The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02427

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"dewish Floridian
Combining TMf JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 32
Miami, Florida Friday, August 8, 1975
joc by Man Two Seclions Price 25 rents
BACK FROM HELSINKI
Ford Says He's
'Encouraged;'
Arms Flow Slows
WASHINGTON "I am
really encouraged and opti-
mistic. I honestly believe
there were more pluses than
minuses," said President
Gerald Ford on his return
here Monday night from a
10-day, five-nation trip to
Europe.
The trip .ncluded his par-
ticipation in the European
security conference in Hel
sinki, where he signed on
the dotteJ line the Soviet-
sponsored security agree-
ment that the President said
he hoped would give the
Eastern European nations
now in the Soviet orbit an
incentive to move toward a
greater degree of personal
independence.
WITH PRESIDENT Ford and
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer was U.S. Ambassador to
Continued on Page 8-A
PRESIDENT FORD
Echeverria
Given Israeli
Welcome
Fight Against Ouster
From UN Being Won
Worldwide Effort Staged
2-A
JERUSA1 EM(JTA) Offi-
cials here say the tight against
the Arabs' plan to oust Israel
from the UN is by no means
over yet -but they cautiously
nit to a more hopeful and
... Stilt9 Chance of War
Greater Than Last Year
New and Eeaiful Weapons 13 A
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA) While Israeli political leaders
are preoccupied with irtensive bargaining for an interim
accord with Egvpt in Sinai, military circles here and other
observers have expressed increasingly pessimistic views
over the prospects of any
significant peace settlement
with Israel's neighbors and,
in fact, have strong doubts
that the Arabs will settle for
anything less than the
shrinkage of Israel to its
1967 boundaries.
Should they ever succeed
in forcing Israel back to the
old lines which Israel insists
are insecure and indefensi-
ble, the Arabs would set the
stage for a further attrition
of Israel by demanding the
rights of the Palestinian
people and thereby hope for
the ultimate destruction of
the Jewish State. In fact,
military circles feel that
chances of war are much
greater now than a year ago.
Continued on Page 15-A
relaxed feeliny than was preva-
lent here only a week ago.
Developments in Helsinki, in
Kampala, and in Stockholm
have demonstrated that if Is-
rael must fight the ouster bid
she will not fi.uht alone. They
have demonstrated, too. that
the Arabs will not have the go-
ing as easv as they had perhaps
thoughtif they do decide to
go ahead and press the ouster
effort.
AT THE same time, though,
political observers here are
warning that western and non-
aligned support for Israel
against the Arab bid will very
probably have its price: those
states rendering this support
will make it contingent (at least
ANTI-SOVIETS
Activists
Jailed In
Helsinki
Ideas Exchanged 12-A
Ford at Auschwitz 1S-A
LONDON(JTA)Six women
activists for Soviet Jewry were
arrested outside the United
States Embassy in Helsinki as
they were about to demonstrate
there on behalf of the rights of
Jews in the USSR.
President Ford and Soviet
Communist Party Secretary
General Leonid Brezhnev were
reportedly conferring inside the
Embassy when the arrests were
made. The. women were released
later in the day.
THE JEWISH Telegraphic
Agency was informed of the in-
cident by a spokesperson for
the Women's Campaign for So-
viet Jewry here. The informant
said the activists, led by Doreen
Gainsford of Britain, went to
Helsinki July 29 to urge world
leaders gathering there for the
final session of the European
Conference on Security and Co-
Continued ob Page 6-A
Continued on Page 8-A
47 CITY UNIVERSITY
JERUSALEM(JTA) "Bi-
envenido Senor Presidente"
say the red-green-and-white pla-
cards on the streets of Jerusa-
lem. "Bienvenido Senora de
Echeverria," in a greeting to
Mexico's President, Luis Eche-
verria, and his wife. Maria
Esther, due here Thursday for
a three-day visit.
Israel was to be the 14th port
of call on the Echeverria's cur-
rent world tour which will end
next week in Jordan.
Since it is not abundantlv
blessed with visits by heads of
state, and since Echeverria is
considered here a warm friend
of Israel. Jerusalem is making
every effort to give the guests
a sincerely hearty welcome.
Officials here say they ex-
pected tough and frank talks
with the Mexican leaderwho
does not hide his deep dif-
ferences of outlook with Israel
on matters of fundamental im-
portance in the Mideast conflict.
Thus. Echeverria has already
indicated that he would argue
forthrightly with his Israeli
hosts on behalf of self-determi-
nation for the Palestinian peo-
ple, a cause which he has con-
sistently supported.
(Self-determination as a po-
litical principle of universal ap-
plication is almost a part of
Continued on Page 1S-A
TO BRITAIN
PLO
Member \
Invited
Confab Moved
8-A
Regents Urged to Probe
Bias in Medical Training
NEW YORK Charging
that admission to the City
University's medical train-
ing program last year was
"unfair, discriminatory and
based on racial categories
and quotas," the American
Jewish Congress has called
on the State Board of Re-
gents to launch "a thorough
and immediate review of the
1974 admissions process" to
prevent future abuses.
In testimony before the
Regents' higher education
committee in Albany last
week, Sylvia Deutsch, direc-
tor of the Congress' New
York Metropolitan Council,
also urged:
Censure of any officials in-
volved "if discrimination and
racial preference are found to
have taken place:"
Admission into the medical
training program of "those stu-
Continued on Page 3-A
By MARK SEGAL
LONDON(JTA) Despite
strong opposition from Britain
and other Western parliamenta-
ry delegations, the PLO has
been invited to send observers
to attend meetings of the Inter-
Parliamentary Union (IPU) in
London in September.
It is understood that although
the PLO representatives will not
be allowed to vote, it is highlv
likely that they will be given
permission to address one of the
meetings. if the president
agrees.
MORE THAN 1,200 delegates
from all over the world will
be attending the conference.
Thomas Williams. Labor MP for
Warrington, chairman of the
British group, intimated that as
president acting for the host na-
tion, he would give permission
"if this was the majority view of
the delegates."
He confirmed that the British
delegation had opposed the PLO
presence but not on ideological
grounds. The decision to invite
the PLO was taken after Afro-
Asian pressure had been exert-
ed at a preliminary meeting in
Sri Lanka in April.
WILLIAMS SAID: We took
the viewand it was supported
by other Western delegations
that although there is provision
in the rules governing the con-
ference for the invitation of in-
ternational bodies, such as the
UN, UNESCO and that kind,
there is not for other types of
bodies like the Palestine Nation-
al Council, which represents the
scattered PLO throughout the
world."
It was the Palestine National
Continued on Page 2-A
Flushing Man Back on Job After Tiff
NEW YORK A Flushing,
N.Y., man returned to work this
week at the St. Albans Veterans
Administration Hospital after
federal officials ruled he had
been fired last November be-
cause of anti-Semitism and or-
dered his reinstatement.
Fred Emert, who was repre-
sented by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith in his
complaint to the U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission, was rehired
retroactive to the day of his
termination, "with all pay and
benefits."
ACCORDING TO Robert C.
Kohler, director of ADL's New
York regional office, the VA
acted after a review of Mr.
Emert's case record.
In a letter to Emert, Kenneth
M. Meyer, acting assistant gen-
eral counsel for the VA, said
that "discrimination and repris-
al because of religion was sub-
stantiated by the evidence con-
cerning the issues raised in
your complaint."
Meyer said that "after a care-
ful review of the complete case
record," the VA concurred with
the findings of a U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity complaints
examiner.
EMERT, a supervisor of hos-
pital police, told ADL last Oc-
tober that he was harassed by
his superior who made anti-
Semitic remarks about him, par-
ticularly when he switched
tours of duty in order to ob-
Continued on Page 6-A


Page 2-A
+Jmi$t> fhrkMam
Friday, August 8, 1975
Diplomats Stage War Against Israel Ouster
JERUSALEM (JTA Is-
raeli diplomats around the world
have been instructed to K
none efforts to enlist -
port against the Arab move to
suspend Isratl from the United
Nations
Officials in Jerusalem said
the first results of these diplo-
matic contacts have been not
discouraging, with several gov-
ernments undertaking to oppose
the move and to urge others
to do so too. The Israeli offi-
cials were reluctant to name
sp "cific governments.
ISRAEL IS 90gg-sting, t was
learned, that friendly states un-
dertake to apply to ts ';>! -s
any restrictions or curtailments
tnat (he forthcoming General
Assembly might vote to apply
agvnst thp Is aeli drlegnion.
The officials here reiterated
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon's
\ cning hat Israel would retal-
iate jyinst the UN it it were
disc i i1 ited against at the
i neral Assembly. They stress-
ed, however, that no firm de-
cisions have yet been taken on
how Israel would precisely act
in that eventuality.
.A lion in a Knesset statement
indicated at Israel would bar
the UN from the Mideast peace-
Kick UN Out of lsrael-Allon
By YITZHAK SHARG1L
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
said that if the Arabs and
their allies succeeded in
having Israel expelled from
the United Nations a pos-
sibility that is far from cer-
tain they can achieve he
would propose to the gov-
ernment that all UN activi-
ties in Israel and in all areas
concerning Israel, should be
suspended.
He said this would include
the role of the UN at Gene-
va, th United Nations Re-
lief and Works Agency (UN-
RWA), all UN activities in
the administered territories
and the presence of the UN
High Commissioners House
in Jerusalem.
A MOV to oust Israel from
the UN should concern Israel's
neighbors and the Soviet Union,
Allon declared in a television
interview. Hs said the USSR
cannot expect that Israel would
agree to its playing any part in
the Geneva peace conference or
any ether area if it is not openly
gaint tv,a exclusion of Israel
from the UN.
Accordmg to Allan, although
the Russians loudly sunoort the
Arab o\ister ove in their Ara-
bi~ n-opag-md3. thev have
p-w-atelv exDr^sed a negative
attrt-rde toward the Arab-soon-
sor-H move iinit Israel in the
world organization.
Arabs and their Communist bloc
and Third World allies com-
mand the preponderance of
-'-? in f* funeral Assembly,
their ouster moves are far from
assured of success. He noted
that !r*H h-s Dotent counter-
weapons against such a move.
HE REFERRED to Israels
success in arousing internation-
al opinion against UNESCO's
moves to exclude Israel and said
that proved that Israel can rally
international movements against
such attempts.
He disclosed that Is-ael has
approached friendly nations and
Third World nations with which
it has connections and was giv-
en assurances, some in the form
of official communiques from
governments, that they would
art against any attempt to ex-
clude Israel from the UN.
(Tn Washington, the State De-
partment reaffirmed that the
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U.S. would be ang*-ed if th Or-
ganization for African Unity
(OAU) adopted a resolution for
Israel's expulsion from the UN
at its meeting in Kampala.
Uganda.
(State Department spokesman
Robert Anderson said that, as
Secretary of State Hen"-y A.
Kissinger has stated. "We are
mmni-,t?lv against the expul-
sion of any nation from the
UN." In Kampala. Uganda's bit-
terlv anti-Israel P-sident Idi
Amin told the OAU delegates
that Israel must be expelled
from the UN.)
REFERRING TO the negotia-
tions on the interim agreement.
Allon said he didn't think that
Egypt's reply to Israel's latest
proposals represented Cairo's
last word. He said Israel sin-
cerely wanted an interim agree-
ment and he believe J a chance
should be given for another
9tep.
Every possible way must be
explored and if. regretfully, no
agreement is reached, it will be
clear to us and to the U.S. that
Israel did everything possible to
achieve one. Allon said.
PLO Invited
To Confab
Continued from Page 1-A
Council that had asked for per-
mission to send PLO represen-
tatives. Williams said.
HE ADDED: "We feel that if
the IPU invited groups of that
kind, the rules should be chang-
ed in the future to include other
organizations. After all. what is
to stop the IRA (Irish Republi-
can Army), for example, mak-
ing a similar request?"
Meanwhile, strong represen-
tations have been made to the
British government by the Is-
raeli Embassy and various
prominent members of the
Anglo-Jewish community at the
prospect of the PLO being per-
"i'ted to attend the projected
IPU meeting here in September.
B'NAI ISRAEL*
A Or. Miami Youth Syn. (erthad.)
Hifh Hthttf Stftti will ctKintiti' bf:
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
t: Club do Lot Amernoi
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8500 S.W. 8th St.
NttM ?*/ by rOUt ionttiwn
'r information cok: 274-9556
PLANNING
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ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
C1 me. -hther, 635-6554 and
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local movina 8 lo"o dis'e
moving anywhere in tha U.S.
or ov rseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
making process if it \v-e sus-
pended from the Assemblv.
THE OFFICIV S e Dl ln1
that Israel is not lin' inz or hing-
ing tw,e current int-ri t i -
Pi Egvnt with the Arab move
agoinst it nt tha U I
The agVeemerit will ^J signed
as soon as it is ready to be
- .'-ju. ..--'.ci'ing the negotia-
tions can be successfully con-
cluded, these officials said b-
rael is not awaiting the result
of th Assemblv before ert ring
into the ag~eemen' with Egypt,
the officials explained.
At the 9Vn tim?. they point-
ed out. implementation of the
agreement, if achieved, would
onl\ begin after the Assembly,
and Israjl woul 1 certainly not
implement it if the UNBF ro'.e
i vital component of ithaJ
r*e inatory action against Israel at
the Assembly.
MEANWHILE, officials here
have decried the African fore
minister's call at the Organizu-
tijn of African Unity (OAU)
meeting in Kampala. Uganda
f-- [j i. suspension from the
UN, saying this action would
i.iid.nnn: thj existence of the
world o's ni^ation itself.
The officials called on the
African heads of state to "thi
.n p 'f*^ adopting their
f"-eign minister's recommenda-
tion.
In nn implied word of en-
cn"rag>",ont to those Africa!
leaders who have expressed dis-
aroroval of the recommenda-
tion. tha Israeli officials sail
any "action to avoid a sterile
consensus at Kampala" would
serve to raise the esteem of
Af.ican states in the eyes of the
warld.
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Friday, August 8, 1975
+Jenist> fhridf/dr
Page 3-A
Urge Regents to Probe Med Training Bias
Conlinued from Page 1-A
dents denied entry by reason of
discrimination:*'
"A clear and unequivocal
statement oni-osing the use of
racial and ethnic criteria as an
integral part of the revised ad-
mission procedure."
MRS. DEUTSCH warned trnt
the "unresolved controversy"
over charges of discrimination
could "blight an important and
innovative program." She add-
ed:
"We believe that the biomed-
icai program can play a vital
role in meeting the shortage of
phvsicians in our urban areas
and in serving as a model for
sitmilar programs throughout
the country. However safe-
guards must he established and
enforced to prevent discrimina-
tion, preference or quotas.
"The Board oi Regents must
tn>ure that higher education id-
mission criteria, policies and
Detente Test Fails;
Calls Hard to Make
NEW YORK(JTA) In a
dramatic test of the Soviet
Union's compliance with the
spirit of detente and interna-
tional telecommunications, a
group of well-known New York-
ers tried to place calls to Jew-
ish activists in the USSR.
But only three of the 25 calls
went through. The event, which
was sponsored by the Greater
New York Conference on Soviet
Jewry, was also aimed at the
meeting between President Ford
and Soviet Communist Party
Secretary Leonid Brezhnev at
the European Security Confer-
ence in Helsinki, Finland.
VARIOUS EXCUSES were
given" by Soviet operators why
the calls did not get through.
One ofierator told GNYCSJ
chairman Eugene Gold, in the
midst of their conversation,
that she could no longer speak
English. All of the persons call-
ed were notified in advance, ac-
cording to the GNYCSJ.
One of the calls that did get
through was to mathematician
Dr. Ilya Piatetsky Shapiro,
whose phone had been discon-
nected for over a year. He urg-
ed pianist David Bar Ilan to
"continue your efforts as much
as possible to help us."
Isaak Tsitberblit told a New
York television reporter that
"You don't know how difficult
it is for us to be alone here
under such circumstances. It
only possible to continue be-
cause of your concern and
help."
ILYA UCHITEL told City
Councilman Howard Golden that
he lost his job after applying
for his visa and that he is now
forced to do menial labor to
avoid arrest for parasitism.
The New York participants
also spofce on the-telephone to
relatives of Soviet Jews now in
Israel who described their dif-
ficulty in communicating with
those they left behind.
Margy Kuth Davis, coordi-
nator of the event, said, "The
cut-off of phone communica?
ions, an increase in the num-
ber of trials of Jews, the ex-
cessive tax on charity funds and
a sharp decline in recent
months in Soviet Jews emigra-
tion combine to underscore the
growing magnitude of the plight
of vast numbers of Jews and the
relentless campaign of harass-
r >nt I i >n-.ression being wag-
ed against them by the Soviet
govern i'lent,"
SEND FQ BOOKLET
HONOPWG ]77$ AND
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j, social event 5
flr 'zvah. Wedding
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5j2-nu
practices are totally non-dis-
criminatory."
THE PROGRAM of the Citv
College Ceni it Biomedical
Education offers a four-year
undergraduate program that in-
cludes the equivalent of the first
two years of medical school.
Students who complete the four-
year course and pass a special
examination will be admitted in
to the third year of medical
school, thus making it possible
to obtain an MD degree in six
years instead of eight.
In response to charges that
racial preferences had been em-
ployed in choosing the Septem-
ber, 1974, entering class, an in-
dependent inauirv ordered bv
the New York City Board of
Higher Education and made bv
CUNY Chancellor Robert J.
Kibbee found that racial lists of
candidates had been used in the
selection process.
Dr. Kibbee's report was is-
sued on June 18. 1974.
Following release of this
study, American Jewish Con-
gress leaders urged CUNY to
reopen the admissions process
and admit students who had
been eliminated by racial con-
siderations from the class ei>
tering in September. 1974.
WHEN THESE efforts proved
unsuccessful, Mrs. Deutsch told
the hearing in Albany, the Con-
gress submitted a 13-page analy-
sis of the admissions procedure
and called on the State Com-
missioner to initiate a "full-
fledged investigation" under
Section 313 of the State Edu-
cation Law.
Commissioner Ewald B. Ny-
quist declined the request but
did agree to review and monitor
the procedures used to admit
the September 1975 class. H_*
has not reported his findings.
In its study, the Congress
noted that while 55.4 per cent
of the applicants interviewed
were white, only 37.6 per cent
were offered admission. Simi-
larly, minority applicants con-
stituted 44.6 per cent of those
interviewed, but 62.4 per cent
cf those who were offered plac-
es in the program.
ANOTHER TABLE showed
that 65.2 per cent of the white
applicants had a high school
average of 85. but that only 40.2
per cent were invited to join
the program. By the same token.
34.8 per cent of the non-white
or minority applicants had high
school averages of 85 or over
while 59.8 per cent received in-
vitations to enroll.
The table also showed that of
the students with high school
averages beiow 85, or where the
rages were not known, 22.1
per cent were white but none
were accepted. All those offered
places with below-85 averages
were minority students.
Moreover, the American Jew-
Congress study asserted,
twice as many minority stu-
dents survived the interview
process as white students, even
though two-thirds of the whites
had averages over 90, contrast-
ed with one-quarter of the mi-
nority students."
Two lawsuits challenging the
admissions procedure are pend-
ing in Federal Court here.
Mrs. Rabin Complains \
Israel TV Ignored Her
TEL AVIV (JTA) Mrs. Leah Rabin has com-
plained that while the Arabic-language broadcasts on Is-
raeli television showed a great deal of the appearance of
Mrs. Jihan Sadat, wife of Egyptian President Anwar Sadat,
at the International Women's Conference in Mexico City,
the Hebrew-language broadcasts ignored her own appear-
ance.
Speaking at a Haifa women's meeting, the wife of Is-
raeli Premier Rabin said her appearance in Mexico was the
first time she faced the world media, and she used it to
preach Zionism.
She said the Mexican and United States television net-
works prominently displayed both her and Mrs. Sadat, and
she still receives encouraging letters from women in the
United States. Mrs. Rabin said she could not understand
the motive of Israeli television in not showing her appear-
ance.
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Page 4-A
>JeistFkrid&r]
Friday, August 8, 1975
Idle Atomic Speculation
It seems to us that it is idle to speculate on whether
or not Israel has nuclear weapons, or precisely how
many she has, as the Boston Globe set the world to
doing just a week ago.
Suffice it to say that the State Department's denial
on the basis of Premier Rabin's personal assurance dur-
ing a Danish television .interview-.last December that
Israel has no such weapons is ludicrous to say the least.
If Israel indeed nas nuclear weapons, are we to ex-
pect that she should make a formal announcement about
them? Israel, after ail, is not India.
We can only add two thoughts to all of this. Our
editor's notebooks remind us that late in the 1950's,
when Abba Eban was Israel's Ambassador to the United
Nations and the United States, he replied this way to
similar speculation about whether or not his country
had atomic weapons:
"Who do you think made atomic weapons in the
first place?"
Eban meant, of course, the preeminent role of Jew-
ish scientists throughout the free world in the develop-
ment of the first atom bomb, and his clear implication
was that it would be absurd to think Israel did not have
them therefore.
Our second and final thought on the matter is the
recollection of a visit of ours to the nuclear reactor at
Dimona way back in 1963.
While we have never talked about it, and do not
intend to now, we are at least moved to declare that
the advanced state of Israeli technology in nuclear fis-
sion at the time and the distinguished array of interna-
tional scientists on the staff there spoke for themselves.
And that was more than 12 years ago.
Leonid Brezhnev's Tears
Wasn't it sad that Leonid Brezhnev was driven
into a weeping fit following the signing of the European
security agreement in Helsinki?
The U.S. came to the conference in full panoply
President Ford and Secretary of State Kissinger,
along with their perfectly pious statements about the
auspicious occasion.
This meant that we were underwriting the Soviet
Union's enslavement of most of Eastern Europe.
On top of that, just a week before, the Soviets had
succeeded in shaking Earl Butz out of another 10 million
metric tons or so of U.S. wheat, and damn the impact
of the cost of living here at home.
Then, there is Portugal on the borderline of a Com-
munist takeover. Ditto for Italy.
As for NATO generally, the fiasco we are suffering
in Turkey seems to be our crowning glory. Not only do
the Soviets live to see the falling apart of NATO.
But Secretary General Brezhnev's phony substitute
for it the European security agreement now in-
cludes President Ford's signature to it.
We don't know just exactly what it was that made
Brezhnev cry. It seems to us that he should have been
roaring with laughter all the way back to the Kremlin.
The Public's Foreign Policy
The Ford Administration suffered a major setback
when it had to withdraw its letter to Congress outlining
a proposed sale of a $350 million air defense system to
Jordan. The State Department said that it may resub-
mit the same proposal in September, but unless the
package is reduced, especially the number of "Hawk"
ground-to-air missile batteries, it seems likely that the
arms sale will be rejected again and rightly in Congress.
The Administration's recall of the proposal came
only hours before the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee was expected to reject the sale as the House
International Relations Committee had done earlier.
State Department spokesman Robert Anderson said
the Department was "surprised" by the strength of the
opposition in Congress. But he shouldn't have been.
Members of the Senate and Congressmen correctly
expressed the fear fhe sale would upset the military
balance in the Middle East.
Witnesses before the Senate and House Committees
noted that Jordan had kept out of the Yom Kippur War
because of the lack of an air defense system. There was
the Israeli fear that Jordan, with heavy air protection,
coupled with a new friendship with Syria, could take the
offensive against Israel.
Congressional opposition was clinched when Sen.
George S. Brown, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, believed that six "Hawk" batteries were sufficient
for Jordan's defensive needs.
The defeat suffered by the Administration in the
Jordanian sale should be another lesson to Secretary
of State Henry A. Kissinger that he can not run foreign
policy with complete disregard of public opinion.
Lawman Moses Bites the Dust
..DROTECT ME from my
friends. I know my enemies
and can take care of them my-
self." Thus goes the old saying,
or something very close to it.
Example: "I'm ready for the
Arabs, but what do I do about
the Fulbrights?" rt ... ,
" NOW COMES Burt Lancas-
ter, whose "Moses the Law
Giver" bid adieu to the tube
the other night after six gruel-
ling weekly episodes on CBS te-
levision.
leo Mindlin

MODERN AHTrSMmSM
Before this magnum opus of
his. I would never have thought
him either a friend or an ene-
my. Now. reluctantly. I musj
put him in the category of
f l iend.
After all. as. a consequence
of his TV production., .once
aeain untold millions of Amer-
icans heard emphasized for
them what they have been hear-
ing in church on Sunday all
t'leir lives long the Hebrew
God Jho'. ah is wrathful and
obsess, d with vengeance.
SOME WILL think me ob-
sess^, too. It is not two years
agj that I took out after Sir
Laurence OhVier's production
i f Shakespeare's "The M
chant of Venice" on ABC-TV.
What I mean by obtesti
cisj is the tree;; -floal
' ar (.f what mn-Jev.
oi us as if I don t for
tl part know right now. and
as -i uiJn t come to u:>.:
i >ng aso that I should
i' it ean
But th? truth is that Shylocks
speech. "I am a Jew. Hath not
a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew
I'.jnJs. organs, dimension-.
s nsjs. alfections, passions?'*.
n?- er did mitigate for me the
danger of The Merchant of
Venice" "specially not as
Oli' i.-r delivered it. friend or
not.
IN THE end. all the hateful
anti-Semitic stereojtvfles in the
play win out overTnis speech.
The Jew-hater sees a play and
is confirmed in his'bigotry by
no lass an immortal than Shake-
speare.
On a lesser dramatic level,
Continued on Page 13-A
Who Got Most Out of Helsinki?
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
As the leaders of Europe,
AmericT and the Soviet Union
gathered at Hclsin'.i. in a se-
curity powwow, the gain-and-
loss question was being raised:
Who is getting what from the
E-ironean Securitv Conference,
at what cost, and with what
strategy?
Inis is not something io
harangue about, but to make a
cool stock-taking and assess-
ment. The immediate Soviet
aim is clear enostih.
AFTER ALMOST 60 years,
the Soviet leaders want *o
legitimize the Russian Revolu
tion. and after 30 years they
want to legitimize the new
European boundaries carved
out in the wake of World War
II. They have worked hard io
get the stamp of Western ac-
ceptance for the East European
regime.
It makes it easier for the So-
viet Union to deal with potential
unrest and dissent in those re-
eimes and within Russia itself.
It may give Western Europe
the illusory feelina that it can
ease up on NATO military
readiness and even dispense
with the American military
presence.
ON ITS side, the United
States seems to come out with
the short end of the stick. Usu-
ally the Security Conference has
been considered one of a pair
of twins, along with mutual
balanced force reduction (MB-
FR) in Europe. That hasn't hap-
pened.
Whatever the West gets from
the Soviet Union at Helsinki
will have to come mainly from
some future results of current
contested issues, in the Middle
East and in the coming SALT
agreements.
This looks like pie in the sky,
in exchange for bread now. But
in foreign policy, the intangibles
are what count, and they oper-
ate on both sides.
l.EKNER
WHAT THE Russians nrC buv
in is Europe's goodwill. That
can be shattered overnight bv
future Russian actions like the
past onis in Hungary and
Chechoslovakia; it can be badly
affected by Russian rigiditv in
the SALT talks or bv Russian
aggression or treachery' in the
Middle East.
In some ways this nuts the
pressure on the Soviet Union to
enter into some sort of world
moral community.
Actually, after the American
reverses in Southeast Asia, the
idea of force reduction in
Europe might have lost its ap-
peal.
THE AMERICAN policy-mak-
*~n mav now prefer to stabilize
Europe at its present force
levels rather than risk force re-
ductions whichon the Western
ide-night take on a momen-
tum of their own.
Thus the pro and con reason-
ing on Helsinki. But neither
i guntent is complete unless it
toi'-h^s the question of large
strategy and the future.
In the draft of a striking "net
assessment" on the comparative
strength and capabilities of the
United States and Russia
"Giants in Darkness," drawn up
for the General Electric-Tempo
in Washington George G. S.
Murphy and Michael M. Stod-
dard lay out three scenarios
which might describe the larger
Soviet strategy on detente.
ONE IS that of "strategic" (or
long-term) detente, which is to
sav that the Soviets mean to
sti*k with it as a permanent
policy.
The second is that of "tac-
tical" (short-term) detente. This
assumes that the Soviets are
playing the detente game only
for what it is worth to them,
and only to catch ,up with the
West in technology, economics,
Continued on Page 13-A
^ewislh FJloridian
FFICE AST PI-ANT 120 X.E. th STREET TELEPHONE ST3-UM
P.O. Box ftl-;>T3, Miami. Florida 33'Ot
FRED K SHOCHET
Editor and Publixher
leo Mixnux
A.ssoclate Editor
SEI.MA M. THOMPSON
Assistant to Publisher
Ths Jewish rioriman Dots Not Guarantee The Kaehrvth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
Published evory Friday sine 19:7 hv The ,IwlBh Florldlan
_______________S<"nd-Cla(^ Pomace Paid at Miami. FU._______________,
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
W-mber of th* Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Fsatwr* Syndi-
tat*. Worldwide News Service. Nstional Editorial Association. American As-
sociation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and th* Florida Pros* Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Arss) On* ve*r $10.00 Two V**r* 1-<*
Out of Town Upon Request
Volume 48
Friday, August 8, 1975
Number 32
1 ELUL 5735


Friday, August 8, 1975
Jen1st) tlrrSdliain
Page 5-A
Rabbi Attacks Religious Establishment
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM(JTA)A rab-
bi who is a Labor member of
the Knesset deplored the state
of religion in Israel and deliv-
ered a stinging attack on the
religious establishment which,
he charged in a Knesset speech,
was involved more in politics
than in its spiritual calling.
Rabbi Menachem Hacohen,
the religious mentor of the
Labor Party and Histadrut.
blamed his own party for the
state of affairs no less than the
National Religious Party which
controls the Ministry for Re-
ligious Affairs and the local re-
ligious councils that function
in most Israeli cities and towns.
RARBI HACOHEN spoke dur-
ing the annual Knesset debate
on the Religious Affairs Minis
try. He charged that rabbis
were increasingly becoming
State-employed kashrut watch-
dogs while their traditional role
as spiritual leaders has di-
minished.
The local religious councils
were often sloppy and ineffi-
I cient in the us? of the large
funds made available to them,
Rabbi Hacohen said, adding, the
Chief Rabbirltte itself VJs para-
lyzed bv discord. He was re-
ferring to the perpetual feuding
between t*M A-m^enazic and
Sephardic Chi -f Rabbis. Shlomo
Goren and Ovadia Yossef. since
their election three years ago.
Rabbi Hacohen, himself an
Orthodox rabbi, also assailed
the yeshivas which, he said,
w -re for the most part sealed
off fro~n t'le world around them
?nd r-hv-d virtually no role in
the life of the Stat;.
HE CHARGED that most ye-
shiva students, legally exempt
from military duties on religious
grounds, fail ;d to assume their
fair share of the burden of na-
tional defense.
The religious courts (bet din)
are undermanned often as a
result of internecine feuding
and o"envorked. causing suf-
fering and hardship for the liti-
gants who appear before them,
Rabbi Hacohen said.
Although the Labor Party
rabbi has long urged the.sepa-
ration of religion and State in
Israel in the best interests of
both, he did not refer to that
issue in his Knesset speech.
Inst2ad, he urg?d Religious
Affairs Minister Yitzhak Rafael
to unde'tak" a thorough over-
haul of his ministry with a view
tc improving the sendees it is
supposed to provide the citizen-
ry
BUT Rabbi Hacohen was not
"' only Kn^seter to inveigh
against the Ministry for Re-
Iigio"s Affairs and Rafael per-
sonally.
!.:'ufs ftideon Patt called on
Premier Yitzhak Rabin to dis-
miss Rafael on the grounds that
his "negative public image"
causes additional tension be-
tween religious and irreligious
Israelis.
Aguda's Shlomo Lorincz aim-
ed his attacks at Rabbi Goren,
whom he compared to Idi Amin
of Uganda. Both of them liked
to, .wear their Israeli paratroop-
ers wings, he pointed out, and
both of them practiced tyranny
and vengeance and dictatorship.
THE INDEPENDENT Lib-
eral's Yehuda Shaari demanded
that Conservative and Reform
rabbis also be recognized by the
Israeli authorities. Under the
present rules, only Orthodox
rabbis are recognized.
He called for the appointment
of one Chief Rabbi instead of
the present two who, he said,
feiided ceaselessly.
Rafael said he would ignore
the attacks on himself and his
ministry which, he said, were
tendentious. He conceded,
though, that a good deal needed
to be done to improve religious
services provided by his min-
istry. In the vote, all coalition
members supported the motion
"taking note" of the Minister's
statement.
Stop Aid
ToILO
WASHINGTON (JTA)
George Meany, AFL-CIO presi-
dent, last week asked Congress
to stop financing international'
programs and agencies that
have been transformed into "in-
struments of political warfare"
against the U.S. and Israel.
His targets, in testimony be-
fore the House International Re-
lations Committee, were the In-
ternational Labor Organization
and UNESCO.
MEANY NOTED that both
organizations were set up for
humanitarian reasons and have
done good work in the past,
particularly the II.O. But in re-
cent years, under the domina-
tion of the Communist-Arab
bloc, the ILO and UNESCO
"have been completely pervert-
ed," he charged.
Responding to a question,
Meany said the U.S. should give
the required two year notice of
intention to withdraw from both
organizations.
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Page 6-A
+Je*ist fkcrHinr
Friday, August 8, 1975
Military Moves Against Hebron Expansion
By GIL SEDAN-
JERUSALEM(JT A) The
Israeli military government has
repulsed attempts by Kiryat
Arba residents to increase. the_
Jewish presence in Hebron.
Kiryat Arba residents, who
two weeks ago established an
operational headquarters to im-
plement their decision to force
the renewal of the Jewish pres-
ence in the city of 3S.350 Arabs,
tried to force their way into the
Cave of Machpela (the burial
grounds of the patriarchs) dur-
ing the hours in which only
Moslems are allowed.
THE SMALL group was
evacuated by the local military
government which also moved
Flushing
Man Back
On Job
Continued from Page 1-A
serve the Jewish High Holy
Days.
Four davs after contacting
ADL. he spoke with an EEO
representative at the hospital
On Oct. 24, he was notified that
he would be terminated on Nov.
8.
The Flushing resident filed
two formal complaints to the
U.S. Civil Service Commission
with ADL assistance. In on?, he
charged discrimination, submit-
ting a statement by fellow em-
ployees that his supervisor had
made anti-Semitic remarks.
HE ALSO submitted state-
ments from two other super-
visors as to the high quality of
his work.
'.n the second complaint, he
charged he was fired in retalia-
tion for complaining to the EEO
representative ths previous
month.
Emert was reoresented by at-
torney Michael Krakower, of the
Lawyer's Lodue of B'n i B'rith.
Krakower acted on behalf of
ADL.
IN THE past several months.
ADL also successfully repre-
sented five postal employees
and is currently representing
five others, all of them den
promotiors because of a misin-
terpretation of the federal g
ernment's affirmative action
program. Kohler said.
According to 1 all ten
re by-passed for promotions,
with the advanc ng to
Isadvanta de-
the faci t1'
beti exan
record-.
and Natl
resented or
complainants for A'
U.S. Civil Service Commission
EEO complaints examiner.

Activists
Jailed In
Helsinki
Continued from Page 1-A
operation to take cognizance of
the plight of Jews in the USSR.
They also intended to present
a letter to Finnish President
Urho Kekkonen. chairman of
the conference. The women
were about to unfurl their ban-
ners when a police wagon drew
up to the Embassy and removed
: 1 from the scene, the in-
formant reported.
The Finnish police denied thai
the demonstrators were under
arrest, but observers in Helsinki
reported that peaceful demon-
strators normally would have
been undisturbed.
them out when the Jewish group
tried to post guards at the en-
trances of the cave.
A group of about 30 Kiryat
Arba militants tried to enter tbjr,
emplv biffliffrig which served as
the Hadassah clinic in Hebron
until Jews fl"H fH city in the
Arab riots of 1929.
However, the place was
guarded by soldiers and t*ie
settlers left "in order to avo'd
clashes between Jews and
Jews "
RABBI MOSHE Levinger, who
was the leader in establish::-:*
Kiryat Arba over eowrnt^nl
opposition, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agencv that efforts I 1
jnce in
H-'b-cr- "" -
He charged that he has been
unsuccessfully pressing the mili-
tary government for years to
extend the Jewish time for
prayer in the Cave of Machpela
beyond trie present- se*W>-hnr
limit.
Rabbi Lsvingar said it was
also time to rebuild the Jewish
quarter in Hebron which was
destroyed in 19"!9 and recon-
struct such buildings as the
synagogues of Tiferet Levaacov
and Avraham Avinu which are
now in ruins
He said the Arabs had dese-
crated fcolv books and objects.
ASKED WHETHER the ac-
tions of the Kiryat Arba resi-
dents might unnecessarily de-
.jr-n- A**ab- Jewish re
Rabbi Levinger reDlied. "As Ion1:
as there is Jewish presence in
Judaa and Samaria (the West
Bank), the Arabs will feel that
we are to blame for anything
-that happens" hefeT
Pibb' L"-vtngr said he met
with Defense Minister Shimon
Peres two woeks ago but re-
ceived no substantial answer
except a promise that Peres
would visit the Jewish settle-
ment.
Asked whether he would halt
the militant operations until
Peres' visitTkabbi Levinger re-
"Hd "not necessarily."
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Friday, August 8, 1975
+JfWfst IHhridlirin
Page 7-A

First Year Free At Royal Park,
The Hidden Condominium
by Larry Lowenthal
There's a beautiful apartment
r mmunuy being buili in Fort
Lauderdale, but very few people
KiluW aDouc it.
Why? Because, in the builder's
woids, "We're hidden away tn a
quiet street, next io a secluded
waterway, across from a secret
county park right in the
heart of town."
Our curiosity was aroused. Most
developments the size of Royal
Park (21 low-rise buildings) are
on main roads for saies pur-
poses, to attract the attention of
passing motorists. Why did the
builder of Royal Park ta^e a
different approach?
"There are plenty of places for
people who don't mind living in
congested areas." said a spokes-
man, "but there wasn't much to
choose from if you wan ed i n
apartment in a true residential
neighboi hood. That's why we
chose this site. It s so different."
DIFFERENT IT IS. Northwest
38th Street is a quiet, paved 2-
lane read with very little traf ic.
Oahland Park Boulevard, just a
few blot 'th. is a main hi
way that takes the brunt of the
east-west traffic in and out of the
nearby interchange with 1-95.
Royal Park itself has ji' OS*
guarded entrance on 38th, a
street lull oi pjea*fit .--.0--
family homes.
The property is surrounded by
waterways on three sides for
even more privacy.
"Aud best of all." they added, "is
the fact the Easterlin County
Park is directly across the east
waterway, so no one will ever
take away our view."
THE PARK PRESENTS a pretty
imposing view. A solid wail of
tall trees faces Royal Park resi-
dents from across the water.
The rustic park is a haven for
folks who like to picnic, cook
out, camp out, or just s:T and
commune with nature.
NO PAYMENTS FOR 1 YEAR.
The builder Crocker & Com-
pany, Oakland Park Inc. has
made special arrangements with
the Irvington Investment Com-
pany, the people who finance
most oi the buyers at Royal
Park. Under the terms of the
arrangement, if a purchaser ob-
tains his mortgage on his Royal
Park apartment from Irvington,
then the builder will pay all
mortgage costs, maintenance,
and real estate taxes for the
first 12 months.
They figured out that, for a typ-
ical purchaser, this can result
in cash savings of over $3,700.
New buyers are also eligible for
the 5% Federal tax credit,
which can amount to an addi-
tional savings of $1,400. Add
this to what the builder is of-
fering, and you come up with
cash benefits of over $5,100 in
tne first year.
"We're not only offering a
peaceful place to live," he said,
"we're aiso offering peace of
mind with this program."
"1ERE ARE MANY RESI-
DENTS now enjoying the com-
forts of condominium living at
Koyal Park. That means lots of
grass, 2 heated pools on the way), shufi'leboard
i:-, and an enormous, 12.000
ft. recreation facility with
art and craft rooms, a billiard
room, exercise rooms, card
rooms, saunas and steam baths,
. lib room with fireplace, and a
hUfe auditorium with kitchen.
EVERY APARTMENT at Royal
Park ccmes with individually
Cl ntrolled central air condition-
ing and beating, wali-to-wall
carpeting, a dishwasher, and
many other deluxe features, in-
cluding a carpeted, screened
balcony.
Prices are quite reasonable,
starting in the low 20's and end-
ing in the upper 20's. There are
3 basic floor plans: 1 bedroom/
1 bath. 1 bedroom.'1'2 bath, and
2 tedroom/2 bath.
IT'S EASY TO FIND Royal Park,
even if it's hidden to h**avy
traffic. Just take 1-95 to Oak-
land Park Boulevard, exit east-
bound. Take a left at the first
lirht, which is known as both
N.W. 9th Avenue and also Pow-
erline Road. Drive north about
3 blocks to the first stoplight,
which is N.W. 38th Street. Turn
left here and you'll be at Royal
Tark in about a minute. Their
address is 1500 N.W. 3Sth Street,
and their phone number is
759-6300.
Temple Emanu-El, the new Reform Synagogue, is located on West
Oakland Park Blvd., just a few minutes from Royal Park.
Swimming pool has country estate aspect at Royal Park.
Fireplace adds to decor of clubhouse
iW.ERClAL BLVD.
38TH ST.
ROYAL,
PARK
OAKLAND PARK
BLVD.
00
cr
.i
SUNRISE BLVD.
WIE BLVD.
Map locates the hidden condominiums


Page 8-A
+Jeinorkiian
Friday. August e\ 1975
Israel Winning Over Ouster Move
Continued from Page 1-A
tacitly) upon greater Israeli
"flexibility" in the ongoing in-
terim settlement talks with
Egypt.
Israel for its part has tried
to keep the two issues (the UN
and the talks) separated. Its of-
ficials have stated on numerous
occasions that the pace of the
talfcs with Egypt is set solely by
their content and intrinsic prog-
ress, not be extraneous consid-
erations such as the UN ouster
effort.
At the same time, they add.
the! implementation of a new
agreement, if and when conclud-
edj would inevitably hinge upon
the UN developmentssince the
UN emergency force is destined
to play a central role in the new
settlement.
THE IMPLICATION is that Is-
rael would not move towards
implementation if it had been
discriminated against at the UN.
(This policy is open to the
question which in Kampala
took on a practical aspectof
how Israel would act if it were
ousted by a UN majority which
did not include Egypt.)
The Israeli policy of sepa-
rating the two issues, however,
is not necessarily adhered to by
other states, including Israel's
chief friends. Their support
Ford Encoura,
ions Floiv Slow
ged
Weapi
Continued from Page 1-A
Egypt Herman Eilts. who joined
the President and staff aboard
Air Force One in Belgrade.
Yugoslavia, the President's last
stop-over.
In Belgrade, there was some
tough talking between Ford and
Yugoslav President Josip Broz
Tito, who called on Israel to
withdraw from all the occupied
Arab territories.
In response. Ford declared
that "moderation on the part of
all parties" is essential if there
is to be an interim agreement
reached between Israel and
Egy;* >n the Sinai.
The alternative, he declared,
would be world catastrophe.
IN A SEPARATE press con-
ference in Belgrade. Dr. Kis-
singer noted that "I think t!
i some slight movement on both
sides" in the negotiations.
Kissinger was to met with
Israel Ambassador to the U.S.
Simcha Dinitz in Washington
Tuesday. He said he would know
'sometime next week" whether
he will be renewing his personal
shuttle diplomacy in the Middle
East.
As if to underscore President
Ford's remarks in Belgrade that
"a stalemate in the Middle East
is unacceptable." reports circu-
lated here this week that export
licenses for literally dozens of
Israeli reauests for military
equipment have been held up.
THE REPORTS said that un-
der ordinary circumstances ap-
proval would have been routine.
Among the items Israel has
been seeking are the J79 en-
gines used in the new "Kfir"
fighter plane, as well as in the
Phantom jet. Also included are
transmissions for the M48 and
M60 tanks.
The State Department denied
here that there is a deliberate
hold-up. Spokesmen said that
the requests are "being pro-
cessed. "
BUT IT IS understood that
the deliberate slowdown has
been geared to Secretary Kis-
singer's attempt to arrange a
new interim accord between Is-
rael and Egypt
Observes in Washington
point out that the reassessment
of American foreign policy in
the Middle East announced
Mar. 24 by President Ford fol-
lowing Dr. Kissinger's return
from his last round of unsuc-
cessful talk* was the date on
which Israeli requests for new
arms were shelved.
But it was also understood
that the halt in the flow would
not include requests made prior
to Mar. 24. Now, it seems clear,
even prior requests are being
set aside in an obvious move
to apply pressure on Israel for
greater concessions.
Meanwhile, the State Depart-
ment has acknowledged that the
sale of military equipment to
North Yemen has been ap-
proved although spokesmen de-
clared that the sale would be
for arms worth some S10 mil-
lion and not 550 million as
previously revealed.
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against the ouster bid is seen
by some here as based on the
assumption that a new Sinai ac-
cord will be achievedby fur-
ther Israeli concessions if neces-
Crime Conference Moved
To Geneva on Sept. 1
By YITZHAK RAB1
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) The United Nations
Committee on Conferences decided July 30 to hold the fifth
MEANWHILE, however. Je- Congress on Crime and the Treatment of Offenders in Gen-
rusalem has naturally been eva on Sept. 1. The Committee rejected a proposal by Can-
heartened by the Arabs" failure ada t0 postpone the congress until next year,
at Kampala, by the Soviets' in- .jL m
dications at Helsinki, and by The conference was to have been held in Toronto, but
the firm stands taken by the the Canadian government announced last week that it had
U.S., Canada, and latterly by ask.ed Secretary Genera'. Kurt Waldheim to postpone the
western European leaders. conference because the government did not want to hold it
The Arab bid. it seems, will in the Canadian city at this time,
run up against the opposition of
the Western and Communist THE CANADIAN action came after strong opposition
blocs, as well as from a number developed in that country to admitting representatives from
of the more sober non-aligned tne Palestine Liberation Organization to Canada to attend
states the congress as observers.
Premier Yitzhak Rabin, re-
turning from Stockholm Sunday. After the decision was announced, Canadian Ambassa-
spoke of a possible shift in Euro- dor Geoffrey Bruce expressed his government's "disap-
Arab relations as reflected in pointment and concern'' that the committee was not willing
the strong stand of t* Euro- l0 agree to Canada's request for a postponement of the con-
EITnSf Laa,?n ."rht^.T'hw 8ress- *'You nave turned down that request," he told the
had m*t against tn? ouster bid. D i -
OTHER HIGHLY placed CommKtee.
sources here are less sanguine. >i nave difficulty in remembering when Canada has
Apart from the hkelv politics turned d request Irom the United Nations. It is ex-
pnee to be demanded of Israel m .. \. ,. ,, ... .. ..
later, these sources feel the tremely disturbing that :he United Nations has seen fit to
European stand is less impres- refuse a modest request from Canada."
sive than it perhaps looks at
first sight.
The Europeans, they say,
have conveniently found a
moralistic. universaUstiC posi-
tion from which they can sup-
port Israel and show a measure
of tentative defiance of th?
Arabsin the knowledge that
the Arab ouster bid has not won
respectability in the Third
("Progressive" I World.
Nor is it supported with total
enthusiasm even among thL' en-
tire Moslem bloc as evidem-vd
by Egypt's refusal to no along
with the rest of the Oreani'.ation
of African L'nitv ntatives
on Israel's ouster at their meet-
ing in Kampala.
School Opens Yom Kippur
PARIS(JTA) The French
Chief Rabbi. Dr. Jacob Kaplan,
has called on all Jewish parents
nt to snd their children to
school on the opening of the
scholastic year. Sept. 15. which
fills on Yom Kippur.
In an official communique.
the cl bH also "depl wed
th administration's refusal n
postpon the forthcoming school
year by one d IV to n iblj Jew-
ish chiJ !-vn to att ,-n 1."
THE COMMUNIQUE was re-
leased after Dr. Kaolan and the
president of 'he French Central
Consistory. Baron Alain de
Rothsrhil \. appealed in vain to
the Minister of Education and
other top officials asking them
to change the school opening
day.
The Ministry of Education,
which fixes the start of the
school year for all estal
menta in the country, refusi d
to change the date but off:
authorized Jewish students
rs to start school om
late this year.
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Friday, August 8, 1975
>k*i*tfkrictkir
Page 9-A
AT & T Asked to Vow Saudi Loan Won't Cause Job Bias
NEW YORK The America.; .iewis!i Con-
gress has called on the American Telephone
.and Telegraph Company to star? publicly that
the $100 million loan it has obtained from
Saudi Arabia ''witt not influence your employ- '
ment policy toward Jews, either at home, or
abroad, and that your company has not sur-
rendered to the Arab boycott of Israel or of
firms doing business with Israel."
In a letter to AT&T Etecuti*-? Vce Presi-
dent Chattel I.. Brown, Hova-d M. Sqnad-on.
chairman of the Congress' national Governing
Council, notpd that Saudi Arabia refuses visas
to Jews an I narticirat-s in the Arab League's
boycott of companies doing business with Is-
rael.
THE AMERICAN Jewish Congress letter
said that "in view of these known, admitted
policies of Saudi A-abia," the announcement of
the loan would "in"' itablv sMeest to minv
Americans that AT&T has agreed to comply
with Saudi policy regarding the employment of
Jews and with the Arab boycott of Israel and
of companies that deal with Israel.
* ^ M i i f V *
"We believe it would therefore be most
appropriate for AT&T to utilize the occasion
of the loan agreement to inform the public
that the S100 million loan will not influence
your employment policy toward Jews, either
at horn? or abroad, and that your company has
not surrendered to the Arab boycott of Israel
or of Arms doing business with Israel," Squad-
ron said, adding:
"An announccm?nt by AT&T publicly re-
jecting in? persistent efforts of Arab states to
export anti-Semitism to America and to use
our country's economy to carry on thftir war
aeainst Is-a"! would, we believe, be warmly
w.lc>- 'd ",r fi American people.
"IT WOULD also be consistent with the
policy of the U.S. government, declared in the
Export Administration Act of 1969, 'to oppose
restrictive trade practices or boycotts fostered
or. imposed by foreign countries against other
oountres friendly'to-the-United'States.'"
"More important, such a statement would
be a declaration that your company's employ-
ment policies will not be affected by Arab
bigotry.
"Arab discrimination against American
Jews and Arab boycott demands directed
against Israel have been successfully defied
by many companies in the United States and
elsewhere. A clear statement from AT&T re-
pudiating anti-Semitism and rejecting the boy-
cott would set a welcome example of resistance
to blackmail for other companies that may not
be in the same position c take a leadership
rolp."
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Southern Bed


Little by Little, Jewish Community Losing Top Execs to Retirement
f ITTI.E BY little, the Jewish community apparatus
is losing its thinking top executives They reach
the Ectirement age and are honored for their many
years of creative and dedicated service by being
shifted to honorary positions with no real influence.'
They are. of course, being replaced by able
successors. However, their valuable experiences as
community builders and innovators are lost to a
great extent. Successors usually nrefer to put their
own mark on their institutions; they seem to avoid
seeking advice from their predecessors.
IN THE course of the last years, the Jewish com-
munity lost from its front >-anksthroueh rpti-em such leading and actively creative executive per-
sonalities as Dr. John Slawson. Dr. Miu'ice Hexter,
Joe Willen. Isidore Sobeloff and a number of others,
not to speak of Dr. Joseph J. Schwartz, who died
recently.
Now, we have witnessed in the course of one
week the retirement of three more important top
executives in communal work They are Henry L.
Zucker, Sidney Z. Vincent and Isaiah Minkoffall

h
orts
^_7l>0/7J
known nationally for their enviable records of ac-
tivity.
RETIRING ALSO is Abe L. Sudran. the top
executive of the Jewish Community Council of Es-
sex County, a major community.
Other retirements are expected at a time when
new forces for top executive communal positions
are still in the process of training. The replacements
coming now are mainly through one organization
taking away the top executive from another organiza-
tion.
Some Jewish leaders are, therefore, pondering
over the practice of retiring people in executive
positions when their usefulness has not diminished
but only for the reason that they have reached a
certain age.
MOST OF the retired executives are perfectly
able to serve in an advisory cipacitv with the use-
ful background of their experiences of many years.
Some of thembut hot aTIaftf united"to'Sb so by
their organizations.
Others are sought after by other organizations
which are anxious to benefit from the voluntary
services of those highly experienced men.
Dr. John Slawson. for instance, who rebuilt the
American Jewish Committee from a small group of
individuals into a vibrant mass organization with
branches in many citiesand who is deeply inter-
ested in strengthening Jewish identity among col-
lege youth, as well as in Jewish education in gen-
eralhas been invited by the Council of Jewish
Federations to take a special interest in its college
youth program.
IN FACT, he helped to start this program. He is
i o interested in the American Association for Jew-
ish Education. *To him. Jewish education is largely
the basis of Jewish continuity in this country.
S<
cuntour
;v
&
CpC/c/vJIrtM
INHERE IS a French adage. "The more things
change, the more they are the same."
In the book, "Jewish Radicals: From
Czarist Stetl to London Ghetto."' ny Wiiiiam
Fishman. New York. Pantheon Books, 336
pages. S12.95), there are accounts of mass
meeting.- "to protest against the inhuman treat-
ment and persecution of Jews in Russia."
The date of the first of these meetings is
November 1. 1890! What good did these mass
meetings accomplish? In 1965. the then Sen.
Fulbrigh: advocated "quiet diplomacy" to se-
cure the right of emigration for Jews from
Soviet Russia.
QUIET DIPLOMACY has failed and will
continue to fail until the conscience of the
world is aroused and when American capital-
t ists realize that Soviet barbarians cannot be
accorded any economic or technological assist-
ance until they show evidence of acting hu-
man :ly and in accordance with their signature
to the UN Declaration of Human Rights.
itcneous with the mass migration of
Eat a Jews to the U.S.A. in 1881.
thousands of other Jews from Russia and
Poland were establishing themselves in Lon-
don^ East End.
THE SHABBY tenements of Whitechapel
and Stepney were comparable, if not worse,
Jewish, English Radicals
And (he Mossad
than those of New York's Hester Street. Among
the newcomers to England were some of the
radical intelligentsia from the Czarist police.
They and some Socialist leaders planted
their ideas in Britain. They inspired Rudolf
Rocker, "a charismatic German" Christian, to
devote himself to the Jewish immigrant cause.
William Fishman is an English history
professor. He has written a unique and moving
story of immigrant life and a layman's social
history '>f English Jewish -adicals that ends
with the advent of the First World War.
EHl'D AVRIEL'S "Open the Gates: A Per-
sonal Story of the 'Illegal' Immigration to Is-
rael" (New York. Atheneum. 3o9 pages, S10)
has a preface by Golua Meir.
As the sub-title reveals, this is a first-hand
account of the attempts of the Mossad. an or-
ganization created by the Haganah High Com-
mand in 1938. to conduct illegal immigration
into Palestine.
Parts of the book read like a CIA plot or
a James Bond story, except that the book is
fact, not fiction. The chapters of the Jewish
Resistance and the additional task of securing
military supplies (1946-49) while supplying
little hi'r.erto unknown facts, do add additional
interest to the book.
Qarj
Who's Laughing? -
An Israeli Piano
Haifa
WHEN ISRAEL Aircraft Industries Ltd. was
established in 1953 many people laughed.
What pretentiousness! Is little Israel going to
produce airplanes? Nobody laughs any more.
Similar questions might be asked about
Israel's venture into the production of a high
precision instrument like a piano. But when
inspired devotion is wedded to technical skills
the results are apt to confound even logic.
THE INBAL COMPANY is small even by
Israel's standards. It has only about 17 em-
ployees, and its present production is no more
than 14 upright pianos a month. This is not a
very impressive figure, considering that some
of the big companies of the world produce
20.000 or more units a year.
Still, considering that Israelis buy over a
thousand pianos a year from abroad, there is
obviously a market here. As for export possi-
bilities that's a deferred part of the dream.
THE VISION began with businessman,
building contractor Shmuel Levov. Aside from
a love of music, he had no particular affinity
to pianos, but the thought of building them
here came to him in a flash, and it has since
become his hobby an expensive hobby, it
might be added.
Inbal is one of those very rare creatures
in Israel, an industry operating entirely with
private money. It has no government loans, no
government participation, little government
encouragement.
To the contrary, Mr. Levov wryly told
me, most of his problems and difficulties are
caused by the government.
Chance brought about his meeting with
Baruch Jancik, who immigrated to Israel from
Czechoslovakia in 19n9.
HE HAD been a textile technologist, but
pianos were a hobby. He studied to become a
piano tuner, became interested in how pianos
were made and dreamed about making
pianos. The two dreams merged about five
years ago, and Inbal was born.
Today. Jancik, semi-retired, keeps an eye
on quality control at the workshop, ana his
son, Tommy, is plant manager.
When they began, they imported almost
everything from abroad, and did only the as-
sembling. Then they developed a staff of car-
penters and began to make the cabinets. They
had some idea of their own about the big
metal frames, which are the backbone of the
piano, and today these are cast for them by
Vulcan in Haifa.
Vd
ert
t^tamtf
Women In
Speak Out
AS WE approach the 55th anniversary of adoption of the 19th
Amendment assuring American women the right to vote,
we are dramatically reminded that economic, political, and
social equality for women is going to be achieved with speed
calculated to push the opposition to the wall.
No longer one of the nation's minorities but definitely a
51.6 percent majority, women have proved this summer both at
the International Women's Year conference and the Tribune in
Mexico City that neither Phyllis Schlafly nor state legislators
nor Congress nor religious traditionalists nor Little League die-
harr's can hold back a throbbing, swelling emancipation.
IN THE Jewish community, we might have needed no
more than a Deborah of Biblical times or a Golda Meir in our
own days to light the way to the inevitability of male-female
parity in hundreds of human activities, vocations, and en-
deavors.
Long honored for their central role in sacred ch le
works which are themselves the honeyed core of Jewish
Jewish women are now moving gracefully and with 1st
of trumpets into positions of leadership in Federations, Com-
munity Councils. Synagogues, and Social Agen i s.
One bold rabbi has even advocated the abwhti 'ii of pie
Sisterhoods; nor did the heavens fall wh n pok<
AS LONG ago as 1837. Sarah Grimh lighting the gaod
battle for "feminists." told an all-ma' leg -> "' 'I ask no
favors for my sex. All I ask of our breth Is tint they take
their feet olf our necks
From that forthright plea to the action of President John
F. Kennedy in establishing the American Commission on the
Status of Women, the road was rough and the obstacles nu-
merous. Even now, proponents of passage of the Equal Rights
Amendment need positive action by six more state legislatures
for the guarantee they seek against sex-based discrimination
by government at any level.
Plans formulated in Mexico City by Americans determined
to retire state lawmakers bucking that tide may assure victory
for that effort.
BY ORGANIZING carefully, by keeping their cause con-
stantly before the public, by making the best use of legislation
and the judicial process, American w imen have in recent
months forced key industries to pay out well over
$100,000,000 in wage parity claims, have made notable gains in
efforts to secure the rights and integrity of rape victims, and
are now well on their way to end discrimination in the basic
field of credit.
FOR IN those sessions, it became clear that the plight of
millions of women in undeveloped nations packed a challenge
dwarfing all challenges on the American scene.
One in every three adult women cannot read or write; and
along with illiteracy in the underdeveloped countries go lack
of medical care, clean water, and nutritious and untainted food.
For women in many lands still bearing the weight of poverty.
slavery, exploitation, and hunger, the priority for economic
improvement must be placed above the goal of political ad-
vancement.
CONGRESSWOMAN BELLA Abzug epitomized this over-
riding concern with these words: "We seek equality with meti
o_t do we seek an equal share of poverty or an equal share of
war? What we seek to .'hare are the bounties and blessings of
this society. And only in a world of peace can we realize our
dreams."
Congresswoman Ataug's message entered the record in
Mexico City between the weird and lamentable scene in which
Jihan Sadat, wife of Egypt's president walked out when Leah
Rabin, wife of Israel's Prime Minister, rose to speak and that
noxious act of condemnation of Zionism by representatives
61 nations.
of
lini.........i .,1.1.11 -.. ami......,.,. iti
Friday, August 8, 1975 +Mi\,st Ihrklkir Page 1'A


August 8, 1975
* knist tier id/for
Page 11-A
. K.'s Anger a Carefully-Staged Scenario
The Jewish Floridian:
ptary of State Henry Kis-
ias stated that "the fun-
il issues in the Arab-
conflict remain unre-
and we are now at a
k-here there must be a
yard peace or toward a
fisis."
I Kissinger has displayed
lanper toward Israel's "in-
Jlity" in spite of the fact
ie knew in advance that
sraeli government would
?ree to a retreat from the
and Gidi passes in the
[or give up the Abu Rodeis
?ld without a "quid pro
from President Sadat of
VEL HAS stated emphat-
in recent weeks that it
_ not move a foot back un-
bgypt agrees to the end of
erency. Sadat cannot
to a public statement to
jiik-ss he has the fortitude
iort the PLO and some of
srab countries.
OUR
READERS
WRITE
"Let Thy Words Be Brier
Kohe'.eth (Ecclesiastcs)
r
Dr. Kissinger's intemperance
in charging Israel with breaking
an agreement with him is un-
worthy of a Secretary of State.
He is well aware of Israel's dis-
mal experiences in the past with
Arab agreements. The present
policy of our State Department
is misleading, unworkable and
detrimental to Israel's security
srael Stages Raid
>n Lebanese Town
TEL AVIV All raiders returned safely following an
:k Tuesday by Israeli forces on the southern Lebanese
of Tyre.
According tc initial reports, five Palestinian guerrillas,
Lebanese army offices and a child were killed.
The raid occurred about 2 a.m., when some 300 Israeli
Lmando troops landed on the beach near the El-Bass
agee camp.
AT THE SAME time. Israeli gunboats were reported
nave shelled the Rastudiyeh area, as well as the military
hacks at Tyre.
According to army headquarters in Tel Aviv, "A num-
of terrorists were injured or killed and army emplace-
|nts were blown up."
Lebanese eyewitnesses >aid that the Israelis withdrew
ier heavy fire.
Meanwhile, in retaliation for the raid. Palestinian com-
ando units fired rockets into Kiryat Shemoneh.
as well as to the U.S. global
position.
Dr. Kissinger's position at the
present time is in direct con-
flict with that of the Secretary
of Defense, the Pentagon and a
great majority of the U.S. Sen-
ate.
IF DR. KISSINGER is hoping
for an imposed settlement of the
Arab-Israeli impasse, he is due
for a great disappointment. His
own "intransigence" has spoiled
his romance with Sadat.
Americans now bemoan the fact
that U.S. credibility is now
questioned the world over.
Even President Ford, in his
"State of the World" speech to
Congress found it necessary to
reassure our allies publicly that
the U.S. is not running out on
it international tuTirrit'iients.
However, he neglected to
mention Israel in his reassur-
ances. The U.S. Senate, in con-
trast, bv an overwhelming ma-
jority, has declared their full
support of Israel.
IN THE future. Israel will not
agree to imoosed settlements.
Her new military strength and
atomic reserve plus her own
manufacture of military weap-
ons and jets should be a de-
terrent to her Arab neighbors.
Ir, {he past, imposed settlements
have been a way of life to both
the Arabs ^id Israelis. The va-
rious armistices and cease fires
of 1948, 1949, 1956. 1967. 1970
and 1973 did not come by ne-
gotiations and the willingness of
both sides, but were imposed
by outside powers.
Israel was winning all the bat-
tles but was always forced to
end the fighting, thus saving
Egypt and the other Arab coun-
tries from complete defeat and
disgrace. In the beginning, it
was Great Britain that served
as the protectorate of the Arabs
to deprive Israel of the fruits of
victory, forcing an early armis-
tice. Later, it became the UN
and the U.S. in combination
with the Soviet Union, which
forced Israel to halt its victori-
ous march to save the Arabs
from further humiliation.
THE ARABS however, used
the respite of the various ar-
mistices and ceasefires to rearm
and start a new war.
It is sheer hypocrisy to main-
tain that this time an imposed
solution will end differently.
Even an "ultimatum" by Presi-
dent Ford will be resisted by
Israel.
LOUIS HOBER.MAN
Miami Beach
fc it
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The pallor of shame that hung
over the City of Miami Beach
has been lifted.
The commandment to honor
and respect the elders has been
nglected in the past. But this
has now changed with the open-
ing of Rebecca Towers.
In place of apathy, th?re is
concern, and in place of neglect
there is loving care.
We should not look at this ac-
complishment as a signal to re-
lax our efforts but rather a mo-
tivation to more and greater ac-
complishments.
RABBI
PHINEAS \. WEBERMAN
Ohev Shalom Congregation
Committee
Extends
Credits
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
House-Senate Conference Com-
mittee has extended arms sales
and credits to Israel, due to
expire Dec. 31, until June 30,
1977.
The l0-month evtension was
contain-d in a $31.2 billion bill
authorizing arms purchased by
th Denartm-nt of Defense
which was made public by the
Conference Committee. Con-
gress may approve the bill and
^nd it to President Ford for
his signature.
THE HOlSE-Senate Confer-
ence Co-inittee had been ap-
pointed to work out the differ-
ence betw "n the two bodies in
the bill, including the arms sale
to Israel.
The Senat-; had anproved an
c "t*nsion of arms sales to Israel
while the House had not. The
Senrte approval was over the
objections of Sen. John Stennis
(D.. Miss I chairman of the Sen-
si! ? Armed Services Committee,
who s"ud that the Israeli sale
outside the jurisdiction of
his committee.
The Conference Committee re-
port listed the House members
as registering "serious reserva-
tions' about the extension to
Israel because they believed the
proposal should not have been
in the weapons bill and should
be considered by the commit-
tees dealing with foreign affairs.
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Page 12-A
*Jenist rtoridiar
Friday, Augm 8 {
Excommunication Tiff Cool Summer Breeze
wmijs w ;re tho nub of l^
insult. The Aguda jKH
Rabbi '
titurship
v-jSi
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
raelis suffering through a long
hot summer of political tension
and -'economic woes received
much needed comic relief last
week when the ancient edict of
excommunication was invoked
by the Chief Rabbinate Council
against Aguda bloc MK Shlomo
Lorincz for likening Ashkena-
zic Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goren
to President Idi Amin of Uganda
in the course of a Knesset de-
bate.
The excommunication edict
and the war of the printing
presses it precipitated between
the newspapers of the rival
Orthodox factionsthe National
Religious Party's "Hatzofe" and
the Aguda's "Hamodia"
brought smiles and laughter to
the populace.
IT WAS a welcome change
from the daily dose of news
Exchange of Ideas Continue-K.
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger said in Helsinki
that the U.S. was continuing
to "exchange ideas" with
the Soviet Union on the Mid-
dle East because "it is clear
that no final solution can be
achieved by cither of the
parties by icself."
He made his remarks to
a press conference in the
Finnish capital which was
piped into the State Depart-
ment for reporters here. He
said, in reply to questions,
that the Soviets were skep-
tical of any results emeiging
from the current step-by-
step process of negotiations
between Israel and Egypt
but were not actively op-
posing them.
KISSINGER, who was ic-
companying President Ford at
the final session of the European
Conference on Security and Co-
operation in Helsinki, told re
porters that he had discussed
the Middle East with Soviet
Communist Party Secretary
General Leonid Brezhnev ane
with British Prime Minister
Harold Wilson at Helsinki.
He said the progress of the
current Mideast negotiations
was at the top of the list. "With
respect to the Middle East, u
is clear that no tinal settlement
[American Israeli
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can be achieved by either of the
parties itself and it is therefore-
natural that periodically we ex-
change ideas and also, as co-
chairman (with the Soviet
Union) of the Geneva confer-
ence, we exchange ideas as to
the appropriate time when that
conference can be reconvened."
Kissinger said.
He addnd. "Of course, we
have a long list of bHateral is-
sues. These and other topics
will be discussed when we meet
again."
ASKED IF the Soviet Union
was satisfied with the present
step-by-step negotiation. Kissin-
ger said that the Soviets are
"not actively opposing the ef-
forts that are now going for-
ward."
Asked if he had discussed
with the Soviet leader a compro-
mise on the trade and emigra-
tion issue, Kissinger said they
had reviewed the discussions
that a group of Senators had on
their recent visit to the Soviet
Union and that the U.S. had
pointed out its judgment of what
is required with respect to the
trade legislation.
Kissinger said that all along
the U.S. held the view
progress in this area is more
likely to be achieved by an un-
derstanding of the n-eds ot each
side and that decisions should
be made independent^ on that
basis rather than by legislation.
THE MIDDLE East was also
one of the topics of discussion
in Helsinki between Ford and
Brezhnev and between Ford and
Wilson at separate meetings in
the Finnish capital.
Presidential press secretary
Ron Nessen announced in Hel-
sinki that Ford and Wilson dis-
cussed the Middle East and
Eastern Mediterranean security
at a breakfast meeting and that
later in the day Ford and Brezh-
nev met for two hours during
which they discussed the Mid-
dle East. U.S.-Soviet relations
and the SALT talks before going
to Finlandia Hall for the open-
ing of the final session of the
European Conference on Se-
curity and Cooperation.
about stalemated interim nego-
tiations in Egypt. Arab attempts
to oust Israel from the UN. con-
fusion and consternation among
labor and management over the
effects 'Of the 'new tax reform
measures and the rash of wild-
cat strikes.
While the Orthodox nke t,-*
matter very seriousl'-, a majori-
tv of Israelis have always look-
e I with wry amusement at the
feuding and recriminations
within the religious establish*
ment.
Yel many thoughtful Israeli-*
religious and secular alikeare
- tddencd by the continuing ero-
sion of the imag and authority
of the Chief Rabbinate.
THE EXCOMMUNICATION
Lorincz was described by Ma-
ariv as s "comical anachron-
ism." Tii Jerusalem Post h sad-
lind th1 stow with photographs
of Rabbi (ioren and Amin. Both
men were shown wearing Israeli
paratrooper wings.
Rabbi Goren won his as Chief
Chaplain of the armed forces,
and Amin, who once professed
undying friendship for Israel,
took his paratroop training in
this c<;mtry- The paratroop
appointment of -davanirr?
ligious court nidges.
"Curiously enough i,
pala (capital of Uganda) St
too. is someone who has
paratroop wings." Lorinczs*l
The Chief Rabbinate Council
communicated Lorincz on fol
30 at a session held under 9
bi Goren s chairmanship J
boycottedas usual-by mil
chairman, Sephardic Chief R*J
bi Ovadia Yosef, whose pen*!
ual quarrels with Rabbi Go-J
make the news almost as 9
qu-ntly as the daily weather'J
port.
MEANWHILE, Hatzofe",
"Hamodia." respectively, prj
ed and condemned the excoji
nuinicution. t"he Atiuda nn
paper claimed th it even
ci ct ss found R ibbi Goren i|
ability and published run
that he was about to resign
Hatzofe published a
f'om Rabbi Zvi Yehuda
the NRP's religious
condemning Lorincz.
NRF Secretary-Genenl lil
Bernstein demanded that i>]
line's remarks be expunm
from the Knesset records.
Does Israel Have
Atomic Weapons?
WASHINGTON (.TTA) The State Department
referred reporters to a statement by Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Ratin last year denying that Israel possessed nuclear
weapons.
The statement by Rabin in a Danish television interview
broadcast on Dec. 17 was cited by Department spokesman
Robert Funseth when reporters asked him to commen
an article in the Boston Globe that said seni >r American
analysts believe Israel has assembled ten nuclear w< p
each as powerful as the atom bomb that destroyed Hiro-
shima in 1945.
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THE GLOBE article was
written by William Beecher, the
paper's Washington Corre-
spondent who was, until recent-
lv, a spokesman for the Defense
Department.
Funseth said that "the United
States strongly believes that
every nation should strictly ad-
here to the nuclear non-prolifer-
ation treaty," a treaty Israel has
not signed.
Asked if that comment in-
cluded Israel, ho said "that is
very clearly im]
But Funseth also intimat .'.
t at the U.S. accepted Rabin's
statement that "Israel is not a
nuclear power which means
I has no nucl *ar weapons."
FUNSETH NOTED that '
stressed in the interview the
Israeli government's policy that
it will not be the first to intro-
duce nuclear weapons in the
Middle East conflict.
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IV, August 8, 1975
fJinteJh fkricfteun
Page 13-A
awman Moses Succumbs to Lancaster
Continued from Page 4-A
it Lancaster has done us a
lilar djsservlce. friclld or hot.
ce again," the" iJew-hater is
nfirm'.'d in his bigotry. "So
It's how Moses was," he rea-
s. "That's how they all are.
.ouldri't be shown on TV if
Cerent true."
ind why should he not rea-
that way? When the people
[Israel, fleeing from the Pha-
lli, lose faith in Moses, they
tcumb to the blandishments
Idolatry.
;k II. n. DrMILLE had
ton Hesf.n hurl down the
ets given to him by (Jod on
Sinai, then despite his an-
return to thr mountaintop
cond copy.
lut Lancaster does more.
pcaster whips and stones liis
(am Israelites to death in the
i of Jehovah's love. He
melts down Aaron's effig)
{turning liquid gold and forc-
tiem to drink of it as a sign
their sinful ways, which of
p: se kills them, a process he
sees as punishment and expia-
tion. ..
How \?ry fcreudian, and
-~ttveR Christian .iyr>u will, the
"taking" of the Host for purifi-
cation.
AS IF that weren't enough,
Lancaster's Moses hurls Israel-
ites over steep desert cliffs
wholesale. For a moment, he
has us confused, and we think
we are back with him in Tomb-
stone or Dodge City, fightin'
Injuns or the sheriff or shcep-
hearding poachers intruding on
good cattle-grazing land.
In God's name, he wreaks the
kind of carnage for which Je-
hovah is so well-known in a
Gentile world. Nothing of Mo-
ses' humanity, humility and
stiny. all of these qualities
1 mphasized by his fearful stam-
mering, emsrg-s in Lancaster's
characterization.
In the end, nothing can save
the production either from the
fate of its terrible mediocrity
and unfidelity to history and
Jewish tradition.
IX FACT, Dodge City-style,
LERNER: Who Got
More Out of Helsinki?
[Continued from Page 4-A
p* and political position.
he third i< a China strategy
tactictrcrt they are not
ticularly focusing on the
st but on Chin<: that they
11 a stabilized Western front
Europe.and America, so that
[ can turn their backs on
Br long-term opponents in
ler to face their immediate
ptlH'rs-in-rr*iitT, the Chinese.
rilK AUTHORS wisely add
kt these three scenarios don't
lessarilv exclude each other.
own feeling is that the So-
ire not closing any of
r options.
he bothersome enemy may
China, b-it the immediate
|U S are Furore and tech-
iy. Thev lia-f b -en playing
fch-up with the West ever
ee the 1920s; they are closer
r than ever -md they hope
Sit closer still.
they can woo Western
[ope they stand to gain not
by loosening Europe-
American ties buteven more
by playing off the Western
European nations against the
United States in buying their
technologies and offering their
trade. And, one must add, per-
haps also their good offices
with t1^ Arab oil cartel.
IN LOXG-TERM strategy the
Russians have not given uo
their grandiose dream of world
power, but they are waiting to
see what happens next. Thcv
would prefer to get command
of Eurone bv the "back door"
appronch, through Europe's
energy needs.
But could they conceivably
risk the big showdown over
Europe with the United States
some day' Communism got
started in Russia with World
War I and spread through
Eastern Europe after World War
II.
Will Marxist doctrine be
tempted by the thought of
Europe as a treasure-trove after
World War III?
Lancaster's Moses, pontificates.
Not only does he not stammer,
an Old Testament flourish de-
signed to underscore .his mor-
tality, but one can almost hear
in his delivery the firing of
gun-slinging varmints just be-
yond the next pass.
And when a child asks Zip-
porah, "Where is Moses to-
day?", she replies, "He is out
saving Israel. Someone must
do it."
To which, if asked. I can only ,
observe, "You call that saving
the burnings, the stonings,
the hurlings of Israelites to
death from cliff-tops?"
And. indeed, what did the
Pharaoh do that Moses presum-
ably does not do better? That is
what the old saying means by
"protect me from my friends."
I AM at a loss to understand
Lancaster put this pot-boil-
er together in the first place.
To State it bluntly, "The Bird-
man of Alcntraz" has flown the
coop.
If Lancaster's characteriza-
tion of Moses lacks, among
other things, destiny, it is that
Lancaster himself lacks destiny
for such a role. The dramatic
weight is simply not there.
My own impression was of
dialogue devoid of either poe-
try or conviction. He seemed
to have all the elan of a mono-
syllabic football coach in heat.
PERHAPS LIKE old Father
Abraham, Lancaster "has come
to his days." He can no longer,
with the ease of a decade or
two ago, fly daringly on a Big
Top trapeze or outdraw the
sheriffs of half a dozen or so
counties in the nineteenth cen-
tury American southwest or
scale cliff-like walls in a dis-
play of breathtaking acrobatics,
and so must resort to hurling
people from their tops instead.
In Moses, he saw, perhaps,
his coming of age, a statement
on his own life and career as an
actor in which he purportedly
drove toward the excellence of
Canaan, but was not permitted
to enter because of all those
murders he committed in an
endless array of shoot-'em-ups.
Whatever the reason, the guilt
he must ifow bear for "Moses
th..La,wjGiver" is not entkely
his own. Chief script-writer was
Anthony Burgess, one of the
most talented novelists of the
past two decades ("Enderby,"
"A Clockwork Orange," "The
Eve of Saint Venus," 'The
Wanting Seed.")
BUT THE Burgess script, an
effort gone awry, would betray
anyone most cruelly, not only
the likes of Burt Lancaster. Tc
forestall that eventuality, the
Hand of Jehovah, believe it 01
not, attempted a role in "Moses
the Law Giver."
The 1973 Yom Kippur War
interrupted Lancaster's produc-
tion schedule in the Sinai. It
was a divine message to Lan-
caster to give it all up as an
abomination as wicked as
Aaron's effigy- -But Lancaster,
obviously, ignored it.
And so now, the damage to
Israel if not to Moses is done.
One can only wonder what will
be required of him to expiate
his own idolatry in the desert.
Perhaps a gentle shove off one
of the steep cliffs surrounding
Beverly mils.
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earful Weapons Set
For Next War
JERUSALEM(JTA) A re-
rch paper by a well-known
aeli authority of Soviet af-
rs predicts that a fifth Arab-
aeli war will employ the most
Rusticated and destructive
aponry from the arsenals of
two super-powers short of
ual nuclear weapons.
)r. Amnon Sela, in his paper
lished by the Soviet and
fct European Research Center
jthc Hebrew University, also
bested that the present pre-
lous military balance in the
Idle East "creates a fertile
md for a variety of pre-
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emntive strikes."
HE SAID that Israel is in a
military position to seize such
an opportunity but does not dare
to for political reasons. Egypt
might be willing to launch
another surprise attack on Is-
rael but does not dare to be-
cause of its present inferior
military position. Dr. Sela said.
Consequently, he observed, it
is the super-powers which will
play a decisive role in the next
war. "In a number of ways they
have already settled what the
next war will be like and
even how long it will last."
DR. SELA believes that the
line between tactics and strate-
gy will continue to be obscure
in any future war unless Israel
crumbles under the weight of j
Arab pressure.
"If Israel could cross the di- i
viding line between tactics and
strategy, that is, winning wars
instead of battles, it would be-
come the sole arbiter of Mid-
eastern affairs." Dr. Sela wrote
"But." he added, "no Israeli
victory of this kind seems pos-
sible."
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Page 14-A
*-Jeistfkri
Friday, August 8, 1973
Iii the Shadow of Kissinger's Red, White and Blue Jet
By JANE and LEE K-THORPE
We wen rtg in the -
of the peacemaker rece-
catching pj of H<.
K-~ white and Mae "0" in Cairo.
Darrmsc .-.-... A
Kissinger, we were ta'.
peace.
Our dusty, camera-laden group
32-strong. all >ournar.sts anJ
com-m:- cM 1 the VS.
was attending an editorial con-
ference or. the Midd'e E
rening in five countries of :
troubled area.
JUDGED IMPORTANT be
cause of our media pipeline :c
American people through
o*r respective papers and net-
works eeting with
heads of ate and national iead-
trs in Lebanon. Egypt. Syria.
Jordan and Israel.
We asked our key question
everywhere: Is peace realisrical-
.> possible ia the Middle East'-
We asked in palaces and in taxi-
cabs, in ministries and in refu-
gee camps, in Suez, in the souks
'.markets1, wherever we could
find people who understood our
language and were willing to
step and talk to us.
1: seemed a short and simp'e
little set-en-word question, but
the responses it drew, especialrv
m "high places were lengthy,
convoluted and full of abstrac-
tions and conditional phrases.
ON ONE point, however, all
were agreed Everyone wanted
peace. Every statesman in the
Sbddle East described his coun-
try as peace-kmng
Still, the louder the cries for
peace, the more perfectly in
unison they soanded. the strong-
er grew the counterpoint in our
tars strains of distrust and
fear, from Arabs and Israelis
alke. that no promise, no agree-
ment, written or otherwise, can
be absolutely trusted.
Nothing, they seemed to feel.
can realistically guarantee a
iaatmg peace.
NO HEAD of state said diose
things to us in these words.
They talked, instead, of peace
possible, but ordy "barely
possible.'
The attitude m observed
most often a as one 01 guarded
optimism, a favorite phrase
that g2-. :le comfort. 0
a bit of hopebetter, of course
than no hope at alL
Now. with the wo-'.d's arter.-
tion on shuttle diplomacy and
step-by-step unilateral disen-
gagements, the focus is moving
to the problems of the more
moderate Arab states in nego-
tiating for peace without of-
fending the radical, hard-hne
Arab countries and the Pales-
tine Liberation Organisation
(PLOV Positions differ, political
fortunes are on the line, and the
problems and potential road-
block < as everyone must know
by now. are many.
FO ISRAEL the risks are
.'ANE AND LEE K-THORPE
EDITOR S S'OTE: This is the first in a series of articles
by Lee K-Thorpe and his wife. Jane, describing
their participation in the Second Editorial Confer-
ence on the Middle East that took them to Leba-
non, Egypt. Syria and Jordan. Mr. Thorpe is a
Chicago area businessman. For the past nine years,
the Thorpes hove made their second home at 400
Kv'.g&Pt. Dr.. Miami Beach. Mrs. Thorpe is a free
ktnee journalist whose columns have been publish-
ed in Pioneer Press. Lerper Papers of Chicago and
The Jewish Sentinel, in which this series first ap-
peared.
probably the greatest, and
opinion within the country is
understandably most divided
Asked to give up territories of
important militarv and eco-
nomic value in return for
pledges it tends to distrust,
pressed for the rights of Pales-
tinians < no one is clear on what,
in effect, this means 1. its back
0 the walL
Our trip began in Lebanon,
host countrv to most of the refu-
gee Palestinians.
Over 400.000 men. woen
and children are living by
choice in primitive camps in and
around Beirut and elsewhere in
Lebanon.
The Palestinhr*. refugees are.
according to D- Charles Malik,
a Lebanese state-"?n now teac'--
ing at Beirut's Aerican Uru-
vuaMj, "p< more pow-
erful than any other group in
the Arab w>-
They are a "er by far
than the mall 1 Mnese ar
and they bold considerable
wealth
Frankly sa-
asked how :: a
has been ur.
terrorist ad
sirapry not able I
not control I
we would not
Malik, who se>- .
ago as Pres
Session of the '"
sembty and w
the UN Sea
on to S3V that '
Malik when
'it Lebanon
control PLO
Lebanon is
-e. We can-
;'.inians and
we could "
*ime vears
' the 134)
eneral As-
-lember of
ncu\ went
-Id. indeed
be against the character of the
Lebanese people to interfere.
-THE LEBANESE." he said
are not fighters. We want to
live in peace with the Palestin-
ians, and we think of our coun-
try as offering a refuge for the
persecuted, unwanted, kicked
out people of Palestine."
These attitudes, commendable
as they seem on the surface, are
frightening. They will surely
prove to be stumbling blocks to
peace when it is time for Sec-
retary Kissinger to begin nego-
tiations for peace in Lebanon.
How can a nation which con-
fers one of its major problems
tc be working out a stable
mode of existence for the Pales-
;ns in our midst, which ad-
mits :ts unwi'hngness to cen-
sure (certainly a doubtfui posi-
tion from an-.- rr.onl point of
vie--' l:ty to con-
trol a wealt'- -armed,
stror-.r c '.:=
cour:r- ho* can such a na-
tion act Indrirmleutly at tint
peace ta
THE PAIESTLMANS. otaO
have come '.3te ->erhaps. to an
appreciation of c/i public re-
lations and rable influ-
encing of public opinion, are
determined not to become ab-
sorbed in th? Lebanese com-
munity, refusing both Lebanese
and LN ? other
benefits, for reason- if strength-
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ening political pressure and
dramatizine their condition.
Many have also refused em-
ployment and denied themselves
available community services;
health care, schools and other
services.
On our second day in Beirut
we-visited a PLO refugee camp
situated on a craggv hill near
the center of the citv. We were
en there by a young married
couple from the United States.
expatriatM and passionate
champions of the refugees.
The couple were members of
"Americans for Justice in the
Middle East which, we learn-
ed, is an organization founded at
the end cf the 1967 Arab-Israeli
War for the purpose of balanc-
ing what it believed (and stiU
believes > a bias in the American
press against the Palestinians.
More than half the members of
the Beirut-based organization
are in the United States
OUR EAGER volunteer guides
(who had come to meet us at
our hotel the evening before,
less than an hour after our ar-
rival in Lebanon) led us now
past the crude stone huts of the
Palestinians excitedly talking
to us both at once and introduc-
ing us in rapid Arabic to their
friends in the camp We tried
to understand what we were
being shown, to absorb the feel-
ings and tensions all around us
Ittle holding on to even- sight
and smell and sound.
It was a windy day. and on
Beirut's beaches high ocean
breakers had been rolling in
ever the jetties all morning.
The air was cold. too. and storm
clouds were gathering over the
refugee camp. Yet the women.
young and old. and children,
shivering, barefoot in their rub-
ber thor.g sandals tdime store
variety), crowded the doorways
to have a look at us
Black pipes ran along the
M paths. leaking cold
streams of water, and inside the
huts we could see small cooking
fires burning here and there and
pallets for sleeping or maybe
sitting, but little furniture. Were
these the wealthy Palestinians?
Their wealth, obviously, is ear
marked for other thingslike
arms. Not simple comforts.
A STONE statue, the lift
ire of a guerrilla fighter in
itant posture, dominated a
fork in the stone path Right
arm outstretched, the figure
aloft 3 rifle
No picture taking, we wet*
told as we made our way uphill
to the camp's clinic, a rude
stone bvilding not unlike the
simple low huts all around us
only sorrvwhat larger and two
stories high. G'-andly named
Haifa HosmitaL it had been es-
tablished in 19~o to provide
emergency surgerv services; to
t~at "certain illnesses;" to
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times." and is staffed bv thral
doctors in general practice and
three medical specialists all
volunteers living within th
camp or in other camps. In ad.'
dition. other physicians, not]
Palestinians, sometimes volun.
teer a few hours a week, n
were told. And this is not'
strange, remembering that the!
majority of the Lebanese people
are deeply sympathetic to tn
Palestinians and their state ol j
homelessness.
"Profound sympathy." said.
Dr. Malik, "is felt by the Lei*
nese for the Palestinian cause
independent of the meam
they (the PLO) use The word
terrorist- is your term Heri
they are called freedom fight-
ers.
We looked in the doorway f
a 10-bed ward, instantly intec
rupting conversations amo^
the room's three or four pt-
tients and their viattors
BACK OUTSIDE we resume*
our climb along the stone walks,
trinnme over the wr pipes,
meeting the openly hostile Bates
of the men. now. come out to
see the foreigners There wert
no smiles for American visitors
here; we were repres 'ntatives
of Israel's support an^ -treneth,
its big power friend, the United
States
Black-margin potters on the
walls of the huts and on trees
and fences reminded us as thef
must daily remind th" ;fuge,
of the dead; picture' re thi
faces of young men kill -d in ths_
raids, names and a dat
and places of death 'ed
low Our guide* Iran ted the J
obituary poster's Arab : letter-1
ine for us.
Near the top Trf hill w I
came to the camp's aool. 1
two-room building, he 1 hy aa
oil stove, its efhci 1 nveredj
by cold gusts of w lowinfl
through the panel idomj
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1


Kday. August 8, 1975
+Jenisti fk>ridlair
Page 15-A
See War More Likely This Year Israel Faces Week
Continued from Page 1-A
THAT GLOOMY scenario,
lough by no means shared by
I raelis, is based on botfi
;. and political develop-
ments of the past year. A year
jo, Israeli military circles
Vint out, Egypt and Syria were
idverse position owing to
e severe losses they suffered
the Yom Kippur War.
But since July, 1974, the situ-
I las changed. The Egyn-
an and Syrian forces have
sen reequipped to their pre-
rj Kippur War strength, and
, i in fact, may be even
jager militarily than in Oc-
lb*r, 1973, the military circles
ly
11-''-'ermare. they point out.
ule the political situation was
scure a year ago, the Arabs
tiy are increasingly blunt in
?i- statements and their talk
?v\ is openly of a new war
- than peace.
RESIDENT ANWAR Sadat of
. h has declared publicly that
ace with Israel is not attain-
ts in this generation. He made
MS remarks despite the on-
il".: negotiations for a Sinai
tl sment, and thev echoed the
bsummit meeting at Rabat,
>cocco, last October when the
ab summit meeting at Rabat,
.'stine Liberation Organiza-
the status of reoresentative
spokesman for the Palestin-
oeople.
k'hat the Arabs want, these
leli circles say, is peace with-
:ieg niations and without
i ssiona on their part.
They want Israel back to its
e, 1967, lines and not an
less and would then start
titin? demands on behalf of
Palestinians. In short, they
r. the conditions of the 1974
Rabat summit remain operative
no negotiations, no recogni-
tion and no neace with Israel.
THERE CAN be no progress
toward peace, the Israelis say,
while the Arabs constantly es-
calate their. economic and po-
litical warfare against Israel in
the form of the boycott, the oil
weapon and attempts to oust Is-
rael from the United Nations.
Assessing the immediate mili-
tary situation, Israeli circles
concede that there have been no
overt violations by the Egyp-
tians of the January, 1974, dis-
engagement agreement. To the
best of Israel's knowledge, the
Egyptians have not advanced
anti-aircraft missile batteries in-
to the limited forces zone west
of the Suez Canal or on the
eastern banks of the canal.
But they have prenared sites
for such batteries on both banks
of the waterway and Israel re-
gards this as a violation of the
disengagement terms.
SIMILARLY, Israel has no in-
formation that the Soviet MIG-
25 jets, flown by Russian pilots,
have been withdrawn from
Egypt. The MIG-25s were sta-
tioned in Egypt before the Yom
Kippur War and flew reconnais-
sance missions over Israel-held
territory.
According to direct Israeli ob-
servation, Egypt's army, navy
and air force were placed on a
state of alert two weeks ago
when Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmv announced that
his government would not agree
to extend the UNEF mandate
which expired July 24.
(This was confirmed by
President Sadat in Khartoum
when he said that Egypt's arm-
ed forces were in full mobiliza-
tion and under 24 hour alert. He
told a press conference in the
Israel Rolls Out Carpet
For Mexico's Echeverria
PJorvinued irom Page 1-A
Mexican ethos, say observ-
>1 Mexican politics.)
|F. WILL argue, too. against
acquisition of territory by
tea cardinal and con-
eni plank of Mexican po-
fil philosophy.
oico itself had vast areas
fertile land taken by force
th U.S. (California. Texas.
f. Mexico), and partly as a
that it firmly opnose
nomena in other parts
p world.
f-it beyond the differences of
which Israeli dinhmats
s who know him wU
ncerely held on Ec'ie-
>art, the Mexican lead-
| nsidered here to be a
" friend of Is-ael and the
-..rmlp ,^ a frqnV an 1
r. admirer of the social, tech-
and agricultural de-
t of the Jewish State.
IVRINO HIS viiit, he was to
s'lown sites of scientific and
interest abound the coun-
ts well as holding exten-
oolitical tal^s with Premier
and other top ministers.
' HI spend Saturday as Al-
- -'- on Kibbutz Ginossa:
p he and Maria have oiwn
- id intMofl in th? kibbutz
socio-agricultural f-ame-
nl will hold a closing
N conferenc- together with
sre Sun Jay.
The Echeverrias were to
bring with them an entourage
of ISO persons, flying in two
special jets.
They include Foreign Min-
ister Emilios Kabasso and Mrs.
Rabasso, several deputy min-
isters and officials, adminis-
trative personnel and newsmen.
"\*
S
Sudan capital that "The time we
feel that diplomatic ?ffo-ts are
of no use. we will have nothing
Wt before us but to prepare
for another battle." Sadat said
Is-ael hai no option but to with-
Of Labor Strife
TEL AVIV (.TTA) Israel faces a week of labor
draw totally from oc^niad-A^b^^J?*6 as strikes are threatened by salaried engineers,
territories and restore the ie le Israel, the nation's largest financial institution.
The government the Histadrut and other bodies
are trying to avert the walkouts which could result in no
construction work being done, no permits issued, no in-
spection by engineers, no fiscal transactions in the coun-
try's largest bank, and the grounding of Israel's national
airline.
The labor disputes are a result partly of the new
tax reforms and partly of the efforts to close the salary
gaps between various employe groups.
Gustav Badian, secretary of the Engineers Union,
said some 15,000 salaried engineers will start a partial
strike because their demands to maintain the ratio of
salary differences between them and other groups have
been turned down. He said the strike would hit all
spheres of work except essential security projects and
plants.
mate rights of the Palestinian
peonle.)
THE EGYPTIANS subseount-
ly reversed themselves on UNEF
but Israeli securitv circles are
convinced that had UNEF been
forced to withdraw, clashes be-
tween Israeli and Egyptian forc-
es would have been inevitable.
Each side would have at-
tempted to seize as much as pos-
sible of the buffer zone evacu-
ated by the UN forces.
That immediate crisis has
been resolved, temporarily, but
it is the opinion not only of Is-
rael but of the Security Council
that the tension will be renewed
on an even more dangerous
scale as the new UNEF dead-
line of Oct. 24 aooroaches.
Should the UNEF mandate ba
terminated then, Israel* rtTtoa
fear a replay of the 1969-70 war
of attrition between Israel and
Egypt on an even more inten-
sive scale as each side would
trv to prevent the other from
gaining the initiative.
WITH REGARD to Israel's
other neighbors, observers not-
ed th^t there were no si?ns of
a military alert in Saudi Arabia,
Svria o<- Jordan Hu^ng the re-
cert c*" The Jordanians. nvertheless,
are continuing to buiM U* tv";-
fortifications on a line facing
Israel ^nd w>"ld doiibtlesflv
use them as the jumping off
point for an attack should thev
join in a new war against Is-al.
Thy are more lively to join,
Israeli circles say. if they re-
ceive the $350 million air de-
fense system thev seek from the
United States which would pro-
vide an umbrella against Israeli
ai" attacks on lordan.
ISRAELIS ARE also seriously
concerned that Jordan might
once again give the PLO terror-
ists a free hand to operate from
its territory.
On the other hand, securitv
circles here seem convinced
that Jordan is more concerned
over the effects on its own
sovereignty if the PLO was al-
lowed to operate from bases in
Jordan.
Ford Lays Wreath
At Auschwitz Camp
PARIS (JTA) President Ford laid a wreath
at the international monument at Auschwitz marking
the site of the notorious death camp where four-million
Jews were slain by the Nazis during World War II.
But the stone monolith, erected by the Polish gov-
ernment, contains no mention of the fact that most of
the victims were Jews. The inscription, in 20- languages,
states only that "Four-million people suffered and died
here at the hands of the Nazi murderers between the
years 1940 and 1945."
THE PRESIDENT, who toured the Auschwitz site
near Cracow in Southern Poland, made no formal state-
ment. But he remarked, "It's horrible unbelievable,"
when he viewed the site of the gas chambers and cre-
matorium ovens.
Me was accompanied by the Secretary General of
the Polish Communist Party, Edward Gierek, and by
Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, many of whose
relatives died in death camps similar to Auschwitz.
According to eye-witnesses, the President appeared
deepfy moved as he walked through the remnants of the
Nazi charnal house for some 12 minutes. Later, he wrote
in the camp's Book of Remembrance: "This monument
and the memory of those it honors is for us a new source
of inspiration in the quest for peace and for cooperation
and security for all nations."
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Page 16-A
*Je*ist> thrMkui
Friday, August 8.
*"* *S Iff-
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1. BIAS TIRES
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;


.-
nORItHAN FUBUSHtR CMHTtD WITH IDEA
^Jewish Floridian Fascdll!i"w.......Ei".....

Miami, Florida Friday, August 8, 1975
Section B
Small Businessmen To Hire
Ebaii Lists 15-Point Peace Plan
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEMiJTA^Form-
er Foreign Minister Abba Eban
has present d 15-point peace
plan, including a delineation of
Israels future bord?rs. which he
said the government should pro-
pose without delay.
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
said an overali settlement was
only one of the options facing
Israel at present and ruled out
Eban's SUggSStion that Israel
map its final borders before ne-
gotiations with the Arabs begin.
Both diplomats stated their
views at a meeting of the Labor
Alignment's Knesset faction.
THE MEEriNG, surprisingly,
was devoid of polemics. Eban,
who has come under bitter crit-
icism from Premier Yitzhak
Rabin and other Labor Party
leader? for his public criticism
of the government's policies
during the recent bilateral talks
with Egypt conducted by Sec-
retary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer, asked "Is it not possible
for a man sincerely to believe
that the situation is serious and
sincerely to propose ways to
remedv it?"
His peace plan en- isaged an
Israel withdrawal from the bulk
of the Arab territories occupied
since the June, 196?. Six-Day
Ones Shabbos
Program Begins
At B'nai Israel
u Israel and Great*' Mi-
Youth Synagogue will be-
its Oneg Shabbos program
.. a; I p.m.. A K: Idustl
in honor of th* forthcoming
marriage of Rifkah Glisman
and Efraim Varon cosponsored
by Dr. and Mrs. Theodore
Friedman and Mr. and Mrs.
William Jarobs will follow Rab-
bi Ralph Glixman's discussion
of the way a contemporary or-
thodox Jewish family may en-
jey the holy Sabbath.
The synagogue, which has a
complete calendar of varied ac-
tivities, plans to hold "open
house" on three consecutive
Sundays Aug. 17, 24, and 31.
Steve Rogosim's 1*2 won
first place in the synagogue
bowling league's tournament
match at Bird Bowling Alley
last Sunday. Alan Schienthal
was in second place with 156.
and Albert Weiner was third
with 148.
Bill Hirsch is the advisor for
this project, which is one of the
many facets of the synagogue's
program.
War but recognized the need for
a continued Israeli presence in
"tactically significant" areas
such as the G'lan Hpjghts and
Sharm el-Sheikh and the perma-
nent status of Jerusalem as a
unified city and the nation's
'capital.
OT"r" POtvts of the Eban
peace ) hn were:
^ r-.'i n..^po(i neace t^patv
pbod''"? t^ political recogni-
tim of ii-ael and end to the
state of war;
E"l to hostile actions by
Irregulars;
Iron c'ad demilitarization
arrangements;
Provisions for the mari-
time rights of all parties;
End to economic warfare;
End to hostile propaganda;
Free traffic of foreign tour-
ists between countries.
Also, trade ties, cultural rela-
tions and the establishment of
diplomatic relations to be im-
plemented gradually, regional
cooperation, an end to political
harassment in international
forums, mutual compensation
for Arab refugses and Jewish
refugees from Arab lands, open
borders, especially within the
boundaries of Mandatory Pales-
tine.
EBAN SAID there was no con-
tradiction between such an
overall peace plan and efforts
to achieve a step-by-step settle-
ment. Allon said he did not rule
out additional interim agree-
ments and that war was not
necessarily unavoidable."
But he insisted that Israel
could not lay out a map of fu-
ture frontiers beforehand when
those frontiers will be items for
negotiations. Allon said he also
did not rule out a mutual de-
fense agreement between Israel
'and her friends." However, he
added, guarantees cannot serve
as a substitute for an independ-
ent defense capacity."
Mayor Ferre Vice Chairman
Of Bicentennial Committee
Miami Mavor Maurice A. Fer-
re was named vice chairman
of the Mavors' Committee on the
Bicentennial as part of the na-
tionwide program designed to
celebrate th country's 200th
birthday in 1976.
The appointment was an-
nounced by Mayor Moon
Landrieu of New Orleans, pres-
ident of the U.S. Conference of
Mayors, working with The
American Revolutionary Bicen-
tennial Administration in plan-
ning a meaningful anniversary
for the Nation.
Leadership Training Session
Sunday For BBW
B'mi B'rith Women South
Coastal Region Chairman Alma
Hofstadter will preside at a spe-
cial leadership training session
f>r BBW Council Presidents
and Vice Presidents Sunday
from 9:30 to 4:30 at the Deau-
ville Hotel, Miami Beach.
In attendance will be about
50 women, representatives of
the four South Florida Councils
of B'nai B'rith Women: Twin
County, Intercoastal, Miami
Beach and Miami; as well as
of lice, s trom unaffiliated chap-
ters from Palm Beach County.
The workshops were organ-
ized by South Coastal Region
Leadership Training Chairman
HarrL't Horwitz of North Miami
Beach, in cooperation with the
chairmen of specific areas of
concern: Zelda Wolff, program;
Elise Factor, administration;
Edith Bassman, constitution and
by-laws; Phoebe Gould and
Mollye Ginberg, fund-raising;
Elaine Miller, communications;
and Region Vice Chairman Joan
J. Bernard Shumate, president of South-
east First National Bank of Miami who is
serving as 1975 general campaign chair-
man for United Way, has announced sev-
eral new appointments. Louis E. Fischer
(left) president of General Development
Corporation, and Theodore Pappas, chair-
man of the board of The Keyes Company,
have been named cochairmen of Unit C,
which is responsible for contributions
from savings and loan associations, land
developers, mortgage, real estate and in-
surance firms. G. William Ryan, vice pres-
ident and general manager of WPLG-TV,
Ch. 10, will chair the Unit D campaign
among media and advertising firms. Stan-
ley G. Tate, chairman of the board of
Ryerson and Hanes, and Edward T. Ste-
phenson, president of the Dade County
Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, will serve
as cochairmen of Unit E, which raises
funds within the construction industry
and telephone communications system.
Murray D. Wood, (right) partner in
charge, Ernst and Ernst, has been named
chairman of Unit F, which campaigns
among Dade's legal profession, banking
groups, accounting and finance firms.
Congressman Dante Fascell
(D., Fla.) has introduced legis-
lation in the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives to establish a pro-
gram whereby small business
concerns would receive federal
assistance to hire unemployed
workers.
The Fascell proposal would
enable small business concerns
located in areas of high unem-
ployment to apply for federal
funds to pay wages and employ-
ment benefits to individuals who
are unemployed. The funds
would NOT be available to firms
which have job openings as a
result of laying off or terminat-
ing employment of any regular
employee.
The four-year program, to be
administered by the Department
of Labor, would provide the
funds on a percentage basis of
the total wages paid to the new-
lv hired workers. For example,
the program would provide 80
per cent of the total wages and
employment benefits for the
first year of operation; 60 per
c >nt for the second year; 40 per
cent for the third year and 20
per cent for the fourth year.
Fascell credited Miami news-
paper publisher Fred Shochet
with the idea for the proposal.
"I believe this would be a
meaningful and effective way of
providing work for thousands
oi unemployed individuals who
have been laid off by large
corporations while at the same
time helping small business
firms increase their productivity
with skilled workers," Fascell
said.
"It is my hope that this bill
will receive prompt and favor-
able consideration by the Com-
mittee on Education and Labor
as one means of easing the cur-
rent unemployment situation,"
he concluded.
'Ms. Douglas Gardens'' To
Compete In State Finals
Region Officers
Wolfberg, membership.
The chairman of the day is
Miss Mollye A. Ginberg of Hal-
landale.
The training session is a
"first" for the newly formed
South Coastal Region, and has
been planned to prepare the of-
ficers for their new responsi-
bilities and to clarify the vital
relationship to their counter-
parts on a chapter level.
The restructuring of B'nai
B'rith Women began with the
formation of the South Coastal
Region in early April of this
year and is part of a general
restructuring plan approved by
BBW at its Triennial Conven-
tion last March.
The changeover from Dis-
tricts to Regions, which will
gradually take place over the
next ten years, will increase
service to chapters and better
enable the development of lead-
ership potential from the gen-
eral membership of the chap-
ters.
Lillian Cowen is 81 years old
and has never flown in her life.
Until two weeks ago, Lillian
Cowen had also never been a
beauty contest winner. But that
changed when she was crown-
ed Ms. Douglas Gardens, and
now, so must her travelling
habits.
Ms. Cowen flies to Orlando to
compete with five other aged
beauties for the title of Miss
Florida Nursing Home next
Tuesday.
THE CONTEST, which will
ultimately end when "Ms.
America Nursing Home" has
been chosen, is meant to dem-
onstrate that beauty is a life
long quality that does not di-
minish with age.
There will be five finalists at
the Orlando finals, which will
be held in the Rocky Mountain
Room of the Contemporary Ho-
tel. Each contestant represents
a different district of Florida
and all will be escorted by res-
idents of their respective
Homes.
Ms. Douglas Gardens' escort
will be the dashing Louis Ja-
cobs, star of a United Way com-
mercial currently being aired
throughout the country.
THE SPOT made news in Mi-
ami last week when a nephew
Jacobs had not seen in 30 years
saw the spot and as a result,
was reunited with his lon lost
uncle.
Speaking of the upcoming
contest, Ms. Cowen remarked,
"Although there will only be
one "Ms. Florida Nursing
Home," I believe the value of
this event will be that five
graceful ladies will have an op-
portunity to show the world
that age places no limitations
on spirit and inner beauty."
Miami based Air Florida,
which will be flying Ms. Doug-
las Gardens and her entourage
to Orlando, has renamed the
flight the "Ms. Douglas Gar-
dens Royal Coach Express."
Lighthouse Can
Help The Blind
If you know an adult who is
blind or near blind, house-
bound, or chair-bound, perhaps
totally dependent on others for
almost every act of daily liv-
ing, the Miami Lighthouse can
help with a training program
paid for with state or federal
funds, free transportation door-
to-door, professional counsel-
ors and qualified instructors.
More and more people are
becoming visually impaired in
later life. The Lighthouse pro-
gram enables these people to
adjust, to cope with this visual
problem, to live with dignity
and self-reliance.
Do the blind or near-blind
person you know the greatest
favor possible. Put him in
touch with the Lighthouse.
U.S. Rumanians
Defend Ex-Nazi
DETROIT (JTA) The Rumanian Orthodox Epis-
copate of America, in its annual convention at Grass Lake,
Mich., adopted a strong resolution backing Archbishop
Valerian D. Trifa and plsdging to aid in his defense against
the U.S. Department of Justice in the move to have him
deported as a participant in Nazi crimes and the murder
of Jews in Rumania during the years of the Hitler regime.
The resolution on behalf of Trifa stated that he "has
been subjected to continuous attacks on his reputation in
order to disrupt his leadership," and that "these continued
attacks have culminated in a judicial proceeding intended
to smear and destroy his reputation, which interferes with
the peace and religious freedom of the members of the
Episcopate."
The convention also reaffirmed "its trust in and alle-
giance" to Trifa, pledged its support in his defense, and
sent a copy of the resolution to President Ford.
Two weeks ago, the U.S. Attorney in Detroit formally
charged Trifa with having won his naturalization through
"false and untrue" denials of membership in the Iron Guard
and participation in the murder of Jews and Masons in
Rumania in 1941.


Page 2-B
Jc*ist Fkridiar
Friday, August 8, 1975
Dauer Elected President Of Stone Will Herbert Aronson Appointed
Weizmann Institute Committee Open Office As 1st Federal Assistant V-P
Dr. Maxw '11 Dautr. president
of Lauderdale LaVes General
Hospital and a nationally known
DR. MAXWELL DAUER
scientist, has been elected pres-
ident of the Florida Committee
tor the Wiczmann Institute of
Science.
Dr. Dauer. a resident of Mi-
ami Beach, will head the Florida
Committee's program to bring
greater awareness of the R^-
hovot. Israel's Weizmann Insti-
tute activities in fundamental
research in the natural sciences.
The appointment of Mrs. Lee
H^l^ern RocVstein. the recent
bride of Dr. Morris Rockstein.
Professor of Physiology and Bi-
ophysics at the University of
Miami School of Medicine, and
a noted author and authority in
the field of aging, as executive
director of the Florida Com-
mittee, was announced by Dr.
Dauer after assuming his new
pest.
'The Weizmann Institute is
one of the leading facilities in
the world in natural sciences,"
s"id Dr. Daur. "The work being
done there in the fields of can-
cer research, nuclear science,
b-ain research, bio-eneineering
and other areas is having a sig-
nificant impact not only in Is-
rael, but throughout the wo Id."
In addition to his position at
Lauderdale Lakes. Dr Dauer is
?!so Professor and Director of
tu.e Division of Radiological
Physics in the Department of
Radiology at the University of
Miami School of Medicine.
A prindneJ in D^K. Ltd..
c wnsr-buflder of Miami-Da 1:
Gftrrl Hosnital. and a p-in-
cin?l in the development, con-
strx'Ction and or>~rat'on of St.
pot-shurs f!en-al HomitsL h
has aho seed a consultant
on technical design, planning
and operation of mirthf* af
h^crjt^l ana" medic*) heUttte*.
D-. D^u""" s^-ved in th U *v
Ar-v Medical Corps from 4fl
t*'' 1961. when he retired
with the rank of HautflWit
Colon'1. During that tHie he
se-ved as Assistant Medical Di-
rf-t^' for th Manhattan Proi-
f .. .. ;.., ,v,? U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission.
D-. Dauer recei,-d h;s A.B.
?"d c". M. dg-e-s from New
York Universitv and dH oost-
,-.. j.,,o c.-,. jn ntv'Mologv at
Harvard University. He earned
8*1 I.*..P. dege from G^o'-ge
W'asmngton Unive-itv ->nt a
P'rD. d8-e from the Univer-
sity of Chicago.
A di^ctor ana" -l-tib""" of
thf 1*>vec,'ti,.'e Com'^'tt0**. t^-io.
nirolaou Cancer Research Insti-
tute in Miami, chairman of the
board. Heart Institute of Flo--
1a, Inc.. Laude-dah Lak"s. and
pri j-.pt of Florid* Mad'cal
Center Foundation. In-.. Lauder-
dale I-akes. he i a mmber of
the cocietv of Fonnde*"*. Uni-
versitv of Miami, and tV
Fo'mders Club. Wt. Sinai Med-
ic1 Center. Miami Beach.
Mrs. Rockstein previously
served on the staff of the
American Jewish Co**vnitt
whre she o^sanized fade ani
industry functions Bad a'"-""1': i
special events. She also wrvsd
the' Joint Df>nas Appeal,
formerly t*1 fund raisia! arm
of the Anti-Dfamadon I. ".gue
ol B'nai R i>h ?n i die Amsrican
Jewish Committee.
In her nW"t rec 'fit notti'ti
,-.- director of fun' raising for
the New York Sctian. National
Council of Jewish Women, Mis.
Rockstein rah ;d the fern's need-
ed to sunpo t an annual budget
of over SI m;,lian.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, di-
rector of chaplaincy of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and executive vice
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Mi-
ami, has been engaged as
cantor for the High Holy
Days by the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy and by
Congregation Beth El of
Miami Beach according to
an announcement made by
Hyman Chabner, president
of Beth El, and by I. H.
Abrams, chairman of the
executive committee of the
Hebrew Academy. He will
share officiating duties at
the services with Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, princi-
pal of the Hebrew Acad-
emy.
Ill Miami
Sn. Rfc?"rd (Dick) Stone
l'! ^-<^n a M'a-m office to serv*
constituents and provide liaison
with local and regional govern-
paer's in South Florida next
month, it his been announced
ftaffm? the office will b-
P"t t W "in t. who has been an
pi o ti "ton-> ;-> Tallahasee and
Washington. Weiner's geoeraph-
jc -, of r-snonsibili'v will ex-
ten 1 fmm Palm Beach on the
r-vt^ *o K-v W-ct on the south,
and weft to Fort Myers.
"W hi''' Vnown of the ned
fir fhfa office all alone."' Stone
saK "but we waited until we
coal i assign someone who
knows "'I' "has "s of our consum-
er"-;'nice and legislative oper-
ations.
"Mr. V.''in >r has now achiev-
ed tht background." Stone add-
ed. "H^ is equipped to help us
serve the citizens of South Flor-
ida as well as we possibly can."
The cton office in Miami, to
open Tuesday. SeDt. 2. will be
loeafd in Room 731 of the Fed-
eral Office Building at 51 SW
Fi-t Ave.
W-in^r will soon announce
reg-'lar hours for constituent
service in the office. When he
is traveling to other areas of
South Florida on business he
will keep in touch by means of
a bilingual telephone answering
service.
Weiner. 29, has maintained
permanent residence in Miami
since 1972. A former Peace
Corps volunteer in Brazil, he
has specialized in condominium
and senior citizens legislation
and casework while working in
the Senator's Tallahassee and
Washington offices since Janu-
ary. 1975.
Lieberman Voted
Executive V-P Of
Young Democrats
Mi tmi attorney Ronald S.
Lieberman. secretary of the
Young Lawyers Section of the
Daie County Bar Association,
has been elected executive vice
president of the Young Demo-
cratic Clubs of Florida.
A former assistant to Dade
County State Attorney Richard
E. Gerstein. Lieberman is a past
pr.-silent of the Young Demo-
cratic Club of Dade County,
and is presently a member of
the Dade County Democratic
Executive Committee.
A campaign aiie to the late
Mayor Jack Orr in his last suc-
c ssf il race. Lieberman served
a* Dade County Campaign Man-
ager for School Board member
Bill Turner in 1970 and Secre-
tav of State Bruce Smathers in
1974. He was elected as dele-
gate from the 15th Congression-
al District to the 1974 National
Democratic Party Mid-Term
Convention in Kansas City last
year.
Lieberman is a trustee of the
Tzedakab Lodgs No. 2959. B'nai
B'rith.
Lew To Be Moderator
Harry Levy, president of
Voters. Incorporated, will mod-
erate its onen meeting Tuesday
at p.m. in the Washington Fed-
om| Ai.dif-m, 1234 Washing-
ton Ave.. Miami Beach. Miami
B-ach foimcilman Leonard
Haber. M.D., and Leonard 0.
Weinstein. and Robert H.
Bums, civic leader, will be the
guest speakers. There is no ad-
mittance charge; the public is
invited.
B'NAI ISRAEL*
4 Gr. Miami Youth Syn. (orthod.)
MfA Htiidmy hnini mM tin4u Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
t: Club d* Lot Americas
(form.rly YM-TWHA)
8500 S.W. 8th St.
Mill !( by rOUt donauon
F.. .nfirmilxx cft: 274-9556
^C>^*^2^^
PhtFi^rt#o
OVCiN ESTHER
KOSHER POULTRY
mi
*rt w d t*ort-n
tttt f\'*\\ U-S. &*!. UwfttH*
XOWIB (MATS ad fOU*TIT
1717 N W 7rh Awa
Mfni, Pit.
r*hov 32-1855
Herbert Aronson's appointment
as assistant vipe president -
business development of First
iid\>t.rti AKO.saO.N
Federal Sa\ ings and Loan As-
sociation of Miami was an-
nounced by Robert V. Walker,
president of the Association
following approval by the beard
of directors July 21.
A member of B'nai B'rith
Sports Lodg' 2834, Arons
well known in Greater Miami
table t?nnis circles. Ranked \'o.
5 in the nation in 1915. Aronson
is a farmer Illinois State and
All-India table tennis cha
He has given many exhibitions
of table tennis skill in che
South Florida area an,! .in
acti' e in promoting table ten-
nis far voung people.
Since coming to Miami in
1969. Aronson has served First
Federal customers as chief sav-
ings officer at the NE l'-'3rd
ft eel ofliee and as b n
d.". elopment officer. He is ac-
dwe in A'ath Yeshuiun Syna-
gogue, Am irican Jewish Con-
g -ess an j the United V7
hirst Federal of Miam is the
old si and largest sa ;: ,:
loan association in the nith
with tot.al assets in exc i
$1.5 billion. As assistant ice
president business develop-
ment, Aronson will work in the
3!-stary First Federal Bu.iding
at 1 SE 3rd Ave. in downtown
Miami.
^iHJng Ita\iai\j5ty\e is as
easylasJ/Vle! cBais'.'..\i1tl\/
Y\e\p froit\Chef floy-ar-dee
hvite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee'
to your house when the
ycur.csters call for pizza!
Just open up the Chef's
Cheese Pizza and you've
practically got it made.
Everytnings right there
Pizza flcur mix. the Che'; special
savory sauce, real Itali; n cheese
and easy directions..' ist 20 minutes
in your oven and yo II have a
delicious, "home-made"mychei'
A sizzling, tangy pizza to set
before the kids They'll
just flip for it!
Treat Your Feet to a New Kind of Comfort
and Fashion .. STRAIGHT FROM ISRAEL!
ALL LEATHER
Israeli Sandals
First Time In America .
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i Cushion Leathtr
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Ever visited Israel? Then you know
sandals are second-nature for
Israelis. They wear em day and
nighton rough roads, sandy
stretches, city streets You
will, too. once you treat your
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and fit* Choose White,
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Friday, August 8, 1975
+Jm 1st fkx-ldlan
Page 3-B
Russian Joins Family in Beersheba After
Miami Mayor Ferre Intercedes
Four ypar* w\ vuif~i
Markman w ii'd on ch->-e->'.
of "hooliganism" and "anti-
Soviet activity" by Russian au-
thorities.
Today, he :s reunited with his
wife. Margarcta Markman. and
son in Beersheba. Israel.
The reunion came about as a
consequence of the intercession
of Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre.
r"""~.|s'feioh to emigrate to Is-
rael. That's how h eot into
trouble in the first place.
"Requests for emigration to
Israel are almost always han-
dled this wav." according *r>
Mrs. Mi'iam Wolf, chairperson
of the South Florida Conference
of So\i"t Jewry's "Adopt-a-
p<-lonar Program."
Mayor School To Speak At Retinitis Group Meeting
The general meeting of the
|Dade-Broward Chapter of the
[Retinitis Pivientosa Foundation
will be held at B n.m. i n lav.
Aug. 15, al the First Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
:ai ne Blvd.. Nori i <
I Bench.
Mayor Paul School of North
u-iv \'ji|.... vviii be the u i I
speal er. Mayor School, the Did
County chairmen for Floridian
State Controll 'd Gambling, will
peaking in favor of legalized
casino gambling.
The program is now a com-
mittee of the Greater Miami
j vih Federation.
When Markman was released
|it Anvil. Soviet secret police
told him that he would not be
g 'in" f Isra-1 at all, but to a
s~ni| fjVrnJan town instead.
IN FACT, thev said, he would
ha1" to b^sin all over again the
tedious and dnngerous process
of anolying for permission to
emigrate.
Pnssihlv. they warned him.
he might have to face another
jail term.
In d ss<<>' A' s. Ma-kman
anneal -l t> th "^dopt-a-Prison-
.. Or a pro-^ntly, M -
n,\ \\ .,.- Ferre to in-
Nicolai Posnikoff. district chief
in the town of Sverdlov. USSR,
in Markman's behalf. He also
telegraphed the Soviet Union's
emigration authorities and the
KGB.
ALMOST IMMEDIATELY,
Markman was told he could join
his family in Beersheba.
Now. Mayor Ferre has a tele-
gram from Mrs. Markman say-
ing: "My husband, Vladimir
Markman, for whom you inter-
ceded before the Soviet authori-
ties receiyed permission to go
to Israel. My son and I want to
thank you and to express our
deep gratitude to you for your
kind intervention on his behalf.
Thenk vou and God bless you."
DEADLINE
For
who
The
Religious
sei
telegram
Institutions and Organizations
wish to place Greeting-Advertisements in
Jewish Floridian will be AUGUST 22nd.
Please mail your copy to us at
P.O. Box (11297:;, Miami. Fla. 33101
or Call Mrs. Thompson at 3734605
I
I I
?
I
I
FACT1:
Clinical studies show liquid corn oil is unsurpassed
among vegetable oils for lowering serum cholesterol.
FACT 2:
Fleischmanns* Margarine is made from 100% com oil,
and is high in important liquid corn oil.
FACT 3:
Using Fleischmanns as part of a low saturated fat diet
can help reduce serum cholesterol.
Wl!
Reducing serum cholesterol may help decrease
the risk of coronary heart disease.
Now that you know tWese facts, vou know whv polyunsaturaU's and low in saturate
you should use Jfleischmanns. Its rich corn oil Remembei^usmg r'leischmann's as an important
goodness makes this margarine a delicious pa" > a low saturated fat diet can help lower
addition to today's sensible low saturate fat serunvchojesterol Serve your famil
diet. Even.1 pound is made with almost one full Fleischmanns- Margarine. It makes sensible
cup of liquid com oil.' Fleischmanns is high m eating delicious.
Fleischmanns Margarine. Makes sensible eating delicious.
^r;j!;U^
Soft


*
fiefscflfxanns Fleischmanns
I IBS-,.
Marg,
Margarine
Anothc! Fine Product) HtmtdtnU-nMimti


Paee 4-B
+J&nit Fki iJ&r
Friday, August 8,
1.000 Campers Participate
In JCCTs Maccabiad Games
Oath ol
Good
young Jewish day camp
the
ed to -'-.-: the

I
i:-. tl
an Ho
can


red ".: -hon to
: J to
>dy,
we dedicate to o ir
err |al."
filed

Si
the
thful

di-
I
ts
I com-

i
I
ted
too to late.
Jewish World's Fair Aug. 14
At M.B. Convention Center
The public is invited to en-
joy the colorful sights ind
sounds of the first "Jewish
World's Fair." sponsored by the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida. Thursday eve-
ning. Aug. 14. at Miami Beach
Convention Center.
The JCCs. a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's family of agencies, are
sponsoring the event to kick off
their year-long Bicentennial
celebration.
The Fair's theme will be a
Salute to America, and the Jew-
ish community's contributions
to our nation's two centuries of
growth.
Admission at the Convention
Center South Hall will be SI
for adults. Children will be ad-
mitted free of charge. Opening
ceremonies will begin at 6:30
p.m. and the Fair will be open
until 9:30 p.m.
JCC President Donald J.
Reiff will welcome numerous
community leaders as well as
local, state and national digni-
taries. Leaders of South Flori-
da's religious community will
help launch the event, whose
features will document Jewish
history around the worldfrom
biblical times to the U.S. Bi-
centennial.
Included ifl the 1975 "Jew-
ish World's Fair" will be acres
of game booths, art displays,
original crafts, musical presen-
tations, drama and dance to
document American Jewish his-
torv. and refreshments.
Taking part in presenting the
fair will be the nearly 1400 JCC
summer campers, along with
representatives of many major
community organizations.
For further information, con-
tact Mr. Just at the JCC office.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN DAVID FOR ISRAEL
Drescher Named Chairman Of
Southeastern U.S. Region
S I Drescher. Miami Beach
civic leader and real estate de-
veloper, has been named chair-
n'jn of the Southeastern United
tes region for The America*
Red ael-
Drescher's acceptance was
announced by Handle-
man of Miami Beach and De-
troit, national president of the
ncan Red Magen David.
ich supports Israel's official
Red Cross and Civil Defense
agency.
Drescher has served for sev-
eral vears on the national board
of directors and the executive
committee of the American Red
Magen David, the only agency
in the United States authorized
to solicit and accept funds for
the Magen David Adorn in Is-
rael.
A graduate of St. John's Uni-
versitv School of Law. Dres-
cher is a member of the New
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DADE BR0WARD
and/or Both.
Telephone, Personal Contact,
Servd resume to S.T.,
Box 012973, Miami 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
York Bar Association. He was a
leading clothing manufacturer
for many years in New York
City, before moving to Miami
Beach in 1967. and headed sev-
eral firms including Cardinal
e&
A patron of the widely ac-
claimed motion picture, "The
Tea;r,." which depict-; the
work of the Red Mag.m David,
operator of Israel's only nation-
wide ambulance and blood
services, Drescher and his wife,
Esther, have contributed a car-
diac rescue ambulance to the
Magen David Adorn.
An ardent golfer. Drescher is
a member of the Bayshore Golf
Club, and is active in the an-
nual tournament held there in
behalf of the American Red
Magen David for Israel.
In his new post, Drescher
will coordinate membership,
fund raising and public rela-
tions activities for the Amer-
ican Red Magen David for Is-
rael in Florida. Georgia, Ala-
bama, Louisiana, Mississippi,
South Carolina. North Carolina
and Tennessee.
Bell Offer*
'Design Line"
Telepl
lone*
Just like the old Model T
For.' be iust
standard 1 for
h- color-
individu-
ality triumphs over utility. In
- irted of-
optional
styles rtro-
nd
com-

something of a
ithem
i
of.

tea *
nays f>'
anything ->-e company has of-
fered before The styles range
from nostalgic to futuristic.
The housing materials include
wood, simulated leather, and
brass plate. Some models hide
their identity as telephones:
rthers beg for attention. Th"
end result is enough variation
to make the telephone a room
designer's dream.
These telephones carry a one-
time charge, ranging from
S59.95 to $109.95. depending on
the model. To assure quality
phone service, the inner work-
ings remain the property and
responsibility of the phone
company. If the parts ever need
repair, they're fixed at no
charge.
The Design Line series was
manufactured in part by West-
ern Electric, the Bell System's
primary supplier, and in part by
the American Telecommunica-
tions Corporation, an independ-
ent telephone equipment manu-
facturer.
Allen Goldberg, Miami
Beach civic and religious
leader, has been elected to
the City of Miami Beach
Civil Service Merit Board,
which rates employes of
the city. A past president
of Temple Emanu El's
Men's Club and former ex-
alted ruler of the Miami
Beach Elks Lodge, Gold-
berg was chosen by fellow
members of the Personnel
Board, on which he has
served since 1960, part of
that time as chairman.
International Conference On Tay-Sachs Scheduled
The National Tay-Sachs and
Allied Diseases Assn.. Inc., and
the National Foundation March
of Dimes will cosponsor the
first International Conference
on "Tay-Sachs Disease: Screen-
through Dec. 3 at the Riviera
Resort Hotel, Palm Springs,
Calif.
Organizing chairmen are Mi-
chael M. Kaback, M.D., John S.
O'Brien, M.D., and David L.
tht i" th
ign for I
. <>/ i'r. SI
Stowaway is also a
a -."Tic walnut design. Both models come with
black or ivory interiors, rotary or Touch-Tone dialmi]
Hecker To Direct Fla.-Wael C of C
Milton M. Hecker has been
appointed executive director of
the newly renamed Florida-Is-
rael Chamber of Commerce, ac-
cording to an announcement
made by Harry Rich, president
of the private, non-profit or-
ganization dedicated primarily
to promotion of stronger trade
ties between Florida and Is-
raeli businessmen and indus-
trialists
Hecker was formerly with
the Sun Bank of Bal Harbour
where he was it
the trust department's
business development. He]
recording secretary of the I
Coast Lodge of B'na; B'ri:;,
The Chamber, located a:
Biscayne Blvd.. was forr
known as the Grea- i
Israel Chamber of Co~m
Rich said the chance to
ida-Israel Chamber of Cl
merce was made "to J
association to broad
tivities within the St
ar>c5 his
3c;a Raton Hotel
ar.d Cljb Orchestra
'Wedd- j! S
Bar '.'
our Spe. a "
651-2803
FINE ANTIQUES BOUGHT AND SOLD
Ready Cash Available For 1 Item or Entire Estate
PLEASE CALL 866-0905
DECOR INC.
9446 HARDING AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
t*
Outhouse
The Store For Plant Decorating
In Your Home And Patio.
COME IN AND BROWSE AROUND
We Carry a Wide Variety of Plants
Bonsai Wandering Jew
Spiders Mocrame
Many Others
We will revive your oM plant FREE
' -- OPENING SPECIAL
HANGING BASKETS ,
$1.00 OFF with this Ad J
Op My *-4 fru ? imn. 11 to PM
623 E. Dome loach Boulevard
(3 MHb ImI el 0* Jai-AW)
Tel. 920-9036
I
ing and Prevention" Nov. 30 Rimoin, M.D., Ph.D.


\day, August 8, 1975
-Je*istFk>ric/foF
Pase 5-B
Flagler Federal V-P Serves
& CII Program Coordinator
. Flagbr Federal Savings anJ
loan Association of Mia^ii Ms
inounood that it is aiding the
HARVEY R. KAPLAN
pn^-iltants for Israeli Industry.
c. (C.I.I.), a non-profit organi-
jtion designed to promote the
Ivelopment of Israeli indus-
les.
[Harvey R. Kaplan, a vice
esident of Flagler Federal, co-
iinates the association's sup-
\ x efforts in behalf of the
I. program, which has de-
i>ped a reservoir of volunteer
is "ints from many snecial-
I Is to servo as advisors
li manufacturers repre-
: a broad range of busi-
nterprises in Kibbutzim,
!'ii, new immigrant vil-
tes and private industries.
The problem of coordinating
200 consultants from
i the nation with Israeli
icturers was tackled by
r. Kaplan, who also serves as
a unit chairman for the C.I.I,
profam. with th~ supporting
efforts of Flagler Federal.
He dvHnn system which automatically
matches a specific problem area
in Israeli industry with an ex-
pert consultant. In addition, the
computer svstem makes possible
*n pfficiont mailing procedure
for the purpose of general com-
munications among the con-
sultants.
Under t^e leadership of
Chairman Sam Topf, president
and director of Jordan Indus-
tries. Miami, the consultant pro-
gram has proven to be an
enormous success.
"The benefits of having ex-
pert assistance for Israeli in-
dustry are evidenced in many
ways ... the utilization of un-
employed Israeli workers, more
efficient production methods,
and the reduction of imports
and the increase of exports. The
assistance program also allows
a reduced research and develop-
ment cost for the Israeli manu-
facturer," says Mr. Kaplan.
"Program consultants receive
equally rewarding benefits," he
added. "In addition to having
the satisfaction of aiding Israel
;nd seeing their work and ideas
take shape and form, the con-
sultants have the gratification
of participating in the transfer
of technology and operational
'know-how.- to further the uni-
versal aim of all men who wish
to see a prospering Israel in a
v "11 of cooperation and flour-
ishing trade.
"The most rewarding experi-
ence of the program is. how-
ths understanding that the
participant is contributing to
the ecnn wnic self-sufficiency of
a nation."
-I 91-Ycar-Old Uncle Found
Through United Wav Ad
mse of the United Wav,
-year-old Louis Jacobs, a resi-
r/ i : the Miami Jewish Home
i Hospital for the Aged, a
ted Way b "r'i riary agency.
reunit after 30 j
Milton Jacobs,
n pi: sw recognized
m a Unit id Way televi-
announcement.
1 watching television
\ .iv night, Milton Jacobs
one of the United Way's
public sen-ice announce-
Its featuring residents of the
ami Jewish Home and Hos-
for the Aged. In this an-
ancement, Louis Jacobs says.
need the home. I have no
lily, no children."
MILTON JACOBS called the
ited Way, and upon learning
man's identity realized that
hunch had been right. It was
uncle whom he had not seen
30 years and had thought
since passed away. They
last seen one another in
|iv York, nearly 30 years ago.
ilmost immediately, Mil-
and Louis were reunited at
Miami Jewish Home and
1. where Louis has been
living for 10 years receiving as-
sistance for his residency from
the United Wav.
Loui i Jac bs was filmed last
April during the production of
United Way's annual campaign
film.
He is being featured with
en other recipients of United
Way services in a series of pub-
lic service announcements for
television, excerpted from the
film and beins broadcast in Mi-
iami since Sunday. July 27.
NOW THAT they have been
reunited. Milton Jacobs intends
to recelebrate his uncle's 91st
birthdav with a partv for him
at the Home. Jacobs' 91st birth-
day took place only a few weeks
ago.
The United Way public serv-
ice announcements will con-
tinue to be seen in Dade Coun-
tv through the fall as the
United Way conducts its 1975
campaign.
To kick off this campaign, the
seven minute film featuring
Louis Jacobs will be televised
simultaneously on all of Dade
County's commercial television
stations at 7:54 p.m.. on Tues-
day. Aug. 26.
RONEY PARTY SHOPPE
BOUTIQUES GIFTS STATIONERY
fcializing in Greeting Cards Unusual Large Selection of
Jewish New Year Cards Attractively Priced
BROWSE AROUND" FOR HUNDREDS OF GIFT ITEMS
ALL REASONABLY PRICED
*45 Collins Ave. Roney Plaza Arcade 534-3713
[Agency for Russel Stover Candies Hallmark Cards
BONDED FRUIT SHIPPERS
Emanu-EVs Choir
Rehearsing For
High Holy Days
Under the direction of Israeli
composer Shmuel Fershko, the
Temple Emanu-El Choir has b"-
gun rehearsing for the High
Holy Days, which will b? ob-
served in Miami Beach Conven-
tion Hall North beginning the
night of Sept. 5.
Cantor Zvi Adler is worHn,
closely with Fershko. musical
director of Temnle Emanu-El, in
planning for liturgical music
which will be a key part of the
services to be conducted by Dr.
Irving Lehrman.
After 18 years in the Miami
Beach Auditorium for the High
Holy Days, Temple Emanu-El is
moving to Convention Hall
North this year.
With the resulting increase in
the number of seats, tickets are
now available for non-members
of Miami Beach's largest con-
gregation, according to Judg?
Frederick N. Barad, president
of Temnle Emanu-El.
Cantor Adler, who has served
the synagogue for the past 15
years, worked closely with
Fershko in organizing the Tem-
ple Emanu-El Choir.
Rabbi and Mrs. Morton Malavsky (left) of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grossman
(right) were welcomed to Israel by Menachem Beigin,
leader of Israel's Likud Party, during their recent tour
of the state. The local group, which was led by Dr. Ma-
lavsky, explored many areas in Israel seldom seen by
visitors, and also met with Menachem Porush, a member
of the Knesset.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
SOL LANDAU, Rabbi WM. W. L'PSON, Cantor
RABBI MARVIN ROSE, SHELDON G. MILLS,
Educational Director Executive Director
2625 SW. 3rd AVENUE 7500 SW. 120 STREET
854-3911 238-2601
DADE'S FIRST JEWISH CONGREGATION
BI-CENTENNIAL 5736-1976
Historic Brochure upon Request
PASTORAL COUNSELLING HAVUROT-FELLOWSHIP
FULL RELIG'OUS SCHOOL FULL YOUTH ACTIVITIES
UNIQUE CONSERVATIVE DAY SCHOOL
INQUIRES INTO OUR FAMILY MEMBERSHIP WELCOMED

NOW... 7 DAYS MATINEE I EVENING
ALL STAR
PLUS
A FEATURE
MOVIE
"l TO I P.M.
$100
VAUDEVILLE
MUSIC COMEDY SINGING DANCING
5 BIG ACTS LIVE BIG BAND
COMPUTt NIW SHOW tVIRY FRIDAY
1

Now thru Aug. 17
/.BEST \
J PLAY
How you can get tickets. IN PERSON al the Box Office. Jordan Marsh (Downtown
Miami, Dadeland. 163rd St. Shopping Center. Hollywood Fashion Center. Lauderhill
Mall. Ft. Lauderdale Sunrise Shopping Center. & Pompano Fashion Square). Keys Rec-
reation Center (Homestead Air Force Base). Leblang Tours (71st St. & Collins Ave).
Miami Beach Radio (Lincoln Rd. Mall). Neiman Marcus (Bal Harbour). Saks Fifth Ave-
nue (Lincoln Rd. Mall).
DIAL-A-T1CKET: Charge your guaranteed, exact seat locations for EQUUS to your
Master Charge or BankAmericard by phone. Call 444-9831 and say "1 want to Dial-a-
Ticket."
STUDENT DISCOUNT: Only S3 50 with valid ID per ticket, on sale in advance at
Box Office only (No phone reservationsno Fri. & Sat. eves.).
TIMES A PRICES: Tues-Thurs. Eves, at 8:30. Sat. Matinee at 2. Sun. Eve. at 7:30:
S8.50. 7.50.6.50. 5.50. 4.50 Fri.-Sat. Eves, at 8:30: $9.50. 8.50. 7.50. 6.50. 5.50 Wed.
Matinee at 2: $7.50. 6.50, 5.50. 4.50. 3.50 Shows start promptly: no latecomers seated!
For adults and students (over 18) only.
Dinner Theatre Package only $13.00 (Tuesday Wednesday. Thursday &
Sunday Evenings) Complete Dinner at CAFE BRASSERIE in the Coconut Grove Hotel.
BLACK CAESAR'S. THE HASTA, THE TAURUS. MONTY TRAINER'S BAYSHORE
RESTAURANT. SCAMPS, or VINTONS TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT (entree, salad,
dessert, and choice of beverage) PLUS a good Orchestra Section seat for EQUUS. On
sale now at the Box Office only (Tax included: gratuity at restaurant extra.)
I.unc heon, Theatre Packageonly $9.50 (Wednesday & Saturday Matinees)
Complete Luncheon at SCAMPS. THE TAURUS or MONTY TRAINER'S BAYSHORE
RESTAURANT (Entree, Salad. Dessert and choice of beverage), enjoy shopping and a
leisurely stroll through picturesque Coconut Grove, and see EQUUS from a good
Orchestra Section seat. On sale now at the Box Office only (Tax included; gratuity at'
restaurant extra.)
From Miami Beach only $13.00. Luncheon Theatre Package PLUS
round-trip door-to-door motor coach transportation. Call Leblang Tours at 865-0341 at
least one day ahead for reservations. No credit cards for Packages or other discount
tickets (cash or local check only).
Information: 444-9831
___ Low Group Rates: 253-5566
(< ifn ii 11 < r n u I L i\ I mi S4


Page 6-B
fa/rf norkMatr
Friday, August 8, 1973
'Miami Shalom' Now Ready
To Welcome Newcomers
Benjamin 1. Shulman, right, chairman of the board of
Bank of Miami Beach, presents the first United States
Bicentennial coins distributed it: ihe city to Sol Roth, a
member of the City 0! Miami Beach Citizens Advisory
Board, as Jaime E. Pino, deft) president of Bank of
Miami Beach, looks or.. The new SO-cent coins bear the
dates 1~76-1976 and have a picture of Independence Hall
on the reverse side; they may be secured at face value
from Bank of Miami Beach.
Ann and Murray Ginsburg
are home from a fun filled vaca-
tion in New York. They played
hours of tennis at the Seawane
Club in Hewlett, visited lots of
friends, and Ann claims to have
shopped for the year, but Mur-
ray doubts that claim.
Jeanne and Elliott Dinner-
stein and Dr. Harold and Cecily
Silberman are back from Rod
Laver's Tennis Camp in Water-
ville Valley, N.H. They said the
food was good, the accommoda-
tions excellent, the clay courts
were in good condition and they
had a fine group of instructors.
Something must have been
going right for them because
Cecily and Hal were the winners
of the mixed doubles tourna-
ment. Part of their prize in-
cludes a week at Hilton Head,
S.C.. when they will play other
winners of the Laver tourna-
ments and the grand prize
is a three week vacation in
Australia!
Lenore (Mrs. AD Raven and
Rabbi David Baron of Temple
Or Olom have teamed up to es-
cort a group to Israel. Rabbi
Baron is a former resident of
Israel and they've custom-
planned two weeks from Oct. 27
to Nov. 18.
The group Includes Mrs.
Birdie Alexander, Leona and
Paul Zuckerman plus her
parents, and the Max Green-
bergs who are coming from
Brooklyn to join the tour. Bev
and Chuck Harris and the
Murray Ritters are also busy
planning their packing. Those
interested may call Rabbi Baron
or Lenore at Kings Bay Travel.
Thelma and Milt Jasper took
time off trom the tennis courts
at Kings Bay Country Club .
and the courts weren't the same!
After three weeks of driving
along the east coast and visiting
their son, Stuart, who's an at-
torney with the Justice Depart
ment in Washington. D.C., they
decided to head back to the
tennis courts. (Sometimes they
even go home.)
It seems the final disillusion-
ment came after they saw a
morning talk show in the na-
tion's capital when Wilbur
Mills' girl friend stated she still
loved him and then watched
him conduct a special Senate
committee meeting.
Gert Feuer's back in town
after taking a two week Rhine
cruise. Marshall stayed home,
but daughter Elaine went with
Gert. It was Elaine's first trip
to Europe and she really
had a marvelous time.
Gert fell in love with Lucerne
all over again. She's got Europe
in her shoes and she and
Marshall plan to celebrate their
25th wedding anniversary with
a three week trip to Europe and
then sail home on the Queen
Elizabeth II
Lynn and Tom Heroux took
their youngest son, Jon, to Or-
lando for his first time in camp.
For the first time in years they
had no children at home .
and right now they're busy
"honeymooning!" Later in the
summer the three of them plan
to spend some time in their
Cole-ado condominium.
The Ed Dorit family is a
traveling one. First Elaine and
Ed went to Boulder, Colo., to
visit their daughter Lynn. Then
they drove to Colorado Springs,
Vale and Steamboat Springs .
which got its name because one
of the springs makes a chug-
chug, steamboat-like noise!
While driving 11,000 feet uo,
Elaine had the gas pedal to the
floor but the car would only go
about 35 miles per hour. Seems
the lack of oxygen makes cars
and people go slow.
When they returned to Miami,
their son, Niley, left for Mexico
City ... to visit Ed's brother's
family, Murray and Irene and
their children Robert and Les-
lie.
Robert took Niley to Guada-
lajara for a week, then Murray
and Robert returned, with Niley.
to \Yiami for a short visit
Attractive rt\ >'
color of woodcuts ho-
graphs by Esther Glue* '.
Shapiro Ulusti att 1 h .' rt
Calendar issued by the Na-
tional federation of Tem-
ple Sisterhoods for the year
5736. Mrs. Shapiro, ihe wi-
dow of Herman T. Shapiro,
an architect in Cincinnati,
Ohio, is Assistant Professor
of Printmaking at EJg.ec'
College.
Large Enrollment
At South Datle
Hebrew Academy
"Because of a tremendous up-
surge in registration, the South
Dade Hebrew Academy will in-
ly be able to accept a limit i
number of studmts for the Ml
term," said Erwin B. Marshall,
princioal of the Southwest Dal;
County all day school.
The South Dade He
Academy, a benef~iarv a*T>--
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, is locafd on a 3-
acre site at 11S01 SW ":" A
and is entering it-; seventh yar.
The school, which *nco-----m-
*s nu*"e*"y through eighth
e-ade. has fo*ir ai>- ?on,i'ti/mi
buildings which contain cl
rooms, a*i*nce i.ib---t^-<- -- I
a't room, library, administrative
offices and a 2-acre athl ti;
field.
"When we moved to oil" no,v
location last year," said D-
Melvyn Greenstein, president of
the school, "our enrollment
swelled from 80 to 160 students.
We already have 175 childre-
registered for this September
and we haven't even entered the
normally high enrollment perio 1
immediately preceding the
opening of school.
"Because we are co*nnHt to small classes provid^g in-
c""idualized attention we will
onlv *v M to n&**m aDprox-
imately W no- st-^mts be-
fore viro r'rw-- mf '-oliment"
Dr. Grenst"?in continued.
I siu,.e t,e main reason
for this situation is the fact that
it has become common knowl-
edge that our students have av-
e-aged in the top 10 per cent in
the Standard Achievement Tests
given throughout the country
each year."
Parents interested in enroll-
ing their children may contact
the school
If you are new to the Greater Miami area, your Jewish
"w......l^ ** -<-\ ~- you. Tt's called "Miami Shalom," and it's sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration's Women's Division.
"Our goal is to get to
know the many new resi-
dents who locate here each
year," said Shalom Chair-
man Mrs. Sol Landau, so
that we may invite them to
one of our regular social
evenings Open House at
the Federation, 4200 Bis-
cayne Blvd.
"That way we are able
to orient newcomers to the
MRS. SOL LANDAU many fealures ^ cQm
munity has to offer." she continued. "We make it easy to
set to know other people from a variety of backgrounds who
all have something in common: they're new to Miami's Jewish
community.
Abo'e all." she added, "we want each new resident to
feel welcome."
' Miami Shalo'-" begins i*s regular program of open
houses for the 1975-1976 year Sunday. Aug. 24. at 7:30 p.m.
in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Building.
Hel ing welcome the p wco,**ri that evening will be
Federati in President Many B. Smith and Women's Division
President Marilyn Smith.
For further information, phone the GMJF Women's Di-
vision.
Ceil Zucker, president of the
Jew: auxiliary
of the State of Florida, is attend-
ing the Aug. 3-10 National C in-
vention of the Jewish War \
erans Auxiliary in Las Yeg is.
Nev., which promises to be uii
ol the largest ever held.
The State of Florida has a
candidate for national office.
I ene Cooperman of Miami
K-ach. and many Floridians, in-
clu 'ins Department officers and
iM*ry members, will be vot-
ing. -Ms. Zucker has again been
h no '. J by being asked to serve
as : h n : the "Distinguish-
e "'- '-" lea" given by the na-
tional o-2inization during the
convent: n.
: '. :.:
'""' contingent
Of ibjrs accompanying Com-
------u. m.v r-cn.,n|H inj
President Claire Gre?nwal.1, the
husband and wife t^a-1 of th
Norman Bruce B-own Post and
Auxiliary 174 of th -wl >V Ww
Veterans of the U.S.A. to the
national convention at the Hotel
Frontier in Las Vega t^'s -ek
is Ralph Rosofsky, a Committ e-
man of the National Executive
Committee, his aurilia-v mem-
ber wife, Sylvia, and Tessie
Rosenberg of the Post.
President Greenwal 1 is at-
tending va*iOUS *~ workshops in addition to meet-
ings on Constitution and B'-
Laws Changes, the Woman of
the Year Luncheon, ani a ban-
quet honoring outgoing National
President Anita Gotthoeffer.
President Greenwald will be I
back in Miami to hold a boarJI
meeting at her home 1'uesday
.v .. M -,-y,.,,,- v,;; r>e held ]
'i u sdaj. Aug 24. in l ic newj
0 tins in the First Fed-i
era! I make plans for the|
rig year.
-
Mickey and Susan Schemer, j
owners of "Living Things" in
en their annual buying expedtj
tion. Thev will cover more tha
8.000 milB this summer
search of unique plants l
planters for their clientele.
ir Si
******
Lectures Precede High Holy Days
A series of three lectures will
be delivered by Rabbi Simcha
Freedman of Temple Adath Ye-
shurun, 1025 NE Miami Gar-
dens Dr., North Miami Beach,
in preparation for the High
Holy Days.
The Rabbi will speak on the
theme of "Shofaring in the High
Holy Days" during the first of
three sessions to be given on
succeeding Tuesdays at 8:00
p.m.
The Rabbi will elaborate on
the major themes of the holi-
day period as brought forth
through the pa^es of the Mach-
zor. He will demonstrate the
sounds of the Shofar and ex-
plain their meanings and ex-
plain the way the Hebrew cal-
endar works in relationship to
the Jewish holidays.
Cantor Ian Alpern will chant
and demonstrate the traditional
High Holy Day melodies, ex-
pounding on a number of the
most familiar prayers. There
will be ample opportunities for
questions and answers. Every-
one is welcome to attend.
DEBRAH PONN
Artist Debrah J. Ponn of Co
nut Grove has been selected I
inclusion in the 1975 edition1
International Who's Who in A
and Antiques, published by M|
rose Press Ltd., Cambridg
England. Ms. Ponn, a student"
Thomas J. Strickland's. IT
member of the National S
of Literature and the
Grove House, the Palette
and the Miami Art Center
had one-man shows at Fu
Federal Savings and Loan l
ciation and at Temple Betn^j
hat year, and previously^
ricinated in numerous
showings..


Friday. August 8, 1975
+Jei*t ticrkfian
Page 7-B

% 11;
* '
IMMM1* Illl
Dr. Joe/ Sandberg, (right) vice chairman of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, presents a resolu-
tion of support to International Longshoremen's Associa-
tion President Thomas Gleason after members of the
I.L.A., meeting in Miami Beach, voted to give Gleason
the authority to order them not to load wheat aboard
ships bound for the Soviet Union. The motion is being
backed by the AFL-CIO
Felice Schwartz, Gisella Gutter
To Cochair Oct. 19-22 Convention
[lice (Mrs. Gerald) Schwartz
of Miami Beach and Gisella
(Mis Siegfried) Gutter of
North Miami Beach have been
named Florida cochairmen of
national Golden Jubilee
Convention of Pioneer Women.
The conclave marking the
50th anniversary of the found-
ing of Pioneer Women, the
Women's Labor Zionist Organi-
zation of America, will be held
at the Dsauville Hotel in Mi-
ami Beach Oct. 19-22.
Announcement of acceptanc-
es by Mrs. Schwartz and Mrs.
<: itter was made by Mrs. Mil-
ton Green, national convention
chairman and president of both
the South Florida Zionist Fed-
eration and the South Florida
Council of Pioneer Women.
Mrs Schwartz is a life mem-
ber of Pioneer Women and is a
P3st president and vice presi-
dent of the Albert Einstein and
Aviva Groups of Hadassah. She
is former vice president of the
Zionist Council of Omaha, and
is i native of Pender, Nebraska.
Mrs. Schwartz graduated
from Miami Beach Senior High
School, where she was a drum
majorette and a Young Judea
leader, and attended the Uni-
versity of Miami. She is a mem-
ber of the area board of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division, was co-
chairman of the Temple Beth
Am State of Israel Bonds din-
ner honoring Mrs. Eleanor
Roosevelt, and has coordinated
Shelley Golden To
Marry Richard Leebovo
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Golden of
Grand Rapids, Mich., announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Shelley Beth, to Richard
Alan Leebow, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Leebow of
North Miami Beach.
Miss Golden eraduated from
Michigan State University; Mr.
Loebow graduated from Univer-
sity of South Florida.
A fall wedding is planned in
Grand Rapids.
Hadassah Chapter Planning Sept. 29 Membership Gala
Mrs. Jean Feinberg, president
of the Miami Beach Chapter of
Hadassah, announced at a re-
cent membership planning
meeting that the annual "Mem-
bership Gala" will be held at 1
p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, at the
Convention Hall South. Invita-
tions will be extended to all
paid-up members, life members,
new members and new life
members.
The membership committee
consists of Mrs. Joseph Rosen-
berg, membership vice presi-
dent; Mrs. Jack Miller, member-
ship coordinator; Mrs. Sigmund
Rostler, life membership chair-
man; Mrs. William Adams, re-
enrollment chairman; Mrs.
Martha Silverstein, transfer
chairman; Mrs. Hyman Abrams,
decorations chairman, and Mrs.
Samuel Oppenheim, hostess
chairman. ____
'Backgammon Niqhf Friday
Single, widowed and divorc-
ed persons 30 to SO are invited
to join Friends Unlimited Fri-
day at 9:30 p.m. in the Temple
Beth Am Chapel for a "Back-
gammon Night," with Gary
Mednick as instructor. A dona-
tion will be taken at the door.
Guests are urged to bring their
own boards.
Helene Bekoff, Husband Gary Rosen
Honeymoon In Mexico City, Acapulco
Helene Fayne Bekoff and
Gary Rosen were married Sat-
urday, June 21, at 8:15 p.m.
JWVA 330 Summer Meatinq
Set For Thirsdav. Auq. 14
THo Jewish War Veterans
T mites Auxiliary 330 will pn'd
its summer meetine at th
Washington Federal Bidf?.. 1234
Washington Ave., Thursday.
Aug. 14. at 8:30 p.m.
Social activities in the com-
ini! months will be planned and
refreshments will be served. All
members, friends and guests
are invited to attend. For in-
formation, telephone President
Pauline Lazarus.
numerous activities for Temple
Emanu-El of Miami Beach, Bar-
Ilan University of Israel and
the American Red Magen David
for Israel.
Mrs. Gutter spent three years
in the Nazi concentration camp
in Auschwitz, where her fam-
ily was exterminated. She met
her husband at Auschwitz, a
symbol of the Holocaust, and
returned with him to her native
Czechoslovakia after the defeat
of Hitler and the end of World
War II.
The Gutters applied for emi-
gration to Palestine, but British
restrictions prevented that, so
they moved to Venezuela in
194". Mrs. Gutter became the
personnel manager of a large
insurance firm there, and was a
volunteer for the Red Cross,
Cancer Society and a children's
hospital for polio victims.
They moved to Dade County
in 1963, and she became a vol-
unteer in North Miami area |
hospitals. She joined Pioneer
Women six years ago, and is j
now vice president of the Pio-
neer Women Council for South
Florida.
Mrs. Gutter is a board mem-
ber of the Aviva Chapter, serv-
ing for two years as chairman
of the Moetzet Hapoalot com-
mittee, and now is both pub-
licity chairman and vice chair-
man for membership of the
North Miami Beach Pioneer
Women chapter.
Latin Party Saturday
Gulfstream Chanter, Women's
American ORT. plans a "Latin
Party" Saturday at 8:30 p.m. in
the home of Dr. and Mrs. Len
Haber. The event will feature
dinner and live music. Contact
Joan Ciment or Fela Flemem-
baum for additional information.
MR. AND MRS. GARY ROSEN
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
performed the double-ring cere-
mony in the sanctuary of
Temple Beth Am, where the
bridegroom had become Bar
Mitzvah and been confirmed.
Helene. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Leo H. Bekoff of North
Miami Beach, is a mathematics
major in her senior year at the
University of Florida.
Gary, he son of Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Rosen, attended Iftnory
University in Atlanta and re-
ceived his Bachelor of Science
degree with honors from the
University of Florida June 14.
He majored in chemistry.
The bride was attended by
her sister, Abbv Susan, maid of
honor. Wayne Rosen served his
brother as best man and also
escorted Helene's paternal
grandmother. Mrs. Sara Brill,
down the aisle.
A reception was held for rel-
atives of the couple at Kings
Bav Country Club. Guests in-
cluded Mrs. Sara Brill of Wyn-
crte. Pa.; Dr. and Mrs. Malcolm
Behrff of Woodbridge. Conn.;
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Rosen of
Surfside; Mr. and Mrs. Martin
Biloven of Asheville, N.C.; Mrs.
Rosalind Nowak of N.Y.C.;
Lawrence Stone of Brooklyn,
N.Y.; Dr. and Mrs. Eugene
Grossman of Tarrytown, N.Y.,
and Burt Greenstein of North
Miami.
After a honeymoon trip to
Mexico City and Acapulco, the
newlyweds will spend the sum-
mer in Miami and return to
school at the University of Flor-
ida in September.
nearing completion...
THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street. Miami, Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE a a sacred
family trust. Although you may
not like to think about it. the time
to arrange lor it is long before
the need, when your mmd is
unclouded, and you can consider
the alternatives The perfect
alternative is Mount Nebos
Garden Mausoleum.. .a sanctuary
Of love and peace; a comforting
place for prayer, remembrance
and meditation.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDINARY GROUND
BURIAL Entombment in this
magratcent mausoleum is com-
parable to ground bunal. yet how
much more reverential. And there
is nevet a maintenance charge,
crypts wilt be maintained beauti-
fully forever, with sympathetic
concern and professional care as
part of the total purchase.
YOU MUST VISIT
MOUNT NEBO TO TRULY
APPRECIATE IT. FREE
TRANSPORTATION s offered
to this beautiful haven, from
wherever you live in Oade County.
And as a token of our apprecia-
tion for permitting our represen-
tative to show you our new
mausoleum, we have a FREE OUT
for you YOUR CHOICE OF:
Beautiful, stainless water
pitcher Stainless. 3-ptece sugar. '
creamer and tray or Silver-plated
salt and pepper shakers
We must ten you, how-
ever, that the supply of
gilts is Imited
SELECT NOW
FOR CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AND LOWER
PRICEour pre-comple-
kon purchase plan offers
substantial savings, as weH
as smalt initial deposit and
3-year terms.
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
MAR. TH COUPON TOOAr
MOUNT NEBOCEMETEKY 4. GARDEN MAUSOLEUM
POST OFFICE BOX 4404(71 MUM. FIOFMM JJ144
S. ~~*
OWahouHMQMnn.pHmMWnnMUllpmMlioBOH
Ojifo MoIji.t. pcxt"q lya 1 >vHPi err.
and omm at yw paywwni plan.
QI prate MaatfJM MM erawX Bunal
appaawiant at Mount Nabs. I unoaraian* tnai l raoaura
PMC I Kara kaat m
"i yaw nipniaantanra.
SHUT-
an_
JSfHW6_


Page 8-B
+Jems*norkliar
Friday, August 8, 1975
Religious Services
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA.
TION 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
%ibh: Zvi Raohaely. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron. 1
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Ave.
Conservative Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
2
BETH AM <-mple) 5950 p.. Kendall
3r.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M. Baumqard. Associate Rabbi
Barry Altman. 3
AGUOATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrev.
Keligicut Community Center. 19.?5
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. S3-A
BETH TORAH. 1051 N. Miami Beach
Blvd. Conservat.ve R*hbi Max Lip
achitz. Cantor Jacob 8. Mendelson.
34
BNAI RJ-nAEi. 1401 NW 183rd Sx
Conservative. Rabbi Victor D. Zwol.
ino. Cantor Jack Ler.ier. 31
CONGREGATION BET BREIRA. 107-
55 SW. 112th St Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
ICTH DAVIC. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lipson. 4-A
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 571
NE. 171st St. Orthodox. Rbbi Ne-
sim Gambach. Cantor Joseph Na-
houm. 36-A
SINAi (Temnie< OF NORTH DAOfc
18801 NE 2?nJ Ave. Reform. Rabb
Ralph P. Kmosley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes 37
CTH DAVID SOUTH 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4-B
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
Bidnick. 3*
BETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Pabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Stahi. Rev. Mendel Cutterman. 6
ETH TOV (Temple; 6438 SW 8th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Charles Ru-
bl S
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER *f.'.
AMI 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox
Rabbi Zev Leff.
CORAL GABUS
JUDEA (Templel. 9550 Granada Blvd.
Reform Rabb' Michael B. Eisen.
stat. Cantor Rita Shore. '1
'MAI ISRAEL AND GKEATER
MIAMI YCUTH SYNAGOGUE. 9610
Sunset Drive. Orthodox. Rabbi Ralph
Olixman. 8-A
---------------
ISRAEL (Temple) OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19V. St. Reform.
Rabbi -/Oseoh R. Narot. 10
ISRAELITE ENTER. 3175 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
ffaidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
ZAMORA I'.emplel. 44 2amir Ave
Conservative. Rabbi Maurice Klein.
41
HMW
MOGAN DWID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D Vine. M
fCPT LAUDWDALt
BETH ISRAEL (Templel. 7100 W.
Oak'and Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz Cantor Maurice New. 42
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
MVtt Reform. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment. 43
OR OLOM (Tempie) 8755 SW 16th CORAL SPRINGS HEBREW CON-
St. Conservative. Rabbi David M. GREGATION. Reform. 3501 Univer-
Baror. Cantor Stanley Rich. IS aity Dr. Rabbi Max Weitz. 44
TEMPLE ISRAEL.SOUTH (Formerly TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9101
eth Tikva) 90^5 Sunset Or. Reform. NW 57th St Conservative. Rabbi
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 1S-A Milton J. Gross. 44-A
AMU *L. (Temple) 89C0 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite 306. Rabbi Maxwell
Berger 9
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. 14
2ION (Temple). 8000 Miller Rd. Con-
servative. Rabbi Norman S'lapiro.
Cantor Errol Hel'man. 1f
HIALtAH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan Zolondek IS
N0K1H MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
22*5 NE. 121st St. Conservative.
Rabbi Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Can-
tor Yehuda Binvamin. 35
MIAMI BrAlH
AGUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox1 389' Stirling Rd. 62
PHMPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER 61"
wu/ oth Rt, ii. *
SHOLOM (Tample). 13? SE 11th Ava
Conservative Rabbi Morrif A. Skop
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. *f
HALLANDAlt
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Oanziger 12
HOLLYWOOD
BETH El (Tempi-). 1351 S. 14th Ava.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfelc* S
IETH EL.
Orthodox.
:4O0 Pina Tree
Dr.
5
IETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shspiro. 18
ETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamchea.
19
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
BETH SHO'.OM (Temple). 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kronish.
Cantor David Conviser. 21

TEMPLF BEIH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conse-vative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde
cai Yardrini. 21-A
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Trooper. 22
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
GATION. 843 MeriHian Ave. 22-A
----------a
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 178th St..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobsoh. 22-B
CUBAN HEBREW CONGKEfiATION
1262 Washington Ava. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON
GREGATtON. 715 Washingto-
BETH THALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar-
thur St, Conservative Rabbi Mortos
Malavsky Cantor Irving Gold. 46
--------------------
SINAI (Temple). 12f1 Johnson St
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfleld
--------------------
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Conservative.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
David Rosenfield. .7-
TEMPLE SOLEL (Liberal) 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-0
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE.
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams.
MIRAMAX
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. Drazin,
Cantor Abraham Kester. 4S
HOMtSTtAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 MF Rth St Con.ervative. 61
r~
CANDLEUGHTING TIME
1 ELUL 7:44
tu>
Rabbi Meir Masliah Melamed.
la Bar Mitzvah
KMANU-EL (Templet 1701 Washing,
ton Ave. Consei vative. Rabbi Irving
Lahrman. Cantor Zvi Adler. 24
-------
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross
----------s>----------
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibnr H. Sterrr
Cantor Meyer Enoel. 2"
-------a
KNESETH ISRAEL. 1415 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MEM OR AH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. Raeei Mayer Abram-
oveitz. Cantor Nlco Feldman. 21
----------a----------
NER TAMID (Temple). 79th St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eagen* Labnvitz. Cantor Edward
Klein.___________
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. RabDi r-hineas A. Weber-
man.
?0
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmias. 31
----------------
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1542
44 Washington Ave.
NORTH BAY V1LI "GE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway.
North Bay Villnne. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Vavneh J2-A
NORTH MIAMI BIACH
AGUDAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEFARD
CSNGREGATION. 707 5th St.
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo-
-Ite.______________*
ADATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1025
N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Conserva-
tive*. Rabbi Simcha Freedman. Can-
tor ln Atparn. SS
JEFFREY SCHWALB
Jeffrey Garon, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard Schwalb of
Miami, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Sat-
urday Aug. 9t
at Temple
Beth Am.
Jeffrey is a
student at
Lingle Junior
High School
and has re-
ceived his He-
brew educa-
tion at Tem-
ple Beth
Torah and
Temple Beth Am.
Alter the service. Mr. and
Mrs. Schwalb will host a Kid-
dush at their home. That eve-
ning, a formal dinner at Kings
Bay Yacht and Country Club
will be held to celebrate the
occasion, and a Bar-B-Que will
be held Sunday at the parents'
home for the out-of-town guests
relatives, friends and family.
JEFFREY
Flagler Running
Expanded Matinee
Race Schedule
Flagler Dog Track, forced to
reorganize its stake schedule
due to the kennel owners' boy-
cott which delayed the track's
opening, has announced the
running of a $25,000 Marathon
Championship.
Qualifving for the champion-
ship began Saturday night;
semi-final action continued
Tuesday and ends this Friday
night.
The championship final. Fri-
day night, Aug. 15, is being run
in honor of the late Flagler
owner, Isadore Hecht, and will
be known as the Hecht Me-
morial Marathon Championship.
Flagler cancelled its original-
ly scheduled S100.000 Interna-
tional Classic, which had been
slated to begin July 4. The
finale to that big race was to
have been run Saturday night,
Aug. 2.
After opening for its sum-
mer season 18 days late, Flag-
ler will now be open through
its scheduled date of Sept. 4 but
the track is running an expand-
ed matinee schedule.
Flagler's 1 p.m. matinees are
held daily except Wednesday
with senior citizens admitted
free to the grandstand at each
weekday program. Night racing,
as usual, is held each night ex-
cept Sunday beginning at 8 p.m.
kadiniah Lunch
Benefits Summer
In Israel
Camps
Westchester Medical Staff
Officers For 1975-76 Year
Sylvia Urlich. president and
chairman of the board of West-
chester General Hospital, an
osteopathic community health
care facility, has announced the
medical staff officers for 19"5-
76.
Chief of Medical Staff is M.S.
Fox. DO.; Irwin Gotbaum, DO.,
is vice chief; Richard V. Li-
mond, D.O.; secretary, and Paul
A. Lippman, D.O., treasurer.
Bank Consortium
Promises No
Discrimination Here
Kadimah Chapter of Pioneer
Women will hold a luncheon
Tuesday noon at Beth Kodesh
Congregation, 1101 SW 12th
Ave. to raise funds for summer
camps in Israel for children liv-
ing in border settlements.
Cosponsors of the luncheon
are Mrs. Louis Gadon, Mrs.
William Sokolof and Mrs. Ber-
tha Reisberg.
Chairmen for the afternoon
are Mrs. Elsa Kreutzer and
Mrs. Fred Sandier, chapter
president.
The luncheon is open to the
public; a donation for the sum-
mer camp fund is required.
Pioneer Women, the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America, sponsor- health, edu-
cation and welfare programs for
Israeli children and working
women.
Adath Yeshurun Finalizes
Plans For High Holy Days
The ritual committee of Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun has final-
ized its plans for the High Holy
Days. Rabbi Simcha Freedman
and Cantor Ian Alpern will con-
duct the services.
The services will be held in
the temple's new sanctuary and
its adjoining social hall so that
both members and non-members
will be able to attend. I. Pach-
ter, principal of the Hebrew
school, and other members of
the faculty will conduct youth
services in the temple's youth
chapel under the supervision of
the rabbi.
NEW YORKA consortium of
Arab. European and American
banks seeking a charter for a
new bank in New York State,
has assured the American Jew-
ish Congress that it will "ad-
here to principles of equality
and non-discrimination" in its
lending and hiring policies.
The assurances were given
after the Congress had called
on the State Banking Depart-
ment to require a pledge of non-
discrimination from the organiz-
ers of the United Bank. Arab
and French. New York (UBAF-
N.Y.) as a condition for issuing
it a charter.
IN A LETTER to the Con-
gress, the First National Bank
of Chicagoone of the organiz-
ers of the new banksaid that
the new bank's certificate of
organization would contain the
following provision:
"The Bank intends to conduct
its operations in full compliance
with all applicable requirements
of the United States and New
York State Law; accordingly, the
Bank will, in all aspects of its
operations, adhere 'o principles
of equality and non-discrimina-
tion."
Donald J. Yellon. senior vie
president and general counsel
of the Chicago bank, wrote that
his institution had "also insisted
that each of the proposed par-
ticipants formally execute the
non-discrimination clause so
that there could be no question
on this point We intend to
live by that principle in fact
and in spirit."
THE AMERICAN Jewish Con-
gress also released the text of
a letter from Ernest Kohn, Act-
ing Superintendent of the State
Banking Department, expressing
American Savinqs Names
Bass North Shore Manaqer
Thomas R. Bomar, president
of American Savings and Loan
Association of Florida, has an-
nounced the appointment of
Joseph S. Bass as manager of
the American Savings North
Shore office located at the
corner of 71st Street and Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach.
Mr. Bass was formerly pffili-
ated with Franklin Society Fed-
eral Savings and Loan in New
York City as vice president of
branch administration and also
served as branch manager for
Franklin Society. He attended
Bronx Community College and
Lehman College, both in New
York.
Weinberq Beth El Speaker
Temnle Beth El's Sabbath
Services wffl be conducted Fri-
day at 8.15 p.m. by A. Pettie
Weinberg. honorary treasurer of
the temple, who will speak on
"Words of Wisdom." Memorial
prayers will be recited at the
conclusion of the service.
"Ill"
AIR CONDITIONER
REFR GERATOR FREEZER
REPAIR
24 Hours 7 Days a Week
PHONE: 264-5874
RABBINICAL STUDENT
and wife will drive car to
New Jersey New York Clt>
for gas and toll expenses.
Leaving August 17. Call Al-
bert621-9009, after S P.M.
"the firm conviction of this De-
partment that discriminatory
practices or policies not only
would be inconsistent with the
anti-discrimination laws cur-
rently in effect but are in-
compatible with the public serv-
ice function of banking institu-
tions in this state."
Kohn wrote to the American
Jewish Congress in response to
a letter from Rabbi Arthur
Hertzberg, its national presi-
dent, following reports that the
Bankers Trust Company of New
York. First National Bank of
Chicago. Security Pacific Bank
of California and Texas Com-
merce Bancshare of Houston,
Tex., were putting together the
new financial institution.
MORE THAN 20 Arab banks
and several from Europe would
reportedly be associated with
the American banks in the
founding of UBAF-N.Y.. and an
estimated 40 per cent of the
bank's initial S25-million capi-
tal will come from Arab sources,
news reports said.
Howard M. Squadron, chair-
man of the American Jewish
Congress Governing Council,
said that the bank's assurances
represented "a welcome, forth-
right statement."
He added: "While Arab bank-
ing interests should be accord-
, d tie same riht to operate
here as other foreign banks,
they may not distort American
bunking commercial operations
in order to satisfy extraneous
political objectives.
"We have every confidence,
based on the statem-nt of the
First National Bank of rN
and on the equal1 v h"
pronouncement of t'
Banking Departmepi th it the
new institution will
within the n- of New
York law.'-
CEMETERY PLOT
for salp <2* 'cated in L?kside
Memo-ia' Pa If. TS ptice for
ea-h p'ot is $200.00. For in-
formation call 931-7728.
Cantor For High Holy Days
or Year-Round
Traditioral Nusach. Beautiful Te-
nor Voice. Experienced Baal
T'filah and Torah Reader. Cantor
Alpert 672-9544 or 672-9770 from
1 to 3 or 7:30 to 9 p.m.
COWSFRVATIVf CANTOR
Available for High Holidays,
also all year round.
Experience 25 years.
Nice Nusach. Phone 864-9397
500 HIGH HOLIDAY ADLER
Prayer Books for sale. Good
Condition. Very reasonable.
All or part.-221-9131.
Religious School Teachers
Also Music and Dance.
TEMPLE BETH EL,
HOLLYWOOD.
Phone 944-7773 (Miami Line)
WIDOW 59, Haven't any chil-
dren, am a sincere, reliable
person. Financially secure, in-
terested in gentleman respon-
sible, good character between
age 60 to 65.
Write Widow, P.O.B. 012973


Friday, August 8, 1975
*Jenit Meridian
Page 9-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT C^ THE
ELEVENTH JUD'C'AL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA l\ JM') FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PrSOBATE NO. 7;
ll l<
HARRY Ol ''

NOTICE to CREO*TORa
To All -'
. or Demands Age i
-.
u

ERG,
I'll '
''
.
IV.
:
i mo will

llj
u
rtTH
I
i...
Chapter i ward
n the '-
udes th .j Puerto Rit
ah Group of the Miami i \ .
for being the ou standing group in the Florida Region.
With nie Jacobson, (left) president of the Aliyah
Group o; Hadassah, is Ellen Mandler, immediate \
it of the Miami Chapter of Hadassah.
wnings
'

NEW PR FIRMBruce Ru-
bin has formed a public rela-
tions counseling firm bearing
his name at 5900 SW 73rd St.,
South Miami. A member of the
Public Relations Society of
America and a past member of
the South Florida chapter's
board of directors, he is a regu-
lar guest lecturer at M.ami-
Dade Community College.
-Cr 'r
EMCEE Bill Schusel will
serve as master of ceremonies
at the regular meeting of Bis-
cayne Democratic Club Monday
at 8 p.m. in the Washington
Federal at 1234 Washington
Ave. The program will include
the film "Project Access."
Cr <*. tfr
APPOINTMENTMichael H.
Shapiro, vice president and
senior trust officer of Jefferson
National Bank of Miami Beach,
has been appointed to serve on
the Florida Bankers Associa-
tion's Employee Benefit Plans
Committee. The Florida Bankers
Association is the state trade
, sociation representing Flor-
ida's 740 commercial banks.

APPOINTED Thomas C.
Snellgrove of Plantation, presi-
dent of City National Bank of
Hallandale, has been appointed
to serve on the Florida Bankers
Association's Economic Devel-
opment Committee.

APPOINTED Florida Su-
preme Court Chief Justice
James C. Adkins has announced
the appointment of Judge Ber-
nard R. Jaffa to the Supreme
Court's Committee on the Bicen-
tennial established in November
of 1974 to organize, coordinate,
and implement the Bicentennial
WWCA Has Local Office
The World Wide Cycling As-
sociation, formed in 1974 to reg-
ister bicycles with a view to pre-
venting their theft or effecting
their recovery, now has a local
office in Miami Beach. Arthur
Nilsen, the local director, may
be contacted at P.O. Box 41-
4390, Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
for details.
Grassland 'Cap At Colder
The $30,000 Grassland Handi-
cap is this weekend's feature at
Calder Race Course with three-
year-olds competing at one mile
over the turf. Racing continues
at Calder right through Labor
Day. Tuesdays and Sundays are
dark through the summer sea-
son.
KM
activities of Florida's judiciarv
and The Bar.
& ft ft
AUDITIONSCarmen Nappo
Youth Symphony auditions for
the 1975-76 season will be held
at 1 p.m. Sunday. Aug. 24, and
Sunday, Aug. 31, in the Summit
Room on the fourth floor of the
North Miami Beach City Hall,
17011 NE 19th Ave. There are
openings in every section of the
orchestra.___________________
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
,N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-24240
NOTICE FOR ADOPTION
IN RE:
Petition of ,
MARSHA I YONS MINI
T( l: Phil Tlpton
646 O '
Med, NOTIFIED
., for adoption ha.
, ... vou are retired
... -'v. ropy o your writ en de-
r, nm- if any, to n on STANL-hi '
OOODMAX
: IK
the original with th. "
.,,,% Btylf.1 court on or 1 i U r Sep-
l| '
mandd In the compl
'.,"'. Bhall be published once
;, ^ weeks
R1DIAN
\\ ITNHSS m> hai 'I and ll
ui..... Florida
RICHARD r BRINK 1
, del i Cou
i e O-unl Floi da
By BARBARA Ri "HERS' 'N
\ i >< "u i Clei'.
u
- \\l KV K fSl -v.\\
nd sir. i
1'"
Ui rney foi P. turner^ ( ,._.,,_.,,,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4020
JOSEPH NESBITT
In Ite: Estate of
ABRAM R ANTHONY,
' "NOTICE TO CREDITORS
t.. aii Creditors and All Persons
Having claims or Demands Against
B*Ynu are hereby notified and reqnlr-
P,l to present any claims and flo-
mands whieh yon may haye _'""ll
[he estate of ABRAM R ANTHONY
,.,.,! mi,- of Dade County, Flor-
i,i:, to the Circuit Judges of Dade
County, and file the same In dupll-
, ,1, and as provided In Section 788.16.
Florida Btatutes, In their offices In
the Countj Courthouse In Dade Coun-
lv. Florida, within four calendar
months from the time of th< first
publication hereof, or the same will
be ban i d
Filed at Miami, Florida, this c.th
dav nf AUfUet, A D, 1975.
II i \ n kNTHONY
\- Exi cutrix
First publication of ihi* notice on
ili, 8th da} of luerust, 1971
SHAPIRO FRIED, WEIL SCHEER
Mi,,, ilrlx
407 Lincoln Road, Suite in-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33ia
1/8- !
NCT CE UNDER
FIC_T TIOU8 NAME LAW
that
u
'
I
u ii I y,
.
Gil BERTl i & MIDALIA Ml.
i
: -
DF THE
CLF.
OF FLO" FOi~i
PROBATE OV N
PROBATE NO
G rVYNN PARKER
i :er
NOT'CE TO CREDITORS
lu'Ir-
. *
. i
BENJAMIN PACKER
I r*
to the Circuit Judges of Dade
County, and file thi
pate and as pros Ided in s
Florida Statutes In tl ea In
the County 'ourthi ue< I
ty Florida, within four calendar
months from the time of the first
publlcatii n hen f, thi same will
hi barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, this th
day of August. A.D 1975
BETTY PACKER
As Executrix
First publication ol this notice on
the >th ilay of August, 1975.
Ki mmel, R< gers, Lorbi r &
Shenkman
By: Alan R, 1/orber
Attorn, y for Exi i utrlx
4"" i itni "in Road,
Miami Bea< !.. Florida 33139
8/8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4260
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM W'HITEHt IRN
De. aaed.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
T<> AM. PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID
DECEDEN 7.
you are hereby notified that a
pun n to be
the last :ii iment of said
decedent hai been admitted to pro-
bate In said Court, You are hereby
nmmanded within >i\ calendar
months f''"i the dati of thi
publication of this notice I
hi ...,,,; i show cause, If any
you can ^ hy thi act Ion of said I 'ourl
d w 111 i" pi
should not stand unrevoked,
JOHN K BLANTON
Circuit i ui
RICH VRD P BRINKER, Clerk
Bj C< 'RN'EI !. ROBINSON
I li pu J Ink
Attorni y 1 Piotkin
8
First pu of tl notice on
( August, 1975,
8-15-22
NOTICE LMJER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
x BX that
< :
KIlA-
122
ST A T 7. M A N

S
I.
IN THF OF THE
IN AND
FLORIDA
- NER m ION OIVSION
.-...Bi-ICATION
K >-' HAW,
ill1'!
yol J"l
Hired to
tin
,: man "":
Court i ''"''
litioner's attorney, Her-
man Col 3 ^v 1*1 Street.
Mian '' '" before)
Sept, 5 1975
tu 24 1975
RICH W.\- P BRINKER
rk, Clr u:' '"..urt
: .1 POT
1 h puty Cl< rk
8/1-8-15-M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 73-3401
IN RE: Esl of
I. SCHOENTHAL,
: i
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
MAKE APPLICATION FOR
DISTRIBUTION AND FINAL
DISCHARGE
NOTICE la herebj given thai we
have filed our Final Report and Pe-
titlon for Distribution and Final I
chargi Ci Rxecutora ol thi
of SIEGFRIED SCHOENTHAL, de-
i eased, and that on t!:e 2nd day ol
September, ll'TV will apply t" the
Honiirai.li' Circuit Judges .if Dadi
County, Florida, for approval of said
Final Report and for distribution and
final discharge a Co-Executors ol
the estate of the above-named ileee-
ii.nl. Tins 28th day of July, 1975.
HENRY NORTON
M IROOT WKII.ER
HENRY NORTON, Attorney
\' ion:, y for Estate
1201 Biscayne nuii.iinc
19 n .st Flagler street
Miami. Florida 33130
Phone: ."74-:;n
I I-S-18-M
your
NOTICE UND-ER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned desiring ti
in business under Hie fictitious I
\i LIED ''I CANING si:k\ ICE at
: 145 West 1th \-.. i ui tpartmi I
is to ret
1 thi Clerk { the ''ir-
cult i 'ou I County, Fli rlda.
RIi HARD Tl: NCHET I ll
HARVEY D Ri iGERS
Applicant
\ W I70i Avenue
Miami, Fa rlda 88125
8/1-8-15-22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-24301
NOTICE FOR FORECLOSURE
OF TWO MORTGAGES
SYLVESTER K MlKCMnll, SAM
MAMll a. RALP a PECRRINO.
MILTON KOSANOVICH and ELIZA-
BETH KOSANOVICH, his wife,
Plaintiffs,
CUTLER*': LAND DEVEX/>PMBNT
, ORPORATION. \ FLORIDA COR-
POR iTION and GEORGE J. K"SSl.
and NEIL STCDNICK
I ii ;', i dants,
TO: CE' IRGE J ROSSI
Ti k : Avenue
Weehawken, New Jersey
Yor ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing property in Dade County, Florida:
The South \ of the SE '. of the
SW '. ..f Sei I..... '' Township '6
South, Rangi 40 East, Dade Coun-
tj Florid i
llowlng property in Dade
Ci ui tj F m da :
Th, Soutl ', of the s\v ', of the
s\\ 11 ol >. ctlon 16, Township 56
South, Rai se i" Bast, Dade Coun-
ty, Fli
hat (tins! you and you
.,:-. required to serve a copy of your
written di fi .- -. If any, to It on
WIL1 1AM K CHESTER. Plaintiffs
ttorney dress Is 955 N.E
Roth Street, Miami. Florida on or be-
fove Sept md to file the i
i. this C ii 11 el-
,ii plaintiff's at-
ej or : mm< dlately thereafter;
ulI will be entered
-1 \. ii fo rellel demanded
pi i'on.
Thli I be i ubllahed i
I Wl -in
FLORIDIAN.
TNESS l ..1 of
la on this
2S ul! >7!i
RII HARD !' BRINKER
\- C i
rlda
Bj P COPE1 AND

Wl' MAM K CHESTER

'" \ i:
'-
B-15-SS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-855
In RE- Estatl of
GEi IRGE CIZIKE
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona Hav-
ing Claim/ or Demands Against Said
Estate:
TOO are hereby notified and requir-
nl to present any claims and de-
mands which you may have against
thi estati I GEORGE CIZIKE de-
ceased late of Dade County, Florida,
t., the Circuit Judgea of Dade County,
and file the same In duplicate and
as provided in Section 783 :,;. Florida
statutes, iii their offices In the Coun-
ty Courthouse In Dade County, Flor-
ida, withii lendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
the same u i'l be barn 'i
Filed at Miami. Florida, this L'Pth
da} of July, A i> 1975
JOHX KASTNER
Af administrator
First publication of this notice on
' '.i daj of ^ugui
I LD si! YERMAN, ESQ.
ni \ for Adminlatrator
berts Buililing
I
8'l-8
IN THE CIPCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOSEPH NESBITT
PROBATE NO. 75-4673
SARAH .- 'E1N.
di
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
I I
i Demands Aaralnat
'.lie:
> ou are hen fli and i auir-
, ,1 tci "ds
-
lute
I
i irlda
wlthii from
' -
Filed J
da) of July. A.D
HARR1
ii HAN
Fli pu "ri
llle |ut
SIIA1 C
"
8 1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEV ENTH JDICIAL CIRCUIT
-LORIDA iN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROB'.TE DIVISION
FRANK B. DOWLING
PROEATE NO. 75-4261
ll RE Esl
SAMl'EI. SCHWARTZ
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
VII !!' nil All Pi rsonsl
Hnvina; -i Aarainst
Said Estate:
Vou are hereby notified and requir-
ed to presi ms and demands
ii : i havi aeainst the ea
of SAMl'EI SCHWARTZ de-
eeased lati of Dadi intj Florida,
to the i 'Ircuit Judgi of iadi I lounty,
ami rile the sami In duplicate and as
it,,\ id. d in Section 783 I Florida,
Statutes, in thi In the t lounty
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or ih. sain, will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 24th
lav of July, A.P 1976.
FRANCES R. WENIG
HANNAH E DAVIDSON
As Executrices
First publication of this notice on
the 1st day of August, 1975.
ESTHER ii SCHIFF
Attorney f.,r Ex.. utriees 1
4"7 Line,,In Road
Miami Floirda 3313!*
8/1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
NO. 75-4726
In RE: Estate of
CELIA FRIEDMAN
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To ah Creditors and All Persons
Havlna Claims or Demands Asainst
Said Estate:
Y,,u are hereby notified and reciuir-
ed to present any claims and demands
which you mas havt aarainst the es-
tate of CELIA FRIEDMAN de-
ceased late of Dade County. Florida,,
to th. County Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733 16 Florida
Statutes, in theli offices In the County
Courthouse In bade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or ih, same u 111 be barred.
Filed ii Miami. Florida, this 2-lth
day of Juls A.D 1978
QEi IRGE FRIEDMAN
\- Exei utor
Flral nublii Btloi of tl .- notice on
the is! di y ol iifrust, 1975,
KWITNEY, KRi iP &
SCHE1NBERC P A
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Be h, Fla,
Attor Exi utor
512
8. 1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4503
In RE
HARRY EDW A!.PS
,|. .
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Oedll
Hnvina Clalme or Demands Against
IE
you re hen: t i Quir-
ed to presenl anv laim- i mands
h v, ti mas have aa a es-
tate of HARRT EDWARDS de-
, eas..! late of I >ade County, Florida,
to the i v-, u > Judgei of i 'ade County,
and flli thi same In dup Md aa
providi d In Section 733 16, Florida
statute-. In theli offices In the County
Courthouse In Dade County, Florida,
within four calendar months from
the time of the first publication here-
of, or th. same will be barred.
Filed at Miami, Florida, this C4th
day of July. A D 1978
RONALDSHAYNE
Ai i:\e.Utor
First Publication of this notice on
the 1st dav of August', 1975.
EUGENE LEMIJCH, ESQ.
Attorney for Executor
l'Tl'" Vt*. Flaglei Si Miami Fl. 33135
8/1 -S
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t,. engage
in business under the fictitious name
of "LATIN AMERICAN social
ill: INC SI ICIEDAD LATINO
AMERICAN 'I IP INC at 711 Bea-
rom Blvd Apt 18, Miami. Florida
Intends to register said name
With the Clerk nit Curt of
Dad. < nr,: \ Florida,
APE I. FA ALVAREZ
Til Beacom Blvd apt IS,
y, '135
8/1-8-13-23


Page 10-B
+Jewlst rkrkfian
Friday. August 8, 1975
bttuaries
Mrs. Max Shapiro
Passes After A
Long Illness
Phyllis Shapiro, wife of Rabbi
Max Shapiro, spiritual leader of
Beth Kodesh Congregation, died
Thursday, July 31. in National
Children's Cardiac Hospital af-
ter a long ill-
ness.
Mrs. Shapi-
ro, a 20-year-
resident of
Miami, was a
native of New
York City and
had been ac-
tive in many
community or-
g a n i zations.
She lived at
2451 Brickell'
Ave.
In addition to her husband,
Mrs. Shapiro is survived by two
sons. Robert Sackman and Don-
aid Sackman; a brother. Jos
Watson Holies; thrc; sisters,
Evelyn Elder, Ethel Spencer,
and Muriel Thompson and two
grandchildren.
Services were held Sunday at
Beth Kodesh Synagogue under
the direction of Gordon Funeral
Home. Interment followed in
Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Services Held
For Attorney
Alvin Sandier
Services were held Monday,
Aug. 4, for Alvin M. Sandier,
71, who died Sunday in Mount
Sinai Hospital.
An attorney, Mr. Sandier was
a native of Baltimore, Md., and
had been a resident of Miami
Beach for 40 years. He was a
nast Master of Southwest Lodge
No. 286. F&AM. and a member
of Mahi Shrine.
Survivors include Mr. Sand-
ler's wife. May, his son. Martin,
of Miami Shores; a brother,
Harold, of Long Beach, Calif.,
and two grandchildren.
Riverside Chapels were in
charge of the services. Inter-
ment was in Mount Nebo Ceme-
tery.
SCHEUER
BBl IE Bai
11 pi r Dr., i'... Harl or island,
lui Bui
\ \ : bj Ifi Tl -.!. daughter,
irrandchlldri n.
i: Ic Mi i
In i! Sen
hi Hanoi ix
pel, Interim nl follow cd In x. V.
VERSCHLEISER. Irving, of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
AITKI.. I'arl. Tl. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
BROOKS. Leon. 7. of Miami. Blas-
berg.
DIAL. Minnie. 75. of Miami Beach.
Riverside,
FAYANS. Leon, "f Miami Beach.
Riverside.
BERLIN, Irvine, "-. "f Miami.
Gordon.
FRIED. Samuel. 77. of Miami Beach.
Riverside,
OH'CKSTKRN. Gladys Wolfe. 52. of
Hollywood, Fla.. formerly of Miami.
Gordon.
HELLER, I., nore. SO, of Miami Reach.
Riverside. Interment Mt Nebo
Cemetery.
MANN. David, 7, of Miami. I.evitt.
RAND, Phillip. 87, of Miami.
Riverside. Interment Mt. Nebo
Cemetery,
REIZEN8TEIN, Loots, II, of Miami
Bench, Riverside
WHITEHoRN. William, 32, ..f Miami.
Qordon, Intermenl Mt. Nebo
C( metery.
WEINTRAl'B Fannie, 7t, of Miami
Beach. Riverside,
WOI FF, Sam, S!>, of Miami Beach.
Riverside
FIELD, David, S3, of Miami.
Riverside.
HECHT, Donna, B5, of Miami Gordon,
Interment Mt, Kejbo Cemetery.
MEYROW1TZ Sally, 77, of Miami
Beach Riverside.
SCH18SEL, Ida, i I S rth M iml
Beai h Rlvi rslde
BINDER, Esthi r, i of N rth Miami
! I : vlti
BIRKH v HN Sad 7 ol Bal llar-
i ur Rlvi Bide,
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Ser.ij!if ,'e,sh Co-"iun,t/ s.nee I US
ORTHODOX
CONSERVATIVE
__________REFORM SERVICES
EmjnufiGomon '1946) Ikt Gordon
Hj'ry Gordon (1964) ijmes 6 Gordon
_ Telephone 858-5566_____
PALMER'S
ilAMI MONUMENT COMPANY'!
fSSSONAUZED MEMORIALS
CUSTOM CRAFTED
IN OUR WORKSHOP
4444* 21 4444922
32T9 SW. 8th ST.. MIAMI
*-*a
Memorial Chanel
[emonai K^nape
"JEWISH fUNIKAl DiVfCTOtS"
$
LOCAL AND 'yj-r f)P ST/.Tl
ARRANGEMENTS
949-63; 5
133S* W. DIXIE HWY.. N.M.
IEGAL NOTICE
in the circuit court of the
Eleventh judic al circuit of
florida. in and for
dade county
probate division
prcbate no. 75-4577
FRANK B. DOWLiNG
In RE IN- f
(.'EM. ii.m "i ck ki n at
CEIJ HOPCHICK.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Cred!) All Persons
ii. \ Ins i 1 > mands Axalnsl
s. Id Estate:
You are herebi notified and reaulr-
rtd ti on nt anv i lalms and no-
mandu hlch vou mav 1 ilnst
the estati I i 'El1 H VPi HICK, also
as CEIL HorcnicK. deceas-
ed late of Uu< Sew York
to thi i ur Judari Ii I lounty
fill the -;inif in dunllcate and m
ied in s.. tlon 7II 16, Florida
Statutes, ,ri ili. in ihe cnun-
iv < 'ourl i.mi-1 In I i Counti Flor-
.: thli six months
i' hi im.....f the '" i "ui' Icatlon
: mi i III i" barred
Fill la. this i^th
.lav ol Julv, A I' IMS
FREDERICK ZEIGER. ESQ..
Mtomes lor Anclllan Pro. edlnra
! nf this ii"', Ice 'n
lU 75
ZEIGER .v ES< IS
n Proceedings
id, Suite .
i (331 rT7l


ItvrMC *Ll SO ST ATM
AMPU PAUkNtt IN THI KA1
aPOSUI .' '-I'ESBi
JU -..OUaiat
MM
865-2353
720 Seventy Rnf SlrI
fforfv c.: Mi
W) A' 4 gisiiationi oi llivicl
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAVE LAW
X' n i' i; is hereby (in en that
l lit- UIK I'o in
,i,i.:. .' ..i'
CITY BANK BI'll DING a i uml
city
i m Florida
tli. r the
Cou f I '"i Ida.
\KT / PERI.MA-W 'I'm:
SMITH. M Wl'l ER. SMITH,
PARKER S V. ERNER
attorney for Am licanl
': Mncoli 7-B
(Tel: 534-8271)
7 25 8 1-8-18
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring t" eni
in business under tin- fictitious name
ctlon Service, Inc.
IVi 19 H il i-'l.-i.
1 'Ii i : "In uii Court i I 1 >ade
County, Florida.
'
i .' ..lit
Robi rt I S ..
' a Kenln
: ell Avi Mia nl .
i| A] nl. ,.nt
When a loss occurs
away from home.
"'"HI
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
949-1656
13385 West D.xie H.ghway
kceioentad by S. Levitt, F.O.
In New York:
(212)263-7600
Queer* Blvd. & 76th Road
Forest Hillt,N.Y.
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
1 hei ; Bl'lLD-
i day
.
ii- H ness at MI-
Ih
......i the
\..i of In-
i under
I
(SI VI I tli'
' apltal, tiii--
daj "i Julv. i
HERS
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
R 7S
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
. 18 HEREBY GIVEN that
the u saga
under the fictitious name
port -Im-
Apt
No, "..Hi. Intends to
i tlio
i. County, Flertda,
RICARJ OAR" '
/1-l.tS.U
r.'Ji ICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
KOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring1 to engage
in business uinler the fictitious I
of FOREST ESTATES HOME8 at
J700 N B :''"!'i Bl Miami 33180 In-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida,
BEE Construction Corporation
1/1-1-15-22
LE6AL NOTKf
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
N( ''I ICE !.- i.i.i.i.i- ,..<.'
,, dersiKi
bu.-ni' .-s uii'l- r tl
' IMPORTS .ii 118 S.V
A\ Miami d
ivlth thi < !lei ol i Lin ult
i ,i ; ol i .. Ci unt>. Fl da.
Si l.\ EN......
7 1--
CIRCUIT COURT. 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 75-^5099
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JACK Wt H I]
Petltloni r-Hu '
vs.
MARTHA W< "'Ii.
Ri pondeni \\ Ife.
^ u, MARTHA
,. to servi B ipj ui
>u r to tbi
filed against you, u
i rney, GE" iRGE NICHI 'I AS, I
N W, 12th Avei ui iliami,
Ida
of Court on i
.V is,- iii. Petli ion ... ill fonfoi
\"U.
''...
RICHARD P
Wll.l IE liRADSH '
i lepul I .. : .
____________ 8
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(No Prcoertvl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 75-21390
IN :
: M IRRIAGE l IF
HEI EN \ VPOI 1TANO.
I 'etltloni i \\
inn.
FRANK NAPi H ITAXO,
Ri nv>ndi md
TO: PRANK NAPOLITANO
A vi ii-
Brooklyn. \'i
*OU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
'in! a Petition for : n of
Marrlaare has been filed asralnsl vou
and m>u are reaulred to i ,i copv
f \"in- written defi -. II am to
the Pi tition on the Pi tltl.....r H
attorneys, Mali
address Is 1401 Brli kell Avi m RU ,.
inn. Miami, k orid
AIIUUSI I
nal with the nrk "f the Ci urt
' before | oner/
vrife'i attorneys Mali And Bloom
ir Immediately then v j.^
i..uit will be held taalnst you
for the relief demanded in the Petl-
I'ATKU at Miami. IM.|,. Pountv.
Honda, ihlx lltli dav .,f .lu|\ 1.7S
i:ii-h ird P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Bv: U BARNARD
_ Deuutv Clerk
(Court Seal)
7/18-25 J/l-l
IEGAI NOTKE
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-22159
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
AKNII-FO TOMAS LAJES
and
ABEI.INA I.AZO I.AJKS
TO; ABEUNA UZn l-AJES
YOi; ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution "f your
MarriuKe has been filed and com-
menced In tliis court and vou are
rc ten defenses. If anv. to it on AL.-
BERT 1-. CARRICARTE. FA. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose address is
I4DI N.W. "th Street. .Miami. Florida.
BJtd tile the oriKinal with the Clerk
of the above styled court on or be-
fore AuailSt Tl. l>7i: otherwise a
di fault will be entered ajrainst you
for the relief prayed for In the com-
plaint or petition,
This notice shall be published once
each week lor four consecutive
\n THE JEW I8H FLORJDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
Said coin i at Miami Florida on this
iciii day of ,iuiv. .::."'.
RICHARD P BRINKER
a- i ;, i k, Cln nil "'"in t
Dade County. Florida
fcl> C I' Ci IRELAND
A I'H'UIV l
(Cln ml < '"U, i E
AL.Bfc.R1 L ARR1CARTE. 1' A.
Altoi i" v lor the busbaiid
S w 7th 8
;, i loner
in the circuit court of the
iith judicial Circuit, in and
for daqe county. florida
general jur..sdlc i ion division
NO. 75-2^851
NOTICE OF ACTION
ARTHUR LEE .mam El an i
ti i El.LA MAE MA.-.I i.,.. !.. ,..'...
Plaint II i.
\
HARRY T. CARVER, and
JANETTE M. CARVER, his wife.
Defendaiita.
Tt.>: Han y i Can er and
Janette M Carver, bis wife.
el al.
Reaidi nknown
YOI' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an actli n i" n move a i loud on
title '" thi following described oroD-
.-i iv in Dade i unty, Flond
Lot 10, Block i. rt 'l>.
aocordlna ;.' the Plat thereol re-
corded in P r.n-'i 7 of
the I'ubin Rei oi ds ol l >i di Coun-
ty, i-'ioi |i
has been I you and ]"u
a re i suulri 'i s "itr
\, rltten defei I ai to it on
SanMii I B Peai man, plaintiff
torney. whose address is 4**7 Lincoln
Road. Suite 7-K. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 1313!*. "'I ir betore the 82nd d iv
of August 1*78. and file the orlsjinnl
with the i 'Ii rk of ihli i "oui; either
ffs' atl
mmediateb thereaftei hi
., default ill i enter- I
for the relli f di manded In ih( "om-
i.i. mi
w ITNESS mv hand and thi seal or
this Ci uri on thi Htli daj of Ju \.
RICHARD P BR NKI'.U
A i- Cli nf thi Ci nr
B> M Ki IMINSKI
A I I I II \ Il I k
; 18-35 S 1-s
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4*00
JOHN R. BLANTON
In RE: Estate of
MORRIS ANISFKI.I)
Deceased,
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLORIDA;
TO ALL PERSONS INTEHESTICD
IN THE l-ZSTATE OF SAID
DECEDENT.
You are hereby notified that a writ-
t. n in-trument purporting to be the
last will anil testament of said dece-
dent has been admitted to probate in
said Court You are hereby command-
ed within six calendar months irom
the data of the first publication of
this notice to appear in saiil Court
anil show cause, if an) y"ii can, why
the action of said Court in admitting
sai'l >\ill to probate ,-houlil not stand
unrevoked
JOHN K. BLANTON
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P BRINKER. clerk
By H'H.I.IS I. LANGE
Deput] Clerk
AttorneyDi.....I M Kell
!:; Alnsley Building
Miami. Florida S3131
I-' I | nl;:. all. l, of thi tlci "1
thi -'. la: ol August,
.L'-:9
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HKKEB) :
the undei
mi i'ii- inder the I ame
Bl :. RESUME Si-.IA ICES at
E 67th si reet. Suite
Mi.in-. Beach. Intend
Clerk ol 11, ii. uit
- ui i of Daai nntv, Florida
11 I. 'i
I IM
.
NOTtCE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
d, desiring to ngage
ui..., i ilu f.. tltii us name
.. i I ...-.-ii Ave-
tch. Florida Intends to
the < "lent
< f the i III ult 'o,n t ..f bade ( uuntya
'
PIPO INC
n irton
'-' Bldg Miami
Attorne) for Applii ant
3/8-11 -22-11
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
in the circuit court of the
Eleventh judicial circuit
of florida. in and for
dade county
civil action no. 75-24779
action for d'ssolution
of marriage
in re the marriage of
i.'l.T- i AIX>NZ< '. '
Petitioner, /

D VLONZO, /
.......
TO: Maria D Alonso /
' ladwnj [
i: ml iir-i '.. NT
YOC ::' HEREBY NOTIFIED
i I i.. ioIuI f M r.
filed utall ll II and
py of
f any, to II *n
i \i<\.< IKR8( >N, BSD, ittorney
addi. -- le int
N.W. 12th Avei i ... mi.
' d file the oi (final
.1 the ..'.. -. 11 .1
. .an on or i" s.pt. il, .7-,;
then di fault ill hi en ten d
11 f the relief 1 l< 1
ni'-i: nil ..1 petition.
This hall be pu Itshed once
for 1..in -.. m, ,-ka
HE JEW isil |-|.i IR1DIAN
'VII at
' oui i Ml ml, Florida on thtg
of Julj 19
RICH VRD P BRINKER. '
, Circuit 1 1
Florida
ENBERO '
As Di :- Cl.-rk .'
n -...,. 1
GLAD UN ESQ '
' Boat :.....- Kosa, P A.) /
iV. 12th Avi 1
I Florida
Attorne; petll
I S-lS-22-lf
tor Istt Alpsi n.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
.NO PROPER!Y)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION r.'O. 75-24065
CEfifcRAL JURIbDICi ION DIVISION
act.on for Dissolution
of marriage
tHKlAUh. i'
r.
Pi
1 iTKO '. 8KT,
' v
17 : .. -
Baldwin, Nei rk
IRE IIERER1 NOT IED
1 ion for I ilui of '.
bi n fib 'i again' 1 u '
.
Pearti rney for
1 in I.in-
.1
.1 file thi 1 Iglnal
. 0111' on or bl I ml.. S, 1973!
rau entered
Ii.....led
in lit) n.
Tin i .
oh wi ..k for lour 1 i SCU lv
THE .IKV. IRIDIAN.
\\ 1 r\M sal o
sai'l ...urt at lorlda on this
lsi da] of Anguat, UTS
I!!- HARD P BRINKS
A Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade Countv, FI01
By 1 BARN MM-
A Denuty clerk
"11 Ult Court Seal 1
BAMCEL Ii PEARLMAN
' 7 I 11 .In Road. Suite 7-K
Miami Beach. Florida 3313!
Attorney for Petitioner
8/8-15-M-M


Friday, August 8, 1975
+Jewi$t Fhrkfiar,
Page 11-B
LEGAL NOTKI
LEGAL NOTKf
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTKf
NOTICE UNDER
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23406
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
UEXK.SE JACKSON,
Wife. Petitioner.
.ind-
JOSEPH WILLIAM JACKSON.
Hush." ml. I;. -,wui. n:
TO JOSEPH wn.l iam JACKSON
VIII- ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
Iwhosa addre 12230 N.W 7th DANIEL RETTER. attorney for Pe-
[Avenue. Miami. Florida, arid file the titioner. whose address Is sni Hade
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY QIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under Ilie fictitious name of
CONCEPT 2.....I (SPORTABLE8) at
1125 N.E 125th St.. North Miami.
Fla. nil. mis to register said name
with the Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
CONCEPT 200(1 N.V
HOHKHT liENIN. President
RICHARD KKot'l'
Kwitney, Kroop \- Schelnbera:
Suite 512, 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beai h
.. o ... .-. VWr
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-11669
.iiuin.il with the clerk Of the above
i .i court on or before vugust 22.
j' 75 tered against VOU fof the relief dt-
t d I] th.....momlnt or netltlon
This not'ee shall be published once
tn.'i. week for four roneccutlve weeks
i HE JEWISH FLoRiDIAN.
Federal Building. i"i Easi Flasrler
Street. .Miami. Florida MU1. and file
tin original wl'h the clerk "f the
above styled court on or before Aug.
29, 1975: otherwise a default Will he
. ntered aaainal vou for lb* relief de-
manded in the comnlalnt or netltlon.
This iii.in shall lie BUbllshed once
WITNESS niv hand and the seal of each n*eek for four- consecutive weeks
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-6169
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAMES l- WADDBLL.
Petitioner Husband.
MARGARET 11. WAl'DEI.L
Respondent. Wife
TO -l A R11A ET .j. Wt> DO El .1, ,
VOT' ARE HEIfERY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
r-;ie. has i.....n filed against yni and thai an action for Dissolution of Mar-
in u are reouired to serve a enpv of ring.- lias been filed against vou and
[\. .: written defences. If any, to It on you are reOUlrod to serve a OODV of
JAMES 1. HADDELL. Petitioner your wrlMen defnses. If any to It on GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
ROTH.MAN HOMES. INC.
a Florida con oration
Plaintiff.
REG IN A POOL HOMES. INC.. a
FloiIda corporation, Ml 'KRIS
LEONARD HERMAN, individually
et al..
I lef.-nd.uils
TO: MELVIN G. DODSON. M.D.
I.......Coral Reef Drive
Miami. Florida
THOMAS I-EROFX
5. Dixie Hwv.
Miami. Florida
MARILYN I.EROTX
17430 s Dixie Hwv,
Miami. Florida
TOC. AND EACH OF VOT". ARE
NOTIFIED th.it an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following
nroDertj In Dade Countv. Florida:
lx>t IK. Block ::. and Lots l. B. 7.
s. : and i". Block 5 SLACHTER
SI BDIVISION ,i- recorded in Plat
Book 68, Page 92 of the Public
Records of Dade Countv. Florida-
has been filed against you and tou
are reouired to serve a cqdst of vour
written del.uses, it anv. to it on
Myers. Kadmui. Levlnaon & Kenln,
attention, r.'dw in M. Gmsburg. Es.i .
Plaintiff's attorneys whoso address
is Suite 700. 1418 Rriokell Avenue.
Miami. F.orida 33131. Dhone number
(305) 371-9041. on or before August
22. in?"., and file the original with
the clerk ol tins court either before
servici on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediate!} thereafter: otherwise a de.
fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS mv hand and seal of this
Court on Julv 17th. 1975.
Klt'HAI'.D P HRINKEK.
as Ol. rk of the i 'ourt
Bv: N A HBWETT
Dcduiv flerk
7'25 R'l-X-15
k ,i ourl Miann Florida on this
l>th dav of Julv. !!'7r.
RICHARD P BR'NKBR.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
11,nl C untv Florida
B\ N HOI l.V
\s i >eoutv Clerk
... i ...... Real)
- | W \DDEI.T.
.' v w 7**1 A venue
hjaml Florida
p -loner
7 'JB 8'1-8-16
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNO PROPERTY)
In the circuit court of the
Eleventh judicial circuit of
florida. in and for
dade countv
civil action no 75-,1105
action for dissolution
of marriage
,-,.; -ruv \| \ I'm \.;j.; OF
I-- \ EMILIA COBt IS.
>REV70 i' I :< 18.
I opRVZO i-opns
i R, -!'..-. c..'-no\en)
lOi" ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
......it f. Dissolution of Mar-
i.,- been filed against vouB and
e ', fitllr.,'l *o ., ...o\ of
i.- \.-'M.>. di-f.......-. if anv. to 1" on
-i. i pfti'O POSTCHIN. attorney
i\.....ne-. n hose addresi is lai
XV "h Avenue. Miami '"
ft'e the original with the clerk of
I ,.V'- stv'ed eou-t on or hfore
T-t N. i^7r.: otherwise a default
h< ne"d against von for th
<' demanded In the comnlalnl or
lit ion
fhi" notice >aTI h* nnblKhed onoe
hh n '' k fo- f^nr eonseeu'lve weeks
|~tir- ipwiSII F'OR'DIAN
,'ITNKSS mv hand and the seal of
..i-t .' M'.itv. Florida on this
(lav of Julv. ' HH"HARD P BR'VKER.
A n-ri<. C Dad C.untv. F'orida
Bv D W*PK
As Denutv Clerk
|-eu*t Pour* ^*it>
\V KR^'O SOS^CHIN. ESQl'IRB
N W 12th Avenue
nl FL 821JI 1824-4555)
Attornev for Petitioner
7/H SI-8-18
In THE JENVISH FI/>RIDIAN
WITNES8 my hand and th. seal of
aid oourl al Miami. Florida on this
21st dav of Julv. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Al 'lei k. Cin uit C'lirt
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B .! FI Y
As Denutv Clerk
fClrcuit Court Seal
DANIEL RETTER. ESOI'IPE
H'l Fast Flagler Street No. Sl
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: 358
Attornev for Petitioner
7 25 s 1-8-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of THE
11TH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-??987
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
' IERAI h T FTMAN..
Petitioner.
and
OAYLE J. FTMAN.
Resnondenl
TO: OAYLE J FTMAN
108 Mllford str. .-t
Medwav, Massachusetts
TOP ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage ha* been filed against VOU and
Vou are rt OUircd to serve a COOT of
vour written defenses to It. if anv vou
have, on V RORFT OARI ISLE. aT-
lornev for the P-titloner. at his
sddresa: ''9!* Alhambra Circle. CAral
Gables. Florida. 33134. on or before
.,., -i/th anv of Aug.. 1975. ana me
the original with the Clerk of this
Court, either before servile on Peti-
tioner's attornev. or immediately
thereafter: otherwise, a default will
be .ntered aeainst vou for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
VS ITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on Julv 17. 107:.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
an Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv: L. S DePlETRO
Denutv Clerk
7 '25 8. 1-8-1R
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
|TH JUOIC'AL CIRCUIT IN AND
fOB DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
tNERAI. JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 7S.23346
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
RE:
|e Marriage of
cti ijjto CI'BEI A.
Pi titioner Husband.
lit A UF1NTANA OI.'BELA.
I:. ;,, ndeni fWlfe
7-OP A OFINTANA CCHKI^
Lorraine t"6
SnntiRgn D Cuba
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23401
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION tmoner. whose
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23410
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN UK: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN PAI'I, aka ANTEI/YT
LAFI.EPR.
Husband. Petitioner,
ajid
SARA ALCIME I.AFLEITR.
Wife. Resnondent.
TO: SARA A LOME LAFLEfJR
YOF ABE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reouired to serve a CODV of
vour written defenses, if any. to It oa
DANIEL RETTER. attorney for Pe-
IN RE: THE MARRIAOF. OF
MARIE SA1NTERCILE POINVII.
SIMON
Wife. Petitioner,
and
JEAN SIMON.
Husband. Resnondent.
TO: JEAN SIMON
Federal Building. 11 Ea*t Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
abr ra stvled court on or before Aur
39. 197.1: otherwise a default will he
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the comnlalnt or netltlon
This notice shall be Published once
YOF ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED ,h week for four consecutive weeks
that an action for Dissolution of Mar- ( THE JEWISH FI.DRID1AN
rtage has been filed against vou and
vou are reouired to serve a COOT of
vour written defenses, if anv. to it on
of.' ZOI1.A OFINTANA CFBELA. DANIEL RETTER. attornev for Pe-
herebv notified U) fiie vour de- titioner. whose address Is H01 Dade
I v. pleadings to this suit for dls- Federal Ruildlng. 1"1 East 1-lacier
Hen of marriaee with the Clerk of Street. Miami. Florida 3313' and fil.
Court, and serve a conv on the the original with the clerk of the
above stvled court on or before Aug.
_".*. 1975: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the eomnlaint or Petition,
This notice shall be published once Miami. Florida 33131
RCh week for four consecutive weeks Phone: I58-C09A
t n is Attornev. DAVID A.
fSSEl I of Mi. law firm of MIL-
IP AVI* I'l'SS':' L. 140S Ainslev
lilding. Miami. Florida 3313:. on or
|re ;>-e -.'9th dav of August. 1975.
default will be entered againxt
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
Mltf court at Miami. Florida on this
tlH da\ of Juh. 1975
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Cunt v. F1--rida
Bv II J FOV
As Denutv Clerk
(I "in uit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESOFIRB
S01 Dade Federal Building
ini East Flagler Street
hATED JFLY 21. 197'.
L'CHARD P. BRINKER.
\- ..-' ,.f the C'rrolt '".-urt
i'\ NED ROSENBERG
Denutv Clerk
Ircuit Court Seal)
7 28 S'l-8-IS
in THE JEWISH FiniCDlAN.
WITNESS mv band and the seal of
laid .ourt at Miami. Florida on this
List dav of Julv. 1975
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad.- C mti'v ,:""-tda
Bv B J. FOY
As Denutv Clerk
fClrcuJI Court Seal)
r. .......I P17TTRR. ESOPIRE
801 Dade Federal Building
mi Eust Flagler Street
Miam'. Florida 33*31
AUoraet for Petitioner
7'25 8/1-3-15
Attorne\ for Petitioner
(t'l-S-m
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICiAl CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVSION
PROBATE NO. 744864
IN RF ESTATE OF
MAX WEITZ.
Pec-.-''
NOTICE OF PROBATE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
NO. 75-33159
G J O
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
RF The Ma-riaee of
LAl'RA SCHI.IFX1ER. Pulitloner
and
VAYNE B SCHI.IFC.EIt.
R*.snnndent
O: Wavne E. Sehlieeer
809 Kut.1 Avenu*
Belvedere I!"nol fiinn8
. >'F ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
I' t a netltlon for Dissolution of THE STATF OF Ft OR DA:
rmnienced In this court and vi-u are ty Tiip; ESTATE OF SAID
enutred to serve a conv of vour writ- DECEDENT
en rte'nses >t anv. to It on W'll.- You are herehv notified that a writ- Federal Biilldlne-. ini pj^at P'if'r
IAM K niESTER attornev for Pi- ten Instrument nurnortlne to he the Street. M'aml. Florida 33131. and file
Ution,.-, whose address Is 955 N E |si will and tsetament of said dece- the original with the clerk of the
"'th Street Miami. Florida rtrtlSS and dent has been admitted to nmhate in ahov. styled court on or before Aug.
' tin : ,1 with the nlerk of the ... ..i Court Vou are hereby command- 29 1975: otherwise a default "-oi he
il. vi sty'ed court on or before Aug- ed w'thin six calendar months, froro entered agains* vou for the relief rte-
Pl I97S: ..tberwi-e a default will ih,. date of the first publication of mnnrted In the onmn'auit or nottmn
I e entered aralnst yoU for the relief this notice to amaar in said Court This notice -hall he Published once
1 ayad for in the comDialnt or oeti- and show cause, if anv vou can. whv
t O" the action of said Court In admit tin*
This notice shall be mudtshed once s..,irl w'l' to probate should not stand
each week for four consecnttve weeks unrevnked
in Ti'p .t^visH FIOR1D1AN JOHN R. BI-ANTON
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of Cl-tilt Co.iet i-c~p
sa'd NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
C'VIt ACTION NO 75-??3'r
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
ptr ma BPiA^e
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RF THE MAPRIAOW OF
DA.VK MAT'O' I RFOZ1.
Husband. Petitioner
-i..rf
MM c\RtTA IOSEFA NAVARRO
MORENO RTTOZt.
Wif>. Resnondent
TO: MARGARITA JOSEFA
NAVARPO VOPICVO RVOZI
Av Ro'et Fd Pnmiimilo-
Santo Monica. Caracas. Vans,
YOF ABE HEREBT NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou .are reoi|ir*.d to se-ve a copy nf
s-our w-ltteo defepses. If any. to R on
DANIEL RFTTER. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is S01 Dade
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4694
In RE: Estate of
HARRY BAKER
lb eased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Peraons llav-
Said
ins Claims Of L'etti.Uids Aamsl
Estate:
are hereby notlifedi and re-
lo jnese'il anv (kuhrs and de-
wnfen you may have^ against
You
quit ill i.
mantle
the .-tat. of HARRY BAKER
deceased latt ol Dade ".-utitv. Florida,
to the circuit Judges ..f Dade CountTi
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided In Section 733. IS, Florida
Statutes, In their office! in the Coun-
t) Courthouse In Dade Countv, Flor
Ida, within four call ndar months from
the nine of the "i-i publication bary-
r il -.ime win be barred
Filed al M i,i nn. Florida ibis .loth
da} Of Julv. AD. 1975.
M \i:y m. DKYTBR
As Executrix
First publication of this notice on
the s'h ,u,\ of August. I97J.
STAXI EY M PRED
Atti i v for Bx .in- :\
PRED AND NEWMAN
Suit. 808 |110 lit ii kell Av...,
Miami. Fla, 88181 1377-02881
* 8-11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4231
In RE. Estate of
ANTHONY C. Dl CARLO
.' i se NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
ing Claims or Demands Against Said
Batata:
You are herehv notiifed and re-
quired to present any claims and de-
mands which vou mai have against
the estate of ANTHONY C Dl Carlo
deceased late of Dade County, Florida,
to the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and file the same in duplicate and as
provided in Section 733.16, Florida
Statutes, in their offices Id the Coun-
ty Courthouse in Dade County, Flor-
ida, within four calendar months from
the time Of the first publication here-
of, or the sam.- will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 1st
dav of August. AD 1!'7".
JOSEPHINE Di CARLO
As Executrix
First publication of this- notice on
the sth dav of August. 1*7".
MORRIS COHENMS-Mlf
Attorney for Executrix
HiSnn N E 19th Avenue
North Miami Peach. FI 881*2
6 8-11
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
' h. VERNON RAI-
NET TRUCKTNG. INC. was on the
25th day of November. 1974. incor-
porated under the laws of Hh- State
of Florida, with Its principal place of
business at Miami (Dade County)
Florida.
I further certify that the above cot -
poratlon filed in this office on the
7th day of July. 1975. Notice of in-
tent to Voluntarily Dissolve under
Section 608.27. Florida statutes
. ... uttt iu> Hand and the
"ir.al Seal of the State of Florida.
at Tallahassee, the Capital, this
the 7th day of Julv. 1975.
BRUCE A SMATHERS
Sec-etarv of Slate
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
R B 7!
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
I hereby certify that J M PLASTER-
ING, INC. was on the ::ntli daj of
October, iii7L'. Incorporated under the
laws oi the State of Florida, with its
principal place of business nl Miami
i Dad. County) Florida.
i further certify thai the above cor
poratlon filed in this office on the
7th da] of July, 1975, Notl *of In-
leni to Voluntarili Dlesotylj under
Section R08.27, Florida statutes
GIVEN under m\ li.i i.d Sand the
flrwt Seal ul ill. S'aV. ol Florida.
ai Tallahassi Ihi i ap tal, this
the 7th day of Julv. 1975
BRUCE A s.M aTHERS
s i | \ i s
PRELIMINARY CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-21671
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVIS'ON
NOTICE OF PUBLICCTON
BARTON SAVINGS AND
I i lAN VSS< 'CIATION.
Plaintiff.
VS
Mi iRTIMER II WILLIAMS
and .myrtle WILLIAMS
wife, and FARMERS RANK OF THE
'! ATE OF DELAWARE.
Del. adapts
T< >: Farmi Lank of the
Sla I. Of i "
10th and Market Stt
Wilminiri. 'ii I lelfl W
I'Ol" ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
,i -id' to fore lose mortgage against
real and personal Pioi.erU lias been
filed igalnsl n..u In tbe above Court
by the Plaintiff
The oropert) sought bi turecloa-
ad is as follows:
Beginning at h notnl IW.21 feet
Xorihwardlv of and Hi:' feel U'eat-
wardly of th. Southeast corner of
the \E', of the s\v, of the sw>i
of the Si:1. S. tion 34. Township
52 South. Ratine 41 Blast: tli-nce
Southwardly parallel t.. the West-
erly line ..! the SE', of Section 34.
aforesaid a distance of 14' !0 feet;
thence We-twardlv along a line
parallel to and 25 feel measured
North" .ii dtv al right amrles from
the Southerly line of the ne1. of
the sw, of the s\\ !, or the SEW
of Section 14, aforesaid a dMtaace
of 7,", feet: thence Northwardly
along a line parallel to the West-
erly II.....f the si'1, of Section
III. aforesaid a distance of 141 2i
feet: thence EaatwardH a distance
of 7.'. feat to the. point of begin-
ning. The above described land be-
ing also known as Lot I* Of cer-
tain unrecorded plat entitled GC-
DRIAN SUBDIVISION.
AND ALSO
The West ":! feet of the East
llil'MS feet ot ihe South 11.^1 feet
of the N'i of the SW; 'of the
SWV of the SEW. less the South
_T, feet of Section :I4. Township .S2
South. Range 41 East, the above
described land also being known
as the West Tvt feel of Lot 1 of a
certain unr. corded plat entitled
CFDRIAN SIHDIVISION.
YOF ARE REOHIRED t" serve a
copy of vour answer or oth-r plead-
ing on Plaintiffs attorney. Malcolm
H Friedman. KOti Douglas Road.
Coral Cables. Florida 33134. and file
the original In the office of The Clerk
of the above Court, on or before the
lath dav of AUKUel 1975. in default of
which the comnlalnt will be taken as
coniessi d adinst you for the rebel
reouested in Plaintiff's Complaint and
Pleadings.
Bated ibis 7th da\ of Julv. 1976
RICHARD P. BRINKER ,._
Cl KKK OF THE CIKC1 IT CO! RT
OF |W\DE COFNTY. FLORIDA
Bv I. BARNARD
Denutv (Terk
7 i*-:S 8/1-8
NOTICE UWDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE |g HEIU>:i thi- undersigned, auslrlng to engage
in bus mss under th. fictitious name
of POTS \ KNOTS at '.171 S.W 79lli
Street. Sou ii Miami. Fla 33141 intend
to reglrter said name with the fTerk
ol th. cm Lit Courl of Bade Countv.
Florlds
K HEATHER MO I t\'S
RfiVA D HERMAN
BL-TSTEIN .- MOLANS
Attorneys for K Heather Molana
..nl l: VS D Hi -man
.1 I. Pot" N Knots
7 18-25 I l-s
19th dav rf Jot v. 197S
RICHARD P. BRINK EH.
A r^'erk. Clrcu't C"trt
Dade C-untv. >"U>rlda
Bv B J. POT
'D*ou,y Clerk
*'LI. IAM K OHKSTEH
ev tr~ petitioner
155 N E Rnth Street
Miami, Florida 3.1128
7/2S
By COBNELI. POHINSON
Ditv Clerk
fjOWIS H STA I.I.MAN
Attornev
4*7 Lincoln Road
.Mlam' Beach. Florida J3139
Blr^t puhlloation of llils netlce- on Miami. FloriC* MTCH
th 25th dav rf Julv. l!>7.r. Phone S&8-*epr.
7/25 8/1-8-1B Attornev for Petitioner
8/1-S-15 (Circuit Court Seal) -5
i-ach week ti.' f^ir cs,.,!'**.. weeks
In THUJ JEWISH FIORIDIAN
WITNESS nn- hand anil the seal of
said court at Miami Florida on this
27sl dav -' .Ill'v. 107"
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad- C- uptv F'orida
rv n T pr>Y
As Denutv Clerk
rC'-.u't Coir' S<-aD
P. 901 nan> Pette-al Pui'dlng
101 East Flagler treet
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL C'RCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVIS'ON
J. OWVNN PARKER
PROBATE NO. (5-4708
In RK: Estate of
MORRIS HIRSCH
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and AH Persons
H.nini: Claims or Demands Against
Skid Estate: ,
You are herehV notified and reouir-
ed to nresenl anv claims and demands
which vou ma ha\. against the es-
,.,,,. f mo"'"S HIRSCH di-
, ,..IM, .. 1,1, nf v-..l. Comity. Florida.
t.i the Circuit Judges of Dade County,
and rib the s..mc in rlu"'ioate and as
provided In Seettan 7" 'K. Florida
Statutes. In their offices In the County
Courtkouse In Dade County, Florida.
within foir calendar nynthe- from
IhM tint, of the first publication here-
of, or tin sam. will be barred
Filed at Mlsmi, t-"orida, this L'4th
dav of J..v D I97S
DANIEL M HIRSCH
As Execute*
First publicat'on of tbl notice on
ihe 1st .!.i\ of August. VblZ.
CYFE.V ,v MB1 INS
attorneys for Executor
S?.r> Arthur Codfrev Ro.d.
Miami Heach. Florida ISM*
8/1-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
UK rLOHIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
JOHN R BLANTON
PROBATE NO. 75-4800
In RE: Estate of
MORRIS AN1SFELP
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To mi c.-ditor- and All Persons Hay-
ing r* Estate:
You are hereby notiifed and re-
ouired to present ari' claims and OB"
m mil- which : "ii may have against
the .slat, of MORRIS ANISFELD
deceased late nf Dade County. Florida,
t. ihe ''ircuit Judges of Dade County.
..ml file the same In duplicate and as
provided In Section 713 1f>. Florida
Statutes, m their offices In the Coun-
tv Cotirthou.se in Dade County. Flor-
id, i. within four calendar months from
the urn- of the first publication here-
of or the same will be barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, this
dav of Aumist. A D 1975
SIDNEY EFRONSON
As Executor
Flrt publication of th'- ItOtlCI
th.- dav of Aiurust. 1975.
DANIEL M KEII.
Attorney for Estate of
Morris Anlsfeld
612 Ainslev Pudding. Miami. Fla 331.12
S IS
1st
ce on
8/1-8-11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
ihe undi "ikne'1. desiring to engage In
bualness -ind. -he fictitious name of
JiAN.N" THE BEST at 114") S.W.
:'7th Avenue. No 104. Miami. F'a.. In-
tends to recister sa'd name with the
Clork of Ihe Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. F'orida
MANTEL. HE1 REPA
. 18-25 8/1-8
NOTICE UNDER f-ICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in hu-iness utoler the fictitious name
of CANTON and CANTON OV WEST-
CHFSTFR at number 2501 S \V >-7th
Avenue, in the citv of Miami. Florida,
intends to register the said name
w'th the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade CountV. Florida
Pat.d at V'sml. Florida, thjs L'lst
dav of Julv. IfTH
ANTHONY LEY CHU
7 _'-, | 1-8-15
NOT'CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS IIEREWY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in Knunaasa mwmr the fictitious name
of PWVF'A. IMPORT A EXPORT.
1VC OF MIAMI at Hotel McAllister
A read. S"i'> We -'. 311 East Flagler
St Miami Fla 13132 intends to reg-
ister -a'd num. with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dad* County, Florida.
l.AZARO AI.HO President
Hotel Mrallister Arcade. No. 20
311 Fast Flagler Bt, Miami. Fla 33132
8/1-8-15-22


Page 12-B
JMftlfhrtdkHJ
Friday Augusts
Ut
Be
Tr
Cb
Mi
SO.
ale
Wi
Ev
an-
gr.
FOOD
FAIR
OUR BUYERS 'KNOW THEIR ONIONS'
AND THEIR MELONS TOO!
Thok years of experience in "Shopping for illlHUHIl of forks like yourse* bos mode
thorn tho top notch authority on fro$h Fruit$ and Vegetables, liko tho molons boing
featured this week,In ovory dopartmont, whothor it is moat, dairy products, cannod
goods, or whatever... tho Food Fair buyer "Knows his onions" and buys the best for you.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURS. THRU WED. AUGUST Uth AT ALL FOOD FAIR STORES. EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MARKETS
_ SUPERMARKET
\4 AND J^J I CUT UP IftifV
hVI 'full of juice I W id I m\ / _____
LB- k/ ----------^ej 5SI2E
______I RICH IN
GRADED U.S. NO. 1 FANCY HIGHLY FLESHED ^^ | & ^H V ^ COLOR
Cantaloupes 2 89 |ii--^w,TOTHERPU'f^^H *TASTE
GR A DID U.S. NO. 1 FAVORITE FOR FLAVOR _
Yellow Onions ss.""".............i.. 25
CALIFORNIA RASCAL GRADED U.S. NO. I lADtW' NATUiAl GDNt" E '"' JL l|jC
Celery Hearts "XT___2 '. 48* Solad Size Tomatoes O SU JEW
graded u.s.NO.Itof-s in vitamin a. -- DEL MONTE EASY TO DIGEST
^S^nt128e Colden Ripe Bananas 15 u
CREAMED
Cottage Cheese
LIGHT N LIVELY M LOW IN FAT ia O* I2-OZ. | CUP
ORDEN 5 COLORED (CHilSI FOOD)
American Singles.............88f 89*
P.P. RRAND Mlk*
Cream Cheese.................:..8K 43
ALL FLAVORS _
Borden's Yogurt...........3 ift 87*
Soft Margarine
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 36
Ssstfsss
n59
..A WTH OTHER FURCHASES
BONUS SPECIAL! SAVE 36*
MRS. FILBERTS
2-8-OZ. CUPS
KAHN'S
59
1-LB.
PKG.
Sandwich Spread & 39*
ACMI CRIAMID OR -.
Wine Herring Tidbits.......*S 89*
Meal or Beef Franks
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
32-OZ.
BOTTLE
89
C HEAVY
DUTY
HA. O* SHIPPED GRADI A FRESM KID -OBX M^
Fryer Parts ."
99''
i WHOLE RREAST WITH RIBS WHOLE LEGS
THIGHS OR DRUMSTICKS
NUTRITIOUS
Sliced
Beef Liver
LIMIT ONE ITL, PLEASE. WITH OTHER FURCHASES
Of $7.50 OR MORE.EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
BOMUS
-ON 2
, CANS
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT.
AVAUAIll ONIT AT IfOtll HAVING SllviCI COUNIW
All MIA! AND CMIIil tUCID 'O OlDft_____
NOVA SALMON
HYGRADE'S
'BALL PARK'
*1
25
OR KNOCKS
1-LB. PKG.
DELICIOUS FROZEN FOODS
SO EASY TO FIX ANYTIME!
POUND CAKE
eipe >Bieml i
OR LOX
FRESHLY
SMOKED
$1
Aa** QUARTER
29
SLICED
STOUFFER'S
FROZEN
89
OTHER PURCHASE
nvt-oz.
PKG.
POTATO KINO SHOESTRING STYLE
Frozen Potatoes 4% & 79*
TROPHY FROZEN _
Sliced Strawberries 3 ;^sz $1
f y ne tMW
OF W Sff
WITH TOMATO SAUCE
Heinz Beans
WONDERFUL BAKED GOODS!
MAOf WITH PLJRI VlCIIABll SHORIINING
Cream Coffee Cake
BAVARIAN
FRESH SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
AVAHAb.f A- SIOIIS AHM SIVlll COUNT!"*
FINEST
FLAVOR
BORDEN'S
16-OZ.
CAN
FLORIDA CAUGHT
Mackerel.
ii.
55
Magnolia Milk
40-OZ.S111
. CAN
1
CHICKEN OF THE SEA CHUNK
Light Tuna
14-OZ
CAN
CHIF lOY-AR DIE
(lirtnorc 'vou iaiaona
Ml IIII CIS SPARMfTTI W/MiAT tAUt .,
P.P. RRAND
Tomato Juice....................f 59*
DELICIOUS
Quaker Quick Grits.........% 79*
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UM.T OUANT.T.ES. AU CLERICAL, TYFOGRAFH.C. FHOTOORAFH.C AND Ft.NT.NG ERRORS ARE SUWECT TO CORREOK3N. H
6',-OZ.
CAN


Full Text
t-iday, August 8, 1975
+Jmfst> IHhridHain
Page 15-A
See War More Likely This Year Israel Faces Week
Continued from Page 1-A
THAT GLOOMY scenario,
| h by no means shared by
I; Israelis, is based on bov'i
Ji'.itary and political develop-
(ents of the past year. A year
, Israeli military circles
jint out, Egypt and Syria were
an adverse position owing to
|e severe losses they suffered
Yom Kippur War.
I But since July, 1974, the stat-
ion has changed. The Egyo-
Ln ar.d Syrian forces have
I: : ^equipped to their pre-
Kippur War strength, and
ru in fact, may be even
1 r militarily than in Oc-
)?:. 1973, the military circles
rt^ermore. they point out,
le the political situation was
scure a year ago, the Arabs
hy are increasingly blunt in
tr statements and their talk
iv is openly of a new war
few than peace.
>RESIDENT ANWAR Sadat of
pt has declared publicly that
ice with Israel is not attain-
in this generation. He made
e remarks despite the on-
|:_: negotiations for a Sinai
tl >ment, and thev echoed the
bsummit meeting at Rabat,
I >, last October when the
b summit meeting at Rabat,
jstine Liberation Organiza-
the status of reoresentative
spokesman for the Palestin-
oeople.
fc'hat the Arabs want, these
|eli circles say. is peace with-
nejotiations and without
essiona on their part.
ev want Israel back to its
, 1967, lines and not an
tess and would then start
lating demands on behalf of
Palestinians. In short, they
the conditions of the 1974
Rabat summit remain operative
no neaotiations. no recogni-
tion ?ni no oeace with Israel.
THERE CAN be no progress
toward peace, the Israelis say,
while the Arabs constantly es-
calate their economic and po-
litical warfare against Israel in
the form of the boycott, the oil
weapon and attempts to oust Is-
rael from the United Nations.
Assessing the immediate mili-
tary situation, Israeli circles
concede that there have been no
overt violations by the Egyp-
tians of the January. 1974, dis-
engagement agreement. To the
best of Israel's knowledge, the
Egyptians have not advanced
anti-aircraft missile batteries in-
to the limited forces zone west
of the Suez Canal or on the
eastern banks of the canal.
But they have prenared sites
for such batteries on both banks
of the waterway and Israel re-
gards this as a violation of the
disengagement terms.
SIMILARLY, Israel has no in-
formation that the Soviet MIG-
25 jets, flown by Russian pilots,
have been withdrawn from
Egypt. The MIG-25s were sta-
tioned in Egypt before the Yom
Kippur War and flew reconnais-
sance missions over Israel-held
territory.
According to direct Israeli ob-
servation, Egypt's army, navy
and air force were placed on a
state of alert two weeks ago
when Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmv announced that
his government would not agree
to extend the UNEF mandate
which expired July 24.
(This was confirmed by
President Sadat in Khartoum
when he said that Egypt's arm-
ed forces were in full mobiliza-
tion and under 24 hour alert. He
told a press conference in the
Israel Rolls Out Carpet
For Mexico's Echeverria
pkntinued irom Page 1-A
(Mexican ethos, say observ-
(oi Mexican politics.)
WILL argue, too. against
acquisition of territory by
ia cardinal and con-
plank of Mexican po-
philosophy.
lexico itself had vast areas
fertile land taken by force
l"i- US. (California. Texas,
Mexico), and partly as a
0! that it firmly opnose?
nomena in other parts
fl world.
Lit beyond the differences of
which Israeli diplomats
rs who know him wsU
I sincerely held on Eche-
[ rt, the Mexican leaJ-
considored here to b: a
i ad of Is-ael and :'
' 'wIp n^ a frin- ani
1 admirer of the social, tech-
i il and agricultural de-
} t of the Jewish State.
I RING HJS vi3it, he was to
[hown sites of scientific and
-st around the coun-
.11 as holding exten-
["olitical tal^s with Pre-r.ier
l ani other top ministers.
#ill snend Saturday as Al-
' on Kibbutz Ginossar
he and Maria have ottjn
1 -it i-eM in th kibbutz
Jocio-agricultural f-ame-
1 an 1 will hold a closing
s conference together with
' sra Sun Jay.
The Echeverrias were to
bring with them an entourage
of 180 persons, flying in two
special jets.
They include Foreign Min-
ister Emilios Rabasso and Mrs.
Rabasso, several deputy min-
isters and officials, adminis-
trative personnel and newsmen.
~\*
Sudan capital that "The time we
fel that diplomatic -ffo-ts are
of no use. we will have nothing
lft before us but to prepare
for another battle." Sadat said
Is-ael had no option but to with-
draw totally from ocfiumed Ara
territories and restore th" >eiti-
mate rights of the Palestinian
peonle.)
THE EGYPTIANS subseount-
ly reversed themselves on UNEF
but Israeli security circles are
convinced that had UNEF been
forced to withdraw, clashes be-
tween Israeli and Egyptian forc-
es would have been inevitable.
Each side would have at-
tempted to seize as much as pos-
sible of the buffer zone evacu-
ated by the UN forces.
That immediate crisis has
been resolved, temporarily, but
it is the opinion not only of Is-
rael but of the Security Council
that the tension will be renewed
on an even more dangerous
scale as the new UNEF dead-
line of Oct. 24 approaches.
Should the UNEF mandate be
terminated then, Israeli H^dcs
fear a replay of the 1969-70 war
of attrition between Israel and
Egypt on an even more inten-
sive scale as each side would
trv to prevent the other from
gaining the initiative.
WITH REGARD to Israel's
other neighbors, observers not-
ed th*t there were no shrns of
a military alert in Saudi Arabia,
Svria or Jordan H'i~ng the re-
cent c->sis over UNEF.
The Jordanians. nvertheless,
are continuing to b'."'d ']" f1""-
fortifications on a line facing
Israel nnd wn,,ld doubtlessly
use them as the jumping off
point for an attack should thev
join in a new war aqainst Israel.
Th-y are more lively to join.
Israeli circles say. if they re-
ceive the $350 million air de-
fense system thev seek from the
United States which would pro-
vide an umbrella against Israeli
air attacks on lordan.
ISRAELIS ARE also seriously
concerned that Jordan might
once again give the PLO terror-
ists a free hand to operate from
its territory.
On the other hand, security
circles here seem convinced
that Jordan is more concerned
over the effects on its own
sovereignty if the PLO was al-
lowed to operate from bases in
Jordan.
Of Labor Strife
TEL AVIV (.ITA) Israel faces a week of labor
strife as strikes are threatened by salaried engineers,
TTA1 air crew members and the employes of Bank Leumi
le Israel, the nation's largest financial institution.
The government the Histadrut and other bodies
are trying to avert the walkouts which could result in no
construction work being done, no permits issued, no in-
spection by engineers, no fiscal transactions in the coun-
try's largest bank, and the grounding of Israel's national
airline.
The labor disputes are a result partly of the new-
tax reforms and partly of the efforts to close the salary
gaps between various employe groups.
Gustav Badian, secretary of the Engineers Union,
said some 15,000 salaried engineers will start a partial
strike because their demands to maintain the ratio of
salary differences between them and other groups have
been turned down. He said the strike would hit all
spheres of work except essential security projects and
plants.
Ford Lays Wreath
At Auschwitz Camp
PARIS (JTA) President Ford laid a wreath
at the international monument at Auschwitz marking
the site of the notorious death camp where four-million
Jews were slain by the Nazis during World War II.
But the stone monolith, erected by the Polish gov-
ernment, contains no mention of the fact that most of
the victims were Jews. The inscription, in 20- languages,
states only that "Four-million people suffered and died
here at the hands of the Nazi murderers between the
years 1940 and 1945."
THE PRESIDENT, who toured the Auschwitz site
near Cracow in Southern Poland, made no formal state-
ment- But he remarked, "It's horrible unbelievable,"
when he viewed the site of the gas chambers and cre-
matorium ovens.
Me was accompanied by the Secretary General of
the Polish Communist Party, Edward Gierek, and by
Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, many of whose
relatives died in death camps similar to Auschwitz.
According to eye-witnesses, the President appeared
deeply moved as he walked through the remnants of the
Nazi charnal house for some 12 minutes. Later, he wrote
in the camp's Book of Remembrance: "This monument
and the memory of those it honors is for us a new source
of inspiration in the quest for peace and for cooperation
and security for all nations."
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Page 14-A
+Jeisti fhridiar
Friday, August 8,1975
In the Shadow of Kissinger's Red, Wliite and Blue Jet
By JANE and LEE K-THORPE
We were walking in the shoes
of the peacemaker recently,
catching glimpses of Henry
Kissinger and his beautiful red.
white and blue 707 in Cairo.
Damascus and Israel. And, like
Kissinger, we were talking
peace.
Our dusty, camera-laden group
32-strong. all lournalists and
communicators from the U.S.
was attending an editorial con-
ference on the Middle East con-
vening in five countries of that
troubled area.
JUDGED IMPORTANT be-
cause of our media pipeline 10
the American people through
our respective papers and net-
works, we were meeting with
heads of state and national lead-
ers in Lebanon. Egypt, Syria.
Jordan and Israel.
We asked our key question
ererywhere: Is peace realistical-
ly possible in the Middle East?
We asked in palaces and in taxi-
cabs, in ministries and in refu-
gee camp6, in Suez, in the souks
(markets), wherever we could
find people who understood our
laaguage and were willing to
stap and talk to us.
It seemed a short and simple
little seven-word question, but
the responses it drew, especially
in "high places." were lengthy,
convoluted and full of abstrac-
tions and conditional phrases.
'ON ONE point, however, all
were agreed: Everyone wanted
peace. Every statesman in the
Middle East described his coun-
try as peace-loving.
Still, the louder the cries for
peace, the more perfectly in
unison they sounded, the strong-
er- grew the counterpoint in our
ears strains of distrust and
fear, from Arabs and Israelis
alike, that no promise, no agree-
ment, written or otherwise, can
be absolutely trusted.
Nothing, they seemed to feel,
can realistically guarantee a
lasting peace.
NO HEAD of state said those
things to us in these words.
They talked, instead, of peace
as possible, but only "barely
possible."
The attitude we observed
most often was one of "guarded
optimism," a favorite phrase
that gave us little comfort. Only
a bit of hopebetter, of course,
than no hope at all.
Now, with the world's atten-
tion on shuttle diplomacy and
step-by-step unilateral disen-
gagements, the focus is moving
to the problems of the more
moderate Arab states in nego-
tiating for peace without of-
fending the radical, hard-line
Arab countries and the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
(PLO). Positions differ, political
fortunes are on the line, and the
problems and potential road-
blocks, as everyone must know
by now, are many.
FO ISRAEL the risks are
JANE AND LEE K-THORPE
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first in a series of articles
by Lee K-Thorpe and his wife, Jane, describing
their participation in the Second Editorial Confer-
ence on the Middle East that took them to Leba-
non, Egypt, Syria and Jordan. Mr. Thorpe is a
Chicago area businessman. For the past nine years,
the Thorpes have made their second home at 400
Kings: Pt. Dr., Miami Beach. Mrs. Thorpe is a free
lance journalist whose columns have been publish-
ed in Pioneer Press, Lerper Papers of Chicago and
The Jewish Sentinel, in which this series first ap-
. peared.
probably the greatest, and
opinion within the country is
understandably most divided-
Asked to give up territories of
important military and eco-
nomic value in return for
pledges it tends to distrust,
pressed for the rights of Pales-
tinians (no one is clear on what,
in effect, this means), its back
is to the wall.
Our trip began in Lebanon,
host country to most of the refu-
gee Palestinians.
Over 400,000 men, women
and children are living by
choice in primitive camps in and
around Beirut and elsewhere in
Lebanon.
The Palestinian refugees are,
according to Dr. Charles Malik,
a Lebanese statemin now teach-
ing at Beirut's American Uni-
versity, "politicallv more pow-
erful than any other group in
the Arab world.
They are arm* better by far
than the small I banese army.
and they hold considerable
wealth.
"Frankly," sal
asked how it is
has been unabl t
terrorist activity
simply not able *
not control the T
we would not
Malik, who ser .
ago as Presid
Session of the V
sembly and w
the UN Secu'i
on to say that '
Malik when
bat Lebanon
control PLO
"Lebanon is
ie. We can-
ninians and
we could "
jome years
f the 13th
General As-
nember of
.mcil, went
Id, indeed,
be against the character of the
Lebanese people to interfere.
"THE LEBANESE," he said,
"arc not fighters. We want to
live in peace with the Palestin-
ians, and we think of our coun-
try as offering a refuge for the
persecuted, unwanted, kicked
out people of Palestine."
These attitudes, commendable
as they seem on the surface, are
frightening. They will surely
prove to be stumbling blocks to
peace when it is time for Sec-
retary Kissinger to begin nego-
tiations for peace in Lebanon.
How can a nation which con-
siders one of its major problems
to be "working out a stable
mode of existence for the Pales-
tinians in our midst." which ad-
mits its unwillingness to cen-
sure (certainly a doubtful posi-
tion from any moral point of
view) and its inability to con-
trol a wealthy, well-armed,
stronger "country within its
country"how can such a na-
tion act independently at the
peace table?
THE PALESTINIANS, who
have come late, perhaps, to an
appreciation of sood public re-
lations and the favorable influ-
encing of public opinion, are
determined not to become ab-
sorbed in the Lebanese com-
munity, refusing both Lebanese
and UN housing, among other
benefits, for reasons of strength-
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ening political pressure and
dramatizing their condition.
Many have also refused em-
ployment and denied themselves
available community services;
health care, schools and other
services,
On our second day in Beirut
we visited a PLO refugee camp
situated on a craggv hill near
the center of the city. We were
taken there by a young married
couple from the United States.
expatriates and passionate
champions of the refugees.
The couple were members of
"Americans for Justice in the
Middle East which, we learn-
ed, is an organization founded at
the end cf the 1967 Arab-Israeli
War for the purpose of balanc-
ing what it believed (and stilj
believes) a bias in the American
press against the Palestinians.
More than half the members of
the Beirut-based organization
are in the United States.
OUR EAGER volunteer guides
(who had come to meet us at
our hotel the evening before,
less than an hour after our ar-
rival in Lebanon) led us now
past the crude stone huts of the
Palestinians, excitedly talking
to us both at once and introduc-
ing us in rapid Arabic to their
friends in the camp. We tried
to understand what we were
being shown, to absorb the feel-
ings and tensions all around us
while holding on to every sight
and smell and sound.
It was a windy day. and on
Beirut's beaches high ocean
breakers had been rolling in
ever the jetties all morning.
The air was cold, too, and storm
clouds were gathering over the
refugee camp. Yet the women,
young and old, and children,
shivering, barefoot in their rub-
ber thong sandals (dime store
variety), crowded the doorways
to have a look at us.
Black pipes ran along the
stone paths, leaking cold
streams of water, and inside the
huts we could see small cooking
fires burning here and there and
pallets for sleeping or maybe
sitting, but little furniture. Were
these the wealthy Palestinians?
Their wealth, obviously, is ear
marked for other thingslike
arms. Not simple comforts.
A STONE statue, the life-size
figure of a guerrilla fihter in
militant posture, dominated a
fork in the stone path. Right
arm outstretched, the figure
held aloft a rifle.
No picture taking, we wop-
told as we made our way uphill
to the camp's clinic, a rude
stone building not unlike the
simple low huts all around us.
only somewhat larger and two
stories high. Grandly named
Haifa Hospital, it had been es- '
tablished in 1970 to provide
emergency surgery services; to
fat "ce-t The New
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those within the camp-all f. I
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time*, and is staffed hv thrl
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volunteers living within' Z\
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dition. other physicians m)
Palestinians, sometimes volun-
teer a few hours a week
were told. And this is'
strange, remembering that the I
majority of the Lebanese people
are deeply sympathetic to the
Palestinians and their state ol.,
homelessness.
"Profound sympathy," say
Dr. Malik, "is felt by the Let*
nese for the Palestinian cause
independent of the mean
they (the PLO) use The won!
'terrorist' is your term. Her*
they are called freedom figb>
ers."
We looked in the doorway et
a 10-hed ward, instantly into.
rupting conversations amor*
the room's three or four pa-
tients and their visitors.
BACK OUTSIDE we resume!
our climb along the stone walks,
trinping over the water pipes,
meeting the openly hostile pnes
of the men. now. come out te
see the foreigners. There were
no smiles for Amerinn visitors
here: we were repress mtativej
of Israel's support and strength,
its big power friend, the United
States.
Black-margin posters on the
walls of the huts and on trees
and fences reminded us as they
must daily remind the vfugeet
of the dead; pictured were
faces of young men kill -d in
raids, names and as dfl
and places of death "*ed
low. Our guides tran ted the
obituary poster's Ai-' z letter-
ing for us.
Near the top "of t
came to the camp's
two-room building he
oil stove, its affid
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