the school
of the first prize winner in each
division to be used in its library.
All students attendinc Jew-
ish schools in South Florida
afternoon religious schools,
weekend schools and Hebrew
day schools are eligible to
participate in the contest,
Berger explained- The essay
must be th original work of
the applicant, and contestants
may submit an essav. research
project or creative writing.
Among some of the topics for
the contest are: "Heroes of
American Jewish History."
"What America Means to Is-
rael." "Jews Who Contributed
to American Life," "A Critical
Moment in American-Jewish
History." "The Influence of
Judaism on American Life."
"How My Family Came to
America" and "Leaders Who
Shaped American-Jewish Life."
I? Maver Abramowitz. rabbi
of Temple Menorah and a co-
chairman of the Florida Com-
mittee fo r?he Encyclopaedia
Judaica, said "This essay con-
test has two major purposes.
On, to introduce the overall
concept of the Jewish role in
America's first 200 vears. And,
secondly, to dramatize the in-
terlocking relationships of the
Jewish neonle in the United
States, Israel, the Soviet Union
and the world over."
The essay must consist of
not less than 250 and no more
than 500 words for the junior
division and between 350-700
words for the senior division.
Essays., mo*; be accompanied
by an official entry form.
All entries must be mailed not
later than November 18 to the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Mental Health Association
To Hold Meeting Nov. 5
The Mental Health Associa-
tion invites the relatives of hos-
pitalized or discharged mental
patients to a meeting Wednes-
day. November 5, at 8 p.m., at
the assocition offices, 800 Brick-
ell Plaza.
Ms. Marl Brauzer. ACSW, will
facilitate groun discussion. This
event is one of manv scheduled
at regular intervals bv the
Family Services Committee to
meet the needs of families of
mental patients.
Al Jocobson Guest Speaker
Al Jacobson vice mavor of
Coral Gables, will be guest
sneaker at Temple Zamora, dur-
ing Friday evening services.
His toric will be "Can We Stay
in Business."
The "Bert Brown Roast" is a
first for the B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation of vhe United States, with
all proceeds from the dinner to
establish a permanent Presi-
dent's Club endowment for the
benefit of B'nai B'rith youth
services.
Serving as roastmaster and
master of ceremonies will" be
Alfred H. Golden, vice presi-
dent of Riverside Memorial
Chanels of Florida, who is also
active in B'nai B'rith and is a
national commissioner of the
Anti-Dofamation League of
B'nai B'rith (ADL).
Fred Snyder. first vice presi-
dent of the Florida State Asso-
ciation of B'nai B'rith Lodges,
is eeneral chairman of the
Brown testimonial. Cochairman
is Louis Hvmson. president.
elct of the B'nai B'rith Council
of South Florida Lodges.
B'nai B'rijh youth services
provide for the maintenance
and growth of the Hillel Foun-
dations, now serving 340 col-
lege camnuses. support of the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO) and its more than 1,100
teen-age groups, and Career and
Counseling Services found in
some 20 major communities in
the U.S.
Reservations, may be made
by calling the B'nai Krith
Foundation office.
INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN ARTIST
Willing to sacrifice PAINTINGS AND GRAPHICS at
Auctions, Benefits, Private Sales, etc. with objective to
raise fonds to finance research in Vad Vashem for
Present Paintings on the Holocaust.
TONY KECK
C/0 the Hideaway, 4111 S. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
AH Inquiries and Help Greatly Appreciated
EVEREADY x
GE
POLAR IOD g
Kodak
DISTRIBUTOR
WANTED
g asjaiSv^K*sJ^
;::: mmSSSSloStSStt 12-imntn repurchase agreement
CAU. Mr. M#rk( Tall Free! IM0 MHT70
or Collect A. 14 mi mi
$ Monday to Friday. ? topm 6 O.T.
Or Write Fireitone FHoleareeM. F eton BeiMiag-MK in*
I.IN JrdSt.. CulumbuJ On.o jm

YOU CAN OWN A CUSTOM
UILT TOWNHOUSE
FOR LESS THAN
"Sp/if^
1 Lmvel
WTownhomes
1 With a cor 9re9e
iWunmtmMVittmmro*A**o tot.
,$ORpo
PER
SI.
FOOT
'uSum Tw nragii mwj
IN MST KSIM W 3 W. WIW*
OLYMPIAN
"^ xxMy>>
271-1787
NO. ftCNOALL On. *.W. 1S40IAVK.


Page 8-B
* Jen 1st fkr/dian
\_rharminqlx
Miami Beach
Hadassah
9lxJ
yours,
I
;v
dilh ^ipp

The American Jewish Con-
1 their first annual
conference at the Seville Hotel
on October 10 and 20. Them =
was "A R'.-affirmation oi
America's Ideals of Social Jus-
tice, Freedom and EaualitV."
Chairperson for the conference
was Idabelle (Dr. Herman J.)
Friedmnn.
At the luncheon meeting on
Monday, Mrs. Friedman wore
a carefully-tailored iced pink
silk gabardine suit Myriam
(Mrs. Robert) Wolf, president
of the Florida Women's Divi-
sion, greeted the guests in a
white dress covered with navy
polka dots, elasticized at the
waist and cuffs.
Mrs. Rose Rosanoff chose e
black hand-screened print with
red and white in an oriental
motif. Ray (Mrs. Joseph) Gro-
ber wore a gold oants ensemble
with a matr.hine blouse, and
Eve Leiken chose a white long-
sleeved shirt to go with her pink
floral print pants suit.
Belle (Mrs. Ben) Kamen wore
a tangerine and white polka dot
dress with a matching hip-
length jacket
Mrs. Roma Fineberg, who led
in the singine of the national
anthem, chos- a thre-nieoe en-
semble in navv with a vel'nw
floral n*-int. B-rnice (Mrs. Mi-
chael) Waswman wore tones
and shades of brown* In '"r
pants ensemble. Mrs. Rav Rein-
ford's beige ensemble featured
a bamboo print in black and
white.
Jeanette Stem tonned hr
white skirt with a blue boucle
blouse as she accented con-
gratulations on th** Wrth of hr
first great-grandchild. Ella \M-
kawitx's white oants ensemble
had ein?hm nrint anHimvs on
the iacket and was worn with
a light pink shell.
Judith (Mrs. Murray) Tenner,
a national lln nresidmt of the
Women's Division of AJC. ore-
sided over Hi* mro-nine smin*r
in^ cnHco red print bodice and
blue skirt.
CENTRAL FLORIDA
10 rrM, beautiful country build-
ing site witn ponds, tree* and com-
lately fenced. County road front.
ge, three miles from town. Phone
'or appt. 773-6417 (Wawchwla. Fla.)
(3.0OO.00 an acre with term*.
CONDO
1580 WEST AVE.
1-bedroom, 1'/2 bath. Patio. Part-
ly furnished. Asking $33,900. Call
John Rltay, Assoc. THE KEYES
CO. 371-3592.
REFINED, MATURE WOMAN
TO SHARE LOVELY 2 bd. 2
hath APT. in DADELAND
AREA All recreation facilities,
social directress and excellent
service.
Call after 6 p.m. 279-3678
OPENING FOR MATURE
SALESMAN
Part-Tim* --Car Necessary -
Sale* Experience. Reputable
South Miami firm.
Phone 9324582
Thelma (Mrs. David) Newman
was one of a number of mem-
bers who were in from the Palm
Beach 11 oants suit wa-
in a Goya red. Dorothy (Mrs.
Louis) Elkies wore a teal blue
dress which had a nleated skirt.
Terry Fc'.iman, executive di-
rector of the Southeast region
AJC. wore a three-oiece beige
lace-knit dress. Sylvia (Mrs.
Charles) Silvers' pants ensemble
was in ombred greens, while
Beatrice Gottlieb combined
pinks and blues to top her white
pants.
Sylvia (Mrs. Irving) Kaplan,
a national vice president of the
Women's Division, selected a
silk surrah print in the navy,
red and white bicentennial mo-
tif. Also in the same motif was
Gert (Dr. Bernard) Ehrenpreis.
Her ensemble combined a white
skirt, red blouse and nautical
jacket.
Sally Goldstein's three-piece
silk jersev pants ensemble was
in a watercolor-wash nrint of
lime and lilac. Muriel (Mrs. A!)
Meyerson wore an emerald
green knit suit with narrow
bands of navv and white and a
navy scarf at the neck.
President-elect. Mrs. Mollie
Gersh, wore an emerald green
print pants suit. A shocking
pink rwnt ensemble was worn
bv Mildred (Mrs. Sol) Berlin.
Her silk blouse was multicolor-
ed with the exact pink color
predominating. Pearl (Mrs. Ben-
jamin) M.-w dell's Persian print
jacket was worn with brown
slacks and a turauoise blouse.
Esther Cohen topped her white
pants with a geometric nrint
blouse in new fall colors. Mollie
(Mrs. Nathan) Bnshman's colors
were orange and brown in her
pants ensemble.
Gaest sneaker for the lunch-
eon was Leona (Mrs. Marcy)
Chanin, president of the Na-
tional Women's Division. Com-
ing from Manhattan, she select-
ed a sage green chiffon print
blouse.and matching scarf with
a coordinated green gabardine
skirt.
Kodtmoh Pioneer Women
To Hold Luncheon-Meeting
Kadimah Chanter of th Pio-
neer Women will hold a lunch-
eon meeting Tuesdav. Novem-
ber 11. at n'ym at Beth Kodesh
Congregation.
Chapter president Mrs. Fred
Sandier announced that the
luncheon will be sponsored by
Mrs. Kntie Gordon and Mrs.
Hilda Flaum.
Mi
Meetings
The Miami Beach Chapter of
Hadassah Groups are planning
meetings on the following dates
Emma Lazarus Group will
meet at the Holiday Inn. Col-
lins and 8~th St.. on M
Nov. 10, at 11 W
- Hadassa

ol :ii--' Mis

guest spei
Sbaloma C.n.up will meel
Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the Sir
Club Hut 1. at noon.
Royal Maccabees Group will
meet at the Financial Federal
Savings & Loan. 75S Collins
Ave.. on Monday, Nov. 17, at
7 p.m.
-to
Royal Maccabees Group will
meet at the Versailles Hotel
Sunday, Nov. 23, at 12 noon.
Rabbi David Raab will be the
guest speaker. Toni Samoni will
entertain.
it it
Louis D. Brandeis Group will
meet at the Fontainebleau Ho-
tel on Monday, Nov. 25. at
noon. Entertainment will be a
novelty act by Pearl Burnett.
Lincoln Group will hold a
regular meeting on Monday,
Nov. 10, at 12:30 p.m. at 100
Lincoln Rd. in the Club Room.
d & :-
Forte Towers Group will
hold a meeting on Monday,
Nov. 10, at 12:30 p.m. in the
Auditorium. Program Film.
"If I Forget Thee."
ft
v?
Haim Yassky Group will hold
a luncheon and card party on
Wednesday, Nov. 12, at nocn
at Byron Hall.
ft ft
<*?
and his
Boca Raton Hotel
and Club Orchestra
Bay Harbor Group will hold
its regular meeting on Monday,
Nov. 10, at 12:30 p.m. at the
Town Hall of Bay Harbor. Pro-
gram Book review by Mrs.
Florence Scheiner, president.
ft ft ft
Morton Towers Group will
hold a general meeting on Mon-
day, Nov. 10. at 11:30 a.m. at
American Savings & Loan As-
sociation at Alton and Lincoln
Roads. Free dessert and cf-
fee. Program -r-'Book revj-.w
by Soprii Primak of "The Last
Escape." Program Mrs. Dora
Krimsky.
Sonthgate Group will hold a
meeting on Monday, Nov. 10,
at 7 p.m. in the Terrace Room.
Program Film, "If I Forget
Thee." Presiding Shirley L.
Rosenberg.
ft ft ft
Plaza 800 Group will hold a
meeting in their Social Hall.
Monday, Nov. 10, at noon.
President is Mrs. Rose Miller.
"Weddings &
Bar AAitzvahs
our Specialty"
65;-2803
Mature Woman
who needs companionship
WANTS TO SHARE
beautiful apt. in HaUandale on
Ocean with mature woman
who needs home. Local refer-
ences required. 1-925-6789
WA N T E D
Family plot for up to 8 or
mausoleum crypts or mauso-
leum family room, preferably
Lakeside or Ml Nebo Ceme-
tery. Private party. Cash pur-
chase. Phone 759-1444
',''
I
Maureen Harwitz is
wife and mother whose c?
ment to work, self, home"
its the priff
Judaism at its beet.
: lised to belfcve that
! not just for an
f, but to get a
' she says of her Philadel-
ring.
DURING HER undergraduate
years at the University of Pen-
i, Maureen taught Sun-
day Schrol at a Conservative
synagogue and earned her
"book mony." In I960. she was
gaduafd from Penn with a
ma'or in mathematics and a
double minor in Russian and
German.
That most fortuitous choice
of subiect matter along with the
times (Snudnik was launched in
1953) enabled Maureen to b?
considered "a very desirable
employee" by RCA.
At 22 vears of ag^. Maureen
Harwitz was eneae-d as an sngi-
ner in defense electronics.
"I WAS part of the facility
at RCA t'lat spotted the original
Snutnik," she relates proudly.
"It was a nrivilee- to work,
and I lived working and the
people I was with."
Fift^n vears later. M^nr^en
Ha'wirr' attitude is much the
jwrnf. Wi.at has ch*need are the
"whst" and "who." but not the
"how." Married to Dr. Daniel
Hst-wto. w">o eamR to Miami in
19*5 to rf-> M* int^mshin at Mt.
Sin^i Hospital. Mmimah is the
n^nt^r of rw"> voung sons,
Michael and David.
1- 1047. t* H-rwit7 familv
rrarf to an island community
in North Miami, and that is
where Maureen began her com-
munity involvement, which she
r escribes as "my non-paying
job."
ALTHOUGH SHE no longer
considers herself a "political
nereonnage," most North Mi-
ami*nc remember Maureen for
b*r 1973 mayoral race. Although
c'ic *>Tiered the greatest num-
hf* of, vote* 5n the general elec-
tion. .* '""st in the ruifoff
*>midi anti-Semitic and sexist
slurs.
"The mMwS'iwilpn of ray be-
jr-.c .i ** P -mw) bother?
ed .* let of ncoplc," she sadly
recalls.
The Harwirzes are affiliated
with Temple Israel of Greater
Miami. However, it was a recent
trio to Russia that prompted
Maureen to comment that the
trip "sensitized me to my Juda-
ism."
SHE MET Jews in Leningrad
who had thought thev were real-
ly Russians only to discover
their second class status while
trying desperately to enroll
their children in school. She
was forced to draw the inevi-
table parallel to Nazi Germany.
"As a result of the trip," she
explains, "the kids (her sons)
are saving a portion of their
allowance to send to Jews in
Russia."
That familv involvement is
typical of Maureen's interests
and efforts. Since "the priorities
we set up in our community
have an impact on our kids,"
Maureen's priorities are values
she hopes to inculcate into her
children's futures.
She envisions her future, as
well, here in Miami. "We've got
to do something legislatively so
that development doesn't ruin
the reastn we're all here."
HER CONSERVATION work
>s predicated on her observa-
tiens: Biscayne Bay is no longer
"vodka clear," hence her presi-
ievrew nc
' sented a nl
tfiool's GlJ
\ublin, rej
hey wci
. idenrim
'win B,|
V
dency of the Izaak Walton
League which is active in pre-
serving the quality of potable
and recreational water: Arch
Creek, the ancient Tequestan
habitation ( "gives us an im-
portant sense of place." so she
is a leader in the Save Arch
Creek campaign; and GreynoMl
Park picnic grounds should not
be used for a librar since we
should "protect whatever we've, f
got that's good when >ther op-
tions are available.' lencc her
past chairmanship ol :he North
Miami Pa-Vs. Recvmon and
Beautification Boarc
HeT husband supported her
in her political endeavors, even
stumning for her election in a
person-to-person ar.j door-tc-
door campaien. Her sons par-
ticipated in her Arc- 'reek digs
for Indian artifacts.
JUST AS Maureer s 'amity is
involved in her work, -he teels
her family is the cause of her
community concern-' "1 am
mother with two lit* .- boys.
"I-want to make sure c.aey
up to be big-boys." -' adds to
the tK<>cossK>n Of ''" Bikeway
Task Wee for saf.:, in cycl-
ing.- ,
In f*r* M is s-"visoring a
, hikr-rid*---'"" for the .'rwish
Community Cent.': >f North
Dade.
It; nnyif is to '-oTiote the
establishment of a >wish "Y"
for North Dade area children.
IN SPIT*7 of hv ;-tmiDgly
t"tal comnrttment of time and
effort to making her c i-nmiinity
a more enriched, ev flded home
in which her boys -,v grow.
Maureen 5"s she "not do-
ing enough."
im i
.::-Ht
/rv}
of self-ful-
: .olvement
It is that oualif
fillmpnt through
outside on^'s own sober*, th
work ethic, that sets Maureen
Harwitz apart as a svcial and
unique voung woman in our
community.
Rabbi Gorfmkle To Speak
Guest Rabbi Joseph Gorfmkle
will speak on the topic "Tne
Challenge of the Bicentennial
to the American Jewish Com-
munity." tonight at Temple Of
Olom.
In the absence of Rabbi Da-
vid M. Baron, who is leading
congregational tour m Israel-
the rabbi emeritus of rempx
Beth Moshe will lead the Sao-
bath service.
tn Miami dpuht w ** "*<*** mw*"**"***
and is licensed to pract.r^ rv-- .^
Uftlt Wa>aM*>


fjidfrt
1975
* Jems/? Khridftan
Page 9-B

To ^ ^ **j v
\f
uh 0"
::


- jrew School stu-
.cipate in the an-
. ation Ceremony
'^ ate Friday evening
7:30 p.m., Novem-
iich will be preceded
"\oh?t dinner in honor
Consecrants, at Beth
p^*, Congregation. Mr. I .
i Til* '""Gr ''' ''' '
rjj0t9d-- esid."." announc <
L^k Dr. Max A I.i-vchitz, Spiritupl
j^pundcr. will efticir.t n.nd cha-e
' fwi'the stud. v"'<
^Htniat'.ve T-irot will n; .
Red hv K-'bhi Norr
(ssman. Educational Direcl
In-tmcto s of the first grade
tebrew classes re: Mrs. E.
iergman. Mrs. S. Berk, and
Mrs. A. Markowitz.
The Consecrants are: Lisa
Alexander, Bernard Attias. Lin-
da Bodne, Amy Cantor, Gregory
Felder. Marci Field., James
Friedman, Lisa Fuchs, Todd
passman. Jeffrey Gold, Susan
'"Hen. Jonatham Kaplan. Law-
Jence Karp.. Wayne Keil. Jef-
frey Klein. Richard Roller. Bar-
ry Krutchik, Morris Levy, Jeff
Ma-garetten, Cheryl Max. Mer-
rier Morse. David Moskowitz.
Beth Mufson. Albert Nae, Ian
Neuberger. David Nudelman,
Debra PesetsW, David Prasch-
nik. Richard Rand. Avi Rosen-
blatt. Daniel Rosenthal, Mindy
fabin. Pamela Silberglied. David
Silverman. Francine Starr. Ilene
Sussman, Pattv Taer. Steven
Tepper. Maria Magman. Jill
Wiatric. Teddy Wohl. William
Wucher. Sandra Zuckerman and
Sherri Zuckerman.
*~
Wff
uel French Co. of New York, is
a one-act comedy based on the
Yiddish folk tales Linda remem-
bers hearing as a child. Al-
though her first play, Miss Sha-
piro has been writing.ever since
she learned how and has had
several of her noems published.
Northwestern, Miss Sha-
".!- an editor of the school
paper, The V' illy x
She | '1 fro
. -i Co al Park '.-, ii ..
;re she was cl
Sh .- t'i. i of Mr
- ; of
Mia:::;.


Mr. and M-s. Tom Grubsrg
and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hcchman
will be \velroT*d bv Tem"l
Beth Tov durinp. Fridtv evening
services. Octob'r 31. Thev will
be called to t^e nulnit to an'"
a report on their recent trip
to Israel.
LINDA SHAPIRO
At 21, Linda Shapiro is a pub-
lished plavright. Her first play,
"A Story of Chelm," appeared
in print iust in time to be Miss
Shapiro's graduation present,
her copy arriving in the mail a
few weeks before she graduated
with honors at Northwestern
University.
The play, published by Sam-
Cantor Bornstein To Be
Greenfield Series Speaker
Cantor Jacob Bornstein will
be the featured sneaker on the
Greenfield Lecture series at
Temnle Israel Sunday morning
at 10 a.m continuing the the
emphasis on th Bicentennial
celebration when he discusses
"The Contribution of Jews to
the Music of America."
Cantor Bornstein. who receiv-'
ed his ordination and a Master's
degree in "Education at the He-
brew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, also earned
a Master's decree in Music at
the University of Miami.
Gift Of life Chapter
Th Gift of Life chanter of
th National Asthma Center will
et Mondav evenine. Nov. 3.
at 8 p.m. in the recreation room
r* PW<,^wood Apts., 13841 S.W.
90th Ave.
Harold Pwrael*. coordinator
H pV auxiliaries from the hos-
r' -' in Denver, will be the |
guest sneaker.
At Cltfb Features Dorst
The monthly at forum of the
Miami Beach Art Chib will
meet Saturdav, Nov. 1, at 3
p.m.. in the Rotunda room of
the Miami Beach Library.
Guest speaker will be Claire V.
Dorst. discussing and demon-
sfating acrylic painting.
Now thru November 16
, World's Greatest Detective
Tn a frightfully spectacular evening
featuring genuine London fog. trap doors,
secret passages, gas chambers, a d.m,l .n
distress, mysterious knock.ngs. a dastardly
assortment of villains, a plot to topple k.ngdoms.
an unbelievable ending!
rl
GOOD SCATS ON 9AIE: A. .k. B.. OlfU. .JSJ.M!&"*? l^^tSjS
miIui i,MilMU..I IUd*>. l*Ml *" s*u* ,'"1 .miUVIl f ASHION SQUARE
rtBBIWMI f ..........
-jIA^A-TICICtT: CkHP **raa**** M Mai loc.ti>-.% pfgMgB.531 m4 handy lth
"t^.Cla* *!* C.H 442-40tO .r* My !*"lloOi-lAcM H*,kW"
I
(! u,"tl"
jjUDCWT DISCOUNT: Only UMwith v.lid in ,
%0, 0c 1^11 t>o. Wto.. , Not rc oh mended loi

rocoMMdm* Ut yo* cMMw-

Information & Reservations: 442-4000
Low Group Rate.: 253-5566
IIHl Time piiriMDWC
J
How Free Is Kntherine Storm Becomes Bride Of
First Lieutenant Benjamin Sley
Our Press
Forum Topic
The Hillel Foundation of the
University of Miami and the
Miami Forum for the Study of
Democratic Institutions will pre-
sent an open forum dealing
with the question "How Free is
Our Press ;ind the Electronic
Media?"
ni Forum members are
local subscribers to "The Cen-
Magazine" from which thev
select articles for their group
ssion meetings.
Guest panelists will bs Ln
Aronoff. writer Droduc sr for
the nublic affairs office of
WCKT-TV, Lanv Jinks, execu-
editor of the Miami Herald,
Fhep Morgan, executive pro-
(.ucer of WPBT-TV, Garth
Rpves. business manager and
editor of the Miami Times news-
paper, and Frank Wilkensof,
director of the "National Com-
mittee Against Repressive Leg-
islation."
Moderator for the evening
will be Dr. Robert Knowles, co-
ordinator of professional serv-
ices for Comprehensive Mental
Health Services. Inc. The pub-
lic is invited to attend this event
which will be held at the Hillel
Foundation of the University of
Miami, on Sunday. November 9
at 8 p.m. No admission charge.
Katherine Storm of Corpus
Christi, Texas, and First Lieu-
tenant Benjamin Harry Beryll
MRS. BENJAMIN SLEY
Slcy, United States Marine
Corps, of Miami Beach, were
married Saturday evening in
Corpus Christi.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Carroll
Storm of Corpus Christi. The
bridegroom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harry Sley of Phita-
delphia and Miami Beach.
Mrs John GuvtOD of Dallas.
was her sister's matron of hon-
or. Best man was Robert Grosa-
man. Jr., brother-in-law of tie
groom.
The bride's parents host<
after tl
Following a rip
Lc : the couple "ill \v .-
groom is
A ti H( hi i. the i1 idi earn< d
h Bachelor and Masl irs d< -
Bavlor Universit
io-1!. an attorney.
i a r-admt of Central Hieh
School in PhiHdel"hia. the Uni-
versitv of Colorado and Baylor
school of law.
Torah Academy Presents
Children's Film Festival
Torah Academv of South Flo.
ida presents Disnev's "Legend
of Johnny Apoleseed." "Cap?
for Sale" and Charlie Chaplin'*
"One A.M." as part of the chil
dren's film festival on Novem
ber 11. at Washington Federal.
633 NE 167th St.. North Miami
Beach, from 2 to 3:30 p.m.
You Can Believe In...
MIAMI CITY COMMISSIONER
ROSE
GORDON
SHE HAS KEPT FAITH WITH YOU!
- ROSE GORDON HAS FOUGHT FOR:
* Day Care Centers for Working Mothers
* low Cost Housing
* Reform of Miami's Planning & Zoning Systems
* Improvement and Enlargement of Police Department
* Programs for the Handicapped
* Boxing Program to reduce crime & drug involvement
* Seminars to interest youth in government
* Senior Citizens Day Care Centers
RE-ELECT MIAMI CITY COMMISSIONER
ROSE GORDON
PULL LEVER 4-A
For Free Transportation to the polls
Phone: 576-6846, 573-0445 or 856-8660
(Paid by Committee to Re-Elect ROSE GORDON, Stephen Chepenik)


>*r I -t
>*WsS/*>'*
Fndar October
".-c
Enthusiastic Globe
Girdler If rites
'Total Traveler
k., ft^TMA tn
tlM Must Om^-'
be* /*i-<^yec -.
fer w0 nut M'-mow << a*
ggaj ' ut baa* Mm Ifawae **
^muC: axis *-vf -wXkauj* wet*
A* O-t ;rn,ni.< V/MMNT
4 ;*- 7v* ftmiai o*o
#tt a* 44 ***/* aasd
*ae. hk
M*** /*l"*l t** rtaCav ** Vfa
wr/..* Mn feiMM *m ***
w'x* tbt '!>*** A**>y of flat
1 .-! Jnd**)ry
uu m*4 *mrtm*A **rkr. db*a
** *#* CHOI ***. <#' a *-r
uutry onntftemvm m n YtaVfah
ftMMp*r# **Th* f orwe*4"
>* "if yte*m mm* n
t*UU*i ttt l*u s*om *#* f
Gold ('4MI -nd lUrrtfon *
rtrtet **fl a* "W* rh*n
<9/r#i MlfHfMt iwMltiWUM
I< *JJ /t-(//i>-t eh* os*c
;&* (Mil T/vc|tf *t her
log/, M*r lAitm&tr ha* sorrty
ili '/<* f(/"i \i*i r>tA-'iiU"flf.
which bad* *o*id etrcuag
-, /,-: / i| dsaflel tii*i* in
I at d I QSfflJ tc*/> -/ I***-
band ''' Aaja Miito*
I'. | >ii-f '/f '-.tuff
f,r it.r jSf avli ion
undei <*n bougie* MeArthur,
Mi.- l-.iwn bad a f**ly made
sjtlffcoi r.,r bOf typed
i
I WsataTT, *h*rv*r I hap-
I It b st'O OX|>llflB
., n, Jim.an fhl wrote tut
> iinl kirD" l"i nn in-
l-lliirt (,. r nalWOtk In wspapar
fm r 'ir i .ni,lain*,
"I .,<.... > nut
i..I I ii''-i M"i pregnant
in Iran f. m 'I
' l> n lie-1 linnlintit) waa trane
fr l ,. .1 Li l,rf-' il> llir mill
1 i ........'il-lnii I'. Hontlv
QtiastKM1 Ami what did vom An
ilui |n| llir VII nni' li
i nil:., il In i NirUon Mtinpl |f>
l1ii.ii '.lir fnUnd mil in iiril 11-
MStiOni nirinlriil M ln-M flfll
mani mi auntoi hti husband!
0 lr.- In nil rulrrniril iii.nllluM
i.i fiiiiimii' only ''li paari iftai
1 till. I n lull
I Inallv '"< '' In Mi->Mi. Mm
Itllllll t-'lriv III tlV Wlfll llir "Wlllll
m a i Inli Mi mill i nnlnoed
Hit- Mi-mil Mr., li 'iin thai it
III e .It .1 l hurl .1.1... In >|(}f
len yrti wllli llir ".iin ulir li.nl
ini awn Pfivata llbaratlon
mii\cinrMl an ihf mlvnnrril limn
liovrl illli.i I-. tvnnuli r.lil.u
In naaiu laic eilllnr
IIKN lllirr M-ni iil.l nrwapa>
en <>iiit1111 aarvaa u mi .1. iiilinn In tin fOUl VMI 'l>'
Saturday ntornlni i<*tk rium
Ami now ihj Iin" cmhaiKrU on
a .run nl filial travrkr vauha
'l'i H) I rtlln* \lii|< Ihr
III.)
W AN11D
VV king tiiiv mat*-
lala ti Jnwlih (Uatiooim
y.u.oa iiilttliiianl .livllle
inJivHluliil laainlno mod*H
r..ihuol lhiouh Ji High
ail popol In #<*'**
Jawiih Taajchttt Catar
f Hit Dalarat NoM
lai (MlffNtAY MAO
WHAAITTl. U, MOl
vm**n wex ajht aj
AaafjM. tmncrmtmc tu
t* flat
a **** dan/ 1 *
iwa** */4rv fcrt tw hntt Har "fca
Bh" '!**/ wt a* lacaet as
flaw w*M k dwM>
rl>* WtJAT hrniinm
tm Mkonw.
faaamaa dat M7 aw. Mr*
fcaw aaraatwd mmch irrtaaw
f* a*r arnci^a tn Law* ui
I*r#H Monrh* \mki
WHf.KKVf.9 4* Mima trmai.
Aary ** w th* imAMk ot
rtat local Jeadatt cowwnwatty
rh* wruw-'/tOBe* ao] fhc ilapv If *nd wfeew tHr atea art
,/ 4if*rfa.' 'th* ct*n*umm *r+
iAuca wrrgr'sma and ondtr-
'kf4l'". fhe> try to rectify
rh* tttiurttz/o hv armealrny "
Lw>t n<:ui* and ftrHrwn* tm
ihfMm
That "taj MVQrvamcfM e--^n
'//. ti-iiOji\. acent* oonronrlaia
to K#ti*l ftlum't hft->rv!- ht i*
a <3i-jif/iiiiij] eaanjMfc dfflanM
in ui'Ki'ji- avan ** an* *>u *t
r.arr inarMjacrtnt 'hi't<-rtd de#k
that bw profan*
nal nf>- did net \*-v>n ttrtttt
ki that id hava "more
iinir to writi...... that ia
inf iii the tan* i'ut,
it Mr* I'.i im keaof a) bar
oraaant naca <-\i<- will ba om
iiinii in.;,.. m ',! loa] tnm
iloll\ \wkhI
Doi; 1
rack
0|M-iir Siiiu.uy
i .vii'iniii! i ii .!; ii iindci
wav ui it wood l"ii/ I rack
Dnn head foi tin- flnl i>
Iin*- 1.' iimei i nisi i ex
i i-i.i fiundav iiii the fit t iti
inttlpa umi' i v.iv at k ii.ui
Holh/WOOd Blr.n !. iitiiici afttr-
ii..on l'ii limn,.] r.ii.niw Ini |hC
matlne* lana with raork achak
nliil Iiii Nnv I mid NOV I
I lien uvtrv Monday Wrdnaa-
i,nv iin.i Saturday throunh afar.
i
lloll*imil tut-, vi-alinu lor
over H,.K)0 Una and n total
inpitiiiv iii ,.mkk aii mata In
Iho trandataad will remain frra
lliln nrnMin on n lirnt cniiu-.
In"t aervd baaia
lic thud now "Greyhound
( hih ntfi-rn a, awtrmet menu
on rxrn raclnt afternoon nii
nlaril llir fourth floor. "Hfcv
line Room' will nffrr a hnflet
maal mi Krtday and setunlav
avanlntj
Hollywood wgl uiirr ita lirat
maloi Malta* rac of ih* s*o-
ton ihr HS.OOu llollvwoodian.
with iiuniitMiif pettlna tindr*
wnv oil N'*v l'> ami lt-naifl*t to
ihr Pea) a ha*le
Adoth Yaihurun Sisterhood
To Hold AniNtol Morhaf-Ploce
The mmrrhiHid of Temple
Aiiiitii Yaahnnni win imui its
nnnunl "Ma>')ict 1'UU.e in Jem
aaleni" Sunday lr*w H %m to
< p in
At t uh> and vndtMoati wUl a
diajdaykM end *i*m their
waifla. Children can view
inoviaau while iMtranta hrewaa
and anew the wewbaef art
(>roup% Moid
Hom$Uy Heo09&
fladaahtor < '.ajarr
M*rrr
rV. n :: ..V. ; i
:-*a%t JWt.i TV !*:
iv*. *mh ev flflj at Hat
Tat Mj*-tt *f*
aaatt. Ae^*ji fMrvoan. L Uex
M*ar. fJkfcrteric Wv.pt Seidi
titan e. Asuu OMan Ca*r :*^y iv '*e**eer, Srrn*
Heroes a&d a%Jes M*o*>:'
ia/Haa fcataeeira m Otweaar.
J* addRjoc to u* -vio% aav
tory of rhe Hada*t* Qa4*r
a* porr*yed hj r* p** pr**i
dealt the da) erf: featurt i
attfll eaotjateu'iD of Ttw Je-
iah-Azwencaa; tzpem** a! a
penet dtecutaaon. is k*i> .r. at*
end j: DtAZaitP*
0<*n* fneeVaae t> eeepter
prendewt Natalie B. Lyott
education prawelaet :..
chaurperaciD of tse day The
fflttat it IBYVJBd
-HabiMh Mom* ovtr
and the group* of the Mjtmi
Oaapaar oi Hadaatah are Khed-
adnaf omeral meetjntu for tfte
rr.eath of Noverr.eer
The AMyah Oreap will
ilx aexl maartinai en WednevOtry
KOI 12. at 7 45 p m. a' -
recr*afi'in room of The Summit
Af/ta Huabandi are invited tc
hear Ma; Fink, an Israeli pilot,
v. f.n will preaent An Israeli
i*i* or*} the Vom Kippur War
Man (, A film about Medicare and
.,' i.u Security will be hi&h-
Ited at the next meeting oi
mi leepaji Gtesf '>r. Mon-
..'.-. 24, at 1 p.m. Iht
11n will be held at the
Mrt Eddjpral Bevingl and Loan
Beflk <>n ( oral Way and 27
Avenue Presiding ia Mri PI
Jin (hmvu
Roz Soil/ will he the ;
eal ei the Eleanor Roeae
crt <.iup maetirflj on Monday,
.v io, at 12 45 p.m. in the
Marl'n Auditoiium Rose Sar-
mw will preaidi
Mr Sidney Aaher, president
ol iin I'.iiiiiiir SoltZ-Yaffa Group
announced that they will have
a Mini Paid Memberahip Lunch*
<;oo meeUnit >' ,nt" r(nlr Arn_
haaaailiMM Molc-l on Monday,
Nnv 10, al 11:30 am. Kva Ale-
i*an. rhjurwiinan, announced
thai entertainment will be pro-
vided hy the laraeli Elaine and
Lei Waitman Trio.
Diaibetefl learning
Center^ Open
I In oho|,(Mii |)a StartinK Nov. 11, even, dia-
betic, whether treated by in-
sulin, pills, or by diet alone,
will have an opportunity to be
educated about their disease
lre oj nhlllCl at four new Di-
abetes Lt-arninR Centers
The cMricrs will be held at
four locations in the county;
.Inrksi.n, Baptist and Veteran*
Administration Hospitals and
Miami Dade Community Col-
lan>, Miami Beach facilty.
Three evening sessions, two
hours each, will be off red o"w
a lour evening peri id fro"i t
to *> p in at all locations ere it
Veterans Hospital Morning
classes from 10.30 to 12 no< p
Will be held at Veteruns in
!hx.* A.-tM
The center* *re a product
ef te Miami groaga th*
Hade AaaeeJatten ei Diabetes
Educators and the Juvenile Da-
abeaaa R*aaarch FoundanciL
.r*. FonmSena s-
.....-*y^ by Amtncm ww&ic ?efar--. -
M | *ep+Mr*x tenth on reo 22 enffl! be Ha
ord B^rnc-'d f'aib. oapiomcz* corrcarendriirs *r-
r. u rvtv. . liavdi
21 Bnr rxmA wtU ^aerd cne cf America* hf
Sam Uveraon. Tickets for The I9~6 Perm
, are svaJabie by aattflj ihe Beth Dand
f 1 0(S H h/Ppi T)H C A
J S IE H/i/o" 7. A B S 2 5
J !l 0 D 3 H X
R w(g A I A H 3
3 B J U
S T
R I
A 3
?\7 f
L
I
BAP
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(IlAf 1
: g 3 F T
CZ j | P)P
CBTP1CJ
y.7f"B A B I DM J B L 5
KCHJB Z(!i 0 L L il Q
i
i
s
Modem Israelis:
ALLON. BEN-ZVI. DAYAN, DIMTTZ, EBAX, E?H-
KOL, MEIR, PEREZ, RA&LN, SAPIR, SHARETT. SHA-
ZAR
Richard Essen Appoints
Society Of Fellows Ghairmen
Leonard L Abess William
M Alper. Ben
.. (c Talianoff nave
... pointed honon
Of the Florida Chapter i: the
Society of Fellows of the Anti-
Defamation League ol B'nai
i. The appointments
announced by Richard E
Btati chairman n! the S
of Fellows.
A former chairman of ADL's
Florida Regional Board. Leon-
ard L. Abess has been asso-
ciated with the League in a
variety of leadership positions.
He is the donor of ADL's covet-
ed annual Human Relations
Award which bears hi? name.
Mr. Abess is chairman of the
Board of the City National Bank
Corp. and has been recognized
frequently for achievement* a*
a business leader and philan-
thropist.
William M. Alper has been
active in the leadership of the
Society and of ADL for many
years. Currently aening on the
Executive CommitP.e oi the
ADL Regional Board, he ia a
past chairman of that Board.
He served as the 1972 chair-
man of the Society of Fellows,
is a national commissioner of
the League and a member of
its Latin American Affairs
Committee. Mr. Alper is a
prominent Dade County attor-
ney.
Ben Easen, an attorney, has
been an active worker in the
Miami community for the paat
thirty years and ha* been iden-
tified with many of the major
Jewish organization* in th*
area. In 1973 he nerved as co-
chairman of tlie Society oi J-el-
lows of the Ami Defamation
League and li currently a mem-
ber of ADL1* BatatwUs* CM*.
"ttee *ad ft* Watf**** j^gj
George J. Taiianoif promi-
nent .Miami Beach attor-. and
ci'.ic leader, ae.-vej at"
n of Mj H>.ua i r._ : cf
: Soci ty I Fci ws i.i I-"3.
19"0 ani is7i. U* has been
:: j wit! tht A-:>
D;:j::a; a JU a:..: its par-
'! n, B n^: B nth,
a*d is nati nil chairman of the
League's Community Ser
Committee. He served for rr.
years as chairman of the Flor-
ida Regional Board oi the
League and was a member of
ADL's National Advisory Coun-
cil. He is also past president of
the Florida State Association
of B'nai B'rith lodges.
Operating with tne authori-
aation of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the Society
of Fellows is endeavoring to
enroll new members whose sup-
pert will help immeasurably the
continuity of the multi-faceted
programs of the League.
The Society of Fellows is a
leadership group whose mem-
ber* work to promote ADL's lo-
cal and national programs.
Members of the Society spon-
sor special ADL activities and
accord fitting recognition and
public hooor to individuals for
generosity and meritorioua
service.
JWV Auxiliary
To Hold 'Annual
Chanukah Party
The Jewish War Veteran!
Poet and Auxiliary No. 330
will hold its annual Chanukah
party Thursday night, Nov. 6,
at 8 p.m., at the American Le-
g**n Hall in Miami Beach.
The Ladles Auxiliary will
aarva holiday refreshment*
and there will be music and
entertainment. For information,
sesaphene iwaaidini Paidane
k**L
lore the US. Supreme Cour.
fairs.
^^^B


Friday, October 31, 1975
+Jcnisti fk>ridHfyn
Pa?e 11-B
SWl
^abbwttal flane
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. L'oschitz KaoDi Robert j. Or*and
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
JSSUES AND ANSWERS
^
"In The Beginning"
i
i
By RABBI ROBERT ORKAND
Temple Israel ot Greater Miami
All beginnings are hard .
especially a beginning that you
make by yourself. That's the
hardest beginning of all." Thus
begins Chaim Potok's latest
novel, "In The Beginning," a
novel that tells us a great deal
about the author himself and.
in turn, about ourselves.
The central figure in Potok's
work is David Lurie, a young
ibov growing up in the difficult
jyears of the 1920's and '30s.
\\i father and uncle are former
lembers of the Polish under-
round who have come to the
Jnited States, to the "golden
d." to escar>e the oporession
Eastern Europe. The two
len, upon their arrival in the
Jnited States, founded the Am
vedoshim Society that would it -
smpt to raise the funds neces-
to bring other members of
underground to this country,
young David learns of the
of his father's brother,
;r whom the boy is named,
ihe hands of the Cossacks,
is told time after time that.
Jew is always to be on his
rd. He is always to know
It he is hated by the "goyim"
it is only by fighting back
r. the Jew can survive in a
ttst difficult world,
lus David grows up believ-
that the Jew must always be
Idy to fight those who- hate
But how are we to fight
c? David's father says that
must be met by force. At
same time, David is raised
[an Orthodox environment,
in which Torah is sacred,
taining the peaceful solu-
to all the problems of the
David is taught that it is
[duty of the Jew to know
for only then will our
ies be defeated,
sdless to say, David is con-
As an Orthodox Jew, be-
in the divinity of Torah,
is taught to believe that
edge is the Jew's most ef-
tool. But, asks David,
we simply accept the
fcdge of Torah without
n? For David, a brilliant.
Dninn young man, the
s far from clear. David's
Torah begins with Mr.
a friend of David s
One Shabbat. after the
of the Torah. the young
Mr. Bader a question
He "sidrah" (the portion
teek):
ht God tells Noah to
Kwo animals of even
Rnto the ark; then God
Koah to take seven of
Ban and two of the un-
inimals into the ark.
did God tell Noah
**M fc Bader) gased at me
^^ k silent for a long
Kt. "Am you able to
Ktthi"? I nodded. "I
Huid the Rashi "
asked a good ques-
Rbu aren't satisfied
answer given by
was not satisfied.
ks, does Rashi need
j to read the Torah?
_*, did. not God give
free of difficulties?
iUd have been no
, commentaries of
there. Thus begins
ag, the searching,
who it to lead
__on that would
j course of his life and
to be an outcast from
his family and his Orthodox
community.
David's questioning causes
him to want to know about what
non-Jews have written aboui
the Bible, so as to understand
the hatred of the "goyim." He
discovers textual criticism
which asserts that the Bible was
written by in$pired men who
lived during different times and
who had particular points of
view that caused them to write
the Bible as they did. Ultimate-
ly, David, after graduation from
the Yeshiva, goes to the Uni-
versity of Chicago to receive a
degree in Oriental Studies, the
study of textual criticism
David's search for the truth
was, perhaps. Chaim Potok's
search for the truth. He, like
David, received a classical Jew-
ish education, having graduated
from Yeshiva University. He,
like David, seems to have ques-
tioned and ultimately was or-
dained at the Jewish Theolog-
ical Seminary, the Conservative
rabbinical seminary, where he
received an education that was
a departure from the strict
Orthodoxy of the Yeshiva.
David's searchand Chaim Po-
tok'sis an important one, for
it represents the attempt at self-
discoverv undertaken by count-
leas numbers of Jews.
What David discovers in "In
The Beginning" is that to be a
Jew does not necessarily de-
mand allegiance to any one way
of looking at life. Who is to say,
for example, that the use of the
sword or the gun is the only
way to fight our enemies? Is
it not possible to fight them with
well-chosen words as well? Does
looking at the Bible from a crit-
ical, literary point of view make
it any less meaningful or im-
portant for the Jew?
Cannot the Jew find guidance,
strength and comfort from a
Bible written by men who
searched and struggled as have
Jews for generations? David's
attempt to answer these ques-
tions, his search for a truth that
will be right for him. has been
our search as well. Should the
Jew who auestions as David
questionsbe seen as an out-
cast, a heretic?
The point is that David's
need to search, and the dis-
coveries he makes about him-
self and his religion, does not
make him any less a Jew but,
perhaps, more. David's refusal
to merelv accent that which had
been passed down from father
to son creates within him the
need to search, to learn, to
know. That nead represents the
kind of intellectual and emo-
tional searching that has been
so much a nart of Reform Juda-
ism since the first decade of
the tth century. While that
searching may. on occasion, lead
us down the wrong oaths, the
procaa* ultimately leads to a
strengthening, rather than a
weakening, of Judaism. We. like
David, cannot be merely content
with what was. We. like David,
must continue to find new wavt
of answering the- questions, that
constantly confront us, ques-
tions that cannot always bt
answered by tradition, alone.
Near the end of "In The Be.
ginning" David, now a graduate
student, goes to Germany to da
Biblical research. Standing at *
memorial erected in one of tha
concentration camps David has
an imanmary conversation with
his dead Uncle David and his
David, the Biblical scholar:
I tried, said my father. It
was my job to try. We could
have done more together a?
father and son. But the
world kept coming between
us, stealing my time and
strength. And he (David the
scholar) went out to their
evil culture.
To another culture, said
my uncle gently. To bring
new life to our roots.
To an evil culture (said
David's father). Look how
it slaughters us.
David (Uncle David said),
look at me. Here is the past.
Never forget the past as
you nourish the present
Like David, we too must
never forget the past. But, like
David, we must bring new life
to the present by means of both
creed and deed.
Question Box
By Rabbi DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
lc) 1976. Jewish TeUaraphic Aqency
QUESTION: Why is the
day after a festival still re-
garded as a festive day?
ANSWER: The day after a
festival is usually called "Isru
Chag," which is taken from the
Psalms (118:27) where we are
told to "bind the festive sacri-
fice with cords." The term "Is-
ru Chag" would mean to bind
the day of the festival to the
day after so that it would not
be quickly forgotten. In the Je-
rusalem Talmud this day is also
called "Breh D'moeda," which
means "The son of the festi-
val" This means that the day
after the festival still bears
fruit of the joy of the festival.
It is claimed by some that the
reason for this extra day of re-
joicing stems from the fact
that in Israel the festival oi
Shavuoth lasts only one day. In
the days of the Temple, when
sacrifices were offered, some
of the sacrifices were evidently
offered also on the day after
Shavuoth. Consequently, this
day was also regarded as a fes-
tive one and this practice was
also extended to other holi-
days. Furthermore, on other
holidays the meat of certain
sacrifices could be eaten for
two days. This meant that the
meat of a sacrifice that was of-
fered on the last day of a fes-
tival could still be eaten on the
day after the festival. Thus, the
day after tne festival still has
some festive conotation. Gen-
erally speaking, in Hebrew tra-
dition, festivals are not sup-
posed to be merely isolated ex-
periences. The spirit of the fes-
tival should have some influ-
ence on the other days of the
year. Observing an additional
day in a festive mood would in-
dicate the carry-over from the
holy days to the secular days of
the year.
TV Programs
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
spiritual leader of Temple
Menorah, will appear on
"The Jewish Worship
Hour" Sunday morning,
Nov. 2, at 9:30 a.m. on
WPLG-TV, Ch. 10.
CANDIELIGHTING TIME
m
26 HESHVAN 5:20
A BICENTENNIAL COMMEMORATION
Haym Solomon
By RABBI
MICHAEL B. EISENSTAT
During the period of the
American Revolution, one of
the most fascinating personali-
ties to emerge was Haym Salo-
mon. Though not American
born, surely he was one of
America's most ardent sons.
Haym Salomon was born in
Poland in 1740 but died in his
adopted homeland in 1785. As a
European, Salomon had ample
opportunity to learn other
languages. He took full advan-
tage of this opDortunity. Before
coming to the New World, he
had at least a working knowl-
edge of German, French. Italian,
Russian, Polish and English.
These skills he used well n
making valuable contacts with
the merchants of Europe.
It did not take the British
long to learn how ardent a
sympathizer Salomon was of the
American cause. By September
of 1776, he was in a British
prison in New York, suspected
of spying. It was here that his
skill with languages saved him
for the Hessian guards needed
a translator. Not only did Salo-
mon translate, he also propa-
gandized, inducing some num-
ber of Hessians to leave British
military service.
Salomon's greatest skills lay
in the world of finance. He be-
came a very wealthy man. His
love of America was as great
as his financial skills and it was
not long before Salomon found
himself called upon to help fi-
nance the Revolution. Robert
Morris, Supervisor of Finance,
called upon Salomon to begin
selling the new country's bills
which were outstanding with
many of the countries of Europe.
So staggering were the debts
that our new nation was amass-
ing in this brief time that Salo-
mon often had to accept the li-
ability for them on his own
when the country could not
meet its obligations. Thus, when
he died, his estate was com-
pletely eaten ud by the debts ol
the new country Only 44 years
old when he died, it is a mea-
sure of both his fiscal acumen
and his sincere patriotism that
he had in that short time been
able to amass a great fortune
and to spend it on the causa of
a free America.
Haym Salomon was not only
lover of country, but was a lov-
er of his own Jewish people
and bis faith. He was one of the
founding members of Congrega-
tion Mi'-kve Israel and was also
the largest single contributor
to the first genuine synagogue
building in Pennsylvania.
His death at such a young
age, though common to many at
that time in history, is none-
theless tragic, for having accom-
plished so much in such a short
time, one can only speculate
how much more he might have
done had he lived longer. Here
was a man and a Jew who help-
ed build this country.

;

I
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
!] Haye Sarah
The cave of Machpelah at Hebron. Eliezer leaves
Hebron with camels on Abraham's instructions.
"And after this, Abraham buried Sarah his wife in
the cave of the field of Machpelah before Mamre"
(Gen. 23.19).
HAYE SARAH Sarah died at the age of 127 in
Hebron, and was buried in the Cave of Machpelah,
which Abraham purchased as a family graveyard.
Anxious for Isaac to marry one of his kinfolk rather
than an idolatrous Caananite woman, Abraham sent his
trusted servant Eliezer to his former home in Mesopota-
mia where his brother Nahor lived. Approaching the
city, Eliezer prayed for the success of his mission. He
determined on a procedure: He would ask each girl he
met, "Give me your pitcher and let me drink"; the girl
who would reply, "Drink, and I will give thy camels
drink also" should be Isaac's destined bride (Genesis
24.15). Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel, the son of Abra-
ham's brother Nahor, came to the well to draw water,
and responded with the correct formula to Eliezer's
request. Thanking God for His kindness, the old family
retainer presented himself to Rebekah's family, explain-
ed his mission, and received permission for Rebekah to
accompany him back to Canaan as Isaac's prospective
wife. Isaac loved Rebekah, and was consoled in her after
his mother's death. Abraham took another wife, Keturah,
and she bore him sons whom he dispatched to the east.
At the age of 175 Abraham died and was buried next
to Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah.
This recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted
and based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,"
edited by P. Wollman-Tstmir, $15. Publisher is Shengold, and
tho volume is available at 27 William St., New York, N.Y.
10005. President of the society distributing the volume is
Joseph Schlang.


Page 12-B
v-Jenis^ fhridflfsun
Friday, October 31, 1973
.i j. k_,Jl_, 1_r*L -*- .rfV u-^llYV.-* -'>-^^>-^^->*^-^*v
jo4 Mifyu&k
BB Plans Intensive Campaign ]
On Behalf Of Its Youth Sen ices
k V
Ml *
David Keen R. H. Cooper Steven Weiss Aharon Lehrfield
AHARON LEHRFIELD
Aharon Yochanan Lehrfield,
son of Rabbi and Mrs. David
Lehrfield, will become Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, November 1st
at the Kneseth Israel Congrega-
tion.
Aharon is the third son of
Rabbi and Mrs. Lehrfield. He
is an honor student at the He-
brew Academy, and is now serv-
ing as. secretary/treasurer of
the student body.
Among the out-of-town guests
expected are: the parents of
Mrs. Lehrfield, Rabbi Eichen-
stein, Chief Rabbi of the Ortho-
dox community of St. Louis, and
Mrs. Eichenstein; the parents
of Rabbi Lehrfield. Rabbi and
Mrs. Louis J. Lehrfield of Jeru-
salem, Israel; as well as numer-
ous aunts, uncles and relatives
from all over the country.
Following the services, there
will be a kiddish in the syna-
gogue social hall. Aharon will
also be honored at a luncheon
Sundav afternoon at the Kon-
over Hotel.
MARK ALAN SCHAFFEL
Mark Alan, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Schaffel, will be
called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning at
Beth David Congregation.
Mark is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Palmer Preparatory
School and is a member of the
Miami Boys Choir and the Na-
tional Fraternity of Student
Musicans.
His parents will host the Kid-
dush following services in hon-
or of the occasion.
ft ft ft
WILLIAM A. WILENSKY
William, sop of Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Wilensky, will cele-
brate his Bar Mitzvah at Tem-
ple Judea Saturday morning.
ft ft ft
LISA FABIAN
Lisa, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Perry Fabian will become
a Bat Mitzvah Saturday morn-
ing at Temple Beth Sholom.
ft ft ft
ROBERT H. COOPER
Robert Howard, son of Mr.
and Mrs. William B. Cooper,
will be called to the Torah as
a Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Am Saturday mornig.
Robert attends Gulliver Acad-
emy where he is an eighth
grade student. He will be hon-
ored Friday evening at an Oneg
Shabbat and Saturday at the
Kiddush following services.
Dr. and Mrs. Cooper will also
host a dinner Saturday evening.
Guests include grandparents
Mr. and Mrs. Allen First and
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Cooper,
aunts and uncles Mr. and Mrs.
fay Cooper, Dr. and Mrs. Allan
Uaumel. Out-of-town guests
from Brooklyn and Long Island
will also attend.
ft ft ft
BRYAN FRANKE
Bryon, son of Stewart and
Elinore Franke, will observe
his Bar Mitzvah Saturday morn-
ing at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion.
Bryan, an eighth grade stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Jun-
ior High School, attends the
Beth Torah Harold Woik Reli-
gious School.
His parents will.sponsor the
Kiddush following services.
Guests include Mrs. Rose Mor-
gan and Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Barmash.
ft ft
STEVEN ADAM WEISS
Steven Adam, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Malcolm H. Weiss, will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday morning at Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
Steven is a ninth grade stu-
dent at the Nova University
School in Ft. Lauderdale.
Mr. and Mis. Weiss will host
the Kiddush following services.
Guests include aunts and un-
cles Mr. and Mrs. Joel Weiss
and Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Sokolsky from Atlanta.
ft ft ft
DAVID KEEN
David, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Keen, will celebrate his
Bar Mitzvah Saturday morning
at Beth David Congregation.
A seventh grader at Rockway
Junior High School, David at-
tends the Beth David religious
school.
His parents will host a recep-
tion at their home and a din-
ner at Temple Emanu-El in Da-
vid's honor.
B'nai B'rith will launch an
intensive Fund Raising effort
between now and December 31st
on behalf of its Youth Serv-
ices, it was announced by Mal-
colm H. Fromberg, Chairman of
the South Florida Fund Raising
Cabinet.
The 510.000,000 national bud-
get of B'nai B'rith on behalf of
its prestigious Youth Services,
will be met by an intensive
campaign all over the United
States, in order to reach its goal
by December 31st.
In South Florida, the cam-
paign will be active in Century
Club Breakfasts which will be
held in Dade County at the
Doral Hotel on November 16th
and in Broward / Palm Beach
Counties on November 23rd to
be at the Holiday Inn North in
Ft. Lauderdale. In addition to
this, lodge fund raising meet-
ings will be programmed for
youth services as well as Parlor
Meetings.
Highlighting the drive will be
two President's Club Receptions:
one to be hosted by Burnett
Book Discussion Group
To Open Season Nov. 6
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spir-
itual leader of Congregation
Ner Tamid, will open the 1975-
76 season of the Great Jewish
Books Discussion Group with a
presentation of "Sabbath
The Day of Delight," by A. E.
Millgram, Thursday, Nov. 6, at
1 p.m., in the Miami Beach
Public Library.
Group co-ordinator is Sam-
uel Reiser.
The 1975 Israeli Chassidic Festival will be presented
Saturday, Nov. 1, at 8:30 p.m. at Miami Beach Conven-
tion Hall South. The one-night performance is a musical
review featuring Israel's leading popular Biblical songs
and is based on Israel's annual Chassidic Song Festival.
The two-hour extravaganza, making its return to the
United States for the fourth year, features solos and
choruses of ballads and rhythmic medleys on Biblical
themes, costumed, and, for the first time, choreographed
to Chassidic folklore. Tickets are available at the Miami
Beach Convention Hall South box office.
Chumbley Awarded $3,000 Grant
In 3rd Musical Showcase Contest
Robert Chumbley of Coral
Gables, a graduate student at
the Juilliard School of Music,
was awarded a total of $3,000 in
scholarships for his perform-
ance at the third annual Finan-
cial Federal Savings and Loan
Association Musical Showcase.
Chumbley and finalists Rich-
ard J. Reif. Jr. of Webster,
N.Y.; Laura A. Larson of Mi-
ami and Timothy Baker of
Richmond, Ky., each received
a $1,000 grant. Chumbley was
awarded an additional $2,000
for his outstanding perform-
ance at the concert by the board
of judges headed by Dr. Karl
Haas.
"Financial Federal hopes
that through the showcase pro-
gram it can not only assist as-
piring young musicians in ad-
vancing their careers but pro-
vide interesting musical pro-
grams for all members of the
community," said Milton Weiss,
president of Financial Federal.
The initial musical showcase's
award was doubled to $5,000
in 1974. The scholarship fund
for the third competition was
increased to $6,000, said Weiss,
because of overwhelming re-
sponse from the community
and interest in the program by
young musicans from through-
out the United States, Canada
.and Central America.- "... ......
Roth, Trustee of the B'nai B'
Foundation, Thursday, No\
her 20th. and one under the
leadership of Alan Blaustein at
Hillcrest Country Club. Sunday
afternoon, November 23rd.
The climax of the campaign
will be the Humanitarian Award
Dinner Ball which will be held
Sunday evening, December 14
at the Konover Hotel, when
B'nai B'rith will honor Miami
Mayor, Maurice A. Ferre.
"Fund Raising on behalf of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Services,
Hillel, BBYO and Career and
Counseling is the AAA priority
of B'nai B'rith activity from
now until the end of the vear.
The B'nai B'rith Youth Serv-
ices Appeal support by the
Lodge Service Funds, and Cen-
tury and President's Clubs Rre
depending on fulfillment of the
quotas set bv B'nai B'rith H's-
trict Fund Raising Cabinets in
order to maintain the services
on college campuses and with
the teen-age grouos." said
Fromberg. "It is encumbent on
every leader in B'nai B'rith. and
I have received assurances
from evervone, that no other
activity will deter them from
these efforts.
"Today." Fromberg continu-
ed. "B'nai B'rith maintains a
presence on over 300 campuses.
Here in Florida, we have a co-
ordinated activity at the Uni-
versity of Miami, FTU, Dade
Community Colleges, University
of Florida at Gainesville which
have as their undeminning sun-
port, the B'nai B'rith Founda-
tion of the Unit
"Although v
here to ha\e
the Miami Jev
J3 3r'.'l do not ,
lunds to extend our -.:'..
each and ever- Ca nnus in FTor-
ida. In. oarticula .....t
groups, the B'na. B'rith Yo:
Organization, is it. dire need o'
additional funds, tyhile we j-
able to sen-ice 4G,non yot'pj.
sters in 1.100 communities fa.
in Florida we have 49 unn
with three staff menib' rS cove;.
ing tta entire state. hc- .,
the Miami Jewish Fed
helps us with our program,^
but we have a waiting '
thous-mis of youngsters
we cannot >.,-,, |
lack of funds." Fro*nberR .-,
clud"d h" an^*'inq to
B'nai R'rith councils, lodges ani
associations to concentrate their
effons in order to make thj
Centt'T Cl"h function* and Par-
lor M-t:ngs overwhelmingly
successful.
Fromberg is a Past Presided
of the Soi'*.'> Florid? Council
and is at'nr PresH-m of District Five. Sen
ing with Frombrg on the South
Florida Fund Raising Cabinet
are: Alan Blaustein. R*rt S
Brow"/ Ira Catz. Mel Felgelei
Alfred Golden, Barry T. Gur
land. Kennvh Hoffman. Robert
Hoffman. Louis Hvmsnn, Jack
H. Levin. E. Albert Pallot. Sam-
uel Pascoe. WillUm G. Rabins.
Samuel Sherwood. Fred Snyder,
Louis Sohrin, Dr. Mike Teitel-
baun*. Richard Zimmerman.
Tanya Berns Runs For
City Council Of Miami Beacli
Tanya Berns. running for the
Miami Beach City Council, has
stated "I believe that we have
reached the time when the first
woman should be elected to sit
on the Council of the City of
Miami Beach. I believe there
are certain objectives which
can best be served by the at-
tention of a well qualified wom-
an with a total dedication to
the City of Miami Beach.
Other planks in the candi-
date's platform include full-
time availability of the City
Council members to the resi-
dents of the community. "My
telephone number will always
be published for all those who
wish to reach me by telephone
dav or night." she stated.
"I am running for the City
Council because I believe that
the people of this community
can truly have a voice in the
every day affairs of their gov-
ernment once those elected of-
ficials who represent special in-
terests only have been elimi-
nated from office."
Hope Chapter Holds Bazaar
The City of Hope. Dad a
Chapter, will hold a gala bazaar
and white elephant sale on
Tuesday, Nov. 18. from 10 a.m
to 4 p.m. at the Galahad Dade
"A" building.
ROSS' POOL CARE & REPAIR
CHEMICALS & EQUIPMENT
*|
FrttWaturAMlysif
Grand Opening Sale just call
448-7151
NOV. 1 to DIC 31st
EXTRA SPECIAL 10-25%
Discount on all Merchandise
FRB REFRESHMENTS
Htss' Pttl C*t ktair
4.1T
HsmMMbMM
St.9-3
--...... '


riday, October 31, 1975
>Jmistifhrdttan
Page 13-B
/T~^
0 ^ m
Uloc and Lea Levin, pictured above, were presented the
yiistadmfs highest award, "The Tree of Life" in what
Council President Morris Newmark said was one of the
post successful campaigns launched in the past five
bears. Israel's Ambassador to the UN Jacob Barmore
Ueft), was the main speaker to more than 900 guests
Assembled with Bernard B. Jacobson, national executive
vice president, and Dr. Leon Kronish looking on.
isemary Furman, center, is congratulated on the com-
mon of the psychiatric recreation unit at Mercy Hos-
al and the plaque which the hospital presented to her
\her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frankel, left, and her hus-
\id, Richard and daughter, Kate. The area was made
sible through the efforts of Rosemary Furman and a
hmittec of 25 Jewish women who took on the respon-
\ity of raising necessary funds for the facility. A to-
\f 75 gifts of cash totaling $14,586 and 13 gifts of la-
and materials totaling $9,600 was raised. Much of
loney is still in the bank and will be used to renovate
psychiatric unit. _____
L. Plummer, Jr. To Seek
leelection To Commission
on hi record of ac-
inient during his past
rs on the Miami City
fon, J. L. Plummer, Jr.
the support of the
Miami to assist him
wing his fight to reach
by their vote on Nov-
these, according to
ner, is the 100% in-
of superior street
designed to fight
the development of
| than 1,000 acres of
ey into a public rec-
rea with marinas,
amping and picnic
Imer is a native Mi-
president of the
hummer Funeral
land his wife, Carol,
parents of two daught-
Kmd Joni, and live
Grove,
He is a member of Woods-
men of the World, Miami Elks
Lodge, Variety Club, Kiwanis
Club of Southwest Miami, Pap-
anicolaou Center Research In-
stitute and the Greater Miami
Crime Commission. He is also
the founding chairman of the
South Florida Crippled Chil-
dren's Clinic.
Mr. Plummer has been a
member of the Planning and
Zoning Board for the past
eight years and also serves as
Vice Mayor of Miami.
Ladies Aux. 196 Luncheon
Ladies Auxiliary George
Gershwin Lodge 196, Knights
of Pythias, will hold a general
meeting Nov. 3, at the Surfside
Community Center. A member-
ship luncheon will be held Nov.
8 at 12 non at the Doral Hotel.
L Silverman To Be Honored
Tsh Home For Aged Auxiliary
F^er Miami Women's
Jewish Home and
tthe Aged, will hon-
[lnorory president,
Kffilverman, with a
Tparty.
at will be held at the
Jardens Rubv Audito-
lay, November 16, at
K hosted by Sol
the honored guest's
Hiakovsky, pro-
has arranged
^program featuring
Kfcerine Russell.
MOLLIE SILVERMAN
Artists Honored
At Reception
Sunday Nov. 9
A multi-media exhibition of
glazed watercolors, fibers,
watercolors and ceramics will
open at the Lowe-Levinson Art
Gallery of Temple Beth Sholom
of Greater Miami on Sunday,
November 9. from 5 to 7 p.m.,
at a reception in honor of the
four participating artists .
Sonia Risolia, Canpy Blitstein,
Raymond Warsager and Jack
Sapos.
Risolia, who will show her
glazed watercolors. is an
American artist who has studied
and painted in Madrid, the Art
Institute of Chicago. Art Insti-
tute of Miami and the Flat Iron
Building in New York.
Blits.'ein has been doing
macrame wall haneings for the
past year and a half. Her first
showing last vear at the Coco-
nut Grove Arts Festival won
her second prize. She is on the
faculty of the Metropolitan Mu-
seum of Miami, teaching begin-
ners and advanced students.
Art was a natural for Brook-
Ivn-bom Raymond Warsager.
His father and grandfather
shared a love for painting and
both were recognized artists.
Raymond started early to carry
on their artistic h^ritape. first
studyin gat Arts High in New-
ark and later at the Art Institute
of Miami, where he graduated.
Sapos is a notter who has
been with the Dade Countv Art
Program for the oast 17 vears.
He is at present at the Florida
International Universitv study-
ing for his Masters degree in
Ceramics. He has been in uind
shows also at the M.M.A.M. and
the Reheis Gallery in Ft.
Lauderdale.
IEGAI NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
J. GWYNN PARKFR
PROBATE NO. 75-642t
In RE: Estate of
DAVID L SCHOENHOLT.
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Person* Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of DAVID I* SCHOENHOLT. de-
ceased late of DaUe County. Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate ami as
provided in Section 733.lfi. Florida
Statutes, In their offices in the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof, oi
the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 29th
dav of October, A.D. 1975.
ADELE SCHOENHOLT
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the 31st day of October, 1975.
BROAD AND CASSEL
Attorneys for Executrix
1108 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida 33154
10/31 _ll/7
*-- -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-34414
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of'
CHRISTNE ANN HAINVLLE.
Wife,
and
DANIEL NELSON RAINV1LLE.
Husband, _
TO: DANIEL NELSON RA1NVILLE
4747 West Rive Drive
Comstock Park, Michigan
TOII, DANIEL NEIJiON RAIN'
V1LLE, are hereby notified that a Pe-
tition for Dissolution of Marriage un-
der Florida Statute.61 has been filed
against you, and you are hereby re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer
or Pleading to the Complaint on Peti-
tioner Wlfe'ji attorney. HAROLD A.
Tl'KTLETAUB. 9300 South Dixie
Highway. Miami. Florida 3315S. and
file the original Answer or Plentf.na
In the office of the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court on or before the nth day
of December, 1975. If you fail to do so.
Judgment by default will be taken
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published one*
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FUIR1DIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at Miami.
Florida, this 29th day of Oct., 1975.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Hade County, Florida
By: S. JAFFE
Deputy Clerk
HAROLD A. TtlRTLETAUB
Attorney for Petitioner Wife
9300 South Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33156
.;.,;,-ism:
10/31 11/7-14-21
Robert Shapiro Elected Oiman
Miami Chapter AJCommittee
Continued from Page 1-B
Harvard University and Harv-
ard Law Schol. A member of
the board of governors, nation-
al executive council of AJC, a
former vice-president of the
Greater Miami chapter, a
member of the board of Temple
Israel, a former member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Young Leadership Cabinet.
Shapiro's commitment to the
Jewish Community and his ex-
perience makes him well quali-
fied for his new post.
He served on the grievance
committee of the Florida Bar
Association and is a member of
the Dade County Bar Associa-
tion.
In addition to the election of
Shapiro, the following persons
were elected executive com-
mittee: Dr. Charles R. Beber,
Robort Breier. Alvin Cassel,
Jesse Casselhoff, Evelyn Cohan,
Audrey Finkelstein, David B.
Fleeman, Joseph Z. Fleming,
Aaron A. Foosaner, Judge Wil-
liam E. Gladstone, Raymond R.
Grossman, Marshall S. Harris,
Joel Hirschhorn.
Also Rosalind R. Katzman,
Shepard King, Monna Lighte.
Dr. Aaron Lipman, Sen. Ken-
neth M. Myers, Kent H. Novell,
Samuel J. Rabin. Elaine Silver-
stein, Herbert L. Sobel, Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff, Barton S.
Udell and Richard Wolfson.
Board of directors: Merle
Baker, Dr. Samuel Berkowitz,
Dr. Jack Ira Berne, Alfred
Boas, Gary Brooks, Hinde Dia-
mond. Marcie Ersoff, Dr. Helen
N. Fagin, Ted S. Finkel, Irving
Firtel, Dr. Jerome Fleeman. Dr.
Rose Gordon
Seeks Reelection
To Commission
Running for re-election to
the Miami City Commission
Realtor Rose Goidon states
that the 13 objectives she used
as her platform four years ago
have virtually all been attained.
Among these are improve-
ment and enlargement of the
Miami Police Department, cre-
ation of child day care and
senior citizens day care pro-
grams, programs for the handi-
capped and the mini-bus inno-
vation.
A member of the Miami
Planning and Zoning Board for
eight years before running for
councilman, Mrs. Gordon has
also stressed reform of Miami's
planning and zoning system
during her term in office.
A mother and grandmother,
Mrs. Gordon, the wife of retir-
ed contractor Alexander Gor-
don, has been a resident of
Dade County since 1940.
Edw. J. Fox. Richard E. Ger-
stein. Judy M. Gilbert, Nancy
Goldstein, Steven Greenberg.
Stanley G. Greenstein, Sandy
Grossman, Morton Hill, Evie
Hirschhorn.
Also Abel Holtz, Juel Janis
Gerald Katcher, Alan B. Kess-
ler, Dr. Barbara A. Levey, Dr.
Gerald S. Levey, Dr. Barry B.
Levine, Judith Levine, Hon.
Geald A. Lewis, Dr. Martin L.
Madorsky, David Mesnekoff,
Joacob Meyers, Phyllis Miller,
David G. Mishkin, Neale B.
Monte, Gabriel Nahmias, Rabbi
Joseph Narot, Dr. Morton S.
Notarius, Jack Lee Orkin.
And Priscilla Perry, Irving
Peskoe, Dr. Felix H. Reyler,
Philip Saks, Howard R. Schar-
lin, Neil Schiff, Joseph S.
Schwartz, Irving L. Segal, Hon.
Robert L. Shevin, Barry D.
Siegel, Harold Spaet, Sue F.
Stevens, Hon. Richard Stone,
Sidn.-y S. Traum,, Robert H.
Traurig, Kenneth Treister, Mi-
chael Weiss, Reva M. Wexler.
Alexander Youngerman, Dr.
Lloyd C. Zand.
Civic and Political
Groups Endorse
Dr. L. Haber
Endorsed by many of the
leading civic and political
groups on Miami Beach includ-
ing the Tenants Association,
the Democratic Club, Dade
County Council of Senior Citi-
zens, Voters, Incorporated and
the Senior Citizens of Miami
Beach, Dr. Leonard Haber, whe
is running for re-election tc
the Miami Beach City Council,
stated "A great deal has been
accomplished in the past four
years; however, there is much
more to be done for the peo-
ple of Miami Beach and I in-
tend to be one of the doers."
Dr. Haber is married to Dr.
Merry Sue Haber, is the father
of three sons. His parents, Max
and Sally Haber, are serving as
chairmen of his campaign.
"lien NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
Case No. 75-341S1
NOTICE BV PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
MOLERON NIVOSE, Husband
and EI.OISE SEARS XIVOSE.
Wife
TO: EI.OISE SEARS NIVOSE
(Residence l'nknown)
yOU ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
hat been filed aganst you and you
arc hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other pleading to
the Petition on the Husband's Attor-
ney, HARVEY ROGERS, whose ad-
dress is 14S4 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami,
Florida 33125, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
m or before ths 5th day of December,
1875, or a Default will be entered
ngainal you.
DATED this 24th day of October,
1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By MARION NEWMAN
10/31 11/7-14-21


Page 14-B
*Jn*# FkrkMan
UCAl
UCAl NOTKt
IE6AI NOTKI
UCAL MOTKt
Friday, October 31
m
-
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fi
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hi
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io
B
6*
Ki
NOTICE OF ACTION
CWt;CriVL-SEBVTOE-
fNO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TMl
ELEVENTH JLDIC'Ak CIRCUIT
OF *LORH>A IN AND FOR
BAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NC 1-ZtU*
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIV'SION
ACTION FOR DTSSOLUTiON
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MAKP.iA'.E C F:
FRANe-isc bhuian
and
vN
T' BUBA HUUN
" *'
,- .
y-m-f -' ansreal R<
'ua.ia'ajar.i. Jal:-
-4 ; ARE HE!
tha" I
i-aire hat bean filed Milt roa
you tr- requ.r-
8LWTI GSRS* \. Pj."
. -, ,0.1'--- -

~f h- -acv-
-
default
*-- "
pot shed
&"* '
:-.il :aN
s
Of -: "
'
IXnic COSJBtJ P
IHI TT
. .
fCJrcul: ->m-t Seal' ,
JO \ HIN A K' SS F A.
iv n "-v a- --j-
s arm. pim-ida ra
A'.rorr -.-> f r I ......
NOTICE OF CONSTRUCTIVE
SERVICE
IS WE C'WCUT COURT OP TMl
uEVENTR .iiD.C'*- C DC. T IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION C VISION
CASK NO. 73-2T%M
ACTON TO FORECLOSE
MORTGAGE
HEP. KI.EHER and
.-1MARIE KIXBKF.
Plata I nt*
tnujjka Vhler
ANGEI-A 'TILER hts w.fe
DePendBnt.-
M IfJUAN HLER and
ANGE/.A [HLER. ha 1?e.
-a*a sw Jrd Place
Sitmi, PV.nda
T u ftlU-lAM T'HLER are hereby
MMIIM nil a Oocnpiatnl to f*"e-
rlosa a (MOi-i asnrtffar- en the fol-
Jcwinc described property, to wit-
Lot BV" > I. OMNI ESTATES
(BJcr>Nl APPITK-N accf-rt-<
io she PAtt thereof, a* recordt-1
Plat Pools 5 at Paffe 5* of the
Pur Ik- Record* of Dade Coacit>
Florida,
has been filed aaaiiist yea ar.d "
are r-rutr- -1 -e serve a c py ot your
Atner ir Pteamn. Si the Com plain:
on the t'.. t-'f attorney MARS-
HALL B PTS-IER 9eS5 S D**H
tfWrr.w Suite 300. Mkuni. Florida,
and file tha oncnnal Answer or Fiead-
rhg gih ate* at 'he C*rk
Cireu;t Court a or before the 5th
das/ of December 1ST*. If yea fail to
dV r ;il!|in--.i by defaolt :T1 be
tik-r. T>m5rt rra Mr the reKe* de-
Biaml* d la ''nrpteint
*U be pa* --- *
each wee* fnr renr cnaecat!e
JET-nSH PLriRTTIAN
IViNE a.\P ORfEREI: at Miami.
D*de Cow;y. "FVrtda. *:r 59-Ji day
e- :-:
- ait C^ort Sii:. ^__
PT'-rTAftT F URITKE?.
CT- Circuit Cowrt
By St. A HEWETT
IO Perxity Clerk
Marshall B. Fiaher ^
-r.e? *.ry Plaititrtta
r v > Diaie Hmhway
Suite 3M
alami. Pkrida n:s r-rv
it r. n T-.4-::
wt>tk:e of action
IN TrlE CTPrCUIT CO*TPT OF THE
ELEVtr^TM JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DATJ-E COUNTY
CIVIL ACTTON WC ".-JHI
C1WIL RCTlOl"
PC P-:
SHIRLEY C BC-PJER.
Plarr.'-
Vl
SANCf 1AVEL aird ISAAC
GAMKL
TO. *V~T GAMrTL ar.d
I**A'- OAMEU
RE-STT'^NrE I"NKN- W\
TOD ARE HEREBY N< "Fla*
that an action for reactater I *a-
tra<-t and recorery of depe*:'. rRiie
on real property, ta-arlt
Lot IS. Block Tl. OCEAN PEACH
ADDITION NO. I a letwded m
Plat Bnok at Pare n of the
Pnbl:<- fteeatds el Da* Ooanty
Florida
In Dade CHm*. Florida, hwr r^er.
filed if>!'.-' yu arid yea ara raqair>-
a oay at yaa wr-.-t^a
defense*. .'. aiw '" UoB KWTNtT
KROOP A ?CHEJNBt*n PA a--
torneys for Petit(eeier. w+e aiii -
is 45* Llncola Hoad Mlarr.': B*arh.
Florida 3313. aal flte the rrta.aal
with the clerk of Oa> akwva-sfyled
court oa or before Xuiuab<-r It. Wf>.
otherwiae a defaott w be
aaainat yoo for the raalef d
in the complaint
TfcM notice aail Ve .
each week for fnr eom*catrra
in THE JEWISH FVf-RIt'lAN
WITNESS ary hand wrrd the peal
of sa>d court at MiamL Florida OB
thi* ftth day of Octoaea. I^"
RI-HARl) P BRI*KR.
Al CScm Circuit Cain
Dad* Oownty Fi"ida
By 8NKEV&S
A* Demny Clerk
c-' .*-!
p a

i
17-24-Jl
IN THE C'RCCitT COURT F THE
ELEVEN-" JUDICIAL C RCU IT
OF FLORTDW IFWrTO"
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
J. G*V*N PARKER
RROBATE NO *-*
!
-
VCTTCE to CREDITORS
To a :i*v:
Beaaiaaa Afataai 9a-.d
-
a -. -.- **-
'. as
-
Pta-3-- -

--
1
..
ETAN1 E
-


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is ~-E C RCU T COURT Ge THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCL T
Cc FuC" OA N an" C0R
DACE COUNTY
POB"E C V SION
JCSCR- NESB1T-
PROBATE NO 75 i~
-
K EASAR
BASCR
de eased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
-- A -llT-
nir CiBims i r remand* At
E -'.-. -
Ya a-- rifled ar.d req
ed U aims ar.d demands
--
tate TBBRrXE CBAEAR
a k a CATHERINE CEASE lereaa-
1 late
ttada C" or.-y
*y-.4 fi! the mme -r\ dwok' ate and a*
prr vwWd Florida
?tatt- --.-- -Vi Coka-
loartkmMa DtMt Coaatj FVr-
.da wtthrr ff^r --a.^-iwiar nK-nth*
From tBe (Tbm '
M' nr tk* mm* wHi b tar*4
F led at M
dar -f October A-B "*""
T.VLrv i.-.HNS -N JR
A* Execu* -
F:-*" jiatiltl on
- rwaan
STANLEY M PRBD
PRET .'.NT NtRHAN
Mtaraayi far Ex-^ntor
?att ml I1W Brv-k-II AN
Miam FV r.da u:):3"-Mt
__________________________;c 3: :: ~
IN THE ORCUiT COURT F THE
ELEVENTH MtlCIAl CIR6UIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PNOBATE DIVISION
FWANK B COWLING
PROBATE NO rVBTtl
In RE Et*-.
;.y mar>^ijes
NOTICE TO CREDIT**
~ Al 4 All Peaaom Har-
)aim -jt ENmar.ls BMMkat Said
Batata:
T' llflad ar.d requir-
ed to imam a> rkrrms and d>otaads
whRh yj may h;re awalnst the ea-
tatc >'.AK>LaE3. dicia-
ed late of Dad- C aary PwrMa
the Clrrwi- Jwar-* of Dade Coanty
and tale the *m* n ilupkcate and a
Florida
statutes, in tbeir Mficee in -he Oat-
m DaBa i an:>. Plor-
' u- a:*ndar rr I
rr^a -k Ofeat tak ftrat paMteaMni
r.ereo: oe BUBI -.|i h ber-ed
\: am ft -:da. thja Xird
day of Ortcber AD :r:r
SAMl M TH
As Bzecator
Flrat patoIira->-r. 4 th rv: on
the KM day of Odtokor, :75.
SSCTfM MA.XDLER. SMITH.
PARKER A WERNER
-AMfEL 8 SMITH
fi Exatalof
4- braeebt Road
Miami Eeach. Ftor-.da XS139
___________________________\* M 11 '
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTBUCTO.E SERVICE
(NO PROPERTYi
IN TMl C*RCUIT COURT OP THE
EuEVfNtH JUOrCIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVR. ACT ON NO ^-34'38
GENERAL JURISDICTION DiVISiON
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
rN .F "ME WARP.
! Al !. RMHAP.I : I KNE'HT.
-r.
a-.d
UNI-A V OOT*NECHT
Baapoatl*
Saw.er
Catmn -- P. m riar.d _______
(RE HI "'" -:
Aat in Mar-
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> \\ :: ait
.4-4"'
Atr* -vy for PetltioT.er
It 31 11 7-1+-91
NOTICE OF ACTfgR)
COrSTRUCTrV (NO RROfEtrrY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TPIE
ELEVENTH JVWCIAC CmCW'T
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 7,*S*ILnl1
GENERAL JURISDICTION OrVTSftW
ACTION FOR OfBBOLUTION
OF NARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
A P. rKjrTERlXV
Pettrtf
and _
JOPE A iZvtriERpn.
Rrspc"d*-n'. Has**ano.
1.. J'SEA !Z ggfr. '.' Wnkon
TOD ARE iFTED
that an action for Dla^ofOtion of Mar-
riare ha been Tiled agkrmrl yoo a^d
yoa are reqanred to serve a rvpr of
your writ---. *>fene, M try to It
- M P*-
-r. who anYh-eii is 147 B.w.
27-j. Miam. Florida Mitt.
ar.d :. I
... .,[ on or before
v d*fiOlt
.-.,::-: > u for the
: detnanded In the eompkdal

Tl! -"1
III** week!
AN
WI1 .:..--' : -a! Of
, i n this
A-
Dad< ia
FREDERU K
.
ii .. Seali
Mar M Afaw Eaq
AOCTXj ANTON 4% PINEIRO
IM7 P W iT'h Avenue
Miami Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
! tl-31 11 T-14
*TeJJJEOFFLOR'D
IIIFAH I MSN I OF S-T
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTYi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-33t*
general jurisdiction division
action for Dissolution
Or marriage
IN RE The Marrta*.
..ARiDAO MACXAJ3
Pe-
aifd
> a traciAB
R->'
T- JOFE A XACtAS f>a!k 12t.
Ra MBt. Entre T7 y J*.
Mananfct 15. Hajar.a. Cuba.
Y< ARE HKHET PIED
-ha: an a. tloa for r.saolwlton of Mar-
r f. : agatnst you aau
I ^re required U seTre a copy of
-- ae4"eoe*. if a-;.
ABE KOSS i'It'v fbf P< .-
Whoa* address Itl N W ir.h. Ave-
nue Mramt. Florida and file the
-araal with the rlerk of the above
- d >-ourt OB or before Eierr.b*r
i a ie a defauit w
--! atrainst yu for the M -'
manded m the cnmptaint or pey"
Th Batata -*aii ae abba end
-a r j: .-^wwrutiee weeks
HE JEWISH FLORIE'IAN
WITNESS my hand and the **a
..art at Mbrrnt. FHrtda at
^rd day > RICHAKD P RRiNKER.
A- I'lerfc. Cir- u I Bri
Dade Crxanlv FVortda
By B LIPPS
Ae Ikjmjt* i.'ierk
iCkradt Court Baal)
ABE K< >Sa\ ES*<
>'. N t\ :j'h Ai.j-
Miami. Eiurrda Ph *24-4C>3
Mtuiaaj for Petttxaier
:-i4-n
ii
NOTICE. UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
XOTrCE !S HEREBY GiVEN that
uaders^ned. deairii^ to en4fawe
' ra 1er :h> fictitious uie
Of SAVER S. K at ^9S NB :
Avenue Miatm. Fta. UIM ia.enda to
ref^ter said name wflh the Clem ;
tit Circuit Court of Dade County.
Pr:da.
ALBERTO D AR^ENAL'LT
_______________________It 54-31_____II. T-14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C4RCUIT
OF FLOaWA IN ANO FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBjATB DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 7S-4III-2
In RE: Eatate of
SAMl'EL NADEL
de -aeed
NOTICE TO CtttJOlTORS
T A3 l>e.tre- and AH
ia Oain-.s or Danaaad* Arains: Sa.d
atate
You artj hereby imtJf.ed and requ:r-
d xx- prt;" I any etBlro* ar.d demands
a'r.nh ytm am* fetaae aaairtst the es-
tate or SAIItTJBL NADEL. de-
County. Flonda.
of Dade CountV.
duplicate and am
733 li. Florida
in the County
County. Florida,
from the
A here* I
barred
Piled at Meaanl PkartSa. this 59to
day '> -"! er Al 175.
m.V!A RT-MXK
A* Eaaatrti
Firm re ->f Uaia notice on
he net day of October. 1*71
Jl-SK RB5R)r
raay for Executrix
:I7 M B F!a
It. 1
rN THE CRCU1T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FUORIDA IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANK B DOWLING
PROBATE NO. 75-6591
IE tta:-
"-HEED .-. k a
JULIA :-:!
deeeaecd.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
T A Hav-
rt.g CBjObb r Demands Aralnsi said
Eri.,
Y-m are hreby r-^|jfid and requir-
ed to presvT-t ar,\ claim-vind demands
which you may have sm-iit the e.
late of J\ih!a L Louahe^d. d-
ed late r.f Dadt Coin-.::. FTcnda. to
Circanl Jmkjki ButJ* coar.tv
and file the same ir. duplicate and as
-.ded in s- 7JJ It Florida
Statatca their 'n, Casin-
urrhr*-e in Dade Counly Plor-
ids- months
n-can the time of ihe first publication
- the sum- win be barred
al Miami Florida. thN Jrd
day of 'V-iotwr a l> I
WALTER J I.'H'ilHEEP
M Wm
Fl-st uubHcatl4 n -h.r nolicr on
the list day of cvtor-- uafl
HBRICKKT Z MARVIN
Attorney for Estat. ol
Julia L Louaheed
*1 S VT mtl\ Avenue
Mmmt. PV rtua 3t17
It 11 ii 7
IN the CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORID*
CASE NO 73-SSOFI
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTICN
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
VTRRAY MAUNA.
Petition er,
and
FATE MAI.INA.
R=oonden
PATE W A LIN A
AM" Ea^t n Street
Br<-. klyi Vvr York
Ton .- r.i tlfied that an action for
I. BtM Marrlaire has uuaa filed
. i u and > u are required to
.-rve a rtpv of vour TTtten defer ?.
if any. an LBON A EPSTEIN. Pe-
titio- --> akuat addre>. I
4.1. Utteatl Road Miami Beach, r
ida UI3S h- .sir. day
' rtdatjMBct '."'' and file the orla-
aaj u tk of this Court
either BetoT* tfelrlte on Petitioner's
attorn* >- or immediately therekfte':
<.th^-is .i rt^fiiult will be entered
again-' uga I -.he relief oVraer-deB
:n th "'r-.p.a nt or petition
WITNESS my hand and seal of
urt on it October itTS
HARP P BRINKER
Ai ark 'nt Court
i. SNamBEN
As Deiuii it. rk
in H : n --14
IN T-, C.RColT COURT OF T*HE
ELEVEiVTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-t21
m RE Estatr i f
GLADYS R. THOMPSON
PENNY Tiii'Ml.-'N
'- .
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Cl-Odtton :d AB Persons Hav-
:n Affainst Said
Estate:
-.- hereby n. t'fied and reqalr-
d b bm and demands
wh n > tate ci GLADYS R THOMPSON,
a k FENNY THOMPSON deceased
late of Miami, Dade County, Florida
to the C* tat Juifkes of Dade County,
and rub* In duplicate and as
p-ov ...v at --j :e piorlda
Statutes, fices la the Countv
unty Florida.
within fi-ur calenJhr months ffsn-1 the
,'rr' jU cation hereof, or
the >ame u ill be barred.
Filed a: Miam.. Florida, this ltth
<-*>' AD ItTi
Cmtia. R THi MPSA .\
As A'dffimi.-rraror
r I lutlh-ation of this notice on
:h^ Mta das of October. 1*7
A IAY 'RISTi ;.
Attorney ftr Adm.nirtratcr
N K Firs: Avei.ue. Miami. Pla.
10 14-31
E J
I rwreby '.ettrfy fbsrt Rf.
TT rfiflP arm on th
Jsrne. rfT5. fnteflrporated undtr
** of fne State <-f Flor-rta w;a
pilr-raal ataceof bus-
raraeh I furfher '*TTir> rha-
bbtu'Ioi fTTed in rkh
Hth day of ^rtoher
Intent to VoraWtai 11
tut T. Florida -
GrV'EN ander my
Great Seal ol
Tslmhass-
h- .4th day
fS-a! of the Sts" '
BRT"
.
pa-ELIMINARY CE = F'CATl
OF DlSSOL1. CN
I
the u-'ier> % -
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE .Aw
- "' E.N ttitl
BM
-" 'i~(l
IARDEN Al iRTMENTJ .A
v I
I
I
' r>-:d-
74-Jilt
______________________-'. -'i.n|
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUOICIAl"
C RCUIT. DADE COLN-- cL0P>M '.
GENERAL JUR'SD'CT'CN DIVISION I
NO TS-S^OM
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRl AGE F
FRANK T ACGrSTINE
Pet i tloner Hasbt.
t\ :.!.1E R GRIFFIN A "-.re- 'vr
Rewpondert-V.
?< u. WILLIE !'. S AC. I
;"-T!NE RES1DEN- E N'-A'i'WN'l
,.- hereby notified --. ropy tf\
your Answer to flhi rissohitlOfl cf I
Marrteaa filed siraie-- j npr. hut.
bands attorney. GE> RGE NI'-RO.
i.s ess}.. !7 Nu ::- Avanw,
Miami Florida MSI orltliull
. .if Court -. n,. I
r :*:' th* PttM
I ill be c- i
Dated a
R-'-HARD P BRINK:-". .'LERK
B\ N A H": "TT
Depu--
IhTTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF TH||
ELEVERTTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
OADE COUNTV
NOTICE OF ACT ON
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
fNO PROPER""
CIVIL ACTION NO 75-330U
GENERAL JURISDICTION DiV1$IOl|
ACTIOH FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE CI.AIRE \-BRONICA HASK#
WIFE
and __
FI WARD J<">SuTPTT HASK".
nastuind _^_
T> RTWARP JOSEPH HA,
Residence I'nk-
YOP ARE HEREBY SO]
:*- ^n sjcakat for Dish^lui. I of !
- jfce asa Ween fih-d acalrs: ybu ;
> u are required to serve a copy I
rowj arlttau datenses wy. to i
on LOt'IS HtpLI.EP. at: fnr 1
!
Road Pull* IS*. Miam- BeaelV
Ma. and file the orin ml w
ilerk of the b-ve -- urt a I
balore Noverr.i tlkrkBiJ
default HI be dntared arainR
Inr the r-lief demanded :
- petition
T>.- notice shall be hi
each wee*, for fi^trr
- THE JEWISH V OPIDIAS
'' ITNES8 my hand and tnfl
said court at Miami. F ltth day of Ociobe- ___
RfCHARD P PRINKER
As Clerk. Ctf n -""
Dade C-u-.-.v. F
By K SN
A Deouty CI
jit Coaat Seali
. 74 n
11
~i
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAtV
NOTICE IB HEREBY GIVEN that
the Bnderakrnea. desirinu- to eriffaffe
in buame uader the Bctiflous name
f TnTK CNl'T GROVE PLAT-
ROOBE a: JBAs Ma'.r. Hwy CoromM
3rv. Phi. S3HJ intend to reffister
me with the Clerk of the Cir-
Bri "1 IV
'I ITHOl'SE LTD
\ -
IRTNER
A F
RN A HEI1MELEE
All
II 7-lt-Jl
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
UF KLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
FRANtt B DO'VLINC
PROBATE NO. 7S-2S44
InRE. Estate of
iTuTNHRAI. GRANT OtrTM
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To Aii Crediiore and Ail Persons Hav-
Ibff Claims r Demands Acainst Said
Estate
>' u are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which >-ou may have aaalnst the es-
tate of GENERAL GRANT ORVIN de-
ceBaed late of IHde County, Florida
to the Circuit Judiree of Dade County.
and file the same in dunfteate and as
provided in Section 7S3.lt, FVrlda
Statutes n their offices in the Coanty
lotrrthouae in Dade County. Florida.
*ithin four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof, or
the same will be barred.
Piled at Miami FToHua. this l'lh
day of October, A D ljm
EVA ORVUt
\'!mlr!*tratrtx
LF ation of this notice on
'
- ""'HIN
A iminlstraklx
Are.
10 54-31
NOTICE OF AC ON
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF i
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRC-"I
OF FLORIDA IN AND FI
OADE COUN'V
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIV'I
Civil ActNn No TS.SZt"
IN KE THE MAKRiAiii F
ANNA GOI.I-F'XRB.
W ife-Petitioner.
and
NATHAN GOLDFARB.
Hasband-Responder-
ACTION FOR OISSOLUTIO"
OF MARRIAGE
TO. NATHAN GOLDFAhB
4.V5 Beack Street
Revere, Mas*
v..f ARE HSrEI M11
that an acttaa far Dtau.
r..Fe ha* barn filed an""
you are reqhlr.-d f
v. ur written
an HAttVr:r *>
whose ad.i'
cfrn Rnart Mbrrn;
JS1S*. and me the
.4rk of Ihe abcv W^I.^h
before N'.v.mber 19
a dbfault win he entere,!
fir the relief demanded
plaint or petition.
rfjBvt

rr..i
TTus notice shall be -ublifl
^e^^
uach weak for f.r V*'-|r(IAll.
in THE JEWISH I
wrr?ESR my rtsnd Tf?r
s. d rvurt at aliam- FWtam _
fSth day of fV-Cober IS. -j_
Dade Otkrity. rr!
By I
Depu-v
- ii u" >
HAR\ EY RICWMAN
-. r, f,.r Y\ if.
A"
'
P
--.er
- Rosd

M


Friday, October 31, 1975
PJmlstrfhrMfor
Page 15-B
Mey
Orga
er Baskin,
nization
Leader
Meyer A. Baskin, 64, a mem-
ber of the World War II Man-
hattan Project, which developed
the atom bomb, died Saturday in
his home.
Mr. Baskin was born in Bos-
ton. He received a bachelor of
science degree from Harvard
University, a master of science
degree in chemical engineering
at Massachusetts Institute of
Xe -nology and a law degree
at New York University.
in 1946, Mr. Baskin moved
to Miami and practiced patent
law. He practiced until his
death.
Mr. Baskin has been presi-
dent of the Harvard Clubs of
So-.'th Florida, the Zoological
Society of South Florida, the
Florida Patent Attorneys Asso-
ciation and Temple Jijdeah of
Coral Gables.
He also was president of the
Greater Miami bureau of Jew-
ish Education and was one of
RE1SS
UGAl NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKf
EMILY, 42. of North Miami Beach.
pas.-ed away Sunday Survived by
her husband. Morton, bom, Michael.
DaMet, daughter. Erica Rents all of
NMB. slater, Maxlne Mayer, N.J
and parents, Mr an Dorfman, H PH M. inner .if the Mol-
Kdhai Sisterhood Beth Torah.
... arere held Tuesday at I vttt
North Miami Chape rment
-ial Park.
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 85
d Fl Title Manual of Department
of IVotor Vehicles.
> given tl ll tl
i"5 Stai Shell
Fifth
Strei Ml m Bea ; Florida, will
transfei tltl, if n I9W i iSubre Huirk
automobile. 1974 License Plata No
: W-17S57 el ging to Robert i Cal-
derln, 1245 Eu 'lid Avenue, Mlai
Florida, 38189 The transfer Is
'n pan ,.-:. ihe lien which
Stan's Sheil Service Canter has
t the vehicle fur storage The
amount of aald lien is fttS n
CIALBCT .v OALBL'T 672-3100
10'31 75
MEYER A. BASKIN
the founding presidents of the
American Technion Society of
South Florida. In 1959 he re-
ceived the first State of Israel
award for his leadership in the
Israel Bonds organization and
served as a member of the board
of governors of the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation.
He is survived by his wife
Florence; two sons, Jonathan
and Marc; a daughter, Kathy
Davidson; a sister, Ruth White; houaejiew hay In ehetr yoaajfcion
, the fallowing described property.
a brother, Leonard; and a grand-
notice or
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
by virtu.- oi Chanter 7s Florida Stat-
ute* Annotated (1941) Warehouseman
and Warehouse Receipts Wherein AB-
BOTT MOVING A 8TOKAUE CO and
A, B. VAN LINES INC., Florida cor-
porations liy virtue Of their Ware-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
ELIVINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA 'N AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO 75-6199
In UK Bat i*e of
ANN" '>;'! NfiBKRf I.
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor I All Hav-
- tl Is Against Said
Vou are I ertltiy notified and requir-
ed I Bis and ilematnls
lie ea-
NEBERG de-
i- t
du)l i a nd is
i
: Dad inty,
.I-- foui lbs from the
i.-of, ir
barfed,
i\ : Florida, this 2 itl
day oi A.D.
CARL ORONEBERG
As Executor
First publtcatl irf this noi
the 24th day of I lot >ii-r.
HENRY NORTl IN
At in ej for Executor
1:'1 Biscavne Building
in Weal Flagler Street
Miami l*lorl la 331.10
874-3116
10/24-31
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME'
Semnt the Jewish Clfrnnumty since 1931
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
_____________RCrORM SERVICES
Emjnutl Gorton (1946) IkfCarMn
Hain/Coition (1964) limes B Go>don
daughter.
Services were held at Temple
Judeah. Riverside Chaoel was
in charge of arrangements.
BLACKMAN
RERE' I'A. M, pnsMfl away Oct. 27
A resident of Miami for II years.
Bh* i- survived by sons. Edward of
Miami, Ben of Brooklyn and Leon-
ard of I I. NY. ; grandchildren.
Mrs Sandra Cloldsteln and Mrs. Di-
ane Sherman of Miami and Mr-
i'1-t-.-, Stntfn of X V Clifford
Blackmail. N Y K'errf Mara
HI,id man of NY.. :! peat-grand-
children I oeal arrangements by
i"--..- .!.. Chapel, IMfl Alton Ril..
MB Intermenl was held in N V
L'seil Household goods as the property
of MR AND MRS MANOEI, GONZA-
LEZ, whose last known address was
115 li'th Street. Onion City. N J ,
and that on the 24th day of Novem-
ber, H73 during Ihe legal hours of
aala mainly between 11:* forenoon
and 2:00 in the afternoon at 2136
N.W. 240k Avenue. Miami, Florida the
unuVr.-igned shall offer for sale to
the hlg*hsl bidder for cash in hand
the above described prouerty of MR.
AND RS MANI'EI. GONZALEZ
Dated at Mianv. Florda. ths 2Sth
day of October. 173.
10/St 11/7
notice of action
constructive service
(no property!
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial c'rcuit
of Florida in anu for
dade county
civil acton no. 75-31632
action for o'asolution
of ma'"riaoe
general jurisdiction division
N RE: The Mat-.age of
PBARl. POLUICK.
Wife.
and
DANIEL poi.i.oci-.
Husband.
*TO: MR DANIEl. POLLOCK
Residence Cnknown
TOO ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
.hat m action for Dissolution of Mai-
iage ha.s l>Ml filed against you and
you are required to serve a ropy or
your w.itten defenses, if any, to ll
en Kwltney. Kroap Scheinberg. at-
'ornevs for PetKtoner. whose adrfrs.
'a 42*i Lincoln Road, guile 512. Miami
Beach, Florida 1S13>4 and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above styled
,-ourt on or before November M. 1375.
otherwise a default will be entered
igamst you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
uch week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hnnd ahd the seai of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
,3rd day of October. 1975
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dads County. Florida
Bv L. SNERDRN
As Dei>aty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
KW'ITNEY. KI'OOP *
SCHEINBFR'I. PA.
l^a Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Be-trh. Florida SSTS8
Attorney for Petitioner
lrt/IO-17-24 SI
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Heieand in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
1338S West Dixie Highway
Sm Mrm^m o -. a m. w h n. v_
Broward CouBiy.
925*3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
CONF"rl^-riVE = RVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
'N THE C'RCUIT COURT OF TtlE
ELEVENTH lUOICIAL C'RCUIT
OF ftooini in Nb won
OAr>F COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-32400
OENEAL Ur,l4D,ffT",H ^* V",ION
ACTION FOR DI$OLUTION
OF MAHR'AGK
rv PF the vt^RRiAOK OF:
oo riP, DAVII^A.
IHNWilt.
and
omLLKRMO DA VILA,
R ***OrtW*v"*T'I.
TO: r.ttTLI RRHO DAVII^
Cant Wnown re.ldem.**)
Calle tl. No 1373
IM"?Tnr (Boyaeal
folorobia ._
VOTT ARE HRREBT NOTfFTED
th it an action for Dissolution of
Marftaare haa been filed aarninst rou
and rou are reouired to aerve a tanr
of <>ir written defenaea, tf any. to It
on'CLADYS OERSON. attorney for
P-'ltiofl^r. whose address Is tot N W.
., l"th Aenue, Miami, Florida 33128.
4 and fit* the original with the eleeh of
he ftbova st"led court on or before
Nor, 21. ItW: otherwise a default
,uill be entered naalnst you for the
jrelief demanded in the oomulalwt or
BerfBNM.
This noti MkOll "ek for four consecu'iva weeks
in *HR JEWISH FIOtinOIAN
l-lTrTBSR'nir hand snd nhe seal of
aid court it Miami. Florida on this
10th d/v of October. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKKR,
A.1* Clerh. Circuit Court
Did" County, Florida
BTB SAF9U
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
r.IADYS OERSON. ESQ.
i01 N W 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 3312H
Attorney for Petitioner
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CiPCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND f3R
OADE COUNTY
NO 75-32245
OENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
ABII ONE S A VINOS ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff.
vs.
MARVIN W OWENS and DEBRA
OWEN'S, his wife, and
FARMERS BANK OF THE STATE
OF DELAWARE,
Defendants.
TO: Farmers Bank of the State
of Delaware
luth and Murket Streets,
Wilmington, Delaware
TOO AI'K HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foreclose mortgage
against real and personal property
hi- beer, filed against you in the
above Court by the Plaintiff
The flfioerty sought to b- foreclos-
ed is is follMtl.
lot I, Block IS, SOOTH MIAMI
HEHJHTS ADDITION "X" aC-
cording to th* Pint thereof, r*-
c irded in P'.at Book K'.t. pag* :I3, of
the Pubiii- Records of Dad.- i"nun-
ty Florida.
YOO ARE REMMREP to serve a
coov of \ ur ausnafur ,,n other plead-
ing on Plaintiffs attorney, Malcolm
H Friedman, soo D>aglas Road. Coral
>".,ihlHs Florida. 33134 ..nd file the
original in 'he office of the Clerk of
the above Court, on or before the
2' day of Nov. IJ75, in default of
vMii'h the mplalnt will be taken as
confesse roue-l In Plalntlfrs Complaint and
pleadings
Di''d this th dav of Oct.. IMS
RICHARD P. BRINKKH. CLERK
CIERIC OF THE CIRCI'IT OOl'RT
OF DADE COf'NTY. FlJDRIDA
By I. BARNARD
Deputy Clerk
U/lT-24-31 11/7
IN "HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF P'.ORlOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO 75-29803
GENERAL JURISDICTION O'VISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
FEDBEftl NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION
f ilntlff,
vs
WA1 TK" WESTBERRY ind
INKZ WKSTHBRKV. hi- wife,
residence unknown, if living, unknown
spouses, if remarre.1 i,id If da, id.
then onknown spouses, if remarried:
all unkt>n heJra, davlsees, srantaea,
aaslgneuV, llenutu, -reiirors, trustees,
or otherwise clailuin* by, through.
under ir against the said Walter
WestbeRrs ind Inea Westbarr>'. hla
wife and against all other per-
hi ving or laimimt to have any right.
,i,le r Ihreresl III or to the property
jerein described.
Defendant*
"j: Vwhlter Westberry and !m>a
W.stherry. his wife, residence
unknown, .f living; unknown
soouses, it remarried, and if
dead then unknown spouses, if
r-*iarried: all unknown heirs.
iMVIseea, grantees, assignees.
Ilenor-. creditors, trustees, or
otherwhM daltning by, rhrourh.
urder r against the said Walter
w/estbetry and lne Wealkerry.
Mb wife, and against al' othee
prsons having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest
in or to the property herein
duscrthed.
TOO ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foreclose mortgage
aT)nst real and personal nrooeftr haa
been fled against you in th afcove
Court uv the Plaintiff. Federal Na-
tional Mortgage Association.
Thu Juwerty sought to be foreclos-
ed Is as follows:
lot tl KVce- t*. LOVO ES-
TATES, according to the Plat
thereof, recorded In Plat Book 61,
paee 27. of the PuMIc Records of
Dade CouaAy. Florida.
TOO ARE BFjQOIRFP to serve a
eopr of your answer or other olead-
hut on Plaintiff's Attorney. MAte>
COI.M H FRIEDMAN. sOO Douglas
Road. Coral Oafclae, Florid^ Ml 34.
and file the orimnul In the office of
the Clerk of the uboee Court, on or
befrtre the 14th day of Noviuawcr.
1975, in default of which the coui-
plaint will be take* a contaaaed
ipht you for the relief requested
in Plantirt complaint and pleadings.
DATED this 2nd t*ar Of October.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By: N A HEWETT
Deouty Clerk
(COORT SEAI.)
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
,NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COORT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDiC'AL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JLR;SO'CT'ON DIVISION
C'VIL ACTION NO 75-31771
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The i-i trr! lg of
ALAN 0 ^VIS
. i Petli mer,
M.i.V- I DAV7S
Wife lent.
TO A V
Fan '
\\ .'.-J
NOTIFIED
'iir
Marrl tf een filed and nmRi nc-
. quired
to terve 3 '' ''""
it on 01 i"N 7..
...... ESQ of LYONS AND
SV ITM I' A for 1
who** ad : N ^^ 7th Street,
Miami. P'oiid !i ai i file .. orig-
inal with the clerk of the ibove
- vied court "tl or before Nor 14,
|7B; othrrwIW default will 1 en-
tered agninst you for th-- relief bray-
ed for in the comnlalnt or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for fnur conaecutlvj w-ks
in THE JEWISH Fl oripiaN.
WITNEFS mv hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
Ihla tl' il.iv of O.-toher. *f75
RICHARD P BR'NKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By I BARNARD
As Deouty Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal>
LYONS AND SMITH. P,A.
12W N W 7th Street
Miami. Florida SStW
Attorney for Petitioner
10/10-17-14-31
IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
/.OBATE NO. 7S-M71
In RE: Estate of
HERMAN SOI.OMON.
deceased _
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors ami All Persons Hav-
ing claims t Demands Asalnul Said
Estate:
You are hereby notified and Tuqulr-
,,! .. present any claims and demands
wrnrh jou mi\ have agmtMl the eg-
tate if HERMAN StU-OMON, daceas-
..i late ot n.ide county, Florida, to
the Circuit Judges oi Dune County,
ttnd file th- nm In dunllcate and aa
prorMed In Section 733 IK. Florida
statutes, in their Otttru* In the Coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County. Flor-
ida. Aithtn four calendar months
from the time n' the first puhlicai in
hereof, or the same will be barred.
F ed at Miami. Florida, tins ^sth
day of October, A D 1975,
1H( I LEO FISHHEIN
SAMUEL li PEAHl.MAN
As Kxecutors
First publication i thin nolle* on
the 31st dav of October, 1976,
SAMOBL B PEARI.MAN
Attorney for Kxecutors
417 I Incoln Road. Suite 7-K
Miami Beach, Florida 33'39
10'31 11/7
IN THE C'RCU'T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
J. CWYNN PARKER
PROBATE NO. 73-8764
In RE: Estate of
ftOCCO MAiNlBHO,
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All I'ersons Hav-
ing Claims or Detuanda Against Said
Esti. te
f 11 art hefeby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may hare agutul the es-
tate of himTii MAINIERo. deceas-
ed !ii,. ,f Dade County, Florida, to
the Circuit Judges of Dade County.
and file 11 vim rn dunlTCate i'ci is
provided in Sectii* 733.Hi, Florida
BtffWtuB, tr, their off'ces In the Coun-
tj Coarthause in Pde County. Flor-
ida, within four calendar months
from the time of tile fin* publication
hereo:. or the same will be barred.
: at Miami, Florida, this 28th
dav of OctOMF, A.D. 1*7*
ANNA 'iAl.ASSo
As Executrix
First publication of this notice oil
the 31st day of October, 197S.
1/*1 11'7
IN THE C'RCU'T COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIOA IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-787
rn RB: Eutate of
EDWARD SAMUEL.
decee-ad
NOTrCE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Estate:
Tou are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and deuiands
whir* you 4nay have against the es-
tate ef EDWARD SAMUEL, deceas-
ed late of Dade County, Florrna. to
the Circuit Judges of Dade County.
,inu ide the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733. IS, Florida
Statute*, in their office* In the Coun-
ty Courthouae In Dade County, Flor-
ida, within four- calendar months
from the time of the first publication
herwof, or tlu same Will be barred.
Filed at Miami, FiuriUa. Ui -th
day of October, A.D. IMS.
CH/RLOTTE SAMUEL
As Administratrix
First publication ul this notice on
the 31st day of October. 1H7".
PHILIP M. SEGAL of BROAD
AND CASSEL
Attorneys for Estate
1108 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, Fla. 331 ?4


:*-
Friday. October 31
t
a
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8
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SHOP FOOD FAIR FOR A BIG VARIETY OF. .
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Full Text
Page 6-A
*Jeistfk>ri % i +
Peres Recommends
West Bank Self-Rule
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Shipion
Peres has suggested for the first time publicly that Arabs
should assume self-administration on the West Bank
under the local Arab- leadership.
fie made that proposal during a visit to the city
couod of Beit Jalla, an Arab town south of Jerusalem.
"There are sufficient decent and sensible men in
Judaea and Samaria who can administer their own mat-
ters," Peres declared.
HE SAID that the Arab summit conference at Rabat
Which eliminated Jordan as the spokesman for West
Pank Arabs and the unacceptability of the terrorist or-
ganizations had created a vacuum which should be filled
by self-administration.
Peres' ideas are apparently shared by Foreign Min-
ister Yigal Allou who was reported to be preparing to
make a formal proposal to the Cabinet soon for the im-
mediate transfer of the civil administration on the West
Bank and the Gaza strip to the hands of the local resi-
dents.
PERES INITIATED the concept of administrative
autonomy about six months ago in private talks with
West Bank leaders. None of them was prepared to as-
sume the responsibility at the time.
One Arab notable in Jerusalem told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency recently that "In the past we thought
some form of .co-existence with the Jews was possible,
but now we don't believe so any more."
The spokesman, who was one of the Arab leaders
tpproached by Peres, accused Israel of responsibility
jor deteriorating relations wtfh West Bankers by ex-
propriating land for Jewish settlement.
Eeheverria Told to Return
Degree to Tel Aviv University
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tel Aviv University stu-
dents are demanding here that President Luis Eehe-
verria return the Honorary Doctorate awarded him by
the university on his recent visit to Israel because of
Mexico's vote for the anti-Zionist resolution in the UN
General Assembly's Third Committee.
The demand was contained in a cable sent to the
Mexican President by the University Students Associa-
tion with copies to UN Secretary General Kurt Waldheim
and to the Mexican Embassy here. The cable declared
that Eeheverria was not worthy of the honor conferred
on him.
PROF. SHLOMO SIMONSON, rector of Tel Aviv
University, has also cabled Eeheverria expressing shock
over the Mexican vote and asking for an explanation
inasmuch as Eeheverria had expressed friendship for
Israel when he visited here.
VOTE Of VIKTBU WmMnffT
Knesset Raps UN Resoluti
m
fly GIL SEDAN
TFRIISALEM (JTA) The Knesset, with virtual
unanimity angrily condemned the anti-Zionist resolution
adopted by thfceneral Assembly's Third Committee, urged
its defeat in the Assembly's plenary and expressed appre-
ciation to the 29 nations which voted against the draft in
the Humanitarian, Social and Cultural Committee.
A Knesset resolution adopted after a debate on the UN
action reaffirmed that Zionism is the movement for the
reconstruction and liberation of the Jewish people.
ONLY THE four-member pro
rssoluti >n
moans
Moscow Rakah Communist fac
tion voted against the Knesset
resolution. The five member
Aguda bloc was absent.
President Ephraim Katrir and
Leon Dulzin, acting chairman
of the Jewish Agency and
World Zionist Organization Ex-
ecutives, attended the Knesset
meeting which was the first of
its winter session.
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon.
opening the session on behalf
of the government, said that
i1 -spite the fact that the passage
of the anti-Zionist draft in the
Third Committee was "not with
an impressive majority," there
were difficult campaigns ahead.
ALLON DID not rule out the
possibility that the General
Assembly plenary might adopt
the resolution "perhaps even at
a worse balance of votes."
He observed, # however, that
"if the General Assembly adopts
the committee's resolution, it
will be backing a negative res-
olution and the day will come
when many of its supporters
will regret backing it and just
like other distorted resolutions
of the General Assembly, this
too will end up the garbag*
heap of history."
Allon addeJ that Israel and
the Jewish peor-le should not
underestimate the int unions
behind the besmirching of Zion-
ism. "Joining an anti-Zionist
Semidsm"' "*" "**
LIKUD MEMBER u
Beigin clamed that E^
among the mitu.^0^;
Zionist drat (the ana?.'
sors **re Cuba anS
states an induJiagz<
declared: *"*
"w- should not I
b t rather accuse |3
raised their hands t,;lr
graceful resolution."
Beigin said the ret*
r-oresent'd anti-Judai^
than anti-Semitism becJJ
Arabs too are smites.
He alsi assails F-_.
President Anwar Sadat wj
leg'dly saying he r^af
"TOtvy ortm" onlr i
after he had committed^
n.t to reso ) f)rc;c:-^_
Sinai inteir-i ac;Drd ""
your precious jewels
;o the rrosl piestigious
jewelers *n the South
Call Lewi* Riistein fhone. 44V
_______Herb Schoenbert 5
Roberta di Camerino
Venezia, New York, Chicago, Toronto r
vfll
J.F.
Jewish
Gvilization
It's all there in the
Encyclopaedia
Judaica.
For free color
brochure.
call (305) 534-8231
or write: E. J., Suite SOS,
420 Lincoln Rd., M.B. 33139
PAYMENT ACCEPTED
IN ISRAEL BONDS
Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
You are cordially invited to attend
THE GOVERNOR RtUBIN O'D. ASKEW BALL
INAUGURAL BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14th, 1975 6:30 P.M.
FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL PROMINENT SPEAKER
DANCING iNTERTAINMENT
RABBI IRVING LEHRMAN
Chairman
JNF Foundation
JUDGE ZEV W. KOGAN
PretMenf
JHF Southern Region
RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
Chairman
UK Utcvtive Uati
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
President
JHF of Greater Miami
Show Your Solidarity With Israel
Strengthen The Jewish National Fund
For tickets contact: JEWISH NATIONAL FUND,
420 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, FLA. Telephone 538-6464
Aboard the s/s FedericoC
Sailing December 9 through D**"^,
Costa Line's luxury sh.p departs from Port Everglades, Flond.i. ior a
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A.rrcn. o,,-i.,_________i.i.i c* unur travel a$ -


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FILES


October 31, 1975
+Jmist>ftoriktia>/7
Pape 7-A
c9r>muNisT-miRD worn* BARBARITY
1TED NATIONS
Oct. 17 will be re-
as a day of infamy at
United Nations. It was a
vhen a eabal of Arab,
lunist and Third World
. succeeded in formal-
it heir hatred of Zionism
[ Israel by adopting a
resolution in which
sm was equated with
cas a day of inf?my be-
the 70 countries
voted for the resold
in the Third Committee
aided and abetted, hv
t-nally or unintentional-
the 27 states that ab-
ed in tfte rre fn<* by
16 states that were ab-
[W\S a d<*r *f infsrnv h*
l the draft now nrwlde*
i of tVose states with a legal
jtb*"?] wn"""- and rational*
njM o-:-nc a^ain^t Is-
[and, possibly, for action*
C 7innie,e *v* Zionist or-
jitions within those coun-
jwh<"-'> a 7i-nist group may
|be functioning.
in the eui-> of fWjHlH
i. an onsl^'jiM asaiirr tV
national livorati^n mo^e-
f .u- ionc*cv, non|o and
"ibo-tin-tit of *''"!c '"*
in the State of Israel.
Iwa? a dv of infa-iv h-
the d-aft inrom-j-fo ths
[technique of the biff lie.
WAS also a *v of v--
*v in that the d-aft resnlu-
land vn*" ">'1'' '""" '", "",
fcl. Humanitarian and Cul-
Cdnwliftte. The ffice "11
Jraft a-e evid^n^e that this
ir.itte' H nOKter n"i'i. nor
anitarian nor cultu-al.
le vote ca-ne a litt'Q "we
I a week after Uganda Pres-
I1i Am1i s"w d Mfl
bd >n the General Ass1 "*blv
cal'ins ^n tV American
...n ; J .1,-i- M Zirnist?." called for the ex-
i of toad fro"i the
ed Nation* aOi "the extinc-
lof Israel as a statV
le Arab sponsored d'^ft
lution eouatinc Zioni-n
racism was denounced bv
fcii Ambassador Chaim Her-
(who told the Third Coti-
ee that the draft has "de-
ed" the United' Nations "bv
ducina this anti Semitic
nt into the worH todav.
i so doins you will destroy
Jtimately."
3NARD GARMENT, a
be of the U.S. delegation
he UN. speaking before the
called- the- draft resehitlon
cene." a "supreme act of
It." and "one of the most
vous errors." in the 36-year
ence of the world body.
lie vote for the draft resolu-
-70 in favor. 28 ooposed.
Abstaining and 16 absent
nist Dowers to vote in fav- of
a draft resolution linking Zion-
ism with racism.
One unnamed high official of
the U.S. Mission flatly accused
Chile of selling its vote to the
Arabs in exchange for'Arab sup-
port when the issue of alleged
torture and political repression
in Chile comes up before the
General Assembly. The Chilean
Mission declined immediate
comment on the charge.
U.S. officials expressed dis-
appointment that many Latin
American countries "deserted
ub't by supporting the anr>Is-
rael draft resolution or abstain-
ing. At the same time, thev
painted oat that some black
African countries that usually
supported the Arabs on Middle
East issues, either abstained or
voted against the resolution.
American analysts of the vote
who noted the split in the black
African bloc, castigated the at-
titude of Latin American na-
tions. One U.S. official was qnot-
ed as saving "The Fascists in
Chile and some like-minded mil-
itary regimes are lining up with
the anti-Semites."
THE AMERICAN officials
charge that Chile sold its vote
was based on the fact that a
five-member UN working group
had submitted a report last
week denouncing the existence
of "torture cells" and other
forms of Political renression in
y of Infamy nt United Nations
MURRAY ZVCKOFF came after heated and prolong-
ed discussion in the Third Com-
mittee, and after the U.S. and
the nine members of the Euro-
pean Common Market warned
thev would vote against it.
The vote also came after the
committee had overridden a re-
quest bv two black African
co"r^-ies Sierra Leone and
Zambia1 postpone until next
year consideration of the reso-
lution.
The vote was 68-45 with 16
abstentions. The ooerative sec-
tion of the draft proDosed that
the General Assembly deter-
mine that "Zionism is a form of
racism and racial discrimina-
tion."
HERZOG, IN his statement,
declared: "We have listened to
the most unbelievable nonsense
on the issue of Zionism and
from whom? Prom countries
who are the arehtypes of rac-
ism."
Qbo-'-vers "<* that the Am-
bassador'* denunciation of the
countries supporting the draft
recd-tion had a marked impact
e*d that thre was a shocked
silence at the conclusion of his
(l*M||t
Daniel M o v n i h a n the
American Ambassador, walked
from his seat in the committee
to where Herrog was sitting and
embraced him iust after the
vote took rlace. But many dele-
gate* applauded th* vote.
JEWISH SOURCES in New
Yn-k criticized th New York
Times for its total omission
i gnt p it utorv on the ses-
sion anJ the vnt? to anv refer-
. ,.;.,,_., ?v vian d-'?;
p*te AW trusted at length. (The
ow*ve*\ in its Suniav
deigned to devote all if
- ".: mce to Herzog's state-
ment.)
armflM t.'d flfe eo*,"tU*e
that, at '"- iw^twt of fipM-
o~iqp-. rh* !'X 'vis "at the
mint of o::ici'..v eadecstas an-
ti-Semitism, one of thj ditet
anc ism known in human h'*sto-v."
He added, "we fl'W also iue
a warningthis resolution niec-
es the work of the United Na-
tions in ieooardv." H-> dsc-;hed
7:->ni-' oS a ovepi^nt seeking
to preserve "the small remnant
c-f \h" X?wfsh p^op'^ tv"' sur-
vived the horrors of raciai holo-
caust."
GARMENT SAID the draft
wovld flltfWT'Bg? anti-Semitism
and grout) hostilitv and ' yv.t^r.ffl.,* prevent the United
ct^'-c ^neratinB wtith
Pt^^^ rj^J -mb*rs in a ten-
yea' rro?"arp to co-^hat ractem.
He said the decision would
hav far-^aemflp consaueOCes
pecauso tp d-af' involved the
"moral au,v">*itv" that h" said
was the UI*'s "only ultimate
claim" for support.
Movnihan expressed "pro-
found gratincatlon"" for thC sup-
port Israel received fr"" e
nations ooooition th-> drat
resolution and indicted l**t
the. African program for a W
conference and "action pM
aeainet "cial discnmlnatioti
would suffer, at least as far as
the US. and Western Participa-
tion and nossibf- fundina is con-
cerned. Some Western dmlomets
mats expressed cencern afWr
the vote was taken that the ac-
tion woul* damage U.S. support
for the UN.
AT THE same time, officials
were sharnlv cHtical of La*J
American countries that #!
up with the Arab and Conrrm-
Body Not Believed
Missing Chilean Jew
NEW YORK (JTA) The family of a missing
Chilean Jew has finally convinced Chilean authorities
that the body of a man found near El Pillar, Argentina,
last summer and identified as Juan Carlos Perelman,
was in fact not the remains of their relative who dis-
appeared.
Argentine police have established that the docu-
ments found near the body were forgeries, it was dis-
closed here by Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal, director of
the B'nai B'rith AntirDefamation League's Latin Amer-
ican affairs department.
SIMILAR FORGERIES led to the erroneous identi-
fication of another body found at El Pillar a that of Luis
Alberto' Guendelman Wisniak, a member of the Chilean
Jewish community who is also missing.
The discovery of the bodies ted some government-
controlled newspapers in Chile to claim that the missing
men were Marxists Who faxed their disappearances to
embarrass the Chilean government and were later as-
sassinated by guerrilla groups they joined, Rabbi Rosen-
thai reported.
Chile, ruled by a right-wing
military junta.
The report on the human
rights situation in Chile is due
to be discussed by the Third
Committee and later bv the Gen-
eral Assembly, though no dates
have been set.
According to informed sourc-
es at the UN. the Chilean dele-
gation has been canvassing
pipmhers for support on the hu-
man rights issue and found Arab
diplomats responsive. The Chil-
ean delegate rejected the report
of the UN working group as
"without foundation" and ob-
tained mainly from hostile
Chilean exiles.
But Chile, which had promised
to cooperate with the UN in-
vestigation, barred the world
organization's human rights
tam from that country.
DR.LEONARD r
.***

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President
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