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The Jewish Floridian ( July 25, 1975 )

UFJUD
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 25, 1975

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02425

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
July 25, 1975

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02425

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
"cJewish Floridian
Combining THE JEWISH UNITY and THE JEWISH WEEKLY
Volume 48 Number 30
Miami, Florida Friday, July 25, 1975
wc by Man Two Sections Price 25 rent*
No Agreement Yet, State Dep't. Warns
AJCONGRESS "SHOCKED'
Justice Dep 't. Has
No Anti- Boycott
Prosecution Plan
New York 'First* Hailed 10-A
EEC Blocked Action 10-A
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress here this week
said that it is "shocked and
dismayed" by the testimony of
three Department of Justice of-
ficials which, the Congress said,
indicates that the Department of
Justice "has no intention of en-
forcing the antiboycott provi-
sions of the Export Administra-
tion Act."
In a letter to Attorney Gen-
eral Edward H. Levi, the Con-
press said that "it is time to
enforce the declared antiboycott
policy of the United States.
"WE CANNOT prevent for-
eign nations from being at war
with each other. We can prevent
them from trying to use our
economy to wage a war against
a friendly nation."
The letter, signed by Joseph
B. Robinson, AJCongress gen-
eral connsel, was in response
to testimony by Assistant Attor-
neys General Antonin Scalia, J.
Stanley Pottinger and Thomas
Kauper at hearings before the
Subcommittee on Monopolies of
the House Judiciary Committee
Continued on Page 10-A
ATTORNEY GENERAL LEVI
receives protest
ADMINtSlRATM DISPUTES CWTICS
Deny Sale to Jordan
Will Upset Balance
Congressional Rebuff
By HELEN SILVER
3-A
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Two Administration officials
disputed the contention by Con-
gressional opponents of the
sale of a $350 million U.S. air
defense system to Jordan that
it would tip the balance of mili-
tary power in the Middle East
against Israel.
Testifying at a hearing that
Moynihan Warns Against
UNations Ouster of Israel
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Immediately after he
presented his credentials on July 17 as the new representa-
tive of the United States to the United Nations, Daniel P.
Moynihan said that the United States will take "a vigorous
posture" at the UN, warned of grave consequences to the
UN in case Israel is expelled and indicated that the United
Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) will remain in the
Sinai.
Speaking at a press conference here, Moynihan said
that if the expulsion of Israel "really happened," it will be
a "blow to this place (the UN)" and warned that the com-
mitment of President Ford to the UN "will be under strong
challenge by Congress."
Continued on Page 6-A
opened July 16 before the
House subcommittee on inter-
national political affairs and
military sales, Assistant Secre-
tary of State for Near Eastern
and Southeast Asian Affairs
Alfred L. Atherton, Jr., and
Maj. Gen. Howard M. Fish,
USAF, Deputy Assistant Secre-
tary for security assistance at
the Defense Department, claim-
ed that the projected sales to
Jordan were "modest compar-
ed with the defense systems of
other countries in the area"
and "would not alter the bal-
ance of power in the Middle
East."
AS OF July 16, 45 members
cf Congress were co-sponsor-
ing a concurrent resolution in-
troduced by Rep. Benjamin
Rosenthal (D., N.Y.) objecting
to the sale and calling for hear-
ings.
A similar resolution was in-
troduced in the Senate by Sen.
Clifford Case (R.. N.J.).
Atherton, repeating the testi-
mony he had given earlier be-
fore the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee, characterized
Jordan as a moderate country
and contended that the arms
sales would benefit American
foreign relations in the Middle
East, because if the U.S. refus-
Continued on Page 8-A
Sadat's Talk Merely
'Studied' Extending
Of UN Force in Sinai
CAIRO After threatening that he would not permit
an extension of the United Nations Emergency Force man-
date in the Sinai after its expiration on Thursday (July
24), in a major address here, Egypt's President Anwar
Sadat Tuesday accepted "in principle" an extension of the
mandate and, also "in principle," an interim agreement with
Israel based on discussions between Israel Ambassador to
the United States Simcha Dinitz with Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger last weekend.
But the State Department in Washington warned at the
same time that there was still no formal agreement, and
that it would be premature to say there was.
In fact, Sadat warned that he was merely "studying"
the possibility of Egypt's consent to the UNEF mandate.
SIMULTANEOUSLY, in Beirut, Lebanon, Arab spokes-
men declared that if Israel did not withdraw from occupied
territories, there would be a meeting of all Arab leaders to
prepare for a joint military operation against Israel by
Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon and the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
In Jerusalem, the Israeli Cabinet had met Sunday for
Continued on Page 2-A
MOT PART Of ANY ACCORD
We Won't Send U.S.
Technicians to Passes
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
said here that "there is no
agreement" to have Amer-
ican technicians man the
electronic warning system
in the Sinai as part of an in-
terim agreement between Is-
rael and Egypt.
But Department spokes-
man Robert Anderson told
newsmen, "If it turns out
this eventuality take place,"
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger "would be in clos-
est touch with the Con-
gress."
ANDERSON WAS commenting
on reports that Israel had pro-
posed that the U.S. would man
the Sinai warning systems if Is-
raeli troops pull back from the
Gidi and Mitla Passes.
Anderson would not comment
on the details of the current ne-
gotiations for the agreement,
but confirmed that the latest Is-
raeli proposals have been sub-
mitted to Cairo by American
Ambassador Hermann Eilts who
returned to Egypt Sunday. He
said Eilts had already reported
to Kissinger and that there will
be continuing negotiations.
The State Department spokes-
man stressed that if U.S. tech-
nicians would eventually be
sent to the Sinai, they will not
Continued on Page 6-A
20 Arrested in Anti Kissinger Rally
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Eleven persons remained in
police custody out of more
than 20 arrested in a mas-
sive demonstration against
the United States and Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kis-
singer which ended with the
stoning of the U.S. Embassy
here.
Police said that one of
those in custody was re-
sponsible for smashing an
embassy window as mobs
surged toward the building
and were blocked by trunch-
eon wielding riot police.
No injuries were reported.
THE DEMONSTRATION,
which drew an estimated 15,000
people, one of the largest in Tel
Aviv's history, was sponsored
by Likud, the younger elements
of the National Religious Party
and a variety of other groups
and ad hoc committees opposed
to further Israeli withdrawals in
Sinai.
Their anger was vented more
against alleged American pres-
sure and Kissinger personally
than against the principle of an
interim settlement with Egypt.
Addressing the crowd which
had assembled, with police per-
mission, in Tel Aviv's munici-
pal square, Menachem Beigin,
leader of Likud's Herat wing,
demanded that the government
Continued on Page 9-A
MENACHEM BEIGIN
resist pressure


Page 2-A
*Jenif fkrMkUi
Friday, July 25, 1975
No Agreement Yet, State Dep't. Warns
Continued from Page 1-A
four and a half hours, deep into the night, discussing the
interim agreement negotiations up to that point.
Ther Ciabinet tate:nent was
these principles were seen as
the ,Uut:..,:_ IMiflUtyMft
concessions on the territorial
question,
ecu Sere as reflecting Israel's
determination to maintain a
forceful position orr this issue
in the face of Kgypt's blatant
pressure tactics.
rhe timing and tone of the
statement were both considered
significantin view of the fact
that the Security Council was
O^e to convene later Tuesday
to discuss the mandate issue.
UNTIL NOW, the Israel gov-
ernment has been caret ully
playing down the Egyptian re-
fusal to renew the mandate
in the hope that Egypt would
yet climb down and accept
some vague formulation draft-
ed by the Security Council.
Monday morning, observers
here were less certain that a
solution would in fact be found,
and the Cabinet statement gave
expression to their mounting
concern.
At the same time, the mood of
optimism concerning the prog-
ress of the interim settlement
negotiations continued to pre-
vail, with observers here still
predicting a successful conclu-
sion, which only partly occurred
during the cojrse of President
Sadat's talk.
JERUSALEM AND Washing-
ton were not awaiting Cairo's
response to Israel's latest pro-
posals, which included a detail-
ed map, sources here said.
The map had been approved
by the Cabinet, and the result
of this vote was cabled to
Washington together with a
message empowering the U.S.
to formally submit the Israeli
map to Cairo.
The Cabinet statement point-
edly noted that the proposals
had included "geographical
principles" as if to hint that
INFORMED SOURCES said
the Israeli proposals had .merg-
ed after lona and not always
harmonious debate within the
negotiating t3am. Defense Min-
ister Simon Peres had pressed
for a tougher line, both on the
passes and on the line of with-
drawal north of the passes. link-
ing the (northernmost) Gida
Pass with the Mediterranean
Sea Coast.
Rabin, according to these
sources, committed Israel to
make greater concessions in the
northand also in the south on
the Gulf of Sue? Coast than
Peres had thought prudent, and
there has since been some heat-
ed exchanges between them.
The Sadat acceptance is of a
package proposal which incluJ-
33 a significant American pres-
ence in the passes area: Such
a presence. Peres believes,
would enable Israel to surrender
larger parts of the passes than
would otherwise have been pos-
sible.
Israel feels the American
presence would oe more de-
pendable and less susceptible to
Egyptian whims than a UN
force although there is of
course no intention of dispens-
ing with the UNEF as the force
to patrol the settlement and po-
lice the buffer zone.
THE ISRAELI proposals in-
cluded:
Four, or perhaps
six.
40 Islamic Nations Vote
To Oust Israel from UN
Britain Opposes 6-A; Dr. K. Warns 6-A
UNITED NATIONS
(JTA) Forty Islamic na-
tions, including America's
NATO partner, Turkey, and
Iran, demanded the expul-
sion of Israel from the
United Nations and all other
international organizations
in a resolution adopted
without dissent at a four-
day conference of Islamic
foreien ministers in Jidda,
Saudi Arabia, which con-
cluded July 16.
According to reports
reaching here, the resolu-
tion, sponsored by the Pal-
estine Liberation Organiza-
tion, urged all member na-
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tions of the UN "to sever
their political, cultural and
diplomatic relations with Is-
rael."
THE RESOLUTION said.
"The conference also condemns
the states that extend military.
economic and human support
to Israel" and declared that all
Zionist congresses were a di-
rect threat to world peace.
The resolution was adopted
in face of criticism by Secre-
tary of State Henry A. Kissinger
earlier last week that Third
WdrM nations were undermin-
ing the UN by using it as a
weapon for political warfare.
Kissinger implied that the ex-
pulsion of Israel from the UN
could bad to a withdrawal of
U.S. support from the world
organization. Kissinger made
his remarks in the course of a
major foreign policy address in
Minneapolis July 15.
AT A PRESS conference
there, when asked about the
resolution oy the Moslem for-
eign ministers, he told news-
men, "We have nat said exactly
what we shall do if the Charter
of the UN is violated but we
believe that expulsion of a
member would be an act which
would affect American partici-
patijn in the actions of that
bod;."
H.' added that the Ford
Administration "undoubtedly
wjuIj tai\e sonic actions but
what these actions would b.> I
am not in a position to say.
THE JIDDA resolution rec-
ognLed the PLO as the sole
legitimate representative of the
right; of the Palestinian people
tJ cstijlish an "independent
nati.iul authority" in the tern
tories now occupied by Israel
and condemned as ill-gil Is-
rael's occupation Of that terri-
tory.
A PLO spokesman reportedly
expressed the hope that the
the UN would be supported at
the forthcoming meetings of
Af.L-an leaders in Uganda an.t
of non-aligned nations in Peru.
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American manned surveillance
stations at strategic points in
the passes area. Piese stations
wot'Id provide information to
both sides:
Two surveillance facilities
.f.n s-> n.!,-.! Im the parties.
Israel would continue to man its
existing facility at Urn Hashiba
at the west ol the Gida Pass
(t would b some sort of sn-
clave), and Egypt would build
its own facility at the east of
the Gidi. Both these faclllti ss
v mid be "sunervia id" by the
American on'mg *nt. but oper-
ated by Israelis and Egyptians;
Israel will retain only the
eastern approaches of the pass-
esbut the Is "a Mi hold will in-
clude the strategic Jebel Gidi
mountain, situated between 'he
passes and with a commanding
view of both of them.
THE PRECISE delineation of
the line to the north .and along
the Suez Gulf Coast was not vet
available. It is clear, though,
that Israel will wish to rebuild
.: son? s cti'Sns of the inland
1 "ad ftoflB. the Suez Gulf to
gharrtf BMhfll h-tar*at"h foes
not run to i el e to the coi
road, which will be ceded :o
Egyot.
In warning that President
Sadat had not yet made a
formal accent ince ol I te aeli
proposals, the State Department
expressed guarded optimism
that he would, adding that if the
climate were right. Secretary of
State Kissinger might return to
the Mideast for some more
shuttle diplomacy.
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Friday, July 25, 1975
-.JmUtfkricfiaf)
Page 3-A
Israel Air Force Still Supreme Ford Arms Sale
TEL AVIV (JTA) Gen. Benjamin Peled, com-
mander of Israel's Air Force, said here that the IAF still
enjoys qualitative if not quantitative superiority over all
Arab air forces despite the reequipment of the Syrian Air
Force by the Soviet Union to more than its pre-Yom Kippur
War strength and the supply to Jordan of new American
jets replacing their obsolete British Hunter types.
Addressing a press conference here on the eve of Air
Force Day, Peled acknowledged that if the United States
supplies Jordan with a $350 million air defense system,
including 14 batteries of Hawk ground-to-air missiles, the
I.\F would have to reassess its operational planning.
HE SAID the situation would
be niuch better without the
American missiles in Jordanian
hands but if thsy are supplied.
"we will have to learn to live
with them."
He also expressed belief there
answ to the Soviet-made
SAM-6 and SAM-7 anti-aircraft
missiles which took a heavy
toll of Israeli plr.nes during the
Kippur War.
He said the lessons of the
1973 war have been learned
Recruiters
Eve Workers
NEW YORK(JTA)"ACTS
for Israel" (American and Ca-
nadian Trade Skills for Israel)
opened their offices here last
week. The organization has been
formed for the express purpose
of recruiting skilled labor to
work in a civilian capacity in
Israel during a crisis.
It is only during times of
mobilization that volunteers
will act as back up specialists.
ACTS IS now ready to seek
volunteers from all over the
I nited States and Canada. This
includes heavy equipment
operators, truck drivers, elec-
tricians, automobile mechanics
and technicians in many other
fields.
1 Al Bazel, executive director
of ACTS said: "We are confi-
dent that in the event of a crisis
the economy of Israel could
have some semblance of nor-
malcy through these efforts."
HE WENT on to say, "the
week before the Yom Kippur
War, no one knew or surmised
that war would come. We
therefore urge concerned peo-
ple to volunteer now so we will
be ready if there should be
another sneak attack."
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and applied b;' the Air Force,
and the mistakes made then
would not be repeated.
PELED STRESSED that he
was speaking from the purely
military not political stand-
point when, in reply t.) ques-
tons, he comm.-nted on the is-
sues of the advance warning
radar stations in Sinai and the
Israeli air base at Refidim in
eastern Sinai.
He said that, if under a new
interim accord with Egypt, Is-
rael is required to abandon the
surveillance posts at Um Kha-
shiba, just north of the Gidi
Pass, there would be a substi-
tute but it would be an "ersatz"
substitute not as valuable as
the original.
With regard to the Refdim
airfield, which Peled described
as a forward air base, he said
its future effectiveness would
depend upon the location of Is-
rael's new defense lines under
an interim agreement.
IF THE enemy's new lines
are close enough to neutralize
the effectiveness of Refidim,
steps wll have to be taken to
secure its functions under the
new conditions, Peled said.
He did not indicate what
those steps might be an did not
those steps might be and did
not mention the possible con-
struction of a new air base to
replace Refidim.
He said the major problem
of the IAF was to increase its
flexibility in lesponse to chang-
ing situations and always to
gain the initiative and force the
enemy to respond to Israel's
actions rather than the oppo-
site.
HE FELT that the IAF could
handle any situation that might
arise from whatever political
decisions are adopted. Peled
praised Israel's new "Kfir" jet
interceptor, the first combat
plane designed and produced
in Israel.
He said it was capable of
competing with all present and
future types of interceptors.
Gets Stiff Rebuff
WASHINGTON(JTA) A
Congressional effort is being
made to block the Ford Admin-
istration's attempt to sell a
modern air defense system to
Jordan costing about $350 mil-
lion.
Sen. Clifford P. Case (R., N.
J.), a member of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
introduced legislation to bar the
sale, and similar legislation was
expected in the House by Rep.
Benjamin Rosenthal (D., N.Y.)
and other congressmen.
THE WHITE House letter said
the U.S. plans to sell 14 bat-
teries of "Hawk" ground-to-air
missiles costing $260 million
and eight batteries of "Vulcan"
anti-aircraft guns for about $90
million.
Case scored the Administra-
tion because the letter to Con-
gress did not also say that the
U.S. plans to sell Jordan about
300 shoulder fired "Redeye"
anti-aircraft missiles for about
$4 million.
Under a new law. the Presi-
dent must inform Congress of
any military sale of $25 million
or more and Congress has 20
days in which to do nothing or
to block the sale. The "Redeye"
missiles sale is under $25 mil-
lion but Case said Congress
should have been informed of
their proposed sale.
HE SAID he was concerned
because they were highly port-
able and "might fall into the
hands of terrorists in the Mid-
dle East."
The "Hawk" missile deal,
which was disclosed following
King Hussein's visit to Wash-
ington in May, was believed
earlier to be about $100 million.
The House International Re-
lations Committee had post-
poned a hearing on the sale in
order to forestall a possibly
angry debate on the Mideast
while Secretary of State Henry
A. Kissinger was holding a se-
ries of conferences on the Mid-
dle East in Europe.
THE ADMINISTRATION'S let-
ter to Congress said the sale
"would be in the national in-
terest of the United States,
strengthening Hussein's internal
position and reinforcing Jor-
dan's policies of moderation at
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When Pan Am opened the
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offered the traveler the fastest and
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1975
It only took three and a half days
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Of course, the flight was weekly
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Things haven't changed much
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Except that now we leave every
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All told, we have more flights
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airline.
For example, we have 25 flights
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The flights include 5 a week to
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p*\
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See your travel agent.


Page 4-A
+Jk*ist fkridian
Friday, July 25
The Quid Pro Quo
We noted in these columns several weeks ago the
erroneous television report of an interim accord signed
by Israael and Egypt.
And only last week, we suggested that the com-
pletely opposite feelings with which Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin and Secretary of State Henry Kissinger
came away from their talks in Bonn is yet another hall-
mark of American foreign policy and wire service de-
termination that there shall be an accord reached be-
tween Israel and Egypt, Israel's position notwithstand-
ing.
And now, on Monday, there was yet another "sign-
ing," which the press "reported." But the alleged sign-
ing was no more than President Sadat's promise to
study an extension of the UNEF mandate in the Sinai.
The rest remains as tentative as before and
even the U.S. State Department, no great lover of Israel,
warns that there is still no agreement, much less "sign-
ing" of an interim accord.
The point here is that everyone wants peace in the
Middle East, Israel included, although increasingly the
L'.S. seems to be taking the position that Israel's desire
for peace must be hcid suspect.
The difference between Israel and everyone else
is a very simple one the quid pro quo.
tV *tV *^v
fN #~4 "
A Display of Purpose
Secretary of State Kissinger keeps talking about the
risks Israel must take for peace. But the thought itself
is a paradox. Why should the reaching of a peace accord
between Israel and Egypt be risky for Israel? unless
as Dr. Kissinger, himself, well knows, that Egyptian
diplomacy is dedicated to a piecemeal destruction of
Israel as a nation.
Surely, better than anyone else, Dr. Kissinger has
experience with this kind of diplomacy. It was the kind
of diplomacy practiced by the North Vietnamese in
Paris.
What Israel wants for withdrawal is a genuine
Egyptian display of peaceful purpose. But Egypt's hedg-
ing on her agreement at Km. 101, which ended the
Yom Kippur War, relating to Israeli cargoes in the Suez
Canal, and Egypt's frank role in the current move to
oust Israel from the United Nations all clearly demon-
strate, if nothing else does, that the pressure on Israel
being generated by Dr. Kissinger and the administra-
tion, and which the press so avidly reports, is not bal-
anced by a single Egyptian quid pro quo.
As we say, everyone wants peace. But what are
the Arabs generally and Egypt specifically doing to
demonstrate this "fact" of their peaceful purpose?
President Sadat's speech on Tuesday may be the
first Arab possibility of such a quid pro quo.
Miami's 79th Birthday
The City of Miami will be observing its 79th birth-
day on Monday, and there are a number of events sched-
uled to mark the occasion.
On July 28, 1896. Miami was incorporated as a city
with 343 voters.
That auspicious event occurred only three months
after Henry Flagler extended his Florida East Coast
Railroad into Miami.
The functions planned for Monday to celebrate Mi-
ami's birthday should attract many South Floridians
proud of "Sun City's" history and progress since those
early pioneering days.
"^Jewish Floridian
FFICE AND PLANT 120 n.e. nth STREET TELEPHONE 373-4S0I
P.O. Box 01-2S73, Miami. Florida 3310?
FRED K SH< "CHET
Editor and I'm
LEO MINDLJN

SKI.MA M. THOMPSON
tant to Publisher
The Jewish Florioran Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Column*
PubUM'.' '1 I v.rv Friday 'ince 1927 by Tli'- Jewish Fiorld!en
Secund-Clasi Pnnajte Paid at Miami. Fla.
The Jewish Floridian hat absorbed the Jewiih Unity and the Jewish Weekly.
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Seven Arts Feature Syndl.
eate, Worldwide News Sen/ice. National Editorial Association. American As.
eeiation of English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) On* Vear $10.00 Two Years SUM
Out of Town Upon Request
Private Citizen Nixon in Actm
HTHE OTHER day. an obscure
California resident, a reti-
ree named Richard Nixon, was
walking along the Pacific
Ocean shore adjacent to his San
Clemente beach house'.
With him was a retinue of
his military advisers and secret
servicemen nothing vulgar,
just the normal complement of
servants who surround most
obscure Californians, and ob-
scure retirees generally, on
their peregrinations.
Mindlin

AAB5 COMMUNISTS ANP
OTHER TOTMJTARIANS
fe ( \ "look who is \tftity shout.
\ ihe liberated women / "
AFTER ALL, what with
our inner city conflict siorn
over into the peaceful
docks, you can never tell
you might suddenlv hay?
wage an undeclared "war
When all of a sudden
ard Nixon heard the terrS
barking of a small Wav,
spaniel who had somehow
swept out by the undertow'
the thunderous waves of
sea about 50 yards awav
was then in the process"
drowning.
Mr. Nixon without
set up a command p0t
took charge of the situarji
With the cool efficiency "'
belied his retirement and ,
scurity. he gave immediate i
ders to his military aides
secret servicemen to re
the spaniel.
AFTER THAT, he
applied artificial reap
-spite his own very pa:^
phlebitis, which bee
more painful when, in the
suing melee, one of 1
aides accidentally ste]
while he was bendinj
spaniel to save its life.
When it was all over, ,
the little homeless do
Ins around him in delight at
gratitude, Mr. Nixon gave fu
ther orders that th
should not be notified
Naturally, the wire service
with their notorious noses fa
non-news, picked up the stag
of the rescue the very next _
and featured it in the presj
across the land.
UNFORTUNATELY, the pre
is not always on its toes. I
tiree Nixon has a penchant.
good deeds going back ma
Continued on Page 9-A
Let's Listen to Solzhenitsyn
Volume 48
Friday, July 25, 1975
X..
Number 30
17 AB 5735
By MAX LERNER
Los Angeles Times Syndicate
Watching Alexander Solzhen-
itsyn on TV. on the "Meet the
Press" program, one saw a
transplanted hero, with a Dos-
toevskian growth of beard and
fierceness of eye, coming on
with the intensity of a major
prophet. Because the setting
was the familiar American one
of electronic journalism the tor-
rential flow of his talk had to
be sliced up into question-and-
answer segments.
When the Apocalypse comes
it will be measured out in two-
minute driblets, with time out
for a commercial.
SOLZHENITSYN'S American
tour is not just a case of anoth-
er visit by another famous for-
eigner. It is a historic test of
what happens to a hero when
he gets ripped up from his na-
tive soil and transplanted to a
foreign one.
Does the magic of heroism
get muted, the halo tarnished?
Does the sense of the extra-
ordinary dissolve when dipped
into the everyday?
The Soviet leaders, when they
packed Solzhenitsyn off on a
plane to Switzerland, may have
gambled on this happening.
They hoped that with the trans-
planting to Western Europe
and America the bloom would
wear off the rose.
WILL IT? The danger of its
happening is clear enough. As
long as Solzhenitsyn spoke and
wrote from within the belly of
the monster itself, putting his
life on the line, courting peril,
daring the Soviet masters to
stop him, the rest of the world
including his critics on the
left watched in awe.
They didn't dare speak out
against him. But now that he
is out of extreme danger, ap-
pearing securely before Amer-
ican audiences, visiting with a
delegation of American sena-
|
LERNER
tors, his critics no longer are
inhibited.
The whispers get louder.
Isn't he a cold warrior, as wit-
ness his quoting Melvin Laird
on SALT I? Isn't he old hat,
hobnobbing with George Meany
and the other old men of Amer-
ican conservative labor?
ISN'T HE a fanatical anti-
Communist, who will get the
United States into trouble with
the Soviet Union? Isn't it dan-
gerous to talk of the Russian
people being buried by their
rulers?
Isn't he just a Catholic writer
carrying the same old anti-Com-
munist message that other
exiles have carriedthe Poles,
Lithuanians, Latvians and the
rest?
Isn't he a stick-in-the-mud
conservative, and a mvstical
one, too. with all his talk about
religion and love of the Rus-
sian earth and the soul of the
people? Isn't he enveloping the
American people of the Heart-
land with the same mystique?
THE ANSWER is. of course,
that one can disagree with par-
ticular views of Solzhenitsvn
and still see his continuing
heroic quality. He could have
made an easy adjustment to his
exile.
He could now be mouthing
all the fancy rhetoric that
would go down beaut
the intellectual elite-
York, Washington. ;
don, and they would be carr
ing him on their sho
before they dumped him
time. But that isn't his
He is in dead eanu
consumed with an ini
and he won't let an
him get out of reach
flames.
ON THE question ol Pre?
dent Ford's failure to I
Solzhenitsyn's answer thai
he didn't come as a | Ml |
the American govern:
didn't expect to be n 1
Mr. Ford is good en "I
its own way. Yet si j
must be added.
As long as the rulers of one |
great power would deem it an
unfriendly act for the bead of I
another great power to talk!
with a major intellect.:.:, figure I
from either country, there is >]
common climate between the!
two. and as yet no world inter!
lectual community. Sohhenitsyil
is especially good on the ques-l
tion of communication b
peoples, The experience of onel
people, he says, is con: -;' ]
ed back to another by its g^t&*
writers.
HE ADDS that the burden ofl
experience borne by the RuS"J
sian people has been tragic-.
This is true of the Ami 1
people, too, if our write I
thinkers could only express It
Asked whether he regal*]
the West as in decline. Solzhen-
itsyn answers no; that it is on^i
the will of its ruling groOI*
which is weak. He mght b&\
added that the percept
its intellectual communities are
also confused.
If Solzhenitsyn can act as ,
seer, and invoke the experience.
of the Russian people to maMI
the people of the West see;
more clearly, he will plfl>' i
great historic role outside Ru^
sia, as he did within Russia.


Friday, July 25, 1975
*"Jewist< fkricfictr
Page 5-A
Miles Labs Survives Arab Blacklisting
pv WILLIAM J. DRUMMOND
Los Angeles Time Service
HAIFA For more than a
decade, the Arab economic boy-
cott has been directed against
Miles Laboratories Inc., of Elk-
hart. Ind., the big pharmaceu-
tical company.
U'e just do not do any busi-
Dess at all in the Arab conn-
says an official of Miles,
boasts of operations in
140 other countries.
THE ARAB world is a big and
potential lucrative market for
such Miles consumer products
as its new vegetable protein
food line, which is being de-
veloped as a meat substitute.
The boycott has effectively
squeezed Miles out for over 10
years, except for a trickle of
covert trading.
"The company had the option
in 1966 to get off the listby
liquidating all operations here
in Israel." the Miles spokesman
says, "but the company made
he decision to cope with it."
Miles Laboratories has, in
fact, annually been calling the
boycott's basic bluff that Arab
economic power can cripple a
major company. The American
firm has been continually ex-
panding its investment in Israel
and making a profit at it.
THE BOYCOTT, backed by
the 20-nation Arab League, has
become a prominent factor in
international business life, es-
pecially since the 1973 war
when the Arabs discovered their
economic clout with the oil
embarcn.
Two days after the outbreak
of war, Miles Laboratories
phoned Israel to announce that
the company had approved a
new project in the country, and
currently a $5 million invest-
ment is being made in a citric
been able to buck the boycott
acid plant on Haifa Bay.
The reason why Miles has
provides insights into the limits
of Arab economic power as well
as the strength of the Israelis.
"BY THEIR deeds ve shall
know them," declared Miles
President George W. Orr, Jr.,
quoting the New Testament at
the recent dedication of a new
Miles facility in Jerusalem.
"Of all the places I visit,
there is no question that the
most exciting one, the one that
has the most profound impact
on me, is Israel," he said.
"It has to be true that one of
the great, incredible happenings
in all the history of mankind is
that people could sustain a goal,
a purpose generation after
generation and achieve that
goal by taking this abused land
and transforming it literally in-
to a land of milk ad honey.
"Not only have you trans-
formed, but at the same time
you have had to defend it."
FOR THE president of a firm
that last year had sales of $386
millionroughly half of which
derived from international
operationsto make such a pro-
Israel statement is remarkable
indeed.
The more usual practice now-
adays, observed Jerusalem Post
economics specialist David Kri-
vine, has been for companies to
compete feverishly for petro-
dollars in such a way as to out-
boycott the boycott "in a frenzy
of ingratiating salesmanship.
"Petrodollars are the rage."
he said, but to compete for bi."
business deals in the wealthv
Persian Gulf states, the busi-
nessman requires the so-called
negative certificate of origin,
testifying that his firm has "no
commercial, industrial and or
any other relations with Israel."
THE IMPACT of the boycott
on Is>-aH is virtually impossible
to calculate in dollars and cents.
Total foreign investment in
the Jewish state in 1972 was
$150 million. In 1973, the year
of the war, it fell just below
$100 million. Last year, it was
$70 million, less than half the
prewar level.
"The boycott has only mar-
ginally affected investment,"
says Commerce and Industry
Minister Haim Bar-lev.
HE ATTRIBUTES the fall in
investment to economic reces-
sion in the West and to "our
high military mobilization rate
. This atmosphere is not the
best for investment."
Bar-Lev separates the foreign
companies affected by the boy-
cott into three groups.
First, a number of small and
medium-sized companies choose
not to do business in Arab coun-
tries. Second, large firms, such
as Miles Laboratories, are
aware of the boycott but choose
to ignore it, and third, there are
companies "who give in to
blackmail," Bar-Lev says.
MD Telethon Ball Aug. 29
Coral Gables Country Club
will be the setting for this
year's Muscular Dystrophy Tel-
ethon Ball Aug. 29 at 9 p.m.,
according to Jon Andrews, man-
ager of the Arthur Murray
Dance Studio in Coral Gables,
which is sponsoring the event.
A nationwide goal of $200,000
has been announced, with
studios from coast-to-coast par-
ticipating.
Your savings at Dade Federal
does make a difference
Join the Dade Federal Savers Club and
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MAIN OFFICE: 101 EAST FLAGLER
SB?'
ir a .m T,i.mi-1

Page 6-A
9-JewisiifkrAJfor
Fnday, July 25, 1975
Britain Would Block Move Against Israel
By MARK SEGAL
LONDON(JTA)A govern-
ment spokesman said here that
any move to expel Israel from
the United Nations would be op-
posed by Britain because "it
would seriously damage the pos-
pects for successfully negotiat-
ing a settlement of the Arab-
Israel dispute and it would
gravely damage the credibility
of the UN."
David Ennals. Minister of
State for Foreign and Common-
wealth Affairs, said it was of
great importance that the char-
ter of the UN be respected and
its procedures respected as well.
HE SPOKE in the House of
Commons in reply to Labor MP
Alon Lee Williams, who said
that Secretary of State Henry
Moynihan in Warning to UN
Continued from Page 1-A
HE CITED the action by-
Congress in withholding support
from UNESCO after its anti-
Israel resolutions. Movnihan
said, however, that the U.S. will
not withdraw its membership
from the UN if Israel is ex-
pelled, but the U.S. role in the
UN would change.
Dr. K. Repeats
Caution to UN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A high State Department offi-
cial said that one purpose of
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's Milwaukee speech
was to warn the United Na-
tions General Assembly against
any attempt to oust Israel next
fall.
Although in his address to
the University of Wisconsin's
Institute of World Affairs Kis-
singer did not mention Israel
by name, the official, briefing
reporters here, noted that the
Third World or non-aligned na-
tions succeeded in suspending
South Africa from the General
Assembly last year and \\a-
considering similar action
against Israel this year.
KISSINGER WAS clearly re
ferring to such moves when he
warned that "If the UN begins
to depart from its charter
where suspension and expul-
sion are clearly specified pre-
rogatives of the Security Coun-
cil, we fear for the integrity
and the survival of the General
Assembly itself and no less for
its specialized agencies."
At another point in his
Hans H. MarcuseS
Louis W itkiii
To assure you of a I
Mperb social event I
Bar Mitzvah, Wedding
Anniversary Party.
/rt the all new
speech, Kissinger observed that
"the coerced are under no com-
pulsion to submit. To the con-
trary, they are given all too
many incentives simply to de-
part the scene Such in-
centives are ominously enhanc-
ed when the General Assembly
and specialized agencies expel
member nations, which, for one
reason or another, do not meet
with their approval."
ALTHOUGH THE Secretary's
warning was an oblique one, it
was seen by many observers as
constituting a reassurance to
Israel of continued American
political support, especially as
Kissinger spoke barely three
days after his meeting with Is-
raeli Premier Yitzhak Rabin in
Bonn.
Israel is known to be seeking
commitments of American po-
litical, economic and military
assistance as part of the quid
pro quo for the territorial con-
cessions the U.S. is urging it to
make in the interests of a new
interim settlement with Egypt
in Sinai.
Kissinger was sharply criti-
cal of UNESCO, which voted
sanctions against Israel and ex-
cluded it from its regional
groupings and of the Interna-
tional Labor Organization (ILO)
which has recognized the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization.
HE DID not refer directly to
those actions. However, he
spoke of those agencies as hav-
ing been "heavily politicized"
and diverted from the construc-
tive tasks for which they were
created.
U.S. Vows
Not to Send
Technicians
Continued from Page 1-A
be American military personnel.
He said he did not know the
nature of the technicians who
would be sent.
ANDERSON ALSO told news-
men that the United States is
in close consultations with the
members of the Security Coun-
cil and United Nations Secre-
tary General Kurt Waldheim on
the extension of the mandate
for the United Nations Emer-
gency Force in the Sinai, "and
we are hopeful that the problem
will be resolved."
Anderson also expressed the
hope that Congress would ap-
prove the Administration's pro-
posal to sell a $350 million air
defense system to Jordan.
He reiterated the Adminis-
tration's position that "by help-
ing them (Jordan) with an air
defense system they wished to
have, we may be able to help
them to continue a moderate
policy."
Elaborating, Moynihan said
that the U.S. hoped that occa-
sion will not arise. He noted
that the League of Nations
"came apart piece by piece."
Moynihan observed that the
General Assembly is a repre-
sentative organization, and it
can only function in that model.
"YOU CANNOT run the Gen-
eral Assembly without accepting
the procedure of representa-
tion," he said.
He explained that a state can-
not be excluded because it is
not liked by others, just as a
Congressman who is not liked
by his peers cannot be expell-
ed. Moynihan also pointed out
that the Assembly cannot make
"binding decisions." only rec-
ommendations to governments.
Moynihan further argued that
there is nothing more important
to the interest of nations in-
volved in a conflict than that
all sides be represented at the
UN and be aware of the other
side's opinion.
ASKED ABOUT Egypt's threat
not to renew the mandate of
UNEF, Moynihan said that no
one has asked for the with-
drawal of UNEF. He disclose!
that he met with Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim at the in-
struction of Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and said
that the U.S. is exploring with
Egypt to find out what the prop-
er UN role should be in the
Sinai.
He said that he does not want
"to suggest the UNEF will not
be there" after July 24. He did
not elaborate, saying only,
"This is a very serious ques-
tion."
Moynihan, stating that the
U.S. will certainly take "a vig-
orous posture" at the UN,
quoted Ford who said that the
U.S. will be looking for a dia-
logue of "candor and direct-
ness, understanding and re-
spect."
A. Kissinger's recent attack on
the Third World nations for us-
ing the UN as a political weap-
on should not be used as a pre-
text to weaken its charter.
"We believe in the universal-
ity of the UN, as well as strict
observance of the charter," En-
nals said. He also explained in
reply to Leslie Hutchfield, chair-
man of the parliamentary
branch of the Labor Friends of
Israel, why the British delega-
tion to the recent UN-sponsored
International Women's Con-
ference in Mexico City abstain-
ed rather than voted against a
resolution equating Zionism
with colonialism and calling for
its elimination.
"ON EVERY vote with ref-
erence to Zionism at the Mex-
ico conference, the British gov-
ernment made their position
clear. It was only in the final
declaration that we did not sup-
port it but wm abstained because
had we voted against, we would
have voted against the princinal
cont-nts of the declaration
which was concerned with
women's rights." Ennals said
He added, "We take a strong
view that it would be datnaeine
to the UN interests and contrary
to the spirit of universality 0f
the UN for any action to be
taken which would seek to ex-
clude a member state and any
proposals for the expulsion or
exclusion of Israel."
REFERRING TO the Jidda
conference of 40 Islamic foreign
ministers which voted to seek
the expulsion of Israel from the
UN, Ennals said such an mitia.
tive would be unhelpful.
"We cannot at this stage say
what initiative will be taken at
the UN, and most of us hope
that reason will prevail,' he
said.
Mrs. Audrey Wise, a Conserv.
ative MP, asked what part the
government would play in en-
suring that any such threats
would be resisted strongly En-
nals replied that British policy
was based on Resolution 242
which accepts Israel's right to
live in secure, recognized boun-
daries and also requires the
need for Israeli withdrawal.
"The two things have to be
looked at together, and it would
he wrong to take one part of a
policy and say it is our whole
policy." he said.
nv7

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Friday, July 25, 1975
* knist fkrirftor
Page 7-A
Superpoiver Contingency Plan Urged for AtomicWar
NEW YORK (JTA) The world's superpowers
should immediately begin contingency planning for a nu-
clear confrontation in the Middle East so that effects of any
such event do not spread to world atomic war, two interna-
tional defense experts warn.
Drs. Robert J. Pranger and Dale R. Tahtinen, authors of
'Nuclear Threat in the Middle East," a 57-page study re-
leased by the American Enterprise Institute for Public Pol-
icy Research, analyze the possibilities of a nuclear con-
frontation between the Arab states and Israel and conclude
that if war is not curbed in the Middle East, it will even-
tually become nuclear.
PRANGER AND TAHTINEN are, respectively, director
and assistant director of foreign and defense policy studies
at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Re-
search. They also have co-authored "Toward a Realistic
Military Assistance Program."
Pranger, former deputy assistant secretary for defense
for international security affairs, also is author of "Amer-
ican Policy for Peace in the Middle East, 1969-1971."
Tahtinen, author of "Arms in the Persian Gulf," is a
former assistant for research and legislative analysis to Sen.
Robert P. Griffin (R., Mich.). The American Enterprise In-
stitute for Public Policy Research is a non-partisan, non-
profit, publicly supported educational and research organi-
zation which itself takes no positions on issues studied by
its scholars and associates.
"THE BEST national security option for the United
States, the Soviet Union, the Arab countries and Israel is a
just and lasting peace settlement at the earliest possible
date," the authors stress in a preface to the volume.
But they recommend that the U.S. prepare unilaterally
and in consultation with the Soviet Union for possible nu-
clear war in the Middle East, the consultation being on "an
informal, low-key basis."
rios, including a feeling by one
side or the other that its na-
tional survival is threatened,
the use of tactical nuclear
weapons for interdiction of the
enemy's approaching forces or
behind the lines bases or sup-
plies, and preemptive use when
intelligence indicates that an
opponent might strike first,
leaving little chance for repuls-
ing the enemy by conventional
means.
A PREEMPTIVE attack, the
authors say, would be the most
dangerous use of unconvention-
al arms in the Middle East, with
grave repercussions for both
the region and the world.
"If Israel were to stage a pre-
emptive strike against the Arabs,
the Soviet Union might take
drastic action against Israel,
with the United States (depend-
ing on the nature of the Soviet
Included in such preparation,
they stated, "should be contin-
gency planning for severely iso-
lating the zone of atomic war-
fare and for terminating hos-
tilities at the earliest possible
date "
THE AUTHORS do not find
nuclear war in the Middle East
inevitable, nor do they suggest
that a fifth round of conven-
tional warfare is inescapable.
The study looks toward the
worst possible case, in which
warfare continues and escalates
into the use of nuclear weapons.
There are indications mount-
inn in their persuasiveness that
nuclear weapons may already
be present in the Mideast, the
authors say.
They cite pr^prams of re-
starch and other peaceful ap-
plications of nuclear energy un-
derway fcr some time in Egypt,
Iraq and Israel (including Is-
rael's advances in the new tech-
nology of laser enrichment of
uranium) and note the mystery
surrounding current operations
in at least one Middle East re-
actor center Israel's Dimona
facility.
The authors also emphasize
the importance of any tactical
nuclear weapons in the Middle
East since, given the very short
distances involved between
countries, what is tactical in
the NATO or Eastern European
context can easily become stra-
tegic in the Arab-Israeli conflict.
EVEN MORE so than in
Europe where these weapons
are present, the possible esca-
lation of their use from conven-
tional to nuclear war is a dis-
tinct threat because of the con-
stant state of no-war, no-peace
in the Middle East.
The authors make note of the
dearth of information on what
would be Soviet reactions to
American use of nuclear weap-
ons in Europe, to say nothing
of Soviet response to any such
usage by Israel in the Middle
East. Nuclear war could be
prompted by a number of fac-
tors, Pranger and Tahtinen say.
They examine several scena-
Invite Former Arab Residents
Back to Territories -Allon
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yigal Allon
proposed to the Cabinet that
the former residents of Ikrit
and Biram be allowed to return
to their native villages near the
Lebanese border which they
were forced to leave during Is-
rael's war for independenuce
27 years ago.
"It is time that we fulfill the
promise we gave those villagers
a generation ago. I believe that
it may be done without creating
a precedent," Allon stated in
his proposal submitted to the
Cabinet in writing.
THE CABINET is expected
to act on the proposal within
the next few weeks. It is cer-
tain to be backed by the "dove-
ish" members of the coalition
and, if adopted, would lead to
the first return of the Arab vil-
lagers to their original homes
since 1948.
A favorable decision would
also represent a break with the
policies of the former govern-
ment of Premier Golda Meir
which adamantly refused to
permit the villagers to return
to their border villages on se-
curity grounds.
The issue was raised repeat-
edly over the years. The Arabs,
Maronite Christians, were re-
settled in the nearby village of
Gush Halav but they have per-
sistently petitioned the Israeli
authorities for permission to
return to their old homes.
BEFORE THE Yom Kippur
War, the matter became a sub-
ject of national debate and
peaceful demonstrations were
staged in which many Israelis
supported the displaced villag-
ers.
But the Meir government
contended that the security
problems that originally requir-
ed the evacuation of Ikrit and
Biram still applied.
Moreover, the two Upper
Galilee villages were razed and
the only structure still standing
is the church in Biram which
is still visited by the original
congregants.
retaliation) moving
against the USSR.
in turn
"If the Arab states were
similarly to attack Israel, the
United States might take re-
taliatory steps, leading to a Rus-
sian reaction of some kind,"
they point out.
THE AUTHORS lay out a
four-part plan which they sug-
gest should constitute America's
response to nuclear war in the
Middle East. First, they suggest
examination of the "nuclear
code of good conduct" between
Moscow and Washington to see
if it is strong enough to with-
stand corrosive forces once
medium powers use nuclear
weapons.
Second, they raise the possi-
bility of rationing technology
which could lead to a nuclear
weapons capability.
"Can progress in the develop-
ment of nuclear weapons be
slowed down, if not stopped en-
tirely?" they ask. Thirdly, the
authors discuss the possibility
of strengthening controls on
supplying nuclear-capable mili-
tary equipment by the super-
powers.
FINALLY, THE best means of
isolating a Mideast nuclear con-
frontationand terminating it
they suggest, is the full-scale
preparation of an American
peacekeeping force, perhaps in
cooperation with a Soviet one,
capable of dealing with all as-
pects of an environment ravag-
ed by nuclear weapons.
"Without the suggested con-
tingency planning nuclear
war in the Middle East could
well spread to world atomic
war, a wildfire whose only con-
tainment would come when it
devoured itself," they conclude.
V
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Peae -A
+ J Friday, July 25. 1975
WJC in Resolution on Jewish Concerns
. \
The 6
Beard of rid Jewi
-;greM c three-
wee* *.::-a -
lui.
Ran
pwa re
.Sixteen countries were
npmi the mee;.
WMl.p .! Xiurzn.c- cr.^.r-
man '/f the Ge ard,
ppided at iOM
in which the ;
dated Dr ,\'ahum Goki-
mann M ->f the WJC,
and Pinna-. Sanir chairman
of 'he Executives of the
World Zy.ms' Organization
and Jewish Agency
A HfCUMON or the Arab
boycott a introduc-d by Ed>
gar Bronfman -A New York,
chairman of the WJC Committee
established to initiate measures
ai nate the activities of the WJC's
affiliate* in this connection.
I l to the boycott was not 'ust 1
Jewish responsibility. Interna-
tkmal intimi Jat:-m the
ment of the democratic rigbu of
.. .
- -
....
. : ces
WHAT IT d:d oppose wa
of thh iovestaam as a
- Bmk Tr .
M to attack the cons:-.ration-
ghts of Jewish citizens, sub-
wetl the democratic values of
satieties j->d distort political
.restitution,, b'jjini-s practices
or forcien policies of countries
ante* "heir citizens
A all faiths and creeds complete
quality
One 'A the most potent wea-
pons against the boycott. Bronf-
- said. vas public disclosure,
minti the searchlight of public
I Ban ledec and inquiry on the
activities of the Arab boycott
leaders
Avraham Agmon. former di-
rector g-neral of the Israel Min-
. of Finance, and recently
appointed director of the Israel
Government Office to combat
the Arab Boycott, said interna-
tional trade depended on a web
of interdependence.
IF THE Arab boycott were to
shatter this web by introducing
an artificial division of interne*
rJonal ma-Ms into ethnic sec-
tion. H ~.:ght very .veil destroy-
that very stabtttt) of the West-
- economies
Arab ir.
The Sovset-Jewpfa scene was
surveyed by Dr. S Levenberg
of Londor.
oral affairs,
p*^ssed the [hat BO radical
ir. Sonet pobc
be expected befo-e the 25th
Cor :-
rist P scheduled for Febru-
ary. 1976.
He reg-j.-dtd as of consider-
able i-nportsnce the visit to the
USSR of a eroup of American
Senators which had received
-nendous publicity in the
So' if ~
IN HIS opinion, the Sonet
leaders while publicly opposed
to any interference in their in-
ternal policy on emigration.
were still ready for private ne-
gotiations and compromise so-
lutions.
Dr. Samuel Pisar. of Pans, a
distinguished international law-
yer and author, called for the
support of detent? and expand-
ed economic relations between
East and West, and particularly
b .'tween the United States and
the Soviet Union.
He stated that normalized
East-West existence, esr-ecial-
ly through economic means, of-
besl :'.:arantee of
pe
global r
( .,S. 'Explains'' Anna to Jordan
Continued from Paze 1-A
td to supply I '--n.se
have no
difficult, in obtaining the
equipment from other coun-
HE SMi) the Mvength ol
m
v.*% far bl lOV 'ha' of the sur-
roandir and that
King Husvjin, in his to
the U S had expressed concern
that Jordan could not a
(American Israeli!
t/ All Religious Arliclt
Fe. Syneaoquet Schools Hornet
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Syria should that country come
under attack.
Atherton agreed with Ri
thai that one reason .Jordan did
not pjiticipaie in the Yom Kip-
'.''11 mi because of the
of its dtfen .
Bui be ^aid he wai not
aware of any joint mil
miniatration ra Jordan
and Syria.
ONE OF the major objections
to the sale o" the air defense
tem to -Jordan has been
that it has entered a joint mili-
tary pact with Syria and that a
modern, sophisticated air de-
n brella would enable it
to join that country' >n a con*
certed attack on Israel.
Per. to questions by
members of the panel. Atherton
said the flow of American
arms to Israel previously
agreed to was not interrupted
w.V-n the lord Administration
b^gan its reassessment of Mid-
II Bai t policy Mar. 23.-
He also claimed that there
was "no coincidence'' between
the reassessment and the pres-
entation to President Ford of
Jordan's request for an air de-
fense system He said the Pres-
ident was briefed on the pro-
posed sale as early as Feb. 10.
more than a month before the
reassessment was ordered
FISH TESTIFIED that the air
defense system sought by Jor-
dan was far smaller than
items of other countries
in tl
He said its capability was
ivalent to one-fiftieth of the
or equivalent sys-
'ieth of
the Hawk'' or better systems,
: one-thirtieth of other air
defense systems. He defined the
1 as embracing Egypt, Is-
rael, Syria. Iran. Iraq and Jor-
dan.
While the exact quantity of
the weapons proposed for Jor-
dan is classified information.
Fish said the breakdown re-
cently reported in the press
wa* "in the ball park It was
reported on July 12 that the
U.S. proposed to sell Jordan
14 batteiies of "Ha ^ur-
face-to-air missiles, eight bat-
teries of "Vulcan'' anti-aircraft
guns, and about 300 shoulder-
fired "Kedeye" anti-aircraft
missiles.
- .- the
jeoiog-.cal dif-
fe-e-
SPECIFICALIY. Dr
ttM-OTOS-
cnents
USSR and
I '-eedom. of emi-
to Israel.
H? J the fear thai a
- "j *v-'- - r>f the
cold Id be harmful to
Jewish m a"d to t>ie
fre*r flow of oeoole and ideas
and commodities between East
"r^e mee*:n2 adopted a reso-
lution denlonns; the oontinua-
of co-i=T h;t,as|=-v"'nt of
Jew? se*Hne to emigrate to Is-
rael, c^liine on th* So'.iet Union
to 2-ant "v't permi' to all Jews
who apnlied for them and to
rive fa :lit- to all other .I*ws
in the Sonet Union to es'ablish
and maintain 1 full Jewish cul-
tural and religious life.
THE RESOI.l'TION also ore
ed more effective coordination
and cooperation in the WJC's
work in behalf of Soviet Jewry
and called on the WJC Execu-
tive forthwith to initiafv to-
gether with all concerned par-
ti?* a process of reassessing the
^= methods and actions
- Jewish oeonl's
worldwide efforts in this field.
tS to 0*3
tion u
the U
cial : n that focused on
the relar. -. the
WJC end its affiliate, the Fed-
n of the Jewish
munities of Rumania.
The resolution emerged from
a meetine between a subcommit-
tee chaired by Sol Ranee, of
Winnipeg, treasurer of the WJC,
and. Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen
of Rumania.
THE RESOLUTION referred
to the principle of non-interven-
tion in the domestic political
affairs of a community's coun-
-.bodied in the WJC's con-
stitution, and reaffirmed the
- view that no action in-
volving a particular Jewish com-
munity should be undertaken
without prior consultation with
the leadership of the com-
munity concerned.
The resolution noted that very
large numbers of Jews have
been permitted to leave Ru-
mania to be reunited with their
families in Israel.
Labor
Dispute
Showdown
TET. ArT'--'JTA
ion of 'abor dfapucej
ed the shutdown of the
rhmi~al industry's plant in the
Haifa Bay area last week A
bri '. closure of the oil port at
Ashdod took place over what
the head of the local port work-
-* -mion considered a personal
insult.
T" Haifa 450 petrochemical
workers who have beer, on a
work slowdown in a dispute
over wages were furloughed in-
definitely by management The
workers disregarded a Labor
Court order to resume their
normal work routine.
LAST WEEK they blocked
shipments of products out of
the Haifa plant. Management
later shut the plant down and
said it might sue the employees
for damages.
The dispute, which is not sup-
po"-ted by Histadrut. began
when management declined to
pav the workers production
bon"ses called for in their con-
tract when production exceeds
an agreed quota.
The management claimed
-:on at the
iped because of lar-'
dine in orders and the:-'
no production above quoi
AT ASHDOD Port. Yehoshua
Peretz. the local port union
:. called a three-hour
ie he was asked for
identification by a polici in
guarding the dock gates. He
claimed the incident was an in-
sult to himself and all the port
workers.
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Friday, July 25, 1975
+Jmhlt> ffortdfian
Page 9-A
LEO MINDLIN
IX THE end, the CIA and
FBI went so far as to hire a
bunch of Cholo Californians to
Private Citizen Nixon's Command Post
to
Continued from Page 4-A
years good deeds that have
yet to be reported.
And although, of course, the
spaniel is a heartwarming in-
cident that amply illustrates
the Californians profound hu-
manity, the unreported good
deeds have to do with the very
welfare of the nation and what
obscure retirees can do to ad-
vance it. Perhaps the failure to
report them is an editorial con-
spiracy against him.
Once, for example. Mr. Nixon
became aware of the terrible
implications of the first Rus-
0 wheat deal, as a private
citizen he set up a command
post and gave immediate or-
ders to his aides to contact an
tally obscure casual ac-
quaintance of his named Earl
Butz, who happened at the time
to be a Ralston Purina execu-
later doubling in brass as
our Secretary of Agriculture.
"NOW THAT'S not fair.
Earl," Mr. Nixon told him over
telephone. "All the Russian
deal can do is drive up the
price of wheat here at home
for our fellow-Americans, who
are already beleaguered by the
consequences of monopolistic
practices designed to manipu-
late the cost of living.
"Earl, the people behind the
deal are only interested in per-
sonal profit, not the good of
the people. And for whom?a
bunch of Commies. That's un-
Am trican, Karl. Now, I've got
a command post here, and I'm
issuing orders that you see
what you can do to put an end
to this craven injustice."
At the time of the second
Russian wheat deal. Mr. Nixon
was too busy applying artifi-
cial respiration to the spaniel
to contact Mr. Butz again. But
there are loads of other good
:i:at the editorial con-
spiracy has failed to report.
AI iilK ALL, he can't be on
top of all of the evil actions of
men all of the time only
some of them all of the time,
or ail of them some of the time,
but not all of them all of the
time.
rake for instance the Com-
mies, themselves. Years ago, un-
retired but nevertheless ob-
scure. Mr. Nixon became aware
of all the pinko radiclibs
around the place and. until his
retirement, never ceased his
vigilance against their subver-
sive design.
Whenever the nation's lead-
ers governors, congressmen,
even a President or two
seemed suddenly to-go soft on
the Commies, he would set up a
command post and issue imme-
diate orders to let the rest of
the country know about their
activities.
TO THIS very day. he is still
in a righteous rage over our
first landing on the moon dur-
ing which our astronauts affix-
ed a plaque to the lunar land-
scape celebrating the outer
space achievements of the
United States and the Soviet
Union, when even now the
Russkies have yet to set a foot
ire.
At the time, he had no
thought of losing his life in an
attack of phlebitis and so could
do some pretty good righteous
20 Arrested in Anti-K. Rally
Continued from Page 1-A
stand fast on its principles and
refuse to succumb to American
pressure.
HE CALLED on the govern-
ment not to give up one inch
of territory unless Israel's coun-
ter-demands are met to ensure
the integrity of its defense.
One group, calling itself the
"Committee Against Withdrawal
from Abu Rodeis," set up a two-
way radio to communicate with
workers in the Sinai oilfields
and relayed to them a resolution
adopted by the demonstrators
not to abandon the oilfields
which are essential to Israel's
economy and security.
";her groups communicated
lilarly with settlements in the
Jordan Valley and on the Golan
Heights.
["he participants included the
eater Israel Movement which
lands the annexation of all
the administered territories and
the "Committee of Women for
Israel's Security."
THEY WAVED scores of post-
ers and banners protesting
American pressure and de-
nouncing any withdrawal.
One banner said, "Americans
Beware K (Kissinger) is a
Soviet Agent." Another said, "If
Territory is not ImportantTell
it to the Arabs": and still
another: "Dr. K. We Shall Not
Win You Another Peace Prize
With Our Blood."
A large force of municipal
police, reenforced by border
police units, was on hand to
prevent clashes with "doves"
should they have attempted to
interfere with the demonstrat-
ors.
But no clashes occurred. The
demonstration was angry but
orderly until masses of people
started marching westward to-
ward the Tel Aviv beachfront
where the L'S. Embassy is lo-
cated on Hayarkon Street, a
neighborhood of luxury hotels.
THE POLICE had not issued
permits for a march in that di-
rection and a majority of the
crowd was dispersed by border
police and mounted patrolmen.
But several hundred shouting
demonstrators, many U them
wearing yarmulkas. managed to
push their way to the seashore.
They were halted outside the
Embassy compound by a heavy
cordon of police and began hurl-
ing curses and stones at the
Embassy.
The police made their arrests
at that point and the crowd dis-
persed leaving the street litter-
ed with stones. The only dam-
age to the U.S. Embassy build-
ing was a smashed window.
POLICE MAINTAINED a
heavy guard around the com-
pound through most of the night
but apart from small knots of
people on street corners, the
demonstration was over and no
further incidents occurred.
Hayarkon Street was opened
to normal traffic in the morn-
ing, but police barricades re-
mained around the Embas- ,
compound.
raging about subversives in the
highest echelons of govern-
ment.
Unhappily, when the Apollo-
Soyuz mission was in progress.
Retiree Nixon couldn't rage
nearly so well. Not only was he
busy saving a spaniel's life, but
his phlebitis was doubly pain-
ful because of the klutzy mili-
tary aide wno stepped on it,
thus contributing to immobil-
izing his efforts.
PERHAPS Mr. Nixon's great-
est good deed occurred when
word of his activities spread
from mouth to mouth across
the land. (The conspiratorial
wire services just wouldn't
bother with reporting THEM.
You must admit that a spaniel
is more spicy).
Acting like an earlj consum-
er advocate prototype, he nat-
urally found himself enmeshed
in th secret surveillance pro-
grams of the CIA and FBI
"enmeshed" meaning that he
became a victim of them. They
bugged his beach house, used
high-gain dish antenna listen-
ing clev ices from rooftops
around San Clemente, and be-
gan to follow him around with
telephoto cameras.
They even planted Uher and
Nagra taperecorders wherever'
he happened to be. went to the >
extreme of injecting drugs into |
his drinking water to see
whether he would go psycho or
even try to do away with him-
self, and on one occasion ille-
gally called upon the resources
of the Internal Revenue Serv-
ice to besmirch his reputation
by branding him a tax cheat.
steal into his beach house
see what they could see.
To all this unAmerican ha-
rassment. Mr. Nixon responded
coolly. He immediately set up a
oomand"post and issued-orders
through his military aides, in-
cluding the kiut/y one, stat-
ing something to the effect that
his constitutional rights were
being violated and that the CIA
and FBI practices were estab-
lishing dangerous precedents
that imperilled the very fabric
of the nation's democratic free-
doms.
Nothing fazed him.
ONE CAN go on and on with
recounting this obscure reti-
ree's good works, whose history
reads like Johnny Appleseed's.
Suffice it to say that an equally
obscure although not yet re-
tired high school football coach
in Michigan has now taken up
Mr. Nixon's cudgels.
"He's a good man," says the
coach, "super, and all this ac-
tivity against him is a bummer.
Why arc they trying to hang a
rap on him? What do they think
this is. the world of Idi Amin?
If I had my way. I'd pardon
anything he ever did wrong be-
cause he does everything else
right.
"Why," concludes this sav-
ant, "with his nose for the no-
torious, he ought to be Presi-
dent."
B'NAI ISRAEL*
a Gr. Miami Youth Syn. orthod )
Hifh Holido, Strvkti mill bt londvitttt by:
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
: Club da Lot America*
(formerly YM-YWHA)
8500 S.W. 8th St.
lukttl B.ailablt by tOUf dtnatun
For Information call: 274*9556
Rumania Seeks Flood Aid
JERUSALEM (JTA) Rumania has asked Israel
for extensive aid to help repair damage caused by recent
floods in that country, the government disclosed.
The Rumanian Charge d'Affaires, Gheorge Roata, met
with Commerce and Industry Minister Haim Barlev to con-
vey his government's request for phosphates, seeds, animal
feed, irrigation piping and electrical equipment.
HE ALSO asked for long-term credit facilities, appar-
ently to help cover the cost of the requested aid.
Barlev, who visited Rumania last year, expressed his
profound sympathy for the Rumanian flood victims and said
he would pass on the aid request to the government for
consideration.
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Page 10-A
+Jeist fkrkBan
Friday, July 25,1973
EEC Moves to Block Arab Boycott Action
By MARK SEGAL
LONDON (JTA) Two
^raeli officials disclosed at a
press conference here that
measures to block Arab boy-
cott action were included in the
discussions leading up to the
recently signed pact between
Israel and the European Com-
mon Market countries and are
also part of the ongoing nego-
tiations for an Israeli-Egyptian
interim agreement in Sinai.
Avraham Agmon. the recent-
ly appointed advisor to the Is-
raeli government on counter-
boycott measures, and Dan Hal-
perin. an advisor to the Finance
Minister specializing in that
area, visited here in connection
with the Anglo-Israeli Chamber
of Commerce ami boycott
drive.
AGMON SAID that before it
signed its agreement with the
European Economic Communi-
ty 1 EEC I calling for a mutual
reduction of tariffs. Israel ask-
ed for measures to prevent
Arab discriminatory practices.
He said Israel believed such
measures were in the interests
of the EEC in its efforts to de-
velop a Mediterranean free
trade area.
He explained that Israel's
main trading partners were the
Common Market, the United
States and Canada which, to-
gether, accounted for 80 per-
cent of Israels foreign trade.
Western firms, therefore, have
Justice Vows Not to Prosecute
Continued from Page 1-A
in a hearing on an antiboycort
bill sponsored by Congresswom-
an Holtzman and a number of
other Representatives.
The full text of the letter fol-
lows
"THREE REPRESENTATIVES
of the Justice Department, testi-
fying at a Congressional hearing
on Wednesday. July 9. express-
ed general opposition to Fed-
eral legislation to bar compli-
ance by U.S. firms with the Arab
boycott. We are shocked and
dismayed by this testimony,
which we regard as a declara-
tion of moral bankruptcy.
'"First, it repudiates existing
governmental policy, declared
in Federal law. which condemns
compliance with the boycott and
says, in effect, that that law-
should not and will not be en-
forced. Second, it argues that
individual decisions of U.S. busi-
nessmen about whom they will
deal with are indistinguishable
legally from attempts by foreign
governments to use the U.S.
economy as a means of carrying
on their wars.
That is the effect of the testi-
mony given by Assistant Attor-
neys General Antonin Scalia, J.
Stanley Porringer and Thomas
Kauper at hearings before the
Subcommittee on Monopolies of
the House of Representatives
Judiciary Committee in a hear-
ing on an antiboycott bill spon-
sored by Congresswoman Holtz-
man and a number of other
Representatives.
The Holtzman bill may not
be perfect. Indeed, the American
Jewish Congress, together with
other Jewish organizations, has
proposed a somewhat different
approach to this problemone
that wourd ban discrimination
against one country only if it
was done at the behest of
another country. But if the
Justice Department does not
like that approach or that of
the Holtzman bill, it should
come up with an alternative.
Its failure to do so leaves no
doubt that it has no intention of
protecting American business
from the pressures now being
exerted, admittedly and defi-
antly, by the oil-rich Arab
states.
"WE REMIND you that the
Export Administration A c t
adopted six years ago establish-
ed the policy of the United
States 'to oppose restrictive
trade practices or boycotts
fostered or imposed by foreign
countries against other coun-
tries friendly to the United
States' '50 App. L'.S.C. Sec.
2402(5>. That is a sound, ra-
tional, easily understood policy.
"It is manifestly absurd to
say. as Mr. Scalia has said, that
this policy would have barred
American firms from boycotting
Hitler Germanv. The policy
leaves American firms free to
make whatever choices they
|* N.Y. Puts Brakes
On Firms Blacklist
NEW YORK (JTA) The American Jewish Con-
gress hailed the passage last week of a bill by the New
York State Legislature the first in the nation pro-
hibiting "boycott or blacklist" directed against individ-
uals or corporations residing or doing business in the
State.
In a statement calling on Gov. Hugh Carey to sign
the bill into law. Jack M. Elkin, chairman of the New
York Metropolitan Council of the AJCongress, said the
measure would give the State Division of Human Rights
"strong enforcement powers to prevent Arab govern-
ments from imposing their prejudices on commercial
and financial practices in this state."
wish to make in implementing
their own business objectives.
At the same time, it protects
them from pressures to c?.rrv
out the economic warfare of
foreign governments.
"Unfortunately, the policy de-
clared in the Export Act is not
now being effectively enforced
and conseauently is not giving
that kind of protection. The pro-
posed legislation is designed to
correct that situation.
"We are particularly astonish-
ed by Mr. Scalia's statement that
the Arab nations are not dis-
criminating against Jews but
against companies assisting an
enemy of theirs.' Is he unaware
of the absolute exclusion by
Saudi Arabia and other Arab
countries of all Jews, regardless
of their relationship, or lack of
it. with Israel?
"MR SCALIA even suggests
that there should be no prohi-
bition of discrimination on the
basis of race, religion, etc. in
the selection of corporate of-
ficers and directors because
such discrimination is not now
illegal. That is precisely the rea-
son why new legislation is need-
ed. Is the Justice Department
defending the right of compa-
nies to engage in such biased
practices?
"Equally astonishing is the
failure of the Department of
Justice to suggest that antiboy-
cott action can and should be
taken under existing laws. The
American Jewish Congress has
submitted to you. and to each
of these three Departmental
spokesmen, a study of ways in
which the boycott, and compli-
ance with it. violate antitrust
and other existing Federal laws,
in addition to the Export Ad-
ministration Act. There is no
suggestion in Wednesday's
testimony that the Department
is considering action to halt
these violations. Its position ap-
pears to be that the boycotters
must be left untouched, regard-
less of whether their activities
have been or can be prohibited
by law.
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good reason why they should
not submit to Arab blackmail,
Agmon said.
HALPERIN CONFIRMED that
in the talks on an interim agree-
ment being conducted through
the good offices of the U.S..
Israel made it clear that Egypt
would have to modify its eco-
nomic warfare against Israel as
part of the efforts to reduce
tension.
He said the main problem in
Britain was that a number of
British firms deliberately avoid-
ed doing business with Israel
for fear of Arab boycott action
without actually having been
threatened by the Arabs.
He added that when a firm
stands up to boycott threats,
the Arabs become more tiexible
and back down.
HALPERIN SAID this was
the case in the banking world
where most banks, with the ex-
ertion of Kleinwort-Bensoo of
London, refused to bow to boy-
cott pressures.
In Franc-?, he said, a leading
Franco-Arab bank is working
with Jewish firms and the Arab
boycott office has found a way
to explain this. He said the
Anglo-Israel Chamber of Corn-
mere, was seeking tougher
counter-measures in this coun-
try comparaDle to the legisla-
tion in the United States that
outlaw- discriminatory prac-
Britain's long standiag *
cial position on the Arab W
cott is to ignore its existed"
Department of Trade officuk
when consulted bv BriS
firms, say there is no reason
why a firm cannot deal *.
both Israel and the Arabs.
But they leave it up to th.
individual firm to decide wh
to do.
THE ARAB League informa.
tion office here put out a state-
ment Friday justifying the and-
Israel boycott on grounds that
the Allies boycotted neutral
countries that did business with
Nazi Germany during World
War IT
They also claimed that the
boycott weapon was first used
by Zionist settlers in Palestini
early in this century when they
banned the us; of Palestinian
labor in Jewish settlements.
Meanwhile. King Khalid of
Saudi Arabia opened the sixth
Islamic toreign ministei bonier-
once yesterday in J.
plea for Moslem solidarity and
a denunciation of IfraeL
According to reports from
Jidda. Syrian Foreign Minister
Abdel-Haiim Khaddar -aid he
was optimistic that the 40-na-
tion conference woulo approve
his call for Israel : be ex-
cluded from the United Nations.
A Syrian resolution to the
conference also calls : r Israel
to keep out of all int.. rational
conferences under IN auspices
and urged Moslem nati SI to
join the Arab bey n against
Israel.
House Studies New
Foreign Policy
WASHINGTON JTA
The House Subcommittee on
Future Foreign Policy began a
series of high-level hearings to
aid in the national reassess-
ment of U.S. future foreign pol-
icy. Ambassador Averell Harri-
man was the first to testify be-
fore the committee chaired by
Rep. Lester Wolff (D-, NY.).
Other witnesses scheduled to
testify this week included for-
mer Secretary of State Dean
Rusk, Henry Cabot Lodge, for-
mer Supreme Court Justice Ar-
thur Goldberg, former Under-
secretary of State George Ball,
Gen. Maxwell Taylor, and for-
eign policy expert. Prof. Hans
Morgenthau.
THE HEARINGS are part of
the Administration's reassess-
ment of its global policies, par-
ticularly in ne Middle East.
Wolff called the hearing
"the first in-gathering of major
American decision makers
since the 1965 Fulbright hear-
ths New
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"We have contacted for the
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son and Nixon years a.- the best
men and women qualified to
help present policy-makers re-
define our aims, review the is-
sues, and reassess our role ill
the world."
AFTER THE July hearings,
the subcommittee will recon-
vene in September to call
broad spectrum of witnesses"
from the present policymak-
ers, writers and scholars.
The new subcommittee was
formed with a specific mandate
to study the articulate foreign
policy alternatives when the
International Relations Com-
mittee was reorganized earlier
this year from the old Foreign
Affairs Committee.
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Friday, July 25, 1975
+Jmlst) fkridlfori
Page 11-A
Fascell Urges Hold
On Arms to Jordan
WASHINGTON U.S. Rep.
j Fagcstf, ranking member
ij. tbe^Uouse iji%ternakml.*e-
Committee, and chair-
il the subcommittee on in-
ml Political and Mili-
i Affairs, said this week that
| joined with Cong.
, n Bingham, of New
I in support of his resolu-
tion to disapprove the proposed
a sales package to Jordan.
Hie proposal is for a eonv
anti-aircraft weapons sys-
| he Mtel amount is i'ar
heater than anvone anticipated.
fn fact, it is $37 million more
West German Finance Minister
Apel, and Vornv.T Hh t'o'mmis-
- wn4r of vMe'rtiiam-JTahn J. Mc-
Cloy.
No Soviet Exits
WARWICK. N.Y.During the
past two-and-on.'-half months.
no evit visas have been granted
to Soviet Jews in Moscow and
there appears to be no move-
ment, according to Soviet Jew-
ish activist Leila Kornfeld.
Her observations were given
to 200 Reform Jewish tem-agers
of the National Federation of
Temple Youth, affiliate of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, over a telephone
hook-up between the UAHC's
summer camp in Warwick, N.Y.,
and Moscow.
The call was placed Thursday
afternoon. July 17 (evening
Moscow time), in connection
with the observance of Tish'a
B'av to wish fellow Russian
Jews well on the festival ob-
servance.
hhi Main
! MM**
- mm* mi
Ml
IMMWBBHM !
Mfluoai
> -<
sail MBuaiiH
^J ^mu> mWM WtB %%% m%\ I
it
ir
Jhan the total amount of funds
nade available to Jordan in
iry assistance and credit
Isles for the entire period be-
h-een 1962 and 1974.
"All of us who are strong
I of Israel have in the
ind would continue to sup-
port me military assistance to
I in ijasonable amount."
6 i iscell.
"However, the present admin-
l proposal is far too
to maintain a reasonable
balance b.'tween Isravl and her
ighbors and it should not be
& roved at this point.'"
In a related development, the
mate moved Tuesday to put
Dfl .i decision on the arms sale
|o Jordan for at least 4S hours,
decision followed an an-
|eal u a Senate committee by
Elmo Zumwalt to reject
cause of its dire con-
-- on the Middle East
Mizrachi Convention
JERU; ALBM Some 400
S of American Mizrachi
from throughout the
including over 100 from
New York metropolitan
! 'ft Kennedy Airport for
th Anniversary Jubilee
n ot American Mizra-
F -ii here.
Evelyn Schrefber, na-
r-n 1 president of American
W imen said that at
m : in hi .i I. slated
\ | j 4 ft & .1 .,. |f ;
'' U m' -mi >s will be
by more than 1.000
i Women I
ho have settled in ls-
10 ire affiliate! with
i :an M'zrachi Women
in the '.wish St ne.
*
'V'C ilono-s violdmann
GENEVAThe World Jewish
[ SS honored its president
pi C if 1'inaVj Dr. No him Gold-.
with a dinner in thp Ho-
Riche^ond here on the oc-
'sicn of Hh SOth birthday. j
linnet fallowed a three-
lay meeting of the WJC Gov-
erning Boarrl. and Philip M.
lutmick, chairman of the
"J. presided at the dinner.
tings to Dr. Goldmann
received from President
N lim Kn ir nf Is<1. Pri-*v
'inister of Israel Yitzhak Ra-
n. Speaker of the Knesset
- layahu. United Stat -s Sec-
of Ft ate Henry Kissinger,
nt Ceaussc'i of Ruma-
ji'-a. President Kreisky of Aus-
ria. President Tito of Yugoslav-
President Scheel of West
srmany, Chancellor Schmidt
West Germany, West German
f'ortign Minister Genscher,
German Grant Revealed
REHOVOT, Israel A DM
355.900 (IL 900.000) research
grant from the Volkswagen
Foundation has been received
bv Prof. Emanuel Gil-Av of the
Weizmann Institute's Organic
Chemistry Department to help
finance a joint German-Israeli
study designed to develop new
synthetic and analytical pro-
cedures in the field of amino
a-^ds nnd neptides with poten-
tial significance in spheres
ranging from the development
of more effective drugs to the
search for life in outer space.
i: it ->
Bond Leaders in Israel
NEW YORKForty-five U.S.
and Canadian Jewish leaders
will go to Jerusalem at the in-
vitation of Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin on Aug. 2 for inten-
sive discussions on Israel's ur-
gsnt economic needs.
During the three days of in-
tensive sessions and visits to
strategic economic and security
sitps, the IsraH Bond leaders
will also confer with former
Prime Minister Golda Meir, Fi-
nance Minister Yehoshua Ra-
binowitz. Defense Minister
Shimon Peres, Chief of Staff
Mordechai Our, and other high
government officials.
The special top level con-
ference will wind up its pro-
gram on Tuesday evening. Aug.
5, at a dinner with President
Ephraim Katzir.
Lehman Wires Ford
WASHINGTON In rtspnnsc
to a telegraph from U.S. Rep.
WiHia"! Lehman. Vernon C.
Loen replied mat "Our (the
Loen, deputy Assistant to Pres-
ident Ford, told Rep. Lehman
here that "the most effective
way to assist Jewish minorities
is through quiet diplomacy."
Lehman's telegram was ad-
dressed to the President on the
subject of Syrian Jews.
administration's) efforts are di-
r"rtr-d at working closely with
DON WRIGHT in Miami News
other interested governments
and with interested American
Jewish organizations, while
simultaneously attempting on a
broader basis to create an at-
mosphere of trust in the Middle
East as a whole which would be
conducive to the cessation of
discrimination and respect for
hu-"an rjffhts."
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Page 12-A
-JeistFkrkJiar
Friday, July 25,
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Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, July 25, 1975
Section B
Synthetic Benzene Could Cut
Dollar Drain for Aral) Oil
FORT LAUDERDALE A
synthetic gasoline extender,
which could bo mixed with or-
dinary automobih fuel up to 20
percent, could help cut the dol-
lar drain to the Arabs, Dr. Mur-
iy Tamers, of Nova University,
told a meeting of the Fort Laud-
erdale Acadjmy of Sciences
here.
The OPEC cartel has warn-
ed us that they're going to up
the price of oil again in Sep-
tember," Dr. Tamers pointed
out.
"I THINK it is imperative
that scientists and industrialists
addross themsehes to solving
the energy problem. It is a cri-
sis situation affecting our whole
economy."
The Nova chemist has devel-
oped his fuel a totally syu-
thetic bonzjne from waste
chars of a chemical industry in
New Jersey. It can also be made
Lorn coke, agricultural wastes,
limestone, anJ other native raw
materials, says Tamers.
Hj estimates that the cost of
producing the synthetic benzene
would be about 31 cents per
gallon.
I DON'T want to say that
bsnzens and its derivatives
could completely replace im-
poit;d petroleum," Tamers ex-
plains. "The benzene and relat-
ed compounds would be mixed
to an extent of 10 to 20 per-
cent with ordinary unleaded
gasoline.
"It has an octane number of
103.'' he points oat.
" This sj nrh'etic gasoline
could c..t (i.wn the imported
petroleum by something like
on. to two-million barrels a
day."
An additional two or three
;"i!lion barrels coulJ be saved
through other coal liquidation
proc sses.
WHAT WE need now is S8
million for the pilot plant to
,s; at the feasibility of
the method," says Dr. Tamers.
"Eventually, a large size com-
mercial installation would be
ot the order of S300 million.
it s I million sounds like a
lot. perhaps you should consid-
er the fact that S^ million is
what we pay every three hours
of every day to import petro-
leum into this country.
"We are s-ending out of the
country each day something
like $70 million for petroleum
alone. So even the $300 million
1 am talking about for a future
plant is equivalent to maybe
f >'.:.- Jays of what we are al-
ready spending to import pe-
troleum.
"THE PETROLEUM import
to this country should never
be more than 10 to 15 percent
of the total we use," he says.
"Otherwise it's an insupport-
able national security danger."
Dr. Tamers suggests that in
addition to the use of synthetic
benzene, Americans should de-
crease the present importation
of seven million barrels a day
by another million through con-
servation and use of smaller
automobiles.
Dr. Tamers, 41, a native of
Pittsburgh, is also experiment-
ing with the creation of syn-
thetic food from coke and lime-
stone rocks at the Fort Lauder-
dale University.
i ::'.;!., n...>i i :'M...... ;i
The United Way of Dade County recently announced
three managerial exchanges: Clark J. LaMendola (left)
has become Agency Operations Director. During the past
five years his duties have included Public Information
Director, Campaign Unit Director, Director of the Health
Foundation and Director of the Community Services Di-
vision. William B. Covitz is now Campaign Coordinator,
having served the previous two years as Planning Direc-
tor and also as the Executive of the Coordinating Coun-
cil. Leon Matthews (right) who assumed the position of
Planning Director, has been Agency Operations Direc-
tor since 1974. He served as Community Services Direc-
tor and Public Information Director since joining the
United Way in 1973.
.
MHBHH.......
Record Breaking Enrollment At
I .<-In-in a ii. Temple Emanu-El Schools
The early advent of the High
Holy Days this year is one of
the contributing factors leading
to record-breaking enrollments
for the Lehrman Day School
and the Temple Emanu-El reli-
gious, kindergarten and nurs-
ery schools, in the opinion of
Lawrence M. Schantz. Miami
I.each attorney who is chair-
man of the board o! education
for both Temple Emanu-El and
its Lehrman Day School.
Schantz said limited vacan-
cies remain in most grades in
the school, which is currently
accepting additional registra-
tions at its 727 77th St. loca-
tion. Grades range from the
first through the ninth, and the
Lehrman Day School is a fully
accredited member of the Solo-
mon Schechter system, national
association of Hebrew day
schools.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El, personally
supervises the school, which
was named in his honor several
years ago. It was founded under
the leadership of board chair-
man Samuel N. Friedland, ac-
cording to Judge Frederick N.
Barad. president of Temple
Emanu-El and former chairman
of the board of education.
Registration for nursery and
kindergarten classes is under-
way at the temple office, 1701
Washington Ave., in the new
school and social hall building.
Under the supervision of
Mrs. Naomi Brandeis, the Tem-
ple Emanu-El pre-school pro-
grams have received local,
state and national awards for
both Jewish and general stud-
ies, Judge Barad said.
Mayor Rosen Appointed To
New President's Council
Mayor Harold Rosen of Mi-
ami Beach has been appointed
to the newly-formed President's
MAYOR HAROLD ROSEN
Council of the Greater Miami
Hebrew Academy. Rosen's ac-
ceptance was announced this
week by Judge Norman Ciment,
president of the South's largest
Hebrew day school.
Recipient of the 1975 Israel
Prime Minister's Aw-d from
the Israel Bonds Org mization
and the State of Israel, Mayor
Rosen is cochairman of the
Florida Committee for Bar-Ilan
University and honorary chair-
man of the Greater Miami Chap-
ter of the American Red Magen
David for Israel.
He will work with Judge Ci-
ment and other members of the
President's Council in expand-
ing the community awareness
of the Hebrew Academy, found-
ed in Miami Beach in 1948 un-
der the leadership of its prin-
cipal, Rabbi Alexander S. Gross.
Rosen, a member of the Jew-
ish War Veterans of the United
States of America, served in
both World War II and the
Korean War. A former munici-
pal judge, he served as coun-
cilman and vice mayor of Mi-
ami Beach before succeeding
the late Chuck Hall as mayor.
Others whose acceptances
were announced by Judge Ci-
ment include Judge Jason Berk-
man of Miami Beach, former
Beach Vice Mayor Burnett
Roth, Herman T. Isis, Benja-
min Volpe, Robert M. Marlin
and Dr. Norman Moskowitz.
Continued on Page 10-B
Judea Lodge 2855 Recognized At
District And State Conventions
Judea Lodge 2855 of B'nai
B'rith received recognition for
its activities at both the Dis-
Col. Kntcher Ben Kutcher
trict and State Conventions.
At its recent convention in
the Americana Hotel, the Dis-
trict Council awarded a plaque
to Col. Nathaniel Kutcher. pres-
ident of the Lodge, as the most
outstanding B'nai B'rith presi-
dent of the year for lodges with
200 or more members.
During Col. Kutcher's admin-
istration the Judea Lodge rais-
ed funds for an ambulance for
Israel, participated in the activi-
ties of the Jewish Emergency
Fund, the Federation Drive.
Col. Kutcher, who has been
president of the Lodge for
three successive years, receiv-
ed two citations from General
Patton during World War II for
heroism.
The Florida State District
Council awarded a plaque to
Ben Kutcher, vice president
and program chairman of Ju-
dea Lodge, for the finest pro-
grams of any B'nai B'rith Lodge
in the state of Florida.
The programs included edu-
cational, civic, and cultural en-
deavors which were planned to
interest the Jewish community
in current events and other
matters of importance.
Sen. Gordon To Address
Moorings Men's Club
Sen. Jack Gordon (D., Miami)
will address approximately 300
members of the Moorings Men's
Club at a Sunday morning
breakfast, Aug. 3, in the Moor-
ings Auditorium at 14th Avenue
and NE Miami Gardens Drive.
Other guests will include Mrs.
Gordon, and the vice president
of the Washington Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Assn., Samuel
Gillott. and Mrs. Gillott.
NJCSE Planning Labor Day
Weekend At The Desert Inn
Robeit Kanzer Chapter, Na-
tional Jewish Civil Service Em-
ployees, Inc.. plans a Labor Day
Weekend at the Desert Inn Aug.
29-Sept. 2; Sam J. Newman,
who is serving as chairman,
may be contacted for details.
The group will open its new
season with a meeting in the
Washington Federal at 1133
Normandy Dr., Miami Beach,
Sunday. Oct. 19, at 1 p.m.
City of Miami Will Celebrate
79th Birthday With Many Fetes
Maurice Gusman, (center), turned over the deed to
Gusman Hall to the City of Miami July 17. Accepting,
(from left) were Commissioners Rose Gordon and Rev.
Theodore R. Gibson, Mayor Maurice A. Ferre, holding
the deed, and Vice Mayor J. L. Plummer, Jr. The prop-
erty will be managed by the city's Off-Street Parking
Authority which is under the chairmanship of Mitchell
Wolf son.
Several public celebrations
are planned to observe the City
of Miami's 79th birthday on
Monday.
It was on that date in 1896
the City of Miami was in-
corporated with 343 voters
scarcely three months after
Henry Flagler had extended his
Florida East Coast Railroad in-
to Miami.
The City of Miami's "official"
birthday party will be from 3
p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Historical
Museum of Southern Florida,
3280 S. Miami Ave.
BIRTHDAY CAKE and other
refrshments will be served, and
several members of local pio-
neer groups will be on hand for
the celebration.
Also saluting the city's birth-
day will be a special doll show
at 2 p.m.. at Legion Park, lo-
cated east of Biscayne Boule-
vard and NE 64th Street.
Ribbons and certificates will
be awarded to doll owners for
the best dolls in 14 categories.
Among the categories are most
natural baby doll, most unique
or unusual doll, clown doll, doll
which most resembles its owner,
oldest doll, smallest doll, and
most beautiful bride doll.
THE CORAL Gables Chil-
dren's Theater will entertain
and a large birthday cake will
be served.
The Miami Pioneers Club will
celebrate the city's birthday one
day early.
The pioneers will open their
clubhouse at 250 NW North
River Dr. to the public from 3
p.m. to 5 p.m.. Sunday.
Several items from Miami's
past will be displayed, including
tools, household goods, old pic-
tures and clothing items such
as a women's bathing suit made
in 1912.
ACCORDING TO Pioneer Club
member Annie Lane Sibert,
whose mother made the suit,
"It is more like a big dress with
bloomers! The dress had match-
ing stockings, tennis shoes and
a hat trimmed to match the suit
and stockings for the arms to
prevent sunburn."
Membership in the Pioneers
Club is limited to persons who
came to Miami before 1915 or
their descendants.


Page 2-B
*Jeni*tncrkJ&r
Fritkv, ju:v,.
Youngsters Mark Destruction
Of First Jewish Temple

i i t 4 Wir "*M m U 1 1 r 1
Bits and pieces of Jewish his-
tory fell into place last n
as 1.500 jroungste s and senior
citizens from South Florida par-
tirirat^d in the reenactm.nt of
Tisha B'Av.
The g cup. all ca-nn-?rs of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida summer canping
program, participated in an
archeological experience rem-
iniscent of the vear 70 CE.
IT WAS during Tisha B'Av
that the first Jewish temple in
Jerusalem was destroyed. To-
day, this solemn holiday calls
forth the rejuvenation of one's
commitment to Judaism and the
age-old tradition of Tzedakah
(caring for those in need).
At the event. Rabbi Solomon
Fchiff director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Chaplaincy Service, ex-
plained the meaning of the day
and gave the group an appre-
ciation of their Jewish heritage.
The "dig'' took place in a
mile stretch on Haulover Beach.
Small Israeli flags marked the
place where each g"-oup w
scheduled to uncover "arti-
facts."
These relics had been made
by teen-agers in the JCC's sum-
mer workshops and were later
used to reconstruct a facsimile
of the present day Western
Wall, the on!v remains of the
temple in Jerusalem.
"ALTHOUGH TISHA B'Av
r"yri<-~0-v* t;)e sidness of
the destruction of th^ tempis
in Jerusalem, w* arr also cele-
brating the fact that we now
have a State of Israel and we
can worship again at the West-
en Wall." commented JCC
President Donald J. Reiff.
After the "dig," Rabbi Schiff
gave a sho:t prayer in memory
of those killed during the de-
struction of the Temple, the
holocaust in Europe. World
Wars and guerrilla terrorists' at-
tacks in Israel.
"I'm excited about the event
because through participation,
the campers have acted out the
~f S ^Kc-T!|ry#_ We
~^~1T**lft
did not just mourn fhs destruc-
tion, but also-Ke took. rarI in
the rebuilding of the Temple to-
day." Rabbi Schiff said.
THE ARCHEOLOGICAL "dig"
is only one of the several cul-
tural and religious activities
planned for this summer by the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's family of local agencies.
Helping to coordinate the
event were Dr. Allan Kellert
and Allan Margolis. cochairmen
of the North Dade-South Brow
ard camping services, and Na-
omi and Evan Olster. cochair-
men of the South Dade camp
ini' -"JO'S.
Workmen's Circle Relocates
The Workmen's Circle ha*
moved its Southern Regional of-
fice fro-" 311 Lincoln Rd. 0 ft|
Lincoln Rd. (entrance on Wash-
ington Avenue). Sanford F. Gil-
Singles 30-50 Invited
Friends Unlimited invites
single, widowed and divorced
persons between the ages of 30
and 50 to join them at the Do
Drop Inn at Temple Beth Am
Fridays at 9:30 p.m. for coffee |
and stimulating programs.
Southern Regional Office
bert. who has assumed the post
of regional director, will be
headquartered there.
The Southern Regional Con-
ference will be held at the di-
Lido Hotel. Miami Beach, dur-
ing the Labor Day weekend
Aug. 29 through Sept. 1. Res-
ervations should be made im-
mediately
Mrs. Carol Siegel (center) activities director at tfe i
ami Beach Hebrew Home for the Aged, is show |
two of the home's residents, Mrs. Kathryrt VictorhLl
(leftj and Mrs. Clara Jackson; the two are among }.\
participants in a program which encompasses art, fej
manities, sewing, human behavior and English. Bed-rjJ
den, ambulatory and semi-ambulatory patients art %
eluded in the program.
Free Vegetable Seed Pecks Offered by Flagler Federal
Three free packets of veg-
etable seed which may be grown
in the window planters of a
home or apartment are being
offered to persons visiting any
of Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association's nine Dade
or Broward offices.
In addition, individuals
open or add S100 to then
ings account will receive i
package of seeds plus i
page guidebook on g
freezing and storage cf
tables, and a list of rtc.pal
SECOND WOMAN ORDAINED
Rabbi Bernstein New Head
Of UJA Programs Department
i
^Cep&aaZfav
vtf trwvttrt
v TEMPLE BETH TOY $
RABBI CHARLES M. RUBE I
6438 S W 8th Street Phono 261-9821
Daily, Sabbath and Holidav Services. Roliqious School.
MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES INVITED
NEW YORK Rabbi Michal
Bern tun. the second woman
ordained by the Hebrew Union
RABBI MICHAL BERNSTEIN
Coll-ge Jewish Institute of Re-
ligion, has join-d the staff of
the United Jewish Appeal.
Frank R. Lautenberg. UJA gen-
eral chairman, announced here.
Rabbi Bernstein will s?rve as
director of the University Pro-
g-a-is Department, which ia-
clud"s the newly-formed Facul-
ty Ad- isory Cabinet and student
campaigns on nearly 200 cam-
ruses.
"WE ARE phased that a wom-
an as uniquelv qualified as Rab-
bi Bernstein will now direct both
programs." Lautenberg said.
Dr. Marshall Goldman, chair-
man of the Faculty Advisory
Cabinet, noted that "Rabbi
B=Tistdn assumes her new po-
sition at a time when the
America^ academic community,
is changing.
"The radical atmosphere of
the late 1960's has given way n,
a more introspective, realistic
approach to the solution of the
critical problems to which the
UJA addresses itself. Jewish
academics are now assuming
their responsibilities in these
efforts."
RABBI BERNSTEIN, who
studied psychology at the New
School for Social Research
while preparing for the rabbin-
ate, holds a BA degree from
Hunter Collm.
During 1967-63. she studied
at the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, specializing in psy-
chology and Judaic Studies.
Rabbi P-rnstein served in the
Israel Defense Forces during
196?'-*9. She has had extensive
experience with students as co-
ordinator of youth programs at
various summer camps and re-
ligious schools.
As a student rabbi, she served
congregations in Port Washing-
-p NY ar1 D-inbunr. Conn.
OUEEN ESTHER
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and
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Invite Chef Boy-Ar-Dee"
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or ground meat, both styles of the Chefs
sauce go equally well with chicken,
fish and omelets Of course, the. -e idea!
for pouring over any kind of lukshen-
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IV.
July 25, 1975
* Jen 1st) fhridliaiii
Page 3-B
AJC Study Shows
U.S. Support Of
Israel Growing
feW YORK United States
(port of Israel has been a
[itive factor in strengthening
ente with the Soviet Union,
has not significantly less-
fed our relations with the Arab
rid, according to an analysis
the U.S. stake in the Middle
it just published by the
lerican Jewish Committee.
Titled "Israel and America's
tional Interest," the booklet
|ks to answer the questions
iy Americans have asked
but U.S. involvement in the
idle East situation. It is pun-
ned by the Institute of Human
j..turns, American Jewish
vish Committee here.
[HE BOOKLET deals with
estions like:
VVhy does the U.S. support
ad's right to exist?
Wouldn't the rich Arab
Jto-i be a better ally than
?1?
How does U.S. aid to the
lb countries compare with
aid to Israel?
Does continued American
pport for Israel threaten to
Btroy detente?
What is the UN position on
^hdrawal from occupied ter-
aries?
Is the U.S. risking a big-
kver confrontation if Israel
the Arabs go to war again?
[HE BOOKLET stresses the
that Israel, as the only
fcstern-oriented country in the
JdJle East, has been a power-
deterrent to Russian domi-
tice in that part of the world.
^Without a strong Israel," it
Kes, "the Middle East could
very quickly become a Soviet
outpost."
It rejects the idea that
American support of Israel had
anything to do with the rise in
oil prices in the past two years.
"In fact," it points out, "the
big price hike did not originate
with the Arab statesthough,
obviously they try to get po-
litical mileage out of it. Accord-
ing to the Senate Subcommittee
on Multinational Corporations,
the impetus came from Iran,
which is not an Arab state, and
Venezuela, halfway around the
globe from Israel."
IN ANSWER to the question
concerning a possible big-power
confrontation in the event of
another Middle East war, the
booklet maintains that such a
confrontation is unlikely "as
long as it remains clear that the
U.S. will continue to support Is-
rael if she is attacked by her
Arab neighbors."
It points out that "since
World War II there has been
ample evidence that conflicts
are more likely to erupt where
U.S. commitments are vague
and undefinedas in Korea
and the Communist world may
misjudge what America's re-
sponse to provocation would
be."
It states that "wherever the
U.S. commitment has been firm
and unequivocalas in Berlin,
Greece, Iran. Cuba and, most
recently, the Egyptian-Syrian at-
tack on Israel in 1973 the
Soviet Union has been careful
to avoid direct- military con-
frontation with the U.S."
Sen. Javits Talks
ith Jewish Heads
h'EW YORKSen. Jacob K.
pits (R., N.Y.), recently re-
rn?d from a Senatorial dele-
Itijn visit to the USSR, met
Ith leaders of the National and
feater New York Conferences
Soviet Jewry, to report his
Ipressions of the visit, especi-
ly the issue of Jewish emigra-
b
[Commenting on his discus-
?ns with top Soviet leaders,
fciator Javits stated that any
ping of credit restrictions is
to progress on the emigra-
)n issue.
[ REFERRING TO possible
fanges in U.S. laws regarding
ade with Communist countries,
ie senator stated that "there
fcs to be some movement on
Ie Soviet side" before any
Ranges are possible. Soviet
krformance on emigration for
Ie first half of 1975 gave no
fidence of any Soviet move-
BOt.
| According to the New York
epublican, "the big break-
Irough" in the delegation's
pit was the Russians' recogni-
)n that Soviet trade is im-
ttrtant to the United States not
Jst as a commercial venture
it as part of a broad move-
lent toward detente.
He added that their visit had
helped convince Moscow that
dealings with the United States
must involve the Congress as
well as the White House if re-
sults are to be achieved.
IN A separate but related de-
velopment, Senators Hubert H.
Humphrey (D., Minn.) and
Hugh Scott (R., Pa.), cochair-
men of the Senate delegation
which visited the Soviet Union
early this month, were urged
to wait for "action by the
Soviets: an end to the harass-
ment of Jews, unhampered emi-
gration for those Jews who wish
to leave, and the equality of
treatment in the USSR for
Jews" before any thought can
be given to modifying the law
of the land.
In letters sent to the two
Senators, ranking members of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, the expectations of
the American Jewish communi-
Datod at Miimi. Florida, thhi
ty in regard to Soviet Jewish
enmration were spelled out by
"NCSJ Chairman Stanley H.
Lowell and Rabbi Israel Miller,
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
m
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO VIEW THE EXHIBIT OF
ELIO PENSO
ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY
July 28-Aug. 1, 1975
WEEKDAYS 9 A.M. TO 7:30 P.M.
BACARDI ART GALLERY
2100 Bitei/n* Blvd Mumi. florid*.
JWB Slated
To Mark
Book Month
NEW YORK "The Jewish
Book in America: A Bicenten-
nial Celebration" is the theme
of the forthcoming Jewish Book
month, which the Jewish Book
Council of JWB has announced
will be observed from Oct. 31
to Nov. 28.
This year's theme has been
selected to call attention to lit-
erature dealing with Jewish life
in America during the past two
centuries.
A VARIETY or program ma-|
terials have been issued by the|
JWB Jewish Book Council to |
assist more than 2,000 local >
groups in planning programs to
celebrate Jewish Book Month.
The Council has issued a se-
ries of bibliographies dealing
with American Jewish history,'
biography, fiction, children's
books, and dramatizations, as
well as "Programs for '76: Pro-!
gramming Suggestions for Jew-
ish Groups during the American i
Revolution Bicentennial Cele-
bration," prepared by Hannah |
Grad Goodman.
The Council's 1975-1976 "Jew-1
ish Book Annual," volume 33,
will feature a Bicentennial sec-
tion with articles and bibliogra- \
phies appropriate to the cele-
bration.
Under supervision of
Orthodox Rabbinical Council ol Greater Miami
CAFE SHALOM
STRICTLY *\P" KOSHER
DAIRY RESTAURANT
PIZZA FLAFEL
HAOLAM MUENSTERCHEESE
163 Collins Avenue
Phone 673-4490 Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Library Offers Activities
The Miami-Dade Public Li-
brary System is conducting a
summer series of activities for
adults and children of all ages
at the main facility and its
branches. Call the Main Library
for details on this free program.
ih
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mm


.--
President Ford Informs Lubavitcher Gathering That He Has Big Tsores
PRESIDENT FORD has been speaking Hebrew. So
far, it is only one word, but like they say. the
longest march begins with one step.
Addressing the Hasidic organization. Friends of
the Lubavitcher, who are gathering funds to build
a new library in Israel to bear the name of Senator
Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania, the President said that
when he had tsores he likes to turn to the Pennsyl-
vania Senator. The President went on to add that
lately he has been having a good deal of tsores.
TSORES IS a good Yiddish word, but it is
derived from the Hebrew and it is time a President
of the United States showed some knowledge of
Hebrew.
The country is presently greatly excited about
the bicentennial of its existence. If we are to renew
the spirit of the founding fathers, we should also
renew something of their attachment to the Hebrew
language.
in
y emph3.
When George Washington's father asked little
George if he had chopped down the cherry tree.
George said. "Yes. father, I did it with my little
garzen." That means "hatchet" in Hebrew.
But Parson Weems who first published the story
had the wild idea that some Americans didn't know
what a "garzen" was. so he translated it into English
THE SAME reason why the words on the Liberty
Bell. "Proclaim Liberty to the Land." were trans-
lated into English instead of using the Hebrew ol
the Old Testament from which it is derived
We don't know about Washington s kn of Hebrew, but hi great Secretary of the Tre^1*
Alexander Hamilton, as a boy attended a J*S|
school in the West Indies, and according to w!?
he wis dble to recite the Ten Commanding
Hebrew.. jfcf^
THE STUDY of Hebrew was especially
died in Puritan New England where "the $|
'iberty" was strongest in the beginning The m,
sehind the Boston Tea Party. Sam Adams, was c2
9f the British. "Sam. the Psilm singer" His vn>
-ang out in church singing the Hebrew ?sa|ms *
heir recurrent H.illelujahs.
Hallelujah is the Hebrew word probablv but
known to all Americans and probably expressed
Hasidic sprit better than any other
Mr Ford was speaking to Hasidim who also
have a special philosophy about tsores
-
IKoLcrt
Rabbi Responds in Shock
To Committee's Ethnicity
RABBI MURRAY SALTZMAN of Indianapolis,
a comparative newcomer to the panel of
commissioners appointed by the President to
serve on the United States Civil Rights Com-
mission, has encountered the rawest kind of
feeling about ethnicity in Boston and has re-
coiled in shock and near misbelief.
Sitting with fellow federal commissioners
on a national hearing to air grievances over
Boston public schools desegregation pro-
cedures, Rabbi Saltzman recently heard John
J. Kerrigan, a former chairman and current
member of the Boston School Committee, drag
into his testimony the observation that some
15,000 Jewish families had departed Mattapan
"to get away from the schwarzes."
GIVEN THIS bowl of verbal mishmash,
Rabbi Saltzman made a point of refusing to
take his turn at questioning Mr. Kerrigan. His
only comment was that he wanted no truck
with this "slurring and divisive impact of his
(Kerrigan's) inflammatory remarks."
Surely, fair-minded observers would sym-
pathize with Rabbi Saltzman's reaction. And
those who have lived closely with Boston's
shrill rebellion might want to remind interested
and puzzled people in other parts of the na-
tion that Mr. Kerrigan, with characteristic in-
Venice History
Book Reappears
[ RECENTLY addressed the delegates to the
annual conference of the Association of
Jewish Libraries. During the course of my re-
marks on the history of the Jews in Latin
America, I referred to Cecil Roth's book on
the history of the Marranos and spoke of it
disparagingly, citing, in support of my com-
ments, other historians who denigate Roth's
works.
During the break after my address, sev-
eral of the librarians unanimously commented
that they were glad to hear my criticism.
THEY ALL agreed that he was overrated
and "over-touted" and that the time was long
past for a disclosure of his shortcomings.
Another of Roth's books of an early vin-
tage, "History of the Jews of Venice" (New
York, Schocken Books, paperback, $6.95, 407
pp.) with illustrations, might have better been
forgotten.
The book was first printed in 1930, and the
present edition is a photo-offset of the original.
Several months ago, we praised Schocken
Books, but their recent indiscriminate refcub-
lication of books without any updating and
without an introduction by a competent hisr
torian who would indicate errors and edit the
book is a disservice to scholarship, especially
Jewish, and constitutes the perpetration of de- .
ception upon an uninformed public.
SCHOCKEN IS trading upon the name of
dulgence in hyperbole, was making use of much
more than slurs and incendiary' and inaccurate
speech.
ONE MIGHT well have asked Mr. Kerri-
gan what has caused the tragic deterioration
of one of America's proudest and most highly
respected public school systems.
Leaving the issue of racial fears and hos-
tility aside for the moment, could there be any
doubt that in the past two or three decades.
thousands upon thousands of Jewish families
have moved out of a great variety of Boston
neighborhoods because quality education for
their children is among their highest aspira-
tions,
WHATEVER THE ultimate findings and
recommendations the U.S. Commission On Civil
Rights submit to appropriate federal agencies.
Boston appears certain to face continuing and
ever more disturbing civil strife over the school
issue. .
Boston public school enrollment will
probably be down by nearly 10.000 if and when
schools re-open in September. Parochial and
other non-public schools, both in the city and
its environs, will absorb some of the boys and
girls.
OeywoM*1 ^Z).
Xid
man
Cecil Roth, a most prolific writer until his
death a few years ago, and his reputation.
Roth had no hesitancy in having the same ma-
terial appear in two or more places.
The book has several errors, several di-
gressions from the Jews in Venice, a poor
index (that is no listing of any of the several
edicts of expulsion); no footnotes (Roth says
believe me); and he reveals a ridiculous con-
cept of history.
HE WROTE (p. 94), "Happy, indeed is the
Jewish community that has no history."
It appears that his concept is the history
of pogroms, martyrology and disaster. What
about the history of Jewish culture and science?
His background history of 75 pages has
no chronological development or logical ar-
rangement by subject matter.
The book, as are most of Roth's, is a
synthesis. His brief bibliography consists of
secondary sources. Although he refers in the
text to archives, he lists none in the bibliog-
raphy.
ROTH'S EARLIEST research was in Italy,
and the book on Venice is an apparent offshoot
' of thai research. His historiography places him
beyond use by scholars.
He wrote well and with facility. He is a
good story-teller and parts of the book make
interesting reading, but it lacks depth
It" Is Sad" that the attributes of his pen do
not overshadow his major deficiencies.
I
J{MI
>A
on en
< ompeiing
Spoils ^
Are Here
|)OV DJERASSI. the son of Bulgarian Jews who emigrated*
Israel then came to the United States when Dov was ei*
wars old. is the new NCAA hammer throw king. Dov 3
the big weight 2:5 feet S inches to capture the title recent,*
His first ambition is to make the United Si itet OK*
team, and at the rate he is going by the time the Games nl
around, he should be hitting around the 230-foot mark He n
a member ol the 1973 United States Maccabiah team, and i
j former Israeli looks forward to making the W77 competina
ON THE subject of the 1977 Maccabiah Games, the Unaed
States Committee Sports for Israel is busily engaged in stmq
up early plans to get the campaign rolling for the biggest id
best United States team ever to compete in the Holy Land.
Robert Rosenberg, one of the past presidents of the Usad
States Committee, and a former bank executive, now retired
has been appointed general chairman for the United Stan
team by President Nat Holman. Rosie is an indefatigable worte
and is traveling the length and breadth of the country setta
up committees and groups to work out the plans for selectai
and financing the 1977 team.
NEW YORK soccer fans and many aficionados throughon
the country are excited over the American debut of Pele. tie
great Brazilian soccer star, who. after retiring from the zm
in Brazil, joined the New York Cosmos, a member of the Nod
American Soccer league.
In his first two outings. Pele and the Cosmos drew selka
crowds of 22.000 fans, probably 17,000 more per game thn
they have been averaging during the early part of the campaiga
A LESS publicized star with the Cosmos, who armed ij
week or two before Pele made his debut, is Mordechai Shpigler.
Israel's veteran internationalist. As a matter of fact, in *'
first two contests. Shpigler proved to be in better condiM
and showed off his talents in better fashion than the mud
more highly exploited Pele.
In addition to Shpigler. David Primo. another Israeli vetene
internationalist, has joined the Cosmos. Both of these playen
are highly paid so far as salaries go in the yet-to-catch-on go*
of American soccer.
For three months play, Shpigler reportedly is recei
515.000 while Primo is to earn $10,000 over the same period
AS SPORTS salaries run, these are not exorbitant sal*"*
but so far as soccer is concerned both Israelis are earatf
much more than the average soccer performer in the States.
A member of the Dallas club, which played against *
Cosmos in New York City, revealed that the average W
for a professional soccer player in the NASL runs about Si**
for the season. In view of the fact that the teams play so*;
thing like 30 games at a minimum, including exhibitions, W
is quite a paltry amount for a professional athlete today
While Pele is expected to help boost attendance all aroo
the circuit and supposedly is to create,'the"necessrv.y,,"J
>n the United States to make soccer a ritfc prflfcssiphal iff
the other performers already are beginning to look upon *
reputed $4.5 million contract with jaundiced eyes.
SINCE SOCCER in the States is played at a time when n*
roreign country players are in their off season, it is qwtt J
IMe that there will be an influx of additional Israeli ?^
>n both the NASL and the American Soccer League comene
season.
There are at least four internationalists in Israel who hg
Played professional soccer in other areas of the world
would be likely candidates for openings here in prrfjj
soccer, and these include Shpigler, Bello. Romano and Vis ^
One of the unique arrangements in worldwide soccer P
that amateurs and professionals can play together oo
same same team in World Cup competition. However, tnei"
tess.onals are barred from participation at Olympic Game*
4"B Friday. July 25. 1975 +Jf**4*fif***l&


iy, July 25, 1975
+Jmlsfi fkrldkin
Page -5-B
rolocaust Can't Happen
Maximilian Schell
By NOR.MA OROVITZ
Irish PlorMian Staff Writer
la- inilian Schell, th* man,
Maximilian Schell, the
|g?, merged an.1 then opted
iii' ergent paths, during a
ks luncheon last Wednesday
is Sheraton Four Ambassa-
HbteL
(Shell, hare in Miami as part
: -city promotional tour
razed by United Artists, was
man to be savored more off
Hi than-Qi. if-that is even
emoti possibility.
TIIELL HAS oen tvpe-cast,
migb'.he is a man of varied
P>tS, heretofore unknown by
American audience. The
U s eye immediately con-
es up visions of him as the
ense attorney in "Judgment
Nuremberg" and more re-
ly as an ex-Nazi in "The
fessa File."
luch of his film career con-
tra tes on the recarrent
me of the Holocaust. Soon to
released in Miami is his
Man in the Glass Booth."
is ostensibly the story of
|ex-Nazi cum American Jew-
businessman, Arthur Gold-
il. who is caught in hi* own
of terror 30 years after the
le image we "know" to be
rimilian Schell. the actor,
i chooses to deal in these
;hty roles is the man, as
on the s abject of World
n.
IE WAS himself an object of
secution during that period
Nazi terrorism forced his
tier, an Austrian blacklisted
or, to flee to Switzerland
his young family.
chell interprets his own par-
pation in Holocaust genre
as his statement on the
ortance and necessity of ac-
responsibility for one's
actionsa character trait
Intedly absent in the Nazi
Sure.
f Anti-Semitism should be ex-
ninated," he said, despite his
appraisal that it still does
However, he feels, "it
lldnt happen again," refer-
to the Holocaust.
firmly approves of the
ious Holocaust courses be-
taught on the nation's cam-
es as a "prophylactic meas-
"Young people should
so that it never happens
lin," he explained.
FAMILIAR WITH the work
don? by Simon Weisen-
il. Schell concurred on the
Miry W briutring^aris to
e. He is apparently sad-
ned tht Weisenthal is no
epr a "nrophet" but a man
the "business" of hunting
zis. Howeve*-. he thinks
sentbal is right to "seek out
men who were responsible."
The use of a glass booth for
Isra^tj scenes, in his most
?nt release, is reminiscent of
19-S1 trial of Adolf Eich-
in in Jerusalem. However,
?11 is emphatic that this film,
Sinally part of the American
Theatre subscription se-
s- is neither a duplication nor
rallel of' the Eichmarm inci-
"Bpoth," ; Jt acceptance and
adulation by film critics has
cwsed him td'fear his own po~
sible disappointment. He de-
scribed his part as "the most
comrl te role I have ever
rlayed. It's really a on2-man
show "
Schell is. himself, most de-
cidedly a very personable one-
man show, and this is where
his one dimensional screen
image multiplies geometrically.
Ha is. at once, a consummate
actor of international reknown,
a frustrat 'd pianist, a screen
writer ("You iust have to do it
yourself, if you don't have a
good screen writer"), a film
director, an operatic director
(he opens with "La Traviata" in
September in Switzerland), an
occasional student (he takes
university courses from time to
time), a former journalist, a
possible professor (UCLA of-
fered him a position to teach
acting, which he believes to be
unteachable and besides, he's
too busy), and a most delight-
ful, impish comic.
HIS ONE admitted fantasy is
to write, direct and star in a
Western. You read it correctly,
folks a cowboy and Indian
Western straight out of the
Rhine Valley!
His philosophy follows:
"Europeans who couldn't make
it in Europe were the ones to
settle in America."
He credits our cousins across
the sea for America's success.
The scenario he envisions is
that of a French criminal type,
an errant English musician, and
a bourgeois German landing in
America, teaming up, buying
guns and heading West.
"It will be the Western of all
Westerns," he beams.
HE WOULD include various
campy cliches but cannot de-
cide if the girl in the film should
be rescued by John Wayne or
Henry Fonda.
He frankly verbalizes that he
wants to be known as a man
with a sense of humor. In fact,
he could imagine creating this
Western-European satire "with
Woody Allen, whom I admire as
a comedic talent."
Although he admits that he
is "one actor who adores Holly-
wood because film really mat-
ters," he tends to respect
European filmmakers who do
not pander to contemporary
tastes for violence, as is Holly-
wood's habit.
"EUROPEANS DON'T fall in-
to the trap of marketing vio-
lence," he explained. He does
see, however, the next ten years
as the belated "high time of
Hollywood."
In respect to Hollywood's ca-
pacity for success, he feels
"Europe is at a great handicap
it's the language"


MUST-say I never mw the
and I oWr want to.V be
of
"The Man in the Gla Aug. 28.
Spinoza Fomm Announces
August lecture Schedule
The Spinoza Forum founded
by Dr. Abraham Wolfson meets
each Thursday at 10 a.m. in
the Washington Federal at 1234
Washington Ave. under the
chairmanship of Belle Plotch.
All are welcome; there is no
charge.
The lectures next month will
include "Total Positive Health
Through Exercise," by Mr.
McLaughlin. Aug. 7; "Staying
Young and Fit Through Dance,"
by Lois Pond, Aug. 1*; "Jewish
Artists in Our History," by
Sarah Lipaky, Aug. 21. and
"How to Save Money, on Your
Electriciry," by Jackie Moon.
MAXIMILIAN SCHELL
An American film has an
audience wherever English is
spoken. European films are ap-
Hillel Day School
Plans Half-Day
Pre-School
Hillel Community Day School
plans to open a half-day Pre-
School to provide an opportuni-
ty for those students on the.
waiting list to take advantage of
the educational program offered
at Hillel.
"This procram will enable,
those students who are not yet'
ready for a full day of school;
to benefit from a school pro-
gram that will meet their pres-j
ent needs," said Rabbi Albert;
Mayerfeld, principal. "The vul-:
nerability of young children!
necessitates quality educational!
programs along with meaning-!
ful Shabbat and holiday experi-
ences." Rabbi Mayerfeld added.
"In keeping with this philoso-'
phy, Hillel Community Day
School offers an exciting, chal-|
lenging and supportive educa-
tional environment for little
people. It is an environment
geared to the child's individual
needs, encouraging learning in
a realistic way."
The rapid growth of the stu-
dent population at Hillel, 21288
Biscayne Blvd., North Miami
Beech, has been analyzed and
evaluated by the staff and the
Educational Committee, Dr. Lee
Duffner, chairman of the educa-
tion committee announced.
"The purpose of the study
was to determine how the
school can best serve its grow-
ing young community effective-
ly with educational excellence,"
Dr. Duffner reported.
Hillel's Pre-School for three
and four year olds has tripled
its enrollment during the past
year. Despite the addition of
class units, the school has a
waiting list.
According to Marshall Bal-
tuch, executive director, bus
transportation will be provided
In the morning only; the child
will be picked up in front of his
home.
Hours for the half day session
are from 8:30 ajn. until noon.
Monday through Friday.
In keeping with the school
policy of providing individual
attention to every student, en-
rollment is limited and, there-
fore, early registration is sug-
gested.
For further information, call
the school office from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
-
Gladstone Guest Soloist
Steven Gladstone, a Univer-
sity of Florida graduate with a
background in opera and the-
atre, will be the guest cantonal
soloist Friday evening at the
Shabbat service of Congregation
Bet Bretm, a newly organised
synagogue which meets at 10755
SW 112th St
, Star
Believes
lllicable only, tp specific lan-.
iuage markets, ,'.'
For instance, Schell's "The
Pedestrian" was filmed in Ger-
man and English. His upcoming
film, "Tales from the Vienna
Woods," will be filmed in Vien-
nese dialect, while the plav will
be performed in English for
London audiences.
SCHELL. an Academy Award-
winner, was born in Vienna in
1930. He maintains a farm in
Austria, an apartment in
Munich and refers to his
father's home in Zurich as his
home, as well.
"Actually," he said. "I don't
know where my home is any-
more. It's where my work and
friends are."
With a calm facade in his
most frenetic world. Schell ap-
pears to be the kind of man one
would be pleased to call a
friend. His manner is nice 'n'
easy, casual and comfortable.
His charm and candor personi-
fy the man to depths far great-
er than the image.
Oh, bv the way, his film opens
Aug. 1 at Loew's Bay Harbor
Theatre, the Coral and Skylake.
The promotion of Amos A.
Turin, vice president. North
and Central America to ex-
ecutive vice president has
been announced by Mor-
dechai Ben-Ari, president
of El Al Israel Airlines. Mr.
Turin joined FA Al in 1961
as vice president, opera-
tions. He served as vice
president, Organization and
Management Services, from
1963 until 1973 when he
assumed his previous posi-
tion in the United States.
JCC Arranging For Visits
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida will ar-
range, free of charge, a friend-
ly visitor for any senior citizen
who lives in the North Dad'e
area. For intormation call the
North Dade office, 20400 NE
24th Ave.
Now thru Aug. 10
>4*.
fBEST >
PLAY g
^1975^
'.V
How to get tickets...
IN PERSON ON SHAM BEACH:
Jordan Marsh (163rd Si. Shopping
Ctt. N. Miami Beach). Leblang Tours
(71st St. & Collins Ave). Miami Beach
Radio (Lincoln Rd. Mall). Neiman
Marcus (Bal Harbour). Saks Fifth
Avenue (Lincoln Rd. Mall).
BY MAIL: Specify number ol seats.
date. rime, price, orchestra or mez-
zanine section; enclose local check or
money order and self-addressed
stamped envelope: Mail to Coconut
Grove Playhouse. P.O. Box 330646.
Miami. Fla. 33133.
TIMES B> PRICES: Tues.-Thins. Eves,
at 8:30. Sat Matinee at Z Sun. Eve. at
7:30: $8.50.7.50, 650 550.4.50 Fri.-
Sat. Eves, at 8:30: $950. 8.50. 7.50.
650 5.50 Wed. Matinee at 2: $7.50.
6.50. 5.50, 4.50. 3.50 Shows start
promptly; no la -comers seated!
DIAL- A-T1CKET: Charge your guar-
anteed exact seat locations by phone
to Master Charge or BankAmericard.
Call 444-9831.
Luncheon/Theatre Package
From Miami Beach only $13.00 Complete
(Wednesday Saturday Matinee.)
Includes round-trip door-to-door motor coach transportation, complete Luncheon
at SCAMPS. THE TAURUS, or MONTY TRAINERS BAYSHORE RESTAU-
RANT. (Entree. Salad. Dessert, and choice ol beverage), enjoy shopping and a
leisurely stroll through picturesque Coconut Grove, and see EQUUS from a 9*
Orchestra Section seat. (Tax included; gratuity at restaurant extra.) Call LEBLANG
TOURS at 865-0341 at least one day ahead lor reservations.
Dinner/Theatre Packageonly $13.00
(Tuesday, Wednesday. Thuradey Sunday Evenings)
Complete Dinner at CAFE BRASSERIE In the Coconut Grove Hotel. BLACK
CAESARS. THE HASTA. THE TAURUS. MONTY TRAINERS BAYSHORE
RESTAURANT. SCAMPS, or VTNTON-S TOWN HOUSE RESTAURANT (en-
tree, salad, dessert, and choice of beverage) PLUS a good Orchestra Section seat
for EQUUS. On sale now at the Box OiBce only (Tax Included; gratuity at restaur-
ant extra. Transportation not included.)
Fot adults and students'ovi 18) onh
Information: 444-9831
Low Group Rates: 253-5566
|n* null "ft \<



r


Pa Re 6-B
mjmtsfi fkrXltor
Friday, July 2Si lg?
Eban Foresees Selective Conimitment as U.S. Police
JERUSALEM (JTA^The
United States will be more se-
lective in its commitments to
other countries in the post-
Vtetnam War pert-il This view
was expressed by both ex-
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
and John Hopkini University
Prof. Robert W. Tucker at a
two-day symposium on "The
Future of American Foreign
Policy" held recently under
the auspices of the Hebrew
University's Leonard Davis In-
stitute for Foreign Relations.
Former Foreign Minister
' Eban predicted that the U.S.
would evolve a selective "doc-
trine of commitment." pledging
active support for countries
overseas on the basis of more
careful criteria than hitherto.
THESE CRITERIA, he said,
would take into account ths
legitimacy and popularity of the
government of a potential re-
cipient of aid. the will ani de-
sire of the government and
peorle to aid and defend them-
selves, and the use to which
American aid is put in that
country. ^**
Eban quoted a recent state-
ment by U.S. Ambassador-desig-
nate to the UN Daniel Moyni-
han: Instead of the U.S. working
to win the confidence of the
Third World as hitherto, the
Third World would have to be-
gin wooing the U.S.
Eban noted the speed and
frequency of fluctuations in
American foreign policy. The
isolationism of the 1930's had
shown a "parsimony of univer-
salis-.\" whereas the U.S. of the
Vietram era considered itself a
general defender of the non-
Communist woiid.
EBAN PREDICTED that U.S.
policv in the future would be
based on empiricism rather than
ideoloev. However he challeng-
ed the prevailing fear in Europe
Jewish Campers Compete In
Maceabiad Games July 29
Tue second anrrMl Miccabiad
Games sponsored by the Jew-
ish Communitv Centers of South
Florida, a member of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Fed^ation's
family of agencies, will take
place between 10 a.m. and 3
p.m. Tuesdav at the JCC Miami
center. 8500 s\V 8th St.
The public is invited to this
youthful equivalent of Israel's
annnal Maceabiad. a complete
international Olympics of sports
competitions.
More than 1.400 campers
from Jewish camps throughout
South Florida will participate.
Maceabiad participants, between
the ages of th;ee and 14, will
be divided into competm?
"Blue" and "White" teams for
series of swimming and field
sports events.
Several local dignitaries will
participate in the opening cere-
monies, observing America's Bi-
centennial, and acknowledging
Jewish contributions to 200
years of American history.
The Maceabiad will be dedi-
cated to the contributions made
bv American Jewry to the na-
tion's growth.
Donald J. Reiff, president of
the JCCs of South Florida, will
heln launch the event, along
with North Dade-South Broward
Camping Services Chairmen Dr.
Allan Kellert and Allan B. Mar-
golis, and South Dade Chairmen
N'aomi and Evan Olster.
For further information on
the Maceabiad Gamts. contact
the JCC Day Camp office.
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Sailing August 22, September
26, October 31, Novmber 28
Bottle of French Chamoione,
beautiful Bon Voyage Travel Baa
per cabin.
RATES START FROM S116. PER
PERSON AUG. 22 FROM $105.
OTHER SAILfNGS. Dlus port tax
OCTOBER 17 NORTH DADE EX-
:hanoe club a. north dade
ROFESSIONAL CLUB. MEM-
3ERS. THBIR FAMILIES AND
FRIENDS.
Kosher Food available.
Chase Federal
Appoints Three
Region Directors
Three Chase Federal officers
have be*m anpointed to vice
president regional director of
branch operations at a recent
board of directors meeting, ac-
cording to Stephen J. Waters.
Jr.. executive vice president
savings.
They are E. E. Brown'
(Southern Region). Allen Gilder-
sleeve (Central Region) and
Henry Prior (Northern Region).
The appointments which take
effect imnrrdiatelv wr> a result
of Chase Federal's 1975 expan-
sion program in both Dade and
Broward counties.
Four new permanent offices
have opened this year: in North '
Bay Village and Southwest Mi-
ami's Concord Shopping Center
in Dade. and Cooper City's
Cooper City Plaza and Sunrise's
Inverrama Plaza in Broward.
I
The Association, which is'
fifth largest in Florida and 42nd
largest in the nation, currently
has IS regional locations serv-
ing South Florida. Two more of-
fices are slated to open this
year and in early 1976.
ABBA EBAN
and in Israel that the U.S. is
heading for a period of renewed
isolationism.
This fear is based on the as-
sumption that presidential pow-
er has declined in relation to
the Congress. Eban agreed that
Congress is more heeded than
previouslyit used to play thf
role of the "Greek chorus ex-
pressing eloquent alarm."
There was. he said, a general
growth of sensitivity to the pop-
ular consensus, and with ever
:iter publicity given to the
details of diplomacy, foreign
policy can no longer be con-
sidered the "property'' of an
elite. Bat the power to initiate
remains with the President, and
the importance of this must not
be minimized.
PROFESSOR TUCKER, a lead-
ing political scientist whose
name hit the headlines earlier
this year when he outlined in
'Commentary'' the scenario for
an American invasion of the
Persian Gulf, said that Eban's
view was the general consensus
amongst American political
scientists.
What was widely foreseen was
neither a renewed isolationism
nor any energetic reassertion of
power, but rather a mainte-
nance of the power balance.
On the one hand, surveys in
the U.S. showed the population
was more opposed to foreign
involvement now than any time
since the 1930s.
Anti Communism had been
the central motive of involve-
ment during the cold war pe-
riod, and that had disappeared
now in its virulent form.
MOREOVER. SAID Tucker, a
definite change in the execu-
tive-legislative balance had tak-
en place, and he foresaw a new
assertion of congresaionaJ pow-
er. He also saw some parallel
in the political atmosphere to-
day to the general feeling of the
1930s that thi
calcitrant" and that the dangers
it posed were no: nt to
force the U.S. to increase its
involvement.
On the other hand, the fail-
ure in Vietnam onlv mad.
I S. population more V
for success elsewhere. He]
even traced yearnings f0r
perial power.
(Eban noted the persi^a
of the term "imperial"
titles of several recent
books on politics.)
And the public had a
interest in maintaining the"!
of the defense budget, sinal
knew that any cuts would i_
age the general standard
li\ing.
THERE WAS also
possibility that Congress w
little afraid of the pov i
ifested during Watergate, a^|
had indeed been helpful ardj
operative recently.
over the Mayaguez i
The President, too
been somewhat oppressed
certain sense of non-1
during this term -bul j
ing would dissipate .:
elected in 1976.
This might res-il* ir
p?tic pursuit of j
gonls traditionally t'-.e
where Presidents can
readily win solo succi
South Dade Post-Auxiliary
Sponsoring VA Ward Party
South Dade Post 778, Jewish l
War Veterans, and its Ladies I
Auxiliary will sponsor the ward
games party Saturday evening
in Miami s Veterans Hospital
with Evelyn and Ben Clein and
i,cin anu Aoe Eisenman as >
hosts.
A covered dish-swim party-1
will be held at the Eisenman
home Saturday evening. Aug.,
16, according to Mrs. Clein.; [ VHF-UHF ANTENNA
president of the Auxiliary. **HooWMHMMBaMoM
T.V.s INC. Present to the Public
This SPECIAL OFFER!
Due to high cost of livinq we ere willing to cut our cost o-d
give you quality workmanship and service at our iow, low, [
prices. We don't want ell the customers, just you.
GRADE A COLOR
PICTURE TUBE
Installed Guaranteed T year
Reg. $200. For you now only ...
This includes pick-up, delivery ond installation, no hielMJ
charges, no gimmicks. Were registered with the Stti
Bureau of Electronics, Tallahassee. Reg. -5243.
All other service charges or* 14.95 per call, but ...with
this od, we will credit you $5.00 off on oil service calls.
$
129
REPAIRS:
TV's all makes
stereos, components, "MF1^
tape decks & recorders U
688-05311
INC.
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MIAMI. FtMM KM
Once-in-a-lifetime Opportunity
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REPOSSESSIONS
WOODSIDE
IELUXE 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH CONDOMINIUM APARTMENTS
16950 WIST DIXIE HIGHWAY
only 14 out of 232 remain... now seHing for only
$

KOL SIMCHA ORCHESTRA 1 1 1
iBrv^*)i / Mus,c F0R ALL occasions t
0^~-~~l*f-^SBfnT \ Now AcceP,'nfc Bookings 1 1
iCdV J ll3 EVENING: /fj^NA UJ ,30S> 264-9326
*-*^ Vi / t^ FREIUACH AND POPULAR MUStC

21,900
NO RECREATION LEASE NO LAND LEASE
10\ Down |'/i% Interest 29-year financing
In-*?^,l.^'.$.^,,!? -,t,.m* "?"* M*m 0. n**.*, ^,n<^.i
!Ti..' .? '"?,9 ION of 1.50".) plu, S37.7S
till -i/.f- .'" ,h.!. *"Mml ""'"Iwm pros,*"** ov.iloble
upon vnting our ioli offlc*. ^
NEW, NEVE* OCCUPIED
>,H >
Woll-lo-woll (srpilmg
Central heating and air
conditioning.
Screened torrac* an each op<
Kitchon op pi i one.,: 1S.J ,, f,, lr#lf.ff-,
refrigerator. Soil cloaninf range
and dishwasher, Luminous ceiling
Hootod Fool
Short distance to 163rd St.
Shopping Contor and Grtyn
Pork
16950 W. Dixie Highway across the street from Old
Spanish Monastery Phone 940-3093


r-. July 25, 1975
+jnistnr)ridTfor>
Page 7-B
.,.:,/ Mrs. UotWn yrevmm (left) present the Soviet
reedom Flag to Dr. Robert Wolf, chairman of
\h Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, and Ed-
osenthal, executive director of Community Rela-
[', Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Soviet Freedom
Flag Unfurled
At Cape Lift-Off
CAPE CANAVERAL Three thousand Jews and sym-
lizers massed here outside the Kennedy Space Center
week during the U.S. launch of the Apollo-Soyuz Test j
Iject. asking the Soviet Union to allow emigration of
Bet Jews to Israel.
A giant weather balloon bore aloft the message, "Good
U.S. Soviet Spacemen. Launch Soviet lews to Free-
A SPOKESMAN for the South Florida Conference on '
let Jewry stated that the message, in English and Rus-
y as to point out that the rally was not in protest of
:e mission, but rather was called to urge further co-
il with the USSR in granting emigration rights to
Met Jews.
.'. C hicago nun. Sister Ann Gillen of the Inter-religious
k Force on Soviet Jewry, addressed the crowd, and
^Mges of support were received from numerous public
including Senator Henry Jackson and Florida Con-
| William Lehman.
A LETTER from Moscow scientist Alexander Druck
paceraen was released, asking their help in obtaining
Israel, which had been denied on the pretext of
work in Soviet space research. Druck pointed out that
ring of space information makes his refusal absurd.
. -he height of the rally, a new "freedom" flag, se-
raised in Moscow by Soviet Jews, was unfurled,
an open letter to Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin, at
e to witness the launch, Americans of all faiths
I the Soviet Union with an increase in anti-Semitism
with staging show trials to discourage its Jews from
ting to emigrate.
WIDOW MUST SELL
ORIGINAL FINE OIL
INTINGS to settle estate
it's a good investment.
531-1552
P5 S.W. 89 Ct. 274-6205
JEDROOM 2 BATH WITH
'GE FAMILY AND LIVING
30MS. CENTRAL AIR AND
USCIOUS LEMON TREE.
OWNER $81,000. DROP BY
DURING WEEKEND.
>RNER 64 ST. and 89 COURT
DATE SINCERE AND
INTERESTING PEOPLE
SSS DATING/MARRIAGE
SERVICE 947-5594
ESTABLISHED 1968
16499 N.E. 19th AVENUE
SUITE 110
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
HiSERVAllVE CANTOR
.liable for High Holidays,
all year round.
Experience 25 yean.
\ Nosach. Phone 864-9397
pligious School Tethers
Also Music and Dance.
TEMPIE BETH El,
HOLLYWOOD,
lone 944-7773 (Miamf Line)
Herewith I express my thanks
to RABBI A. BEN-HILLEL
of 420 15th Street, Miami
Beach, for the transfer of
many valuable Seforim to the
Yeshivah Gedolah of Greater
Miami. May Hathem convey
to .him and to his Rebbetzin
a quick recovery, a Refua
Shleima and a full alleviation
to his personal problems.
Amen.
Rabbi Yehuda Leib Sebapiro
HIGH HOLIDAY ADLER
aver Books for sai*. Good
Condition. Very reasonable.
All or part.-221-9131.
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
DADE BROWARD
and/or Both.
Telephone, Personal Contact,
Send resume to S.T.,
Box 011973, Miami- 33101
ALL REPLIES HELD IN
STRICT CONFIDENCE
Blackstone Hotel
Prepared For
High Holy Day*
The 242'FOOm r\.\v Blackstone
Retirement Hotel, located at
800 Washington Ave., Miami
Beach, is preparing for the
High Holy Davs, ;ierortHns to
Fudah Burstyn, own*r monatter.
Kabbi A. Ben-Hill ?1. resident
mashgiach. will officiate.
Mr. Bnrstvn said the reserva-
tions are coming in early and
he looks forward to a capacity
house.
Services are held daily in the
Tiferetli Jen"Udah Svnagoeue on
the premises. Three Kosher
meals are served each day with
salt, sugar and fat-free diets
strictly observed.
Completely renovated and re-
furbished, The Blackstone is
ideally located for senior citi-
zens, within walking distance to
shopping, beaches, theatres, etc.
Public transportation is at the
Blackstone's front door.
Further information can be
obtained by calling Mr. Burstyn.
Hodossah Luncheon Tuesday
The Natanya group of Hadas-
sah will hold a luncheon and
card party at noon Tuesday in
the Winston Towers 200 Social
Room.
Welcoming Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein, center, on his return
home from a two-month survey mission to Israel are
Rabbi Henry Siegman, (left) executive vice president of
the Synagogue Council of America, and Elie Wiesel, au-
thor and champion of Soviet Jewry. Dr. Lookstein, chan-
cellor of Bar-Ilan University in Israel, was recently in-
stalled as president of the Synagogue Council, umbrella
agency of Orthodox, Conservative and Reform Judaism
in the United States. He is visiting Miami Beach during
the next several days to meet with leaders of the Flor-
ida Committee for Bar-Han University.
nearing completion* ?.
THE GARDEN MAUSOLEUM OF
MOUNT NEBO CEMETERY
5505 Northwest 3rd Street. Miami, Florida 33126
a perpetual memorial of everlasting beauty
SELECTING A FAMILY
RESTING PLACE is a sacred
family trust Although you may
not like to think about it, the time
to arrange tor it is long before
the need, when your mmd is
unclouded, and you can consider
the altemaoveaTne perfect
alternative is Mount Nebo's
Garden Mausoleum... a sanctuary
of love and peace; a comforting
place for prayer, remembrance
and meditation.
COSTS ARE COMPARABLE
TO ORDLNARY GROUND
BURIAL. Errtombment in thrs
magnificent mausoleum is com-
parable to ground burial, yet how
much more reverential And there
is never a maintenance charge;
crypts will be maintained beauti-
fully forever, with sympathetic
concern and professional care as
part of the total purchase.
YOU MUST VISIT
MOUNT NEBO TO TRULY
APPRECIATE IT. FREE
TRANSPORTATION is offered
to this beautiful haven, from
wherever you hve in Oade County.
And as a token of our apprecia-
tion for permitting our represen-
tative to show you our new
mausoleum, we have a FREE GIFT
lor you YOUR CHOICE OF:
Beautiful, stainless water
pitcher Stainless. 3-piece sugar. '
creamer and tray, or Silver-plated
sal and pepper shakers
We must tell you, how-1
ever, that the supply of
gifts is kmMd
SELECT NOW
FOR CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AND LOWER
PRICEour pre-comple-
tion purchase plan offers
substantial savings, as well
as small initial deposit and
3-year terms.
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, CALL 261-7612
r-
I
f
I
I
I
I
-MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY-
Mill NT StBOCEMBTlRV 4. i.ARPLN MAUSOLEUM
POST OFFICE BOX 440-3*7 MIAMI FLORIDA 33144
S*
? Wiltvxit obfcrjafton. plaaM mail me Hi" mlormation on Ine
Oman UaueOieun ndudng types and avMaMly ot crypn.
a-vj mm* olyourpaymenlp.H
O l prala* ntforma*an abaul ground Oonal
D Pleaae nave you> MM ajp>eaanlnva can ma lo a-anQ. an
appointment Mount Nato i unoemand tie! l a receive a
FREE lilFT. wanout lurfier floatation alter I have kept my
apvvxnimanl rat IK* mauaoWum we im your repretemative.
*J_
SratET
C .
if
_IiUiBS!*_


Page 8-B
Mwflli ncrkmsr
Friday, July 25, 1975
J 1
o wn
T Posthumus
Ginger and Allan Posthumus,
1213 Obispo, Coral Gables, cele-
brated the Bar Mttrveh of their
son, T o d d
Adam, with a
luncheon re-
ception at the
home of his
maternal
grandparents .
Sir. and Mrs.
William Mill-
man. 4545 SW
5 8th Ave.,
Saturday. July
5 following
the morning
worship sen-
ices at Temple
Zamora. The celebrant, great-
grandson of the late Rose Dorf-
man. is a student at Ponce
Junior High School, where he
is a member of the Student
Council. He received his re-
ligious education at Temple
Zamora.
t? -ir
Mr. and Mrs. Max Jacobson
of South Miami recently re-
turned from a four-week stay
in London. Vienna and Czecho-
slovakia. From Miami they flew
to London and then on to Vien-
na where they saw an operetta
and were befriended by a young
couple whose 10-year-old son is
a member of the famed Vienna
Boys' Choir. This couple showed
them the areas not usually seen
by most tourists, and their son
provided a private "concert'*
for the visitors.
The tourists flew by small
plane to Prague where they
visited the synagogue where
Rabbi Sol Landau's (Beth
David) great grandfather was
chief rabbi. This synagogue is
now a museum. In the town 0/
P i e s t a n y Czechoslovakia,
known worldwide for its "heal-
ing spa" for arthritics. they en-
joyed the Folklore Festival
where all the natives wore their
costumes and did their folk
dances. Accompanying Mr. and
Mrs. Jacobson were Mr. and
Mrs. Al Goldman and Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Gladstone.
fr -U &
Florida Supreme Court Chief
Justice James C. Adkins has an-
nounced the appointment of
Circuit Judgd Milton A Fried-
man to the Supreme Court's
Committee on the BicentenniaL
established in November of 1974
to organize, coordinate, and im-
plement the Bicentennial activi-
ties of Florida's judiciary and
The Bar.
In making rhe appointment.
Chief Justice Adkins, who serv-
es as chairman of the commit-
tee, said: "It is of paramount
importance that the members of
Florida's judicial system and
The Bar make a meaningful and
lasting contribution to the cele-
bration of our nation's 200th
Birthday. I am delighted that
you have accepted this appoint-
ment. Your participation will
enhance the stature of the com-
mittee and will help insure its
success."
Judge Friedman served 12
years as municipal lodge, seven
years as circuit judge and also
served on the appeals court and
the Supreme Court
fr it -Cr
While visiting the Ringnng
Museum in Sarasota artist
Reyna YoRgeraaaa experienced
a feeling of nostalgia while
viewing the exciting Tiffany
Class Exhibition.
After she received a Tiffany
Foundation Fellowship. Reyna
lived at the Oyster Bay Tiffany
Estate for three months where
she had her own studio along
with 10 other United States
artists awarded the Fellowship.
Many pieces exhibited were of-
ten seen by her in the Tiffany
Estate at that time.
The American Foundation for
the Arts, a non-profit charit-
able foundation active in the
visual and performing arts,
hosted a reception for Miami
artist Jean Serins Saturday
night at the North Bay Road
home ot designer Robert Bleem-
er. Bleemer and the other
Foundation directors, Richard
Levine and Howard Hirschfield.
served as hosts for the party
that featured 40 works of art
by Ms. Nevins.
The guest list included a cross
section of the community. Many
artists and sponsors of the arts
wen* there viewing the collec-
tion Elise Adams was seen
telling Bobby Herman of the
Jockey Club and Belgian artist
Robert Hels Mortel about her
upcoming 'vweek opera tour in
Europe. Jordan Davidson, who
is making the same trip, was
surrounded by four beauties:
Kathy Gordon, Inez Lesser,
Vivian Tischenkel and Shirley
Gilbert.
Art dealer Ida Gallager con-
ferred with Sen. Murray Dubbin
and cousin Sandy Parker; Jack
Herman of the Jockey Club dis-
cussed the condo situation with
attorney Steve Tico and Virgil
Shallaa, developers of the
Charter Club on the bay. Sen.
Kenneth Myers discussed Flor-
ida tourism with Jerry Bariah,
assistant to Miami Beach's City
Manager; Bay Pointers Hilda
and Bradley Dresser were seen
admiring the art collection with
cohosts Bleemer and Levine.
Sir Edwin and Lady Porter
were seen talking with Seymour
Rosenberg, both Pre-Columbian
art collectors, about their fa-
vorite "Digs." Dick Anderson of
football fame drew the admira-
tion of Doris Sutton and in-
terior landscape designer Doris
Haas. The 175 guests danced
and talked until the early hours
of the morning.
The American Foundation for
the Arts' activities for the past
year included provision of the
funds for the University of Mi-
ami to commission a major
piece of sculpture by William
King, similar to his large sculp-
ture in the United Nations Plaza
in New York; a major exhibit of
paintings by Miami ghetto art-
ist Purvis Yoong at Miami-Dade
Community College as part of
Black Culture Week; a one-
month exhibit of 18 unique.
Post Civil War American quilts;
a cocktail buffet at the elegant
Tower House on Miami Beach
hosted by Steve Muss, one of
the trustee*, enjoyed by more
than 400 of the Foundation's
friends.
Coming up during the 1975-76
season will be a series of eve-
nings with collectors in their
homes and artists in their
studios, as well as the sponsor-
ing of the opening exhibit of
the new Metropolitan Museum
and Art Center of Dade County
an invitational show for the
best of South Florida's artists.
AH of these programs will pro-
vide the friends aa opportunity
to actively participate both in
the planning stages as well as
the opening night parties. Thus,
the friende will have a chance
to share the creative experience
with the \iua\ and theatrical
artists involved.
Milton Gordon, a Miami
Beach civic leader, recently re-
turned from a trip to Israel and
Europe which included celebra-
tion of the SOth Jubilee of the
Hebrew University of Jerusa-
lem and a complete tour of the
country.
American Foundation for the Arts directors (from left)
Howard J. Hirschfield, Robert Bleemer and Richard Le-
vine pose with artist Jean Nevins and samples of her
work.
Elizabeth Anne Tinpev Becomes
Bride Of Daniel Carlin Kipnis
Elizabeth Anne Tin?;y.
daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Tyre
G. Patterson of Longmont. Colo.,
became the bride of Daniel
Carlin Kipnis. son ot N'orma
Kipnis of Miami Beach and
Jerome Kipnis of Miami Sun-
day. July 20, at the home of the
bridegroom's family.
The bride, a graduate of
Colorado State University, was
attended by Diane Norma Kip-
nis.
Mr. Kipnis. a graduate of the
Kol Simcha Orchestra Tb
Appear Aug. 1 on Ch. 6
The Kol Simcha Orchestra,
featuring the new sound of
popular Jewish music, will ap-
pear on WCLX-TV's "Judaism
Today" program hosted by Rab-
bi Ralph Z. Glixman. spiritual
leader of B'nai Israel and
Greater Miami Youth Syna-
gogue. Friday, Aug. 1, at 11:30
a.m.
The Kol Simcha Orchestra is
a non-profit development or-
ganization for Jewish youth un-
der the direction of Rev. David
Glixman. who will discuss the
relationship between Judaism
and contemporary' music.
University of Miami, where he
received his Bachelor of Fine
Arts d-e-e and Washington
University, Ft. Louis, which
awirded hi" the Master of Fine
Arts dea'ee. was attended by
Donald Kipnis. best man.
The co-jpl; will regain in
Fouth Florida nntil September,
when they will return to Co-
lumbia South America, where
Mr Kipnis will resume his work
as a sculptor.
i'NAI ISRAEL'
a Or Miami Yuih Syn. .'thd )
Mfft MM*? Strmm wM It SMSSSM h-
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman
Club 4 1st Amr.c
(?rm.rly YM-YWM A
1500 5.W. Sth St.
tkkm *Mb *r rovi 4nf.*
ft xi.rmai.w M* 274-9556
and his
Boca Raton Hotel
and CHub Orchestra
KATHERINE STORM
Katherine Storm
Engaged To Wed
1st Lt. Sley
Mr. nd Mrs. Rilrh CarroHl
Storm of Corpus Chnsti. TexJ
jnmun-:- the engigv-ient oil
thei' daughter. KatheriM, tol
1st Lt Benjamin Harrv Berrjl
Sley. U.S.M.C.. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Sley of PhiUdelpln|
and Miami Beach.
Miss Storm received heri
Bachelor of Science and MasterI
of Science degrees from BaylotJ
University in Waco. Tex.
Lt. Sley, a graduate of Ce|
tral High School in PhiladelJ
phia. earned his Bachelor d.
Science degree from the Uni-
versity of Colorado and gradn-l
ated from Baylor School of La*.
He is presently stationed ii
Owntico, Va.
"Weddings 8.
Bar rWitzv ihs
our Spec 1 a ly
651-2303
JOIN OUR GROUPS SAVE:
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MS B0HEME
SEPT. OCT. 4. DEC. 13
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SRUISE RESERVATION SERVICE
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CALL LEE AT (44-7572
FINE ANTIQUES BOUGHT AMD SOU)
Ready Cash Available For 1 Hem or Entire Estate
PLEASE CALL 866-0905
DECOR INC.
9446 HARDING AVENUE, MIAMI BEACH
ftfOm 1724779
isTAausMfo i
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MOVING & STORAGE
UXAl t LOMC MSTANCf
n smn wmi tiaoi. fimim jam
Come Celebrate at The SEVILLE
WEDDINGS
ANNIVERSARIES
BIRTHDAYS
BANQUETS
BAUTIZO
SWEET 15
ENGAGEMENT
PARTIES
_ ^jevi Lie hotel
fx4ht,es for 75 Minimum to 1.000 Guests Ample /V*/7># Foe 200 Can
2oi ecu** a^o- TKuUni SW/
Reserve Now for Your Festive Occasion!
MANNY ALV. PQQQ a SEVERAOa DIRECTOR PHONE SS2-M11. SHIT. *


Friday, July 25, 1975
+Jewisli trtsHni
Page 9-B
First Year Free At Royal Park,
The Hidden Condominium
by Larry Lowenthal
There's a beautiful apartment
community being built in Fort
Lauderdale, but very few people
know about it.
Why? Because, in the builder's
words, "We're hidden away on a
quiet street, next to a secluded
waterway, across from a secret
county park right in the
heart of town."
Our curiosity was aroused. Most
developments the size of Royal
Park (21 low-rise buildings) are
on main roads for sales pur-
poses, to attract the attention of
passing motorists. Why did the
builder of Royal Park take a
different approach?
"There are plenty of places for
people who don't mind living in
congested areas," said a spokes-
man, "but there wasn't much to
choose from if you wanted an
apartment in a true residential
neighborhood. That's why we
chose this site. It's so different."
DIFFERENT IT IS. Northwest
38th Street is a quiet, paved 2-
lane road with very little traffic.
Oakland Park Boulevard, just a
few blocks south, is a main high-
way that takes the brunt of the
east-west traffic in and out of the
nearby interchange with 1-95.
Royal Park itself has just one
guarded entrance on 38th, a
street full of pleasant single-
family homes.
The property is surrounded by
waterways on three sides for
even more privacy.
"And best of all," they added, "is
the fact the Easterlin County
Park is directly across the east
waterway, so no one will ever
take away our view."
THE PARK PRESENTS a pretty
imposing view. A solid wall of
tall trees faces Royal Park-resi-
dents from across the water.
The rustic park is a haven for
folks who like to picnic, codk
out, camp out, or just sit and
commune with nature.
NO PAYMENTS FOR 1 YEAR.
The builder Crocker & Com-
pany, Oakland Park Inc. has
made special arrangements with
the Irvington Investment Com-
pany, the people who finance
most of the buyers at Royal
Park. Under the terms of the
arrangement, if a purchaser ob-
tains his mortgage on his Royal
Park apartment from Irvington,
then the builder will pay all
mortgage costs, maintenance,
and real estate taxes for the
first 12 months.
They figured out that, for a typ-
ical purchaser, this can result
in cash savings of over 53,700.
New buyers are also eligible for
the 5% Federal tax credit,
which can amount to an addi-
tional savings of $1,400. Add
this to what the builder is of-
fering, and you come up with
cash benefits of over $5,100 in
the first year.
"We're not only offering a
peaceful place to live," he said,
"we're also offering peace of
mind with this program."
THERE ARE MANY RESI-
DENTS now enjoying the com-
forts of condominium living at
Royal Park. That means lots of
grass, 2 heated pools (a 3rd is
on the way), shuffleboard
courts, and an enormous, 12,000
sq. ft. recreation facility with
art and craft rooms, a billiard
room, exercise rooms, card
rooms, saunas and steam baths,
club room with fireplace, and a
huge auditorium with kitchen.
EVERY APARTMENT at Royal
Park comes with individually
controlled central air condition-
ing and heating, wall-to-wall
carpeting, a dishwasher, and
many other deluxe features, in-
cluding a carpeted, screened
balcony.
Prices are quite reasonable,
starting in the low 20's and end-
ing in the upper 20's. There are
3 basic floor plans: 1 bedroom/
1 bath, 1 bedroom/lvi bath, and
2 bedroom/2 bath.
ITS EASY TO FIND Royal Park,
even if it's hidden to heavy
traffic. Just take 1-95 to Oak-
land Park Boulevard, exit east-
bound. Take a left at the first
light, which is known as both
N.W. 9th Avenue and also Pow-
erline Road. Drive north about
3 blocks to the first stoplight,
which is N.W. 38th Street. Turn
left here and you'll be at Royal
Park in about a minute. Their
address is 1500 N.W. 38th Street,
and their phone number is
739rd300.
Swimming pool has country estate aspect at Royal Park.
Fireplace adds to decor of clubhouse
Temple Emanu-EL the new Reform Synagogue, is located on West
Oakland Park Blvd., just a few minutes from Royal Park.
COMMERCIAL BLVD.
38TH ST.
ROYAL
PARK
OAKLAND PARK
BLVD.
i/>
Map locates the hidden condominiums



Page 10-B
* flntfcfi nmrdfirtr
Friday, July 25, 1975
Construction Grant Awarded
To U-M School Of Medicine
A health pro -'
tion ilities construction
;> 5 b. P. '
& I of
Medicine b*-the-Oepartnient of
Ii<- ".: in eltare.
Ci -^1
(D., Fta ) nntifi >d President
H v K>n< Stanford and Dr.
Emanu*! M. Pan?-'". rice presi-
dent for medical affairs and
dean, of the S3.7S6.700 grant,
the largest single federal pwjrd
eve1- received by the School of
Medicine.
This sum represents approx-
imately 70 per cent of the cur-
rent estimated cost of construct-
ing a new Primary Care-Family
Medicine Health Care Center in
the immediate vicinity of Jack-
son Memorial Hospital.
Last March, the Public Health
Trust approved the identifica-
tion of General Obligation Bond
funds in the amount of $1,633,-
800 contingent upon program
approval and federal assistance
for construction of this educa-
tional-service center.
Dr. Bernard J. Fogel, as-
sistant vice president for med-
ical affairs, coordinator of the
grant proposal and co-principal
investigator, stated that the need
to develop a model primary care
training program is especially
critical to Dade County, because
the Decade of Progress Bond Is-
sue and the plans of the Health
Planning Council call for the
establishment of a minimum of
four primary care centers in
Dad rhese centers will
reat'ire personnel highly train-
ed in a heal..... system which
utilizes interdisciplinary teams.
The n ambulatory facility
nwit the school and the
PuWie H .if- Traft to ciordi-
n : ma out-natient activities
for the first time and consoli-
date nuiiierotts services.
In the new facility, which will
be constructed and operated b\
the Trust, the partnership of the
c'-hnol of Medicine and the
Trust will be able to insure thai
primary health services of ade-
quate scope, quantity, and high
quality are available to area
residents, and provided in a
manner which insures economy
for both the consumers and pro-
viders of these services.
This concept has been in-
formally endorsed by the Health
Planning Council which must
give final approval to this new
cooperative project between the
School of Medicine and the Pub-
lic Health Trust.
Judge Conducting Services
Judge Morton L. Abram, a
past oresident of Temple Beth
El, Hollywood, will conduct
Sabbath services Friday at 8:15
p.m. Charles S. Wolfe, a mem-
ber of the board of trustees, will
speak on, "Whom Can You
Trust?" Memorial pravers will
be recided at the conclusion of
services.
Bank of Miami Beach to Open
New Alton Road Office Aug. 1
Bank of Miami Beach, first
in the citv to offer free check-
ing for individuals aged 65 or
over, recently extended its pro-
gram to free checking accounts
for everyone, Shulman noted.
The bank also was among the
first in the nation to provide for
the direct deposit of Social Se-
curity checks.
Riverview Construction Com-
pany of Miami was the general
contractor of the building de-
signed by the award-winning
architectural firm of Fraga and
Associates, specialists in the
construction of remote facilities
for Florida banks.
The official opening of Bank
of Miami Beach's new Alton
Road office at the corner of
Alton Road and 10th Street will
be held at 9 a.m. Friday. Aug.
1. Benjamin I. Shulman, chair-
man of the board, announced
this week.
Mayor Harold Rosen of Miami
Beach will join with Shulman,
bank president Jaime E. Pino
and other South Florida civic
and financial leaders at the rib-
bon-cutting ceremonies.
Drive-in tellers and walk-up
windows form the basis of the
two story building, an ultra-
modern structure which fea-
tures the latest automated
banking and safe equipment by
Mosler Safe Company.
Four drive-in lanes, a walk-
up window and teller service
will be made available to the
public, together with a night de-
pository.
Bank of Miami Beach's Alton
Road office will receive de-
posits, issue withdrawals, cash
checks, make change, accent
payment on loans and provide
other banking services in ac-
cordance with federal and state
banking laws.
Mayor Rosen Appointed To
New President's Council
Continued from Page 1-A
Judge Berkman is former
justice of the peace of Miami
Beach and the neighboring bay-
side communities, and now
serves on the municipal court
bench. He has been active in
numerous Jewish and nonsec-
tarian organizations here for
the past two decades.
Roth is past president of the
Florida regional board of the
Anti Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and former presi-
dent of the Zionist Council of
South Florida. He serves on the
national boards- of the B'nai
B'rith Foundation and of the
Anti-Defamation League.
Isis, a Coral Gables attorney,
is a founder of Temple Beth Am
in South Dade, past president of
the Temple Judea Men's Club
and former vice president of
both Viking General Corpora-
tion and of American Agro-
nomics Corporation.
Volpe, who head6 a Miami
Beach travel agency, is active
in the Cuban Hebrew Congre-
gation and numerous pro-Israel
agencies.
Marlin. chairman of the board
and chief executive officer of
Viking General Corporation, is
a graduate of Miami Beach
High School and of the Uni-
versity of Florida. He was guest
of honor at the 1974 dedication
of the Landow Yestriva Center
in Miami Beach and is active
in the Democratic party.
Dr. Moskowitz, an orthopedic
surgeon, is a member of the
board of directors of the Brew-
ard County Arthritis Founda-
tion. He is a member of the
University of Miami School of
Medicine teaching staff and
serves on the staffs of Doctors
Hospital of Hollywood. Me-
morial Hospital of Hollywood
and the Biscayne Medical Cen-
ter of North Miami.
Eugene Greenspan, executive director of
the Jewish Vocational Service, and Mrs.
Pauline Gould, instructor of the Amer-
ican Red Cross, address the first gradua-
tion of 12 Russian refugees in a home-
companion course. The ceremony took
place on July 17, at the Mt. Sinai Hospi-
tal. The group, which met the require-
ments of the Red Cross for home nursing,
was taught in Yiddish and English.
Jewish Vocational Service
Sponsors Course For Refugees
The first graduation of 12
Russian refugees, trained to
work as home-companions, took
plae* Thursday, July 17, at Mt.
Sinai Hospital.
Among those who graduated
were M. Alperovich. Mrs. C. Al-
perovich, Miss E. Czerniawska.
Mrs. B. Gafanovich, Miss I.
Glossman, A. Moldavan. Mrs. V.
Moldavan. Mrs. B. Malkin, Miss
I. Rosenstein. Mrs. S. Shvaits-
feld, E. Shvartsfeld. A. Urman.
Mrs. T. Urman. Miss E. Vaks,
Mrs. R. Zeliger and Mrs. A.
Zhubrak.
The training course, under
the sponsorship of the Jewish
Vocational Service, was taught
by .Mrs. Pauline Gould, a teach-
er certified by the American
Red Cross. The program, which
met the requirements of the Red
Cross for home nursing, was
taught in Yiddish.
Eugene Greenspan, executive
director of the Jewish Vocation-
al Service, called the program
"a response to a great need in
the Miami area in that it will
be a direct benefit to senior
citizens on Miami Beach."
Trainees who completed the
course are Russian Jewish refu-
gees who have been sponsored
by the Jewish community. The
program will provide employ-
ment for the graduates with
people who need home com-
panions.
The curriculum of this
American Red Cross program
included instructions in ele-
mentary nutrition, basic prin-
ciples of home nursing, bed
making, bathing patients, prop-
er use of wheelchair, walker
and other equipment, as well as
instruction in pulse and temper-
ature taking.
The Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice, through its job placement
program, will serve as a clear-
U0TS Luncheon To Mark
'True Sister Day' Aug. 6
The United Order of True
Sisters, Inc., Miami 43, will
celebrate "True Sister Day,"
Wednesday noon. Aug. 6, with
a special luncheon at the
Sweden House. 17985 BlBOyne
Blvd.
All Sisters and their f.isnIs
are imited to attend and social-
ize with cards and games; the
afternoon is under the chair-
manship of Mrs. Louis Gillman,
with Mrs. Meyer Omansky serv-
ing as cochairman. Mrs. David
Michaelson is president of the
group.
ing house to place home-com-
panions in thj homes of elderly
and ill people.
All graduates have some com-
petence in Enelish and Yiddish.
Employers will pay a minimum
of 52,50 per hour wage for at
least three hours day service.
Call Sam Brown. Jewish Voca-
tional Service Refugee Place-
ment Counselor, for further in-
formation.
The Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice is a beneficiary agency ol
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and the United Way of
Dade Countv.
Fillies And Mores Entered
In Calder's Allamanda 'Cop
At Calder this weekend, the
leading fillies and mares will go
after the S25.OO0 added Alla-
manda handicap. Only six
weeks remain of the summer
meeting which comes to a cli-
max on Labor Day.
Racing fans who are regulars
a re reminded that special 20
coupon half priced discount
booklets good any day and
without quantity restrictions,
are available at the grandstand
admission office. Racing con-
tinues every afternoon but
Sunday and Tuesdav at Calder.
P ist time for the 10 race pro-
i- 1 15 p.m.
JUST REMODELED
Efficiencies 1 Bedroom & 2 Bedrooms
at Rents you can afford.
Overlooking the Bay with Pool.
Furnished or unfurnished.
Air-Cond. No Children or Pets.
Yearly Leases only. Fabulous Location.
Call Sid Howard at
SAXON MANOR APTS.
6800 Indian Creek Dr. Miami Beach
866-6831
BLflCKSTONE
KOSHER HOTEL
3 STRICTLY KOSHER MEALS
( Special Diets Observed )
Planned
Entertainment
Card Room Color
TV Lump
24 Hour Phone
Service
Maid Service
Mashfiachl
Synagogue on
Premises
Near Famous Lincoln
Road
Ocean view Rooms
YEARLY RATE .tOOA Z7T
INCIUDIS3K0SH1BMIAIS fiiW DOUBU OCCUCANCT
StASONAl HATH AVAILABLE UPON BI0U1SI
(or Additional Information CaliS38-l 3 I 1
800 WASHINGTON AVE. MIAMI BtACH


Friday, July 25, 1975
lei*tFk>rk9ln,r
Page 11-B
Landow Yeshiva Center Honors
Founders At June 15 Banquet
Religious Services
During the eighth annual
Scholarship Banquet of the
Landow Yeshiva Center Sunday,
June 15, more than 300 persons
honored its 31 founders.
A special candelabra designed
by artist and sculptor Kenneth
Treister was presented to each
founder. The artwork, cast in
bronze and attached to a ma-
hogany block especially carved
in Honduras for the occasion,
depicts the Holy Shabbos
Candles.
The Candelabra award was
termed the "Ner" Award
meaning light. A Founder of the
school, who contributes $25,000,
establishes a perpetual scholar-
ship in his name, from which a
needy child is able to receive
a Jewish education from nurs-
ery through Rabbinical College.
The first of the candelabras
had been presented to the Luba-
vitcher R-;bbe. Rabbi Menachcm
M. Schneerson. in a special
presentation in Now York to-
gether wi'h Rabbi Sholom I).
Lips'or. derm of the Landow
Yeshiva Center, and Morton
Mayberg, the school's vice
president.
The founders w.mo also pre-
sented with keys to the City of
Miami Beach and received spe-
cial courtesy cards from Coun-
cilman Leonard Haber. who al-
so served as master of cere-
monies.
In his opening remarks. Wil-
liam Mechanic, chairman of the
evening, said, "The type of edu-
cation the children receive at
the Landow Yeshiva Center is
unique and the impact the
school has on the entire com-
munity, with its policy of never
turning away a Jewish child, is
profound."
During the evening celebra-
tion the officers and directors
of the school were installed by
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar. who
charged them with the great re-
sponsibility of "insuring the fu-
ture of our People through Jew-
ish education."
Those installed for the 1975-
1976 school year were Melvin
S. Landow, chairman of the
board; Jack Burstein, president;
Morton Mayberg, 1st vice presi-
dent; Michael Jacobovits, vice
president; Daniel Retter. vice
president; Melvin Feit. secre-
tary; Dr. Michael Goldstein, re-
cording secretary, and Gerald
Gordon, treasurer.
Board members are Irwin
Block. Philip Brafman. Martin
Genet, Rabbi Abraham Korf. Dr.
M. D. Krayanek. Dave Lifshultz,
Dr. Irwin Makovsky. Rabbi P.
Weberman, Kalman Wodonos.
Sherman Baumrind, Dr. Norman
Ditchek, David Dobin, Leonard
Feldman, Dr. Lee Goldberg,
Judge Robert Grover, Leo
Hack, Dr. Murray Kane, Wil-
liam Liss, Louis Makovsky,
Joseph Margulius. William Me-
chanic, Dr. Jack Miller. Eugene
Moses, David Platt. Leo Rappa-
port, King Rich, Samuel
Schechter, Simon Schiff. Joseph
Schmukler. Seymour Schwartz.
Irvin Siegel, Isadore Spolter,
Judge Sherwin Stauber, Irving
Sultan, Dr. Daniel Wuensch and
Leonard Zilbert.
Mr. Landow. in his response
for the Founders Award, de-
clared that it is important for
us to realize the priorities we
have in our own commitments
for future Jewish existence.
The evening was filled with
Chassidic dancing, with the
young men from the Yeshiva
Gedolah of Greater Miami pro-
viding a high spiritual tempo
not often experienced in Miami
Beach. Rabbi Yehuda Leib Scha-
piro. Rosh Yeshiva of the Ye-
shiva Gedolah, gave the invo-
cation, reading a tetter from
the Lubavitcher Rebbe.
The keynete address was de-
livered by Dr. Herman Bran-
over, prominent scientist in the
fi:ld of magn?to-hydrodvnamic
turbulence who is the only Is-
ra?li scientist to have a contract
from the U.S. Navy.
Dr. Branover. who paid the
highest ransom on record to be
permitted to leave Russia and
is now a professor at the Uni-
versity of Beersheva in Israel,
said the Jews of America are
fortunaf to b-> able to practice
their religion in a free country.
If he could do it all over
again, he added, he would give
up his post, honors and exper-
tise to be a teacher in a Ye-
shiva, where he could aceom-
plish the purpose of eternity.
Founders honored at the ban-
quet included Rose Ansel. Re-
gina Brandes. Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Burns. Mr. and Mrs.
Victor Buscaino. Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Burstein. Mr. and Mrs.
Maurice Cohen. Dr. and Mrs.
Maxwell Dauer. Mr. and Mrs.
S. Hallock duPont. Jr., John
Farrell. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin
Feit. Mr. and Mrs. Solomon
Carazi. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald
Gordon. Dr. and Mrs. Abel
Holtz, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Hutner. Melvin S. Landow,
Shirley Landow. Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Levitz. William Liss. Ber-
nice Liss, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Margulius, Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ton Mayberg, Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
liam Mechanic. Mr. and Mrs.
David Platt. Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Retter. Mr. and Mrs.
Conrad W. Robbins. Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Russell. Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Schechter. Etta Schiff.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schmuk-
ler, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Siegel
and Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Zil-
bert.
MIAMI
AHAVAT SHALOM CONGREGA-
TION 995 SW 67th Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Zvi Raphaely. Cantor Aron
Ben Aron. 1
--------------
ANSHE EMES. 2533 SW 19th Am.
Conservative. Cantor Sol Pakowitz.
2
JETH AM C-mpl). 5950 K. Kendall
Dr.. So. Miami. Reform. Rabbi Her-
bert M. Baumgard. Associate Rabbi
Barry Altman. 3
---------------
CONGREGATION BET BREIRA. 107-
55 S.W. 112th St. Liberal. Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff. 3-A
AGUDATH ACHIM. 3rd Ave. Hebrew
Heligious Community Center. 19254
NE 3rd Ave. Orthodox. 33-A
dETH DAVID. 2625 SW 3rd Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Sol Landau
Cantor William Lipson. 4-A
ETH DAVID SOUTH. 7500 SW
120th St. Conservative. Rabbi Sol
Landau. Cantor William Lipson. 4 B
BETH KODESH 1101 SW 12th Ave.
Modern Traditional. Rabbi Max Sha-
piro. Cantor Leon Segal. Rev. Alex
Siahl. Rev. Mendel Cutterman. 6
3ETH TOV ,Temol'. 6438 SW Pth
St. Conservative. Ratbi Charles Ru-
bel. 8
-NAI ISRAEL AND GhEATER
MIAMI VCJTH SYNAGOGUE. 9610
Sur.set Drive. Ortholox. Rabbi Ralph
Glixman. 8-A
OR OLOM (Tempi*) 6755 SW 16'h
St. Conservative Kabbi David M.
aaror. Can'.o' Stamey Hicn. 13
TEMPLE ISRAEL'sOUTH (Formerly
Beth Tikva) 9028 Sunset Or. Reform.
Rabbi Joseph R. Narot. 13-A
8AMU E-_. (Temple) 89C0 SW 107th
Ave.. Suite J06. Rabbi Maxwell
Berger 9
TIFERETH ISRAEL (Temple). 6500
N. Miami Ave. Conservative. 14
Pictured at the eighth annual Scholarship Banquet spon-
sored by Landow Yeshiva Center are (from left) Coun-
cilman Leonard Haber, M.D., who served as master of
ceremonies; Kenneth Treister, designer of the Per Award
presented to each founder; Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar,
dean of the educational facility; Melvin S. Landow, chair-
man of the board, and Jack Burstein, president.
Question Box
riON (Temple). 8000 MiMer Rd. Con-
irv,vive Rabbi Norman S'tapjro.
Cantor Errol HeMman. If
HIALIAH
TIFERETH JACOB (Temple). 951 E.
4th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Nathan Zolondek. IS
riORiH MIAMI
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION.
2225 N.E. 121st St. Conservative.
Rabbi Dr. Daniel J. Fingerer. Can-
tor Yehuda Binyamin. 35
MIAMI BEACH
ASUDATH ISRAEL. 7801 Carlyle Ave.
Orthodox Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever. 17
ETH EL. i400 Pine Tree Dr.
Orthodox. S
ETH ISRAEL. 770 40th St. Orthodox.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro. 18
8ETH JACOB. 301 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky. Cantor Maurice Mamches.
W
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
(e) 1975. Jewish Telegraphic Aaency
Why does Jewish tradi-
tion require a very re-
strictive procedure in kill-
ing an animal which is per-
missible for food?
A number of reasons are of-
fered in various texts of rab-
binic literature.
Some claim that this parallels
the procedure which is required
in order to bring an animal for
a sacrifice on the altar. The
Jewish table represents the
altar. Thus the animal must be
killed in the same way in which
it was killed for the act of sac-
rifice.
Rabbi Bahya comments that
before the flood in the days of
Noah man was permitted only
a vegetarian diet of fruits and
vegetables. It was only after the
flood, as his desire increased
with great pressure, that he was
allowed to eat the flesh of ani-
mals.
Jews, in the course of their
travels through the wilderness,
were allowed to eat the meat
only if it came from animals
that were brouent as a sacrifice
in the sanctuary. Only some
time later were Jews allowed
to slaughter animals for food
alone, presumably because they r-
were at times too far away from j
the sanctuary. Even then the
procedure of slaughter was still
the same as was done for the
altar.
Maimonides explains that the j
permission to eat meat was a
special dispensation allowed
man because his natural diet
should have been strictly vege-
tarian. This dispensation to eat
meat was only given if man
would be as compassionate in
his slaughter of the animal as
possible. The Jewish method of
slaughter (shechitah) is the
most compassionate method of
slaughter.
Nachmanides raises the
question of the right of man to
take the life of another living
creature, i.e., an animal. He
hints that man, a higher being
because of his intellect, was
given this right provided he did
the killing in the most humane
manner.
Some commentaries indicate
that the procedure of shechitah
was required of a Jew who
wished to eat meat as a pos-
sible means of discouraging him
from eating meat whose prep-
aration required so many tech-
nicalities.
The very procedure of killing
an animal properly is involved
with so many details that, at
least, it shows man how much
care and concern should be in-
volved before taking the life of
a fellow creature, especially to
see to it that a minimum of
pain and discomfort is caused.
BETH RAPHAEL (Temple). 1545 Jef-
ferson Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Elliot Winograd. Cantor Saul Breeh.
20
SETH SHOLOM (Temple). 4144 Chase
Ave. Liberal. Rabbi Leon Kroniah.
Cantor David Conviser. 21
'EMPLr BETH SOLOMON. 1031
Lincoln Rd. Modern Conservative.
Rabbi David Raab. Cantor Morde
rai Yardeini. 21-A
CONGREGATION BETH TFILAH.
935 Euclid Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi I.
M. Tropper. 22
SETH YOSEPH CHAIM CONGRE
CATION. 843 Meridian Ave. 22-A
TEMPLE BNAI ZION. 200 178th St..
Miami Beach. Rabbi Dr. Abraham I.
Jacobson. 22-B
CUBAN MEBREW CONGHFGATION
1242 Washington Ave. Orthodox.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig. 23
CUBAN SEPHARDIC HEBREW CON-
GREGATtON. 715 Washington Ave.
Rabbi Meir Masliah Melamed. 23-A
CMANU-EL (Temple). 1701 Washing-
ton Ave. Consei vative. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman. Cantor Zvl Adler, 24
HEBREW ACADEMY. 2400 Pine Tree
Dr. Orthodox. Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross. 29
----------------
JACOB C. COHEN COMMUNITY
SYNAGOGUE. 1532 Washington Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi Tibnr H. Stern.
Cantor Meyer Engel. 26
KNESETH ISRAEL. K15 Euclid Ave.
Orthodox. Rabbi David Lehrfield,
Cantor Abraham Self. 27
MENORAH (Temple). 620 75th St.
Conservative. RaDol Mayer Abram-
owltz. Cantor Nico Feldman. 28
NER TAMID (Temple). 79th St. and
Carlyle Ave. Conservative. Rabbi
Eugene Labnvitz. Cantor Edward
Klein. 29
OHEV SHALOM. 7055 Bonita Dr.
Orthodox. Rabbi Phineas A. Weber-
man. St)
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER. 646
Collins Ave. Rabbi Sadi Nahmiaa. 31
CONGREGATION ETZ CHAIM. 1542
44 Waahington Ave. 32
NORTH BAY VILLAGE JEWISH
CENTER. 1720 79th St. Causeway,
North Bay Village. Conservative.
Cantor Murray Yavneh S2-A
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AGUDAS ACHIM Nl'SACH SEFARO
CONGREGATION. 707 5th SL
Orthodox. Rabbi Mordecai Chaimo-
v.ts. .
BETH TORAh. :051 N. Miami Beach)
Blvd. Conservative. Rahbi Max Lip-
schitz. Cantor Jacob B. Mendelson.
34
BNAI RAPHAEL. 1401 NW 183rd R*.
Conservative. Rabbi Victor D. Zwel-
ing. Cantor Jack Lemer. 3*
SINAI (Templet OF NORTH DADB
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kmgsley. Cantor Irvingj
Shulkes. 37
SKY LAKE SYNAGOGUE. 18151 NE
19th Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi Dov
Bidnick. it
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER I/:
AMI. 990 NE 171st St. Orthodox
Rabbi Zev l.eff. St
CORAL GABLES
JUDEA (Temple). S550 Granada Blvd.
heform. Raob' Michael B. Eisen-
stat. Cantor -ita Shore. 44)
SRA6L (Temple) OF GREATER
MIAMI. 137 NE 19'.:. St. Reform.
Rabbi -oseoh R. Narot. 10
SRAELITE ENTER. 31/5 SW 25th
St. Conservative. Rabbi Solomon
Waidenberg. Cantor Nathan Parnass
11
ZAMORA i"empiei. 44 2amora Ave.
Conservative. Kabbi Maurice Klein.
41
MNsfStPf
MOGAN DWID CONGREGATION
9348 Harding Ave. Orthodox. Rabbi
Isaac D Vine. 60
fCRT IAUDCR0AIE
BETH ISRAEL (Temple). 7100 'N.
Oak'and Park Blvd. Rabbi Philip A.
Labowitz Cantor Maurice New. 42
EMANU-EL. 3243 W. Oakland Park
Bl\d. Reform. Cantor Jerome Kle-
ment. 43
CO*AL SPHINGS HEBRfcW CON.
GREIiATION. Reform. 3501 Univer-
sity ur. Rah:-i Max Weitz. 44
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
NW 57th St. Conservative. Pabbl
Milton J. Gross. 44-A
YOUNG ISRAEL of HOLLYWOOD
(Orthodox! 3P91 Stirling Rd. S3
PWHPANO BEACH
MARGATE JEWISH CENTER 61T
""W 9th Pt. 4->
sholom (Temple). 132 SE 11th Ave.
Conservative. Rabbi Morris A. Skop,
Cantor Yaacov Renzer. 4*>
HALL AND ALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER.
Conservative. 416 NE 8th Ave. Rabbi
Harry E Schwartz. Cantor Jacob
Danziger 12
HOLLYWOOD
BETH EL (Temple). 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe. Assist-
ant Rabbi Harvey M. Rosenfelf
BETH FHALOM (Temple). 4601 Ar-
thur St. Conservative. Rabbi Mortotj
Malavsky Cantor Irving Gold. 40
S I N A I (Temple). 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi David Shapiro.
Associate Rabbi Chaim S. Listfield.
TEMPLE BETH AHM. Coneervatlve.
310 SW 62nd Ave.. Hollywood. Rabbi
Oavid Rosenfield. 47-
TEMPLE SOLEL .Liberal) 5100 Sher-
idan St.. Hollywood. Rabbi Robert
Frazin. 41-O
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGRE-
GATION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd.. Plan-
tation. Rabbi Arthur S. Abrams.
MIR AMAH
ISRAEL (Temple). 6920 SW S5th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Avron. Drazin.
Cantor Abraham Kester. 4t
HOMESTEAD
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER.
183 NE 8th St Conservative. 61
KDATH YESHURUN (Temple). 1028
N E. Miami Gardena Dr. Conserva-
tive. Cantor Ian Alpern.________ S3
Airmail-lst Class
Consolidation
Awaits Rate Hike
With the postage rate issues
still unsettled by the Postal Rate
Commission, the Aug. 1. target
date to consolidate airmail and
First Class mail (up to 12 ounc-
es) will be temporarily post-
poned.
E. H Daws. District Manag-
er Postmaster of Miami, said
that an activation date for this
planned service improvement
program will be determined af-
ter the postage rate issue has
been announced by the Com-
mission.
"The Postal Service is unable
to proceed with the program
until a decision on postage rates
has been arrived at by the Post-
al Rate Commission," explained
the District Manager Postmas-
ter, "since the upgrading of
First Class mail to airmail serv-
ice is sensitive to revenue re-
lationships between the two
types of mail."
Once the Postal Rate Commis-
sion decision is issued and ana-
lyzed, pertinent operational ac-
tion courses will be determined
and a new target date for ac-
tivation of the program will be
announced.
"We are continuing our ef-
forts to unerade First-Class mail
service, pending the Postal Rate
Commission decision," he
stressed,_____________^


'
Page 12-B
"Jewistincrkfton
Friday, July 25, i97j-
1
m nation utnmm
* :
t
X
'St I
-> 11, 'Jjadl

The ATnericun Savings Main Office at Washington Ave-
nue and Lincoln Road (top) rings out the Bicentennial
year with Americana songs, played daily on its Carillon
chimes. The Bay side Opice at 1200 Lincoln Rd. (bottom)
reflects the nation's origin with mosaic murals of Amer-
ican scenes which decorate the exterior walls of the
building. All Dade and Broward offices display the na-
tion's flag 3b5 days a year, spotlighting it when flown
at night.
Ford Urged to End
^ Discriminatory
Practices in Army
WASHINGTON The Amer-
ican Jewish Congress urged
President Ford to end the
"odious practice" of discrimina-
tion against Jewish Array per-
sonnel in assignments to Saudi
Arabia and other Arab coun-
tries as revealed in a report of
the General Officers' Steering
Committee on Equal Opportu-
nity.
"The United States Govern-
ment may not enter into dis-
criminatory partnerships," the
Jewish organization wrote the
President.
THE ARMY'S assignment of
personnel -00 the basis of race.
religion, national origin or sex-
was an "intolerable situation"
that "violates fundamental
American law" even when done
at the behest of a foreign gov-
ernment, the American Jewish
Congress said in a letter to the
White House.
The General Officers' report
confirmed charges that the
Army Corps cf Engineers had
acquiesced in Saudi Arabian de-
mands not to nave Jewish per-
sonnel on projects in that coon-
try. The Steering Committee
recommended immediate ter-
mination of such duennuna-
rjon.
In his letter 10
Fowl. Howard M.
JUP.Jfet*.
American Jewish Congress Gov-
erning Council, wrote that the
prohibition against religious
discrimination in the selection
of government employees was
"particularly dear."
He declared:
"SUCH DISCRIMINATION of-
fends not only general consti-
tutional principles but also the
specific provision in Article VI.
Section 3 of the Constitution
which declares that 'no religious
test shall ever.be required as a
qualification to. any office or
public trust under the United
States'."
Squadron added. "The kind of
discrimination of which the
United States Army has now
been found guilty is, as you put
it in a forthright statement last
February, totally contrary to
the American tradition and re-
pugnant to American princi-
ples.'
"At the time you made that
statement. Mr. President, you
pledged not only that any alle-
gations of discrimination would
be fully investigated but also
that 'appropriate action' would
be taken under the laws of the
United States.'
"Now that the facts nave
clear. ia tape for
The American Jewish
Congress therefore urges, you.
as Cttssnander-ia-Chief of the
a-
Joseph Handleman Elected
By American Red Magen DavicJ
Joseph Handelman of Detroit
and Miami Beach, long-time
participant in the United Jew-
ish Appeal and Jewish educa-
tional causes, has been elected
national president of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel. His election was an-
nounced by ARMDI national
board chairman Emanuel Cellar,
furrier chairman of the House
Judiciary Committee.
Handelman assumes the lead-
ership of the American Red
Magen David, the sole agency
in the United States authorized
to solicit and collect funds for
the Magen David Adorn. Israel's
Schwartz
Appointed
Chairman
Gerald Schwartz. Miami
Beach fund raising and public
relations executive, has been
appointed Israel Committee
chairman of the B'nai B'rith
Council of South Florida.
Schwartz's acceptance was an-
nounced by Barry Gurland,
president of the Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges in Dade
County.
A former national Israel
Bonds chairman for B'nai B'rith.
Schwartz is a former state
chairman of the Israel Commit-
tee of the nation's largest Jew-
ish fraternal organization. He is
past president of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith and
was president of the Henry
Monsky Lodge of B'nai B'rith
weekly luncheon club in
Omaha. Nebraska.
Schwartz serves in develop-
ment fund capacities for such
organizations as the American
Red Magen David for Israel and
Bar-Han University in Israel
and is public relations consult-
ant for the Pioneer Women.
A member of the national
board of directors of the
American Zionist Federation
and past president of the Zion-
ist Council of South Florida.
Schwartz has served in leader-
ship positions for the United
Jewish Appeal. Israel Educa-
tion Fund. State of Israel Bonds,
the American Friends of the
Hebrew University and several
other Israeli-oriented agencies.
Schwartz, a vice president of
the National Society of Fund
Raisers Gold Coast (Florida)
chapter and an accredited mem-
ber of the Public Relations So-
ciety of America, is a graduate
of the University of Miami and
of North Carolina State Univer-
sity.
Schwartz, bead of a public
relations and advertising agen-
cy in Miami Beach for more
than 2S years, was publicity di-
rector of the VS. Army m
Europe after World War H. and
* press aeoetaiy to the
Governor of Nebraska.
A former Deputy Chairman
of the 14-state Democratic Mid-
west Conference. Schwartz has
played active roles in the Pres-
idential campaigns of John F.
Kennedy. Lyndon B. Johnson.
Adlai Stevenson. Estes Kefauv-
er. Hubert H. Humphrey and
Henry M (Scoop) Jackson.
Schwartz will coordinate ef-
forts of the B'nai B'rith lodges
in Sooth FWnda in behatf of
B'nai B'rith progiatua in Israel
I the 3vw
national Red Cross society.
Originator and creator of the
Handelman Company in De-
troit, a firm listed on the New
York Stock Exchange. Handle-
man is now an independent
sales consultant.
A contributor to the Jewish
Federations of Detroit and
Greater Miami. Handleman has
served on the national board of
directors and the executive
committee of the ARMDI for
the past five years. He served
as the cochairman of this sum-
mer's highly successful Inter-
national Conference of the
Magen David Adorn held in Is-
rael, and hns visited the Jew-
ish state prior to and since its
rebirth in 19*8.
Deeplv interested in all as-
pects of education. Handleman
has established the Joseph and
Sallv Handleman Communica-
tions Center at The Dropsie
University in Philadelphia, the
Handleman Institute of Record-
ed Sound at the University of
Miami School of Music and the
Laboratory of Languages at the
Hillel Day School in Detroit.
Mrs. Handleman. the former
Sallv Kabaker. was born in
Clinton. 111., but she and her
husband, born in Buffalo, spent
Youth Program
Announced By
Ni Miami Temple
Beth Moshe Congregation of
North Miami, under the spirit-
ual leadership of Dr. Daniel J.
Fingerer. announces a youth
program for Elementary (K-6)
school children at the Center
Mondays and Wednesdays from
4 to 6 p.m.
The junior and senior high
teens will have a separate teen
lounge Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 7 to 10 p.m. Classes will
include movement and dance,
painting, puppetry, arts and
crafts, cooking, sewing, small
fry gymnastics and folk sing-
ing.
The older groups will partici-
pate in a horseback riding club,
music club, cultural program,
scuba club, and other varied
activities.
Jules Einhorn. educational
director at the center, plans to
have a strong USY group with
many Shabbatons and Kinosims.
For the retired people. Beth
Moshe will sponsor a strong
activity day every' Monday at
9:30 am.
Services begin at 8:15 p.m.
Fridays and Shabbat morning
at 900 a.m.
President Ephraim Katztt
of the State of Israi.'. leH,
congratulates Joseph Han-
dleman of Detroit and Mi-
ami Beach on his election
as national president of the
American Red Masen Da-
vid for Israel. ARMDI is
the sole support and sup-
ply wing in the Vr.hed
States of Magen David
Adorn.
most of their lives in D-.troit
before moving to Miami Beach.
The Kabaker familv has been
for many years amonj: the lead-
ers in Michigan in support of
Israel, communal and congrega-
tional activities. The Jewtsfc
National Fund. UJA and Ha-
dassah arc among -cores of
causes which have enjoyed
their benefactions.
The Kabakers have planted
one of the largest .INK forest!
in Israel in memory 0; David
Kabaker. have established I
synagogue in Ashkelon. Israel,
and a social center in a Yemen-
ite settlement near Jerusaleffl.
She has been a longtime sup-
porter of the American Red
Magen David for Israel, donat-
ing an ambulance on her owl
and joining with her husband ia
local, national and international
efforts for the Magen David
Adorn.
The Magen David Adorn id
Israel serves as the nation!
Civil Defense as well a? m
Cross agency, and in warn
is an auxiliary of the Zaltf,
Israel's Defense Forces.
The American Red MageJ
David for Israel Is a voluntary
agency, headquartered a W
York City, which ha> 56 chap-
ters throughout the In**
States. Funds raised by m
ARMDI are used for the b*ood
bank, first aid. emergency res-
cue and other medical and nr
manitarian programs
Magen David Adorn in Janet
CHANG* Of ADMtm?
Please use this form tc notify THE JEWISH FLORID!AN of'
any change in your subscription address. Please alto* t*o
weeks for changes.
Name ____
OlO ADOtESS
attach mailing lb*4
frem mis issue hare
NEW ADDRESS
Apt. No
State_____________Zip
Street _./____
Gty-----------_...
Effective date
PtEASE USE THIS FORM
MAH TO;
tw mm
.o. IOX 01



lay, July 25, 1975
*'Jmisti fk>ridian
13-B
Inside Judaica
UGAt NOTKI
IEGAI NOTICI
UCAL NOTKf
Jewish
1961
1962
196$
Who are the
Nobel Laureates?
The Nobel Prize is awarded
[annually to men and women
[who have "rendered the great-
test service to mankind." Since
[the inception of the-prize in
11899 it has-been awarded to the*" 1973 Brian David-Josephson
following 67 Jews or people 6f Economics
1965
1969
1971
Robert Hofstadter
Lev Davidovich Landau
Richard Phillips
Feynman
Julian Schwinger
Murray Gell-Mann
Dennis Gabor
Jewish descent:
World Peace
1911 Alfred Fried
11911 Tobias Michael Carel
Asser
11963 Rene Cassin
[1973 Henry Alfred Kissinger
I Literature
Il910
1970 Paul Anthony Samuel son
1971 Simon Kuznets
1972 Kenneth Joseph Arrow
UAL NOTICE
Paul Johann Ludwig
Heyse
Henri Bergson
Boris Pasternak
Shmuel Yosef Agnon
Nelly Sachs
Physiology and Medicine
1903 Elie Metchnikoff
Paul Ehrlich
Robert Barany
Otto Meyerhof
Karl Landstelner
Otto Warburg
Ernst Boris Chain
Hermann Joseph Muller
Tadeus Reichstein
Selman Abraham
Waksman
|1953 Hans Krebs
|l953 Fritz Albert Lipmann
|l953 Joshua Lederberg
H9S9 Arthur Kornberg
11964 Konrad Bloch
11965 Francois Jacob
Il965 Andre Lwoff
|l9r>7 George Wald
Il968 Marshall W. Nirenberg
[1969 Salvador Luria
[1970 Julius Axelrod
B97D Sir Bernard Katz
Il972 Gerald Maurice Edelman
[1927
1 58
1966
1966
1908
1>>14
1922
h930
|l 1945
B946
p950
1^52
Chemistry
J1905 Adolph Von Baeyer
Henry Moissan
Otto Wallach
Richard Willstaetter
Fitz Haber
George Charles
de Hevesy
Melvin Calvin
Max Ferdinand Perutz
William Howard Stein
hysics
936 Otto Loewi
Otto Loewi
Joseph Erlanger
Herbert Spencer Gasser
Albert Abraham
Michelson
11908 Gabriel Lippmann
11921 Albert Einstein
11922 Niels Bohr
Il925 James Franck
11925 Gustav Hertz
11943 Otto Stern
(1944 Isidor Isaac Rabi
11952 Felix Bloch
11954 Max Born
11958 Igor Tamm
(l959 Emilio Segre
[i960 Donald A. Glaser
11906
1910
11915
1918
B943
|l961
1962
1972
11936
11944
|l944
Il907
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TH
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OP
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-477
In RK: Estate of
JAMKS BURDEN,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditor! and All persona
Having Claim.'" or Demands Attains!
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and reaulr-
ad in oreaenl any claims and de-
mands winch vi.u mav have against
the estate of JAMBS BURDEN'
deceased late of Dade Countv. Florida.
10 the Circuit Judges of Dade Countr.
and Me the same In ilunlicate and as
provided In Section 733.16. Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
tv Courthouse in Dude Countv. Flor-
ida, within four calendar month*
from the time of the first publication
hereof, or the same will be barred
Filed at Miami. Florida, tin.- 21st
day of July. AD. 19TB.
BRUCE BURDEN
As Executor
First publication of this notice on
the 25th day of July. 1975.
M. JAY BENNETT
Attorney for Executor
lino Kane Concourse. Suite 201.
Bay Harbor Islands. Fla
7/25 8-1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CITY BANK BUI UMNO at number
12550 Biscayne Boulevard, in the Cltv
of Miami. Florida, intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv. Florida.
STUART Z PERLMAN. Trustee
SMITH. MANDIiEK. SMITH.
PARKER A WERNER
Attorney for Applicant
107 Lincoln Road. Suite 7-B
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Tel: 534-8271)
7/25
8/1-8-13
UCAL NOTKI
.,. THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ILEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAOC COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 7S-4SZ7
He Estate of
FLORENCE S. GREENBERG
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All Creditors and All Persons Hav-
Claims or Demands Against Said
Kite:
You are hereby notified and reouir-
to present anv claims and demands
kleh you may have against the es-
>'of FLORENCE S. GREENBBRO
Sased late of Cuvahoga Countv.
to the Circuit Judges of Dade
,Jty. and file the nnw In dupli-
^e and as provided In Section 733.16.
orida Statutes, in their offices In
'Countv Courthouse in Dade Coun-
Flortda. within four calendar
JDths from the time of the first
Ication hereof, or the same will
barred.
Tiled at Miami. Florida, this 23rd
'of July. AD. 1975.
DAVID B. GRBBNBKRG
As Ancillary Executor
(First publication of this notlc* on
-"th dav of July. 1975.
HTH. MANDLER. SMITH.
IHKF.R & WERNER
SAMUEL S SMITH
|tornev for Ancillary Executor
Lincoln Road
lami Beach. Florida 33139
7/25 8/1
NOTICE UNDER
, FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN thai
|e undersigned, desiring to engage
'usinesa under the fictitious
!-ine of Continental Doors, at 1031
V- 8th St.. Miami. Florida 33136
Hinil t register said name with the
k*rk of the Circuit Court of Dade
pountv. Florida. t
ISAAC SCHIGIELi
7/11-18-25 8/1
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF
BULK TRANSFER
Pursuant to Florida Statute 676.S-107
a bulk transfer under Article 6 of the
Uniform Commercial Code will be
made at the law offices of Marvin A
Sheppard. 9150 s w 87th Avenue. Mi-
ami. Florida hi or after August. 25.
1975. at 2:00 P.M.. between Turando
Terra .ciano d/b/a Momma Pisza.
Transferor, whose business address is
16999 a Dixie Hlghwav. Miami. Flor-
i la and N'atallno Galll and Aurora
Galli. Transferee, whose business ad-
drwa will be 1SH99 S. Dixie Highway.
Miami. Florida.
During the three years last oast the
Transferor, so far as is known to the
Transferee, has used no other business
nam- or address other than that listed
above.
Debts of Transferor, relevant to said
business, will be paid in full as they
fall due as the result of this transfer.
Creditors of the Transferor should file
their claims with Herbert Z. Marvin.
Attorney at 9150 S. W. 87th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, on or before August
22. 1975.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 22nd
day of Julv. 1975.
NATAIJNO GALLI
AURORA GALLI
Transferee
Publication of this notice on the
25th dav of Julv. 1973.
Marvin A Sheppard
9150 s w 87th Avenue. Suite 103
Miami. Florida 33176
Attorneys for Transferee
7/25/75
NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of CANTON and CANTON OF WEST-
CHESTER at number 2501 S.W. 87th
Avenue, in the Citv of Miami. Florida,
intends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade Countv. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thjs 21st
dav of Julv. 1975.
ANTHONY LEY CHU
7/25 8/1-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75.2*7
In RE: Estate of ____
JAMES ALEXANDER PLATER
d-ceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Te All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate: M
You are hereby notified and reaulr-
ed to present anv claims and demands
which you mav have against the es-
tate of JAMES ALEXANDER
PLATER deceased late of Dade
Countv. Florida, to the Circuit Judges
of Dade County, and file the same In
duplicate and as provided In Section
733.16. Florida Statutes. In their of-
fices in the Countv Courthouse In
Dade Countv. Florida, within four
calendar months from the time of the
first publication hereof, or the earn*
will be barred. .: .. rf
Filed at Miami. Ftr.rlda. this 21st
dav of Julv. AD. '975
INDIA WYCHE
As Administratrix
First publication of this notice on
the 25th dav of-ilulv. 1975.
LOUIS GLAZBR
Attorney for .Estate of James
Alexander Plater.
mil Biucji.v-ne Boulevard
Korth Miami. Florida 33161
7/Z5 /
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name of
CONCEPT HH (SPORTABLES1 at
1115 N.E. 123th SL. North Miami.
Fla. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv. Florida.
CONCEPT 2000 N.V.
ROBERT GENIN. Presidenjr W
RICHARD KROOP
Kwitnev. KroiKi A Schetnherg
Suite 112. 420 IJncolh Road t
Miami Beach
_______________________7/23 -8/1-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTV. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-11CM
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF AOTION
ROTHMAN HOMES. INC.
a Florida corporation
Plaintiff.
REOINA POOL HOMES. INC.. a
Florida corporation. MORRIS
LEONARD HERMAN, individually
et al..
Defendants.
TO: MELVIN O. DODSON. M.D.
9000 Coral Reef Drive
Miami. Florida
THOMAS LEROUX
17430 S. Dixie Hwv.
Miami. Florida
MARILYN LEROT'X
17430 S. Dixie'Hwv.
Miami. Florida
YOU. AND EACH OF YOU. ARE
NOTIFIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following
property m Dade Count v. Florida:
I.ot 16. Block 3. and Ixits I. 6. 7.
8. 8 and i". Block :. slachtbi:
SUBDIVISION as recorded In Plat
Book 88. Page 92 of the Public
Records of Dade Countv. Florida,
has been filed against vou and vou
are reouired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if anv. to it on
Myers. K.i nla n l.evinson A Kenin.
atteatlon: Edwin If, Ginsburg. Eso .
Plaintiff's attorneys whose address
ll Suite 700. 1428 Brickell Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33131. phone number
(SOS) .'171-9041. on or before August
22. 1975. and file the original with
the clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against vou for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on Julv 17th. 1975.
RICHAl'.D P. BRINKER,
as Clerk of the Court
Bv: N. A HEWETT
Deputv Clerk
7/25 8/1-8-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7S-23410
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN PAUL aka ANTELOT
LAFLEUR.
Husband. Petitioner,
and
SARA ALCIME LAFLEUR.
Wife. Respondent.
TO: SARA AIX"IME LAFLEUR
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reauired to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 83131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Aug.
29. 1975: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORJDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21st dav of Julv. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B. J. FOY
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Phone: .158-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
_________7/25 8/1-S-1S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO 7523399
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DANTE MATIOLI RUOZI.
Husband. Petitioner
MARGARITA JOSEFA NAVARRO
MORENO RUOZI.
Wife. Respondent.
TO: MARGARITA JOSEFA
NAVARRO MORENO RUOZI
Av. Bolet. Ed. Domlnodor
Santo Monica. Caracas. Venes
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou Jre reauired to serve a cony of
vour written defenses. If any. to it on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Aug.
29. 1975: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORXDIAN.
WITNESS my hand aal the seal of
said court .at Miami Florida, on this
Jlst dav or Jufr. 197K.
RICHARD P. BRINKB8L
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B. J FOY
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 1*131
Phone: 358-6090
Attorney for Petitioner
7 23 8/1-8-13 (
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DAC4E COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23406
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
(IENESE JACKSON.
Wife. Petitioner,
and
JOSEPH WILLIAM JACKSON, A
Husband. Respondent.
TO: JOSEPH WILLIAM JACKSON
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reouired to serve a cov of
your written defenses. If anv. to It on
DANIEL BETTER, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 Bast Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above stvled court on or before Aug.
29. 1975: otherwise a default will he
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLOR1DIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court a: .Miami. Florida on this
21st dav of Julv. H7V
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv li .1 Ki iV
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQUIRE
l'H Baal Flagler street No. sol
Miami. Florida 33131
civile: 358.(090
Attorney for Petitioner
7.23 8/1-8-18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT CVS THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-22987
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage ,.f
GERALD T. UTMAN..
P-titioner.
and
OAYI.E J. UTMAN.
Respondent.
TO: GAYLE J. UTMAN
;'>8 Mllford Street
Medwav. Massachusetts
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
vou are reouired to serve a corn- of
vour written defenses to It. if anv you
have, on V. ROBERT CARLISIJ5. At-
torney for the Petitioner, at his
address: 299 Alhambra Circle. Coral
Gables. Florida 33134. on or before
the 29th day of Aug.. 1975. and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court, either before service on Peti-
tioner's attorney, or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise, a default will
be entered against vou for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on Julv 17. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
as Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: L. S. DePIETRO
Deputy Clerk
7/25 8/1-8-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23401
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIE SAINTERCILE POINVIL
SIMON
Wife. Petitioner,
and
JEAN SIMON.
Husband. Respondent.
TO: JEAN SIMON
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
v >u are reouired to serve a coov of
vour written defenses. If anv. to It on
DANIEL RETTER. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 801 Dade
Federal Building. 101 East Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above stvled court on or before Aug.
29. 1975: otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for the relief de-
manded in the comnlaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FI-OR1DIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21st dav of Julv. 1975
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv B J FOY
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL RETTER. ESQITRE
801 Dade Federal Building
101 East Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Attorney for Petitioner
7'23 8'1-8-15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 74-4804
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX WEITZ.
Decease I
NOTICE OF PROBATE
THE STATE OF FLOR'OA:
TO Al L PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE OF SAID
DECEDENT.
You are herebv notified that a writ-
ten Instrument purporting to be the
last will and tsetament of said ilece-
dent has been admitted to probate in
said Court. You are hereby command-
ed within six calendar months, froc
the date of the first publication of
this notice to apnear in said Court
and show cause, if anv vou can whv
the action of said Court in admit'ing
said 'will to probate should not stand
unravoked
JOHN R. BLANTON
Circuit Court Judge
RICHARD P flHINKBR. '-'erk
Bv CORNELL ROBINSON
Danmv Clerk
LOUTS, H STALL.MAN
Attorney
4"7 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 3.1139
ei.19
First publication of this notice on
the 25th dav of Julv. 1976
.3 8/1-8-15
Circuit Court e.4i) .
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-0169
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAMES I- WADDELL.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MARGARET B WADDELL.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: MARGARETB WADDELL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou and
you are reouired to serve a coov of
vour written defenses, if anv. to It on
JAMES I.. WADDELL Petitioner.
Whose address is 12230 N.W 7th
Avenue. Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
stvled court on or before August 28.
IMS: otherwise a default will be en-
tered against vou for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on thli
16th dav of Julv. IJ76.
RICHARD P BRISKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad- Countv, Florida
Bv N HOI LY
As Deoutv Clerk
(Clrcu't Court Seall
JAMKS I WADDELL
1-230 N w 7th < venue
Miami Florida 331S8
Petitioner
7 25 81-8-15
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-23105
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROSA EMILIA COBOS,
and
liORENZO COBOS.
TO: I ORENZO COROS
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against vou. and
vou are reouired to serve a coo'v of
vour written defenses. If any. to it on
GUII.LERMO SOSTCHIN. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 101
N.W. 12th Avenue. Miami. Florida,
and file the original with the clerk of
th- above stvled court on or before
August 29. 1975: otherwise a default
will he entered against vou for the
relief demanded in the comnlaint or
petition.
This notice shall he published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
In THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on thta
18th dav of Julv. '97".
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
Bv A D WADE
As Denutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
CUM I EltMO SOSTCHIN. ESQUIRE
HH N W 12th Avenue
Miami. FL 33128 (324-4555)
Attorney for Petitioner
7 35 8/1-8-1*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 75-23346
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE
The Marriage of
ANTONIO CUBELA.
Petitioner Husband,
and
ZOII.A QUINTANA CUBELA.
R.spondent/Wife
TO: ZOII.A QUINTANA CUBELA
L/>rraine 1066
Santiago De Cuba
YOU. ZOII-A QUINTANA CUBELA.
are hereby notified to file vour de-
fensive pleadings to this suit for dis-
solution of marriage with the Clerk of
the Court, and seme a coov on the
petitioner's Attorney. DAVID A.
RUSSELK of the law firm of MIL-
LER AND RUSSEI.I- 1408 Ainsley
Building. Miami. Florida 33132. on or
before the 29th dav of August. 1975.
or a d-f.iulT will be entered against
you.
DATED: JULY 21. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
Bv: NED ROSENBERG
Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
7/25 8/1-8-16
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIOA
NO. 75-23153
G J.D.
PETITION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN' HE: The Marriage of
LAURA SCH1.IEGER. Petitioner
WAYNE E SCHLIEGEH.
Respondent
TO: Wavne E. Schlieger
909 Bast Avenue
Belvedere. IWnola 61008
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
vour Marriage has been filed asd
commenced In this court and vou are
renu'*"ed to serve a coov of vour writ-
ten defenses If snv. to it on WIL-
LIAM K CHESTER attorney for Pe-
titioner, whoae addroai is 955 N.E.
'>th Street. Miami. Florida 33138 and
file the original with the clerk of the
above stv'ed court on or before Aug-
ust '.">. 1975: otherwise a default will
be entered against vou for the relief
"aved for In the complaint or peti-
tion.
This notlre shall be published once
each week for four iNinsecntlre weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
nth dav of Julv 1978
RICHARD P BRINKER. -
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Ciuntv. Florida
Bv I! I FOY
Deputv cierk
u I jam K CHESTER
Attorney for Petitioner
'-- N E 8"th Stn
Miami. Florida 33138
7'25
8/1-8-H.


Page 14-B
+Je 1st tier Mitt
Friday, Julyjs, 19?5
bituaiies
LEVINE
OSCAB H.. SI. died Wednesday.
July !;. at his home. 314 lSTth St..
Miami Beach. A native of New York
Cltv .Mr. Levine had a ilistliiauUhed
career In the field of economics ami
was a member of the American
loan Academy of Politics and Social
Economic Association and the Amer-
Sciences. Survivors include his wife.
Ann KnoDf: daughters Bonnv Le-
vine. Ph.D. anil Chervl Levin*
I.eone. M.D.: son Peter M. Levine
M.D1: son-in-law. Philio Leone.
-M.D.. arandaon. Seth Aaron I.eone;
and two sisters. Mollie Nadler and
Mrs. Eva Lederman. Services were
held under the direction of River-
side Chapels with interment in Deal.
N.J. _____________________________________
K1I1BRT. Jacob. 81. of Miami Beach.
Hlasbera.
NU88BAUM. Leo. 73. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
PAKUS. Jean. 74. of Miami. Gordon.
6AK$AIS. Samuel Z.. 76. of Miami
Beach. Riverside.
BIEIaER. Louis. 82. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
BROWN. Oussie. 74. of North Miami
Beach. Riverside.
FLAMM. Hannah F.. 64. of Miami
Beach. Rlasbere. Interment Mount
Nebo Cemeterv.
GLOSTER. Samuel. 78. of Miami
Beach. Levitt.
KAD1SH. Bernard, of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
KATZ. Svlvia. 62. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
MACHLOWITZ. Jacob. 85. of Miami
Beach. Riverside
BKLL. Nathan. 75. of Miami.
Riverside.
BERGEH. Florence Bertha, of Mami
Beach. Riverside.
BKLL. Sadie. 75. of Miami. Riverside.
FRIEDMAN. William. 87. of Miami
Beaeb. Gordon.
GI.ASSER. Max. 62. of Coral Gabl.ML
Riverside. Interment Star of David
Cemetenr.
KOKMAN. Sadie. 69. of North Miami
Beach. Riverside.
LEVIN. Rarnt, 81. of Miami Beach.
Riverside.
LIPES. Mav. 73. of North Miami
Beach. I^evitt.
FEINSTEIN. Fannv. 94. of Miami
Beach. Levitt.
GOLDSTEIN. Bess. 67. of Miami.
Riversde.
HARSIS. Rose. 77. of Miami Beach.
Newman.
SCHAFFRAM. Frank L. of North
Miami. Blaabere.
SHERMAN. Julius. 73. of Miami
Ba u h R
ABRAHAM. laidora II 91. of Miami
Beach Blverad*
IUi iii i Zaki.- 7" of rriami Beach
Bea. h Itiversld* J
JEFFREY. Mam :.;.. 81. of Mian.'.
Beach. Riverside
M1I.I.1KKN. Rose. 88. of Miami
Sorlnas. Gordon
SCHKtTER. Lillian. 7c. of Miami
Beach Gordon
S<"v'll>KK. Vivian. 49. of Miami
Gordon.
SI.\,o.. CZ. JoseDh. 65. of North
Miami Beach Levitt.
TRIER. Dr Jerome H. 77. of North
Miami Beach. Riverside
V ': Rose. 74. of Miami Beach.
Blasber*.
r_- """Ham I.. 68. of Bay
Harbor. Gordon.
GOLDBERG. Joseph. 75. of Miami
Beach Riverside.
GRAI'BART. Sarah Sonia. 78. of
Miami Beach Riverside
MARGULIS. Cyrua. 68. of Miami.
Gordon.
MKH1.MAN. RoaeDe C. 65. of Miami
Reach Riverside. Interment Mount
.Nebo (_ emeterv.
PLOTZKER, Rose. 64. of Miami
Beach Riverside.
'2*.? 'rv'n*. 86. of Miami. Gordon.
STERNE. Helen. 78. of Miami
Gordon Interment Mount Nebo
Cemeterv.
TENENBAUM. Paul. 83. of Miami
Beach. Riverside
TORN Ruth. 52. of North Miami
Beach I-evitt
wS(iAST- 'rv,nr Bv Harbor
[aland. Riverala*.
BLBAUM. Stanlev Robert. 45. of
-North Miami Beach. Blasbera
Burma Fatal To
Aguriath Israel's
Dennis Ever. 28
LEGAl NOTItt
ICGAl NOTICE
Dennis Barry Ever. 28. execu-
tive director of Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute. Miami Beach,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO JMM ,_..
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IV PI-"'
died Saturdav, July 19, in San arnulfo tomas LAJEfl
Antonio, Tex., of burns sus-. -, x?i, ,
tamed while painting a root T,, abelina lazo lajes
hara VUI' ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
ncrc- that i .....n for Dlaaolutlon "f rour
Mr Ever son of the temples I ^ ^^"^"^K
founder, the late Kaboi Isaac required to serve a copy f rour wrlt-
Hireh Fver hnifihed a live tan defenaea. if anv. to it on AL-
tnrsn ever, orusnea a uve HK|(T t carricahte. pa attor-
electnc wire with the pole ne n,.v for petitioner, whose addrees is
urae neina anrl trmk a heaw '" N w 7th Street. Miami. Florida.
was using, ana took a ne Charge through his body. f the above stvled court on or be-
., .,-___I fore August 22. 1975: otherwise a
Mr. Ever, a resident 01 Miami default will be entered aaainst vou
Beach for the past 25 years, is tor a ;',rnav*d for '" "" c*m~
survived by his mother, Mrs. This notice shall be published once
t_,jv r,.sr. thrt>p hmthprs El- eac" wek for four consecutive weeks
Iruay tver, tnree orotners, ci .,, THK JEW1SH Fi.okidian
liott, Judah and Rabbi Sheldon
N. Ever, the present spiritual
leader of Agudath Israel, and
a nephew, Isaac Zvi.
Services were held Monday
under the direction of River-
side Chapels; interment follow
ed in Vista Memorial Gardens
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE rj HEREBY wi\ kv .u
the under.-ik.-i., .I ,|. ... ,|L. '. I it
in bualneaa under the fi, ;-.,,
of NOTARY BOND I^nderwbS'
Kits at number 99" 8 W VUT-
ln th.- I itj of Mian,, .
tends to Reartater tha
the M..rk of the Circuit CourT'S
Dada Ciuntv. Florida rt *
Dated a' Miami Florida (hi in
dai of JULY lTG "" UU>
BONDING CORPORATION
OF AMERICA
a Florida cornoralion
Hv: SAM SEITI IN. l>reM,i, .
MARVIN H. OILUMAN- '
Aiiornev for Auolicant
1898 Blscaj na Boulevard
My mi. Florida 33137
_________________im-u-n s/i
IN THE
ELEVI
OF M.UMIUA IN AND
DADE COUNTY.
NO. 75-17979
General Jurisdiction Division
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
BUFFALO SAVINGS BANK
Plain Off.*01* bMk,n* """hi.
\
E CIRCUIT COURT OF ThT
'ENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
' FLORIDA IN AND FOR
WITNESS mv hind and the seal of 1THr.lMAJ? A CASH and ANNIE j|
LEGAL NOTKI
friendship...
means someone cares
GORDON FUNERAL HOME
Simmj Hie Jewish Community since liM
ORtMOOOX
CONSERVATIVE
_^ ^EfORMSERVICES
Eminuel Cordon (IMSI HieCeftfts
H it", Coidon | I9S4) James B. Cordon
Tejejjhone B58-55M
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57fh Avenue
Phone 266-2888
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4450
In RE: Esta'e of
LILLIAN ARONSOHN
deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and AM Persons
Havinar Claims or Demands Aaainst
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and reauir-
ed to nresent anv claims and de-
mands which vou mav have aaainst
the estate of LILLIAN ARONSOHN
deceased late of Da.le Countv. Florida.
to the Circuit Judaea of bade County.
and file the same in dunlicate and as
nrnvlded in Section 733 16 Florida
Statutes, in their offices in the Coun-
tv Courthouaa in Dade Count) Flor-
Ida. within four calendar months
from the time of the flral oubli'-atlon
hereof, or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this 18th
day of Julv. AD 197*
LILLIAN
EDITH GROSS
CHARUITTE SCOTTf
As Executrtcea
First publication of this notice on
the 25th dav of Julv. 1975
Kommel. Hovers. I Attornevs for Executrices
20 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla.
7 '23 .,1
i'ASH. his wife, at al..
residence unknown, if livina: un-
known sDouses. if remarried.' and if
dead, then unknown Hlfineea. If re-
married, all unknown heirs ......-ntl
arantees. a-ssigneea. lienors. CTedltora.
trustees, or otherwise clalmina hv
throuah. under or aaainst the ,., i
Thomas A. Caah. and Annie M
C h, Ins wife and aaainst all other
Bavin* or clalmina t.i
anv riaht. title or interes- in or
to the nrooertv herein described.
Defendants
TO THOMAS A. CASH and ANNIE
M. CASH his wife. &
residence unknown, if livlna: un.
known sonuses. If remarrlr.l inrl
if dead, then unknown aoou
if remarried: ell unknown heira.
deviseea. arantees. ainnee-
inor*. creditors, trustee-. ,,r
otherwise clalmina bv. throuah.
under >r acainst the said
Thomas A i'ash and Annie
M i-h his wife, and Lf I
all other nersons havimr
clalmlnar to have any rial
title or interest, in or to the
urooertv herein deaerlted
Yor ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED th
a suit to foreeloaa nortaaae -t
rea md Deraonal Dropertv hai r>-en
filed aaainat rou in the above Court
h\ the Plaintiff. Buffalo Davliun Bank,
The uronertv souah' to f .r-
cloaed is as follows:
Lot I2. Block !. LAKE LUCERNE
SECTION TWO acoordina to the
Plat thereof. recorded i:- I'! it
Booh 71 Mara 34. of the Pub
R-cords of Dade Countv. i
Yor ARK REUIIItKI" ve
conv of vour answer or othei !
ina or F'laintiffs Attorney, MALCOLM
H FRIEDMAN, s-m Douclai :: ,l
'"oral ''.allies. Florida IJ1S4 i
T-K Miami Beach. Flor- Ida 33139 on ir before the _!2nd dav lr"" *boy Court, on ir before "he
' iuauat 1976 and file the oriel na! l5,n lliv Aueust. IM fault
said OOUTt -it Miami. Florida on this
With dav of Julv 1 ?Trl
RICHARD P RRINKKR.
As Clerk Circuit Court
Hide Countv. Florid i
Hv C P COPELAND
\ : Monti I "erk
fCircuil Court Seal)
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE. PA.
Attorney for the hush U I
2491 N w 7th Street
Miami Florida 33125
Attornev for Petitioner
______________________ : is.m < i-s
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NO. 73-23851
NOTICE OF ACTION
ARTHl'H LEE MANt'EL. and
STELLA MAE MANUEL his wife.
Plain' -
T CARVER II l
I N ETTE M CARVER, hia wtfa.
Defendanta. "
TO: Ham r i airver and
Jan--" M >: er his wife.
et al
Rea lenoa C'aknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to remove a Oeoud oa
title to the (ollowma described Dron-
er'\ in Dade c..Untv. Florida:
Lot 10. Block i of CRE8TWOOD.
a ordina to the Dlat thereof re-
corded in Plat Rook |, I'tste 7 of
the Pulilr- ".e ords it p.i l.. dun.
tv. Florida,
has been filed aatalnat vou and \ >u
are reouired I i lerra copy >f your
written defenses, if anv. to it on
Samuel It I'earlman nlaintiff's at-
toenev whose addreaa la i"~ Lincoln
Road. Sull -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDIC'AL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
PROBATE DIV'SION
PROBATE NO. 75-4577
FRANK B. DOWi-'NG
r- RE: Bstate of
CEIL HAPCHICK also known .vs
Hi 'PCHICK
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All "' lUora '! All Peraona
Havl na C Demand! \..
Said Batata
v U I bv iulr-
ad Dreaei I anv cla I do-
manda u h b i r bi
the estate ':"' ,: '"ICK
CEIL HOPCHICK i
i ,. York
to Circuit Judaea if Dade Countv
ind lu' ite and as
da I In Ba. tlon v
th< i| 'oun-
ts url -. lade < '' v
I ivlthln bIj

' r the aan '. be b in I
File.! ,- Miami ixih
day
attorney for A nan
!a on
: I97J
ZEIOl
Atl nev for AnclUarv Proceedinaa
id, Bu
531-76771
< l
of
w-i;h the Clerk of this Court either
before service on ntalntlffa' att .rnev
or Immediate!' thereafter otherwisa
.it win he anterad aarainsi vou
for the reliel demanded lo the Com-
WITNESS nv. hand and 'he .
' 'our: >r: tha if Ju \
II-
Rl HARD P BR'NKER
> of thl C lUTt
E M K IMTNSK!
As D-Dutv Clerk
:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EuEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUN'V
PROBATE DIVISION
PR3BA-E NO '5 3403
, ......JOSEPH NESBITT
In RE Estate
MAX OOI D
' i wed
NOTICE TO COEO'TORS
:--
H 'vinr Clain

You ii
wnicn m i
MAS
lorldj
Dade Cou
S D
n u
Hid- .- unf '
Of Which the comulaint will lie
d aaainal vmi for tl re.
IU" -'e.i in Plaintiff's i

P VTED tl la 7th day of Ju % 197a,
RICHARD BRJNKER
' cull i 'ourt of
i ui ti Florid i
i: N A HKWKTT
Denutv Clerk
t/RT SEAL)
T/Il-U
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
' h- :.TV.
iNc 'v.i- an iiru-
tl law s
the State <.( Flor: la. a th its
tirln Loal olaca of businesa al Ken-
Dade '' untv) Florida
' fu.......rv that nor.
norition filed In ofl ir th
' v' if In-
tent *o Voluntarily Dissolve u
in 27. Florida Btatutea
VE I and the
Oreal S of tha SI il
thi i'
the nth 6 '.
BRCCB v BM OTHERS
>';
PRELIVINARv CEP-1-'F'<-ATE
OF DISSOLUTION
fii
i
Utl
C iurt
' from

' '
dav of July. AD 19
1 OSE GOl I)
Aa Exe lutrix
the 11 h dav of JU|V
1
ui
'.th
Al f ir Exe- ui
MM NT ... \ .
Miami F!a. 33169

IN THE C'RCUIT COURT OF THC
ELOF VtlS, r,U 'C'* l- CRCu"TK
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
___OADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO 79.4491
.. ,.-JOSEPH NESBITT"
'vvi- T 'PI DR OILLMAN.
Tunler
N'oTJei TO CREDITORS
lavln. c ITn'.t0r" ,v"1 v; :'
S lid
To
11-1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF T"E
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOP DADE COUNTV.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVIS'ON
CASE NO. 75-15312
RE-NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
THE MARRIAOI
- \ W UTH FLYNN.
P Itinner
iWARO FLYNN,
Reaoond
Yi il RICHARD EDV1 I
'ti .-
N'i iTIFIEP T' FII K >"ur
' *


Pel v ye VON
" .\ SMITH Suit- -'
.
... :. ''h
oat if Au I
Marriaa
' i
i ED: Ju
RICHARD I :it
I M:p Ri ISENBEIM
Demitv Clerk
i '" iurt s. .ii
________ I
NOT.'CE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
'N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF "ThE
ELEVENTH JUD'CIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Civil Action No. -5-21332
ACTION FOR DISSOl UTION
OF MARRIAGE
THK MAHIUAOE OF
- :i"l PUOLIO Pel
ri ise pfoi r<
To RI >> pt'Ql
\ ii'
IS440
VOI' \>m.; ii| RB1TV Ml h*.
'
riled au I vou ai
are rrouir, d I


FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
j
949-1656
13385 West Dixie Highway
Represented by 5. lev.tr, F.O.
In New York:
U 11\ 263-7600
Queens Blvd. A 76th Road
Forest H,i:$,N.Y.
I: Man >i Pel
.i
'
I'.: MOt
-:,
Trir '-d
I ne
'' la ..iico
I'li'.n. I74-I11
7/4-11 i
Juiy-A-D,m50r,dtt- '
LEONAI -ii
Pi-. ,A'" ''>' Uturs
KIN
'DKARP. P.A.
'iU.
I url ,i Miami r '
-'I Julv
RICHARD P BRINK I
url
I ide C..|inl\
' .,,
u
BUT a : M.lil'T.
UI"
lot
Attorney fur Petitioner .. .


Friday, July 25, 1975
+Jm1st> fkridlian
Page 15-B
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTrCF
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE UNDER
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
SOI : IS HEREBY GIVEN that
I).,. U I1B to : .
to }\l Ml' tltloUS I in.
, i 1:1 ,\ w. intends to n
mid n .mi-- of ihe i 'U 11. "i the Circuit
County Floi
i .\v i.,.i:y. iXC.
: 4-n-H
Fictitious ivAMe law
NOTH i-' W HEREBY itVEN Ihnl
ll, iiii.l--r-miit-.l. ii.-sli iw ,Jj. tiMMiri-
i- in iiu." unuer Uu- fictitious name
, c irlanao Kan -. M i >. al
i ns Avenue. Miami Ben h. Florida
i i eprif r raid na me with
i the Cm uii Courl of
I County. Florida
. Ciemente Ramos. M.D, P.A.
a Fla. Corn.
I aw '"in- -
M. h In F Frankel
4_" Lincoln I'.'i Sun.- 91
4-11-1S-25
in the circuit court of the
eleventh judicial circuit
of florida in and for
dadecounty
civil action no. 75-20732
action for dissolution
of marriage
IN RE:
ERNEST WEEKES.
HUSBAND
and
BEKXW'K WEEKES.
IVIFE.
Tip UKKNU'E H'KKKES.
2s* Lincoln Pis. -e. Ai't. 3B.
Bn .-I- 'vii. New York.
VOl AIM. NOTIFIED that a Peti-
tion for Dissolution of vour Marriage
h..- been filed and vou are rvautred
(0 nrvi a itjpv of vour written de-
f, n e*. it any. to it on KH'HAKli
AND KH'IIAHli. Attn: MELVIN .1
I.CHARD. attorney- tr -Petitioner.
l:..w address is 927 l.lneoln Road.
Miami Beach. Florida 3313*. and file
II i original wilh the clerk of the
above styled COUM on or before Aug-
ust 6. 1875: otherwise a default will
b< entered against vou for the relief
; mi..iid< il In the netltion
VVTNE.SS my hand hiI I he -eal of
hid urf at Miuni*. K.orida on this
27th day of June. 1975
RCHALD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Lade Count v. Florida
|(r I. SNEEDEN
As iM-nutv Clerk
(Circuit I'nurt Seal!
7 4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
Nnllit: Id tiEKEm OIVEN that
tl undersigned, desiring to engage
iii buainesa under the fictitious name
< f Scorn Industries at Ml] N.w. 3fith
Street, Mami. Florida 33144 Intends
II lejcialar said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
S'opE CO.NSTR1I'THi.N, INC.
Harvey D. Rogers
14.' 1 N.W. JTth Avenue
f am Florida
Attorney for Applicant
7/11-18-86 S.'I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREH1 GIVEN that
I!.. undci signed. desil-jli. .to enrage
ir. buslm under the fictitious name
it CohkE CIJ2ANERS AND Ul'N-
IdlY al 1.310 N. K 2na An-.. .Miam .
FUrid.i intends to renter said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Cout
id Lfaue County, Florida.
R. A PILoTo. rNC
Eugene l.em lc.h
Attorney for It. A Piloto. Inc.
L7,ili W. F airier Stic t
Miami. Florida .13135
7 11-18-26 8'I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
E-EVENTri JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO 75-2118
ACTION 'OR D'SSQLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN l.i:
i mat i lajre of
BAM EL \ LAMBERT.
1 'e;,tinner,
.inn
8AI I V I AM IIKKT.
Respondent
Tii SALLY LAMBERT
>; EnwHI I inn
\\ iliiigbi.rn. New Jersey 1)8046
YOF ABE HKHEBY NOTIFIED
that an action for l)issolut>< n of Mar-
' :.i: has been filed against vou and
vou ^f rwmlred to mtv h copv of
your written defenses. If any, to It on
. ...... Olil.V. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whoae address is 4''7 Lincoln
I..-..d. hoom 11-A with th. clerk of the
above styled court on or before Aiie-
u.-t G. 197.'.; otherwise a default will
le en:er-il against vou for the relief
demanded In the coniolaint or petition
I..t-d at .Mlano. Florida on 1 at dav
ol Julv. IMS
KfllAKD P BRINKER.
A* Clerk Circuit t'ourt
1 uli Countv, KUiaWlv.
BY: M KI-IM1NSKI
As I '. ir- t'lerK
(Circuit Coart Mall
7'4-11 J|-3S
N THE C.RCUIT COUBT OF THE
".1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTV. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 75-21186
GENERAL JURISDICTION O'V'SION
NOT-Cfe BV PUBLICATION
IN RE: The .v.Tiajre of:
MA.V'El .1 RSI'S MI'VOZ.
l'etitioner/HusbHiid.
.,n.l
MALTA AHANIJA DE MI'VOZ.
Res-iondenl wife
TO: MAHTA ARANDA DE MI'NO/
'. I'nknown
Wr VI E HEREBY NOTIFIED
II .i Pi tltion for Dlaaolutlon of Mar-
riage has i,ii filed an.....-t *'-u. and
mu ,ir. remilred to reeve a oov of
vour Answer or pleading lo the Pe-
'n. Land's att' I ne\
VII TON C OOODMAN ESOI'SRE.
'' : W. Blaua>vne BuUd'na-. n- hvm
Flakier Street. Miami. Florida |*1SA.
i iiu ortkfTnal Answer nt olead-
"i In 'I.....ffi.e of the t'lerk of the
' i" u i -ii-t mm or before 'he xh
! AutruM. IMS, If mu fail to do
fault .In,Urn.-ii' will bi taken
mi for the relief il- iiand.-il
Petition
Pt \>: \|. i >i oi:i i-1> at ,'i 8'.
. krtda. this 1st dav of julv. Hft.
RICHARD RRINKER. C4ert
lilt Court
I 'in!.- < '..llntv FIoi Hi.I
} B .1 Fl'V
,, I out i I'lerK
il i .ul' Court Sea!i
7/4-11-18-25
NOTICE UNDER
MCTITiOiS NAME LAW
NOT E IS IlEiiEBY GIVEN that
undi -mn. d, di B.i ilia :- ':u.,u..
ii hu .Ineas i.ndei the : [loll name
of GRAN PARiti B Vk'EHY
N u a Mu m I- in-
'- nd ii reelali r rl nami nrlth the
Clerk .i the Cin alt Courl of Dad*
i ... ...
SCPEIIK iR \K\: IN<
7/4-11-It 25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
...ELEVENTH JUDIQIALC RCUIJ
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FCJR
DADE COUNTV
NO 75-1or">7
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
.*.'.< .XiOKTCAOE CoRpuKATION
Plaintiff.
TKli It 111. W I. INC. and CAHOL.YN
BOVl LING, his wife.
in unknown, if llvlna: un-
known Douaaa, if remarried, and if
di ad. then unknown aDOHBM, it re-
niiirrleri: all unknown heirs. devLseee.
arunteea, Hakmaea. Honors, credltora.
truateas, or otherwise clalmlna bv.
tlnouKh. under or against ihe said
Ted H Kowlmg and Carolvn Bowlna.
In> wife
and aenlnat all other persons havine
or claiming to have anv right, title or
Interest in or to the property
herein descrilid.
Defendants
TO: Ted It Bowling and Carolyo
Bowling, his wife, residence un-
known. It living: unknown
spouse*. If remarried, and If
dead, then unknown apouses. If
remarried: all unknown heira,
devisee granteos. assignees,
lienors. creditors, trustees, or
otherwise claiming hv. through,
under or against the said Ted R
Bowling and Carolvn Bowling
his wife, and wralnst all other
person* having or claiming to
have anv right, title or interest.
in or to th* oronertv herein
deacrlked
YOF ABE HBKICBY NOTIFIED
that a suit to foreclose mortgaae
against real and personal ornoortv
has been filed against vou In the
above Curt bv the PlalnMff. MGIO'
Mortgage Cortsnration.
The nrm.crtv eougLt to be foreclosed
Is as follows:
I.ot 1. Block 24. FIRST ADDITION
To i A KOI. CITY GARDENS, ac-
cording to the Flat thereof, re-
corded in Flat Book i-K. page 81. of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ts-. Florida.
YOF ARK ItEoriKKI) to serve a
coi.v of vour answer or other plead-
ing on Plaintiff's Attorney. M.M.-
COI.M H FRIEDMAN. sOO Douglas
Itoad. Coral flahles. Florida 3:1134. and
file the oiiginal in the office of the
Clerk of the above Court, on or be
tore the dth dav of August. 1975. In
-..;..uli of which the coniolaint w4U he
taken as confessed against vou f-,i
ihe relief reauented In Plaintiff's roan-
plaint and pleadings.
DATED this 2nd dav of Julv. 197*
RICHARD P. HRINRKR
Clerk of the Circuit Courl of
Dade County. F.orida
B* N. A HEWETT
I>.-imtv Clerk
Ml .CUT SKAI.)
7/4-II-I8-IC
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 7S-21227
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN UK: The .Marriage of
ItoDOI.FO OOMEZ
Husband
and
ItOSAI DA QOMJ4Z.
Wife
TO: ROSAI.HA GOMEZ
RESIDENCE IN KNOWN
VOC ABE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that mi action for DlHsoKMIon of Mar-
riuce has been filed against vou and
you are reaulred to serve a copv of
vour written defense*, if anv. to it on
IOCIS R BEI.l ER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 4:'0 Lin-
coln Road. Miami Beaoh, Fja and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before Aug-
ust ti. l!'7.'i: otherwise a default will
he ntered against VOU for the relief
il. mantled in the complaint or petition
This ..otice shall be Mlbllahed once
each week for four consei Otlve weeks
In THE JEWISH Fli'HlDlAN.
WITNESS my .hand ami the seal of
said court at Miami Florida on this
1st dav of Julv. IMS
RICHARD r BRINKER
As Clerk. (Ircuit Court
Dade Coiintv. Florida
Bv M Kl IMINSK1
As Dauntv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
Louis R Holler f:. 420 Lincoln Road
Mlam< Beach. Florida 88MM
Attorney for Petitioner
. 7/4-11-18-25
STATE F FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF 6TATE
I hereto certify that ARGO HARD-
WARE. INC was on the iftith dav of
April. 1!iS4. IncoriM-rated under the
laws of the State of Florida, with
Its principal place of business at Mi-
ami (Dade Counlvi Fiorina
I further certify that Ihe above cor-
poration filed In Ibis office on |Kc
Hth dav of Julv. IMS. Notice of In tout
to Voluntarily Dissolve under Section
k".v 87. Florida Statutes
filVEN under m\ hand anil Ihe
Great Seal of the State of Florida,
at Tallahassee the 1 .vital, this
the K'h dv of l-'v 1MB
BRUCE A SMATHERS
cprRFTAIV ocr c+TE
PRELIM'NARV CERTIFICATE
OF DISSOLUTION
7 is n
NfiT'CE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEPERY GIVEN that
th-' iindersigner. deslrlna to engage
m l.iis'ness under the f'c'itlous name of
lii|IKKT F. HM'SCMF'F' I>. DDS
ii v-,.i itird Road. M'aml. Florida in-
tends to register said name with the
''. k of th<- Circuit Court of Dade
Countv. Florida
ROBERT IV HII'SCHFIEI.D.
DPS PA
Bv: ROBERT E II IKSCHFIEl.D.
PUS IM.ES'I.F.VT
Melvln E W-Mi-i.-in
Frombenr. Frombera a.- in-'h. PA.
11" \% Flaa'or 81 .Miam'. F'orida
Attorneys for
Ki.l.crt E Hlrschfll Id. D D S P.A.
7 11-11-21 8.1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS in.i.Ki.i HVEN that
iIi- tin.i. rslfrned, dsslr] ib *. .- n ..
i.us.in at uii- 1.1 the fli u
S\\ AN IMl iRTS at 118 S V -'7-li
^ve., al i. mi Intonda t<- itei aid
name with thi Clerk ol i ..-.-uit
Coui i of Dade 'ountv. Florida.
STEVEN C< 'HEN ,
7/18-25 8/1 -s
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-4260
JOHN R. BLANTON
In RE Estate 6T
WILLIAM WHITEHl RN
dei ., ...
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having "Maims or Demand* Against
Said Batata:
Vou ..I- hereby notified and reaulr-
ed to present anv claims and demands
which vou may havi uaJnat the es-
tate of William Whltchnrn. deceased
late of Dade County, Florida, to the
t'ircuit Judges of Dirde Countv. and
file the same In duplicate and as pro-
vided in Section 733.Hi. Florida Stat-
ute*, in their offices in Ihe Countv
Courthouse in Dade Countv. Florida.
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof,
or the same will he barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, thia th
dav of Julv. AD IMS.
Isidore Ira Blitt
Judith Rlltt
As Executors
First publication of this notice on
the lMh dav of Julv. 1!'7.'..
Leo piotkln
Attorney for Executors
!'7fl S W. 4th St.
7 18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-960
JOHN R. BLANTON
In RE: Estate of
MURIEL OAITER
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persona
Having claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
Y'ou are hereby notified and reouir-
ed to present anv claims and d. mands
which you may have against the es-
tate of MURIEL GAITER. Deceased
late of Dade Countv. Florida, to the
Circuit Judges of Dade Countv. and
tile the same in duplicate and as pro-
vuted in Section 733.16. Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices in the Countv
Courthouse in Dade County. Florida.
within four calendar months from the
time of the first publication hereof.
or the same will be barred.
Filed at Miami. Florida, this Ifith
dav of Julv. A II 197a.
Sidney Ufronaon
612 Aitisley Building
.Miami. Pla. 33132
Af Executor
l-'irst publication of this notice on
the. 1Mb day of Julv. 197.1.
Alan L Wetsberg
Attoi nev for Estate
813 Ainslev Building.
Miami. Fla .13132
7/18-25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-81671
GENERAL JURISDICTION
OIVIS'ON
?JOTlCE OF PUBLICATON
BARTON SAVINGS AND
IA"AN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff.
MORTIMER II WILLIAMS
and MYRTLE WILLIAMS his
wife, and FARMERS BANK OF THE
STATE OF DEI.AWARE.
Defendants
TO Farmers Bank of the
Slalt o| -, .-... .
intli and Market Streets.
WdliHiM! loii m.law .tl i
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a suit lo foreclose mortgage against
real and personal property has bean
tiled agfciH.' t you in the above Court
bv the Plaintiff
The property sought to he foreclos-
ed is as follows:
Beginning at a iwMnt HSS.21- feet
Northwardly of and 161 feet West-
wards of the Southeast corner of
the NE" of the BWVi of the 8W1.
of the SE1, Section 34. Township
52 South. Range 41 East: thence
Southwardly i>arallel to the West-
erly line of the SE> of Section 34.
aforesaid a distance of 141.20 feet:
thence Weatwardlv along a Una
parallel to and 25 feet measured
Northwardly at right annles from
the ^Southerly line of the NE'. of
the SW of the SW1-. of the SE'S
of Section .34 aforesaid a distance
of 7.'. feet: thence Northwardly
aknig a line Parallel to the West-
erly line of the SJEV. of Section
34. aforesaid a distance of 141.28
feet: thence Eastwardlv a distance
of 7.', feet to the point of bettin-
- nlng. Tht above described land be-
ing also known as Lot IR of cer-
tain Unrecorded plat entitled HI'-
DP'AN s-'HDIVISION
AND ALSO
The Wi-i 53 feel of the East
l8 "S feet of the-Hnirth 1"! 11 o.i
.f Ihe X'.. of the SW1. of the
SW1. of the SE'.. less the South
85 feel oi Section 34. Township 52
South. Range 41 East, the above
described land also being known
a- the West '..I fe I of I.ot 1 of a
i i lain unrecorded Plat entitled
OTDRIAN SVltDrVISION
VOC ARE REQUIRED lo serve a
ing on Plaintiffs attorney, Malcolm
H Friedman. *"" Douglas Road.
Com: GaMei Florida 88184. and file
the original hi the office of the Clerk
.f the above Court. n or bat- re t1"'
ivh dav of Auanisl "'7'. In 11, fault of
which the complaint will be taken as
i-oiii.-ss. .1 again-; you foi the relief
reouesti i in Plaintiff* Complain I and
Pleadings
11 :'I luly. ::'7_.
RICHARD P BRINKER
i'l FRK OF THE CM c'I'T ii-t-RT
< i 1 ADE COCNTY. Fl "I.IL'A
r. PAPNARD
Deuutv i~erk
7 18-it 8 1-8
IN TH CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 75-21897
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
LIZ ALBA LEI IN.
Plaintiff.
Ys
Ll is E I Ei N. WA1 I"1 LEON
and GONZAI.I I l.E IN,
I I leiidaiit s
YOC, I.CIS E I Kmn, ANB.GON-
ZALO I BON, residence unknown.
.in hereby notified thai h complain I
to cancel deed has been filed agalnsi
Hi. following described property, to-
w i t:
I ol 18, Block :'." of Nt iR\\'( ll >l I
8RD ADDITION SECTION I.
ri cording io the I'l.c thereof,
recorded In Plat Book .',7. Page
2S. of the Public Record*, ol Dade
Countv. Florida,
and you are renuir, d to file vour an-
BWei to the complaint to camel deed
with the j'lcrk of the above Court
and serv. ,i eonv thereof u.....l Plain-
tiff's attorney, Herman Cohen. Es-
OUire, 828 8.W 1st Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. on or before August
12. 1975. or else complaint will be
confessed
Dated: Julv IK. 1975.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Bll rk. Circuit Court
By: B I.IIM'S
Deoutv Clerk
7/11-18-25 8/1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of POTS 'V KNOTS at ti!7l S W 79th
Street. South Miami. Fla, 33143 intend
to register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
K. HEATHER M01.ANS
REV A D HERMAN
Bl.lTSTElN & MOUNS
Attorneys for K. Heather Molans
atid Reva II Herman
d'h/a Pots N Knots.
7/18-28 8/1-8
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-20492
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage ol:
<;rady beck ham
Petitioner.
FRANCES ELIZABETH HALL
BECKHAM
Respondent.
TO: FRANCES ELIZABETH HALL
BECKHAM
Route One 111
.M. rsh..n Georgia
YOC ARE HEREBY NoTIFIEi.
that an action for Dlssolulion of Mar-
riage has been filed against you anil
you are reouircd to serve a cony of
vour written defenses. If any. to It on
LAW OFFICES OF HERNS A AR-
NOVra'Z. attornev for Petitioner,
whose address Is 420 I IncolU Road
Suite 451. Miami Beach. Florida 33139.
anil file the original with the clerk
of the above atvled .ourt on or before
August i. 197'.; Otherwise a default
will be entered against vou for the
rein I demanded in the coniolaint or
Petition
This notice shall he published once
each e/eek for four roive<*titlv weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.OR1DIAN.
WITNESS inv hand and the seal of
said court at Miami Florida on this
1:5111 dav of June. 197".
RcHARP P BKLNKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Hade Countv. Florida
By L. SjSEEDBN
As Deoutv Clt rk
(Cir.uit Court S...1I
I AW DFFICBB of BERN'S *
ARNI 'VIT/.
*2 I incoln Road. Suite 45"
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
838-4421
7 4-11-1R-2V
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
iNO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTV
CIVIL ACTION NO. 75-?0811
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIV'SION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
ALICE FOX I.IM. Petitioner
and
PETER 1 Ml. Respondent.
TO: PETER I Ml
n East Gunhlll Ro.ol. Ant. G-3
Bronx. New York H14H7
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action lor Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against yu
a,nd you are n nulred to serve a copv
of vour w'iiti-n defense*, if any. to
It on H Alt I AN STREET. P.A. at
torin-v for r..|iinnei. whose adwOSI
is I57O0 Blscavne Blv 'I Suite 41.
North Mfairri PtorMa tm*h ami (We
ll.- original with the clerk of the
above atvled court on or befon 8th
August. If 7*i. otherwlm < default will
be enored against vou for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint or
netltion
This notice shall be nubllahed once
each week for four ons.-.-imv. weeks
in THE JEWISH FI.ORIIHAN
WITNESS ni\ hand and the seal of
sad court al Miami. Florida on this
27lh dav i I Juni l"7"
lU'HA-RD P BRINKER.
As Clei k. "ir.-uit Court
Dade < ountv Florida
Hv M tRTON NEWMAN
\ i ii nut\ Clerk
ICireui' c,.UIi Seali
HA III AN STREET P A
ir""e Blsfavne P*vd eu'te 4in
N< rth Miami. Florida 83181
Altorni v for Petition! r
89" 5852
7/4-11-1S-2V

NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(No Prooertvl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION)
CASE NO: 75-22390
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE I IF
HEI EN NAPOI ITANO.
Pel
a ii.i
FRANK M.M.....TAN'n.
pspondi Husband
Xi i FRANK NAPOI.ITANG '
-.-; V v Avenui
Brooklyn, New Yoi I-
>"i ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
, (or Dissolution of
N1:11 li.iu. ha- talnst VOU
and you .- r..... red to nerve b cony
'i.i anv, to
the Pelll on ,.., the Potitlonei Wife's
a'i-.i in Mali tnd Bii m, whose
-- is I4"i Bricked Avenue, Suite
1101, M ,ii F oi Ida 38131. on or be-
\ ii -11 i lf7' and file the
original with the Clerk :' the court
either before service on Petitioner/
Wife's attorneys, Mai.- And r:i....m.
or immediately thereafter: otherwise.
di fault will he held against vou
for the relief demanded in the Peti-
tion
DATED al Miami had.- Countv.
Florida, this 11th dav of Julv. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Bv: L BARNARD
Dcnulv Cl.rk
Court Seali
7 '18-88 I 1-8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of ABLE RESl'.ME SERVICES at
633 NE 167th Street. Suite 325. North
Miami Beach, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dalle Countv. Florida.
H E OOULDKN
Owner
7,18-25 S/l-8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUOICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
NO. 75-?0e74
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
S S CROSS REALTY.
Plainllff.
vs
L T. GOLD and NORA BOLD.
his wife, and BORIS VASILIEVlfH
and ADEI.A VASILIEVTICH. his wife.
Defendant'
TO: I. T !01jr and
NORA COLD, his wife
Route Xn 3
i leveland. Georgia 30.'.2S
YOU ARE NOTIFIEI' that an ac-
tion to foreclose and eauttable lien on
the following property In Dad- Coun-
ty. Florida:
Uit 1. Block r*. Mb ADDITION
TC QREENHAVEN si'BDIVI-
SION according to th-- Plat there-
of, recorded In Plat Book 62. page
79. of the Public Records of Dade
Countv. Florida,
has been filed against vou and vou are
reouTred to serve a ennv nf vour writ-
:. n defenses, if any. to it on Malcolm
H. Friedman. Plaintiff's Attornev.
whose address |* sen Douglas Road.
Coral Gables. Florida 31134. on or be-
fore August s 197.".. and file the
original with the Clerk nf this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney, or num. dial.-i, thereafter:
otherwise a default will h.- entered
anainst vou for Ihe relief demanded
in the comulalm or petition
WITNESS mv hand and the seal of
this Court on June 1'fi. 197'.
RCHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
Bv C P COPELAND
As Deoutv Clerk
7,4-U-18-28
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR-DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cae No. 75-21483
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
In Re The Marriage Of
JELIE CBfl.VLDi Wife and
ARTHUR B HERALD. Husband
TO: ARTH1K B GERALD
c o B. inn- Ci'-rald
Route I, Box lifiR
Raymond. MisslsaloBl 89164
YOC ARE HEREBY notified that a
Petition for Dissolution Of Marriage
has been flleu against you ami vou
are lier.-liv r-nuir. d to Serve a .oov
of your answer or other nleading to
th< Petition on the Wife's Attornev.
I .ester ROGERS, wln.s, address is
14".4 N W 17ih A\. nue Miami. Florida
3312.".. and file the original with the
Clerk of th* aliov.- atvled c*urt on or
before this 15th dav of August. 1975.
or a Delaull will be entered against
vou
DATED this 3rd day of Julv. 1975.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Clrosjll I 'null
Bv L BARNARD
7 I1-18-2G v i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
PROBATE -DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 75-2958
JUDGE OOWLING
In RE Estate of
LOUIS M COVEI,!..
doceuscd
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
To All Creditors and All Persons
Having Claims or Demands Against
Said Estate:
You are hereby notified and requir-
ed to present anv claims and demands
which vou may have against the es-
tate of LOI'lS M COVEI.L deceased
lal.- of Dad,- OoOtV. Fieri.la. to the
ClTOUll Judges of Dude Countv. and
file the sam. In duplicate and as pro-
vided in S.etioii 733 18. Florida Stat-
utes, in their offices In the Countv
C urthousjt in Hade ('ountv. Florida.
Within four calendar months from the
lime of the lirst publication hereof.
or the sum. u 11 be barred.
Filed a' Miami. Pk*r.ida. this 14th
dav of Juw, a H. 197:.
Ronald I. Davis, attorn.-v for
I Moris Wi Insteln. Admli Isl ratrlx
Cum Te-iainento Annexe
First publication of this notice on
>i dav of Julv '"7
Ronald I. I
Attorney for Betate
: Blscayne Buildlnc i W Flarler
Street
7 18-85
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY HIVES' that
the mull sleriii deslrlna lo enaace in
I.... -.,.ss .in.....h.- fictitious name of
MANN' THE BEST at 1148 S.W.
27th iv.-'itii. No 104. MHam Fla in-
1. -i's to rerl-'ter said flame with the
. Ihl Cln nil Court of I
Countv. Fli
MANTEL HEI HERA
5-2B


Page 16-B
Friday, Juin.
FOOD
FAIR
GET MERCHANTS GRKN STAMPS. YOURS WITH ^^ PURCHASE.
-S. SHOP AMY DAY OF THE WEEK FOR
QUALITY & SAVINGS
pr,ces effects from date of ^^^f^Sum. 3
AT All FOOD FAIR STORES EXCLUDING FOOD FAIR KOSHER MAKKt
| WONDERFUL
Baked Goods
MADE WITH PURE
VEGETABLE SHORTENING
BURNY BROS.
Cream
Cake
M. $ 1 *
PKG.
AMERICAN KOSHER
(MIDGET)
Salami or
Bologna
oz $129
CHUB
BONUS
SPECIAL!
SAVE 20'
NON-DAIRY CREAMER
BORDEN'S
CREMORA
$|09
22-OZ.
JAR
umii ONI MR. PUAM. WITH OTHIR PURCHASIJ Of IT 0 OR MOH,
EXCLUDING CIGARITTI*
P.P. BRAND
FRUIT
COCKTAIL
A .
WE RIBflM
lllllllllllll
| FEDERAL FOOD
STAMPS
YOUR
FOOD STAMPS
Will GO FURTHER
AT FOOD FAIRI
FOOD
FAIR
SUPERMARKETS
BONUS
SPECIAL!
SAVE 41'
VITA
Creamed
Horring or
PARTY SNACK
h89c
317-OZ. 9
CANS
LIMIT 1 CANJ. IHIAtl. WITH OTHIR PURCHASIS OF ITS* OR MOM.
IXClUOINC CIGAMTTIS
TOP QUALITY
CORONET
BATH TISSUE
NORTHWESTERN FINEST
EATING QUALITY
Bing
Cherries 37
Red Watermelon 10C
I JU^Siinkisf Lemons........11 A. 69'
GAEDIN FRESH _
Boston Lettuce...................hiao 29*
SWIIT IATING _
Red Plums...............................u.59c
FRISHIl BRAND UNSWtfTINIO
Grapefruit Juice................SSi 89e
GAIOIN _-
Fresh Broccoli..................bunch 49
UMIT ONC PKG. OF I tOllS. PlIASI WITH OTMIt PURCHASES OF 17 50
Ot MOM. EXCLUDING CIGARETTE*
LES CAL 99% FAT FREE
IC3 w*L 7J/i ri run
Yogurt 4 as 99
MRS. FILBERT'S SOFT
FLA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A' FRESH ICED
FRYER
QUARTERS
LEGS OR
BREASTS
69
LB.
FIA. OR SHIPPED GRADE A FRESH ICED
P-IA. UK mrreu vkli ricin iw
Fryer Parts....., 99e
WHOll IICJ "THIGHS -DRUMSTICKS WMOll IREASTS W (IIS
NUTRITIOUS SlICED ^^ ^^
Beef Liver..........99c
U.S. CHOICE-WESTERN BEEF CHUCK .
Pot Roast To^r*!
FRESH SEAFOOD DEPARTMENT
,Ai, A I. I AT STOMS WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
69
LB
BORDEN'S CHEESE FOOD
American
Singles
COLORED
s 89e
Margarine 59c
RIAKSTONI STAY-N-SHAPI ..
Cottage Cheese.................cuV 55'
PP BRAND
Cream Cheese....................& 43*
IN OUR DAIRY CASE!
FIO-SUN
Orange
Juice
3 QUART ?
CONTS.
RICH'S FROZEN
Coffee Rich
16-OZ.
PKGS.
FIEISCHMANN S FROZIN
MACKEREL
55c
FLORIDA
CAUGHT
SERVICE APPETIZER DEPT.
AVAIlAtll ONI* AT STORIS NAV'NC SIRVICI COUNT!"
All MIAT ANO CMIISI SUCIO TO OR01R _____
Skinless Franks
Egg Beaters......................: 99'
P.P. ERANO FROZEN
Corn-on-the-Cob...............8ft 69c
CHUN KING FROZIN _
Egg Rolls............................$& 85
FROZEN fcjfcA,
Buitoni Lasagna JSJ 89c
PARADISE PRESERVES
Pure Strawberry
32-OZ.
JAR
MILANI 1R90
OORMAN S IMPORTED AUSTRIAN *
Sliced Swiss Cheese tfc-1: 79*
FISHER'S FULL MOON C 4 IB
Longhorn Cheese.............SffT
FRIINOSHIP CCC
Sour Cream........................con! DO
OIANGI tlOSSOM Mtit
Citrus Punch.................4 <*?. 49c
FRIENDSHIP PINEAPPlt CRIAMIO .>.
Cottage Cheese ^65
REGULAR OR DINNER STYLE
Meat Franks
COPELANDS
jo;
PKGS
89*
AMERICAN
KOSHER
$|29
LB.
KEEPS FOOD FRESH
Handi-
Wrap
400 FT. ROIL
79
P.P. BRAND
Iced
Tea Mix
24-OZ. JAR
$l
45
FBiipjm i*-nF
French Dressing.............."mi 59c
EATH SIZE All VARIETIIS _
Dial Soap.......................3 IS M
FOR CUANINC
Parsons Ammonia............itm, 35c
FOR ClIANIR LAUNDRY m
Borateem Plus ST1!11
-AND O FROST (AIL VARIITIIS)
Smoked Meats sucto.....
BIIF FRANKS OR TflC
Lum's Hot Dogs.................Sffl
COPIIAND S SlICIO J4 1J
Meat Bologna.....................#t*
KAHN'S MIOGIT *)Qt
Sandwich Spread..............cmm "
RUBINSTEIN RED
Sockeye Salmon
7V.OZ.
CAN
GULDEN'S SPICY
Brown Mustard
PITIR PAN SMOOTH OR
E-OZ
..JAR
Crunchy Peanut Butter .3? W
SMUCKIRS M ){
Grape Jelly........................3kT 3
RIFRISHINO EIIR OR M .... $1*5
Schlitz Malt Liquor 6 88
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. AU CLERICAL. TYPOGRAPHIC. PHOTOGRAPHIC AND PRINTING ERRORS ARE SulJECT TO CORRECTION. NONE SOLO TO DEALERS.