The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02433

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
d __Number 38
Miami, Florida Friday, September 19, 1975
uc by Man Two Sections
Price 25 rents
WITHOUT STRINGS ATTACHED'
Herzog Proposes
Technical Assist
Arab Nations
Report Secret Missile
Pact for Israel
To
Ongoing r-.nd Relentless Campaign ll-A
\ I rZHAK RABI
MONS (JTA)
is offered concrete
i ia 'e the bene-
I earch in agricul-
.11 and solar energy
,,;', ib neighbors "with-
but strinsi attached and without
pr.jr,u i > an ultimate solu-
tion ol the political problems
rhich beset the area."
The proposals ware contain-
ed in the maiden speech of Is-
Ira.'l.s :- Ambassador to the
United Nations, tliaim Herzog.
WOMEN IN SINAI?
Abzug
Praises
\ NEW YORK (JTA) An-
Inouncing her support of the Is-
rteli-Eg) ptian peace agree-
ment, hep Bella S. Abzug (D.,
IN.Y.) said liere she has been
I receiving inquiries from women
who want to volunteer for the
proposed American civilian
Igioup of technicians to monitor
learly-wdming posts in the Si-
liuii
"It might be a good idea to
Iinclude women technicians in
I the group because their pres-
ence v ould underscore the
I peace!u: goals of this mission,"
Contin ian Abzug com-
Imenti
SHE SAID among those seek-
I mteer was a young
I ian with an en-
legree who speaks
I'l br an I Arabic and is a
Middle Eastern af-
: tter to Rep. Aozug,
ant said:
11 .ends in both ls-
; it, and I hope that
| an assignment in the
I Smai I could help all of them
1 inued on Page 9-A
delivered September .y at the
opening of the Seventh Special
Session of the General a
bly convened to discuss a new
international economic order.
AN' ANTICIPATED demon-
strative walk-out by the Arab
delegates and theii" Third World
allies did not materialize when
Continued on Page 15-A
AMBASSADOR HERZOG
in maiden speech
Ex-Auschwitz Inmate
Now Cabinet Minister
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Mine. Si-
mone Veil, Fiance's Minister of
Health, is unusual in many
ways. She is the first and
only woman to reach Cabi-
net rank in Fiance. She is the
only Jew with full ministerial
responsibilities. She is a former
Auschwitz inmate with the num-
ber 78651 tattooed on her fore-
arm.
Despite these facts of her
life, which some might consider
handicaps to high public office.
Mme. Veil has become France's
most popular political figure.
Recent public opinion polls
ga>e her a six percent edge
over Premier Jacques Chirac
and two percent over opposi-
tion leader Francois Mitterand.
IN AN exclusive interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency last week, before she
Continued on Page 2-A
BEHIND CLOSED DOORS
Israeli, Egyptian Teams
Move to Implement Pact
GENEVA (JTA) Israeli
and Egyptian working teams
met behind closed doors to be-
gin the task of drawing up the
del died military protocols to
implement the Israeli-Egyptian
interim accord in Sinai.
i hey met in a secluded room
in the Palais des Nations. Unit-
ed Nati ins headquarters here,
despite indications that the
first meeting would be an open
session with both sides making
public declarations as to the
historic nature of their under-
taking.
ISRAEL REPORTEDLY want
ed an open session in order to
thaw the icy formality of last
Thursday's signing ceremonies.
The Israeli group was in-
formed that Egypt had agreed
to a public opening session.
But diplomatic sources said
that '.he Egyptian delegation re-
ceived instructions from Cairo
to insist on private meetings
behind closed doors and out of
glare of publicity.
T ie Egyptians reported their
ctions to Gen. Ensio Sii-
lasvuo, chief of the UN peace-
keeping forces in the Middle
East, and to the American ob-
server, Deputy Undersecretary
of State Hal Saunders.
THE EGYPTIAN team is
headed by a ranking military
Continued on Page ll-A
WASHINGTON Columnist Jack Anderson report-
ed this week that there are secret and "bonus" agree-
ments between the United States and Israel as a reward
to Israel for signing an interim peace accord with Egypt.
In a column in the Washington Post on Mondaj,
Anderson declared that one such agreement promises
that the United States and Israel will have "an early
meeting to undertake a joint study of hiph technology
and sophisticated items, including the I'ershing ground-
to-ground missiles with conventional warheads, with
the view to giving a positive response."
THE PERSHING missile has a range of 460 miles,
and this would put the major Arab population centers
well within Israeli reach.
Anderson declared that the Pershings would have
only conventional warheads as delivered by the U.S.,
but "the implication, according to our sources, is that
the Israelis will be able to attach their own nuclear
warheads."
CURRENTLY, the U.S. Army has between 250 and
400 Pershings with nuclear warheads deployed through-
Continued on Page 13-A
WZO Declares Lima
Resolution An ti Jewish
Warning Voiced Against Overconfidence 6-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) The World Zionist Or-
ganization Executive, in a bitter statement, has con-
demned the anti-Zionist resolution passed by the non-
aligned conference at Lima as essentially anti-Jewish.
The Executive pledged to step up world-wide informa-
tion campaigns to fight the Arab-led effort to smear the
name and meaning of Zionism.
ZIONIST FEDERATION leaders in many countries
have been instructed to seek meetings with government
Continued on Page 13-A
Mexico City Gives Okay
To PLO Office Opening
Egyptian Ambassador Taken Hostage 7-A
MEXICO CITY (JTA) President Luis Eche-
verria ratified his promise given to Palestine Liberation
Organization leader Yasir Arafat to permit the 11.0 to
open an information office in Mexico's capital. The rati-
fication of his promise came during a meeting here with
a PLO delegation led by the head of its political depart-
ment, Farouk Kaddumi.
Echeverria originally made his promise to Arafat
Continued on Page 13-A
A 'FIRST' RECORDED I0R SOUTH FLORIDA
Russian MD to Practice in Miami Soon
SIMION TSINKER
accident of fortune
By NORMA OROVITZ
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Simion Tsinker traveled dur-
ing the winter of 1974. He went
from the Ukraine to Vienna, to
Rome, to New York and, finally,
to Miami.
Simion Tsinker is a Russian
refugee. He is a physician by-
training and a vena-punetunst
by trade. He has just made a
main step" and sees more
work ahead for himself.
SIMION TSINKER explains.
"] was a doctor. I didn't give
up."
At 28 years of age. Tsinker
speaks matter of factly of his
emigration from the Ukraine to
Miami Beach and Mt. Sinai
Medical Center. This ruggedly
handsome young man has a
rigid attachment to his chosen
profession and, in spite of some
time lost, he is determined to
practice the gynccology and ob-
stetrics he was schooled in.
Tsinker recalls how "connec-
tions and money were neces-
sary to be accepted" into the
Ukrainian Medical College In-
stitute. Competition was very
stiff as this particular institute
restricted the bulk of its enroll-
men to native Ukrainians.
IT PERMITTED only a
"counted number" of other
Russians and Jews. Tsinker
traveled to Tvumen, the capital
city of Siberia, and made appli-
cation to that region's medical
Continued on Page 1S-A


^^^^^^^^^^H
Page 2-A
> Jenist fhrtdfiyr
Friday, September-
Auschwitz to French Cabinet
Continued from Page 1-A
left for Israel on a five-day of-
ficial visit at the invitation of
t te Israeli government. Mme.
Veil spoke asout what it was
like to be a woman Cabiael
n.inisier. a Jew with strong
s.-ntiinental ties to Israel and a
number ot i government whose
attitude toward Israel, while
more friendly than in the re-
cent past, is still ambiguous to-
ward the Middle Cast and which
has recognized the Palestine
Liberation Organization as a
representative body.
Mme. Veil has been a fre-
quent t isitor to Israel in "a pri-
vate capacity.' Her three sons
have all \isited Israel and have
studied Hebrew at Ulpanim
there.
SHE JOINED the government
last summer after the Franco-
Israeli rift on the arms embar-
go was mended, although Is-
raeli diplomats and many Jew-
ish organizations in France are
still not happy with the govern-
ment's Mideast policy. The JTA
asked her if she felt more a
minister or more a Jew.
Mme. Veil: There is no. there
can be no such problem. I am
French and a member of the
French government. Emotional-
ly I f.'el chse to Israel and to
Jerusalem both a> a Jew and as
a former deportee but there
can be no question of a double
all'giance. Israel is something
special to me and to my family
but there is a clear distinctive
line between sentimental in-
volvement and concrete politi-
cal factor*.
JTA: Today it might be easy
to reconcile sentiments and
f-oc-ri h"f 3 f-w va^s ao?
MME. VEIL: No. it is never
eaaj out i! has to be done. 1
remember a friend of mine in
my native cit; oi Nice wn > waa
an !::ilijn married to a French*
When Italy imaded France
during the war. stabbing nei in
the back, she, my friend, had to
choose her options and riiake
up her mind on le she
was. It was n >; easy, but she
did it. I think she made trie
right choice. The important
t'-.uig is to try and remain ob-
jective and impartial and judge
matters on their merit. I think
that this can nearly always be
done. (With a smile) I don't
Inow how Dr. Kissinger feels
about this but as far as I am
concerned there can be no
problem in what direction my
duties and responsibilities lie.
Mme. Veil does not like to
speak about her concentration
camp experience. Sometimes
the subject crops up unexpect-
edly.
During the debate in the
French National Assembly last
fall on her bill legalizing abor-
tion in France, a Deputy shout-
ed at her: "You want to send
our unborn children to the cre-
mation ovens."' Mme. Veil,
whose parents and brother died
in Auschwitz, slumped forward
in her chair and ner eyes filled
utth tears.
THE ASSEMBLY President
as' ed her if she wanted a re-
cess but she replied, coolly. "No,
this will not be necessary," and
the debate continued. Late in
the night, when the vote was
taken she had won and France
became the first Catholic coun-
t-v t~< l-eaMze abortion.
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served.
In spite oi thei'- aasi
the famtty declared itaeli
ish at the time of the
occupation. Mme. Veil was
rested in 1944 by a Gi
patrol. Her parents, her
er and sifter were arreste
days later. They were all ce-
ported to Auschwitz anj
the two daughters survived
AFTER THE war she return-
ed to nance anc ituuied law a:
the Sorbonne in t'ans where she
met her husoana. Antuine Veil,
today president of African Air
Lines, a state-owned coir; an)
and a senior ci.il servant ^ne
worked as a magistrate fr
her graduation until she was
appointed to the Cabinet last
summer by President V'aleiy
Giscard d'Estaing.
Mme. v. il is e member n
political partv and her ap.....
ment came as a su ~ is
thought that Giscard
was mainly interested
Ulg Ilia elifd r
appoint a woman : i C
rank if elected. He chose
Veil as fitting the role
unaware at the time, that one
year later she would emerge as
Franc's main political pe -
nality with, observers a:
bitions of her own
JEWISH observers fear.
e\er. that even if she m
good and eventually rep]
Chirac as Prime Minister, they
will !ia\e little additional .
ence ;n French govern
circles.
Always distant from organiz-
ed Jewish lif\ Mme. Veil has
drawn even further away
her appointment as minister.
The only appearance she
made at a Jewish gathering was
at a recent meeting of the Al-
liance Israelite Universelle. con-
sidered here as the most French
of Jewish organizations an
least involved with Israel and
Zionism.
This does not prevent
youngest son. Jean Michel,
planning to re\isit israel
perhaps settle there one d..\
L'Shona Tovo Tikesevu
Our New Year wish for Israel I
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?he CJA and the
Fund.
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M9-19-75
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'9-75


Lay, September 19, 1975
* Jenisti ffaridian
Page 3-A
How it Was When Alaska Was Born
By PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
A new field for Jewish social

jpened with the
CdmiioE of the Territory of
EU as the 49th State m our
Whiit it is known that Jews
Ihave lived in Alaska for more
Lan IOC years, very little is
known about their continuous
ljunc!: ;- community, or
|abo;u theii organizational life
L.i entity.
It has definitely been estab-
lished -i eral earlier stu-
dies that individual Jews have
exploit ii Alaska, that they
ave participated in the nu-
Ibbtoui ishes, that there
wn aders there. But
unul vt --entry there were
|no Je s m Alaska.
ALASKA WAS discovered by
W two Russians, Bering and
[chirikov in 1741. and was then
Ideclui'cii E j>-ian possession.
|7ht Russian-American Fur Co.,
Iformtd in 1799 encouraged
Itiiidi bel --" the newly dis-
kovered territory and the
lllnittd States. Alaska was sold
|to the United States for $7,200,-
3 tents an acre in
Il867. A dispute over the Alas-
kan-Canadian borders was ad-
justed in 1903.
These dates may be very vi-
tal to Jewish historians and
[demographers in their search
[for data about Jewish exped-
ience in Alaska. In the 125 years
[of Russian control of the ter-
ritory, there had begun fur
|trading and fishing.
JEWS ARE believed to have
[shared in both activities. While
I government restrictions and
discriminations may have cur-
| tailed their participation in
fishing, fur trading certainly is
believed to have attracted Jew-
lish skill.
It is not to be inferred from
[this, however, that the Jews
who were active in this trad-
ing in Russian-held Alaska were
I Russian Jews. In all probability,
they were mainly from neigh-
boring Canada, with a sprink-
[ling of American Jews.
When the United States ac-
quired Alaska, Jewish interest
in the territory increased, and
adventurous Jews came there
by way of the states of Wash-
ington and California. The ma-
jor links for several decades
were with California, many
Jews from the Golden State
having established businesses
in the chief Alaskan centers
Juneau, Anchorage, Fairbanks.
and Ketchikan.
BUT THERE was an equal
interest among Jews in the state
of Washington. Sailings by boat
from this country to Alaska
have been arranged for many
yoars, during the latter part of
the last century; and the early
Pt of the present, by way of
Seattle.
Thus, with Seattle as the fi-
nal point of embarkation from
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HEN. ERNEST GRUENING: In the Beginning.
this country to Alaska in the
1880's and 1890 s, the Klondike
and Yukon gold rushes were at-
tractions for Jews as they were
for non-Jews. In a sense, this
new attraction to the North-
west also was responsible for
Jewish migration movements to
the state of Washington.
A TYPICAL example of the
settlers in Alaska in the late
'90s was a former Detroiter,
Herbert Robinson Greenberg,
who passed away in 1957 at
the age of 99. Greenberg left
Detroit for California in 1896.
From there he went by boat to
Seattle, and from Seattle he
went to Alaska on a summer
boat. It took him nine months
to make the trip to Alaska. To-
day, by air, traveling time tx>
Alaska from San Francisco is
five hours.
Greenberg joined the Klon-
dike gold rush and staked three
successful gold producing
mines. He was in the habit, on
his visits to his great-grand-
nephews in Detroit, to present
them with gold nuggets, and he
was called Uncle Nugget. One
of his mines became known as
Bessie Mine and was the sub-
ject of a feature article in Time
Magazine 37 years ago (1938).
HERBERT GREENBERG liv-
ed in Alaska from 1897 to 1954.
He built the first Alaskan ra-
dio station and it was later tak-
,en over by the United States
Army. His children now live in
California a typical result of
Jewish wanderings away from
the small communities where
there is danger of intermarriage
because of the limited number
of Jewish residents and the
limitations in Jewish religious
and cultural activities.
The three major Jewish per-
sonalities whose names were as-
sociated with Alaska are Ernest
Gruening, the former governor
of Alaska and then its Senator
and the two California pioneers,
ewis Gerstle and Louis Sloss.
GERSTLE, WHO was born in
Bavaria, December 17, 1924,
worked his way on a boat to
the United States in 1847, be-
came a peddler in Louisville,
Ky., and was attracted to Cali-
fornia, during the gold rush
days of 1848, and traveled by
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He optned a fruit stand, labor-
ed in the gold mines, later went
into the wholesale grocery
business in Sacramento, then
moved to San Francisco and
became a mining stockbroker.
When Alaska was purchased
by the United States in 1867,
he joined two other firms in
acquiring the Russian-American
Alaska Co. and acquired seal
fishing rights. He also estab-
lished a steamship line between
San Francisco and Alaska. Ger-
stle was active in Cafifornifrl
Jewish affairs congregation-
al and philanthropic and
served as treasurer of the Uni-
versity of California. He died
Nov. 19, 1902.
LOUIS SLOSS, who was also
born in Bavaria, was several
months older than Gerstle, hav-
ing been born July 13, 1824.
Upon his arrival in the United
States in 1845, he too, became
a peddler, in Mocksville, Ky.,
and later also went to Califor-
nia where he met Gerstle and
both became partners, their
business association lasting 50
years. He was active in philan-
thropies and was treasurer of
the University of California for
17 years. He died June 4, 1903.
Gerstle and Sloss were mar-
ried to two sisters. Hannah and
Sarah Greenbaum.
The career of Gruening is
now a matter of record. It was
due mainly to his valiant and
untiring efforts that the cam-
paign for Alaskan statehood
materialized. Ernest Gruening,
like his father. Dr. Emi! Gruen-
ing. earned a medical degree
from Harvard College. But upon
receiving his doctor of medicine
degree in 1912, he turned in-
stead to journalism and held
numerous important editorial
posts in Boston, Mass.. and
Portland. Maine. He served as
editor of the New York Tribune
and the Nation. Then he was
given major federal appoint-
ments.
AS GOVERNOR of Alaska.
Gruening formed the first
Alaska National Guard in 1940,
and during the last war was
the organizer and commander
of the Alaskan Territorial
Guard. He was a member of the
commission that supervised the
construction of the great high-
way connecting Alaska to the
United States.
A great interest was taken in
Alaskan possibilities as an im-
migration center for Jewish
refugees by Miss Ruth Gruber
(now Mrs. Philip Michaels, of
New York), the well-known
writer, traveler, and lecturer.
Miss Gruber, as a member of
the staff of the late Secretary
of Interior Harold L. Ickes, in
the Franklin D. Roosevelt ad-
ministration, did most of the
research for her department in
Alaska. She prepared volumin-
ous reports on the Territory
and she envisioned Alaska as a
place of settlement for many
thousands of Jews who were
compelled to escape from Na-
zism. But her idea never ma-
terialized.
ONLY ABOUT 52 years ago,
a Jewish merchant was one of
the leading citizens of the Alas-
kan city of Juneau. Isadore
Goldstein was a popular mer-
chant there and was highly hon-
ored for his honesty and in-
tegrity. He was eltcted mayor
of Juneau six times.
His parents. Robert and Anna
Goldstein, came from Califor-
nia and established a mercan-
tile business in Juneau. Their
son, Isadore. acquired that
business. Isadore was married
to Miss Carol Kahn, of San
Francisco.
AMONG THE early American
Jews who came to Alaska was
the fur-trading merchant, Jack
Goldstone. who was believed to
have inspired the purchase of
Alaska by the United States.
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Page 4-A
*J(f%i^Fkrid//^r
Friday, September
*-? 1J7J
The Sukkoth Festival
Jews throughout the world begin their observance
of the Sukkoth holiday on Friday at sundown. Tradition
tells us that the pnmary symbols of the holiday, the
esrog and the lulav, represent the heart and will of man.
Sukkoth is both a Festival of Thanksgiving and a
period ufrrisiurlcal remembrance. It commemorates the
wandering of the ancient Israelites in their journey to
the Promised Land. It also expresses Jewry's gratitude
for deliverance, coming as it does on ihe heels of Yom
Kippur when the Book of Life is closed.
Thus, on Sukkoth, it is traditional for Jews to erect
a Sukkah an open booth decorated with the fruits
of old Palestine to mark the temporary dwellings in
which they lived during their wanderings in the wilder-
ness.
In the Sukkah, they reflect upon the concept of
freedom, both physical and spiritual.
The esrog and !ulav jointly symbolize the essential
substance of Judaism throughout the ages the Jew's
spiritual belief and his indomitable will to identify with
his tradition in the face of constant threat to his survival
as a Jew.
This union of personal conscience and the right to
self-determination are the basic ingredients of al! free
men a union toward which many people in the world
aspire today.
Sukkoth thus serves to remind, us that Jews have
been a free people dnce the dawn of Jieir history de-
spite the afflictions they have suffered in the name of
their faith.
The *\ ea* of Technicians
The primary thing to be said for Congressional ap-
proval of U.S. civilian technicians stationed in the Sinai
is that they symbolize the Egyptian-Israeli interim agree-
ment as Soviet-'Tein."
This is no small achievement in light of the extent
to which the Ford administration, and the Nixon admin-
istration preceding it. have gone to pay homage to the
Russians at every opportunity.
Even in the matter of the agreement itself, the I' S.
remained conspicuously absent not only at the signing
ceremony in Geneva, but at the first working session of
representatives of both the Israeli and Egyptian govern-
ments to work out details of its implementation.
In effect, the U.S. did not want to "insult" the
Soviets, who for their part, refused to be present because
they wanted to put the world on notice that they accept
"no responsibility" for the agreement as if any
had asked them to.
Why should they presume to accept respor
for it when the tr_t> is that they have done every-h
possible to sabotage it from the very beginning.
Yet so concerned about Soviet feelings is the Ford
riticfi of course takes its cues
Set -.a:e Kissinger, tha: it ;->:ruc*ed l\S .
from ".r.ese sessions
An I nnaiural Dependence
Having said that So-. :et ab ;:.. e :i better than
presence, and that rids :s good enough i
O.S. to approve the Smai technicians conditions,
would like to suggest that those Israelis who ere
spoken in their crut.-iirr. of this con.:
cellent point.
Mainly, they are concerned that it paves the -;
tov. Israeli dependence upon
American power in :he matter of peace hetwecr. Israel
d Egypt when it ought to be Israel that shi uiucr-
that duty as a free ind independent nation.
We agree. Bu' our own reservations move in
another direction.
We are concerned about the course of events should
the Egyptians decide to launch a strike against Israel
before the three years of peace to which they have
committed themselves have passed.

---
In the Wax of Self-Defense
For their part. Egypt could care less about the
ety of several hundred American technicians. On the
other hand. Israel would have to care very much indeed.
The consequence might well be a hampering of Is-
raeli maneuverability in self-defense and an unnatural
advantage ;:ven to Egypt without America's cuite mean-
ing to do that. Here at home, the feeling against the
^h community could, in the end. be disastrous.
Tho t0 ire not mcons -ir prc-
Israe!; stance.
Toe. .v mining every conceivable fu-
and "g things that
yet thought to see.
Words and Actions Don't Match
HARDLY a year ago, there
was Gerald Ford as Vice
President by the grace of Spiro
T. Agnew's criminality. Now.
seme thirteen months later
-ten- is ra!d ford as Pru-
dent by the grace of Richard
M. N'ixcn s criminality
No one but the People of
Michigan elected Ford to any-
thing, and wouldn't you know-
it. like a sveit? V dentine with
the -chutzpah" of a "chamor.''
he is already beating the hust-
-caw it ay?
\777i
ings to tell us why .,
be President again uld
AMONG THE million.* ,,
reasons why he should m, ,
nbfe 'nteniew he gave'fcV
Laura.-Mo., the-oft,r d* ,*
ing which he declared hat "TW
business of ihe preside**?
the people." B
Luve a knight in ,;-;nin-
mo.. Ford was defending _
' !'S right to know again*
thj best advice of the Seem
ten ice and other protectors of
the realm who an- arguing that
th.- President ouent to restrict
his public appearances follow-
ing the assassination attest <
hiii in bacranu: me t*
wieks ago.
Without a doubt Ford's
u >rds do have a certain self-
sacrificial splendor, but like the
rest of what he sa
empty rhetoric jacked
up against hi-
AT THE same time that he
was making t: p^
njuncjment. th ...
ji.st aoout t:j c
tae people b right l i noi
ali trie fury the rial of-
ftc wields
At that ver -t. Ford
wm preparing to
_:.!.a of tne classified docu-
: : ,-,: sent to t Com-
mittee on Intel! for ::
hea ing into the
me committf ist mace
public th CIA incredible
bungling of intelligence data on
the eve o; tne 19~3 Yom Kip-
pur War that "proved" there
was no imminence of war in
the Middle East.
FORD DIDN'T like that be-
trayal of official incompetence
Continued on Page 13-A
Can Past Glory be Recaptured?
By MAX LERNER
Los Aneele* Times Syndicate
- Hi .."" I N N V I
-
- -
'.
..
iortfc i _'
no* u nacfeetsiqi
-
-
-

es he
I.. Dt
.- ;i not of
..den Johns n
is a 1
-;tor. a v
man. K.s em-
ml bread
- But where LBJ
m life.
. ssn't
EUGENE McCARTW
L96E
.- -
er to
te ha
human

the hour
re by-
ft him with
LERNCR
I followed Sargent Shriver
and Paris
s to be
ocia-
rfa Mc-
with
I YJ2. He is n.it a Ken-
i is related to
- breams of
. John Kennedy.
He hunself. Yet
:ard to believe tas he told
..- that he is
a star of destiny that will
carry him to the Presidency.
George Wallace's dream is
that he can pick up where he
left off when he was shot in
1972, and that nothing has hap-
i since.
Like one of those unused
clocks in a musty house, which
always reads 4:30, George Wal-
lace has expected time to stand
still for him. Yet in fact it has
n cruel to him It has in-
capacitated him for the most
nueus offic
It was made his c mpijoship
f
banai.
WHEN
U
I
.
re beating a bi ^;;
d) well ;n th-
-
ane for ei1 ,n m
ticket.
After the Md f*>'
trophe in 1972,
and Henry Jack- > f
better road n bm
itory doesn't state w
Emerson's law t *
THE FEELING about MUSW
today is that a man who could
not take the pressure w
campaign won't take the prw
sure of the Pre
Jackson dre.v '*
scales of historic justice wow
swing his way. anc for a tune
Continued on Page U**
'iJewisii Floridian
E AM PLANT || BTHBBT

: M

:: MINI
lie 1
SE1 '
"
'
w.th Fier -^r Cces Not C Of Tn Mrr-nndiie Adv't*$ed in Its Column*
V .
_________ ;______
wish Unit) >" :
!_:" ". A*nsy, Seven A"> F'. .,- *
Oot c' Town Uoon Request
B
19, 19"5
-------N
14TIS 15731


Pridav September 19, 1975
* Jkwiiti Fht/dU&f)
Page 5-A
'or co-piete information and reservations, contact: fJowar(l ^t0,ie,> DireC*r ^ ^ver ^eaS Pl'Ograms
United Jewish Appeal [
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, N.Y. 10019
(212) PL M500
. .i*i


Page (5-A
Jmist-fkrkfiar
Friday, September
HOLIDAY BEGINS FRIDAY AT SUNDOWN
Origins of the Sukkah Booth
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
The sukkah is a booth erected
for the festival of Sukkoth. which
this year begins on September
20, in accordance with the bib-
lical commandment "Ye shall
dwell in boths seven days"
(Lev. 23:42). The reason for the
commandment given in the
Bible is "that your generations
may know that I made the Chil-
dren of Israel to dwell in booths,
when I brought them oat of the
land of Egypt" (Lev. 23:43).
THE MOST important section
in the construction of the suk-
kah is the roof made of cover-
ing known as "sekhakh."' The
sekhakh must be cut from that
which grew in the soil and
which is not susceptible to
ritual impurity.
The authoritative Encyclopae-
dia Judaica reports that the sek-
hakh must be so arranged that
the shaded area within the suk-
kah will exceed the unshaded.
Any material may be used in
the construction of the walls, at
least two of which must be com-
plete, while the third may be
partial. It is particularly meri-
torious to begin construction of
the sukkah at the conclusion of
the Day of Atonement.
Throughout the seven days of
the festival, the sukkah must be
regarded as one's principal
abode, and the house merely a
temporary residence. Thus, it is
forbidden to eat in the sukkah
on the first night of the festival.
If rain is like to spoil one's
DR. LACHMAN is executive
editor of the Encyclopae-
dia Judaica. Sukkoth be-
gins at sundown on Fri-
day. In this column, Dr.
Lachman discusses the
origins of the Sukkah as-
sociated with the celebra-
tion of the holiday.
food, it is permitted to transfer
the meal to the house. Bach
time one eats in the sukkah the
blessing "to dwell in the suk-
kah" is recited, usually after the
blessing over bread.
IT IS customary to decorate
the sukkah with fruit (which
may not be eaten during tha
festival) and with the symbols
of Sukkoth. and to recite spe-
cial welcomes to the seven
"guests of the festival," Abra-
ham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Mos-
es, Aaron and David, on each
day of Sukkot. According to the
Midrash, the Children of Israel
were divinely protected in the
wilderness by the shelter of the
tabernacles solely because the
Patriarch Abraham had given
shelter to three strangers be-
neath the tree on his property.
It is also customary to construct
a sukkah at the synagogue
where a token meal (usually a
Kiddush). is held after the holi-
day services. In present day Is-
rael the Samaritans erect the
sukkah inside their houses,
Zionist Leaders
Warn Against
Overconfidence
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
world Zionist leaders have
warned the Jewish community
against being lulled into a state
of overconfidence as a result
of the Israel-Egypt pact by un-
derrating the impact of the con-
certed Arab propaganda cam-
paign launched among all sec-
tors of the population.
They called for a stepped-up
public education drive to rally
support for Israel's
which, they gai u .;..
threatened by extremist A
re( imes.
ADDRESSING heix- a meet-
ing '' th cutive c mmittee
oi the World Confederation of
ited / i / Sha-
piro, its ait, and (Caiman
Sultanik. executive vice presi-
dent, asserted that it would be
"a colossal blunder for Jews
everywhere to assume that the
signing of the interim agree-
ment gives cause for compla-
cency as long as there is no
acquiescence by the Arab states
for secure Israel boundaries."
The World Confederation of
United Zionists is the central
coordinating body of all Zionist
organizations throughout the
world who subscribe to the
principles of non-identification
with political parties in Israel.
In the United States the main
constituents of the Confedera-
tion are Hadassah, B'nai Zion
and the American Jewish
League for Israel.
SHAPIRO, who serves as
chairman of the World Keren
Hayesod. stressed the need for
the Zionist movement to wage
a campaign ^.mong the Jewish
communities "to deepen the
Zionist ideology by imparting
an understanding and consci-
ousness of the meaning of the
centrality of Israel in Jewish
life today."
Shapiro emphasized the im-
portance at this time of
strengthening non-party Zion-
ism to attract all segments of
diaspora Jews who do not wish
affiliation with a political party
in Israel.
Involvement in diaspora Zion-
by Zionist leaders in
1 an leaders of aj
: I irael would!
I1 ntal to the Zi.
he said.
a member cf the'
?rid Zionist Executive, re-
ting on his visits to Latin
America, the Far East, Aus-
tralia and New Zealand, stated
that the influx of Arab oil funds [
into those countries for propa-
ganda purposes have also stim-
ulated the local Arab residents
to a closer alliance with the
anti-Semitic and extremist left-
ist groups, contributing to the
creation of an anti-Semitic cli-
mate.
HE REPORTED that these
anti Israel sentiments have
even infiltrated into certain
government ranks.
Sultanik further stated that
the economic difficulties, as was
the case in other countries in
the past, are being exploited by
anti-Semitic elements to incite
the population against the Jews
and against Israei.
He underscored th-,- urgency
for world Jewry to rally the
constructive forces throughout
the world in order to "prevent
the sowing of the seeds for the
nucleus of another holocaust."
while Jews construct sukkot on
the sidewalks, roofs, and bal-
conies of their houses reminis-
cent of what is described in
Nehemiah: 'So the people went
forth and made themselves
booths, every one upon the roof
of his house, and in their courts,
and in the courts of the house
of God ." (3:16-18).
PHILO suggested that the suk-
kah was built to show misfor-
tune at a time of good fortune
and to remind the rich of the
poor and Maimonides similarly
interprets the lesson of the tab-
ernacle. There are modern
scholars who see the origin of
the custom in reinterpretation
of some ancient agricultural rite
but the nature of this is disput-
ed.
Prayers Said For
Ford's Escape
TEL AVIV (JTA) A special "gome!" blessin,]
was recited for President Ford during Rosh HashoruH
services at a Sephardi synagogue in Rama? Gan ate
the President narrowly escaped a possible assassinate
attempt in Sacramento, Cal. *
The benediction, traditionally offered bv a Jew who
averts disaster, was given by Moshe Lew. an imwr?|
who has been corresponding with the White House aboJ
Israel's need for American backing.
FORD HAD a pistol pointed at him bv Lyi^.
Fromme, identified as a member of the Charles Manson
family," while mingling with crowds in the California
capital. A secret service agent disarmed the woman
before she could fire.
Levi said that since Ford is a non-Jew he canno'
recite the "gomel" blessing for himself and Levi decided
to offer the prayer for him.
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*


Sep
tember 19, 1975
* A^h > A fkractiar
Pace 7-A
Terrorists Take Egyptian Hostage in Madrid
icy M. ^ronotfifz has
i nominafed to be Judge
I i/.S. District Court
Southern District o/
^i, succeeding Judge
5, Mehrfens. A Mldmt
ney fl"d former city
llM*iorer, Arotiovitz
. n-'ecfed /rom among
In candidates and rec-
[end:d by the Florida
icifll JVomiiMtMj Com-
et Sens. Lawtcn Chiles
Richard Stone have
\arded Arortnvitz' name
|hc White House for ar>-
iiment.
>
EVENING WITH
HENRY HOWARD
l.'c-n Chairmen and Chair-
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PHONE: 866-0200
MADRID Egypt's Ambas-
b to .-:- Mahtneud Ab-
del Ghaffar and four other Arab
j leaders, wari ^detaiife j as hos-
"tag.3 in EgypTs Embassy here
Monday by terrorists who claim-
ed to be acting in the cause
of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization.
The terrorists threatened to
kill the hostages and blow up
the Embassy if Egypt and Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat failed to re-
pudiate the Interim accord en-
gineered by U.S. Secretary of
Slate Henry Kissinger and sign-
ed by Israel and Egypt in Ge-
nera last week.
AFTER A 16-hour siege of
the Embassy, the quartet agreed
to let four of the hostages go
if Egypt provided them with a
plane for Algeria.
In addition to Egypt's Am-
bassador, the other hostages in-
cluded Iraqi Ambassador Has-
san Nftgib. Algerian Ambassa-
dor Mohamed Khaled Khelladi,
Egyptian Consul Mohamed Shaf-
fei Kedkki. and Press Attache
Mohamed Affifi.
The attack came on the heels
cf a statement by President
Sadet calling for Egyptian repu-
diation of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and the So-
viet Union, which Sadat charg-
ed was trying to wreck the in-
terim accord.
ALSO THERE were angry
comments by PLO Chief Yasir
Arafat over the weekend that
his organization planned to step
up its terrorist attacks against
Israel at least until any accord
betw '?fl lerael and the Arabs
mentions the Palestinian people
and their right to a separate
and independent state in Pales-
tine presumably the Weal
Bank of Jordan.
"This is no picnic." he said in
an NBC-TV interview. "This is
revolution. '
r*'-erthelew. the PLO
tly dissociated itself
the attack on the Egyp-
tian Embassy here. Also:
It was an Algerian airliner
that arrived at Barajas Interna-
tional Airport early Tuesday to
take the terrorists to Algeria;
While they let four of their
five hostages go, the terrorists
took Ambassador Ghaffar along
with them and four other hos-
tag '6;
Sadat, in an address before
Egypt's top political leaders, re-
vealed that Algeria agreed to
send a plane, but that the Al-
gerians had asked for "Egypt's
permission," of which Sadat
said, "I gave them my approval
immediately";
Careful n:it to widen what
appears to be a breach between
Egypt and the other Arab na-
tions, Sadat also said, referring
to the PLO and its chief. "Yasir,
our position in the Arab-Israeli
conflict has not changed. We
always think of their Arab in-
terests as well as the interests
of the Palestinian people."
Jordan Deal Played Carefully
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Ford Administration
withdrew its letter to Con-
gress announcing a propos-
ed sale Of a $350 million air
defense system to Jordan
just hours before the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee was to vote on wheth-
er to object to the sale. The
House International Rela-
tions Committee had voted
to reject the deal.
The Administration's de-
cision was announced by
Sen. Clifford P. Case, (R.,
N.J.), a member of the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, who had conducted
negotiations with the State
Department in an attempt to
cut the number of "Hawk"
surface-to-air missiles being
sold to Jordan from 14 bat-
teries to six.
CASE IN a statement to re-
porters, said he believed the Ad-
ministration's decision was
"wise." He noted that both the
Senate and House committees
had "developed evidence that
such a sale (of Hawks) was ex-
^ccjve."
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"I hope that any new notice
sent to Congress after the Au-
gust recess will reflect what I
see as the overwhelming con-
cern in Congress that the pro-
posed sale to Jordan was larger
than her requirements for pure-
ly defensive purposes," Case
sairl.
"This is in accord with the
unanimous views of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff. This should
serve as ah informed guideline
both for the State Department
ahd for Jordan as well."
THE ADMTNISTRATION an-
nounced the proposed sale,
which also Includes eight bat-
teries of "Vulcan" anti-aircraft
guns, to Congress on July 11
under a new law which requir-
es the Administration to inform
Congress of any proposed arms
sale of $25 million or more.
Congress then had 20 days in
which it could disallow the sale.
Case and other Congressional
critics objected that the sale
was too large and would upset
the military balance in the Mid-
dle East.
They also objected to the pro-
posed sale of 300 "Redeye"
shoulder-fired missiles because
of fear they could fall Into the
hands bf terrorists.
The Administration, which
maintained the sale was needed
to keep Jordan moderate and
friendly to the United States, at
first reportedly agreed to re-
duce the "Hawk" batteries to
six.
BUT IT then called for the
full sale after King Hussein of
Jordan rejected any cut in the
arms he had been promised.
However, last week Gen.
George S. Brown, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told
the Senate committee that the
Chiefs had unanimously recom-
mended that only six "Hawk"
batteries be sold to Jordan.
Brown said the Joint Chiefs
had decided there were only six
sites in Jordan that needed the
"Hawks" and that six batteries,
with six launchers to a battery,
were sufficient for Jordan's
needs. The Administration had
asserted that 14 batteries were
the minimum for a Jordanian
air-defense system.
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Page 8-A
+ k>wistifk>ridliaM_
'No' in March, 6Yes' in August for Rabin
WASHINGTONPolitical ob-
servers tend to confirm Dr.
Henry Kissinger's assessment
that the present accord between
Israel and Egypt is substantially
the same as that which was pro-
posed last March and which Is-
rael rejected at that time.
Both the New York Times and
the Parisian Le Monde hold the
same view. The authoritative
Hebrew daily. "Ha'aretz." is also
in accord with this view but.
adds that the only gain Israel
apparently achieved is agree-
ment on the part of Egvpt that
some 150 American technicians
should be allowed to man elec-
tronic surveillance equipment in
the Sinai passes which will warn
either of the two sides of a pos-
sible breach in the armistice.
At the same time, "Ha'aretz"
characterizes this gain as a
"dubious achievement." The
newspaper further states that
the involvement of Americans
on the border with Egypt is
bound to evoke a negative re-
action on the nart of American
public opinion.
it it it
Sharon to Address ZOA
NEW YORK Gen. Ariel
(Aril;) Sharon, mihtarv adviser
to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and hero of the Yom Kippur
War. will be featured guest
sneaker t the oneninq sssion
of the 78th annual national con-
vention of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America at the Sheraton-
Chicago Hotel on Thursday eve-
ning, Oct. 2. ZOA president. Dr.
Joseph P. Sternstein. will de-
liver the keynote address.
The convention will b ad-
dressed by an array of distin-
guished public flswres. among
whom are Sen. John G. Tower
(R.-Tex.). who will be the prin-
cipal speaker at the closing con-
vention banquet.
Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr.,
former U.S. Chief of Naval Op-
erations, who is currently presi-
dent of American* for Energy
Independence, will be the prin-
cipal sneaker at the plenary
session Saturday night. Oct. 4.
Prof. Hans Morgenthau. au-
thority on international affairs,
and outspoken critic of U.S.
Government policies in the Mid-
dle East, will also address the
convention.
it it it
Jews Resented Being Excluded
TEL AVIVActing chairman
of the Jewish Agency, Aryeh
Dulzin, speaking on how world
Jewry feels these days, said at
a press interview that American
Jews "do not understand, nor
do they appreciate why the Is-
rael government gave up so
much in their negotiations with
Dr. Kissinger.
"American Jews had hoped
that our government would be
steadfast, but events demon-
strated weakness instead. And
this was reflected, they feel, in
its dealings with the U.S. Secre-
tary of state. It also had a direct
bearing on the attitude of Egypt,
which was emboldened to stif-
fen its position."
According to Dulzin, Amer-
ican Jews resent the fact that
they were not permitted to play
any active role during the re-
cent developments on the poli-
tical front. "When I asked one
UJA leader," Dulzin said, "how
do you account for the fact that
contributions are up, he explain-
ed verv simply: 'Jews are an-
gry, Jews are concerned and are
resentful that they are not al-
lowed to do anything on the
political scene. The only thing
that they can do is to make their
contributions, that is, give
money.' This is, perhaps, a posi-
tive effect of a negative attitude,
but it can change for the worse
if there is a feeling amongst
Jews of being isolated, in the
s"me wav that Israel has be-
come politically isolated among
the nations."
it Bankers Earning Millions
NEW YORKLondon sources
reveal that three well-known
Jewish bankers have each earn-
ed more than a million pounds
sterling in a transaction involv-
ing the purchase of arms by
Saudi Arabia from England and
France.
The financiers handled the
transaction at the behest of the
Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia,
brother to the incumbent ruler.
Israel Population
Set at 3.4 Million
JERUSALEM (JTA) Some 3,451,000 people pres-
ently reside in Israel, Ihe Central Bureau of Statistics an- \
nounced on the eve of Rosh Hashonah. Some 2,921,000 of
these are Jews, and 530,000 non-Jews.
THE OVERALL population growth during 1974-75 was
2.1 percent, the Jewish population increased by 1.8 percent
(51,000), ?ind the non-Jewish population increased by 3.7
percent (19,000 Moslems, Arab Christians and Druze).
The slow rise in the growth of Jewish population was
partly related to a drop by 48 percent of the number of
"Olim" arriving in Israel last year. Only 22,000 immigrated
to Israel during 1974-5.
Russian Jews Injured
By Police on Rosh Hashona
NEW YORK (JTA) Several Jews were injured
when police forcibly ended their attempt to block heavy;
traffic deliberately diverted past Moscow's Central Syna-i
gogue on Arkhipov Street on Rosh Hashona evening, the
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry reported here.
The diversion of traffic to the narrow, normally empty
side street on the High Holy Days is a typical form of Soviet
harassment, an SSSJ spokesman said.
This time, Jews lay down in the street in front of the
synagogue but were dragged away by police.
The Crown Prince was quite
aware that the three bankers
were Jews.
The transaction involved a
bankers belongs to a very pro-
large sum of money. One of the
minent Jewish family in Lon-
don.
i? it
PLO Listed in Directory
NEW YORK UN Secretary
General Dr. Kurt Waldheim di-
rected that the PaWtin* terror-
ist organization (PLO) be in-
cluded in the "Blue Book"
which lists all diplomatic repre-
sentations in the UN. By this act
the terrorist organization has
been officially recognized as the
representative of a sovereign
state.
Israel's energetic efforts to
frustrate this act were of no
avail. The Israeli government
had reauested the intervention
of the United States, but the U.S.
State Department failed to react.
However, the United States is
conducting a counter-offensive
to the movement which has been
initiated by the Arabs to ex-1
elude Israel from the coming
session of the UN.
In this- respect, America en-
joys the backing of Kngland.
France, Canada and India.
. .. ,-..
Reiect Hawk Missile Sale
WASHINGTON Ccns.
should block the proposed sale
of the Hawk anti-''ircaft m's^ile
batfri""! to Jordan. cn. Rich-
ard (Dick) Ston1 M in a letter
to his Senate colleagues.
"Such a sal" is n tt^ev n the
pitinTT1! s"C'*'-'tv n-v- flio nation-
al interest of the United States,"
he wrote.
Th Administration nroDOSSS
to sell 14 batt'H -- of '' H I-
vanced Hawk missiles to Jordan.
Unless eithsr til S r or the
House blocks the sate bv Sept.
22 it will automatically i;o
through.

Percy Rebukes PI 0 '". t-> i-sts
CHICAGO "At this time,
when we have reason to expect
a reduction of tensions in the
Sinai as a result of the Israeli-
Egvntian interim settlement, it
is disturbing if not surprising to
hear threatening sounds from
j Hans H. Marcuse"
Louis Witkin
To assure you of a
superb social event
Bar Mitzvah. Wedding
Anniversary Party.
!
:
nt the all new
certain *tiBian(h&?r
Sen. Charles Percy (R.-IH.) de-
clared here this week.
It is clear that the Palestin-
ian extremists feel alienated as
thev see other Arab leaders now
acting in a more conciliatory
manner, one which provides the
first glimmer of hope that the
Arab-Israeli dispute can be set-
tled by negotiation rather than
war.
To extremists, the path of
negotiation ifi so contrary to
their hit-and-run tactics that the
very thought of it is threaten-
ing. So threatening in this case,
in fact, that the PI*0 newspaper
in Beirut has urged Arabs to
shoot to kill any Americans sta-
tioned as cease-fire observers in
the Sinai .
"The PLO threat will not in-
fluence Congressional action
one way or another. What it will
dolike previous PLO threats
and acts of terrorism is to
Fritter, September 1%. #
further hinder the taii
rights and goals of th*
tinian people."
ft it
Blck uroup auppon, lri
NEW YORK-A newly.J'
Black Americans to Support
rael Committee (BASIC)
up of more than 100 pro'iw,
Blacks, has expressed "admin
tie." for Israel's "democr
values" and "her impressive,
cial achievements."
The group, whose chairman;
the veteran labor leader
Phillip Randolph, and whose!
rector is the civil rights lead
Bavard Rustin, condemned
anti-Jewish "blacklist," affirn
that "Blacks and Jews haft-
common interests in democranl
and justice" and support^
"democratic Israel's right ttl
exist."
BASIC said it supported!
"peace through mutual recoil
tion" in the Middle East aid
"the rights of the Palestinian!
to genuine self-determinatiiJ
but not at the expense of tin
rights of Jews to independence!
and statehood."
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Iprtday. September 19,1975
^JewisHhrkUart
Page 9-A
Woman Seeks Post in Sinai
Continued from Pag* 1-A
t0 lead a more peaceful life.
1 have been in the Negev.
aid I know how bleak and des-
olate the land can be, but I will
volunteer for one to two years
service _____________
CONGRES&WOMAN ABZUG
said she was referring inquir-
ies about the volunteer force
to the State Department.
In her general comments on
the Israeli-Egyptian pact, she
said:
"I welcome and support the
interim agreement as a signifi-
cant step toward achieving a
stable peace in the Middle East:
It is a great relief that after
the disappointments earlier this
year it has been possible to
work out a plan that will pro-
vide three years of peace be-
tween Israel and Egypt and
lessen fears of a major war.
"I BELIEVE the concessions
made by Israel demonstrate that
nation's deep sense of respon-
sibility and commitment to
peace. The fact that both Israel
and Egypt insisted on the pres-
ence of American civilian tech-
nicians in the Mitla and Gidi
Passes shows that neither sido
views this as a partisan gam,
but rather as a further guaran-
tee of peace. Also, the Amer-
ican technicians will be sta-
tioned within the UN buffci*
zone, which provides anotlW
safety factor.
"I hope Congress will appro. i
the agreement and provide trio
aid necessary to maintain peace
in the Middle East."
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'Glezele Varans' Just the Thing to Cool OB on a Hot Summer's Day
W'fTH ALL the talk about new sources cf energy
the s-n. the sea. the winds wnat about an old
J-wish source that has stood the test cf many years.
-.lean a "glezele varums" (a hot glass of tea).
!MWhat doz'i a good Jew da to cool off? Does he
turn on an electric fan? No. Ke takes a hot glass of
tea.
IN WINTER, when he wants to warm up. does
he waste gat lint? No. He takM a hot glass of tea.
To be sure, warming a giass of tea requires
some fuel too. but warming a cup of tea is much
cheaper than warming or cooling a room .
Why are Jews such lo\ing people? I have often
wondered about it. The answer is plain. If you get
into the practice of kissing, you must become lov-
ing, and what people kiss so much as Jews?
Jews kiss several times as much as other peo-
ple. Maybe you doO't realize it. If so, it's because
you do hot associate With the right kind of Jews. A

good religious Jew does a great deal of kissing.
Many Jews will not leave or enter the house with-
out kissing.
THEY KISS the Mezuza on the door, of course.
And what a wonderful thing to kiss. In the
Mezuza is a little parchment ih which is inscribed
the words of Scripture: "Thou shault love the Lord
thy God with all thy heart and all thy might" .
I understand that the home of Attorney General
Edward Levi, when he was president of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, had a Mezuza on the door.
Levi is row concerned with the great a
in crime in the country especially murders and
he wants to make it more difficult to get guns.
MAYBE IF there were Mezu-as on tvery hc^e
for people to kiss, it might work even better. We
have never heard of a man with a Mezuza on his
house shooting another .
Psoriasis is a very hard word to spell. It's even
harder to have it. There are worse things but it is
an annoying skin affliction and millions of people
suffer from it in greater or lesser degree.
A Dutch scientist recently reported that the
Dead Sea area in Israel is very beneficial for the
sufferers. The reason is said to be the high oxygen
content of the air in that area.
This is a little paradoxical when we remember
that the Dead Sea is the lowest point on earth below
sea level.

Salaries Up.
Tuition Down
rpHE CURRENT recession has put the Hebrew day school
movement in a "financial pincers" of simultaneous requests
for reduced tuition fees from marginal or newly-jobless parents
and requests for cost-ovliving increases from teaching staff
members, according to officials of Torah Umesorah, the Na-
tional Society for Hebrew day schools.
But the officials stressed that no Hebrew day schools
had been forced to close for financial reasons during the
school year which ended last month and that it was highly un-
likely that any would be forced to shut down for such reasons
during the coming school year.
DR. JOSEPH KAMINETSKY, Torah Umesorah national di-
rector, told a meeting of the educational agency's board, con-
vened to discuss the recession-inflation crisis, that the twin
set of requests were playing havoc with day school budgets
throughout the country. He said a number of Hebrew day
schools had not met their payroll for weekr
He reported that the 474 Hebrew day schools, located in
34 states, were preparing requests for larger allocations from
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds. He said that, in most
cases, the requests will be for increases of between 15 and 25
percent, with some schools planning to ask increases of up to
50 percent.
MOSES I. FEUERSTEIN, Torah Umesorah executive com-
mittee chairman, reported that the loan funds of the agency
had been totally depleted. Last year, he said. Torah Umesorah
provided Hebrew day schools with interest-free loans totalling
nearly S330.000.
Rabbi Bernard Goldenberg. Torah Umesorah director of
school organization and \ >:<.-- nal services, reported that
day schools he visited during a recent trip to the
south and the east coast indicated plans to raise tuition fees
by ten percent for the 1275-76 school year.
AMPLIFYING THE reports, Rabbi Goldenberg told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that the problem of unmet payrolls
was g-eater is the New York area I an sewhere in the United
States. He said that, outside of New York, the longest period
o: non-payment of salaries was around two months, while in
the New York area it was as high as four months for some
schools.
He said the affected teachers were turning to loans, credit
extensions and their in-!aws. He also noted that many Hebrew-
day school teachers have long been forced to moonlight, that
some hold down extra jobs and that wives of teachers usu
work. He said that the 'act was that New York Hebrew day
schools "are carried on the backs of teachers."
HE SAID he found most schools he visited determined not
to cut instruction?! staifs and educational programming and
that they hoped to make savings in areas of extra-curricular
activities, office overhead and tighter control over use of sup-
:e used by a few schools with some sue
which more sch paxrttd to test, he said, is to urge
pare: borrow | : inds from ban' s.
He said th ptooeetore provides the school with funds at
the start of the school year while costing the parents only the
different merest deductions on their income tax
and the interest charge ior the loan. But. he noted, that pro-
cedure can work only with middle-income families.
RABBI GOLDENBERG said some parents send their chil-
dren to day schools for reasons other than religious commit-
ment, such as the quality of the schools.
For such "fringe-interest" parents, reductions of scholar-
ships or tuition increases often leads to a decision to take
their children out of the day schools. He said that, outside of
New York, such losses can be as high as 10 to 15 percent of
enrollment.
Friday, September 19, 1975 fJewist)fkrkM&nP*& 10-A
-

&v~~ Refen( 0fferin$s B.v
anLriccman
WHY "Gates of Bronze." by Haim Hazaz.
translated by S. Grshon Levi and with
introduction by Robert Alter is "a prize-win-
ning landmark of Hebrew fiction and a work
rich in historical and Jewish resonance" (Jew-
ish Publication Society. S7.95. 400 pages) is an
enigma to this reviewer. Hazaz was one of Is-
rael's literary giants, but early works of even
the great might be better forgotten.
The book was written in 1923 while Hazaz
resided in Paris. It is a novel. The story ro-
tates about the Jews of a shtetl, Mokry-Kut
(not the only strange name in the book), and
how the Russian Revolution affected them.
THERE WERE Mensheviks. Bolsheviks.
Whites and Anarchists. Tie fictional shtetl is
not a microcosm of other similar villages and
the difficulty of making comparisons lies in
the fact that Mokry-Kut lay off the beaten
path and were often weeks behind in an aware-
ness of developments in the country.
We understand that communications were
far fro-i adequate during the fateful years
1917-1918.
CHAPTERS ARE brief, continuity is spot-
ty, and many characters are not three-dimen-
sional. Both the translator and Alter concede
. translation was fficult be-
Hello There. Who's
Listening on Line?
(JMBR PXESKfl .... in Israel there is lit-
tie control over tapping of telephones.
-s are known
to utilize wire taps to obtain information on
activities which menace state security, and the
public understand the justification for such
action.
The best known ease was in 1%" when
our sophisticated ei-.v -vices nicked up
the now historic
nd I
- of the Si v...-.
RECORDINGS, as broada
rael Radio, gave the whole world a chanc
hear ? sar Lead Jordan's
into thinking the war was ^oing well for tin-
Arabs when tter of fact Nasser knew it
had already oeen lost.
Isras luipment to listen
~:1 :1 ions in l teir battle
against crime. Aftei c i ninals them-
selves exploit such ,.. i : ,r their ,n,,..
>es.
We have only to recall the case of the
clever swindler who successfully tapped the
telephone of a bank, intercepted incoming calls
from the bank branches, and one aft-r the
other 'authorized" the cashing of worthless
checks.
THE PRESS is not exempt. Outgoing mail
Jewish Publication Society
cause there is so much of Hazaz that is neces-
sarily lost in translation" .
"THE POLISH LAD," by Isaac Joti Li-
netski. translated from the Yiddish by Mosne
Spiegel with introduction by Milton Hindus
(S7.95. 305 pages) is a delight. The book first
appeared in 1869 in Poland and was an imme-
diate success.
It Is a polemic and diatribe against Hasid-
ism. As a novel it is engrossing. As a pok
it is overdone to the extent that the readsi
will reject the exaggerations of the author.
I am not a "hasid," but I do know that
Hassidism did much to revitalize East Europ-
ean Judaism in the 19th century.
THE BOOK is rightfully called i
classic of its time. Readers are cat'
remember that the author was a SCi
Hassidic family in Podolia, Ukraine. I re-
belled against his milieu and became a
He affiliated with the right wing masl ... '.
Converts usually are h:i sh '
earlier associates in man. s oi fd! e
have lea ned, to our regr t. fe *n Jew
tates to Christianity. Jewi-h apostates are
usually more virulentlj .
horn to Christiani
Qsd


cables of a newspaperman are subject to
tiny to ensure that he is not. deliberately
or unconsciously, b traying information
ful to national security. If this is justii.
it any different if his telephone calls I
overseas newspaper are also monitor
But then this might lead to probing
- sources of information.
B in i the delicate problem of press fn
nd. it comes down to the c>
infringement of citizens' rights on j
ne hand, and the need to ensure
ther. All of democratic govern
' the willingness of a citizen t
some of his individual lib- n
for that law and order which is in
1 "' rests of all.
I. foi one. wouid prefer to see a bit
dividual rights nibbled away, rather than
ks in the national security
in a nation like Israel which is ill
state of war.
Nl ERTHELESS, there is fear of 8
especially since the private detective age
and investigation offices which have I
roomed in Israel are free to listen in with al-
most no legal hindrance.
The Ministry of Justice is now prepar'n8
a draft law to regulate and control eavesdrop- j
Ping, without banning it completely.
-\

...


L;t!a;, September 19, 1975
''
Iph/*#- fk-rldtaam
Page 11-A
Gremlins Mystify Headline-Writer's Zeal
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
um I at the outset compli-
I ment' both you and your staff
for producing a constantly-im-
proving and increasingly more
readable and interesting pub-
| lication.
However, in The Jewish Flor-
I iUian of Palm Beach County of
Sept 12, there appeared a some-
what less than accurate head-
line reading "Bicentenial Event:
IS N'avy's First Jewish Rear
I Admiral."
IT IS true that the second
(paragraph of the informative
article on the renowned histor-
ian. Rabbi Bertram Korn, re-
cen'tlv promoted to Rear Ad-
miral in the Naval Reserve, does
state that he is "the first Jewish
Chaplain in the history of the
nation's armed forces to achieve
flag rank, but that is a far cry
from being our Navy's "First
Jewish Rear Admiral."
With no real effort I can think
of at least two (and there must
be more) Jewish Rear Admirals.
One is my friend and long-
time associate in synagogal ac-
tivities in Annapolis, Md., Rear
Adm. Morris Smellow, a Naval
Academy graduate and a most
estimable gentleman, and if I
mistake not, Hyman Rickover
either was or is of flag rank,
as a Rear Admiral or higher.
Your headline-writer should
watch out for those composing
room gremlins who are ever
lurking about.
LEO MELTZER
W. Palm Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reader
Can Past Glory
Be Recaptured?
Continued from Page 4-A
I he looked like the lead contend-
er. But with all his knowledge
and ability, he got tangled in a
detente controversy with Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger,
which deepened the fears about
[his Hawkishness, and history
I lost him.
THERE REMAIN the three
I Democrats who (along with
Wallace) are likely to fight it
put Hubert Humphrey, Ed-
ward Kennedy, Edmund (Jerry)
Brown. Humphrey is the vet-
eran who has been in all the
wars, seen all the battles, wept
for all the defeats, rejoiced at
I all the victories.
He is a good post-Watergate
[candidate because, if the Demo-
crats had worked for him just
a little harder in 1968, Nixon
Iwould have never reached the
| White House.
He calls himself a "utility in-
fielder," but his dream is that
history is inexhaustible, and
that after so many failed chanc-
es it will give him this last one.
President Ford thinks his op-
ponent will be Humphrey.
KENNEDY IS far in the lead
and will dominate the conven-
tion. His dream is that he will
live out the dreams of his
brothers and escape their night-
mares.
He is keeping his options I
open, but he will have to deal
seriously with the Chappaquid-1
dick shadow before he can be
nominated, or the election will
be messy. If Humphrey and
Kennedy get into a stalemate,
with Wallace contributing to
it, Jerry Brown may be a vi-
able candidate.
He comes from the right
state, has no past history to op-
press him or past enemies to
trip him, and his wry antipoliti-
cian style fits into the na-
tion's mood.
Israelis, Egypt
Implementing Pact
' Hid from Page 1-A
tl. Taha el Magdoub.
[ team is headed by
| to Prance, Mer-
lL it, a civilian.
ler him, however.
I h rankin | I
in, Gen. Herzl Sha-
ll I the General Head-
Branch; Gen. Avra-
I ir, chief of the Plan-
ich; and Col. Shimon
wn, liaison officer to the
|l "' Nations Emergency
force (UNEF) in Sinai.
The Israeli delegation con-
ned with Saunders and with
o'ilasvuo.
AT THE opening session, de-
scribed as "businesslike," the
teams drew up an agenda
F0r their future sessions and
'anned the routine of
ork.
their
Th* first Israeli withdrawal,
Fcribed by the interim ac-
P*. will be from the Abu Ro-
oilfielda
I
Is in southwestern
I Soviet Union and the
States, cochairmen of the
M* conference under whose
[^ices the meetings are tak-
<* stayed away from the
openina session, as they did at
the siyning ceremony.
The Soviet Union had said
they would not attend beca ise
it wants : rility for
the pact. The U.S. d d I
ap-
pearance of a br< :n of coop-
eration with the I SR
Midea it
SHLASVUO opened the meet-
ing with tributes to the Israeli
and Egyptian governments
'which have already demon-
strated their determination,
wisdom and courage to take
risks for peace."
He said the interim accord
may contribute to create the
proper framework" which
could contain "a comprehensive
solution in the whole area of
conflict."
Siilasvuo also stressed that
the military working groups
could contribute to the search
for peace by creating a proper
atmosphere, an obvious refer-
ence to the chilly atmosphere
at the signing.
He said the difficulties of the
tasks ahead were due "to con-
flicting perceptions of what
constitutes a just and lasting
solution "
l
am
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Worit Be Brief
Kohclcth (EccUtiastes)
rsmmmmi?mMmiwnnmmmtinmmitMMM\i\nmu<.u.
Meltzer is of course abso-
lutely correct. The grem-
lins were work.;.g over-
time.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Having subscribed to The
Jewish Floridian for four or five
years. I like most of your arti-
cles. However. I don't see the
value of carrying Max Lerner's
column.
THERE IS almost nothing on
Jewish subjects. In fact. Lerner
seems to avoid mentioning any-
thing on Israel, Soviet Jewry.
anti-Semitism, and so forth, to
such an extent that it is hard
to believe that Max Lerner is
Jewish.
I wish you would put in col-
umnists who deal with Jewish-
oriented subjectswe can read
secular or political columns like
""mj Max Lerner's in the daily press.
EARL RODNEY
North Miami Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Some
readers complain just as
ardently when we leave
Max Lerner out for a
week. Furthermore, the
number of columns Le-ner
has written, and The Jew-
ish Floridian has vublish-
ei on "Jewish subjects,"
is legion. For some reason,
Mr. Rodney seems to have
missed them.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Although there is little basis
for much optimism, the interim
agreement recently initialed by
Israel and Egypt carries within
it a potentially constructive first
steD towards the attainment of
peace in the Middle East. The
joint enterprise can become the
practical ground on which gen-
uine overtures towards peace
can be founded, if the oarties
to the agreement faithfully car-
ry out thir promises and re-
sponsibilities.
We are indeed gratified by
the contributions of our govern-
ment towards this end, and we
commend President Ford and
Secretary of State Kissinger for
their successful diplomatic ef-
forts.
THE AGREEMENT serves
substantially to lessen the So-
viet role in the Middle East and
correspondingly to increase
American influence in an area
rf the world Vital to our own
cor :. reaffirms our coun-
try's leading nlace in world af-
fairs and reestablishes our gov-
ernment as a nrinciDal factor
in h-idging international differ-
ences.
By assuming the role of "im-
partial umpire. our government
is nakme a direct contribution
to tranquility in the area.
American m-ticioation is at
the request of both Egypt and
Israel, with both 'des having a
=*V'e in 'maintaining the Amer-
ican nrenc there. In this
resoect. we call for earlv ratifi-
cation of the agreement bv the
U.*5. Congress including those
""visions the^ relate to the sta-
tioning of American civilian
technicians on both sides, which
WSre ---iuested by both parties.
THE ACTIVE participation of
r*vW nsuro that the im-
nle^ientatiin \> ill be fair and
und'r constant scrutiny.
Although th agreement rep-
resents a minimal risk on the
pt I the United States, the
tt<>inabh cal of stabilizing a
p: c:*' to on- w'fa*" and to that
of the rest of the free world.
ffs success ^enends on the
ability of r>e U.S. to see to it
t^at bo*h the letter and the
sni-ir of the new accord are
soHjoulously observed and im-
plemented.
On!v if its obligations and
responsibilities are faithfully
ed out by all sides can the
interim agreement become the
preamble to a Hist and lasting
peace in the Middle East.
MRS. IRVING B. KAPLAN
Miami Beach
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Page 12-A
+ Imitf nrrHtir_
Friday, September,
Ford Seeks Sinai Support from Leaders
By JOSEPH
WASHINGTON -
President Ford r .
33 Affier.. rders
at the White Hotu
invitation lor 40 rr.
and received ti
on the
America.-
nai under va new
brae
Attending (he me
*he Cabinet root
Secretar
Kissinger vai also present
were represent "
Conference of P tl of
FIILIM. IN
MCKGMKHD
.rnencan Jewish Or-
chaimaa, Rabb.
er and M
chainBafl of the Board of
man of the J-:
FISHER, a personal friend of
- -
\
" -
-

the
help in
ASKED BY Did
he (\ '
in the Conk-
plied, The President
cited, than to
he observed, "The Presi-
ld be very happy if we
He indicated that Ford
that not only a majority,
helming majority
support in Congress would
for the interim agree-
and would support a
movement for peace in the
en hisher was asked why
;aders of the American Jewish
mity were so supportive
the technicians while so
in Israel were against it,
plied, referring apparent-
the Interim agreement as
Udall Warns Against 'Partisan Opposition'
WASHINGTON fJTA)
Terming the congression-
al action on the U S assur-
ances to Israel "critical to
world peace," Rep. Morris
K. Udall (D Ariz.), called
on the House Democratic
leadership to 'think care-
fully about any partisan op-
position."
In a letter to House Speak-
er Carl Albert, Udall ex-
pressed his hope "that the
Democratic majorities in the
House and Senate would
take no action which might
jeopardize he Egyptian-Is-
raeli agreements without full
and complete understanding
A the implications and far-
reaching effects of congres-
sional delay that could be
construed by the parties to
the agreement as undue
hesitancy or procrast: na-
tion."
UDALL acknowledged that
the commitment of U.S. civil-
ians to the early warning line
needs further clarification, but
termed the commitment a~ re-
vealed in the agreement a very
modest risk. '
Ldall dismissed as "simplis-
tic" the analogies drawn by
some critics of the agreement
MO the positioning of
Americans in the Sinai and
Vietnam.
'The current agreement dif-
fers from Vietnam in numerous
fundamental differences," Udall
wrote Albert.
"In Vietnam, the Americans
were military personnel, here
they will be civilian volunteers.
'[\ VIETNAM we entered a
body contested war at the urg-
SEN. UDALL
Blacks Critical of Arab Tactics
4 one siik. Here we are
j in by bo>n sides in an
effort to avoid further war.
In Vietnam we were trying
to bring about a military vic-
tory in a war. Here we are
trying to maintain a diplomatic
compromise aimed at assuring
peace.
In Vietnam there was no in-
ternational police force. Here
the American technicians will
supplement an agreed upon
United Nations peace-keeping
force.
"Vietnam involved an open-
ended commitment of U.S.
troops. The observer and eariy-
, functions of the Amer-
icans in the Sinai are of a very
limited and special nature not
lie to easy expansion."
UDALL REAFFIRMED his
mg support" of the
U.S. role in the peace-k<
effort despite his own pre1
criticism of Secretarj
a whole, that as m
cratic society, there
against it.
Btl' HE said the
ove,w'' -. udorse
the accoru indicated^
Jority feeling ln hl^
rWM -uim
pact was gaou for ju
good for IsraeL He
t.-.at there certainh.
involved but saij that*i
the great things" abom
tenm ace >rd is that i
be time for i
Miller said that In-
dicated to the Jewish]
that the major problem
gress was no! the pn
U.S. technicians in i
the matter of aid. He"!
Secretary reported ,
questions he was asked]
appearances before
sional committees
economic aid rather
nicians.
MILLER SAID that thtl
tion of U.S. hid to bn
only touched on and the]
of SI billion-plus wasL
ed but nothing specific i
cussed.
There was also no l
of any futuie n igotii
the Golan Heights or the]
of Uo. arms to Israel l
meeting. Miller said tit]
nicians issue was exp
be resolved by a joint:
tion in Congress in 101
be followed by the aid |
the Administ ration will t
Miller said the Jewish!
wished Ford well and i
ed gratification over bis 1
from an attempted
tion. They told hia
ers for his welfare werei
in synagogues during the|
Hashonah services.
Miller said the issues i
\iet Jewry .mJ Syria.
were discussed but gavei
tails. The meeting was1
between the President
large group of America!
ish i iad last"
her when the issue
Jackson Amendment.
NEW YORKTwo of the na-
tion's leading Black newspapers
were critical this week of Arab
proposals to expel Israel from
the UN General Assemby, the
American Jewish Congress re-
ported.
In an editorial, the Chicago
Daily Defender said: "The Is-
lamic Foreign Ministers' Con-
ference calling for Israel's ex-
pulsion from the United Nations
was not only foolish and damag-
ing but would bring no credit
to the ministers themselves and
no benefits to Arab interests."
American Israeli
$ All ftlifi Arficlti $
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ON THF. same dayJuly 22
The Philadelphia Tribune de-
clared: "The UN has acted ir-
responsibly throughout the
Arab-Israeli crisis, but if they
become so outrageous as to vote
to expel Israel, it will be clear
that they have completely out-
lived their usefulness."
The Chicago Defender called
the Islamic Foreign Ministers'
resolution "a crude and emo-
tional gesture of contempt to-
ward the United Nations and a
deliberately rude and provoca-
tive reply to Secretary of State
Kissinger's speech appealing for
a more constructive attitude by
the smaller members of the
world organization.
"That the United States might
withdraw financial contribution
to the UN is an ominous con-
tingency that should not be
ruled out if the third world na-
tions go through with the reso-
lution to expel Israel," the De-
fender said, adding:
"WITHOUT U.S. membership,
financial support and influence,
the UN wpuld be an empty
shell."
The Defender, flagship of the
Sengstacke chain of papers, is
published daily with an audited
circulation of approximately
35,000 It is one of two Black
dailies in the U.S.
In its longer editorial, the
Philadelphia Tribune, asserting
that a vote to expel Israel would
'ptiiMpMi *S*^ov an*
Rabbi Joseph E. Rackovsky
Phone 672-7306
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be an outrage and an injustice
of monstrous proportions.' de-
clared:
"Most of the UN member na-
tions hardly come to that august
body with clean hands. Over
half the nations are military dic-
tatorships which do not have
even the most basic freedoms,
humane treatment of ordinary
citizens, or democratic princi-
ples in their own countries.
MANY OF the member na-
tions have engaged in the ruth-
less, cold blooded murder of
thousands of citizens or the im-
prisonment and torture of tens
or hundreds of thousands for
simply disagreeing with their
governments' policies. In this
category are Chile, Haiti, Brazil.
Uganda, Uruguay, the Soviet
Union, Indonesia, the Philip-
pines, South Africa, South
Korea, etc.
"Many others, such as Iran.
Paraguay, Nicaragua and Saudi
Arabia, have a tiny number of
citizens controlling enormous
wealth, while the overwhelming
majority of their fellow country-
men suffer from incredible pov-
erty, hunger or even starvation.
"Israel is light years away
from both of these categories.
Yet no one has ever talked of
expelling any of these other
countries from the UN (except
for South Africa) while many
now talk of expelling Israel.
"IRONICALLY, the same land
of Israel which the UN now
talks of expelling was the crea-
tion of the UN in 1947. At that
time the UN voted to create a
Jewish state alongside a Pales-
tinian state on the West B*ank
of the Jordan River. The Arab
nations refused to abide by the
UN resolution, however, and
fought a war (unsuccessfully)
to keep Israel from becoming a
state." 6 I
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Septe
mber 19, 1975
fJknisti fhridHmm
Page 13-A
esident's Words. Actions Don't Match
Lued from Page 4-A
L bit. and not only did
L the inciiminating docu-
ment back immediately.
also threatened the Con-
Lat he would permit no
tjocuments to be sent to
fuse Committee mvestiga-
Lct he was saying that
Lniitk'c had been too
table in its performance
"people- not his, not
\s, bin the people's
it's prettj ood going for
jident who so piously and
lus|y made that self-serv-
ing statement of his in St. Louis
about the President's business
and the people's business being
one and the same thing.
IN FACT, in that radio inter-
view, Ford had gone on and on
about the presidency, not of
course in the concrete terms of
his own repeated violations of
the public trust, but instead in
the abstract terms of a presi-
dential candidate hot on the
trail of reelection.
"It is to their (the public's)
hopes, their dreams and their
aspirations," he said, "that the
presidency is addressed.
"You cannot begin to gain a
sense of what is on people's
Secret Missile
IPact With Israel?
Continued from Page 1-A
I Europe < nd the N'ATO defense structure.
Anderson also said that this same secret agreement
the United States on record as being "resolved to
tjnuf. to maintain Israel's defensive strength through
{supply of advanced types of equipment, such as the
aircraft"
Anderson noted that although Dr. Kissinger has
eated again and again that there will be no secret
I. commitments in the Middle East at least none
[t Congress will not know about such agreements
fertheless exist, including the one he documented
day.
In a related event, Lt. Gen. Mordechai Gur, Israel's
|ief of Staff, speaking in Jerusalem in a television in-
view marking the second anniversary of the 1973 Yom
[ipurWar. said that Israel is much stronger today than
was when Egypt crossed over the Suez Canal and
proved the vaunted Bar-Lev Line two years ago.
GEN. GUR declared that Israel is capable of fight-
; another war with the Arabs without another Amer-
\n arms airlift.
"I think," he said, "that the principal change that
come about since the Yom Kippur War lies in the
I ci untry has put vast reserves at the dis-
I Defense Forces.''
Gur n< elaborate on why he believes I-
| Id ither round against the Arabs without an
frcm the U.S., or why he thinks Israel is
Mi r than two years ago.
WZO Says Lima
'solve Ai? ti-Jewish
Continued from Page 1-A
fillers ; i explain the sinister overtones of the Lima
jclutions comparing Zionism to racism and fascism
fI of similar resolutions passed by the International
Icmen'.s Year meeting earlier in Mexico City and at the
fganization of African Unity conference in Kampala,
Iganda.
"The activities (of the Arab extremists and the
L) at Lima were not merely anti:Zionist but
*fe part of a hate campaign against the entire Jewish
FPle and against individual Jews everywhere," said a
ptement read by acting chairman Leon Dulzin and
proved by the entire Executive.
lexico Agrees to Opening
Of a New PLO Office
Continued from Page 1-A
. n e met him during his Mideast trip last ir.onth
visiting Israel. Meanwhile, the Haifa folklore
B,e' arrived here to present several performances.
The group was here as guest of President and Mrs.
teverria who invited them during their visit to Israel.
minds by sitting in the safety of
the Oval office and looking at
opinion polls."
WAS THE President saying
that he wouldn't let Lynette
Fromme's attempt against his
life keep him from performing
his duties in behalf of the peo-
ple's business? Or was he say-
ing that, contrary to the advice
of the Secret Service, he would
not let her attempt against his
life keep him from kissing
babies, snaking hands and mak-
ing empty speeches now that
the 1976 reelection campaign is
officially open?
These are two very different
things, but it is clear that Ford
would like us to believe they
are one and the same thing.
In fact, in the performance of
the people's business, public of-
ficial after public official relies
on the people's stupidity. And
sn they underestimate the
people's understanding and are
caught at something underhand-
ed, they can always hide be-
hind a "Top Secret" rubber
stamp or make another
speech.
DALLAS WAS "another
speech." In Dallas the other
day, President Ford told 3,000
screaming Republican women,
"I've had it with the negative
attitude that would vrite a self-
fulfilling prophesy of doom for
America."
What does "I've had it"
mean? Does it means that if he
is reelected. Ford promises to
change conditions so that nega-
tivism, so damaging to Amer-
ica, will change of itself? Does
it means he'll silence the nega-
tivists? a far more likely
"self-fulfilling" prophesy than
the negativism itself.
Stack this speech up against
Spiro T. Agnew's "nattering
nabobs of negativism," and we
realize that the politician is
changed, but the politics re-
main the same.
In the end. "I've had it" are
words signifying nothing.
BUT FORD'S latest veto of
an extension ol price controls
on the production of domestic
which \-;:! raise the already
skyrocketing cost of gas that
is an action that DOES mean
s tnething.
Should an obtuse Ford have
wasted his time wondering
about negative American atti-
tudes? Can it reallv be that he
sees no relationship between
his empty words and the sense
of doom new pervading the na-
tion?
In another exercise in politi-
cal vanity at just about the
same time. Gerald M. Caplan,
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director of the National Insti-
tute of Law Enforcement and
Justice, declared tbat "The
number of seriously disturbed
people in the big cities is shock-
ing.
"You don't know," he said,
"which ones may be dangerous
or not. They see reality through
a distorted filter. They are
crazy, and there is a large num-
ber of them."
CAPLAN'S REMARKS were
in response to the Lynette
Fromme case. Unfortunately,
"crazy" is neither a legal nor
a medical term, but a medieval
hangover that betrays our fears
of something we still know so
little about.
And so, Caplan's statement,
for all its cogency, must be
handled like a booby trap. I
suppose Caplan meant to say
that public oiiicials like Presi-
dent lord are targets these
days for just about anybody.
But that holds true for all of
us in the big cities, not just for
public officials. And the issue
is not that we are surrounded
by hordes of "crazy people."
INSTEAD, the issue is WHY
they are "crazy." One answer
that comes quickly to mind is
the public officials themselves.
They lie. They steal. They,
cheat. They conspire at every
opportunity to subvert the gov-
ernmental order. They consort
with cartelists, reap profit from
the twisted exercise of their po-
litical power as it never was
intended.
Their violation of the public
trust makes it difficult for men
to eat. to own homes, to drive
an automobile.
THEY MANEUVER captive
Presidents to make grandilo-
qunt statements about the pub-
lic's business and the public's
rigiit to know at the same time
that these Presidents with in-
creasing regularity shut off
every avenue of information
(the House Committee's hear
ing into the CIA) and open
every road to ever-rising cor-
porate profits (the Ford veto I
price regulations on..domestic-
oil).
They are a never-ending
source of conflicting signaIs
and, if as Caplan says of them,
they see reality through a "'dis-
torted filter," it is for the ren
son that their elected officials
say one thing to them and do
another against them.
They are a never-ending
source of growing frustration,
rage and ultimate violence. Yo.i
want to trust them, to love
them; and you must wind up
hating them because their "pub
lie service" is little more than
a private rip-off campaign.
THEY CAN drive anybody
crazy, and their victims are not
isolated specimens to be exam-
ined by the curious beneath a
sociological microscope.
Their victims are all of us.
We are the victims of the Fords
among us who talk about the
presidency and the public s
rights but who can't even, from
time to time, throw us so much
as a bone.
J.F.
Jewish
Civilization
It's all there in the
Encyclopaedia
Jnrlaica.
For free color
brochure*
call (305) 534-8251
or write: E. .T Suite WM5,
4:0 Lincoln Rd.. M.B. 33139
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MAZOLA CONTEST
Contestants must be 18 years
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HIALEAH DRIVE SHOPPING PLAZA
HIALEAH 33010
Telephone 887-8377
iv/a-w


Page 14-A
*Mnist FkrkUnr
Friday, September
Herzos's Post: A Tough Time
lEGAl NOTICE
, NOTICE
ft
By YITZHAK RAB1
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Major General (Res.) Chaim
I Herzog writer, commentator.
"military and political analyst,
lawyer and Israel's new Ambas-
"sacor to the United Nations
assumes his new post at the
time when Israel is being spot-
lighted* by an ongoing, relent-
less Arab public campaign to
exclude her from the UN Gen-
eral Assembly and if possible,
to oust Israel completely from
the world body.
"I came to the United Nations
with no illusions," Herzog de-
clared the other day in an in-
terview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Acencv. "I am fully
aware of the prejudice against
the Jewish State on the part of
the majority here. But I am de-
termined to defend Israel in the
best way I can."
IN HERZOG'S opinion, the
Arab public campaign to ban
Israel from the UN has proved
to have a boomerang effect.
After a long period in which
Israel's public image has been
at ebb. there has been a favor-
able shift in public opinion
throughout different parts of
the worki Herzog said.
The viciousness and intensity
of the Arab drive, without
showing any concern that the
UN might collapse if Israel is
ousted, is to the advantage of
Israel, he explained.
But the 57-year-old Irish-born
Ambassador, who came to Is-
rael (then Palestine as a child,
contends, however, that the sec-
ond interim agreement between
Israel and Egypt is very likely
td moderate the Arabs' anti-Is-
rael campaign at the United Na-
tions.
AT THE SAME TIME, he
added, the danger that such a
move will be. launched cannot
be entirely excluded. "There is
always the possibility that Arab
extremists will try to sabotage
the agreement by pressing for
action against Israel at the Gen-
eral Assembly," Herzog observ-
ed.
The- envoy, who held various
command and staff posts in the
Israel Defense Forces, including
the post of Director of Military
Inteligence (1948-1950, and
1959-1962) also believes that
the second interim agreement
in the Sinai reduces the danger
of a new outbreak of war in the
Mideast.
During the hour-long inter-
view, held at the Ambassador's
LESAr NOTICE
offic* at the Israeli Mission to
the Uir'fd Nations here. Herzog
also discussed the upcoming
Ctaternl Ass***ir|v, 'he lessons
of the Yom Kippur War and his
personal anr"o*ich to his new
din'n-natic mission.
FoU-nvirc are excerpts from
the interview:
JTA: ately there has been a
lot of talk about the Arabs mov-
ing to excel Israel from the next
General Assembly. In your opin-
ion, is this really going to oc-
cur?
HERZOG: It is very difficult
to evaluate exactly what will
happen. Those who are instigat-
ing this anti-Israel move do not
seem to be sure of their next
steps. However, they must be
aware that this attack on Israel
is boomer.in sin a to Israel's ad-
vantage. In thei'- attack they
have already passed the line
of counterproductivity and it
has brought clear statements
in favor of Israel and
against any move to expel or
suspend her from the world or-
ganization. Such statements
have already come from the
European countries, the Nordic
countries, the Socialist leaders
of Europe during their recent
meeting in Stockholm, and it
brought about a split betwsen
the Arabs and some African
states durine their recent con-
ference in Kampala. Uganda.
JTA: How would a successful
interim agreement between Is-
rael and Eeyrt influence Arab
policy at the United Nations?
HERZOG: If there is an in-
terim agreement in the Mideast
it will affect the votes of
many countries who will
not support a move to expel
Israel. But the danger of such
a move still exists. On the other
hand, I believe that the Arabs,
even the extremists, will think
twice before they press for such
action because the last thing
they want is to be defeated.
There is another aspect that
could prevent the extremists
among the Arabs from radical
moves that would further break
Arab unity: the majority of the
Arab states will not favor wid-
ening the polarization among
the Arabs.
JTA: Where does the USSR
stand on the issue of Israel's
expulsion?
HERZOG: The general indica-
tion is that the Soviets support
the universality of the United
Nations and therefore are
against the move to ban Israel
from the General Assembly. I
have not met any Soviet diplo-
mats since I arrived here two
weeks ago and, as I said, this is
ft
of what awaits US at the Gen-
eral Assembly. We can expect
tne | z majority without
anv relation to the rights and
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OC FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-28882
1-ENEDAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ArTlON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
wrongs of the issue. As in pre- ... RE. T).r MarriaK,. 0f
vious Assemblies it is certain ,>:Y werner.
that all the usual anti-Israel res-
olutions will be adopted.
JTA: Even if there is an in-
terim agreement?
HERZOG: If there is an agree-
ment, the Arab approach might
UoneK
'I
N WERNER
;;. .| ndent.
-. | -i in WERNER
, i;.. i. Wi rnlkova
n- mm i
lallfornla 91801
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
hP lmvr in tone but not in sub- il action for Dtaeolutl. n of Mar-
re iou-r in tune uui m f||t(] H|rninst you ana
tance. We can expect less u.,tli ,,, srrv. a oopy of
iriimnnirv.is debates but the yoUi If any. to It on
aciimuniLKis uwa henry SoRTON, attorney for Pe-
anti-Israe! reso.utions. as I said. ... address It 1201 Bta-
I u Una, IS w.st r"lagl< r
... Florida 331S0, and file
11 rltl the clerk <>f the
ui-l or before < ksto-
i. othent l a it faull will
i.....RKainal you foi the relief
i oropla o> oeti-

al of
Miami, Florida on this
. Si Hi, mber, I97f
VRD P BR1NK1 R
IN THE CIRCUIT COuir
11TH JUDICIAL CIRcmI'
FOR DADE COUNTY J1
GENERAL JUR.Sd&U
CASE NO 751D|
IN RE: The Man la* .**
KATHRY.V i.Wn, ,'-'.,
and "'
1AEL P LYNCH hi
ACTION FOR DISSOLUH
OF MARR|Af,plT
TO: MICHAEL P ?$&
(Address inl m
TOO ARE HEW
..n action for I
haa been riled uSL
you i.r. ..o,,,.,... ,l!,"i

will be there.
JTA: How do you conceive
vour role as Israel's Ambassa-
dor to the UN?
HERZOG: I bring with me my
personal approach. I am guided
by the principle that no country
has permanent enemies or per-
manent friends. A country has
only permanent interests. I
come here with an open mind.
' Ircull Court
Dad< C iunty, Floi Ida
] P COPELAND
a- I puty Cl< rlc
......... ..- ","/* Y t i Court Seal)
determined to defend Israel in Norton
require.
'' "Jr written on G ALEXANDERmSt
Attorney foi >. M>?".|
addreai la 612 .^,
N B First Avenu
and Ml,
of the abov. -iviHi
befor. October r
defauK will b.
foi the relief
plaint or petition
This notice aha : b. nu,;.v
ea.h week for J
in THE JEWISH
WITNESS n ,
' l! I "urt :ii Miami nit '
FlOTlda, II,,.- 8th .lay **
RICHARD P B
Dade .ui w i
n> PREDBBJC?
lander v
Attorney for Petii \y .
611 ill -;. v UulkllnR
M n Florida
Tel: 378-1417
-is-a
-:-
the best way that I can.
JTA: Soon we will be mark-
ing the secona anniversary of
the Yom Kippur War. In retro-
spect, what are the major les-
sons for Israel to learn from
that war?
HERZOG: The main lesson-
not to accept any preconceived
idea or concent as binding. We
live in a very volatile area and
we must aoapt ourselves to the
fluiditv of the situation in the
area. We must understand the
multifarious aspects of a defen-
sive posture. The big mistake
before the Yom Kippur War
was to see in the Suez Caml a
maior answer to our military
aym Uuii.linr
19 W. Flaglei Street
I k 33130
I 74-3116
kttorm Petition! r
;, 12-19-26
N THE CIRCUIT COURT IMI
FOR DADE COUNTY FiflK,
GENERAL JURISDICTION DM.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75.51
in 3 IN UK. THE MARRIAGE Or]
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28654
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
THE MARRIAGE OF:
PRAM is.'" l; IK I.MAN.
and
5a BIBLMAN
TO KI.isa BHCLMAN
Call. Plan dc Valladalld No. MM
Fr..i"ionttmtento Revolucion.
Guadalajara. Jalisco. Mexico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that .., action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage hat been filed againi-i you and
you are required to serve a copy of
on
r
is 101
N.W. 121h Avenue. Miami. Dade
County. Florida, and file the original
with the Clerk of the above stvled
Strongest bargaining POSrr.On. It court on or before October 17th. 1975;
that country is not prepared to ?*"* a default *m be entered
____ .u:_ j--: i__ u against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive we. k>
in TOE JEWISH FLOKID1AN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
MM .ourt at Miami. Florida on this
tith day of September. 1975
KM-HARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By MARION NEWMAN
As Denutv Clerk
il ircuit Court Seall
?,Tv, S(STCH1.\ & ROSS,
101 .\ W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorneys for Petitioner
/12-19-2
problems. We have ignored the your written defenses, if aj.y. to It 01
overall importance of economic gfcftg" SS?\agSn fo
strength. A country with t def-
icit of $3.5 billion is not in the
eliminate this deficit bv irk-
ing harder to raise the n->*\ >nal
productivity by 20 perc -r
which is al) that is reo'.
and if it allows itself,
same time, the luxury of
unrest, then it has nob.
blame but itself.
JTA: Is there a r
daneer of a new war in tu
east?
ed
the
W
to
mt
;d-
P A.
HERZOG: I think that -at
deal depends on the re* of
the interim agreemen* :th
Egypt and on the mair' nee
of Israel's deterrent cr
However, I do not see ai tll-
out war as inminent.
LECAl NOTICE
10/3
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
lr*TH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-22159
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ARNULPO TOMAS I^AJES.
Husband
and
ABEI.1XA UAZO LAJES.
Wife
TO: AHF.UNA I.AZO I,AJES
5609 Hudson Avenue
West New VnrK, N.J.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed apalnst you and
yoil are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to It on
Albert I,. Carricarte, Esq., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 2491
N.W. 7 Street, Miami. Florida, and
file the nriKlnal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Oc-
tober 17. 1!"7".; otherwise a default
JTA: What's ahead for Israel
in this year's General As-
sembly?
HERZOG: I have no illusion
LEGAL NOTICE
will be entered si UlSI you for the
relief demanded in 'he complaint or
petition.
This DoUce >> v ubllshed once
each week for f< -i 'itive Weeks
in THK JEWI8H 'UMAX
WITNESS mj nd the seal
of said court sI -ida on this
9th day of s.- ...
RICHAP1 "KKR
As Clerk, urt
Dade C
B) BA1 r SON
nil Court y
ALBERT BSQ.
1491 N W 7
Miami, Flor'r"
A t toi
Phoi,, No ''


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT '
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT '\
FOR DADE COUNTY FLC
the impression among the dip- eneral jurisdiction r
... -TT%:._ K CASE NO. 75-27795
lomats here. notice by publicat
WDI.IE MAE H1RSH and \I
SOLOMON.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
ADTA.VnKN. MARILYN TA
and WILLARD M. WOHLOl
aa laal directors and trustee
property of GEM OtlTFITT'
a dissolved Florida corporati.
and LOUIS SAKS and HARI.
SAKS, his wife, and if any ,
aforesaid named defendants
their unknown devisees, hei-
personal representatives, |ep
urantees, or claimants ml
under or against them and a
person or persona unknown
Plalmiffs having or cbtlmini
any riuht. title or Interest i'
through, by or under the sa
defendants.
I'efendants.
TO: The Defendants, AI
and MARILYN TANXIIN
PennliiRton Cap. Vlralnla V
TOi- ARE HEREBY "
tlial a I'omplaint to Quiet
' '", ''"' i.....laratory .ludci.
followini; described prop.
lx>t 10, MOONOATE, ac-
ute i'l.ii thereof, reoorde
Honk 72. at page 9", of i
Records of Dade County
has l,e. filed against v.
an directed to file your
sponse I., ihls action wit1
of the above Court and
upon Plaintiffs' am,,,-
ZAMPT smith. Bulf
South Dixie Highway, c
Florida W14. on or bef.
day of October 19TB eh
PlfJ.nl will I,, taken' .,-
DATED September in
RICHARD P BRi:
'lerk Clrcull r
By: N. A. HEVfl
Denuty l llerk
i I Courl Beat)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA .N ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
, P,ROBATE NO 75-1202 (Parker)
In RE: Estate ,,(
LI.SK M HltdWNE
Deceased. /
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKI
APPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
v nA,ND FINAL DISCHARGE
k ... ? '" "''by given that 1
have filed my Final Report and Pe-
1 '"on for Distribution and Final DIs-
vfSS '"n^lir"' "' ,n*- **W> of
HROWNE. deceased, ami
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5744
JOSEPH NESBITT
In RE: Estate of
HARHT OltEKNHKRO
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing: Claims or Demands Against Said
Batata:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you may have against the es-
tate of HARRY ORBENBBRO,
deceased late of Dade County,
Florida, to the Circuit Judges of i>:,(|,.
County, and file the same in dupli-
cate and as provided in Section 7S3.16,
Florida Statutes. In their offices hi
the County Courthouse in Dade Coun-
iv, Florida, within four calendar
months from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same will be
barred.
I Miami. Florida, this 9th
daj ol September, A 11 1975,
REGINA CARR
As Executrix
Flrai DUbllcaUon of ibis notice on
the 12th day of September, 18
GA1 BUT A QALBUT, Attys al Law
fo Per onal Representative
721 Washington Are.
B. a. ii. Ha. a
9 12-19
that on the MU, day of OdtSE? mT
H apply t the Honorable Circuit
Judges of Hade County, Florida for
"I'Proval of said Fn,al Report and for
'I' tnl.u-,.,,, :1 fma, JBSmJ as
Executrix of the estate of the abovc-
lunie,, ,,,.,,^,. ThtK g,n Qay of^_
MARIAN B COTTRELL
Ilami. Florida 33130
PATRICIA JEAN BYRON
Wife.
and
RAYMOND Fi IS' ER BTR0N
Husband
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Raymond Foster Blrm.
8 Sgt F.r,
M I Company
12nd Alrboi n. Divided
Port Uraitc NorUl CmBBi
28307
TOU ARE NOTIFIED that al
t.i n fur Dissolution n( Mar in
1 ii :ody has been filed anluti
and you are required to Mrvtn
of your written ilefensw. jf w|
it on HEMtV M WAITEK1X, |
tloner's attorney, whose adtrnil
740 71st Street. Miami Rnrg.nl
Ida. on or before ii.toher 15. 1IB.J
file the orhrtnal uith the citric d(
court, either before service ob |
tiffs attorney or immediatsly '
after: otherwise a default will hi
tered aicainst you foi the retirlL
manded In the complaint or petilxtl
WITNESS my hand and m*! til
Court on Sept R. l"7i
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By I. SNREDES
As Deputv Clerk
I I1-1MI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0FTH
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AW
POR DAOE COUNTY, FL0RID|
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVIIi
CASE NO 75-28400
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE IERVICI
NO PROPERTY
In Re Petition for Adoption by
JAMES ALLAN BAM
TO: WAYNE Cl INTON WAL
HESIDENCF. I NKXOWK
TOtI ARE NOTIFIKP that the I
titioner, JAMBS MIAN BASS, I
filed a Petition in the abm-d
Court for the adoption of the I
child named In that Petition, U*t
are commanded t<> serve a <^M
your written defense-, if any. oil
titioner's attorney, BBMm
SCHHE.HFR. 2l20 N E 163rd I
North Miami Bea 'h, FlorKU,
on or before Octobei 17. Ifli
file the original with the Qtrt I
this Court either before rkt i
Petitioner's attorney or in
thereafter, othnrise defatlt
be entered asainsi yon for the i
demanded in th. Petition.
WITNESS my hand and u* i
of the Court at Miami. Dede '
Florida, this xih day of 8eM
1976.
RICHARD P BRINKW
as Clerk ol said Ceart
By C. P Cl i'KI^ND
As Deputy <>rk
BRBOBR & SC'HREIBER
Attorney for Petitioner
- 12-JJ-M
lion,
THE CIRCUIT jflS^MSp
10/3
THE
E.L""Tl;H JUDICIAL CIPCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
ENERAL jUmSDIC^ON DIVISION
N.Tf*SE NO. 7S-29004
lS?H?J BY PUBLICATION
'BE DtMINADOR BAZAN
l ti'ioner.
RIBBIRO BAZAN.
I
ner,
''A CR1STTNA
"espondi
/'\\A'|AI:,''\,<"HISTIN"A RH.EIRO
ban, 7" ';:"'" ,M"lues 44-70*. Co-
VRE II ii, iv ''''"'"" Rr
h day of t.ctolier. 1976 Si .
iuk'oSS""....." '" W"
'' ''-V '' BMNXRR
Bj '. "' COWJl AND
, l/epuly Clerk
' Court goal;
12 in 2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 1
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRC UN |
OF FLORIDA IN ANO Ft
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTJON NO. ""Sg
GENERAL JURISDICTION\tjff
ACTION FOR D'SSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IV RE: THE MARRI ^'^iv.Lwr
OAILPERLMAN, w ib--Petit"""*
and
HARRY PERI MAN.
HMband-Resnoi a. '
TO: BARRY PERI-MA*
C/O iieriiu.b P. 'iman
l.-,]-.'!.ri Mill Stic. '
H..word Beach
Queens, New_Y, ,vu%
ution of'
-' S!i,'t
, if any. ';''
n.irney and .*
TOO ARK HERKBT *c
Unit an action for I l
in bas been filed
you nre required
your written d. I
Arthur ,D PVIahman,
ti'ioner, w hose addn
coin "Road, Suite N
' h Florida, ... ,
nal arlth the clerk of tne
-..,, ,,,., on or b. .;re M
1975: otherwise a default ,
.1 -ainsi you rot '' ,,|j
i inded .........mols ,"'h;-
-i.....ESS mj ',*',?"
In ,, Mlam'. Florws
r <,.,! i:>7'. PS
tOHARD P ri^.KEF
r i .\ i; i i iir,

,tv. K'orl
. i 8NEKDBN
Pr
l|IJ
'ourl B. i! i
M
'
- -

-y; ^iSimmi i i
-


riday, September 19, 1975
* knist ftoridfcur
Page 15-A
[ussian MD Will Practice in Miami Soon
Continued from Page 1-A
h^"' where "less attention
to nationalities."
c\j- the nine months prim
>ptance into the Bix-
-mation college-med-
,1 program, Tsinker
a Siberian machine |
h m his college career
[zed training in gyn-
I d obstetrics, Tsinker's
L. request was ignored.
k is arbitrarily placed in
! region's mental hos-
rnship program.
j IT \\ AS then that he and his
, began seriously to think
ttS of emigration. Neither
, nor his father considered
, iivea "political." They
elatively confident in ap-
I for permission to leave
I For us, it wasn't really
jo bard, At first, we were
if.iiJ of some kind of reprisal.
ut t had never served in the
they use that as an ex-
mt to leave. 'Perhaps,
know some secret,' they
theorizes that had he
l a dissident, there would
few possibilities to
For six months, they
. ted.
, Department of Visas
rations, we saw a lot
ivho had been waiting.
sals."
Russia would so
permit a young man with
training to leave,
fin s the difference
In priorities.
Simion l sinker and young pauent.
i-
L, ..
"A doctor is not considered a
big-shot in Russia. He is con-
sidered intelligent, but at the
same time, the salary is very
small and is exceeded by sal-
aries of workers."
A college friend, also a doc-
tor, similarly got permission to
emigrate and is now practic-
ing in Israel.
HE AND his parents are sat-
isfied with their adopted home-
land. "I like it here. The safety
situation is uncertain in Israel.
Quite a few Russians who went
to Israel have since cume here
to the United States.'"
The Tsinkers journey to the
United states was not non-stop.
However, under the fatherly
arm of the United HIAS Serv-
ice (Hebrew Immigration Aid
Society), the delays were rela-
tively short.
After processing and counsel-
ing at an Austiian converted
military camp, the Tsinkers
were shuttled on to Rome. That
was where they had their first
contact with the United States
in the person of the American
Ambassador.
IN FEBRUARY, 1974. their
\isas fine ipi roved, they ar-
rived in Miami, one of 40
lies accepted : > absorption
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
In the span of one mom:..
Federation's Inter-Agency Coun-
Israel Offers Assist to Arab;
Continued from Page 1-A
.' Israeli envoy mounted the
I
nil Assembly Presi-
[ ...la/iz Bouteflika of Al-
Ige is was not in his chair while
aeli .spoke.
Hi had left the hall shortly
the preceding speaker,
ite of Senegal, com-
[r '.'-i his remarks.
I HE i iRVEU envoy also pro-
[pos.: the creation of an Inter
jgratej Economic Community in
' Middle East along the lines
i opean Common Mar-
ket.
Ha said that "Israel is pre-
pared unilaterally and without
reference to political problems
which di\ide our area ... to
allow the free passage of goods
to our neighbors to and from
the ports of Israel."
Sources here said the Israeli
Ambassador's first speech was
deliberately non-political and
addressed the subject of the
.special session in concrete
terms in order to demonstrate
Israel's ability to contribute to
the world community and.
hopefully, to avert the usual
harassment of Israel in the
Hackney Trades
Council in March
Wainst Nazi Demo
&
v X (JTAl The
t's ma eh through
'- of East London last
tao first day of Rosh

upstaged by a
monstration organiz-
the Hackney Trades
K
c
.
0
. I s Council counter
. n attracted over
. white the Na-
' march mustered
5 ["he two demonst ti-
er confronted each
'Bl.Y the National
h .'-.is ai ned against
,; Bgers." and they held
' aer depicting a young
- attacking an eld
man.
I f insisted that the
tnofji -r" be cover-
ch the National From
the word censored"
" Still criticized for
them to use the ban-
also said that 80
_ W the muggers were Black
n-i 85 percent of their vic-
Ums were white.
The National Front march
and rally at the end of it raised
th>- whole question of how close
Front could < opi
inciting race hatted without in-
lrin"ina t*w ; B
Iff PARTICU'WTS in the
Traues Council rally b lie1 ed
that the date olios, n by the
tional Front was a I liberate
incitement against tl f
the Borough.
But Tra les Council rail:
Michal Knowles said
that his demonstration she.
tl political alternative to the
, Front,
I
was tl- M dement atioa
in h nee the Fascists
General A-.senbly by tie Arab
state* and tiieir allies.
IX HIS prepared address.
Herzog said Israel was ready ta
share the fruits of its research
and experience with other
countries ot the Middle East.
He mentioned specifically
'drip or trickle" irrigation de-
veloped In Israel, the discovery.
of a high-yield, diseasa.resistant
strain of wheat by seiantist* of
the Weizmann Institute of Sti-1
enci. the development of solar |
energy, and the desalinisauon |
of sea water and brackish war I
IK.
THE AMBASSADOR noted I
that at lsast 50 member nations
of the UN are benefiting from i
Israeli technical and agricui-
turai aid.
it-, .- -. j ...,. ty- Hece^'oer;
31, 1974. 19.356 trainees from
developing countries had re--
c ; ed ti tin in e! an
5411 :- ,e;r
de-
\ -1
' i b '
'd ai c : '
transport to and fro ','
ine c iit.it I'flich
nal Israsii -
, TO
n.is j
-_:.-
sine: it effect
main
He
.
ire I
c iu i : '
pil on Russian Immigration
had arranged for an apart
had seoured familiar jobs for
the elder Tsinkers and.:placed
Simian at Alt. Sinai.
The c nsortimn of J;
lies all work in unison to
sati;;; tl li ite and I
needs oi rel reset-
tling in. Mian
41 in:; ly oJ Mia ai,
Tsinker was enrolled in a
tensive Kn.mish course and a
post-doctoral refresher course
designed for aliens. Well-pre-
pared, he has recently passed
the equivalency examination for
foreign medical graduates. Now
eligible for internship, he hopes
to complete his training at Mt.
Sinai.
Much like the qualified Cu-
ban refugee doctors before him,
Tsinker regretted his inability
to practice medicine.
"I felt myself not so com-
fortable not practicing medi-
cine. But because of the law. I
wasn't allowed to do any work
except vena-puncture. How-
ever, his professional situation
has not been static.
"People here at Mt. Sinai
have helped me a lot. When I
started attending courses. I re-
quested shorter work hours and
they complied."
SIMIO.N TSINKER has exert-
ed a certain amount of iiutia-
ti e and in the IS months since
arriving in Miami, Tsinusr has
reordered his life.
Than's to HIAS. Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation and
Sinai Medical Center, this
sian refugee will soon be Si
Tsinker, M.D.
According to Sam Brown of
the Jewish Vocational Sen ice.
'locally Tsinker is the first
Russian doctor to pass
equivalency evam."
WORLD RENOWNED
J-&n
671 Was hint
MSTAURANT
n A ve., Miami Btach
Pound Slides
Down Again
- The"
:- [
1.9 a ...
five weeks. The ratio
of the 1
i- n w IL 6.36= >1 u] from IL
6.24-S1,
c ;mi .n-
peared I i d turned i
n of the na-
i. i ncv.
The government promptly is-
sued a i that it will
keep p-ices a* 'heir present lev-
els for essential commodities
and utilities such as fuel and
electricity. As a result there
was no buying stampede to stock
up on goods.
THE ONLY consumers direct-
ly affected by the devaluation
are those going abroad and
purchasers of 1976 model cars.
The price of airline tickets
rose as a result of the new ex-
change rate and the higher
travel tax. Airline ticket hold-
ers who bought their tickets in
advance under the old prices
will have to pay the difference.
A special ministerial commit-
tee was empqwered early this
year to devalue the Pound at a
rate of up to 2 percent auto-
mat: rail y e' ery 30 da) s it deem-
...... interests of
Israel's economy
THE DEVALUATION an-
no inc id. t erefore was not un-
cipated.
The main ir:-:-.' of I de-
vs!'.' ition is t ease the balance
of payments deficit reduce im-
ports stimulat exports and
j:-ejurage Israelis from trav-
eling abroad in order to pre-
serve the nation's dwindling
fcil Reopening Sept. 15
em mm mimmi
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537-3987


Page 16-A
*Jewistncrktiari
Friday, September 19,15
?ires
y/ithin
the
SSGXEZ***
You are about to find out
why a tire you never heard or
is t\w. V>ft tire for these times
Radically new. Radically different.
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The I R I Ail-Stee! Radia! is the worlds first
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of gas than from either bias or belted bias
tires Because of the exclusive I R I All-Steel
construction, you get thousands of extra miles
out of the tire itself We believe the result
Is the lowest cost per mile of driving from any
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Our engineers believe the I.R.I All-Steel
Radial drives safer, rides more comfortably,
steers more precisely and responds surer
than any other tire you can buy at any price.
We guarantee them for 50.000 miles. What's
more, Norton is so sure you'll find these
the finest tires you've ever had that if you
are not satisfied at any time within 90 days,
we will refund your purchase price in full.
No tricks. No hidden charges.
But, boil it all down and
you've got three basic
tire types to consider.
1 BIAS
2. BELTED 3. RADIAL
\. BIAS TIRES
Tro four or sometimes even more plies 'or
la>e-s) o< material cross under the tread at an
a~i e or bias to the center line of the tire Generally
the chapes! m tc :-.
2. BELTFD TIRES
S II Is :- bias tire lac KM I:- of two
o- nori beH i thai m >.:.-: -? tire
:ie treats T^ i ;;-: oej j ;as sidewall
increases tread stability and improved
:?.: k
3. RADIAL TIRES
Offe' the n-ost des.'ab'e featu'es Cords of
mate-i ran fro* (idem : s :e*3 c-:ss -g the
tread at 90 deg'ees Two or more belts:' material
also run around the t re Price per tire is higher,
but cost per mile is io*er.
Buying tires is tough enough.
You almost need an engineer's education to
understand tire advertising these days There
are bias and belted and radial types F-78's
and FR-78's and 7.75s all of which fit the
same car And nylon and rayon and polyester
and fiberglass and steel. And plies on plies.
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
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Conventional, so-called steel radials. put steel
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sidewall to sidewall The conventional steel
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an I.R.I. Ail-Steel Radial.
An exclusive design and engineering process
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A third barrier of steel cables replaces the
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Rated Load Range D.
I R I All-Steel Ra
.err.mer.t stand-
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passenger tires even steel-belted rad.als
earn only a B or four-ply rating Load Range D
means an extra margin of strength and safety
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Improved steel cable design means extra
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The I R.I. All-Steel Radial uses a specially
designed steel cable engineered exclusively for
us Each cable is wound of seven strands of
SAfETY
rffn
CENTER
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HIALEAH PALM SPRINGS MILK1175 49th St.822-:50
CUTLER RIDGE2"3S0 S Dixie Hwy233-5241
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For tfte Store Nearest You Call 633-8635
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3. Double steel protection here.
The only passenger tire with steel
on both sides of the bead
for sure-fire responsiveness.
4. All-weather computer-designed
tread.
three-filament wire That's a total of 21 strong
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result is a soft, luxurious ride.
The new year-'round tread.
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BF Good rich


Top Israeli Labor Leaders To
Address Histadrut Conclave
v ruh;-.'" Meshel, secretary Shapiro, NCLI president; Uzi_______________________________________________
1 nif Histadrut and Israel Kloch, American representative ~ -~~~~---------------------------------------------------
I treasurer, will be fea- of the Histadrut; Dr. Sol Stein, Miami, Honda -- Friday, September 19, 1975
Jewish Floridian
Kessar,
Section B
president, Israel Histadrut
Foundation: Rabbi Leon Kron-
ih, Miami Beach; William H.
SylV, of Philadelphia; Dr. Allan
Pollack, chairman, American
Histadrut Cultural Exchange
Institute; Bernard B. Jacobson,
NCLI executive vice president;
Matthew Schoemvald. chairman,
American Trade Union Council
for Histadrut, and representa-
tives of the Labor Zionist Al-
liance. Pioneer Women and
Workmen's Circle.
Attorney Aaron L. Solomon,
who is serving as convention
chairman, stated, "This Conven-
tion, taking place on the heels
of the new Israel Egyptian ac-
cord, will be the springboard
for a massive effort to solve
many of Israel's domestic prob-
lems, especially to help the de-
Continued on Page 2-B
Israel in Sudden Paroxysm
Of Soccer Game-Fixing
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) At
a time when Israel's govern-
ment is engaged in continuing
the momentum achieved by the
second interi n agreement with
Egypt, coping with domestic
political and economic prob-
lems and waging an interna-
tional diplomatic battle to win
support among democratic gov-
ernments to thwart Arab ex-
tremist moves and those by thp
ISRAEL KESSAR
., | ,p akers at the 52nd an-
convention of the National
for I-abor Israel
tiled for Oct. 10-12 at the
ji \ Hilton Hotel.
, 1000 delegates and
are expected to attend
,.. which will launch
.-- |rive on lv>half of the
: l nit Campaign, in
ijor health, educa-
i social welfare pro-
ni i: led by the Israel
ration.
prominent partici-
various convention
will be Dr. Judah J.
Congress Invites Knesset Dclegfition
JERUSALEM (JTA) For the first time in Is-
rael's history, the U.S. Congress has invited the Knesset
to send a delegation of MKs to Washington as its guest.
Speaker Yisrael Yeshayahu announced acceptance
of the invitation, received from House Speaker Carl Al-
bert (D., Okla.) and Senate Majority Leader Mike Mans-
field (D., Mont.) for him to visit Washington at the head
of the Knesset delegation.
He said the date and composition of the delegation
would be announced soon. The invitation, delivered by
U S Ambassador Malcolm Toon, recalled the Knesset's
:ent months to numerous groups of
Si nators and Representatives visiting Israel.
Soviet Union to scuttle the new
accord, the Knesset has now
been forced to become involv-
ed in a political battle concern-
ing the future of soccer in the
country.
Some Western news media
have been quick to allude to
the situation with such frothy
expressions as game fixing
scandal hits Israel's soccer
sport, or Israel is reeling from
the mot shameful season of
corruption, or even comparing
the so-called scandal to Water-
gate. The entire situation must
be placed in its proper perspec-
tive.
FOR SOME time now, there
has been talk of game-fixing
during the course of the regular
season and playoffs which are
very important in the Israel
soccer program.
The National League is com-
prised of 16 teams, and the two
last teams always are relegated
to a lower division. The two
best teams of the lower divi-
sion then move up to the Na-
tional League at the conclusion
of each season.
Two young mavericks in the
Knesset, Ehud Olmart ol the
Free Center Party, and Legis-
lator Josef Sarid of the Mapai
Alignment, are battling in the
Knesset for a permanent league
of 18 teams and in addition are
insisting that half the members
of the Soccer Federation should
be discharged, based on a sug-
gestion made by Judge Etzioni,
of the Israel Supreme Court,
five years ago.
OPPOSED TO these "up-
starts" are the veteran politicos
who have used soccer as a
method of winning votes at the
polls.
The veteran politicians who
support their particular teams,
basically Mapai, progenitor of
Hapoel teams. Likud Herut
Continued on Page 4-B
Jewish Defense League Hopes
Federation Priorities Will Change
Leonard Luria Named National
Cochairman Of Israel Tribute
ami .'.-. .-'' Fede ation Women's Division
UarryB.Sn >ht) greeted area chair-
e cm ti .': y< i a\ last week's Oriental \ r
i te/i >oi I ide Chairman Mrs. Her-
. Miami Beach Chairman Mrs. Richard U
: Bade Chairman Mrs. Charles Held.
Leonard Luria, prominent
South Dale business and com-
munal leader and head of L.
Luria & Son, Inc., South Flor-
ida's largest catalog jewelers,
was named as national cochair-
man ol the Catalog Showroom
Industry dinner honoring Har-
old Roitenberg, head of Crea-
tive Merchandising and Pub-
lishing. Inc., in New York City.
Mr. Luria, who serves as
chairman of the Advisory Com-
mittee of the Greater Miami Is-
rael Bond Organization, also
serves on the National Cam-
. Cabinet of the State of Is-
rael Bunds.
The Nov. 1 dinner, at which
.. Prime Minister's Medal of
: will be presented to Mr.
nberg. will be part of the
i ,ti( nal i ffort by the industry
to sell $5-million in State of Is-
rael Bonds.
State of Israel Bonds is the
largest source of development
dollars for the State of Israel.
LEONARD LURIA
The Jewish Defense League
staged a nre-Yom Kippur dem-
onstration against the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation on
Sunday.
Recalling Joshua's Battle of
Jericho. Jewish students, in tra-
ditional white Tom Kippur kit-
tel (gown, marched around the
Federation to protest what they
called "the financial neglect by
Federation of Jewish education."
DAN GOTTLIEB, executive
director of the Miami Jewish
Defense League, declared that
"We don't want the Jewish Fed-
eration Building to physically
fall down but Jewish education
should be Federation's top pri-
ority.
Without education as Jews
we igpnt survive."
Gottlieb said he hoped that
emonstration, during which
the shofai was blown to recnact
Joshua's mar :h around the city
of Jericho Beven would
help change the Federation's
priorities esneci llj n funding
sh educati m
r last week at Board Orientatu n Day were Great-
Aiami Jewish Federation Women's Division vice presi-
dent; (left to right) Mrs. Adolph Berger, Community
ion; Mrs. Norman Lipoff, Leadership Development,
and Mrs. Sol Goldstein, Campaign.
See Story Page 8-B
Sen. Jaek Gordon
Featured Speaker
On ASA Program
South Florida Chapter No. 46
of the American Society of Ap-
praisers will hold its installa-
tion dinner for new officers on
Saturday, Sent. 20. at the Key
Biscayne Hotel.
State Sen. Jack Gordon, presi-
dent of Washington Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association, will
be the h atured speaker on the
evening's program.
\ < offlc is being installed
on that date include President
11. rriet B. Cohen. A.S.A., As-
nt Vice President of Wash-
ington Federal. Vice President
Norman Kurferst, A.S.A.. As-
sistant Chief Underwriter, Fed-
eral Housing Administration.
tary Murray Beck, A.S.A..
Dade County Property Evalua-
tion Specialist and Property Ap-
praiser, and Treasurer William
G. Helfgot, member.
Directors to be installed are
John Basmajian. A S.A.. David
P. Bishop. F.A.S.A., Al Blake.
A.S.A., Joseph B. Prussiano.
A.S.A.Regional Governor, and
Edward Waronker, A.S.A.
Mrs. Morris Feldman Appointed
A J Congress Executive Director
The appointment of Mrs. Mor-
ris Feldman as executive dir sc-
Amei ican Jewish Con-
gress lias been announced I"-
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, presi-
dent of the Southeast Regiona
Board of the Congress.
Mrs. Feldman has a long !,:s-
tory of Jewish communitv work.
She was the North Dade Direc-
tor and Community Coordinator
for thp Greater Miami Jewish
Federation forth- past 10 years,
and most recently the regional
fund-raising director of the
State of Florida for the Amp-
liation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Mrs. Feldman. a resident of
li since 1940. attended the
University of Miami. She and
her husband, a vocational edu-
cation teacher and baseball
coach of Mi imi Cent
School, have three children.
The Feldmans have visited Is-
rael many times; the last occa-
tion was the Bar Mitzvah of
their youngest son, held in Ne-
tanya, Israel.
MRS. MORRIS FELDMAN
Mrs. Fel Iman i ius to
nerican
youth
involvement, and is in the midst
of organizing such a group to
develop a better understanding
of American Jewish viewpoints
on issues important to American
Jewish life. Israel's survival and
Soviet Jewry.
M


Page 2-B
v knitffkridiiar
Friday. September
19,
MImMI
AHAVT SHAJ-Col CON.GREGA-
ThON 99S SW ?tti Ave OrAhpdoa.
Rarbi 7' RaohaeAy C:intor Aro
Ben Aron. 1
ItTM SMO'.OW (Tempiei 4144 Chase
*vf U'-tfi Raobi uion Kion.sn.
"ma' Day. Cnraiifr 21
, -
.-it-. m|i HaN .. mill
W ..r>h ; -
ANSHE EVES :-.'? SW -th Am.
Cons^rvat.ve Cantor Sol PaKOwita.
2
BETH AM .Teat-pie'. 5SC N Kendall
Dr. So Miami. Reform. Ralbi Hrr.
I -rt M Baui-gj-3 Asc..a:. R.idu.
Mitchell C.htfit* 3
mm x Mat-
I ii .. I:

CCr.GREGAT'0 a BET BREIRA 107.
56 S_W ll2Jfc St. Laperal Ra i,
8ar-y Taoachn.Koff 3-A
mil .-' mi. u: I'- m
-
for .1- 9 itm
,.l K;;.i. I .4- < 't.iv- h
'EMPLT BEIM SOLOMON. "031
L-nrcln ^d M-dern Conse-vat.ye.
Rail pi Dyid R**p. Cantor S.erde
irOri|i|. 2--A
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH.
MS Eocl'T Ave Or.hodox. Rabbi I,
M. Trouoo* 22
JpTw vosrot- r-M M CONGRE
GAT-ON. Z*i V-nai.ap *v. 22-A
ETH DAVIE
rv
P. Th
Cantor William Lic-pn,
SA 3rd Ava*.
3^- Mi;m
4. A
Kfjd > !>.!" iu.. ISf' Mi:/.>,.n !
..
\...|. I S uii;'>. .'. in..
. Ur and
- ; Sun-
; -i|. ii..- i>m-
.... u- huvl
rh'lilr.-'. '\'lh .Tr-'irim -i
I -.i u>
TEMPLE BNAi ZION. -'JO 173th St.,
V ami Bt-..n Rabbi Dr. / brjham I.
*fn 22-C
U ;. ,i. IT1 ..
-. MM O ul .--ll -
ula>v
H rvttM
v'.*". -.t*^ ,. Or".r-dcx
Rabbi Do* Rozencwaia. 23
ll 6-N bfcP-- I. nfio'lVV COM-
'."FG'T ON M* ,'.i.n mien Ave.
Ran\i Meir Wail >/ Velan ed. 21-A
Sap
IETH DAV'D SOUTH 7400 SW
'2*"th St Cc-iervitive Rabo' Sel
i-andau. Cantor Wili'am Lipso... 4 B
iMA-"L Ei T .... a,r. ..'01 w -a-
ton Avi. Conse. native Pabbi Irv -
ii Cantor vi Adie. 24
I >.....
,-U ,". H
.uo -.lay- ... uarh
.... .
I-. Malik n i Pi
-
mil .>
IETH KOOESH IrC' SW 12th Ave.
M>J-rc Trafit.ooiM Rabbi Mail S>-a
o ro. Cantnr Leon SeaAl. Ran. A lax
M-n-1-' f .''."' s
R 11 Ul I -'
- n -M. ,\ ; / .
IT. Sil,.-i.. 1 i S
su H m i. a r
Biaen
4T Tf)V TciubI* ol'c SW "t>
St Convativ. rjtv Crariej P-j
*
.
.-. Saituri]
. ;,.., -1,.. -;
g ii 7 ii.ro. thi a- -
u -
1E8REW CiDE''- ;" P >. Tree
O* Orticjr Rapo. Alexander *
Grot*. 2%
I/.AJ ISRAEL AVO GhgaTER
V AMI Vf.-w ^VACl'Cir j~0
o' Gi.ma 8 A
u .
. w I-
.l-r!> i
i ui Jrwn : .. Spe .
^.vc .^r-tN .- VUNITY
SiNAGCGLE. >& V, aan.ngtor. Ave.
O'th'oo -lai.-p. ,D"r H. Sttrn,
Captor Meyer bnoal. .t
- w.
.\r.- ... -
.- n K.-hhI
.. .....
-
rNESETH 'Sr-.AtU. < j EMCid Ava.
Ur'.hodox. Rabbi Oav.c L#hlkfi*ld.
Cantor Abrai'.atii. Sau 21
Ha Bt^iu V>v Season
l)urinnS<|)l Several Miami Beach Cha
of Hadassah groups have sched-
uled Sejfffimber meetings as tbe
new iqestn begins.
Masada Gioup was to l>ld
its liist meeting ol the season
at l-.M p.m. inursday in the
Tower -ti social hail, -*K>1 Pine
l*ree :)'.. Mid ni beach, featur-
ing Mrs. Gus Mentz, pas! preai-
dent oi the cnanter, as guetl
speaJwr.
The first luncheon meeting oi
the a-uuis O. liaiiJei.N Group
will be held .Monday noon at
the Kontainebleau Hotel wiLii
Mis. Wiliiam Saflir, president,
presiding.
Hanoi (Jroup's first luncheon
meeting "' the year will ix-
heid Moiiviay noon at the Dai-
cjloiia ii.itel. vv.th S>yd Spear.
president, presiding. A film will
be pan of the programi
Royal Maccabees Group plans
,. :i_niiiai- iiicciing- in tiie Fi-
nancial Federal. 7oa Washington
Ave.. Monuay, ^ept. JV. at 7
pjp, liaivi i.andy. president,
p.o.;ii>es an ent.itainiuf; pro-
gram.
.Naunya Group will hold a
paid-up meiiibei'ship UtaaCheon
in the U'lishmgton inural at
633 NK 16"th St., Tuesday,
Sept. 30. at noon. The prog
will feature vocalist Helen Re-
voire. M s Murray Nortman is
sening as chairperson.
ISRAEL. 'TpiDle' OF GRt/TEH
M.AMI 117 NE SI K-lo-m.
D"l'"i -ob R Niral 10
]"-
"I! -. '--~\ ,l|.| III- .
'
''- |N
I'.-, -U- -.1.
f.ORA- Trmpltl. 620 76th St.
Conservative. Kico' Mayer nbram.
o rintor N.co Ptiamj-, 2S
IWEL'TE PNTIR -i/S SK 25rn-
l '>-va-.v Mu. Saiiion
Wa- lenterg Cn-c- *ia\Y r\ Pai-iSM
11
F ... :
Wet
.
S.
OP ClvM T-r.- S7b5 sw :th
St fi'irrvi' .e -aoDi Dav-i Ma
r i'n-rit, m of '3
- ii-..... -
-,- .
TfJ/.toi e ISRE-. SOOTH formerly
3-'h T.kvai "Cvi Soni". Or. Rr'orm
-.-of n .-.- '3 a
iAVL =-. Tcmivl* o-0 SW 107**
' 5lit KM Rabbi Maxwell
e-i
TIFEi-tTM ISRAEL Temolai. 6V>
N h% am Ave. Conservative. 14
ZiOM leanp.e'. 3uU) M. ler. Rat. Con.
aw. a .; Paboi Normal] S'-asira..
"-:o f"0. HeHrrar 'f
in Satui .
^MUaUl
'"f-tTM JACCB iTemplj,, M E.
*v Ci"eiv4live. R
Nat.iar. ZolonaMA. '*
r' I'hai Km
.-.. ii >
Install. .
: ni v, otna -a ... -. sui.-i o
..in ..., >,.. ...
HOtiH MIAMI
BETM MOSHE CONCPECAT'OI*.
?^?5 N E. 1ttt St. Canservat've
Rib*-. Dr. Oan.el j. F.nmrtr Can
nr'.V-haida B:nm:n ..
r'i..l: .- ,;yr.|...\.
MIAMI BlACX
aCLDATm iSRAIL. 7S01 Carl/ie Axta.
'rihciax Kabl theldch '." Fwr t;
:
i i> i. i...
imy-i ,> ir..-b- ii i.i,h
.ii
v.ER TAMIO iTenipiei *9ia> St ana
Lari/ie Ave Co r-vjt ve P.i-
fcaaoen* Lab'vita. Cantor Edward
- -" .>
.- ,.
I j. u ajj
ii i.. .
... ,
r-^=i
>$l$4 >"-^~ 'via bar.ta Or.
_'Vnco)x. rtj^o. r-nu-iaas A. Wefer.
'-" ;
---------------ttr-^----------
>*tAJ\fc.C fc.\ ,SH Cf.TEP ",i
Ccljf.a.^ve Haut. C j. "Stai-in ax M
11. iu
'i I-..
I
:
1542
32
.On^r-ECATlOS t i TMAaM
\\i\r. r a-^n s,.
frt.Tr. BA \.w /-CE JEW'SH
CtNTEr.. -T^o -n i| Cau. >way
or-.r. St, Vsllaoe Canae-;.-: ve
""'" ''-1": -. axrrr- 32.a
-
- I


G'-OAS ACHIM NI'4-ACH SEFARO
CONgi-.eg*tio. re: 5th st
O-ahoow. Raoc Mr.rJa:i Cr mo.
'ta S'.p"
AiOl?rr/ "IIMI BfACrl
*DAfH VSH.RL\ (Temple). 102S
NE Van-- Gi'-"ni Dr Cc-serva-
tivc Rabbi Simcha rreedman. Can.
or lag ALcer.o. jj
;
> .11
: i.
AGUOATH ACHIM 3ra Ave Hrfea
-- i cu> Ct'irun.tv Cer-ec. '9)M
* E '.r1 Ave Or-koJij xj.a
KTH EC.
cm : no dux
.am Pi.-a
? r*e ->r
' i
*TH ISRAEL. 77*VJUi ot. Oarthodoa.
ai|iji ."^-ewai EMaaajaJ'f,
BE'H TORAti. '36.1 N. M.ami Seich
Bivrt C5n..rv,--ve Rhh, Max ,.;(>
ch.ti Canter Jaajnta B. Mendel* .n
r<
_ -
BNUAI ^M-AE 1401 NW !83'C *a
C. nservat.ve Rabt Victor t> Z.i
mn. C*niui lira Lei.ter. 3a

iEPHAROIC JEW.SH CENTER -.71
N E I71at St. Orthodox Rbb< Ne-
'm Gamhach. Cantor Joaepr. Nt.
houm. 36-A
1 u- .. .
......,
H ll d ... ,,. Sun.|:.i ir
5.INAI rniol-i. ( :>>RTh DDP
IfflO -VE C.'nJ a., R.torm RaLa
Ralv-- o. K'MV-. Cantor irv,na
Shu'kea ^
ram | -,. rvia-, S ,,,
,,. ir-Mi
Rally Wednesday Sponsored
By Ad Hoc Committee Here
A rally sponsored by the Ad
Hoc Couiinittje to Defeat Sen-
ate Bill 1 will be held Wednes-
day a; the Jewish Cultural Cen-
-i'. -i_9 l.cno\ Ave., Miami
Beach. The 8:00 p.m. meeting
will feature Anne Braden, na-
tionally Kno\Mi civil rights aCf
ti\ist: Mate Rep. Joseph Gerj
tign an 1 Lisa Grace, of thf
Flo* ida Alliance Against Repres*
.sion as speakers.
.M-rjP.is of various commu-
nity oj-ganiz tinns will be pres*
ent to .cqprdinate their joint ef-
fort u dekat Senate Bill 1.
.iicti -e erely curtails tlie
to assembly
JHHA Auxiliary
Lunch mm Sept. 'SO
Greater Miami Women's Aux-
iliary. Jewish Home and Hos-
for the Aged i D tuglas Gar-
. ps will hold its monthly
leon meeting at noon Tues-
day. Sept. 30. in the Delano
Hotel
- Lawrence l Shan i Sil-
ident of the auxil-
: ..) .;.'. SMt and weieoine the
guests; the invocation will be
gives bsj Mo. a. .i Molaajcy.
Guest speakers will be Mrs.
1'oad DoBa-aiu. who is the di-
rects, oi group work in volun-
teer ssaxvice at Douglas Gai>
d.ns. and M.s. Augusta Schles-
IBg.-B, pi e-idem of the Resident
Council.
RcaWEVations must be made
early by cal.inu Anne lanen-
baum and Iknnv JaftN.
Ellaine Honig, assistant vice president and secrcMry]
the chairman oj the board and to the president i
icon Savings and Loan Association of Florida, hos
honored for completion of 20 years of service. Mor-i.
Broad, chairman, presumed Mrs. Honig with a die-
pin at a recent meeting of the board of directors
Honig started tier financial career when American id
ings had a single office end assets of approximately 'in
million dollars, s/it- became secretary to the
in 1964 and was namec assistant vice president in 'M
Top Israeli Labor Leaders TJ
Address Histadrut Conclave.
Continued from Page 1-B
prived elements who lag behinJ
the rest of the nation in educa-
tional an. economic respects."
M,r. Meshel. head ol lie
1.250.000 member labor fede a-
tioo which e-iibraces 90 pci cut
ol Israel's labor force, has play-
ed a ke> rolj in phoning Is-
raels economic directions suxcaj
Hie Vo-n Kippur War. lie is in-
Milvyd in toe level iKgotiaiions
oi) uagj poli.ies. lases aud eost-
Nl- U''ssir. rh | fi-st Y -'nenit.'
Israeli to.be elected to the scn-v
in echelon of Flistidrut.. is a
socialist in the area of reha-
bilitation of slurjis and the Iraiur
mg ol young people from \ind-*r-
piivilt- ,1 timili-s for higher
vocational and civic ranks.
The convention will saint-
on of the leading A-neyjcan
i ade unions that v\ is t iuju] 1
b; Jewish n vdl v or! ers 7S
vea-s ai the int mi-tio-vil
1 "'i -' Gni-m in Workers' Un-
ion. Sol C. Chai! in newlv in-
stalled pr< sivii nl of
nnd two I'ii-'
Unbinskv and l.uuis -:
will be cited foi their it :J
to Israel and l!i-nJu: t\
cun\euiion luncheoik
The ac:ii ; iu>
asm ,',c ^-atiooaj 1
the Israel Histadrut i
w.jll be hiM'iliu'u.'d 4:'..
\v.iUijij b\alli>t 'iu ;'
October 12t;i. when th
i'hmx will cek-bratij ICtj itl
oj iu -if S-ji) iiiilKoa
lojiijvleiii)- cod iiitnK'Dtj
p^OgjJIUfl iu Israel.
A ke\ '.'.o.ii ul lh l>."-
is to htl'> raise IL 1W '*
for a inortv; >-. fund '9 9
\etjj.aiis of :h Isirte-
i orcis and ''!'' iwi-i! :It
couples in : I m cost "
The roun latiun'*
wis !vii!e.. sevei v-C
tV then a
United Si ii -s, P i ::v
Yitzhak Ribin m>d -;
'isi-isti<"i!!v endorw
i fJ i^.,i--.< :'|
the Jewish '." i
?>.
.1 \...lr... <*. .
TH JAC^B. ioT^ia-vnotoa Ava. ^ :"3 ^* ^ff*^
0.i.^uca. Raabi sr..,iar,anu T. SKY LAKE sv-NAtU :le 18'51 Ne
wirany. Canter Maunce Majmchei. I""- Av 0rt.,n v,. R
1
1h raphae'.. 'Tcoieli-). 1S45 J#f-
revaan Aara. Conservative RabM
Elliot W.i.igrac. froau.' aatit bit...
'> A>
v 1 -
I
in T r.-ir Kii;.i.
abjbi
In.. Sayniuii.
Dov
( unturned on Page 14-B
Deadline Sept. 20
I Special voter retfatratjpn lo-
ci"-..is Bre now availab.l- for
ivsul-nts of Miami, Miami
Beach nnd Iflalejh interested in
i otmo Nov. 4 i-i municipal elec-
tions.
I>.adline for registering m
vote is 5 p.m.. Sent. 70.
I-ocition-. are ai the KI:-ctions
Dotart-neot, 1400 Biscavne
r.lvd.: Soot1! Short- Omminitv
(entr. W ^.r, ,, ^ -T
Peac4i cirj HalL 1)30 Washing-
ton A*K Hialeah Adult Cnmrnu-
mty Center. 20 West Sixth St
Westlpn,. Shonnin'j e'ent r 1777
West 49th St.: an,l the Metro
lustice Bqildinn. 1351 NVV 12th
St.
If you're moving and want to keep receiving +Je*ld[
fhrjeflsu? notify us 2 week* in advance, using the fo
provided below.
My new address is:
' llleau, IVaui
Mln>
""'v
a '
ABU
/,,.'
si -
5-- <
M*til to;
** 012r7a, M,;inii. Florida 33101


September 19, 1975
-Jenisli BorkMan
Page 3-B
Inglish Jews, Like All Anglos,
rorry About Style, Conformity
By y\\::K SEGAL
bNDON Anl0 Jew"
Icommu.. -:-ects the o-
-inwhK .'.ves. and thus
concern tor :ormality and
in its --..tun centralize*.
nunal lifc in keeping
the -iish society
ates It -"v mucn P*1-1
- '.any Jews live
ft.vo lew 'ri an anxiety
It their p we m the general
ety never -u' below the
issimilati"-' ^s for official statistics sup-
' earlier this year by the
fd of Depi ties of British
h showed one out of
b five B : Jews marries
,'0f the nunity. More-
r. this da ndicated a steep
line in the lumber of Jew-
couples ing in syna-
beSr
._> it i.s compensation
judai-: irvMog bet-
in this .-;-et than the
Itotani idle church -
Great
IEW1SH fication often
6ns attei mg synagogues
o yeai te Kol Nidrei
vice on Y n Kippur eve.
a yeai I involvement
Israel wl become the
ne mean- >l identification
conscious
foe gem ance of Brit-
I society is ndergoini severe
pins as in ition and econo-
: difficult.t ut at all classes.
there fears for to-
ll-row, and that the two mil-
i Black immigrants may only
| the first victims of prejudice
1 discrimination, with ancient
i-Semitic prejudice raising
head.
Those concerned about the
nmunity'.; future need only
kk ut statistics Though even
Biologists admit problems in
kaning data on Jews, when
ligion is di I clement enu-
prated in the official census
documentation.
HE RECENT conference of
i Jewish Historical Society- of
Igland on Anglo Jewry in the
Ictorian Age showed that the
Immunity numbered 46,000
in 1882 rising dramatic-
|y to 300,000 by 1914 due
waves ot :-agnation from
lland and Russia- which main-
1 headed for : ;e United Statue.
|-Most British Jews today de-.
from uvinigrantB who
to make to New York
' the Board's .dearchers -say.
|Todey, there ire 410,000 Jews
I Britain, of w tumi 350,000 live
fend
icadeniv Women
Heel \\ < dnesday
I First meeting of the new Jew-
lh year of the Hebrew Academy
iomen Wednesday -will feature
l nook
642
review bv Mrs. Sherry
'lomoti at the home of Rabbi
ni Alexander 6. Gross,
Flamingo Dr., Miami
tack,
[The 12:30 p.m. session will
r ,'fL coffee and cake served
I *8. Gross, life member-of
F WDrev, Academy Woman.
f"'chusl|Pnorts the Greater Mi-
" Hcbi.'w Academy, lnrpest
'eorew day school in the South.
r. Solomon will review a
book, -The Kissinger Er-
in Policv in
r East," by Gil C. Al-
, I Vdler, presi-
t iw Academy
L nization is
from support-
i IB lach school,
L .';'' former parents, alum-
I friends of Torah
that the former communal rab-
bi of Manchester. Rabbi Altman
is now a professor at Brandeis
University. But the campaign
._.... for Soviet Jewry managed to
' irnviW'18 England alujgetjbjfir. bring many people into the
JUSTr AS American Jewry re- mainstream who would other-
pluralism of Amer- wise have stayed outside.
Mushlin Authtr Of Article
Irving Mushlin, ;,anaing di-
rector of the Dade-Monroe
Tung Association, is the author
of an article entitled "The Tu-
berculosis Patient iu the Cen-
tral Harlem District of New-
York City," which appeared in
this months issue of The Amer-
ican Journal of Public Health.
Mr. Mushlin, who assumed his
present post last year, conduct-
ed his study while serving as
managing director of the New
York Lunc Association.
in Greater London. The smuller
pnn incial communities are
withering away, like Belfast or
Sheffield with the brightest and
most talented drawn to London
fleets the
ican society, so the British com-
munity is as highly centralized
as the British establishment to
which many of its leaders be-
long. The representative com-
munal positions are replete
with titled men and women who
were ennobled by the Queen' at
the governments advice for
their service to both the gen-
eral and the Jewish community
The Jewish contribution to
Britain is quite out of propor-
tion to the community's size,
whether in science, the arts,
the judiciary, the economy or
public life.
There are more than 40 Jew-
ish Members of Parliament, and
18 Jews are in the government
at various levels. Thus. Harold
Lever, MP, as the Chancellor
of the Duchy of Lancaster, i.s
very close to Premier Harold |
Wilson, while Sir Keith Joseph.
MP, is considered the ideolo-
gist behind Margaret Thatcher,
leader of the Conservative op-
position.
Yet obviously they do not af-
fect British policy on Israel,
which is sympathetic largely!
due to Wilson's ..deep personal
conviction of many years stand-
ing of the justice,of.the Zionist
cause. Yet the ambivalence to-1
wards Israel and Jewish mat-
ters surfaces from time to time.
A MARKED example was that
the British delegation at the In-
ternational Women's Year Con-
ference in Mexico which ab-
stained on the "elimination of
Zionism" resolution, was headed
by a Jewish MP. Millie Miller,
MP for Ilford, one of the few
constituencies wliere Jews can
influence the vote.
She has since come under at-
tack from the community for
not voting against, but explains
she had to abide by Foreign
Office rulings. Usually they
manage to avoid such a dilem-
ma of their Jewish loyalties-
clashing with their political in-
terests.
The basic insecurity is there,
despite the general prosperity i
and integration of the oommu-
nity. One need only judge by;
the intense pressure from or-
ganized Anglo Jewry on the
British government to amend
the Race Relations Act so as.tot
be able to prosecute anti-Jew-,
ish incitement.
THE ACT was brought in to
protect Britain's two miHion
Black immigrants, with the
Jews reduced to the second
largest minority. But Jewish
antennae are always alert to
any likely threat.
Signs there are aplentyv the)
emergence of the neo-Fascist
national front on a countrywide
basis, which is making small in-,
roads at elections, especially1
among poorer white areas ad-.
jacent to Black centers.
A most recent case highlight-1
ing this ambivalence was thej
furor evoked by the reburial in'
Jerusaknn of the two Stern
group men who killed Lord
Moyne in Cairo 30 years ago_
Latent anti-Semitism combined;
with near hysteria among many
prominent Jews, including Lord
Rothschild, was iv\ealed in itsi
ugliness.
THE- STIFF formality of or-
ganized Jewish life with its
stress on the upper crust and
the titled has del irred ''
younger Jew Mall* intel-
lectual.- fr< involved in |
commui s i nUki
lea, British Jewry lacks Profes-
sor-Kabhis.
I-
Today, the main test of the
organized community's capacity
for adjustment to changing
times is symbolized by the dis-
cussion on whether to copy the j
American model of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry or
to have it attached to the Board
of Deputies as a department of
ts administration. Much will'
depend on the result
COMPLETE
INSURANCE
PROTECTION
personal/ business
MWMMMHMHMBJ
BERNARD B SEGAL
VICE PRESIDENT
KEYES CITY INSURANCE
AGENCY. IHC
2750 DOUGLAS ROAD
MIAMI 33133
TEL 442-023J
Representing
r
THE TRAVELERS
INSURANCE COMPANIES
PUZZLED! by Norm* A. Orovilz
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There are 15 words and phrases related to the holiday period, beginning with Sukkot and concluding with Simcliat Torah, hidden in this puzzle. The words are placed verticalLv. horizontally, diagonally, frontwards and backwards. How manv can you find? Answers are on page 6-B. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. VARIATIONS IN TRANSLITERATIONS AND PHONETIC SPELLING MAY
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ith Organizations, Temples, Tour Operators and Travel Agents:
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Last Tour Before Air Fares Go Up November 1st.
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YOU ARE INVITED TO A FREE FRIED CHICKEN BRUNCH
TO HELP CELEBRATE
The Grand Dedication Ceremonies
OF THE ALTON ROAD BANKING CENTER OF
BARNETT BANK OF MIAMI BEACH, N.A.
where: Barnett Bank of
Miami Beach, N.A.,
1414 Alton Road
(under- the big top)
when: Sunday, Sept. 21,
10 a.m. sharp
what: grand dedication
ceremonies with free fried
chicken brunch, cole slaw,
potato salad, iced tea .
THE WORKS
who: Dedication by U.S.
Senator Richard "Dick" Stone
Metro Mayor Steve Clark
Miami Beach Mayor
Harold Rosen
Entire Miami Beach
City Council
and YOU!
We sre proud of this new banking center,
expressly designed to serve the needs
of the 9rea s senior citizens. Come join us
and share our pride.
Barnett Bank of Miami Beach, N.A.
420 Lincoln Rod Mali 1414 AHon Rol
Phon* 538-7831
Member FDIC


Page 4-B
*Jeis*fl*ri&-
Friday, September 19
H
Sen. Stone Keynoter For
Bank's Dedication Sunday
U.S. Sen. Richard "Dick"
Stone will be the keynote speak-
er at grand dedication cere-
monies Sunday at the Alton
Road Banking Center of Barnett
Bank of Miami Beach. 1414 Al-
ton Rd. The ceremonies, which
will begin promptly at 10 a.m.,
are open to the public.
"We are very proud that Sen.
Stone will be our special guest,"
said Alan Master, president of
the financial institution, "and
' we are also pleased with the
other dignitaries that will be
attending."
Metro Mavor Steve Clark, Mi-
ami Beach Mavor Harold Rosen.
Metro Commissioner Harvey
Ruvin. the entire Miami Beach
City Council, and other promi-
nent people will be on hand for
the ceremonies. Master said.
"We think it's particularly
noteworthv that Donald Tarle-
ton. Regional Administrator of
National Banks, is coming down
from Atlanta for the dedica-
tion." Master added.
The significance of the event,
according to Master, is that
" possibly for the first timea
bank has been conceived as a
sen-ice- outlet for the financial
and other needs of a concen-
trated population of senior
citizens.
"The. concept for building a
banking facility for the senior
citizen is not an afterthought
Our decision to build this facil-
ity on Alton^ Road reflects our
comnntmfcW toJiwUitV t Mi-
ami Beach and its senior resi-
dents," said Master.
Some of the senior citizen-
oriented items in the facility in-
clude ramps meeting federal
specifications (no steps), re-
served parking for the handi-
capped, lowered teller window
and check writing desk, free
"hot line" to the district social
security office, and monthly
Barnett Bank-Senior Citizen
health days, when certain free
medical consulation is offeree*
(glaucoma screening, hyperten-
sion and blood pressure checks,
etc.)
"We are verv proud of the
new Alton Road banking center,
and we hope that all of our
friends and neighbors will join
us this Sundav morning and
share our pride." Master said.
Brunch, featuring fried chick-
en wiH be served under a gigan-
tic tent adjacent to the bank at
1414 Alton Rd.
South Floridians To Attend
Weizmann Institute Dinner
Two South Florida men and
their wives will be among scores
of prominent international sci-
entists who will attend the an-
nual dinner of the American
Committee for the Weizmann
Institute of Science in New York
Oct. 13.
They are Dr. and Mrs. Max-
well Dp.uer of Miami Beach and
Dr. ?nd Mrs. Morris Rockstein
of Coral Gables.
Dr. Dauer is the Dresident of
Lauderdale Lakes General Hos-
pital and a professor and direc-
tor of the Division of Radio-
logical Physics in the Depart-
ment of Radiology at the Uni-
versity of Miami School of
Medicine. Dr. Rockstein, a
gerontologist, is a professor of
physiology at the medical
school.
Guest of honor at the New
York dinner will be Irving S.
Shapiro, chairman of E. I. du-
Pont de Nemours & Company.
He will receive the Weizmann
Medallion, an award presented
annually for distinguished serv-
ice to science, Israel and the
Jewish people.
Dr. Dauer is president of the
Florida Committee for the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science. Mrs.
Rockstein is the committee's
executive director and Dr. Rock-
stein is chairman of the com-
mittee's scientific advisory
board.
The Institutebased in Re-
hovot, Israelis named for the
first President of the State of
Israel, Dr. Chaim Weizmann,
who was a recognized leader in
the world's scientific commu-
nity as well as a statesman and
leader of the World Zionist Or-
ganization.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science was begun in 1934 as
the Daniel Sieff Research In-
stitute, and adopted the present
name in 1944. Today, the In-
stitute is in the forefront of
world research in biology,
physics, chemistry, and math-
ematics and in the teaching of
science, on the graduate level;
and is internationally renowned
as a leading center of scientific
excellence.
The full scientific comple-
ment of the Institute numbers
about 1,500 and an additional
500 scientists in training are
located at the Feinberg Grad-
uate School, chartered by the
New York State Board of
Regents.
Each year, some 500 scientific
papers are published trom the
Institute in leading scientific
periodicals around the globe.
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Milton Gordon
Lodge's Speaker
Milton Gordon, former attor-
ney for the U.S. Department of,
Housing and Urban Develop-
mvt who has just returned 1
from Israel, will discuss higher J
education in the Jewish state
Friday at a 12:30 p.m. meeting
of the Miami Beach Lodge of,
B'nai B'rith.
The session, in the civic room
of the 100 Lincoln Road Build-:
ing. is free and open to the gen-
eral public.
Gordon will describe visits to
Bar-Ilan University, located in
Miami Beach's sister city of
Ramat Gan, and to the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
A former member of the City
of Miami Beach Housing Au-
thoritv, Gordon is a Shomer Is-
rael >'ardian of Israeli in the
!-raeI Bonds Organization, ar>J
a c .- ';> the A-
of the Hebrew Univer-
sity. I
Soccer-Fixing
Continued from Page 1-B
sponsors of Betar Lis and the
General Zionists patrons of the
Maccabi teams, are firmly op-
posed to Olmart and Sands
suggestions and don't want am
interference from the Knesset
so far as'the operation of the
Soccer Federation is concerned.
> 'The whole matter has been
turned over to Aharon Yadlin,
Minister of Education, who is
due to come up with a ruling
this month as to the future dis-
position of Israel's troubled
soccer leagues.
THE BIGGEST problem in-
volved is the fact that Israel's
Sportstoto, a legalized lottery
based upon weekly National
Soccer League game results,
which throws off millions of
pounds annually into a pool for
subsidizing the bulk of Israel's
national sports programs, is in
jeopardy.
A possible suspension of soc-
cer league play, which is an
extreme likelihood, would wreak
havoc with this program. With-
out the weekly sport lotury, Is-
rael would not be able to par-
ticipate in any international
competition.
THIS WRITER spoke to Haim
Glovinsky in Tel Aviv, who di-
rects the tax-exempt lottery
based on soccer. He advised
the JTA that he does not an-
ticipate an adverse ruling from
Yadlin.
As a matte: of fact, he point-
ed out that the Israel national
select team has already left for
Holland to prepare for the pre-
Olympic elimination tourna-
ment which will take place in
Tokyo in October.
At that time, it will be deter-
mined by Israel's play in the
Asian bracket as to whether or
not it will qualify for participa-
tion in the Olympic Soccer
Games to be held next year in
Montreal.
1 4
1
; \
The Working Committee for the American Jewish Con-
gress' first annual conference on the Reaffirmation of
American Ideals of Social Justice, Freedom and Equality
oct. lv ana ^> "< i tutvuit notei. inciuac (seateii
Mrs, Sylvia Kaplan, Mrs. Isabelle Friedman, 1;
od Mrs. Mottie Gersh; (standing) Mrs. Mildred Berlin'
Mrs. Roma Fineberg, Mrs. Judy Teppcr, Mrs. S
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( September 19, 1975
fJenisli Ihridicnn
Page 5-B
j^civits c/ Uiew
Rumanian Cedars Installs Dr. Kaufman

with NORAAA A. OROVITZ
hen the Miarrrl* "Dolphins
schedule kicked off
pre season exhioition
Ln s, unce again fans of all
faiths became a captive audi-
Lce for cl.-igymen of specific
Ui-suasions who have been in-
Kited to mic the pre-game in-
\ocations.
Rather than preaching to or
praying with congregants in
their own respecti-e churches,
Clergymen have betn addressing
L rili^i )nsly--.isparate group of
lupwa.Js of 70.000 people.
FOR THE Chicago Bears
Igam.'. Rev. Karl Krutger, of the
[holy Cross Lutheran Church,
(invoked a blessing in his "nor-
[mal manner of prayer." The
I Rev. Krutger, whose purpose
I was not to offend any group,
[justified his Christian phrase-
lology- An individual would ex-
Jpect that whoever gives the in-
I vocation would pray as he nor-
mally would pray according to
I his own convictions and his
I own theology."
Certainly, the intent of reli-
Igious leaders is not questioned.
Rather, it is the 'modus oper-
andi" that is in question. Joe
Robbie, Dolphin owner, initiat-
ed invocations "in an ecumen-
ical spirit."
THE INVITATIONS have been
issued :-11:11 his office, and an
effort has been made to balance
appearances of varied clergy-
men.
No content guidelines are
ever suggested because Robbie
considers censoring a clergy-
man inappropriate.
ARTHl K TEITELBAUM, of
B'nai H'rith's Anti-Defamation
League, is long familiar with
the problem. In deference to
those who are religiously-com-
muted anJ whtrgj'to*^ public
gttii.:ing and are then subject-
ed to a prayer sen ice, Teitel-
baum offers a simple solution:
Diop the invocations.
Teitelbaum questions the de-
siiability of ha. ing any pray-
ers at these gatherings at ail.
And if the practice is to con-
tinue. Teitelbaum would like to
see invocations that are "inclus-
ive, not exclusive" of all reli-
gious denominations.
Christian prayers that are
"particularistic" offend the
sensitivities of those Jews who
are forced to listen.
RABBI SOL Landau, of Beth
Da', id Congregation, is no
stranger to the invocation cir-
cuit. As Jewish Chaplain to
Homestead Air Force Base, he
frequently finds himself bless-
ing a religiously-mixed group.
In those instances, he choos-
es not to use a "particular Jew-
ish form" of prayer. Instead,
Rabbi Landau elects to make his
blessing "more universal to be
held in a way to be acceptable
to all."
The ADL, which has received
'sympathetic, but,. ineffective"
hearing or -fa vocational com-
plaints in the past, may soon
see their efforts rewarded with
action. .
*- j -"i* V"''
Joe RooWfe* who ''would rath-
er eliminate'u*he invocations
than crea6f~*;sqmroversy," nas
suggested a meeting with var-
ious denomination leaders in or-
der to communicate concerns.
Instead of giving' invocational
guidelines, Robbie hopes to
solve the problem by appealing
to the sensitivities of reason-
able religious leaders. The Jew-
ish community looks forward to
Robbie"s success.
Women's Division Of AFHU Holding
1st Fall Luncheon Meeting Thursday
The first fall meeting of the
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion ol the American Friends
of the Hebrew University was
to be held Thursday noon, ac-
cording to an announc.m^nt by
Lillian (Mrs. Leon) K jni \
president of the Wom.ns Di i-
sion.
The luncheon, which is op^n
to the public will be held at the
Montmartre Hotel, Miami Beach.
Albert A. Dome.-, regi ;nal di-
rector of the American Friends
of the Hebrew Uni ersity, will
present an outline of the year's
activities planned for Greater
Miami.
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Among the reports to be giv-
en at the inaugural meeting will
be an account of the Golden
Jubilee Convocation of the He-
brew University held this sum-
mer in Jerusalem in which the
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion participated.
Among some of the South
Floridians who participated in
the two-week convocation were
Mrs. Lillian Dubowy, Leon
Kronheim, Mrs. Isidore Katz-
man, Mr. and Mrs. Morris To-
pol, Mrs. Rose Hochstim, Mrs.
Charles Charcowsky, and Miss
Esther Wildman.
Also, Mrs. Ida Wessel, Mrs.
Harry Becker, Milton Gordon,
Mrs. Philip Gould. Mrs. Lena
Young, Bernard Young, and
, Mrs. Dorothy Cohen.
Jews Found
'Vital'
PARIS (JTA) Rabbi Is-
rael Miller, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations, said here that he had
found the Rumanian Jewish
community to be a highly vital,
well organized and active com-
munity.
R-Hbi Miller returned from a
week-long trip to Rumania dur-
ing which he visited syna-
goeues, Jewish institutions,
clubs, welfare facilities and
conferred with local officials
and foreign diplomats. He visit-
ed the country as guest of the
Ripwwniwi eovernment.
THE CHAIRMAN of the Pres-
idents Conference told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency, "I was
surprised to see the Rumanian,
community to be so vital, so well
organized and so well attended."
He said that all these activi-
ties were carried out not only
with the full knowledge of the
Rumanian government but with
its active help.
Rabbi Miller said that he did
not know how many of Ruma-
nia's estimated 60,000 Jews
want to leave the country but
he hoped and believed that all
those who want to do 6o will
be able to do so.
He said that he, nonetheless,
gave the American Ambassador
in Bucharest a list of Jews
whose families in Israel and
elsewhere said they were pre-
vented from leaving the coun-
try.
RABBI MILLER, who visited
Jewish installations in both
Bucharest and a number of
other cities, said that as far as
he could ascertain the svna-
gogues were not merely show
pieces but vital parts of the
community.
He also expressed praise for
the kosher restaurants, the Yid-
dish theater, the Yiddish paper
which appears in Rumanian and
Hebrew, and the various other
installations.
He said he saw Jewish choral
groups sing in Yiddish and He-
brew and one day in a small
provincial city found 50 people
attending services in the local
synagogue early in the morning.
HE DEPLORED the fact,
however, that there are only
two rabbis left in Rumania and
expressed fear as to what will
happen after Rumania's Chief
Rabbi, Moses Rosen, retires.
Rabbi Miller said he intends
to present a report to the Amer-
ican Jewish community on what
he had seen during this week-
long trip.
JFCS Workshop Sept. 30
The Women's Committee of
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is sponsoring a work-
shop entitled "The Family and
the Changing Role of Women"
Tuesday. Sept. 30, from 9:30
a.m. to noon at the Greater Mi-
ami Jewish Federation, 4200
Biscayne Blvd. For information
and registration (no fee) phone
JFCS.
President Of Medical Staff
Dr. Arthur L. Kaufman was
installed as president of the
Medical Staff of Cedars of Leb-
DR. ARTHUR KAUFMAN
anon Health Care Center at the
group's annual meeting last
week.
Dr. Kaufman, who has served
as president-elect this year,
takes office Oct. 1 succeeding
Dr. Joseph Freeman, who is
completing a one-year term as
president. Dr. Freeman also
served as president of the staff
in 1971-72.
Other officers and members
of the Medical Board elected
Tuesday include Dr. Charles
Beber, president-elect; Dr. Eu-
gene Korarad, secretary-treas-
urer; and Dr. Fred Wasserman,
Dr. Herbert Kaiser, and Dr. Ir-
win Weinberg, members at
large.
Also serving on the board by
virtue of their staff positions
are Dr. Leonard Steiner, Dr. N.
Joel Ehrenkranz, Dr. Wayne
Rorts. Dr. Daniel Seckinger,
Dr. Robert Feltman. Dr. Victor
Dembrow and Dr. Freeman.
Dr. Kaufman, who received
his medical training at the Uni-
versity of Illinois School ol
Medicine and completed his in-
ternship and residency at E. J.
Meyer Memorial Hospital in
Buffalo, N.Y., and the Veterans
Administration Hospital in Buf-
falo, serves as assistant profes-
sor of medicine at the Univer-
sity of Miami School of Medi-
cine, and is a Diplomate of the
American Board of Internal
Medicine and an Associate of
the American College of Physi-
cians.
Dr. Kaufman was Chief of
Medicine at Cedars of Lebanon
in 1967-69; Chief of Cardiology
at Cedars in 1970-71; president*
elect of the Heart Association
of Greater Miami in 1972; and
president in 1973. He has offices
at 1150 NW 14th St.
The Outgoing president, Dr.
Freeman, is a graduate of the
University of Louisville School
of Medicine and completed his
internship and residency at ML
Sinai Hospital in New York. A
clinical professor at Jackson
Memorial Hospital and Univer-
sity of Miami School of Medi-
cine, he is a Diplomate of the
American Board of Otolaryngol-
ogy and has offices at 245 SB
1st St.
During the meeting J. A. Zis-
kind, executive director of Ce-
dars, announced that the first
patients will be admitted to the
new 500-bed East Building on
Sept. 27, and that dedication
ceremonies for the new facility
are being planned for some time
in November.
Chai Chapter Luncheon Set
B'nai B'rith Women, Chai
Chapter 974, plans a luncheon-
meeting Sunday, Sept. 28, at
noon, in the Delano Hotel. A
nominal donation is required,
quired.
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my peace
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., by Uriel Ofek
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Page 6-B
+JeHitfkridfcw
Friday, S.-^
Albert A. Darner, (left) receives a $100 check to the
American Friends of the Hebrew University from Michael
E. S. Becher of Miami Beach. Looking are Leon J. Ell.
one of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's major sup-
porters, and Herbert Buchweld, (right) president of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the American Friendsi Becher.
executive vice chairman of the Florida Committee for
the Encyclopaedia Judaica. studied at the Hebrew Uni-
versity as a participant in the American Student Program.
Dorner, regional director of the American Friends, said
Becher has agreed to work with him to enlist support
from other graduates of the Hebrew University's over-
seas student program.
Women s League For Israel Names
Straus Florida- Representative
Clifford A. Straus of Key Bis-
cayne has been named Florida
Representative of the Women's
League for Israel.
In his new position, Mr.
Straus will be in charge of
organizational development
r-throughout the state of Florida
and will serve as a liaison with
th> League's national headquar-
< ten:.
A native of' Richmond, Va..
end a resident of the Miami
area for the -past 25 years. Mr.
Straus, who holds an M.A. in
Social Administration, .has serv-
ed several agencies in the com-
munity, including the Israel
Bond Onnnization. Mt. Sinai
Hospital, the Urban League and
the Better Business Bureau,
which he organized.
Mr Straus served as a public
sneaker and field worker .for the
United Jewish Appeal following
two years in Israel. He has also
worked for the Miami offices of
the Jewish 'rheokwical Seminary
and the Albert Einstein Medical
School of New York's Yeshiva
University.
The Women's Leieue for Is-
rael is a non-nrofit. non-political
THE INDIANER
FAMILY
Nina, Paul, Tamara,
Cindy, Bruce, Dorothy
Steve and Evan
Wish Their Relatives and
Friends a Happy Succoth
organization whose members
are devoted to improving the
social, economic and education-
al welfare of Israel's youth
through residential homes, ef-
fective vocational training and
rehabilitation, guidance and
placement, and Hebrew instruc-
tion.
The league organized in
1928also maintains a Weav-^
ing Workshop for the Blind,c
where sightless young men and
women gain economic and so-
cial independence.
At the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, the League has help-
ed thousands of young people
through its dormitories at Givat
Ram and Mt. Scopus, the stu-
dent cafeteria, sUident center,
and the Rose Isaacs Chair in
Sociology.
fa the Miami area, there arc
.four chapters of the Women's
League for Israel, The Aventwra
Chapter; is presently chaired by
Mrs. Frank Koch of North Mi-
ami Beach: the Shalom Chapter
bv Mrs Mortimer Nathanson of
Hallandale. the Florida Chapter
by Mrs. Delia Slater of Miami
Beach, and the Lincoln-Roney-
Mlami Beach Chanter bv Mrs.
Meyer Resntck-of Miami Beach.
Post. Auxiliary
Qfeeefve Festival
At Tuesday Meet

Observing the culmination oi
this year's High Holy Days and
the Festival of Succoth the Nor-
man Bruce Brown Post No. 174
and its Ladies Au lliary oi the
Jewish War Veterans have
planned a special evening for
their members, (many iust re-
batatas from a long summer -
vacation) and their guests Tues-
day, at 7:45 p.m. in the Commu-
nity Rooms of the First Federal
at 2760 SW 22nd St.
Gii'-st speaker Walter Dart-
land." Dade County's first Con-
sumer Advocate, will he intro-
duced by Ralph Rosofsky. past
post commander and national
committeeman.
Mr. Dartland believes "God
Helps Consumers Who Help
Themselves," but when "God"
and the consumer need a little
extra assistancethere's Walter
Dafttand.
Associated with Metro. Mr.
Dartland is answerable only to
County Manager Raj Goode.
Post Commander Alex Green-
wMd and Auxiliary President
Claire Greemvalu will greet
members and guests. Mrs Svl-
via Liehman. hostess, assisted
by Catharine Morris and Gert-
rude Raderman have planned
holiday refreshments for the
close of the meeting.
Dwifcrl Society To Install
Miami Beach Dental Society
will holu its installation banquet
at the Carillon Hotel Sunday,
Sept 28, at 6:30 p.m.. it has been
announced. The October sched-
ule will include "General Anes-
thes'i in Operative Dentistry"
Monday, Oct. 27, in the Embers
Restaurant. i
Dade's Fire Fighters col-
lected a grand total of
$71,174.60 from drivers
during the Labor Day week-
end, in spite of rain squalls
and four large fires to fight.
Here, after all the hard
work, Sam Stone, chairman
of the Dade Council of Fire
Fighter's "Weekend Against
Dystrophy," and the men
present the money to the
association during the Jer-
ry Lewis Telethon.
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INGATHERING, of BOOTHS, of TABEKNACLES
MINI ATZERET, MYRTLE, SUKKA. ETR
PALM BRANCHES, CITRON, TISHRI. VV, LEV
ICUS.
Spirit Of '76 Is Luncheon Theiml
The Sisterhood of Beth David
Congregation plans a member-
ship luncheon Wednesday at
10:30 a.m., at Beth David South,
"500 SW 120th St.. utilizing the
Bicentennial theme embodying
the "Spirit of 76."
Sisterhood will enact its ver-
sion of the first meeting of the
Continental Congress
The con worhn
the Sisn mertba
luncheon Mn :
Alterman. .": ector td
cording st. Ma
J. L. Ten. ^resident:
Donald T ; meuiba
\ice pies id Mrs.
Portnoy. rip duet
retary.
AMERICAN
CABINET
CUSTOM FINISHING
ANTIQUES
GCLD AND
SILVER LEAF
CUSTOM BUILT
CABINETS
BARS
DIVIDERS
IWT WALLS
327 N.E. 69th Street
Miami. Florida
Phone 754-3732
FRANK GONZALEZ
THE SANCTITY OF LIFE
URBAN AND COMMUNITY CRISIS
CHANGED EXPECTATIONS OF JEWISH WOMEN
POLARIZATION AND INTERACTION IN ORTHODOXY
PRIVATE ETHICS AND PUBLIC MORALITY
Is ues of vital concern to the Orthodox ( nattl __,
Issues which demand thorough analvs:.- i ublfc
by our community's best talents ... ai
And now, a unique and historic conferer-ct -ieV(lte<1(!lJ
clusively to these burning public issues gathering
standing leaders and thinkers from the Ortnodox JP"
communities of the United States and Car.;.......
THE FIRST NATIONAL ORTHODOX LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE ON PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Thanksgiving Week, November 26-30 1975
at the Essex House Hotel in New York Cry
Under the auspices of the UOJCA
For further information contact: Public Cor.^4
Committee! Union of OrtfuMox Jewish I "'"fj
America!lib E. 27th St./New York, N.Y. 6/Tel M
725-3400 /Si
David H. Hill Conference Chan man A U
Sheldon Rudoff Conference Co-chairman ; LIB
Harold M. Jacobs UOJCA President \T]''


Septerr.
er 19, 1975
*Jtw#rt tkrMUam
Pape 7 B
Medals Commemorate Arrival of
] st Jews To Settle In America
\0 are ';v /or *ne 0ct 8 "Backgammon, Canas-
[,', ,,- 'iv.draWmg Luncheon" at the Palm Bay
, ;or />,., n, a non-profit community group Work-
In coop ; witn Mount Sim" Medical Center to
Lc fa "tost comprehensive facilities and scrv-
hpr' ,; lal-medical care of children. Shown
L are Lipsky. chairwoman (seated); Judy
L i- lent and Janyce Robins, (right) presi-
|(,/p, |, in the playroom the organization con-
[vj Pediatrics Department of Mount Sinai
leal I
1-Hmn Physician Coverage
an n rated At Cedars ER
B-'invj c by physi-
n on a M-
IbtsU :'.iated this
ey depart-
of (ed A Lebanon
according
aonoun : by .J. A.
|d, exi !i rector.
Bun Ziskind
\. the icy depart-
-\ i 11 :- id Into Jhe
i!lv-co.....leteJ Hast Build-
ithe Cedj :omplex.
Is m" :e is con-
wif'i o litnient to
U j f the c"-'i-
" ; %aid. "For
ir-i i hen aware
w mini emer-
fftCili1 -'ts Civic Cen-
a, .. new emer-
,',,;,,. "-vic- is dc-
|d to iv.. : need."
ige for Hie
I enic nro\'id"'t
uroun tors headed
P>'- Pre ier and Dr.
ir Leni
Pevrier > tduate of the
ii completed
year ir ship in intern-
al medicine at Jackson Memo-
los'i'-.il and has four years
emergency room experience,
i I also spenl two years with the
Center for Disease Control in
Atlanta.
Dr. I.onnev. a graduate of the
.Medical College at Ohio State
University, was director of the
emergency room at Grant Hos-
pital. Colunib'H, Ohio, for two
years, and for the past three
and a half years has been an
emergency physician at Mercy
Hospital in Miami.
The group also includes Dr.
Lou Aquino, Dr. Phyllis Price
and Dr. Douglas Miller.
The new Cedars emergency
department includes a much
larger treatment area, more ex-
ive equipment, an x-ray
room, an operating room for
minor surgery, a fracture room,
and observation rooms.
PWER IN HOLLYWOOD
lAiNTS UKPENDABLE
THN HOUSEKEEPER
hWMkcca -, ind COOkiOfl.
J*2Jj in.; Ph. Holly.
W-J8 ;046. 922-2681
[REUGlOtiS SCHOOL
TEACHERS AND
MUSIC TEACHER
Temple 3eth El
plywood ^ 020-8225
""I line 44-7773)
Sisterhood Has
Evening Chapter
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Am announces the sea-
son's first meeting for the new-
evening chapter at the temple
Wednesday at 8 p.m.
The theme of the meeting
will be, "Where I've been
Where I Am Now Where I
Am Going to Be.'" Guest speak-
er for the 'value clarification
workshop" will be Ruth Siegel.
Business and professional
women, women who cannot at-
tend daytime meetings for any
reason, and women who just
prefer to attend meetings in the
evening are encouraged to
come and bring friends. New
I leas and input are solicited.
'STINCTIVE PARTIES
UNLIMITED
Wjt| Frn, a MOMS' Event
'"' Spe: si nf
WORRY FREE
ARRANGEMENTS
(l..v..
f: llivili,-
' .IS----|M T
INTRODUCTIONS for Companionshi*
or Marriage. All *# W0RlD
WIDE SWVICE. Call (305) 491-4020
or write for Information: UW
dick enterprises, 2501 e. Coat
nerciol Blvd., Ft. lauderdale, Flo.
The "Arrival of the 23" is
the subject of the first medal of
a series of 120 medals of The
Medal!ic HHtory of the Jews of
America now being produced by
The Judaic Heritage Society and
filling a void in the printed his-
torical record, the Jews of
America.
Particularly timely now as we
celebrate our National Bicen-
tennial, the first medal of the
group shows the first Jewish
settlers in America23 refugees
from Brazilarriving in New
Amsterdam in September, 1654.
Although a sprinkling of in-
dividual Jewish settlers had
reached the continent earlier,
this marked the beginning of
organized Jewish life in Colonial
America. In the years to follow.
American Jewry was to con-
tribute a great deal to the
growth of the nation, far beyond
the significance of its modest
numbers.
East Side
Jewish Life
Illustrated
NEW YORK (JTA) The
vitality and the pathos of Jew
ish life on New York's Lower
List Side during the late 1800's
and early 1900's is hauntingly
presented in a series of nostal-
gic photographs which illus-
trate the Hebrew Publishing
Company's Lower East Side
Calendar Album for the Jewish
Year 5736.
The calendar was designed
and edited by Marcus A. Cohen.
COHEN, formerly an editor
and designer for major publish-
ers, now devotes himself mainly
to the study of Jewish history.
In selecting the photos for the
Lower East Side Calendar, he
chose pictures which "recreate
a past that no longer exists and
which shed new light on an im-
portant group of people and
their style of life."
As a descendant of immi-
grant parents who themselves
lived on the Lower East Side,
Cohen believes that these
photos will recall fond memo-
ries for a generation which
produced some of America's
outstanding figures in litera-
ture, entertainment, science
and commerce.
THE ALBUM contains some
two dozen photographs includ-
ing market scenes on Hester
Street, a tenement sweat shop
on Ludlow Street, the old Sec-
ond Avenue "El" at Broome
and Allen Streets, scenes from
the Yiddish Theater and family
portraits.
There is also a glossary
which describes all Jewish
holidays and a table of candle-
lighting times in principal U.S.
and Canadian cities.
graph*,
- thvmei
l|nW9ement, W*ddina$,
^esrten,/ Ptnm]^
\m ff?,, ToBen
MUTOV W7-4S97
RABBI -MARRIED. FULLY
QUALIFIED TO HANOLE
HEBREW AND RELIGIOUS
SCHOOLS. CANTORIAL VOICE.
BAAL KRIAH. CERT PIED
MEDICAL MOHEL. DESIRES TO
RELOCATE IN MIAMI OR
VICINITY. BEST REFERENCES
Reply Bo*RM 01M73, Miami 33101.
Racing At Calder Continues
On 5-Days Weekly Schedule
The 1976 classic hopefuls will
get their first test of the fall
season when Calder Race Course
offers the 7 furlong Beau Gar
Stakes this weekend.
Racing continues on its five
afternoon each week schedule
until the first Tuesday of Oc-
tober when only Sundays will
be dark. Post time for the first
of 10 events remains at 1:15 and
will be kept at that time
throughout the Tronieal Park
season which continues the
present meeting in early No-
vember.
In calling attention to the
early struggle of American Jews
for rt>liaious freedom. The
Medallic History of the Jews of
America marks the milestone of
the first svnauoeue designed
and built in Continental North
America which was consecrated
on April 8, 1730.
Eighteenth conm-v Jewish
life, as port raved in several
medals, shows the Jews' promi-
nence in the commercial world.
Medals depicting Francis Sal-
vador (th" first JtMv to die In
the Revolution), Aaron Lonez
(a successful merchant and im-
portant Revolutionary leader),
and Havm Salomon (The "bro'"r
of the Revolution") honor the
important contributions made
>iy Jewish Americans t.) the
fight for independence.
Many outstanding Jewish
citizens in America after the
United States became a nation
^ire also commemorated with
medals. These include, among
others. Ernestine Rose (1810-
1892). an earl" fighter for wom-
en's rights; photographer Solo-
mon Nones Cnrvalho (1815-
1897). perhaps the second Jew
to cross the Roc1 ?s; Jos*nh
Seligman (1*19-1880), leading
international banker: Emma V'i-
zarus (1849>1887), author of the
famous sonnet inscribed on th;
f.m.,, n( | Ihortv; ami Louis
Dembitz Brandeis (1856-1941).
the first Jew to be aopbinted to
the U.S. Suoreme Court.
The list of memorable people,
places and events feature.! in
Th M 'rtnllic Hispv-v of the
Jews of America totals 120. The
series is schedul id for comple-
tion on America's 200th birth-
day.
This chronicle, with its ac-
comoanying historical notes, is
an important addition to rhe
written historical record of the
Jews of America and a meticul-
ously crafted and endtti ing
artistic series any Jewish Amer-
ican would be proud to own
and display.
The originator of the history
and its design concepts was
Robert Weber, president of The
Judaic Heritage .Society. Sculpt-
or for th enti v series is Karen
Worth. The literature accom-
panying each medal of the Series
was written bv Fred Herf'im
For futfV'- information about
the complete Medallic Hi. tory
of the j-uvs of America, wfte:
The Judaic Heritage Society,
Suit.' 4011. ^*6 United Nations
Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017.
Heritage, Tradition Basic
Ingredients Of Kosher Foods
The heritage of the Jewish
people is one of the tew con-
stants in the historv of the civi-
lized world. Rooted in antiquity,
it provides Jewish people a
powerful sense of purpose, and
a shared sense of belonging.
One of the most enduring
cornerstones of Jewish heritage
is the observance of Kashruth.
American Jews are genrallv
aware of the more prominent
injunctions under Jewish Die-
tary Laws, such as prohibitions
against mixing meat and dairv
food products, or eating pork
or shellfish. However, many are
unaware of more subtle differ-
ences between kosher and non-
kosher foofK and the reasonl
for these differences.
Acttiallv. one of the most im-
portant differences is found in
the Production of foods, most
r-adilv s.-y in th" nrocessinu
of meats and noultrv than in
any other "koshering" proce-
dure.
A tour of th'> nation's la*e*t
kosher noult'-v nrocessine plant.
(netted in Nfifflintoun. Pa., nro-
virl" nn hTf*es1inR education
in this regard.
In fact. Emniiv Kosher Poul-
try, Inc. encourages groims to
visit this plant, not onlv to
demonstrate the ;dvantpg8 of
kosher ponlr>-v. hut to illustrate
noints nf rliff'rrnice in nrocess-
in'_' which brina tnilv "kosh"-"
poultry into conformance with
th" strict"*) rahh'nienl interpre-
tation of dietarv laws.
The entire nhecbitah (ritual
slauohter') oroeess is nerformed
by shochtim (sn^ciallv fain^d
personnel authorised hv rabbin-
ical authoritv), boclkim (in-
spectors), and mai|'"i'-''im fu-
pervisiors) in a continual on-
premise operation.
Under tlv naroful so-ntinv of
these rabbinical authorities,
many steps are taken to amure
the con^",, '"n''"rl wW**h
is unouestionahlv kosher and oi
the finest qualitv:
Each em'eken i-; hand hld
bv the Shochtim at the moment
of slaughter, to assure the most
perfect and humane cut, as re-
quired by law,
No hot or heated wat-r is
used In the removal of feathers.
Cold water p>'ncesin';. which
promotes rapid removal of
blood, is the onlv method ac-
cmtabl- to evmnizattOBS super-
vising Kashruth:
Every bird is checked for
wholesomeness bv U.S. Govern-
ment Inspectors. However,
manv birds passing this inspec-
tion are under .TewfsTl Hietarv T.*ws
when checked bv rabbinical
supervisors;
Correct and precisely lo-
cated incisions are made in each
chicken wine and nnrk so that
the blood will be fully drained.
Each bird is submerged in run-
ning tan water for no less than
on^-half hour to soak and loosen
all blood pm-icles. and then is
Inmg on a line to drip dry.
Birds arc then hand salted in-
teenallv and weternallv, and
stacked correctly to drain no
les than one hour so that the
salt loosens and absorbs any re-
maining blood;
After salting, the chicken
is rinsed in three separate vats
of running ''old watar to re-
move the salt and cleanse the
bird;
All poultry is chilled to
under 40 degree before packing
in order to preserve and retain
its freshness and quality.
At Empire Kosher Poultry,
all of these procedures, as well
as the physical Plant and equip-
ment, are endorsed bv the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations o( America as meet-
ing the highest standards of
Kashruth.
In addition, each of these
procedures contributes to pro-
ducing a most pure Kosher
chicken, superior in Quality to
those processed without ben-lit
of proper rabbinical supervi-
sion.
It is well known thai kosher
products command a "premium"
mice in the market place. How-
ever the atlweno* to retfvhras
mandates, and the hygienic
prescriptions that far exceed
non-kosher processing stand-
ards are considered bv growing
segments oi tha consuming pub-
lic to be w 11 worth the addi-
tional charge


Page 8-B
+JmlstncriJtor>
Friday, September
/vA 14 ma d J
o u n
Abraham Grunhut, president
of the Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami and Emanuel
Mentz, chairman, .INF Morton
Towers, were tendered a sur-
prise luncheon by the Jewish
National Fund leadership in
honor of their recovery from a
recent illness. Mr. Grunhut was
praised for his devotion and
dedication to Israel in its total-
ity, and to Jewish National Fund
especially by Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man. chairman, JNF Foundation,
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, chair-
man. JNF executive board, and
Judge Zev W. Kogan. president,
JNF Southern Region. Ernest
Samuels, president of the Point
East condominium complex, and
vice president of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of Greater Miami
brought greetings, and extended
his best wishes to Mr. Grunhut
for continued good health. Rab-
bi Lehrman extended best
wishes to Mr. Mentz on behalf
of the entire leadership for his
recovery and wished him con-
tinued well-being.
Attending the luncheon were
Mr. and Mrs. Lou Aronson, Mrs.
Florence Behrens, Simon Ber-
stein, Prof. Andre S. Bialolenki,
Lester Bigelman, Leon Buda,
Mr. and Mrs. George Brodie,
Mrs. Celia Broff, Mrs. Lillian
Dubowy, Harry Feldman, Shmu-
el Fershko, Jack Filosof, Ezra
Finepold, Mayshie FWedberg,
Abraham Grossman, Mrs. So-
phie Haspel, Mr. and Mrs. P=ter
Heller, Isaac Jacobowitz, Her-
man K.-iss. Bernard Katz, George
N. Kotin, Sam Kusnetz, Moe Le-
vin, Mrs. Frieda Lifschudz, Mrs.
Louis Lustie, Mrs. Florence Mi-
nov, Samuel Mirenberg, Sam
Pascoe, Mrs. Albert Pomoer,
Mrs. Miriam Press. Morris Put-
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Moe Rlffen,
Isidore Riffkin, Martha Rosen,
Celia Rosenblatt, Morris Ros-
sein, Abe Savelle, Toby Schach-
ter, Oscar Schapiro, Igor
Sennit/. Leon Schuster, Malka
O "n
Shklair, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Sichel, Meyer Siegel, Bernard
Silver, Mr. and Mrs. Joshua
Stadlan, Ben Talewsky, Max
Tannen, Simon Tetenbaum, Mr.
and Mrs. Abraham Tiktin, Mrs.
Frieda Tobey, Mrs. Ida Wessel
and Mrs. Sid Wladaver.
ft ft ft
He mice (Dr. Henry) Ring has
not given up tennis, but she cer-
tainly has more than one racket.
An Eastman Music School grad
with a UM Master's, Bebe has
finally responded to repeated
requests and is accepting piano
students in her lovely Coral
Gables home on Tivoli. Mean-
while, son David is a junior at
Harvard, Wendy a freshwoman
at Yale, and Jonathan a ninth-
grader at Ransom-Everglades.
ft ft ft
Harriet Potlock, director of
Music for Temple Beth Am Re-
ligious School, announces that
Friday. Oct. 3, the 7:30 p.m.
service will be dedicated to
those campers who attended
Camp Coleman and Beth Am
day camn. Favorite songs will
be sung and friendships will be
renewed at the Ong Sbabbat
which follows services. Robbie
Kessler will be the song leader.
ft ft ft
The first Florida Branch
Board meeting of the vear of
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism was to be held at
Beth Da"id Congregation Thurs-
day at 10 a.m. featuring capsule
workshons for le^dersh'n train-
inp headed bv Mrs. Marshall
Baltuch; Sneakers Bureau led
bv Mrs. Mever Levmson and
Youth by Mrs. Edward Hoffman.
Florida Branch is one of 28
branches of Women's League
For Conservative Judaism
throughout the United States
and Canada. Mrs. Morton Levin
is president of the Florida
Branch, which comprises 33
Sisterhoods.
Camel (Men for HilleD. Mrs.
Ira Ginsberg (public relations),
Mrs. Sidney Harris (PTA),
Moses Hornstein (community
relations) and Mrs. Barry Sein?
feld (hospitality).
Newly appointed trustees are
Rabbi and Mrs. Aaron Shapiro
and Dr. Max A. Lipschitz.
The Drincipal of Hillel Com-
munity Day School is Rabbi Al-
bert Mayerfeld; Marshall Bal-
tuch serves as executive direc-
tor.
Hillel Community Day School
Board Of Governors Meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 30, is the date
set for the board of governors
meeting of the Hillel Commu-
nity Dav School, 21288 Biscayne
Blvd., North Miami Beach.
The board functions as the
overseeing body of the school
and meets quarterly under the
leadership of its president,
Michael Scheck.
One of the main items on the
agenda is the construction of
the new school buildings.
Planned to be built in three
phases, the school will be the
most modern educational facil-
ity in Southern Florida. Elemen-
tary, Junior High and High
School buildings are to be con-
structed along with a library,
gymnasium, kosher dining room
and science labs on 6^ acres
already purchased in North Mi-
ami Beach.
The meeting will be held at
Beth Torah Congregation. 1045
Interama Boulevard; Mr. Scheck
will introduce and welcome
the new members elected
to serve on the board, including
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Camel, Dr.
and Mrs. Jordan Davis, Dr. and
Mrs. Robert Ennis. Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Harris, Mr. and Mrs.
Moses Hornstein, Mr. and Mrs.
Dennis Lentin, Mrs. Barbara
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mill-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Martin
linger.
New members elected to
serve on the executive board
are Alan Bostom (at large), Paul
Book Review For
Pioneer Women
Mrs. Sara Helfand will review
the book, "There Was Once a
Time," bv Ann Marie Rasmus-
sen-Rockfeller, Wednesday dur-
ing a meeting of the Golda Meir
Chapter of Pioneer Women.
The 12:30 p.m. session is
scheduled in the Washington
Federal Auditorium, 1234 Wash-
ington Ave., with admission free
and open to members, their hus-
bands and the general public.
Mrs. Katherine Lippman.
president of the chapter named
in honor of Israel's former,
prime minister and former na-
tional head of the Pioneer Wom-
en, will preside at the meeting.
Mrs. Claire Balaban is publicity
chairman.
Details of the national Golden
Jubilee convention of Pioneer
Women, the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America,
scheduled Oct. 19-22 at the
Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach,
will be reported.
Pictured from left to right are Cantor Saul
H. Breeh, Emanuel Mentz, Abraham Grun-
hut, Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Rabbi Mayer
Abramomtz, Judge Zev U". Kogan
Ernest Samuels.
Membership Gala
To Feature Two
Entertainers
At a recent program plan-
ning meeting of the member-
ship committee Mrs. Jean Fein-
berg of the Miami Beach Chap-
ter of Hadassah. announced that
Danny Amihud and Rachell
Paston will provide the enter-
tainment at the chapter's Mem-
bership Gala honoring Sen. Jack
D. Gordon.
Sen. Gordon will receive the
coveted Myrtle Wreath Citizen's
Award at the gala Monday.
Sept. 29. at 1 p.m. in Conven-
tion Hall South.
Miss Paston has appeared in
many musical comedies with
stock companies and night
clubs throughout the United
States. She was seen on NBC-
TV in California and New York
and has appealed at the Fon-
tainebleau here and many ho-
tels in Palm Beach and Ft.
Lauderdale.
Mr. Amihud, a popular Israeli
guitarist and singer, has toured
the United States with great
success.
Also appealing on the pro-
gram will be Mayor Han/d
Rosen of Miami Beach and Mrs,
Maxwell Weisberg. president of
the Florida Region of Hadas-
sah.
Invitations will be extended
to all paid-up members, life
members and new life mem-
ben. Awards will be made by
the membership committee to
the 31 groups who have fulfilled
their membership goals.
Rabinowitz In
Washington
For Talks
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
departure of Finance Minister
Yehoshua Rabinowitz to Wash-
ington may mark the end of the
reassessment by the United
States of its Middle East pol-
icy, according to some observ-
ers here.
This speculation was enhanc-
ed by the fact that Rabinowitz
is the first of three Cabinet
ministers who will go to Wash-
ington this month.
DEFENSE MINISTER Shimon
Peres is scheduled to go to the
United States to discuss Israel's
arms requests, and Foreign
Minister Yigal Allen will be in
Washington to evaluate with
American leaders the situation
developing from the agreement
Israel negotiated with Egypt.
Rabinowitz, before leaving
Ben Gurion Airport, said he was
satisfied with the Israeli-Egyp-
tian accord. He said he would
discuss in Washington every
facet of Israeli-American eco-
nomic relations.
Rabinowitz will also meet
with finance ministers from
other countries at the World
Bank and International Mone-
tary Fund meetings being held
in Washington.
'Orientation Day' Hosted B)
Federation Women's Divufo
Called to order by Leadership
Development Vice President
Mrs Norman I.ipoff, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Wom-
en's Division hosted its "Board
Orientation Day" last week.
More than SO leaders from all
parts of Dade County gathered
at the Federation for a morning
of instructive presentations on
Women's Division organization
for the upcoming Bicentennial
year.
Women's Division President
Mrs. Harry B. Smith, and Vice
Presidents Mrs. Linoff. Mrs.
Sol Goldstein (Campaign) and
Mrs, Adoll Berger (Community
Education), intro luced program
leaders from Miami Beach,
North Dade and South Dade.
' la i m t day's ag oida were
filmed highlights of the Greater
i.!--i .'. h ;i Federation's fam-
'- mcics, and Jewish con-
ibuti ns to -00 years of Amer-
ican historv.
Among those Women'' Divi-
sion programs revealed for the
ns vear were: Aiea board
leadership presented by area
".en, Mrs. Richard Levy
'Miami Beach), Mrs. Charles
Held (North Dade. and Mrs.
Herbert Praver (South Dads).
Area vice chairmen respectively
are Mrs. Martin Gelb, Mrs.
Painh Kingsley and Mrs. Sol
Center.
An energetic 1976 ComJ
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emetj
Fund was introduced
rousing cheer from tin
sign's Campaign Coord
including Mrs. Donald u
and Mrs. St-phen Scnsonifl
an., Beach, MrS. rJ
Fchwartz of North DadM
M-s. Morris Kute-nick awf|
David Sclnectsr of South I
Thfl Coordinators serve
Ca-,v-n Vice President]
Goldstein.
Among the numerous m
and programs introduced!
the coming year were E4
tional "coffees," bus tours,|
special events; campaipi
meetings and missions to I
"Learn-Ins" and current i
seminars; the involvemefll
svnagogue women, to be i
vened by Mrs Irving Lehi
and th 19?s General.
of th Council <>: Jewish F
tions and Welfare Funds. o|
held in Miami Beach this 1
vember.
liti^ of ti). Wv"n' D
within the Gr ater Mi*
ish f^Hpr.-.thn were ev"laa(
by Women's Division Di"
Joan Scheiner. and Federao
Executive Vice President, I
ron J. Brodie.
American Jewish
Meetings Resume
The Golda Meir Chapter, Flor-
ida Women's Division, American
Jewish Congress, will hold its
first meeting of the season Mon-
day al 12:30 p.m. in the Partv
Room. 5001 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach.
The pro-am will feature
"American Jewish Cong'^ss Ac-
tivities for the Year." Dessert
and coffee will be served
Friends and neighbors are in
vited to attend.
ft ft ft
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Jade
Winds Chapter will hold its first
meeting of the season in the
Tower Auditorium.
The program will feature in-
stallation of officers by Sylvia
Rivchun. Mrs. Mildred Berlin
will give the presentation.
ft ft -ir
A meeting of the foint East
Chapter will be held Wednesday
at 12:30 p.m. in the French
Room.
. There will be a panel discus-
sion of American Jewish Con-
gress s "Action Reviewed"the
variety and scope of their ac-
tivities which form the basis of
their Program. Husbands and
friends are invited.
tk ^ ft ft
'he Justine Louise Wise
inpaKeKWlU h0ld its first meet"
ng of the season at a new meet-
Th PHaCeothe Tar>eton Hotel.
Thursday. Sept. 25. at 12:30 p.m.
,-hS!lyn Greenberg. Program
JIS ""??,-**" present "Con-
Kress Unlimited." Coffee and
Congress Chuplf
During Scptemb^
cake will be ed: men*
neighbors are invited tostta
_A. '- t7
Thursday. Sept aj
p.m. the Mi H Coral
Chanter will hold its first1*
int? of tbfa noo "' th?
Federal, 2760 Coral Way. M
Guest sneaker will be
Mollie Gersh whose M*j
be: "Introducing American!
ish Congress to rrt &*
nitv." Luncheon will be se
hU9b*nds. fri mds and neigM
are invited.
A '- A book review of AH
Hnilev's "Th- Monev Chai
will b featured at the
month!" meeting of thet
Dale Chanter Mondav. Se*j
at H:30 p.m. in the UT
South Becreation Rnon1 ,
South Ocean Dr.. Holly*
Dessert will be
F-i-nds and nei^ibors ^
vited to attend.
ft ft *
The opening meeting
North Dade Chapter wiin
discussion on what Anw
Jewish Congress is doffi
the Arab boycott, the an
exnulsion of Israel fraj.
United Nations and the
home scandal.
A petite luncheon wj
cede the discussion
Sept. 2i-. at 12:30 p.nUJ
A of the Washington t*
*33 NE 167th St. NoB"
Beach.


bday
( September 19, 1975
'JewUti ffrrkJfon
Page 9-B

,*
-'.... >,.-Smr


h women of South Dade will be educated through
a series of Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division -coffees," Sept. 22-26. Leading the effort will be
South Miamian Betty Suchman (seated), working with
Community Education Vice President Helenc Berger
(left). Among the many women hosting "coffees" in their
homes that week will be Mrs. Jerome Herskowitz (cen-
ter of Coral Gables and Mrs. Errol Eisinger of South
Miami.
I
I
I ^

'
v
Mrs. Robert Or seek of North Miami Beach (left), will
lead the North Dade series of Greater Miami Jewish
federation's Women's Division educational "coffees,"
Sept. 22-26. Among those hosting the North Dade events
mil ho (left to right): Mrs. Aaron Podhurst of Miami
Lakes; Mrs. Jerome Reich of North Miami Beach; and
Mrs. Henry dayman of North Miami Beach.____________
Temple Israel Workshop Oct. 25
To Feature Keynoter Ramona Barth
Lapham To Chair
City Of Hope's
Oct. 18 Banquet
David M. Lapham, former
Mayor of North Miami Beach,
has accerted the position of
general chairman of the Oct. 18
Spirit of Life Testimonial Ban-
ouet honoring the Hon. James
E. Reardon at the Carillon Ho-
M. according to word received
from Mrs. Seymore Miller ex-
ecutive banquet coordinator of
the Teddv Grant Men's Chapter
of the Citv of Hone, which is
sponsoring the event.
Serving with him on the ban-
miet committee are Leonard Hel-
fand, Harry Cohen. Milton Litt-
man, Burton Loebl. Dan Dief-
fenbach, Leroy Lew. Edward A.
Keyes, Harrv Goldberg. Jeff
Lynn. A. Milton Rubin. Earl
Bonnett, Sid Hersh, Irving Moss
and Ralph Volpe.
Jack Lippson is banquet
chairman of the Teddy Grant
Men's Chanter and Ralph Mar
der is president.
Mrs. Cy phsky r.\ Miami
B-^ch ani Nathan Ehrlich of
Hollywood are members of the
Medical Center's national board
of directors.
Further information about the
banquet may be obtained bv
calling Mr. Lanham, Mrs. Mil-
ler or the City of Hope Regional
Office.
With nationally known fem-
inist lecturer Ramona Barth as
keynote speaker and an all-
star cast of local volunteer and
Professional specialists as dis-
cussion leaders, Temple Israel
of Greater Miami will present a
day-long workshop Saturday,
Oct. 25, beginning at 9:30 a.m.
The forum, designed to give
the men and women attending
maximum opportunities to ex-
press their own views and dis-
cuss them with the resource
People, will be presented as an
Ev'elyn P. Behrman Memorial
Project for this year.
. Open to the public, the meet-
>ng will continue until about 4
Pm Lunch will be available
and reservations may be made
y calling the temple offices.
Among the local speakers of
special Jewish interest on the
"st are Rabbi Joseph R. Narot
f Temple Israel, chairing a
workshop session on women in
religion with Sister Trinita
Flood, president of Barry Col-
legs, and the Rev. Marguerite
A. Hill, assistant superinten-
dent of the Biscayne Methodist
Nursing Home; Brenda Shapiro,
director for Florida of the
American Jewish Committee;
and Audrey Finkelstein, chair-
person of the Dade County
Community Relations Board.
The keynote speaker, also
known as "Mrs. Ramona X,"
originated a group of Women s
Studies courses at colleges and
centers in the Boston area and
is the author of several articles
and books.
Wife of Rev. John Barth, a
Unitarian minister who former-
ly served a church in the Miami
area. Ms. Barth has received
special citations from the gov-
ernors of New York and Mas-
sachusetts for her work ui
special presentation projects
honoring great women in his-
tory, a topic some of her lect-
ures refer to as "herstory.
Mrs. Frances Katzman, 'left) a prominent Hadassah lead-
er, is shown pinning her heart at a special 'To Israel with
Love" luncheon where more than $150,000 in State of
Israel Bonds was pledged by some 75 women. Participat-
ing in this gala event were Mrs. Emanuel Mentz; Mrs.
Herman Feinberg, president of the Miami Beach Chapter
of Hadassah, and Mrs. Isidore H. Abrams, (right) chair-
man of the luncheon, which featured Israel diplomat,
Abbie Ben-Ari as a special guest.
Music
bu "Weddings & Bar Mitzvahs
^^jt^jQu ^^ ancI n's our Specialty"
Boca Raton Hotel 651-2803
and Club Orchestra
nearing completion...
THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE ts a sacred
family bust. Although you may
not like to think about it, the time
to arrange tor it is long before
the need, when your mind is
unclouded, and you can consider
the alternatives The perfect
alternative a Mount Nebos
Garden Mausoleum.. a sanctuaiy
of love and peace; a comforting
place tor prayer, remembrance
and meditation.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
BURIAL. Entombment in the
magnificent mausoleum is com-
parable to ground burial, yet how
much more reverential. And there
is never a maintenance charge;
crypts will be maintained beauti-
fully forever, with sympathetic
concern and professional care as
part of the total purchase.
YOU MUST VISIT
MOUNT NEBO TO TRULY
APPRECIATE IT. FREE
TRANSPORTATION is offered
to this beautiful haven, from
wherever you ive in Dade County.
And as a token of our apprecia-
tion for permitong our represen-
tative to show you our new
mausoleum, we have a FREE OUT
for you YOUR CHOICE OF:
Beautiful, stainless water
pitcher.. Stainless, 3-piece sugar,
creamer and tray or Silver-plated
salt and pepper shakers.
We must tell you. how-
ever, that the supply of
gifts is irmted.
SELECT NOW
FOR CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AND LOWER
PRICEour pre-comple-
tion purchase plan offers
substantial savings, as well
as small initial deposit and
3-year terms.
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
-MAH TWS COUPON TODAY-
MOUNT NEK) CEMETERY & GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
SSn Of FICE BO 440-3.7 MM*. FLORIDA 33W4
O Withoul obbgabon. P*Mw ma* ma M tnhwmalwn on ma
Gardan lta*m "duomg typat and avaty m oypia.
and data* ot yaw payment plan
D I pianx mfcxmaaon about o/ound ounai
O hava you aala. rap-aaanunva can ma arranoa an
ipomman. at Moon. Nabo I unoanwnd > I -* '*
FREE GIFT. *oul furthar oMoaMn. *- I "ava ''"
apponlmanl Ha mauaolauni Ma *n your rapnnantativa.
STBtET
CJQ_
a*.
. T6lfH0<1f_


I age 10-B
fJenistfkricfiar
Friday, September 19, l57j
Mayaguez Still Hangs Like Pall Over Capitol
3y MAX LERNER
!.o<; Annehs Times Syndicate
Washington i; a city of mir-
ofsthe political actors watch-
g the media elite, the media
.itching the actors, each gfOUp
a'ching both itself and the
ther in the mirror of history.
As a result, except for the ad
:ien s worl.l, Washington is th
vst remaining instance of what
)i\ id Riesman onc.j described
s other-direcfiveness seeing
oneself in the mirror image Oi
itfttfs.
THE LENGTHENING shadow
i the Mayague'. incident still
hangs over the city. But both
the elites grasp only pan ot its
leaning. Ths sharp American
nilitary response is seen, by the
Administration and us oppo-
nents ali'-e. as a message sent
to the vvnild about American
toughness in meeting its com-
litmcnts.
it is that. But just as impor-
aht as how other nations view
America is how America per-
. I'ives reality and how it sees
tsclf. The world's image of
\merica counts, of course, but
America's national self-imag*
cdunts just as strongly.
THE REASON ought to bt
- retty obvious.
v..u can read it in the whole
flutter of individual self-im-
movement bool.s that is gently
shaking the paperback book
; tands.
You want people to haw
rohfidence in you, but they
von t do it unless you carve
jut some confidence in your-
self. That is the truism the
books convey, in a thousand dif-
Lfcnt forms, and there is a
cote of truth in the truism. It
ipplies to the nation, too.
THE VIETNAMESE war, and
he way it endednot with a
bring but a whimper rocked
-he American national self-
Artists Invited
To Submit Entry
In JCC Arts Fair
Artists are invited to display
nd sell their works at an Arts
nd Crafts Fair, sponsored by
he Jewish Community Centers
if South Florida Sunday, Oct.
26 at the Highland Oaks Elc-
nentary School grounds. 20400
n'E 24 Avenue, North Miami
iJeach. The fair will be open to
he public from 11 a.m. until 4
i.m.
1A11 entries must be the orig-
nal work of the artist. Ribbons
vill be awarded in oils and
icrylics, water color, sculpture,
-jraphics, mixed media, photog-
-atohv and cratts
Registration is now being
aken for exhibit space; regis-
ration blanks may be obtained
by calling the Jewish Commu-
lity Centers. -Registration for
pace will be closed Oct. 3.
'The Jewish Community Cen-
sors is a beneficiary agency of
rfeater Miami Jewish Fedeta-
ion. Jewish Federation of
Ssuth Broward and" the United
Vay of Dade County.
Henry Howard Makes 11 Solo
1Presentations Available
Broadway character actor
Henry Howard has increased
his solo performances of orig-
nal drama and comedy vignet-
able to organiaations in the area
his season.
1 Mr. Howard, the current pro-
gram chairman for the Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges, has been making per-
sonal appearance here since
1964. when he moved to Miami
Beach.
IflMge. Most Americans hunger
to have it rebuilt.
There was a good piece '"
Meg Greenlield in The Wash-
ington Post about how the in-
bred Washington elites see the
American people as somewhere
"out there," in the vast space;
of the hinterland, thus turning
real people into abstractions.
Without wanting to saddle net
with my Own" view. I am struck
bv how often confronted bv
poll figures afcrJt the American
majoritythe Washington com-
mentators will cheer "the peo-
ple" when tiiey reject power
and authority, but chide them
when thev show some degree
of swagger and national self-
confidence.
IN BOTH cases the people
are expi*Srflng their sense of
the n iMmnl self-image, how-
ever wavering it may be. Right
now the mood is toward some
new beginnings in self-confi-
dence.
The House of Representatives
showed it. in passing the de-
fense appropriation by beating
down almost every amendment
to it with a surprisingly large
majority.
It may beas reported a
way of reassuring allies and
warning oli aggressors, thus
sending a message to the world
But in the communications rev-
olution we fall into the fallacy
of seeing every decision as a
signal we are communicating
to someone.
THE MESSAGE doesn't have
to be to the outside world. It
may Ik- a message to ourselves.
It isn't only allies that the poli-
ticiansand the people at home
are reassuring. My hunch is
that they are mostly reassuring
themselves, looking to that
fortress of strength within one-
self on which everything else
depends.
I have been spending some
Canada Dry Announces Major
Retail Price Decreases
Canada Dry Bottling Co. of
Florida, Inc., has announced
that major price decreases were
offered to all segments of :he
Dade and Broward County re-
tail trade.
"All elements finnllv fell into
place allowing us to make these
adjustments on a lohg tern
basis," Roger R. Nelson, vice
president of the state wide cor-
pany, said.
"Up to this point we have
been offering special promotion
allowances which had the effect
of lowering prices but only for
short periods. Sugar now seems
to have stlbllften' after recent
tip and down actions."
Almost every product the
company manufactures or dis-
tributes is co'"'h! down from
10 per cent to 12 per cent.
"Our largest vbfume items.
ginger a*e and club soda, are
being dropped about 10 per
cent." Mr. Nelson said.
"On the other hand we Jus!
absorbed a 20 oer cent increase
on tonic extract and can't move
on it. Other items like our cola
and Bubble Up are already at
social low nrices and we hope
to maintain those levels at least
for the. time being."
Commenting on recent criti-
cisms of the industry on pricing
policies, Mr. Nelson said. "Sugar
has come down and we were ex-
pected to follow suit. This
couldn't be done immediately
because of inventories and con-
tractural commitments.
"At the same time all other
costs were rising. Glass costs
just rose by 10 cents per case
on Aug. 1, and all other pack-
aging costs are ujj.
"ingredient costs (aside from
sugar) are up and parent com-
panies, not just Canada Dry, are
raising extract prices. One item
very few thihk about, our elec-
tric bill has risen from $2,200
per month lust two years ago.
to over $5,000 in the month ol
Jiity."
"All in all. the industry has
been fair with the consumer.
We've used the special sale ap-
proach as evidenced by all kinds
of low priced specials on manv
brands in most if not all stores.
"Just to cite an example, you
can generally find the family
sire returnable bottle of the
major brand items on sale at
4 for Si.00. The regular price
ranges from 35c to 40c per bot-
tle."
Mr. Nelson said that lower
shelf nrices would in all
probability show up in the next
week to ten days. He declined
to comment on what action
other companies might take.
Youth Festival At Beth Torah To
Open Conservative Movement Week
A gala youth festival at Con-
gregation Beth Torah, North
Miami Beach, will mark the
opening of the United Syna-
gogue -Conservative Movement
Week Oct. 12-18.
Ms. Ruth Wagner of Temple
B'nai Raphael, chairman of the
event, announced that the festi-
val would include special booths
displaying various aspects of
youth programming.
Booths to be constructed by
each youth group of the South
Florida Conservative Syna-
gogues will nortrav different
aspects of USY activities such
as Tikun Olam, Tikvah, Soviet
Jewry. Religious Programming,
Social Actions, Israel Pilgrim-
age, Eastern Ev >an Pilgrim-
age and U.S.\. on Wheels.
Judge Arthur Winton, chair-
man r>f the Regional Youth
Certificates of Appreciation
would be presented to the Youth
Chairm*". Yoftth Directors, and
USY Presidents of the affiliated
synagogues at the festival
Edward Hoffman, of Temple
Beth Shalom, Hollywood, who is
also the Youth Commission
chairman for the Youth Festival
reported that among the high-
lights of the Festival will be
performances by USY choral
and dance groups as well as
staging and dancing for all who
attend. Cantor Jacob Mendel-
son of Beth Torah Congregation
will lead the choral group.
Dr. Morton Siegel, executive
director -ol the Unit d Svni-
gogue of America, will deli\ -r
the kevnote address. Dr. Sieg >|
will address the Festival on the
topic "The Future Today."
hours in Washington with the
itive Seminar, which is
pan Of the Foreign Service In-
stitute.
test sens,; ,e,.o ^
in th
feel they have b
wftere they .-., **
they think they Jre I
THEY ARK some 80 men sn I
women, all holding responsible
posts involved
with American
world lelations. getting a 1%
fresher overview
happening inside
America.
don't be! i. 1 ,
at t- P..1Msh. who ......jyg
IF YOl
t fl*>
vision,
of what is
and outside
Mv stress was not so "inch
on the sinews of American
power, about which thev know
more than I do. but on the so-
cial imagination of a nation.
For much denends, in a na-
tion, on the windows of percep-
tion, which open out on the
larger world but also open in
ward upon our inner world,
where we do so much of our
myth-making.
Politics and vision are close-
]v related. The strength of Un-
people depends greatly upon
their myths about themselves
and the T-nt.Iis ^
have never lost it
Look at the Russians nfe.
the vision has become
arid the Chinese, where it
fresh. Look at the French X
lost the vision in t'.,.;. .,'.,
humiliation, and the Germain
Who lost it in the squalor of
Hitlerism. and see how each ha<
begun to regain it.
THERE ARK more shocks
ahead for America the m-
pending additional increase |i
oil prices by the oil cartel, the
Oeneva conference on the Mid
east, the tussle over the SALT
talks, the question of what will
happen in the crunch to South
Korfa. The American sell-
ing. The question is how it will
stand up under that battels*
Bab Mifyuedt
ff\-j'(\jjf\.Yft\. i<"Vs**"CiA'W'AasTAMt^f*> f ^w*^*Aif %*'*Ws'*'WsMV#rfWAi' Maria Nadel
Douglas Heller
Isaac Esquenazi
ALAN GARFINKEL
Alan Bennett, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leo Garfinkel. will become
a Bar Mitzvah Sunday, Sept. 21
during the 8:30 a.m. Succoth
sen ice at Beth Torah Congre-
gation.
Alan is a member of the fifth
grade class at Beth Torah's
Harold Wolk Religious School
and attends North Miami Junior
High School, where he is in the
eighth grade. He plays baritone
in the school's marching and
concert bands and has been a
member of the Student Council
for three years He is a member
ot Scout Troon 42. where he
serves as Patrol Leader.
Mr. and Mrs. Garfinkel will
snonsor the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the oc-
casion. The guest.; will include
Ins grandmother. Mrs. Rose
Garfinkel, and grandhth < Bar-
ry Singer of Rlverdale, N.Y
.' r- ft
MARLA NADEL
Maria Helen, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Milton H. Nadel will
be adled to the Torah as a Bat
k.itzvah Friday, Sept. 19, at
Beth David Congregation.
J^ **" ,s s'"dent in
Beth Drids Hay "lass and at-
tends Rockway Junior High
School, where she is in the
eighth grade. At Camp Pine-
wood. North Carolina, Maria
received certificates in water
skiing and Softball.
*? and Mrs. Nadel will host
the Oneg Shabhat following the
Ben*** and a reception-lunch-
sen Saturday, Sept. 20, in the
"a Dora Room of the Doral
Country Club.
.Among the special guests
sharing m the festivities wBb!
Maria's sister, Ronnie, and her
E: T M'ttman. who Sr
''Mng in from Lawrence NY
[?'" tn, occasion; her uncle"
K2J** W M". andUMrs:
wSJ SlhCT"ian, directoi
of youth activities for the South- Hean Pearl of Mi;il,u
east Region of United Syna- < ^ '
fogue. coordinating the Youth ANDREW ALBERT
Andrew Seth, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard B. MV*t will
celebrate his Bar Mitzrtfi at
Temple StMl <* North 'Sat
urday, Sept. 20, at the 10:3(1 BM
worship service*
Andrew is an eighth grtde
student at John F. K nn :v Jun-
ior High Sc'nol an 1 ittellds
Temnle Pit i'< ' He plavs b >m with 1 ious Littls
League ic'ims
The c- le>-sn!'v vnrnts will
hos the K1 Mush fo'iuvmc the
sen-ices and a reception Satur-
day at the temple celebrating
the occasion.
* &
DOUGLAS HELLER
Douglas Paul, son of Mr. and
Mi-s. Daniel Neal Heller, will be-
come Bar Mitzvah Saturdav
morning. Sept. 20, at Temple
Emanu-El.
Doughis received the Amer-
ican legion Award for outstand-
ing achievement in scholarship
nnon graduating from North
Beach Elementary School. An
honor student, he attends the
eighth grade at Ransom School
where he received the "th grade
Scholar's Award. His musical
instrument is the piano.
The celebrant will be honored
at a luncheon Saturday si the
Westview Country Club. Hi?
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Star, will attend the event, and
relatives and friends are conv
ing from New York and Sou'.n
Africa.
b it
ISAAC ESQUENAZI
Isaac, the son of Mr. and M
Joseph Esquenazi. will betomi
a Bar Mirzvah at Temple
norah, Saturdnv morning. '-ePt
20.
Isaac is a seventh grade stu
dent at Nautilus Junior HUP
School. Folowing services there
will be a Kiddush in W"
Menorah's Crimson Room anu
Isaac will be honored with
reception and luncheon at tne
Deauville Hotel Sundav aftci-
noon.


fridiiy. September 19, 1975
f-hnist HcrlcUati
Page 11-3
IJust What Does Soviet
Writer Want in U.S.?
JACK STEGEL
at rash >l activities
I for AL'ksandr Sol-
raises questions.
with why? His genu-
audicneefl in the AFL-
ioua Senators led
nti:;l would-be Henry
the gtatar first refus-
al 0, president Ford to see him
and r Jultant furor, and all this
off by Sol/.henitsyn's
lit Conservative Sen.
of New York for an
embrace at the Union jambo-
ii even the trades pec
. lvcs did not want the
there, only emphasizes
..... nature of the Rus-
sia! sit here.
s saitsyn received the
-,.,. Prize for literature, not
politics, vet I doubt whether
n or Meany have read
the former's books or even
have the critical capacity to
evaluate them.
MOW COME Le Due Tho, who
shares a Peace Laureate with
Henrj Kissinger, has not been
to the States to be em-
braced by the same constella-
tion Ol political and working
class bureaucrats? Le Due Tho.
I am sure, could talk of htcra-
ntr
And why. for instance, have
been no meetings with
Sol/'umtsyii and -the- writing
:ak ii of America? Why are they
at a distance when presumably
here is the best of common
pounds? Why haven't they
bothered to agree with his
claim that one of the Soviets'
writers Shoiokhov, did not
write the "And Quiet Flows the
Don books?
THE LATTER, in "Seeds of
tomorrow," depicted the vio-
lent resistance of Soviet people
to the collectivisation program.
9d1 lenltsyn doec DOt touch on
Or are the American writers
staying away because the Rus-
as a hawk on Vietnam
and was ready to sacrifice
American blood in his crusade
throw the Soviet regime?
In a larger although ambiva-
lent context, Ford's reluctance
Solzhenitsyn grace the
front lawn or the Oval Office of
lite House makes sense
pirit of detente with
all irs faults and grain deals
i the light of the five men
who touched hands miles above
arth.
KISSINGER IN his speech in
lukee had ambivalently
unfavorable things to say about
Solzhenttsyn. Primarily because
he is a rub in the detente mix,
dless of how cosmetic that
! be. Phis did not prevent
Sil vnitsyn from dictating to
President Ford what U.S. For-
eign Policy shonld be at the
summit in Finland and this
from the Tolstoy Estate in the
name of the man much of whose
work and latter life were devot-
ed io peace.
All this brouhaha aside, what
should be the attitude of the
American Jewish community?
ay away, obviously. Not
because of the Solzhenitsyn
n here or his own war
against the Soviet Union, as if
there weren't already conflict
enough, but because his dissi-
dence, while creamed with hu-
"Tin touches, is basically polit-
ical.
HE HAS not taken a stand
for Soviet Jews who want out,
01 even in, on some other
terms.
He has not once mentioned
Mrs. Mandelstam who wrote of
her Jewish poet husband, nor
s lie referred to the literary
burial or even the rebirth of
Babel. He has not even
''ad a page or two from a work
f his in progress.
ALEXANDER SOLZHENITSYN
Has he ever read or com-
mented on the Diary of Anne
Frank? Has he mentioned Rin-
gleblum or the Warsaw (ihctto
Fighters? Many people invoke
their names, although improp-
erly, in their differences with
the Soviet Union. Has he taken
a stand for Israel, for instance?
Has he inveigh .-d against Babi
Yar as did Yevtushenko?
BUT WARMED up leftover
cold warriors now want to add
to the laureate a canonization,
which usually takes place after
death. Solzhenitsyn is a con-
venient ploy, as are they, in his
and their political games. And
while wartime Jewish anti-fas-
cists like Mikhoers or Pfeffer
(whose deaths the Soviet Union
will have to explain) were
fighting against the Nazis, Sol-
zhenitsyn was plotting with his
ffirst) wife against their gov
etntnent which was then rend-
ering a massive blow against
the anti-humanist Hitler.
- iSolzhenitsyn wants the Soviet
Union changed. To what? To
the old Holy Mother Russia
with its pogroms, murders of
.lews in smaller- but multiple
acts of genocide?
HE WANTS us to ride his
wave of the past, neglecting to
emphasize that during his stays
in the Archipelago the Russians
cured him of hi4- cancer. Penal
institutions are a many-sided
phenomenon and exist else-
where in the world.
Common criminals do not in-
vite our sympathy or enlist our
aid. But the noliticals and the
humanists, held in detention or
at bay is another matter, and
we should decide for ourselves
what action we take.
But today at least, we know-
where the Jewish dissidents
are, and if they disappear, we
knew that too. We can even
find out where they have been
taken and with persistent and
proper pressure get them re-
leased, as has lately been the
case.
SINCE THE Holocaust. Jews
in the Soviet I'nion, elsewhere
and everywhere in the world,
are our concern. As world citi-
zens we also have broader in-
terests.
Perhaps the good of the two
go hand in hand. And in none
of this can Solzhenitsyn help.
It we have differences with the
Soviets, and we have, we do
not need such intermediaries.
Nor should we get into the mid-
dle of the bear-hug galas run
bv the axe-grinders.
Caveat, it seems to me, is the
word for Solzhenitsyn.
Adath Yeshurun Conducting
Sukkah Building Contest
Temple Adath Yeshurun is
conducting a sukkah building
contest. A committee will judge
sukkahs built by congregation
members and award certificates.
Participating actively in var-
ious ways in the temple's ob-
servance of the festival will be
families, members of the Men's
Club and Sisterhood, young
couples' group and religious
school and nursery school chil-
dren.
Tiro Honors
Accorded To
Prof. Liebnum
Prof. Seymour B. Lisbman.
prepotent of thi JeWisH Hi Hrf
iccal Society ol South Fl irida
Inc.. has-been imiteH to join
the editorial mard of Hereneia
.India, a se*Wlarly bi-pi inthly
journal publish.-d in Bogota,
Colombia, bj B'nai B'rith inter-
national l. tiga ->.
I'i-i i, l.L-bnian has aisi been
invited to submit a caper for
42nd International Congress
of Americanists which is to be
held in Paris, Prance, in Sep-
tember 1976.
The professor had 3 paper,
".Sephardi Lthr city ii the Span-
ish New World." read at the
41st Congress which was held
in Mexico in September 1974.
This paper will be published by
Jewish Social Studies at the
end of this year.
T't- president of the Jewish
Historical Society is and has
been for the past four years
Adjunct Research Scholar at
the Institute of Inter-American
Affairs of the University of Mi-
ami. His most recent books
have been published by the Uni-
versity of Miami Press: "The
Inquisitors and the Jews in the
New World," and "The Great
Auto-de Fe of 1649" by Coro-
nado Press of Lawrence, Kans.
Nelson-Hall Publishers of
Chicago have scheduled publi-
cation of his book. "Understand-
ing the Latin American Mind,"
for January 1976.
Fioridians Will
Attend Oct. 19-22
AMW Convention
FnnHne Katz. president of
the Florida Council of American
Mizrachi Women, and delegates
from most of the 15 chanters in
Miami will attend the AMW con-
vention in Washington's Statler-
Hilton Hotel Oct. 19-22, it has
been announced.
Delegates from 360 chanters
in 37 states and the District of
Columbia are exoected to be
present when Sen. Richard
Stone of Florida. Sen. Jacob
Javits of New York and Sen.
Abraham Ribicoff of Connecti-
cut become the first national
recipients of the AMW Bicen-
tennial Public Service Award
Monday. Oct. 20.
Israel's Ambassador Simcha
Dinitz and Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy. 1974 winner of the Amer-
i.an-Israel Friendship Award,
will share the kevnote session
Sundav. Oct. 19. during which
the 1975 Friendship Award will
be presented to Sen. Edward
Brooke of Massachusetts.
The convention program will
include the nremiere of a new
film on AMW's history: "Years
of Faith," the Jubilee Multi-
Media Review and a fashion
show created bv AMW students
in Israel as well as special ses-
sions on the American Bicen-
tennial and the International
Women's Year.
National vice presidents Lily
Stone and Jeanne Finkelstein
will be also among the South
Floridians attending the four-
day session.
Hillel PTA Sponsoring Its
Annual Candy Sale Benefit
Hillel Community Day School's
Parent Teachers Association,
under the leadership of its
president, Mrs. Sara Harris, is
present sponsoring the
school's annual candy sale.
Students of the school are
canvassing their neighborhoods
selling candy, proceeds of which
will be used to purchase equip-
ment needed for the school.
Rosemarys llmne
R- ROSEMARY FURMAN
Joyce Sumhcrg called to tell
me an interesting idea thai the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion is trving this year. Instead
of the i neTesa line-tin of eoffees,
botli of the educational and
fund-raising variety that Fed-
eration Women's Division spon-
sors every year, there will be
just a few weeks of coffees at
homes around Dade County.
They start next week, ano it
successful, you won't have to
RSVP to ten more as the season
progresses .
Betty Suchman is chairwom-
an of South Dade's coffees.
Helcne Berger will be speaking
at seme of those. In the North
end of town, Dorothy Podhurst
and Phyllis Orseck are in
charge, ana Marilyn Smith will
be speaking. Miami Beach is
chaired by Marcia Olin, and
Beachites may hear Joyce Sum-
berg .
Education coffees are for
those just getting acquainted
with Federation. There, the ex-
pectation is not that you give
money, but rather that you
come to appreciate the concerns
of Federation, oo these are good
to go to .
The list of women giving
coffees is so long that I wonder
if there will be anyone left to
go to them, but next week alone
some of those hostessing are
Fran- Blum, Robbi Herskowitz,
both of South Dade, and Janet
Solomon of North Dade. That's
just on Monday .. .
On Tuesday, the likes of F.l-
len Baum, Vida Berkowitz.
Vicky Jackson, Margo Margole-
sky, Judy Reich, Eileen Swaye.
Elien Gardner and Marilyn
dayman will be opening up
their i.omes.
Bremla kmgsley, Rabbi Ralph
Kingsley's wife, is giving a cof-
lce, as are Maxine Schwartz and
Drs. Neil and Dorothy Koreman.
And lots more.
Noticed in the flyer sent by
CCEW that Debi Hoffman, Lar-
ry's wife, is now director of ad-
missions of Biscayne College.
That's a big job. probably made
- by the fact that the H"
ha' e iu ', moved from
ami Sh ires to outh Miami .
Somehow, Debl's timing u
off. CCEW, by the way. I i
some interesting courses
women, not the least ol which
is entitled "Sell Employment, or
Starting YOU] Own Business" .
Lynn Gladstein is teaching
ceramics class there. Already
in her own business is Bobbl
Litt, selling gold chains and m -
celleneous trinkets. And Nancj
Davis is mal*,ig candy git:?
good for hospital visits or pai
favors.
Hank Green, whose H 3
Nancy is not working, is one if
the new members listed I
South Dade's new private club,
Nero's. Figures, cause the ell "
is located in Hank's Dadela
Towers.
Chickee Chatter: If they p it
me on that team, I'm not pla
ing." "If thev out me with he
I'm not plaving." "Who nee.
league terni'S anyway? I'm o
here for the exercise." It's th t
time again.
Women's League
Season Opener
The fall season of the Lin-
coln-Roney-Miami Beach Cha
tor of the Women's League Fi
Israel will open Tuesday
12:30 p.m. in the 100 Unco I
Road Club Room, Miami Beac I
Fran ResnicK, president.
greet member:, and guests wh
will also have the privilege
meeting the new southeaste
director. CliLord Straus. Re-
freshments will be served.
Emphasis this year will be on
the expansion of the Nathan
Training Comer for rehabilita-
tion of the blind, handicapped
and retarded as well as the
Scholarship Fund for disabl
Israeli soldiers.
NATIONAL JEWISH HOSPITAL BEWIT
Sen. Cain To Be Honored At
Oet. 29 Testimonial Dinner
The committee for the nation-
al Jewish Hospital dinner hon-
oring Sen. Harry P. Cain launch-
ed its campaign Thursday. Sept.
11, at a meeting at the Standard
Club. Dr. Henry King Stanford.
president of the University of
Miami, presided at the planning
meeting attended by over 70
community leaders.
Heading the executive com-
mittee are Don Shoemaker. Wii-
liam Ruben and Nick Ajhar. Co-
chairmen are David Blumberg,
Art Brims. Martin Fine. Ed
Graftori. Robert Simms and Wil-
liam Singer.
A Dade County Commissioner
and former U.S. Senator, Sen.
Cain will be guest of honor at
the Oct. 29 testimonial dinner
and will be cited for his dis-
tinguished service to his fellow-
man.
Sen. Cain, who recently made
a visit to National Jewish Hos-
pital, reported to the dinner
committee on current programs
at the hospital, which has given
over 41,000 days of patient care
to residents of Florida who suf-
fer frem asthma, emphysema,
TB and severe allergies. The
center provides treatment re-
gardless of race, creed or ability
to pay.
.1. Stephen Hudson, senior
SEN. HARRY P. CAIN
executive vice president of Fit .-
ship Banks Inc., will be tie; -
urcr for the black-tie dinne
Proceeds from the benefit n
be used to further research.
training and patient treatme it
for the pediatrics division of the
hospital.......... ,,._


Page 12-B
vJewist fh>ridian
Friday, September
ip
XftbMnuxl $ta#
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Upschitz kaobi Robert J. Omand
19.
devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
American Jews And Israelis
t Must Establish Dialogue
RABBI EMANUEL EISENBERG
Temple Beth Sholom
Lake Worth
There is a fundamental risk
involved in discussing the rela-
tionship between Israel and the
Galut (Exile). The risk is that
Israel pays the price of life and
security, while the "Galut," at
least the Western Jewry, enjoy
the immunity.
We must, nevertheless, con-
front the issue. The relationship,
which is indispensable to our
common existence, will perish
without dialogue. Through mu-
tual, if anguished, encounters,
we might find a way to strong
and enduring alliance of body
and soul.
The highest consideration re-
quires open discourse, even if it
becomes harsh at times; efforts
to repress it are harmful. Jews
of the newer generation will not
be silenced by reminders that
Israel is paying the ultimate
price; they will either speak out
and in less than friendly man-
neror become alienated.
Some Galut Jews could argue
that their own fate is affected
by the way Israel is operating.
We .n Galut will experience the
fallout o f anti-Semitism as a
consequence of Israel's struggle.
Long before the issue of 'Is-
rael-Galut relationship' began to
agitate us, history had already
decreed that we are a people
One People.
The initial premise on which
Israel Galut relations must be
established is that, even with
emergence of the State of Israel,
our besetting question is still
the Jewish problem.
Any effort to achieve ac-
commodation along the lines of
"they and we" rather than "I
and thou" of "Israel vs. Galut"
rather than one people fighting
for its survival is bound to lead
to estrangement and growing
mutual peril.
Jewish survival becomes in-
creasingly questionable if we
permit a chasm to arise between
Israel and the Galut. The Galut
cannot sustain itself spiritually
alone without the most intimate
relationship with Israel.
Israel has given us "moral,
istenrial strength." It has given
istential strength. It has given
us strength to live as Jews and
to labor on behalf of our fellow
Jews. It has revived our Jewish
consciousness and actually in-
tensified it.
It is the rebirth of Israel that
has ignited the minds and hearts
of American Jews and Jews all
over the world who now want
to establish their connections
with their people's culture.
The State of Israel has given
the Jews pride in its achieve-
ments, but it must be followed
up by a continuation of a true
spirit of ommitment to the re-
ligious teachings to make it a
Jewish land, a home for a Jew
to feel proud of.
Israel cannot be a transplant of
a "Jewish Society of the Galut,"
but a creation of a "new Jewish
Society in Israel" where the
secular and religious can both
work in one.
Salvation of the Galut Jewry,
and the theme of "One People"
can only be accomplished if we
commit ourselves to Judaism
and Israel recommits itself to
the te.''ungs of the Bible for it
is the Holy Land, and it was
giv.n to us as a Holy Land, and
it can only survive if it remains
a Holy Land.
For it is written "Nee Meet-
zeeyon Teyzey Torah. Udvar
Adonay Mee'Yrushalayeem. Out
of Zion shall come Torah
(knowledge) and the word of
G-d from Jerusalem."
r Purification Or Politics?
By Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Temple Judea
The argument over "Who is
a Jew?" continues to burn.
Within the ranks of the Reform
Rabbinate there has arisen con-
troversy since some of its
members have begun conver-
sion procedures "k'halacha,"
according to Orthodox law.
One might have thought this
development would be greeted
with enthusiasm by the Ortho-
dox. After all, their stated con-
cern has been with the pres-
- ervation of the Law and its
observance oy all who are or
would be Jewish. Such is not
the case.
Several rabbis, myself includ-
ed, attempting to institute
traditional conversion proced-
ures have found stumbling
blocks placed in our paths, not
by the would-be converts but by
the Orthodox Rabbinate.
I called a prominent Orthodox
rabbi recently, tq arrange for a
young lad\ to und.rgo the rite
of Mikve. She had studied and
read deeply over the many
months under my direction and
that of a recognized Conserva-
tive Rabbi in our community.
At the conclusion of these
studies, I arranged for a "Beth
Din" to examine her knowledge
of Judaism, her motives, her
feeling for Judaism and the
Jewish people. We three Re-
form Rabbis were uniformly im-
pressed with her grasp of
Judaism and with her sincerity.
The Orthodox Rabbi stated
that in order for the young lady
to use the Mikve, she would
have to be re-examined by the
Orthodox Beth Din, which
would have to have full authori-
ty in the matter of her conver-
sion, and that I would have to
surrender all "authority" in the
matter.
What is at stake here is fun-
damental to the unity of the
Jewish commui.r;y. Is the
Orthodox Rabbinate concerned
with the preservation of the
"purity of the Jewish people"
and the Halachah it claims to
hold in reverence, or is it con-
cerned with establishing itself
as the religious "power broker"
among the various segments of
the local rabbinate and in coerc-
ing Jews and those who would
be Jews into its own mold by
abusive controls of community
institutions?
I have spoken with many
rabbis, more traditional than I,
in our community and they
have told me that because of
the above abuses they no longer
direct persons to the Mikve,
but take them straightaway to
the ocean for the purposes of
conversion.
The Orthodox Rabbinate,
having forced the issue of con-
version "according to the Law,"
can serve no purpose by deny-
ing the person who would
observe the law access to the
appropriate institution other
than for political muscle on the
American Jewish and Israeli
scenes.
Inside Judaica
RABBI MICHAEL EISENSTAT
QUESTION BOX
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
Why does Judaism re-
quire the institution of a
synagogue, i.e., a sanctuary
especially built or designed
for use in prayer, etc.?
Some base this requirement
upon the commandment in the
Bible where Moses was ordered
to build the Tabernacle in the
wilderness where it is said
"They shall make a sanctuary
unto me" (Exodus 25:8).
Basing their opinion upon the
rest of the passage where the
Bible writes: "So that I might
dwell amongst them" some com-
mentaries state that the purpose
of the sanctuary was to make
it possible for man to feel the
presence of the Almighty.
Others say that the sanctuary
is to serve as a model and as
an example of what a man's
home and his total life should
be. teaching him that he should
experience the presence of the
Almighty everywhere and at all
times.
CANDLELIGHTiNG TIME
14 TISHRI 7:01
By DR. FREDERICK LACHMAN
Executive Editor
Encyclopaedia Judaica
What is Judaism's atti-
tude towards suicide?
The duty of preserving life,
including one's own, is one of
the paramount injunctions of
Judaism. The prohibition of
suicide is a national corollary
to this; and yet, the authorita-
tive Encyclopaedia Judaica re-
ports, it is nowhere explicitly
forbidden in the Talmud. Post-
talmudic authorities, however,
considered suicide a most hei-
nous sin. even worse than
murder. It was thought to be a
denial of the doctrines of re-
ward and punishment, the world
to come, and the sovereignty of
God, and the opinion was ex-
pressed that an individual's sui-
cide forfeits his portion in the
world to come. There is a dif-
ference, however, between ac-
tive suicide and letting oneself
be killed. Suicide is also sharply
to be differentiated from mar-
tyrdom.
Four definite suicides are re*
corded in the Bible: Samson,
'Judg. 16:30) Saul and his arm-
bearer. (I Sam. 31:4-5) and
Ahithoohel (II Sam. 17:23). The
first three re regarded as
"suicide under mitigated cir-
cumstancesr,". o 40 speak. The
most famous act of suicide in
Jewish historv is the mass self-
immolation of the garrison of
Masada in 73 C.E. as reported
bv Josephus (Wars. 7:320 ff.).
It has been suggested that they
acted in accordance with their
inte.-nret'Hi'"! of \b* halakhah
which included slavery and
subjection to a foreign power
as on? of those principles con-
cerning which one was enjoin-
ed "to b- killed rather than
transgress." Other cases of sui-
cidesuch as the mass suicide
in York in 1190which were
motivated by either the desire
to avoid forced conversion or
fear, are considered to be acts
of martyrdom.
Only in late post-talmudic
times, the Encyclopaedia Judai-
ca says, were laws regarding
suicide formulated. No rites are
to be performed in honor of the
dead, but everything which ap-
pertains to respect for the
mourners is permitted. A dis-
tinction is made between suicide
while of sound mind to which
this and other restrictions ap-
ply, and suicide while of un-
sound mind, to which thv do
not apply. Thus the suicide of
a minor is not regarded as culp-
able.
Apart from exceptional cir-
cumstances, such as during the
Nazi persecution, the incidence
of suicides among Jews has
been small. The mass suicides
during the Middle Ages to avoid
forcible baptism are generally
regarded as martyrdom. The
self-immolation of Meir Fein-
stein and Moshe Barazani who
blew themselves to death in
prison in Jerusalem in 1947 on
the eve of their execution in
order to cheat the hangman, was
justified in analogy to Saul.
In Jewish Law a person de-
stroying himself is presumed to
do so without the necessary pre-
meditation whether from
pathological depression and not
being m possession of his men-
tal faculties or from "duress."
Duress includes not only com-
pulsion such as the necessity to
Kill oneself rather than surren-
der to the enemy or violate
yods laws, but also the (sub-
jectively) reasonable despair of
life or the identification.
person who just died The,
of duress being as wide
is, the law will presume*
man found dead from hi,
hand took his life involj
and without premeditation,
the contrary is proved,!
es the Judaiei
Q. What is the "Jewish L
cy" and what does it do!
A. The Jewish Agency]
international, nongovei
body, centered in Jer_
the executive and rep..
tive of the t'orld Zionist"(.
ization, whose aims aretoi
and encourag e Jews thn
the world to help in the c
ment and settlement of 1
rael.
According to the air
tive Encyclopaedia Jud
ter "Jewish Agency" fir* j
peared in Article Fourth
League of Nations Mandate j
Palestine, which stipulated I
"an appropriate Jewish,
shall be recognized as 11
body for the purpose of 1
ing and cooperating with I
administration of Palest* |
such economic, social, and 1
mattersee as may affect lie^
tablishment of the Jewai!
tional Home and t/y.
of the Jewish populj
Palestine." The article weal
to tecognize the Zionist I
ization as such an agency'
long as its organization ando
stitu'Jon are in the opinioa.j
the Mandatory appropriate."!
deed the two were coten
from the time that the Ml
was ratified by the
Council in July 1922 until l
enlarged Jewish Agency
into being in August 1929. Fn
that date until the estaoKsh
of the State of Israel, this I
played the principal role in t
relations between the Nal'"
Home and world Jewry out
one hand and the Man
and other powers on the (
In May 1948 the Jewish.1
cy relinquished many of^
functions to the newly
government of Israel, but I
tinued to be responsible for 1
migration, land settle1
vouth work, and other actw
financed bv \oluntary if
contributions from abroad,
E/J reports.
On July 2" 1954 a fa
covenant was signed ben
the Israel government ai
World Zionist Organization-*
ish Agencv. recognizing the
ter as the representative
wo il Jewry in relation to'
tions carried out through
following departments: lmir
tion, absorption. a8nCU
settlement. Youth Aliyan.
nomic, organ rat ion. i"
tion, external relations,
and He-Halut:. education
culture in the Diaspora.
later Torah education ana
ture in Diaspora
In 1960 an American
was created to supervise
bursement in Israel 01 >
raised by the United Jew
peal, in compliance witn
government regulations !
deductible gifts to chan
organizations. The new
was named the Jewish w
for Israel, Inc. (chang,
United Israel Appeal,m-
1956). Its board of directors ^
composed in equal Part*J
ganized Zionists, non-*'
and persons drawn rom
camps who were active 1^
raising. The Jerusalem
tive of the Agency was ap
Continued on Following W


I September 19, 1975
* k-ni*ti nvrMiart
Page 13-B
jiormity of Holocaust Needs Recognition
LEGAL NOTICE
L p\VU> FRIEDMAN
L VORK-(JTA) Emil L.
Lh..im. professor of phil
f a, the University of To
fdeclared here that unless
torld responds with rigor
' enormiiv nrthe Holocaust
I all be le troyed by it.'
L|. his remarks at a Dress
Lrence during the opening
y the foiir-dav "Internation-
jcholii'- Conferenca on the
Uut- \ Generation After"
flredb' 'ho Institute of Con-
I.....v of the Hebrew
tr.-jtv nf Jerusalem and the
Jewish Appeal.
IcKENHEIM *AID the only
lCl of defiance" to the
(.au>' has he*"! the eration
|he .ct:it' of Israel. He said
ia'l m rnienl the world
tnts And Friends Of
land Meeting Sunday
Ifchliehtiiv! the fall meeting
parents and Friends of Sun-
Sundaj at 2 n.m. in the
Etoriirn will be Norman Ger-
e's talk on "Court Hearings"
a panel discussion of the
^ntlv passed legislation pro-
ng a "bill of rights" for the
Irded, according to Mrs.
: Weiss, president.
lanelists will include Mr.
stein, "public defender of
retarded." Larry Forman,
gland's director of programs
! services; Bill Ferris, direc-
I of social services; U. Davis,
lage life director, and Sheryl
pell, regional director of so-
. services.
Am Coffee For Singles
h\ Edwin Flatto will discuss
jbook "Warning Sex May
[Hazardous to Your Health,"
day at 9:30 p.m. during the
lee sponsored by "Friends
limited" at Temple Beth Am
[singles 30-50. Donations will
[taken at the door.
had a "twinge" of conscience
when the United Nations voted
for the establishment of Israel
He said now that same UN has
become the world center of anti-
Semitism.
Noting *that French Nobcf-
prize winners in opposing UNES-
GO'S antirlsraci resolutions said
UNESCO was calling on paper
for the destruction of Israel,
Fackenheim said that before the
Nazi era there were a hundred
/ears of calling for Jewry's
destruction on paper in anti
Semitic writings.
Nathan Rotenstreich. professor
of nhi'oeonhv at Hebrew Univer-
sity and chairman of the con-
ference, said the nurnosr of the
gathering at the Carnegie Endow
mont for International Peace was
to put the Holocaust into per-
spective 30 years after the lib-
eration of the concentration
cames.
HE SAID scholars from North
America, Europe and Israel
would discuss the historical and
philosophical meaning of the
Holocaust as well as the effec
Nazism has ori today's anti-
Semitism. |
THE SESSION,Here focused on
Jewish reaction to Nazi rule.
Raul Hilberg!' professor of po-
litical science at the University
of Vermont, umbl the author of
"The Destrur4k>rr of the Euro-
pean Jews" said that his studies
showed that the- ffazis set up a
bureaucratic machineig. for the
Retirees To Meet Tuesday
Retirees of New. York District
65 will hold a regular member-
ship meeting at the American
Savings, 1200 Lincoln Rd., Tues-
day noon.
destruction of Jews. He said the
Judenrat, the Jewish Councils in
the ghettos were designed to fa-
cilitate the destruction of the
Jews.
However Hilberg stressed that
the Jewish members of thr Ju-
deirats were not collaborators or
. I a,
LEGAL NOTICE
ideological suoporters of Nazism
but thought they were acting to
help save Jewish lives.
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HKKi.r.i GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t" i ngage in
business under the fictitious name of
DENISE FASHIONS at 8054 8.W. 8th
Street, Miami, Florida intend to reg-
ister aald name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dads County, Florida,
I >ENISE i;' INZALEZ
PEDRO E. GONZALEZ
g 19-26 10 3-10
CIRCUIT COURT, 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-29730
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OFi
IM'XM SL'AREZ.
Petitioner- Husband*
\ s
FRANCI8CA BULIA VALLESTERO
SUAREZ,
Respi indenl -Wife.
You, FRANCISCA BULIA VALLES-
TERO Sl;AREZ, RESIDENCE UN-
KNOWN, are hereby notified to serve
a ropy of your Answer to the Disso-
lution of Marriage filed again*) you.
ui'ii husband's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS, ESQ., SIS N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida S31S6, and file
orlglnai with Clerk of Court on or
before October 24, 197"): otherwise the
Petition "ill be confessed by you.
' ited this 17th day of September,
1OT5.
luCHARD P RRINKER, CLERK
By: It 1 fPPS
Deputy ci"-'-
'.'/19-2C 10/3-10

Ihriiiaii Day School Announces New
rJudaism Through Arts' Program
TJudaisii! Through the Arts,"
pew program of the Temple
panu-Kl religious school, was
pounced this week by Law-
pee M. Schantz, chairman of
boarc of education of the
ami Beach congregation.
1 Kuttler, recently-
tainted vouth director of
friole Emanu-EI, will co-
pinat'.' the --'vm".-vine's most
pprehensive .ludaica pro-
mming in its 36-year history.
rJudaism Through the Aits"
place its emphasis on the
ed for developing skills as a
ring Jew, as well as a knovvl-
ge of the cultural heritage of
i Jewish people.
l"We want our students to
Nv^to do," Schantz said, ad-
ida
lea
ptinued from Preceding Page
by this body as its official
lent for implementing the pro-
rams for which American
Inds were allocated. To moni-
F these expenditures, it main-
lined an office in Israel.
|The Jerusalem Executive, in
pi was represented in Amer-
by a body known as The
P'sh Agency American Sec-
Pn. Inc., which consisted of
lse members of the Executive
po resided in the United
[ates Unlike their colleagues
! Jerusalem, the American
of the Executive did
! Agency departments
of them were respon-
he activities of certain
fPartments in the Western
emisp!-,ere.
ding, "we want t)iem to have
the opportunity to apply what
they are learning within the
context of their Jewish experi-
ence."
Sessions begin Sundav. Oct.
5. and will be held each Sundav
from 9:30 a.m. until noon. Chil-
dren may be enrolled at the
Temple Emanu-EI religious
school office.
Half of each session will con-
sist of Judaica programming
implemented by the faculty of
Temple Emanu-EI and its Lehr-
man Day School.
Dr. Joseph Liebcnson. Mrs.
Sara Liebenson and Mrs. Betty
Gree.nberg will guide students
in the areas of Jewish history
and practice. The remaining
portion of each class will allow
students to rotate through each
of the arts programs.
Vision Screening Training
Available In 3 Workshops
Teachers, parents and grand-
parents are invited to free pre-
school vision screening train-
ing workshops sponsored by the
Florida Society for the Pre-
vention of Blindness. Three 9:30
to 3:30 sessions are scheduled
next week as part of the local
early detection effort.
Tuesday*s will be held at Ra-
der Memorial United Methodist
Church, 8755 NE 2nd Ave.:
Wednesday a workshop will be
held at Westminster Christian
Elementary School and Thurs-
day, Sept. 25. the final training
session will be conducted at
Dorsey Skill Center. 7100 NW
17ch Ave. Call the YSPB Office
for reservations.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLOR'DA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
C'VIL ACTION NO 75-? GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR mm UTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN HE:
LOURDES JEFFERSON
and
AI.HEKT K. JEFFERSON
TO: ALBERT E JEFFERSON
.">>'. At wood Avenue
Paw tucket. R.l. 02860
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution <>f Mar-
riage has been /lied against you and
you are required to -serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Hyman P. Galbut. attorny for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 781 Washing-
ton Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida
331 H:, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before October 20, 1975; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
III THE JEWISH FI.OHIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
ISth day of September. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKEK
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By l. 8NEEDEN
As DflDUty Clerk
ii':' ii t i 'ourl Seal I
GALBUT AND OAI Bl'T
7SI Washington Avnue
Miami Beach. Fla S3139
Attorneys lor Petitioner
g 19-J6 10/3-10
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Legal Notice Is hereby given that
sealed bids will be received by Tin:
JEWISH HOME FOR THE AGED
OP GREATER MIAMI. PI ORIDA for
construction of Additions to gpuglas
"Gardens, Miami, Florida Bids will be
accepted until 8:00 I'M Local Time
on October Ifith, I97B and a< thai time
be publicly opened and read aloud at
Ruby Auditorium of the JEWISH
HOME AND HOSPITAL FOR THE
AGED OF GREATER MIAMI. Miami.
Florida,
Contract forms signed between
owner and Contractor will be tiie
Standard Form No A-101, Stipulated
Sum. Of the American Institute of
Archlti I -
Copies of Plans and Specifications
may be obtained at the office of THE
SMITH, KORACH, HAYET, HAYNIE
PARTNERSHIP on receipt of depo-
sit. General Contractors bidding this
project will receive two (8) complete
s.ls of bidding documents with a de-
dorII of $100 lOne Hundred! dollars
per set. or a total of $.' (Two Hun-
dred i dollars. Tli i -^ deposit will be
refunded to prime bidders providing
bidding documents are returned In
good condition, bound in original form
within a period of 10 (ten) days after
award of contract Additional copies
of documents or parts thereof may
lie obtained by prime or sub-contrac-
tor* at cost of reproduction and han-
dling and are not returnable. Addi-
tional copies of bidding material will
he on file in the offices of I-' W Dodge
Company and Builders Exchange In
the immediate area
Accompanying the bid proposal
shall be a certified or cashier's check.
or Bid Bond, made payable to the
Owner. Jewish Home and Hospital ror
the Arid, Miami. Florida, for not less
than .". percent Of the hiil proposal
monetary amount, or the largest pos
sible combination of the proposal bid
amounts.
liquidated damages are required
for this work: the Contractor shall
agree to complete the entire work
required on drawings and in Specifica-
tions within given number of consecu-
tive calendar days indicated on Bid
Form.
Failure to complete the contract
within the given number of consecu-
tive calendar days including any ap
proved extension of time the sum pee
day of six hundred ($"ft.'i) shall be
deducted from monies due the Con-
tractor, not ns a penalty but as liqui-
dated damages and added expense for
supervision and administration of the
Contract.
Qualifications Of Bidders: The suc-
cessful bidder shall submit the follow-
ing with the bill, all of which shall be
to the satisfaction of the Architect-
Engineer or < iwner,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Itaat
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious names
, FORTUNE MILLS AND BIDE-
Kli K8 at -"..... E. Hallamlale Beach
Blvd., Hallandale, Fla, Intends to regr-
,, ., i i mi '' ""'' *
Circuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Hoi Line of Connecticut, Inc.
by Irving < lerard,
President
Robot Bhaplro, Bsq
Myer Kaplan, Levlnson & ,,
tnetau -- MlMfoWt.o;
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-5762
In RE: Estate of
ALEXANDER KATZ
NOTICE UNDER
F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
i desiring to engage
,. titious name
SHOP at
Blvd
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDlCiM- CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5824
In RE Estate of
MARIA ANTI >NIOU
ib ceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed lo pies.-nl any claims and demands
which you may have against thi es-
tate of MARIA ANTONIOl de-
,,.,:., ,1 late ol Dade County, Florida,
tn the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and fill the sain.- in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733 16, Florida
Statutes, In their offices In the I oun-
iv Courthouse In Dade County, Flor-
ida within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
,.i nr the sami 111 be barred _
Filed at Miami, Florida, this lati
lav ot Septembi r. A o 1975.
ai VIN CASSEL
As Administrator CTA
First publication "i ib's notice on
rhe ISth dny of Sentembi r, 197 i
BROAD AND CASEI.
Attorneys, for Administrator < ta
: k int Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida 3M ^ '
i Ki^--a.,| statement oertlfled by
a C.P.A.
2. Name ol Bonding Company and
letter indicating their assurance
of bond Issuance
4 Name at laasl three health fa-
cilities, or 10i> bed nursing
home or a hospital or major ad-
dition thereto constructed '
The General Contractor, or un-
Iter bis direct supervision.
4 I .-it. indicating that the Gen-
eral Contractor has been in the
construction business for at least
* years
The Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged. Miami. Florida, reserves
the rlghl to reject any or all bids or
to waive any informalities in the bid-
dlna ., ,
No bid can be withdrawn or VOlned
fnr a period of a 1 (thlrtj I day" Bfter
the opening I bids without the con-
s,.....f the Architect-Engineer
NOTICE TO CRED'TORS
To \il Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
YOU are hereby notified and requir-
ed tO present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
the state of ALEXANDER KATZ,
deceased late of Dade County. Honda.
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County.
I ml file the same in duplicate and as
;',I',,, '.1...1 In Section 7M.18. Florida
statutes. In their offices In the Count}
Courthouse In Dade County. Florida.
Within four calendar months Irom the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will be barred.
piled at Miami. Florida, this l.th
I ,v ,,f .<,.... ml..... V O '07S
FERDINAND KATZ
As Administrator C.T.A.
First publication Of this notice on
the i:"h dav of Seotember, 107-,.
HENRY NORTON
, f0i \,i|ii-.osti-ator ( I .A.
1201 Blscayne Building
Miami, Florida ii /l-2
Miami, "'
aid name with
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLOR'DA 'N awr> FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5642
In RE: !' ,.,. ,.<
AN'ta WEINBACM
deceased ___
NOTICE TO CREDiTOR To All Creditors snd AH Persons
HaviiiL- Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
y,,ii are herehv notified and requir-
ed to present any Claims and demands
which vou mv hav.......ilnl the es-
tate of ANITA WFINBAUM, rle-
censed hte of p-wle Coon*" Florida.
,n .b cnit ,Tiid- of n..i.. County.
and fde the same In dunlicate and as
nrnvldod In S.-t'o- 7S^ 10. Florida
Sta'oies. in thel ""I-es in the Coun-
(V Coo-'t.oiise in Undo Cnuntv. Plor-
i,la, v.'thin fo'ir cnlendar months from
,h.' iirv,.. of >be fi-' nohlication here-
of or the same will he barred
Filed at Mml. SJd. 'his nth
,,,,. ,,f se-'emb-r. \ n 97S
7. FA' "' KOOAN
,\s Kxeciitor
pirst n"bl|ca"on of l>ls no-'ee on
,h 11th d-v of Rentornher, 1975
Cald'n, F'o>ienherg. Kogan aV
Koee.'m
bv: Zev W Koran
Od.-fiov foe F\e'*l|tor
420 Lincoln Rd.. Miami Beach. F"fl. ^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
CENERAL JURISO'CTION DIVISION
NO. 75-29309
NOTICE FOR FORECLOSURE OF
TWO MORTGAGES
.Mil <> WINDRICK,
Plaintiff,
,-l-Tt kim WO DFV""1 FOMENT
CORPORATION, A Fl ORIDA
i-i 1RPORATION, OEi 'ROE J ROSSI
AND NEIL STt'DNICK,
Defendants
]'i i: 1 leorge .1 Rossi
70 King Avenue
VVeehawken, Nev. Jersey
VI T ARK NOTIFIED 'bat an ac-
tion to foreclose a m irtgaa-e on the
following property in Dade county,
Florida: ,
The south \ of the SE ', Of the
siv >, of Section I*, Township >',
south. Range 10 (Cast, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
ind on the following property in Dole
I'nMiitv. Florida:
The South ', Of the SW 'i Of the
s\\ ', of Section Id Townshln 0
Pou'h, Range I" Baat, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
haa been fill A agalnsl you and vou
are required to serve 11 copy of your
,. ..!. ,, ,1,,f, 1.. .. -t any. to it on
WILLIAM CHESTER, Plaintiff's
attorney wbone address Is 9SS NE.
Sth Street. Miami. Florida on or he-
fore October 34, I97S and to file the
original with the Clerk of thi; Court
either before si.....1 on Plaintiffs at-
torne) or Immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default "-III be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the comolalnl or oetltlon,
This notice si ail he nubllshed once
for four consecutive weeks in
The JEWISH I"1 OR'DIAN
WITNESS mv hand and the ea m
..,1,1 I-. nr ,' IHlBW Fln'd m this
I2th da of Se|
R{ .1, d RRINKER
As Cli Circuit C
-
bar:
11.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
0p pLOPina in AMD FOR
riAOF COUNTY
prorate DIVISION
ncpoM NCSR'TT
PROBATE NO. 75-5828
t pk i.-. 1 ,-. .f
\ up mi \ m WBINSTI "K
'"'NOTICE TO CREDITORS
t mi Creditors end All "'
11 Claims or D< mands Against
j ,,.|IV .titled snd reoulr-
Pri -ii......1 an^ cln'ms snd demands
,.1 icv >.....nv hn' '; ;-
,.,,.. r m:i:am vm \VEl\*STO< K. de-
,1 1 .,,. ,,f pde Com t.. Fiorina,
,,. uli .'"'i..... n ide County,
. ,1 ,. ..,.,. 1 .1" js
, ., i,l, ,1 In Swtli ""' ,,; i'''"ri''i
e......ie In thi nffleej III thi I iun-
.. ,...!.... ,,, I I I ""' ''
Ids within four calendar months I
,,... 1... < nnbuc ; -t 1 hi re-
,,' .- the same wl'J hi hatred.
i.-m. 11 mi mi, ''id this 12th
1 -.'.......ml"- D 1*71
HKTTV > I-IVST, ick
As Exi cutrln
i- ,. ,.,,i,ii,;,<', of this 1 "a
..... ^ nib'!'. I
H VRRT ZUKERNICK
v I___f\ I'"-'' lie
.an Road
Miami Beach. Fla M1J9 ^^
','
'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA 'N AND FOR
pipe r.nnNTV
probate DIVISION
JOSFBH NFSBITT
PROBATE NO 75-5853
1. 1. i.- Pmf" of
SAP"' W'l'iSS
deceased _.__^
jqticf TO CRED'TORS
To All Creditors and AM Persons
11 ...... Claims or Demands Against
Ss'd Estate:
v. ,, ..... herehv notified snd rooulr-
,. 1 .. or,- ent any claims snd demands
,. x ., nev h -ve against the es-
,,... ,,f RADIF WEISS, de.
I i,. ,.f l>. d Co.oilv. Florida.
to 'he Circuit JudBTeS of Pol,- County.
...... .-<. ih-' s>o- 'n dio.lii-ate and as
provided in Section 7SS 1 FJorida
pti.....,.s m their nf.....s in the < oun-
,, r .....house In ri 1 '' unty Plor-
i,i., n-'thln four .......Ida' months from
I...' I......I 'I.
the same "I- '......."'
pil...... Mi-mi (Piorlds this 1-th
THITH W K
v i-> ntr'x
a on
.....

i ROTH,
P v
.... -: '
..


Page 14-B
+Je1$f fkridfor
Friday, September
IS
Religious Services
Continued from Page 2-B
OUNG ISRAEL OP GREATER M
AMI. 990 NE 171s; St ontioaox
Rabbi Zev Leff. M
C09AL GAMi
-L'DEA (Tn>ptei. S550 G-anaoj Bwd
fiefcrm. RaM" M chad 8 E -n.
tat. Canter r-ta S*-re *'
!
BE*h fHALOM |TM*IM 44>0< Ar.
tnor St Cr-'sc'vat ve. RatD. Martss
Mi'av>> Center irvlr-g Go'*.
ZAM0RA iTemote.. 4 2amra Av
Conservative. Habbi Maur.ce K r *
*
StaMrdaj

SI Sl iTtmpie). 12M jchnaon St
uonaerval.ve RaDbi Dav.d Shaoira.
Associate Rabbi CMr S Lutf'eia
:, !!1
. !'
TEMPLE 61t- AMM Corservat.va.
1 ; v atafl Ave Ho:lwooo. F.i*b
Oi>a Rostnf aid. 47-B
TEMPLE SOLEL .Liberal. 5130 Sbr-
idan St HC'lywooo. Raaoi Robert
Frazm. 47.C
OQAN OAVID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave O-t--oo Rabb
Itaac D Vine. 9
- B ita
FOtrr mi/dud Air
3ETH ISRAEL iTtlMM). 7100 TV
Oakland Park B'vd Rabbi P-'I'o A
Labowrtx Cantor Viurct Ne 4
EMANU-EL. 32*3 W Oaf'a-d P.irw
Bid Refc-rr. CanrM- Je-om? K e
nent. *S
~AM**RAC JEYVTSH CENTER. '
NvV 57'h Si. Contervat va ?3-">
Milion J. Ores* 44-A
-
OUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
'Orthodox- 3897 Stirling Ra 52
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Noa H II Rd Plan.
t.'iion Rabbi Arthar S. Abrama.
miKAMAK
ISRAEL (Temale. 6920 SW S5t St
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. Drjim
Cantor Abraham Kester 41
HOmtiUAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTEP
1E3 NE tth St Conservative. 51
Court Rules
\o Merit hi
Complaint
UGAl NGTKf
NOT CE ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERV CE
,NO PROPERTY,
IN THE CIRCL-'T CouRT OF THE
ELEVENTH JLDiCiAL C'RCUIT
OF FL0RI3A 'N AND FOR
OADE COUNTY
i-- -s NO "5-?69"
GENERAL Jjfl SO'CT.ON DIVISION
ACTION FOR D SSOLLTION
OF ma PR AGE
OX
'
TO \ \ i EON

. ';
LEGAL NOTICr
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO 75-5628
JOHN R. BLANTON
i- i:i:- K*w.....' ,
. i i n| lUlhK'l
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
UlCn '' r"on" "
- ACainttt Bald
6Al NOTlCt
.NOTICE LNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMF ,
NOTWB Is HI | x U*
ih.- naclaaslanod '^tH
bu '" .,
of IN- I |
lie. Bait*, :
. Intend* io "" I':..
' Ihe lerl
of Dad. couny i
^ i- .^.....M told ''fl R| ,.-
Attorney tor i.xti:;-i >,,., .
'"' "-""V UW.2 L'' a
n bi......mandf WW Piaster .-
hiiv. ..-- Miami, i
....... .1 I .llt-I'4' A*.- .
"''.....I
\ ,i n< !'. iv i' nrWa. iWi "in "lew
.,. hi ih.- fl
I .. i-i v col DBERO. de-
I ..!. f..UIllv.
. jii Judgi .- ul I Mioa
-"" '" ^liU'l'-
s. ction (3S.18.
-
, Hide d ill
il< -mliir
raj
....
i llll.s I'll!

vl I i: l:i : 'I DKICH

r ,
u
JEWISH ^N
. r i -
Bl
s
RICHARD P I
. .
i- i' ir '-
B) M \l:! N- \s
A- I :
i! u-' .-
- US. V A
V.V I.;:
:n iikkojiI \n
.\- Km cuti -
. pui I i it toe on
'"'
. -i \\ i:il. ,v SCHEER
V1111| *
I (nail
.IV
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT n^
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL\Z Ht
OF FLORIDA IN aNd'S."
DADE COUNTY FR
PROBATE DIV'SION
MORRTH HAI.l.Ki;
(Iki -
to A^^asL. rss2
,V "' '": IBdna
which roj m.n i .,'[>
tat- of M..,:
> liu- i. ,:
PlorMB, I.. Hi- i, ; JudiesoTa
County, and fil.
in _
*f>mi>AN0 UACH
ARGATF JEWISH CENTER
k.\ju .rth kt
.--
- I
SHOLOM Tmpl IS! SE lit" Ave
Conaervattva. R> >o. Mornr A Skoa
Ca-tor Yaacav Remr
The Third District Court of
PMlf h=is ruled that there i?
no merit in the complaint made '"7"
by the City of Miami Beach
tiiat Kosher lie Emanu-Ki c matitute a
comnwrciai business activity in
i ned re&idential.
HAllANOilt
-ALwANDALE = ^-i-i CE'-'EB
Centarvat v H NE --n ve Ratb.
t-fy E BCtlW '; Ci'-.cr .'-;
Oani aer ;
'
-
-
nourr/ooo
cETH EL Reform. Rabbi Samo-I Jaf'e. Aaa;t-
ant Rabbi Harvev M Roienf-'f *
LEGAL NOTICE
'dings and Bar Mitzvahs
have beer catered by Irung
Suiiicraein and Sidney Hecht-
at the tempie since 1967.
vo years ago the city ob-
tained an injunction against
them, prohibiting than from
serving at some, but not all.
temple functions. And last year
the city charged the caterers
with violating the terms of the
injunction and obtained two
contempt judgments.
appeals court agreed and struck
down both the injunction and
contempt orders.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is? HEREBY GIVEN
. fcn i i-u- Ti- -- undt the fictitiouf i
BOCTHLAXTJ APARTMENTS ni
"'I AH all :.-.; B. bi !:. Flor-
:fin il- I : E .i:'l i..m.- v-ilh
- | j13 ui; I'l-uri f-f
Kl- rldn
SARA EDET.M x V
f> s-u-ra
iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4421 (Nesbitt)
IN RE: ESTATE >V
ATE Tl I T.MAN
\VK TTPTJBR
D. .-!
NOTICE OF PROBATE
' HE STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTEP i\
THE BSTA.TE OF SAM- I >(: KUK.VT
I bj notified !'.
i -a- m |.. rh
P
I

uri V'u .ir^ h.---!> rotnm;
notice i" ni i d i Vtun
iii.i.iilm. n ,ir.
haa bewti i.i ; aaali >i
, ,i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERV CE
,N0 PRCPERTV,
-. -HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDiCIAL C RCUIT
CF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACT-ON NO 75-284J:?
GENERAL JURISDICTION OIVISiON
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE Ti
VRD M'lI.LlA IK.
I'. II :
.- .
- \, .- ...
.~-.. .
Pr V r-
M .tf..->.
ARE iii.'. : i
rh u
a keen I
till. t-rvi
> ir i> if- i, .:;. i -. -
DA\ ID K ST" >NK :.-'.i
> 1... 1 .-, .
NOTICE LNOER
FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
IH UIVEN ili.il
t -
u. ..... ii i vii mi
VXXEtj HOI. OK MOD-
tt'Ht M : -

. Clr-
.. ii P nrida
..;-i4,|
Rabbi Irving Lehrman. who
testified in the caterei-s' behalf, !' N !il Avenu.
told the court that Iei>ih Ijjit- -v
requires a kosher feast to cele- SH." '.n "r '
oiherawiKi a Ii iul
brate religious ceremonies. The 'r-'1 aaahwi
ni:.. a,a in ill. i.u
This m.ii. <- >h
,i. h v
in THE AKW !>H Fl i iRI
YViTK ElU m
in m M i .
.- .-i !;-.
i. HAUIi r
A i ., i ur.
I
Bi IIARIl i.N \t: >\ m.\ n
A- 1 > a-
DAVID E ST< i.\E, i.>i i| HI
STi >NE M "STCHLN S -- i \
N -' V
I
All. :

U6AI NOTKE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
DAOE COUNTY
NO 75-28937
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
FB IKK ROREI! -
IJ.ilimlt
i DC \Kl: v ., k .,
k RaWru
Utnt
Tl .\,.i-..i. v,-,a. a k a
t-
\Uri;i I'umiKi
K" I B NO. I-M
''" i -ir ':-. ralda Columbia
:: NOTIFIED ii,..i an
fur
Ii
bM I u
i-" NESBITT
l .,.. .,
mm vm, i BitrxKER -.-
Bj CHAR] i."f t\ OIRARH
I : U '
!: -I. :,.
H.-il! \

One 8.E u-
y of thlo i
iht- 19th day "( Sept M7S
: !:-...
NOTICE UNOER
FICTIT40US NAME LAW
M iSItiU la' Hi.Cim HIVK.V
ih. ui.n-r- -irMm ti
l'(4a iai uiiirr u u n. m,
SMMT i;-M.i*ir: |
.
'Mfhl '.iia.iu.ii-,. ...
you and : i u. uu
i.. aaraa i .-..% of iv
N THE CIRCUIT CO'. RT OF THE
ELEVENTH .UDiClAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVSION
PROBATE NO 75-5714
JOSEPH NESBITT

Hirnwu; m \> vi s

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
i .-..I,- II ,\ -
> A i ..-..., i
ml n u.i
....
i: He i>-
< : M VITNTS
i ... I- (. ii IV.
UiIkv
u III'!: -
:
11 ..|r t'oun-
ui ...... dai
Ii in-i
;n be
! r i i 'Hi
-. .-. ii .. i. A I 1975
I RSI l A UK ZliEB
\- Kxeeuinx
uti \
- \ m >:!/
.......
. -.1-.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N"' '< i:i\ i:x thi.i
-.. eiucasi
' '"-ii--'- ii Kctitiou. name
', vAVf l1" MEDICAL AN1,
A I. \ A
FTnrlaa
-.'- .,.| mime
i rrul i-viiri
1 i
1 ,; KSSH .\ \i VISION
XERVK-ES, INC
Id .
NOTICE UNDER
. e ctrfiays name law
' '" HEKEin n m:n ibai
rail nri'l Af "\ i.
I "l.i Si.ilui. -
l>. Horlda. ,;
ni ii hr i-'.tu ih.
Ul I I., i ,
' '' -I
bj : Moans vnwaw
T \
llllli. ..
,... u
SIMON. HAVS ill V|.v. ,
At ton \
\,..-i. Run
in.. Florida :
______________ i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of -mi
ELEVENTH JU D1C i AU C'flCUl'
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 75-77736
GENERAL JURISD'CTiON DivisionI
ACTION FOR O'SSOUL'TION
OF MARRIAGE
IX RE: Th< m
Kl M'S Bl IRfl -.i
.,11.1
KE Bl lETTi 'HER
n E RKjhh .,:;:
AI'KMIAI.i:.
FLENSl '
.!:m v.n v
Vi.l ARE HI I": votii
ill ni i n
.'I.,.'
> .ii re r. .|ir- l.i i tf M I
\ our a rltten .1. %a I
ARTHUR II I IH iv <,]
I', liii.inor. <\h.-. -- -
' hi 1'rlv... II K|m*I
:'""'.'. n.I Die nil,.!] ikj
'l.-ik of the ;ili.\. rurl r. a |
l.rfore Oi-tohi-'
ill f.lllU \\ill I- R.-I J1
fur 'h-' reli.-l ill
[ilninl or i i
\V'ITNKSk w In 'HlJ
l c-urt ;.i Mini :. ait |
."Ii ilxy of Aiikii-
RICHARD y I'OilKKEB
A Clerk, i "ii u I Cojirl
1 i..ii. i'. ii
Bt H i I'l'S
^ l>. pul i-rH
ir-nlt <-.-ui i -
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE UAW
NOTU'K l HKRI I 'IVKX *H
:h^ ir ,1. r-iKi .-.I
buflaaM aiiil. i ali. i n*v*4'
lM'M'KX i.> .jl-mt I
Miiiw .. i. nelrtaraj f
name wii! (hi i ''''fl*
Couit Xalionnl Ri i
x K i.
1 141
-ir uiiu.-i. riefoaMM, If an) i.. i
Mai Im II. Friedman, Pla'ntlfl -
-. Jdn -.- i- \... Doujt>
la- R. ad, Coral Gabim. Flar da I: I Ti
'- "' ..... I Hie
' ..- ihw
' u '- Plat--
' -' thare-
-- dateuli will ..
M ,,,- y,,u for It r.U.f ilr.
fl ComtfctfM or p. -itMn
., .,|'--' a*l or
1 uri on Sepl !u l73
RK'HARD P BKINKER
as .-;. ,urC
By I: J Pi .\
H. imii>- i .
-
IN
, bu IIHW ll.ii!., IW' :"**
A SANeHEa ;xi:s m KIDV*. CCTT EatiJ
....-.. .ih i-i.r Kiid iii.m.. i. '..*.
XiJ_ _,_, Court ..f < r.uil .1 ..ui I > ***
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE Ida
-Eventh judicial Circuit "* \i: RODULFi SEZ
OF FLORIDA IN AND fop -,. i la.aa
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME UAW
XOTICK IS IH I UIVE.N ''
tl,. timl, raixn. il
bu-lnajt UBiler "li
at w-.|
:., r*
*H
I
IN THE CIRCUIT muRT np THF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN ANO FOR
DAOE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28940
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
re of
HERBERT LANDRCM rMUhaaA
MNDRCM .
ANN I ANDRC.M
i:i BAR] i ..' ; .v>.\ i.
TXtON WAT
: UvOEVALE CAUFORXIA
s-. ,

fil*-rl .ik and
-,r.- riu
.
ARTHI'R H

;
cvenaaewttouis Mthaamoima
I J L i
whence notaranoout
i
f'T the relief den:
on
WITNESS mj V'.^..:...- a.VAj.2
HARD P DRINKER

We,
need
you.
If you can aj>epdjme daw,
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE OIV-ISION
PROBATE NO 75.JV8
... :
h RED K' .r
..
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
' I I ,
}"u *'' raqulr-
Ii.

M.K,. ,,,
] la .
;; '' '-.uu Judge*

u..
I! '."-.
C0NSTRLCTiVE SERVICE
'NTHec^c^IJTV.
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
r.w. DADE COUNTY
rF. CIVIL ACTION NO 75-27953
C'ENner?*L JURISDICTION DIVISION

1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME UAW
Ni.'lH-K IS H, tl U'VfcN "J]
III. un.l. r-icu, il. '"'*''>
business a. .1.-- I
i:\Ri-IA H.MlliH I
BTRCCTrON M VI aair
N W. !;::,il. s:-.. I'"~' 7J
Intend* .. *'5J
H Clark
1 lade I'l'Uiin I':'
CilLBEIC '

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0JJ*
HTH JUDICIAL Cl-'C'T. IN A~
FCH DADE COUNTY FUORIO*
C.FWERAL^u'RrsDICT^NDlV^
j call your locji \o!unr. .-
'
ft
s


the National C- l
f a. nmi |
notice un:er
1
I
w
:,l..f
"

-
.

r.M i,,ju.ri
\ I
11
Ii in.,n Ji SI
\'W T A
I I

a '

.. : Mi
rvrltu
DPI
.'*


riday. September 19, 1975
frJfeMffft FhrkHtnr,
Page 15-
Obituaries
(f, 71. of Miami
I ..'.'.-, II.. Ht. ... MlMBl
f ,;. ill..i. -' ii< "Mi
PjJ ,.,...t Mounl N'ebo
I; ".' ,-..m,,. *, of. tftaml
I .. l|MI'
L:' ., . ,|. IllUTJIlWIt
,1 M.UI.'IIMI l.M'li.
L, lUy, M. "I JIlulill
--ili.
, ,.!,.., .1,.. I... Ill
"" "".V .. ,.
ii.,,-... ,,. i>| North
;.-.. ,-nle.
S 7". ..i Mluml
'"'''' r ,,-
III,' III Mil mi
r. I......IHi I UU-Ilt Mi'Ulll
' !>'
|! Kadlo. ''-' ,of ll>.ll. .Ii
, i in. III .Sim "l I'm nl
Ul 111. I Mll-i
.... i.:.. ..I Mlnml
is.
!.- man, 71, of Mlnml
II CS
,.| K.. 73. of Mi:iliii
. ,1, nil, I III, III .\|. Ill I
... .1 ; '. i.i Km ih
,i.,. I.i v ill.
k-i ill.. 73 ..i Mlnml
M
I \l!Cn Martin, '. nl Xnrtli
|(kJ| r-i-|. .
i i, ; ,.r Miami lleityh.
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Sen ,. if *i^h Coirmunilji sine* 1938
0RTX0GOX
COSSERVATIVf
REF_0M SERVICCS
( '.-vcjn'lWS! IktGonJen
Hju) icido'i J964I ijmei B Goidon
Telephone KS8-S5M

l.'ll-'KIX. Ktlii-I Win-i.-n. BS, ..I ,M i.i ill)
I lea i Ii Uii, i -.i.i, .
i:".si:\|.i:i.n. shiii.-y, is. ..: Miajnl
\\ i. ss. Toi.j 78, iii Mlnml I'., n< b,
New man
KI:A.S.si i\\ I: .... ii 73, of .Miami
I a. Ii I .i-\ ill.
m i.i mas. Iti.w UliM.in, ..I' North
.Miami i -I..
MKVKUSO.., |i,.,. ,,y ,,," \,MU|
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Vll:l-;i I .;,\nl. 7, n'f .Miami
IllXM I -nil- ll,l. I Ill-ail Still ill I >H1 nl
.Minn.ii.il r.ri,
l-'KIT .llU'l.li, 711, i.i .Miami lieaeli
I fVitt.
'illKKTI Kir. Pauline, 7:. nf .Miami
l-i.i.l, III, m-i-K.
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lllv. -I.I.
IT/.M'W nx. i:ii,,ia. nf \,.1 ii, Miami
Ilia. Ii. LtlVl r.-iil,
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Ciaili. Kiwi.-I'll.
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'...11. i:m 1 all Inli ilium MnUlll
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Levitt.
I '1.1:. \. \,.nn. 7s nl X..I in Miami
I ll a. Ii. Uii 11 i-iili-
i: W/. .\. .. ill, ..I Miami I., vili
1 1 ASS. H.\ in.hi S. nl .inaiiii Hi 1.I1.
I a ., 1 -1.1. Ini. 1 mi-ill Miiuiii \'i l'
1 nn
'i' '. in.i:i:c. \.i. 1,. 7.'. i.f .Miami
I -. ) 1 iin i' -iii.
HK.Mll'.i -ll..... -. ''.. ..1 Miami 111 11.-ll
Vi ... 1 1 an
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ill I11I.1 m. in M.iiinl
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, '.. 1 ....a
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III a. Ii ,\. 11 man
I 1 'I, 11 Iv' ll.lli}, i.'i I.I '..rill ial.l. -.
\\ KITZKXIli IKKKIS, .1. ."!. 7'. ..1
\i.i iii Miiiliii 111 Ii Hi. 1 1 -..|.
...... 1 ..,,1 Hull II. "I \"l Mi
.III. I.I I '.. a I < ,..11.1 1 I '1 .lllal ion
ii-l},
! 11 Hi TV. i-.alnii I. .- nl Mlnml Hna.li.
II 1 ,1
' 1 ..-. ,lu,lull I! IS, i.i Miami
I: :.. I. I.il .T- ill
, I S I I.I.V 11,111 i, -.. Il( \,.| III
in. I :. I.I, I -la l-< 1 u
, JHI l! I-'!'-' 1.111 I .. i. "i Mil ml
I t. a. Ii aifili l'
ii ;i: m \.\SK >'. ,li -- '. nf Miami
1;.-... h <:..1.1.-11
;.X>'i:i'i:i., Xntli..... i, of Miami
I!, i. '; 1. Mbli
I i:\ INSn.V !- Tii. "I Miami Hi ..-'.
I: i v t-> i. I -
11II I Iii:. Saniual. ::. ul Miami
I- ui Ii Bl .-1 >i W
' .i i\v .Maniiain. iii, i.f Xorth
.Miami l:.a.h. Kivii.-iil.
rg, 1::. ..I N-.i Lli
ilia llli II|il>l.(>rB.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
* *- All SI ilATM
*Mtl -.i.^i ,.. TNI lU
865-2353
720 5--en(y faU Str**l
f i*J*>n Cih> Mm
en *(-( Bot\
.i-.i'.TuwiMji.yici
Phone 266-2888
PALMER'S
MIAMI MONUMENT COMPANY/J k
RMONaUZEO MEMORIALS
CUtTOM CRAFTED
in our woRumor
4444921 444 22
3179 SW. A ST.. MIAMI
r
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656 In Hollywood:
1 131 SWesl Dixie Highway 925-3396
l'i wiltd by S. levin, F.D. 1921 rrmlirukc Ri!.
^ew York: |212) 2b3-rb(JO Queem Blvd. (. 76lh Kd .Forest Hills, NY
LEGAL NOTICE
iN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DAD6 COUNTV, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 7S-29069
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Ki
Ii ill\ K w i :ST, iiu.-'.......
nil .Mi.\t:s M i.sr
TO: ai:\k.-- a k.si
i- .' .M.u i :;i,-.., i ,.i.. .
i.m'. ',.1. inn.. ,\ i IIU-
A|inrtiqi nl No
\V a.-a mniuii, 1 l. '
Viii \i;i: liRKlSHY
I i I'.n "i I ii- .-'.luli'ii '.! Mai I
I a> li.ii i. I'.li'il aualtisi i..u an'l > "U .
i.i l. i|tliri 'I I.- -.ii.....;..i of
n-iir au.-ii r i-i ..iii, i nli i..
IVillInn iiii Hi.- Hul>Hiid'n Attorney,
i.i-:sii:i; let ki Kits, uii.-......ii.-- i>
i I.M V\\. Ii AVt i.u. .Miami, fun..i.i
::::u.".. imil file the itIkIiihI with tni
i l..lk il III. al.i.i. -T\|. .1 I'.-uit .....
i.. fur., iiii- iiiii day nf 11. in)., r. |T5,
"i a l'.:laull will i" .nl.liil uniiiai
>-'ii
I'ATHD tlil 10th da) of gopienhea,
1975,
UU M.u.'ii p. BR1NKBR
i nil. nf ill. i in uii lourl
i;> XKli i.'isi:.\i:i;i:i;
:i I9.: ',. .;. in
NOTICE Oh ACTION
COKtSTKUCTiVE SEKVICE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUTES 49.021
IN THE ClnCUiT COUiiT OF THE
1ITH JUDICIAL CIKCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISD.CTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-25047
ACTION TO *l-iuhi uuARQIAN
AD LITEM TO REPRESENT ALL
UHKhb\(iv -PAn'i iES n SUiT TO
CLEAR TITLE
i;i ii.i:i;t .\i. i. i..>< >.\ taiU
.1 i-..\.Ni;'i"i'.\ w i i.s- i.s a I. a
JUXNKTI i: u I l.si N, IiIh wife,
l'lailllill~.
JOHN M. 8TEVEX8 and VKI'.TIt:
m.u: si i: \ i:.\.-. i.i n.. ii
llvlra anil all those |i..rsinis
a lll.liu llli.i. III. III.
1 ii-l'i.la|.lilM.
Til: .IIHIN ,M. STK\ BNS ami
VKKTIK .\I.\K 8TKVKNH. hl
iiif--, ili.-ir lii.ii> and nil lli"--
imsiiii- UuiiniiiK miil.i' ill.-in
11.1..-ii ii-;.\. i: i .\ km i\\ \ i
YOU a 1.1: iir.KKiiv miTii-ii:ii
ilia) an a, lii.ti In .i|*i>..iui (tanrdlnn
Ad I ill in I" 11 |'' nl all uiiLii'ii n
paili.- in u|l 'li-ai- lilli- In Illl
Inlliwitm ilii-< lain : l>r. .|it-i. i :
i in : a, in lAMiaii'V l'liorKi:-
TIKS, m rdl i" ill.i I'lai Mi-i. -
of, a- III I ''ul I'.."
ai Pin(e 102, i.f iii. Public Havnrda
nl I ..nl. i.-linii. l-"|..ii.la.
Ii:.- I..A-.H lili'l u... 11 -1 yilU anil mil
" i nllii-. nl.....i a >> !' > "in
m i il.....I. i.u-.-. If any. in il ,.n
i:i.:11.i i-:i:.mii smiTtHilM, Esyrilli;,
All..in. \ |.,| ['In 111 11 Hh, Minis, lllli
i 101 -N.W l-'Mi Av.nu.. .Miami, (flnr-
lilu, IH. .Ii- in -in.'I H uii Mm I'Jyfk nf
ill. jl...ia My|.,.l i'..url "H "r Ulfori
......Imt L'llli, I ??.": "lii'ii'i-i II il<-
i.uiii uill 1..- viii...-.il against you for
III- tlju< .'..IIIHU.I...I in III. i". lllnlail".
Till* Notion 'fia.ll |M l-Ulilisll-'! on,
a \i..l> I'm- loUC iJUMM'Ul v. i, i Ii-
ii.. i:\v su i-'i i'i.ii'A.v.
VVITNR88 m\ hand mil s.ul ul
-.nl t "ini ..i .Mhimi. I :..! County,
|.'!..li.Ll >>J| Illl- l.lli mi "f S|.|i:Iii1m i.
MM U-VUI' I' liKIXK'MK
\- I I...1... I ...1*11 Ul-
|l:..l, r...illl\. J'l.
H\: X A Hi:\Vb."IT
A- l'-i.uM ri..-rk
K 'iivuil "III I. A fl I
nil .i i:i..\j" .->''sii in\ i:s-/i ii;i:
Ml.. I..J l-i.. u u>
liiV X. U >ji!i \\ iiu.
Miiuiii. *'l. ;i::> i TM '::'
19-26 I" S-10
IN THE CIRCUIT COU.aT- OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN..AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Fi OR'OA
ENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 75-28064
NOTICE Of PETITION FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
n Hi. .M..I -.' i
.- ......i N <. nmsTi ii-ii|.:i:
I" ill il AS 'I.AKKK. a iniii"! to
iliKl.vriH-i.l.|.;K .l.ilIN I'Ai'i.l \M>.
in 'i;Ym;j.-.i; imi .;i .vs i i .vi:KI-:
Ui -iili ii. I' .,iiii..i i.
Yi.il- Ai:iv iiui:i:i^ \.riiKii:i>
,l,al a I lltli.n .'I illHtllK! "' -
in,, ,. ,, ,, i.i i;i:i:\i' i i i-:k u,\
I II IV.VV i l" ItiU'W ,n" l|!"n'' ,f
.'iii:is:r,ii'iii.i: un >;i as , in ,..!. i" lliKIS-li.iiai.luli .1-iH.V
I'.Xlii iV AM '. mill .'."ii iili' i'iiiiii.il '
,ii. a ... .> .a i ..ui- i.i.i..i-ii"M- in
ih. i i.i. |id|njr>- '"' "" i" Utinn "ii tin-
.i iili.....i- iii"in.y. IAWKKM'i: I
'Illl I A.\J 'l-.K. II '.' K.......1} '"all--
,;, Ni.nli itaj Villniri-. Klorlrtn.
iv ...nl nl, .I., "iii Inal !' <
,,|,,, ,i,,.,,- ,., 'I,..i- oli ii'linu.- in Hi'-
-in. iii Hi. I. 'i. ". thi >ii-.-ini 'iii-i
nil "i I..-I..1V ilii H'lli .la.i "I ii.l"l. 197.1 li i.u fail '" il" HO, ill.lKJlUJll
.nil 1.. .....rod fin ih.- rr-lii I mam'.
. .1 l|| : I ; "I "i .'< "a.
IKiMi '.\H ilM'KUKI/ in Mlnml,
llail.- Countji Kloiiilii. Illis L'llil ila\ "f
Silili UUlvA'l L'i '-
i:i. ii.v.:i. i- \:msi ii.,'... i 'ii. uii u,r*.
| ,;, I ,111,1.1 l-'I'-ridll
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LEGAL N0TKE
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GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CSE NO: 75-27795
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
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GENERAi .lUR'SDl.CT ON DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-',7n7n
NOTICE OF ACTION
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LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANC
FOR DADE COUNTY. i-'LORIDA
GtNEHAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 75-2775
NOTICE SY PUBLICATION
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DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT.ON. iVO. 75-~7l..6
GE.Nb.-iAL .IURISDICT ON DIVISION
A.CTION FOR DISSOLUTION
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s i 12-19


Page 16-B
-JetvlstinerkBar}
Friday, September 19
LOOKING FOR QUALITY,
LOOK TO FOOD FAIR
At Food Fair our produce buyers look for and buy only the
best quality produce. They know you want only the best for
your family, so nothing less will do.
PRICES'EFFECTIVE FROM DATE OF PUBLICATION THRU WED.. SEPT. 24h, AT AIL FOOD FAIR STORES EXCLUDING KOSHER MARKETS
FOOD
FAIR
Bartlett Pears
SUPERMARKETS

SUNSWEBT P/tTEd
SWEET
EATING
PEAK OF GOODNESS
C Tp
QUALITY
LB.
PEAK Uh OUUUNtib yT .
Honeydews each 7 9
c
I2-OZ.
PKG.
#j / "" t "KG.
MILDLY NIPPY __
Fresh Scallions.........2 bunches 29
U.S. 1 (PICK YOUR OWN) _
Yellow Onions....................... 19'
FLAVORFUL AND NUTRITIOUS
Fresh Mushrooms..............u. 89
CRISP GARDEN FRESH
Romaine Lettuce...............head 29*
HIGH ENERGY .
Avocado Pears.............3 for
BORDENS OR
les Cal Yogurt
ALL
FLAVORS
FRESHLY SQUEEZED
8-OZ.
CUPS
Flo-Sun Orange Juice3cuo*NVss93c
NON-BUTTER FAT (USE LIKE SOUR CREAM) _
King Sour Dressing cX. 43e
FRIENDSHIP
Creamed Cottage Cheese eft 69'
LITE-LINE
Borden's Cream Cheese '": 43
GOLDO CORN 100% PURE __
Corn Oil Margarine #5: 55c
GORMAN S IMPORTED AUSTRIAN
Sliced Swiss Cheese tSS: 79
AMERICAN KOSHER MIDGET _
Salami or Bologna ISS'I"
HEBREW NATIONAL KOSHER ....
Franks or Knocks ,,1"
K ANN'S
IAMN 3 A A A
Sandwich Spread ^ 39c
SEA SNACK
Shrimp Cocktail ffi 45'
FRESH SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAtlABU Al STORES WITH StRVICI COUNTERS
Trout
FANCY
FRESH
WATER
I
29
LB. (RAINBOW)
P.P. BRAND (SECTIONS)
Grapefruit
16-OZ.
THOMPSON SEEDLESS
Grapes
EXCIUDINC
c|CARc-rrfs
llllltllliill
:'.:;:
SUMPS
BONUS SPECIAU SAVE
DEL MONTE^
Prune Joke
40-OZ. rfaQf 7
BOTTLE rAccvA/LTH OTHER PURCHASES
Ivory Liquid
DISH DETERGENT
Fry
FLA. OR
SHIFPED
PREMIUM
FRESH
LEG OR
BREAST
QUARTERS
FLA OB SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH ^&A
Fryer PartsTx,
WMCKE IEGS Yl-O.t BREAST VY'RIBS 'DRUMSTICKS '1HI6MJ
FRESH BEEF t? 1 A
round Chuck 1..
48-OZ.
BOTTLE
$1
29
LIMIT ONE BTL.. PLEASE WITH A $7.00 PURCHASE
OR MORE EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
ON*'
CANS
SERVICE APPETIZER DB
AllAlll OHt Al STORES KA*|r4C 1(II*C
ECSppered Salmon

FRESHLY
SMOKED
59
COR
STURGEON
QUAPTc' IB.
A6-OI.
CAN
pp BRAND
UNSWEETENED W ^ ;-PURCHASE
OR l
DELAAONTE.
Spinach
FROZEN
15-OZ.
CANS
FINE, MEDIUM AND WIDE
DELICIOUS FROZEN
SO EASV fQHX ANYTIME I
French Fries
l^P PKG.
BIRDS EYE FROZEN p
Cool Whip..........................%0296
FROZEN r tl.t
Eggo Waff les......................VS'M
P. P. BRAND CHICKEN, TURKEY OR BEEF
Meat Pot Pies 4 AS. 99j
WONDERFUL BAKED GOODS
MAOE WITH PU VEGETABLE SHOBIENING
Pantry Pride Noodles 55'
RUBINSTEIN'S BID
Sockeye Salmon...............canz$119
SUOAB SUBSTITUTE
Sweet IT Low....................^ 89*
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT OUANTITIES. All CLERICAL TYPOGRAPHIC, PHOTOGRAPHIC ANrt PB.mt.^ e 5"OZ' PKG" ^"^-..HS
JTING ERRORS ARE SUBJECT TO CORRECTION. NONE SOID TO DtAl
Pastry Danish


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Page 8-A
^Jmistn^ridiar
Friday, September la..
'No' in March, 'Yes' in August for Rabin
WASHINGTONPolitical ob-
servers tend to confirm Dr.
Henry Kissinger's assessment
that the present accord between
Israel and Egypt is substantially
the same as that which was pro-
posed last March and which Is-
rael rejected at that time.
Both the New York Times and
the Parisian Le Monde hold the
same view. The authoritative
Hebrew daily. "Ha'aretz." is also
in accord with this view but.
adds that the only gain Israel
apparently achieved is agree-
ment on the part of Egvpt that
some 150 American technicians
should be allowed to man elec-
tronic surveillance equipment in
the Sinai passes which will warn
either of the two sides of a pos-
sible breach in the armistice.
At the same time, "Ha'aretz"
characterizes this gain as a
"dubious achievement." The
newspaper further states that
the involvement of Americans
on the border with Egypt is
bound to evoke a ngative re-
action on the part of American
public opinion.
ft ft ft
Sharon to Address ZOA
NEW YORK Gen. Ariel
(Aril;) Sharon. milUsrv adviser
to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and hero of the Yom Kippur
War. will be featured guest
sneaker At the oneninq session
of the 78th annual national con-
vention of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America at the Sheraton-
Chicaeo Hotel on Thursday eve-
ning, Oct. 2. ZOA president. Dr.
Joseph P. Sternstein. will de-
liver the keynote address.
The convention will ba ad-
dressed by an array of distin-
guished public flenrns. aninim
whom are Sen. John G. Tower
(R.-Tex.). who will be the prin-
cipal speaker at the closing con-
vention banquet.
Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr.,
former U.S. Chief of Naval Op-
erations, who Is currently presi-
dent of American"! for Energy
Independence, will be the prin-
cipal sneaker at the plenary
session Saturday night. Oct. 4.
Prof. Hans Morgenthau. au-
thority on international affairs,
and outspoken critic of U.S.
Government Dolicies in the Mid-
dle East, will also address the
convention.
ft ft ft
Jews Resented Being Excluded
TEL AVIVActing chairman
of the Jewish Agency, Aryeh
Dulzin, speaking on how world
Jewry feels these days, said at
a press interview that American
Jews "do not understand, nor
do they appreciate why the Is-
rael government gave up so
much in their negotiations with
Dr. Kissinger.
"American Jews had hoped
that our government would be
steadfast, but events demon-
strated weakness instead. And
this was reflected, they feel, in
its dealings with the U.S. Secre-
tary of state. It also had a direct
bearing on the attitude of Egypt,
which was emboldened to stif-
fen its position."
According to Dulzin. Amer-
ican Jews resent the fact that
they were not permitted to play
any active role during the re-
cent developments on the poli-
tical front. "When I asked one
UJA leader," Dulzin said, "how
do you account for the fact that
contributions are up, he explain-
ed verv simply: 'Jews are an-
gry, Jews are concerned and are
resentful that they are not al-
lowed to do anything on the
political scene. The only thing
that they can do is to make their
contributions, that is, give
monev.' This is, perhaps, a posi-
tive effect of a negative attitude,
but it can change for the worse
if there is a feeling amongst
Jews of being isolated, in the
s-yue wav that Israel has be-
come politically isolated among
the nations."
ft ft ft
Bankers Earning Millions
NEW YORKLondon sources
reveal that three well-known
Jewish bankers have each earn-
ed more than a million pounds
sterling in a transaction involv-
ing the purchase of arms by
Saudi Arabia from England anil
France.
The financiers handled the
transaction at the behest of the
Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia,
brother to the incumbent ruler.
Israel Population
Set at 3.4 Million
JERUSALEM (JTA) Some 3,451,000 people pres-
ently reside in Israel, the Central Bureau of Statistics an-
nounced on the eve of Rosh Hashonah. Some 2,921,000 of
these are Jews, and 530,000 non-Jews.
THE OVERALL population growth during 1974-75 was
2.1 percent, the Jewish population increased by 1.8 percent
(51,000), -nnd the non-Jewish population increased by 3.7i
percent (19,000 Moslems, Arab Christians and Druze).
The slow rise in the growth of Jewish population was
partly related to a drop by 48 percent of the number of
"Olim" arriving in Israel last year. Only 22,000 immigrated
to Israel during 1974-5.
Russian Jews Injured
By Police on Rosh Hashona
NEW YORK (JTA) Several Jews were injured'
when police forcibly ended their attempt to block heavy1
traffic deliberately diverted past Moscow's Central Syna-i
gogue on Arkhipov Street on Rosh Hashona evening, the
Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry reported here.
The diversion of traffic to the narrow, normally empty
side street on the High Holy Days is a typical form of Soviet
harassment, an SSSJ spokesman said.
This time, Jews lay down in the street in front of the;
synagogue but were dragged away by police.
The Crown Prince was ouite
aware that the three bankers
were Jews.
The transaction involved a
bankers belongs to a very pro-
large sum of money. One of the
mincnt Jewish family in Lon-
don.
ft ft ft
PLO Listed in Directory
NEW YORK UN Secretary
General Dr. Kurt Waldheim di-
rected that the Palatine terror-
ist organization (PLO) be in-
cluded in the "Blue Book"
which lists all diplomatic repre-
sentations in the UN. By this act
the terrorist organization has
been officially recognized as the
representative of a sovereign
state.
Israel's energetic efforts to
frustrate this act were of no
avail. The Israeli government
had reauested the intervention
of the United States, but the U.S.
State Department failed to react.
However, the United States is
conducting a counter-offensive
to the movement which has been
initiated by the Arabs to ex-1
elude Israel from the coming;
session of the UN.
In this- .-csnect, America en-1
joys the backing of England,
France, Canada and India.
ft -"r
Reiect Hawk Missile Sale
WASHINGTON Ccn?
should block t^e proposed sale
of the Hawk anti-aircraft m'ssile :
batteri") to Jordan. cn. Rich-
ard (Dirk) ?ton% *aM in a letter
to his Senate colleague5.
"Such a ial1 is n it^er in the
p-.twvv1 ci|Wtv nor th n-ition-
al interest of the United States,"
he wrote.
The /\d*mnistnt;on proooses
to sell 14 batrvi -- of *' 1 I-
vanced Hawk missiles to Jordan.
Unless pith sr the Sena! or th
House blncks the stl- bv Sept.
22 it will automatically go
through.
Percy Rebukes PI O ". f""vsts
CHICAGO "At this time,
when we have reason to expect
a reduction of tensions 'n the
Sinai as a result of the Israeli-
Egyptian interim settlement, it
is disturbing if not surprising to
hear threatening sounds from
certain Palestinian leaders,"
Sen. Charles Percy (R.-IH.) de-
clared here this week.
It is clear-that the Palestin-
ian extremists feel alienated as
thev see other Arab leaders now
acting in a more conciliatory
manner, one which provides the
first glimmer of hope that the
Arab-Israeli dispute can be set-
tled by negotiation rather than
war.
"To extremists, the path of
negotiation is so contrary to
their hit-and-run tactics that the
very thought of it is threaten-
in". So threatening in this case,
in fact, that the PW) newspaper
in Beirut has urged Arabs to
shoot to kill any Americans sta-
tioned as cease-fire observers in
the Sinai ..
"The PLO threat will not in-
fluence Congressional action
one way or another. What it will
dolike previous PLO threats
and acts of terrorism is to
further hinder the
rights ana goals of tF
tinian people."
ft "^ a
Black Group somm, l
NEW York .A 3 '
Black Americans to Sunn^
rael Committee (BASIC,
up of more than 100 Pron
Blacks, has expressed *
tie. for Israel's "dS-
values" and "her imprest
cial achievements."
The group, whose chairj
the veteran labor leader F
Phillip Randolph, and hiJ
rector is the civil rights M
Bavard Rustin. condemned!
anti-Jewish "blacklist," affj
that "Blacks and Jews
common interests in den
and justice" and suPlM]
"democratic Israel's rirtt
exist."
BASIC said it
"peace through mutual reco
tion" in the Middle East!
"the rights of the Palestim.
to genuine self-determina]
but not at the expense <
rights of Jews to indepen
and statehood."
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-iday
. September 19, J975
i' a i i i
Page 9-A
Woman Seeks Post in Sinai
Continued from Page M
lead a more peaceful life.
i have been in the Negev.
d I know how bleak and des-
batc the ,and can be' but 1 wiU
Lunteer for one to two years
Lrvice." _____________
CONGRE9&WOMAN ABZUG
said she was referring inquir-
ies about the volunteer force
to the State Department.
In her general comments on
the Israeli-Egyptian pact, she
said:
"I welcome and support the
interim agreement as a signifi-
cant step toward achieving a
stable peace in the Middle East.
It is a great relief that after
the disappointments earlier this
year it has been possible to
work out a plan that will pro-
vide three years of peace be-
tween Israel and Egypt and
lessen fears of a major war.
"I BELIEVE the concessions
made by Israel demonstrate that
nation's deep sense of respon-
sibility and commitment to
peace. The fact that both Israel
and Egypt insisted on the pres-
ence of American civilian tech-
nicians in the Mitla and Gidi
Passes shows that neither side-
views this as a partisan gain,
but rather as a further guaran-
tee of peace. Also, the Amer-
ican technicians will be sta-
tioned within the UN buffer
zone, which provides anolAor
safety factor.
"I hope Congress will appro.
the agreement and provide tho
aid necessary to maintain peace
in the Middle East."
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