The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02432

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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
'~~ ne 48 Number 37
Miami, Florida Friday, September 12, 1975
M'c hv Man Two Sections Price 25 ~enta
LABOR THRtATENS PUWSHMiNT
Is Dayan Facing
Party Ouster For
Shunning Pact?
1AM (JTA)
and Mordechai
n ay face ouster
Pa ty for vot-
interim pact
i in the Kn isset in
arty disi ipline.
die Won
thai any Laborite
.. dnst the govern-
!.. ousted. The for-
nss Mini it *r and Ben
. it mbe s of Labor's
ig, joined the opposition
ig th accord.
otes were also cast
Ben Msii and Zevu-
the Na-
. Party's "Young
MOSHE DAYAN
he voted *nr'
T.W MONTHS WAY
Vow No U.S. Pressure In
(( ming Pact With Syria
/ID LANDAV
.; -- C.TTA) The possibilities of a new
e( nenl with Syria along the lines of the one
, '. .; Egypt was on the minds of Israeli offi-
itical pundits here.
he ink hardly dry on the new Sinai accord, Cabi-
asking Premier Yitzhak Rabin and For-
jal Alton whal the future and Secretary
. Kissinger have in store for Isr.
1HE BEGINNINGS of
Kahane
Opposes
Peace Move
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
-NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Meir Kahane, the
head of the Jewish Defense
League, announced here the
start of 10 days of intensive
lobbying to have Congress
reject the proposal to have
American technicians man
early warning systems in the
Sinai.
Kahane, who stressed he
is opposed to the entire
agreement initialed by Is-
raeli and Egyptian officials,
noted that since Israeli ap-
proval was conditional on
the Americans being in the
Sinai, its defeat by Congress
would kill the entire agree-
ment.
KAHANE said JDL members
have left for Washington and
would aim their lobbying first
at members of a House Inter-
national Relations Subcommit-
tee that plans to hold hearings
Continued on Page 3-A
nc?o-
i ation i foi a pact with Syria
on the Golan Heights set
to be the next step, though
probably many months away. In
his brief speech at the signing
ceremonies in Rabin's office,
Kissinger had dropped signifi-
cant hints that the U.S. would
hold itself ready and available
for further diplomatic progress.
At an farlier background
briefing for reporters at Kis-
singer's hotel, a senior Amer-
ican official said the U.S. "fa-
vors" an interim agreement
with Syria.
THE OFFICIAL said that if
new negotiations with Syria
were to begin, they would have
to develop along the lines of
the new accord concluded with
Egypt.
The scenario would consist ot
Continued on Page 9-A
Gulf Admits $50,000
Pro Arab Gift 'Error'
NEW YORK The Gulf Oil
ration's $50,000 contribu-
tion t.) pro-Arab organization
shouid not have been made and
will not happen again, accord-
ing to a letter from B. R. Dor-
8ey, chairman of the board, to
Dur Graubard, national
chairman of the .-mti-Defama-
tion League of M nai B'rith.
If ] was the climax
of a seri of conferences and
ispondence oetween ADL
and Gulf following the disclo-
sure last May that the oil cor-
poration's Bahamas subsidiary
had made the contribution
igh the First National City
Bank's office in Beirut to a
group seeking "a better under-
ing" of the Atab position
or. various issues.
TH2: GULF OFFICIAL told
(: auMrd that he "had no
knowledge of the contribution
at th.' time it was made" and
he shared ADL's concern
It it.
"It is my view," Dorsev said.
this company should not
I : ve made a contribution to
.; political activities for
gn interests in the United
and I can assure you it
\ s never our intention to do
i The contribution in qucs-
v as regrettable, and you
lin that it will not
pen again."
Dorsey, in testimony before
the Senate Foreign Relations
Continued on Page 13-A
56 BILLION COMMITMENT
We Can Take Pride In
I Interim Agreement K.
Leaders Approve 6-A
Soviet Role S-A
Army Evacuation S-A
Terrorists Hit 9-A
Civilians Issue Sec. B
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger bid this week
for massive Ameiican sup-
port to the U.S. participation
he has committed in his me-
diation for a second stage Is-
raeli withdrawal in Sinai.
Appearing before the
House International Rela-
tions Committee, Kissinger
outlined in words and with
maps what the agreement
between Israel and Egypt
entails and declared "we
ean take pride in the fact
that we are the party both
sides have confidence in."
KISSINGER wa nee that the
process of peace in the Middle
Continued on Page 9-A
Ford Asks 2 Parties
To OK Sinai Accord
WASHINGTON (JTA) President Ford asked lead-
ers of both parties in Congress to adopt a joint resolution
approving the stationing of up to 200 American civilians in
the Sinai desert as part of the second Sinai accord between
Israel and Egypt.
The President also indicated at a White House briefing,
according to Sen. Robert Byrd (D., W.Va.), deputy majority
leader in the Senate, that the foreign aid bill of assistance
to Israel and its Arab neighbors will go to Congress after
the issue of an American presence in the Sinai is settled by
Congress.
provide oil for Israel but this
will be included in the aid pack-
age.
The figure mentioned for Is-
rael is about $1 billion less than
BYRD SAID that the aid
package for Israel will total be-
tween $2.2 billion and $2.3 bil-
lion of which $1.5 billion will
be in military assistance. No
mention was made of the
amount the U.S. will expend to
Continued on Page 12-A
SHIMON PERES
in U.S. next week
Israeli llabbi
Combats
Secularism
TEL AVIV (JTA The
Chief Chaplain of the Israel
Arm;.-. Rabbi Mordecai Firon.
id in a pre-Rosh Hashonah
interview that in 27 years of
participation in directing High
Holy Day services, he could re-
port that most of the army
chaplains did succeed in achiev-
ing contact with soldiers most
of whom, he said, were secular-
minded.
He described the annual pro-
gram as "a young tradition in
the young Israel" going back
2,000 years when Ezra returned
from Babylon and called on the
Jews to prepare for the High
Holv Days, to express repen-
tance, to enter the New Year
with a feeling of purity, with a
true desire to sin no more.
THE LEADERS of the spir-
itual awakening effort now are
the rabbis of the army chaplain-
cy led by Rabbi Firon, who
holds the rank of major general,
and his deputy Rabbi Gad
Navon a brigadier general.
The interview was held in
Continued on Page 11-A
Morton Hit for Secret Boycott Info
NEW YORK "Whom is
Secretary Morton protecting?'
the American Jewish Congress
has asked in a comment on the
Commerce Department head's
reported refusal to provide the
House Committee on Interstate
and Foreign Commerce with a
list of U.S. companies filing re-
ports on requests to comply
with the Arab boycott of Israel.
The Jewish organization,
which is seeking the same in-
formation from Secretary of
Commerce Rogers C. B. Morton
under provisions of the Free-
dom of Information Act, said
U.S. policy was to oppose boy-
cotts of friendly nations and
that it was "improper for a gov-
ernment official to operate as
though no such declaration of
policy has been made."
THE AMERICAN Jewish Con-
gress' criticism came in a letter
to Rep. Harley O. Staggers,
chairman of the Commerce
Committee, after news reports
this week quoted Secretary Mor-
ton as having told Staggers
that "disclosures of the identity
of such firms might expose
them to economic pressures and
counterboycotts by certain do-
mestic consumer groups."
In his letter to Rep. Staggers,
Howard M. Squadron, chairman
of the Congress' national Gov-
erning Council, declared:
"Whom is Secretary Morton
protecting?
"OBVIOUSLY, no company
which has rejected a boycott
demand is likely to be exposed
'to economic pressures and
counterboycotts by certain do-
Continued on Page 2-A
^^^H


Page 2-A
vjenistfhiidian
Friday, September '.: 1975 Is
Remembering Important To
High Holy Day Observance
By ROBERT SANDLER
Before beginning their daily
prayers, Jewish mystics in the
Middle Ages used to devote a
certain amount of time to con-
centration and meditation in or-
der to achieve a mental state
of reverence.
Only then did they consider
thenisehes to be properly pre-
pared to contemplate divine
Thoughts and feelings. Similar-
ly, during the month before
Kosh Hashonah and Yom Kip-
pur. Jews have become accus-
tomed, over the centuries, to
bestir themselves with an
awareness that the High Holy
l)3>s were approaching.
IX SOME synagogues, the
Shotar is sounded daily, as if
calling all Jews from distant
places, reminding them that the
holiest days of tlje Jewish cal-
tmlar the Days of Awe are
at hand. An air of spirituality
begins to hover in and around
t' time.
The act of remembering so
important in Judaism general-
ly has pervasive significance
during the High Holy Day sea-
son. This is especially so regard-
ing the remembering of the
dead. Visiting the graves of the
dead during the month before
Kosh Hashonah was, for a long
Tine, common practice in Ju-
daism. For some it still is.
At this time of year, even
mammal Jews remember that
they are still Jews, that they
are members of the Community
of Israel, human links in the
historic chain of an ancient and
glorious tradition.
THE FULL impact of the
s instance and significance of
Tiie High Holy Day season does
Prof. Robcl Sondlcr is a
member of the faculty of
the University of Miami,
where he serves in the
English Department and
the Department of Judaic
Studies.
not begin to occur until the
first evening service of Kosh
Hashonah. Beginning with that
service and continuing through
Yom Kippur. each Jew (ideally)
BMrchss and analyzes his con-
science. Each Jew. within the
privacy of his own mind and
heart, engages in a personal re-
capitulation and evaluation of
the quality of his life during
the year that has ended.
During Rosh Hashonah and
Yom Kippur, if at no other time
of year, each Jew acknowledges
the truth, the core,'of his in-
nermost being and admits to
himself, in publicly recited
readings, that he has erred, that
he has sinned, that he has com-
mitted unworthy actions.
Having made such admis-
sions, each Jew articulates his
intention of trying to correct
whatever wrongs he has com-
mitted and to try to do better
in the year to come.
THIS ENTIRE process of con-
science-probing, of remember-
ing the dead, of restating one's
identity with one's people, is
both a powerful intellectual ex-
perience and an intensely emo-
tional experience. This is pre-
cisely as it was intended to be.
I have become aware, how-
ever, bath from my own ob-
servation and from reading and
listening to the reports of oth-
Gazit, Shafir Sign Accord
JERUSALEM (JTA) .\10rdechui Gazit. Israel's
Ambassador-designate to France, and Gen. Herzl Shafir, of
The Army High Corr.mi.nJ, signed the new interim pact with
Egypt on Israel's behalf in Geneva last week.
Gaza, loimer director general ot the Prune Minister's
Office, and Shafir, who signed the disengagement agree-
ment with Syria last year, comprised Israel's technical team
which worked out the details of the military protocol with
Evypt necessary to implement the accord. The latter is ex
pected to he signed at Geneva before the end of the month.
ACCORDING TO th. Annex to the accord, representa-
tives of the two parties will meet in the "military working
group" in Geneva "to begin preparation of a detailed proto-
col for the implementation of the agreement" and to assist
in maintaining the scrupulous observance of the cease-fire
Mid other element's of the agreement" which the two parties
hare agreed to regarding the definition of lines and areas.
Tormenting Rectal Pain And Itch
Of Hemorrhoidal Tissues
Promptly Relieved
In many cases Preparation H
gives prompt, temporary relief
from such pain and itching
and actually helps shrink
welling of hetnorrhoidal tis-
sues caused by inflammation.
Tests by doctors on hun-
dreds of patients showed this
to be true in many cases In
fact, many doctors, them-
sc-Kc.. use frcpnrutim IV or
recommend it for iheir fam-
ilies. Preparation H ointment
or SdppositOI iei.
^MIAMI TITLE & ABSTRACT^
104 N.L 1st STREET PHONE 373-8432
ABSTRACTS ESCROWS
TITLE INSURANCE
A DIVISIOM Of
Ttiebicwi
TITLE
R Ml
iUJiil
en in resell years, that m
many synagogues a very de-
liberate effort in made to tone
down the enuJUona] fervor that
has for so long pervaded the
Kosh Hashonah and Yom Kip-
pur services. To the extent that
this has occurred, it is. in my
view, regrettable.
I CONTEND that it is desir-
able for each Jew. during Kosh
Hashonah and Yom Kippur, to
undergo a powerful, soul-level
emotional experience. As we
read in Ecclesiaates, "To every-
thing there is a season ... A
time to Weep, and a time to
laugh."
There is a time to be ration-
al and analytical, and there is
a time to be emotional and spir-
itual. The High Holy Day sea-
son is the time, it seems to me.
for each Jew to allow himself
to be assaulted by the sharpest
pangs of conscience. It is the
time for each Jew to engage in
the deepest possible soul-
searching. It is the time when
a carhaisis of confession, con-
trition, and penitence should
result, hopefully, in a transfor-
mation of one's values and in
a redirection of one's goals.
The combination of intellec-
tual and emotional elements
that Characterize the Kosh Ha-
shonah and Yom Kippur serv-
ices clearly indicates that they
were designed for precisely
that purpose. And if a few tears
are shed in the process, that is
only mrmai and natural to the
human condition.
THE INGENIOUS writers and
composers ot our liturgy pro-
vided for psychological protec-
tion during those moments of
soul-nakedness and recollection
of grief, and they also provided
for psychological revival.
It is intended that each Jew
come to the 1 nd of Yom Kip-
pur in a healthier condition, in-
tellectually and 1 motionally,
than he was in at the beginning
of Kosh Hashonah.
For this brief period of time
in the Jewish year especial-
ly since so many Jews seem to
vanish for the rest of the year
it is desirable that a strong
emotional impact be retained
as a positive force for rejuvena-
tion and growth both tor Indi-
vidual Jews and., as a conse-
euaaoe, tor Judaism generally.
L'Shona Tove Tikesevu
Our New Year wish for Israel
is to Make her Economically
Strong and to Give more to
the CJA and the Emergency
Fund. Mayshie Friedberg
173c'ud
unousfcws
Amman History

Sfffl FOR BOOKLET
hokow'g 1776 and
famous jfws in
amman history
ExsiNaq ascswHs of Jvih a-
rriotl in th- crmrttoa and shaping
Hi' mI* Valuable radmo tor
J all ags SEND 50e (NO STAMPS
PttASEi TO: fwlsk Patriots. Box
**88, Grand Central Station. N.Y ,
NY. 10017.
Morton Criticized
For Secreting
Boycott Information
Continued from Page 1-A
mestic consumer groups.' Thus.
: companies whose sensitivi-
ti s and c ran tithe position
Secretary Morton is trvintt to
rve are those which are
defj ma the lejcUlativelv <'->-
rhrod national policy by yield-
ing to the boycott."
Squadron aoted that the Ex
port Administration vt of lfs.
which states the U.S. govern-
nunt's anti-b'tveott policy and
i-ouirr-s the filing of" reports on
bovoott requests, does not re-
(Klirf domestic companies to
comply with the policv.
Bt, he said. "fjf"c>rnmrnt of-
ficials may not ignore it or.
nr, take Men to assure non-
complying domestic concerns
that they will be protected from
Si i-owe effects." Squadron
added:
"THE -CERTAIN domestic
consumer afOUW' referred to
bv Secretary M >rtn may well
include the American Jewish
Congress and its officers who
sneak for a large number of
American Jews who are ad-
versary affected by the Arab
boycott both as American
businessmen and as Jews.
"'Ihe impact of the boycott
on the American economy has
recently increased sharplv as a
result nl the sudden flow of
money to oil-rich Arab states.
Individual citizensJewish and
non-Jewish- have a right, as
citi/ens. to combat the boycott's
restrictive distortion of the
economy in which they operate.
"Aeeo'dingly. the American
Jewish Congress and its mem-
bers have been urging export-
ers am. Other business concerns
to refuse to comply with the
boycott. This activity is in the
national interest because it
carries OUt a nationally declared
policy.
"1IE.\CK. it is preposterous
for the 1 onunerce Department
to treat such activitv as an nil
which moat be guarded against,
in effect the Department
thereby becomes a partner, an I
not e'en a silent partner, with
companies thai are rejecting the
national policv."
The American ,h 5h, (on.
"ess wrote on June 20 to the
Commerce Department request-
ing the boycott information un-
der the Freedom of Information
Act. On July 14. it received a
r snonse from Rauer H. Meyer
director of the Department's
Office of Export Administration,
rejecting the request
Meyer said the Freedom of
Information Act pro- ides that
material not be disclosed which
is specifically exempted by stat-
ute from disclosure: be noted
t'>at the Export Administration
Act exempts from disclosure
material in the boycott renorta
which "is deemed confidential"
unless the department head de-
termines that vvitholding it is
"contrary to national interest.'
ON AUGUST 11. the Congress
filled a formal anneal with Sec-
retary Morton asking him to
overrule the decision. The ap-
peal argued that a determina-
tion of confidentiality cannot
be made "arbitrarilv." and that
a 1974 ruling by the Court of
Anneals for the District of
Columbia had held that "the
test for confidentiality is an ob-
jective one."
'; its appeal, the Jewish or-
ganization declared
"Hatter which is plainly not
confidential cannot be mule so
because an official of the de-
partment declares that he
deems' it confidential. It that
were so. an agency could effec-
tively immunize Mies from
disclosure under the Freedom
ol Information Act by 'deeming'
them confidential."
IN ITS LETTER this week to
Rep. Staggers, dated Aug 28,
the American Jewish Congress
said Secretary Morton's ex-
pressed d-rsire to shield report-
ing companies from "economic
pressure anu coonterboycotts"
and his refusal therefore to
provide the Congressional com-
mittee with the information rep-
resented "a blatant viol ition of
the declared public policy of
the nation.'
liossmoor
Vf COCONUT CREEK
ilie iimsier planned
ndiilleoiiCaominiiiiii
eommiiiiih.
from S18.800.
no kind lease
no recreaiiozi .ease.
Take Turnpike exit 24.
West on Rie. 814. Phone ,:: -3510
From Miami TOLL FREE (3
M9-12-75
9-12-75
M9-12.75


f^nv September 12, 1975
+Jenisl> Meridian
Page 3-A
Kaliane Will Oppose Egypt Interim Accord
Continued from Page 1-A
. ind the mem-
SSh But even"
3; members of Conress
lull bt e said-
.. said that the
lobbying wiU tocua chiefly at
' ;>.;/.- in am, those
Hjrge McGovcrn
' s] e opposed to
involvement over-
thoee Hw Sen. Henry
.,, Wash.), who
support Israel and
\mcricans in
id to increas-
ed So ,em in the
area
KAHANE SAID lie would ask
bolh House subcommittee
Amerit
teas, i
M J
strong
fear thi
the Sir..
and the Senate committee to
allow him and other "Jewish
activists" to testify against the
agreement.
Kahane, who is serving a
prison sentence at a federal de-
tention center in Manhattan,
said he has asked prison au-
thorities to allow him to go to
Washington for a day "on the
grounds of potential death in
the Jewish nation that is my
family."
Kahaiv said ne v-pposcci tne
use of Americans in the area
because tne presence of any su-
perpower will escalate any con-
flict in the Middle East and
because it sets a "dangerous
precedent" for Israel to allow
"her defenses to be manned by
strangers."
HE SAID he would not op-
pose the use of U.S. troops in
the Middle East if the Soviet
Union or any other major pow-
er sjnt their troops in first.
The JDL leader also announc-
ed a "March on Washington" in
front of the White House Oct.
5, called by the recently form-
ed Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Activ-
ist Organizations which, like
another new group called
American Jews Against Ford,
is seeking to get American
Jews and non-Jews to work for
('resident Ford's defeat in 1976
and to support the opposition
in Israel to Premier Yit/.hak
Rabin's government
Neither group has any links
to any major American Jewish
organization.
WHILE KAHANE was hold-
ing his press conference here a
simultaneous conference was
taking place in Washington
where a group of Jewish clergy-
men and fundamentalist Prot-
estant ministers were issuing
similar statements.
1975
5736
The Weinsteins
Jackie Dan Rickie Joey and Linda
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Page 4-A
*-Jmistfhridiar
Friday, September 12, 1975
Yom Kippur 5736
Jews throughout the world will mark Yom Kippur
starting at sundown Sunday evening. Climaxing the mood
of solemnity that began with Rosh Hashona, the Day of
Atonement is generally associated in our memories with
the tearful, somber liturgy compiled during centuries of
the tragic persecution that comprise much of the history
of the Jewish people.
While Yom Kippur was meant to carry the full and
solemn impact of a day of judgment for our conscience,
the tragic note was added during the bitter periods of
misfortune and suffering that afflicted many of our peo-
ple down through the ages.
Although the day is one of fasting and solemn
prayer, Yom Kippur is actually a festival and a day
which the rabbis traditionally consider a time of recon-
ciliation between man and God.
W^'~ vV
Affliction Still With Us
If our generation carries the memory of the worst
Holocaust ever to strike the Jewish people, we have,
in more recent years, witnessed the joy of a return to
our historic homeland and a renaissance of our nation-
hood unparalleled in history.
Nevertheless, affliction and suffering are still with
us. In Israel, it is just precisely two "ears that the Yom
Kippur War of 1973 unleashed the most terrible assault
on that young nation in its entire history. In Syria,
there are thousands of Jews living in virtual bondage,
unable to get out to freedom.
The Jews of the Soviet Union are also in bondage.
They must pay for the privilege to leave with untold
suffering and physical intimidation.
The very fact that most of us are keenly aware of
these afflictions diminishes our complacencies on this
holiest of Holy Days.
The Day of Atonement is our opportunity to rededi-
cate ourselves to the tasks that lie ahead tasks that
may bring us closer to the time when Yom Kippur, with
all its solemnity, will be a truly festive day of joy and
satisfaction for our achievements.
We Must Remain Alert
"Not with fanfare, but also not with a feeling of
mourning," was the comment of former Israeli Premier
Golda Meir on the new interim agreement between Is-
rael and Egypt. Her remarks pretty well sum up the
feelings of most Israelis as well as American Jews.
The agreement which was worked out by Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger came after Israel received
both American pressure and promises. Israel gave up
the added security of the control of the Gidi and Mitla
Passes in the Sinai and the assurances of a steady oil
supply from Abu Rodeis.
Bui she received in return an agreement that Amer-
ican civilians will monitor the. Sinai warning stations,
assurances of United States economic and military aid,
a guarantee of a steady supply of oil, and a promise
that the United Nations Emergency Force will remain in
the Sinai for at least another three years.
Perhaps most of all, as Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Rabin pointed out, "A contractual and public agreement
has been achieved that both countries are firm in their
resolve to reach a final and just peace through nego-
tiations."
President Ford was perhaps overdoing it when he
called the acord "one of the most historic" achievements
of "this decade, perhaps this century." But he was
correct in saying that it reduces the risk of war and
provides new opportunities for the pursuit of peace in
this area.
"iJewisIi Floridian
OFFICE AND Pl-AXT 1M N E. Mr, STREET TKI.KI'H* i.NE 373-4*>5
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FRED K. SHOH1KT
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Out of Town Upon Request
A Declaration of Independence
IN THOMAS Jefferson's pew
in Bruton Parish Church, one
feels the compacting of history.
Jefferson's nameplate hangs
there on the door to his seat.
Opposite, is George Washing-
ton's pew. One or two rows
down is John Marshall's, the
chief justice who, in Marbury
vs. Madison, set the precedent
that the Supreme Court would
be empowered to pass on the
constitutionality of congression-
al legislation.
THE FRIENDSHIPS and even
the animosities that tied the
hounding Fathers to one an-
other pervade the atmosphere
Mindlin
in this church in Williamsburg.
Va., still palpaoie, still vital.
SfTTlNca OUTOPOf TV16W0KU)

long after the men themselves
have died.
Listen, and you car. hear
their enflaming speeches just a
few blocks beyond in the House
of Burgesses. Look, and you can
see the writhing of then pas-
sions yearning to be free,
Many of these men, it is true
were aristocrats in the be,,t and
the worst the European
sense of the word.
BUT JEFFERSON, the noblest
of them all. whose refined sen-
sibility is readily apparent at
Monticello, the genii an'j
mansion he designed and built
for himself high in the hills
above Charlottesville, was more
a spokesman for "demo- than
for "aristoi" more : ir the
people than for the elite
What is never quite clearly
understood is that the Amer-
ican revolution was atypical, it
was not a war to change :he
e: i.iting order of things but
rather to consolidate ex-
isting order and to immunize it
against outside interfere
It was not. like the French
or Russian revolutions, design-
ed to overthrow oppressor^ and
f.ee a hug; class of oppressed
On the cjntrary, it was i re-
volt of the bourgeoisie, whose
g, -wing wealth and power re-
fused any longer to tolerate
England's exploitation o: that
g.-owth and limitation of that
power so that the colonists
would n >t become international-
ly competitive.
IT WAS not a revolution of
the silent and hungry, but of
the eloquent and proletanan-
bourg-ois privileged determin-
ed to continue the enjoyment
of their privileges.
And, oh, how eloquent they
were in the statement of their
principles! And how passionate!
Continued on Page 13-A
College Scene is Not Too Happ>
Volume 48
Friday, September 12, 19T5
Number 37
7 TI5HRI 5736
By MAX LF.RNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
There is a cheerless item in
the news for this college-open-
ing season. The American as-
sumption has been that if you
can get a higher education and
a college deg.ee, they will more
than ray off in a better job. Now
we ar told by a pair of profes-
sors at Harvard and MIT.
Richard Freeman and J. Her-
bert Holloman. that it ain't
nee =>s arilv so.
Their figures show that the
differential between the income
of a college graduate and a
high-school graduate is narrow-
ing sharply and that, while it
pays to go to college (the re-
turn on what parents and stu-
dents lay out), the payoff is
dwindling.
AS A RESULT the percentage
of college-age youth who are
attending college, which kept
rising steadily for decades, has
begun to tuni back in the last
three years.
Like many research studies
this one confirms what we sus-
oected V< along. The big college
boom is over. University
budgets have felt the impact of
the change, and college presi-
dents wince at it. Two auestions
come up. What has produced
the change? And does it follow
that college has become a bust?
IN LARGE part the new trend
is the result of the depression
and the inflation: High-paying
jobs, in the professions and in
corporate management, are get-
ting scarcer, and college costs
are getting higher.
But ther are other factors
ooeratine. Some employers are
not as anxious as they were to
Day higher for higher educa-
* -i They suspect that college
ition often undercuts the
work ethic, and they may be
LERNER
content to pav somewhat less
for a less highly educated em-
ployee who (as they see it)
hasn't been spoiled by college
and therefore will try harder.
HARRY TRUMAN had a salty
pnrase for some of the college
graduates he encountered, espe-
cially those with higher degrees.
He called them "overeducated
SOBs." In a different sense,
which Truman never intended,
there are an increasing number
of college graduates now who
are "ov". 'u'-afnT: Thev nn't
get the iobs they were trained
for and have to settle for jobs
that make many of their cours-
es seem wasted or irrelevant.
The res-It in demoralization
is worse than the loss of in-
come.
Ther* is still another source
of th change, which economists
would note if they cared about
psvcholoev and politics as part
of their subject.
IT ISN'T |ust a question of
a declining iob market but also
of new value questions being
"aised by youne neoole of col-
sand bv many who
al their degrees.
It started around 1970. A:o-:
with a widespread return to
career orientation, after the
'60s. there was a lesser but
-able questioning o: c 11 Ber
goals, and a movement I
inn y awareness, simpler life-
q" *s arid less stress on payoff
values.
DO ALL these add up 11 the
prooosition that college :s a
bust? Thev shouldn't. There is
a double fallacy at work: on one
side with too utilitarian atti-
tudes toward college, or. the
other with too negative ones.
Those wo think wholly of an
economic return on a college
investment have missed the
point. They are putting the
wrong questions to college and
to life itself.
Yes. college should give a
student greater skills in what-
ever interests him, but it should
also help him to see the rela-
tion between his skill and the
affirmation of life. If it doesn't,
only then is college a bust
I CAN understand some of
the others, who are turning
awav from college because they
see it as too worldly, too un-
related to the deeper levels of
being and feeling. Yet I can't go
alop^ with their solution of
skipning college.
They might take a few years
off. and enter it later when
rsv nave more mature ques-
tions to put to their college ex-
perience. They would also do
well pick a college which has
genuine teachers, and not iust
robots with Ph.Ds.
But they will miss more than
thv gain by missing the ex-
perience of matching minds and
values with some of the best
their elders and their peers
THEY MAY also find, in the
end tNat learning how to make
a rolerable living need not un-
fit vou for learning how to
make a life.


Friday
, September 12, 1975
+ knUMcridton
Page 5-A
Y)m1eruah.
The Day of the Sounding of the Horn.

The sound of the Shophar (Ram's Horn) rings
nwa-y ears and touches many hearts, oecause
"ymboiizes the goals toward which all
mankind is striving.
A modern Jewish scholar tells us:
'The Shophar is a call to man to hear the
sounds of weeping humanity; to teel the
unspeakable pain of the world.
And to resolve to do battle against all these
forces working for man's oppression and
subjugation. That the day might come when
the tear is wiped from every cheek and sigh
[from every lip."
How fitting it is, then, that the Shophar is
sounded on Yom Teruah, the 1 st day of the month
of Tishn. the beginning of the New Year.
This Holy Festival is so revered a part of
Jewish life that it has not just one, but four
designations:
Yom Teruah (The Day Of The Sounding
Of The Horn). .
Rosh Ha Shanna (The Beginning Of The Year)
Yom Ha-Din (The Day Of Judgement).
Yom Ha Zikaron (The Day Of Remembrance).
Each name, each thought has its own
significance for this, the first of the Ten days of
Awe which end in Yom Kippur, the Day of
Atonement. Truly Yom Teruah is a time to welcome
the New Year by reassessing the values one sets
on life: reaffirming the faith in G-d, rekindling IhO
spirit of hope and peace for all mankind.
May you be inscribed in the Book of Life
for a good year.
" RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Director*
MIAMI BEACH' 1920 Alton Road at 19th Street/53M.tSt
M'ami, No. Miami Beach, Hollywood, SuruiSfc
Murray N. Rubin, F.O,
'



kmii* fhjrrfar
Fnaas
- m
Top Leader* Hail
! New Peace Move
Plan Confab on Soviet Jewry

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JEWISH i.GNCY
-
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pnbier- >---- ;-;.
Sana paic -
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< *mf preoee Head

Washington Federal
phased to bung you tfie b*-oadcs- -e
HIGH HOLY DAY Sf.ftVC55
from Temple Itrfte*
oh WTMI mistie:
VOM KJPPU& THE DAY OF AtC\E*E "
>--da* September 1A 00 9 3C DV
Mondav September 15 10 00 AW : \
in observance of tht
High HoW Davs Whwgt:-
federai offices wH be Cfo*r:
Mondav September 11
Britons Oppose March
P (W .Viri. in Hackney
_
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7- :r :
e~ g a my good friends
33 a*ways during
the
Holiday Season
STEVE CLARK
---E ::_.- mayor


SaataoiMr 12. 1975
+Jmlsli flu-rid fan
Page 7-A
USE THIS BALLOT TO VOTE FOR A STRONG ISRAEL
On Yom Kippur it is our duty to memo-
rialize the brave young men who gave their lives in defense
of Israel two years ago.
The commitment card for the purchase of
an Israel Bond is your ballot for a strong Israel. When you
turn down a tab on this card, you register your vote for a
strong Israel in a manner fhat will strengthen Israel's
economy as well as the spirit and faith of its people in their
determination to win a just peace and build a free and
creative nation.
BUY ISRAEL
nt
NDS
For prospectus and Israel Bonds write or call
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
420 LINCOLN ROAD, MIAMI BEACH, SUITE 2A TELEPHONE: 531-6731
LEONARD L. LURIA
Chairman, Advisory Committee
ROBERT L. SIEGEL
General Campaign Chairman
GARY R. GERSON
Chairman, Miami Beach
MILTON M. PARSON
Executive Director


tVge A
Friday, September 12. 1975
Soviets Play Divisive Role at Geneva
and
By EDW1S EYTAX
GENEVA JTAj Is-
rael and Egypt signed their
second cnsenfagemen:
agreement in the Council
Chamber of the Palais des
Nations here at 5 p.m.. local
tune, on Sept. 4.
The ceremonies were
brief, cool and strictly ac-
cording to protocol with no
speeches, handshakes or
congratulatory remarts be-
fore cr after the signings
The two delegations faced
each other across a table
with Gen Ens:o Siilasvuo.
commander of the United
r-i pe^ce-seep.r.g forc-
es in the Middle East seat-
ed bet'A'eer. then:
THE TWO 5-ptr
"Jr.. r ; -
ztt a .-
- -
' ""-

:
:; were
! i tikjl
-;r.d. attnoofl
rerr -\ >?cre-
tary
tor
-
aours with 1
-

I
no parr of mpa for
the pa MOSCOW
and the libera-
tion Organization of its deci-
sion. According to reliable
sources, the US decided at the
ate not to attend the
order to avoid the
of a breach of co-
ooeranDO with xhe Soviets m
the iLdeast
Mmutes before the ceretaoar
beean. UN "{tV"** remored
the two tables that had bees
prepared for the American and
A FOREIGN Mnastry spokes-
nuc x Jerasa'-era said that the
2t-3ce of the two scperpm-
an bean the 5imo6 c: Genera
has no effect on the vaixhry
of the pact.
Hi Said
pames were
the two
fat the
. e UN
wochd be levtesented. He a*l
however, uat Moscow's deraoc-
strac*e boycott of the cere-
aaocues veuid caose
keep a dose watch on the So-
viet attitude ir ae iLddls E-ii"
in view of the general acs-
paere of detente.
He said the qjescoc of dH
Soviet presence at Geneva was
mar ducossed daring Secre-
tary of State Henry A Kn
ger 5 *iti Israei: Leaoc11
THE ISRAELI aafcptioa ^ii
beaded by Mordecba: Gar:: Is-
raei 5 Arabassacor-des^na:
France and Gen. Herzl ShaSr.
of tie Army High Corcrnaad.
The fact thai Cairo appointed
-. officer to heac "-be
Egyptian delegation
::::;
Army Evacuation
To Take 8 Months
3 V

a i ne
. .'.;-
I
.". ~ -
-- by
if I
l
The wdhdrawali will be-
gin only akXa the comple-
tion of : in Ge-
gn the military proto-
- of the :r.:enm pact.
THE LATTER will contain
the details and timetable of the
Israeli evaluation, the assump-
tion of control by United Na-
tions forces of the areas evacu-
ated. anJ the advance of Egyp-
tian forces into the areas stip-
ulated by the agreement, main-
ly along the coast of the Gulf
of Suez.
Egypfian cr.ilian oil experts
are expected to taic over the
evacuated Abu Rodeis oilfields
in southwestern Sinai within
about two weeks.
They will be working with
Italian experts who were oper-
ating the oilfields for the
".ans pnor to their capture
by brad ir. the 196" Six-Day
War.
THE ISRAELI Army wast-
ing n; ~. -. nej its
iefenat iaea in accord-
:.t utaibu agree-
"
-

-
I
.- r :
!
- Ben .'... .
: -
-
thai sill tepatate Israeli and
Faj|ii:ar. izzcn He ;-.-..-.rs
:: an asset :> Israel s
.vammg system in 1
thai Egypt aftawxa a mrpnse
attack.
THE ADDED scac<
enable Israel to make use
mobile warfare ability tac-
tic in which Israei scab in-
stead cf being pinned down to
MSSk position] centered on a
single defense line, the Gen-
eral said.
The wide area of the north-
ern Sinai plateau is ideal for
a rs hailing of Israeli amor
and should the 'Lr- r::ar.i ;:
tempt to braaft rhroos^) the
IlitJa and G:ii Passes
j be involved m a tank bat-
tle under conditions favoring
Irael and in vhich L-r
u:c:a:e the movments and the
outcome. Ben An said.
THE SOLE disadvantage of
the new lines is that they are
out of art:Her. range of the
Suez Canal, he said.
jBI desire to c^ssify the agree-
sacat as "a purely military act."-
ooservers said.
LrtraordiBary security meas-
ea were taken in connection
the 5-gning ceremonies
me of the bostihry of many
the mterjn pact.
Not a single Arab ambassador
or official of lower rank was
hd to greet the Egyptian
I when it arrived at
the Genera airport
ONLY THE Egyptian Embas-
Nafl ea present Police
;pters hovered over the
rport tfl the Er-7t:an and Is-
raaa leteajatioaa .anded at sep-
amea Police armed with
- ..ned the roads
leading I BT|
The and Egyptian de!-
started a unet of
sday ta work
_-----.;-- f the
accord, such as the time-table
of Israeli withdrawals, the
routes of withdrawal and the
evacuation of personnel
material by Israel-
UN circles said no d.fficul-
ties were expected and the task
of working out the military
protocols based on the original
draft agreements initialed in
Jerusalem and Alexandria Sept
1 would be completed within
two weeks.
EN CAIRO, Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat attacked
those Arab states that have
criticized Egypt's approval of
the agreement with Israel
In a speech broadcast live to
the entire Arab world Sadat
said some Arabs "have believ-
ed Israeli claims that we have
made political concession; and
that we have agreed to end the
state of belligerence with Is-
rael.'"
On the contrary he asserted,
Israel has accepted the :ea of
vithdrawing from Arab .
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September 12, 1975
+Jewlstifk>rkJkin
Page 9-A
\ets Hit Terrorists to Save Pact Integrity
AVIV (JTA) Israel
i jets attacked terrorist
. on the Lebanese coast
i of Tyre again following up
cks on terrorist strongholds
; Fatahland sector of south-
ern Lebanon,
militarv spokesman said
, air strikes were of several
utes' duration and that all
returned safely to their
_J patrols carried out a
Bblng operation for terrorists
the Lebanese borders.
sources said Israeli
shelled several villages
nese
during the night. A number of
shells from an unidentified
source were fired at the Har
Dov section in Israeli territory
last night but caused no casual-
ties.
The air strikes and other ac-
tions by Israeli forces were de-
scribed by military sources as
preventive operations intended
to keep the terrorists from car-
rying out sabotage and attacks
on civilian centers in Israel.
The terrorists have proclaim-
ed their aim to sabotage the
new interim agreement reached
between Israel and Egypt.
That, and the fact that Sep-
tember has always been a month
of heavy terrorist activity,
prompted Israel to maintain a
high state of alert in the north-
ern border region.
Police and civil guards have
been re-enforced by army units
and border police but the alert
has not interferd with normal
life in the border area.
SEPTEMBER is considered a
dangerous month because it in-
cludes certain anniversaries
which the terrorists try to dra-
matize by committing new out-
rages.
?act Should Make Us Proud-K.
Continued from Page 1-A
;! jS a matter that occurs
'sanu\ of miles away but
Kh affects every American.
|"The agreement could open
v lV to 1 in the whole
had warned earlier
I war anJ economic disloca-
ii coul if tbe U.S.
|: agreement failed.
lommittoe voted prior
Kissinger's remarks that it
closed session
I I statement.
in (1)., Pa.),
rmai) i1 : le committee.
Jij thai of Kissinger's
nreuti n "is very sensitive."
KISSINGER s;,v>-ed that the
number of American tech-
icians to serve in hinai be-
|reen Egyptian and Israeli lines
oj!j nji exceed 200. and not
are than ",; \\>uld be at the
irning stations at any one
Inc.
J The technicians, he empha-
|zed, will not he there to serve
side or the other "in con-
I to Vietnam."
| While both Efjypt and Israel
nted the Amei icans there,
said Israel would not sign
Be agreement if they were not
Naced.
[in discussing financial assist-
KissiniaT hinted that the
assesnitni policy the U.S. had
Inployed mainly against Israel
per his failure to bring about
i agreement in March was de-
igned as a pressure mecha-
sm.
NOTING THAT Congress has
insistently Kicked .inancial
Id to Israel. Kissinger said his
Irogram for Israel will include
|jnds in \i.u of her withdraw-
al her military and eco-
gdc needs. As for Egypt, he
N, it was "important to take .
r.to account Egypt's economic
because of Egyptian
pi Jem Anwar Sadat's "mod-
pation."
Without specifying figures,
;s>nger said his request to
Mrs. Leon Kaplan
Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Brickman
*ren,Patti and Kenneth
Mr. and Mrs.
Mwin M. Ginsburg
[ynn Elaine and Susan Jill
<"id Donald Allen
Ky and Karen Kaplan
rhh their Relatives and
p* a Happy New Year
HEBREW -- HANDLE

E,
FIED
SIRES TO
N.MIAMI OR
** B, H%EQS1T0R,EFERENCES
^ "M 012973. Mi.mi 33101.
Congress for Israel will be less
than Israel's needs going up to
$3.3 billion. He did not mention
Egypt's requirement but last
week, at the White Hous \ con-
tiiess'onal leaders were told the
non-military packa".' for Cairo
would be between S550 and
$i00 million. For Israel, the aid
would be for both military and
economic purposes a billion less
than Israel was seeKing or $2.2
to $2.3 billion.
ANOTHER SIGN of the ran-
proiclument in American-Israeli
r lations is the visits here in
the Coming w.-els and months
ol Defense Minister Shimon Pe-
res. Foreign Minister i'igal Al-
bn and Premier Yitzhak Rabin.
Rabin is expected in Wash-
ington, possibly in November,
for talks with President Ford
following the visit here by
President Sadat in October.
Allon, who goes to New York
to head the Israeli delegation
to the United Nations General
Assembly at the end of this
month, is expected to hold talks
with Kissinger in New York
and in Washington.
PERES 13 expected here next
tj shop for sophisticated
American weapons. During the
i as essmant period, the U.S.
i fused to pro-, itle new con-
i acts to Israel while dealing
with Arab countries, including
Jordan.
It is now reported, however,
that the Israeli arms procure-
ment program is about to go
forward with the acquisition
of 1-15 fighter planes to match
the So\ iet MIG-23s in Egyptian
hands, hundreds of tanks to de-
fend Sinai east of the Mitla and
Gidi Passes and surface to sur-
face missiles.
These include the so-called
"Black September" of 1970
when Jordanian forces expelled
the terrorists from their ter-
ritory, the Munich masacre of
Israeli Olympic athletes in Sep-
tember, 1973, and the anniver-
sary of the death of Egyptian
President Gamal Abdel Nasser,
still a hero to many terrorists.
September is also a month of
Jewish holidays when increased
travel on the roads offer tempt-
ing targets for terrorists attacks
on civilians.
THE NEW interim agreement
between Israel and Egypt has
already drawn a hostile recep-
tion from Palestinian terrorist
grouns and their supporters in
the Middle East.
PLO chieftain Yasir Arafat
denounced the pact as an Amer-
ican move to "divide the Arab
ranks and exnloit the time for
Israel and strike the Palestinian
resistance."
Zuheir Mohsen, leader of the
Syrian-sponsored Saiqa terrorist
group, said that the agreement
was aimed at preventing prog-
ress on other fronts. He claim-
ed that Egyptian-Palestinian re-
]', is would be "very bad un-
til further notice."
The Marxist Popular Dem-
ocratic Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine denounced
"the Egvntian policy of retreat."
MEANWHILE, Israel is train-
ing a corps of civilian sharp-
shooters, ranging in age from
25 to 60 to guard against ter-
rorist attacks in heavily popu-
lated urban areas.
The units are composed of
army veterans and others who
have excelled in sharpshooting
competition and they will train
others.
The aim of civil defense com-
manders is to raise the level
of shooting among the civil
guard which operates under the
authority of local police chiefs.
No Pressure |
In Upcoming
Syria Talks
Continued from Page 1-A
diplomatic feelers, followed by
diplomatic contacts in Wash-
ington to narrow most of the
gaps between the two sides.
Only after that was accom-
plished would there be a round
of intensive "shuttle" diplomacy
aimed at wrapping up an agree-
ment, the official indicated .
Israeli newspapers said here
that the U.S. and Israel have
reached an informal under-
standing that attempts to ex-
plore possible talks with Syria
would begin before the end of
the year.
THE UNPUBLISHED US-Is-
rael memorandum which is part
of the interim agreement with
Egypt reportedly contains an
undertaking by Washington not
to press Israel for territorial
concessions on the Golan
Heights beyond the minor ad-
justment which Rabin indicated
were feasible when he visited
Washington last June.
Defense Minister Shimon Pe-
res noted that a majority of the
Cabinet would oppose any
agreement that involved the re-
moval of Israeli settlements es-
tablished on the Golan Heights.
Most of these settlements are
located right on the disengage-
ment border which is almost
identical to the post-1967 lines.
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jrSolert
New Refugees
And Ik
\ MERICA'S EFFORT of trying to resettle 131,210 Indochinese
refugees has its good and weak points. If you listen to
the 'official U.S. Task Force director. Julia Vadalin Taffc you
ly We convinced that absorption of the uprooted is going
smoothly, with sponsors found, some jobs looted, and camp
living somehow bearable.
II. on the other hand, you listen to Senator Edward M.
Kennedy head of the Senate subcommittee investigating the
procedure you will be impelled to note that the program has
turned into a shambles because of failure of leadership.
What is truth, what fiction, we'll learn later.
MEANWHILE, Americans by the millions are demonstrating
'_vnuine compassion for the newcomers, each of whom must
be guaranteed room and board and 54,000 as a part of sponsor-
ship.-
It is good to know that the $550,000.0*10 voted by Congress.
at President lord* urging, to carry out the gigantic rescue
perotion. is being put to wank. We can take cHwer also from
:he report that the first 25.000 refugees were meshed into the
American scene by warmhearted backers in short order.
Time will reveal how it all goes with the remaining 107,210
intmigrants.
SEVERAL JEWISH communal organizations have made spe-
cial pleas lor a hearty welcome for the refugees and are joining
in the task of finding sponsors. No doubt, the leaders of these
organizations recall America's spotty record on immigration
from the early part of the 20th century through the rough days ,
under the McCarran-Waller Act.
How many of our fellow Americans recollect the shame
of our State Department's behavior during some of those dark
days? Do they know the degree ef moral insensibility exhibited
by State Secretary CordeH Hull and Assistant Secretary Breck-
inridge Long when Adolf Hitler was tetagtwpMng his determina-
tion to expel, mistreat and extei da died non-Aryans
from his blood-lusting domain?
CORDELL HULL, in thou days wa boasting of "the
.sous quantity of Refugee* v haye already received" while
fully aware that between 1933 and 1943 there were more than
400,000 unfilled places within the U.S. immigration quotas of
countries under Nazi domination.
This was the same Si ry who met the cries for
mercy with this incredible optntoir "Tfte unknown cost of
moving an undetermined number of persons from one undis-
closed place to an unknov on, a scheme advocated by
certain pressare groups, is, of course, out of the question."
NOWHERE IS the sordid story of such cold-hearted be-
navior on the part of American government officials of those
days more movingly revealed than in "While Six Million Died."
a fully documented chronicle of the horror scene in the State
Department written by Arthur D. Morse after a careful and
exhaustive search of official records.
Morses account of Hull's role in this black chapter of
American history and of Franklin D. Roosevelt's lamentable in-
action when the uprooted begged for sanctuary should be made
standard classroom reading.
ABOVE ALL, those who properly and honorably applaud
our show of compassion to refugees from Vietnam today should
go back to Morse's day-by-day log of join ney of the Hamburg-
American Line's "St. Louis" which sailed from Germany May
13, 1939, with 936 passengers--930 of the," Jewish refugees out
of Hitler's hell.
Victimized and rejected by corrupt Cuban authorities when
they tried to enter Havana in hope of eventual settlement in the
United States; hounded by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter hard by-
Miami; eventually forced back towards Germany waiting to
persecute them anew, these refugees were rescued by the Joint
Distribution Committee and given haven by Belgium. Holland,
r-ngland and France, but not by this land of freedom.
Friday, September 12, 1975 fjttnislh fk-rudfi^m '* 10"A
Zionist Hislorv:
Freud Exhumed
i nth. KECF.M 'ears. Catholics were barred
from reading the Pentateuch unless a priest
was present. He could prevent the infiltration
of heretical or non-Catholic theological con-
cepts and could clarify discrepancies between
the Five Books of Moses and the New Testa-
ment.
I believe that a well-read Zionist or other
person steeped in Jewish history should be
present -when reading "A Psychohistory of
Zionism," by Jay A. Gonen 'New York, Mason
Charter, $15 376 pp.).
MUCH OF the book is one man's opinion
wWnh i mntrary m t'1" fact*. '' alm08' attains
what Podhoretz once described as "perversity
of brilliance."
Prior to reading non-fiction, one should
know the biography of the author. Jay A. Gonen
wa-. born in Haifa in 1935 His parents were
Socialists and non-religious, if not agnostics.
He left Israel in 1961 to study psychology
in the United States and received his doctorate.
His present (second) wife is a Christian. He
has two children. He renounced Ins Israeli citi-
zenship and is "a dropout from Israel."
HE IS a Freudian in every sense of the
word and a follower of Fiik Erikson, a pro-
ponent of psychohistory. This latest fad has
been derided by Jacques Barzun and other
eminent historians. Erikson, at least, tried to
learn about historiography before entering the
field.
Gonen, as a Fr< u aspects
Tim Jewish Coinnuinitv

Withers in Castro Paradise
pUBA'S JEWISH population of approximately
1,700a tenth its size before Fidel Castro
took power 16 years agohas full "religious
freedom." but the lone Jewish elementary
school on the island has only 37 pupils with a
Hebrew speaking non-Jew as their teacher.
These pupils, like virtually all Cuban
school-age youngsters, belong to the blue-uni-
formed Pioneers to whom the principles of the
Cuban Revolution are taught.
"WHAT WILL happen to Jewish faith and
practice'", an American correspondent recently
in Cuba asked. Someone shrugged and smiled
thinly and replied. "Much depends upon the
home, too."
The correspondent, Robert Gruenberg of
the Chicago Daily News, said in an interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in Wash-
ington that a Cuban Jewish civil engineer sum-
med up the Jewish community's situation this
way: "We respect the government, and the gov-
ernment respects us." and "th?re is complete
freedom to practice the religion."
CUBA'S JEWS, about 1.500 of them living
chalutz re.
- sexual j
a result oj
of Zionism in sexual terms. Tht
turned to the Holy Land in order to have
relations with his mother, and as
such relationship he procreated and begaThJ
self as a new man.
HE ADOPTS Loewenberg's analysis tf
Heral but extends to all Zionists all of Herzl'
neuroses, including the act of being a gamble*
in his meetings with European rul
Gonen then writes that for a gambler, "nip.
ning could stand for orgasm and killing the
father (an ideal), while losing could mean ca*
Nation < being killed."
Gonen also fails to distinguish
Israelis and Zionists. He should know that dur-
ing the 1950s, many Israelis regarded Zionitn
in n ".'oiviti'-,, <5f>ns.
HE EITHER does not understand Ahad
Ha-Am or distorts his thesis. Ahad Ha Am wote
while living in Palestine. "1 maintain that Zion-
ism cannot confine itself to the material work
of rebuilding Palestine While making even
effort to create a large Jewish settlement on
sound lines, we dare not neglect to do what is
necessary to make Palestine" a cultural center
He was a practical, as well as a cultural Zion-
ist.
Gonen writes well, but his book is not
history' but a web of misinterpretation. He lacks
a thorough understanding of what has hap-
pened in Israel since the Yarn Kippur War Hi-
la-; chapter, non-historical, should be read be-
cans,' i; i- int llectually stimulating even though
one can disagree with parts of it.
Vofdcff
n Havana, have five synagogues thai cnN
h'fore the Castro revolution. I'!-
Orthodox, Reform, Conservative and Si
congregations. There is no rabbi. An American
rabbi who had been there left.
However, two kosher butcher shops func-
tion, and kosher meals are served in a syna-
gogue. Passover supplies come fro
Jewish organizations.
Cuban Jews, Gmen'i a -"' experience
no difficulty in receiving narc 1- frO"i the
United States, but most of the postal traffic is
lrom Canada.
IN PRECASTROS Cuba, the Jews were
mainly in the professions and commerce and
industry. Those there now are mainly profes-
sionals and. like most other Cubans, are gov-
ernment employes.
Those remaining may be divided into three
principal groups: those ideologically-oriented to
the Castro philosophy, including some in promi-
nent governmental posts; those who felt they
COUld continue a decent existence by working
and drawing on their savings.
-....,.

.
Israeli Style Kibbutz for Vietnam Refugees in the United States ?
J3E0PLE SEEM to be learning something from
Israel. Is it not written out of Zion shall go forth
rhe Law? The former Premier of South Vietnam,
N'ygen Ky, announced in California the other day
that he wanted to establish an "Israeli-style farming
kibbutz" for several thousand of the Vietnam refu-
gees in the United States.
Maybe the idea would be good for Amerecan
unemployed. If it is good for the unemployed Vietna-
mese, it should be good for Americans unemployed.
THERE ARE people who do not care for the
kibbutz style of life. They like urban life. They like
to get up in the morning and rush for the subway
It gives them a thrill. In the cars, packed like
sardines, they get that delicious feeling of being
squeezed.
Besides, there is the fresh air of the kibbutz. A
lot of people are not used to it. One fellow who went
to the country had to be rushed back to a city
hospital.
siUcivtd
*^cnw
artz
He was almost poisoned by the sudden flow of
unpolluted air, and there are those who can't stand
the singing of the birds.
One city chap was so disturbed on f.\ recount
he stuck his head out of the window m I hollered
to the birds. "Hey you," he said, "what do vou think
this is, Carnegie Hall? Get going. I want to sleep."
BUT THERE are many who would like it There
are many advantages. For instance, if you have
military ambitirns, why go to West Point? A kib-
butz training is just as good.
Most of Israeli generals come from the kibbutz
and considering the fact that the armies they com-
mand were much smaller than those of the opposing
forces, it must be considered they have done pretty
well.
Study your American history and you will find
that when Sam Adams, back in Boston, proposed to
tight the British, many kept saying to him, "Sa"1
you must be out of your head. Look at the British
military organization. It is the finest in the world
We Americans have no military organization. e
haven't any officers. All we have, Sam, are rattle-
snake colonels."
A man who had shot a rattlesnake was considered
to be licensed to call himself a colonel.
YET THESE rattlesnake colonels, who J
laughed at, didn't do so badly fighting the Bnnw
They had the same background as the generals who
came from the Israeli kibbutzim.
nUliim i
-"' ...... ii
H MW


Lay. September 12,
1975
* tmi
Page 11-A
\smeliRabbi Struggles Against Secularism
Continued from PaR~> 1-A
Kftl I'i.nr office, where he
Z surrounded by books on
Erisli lore- one wall was
I nuotmion from a letter from
he late Chief Rabbi Abraham
look which stressed the im-
Knce ol B Healthy body of
kins able physically to defend
fclpiritua] -al-ics of the Jew-
ish nation. Rabbi Navon took
an in the Interview.
LIKE AIL army activities.
L, annual observance is based
k military orders requiring
Mdiers to attend the meetings
kith their rabbis and to pay
La to their message urging
Epentence, not in connection
Lth relations between man
Ld Cod but in relations \
Ltwcp man and man, to his
Crroundings. his family, his
Lit and l"s homeland. Kabbi
I lid.
H: observed that each Rose
Hasbonah period was a chal-
gnat to reach the soldiers'
leans and minds and that
five get them interested, we get
Wm thinking."
f Hr Mi'ded that the chaplains
rfinJ a readiness to listen, in
{openness to Jewish values. Jew-
ish tradition and everything
hat stands For Jewishness, na-
Itior.al Judj
RABBI 1'IKON explained that
he programs were not for en-
listed men only. He said that
first with the higher
eommanci in the General Head-
purters and in the various
ammands and bases
Then the senior officers and
fche rank-and-file participate.!
Movie Man
jtivcs
In N
ew
York
NEW YORK- ,JTA)-Re-
pivned Soviet ctnenMROgrapher
fukhail Si slo' whose two-year
fnigsle to otnigrate won the
Pttention of ,Ti ,n Paul Sartre
I 'one de Beauvoir, ar-
rived at New York's JFK Alr-
Jw with thi help of Onlted
f s >. ici
Until Ma d partttfe, Btutov
1 larded as a major figure
I"'no dissident movement and
p' "n a hunger strike to
J i ition. He was
loined by writer Felix Kamov
PJjournalist Bvgeny Baras.
THE 36-YEAR-old Suslov has
Pde"" "i rWmi in the
His production of
J-nekhovs -The Seagull" won
P silver nri tor film photog-
EV" "'- l973 International
r Festival in San Francisco.
Another film, "The 6th of
i""e- a|v RuMian Revo-
C V''" con*idered a mile-
fne in the Soviet film industry
Kn by over million
linSrUpSlV fed beeB out of w"-k
pne apphmu for an exit visa
Itioli C and hi" fami,v
KeV 0" S1"1'11 amonts of
IripnH, SeI" hv anonymous
pds in Amcrica flnd Europe
DURING Tins tlie. his films
f e noun throughout the So-
Kew'f0"' but his na "*
Feted fro,,, lhe crcdit8 ^^
EL ,u Uslnv were hl ^fe-
Gm ""'. 16-Vear-old on.
Knts anT' M,'S- Suslov penis and sister.
NSn^0t,!erIly"-aJourn3list.
In cwli previou>y settled
KiS nd'also under mAS
Kv V* "* With the
kEl' ,hai1 2'9m Ri"
J975 h ** ninths f
He added That "we find an in-
tellectual curiosity among many
listeners that are far from Jew-
ish religion and tradition."
The rabbi readily described
emotional meetings with sol-
diers in remote units on the
Colan Heights and in the SuTai.
There, under a burning sun
or in the shade of tanks, be
mec'ts the soldiers, talks with
them flnd seeks to brrhg "them
to thinking on the Jewishness
which they represent.
HE NOTED that it was not
preaching in the sense of try-
ing to gag a soUiier to become
religions. He said he felt that
not even the Yom Kippur War
"trauma" had hrough Israclies
back to religion but that it had
made them more open to under-
standing of matters connected
with the Jewish heHlag?, Jewish
morals, Jewish values.
Rabbi Navon stressed the need
for a special campaign lor re-
pentance in the army. He said
every Jew must think of his
wrongs to himself and to his
society, but the Israeli soldier
must also ponder on whether
he has fulfilled his duty to his
unit, to the army and to the
State ol Israel, whose security
>-sts In his hands.
HE NOTED that the Jewish
faith is one developing upon
the indiviuiral. It is not a mass
that Jews perform, it is a serv-
ice, a prayer by the individual
.lew to the Almighty. Rabbi
Navon said, and hence the need
for each Jew to make his own
spiritual and moral reckonin<:
during the Hebrew month prior
to the Iliqli Holy Days.
He said the main theme of
this year's effort is faith: faith
in the Jewish nation, its mis-
sion, its force, and in the Al-
mighty. He noted that the Is-
raeli soldier has a good example
to cite.
ALL JEWS are children of
Abraham who was a lone man
in his new thinking and belief
in one (Jod. Abraham, Rabbi
Navon said, was called "Ivri"
because he stood alone on one
has ("Ever" in Hebrew) with
the world on the other, but he
was able to stand against the
whole world because of the
force of his deep belief.
Rabbi Navon declared that
now, 4.000 years later, "again
we Jews are alone against the
whole world, with the power
of our faith and we shall over-
come. The rabbis are confident
of this and we would like to
share that belief."
On their behalf, he said, he
conveyed to jews everywhere
the hc**es for a happy, peaceful
vcar full of faith.
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4D-


Page 12-A
*Je*isl>ncrtdriar?
Friday, September 12
. 1975
Ford Asks Quick Approval of Pact
Continued from Page 1-A
the amount Israeli officials had
indicated last month Israel
would need for the current fis-
cal year. Byrd also disclosed
that the aid package will in-
clude between $650 million and
$800 million for Egypt. He said
this would be "non-military"
aid for now.
BYRD ALSO said that no
mention was made at the While
House meeting of funds for
Jordan and Syria but that Jor-
dan insists on getting 14 Hawk
missile installations, or it will
go to the So\iet Union for as-
sistance.
Byrd said that this was stat-
ed by King Hussein in a letter
to Sen. Mike Mansfield (D.,
Mont.), the Senate majority
leader, and others.
House Speaker Carl Albert
(D., Okla.) and Byrd both indi-
cated that Soviet objections to
the second-stage Sinai agree-
ment were not too important.
Byrd said that he did not know
whether the Soviet objections
"are proforma or not. That
remains to be seen. This could
U.S. Pressure on Israel Clear
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department has ad-
mitted "certain" military items
have not been delivered to Israel
but denied that the supply pipe-
line is closed.
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The denial came after a re-
port that the United States has
suspended or slowed delivery to
cause the Israeli government to
make more concessions towar Is
a second interim agreement with
Egypt.
DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN
Robert Anderson said that the
U.S. has shinned more than S100
million of military equipment to
Israel since Apr. 1. He would
not say what the equipment
.was. .. -. .
"There are certain items
where deliveries have not been
made for such reasons as not
being available, production
schedules and special tech-
nology." Anderson added.
"As we have indicated previ-
ously, requests for some items
representing new or advanced
technology remain pending un-
til completion of the reassess-
ment."
DESPITE ANDERSON'S de-
nial, reports persisted that the
slowdown or suspension of de-
liveries for materials contracted
for before President Ford an-
nounced his reassessment of
American Mideast policy in
March is actually taking place.
Observers wondered why the
Department chose Apr I
as a date to discuss deliveries.
Secretary of Defense James
Schlesinger had disclosed early
last spring that shipments to Is-
I would be completed in
April.
Thus -I t:> s,1"!"-' "
servers th n militarj items could
l ting forward at a trickle to
p the pipeline technicall'"
open but the bulk of the ma-
terials which Anderson said
had been shipped since April
actually were made about four
months aijo and little has gon
forward since then.
UNDER QUESTIONING, <\n-
derson denied that political rea-
sons are the basis for inducing
Israel to be more forthcoming"
on a new agreement and that
the State Department has in-
structed the Pentagon and the
U.S. Munitions Control Board to
slowdown or halt shipments to
Israel.
"I rule out the question of po-
litical pressure," he said. "I
don't accept the word 'pre
sure.' he said.
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be expected. I don't think this
should be a factor of weighty
consideration."
Asked what was next in the
Middle East on the part of the
U.S.. Byrd said "there is no
timetable." He added, however,
that it was clear that contin-
uous political momentum is re-
quired and that "Egypt expects
to get all of its territory back."
ALBERT, who earlier had in-
dicated reservations about the
stationing of American civilians
in the Sinai, said that he told
the President that "I will sup-
port him on this." He said it
was a calculated lisk but one
worth taking.
Albert noted there was no
discussion about civilian moni-
tors i'ii Israel's frontiers with
Syria and Jordi n.
John Sparkman (D.,
Ala.), chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
later I u I S icr tary of State
Henry A. Kissinger's details on
the agreements before his Com-
mittee.
Kissinger arrived from 'iis
shuttle.diplomacy in the Middle
East and was welcomed bv
who said Kissinger had -w
tiated with great skill J\
enormous diligence" H
SPARKMA., AND BJ
that Kissinger assured the
gressional leaders that 1
were no sscret agreenj
tercd into by the I'niudjJ
with either side.
He said that (he unpuft
undertakings were not 2
ed at the meeting but thl
classified mite;id \k\\\)A
sented to th.> Foreign RtJ
Committees of both Housl
Senate.
Sparkman also said that!
Senate Armed Senicei
mittee may hold public hea
on Kissinger':- understand!
REPUBLICAN HOUSE!
John Rhod( f Arizona]
the Jewish 1 'eleg iphic Ag
that when the President
asked for an eement bvl
Congress oi |
in the Sinai n two n3
"there was i Bmurrer.
("rsij-nti j
P' n Ns at T -leg
of support for the U.S.
enc i in th
the1 White House front "si
the major Jewish cig
turns.".
Sincere Wishes
for a
HAPPY NEW YEAR
COUNCILMAN
Hal Spaet
fc************************^
Best wishes for a
Happy New Year
COUNCILMAN
Dr. Leonard Haber and Family
**************************


September 12, 1975
+JeKfi fhrkiictr
Page 13-A
MINDLIN
Jew Declaration of Independence Needed
ontinued from Page 4-A
ons Declaration of Inde-
hence is a perfect example
fn thesc dualities and mo-
[ that moved the Founding
Us anJ those who followed
into their terrible war.
Itting in hifi pew in Wil-
Lburg. experiencing a pal-
feel of this heroic and
,rjC past. I was moved to
der what has happened to
trson his document, his
,ers and their principles
he two-hundred intervening
k"E THING is certain: We
arrived at a time when
middle class society on
whose safety and security the
nation was founded is infinitely
more hard-pressed than it was
under the rule of old King
George.
For the safety and security
to both persons and property
for which the terrible war was
wagad and won are no longer
either safe or secure.
If the Jeffersonians won out
over the Federalist-Hamiltoni-
ans. if "demos" vanquished
"aristoi." the fact of the mat-
ter is that a new "aristoi" in the
loiin oi weapons and energy
specifically, of the military and
industry generally, is rising
today to overwhelm "demos"
and ride it like a bespirred
Gulf Admits
$50,000 'Error'
(Continued from Page 1-A
jimittee's subcommittee on
Itinational corporations on
16 had voluntarily revealed
[contribution,
he testimony made national
and caused widespread
era and demands for ac-
On May 2", 11 days after
bey's appearance before the
committee, the Conference
Presidents of Major Amer-
Jewish Organizations, of
ch ADL and B'nai B'rith are
nbers, adonted a resolution
sing its r^mbership to "ap-
and endorse acts of con-
:e taken by individual
nbers reacting to the Gulf
[Corporation gift to Arab
trees in Beirut, I-ebanon, for
paganda purposes in the
[ted States."
INVESTIGATION under
[direction of Arnold Forster.
-'s associate director and
en! counsel, since that time
aled thai in spite of the
extensive search of the
bpany's Comdex records,
officials had been unable
nd who had authorized the
s.
forster and C-raubard said
as League meetings with
officials progressed, it be-
obvioiiN that thev were
W concerned about the con-
tributions rind considered such
gifts totally improper for an
American company to make.
They went on to say that
Dorscy and his associates had
been completely forthright in
their responses to the League
throughout the many weeks of
consultations.
THE ANTI-DEFAMATION
League's analysis of the sub-
committee testimony and its
own research revealed that the
contribution had been made to
International Affairs Consul-
tants, a now defunct organiza-
tion that had been fairly ob-
scure during its lifetime. Fur-
ther ADL research showed that
the funds in question had gone
to Beirut because the treasurer
of the organization was living
there.
The money, Forster said, had
been used in America to help
subsidize a publication that
dealt with such things as al-
leged violations of the human
rights of Palestinians in Israeli
Administered Territories.
THE FUNDS had also been
used to help finance a Dro-Arab
book and one or two other
minor pro-Arab ventures.
The Anti-Defamation League
regularlv reoorted to and shared
if-, findings and conclusions
with the President's Conference.
European nobleman once did
his peasant horse.
THE MIDDLE class dilemma
two-hundred years after the
Declaration of Independence is
simple and tragic. The bour-
geois' right to property is be-
ing confiscated piecemeal. His
right to liberty is being choked
by secret government in ca-
hoots with the oil and food car-
tels. His right to life is an ir-
relevancy given his loss of the
right to property and liberty.
Nor does he have any
spokesman to trumpet his cause.
George McGovern, the Demo-
crats' 1972 five-and-dime mes-
siah, appeared at a Senate com-
mittee hearing on Sept. 4 in-
quiring into the latest Russian
grain sale and its impact on the
rising cost of living (again).
There, McGovern established
an Edgar Bergen-Charlie Mc-
Carthy relationship with Agri-
culture Secretary Earl Butz,
whose obscenity as a spokes-
man for the administration's
rip-off of America is typical of
the tightening rei(g)n upon the
faltering middle class horse.
BUTZ DIDN'T have to say a
word. McGovern, from a great
corn and grain state himself,
"explained" to the committee
the Butz point of view.
Not only is there rank cri-
minality, dishonesty and hypo-
crisy in the nation's leaders, |
such as the Sept. 4 hearing |
demonstrated. There is neither
passion nor eloquence any-
where.
Forget McGovern, who does
not even seem to be able to
hew to a decent line of medi-
ocrity. Who are the outspoken |
alternatives to President Ford
Henry Jackson? Lloyd Bent-
sen? Morris Udall?
IS THERE a single one among I
them who does not sound like i
tepid dishwater? Is there a sin-
gle one among them who, like |
a dog, is not prepared to fetch ;
for the right reward?
Without spokesmen, hounded
by greedy leaders who fail to
understand that an America
unable to eat, denied at least |
some of the fruits of its honest
labor, fearful at night even be-
hind locked doors such an
America needs a new Declara-
tion of Independence.
This is the thought that oc-
curred to me there in that pew
Compliments of
Burger King!
Hayeit,
BURGER KING CORPORATION
7360 North Kendall Drive
Miami 33156
in Williamsburg that any fu-
ture standard-bearer against
the Fords, the Nixons, the
Butzes, the Pentagon and Ex-
xon must offer the nation a
new Declaration of Independ-
ence from such implacable ene-
mies as these.
IT MUST be a document
listing a bill of complaints that
will make Jefferson's against
George III pale by comparison,
and a statement of principles
designed to chase the crooks
and the illiterates out of our
highest councils.
Above all, it must be passion-
ate, and he who reads it must
be eloquent and ring with the
sound of an uplifting poetry
that will put the wheelers-and-
dealers on notice that they can
no longer depend upon their
continuing appeal to the basest
instincts in us as a means of
further and further enslaving
us.
On July 4, 1964, one day aft-
er President Johnson signed the
Civil Rights Ac! into law, Gov.
George Wallace, the anti-civil
libertarian, offered his own
Declaration of Independence in
an address in Atlanta, Ga., in
which he argued that the new
law is a "fraud, a sham and a
hoax," a violation of the spirit
of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
IT IS an act of tyranny, he
said. "It is the assassin's knife
stuck in the back of liberty .
With this assassin's knife and a
blackjack in the hand of the
federal force cult," Wallace
warned, we are being pressed
"back into bondage bondage
to a tyranny more brutal than
that imposed by the British
monarchy which claimed power
to rule over the lives of our
forefathers under sanction of
the divine right of kings."
Today, he argued, "this tyr-
anny is imposed by the central
government which claims the
right to rule over our lives un-
der sanction" of omnipotence.
I DO not mean for us to ape
a bigot in our own Declaration
of Independence. I found Wal-
lace's prejudice then, and still
find his prejudice, reprehensi-
ble. Rather we must understand
his words in terms of the larger
battle lines now forming.
And it is his passion we must
seize upon as our own and
adapt to our higher purpose.
t
In this same passionate spir-
it, we must rid ourselves of
those who are bigoted against
"demos." Short of this, we are
undone.
JOHN
STEMBRIDGE
of
NORTH MIAMI
Extends to the
Entire Jewish
Community
A Very Happy
New Year
jnran row* rvtxfr.,
*sfi
APT.
HOTEL
63rd and Collins
sherry frontenac
65th and Collins

GREETINGS TO MY MANY FRIENDS
tor this
High Holiday Season
COUNCILMAN & MRS.
Howard Nou
%s, n!%<>%' V< ^'fc-'V*" *


Page 14-A
9-Je^istnerSdliar
Friday, September 12. ijT
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in
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We guarantee them for 50,000 miles. What's
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cefini>
BFGoudrich


L September 12, 1975
*J& m ?$ti fhrf&oun
Page 15-A
\olitical Importance of Accord Stressed
_ DAVID LANDAU
Ami GIL SEDAN
IrUSALEM (JJA) -
,., Vitzhak R^bin has
. :; ,he n,litical sigmfi-
I -> [srael-Egvpt inter-
Cford anil the fact Egypt's
;| inj,5 Were "stated cate-
,.,'i; contractually and
licl, in contrast to similar
I ta inss jiiven in the oasl
t nplv referred to United
Ions resolutions.
I id that Urael decided
Em the pad "because of our
,;.,, thai progress with
L iS possible an.i iheuld
K,, postponed wlelv biwwwe
llonments on other fronts.
in nilVnsive initiative
|,i Israel, miettt undermine
(agreement and the stability
U will have been achieved."
(lIK PRKMIFR alo stressed
Hi the end of the discus-
I ill un islanding was
|vcd with the U.S. on a di-
i s ni issues an iin-
bandms that will enable m
receive the continuous a*-
fcne nl ill <>' in th nro-
of ^trcn'-'thenin? and con-
BathM Israel through the
thai. "I sophisticated weap-
B8 well as in hifjh. im-
ni nolitic il subiects d^riv-
Ifrom interests common to
?1 and th i IH hi fftonell
I intemitional eontexts."
egnrdinc Israel's return of
Abu Rodeis oilfields to
pt. one ol Che main points
of criticism by opponents of the
pact. Rabin observed that "Is-
rael never regarded Abu Rodeis
.is its cternul heritage We
did not relinquish it before as-
suring the supply and storage
of fu -1 reouired bv Israel."
THAT REMARK was seen is
an i'vr.|icit confirmation of re-
ports that the U.S. has commit-
1 d itself to fewer Israel's loss
of Abu Rodeis oil and to help
build "vissivc subtenanean oil
reservoirs in the Negev.
Rabin also rejected anv par-
allel between the agreement's
provisions tar American civilian
I clinicians to man an advanced
warning radar oost in Sinai and
the American presence in Viet-
nam a decade ago. He told the
ItneaM) thai in the event of
war. Isranl exn"ctd no Amer-
ican presence in Sinai.
THE MOST vigorous opposi-
tion to Ihe pact was voiced by
former Defense Minister Moshe
Haven of .the Labor Party and
l.i'cnd onnnsition leader Mena-
chem Beigin.
Dayan "anoloaiwd" to his
l.Ha3U78 for not ioining
rh-ni jn fa,rnv of the interim
nen-irmnit. "Unlike my friends.
I cannot he Fkixlbie and vote
an in favor of a settlement
which 1 rnipose in March." Da-
yrji -said in un obvious slap at
rh- Rnbm government.
Davan tainted from th" Pre-
mier's spp^ch to th Knesset
l;ist March in which he ex-
pressed surprise that Egypt had
Deny Ford, Tito
lame to Agreement
)ii Interim Accord
PARIS iJIA) White House press secretary Ron
ken has denied that ;; reported identity of views on the
Idle East between President Ford and Yugoslav Presi-
lt Tito meant that Ford bad endorsed Tito's call for a
pate Palestinian state, according to reports reaching
k from Belgrade.
iNessen's denial came after the two leaders, following
|s which focussed on The Mideast, called for moderation
I Flexibility in the attempt to reach u setllemeni in the
lb-Israeli conflict.
W. two Presidnts son'-..
r rs it the end of Ford's
to Bel? ni.' and prior to
Bight home which also mark-'
I'''.' 11!! ol the American
'''i- 10-day visit to
prd > em Israeli-
f''1'11 on an interim
is unaccept-
&{ do doctors
recommsnd
Pfetsinpain?
'"" medications a
WanordiMitiHtcan PiMcriba
'"But thorta one pain re-
'!',u-|''. md dentists dis-
'-''"' l mi An.i. in.
IMiiinii '"' Bve oul over
J i tablets lot
- ['"in toothache and
' !l i linor pains
| ; And millions take
i. Ii upset.
'.'' ,'" lin, i ike Hi
Rive ...u i
Am
he
ou in
At a dinner for Ford, the 83-
year-old Yugoslav leader said
that Israel must withdraw from
A'.-ib territo i ;s as soon as pos-
sible and recognize Palestinla"
independence.
Ford too!; no notice in hi
own remarks of Tito's surpris
statement which was seen i
implying criticism ol Secretar
ol State FUnry A. Ktssingsr
Sl r-nv-t >n n lotiati
BU r TIIEN i'n i agdn mi
i i -- l n -wsm ;n when h i ta1
iis i-iews and Ford's were i I wi
ii -a on thr Mid -\-' ac rdin
to reports arriving here.
ji .nj | he formed this opir
lost "aft sr 1 '"i-'1 W*v Pi -
i lent Ford said about the ac-
tions the United States in-
tends to take in th future."
Neaaen, according to the re-
ports, said there was no change
in U.S. policy which says that
rhe rights ol Palestinians should
' e recognized in any settle-
ment but avoids anv position
on the eventual outcome of ne-
, .,, itjons,
m 1 k
TOT
FREE T SHIRT W/PURM *6" op
SHEakejl circDS
,4'31W.OiK,.M*y.
N. Miami. F la. 33161
the temerity to demand the re-
turn of the Abu Rodeis oil fields
Dd the Sinai passes without
ending its state of belligerancy.
THE BASIS of Dayan's ar-
guments against the pact was
that Israel should have striven
for a general settlement instead
ol an interim accord.
"There will be no end to bel-
ligerency without the USSR."
he sail., and observed that if
Svria agreed to end belligeren-
cy. Israel should agree to more
th.-m iust "cosmetic changes."
Davan said he was against
the interim agreement in which
Israel made concessions in re-
turn for substantial Egvntian
ouid pro quo. torn m which Is-
rael withdraws in return for
American compensations.
tt is not hoik! when the Amcr-
ifans nav instead of the Egyp-
tians. Pavan said.
BEIGIN took much the same
line as Davan. charging that
the Rabin -government had col-
lapsed under American .pressure
and warned that nnv American
prt'KRUve was hnmhteffl for more
Israeli withdrawals.
Uke Davan. Becm nuntv'
essnSfeflr star -ments bv the Pre-
mier, rnclud'ng one to the Kn-s-
et last Februan- ond an in-
tftrvB-w on ABC television
pledgine not to iic the Sfna;
passim or the oilfi-jlds withoti'
a dch>"ttinn of non-belligeren-
cy by Egypt
Bfigm charged that by sign-
inn the pact without E'!vpt's r<-
itiCtinn "f hcllig^rfncv. kraal
w as implicrfh- endorsing Cairo's
BBBttka that thr stnte ot wa-
i "''an i "id '"^ arastaaa th
fruits of Israel's 1967 victory
"It i< a stiP Bag tovvuid aBBRSB
hm towH'd turther pressui-es."
aatafethl ctarned.
RHHRDR9 BRBRI ltrgin-.-
Kifiw* amirm-pl af the int-ri-^
accord was low-keyed, and the
fmemkr did not rt".mnt t"
i>'"oa-11" the pact his govern-
T"t>nt had atRMtV V;s trni" re
Hectcd the remarks of farm'1'
}>rpnii^r Oohia Me.ir mo Kni'l
after ft? acreermmt was inhia'
e.d. thm it should be erect-'
r> xvith a feeling nf mourning."
Knbin said b- could not claim
t'vit thr> n" Hbbb seane bett"
than tlw old ones, and he did
not main? light of the Iral
u ithdrawal. But "the consid ira
tions of lsr i l's secnriv ar
complex and they cannot h" i
stricted to the auction (lf '-"'
,ifv<' -iloiv-." h st it Rabin said the new line ws
"firm" and facilitated both de-
lense and atM**. H- said tint
Israel's army would be strength-
ened so that "from the point
of view of overall security con-
siderations. Israel will b'
stronger after the agreement
both politically and militarily."
"THE AGREEMENT WITH
Egypt," the Premier said, "is a
very hopeful event. Its prim-in ,1
signi*;cince is salientlv politi-
cal. It* principal content is that
the agreement has been achiev-
ed that fore- and fighting will
no long-r characterize Israel-
Egyptian relations ... A con-
tractual and nublic agreement
has been achieved that both
countries arc firm in their re-
solve to reach a final and just
peace through negotiations."
Rabin added that he did "not
attribute to the President of
Egypt violations ot Arab soli-
darity', b'lt a realistic approach,
nam-ly that an curfeenrntt w'th
Israel should not be delayed be-
cause of What happens in Is-
rael's r-lotinns with other Arab
countries."
HE OBSERVED that "The
political significance is the es-
sence of the agreemej t we have
signed and is the main t|uid pro
quo for the concessions we
made and for its sake it was
worth our while to lake reason-
able risks."
The Premier affirmed that
while the negotiations leading
to the agreement had highlight-
ed the yawning g'llf of hostility
and suspicion, the agreement
CWfdns "the seeds of relations
which did not exist before," es-
pecially th: provisions For a
permanent joint commission and
lor the Shared use of the Abu
Rol-is road which could help
develop a "new atmosphere."
RABIN SAID that he was not
annealing before the Knesset as
B c-lebrant. 'nor as one who
doffs armo**, Israel will con-
tin"" to look to her defenses....
I! Bgvnt really wints peace. Is-
rael will be willing to replace
the nres-nt agreement with a
final B*aoe agr^emsoit wit'f all
the territorial Changes required
in this, ipj'udine the army's de-
pfovment on permanent defen-
sible borders."
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Page 16-A
+Jewish nerkttan
Friday, September
we is a good Temple member, lives an exemplary life, is a devoted husband and father.
But he is neglecting an important moral obligation.
He has not yet made his cemetery arrangements. Like other
moral and spiritual obligations, these arrangements must
not be forgotten. By planning ahead, decisions can be made
calmly. They can be made without emotional pressure.
They can be made wisely, and they can be made together
as a family. If you have not yet fulfilled this obligation to
your family, we urge you to do so now. In this wayjo"
can be certain that your family will not suffer needlessly-
m mm rm re $n ow atonoi jwmmmu it mmu
MASTU CMAFlSmtH III SIIVIB AMD MONU
MIAMI'S MOST BEAUTIFUL EXCLUSIVELY JEWISH CtMeTKKY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street


Combining pleasure with business are Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man chairman of the board of governors of Greater Mi-
rael Bond Organization, and Mrs. Lehrman, who
Israel's former Prime Minister Golda Meir
at the King David Hotel in Jerusalem. The Lehr-
among forty-five U.S. and Canadian Jewish
ho, at the invitation of Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, intended the 1975 Israel Bond Leadership Con-
r three days of intensive sessions and visits to
nomic and security sites. The Aug. 24-28
, helped to signal the launching of increased
. throughout the free world for the Fall cam-
for Israel Bonds to provide a maximum share of
, urrent $1-billion Development Budget.
Barry T. Gurland Appointed
To Young Leaders Cabinet
Barry T. Gurlanl. president
of B'nai B'rith Council of South
Florida Lodges, has been ap-
pointed to the national Young
Leadership Cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal, cabinet
chairman R. Alan kudy of
Houston has announced.
As on of his first acts tut a
membei of the UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet, Gurland
will participate in a four-day
retreat next month at Lake
Bluff. 111. About 200 men un-
der the age of forty are mem-
bers (i the national cabinet.
Gurland, who is president-
elect of the Florida State Asso-
ciation '! B'nai B'rith Lodges,
is a m.'inber of the leadership
cabinet of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Gurland also seaes on the
ad\isory committee of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization and the board of
directors of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy.
Past president of the Greater
Miami B'nai B nrh Youth Or-
ganization (BBYO) board of di-
rectors, Gurland is chairman of
the B'nai B'rith District Five
Young Leadership Committee.
He is a certified public ac-
countant with Laventhol and
Horwath, a national accounting
firm with offices in Coral Ga-
bles.
Gerald Lewis To Be Recipient Of
(I Service Award
]97."> I) is I i ii if ii is he
G A Lewis, Comptroller
of 1 la, will be the recipient
of the 1975 Distinguished Serv-
d presented by the
South Florida Public Service
Society at a testimonial ban-
quet Friday at 8 p.m., in the
Doral Country Club.
Mr, Louis will receive the
in recognition of his un-
irts as a public servant
i ird the rights of the
and the interests of free
enterprise.
The South Florida Public
Service Society is a group
of community-minded citizens
wishing to call to public atten-
<> ;t:ve work of volun-
teers and pubic servants.
SFPSS members include Hon.
Steven P. Clark, Mayor, Metro-
politan bade Countv; Sister M.
Trinita Flood. 0. P., President
of Barry College: Hon. Clara
Oesterle, Commissioner, Metro-
politan Dade County; Mrs.
Charles H. (Audrey) Finkel-
stein, immediate past president
of the Gold Coast Chapter,
American Women in Radio and
Television; Rep. Dick Clark.
Florida House Majority Leader;
Mis. Paul W. (Arlene) Shan-
non, assistant professor-educa-
tion, Barry College; Thomas M.
O'Leary, treasurer. Castleton
Industries, and honorary mem-
ber Judge Alan R. Schwartz.
Circuit Court.
Jeanne Wolf, network public
broadcast television personality,
WPBT, Ch. 2, will serve as
mistress of ceremonies at the
banquet. She is also this year's
South Florida campaign chair-
man for the Cystic Fibrosis
Breath of Life Campaign begin-
ning Sept. 26.
All proceeds from the testi-
monial banquet honoring Mr.
Lewis will benefit the South
Florida Chanter. Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation.
Herbert Buchwald, new president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Friends of the Hebrew Univer-
s"y, is greeted at a welcoming reception for AFHU offi-
cers in Miami Beach. From left are Albert A. Dorner,
regional director for Hebrew University; Dr. Irving Lehr-
man of Temple Emanu-El, honorary fellow of the univer-
s"y, Mr. Buchwald, and Harry A. Levy, new chairman
f the board of the American Friends' local chapter.
"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, September 12, 1975
Section B
Lehman To Submit
Service Academy
Nominations
Applications from those in-
terested in competing for a
Congressional nomination to one
of the United States Service
Academies for the class enter-
ing in July, 1976 are currently
beinc accepted by Congressman
Bill Lehman of Florida's 13th
Congressional District.
Rep, Lehman will submit nom-
inations ni tne U.S. Air Force
Academy, the U.S. Military
Academy, the U.S. Naval Aca-
demy, and the U.S. Merchant
Marine Academy in December.
Rep. Lehman will nominate
ten vounq men for each vacancy
at the Air Force, Military and
Naval Academies. There will be
r-ne vacancy filled at each of
the three academies next year.
The procedure for nominating
individuals to the United States
Merchant Marine Academy dif-
fers from the procedure follow-
ed bv the other three academies
in that nominees compete ac-
cording to State quotas, and
each Member of Congress may
nominate as many individuals
as he chooses.
Anv person interested in at-
tending the U.S. Coast Guard
Academy may obtain a cata-
logue and an application form
by contacting Congressman Leh-
man's Washington office. The
Coast Guard Academy does not
use Congressional nominations
as a means of selecting its
Cadets, but Congressman Leh-
man nevertheless welcomes
hearing from all young men and
women interested in the Coast
Guard Academy.
E. Albert Pallot, local bank-
ing executive and civic
leader, has been reelected
to a record-breaking 13th
term as chairman of Mi-
ami's Committee on Ecol-
ogy and Beautification. The
citizens' group promotes
better land-use and archi-
tectural design, conserva-
tion, and upgrading the en-
vironment. __
Benjamin I. Shulman, (left) chairman of the board of the
Bank of Miami Beach, turns over a check to Robert L.
Siegel, general chairman of Israel Bonds for South Flor-
ida, redeeming the bank's increased purchase of State of
Israel Bonds for 1975. Shulman pledged Bank of Miami
Beach's continued support for the Israel Bonds drive as
the organization's High Holy Days efforts in more than
25 Dade and Broward County synagogues and temples
got under way.
new members and new life
members. They will be eligible
the University of Michigan.

Sen. Jack Gordon To Receive
Hadassah's Myrtle Wreath Award
Sen. Jack Gordon will be the
recipient of Hadassah's Myrtle
Wreath Award at the "Member-
ship Gala" to be held at 1 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 29, in Miami
Beach Convention Hall South,
Mrs. Jean Feinberg, president of
the Miami Beach Chapter of
Hadassah, announced.
Sen. Gordon, who has served
as president of Washington
Federal Saving and Loan Asso-
ciation of Miami Beach since
the institution was founded in
1952, has combined a leader-
ship role in the savings and
loan industry with a distinguish-
ed career in public service.
Elected to the Florida Senate
in 1972, Sen. Gordon was vice
chairman of the Senate Educa-
tion Committee and a member
of the Health and Rehabilitative
Services and Criminal Justice
Committees. He was also chair-
man of a committee which con-
ducted a state-wide inquiry into
the rising costs of medical and
hospital care in Florida.
In the current legislature,
which will extend through 1976.
Sen. Gordon holds a number of
key Senate leadership assign-
ments. He is chairman of the
Ways and Means Committee,
and the Health and Rehabilita-
tive Service Committee, vice
chairman of the Education Com-
mittee and serves on the Rules
Committee.
A resident of Dade County
since 1940, he is a graduate of
paid-up members, life members.
SEN. JACK GORDON
Invitations to the membership
gala will be extended to all
for a number of prizes.
The membership committee
consists of Mrs. Joseph Rosen-
berg, membership vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Jack Miller, mem-
bership coordinator; Mrs. Sig-
mund Rostler, life membership
chairman; Mrs. William Adams,
reenrollment chairman; Mrs.
Martha Silverstein. Transfer
chairman; Mrs. Hvman Abrams.
decorations chairman and Mrs.
Samuel Oppenheim, hostess
chairman.
Temple Emanu-El Sponsor
Of Fall Tennis Tournament Yom Kippnr film On L.IL / JMinaaj
Temple Emanu-El of Miami
Beach will sponsor a tennis
tournament for members and
their teenag^s this fall, it was
announced this week by Judge
Frederick N. Barad. president,
and Samuel N. Friedland, chair-
man, of the board.
The event will feature separ-
ate tourneys for men and wom-
en, with a mixed doubles divi-
sion in addition to the meet for
teenagers. It will be played on
several courts in the Greater
Miami area owned by Temple
Emanu-El members.
Gregor Piatigorsky, world re-
nowned cellist, stars in "Choose
Life," a new quarter-hour mo-
tion picture about Yom Kippur,
produced by the Jewish Chau-
tauqua Society which will be
telecast on WCKT-TV Sunday
after 4:30 p.m., following the
showing of "Exodus."
Chautauqua filmed Piatigor-
sky playing the "Kol Nidre" on
the cello in Temple Israel, Hol-
lywood, Calif., on Yom Kippur
eve, 1973 ,the day the Yom
Kippur War was launched by
the Arab nations' attack on Is-
rael. _
Scenes of the war in Israel,
and in Germany and Russia,
highlight the history of the
persecution of the Jews. Addi-
tional scenes filmed at Temple
Beth El, Great Neck, N.Y., re-
late the modern relevance of
the Yom Kippur liturgy.
The film, the 36th film pro-
duced by the Jewish Chau-
tauqua Society, ends with a
prayer for peace.


Page 2-B
*Jeitf fhrkffar
Friday, September

12,
1*"> Euc11 *vj.
Orthodox. Rabb. 0.< Lohrf'eia.
Caruar Abraham *"
; p.m; Saturd> -
;-, p.m MM -
day.

K I '

Four Zionist Leaders To Address
Golden Jubilee Convention Here
Synagogues throughout the Greater Miami area will
conclude the High Holy Day period Monday with the ob-
servance of Yom Kippur. the Day of Atonement, which be-
gins with Kol Nidre services Sunday evening at sunset, con-
tinues throu"h thf dav Mcnuay. enuing at nighifad wnh the
sounding of the Shofar.
Monday's scheauie also includes a Yizkor Memorial
Service for the deceased.
^E-IORAH ,Ttn.D''. 6.0 h St.
Con.er^t.v* Raco' M' norarr.
owitz Cantor N.co F-on-an
-
MIAMI
AMAV^T SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
R Ben Aron. 1
ANSHE EMES 3533 SW '9th Av*.
Conaervative. Cantor Sol Pakowiti
2
BETH AM (Temple). 5950 N. Kendall
Dr., So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M. Baumgard. Aaeoeiate Rabbi
Mitchell Chefitz. 3
Friday. *-3<> p.m.. Family Service.
Sermon: "A Credo for the Modern
Jew.- "Kol Nldre by i-etllat Dr Ne-
runs. Duplicate adult tTrta)*, !' n.m..
Saturday. S:3H am.. Sermon: "Stand-
ing- Firm in the Storm" Children's
arrvlce. 1:30 p.m. ith Kahbi Baum-
Surd speaking on "The Wizard of
ze." Afternoon Family Service, 3:3"
p.m. Sermon: "Mysticism and the
Reform Jew," by Rabbi Mitchell Che-
fitz
CONGREGATION BET BREIRA. 107-
55 SW. 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3.A
Friday. S:15 p.m.. Si'im.n "The Next
Step in Religion." Sunday, s p.m. Kol
Nldre In Mauri..- (lu.-man Concert
Hall. L'nlvaralt} of Miami ommmm.
Sermon: "An OverView of History."
ETH DAVID. 2*25 SW 3rd Ava.
Conseivu..v. .. j ,, _^..
Cantor William Lipaon. e-A
Saturday. Kol Nldre, 7:15 pm Ser-
mon: "Humaiiity'a Quilt and a
mei:t": Monday, v:i" am Sermon:
''JSelf-1'elusion and lnini"rt:ility Yia-
kor Memorial Service about noon:
(Jhlldran'a Service, 1 |i m .
si..ii conducted bj Rabbi Marvlr Rose,
4 ii m : Mlncha led by fSTei -
.W.l.ih. .:; p.m.; i
5 p m.
lTH DAV'D SOUTH T'.OO 8W
1r0th St. Conaervat've. Rabsi Ss'
Landau. Cantor Williarr Llpao.. a
Friday, 8:15 p.m.. Sermon: "The
Meaning of RepeMamoe."
BETH KODESH 11Ci SW 12th As*.
Modern Traditional. Pabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Sejal. Rev. Alex
>'m. ev Vsnaei Ca'iwmi- 4
Saturday. g:MJ a m Saobath of !'..-
peoutnea, BaiAuii: Does K-
Have Validity?" Sunday. >i:;!>i p.m..
Kol Viili-e. Sermon: Th-- TrMtlc
lit*'." Monday. < a ni Day >f Mo* -
m-nt: V-zkor Bervke 11 am. Baa
mon: "Alone In The World" \
e. :. p.m. Sermon A Pitting
End."
STM TV ,TamDl 64M fw th
St. Conservative Rabbi Chart** Ru-
el g
Saturday morivna-. Shabtmn StlUVa:
Sunday. .Kol Nidre. ..:(' i> m Sermon;
"The Three Pillars of the Jewish Peo-
ple." Monday. 9 am. Yom Kippur:
ll:a a m Viakor Memorial Service,
Sermon: "The Way to Ix.ng Life."
B'NAI ISRAEL ANO GhEATER
MIAMI VrUTH SVNAGOGLE M-VJ
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
* _______ 3-A
IBRAFI rT.iy.e--. > 1-.---
miami. 137 NE 1t.h SL Reform.
Hauoi tfoaasn A. Narot 10
S.sl.i am of Hepentance at the temp;->
Friday. 8 p.m.; Kol Nldre Sunday at
p.m M.B. Convention Hall South.
featuring three traditional prayers by
cellist Earl Greenfield: Sermon:
"('rnmllmmf ami P*nin M"r. I w
Yi m Kippur. Sermon: "What Then?"
Simultaneous children s >-r\ -
ducted by Rabbi Robert Orkand: High
Holy Pay prayers led b) lay]
noon: followed by afternoon Ben
YISKor prayer and Keilah liturgv
Rahb: Orkands afternoon sermon will
be "I'n Adjusting to the Abnormal"
ISRAELITE ENTER. 31/5 SW 25th
St Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Wa.lenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnata
Fri.lay. R p.m Sabbath Eve let*
Sa'uniiy. s 4." a.m. Sermon: S '
nificance uf Teekuvah"; : p.m.. Mln-
cha and Maariv Sunday. Kol Ni-lre,
... or. in .,.: (.-,,r Whom tl
Siren S.-unds"; 7 pm.. Mlncha and
Hajari* Monda>. Yom Kippur I
a ni Sermon: "The Letter if l,
Maidens". ll.3 am. Visitor Memo-
nai Service; I2:M ,, m ..|U5ai S
p.m. Mlncha; ; pm. Neilah, Sera
"lii- Hook of V m .Ii Shofar bia-;
at sui.seL
TIPERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 5500
N Miami Aye. Conservative. 14
:iON "lemp.e. 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
aervative Raboi Norman S'-apiro
Cantoi Eerol H*Km*n '*
Friday. i:t< ;>.m.. Traditional Suneei
Service; Sunday. 7.15 pm. Kol Ni-
dre, Sermon: "Returning to HasiiV.
Monday, :' a.m Yom Kipnur. Ser-
mon: "Charting Our Future"; Yizkor
Memorial Service.
mmm
riFBRETM JACOB (Tempts). 81 E.
4th Ave. Conaervative. Rath'
Mettian Zolonaew 15
Sunday. 7:15 p.m.. Kol Nidre. Sermon:
"The Prayer for Forartvenea*". Mon-
day. H a.m.. Yom Kippur. Sermon:
"Self Evaluation" Ylakor. 12:30 p.m :
,"ncha. 4:30 p.m.. followed by Nei-
lah.
NOftTff MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION
2225 N E. 121*t St. Conaervative.
Rabbi "Or Daniel J. finqerer. Can
tor Yehuda Binvamin. 35
MIAMI BtAlU
^OUDATM |8RBL. 701 Carlyle Av*.
Orthodoar Rabb' 2h*ldon W Fver 1/
Saturday. :< am. Sermon: "True Re-
pentance Utilization of Man": 7
pm. Mlncha. followed by Maariv.
Sunday. Pre-faM meal follow* 2 p.m.
MlnrliH Service; 7 p.m.. Kol Nidre;
Monday. Sam. Stiachris. II .'<" am.
Yizkor Memorial Service. Sermon: "To
ni-nilier and He Remembered":
13:30 i> m Mu.-.if: 1:30 p.m., Mlncha:
. '" b.ib., Nullah; 8:M p.m. Shofar
and Mnativ.
ETH EL.
Orthodox
*00 Rlne Tre* '}'
JETM ISRAEL. 770 40th ot Orthodox,
^abbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
BETH JACL'B. SO* War-ington Ave
jrt-iooox Rabbi Sr-.iaryahu T.
Swiriky Cantor Maunoe Mamchea.
1
JETM RAPHAEL 'Temple). 1545 Jef
e.-ton Ave Conservative. Rabbi
r'liot Wmoorad r.ntor Sau' lrvfc
20
Pur lay. 8:31 n.m K >1 Nldre, Sermon:
"H-e Chain' : Monday, 8 a.m. Yom
KiDour, Sermon: "When Moaea
" 12:3" pm., Tiikor Memorial
Service.
1FT" ?H"' om --mple) 4M4 Chase
Ave. Liberal Rabbi i_*on Kronish
'"ntor Oi.fd Conviaer 9%
lay. 8:15 pm.. Shabbat Shuvah,
Sermon: "Is There No Place To Q
Sunday, Kol Ridre, S:1S and 8:4i p.m..
Sernnn: "What Shall We Believe?"
Monday, 9 l-S am. Sermon: "Will
""here Be A Jewish Fam?i> n.m,
S-'tpon: "Wher.- Are We Qolnar?" I.v -
Rabbi Harry Jolt: 4 p.m Yizkor
.--rvice Sermon: "What is the Mean-
ing of Our Living""
'EMRLr BHTM SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conse'vative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor feorae
*i Vareieini. 2'-a,
3u lay, 7 p.m. Kol Ni.ir,-. Sermon:
\'l \'ow.". Monday. 8 am : I!
, m Y'izkor Memorial Service. Ser-
in >n: "It Is Easy To Forget "
CONGREGATION BKTH TPILAH.
935 Euclid Av*. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M Trooper 21
86TH VOSEPH CHA'M CONGRE
GATJON. 843 M-eid.*n Av*. 22- A
TEWLE BNAI ZION. 200 173th St..
Miami B*ch. Rabbi Or. Abraham I.
Jacobson j?.**
I iy p m Saturday. 9 n m and
5:38 pm; High Holy bays Servi.es
noted it 17.1th Street Cinema.
Collins Avenue and 17"th Street Sec-
.nmversary .bseryame Monday.
marked by special prayata
.'JBAN HEBREW CONGMECATiON
.'? Watningtoi Ave. Ortndox
Rabbi Dow Renrtcwala;, zi
:uban sepharoic hebrcwcon
SREGAT'ON. 71 Washington Ave
abbi Meir Mailiah Melan unoay, 7 p.m., ija BM: 'V' > m .
K .1 Nidre: Monday, 8 am. Tefila
OR O' CM fTer-oie) 8755 9W 16th
St. Conservative Rabbi Dav 1 M.
'w r.nte- R';n
Friday. 8:15 p.m.. Sermon- "Apathy
and Repentance Saturda) I i" a.m..
Sermon: "The T-n Days of lenl-
ten. : Sundav 7 M | m Kol Midre
S rtnon: "L An Sin a Myth?": Mon-
v i m Y'-^m Kippur, Serr
"Averting the Stem Decree": M I
Keilah. ", p.m.. followed h) conare-
rational breaking of the fael i
Oollaalon in th^ social hail (by
van.e reservation only).
Tfmpi f isRae- .mOWt**
Beth Tikva) 8025 Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph. R Narjt. "3-A
BAMU f_. (Temo'c) 88C0 SW 10Tt
Ave.. Suits J0 "ISO i>.
B*'0r i
Kol Nldre Sunday. 7 p_m.; Yom Kip-
pt.r ... oV rr\ a> He***; I k5
a.m.. Torah service: 1145 a.m.. Ser-
mon and YizK 1 p.m.. Mil-
K.->f 3 nm. M'-ha; p.m. Neilah
and Mincha service.
fMANU-EL fTsmoiej. 1701 Wash oq.
ten Ave. Cone*, vativ*. Rabbi Irvt'no
.rman Cantor Zvi A*l ?
I 8 n.m.. Katrbalat Shabbat
errlcea in flie analn nanctuary Sat-
: am. Shabhoa SUuivah (Sab-
rf Repentance) service; \-m
t- earelcw in Convention Hall
N' rh uill Urgin Sumla> evening wi'h
N Ire md .ontinue through Mon-
^EBREW ACADEMY 2MT eine Tree
Dr Orthodox. Raobi Alexander S
Qr*as 2e
J_ int servi.es with CoeaZTegation Beth
lemy's auditorium Kol
V(dr. 8:15 n.m Sundav. S-rnini:
vn-at I* A Jew' by Rabbi Aim I
' iy. a.m 9 "it
it .r A t--iv--": Yizkor Me-
morial Service. Ham.
ACOS r. COHEN COMMUNITY
SVNAGOOUE 1532 Washington Ave. ,
Orthsaox. Rabbi ribnr H. Stern
Can-or Msver Enewl. ?*
I.-. : J(I im Shabbath Slun
5 p.m annual Torah ler-ture Sun
7 > ra Kol Nidre. Serm.n: "Be*
h.r^" (S:f Determinatingt Monday,
am, Y*om k'ipoor. Sermon: "If f
Forget Thee. O Jerusalem": Tizkof
Srvlces. noon: Neilah. ftli -m .
of Fast 8:11 p.m.
iro
yER tamid iTempie t S.
Criv e Ave. Con*rvative. Raooi
Eoorne Labovitt Cantor EJwar
Klein.
21
Krldai 7 p.m
- S
Kei ;- '"v
Sunday. 7 n.m K '. N'id- S
Yom Kippur War l'lus ru
.\l.....la*. 9 3d -i ni Y..ni kippui ll
i m i /'"!. Serm n ''
i >ur Dearly Departed AUKlllarj aerv-
loaa tor non-affiliated in -it- tempi -
Sklar Auilitorium ciLlui'lcil by Itabbi
Mward Farver and Cam Hyman
Fein.
jHEV SHALOM. '055 Bonita Dr
Orthodox. Raboi t-nineas A. Weh
men. *I
Baturoay, Shaehria, '" i m -"
period. .". p.m.. Minch.ih. 7 p.m Sun-
day. Minchah S P m. Kol Nldre. 7
pm.: Monday. Shachns. 8 am To-
ran leading. |l):30 a m Sermon and
Yizkor. 11:15 a.m.. Mussaf. 12:15 p.m..
Minchah. 4 pm. Sermon and Neilah.
8:80 p m Shofar and Maariv 8 p m
EPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. f48
Collins Ave. Rabbi S>i. Nahmia* '
Saturday 8:30 am. Shabbns Shuva:
Sunday. i:^* p m S-rmon "The 0 >
of Rapnineaa." Monday. am Ser-
mon: "A Passinc Shadow YiSkpr
Memorial Services, noon.
CONGREGATION ET2 CHAIM
44 Washington Ave
1542
32
MORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
North Bay Villaqe. Conservative
C*ne Murray Vvtth S2-A
Continued on Page 14-B
Four prominent American
Zionist leaders will l among
rhe fsatured >peaKers at the
national Golden Jubilee Con-
vention of the Pionew >m?n
iduled at the Deauville Ho-
tel in
MN Harriet GreeB. chair-
man of :he four-Jay conclave
ami president of the Pionvser
Women Council of South Flor-
ida announced -he acceptances
of Mrs. Esther Zacklar. former
national president of the Pio-
neer Women, and I. L. Kenen,
former chairman of the Amer-
ican-Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC).
Dr. Judah Shapiro, president
of the Labor Zionist Alliance.
and Dr. Allen Pollack, Yeshiva
University professor and mem-
ber of the American section of
the Jewish Agency, will also
address the convention expect-
ed to draw some 2,000 dele-
gates from throughout the
world, Mrs. Green said.
Other speakers already
scheduled for the conclave
marking the 50th anniversary
of the founding of the Pioneer
Women will be U.S. Senator
Lloyd M. Bentsen (D.. Tex.)
and Ambassador Simcha Dinitz.
Israel's envoy to the United
States.
Pioneer Women -. ,,
wl* rTomefi
gamzatt ...n in
.
"*
PROF. ALLEN POLLACK
twelve countries overseas,
the largest Jewish wotwo,*!
ganization in the world
over 650.000 members.
Convention headquarters
located in Suite 600 of the i
Lincoln Road Building in
ami Beach.
Maxwell House Coffee
Honors Famous Jewish-American Patriots
HAYM SALOMON 17-40 1785
Financier Sinker of the American Resolution Patriot
Hayni Salomon was a fervent putri.u,
whose love of liberty and business
acumen combined to make him the
financial hero in the War ot Inde-:
pendence. Born in Poland in 1740. he was
forced to flee that country in 1772, due to his*'
fight for freedom, along with Pulaski and'
Kosciusko who became military heroes of the
Revolution.
Salomon prospered from the very start in
America, doing business with wealthy loyalists
while joining the Sons of Liberty, a group ol
revolutionary patriots. He was twice arres'ed
by the British but managed to escape execution
both times: finally fleeing to Philadelphia.
Salomon's reputation for honesty and skill in'
trade, especially foreign, attracted Robert
Morris, then Superintendent of Finance, who,
called on him for help in raising money to u age'
the war. and later to save the emerging nation
from financial collapse. Morris' diary indicates
some 75 transactions were made by the two
men between August 1781 and April 1784.
As President Calvin Coolidge said of Haym
A tradition in American-Jewish homes
for half a century
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
Salomon: "He negotiated for Robert Morris
all the loans raised in France and Holland,
pledged his personal faith and fortune i w Mor-
mons amounts, and personally advanced large
sums to such men as James Madison. Thomas
Jefferson. Baron Steuben. General St. Cur mi
many other patriot leaders who testified that
without his aid they could not have car.-don
the cause."
Salomon's place in history is memorialized ^
a 20-foot h:gh statue standing at Wab wd
Waeker in Chicago. Unveiled in 1941, the
statue depicts three great Revolutionaries!
George Wa>hington in the middle, flanked by
Robert Morris and Haym Salomon. It is a tell-
ing tribute to the Jewish-American patriot
whose lile was dedicated to his family, friends
and country.
r'onormq|776anfJ
Famous fc]
"' Wicaefowon.
SEND FDR
EXCITING
BOOKLET
Honoring 1771b *
and Famous
Jews in
Amencin
History
" J your children will 'hfillH
M| stories in this hookl-'
It"* frrith ftirtrim* ( imiwica the I
in) "historic^ Jews who mad< '
camrietRhflM Si the creation ifta
M: n.u wn. Send name nil iddiea* with Ji'-'-'
JEW t?H AMERICAN PATRIOT"
H'-v i HH. Urand Central Stan >rt
N."a Y,).-k, N Y. 10017


September 12, 19"5
+Anist Fhridtton
Tage 3-B
Betty Ford's Appearance Hailed at Zionist Dinner
K Israeli Am-
Dinitz has ex-
here that
? n agret.
I point m
r hich has lorg
1 Into war
nov. tad the Arab world
I peace
Dinitz. who returned 24 hours
B? from Jerusalem, where
rated in the negotia-
tor the pact, spoke at the
taanmia. dinner of the Reh-
Z aomsts of America, fhe
kre than 2 COO persons who
Tended UH fete were espe-
Uv excited about the appear-
of Mrs. Betty Ford, wife
[the President.
lany rushed up to the front
I the dais to get her autograph
LL tht dinner. Mrs. Ford,
k heard Dinitz. RZA presi-
L, Dr. Maurice Sage and
kr RZA officials praise her
JTband for his long-time sup-
In of Israel and for the
jhievement of the Sinai agree-
knt said she had "a very emo-
Cnal evening at the RZA din-
er.
.She presented the organiza-
Ln's Israel Independence Day
Lard to Milton H. Hoffman, a
Led kosher food industrial-
fwho is a long-time friend
T the Fords.
*
Stone Marks Birtliday
lUNIONDALE, N.Y. One of
, men most instrumental in
i United States for the estab-
_jent of the State of Israel
quietly observing his 75th
rthday in Boston.
is Dewty D. Stone, born
I ]<<(( who has
been dii oi tht pasl thrc -
. debilitating effects
: Pai I -ase. and so
has not been Been in public in
cent years.
But for over half a century,
Stone's name has been synony-
mous with the Zionist move-
ment in the United States.
*
New Insights Into Leukemia
FEHOVOT, Israel A study
of the membranous outer cov-
erings of white blood cells re-
cently carried out by Weiz-
man Institute scientst Prof. Leo
Sachs has shown that membrane
characteristics can be used to
clearly distinguish some forms
of leukemia and Hodokin's dis-
ease, a factor which may be
useful as an aid in the clinical
diagnosis of these illnesses.
In addition he has discov-
ered that myeloid leukemia is
caused by at least three differ-
ent disturbances in cell chem-
istry, an important factor in the
characterization of this cancer.
Prof. Sachs, head of the Insti-
tute's Department of Genetics
and dean of its Faculty of Bi-
ology, examined the membranes
of white blood cells from pa-
tients with chronic lymphocytic
leukemia and Hodgkin's dis-
ease a cancerous condition
of the lymphatic system.
Working with Dr. Uri Mintz|
of the Tel Aviv University Med
ical School, he applied a grour
of recently developed mem
m
l
brane characterization test- to
and was able to
of the
' .ions and
y blood.
The tasts beet their
. may well serve as
in the diagnosis of these
es.
:V ft -b
Soskis to Retire
NEW YORK Philip Soskis,
veteran agency executive and
Jewish communal leader, who
assisted in the founding of NY-
ANA, the New York Association
for New Americans, in 1949 and
has served as its executive di-
rector for 23 years, is to retire
at the end of the current year.
Mrs. Sophie S. Udell, president
of NYANA, announced this
week.
Under his direction, and
"thanks in large measure to
Phil Soskis' extraordinary abil-
ity and commitment," Mrs.
Udell noted, NYANA has assist-
ed in the settlement and inte-
gration of more than 155,000
Jewish refugees in the Greater
New York area, with funds pro-
vided by the United Jewish Ap-
peal (and more,recently .by the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies).
fr ir -ft
Jackson Voices Concern
WASHINGTONFor the sec-
ond time since the Yom Kippur
War, Israel has agreed to with-
draw from defensive positions
in the Sinai in the hope that
peace, like the Israeli defense
line, will be brought closer to
home, Sen. Henry Jackson de-
ed here.
"But unlike the earlier
engagement with Egypt or last
year's agreement with Syria,
this most recent agreeme:H
volves, for the first time, the
stationing of American person-
nel in the zone separating two
hostile armies."
Jackson, echoing sentiments
he cited at a Brandeis Univer-
sity dinner in New York on
Sept. 9. declared that "This is
a development that many Amer-
icans and many Israelis have
greeted with reservations and
I am bound to say that I am
among those who are concerned
at the implications of superpow-
er involvement in the Arab-Is-
raeli dispute.''
Emigration to U.S. Doubles
NEW YORK Of the 9.000
Soviet Jews to emigrate to the
United States with HIAS' help
since 1968, more than a third,
3.490. arrived in 1974. reports
United HIAS Service President
Carl Glick in the migration
agency's annual report.
The 1974 figure represents a
100 plus percent increase over
the number of Soviet Jews ar-
riving on U.S. shores in 1973.
"For HIAS," Glick said, "1974
will be remembered as the year
of the Russian migrant."
LANDOW LUBAVITCH
YESHIVA THRIFT STORE
OHOLEI TORAH BOYS
BETH CHANA GIRLS
YESHIVA GEDOLA GRADUATES
Needs Your Good, Used Furniture,
Clothing, Appliances
Dishes, Pots and Pans, Bric-A-Brac
and What Have You!
FOR FREE PICK UP CALL
653-2270 -:- 653-2271
All Donations Tax Deductible
Sueeeth will end.
Bui fading the Tciah gees en feieven
BY ESTHER FEINBERG
Succoth is the joyous time of year when everybody gathers to enjoy the bountiful fruits of the harvest -
The end of Succoth also the time when we complete, and ^^^tltlTlSS^^S^SSt^
These delicious holiday recipes come to you from the makers of HELLMANN S and BEST FOODS-
Real Mayonnaise. We hope you like them.
SQUASH AU GRATIN
1 cup HtLLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 cup finely 6hredded Cheddar
cheese or grated Parmesan
cheese
2 eggs, slightly beaten
112 cup chopped onion
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
I /4 teaspoon salt
Dash pepper
2 pounds yellow summer squash
cut in 1/2-inch slices, cooked
and drained (about 5 cups)
1 cup soft bread crumbs
2 tablespoons Nucoa margarine,
melted
In large bowl stir together first seven
ingredients. Fold in squash. Turn into
greased 10 x 6 x 1 3/4-inch baking
dish. Toss together bread crumbs and
margarine; sprinkle over squash mix-
lure. Bake uncovered in 350'F oven 40
to 45 minutes or untH lightly browned.
Serves 6.
Submitted by.
Mrs. Herman Cohen, Norfolk, VA
CRISP SUGAR COOKIES
3 eggs
1 t/2 cups sugar
3/4 cup HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
2 teaspoons vanilla
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
4 cups unsifted Hour
In large bowl of electric mixer stir to-
gether all ingredients until well mixed.
Cover and chill dough at least 2 hours.
Shape dough by level tablespoonfuls
into balls. Place 3 inches apart on well
greased cookie sheet; tlatten with bot-
tom of glass dipped in sugar. Bake in
400F. oven 6 to 8 minutes or until
rightly browned around edges. Immedi-
ately remove from cookie sheet; cool
on wire racks. Makes about 65 (3-mch)
cookies.
Submitted by:
Lea Roberts, Los Angeles, CA
CUCUMBER RELISH
3 large cucumbers, pared
1/2 to 1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons
HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 teaspoon dried dill weed
1/4 cup plain yogurt
Cut cucumbers in half lengthwise Re-
move seeds; cut into thin strips about
2 inches long. Sprinkle with salt; let
stand 1 hour Rinse with cold water;
drain thoroughly. Strr together Real
Mayonnaise and dill weed Fold in
yogurt. Pour mixture over cucumbers.
Cover and chill several hours. If de-
sired, serve on bed ol lettuce. Makes
about 2 cups.
Submitted by:
Mrs. Helen Silverberg, Brooklyn, NY
PLEASE-send us your recipes
We'd be delighted if you'd share more
of your favorite Kosher mayonnaise
recipes with us. We'll print your name
and send you $10.00 for any recipe we
use in our advertising. Just send your
special uses tor HELLMANN'S or BEST
FOODS Mayonnaise to me;
EstherFeinberg.ConsumerServiceDept.
Best Foods Div of CPC Int'l Inc.
Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632.
Be sure to include your name and ad-
dress. All recipes become the property
of Best Foods, and may be adiusted or
edited betore publication
Easi or ihe Rock.cg Ihe name is hElimann 'S
West 111 BEST FOODS By Ihei name, rt t
Ihe same line Real Mayonnaise
BAKED FISH FILLETS
1 package (16 cz) frozen flounder
tillets, thawed
1/2 cup HELLMANN S/BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
4 reaspoors preccred mustard
2 tablespoons chopped green onion
1 can (16 oz) s.iced carrots, drained
Cut fish into serving size pieces, dram
on paper towels Place m 113/4 x
7 1/2x1 3/4-incn baking dish Stir to-
gether Real Mayonnaise and mustaro.
spoon over fish Sprinkle with onion
Arrange carrots around fi.ih. Bake un-
covered m 35CF. o^en '.5 minutes or
until fish flakec e a; ,.v.intcrk Serves4
Submitted by:
Mrs. Fleischmen, Wtsl Hempstead, NY
:


Page 4-B
fJewish fkrudlirnm
Friday, September
1:
\
Congress Grapples
With Sinai Desert
Civilians Issue
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Congress returned to Washing-
ton from its August recess to
grapple with the issue of weth-
er American civilians should
be stationed in Sinai as proposed
under the Israeli-Kgyptian in-
terim agreement initialed by
both sides.
The President and Kissinger
have already discussed details
of the American commitments
associated with the Israeli-Egyp-
tian interim agreement, especi-
ally the stationing of American
civilian technicians between
Israeli and Egyptian lines to
monitor electronic detecting
equipment designed to give in-
stant information of military
movements on both sides.
THE ADMINISTRATION,
"approaching this with a sense
of urgency," as a State Depart-
ment spokesman put it, is push-
ing hard for a quick resolution
by Congress on the U.S. com-
mitment of monitors. White
House aides have had "prelim-
inary conversations" with the
two Congressional committees
dealing with foreign affairs and
the dates will be set soon for
Kissinger to testify before them.
In the rush for Congressional
approval, Administration offi-
cials were nevertheless cautious
in declining to predict publicly
when Congress may act.
It is eenerally understood
here that unless Congress ap-
proves the American personnel
role, and other aspects to the
agreement directly involving
the U.S., the effort for a second-
stage Israeli withdrawal will
founder.
STATE Department spokes-
man Robert Funseth said the
Administration's presentation to
Congress of the Middle East
package will consist of "full
consultation" on the agree-
ments, request for approval of
the U.S. civilian monitors and
Congressional legislation for the
expenditure of funds through
normal appropriations channels.
These would include Amer-
ican assurance of oil supplies
for Israel. Funding usually re-
quires much time, but delay on
that element is not expected to
impede Israel's withdrawal.
The personnel issue, however,
is viewed as decisive. There are
also commitments that Kissinger
may have made to Egypt which
are unknown and could possibly
wreck the accord.
According to one observer, a
sense of "uneasiness" prevails
on Capitol Hill. Few Congress-
men will commit themselves at
this time. Sen. Majority Leader
Mike Mansfield (D., Mont.) has
reiterated his opposition, ex-
pressed last week, to the Amer-
ican monitoring role.
AMERICAN civilians in Sinai
"sets a bad precedent," Mans-
field said. He suggested that
the monitoring "should be done
by the United Nations."
Sen. Gale McGee (D., Wyo.)
conceded that involving Amer-
icans was "risky, but well worth
the risk if we can contribute to
peice in the Middle East."
Rep. John Anderson (R., Ill),
third-ranking House Republi-
can, siid he expected to "sup-
port the agreement," noting
that the monitors "will not be
military or even paramilitary
personnel" and therefore "the
argument that it would involve
the U.S. militarv in the Middle
East with combat forces is not
a rood argument."
But a senior member of the
House Appropriations Commit-
'icommitee on foreign
operations, Rep. David Obey
(D., Wise.) warned on a tele-
vised interview that U.S. tech-
nicians in Sinai could become
symbols for terrorists "who
want to blow things up."
OBEY, a member of a Hous,'
delegation that recently visited
Israel, Egypt. Jordan and Syria.
said that "If the terrorists do
attack and the U.S. responds as
it did in the Mayaguez affair
involving Cambodia, the U.S.
may well be basically unable
for a long time to play an ef-
fective role in the Middle East."
Leaders of Jewish organiza-
tions called uoon Ford to urge
Congress to approve the pres-
ence of U.S. civilian personnel
in the Sinai and expressed the
view that the upcoming Con-
gressional debate is not just a
Jewish concern but a national
matter involving all Americans.
Mrs. Charlotte Jacobson,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization-American Section,
said that with the "assumption
by the U.S. of participatory role
is the peace-making and peace-
keeping process in the Mideast,
it becomes essential for the
American people to understand
how their continued concern
for peace in the area is vital to
American interests."
REFERRING to the pending
Congressional hearings in re-
gard to American commitments,
Mrs. Jacobson emphasized the
importance of full support for
those commitments by the
American people as their means
of expressing their belief in the
need for maintaining the secur-
ity of Israel.
At the same time, she pledged
the continued vigilance of the
Jewish people on behalf of Is-
rael as the new pact is tested
in the months ahead.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith noted that thf-e
is some concern that th U.S.
commitment is a risk in light of
this country's experience.
Seymour Graubard. ADL's
national chairman, said. "There
is a fundamental difference in
t1 i;s instance. Egvot and Israel
have both indicated that the
presence of U.S. civilians is
desirable and have requested
that they be sent to monitor and
operate earlv warning stations
in the Sinai."
WHILE welcoming the agree-
ment, Graubard also called for
"direct. fac-to-face negotiations
between the parties." as the
onlv road "to the mutual trust I ^_ ^
and credibility which are neces-. 7 | ^j
sarv for a real and lasting solu- i ^
tion."
Abel Holtz, chairman of
the board of directors of
The Capital Bank of North
Bay Village lias announc-
ed the appointment of Irv-
ing A. Levine as senior
vice president. Mr. Levine,
who comes to the Capital
Bank from the
Bank of North
New York, where he was
senior vice president, will
be responsible for all com-
mercial lending.
Senate Supports
Investigation Of
Condo Leases
The U.S. Senate passed H.R.
8121, which directs the Federal
Trade Commission to complete
its investigation into 99-year
condominium lease abuses, last
week.
Rep. Bill Lehman (D., Fla.).
had sponsored a similar move
in the House which was ap-
proved on June 26 and Sen.
Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.), spon-
sored the Senate action.
In language prepared jointly
by Lehman and Chiles for a re-
port to accompany the bill, the
Senate Appropriations Commit-
tee said:
"The Committee concurs in
the House increase of .
$75,000 for the condominium
investigation with the under-
standing that the Commission
will utilize whatever resources
are necessary to complete the
condominium Investigation and
that 575,000 shall not be con-
strued as a ceiling."
"Both Houses of Congress
have now ordered the Federal
Trade Commission to complete
its investigation into unfair and
deceitful condominium leas .
said the Congressman.
"I will be carefully watching
the progress of the FTC investi-
gation to insure the earliest
possible action to relieve the
hard pressed condominium
owners in South Florida," he
added.
PUZZLED! by Norioa A. o!ov
C N A V I S M Q p
:: r a Y I R z : ;
i r"h s i i u o a
b v v h i g m t v
pefsznmeh
dagbljabs
ldmauste:
NAZTLKIT :-f
itz
W R W S
6
C F
it
The twelve month.-; on the Hebrew calendar, plus the]
one alternate month are included in this puzzle The
month i are placed vertically, horizontally, d:
ards i n.l backwards. How many cun you find?]
The an iwers are on p ge 6-B.
GHTSRE ERVED. VARIATIONS IN Ti \\.|
3 AND PHONETIC SI ELL.NG M.
CUR.
Presidents of all major Jewish women's organizations
have formed a "Council of Presidents" to coordinatt
their activities for the coming year. Mrs. Adolph Berger
(second from right) of North Miami Beach, Community
Education Vice President of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division, convened a meeting of
the Council last week. Among the presidents taking part
were Mrs. Ben Belfus, representing Brandeis University
National Women's Committee, and Mrs. Alfred Stone,
representing American Mizrachi Women, (left) and Judy
M. Gilbert, (right) representing National Council of Jew-
ish Women.
HADASSAH
Extends to trie
iwnii uwish community
Besi Withes for a Happy New Yea- To All...
THE MIAMI CHAPTER
Mrs Harvey Friedman
President
THE MIAMI BEACH CHAM
Mrs. Jean Feinberg
President
The American Jewish Con-'.
press expressed support fori
Ford's call for the use of U.S.;
civilians to monitor the new Si-1
nai agreement and said a U.S.]
presence there was an "essen-
tial" element in nrogress toward
peace in the Midat. In a tele-
gram to the White House. Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg. president of
the AJCongress, stated:
"The fact that small numbers
of American civilian technicians
will be stationed on both sides
and will be there at the request j
of both parties should elimi-
na'# anv serious apprehension
that America will find itself
drawn into some future conflict.
American citizens would not be;
there in any partisan capacity !
and would not be identified
with the cause of either side. '
Any analogy to America's past
involvements or to conflicts in
anv-other Part of the world is
wholly misleading."
Wholesale Distributors of
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KOSHER POULTRY
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lay,
September 12. 1975
^Jeniit fhhkMOHn
Page 5-B
Betty Ford Can't
Have it Both Ways
ill Is
TOK, The Jewish Floridian:
Pord's statement a**- fl"""""""""-
sexual promiscuity and
quent qualification re-
"r infantile naivete that
,,, malady. She would
no measures be taken
^xual relations ou'side
iage commitment, yet
me time she feels the
ng family ties and
, neatest thing.
V, .'i juvenile think-
md among those who
c a car with a green ecol-
demanding that we
It they want
L, th should get rid of
line that pollutes it.
!!, FEDERAL gowrnmen!
milli 'as of dollars for
i i cancer, heart
ease and relat-d illness s
,1, ,i the same time it legal-
r.i even sibsidizes the
notion and sale of tobacco,
fe've removed disciplinary .
traints and moral teaching
m our schools and also ex-
.1 them to be crime-free,
nquii place? of learning.
The economy of our nation
1 its cities faces imminent
ure because of massive
nding in non productive,
iteful areas on one side and
tolerance of widespread cor-
ption on the other side.
We cry about the energy
ortage and set up expensive
eral bureaucracies to handle
problem, yet we guzzle gas-
line and burn electricity as if
iev were limitless resources.
THE FIRST Lady in her State-
our childish na-
H of wanting to
re 0 r.d to cat it.
Yo cannot I" '
B( ,ut on ail
Jdes t'.ie Ior.".-la t-
l loyal family,
ou i :ommitmcnt
; fo i moinari-
iry .. tsures.
We real! e that there
st forci s that are poised
us from within
the form oi immorality, pol-
htion. disease, crime and eco-
nomic failure.
If we do not exert counter-
lorcis of equal strength to op-
pose them, they will succeed in
destroying this nation. Alt r
wo-hundred years of exisUnse,
It is time we grew up and a>.-
pumed a mature mentality.
PHlNEAS A. WEBERMAN
RABBI
Ohev Shalom
Congregation
irmrtmnwiHM
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Word* Be Brief
Kohekth (Ecclesiastej)
more apirj apply to the sen-
sational distortions than
to Mrs. Ford herself, who
mainly tried, apparently
to the Rabbi's dissatisfac-
tion, to correct the record.
Halloran To MC
Tuesday Luncheon
Boh Halloran, WTVJ-Ch. 4
snortcaster, will be the emcee
for the. 5th Anniversary Archie
Stone Foundation Dolphin Hur-
ricane Kickoff Luncheon Tues-
day at th f?ami Springs Villas
Playhouse.
Team captains from the Mi-
ami Dolphins and nlayers from
the University of Miami will be
among the featured speakers at
the lunch-on which begins at
11:30 a.m. Hurricane head
coach Carl Selmer and his staff
bnve chosen to select team cap-
tains on a game-by-game basis.
Monies raised through the
l'*ncheon a*e distributed in
grants, with half designated for
Variety Children Hospital and
half for snorts-oriented youth
orfHnizations. In five vears, the
Archie Stom Foundation has
raised .ind dispensed more than
$65,000.
For tickets or more informa-
tion, call the Archie Stone
Foundation. ,
Florida Conference On Quality
Of Life At Americana Oct. 5-7
A Florida Conference on the
Quality of Life, "to examine
those factors which affect a
child from conception through
adolescence, and which deter-
mine the quality of a child's
life," will be held Oct. 5-7 at
the Americana Hotel, Bal Har-
bour.
Mrs. Sydney L. Weintraub,
civic leader, and Bernard J.
Fogel, M. D., assistant vice pres-
ident for medical affairs, Uni-
versity of Miami School of Med-
icine, will be cochairmen of
the event sponsored by the
Florida Medical Association,
Junior League of Miami, Dade
County Chanter, National Foun-
dation-March of Dimes and Uni-
versity of Miami School of Med-
icine.
Topics to be discussed include
prenatal care, family living,
parenting, child abuse and neg-
lect, the. child's environment,
social influences, education, le-
v?\ aspects and the volunteer's
role.
Cosnonsorsat least 50, who
will br'ng the attendance to
over 500include Coral Gables
Hospital, and Mt. Sinai Hospital
Volunteer Services; Baptist,
Jackson Memorial, Mercy, James
A. Smith, South Florida State
and Va/iety Children's hospi-
tals: Dade Public Schools, Dade
Public Welfare, Florida Acade-
my of Family Physicians and
Dade County Department of
Public Health.
The public is invited to at-
tend; registration fee includes
a banquet, two luncheons and
all meetings.
rVewmark Drawings Featured
The drawings of Marylynne
Newmark, a free-lance illustra-
tor and portraitist, will be fea-
tured by Temple Beth Am in
its first exhibition-sale of the
new year Friday, Sept. 26, fol-
lowing the 8:30 p.m. services.
The showing, on the theme
"Man's Relationship to Man,"
will feature studies of people,
their introspections and interre-
lationships.
EDITOR'S NOTE: To be fair
to the First Lady, Mrs.
Ford's subsequent "quali-
fications" ciearly suggest
that some of t/ie attitudes
JtMouieci to her in the
VM pia^e were deliber-
JteJv distorted to make
men. more sensational.
u -- Kc/' ,n W'ebcrman is
' tally accurate, he
W < rtheless dismisses her
Unifications as "infantile
'' which would
COMPLETE LINE
RELIGIOUS GOODS
SELECTED ISRAELI
ESROGIM
!SS crystal, inc.
5(J/ Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Phone 532-5912
APPY NEW YEAR
Cook with Sweet-Unsalted Mazola;
and you may soon be baking in Puerto Rico.
Send us your favorite recipe using
Sweet Unsalted Mazola Margarine,
and you could win one of these ex-
citing prizes:
lstprize: A week tor two at the elegant
Americana Hotel, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, with breakfast and dinner daily.
Round-trip transportation from New
York to San Juan will be via smooth,
comfortable American Airlines 747.
Three 2nd prizes: $ 100 in cash.
Doing whut wedobest.
Contest is so easy to enter.
The recipe you submit can be a standard
to which you've added some personal
touches of your own. Or it can be a crea-
tion that's entirely yours. (The judges will
be looking for that extra little something
you do that makes a dish really special.)
You can choose an appetizer. A main dish.
Any kind of pastry or dessert. In fact, what-
ever you like. And you can enter as many
recipes as you wish. The only requirement
I iitrre ""H"" "' """
Mi
Mrs
Mi..
\inie
lll.il
iFlTKl
Add...

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Mi *f l

under .'"? IS4.0
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Dot milk nine,
Do(ia>iep.e.eren.r "' l*"*- S,'"--J""
DOito (Flat* "*>>)
.
is that the ingredients include Sweet Un-
salted Mazola Margarine and that a proof
of purchase accompany each recipe. And
the use of Sweet Unsalted Mazola makes
this contest even easier.
Sweet Unsalted Mazola is one of the few
margarines that's not only kosher, but
parve. as well (which means you're not
imited to dairy dishes) What's more, un-
ike butter and the majority of other
margarines, it won't burn at normal frying
temperatures. And since Sweet Unsalted
Mazola is made with pure com oil it s also
high in poly ui iwinsaturated
fats.Andcno!esrrol-free But mostimpor-
tant, Sweet Unsalted Mazola has .1 light,
-- delicate flavor that m ikes whatever you
make taste particularly delectable,
So send in those recipes Who know-?
That Puerto Rican rip coi 'd be
thing you'vegotcookingright now
Contest Rules.
| Br,.., Mtull MMgnm inJ be
nyihmfromanhund'oc roadmen
Vi mav mei ." Irani rtopei > u *nh but m* "'"*""
m .....moanied bi i proof -I puichiK limn ilig ih
... ..i,, omum liquid Com Oil from from ml) Nut* addre.
,*i telephone numbr- ihouM be in. laird ith ra.h re.ipr No
entry -ill be a..epted nfcout nueom ihe abuie requirement.
No en", .ill he Kknowttdfrdoi leiumed
1 Enme. IMOI he poOTH :led no Uift .ha., 12/ 11/7* Winnm
will be inn.Hin.ed ihr ^rek ol 4/V 7^
Mill i.i Sneei I'nulieil Minxi
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Grand Cennai PoHOfrka
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:
STORE COUPON IS
Tv*>THt IUAUK 1
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hjndlinff chargn P'
compbrd with the lei
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Send to ReM Foo* Di*w I IX IihwiuhomI In*
Chnicw !.'- i527M





I IOC Here's 10c to get you started. AU


Page 6-B
+Jeistfk>riditer
Friday, September
.
United Synagogue Movement
Plans Week Of Activities
United Synagogue Conserva-
tive Movement Week, Oct. 12-
18, will honor -the 20 Conserva-
tive Congregations in South
Florida affiliated with the
United Synagogue of America,
Joseph Golden of Beth Torah
Congregation. North Miami
Beach, president of the South-
east Region United Synagogue,
announces.
A week of exciting events and
activities is planned, involving
the United Synagogue Youth and
Kadimah Youth Groups. Wom-
en's League for Conservative
Judaism. National Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs. Rabbinical
Assembly, Cantors Assembly,
Afternoon Hebrew Schools. Solo-
mon Schechter Day Schools and
affiliated member, synagogues.
Morton Grebelsky of Temple
Emanu-El, Miami Beach, who is
the chairman of this action-
filled week.* %aid, "Tne purpose
of this series of events is to in-
form a:.d make known to South
Florida Jewry the contribution
and progress of the United Syna-
gogue and the Conservative
Movement in our area as well
as throughout the Jewish world.
"The week will also provide
an opportunity to give recogni-
tion, by the presentation of Cer-
tificates of Appreciation to all
affiliated synagogues and their
professional staff, including the
rabbi, cantor, educational direc-
tor, executive director as well as
to synagogue presidents and
heads of the constituent arms of
the Conservative Movement, for
their part in making the United
Synagogue and the Conservative
Movement in South Florida an
effective force," Grebelsky
added.
Area conferences will be held
at which time Certificates of
Appreciation will be awarded.
For the first time boards of di-
rectors of area synagogues will
gather together for a dinner
meeting to discuss matters of
mutual concern. This will be
followed by an open meeting of
the membership of the afore-
mentioned synagogues.
Highlighting these events will
be Dr. Morton Siegel, executive
director and director of the
Department of Elementary.
Secondary and Adult Education
of the United Synagogue of
America.
Eugene Lipman of Beth To-
rah Congregation is the chair-
man of the North Miami Beach-
Hollywood Area Confe/ence
which will be held Monday. Oct.
13, at Temple Beth Moshe.
North Miami.
Participating synagogues will
be Beth Torah Congregation.
Congregation B'nai Raphael.
Temple Beth Moshe. Temple
Sinai, Hollywood; Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood; and Temple
in the Pines, Pembroke Pines.
Tuesday evening a similar
meeting will be held in Miami
Beach for the affiliated syna-
gogues in Miami and Miami
Beach. They are Temple Emanu-
El, Temple Menorah. Temple
Ner Tamid. Beth David Congre-
gation, Temple Or Olom and
Temple 7ion.
Affiliated Conservative Con-
gregations Temple Sholom. Pom-
pano Beari-; Temple Beth Is-
rael, Ft. Lauderdale: B'nai To-
rah Congregation, Boca Raton;
and Temple Beth El. West Palm
Beach, will hold their Area Con-
ference Wednesday. Oct. 16. at
Temple Sholom, Pompano
Beach.
The week's festivities will be-
gin on Sunday, October 12 with
a Youth Festival with each of
the twenty United Synagogue
Youth and Kadimah Chapte-s
displaying various aspects of
Youth Programming. Specially
constructed booths are being
made for this occasion which
will portray different aspects of
USY activities such as Tikvah,
Tikun Olam. Soviet Jewry, So-
cial Action, Israel Pilgrimage.
East European Tours, USY-On-
Wheels and other similar proj-
ects.
Judge Arthur Winton, vice
president of the Southeast Re-
gion United Synagogue of
America, and the Regional
Youth Commission Chairman,
has appointed Ed Hoffman
of Beth Sholom Congregation.
Hollywood, as chairman. Herzl
Honor, Education Director of
Temple Zion, Miami, is coordi-
nating the activities for the
Afternoon Hebrew Schools.
Ms. Ruth Wagner of B'nai
Raphael Congregation; president
of South Florida USY, is USY
chairperson for this event,. Dr.
Siegel will keynote the evening
and Certificates of Appreciation
will be awarded to USY presi-
dents, regional officers, youth
committee chairmen and youth
directors.
On Tuesday, October 14, a
Solomon Schechter Day School
Conference for Professional and
Lay Leaders is being planned
with Dr. Siegel presiding. This
will be the first such confer-
ence held in the Southeast.
Participating will be day
schools from Temple- Emanu-
El and Temple Menorah, Mi-
ami Beach; Beth David Congre-
gation, Miami; Jacksonville,
Jewish Center, Jacksonville;
Congregation Rodeph Sholom,
Tampa; Ahavath Achim Congre-
gation, Atlanta, Georgia.
Other day schools in Miami,
Hollywood. Ft. Lauderdale.
West Palm Beach, Orlando, and
Birmingham, Ala., have been
invited to participate.
The Southeast Region Rab-
binical Assembly President,
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz an-
nounces that a colloquim deal-
ing with matters of Rabbinic
and general interest will be
held on Wednesday, Oct. 15;
Rabbis in the area from the
three branches of Judaism will
be invited to participate and
present papers.
Mrs. Marcy Levin, of Beth
Sholom Congregation in Holly-
wood, president of the Florida
Branch of the Women's League
for Conservative Judaism, has
called for a Mini-Conference of
the twenty Sisterhood Chapters
in South Florida for Thursday,
October 16. The Conference
dealing with the Sisterhoods'
role in the developmer
Conservative Judaism will be
under the chairmanship of
Mrs. Rochei'.e Baltuch of Beth
Torah Congregation.
On Friday e\ening. the Re-
gional Officers will present Cer-
tificates of Appreciation to each
of the affiliated synagogues.
Jerry Sussman of Temple
Menorah. Regional Past Presi-
dent and chairman for the
-evening, stated that the Rabbis
and Congregations are prepar-
ing special sermons and pro-
grams for the Friday evening
service.
Culminating the week's acti-
vities on Saturday night. Octo-
ber 18, will be a gala concert
presented by the Cantors As-
sembly under the leadership
of Cantor Saul H. Breeh. presi-
dent, at the Diplomat Hotel.
Arthur Levine, president of
the United Synagogue of Amer-
ica, will be the special guest
that evening. Certificates of
Appreciation will be given to
Synagogue Presidents and Pres-
idents of the Rabbinical Assem-
bly, Cantors Assembly, Wom-
en's League for the Conserva-
tive Judaism. National Federa-
tion of Jewish Men's Clubs.
Seymour Mann, Temple Sinai,
Hollywood, chairman for the
evening, promises "that the
program will be a memorable
one for the Conservative Move-
ment in South Florida."
Rabbi Sevmour Friedman, ex-
ecutive director of the United
Synagogue of America, South-
east Region, is coordinating all
these events with the assistance
of Harry J. Silverman. regional
director of youth activities.
Rehring Named By Flagler Federal
The board of directors has
announced the appointment of
Jack Rehring as branch man-
ager of Flagler Federal Savings
and Loan Association's Sunrise
offia*
Mr. Rehring. a veteran in the
field of consumer finance, real
estate, and mortgage loan serv-
ices, was a leader in establish-
ing the charter for a savings
and loan association in Dayton,
Tenn., and served as president
of that association until 1969.
Mr. Rehring will be respon-
sible for the overall operation
of the Sunrise office, coordinat-
ing savings and ioan services
and supervising the six-mem-
ber staff.
The Sunrise office, located at
6175 W. Sunrise Blvd. will
hold its "Grand Opening" festi-
vities Monday, Sept. 29.
APPOINTED Maria Her-
nandez, loan officer at Chase
Federal's Lincoln Road location,
has been appointed to Miami-
Dade Community College's'
Board of Trustees by Florida's
Gov. Reubin Askew.
Best Wishes for the
NEW YEAR
State Representative
Nancy Harrington
and Family
HOLIDAY GREETINGS FROM...
S.O. TEXTILE CO. INC.
Distributer THU COUNT PRODUCTS
217 N.W. 25 STREET, MIAMI
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M Q P
Hebrew months: Tisnrl, Heshvan. K rebej
Shebat, Adar, Nisan, Iyar, Sivan, Tammuz, A:. Eiuli
Veadar.
Joel Kaplan To Head,Boys'Groi
STARLIGHT, Pa. An 18-
year-old college freshman and
a 17-year-old high school sen-
ior were elected presidents of
the respective boys' and girls'
groups of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization during an-
nual conventions at B'nai B'rith
Perlman Camp here.
Joel Kaplan of Miami, who
begins his studies at Miami-
Dade Community College this
month, was the unanimous
choice to head Aleph Zadik
Aleph, the boys' group, for the
one-year term.
Joel has been a member of
Legends Chapter in Miami for
four yean and last year, while
serving as regional preside
the organization'- Souths
district, was awarded
Silver Shield of David fori
standing individual
ment.
Shari Miller of Potoir.ac,
a senior at Churchill
School nd a winner of
group's Silver Star of Del
for outstanding ia*
achievement, was elected
ident of B'nai Bnth Giri|
The B'na: B'rith Youth I
ganization. with an enroQ
of 45.000. is the Largest Jet
teenage youth movement in
world.
a
THE FORTE' FAMILY

A Happy
New Year
To All...
FORTE' TOWERS
10th to 12th Strati on Wost Avonuo,
Miami Beach
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
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PHONE: 633-0108
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
StABROOK RtSORT
9401 Collins Avenue, Surfside
Miami Beach 866-5446


September 12, 1975
+Sk i* isf Fh rid fan
Vape 7B
Selichot-As
Today's Rabbis
See the Prayer
UAvme ;os isuu ocr. n
Congregational Delegation To
Participate In 10-Day Mission
B NORMA OROVTTZ
5, Floridian Staff Wnter
Uchot 'prayers serving
fcmression of repentance and
ft for God's forgiveness is
dictionary definition of
the name Selichot (or
nos). carry more weight
, fcjt the literal meaning?
ieUchot more a "spirit" than
Mafic service?
0 SOME, the term. Selichot.
[unfamiliar. To others, Sel-
Tot refers not just to one
Jvice but to the continuum
[prayers of repentance held
VnR the entire period from
? Sj^hath night just prior to
kh Has^onah to and inchid-
[ Yom Kippur.
Rabbi David Lehrfield. spir-
al leader of Knesseth Israel
tgrepation. explained that
tordinc to Jewish law. the
Tnmencing Selichot service
iii!d be held during "the last
J of evenine. just before the
s of the sun."
However, he maintained that
, ti-re of the service is in-
ternal fo-noard to the actual
I of nrave- "We feel that ac-
i affects the mind."
HEREFORE. Rabbi Lehr-
d. whos-. 0:'hodox congrega-
. had 400 in attendance for
Bcbot. said that "a Jew is
und by law to observe Se-
ios. and we hoDe that the
feervance will make him more
to feel moved toward God."
Joseph Narot. rabhi of
. le Israel of Greater Miami,
: pleastd that the first Seli-
jol service ever held in the
Iform synagogue created a
lefinitve mood."
"Wf have hesitated in Temple
hel. Wi wanted an experi-
|ce not iust another sen'ice."
said The 70 congregants
gathered for the 10 p.m.
vie were '.\posed to an ex-
taBtkm.
f'Ssme Ion* to Selichot
caust rtion or guilt
Y eo on to lead their same
|dr. NAROT said that h?
? ''" basic question
season, "Is
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W ISRAEL BONDS
Regretfullv. he surmised that
for many there is a "different
spirit" today. Nostalgically, he
recalled the "davening and cry-
ing" reminiscent of the Selichot
services of his youth.
MRS. LEON SIMKINS, who
converted to Judaism four years
ago. sees this period "as a way
of measuring time" rather than
as a separate time of repen-
tance and resolution.
She finds, however, that the
Yizkor services are most mean-
ingful and that is the time that
she does her soul-searching.
The distinction, then, may be
merely semantic. There is, for
Mrs. Simkins. a specific time
for Selichot-typc prayers.
Jaoyce Robbins. who is in-
volved in Miami Beach com-
munity work, maintains that she
is a Jew "all year round." She
does not "rethink" her life at
one holiday. As a new member
of a liberal congregation. Mrs.
Robbins thinks it is hypocritical
to be a Jew onlv once a year.
FOR MARTIN WASSERMAN,
a second year law student at
the University of Miami, "say-
ing Selichos prayers is supposed
to be your own thing."
He differentiates between re-
pentance and "resolves" for the
new vear. "The spirit of re-
pentance affects behavior. I
guess Selichos is a mood. Know-
ing that God is judging you. you
tend to be more careful."
Wasserman's appraisal re-
flects what Selichot means, re-
gardless of the temopral setting
or the way in which it is
announced. As Jews, we arc
aware of our responsibilities for
our behavior.
Rabbi Lehrfield summed it up
succinctly. "There's a recogni-
tion on our part that we should
humble ourselves fjid acknowl-
edge that we have done things
wro.ng." Hopefully, wt shall
right them in this new year.
More than 20 key leaders
representing Greater Miami
area congregations will be
among those invited to partici-
pate in the 1975-76 State of Is-
rael Bonds Congregational Pil-
grimage to Israel, a 10-day fact-
finding mission, Oct. 22-30, Mil-
ton M Parson, executive direc-
tor. Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization, announced at
campaign headquarters, 420
Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach,
"The Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization has extended
a special invitation to rabbis
and top congregational leaders
to see first-hand what has and
is transpiring in Israel during
the time of interim agreements
with her neighbors," Parson
said.
"This is a trip designed for
people who look to Israel with
special love and concern, for
those who have been 40. Israel
before and for those who are
going for the first time."
Under the auspices of the
State of Israel Bonds National
Rabbinic Cabinet, the American
synagogue leaders will have
private meetings with leaders,
high ranking army officers and
economic experts including a
visit to military installations.
The planned itinerary in-
cludes visits to Kibbutz Ayelet
Hashachar, a rest home in
Ma'alot, a trip to the West Bank,
a special Knesset visit and pri-
vate reception, meetings with
Russian immigrants, a trip along
the Le'-.nese border, the ports
of Ashdod and Ashkelon, the
Golan Heights and the disen-
gagement lines and new settle-
ments.
"Many Vips to Israel have
been planned, but this is one
that has special significances
for this special group of select
men and women." Parson said.
"Although there is a tran-
quility established on the polit-
ical and military fronts as a
result of a new interim agree-
ment with Egypt, the Arabs will
not halt their economic warfare
against Israel." he continued.
"Therefore it is increasingly
important that our community's
leading congregants see first-
hand how Israel needs our eco-
nomic snport even more now
than they did before the agree-
ment.
"It is for this reason that we
urge these leaders to take part
in the mission, and come back
and report in their own words
the importance of the role of Is-
rael Bonds In 1975-76. Let's all
make the Israel Bond 25th An-
niversary Year a banner year."
Parson indicated that Israel
is currently experiencing an
economic slowdown as a result
of a new austerity program in-
volving "creeping devaluation
and curtailment of government
expenditures."
"This year the Israel Bond
campaign will have an even
greater role to play in provid-
ing the resources to expand Is-
rael's industrial production and
to maintain the pace of develop-
ment." he said.
"It is our fervent hope that
Greater Miami and particular-
ly the Dade and Broward coun-
ty community will respond with
this urgently needed economic
aid through record-breaking
purchases in the next nine
months."
Robert L. Siegel is general
campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Or-
ganization.
Hillel Community Day School
Opens With Record Enrollment
Hillel Community Day School
has opened its doors for the
1975-1976 year with a record
breaking enrollment. The
school, entering its sixth year,
has a student body of over 250
children.
Because of its rapid growth
and policy of not allowing more
than 20 students per class. Hillel
has expanded its classroom
facilities and enlarged its ath-
letic fields.
Transportation. which is pro-
vided for all students at no
extra fee. has grown to include
II huses, picking up children
from all over the North Dade-
South Broward areas.
One of the new developments
at Hillel is its half-day nursery
program. Mrs. Lynda Magle &
the teacher in charge of Jiis
class which will contain a va-
riety of pre-school activities in-
corporating both secular and
Jewish studies.
For the first tine, Hillel will
have a ninth grade advanced
senior high chool Toeram
This freshman year will include
a departmental program both in
its secular and Hebrew depart-
ments.
Rabbi Albert Mayerfield, the
principal of the school, has de-
veloped an advanced program.
Mrs. Shula Amikan, one of
the new teachers in the school,
will be tutoring students on all
levels of conversational and
written Hebrew.
A limited number of student
openings are still available in
certain grades.
Royal Palm 0RT Luncheon
Royal Palm Chapter of Wom-
en's American ORT will hold a
paid-up membership luncheon
at 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Sept.
25. at the home of Avril Spell-
man. 9009 Hawthorne Ave.,
Surfside. Myra Rishty, presi-
dent, welcomes all prospective
members to the first meeting of
the new year.

The Management
arid Staff
wish you a New Year
filled with joy
and contentment.
THE NEW BLACKSTONE
KOSHER HOTEL
"a home witha Jeuish Heart
800 Washington Ave., M.B.


Page 8-B
+Jeist>ncrk&9r)
Friday, September
U 1J
rc0 u n d J
O wn
Daniel, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Howard
Lessner and
Lessner and
grandson of
Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Shaw-
mut, won the
Van Cliburn
Scholar-
ship in the
piano compe-
tition at In-
terlochen and
C-_.- !,_ was selected
Daniel Lessner mm ., ,.
as the first
soloist with the 240 member
Youth World Symphony, accord-
ing to Ruth Brotman, president
of the Society for Young Per-
formers. Daniel, 16, a four-time
scholarship winner, is scheduled
to appear in a television broad-
cast aired on WCKT-Ch. 7.
i-r &
U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Wil-
liam C. Haas, son of Mrs. Mu-
riel S. Haas of 5710 SW 52nd
Terr., has arrived at I,. G. Hans-
com AFB. Massachusetts, for
duty as director of personnel.
Col. Haas who was previously
asritned at Headquarters, Air
Force System Command, An-
drews AFR, Md.. serves with the
3245th Air Base Group, a part
of AFSC.
Aeronautically rated a master
navigator, the colonel received
his B.B.A. degree in 1958 from
the University of Miami and
was commissioned there
through the Air Force Reserve
Officers Training Corps pro-
gram.
& *
Airman Anthony Chaiken. son
of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Chaiken
of 4660 W. 8th Place, Hialeah,
has been selected for technical
training in the U.S. Air Force
aircraft maintenance field at
Chanute AFB, 111.
The airman, a 1975 graduate
of Hialeah High School, recently
completed basic training at
Lackland AFB, Tex., where he
studied the Air Force mission,
organization and customs and
received special instruction in
human relations.
- &
Maiilyn Teitelbaum, daughter
of Mr. and Mr*. Joseph Teitel-
baum, 7655 SW 143rd St., at-
tended the National Convention
of Delta Phi Epilson Sorority,
at the University of Florida
where she served as an official
delegate of her chapter. Miss
Teitelbaum. the chapter's Rush
Chairman, is studying speech
pathology with a major in edu-
cation and is a member of the
June '77 class. Her chapter won
awards for the Best Rush Pro-
gram. Best Pledge Program,
Cystic Fibrosis Plaque and the
Community Service Cup.
J
'.-.
5?
Mark J. Bunim, son of Mrs.
Louis A. Bunim of Miami Beach,
has been appointed Special As-
sistant Attorney General for the
State of New York by Maurice
H. Nadjari, Special Prosecutor
for the Criminal Justice Sys-
tem. Mark, a graduate of the
Greater Miami Hebrew Acade-
my and Miami Beach High
School, attended Tulane Uni-
versity and New York Univer-
sity, and graduated from the
Rutgers University Law School
this past June.
While at Miami Beach High
School. Mark, who recently
married the former Linda Sha-
piro of Massapequa, L. I., and
now resides in New York City,
was Florida State Champion in
Oratory for the National Foren-
sic League. He was president of
the Temple Emanu-El United
Synagogue Youth group and of
the South East Region of the
U.S.Y.
Rabbi's Colloquium
Set in Memory
Of Dr. Arzt

4
A Rabbinical Colloquium will
be held at the Diplomat Hotel.
Miami Beach, on Oct. 17 in
memory of Dr. Max Arzt.
Dr. Arzt died at his home in
Lake Mohegan, N.Y.. on Aug.
31.
A FREQUENT visitor to Mi-
ami, Dr. Arzt was Israel Gold-
stein Professor of Practical
Theology at the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary of America in
New York, of which he was also
vice chancellor.
HE WAS a member of the
committee now preparing a new
English translation of the Bible.
Several volumes, including the
Torah. Isaiah and Pslams. have
already been published by the
Jewish Publication Society of
America.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, ex-
ecutive director of the United
Synagogue, Southeast Region,
and a former student of Dr.
Arzt, said that Dr. Max Roth-
schild will be the visiting schol-
ar in residence at the Oct. 17
colloquim here.
Dr. Arzt is survived by his
wife, Esther; two sons, Rabbi
Raphael Arzt, of Israel, and
Rabbi Oavid Arzt, of Baldwin,
L.I.; one brother and three sis-
ters.
Heart Volunteers Teach CPR Course
Heart disease is the nation's
No. 1 enemy and sudden death
from heart attack is the most
important medical emergency
today.
"However." said Dr. Thomas
0. Gentsch. president of the
Heart Association of Greater
Miami, "a person is not dead
simply because his heart stops
beating. Given resuscitation
within the first few minutes of
heart failure, a victim can often
be revived."
More Jhan 5,000 residents
have taken the CPR Course
sponsored by the Heart Associa-
tion as a free public service.
It's a one session course and
instruction takes only one eve-
ning from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Each person who participates
has the potential to save a life.
CPR Courses will be held at
the American Hospital, 11750
Bird Rd., Sept. 16; Osteopathic
Hospital, 1750 NE 167th St.,
North Miami Beach, Sept. 18,
and Mercy Hospital, 3663 S.
Miami Ave., Sept. 25.
Since each CPR Class is lim-
ited to 20 students, interested
persons should call the Heart
Association to register.
SPEAKER Dr. Richard
Berger, a member of the Speak-
er's Bureau of the Heart Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, will
discuss heart disease, the na-
tion's No. 1 killer, at the Coral
Isle Recreation Center, 3545 NE
166th St., Wednesday at 8:30
p.m.
Mizrachi Women Mayor James Reardon To Bei
Recipient Of Award Oct. 18
Ushering In
Jubilee Year
Shalvah Chapter, American
Mizrachi Women, president Ar-
lene Ditchek has scheduled a
meeting Wednesday at 8:15 p.m.
in the home of Gilda and Jack
Burstein. 633 W. 28th St. Pro-
gram chairman Elaine Dobin
has arranged for the eminent
Dr. Elaine Needell to lead a dis-
cussion on child psychology.
ir *& &
Geula Chapter president
Freda Oster, together with her
membership chairmen. Hermia
Reinhard and Margie Weinberg,
has arranged for a gala mem-
bership party at the home of
Francine Katz, 3630 Flamingo
Dr., Wednesday at 8:15 p.m.
*>
hadar Chapter president Lil-
lian Chabner is calling an in-
stallation meeting and "get to-
gether" at 12:30 o."i. Wednes-
day. Ft*t 24, in the Washington
Federal Recreation Room, 1133
Normandv Dr.
Chai Chapter president Pari
Wallen qreets the Jubil- Year
of AMW with a partv Wednes-
day Sept. 24. at 7:30 p.m. in
the homp of Ruth Sakowitz, 8650
SW 84th Court. The Chai Play-
ers will present a humorous
program. Guests are welcome.
Membership chairmen ar Milly
Rozvnes and Helen Herskowitz
Shosbnm Chanter president
Ros<* Shapiro is ca'Nne her
members to meet Thursday,
Sept. 25. at noon in the Rendez-
vous Room of Seacoast Towers
North where lunch will be
served. Guest speaker is H0'0".
Lacter who has iust returned
from AMW Golden Jubilee
celebration in Israel.
*
Francine K*x?.. nr*Mit *f
the Florida Council, has an-
nounced the formation of a new
chanter in the Winton Towers
at 174th St. and Collins Ave.
Next function for this brand
new chanter is a Succoth Party
Monday. Sent. 22, at 11:30 a.m.
in the 200 Building Auditorium.
Residents of the 200 Building
and surrounding area are invit-
ed as guests. There will be en-
tertainment and a luncheon
snack.
Rose Shapiro, president of the
Shoshana chairter will be the
hostess. Membership chairmen
of Florida Council. Regina Wang
and Bess Jacobs, and Lily Stone,
hr^rqrv president, and Fran-
cine Katz will be on hand to
welcome everyone.
Yiddish Poetry
To Be Featured
At A viva Meeting
A special program featurinp
Yiddish poetry and humor will
highlight the opening fall meet-
ing of the Aviva Chapter of
Pioneer Women Wednesday
noon at the Washington Fed-
eral Auditorium. 633 NE 167th
St.. North Miami Beach.
Mrs. Victor Cohen, president
will preside with Mrs. Al Sei-
den. program chairman, pre-
senting the Yiddish program.
The meeting is free and open
to all members of Pioneer Wom-
en, the Women's Labor Zionist
Organization of America, and
also to the general public, ac-
cording to Mrs. Gisela Gutter,
publicity chairman.
Refreshments will be pro-
vided by Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Zimmerman, long-time support-
ers of Pioneer Women, who will
celebrate their 50th anniversary
at a national Golden Jubilee
Convention at the Deauvillc Ho-
tel in Miami Beach Oct. 19-22.
Mrs. Gutter and Mrs. Gerald
Schwartz are cochairmen of the
convention committee headed
by Mrs. Harriet Green.
James E. Reardon, immediate
past Mayor of North Miami
Beach, has been selected to re-
ceive the first annual Spirit of
Life Award of the Teddy Grant
Men's Chapter of the City of
Hope, according to word receiv-.
ed from Ralph Marder, chapter
president, and Mrs. Cy Plasky,
member of the City of Hope's
national board of directors.
The award w.il be presented
at a -;dla banquet Saturday, Oct.
18. it the Carillon Hotel.
Mayor Reardon. who with
Mrs. Reardon. Bit long time life
members of City of Hope, was
chosen bemuse ol his outstand-
ing chic and philanthropic en-
deavors in his community dur-
ing the pas! nventy-thre" "cars
that he has resided r.i North
Miami Be&ch.
In addition t his work >vith
the C''*V of Hone, he is a foi mer
chairman of the United Fund.
Boy Sco';- '"nd drive, and a
member < '. the board of the
Cystic Fibrosis Charter. The
founder of the North Hade Chil-
dren's Center for t'-e physically
and mentally disabLJ, his ci ic
affiliations incl "'" (. Amer-
ican Legion. DAU. Amvets.
VFW, li.'.Vm A-i.iieuP Club,
the Elks. Florida and Dade
League of Municipalities. He is
d vice president of the County
National Rank.
Cc.Uler Resumes Racing
Schedule Sept. 13
Calder racing begins on Sat-
i"-dav. Sept. 13. as the third and
final leg of the 1975 .summer
season g;ts unde'way for 41
afternoons of the sport of kings.
During September the regu-
lar summer sched-ile of no
racing Tuesdays and Sundays
will prevail. Beginning with the
first Tuesday in October, how-
ever, only Sundays will be non-
racing afternoons at the North
Miami track.
Bar Mitzvah
Mark, the son of Dr. and Mrs.
Norman Liebman, will become
a Bar Mitzvah
Saturday morn-
ing. Sept. 13, at
Temple Meno-
raH.
Mark is an
eighth grade
student at
Nqiitilua ir.
Hi"h School.
rt Kiddush
Will follow Se-v-
>c"s in the
Crimson Room
of Temple Me-
,. norah and a
dinn-r r-c-ention honorin., Mnrk
will be held at the Doral Hotel.
During his tenure as M,
many improvemnts in the,
public services and fan
were made. He has recri
numerous awards including]
Mark Liebman
MAYOR JAMES REARDOX
John F. Kennedy Memonl
Award, Temple Adath Yeshn
Community Award, ..'. J
Veterans Service iward \'oi
Miami Beach i i ns (tub Aw
and the North in
Optimist Youth Service An
rhe city of H |
renowned for its treatment i
research in the cai
diseases such a incer, leal
mia. cardiac and chest diaefl
metabolic malfunction
nerve diseases for over
years. It serves as a "thai
tank" in the field of Hospq
Administration, and was i
ly chosen by the World Hei
Organization as one of six I
search Centers throughout
world for specific Cancer
search.
The patient intake is inten
tional. and all patients are t
ed without charge. Admisstj
is for children and adults, oaj
non-sectarian basis.
There are some 13 City
Hope chapters in South Florid
and 500 throughout the nana
Further information ah
the banquet may be obtained I
calling the general chair
the Hon. David Lapham.
banquet committee indu
many civic notables is cun
ly in formation.
Singles 30-50 Invtot
Singles between 30 and!
are invited to join "Friends"
limited" at Temple Beth
Friday at 9:30 for cotfet
a program fsatui rtfi :>l!;
Rosita Perez. Dons
taken at the d<
Regency Singles Ga!o Set
Regency Sir.?< < '''of;
ami Beach is pi tnr. ng
party, ("vicing, nd :ib*
ments a he Ho1 day !r.n.l
79th St a,-:.- "\
Villag" onen singles *K",
Saturday. Sept 20 it J'!(,l
A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL .
PALL RUTHFIELD
V CE PRESIDENT
of
Sheai-4011 Haydea Stone Inc.
A"l 7l..r... ......___________________.
631
Mst STPEFT MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
PHCNE 864-2201
DAVID C. HOROWITZ, D.O.
ANNOUNCES THE ASSOCIATION OF
ALAN BERLIN, D.O.
FOR THE PRACTICE Of DERMATOLOGY, SKIN SURGED
AND ALLERGY
Offices located at
South Browa'd Medical C
Interama Building Suite 105
16666 NE. 19th Avenue
North Mian-i Beach, Florida
947-1466
oourn orowero nwu^"'
599 South Federal Highway
Dania, Florida
920-4752


day
, September 12, 1975
+.3cwishhridltor)
Page 9-B

[for their outstanding effort on behalf of their brethren
Iin Israel during these High Holidays, Beth El Congrega-
tion and Greater Miami Hebrew Academy were present-
led with the first State of Israel Bonds Silver Torah Shield
j 4ard symbolizing Israel's freedom as an eternal flame
[and commemorating the martyred defenders of Israel, at
lihe services ushering in the Jewish year 5736. The
laward, on original religious ornament created by world
penowned sculptor Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert and an Israel
\Bond Torah Mantle Cover was presented by Milton M.
\Parssn left) executive director. Greater Miami Israel
Bon J Organization, to Hyman Chabner, Beth El Congre-
gation ; ndent and treasurer. Greater Miami Hebrew
\Academy; Rabbi Alexander S. Gross, principal. Greater
\tiiami Hebrew Academy, and Rabbi Solomon Schifi,
{(right) ttive vice president of the Rabbinical Asso-
Greater Miami.
Rossmoor's Nassau Village
Reutly For Occupants Dec. 15
The fi-st residences in Nas-
au Villa;- the second con-
struction phas for Rossmoor
Cocoriit Cre -1. will be complet-
|ed and certified for occupancy
mid-December, according to
Kossnior's director of con-
Istmcti.in. Orian J. Smith.
Rossmooi Coconut Creek will
iz 24 "villages," all in a
aribbaan theme (Bahama,
Nassau. Martinique, Victoria,
Kingston, l.ucaya, Bimini, etc.)
ilus an interesting variety of
Irecreation features and facili-
ties.
The first construction phas?,
Inow completed, included Baha-
Iraa Village (304 residential
limits in 20 two-story villas),
[the S2-million Clubhouse One,
Ian lb-hole Rolf course, two
IwimminH pools, riding and jog-
[ging trails, and a 6-ft. privacy
land 'security wall around the
|adult section.
Rossmoor's second construc-
tian phase, Nassau Village, in-
cludes 276 condominium apart-
ments, offered in seven floor
plans. The 276 units will be in
19 two-story villas. The Nassau
Village site is primarily water-
front, overlooking the develop-
ment's numerous waterways, la-
goons and canals.
Nassau Village t.ill be diiect-
ly opposite Clubhouse One, the
community's social and recrea-
tional complex, and adjacent to
the projected ten-court tennis
complex. The third swimming
pool will be centered in Nassau
Village. (A "community" pool
is projected for each of the 24
villages in Rossmoor's compre-
hensive plan for the Coconut
Creek community.)
Seven of Nassau Village's
"villas" will be "topped out"
this week.
[Free Glaucoma Tests
[Offered On Wednesday
Florida Society for the Pre-
Ivmtion of Blindness is giving a
jfree glaucoma test Wednesday
jfrom 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Suni-
lland Shopping Center on South
|Dm.' Highway. A mobile unit
[will be parked behind Security
|Bank Bids. This is open to the
Ipublic.
Bnai B'rith Women of Coral
[Gables are participating in this
project under the chairmanship
F Mrs. Irving Matlin. Mrs.
[Herbert Schurowitz, Mrs. Joseph
[Levine and Mrs. Sol Greenberg
[will be in chaige from 10 a.m.
l 12:30 p.m. Mrs. Gert Kanzer,
Mis. Joseph Feldman and Mrs.
prank Sparber will be in charge
during tht- afternoon.
Sisterhood Teo Welcomes
Kekitzen Anna Freedman
JV Sisterhood of Temple
Adath Yeshunin, 1025 NE Mi-
JJ Gardens Dr.. will hold its
nrst genera] meeting of the
New Year at 8:00 p.m. Wedncs-
I day.
A "Welcoming Tea" for the
an! M ltZCn' Anna Freedman,
nt all new members will be
flowed by a program of to-
fen l>!k dandn; presented by
LYossi Yanich.
\Y* WOUlD LIKE TO SHARE
'BEDROOM, II* BATH APT.
; r.e.'ned' intelligent wom-
I'-'.m.dHle.aged. N.E. Section.
CH between 6-7 p-m.
944-4623
Seniors Invited
To Participate In
JCC Programs
Dr. Benjamin Liftman, chair-
man of the advisory commttee
for the North Dade Senior Adult
Service and Activity Project of
the Jewish Community Centers
of Son*# Florida, has announced
a wide variety of options for
seniors in North Dade to be-
come involved in both educa-
tional and recreational pro-
grams and volunteer services.
The JCC will offer folk dance
art. needlenoint. current events
macrame, backgammon, costume
jewelry making an-1 a .lewis''
pvnenence class at Tcmrile Beth
Mosh<\ 22?3 NE 121st St., even'
Monday, free of charge to al'
senior citizens in the area.
On Wednesday, bowlins will
be offered in North Miami and
North Miami Beach.
Temple Fn*>i of North Dade.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. will spon-
sor a two davs activity program
which includes "Fun with Yid-
dish,'' folk dance, macrame.
Jewish experience, backgam-
mon, astronomy, art, needle-
point, costume jewelry making
and current events. All senior
citizens are welcome.
For information, call the Jew-
ish Community Centers. The
program is starting the week
of Sept. 22.
Alpha Delta Sigma
Officers Elected
For 1975-76 Year
Alpha Delta Sigma, the Mi-
ami professional and alumni
advertising society, has elected
new officers for the 1975-76
year and announced its plans
for the distribution of academic
scholarships.
The new officers are Rich
Rudner, of the Better Business
Bureau of South Florida, presi-
dent; Rick Brockhouse, of Flor-
al Imports, and Marshall Sim-
mons, of Marshall Simmons Ad-
vertising, vice presidents; Rose
Rice, of Rose Rice and Asso-
ciates, secretary, and Dave
Smith, of Overbrook Music
Company, treasurer.
Acting directors on the board
will include Dan Fitzgerald, of
Kashioncrest International; Rick
Fried, of The Dawson Com-
pany; Enrique J. Perez, of the
Miami Metro Department of
Puoucity and Tourism; Tommy
Thompson, Bill Vaughan, Al
Zimmerman, and immediate
past presiuent Dick 1-oltz, of
l tic Miami herald.
"Alpha Delta oigiiia is geared
to 'Oiiclg. tile gap among col-
lege advertising students and
p. tes&ional practitioners in the
Held, said tne new president.
G'MAR TOV
GUSSIE AND WHITEY WILLIAMS
RABBI AND MRS. ARNOLD RICHTER
MOSHE AND SHIRA
SHALOM DAIRY
RESTAURANT
SERVING DELICIOUS ISRAELI AND CONTNENTAL
FOOD SPECIALTIES INCLUDING PIZZA AND FLAFEl
Under Strict Supervision Orthodox Rabbinical Council
of Greater Miami
163 COLLINS AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
Phone 673-4490
Happy Neiv Year To All
Biscayne Opens
1975-76 Season
Biscayne Dog Track opened
its 197o-76 season last weekend i
and track ofiicials termed the !
inaugural program an unqual-!
iliea success. A crowd of 8,746 j
turned out to uet $462,084 on j
the nine races.
{
1 welve races were back on j
the progiam Saturday night
ai.J, although there were nine I
a^ain for Monday, it was ex-1
pected that the track would re-
turn to its regular 12-race for-1
mat for the remainder of the |
eve, 1973, the day the Yom
meeting which ends Nov. 6.
Matii^e racing, fiiich was
temporarily postponed, also
was expected to resume shortly
as more and more greyhounds
arrive from throughout the
country.
Biscayne, c. N.W. 115th St.
just off Interstate 95, will be
running every night except
Sunday with first post at 8 p.m.
THE NEW
MARIO CKUY
HAIR CUTTERS
715 N.E. 167th St.
N. Miami Beach
651-4061
Call for appointment
ftg^/
NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
INTRODUCING
LINDA (FORMERLY WITH "HE & SHE" AND "JUST HAIR"
NOW WITH OUR STAFF OF HAIRCUTTERS.
A FULL SERVICE
HAIR & BEAUTY SALON
13 PROFESSIONAL
MASTER COSMETOLOGISTS
4 MANICURISTS
7 HAIRCUTTERS
6 HAIRSTYLISTS
El ECTROLOGIST, SALLY GURMAN PRACTICING
FOR 25 YEARS AND MEMBER OF E.S.A.,
FORMERLY OF FRESH MEADOWS, N.Y.
SPECIAL
I PERMANENT NAILS
[INTRODUCTORY OFFER
BY DIDY FROM RIVERDALE, N.Y.
$25
00
STOP
AND
SHOP
. HERE
GRAND OPENING
wFALLS^1
MEAT & POULTRY MARKET
A 1550 NE 165st. N.M.B. ,__
^ TUfSDAY WEDNESDAY YHURSDAY T3g
GROUND NECK QQt J AMERICAN K0SHERAA.
& TENDERLOIN ....00 t| FRANKFURTERS.......99* ,m
FRESH KOSHER BEEF
CHICKENS Qt \ FOR STEW..........Tli
BROILERS & PULLETS.../3 lb J *************
************** | BABY RIB .,
FRESH FROZEN -- J laMB CHOPS......!l"i
"S^Iu i **************
BEEFCmJCK******* I CHUCK BLADE STEAK
SHOULDER STEAK, f Formerly
TONELESS............."lb | 'MIE CHUCK.........1 lb
FREE DELIVERY
949 958 7


Pnpe 10-B
p Un is f fk rJiiar
Friday, September 12
15-5
Army Engineers Take on Task
Of Establishing New Lines
By YITZHAK SHARGiL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The burden of establishing
Israel's new defense lines in Sinai and the evacuation of the
present lines will fall mainly an the array engineers corps
and en military sappers who face the tough and dangerous
jab cf clearing the minefields and destroying underground
bunkers, subterranean storage dumps and other military
installations that cannot be moved, military- sources said
here.
The new line runs sonth-
wards from the Mediterranean,
naar Rumani, through the hilly
region where it turns eastward
to the entrances of the Gidi and
Mtla Passes and then west
cgain toward the Gulf of Suez.
The new. line runs parallel to
the Gulf to a point south of the
Abu Redeis oilfields.
THE ARMY is already en-
gaged in a massive moving op-
eration that will remove even'
pcrtebk object of military val-
ue iacludiag prefabricated
structures, observation pests
and barbe(f*wre.
A naw line of bunkers is be-
ing built on the new lines and
as minefields are cleared in the
area that will become the Unit-
ed Nations-manned buffer zone,
new minefields are being laid
in the forward areas of the Is-
raeli military zone.
The last positions to be evac-
uated by Israel will be Balooza
en the Mediterranean coast
and Tassa. on the Refidim-Suez
Canal road.
THE NEW lines are defined
in the Annex to the interim
agreement. As in the earlier
disengagement agreement, the
buffer zone is flanked on both
sides by zones of limited forces
end armaments.
Access to the buffer zones
wiil be controlled by the United
Nations Emergency Force (UN-
EF) according to procedures
worked out by the Israeli and
Egyptian working teams and
UNEF.
Aircraft of each side will be
permitted to fly freely up to
the forward line of that side.
Reconnaissance aircraft of ei-
ther party may fry up to the
middie line on the buffer zone.
Witfein the buffer zone there
will be established, under Art.
IV cf the agreement, an early
warning system entrusted to
V.i d ilian personnel as de-
t. led in a separate proposal
v hie part of the agreement.
AUTHORIZED personnel
. ccass to the buffer n te
1 transit to and from the
.. ning stations. The
l h that will be
earned out will be determined
by the wed is and UX-
1
arc:; the UNEF will
"here are no mili-
tary itar] lorcei of
kind or military' fortifica-
I ns.
It will establish chec
and have the freedom of move-
re. function.-.
ci and third-
c .: ontlian oilfield person-
nel 11 have the right to enter
and exit from work and to live
in the area of the oilfields.
0 I for the buffer zo;.
1 c UN posts.
:;an civilian police will
be allow;d to perform normal
civil police functions among the
Civilian population in such
9 and equipped with
such weapons as provided for
in the military protocols to be
worked out at Geneva.
ENTRY AND exit from the
area by land, sea or air will
be only through UNEF check-
points which will be establish-
ed on the dividing lines of the
buffer zone and at other points.
Their precise location will be
determined by the military pro-
tocols.
Access to air space and the
coastal area evacuated by Israel
will be limited to unarmed ci-
vilian helicopters and transport
planes and unarmed civilian
vessels involved in civilian ac-
tivities. Israel has agreed to
leave intact existing civilian in-
stallations.
The Annex provides for a
continuation of aerial recon-
naissance missions by the U.S.
over the area covered by the
agreement. The U.S. will make
reconnaissance results avail-
able to both Israel and Egypt
Rosenberg Appointed Chairman Of
Conservative Group's Convocation
Carl Rosenberg, president of
Temple Menorah. has been ap-
pointed chairman of the Con-
vocation for Conservative Syn-
agogues of Miami and Miami
Beach, bdng held as part of
the United synagogue Conserv-
ative Movement Week, Oct. 12-
18.
The Coavocation will take
place at Temple Emanu-El,
1701 Washington Ave.. Miami
Beach. Tuesday, Oct. 14, at
8:00 p.m.
Preceding the meeting there
will ee a ouifet dinner for the
boards of directors of the syn-
agogues. Dr. Morton Siegel, ex-
ecutive director of the United
Synagogue of America will be
the feaiuxtc sneaker of the
evening
JCC Offers
Extensive
Fall Program
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters will offer an extensive pro-
gram this Fall including all
tvnes of activities, events and
classes for all ages, from pre-
school to Senior Adults with
programs held throughout Dade
d K oily wood. Donald
J. Eeiff, orasident of the Jewish
Community Centers of South
- :r.r.o'jnced.
Cla^ Be offered in arts
and crafts, archery, biking,
ns. bowling, ceramics,
ar. wood
:na. rr BMSJIC,
sc enc< and nature ac-
tivities, painting. sculpture.
- -ports, d'ama and
mate.
The Children's After-School
>?- tail beeir. the week
Registration for South
Dade ind rrograms will
be taking place next Tuesdav
at Beth
d South 7508 SW 120th St.:
Crest EVementarv School,
v School. "955 SW
K niale Lakes "Red
$401 I .akes Dr.
Registration in North Dade
wrll be he. ^inii.
18801 NE 22nc Ave.. North Mi-
ami: Temple Beth Moshe. 2225
NE 121st St.. North Miami;
Highland Oaks Elementarv
School. 20500 NE 24th Ave.,
North Miami Beach, and Sabal
Paim Elementary School, 17101
NE 7th Ave. North Miami
Beach.
HcDywood registrations will
be taken at the JCC Hollywood
Branch, 2838 Hollywood Blvd..
Hollywood.
Morton Grebelsky. chairman
of the United synagogue Con-
servative Movement Week, an-
nounces that the leadership
of the participating synagogues
in the evening's ceremony, who
will be honored for their efforts
in furthering Conservative Ju-
daism in the South Miami area
include Dr. Irving Lehrman,
Cantor Zvi Adler, Gershon Ru-
ben, executive director. Mrs.
Mae Perlstein. educational di-
rector, and Rabbi Ralph Y.
Carmi, ritual director of Tem-
ple Emanu-El;
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
Cantor Nico reldman. Mrs. Reva
A. Friedman, executive direc-
tor. Mrs. Mira Frankel, educa-
tional director and Mrs. Irving
Shalom ritual director of Tem-
ple Menorah;
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, Can-
tor Edward Kiein. Emanuel
Feder. education ttrector, and
Rev. Moshe Ben Ishai. ritual di-
rector of Temple Ner Tamid;
Rabbi Norman Shapiro. Can-
tor Errol Helfman. Irving Ja-
cobson, executive director, and
Herzl Honor, educational direc-
tor of Temple Zion;
Rabbi Sol Landau. Cantor
William W. Lipson. Sheldon G.
Mills, executive director. Rab-
bi Mania Rijse. educational di-
rector and Louis Gaoon. ritual
i footer 1 Bath David Congre-
gation;
Rabbi David Baron, Cantor
Rosalyn
... director
Hxrg, riti
tor 0! T- Olon.
I-caguye Offers
Scholarships

League wfcnfa ha- b.-eu av j-
in>; m
deserving stud tits
mental and or the
!
series of audhiem I nward-
r the age of 25,
on two more Saturdays: Sept 20
and 2".
Applicants interested in beint*
auditioned by : ,,,,..
should ad Iress
quest to Committee .
tions, c
and Arts League. ."
Ave. Miami Beach. Fl
33154.
Cochairmen are Lou Siegel
and Sol Liskin.
JhZ let,ter of aPPication
should include name, address
telephone number, age brief
professional vita and a photo-
graph.
Seminar Scheduled Sept. 22
For B'nai B'rith Deputies
and to the chief coordinator of
the UN peace-keying mission
in the Mideast.
THE AGREEMENT limits
arms in the limited forces zones
of both sides to eight standard
infantry battalions. 73 tanks,
60 artillery pieces including
heaw mortars whose range
shall'not exceed 12 kilometers.
The total number of person-
nel on both sides cannot ex-
ceed 8.000. Both sides agreed
not to locate weapons in the
area which could reach the
lines of the other side.
They also agreed to construct
no new fortifications or instal-
lations greater than those
agreed to.
The parties will not place
anti-aircraft missiles within an
area of 10 kilometers from their
respective lines. UN forces will
conduct inspections to ensure
that the agreements are ob-
served in all respects.
A seminar for Bnai B'rith
lodge deputies in Broward,
Palm Beach and Dade counties
will be held Monday evening.
Sept. 22. according to Harry
Cohen of Hallandale, deputies
chairman of the Florida State
Association of Bnai B nth
L-odK28- ... .
The 8 p.m. session will De
held at the Holiday Inn at the
Golden Glades Interchange in
North Dade.
Participating will be over 70
deputies from the B"nai B'rith
Councils of Broward Palm
Beach and South Florida Lodg-
es. They were appointed last
May following the state asso-
ciation convention in West
Palm Beach, and will serve for
one administrative year
A deputy's role is on< *,
consultant to a Bnai B'J
lodge, counseling and 8 on particular problems ;
serving as the liaison benZl
the lodge and the state a$w[
tion.
Also scheduled to partiom
in the seminar are Mikt Trtl
baum, M.D., of North juS
president of the Florida
Association of Bnai ,
Lodges. Ira H. Catz of Hoft!
wood, stat leadership chainZ
and Fred Snyder of North ft
ami Beach, first rice pit
of the state association.
For further information. c* I
tact the B'nai B'rith Regtead I
office.
Richman Named General Manager
Of New Tel Aviv-Sheraton Hotel
Harold Richman. who has
managed Sheraton hotels and
motor inns in New England for
the past decade, has been
named general manager of the
Tel Aviv-Sheraton, a 22-story,
400-room structure due to open
on the Mediterranean in mid-
1976.
Announcement of Richman's
appointment was made by
Howard P. James, chairman
and president of the Sheraton
Corporation.
Born in .Boston. Rictrmn at-
tended the University of North
Carolina and entered the hotel
industry after spending several
years in his family's real es-
tate business.
After manasing a motor inn
and restaurants for the Hotel
Corporation of America (now
Sonesta Hotels) for two years,
Richman joined the Dunfey
Family Corn. He managed the
Behrnian to Serve
First Federal As
A Consultant
Myron M. Behrman, vice
chairman of Oscar E. Dooly As-
sociates, has ben named special
consultant to the Loan and Ex-
ecutlve Committees of First
Federal Savings of Miami. Pres-
ident Robert V. Walker an-
nounced.
who has represent-
in many real
tion< over a nerioJ
"f \ >ftrs, -.' ->d as
' "--tory
Firs1 lild ng in down-
town Miami.
lose First Fed.
-;- ;- in in earlv Sop-
lerly the

-" E D. 'Ik Associ
bis stock-
man of the
I
' '-; years. Behr-
.....
ney in the
of Washington.
wildings, including
ties and Ex-
'ii headquar-
Sheraton-Lexington Motor In
in L-sington. Mass.. the Shtr-
aton-Tobacco Valley Im g]
Windsor. Conn., and the hittarit
Parker House in Boston as d
as being regional director i \
operations for five years.
In the summer of 19"3. Ritfc.1
man was named director ef cm
erations and General manage!
of the Shera'on-T'ira Hotel* a I
Framingham and Braintr* |
Mass.
A past president of the Food I
and Beverage Executive Sedan
of Greater Boston. Richran *a
a director of the South MiddVI
sex Count}' Chamber of Con-
merce and a member ef
AHAMA. the Massachusetts H>
te! and Motel Association. Net
Eppjind Innkeepers. HSMA.
Skal and th<- Maartnsen
Food Service Educational Con-
di. He also ma ^ &
the nrestieious -' ; *
la Oiainedes Rotisseurs.
Religious School Teachers
Also Mo*ir i"d 0"t.
TfMP'f B"H EL
Phont 944-7773 Mitmitid
HOUYWOOD.
Services To Be Broadcast
. TeniPle Israel's Kol Nidre and
}m KPPur services will again
be broadcast over WTNU-FM
-the evening services at 8 p.m.
and morning at 10. Sundav
evening. Dr. Joseph R. Narot
wiH discuss "Passion And Com-
mitment'; Monday morning
"What Then?" will be the topic.
COOK UP A
FREE TRIP TO
PUERTO RICO
send us your favorite recipe
usirri Sweet Unsalted
tola
Marfarint
Send recipe and P">;0,*I
chase (green flag w.th *J
contains liquid forn o.i ~
front panel) with your s<*
address and phone number*
JEWISH FLORIOIAN
Box 012973. Miami 33'0i
MAZOLA CONTEST
Contestants must be 18 V'rt
or older.
SPECIAL CONTEST
FOR OUR READER
The winner of oot JjJ
contest will win $IW*
end oil entries will be *
ik for the grandlp"
I trip te Puerto Rico.
ENTER NO*'


riday. September 12, 1975
+JmHii Hcridtarn
Page 11-B
UAHC Urges Vatican Guide Implementation
NEW YORK(JTA) The
[union of American Hebrew Con-
[peg3ticns has announced it was
[districting to its 715 Reform
Lvalues an action summary
Ica'Iing on its 1.1 million congre-
Igants to implement the recently-
[issued Vatican guidelines on
I Catholic Jewish cooperation.
Announcement of the distribu-
[tion was accompanied by a state
Iment fry Rabbi Balfour Briekner.
director ot the UAHC mterreil-
IgM is Aff dra Department, de*Iar-
ling that the failure of the guide-
[ltnes to mention Israel, while
I'vofortun.ue and regrettable,''
fd.d not necessarily represent an
irael posture by the Vati-
lean.
THE UAHC urged Reform con-
Lregant- to implement the guide-
I, i mating joint programs
I with '>tal Catholic churches,
.uch -'- studj seminars, and to
in joint social action ef-
II ich areas as homing.
I revenue sharing and
| health insurance legisla-
tion.
Rabin Brickner also said thai
I- failure to mention Israel was
"understandable" in the context
[of the existence of Catholic
Ichjrches in Moslem countries
land criticized Yitzhak Rafael. Is-
Irael's Religious Affairs Minister,
for hts severe condemnation of
|*..i.' sidelines.
Rabbi Brickner contended it
l*juld be "most unfortunate" if
criticism of the guidelines, which
emphasized only the absence of
i specific reference to Israel, cre-
ated a "negative atmosphere
which could prohibit Jews and
Catholics in America from work-
ag together."
HE SAID "those who help to
a use this omission in the guide-
lines as a pretext to avoid see-
jing the positive values and oppor-
unities that the guidelines of-
ered to open new doors to great
er Catholic-Jewish contacts in our
cietv "
[Cedars Launches
Effort 7*> Enlist
\More Volunteers
ton Pi the Penin8 of a new
pw-bed patient tower, Cedars
Lebanon Health Care Center
. 'inching a program to enlist
poaittonal volunteers needed to
pvide those extra, special
prices to patients.
Volunteers, both men and
[omen, are needed to deliver
i flowers, to operate the
Wry and gift carts, to serve
the Lobby Shop, and to assist
various departments of the
^Py^ Gerri Panerali, di-
or of Volunteer Sen-ices.
iid- A wide choice in the davs
* number of hours is avail-
poie.
''Our many volunteers can at-
ps that serving as a Cedars
CSV n rewardin expe-
pnet. Ms. Panerali said. "As
^vo.unteer you'll have the op-
np',t0 meet many interest-
PR; peonle. and you'll have the
^stacnon of knowing that you
r- heloing others."
Volunteers rece.ve comp!._
ER' !.,nches and dinners
a" d,uty at the hospital,
f3- Panerali added.
ersons interested in serving
Dnt^\ars Vol"nteer should
Ms. Panerali.
Meshops For Parents Set
Ration for the workshop
r How to Parent More
; e'V is now undenvay.
hour workshops, con-
l'. ;?V a member of the
I pMnOy and Children's
Kv mV"1 begin next
ho w W- ,lhe main office.
luef Ave" and con-
^or^x consecutive weeks.
In calling the omission under-
standable. Rabbi Bricker said
that "de jure recognition" of Is-
rael by the Catholic church
"might jeopardise the life of
churches and Catholics in those
countries" in the Middle East and
in "Third World" countries "at
war with or hostile to Israel."
He said Jewish critics of the
guidelines "ought to be sensi-
tive" to such political problems
and "not exiwct more than is
realistically possible at the pres-
ent time.'
RABBI BRICKNER said he dis-
agreed with Rafael's statement
that the guidelines proved that
"the church is still far from
recognizing the religious and his-
torical connections between the
people of Israel, the land of Is-
rael and their right to live in it."
He also rejected Rafael's as-
sertion there is "no extended
hand to the Jews" in the guide-
lines.
The Reform leader said the is-
suance of the guidelines, the cre-
ation of the Vatican Commission
on Relations with Jews, and the
remark by Pope Paul in receiving
a Jewish delegation in con-
nection with issuance of the
guidelines that he hoped "a true
dialogue may be established be-
tween Judaism and Christianity,"
demonstrated an "extended hand
of friendship."
Rabbi Brickner also contended
that the statement in the guide-
lines about the need for Chris-
tians 'to learn by what essential
traits the Jews define them-
selves in the light of their own
religious experience'' indicated
that the Vatican "perhaps too
subtly for some," acknowledged
"by implication the Dlaee Israel
plavs in the Jewish self defini-
tion."
Wiilf, Mitchell
Join Staff Of
Barnett Bank
Kn-Wor, B. Wu!f ind C. John
Mitche'l. Jr., recently ioined
the staff nf'"i"" Ri-'- niv
Harbor Islands. N.A., 1108 Kane
Concourse, according to T. H.
Brandeis. oresident.
Mr. Wu'f. ice orsidnt and
cashier of the bank, has had
evfnsive banking and mortgage
"broken evnerienc" in various
South Florida banks.
Mr. Wulf attend Oklahoma
State College and completed his
education at the graduate
School of Banking. Universitv
of Wisconsin. He is treasurer of
th- Mia^i Chanter of Bank Ad-
ministration Institute, and di-
rector of the South Miami
Chamber of Commerce.
Mr. Mitchell, assistant vice
president of th bank, has had
extensive banking onerations
experience in South Florida.
Mr. Mitchell, who is oresently
sen*in ami Chapter of the American
Institute of Banking, received
his Associate of Business Ad-
ministration degree from Mi-
ami-Dade Junior College and his
Bachelor of Business Adminis-
tration deqree from Florida In-
ternational University.
Committee Slate
Ratified Aug. 28
Election of the coming year's
officers wre ratified by the
Citv of Miami Committee on
Ecologv and B^iutification at a
Columbus Hotel luncheon meet-
ing Aug. 29.
Chosen to soesrhead the or-
ganization as chairman for the
13th consecutive vear was E.
Albert P^llot. and architect Al- -
fred B. Parker also will repeat
as first vice chairman.
N>w ''ice chairmen elected
for the first time we-e James L.
Davis and Mrs. Robert A. (Mar-
garet > Burton. Jr.
Other vie* chairmen select-
ed were Edward Q. Adams,
Marie Enterline, Edward J. Or-
rits. Melvin Jacobs. Sallv Mil-
ledae. Mrs. Claude Penner.
Ralnh Renick. Mrs. Simeon
Snear Admiral Irvin J. Stephens
and Mollie Turner.
ARIE KADURI
GEULA GILL
THEODORE BIKEL
South Dade Hehrew Academy
Sponsoring Four Top Shows
Leon Seaal To Open
Cultural Wincle Series
Leon Segal, lecturer and
scholar, will ooen the Jewish
Cultural Wincle lecture series
Tuesday. Oct. 14. at 10:30 a.m.
with a discussion of "The Bib-
lical Elements in American De-
mocracy." followed by a presen-
tation of American-Jewish folk
songs.
The Jewish Cultural Wincle,
organized five years ago
through the efforts of Mr. and
Mrs. Max Meisel to further
Jewish culture in the Miami
Beach area, presents programs
featuring the obsenance of
Jewish festivals, folklore and
recitations in Yiddish the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month at
Agudath Israel Hebrew Insti-
tute. 7801 Carlyle Ave. This
coming season will be dedicated
to the Bicentennial observance
and will highlight the Jewish
contribution to American civil-
ization. _^_^_
South Dade Hebrew Academy
will sponsor four top shows in
Miami Beach during the 1975-76
season, according to Arie Ka-
duri. of the Arie Kaduri Agency.
which has booked the perform-
ers.
The 1975 Israeli Hassidic
Festival will present one per-
formance of its spectacular
song, dance and musical pro-
duction in Miami Beach Con-
vention Hall-South Saturday,
Nov. 1, at 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20, at the same
time, Thedore Bikel actor,
singer, composer, musician, au-
thor, lecturer and raconteur
will star in a one night per-
formance at the Convention
Center. The new Israeli song-
stress sensation. Hanna Aroni.
who has more than 700 folk
song ballads and pop songs in
Hili President
Of 1976 Miami
Int'l Boat Show
Royce A. Hiil has been elect-
ed president of the 1976 Miami
International Boat Show, to be
held Feb. 20-25 at the Miami
Beach Convention Center.
The Miami International Boat
Show is the nation's largest -
public marine extravaganza.
The 1975 show featured more
than $55 million worth of boats,
engines, and marine accesso-
ries displayed in approximately
425.000 square feet of space.
Hill, a member of the Miami
International Boat Show board
of directors since 1956. served
as the show's president in 1962,
1964, and again in 1967. He had
been an executive of Detroit
Diesel for 30 years when he re-
tired in 1973.
Other officers for the 1976
show are William S. Simpson,
vice president: Robert W. Gard-
ner, secretary, and Marvin S.
Perkins, treasurer. Directors
are F. Braden Dawson. Jack W.
Barnes. Jr.. and Capt. Jack
Manson.
John Rogers is the show's ex-
ecutive manager.
her repertoire, will be on the
same program.
Jan Peerce will return to Mi-
ami Beach Saturday. Feb. 21,
with an all-star cast, for a one
night performance in the Thea-
tre of Performing Arts.
The Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts will also be the scene
of Molly Picon's appearance
Saturday, March 27, along with
"Israel's Official Goodwill Am-
bassadress of Song" Geula
Gill.
Molly, one of the most en-
dearing ladies of the theatre,
made her stage debut in 1904
and has had a triumphant
career on stage and screen.
Miss Gill has been called a
"singer with a vibrant voice,
resonant and clear."
Men And Women For Hillel Planning
Nostalgia Night Down Memory Lane
There are three vice presi-
dents in charge of membership,
two of whom represent condo-
miniums in the area. Mrs. Loreli
Ennis represents the parents;
Bill Siegel and Mrs. Sally Mill-
man represent Point East and
Century 21 respectively.
Fund raising vice presidents
are Alan Bostom and Mrs. Judy
Camel; Ben Genad is program-
ming vice president, Mrs. Ann
Tepfer, recording secretary,
Mrs Lili Gclnowski correspond-
ing secretary and Mrs. Shirley
Genad treasurer.
Men and Women for Hillel
will hold a joint meeting with
ehool's PTA next month.
Regular meetings are held each
month, with special events
scheduled according to the sea-
sons and holidays.
The first function of the new
school year sponsored by Men
and Women for Hillel will be a
"Nostalgia Night Down Memory
Lane" featuring singer Herb
Starling Thursday, Sept. 18, in
the school's newly enlarged
cafeteria, 21288 Biscayne Blvd.
Mr. Starling will lead a fast-
paced Sing Along as well as en-
tertain. Cocktails, appetizers,
coffee and cake will be pro-
vided.
Paul Came! and Mrs. Betty
Weinbe'g are co-presidents of
the organization, which wel-
come! persons interested in
supporting the school into its
membership and is not limited
to parents of students. The Men
and Women for Hillel functions
through the school as a social
organization
PTA Plans Brunch And Style Show
A brunch at the home of Mrs.
Ellis Barrist, 2277 Sunset Dr.,
Sunset Island No. 3, Wednesday
will highlight the opening meet-
ing of the PTA of Temple
Emanu-El and of the Lehrman
Day school.
A special attraction will be a
style show presented by Young
Sophisticates. Mrs. Monique
Greenwald will serve as chair-
man of the day, according to
Mrs. Albert Levy, PTA presi-
dent.
Mrs. Harold Kurte wi'.l sene
as narrator for the fashion
show. Reservations are req
ed and may be made at the
Temple Sisterhood o!
Dr. Irving Lehrman.
Temple Emanu-El, and Mrs.
Mae Perlstein. principal of the
Lehrman Day School, will pre-
sent an introduction of the new
school year.
The PTA will be inaugurat-
ing the Miami Beach congre-
gation's 36th year as the largest
Conservative synagogue in Che
city.
Vaughn To Be Foundation's
Guest Speaker Sept. 19
The general meeting of the
Dade-Broward Chapter of the
Retinitis Pigmentosa Founda-
tion will be held at 8:00 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 19, at the First
Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
ciati hd, 18301 Biscayne Blvd.,
North Miami Beach.
ker will be AI
n. di.-tiict governor of
the Lions Clubs in District 35A.
All Lions and their wives as
well as the general public are
cordially invited to this meet-
ing.


Page 12-B
* kwlst ncrkffan
Friday, September 12
. If
h>
JUbbtnual flag*
^devoted to discussion of themes and issues relevant to Jewish life past and present
co-ordinated by the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
co-editors
Dr. Max A. Upschitz Kaobi Robert J. Or^nd
We Must Accept Haw Secular We Have Become!
Responsibility
By RABBI SOLOMON SCHIFF
Director of Chaplaincy,
Gr. Miami Jewish Federation
As the ten days of repentance
draws to a close with the sun
fading on Yom Kippur day.
we read one of the most mov-
ing of all the Biblical Books,
the Book of Jonah. The mes-
sage of this Book is a most fit-
ting one with which to end this
sacred period.
Jonah the Prophet is told by
G-d to go to the city of Nineveh
to tell the people that unless
they turn from their evil ways
they will be destroyed.
Jonah, fearing to accept this
assignment, runs away. He
boards a ship bound for Tar-
shish. A great storm threatens
the ship and all aboard seek to
discover on whose account the
Lord was bringing this upon
them.
After Jonah confesses that
lie is to blame, since he ran
away from G-d. he is cast into
the sea and the storm sub-
sides. A great fish swallows
Jonah who then prays to G-d
for forgiveness.
After the fish throws him out,
Jonah proceeds to Nineveh to
fulfill his mission. The people
of the city repent and are
spared.
The message is quite clear.
One cannot escape from respon-
sibilities. One can try, but will
only meet with disappointment
If we look for the cause of
many of the problems of our
day, it can be found in people
fleeing from their responsibili-
ties. Corruption in government
thrives on large numbers of
citizens who too often avoid
their responsibility of demand-
ing laws and officials that will
make public office the high
calling it should be.
The rapid deterioration of
our environment is brought
about by the callous disregard
by many of their responsibility
to the future. In their attitude
toward the environment, many
behave as though this were the
last generation.
In these as in all other areas
of life we must ecch assume
and fulfill our own responsibil-
ities. Like Jonah, no one can
flee from them and expect good
things to happen.
As citizens of our commu-
nity, we must each accept the
responsibility of supporting the
United Way, whose 64 health,
welfare, and character-building
agencies serve the needs of
countless numbers of people.
As Jews, we must fulfill our
responsibility for preserving
and strengthening our ties of
Judaism and the Jewish people.
We must strengthen the syna-
gogue, a prime source of inspir-
ation and identity. We must
commit ourselves to the cause
of Jewish education and learn-
ing.
A dynamic Jewish community
here in the United States also
needs a commitment by each
Jew to the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund Campaign, whose
26 local agencies and B
services help make Greater Mi-
ami a better place in which to
live. It also helps the people in
Israel by helping secure their
quality of life. We must support
the Israel Bonds Campaign
which helps in the economic de-
velopment of the Nation.
As we begin a new year, let
each of us resolve to do our
share of the many tasks that
must be done. As responsible
individuals, let each of us ac-
cept our responsibilities and
thus make for a better com-
munity and society.
By RABBI SOL LANDAU
Beth David Congregation
America is increasingly be-
coming a secular society.
Despite insistence that we
are "One Nation under God" in
the pledge of allegiance and
that "In God we trust" on the
bills and coins of the United
Mates, there is little evidence
of "God"-influence in the coun-
try today. In fact, the decline
of each single traditional insti-
tution from the government to
the family reveal the shiftless
gears and directionless mobility
of the population which each
new poll just underscores in in-
tensity.
The l->ck of the spiritual di-
mension in America's life of the
1970s is felt keenly, but left
unattended and consequently
unresolved.
A vivid example of the mar-
ginal role the religious national
leadership plays in government
affairs is its mere ritual par-
ticipation in the pageantry of
inaugurations, conventions and
banquets. God's name is invok-
ed, but His spiritual power not
energized for the people.
Yet, in a most comprehen-
sive religion survey, published
in the November 1974 issue of
Psychology Today, in which
40,000 readers had participated,
it was found that the majority
of Americans held I i a beli I'
in a supernatural being or force.
While only a small mini
I ilar i
ic s attendance, their at
.".eii a deeper move to
the spiritual in the "temple ot
! -i. th ough search
for Eastern insight, than they
had done before.
This survey should indicate
that America is still, if not a
CANDLELIGHTING TIME
m
| 7 TISHRI 7:09
God-believing nation a God-
conscious nation. However, the
mores of the present-day Amer-
ican society do not bear out the
implication of the survey; God
is hardly given any time in
daily living, with the exception
of the hard-core religionists.
The tragic results of this spir-
itual famine are all around us.
In the American Jewish com-
munity, we find the very same
picture, but the resulting con-
sequences even threatening its
very existence. After all. it is a
minority entity which owes its
unique survival to its primarily
religious component.
Outside of all otiier consid-
erations, the declining spiritual
input of Judaism to American
Jewish Life makes disappear-
ance into the "melting pot" a
frightening possibility.
History shows that no cul-
tural or ethnic minority has
survived the American majority
culture beyond the third gen-
eration as a distinct spiritual
force, unless it regenerated its
own religious character con-
stantly.
The elimination of spiritual
leadership in the major direc-
tion of the Jewish community
was starkly underscored in a
recent article In the Magazine
Section of the Miami Herald
entitled: "Is There a Jewish
Elit< in Miami.'" in which not
even credit was given to die
and cultural institu-
tion outside of the communal
leadership and simply ignored
" in th main-
n l its activities.
U.S.
nate permitted itself to
( I from effective
units leadership, as the
editorial in the Jewish Post of
July IS, 1975 pointed out. How-
eve the fact is that the rabbis
"have almost no voice in com-
munity affairs," and as the na-
tional weekly further contend-
ed, "it deprives the commJ
of a significant ingredient j
cause it no longer can make]
contribution, it warps that i
munity."
Undoubtedly, the almost tot
secularization of the Amerig,
Jewish community, excepting]
few religious islands, must i
the question of the w
tionale of Jewish existed
This means defining or redefa
ing "What is a Jew" long L
fore a deterniinati in of "wj
is a Jew" can begin,
Are we merely a
bound together by shared"i
ories, held by common m
dies and achievements, <:rip_
by joint socio psychology
feelings, possessed by reciirri
eternal pressure;
Or are we the people wb
name is "Israel" because it i
jected ethical monotheism i
the world scene and destia
to be "champions of the
God" including in its fellovrsl
all its people?
Whether we agree with
notion that we are to be a i
intoxicated people or part of J
unique religious civilii
the Jew is "incomplete" *ii
out his spiritual dimension j|
en a prominent place in
community and personal life.]
Our Jewish community
a spiritual blo.kl tracsfuaj
u'rhout which its Drain
..art cannot ".rate no
longer. This ce foi reihii
ing and re till -f oure
ganizational \
which, in tun
American J
tion and spiriti
Ben Zion Dinu the emi
Israel] historian ssed ti|
spiritual nature ol the Jewi
peopie in si rms ^
"House of Israel" handed
gether as the "congregation (
Israel" will become the ">
munity of Israel, out of
mitment to the "God of Isn

QUESTION BOX
By RABBI DR. SAMUEL J. FOX
ic) 1975. Jewish Telearaohic Aaencv
What is the purpose and ori-
gin of the custom of "L'sh-
pizin?"
"Ushpi7in" is the name of
the historic visitors that are
TV Programs
SUNDAY, SEPT. 14
"The Jewish Worship Hour'
9:30 a.m., WPLG-Ch. 10
Host: Rabbi Morton
Ma lav ky.
Tempi.: Beth Shalom,
Hollywood.
"The Still Small Voice"
10 a.m., WCKT-Ch. 7
Host: Dr. Joseph N'arot,
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami
Topic: 'Yom Kippur"
Guests: Rabbi Leon Kron-
ish and Rabbi Irving
Lehrman.
supposed to be welcomed into
the succah on the Festival of
Succoth. No Jewish Sabbath or
festival is complete without
having guests at one's table. The
Bible which commands us to
be happy on the festival, also
asks us to see to it that the
widow, the orphan, and the
stranger be made happy as Well.
Through the mystical tradi-
tion, special invisible historic
guests were invited into the
succah called "Ushpizin" ("Hos-
pes" in Latin). These are the
patriarchs of our people, Abra-
ham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph,
Moses, Aaron and David.
Every one of the seven days
of Succoth one of these guests
is welcomed into the succah.
In observing the festival of
Succoth the Jew relives his an-
cient past as if it were existing
in the present. An earmark of
the ancient past was the
struggle and wandering of our
ancestors.
The succah itself is a symbol
of wandering (the wandering of
the Jewish people through the
wilderness always with a
dream of permanent settle-
ment).
The Jew learned to be at
home under the protection of
the Almighty no matter where
he lived, as did all of the afore-
mentioned forefathers, includ-
ing David, who had to flee from
King Saul.
Some traditions bring a spe-
cial chair into the succah for
the guest each night. Others
light a special candle in honor
of the guest of that night. Some
even light seven candles every
night in honor of the special
guest. Hasidim would make a
great feast on the night that
one of the guests would bear
the same name as the Rebbe.
In Galicia the name of the
guest for the day was inserted
in a snecial frame in the succah
that day. The invisible guest in
the succah parallels the invis-
ible Pronhet Elijah who sup-
posedly comes on Passover
night and attends every Jewish
circumoision.
SYNOPSIS OF THE WEEKLY TORAH PORTION
j Haazinu
Moses addresses all the assembled Israelites.
"Give ear, ye heavens, and 1 will speak: And let rk|
earth hear the words of my mouth" (Deut. 32.1).
HAAZINU Moses' song beginning "Give ear. ye I
heavens, and I will speak" contains the principal ele-1
ments in the unique relationship between God and '
people Israel.
Moses opens with a call to heaven and earth to
witness his declaration. From the beginning of tin*
Moses asserts, the Lord had chosen Israel for a speed
place among the nations of the world. He had firsts'""
gled out Israel in :he desert, whence he lovingly w
them into the land of Canaan.
But Israel, Moses prophesies, would abandon their
God for foreign idols. Then Gold would send a cruel nM
tion to enslave and torment the children of Israel. Even-
tually however, God would have compassion on Hist*
loved people and wreak vengeance on Israel's tormen-
tors. All the nations would then behold how the L
had avenged the blood of His servants and had ms*l
expiation for the land of His people.
At God's command, Moses prepares to ascend
Nebo, in the land of Moab. From there at a distance
is to glimpse the Promised Land and die, as Aaron tij
died at Mount Hor, "Because ye trespassed against |
m the midst of the children of Israel at the waters
Menbathkadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because W
sanctified Me not in the midst of the children of W*
(Deuteronomy 32.51).


September 12, 1975
*- Unit!) ITtvridlifor)
Page 13-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE

4
Qrcr\de electronic switching center
Downtov i Miami is one of Southern
I and most modern facilities.
The electronic complex will gradually re-
place much of the existing equipment
currently serving downtown customers.
kmthern Bell Shows Off New
Electronic Switching Center
The Grande, an ultra mod-
i electronic switching center,
the site of an open house
[id this week by Southern Bell
local business and commu-
|y leaders.
\s part of the moderniza-
and reactivation of the
Aiitown area, the Grande
nter, an SI8 million facility,
designed to meet the
birth needs of Downtown Mi-
|ii until 1991.
will also, over the next
eral years, gradually absorb
switching functions being
ovided for many downtown
ephone users by other equip-
in the firm's N.E. 2nd
et building.
he S18 million total invest-
|nt includes the cost of land,
Ming, equipment, and cable
ement for the facility. Con-
:i on the center
45 MTV 5th St. in August of
has four stories
tally, ph basement cable
Hit. Two additional floors
pW be c nstructed at some
ture, if needed.
Brown, Southern Bell
LEGAL NOTICE
I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCT IVE SERVICE
i.NO PROPERTY)
HE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
tVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
"f FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
|VIL ACTION NO. 75-22159
CTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
l-THE MARRIAGE OF;
JJ0WMIA8 LAJB8,
aiui
fSA'Uzi LAJB8,
(SiKV LAZO i-AJES
'"! Hud-,.,. Avenue
" ARE HEREBY .NOTIFIED
;''"">: for Dissolution of Mar-
"" filed against you and
i'r "linn,! Berv, ., ,
."' "" '' ''nses, if any, toll on
:i|. Esq., attorney
i'"'""- >vhoK a.....ess is 241
: ,;,'r"'. Miami, Florida, and
".""'! '" the clerk of the
,;' .';."": "'I or before Oo-
wlse a ili-fault
Enlnsl you for the
""l In the complaint or
I I be published once
I ,-.; utive weeks
pXKss OR1DIAN.
Id ,. nd and the seal
1 n; .'"......*
I.NKKK
i,,,' mi Conn
lu >' 'v. Florida
" : I i.....BRSON
lera
f LRTB ESQ.
[
8-19-M i" :;
Vice President Florida com-
mented that the electronic
equipment is of the fastest, new-
est and most flexible ever de-
veloped, and makes possible a
wide range of optional services.
The new services include:
Call Waiting Service. If
you are talking on your phone
and someone dials your num-
ber, the new Call Waiting Serv-
ice lets you know by means of
e soft tone signal that someone
is trying to reach you and
the caller doesn't get a busy
signal. Call Waiting enables you
to put your original party on
hold while you answer the call.
Three-Way Calling. The
new Three-Way Calling feature
enables you to place a call on
hold while you dial another
number and add a second party
to the conversation.
Speed Calling, This enables
you ro dial frequently called
telephone numbers using an ab-
breviated dialing system.
Call Forwarding. Your calls
can be automatically switched
to another telephone number
when you are away from your
telephone.
Electronic Switching Systems
were developed by Bell Labo-
ratories, research and develop-
ment unit of the Bell System,
and made by Western Electric,
the manufacturing and supply
unit.
The two Bell arms worked
closely with the associated Bell
Telephone companies to perfect
a reliable, efficient and eco-
nomical electronic switching
system which incorporates sol-
id-state technology and high-
speed bulk memory.
The electronic b.ain of this
center doesn't waste a micro-
second, pert'orming more than
two million separate operations
in the time it normallv tak customer to dial a telephone
number. And it still has time
left to check its internal work-
ing parts.
This instant diagnosis con-
tributes to its dependability.
Automatically finding, admit-
ting and correcting its own mis-
takes, Electronic Switching Sys-
tems are approaching the goal
of having a switching office out
of service due to natural
causes no more than a total
of two hours during its 40 year
lifetime.
The new electronic centers
are being put into service on a
gradual basis throughout South
Florida. With advances in tech-
nology, there will be many new
services and faster call comple-
tion.
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5744
JOSEPH NESBITT
In RE: Estate of
HARRY CKF.KNBERO
' "NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To Ml Creditors and All Persons Hay-
in* Claims or Demands Against saw
Ton are hereto notified and reaulr-
. ,i to present any claims and demands
which you may have "<"'',-' .',,'. ,'X"
tat.- of HARRT OREENBERO,
deceased late of Dade County,
Florida, t<> Ihe Clroull Judges ol Dane
County, and file Hie same In dupii-
, and .1- provided In S< etlon 133.16.
Florida Statutes, In their offices In
the County Courthouse In Dade < oun-
,\ Florida, within four calendar
m mthi from the time of the firs!
pabtl. atien hereof, or Ihe same will he
bam 'i ... .,
,1 Miami, Florida, this nth
' I n| September. A.D in I
RBOINA CARB
Aj Exi i utrlx
First nubllvatlon of 'his notice on
s, ptember. Ill
< \I BUT A 0 VLBUT, Attys. al
. for P< rsonal Ri presentatlve
7:'i Washington Avi
Miami Beach, Fla MISS .
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CifCUIT COURT OF THE
nTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
GENERAL "b.SD.CT.ON DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-27795
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
WLL1E MAE HIRSH and ABNLR
Si 11 i >M< IN,
Plaintiffs,
ALT A X N EN, M A1:11 V X T A N N K X
and WILLARDM. WOHLGEMVTH.
,,. |asi directors and trustees of the
property of OEM OUTFITTERS, INC.,
., dissolved Florida corporation. ^^
:i ,, is BAKS and HABRIETTB
SAKS, his Wife, and if any of the
aforesaid named defendants be dcn.l.
their unknown devisees, heirs,
personal representatives, legatees.
grantees or claimants otherwise
under or against them and any
oerson or persons unknown to tlie
Plaintiffs havlna or claiming to have
any right, title or interest Hi the lands
through, by or under the said
defendants,
thai a Complain) to Quiel Title and'
,. por Dei laratoi y Judgment on the
following described Property, to wit;
I o( in MOONG en:, according to
ile Plal ii.......f. recorded In Plal
Bool 72, a) page 90, of *e Public
i;,., ,,,,|S ol Dade County. Florida.
ilnsl you and you
., t0 me your written re-
sponse to ihis action with the '; rK
;,r the above Court, and serve a couv
,.- Attorneys IOS
ZAMFT ,v SMITH. Suite 850, ISM
SllUth i'iv.. Highway, Coral Gablfs,
Plot Ida 331 I*. n or 1" ion th< litn
,i ,> ,.( October, 1975, else the Com-
plaint ill bi lak< n .is .....fi
II \TI :i | Se'iti mber 10, 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Hi rk Circuit Court
By: N \ HKW ETT
i >, put y 'hi k
(Circuit Com t S< all
;i 12-19-26 10 3
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
i.NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-28882
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: Th< Marriage of
VIVIAN MARY WERNER
I 'etltloner,
and
NEL80N WERNER.
Ri spondent.
TO: KELSON WERNER
o Hei i" rt Weralkov*
10517 Passageway Place
Agoura, California 91301
Vol ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed agalnsi you and
you an required to Berve a copy of
your w mm. n defi nses, If any, to it on
HENRY NORTON, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 1201 Bls-
cayne Building, l!' West Flagler
Stn ei. Miami, Florida SSI30, and file
the nriginal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or I" fo-o Octo-
ber it. 1973; otherwise a default will
I"- ei.i. r< i agalnsi > nu for the n lief
demanded In the complalnl or peti-
tion,
WITNESS my hand and thi .' <
wild nun al .Miami. Florida on
9th day i f Fenii mber, 1975
RICHARD P RRIXKER
-1 i 'li rk, i 'ir, in- i 'ourl
1 >ad< i' untj PI '
Bj C P C) iPEl AM)
As Deputy )."!, rk
ICIn nil Court Seal)
IIFXltV \i IR1 IN
1201 rtlw ayi Building
in w ei I Flagl) i Strei t
.Miami. Florida 33130
Phone: 374-3116
Utorney for Petltloni r
:t.-1^- !!-_
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
,NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28654
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
I'RANCISCO BIELMAN,
and
Ri ISA BIELM \N
TO: K1.1SA H1K1..MAX
Calle Plan de Valladalld No. 350S
Fracclonamlento Revolucion,
Guadalajara, Jalisco. Mexico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if a/ljr, to it on
GLADYS GERSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 101
.V W. 12th Avenue, Miami. Dade
County, Florida, and file the original
with the Clerk of the above Stvled
court on or before October lith. 1975:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
Sth day of September, 1976.
RICHABD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Pade County, Florida
Bj MARION NEWMAN
AS Deoutl Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOHTCHIN ii KOSS. P.A.
I'M X.W. 12th Avenue
.Miami. Florida 33128
.\ Horn, yg for Petitioner
w 12-19-26 I" :i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH -UDICIAL CIRCUIT
CF FLORIDA .N AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO 75-1202 (Parker)
lii I, i: i:- tati "f
UI.SE Al BRIIWNE
''.....-, ,1.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MAKE
PPLICATION FOR DISTRIBUTION
AND FINAL DISCHARGE
NOTICE is hereby Riven thai 1
have filed my Final Report and Pi
tlilon for Distribution and Final BIs-
. at x< u "iN "f the estati of
ELSE M, BROWNE, deceased, and
thai i ii ihe ::>t!i rtaj of ictober, 1975
will appl> to ih, Honorable Circuit
Judges : Bade County, Florida, for
approval of said Fi\l Report and for
distribution and final discharge as
Executrix of the estate of the above-
named decedent. This Mil day of S.p-
:, mbi r, 1978
MARIAN S. CiiTTI.'Fl.l.
Executrix
HENRY NORTON, Attorney
'el His., ivne Building
19 West Flagler Street
.Miami. Florida 33130
Phone: 874-3116
9 12-!!'-:'fi 10 "
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIPCUIT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-29004
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE i >F
JOSE nOMINADOR BAZAN,
Pi i iiioner.
MARIA CRISTINA R1BEIRO BAZAN,
Ri pondent.
^"l MARIA CRISTINA R1BEIRO
BAZAN, !., noliio Mlquel li-7"J. ',,
ha I a 7.i i '7. R di Ji....... 11 .'
ill, ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO
i-'il E your written response to this
act Ion for ilissoici Ion ,i man
uiili the Clerk of the abovi Court,
and -i iai a i opy upon i
Attorneys, VON V. U FT A SMITH.
Sum ". 132"' South Dlxli Hlghw v.
Florida 33140, on nr be.
in 17th day of >, lober, 1975, aim
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
will b< laki n as i
I lATEl <: Si pti mber 10, 1975
RICHARD P BRINKER
Bj c P ei >PBI VND
I
9 2-1! :<; lo z
IN THF CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-28645
.': Tl i Han ol
KATHRYN LYNCH, Wife,
Mid
MICH A El P. I wen. Husband,
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
MICHAEL P LYNCH
(Addn l 'nknnwn i
Vi'i VRE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mai-
riagi has been filed against you and
you ar. required lo sere, a copy i
your written defenses, If any, to II
i n G. Al BXANDER NOBIL, ESQ. ,
Attorney for Petitioner, Wife, whoso
address le i',i_ Alnsley Building, M
\' l. Flrsl Avenue. .Miami. Florida
2, and til, the original with the
clerk of ihe above styled court on Ol
I" fore I tobi IT. I97S oiherwi.se a
d. fault will ',. entered against you
for tin relief demanded In the com-
plaint Dr petition
Tins ii,.i i he published once
pai h week foi ur eon- ecutlve u
In 'I HE JEWISH Fl ORIDIAN.
WITNESS mj I at d i d thi seal 11
I i 'ourl -. M ..nu. had.' Count; ,
rida, iiiis 8ih day of September.
1975.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
. '' rV i 'ir.-uii i 'ourl
Had, <%.,,mv. Florida
Bj (1 FREDERICK
Vies ler Nnhll, I
1 Itorni v for P Ml Inner Wife
12 Vlnsli i Ruil
.Miami Florida 33132
79-1437
9 12-19-26 to 3
N THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENFRAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28674
IN RE: THE XARRTAOE I IF
11-4X'.' 1.JE \\ HYJp.N, r
Wife. '/I?.
and
RAYMI IND 1'' ISTER BYR< IN.
Husband.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Ravim i',l Foster Byron.
S Sgl Et ~~7
M i Company
R2nd A trhorne Division
V"-- Bragg, North Carolina
2s:i'7
YOL ARE NOTIFIED that an ae-
tlon for Dissolution of Marriage and
Custody has been filed against yon
and you are required to serve a COP>
of your written defenses, if any, to
l on HENRY M. WAITZK1N. peti-
tioner' attorney, whose address Is
7tn Tlst street. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida, on or before Octoher 15, 1975. and
file the ortRinal with the clerk of thlf
court, either before serjjice on plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after: otherwise n default will be en-
tered against you foi the relief de-
manded In the complaint nr petition.
WITXF.SS my hand and seal of thif
Court on Sept. S. 1175.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By L. SXEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
_________ ________9/12-19-26 10/3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-28400
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
In Re Petition for Adoption by
JAMBS ALLAN BASS
TO: WAYNE Cl INTON WAI.DROP
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the Pe-
titioner. JAMES A I.!.AX BASS, ha-.-
filed a Petition In the above-styled
curt for thi adoption of the minor
child named In that Petiiion. and you
are commanded to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, on Pe-
i er's attorni \. BREGER &
SCHREIBER, 2020 N.E 168rd Street.
North Miami Beach, Florida, 33102.
,.' before October 17. 1976 and
fill the o n iih the Clerk ,>i
this Couri eithe/ before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Immediate)?
thereafter, othrwlse a default may
hi entered i you for the relief
,i i.e.mi. tl :n ih, Petition,
WITNESS mi hand and the peal
he o urt ai Miami. Dade County,
Florida, sth da) of September,
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of said Court
By < p ci iPELAND
\- I lenuty Clerk
BPIXIER .v CHREIBER
a i toi n,-\ tor Potltloner
9/12-19-26 10/3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28190
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OAIL PERLMAX, Wife-Petitioner.
and
BARRY PERI MAX.
Husband- Ri roondent
TO: BARRY I'F.KI.MAX
|' i i;. i ii ude Tollman
r.i -:;:. s4ih street
ll ward Beai h
i |ui ns, X.u York 11414
Y"l ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar
I at been filed against you and
v ii i ed to serve a copy of
your wrltti es, if any. to it on
\iiliiirl> Frishman, attorney for Pi -
ii'',,ii'*. whose address is 4^11 Lin-
coin Road, Suit, No. S10, Miami
Bi I da, 3S1S9, and file the
original with thi clerk of the above
styled court on or before Oct. 1".
; otherwise a default will he en-
tered agi u foi the relief de-
nial.:,,! "i ii., complaint or petition.
WITNESS mi hand and the seal of
aid ruurl al Miami, Rloi Ida on thli
3rd daj ol Si pi 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerl it .nil Court
Plorlda
rr. 1. SNEEDEN
As Di puty Clerk
ui
9 12-19-26 10/3.


Page 14-B
*Jewi$tTkrdian
Friday, September
11
Religious Sendees
LEGAL NOTrtt
LEGAL NOTICF
CO
Continued from Page 2-B
Blind*?, 7 i tr. Mi
, p.m
AGUDAS ACHIM NfSACH SEFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 5tn St.
Orthoo^'- Rabbi Mordecai Cha^me-
NORTH MIAMI BtACH
ADATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1025
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor 'an Alpern. SS
Sunda p.m., K< l Nldr<
day, Sam. Mernlnf Sen
n.m Yiakl r, 6:1! i>m Nc
p.m >:. i Bh< far eoundln*.
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3'd Ave Hebrew
Ret ig.owe Community Center. 1
NOTICE OF ACTION
NSTRUCTIVE SERV CE
NO PROPEc"_
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
E'\d. Reform. Csr.tor Jerome K e-
ment. *9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of.THf
NTH JL'DIC
LORIDA IN
DADE CO- NTV
eleventh Judicial c.rcuit
of florida_i_n and f
TAW RAC JEWISH CENTER. 9
Nv 57tn ht Consrrvat ve.
Mi.:rn J .ross.
Sermi n:

-
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
odc-x). IZ97 Stirlir.fl Rd. 52
: -mi,.- Batui
p in Kol Nidre; Id
pur
enMPANO BtACH
VARGATF JEWISH CENTER 6V~
~w ttn St. 44-
, -
DM!
! ''
BON
known
YOU A! ''"
IN THE CIRCJIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH .LDICIAL CIRCUIT
C^ r-ORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5628
JOHN R- BLANTON
'JJoTlM TC CREDITORS
UGAl NOTICE
NOTICE LNDESf
FICTITIOUS NAMe ,
-AW
the
in Lu- j
Avenu "!

ol i .....> O III .
INI ;
1........ Attorney for INTERTRAMwJ
i and requlr- *"*-" I. *1
,i .l.mandu Flagler Street
.".":::':':: 12 '
NOTIF

ALAN .' HODIN I
i
Count '""'
led In Sect
In their ofOceii In
Coun-
ty. Florida, within four
time
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT en
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CuLfti
OF FLORIDA IN AND Foil
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE
f the first in RK
O'VISION
PROBATE NO. 75-49M
,- nf
tua'i'y *"siino^y. 7 p.m. Kl Nln. hikfren's Bar* 2:41 p.m., After-
730 p m Beranon; s pro. Maariv. nooa Service; 4:16 p.m., Yizkor Serv-
Monday, 8 a.m. Shachrit: 10 a.m. To- ice; 5 p.m., Closing: Service
rah Reading; n a.m.. Beraaon; 11:8*
am. Yiiki.i Memorial Bervioe; 12 10
p.m., Musaf tadditional): 4:80 P;m.,
Mincha: :15 pm.. Nellah. Yom Kip-
put Auxiliary Services in Wometco
163rd Street Theatre Sundav .
p.m., Kol Nidre; 7:30 p.m., Sermon:
8 p.m, Maariv Monday. 8:30 a.m..
Shachrit: ll:M a m. ToJ "e-iine;
11:3 a.m.. Sermon: 12 o'clock Ylzkor
Memorial Service; I p.m.. Muaal tad-
clrtional); 4:30 p.m.. Mincha; 6:15 p.m..
Nellah ,, _
B'NAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd fH
Conservative Rabbi Victor D. Zw*<-
inej. Cantor Jack Lamer. M
Sunday; 7 p.m Kol Nidre; Monday,
9 am. and 8:80 p.m.. Yom Kippur.
6EPHAROIC JEWiSH CENTER. 571
N.E. 171st St. Orthodox. Rabbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm 36-A
Friday, 8:15 p.m. and Saturday. 9 a.m.
in the synaROKue Sunday. 6 p.m.. Kol
Nidre; Monday. 8 a.m., Yom Klpput:
1 p.m., Yizkor services, held in Py-
thian Hall. 2300 NE 171st St.
SINAI .Temple) OF NORTH DAM
188G-. NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rahl
Ralpn P. Kinosley. Cantor Irvina
Shulkes. 87
Friday, 8:15 pm. Shahhat Shuvah:
Saturday, 10:30 a.m.. Sahbath mornine:
Service; Sunday, 7 p.m.. Kol Nidre:
Monday, 9 a.ns Children's Service;
10:30 aim. (all day) Adult Service.
| t ii
SKV LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 11151 NE
lth Ava. Orthodox. Rabbi D~
Bid nick. 8
Sunday, 7:1S p.m.. Sermon: "Vows To
One'a Own Self" Monday. 8 a.m Yom
Kippur, 11:15 a.ra., Tiakor. Sermoa:
Immortality" 8:10 p.m.. Shofar
Blowing; 1:16 p.m., End el Fast.
a----------
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MI-
AMI. 990 NE 171st St Orthodox
Rabbi Zev Leff. 81
C0KAL GABIES
JUDEA (Temple). 5SO Grenidi Blvd.
Reform. Rabb' Michael B. Elaen-
atat. Canter R'ta Shore. *
Friday. 8:15 p.m. Sermon: 'Ttie
Importance of Being Hungry a His-
tory of Foodless Dinners." Sunday. 8
p.m.. Kol Nldre; Sermon: "What Will
Be Or Be What Win Monday. 10
a.m.. Sermon: "Moral Technocracy
The New Jewish Science m Israel"
Yoarth service, It a.m. and children's
service, 2:8 pirn. Afternoon and
memorial service, 4:30 p.m., Sermon:
"The Way We Were."
ZAMORA iTempM). 44 2amor Ava.
Coaserva.lve. Rabbi Maurice Klein
4*
Sunday, 6:30 p.m.. Kol Nidre; Mon-
day, 8 am.. Opening1 Service. Shachrit
Service, Torah readinar, Yiakor Serv-
ice), Mincha Service, Torah Reading,
Nairn. Service. Concluding Shofar.
HAUANDAlt
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. RabM
Harry E Schwartz. Cartor Jacob
"**nzioer 18
Friday. 7:30 p.m.; Saturday. 8:4S a.m..
.-. mon: "l ife is What You Make It":
Sunday, 7:15 nm. Kol Nidre, Ser-
"The Cry I- Tba Night"; Mon-
S:30 a in S< mi i" D the
Pooi"; Yizkor Memorial Service 11:30
iSoe'-ia' Yfskor for non-ticket
holders at 3:30 p.m.)
iiV'tHE JEWISH FIXiRJDlAX SHAPIRO. FRIED WBIL SCHUBB
WITNESS ni> hand and the seal of attorm late
-aid Boart at Miami. Florida on this 4,17 Lincoln Koad
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
8/12-18
Mr day of September. 19
RICHARD F BB1NKER
A> Cierk. Circuil Court
Dad County. Florida
Pv MARION NEWMAN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ,_
ALAN J HODIN, EMPIRE
STONE SOSTCHIN b Kl SS
101 N W 18th Avenue
Miami. Florida 83128
Atti Petitioner
-}-2<
1 \
10 3
Hourwooo
BETH Ci, {Tempi-). 1351 S i4tb Ave.
Reform Rabbi Samuel Jaffa. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvev M. Rosenfelr; 4
BETH fHALOM (Tenp*). 4tr> Ar-
thur St. Canservative. Rabbi Mortos
Malavsky Color Irvina Golrt.
SIN Al (Temple). 12M Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi Oavid Shsoira.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield
Friday, 8 pm. Shahhat Shuvah: Sun-
day. 7 n.m Kol Nidre; Monday. 7:34
a.m. Yom Kippur: 11:30 a.m. Ser-
mon and Yizkor Service; 5 p.m.. Net-
lah.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Coreervetlve.
310 SW 82nd Ave.. Hollywood. Kabbf
Oavid Rosenfield. 47-
Sunday. 6:30 p.m.; Monday, i a.m.;
Yizkor 11 a.m.
TEMPLE SOLEL 'Liberal) 5100 Sher-
idan St., Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 47-C
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nab Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrama.
MNMMAR
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW SSth 11
Conservative. Rabbi Avron, Drszin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 49
HOMISTUD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER
183 NE 1th St Conaarvativa. >
LEGAL NOTKS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO 75-aiS7
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
FRANK ROBERTS,
Plaintiff.
va.
MATILDE VERA. a/k/a
Matikto Knhert*.
Defendant
TO: Matilde Vera, a/k/a
Matilde Roberts
c/o Maria Camne
K I O B NO. 8-38
Terelra Klsaralda. Columbia
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
Action for annulment of mar-
riage aaa been filed against you and
you are required to serve a cony of
your written defenses, If any. to It
on Malcolm H. Friedman. Plaintiffs
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28692
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
EDWARD WILLIAM STRAUB. JR..
Petitioner,
and
BARBARA SD8AN STRAl'B.
Respondent.
TO: Mrs Barbara Susan Straub
613 Prairie Avenue
Maltoon. Illinois 61938
YOV ARE HEHEHY NOTIFIED
that an action for Ihssolution of Mar-
riage hat been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to it on
DAVID E STONE. ESQl'IRE. attor-
ney for Petitioner. v,hc,. ad drew
111 N.W. 12th Avenue. Miami. Florida
33128. (805) 311-4555, and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above styled
cowl on or before October 17th.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY C.1VEN that
the undersigned desiring t<> 1
in business uinl- r the fictitious name
of MANNEQUIN SCHOOL OP M"I>-
ELLNG INC. at T- Coral Way, Mi-
ami. Florida U nda t" register
..m. (I Clerk Of ?he Clr-
. u:: Court of Dadc County, Florida.
NORA BVLNES
MANNEOPIN SCHOOL
i iF MODELING LNC
I j" k ".-i:'-i9
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-5714
JOSEPH NESBITT
In RE Eatatt '
BRNA HEDWIG MAGNUS,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
:ne Claims or Demands Arainst Satd
Eetatc:
You arc hereby notified and requir-
ed to present any claims and demands
ubich you may huve against the es-
tate of ERNA HEPVMG SIAliNllg,
DIT0RI
I rajaj I
' ] I
d and :
:md 1
auainst I
tate .( MORRIS haueT
ceased late of Dads (V
Florida, to the Circuil Judrn oil
County, and file th. same m ,
cate and as provided :n Section I
Florida Statutes, in their off!
the County Cosjrthouse in PadVl
ty. Florida, within fi.ur cjL
months from the timf (lf f,
publication hereof, or the nan* t
barred.
Filed at Miami Florida, thai
day of September. A D 191
By: Moses .1 i;i:rxnwEM
As Admlnlatrator r t a
First publication tl I
the 12th day 01 Septi int., r. 157s'
SIMoN HAYS K- OK 'MiWETO
Attorneys for Admlni-trator I
608 llaelay Huii.in 1-
Miami. Florida KtSt T'l: 371-8
__________________ Mi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT orrii
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUfl
OF FLORIDA IN AND F08
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7S-?TOI
GENERAL JURISDICTION OlVIStj
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN BE; The main...-' ,,f
\'I..\I'S BOlBTTCHER, husbani
and
EI.KE HtlETTi'IIKK. wife.
TO E' KE POETTCHF.R
AjPBNRADEKSTUASSE-t
FLENSKI'RC WEST
GERMANY
1975; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against vou for the relief de- d*y of September. AD. 1975
mended in the comnlaint or petition. VRSL'LA METZGER
This notice shall be published once As Executrix
each week for four consecutive weeks
YOV ARE HEREBY NOT
deceased late of Miami, Dade County, that an action for 1 ns^nlution of 8
Florida, to the Circuit Judges of Dade rjage has been filed agalnal wt|
County, and file the same in dupli-
ate and as provided in Section 733.16.
Florida Statutes. 111 their offices in
'he Cmihiv Courthouse in Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, uithin four calendar
month* from the time of the first
publication hereof, or the same will be
barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 5th
yrm Tf required to serve >
your written detenu-- if any. to I
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attornoj
Petitioner, whose address kl 1*
Ocean Drive. Hallandale.
33009, and file the original win I
clerk of the above styled coart r
bntore October 10 1875; othe
default will be entered agsiaatj
for the relief demanded in the t
in THE JEWISH FI.ORJDIAN ,he 1Jlh day of September, 1975
WITNESS my hand and the seal of KI'RT WELI ISCH
said court at Miami, Florida on this A.22rB'v 1"T Bx^culri5t-
plaint or Detitlon.
WITNESS my hand and the
First publication of this notice on said court at Miami. Florida
8th day of September, 1975.
RICHARD P BH1NK.ER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv MARION NEWMAN
As I mi: Clerk
iCircult Court Seal)
DAVID E STONE. ESQUIRE
STONE. SOSTCHIN & KOSS, PA.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorneys for Petitioner
9/12-19-26 10 3
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GD/BN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
In business under the fictitious name
of SPORTS UNLIMITED at 2318 West
URSULA METZGER
Suite 200-E. 161 Almeria Ave.
Coral (Jables. Florida 331S4
9/13-1*
litth day of August. 1975.
RICHARD P. 11KINKEE
As Clerk. Circuit Coart
Dade Countv Florida
Bv R 1.1 VPS
As Demi tv Clerk
(Ctnouit Court Seal! _
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
''CAROL CITY MEDICAL AND
LIE CLINIC at 4869 N.W. 183rd
?S5*' Ca",, C"5'' M'wni. Fkirtdav EVKLTENK: HAKRELI
<3o55 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade Countv Ffortri*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFT
ELEVENTH JW0,C,AL. SS
OF FLORIDA IN AND F
OAOE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-6087 IDS
fn RE: Estate of
Dade County, Florida
PROFESSIONAL VISION
SERVICE8. INC.
9/12-19-26
10/3
NOTICE UNDER
JlnfSIPf
MOGAN DAVID CONGREGATION
S4B Nardlna Ave Orthodox. RabM
Isaac O. Vine. 80
Sunday, 7 p-m., Kol Nidre; Monday, "-ttoniey whose address i* 800 Doug-
8:30 aaa., Tom Kippur; 12:15 p.m.. ,as Road. Coral Gables. Florida 33134.
Yitkor. on or .before Oet. 17. 1975. and file
----------a---------- 'he original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or Immediately there-
after: otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida intends v.wICJ,TJ.US,NAME LAW
to register said pame with the Clerk ... ', K ls HEREBY GIVEN that
of the Circuit Court <4 Dade Countv
Florida.
A SANCHEZ
a/12-19-26
10/3
NOTICE TO CREDITOR^
To All Creditors and All
Having Claims or Demands
Said Estate: ...
Yoti are hereby notified !
quired to present any claims sasj
mends which you may hav
the eaUte of HVELYEXF. HA
deceaned late of Pads t-cuatj,
enuage Mk\ to the Circuit Judges ot -
name County, and file the same ut'
,,, cate and a* provided in SectKjJJ
">o E-i,i.t^ Statutes, in their M~
nT LAVDfRDAlt
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 W
Oakland Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A
Labowitz. Cantor Maurice Nets. 4J
WITNESS my hand and the seal of FRED KOOP,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4828
In RE: Estate of
the uiid.rsiKii.il. desirinr to .
KSn|V,r2gu5& WSna- wtt **
the Clerk of the Circuit (Wt of ,ne County Courthouse n
I'ad. Countv. Florida V. Florida, wilh.n or
JOSE R. V1LLAR months from the tim- or un
__________ 9/5-12-19-M Publication hereof, or the *aan
be barred.
IECAI NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
D*DE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-28940
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
HERUBRT LAVDRTTM. husband.
and
ANN LANDRUM, wife.
TO: ANN LANDRUM
c/n RICHARD J OONSALVES
9437 BULLION WAY
ORANGEVALE. CAUFORNIA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy o'
your written def.nses. If any, to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1980 So
Ocean Drive, Hallandale, Florida
this Court on Sept. 10, 1975
RICHARD P. BRLNKER
as Clerk of the Court
By B. J. FOY
Deputy Clerk
9/12-19-26
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All <>j,Iorb and All Persons H
*OTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
... -.._ ,N0 PROPERTY)
ELTFHvCCtRmCU,T cOURT OF THE
nV^NT,2.iUO,C,AL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIgA >N AND FOR
.....DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-27958
Filed at Miami. K'orida. tan I
day of August. A.I' I9W.
ISAAC HAHKEI.L
As Administrator
First publication of th'*.""""T
the 5th day of September. '
WOt FSON. DIAMOND AJ>U
LOG AM. P. A
We,
need
you.
tat.- of FRED
late of Dade
to the Circuit
KOOP,
County,
Judges
es-
deceased
Florida.
of Dade
If you can spend some time,
330"!'. and file the original with th- (Vcn a few hours, with someone
clerk of tbe above stvled court on 1 ,l___I .. L~.. 1 ^,,
or before ., mb, r 17. fas: otherwise o needs i\ hand, not a handout,
a default will he entered against you I your local Voluntary Action
for the re"ef demand, d in the com-
plaint or "etltion.
WITNESS my band and the seal of
said court n vflaml, Florida on th'
Kith day 1 'icmb. r. 1!'7."
!" O P BRINRER
.....'-tr* Ooiirt
I. '. Countv. Florida
Rj 1 BARNARD
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuil Court Seal)
19-28
ty, Florida, within four cal
months from the time of tJ,e first
bMwSt here"r' "r lhC Same Wl" b
Filed at Miami, Florida, this 9th
day 01 September, A ,d. 1975.
As Administrator
ERJC BALTER
Firv^"""..Tostamento Annexo
I-1 s publication f ,hi.. llo(l0e
SOL1 ALEXANDli?ten,b,r- "
Attorney tor Estate Of Fred Koop.
Deceaaed
19 \- Flaglc-. Suite 317. Miami. Fla
1/12-19
Petition,-i
OAv-'dHvi FBLDIUN
_ Respondent
119-48 I clou Turnpike
YOT- "J%*% Np' York
Jpl ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
hat an action for Dissolution nf Mar-
V,',U HIv" '" '''''' *L'"i";U V"" ""H
.N THE CIRCUIT COUT Of
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN JTI
FOR DADE COUNTYiFL0l"j
Caae No. 7-2?W M
GENERAL JURISDICTION 0'
NOTICE TO DEFEND
In Re The Marriac of,
MARY JANE REUTEIt.
Wife/Petitioner. Ana
luWJ
,rer. Or write to "Volunt-er,
.hinpon. D.C. 20013.
-. he National Center tor
Voluntary Action.

4>anncfrl
C1o-,NOT,CE UNDER
, x HKREB\ : \ kX .1
ned. desiring to .
under thevflctll ,
A 1 US JEW El Kl .1 208 \ r
Miami. Fta. intend
in with Ihi ':
JORGE BAUD
t "
"";M" "h'l; flRINKER
1 Ircull 1 uit
Jti Countt i'i
SNEEDEN
utt ci, rV
- all
n1TAUBEa ESQ.
""dfri t Road
n. Florida 33H1
for Petitioner
-lL'-l9-36
of record, nan lalei '.'''.'"tiJ
ltd tO file I
with the Clerk of this
. 1 anil \"ii I
you for the Rellcl
Petition, ,1
Dated: M Autrust, *'
Florida ,..,..,.,. cia* j
HI. II \H1. P BR iJ-^Sn
lu C P 1
Deawty Cl. rn s 5 j


. September 12, 1975
resident
lj a \KI&
Services Held Tuesday, Sept. 9
tor Max WeiU, Founder Of Sybil's
for Ma* WWtz, 81 rael FreedDm Award in the Is-
! Miami since 1931 rael Bond drive in 1967.
r in the Jewish com- Sur ivtns are his wife Sybil;
daughter. Mrs. Claire Cohen; a
on. Robert; and three Hinnd-
children.
Mr. Weitz was a member of
tfie Jewish Federation ftv n\o,,a
than 50 years and a member of
B'nai B'rith and Temple Beth
Sholom. He bclonqed to Federa-
tion's Century Club and sup-
ported Israel Bonds here for
m*nv vears.
Interment was in Mount Nebo
Cemetery.
+J**/siifk>r*0Mi
Page 1S-B
*

rfc f
<
MAX WEITZ

Lnity for many years, were
d Tuesday under the direc-
|n of Riverside Chapels. He
I Sunday in Mercy Hospital.
Ik.*. V |'s, a women's clothinR store
1932 KM a native of New
L-k He was awarded an Is-
friendship...
I means someone cares
.BON FUNERAL HOME.
Lr-j the jtwiiri Community vnce llJf
|HTH037>
COSSEBVTIVE
REFORM SERVICES
irj-.- Sjr'01 <>*i lk(Ct>M*
f I). 'U9641 )ini S Ctnlon
JTtltphonc 8M-656*
IN f*
MIAMI
BEACH
i Cell JEfferson 1-7677
mWMXM
fVNERAl HOUB
1333 DADE BOULEVARD
Edward T. Newmon. F.D.
Rothmau Buried
In Cleveland, O.
David Rnthman. forme troas-
urer of Kneseth Israel Con-
Rreeation. (Hd Monday, Aug.
25. in Miami Beach.
Mr. Rothman. who also
s*r\***d is vie* -"-"qirlent of the
fpmple dimm* the tn years he
ws associated with it. was
known for his nhilanthrooic
work in behalf of Yeshivos and
orphanages in Israel. He had
*1"0 be*n honored bv th<* Israel
Fond o-oini-.ation and the Jew-
ish National Fund.
Services were hld for Mr.
P"tham. who is survived by his
w'fe *md two brothers, at
Kisth Israel unier th* direc-
tion of Newnan Funtral Horn"
'"'""ment was in Cleveland,
Ohio.
WITAER
i'K' 'A. D( '" H" v .
v" "h Mlam ......I iway
Tuesday night Mrs W : hud Iwn
m -mluT of Retl El By i -rue and
Beth Jacob Syi iconic i life
m-mlaer of Mlsrachi Woajen: she
it jv-im lated Ith mai y harlta-
b'e '' ganlzai lona Bl -lid bi n a
.M': ini rsldfiii for the cast 20 years.
im'nf f" in Worcester, Man* She
La survived by her son Irvine, of
tfnehtntrtnn, DC; th laughters:
Mr..-. Sonia Mir-vi--- o' )'.....
Texas, Mrs Sally i Rover, of North
Miami Bettch ana Mrs Bertha s.igal
of Miramar a brother, Ifvman I -s-
ser, ol Skokle, Illinois; nine grand-
.hlldren and five great grandchil-
dren Bewrlcaa Were held Wednesday
at 1:30 at Gordon Funeral Home
with interment at Mt. Who Ceme-
tery
fir

IxTxlHl
*. I.OUIIU4
865-2353
no S,..nly fiof sin*
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open fiery Day Closed Sobbtrth
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2868
rALMER'S
MONUMENT COMPANY/
AJJZED MEMOfUAIJ
CUSTOM CHATTED
IN OUir WORKSHOP
4444921 4444922
3279 S.W.MI ST.. MIAMI
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
tut} 656 HeHy wood:
K-l ?!' Dixie Hi*hwaV 93W
L edbv s Lev.ti. f o. 1921 Pembroke Rd.
' Y<>rk: (212) 263-7oOO Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd..Forest Hills. N.Y.
INM NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICT'ON DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-'7070
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN F.K: The Marriau- nl
JANS? I E r08BPH LEWIS.
Petltl-'!--
and
KK\Nt:i H IIAIM. LETK'IS.
ResDondenf
TO KB.VNETH R LEWIS
, i Penile Delta
_;>'i N Lincoln
('hii'aii. Illinois
Veil- \VK SBfTCBT VO-r-F":!'
thai o petition for dissolution of row
:n irr -' .': i bi -i fllod and i
meneed In tlii!" Court ami '"U ire re-
iii>i. .1 : mi i i on' at v.>i- writ-
tea rleieiuef. if anv. to it "n QCOROE
EL4AB. .IK. PA. atlnnu-v for netl-
wlione roi'lr-im la: W Inarahnm
Ruildlns, Miami. Florida 331.11. and
file the original with the Clerk of
the rthora-atyjed Caurl on or in-fure
Se-t, 22. '''7" otnenrtoe default
iii be entered Main** vou for the
relief nrayed for in the ciimnlnint or
oetition
Tin.- notire shall !> oal.l'.-hed nnc
'.'tell H'e^k f foil-- -.. weeks
in ilu- JEWISH Fl.oP.iniAN.
witnkss my hand and tlie neal of
aid Court at Miami Florida on thi*
'.MM dav of Aiiu-' 17^
RICHARP P HltlNKER.
An Clerk, t'ir.ult Court
Pade I'oun'v Florida
i:> H. K MUSCORELIA
AS PM'M'V I'Vdt
b-oiiuk ELIA8. IR I' A.
ni Inr:ham HnHdina
Miami. Florida Ml Si
Attorney for Petitioner
s'S9 t'S'tS'tt
NOTICE U^^ER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HE"EHY (JIVEN 'hit
he undersiuned. decirin* to enaaae
n business undr the f lous nam
VT'TQ I'AlVTlN'O roliPOKATlON
IF AMERICA at M* SW 70th
Street. Miami. Florida intend" to re-
Hater -aid name with the Cl.rk of
> On-ult Cottr1 of nnde Countv.
Florida ____
otfpv wfn>A Aim
PAINTERS. INC
Bv VflRTOV ROSEN". PRESIKENT
vommel. Roeer*. l.o'h?r A Shenkman
fo-tievs for Sonth Florida Auto
"aln'ers. Inc.
* 'js .r>-12-19
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME L *W
NOTICE IS HEKEKY O.VBN tha>
'he undentlutied. dealrtn. to gnane*
|n llO'-'nr-- 1'llder >< f 'tit! >U Mil"
of JBM ENTERPRISafl al :'"*4" NE
^i roU" North "Inmi Hea-h. In-
tend to register Mid name with the
.a- ., I'in-uit Court of Dad*
Conty, Florida.
*OaS<*F M m "!R
EI.A.VE M*1 FB
< '-:2-M S-ll
NOTICE UNOeR
F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IP HE*EHV r.'VF.N thit
h u-uleralaned deairlna to enne
in bue'neaii unde- 'he fl<-i"ou nim<
,. \TPQ pPO' n'S K'OWPR SHOP
MRS HARi P S or.-H'P PATIO at
'7 N E 79th Str-ef Mi.mi. Florida
ntendo -o reri'e- nald "t" JHHI
h. C'rl- of 'v C'r U" Court of Pad
Coun'v Florida.
fricDAvi co-pr>iA*pm
In- Mildred Caelan Preldent
S'?9 IfS-ll-K
N^T'C= UNOE*l
F'CTITIOUS NAViE Le>W
NOi"'"E 'S HKI'Kl'' r?i\*BK
the underalcr I rln* to until
in h"ii'.- u ler 'h.. fctliloUi ii im-
of SIR SPKKi'V Ml '7-: SK ''-<*
ffr, .,; North MMlW H-i-h Florida
..,.,.,.,i- to ki-' -aid "arm '' i*
i ,.-!< Of the Circuit Court of Dad*
County. Florida
DAV'P P RAVER. INC
Rv Piv'rt P Kaner
lent
ri iSEPH SCHMIEH
\'-..-i.v for David P Kaner. Inc.
tins Lincoln Road.
M ,,, Beach. Fla. ZV**^ ^
IE6AI NOTICE
NCTICE UNOER
FCTITiOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Hi- und-r-it'. : teatrtnft to e:ia*
" ."" >u- name
' BOI EV \r..' a M IDS n H5t i: .
-a>iir Blvd. Mural. Intends to rru-
k of ;he
1 u : i. c lutity, Fl irida.
T-\ ;;-
la Con
M- vli "
"- I .
* --!!
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial cicu'T,
in and for dade county,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 75-28M*
NOTICE OF PETITION FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
111 the Mai : ..f.
Chanue of Name of CHRISTOPHER
DOCULAS Cl ARKE. a minor, to
CHRISTOPHER JOHN PADOVANO,
R minor
TO: ROGER DOUGLAS CLARKE
Residein e 1'nknown
TOT! ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for ehane of name
ha* been tiled by BRENDA LEE PA-
DOVANo to chamte the name of
CHRISTOPHER DOCOLAS CLARKE,
a minor, to CHRISTOPHER JOHN
PADOVANO, and you are required ta
M!-ve a copy of your objection* or
oilier pl.arlinj;.- to tne pen, on ...i u -
petitioners attorney, I AWREN(*B t.
Hoi.l^vNDER. I6M Kennedy Caune-
way. North Bay Village. Florida.
33141. and file the original of said
objections or other "lar office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the lAth day of October.
19TS If you fail to do >. 1o*me1t
will be entered for the relief demand-
ed In the -aid ......"'
PONE AND OROERKD at Miami.
Bade County, Florida, this 2nd day of
September, 1*75
RICHARD P BRINKEK
Clerk. Circuit Court.
Pad- County. Florida
By: c p copEI AND
Deputy Clerk
D -.-lL'-10-26
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
fI u .- i ieairlna
In business und.
: MARTIN, a DIVISION of
yoi.kn. INC al .::: N i S"
Btrei i '-
r: -ler -:, d nARI I th th* I 'I "k !
the Circuit Court of Dade, County,
Florida
. DIVISION
of VO! l.\. INC,
Georn Samnas
Attorney lor YO..EN, INC.
H/29 -l!-19
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
not' K |S HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engaire
in business under the fictitious name
of THERMOPLASTIC TECHNIUl'E
INDUSTRIES at 7705 N.W. T5th Ave-
nue, Miami. Fhirida :i:*lftti intends to
register said name with the i i.rk of
the Circuit Court of Pade C lUnty,
Florida.
JI'-MY-RA CORP.
Ifrfl N W l*9th Street.
Ona I.ti.-ka. Florida
KI'P.T WELLISCH. ATTORNEY
AT UW
Attorney for JII-MY-DA CORP
1S1 Almeria Avenue. Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Pla. S31S4 f44". 7*541
1/22-29 ""',.12
IN THE CIRCUIT COU T OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 7S-2855
IN RE ESTATF or
GOPTRI'DE ROSENS'.VEIG
I released.
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLOR DA:
TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID
DECEDENT
You are hereby ho titled that a wr't-
t.-ii Instrument Durcortlng to he the
last will and teatament of Bald dece-
dent has *.....n idni *'*d ......I>ate in
Mild Court You are hereby command-
ed w''hl siv calendar month- from
'he rlate of the flrat nuhl'ratinn of
,his notice to aniear in said Court
,ltll .-! au-e. If any v >u Can, wl.v
the action of said Court in admitting
said vi ;m to pr mid not stand
unrevoke.l
Ji >HV R B" A v"r' N
<"ir^uit C iurl .'udit-
RICHARD P BRINe EfR Clerk
Bj HOLT.IS ; I W'--
i u- cierk
Attorney' VNN "V Fl'
FROMBERG, FROMBERG Sc R'TH.
P A
IP \v Fl.-'-- .- M-1M
Miami. Florida 331*0.
' i ,.i 'icat'oi if this notice on
the i|nd day of Aiwuat,
1/22-2S
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
th- undersigned, desiring to eneae
. i .. under the fl "t u im
of SOCTHLAND APARTMENTF at
1.-.01 Alton Road Miami Bea-h. Flor-
i.'a intends to reg'f- saM runt' with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Pade Countv. Florid*.
> SARA EDEI.MAN
S/K9 9/R-ll-ll
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the under.-iei'.eil desiring to engage
In business under the fi.-tlthius nam-
f LYPIAS RESTACHANT at 188*7
NW 4:' Avenue, Carol City, Pla., in-
tend.- to register said name with the
clerk of the CtlUIIH Court of Dade
County. Florida
RHOINO FELICIANO
i/St-9 9'5-12
NOTICE UNOER
FICT'T OUS NAMS LAW
rtfV'CE It HREIt^ H'VK.V thnt
the undersiMed, desirlnn in eimaire In
business u.ider the fictitious name of
P 4k N INVTB8TMENTS at number
'Shoo wv-i Lake Drive, in the CJt*
.f Hialeah. Florida, intend tq regis-
ter the sa >l name With 'he Cler1 r
th- Circuit Courl of Pade Countv.
Florida. ,, ,
i ,. >ii,- Florida, this 22nd
day of August. 1975.
. \. o..v.\ 3 PRANDI
i> g-TCVW VES8ELROTB
MELVIN E WB'VBTH-IN
Attorney for ADDlicant
i HEIiG. FROMliBRtJ t
ROTH. PA.
"i West K'au'er Street
Suite M-">2
M. mil. Florida 3*110
S 11 9 '5-12-19
l T"F r-otiU'T roURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CtRCUlT
OF FwOR'DA IN AND FOR
OAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DlVSION
p-o-'| NO. 78-*161
IN RE. ESTATE I IF
BAMOEL SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE ST.VK "F -" C"-P,>
-Cl A' PERSONS INTERESTED
tV -eta-.- pg ATE OP SAL
DECEDENT
You are hereby notified thai a wr t-
ten Instrument ournortlne to be tne
last will and testament of n'd *
dent ha- I'-en .dtTT'tted 'o DTObal I
si'd Court You are hereby commanded
rittlin --v I'endar month- hun 'he
date of the firs' nubll'atl-"i of this
n M I an-iear In s.ald Court and
show rause, !f i'"v vou can, rrhe the
action of ,-ld Court in adml'tiuir -I'd
aroMte should not stand un
r.v lk
FRANK POW'LINU
I 'rcult Courl Judge
Rl HARD P BRINKBH. C'erk
Pv MIRIAV 3 HBNDRICrtSON
Ii.-iutv Clerk
A'tn-n-vESTHER G. SCHIFF
4f'7 Lincoln Road
M .mi Bo h F'i 33138
First publication of this notice on
the Itnd dav Of August. 197."
(Court Seal)
8/22-29 9/5-11
LEGAL NOTICf
NOTICE UNOER
F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
Nl HEREBY GIVEN I
the ur ier-i*n-i lealnntl to eni
in bu i iu
PAUL KATE RKALTY at 592

"tend to !- >. ..
Clerl tit C urt of Dade
i' aiDt' Fl r ;
PAUL r '
Owner
S 5-12-19
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Or THE
1"TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75--97S
NOTICE BY PUS.iCA* ON
IN 'TION i if 1)1 -:'
s MA6SINGHAM tl rouAl.
Next f Kin D
NOT CE BY PL3 :-i_ION
TO: TERRt MASSINGH I
H H

voi :d
tl Pel '' ime
had I the
i rve
.
.. Petii ittor ay,
AHTIN Bl TS nil
a- ui SUexi Florid ind file
irlirli al An r er In I i ol
tne f the i it u n or
the t*lh la> -" ''' iber,
1973 othei u i.-e ^i :.. lull .' ;; be en-
i agalnat you
DATED at Mlam thin ir>tb
' August,
RICHARD P BRtNKER,
Clerk of civ, u" c
Mlam pade County Florida
By BARBARA ROPERS' >H
Penuty Clerk
fCourt Seal)
M a 9/5-12
NOTICE UNDER
F'CTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, dealring to engage
in hurlnese under the fictitious name
if RIVOLI at 74*T Dadetan I Mall,
.iliimi. Pad. County. Florida intends
to register said name with th* Clerk
nf the Circuit Court of Pade County.
Florida,
RIVOLI OF PAPEI.ANP. INC.
7457 Dadeland Mall
Miami. Pade Countv. Florida
KI'RT WELLISCH
Attorney for RIVoLI OF g
DADEI^VND. INC
;rtl Aimeria Avenue. Suite JOO-Bu,
Coral Gables. Florida 141*4
_M2-39 1/5-U
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 74-11360
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
IN UK The Marriage of
DANIEL MACKEY, Husba rt
and NAZARK MACKEY. wife
TO: NA7..4KE MA' KEY
Residence faktmwrn
YOV ARE HEREBY lU'red to
erve a copy of your Anawer lo the
patitko for Dissolutior of Marriage
herein on the Petitioner's Attorney.
MVRRAT i. KLEIN. MO Seybold
Rui'ding. Mr im Florida i' i fBe tii
original In the office of the cierk of
the Clrewit Court on or before 8eDtem-
bei 26 1975 >r said cause will be
tit^-n a.- ,oiii..-.-.-.d i.; u
DATED this 18th la- of August.
RICHARD P BRIN1
i "erk if the 11r ui' '" >urt
BARBARA Rl "' IRBON
Deputy Cl" ,.
1/22-23 l/B-U
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY!
IN THE C'HCUIT COURT Or THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-27036____
GENERAL JURISDICT'ON DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marrlave of:
SANTJOP, Al EX SKI.AK.
Petitioner.
and
BERTHA BKLAR.
Respondent.
T( I. I""' l* '" A R
Aonrtment rtP
1 ",.",(1-Sind S'----'
ltro>k'vn. N-w York. M214
YO'- ARE HK"EBY NOT'P'BD
hat in acthHI for DlWohltlon of Mr-
r'age in- h.n filed agalnat vou and
vou a*-.- rooulred to serve a cony of
..,,- i.-r'tten defen-es. if any. lo it on
HV.MAN P OA' ltt'T. B*n., attorney
r,.> Petitioner. wWiee erldrMI la HI
Was' ''win on Avenue. Miami Beaclt.
pinrlrla. 3t1S, nnd til- 'be Original
with the clerk of the above styled
snarl on or before s-it If, 19TB:
otherwise a default will he entered
sgninst you for the rel'-' demamle in the comnialnt or oetition
tt,i nmtice shall be 'ajMlehed once
,e- week for four cnnse">t*ive weeks
in THE JEWISH F'Ofp'AN
Witness mv hand and the seal of
., d court at Miami F"->rlda on thl
11a| dav of Aueust. '''"
HICHARP P BRINKER
\. C'erk, cirou" Court
p." -' "" i'1'
Bv R J. FOY
As Depntv Clerk
n**tr*rs ivnnA"!'""
- ..- r..tn-> \\.......
!.-, -h. -la M*M f6tl-S1IH
.\ oi-'.-vs for Pet'' "er
I'M 9'6-1l-1
IN THE <-'C'llT pnueTT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN "NO FOR
ftJDE CM'NTV
PROB*TF 0'"-3ION
No. 75-614
In PR- F'ate of
,H'DV A NN W FRY
Ooe 1 -I
NOT'CE TO CREDITORS
Un ah CtaJRori and All Persona
Fsv'ns Oaltns or pema-ds Against
Sa1 Estate:
You Bit hereby notifed and re-
oU''ed to -iresent anv .la'm- md i'e-
mands which you may have against
tne ,.. it, ,)f lIPY ANN AVER*
,U-.-ied. late of Pade Countv. Flo-,
l-'a. "o the circuit Judges of Dado
Cotmty. and rile tie mrm in ilunli-
cate and as orovided in Se'ot 733 !,
"Pnr'da Statutes, In their offices In
th- County Courthouse 'n Dade Coun-
tv F'orids. within 4 ca'endar months
'-, rn 'he t'me of 'he free*, nublication
he-e if or the same will be barred
Dated at Miami. Flo-'dv this 19th
day of Aurut A D 1'7S
RICHARD KROOP FOR
pun p .\ vtuv
Al Administr cor
pie o-.Mi.iMon of 'his notice on
the r.th dav of Reitem'ier. 197S
K"'1TNEY. KPOOP A-
S "HEINIIHi'C, p A
A Aen#y for Administrator
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach, Fla.


Page 16-B
>Jetvlsf>nor*^L
Friday, September
Hi
THE SEASON'S BEST
Just The Way Nature Intended
Our export buyers pick from the finest crop to make sure you get the best
possible quality. After their selections are made, refrigerated trucks rush from
the fields to our stores to bring you the freshest fruits and vegetables available.
At Food Fair you'll find our produce to be the best, season after season.
PRICK EFFECT.VE FROM DATE OF PUBLICATION THRU WED., SEPT. ,7,h AT ALl FOOD FA.R STORES EXCLUDING KOSHER MARKETS
PASCAL
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS

Plums
ittx
FREESTONE
BLUE
ITALIAN
FOR APPLE SAUCE AND WES-GREENING
CILERY
7S
4>-V
LB.
CR\$P
AND CRUNCHY
>i
I
Apples 3
Fresh Tender Carrots......>: lSr Grapefruit Juice gauon 13
CRUNCHY nt%(. All PURPOSE A(
Fresh Green Peppers..........i. 29c U.S. No. 1 Potatoes & 59
UKIIT ONE STAtK. PLlASE W.tm ^^
0F 2fJ^^^
EXCELLENT QUALITY $ NUT.mOUS AN. D.I.C.OU. --(
Yellow Squash..................3 m. I Louisiana Yams ..... ia
FRESH SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAUAill Al ITOIIS *ITH UIVICI COUNTIIS
Yeilowtail
$| 19
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
LB.
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT.
A VAU A.ll ONII AI iTOtll HAVING IIIVICI COUNIU1
Alt MIA I ANO CHIMI iilCID IO OIOII
Large Whiteffish
$|69
ALL OF OUR BEEF CUTS LISTED ARE
U.S. GOV'T. INSPECTED
WESTERN CORN FED BEEF
BEEF CHUCK UNDER BLADE
Pot Roest
$i49
TENDER
AND JUICY
FRESH BEEF
FRESHLY
SMOKED
LB.
FLO-SUN FRESHLY SQUEEZED
Orange Juice
ERA LIQUID
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
16-oz. ^1QC
BOTTLE ^f M
LIMIT ONE BTl.. PLEASE. WITH OTHER PURCHASES
OF $7.00 OR MORE, EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
Ground Chuck* I!'
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Parts 99'
WHOli UGS'WMOll IIEASTS W UltS 1 MlOMS-MUMitlCO
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Qtrs
LEG OR
BREAST
QUARTERS
IN OUR
DAIRY
CASE
'LITE-LINE'
QUART
CONTS.
Borden's Cream Cheese S& 43*
ALL FLAVORS BORDEN'S OR ..
LesCal Yogurt 4 ^ 99c
FRIENDSHIP ..
Midget Farmer Cheese ^ 49c
DELICIOUS .
Friendship Sour Cream..2. 53
VITA PARTY SNACKS OR _
Creamed Nerring..........}}g $135
HIRREW NATIONAL MIDGET ,_
Salami or Bologna...........'&&*"
KAHN'S jfcjfci
Sandwich Spread.............. 39*
Orange Juice
312 OZ $ 129
CANS
P.P.
BRAND
FROZEN
RICH'S J
Frozen Coffee Rich 3 :
I
OZIN
Whipped topping
o
PKGS.
1
WONDERFUL BAKED GOODS
MAOI WITH PURE VIGIIABll SHORN'"
STOKELY'S
Gatorade
Pound Cake Ri"S
1
AMERICAN KOSHER
48-OZ.
BOTTLE
Franks or Knocks
HUE SEA
12-OZ.
PKG.
I WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. All CLERICAL,
Chunk Light Tuna.. JJf 45e
ICELAND W .........CAN TNP
Long Brain Rice.........3 ft 99e
t.t. (RAND SLICED O. WHOLE
White Potatoes..........3 &8J 8T
IH
OFFER VALID THRU BAKED
, WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 17* GOODS
URS ARE SUBJECT TO CORRECTION. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS.
^Bumy'-Bros.
CREAMY

29 ,4-OZ,
PKG.
" VcASH REBATE WIU U
GIVEN WITH PURCHASE
ANY BURNY BROS.


Full Text
lay
September 12. 1975
*Jeniti fhrkBcM
Page 5-B
Betty Ford CanH
die it Both Ways
TOR, The Jevrlfb Floridian:
stafment
a'-
Fort
sexual promiscuity and
|
t>"HMRVNIW>ltluB
it is
this k '
und
m oar
tn
|uent quaii'ication re-
. an infantile naivete that
i,,i malady. She would
io measures be taken
sexual relations outside
iage commitment, yet
_;,,,, time she feels the
strong family ties and
he "greatest thing.
j oi juvenile think-
' among those who
with a green ecol-
i demanding that we
-v. It they want
, they should get rid of
machine '.hat pollutes it.
HE FEDERAL governmen:
milli ins of dollars for
; of cancer, heart
.,.,.. and related illness's
le at the same time it legal-
r.d even subsidizes the
uction and sale of tobacco,
e've removed disciplinary
traints and moral teaching
our schools and also ex-
them to be crime-free,
nquii places of learning.
lie economy of our nation
its cities faces imminent
ure because of massive
mding in non productive,
steful areas on one side and
tolerance of widespread cor-
tion on the other side.
; cry about the energy
age and set up expensive
Berai bureaucracies to handle
problem, yet we guzzle gas-
le and burn electricity as if
i re limitless resources.
[RST Lady in her state-
em reflected our childish na-
priLti mentality of wanting to
kvc oui I to eat it.
i ii not Iri-
i ut on all
lies in the long-la t-
i loyal family,
ii a commitment
. fo > momari-
s ires.
I v.". ealize that there
list forci that are poised
|ad! us horn within
the form of immorality, pol-
Ition. di ease, crime and eco-
pmic failure.
[if we do not exert counter-
pces of equal strength to op-
se them, they will succeed in
tstroying this nation. Att r
po-hundred years of existence,
is time we grew up anJ as-
timed a mature mentality.
PHINEAS A. WEBERMAN
RABBI
Ohev Shalom
Congregation
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Words Be Brier
KoheUth (Ecclesiastes)
;',. ::;...';. i.....i i -.'..::: ''>' *"n;
more apxrj apply to the sen-
sational distortions than
to Mrs. Ford herself, who
mainly tried, apparently
to the Rabbi's dissatisfac-
tion, to correct the record.
f>lT0R'S NOTE: To be fair
to the First Lady, Mrs.
Ford's subsequent "quali-
fications" aearly suggest
that sot:ie of Hie attitudes
first pia.e were
flkrv distorted
more sensational.
Hal bi Webcrman is
ially accurate, he
theless dismisses her
cations as "infantile
"ttvete, which would
in the
deliber-
to make
COMPLETE LINE
KUG'OUS GOODS
ELECTED ISRAELI
ESROGIM
\t? CRYSTAL, INC.
307 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Phone 532-5912
^APPY NEW YEAR
Halloran To MC
Tuesday Luncheon
Bob Halloran, WTVJ-Ch. 4
sDortcaster, will be the emcee
for the. 5th Anniversary Archie
Stone Foundation Dolphin Hur-
ricane Kickoff Luncheon Tues-
dav at th rl'imi Springs Villas
Playhouse.
Team captains from the Mi-
ami Dolphins and nlayers from
the University of Miami will be
amone the featured speakers at
the lunch on which begins at
11:30 a.m. Hurricane head
coach Carl Selmer and his staff
bve chosen to select team cap-
tains on a game-by-game basis.
Monies raised through the
l"ncheon a*e distributed in
grants, with half designated for
Variety Children Hospital and
half for sports-oriented youth
< realizations. In five years, the
Archie Stone Foundation has
raised ind dispensed more than
S65.000.
For tickets or more informa-
tion, call the Archie Stone
Foundation.
Florida Conference On Quality
Of Life At Americana Oct. 5-7
A Florida Conference on the
Quality of Life, "to examine
those factors which affect a
child from conception through
adolescence, and which deter-
mine the quality of a child's
life," will be held Oct. 5-7 at
the Americana Hotel, Bal Har-
bour.
Mrs. Sydney L. Weintraub,
civic leader, and Bernard J.
Fogel, M. D., assistant vice pres-
ident for medical affairs. Uni-
versity of Miami School of Med-
icine, will be cochairmen of
the event sponsored by the
Florida Medical Association,
Junior League of Miami, Dade
County Chanter, National Foun-
dation-March of Dimes and Uni-
versity of Miami School of Med-
icine.
Topics to be discussed include
prenatal care, family living,
parenting, child abuse and neg-
lect, the. child's environment,
social influences, education, le-
pnl aspects and the volunteer's
role.
Cosoonsorsat least 50, who
will br'na the attendance to
over 500include Coral Gables
Hospital, and Mt. Sinai Hospital
Volunteer Services; Baptist,
Jackson Memorial, Mercy, James
A. Smith, South Florida State
and Va/iety Children's hospi-
tals; Dade Public Schools, Dade
Public Welfare, Florida Acade-
my of Family Physicians and
Dade County Department of
Public Health.
The public is invited to at-
tend; registration fee includes
a banquet, two luncheons and
all meetings.
Newmark Drawings Featured
The drawings of Marylynne
Newmark, a free-lance illustra-
tor and portraitist, will be fea-
tured by Temple Beth Am in
its first exhibition-sale of the
new year Friday, Sept. 26, fol-
lowing the 8:30 p.m. services.
The showing, on the theme
"Man's Relationship to Man,"
will feature studies of people,
their introspections and interre-
lationships.
Cook with Sweet-Unsalted MazolaJ
and you may soon be baking in Puerto Rico.
Send us your favorite recipe using
Sweet Unsalted Mazola Margarine,
and you could win one of these ex-
citing prizes:
1st prize: A week for two at the elegant
Americana Hotel, San Juan, Puerto
Rico, with breakfast and dinner daily.
Round-trip transportation from New
York to San Juan will be via smooth,
comfortable American Airlines 747.
Three 2nd prizes: $100 in cash.

Doing what we do best.
Contest is so easy to enter.
The recipe you submit can be a standard
to which you've added some personal
touches of your own. Or it can be a crea-
tion that's entirely yours. (The judges will
be looking for that extra little something
you do that makes a dish really special.)
You can choose an appetizer. A main dish.
Any kind of pastry or dessert In fact, what-
ever you like. And you can enter as many
recipesas you wish. Theonly requirement
is that the ingredients include Sweet Un-
salted Mazola Margarine and that a proof
of purchase accompany each recipe. And
the use of Sweet Unsalted Mazola makes
this contest even easier.
Sweet Unsalted Mazola is one of the few
margarines that's not only kosher, but
parve, as well (which means you're not
limited to dairy dishes) What's more, un-
like butter and the majority of other
margarines, it won't burn at normal frying
temperatures. And since Sweet Unsalted
Mazola is made with pure com oil it's also
highin polyunsaturaies Low in saturated
fats.Andchol strol free Bui mostin
tant, Sweet Unsalted Mazola has a
delicate flavor that makes whatever you
make taste particularly delectable.
So send in those recipes. Who know-?
That Puerto Rican rrip cot 'd be
thing you'vegot cooking right now.
Contest Rules.
; Reap : "-I include '-'' Ml i ''."* and miv he
anythir*jliomanbor. J ot -< lo.dcwrfl
> lou nuv enter I** *"h hul "ch '",p
med K a rancd ol purdiMt Imai flag with
am UqmJ Corn OJ from from jll "-'<* .*<<
and telephone numhrr ituuld he mjujed with ea.h rrapt V.
entry will hr ac.epled withoji Ml "1* abo.e tequircmcnti.
No mm will he a, kmmMpd 01 Moiiwd
i Emm-, mm he pomr :krd no hHI than I2/1I/7S Winm
will br ann.Kin.rJ thr wvek -.1 1 It
Mad to Sweet 1'nvalteJ Ma:ola
Re cipr CoMCM
eo ..1700
('land Central Pom Ortue
s,. vi s I 10017
4 Cnnte.tanu must he 18 year, or oUti ml a mideM -V Uraied
Sute* Piatlicti* profr.MOna! \vmc ecoTKHniit.. ptn*rsMOnal
cool., aid emplown .J CPC lnvnun>
    itic. and thru (anulio. is well a. then advriti.ing a|(en>ir. a.r
    not eli^We to entrt this cocnpetioon
    1 Pteliminaty Kieenim will he J.ie hv inJependent ludninit for
    the election o( the foul wmrins rtctOM and will he under thr
    auriie .( CPC Imernali.^ia! In. and will he .> the ha.i. Ot
    taste ippcarince orwn-i"iv afpniw appeal ami ikt ol tltar
    dtrectKvis
    ( The Iiim prlH winner utee. to take the mp to Puerto Rt.o
    berween Mav. l7n and Miv l77lno iiarMitution. will h.- made I.
    and to allow the ue ol rWhet l.krne., in normal puHiaty pur-
    r..^s. -hi.h ,l MM CanHHWe an enoUnvemenl .4 the advei-
    tner pnJuct
    7 Reopr. bKon* ihe priTetty ol CPC Innanatiorul Int with
    mhi. u adi.i.i and edit lot puhlicaiKi Detuaoa .* the ("dp. .
    tnl Ta.es ,i pnm ate nsejcnstMUT ol winneis
    H CoMtM void where pri^ihted of reoncted by law
    I atfree to foSow aH .'wote.i rule-
    Mi
    Mi,
    MrM
    Name
    ila-il

    A.II-.

    , iuiel
    12 pCudi I
    Prmnr
    Mi ace ,

    . H s=mG 6Son
    il-edhl r.-l.i ...m<1rinn.Mmil%".
    I
    I
    I
    I
    I
    I
    I
    I
    I
    SWEET-UNSAI TCD IVl3ZOI*l
    *
    CONTAINS
    .y.iOOtO '
    CORN 5lt
    SWEET-UNSALTED
    A
    I6c:
    STORE COUPON
    TOTHI DEALER K, ,.h .
    HI iyi the pur.L
    dUCI -r Ml P*
    Marga
    DRmrKtedi >lo wrfcimllo. ^Itidiei
    Dofntav wAet.n "
    DOt milk ailerc
    Drt la.te prek-en.e ol UnuM *""
    Dc>he-iriea^.pe,.M
    i KCCpl a. .*ot
    anMimri -i ^
    handlint el .....' "**
    complied nh the ftfMCI
    nNK IIKH ',IV ". I he .1.-
    Htnrd ot nanftrrtd bi wu Vmd "l>
    ency i~r '"" inmi noiwl *' ot whrrc
    . rwive :. Mikml Vow
    ' |iii.h.^

    Jempiionmu.tr.
    npucei ralue A "h ml s ^
    Send to Bei Fooi Divine* < PC lt.i.-i.in..nal In.
    IV.. 102 Cbwori I. .. iii
    10c Here's 10(^to ^et yu started-1~ j


    Page 4-B
    fjk w ist1 IfkrMinn
    Friday, September 12
    Congress Grapples
    With Sinai Desert
    Civilians Issue
    By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
    WASHINGTON (JTA)
    Congress returned to Washing-
    ton from its August recess to
    grapple with the issue of weth-
    er American civilians should
    be stationed in Sinai as proposed
    under the Israeli-Egyptian in-
    terim agreement initialed by
    both sides.
    The President and Kissinger
    have already discussed details
    of the American commitments
    associated with the Israeli-Egyp-
    tian interim agreement, especi-
    ally the stationing of American
    civilian technicians between
    Israeli and Egyptian lines to
    monitor electronic detecting
    equipment designed to give in-
    stant information of military
    movements on both sides.
    THE ADMINISTRATION,
    "approaching this with a sense
    of urgency," as a State Depart-
    ment spokesman put it, is push-
    ing hard for a quick resolution
    by Congress on the U.S. com-
    mitment of monitors. White
    House aides have had "prelim-
    inary conversations" with the
    two Congressional committees
    dealing with foreign affairs and
    the dates will be set soon for
    Kissinger to testify before them.
    In the rush for Congressional
    approval, Administration offi-
    cials were nevertheless cautious
    in declining to predict publicly
    when Congress may act.
    It is penerally understood
    here that unless Congress ap-
    proves the American personnel
    role, and other aspects to the
    agreement directly involving
    the U.S., the effort for a second-
    stage Israeli withdrawal will
    founder.
    STATE Department spokes-
    man Robert Funseth said the
    Administration's presentation to
    Congress of the Middle East
    package will consist of "full
    consultation" on the agree-
    ments, request for approval of
    the U.S. civilian monitors and
    Congressional legislation for the
    expenditure of funds through
    normal appropriations channels.
    These would include Amer-
    ican assurance of oil supplies
    for Israel. Funding usually re-
    quires much time, but delay on
    that element is not expected to
    impede Israel's withdrawal.
    The personnel issue, however,
    is viewed as decisive. There are
    also commitments that Kissinger
    may have made to Egypt which
    are unknown and could possibly
    wreck the accord.
    According to one observer, a
    sense of "uneasiness" prevails
    on Capitol Hill. Few Congress-
    men will commit themselves at
    this time. Sen. Majority Leader
    Mike Mansfield (D., Mont.) has
    reiterated his opposition, ex-
    pressed last week, to the Amer-
    ican monitoring role.
    AMERICAN civilians in Sinai
    "sets a bad precedent," Mans-
    field said. He suggested that
    the monitoring "should be done
    by the United Nations."
    Sen. Gale McGee (D., Wyo.)
    conceded that involving Amer-
    icans was "risky, but well worth
    the risk if we can contribute to
    pe Rep. John Anderson (R, 111),
    third-ranking House Republi-
    can, siid he expected to "sup-
    port the agreement." noting
    that the monitors "will not be
    military or even paramilitary
    personnel" and therefore "the
    argument that it would involve
    the U.S. militarv in the Middle
    East with combat forces is not
    a "ood argument."
    But a senior member of the
    House Appropriations Commit-
    tee's snbeommitee on foreign
    operations, Rep. David Obey
    (D., Wise.) warned on a tele-
    vised interview that U.S. tech-
    nicians in Sinai could become
    symbols for terrorists "who
    want to blow things up."
    OBEY, a member of a House
    delegation that recently visited
    Israel, Egypt. Jordan and Syria.
    said that "If the terrorists do
    attack and the U.S. responds as
    it did in the Mayaguez affair
    involving Cambodia, the U.S.
    may well be basically unable
    for a long time to play an ef-
    fective role in the Middle East."
    Leaders of Jewish organiza-
    tions called unon Ford to urge
    Congress to approve the pres-
    ence of U.S. civilian personnel
    in the Sinai and expressed the
    view that the upcoming Con-
    gressional debate is not iust a
    Jewish concern but a national
    'matter involving all American?.
    Mrs. Charlotte Jacobson.
    chairman of the World Zionist
    Organization-American Section,
    said that with the "assumption
    by the U.S. of participatory role
    is the peace-making and peace-
    keeping process in the Mideast,
    it becomes essential for the
    American people to understand
    how their continued concern
    for peace in the area is vital to
    American interests."
    REFERRING to the pending
    Congressional hearings in re-
    gard to American commitments,
    Mrs. Jacobson emphasized the
    importance of full support for
    those commitments by the
    American people as their means
    of expressing their belief in the
    need for maintaining the secur-
    ity of Israel.
    At the same time, she pledged
    the continued vigilance of the
    Jewish people on behalf of Is-
    rael as the new pact is tested
    in the months ahead.
    The Anti-Defamation League
    of B'nai B'rith noted that th*-e
    is some concern that th U.S.
    cornmitmpnt is a risk in li^ht of
    this country's experience.
    Seymour Graubard. ADL's
    national chairman, s^id. "There
    is a fundamental difference in
    t' i's instance. F.gvnt and Israel
    have both indicated that the
    presence of U.S. civilians is
    desirable and have requested
    that they be sent to monitor and
    onprate earlv warning stations
    in the Sinai."
    WHILE welcoming the agree-
    ment, Graubard also called for
    "direct. fa between the parties." as the
    onlv road "to the mutual trust
    and credibility which are neces-
    sarv for a real and lasting solu-
    tion."
    The American Jewish Con-
    gress expressed support for;
    Ford's call for the use of U.S.
    civilians to monitor the new Si-1
    nai agreement and said a U.S. |
    presence there was an "essen-
    tial" element in progress toward
    peace in the Midat. In a tele-
    gram to the White House. Rabbi
    Arthur Hertzberg. president of
    the AJCongress, stated:
    "The fact that small numbers
    of American civilian technicians
    will be stationed on both sides
    and will be there at the reouest
    of both parties should elimi-
    na*t any serious apprehension
    that America will find itself
    drawn into some future conflict.
    American citizens would not be
    there in any partisan capacity
    and would not be identified
    with the cause of either side.
    Any analogy to America's past
    involvements or to conflicts in
    anv- other nart of the world is
    wholly misleading."
    Abel Holtz, chairman of
    the board of directors of
    The Capital Bank of North
    Bay Village has announc-
    ed the appointment of Irv-
    ing A. Levine as senior
    vice president. Mr. Levine,
    who comes to the 1
    Bank from tht
    Bank of North Amer cc
    New York, where he
    senior vice president, will
    be responsible for all com-
    mercial lending.
    Senate Supports
    Investigation 01
    Condo Leases
    The U.S. Senate passed H.R.
    8121, which directs the Federal
    Trade Commission to complete
    its investigation into 99-year
    condominium lease abuses, last
    week.
    Rep. Bill Lehman (D., Fla.).
    had sponsored a similar move
    in the House which was ap-
    proved on June 26 and Sen.
    Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.), spon-
    sored the Senate action.
    In language prepared jointly
    by Lehman and Chiles for a re-
    port to accompany the bill, the
    Senate Appropriations Commit-
    tee said:
    "The Committee concurs in
    the House increase of .
    $75,000 for the condominium
    investigation with the under-
    standing that the Commission
    will utilize whatever resources
    are necessary to complete the
    condominium investigation and
    that $75,000 shall not be con-
    strued as a ceiling."
    "Both Houses of Congress
    have now ordered th( I
    Trade Commission to complete
    its investigation into unfair and
    deceitful condominium leases '
    said the Congressman.
    "I will be carefully watching
    the progress of the FTC Investi-
    gation to insure the eai
    possible action to relieve the
    hard pressed condominium
    owners in South Florida." he
    added.
    PUZZLED! by Norina A. Orovi,
    CNAVISMQ?
    M R A Y I R Z :
    BVVHI GMTV
    pEfSSVHBfl
    DAGBLJAB3
    LDMAUSTEE
    NAZTLKIT
    W R W S E C F K n
    The twelve month.-; on the Hebrew calendar, plustkJ
    one alternate month are included in this puzzle id
    month nai es are placed vertically, hori .. d:aaon-
    >is and backwards. How mai youfinffl
    . arc on pge 6-B.
    /.; E EKVED. VARIATK IN TI ft]
    3 AND PHONETIC SI ELLN MAY 0G
    CUR.

    Presidents of all major Jewish women's organization
    have formed a "Council of Presidents'' to coordinaU
    their activities for the coming year. Mrs. Adolph Berger
    (second from right) of North Miami Beach. Communilj
    Education Vice President of the Greater Miami Jewish
    Federation Women's Division, convened a meeting of
    the Council last week. Among the presidents talcing pan
    were Mrs. Ben Belfus, representing Brandeis University
    National Women's Committee, and Mrs. Alfred Stont.
    representing American Mizrachi Women, (left) andfoif
    M. Gilbert, (right) representing National Council of k*
    ish Women.
    HADASSAII
    Extends to (Tie
    EHTIRl JEWISH C0MMUHIT1
    Besl Withes for a Happy New Yea- To All.
    THE MIAMI CHAPTER
    Mrs Harvey Friedman
    President
    THE MIAMI BEACH CHAPTS
    Mrs. Jean Feinberg
    President
    no
    Wholesale Distributors of
    QUEEN ESTHER
    KOSHER POULTRY
    and
    Processors and Exporters
    of the finest U.S. Govt. Inspected
    KOSHER MEATS and POULTRY
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    special sizes 14V4 to 32%, 38 to 52
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    lor women 5'2" and under)
    DOWNTOWN MIAMI-MIAMI BEACH-WESTlAND-HIA^j
    PADELAND-HOLLYWOOD-FT LAUDERDALE-W. PAtM #


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